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Full text of "The manors of Suffolk; notes on their history and devolution, with some illustrations of the old manor houses"

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The 



Manors of Suffolk 



Notes on 



Their History and Devolution 

The Hundreds of Carlford and Colneis, Cosford and 

Hartismere 

With some Illustrations of the Old Manor Houses 



BY 

W. A. COPINGER, M.A., LL.D., F.S.A., F.RS.A. 



Of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-Iaw, Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Law in the 

Victoria University of Manchester, Sometime President of the Bibliographical Society, Author of 

"County of Suffolk : Its f-fistory as Disclosed by Elxisting Records," &c. 



Vol. 3. 



Privately Printed 

and obtainable only by Subscribers 

from 

TAYLOR, GARNETT, EVANS. & CO., LTD. 

MANCHESTER 

I 909 






i^y 



^ 






IV ^li-A^L 



■^ 



CARLFORD AND COLNEIS HUNDRED. 



SAXTON, 
1576. 







BOWEN, 
111. 




THE 



Manors of Suffolk. 




CARLFORD AND COLNEIS HUNDREDS. 

^ARLFORD Hundred is of an irregular figure, about lo 
mUes in length from north to south, and from 4 to 6 mUes 
in breadth. It is bounded on the south by Colneis Hundred, 
on the east by Woodbridge, the River Deben and 
Wilford Hundred, on the north by Loes Hundred, and on 
the west by Bosmere and Claydon Hundred and the 
Borough of Ipswich. It is in the Deanery of Carlford, Arch- 
deaconry of Suffolk, and Woodbridge Union. 

The southern part of it, extending from the bounds of Ipswich to 
Woodbiidge and the River Deben, has generally a light sandy soil and several 
open heaths, but in its northern parts a rich loam prevails, and there is a 
strip of rich marsh land, and in former days it had several hop yards on its 
southern boundary in the valley extending eastward from Bixley Decoy 
Ponds, near Ipswich, to Kirton Sluice on the River Deben. It contains 
27,539 acres. 

Colneis Hundred is one of the smallest divisions of Suffolk, being 
only from 4 to 5 miles in breadth, but extending about 10 miles south- 
east from the Liberty of Ipswich along the north-east bank of the River 
Orwell to the ocean, where it terminates in the cliffs of Felixstowe, Walton, 
and Landguard Fort. It is bounded on the north by Carlford Hundred, 
on the west by the OrweU and the Liberty of Ipswich, on the south by the 
German Ocean, and on the east by the river Deben, which separates it from 
the Hundred of Wilford. 

We have treated of the two Hundreds together ; Carlford is divided into 
18 parishes, and Colneis into 10. The fee of both Hundreds is in the King. 
Together these Hundreds have 64 manors, as follows : — 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Bealings 


(Great Bealings. 




/Clopton HaU al. 


(Great) 


Seckford Hall. 




King's HaU. 


Bealings 
(Little) 

Brightwell 


[ Little Bealings. 


Clopton 


Brendhall, 
Rouse HaU. 


Brightwell. 
Bucklesham. 




Wascolies al. Wes- 
terlyes {pUm Naun- 
ton's). 


Bucklesham . . 


Kembroke. 






[TyreU's Hall. 




Culpho al. Verdons 




(Burgh Hall. 




and Wachesham. 


Burgh 


Thistleden HaU. 


Culpho 


Abbots or Culpho 


Cleeve's al. Blom- 




Abbatis Or C. 




vOles. 




. Regis. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 




["Falkenham or Fal- 




[Playford or Playford 


Falkenham . . 


kenham Dodnash. 


Playford .... 


J H. with Mitchehs. 




.Russell's. 


Meer or Mere Hall. 


Felixstowe . . 


Felixstowe. 




Lees. 




[Foxhall al. CasweU's. 


Rushmere .... 


[Rushmere Hall. 
Bixley. 


Foxhall 


Foxhall. 


^k ^ fc.B.fc.F^^iii ^J^, ^^ t fl ■ * 




Felton's. 




/Grimston Ha,ll with 


Grundisburgh 


Gnmdisburgh Hall. 


Trimley St. 


Morston. 
Morston Hall. 




[Hasketon Hall. 


Martin 


Capel or Capel Hall. 


Hasketon .... 


Thorpe Hall. 




Stratton Hall cum 




(The Rectory. 




> Seabridge. 


Hemley 


Helmley. 




Trimley St. Mary's, 


Kesgrave 


Kesgrave or Tud- 




Candelent or 


Kirton 


denham's. 
Kirkton or Kirton. 


Trimley St. 

Mary.. 


Candlett or 
Fourthe. 
Blowfield. 


Levington 


BurnaviUe's, 




Alteston now with 




Martlesham Hall. 




Trimley. 


Martlesham . . 


Scots. 




Tuddenham or Loud- 




Hethe's. 

Brokes Hall al. Cow- 


Tuddenham . . 


ham Hall. 
St. Bartholomew's or 




haugh al. Cow 




Bertilmemes. 




Hall. 




Waldringfield al. 


Nacton 


Sholand or ShoUand 
Hall or Tame. 


Waldringfield 


Waldringfield- 
Hilton. 




Purdies or Purdews. 




Rivershall. 




St. Peter's. 




Walton. 




Alnesbourn. 


Walton 


Caldecote. 




Newbourn-cum- 




Langeston. 


Newborn n 


Martlesham. 
" Haspley with New- 




Burwash. 

Curdon's or Cardew's 




bourn. 


Witnesham . . 


Hall. 
RedhaU al. Bramp- 
, ton al. Bromton. 


Otley 


Overhall. 




NetherhaU. 





BEALINGS (GREAT). 




BEALINGS (GREAT). 

N Saxon times Ulmar, a freeman under Halden, the predeces- 
sor of Geoffrey de Magnaville, held a man with loo acres in 
demesne, and Ulmar himself had under him 3 villein tenants. 
In demesne there were 2 ploughteams, and belonging 
to the men i, and 3 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 
16 hogs, and 80 sheep, valued at 20s. Also a church with 
40 acres, valued at 4od. The Abbot of Ely had the soc. 
By the time of the Norman Survey the value of the manor had risen to 
40S., but there had been a general decrease in the appurtenances of the 
manor all round. There was but i ploughteam in demesne ; 3 beasts, 
12 hogs, and 60 sheep, and the only increase was in i rouncy. The 
manor was held by Hervey of Bourges as tenant in chief.' 

Amongst the lands held by this Hervey of Bourges in Bealings we find 
another holding. He held in demesne 10 freemen— Blackman, Alwin, 
Stannard. Ana, Aluric, Turbot, Edric, Godwin, Alston, and Annud the priest, 
and of the last Halden had commendation, and of the others the Abbot 
of Ely. They had 84 acres and 2 ploughteams and 7 acres of meadow, 
valued at 20s. In the time of the Confessor there had been 4 plough- 
teams.'' 

Amongst the lands of Robert Malet we find one Woolnough with 14 
acres, having in the time of the Confessor i ploughteam and half an acre 
of meadow, valued at 25., but at the time of the Survey 28^.' 

Great Bealings Manor. 

In more recent times there were two manors in Great Bealings, the 
principal lordship and that of Seckford Hall Manor. The former held 
by Hervey de Bourges passed to Gilbert de Peche, and was held by Sir Hugh 
de Peche in the time of Edward I. ; for in 1285 Sir Hugh had a grant of 
free warren here,"* and dying in 1292^ was succeeded by another Hugh de 
Peche, who died about 1310,^ and was succeeded by Eva his sister, wife of 
Sir Robert de Tuddenham, son of Sir John de Tuddenham by Lady Joan 
Charles, his wife. Sir Robert died about 1308, and his widow Eva in 1311,^ 
when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert de Tuddenham, who 
married Catherine, daughter of John de Patshull, and sister and coheir of 
William de Patteshall or Patshull, of Northamptonshire, and died about 1352,^ 
leaving his widow, who survived till 1383, for this is the date of her will, 
which was proved i6th June the same year. Their eldest son, Robert, 
died a minor in 1337,^ ^-^^d the manor passed to his cousin. Sir Robert de 
Tuddenham, son of Thomas de Tuddenham. Sir Robert de Tuddenham 
died in 1362, when he was succeeded by his son. Sir John de Tuddenham, 
who was a miaor at the time of his father's death, and consequently the 
King twice presented to the living of the church by reason of his having the 
custody of the lands during minority.'" 

Sir John was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1383. He married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir Robert (and sister and coheir of Sir John) Wey- 
land, and widow of Sir Thomas de Graunison. 



' Dom. ii. 4416, 442. 
*Dom. ii. 4416, 442. 
' Dom. ii. 3156. 
♦Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. I. 
= I.P.M., Extent, 20 Edw. 
^I.P.M., 4Edw. II. 31. 



126. 
I- 37- 



n.P.M., 5 Edw. II. 43. 

^See Manor of Eriswell, in Lackford 

Hundred. 
9I.P.M., II Edw. III. (2nd nos.) no. 
'° Pat. Rolls, 13 Edv*r. III. pt. ii. 38 ; 17 

Edw. III. pt. ii. 7. 



4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1385, Sir John de Tuddenham and Margaret his wife were parties to a 
fine levied in respect of this and the Manors of Grundisburgh, Sutton, and 
Newton juxta Ipswich, by Hugh Hovel.' Sir John de Tuddenham died in 
1392, and by his will dated at Kediton desired to be buried in the chancel 
of the church ofEriswell, of which place and of Kediton, Bealings, Newton, 
Grundisburgh, Corton, and Lound he was lord. His widow Margaret 
died in 1416, and her will was proved 15th June, 1416, by which she desired 
to be buried in the church of the Augustine Friars at Thetford, by the tomb 
of her daughter Elizabeth, the wife of Sir Thomas Hemgrave. Sir John 
had issue two sons and a daughter— John de Tuddenham, who married in 1378 
and died without issue ;' Elizabeth, married to Robert Fitz Ralph ; and Sir 
Robert de Tuddenham, who married Margaret, daughter of John Herling, 
widow of Thomas Misterton, and died in his father's lifetime, leaving issue 
two sons and two daughters, Robert de Tuddenham, who died without issue in 
1417,^ and Sir Thomas who married Alice, daughter of John Wodehouse. 
The marriage was entered into by Sir Thomas before he came of age, and 
in 1436, on a full hearing of the cause at Lynn, before the Chancellor of 
Norwich, the Prior of Lynn, &c., he was divorced from his wife on proof and 
her own confession of adultery. She had before this left him, and was at 
that time a nun professed at Crabhouse, in Wigenhale, in Norfolk. He was 
empowered to marry again. The close of his life was equally unfortunate 
with its opening, for in 1461 John, Earl of Oxford, Aubrey, his son and heir, 
Sir- Thomas Tuddehham, John Clopton, John Montgomery, and William 
Tyrell, were arrested by John, Earl of Worcester, Constable of England, on 
suspicion of having received letters from Margaret, wife of Hen. VI., and 
being convicted were all beheaded (except Clopton) on Tower Hill, 22nd 
Feb. 1461.* He died without issue, and was succeeded by his sister 
Margaret, then the widow of Sir Edmund Bedingfield. She died seised of 
the manor in 1474.^ Her will bears date 24th May, 1474.® 

On the death of Margaret Bedingfield^ the manor passed to her 
grandson. Sir Edmund Bedingfield, son of Thomas.^ Edmund Beding- 
field married ist Alice, daughter of Sir Ralph Shelton, by whom he had no 
male issue, and 2ndly, Margaret, daughter of Sir John Scot, of Scots Hall, 
in Kent, and Comptroller of Calais. On the coronation of Rich. III. he 
was created a Knight of the Bath, and was so highly esteemed by Hen. VII. 
that he became the recipient of various grants of the estates forfeited by the 
Lord Lovell. His wUl is dated Calais, 12th Oct. 1496, and was proved 
28th January following. His eldest son and successor. Sir Thomas Beding- 
field, died 15th March, 1538, without issue, ^ and his next brother, Robert, 
being in holy orders, the manor passed to the 3rd brother, Sir Edmund, who 
attended Hen. VIII. in his wars abroad, and was knighted by Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, while General of the English army at Montdidier, 
in France, on the taking of that town in 1523. , He married Grace, daughter 
of Lord Marny, and was succeeded by his son. Sir Henry Bedingfield. 

' Feet of Fines, 8 Rich. II. 8. ^ i^p^. j-g Edw. IV. 38. 

* A Sir John Tuddenham died seised of the ^ For her Will see Manor of Eriswell in 

manor in 1422 (I. P.M., 10 Hen. V. Lackford Hundred. 

266) ; and Margery, wife of John 7 1. P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 

Tuddenham, died seised of same ' See Brandeston Manor, in Loes Hundred. 

and the advowson in 1460 (I. P.M., 9 1.P.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5. See, however, 

38 Hen. VI.). Hestely Manor, in Thorndon, in 

3 1.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 42. Hartismere Hundred. 
♦Pat. Rolls, I Edw. IV. pt. iii. 18 ; I.P.M. 

5 Edw. IV. 34. 



BEALINGS (GREAT). 5 

Edmund Bedingfield in 1585 sold the manor to John Clench, a Justice of 
Queen's Bench.' He was appointed Justice 29th May, 1584. When a 
young man he was steward of the manors of Henry Crane, who, for his 
able services granted him for life a lease of an estate in Crowfield for £100 
a year less than its value, upon condition that he did not assign it to anyone. 
This induced the Judge many years after he attained that position to reside 
at Crowfield, and he remained there until he purchased the estate at Hol- 
brook. He died 19th Aug. 1607," and was succeeded in this lordship by 
his 2nd son, John Clench. He married Joan, daughter and sole heir of 
Robert Holme, of Wyverstone, widow of John Pretyman, of Bacton (she 
died ist Dec. 1629), and died 4th April, 1628, at the age of 68, when the 
manor passed to his 4th son, Edmund Clench.^ Edmund Clench died in 
1679, and was succeeded by his son Edmund, who sold the manor to Dr. 
Thomas Wood, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, from whom it passed 
by will dated 1690 to his nephew, Henry Webb, at whose death, 13th 
January, 1709, it went to his son and heir, Henry Webb. In 1710 the 
manor was disposed of under an Act of Parliament for discharging the 
debts of Heniy Wood al. Webb, being sold to John Pitt, of Crows Hall, in 
Debenham.* It was bought fiom Pitt's heir by James Bridges. On 
Bridges's death, the manor went to his widow, Lady Jane, who sold it to 
Sir John Major. He died in 1781, when the manor passed to his daughter 
Anne, married to Sir John Henniker, created Lord Henniker, from which 
time it has descended in the same course as the Manor of Gt. Thornham, in 
Hartismere Htindred. 

Page mentions that the hall some years after the purchase by Bridges, 
became the residence of the farmer of the estate, and was at length puUed 
down by Sir John Henniker, Bart., who at that period was the owner of the 
property. 

Seckford Hall Manor. 

The second manor, a Seckford Hall, has a separate heading in the 
Domesday Survey, being under the head " Seckford." 

Aluric, son of Ulviet, under commendation to Harold, held in the 
Confessor's day 2 carucates of land as a manor. There were 4 villein tenants, 
13 bordar tenants, 2 ploughteams in demesne, and a third which might be 
made up if occasion required, and 3 also belonging to the men, 10 acres 
of meadow, i mill, i rouncy, 4 beasts, 30 hogs, and 100 sheep. The value 
was then £^, but at the time of the Survey there were two more bordar 
tenants, no rouncy, 20 hogs, and only 36 sheep. The length of the holding 
was 6 quarantenes and the breadth 6, and it paid in a gelt y^d. The tenant 
in chief was the Bishop of Bayeux, and the manor was one of those Earl 
Ralph held at the time of his forfeiture.' The Bishop of Bayeux also held 
here 4 fieemen under commendation to the said Aluric, with 8 acres, i 
acre of meadow, and half a ploughteam, valued at 16^., which Roger Bigot 
at the time of the Survey held of the Bishop. ^ 

' Fine, Hil. 27 Eliz. rebels and usurpers for his own 

» For account of himsee Holbrook Manor, estate, which was^i,20oayearin the 

in Samford Hundred. time of Chas. I. This family after- 

3Gipps says that this John Clench died wards removed to Botsham, in 

without issue, whereupon " the Cambridgeshire, where they are now 

estate came to Capt. Clench, who seated." 

was a gallant officer and served his 49 Anne, H.L. Journals xix. 230, 242, 243, 

King and country faithfully, but 245, 264, 268, 285, 301. 

suffered with his King and country, s Dom. ii. 373. 

and was forced to compound with */6. 



6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1 185 Bartholomew de Seckford, son of William de Seckford^ held 
the manor/ and it passed to his son and heir, John de Seckford. He 
married Anne, daughter and heir of Sir Walter (or Sir Peter) le Vernon als. 
Hunter. 

On John de Seckford' s death, the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir John de Seckford, who married Joan, eldest daughter and coheir 
of Sir William Hackford, or, as some say, daughter and heir of Thomas, son 
of Sir Thomas de Hackford. On their death, the manor passed to their son 
and heir. Sir John de Seckford. who was living at Great Bealings in 1359. 
In 1331 he became entitled in right of his mother to Hackford or Hakeford 
Hall Manor, in West Herling, co. Norfolk, and in 1334 had a grant of free 
warren in Seckford Manor. "^ 

He married Alice, and was dead in 1372, when the manor was held by 
his son and heir. Sir George de Seckford. 

He, in 1401, settled the lordship on Margaret his wife, daughter and 
heir of Sir Thomas Jenney, Knt., who, after the death of Sir George, re- 
married Augustine Stratton, of Shottery, and this property passed to Sir 
George's son, Seckford. 

He married^ Alice, daughter of Thomas Rokes, of Ridlesworth, in 
Norfolk, and died in 1450, leaving a widow (who remarried Sir Henry 
Wingfield, Knt., of Orford, 6th son of Sir Robert and Elizabeth GowseU) 
and a son, Thomas, who succeeded. 

Thomas Seckford married ist Margaret, daughter of John Purrye, of 
Aylesham, co. Norfolk, and 2ndly, Elizabeth. 

He died 23rd Nov. 1505, and was buried at Great Bealings, leaving 
Thomas Seckford, of Seckford Hall, his son and heir, who married Margaret,* 
daughter of Sir John Wingfield, of Letheringham, Knt. Thomas Seckford 
represented the borough of Orford in several Parliaments, and dying 20th 
Sept. 1575, aged 80, was interred in the parish church of Great Bealings, 
where a monument remains to his memory. 

Thomas Seckford was followed by his grandson, Charles Seckford, 
Thomas's eldest son, Francis, who married Ellen, daughter of Thomas 
Whittington, of Newbury, co. Stafford, having died in his father's lifetime. 

Charles Seckford married at Framlingham, iith Oct., 1575, Mary, 
daughter of Thomas Steyning, of Earl Soham, by Frances his wife. Countess 
Dowager of Surrey, daughter of John Vere, Earl of Oxford. He repre- 
sented Aldeburgh in Parliament in 1572, and died 20th Feb. 1591-2, aged 
37, being interred in the family vault in Woodbridge Church. His widow 
Mary succeeded to a life estate in the manor, and amongst the Chancery 
Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth will be found an action for 
account by her against Richard Fysher as to Seckford and Bough Manor.' 

On the death of Mary Seckford in August, 1596,^ Sir Thomas Seckford, 
son of Charles, born 20th April, and baptised 30th April, 1582, at Great 
Bealings, succeeded. He was knighted at Newmarket 5th March, 1607. He 
married Anne, daughter of William Brewster, of Castle Hedingham, in Essex, 
and widow of Robert Kirkby,of Henham, co. Essex, and died, and was buried 
at Woodbridge, 15th Aug. 1610, leaving Thomas Seckford his only surviving 

' Rot. Pipe 1185. " She died 29th Oct. 1557, aged 64. 

' Chart. RoUs, 8 Edw. III. 50. ' C.P. iii. 58. 

'The Visitation of 1561 says Margaret, * She was buried at Woodbridge, 24th Aug. 
daughter of Goldingham. 1596. 



BEALINGS (GREAT). 7 

son, then two years of age, he having been baptised at Woodbridge, 15th 
March, 1608. 

This young man died 26th June, 1624, while a student at Trinity 
College, Cambridge, aged 16, and lies buried in the chapel there under a 
handsome monument erected to his memory by his uncle, Henry Seckford, 
who, on failure of issue male of his brother Thomas, became seised of the 
manor. He was born 15th Aug., and baptised at Great Bealings, ist Sept. 
1584. He married at Woodbridge, 20th Oct. 1614, Bridget, daughter of 
Robert Kirkby, and died without issue, being buried at Woodbridge, 29th 
May, 1626. The manor passed to his cousin, Henry Seckford, of Clerkenwell, 
Master of the Pavilion to James I. This Henry was son ol Thomas Seckford 
and Catherine his wife, daughter of George Metham, of Lincolnshire, which 
Thomas was son of John Seckford, of Great Bealings, who was married there 
23rd Jan. 1547, to Agnes, daughter of Cramwell, of Cramwell Hall, co. 
Lincoln, and buried at Little Bealings, 6th July,i58i (his wife having been 
buried at Great Bealings, 26th April, 10 years earlier), which John was a 
younger brother of Francis Seckford, the great-grandfather of Thomas 
Seckford who died in 1624. Henry Seckford supported his claim as heir 
male, and sued out his livery in 1629. 

He suffered a recovery, and being seised in fee settled the estate on 
himself and Dorothy, his second wife, daughter of Sir Henry North, of 
Mildenhall," and their heirs, but died in 1638 without male issue. 

His two daughters were Rebecca, who married Robert Kirkeby, and 
died without issue, and Sarah, who married at Gt. Bealings, 13th April, 
1631, Charles Drury, of Rougham, by whom she had issue, Seckford Drury, 
baptised at Rougham, 15th April, 1632, and buried there 31st March, 1634, 
and Dorothy Drury, buried at Rougham, an infant, 14th March, 1633. 
Sarah's 2nd husband was John, 2nd son of Dudley, 3rd Lord North, to 
whom she was married at Kirtling, 20th July, 1634, but by him she had no 
issue. 

Henry Seckford' s widow, Dorothy, held her first court 15th Jan. 1638, 
and died at Seckford Hall in 1673. She devised the estate to Seckford 
Cage, the heir-general of the Seckfords, being a descendant of Sir Anthony 
Cage, of Long Stowe, co. Camb.,who had married Mary, sole heir of her 
brother Thomas Seckford, who died in 1624. Seckford Cage mortgaged 
and subsequently sold the manor to Samuel Atkinson, of Croydon, co. 
Surrey, by deed 2nd Nov. 1713, and a fine levied Mich. Term, 12 Anne. 
One Henry Norton held a court 20th May, 1673, but this may have been 
as a representative of Dorothy Seckford ; for Samuel Atkinson certainly 
held a court 13th Oct. 1707. 

It seems, however, that the King granted to George Kirke all that 
belonged to the Crown of demesne of Henry Seckford, on his death without 
heirs, for there is a petition from George Kirke for rectification of this 
grant amongst the State Papers in 1663, and the petition was granted.' 

Still it is clear that Samuel Atkinson died seised in 1718. By his 
will dated 6th Feb. 1716, he directs that after the death of his wife Mary 
and default of all issue, the manor shaU go to his cousin, Samuel Atkinson 
(son of his late cousin, Samuel Atkinson, deceased, who was son of his late 

' Her will is dated 19th June, 1672, and she ^ State Papers, 1663, 102. 
was buried at Woodbridge, 8th 
April, 1673. 



8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

brother, John Atkinson), in fee. The will was proved with a codicil London, 
loth Jan. 1718. Mary, the widow, actiially had a life estate in the manor 
under a settlement made 20th Dec. 1709, pursuant to articles before marriage 
dated 20th April, 1706. Settlor and testator was succeeded accordingly 
by his widow Mary, who held courts 28th April, 1736, and 15th Aug. 
1738, and she was succeeded by her husband's great-nephew, Samuel 
Atkinson, in 1746. He held a court 13th June, 1746, and died in 1773, 
leaving the manor by his will dated ist July, 1772,' to his cousin, Elizabeth 
Rolph, spinster, who married ist Thomas Wilkinson, of Croydon, and 
secondly George Thompson. She made a settlement dated 5th and 6th 
May, 1774, on her first marriage, by which this manor was limited after her 
own life interest to Thomas Wilkinson for life, and then in tail male with 
remainder to daughters equally, and in default to such persons as the settlor 
should by will appoint. 

Thomas Wilkinson died 3rd Feb. 1775, without issue, and a few days 
afterwards Elizabeth, being a widow, made her will dated 17th Feb. 1775, 
whereby she devised the manor to her trustees, Oliver Bacon and William 
McPheadris, upon trust to sell and divide the proceeds between her brother, 
Samuel Rolph, and her sisters. The two trustees appointed by settlement 
held a court nth Sept. 1775. Elizabeth then takes as a second husband 
George Thompson, and by indenture 4th Oct. 1775, again settles the manor. 
Two months later, on 27th Dec, she died without issue, leaving John Rolph, 
her eldest brother, her heir-at-law. The will was proved 2nd April, 1776, 
by Oliver Bacon, and 7th Aug. 1800, by George Thompson. The trusts 
of the will and of a codicil were established by a decree of the Court of 
Chancery, 29 th AprU, 1784, and though the parties interested did by an 
agreement dated 27th March, 1804, arrange to divide the property without 
sale, still subsequent proceedings in regard to the separate shares ultimately 
resulted in the manor being sold. Pursuant to a decree of the Court of 
Chancery, the Manor and Hall were offered for sale by public auction at 
Ipswich, 31st July, 1832. Lot i was Seckford Hall and Cherry Garden 
Estates of 441 acres, and the manor formed another lot. This extended 
over several hundred acres. There were stated to be 27 copyhold tenants 
and 8 freehold. The average amount of fines and quit rents for seven years 
ending Mich. 1833, was ^'j'j per annum. Lot i was purchased by James 
Morrison, of Upper Harley Street, M.P., for ;fi 0,100, plus timber valued 
at £1,122. i8s. 3d., and conveyed to him by indentures dated 12th and 13th 
July, 1833. The Manor of Seckford was purchased by John Wood for 
^2,100,'' and he held a court 6th Aug. 1838. In 1844 the manor was vested 
in George Moor, of Bury St. Edmunds.^ By 1885 the Seckford Hall estate 
had passed to George Tomline, from whom it has descended like Bacton Manor, 
in Hartismere Hundred, to and is now vested in the Right Hon. Capt. 
Ernest George Pretyman, of Orwell Park, D.L. There is an account of the 
hall and library in the Archceoloqical Journal, Ivi. 393. The hall was the 
seat of the Seckford family from the time of Edward I. to that of Charles I., 
and was rebuilt or considerably improved in the reign of Elizabeth by 
Thomas Seckford, the munificent founder of the Woodbridge Grammar 
School and the almshouses at Woodbridge. The hall is now partly 
in ruins, but a portion is occupied as a farmhouse by George Watkins 
Hunt. 

'Proved Cant., 17th Nov. 1773, 28th Jan. 'Ipswich Journal, 4th Aug. 1832. 
1774- • ^ Page says in James Morrison. 



BEALINGS (GREAT). 9 

The customs of this manor are : The youngest son is heir, a moiety to 
the widow as dower, a rehef of iocs, due on the death of the lord of the manor 
of Rushmere. 

Arms of Seckford : Ermine, on a f esse Gules, three escallops, Or. 




Seckford Hall. 



B 




10 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BE A LINGS (LITTLE). 

|N King Edward the Confessor's time Aluric, son of Ulviet, 
held 50 acres as a manor, and 2 bordar tenants. There was 
then I ploughteam, after reduced to half a team, 3 acres 
of meadow, and a mUl, which by the time of the Domesday 
Survey had disappeared. The value was formerly 20s., but 
then I OS. 

Another manor was held in the Confessor's time by 
Beorn, a freeman, with 50 acres and 3 acres of meadow, the value being 8s. 
This land Beorn bought of the abbot, with an agreement that after his 
death it should revert to the Church of Ely. This last manor was at the 
time of the Norman Survey held by Odo de Campania, Bishop of Bayeux, 

who was the tenant in chief of both manors. A William de seems to have 

held of Roger Bigot, who held of the bishop. Both these manors were held 
by Earl Ralph on the day of his forfeiture, and by Hilary of him.' 

Amongst the possessions of Hervey of Bourges in this place we find 
held by Geoffrey, 2 socmen, Gladman and Brihtric (over whom Godwin 
had soc, sac, and custom), and one Leofsi, of whom Edric had commenda- 
tion. These 2 socmen had 28 acres. In the time of the Confessor there 
was I ploughteam which at the date of the Survey had disappeared. 
These with i acre of meadow were valued at 2s. Leofsi held in demesne 
20 acres and formerly had one ploughteam. He also had g acres of meadow 
and one mill, the whole valued at 9s. Hervey of Bourges also held in 
demesne in the Confessor's time, Leuric and Brihtric, 2 freemen under 
commendation to the Abbot of Ely, with 10 acres, half a plough-team, 
and half an acre of meadow valued at 2s. Hervey also held in demesne, in the 
Confessor's day, Ulmar and Bond, 2 freemen under commendation to the 
said abbot, with 4 acres, valued at 8d., and he (Hervey) also held in demesne 
Hardekin, a freeman under commendation, half to Durrant, Edric's man, 
and half to Harold, with 2 acres valued at 6d. " It," whatever this may 
be, " was 6 quarantenes long and 15 broad, and paid y^d. in a gelt."^ 

The other holdings in Little Bealings recorded in the Domesday Survey 
are that of the Abbot of Ely, who had two freemen with 20 acres under 
commendation and half a ploughteam, valued at 35.,^ and that of Hugh de 
Montfort, who had a freeman under commendation, half to the Abbot of 
Ely and half to Edric, holding 4J acres valued at 8d.* 

Little Bealings Manor. 

In the time of Edw. I., the manor of Bealings Parva was vested in 
Henry de Playford, and on his death in 1289 it passed to his son and heir, 
Richard de Playford. In 1312 Bartholomew de EUingham had free warren,^ 
and in 1316 we find the manor vested in John Hubert. In 1334 it was 
vested in John de Seckford, who this year had a grant of free warren here.® 
It seems ultimately to have gone with Seckford Manor, for it was sold by 
Seckford Cage, the devisee of Dorothy Seckford.'' 



' Dom. ii. 373. 5 Chart. Rolls, 5 Edw. II. 30. 

^Dom. ii. 442. 6 Chart. RoUs, 8 Edw. III. 50. 

3 Dom. ii. 386&. 'See Seckford Hall Manor, in Great 

•*Dom. ii, 4066. Bealings. 



BRIGHTWELL. 



II 




BRIGHTWELL MANOR. 

|N Saxon times this manor belonged to the Church of Ely, 
having been given to it by a Saxon noble, Oswi, and Leofleda 
his wife, father and mother of Alwyn, on his admission to the 
monastery of Ely (where he became a monk and was after- 
wards Bishop of Elmham about 1021), and it remained with 
the monastery at the time of the Domesday Survey, the 
entry being as follows : — - 

" The Saint (St. Etheldreda) in King Edward's time held as a manor 
2 carucates of land. Then 6 villein tenants, now 5. Always 3 bordar 
tenants. Then 5 serfs, now 2. Always in demesne 2 ploughteams. Then 
4 ploughteams belonging to the men, now 3. And i church estate without 
land, and 6 acres of meadow, and 2 mUls. Always i rouncy and 40 sheep 
and 8 hogs. And there is one socman with 12 acres and he dwells in 
Newboume— always valued at 40s. It is 10 quarantenes long and 6 broad, 
and pays in a gelt 4^d. Others have holdings there.'" 

Hervey, first Bishop of Ely, dividing the possession of the church between 
the bishop and the monks, this was assigned to the latter between 1109 
and 1131.'' About a hundred years later, in 1234, we find the manor vested 
in Richard de Gossebek, who was succeeded in 1272 by Sir Hugh de Gosse- 
bek who dying about 1311,^ the manor passed to his son and heir, Ralph de 
Gossebek. Ralph's daughter Beatrix married John de Lampet, and to her 
the manor passed. The manor was held by the Lampet family till the time 
of Edw. III., when Wilham Lampet and Mabel his wife levied a fine of the 
manor. " 22 Edw. III. 16. William Lampet and Mabel his wife v. Jacob 
Sampson par. of Middleton ch. Edmtind Salman chaplain, and John Hare 
chaplain of Brightwell Manor, with appurtenances and advowson of 
church in Waldringfield and Martlesham." William Lampet left an only 
daughter, Catherine, married to John Lovyll, who left an only daughter, 
Agnes, married to Philip Curson, of Letheringset, in Norfolk. 

Davy mentions a Robert Curson as lord, who, he states, married 
Margaret, daughter of William Lampet, and was succeeded by their son 
and heir, William Curson. Either this Willw.m Curson, or possibly his son, 
William Curson, and Cecily his wife, were plaintiffs in a suit about 1457 
against one John Andrewe, feoffee of John Lampet, father of the said 
Cecily, touching this manor and the manors of Waldringfield and " Lam- 
petes in Helmingham."'* 

William Curson died in 1485,' when Elizabeth, his daughter, married to 
Sir Thomas Teye, Knt., of Ardley, in Essex, succeeded, and at her death the 
manor passed to her eldest daughter and coheir, Margaret, married to Sir 
John Jermy, Knt., of Metfield in Mendham, who was living in 1553. He 
was a son of Edmund Jermy, and in 1542 a fine of the manor was levied 
against him and his wife Margaret and others by Thomas Bawdy and 
others. The fine includes the Manors of Brightwell, Riveshall (Waldring- 
field), and Stutton, with appurtenances and tenements and rents, and rent 
of lib. of pepper, liberty of the course of two folds, free warren, and one fair 
with appurtenances in Brightwell, Bucklesham, '' Foxhole," Newbourne, 



'Dom. ii. 386. 

» Harl. 43 H. 4 copy. 

3 1.P.M., 5 Edw. II. 14. 

4 E.C.P., 35-38 Hen. VI. 26, 472. 



5I.P.M., I and 2 Hen. VII.; D.K.R. 10, 
App. ii. p. 120. This inquisition 
distinctly says that William Curson 
was the son of William Curson. 



12 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Waldingfield, Henley, Sutton, Brantham, and Tatteston (? Tattingstone), 
as well as the advowson of the churches of Brightwell and Sutton.' 

From Sir John Jermy, who died in 1560, the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Metfield in Mendham, in Hoxne Hundred, until the 
death of Sir Thomas Jermy, K.B. 

About the middle of the 17th century the manor was sold by the 
Jermy family to Sir William Hewitt, Knt. He sold it to Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, of Letheringham, Bart., who died 30th July, 1638, and Sir 
Richard, his son, sold it to Thomas Essington, a merchant, who resided here 
in 1655, and was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1657. He repaired at his own 
expense the almost ruined church, rebuilt the steeple, and reseated the nave 
and also the chancel in which is a vault, the entrance to the same having a 
marble slab with " The Essington vault " inscribed thereon. The chancel 
also contains two small monuments of alabaster, the work of a German, 
whose ancestors were Italians. There are monuments to two of the children 
of Thomas Essington. 

He married Anne, daughter of John Janson, of Ashby Ledger, co. 
Northampton, and had issue John, Martha, and Samuel. John Essington 
succeeded his father, Thomas, and sold the manor to Sir Samuel Barnardis- 
ton, of Brightwell, the 3rd son of Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, of Ketton, 
created Bart, iith May, 1663. He was Sheriff of Suffolk 1666-7, ^-nd M.P. 
for that county between 1673 and 1702. He was Deputy-Governor of the 
East India Company, and was attainted by the Irish Parhament of James 
II. in 1689. 

He married ist Thomasine, daughter of Joseph Brand, of Edwardstone, 
and 2ndly Mary, daughter of Sir Abraham Reynardson, Knt., Lord Mayor 
of London. He died 8th Nov. 1707,'' without issue, when the manor passed 
to his nephew and heir. Sir Samuel Barnardiston, 2nd Bart., M.P. for 
Ipswich 1698-1700. He married 13th Aug. 1709, Martha, daughter and coheir 
of Thomas Richmond, of London, apothecary, and died 3rd Jan. 1709-10', 
when the manor vested in his brother and heir, Sir Peletiah Barnardiston, 
3rd Bart., who died unmarried 4th May, 1712,* and was succeeded by his 
cousin and heir of entail. Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, 4th Bart., being son 
and heir of Peletiah Barnardiston, of Hackney, merchant, by Martha, 
daughter of Rich. Turner, which Peletiah was next surviving younger 
brother of the ist Bart. The 4th Bart, died unmarried at Brightwell 
Hall 2ist Sept. 1712,' when the manor is said to have devolved on " Arthur 
Barnardiston, son of Arthur, youngest son of Sir Nathaniel."* Further, 
that he died 3rd April, 1737, when the manor went to Sir John Shaw, 3rd 
Bart., who had married, Sept. 1716, Anna Maria, eldest daughter and coheir of 
Sir Thomas Barnardiston, 3rd Bart., of Ketton. Sir John died 4th March, 
1738-9/ when the manor went to his son and heir, Sir John Shaw, LL.D., 
4th Bart., who married ist 26th Feb. 1749-50, Elizabeth, daughter of WiUiam 
Hedges, of Alderton, co. Wilts, and 2ndly, 17th Feb. 1752, Martha, daughter 
and heir of John Kenward, of Kenward Park, in Yalding, co. Kent. The 
4th Bart, died i8th June, 1779,^ and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir 
John Gregory Shaw, 5th Bart., who married 9th March, 1782, the Hon. 

' Fine, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII. e He married ist Ann dau. of John Morrice 

= WiU. proved Dec. 1707 and 1710. of Newman HaU, Essex, and zndly 

^Admm. 20 Jan. 1709-10. Will proved Mary, dau. of Rich, Jennens, of 

Dec. 1711. Princethorp, co. Warwick. 



Will proved June, 1712. ^^dmin. 26 March, 1739. 

Will proved Oct. 1712. « Will proved July, 1779. 



BRIGHTWELL. 13 

Theodosia Margaret, youngest daughter of John, 2nd Baron Monson, of 
Burton. In Aug. 1812, the manor was offered for sale with property con- 
taining 627a. ir. 4p. of land and sheepwalk, the rental being ;f576, and 
subject to payment of fji^ per annum to curacy of Brightwell, and also to 
the repair of Brightwell Chapel. The purchaser was John Vernon, of 
Wherstead, who died in 1818, when Sir Robert Harland, of Nacton, 2nd 
Bart., inherited in right of his wife Arethusa, sister of the said John Vernon. 
The manor subsequently passed to George Tomline, from whom it descended 
in the same course as the Manor of Bacton, in Hartismere Hundred, to and 
is now held by his representative, the Right Hon. Capt. Ernest George 
Pretyman, of Orwell Park, D.L. 

Page mentions that a very curious and scarce print, from a drawing 
by Knuff, gives a bird's-eye view of the mansion here, the outbuildings, 
plantations, and a large piece of water attached to it. This mansion had 
been rebuilt at great expense by Sir Samuel Barnardiston, the ist Bart., 
in 1663. In the year 1760 this mansion was taken down except a portion 
now or recently used as a farmhouse. A fine was levied of " Brightwell 
Manor," with the manors of Rivershall and Stutton, in 1527, by Sir Anthony 
Hopton, against Sir Thomas Tey and others. The fine included also the 
advowson of Brightwell Church.' 

Arms of Wingfield : Argent on a bend Gules, between two bendlets 
or cottises. Sable, three hawks' lures or wings, conjoined. Of Essington : 
" 5 fusils in cross" (Davy). Of Shaw: Arg. a chevron betw. three fusils, 
Ermine. 



• Fine, Easter 23 Eliz. 




14 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BUCKLESHAM. 

JHE principal holding here in King Edward the Confessor's 
time was of 30 freemen under commendation to Harold. 
They had 2 carucates of land and 2 bordars. Amongst them 
were 5 ploughteams reduced by the time of the Norman 
Survey, when Robert, Count Mortein, was the tenant in 
chief, to 4 ploughteams. Also 2 acres of meadow and a 
church with 8 acres and 2 bordars. Besides these there 
were in the Confessor's time 2 freemen under commendation to the Abbot 
of Ely, namely, Edric and Uluric, with 18 acres and half a ploughteam, 
formerly valued at 60s., but at the time of the Survey at £4. This Eudo, 
son of Nigel, held of the Earl. It was 8 quarantenes long and 4 broad, and 
paid in a gelt I2i.' The Abbot of Ely also had here 5 acres valued at Sd.' 
but no manor is mentioned in the Domesday Survey except under the head 
Kenbrook, which is in Bucklesham. Here we meet with several entries, 
two amongst the holdings of Roger Bigot, one of the Abbot of Ely, and 
the last under the lands of Hervey de Berri. One of the holdings of Roger 
Bigot was of 5 freemen under Norman— ^Suivold, Ulwin, Ordric, Goodwin, 
and Spretman, with 30 acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteam and a half and 
an acre of meadow, valued at 3s. Kenbrook according to the Domesday 
Survey, was half a league long and 3 quarantenes broad, and paid in a gelt 
lod. The other holding of Roger Bigot here was of 14 freemen, over whom 
the said Norman had commendation — ^Wihtgar, Osbert, Leofstan, Edric, 
Frewin, Brightmar, Blackman, Woolward, Durrant, Goodrich, Siric, 
Woolvey, Alrich, Almar, and Bond, with 73 acres, 3 ploughteams, 3 acres of 
meadow, and a mill and a half valued at 15s. The Survey adds : " The men 
of the Hundred have this land valued at 48s., but it formerly rendered and 
they now render, £6."^ 

The holding of the Abbot of Ely was of a freeman under Etheldreda, 
Goodrich, with 7 acres and a team of 2 oxen, valued at 2od. Originally, 
Roger Bigot held them of the King, but the abbot proved his right of over- 
lordship, and at the time of the Survey Roger Bigot held of the abbot.* 
Hervey de Berri' s holding was a freeman, Ulrich, under commendation to 
the Abbot of Ely, held by Kenold of Hervey. He had 14 acres, half a plough- 
team, half a mil, an acre of meadow, and 2 bordars, formerly valued at 5s., 
but at the time of the Survey at 95.^ 

The above lands in later times and prior to the time of Edw. I., became 
divided between three manors — the Manor of Bucklesham, the Manor of 
Tyrell's Hall, and the Manor of Kembroke, 

Manor of Bucklesham. 

This manor was formed out of the holding of Robert, Count of Mortein, 
in Normandy, usually styled Earl of Cornwall, the Domesday tenant in 
chief, who was the son of Herluin de Conteville, by Herleve or Arietta, 
daughter of Fulbert, chamberlain of Robert, Duke of Normandy, mother of 
William the Conqueror. He was brother to Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, and 
likewise half-brother to the Conqueror. Distinguished as one of the 
largest landowners in the kingdom, it is remarked by Ellis that while the 

'Dom. ii. 292. '^ •♦Dom. ii. 3856. 

»Dom. ii. 3856. 5Dom. ii. 4416. 

3Dom. ii. 3406, 343. 



BUCKLESHAM. 15 

Conqueror enriched his half-brothers not a single manor in any part of 
England, or even the smallest portion of land, is put down in the Survey- 
as belonging to any of his (the Conqueror's) sons.' 

Brady reckons the Count of Mortain's, or Moretaigne, manors as 
793, 248 in Cornwall and 545 in seventeen other counties, but this number 
has been thought to be exaggerated. He is represented in the Bayeux 
Tapestry, and was a great benefactor to the Abbey of Grestein, in Normandy, 
but his character is said to have been dull and indolent. William of 
Malmesbury's description of him is " crassi et hebetis ingenii homo." 
He married Matilda, the youngest daughter of Robert de Montgomery, 
Earl of Shrewsbury, and died in 1091, when this manor passed to his son and 
heir, William Fitz-Robert, or de Mortain, Earl of Cornwall, who was 
taken prisoner at Tenchebray 24th April, 1106, and condemned to imprison- 
ment for life in consequence of his rebellion against Hen. I. The manor 
was, of course, forfeited to the Crown. In the time of Edw. I. we find the 
lordship vested in John Cordeboef,* but in the next reign it passed to Richard 
Len, of Ipswich, who certainly held in 1316.^ The same year, however, it 
seems to have gone to John de Holbroke, and shortly after passed to his son 
and heir. Sir Thomas de Holbroke, for we find Margery, the widow of John 
de Holbroke, in 1330 suing Sir Thomas for half this manor as her dower. 
Sir Thomas de Holbroke died in 1360. In 1350, however, we meet with a 
fine of the manor, with appurtenances in Ipswich, Thurleston, Whitton, 
Bramford, and Cleydon, levied by John de Ufford, William de Bergh, clerk, 
William de Letton, parson of Westtoftes Church, and William de Felmyng- 
ham, against Sir John de Gaston and Katherine his wife, deforciants.* 

On Sir Thomas de Holbroke's death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Holbroke, who died about 1375, when it passed to his daughter 
and heir, Margery, wife, of John Fastolf, Knt. She died in 1387, and he in 
1406, when the manor passed to theii son and heir, Sir Hugh Fastolf, who 
released the manor to Sii- George de Felbrigg, Knt. In 1374 we meet with 
a fine of the manor levied by Thomas Caux, of Hokham, and Elizabeth his 
wife, Henry de Pakenham, and Adam Galyon, against Katherine, who was 
the wife of Sir John de Gaston,^ and Page states that in the 3rd year of 
Rich. II. [1379] Catherine Brewse held the manor of the King in capite, 
and because she " had taken the habit of a nun, she held on the day of her 
profession in demesne half a knight's fee in Foxhall, Kesgrave, and Buckles- 
ham, and WiUiam de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, the son of Margaret, the sister 
of Thomas de Norwich, the father of the said Catherine, was her next heir." 
But in 1383 we meet with the following fine : John Felbrigg, clerk, William 
Hastyng, of Aylesham, Gilbert Boulge, Edmund Kempe, of Saxthorp, and 
John de Banham clerk, v. Thomas Caux, of Hokham, and Elizabeth his wife, 
of Bucklesham Manor and Rushmere juxta Ipswich Manor.*^ According to 
the Davy MSS., on the death of Sir George de Felbrigg the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir John Felbrigg, who died in 1424, when it went to his 
daughter Margery, wife of Thomas Sampson, who died seised of the manor 
in 1439, when it passed as did the Manor of Playford, in Carlford Hundred, 
untU the death of Sir Anthony Felton in 1613. Thomas Felton, son and 
heir of Thomas Felton, held his first court 19th April, 1553. Anthony 
Felton, son and heir of Thomas Felton, held his first court 19th Aug. 1586. 

' Ellis's General Introd. to Dom. vol. i. p. * Feet of Fines, 24 Edw III. 17. 

321. ' Feet of Fines, 48 Edw. III. 19. 

== Extent, I.P.M., 28 Edw. I. 25. ^Feet of Fines, 7 Rich. II. 28. 
3 Extent, I.Q.D., 10 Edw. II. 152. 



i6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Henry Felton, son and heir of Anthony, held his first court nth Nov. 1614, 
and dying in 1^24 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Henry Felton, 
2nd Bart. 

The court, 26th Sept. 1626, was held by Elizabeth, Lady Felton, 
Dorothy, Lady Felton, John Goswold, and Bassingbourne Gawdy, as 
guardians of Henry Felton, 2nd Bart., he being then a minor. This year, 
however, the manor appears to have been disposed of to Sir Richard Broke, 
son of Robert Broke, or possibly to his father, who died this same year. 
In 1639, on the death of Sir Richard Broke, the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Robert Broke, Bart., from whom it has descended in the same course 
as the Manor of Broke Hall, in Nacton, in Colneis Hundred, and Lawshall, 
in Babergh Hundred, and is now vested in Lord de Saumarez. 

In 1764 Kirby says : " The lordship of this parish is in Richard Norton, 
Esq., but the hamlet of Kembroke, which lies on the road from Kirkton to 
Newbourn, is the lordship of Philip Broke, Esq., who also hath the advowson 
of the rectory." We find no evidence of the Manor of Bucklesham having 
been in 1764 vested in Richard Norton. It is stated that Miss Cartwright 
was lady of the Manor of Bucklesham in 1855 and 1885, but certainly the 
Davy MSS. deduce the manor from the Feltons to the Broke family from 
1626. It is, of course, possible that Davy has confused this manor with 
that of Kembroke, which undoubtedly has belonged to the Broke family 
since the time of Charles II. He makes the suggestion that Kembroke 
Manor has become joined to the Manor of Bucklesham. 

The Court Rolls of the Manor for 1539 will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum.' 

Manor of Kembroke. 

This was formed out of the estate of Roger Bigot, and William de 
Bumaville held under him. We learn little of this manor save that it is 
included in the inquisition p.m. of Sir Robert Broke, 25th May, 1626, and 
passed to his son, Sir Richard, then to his son, Sir Robert Broke, and on his 
death in 1693 passed to his nephew, Robert Broke, and has descended in a 
like course with the main manor of Bucklesham, being new vested like that 
manor in Lord de vSaumarez. 

Manor of Tyrell's Hall, al. Tyrrels Feltwell-cum-Foxhall. 

This was formed from the land held by Goodrich of the Abbot of Ely in 
the time of the Domesday Survey, and in 1316 was vested in the Prior of 
Ely. In 1353 the manor was apparently vested in Sir Thomas de Holbroke, 
for this year he levied a fine against John Caperon, parson 
of "Tatyngston" Church, and Henry White, of Tatyngston.^ The 
fine included also the advowson of the churches of Bucklesham, 
Brendwenham, and Holton. The manor probably descended like the 
main manor and passed to the Fastolfs by marriage of Margery Holbroke 
to Sir John, and continued in that family as late as the time of Hen. VII., 
descending like Kirkley Manor, in Mutford Hundred, and Broke Hall, 
Nacton, in this Hundred, to George Fastolf, from whom it was acquired 
in 1510 by Thomas Russhe.^ From Thomas Russhe* the manor passed to 
Arthur Russhe, who died 2nd July, 1537,' when it passed to his son and heir, 

' Add. Ch. 10226. 4 See Kirkley Manor, in Mutford Hundred. 

== Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 10. 5 1.P.M., 29 Hen. VHI. 66. 

3 Fine, Mich. 2 Hen. Vm. 



BUCKLESHAM. 17 

Anthony Russhe. He died 3rd May, 1555, and the manor was apparently 
sold in 1558 to Thomas Seckford.' 

In 1568 it was apparently vested in John Goodwyn, and this year 
acquired from him by Robert Broke.' In the time of Charles II. the manor 
became vested in Sir Robert Broke, who held of the Dean of Ely. 

On Robert Broke's death, the manor passed to his nephew Robert 
Broke, in whose family it long remained, but is now vested in the Right 
Hon. Ernest George Pretyman, of Orwell Park, D.L. 

There are two fines in the time of Henry VIII. levied of " Bucklesham 
Manor," which undoubtedly related to this— the one was levied in 1542 by 
Thomas Carlton against Edward Roes al. Roose, and included Foxhall,^ 
and the other in 1546 by Thomas Danyell and others against Thomas Carlton 
and others.* 



' Fine, Mich. 6 Mary I 3 pjne, 34 Hen. VIII. 

» Fine, Trin. 10 EUz. * Fine, Mich. 38 Hen. VIII 




i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BURGH. 

=J1 MANOR was held here in the time of Edward the Confessor 
by Ailric, a freeman with i carucate and 20 acres of land. 
There were 2 bordar tenants, and i ploughteam and half a 
ploughteam belonging to the men. There were 4 acres of 
meadow, i rouncy, 7 beasts, and 16 hogs, and the 
value was 20s. 

At the time of the Norman Survey the manor had 
increased in value to 30s., and the bordar tenants had risen to 7 ; there were 
2 ploughteams in demesne in lieu of 1, and the men had also a plough- 
team, while the 16 hogs had come down to 12, and there had been an 
addition of 17 sheep. The land had been given to William de Varennes 
as tenant holding in chief of the King. 

William de Varennes also held here 11 full freemen and 3 half freemen 
under commendation to the said Aikic, with 50 acres and 2 bordar tenants, 
formerly having 2 ploughteams, but at the time of the Survey only i, 
and half an acre of meadow. The value had from Saxon times decreased 
from los. to 8s. The Survey says : " All this William de Varennes took over 
as I carucate of land, and R. de Glanville then held it of him, and there was 
a church benefice with 8 acres and several persons had part in it.'" Hugh 
de Montfort had two small holdings here— one a freeman under commenda- 
tion in the Confessor's time, half to the Abbot of Ely, and half to the 
predecessor of Robert Malet. At the time of the Survey there were three 
men with 20 acres of land. Formerly there had been i ploughteam, but 
then only half a team and 2 acres of meadow, valued in Saxon times at 
los., but in Norman days at 55. The other holding of Hugh de Montfort 
was a freeman under commendation, half to the Abbot of Ely and half to 
Edric Grim, with 19 acres and i bordar, i ploughteam formerly, but at the 
Survey reduced to half a team and i acre of meadow, valued at 4s. ^d.'^ 
Geoffrey de Magnaville had four small holdings— ist, 8 freemen under com- 
mendation to Halden, a freeman, with 54 acres, 2 ploughteams, and 2 acres 
of meadow, valued at los. ; 2ndly,3 freemen in the Confessor's time, under com- 
mendation to the said Halden, having 50 acres, formerly 2 ploughteams, 
but at the time of the Survey i only, and i^ acres of meadow valued at 
10s. ; 3rdly, Brichtric, a freeman under commendation to Ailric de Burgh, 
having 10 acres valued at 20d. ; 4thly, Brihtwold Mufla, under commenda- 
tion half to the predecessor of Hervey de Berri and half to the predecessor 
of Robert Malet, holding 24 acres, formerly i ploughteam, but at the time 
of the Survey none, and i acre of meadow valued at 5s. Under this last 
entry the Survey says, no doubt referring to the whole place, " it is 9 quaren- 
tenes long and 7 broad, and pays in a gelt i5£?."^ Robert Malet had three 
holdings, one of 2 freemen under commendation to Edric with 16 acres, 
half a ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, formerly valued at 4s., but at the 
time of the Survey at 3s. ; another of a freeman Adelwold, under commenda- 
tion to Edric in the Confessor's time, having 16 acres, formerly half a plough- 
team, but then half, valued at 2s., which last was held by Robert Malet in 
demesne ; and the third R. de Glanville, holding a freeman, Ulwin the 
priest, who had been under commendation to Edric in the Confessor's time, 
with 6 acres valued at 12^., and 11 acres of free land valued at izi." Earl 
Hugh held here a freeman under commendation to Countess Edgiva, with 

'Dom. ii. 4006. 5j)ojii jj^ 3126. 

'Dom, ii. 406. ♦Dom. ii. 3156. 



BURGH. 19 

5 acres and half an acre of meadow, valued at X2d.^ Earl Alan had a 
villein here with 11 acres included in the valuation of Soham.'' Roger de 
Poictou had a freeman here under the Abbot of Ely, holding 16 acres, 2 
bordars, r acre of meadow, formerly when valued at 5s., having half a plough- 
team, but at the time of the Survey, when valued at 7s., none. This was 
held in Domesday times by Ernolf of Roger de Poictou.^ The Abbot of 
Ely had 6 acres valued at 12^.* The Countess of Albemarle had 2 freemen, 
one under commendation to the Abbot of Ely and the other to Ralph, the 
Earl holding 36 acres, 2 bordars, and in the Confessor's time 2 ploughteams, 
but at the time of the Survey half a ploughteam only, and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 6s.,' and Humphrey the Chamberlain had a freeman under com- 
mendation, half to Brightwold and half to the Abbot of Ely, holding 24 
acres and half a ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, valued at los.* 
There is also an entry under Burgh, in Colneis Hundred, viz., a freeman, 
Goodrich, under commendation to one himself under commendation to 
Harold, with 16 acres of land, 2 bordars, half a ploughteam, and half an 
acre of meadow, valued at 3s. Ranulf, brother of Ilger, was the Domesday 
tenant in chief.'' Amongst the entries in the Survey of the land of Roger 
Bigot in Colneis Hundred is one which probably belongs to this place. 
It is called " Burch." It consisted of i carcuate of land and 6 bordars 
belonging to Walton, also 4 ploughteams and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 
40S. In the Confessor's time the estate had been held under commenda- 
tion to Norman by 16 freemen, named Leverich, Swetman, Goodrich, 
Brightrich, Almar, another Almar, Brightnoth, Leverich, Thoka, Goodrich, 
another Goodrich, Norman, Gooday, Lunden, Aldwolf, and Coleman. 
The Survey adds : " It is half a league long, and 2 quarentenes broad, and 
pays in a gelt 22^." There was also a church with 12 acres, valued at 2s.' 

Manor of Burgh Hall. 

Kirby, following the author of the Magna Britannia, states that Odo 
de Campania, Earl of Albemarle and Holderness, was lord when Domesday 
Book was made, but this seems to be a delusion. All that the Countess of 
Albemarle held was 36 acres of land and 2 acres of meadow, and this 
land not as a manor.' 

The lands described in the Survey as in Burgh became divided into 
three manors — the Manor of Burgh Hall, that of Thistleden Hall, and 
that of Cleeves or Clyffes or Blomvile, the last being possibly not a separate 
manor, but if so it devolved in a like course with the main manor. 

The Manor of Burgh Hall was that held by Alric in Saxon times, and by 
William de Warenna in the time of William the Conqueror. We find that 
in 1286 it belonged to AUce, daughter of WUliam de Pirnho or Pyrrow, 
for she passed it by fine to John de Crek, son of James and Sarah de Pirnho, 
sister of Alice, and that in 1288, William, son and heir of Sarah, granted 
two parts of and the reversion of the third part of the manor (which the 
widow of John de Crek then held in dower) to Robert de Swillington, son of 
Sir Hugh de Swill5mgton and Helewise de Pirnho, which Robert had a 
grant of free warren here in 1290.'° 

' Dom. ii. 300. * Dom. ii. 433. 

* Dom. ii. 293. '' Dom. ii. 4336. 
^ Dom. ii. 347. * Dom. ii. 340. 

♦ Dom. ii. 3866. 9 Dom. ii. 431. 

5 Dom. ii. 431. 'o Chart. Rolls, 22 Edw. I. 



20 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The lordship, or at least a part, seems to be then vested in the Uffords, 
for as early as 1298 we meet with a fine levied by Robert de Ufford, sen. 
and Joan his wife, and Edmund their son, of a third part of the manor 
against Richard de Mundeville and Joan his wife.' It was vested in Ralph 
de Ufford, brother of Robert, ist Earl of Suffolk, in the time of Edw. III. 
He was made Justice of Ireland, and was a distinguished person in his day. 
He married Maud, widow of William, Earl of Ulster, and sister of Henry 
Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster. This Maud gave the advowson of the 
church to the chantry which she founded in 1348 within the Chapel of the 
Blessed Virgin in the nunnery of Campsey, for 5 priests to pray for the 
health of the souls of William de Burgh, her first husband, sometime Earl 
of Ulster, and for the good estate of her two daughters during their lives, 
and of their souls after their death. This chantry was in 1354 removed to 
Rokehall, in Bruisyard. By her marriage with Ralph de Ufford she had an 
only daughter, Maud, who married Thomas de Vere, son of John de Vere, 
Earl of Oxford. Ralph de Ufford survived his wife Maud, and married 
Eve, daughter and heir of John de Clavering, and widow of Thomas de 
Audeley, and had a son, John, who succeeded him, and was summoned to 
Parliament as Baron Ufford in 1360. He however, died on the Tuesday 
preceding the Feast of St. James the following year, without issue, and his 
estates passed to his brother Sir Edmund Ufford, then aged 30 years.'' 

Sir Edmund Ufford married Sybil, daughter of Sir Robert Pierpont, 
Knt., and had issue Sir Robert Ufford, Knt., and from this time to the 
time of Gregory, loth Lord Dacre, the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Benacre, in. Blything Hundred. 

The manor was settled in 1447 with that of Wrentham by Sir Thomas 
Dacre and Elizabeth his wife on themselves, and then on Robert Fynes 
and Phillippa for life, then on Richard Fynes and Joan his wife, and the 
heirs of Joan. 

In 1570 Gregory, Lord Dacre, had licence to alienate the manor to 
Roger Man wood, and the beneficial interest in the manor seems to have 
become vested in Henry, Lord Norris (the son of the unfortunate Henry 
Norris, who in 1526 fell a victim to the King's jealousy, and was attainted 
in Parliament and executed), probably through his mother, Mary, daughter 
of the Sir Thomas, Lord Dacre of the South, who had died in 1534. Henry, 
Lord Norris, and Margery his wife, who was younger daughter and coheir 
of John, Baron Williams, of Thame, had licence to alienate the manor to 
William Collett, and the sale was carried into effect by a fine levied in 
Hil. Term, 31 Eliz. [1588]. A fine was levied in 1589 by Anthony Gosnold 
and others against this WiUiam Collett, probably on the occasion of some 
settlement,^ and ten years later we meet with another fine levied of the 
manor by John Clenche against Thomas Aldriche and others.* 

We next find the manor vested in William Blois,of Grundisburgh, who 
died in 1621, and was succeeded by his son and heir, William Blois, of 
Grundisburgh Hall, who married Cecily, daughter of Sir Thomas Win^eld, 
Knt., and dying in 1672 was succeeded by his eldest surviving son and heir. 
Sir William Blois, from whom to Sir John Blois, 4th Bart., the manor 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Blythburgh in Blything 
Hundred. Sir John Blois, 4th Bart., in 1771 sold the manor to Brampton 

' Feet of Fines, 26 Edw. I. 6. 3 ping, Easter, 31 Eliz. 

"Extent, John de Ufford, I.P.M., 35 "* Fine, Mich. 41-42 Eliz. 

Edw. III. 87 ; Orig., 35 Edw. III. 

19. 



BURGH. 21 

Gurdon Dillingham. He held a court 17th Nov. ,1812, and died in 1820, 
when the manor went to his son and heir, Theophilus Thomhaugh Gurdon, 
of Letton. In 1855 the manor was vested in John Fitzgerald, of Boulge 
Hall,' who assumed the name ot Purcell. On his death the manor 
vested in his executors, who appear to have sold it, for in 1896, the manor 
is stated to have been in Robert Holmes White, of Boulge Hall, and the 
trustees of Major Rouse who died in 1887, and is now vested in Mrs. Holmes 
White, and the said trustees. 

The manor extends into the parishes of Burgh, Grundisburgh, Boulge, 
Hasketon, Charsfield, Wickham Market, and the rents were in 1744, 
^6. ys. lid., and in 1766 £6. 5s. ii^d. The customs were-— the widow 
a moiety for dower, the youngest son heir, and husband tenant by the 
curtesy. 

Manor of Thistle den Hall. 

The place is mentioned by name in the Domesday Survey under the 
lands of Roger de Poictou. One of his holdings was what had been held 
in the Confessor's time by 8 and a half freemen under commendation to the 
Abbey of Ely, namely, 30 acres, upon which had in Saxon times been 
employed 2 ploughteams, but at the time of the Survey i only. The former 
valuation had been 20s., but the Domesday valuation was 8s. only. Another 
holding was one and a half freemen, under commendation to Ailric de 
Burgh, holding 10 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s. ; and the third 
was of 50 acres as a manor and 2 bordar tenants, which in the Confessor's 
time had been held by a freeman under commendation to the Abbot of 
Ely, when it had in connection with it a ploughteam. There was i acre 
of meadow, and the valuation was in Saxon times 20s., and in the time of the 
Survey lis. At the time of the Survey Arnold held this manor of Roger de 
Poictou.' 

A second manor is mentioned in Domesday Survey as then in Thistleden. 
It was amongst the possessions of the Abbot of Ely, and consisted of 60 
acres held by Ulmar, a freeman under commendation to the abbot, and 
5 freemen under him. Of these 2 were under commendation to the 
predecessor of Geoffrey de Magnaville. In the time of the Confessor, the 
manor had i ploughteam and a half, and 3 acres of meadow, and was valued 
at los. At the time of the Survey there was but i ploughteam, though 
the value had risen to 12s. When the manor was taken over there was a 
rouncy, but by the time of the Survey this had disappeared. Also formerly 
there were 5 beasts, but at the time of the Survey 15 hogs, 50 sheep, 12 
goats, and 5 hives of bees.' The only other holding under Thistleden in 
Domesday is that of Hervey de Bourges, which was of 30 acres, which had 
belonged to a freeman Frana, under commendation to Edric in the Con- 
fessor's time. There were 2 bordars, i ploughteam, and 2 acres of 
meadow, valued at 8s. This Reynold held of Hervey de Bourges at the time 
of the Survey, but William Malet was seised of it at the time of his death.* 
About the time of Edw. I. the manors in Thistleden had coalesced, and 
one had become the lordship of Hervey de Thistleden, and passed from 
him to his son and heir, Gilbert de Thistleden, from whom it devolved on 
his son and heir, Hugh de Thistleden, and then on his son and heir, Richard 
de Thistleden, who died here in 1339. The manor then passed to Richard's 
daughter and heir, Alice, married to John Bishop. She died in 1380, when 

' See Manor of Boulge, in Wilford Hundred. ^ Dom. ii. 386. 
•Dom. ii. 346. ♦Dom. ii. 4426. 



22 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

we lose sight of the manor during a considerable interval. In 1564 the manor 
was apparently vested in Anthony " Bisshoppe," and was in that year acquired 
from him by Thomas Rous/ against whom a fine was levied in 1591 by 
Thomas Gawdie and others, but either by way of mortgage or settlement/ 
In 1595 the manor was acquired from Thomas Rous and others by Thomas 
Aldrich/ from whom four years later it passed to John Clenche/ 

In the middle of the rSth century we hear of it again as vested in 
EUis Brand/ who seems, however, to have held a moiety only. He died 
in 1759, and was succeeded by his son and heir, John Brand, who died in 
1764, and was succeeded by his son and heir, John Brand, of Hemingston, 
and on his death in 1803 the manor went to his son and heir, John Brand. 
No courts seem to have been held for a long time, and probably the manor 
is extinct. Davy says : " The greater part of the present house is modern, 
the only remains of old buildings appear on the side of the mere on the 
front side of the house in a mass of flints and mortar, perhaps the remains 
of the old bridge." 

Arms of Bishop : Arg. on a bend cotised Gu. 3 bezants. 

Cleve's al. Blomvilles Manor. 

We find nothing respecting this manor save that it is included in two 
fines in 1527 and 1589 respectively. One is levied by Thomas Walle and 
others against Charles, Duke of Suffolk,^ and the other by Anthony Gosnold 
and others against William CoUett and others.'' This is possibly the manor 
of which Page speaks when he says Mr. Barnes, of Sotterley, who held 
a lordship in the parish of Burgh in 1764, purchased with the advowson 
from the family of Betts, and his representative still (1847) owns it. Davy 
states that the manor was held by WUliam Blois in 162 1, and has since 
passed with the main manor of Burgh. 



' Fine, Easter, 6 Eliz. 5 For arms see Edwardstone Manor, in 
'Fine, Trin. 33 Eliz. Babergh Hundred. 

3 Fine, Mich. 37-38 Eliz. ^Yms^ Easter, 19 Hen. VIII. 

♦Fine, Mich. 41-42 Eliz. ^Fine, Easter, 31 Eliz. 




CLOPTON. 23 

CLOPTON. 

^OUR several manors are enumerated here in the Domesday 
Survey. One was amongst the possessions of Ralph 
Peverell, who held i carucate and 42 acres, which had been 
held in the Confes?or's time by Edric Grim under commenda- 
tion half to the Abbot of Ely and half to the predecessor of 
Robert Malet. To this manor were attached 2 villeins 
and 13 bordars. In Saxon times there had been 3 plough- 
teams in demesne and 2 belonging to the tenants, 5 acres of meadow, 8 
beasts, 80 sheep, valued at 60s. By the time of the Survey there were but 2 
ploughteams in demesne though another might have been made up, and 
there was i ploughteam less belonging to the men. There was wood 
sufficient for 10 hogs and i rouncy, but the beasts had come down to 3, 
the sheep to 20, and the value reduced by 40s. This manor was then held 
by Thorold of Ralph Peverell. There was also a church benefice having 15 
acres, " de quatuor dominationibus " valued at 2s.' 

The second manor was amongst the possessions of Roger de Poictou, 
and consisted of one carucate and 22 acres, which in the Confessor's time 
had been held by Uluric, a freeman under commendation to Harold. A 
villein, 6 bordars, i serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 4 acres of meadow, 
a ploughteam belonging to the tenants, and one rouncy, were attached to 
the manor in Saxon times, and the value was 40s. By the time of the 
Survey the ploughteam of the men had disappeared, and the rouncy had 
gone, but there were in lieu 4 beasts and 80 sheep. The value had come 
down from 40s. to 21s. " It," presumably the whole place, " was one 
league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt " 13^. The last- 
mentioned manor was held by Roger de Poictou in demesne ; and he also 
had here a freeman under commendation to the above Uluric in the Con- 
fessor's time, holding one acre and a half, valued at 3^. Roger, son of 
Ernald, held this of Roger de Poictou.'^ 

A third manor was amongst the possessions of the Countess of Albe- 
marle. She held what Burric, a freeman under Ralph the StaUer, had held 
in the Confessor's time, namely, i carucate and 20 acres, 11 bordars, and 
2 ploughteams in demesne with 4 acres of meadow, 10 hogs, and 35 sheep. 
In Saxon times there had also been 2 ploughteams belonging to the tenants, 
but at the time of the Survey there was but i. The value had always 
stood at 40S. The Countess also held 6 acres (which Ulwin the priest 
kept), valued at izd. ; and 12 and a half freemen under commendation to 
Burric in the Confessor's time, they having 92 acres and 2 bordars, 3 plough- 
teams, and i acre of meadow, valued at i6s. 4^. At the time of the Survey 
one of the ploughteams had gone.^ 

The fourth manor was amongst the possessions of William de Arcis, and 
had been held in the Confessor's time by Edmund the priest, a freeman 
under the Abbot of Ely. It consisted of i carucate and 22 acres, i villein, 
and 7 bordars, formerly having 3 ploughteams in demesne, i belongi^ig to 
the tenants, 4 acres of meadow, 4 beasts, 40 hogs, 30 sheep, valued at 30s. 
By the time of the Survey two of the ploughteams in demesne had dis- 
appeared and half a team of the tenants. One rouncy seems to have been 
left, but the statement is made that all the stock had disappeared and 

'Dom. ii. 4176. ^Dom. ii. 431, 4316. 

'Dom. ii. 3466. 



24 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



nothing remained. The value had come down to los. This manor was 
held by Bernard de St. Audoin of William de Arcis, the Domesday tenant 
in chief.' 

There were three other small holdings in Clopton at the time of the 
Domesday Survey. One was of 2 freemen under commendation to Edric 
having 40 acres, and half a ploughteam valued at ys. 4^. Tiger held one of 
these freemen and Gilbert de Colville the other of Robert Malet.' 

The second was 2 freemen and a half under commendation, half to the 
Abbot of Ely and half to Edric, holding 14 acres formerly with half a 
ploughteam, which at the time of the Survey had disappeared, valued at 
2s. yd. 

They were held by Hugh de Montfort as tenant in chief .^ The third 
holding was that of Hamond, who held of Humphrey the Chamberlain, 20 
acres and i bordar, valued at 5s.* 

The manor and lands in Clopton subsequently formed four manors, 
known as Clopton Hall or King's Hall, Brendhall, Rouse Hall, and 
Wascolies or Westerly es (oUm Naunton's). 

Manor of Clopton Hall als. King's Hall. 

This was the manor held in Saxon times by Burric, a freeman under 
Ralph the Staller, and by Adeliza, Countess of Albemarle, wife of Odo, 
Count of Champagne, at the time of the Domesday Survey. She was the 
sister of William the Conqueror, and Odo was her third husband. He 
joined with others in 1095 in a conspiracy to depose William Rufus, and to 
place Stephen (afterwards King) upon the throne, and for his rebellious 
conduct suffered imprisonment, and in confinement died about 1108. 
He left a son, Stephen, Earl of Albemarle, his successor, and heir to his 
mother. Stephen stood faithful to his sovereign during the contest betweeji 
him and his brother, Robert Curthose, and subsequently went with the 
latter to the Holy Land, and distinguished himself in the victory over the 
infidels near Antioch. After his return to this country he joined Hugh de 
Gornay in an unsuccessful attempt to depose King Hen. I. in favour of 
Robert Curthose, and made a similar effort afterwards for Curthose' s son. 
Prince William. He married Hawise, daughter of Ralph de Mortimer, and 
had three sons and four daughters. He died in 1127, and the manor passed 
to his eldest son, William, called " Le Gros," 3rd Earl of Albemarle.' This 
third Earl was a person of considerable note, and in 1138 acted as leader of 
the nobles, who defeated the Scots in the Battle of the Standard at North 
AUerton under David, King of Scotland. The Earl of Albemarle for his 
services was created Earl of Yorkshire, and subsequently shared in the defeat 
of King Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln. He married Cicily, daughter 
of William Fitz Duncan, Earl of Moray (nephew of Malcolm, King of 
Scotland), and had two daughters, Hawise and Amicia,* Hawise married 
24th Jan. 1180, William de MandeviUe, 3rd Earl of Essex. William 
Le Gros died 20th Aug, 1179, when the manor passed to his eldest 
daughter Hawise, and subsequently vested in her husband, William de 



'Dom. ii. 4316. 

"Dom. ii. 3156. 

^Dom. ii. 406J. 

*Dom. ii. 433. 

5 Arms : Gul. a cross patonee varry. 



*She was mother of John, father of John 
de Eston, or Aston, who claimed 
the Honor of Albemarle in 1278 as 
the right heir, the issue of the elder 
sister and coheir having then 
become extinct. 



CLOPTON. 25 

Mandeville. He died 14th Nov. 1189, without issue, and his widow 
remarried William de Fortibus, Baron of Clein, who became in his wife's 
right Earl of Albemarle and Lord of Holdemess, and was made by Rich. I. 
one of the Admirals of the Fleet in which that monarch sailed towards the 
Holy Land. His lordship died not in Palestine, as some say, in 1151, but 
in England in 1195, leaving a son and heir, WUliam de Fortibus; but as 
Hawise, the deceased lord's wife, took unto herself at the instigation of 
King Rich. L a third husband, Baldwin de Bethune, Earl of the Isle of Wight, 
William was postponed in the enjoyment both of the Earldom of Albemarle, 
and this manor until Baldwin's death, 13th Oct. 1213. William de Fortibus, 
7th Earl of Albemarle, had in 12 14 a confirmation of all the lands of his 
mother. He was one of the famous 25 Barons chosen to enforce the 
provisions of the Magna Charta, but subsequently deserted his party and 
stood resolutely by the King. He shared in the Royal victory at 
Lincoln in 1217, and eventually diedon his way to the Holy Land 22nd 
Mar. 1241-2, being it is said, starved to death in the Levant. He married 
Aveline, 2nd daughter and coheir of Richard de Montfichet, and was 
succeeded by his son, William de Fortibus, 8th Earl of Albemarle. He 
married ist Christian or Devorgill, eldest daughter and coheir of Alan, Lord 
of Galloway, and on her death in 1245-6, without issue, he married 2ndly 
Isabel, only daughter of Baldwin de Reviers, 7th Earl of Devon and 
of Amicia de Clare, by whom he had three sons and one daughter 
only, Avehne, surviving. The Earl died in 1260 at Amiens,' and his 
two surviving sons shortly afterwards (Thomas, his father's successor, 
was only 7 years of age when his father died), when the manor vested 
in the daughter, Aveline de Fortibus, whose wardship was granted by 
the King to Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucesterj for the whole term 
of 15 years of her minority. This grant, however, was shortly after 
surrendered, and the King conferred the guardianship of the heiress on his 
eldest son. Prince Edward. The heiress was married the 6th April, 1269-70, 
to Edmund Plantagenet, sumamed Crouchback, afterwards Duke of 
Lancaster, second son of Hen. III., the King and Queen, almost aU the 
nobility of England attending the wedding. She died, however, in 1274,' 
without issue, and her enormous possessions passed to the Crown. 

In 1304 the manor was granted by the Crown to Margaret, widow of 
Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, in dower, for £12 part thereof/ and on the Patent 
Rolls for this year will be seen not only the grant, but also a mandate to 
William Melksop, keeper of Clopton Manor, to carry into effect the grant.** 
Margaret, Countess of Cornwall, died in 13 12, and thereupon King Edw. II. 
committed the manor to William de Cletton to hold during pleasure.' 

In 131 1 Alice de la Leyghe or Legh is said to have petitioned Parliament 
for the manor. She was the wife of William de la Legh. On what right the 
petition was based does not appear, nor indeed do the Rolls of Parliament 
afford any information as to any such petition, but on the Patent Rolls for 
1314 we meet with an entry not respecting the manor, but as to lands in 
Clopton which rather throws some light on the subject. It is a regrant to 
William de la Legh and Ahce his wife for her life, of certain lands and 
tenements in Clopton, " lately held in dower by Margaret, sometime 
Countess of Cornwall, extended at £11, 9s. ^d. a year." These, the entry 

' I.P.M., 1259-60, 44 Hen. III. FUe 24 (6). ♦/ft. 

*I.P.M., 12th March, 1275, 3 Edw. I. 31. 'Originalia, 6 Edw. II. 4, 

^Pat. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. 13. 



26 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



states, had been previously granted to them by the King, but by reason 
of an ordinance made by the prelates, earls, and nobles of the realm were 
taken into the King's hands.' Further on the Originalia Rolls for the i8 
and 19 years of Edw. II. [1:325-6] we find two entries which go to show that 
the Crown still maintained its hold on the manor. The first is a grant by 
the King at the request of Isabella, Queen of England, to Alic Loverage of 
the custody of all the lands which Margaret, Countess ol Cornwall, deceased, 
late held in Clopton,' and the second is an order to take into the hands of the 
King certain lands in Clopton, which Margaret, Countess of Cornwall, 
deceased, held in dower, and which the King had lately granted to WiUiam 
de la Legh and Alice his wife.^ 

In 1327 we find on the Patent Rolls a grant to Queen Isabella for life, 
by way of dower, of lands said to have been formerly held by Margaret, 
late Countess of Cornwall, of the value of 20 marks a year.* And the follow- 
ing year on the Originalia Rolls is an order in favour of Alice, " formerly 
wife of William de la Legh," in respect of lands in Clopton, " which Mar- 
garet, Countess of Cornwall, deceased, held in dower."^ Also from the same 
Rolls we learn that two years later, John de Carleford rendered to the 
King 20 marks per annum for the custody of lands in Clopton, formerly 
belonging to Margaret, Countess of Cornwall. * In 1331 and 1332 there are 
on the Patent Rolls confirmation of leases of the manor made by John de 
Eltham, Earl of Cornwall. The first is to John de Carleford for life,^ 
and the second is to John de Sekford for life.^ 

The Davy MSS. state that in 133 1 John Lenne, clerk, held the manor 
as trustee, and that he died in 1377. The manor is certainly mentioned in 
his inquisition p.m. in 1377.^ 

Further, they state that in 1332 Ehzabeth de Burgh, daughter of Gilbert 
de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, relict of Sir Roger D'Amorie, held the manor 
for Ufe, with remainder to John, Lord Bardolf, and Ehzabeth his wife, 
her daughter, by exchange with the Crown, and in confirmation of this we 
find amongst the Ministers' Accounts preserved in the Public Record Office 
accounts for 1336 " of land after transferred to Elizabeth de Burgh.'"" 
Elizabeth de Burgh, after marrying Theobald de Verdon, died in 1360, 
seised of the manor, and an extent will be found in her inquisition p.m. 
this year." Further on the Originalia Rolls will be found an order the 
following year to accept security from John Bardolf and Elizabeth his wife, 
for reasonable relief in respect of the manor. '^ Amongst the Ancient Deeds 
preserved in the Public Record Office may be seen a lease dated 30th Nov. 
37 Edw. III. [1363], by Queen Philippa to Simon Noreys, rector of the church 
of Castor in Flegg, and to John de Repynghale, of the wardship of the Manor 
of Clopton, which belonged to Sir John de Bardolf, Knt., to whom the 
wardship had been granted by the King during the minority of the heir ; to 
hold from the death of the said Sir John de Bardolf until the said heir should 
attain full age, reserving to the Queen the knights' fees, advowson of churches, 
&c., together with incidents of feudal tenure.'^ 



' Pat. RoUs, 8 Edw. II. pt. ii. 2. 

"O., 18 Edw. II. 2. 

3 0., 19 Edw. II. 2. 

* Pat. RoUs, I Edw. III. pt. i. 2. 

5 O., 2 Edw. III. 10. 

6 0.. 4 Edw. III. 17. 

7 Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. pt. ii. 9. 



« Pat. Rolls, 6 Edw. III. pt. i. 5. 
9 I.P.M., 51 Edw. III. 20. 
'° 10 Edw. III. Bundle 1094, No. 13 ; 

Bundle 1095, No. 35. 
" I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 83. 
" O., 35 Edw. III. I. 
"3 C, 758 Originalia, 44 Edw. III. 17. 



CLOPTON. 27 

Johiij Lord Bardolf, died 5th Aug. 1363/ when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Wilham Bardolf, Lord Bardolf de Wirmegay, then 14 
years of age, " whose wardship and marriage," says Banks,* was granted 
by Queen Phihppa, wife of Edw. III., to Michael de Poynings, Lord Poynings, 
to the intent that " he might marry Agnes, daughter of the said Michael," 
He did marry this Agnes. 

In 1382 William, Lord Bardolf, appears to have settled the manor, 
and in order to effect the settlement obtained licence to grant to John de 
Cleye or Clay, parson of Ravenham.^ This trustee died in 1403.* 

William, Lord Bardolf, died before Jan. 1385-6,' when a third of the 
manor passed in dower to his widow Agnes (who took for a second husband 
Sir Thomas de Mortimer),^ and subject thereto the manor passed to William's 
son and heir Thomas. Agnes, Lady Bardolf, died 12th June, 1403.' 

Thomas, Lord Bardolf de Wirmegay or de Wormegay, was a person of 
eminence in his time. In 1382 he married Joane, daughter of Ralph Crom- 
well, Lord Cromwell, of Tatshall, but in 1405 taking part with Henry, Earl 
of Northumberland, and others, in the insurrection against King Hen. IV., 
and being pursued by the royal army in great force, was obliged to fly the 
kingdom. He returned, however, after an absence of three years, and was 
present with the Earl of Northumberland at the battle of Bramham Moor, 
19th Feb. 1407-8, where that unhappy nobleman was defeated and slain, 
and Lord Bardolf so severely wounded that he died of his injuries shortly 
afterwards. Page informs us that he was attainted and executed for 
rebellion. This, however, was not the case. It is true he was attainted, 
but this was after his death. Dugdale says that his remains were quartered, 
and the quarters disposed of by being set upon the gates of London, York, 
Lenne, and Shrewsbury, while the head was placed upon one of the gates 
of Lincoln. His widow obtained permission, however, in a short time to 
remove and bury the remains. She died ist July, 1421. Thomas, 5th 
Lord Bardolf, left two daughters and coheirs — Anne, married ist to Sir WilUam 
CUfford, Knt., and 2ndly, to Reginald, Lord Cobham, of Sterborough; and 
Joane, the wife of Sir Wilham Phelip, K.G., son and heir of Sir John 
PheHp, Knt., of Dennington. 

This manor passed to Thomas, Lord Bardolf s, brother, Sir William 
Bardolf, together with Scrotchy, in Norfolk, but the Barony of Wirmegay, 
and the larger Bardolf possessions were forfeited and divided by the King 
between Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter, his brother. Sir George Dunbar, 
Knt., and the Queen. The estates apportioned to the Queen were upon the 
petition to the King of Sir William Clifford and his wife, and Sir William 
Phelip and his wife, granted in reversion after the Queen's decease to the 
representatives of the attainted noblemen. 

Neither Burke nor Banks mention this Sir WiUiam Bardolf. He 
died in 1424 without issue,* and in the following year Joan his widow, and 
Richard Selling, her husband, released the manor for an annuity to the 
ladies, Anne Clifford and Joan Phelip, the 5th Lord Bardolf 's two daughters. 

Sir William Phelip was a Knight of the Garter and Treasurer of the 
Household to King Hen. V. He came from Dennington, under the manor 

' See Manor of Ilketshall Bardolph's, in 3 Pat. Rolls, 6 Rich. II. pt. i. 16. 

Wangford Hundred. Blomefield +I.P.M., 4 Hen. IV. 32. 

states that John, Lord Bardolph, sWill, 12th Sep. 1385. 

died in the 45 Edw. III. [1371], * I.P.M., 21 Rich. II. 4b. 

Aug. 3. "I.P.M., 4 Hen. IV. 39. 

« Baronage, ii. 27. ^ I.P.M., 2 Hen. VI. 34. 



28 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of which place an account of him will be found. He died 6th June 1441/ 
seised of this lordship, and also of the Manors of Ilketshall, Broekley, 
Brundish, Cretingham, Wilby, and Bennington/ His widow had an annuity 
out of this manor, and died 12th March, 1446-7-' Anna, wife of Sir Reginald 
Cobham, died in 1454.* 

Sir William Phelip,' styled Lord Bardolf, left by his wife Joane an only 
daughter, Ehzabeth, married to John, Viscount Beaumont, so created by 
letters patent bearing date 14th Feb. 1440, being the first person ever dignified 
with that title in England. In 1445 he had another grant to himself and 
the heirs male of his body, of place and precedence above all viscounts 
thereafter to be created, and to take place next and immediately after 
Earls in all parliaments and public meetings. He fought bravely against the 
House of York, and was slain in the second battle of Northampton, loth 
July, 1460. He had a son Henry, who died in his father's lifetime at the 
early age of 9, and a son William, who succeeded his father as 2nd Viscount 
Beaumont, and to him this manor passed. 

William, Viscount Beaumont, adhering to the Lancastrian interest, 
participated in the hard fate which befel that House ; for, being taken 
prisoner at Towton Field in 1460, he was attainted by Parliament the 
following year, and divers of his manors given to Lord Hastings.* On the 
Patent Rolls in 1464 is a grant to Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury, and 
George, Bishop of Exeter, and Joan, wife of Sir Wilham Beaumont, and the 
heirs of his body, ot this manor and the Manors of Bennington, Ilketshall, 
Brundish, Cretingham, and other lands,^ and in 1467 King Edw. IV. 
granted the manor to Sir John Scotte, Knt., and the heirs male of his 
body, and all lands, rents, reversions, and services in Clopton, late of 
Wilham, late Lord Beaumont, in the King's hands by forfeiture.* 

William, Viscount Beaumont, subsequently took part with John, the 
Earl of Oxford who fled from Barnet Field in 1470. They retired into 
Scotland, then into France. Landing in Cornwall in 1474 they were both 
taken prisoners by the Sheriff and brought to King Edw. IV., who sent them 
to the Castle of Hamms in Picardy, where they continued till restored 
by King Hen. VII., and an Act of Parliament passed, 7th Nov. in the first 
year of his reign. Wilham died 28th Bee. 1507. He had married ist Joan, 
2nd daughter of Humphrey Stafford, ist Buke of Buckingham, and 2ndly 
Elizabeth, niece of John, 5th Lord Scrope, of Bolton, but had no issue by 
either. 

His sister, Joan's son Francis, Lord LoveU, was his heir, and would 
have succeeded had he not been attainted by Parhament for taking part 
with King Rich. III. at Bosworth, and later with Lambert Simnel in the 
Battle of Stoke, near Newark-upon-Trent, where, in fact, he was slain 
i6th June, 1487. 

The manor subsequently vested in the Crown, and King Hen. VIII. 
in 15 18 granted it, together with the Manors of Bennington, Brundish, 
Ilketshall Bardolphs, Cretingham alias Tyes, and others, to Sir Richard 
Wingfield, Knt., and his heirs male. Sir Richard Wingfield was the 8th 
son of Sir John Wingfield, of Letheringham, Knt., by Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter of Sir John Lewes. 

' Will, 1st Dec. 1438 and 30th May, 1441, ^See Manor of Bennington, in Hoxne 

proved at Lambeth. Hundred. 

'I.P.M., 19 Hen. VI. 30. «I.P.M., 3 Edw. IV. 30. 

^I.P.M., 25 Hen. VI. ag, 30. 'Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw, IV. pt. ii. 38. 

^I.P.M., 32 Hen. VI. 2§. ^p^t. RqUs, 7 Edw. IV. pt. v 10. 



CLOPTON, 29 

This Sir Richard Wingfield married Bridget, daughter and heir of Sir 
John Wilshire, Knt., with whom he had Stonehouse or Stone Castle, near 
Gravesend, in Kent. He attended Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, on 
the occasion of his conducting Mary, the Queen Dowager of France, into 
England, and was in 15 18 admitted one of the King's Privy Council, in 1523 
Knight of the Garter, and by means of the Emperor Maximillian, also 
Kn^ht of the Golden Fleece, with an annual pension of ;^200. This same 
year Sir Richard, with Sir Richard Fermingham, commanded the rear of 
the English army which invaded France, and was also Chancellor of the 
Duchy of Lancaster. He built new offices and galleries upon the old 
foundation of Kimbolton Castle, making the same exceedingly strong, and 
environed the same with a double ditch. Being Ambassador in Spain he 
died there, and was buried at Toledo. The manor passed to his son and 
heir, Charles Wingfield, of Kimbolton Castle, who sold the manor, and 
also the Manors of Brundish, Dennington, Ilketshall Bardolphs, Cretting- 
ham, Tyes, and others, in 1539, to Anthony Rous, of Dennington,' who in 
1541 obtained a confirmation or grant from the Crown. From Sir Anthony 
to Sir John Rous, who was created a Baronet in 1660, the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Henham, in Blything Hundred. It is 
specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Sir Anthony, who died 
8th Feb. 1545-'' John Rous, son and heir of Sir John, held his first court 
I4ih Oct. 1652, and other courts 3rd June, 1654 ; 4th May, 1657 '> 23rd 
Oct. 1657 ; 20th May, 1658 ; 12th June, 1658 ; 26th Oct. 1658 ; 5th May, 
1659 ') 20th June, 1660 ; 9th April, 1661 ; 25th April, 1661 ; 24th Oct. 
1661 ; 5th June, 1662 ; 23rd Oct. 1^662 ; 21st Sept. 1663 ; 6th Oct. 1664 ; 
26th Oct. 1675 ; 15th July, 1669 ; 6th Oct. 1670 ; 5th Oct. 1671 ; 2nd 
Nov. 167^ ; 9th Oct. 1673 ; 30th April, 1674 ; 15th July, 1675 ; 7th Oct. 
1675, &c. 

In 1684 Amald Browne held his first court, and William Betts, of 
Yoxford, his first court 23rd Oct. 1693. It is not unlikely that a John Betts 
held before William, for amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of 
Queen Elizabeth we find a claim by John Betts against Margaret Deaves 
and George Booke for production of deeds relating to Clopton Hall.^ 

WiUiam Betts married Dorothy, daughter of Thomas Mann of Yoxford, 
and held courts 2nd Oct. 1701 ; ist Nov. 1703 ; 31st Oct. 1704 ; 31st Oct. 
1705 ; 4th April, 1707 ; 25th Sept. 1707 ; 3rd Nov. 1707 ; and 7th Mar. 
1708. His will is dated 17th Jan. 1708, and he was buried at Yoxford 
3rd Mar. 1709, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Betts, 
who died without issue in 1716, when the lordship vested in his brother and 
heir, Henry Betts, who married Elizabeth, and died i8th Nov. 1721,'* when 
it passed to his widow Elizabeth. She held courts nth Jan. 1730 ; 9th 
July, 1742 ; 17th July, 1744 ; 9th Oct. 1744 ; 21st Aug. 1746 ; 20th Oct. 
1747 ; 1st Nov. 1748 ; I2th Aug. 1749 ; 6th Oct. 1750 ; 21st Oct. 1751 ; 
I2th May, 1752 ; 9th June, 1752 ; 17th Oct. 1752 ; 19th Mar. 1753 ; 5th 
Nov. 1753 ; 19th Jan. 1754 ; 24th June, 1754 ; 21st Oct. 1754 ; 9th 
Aug. 1757 ; i6th Aug. 1758 ; 13th Dec. 1759 ; 9th March, 1764 ; 14th 
Aug. 1764 ; 2nd April, 1765 ; and died in 1774,' when the manor passed to 
Rebecca, daughter and eventual heir of Henry Betts,^ married to Edmund 
Anguish, from whom the manor went to their only child Anne, married 

» Fine, Hil. 31 Hen. VIII. J Will, Aug. 1771, proved 29th Dec. 1774. 

«.I.P.M., I Edw. VI. 6 His son William having died without 
3 C.P. i. 83. issue in 1771. 

♦ Will, 29th July, 1721. 



30 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK* 

to Matthew Raper, of Wendover Dean, co. Bucks., on whose death, 26th 
Nov. 1826, it devolved on Felix Vincent Raper, a Lieut-.Col. in the service 
of the East India Company, who held a court for the manor 13th April, 
1830, and again 7th Sept. 1835, 20th May, 1839, and his last court 31st May, 

1849, He died 14th Nov. 1849, when the manor passed under his will to 
his widow and Chas. Fraser as trustees. They held a court 23rd May, 

1850. In 1852, after the widow's death, Chas. Fraser, as surviving trustee, 
sold this with the three other manors in Clopton by deed dated 17th May, 
1864 (Joseph Beaumont, of Great Coggeshall, concurring in the assurance) to 
Joseph Erek, Thomas Cree the younger, and Richard Stevens in undivided 
third shares. By deed dated 4th Jan. 1865, Joseph Erek conveyed his 
undivided third share to Joseph Beaumont, and by deed dated 24th Feb. 
1871, the said Thomas Cree, Richard Stevens, and Joseph Beaumont con- 
veyed the whole of the four manors to John Frederick Robinson, of Hadleigh. 

By indenture dated loth Jan. 1872, John Frederick Robinson conveyed 
the same four manors to WilUam Sidney Calvert, of East Bergholt. Ten 
years later, by deed dated 4th Jan. 1882, the said William Sidney Calvert 
conveyed the four manors to Edward Broughton Rouse, M.A., LL.D., 
of Ipswich, and he, by deed dated ist Sept. 1883, conveyed this manor and 
the Manor of Rousehall to Herbert Rouse Brewster de Medewe, of Carlton 
House, Amhurst Road, co. Middlesex, who, by deed dated 20th Aug. 1908, 
conveyed the two last named manors to the Hon. Alexander Hewitt Kerr, 
of Portland, Oregon, United States of America, who is the present holder of 
these two lordships, as also of the other manors of Clopton. The parcels 
of the deed of 1864, practically adopted in the subsequent assurance, were : 
" All that the Manor or Lordship of Brentha alias Brendhall in Clopton or 
elsewhere in the county of Suffolk, or by whatsoever other name or names 
the same is or has been called or known. And also all that the Manor or 
Lordship of King's Hall, alias Kinshall in Clopton aforesaid or elsewhere, &c. 
And also all that the Manor or Lordship of Rouse Hall in Clopton or else- 
where or by whatsoever other name or names, &c. And all that Manor or 
Lordship of Wascohes alias Wastcolies in Clopton aforesaid or elsewhere, 
as the said manors are situate, lying and extending in the towns, fields, and 
hamlets of Clopton aforesaid, and in Otley, Burgh, Grundisburgh, Chars- 
field, Deback, Monewden, Martlesham, Woodbridge, Hasketon, and Helm- 
sley, or any of them, or elsewhere in the said county of Suffolk, together 
with all courts, royalties, privileges, rights, members, and appurtenances 
whatever to the same respectively belonging or appertaining." 

The present lord has in his possession 16 original Court Rolls of this 
and the Manor of RousehaU, commencing with the 25 th year of Queen 
Ehzabeth [1584] and continuing up to the year 1908, when the last court 
was held. 

Court Rolls from 25th to 27th Edw. I. [1299 1301] will be found in 
the Public Record Office.' 

Arms of Fortibus : Arg. a chief Gu. Of Bardolf : Az. three cinque- 
foils. Or. Of Beaumont : Az. a lion rampant semee de lis Or. Of Raper : 
Per fesse Az. and Arg. a pale counterchanged 3 goats' heads erased. Or. 

Manor of Brentha alias Brendhall. 

This manor was held in the time of Hen. III. by Robert de Aula 
Combusta or Brendhall, who was succeeded by his son and heir, William 

' Portfolio, ao3, 73. 



CLOPTON. 31 

de Brendhall, and he by William de Aula Combusta, of Clopton, in 1284. The 
next lord was Nicholas de Brendhall, who had the manor in 1291 ; the next 
Thomas de Aula Combusta, who had it in 1298, and he was succeeded by 
Nicholas de Aula Combusta, who had it in the time of Edw. III. 

Bartholomew de Burghersh died seised of the manor in 1369/ from 
which time to the time of Richard Le Despenser it passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Carlton Hall, in Carlton Colville, Mutford Hundred. The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Edward Le 
Despenser, who died nth Nov. 1375.* On Richard Le Despenser dying 
without issue, this manor does not appear to have passed to his sister, but 
to his aunt, Anne, who had married Sir Hugh Hastings, Knt., of Elsing 
and Gressinghale, in Norfolk. She subsequently married Thomas, Lord 
Morley, of Hingham, in Norfolk, and surviving him, died seised of this 
manor, as also of Blaxhall in 1426. 

In the time of Hen. VIII. we find the manor vested in AUce Lewgore 
(the wife of William Lewgore), who died seised of it 27th Feb. 1524,^ when 
it passed to her son and heir, George or Gregory Lewgore, who married 
Anne, daughter of Edward Latimer, of Freston, and died 19th Jan. 1540,* 
when it passed to his cousin and heir, George or Gregory Lewgore. He 
married Joane, daughter and coheir of John Frewar, of Hadleigh, In 
1543 a fine of the manor was levied by Augustus Parys, clerk, and 
others, against this Gregory Lewgore,' and in 1544 a claim was made upon 
him and his wife for forfeiture of the manor. * In 155 1 George Lewgore 
sold the manor to Thomas Codd, alderman of Norwich,^ who in 1557 was 
called upon to show title to the manor.' However, he died seised of the 
manor in 1558, when it vested in his cousin and heir, Thomas Codd, 
from whom it passed to Thomas Rous, son of Sir Anthony Rous, of Henham. 
Thomas Rous, in 1562 was, like Thomas Codd, called upon to show title to 
the manor,' but seems to have been able to show this satisfactorily. From 
the time of this Thomas Rous, to the time of Sir John Rous, 2nd Bart., the 
manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Henham, in Blything 
Hundred. From Sir John Rous, 2nd Bart., the manor passed to Arnold 
Browne, who held his first court in 1684, and from this time to the time of 
Edward Broughton Rouse in 1882, the manor devolved in the same course as 
the main Manor of Clopton. Edward Broughton Rouse, by deed dated 23rd 
May, 1908, conveyed this manor and the Manor of Wascolies to William 
James Anton, of Bristol, and he, by deed dated 27th May following, con- 
veyed the same in fee to the Hon. Alexander Hewitt Kerr, of Portland, 
Oregon, United States of America, who is the present lord. 

The Court Rolls of this manor and that of Wascolies, commencing 
with the reign of Charles, and continuing complete up to the present time, 
are in the possession of the lord of the manor. 

The fines are arbitrary. 

The custom of this manor is that the youngest son is heir, the widow 
is entitled to one-third for dower, and forfeiture is incurred for taking down 
trees on the copyholds without the lord's licence. 

'I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. i. 14. ''Fine Mich. 5 Edw. VI. 

'I.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 46. 8 Memoranda Rolls, 4 and 5, Phil, and M. 
^I.P.M., 16 Hen. VIII. 16. Mich. Rec. Rot. 48. 

♦I.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 17. 9 Memoranda Rolls, 4 Eliz., Hil. Rec. Rot 
'Fine, Mich. 35 Hen. VIII. 35- 

* Memoranda Rolls, 36 Hen. VIII., Pas. 
Rec. Rot. 10. 



32 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Some of the customary freeholders pay in addition to the free rent a 
castleward rent^ and for every penny of such rent the lord takes on death 
or alienation a castleward relief of 5s. 

Courts were held as follows: 24th Oct. 1698 (William Betts, lord); 
24th Oct. 1700 ; 6th Sept. 1703 ; 29th March, 1704 ; 31st Oct. 1705 ; 
28th Sept. 1707 ; 2nd Nov. 1708 ; 8th Nov. 1709 ; Thomas Betts' first 
court 6th Nov. 1710 ; 3rd April, 1712 ; 9th Nov. 1713 ; 3rd Feb. 1714 ; 
14th April, 1715 ; 3rd May, 1715 ; first court of Henry Betts, nth Oct. 
1716 ; 6th May, 1717 ; 12th Nov. 1717 ; 6th Oct. 1719 ; 3rd Dec. 1722 ; 
27th Sept. 1723 ; 7th July, 1724 ; 6th Dec. 1728 ; 3rd Dec. 1731 ; 4th 
Feb. 1732 ; 30th Oct. 1732 ; ist Aug. 1737 ; 4th Aug. 1770 ; Kt Oct. 
1771 ; i8th April, 20 Jac. ; 3rd Oct. 20 Car. ; 27th March 11 Jac. ; 1.2th 
June, 1660 ; 5th Oct. 16 Jac. 

Arms of Lewgore : Arg. a bend ragul6e Vert., betw. 2 escallops Gu. 

Rouse Hall Manor. 

This was the estate of Uluric in Saxon times, and of Roger de Poictou 
in the time of William the Conqueror, Roger Fitz Emald holding under 
him. It passed to Ernald Rufus or Le Rus, and in 1201 was the lordship of 
Sir Ernald le Rous, probably his grandson, who was succeeded by his son, 
Sir William le Rous, who died in 1253,' when it went to AHce, his daughter, 
who married Sir Richard de Brewse. Sir Richard died in 1296, and his 
wife in 1300, when Davy makes out that the manor passed to their son and 
heir. Sir Giles de Brewse, Knt., who died in 1310, and was succeeded by 
his son and heirj Sir Richard Brewse, who died in 1323. Margaret, Sir 
Richard's daughter and coheir, married Sir John Weyland. Thus Davy 
succeeds in getting the manor into the Weyland family, but there are a few 
facts against this imaginary devolution. First, we meet with a fine levied 
of the manor in 1288 by John de Weyland and Maria his wife against 
Richard de Brewse and Alice his wife,"" and there can be no doubt that by 
virtue of this the manor became vested in John de Weyland. Conse- 
quently, the manor never vested in Sir Giles de Brewse, nor in the second 
Sir Richard de Brewse,nor in Margaret, the latter' s daughter. From this John 
de Weyland the manor seems to have passed to Thomas de Weyland, the 
unfortunate Lord Chief Justice, who had to abjure the realm in 1290, for 
we find it mentioned in the Escheater's return,^ and his son. Sir John Wey- 
land had a grant of free warren in 1301,* and the grant of a market and 
fair in the manor in 1304.' 

Sir John Weyland had both this manor and the advowson of Clopton, 
and he, with Maria his wife, in 1307 levied a fine of both against John 
Olyner.^ On his death about 1312^ these passed to his brother. Sir Richard 
Weyland, Richard's daughter and heir, Cecily, inherited the manor in 13 19, 
and married Bartholomew de Burghersh, who had a grant of free warren 
here in 1349.* He died seised of the manor in right of his wife in 1369,' 

' I.P.M., 37 Hen. III. 49 ; 44 Hen. III. 15 ; 4 Chart. Rolls, 29 Edw. I. 7. 

or File. 14 (17). The manor was s Chart. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. 51. 

then held with Hasketon Manor *Feet of Fines, i Edw, IL 27. 

of Roger, Earl Marshal, by the 'I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 34. 

service of one knight's fee. » Chart. Rolls, 23 Edw. I. 3. 

« Feet of Fines, 16 Edw. I. 7, » Duchy of Lane. I.P.M., 43 Edw. Ill, 142 ; 
Jl,P.M., 18 Edw. I. 51. I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. i. 14. 



CLOPTON. 



33 



when it passed to Elizabeth, his daughter and heir, married to Edward 
Le Despenser. He died nth November, 1375,' and she in 1409. 

In 1489 we find a charter which shows that at that time the manor 
was vested in John Audeley. By it he conveyed to John Bloys, clerk, his 
heirs and assigns for ever, " Clopton al. Bowsyshalle Manor and Sweneland 
and Cokefeld Manors," with all lands, rents, advowsons of churches, &c/ 
This conveyance was no doubt by way of settlement, for we find that John 
Audeley, then Sir John Audeley, had a fine levied against him by John 
Jenor and others in 1514,^ and died seised of the manor on i8th April, 
1529,* when it passed to his son and heir, John Audeley, who died in the 
month of June, 1534,^ when it devolved on his brother and heir, Edward 
Audeley.^ From him the manor passed to Robert Gurdon, who died in 
1579/ when it went to his son and heir, John Gurdon. It then seems to 
have vested in Robert Gosnold, for he in 1600 sold the manor to Thomas 
Rous, who died in 1603, after which time the manor descended in the same 
course as the Manor of Kingshall, and is now vested in the Hon. Alexander 
Hewitt Kerr. 

Courts for the manor were held as follows : 15th July, 30 Eliz. ; 21st 
Sept. 2 Car. ; 26th Sept. 2 Car. ; 17th April, 3 Car. ; 14th Oct. 17 Car.; 
first court of William Betts,6th Sept. 1703; ist Nov. 1703; 31st Oct. 1705; 
25th Sept. 1707; 2nd Nov. 1708; first court of Thomas Betts, 6th Nov. 
1710 ; 14th AprU, 1715 ; 5th May, 1715 ; Henry Betts, 6th May, 1717 ; 
12th Sept. 1717 ; I2th Nov. 1717 ; ist Dec. 1719 ; first court of Elizabeth 
Betts, widow, 29th Dec. 1721 ; 3rd Dec. 1722 ; 12th Aug. 1723 ; 27th Sept. 
1723 ; 15th Dec. 1727 ; 24th May, 1728 ; ist Dec. 1728 ; 2nd June, 1729 ; 
13th Oct. 1729 ; 27th Dec. 1731 ; 13th April, 1733 ; 6th Nov. 1736 ; 29th 
March, 1737; 25thMay, 1737; 1st July, 1737; 25th Jan. 1737; 5th June,i740; 
20th Aug. 1740 ; 9th July, 1742 ; r7th July, 1744 ; 9th Oct. 1744 ; 20th 
Oct., 1747 ; i2th Aug. 1749 ; 6th Oct. 1750 ; 27th June, 1752 ; 19th 
March, 1753 ; 29th June, 1754 ; 24th June, 1756 ; i6th Aug. 1758 ; 27th 
Feb. 1767 ; 6th Sept. 1768 ; 4th Aug. 1770 ; 12th Oct. 1772 ; 3rd June, 
1773 ; 6th April, 1774 ; 21st Nov. 1774 ; first court of Rebecca Anguish, 
widow, and Ann Betts, spinster, two daughters of Elizabeth Betts, 13th 
June, 1775 ; 17th Oct. 1775 ; 27th June, 1777 ; igth Aug. 1777 ; 28th 
Jan. 1779; I2th Dec. 1780; 9th Dec. 1783 ; 25th Jan. 1785; 24th Aug. 1786 ; 
9th June, 1789 ; 15th Nov. 1790 ; 3rd AprU, 1792 ; 17th Oct. 1793 j i8th 
Sept. 1794; 1st June, 1798; Matthew Raper and Ann his wife, 28th June, 
1816 ; Matthew Raper, 13th Aug. 1824 ; F. V. Raper's last court 31st 
May, 1849 ; and Charles Fraser and Ehza Raper's first court, 23rd May, 
1850. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is the sale of a 
seventh share of messuages, lands, &c., in the Manors of Kingshall, Brendhall, 
and Rowsehall in 1709.^ It is dated the 30th May, 1709, and is a sale made 
by Stephen Person, of Derby, in New England (N. America), to John Gibbon, 
of London, merchant, and is of a share Person had inherited from Thomas 
Gamham, hi's grandfather. The customs of this manor are : The youngest 
son is heir, the eldest brother is heir, the widow is entitled to one-third for 
dower, and timber cannot be cut without hcence of lord. It has been the 



' I.P.M,, 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 46. 
«4Hen. VII. CI. dor. 33. 
3 Fine, Easter, 6 Hen. VIII. 
*I.P.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 8. 
5 I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 19. 

E 



^ See Manor of Redhall, in Witneshain, in 

this Hundred. 
•> I.P.M., 7 April, 21 Eliz. 
'Add. Ch. 19269. 



34 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

custom for a fine to be paid on the deaths of free tenants, and on their aUena- 
tions inter vivos. The fines are arbitrary and heriots attached in some 
instances to copyholds in this manor. 

Manor of Wascolies al. Westerlyes {olim Naunton's). 

This was the estate of Edric Grim in Saxon days, and of Ralph Peverel 
at the time of the Norman Survey. 

It was apparently vested in John de Wascoyl, who had the advowson 
of Clopton in 1273. Amongst the early Chancery Proceedings is a suit by 
Robert Fitz Rauff, nephew of Sir John Forstaft against John, nephew of 
Robert Rendelysham, late Steward of the " Manor of Naunton," as to 
erasure of entries in the Court Rolls of the manor.' In 1558 the manor was 
vested in Thomas Codd, alderman of Norwich, and this year passed on his 
death to his cousin and heir, Thomas Codd. We next find it vested in Thomas 
Rous, who died in 1572, and from this time it seems to have descended in a 
like manor with the Manor of BrendhaU, in Clopton, and is now vested in 
the Hon. Alexander Hewitt Kerr. 

A copy admittance to this manor of Thomas CoggeshaU at a court held 
for this manor 19th March, 1753, when Elizabeth 3etts was lady, is given in 
the East Anglian Notes and Queries, vol. v. p. 204. Mr. Daniel Hipwell, 
who makes the communication, does not apparently recognise the manor, 
as he leaves both parish and county blank. There is, however, no doubt 
as to the identity, and the description in the wiU of John CoggeshaU as 
copyhold in Clopton, and the boundaries of the land— ^one being a piece of 
land abutting upon a meadow of the Manor of Rousehall— are all confirma- 
tory. Courts for this manor were held as follows : 24th' Oct. 1688 ; 24th 
Oct. 1699 ; 30th Oct. 1700 ; 27th Oct. 1701 ; loth April, 1702 ; court of 
William Betts, 29th Oct. 1702; 29th March, 1704; 31st Oct. 1705 ; 4th Nov. 
1706 ; 4th AprU, 1707 ; 25th Sept. 1707 ; 2nd Nov. 1708 ; 7th March, 1708 ; 
9th Sept. 1709 ; first court of Thomas Betts, 6th Nov. 1710 ; 5th Feb. 1710 ; 
14th April, 1715 ; 5th May, 1715 ; first Court of Henry Betts, 12th Sept. 
1716 ; 6th May, 1717 ; 8th Oct. 1717 ; 6th Oct. 1719 ; 29th Jan. 1719 : 
first court of Elizabeth Betts, widow, 29th Oct., 1721 ; 4th Oct. 1722. 
Felix Vincent Raper's last court, 31st May, 1849 ; and Charles Eraser 
and Eliza Raper's first court 23rd May, 1850. 

The custom of the manor is that the youngest son is heir, the eldest 
brother is heir, and the widow is entitled to a moiety. The fines are arbitrary 
and heriots attached in some instances to copyholds held of this manor. 



' E.C.P., Bundle 71. 61. 




CULPHO. 35 

CULPHO. 

|HERE were two manors here in Saxon times. One was held 
by Brihtric, a freeman under the Abbot of Ely in the Con- 
fessor's time. It consisted of 80 acres, 10 bordars, and 4 
serfs, 2 plough teams in demesne and 2 belonging to the 
tenants, 4 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 7 beasts, 36 hogs, and 
100 sheep, valued at 20s. By the time of the Survey the 
value had risen to 30s., the serfs had disappeared, the plough- 
teams of the men had come down to i, the rouncies to i, the beasts to 
2, the hogs to 15, the sheep to 60, and the only detail in which a rise was 
discernible was the increase of i ploughteam in demesne. 

The other manor was in the time of the Confessor held by Godric, a 
freeman under Harold, who held 40 acres, 3 bordars, 2 acres of meadow, 
and I ploughteam, valued at 105. The value was the same at the time 
of the Survey, but the ploughteam had disappeared. Both these manors 
were held by Roger de Poictou as Domesday tenant in chief. Roger also 
held in Culpho 21 acres which in the Confessor's time had been held by 5 
freemen under commendation to the Abbot of Ely. In those days there 
was a ploughteam, and the value was stated to be 7s. ; but at the time of the 
Survey there was but half a team, and the value had dropped 2s. There 
was also here a church with 10 acres valued at 20^.' 

The only other holding in Culpho was that of Geoffrey de Magnaville, 
who had 3 freemen, 2 under commendation to Halden, and the third to the 
Abbot of Ely, holding 30 acres and one bordar. There had been 2 
ploughteams, but at the time of the Survey these had disappeared ; also 
2 acres of meadow, valued at 55.^ 

Makor of Culpho al. Verdons and Wachesham Manor. 

This was the manor of Brihtric in Saxon days, and of Roger de Poictou 
in Norman times. It was probably the manor held later by Sir Osbert de 
Wachesham and William de Verdun, who held half a fee of the 
Honor of Lancaster in 1210,^ and which was held subsequently by Osbert's 
son, Giles de Wachesham, who also held half a knight's fee in chief of theKing,* 
andlater by Sir Giles's son. Sir Giles. Thislast Giles's brother, John de Waches- 
ham, about the same time held in Culpho 4 fees ot the Honor of Lancaster.' 
Giles de Wachesham, the father, died in 1267,^ and was succeeded by his 
son and heir. Sir Giles de Wachesham, who is distinctly stated in the Hundred 
Rolls to have held this manor of the King in chief of the Honor of Lancaster.^ 
It would seem, however, that the manor was held really in moieties by the 
Wachesham and Verdon families. Sir Giles de Wachesham, the son,^ died 
in 1272,^ and Davy traces the manor from the Wacheshams to the Verdons 
by the marriage of Isabella, daughter of Giles de Wachesham ; but this is a 
mistake. Giles de Wachesham left a son and heir, Sir Gerard, also called 
Sir Giles, and we find the following entry on the Close Rolls for 1278. 
Shortly, it is an order for John, son of John le (sic) Verdun to have seisin 
of a moiety of Culpho Manor as held of Giles de Wachesham, tenant in 
chief, which moiety came to the King's hands by reason of the wardship 

'Dom. ii. 346. «I.P.M., 52 Hen. III. 14. 

^Dom. ii. 413. 7H.R. ii. 188. 

^ Red Book of the Exchequer, 132 B. i^Sd. * See Manor of Stanstead, in Babergh 

*T. de N. 283. Hundred. 

= T. de N. 291. 9 1.P.M., I Edw. I. 9 ; 3 Edw. I. 28 



36 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Gerard, son and heir of Giles de Wachesham, whilst the heir was under 
age, as wardship of a wardship, and John, son of the said John le Verdun, 
was his next heir, and of full age.' We learn nothing more of Gerard de 
Wachesham, but in 1297 we find that the whole place was held by John de 
Wachesham and Thomas Verdon/ 

This John de Wachesham was apparently a cousin of Sir Gerard, being 
the grandson of John, the brother of Sir Giles, father of Gerard. He was 
dead before 1316, for we find amongst the ancient Deeds in the Record 
Office, formerly preserved in the Court of Augmentations, a grant by John, 
son of William Hoo (probably a trustee) to Dyonisia late the wife of John 
de Wachesham, Knt., and to Thomas, son and heir of the said John, of the 
Manor of Culpho, with messuages, lands, &c., in the Vills of '' Culfo, 
Tudinham, Groundisburg, and Play ford," with remainder upon the death 
of the said Dyonisia and Thomas to John de Wachesham and Edmund, 
brothers of the said Thomas. The deed is dated the Friday after the 
Octave of Easter, 10 Edw. 11.^ It is strange that none of the parties 
named in this settlement were tenants on the taking of the inquisition 
p.m. of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, in 1327. Giles de Wachesham is the 
person there mentioned.* 

On John de Verdon's death he was succeeded by Thomas de Verdon, 
who died seised of the manor, or the Verdon moiety, in 1315,^ when it passed 
to his son and heir, Sir John Verdon, who released it to William West, of 
Newbourne, in 1357. Upon the death of Thomas de Wachesham, the 
manor (or a moiety thereof) passed to his son and heir, John de Wachesham, 
and he sold to Roger de Wolferston. In 1363 we meet with a fine levied 
by Roger de Wolferston, Robb atte Gern, chaplain, and Geoffrey de 
Martlesham against John de Wachesham, and it was no doubt by this fine 
the manor passed from the family of Wachesham to that of Wolferston. 
Certainly about the year 1400 we find the manor vested in Thomas de 
Wolferston or Wolverston (grandson of Roger), who died seised of it in 
1428, when it passed to his son and heir, Robert Wolferston. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Hen. VI. we find a 
suit relating to the manor by this Robert Wolferston against John Frarkes, 
parson of Harkstead, feoffee.® Robert died about 1452, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Wolferston, who died in 1468, when it went 
to his widow Helena, who remarried John Penley. She died in 1478,^ when 
Richard Wolferston, son and heir of John and Helena, succeeded to the 
lordship. He married Elizabeth, daughter of George Seckford, of Seckford 
Hall, Dealings, afterwards married to Richard Jenney, of Herringfleet. 
Richard Wolferston died in 1495,^ leaving a son and heir, Thomas, married 
to Maud, daughter of Sir Humphrey Stanley, of Pipe, co. Stafford. A little 
later the manor passed to Sir Richard Brooke, who died 6th May, 1529, 
seised of it, being succeeded by his son and heir, Robert Brooke, then aged 
34.' It should be mentioned that in the loth Report of the Deputy Keeper 

VCloseRolls,6Edw.I.,i3;I.P.M.,Johnde 6E.C.P. 8 Hen. IV.; 35 Hen. VI.; 

Verdun, 6 Edw. I. 26. Bundle 16, 179. 

'I.P.M., Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, ^I.P.M., 18 Edw. IV. 9. 

brother of the King, 25 Edw. I. 51. « I.P.M., 9 and 10 Hen. VII. ; D.K.R. 10 

3 B. ro66. App. ii. p. 121, Duchy of Lane. ; 

4 1.P.M., I Edw. III. 88. I.P.M., 12 Hen. VII. 51 ; Will 

5 1.P.M., 9 Edw. II. 54. 1492. 

n.PM., 2 Edw. VI. 60. 



CULPHO. 37 

of the Public Records/ we find a reference made to the fact of the pre- 
servation of particulars of " farm of Culpho Manor " on grant to Thomas 
Wingfield in the 36th year of Hen. VIII. [1544]. 

In 1591 amongst the Calendar to Pleadings in the Duchy of Lancaster, 
we find a suit as to infringement of the Duchy liberties on land escheated on 
conviction of Nicholas Foxe for murder. The case is Attorn.-Gen. v. Finche 
and another [33 Eliz. 5],and though the Manorsof Culpho, Bury St. Edmunds, 
lUcetshall, and Bardolfs are mentioned, the Calendar does not disclose the 
connection. As to the Brooke holding there may be doubt, for in 1601 
we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Michael Hey don and others against 
Robert Wolferston.* This Robert was no doubt the grandson of Thomas 
Wolverston above mentioned, and would rather imply that the manor had 
continued in the Wolferston family until this time. If so, it would probably 
have passed from Thomas to his eldest son Philip, who married Frances 
Howard, and as he died leaving a daughter only, Mary, married to Sir John 
Killigrew, would have passed to PhiUp, 3rd brother of Thomas, and ulti- 
mately to his 4th brother Robert, who married Mary, daughter of Edmund 
With57pool, of Ipswich, and left a son Robert Wolverston, manied to 
Dorothy, sister to Anthony, Viscount Montagu. 

In 1609 Sir Michael Stanhope, Knt., held the manor. This is on the 
authority of Davy. Sir Michael Stanhope had certainly some interest here, 
for there is still a charity subsisting in the place established by him. It con- 
sists of £4. 14s. 2^d., being the proportion payable to this parish out of 
certain yearly rents amounting to £48, issuing out of the demesne lands of 
the Manor of Valence, in Blaxhall, granted to trustees in fee in the i6th year 
of the reign of King James I. 

There is a fine of the " Manor of Culpho " levied in 1357 by William 
Pottere against John de Ufford, Knt., Adam de Skakilthorp, parson of 
Causton Church, and Adam de Hautboys, parson of Cockfield Church, 
which Richard de Martlesham and Matilda his wife held for their lives. ^ 
This fine included also the Manors of Playford, Kesgrave, Tuddenham 
Magna and Parva, Blynges, and Rushmere, In 1574 we meet with a fine of 
" Wattesham Manor " levied by Sir William Cordell and others against 
Drugo Drury and others.* 

The quit rents of Culpho Manor in 1743 amounted to £4. js. 3d. per 
annum. 

Arms of Wolferston : Sable, a fesse wavy, betw. three wolves' 
heads erased Or. 

Abbots or Culpho Abbatis or C. Regis Manor. 

This was the manor of Godric, the freeman of Harold in Saxon times 
and of Roger de Poictou in Norman days. 

In 1225 it was the lordship of William de Valoines. His successor, 
William de Valoines, about 1280 gave the manor and the church of Culpho 
to Leiston Abbey, and William Verdon, who married his daughter Matilda, 
confirmed the gift. On the dissolution of the religious houses in the time of 
Hen. VIII, the manor passed to the Crown. It was granted by Hen. VIII. 
in 1536, with the possessions of the Abbey of Leiston, to Charles Bran- 

"App. ii. p. 301. ^Feet of Fines, 31-32 Edw. III. 48. 

" Fine, Hil. 43 Eliz. 'i_ * Fine, Mich. 16-17 Eliz. 



38 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

don, Duke of Suffolk, but he shortly afterwards exchanged the site of the 
abbey and the manors, rectories, and lands attached to it, with the Crown 
for Henham Hall. 

In 1540 this manor was granted by the Crown in fee to Thomas Bacon, 
of Hessett, and was then said to be of the value of ys. sd.^ The grant was 
by letters patent 32 Hen. VHL, and will be found amongst the Bodleian 
Charters.'' There is also a grant of this manor for life to Lady Anne of 
Cleves out of the Augmentation Office 1540-1.^ The same year Thomas 
Bacon obtained a licence to alienate the manor to Thomas Wolferston, sen.* 
Thomas Wolferston was probably the son of Thomas and Maud his wife, 
daughter of Sir Humphrey Stanley, mentioned in the account of the main 
manor. He did homage for Culpho in 1541, and married Philippa, daughter 
of William Homberston, of Dunwich. He had licence in 1554 to alienate the 
manor to Robert Kinge. Robert Kinge died in 1585, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Robert Kinge al. BlondevUe, who, with his wife, 
Patience, in 1606 had licence to alienate to Thomas Moswell. 

In 1660 the manor was vested in Sir William Blois, of Grundisbur^h, 
Knt., on whose death it passed to his son and heir, Sir Charles Blois, who 
was created a Bart. 15th April, 1686. From the Exchequer Depositions 
taken at Woodbridge in 1690, we learn that at that time there was pending 
an action between this Sir Charles Blois and Robert Thompson relating to 
a farm called Newhall or New Culpho, and the sale of part of the estate of 
Sir William Blois, and contract for purchase of manor, &c. Sir Charles 
Blois died 9th April, 1738, and from this time to the time of Sir John 
Blois, 5th Bart., the descent of the manor is identical with that of the Manor 
of Blythburgh, in Blything Hundred. Sir John Blois sold the manor to 
Brampton Gurdon, ol Letton, co. Norfolk, who had assumed the surname 
of Dillingham. He was High Sheriff of Norfolk in 1789, and married ist 
Mary, daughter of Philip Bedingfield, of Ditchingham, and had three sons, 
Theophilus-Thornhaugh, Thornhaugh-Philip, and Philip-Brampton. By 
his 2nd wife, Mary, daughter and coheir of Samuel Howard, he had only one 
daughter, Mary, married to William Frere, serjeant at law, and Master of 
Downing College, Cambridge. Mr. Dillingham died in 1820, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Theophilus-Thornhaugh Gurdon, of Letton, 
CO. Norfolk, and of Grundisburgh, Lieut.-Col. West Norfolk Militia and High 
Sheriff in 1824. He married Anne, daughter of William Mellish, M.P. for 
Blyth, and had issue five sons and a daughter married to the Hon. Henry 
Wodehouse, thus becoming mother of the Earl of Kimberley. His 
3rd son, William, was Recorder of Bury, and Judge of the County Court in 
Essex. 

Colonel Gurdon died in March, 1849, and his widow the following year, 
when the manor passed to his eldest son, Brampton Gurdon, sometime M.P. 
for West Norfolk, and High Sheriff in 1855. He married the Hon. Henrietta 
Susannah Ridley-Colborne, eldest daughter of Nicholas, ist Lord Colborne, 
and had issue two sons and two daughters. On the death of Brampton 
Gurdon in 188 1 the manor passed to his eldest son, Robert Thornhaugh 
Gurdon, who married ist in 1862 Frances-Haiiet (? Harriet-Ellen), 
6th daughter of Sir William Miles, ist Bart., and 2ndly in 1874 Emily' 
daughter of the Rev. Robert Boothby Heathcote, of Chingford, Essex. 

'S.P. 1540, 436(58). 3S.P. 1540-1, 1500. 

== Bodl. Suff. Ch. 153, 4 S.P. 1340, 942 (15). 



CULPHO. 39 

The manor has since passed to and is now vested in Lord Cranworth, of 
Letton Hall. 

Arms of Blois : See Blythburgh Manor, in Ely thing Hundred. Of 
GURDON : Sable, three leopards' faces jessant fleurs-de-lis, Or. 




40 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

FALKENHAM. 

I HERE were two manors here in Saxon times. One was held 
by Edric under commendation to Norman in King Edward's 
time, and at the time of the Survey was held by Turlaville 
of Roger Bigot. It consisted of a carucate of land, 6 bordars, 
I serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 2 acres of meadow, formerly 
4 rouncies but then 3, 10 hogs, and 60 sheep, valued at 30s. 
And there were 7 freemen and a half with 57 acres under 
commendation to Norman, with 3 ploughteams. The names of the 7 free- 
men were Brihtmar, Woolmer, Godwin, Ulward, Goodrich, Sweting (of 
whom Ralph was seised), and Leverich Levesson. And they had half an 
acre of meadow, and their holding was valued at los. 

Roger Bigot as tenant in chief also held here 4 freemen — Leverich, 
Suneman, Manson, and Leofstan (under Norman by half their commenda- 
tion, and the other moiety belonged to Ralph de Turlaville), with 30 acres and 
a bordar, and 2 ploughteams, and an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. The 
place was half a league long and 4 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 

The other manor had in the time of the Confessor been held by Brismer, 
and at the time of the Survey was held by Ranulf, brother of Ilger. It con- 
sisted of 26 acres, and had attached in Saxon times i ploughteam, i rouncy, 
4 beasts, 40 sheep ; but these had apparently disappeared by the time of 
the Survey, when the value was 5s., as against the earlier valuation of los. 
The Domesday Survey here adds some statements not particularly lucid. 
" This Brictmar had several lands, and some part was delivered on the King's 
behalf to Ingelric ; and other parts to Ranulf, Ilger' s brother, and a third 
part to Ralph Pinel ; and in this third part was this aforesaid land delivered 
to Ralph as he himself says, and the said (?) gives this testimony that he 
was seised at the first ; but whether on behalf of the King or not he was 
seised that they ignore ; and say also that Ranulf claims this land against 
Ralph ; and Roger the Sheriff named to them a set term, that they should 
both be present— Ranulf appearing, Ralph was absent ; and therefore the 
men of the Hundred adjudged that Ranulf was seised, who now holds. But 
Ralph Pinel denies this, because he was not summoned for that plea.'" 

Manor of Falkenham or Falkenham Dodnash. 

This was the manor of Edric in Saxon days, and of Ralph de Turlaville 
holding of Roger Bigot in Norman times. The manor was vested in the 
Priory of Dodnash at an early date, and in 1327 the priory had a grant of 
free warren here.^ With the priory the manor remained until the Dissolu- 
tion, when it passed to the Crown, and was granted by Hen. VIII. in 1525 
to Cardinal Wolsey,"* for the endowment of the College in Ipswich. A fine was 
in 1526 levied of the manor by the Dean and Canons of Christ Church College 
in Oxford against Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and others.' On the Cardinal's 
disgrace the manor again came to the Crown, and an account of arrears due 
to the King from land of the suppressed monastery of Falkenham, as it is 
called, will be found amongst the State Papers in 1532.' The manor was in 
1531 granted to Thomas Alverde, who died in 1534. It seems again to 
have vested in the Crown and been granted to the Duke of Norfolk, for in 

'Dom, ii. 339, 3406, 341. ♦S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1833. 

*Dom. ii. 4236, 424. 'Fine, Mich. 18 Hen. VIII. 

3 Chart. RoUs, i Edw. III. 11. es.P. 24 Hen. VIII. 1359. 



FALKENHAM. 41 

1544 we find the manor with divers others in the county given in exchange 
for the castle, manor, and chase of Rysing, in Norfolk, to King Hen. VIII. 
by Thomas Howard, the then Duke, and his son, Henry, Earl of Arundel 
and Surrey. 

On the opening of the seventeenth century we find the manor vested in 
Uriah Babington, who died seised of it in 1605, when it passed to his son 
and heir, Uriah, and in 1609 went to his (Uriah's) widow Anne. 

In 1658 we find amongst the Exchequer Depositicns one taken at 
Ipswich in a suit concerning the Manor of Dodnash, and the tithes between 
Edmond Prideaux, plaintiflf, and Clement Toakeley and another, defen- 
dants ; and the following year a like deposition in a suit between Robert 
Holmes, plaintiff, and William Burton and others, defendants. 

In 1662 the manor was vested in Martha Goodwin, widow, and in 1764 
in Jonathan Barwood. Later, m 1842, we find the lordship vested in 
Richard Norton Cartwright, of Ixworth Abbey. 

The customs of this manor were involved in a suit in 1589 respecting 
copyhold lands then lately belonging to Robert Watson and Margaret his 
wife, in a suit between William Symonds and another, and John Thurston.' 

Russell's Manor. 

This was the inheritane of Brichmar in Saxon times, and of Ralph, 
brother of Ilger, in Norman days. 

In the time of Hen. I. it was held by Sir Robert de Sackville, Knt., of 
the Honor of Eye. His descendants were seated at Buckhurst, in Sussex, 
and were ancestors of the Dukes of Dorset and Middlesex. 

In the time of Hen. VI. the manor was vested in John Russell, of Chels- 
ford, who died in 1427, when it passed to his son and heir, Richard Russell, 
from whom it passed to his son and heir, William Russell.'' This manor was 
held of the Manor of Walton-cum-Trimley. 

In the next century we find the lordship vested in William Waller, of 
Ipswich, who died 8th April, 1535,^ when it passed to his son and heir, 
William Waller," who died ist November, 1547, when the manor went to 
his son and heir, William Waller.' 

We meet with two fines of this manor in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 
The first was levied in 1567 by John Bales against Roger Petytt and others f 
and the second in 1570 by Thomas Lambe against William Clavell and 
others.' 

We next find the manor in Thomas Pratt, for amongst the Exchequer 
Special Commissions in 1594 is a survey of this manor, said to be " parcel of 
the possessions of Thomas Pratt, collector of the Customs in Ipswich."' 
It must then, or within the next three years, have gone to the Crown, for 
in 1597 we meet in the State Papers with a grant of the manor in perpetuity 
to Robert Barker, of Ipswich. The value of the manor was then stated to be 
£29. IS. d^d.^ The Survey Book or Extent of Russell's Manor in 1607 will 
be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum." Robert 
Barker, then Sir Robert, Knt., died in 1618, when the manor passed to his 

' Exch. Dep. at Woodbridge. s I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 152. 

^Half a fee in Falkenham for William s Fine, Easter, 9 Eliz. 

Russel, John, Duke of Norfolk ; 7 Fine, Hil. 12 Eliz. 

I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 43. ^36 Eliz. D.K.R., 38 App. p. 51. 

'I.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 25. sS.P. 1597, p. 427. 

4 Davy makes him son of Richard Waller. " Add. 21042. 

See Peyton Hall Manor, Ramsholt, 

in Wilford Hundred. 



42 THE^ MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

son and heir, Sir John Barker, of Trimley, created a Bart. From Sir John 
Barker, ist Bart., this manor desqended in the same course as the Manor 
of Offton Monks, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred, the descent of which 
has been already given, to the 7th Bart, Sir John Fytch Barker. He died 
in 1766, and left his estate to George Nassau, who died in 1823, devising this 
manor to William Henry, Earl of Rochford, his brother, who, dying in 1830, 
left it to Alexander, loth Duke of Hamilton. 

The manor was later acquired by Colonel George Tomline, from whom 
it has descended in the same course as the Manor of Bacton, in Hartismere 
Hundred, to and is now vested in the Right Hon. Captain E. G. Pretyman, 
D.L., of Orwell Park. 

Arms of Russell : Arg. a chevron betw. 3 cross-crosslets fitchee, Sa. 



FELIXSTOW. 



43 




FELIXSTOW MANOR. 

OGER Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, had 117 lordships in 
Suffolk, oi the gift of William the Conqueror, and upon one 
of them he founded the Priory of Felixstow, and endowed 
it with the Manor of Felixstow Priory, with the churches 
of Walton and Felixstow, and with the tithe and other 
appurtenances in Walton. About the year 1105 the founder 
gave it as a cell to the monastery of St, Andrew at 
Rochester, and the monks here were called monks of Rochester. The 
gift was confirmed by William Rufus. Until the Dissolution this manor 
belonged to the Priory of Felixstow, when it passed to the Crown, and 
was in 1528 granted by Hen. VIII. to Cardinal Wolsey. On his disgrace 
the Crown granted the manor in 1530 to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, who, 
with his son Henry in 1544 exchanged it with the King for the Castle of 
Rysing and other property. 

In 1576 Queen Elizabeth granted the manor to Thomas Seckford. 
Later it probably passed with the Manor of Walton to the Barkers as Offton 
Monks, and as Grimston Hall, in Trimley St, Martin, in this Hundred. 




FOXHALL. 

|HE Domesday Survey contains but one holding under Foxhall, 
namely, 15 acres valued at 2s., held by the Abbot of Ely.' 

There is, however, another under the head " Deme- 
ford," which is, no doubt, Darnford, in Foxhall. This was 
of 80 acres and 2 acres of meadow, 3 bordars in Saxon times, 
having 4 ploughteams, when it was valued at 40s., but at the 
time of the Survey 3 ploughteams only, when it was valued 
at 15s. In the Confessor's time this property was held by 11 freemen under 
commendation to Durrant, who was half Edric's man and half Harold's, 
and at the time of the Survey it was held by Hervey of Bourges as tenant in 
chief.^ 

There are also six other entries in the Survey, under " Ingoluestruna " 
and " Isleuestuna," which evidently belong to Ingulveston or Iselton in 
Foxhall. Two of them were in the chief holding of the Abbot of Ely, one being 
a freeman having 16 acres of land and half an acre of meadow, with half a 
ploughteam valued at 3s., which Robert Malet held of the abbot, and the 
other being a freewoman under commendation to the abbot, having 30 
acres, to which were formerly attached a ploughteam, but at the time of 
the Survey only half a team and 2 bordars, 4 acres of meadow, and a 
freeman with 10 acres, valued at 45.^ Two other holdings were amongst 
the lands of Geoffrey de Magnaville, and consisted of Goodrich, a freeman 
under commendation half to Halden and half to the abbot* having 20 acres 
of land and 2 of meadow, valued at 2s. ; and Halden a socman holding 15 
acres and i bordar, to which holding was formerly attached a ploughteam, 
but at the time of the Survey i ox only; also i acre of meadow, the whole 
valued at 2s.* 

Hervey of Bourges had two other holdings in Ingulveston, in Foxhall. 
One was of a carucate and 4 acres of land, held in the Confessor's time by 
13 freemen under commendation to Durrant, but at the time of the Survey 



'Dom. ii. 386J. 
'Dom. ii. 4426. 



^Dom. ii. 3866. 
''Dom. ii, 413. 



44 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by 6 freemen. In Saxon times there had been 5 ploughteams, but they 
had come down to i. There were 5 acres of meadow, and the whole was 
valued at los. 

The other holding was of one freeman under commendation to the said 
Durrant, holding 12 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 40^. " It/' 
says the Survey, but " it " must refer to the township, and not to these 
two small holdings, "is 6 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and pays in a gelt 
y^d." This Peter de Paludel held of Hervey of Bourges.' 

Under the lands of Hugh de Montford we meet with an entry in the 
Survey of " Isleuertona," which is no doubt the same as the place above 
referred to. Hugh held here 4 freemen under commendation to Goodmund 
with 18 acres and i acre of meadow, formerly 2 ploughteams, but at the 
time of the Survey i only, valued at £4. los., over all of which land the 
Abbot of Ely had soc' 

Foxhall was formerly a distinct parish, but is now a hamlet to Bright- 
well. 

FoxHALL al. Caswell's Manor. 

Before the time of Edw. I. there were three manors here — the Manor of 
Foxhall al. Caswell's, Foxhall Manor, and Felton's Manor. 

Foxhall or Caswell's belonged, in the time of Hen. III., to the Holbroke 
family, and William de Holbroke in that reign held the lordship, which on 
his death passed to his son and heir, Richard de Holbroke, who had a grant 
of free warren here in 1267.^ From this time to the time of John Fastolf, 
who died 6th Dec. 1506, the manor passed in the same course of devolution 
as the manor of Brokes Hall, in Nacton, in this Hundred. The manor is 
specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Sir Thomas Holbroke,* 
John de Holbroke,^ Hugh Fastolfe,^ Sir Hugh Fastolf,' and Sir John 
Fastolfe,' and is included in a fine levied in 1336 by Sir Thomas de 
" Holebrok "and Margaret his wife against William le Neweman, parson of 
Tattingstone Church, and Nicholas Bonde.^ 

We next find the manor vested in the Wingfield family, and Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, Bart., died seised of it in 1628, when it passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Rich. Wingfield, Bart., who sold it to Thos. Essington, who held 
his first court in 1653. His son and heir, John Essington, sold the manor to 
Sir Sam. Barnardiston, 3rd son of Sir Nathaniel, who held his first court here 
in 1664 ; and from this time it has passed in the same course as the Manoi of 
Brightwell, in this Hundred, and is now vested in the Right Hon. Captain 
E. G. Pretyman, D.L., of Orwell Park. 

The manor was offered for sale 26th Aug. 1812, when the property of 
Sir John Gregory Shaw, Bart. It was described then as " a valuable 
freehold estate situate in Foxhall and Brightwell, comprising the Manor of 
Cassolis, in Foxhall, abounding with game." The quit rents were stated to 
be £2. 3s. 2^d. per annum, and the fines to have amounted in 1811 
to ^11. 5s. 3d. It is stated to have been bought by Sir Robert Harland, but 
this does not seem to have been the case. 

'Dom. ii. 4426. 5 1. P.M., 50 Edw. III. 31. 

^Dom. ii. 406. 6I.P.M., 7 Hen. IV. 34. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 57 Hen. III. 5. ^l.p.M., 5 Hen. V. 49. 

*I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 75; see I.P.M., n.P.M., 26 Hen. VI. 15. 

7 Hen. VI. 58. 9 Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. III., 28. 



FOXHALL. 45 

FoxHALL Manor. 

This manor was given by Hugh de Dernford in the time of Hen. II, 
to the prior and convent of the Holy Trinity, Ipswich, where it remained 
until the Dissolution. 

The priory had a grant of free warren here in 1333.' 

It was granted by the Crown in 1544 to Sir Thomas Pope, Knt., who the 
following year had licence to alienate to Sir John Jermy. Pope first 
granted a lease of the manor, with the Manors of Codenham, Greeting, 
and Stonham, to Sir John Jermy in 1545, for the lease is still preserved 
amongst the Charters in the Bodleian.^ Sir John died in Nov. 1560, 
when the manor passed like the Manor of Metfield, in Mendham, Hoxne 
Hundred, to his son and heir, Francis Jermy, on whose death in 1611 
it vested in his son and heir. Sir Thomas Jermy.^ 

Felton's Manor. 

We learn nothing respecting this manor, save that in 1803 it was the 
lordship of the Rev. John Cartwright. 



' Chart. Rolls, 7 Edw. III. 38. 3 See Wicks Bishop, Ipswich. 

« Bodl. Suft. Ch. 1302. 




46 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

GRUNDISBURGH. 

^N Saxon times there were four manors in this place. One 
was held by Algar, a freeman under the Abbot of Ely. It 
consisted of i carucate and 30 acres^ 2 villeins, and 5 bordars, 

2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the tenants, 
4 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 6 beasts, 16 hogs, 70 sheep, and 

3 hives of bees. The valuation in Saxon times was 205., but 
at the time of the Survey the value was double. It was at 

thelatter period held by Heivey de Berri of the Abbot of Ely. The extent 
was 10 quarentenes in length and 6 in breadth, and it paid in a gelt i^d. 
There were also here held by the abbot 7 acres which had been held in the 
Confessor's time by 3 men under half commendation to Algar, valued at 

I2i.' 

A second manor had been held in the Confessor's time by Goodrich, a 
freeman under Harold. It consisted of i carucate of land, and had i 
villein, 4 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the tenants, 
and 3 acres of meadow, valued at i6s. 

The Domesday tenant in chief of this manor was Hervey de Bourges, 
who also held here 3 half freemen, Godwin, Ulwin, and Leuric, under com- 
mendation to Harold, having 7 acres, formerly with half a ploughteam, and 
valued at 2s., but at the time of the Survey, when the half ploughteam had 
disappeared, valued at izd. 

Hervey also held in demesne 2 freemen Burric and Ailric, under com- 
mendation to Aschil, the house-carl in the Confessor's time, holding 5 
acres, formerly with half a ploughteam, but at the time of the Survey none, 
the value being lod. ; and also in demesne Brown, a freeman under commen- 
dation to Edric, predecessor of Robert Malet, holding 20 acres, (and these 
20 acres he held of Edric), formerly having i ploughteam, but by the time 
of the Survey half a team. There were also 2 acres and a half of meadow. 
The total value of this last was in Saxon times 5s., but at the time of the 
Survey 45." 

The third manor was held in the time of the Confessor by a freeman of 
Harold's by commendation, and his wife under commendation to Haldene, 
having 60 acres which at the time of the Survey 4 freemen held. There was 
one villein, and there were 2 bordars, i ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at los. The Domesday tenant was Earl Hugh.^ 

The fourth manor was that of Roger de Poictou, who had 60 acres, 
formerly held by a freeman, Brihtnoth, under the Abbot of Ely, with 3 
bordars. Formerly attached to the manor was a ploughteam in demesne 
and half a team belonging to the tenants, with i acre of meadow. By 
the time of the Survey the ploughteam in demesne had disappeared. The 
value of this holding was 15s. 

Roger de Poictou also had four other holdings in Grundisburgh. The 
first was of 20 acres, formerly held by 7 freemen under commendation to the 
Abbot of Ely, with i ploughteam, valued at 4s. By the time of the Survey 
there was but half a team, but the value had increased to 5s. The second 
was a freeman, Siric, King Edward's man, having i acre and a freeman 
under commendation to Brichtric, having 4 acres ; and 2 freemen, Aluric 
and Brihtman, under commendation to Ailric de Burgh, having 14 acres, 
formerly having among them i ploughteam, but at the time of the Survey 

^Dom. ii. 386. ^Dom. ii. 300. 

"Dom. ii. 4416. 



GRUNDISBURGH. 47 

none, the value being ros. The third was 2 freemen, one under commenda- 
tion to the Abbot of Ely and the other under commendation to Halden, 
with 60 acres and 6 bordars, 2 ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, formerly 
valued at 12s., but at the time of the Survey at los. The fourth was of 40 
acres, i bordar, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, formerly valued at 
los., but at the time of the Survey at 8s., which in the Confessor's time had 
been held by a freeman under the Abbot of Ely, but was at the time of the 
Survey held by Roger of Roger de Poictou.' 

There were three other small holdings here. One of Robert Malet, 
holding 2 socmen under commendation to Edric, with 5 acres and half a 
ploughteam, valued at i2d., which at the time of the Survey was held by 
Humfrey, son of Robert, of Robert Malet.^ 

A second was amongst the lands of Geoffrey de Magnaville, and consisted 
of 26 acres, a ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, valued at 4s., held 
in the Confessor's time by 4 freemen under commendation to Halden, and 
8 acres and half an acre of meadow, valued at i6i., formerly held by Almar, 
a freeman under commendation to Ailric de Burgh. ^ And amongst the 
lands of Roger de Rheims were 20 acres held by Ralph, and belonging 
to Newton and to its valuation.'^ 

GRUNDISBURGH HALL MaNOR. I 

This was vested in Sir Hugh Peche, Knt., in 1270. 

He claimed a market and fair, and free warren here in 1285.^ On his 
death in 1292^ the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Hugh Peche, who 
died about 1310,'' when it went to his sister and heir, Eva, who married 
Sir Robert de Tuddenham, and from this time to the time of Sir Edmund 
Bedingfield in 1528 the devolution of the manor is the same as that of Great 
Bealings, in this Hundred. 

The last-mentioned Sir Edmund Bedingfield evidently disposed of the 
manor, for amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen EHzabeth 
we find an action by Thomas Pells and Francis Pells to complete a sale of 
this manor made by Edmund Bedingfield, deceased, to the plaintiffs and 
others.^ 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Eva 
Tuddenham, who died in 1311,^ also of Sir Robert Tuddenham, who died in 
1337/° Sir Robert Tuddenham," Sir John Tuddenham," Margery Tudden- 
ham,'^ Sir Thomas Tuddenham,'* Margaret Bedingfield,'' and Sir Thomas 
Bedingfield.'^ 

In 1591 a fine was levied of the manor by John Pells against Anthony 
Gosnold and others,'^ and in 1609 the lordship was held by Robert Gosnold. 
In 1688 it had passed to Sir William Blois, Knt., the son of WiUiam Blois, 
by Frances, daughter of John Tye, of Ipswich, which William Blois died 
loth Jan. 1621, and was the son of William Blois and Alice his wifey daughter 
of William Nottingham, which last-mentioned William Blois died in 1607, 
and was the son of Richard Blois, who died in 1559, by Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter of Roger Hill, of Needham. 

' Dom. ii. 346. '° II Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) no. 

^Dom. ii. 3156. "SHen. V. 42. 

^ Dom. ii. 412&. " 10 Hen. V. 266. 

*Dom. ii. 4236. '3 10 Hen. V. 38. 

5 Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. I. 126. '* 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

n.P.M., 20 Edw. I. 37. '5 15 Edw. IV. 38. 

' I.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 31. '6 31 Hen. VIII. 5. 

8 C.P. ii. 305. '7 Fine, Easter, 33 Eliz. 

9 5 Edw. II. 43. 



48 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



The Blois family had resided at Grundisburgh Hall in the time of 
Hen. VII., and were of French extraction, having come into England, it is 
said, at the Conquest. An Ernald le Bloy was one of Aubrey de Vere's 
knights in the time of Hen. II., and we meet with the family in the 
times of Hen. III. and Edw. I. in Essex. William le Bloy held in 1254 
some of the knights' fees which his ancestor Emald had held under the 
de Veres, and Adam Bloy was sheriff, with William Bared, of Essex and 
Hertfordshire in 1334. The earliest mention of the family in Suffolk is 
in 1470, when we find a branch of the family at Norton. 

Thomas Blois, who lived there in 1470, was the father of Thomas 
Blois, whose son, Thomas married Margaret, daughter of William Styles, of 
Ipswich, and died in 1528. He was the father of the Richard Blois, of 
Grundisburgh, who died in 1559, above mentioned. 

William Blois, who held the manor in 1668, was one of the ten members 
of Parliament elected for Suffolk in 1654 and 1658. He married Cecily, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Wingfield, of Letheringham, Knt.,' and died in 
1673, when the manor passed to his 4th, but eldest surviving son, Sir William 
Blois, Knt., who married ist Martha, daughter of Sir Robert Brooke, of 
Cockfield Hall, in Yoxford, and 2ndly, Jane, daughter of Sir Nathaniel 
Barnardiston, of Ketton, Knt., widow of John Brooke, eldest son of Sir 
Robert Brooke. Sir William Blois died in 1675, and from this time to the 
time of Sir John Blois, 5th Bart., the manor devolved in the same course 
as the Manor of Blythburgh, in Blything Hundred. 

Sir John Blois, 5th Bart., sold this manor to Brampton Gurdon, of 
Letton, who assumed the surname of Dillingham, and died in 1820, from 
which time the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Abbot's, in Culpho, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Lord Cranworth, 
of Letton Hall. 

Courts were held for this manor 27th July, 1741, 14th Oct. 1763, 3rd 
Feb. 1766 ; by Brampton Gurdon Dillingham 17th Nov. 1812 ; and by 
Theophilus Thornhagh Dillingham Gurdon, 27th June, 183 1. 

Arms of Blois : See Blythburgh Manor, in Blything Hundred. 

Arms of Gurdon : See Culpho Manor, in this Hundred. 



' An inscription in Grundisburgh Church, 
adds : " by Dame Elizabeth his 
wife.the daughter of Sir Dru Drury, 
Kt., which Sir Thos. was the son 
of Sir Robt, Wingfield, Knt., by 
Dame Cecily his wife, the daughter 



of Thos., Lord Wentworth, which 
Sir Robt. was the son of Sir 
Anthony Wingfield, K.G., by Dame 
Elizabeth his wife, the sister and 
coheir of John, Earl of Oxford." 




HASKETON. 49 

HASKETON. 

MANOR was held here in the Confessor's time by Alwin, a 
freeman under the Abbot of Ely. It consisted of 40 acres, 
I ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, formerly valued at los., 
but at the time of the Survey fixed at 6s. This Alwin cculd 
neither sell nor give his land away from the Church of Ely. 
The Domesday tenant in chief was Roger de Poictou. 
Roger de Poictou also held 7 freemen under commendation 
to the Abbot of Ely, with 16 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 3s. 
He held besides 2 freemen under half commendation to Edric, the pre- 
decessor of Robert Malet, and one freeman under commendation to one 
who was himself under commendation to Edric, and one under commendation 
to Brown. These freemen had 12 acres valued at 2s. 

Roger de Poictou had also in Hasketon three other smaller holdings. One 
was a freeman under commendation to the Abbot of Ely, having 9I acres, 
and half an acre of meadow, valued at 2s. The Survey said, " It was 6 
quarentenes long and 4 broad," which it is presumed must refer to the town- 
ship. The last-mentioned property was held by Roger, son of Ernolf, and 
paid in a gelt /\d. The second of these smaller holdings was in the time of the 
Confessor held by 2 freemen, one under commendation to the Abbot of 
Ely, and the other under commendation to Lustwin, and consisted of 13 
acres, valued at 2s. 

The third consisted of 25 acres and half an acre of meadow, i bordar, 
and I ploughteam, valued at 5s., which had been held in the time of the 
Confessor by 7 and a half freemen under commendation to Edwold, and 
one and a half of these were under commendation to Grimolf . At the time 
of the Survey the value was 4s.' 

Amongst the possessions of Robert Malet we find three entries in the 
Great Survey. One had been held in the Confessor's time by a freeman, 
Lustwin, under commendation to Edric and his wife, under commendation 
to Halden. It consisted of 40 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 8s., of 
which holding the Abbot of Ely had the soc. 

The second had been held by 2 freemen under commendation to Edric 
and consisted of 17 acres, but the dwellings of the freemen were in another 
Hundred. The value was 3s. The third of these holdings consisted of a 
freeman under Edric having 5 acres valued at xzd.'' The Abbot of Ely 
also held here 22 acres, valued at 4s.' The only other entry in the Survey 
of lands held here was of 22 acres, i ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, 
valued at 3s., which in the time of the Confessor had been held by 3 half 
freemen and i full freeman under commendation to Halden, and which at 
the time of the Survey was held by Geoffrey de Magnaville as tenant in 
chief.* 

Under the head Aluredestuna, which is probably Hasketon, we find in 
the Survey a considerable estate held by Ivo as a manor of Ranulf, brother 
of Ilger, the tenant in chief. It had in the Confessor's time been held by 
Durrant, a freeman, who was Robert Malet's predecessor. 

The manor consisted of i carucate and 80 acres, 7 villeins, 3 bordars, 

2 ploughteams (reduced to i by the time of the Survey) in demesne, and 

3 belonging to the tenants, 4 acres of meadow, i mill, 3 beasts, and 50 sheep. 
Also a church with 12 acres valued at X2d. The value of this manor was in 

'Dom. ii. 3466, 347. 'Dom. ii. 386. 

*Dom. ii. 315, 3156. *Dom. ii. 413. 



50 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Saxon times £4, but in Norman days 60s. The length was 6 quarentenes, 
the breadth 4, and it paid in a gelt 10^.' 

Hasketon Hall Manor. 

This was the Manor of Alwin^ a freeman under the Abbot of Ely in 
Saxon times, and of Roger de Poictou in the time of the Conqueror. By the 
end of the Conqueror's reign, the manor was held by Emald Rufus, son of 
Roger, and in 1201 by Ernald le Rus, his grandson, who was succeeded by 
his son and heir, Hugh le Rus, to whom Hen. HI. in 1227 granted a weekly 
market in Stradbroke, and at Stinton, in Norfolk, on Friday, and one at 
Wodebridge on Wednesday.' He was one of the collectors of the fifteenths in 
Norfolk in 1226, and was succeeded by his son and heir, WiUiam Le Rus, 
for he died seised of this manor and of the Manors of Stradbroke and Clopton 
in 1253,^ when Alice, his daughter and heir, was aged 6 years at Christmas, 

There is another inquisition in 1260 of this William, when his heir is 
stated to be his daughter Alice, then aged 14 or 15.* AHce married Sir 
Richard de Brewse, Knt., 2nd son of Sir William de Brewse and Maud his 
wife. 

In 1268 we find this Sir Richard de Brewse suing one Odo de Sincleberg, 
Ralph de Chapelyn, and others, for trespassing on his manor here.' In the 
same year we find him described as Richard de " Brewode," suing Richard, 
son of Theobald, Robert Atherwald, and others, for trespass on the manor.^ 
This Richard and Alice in 1268 granted to the priory of Woodbridge 10 
marks per annum to find a canon to celebrate for ever in the priory church 
for their souls ; and in 1272 William de Brewse granted by fine to the said 
Richard and Alice the manor and advowson of Akenham, with those of 
Claydon and Hemingston, in exchange for the Manor of Bromley, in Surrey, 
and others. 

It is said that in 1272 Maud, wife of John Giffard, had the manor for 
life ; if so, she may have been the widow of William Le Rus, Alice's 
father remarried. Sir Richard de Brewse died in 1296 or 1297, and Alice 
in 1300 or 1301, when the manor vested in her son and heir, Sir Giles de 
Brewse, Knt. He was lord also of Akenham, Clopton and Stradbroke, 
and married Catherine, daughter of Sir Laurence de Huntingfield, by whom 
he had no issue, but by a second marriage he had three sons. Sir Giles de 
Brewse died in 1310,^ when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir 
Richard, who, being then but 9 years of age, came into the wardship of 
Edward Bacon. 

Sir Richard Brewse married Eleanor, eldest daughter of Sir John 
Shelton, by whom he had two daughters. He died in 1323, and was buried 
at Woodbridge Priory. The manor passed to his brother. Sir Robert de 
Brewse. 

Sir Robert de Brewse died in 1325^ without issue, when the manor 
passed to his brother and heir, Sir John de Brewse, married to Agnes, daughter 
of Sir Robert Ufford. On his death the manor vested in his son and heir, 
Sir John de Brewse, who married Joan, daughter of Sir John Shardelowe, 

' Dom. ii. 425. ^ Abb. of PI. 52 Hen. III. Mich. 8, in dor so ; 
" Close Rolls, 9 Hen. HI. pt. ii. i ; 10 52 Hen. HI. Pleas, Innocents Day, 

Hen. III. 29; II Hen. III. 8; 10. 

Chart Rolls, 11 Hen. III. pt. ii. 9. « Abb. of PI. 51 and 52 Hen. III., 12 ; 52 
3 1.P.M., 37 Hen. III. file 14 (17). Hen. III. East 13. 

♦I.P.M., 44 Hen. III., file 23 (17). f I.P.M., 4 Edw. II. 40. 

8 1.P.M., 19 Edw. II. 95. 



HASKETON. 51 

and on his death in 1403 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert de 
Brewse,' who married Ela, daughter of Sir Miles Stapleton, of Ingham, co. 
Norfolk, Knt., and died in 1456, when the manor passed to their son and 
heir, Sir Thomas Brewse. 

He married ist Mary, daughter of Sir John Calthorp, of Burnham, in 
Norfolk, Knt., and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Gilbert Debenham, 
and sister and heir of Sir Gilbert Debenham, of Little Wenham, Knt., 
and in 1456 levied a fine of the manor with Elizabeth, his 2nd wife, against 
Thomas Gardiner, chaplain,' no doubt on the occasion of some settlement. 
Sir Thomas Brewse was High Sheriff of Norfolk in 1438, and of Suffolk in 
1442, and died 17th June, 1482. His will is dated loth July, 1479, and 
it was proved at Norwich 27th April, 1483.^ 

On Sir Thomas's death the manor devolved on his son and heir,William 
Brewse, of Topcroft, who married ist Elizabeth, daughter of John Hopton, 
of Blythburgh, and 2ndly Eleanor, daughter and coheir of Robert Bernard, 
of Starston, co. Norfolk, who married subsequently Christopher Calthorpe, 
of Calthorpe, co. Norfolk. William Brewse died 29th Oct. 1489," when the 
manor passed to his eldest daughter and coheir, Thomasine, married to Sir 
Thomas Hansard, of Ludborough, co. Lincoln, and afterwards of Whitting- 
ham, CO. Suffolk, who was knighted at the Battle of Stoke, 9th June, 1487. 
Thomasine died 20th July, 1496,' when the manor passed to her son and 
heir, Arthur Hansard, on whose death in 15 16 it vested in his son and heir, 
Giles Hansard, on whose death in 153 1 it passed to his daughter and heir, 
Katherine, married to Thomas Rous. A fine was in 1556 levied by John 
Marter against the said Thomas Rous and others.* Katherine Rous died 
without issue in 1558, when the manor passed to her cousin Erosild, daughter 
and heir of William Bower, son and heir of William Bower, and of Dorothy- 
his wife, sister of Giles, the father of Katherine. 

On the opening of the 17th century, the manor was vested in Sii 
Thomas Baker, Knt., who died in 1625, and in 1636 it was vested in Robert 
Naunton, who, 25th April this year held his first court. In 1648 the manor 
had passed to Robert Marryott, son of William, who, 30th March that year, 
held his first court. ' He married ist Frances, daughter and coheir of 
Laurence . Petts, of Kettlebui^h, and 2ndly Margaret. By his ist wife 
he had a daughter only, but by his second a son Robert, who, before 1645, 
succeeded his father in the lordship. The son, Robert Marryott, married 
22nd April, 1658, ist Dorothy, daughter of Stephen Keeble, of Wood- 
bridge, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of James Wythe, of Framsden. Robert 
Marryott died 20th Jan. 1675, when the manor passed to his daughter and 
coheir, Margaret, and a first court was held 25th April, 1676, by John Brame 
and WilHam Hainond, executors of Robert Marryott' s will and guardian 
of Margaret. She married Robert Barker, of Great Bealings, son of Sir John 
Barker, of Trimley, Bart., who held his first court, 7th Nov. 1682, in right 
of his wife. In 1725 the manor was vested in William Churchill, of Wood- 
bridge, who held courts Feb. 1725, 26th Jan. 1736, and 9th June, 1736, 
and by his will, dated 20th April, 1735, devised the manor to his nephew, 
William Castle, who held his first court for the manor 19th May, 1737, 
and subsequently courts ist Aug. 1738, 8th Sept. 1750, 19th April, 175 1, 
and i8th Sept. 1758. 

' See Manor of Vaux, Great Wenham, in + I.P.M., 6 Hen. VII. i6th Oct. 

Samford Hundred. ' I.P.M., 5 Nov. 15 Hen. VII. 

^Feet of Fines, 34 Hen. VI. 14. *Fine, Hil. 3 Mary I. 
3 1.P.M., 22 Edw. IV. 3rd Oct. 



52 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

From William Castle the manor passed to his son and heir, William 
Castle, who died in 1770, when it passed to his widow Katherine (who held 
a court 9th May, 1770), and subsequently to his daughter and heir Katherine, 
married to Edward Bouverie, who, with her, held a court loth April, 1788. 
In or about 1797, John Aldis purchased the manor, and held a court 20th 
April of that year. He, by will dated nth June, 1807, devised the manor 
to his son and heir, John Thomas Aldis, who was about 10 years 
old at his father's death. The manor was shortly afterwards sold to Wilham 
Rouse, of Hasketon, for £1,550. He died in 1830, when the manor passed 
to his widow, Mary Ann Rouse (daughter of W. Miller.) She died in 1834, 
when the manor vested in her son, Rolla Rouse, of Fernhill, J .P. and D.L. 

He was a well-known conveyancer and writer, and married Elizabeth 
Jane, eldest daughter of Rev. Philip Meadows, rector of Great Beahngs, 
and died 2nd June, 1887, when the manor passed to his sons Rolla Charles 
Meadows Rouse, John William Rouse, Frederick Sidney Rouse, George 
Henry Rouse, and Edward Broughton Rouse. The eldest son Rolla C. M. 
Rouse, of Woodbridge, i6th July, 1856, married Mary, only daughter 
of J. Kirkman, M.D. 

The grant of an annuity from the manor in 1335 will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum,' and a lease of the manor 
in 1482 will be found amongst the Stowe Charters, also in the British 
Museum." Extracts from the Court Rolls of the manor in 1646 will be 
found amongst the British Museum Additional Charters.^ 

Hasketon Manor House is a large mansion of white brick, standing on 
high ground, and belongs to the trustees of the late Colonel T. W. Haines, 
who died in 1895. It is at present the residence of Frank Eugene Pattison, 
Esq. The " site of the manor " and 6a. 2r. op. seems to have been dealt 
with as copyhold, and was enfranchised by Devereux Edgar, when William 
Churchill was lord, by deed 24th March, 1728, and Hasketon Hall no doubt 
belonged to the Edgars for some generations, and is specifically devised 
by the will of Devereux Edgar, 9th April, 1739, to his son, Devereux Edgar, 
and by deed dated i6th Feb. 1741, it was sold to Francis Brooke, of Wester- 
field, for £/[,$yo. The manor extended into the parishes of Hasketon, 
Woodbridge, Malton, Burgh, Boulge, Bromswell, " Petristill," Martlesham, 
Bredfield, Lowdham, and Eyke, and in the year 1754 there were 88 tenants, 
and the amount of quit and free rents was £12. os. o^d. In the year 
1797 there were 60 copyhold and 10 free tenants. The customs were that 
the youngest son was heir, dower one third, and the husband had curtesy. 
Thorpe Hall Manor paid a free rent of 3s. 4^. to this manor. 

Arms of Rouse : Sa. two bars engrailed arg. 

Thorpe Hall Manor. 

This appears in the Domesday Survey under the head Thorpe, and 
was held by Halden, a freeman in the Confessor's time, with 3 carucates of 
land. There were 4 villeins, 14 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and 2 belonging to the tenants, 7 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 7 beasts, 12 
hogs, and 100 sheep, valued at 20s. It was 8 quarentenes long and 6 broad, 
and paid in a gelt i^d. At the time of the Survey the value of the manor had 
doubled, and there were some variations in the details of the holding. 
There was then but i serf, and but i ploughteam belonging to the tenants. 
The Domesday tenant in chief was Geoffrey de Magnaville."* 

'Add. Ch. 22577, 22578, 3 Add Ch. 1025, 

^ Stowe Ch. 233. '*Dom. ii. 4126. 



HASKETON. 53 

We find three other entries in the Survey, under Colneis Hundred, of 
Thorpe, which may refer to this place. Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, held 
10 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 40^., which had been held by a 
freeman named Brumer, Robert Malet's predecessor under commendation, 
when it was valued at 2s. 8d.' Roger Bigot had here two holdings,one being 
held of him by Hugh de Hosden, who had 5 freemen, Ulric, Almar, Ulrich, 
Alrich, and Kettle (formerly under commendation to Norman), with 82 
acres, 2 ploughteams, and an acre of meadow, valued at 20s., paying in a 
gelt 5d. The Survey says, " It," but what is not clear, " is 4 quarentenes 
long and 2 broad." The other holding was that of William of the Forest of 
Roger Bigot, and consisted of a bordar with 8 acres, valued at 2s.* 

William, son of Sahala de Bouvilla or Bovile, held under Geoffrey de 
Magnaville, and in the reign of Stephen, Paul de Bovile held the lordship, 
which passed on his death about 1216 to his son and heir, Sir William de 
Bovile.^ From him the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir William de 
Bovile, and from him to his son and heir. Sir William de Bovile, and from 
him to his son and heir. Sir William Bovile, who died in 13 19,* when the 
manor devolved on his son and heir. Sir WilUam de Bovile, and from him 
passed to his son and heir, John de Bovile, whose daughter and heir, 
Margery, married Sir Thomas Wingfield,' and carried the manor into that 
family, where it remained for nearly three centuries. 

Sir Thomas Wingfield made his will 17th July, 1378, wherein he directs 
that he be buried in the choir of the priory of Letheringham, and that 
the sum of £46. 13s. 4d. be expended on his funeral. He gives, amongst 
other bequests, twelve silver spoons and six pieces of plate inscribed with 
the coat armour of Brews, on condition that these articles should not be 
sold or alienated, but remain with his heirs for ever. With a daughter, 
Margaret, married to Sir Thomas Hardell, Sir Thomas had a son John, to 
whom this lordship passed. 

Sir John Wingfield, M.P. for Suffolk in 1383, received the honour of 
knighthood, and presented to the Free Chapel of Stradbroke in 1389. He 
married Margaret, daughter of Sir Hugh Hastings, Knt., of Elsing, in Nor- 
folk, and was succeeded by his son. Sir Robert Wingfield, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Russell, Knt., of Strensham, co. Wore, 
and dying 3rd May, 1409, was succeeded by his son and heir. Sir Robert 
Wingfield, M.P. for Suffolk in 1428, having two years previously received 
the honour of knighthood from King Hen. VI. at Hereford. He was 
steward to John de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, and married Elizabeth, 
daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Gonsell, of Heveningham, by Lady 
Ehzabeth Fitz Alan, eldest daughter of Richard, loth Earl of Arundel, and 
sister and coheir of Thomas, nth Earl, and dying in 143 1 the manor passed 
to his eldest son. Sir John Wingfield, of Letheringham, Sheriff of Norfolk 
and Suffolk in 1444 and again in 1472. He was made a Knight of the 
Bath at the Tower in 1461, and in 1477 was joined in commission with 
the Bishop of Bath and Wells and others to treat with the ambassadors of 
France at Amiens. 

' Dom. ii. 292. ♦ He had licence to alienate or to retain 

'Dom. ii. 3425. on granting other lands in 13 13. 

^ For these descents see Letheringham I.Q.D. 7 Edw. II. 139, 145 ; N.R. 

Manor, in Loes Hundred. file 98; 8 ; 100, 12 ; loi, 3. 

5 See Manor of Wingfield, in Hoxne 
Hundred. 



54 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir J ohn Fitz Lewis, Knt., of West 
Horndon, in Essex, and dying in 1481,' left twelve sons and three daughters. 
The manor passed first to Lady Elizabeth, widow of Sir John Wingfield, and 
on her death to Sir John's eldest son, Sir John Wingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk 
and Suffolk in 1483 and again in 1492-3. He married Anne, daughter of 
John Touchet, Lord Audley, and dying in 1509 the manor passed to his 
son and heir. Sir Anthony Wingfield, Esquire of the body to the King, 
knighted for his conduct at Theronenne and Tournay, made subsequently 
comptroller of the royal household, and installed Knight of the Garter, 
8th May, r54i. In the will of King Hen. VHI. he is given a legacy of ;{200 
and appointed one of the executors. He married Elizabeth, eldest daughter 
of Sir George de Vere, Knt., and sister and coheir of John, 13th Earl of 
Oxford, and dying 20th Aug. 1552' the manor passed to his eldest son, Sir 
Robert Wingfield, of Letheringham, M.P. for Suffolk, who had for his first 
wife, Cecily, 2nd daughter of Thomas, Lord Wentworth, by whom he had 
with other issue, two sons — Sir Anthony Wingfield, who succeeded his father 
in 1596, and married Anne, daughter of William Bird, but died without 
issue, and Thomas Wingfield, to whom this manor passed in 1609, on the 
death of his brother, Sir Anthony, and of his 2nd wife, Anne, who remarried 
Thomas Clenche. 

Sir Thomas Wingfield married ist Radclyffe, daughter of Sir Gilbert 
Gerrard, Knt., Master of the Rolls, and by her had one daughter. He 
married 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Drue Drury, Knt., of Riddlesworth, 
and in 1581 a fine of the manor was levied against him by Henry Warner.^ 
Sir Thomas Wingfield died in 1609, when the manor passed to Henry 
Reynolds and Dame Elizabeth Wingfield, widow of Sir Thomas, and sub- 
sequently to Sir Thomas's son, Anthony Wingfield, of Godwins,* in Suffolk, 
who was created Bart. 17th May, 1627. He married Anne, daughter of 
Sir John Deane, Knt., of Deane's Hall, in Great Maplestead, co. Essex, and 
dying 30th July, 1638, was succeeded by his son. Sir Richard Wingfield, 2nd 
Bart., of Letheringham and Easton, who married ist nth June, 1649, 
Susanna, daughter of Sir John Jacob, ist Bart., and had a son Robert. 

Sir Richard espoused 2ndly Mary, daughter of Sir John Wintour, Knt., 
of Lidney, co. Glouc, by Mary, daughter of Lord William Howard, son of 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and had another son, Henry. Sir Richard held 
courts I2th April, 1654 ; 6th Dec. 1654 ; 2nd May, 1655 ; 27th Nov. 1655 ; 
14th May, 1656 ; 9th July, 1656; and died in 1656,^ when the manor passed 
to his elder son, Sir Robert Wingfield, 3rd Bart., who held a court 22nd 
April, 1657, and died unmarried in 1671.* 

He had, however, during his life, disposed of the manor to his cousin, 
WiUiam Blois, of Grundisburgh, the son of William Blois, who had married 
Cecily, daughter of Sir Thomas Wingfield. Sir William Blois held his first 
court nth April, 1659, and from this time to the death of Jane, the widow 
of Sir WilUam Blois, in 1682, the descent of the manor is identical with that 
of Blythburgh, in Bly thing Hundred. 

Courts were held for the manor by the Blois family, 24th Oct. 1659; 
7th May, 1660; 20th June, 1661; i6th June, 1662; 23rd April, 1663; 5th 
Oct..i663; 30th June, 1664; i5thAug.i665; 25th April, 1667; 30th July,i667; 



'I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 

''I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 65. 

'Fine, Easter, 23 Eliz. 

♦See Hoo Manor, in Loes Hundred. 



'Admin. 28th Dec. 1656. 
« Admin. 17th July, 1671 ; 14th Feb. 
11671-2; and iSthjMay, 1678. 



HASKETON. 55 

2nd Oct. 1667; 19th Dec. 1667; 21st Aug. 1668; 22nd June, 1671 ; i8th July, 
1673; 25th Sept. 1673; 20th Oct. 20 Car. II.; ist May, 1674; 13th Aug. 1674; 
30th June, 1675; 20th Sept. 1675; 22nd Oct. 1675; 31st Aug. 1676; 31st 
Jan. 1677; 26th Sept. 1678; 12th Dec. 1678; 19th Dec. 1678. By Jane Blois, 
widow, 5th May, 1679; 12th Aug. 1680; i6th Oct. 1680 ; 6th Oct. 1681; 
ist Feb. 1682. 

The manor does not seem to have passed to Sir Charles Blois. the ist 
Baronet of the Blois family, who was the son of Sir Wilham by his ist wife, 
for we find that by 1683 it was vested in Robert Thompson, who accordingly 
held a court for the manor 20th April this year, and again 7th Sept. 1684, 
and 1st June, 1686, &c. On the death of Robert Thompson, the manor 
passed to Joseph Thompson and Frances Thompson, widow, executors of 
Robert, and they held their first court 25th April, 1695. 

Joseph Thompson was lord in 1727 and William in 1744, the latter 
holding his first court 19th June, 1744. Robert Thompson was lord in 1765, 
he holding his first court 4th July this year. In 1789 the manor had passed 
to the trustees and executors of the will of Robert Thompson, for they, 
Thomas Corbett and Stamp Brooksband, held their ist court 22nd 
June this year. Thomas Corbett was lord in 1805. This manor pays a 
small annual rent to the main manor. 

Court Rolls of this manor from 1457 to 1459 will be found amongst the 
Harleian Rolls in the British Museum,' and deeds dated between 1539 ^^'^ 
1685 relating to this manor will be found amongst the Additional Charters 
in the last-mentioned depository.'' Amongst the Exchequer Depositions 
taken at Woodbridge, we have notice of a suit between John Punchard 
and Thomas Tree in 1715 respecting the rectory and this manor, and 
also the tithes. 

A fine was levied in 1580 by John Baker and others against Thomas 
Baker and others.^ 

The Rectory Manor. 

Little is known respecting this. It is now held by the Rev. Charles 
Arthur Sinclair, M.A., of St. Peter's College, Cambridge. Extracts from 
Court Rolls of this manor between 1467 and 1606 will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum.* They are admittances 
of various persons holding of the manor ; one the admittance of Richard 
Dryver and Alice his wife to a messuage, garden, and courtyard, with a 
separate path called Throckyldys in Hasketon, of which the said Richard 
had surrendered the copyhold. It is dated Saturday next after the feast 
of All Saints (ist Nov.), 7 Edw. IV. [1467]. A second is of Jane Forster.^ 
A third is an admittance of Thomas Partrych, of Ipswich, farmer, to the 
copyhold of a rood of land in Hasketon at Tynctewall Hylle, surrendered 
by Robert Salys and MerioU his wife for a rent of one halfpenny ; and an 
admittance of the same to the copyhold of the Fyve-acre Close in Hasketon, 
surrendered by the same, for a rent of 2s. This is dated the Monday after 
Palm Sunday, 25th Hen. VIII. [1537]. Another is the admittance of Thomas 
Partrich, of Ipswich, to the copyhold of Crowes, Overapys, Netherapys, 
and Gravell pitts in Hasketon, on the surrender of Robert Salys and MerioU 
his wife, and bears same date as last.^ Another is the admittance of 

' Harl. Rolls, B. 321. ^ Add. Ch. 33011-33033. 

''Add. Ch. 33035, 33040. 5 Add. Ch. 33012. 

3 Fine, Hil. 22 Eliz. ^Add. Ch. 33021. 



56 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Christopher Lamberd and Christina his wife to the copyhold of the Five- 
acre Close in Hasketon, and a rood of land at Tyntewallhille, and two pieces 
in a field called Gravell pitts, on the surrender of Thomas Partriche. It is 
dated at the first court of Thomas Tompson, clerk, rector, the Thursday next 
before the feast of St. Simon and St. Jude (28th Oct.), 34 Hen. VIII. [1542].' 
Another is the admittance of Anne Lomberde, daughter of Christ. Lomberde, 
deceased, to the copyhold of her father's land in Hasketon, she being then 
eight years of age, under the guardianship of Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
K.G., Controller of the King's Household (Lord of the Manor of Thorpe 
Hall, Hasketon), It is dated the Thursday next before the feast of the 
Annunciation (25th Mar.) 4 Edw. VL [1550].^ 



' Add. Ch. 33022. Add. Ch. 33024. 




HEMLEY. 57 

HEM LEY. 

|N Saxon times there was no manor in this place. There 
were, however, nine different holdings mentioned in the 
Great Survey ; four of these were specified among the posses- 
sions of Ranulf , brother of Ilger. 

The first of these consisted of 22 acres in the time of the 
Confessor, held by a freeman under Brictmar, half under 
commendation to Briht and half to the Abbot of Ely, but 
at the time of the Survey held by Ranulf of the King by livery as part of 
his demesne. 

The abbot, however, contended that Ranulf ought to hold the half of 
him. To this holding was attached a ploughteam, a bordar, an acre of 
meadow, and i serf in Saxon times, but the ploughteam had disappeared 
by the time of the Survey. The whole was valued at 4s. The second con- 
sisted of 20 acres, 2 bordars, i ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, 
valued at 4s., held in the Confessor's time by Ulward, a freeman under com- 
mendation to Goodrich. 

The third consisted of 5 acres, half a ploughteam, and half an acre of 
meadow, valued at zzd., held in the Confessor's time by a freeman, Hardwin, 
under commendation to one himself under commendation to Norman, and 
half under Edric's commendation. 

The fourth holding of Ranulf was of 9 acres, half a ploughteam, and 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 3s., held in the Confessor's time by a 
freeman named Brihtric, under commendation half to Brihmar and half to 
Stanmar. There was also a church and 8 acres, valued at 2s. All were held 
by Ranulf, Ilger's brother, by livery of the King and William de Nemours 
of him, the abbot having the soc' In this place the Countess of Albemarle 
held a villein with g acres, valued at 20^., the villein belonging to Clopton." 

William de Arcis also held here a bordar with 5 acres which belonged to 
Clopton and was included in its valuation.^ Among the lands of Roger 
Bigot were 20 acres, 2 bordars, half a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, 
valued at 3s., and paying in a gelt ^d., which had been held by 2 freemen 
under commendation to Osfert and Goodrich.* 

The only other holding mentioned was 10 acres belonging to Clopton, 
to which were attached 2 bordars and 2 men included in the valuation of that 
place. This was held by Roger de Poictou as Domesday tenant in chief .^ 

Hemley Manor. 

This manor was no doubt composed of the lands held in Saxon times 
by Brictmar, and at the time of the Survey by William de Nemours, of 
Ranulf, brother of Ilger. In 1601 we meet with a fine levied of the manor 
by Eliazer Duncon and others against Charles Cornwalleys and others.^ 

Little is known of the history of this manor, but in 1844 Hemley Hall 
was the property of the Rev. George Drury, of Clayton, and he was supposed 
to have held the lordship. It was also stated in White's Directory for 1885 
that the Rev. G. H. Porter was then lord, and in i8g6 and at the present 
time we find Richard Porter stated to be lord. The only place in which the 

' Dom. ii. 424. * Dom. ii. 3406. 

^Dom. ii. 431. ^Dom. ii. 3496. 

^Dom. ii, 4316. ^Fine, Mich. 43-44 Eliz. 

H 



58 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor seems to be referred to besides these modern authorities is in the 
Chancery Proceedings of the 27th year of Elizabeth, where we find a claim 
under a will by John Wood and Anne his wife, and Alice Backler, daughters 
of Christopher Backler, against Adam Fuller and Nicholas Backler, as to 
freehold lands in Hemley,and copyhold lands held of the Manors of Hemley, 
Waldringfield, and Newbourne, late of the said Christopher Backler.' 



' C.P. iii. 304. 




KESGRAVE. 59 

KESGRAVE. 

[HERE were two manors in this place in Saxon times, but 
specified in the Survey under the head of Greenwich. The 
two holdings besides the manors were those of Robert 
Malet. One consisted of 20 acres of land and i ploughteam, 
valued at 3s. 4^., held in the time of the Confessor by 3 freemen 
under commendation to Godwin, Robert having the soc and 
sac ; and the other of 10 acres, valued at i6d., which had 
been held in the Confessor's time by Oslac, a freeman under commendation 
to Edric, of Laxfield, with a ploughteam. There was half a church estate 
with 2 acres and the soc and sac belonged to the Abbot of Ely. " It," says 
the Survey, " is half a league long and 4 quarentenes broad," and it paid in 
a gelt 4^d.^ 

Under the head "Greenwic," which is Greenwich, in Kesgrave, we find 
the manors amongst the lands of Roger de Poictou. They consisted of two 
carucates of land, and had in the Confessor's time belonged to 2 freemen, i 
under commendation to the Confessor and the other to Gurth. To these : 
manors appertained 3 acres of meadow, 3 villeins, 7 bordars, 4 ploughtearns 
in demesne and 6 belonging to the men, all of which ploughteams most 
strangely had disappeared by the time of the Survey. The valuation in 
Saxon times was 40s., but at the time of the Survey los. only. The extent 
of these manors was 6 quarentenes in length and 4 in breadth, and the pay- 
ment in a gelt ^d.'' 

Kesgrave Manor, or Tuddenham's in Kesgrave. 

In the time of Edw. I. the lordship was vested in Sir John de Holbroke, 
Knt., who died in 1316, when it passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas de 
Holbroke. 

In the next reign the manor was apparently held by Richard de 
Martlesham and Maud his wife for their lives, and Sir John de Ufford and 
Edmund de Ufford, brother to the Earl of Suffolk, released all their rights 
in the manor to Robert Tudenham, who died seised of it in 1337,^ when it 
passed to his brother and heir, Thomas Tudenham. 

It probably then went to the family of Bedingfield, as in the case of 
Great BeaUngs Manor, and it is said that Thomas Bedingfield about 1582 
sold it to John Castle. It appears, however, according to a fine levied in 
1584, that the manor came to Thomas Gooding from Alexander Bedingfield." 
Certain it is that Thomas Gooding died seised of it in 1595, when it passed to 
his son and heir, Robert Gooding.^ 

In 1662 the manor was vested in Thomas Essington, of Brightwell 
Hall, and on his death passed to his son and heir, John Essington. 

In 1723 we find the manor vested in Francis Gulston, of Widial, co. 
Herts, and Sarah his wife, daughter and heir of John Stebbing, son and heir 
of Henry Stebbing, and Anne his wife, whose maiden name was Smithier, and 
they conveyed it in 1758 to Thomas Alderton, of Shotley,^ who sold it by 
agreement dated 15th April, 1769, to Lieut-Col. Richard Phillipson for 
£5,000, subject to an annuity of £40, which had been limited by the will of 
Thomas Gooding, loth April, 37 Eliz. The annuity was purchased 
by the Colonel in 1771, and he, by his will, 27th June, 1789, devised the 

' Dom. ii. 313. ■♦ Fine, Trin. 26 Eliz. 

^ Dom. ii. 347. 5 See Freston Manor, in Samf ord Hundred. 

3 1.P.M., II Edw. III. {znd Nos.) no. ^ Fine, Mich. 25 Geo. II. 



6o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor, with the residue of his property, to his niece, Susanna, wife of the 
Rev. Charles Wright, who took the name of Burton-Philhpson. The will 
was proved in the Prerogative Court 27th Aug. 1792. By fine levied 15th 
July, 1790, the manor was settled to such uses as Charles Burton-Philippson 
and his wife should appoint, and in default to husband for Ufe, remainder 
to wife for hfe, then to children, as husband and wife should appoint, and 
to the heirs of the body of the wife begotten by Philippson in fee. The 
husband died 17th Feb. 1800, and Susannah, his widow, married Rev. 
Abraham David Hake, and the manor was appointed after the death of 
Susanna, to her son, Richard Burton Burton-PhiUppson in fee. Susanna 
Hake died in Jan. 1803. 

In 1811 the hall and manor were purchased by William Cunliffe 
Shawe, of Singleton Lodge, co. Lancaster. He was M.P. for Preston, and 
married ist Dorothy, daughter of Richard Whitehead, of Preston, and 
2ndly Phihppa, daughter and coheir of Charles Pole, of Southgate, co. 
Middlesex, M.P. for Liverpool. He died in Nov. 1821, leaving by his ist 
wife a son, Robert Newton Shaw, to whom the manor passed. Robert 
Newton Shaw was J. P., D.L., and M.P. for East Suffolk, and chairman for 
some years of the Woodbridge Quarter Sessions. He married 31st Oct. 1811 
Frances Anne, daughter of Thomas Jones, of Stapleton,co. Gloucester, and 
died without issue in Nov. 1855. 

The hall, situate about a mile E. by N. of the church, was entirely 
rebuilt in 18 12. Page mentions that through the marriage of his ancestor, 
Joseph Shawe (he was W. C. Shawe's grandfather), of Liverpool, with 
Dorothy, eldest daughter and coheir of John Wingfield, of Hazleborough 
Hall, Derby, Robert Newton Shawe, was descended from Sir Humphrey 
Wingfield, of Brantham Hall, who was speaker of the House of Commons, 
and one of the burgesses in Parliament for Ipswich in the time of King 
Hen. VIII. 

The manor became later vested in George Tomline, and after a like 
descent with the Manor of Bacton, in Hartismere, is now vested in his 
representative, the Right Hon. Capt. Ernest G. Pretyman, of Orwell Park, 
D.L. 

This manor was apparently included in a fine levied in 1357 by William 
Pottere against Sir John de Ufford, Adam de Skakilthorp, parson of Causton 
Church, and Adam de Hautboys, parson of Cockfield Church, Richard de 
Martlesham and Matilda his wife, then holding the manor for life.' 



' Feet of Fines, 31-32 Edw. III. 48. 



KIRTON. 



6i 




KIRTON. 

^'f^N Saxon times there was no manor in this place, but there 
are four holdings mentioned in the Survey, three of which 
belonged to Roger Bigot. 

The first consisted of 7 acres and an acre of meadow, 
valued at 3s., and was held in the time of the Confessor by a 
freeman, Goodrich the priest, under commendation to 
Edric before he made himself an outlaw, and afterwards to 
Norman. 

The second consisted of a church with 6 acres valued at izd., held by 
Wihtmar of Roger Bigot ; and the third consisted of 20 acres, a bordar, 
and a ploughteam, valued at 3s., which had been held by 3 freemen under 
commendation to Norman, Grim, Brihtric, and Stanmar. 

The Survey said : " It," probably meaning the township, " was 2 
quarentenes in length and 2 in breadth, and paid in a gelt 2^.' The fourth 
holding was that of Roger de Rheims consisting of 2 acres, valued at ^d.'' 

KiRKTON OR KiRTON MANOR. 

There appear to be two manors in Kirton, for one now belongs to 
Capt. E. G. Pretyman, of Orwell Park, D.L., by inheritance from Col. 
Tomhne, who acquired from the Duke of Hamilton, who held in 1855, and 
the other now held by Francis Taylor, having been acquired from the heirs 
of the Rev. J. Cartwright, who held the same prior to 1855. 

One of the manors was formed out of the holdings of Roger Bigot. It 
is not clear to whom in very early days either of these manors belonged, but 
one was for some generations the lordship of the Stratton family. 

In the time of Edw. III. it was held by Walter de Stratton, and we meet 
in 1376 with a fine levied by this Walter against Margaret, daughter of 
Ralph de Shymplygford.^ Somewhat later the manor was held by George 
Stratton, son and heir of Augustus Stratton. Edward Stratton died 
seised of the manor in 1477,* and a fine was levied of the manor in 1567 
by Thomas Stratton, son of John Stratton.^ There is, however, amongst 
the State Papers in 1597 a grant of the manor in perpetuity to Robert 
Barker, of Ipswich.^ 

In 1702 we find amongst the Treasury Papers a petition of the tenants 
and suitors of parcel of the Duchy of Cornwall for the continuance of Edmund 
Layton, as under-steward of the manor.'' 

The other manor seems to have been held by the Sampson family, and 
Davy makes Thomas Sampson, of Playford, who died in 1483, lord, from 
whom he makes the manor descend in the same course as the Manor of 
Playford, in Carlford Hundred, to Sir Henry Felton, Bart. It is not easy to 
distinguish between entries relating to this manor and the Manor of Kirkton, 
in Shotley. 

One of the manors in 1804 belonged to Sir William Rowley, Bart., and 
the following year to the Rev. John Cartwright. 

There is amongst the State Papers in 1530 a grant in fee of Kirton 
Manor to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, at that time said to have been in the 
King's hand by reason of the attainder of Cardinal Wolsey.^ 



' Dom. ii. 340, 3426. 

"^ Dom. ii. 4236. 

3 Feet of Fines, 50 Edw. III. 17. 

n.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 34- 



5 Fine, 9 Eliz. 30. 

6S.P. 1597.427- 

^T.P. 1702, 85; 1703, 150, 151- 

8S.P., 22 Hen. VIII. 220 (11) 




62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LEVINGTON. 

pUR holdings here are mentioned in the Survey. Two of 
these belonged to Roger Bigot. The first, consisting of 4 
acres, valued at 8d., was held by Leverich, a freeman under 
Norman. The Survey says (probably referring to the 
township), " it was 4 quarentenes long and 2 broad, and 
pays 4d. in a gelt." The second consisting of 32 acres, 2 
ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los., was 
held by 10 freemen under commendation to Norman — Goodman, Leverich, 
Brihtric, Gunnere, Ulrich, Siwold, Huna, Whita, and Goodrich. These 
freemen were held by WiUiam de Burnaville of Roger Bigot. There was 
also a church with 8 acres, valued at i2d.' 

The third holding was that of Hugh de Montfort, and consisted of 20 
acres held by 3 freemen in Saxon times under commendation to Goodmund. 
In the time of the Confessor there were 2 ploughteams attached to this 
holding, which at the time of the Survey were reduced to i.^ 

Kirby informs us that in a farmer's yard in Levington, close on the left 
as you enter from Levington into the chapel-field of Stratton-hall, 
was dug the first crag or shell, that has been found so useful for improving 
the land in this and other Hundreds in the neighbourhood. " For though it 
appears from books of agriculture that the like manure has been long since 
used in the west of England, it was not used here till this discovery was 
casually made by one Edmund Edwards, about the year 1718. This man, 
having to cover a field with muck out of his yard, and wanting a load or 
two to finish it, carried some of the soil that laid near his muck, though it 
looked to him to be no better than sand ; but, observing the crop to be the 
best where he laid that, he was from thence encouraged to carry more of it the 
next year ; and the success he had encouraged others to do the like." 
Kirby further says that " this useful soil has been found in great plenty 
upon the sides of such vales as may reasonably be supposed to have been 
washed by the sea ; towards which such light shells might be naturally 
carried, either at Noah's flood, or by the force of the tides to some places 
since forsaken by the sea. Whoever looks into any of these crag pitts 
cannot but observe how they lie layer upon layer in a greater or less angle, 
according to the variation of the tides. But when we consider that the 
wells in Trimley Street, about a quarter of a mile distant from the mill, are 
about 25 feet deep, and that the springs all rise in crag, we can no way 
account for this crag so many feet under ground, but from the universal 
deluge."^ 

Burnaville's Manor. 

The Manor of Levington never seems to have passed under that name, 
but under the name of Burnaville's, having derived its name from WilHam 
de Burnaville, who held of Roger Bigot at the time of the Domesday Survey. 
In 1233 the manor seems to have vested for a time in Hubert de Burgh, 
but in 1282 it was back again in the Burnaville family in the person of Sir 
Robert de Burnaville, son of Geoffrey, son of William, son of Nicholas, son of 
William, who was succeeded by his son and heir, Robert de Burnaville. In 
the time of the 3rd Edw. it was vested in Richard de Burnaville,* and later 
in Joan, wife of John Goldingham. 

'Dom. ii. 341. t See Manors of Baylham and Ringshall, in 

« Dom. ii. 406. Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

s Suffolk Traveller, 2nd ed. p. 77. 



LEVINGTON. 63 

In 1433 the manor was vested in Richard Steresacre and Hugh Fastolf , 
and subsequently in Sir John Fastolf, who died in 1460/ Sir John Paston, 
Knt., however, was seised at the time of his death in 1466/ and later we find 
the manor in Elizabeth Brandon, widow, who died in 1497, when it passed 
to her grandson and heir, William Brandon. 

The manor not unhkely passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Blowfield, inTrimley St. Mary, in this Hundred, for we find it the subject of 
the same Chancery suit mentioned in the account of that lordship between 
Richard, son of Austin Cavendish, and Sir John Wingfield, Knt., Sir William 
Brandon, Knt., John Sulyard, and Edward Grymston.^ Certainly in 1503 
Sir John Wingfield by deed dated 3rd Oct. 19th Hen. VII., conveyed the 
manor to John Yaxlee, serjeant-at-law, probably, however, as mort- 
gagee,* for we find the lordship in Sir Humphrey Wingfield, Knt., of 
Brantham,^ who died seised 23rd Oct. 1545,* when it passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Wingfield, and yet find a statement that it was vested in 
Anthony Yaxlee, who died in 1538, when the manor passed to William, 
son of Richard, son of the said Anthony Yaxlee. 

Richard Smart, who died 25th August, 1559, seems to have had the 
manor, which then passed to his son and heir, William Smart, then aged 
30.' In 1573 William Smart was called upon to show title to the manor as 
parcel of the lands of Sir Humphrey Wingfield.^ 

In 1609 the manor was acquired by Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., serjeant- 
at-law, who was a native of Levington, and educated at the Free Grammar 
School of Ipswich. 

An account of him will be found under the manor of Framlingham, 
in Loes Hundred, where a copy of his will may be seen. Reyce, in his account 
of Suffolk famihes, speaking of Sir Robert, says he left " Robert Butts, 
Gent., his sisters sonne, heire to his estate in Levington, which had descended 
upon him from his ancestors. William Butts is now living this year 1655." 
By his will, dated 8th August, 1636, Sir Robt. Hitcham devised his lordship 
of " Burvalls " to his nephew, Robert Butts and his heirs, subject to certain 
payments to the testator's sister, to whom and to her heirs he also gave a 
certain farm called " Watkins." He further wills that there be presently 
built after his decease one almshouse at Levington for six female persons 
of the poorest and impotent of Levington and Nacton, the same to be 
built upon his tenement near the street there, and they to have the like 
allowance in all things as the poor of Framhngham are appointed to have ; 
to begin first with Levington, and so successively.' 

He died 15th Aug. 1636, and was buried at Framhngham. Sir Robert 
Hitcham' s nephew seems to have soon parted with the manor, for the year 
after his uncle's death we find it vested in Edmund Grimston, from whom it 
descended to his son and heir, Harbottle Grimston. 

We next find the manor vested in John Goodrich, of Ipswich, who devised 
it to his nephew, William Goodrich, from whom it is said to have come to John 
Goodrich, who was lord in 1803. This, however, is an error, for William 
Goodrich sold in 1743 to Admiral Edward Vernon.'° The admiral did great 

•I.P.M., 38-39 Hen. VI. 48. See Broke n.PM., i6th Jan. 1543-6. 

Hall, Nacton, in this Hundred. ''I.P.M., 2 Eliz. pt. i. 147. 

'I.P.M., 6 Edw. IV. 44. 8 Memoranda Rolls, 15 Eliz., Mich Rec. 
^E.C.P., Bundle 50, 212. Rot. 26. 

*Add. Ch. 20223. 'See Framlingham Manor, in Loes Hundred. 



See Brantham Hall, in Samford Hundred. " See Recovery, 20th Oct. 1743. 



64 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

service in the West Indies by taking Portobello, Chagre, &c., but by his 
disagreement with the commander of the land forces the expedition 
against Carthagena failed. He commanded in the Downs in 1745, and the 
following year was dismissed the service by his Majesty's command for 
writing two pamphlets by which the Secretary of State and Secretary of 
the Admiralty's letters were made known. He died 2gth Oct. 1757, 
aged 73, when the manor passed to his nephew and heir, Francis Vernon, 
Lord Orwell, afterwards Earl of Shipbroke, who, dying in 1783 without 
issue it vested in his nephew and heir, John Vernon, who died in 1818.' 

The manor was later acquired by Col. George Tomline, and like the 
Manor of Bacton, in Hartismere Hundred, descended to and is now vested in 
Capt. E. G. Pretyman, D.L., of Orwell Park. 

There is a Confirmation of Status, &c., in " Bernevilles " Manor in 
1459 amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.'' 



'See St. Peter's Manor, Nacton, in this "Add. Ch. 10215. 
Hundred, and Rishangles Manor, in 
Hartismere Hundred. 




MARTLESHAM. 65 

MARTLESHAM. 

MANOR was held here at the time of the Domesday Survey 
by Ranulf, brother of Ilger. It consisted of 2 carucates and 
a half of land, having in Saxon times 10 villeins, 10 bordars, 
2 serfs, and 2 ploughteams in demesne, 5 ploughteams 
belonging to the men, 12 acres of meadow, wood sufficient 
for 16 hogs, 3 rouncies, 24 beasts, 40 hogs, 300 sheep, 16 goats, 
and 6 hives of bees, valued at 40s. By the time of the 
Survey the serfs had disappeared, the tenants' ploughteams were reduced by 
J, there was a mill, and the rouncies were 5, the beasts 20, the hogs 27, 
the sheep 212, and the hives of bees 12. It was a league long and 5 
quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt bd. In the time of the Confessor this 
manor had been held by Eadwold. 

Ranulf also held here a church with 36 acres, valued at 3s. ; and also 
Godric, a freeman, having 16 acres, i bordar, half a ploughteam, and an 
acre of meadow, valued at 2s.' 

MARTLESHAM HaLL MaNOR. 

In 1316 this was the lordship of Richard 3rewse, and in 1328 had 
passed to Sir John de Verdon, who removed here that year from Brisingham 
in Norfolk, where his ancestors had resided for many generations, and 
where his father, Thomas de Verdon, had died about 13 15. John seems 
to have been a person of great hospitality, from the inventory of the 
establishment he left at Brisingham in 1328 to treat his tenants, &c., 
whenever he should go thither to reside.' In 1344 he settled the manor 
on his son Thomas. Two years later he died, and was succeeded by 
his grandson, Sir Thomas de Verdon (the son having apparently died in 
the short interval), who, dying a few months later, without issue, the 
manor passed to his uncle, Sir John de Verdon, 2nd son of the above- 
named Sir John de Verdon and Maud his wife. This last Sir John de 
Verdon in 1365 settled the manor upon Isabel, his 2nd wife, daughter and 
heir of Sir Thomas Visdelieu, of Shelfhanger, co. Norfolk, Knt., and upon his 
(the settler's) only daughter by this marriage, Isabel, married to Sir Imbert 
Noon, of Shelfhanger. 

Sir John de Verdon died about 1391, when the manor passed to Sir 
Imbert Noon in right of his wife. He died in 1412, when it descended to his 
son and heir, Sir Edmund Noon, Knt., from whom it went to his son and heir. 
Sir Henry Noon, who died in 1428, and was succeeded by his son and heir. Sir 
Henry Noon. This last lord greatly increased his fortune by his valiant 
exploits, being a constant attendant of King Hen. V. in the French wars, 
where, for his gallant conduct he was rewarded by the King with a grant of 
the castle lands and lordship of Tonde, in Normandy. He died in 1465, 
having by his will devised the manor to his wife Elizabeth during the 
minority of his son Henry, and then to him and his heirs. Henry Noon, the 
son, inherited, and died in 1487. In his inquisition p.m. it is stated that the 
manor was worth ;^20, and was held of Roger Pilkyngton, as of the Manor of 
Bresyngham, co. Norfolk, by knight's service. Henry Noon was found 
to be his son and heir, being then 7 years of age.^ 

In 1531 we find that Sir Thomas Jermyn paid rehef for the manor. His 
daughter had married Francis Noon, son and heir of Henry Noon. Amongst 

' Dom. ii. 124. 3 1.p.M,, 3 Hen. VII. 38. 

« See Blomefield's Norf . i. 51. 



66 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen EUzabeth there is an action 
respecting this manor and that of Newbourn by this Francis " Noone " against 
Roger Warren.' Francis died in 1574, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Noon ; and amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time 
of Queen Elizabeth will be found a claim by this Thomas " Noone " against 
William Pilbrowe to recover the title deeds of a messuage and 100 acres in 
Martlesham, which descended to plaintiff as son and heir to Thomas 
" Noone. ^ Thomas Noone died in 1606. 

A little later the manor vested, probably by purchase, in William 
Goodwin, who died in 1639, when it devolved on his brother and heir, 
John Goodwin, on whose death in 1644 the manor passed to his son and 
heir, William Goodwin, of Hasketon, who, dying in 1664, was succeeded 
by his son and heir, John Goodwin. He married ist Mary Dawes, widow, 
daughter of John Glover, clerk and minister of Shottisham, 2ndly Hannah, 
daughter and coheir of Frederic Scott, of Leverton, and srdly Elizabeth, 
daughter and coheir of John Butcher, of Ipswich, physician. John Goodwin 
died the nth Dec. 1699, ^^ ^is 6oth year,^ when the manor went to his 
widow, Elizabeth, who presented to the church in 1724, and died in 1736. 
She was succeeded by her son and heir, John Goodwin, who, dying in 1742, 
the manor went to his son and heir, John Goodwin, who dying in 1758, 
the manor passed to his daughter Anne, married to George Doughty, of 
Theberton, who presented to the living in 1787. George Doughty died in 
1798, from which time to recently the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Theberton, in Bl3rthing Hundred. 

The manor was later acquired by Colonel George Tomline, and is now 
vested like the Manor of Bacton, in Hartismere Hundred, in Capt. Ernest 
George Pretyman, D.L., of Orwell Park. 

Arms : Noon, Or, a cross engrailed, Vert. Of Verdon : Sable, a 
lion rampant. Argent. 

Scots Manor. 

This manor in the time of King Hen. VHI. belonged to Edmund 
Bedingfield, of Oxburgh, on whose death it passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Bedingfield, who died seised in 1590, and was succeeded by his 
son and heir, Sir Henry Bedingfield, Knt., from whom it passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Henry Bedingfield. 

Hethe's Manor. 

This was the lordship of Sir Robert Wingfield in the time of King 
Hen. VI. He died in 143 1, when it passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, in this Hundred, to the time of Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, K.G., who died in 1552. 

In an inquisition in 1482 this manor is referred to as the " tenement 
called Hethes in Martlesham."* In 1567 we meet with a fine levied of a 
moiety of the manor, John Symond against Thomas Gybbon and others.^ 

' C.P. Ser. ii. B. cxxxii. 83. bet. 3 crescents Arg. Of the Scott 
« C.P. ii. 256. family : Arg. 3 Catherine wheels, 
3 He was buried in the chancel of the Sab. within a border engrailed Gu. 
church of Martlesham, where there Of the Butcher family : Arg. 
is a monument to him and his a cross engrailed betw. three water- 
wives. The arms as given on the bougets, Gu. 
monument are : Of the Glover * I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 
family : Sab. a chevron Ermine ^ Fine, Trin. 9 Eliz. 




NACTON. 67 

N ACTON. 

MANOR was held here in the Confessor's time by Good- 
mund and by Hugh de Montfort as Domesday tenant in 
chief. It consisted of 2 carucates of land^ 6 villeins, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne, 3 ploughteams belonging to the men 
(which by the time of the Survey, were reduced to 2), wood 
sufficient for 8 hogs, 2 acres of meadow, a mill, 4 rouncies, 
I beast, 8 hogs, 23 sheep, and 30 goats, valued at 70s., both 
in Saxon times and at the time of the Survey, though at the later period 
there were but 2 ploughteams belonging to the tenants, the mill had dis- 
appeared, there was but i rouncy, no hogs or goats. The sheep had risen 
to 133. 

This manor was a league and a half in length, and a league broad, and 
paid in a gelt 2d.' 

Robert Malet also held here, under the head " Necchemara," 28 acres, 
which had been held in the Confessor's time by 4 freemen under commenda- 
tion to Godwin, son of Alfer. In Saxon times there were 2 ploughteams, 
but these had disappeared by the time of the Survey. The value was 2S., 
and Robert Malet had the soc and sac. The Survey says : " It is 3 quaren- 
tenes long and 2 J broad, and pays ^^d. in gelt." What " it " refers to we 
are unable to say, except that, though linked with this holding, the reference 
must be to the township or some larger estate.'' 

Geoffrey de Magnaville had a small holding of 2 freemen under 
commendation to Halden, with 20 acres, half a ploughteam, and half an 
acre of meadow. The value of this holding was but 2s.^ 

Hervey of Bourges had here a still smaller holding in demesne of 3 
acres, valued at 6d., which had been held by a freeman named Ulfwin 
under commendation to Ingulf, the house-earl.* 

Brokes Hall Manor al. Cowhaugh al. Cow Hall. 

The lands in Nacton became divisible into four separate manors. 
Broke's Hall Manor was formed partly of the land held by Goodmund 
of the Abbot of Ely in Saxon times, and by Hugh de Montfort as Domesday 
tenant in chief. 

In the time of Hen. III. the manor was held by Richard de Holbroke, 
he having acquired what Andrew Peverel had formerly held of the King in 
chief .^ Richard Holbroke died in 1290,® when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John de Holbroke, and on his death went to his widow Alicia, 
and an extent of the manor will be found in 1309 in her inquisition p.m.'' 
Subject to the interest of Alicia, the widow of John de Holbroke, the manor 
vested in his son and heir, Sir John Holbroke, who seems to have died 
about 1316, when the manor, subject to his widow's interest, passed to his 
son and heir. Sir Thomas Holbroke, Knt., who in 1336 with Margaret, his 
wife, levied a fine of the manor against William le Neweman, parson of 
Tattingstone Church, and Nicholas Bonde,^ and in 1553 against John 

'Dom. ii. 406. *See Manor of Holbrook, in Samford Hun- 
' Dom. ii. 315. dred, and Manor of Colviles, Rendle- 

^Dom. ii. 413. sham, in Loes Hundred. 

*Dom. ii. 442. ?I.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 51. 

= H.R. ii. 197. a Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. III. 28. 



68 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Caperon, parson of " Tatington " Church, and Henry White, of Tattings- 
ton/ This fine included the advowsons of the churches of Bucklesham, 
Brendwenham, and Holton. 

Sir Thomas Holbroke died in 1360,^ and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Sir John Holbroke, who died about 1375 or 1376.^ The manor then 
passed to Margery, daughter and coheir of Sir John Holbroke, who had 
married John, son of Hugh Fastolf,* and in 1377 a conveyance was made 
to them by John de Lakinhethe, who was no doubt a trustee. Margery 
Fastolf died nth July, 1387, when the lordship vested in Sir John Fastolf, 
her husband, alone, and on his death in 1406^ passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Hugh Fastolf, Knt. He married Matilda, daughter of Sir Constantine 
Clifton, Knt., and died in 1417.* His will is dated 1417, and it was proved 
in 1419, when a 12th part vested in his widow Matilda in dower. She died 
in 1436 or 1437,'' and then the manor seems to have passed to her son and heir. 
Sir John Fastolf, Knt., who died 31st Jan. 1445,^ and was succeeded by his 
son and heir, John Fastolf, who died in 1460,^ when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Thomas Fastolf, M.P. for Ipswich in 1487, and from him 
to his son and heir, John Fastolf, also M.P. for Ipswich in 1494, who died 
8th Dec. i5'o6,'° when the manor vested in his son and heir, George Fastolf, 
who married Bridget, daughter of Sir Richard Broke, Knt., Chief Baron of 
the Exchequer. 

George Fastolf parted with the manor in 1514, and a fine was levied 
against him by Thomas Franke and others." Franke was either a trustee 
for, or sold the manor to Sir Richard Broke, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, 
4th son of Thomas Broke, of Leighton, and of Joan, daughter and heir of 
John (? William) Parke, of Copenhall, Chester. Thomas Broke was a 
descendant of William de le Brook, son of Adam, lord of Leighton, prior 
to the time of Hen. III., which Adam was the common ancestor of the 
Brokes of Leighton, of Norton," and of Mere. 

Sir Richard Broke was Recorder of London, and represented the city 
in several Parliaments.'^ He built the hall known as Crows Hall in 1526, 
but it was mostly rebuilt and considerably enlarged by Philip Bowes 
Broke in 1767. Sir Richard was a sound lawyer, and had been double 
reader at the Middle Temple, and Recorder of London, which city he 
represented in Parliament for some time. Sir Richard Broke married 

Anne, daughter of Leeds, who died nth Nov. 1547, ^-^d was buried at 

Putney. Sir Richard died 6th May, 1529,"* and was succeeded in this lord- 
ship by his son and heir, Robert Broke, then aged 34,'^ who married Elizabeth, 
heir of the Holgrave family, of Sussex, and a suit in the Star Chamber will be 
found as to a forcible entry and assault at Nacton by this Robert Broke 
against Edmund Lecke and others.'^ A fine was levied of this manor by 
Sir John Jermy and others against Robert Broke in 1559, ^^ doubt on the 
occasion of some settlement. The fine included lands in Nacton, Foxholes, ■ 
Bucklesham, and Levington.'^ 

'Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 10. si.p.M., 26 Hen. VI. 15. 

''I.P.M., 34 Edw. HI. 75. 938 and 39 Hen. VI. 48. 

3I.P.M., so Edw. III. 31. "I.P.M., 22 Hen. VII. 57. 
* He was probably the 3rd son of John " Fine, Easter, 6 Hen. VIII. 

Fastolf, of Caistor, in Norfolk. " Created Baronet in 1662. 

5 1.P.M., 7 Hen. IV. 34. '3 See D.N.B. vi. 388. 

6 1.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 49. «4 21 Hen. VIII. 

?See Kirkley Manor, Kessingland, in '5 i.p.M., loth Apr. 2 Edw. VI. 60. 

Mutford Hundred. '6 Star C.P., Hen. VIII. vol. 6, 342-346; 

s-I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 37. '^Fine, Mich. 1 Eliz. 



NACTON. 69 

Robert Broke died in 1578,' when he was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Richard Broke. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Jenney, of 
Brightwell, Knt., and died in 1613, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Broke, who married Elizabeth, daughter of William Waters, of 
Wimbledon, Surrey. He was High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1623, and on his 
death 25th March, 1626, the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Richard 
Broke, who married Mary, daughter of Sir John Pakington, of Westwood, 
CO. Worcester, Bart., and on his death 23rd March, 1639-40, went to 
his son and heir. Sir Robert Broke, Knt., who was created a Baronet at the 
Restoration, 21st May, 1661. He married ist Anne, 3rd daughter of Sir 
Lionel ToUemache of Bentley, 2nd Bart., and 2ndly, 26th May, 1685, 
Martha Thomlinson, widow, and dying 25th Feb., 1693-4, without 
male issue,^ the title expired, and the manor passed to his nephew and son- 
in-law (the son of his brother William), Robert Broke, who married ist 
his cousin Anne, younger daughter and coheir of the deceased baronet. 
Sir Robert Broke, but by her had no surviving male issue. He married 
2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Hewitt, Bart, of Waresley, in 
Huntingdonshire, and dying in June, 1714, was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Philip Broke, who married ist in 1732 Anne, daughter and coheir of 
Martin Bowes, of Bury St. Edmunds ; and 2ndly AUce, widow of Sir John 
Barker, Bart., and dying in Sept. 1762, was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Philip Bowes Broke, who married in 1771 Elizabeth, daughter and eventual 
heir of the Rev. Charles Beaumont of Witnesham, and dying 22nd Aug. 
1801, the manor passed to his son and heir, Philip Bowes- Vere-Broke, of 
Broke Hall, who was created a baronet 2nd Nov. 1813, in recognition of 
his gallant victory over the United States frigate, the " Chesapeake." 
He was engaged in cruising on the outbreak of the American war in 1812, 
and brought his crew to a high state of efi&ciency. A memoir of this gallant 
officer was compiled by the Rev. J. G. Brighton, chiefly from Journals and 
Letters in the possession of Rear-Admiral Sir George Broke-Middleton, and 
published in 1866. The work contains portraits and many full-page 
illustrations, and deals largely with the second American War, 1806-1815. 
Admiral Sir P. B. V. Broke married in 1802 Sarah Louisa, daughter of Sir 
William Fowle Middleton, Bart., of Shrubland Hall, and dying 2nd Jan. 
1841, was succeeded by his eldest son. Sir Philip Broke, 2nd Bart., who died 
unmarried 24th Feb. 1855, and was succeeded by his brother. Sir George 
Nathaniel Broke Middleton, Bart., 3rd Bart., having assumed in i860 the 
surname Middleton after that of Broke, pursuant to the provisions of the 
will of his maternal grandfather. Sir William Fowle Middleton, ist Bart., 
of Shrubland Hall. 

Sir George was High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1864, and married in 1853 
Albinia Maria, 2nd daughter of Thomas Evans, of Lyminster, Sussex, and 
died without issue 14th Jan. 1887. The manor is now, hke the manor of 
Lawshall, in Babergh Hundred, and by a similar course of descent, vested 
in Lord de Saumarez. 

A list of the portraits at Broke Hall, then the seat of P. B. Broke in 
1797, will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum.^ 

Arms of Fastolf : Quarterly, Arg. and Az. on a bend Gules, three 
escallops Arg. 

' Will 24th Oct. 1577, proved 7th May, I582. ^ Add 6391. 
'Will i6th Dec. 1693, proved 3rd May, 
1694. 



TO THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sholond or Sholland Hall or Lame Manor. 

This manor belonged to Richard de Holbroke in the time of Hen. IIL, 
and seems to have descended in the same hne of devolution as the Manor of 
Broke Hall from that period. It is specifically mentioned in the inquisition 
p.m. of John de Holbrook, who died in 1376/ and that of Sir Hugh Fastolf 
in 1417, then held by him of the Castle of Dover." It is mentioned 
also in the inquisition p.m. of John Fastolf in 1447 f and there is amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum a suit concerning the manor 
in 1456.'* The manor has probably long since become extinct. 

PURDIES OR PURDEWS MANOR. 

This manor was held in the time of Wilham the Conqueror by Roger 
de Poictou, probably as part of Alnesbourne. Not unUkely this is the manor 
mentioned as Nacton Manor in the inquisition p.m. of Margaret Sampson in 
1476.' In 1580 John Barker, of Ipswich, held the same, for in that year he 
conveyed it to Richard Broke, of Nacton, who died in 1613, and from that 
period the manor has descended in the same course of descent as the Manor 
of Broke Hall. 

St. Peter's Manor. 

This was vested in St. Peter's, Ipswich, and on the Dissolution vested 
in the Crown, when it was granted in 1527 to Cardinal Wolsey. In 1633 
it seems to have been vested in one Bull, who must have sold to Sir Richard 
Broke, for he died seised in 1639, from which period it has descended in 
the same course of descent as the Manor of Broke Hall, being now vested in 
Lord Saumarez. 

Nacton has been celebrated for seamen. Here Admiral Vernon, the 
captor of Portobello, fixed his residence, and his nephew, to whom his 
property passed, rebuilt the Admiral's house and surrounded it with exten- 
sive and beautiful grounds called Orwell Park — from the noble river which 
bounds them on the south. This gentleman was created a Peer of Ireland 
in 1776 by the title of Viscount Orwell, and in the following year was raised 
to the dignity of Earl of Shipbroke ; but on his death in 1783 both these 
titles became extinct, and his estates passed to his nephew, John Vernon, 
whose heir carried them in marriage to Sir Robert Harland, Bart., whose 
father was created a baronet in 1771 by the title of Sir Robert Harland, of 
Sproughton, and sailed in the same year as commander-in-chief of his 
Majesty's fleet to the East Indies, being second in command to Admiral 
Keppel in 1778, and one of the Lords of the Admiralty in 1782, but died in 
1784. Sir Robert Harland, who married the Vernon heiress, died in 1848, 
when the baronetcy became extinct, and the estate was sold to George 
Tomline, M.P., from whom the present owner, Capt. Ernest George 
Pretyman, D.L., has inherited. 

The mansion of Orwell Park was greatly enlarged by Colonel Tomline 
about the year 1873, and a very fine observatory has been attached to it. 
Chimes of 16 bells were restored in 1886, the bells being in a tower about 
50 feet from the house in a south-easterly direction. The park in which the 
mansion stands extends to about 200 acres, and is bordered by the River 
Orwell. 

'I.P.M., 50 Edw. III. 31. ♦Add. Ch. 17244. 

'I.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 49. n:PM.., 16 Edw. IV. 48. 

3I.P.M., 26 Hen. VI. 15. 



NACTON. 7I 

Alnesbourn Manor. 

A manor was held here in Edward the Confessor's time by Saint Andrew, 
consisting of i carucate of land. There were 4 bordars, i ploughteam in 
demesne, 6 acres of meadow, and 60 sheep, and it was then valued at 30s., 
which at the time of the Norman Survey had come down to los., and was 
held by Albert of Roger de Poictou as tenant in chief.' It was 6 quarentenes 
long and 2 broad, and paid in a gelt ^d. Robert de Merton claimed view of 
frankpledge in the manor in 1275, and from a feoffment made in 1444 the 
name Merton seems up to that time to have attached itself to the manor. 
The feoffment was of a moiety." 

The manor, however, formed part of the endowment of the priory of 
Alnesbourn, which is situated near the river between St. Clement's in 
Ipswich, and Nacton in the ancient parish of Hallowtree, nowextraparochial. 
It was a small house of Augustine or Black Canons, being a cell to Wood- 
bridge. The revenues of this house were confirmed to the prior and 
canons about 1280, and we find Robert de Belsted and Robert de Twait 
occurring as benefactors in 1300. In 1315 the prior of Alnesbourn was 
returned as lord, and the manor remained in the priory till 1424, when John, 
Duke of Norfolk, and others, purchased it of John Turnour, prior of St. 
Mary at Alnesbourn, and the convent for St. Giles Hospital in Norwich; 
but in 1452, on the request of Wm. Turnour, then prior of Alnesbourn, 
the priory was united to and became a ceU to Woodbridge Priory. In 
1530 it was let by Thomas Cooke, prior of Woodbridge, to Thomas Alvard, 
or Alverde, of Ipswich, by the style of "Manerium de Alvesborne et Ponds." 
At the Dissolution the priory was granted in 1541, as part of the posses- 
sions of Woodbridge Priory, to Sir John Wingfield and Dorothy his wife, 
and in the same year they were found to hold the manor in tail by the 
service of a knight's fee and ^4. 4s. lod. rent. 

It is stated, however, that the Manor of Alnesbourn was granted to 
Thomas Alverd, of Ipswich, and it is clear that it was sold by Robert Bam- 
borough, executor of the will of this Thomas Alverd to Humphrey Seckford, 
of Ipswich. Possibly this was only the leasehold interest, acquired as we 
have stated, in 1530. Humphrey Seckford died in 1575, and was succeeded 
by Thomas Seckford, 2nd son of Thomas Seckford and Margaret his wife. 

He was one of the masters of the Court of Request and surveyor of the 
Court of Wards and Liveries, the munificent founder of the almhouses in 
Woodbridge. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Harlow, and 
widow of Sir Martin Bowes, of London, Knt. She died igth Dec. 1587, 
and he died without issue 15th Jan. 1587-8, aged 72, being buried in a vault 
which he had erected for himself in a chapel on the north side of the cha,ncel 
of Woodbridge Church. 

Francis Seckford, his elder brother, died before his father, leaving a 
son, Charles Seckford, who succeeded both his grandfather and his uncle, 
and married Mary, daughter of Thomas Steyning, of Earl Sohani, by 
Frances, his wife, Countess Dowager of Surrey, daughter of John Vere, 
Earl of Oxford. He represented the borough of Aldeburgh in Parliament 
in the 14th year of Queen Elizabeth, and died in 1591, aged 31, being 
buried at Woodbridge, as was his widow in 1596. 

Davy names Henry Seckford as the next lord, and states that he sold ; 
but as the sale was not made according to Davy till 1630, this could hardly 

' Dom. ii, 347. ' Harl. 85 F. 34. 



72 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

have been the case, as Henry Seckford died in 1626, and was buried at Wood- 
bridge. No doubt the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Seckford Hall, Great Beahngs, in Carlford Hundred, until the purchase by 
Sir Richard Broke, of Nacton. He apparently acquired the manor about 
1630, and married Mary, daughter of Sir John Pakington, Bart. From 
this time the manor has devolved in the same course as the main manor 
of Broke Hall, and is now vested in Lord De Saumarez. 

An " Ayllesbourne " Manor, or rather a moiety of it, was included in a 
fine levied in 1558 by Sir Edward Waldegrave and others against William 
Wyndsore.' 



' Fine, Hil. 5 Mary I. 




NEWBOURN. 73 

NEWBOURN. 

|HERE was no manor in this place in Saxon times. The 
principal holding was that of Ranulf, brother of Ilger, 
who held i carucate and 40 acres, which in the Confessor's 
time had been held by 16 freemen under commendation to 
Brictmar and Quengeva, and two under half commenda- 
tion to the Abbot of Ely. Under them were 14 bordars. In 
Saxon times there were attached to the holdings 4 plough- 
teams and i^ acres of meadow, and the valuation was 40s. By the time 
of the Survey the value was reduced by half, and the ploughteams had 
come down to 3. 

There was also a church with 12 acres, valued at i6d. "And it was 
Norman's witness the Hundred." So the Survey says, which adds : " It is 
6 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and pays in a gelt y^d.'" 

The only two other holdings here were one of Albert the Burnt, holding 
of Roger de Poictou, consisting of 15 acres, valued at i6d., formerly held by 
a freeman under Gurth ; the other of 3 freemen held by the Abbot of Bury.^ 

Newbourn-cum-Martlesham Manor. 

This was the manor of Ralph, brother of Ilger, as Domesday tenant, 
and in the time of Edw. II. was the lordship of Richard de Brewes or Brewse. 
It seems to have passed in the same reign to Thomas de Verdon, who died 
in 1315, and was succeeded by Sir John de Verdon, who was followed by his 
grandson, Thomas de Verdon, who died without issue in 1346. 

Thomas was succeeded by his uncle. Sir John de Verdon, Knt. The 
manor was included in the settlement made by Sir John de Verdon in 1365, 
upon Isabel, his 2nd wife, eldest daughter of Sir Thomas VisdeUeu,of Shotley, 
in Samford Hundred, Knt., as narrated in the account of Martlesham Hall 
Manor, in this Hundred, and the descent of this manor to the time of Henry 
Noon, son of Sir Henry who died in 1587, is the same as of that manor. 

The manor then passed to Roger Warren or Warrener, of Newbourn, son 
and heir of John Warren, and Dorothy his wife, daughter of Robert 
Forthe, of Hadleigh. Roger Warren married ist Barbara, daughter of 
John — of Wantisden, and had issue Robert — not Roger — son and heir, as 
stated in the Visitation of 1561. He married 2ndly Mary, daughter of Sir 
John Cornwallis, of Brome, Knt., and had a son, Thomas. Robert Warren, 
the eldest son, was of Hemley, and married Mary, daughter of William 
Cavendish, of Trimley St. Martin. Robert died in the lifetime of his 
father, and was buried at Newbourn, 6th Oct. 1580. 

A fine was in 1585 levied of this manor by Leonard Caston against 
the said Roger Warren.^ Roger Warren died in 1588 unmarried, when the 
manor passed to his grandson Roger Warren, and on his death shortly 
afterwards, unmarried, the manor passed to his father's half-brother, 
Thomas Warren, of Trimley St. Martin. 

A fine was levied against this Thomas Warren and others in 1589 by 
George Tottie and others,^ and in 1601 by Thomas Glascock and others 
against the said Thomas Warren and others.' The manor, however, 
had been apparently included in a settlement dated 24th Sept. 36 EUz. 
[1594] niade by Charles Cornwallis on the marriage of his son William with 

'Dom. ii. 424b. *Fine, Mich. 31-32 Eliz. 

' Dom. ii. 347. ' Fine, Trin. 43 Eliz. 

^Fine, Trin. 27 Eliz. 

K 



74 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Katherine, daughter of Sir Philipp Parker^ of Erwarton/ and we meet with 
a fine levied in 1601 by Eleazer Duncon and others against Charles Corn- 
waleys and others/ Finally, by deed dated 23rd May, 1612, Thomas 
Warrener, described as of London, at the request of Sir Charles Cornwaleys, 
released the manor to William Cock.^ 

A little later we find the manor vested in Edmund Purpet,* son and heir 
of John Purpet by Anne Rolf his wife, and he (Edmund) sold the manor in 
1622 to Sir William Hewytt and his son, Sir Thomas Hewytt, knights. 

Sir William Hewytt or Hewitt, of Brightwell, was the son of Solomon 
Hewitt, son of William Hewitt, who died in 1599, he being the 2nd son 
of Robert Hewitt, of Kellamarsh. Sir William married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Richard Wiseman, and died in London in 1637. His son. Sir Thomas, 
was created a baronet 19th July, 1660, and married ist Frances, daughter of 
Sir John Hobart, Bart., of Blickhng, co. Norfolk, Lord Chief Justice of the 
Common Pleas, and 2ndly Margaret, eldest daughter of Sir William Lytton, 
Knt., and widow of Thomas Hillersdon. However, in the hfetime of 
Sir Wilham and Sir Thomas, or shortly after the death of the former, 
the manor must have been parted with, for Sir Richard Broke died seised of 
it in 1639, when it passed to his widow. Dame Mary, who, with Sir Robert 
Broke, in 1643 sold it to Nicholas Harlestone, a merchant. 

In 1809 the manor was vested in John Vernon, on whose death in 1818 
it passed to his sister and heir Arethusa, wife of Sir Robert Harland, Bart.' 
In 1855 Newbourn seems to have been vested in Sir Joshua Rowley, and 
the same has descended like the Manor of Nayland, in Babergh Hundred, 
and is now vested in Sir Joshua Thellusson Rowley, Bart. 

Arms of Warren : Arg. a fesse chequy Or and Azure betw. 3 talbots 
passant Sable. Of Hewitt : Gu. a chevron engrailed betw. 3 owls Arg. 

Haspley with Newbourn Manor. 

The land of this manor is entered separately in the Domesday Survey 
under the lands of Ranulf, brother of Ilger. It was 6 quarentenes long, and 
3 broad, and paid in a gelt ^d. There was no actual manor here at the time 
of the Survey, but the holding consisted of a carucate of land, 5 bordars, 
3 ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. It had in the time 
of the Confessor been valued at 30s., and been held by 5 freemen under com- 
mendation to Brictmar, but one was half Edric's man and half Norman's 
man, and 2 were under commendation to Quengeva. There were also here 
7 acres included in the valuation of Almeley.^ 

This manor passed in early times to, the Priory of Woodbridge. On the 
Dissolution it vested in the Crown, and was granted by Hen. VIII. to 
Cardinal Wolsey, and on his attainder granted by the King in fee to Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk, in 1530.^ It seems, however, to have come back to the 
Crown, for in 1541 it was granted to Sir John Wingfield and Dorothy his 
wife. 

In 1564 the manor was acquired by Thomas Seckford, and shortly 
afterwards passed to Roger Warren, who died seised of it in 1588, after 
which it passed through the Warren family in the same way as the Manor of 

'Add. Ch. J0236. 5See St. Peter's Manor, Nacton, in this 

"■Fine, Mich. 43-44 Eliz. Hundred. 

3 Add. Ch. 10244. ^Dom. ii. 4246, 425. 

*As to the Purpet family, see E.A. (N.S.), i-S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 220 (li). 

i. 311, 328,and Waldringfield Manor, 

in this Hundred. 



NEWBOURN. 75 

Newbourn. In 1719 it was probably vested in Anne Western, widow, 
who this year presented to the living. She was the daughter of Robert 
Callis, and widow of Thomas Western, son of Thomas Western, of Rivenhall 
Place, CO. Essex, who had died in 1765. Her son and heir, Charles Western, 
married Frances Shirley, daughter and heir of William BoUan and Frances 
his wife, sister of Sir Thomas Shirley, Bart., and died 24th July, 1771, in 
the lifetime of his mother. Anne Western died in January, 1776, when the 
manor passed to her grandson, Charles Callis Western, M.P. for Essex, 
created Baron Western of Rivenhall, 28th Jan. 1833. Possibly he may 
have had the manor in his grandmother's lifetime, for we find that in 1775 
he presented to the living. The manor during his hfetime seems to have gone 
to one Caryll, and subsequently to one Drury, of Clayton. Davy says in 
1825 Sir William Rowley, Bart., presented, and also in 1832, but was not 
lord. The manor seems to have been vested about this time in one Cross, of 
Henley, from whom a Mr. Porter purchased. 

Court Rolls for this manor, 36 Hen. VHI. 13th July ; 37 Hen. VIH. 
i6th Oct.; 37 Hen. VHI.; 37 Hen. VIH. ; 24, 25, 26, 31, 32, and 34 Hen. 
VIII. ; and i and 2 Edw. VI., are in existence and in private hands. 




76 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

OTLEY. 

JE-^ IK^HERE were two manors held here in the time of the Confessor. 
One belonged to Lustwin, under commendation to Edric, 
and consisted of i carucate of land, i villein, and 4 bordars, 
I ploughteam (and by the time of the Survey also half a 
team) in demesne and i belonging to the men, 2 acres of 
meadow, and wood sufficient to support 5 hogs, valued at 
20S. By the time of the Survey, the value had risen to 

30s., and the manor was held by Humphrey the Chamberlain as Domesday 

tenant in chief. 

Humphrey also held here a carucate and a half, formerly held by 
Lefleda, a f reewoman under commendation to Edric, the predecessor of Robert 
Malet. There were 3 villeins, 10 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 3 
belonging to the tenants, wood sufficient for the support of 20 hogs, 2 acres 
of meadow, 2 rouncies, 5 beasts, 40 hogs, 100 sheep, 25 goats, and 6 hives of 
bees, valued at loos. By the time of the Survey the value had risen to £6, 
the ploughteams in demesne, however, were only one and a half, and of 
those belonging to the men but 2, and the beasts had gone. Of this William 
Malet was seised on the day of his death, and afterwards Robert, as the 
Hundred witnessed. 

Humphrey the Chamberlain also held here 69 acres, which had been 
held by 16 and a half freemen under commendation to Lefleda, with 3 
ploughteams, formerly valued at 20s., but at the time of the Survey at 
30S. Also a church with 20 acres, valued at 4s. Of all this William 
Malet was seised at the time of his death, and Robert afterwards, the King 
and the Earl having the soc. 

Humphrey also held here 30 acres, i villein, and 4 bordars, and i 
ploughteam (increased at the time of the Survey to one and a half), i acre 
of meadow, and wood for 10 hogs, valued formerly at 8s., but at the time 
of the Survey at los. This was held in the time of the Confessor by Brith 
wold, a freeman under commendation to Queen Edith. At the time of the 
Survey Hamond held this of Humphrey. 

Humphrey's only other holding here was of 27 acres, formerly having 
two ploughteams, but at the time of the Survey i only, valued at los. 
This had in Saxon times been held by 6 freemen under commendation to 
Brithwold.' 

The second manor was held by Andrew of Roger de Poictou, the Domes- 
day tenant in chief, and was the land which Edwold, a freeman under 
Harold and his wife under commendation to Edric, had held in the Confes- 
sor's time. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 3 villeins, 10 bordars, 3 
serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to the tenants, wood 
sufficient for 4 hogs, 3 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 12 beasts, 30 hogs, and 
60 sheep, valued at loos. By the time of the Survey the value had fallen 
to 4s., and there were various alterations in the details of the appurtenances 
to the manor. The serfs were but i, the ploughteams in demesne i, 
though more might have been made up, and 3 ploughteams only belonging 
to the tenants ; the rouncies had disappeared, and the beasts had come 
down to I, the hogs to 10, while all the sheep had gone. The manor was 
10 quareutenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 15^.'' 

'Dom. ii. 433. "00111.11.347. 



OTLEY. 



17 



Another holding, consisting of 4 acres (which belonged to Easton and 
to its valuation) was held by Milo de Belefol of Roger de Rheims.' 

The only other holding was that of Walter the Deacon, who had 6 acres 
in demesne valued at I2i.^ 

OvERHALL Manor in Otley. 

This was the lordship of Humphrey the Chamberlain in the time of 
William the Conqueror, and in the time of Edw. I. is said to have been the 
lordship of John de Paynell. This, however, is a delusion. For some 
centuries Overhallwas held of the Earls of Clare and Gloucester, and Nether- 
hall of the Honor of Lancaster. 

Overhall Manor was held by Henry de Hastings prior to 1250. He 
was the son of William Hastings, steward to Hen. n.,and Margaret his wife, 
daughter of Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, which William was son of William 
by Maud, daughter of Thurston Banaster, and widow of WiUiam Cumin, 




Otley Hall. 



which William was son of Hugh, son of Walter, son of Robert de Hastings, 
lord of Fillougley, co. Warwick, living in 1066. Henry de Hastings married 
Ada, fourth daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon, and of Maud, his wife, 
daughter of Hugh, and one of the sisters and coheirs of Ranulph, Earl of 
Chester, by whom he had issue, Henry, his successor, and two daughters, 
Margaret and Hillaria, who at the time of his decease were in the nunnery of 
Alneston, and their tuition was then committed to William de Cantilupe. 
This Henry de Hastings attended the King into France in the 26th year of 
his reign, and was taken prisoner at the defeat at Zante, but was soon after- 
wards released. He also a few years later accompanied Richard, Earl of 
Cornwall, into France, and died in 1250, leaving Henry de Hastings, his 
eldest son, a minor. His wardship was granted to Guy de Lusignan, King 
Hen. III.'s half brother (who afterwards passed it over to William de Canti- 
lupe, the King ratifying the same); but from the Fine Rolls we learn that 
the King committed this manor to Stephen de Spineto and Jusbto Guidon 



' Dom. ii. 4236. 



'Dom. ii. 4276. 



78 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK, 

during the heir's minority.' This Henry in 1260 had a summons to be in 
Shrewsbury with horse and arms to march against the Welsh, and the 
following year a similar summons to be in London. Shortly afterwards he 
was in arms with Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, and others against 
the King, and with those excommunicated by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 
He distinguished himself amongst the Barons at the Battle of Lewes, when 
the King was made prisoner, receiving the honour of knighthood at the 
hands of Montfort, and was made governor of Scarborough and Winchester 
castles. In 1265 he was constituted governor of Kenilworth Castle, which, 
after the defeat at Evesham, he defended against the King's victorious 
forces for the space of six months, making many bold sallies. At length, 
however, finding no hope of relief, he was constrained to surrender, but upon 
the most honourable terms, marching off with bag and baggage. He was, 
notwithstanding, excepted from the benefit of the Dictum of Kenilworth, 
being offered a seventeen years' imprisonment or submission to the King's 
mercy. About two years later, however, on the mediation of Prince Edward, 
he was admitted to the full benefit of the decree, and dying in 1268,^ left 
by his wife Joan, daughter of William de Cantilupe, sister and eventually 
coheir of George de Cantilupe, Baron of Bergavenny, two sons and three 
daughters— John, Edmund, Andra, Lora, and Joane. The manor passed to 
his son and heir, John Hastings, 2nd Baron and Lord Bergavenny, in right 
of his mother. He was constituted Seneschal of Aquitaine, and in 1290 
was one of the competitors for the Crown of Scotland in right of his descent 
from Ada, daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon, brother to Malcolm 
and William, Kings of Scotland. He had also summons to Parliament 
among the barons of the realm from 1295 to the time of his death in 1312-3. 
He was interred at the Grey Friars, in Coventry. By Isabel, his ist wife, 
daughter of William and sister and coheir of Aylmer de Valence, Earl of 
Pembroke, he had issue John, his son and heir, William and Henry, who died 
without issue, and three daughters, Joane, Margaret, and Elizabeth, who 
married Roger, Lord Grey of Ruthyn. Lord Hastings married 2ndly Isabel. 
5th daughter of Hugh Despenser, Earl of Winchester, and had two other 
sons, Sir Hugh Hastings, of Gressenhall and Fenwick, in Norfolk, in right 
of his wife, Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir Richard FoUot, Knt., whose 
male line terminated about the reign of Elizabeth in Sir Francis Hastings, 
of Stusthope, and Thomas. 

On the death of John, 2nd Baron, 9th March, 1312-13,^ the manor passed 
to the elder son of his first marriage, John, Lord Hastings, 3rd Baron. He 
was engaged in the wars in Scotland from 1310 to 1318, and joined in the 
insurrection of the lords when they banished the two Despensers, but 
deserting the barons later joined the King at Cirencester. He married 
Juliana, granddaughter and heir of Thomas de Leybourne, Baron 
Leybourne, and dying in 1325* was succeeded by his only son, Laurence, 
4th Baron, but the manor passed to the widow Juliana, and there is 
an order on the Close Rolls the following year to deliver the same to 
Thomas le Blount and Juliana his wife, late wife of John de Hastyngs 
in dower.' The advowson was, with the manor, assigned in dower, 
for we learn from the Patent Rolls the King presented in 1328 one 
Ralph Chyvaler by reason of the heir of John de Hastyngs, tenant 

'Fine, Rolls, 35 Hen. III. 251, 17. ''Extent of Honor of Gloucester ; I.P.M., 
^'I.P.M., 52 Hen. m. 63. He was buried 18 Edw. H. 83. 

in the Grey Friars, in Coventry. ^ Close Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 29. 
^I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 56. 



OTLEY. 79 

in chiefj being a minor, but immediately afterwards discovering that this 
was the case, and that the advowson had been assigned to Thomas le Blount 
and Juliana his wife, revoked the presentation he had made, yet strangely 
the entry on the Rolls says of the revocation (not of Ralph Chyvaler but) 
of John Sprott.' 

The widow appears very rapidly to have found a new consort, and she 
subsequently remarried a third time,WilHam de Clinton, Earl of Huntingdon. 
He died in 1354, and the manor is referred to in his inquisition p-m."* as it had 
been in that of his son John, who died three years anterior.^ From this 
time to the death of John, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, the manor devolved 
as the Manor of Reydon, in Blything Hundred. 

On the premature death of John, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, without issue, 
the earldom of Pembroke determined, and the baronies vested in him 
devolved upon Reginald, Lord Grey de Ruthyn, as descended lineally from 
Elizabeth, sister to John de Hastings, father of Laurence, ist Earl of 
Pembroke ; but this manor, under the feoffment of 1369, referred to in the 
account of Reydon Manor, in Blything Hundred, passed to William Beau- 
champ, Lord Bergavenny, subject to the life interest of Philippa, the 3rd 
Earl of Pembroke's widow, who seems to have remarried Richard, Earl of 
Arundel,* and died in 1401.^ 

William Beauchamp, Lord Bergavenny, was a younger brother of 
Thomas, Earl of Warwick, and died in 1410, when the manor passed to his 
widow, Joan, sister and coheir of Thomas Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel, who 
survived until 1436,* so that her son and heir, Richard Beauchamp, 
2nd Baron Bergavenny, who was created Earl of Worcester by Hen. V. in 
Feb. 1421, and married Isabel Despenser, daughter and coheir of Thomas, 
Earl of Gloucester, K.G., never inherited or had actual possession of this 
manor, for he died mortally wounded by a stone from a sling during the 
wars in France, i6th April, 1422. The manor therefore, on the death of 
Joan, the widow of William Beauchamp, Lord Bergavenny, passed directly 
to his granddaughter Elizabeth, sole child of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of 
Worcester, by Joane, daughter of John of Ghent, Duke of Lancaster, 3rd 
son of King Edw. III., married to Sir Edward Nevill, 6th son of Ralph, ist 
Earl of Westmoreland, who in her right became Lord Bergavenny. They 
had issue two sons, Richard and George. She died before her husband, and 
he, by the curtesy of England, enjoyed this lordship and her other possessions 
for life. He subsequently married Catherine, daughter of Sir Robert 
Howard, Knt., and sister of John, ist Duke of Norfolk, and died i8th 
Oct. 1476,'' when George Nevill, Lord Abergavenny, became seised thereof, 
Richard, the elder brother, having died without issue. Sir George Nevill 
(who had been knighted at the Battle of Tewkesbury, gth May, 1471) 
married ist Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir Hugh Fenne, Knt., sub- 
treasurer of England, and dying 20th Sept. 1492, the manor apparently 
passed to his son and heir, Sir George Nevill, 3rd Lord Abergavenny. He 
was called by the King's writ at the Tower of London, June, 1483, to prepare 
himself to receive the order of knighthood against his Coronation, and 
afterwards was made one of the Knights of the Bath, on the Sunday before 
the Coronation of King Rich. III., viz., 4th July, 1483 ; after which he 
waited on the King in his progress to the north. In 1492 he was one of the 

^ Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. III. pt. i. 14, 12. ' I.P.M., 2 Hen. IV. 54. 

n.P.M., 28 Edw. III. 59. «I.P.M., 14 Hen. VI. 35- 

n.PM., 24 Edw. III. 80. 'I.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 66. 

^I.P.M., 2lRich. II. 2. 



8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

principal persons with the King at the siege of Boulogne; and four years 
later by his credit and power preserved the county of Kent from joining 
the Cornish rebels then in that county, and had a share in the honour of 
the victory obtained against them at Blackheath, 17th July the same year. 
In 1505, being under suspicion for favouring Edward de la Pole, Earl of 
Lincoln, at that time in banishment, he was committed to prison ; but, 
nothing of guilt appearing against him, he was enlarged and received into 
greater favour than before. 

" The Lord Burgeyny," (as an old historian says) " for his modestie, 
wyt, and probitie (because the Kinge found hym lyke hymselfe), always 
true, faythful, and constant, was of hys sovereigne lorde more esteemed, 
favoured, and regarded than he was before." 

In 1510 he was made Constable of Dover Castle, and Warden of the 
Cinque Ports. On 23rd April, 1513, he was elected a Knight of the Garter, 
and installed 7th May in the eighth stall on the princes' side. And, soon 
after embarking with King Henry VIII., he commanded one of the wings 
of the army at the siege of Theronenne, and at the Battle of Spurs. After 
which he was at the siege of Tournay, and on the surrender thereof was 
appointed by the King, with 6,000 men, to take possession of that city. 

In 15 16, when the King for the honour of his sister, the Queen of 
Scots, then come to visit him, had prepared two solemn days of jousts, 
he was one the King chose on his side. And the year after was one of the 
chiefs who suppressed a great riot in London. 

Two years later at a chapter held at Windsor loth May, several of the 
Knights of the Garter being present with the King, it was on due con- 
sideration decreed: "That the pulpit where is the picture of our Saviour 
on the Cross, and the glass lanthorn at the top, in the King's chapel, should 
be taken care to be duly finished ; and that the whole Society should, for 
the doing thereof with the greater expedition and ease, join in lending their 
helping hands." The sum then imposed upon the Lord Abergavenny was 
twenty pounds. 

■ He was present at that memorable interview betwixt King Hen. VIII. 
and Francis I., King of France, betwixt Guisnes and Ardres ; and on their 
march the Lord Abergavenny publicly said to the King : " Sir, you are 
my king and sovereign, wherefore above all, I am bound to shew you truth 
and not to let for none. I have been in the French party, and they are in 
number double as many as you be." Whereupon he, with the Earl of 
Essex, Edward Ponynge, and Robert Wingfeilde were appointed to take 
an account of the number of the French King's attendants. He married 
Mary, daughter to Edward, Duke of Buckingham, and was imprisoned in 
the Tower for concealment of words spoken by that Duke, loth of September, 
1519, viz., " That if the King died, he would have the rule of the realm, in 
spight of whosoever said the contrary, swearing that, if the Lord Aber- 
gavenny revealed this, he would fight with him." Which words were 
spoken in the gallery at Bletchingley in Surrey. But on the nth February 
following, being brought to the King's Bench at Westminster, and there 
confessing " his indictment of misprision of treason," he was soon after dis- 
charged and was again in the King's favour. He was summoned to 
Parliament as premier Baron of England, by the title of " George Nevyle de 
Bergevenny, Chivaler," and was one of the peers who subscribed the cele- 
brated letter to Pope Clement VII., importing that in case he did not comply 
with King Henry in the matter of his divorce from Queen Catharine, he 
would endanger his supremacy here. At the coronation pf Queen Anne, 



OTLEY. 8i 

ist June, 1533, he claimed the office of Chief Larder, which was allowed. 
He died in June, 1535, and by his last will and testament, dated the same 
year, viz., 4th June, 1535, bequeathed his body to be buried in the parish 
church of Birliiig, in Kent ; and left issue by Joan, daughter of Thomas 
Fitz Alan, 12th Earl of Arundel (his first wife), one daughter, named 
Elizabeth, married to Henry, Lord d'Aubeny ; and by Mary, his 2nd wife, 
daughter of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham, Henry, his son and 
heir, as also five daughters. His 3rd wife was Mary Broke, alias 
Cobham. Henry Nevill, Lord Abergavenny, son and successor of George, was 
summoned to Parliament in 1551 and 1552, and accompanied the Marquess 
of Northampton and some other lords in a solemn embassy into France ; 
as also to present the Order of the Garter to that King. After his return, on 
the 2nd March, he was committed to ward for striking the Earl of Oxford in 
the Chamber of Presence ; but on the 6th April following he had a special 
pardon for the offence. On Wyatt's insurrection in Kent, in the reign of 
Queen Mary, he raised forces to oppose him, and, overtaking a body of his 
adherents at Blackfoil Field, in the parish of Wrotham, he put them to 
flight, chasing them four miles, and taking sixty prisoners. After which 
he marched after Wyatt to London. In 1586 he was one of the peers that 
sat in judgment upon the Queen of Scots at Fotheringay. He died loth 
February, 1586-7, and was buried with great solemnity in the church of 
Birling, in Kent, 21st March following. By the inquisition taken after his 
decease at Maidstone, in the County of Kent, 22nd Aug. 1587, the jury found 
his daughter Elizabeth, then aged 32, to be his sole heir. She had married 
in 1575 Sir Thomas Fane, Knt. Her mother was Frances, 3rd daughter 
of Thomas Manners, ist Earl of Rutland. She challenged the title of 
Baroness Bergavenny against Edward Nevill, nephew of Henry, last Baron, 
and son of Sir Edward Nevill, a younger brother to George, Lord Berga- 
venny, father to this last-mentioned Henry, on which Sir Edward the Castle 
of Bergavenny was settled, both by testament and Act of Parliament, but 
the dispute was not determined until 25th May, 1604, when, after lengthy 
arguments on each part, the title of Lord Bergavenny was, both by judg- 
ment of the House of Peers and order of the Lords Commissioners for the 
ofi&ce of Earl Marshal of England, decreed for the heir male. Whereupon, 
to give some satisfaction to the heir female, the King, by his letters patent, 
granted the dignity of Barony of Le Despenser to her and to her heirs. 
Edward Nevill, 5th Baron, had married ist Catherine, daughter of Sir John 
Brome, Knt., of Hatton, co. Oxford, and 2ndly Griseld, daughter of Thomas 
Hughes, of Uxbridge, and died roth Feb. 1589. 

The inquisition taken after his decease at Maidstone, in Kent, 7th 
July, 1589, recites that Edward Nevill, his son and heir, was 38 years of 
age. The said-Edward Nevill, his eldest son, was summoned to Parliament 
as 6th Baron of Abergavenny 25th May, 1604, and, the year after claimed 
the title of Earl of Westmoreland, as heir male. The case is given in Lord 
Coke's 7th vol. of Reports, where the claim is set forth at length ; but the 
determination was ultimately against him. He married Rachel, daughter of 
John Leonard, of Knowle, in Kent, ancestor of the Earl of Sussex of that 
name, and had issue six sons. He died ist Dec. 1622, and was succeeded 
by his eldest son. Sir Henry Nevill, 7th Baron of Abergavenny, to whom 
this manor passed. He married ist Mary, daughter of Thomas Sackvile, 
Earl of Dorset (Lord Treasurer of England), by whom he had issue Sir 
Thomas Nevill, Knight of the Bath (who married Frances, daughter to 
Henry, Lord Mordaunt, and died in 1628 in his father's lifetime, and was 



82 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

buried at Birling the 7th May in that year, leaving issue Henry, who died 
in his infancy in 1639) ; Charles,who died in 1637 from the effects of a fall 
from his horse ; Margaret, wife of Thomas Brooke, of Madely, co. Salop; 
Cicely, wife of Fitz- William Coningsby, of Hampton Court, co. Hereford ; 
Anne, Abbess of Pontoise in France ; Elizabeth and Mary, who died un- 
married. Lord Abergavenny married 2ndly Catharine, daughter to Edward, 
4th Lord Vaux, of Harrowden, and had issue by her two sons and three 
daughters. This Henry, Lord Abergavenny, was buried at Birling 
24th December, 1641, and the Lady Catharine, his 2nd wife, was buried 
by his side loth July, 1649. 

John Nevill, 8th Baron Abergavenny, son of Henry by his 2nd 
wife, succeeded, and married EUzabeth, daughter and coheir of William 
Chamberlaine, of Sherburne Castle, in Oxfordshire, and died 12th Dec. 
1660, without issue, when the manor passed to his brother George, 
9th Baron Abergavenny, who married Mary, daughter of Thomas, son 
and heir of Henry Giffard, M.D., and had issue by her, one son George, 
and dying 2nd June 1666, the manor passed to this son George, loth 
Baron Abergavenny. He married Honora, daughter of John, Lord 
Bellasys, of Worlaby, and departed this life without issue, 26th March, 
1694-5, whereupon the manor descended and came to the heir male 
of Sir Christopher Nevill, second surviving son of Edward, 6th Lord 
Abergavenny and Rachel, his wife, daughter of John Leonard, namely, to 
George, iith Lord Abergavenny. He married Anne, daughter of Nehemiah 
Walker, by whom he had issue three sons and two daughters, and dying 
nth March, 1720-1, the manor passed to his eldest surviving son George, 
12th Baron, who married Elizabeth, daughter to Edward Thornicroft, of 
the city of Westminster, and dying 15th November, 1723 without issue, 
it passed to his brother, Edward Nevill, 13th Lord Abergavenny, 
who married Catherine, daughter to Lieutenant-General Tatton, and dying 
9th October, 1724, in the 19th year of his age, and without issue, was 
succeeded by his cousin, William Nevill, 14th Baron, son and heir of Edward 
Nevill, brother to George, nth Lord Abergavenny. 

William Nevill, 14th Lord Abergavenny, on loth Feb. 1738-9, was con- 
stituted Master of the Jewel Office. His lordship married ist Catherine 
(Tatton), Dowager Baroness Abergavenny, widow of Edward, the late lord, 
and by her had issue a son named George, the King being his godfather. 
He married andly the Lady Rebecca Herbert, daughter of Thomas, 8th 
Earl of Pembroke, by whom he left issue three daughters, Harriet, Mary, 
and Sophia, and one son, William. His lordship died 21st Sept. 1744, 
and was buried at East Grinstead, in Sussex, 2nd October following, when 
the manor passed to his only son, George Nevill, 15th Lord Abergavenny, 
who held his first court 17th June, 1748. He married Henrietta, daughter 
of Thomas Pelham, of Stanmere, in Sussex, sister to Thomas Pelham, ist 
Earl of Chichester, and widow of the Hon. Richard Temple, and was 
advanced to the dignity of Viscount Nevill and Earl of Abergavenny, 17th 
May, 1784. He died loth Sept. 1785, when the manor passed to his son 
and successor, Henry Nevill, i6th Baron and 2nd Earl, who married Mary, 
only child of John Robinson, of Wyke Honn, co. Middlesex, sometime 
Secretary to the Treasury. The Earl died 27th May, 1843, and the manor 
passed with the title to his eldest surviving son, John Nevill, in holy orders, 
3rd Earl, who, dying unmarried 14th April, 1845, the manor went to his 
brother, William Nevill, 4th Earl, also in holy orders. He married Caroline, 
second daughter of Ralph Leeke, of Longford Hall, co. Salop, and dying 



OTLEY. 83 

17th Aug. i868j the manor passed to his elder son, William Nevill, 5th Earl 
of Abergavenny. He married Caroline, eldest daughter of Sir John 
Vandem Bempde Johnstone, 2nd Bart., of Hackness Hall, co. York, M.P. 
In 1870 the manor was purchased by Edward Broughton Rouse, 
M.A., LL.D., who a year or two subsequently sold the same to John 
Tollemache, now Lord ToUemache, who is now lord of the manor. 

In the time of Henry Nevill, 7th Lord Abergavenny, 1640, he, being 
lord of the manor, brought an action against John Armiger and others, 
particulars of which will be found amongst the Exchequer Depositions,' 
to recover " treasure silver," which had been found in a house in Otley. 
The ancient family of Armiger had been holders of land in Otley from an 
early date, and in 1387 Robert Armiger held a messuage and lands here 
called " Armiger's," and lands in Clopton. John Armiger, of Otley, died in 
1539- Thomas, his son, married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Heigham, 
of Heigham Hall, in Gazeley, and was father of Thomas Armiger, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and lord of Monewden. He married Jane, daughter and coheir 
of John Eyre, receiver of the revenues of King Edw. VI. in Suffolk, and had 
issue Thomas, his son and heir, who resided at Thrandeston. 

In one of the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a release 
of rents in Helmingham due to " Mounseux Manor," in Otley, in 1441.' 

Arms of Beauchamp : Gules, a fesse between 6 cross-crosslets Or. 

Netherhall Manor. 

In the reign of King Rich. I. Adam de Otteley held a fee here which in 
the time of Hen. III. was held by Thomas de Otteley,^ and in 1275 was held 
by Richard de Otteley.* This fee was held by Thomas de Otteley, who died 
in 1296,' when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas de Otteley. One fee 
was in 1327 held by R. Cressener, and in 1330 by Thomas de Cressener. 
Davy enters John Mortimer, who c^ed in 1333, as lord, but if this be correct 
he was probably a trustee ; for we find the manor back again in the 
Cresseners, and passing with the Manor of Cresseners in Hawkedon, in 
Risbridge Hundred, from Robert Cressener in 1410 to his son and 
heir, William Cressener, who died in 1454. 

Shortly after we find the manor vested in John Gosnold, son of John 
Gosnold, of Otley. He married Katherine Kebell, and with three sons, Robert, 
Edmund, and William, had two daughters. John Gosnold died in 1470, 
when the manor passed to his eldest son, Robert Gosnold, of Otley, who 
married ist Agnes, daughter of John Hill, of Ashe, by whom he had two 
sons, John and Robert, and three daughters ; and 2ndly Anne Bacon, 
daughter of Richard Doggett, by whom he had no issue. On Robert's 
death the manor passed to his 2nd son, Robert Gosnold, who married 
Marie, daughter of Robert Vesey, of Hadleigh, by whom he had issue 
Robert, Anthony, John, William, Alys, Katherine, Dorothy, Mary, Agnes, 
Cecyll, and Judith. A fine was levied of the manor in 1542 by Robert 
Gosnold against John Crestener.^ It included lands in Otley, Cleydon, 
Barham, Helmingham, and elsewhere. 

In the Pleadings relating to the Duchy of Lancaster in 1552 there is 
notice of an action by Robert " Gosnall " against Stephen Lowdham and 

•■ 16 Charles I., at Wickham Market. * H.R. ii. 188. 

'Add Ch. 10206. 5 Extent, I.P.M., 25 Edw. I. 38. 

5 T. de N. 283. « Fine, Mich. 34 Hen. VIII. 



84 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Thomas Lowdham, his son, as to exemption from tolls in this manor.' 
On Robert Gosnold's death the manor passed to his eldest son, Robert 
Gosnold/ who married Ursula, daughter of WilUam Naunton, of Alderton, 
and dying in 1616 was succeeded by his son and heir, Robert Gosnold or 
Gosnall. 

Kirby, writing in 1764, says that in Otley is a good old house formerly 
the seat of the Gosnolds, and that in the church is a monument to John 
Gosnold, who died in 1628, which sets forth that he was descended from 
the ancient and worthy families of Naunton and Wingfield, of Lethering- 
ham ; that he was Gentleman Usher to Queen Ehzabeth and King James I., 
afterwards Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to King Charles I., and that 
Winifred, his wife, was a granddaughter of Sir Richard Poole and the Lady 
Margaret, Countess of Salisbury, who was the daughter of George, Duke of 
Clarence, brother of King Edw. IV. This John Gosnold was the 3rd 
son of Robert Gosnold, who died in 1616. John left five sons and three 
daughters. 

Kirby adds: "This family suffered much in the time of the great 
Rebellion, insomuch that the Reverend Lionel Gosnold, the last of the 
family, and rector of that parish, was obliged to sell the estate."^ The 
hall referred to is partly surrounded by its ancient moat ; some of the rooms 
contain examples of ancient oak panelling, and on the walls of two of the 
rooms were formerly a number of heraldic paintings. But to return. 
Robert Gosnold, who compounded for delinquency in 1646,'' died about 
1656, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Gosnold, at whose 
death it went to his son and heir, Robert Gosnold, from whom it passed to 
his son and heir, William Gosnold. On Wilham Gosnold's death the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Gosnold. 

The manor then seems to have passed to Isaac Martin Rebow, of 
Wyvenhoe Park, Essex, Col. of the East Essex Mihtia, Recorder and M.P. 
for Colchester, son of Isaac Lemyng Rebow, of Colchester, M.P. He married 
his cousin Mary, daughter and coheir of Thomas Martin, of Alresford 
Hall, and assumed the additional surname of Martin under the will of his 
maternal grandfather, Capt. Martin. He died 3rd Oct. 1781, leaving three 
daughters, this manor apparently passing to the eldest, Mary Hester, 
married in 1796 to General Francis Slater (son of R. Slater, of Chester- 
field), who assumed the surname of Rebow, and left at his decease one only 
daughter and heir, Mary Martin, married ist to Sir Thomas Ormsby, 
Bart., and andly in 1835 fo John Gurdon (2nd son of Theophilus Thorn- 
haugh Gurdon, of Letton, Norfolk), who on his marriage assumed the 
additional surname of Rebow. He married 2ndly, 3rd Dec. 1845, Lady 
Georgiana Toler, 4th daughter of Hector John Graham, 2nd Earl of Norbury, 
and dying 12th Oct., 1870, the manor passed to his eldest son by his second 
marriage. Hector John Gurdon Rebow, of Wyvenhoe Park, Essex, the 
present lord of the manor. He is J. P. and D.L. for Essex, and was 
High Sheriff in 1882. He married 25th June, 1873, Judith Blanche, daughter 
of the Rev. Philip Gurdon, rector of Cranworth-cum-Letton, Norfolk, and 
has a son Martin. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1364 between Sir William de Hemen- 
hale and John de Bresyngham, sen., and Margaret his wife, the manor 

'Duchy of Lane, Cal. to Pleadings, 6 Gosnold against Anthony Gosnold 

Edw. VI. 6. and others. Fine, Hil. 36 Eliz. 

'A " Newhall Manor " is the subject of a ^xhe Suffolk Traveller, 2nd ed. p. 81, 

fine levied in 1594 by Robert *S.P. 1646, Cal. of Com. 1467 ; S.P. 1647, 

Com. for money advance, 809. 



OTLEY. 85 

being, it is stated, then held by John, son of John de Hoo, for life.' We are 
unable to say whether the fine relates to Overhall or Netherhall Manor. 

Extracts from Court Rolls of the Manor of Otley will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum,' As to customs and 
demesne, see S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1834 (2)- 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth is an 
action by Leonard Pereson against Robert Morse as to copyhold and 
customary lands in Otley and Netherhall in Otley and Kingeshall in 
Clopton, purchased by plaintiff of defendant, as son and heir of Edward 
Morse, deceased, it being alleged that the custom of the manor (which ?) 
was that land should descend to the youngest son.^ 

Arms of Gosnold : Per pale crenellee Or and Azure. Of Rebow : 
Gu, two long bows, bent and interlaced, in saltier. Or stringed Arg. between 
4 bezants, each charged with a fleur-de-lis, Az. 



'Feet of Fines, 38 Edw. III. 39. ^Qp. „. 322. 

*Add, Ch. 10219, 10227. 




86 MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

PLAYFORD. 

|HERE was one manor here in Saxon times belonging to 
Godwin, son of Alfer, holding under the Queen in the 
Confessor's time. It consisted of 3 carucates of land, 8 
villeins, 6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 8 belonging 
to the men, wood sufficient to support 20 hogs, 20 acres of 
meadow, and i mill, 3 rouncies, 15 beasts, 69 hogs, 160 
sheep, and 6 hives of bees, valued at £8. By the time of the 
Survey the value had come down to loos., and there had been various 
alterations in the details. The villeins had come down to 4, in place of 
3 bordars there were 23, and i burgess of Ipswich, i serf only, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 4 belonging to the tenants, i beast only, 25 hogs, 
26 sheep, and i hive of bees, while the rouncies seem to have disappeared 
altogether. There was also a church with 10 acres, valued at 2od. At the 
time of the Survey the manor was held by Humfrey, son of Robert, of 
Robert Malet. 

Robert Malet also held here 100 acres, 3 ploughteams (at the time of 
the Survey reduced to 2), and 2^ acres -of meadow, valued at 20s., which 
had been formerly held by 12 freemen under commendation to the said 
Godwin, all except two, Ettric and Blackman, under commendation to 
Halden, the predecessor of Geoffrey de Magnaville. 

Robert Malet had the soc, sac, and custom. It (probably the town- 
ship) was one league long, i| leagues broad, and paid in a gelt gd.^ 

Playford or Playford Hall Manor with Mitchelis. 

This manor in the time of the Confessor was held by Godwin, son of 
Alfer, under the Queen, and was at the time of the Domesday Survey held by 
Humphrey, son of Robert, under Robert Malet as tenant in chief. It 
appears to have been held in the time of Edw. I. by Richard, son of Robert 
de Playford, and in 1301 apparently by Robert de Qviinton and Segeyna, his 
wife, though in 1316 it still seems to have continued in the Playford family, 
as we find John de Playford then lord. The manor before 1400 vested in 
Sir George Felbrigg, son of Sir Roger Felbrigg. The De Felbriggs were a 
younger branch of the Bigots, Earls of Norfolk. Sir Simon le Bigot, third 
son of Hugh, Earl of Norfolk, marr5dng Maud, daughter and heir of Richard 
de Felbrigg, his descendants took the name of Felbrigg with the property. 
John le Bigot, second son of Sir Roger, the son of the above-named Sir 
Simon, had the lordship of Tuttington (?) in 1339 by gift of his father, 
and was succeeded in it by his son Roger, the father of Sir George Felbrigg, 
who acquired this Manor of Playford. Sir George married ist Amy, daugh- 
ter of Sir Roger de Hales and relict of Edmund de Reedisham, and 2ndly 
Mary, daughter and coheir of Sir John de Aspale, widow of Sir Thomas 
Naunton, Knt. 

In 1367 the King wrote to the Archbishop of Canterbury, his Chan- 
cellor, to pardon his beloved Esquire, George de Felbrigg for money due to 
the Crown in respect of lands granted to him on forfeiture, and about the 
end of that King's reign he was Esquire of the Body to his Majesty. In 
1377 h^ was one of the jury who found Alice Perers (late King Edward the 
Third's mistress) guilty of maintenance. 

In 1383 he and Margery his wife held the lordships of Wortham and 
Ingham in this county. He was in the King's army, when he marched into 

' Dom. ii.i^34l&. 



PLAYFORD. %y 

Scotland in 1385 ; was knighted by him on his entrance into that country, 
and had a grant of £40 per annum for life, payable out of the issues of 
Norfolk and Suffolk, by the Sheriff; was appointed one of the King's 
Proctors in 1386 to conclude a league with William, Duke of Guelderland, 
and Thomas, Duke of Gloucester and Constable of England ; and in 1391 
one of the Lieutenants in the Court of Chivalry, to hear and determine the 
cause between the Lords Morley and Lovell. He built the church porch 
at Playford, and repaired or rebuilt a large part of the church itself. Sir 
George had a grant of free warren in Playford in 1384.' 

Sir George Felbrigg died in 1400, and his will, which is dated 6th Feb. 
1400, was proved i8th May, 1401. He was buried in St. Mary's church in 
this parish. Margery, his wife, died in 1419, and appointed Richard 
Felbrigg, her second son, executor. In a window of the Church of Playford, 
which was built by Sir George, was his portrait, and that of his second wife, 
with the arms of Felbrigg impahng Aspal. Gough in his Sepulchral Monu- 
ments" on the tomb and window, says : "Sir George Felbrigge was buried 
in the north wall of the nave of Playford Church, in a chantry founded 
by him. His slab remains, and on it his figure in complete armour, a 
pointed helmet, whiskers, and gorget of mail, and gauntlets, a lion rampant on 
his breast, a sword and dagger, piked shoes, a lion at feet. The canopy 
over him rests on double pillars, with an embattled base of quatrefoils ; 
in the point of the arch a lion rampant. The same coat is in the north 
window. Upon opening the graves 1784, at five feet depth were found 
bones — a scuU, a jaw, a tibia, vertebrae, and the os ischium — and a rusty 
nail in wood. AU that remains of the inscription is ' ceste . . . funda . de . 
per . al dieu . loange . et . sue. mier . . . pur . I'alme . de . lui . A . 
dieu . quil. est . pete . ei.' The last word is imperfect ; the stops are an M over 
a half rose. On the key stone of the porch, an angel holds the arms of 
Felbrigge. In the window Weever saw : John (George) Felbrydge and 
Margery his wife." 

He was succeeded by Sir John Felbrigg, his eldest son and heir, by 
Margery his wife. He married Margaret de Waldegrave. During his life 
the elder branch, seated at Felbrigg, became extinct in the male Une. Sir 
Simon, who had left the reversion of some of his manors to Sir John, had 
directed Felbrigg and Aylmerton to be sold to pay his debts, and John 
Wymondham had purchased them. He was residing at Felbrigg with his 
wife, the Lady Margery, daughter of Sir Robert Clifton, of Bokenham, and 
relict of Sir Edward Hastings, of Elsing. Sir John Felbrigg, conceiving that 
he had a right to Felbrigg as heir-at-law, made a forcible entry into the 
manor-house. John Wymondham was from home at the time, but the 
Lady Margery was in the house. Sir John threatened to set the house on 
fire ; and when this threat failed to induce the lady to go, he seized her by 
the hair of her head and dragged her out, and took possession. The King, 
however, ordering that John Wymondham be put in possession. Sir John 
Felbrigg withdrew his claim on payment of 200 marks to him by Wymond- 
ham. 

The Manor of Crounthorp, in Norfolk, was conveyed to this Sir John 
by William Hales and Margery his wife. According to a direction in his 
will, dated 2nd Oct. 1423, he was buried in the chancel of this parish church, 
in which were formerly the arms of Felbrigg impaling Waldegrave. Sir 

'Chart. Rolls, 7 and 8 Rich. II. 8. *Vol. iv. 134. 



88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John left an only daughter and heir^ Margery, who married Thomas Samp- 
son/ of Brettenham ; he inherited this property in her right, and died in 
1439. His quartered coat then was, Sampson, quartering Felbrigg and 
Aspal.'' 

From him the manor passed to his widow, the Felbrigg heiress, who held 
until her death in 1476,^ when it went to her grandson, Thomas Sampson, 
son of Sir George Sampson, her eldest son, by Catherine, daughter of John 
Levewthorpe, of Wortham. Sir George Sampson's will was dated 30th 
Sept. 1458, and it was proved gth Oct. 1460. Thomas Sampson, of Playford, 
the grandson of the Felbrigg heiress, was fined for not taking upon himself 
the dignity of knighthood. He married Ehzabeth, daughter and heir of 
John Say (by whom it was thought that Felton was heir to the last Lady 
Berner's lands), and died in 1483,* when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Thomas Sampson. 

He married Catherine, daughter of Sir James Hobart, of Loddon, 
Norfolk, Knt., and died without issue 2nd Jan. 1511-2, leaving his widow 
Catherine surviving. She died loth April, 1546, and was buried at Loddon. 
The manor passed to Sir Thomas's nephew, Thomas Felton, son of his 
sister Margery and of her husband, Robert Felton, of Shotley. 

The Feltonswere a branch of an ancient and illustrious family descended, 
as is supposed, from a younger son of Roger Bertram, Baron of Mitford, and 
Lord of Felton in Northumberland, who died in 1242. This younger son, 
called Pagan or Paine, was Lord of Upper Felton. William Fitz-Paine or 
De Felton, the elder son of Paine, was a commander of great note in the 
Scotch wars of Edward I., and his son. Sir William de Felton, Knt., was 
Sheriff of Northumberland, King's Justice for Scotland, Governor of 
Bamburgh and Roxburgh Castles, Seneschal of Poictou and Limousin, and 
employed in divers honourable services by Edw. H. and Edw. IIL He was 
summoned as a Peer of the Realm to sit in ParUament in 1342, and was 
killed in battle in Spain in 1367, while attending the Duke of Lancaster. 
Robert de Felton, 2nd son of the above-named Paine, had the Manor of 
Litcham, in Norfolk, and in 1297 had the King's hcence to hold a market 
in it. His son was also a Peer of Parliament, and is thought to be the same 
who was knighted with great solemnity in 1306 with 300 others at the high 
altar of Westminster Abbey. His son. Sir John Felton, Knt., of Litcham, 
Norfolk, was also a Peer of ParUament in 1342. But of all the Felton family 
the^most illustrious was Thomas de Felton, K.G., second son of the above- 
named Sir John, and on the death of his elder brother, or, as Gage says, his 
father, Hamon, became Lord of Litcham. Frequent mention is made of 
him in Froissart's Chronicles, and a good memoir of him is given in Beltz's 
Memorials of the Order of the Garter. " The important services," says the 
latter writer, " for which this eminent person was distinguished were 
chiefly performed in Aquitaine, where his mihtary talents were long and 
successfully employed by his illustrious patron, the Prince of Wales, and 
where he discharged during 14 years the high ministerial function of 
Seneschal." 

In 1361 he witnessed the marriage of the Black Prince. In 1364 he 
attended the festivities at Angouleme, in honour of the King of Cyprus ; 

'See Manor of Sulveys, Reydon, in ■*I.P.M., i Rich. III. 35 ; Weever Funeral 

Samford Hundred. Monum. Bur. in Great Bealings 

*See Suffolk Institute, iv. 19. Church. 
n.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 48. 



PLAYFORD. 



89 



was employed with Sir John Chandos in negotiating a treaty with the King 
of Navarre ; was taken prisoner in a desperate battle, in which 200 English 
and Spanish soldiers were killed, the same in which his kinsmen, Sir William 
Felton, the Seneschal of Limousin, was killed. Being exchanged, he con- 
tinued to be employed in affairs of great trust, till in an unfortunate 
encounter with the French near Bordeaux, ist Nov. 1377, he was taken 
prisoner by Jean de Lignac. His ransom was fixed at 30,000 francs, and 
three years given him in which to raise it. This large sum was eventually 
raised by the aid of King Rich., who placed at his disposal a French prisoner, 
Guillaume de Bordes, Chevalier, just at the expiration of the term in 1380. 

In January, 1381, he was made K.G., being the 68th knight from the 
foundation. He died in April of the same year. Besides his Manor of 
Litcham and others in Norfolk, Sir Thomas Felton had property in Suffolk. 
He was lord of the manor called Felton' s, in Barrow, the reversion of which 
he purchased for 40 marks in 1356 of Sir Edmund de Creting, and had free 
warren therein granted him in 1362. He seems at the same time to have 
acquired rights in other lands of the De Cretings, in Risby, Saxham, the 
three Fornhams, Higham, and Hengrave,' and to have possessed the Manor 
of Fordham, in Cambridgeshire." 

But to return. Particulars as to the wardship of Thomas Felton as 
heir of Sir Thomas Sampson will be found amongst the State Papers for 
1512.' 

Thomas Felton, lord of this manor, married Cicely, daughter of Thomas 
Seckford, of Great Bealings, and is mentioned in the State Papers in 1536.* 
He died loth Feb. 1533,' and the manor passed to his eldest son, Thomas 
Felton, of Playford. He married Mary (? Maud), daughter of Sir Richard 
Cavendish, Knt., of Trimley, and d5dngin 1578 was succeeded by his eldest 
son and heir. Sir Anthony Felton, K.B., High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1597. 
In the discharge of his office as such he gave great offence to one Edmund 
Withepole. The fact appears from the Decree of the Earl Marshal, which 
is as follows : — 

" Anthony Felton." 

" A Decree by the Earle Marshall touching a Matter in question between 
Anthony Felton and Edmund Withepole. 13 Maij 1598. 

"Anthony Felton Esq', and Edmund Withipole Esq'., being called 
before the Earle Marshall for a certayne disgrace by the Bastinado offered 
by the s"^. Withypole to the s"^. Felton in the Towne of Ipswich Upon 
long large and deliberate hearing of the ground of the quarrell and of the 
proceedings : the Earle Marshall the last day, being the day above written, 
having called for his assistants, Thos. Lord Howard de Walden, John L"^. 
Lumley, Thos. L"*. Darcy of Chick, Sir W". Knowles K"*- Comptroller of 
her Ma"^^ Household, Sir Walter Raleigh, Captaine of her Ma"^' Garde, 
Sir Robert Sydney, L**. Governor of Flushinge, Sir Edward Dyer, Chancellor 
of the Order of the Garter, did decree the cause in this sort : That the said 
Edmund Withypole should acknowledge that he had done wronge to the 
said Felton, and to himselfe in taking a quarrell against him without ground, 
and in proceeding in it without reason. That the said Withipole should 
confess to the said Felton, he knew him to be a gentleman unfitttobestroken, 
and to have any such disgrace offered him, that from henceforward he would 



'Gage's Thingoe, p. II. 

■"Also see Suffolk Institute, iv. 26. 

3S.P.4 Hen. VIII. 3582. 

M 



* State Papers, 1536, p. 1257 ii. 
n.P.M., 26Hen. VIII. 3. 



90 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

maintayne the said Felton's reputation against any that wold by his former 
unadvised act seeke to impaire it, and that which he now spake he spake 
from his hart and would at all times, and in all places avowe, to which order 
the s*. Withipole submitted himselfe, and performed it accordingly. 

" Whereupon the s*^. Felton is adjudged to be cleare from all touch of 
disgrace, since all the tyme of the assault made upon him, he drew his 
sword, and as a gentleman offered to defend his reputation and Sithence 
till this day, he hath been restrayned by auchthoritye from seeking any 
further meanes to right himself, and now doth receive such satisfaction as 
the Earle Marshall and his assisstants thinke to be fitt for the one party to 
give, and the other to receave. 

" Essex, 
" With his scale of Arms.'" 

Sir Anthony Felton married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry, ist Baron 
Grey, of Groby," and was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1597. He died in 
1613, and was buried in Playford Church, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir. Sir Henry Felton, who was created a baronet, 20th July, 1620,^ and 
died i8th Sept. 1624. He left by Dorothy his wife, daughter of Sir Nicholas 
Bacon, of Redgrave, and widow of Sir Bassingboum Gawdy, Knt., of West 
Harling, in Norfolk (which Dorothy remarried William Broke, of Nacton), 
a son and successor, Sir Henry Felton, 2nd Bart., who was five years old at 
the death of his father, and was made a ward in chancery. His grand- 
mother. Sir Anthony's widow, having Playford for the jointure-house, he 
appears to have resided at Shotley so late as 1677. In Clarke's History of 
Ipswich, there is a story of his feigning illness at his house at Shotley to 
avoid meeting Sir Phineas Pratt, who in that year came to him about the 
purchase of timber for the Admiralty, which it seems Sir Henry had partly 
agreed to. " My lady," who came to speak with the Commissioners instead 
of her husband, let out the secret of his illness when she said, " Sir Henry 
thought himself not engaged to sell the timber, and could have more for it." 

Sir Henry was twice member for the county of Suffolk, in the Convention 
Parliament, and in Charles the Second's second Parliament [1661-1678]. In a 
pamphlet entitled " A seasonable argument to persuade all the Grand 
Juries in England to petition for a new Parliament, or A List of the principal 
labourers in the great design of Popery and arbitrary power, who have 
betrayed their country," &c., printed at Amsterdam, in 1677, and ascribed 
to Andrew Marvel, under the head of Suffolk, Sir Henry Felton is set down 
as a pensioner, and his son a bed-chamber man.* He appears to have 
quarrelled with his cousins the Gawdys, and to have got into some trouble 
with Parliament, in consequence of certain charges he brought against Mr. 
Gawdy.' 

Sir Henry married at Great Fakenham, 19th Dec. 1637, Susanna, 3rd 
daughter of Sir Lionel Tollemache, 2nd Bart, of Helmingham,* and died in 
Oct. 1690,'' being buried the 20th of the same month at Playford, when the 

'Harl. MSS. 607a, p. 326; cited from ^ State Papers, where there is a release to 

Suffolk Institute, iv. 31. him of the £l,roo paid on his 

'Her will, dated 8th July, 1639, will be creation ; S.P. 1620, p. 184. 

found amongst the Bodleian ♦Cobbetts' Parliam. Hist. 

Charters. (Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1369, = Suffolk Institute, iv. 33. 

and a letter of hers to her son-in- ^ Buried at Playford, l8th June, 1678. 

law, John Hobart, in. 1640, will be ? Will proved Nov. 1690. 

found amongst the Tanner MSS. in 

the Bodleian (Tanner cclxxxvi. 107, 

Ixix. 108). 



PLAYFORD. 91 

manor passed to his eldest son and heir, Sir Adam Felton, 3rd Bart., M.P. 
for Thetford, 1689, and for Orf ord, 1695 . He married Ehzabeth, daughter of 
Sir George Reresby, Knt., of Thirby, Yorkshire, widow of William, Vise. 
Monson, of Castlemain, Edward Horner, and Sir Francis Foljambe, Bart., 
but leaving on his death in Feb. 1696-7 an only daughter Ehzabeth, married 
to Robert Rich, son and heir of Sir Edward Rich, Knt., of MuUbarton, 
Norfolk, the title and this manor passed to Sir Adam's brother. Sir Thomas 
Felton, 4th Bart., M.P. for Orford, and for Bury in the time of Will. III., 
and Controller of the Household to Queen Anne and the Prince Consort. 

He married Lady Elizabeth Howard, 2nd daughter and coheir of James, 
3rd Earl of Suffolk.' 

A licence to Sir Thomas Felton to enclose a way in Playford in 1708 
will be found amongst the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum.'' He 
died 2nd March, 1708-9,' and was buried 9th of the same month at Playford, 
leaving an only daughter Ehzabeth, married at Boxstead, 25th July, 1695, 
to John Hervey, of Ickworth, ist Earl of Bristol. Davy states that on the 
death of Sir Thomas Felton the manor passed, as did the title, to his next 
brother. Sir Compton Felton, and that the manor did not pass to Ehzabeth, 
Sir Thomas's daughter, until Sir Compton's death, i8th Nov. 1719, having 
survived all his issue, namely, two sons and two daughters. However 
this may be, the manor did either in 1708-9 or in 1719 vest in Elizabeth, 
Sir Thomas's daughter, and on her death, 2nd May, 1741, was held by her 
husband, John Hervey, Earl of Bristol. From this time the manor has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, in Thingoe Hundred, 
and is now vested in the Marquis of Bristol. 

The site of the Manor of Playford Hall is probably the same as that of 
the manors mentioned in the Domesday Survey, but the present edifice 
was certainly not erected until the i6th century. It has been described as 
a picturesque and curious hall. One date on it is 1589, but some parts are 
clearly of an earlier period. It is stated in Clarke's History of Ipswich that 
Sir George Felbrigge built the hall, but he gives no authority. Probably 
parts of a building erected by him may have remained, but if so they were 
taken down during the i8th century. In an account of " Playford and the 
Feltons " in the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute in 1864,* it is said : 
" an old man of the name of Hustleton, who died about 1840, informed 
Mrs. Clarkson that he remembered, when a boy, a chapel being attached to 
the east of the present dining-room, completing the north side, at right 
angles to which chapel ran the east side, corresponding with the present 
west, so that the present moat washed three sides of the hall in those days." 
The hall, as it now is, is, in fact, just one-half of what it originally was. 
Old Hustleton remembered the chapel " being taken down." 

" The last occupiers of the Feltons were two maiden ladies, who were 
succeeded at the hall by a schoolmaster as tenant. After his time 
it was reduced to its present condition of a farmhouse and occupied by Mr. 
Cutting. After him came Thomas Clarkson." It is said^ anciently to 
have had a drawbridge on the east and a gallery on the south, and to have 
had four sides enclosing the court yard, but this is very improbable. The 
drawbridge must have been on the south side, and the shape of the house 
a half H. 

' Her descent from Hugh Capet is given in s Will proved March, 1709. 

the Suffolk Institute, vol. iv. 57. +¥01. iv. 18. 

"Harl. 7348; Docquet ib. 2263. 'Print of Playford Hall, Davy. 



92 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Lustre has been shed on the hall by the residence therein of the great 
philanthropist, Thomas Clarkson, so celebrated for his efforts on behalf of 
the aboHtion of the slave trade. 

Lord Arthur Hervey, in a paper from which we have already quoted in 
the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute, sympathetically says : "Whatever 
good and valiant deeds may have been done in Church or State by any of 
the long line of proprietors who sleep in the churchyard of Playford, we 
are sure that none contributed more largely to diminish human misery, or 
toiled with more energy and determination to protect the weak and redress 
oppression and wrong, than he (Clarkson) did. And if we value human 
energy for the benefits which it confers upon the human race, and if we 
honour human exertion in proportion to its disinterestedness, and if the 
brightest memories linger around the names of those who have done least for 
themselves and most for others, then assuredly must our sympathies be drawn 
out to the utmost as we stand over the grave of Clarkson." There is an 
excellent portrait of this Thomas Clarkson from the original by A. E. Chalon, 
R.A., engraved by C. Turner, engraver in ordinary to His Majesty. It was 
purchased by Stephen Piper, of Ipswich. 

Arms of Sampson : Gules, a cross Argent, billets Sable. Of Felton : 
Gules, two lions passant Ermine, crowned Or. 

Meer Manor of Mere Hall Manor. 

This manor belonged in the time of Edw. II. to John de Holbroke, 
and from him till the time of Robert Broke, who succeeded his father, Sir 
Richard, in 1529, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Broke Hall, Nacton, in this Hundred.' 

A little later we find the manor vested in Arthur Rushe, who died 
seised of it 2nd July, 1537,^ when it passed to his son and heir, Anthony 
Rushe,^ who sold the same to Thomas Seckford in 1558.' 

A few years later the manor had passed to Sir Anthony Felton, who 
held the main manor, for it formed part of the dower of Elizabeth, his 
widow, in 1613, from which period the manor has followed the main manor 
in a like course of descent, and is now vested in the Marquess of Bristol. 

Lees Manor. 

We find this lordship vested in Margery Sampson, who died in 1439, 
when it passed to Thomas Sampson, who died in 1483,^ from which time it 
has descended in the same course as the main manor, and is now vested in 
the present Marquis of Bristol. 



'SeeHolbrookManor,inSamfordHundred.- ^I.P.M., 29 Hen. VIII. 66. 
"Not 1548, as stated in account of Somerton **Fine, Mich. 6 Mary I. 
Manor, in Babergh Hundred. ' I.P.M., I Rich. III. 35. 




RUSHMERE ST. ANDREW. 93 

RUSH MERE ST. ANDREW. 

|N Saxon times there were two manors in this place. The first, 
belonging to the Abbot of Ely in the time of the Confessor, 
consisted of 80 acres of land, 5 of meadow, and i ploughteam, 
which had become reduced to half a team at the time of the 
Survey. In Saxon times it was valued at 20s., but by the 
time of the Survey the value was reduced to half. It was 
held in the Confessor's time by Turchil, a freeman under 
commendation half to the Abbot of Ely and half to Gurth. The Abbot of 
Ely also held a freeman named Edric under the same commendation as the 
others above-named, with 20 acres, and half an acre of meadow in Saxon times, 
when there was a ploughteam attached to it. The value was then los., 
but at the time of the Survey there was but half a team, and the value had 
come down to 6s. The abbot also had here five freemen under commenda- 
tion to Turchil, holding 15 acres, and having in Saxon days half a ploughteam, 
when the value was 30^., but at the time of the Survey, when the ploughteam 
had disappeared, valued at 3s. The abbot had also a freeman named Leuric, 
under commendation, with 40 acres, 7 bordars, and a ploughteam and a 
half, valued at los.' 

The second manor belonged to Robert Malet, and consisted of 60 acres 
and I ploughteam, and at the time of the Survey 5 acres of meadow, valued 
at 20s. It was held by Ulviet, a freeman under Gurth in the time of the 
Confessor, and at the time of the Survey by Humfrey in demesne. In 
the same holding were 4 acres, valued at i6d., held by two freemen under 
him. This also Humfrey at the time of the Survey held of Robert Malet. 

Robert Malet also held here 30 acres and an acre of meadow, formerly 
having i ploughteam, but at the time of the Survey none, valued at 5s. 
This had in Saxon times been held by 2 socmen under Godwin ; Robert 
Malet, further held 44 acres and i bordar, formerly having 2 ploughteams, 
but at the time of the Survey i only, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 
los. In the Confessor's time these had been held by three freemen under 
commendation to Edric, namely, Leurin, Turchil, and Aluric. Of this hold- 
ing the Abbot of Ely had the soc and sac."" 

Another small holding was that of Roger de Poictou, consisting of 6 
acres, valued at i2d., and held of him by Hunebot.^ 

Another holding mentioned in the Great Survey was that of Hervey 
of Bourges, consisting of 30 acres, i ploughteam and an acre of meadow, 
valued at ids. The Survey says, " It is 8 quarantenes long and 7 broad, 
and pays i6d. in a gelt." It had formerly been held by a freeman Brown- 
win, under commendation to Gurth.* There was one holding of the King 
kept by Robert Bigot, which consisted of 9 freemen with 31 acres, formerly 
having i ploughteam, but at the time of the Survey half a team only. The 
value had been 5s., but at the time of the Survey was fixed at 3s.' The 
last holding was that of Earl Alan, and consisted of 31 acres arid a plough- 
team, valued at 5s. It had been held by ii freemen under commendation 
to Gurth in the time of the Confessor. And in the same holding were 6 
acres valued at i2d., and one church estate of 20 acres, valued at 4od.^ 

'Dom. ii. 3066. ^Dom. ii. 442. 

^Dom. ii. 3156. ■ 5Dom. ii. 2326. 

^Dom. ii. 347&. ^Dom. ii. 293. 



94 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



There are three entries in the Survey under the head Bixley, which is 
in Rushmere. One was amongst the possessions of Earl Alan. It con- 
sisted of a socman with 5 acres, valued at X2d., a freeman in the Confessor's 
time, under commendation to Ralph the Staller, with 20 acres, i plough- 
team and I acre of meadow, valued at 4s., and a freeman with 20 acres in 
Rushmere, included in the above valuation.' The second was 4 acres, 
valued at M., held by the Abbot of Ely,^ and the third was the holding in 
demesne of Hugh de Montfort of 29 acres, i ploughteam, and i acre of 
meadow in the time of the Confessor, held by three freemen under com- 
mendation to Goodmund. The holding was included in the valuation of 
Brithtolston (?).' 

Rushmere or Rushmere Hall Manor. 

This was held by Turchil, a freeman in Saxon times, being half under 
protection of the Abbot of Ely and half under that of Gurth, and at the 
time of the Survey belonged to the abbot. At the opening of the thirteenth 
century — in 1203 — the manor was the lordship of William de Freney, and 
passed from him to his son and heir, Robert de Freney, and from him to his 
son and heir, William de Freney. 

Davy says that in 13 16 the manor was vested in John de Holbroke, 
Knt., and that in that year it passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Hol- 
broke ; but this does not seem to have been the case, for at this time the manor 
appears to have been vested in Richard Lenne, of Ipswich, who had a grant 
of free warren here in 1314." See an extent of the manor in the inquisition 
quod damnum, Rich. " Len " of Ipswich in 1316.' 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1326 by this Richard Lenne and 
Emma his wife against Giles de Wachesham and John atte Northstrete, 
chaplain;® and in 1344 by Gilbert de Yarewell, parson of Blofield 
Church, Salomon, parson of Catston Church, William de Burgh, and 
William de Felm5mgham against John de Catston and Katherine 
his wife.' Probably the manor did vest later in Sir Thomas de 
Holbroke, who died in 1360, when it passed to John de Holbroke, 
who died in 1376, when it passed to his daughter and heir, Margery, 
married to John, son of Hugh Fastolf, who released all his interest 
in the manor to Sir George de Felbrigg, to whom a grant of free warren 
was made here in 1384.^ After this the manor passed in the same line of 
descent as the Manor of Playford, in this Hundred, and is now vested in the 
present Marquis of Bristol. The manor is mentioned in the inquisition 
of Thomas Sampson,' and in the inquisition p.m. of Sir Richard Broke, 
who died 6th May, 1529, leaving Robert his son and heir,'" and of Thomas 
Felton, who died loth Feb. 1533, leaving Thomas his son and heir." The 
Compotus Rolls of the Manor, 1444 to 1453, will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum.'^ 

Bixley Manor. 

In 1555 Francis Noone conveyed the land, &c., called Bixley to John 
Dameron, yeoman, who seems to have held as a manor. In 1602 his widow, 



'Dom. ii. 293. 

»Dom. ii. 3866. 

s Dom. ii. 406&. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 17. 

5 1.Q.D., 10 Edw. 152. 

*Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. II. 7. 



7 Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. III. 12. 

8 Chart. Rolls, 7 and 8 Rich. II. 8. 
9I.P.M., I Rich. III. 35. 

" I.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 60. 
" I.P.M. 26 Hen. VIII. 3. 
"Add. Ch. 10208-10214. 



RUSHMERE ST. ANDREW. 95 

Katherine Dameron, and his sons, Thomas and John Dameron, conveyed the 
estate to Tobias Blosse, of Ipswich, mercer, who sold the same in 1611 to 
Robert Broke, of Nacton, on whose death in 1626 it passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Richard Broke, Knt., who died in 1639. 

After this the manor descended in the same course as Brokes Hall 
Manor, in Nacton, in this Hundred, but seems to have become extinguished. 




96 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

TRIMLEY. 

IN Saxon times there were two manors here. One consisted 
of 50 acres, 3 bordars, i ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, 
which had been held in the Confessor's time by Goodrich, 
under commendation to Norman. At the time of the 
Survey this manor was held of Roger Bigot by Thorold, 
and a freeman, Leverich, held 4 acres under him. The 
manor rendered 35s. There was also a church, with 20 acres, 
valued at /\od. The township was 4 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and 
paid in a gelt ^d. Another church is mentioned, with 8 acres, valued at M. 
Others held land therein. Roger Bigot also had here 6 acres and half a 
ploughteam, valued at i2(?., formerly held by three freemen, Gooday, 
Hildyard, and Derstan, under commendation to Norman, and Derstan 
under commendation to Wihtmar. The said Wihtmar held over them,' 

The second manor consisted of 40 acres, which in the Confessor's time 
was held by a freeman named Lewric, under the Abbot of Ely's commenda- 
tion. There was i ploughteam, also 3 bordars, and an acre of meadow, and 
a freeman under him with 4 acres, the whole valued at 20s. This manor 
Roger Bigot held of the King, but the abbot proved a better title, and 
Roger at the time of the Survey held of the Abbot of Ely.^ 

The last holding cited in the Survey consisted of 2 acres, valued at ^d., 
and belonged to Ranulf, brother of Ilger.^ 

Grimston Hall with Morston Manor. 

This was the estate of Ralph de Tourlaville in the time of William 
the Conqueror. The Great Survey says : "In Grimeston the said Ralph de 
Tour la ville holds a freeman formerly under Norman, with 40 acres, called 
Blackman. And under him 7 bordars, i ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 105. And there are 3 men in the same township under com- 
mendation to Ralph with 36 acres, Herman and Kenrick and Woolfer. 
And they have a ploughteam and a half, and half an acre of meadow. 
Valued at 5s. It is 3 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and in a gelt pays 
yd. Others hold land therein." Roger Bigot was the Domesday tenant 
in chief.* Eudo, son of Nigel, also held of Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, in 
Grimston, 14 acres with half a ploughteam, valued at 4s. 8^., of which the 
Abbot of Ely had the soc. This small estate had formerly been held by 
2 freemen, Aluric under commendation to Harold, and Brithnoth under 
commendation to Robert Malet's predecessor, and valued at ^od.^ 

In the time of Edw. I. this manor was the lordship of Sir Godfrey de 
Bellomonte, Knt., who had a grant of free warren here in 1292,^ and died 
in 1293 without issue, when the manor passed to his widow, Cecily de 
Ferrariis,' and the following year to Sir John de Bellomonte, brother of 
Sir Godfrey, who then paid his relief. 

He left by Alice his wife a son and heir, Richard de Bellomonte ; but 
in 1307 Alice, widow of Sir John de Bellomonte, conveyed by fine the manor 
to Walter de Langton, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, excepting, however, 
her life interest, in which fine her son Richard concurred.^ The bishop 
died in 1321, when the manor passed to his sister and heir, married to 

'Dom. ii. 341. 'Dom. ii. 292. 

''Dom. ii. 3856. 6 Chart Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 33. 

^Dom. ii. 4236. > Extent, I.P.M., 21 Edw. I. 49. 

*Dom. ii. 3416. speet of Fines, 35 Edw. I, 23. 



TRIMLEY. 97 

Edmund Peverel. It passed later to Edmund Peverel and Elizabeth his 
wife/ and to their son, John Peverel in 1331. 

He died in 1362, but the manor seems in his lifetime to have been 
acquired by his sister Margaret, for in 1353 we meet with a fine levied of this 
manor, and the Manors of Aspall and Debenham, by WiUiam de la Pole, 
Margaret's husband, and the said Margaret, against John de Insula, Knt., 
Hugh de Bray, Warin, son of Warin de Bassyngbourn, Knt., William de la 
Dale, Richard de Bayous, Knt., William de Coin, Knt., William de Playford, 
parson of the church of Botun, Ralph de Hynton, John de Opton, and 
Henry de Heweny.'' This also included the advowson of the churches of 
Trimley and Althyston. 

There were two other fines levied of the manor to which Sir William 
de la Pole and Margaret his wife were parties in 1355 and 1358. The 
first was by Hugh de Ulseby, pit., and Sir William de la Pole, jun., and 
Margaret his wife, deforciants,^ and the second by Sir William de la Pole and 
John his son against John,, son of William de Moubray and William de 
Wyleby, parson, and related not only to this manor, but also to the advow- 
sons of the churches of Trimley St. Martin and Alteston.* 

The manor passed from Margaret and her husband. Sir William de la 
Pole, jun., Knt., to their son and heir. Sir John de la Pole, Knt. It was 
then acquired by John Candish, or Cavendish, of London, and of Grimston 
Hall. Jacob, in his account of the Cavendish family, states that Roger 
de Gemon, son of Geoffrey de Gernon, of Moorhall, co. Derby, the son of 
Sir WilUam de Gernon, who died in 1259, ^^^ son of Ralph, who died 1248, 
the son of Ralph, son of Matthew, son of Robert de Gernon, resided at 
Grimston Hall, and married the daughter of John Potton or Potkins, lord 
of Cavendish, and his children, in compliment to their mother, the heir of 
that lordship, as was usual in those days, assumed the name and arms of 
Cavendish. We do not find any particulars of the purchase of the manor 
by this Roger de Gemon, but it was certainly vested in his son and heir, 
John Cavendish, and passed to his son and heir, Roger Cavendish. This 
Roger, with Roger Wolferston, Clement Spice, and William Rulle, levied' a 
fine of the manor against Robert Hamenhale and Joan his wife in 1389.^ 

Under the wiU of Roger Cavendish^ dated Jan. 1404-5, the manor was 
left to feoffees for three years after testator's demise for them to receive 
the profits and lay out the same in the building of a chapel to the honour of 
the Holy Trinity on the left side of the Church of St. Martin in Trimley, 
and in order that they might grant an annual rent of £7. 6s. 8d., issuing out 
of the said Manor of Grymston to be amortised to the said chapel, i.e., 10 
marks to a chaplain there to sing perpetually, and to perform divine 
service in honour of the Trinity, and for the souls of John, the testator's 
father. Christian, his mother, Stephen Candish, William Rule, Thomas, and 
all other his well-wishers, and 13s. 4d. for the annual repair of this chapel. 

The manor passed to Roger's great-nephew, Austin Candish or Caven- 
dish, son of Thomas Cavendish and Agnes his wife, which Thomas was son 
of John, brother of Roger, and of Elizabeth, John's wife. Austin Cavendish 
made his will dated 17th June, 1467, and died in 1468, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir. Sir Richard Cavendish. He brought a Chancery 
suit against Sir John Wyngfeld, Knt., William Brandon, Knt., John Sulyard, 

' I.P.M., 5 Edw. III. 46 (where the manor ■» Feet of Fines, 3I and 32 Edw. III. 9. 

is stated to be held of Dovercourt). s Feet of Fines, 13 Rich. II. 19. 

' Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 4. ^ For Cavendish family,see Overhall Manor, 
3 Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. III. 4. in Cavendish, in Babergh Hundred, 

N 



98 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and Edward Grymston, as to this manor, and the advowsons of the Churches 
of St. Martin (Trimley), and St. John of Alneston, and lands in Trimley 
St. Mary, and St. Martin, Walton, Felixstowe, Kirketon, and Falkenham.' 
Sir Richard Cavendish died seised 7th Jan. 1515, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir Richard Cavendish.^ 

Amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings of the time of Hen. VIH., we 
find an action relating to a forcible entry into a " gold-course," felling of 
trees, &c., in Trimley, by Richard Caundysshe against Richard Lambe 
and others f and an action as to land at Trimley between John Lambe and 
the said Richard "Candysshe."* This last Sir Richard Cavendish was 
Governor of Blackness, and died 12th March, 1554,^ when the manor passed 
in jointure to his widow Beatrice, and subsequently to their son and heir, 
William Cavendish, on whose death in 1572 it passed to his son and heir, 
William Cavendish, who died without issue, and was succeeded by his 
brother and heir, Thomas Cavendish, the celebrated circumnavigator, of 
whom Fuller, in his History of the Worthies of England, says : " Thomas 
Cavendish, of Trimley, in this County, Esquire, in pursuance of his generous 
inclination to make foreign discoveries for the use and honour of his nation, 
on his own cost victualled and furnished three ships (the least of fleets) as 
foUoweth : I, The Desire, admiral, of 120 tons ; 2, The Content, vice- 
admiral, of 60 tons ; 3, The Hugh-Gallant, rear-admiral, of 40 tons. All 
three managed by 123 persons, with which he set sail from Plymouth the 
2ist of July, 1586. So prosperous their winds, that by the 26th of August 
they had gone nine hundred and thirty leagues to the south of Africa, Then 
bending their course south-west January the 7th, they entered the mouth 
of the Megellan Straits ; straits indeed, not only for the narrow passage, but 
many miseries of hunger and cold which mariners must encounter therein. 
Here Mr. Cavendish named a town Port Famine ; and may never distressed 
seaman be necessitated to land there! It seems the Spaniards had a 
design so to fortify these straits in places of advantage, as to engross the 
passage, that none save themselves should enter the southern sea. But 
God, the promoter of the public good, destroyed their intended monopoly, 
sending such a mortality amongst their men that scarce five of five hundred 
did survive. 

" On the 24th of February they entered the South Sea, and frequently 
landed as they saw occasion. Many their conflicts with the natives, more 
with the Spaniards ; coming off gainers in most and savers in all encounters, 
that alone at Quintero excepted, April 1st, 1587, when they lost twelve 
men of good account, which was the cause that the June following they 
purposely sunk the rear-admiral, for want of men to manage her. 

" Amongst the many prizes he took in his passage, the St. Anne was 
the most considerable, being the Spanish Admiral of the Southern sea, of 
seven hundred tons. ^However, our Cavendish boarded her, with his 
little ship (a chicken of the game will adventure on a greater fowl, and 
leap where he cannot reach), and mastered her, though an hundred and 
ninety persons therein. There were in the ship an hundred and two and 
twenty thousand pezos (each worth eight shillings) of gold, the rest of the 
lading being silks, satins, musk and other rich commodities. Mr. Caven- 
dish's mercy after, equalled his valour in the fight, landing the Spaniards on 
the shore, and leaving them plentiful provisions. 

'E.P.P., Bundle 50, 212. ^Ih. 203, 204. 

2 1.P.M., 9 Hen. VIII. 90. 5 l.p.M., 2 Mary, 95. 

3 Star C.P., Hen. VIII., vol. 8, 200-202. 



TRIMLEY. 99 

" Surrounding the East Indies and returning for England the ship 
called the Content did not answer her name, whose men took all occasion 
to be mutinous, and stayed behind in a road, with Stephen Hare, their 
master, and Mr. Cavendish saw her not after. But he, who went forth with 
a fleet, came home with a ship, and safely landed in Plymouth, Sept. gth, 1588. 
Amongst his men the three most remarkable were : Mr. John Way, their 
preacher ; Mr. Thomas Fuller, of Ipswich, their pilot ; and Mr. Francis 
Pretty, of Eyke, in this county, who wrote the whole history of their voyage. 

" Thus having circumnavigated the whole earth, let his ship no longer 
be termed The Desire, but The Performance. He was the third man and 
second Englishman of such universal undertakings. 

" Not so successful his next and last voyage, begun the 26th of August, 
1591, when he set sail with a fleet from Plymouth, and coming in the Megellan 
Straits, near a place by him formerly named Port Desire, he was, the Novem- 
ber following, casually severed from his company, not seen or heard of 
afterwards. Pity so illustrious a Hfe should have so obscure a death. But 
all things must be as Being itself will have them to he.'" 

Thomas Cavendish is supposed to have perished in 1592, and he left 
no issue. We meet with two fines of the manor levied against Thomas 
Cavendish, one in 1585, and the other in 1586, both by Henry Seckford and 
others, and no doubt on the occasion of some settlement of the manor.^ 

In 1591 the manor was acquired by Charles Cornwallis from the said 
Thomas Cavendish just prior to his last and fatal voyage,^ and we find it 
included with the Manors of Haspley and Newbourne and the advowson 
of the church of Newbourne in the settlement dated 24th Sept. 36 Eliz. 
[1594], made by Charles Cornwallis, of Trimley St. Martin, on the marriage of 
his son William with Katherine, daughter of Sir Phillipp Parker, of Erwar- 
ton. In 1597 the manor was acquired by Robert Barker, of Ipswich, from 
Charles Cornwallis and his trustees,"* and was confirmed to him in perpetuity 
the same year.^ Amongst the Add. Ch. in the British Museum will be found 
a defeasance of bond between the said Charles Cornwalleys described as of 
Norwich, and WilKam his son, and the said Robert Barker on a bond of 
the latter on sale of this manor, Moston, and Stratton Hall Manors, 
15th Feb. 1597.^ 

There is an old deed of Robert Barker in 1601 amongst the Harleian 
MSS. in the British Museum.^ Robert Barker removed to Grimston Hall, 
which is about 8 miles from Ipswich. He was made a Knight of the Bath 
at the coronation of James I. in 1603, and dying in 1618 was succeeded by 
his eldest son John, by his first wife, Judith, daughter of George Stoddard, 
of Mettingham, in Kent. John Barker was advanced to the dignity of a 
baronet, 17th March, 1621.'* 

From this time to the death of John Fytch Barker, 7th Bart., without 
issue in 1766 the devolution of the manor is identical with that of Offton 
Monks, in Ofton, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

Sir John Fytch Barker, 7th and last Bart., who died 3rd Jan. 1766, 
left the manor by will, dated 30th Dec. 1762 (pr. 26th Jan. 1766) in 

' Accounts of Thomas Cavendish will be ^ Fine, Hil. 27 Eliz. ; Easter, 28 Eliz. 

found in Locke's History of Navi- ^Fine, Trin. 33 Eliz. 

gation, and in the Harwich Guide, *Fine, Hil. 39 Eliz. 

1808, which last account was re- ^S.P. 1597, 427. 

printed in the Gent. Mag. for ^Add. Ch. 10238. 

1811, pt. ii. p.; 606. See also ^Harl. 4712. 

D.N.B. vol. ix. 358. ^D.K.R. 47, App. p. 129 ; 1622, S.P. 356. 



100 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the events which happened to his widow for Ufe, with remainder to 
George Richard Savage Nassau. He served the office of High Sheriff 
for the county in 1805, and died at his London residence in Charles 
Street, Berkeley Square, i8th Aug. 1823/ unmarried, leaving the 
manor, with the estates, by his will dated 9th Feb. 1819 (pr. 23rd 
March, 1824) fo his half-brother, William Henry Nassau, Earl of Roch- 
ford, from which time to the time of the 12th Duke of Hamilton, 
the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Easton,in Loes Hun- 
dred. The I2th Duke of Hamilton about 1865 sold the manor to Col. 
George Tomhne, and it has since passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Bacton, in Hartismere Hundred, and is now vested in Capt. E. G. Pretyman, 
D.L., of Orwell Park. 

Acquittance for fines for this manor and for the advowson will be found 
amongst the Cotton MSS. in the British Museum,^ and a confirmation of 
status in Grimston and " Moston" Hall Manors in 1459 will be found amongst 
the Add. Ch, in the same depository.^ 

All that remains of Grimston Hall are the large ponds on the side of the 
present house, which fall in a regular series down the valley towards the 
river, and one of the Ilexes mentioned by Kirby and supposed to have been 
planted by the celebrated navigator, Thomas Cavendish. In 1829 it was 
described as being "in a state of decay, one side certainly dead, and that 
probably still alive showing great weakness." 

Marston or Moston Hall Manor. 

This manor arose out of various small holdings. First, 50 acres men- 
tionedinthe Domesday Survey as held in Saxon times by three freemen under 
commendation to Norman, namely, by Goodman, Leofson, and Goddua, 
but two of these were half under Edric. With this holding were a villein, 
3 bordars, a ploughteam and half an acre of meadow, all valued at 8s. 
Roger Bigot was the Domesday tenant in chief. The Survey says : " It is 
5 quarentenes long and 2 broad, and pays 4d. in a gelt." This could not, 
however, have referred to this small holding alone."^ Also Wilham of the 
Forest held of Roger Bigot 20 acres heie with a bordar, a ploughteam, and 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 6s., which had in the Confessor's time 
been held by a freeman Brightmar under commendation to Norman.^ 

Ranulf, brother of Ilger, also held here 4 acres which had belonged to a 
freeman under commendation to Brismer ; and also 10 acres valued at 2s., 
which had been held formerly by a freewoman Ulveva under commendation 
to Brictmar, with half a ploughteam.^ Robert Malet held of the Abbot of 
Ely 5 acres valued at i6d., which had in the Confessor's time been held by a 
freeman WooUett under commendation to the abbot.'' , 

Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, also had 50 acres which had been held by 
5 freemen, Godwin, Aluric the priest's man, Woolver, and Brihtric, the men 
of Roger Bigot's predecessor in title, and Ulwin, the man of Robert Malet's 
predecessor, and Goodrich, Goodman's man, who was Roger Bigot's pre- 
decessor. Formerly there had been with the holding a ploughteam and a 
half, but at the time of the Survey this seems to have disappeared, but 

'See an account of him in Gent. Mag. for ♦Dom. ii. 340&, 342b. 

1823, pt. ii. p. 178. 5/6. 

^Cott. xxvii. 152. 6 Dom. ii. 4236. 

3 Add. Ch. 10215. 7 Dom. ii. 3856. 



TRIMLEY. loi 

there was then an acre and a half of meadow. The earlier valuation was 
IDS., and the Norman estimate 17s.' 

This manor vested in John Cavendish of Grimston Hall, and passed 
to his son and heir, Roger Cavendish, whose will is dated 1405. It has ever 
since devolved in the same course as the manor of Grimston Hall, and is now 
vested in Capt. E. G. Pretyman, D.L., of Orwell Park. 

Capel or Capel Hall Manor. 

The first person holding this manor of which we find any record is Sir 
William Ambervil. 

In 1464 William Owden or Ouband paid a relief in respect of it to 
Framlingham Castle, and in the time of King Hen. VIII. it was vested in 
James Hobart, of Loddon, who died in 1516, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Walter Hobart. He died in 1538,* and in 1544 we find the manor 
in Henry Hobart, against whom a fine of it was levied this year by Nicholas 
Rokewode.^ This Henry died in 1561. The manor then vested in John 
Dryver, who sold it to Thomas Bennett, against whom Dryver's widow, 
by an action in the Common Bench, recovered her dower out of the same. 
Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen EKzabeth is an 
action by this Thomas Bennett against Charles Cornwallis concerning deeds 
&c., relating to the Manor of Capel Hall, when it was contended that the 
premises formed part of the Manor of Grimston Hall. * 

In i6og the manor vested in Thomas Lye, who died in 1639, when it 
passed to his brother and heir, Joseph Lye. 

Later we find the manor in Miles Edgar, ^ of Eye, from whom it passed 
in 1676 to his son and heir, Henry Edgar, who by will dated in 1705 devised 
it to Susan Edgar, his daughter, who married Robert Yaxlee, and died in 
1734, being buried at Eye. 

Stratton Hall Manor cum Se abridge. 

Stratton Hall was for a long period an extra-parochial farm and estate, 
comprising 195 acres of water and 1,239 3.cres of land, generally returned 
with Trimley St. Martin's parish. Stratton was anciently a separate 
parish, and had a lazar house and a church, and the foundations of the 
latter may still be seen overgrown with trees and bushes. It is now a civil 
parish. Stratton Manor had been held in the Confessor's time by Woolmer, 
a freeman under Edric of Laxfield, and consisted of a carucate of land, with 
4 villeins, 3 bordars, i ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the 
tenants, wood sufficient for the support of 6 hogs, 10 acres of meadow, 12 
hogs, and 80 sheep, valued at 20s. The value by the time of the Survey 
had risen to 30s., but 2 of the serfs and half of the ploughteam belonging 
to the tenants had disappeared. In the reign of William the Conqueror, 
and before the Survey, 12 men were added to the manor, whose names were 
Leuric of Hemley, Bruman of Burgh, Goda of Struston (?), Leostan of 
Falkenhajn, Gleeman of Levington, Wihtric of Carlwood (?), Edwin the 
Smith, Aluric of Hopewell (?), Thuri of Culvertston (?), Aluric the smith's 
son in Carlwood (?), Orgar in Culvertston, and Modgeva of Colcarr, all under 
commendation to the said Edric in the Confessor's time. They had 87 

' Dom. ii. 292. * C.P. i. 63. 

"See Manor of Oulton, in Lothingland ' Busshes Manor, Mendlesham, in Hartis- 

Hundred. mere Hundred. 

^Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 



102 THE MANORS^ OF SUFFOLK. 

acres and a half, 2 bordars, 2^ ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow and a mill in 
Saxon times, valued at 60s., but at the time of the Survey rendering 50s. 
The above manor was held by Bernard of London of Robert Malet as 
Domesday tenant in chief. R. de Glanville also held of Robert Malet here 
24 acres, half a ploughteamj and half an acre of meadow, valued at 4s., 
which had been held by a freeman Lewin, son of Brown, under commenda- 
tion to the said Edric. Glanville also held under Malet an acre valued at 
$d., which had been formerly held by a half freeman Aluric, also under 
commendation to Edric' 

Roger Bigot also had several estates in Stratton in or near Levington, 
under the heads of Strattuna. One was of 32 acres held as a manor, 4 
bordars, i ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, valued at 5s., which had 
been held in the Confessor's time by a freeman, Wihtric, Harold's man, also 
38 acres as a manor, 2 bordars, i ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, valued 
at 4s., which had formerly been held by 2 freemen under commendation 
to Norman, Ulfkettle, and another. 

Another holding of Bigot was 10 acres and a bordar, and half a plough- 
team, valued at 2s., which had formerly been held by a freeman named 
Goodman, under commendation to Norman, and a church with 10 acres, 
valued at 2s. These three estates were all held by William de Burnouille, 
under Roger Bigot. The Survey says: "It " (probably the ancient parish 
of Stratton) " was 6 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt yd.'"" 

Sir Olhver de Stratton, Knt., held this manor, and after him Geffrey de 
Stratton, whose daughter and heir Alice married Roger de Cavendish about 
1408. The manor seems to have passed to Roger de Cavendish's daughter 
Margaret, who married William Leveney, and he bydeed dated 12th Sept. 
9 Hen. VL [1421] granted the manor to John Shardlowe on his marriage 
with Margaret, daughter of the said Wilham Leveney.^ We next find the 
manor in Sir William Braiadon, Knt., from whom it passed to his 2nd son. 
Sir Thomas Brandon, who sold it in 1505 to Elen Weldon, widow, Hugh 
Weldon, and Robert Weldon, her sons, and they by deed dated 3rd July, 
21 Hen. VII. [1506] resold to Sir Thomas Brandon,* from whom the manor 
went to his nephew, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who, by a deed 
dated ist March, 29 Hen. VIII. [1538] granted the same to Sir Richard 
Caundish, of Trimley, in exchange for the manor of Gapton HaroUe, in 
Bredwell.' Certainly, Sir Richard Cavendish died seised of the manor 12th 
March, 1534,® and from this time to the time of death of Thomas Cavendish 
without issue in 1592, the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor 
of Grimston Hall, in Trimley. 

A fine of this manor was in 1560 levied by William Cavendish against 
Richard Cavendish.'' The manor was included in the settlement referred to 
in the account of Grimston Hall made by Charles CornwalUs on the marriage 
of his son William with Katherine, daughter of Sir Phillipp Parker in 1574, 
and was referred to in the deed of defeasance, also mentioned in the account 
of Grimston Manor, and passed to the Barker family. Sir Robert Barker, 
Knt., dying seised of it in 1618, after which it passed in the same Hne of 
devolution as the main Manor of Grimston Hall (by reference to Monks 

' Dom. ii. 314. 5 Add Ch. 10225. 

''Dom. ii. 3406, 341&, 3426. 6 1. P.M., 2 Mary 95. 

3 Harl. 53 B. 35. 7 Fine, Hil. 2 Eliz. 
■* Harl. 47 A. 47. 



TRIMLEY. 103 

Offton, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred), and is now vested in Capt. E. G. 
Pretyman, D.L., of Orwell Park. 

There is an action relating to trespass in Stratton Hall amongst the 
Early Chancery Proceedings in the time of Hen. VI.' 

Amongst the Exch. Depositions will be found an action by the Attorney- 
General against Charles Cornwallis, 37 and 38 Eliz., relating to Commons of 
this manor and the Manor of Moston^ and as to metes and bounds.' 



' E.C.P., 20 Hen. VI. 15, 57. '^ Ipswich Exch. Dep., 37-38 Eliz. 




104 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

TRIMLEY ST. MARY'S MANOR, OR CANDELENT OR 
CANDLETT OR FOURTHE MANOR. 

SMALL property is mentioned under the head " Can- 
delenta " in the Domesday Survey, as amongst the pos- 
sessions of Roger Bigot. It was merely 3 acres, valued 
at 6d., which had been held by a freeman named Brihtric. 
The Survey says, " It is a quarentene long and a quarentene 
broad, and pays 2d. in a gelt.'" The area referred to 
cannot be distinctly stated. The lord of the place in the 
time of William the Conqueror was no doubt Roger Bigot. In the 
first year of William Rufus, he armed himself against the King, and 
fortified Norwich Castle, declaring himself in favour of the Conqueror's 
eldest son, Robert, Duke of Normandy. He, however, later stood 
firm to Hen. I. in opposition to Duke Robert, and as a reward had a 
gift of the Castle of Framlingham, and was made the King's server 
and steward of his household.^ He founded the Priory of Black Canons at 
Thetford, dedicated to St. Mary and St. John in the 3rd year of King Hen. I., 
and gave to the monks at Rochester his church of St. Felix at Walton. He 
died in 1107, and was buried in the priory at Thetford with this inscription: — 

Clauderis exiguo Rogere Bigote sepulchro 

Et rerum cedit portio parva tibi. 
Divitiae, sanguis, facundia, gratia Regum 

Intereunt, mortem fallere nemo potest. 
Divitiae mentes subvertunt, erigat ergo 

Te pietas, virtus, consiliumque Dei. 

His eldest son, William Bigod, was his successor, and was constituted 
steward like his father, to the household of Hen. I. From this time to the 
death of Mary, Countess of Norfolk, in 1362, the devolution of the manor is 
identical with that of Framlingham Manor, in Loes Hundred. 

The manor next seems to have been held by Richard Spicer and Rose 
his wife, against whom a fine was in 1376 levied by John de Staverton.^ A 
little later we find the manor in John Wafer, and then in 1428 in Robert 
Saxer. In 1433 Guy de Visdelieu died seised, holding of John, Duke of 
Norfolk, as of the Manor of Walton,* and in 1464 William de Visdelieu paid 
a relief of 50s. in respect of the manor to Framlingham Castle. 

Amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum is an extent of 
this manor and Capell's Manor with Nortons, Oct. 1515.^ About this time 
we find the manor belonged to Sir James Hobart, Knt., of Loddon,® who 
died 24th Feb. 1516,^ when it passed to his son and heir. Sir Walter Hobart, 
on whose death in 1538 it went to his son and heir, Henry Hobart, against 
whom a fine was levied of the manor in 1544 by Nicholas Rokewode and 
others. He died in 1561, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
James Hobart, of Hales Hall, in Loddon, and he and his wife Frances, by 
deed dated the nth Sept. 6 Eliz. [1564]^ sold it to Thomas Lambe, son of 
Richard Lambe' and of Anne (? Agnes), daughter of Thomas Ford, of 

' Dom. ii. 341. 6 See Manor of Oulton, in Lothingland 

« William of Malmesbury, 88 Mat. Paris, 56. Hundred. 

3 Feet of Fines, 50 Edw. III. 13. ^I.P.M., 9 Hen. VIH. 25. 

*I.P.M., II Hen. VI. 43. s^dd Ch. 10231, 10232. 

= Add. 21043. 9 See Manor of Illarius, East Bergholt, in 

Samford Hundred, 



TRIMLEY ST. MARY'S. 105 

Trimley/ and his son Thomas^ on the death of his father, succeeded to the 
lordship. He married Winifred, daughter of William Grislinge, of London, 
and in 1596 sold the manor to Sir Edward Coke or Cooke, the celebrated 
Lord Chief Justice.'' 

In 1805 we find the manor in George R. S. Nassau, and in 1837 in 
Edwin Julian. There is a memorial window in the church to this lord, 
who died on his passage to America in April, 1851. Court books and surveys 
of Candelent and Chapelle (Capel) Manors in 1515, 1528, and 1647, are 
referred to in the Proceedings of the British Archaeological Association.^ 
The Court books of the last mentioned manors, 20 Hen. VIII. — 25 Charles II. 
[1528-1673] will be found amongst the Add, MSS. in the British Museum." 

A rental of the Manor of Candelent in 1610 and 1647 will also be found 
among the Add. MSS. of the British Museum.' 

Arms of Lambe : Sable, on a fesse Or betw. three cinquefoils 
Ermine, a lion passant Gules between two mullets of the field. 

Blowfield Manor. 

In the time of Edw. I. this was the lordship of Godfrey de Bellomonte, 
who had a grant of free warren here in 1292,® and in 1293 the manor passed 
to his brother and heir, John de Bellomonte.^ Later, we find it in Alexander 
de Preto, and in 1362 in John Blofeld, from whom the manor no doubt 
derived its name. Shortly afterwards it became vested in John Cavendish, 
of Grimston Hall, from whom it passed to his son and heir, Roger Cavendish, 
who by will in 1404-5 devised the same to his great-nephew, Austin 
Cavendish, who died in 1468.** 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings is a suit by Richard, son of 
this Augustine or " Austin Caundyssh," as he is called, against Sir John 
Wyngfeld, Knt., Sir William Brandon, Knt., John Sulyard, and Edward 
Grymston, as to the manor and the advowsons of the churches of St. 
Martin and St. John of Alneston, and lands in Trimley St. Mary and St. 
Martin, Walton, " Fylstowe " (Felixstowe), Kirketon, and " Falcenham."® 

In 1503 we find the manor by deed dated 3rd Oct. 19 Hen. VII. conveyed 
by Sir John Wingfield, Knt., to John Yaxlee, serjeant-at-law, Robert 
Yaxlee, and John Waller to the use of John.'° Anthony Yaxley died seised 
of the lands called Blowfield in 1568-9, when the estate passed to his grand- 
son, William Yaxley, son of Richard, son of Anthony." William Yaxley 
died in 1588, but two years prior to his death sold the manor to Edward 
Grimston," who died seised of it in 1610, leaving Harbottle Grimston his 
son and heir. Amongst the Add. Charters in the British Museum is the 
Confirmation of a Status in " Blofield Manor " in 1459.'^ 

Alteston Manor, now with Trimley. 

There were four holdings specified in the Domesday Survey, at the 
time of the compiling of which Alteston was regarded as a separate parish, 
for it was not consoUdated with Trimley until 1362. The first holding was 

' Fine, Easter, 7 Eliz. ^ lb. 

"Fine, Easter, 38 Eliz. sE.C.P., Bundle 50, 212. 

sxxi. 14. 'oAdd. Ch. 10223. 

4 Add 21044. " Manor of Lancaster, in Mellis, in Hartis- 

5 Add. 21045. mere Hundred. 

6 Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 33. "Fine, Mich. 28-29 Eliz. 

7 See Manor of Grimston Hall, in Trimley '3 Add. Ch. 10215. 
St. Martin, in this Hundred. 



io6 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



of Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, who had 48 acres of land and i ploughteam, 
valued at 15s., which had in the time of the Confessor been held by a free- 
man under commendation to Harold, and 2 freemen, Leveston and Goodwin, 
under commendation to Norman, when there was a ploughteam and a half, 
and the value was 8s/ The second holding was that of Roger Bigot, who 
held 2 freemen with 11 acres, Turbin, and Ulwin, valued at 2zA. And a church 
with 5 acres of free land, valued at i^A. The Survey says, under this entry : 
" It is 6 quarentenes long and 2 broad, and pays "jd. in a gelt. Others hold 
in these manors. These are all freemen under Roger Bigot, and Norman 
holds them of him." 

Ralph de Turlaville also held of Roger Bigot 3 freemen, named Leverich, 
Almar, and Raven, with 30 acres, formerly under commendation to Norman, 
and 1 bordar, i ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. The 
fourth holding here was also one of Roger Bigot's. Of him Wihtmar held 
a freeman named Ulrich with 12 acres, formerly under Norman. The 
value was 2s. only.* 

Free warren was granted here in 1292 to Godfrey de Bellomonte,^ and 
in 1330 to Nicholas Bonde,* and the manor is mentioned in the inquisition 
post mortem of William de Mortuo Mari and AHcia his wife in 1304.' 

A manor called Trimley Manor was granted in fee to Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, the same being in the King's hands by the attainder of Cardinal 
Wolsey.® In the 36 Hen. VIII. an Act of Parliament passed ratifying an 
exchange between the King, Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, and Henry 
his son. Earl of Arundel and Surrey ; they giving to the King the Manors 
of Walton, Trimley, Falkenham, with the rectories of Walton and Felix- 
stowe in Suffolk, for the Castle Manor and Chase of Rysing and all its 
appurtenances, with the Manors of Thorpe Gaywood, South Walsham, 
Halvergate, and Ditchingham in Norfolk ; Dunningworth, Cratfield, Hoo, 
Staverton, and Bromeswell in Suffolk, to be held of the King in capite by 
the 30th part of a knight's fee, and the rent of £25 per annum, payable at 
St. Michael into the Court of Augmentations.'' 

A manor called Trimley St. Mary, no doubt the same as above, was in 
1597 granted in perpetuity by the Crown to Robert Barker, of Ipswich.' 



'Dom. ii. 292. 
«Dom. ii. 34r, 341^, 3426. 
' Chart Rolls, 2I Edw. I. 33. 
4 Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. 41. 



5 1.P.M., 32 Edw. I. 32. 
6S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 220 
'Blomefield's Norf. ix. 48. 
8S.P. 1397, p. 427. 



(II). 




TUDDENHAM. 107 

TUDDENHAM. 

[HERE were three manors in this place in Saxon times. One 
belonged to Roger de Poictou and consisted of 68 acres of 
land, 3 bordars, and a ploughteam, but at the time of the 
Survey there were no bordars, and but half a team, and 4 
acres of meadow, valued at 25s. It had been held by 
Goddard, a freeman under the Abbot of Ely in the time 
of the Confessor. 

Roger de Poictou had two other holdings here, one of 30 acres and 2 
bordars, formerly having i ploughteam, but at the time of the Survey none, 
and 3 acres of meadow, valued at los. This had belonged to Lihtwin, a freeman 
under Halden, the predecessor of Geoffrey de Magnaville. The other was 
50 acres and 2 bordars, formerly with 3 ploughteams, but at the time of the 
Survey 2 only, and 4 acres of meadow, formerly valued at 205., but at the 
time of the Survey valued at 15s. This had been held in the Confessor's 
time by 12 freemen under commendation to the Abbot of Ely. The second 
manor belonged to Hervey de Bourges,' being held of him by Bernard 
d'Alencon, having belonged to Brihtmar, a freeman in the Confessor's 
time, under commendation to Edric of Laxfield. It consisted of 80 acres, 
6 bordars, i serf, a ploughteam in demesne, and 4 acres of meadow. In Saxon 
times there were attached to this manor 2 rouncies, 3 hogs, 15 sheep, and 6 
goats, but at the time of the Survey the hogs were 5, the sheep 10, and the 
goats had disappeared. The value was 50s. Edric, the predecessor of 
Robert Malet, was seised in the Confessor's time, and William Malet when 
he died, but the land could not be either given or sold to anyone. Five 
freemen under commendation to the above Brihtmar had held 14 acres 
with half a ploughteam, valued at 4s., but by the time of the Survey the 
ploughteams had disappeared and the value was 3s. Hervey of Bourges 
also had here 4 acres, lying in Bealings, valued at 8d., and held a free- 
woman, by name Aldeda, under commendation to Edric of Laxfield, having 
6 acres, valued at i2d. Hervey also held 2 freemen, one under commenda- 
tion to Ralph, brother of Ilger, and the other under commendation to one 
himself under commendation to the Abbot of Ely, holding 7 acres, formerly 
with half a ploughteam, which had disappeared at the time of the Survey. 
The value was i6d., and the length (presumably of the township) was 10 
quarentenes, and the breadth 6, and it paid in a gelt 15^. All these 
properties of Hervey were held of him by Bernard d'Alencon.' 

The third manor was held by Roger de Rheims, having been held 
in the Confessor's time by Aluric the deacon, a freeman under commenda- 
tion to Saxa of the abbot. It consisted of 12 acres, 3 bordars, i plough- 
team, 2 acres of meadow, formerly i rouncy, 2 beasts, 11 hogs, and 40 
sheep, valued at 3s. Gerold held this at the time of the Survey of Roger de 
Rheims, and also of the same 10 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s., 
which had been held by two freemen, one under commendation to the 
Abbot of Ely and the other under commendation to Harold. Roger de 
Rheims also held 20 acres in the demesne of Tuddenham, and in the Hundred, 
enumerated amongst his possessions were 20 acres belonging to Tudden- 
ham Church.^ 

Another holding was that of Robert Malet and consisted in the time of 
the Confessor of 12 acres, i ploughteam, but which latter had at the time 

' Dom. ii. 346. ^Dom, ii. 4236. 

'"Dom. ii. 442. 



io8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of the Survey disappeared, and | acre of meadow, valued at 2s., held by a 
freeman under commendation to Edric, There was a church with 5 acres 
" in this Hundred," and another freeman under commendation to Godwin, 
holding 4 acres, valued at M." Earl Alan had a small holding here con- 
sisting of 4 acres, valued at 8^. held by a freeman under Ralph the Staller,' 
and the Abbot of Ely held a freeman named Aluric under commendation 
to one under commendation to the abbot, valued at M. This was held of 
the abbot by Hervey de Berri.^ 

TUDDENHAM MANOR OR LOUDHAM HALL MANOR. 

In 1293 this was the lordship of Robert Westerfield, and later was held 
by John de Tudenham,fram whom it passed about 1310 to his son and heir, 
Oliver de Tudenham. In the opening of the 14th century the manor 
belonged to John de Loudham, and on his death passed to his son and heir, 
Sir John de Loudham, Knt., who died in 1356,* when it vested in his 
grandson and heir, John de Loudham, who died in 1374, without issue, and 
was succeeded by his brother and heir, Sir Thomas de Loudham, Knt., 
who died in 1385.^ John de Loudham, his son and heir, succeeded, and 
married Jane, daughter and heir of Sir William Kelvedon, of Kelvedon 
Hall, in Great Brasted, co. Essex. He died in 1423,^ when the manor 
passed to his daughter and heir Jane, married ist to Thomas Heveningham, 
and 2ndly to Ralph Blenerhasset, of Frenze, in Norfolk. She died 20th 
June, 1501, at the age of 97, when the manor passed to her son and heir, 
John Blenerhasset, who was then 77 years of age. He married ist Jane, 
daughter of Thomas Heigham, of Higham Green, in Gazeley, and 2ndly, 
Jane, daughter of Sir Thomas Tjmdall, Knt. He died 8th Nov. 1509, in 
his 87th year,^ when the manor devolved on his son and heir. Sir Thomas 
Blenerhasset. He married ist Jane Sutton, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter 
of John Braham, of Wetheringsett, who died 23rd July, 1561. Sir Thomas 
died 27th June, 1531,^ and was buried in the church of Frenze in Norfolk. 
On each corner of a stone to his memory in the church is a coat of Hasset, 
quartering Orton, Lowdham, Keldon, Heigham, Beacham, &c. His effigy 
remained in Blomefield's time in complete armour, having a surcoat of 
his arms, with his quarterings, and under his head was his crest, viz., a 
fox passant. The manor, on Sir Thomas Blenerhasset' s death, passed to 
his son and heir, George Blenerhasset, who married ist one of the daughters 
and coheirs of John Covert, of Sussex, and andly Margaret, sister of Sir 
George Jermyn, Knt. He died i8th Feb. 1543,^ and his wife Margaret 
is buried in Frenze Church, having died 7th Sept. 1587, aged 70. 

The manor devolved on George's death on his daughter and heir, Mary, 
married to Thomas Colepepper or Culpeper, of Wakehurst, in Kent, and 
in 1544 we meet with a fine levied by John Culpeper and others against the 
said Thomas Culpeperand others,'" and another fine in 1562 levied by James 
Byelles against the said Thomas Culpeper and others." 

Davy states that Sir Thomas Bedingfield, Knt., was lord, and on his 
death in 1539," the manor passed to his brother and heir, Robert Bedingfield.'^ 

' Dom. ii. 315&. ■' I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. 33. 

'Dom. ii. 293. sj.p.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 63. 

3 Dom. ii. 386&. sj.p.M., 36 Hen. VIII. (9th Oct.). 

♦I.P.M., 30 Edw. III. 19. "Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 
si.P.M., 9 Rich. II. 33. Blomefield says "Fine, Hil. 5 Eliz. 

he died 28th April, 1428. " Should be 13th March, 1538. 

«I.P.M., 2 Hen. VI. 24. 'sl.p.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5. 



TUDDENHAM. 109 

This however, is evidently the " Tuddenham Manor " of which Margaret 
Bedingfield died seised in 1475/ and of which Sir Thomas Tuddenham 
died seised ten years earlier/ and might have been either Tuddenham St. 
Mary's Manor, or Tuddenham Manor in Kesgrave, but not this manor. 

In the 27th EUzabeth [1585] we find that Robert King died seised of 
three parts of the manor. Later, it was vested in Robert Smyth,' and in 
1606 passed to his daughter and heir Jane, married to William Wooton. 

The manor was in 1644 vested in John Sickelmore, for he died seised 
9th June, 1644, and his ownership of the manor is stated on a shield-shaped 
tablet south of the altar in the parish church : — 

" Here lyes the bodyes of John 

Sicklemor Gen'. Lord of this Man 

nor and Elizabeth his wife, who to 

gether had issue seaven sonnes and 

seaven Daughters and they left sur 

viving them six Sonnes and Foure Daugh 

ters, namely Mary, Thomas, John, Tobias 

Martha, Nicholas Eliz''. Samuel 

Alice and Jonathan : 

Obijt Johannes : 9"° Jun. 1644 ! 

Johannes filius hoc dedicavit." 

This is surmounted by three escutcheons : dexter. Gules, three sickles 
interwoven Arg. handled Or, Sicklemore ; sinister, Gu. 2 chevrons, Arg. 
Fettiplace ; centre, Sicklemore impahng FelUplace. 

In 1693 the manor was in Philip Bacon, in right of his wife, Mary, 
daughter and heir of John Sicklemore, and by indentures of lease and 
release dated ist and 2nd Oct. 1701, the said Philip Bacon, described as of 
Nacton, gent., and William Minter, of Barham, gent., mortgaged the manor 
in consideration of £1,060 to Thomas Grove, late of Clopton, on whose death 
Mary, of Ipswich, his widow and executrix, together with the said 
Philip Bacon and William Minter, by deed dated 25th March, 1702, assigned 
to Ballestrazzar Gardiner, a nominee of Minter, all right in the manor. 

WilUam Minter, on his marriage with Elizabeth Fynn, of Ipswich 
conveyed by deeds dated i8th and 19th July, 1715, the manor to Simon 
Dove, of Bramford, and Francis Coleman, of Ipswich, goldsmith, as trustees, 
to uses in favour of the said WilUam Minter and Elizabeth his intended 
wife. William Minter, by his will dated 12th Oct. 1738,'* bequeaths certain 
copyholds to his cousin William Minter, the elder of Hemingstone, for life, 
and then to his eldest son, William Minter, the younger. Apparently this 
manor went in the same way as the copyholds, for in 1753 upon the marriage 
of William Minter, of Tuddenham, with Sarah Sparowe, of Wherstead, this 
manor was included in the settlement dated 29th and 30th March, 1753, 
being vested in William Sparowe the elder and William Sparowe the 
younger, both of Wherstead, as trustees. 

William Minter, junior, the settlor, made his will dated 5th March, 
1787,^ and died ist Aug. 1788, leaving his widow Sarah and two daughters, 
Sarah and Mary, to whom he devised all his lands. The daughter Sarah 

'I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. ♦He died 4th July, 1739, aged 85 years, 
^ I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. and his will was proved at Ipswich, 

3 But see Tuddenham Manor, in Lackford 28th July, 1739. 

Hundred, 5 proved 23rd Aug. 1788, P.C.C, 



no THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

married William Tong, only child of William Tong, of Westerfield, clerk, and 
by settlement effected by lease and release dated 7th and 8th Oct. 1789, 
Sarah's moiety of the manor was vested in Francis Brooke and Mileson 
Edgar, as trustees, the same being limited to the use of William Tong and 
Sarah, and their issue. William Tong made his will 5th March, 1794, and 
must have died the same year, for it was proved 12th Nov. following. He 
left his widow Sarah surviving and two daughters, Isabella and Susannah. 

Isabella married one Wratislaw, and S.ed 21st Feb. 1812, aged 20, 
apparently leaving issue. Susannah, her sister, married Michael Turner. 

Mary Minter, who was possessed of the other moiety of the manor, by 
her will dated 24th Dec. 1830 devised the same to her niece, Susannah Turner, 
and died 30th Jan. 1831. Susannah died intestate. 

In 1837 the manor was vested in Major Michael Turner, the husband 
of Susannah, and in John Minter Tong Wratislaw, probably a son of 
Isabella Wratislaw. 

In 1855 it was held by the former and J. Wratislaw. Major Michael 
Turner died in 1865, when his interest in the manor passed to his eldest son, 
the Rev. Michael Turner, rector of Cotton. He married Mary Anne, 
daughter of the Rev. Philip Carlyon, and on his death his interest in the 
manor passed to the Rev. Michael Turner, M.A., of Cotton rectory. 

The Wratislaw and Turner interests have been since acquired by, and 
the manor is now vested in Mrs. Holt Wilson, of Redgrave Hall. 

Arms of Sicklemore : Sa., three sickles interwoven, Arg. handled Or. 

St. Bartholomew's Manor or Bertilmemes Manor. 

This manor belonged in 1252 to John Bertelmen, of " Thodenhan," a 
foreign burgess of Ipswich. 

In 1323 a fine was levied (apparently of this manor') by William de 
Risheton and Alice his wife, and John, son of John de Ofton, against John 
de Wellston and David le Waleys,' and in 1455 by Henry Tumour, of 
Haverhill, Richard Bumstede, clerk, John Yates, John Shotesham, clerk, 
Thomas Mayster, and John Stalon, against Thomas Freman and Agnes his 
wife.^ 

Later the manor vested in George Baldry, of Hadleigh, who died seised 
of it 14th Feb. 1540,* when it passed to Elizabeth, his daughter and heir, 
married to Robert, 2nd Lord Rich. The custody of this manor, and a 
messuage in North Weston, had been granted in 1541 to Sir Richard Rich 
during the minority of Elizabeth, with wardship and marriage.^ 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth is an 
action for discovery by Elizabeth, Lady Rich, widow of Robert Lord Rich, 
against John Fynch, as to the manor or mansion-house called " Bartholo- 
mewes" and land in Tuddenham, Culpho, Play ford, and Ipswich, of which 
defendant had been farmer, and claimed part by purchase.* Lord Rich 
died 27th Feb. 1581, and the manor probably passed to his son, Sir Edwin, 
3rd Lord Rich, of Mulbarton, co. Norfolk. In 1599 a fine was levied of the 
manor by Henry Derby and others against Edwin Rich and others.'' 

In i6og the manor was vested in Robert King, afterwards Robert King 
Blundevill, of Newton Flotman, Norfolk. He sold i8th Feb. 1635, to 
Gilbert Havers, citizen and woollen draper, of London, who became bankrupt 

'This probably relates to the Manor of "I.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 20. 

Tuddenham St. Mary. =33 jjen. VIII. 1541 ; S.P. 947 (i). 

"Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. II. 30. «C.P. ii. 424, 5. 

3 Feet of Fines, 33 Hen. VI. Ii. 'Fine, Trin. 41 Eliz, 



TUDDENHAM. iii 

in i644j when the manor was sold by the Commissioner to Edmund West, of 
Masworth, co. Bucks., who seems to have been trustee only, for Gilbert 
Havers conveyed in 1651 to Roger Pratt, of the Inner Temple, afterwards 
Sir Roger Pratt, of Riston, co. Norfolk. He sold by deed 7th Nov. 1663, 
to John Courthois, of the Inner Temple, for ;£2,400. On his death the manor 
descended to his two daughters and coheirs, Gertrude and Barbara. Barbara 
conveyed her moiety to her sister Gertrude, and she sold the whole in 1679 
to Sir Roger Pratt, Knt., who, 21st May, 1681, obtained a release from all 
parties beneficially interested. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Ipswich in 1679 we find 
an action by Gertrude " Curtlois " and others against Sir Roger Pratt as to 
" the Manor of Bartholomews and Manor of Tuddenham, and capital 
messuage called Tuddenham Hall, and lands in Tuddenham and Culpho, 
lately sold by defendant (when Mr. Pratt) to John Curthois,' and a cross- 
action the same year between Sir Robert Pratt and Gertrude Curthois and 
others amongst the same Depositions. 

Sir Roger Pratt, who had been knighted by Charles II. for his exertions 
in rebuilding with Sir Christopher Wren the city of London after the great fire 
of 1666, married Anne, daughter of Sir Edward Monyns, Bart., of Waldershare, 
CO. Kent, and died without issue in 1684, when the manor passed to his 
cousin and heir, Edward Pratt, of Yoxford,son of Edward Pratt, of Hevening- 
ham, by Ursula his wife, daughter of Henry Rossington, of Framlingham, 
which last-mentioned Edward was 2nd son of Edward Pratt, of Hockwold, 
and Dorothy his wife, daughter of William Cobb, of Sandringham, co. 
Norfolk, which last -mentioned Edward Pratt was brother of Gregory 
Pratt, the grandfather of Sir Roger Pratt. Edward Pratt, the successor of 
Sir Roger, married Emma, daughter of William Tiffin, and widow of George 
Bexwell, and on his death in 1691 was succeeded by his son and heir, Edward 
Pratt, of Woodbridge. He married Mary, daughter of Anthony Apple- 
thwaite, of Ipswich, and dying in 1708," the manor passed to his widow for 
life, who, by deed ist Oct. 1723, released her interest to her son and heir, 
Roger Pratt, of Ryston, co. Norfolk, High Sheriff in 1727. He married 
Henrietta, daughter of Sir Robert Davers, Bart., by Mary, his wife, one of 
the coheirs of Thomas, last Lord Jermyn, and on his death in 1771 the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Edward Pratt, who married Blanche, 
daughter of Sir Jacob Astley, Bart., of Melton Constable, and died in 1784, 
when the manor did not apparently devolve on his son and heir, Edward Roger 
Pratt, of Ryston, High Sheriff in 1798, but passed to the 2nd son, the Rev. 
Jermyn Pratt, rector of Ash. He married 4th May, 1847, Mary Louisa, 
4th daughter of George Murray, Bishop of Rochester and grandson of John, 
3rd Duke of Atholl, and apparently parted with the lordship, for in Septem- 
ber, 1 841, the manor, then but a reputed manor, was sold for ^f 10, 300 to 
Dr. Lynn, of Woodbridge. 

There is a precipe on covenants concerning this manor in 1596 amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum.^ 

Page says that in 1437 Sir John Clifton, of Buckenham Castle, Knt., 
surrendered the Manor of Tuddenham St. Martin to Master Thomas 
WeU and his assigns, it having been long in contest between them ; and he 
infers that this was the same manor which later vested in the family of 
Minter. This, however, seems open to question. 

'31 Charles II., Ipswich Exch. Dep. Oct. 1723, it is stated that Edward's 

"Will proved 1st July, 1708. In a deed con- will was dated 15th July, 1708. 

nected with the property dated 1st 3 Add. Ch. 25498. 



112 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

There is a fine of the Manor of Tudenham and the advowson in 1435, 
but we cannot say to which manor it relates. It was levied between Hugh 
ActoUj clerk, Ralph Harpele, clerk, John Bacon, sen., John jun., Robert 
Blyklyng, of Norwich, Robert Gunton, of Norwich, Peter Laurence, Robert 
Piert, John Folkard, Simon Walsokyn, WilUam Yiselham, John Pennyng, 
draper, Robert Toopp, William Hempstede, of Norwich, and Thomas Gryce, 
of Norwich, against William Ampulford and Margaret his wife.' 

There is also a fine levied in 1326, which includes a Manor of " Tudden- 
ham." It was levied by Richard Len, of Ipswich, and Emma his wife, 
against Giles de Wacheshamand John atte Northstrete, chaplain." 

Arms of Pratt : Argent, on a chevron Sa., between two ogresses each 
charged with a martlet of the first in chief, and an ogress in base, charged 
with a trefoil slipped Arg. three mascles Or. 



I Feet of Fiiies, 13 Hen. VI. 23. » Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. II. 7. 




WALDRINGFIELD. 113 

WALDRINGFIELD. 

jHERE was one manor here in Saxon times. It belonged to 
Ranulf, brother of Ilger, and consisted of i carucate of 
land, a bordar, 2 ploughteams, reduced to i at the time 
of the Survey, and a mill. In Saxon times was i rouncy 
and 100 sheep, which in the Survey became 27, and the 
value was 20s. At the time of the Survey, the value 
had come down to los., the rouncy had disappeared, and 
the sheep were 27 only. The Survey says : " It is 6 quarentenes long and 
3 broad, and pays in a gelt ^d." It was held in the time of the Confessor 
by Brihtmar, a freeman ; Ranulf also held here 40 acres and i ploughteam, 
valued at 4s., which had formerly been held by five freemen under com- 
mendation, half to Brihtmar and half to his mother.' The Abbot of Bury 
had a large estate here. It consisted of i|- carcuates of land, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne, i belonging to the men, 2 acres of meadow, i rouncy, 10 hogs, 
and 100 sheep, valued at 20s. It was 3 quarentenes in breadth and 6 in 
length, and paid in a gelt ^d. This estate in the Confessor's time had been 
held by Quengeva under the abbot. ^ 

In Little Waldringfield Robert Malet held 22 acres, i bordar tenant, 
and I ploughteam, valued at 2s., which had formerly been held by a socman 
under Edric.^ 

WALDRINGFIELD al. WALDRINGFIELD HiLTON MANOR. 

In 1305 Sir Robert Hilton, Knt., was patron of the living of Waldring- 
field, and not unlikely had the manor also, which would account for its name. 
In the next century it was the lordship of Sir Robert Wingfield, who died 
in 1431, from which time till the time of Sir John Wingfield, Sheriff of Nor- 
folk and Suffolk in 1483, and again in 1492-3, the manor devolved in the 
same course as the Manor of Thorpe Hall in Hasketon, in this Hundred. 

John Purpet, of Newbourn, seems to have died seised of the manor in 
1542, when it passed to his son and heir, Edmund Purpet. His daughter 
Jane married Anthony Wingfield, and died seised of the manor in 1562, 
when Elizabeth Wingfield, daughter of Henry, was found to be the next 
heir. Sir Anthony Wingfield, of Goodwins, who was created a baronet 
17th May, 1627, '^sd seised of the manor 30th July, 1638, when the manor 
again followed the same line of devolution as the Manor of Thorpe Hall 
until it vested in Sir Robert Wingfield, 3rd Bart., who died unmarried 
in 1671. The manor, however, was sold in 1662 to Thomas Essington, from 
whom it passed to his son and heir, John Essington, who sold the same to Sir 
Samuel Barnardiston, Bart., of Brightwell. He was the 3rd son of Sir 
Nathaniel Barnardiston and Jane Soame. He is noted for having given the 
term " Roundhead " to the political party which he and his family supported. 
In 1641-2 he took part in a city procession with a petition to the Parliament 
described as " the humble petition of divers apprentices and other young 
men in and about the city of London," who were petitioners for peace. He 
joined heartily in the Restoration, and was knighted and created a baronet 
nth May, 1663. Sir Samuel sat in most of the Parliaments of Charles II. 
as member for Ipswich, and was Deputy-Governor of the East India Com- 
pany, and presented a petition from the company to the Commons with 
reference to a petition presented to the Lords against the Commons.* He 

'Dom. ii. 424J. 3j)oui_ [[ 215. 

^Dom. ii. 369&. *Rapin ii. 651. 

P 



114 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

was tried before Jeffreys, 14th Feb. 1683, for having " maliciously and 
seditiously " in letters to Sir Philip Skipper, Knt., at Ipswich (who had 
married his niece), and to a Mr. William Cavill at Brightwell, and others in 
Suffolk, mentioned " the late sham protestant plot." " 'Tis generally 
beheved the Earl of Essex was murdered." " The brave Lord Russell is 
afresh lamented." " Sir George (Jeffreys) is grown very humble." That 
" it is beheved the King will pardon Algernon Sidney," &c. 

Sir Samuel was fined £10,000 and ordered to find sureties for his good 
behaviour during hfe, and to be committed till same be found. Sir Samuel 
Barnardiston would not pay, and remained a prisoner during the remainder 
of this and a great part of the following reign. In the 2nd WilUam and 
Mary, an Act passed " to free the estate of Sir Samuel Barnardiston from 
the several incumbrances occasioned by judgment given against him upon 
information in the Court of King's Bench." Sir Samuel Barnardiston' 
died without issue 8th Nov. 1707, when the manor passed to his nephew 
Samuel, son of Nathaniel Barnardiston, of Hackney, elder brother of the late 
Baronet, Sir Samuel. This Sir Samuel Barnardiston, 2nd Bart., of Bright- 
well, died without issue 3rd Jan. 1709, and was succeeded by his brother. 
Sir Pelatiah Barnardiston, 3rd Bart., who died unmarried 4th May, 17 12. 

In 1804 we find the manor vested in Mrs. EUzabeth Paiesti, and it 
subsequently went to one Bush, and was then purchased by the Rev. 
Porter, of Ipswich. In 1885 the manor was vested in the Rev. George 
Henry Porter, of Marlesford, and is now vested in Richard Porter. 

RiVERSHALL MANOR. 

This was the estate of Brihtmar, a freeman in the time of the Con- 
fessor, and of Ranulf, brother of Ilger, at the period of the Domesday 
Survey. In 1316 the lordship was vested in Richard Bruce, and in 1428 
in Margaret, widow of William Lampet. Between 1456 and 1459 the manor 
was the subject of the Chancery suit mentioned in the account of Brightwell 
Manor pending between Wilham Curson, Esq., and Cecily his wife, and John 
Andrewe, feoffee of John Lampet, Esq., father of the said Cecily,'' and 
it passed in the same course as the Manor of Brightwell, in this Hundred, 
to the time of Thomas Essington, who bought in 1662, after which it devolved 
apparently in the same course as the main manor. 

The manor is included in a fine levied in 1542 by Sir John Jermy and 
Margaret his wife, against them by Thomas Bawdy and others.^ The fine 
included also the manors of Brightwell and Stutton, and the advowsons of 
the churches of Brightwell and Stutton (? Sutton). 

The manor with the main manor was offered for sale at Ipswich the 
24th Sept. 1836. They were then described as " The Manors of Rivers Hall 
in Waldringfield and Waldringfield with Hilton." 



'See Brightwell Manor, in this Hundred. ^ping, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII 

"E.C.P. 35-38 Hen. VI., Bundle a6, 472. 




WALTON. 115 

WALTON. 

[HERE was one manor here in Saxon times belonging to 
Roger Bigot. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 14 villeins, 
6 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the 
men, and 4 acres of meadow. There was a fishery, 6 rouncies, 
26 hogs, and 140 sheep. This manor was held in the time of 
the Confessor by Norman, and at the time of the Survey he 
held under Roger Bigot, but the particulars given above had 
somewhat altered. There were then but 6 villeins, though the plough- 
teams in demesne had increased by a half, and there was a mill, and the 
fishery had gone. There was a church with 8 acres valued at i6d. 

To this manor belonged Fakenham as a hamlet with a carucate of 
land, 3 bordars, and i ploughteam in demesne, and half a ploughteam 
belonging to the men, 2 acres of meadow, i rouncy, and 80 sheep. The 
whole was valued at £6. This manor was half a league long and 4 quaren- 
tenes broad, and paid in a gelt izd. Roger Bigot also held here 40 acres 
and 2 ploughteams, valued at los., which had formerly been held by 15 
freemen under commendation, namely, Goodrich the smith, Edric, Wool- 
nough, Osulf, Uluric, Stanmar, Levett, Wihtric, Blackman, Manson, Lewin, 
Woolmar, Woolfer, and the other Woolfer and Leofstan. Amongst the lands 
of Roger Bigot we find a holding under the head, " Gulpelea," no doubt 
Gulper HaU, in Walton. He had 40 acres, 2 ploughteams, and i acre of 
meadow, valued at 5s., which had in the Confessor's time been held by 5 
freemen under commendation to Norman. The Survey says: "I^ is 2 
quarentenes long and 2 broad, and pays in a gelt 3^.'" 

The only other holdings here were those of Hugh de Montf ort and the 
Abbot of Ely. The former consisted of 24 acres, valued at 45., which had 
formerly been held by a freeman named Lure, under commendation to 
Norman, but which, at the time of the Survey was held by this. Norman of 
Hugh de Montfort, the Abbot of Ely having the soc.^ The latter consisted 
of the land which Hervey de Berri held of the abbot, and had formerly 
held of the King against whom the abbot had proved his right. It was a 
freewoman named Alveva with 16 acres, under the abbot's commendation, 
and 2 bordars and half a ploughteam, valued at 35.^ 

There are two entries in the Great Survey under the head Wadgate, 
which is a hamlet of Walton. They both were held by Roger Bigot ; one 
was of 5 freemen under commendation to Norman — Leverich, Moregrim, 
Aldwulf, Gooday, and Godwin, with 20 acres, i ploughteam, and half an 
acre of meadow, valued at 4s. The Survey says: "It is 2 quarentenes long 
and 2 broad, and pays in a gelt 2d." The other holding was of 15 acres 
and a ploughteam, valued at 3s. It had belonged to Wihtmar, holding 8 
freemen — Langfer, Fegar, Brumar, Gooday, Edward, Goodrich, Aldwulf, 
Osketel, mider commendation to Wihtmar, and Langfer and Aldwulf under 
commendation to Norman in the Confessor's time.* 

There are three other holdings of Roger Bigot under the head 
" Buregata," which most probably relate to this place. The first was of 
13 freemen who had been under Norman in the Confessor's time. These 
were Goodrich, Sereman, Swain, Leofric, Morcar, Swetman, Sprot, Good- 
rich, another Goodrich, Woolmar, Aluric Stick-Stack, Coleman, Long 
Goodrich, and Seward. (14 seem to be enumerated ; probably the 

'Dom. ii. 3396, 340. 3Dom. ii. 3855, 

'Dom. ii. 406b, '•Dom. ii. 340. 



ii6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Domesday enumerators were confused by the " Goodriches.") These 
freemen had 80 acres of land, 6 bordars, 3 ploughteams, and i acre of meadow 
valued at 30s. The estate was half a league long, and 4 quarentenes broad, 
and paid in a gelt 20d. Of the above one was a half freeman under Edric, and 
he was called Aluric Stick-Stack. The second holding consisted of 20 acres, 
4 bordars, and an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. at the time of the Survey, 
held by Wihtmar of Roger Bigot, but apparently formerly held by the 
said Wihtmar, who was a freeman under commendation to Goodrich. The 
third holding was of 15 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 35., formerly 
held by 9 freemen, named Aldwult, Aluric, Brihtric, Osgood, Gooday, 
Wihtmar, Bruman, Wickens,and Leverich, under Norman's commendation.' 

Walton Manor. 

This was the estate of Norman in Saxon times, and he held, after the 
Conquest, of Roger Bigot, who was the Domesday tenant in chief. The 
manor descended in the Earl of Norfolk's family to the death of Maria,widow 
of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, 1362, in the same course as the 
Manor of Framlingham, in Loes Hundred. In the inquisition p.m. of Roger 
le Bygod, Earl of Norfolk, in 1270, where an extent is given, the manor is 
said to have included a marsh called " Le Holm," a marsh at " Faunten- 
ham," a pasture called " Crostonecroft," a pasture at Kenebrok, 5s. rent for 
cultivating vines at Framlingham, and 9s. rent for customs of ships at 
Stanbake and Gustun, and to have been held of the Bishop of Ely by the 
service of two knights' fees.'' Thomas de Brotherton left a son Edward, who 
after his father's decease was Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England, but 
he died the King's ward the same year as his father, leaving his sisters 
Margaret and Alice his coheirs. The descent of the manor from this time 
to the time of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, who had livery in 
1524, is identical with the Manor of FramUngham, in Loes Hundred. 

The Duke and his son Henry, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, exchanged 
this manor for others with the King, and the exchange was ratified in 1544 
by Act of Parliament, the 36 Hen. VHI. In 1558 Queen Elizabeth 
leased the manor to Thomas Lambe for 30 years. From the Exchequer 
Depositions taken at Wickham Market in 1579 we learnt that a curious 
action was pending at that time. It was as to whether ancestors of certain 
persons were called Blackman, and if so whether villeins-regardants to 
Manor of Walton-cum-Trymley. The action was brought by Sir Henry 
Lee against Thomas Blacke, sen. and jun. 

In 1603 the manor was in the hands of the King, and in 1611 in the 
hands of the Queen. In 1619 a grant of the manor was made to Henry 
Hobart and others, but the extent of this grant does not appear. It is 
clear, however, that it was by no means absolute in its terms, for, from 
the State Papers for 1626 we learn that a warrant was issued for cutting 
down pollard trees growing " on the King's Walton-cum-Trimley Manor," 
required for forts in Essex and Suffolk,^ and in 1628 we meet with a grant 
of the manor to Edmund Ditchfield, John Highlow, Humphrey Clarke, and 
Francis Mothely. In 1634 it was vested in Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., and 
a curious dispute with the Corporation of Ipswich as to the rights of the 

'Dom. ii. 3396. 342. de Brotherton, I.P.M., 36 Edw. III. 

"I.P.M., 54 Hen. III., File 38 (7). See pt. ii. 9. 

Extent. Roger le Bygod and Alicia ^s.p. (1626), 571. 

his wife ; lb. 35 Edw. I. 46. Maria 



WALTON. 117 

manor will be found in Bacon's Annals of Ipswich, p, 507 note. In 1680 
the manor was vested in Sir John Barker, Bart. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1690 is an order to Capt. Hammond, 
Deputy Governor of Landguard Fort on the coast of Suffolk, in Walton-cum- 
Trimley Manor, and to Sir John Barker, lord of the same manor.' An 
action was brought against Sir John Barker by Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., 
touching the manor, waste to common lands, and lands gained from the 
sea there, and Grimston Hall and Manors of " Mossen and Stratton," and 
as to metes and bounds and common of pasture.^ 

Sir John Barker died in 1696, and from this time the manor has passed 
in the same course of descent as the Manor of Grimston, in Trimley St. 
Martin, and is now vested in the Right Hon. Capt. E. G. Pretyman, D.L., 
of Orwell Park. 

Walton was a place of note long before the Norman Conquest, and it 
was here that the Earl of Leicester landed with his Flemings in 1173, and 
was received by Hugh Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, then lord of the manor and 
castle of Walton. In 1176, as HoUingshead informs us. Hen. II. having 
experienced so much trouble with the castles of the principal nobles, caused 
them to be destroyed and levelled with the ground. This was so effectively 
done in the case of Walton Castle that it has never risen since, the very stones 
were borne away, and have been discovered in odd places in the surrounding 
district, some foot paths on both sides of the road having been paved with 
them. In some places it is said they still remain entire. At the same time 
the Castle of Ipswich was demolished. 

Walton Castle stood upon a high cliff in Felixstowe, at the distance of 
about I mile from the mouth of Woodbridge River, and two miles from 
OrweU Haven ; part of the foundation of the west side of it was a hundred 
and fifty years ago still to be seen, being then one hundred and eighty- 
seven yards in length and nine feet thick, and went by the name of " Stone- 
works." How much longer it was it is impossible to say, the sea which is con- 
tinually gaining upon this coast having swallowed up the ruins and washed 
away the remainder of the foundation. There can be no doubt but Walton 
Castle was a Roman fortification, as appears from the great variety of 
Roman ruins, rings, coins, &c., which have been found there. It is thought 
to have been built by Constantine the Great, when he withdrew his legions 
from the frontier towns in the east of Britain, and built forts or castles to 
supply the want of them. The coins taken up here are of the Vespasian 
and Antonine families ; of Severus and his successors to Gordian the third ; 
and from Gallienus down to Arcadius and Honorius. It is certain the 
castle had the privilege of coining money, for several dies have been found 
for that purpose. 

In the parish of Felixstowe, about a quarter of a mile north of Felix- 
stowe, High Street, and at the same distance east from Walton bounds, 
are some ancient and considerable ruins of a magnificent building, which 
goes by the name of " Old-hall." This probably was erected for the manor- 
house, after the castle was demolished, and was the place probably indicated 
when we are informed that "Edward III. laid some time at his Manor of 
Walton before his enterprise into France" in 1338. He sailed from the 
port of Orwell the i6th July. Here also the same monarch confirmed the 
charters granted to the Corporation of Ipswich by an inspeximus dated at 
Walton in 1339. 

'S.P. 2 W. and M. 467. 'Exch. Dep. 



ii8 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



That Roger Bigot claimed to have wreck of the sea here we learn from 
the Hundred Rolls/ and Ministers' accounts of his lands here 52 Hen. III. 
to 27 Hen. VI. will be found amongst the Ministers' accounts in the PubHc 
Record Office.^ A grant of markets and fairs was made to Roger Bigod 
in 1289.^ The market cross was standing long after the market had been 
disused. The extent of fees held here by the Earls Marshal about 1400 
will be found amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.* 
Extracts from court rolls of the manor will be found as follows : 1489, 
Add. Ch. 10204 ; 1497^ Add. Ch. 10221 ; 1560, Add. Ch. 10229 J ^5^0, 
Add. Ch. 10234 '> 15985 Add. Ch. 10239, ^4993 J 1648, Add. Ch. 10252. 
And the Manor-Book from 1620 to 1622 amongst the Additional MSS. in 
the British Museum.^ 

On the Patent Rolls for 1384 there is a confirmation in favour of 
William Gommyld of letters patent of Margaret, Countess of Norfolk, 
being a grant for life of the office of chief bailiff of Walton Manor,® and also 
of a grant to John Baron of the custody of the warren and game of Walton.' 
And in an entry on the same Rolls in 1400 there is the recital of a grant by 
the same Margaret to William Parker for life of the office of bailiff of this 
manor by letters patent which were taken from him by certain men who 
seized the Castle of Framlingham. The office was confirmed,^ and the 
same year, on the same Rolls, we find an inspeximus and confirmation to 
William, Lord of Wylughby, of letters patent dated 5 Sept. 23 Rich. II. 
granting to him Walton Manor during the minority of Thomas Mowbray, 
son of Thomas Mowbray, late Earl Marshal, or so long as it should remain 
in the King's hands by the forfeiture of the said Earl.^ On the Memoranda 
Rolls two years later is an acquittance of issues of the manor to WilUam, 
Lord Willoughby." 

Particulars of an action by John Browne against Francis Colby, 
defendant, as to the close called the " Holme " parcel of the Manor of 
Walton, which complainant sold to defendant with a bond of indemnity, 
&c., will be found amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen 
Elizabeth." 

Caldecote Manor. 

William de Caldecote died seised of the lordship in 1315," whenit passed 
to his son and heir, John de Caldecote, who died in 1331. It seems to have 
passed in his lifetime to Sir John Holbroke, Knt., and from him to his son 
and heir. Sir Thomas Holbroke, who died seised of it in 1360, when it went 
to his son and heir, John Holbroke, who died in 1376.'^ 

Later Thomas Cavendish was lord, and from him the manor passed 
to his son and heir, William Cavendish.'* 

Richard Cavendish held in the time of Hen. VIII., for we find an action 
in the Star Chamber brought by him against Alen Goldingham, &c., as to 
common of pasture in Trimley Heath in Walton Manor.' ^ 



'11. 197. 

^Bundle 1007, No. 4, 20. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 17 Edw. I. g. 

4 Add Ch. 19338. 

5 Add. MSS. 2104I. 

6 Pat. Rolls, 8 Rich. II. pt. i. 24. 
'76. 29. 

8 Pat Rolls, I Hen. IV. pt. iv. 31. 
3 Pat. Rolls, 1 Hen. IV., pt. ii. 25. 



'°M. Trin. Rec. Rot. 18. 

"C.P. i. 61. 

"I.P.M., 8 Edw. II. 25. 

'3 See Manor of Holbroke, in Samford 

Hundred. 
'■tSee Manor of Grimston Hall, Trimley St. 

Martin, in this Hundred. 
•5 29 Hen. VIII., Bundle 17, 356. 



WALTON. 119 

Langeston Manor. 

This estate seems to have been held in Saxon days by Alnoth, a freeman 
of Harold, and at the time of the Norman Survey to have been held by 
Bernard of Roger Bigot as Domesday tenant in chief. In 1336 it was 
apparently held by the same parties as held the Manors of Nacton, Foxhole, 
Holbrook, and Tattingston, for this year we meet with a fine of all these 
manors levied by Sir Thomas de Holbroke and Margaret his wife against 
WilUam le Neweman, parson of Tattingstone Church, and Nicholas Bonde ;' 
and in 1353 another fine levied by the said Sir Thomas de Holbroke against 
John Caperon, parson of Tatyngston Church, and Henry Whit, of 
Tatyngston.* This latter fine also included the advowsons of the churches 
of Bucklesham, Brendwenham, and Holton. 

In 1433 we find that John de Langestone held a fourth part of a fee 
here, and probably this manor ; beyond this, we can gather Httle or nothing 
respecting its history or devolution. 



» Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. III. a8, 'Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 10. 




120 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WITNESHAM. 

IJNE holding only is enumerated here in the Domesday Survey. 
It belonged to Walter the deacon, and consisted of 3 
carucates of land, 10 villeins, 4 bordars, 6 serfs (but at the 
time of the Survey 5 only), 3 ploughteams in demesne, 4 
belonging to the men, 10 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 8 
beasts, 68 hogs, 180 sheep, 30 goats, and 7 hives of bees, 
valued at ;^I2. The valuation in the time of the Confessor 
had been 60s., and the estate was then held by Lewin, a freeman. The 
length was 8 quarentenes and the breadth 4, and it paid in a gelt 5^.' 

Finesford, or Finlesford, which is probably part of Witnesham, is 
separately mentioned in the Survey. There were five holdings here. One 
of Leveva, a freewoman under commendation to the Abbot of Ely, holding 
40 acres, i ploughteam, and 3 bordars, valued at 6s.'' A second was included 
amongst the lands of Roger de Oburville, and consisted of 24 acres and i acre 
of meadow, formerly held by Tepekin with half a ploughteam, and a freewoman 
with half an acre, valued at 45.^ The third holding was that of Walter the 
Deacon, having in demesne what 26 freemen under commendation to the 
predecessor of Walter had held, namely, i carucate of land, of which the 
Abbot of Ely had the soc. In Saxon times there had been 3 ploughteams, 
but at the time of the Survey 2 only. There were also 4 acres of meadow, 
the whole valued at 40s. The Survey adds : " It is 10 quarentenes long and 
3 broad, and pays in a gelt lod. ;"* but it could hardly have been 
the measurement of this small place. The fourth holding was that of Roger 
de Rheims, and consisted of 6 acres and i acre of meadow belonging to 
Newton, in another Hundred. This was held of Roger by Ralph.^ The 
fifth holding was that of Geoffrey de Magnaville, and was held of him by 
William, son of Sahala de Boville. It consisted of 2 acres valued at 4^., 
which had been held in the Confessor's time by Halden. The Abbot of Ely 
had the soc.^ 

BuRWASH Manor. 

John de Weyland held lands here in 1259, ^.nd had a grant of free 
warren this year.^ 

In 1287 Richard de Brumpton granted a messuage and 2 carucates of 
land here in consideration of a rent in kind of the grantees indemnif5ang 
him against the services to Sir Thomas de Weyland, Knt., the lord Chief 
Justice, and his son John. The Lord Chief Justice was banished in 1288, 
when his son, John, held until his death. He had a grant of free warren 
here in 1304.^ 

On the Patent Rolls in 1301 we find a commission issued to enquire 
touching persons who broke the houses of J ohn de " Weylaund ' ' at Witnesham, 
Clopton, Blakehall, Wantisden, Onehouse, and Whelnetham, cut down his 
trees, and carried away timber of the said houses and other his goods there, 
and at " Pettagh" f and three years later a similar commission of enquiry 
was issued relating to damage and trespass in the manors of Witnesham, 
Clopton, Blakeshall, Wantisden, Pettaugh, Whelnetham, Onehouse, and 
Middleton." 

'Dom. ii. 4273. 6Dom. ii. 413. 

'Dom. ii. 387. 7 Chart. Rolls, 43 Hen. IV. 3. 

3 Dom. ii. 405. 8 Chart. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. 51. 

tDom. ii. 4276. 9 Pat. Rolls, 29 Edw. I. 6d. 

5 Dom. ii. 4236. " Pat. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. x/^d. 



WITNESHAM. 121 

In 1307 a fine was levied of this and other manors by John deWeyland 
and Maria his wife against John Olyver/ John deWeyland died in 1312/ 
and the manor passed to his brother, Sir Richard de Weyland, and from 
him the manor appears to have devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Blaxhall Hall, in Plomesgate Hundred, to the death of Anne, Countess of 
Warwick, widow of Richard Nevill, the King Maker. We should mention 
that there is a doubt as to whether the manor passed from Thomas Despenser, 
Earl of Gloucester, to his sister and heir, married to Sir Hugh Hastings, 
Knt., and afterwards Thomas, Lord Morley ; for, as the Earl of Gloucester 
was in 1400 attainted and his son died in 1414, and the attainder was not 
reversed until the first year of Edw. IV., it is not easy to see how these 
persons could have enjoyed the manor.^ 

It will be remembered that Isabel, daughter and heir of Thomas le 
Despenser, on the death of her husband, Richard Beauchamp, Earl of 
Worcester, remarried his nephew, Richard de Beauchamp, 5th Earl of 
Warwick, having obtained a papal dispensation for the marriage, and a son 
of this marriage, Henry de Beauchamp, 6th Earl of Warwick, K.G., did 
actually hold this manor. < 

The manor was in 1553 granted by King Edw. VI. to Edward Nevill,* 
who in 1558 had licence to alienate the same to Robert Gosnold sen. and 
Robert Gosnold jun. The sale was effected by fine levied in 1559 between 
Robert Gosnold and others and the said Edward Nevill and others.' 

Robert Gosnold died in 1616, when the manor passed to his cousin and 
heir, Robert Gosnold, and on his death in 1638 passed to another Robert 
Gosnold. By the middle of the 17th century the manor had passed to the 
family of Edgar, for in 1650 Thomas Edgar^ held .his first court. He was 
Reader of Gray's Inn, 15 Chas. II., Recorder of Ipswich in 1647, and M.P. 
for Orford 1658-g. He married Mary, daughter and heir of Philip Powle, of 
London,' and died 12th April, 1692, aged 90, when the manor passed to his 
3rd son, Devereux, who married 22nd Sept. 1681, Temperance, sister and 
heir of Capt. Robert Sparrow,^ and died in 1739, being buried at St. Mary 
Tower, 31st Aug. 1739,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert 
Edgar. 

Robert Edgar was baptized at St. Mary Tower, 28th July, 1682, and 
was High Sheriff for the county in 1747. He married twice, his 2nd wife 
being Susan, daughter of — Harrington,'" and was buried at St. Mary Tower 
28th, Oct. 1750. The manor passed to his son and heir, Mileson Edgar, 
who, by his will dated 2nd March, 1770, devised the same to his son and 
heir, Mileson Edgar, with remainders over. 

The Manor of Witnesham with Cockfield is stated to have been held in 
1855 and 1885 by Mrs. Woodham, and in 1896 by Brig.-General Surgeon 

'Feet of Fines, l Edw. II. 27. This fine ^See Manor of Clopton Hall, Wickham- 

seems to have included the Manor of brook, in Risbridge Hundred. She 

Redhall al. Bromton, under the was born 7th July, 1655, and was 

name " Brompton." buried at St. Mary's Tower, 26th 

* I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 34. December, 1754. 

3 See E.C.P. Bundle 66, 376. ^jjis will is dated 9th April, 1739. 

♦ Originalia, 7Edw. VI. 2Pars. O. Rot. 85. "She died 6th April, 1764, aged 57, and 
spine, Mich, i Eliz. was buried at St. Stephen's, 
^See Manor of Derneford, Swefling, in Ipswich. 

Plomesgate Hundred. 
7 She died 28th Dec. 1695, aged 80, and 
was buried at St. Mary's Tower, 
Dec. 31st. 

Q 



122 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Charles John Meadows, and the same is now vested in his eldest son Capt. 
Charles A. G. P. Meadows/ 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1564 by Richard Pykering and others 
against Edward Nevyll and others/ 

CuRDON's OR Cardew's Hall Manor. 

This manor in the beginning of the i6th century belonged to the 
Tyrell family, and James Tyrell died seised of it 7th Sept. 1538, when 
it passed to his son and heir, John Tyrell.' In 1544 the manor was 
acquired from the said John Tyrell, described as of Stowmarket, by John 
Gosnold.* In 1560 the manor was vested in Robert Gosnold,= who 
died in 1616, and from this time to the time of Mileson Edgar, who 
took under his father Mileson Edgar's will, dated in 1770, the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Burwash, in Witnesham, 
and from the devisee, Mileson Edgar, under the will of his father, Mileson 
Edgar, who died i6th June, 1830, to the present Capt. Mileson Edgar, in the 
same course as the Manor of Westerfield,in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

Courts Rolls from 17 to 19 Hen. VII. ; i, 10, 15, 18, 19, 31, and 34, 
36 Hen. VIII. (last two courts of John Tyrell) ; 2 Edw. VI. ; 4 and 5 Phil, 
and Mary ; i (courts of Robert Gosnold the younger), 3, 5, 7 to 11, 13, 
15, 16, 19 Eliz., will be found in the Public Record Office.* 

Redhall al. Brampton al. Brompton Manor. 

This manor was probably formed out of the estate held by Lewin, a 
freeman in the time of the Confessor, and of Walter the deacon in the time 
of the Conqueror. On the opening of the 14th century the manor was 
vested in Giles de Brewse or Brewosa.'' 

In 1306 he and his first wife, Joan, levied a fine of the manor against 
Richard de Bello Monte." Giles de Brewse died in 1310,' and the manor 
passed to his son, Robert de Brewse. Robert died under age in 1325," 
and there is on the Close Rolls for this year an order to the Escheator to 
deUver to Katherine, late wife of Robert de " Brewosa," who died a minor, 
this manor under the name of " Wytenesham Manor," taken into the King's 
hands on the death of his father, Giles de Brewosa, and assigned in dower." 

Davy enters Edmund Bacon as lord in 1316, Alice de Beaumont for 
life in 1326, and in 1341 Sir Warin Latimer, Knt. However, this may be 
in 1361, Sir John Brewse, Knt., brother of Robert and son of Giles, held the 
lordship, and on his death in 1389 the same passed to his son and heir, Sir 
John Brewse, from whom it passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert Brewse, 
who Aymg in 1456 it vested in his son and heir. Sir Thomas Brewse, who 
died in 1482,'^ when the manor went under his will dated loth July, 1479,'' 
to his widow for life, and on her death to his son and heir, William Brewse, 
who died 28th Oct. 1489, leaving two daughters coheirs.'* 

'See Manor of Redhall, Witnesham. "Extent, I.P.M., 19 Edw. II. 95. 

^ Fine, Trin. 8 Eliz. " Close Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 30. 

^I.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 22. "I.P.M., 22 Edw. IV. 50. 

♦Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. '3 Proved at Norwich 27th April, 1483. 

'See Netherhall Manor, Otley, in this '♦See Manor of Akenham, in Bosmere and 
Hundred. Claydon Hundred, and Vaux Manor, 

8 Portfolio 204, 23. in Great Wenham, in Samford Hun- 

7 See Manor of Hasketon Hall, in this dred, and Hasketon Hall Manor, 

Hundred. Hasketon, in this Hundred. He 

8 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. I. 38. was buried in Fressingfield Church. 
9 1.P.M., 4 Edw. II. 40. 



WITNESHAM. 123 

In 1488 Sir Ralph Greystock, Knt., is said to have held a moiety of 
the manor, which went to his cousin and heir, Elizabeth. We find in 
1493 Margaret Peyton, Thomas Garneys, and later Sir John Audley, Knt., 
who married Muriell, daughter of Sir Thomas Brewse by his 2nd wife, hold- 
ing, and on the deatii of Sir John Audley, i8th April, 1530," the manor vested 
in his son and heir, John Audley, on his death in June, 1534,° passing to his 
brother and heir, Edward Audley. Later still, it seems to have been held 
by Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., who in 1630 sold the manor and the advowson 
to Daniel Meadows, of Chatisham, younger son of William Meadows, of 
Witnesham.^ This William Meadows, who died in 1588, was son of 
William Meadows, of Rushmere, yeoman, whose will is dated 14th Sept., 
1541, and was proved Arch. Suff. 9 Oct. 1542. The family had held land 
in the parish since the time of Hen. II. and Daniel the purchaser was 
lineally descended from Peter de Medowe, who was seised of land in 
Witnesham in 1188, and ancestor of the Earls Manvers. 

Daniel's elder brother William appears to have purchased Witnesham 
Hall and estate (not the lordship) previous to the yean 614, as the following 
passage from the will of John Minter, of Witnesham Hall, yeoman,* 
shows : — 

" Item, whereas William Medowe of Coddenham, and Daniell Medowe, 
of Barham, their heirs executors, &c. are to paye at dyvers dayes andtymes 
unto myne executors for and towards the performaunce of this my last 
Will and Testament, the some of one thousand pounds of LawfuU Englysh 
money as in and by certain writings made for the purchasing of Witnesham 
HaU, and lands thereunto belonging at Larg appereth." 

William Meadows, who appears to have acquired the manor from his 
younger brother Daniel, made Witnesham Hall his residence, and married 
Grissel, daughter of John Minter, the former owner of the mansion. He 
died in 1637, and left issue three sons, viz., Thomas Meadows, of Pippes, in 
Coddenham, who married Elizabeth, daughter of John Lee, of Coddenham, 
and widow of Barnabas Blomfield, of Stonham Aspal, and had issue ; 
Daniel Meadows, who succeeded his father in this parish; and Ralph 
Meadows, born in 1600, who purchased Henley Hall from the Damerons in 
1630.' Daniel, who inherited here, married Amy, daughter of John 
Brame, of Campsey Ash, by whom he had a son and a daughter, Daniel and 
Mary. 

He died in 1675, and Daniel, his son, succeeded. Daniel Meadows the 
son married Joyce, daughter of the Rev. Edward Rivers, of Bricett Magna, 
and had three sons— Daniel, who died without issue in 1684, Edmund, who 
died under age, and the Rev. John Meadows, who was born in 1655 ^^^d 
inherited the lordship. He married Bridget Proctor, and d5dng 24th 
March, 1715 was interred together with his wife, who died in 1737, in the 
nave of the church of Witnesham. He left two sons and a daughter, viz., 
John Meadows, who married Margaret Buxton, and died in 1750, leaving 
an only daughter Elizabeth, the wife of John Williams, Daniel, and Elizabeth 
married to the Rev. Thomas Buxton, of Syleham. 

' I.P.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 8 ; Will I2th Jan. 4 Will, 2nd Sept. and proved Arch. Suff. 

1526-7, proved 6th June, 1532. 3rd Dec. 1614. 

« I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 19. 5 See Manor of Henlej', in Bosmere and 
3 His will is dated 24th Aug., proved Claydon Hundred. 

Arch. Suff. 22nd Oct. 1580, by 

Margaret his wife. 



124 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Daniel, the younger son, succeeded to the lordship, and resided for 
many years at Botesdale, but died at Witnesham 14th Jan. 1771, at the 
advanced age of 90, and the manor passed to his son, John Meadows, 
by Frances his wife, daughter of Francis Thonylow. 

John Meadows married in 1751 Frances, the youngest daughter of 
Humphrey Brewster, of Wrentham Hall. This J ohn Meadows was appointed 
coroner of the Liberty of Bury St. Edmunds by Rowland Holt, of Red- 
grave Hall. He died at Botesdale in 1763, leaving issue two sons and two 
daughters. Daniel Meadows, the youngest son, died a captain in the 
army in 1779, unmarried. 

Philip Meadows, the eldest son of John Meadows and Frances his wife, 
for many years practised as a solicitor at Botesdale until the year 1801, 
when he removed to Witnesham Hall. 

On the death of his mother, he purchased an estate there of the Earl of 
Westmoreland, and in 1810 erected thereon the mansion called " Burghersh 
House," so named from its proximity to the ancient mansion belonging to 
the family of the Burghershes of this parish. It was enlarged in 1819, and 
is approached by a fine avenue, a quarter of a mile in length, shaded with 
trees. 

He married Catherine, daughter of Robert Rust, of Wortham,and died 
i6th Oct. 1824, in his 73rd year, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, the Rev. Philip Meadows, of Burghersh House, rector of Great Beal- 
ings, who married in 1804 Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Morgan Graves, 
M.A., rector of Redgrave-cum-Botesdale and Hinderclay, by Harriot 
James, his wife, only child and heir of Richard Head, whose father. 
Sir Thomas Head, Knt., was the father of Sir Walter James James (formerly 
Head), Bart., D.C.L., who took the name and arms of James only by Act 
of Parliament in 1778 on succeeding to the estates of his great-uncle, John 
James, of Denford Court, co. Bucks. On the death of Philip Meadows he 
was succeeded by his son, Daniel Charles. 

The manor is now vested in Capt. Charles A. G. P. Meadows, of Witne- 
sham Hall.' 

Arms of Meadows : Quarterly i and 4 Gules ; a chevron. Ermine, 
between three pelicans, vulned proper ; 2 and 3 Sa. a chevron Ermine, 
between three estoiles. Argent (for Brewster). 

Court Rolls of the Manor for the 12, 14 Edw. IV. ; 4, 11, 12, 17, and 
29 Hen. VIII. ; 2 Edw. VI. ; 3, 7, 9, 12 Eliz., will be found in the PubUc 
Record Office. ° 

A fine of " Witnesham Manor " was levied in 1603 by Milo Branth- 
wayte against Philologus Foorth and others.^ 

In the Parish Register is an entry as to the pew enjoyed by the occu- 
pants of Witnesham Hall, 1721-2 : — 

" Whereas a controversy arising concerning a Seat or Pew under the 
Pulpit in ye Church of Witnesham, was by consent of both parties referred 
to my determination, and whereas upon full examination of witnesses on 
both sides it does appear that for about sixty years or as far as memory 
can go backwards it has been ye usage or custom that ye women inhabitants 
of the House commonly called Witnesham Hall (now in ye possession of Mr. 
John Meadowe) as well tenants as Proprietors and Likewise ye women 

' The younger branch of the Meadows ^ Portfolio 204, 24. 
family is represented by Earl ^ Fine, Hil. 45 Eli?. 
Manvers, of Thoresby Park, Notts, 



WITNESHAM. 125 

inhabitants of the House commonly called Brick-House (now in ye possession 
of Mr. Robt. Clarke) as well Tenants as owners have sat together in ye said 
Seat or Pew exclusive of all others unless by leave, my determination therefore 
is that ye said Custom or Usage be continued and ye Seat as now enlarged 
(by consent of the Rector) be maintained in repair joyntly and equally 
by the owners of the house aforesaid. 

" George Raymond, 
" Commisary and Official. 
" Witness — Robt. Beaumont, Rector.'" 



The following entries in the Domesday Survey have not been identified 
as in Carlf ord and Colneis Hundreds, and in order to complete the work so 
far as the Survey is concerned, the entries are here given. 

BARCHESTUNA. 

Lands of Robert, son of Corbution. 

Depekin, a freeman under commendation to Harold, held i 
carucate of land as a manor. Then 6 bordar tenants, now 4. Then 
in demesne i ploughteam, now none. Then 7 ploughteams belonging 
to the men, now none, 5 acres of meadow, and 6 sheep. Then valued 
at 20S., now at 12s. It is 6 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and (pays) 
2d. in gelt.'' 

BOULGE.^ 

Lands of Ranulf, brother of Ilger. 

Uluric, a villein tenant (holds) 4 acres. Valued at 8d. 

BRIHTOLVESTUNA. 

Lands of Hugh de Montfort. 

(were) 18 freemen under commendation to Goodmund, with i 
carucate of land and 20 acres. 4 bordars. Then 10 ploughteams, 
now 5. 2 acres of meadow. Wood for 2 hogs. A church with 6 
acres. It is half a league long, and 2 quarentenes broad. And (pays) 
lod. in a gelt.* 

EDULVESTUNA. 

Lands of Ranulf, brother of Ilger. 
Are 9 acres. Valued at 2s. 

GUTHESTUNA. 
Lands of Roger Bigot. 

Were 6 freemen under commendation to Norman — Moregrim, 
Gooding, and Leofstan, Ulmar, Gooding, and 7 bordars, with 40 acres, 
2 ploughteams (and) i acre of meadow. Valued at 5s. It is 2 
quarentenes long, and 2 broad. And (pays) 3^. in a gelt. 

HOBBESTTUNA. 

Land of Geoffrey de Magnaville. 

A freeman under commendation to Etheldreda (?) and his wife 
under commendation to Halden, in King Edward's time (held) 30 

' E. A. N. and Q., v. p. 373. ^probably in WHford Hundred. 

'Dom. ii. 4256. '*Dom. ii. 406, 



126 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

acres. Then i ploughteam, now none, i acre of meadow. Always 
valued at 5s. 

In the same (township) Topi, a soc-man under commendation to 
Saint Etheldreda (held) 25 acres. Valued at 3s. 

HOPESTUNA. 

Lands of Robert Malet. 

A freeman under Edric held 25 acres of land. Then i plough- 
team, now none, and i bordar tenant. Then valued at 2 shillings and 
8 pence, now at 4 shillings. Saint Etheldreda hath soc. 

IPSWICH. 

Lands of Ranulf, brother of Ilger. 

And in Ipswich is i vacant tenement and another occupied, and 
it renders 8^^. 

KALLETUNA. 
Lands of Saint Etheldreda. 

Isaac now holds. Were 8 freemen under commendation to Saint 
Etheldreda, ha.ving i carucate of land and 2 bordar tenants. Then 3 
ploughteams, now i. 4 acres of meadow. Valued at i6s. It is 
6 quarentenes long and 2 broad, and (pays) 2^d. in gelt. The man 
Isaac holds of the abbot. 

KINGESLANDA. 
Lands of Ranulf, brother of Ilger. 

(there is) i carucate of land — waste land — valued at 2 shillings. 
It is 4 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and pays 5^. in gelt. AH 
this W. de Nemours (?) holds of Ranulf, Ilger's brother. 

KULVERTESTUNA. 
Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 7 freemen under commendation to Norman in King 
Edward's time— Bering, Goodrich, Leverich, Algar, Wolvar, Durrant, 
Aluric, with 25 acres. Always i ploughteam, i acre of meadow, 2 
mills. Valued at 5s. It is 2 quarentenes long and 2 broad. And 
(pays) /[d. in a gelt. 

Lands of Hugh de Montfort. 

(were) 5 freemen under commendation to the same [Goodmund] 
with 21 acres and a half. Then 2 ploughteams, now 1. It is 3 quaren- 
tenes long and 2 broad, (pays) 2d. in a gelt. 

KYNGESTUNA. 
Lands of Saint Etheldreda. 

Saint Etheldreda in King Edward's time held i carucate of land 
as a manor. Then 8 villein tenants, now 5, now 8 bordar tenants. 
Then 2 serfs, now i. Always in demesne 2 ploughteams and 3 plough- 
teams of the men, and 8 acres and a half of meadow. Wood for 5 
hogs. Alwkys i rouncy and 4 beasts, and 30 sheep, and 12 hogs. 
Always valued at 40 shillings. It is 4 quarentenes long and 3 broad, 
and (pays) ^d. in gelt. Others have holdings there. 



DOMESDAY. 127 

LANGESTUNA, probably part of Felixstowe. 

Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 2 freemen and a half, Woolf er and Turbin and Raven under 
half commendation to Norman in King Edward's time, with 30 acres, 
and a ploughteam and a half (and) half an acre of meadow. Valued at 
los. It is 4 quarentenes long and 2 broad. And pays 4^. in a gelt. 
And the said Ralph de Turlaville holds. 

A freeman, Alnoth, Harold's man, in King Edward's time. Now 
Bernard holds of Roger Bigot ; had 40 acres and a villein, and 3 bordars. 
Then a ploughteam and (the same) now. Valued at 10 shillings. 
And a freeman under commendation to AUnot, called Sewin, held 4 
acres, valued at 8d. 

LEOFSTANESTUNA. 
Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 2 freemen, Burridge and Brightridge, under Norman's 
commendation, with 20 acres, and a bordar, and a ploughteam, 2 
acres of meadow, a mill, and a salt pan. Valued at los. This 
Wihtmar holds of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 4 freemen under Norman's commendation in King Edward's 
time, Blackman, and Durrant, and Sevin, and Ulrich, with 14 acres. 
Always half a ploughteam. Valued at 2S. 

In the said (township) were 8 freemen under commendation to a 
certain man of Norman's — Blackman, and Brumar, Edric, Leofric, 
and Alwin, and Woolbald, and Theodric (and) Leofieda, with 12 acres 
(and) half a ploughteam. Valued at 2s. 

MAISTANA. 

Lands of Roger Bigot. 

The said Norman held over them in King Edward's time, were 
6 freemen under commendation with 100 acres of land. Edric, and 
Burchric, and Woolbald, and Aluric, and Almar, and Woolrich. And 

1 villein with 4 acres. And 4 bordars. Always among them three 
ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow. Valued at 20 shillings. And of 
these (tenements) (?) Woolfer, father of Woolbald, was a man half 
under Edric, Robert Malet's predecessor. It is half a league long, and 

2 quarentenes broad. And (pays) 4^. in a gelt. 

MYCELEGATA. 
Lands of Robert Malet. 

A freeman, Levestan, under commendation to Edric (held) 4 
acres. Valued at izd. 

Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 4 freemen in King Edward's time, Regifer and Gooday under 
commendation to Norman, with 12 acres, and Leovestan and another 
Gooday, under commendation to Wihtmar with 4 acres. Always 
among them i ploughteam. i virgate of meadow. Valued at 3s. 
It is 3 quarentenes long and 2 broad. And (pays) 2d. in a gelt. And 
the said Wihtmar holds (over them). 



128 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

NORTUNA. 

Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 4 freemen under commendation to Norman — Manson, 
and Wihtmar, and Durand, and Otti, with 31 acres, and a bordar, 
and a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow. Valued at los. It is 
6 quarentenes long and 2 broad. And (pays) TZd. in a gelt. 

The said Wihtmar holds a freeman, Aldwulf, under Norman's 
commendation, with 20 acres, and 3 bordars, and 2 ploughteams 
(and) 2 acres of meadow. Valued at 5s. 

A freeman, Goodwin the priest, Harold's man in King Edward's 
time (held) 60 acres as a manor. Always 3 bordars. Always in 
demesne i ploughteam. And half a ploughteam belonging to the men. 
Half an acre of meadow. Valued at 34s. And 3 freemen (there were) 
under him with 3 acres and half a ploughteam. Valued at i2d. 

This Thurstan, son of Wido, holds of Roger Bigot. 

OXELANDA. 
Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 5 freemen under commendation to Norman — Blackman, 
Osbert, Wihtric, Goodrich, Brihnoth, with 42 acres, and 4 bordars, 
and 2 ploughteams, and half an acre of meadow. Valued at 5s. 
It is 3 quarentenes long, and 2 broad. And (pays) in a gelt /[d. 

PLUGEARTH or PLUGEARD. 
Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 6 freemen under commendation to Norman with 30 acres — 
Osfert and Alwin, and Woolmar, and Ednoth, and Goodrich, and 
Hardecnut, and under them (were) 4 bordars. In King Edward's 
time 2 ploughteams, now i. Half an acre of meadow. Valued at 4s. 
It is 2 quarentenes long and 2 broad. 

Lands of Saint Etheldreda (was). 

And in a gelt (pays) /^d. (Was) a freeman, under Etheldreda, Edwin, 
with 2 acres. Valued at /\d. And now the said Hervey holds of the 
abbot. 

PRESTETUNA. 

Lands of Ranulf, brother of Ilger. 

Ten freemen under commendation half to Brihmar and half to 
Quengeva, his mother. One of these was under half commendation 
to Saint Etheldreda, held i carucate of land ; now there are 9 bordar 
tenants under them. Then 4 ploughteams, now 2. i acre of meadow. 
Then valued at 20s., now at los. It is 6 quarentenes long and 3 broad 
and (pays) 6d,. in gelt. 

STRUESTUNA. 
Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(was) a freeman under Norman called Ulrich with 16 acres, and 
a bordar, and half a ploughteam, (and) half an acre of meadow. 
Valued at 2s. It is 5 quarentenes long and 2 broad. And in a gelt 
(pays) b\d. 

(was) a freewoman Durilda, under commendation to Norman in 
King Edward's time with 55 acres of land. Now Hugh de Hosden 
holds of Roger Bigot. 7 bordars and a ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow. 
Valued at 40s. The said Hugh [de Hosden] holds 3 freemen (formerly) 
under Norman, — Husteman, Edric and Gooday, with 6 acres, valued 
at 12^. 



DOMESDAY. 129 

TURSTANESTUNA. 

Lands of Roger Bigot. 

(were) 3 freemen under commendation to Norman — Ernet and 
Wihtric and Almar, with 15 acres and i ploughteamj half an acre of 
meadow. Valued at 3s. It is 2 quarentenes long and 2 broad. And in 
a gelt (pa5rs) /\d. 




COSFORD HUNDRED. 

COSFORDS OR COSFORT. 

S bounded on the east by the Hundred of Bosmere and 
Claydon and part of Samford ; on the south by the Hun- 
dreds of Samford and Babergh ; on the west by Babergh ; 
and on the south by the Hundreds of Stow and Thedwestry. 
It contains 30,532 acres in the following 17 parishes and 
38 manors: — 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Aldham 


Aldham. 


Kettlebaston 


Kettlebaston. 


Bildeston . . 


Bildeston. 
Brettenham Hall. 
Ryes. 
Stanstead al. Stan- 


Leyham 


(Leyham or Nether- 
] bury Hall. 


Brettenham 




(Overbury Hall. 




street Hall. 








WilHsham's. 




Lillesley or Lindsey 


Chelsworth 
Elmsett 


Chelsworth. 
Elmsett. 


Lindsey 


or Lindsey Hall. 
Beaumond's Hall or 




/Hadleigh Hall. 




Beaumont's. 




Plessis or Pond Hall. 


Naughton . . 


Naughton. 


Hadleigh 


Toppesfield or Top- 

pesfield Hall. 
Mansers or Hadleigh 


Nedging 
Semer 


Nedging. 
Semer. 




in Hadleigh. 




Thorpe Morieux. 




Cosford Hall. 


Thorpe 


Goi^et's or Gorges. 




Hitcham. 


Morieux 


Throgton al. Thru- 




Witherton al. Wit- 




ton al. Castell's. 


Hitcham . . 


herton's (Bar- 
nard's and Man- 


Wattisham 


Wattisham Hall. 




ton's). 




/'Whatfield Hall. 




Manton or Manton's. 




Berrard's Hall. 




Loose Hall in Lose. 
Kersey. 


Whatfield ..- 


Peyton's or Manner's. 
Hornham. 


Kersey ■ 


Sampson's Hall. 




Forneaux. 




,The Priory. 




VTuddenham's. 



In the 3rd of Rich. I. Adam de Cokefield released his claim in this 
Hundred to the abbot of St. Edmunds, and in the 9th of Edw. I. the fee 
was in the said abbot ; but since the dissolution of that house it ,has been 
and now is in the Crown, and the government in the Sheriff and his offtcers. 



132 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




ALDHAM. 

JjjLDHAM was vested in the time of the Confessor in Ulwin, 
and consisted of 5 carucates of land and a half. At that 
time there were 7 villein tenants, 6 serfs, 4 ploughteams in 
demesne and 4 belonging to the men, 7 acres of meadow, 
wood for 8 hogs, 2 mills, 3 rouncies, 10 beasts, 80 hogs, 
and 140 sheep, and the value was ;^8. In Norman times 
the value had been increased to ^^15, but there seems to 
have been a general decrease all round. The villeins had come down to 
4, the serfs to 2, the ploughteams in demesne to 3, and those belonging to 
the men to 4. The beasts, it is true, had increased to 8, but the hogs had 
come down by 20, and the sheep to 60. There was a church benefice with 
7 acres and the Domesday tenant in chief was Aubrey de Vere.' 

Also, amongst Aubrey de Vere's lands, we find 5 acres formerly held 
by a freeman by commendation only, the soc belonging to the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds. The value was placed at lod. Aubrey' I" holding (though 
it is not quite clear from the Survey that the reference is to this), was 8 
quarentenes long and 7 broad, and paid in a gelt 5^?.^ 

Among the lands of the Abbot of St. Edmunds we find " In Ferdinga 
de Ealdham tenuit Sanctus Edmundus tempore Edwardi regis 6 liberos 
homines et alia Watefelda 10," which the late Lord John Hervey rendered 
thus, " In the quarter curacate (?) of Aldham in King Edward's time St. 
Edmund held 6 freemen and in the other Whatfield 10." They had i^ 
carucates of land, 6 teams, 4 bordars, and 6 acres of meadow, and could 
give and sell their land. The soc, commendation, and all customs belonged 
to the abbot. The value was formerly 30s., which had increased to 40s. 
at the time of the Survey. This holding also paid in a gelt f^d., and was held 
in the time of the Confessor by the abbot. Of this land, Berard held 40 
acres and i ploughteam, valued at los. out of the said value. These 
two townships the Survey states to be 6 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and 
pay td. in a gelt. Others had holdings here. In Aldham also there was a 
church with two acres of land. 

Aldham Manor. 

The Domesday tenant married Beatrix, daughter of Henry Castellan, 
of Bourbourg, and had five sons. He, towards the end of his days, assumed 
the cowl, and was buried in the church of Colne Priory, which he had founded, 
and was succeeded by his son, Alberic de Vere, who was Lord High Chamber- 
lain of England, t. Hen. I. From Alberic de Vere to the year 1462 the 
manor descended in the same course as the Manors of Earls Hall, Cockfield, 
and Lavenham, in Babergh Hundred. 

Aldham will be found specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. 
of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford, who died in 1296;' Robert, 6th Earl, 
who died in 1331 without issue,* when the King took homage of his nephew, 
John de Vere, the 7th Earl -^ in the inquisition p.m. of John de Vere, 7th 
Earl, who was slain before the walls of Rheims in 1360 f and of Matilda, 
his wife ;' of Sir Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl, who married Matilda, the daugh- 
ter of Sir Ralph de Ufford, and died in 1371^ and also in the inquisition p.m. 



'Dom 
''Dom, 



11. 419. 

ii. 419. 

3 Extent I.P.M., 24 Edw. I. 62. 
♦I.P.M., 5 Edw. III. 71. 
'Originalia, 5 Edw. III. 40. 



n.VM., 34 Edw. III. 84. 

n.P.M., 40 Edw. III. 38; Originalia, 

45 Edw. III. 26. 
8I.P.M., 45 Edw. III. 45 ; Matilda, I.P.M., 

14 Hen. IV. 17. 



ALDHAM. 133 

of Alice, daughter of John, Lord Fitz Walter, the widow of Aubrey de 
Vere, who in the 16 Rich. II. had by Act of Parliament the family 
honours restored to him as loth Earl of Oxford, and who died in 1400.' 

The manor is also mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Richard, iith 
Earl, who died in 1417.'' It seems that Alice, the widow of Richard, the 
nth Earl, without licence from the King, and holding this manor as part 
of her dower, married Nicholas Thorley, upon which the manor was taken 
into the King's hands. The manor was however regranted in dower on 
payment of a fine to the Crown.^ Alice died in 1452, when John, her son 
and heir, succeeded. 

In 1462 the manor was forfeited with the Earl of Oxford's other 
estates on the execution of Sir John de Vere, 12th Earl, and the manor was 
granted by the King to his brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester,* but John's 
eldest surviving son, John de Vere, was temporarily restored in 1470,^ 
and ultimately rose to the position of Lord High Steward and Lord High 
Admiral of England under Hen. VII., and of Lord Great Chamberlain of 
England under Hen. VIII. He died in 1512. 

The manor had been granted by the Crown in 1473 to Sir John Howard, 
Lord Howard, but it ultimately returned to the 13th Earl, who died in 1539, 
and was succeeded by his son, John de Vere, 14th Earl, who died in 1562, 
and was succeeded by Edward de Vere, 15th Earl, who sold the manor 
in 1580 to Philip Tilney. He was succeeded in 1603 by his cousin and 
heir, Emery Tilney, who died in 1606, being succeeded by Thomas Tilney, 
who sold the manor to Sir Edward Coke, Knt., in 1609. Sir Edward, 
the great legal commentator and Lord Chief Justice, was twice married, 
and had by his first wife, Bridget Paston, of Huntingfield, ten children, 
seven sons and three daughters. 

Of the sons Edward died an infant, and Robert, baptized at Hunting- 
field 3rd Oct. 1587, received the honour of knighthood. To him the manor 
passed on the death of his father. He married Theophilia, daughter of 
Thomas, Lord Berkeley, by whom he had no issue, and died 19th July, 1658, 
aged 67. 

Through this Sir Robert Coke the London library of Sir Edward Coke 
came into the possession of the Berkeley family, and was by George, the 
14th Earl Berkeley, presented in 1680 to the corporation of Sion College. 
The manor passed to Sir Robert's brother and next male heir, John Coke, 
baptized at Huntingfield 4th March, 1590. He married Meriel, daughter 
of Anthony Wheatley, of Hill Hall, co. Norfolk, by whom he had six sons 
and nine daughters. She died 4th July, 1636, and there is a monument 
to her memory in the chapel on the south side of Holkham Church. He 
died at Honington in 1661, and was succeeded by his youngest son and 
heir, John Coke, who died unmarried, when the manor passed to his cousin, 
Richard Coke, of Thorington, the son of Henry, 5th son of Sir Edward 
Coke and of Margaret his wife, daughter and heir of Edward Lovelace. 

Richard Coke married Mary, daughter of Sir John Rous, Bart., by 
whom he had a son Robert, who succeeded to the Holkham estate on the 
death of John Coke, and the greater part of Sir Edward Coke's property. 
This manor was Robert's, who married Lady Ann Osborn, daughter of 
Thomas Duke, of Leeds, by whom he had an only son, Edward, to whom 

' I.P.M., 30 Hen. VI. 14. 4 Rolls of Pari. vi. 228. 

» I.P.M., 4 Hen. V. 53. s See I.P.M., John, Earl of Oxford, 15 Edw. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 5 Hen. VI. pt. ii. 6-1. IV. 28. 



134 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the manor passed on the death of his father, loth Jan. 1679, in his agth 
year,^ 

Edward Coke married Carey, daughter of Sir John Newton, of Glouces- 
tershire, and died 13th April, 1707, and his widow soon afterwards. They 
had three sons and two daughters, and the manor passed to the eldest son, 
Thomas Coke. He was made Knight of the Bath in May, 1725, in 
1728 Lord Lovel, of Minster Lovel,in Oxfordshire, and in 1744 Viscount 
Coke and Earl of Leicester. He married 2nd July, 1718, Margaret Tufton, 
one of the daughters and coheirs of Thomas, 6th Earl of Thanet, to whom 
Geo. IL confirmed her right by descent to the Barony of Clifford. By her he 
had an only son Edward, who married Mary Campbell, 5th daughter of 
Field Marshal the Duke of Argyle, and died at Greenwich, 31st Aug. 1753, 
in the lifetime of his parents without issue. 

Lord Leicester died 20th April, 1759,^ when the Earldom of Leicester 
became extinct, but his estates devolved (on his widow's death 28th Feb. 
1775) upon his nephew, Wenman Roberts, the son of Lord Leicester's sister 
Anne, and he assumed the name of Coke. 

In 1764 Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart.,^ purchased the estate, and the 
lordship passed on Sir Joshua's death in 1777 to Sir Gerard William Vanneck, 
his son and heir, who died in 1791, when it passed to his brother. Sir Joshua 
Vanneck, Bart., who was created Lord Huntingfield 15th Aug. 1816. After Sir 
Joshua's death, namely, 6th Aug. 1817, the manor was sold for £23,000. 
The sale included the estate known as Aldham Hall Farm, containing 
568 acres, of which two-thirds were free from tithe, all then let at a rent of 
Jfi,ooo a year. Later the manor became vested in Thomas Barrett 
Lennard, in right of Mary, his 2nd wife, only daughter and heir of Bartlett 
Bridger Shedden, of Aldham Hall, who died in 1856, and is now vested in 
his son. Sir Thomas Barrett Lennard, Bart., of Belhus, co. Essex. 



' There is a monument to him in Tittleshall ^See Heveningham Manor, in Bly thing 
Church. Hundred, 



'Will proved June, 1759. 




BILDESTON, 135 

BILDESTON, 

jILDESTON was held in Saxon times by Queen Edith, with 
6 carucates of land. In this extensive domain there were 
14 villein tenants and 6 bordar tenants, 8 serfs, 3 plough- 
teams in demesne, 3 belonging to the men, 20 acres of meadow, 
wood for 10 hogs, 3 rouncies, 10 beasts, 40 hogs, and 80 
sheep. Also a church benefice with 40 acres, i ploughteam, 
and I acre of meadow. The value had varied considerably. 
Under Queen Edith it was valued at £8, and at the time of the Domesday 
Survey, when it was held by Walter the Deacon, it was valued at £10, but 
rendered £12. The length was i league and the breadth half a league, and 
it paid in a gelt $d.'^ 

BiLDESTON Manor. 

Walter the Deacon was the ancestor of the Hastings family. We 
meet with Robert de Hastings, Lord of Euston, in Essex, as lord. He married 
the daughter and heir of William de Windsor, and had a daughter and heir, 
Delicia, married ist to Ralph de Cornhill, to whom the manor passed. Upon 
Ralph de Cornhill' s death his widow Delicia fined 200 marks to the King 
for licence to marry according to her own pleasure, but not Godfrey de 
Ijoveyn. Godfrey, however, fined double the ainount, namely, 400 marks, 
to marry her, and have her lands, if she could show no good reason for 
refusing him.* She seems not to have been able to show any good reason, 
and the marriage took place. This Godfrey de Loveyn or Lovaine, was 
brother of Henry, Duke of Brabant, and he held the manor in right of 
his wife about 1200. On Godfrey's death in 1226 the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Matthew de Loveyn. 

From Testa de Nevill and the Hundred Rolls we learn that Matthew 
de Loveyn held a fee here of the King in chief, ^ and that in the time of Hen. 
III. he had a grant of free warren here.* The entry in Testa de Nevill is : 
" D'na Helewis' de Gwerris bis dotata fuit per dominum Regem, primo 
Will' o de Pinkeney, secundo Will' o fil Rob'ti, et dn'a MatiU' de Flamvill 
similiter est de don' d'ni R., et aUe sunt maritande sed vetule sunt, et maner' 
de Bildeston partita est inter eas et val. xxli. et est de baron' Godefri de 
Lovein p' hereditate' uxoris sue. Math's de Lovayn tenet unu' feod' m 
Bildeston." Robert de Pinkeney was one of the claimants for the Crown 
of Scotland in 1291. 

In 1242 this Matthew de Loveyn had summons (among others) to fit 
himself with horse and arms to attend the King in vindication of certain 
injuries received from the French. The like summons he had to be in 
Chester in 1258 to restrain the hostihties of the Welsh. He was one of 
those barons summoned to a Parliament convened to meet in London 
by writ dated the i8th Oct. 1261, and died in 1261,' being then seised of 
this manor and the advowson held of the King by the service of one knight's 
fee pertaining to his barony of Estaines, in Essex, and 20s. rent for the 
guard of the Castle of Windlesowres, leaving Matthew, his son and heir, 
then 24 years old, who, paying ^100 for his rehef, had livery of his lands. 

Sir Matthew de Loveyne, grandson of Godfrey, was summoned in 1277 
to perform miUtary service in person against Llewelyn, Prince of Wales. 
He acknowledged the service of one knight's fee in " Eystanes " performed 
by himself in the comitiva of the Earl of Oxford. In 1282 he was again 

'Dom. ii. 426. 3T. de N. 291 ; H.R. ii. 151, 199. 

^^See the Great Roll, 2 John, Rot. 3, 6, '•H.R. ii. 153. 

Essex and Herts. 5 i.p.m,, 46 Hen. HI. FUe 26 (18). 



136 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK^ 

summoned to render service against the Welsh, and again in the same year, 
when John de Loveyne performed service for him. Five years later he 
was called with horses and arms to a military council at Gloucester, before 
Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, within three weeks of St. John Baptist, 15th 
July, 1287. In 1294 he had summons to Parliament, but was never again 
summoned there. 

In 1296 he was summoned to perform military service in person 
against the Scots. 

He received various similar summonses in 1297, 1298, 1300, and 1301, 
and died in 1302,' and was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas, then only 
12 years of age. Thomas de Lovaine, or Loveyn, had in 1314 licence to 
settle the manor on himself, Joan, his wife, and the heirs of their bodies, with 
remainder to his own heirs," and the following year we learn from the 
Patent Rolls that he had licence to enfeoff Matthew, parson of the church of 
Drinkstone, and another of the manors then held in chief, and for them 
to regrant to Thomas de Loveyn and Joan his wife, and the heirs of their 
bodies, with remainder faihng such issue to the right heirs of the said 
Thomas.^ Also on the Rolls of Parhament we find a complaint by Thomas 
de Loveyne of overcharge for scutage in respect of this manor.* 

Sir Thomas Loveyne was summoned to perform military service in 
person against the Scots, and to muster at Newcastle-upon-Tyne within 
fifteen days from St. Johii Baptist, 8th July, 1316, and from time to time 
received various other summonses to perform his feudal duties. Thomas 
de Loveyne died without issue, when the manor passed to his brother and 
heir, Matthew de Loveyne, who died in 1320, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Thomas de Love3me. He in 1321 was one of the special 
conservators assigned in the Hundred of Dunmow, in Essex, for watching and 
protecting the highways, dispersing seditious meetings, and arresting offenders. 

In 1322 his arms appear entered on the roll of the Battle of Borough- 
bridge, and in 1325 he was one of the commissioners of array in Essex, the 
commission being tested at Bury St. Edmunds, 25th Dec. Sir Thomas de 
Loveyne died in 1345,^ and was succeeded by his son and heir, John de 
Loveyne, who married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas de 
Wistone or Wiston, and dying in 1347,^ 1^^^ two daughters — Isabella, who 
died in 1359, without issue, and Eleanor, eventually sole heir, who married 
Sir William Bourchier, and the manor then passed into the Bourchier family. 

From the time of Sir William Bourchier, who died in 1397,'' to the time 
of Anne, daughter of Henry Bourchier, 2nd Earl of Essex, and wife of Sir 
William Parr, Knt., Lord Parr, the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Hopton, in Blackbourn Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Henry, 
ist Earl of Essex, who died 9th April, 1483.* In 1541 a licence was obtained 
by the said Sir William, then Lord Parr, and Anne his wife, to alienate 
the manor and advowson of Bildeston to William, Earl of Southampton, 
Sir Anthony Brown, and Sir Thomas Wryothesley as trustees.^ 

A fine to carry out the settlement was levied the same year." This 
fine included also the Manors of Hopton, Drinkstone, Lovaynes, Swilland, 
and Shelland. 

' Extent I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 37. There is ♦ R.P. ii. 403. 

an assignment of the manor to his ^ I.P.M., Extent, 19 Edw. III. 44. 

widow Maud, in dower on the Close ^I.P.M., 21 Edw. III. 22. 

Rolls, 30 Edw. I. II. ''I.P.M., 21 Rich. II., 10. 

« I.Q.D., 8 Edw. II. 150. N.R. File, 108, 10. ^ i.p.M., i Rich. III. 31. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. II., pt. ii. 21. ^S-P. ii., 1541, 1308 (16). 

"Fine, Hil. 33 Hen. VIII. 



BILDESTON. 137 

Sir William Parr' was by letters patent dated 23rd Dec. 1543, created 
Earl of Essex, and on the accession of Edw. VI. was by letters patent 
dated i6th Feb. 1547 advanced to the Marquisate of Northampton. In 
1551 he was made Lord Great Chamberlain of England for hfe. His children 
by his wife Anne were bastardized by Act of Parliament, 34 Hen. VIII., 
and his marriage with her annulled by ParUament 5 Edw. VL, and the 
Suffolk property passed at Anne's death to Walter Devereux, Baron 
Ferrars, 2nd Viscount Hereford, created Earl of Essex 4th May, 1572, 
in view of his descent from the family of Bourchier. He died at Button, 
22nd Sept. 1576, leaving by Lettice, his wife, daughter of Sir Francis KnoUes, 
K.G., sister to William, ist Earl of Banbury, with other issue, a son, Robert 
Devereux, 3rd Viscount Hereford and 2nd Earl of Essex, K.G. This was 
the well-known favourite of Queen Elizabeth. Two fines were levied 
against him of this manor — one in 1589 by John Weaver and others, "" 
the other in 1599 by James Anton.^ 

The manor shortly afterwards passed to John Rivett, of Bildeston Hall, 
son of Thomas Rivett, of Rishangles, by Jane, daughter of Bartholomew 
Bolney, of Wetheringsett, Thomas Rivett being the son of John Rivett, 
2nd son of John Rivett, of Brockford. 

John Rivett, who acquired the manor of Bildeston, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of George Brooke, of Aspall, by AUce, daughter of Sir John 
Tyrell, of Gipping, and d3dng in 1624 the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William Rivett, of Bildeston Hall, who married ist Mary, daughter of 
Gabriel Warcope, of Hadleigh and Bildeston, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter 
of Sir Anthony Drury, by Bridget, daughter of John Spelman, of Narburgh, 
and died in 1643, and was buried at Bildeston Church. On what was 
formerly an altar tomb, but has now been levelled, is the following inscrip- 
tion to his memory : — 

GuUelmus Rivett armig. olim in hoc Comitatu Justiciarius Pacis Anno 

Dom. 1643 obiit. Necnon Elizabetha Charissima ejus consors, filia Dom. 

Ant. Drury in agro Norfolciensi militis, in anno 1671 ab hac vita migravit. 

Et sub hoc marmoreo lapide tanquam uno simul thalamo dormientes con- 

sopiti jacent. 
Ecce vir hoc saxo cum conjuge subtumulatur, 
Quos mors disjunxit soepe reunit eos. 

Arms : Rivett singly impaling Drury, Argent, on a chief Vert, a tau 
between two mullets pierced Or ; and Drury, impaling Rivett, now 
destroyed. 

By an inquisition taken at Ipswich, 6th May, 21 Car. [1645] William 
Rivett was found to be, 18 Car., seised inter alia of the Manor of Bildeston, 
holden of the King in capite by knight's service, and worth £6. William, 
his son and heir, aged 3 years. 

The manor passed to this son and heir, William, being a child by the 
2nd marriage of his father (all his three sons by his first wife having 
predeceased him). William Rivett married Catherine, daughter of Stephen 
Clarke, and died in 1691. The following inscription to his memory, and to 
that of his wife, who died the same year, appears in the church of Bildeston : — 

Hie jacet Guil. Revett armig. in hoc com. Justitiarius ad pacem, hujus 
Manerii dom' et Ecclesiae Patron.' Qui ob. decimo die Feb. 1691 

aetatis suae 52. 

'See Hopton Manor, in Blackboum Hun- ^Fine, Mich. 31-32 Eliz. 
dred. ^Fine, Mich. 41-42 'EMz. 



138 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Arms : Rivett, quartering, Or., two chevronels Gules, on a canton of 
the last an escallop Argent. Clarke, crest, An arm erect couped at 
the elbow, in the hand a broken sword. 

Hie jacet Catharina uxor Guil. Revett armigeri, filia unica Steph. Clarke, 
de East Bergholt Generosi. Quae obiit sexto die Septembris Anno Dom. 

1 691, setatis 57. 

Arms : In a lozenge Rivett and Clarke quarterly. 

The manor passed to his son and heir, William Rivett, of Bildeston Hall. 
The manor subsequently vested in Bartholomew Beale, only son of Henry 
Beale, of Walton, in the County of Buckingham. He died 6th Sept. 1724, 
and there is an inscription in the chancel of Bildeston Church, as follows : — 

Sacred to the Memory of Bartholomew Beale, late of this Parish, 
Esq., and Elizabeth his wife, who lie interred in the Chancel of this 
Church just above the Family Pew. 

He was the only son of Henry Beale (and Sarah his wife), late of Walton, 
in the county of Bucks. Esq. She was a daughter of William Killingworth, 
serjeant-at-law in London. They had issue two daughters, Elizabeth and 
Jane, the elder of whom was married to William Alston, of Bramford, in the 
county of Suffolk, Esq., and the younger to Jacob Brand, of Polstead, in 
the same county. He died 6th Sept. 1724. She died ist July, 1726. 

The manor passed to the two daughters, and was held by them jointly. 
William Alston was a barrister of Gray's Inn, and died in 1749, at the age of 
54, and his eldest son, William Alston, succeeded to a moiety of the property. 
There is a monument on the north aisle of Bramford Church to the memory 
of William Alston, the father : — 

Sacred to the memory of William Alston," a Barrister of Grey's 
Inn late of this Parish, Esqiiire, and Elizabeth his wife, who lye 

' The following is a sketch of the descent of this William Alston : — 

John Alston of Newton 
f. Hen. VIII. 
^1 



I 

William Alston = Ann, dau. of Thos. Symonds. 



Edward Alston, = Alice dau. of William Colman 
of Sayham Hall 



William Alston = Margery dau. and coheir, of — Holinsted, 
I of Maplested, co. Essex, by d. of 
I William Bindloss, serjeant-at-law. 

I 
William Alston = — Nence, of Hadham, co. Hertford. 



William Alston = Avise, dau. and coheir of Jeffrey Pitman, 
d. 1641. I of Woodbridge. 



Samuel Alston, = Alice, dau. of Francis Nicholson, 
of Marlesford. I of Chapell, co. Essex. 



Samuel Alston, = Elizabeth, dau. of Gregory Wescomb, 
of Marlesford. I of Eltham, co. Kent. 

William Alston, 
of Gray'sinn, 



BILDESTON. 139 

interr'd in the body of this church. He was the only vSon of Samuel 
Alston late of Marlsford in this County, Esquire. She was the elder of 
the two Daughters and Coheirs of Bartholomew Beale, Esquire, late of 
Bildeston in this County. They had issue Six Sons, three of whom, 
William, Thomas, and Joseph, survive. She dyed 16 May, A.D. 1741 
set. 41. He dyed 26 July A.D. 1749 set. 54. 

Arms : Alston with Beale on escutcheon of pretence. 
On Jacob Brand's death his moiety passed to his son and heir, William 
Beale Brand, who died in 1799 without issue, and on his death went to 
his widow, Anne Mirabella Henrietta, daughter of Sir Robert Smith, Bart., 
who died in 1814, and was succeeded by Thomas Wilham Cooke, of Polstead, 
great-nephew of the above-named William Beale Brand, from which time 
to the present the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Polstead, in Babergh Hundred, and is now vested in Edward Buckley 
Cooke, of Polstead Hall, or possibly is still in the trustees of his father's 
(the Rev. Thomas Alexander Cooke) will. 

Amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian is a petition to the House of 
Lords in 1637 ^Y John Rivett, patron of Bildeston, and John Ashley, clerk, 
against Bishop Wren for refusing to institute Mr. Ashley,' and in the same 
collection the case of the manor and church, drawn up by Bishop Wren, 
together with his account of Mr. Ashley's case.^ 

Court Rolls of the manor, 23, 32, and 36 Hen. VI. will be found in the 
Pubhc Record Office.^ Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of 
Queen Elizabeth is a claim by Bernard Salter, son and heir, against 
William Wade, to a messuage in Bildeston, parcel of this manor.* 

Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Court of Chancery preserved 
in the Public Record Office is a conveyance dated 6th Feb. 1455, by John 
Fray and John Doreward the elder, to William, abbot of St. Mary's, 
Coggeshall, Bennett Burgh, and Thomas Swatton, clerks, and John Worthy, 
of Bildeston, Drinkstone, Hopton, and Shelland Manors, with land, &c., in 
Felsham and Gedding, with the advowson of the churches of Bildeston and 
Drinkstone, held jointly with others of the gift of Sir Roger Aston, Knt., 
Thomas Feryby, clerk, and Robert Rykedon.^ 

We do not pretend to explain the meaning of this conveyance. 
Arms of Loveyne : Gul. a fesse, Arg. between ten billets Or. Of 
Alston : Azure, semee of estoiles. Or. Of Beale : Sable, on a chevron Or. 
betw. 3 grif&ns' heads erased Arg., as many estoiles Gu. Of Bourchier : 
Arg. a cross engrailed Gu. between four watte vurgels, Sa. Of Cooke : Per 
pale Or, and Azure, a chevron nebulee between three cinquefoils in chief and 
one in base counterchanged, quartering Brand and Beale. 



' Tanner, xviii. 342. '' C.P. iii. 66. 

"Tanner, xviii. 344. ^^i Hen. VI. C. 2269- 

3 "Prkr+folir* 'yno C 



^Portfolio 203, 5 




140 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BRETTENHAM. 

MANOR was held here by Woolnough in Edward the Con- 
fessor's time^ with 4 carucates of land. There were 4 
villein tenants, and 19 bordar tenants, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, and 2 ploughteams belonging to the men, 5 
acres of meadow, and wood sufficient for 2 hogs. A church 
benefice with 24 acres, also i rouncy and 3 beasts. The 
i , holding was valued at 60s. By the time of the Domesday 

Survey the value had gone up to loos., but the serfs had come down to 2, 
while there were 4 hogs in lieu of 2. The manor was then held by Robert, 
Earl of Mortaign. 

The Earl also had 32 acres, which Brien had added to it with half a 
ploughteam and half an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. ^d. The manor was 
12 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt lod^ 

In this place and Rushbrook and Thorp was also an estate belonging 
to the Abbot of St, Edmund. In the time of the Confessor the abbot held 
14 freemen, and they had 2^ carucates of land, 8 acres of meadow, and 7 
bordars. They then ploughed with 5 teams, but at the time of the Survey 
with only 2. The value in Saxon times was 50s., but only 30s. at the time 
of the Survey. The soc, sac, commendation, and all customs belonged to 
the abbot. Of this land Arnolf held 7 freemen, i carucate, and 30 acres 
of land, valued at 15s., as part of the above value. ^ 

Among the lands of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, were 30 acres and i 
ploughteam, valued at 5s., which had formerly been held by 8 freemen.^ 

Manor of Brettenham Hall. 

In the time of Hen. III. Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, held the 
lordship, and from this time to the death of Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of 
Gloucester, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Sudbury, 
in Babergh Hundred. On the death of Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Glouces- 
ter, his possessions devolved upon his three sisters as coheirs, and this manor 
probably fell to his 2nd sister Margaret, who had married ist Piers Gave- 
stone, and 2ndly Hugh de Audley, who was eventually created Earl of 
Gloucester, He was patron of the church in 1344, and died in 1347, 
leaving an only daughter, Margaret, married to Ralph, Lord Stafford, loth 
Baron, created Earl of Stafford, 5th Mar. 1351. He died 31st Aug. 1372, 
and was succeeded by his only surviving son, Hugh de Stafford, summoned 
to Parliament as Baron de Stafford, 8th Jan. 1371, and 2nd Earl of Stafford, 
K.G., who in the retinue of the Black Prince greatly distinguished himself, 
and made a pilgrimage to the Holy Sepulchre in 1385. He married the Lady 
Philippa Beauchamp, 2nd daughter of Thomas, 3rd Earl of Warwick, and 
dying 26th Sept. 1386, was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Thomas 
de Stafford, 3rd Earl. He married Lady Anne Plantagenet, daughter of 
Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, but died without issue 4th 
July, 1392. It is useless to pursue this clue further, for it is clear that by 
1392 presentations to the church of Brettenham afford no clue, as by this 
time the advowson had been attached to the Manor of Desning.* 

At the beginning of the 15th century the manor was vested in William 
Sampson, from whom it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Sampson. The 

'Dom. ii. 2916. ^Dom. ii. 2976. 

^Dom. ii. 369. -^LP-M., 16 Rich. II. 27, 



BRETTENHAM. 141 

Sampsons had been connected with this place for many generations ; as 
early as the time of Edw. II. we learn from the Patent Rolls that they had 
flourished here, for in 131 8 we find a commission issued on the complaint of 
Ralph Sampson that John de Brugg, of Cotenham, Thomas, son of John 
atte Brug' of Cotenham, and others assaulted him and his servants at 
Brettenham, and led away his horse at the price of iocs.' 

Thomas Sampson, of Brettenham, about 1421 married Margery, sole 
daughter of Sir John Felbrigge. He died in 1439,'' when the manor passed 
in the same way as the Manor of Playford, in Carlford Hundred, until the 
death of Sir Anthony Felton, K.B., in 1613. The manor then vested in 
Sir Robert Houghton, Knt., Judge of the King's Bench,^ and from him 
passed to his son and heir, Francis Houghton, who died in 1629, when it 
went to his son and heir, Robert Houghton. 

The manor was then acquired by Sir George Wenyeve, Knt., and as the 
" Manor of Brettenham with Rices " was for many generations in the 
family of Wenyeve, Brettenham Hall being their residence. They are met 
with in the parish as early as 1452, but probably did not acquire the manor 
until about 1700. From the Brettenham Court Rolls it appears that in 1496 
there was an Edward W3meve, a copyhold tenant, and in 13 Hen. VIII. a 
John W5mneve is mentioned as a tenant, his name three years later on 
the Rolls being written " Wynef." In the 21 Hen. VIII. a Margaret 
Wiimeve appears, her name being spelt in different places as " Wyneif " 
and " Weneff." In the 4 Edw. VI. a Thomas Weneyeve is a copyhold 
tenant, his name being spelt in the same court as " Wyneff." Sir George 
Wenyeve, M.P. for Sudbury, who died 26th May, 1706, in his 8oth year, 
married ist Frances, one of the daughters and coheirs of Edward Dudley, 
of Clapton, CO. Northampton, who died 23rd Mar. 1568, and 2ndly, Christian, 
youngest daughter of Dudley, Lord North.* Sir George Wenyeve was succeeded 
by his 2nd son, John, a child by his 2nd wife. John Wenyeve died loth 
Dec. 1736, and his widow Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Christopher Musgrave, 
Bart., 24th Sept. 1751, having had nine children, all of whom she survived, 
except Christian, who had married her cousin, the Rev. Edward Wenyeve, 
only son of George Wenyeve, the eldest son of Sir George Wenyeve by his 
ist marriage. 

The manor seems to have passed after the death of John Wenyeve to 
Edward, the youngest son of Sir George, who lived to the age of 91, and died 
29th April, 1775, when it passed to John Wenyeve, the grandson of 
George, the eldest son of Sir George, by his i st marriage. He was High Sheriff 
of the County in 1784, and died 22nd May, 1801 . His only son, George, never 
married, and died 7th Oct. 1814,^ when the estate passed to his sister 
Henrietta, wife of Lieut.-Col. John Carnac, who dying in 1831 left a son 
and daughter surviving, namely, Georgiana Wenyeve Carnac, and John 
George Wenyeve Carnac. The son died young, and the daughter married 
Edward Fenton, and had a son, John Edward Fenton. 

Brettenham Park, including " the Manor or Manors of Brettenham 
with Rising and Wetherden Hall, near Bury St. Edmunds," producing a 
rental of £3,000 a year, was offered for sale, i8th Nov. 1836, and alleged 

• Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. II. pt. ii. 2id. * She died 13th April, 1708, and was buried 

* I.P.M., 18 Hen. VI. 58. St. Anne's, Westminster, near the 
3 See Hitcham Manor, in this Hundred, altar. 

and Liffey HaH. Buxhall, in Stow ^Will, Feb. 1809. 
Hundred. 



142 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by the Essex Standard to have been sold for £%-l,ooo, but this was denied 
in the Ipswich Journal of 24th Dec. 1836. The property was again 
advertised for sale, 28th Aug. 1838, and finally the whole property, con- 
sisting of 1,750 acres, was ordered to be sold by the Court of Chancery, 13th 
July, 1847. About the year 1850 the manor was acquired by Joseph 
Parker, and later passed by purchase to Thomas Bartholomew Beale, 
who was formerly in the Bengal Civil Service, and was High Sheriff for the 
County in 1874. He married Jane, daughter .of Edward C. Hill, and dying 
in i88g the manor passed to the trustees of his will, his widow having the 
beneficial interest. It was sold to Mr. Herbert, and in 1903 purchased 
from him by the present lord of the manor, Thomas Courtenay Theydon 
Warner, M.P. for North Somerset, 1892-5, and for Lichfield Division of 
Stafford since 1896. 

Mr. Warner is the son and heir of Edward Warner, of Highams, co. 
Essex, J. P. for Essex, Middlesex, and Westminster, D.L. for Essex, and 
sometime M.P. for Norwich, by Maria his wife, daughter of Thomas Carr, 
of New Ross, co. Wexford. Mr. Warner derives his third Christian name 
from the fact of his great-great-grandfather, Edward Warner, having been 
of Theydon, in Essex. Mr. T. C. T. Warner, 6th Dec. 1883, married Lady 
Leucha Diana Maude, 6th daughter of the ist Earl de Montalt. 

The hall, which stands in a park of 150 acres, was for a short time the 
residence of Joseph Bonaparte, ex-King of Naples and of Spain, and 
brother of the ist Emperor Napoleon. It has seen many changes. Altera- 
tions were effected at the beginning of the last century by Colonel Carnac, 
and the mansion has undergone extensive alterations and improvements 
in the hands of its present proprietor. The River Bret or Breton takes its 
rise from a piece of water in the park, and divides the parish of Brettenham 
from that of Hitcham. 

Arms of Warner : Per bend Arg. and Gu. two bendlets, between 
6 roses all counterchanged. 

Manor of Ryses. 

This manor was vested in Thomas Sampson in the time of Henry VI., 
who, dying in 1440,' it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Sampson, who 
died about 1483.'' Sir Thomas Sampson died seised 2nd Jan. 1511,^ when 
it passed to his nephew, Thomas Felton. 

From this time the manor seems" to have passed in the same course of 
descent and together with the main manor. 

Manor of Stanstead alias Stanstreet Hall. 

In the reign of Edw. VI. this manor was vested in Lord WilUam 
Howard, and in 1568 was vested in Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, who this 
year sold it to Robert Rychars.* 

In the Calendar to the Pleadings relating to the Duchy of Lancaster in 
1594 is notice of an action by the Attorney-General against John Bemeshe, 
as purchaser of Stanstead Hall, as to royalties, franchises, and other 
profits, &c.^ 

' I.P.M., 18 Hen. VI. 58. -^Fine, Trin. 10 EUz. 

^ I.P.M., I Rich. III. 35. = Cal. to Plead. Duchy of Lane, 36 Eliz. 3a. 

3I.P.M., 4 Hen. VIII. 



BRETTENHAM. 143 

In 1609 the manor was vested in John Rivett, of Bildeston Hall, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter of George Burke, of Aspall, by Alice, daughter 
of Sir JohnTyrell, of Gipping, and died in 1624, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, William Rivett. 

Court Rolls for 30th April, 1658, and 9th Dec. 1659, are in existence, 
but the name of the lord is not given. In 1662 the manor vested in Robert 
Bailtoft, and he held his first court 12th April, 1662, and another court 
12th Nov. 1662. He sold the manor to Ralph Meadows, who held his first 
court 23rd June, 1665, and probably (though the lord's name does not 
appear), courts held as follows : i6th Sept. 1666 ; 28th April, 1668 ; 27th 
May, 1670 ; 26th Sept. 24 Car. II. ; 3rd June, 38 Car. II. The manor 
then passed to WilUam Meadows, who held courts as follows : 30th March, 
1681 ; 1st Dec. 1681 ; 19th Oct. 1682 ; 29th Aug. 1683 ; 9th May, 1684 ; 
15th May, 1690 ; 4th Sept. 1696 ; 29th July, 1698 ; 7th June, 1699 ; 24th 
June, 1700 ; i6th Oct. 1700 ; 6th June, 1702 ; 24th May, 1704. 

The manor was then acquired by John Beaumont and Elizabeth his 
wife, who held their first court i6th Sept. 1712, and further courts 17th Aug. 
1722 ; 12th Oct. 1723 ; 7th Nov. 1723 ; 7th March, 1728. John Beaumont 
then died, and Elizabeth, his widow, had the manor, and held a court 29th 
June, 1731, and probably also the courts held 25th July, 1731 and 6th 
Sept. 1731, though no name appears in the Court Rolls. 

The manor was then acquired by John Wenyeve, who held his first court, 
i6th May, 1733. By 1740 he was dead, and the court held 17th December, 
1740, was held by Henrietta Wenyeve, spinster. Courts were held 31st 
May, 1741 ; 17th Nov. 1749 ; 28th March, 1758 ; and 6th July, 1758, but 
the name of the lord is not given. The manor was then acquired by the 
Rev. Abbott Upcher, who held his first court 28th July, 1764, and courts 
loth July, 1770, and 24th Feb. 1770. 

The manor then passed to Peter Upcher, who held his first court ist 
Nov. 1779. He also held courts nth Dec. 1779 ; loth April, 1787 ; and 
24th May, 1 79 1. 

Courts were also held 6th March, 1798 ; 15th Nov. 1803 ; a-nd 23rd April 
1819, but the name of the lord does not appear. 

The manor about 1822 was acquired by John Foster, of Biggleswade, 
CO. Bedford, who hejd his first court 6th Dec. 1822. He also held courts 
24th Oct. 1823; 28th Nov. 1828 ; 28th May, 1840; i8th Dec. 1840 ; and 
3rd Jan. 1844 ; 24th Jan. 1844 ; 6th July, 1847. 

John Foster by his will dated 6th Feb. 1847, devised the manor to the 
use of his son, Blyth Foster, for life, with remainder to such uses as he might 
appoint by deed or will in favour of children, and with remainder to use of 
his first and other sons severally and successively in tail general, with 
remainder to the use of the daughters of the said Blyth Foster, equally as 
tenants in common in tail general, with cross remainders between them, with 
remainder to the uses afterwards declared in respect of the hereditaments 
devised to his son, John Nathaniel Foster, for life, with remainders over. 
These limitations were to the use of his (testator's) son, John Nathaniel 
Foster, for life, with remainder to such uses as he might by deed or will 
appoint in favour of his issue, with remainder to the use of all his sons by 
his then wife, Frances Mary Wedd, spinster, equally between them as 
tenants in common in tail general with cross remainders between them. 

A power of sale was given to John N. Foster, and Blyth Foster and 
John N. Foster, the sons, were appointed executors. John Foster died 7th 



144 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

July^ 1847, 8-iid his will was proved in the Prerogative Court 24th Sept. 
following. Courts were held i8th Jan. 1852, and 23rd May, 1874. 

By deed dated 14th Aug. 1866, made between John Nathaniel Foster 
of the ist part, Edward John Foster of the 2nd part, John Alexander 
Kinglake, serjeant-at-law and M.P., of the 3rd part, and Walter Barnard 
Byles and Robert Alexander Kinglake, of the 4th part, being a settlement 
made on the marriage of Edward John Foster, son of the said John N. 
Foster by his wife, Frances Mary, and M. P. Kinglake, an infant of 19 
years, and a daughter of the said J. A. Kinglake, the said John N. Foster 
appointed the manor and other hereditaments after the death of Blyth Foster 
and the determination of the uses limited in favour of his issue by the above 
will, and after the death of John Nathaniel Foster to the use of the said 
Edward John Foster in fee. By the same deed the said Edward John 
Foster granted the manor and other hereditaments to William Barnard 
Byles and Robert Alexander Kinglake, upon the trusts therein declared ; 
and a power of sale was given to the trustees. The marriage took place 
15th August, 1866, and Blyth Foster died 4th Oct. 1871, having been 
married but once, namely, to Alicia Jackson, who died in 1864, and having 
had no issue. 

The manor passed on Blyth Foster's death to John Nathaniel Foster, 
his brother, for life. By deed dated 20th Oct. 1876, made between John 
Nathaniel Foster of the ist part, Walter Barnard Byles and Robert Alexander 
Kinglake, of the 2nd part, Edward John Foster and Mary Poole, his wife, of 
the 3rd part, and Richard Newman, of Hadleigh, of the 4th part, the 
trust for sale contained in the settlement of 14th Aug. 1866 was exercised, 
John Nathaniel Foster concurring to pass also his life estate, and the manor 
was sold to Richard Newman, who thereupon became lord. He held courts 
4th Dec. 1876 ; 6th Dec. 1876 ; 4th Feb. 1878 ; i8th Feb. 1878. 

By his will dated 30th June, 1882, Richard Newman devised certain 
property in Hadleigh, and all his real estate unto Emily Powell Newman, 
his widow, Alfred Newman, his son, and John Lawrence Growse, upon 
trust for sale, and dying i6th Jan. 1883, his will was proved at Bury St. 
Edmunds by Emily Powell Newman alone. 

By a deed poll dated 29th March, 1883, Alfred Newman and John 
Lawrence Growse renounced and disclaimed, and by an indenture dated 
27th July, 1886, made between Emily Powell Newman and Charles James 
Grimwade, of Hadleigh, soUcitor, the manor was sold to the said C. J. 
Grimwade, who thereupon became lord. He held courts 23rd Oct. 1889, 
and 23rd Oct. 1895. By deed dated 13th Dec. 1904, the said Charles James 
Grimwade sold the manor to Walter Arthur Copinger, of Buxhall, who 
forthwith conveyed the same by deed to Colonel John Henry Rivett-Carnac, 
A.D.C. to the King, as representative of the ancient Suffolk family of 
Rivett, who held this manor, according to Davy, in 1609. 

The copyholds at the beginning of the last century consisted of : — 

1. A close called King's Close, in Brettenham, 9 acres, quit rent 4s. 4^., 
and a piece of land called Shepherds Lay, 3 acres, quit rent is. 6d., held by 
William Syer, of Brettenham. 

2. Part of a copyhold messuage wherein Abraham Fisher lately dwelt, 
rent i^d., held by Richard Syer (late Thomas Utlens). 

4. The residue rent i^d. held by John Fisher, late Abraham Fisher. 
4. A messuage called Bellmans, with the yard and gardens and pasture, 
2a. ir., rent 2s. 2d., held by William Sier, of Hitcham, late Thomas Syers, 



BRETTENHAM. 145 

5. Five closes of land called Liverfield lands, in Buxhall, with a tene- 
ment thereon, containing 10 acres, rent ys., held by James Grimwood. 

6. A piece of ground whereon a tenement did stand, rent id., held by 
George Fairds. 

7. A messuage called Pearles, rent 6d., held by Roger Clemence. 

Manor of Willisham's. 

In 1383 Edward de Willisham held this manor of the Honor of 
Clare, and it was later in the seisin of Sir Roger Willesham. In 1421 
John Sampson, of Harkstead, and Katherine his wife, daughter and 
coheir of Roger " Wyllasham" conveyed a moiety of the manor then called 
" Westhame's " by fine to William Hanyngfeld and Cecily his wife, sister 
of the above-named Katherine.' In the time of Hen. VIII. the manor 
was vested in Thomas Spring, the rich clothier, who died seised of it 
29th June, 1523," when it passed to his son and heir. Sir John Spring, then 
aged 50, who, dying 7th Feb. 1547, it vested in his son and heir. Sir WilUam 
Spring, Knt., who was then 18 years of age.^ In 1585 the manor was 
acquired from Sir William Spring by R. Marshe.* 



• Feet of Fines, 9 Hen. V. 53. ^jp^M., a Edw. VI. 65. 

'I.P.M., 15 Hen. VIII. 17. *Fine, Mich. 27-28 Eliz. 




146 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

CHELSWORTH. 

MANOR was held here by the Abbot of Bury. It consisted 
of 3 carucates and a half of land, 8 villeins, 10 bordars, 4 
serfs, 2 plough teams in demesne and 4 belonging to the men, 
12 acres of meadow, i mill, and 2 rouncies. The hve stock 
were slightly altered at the time of the Survey from what they 
were in Saxon times — formerly there were 10 beasts, 16 hogs, 
and 30 sheep, which had become g beasts, 20 hogs, and 60 
sheep. The manor was valued in Saxon times at £4, and by the time of the 
Survey at £5. It was 7 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 
3f<?. There was also a church with 30 acres of land and i of meadow.' 

Manor of Chelsworth. 

Ethelfreda, the daughter of Alfgar, had this lordship of the grant of 
King Edgar, and at her father's request gave the same to the abbey of 
St. Edmunds." 

The Saxon Chronicle mentions Ethelfreda the Fair as a favourite of 
King Edgar, who became so through a very curious adventure. The King 
being a guest at the castle of one of his barons, fixed his affections on his 
daughter, with whom he proposed to pass the night. The family, indignant 
at tiie monarch's intentions, but afraid to oppose his will, contrived to 
substitute a beautiful domestic in her place. Edgar in the morning dis- 
covered the trick played upon him, but was so much pleased with 
Ethelfreda that he immediately made her his mistress, and she so con- 
tinued till his alliance with Elfrida. This circumstance accounts for the 
bestowal of this manor upon Ethelfreda, and led to her giving the property 
so acquired to the abbey of Bury by way of expiation for her criminal 
intercourse with the King. 

Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, by a fine levied in the tressemayns of 
St. Michael in the 4th of King John, granted to Benedict, son of Richard 
de Blakeham in fee farm the said manor, with those of Lackford, Little 
Fornham, Whepstead, and Nowton, reserving as to Lackford the gift of the 
church, and a perpetual rent of £13. gs. 6d. payable to the elemosynary of 
St. Edmunds for the use of the sick dwelling in the hospital without the 
gate of Risby. Benedict to find six reasonable trusses of straw for the sick 
on the vigils of St. Edmund, the Nativity, and Easter, liveries being allowed 
from the convent board to two of his men at the said feasts, and to one 
man at other stated periods of payment of rent. And the said Benedict 
to keep in repair the stone dwelling of the brethren with their chamber and 
kitchen ; and three other buildings, that is to say, one 34 feet long, 17 feet 
wide, and 9 feet high under the beam ; another 20 feet long, 15 feet wide, and 
7 feet high, and a third 39 feet long, 8 feet wide, and 7 feet and a half high, 
and also to enclose a poultry yard, and to keep up the enclosure of the 
court and orchard. 

In 1 23 1 Thomas de Blakenham, the son and heir of Benedict, held, and 
in an action in Hilary term this year brought by him against Richard, abbot 
of St. Edmunds, touching the service of the mill in Chelsworth, and the 
farm of the manor of the parish pleaded that he held the mill under a fine 
between him and Abbot Hugh in King John's time, and the manor under a 
fine between Sampson the abbot and Benedict, son of Richard de Blaken- 
ham, whose heir he was. 

' Dora. ii. 3566. ' Grant 962, Harl. 43 C. 3. 



CHELSWORTH. 147 

In 1253 Benedict de Blakenham, the son and heir of Thomas, had a 
grant of free warren in his demesne of Chelsworth, &c.' He (or, as some 
allege, his son of the same name) was steward of the household of Eleanor, 
the Queen's mother, and a witness to her charter of foundation of St. 
Katharine's Hospital, near the Tower of London, dated 5th July, 1273. 
He is presumably the same Benedict de Blakeham who, in the 52nd year 
of Hen. III., made restitution, under the dictum of Kenilworth, of lands 
granted to him by the Crown, which belonged to persons concerned in the 
disturbances against the King. 

He had assize of bread and beer in Chelsworth, in the time of Edw. I.* 
In 1271 he married Joan, only child of William de Hastings, of Eaton 
Hastings, co. Berks, by Isabella, afterwards wife of Bartholomew de Arden. 
Joan at the time of her marriage was about 16 years of age. 

Her father gave with her in frank marriage the Manors of Southorp and 
Thormertori, in Gloucestershire, and she and her husband joined with him 
in lev5dng a fine of his lands in 1272. On the decease of William de Hastings 
in 1278 Benedict did homage to the King for the lands of Joan, his wife. 
Sir Benedict had summons for the expedition against the Welsh in 1282, 
and d5dng in 1284 left Sir Benedict de Blakenham, his son and heir, a minor 
in ward to the Queen mother. This son proved his age in a trial in 
1297.^ The depositions given on this occasion are of considerable 
interest, and as given in Sir Henry E. Austen's History of Chelsworth, 
a small tract of 53 pp. printed at Hadleigh in 1850, are as follows :— 
" Sir John Gedding, Knight, aged 50 years, dwelling 6 leagues from Chels- 
worth, deposed that the said Benedict, son of Benedict de Blakeham, was 
twenty-one years of age on the morrow of the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist then last, and that he was born at Chelsworth, and baptized in the 
church there. And being asked how he knew this, said that Robert de 
Gedding, parson of the same church, was his uncle, and died four days after 
the birth of the said Benedict ; and that he. Sir John, was heir of the said 
parson, and that it was 21 years and more since his death." 

The other witnesses in order deposed to the same facts of age, place of 
birth, and baptism, each giving some circumstance in proof. " Peter de 
Denardeston, Knight, aged 40 years, dwelling a league from Chelsworth, 
said that in the same year he first went to Cambridge for his studies, and 
heard civil law there for 4 years ; likewise, that at Pentecost next before, 
in the same year, Guy de Mortimer, son and heir of Richard de Mortimer, 
was born, and afterward became his ward by the death of his father, who 
held his lands of him by knight's service ; and that at Pentecost then last 
the same Guy made proof of his age, and was seised of his inheritance, which 
had been in the custody of the said Peter. 

" Hugh de Muryens (Morieux) Knight, aged 50 years, dwelling a league 
from Chelsworth, said that he had a daughter named Joan, still living, 
who was born at Christmas; next before the birth of the said Benedict, 
and who completed her age of 22 years at Christmas then last ; likewise, 
that he was at the feast when the mother of the said Benedict was churched 
or purified, and there was at table with them Sir Richard de Cokefeld, and 
many other knights then deceased. 

" Walter de Bernham, Knight, aged 60 years, dwelling 6 leagues from 
Chelsworth, said that he was living near the house ©f the father of the said 

'Chart. Rolls, 57 Hen. III. ^^bb. of PI. 25 Edw. I. Hil. 14. 

^H.R.ii. 199. 



148 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Benedict when he was born, and he was at the feast when his mother was 
churched, together with many other knights, Richard de Cokefeld and 
others then dead. Likewise that he, the deponent, married the mother of 
Edmund de Whelnetham ; which Edmund had a son, John, born a quarter 
of a year and more after the birth of the said Benedict ; which John was 
of full age, and had hvery of his lands from the lords of the fee. 

" Jolan Sampson, aged 40 years, dwelling 2 leagues from Chelsworth, 
was also at the feast on the churching of his mother, and said that he had a 
bastard son called Ralph, who was born a year before the birth of the said 
Benedict, which Ralph was then 23 years of age. 

" Osbert de Aldham, aged 38 years, dweUing 2 leagues from Chelsworth, 
said he was in the service of Benedict de Blakeham, the father, at the time ; 
and likewise that the deponent's own mother died 5 days before the birth 
of the said Benedict, since whose death it was 22 years. 

" Alan de Rokewode, aged 40 years, living 5 leagues from Chelsworth, 
said that in the same year he was made Vice-Dean of Sudbury, and that 
was the 3rd year of King Edward ; and likewise that it was the first year 
when he purchased lands, by which he well remembered the birth of the 
said Benedict. 

" Henry Milksop, aged 40 years, dwelling half a league from Chels- 
worth, said that he was present in the church of Chelsworth when the 
said Benedict was baptized ; and that the chaplain who baptized him was 
called Sir Nicholas de Cramaville, and he was still living. Likewise, that 
in the same year he entered the service of the cellarist of St. Edmund, and 
was his bailiff at Semer ; which was 22 years ago. 

" John Mauvesjm, aged 40 years, dwelling 8 leagues from Chelsworth, 
said that he had a son, Robert, a scholar at Oxford, who was born two days 
after the said Benedict, which Robert completed 22 years at the feast of 
St. John Baptist. 

" Geoffry de Waldingfield, aged 50 years and upward, dwelling 5 
leagues from Chelsworth, said that he was at the feast when the mother of 
Benedict was churched ; likewise, that the father of the said Benedict, at 
the Easter before in the same year, bought the homage and service of the 
said Geoffry from Sir Thomas de St. Martin, of whom he previously held ; 
whence, when he came to the house of the said Benedict the father, to do his 
service, that is to say, at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 
he found the mother of the said Benedict in childbed ; from which time to the 
feast of St. John Baptist then last it was 22 years. 

" Hervey George, aged 60 years, dwelling 4 leagues from Chelsworth, 
said that he had a daughter, Sarah, who was born at the Pentecost before 
in the same year, which at the then next Pentecost would be twenty-two 
years; likewise, that he was bailiff of the King in those parts for eight years, 
and that Benedict was born in the next year the deponent entered his office ; 
and that he also was at the feast when his mother was churched. 

" Hugh le Ber, aged 40 years and upward, dwelling 2 leagues from 
Chelsworth, said that he was invited to the feast when the mother of 
Benedict was churched, but that he was unable to attend on account of 
business, for that he was a merchant ; likewise, that he married his wife 
at the feast of Pentecost next before the birth of the said Benedict, from 
which time to the next Pentecost would be 22 years." 

On 6th Feb. 1297-8, Sir Benedict de Blakenham did homage to the 
King for his lands, being thereupon summoned to perform military service 
beyond the seas. Under a fine levied by Thomas de Blakeham, Hugh de 



CHELSWORTH. 149 

St. Philebert, and John, his son, against Benedict de Blakenham in 1302, 
the manor was settled upon Thomas de Blakenham for his life ; with 
remainder to Hugh de St. Philebert and John, his son, and the heirs of John.' 
Benedict de Blakeham seems to have divested himself of almost all his 
property shortly after his marriage, reserving a Ufe estate in Chelsworth 
for Thomas, probably his next heir. Hugh de St. Philebert appears to 
have been too much for mild Benedict. We find Hugh on his death-bed, 
in the presence of his household, acknowledging to Benedict in person that 
he had much wronged him, begging his foregiveness, and sohciting the 
remission of £100, the arrears of an annuity oi£6o which he was bound to 
pay Benedict during his life for certain lands in Berkshire and other counties 
sold to him by Benedict, and in compensation for which Hugh delivered to 
him a release of his right in the lands of the inheritance of Eufemia, his 
mother, in Sulham. 

Hugh de St. Philebert died in 1305, and John, his son and heir, was a 
ward in Court, and a question arose whether this Manor of Sulham thus 
granted by Hugh de St. Philebert to Benedict de Blakeham, and which he, 
it is said, gave to Agnes de Somery, had not been given in prejudice of the 
heir. Benedict himself became one of the household of Agnes de Somery, 
the widow of Roger, and mother of the powerful John de Somery. 

To this lady Benedict gave half the Manor of Sulham during his life 
pro sustenacione sua, for his board and lodging, and the other half to her 
absolutely, no doubt in consideration of her protection. The last we hear of 
Benedict is in 1311, when he was performing military service as one of the 
servientes for the abbot of Evesham, Agnes de Somery being then dead. 
As to Thomas de Blakenham, who had the manor for life, he was sum- 
moned in 130a in respect of his lands in Lincolnshire to do mihtary service 
against the Scots, and during several years of the reign of Edward I. he was 
deputy steward of the Liberty of St. Edmund. On his death the manor passed 
according to settlement to Sir John de St. Philebert, son and heir of Hugh. 
He made proof of his age and did homage for his lands in 1313, and three 
years later received confirmation of free warren in Chelsworth.^ 

He was in the Scotch war in 1319, and at the battle of Boroughbridge 
in 1321, where his banner displayed " Bendy of six, argent and azure." 
He was returned to ParUament as knight for the counties of Berkshire, 
Gloucester, and Suffolk in 1323, and was allowed his writ de expensis as 
knight of the first named county in 1327. In 1324 he was in the wars in 
Gascony, and in 1327 in the expedition to Scotland, being in 1331 appointed 
by Edw. in. Governor of Bordeaux. 

He levied a fine of the manor in 1333, probably by way of settlement, 
the fine being between himself and Ada his wife, and John de Ille and Robert 
Mabihun de Chelsworth.^ He died the same year,* leaving issue by Ada 
his wife, daughter of John de Botetourt, Sir John, his heir, Thomas, who 
died without issue, Margery, wife of Sir Richard de Plays (or Plaiz), Knt., 
Alice, wife of Sir Brian de Stapleton, K.G.,of Carleton and Wighill, co. York, 
and Maud, wife of Sir Warren Trussel, which Margery, Ahce, and Maud 
became the heirs general of the family of St. Philebert on the failure of 
issue of their brothers John and Thomas, 

Sir John de St. Philebert, the son, while an infant, was contracted in 
marriage to Joan, daughter of Robert de Ufford, afterwards Earl of Suffolk, 

'Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. I. 5. ^pget of Fines, 7 Edw. III. 26. 

'Chart. Rolls, 10 Edw. II. 20: *I.P.M., 7 Edw. III. 35. 



I5<5 THE MAN'ORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a match agreed upon between the parents in 1332. This lady died early 
without issue, and hes buried in the priory of Woodbridge. Sir John made 
proof of his age in 1347, ^^^ was then married to Margaret, sister and 
coheir of Edmund, son and heir of Hugh St. John, of Basing, which marriage 
was probably the occasion of his being summoned to ParHament in 1348. 
By her he had an only child, surnamed St. John, who survived his father 
but died an infant 19th Nov. 1361. 

In 1351 Sir John de St. Philebert, the son, released to Sir Richard de 
Plays all his right in the Manor of Chelsworth.' There is a curious licence 
on the Patent Rolls in 1353. It is a licence from the Crown for the abbot, 
prior and convent of St. Edmund to release " Richard Plaiz " and his 
heirs a rent of 24^ quarters of wheat, 59 quarters i j bushel of barley malt, 
4 quarters of peas or beans, 1,400 sheaves of heather (bruere), or 20 cartloads 
of straw, stubble, or brushwood for roasting (Jurnatione), a quarter of an 
ox, half a flitch (fresscencie) of pork, i goose, and five hens, and of finding 
for them for two weeks in the year six servants to brew at his costs and fuel 
for brewing, which rent was in ancient time assigned to the portion of the 
prior and convent separate from the portion of the abbot due from the 
said Richard by reason of his manor of " Chelisworth," in Suffolk.* 

By an inquisition taken there in 1360^ it was found that Sir Richard 
deceased, who died beyond the seas, "die Lunae prox. ante fest. nat. B. 
Mariae," 33 Edw. III. [1359] ^^^^ jointly with Margery his wife, then living, 
the Manor of Chelsworth. 

Sir John de Plays was the son and heir of Sir Richard, and to him the 
manor passed. He had been born at Chelsworth in 1342, and therefore 
was but 17 at the time of his father's death.* 

There is a grant of the manor by him in 1363 amongst the Rawlinson 
MSS. in the Bodleian.' On 4th Oct. 1363, John de Bois, cousin of Sir 
Miles Stapleton, and John Charman, parson of System, confirmed to Sir 
John de Plays and Joan his wife, daughter of Sir Miles de Stapleton, of 
Ingham, co. Norfolk, and the heirs of their body, the lordship of Chelsworth, 
with remainder to Miles Stapleton, Sir John de Sutton, sen., of Wivenhoe, 
in Essex, John de Cavendish, &c. This was on his second marriage, in 
order to dower the daughter of Sir Miles Stapleton. Sir John de Plays 
died in 1389.* His will, dated "die Jovis ante fest. S. John Baptist" 
i3'85, was proved i6th July, 1389, and he was buried in the priory of Brome- 
hill in Wetyng, of which he was patron. He bequeaths to the priory of 
Bromehill his " whole suit of Vestments, a Cup and Thuribs of Silver, two 
Vials, an Incense Boat, and an Osculatory of silver gilt. To the Prior and 
Convent of Walsingham, his Red Vestment and 10 Marks in Silver. To the 
Prior and Convent of Bromeholm, his Black Vestment and 10 Marks in 
Silver. To the Abbess and Convent in Marham, to the Prioress and 
Convent of Wykes> to the Prioress and Convent of Heuingham, to the 
Prioress and Convent of Thetford, and to the Prior and Convent of Ingham, 
each 100 shillings sterling. To the repair of every church in his patronage 
40s. To the Church of Chelesworth 20s. To Joan, his wife, all his Wardrobe 
and all his Silver vessels, with all other utensUs and ornaments belonging to 
his house not before bequeathed, with all other his goods and chattels in 

' Close Rolls, 35 Edw. III. 20. "D.K.R., 3 App. ii. 208. 

^Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. III. pt. ii. 36. 'Rawl. B. 248. 

3 1.P.M.. 34 Edw. III. 43. 6 i.p.M,, 12 Rich. II. 44. 



CHELSWORTH. 151 

his Manors of Knapton, Tofts, and Chelesworth." He appoints his wife 
Joan/ Sir John de Burgh, Sir Richard Sutton, and others executors. 

His only child by his first wife, Margery, daughter of Sir Walter de 
Norwich, Margaret, was married to Sir John Howard, ancestor of the Dukes 
of Norfolk. She died in 1391,'' and he 17th Nov. 1437,^ when the manor 
passed to their granddaughter, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Howard 
(by Joan, daughter of Sir Richard Walton, Knt., of W5rvenhoe, in Essex), 
the son of Sir John Howard and Margery his wife, which Sir John had died 
in the Holy Land in his father's lifetime in 1404. Elizabeth married John 
de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford, who was beheaded in 1461 . In 1472 Elizabeth 
the widow, settled this, with other lordships,* on Richard, Duke of 
Gloucester, King Edward IV.'s brother, in trust for her heirs, in order 
to preserve the property in those particularly troublesome and dangerous 
times ; but 26th Nov. 1479 the feoffees of the said Duke confirmed to the 
dean and chapter of the Collegiate Church of St. George at Windsor the 
Manor of Chelsworth, to endow a chantry in the said church. Amongst 
the Ashmolean MSS. in the British Museum are letters dated 1479 of the 
dean and canons of Windsor, constituting an attorney to be taken seisin of 
the manor from Richard, Duke of Gloucester.^ 

The grant, however, did not prove eventually effective, as on the acces- 
sion of Hen. Vn. to the throne John de Vere, the 13th Earl of Oxford, son 
and heir of the 12th Earl, was restored to his family honours and estates, 
amongst which this lordship was included. On the death of the 13th 
Earl in 1512, without issue, the manor passed to his nephew and heir, John 
de Vere, 14th Earl, who died without issue in 1527. The manor then 
passed to his sister and coheir, EHzabeth, married to Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
of Letherington.* 

On their death the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Wing- 
field, who had licence in 1562 to alien to his son and heir. Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, and this year a fine of a moiety of the manor was levied by John 
Wingfield and others against Sir Robert Wingfield.^ The fine included the 
Manors of Brokshall, Walsham Hall, and Preston. In 1576 another fine 
of these same manors was levied by Richard Wingfield and others against 
Robert Wingfield and others.^ 

Sir Anthony Wingfield died without issue in 1609, and was succeeded 
in the lordship by his brother. Sir Thomas Wingfield. A little later the 
manor was acquired by Sir Robert Naunton, who by deed 4th Aug. 10 Car. I. 
settled it on himself for life, with remainder to his brother William and his 
heirs male. Sir Robert died in 1635, when the manor passed to his brother 
and heir, William Naunton, subject to the interest therein of Sir Robert's 
widow. Dame Penelope. It subsequently vested in Robert Naunton, of 
Letheringham, nephew of Sir Robert, who, nth Sept. 1655, sold the manor 

' She died 3rd Sept. 1385. sAshm. 1297. See S.P. 5 Hen. VIII. 

» I.P.M., 15 Rich. II. 31. 4294, 4536. 

3 1.P.M., 16 Hen. VI. 56. His will is ^ Amongst the State Papers for 1539 is a 

dated ist April, 14 Hen. VI . lea§,e out of the Augmentation 

♦ The lordships were Chelsworth, East Offices of this manor and of Bawdsey 

Bergholt.and Brook Hall, in Suffolk, rectory to Thomas Wryothesley. 

and Fersfield, in Norfolk. The S.P. 1539, 1355. 

settlement was effected by two ''Fine, Easter, 4 Ehz. 

deeds, pij# dated 9th Jan. 12 ^ Fine, Mich. 18-19 Eliz. 

Edw. ly., the other 9th Feb. 13 

Edw. IV. 



152 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to Robert Marryott, of Bredfield. There is a Parliamentary Survey of this 
manor (made in 1652-3) in the Public Record Office.' 

Robert Marryott, on the marriage of his daughter Dorothy with Thomas 
Knight, by deeds dated 3rd and 4th May, 1675, in consideration of ;fi,35o 
paid him by John Knight, of St. Martins-in-the-Fields, settled the manor 
to the use of Thomas Knight for life, with remainder to his wife for life, 
with usual limitations to children in tail with an ultimate remainder to 
John Knight in fee. 

Robert Marryott died the same year, when the manor passed in accord- 
ance with the limitations of the settlement. Thomas Knight died without 
issue, and Dorothy, who was a coheir of her father, married Edmund Jenney, 
of Knoddishall, on whose death in 1694 the manor vested in his son and heir, 
Arthur Jenney, who, dying in 1729, it passed to his son and heir, Edmund 
Jenney, who sold the same in 1737 to Robert Pocklington, who erected a 
handsome mansion and became seated here. 

Robert Pocklington was a serjeant-at-law, and died in 1767, when the 
lordship passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert Pocklington. The cousin 
and adopted heiress of Robert Pocklington seems to have been Pleasance 
Pykarell, of Yorkshire, who, assuming his name and arms, married Samuel 
Robert Sharpe, son of Samuel Sharpe, of London,^ who thereupon also assumed 
the surname and arms of Pocklington. He left two sons, ist, Sir Robert 
Pocklington, a distinguished officer, 15th Light Dragoons and Knight of 
the Imperial Order of Maria Theresa, who married Catherine Frances, 
daughter of John Blagrave, of Calcot Park, Reading, and dying 21st Sept. 
1840, left by her (who married 2ndly Sir Henry Edm. Austen, of Shalford, 
Surrey) one son, Martin Robert Pocklington, of Chelsworth, who died un- 
married in 1865 ; and 2nd, Henry Sharpe Pocklington. The latter married in 
1795 Anne Harvey, and by her left at his death 25th Oct. 1816, a son, the Rev. 
Henry Sharpe Pocklington, of Stebbing, Essex, who married 8th Aug. 1827, 
Amelia Georgina, daughter of General George Stracey Smyth, Governor of 
New Brunswick, and died 23rd July, 1842, leaving a son, Lieut.-Col. 
George Henry Pocklington, High Sheriff, 1880, who married 20th Sept. 
1857, Guiliana Maria Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Alfred Cloyne Godwin 
Austen, of Chilworth Manor, Guildford, and had a son, Harry Evelyn 
Stracey Pocklington, who married 5th Aug. 1886, Amy Jane, eldest daughter 
of John Hargreaves, of Maiden Erlegh, Berks. 

Court Rolls of the manor 20, 23, 24 Hen. VI. will be found in the Public 
Record Office,^ and 1563 to 1600 amongst the Additional Rolls in the British 
Museum.* 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings, 1558-79, is an action by Ehzabeth 
Nanton, widow, against John Nevell, Lord Latimer, as to Chelsworth, 
Brook Hall, Walsham Hall, Preston, and Holbrook Park.^ 

The following is a copy of a rental for the manor in 1737.* 

A Rental for Half-year, Lady Day, 1737. 

i s. d. 
Alston Brand Esq"'- late Beales . . . . . . . . o 15 4 

More late Greens .. .. .. .. .. ..099 

More late Bennaworth .. .. .. .. ..016 

' D.K.R., 8 App. ii. p. 67. ^ Portfolio 203, 22. 

^The celebrated surgeon, author of a * 32901-32905. 

" Treatise on Surgical Operations," ' C.P. Ser. ii. B. cxxxii. 18. 

in 1788, and of a work entitled, ^ From a paper in the writer's possession. 

" Letters from Italy," in 1765. 



CHELSWORTH. 



153 



Brewgates Gere late Andrews 

Boltos, widow, late Geoffees 

Beyjus late Brabrookes 

Brownrigg Rob'- late Worth 

Barry Hubbard Esq" late Hubbard 

Chelsworthj Town Lands 

Cutbert John late Jurby 

More late Greens . . 

More late Greens . . 

Cutbert Jos. late Greens 

Clark Eliz. and Mary late Hewett 

More late Hewett late Chaplins 

More late Hewett late Worths 

More late Hewett late Worths 

Curry Damaris late Hindes 

Clark J no. late Prye 

Clark Jos. late Rivett 

Cobbald Sarah late Andrews late Thurlow 

Dean John and Numford Sarah late Wm. Rudland now 

Edw"*- Numford junior 
Fish for Howletts late Myms late Andrews 
More late Myms late Dorisley's . . 
More late Myms late Offwood 
More late Myms late Abbotts 
Green Judith late Eliz. Worth's . . 
Gardner Rob*' late Jene, free rent 
Gage Peter late Kitchen, free rent 
Hanold John late Brandish 
Hall John late Hale formerly Mary Knocke 
Hule John late Hiles free, Relief p'^. by Wm. Hiles 4th 

May 1691 

Hill Henry late Blomfield . . 

Hodges Esq'- late Myns . . 

Kemingale John, late Mrs. Mym's 

More in ye right of his wife^ Copyhold 

Mannings Abraham late Cannele . . 

Nunnford Edward late Pryse late Cloude p"^- free one 

CL\yX C ■■ •• •■ ■• •• •• •• 

Numford Edward late Dansie q free, 8 acres 

More late Andrew Rudland late Sparrows, 7 acres £12 a 

year 
Numford Edward late Tustor q free 14 acres. Relief 

W. E. p"*- by Price 12th August 1699 
More late Althorne and Pryce i acre copy 
Nunnford, Wm. Bate Thos. Green's House and Barn 

and abt. 35 acres of land 
More late Alice Greens 

q Kilm field about 4 acres 

Part of Mowbray q field abt. 3 acres free. 
Do. Cottage late his wife's father Wm. Rudland late 

Jarrold's 
Norman William, late Mary Kingsbury . . 
Pryce Rob'- late Mary Alice Hamott 



i 


s. 


d. 





I 


Hi 








4 








I 








7 





12 


2 





6 


8 





17 


7 


I 


6 


6 





10 


5i 





4 


7 





3 


5i 





3 


4 





2 


6 





I 


6 





8 


8 





4 


7 





6 








2 


9 








9 





I 


I 





I 


7 





I 


I 





4 


9 








7 








6 








9 








li 








lOj 








8 





I 


"4 


3 





2* 





6 


8 


I 


6 


I 








6 








4 





3 


6 





6 








5 


I 








6 





5 


4 





5 


4 








4 








II 





I 


9 



154 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



I 

I 



o 
o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



s. 

II 

3 

2 

o 

I 



d. 
6 

10 
2 

7 
o 



More late Althorne 

Patrick J no. late Clover . . 

More 

Rudland Alice late Lemon's 

Rudland Mary, late Button and Herbert . 

Rudland Jno. late King's late Salters, relief p"^' by Ann 

Bird on the death of Susannah Salter 19th Aprill 

1690 020 
More late Slammers . . 

Rudland William late his Father Wm. Rudland's 
Sage James late Andrews . . 
More late Andrews late Clarkes . . 

Tyrell Charles 

Wright Henry late James Andrews 

Waldringfield Feoffees 

Waterman James late Anthony Vince . . 

Arms of Blakenham : Argent, two bars between 12 cross-crosslets, 
Or. Of St. Philebert : Bendy of six, Argent and Azure. Of Plaiz : Per 
pale. Or and Gules, a Lion passant. Argent. Of Naunton : Barry of six. 
Argent and Sable. Of Pocklington : Erm. 3 bends Azure, on a chief Or 
as many martlets Sa. 



3 
o 

o 
o 
o 

I 
o 

2 
O 



6 

4 
6 

4 
4 
o 

4 
4 
9 




ELMSETT. 155 

ELMSETT. 

MONG the lands of Roger de Oburville was one holding in 
this place. It consisted of 6 carucates and 40 acres of land, 

11 villeins, 12 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 

12 ploughteams belonging to the men, 2 rouncies, 16 beasts, 
30 hogs, and 240 sheep. At the time of the Survey these 
details were altered. The villeins were reduced to 2, the 
ploughteams belonging to the men were only 4, the beasts 

were reduced to 4, the hogs to 20, and the sheep to 200, and the value 
which in Saxon times was £10 had come down to ■£'j. This holding was 10 
quarentenes long and 7 broad, and paid in a gelt 15^^. The Abbot of St. 
Edmunds had half the soc. It was held in the time of the Confessor by 
Thou the Thane.' 

Manor of Elmsett. 

To Roger de Oburville, the Domesday tenant, succeeded Hugh de 
Oburville or Auberville, his son and heir, and by the time of Hen. III. the 
lordship was vested in Sir John de Bathun or Bathonia. In 1275 John de 
Bathun claimed free warren, gallows, view of frankpledge, and assize of 
bread and beer and ducking stool* here j"" and died in 1291.^ His daughter 
and heir, Joan, married John de Bohun, son of Franco de Bohun and of 
Sibil his wife, daughter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby ; and in 13 16* 
their grandson and heir, John de Bohun, was lord.^ 

He was the son of James de Bohun, of Midhurst, who had died in 1311, 
by Joane, daughter and coheir of William de Broase, of Gower and Bramber, 
CO. Sussex. He married 1st a wife named Isabel, by whom he had two 
daughters, and 2ndly Cecily, daughter and heir of John Fihol, of Essex. 
This son never seems to have had the manor, for his father must have 
parted with it in his hfetime, as William de Bohun certainly held in 1358. 
As early as 1328 this William had a grant of free warren here.® He is no 
doubt the William de Bohun created Earl of Northampton 17th March, 
1339, and who at Cressy had an important command. From the 25th 
Report of the Deputy Keeper on Public Records we learn that in 1358 
there was a grant of both this and Off ton Manor by William de Bohun to John 
Botiller, Adam de Eirdale, and others for lives.^ 

WiUiam de Bohun was finally honoured with the Garter, and married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, one of the coheirs of 
her brother Giles and widow of Edmund de Mortimer, and dying in 1360^ 
was succeeded by his only son Humphrey, 2nd Earl of Northampton, 
and as successor to his uncle, Earl of Hereford and Essex and Constable of 
England. 

On the death of his father he was a minor and under the guardianship 
of Richard, Earl of Arundel. He died in 1372,' at the early age of 32, 
leaving by his wife Joane, daughter of his former guardian, the Earl of 
Arundel, two daughters and coheirs — Alianore, married to Thomas of 
Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, sixth son of King Edw. III., and Mary, 
married to Henry, Earl of Derby (son of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster), 
afterwards King Hen. IV. 

'Dom. ii. 405. ^I.Q.D., 10 Edw. II. File 123, 15. 

^H.R. ii. 153, 199. 6 Chart. Rolls, 2 Edw. III. 60. 

3I.P.M., 19 Edw. I. 13, Extent. 'D.K.R., 25 App. p. 7. 

* Extent I.P.M., 10 Edw. II., 70 and 60 ^I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 85. 

acres of land and ij of wood and 'I.P.M., 46 Edw. III. 10. 

20 acres. 



156 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor was in 1421 assigned in pourparty to King Hen. V./ and in 
1427 confirmed to the Queen Dowager as part of her dower.'' 

In 1532 we find an action amongst the Duchy of Lancaster papers 
between the King and Richard Coke and John Smyth, in which the title of 
the Duchy to the manor is disputed. In these proceedings a plan of the 
manor will be found. ^ 

Amongst the same papers in 1586 and 1588 we find an action by Henry, 
Lord Wentworth, against Andrew Keime and Thomas Driver relating to 
the manor and as to herbage and pannage of woods called Bringewood 
and Bushe Cattshill.* 

It is clear the manor remained in the Crown until 1609, and amongst 
the State Papers for 1609 is a letter of John Waddelove touching the 
purchase of the " King's Manors " of Elmsett, Offton, and Somersham.' 

Ministers' accounts of lands in Elmsett will be found in the Public 
Record Office, 7 Hen. V.j'for 7 to 9 Hen. V.,^ for 9 Hen. V.% and farmers' 
and receivers' account of lands of Duchy of Lancaster in Elmsett are also 
there for the 36 and 37 Hen. VI. ^ 

In 1609 the manor was evidently disposed of to Ralph Cecil, Earl of 
Sahsbury, for we find him then lord. He died in 1612. Apparently the 
manor in 1632 belonged to John Cooke, citizen and merchant tailor of 
London, for this year by deed dated 17th June, he sells of lands belonging 
to the manor, 22 acres in Elmsett to Richard Glamfield the elder, of 
Hadleigh. 

In 1649 the riianor was vested in the Rev. Richard Glanville, rector 
of Elmsett, and lord, not only of this manor, but also of the manors of 
Somersham and Offton. He was the son of Richard GlanviUe, mayor of 
Hadleigh in 1626, a descendant of William de Glanville, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, 
a Justiciary in 1196, and a benefactor to his father's abbey of Leiston. 

Richard Glanville died 15th Dec. i667,and his will was proved in 1668." 
He bequeathed a certain piece of land called The Grove, now parcel of 
the glebe, the rent of which, 3s., provides six 6d. loaves to be given to the 
poor on Christmas Day. The manor passed to his son and heir, Richard 
Glanville. He married Sarah Gideon, whose will is dated the 13th Aug. 
1726, and proved in 1734. She was at the date of her wiU a widow. They 
had two sons, Richard Gideon Glanville, to whom the manor passed, and 
William Glanville, who was born in 1665, and settled in Antigua in 1677, 
Richard Gideon Glanville married Eleanor Ashfield, of Somersetshire, and 
died in 1725-6, when the manor passed to Richard Glanville, their son and 
heir, who died in Oct. 1728. 

This is not certain. Davy says Richard Gideon Glanville, son of 
Richard, died in 1725-6, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Richard 
Gideon Glanville, who died in 1767. Mr. Glanville-Richards, however, in his 
" Records of the Anglo-Norman House of Glanville," states that Richard 
Gideon Glanville, son of Richard Glanville, had by his 2nd wife Ann children 
up to the year 1737, and he makes no mention of a Richard Gideon Glanville, 
a son of a father with a like name. It is possible, however, that there may 

'R.P. iv. 137. '^/&. 3. 

" R.P. iv. 187. ^/&. 5. 

3 Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, s Bundle 292, No. 4804. 

24 Hen. VIII. 10. "A translation of the inscription on his 

4/6. 28 Eliz. 6 ; 30 Eliz. 21. tomb will be found infiie " Records 

5S.P. 1609, 547. of the House of Glanville," p. 84. 

fiBwdleii;, No, «, 



ELMSETT. 157 

have been a son of this name, and that he was the person who married Ann 
and had children up to the year 1737. Shortly after 1764, the manor 
passed to John Alderson, of Cambridge, who died in 1782, and he was followed' 
by Abraham Reeve, of Hadleigh, who died in 1826, and was followed by 
Edward Reeve, of Ardleigh, in Essex. In 1847 the manor was vested in 
JamesCuddon, of Norwich; in 1855 it wasvestedin Messrs. James and Thomas 
F. Cuddon, of Norwich ; and now no longer exists save as a reputed manor 
which is vested in the trustees of Sparrowe's charity. 

The old hall standing close to the church is now a farm house. It 
was once surrounded by a moat, remains of which are still to be seen. 

There is in the Public Record Office a parliamentary petition of Philip 
Wentworth relating to the manor.' 

Arms of Bohun of Midhurst : Or, a cross Az. 



'Davy inserts here, Radwell, of Hadleigh, ^No. 9393, D.K.R. 34, App. p. 161. 
as lord, 




158 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HADLEIGH. 

jHERE was one manor in this place among the lands of 
Archbishop Lanfranc. Formerly it consisted of 5 carucates 
of land, 22 villeins, 26 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, 15 ploughteams belonging to the men, 2 mills, 
and 16 acres of meadow, valued at £12. At the time of the 
Survey the details of the manor were altered, the 26 bordars 
were reduced to 19, the ploughteams belonging to the men 

to 10, but additionally there were 2 rouncies, 12 beasts, 120 sheep, and 20 

hogs, and the value was ^15 . 

There was also a church, with i carucate of free land, a ploughteam, 

and a mill, valued at 12s., also a socman with 60 acres in the time of the 

Confessor. It had formerly been held by Holy Trinity. 

On the same land dwelt at the time of the Survey 3 socmen, having a 

ploughteam and an acre of meadow. Further, there were 60 acres held in 

the time of the Confessor by a freeman under commendation and soc. 

On the same land at the time of the Survey dwelt 3 freemen having a 

ploughteam and 2^ acres of meadow. The value formerly was 8s., but was 

increased by 2s. at the time of the Survey. The whole was a league long 

and 7 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt iz^d.^ 
There are five manors in Hadleigh : — 

(i) The Manor of Hadleigh or Hadleigh Hall. 

(2) The Manor of Pond Hall. 

(3) The Manor of Toppesfield Hall. 

(4) The Manor of Mausers or Hadleigh in Hadleigh. 

(5) The Manor of Cosford Hall. 

Mr. Pigott, in his History of Hadleigh, does not mention the Manor 
of Mausers, but has the " Manor of Hadleigh in Hadleighe." 

Manor of Hadleigh Hall. 

Brithnoth, sometimes called Duke and at other times Earl of Essex, 
in 991 devised the Manor of Hadleigh to the church of Canterbury, after the 
death of his wife, Elfleda.^ This was the year the Danes landed in con- 
siderable force in Essex ; the Duke attacked them at Maldon with a com- 
paratively small body of troops. The result was that this valiant soldier 
and earnest Christian was slain. Brithnoth had before starting on his 
fatal expedition made large grants of land to the church of Ely also.^ 
Dugdale's account of the gift of the manor as early as 835 by Elfleda to the 
church of Canterbury, with the consent of Ethelred the King, is a delusion, 
and is, in fact, contrary to his statement as to what happened in the year 
991. It is true there is the same discrepancy in the MS. of Brian Twyne. 
It seems probable that Elfleda gave up her hfe interest, and hence the 
confusion has arisen. 

This would reconcile the two statements except as to the date; in fact, 
the statement that the gift was made with the consent of King Ethelred 
would suit the date 991, but not 835, as he did not commence to reign 
until the year 978. 

In 1305 the prior and convent of Christ Church, Canterbury, held,* 
and in 1317 had a grant of free warren here. An extent or survey of the 

'Dom. ii. 3726. ^Camden, p. 410. 

==8 Rep. Hist. Com. 322. *I.Q.D., 15 Edw. II. 56. 



HADLEIGH. 159 

manor made in 1305 for the monastery of Canterbury will be found amongst 
the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum/ and the Additional MSS. in 
the same depository/ and is printed in Appendix H of Mr. Pigott's History 
of Hadleigh, published in i860 by the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. 

Mr. Pigott states that it was not until 1547 that the manor passed into 
the hands of the dean and chapter of Canterbury/ but he is mistaken. 
The manor passed to them in 1541, and particulars of the grant in frankal- 
moin this year will be found amongst the State Papers for 1541." 

In 1638 Edmund D'Oyley held the manor of the dean and chapter 
of Canterbury, and in 1764 Ebenezer Maurice. About 1840 it was held 
in lease by the Rev. Edward Jermyn, under whose will it passed to his /VcO, »o ' .0 
trustees, the Rev. J. C. Safford and the Rev. John Francis, who held the 
same in 1855. 

In 1875 the lessee under the dean and chapter of Canterbury, the Rev, 
William Hale Andrews, purchased the manor from the Ecclesiastical 
Commissioners, and he shortly afterwards and before taking a conveyance 
sold the manor to John Frederick Robinson, who then resided at Hadleigh 
Hall, and the manor was conveyed to him by the Ecclesiastical Com- 
missioners by deed dated 29th July, 1876. In 1879 Mr. Robinson sold to 
Frederick Last, of Albert Buildings, London, who in 1881 sold to Henry 
Edwards Paine and Richard Brittell, of Chersey, who in 1882 sold the same 
to Charles James Grimwade, in whom the manor is now vested. 

The hall is situate near the church, and is the ancient mansion house 
of the manor. Some 20 years or so ago it was renovated, and is now owned 
and occupied by the Rev. Ernest Edward Ward Kirby, M.A. 

Particulars of the services and customs of the manor will be found 
amongst the Additional and the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum.^ 

Manor of Plessis or Pond Hall. 

The land comprising this manor appears in four entries in the Domesday 
Survey under the head "Lafham" or " Latham," and has almost immemo- 
riably been assigned to Leyham. The principal holding was that of the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds, who held 26 freemen with 2 carucates of land, 6 
acres of meadow, bordars, 6 ploughteams (which at the time of the Survey 
had become reduced to 4) . 

These freemen might give or sell their land. The soc, sac, commenda- 
tion, and all customs except in one case belonged to the abbot, and it was 
held by him in the time of the Confessor, when the value was 30s. as against 
40s. at the time of the Survey. Berard also held half a carucate of land and 
a ploughteam, valued at 22s. out of the above value. The estate was 6 
quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt ^id.^ 

Another estate here was that of Ralph Pinel, and consisted of 40 acres, 
I bordar, i serf, and i ploughteam, valued at los. The soc was in the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds. The estate had formerly been that of Bricthmar.' 
William de Noers also kept for the King 4 acres here valued at i2d. The 
land formerly belonged to a socman.^ The fourth holding was that of 

'Harl. 1006. 'Add. 6159, 6160; Harl. 1006. 

''eisg. 6 Dom. ii. 368&. 

^p. 5 (note). ^ Dom. ii. 437. 

••S.P. 1541. P- 878 (59). ^ Dom. ii. 288. 



i6o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Robert Gernon, and consisted of 20 acres, belonging to Churchford demesne 
in which Scape held. This was valued at 3s., and was held by WilUam de 
Alno.' 

This manor was originally known as Plessis or Plessets, that is, Place or 
Plaize Manor, subsequently as Lafliam Manor, and finally as Pond Hall 
Manor. 

In the reign of King John we meet with a fine levied by Robert, son of 
Gerard, against Matilda de Aldham, with Nicholas, her son, in Lafham, and 
in 1240 a fine levied by Hugh, son of Alexander, and WiUiam, his brother, 
against Thomas de la Pond in Lafham. A John de Lafham appears in an 
extent of the Manor of Hadleigh m 1305, still extant, and in an inquisition 
p.m. in 1323 mention is made of one William de Lafham, who was seised 
of I messuage, 70 acres of land, and 15 acres of woodland here. His heir 
was John de Lafham, aged 30 years.' 

By 1341, however, the manor had passed to Sir William Giffard. 
Amongst the Essex Charters in the Bodleian is a grant in 1332 by Sir William 
Cokerel (son of Sir Robert Cokerel) and Cecilia his wife to Sir William 
Giffard, described as of Stokeneyland, Knt., and Isabella, his wife, of 55 
acres i rood and 12 perches of land in 4 pieces lying in the parish of Hadleigh 
in a hamlet called " Lafham" in exchange for the same quantity of land 
lying in the same village in 16 pieces.^ 

Sir William Giffard had a grant of free warren here in 1340," and on his 
death his estate passed to his daughter and heir, Cecily, widow of Sir Wilham 
Cokerel, then remarried to Richard Kyslingham or Kyselingbury, of London, 
and they sold the manor in 1359 to Helminge Legat, of Essex, Constable of 
Windsor Castle. In 1365 he had a grant of free warren here,' and in 1369 
had a patent granted to him enabling him to impark 300 acres of land, 
20 acres of meadow, 180 acres of pasture, and 139 acres of wood in Hadleigh. 

Two years later he had another patent empowering him to embattle 
his mansion, called " Le Pond Hall in Hadleigh." TMs house probably 
stood on the site now known as Hadleigh Castle. He married Falson, 
daughter of Sir John Mandeville, of Essex, and died in 1391, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Legat, who released all his right 
to his sister Anne on her marriage with Edward D'Oyley, son of Thomas 
D'Oyley, of Staffordshire.' 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is an appoint- 
ment to give seisin in 1398 of this manor and the Manor of Cosford, in 
Hadleigh,^ and it rather throws doubt on the last statement, for the 
authority is from John Hermesthorp, Master of the College of St. Katherine, 
London, Roger Wolferston, and others, constituting John Power and Richard 
Barrel! attorneys to deliver seisin to Edward Leget and Joan, daughter of 
John " Jarnyngan," of Somerleyton, his wife. The document is dated at 
Hadleigh 6th May, 21 Rich. II. [1398]. 

' Dom. ii. 4206. Alicia, sister of Sir John Swinford. 

* I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 21. Sir Edmund was the son of Edward, 
35 Edw. III. Bod. Essex Ch. 197. the son of John D'Oyley, by Rose, 

♦ Chart. Rolls, 14 Edw. III. 39. daughter and coheir of Sir William 

5 Chart. Rolls, 38 Edw. III. 13. Dunstone, of Staffordshire, Knt. 

6 This Thomas was the son of Sir Edmund This John was son of Roger 

D'Oyley, Knt., and his wife, D'Oyley, who flourished in the 

daughter and heir of John de reign of Hen. III. 

Bowden, of Northamptonshire, by ''Add. Ch. 10571. 



HADLEIGH. i6i 

William Clopton, citizen of London, is said by Davy to have been lord 
in 1425, and John Belsham in 1428. The manor is certainly mentioned in 
the inquisition p.m. of this John Belsham this year.' 

It is possible they were but trustees, for we find the manor vested in 
John D'Oyly, son and heir of the above Edward D'Oyly, who, with his wife 
Elizabeth, were both buried in St. John's Chapel, in Hadleigh. In 1466 
John D'Oyly had had Ucence from Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury, to 
have a chapel for his family at Pondhall. He died in 1483, and his will may 
be seen in the Collection of Suffolk Charters in the Bodleian." It is dated 
15th Aug. 1483, and was proved 9th Oct. 1483. On his death the manor 
passed to his son and heir Edward D'Oyly, who married Anne, daughter of 
Thomas Cotton, of Landwade, co. Camb., and dying 25th Jan. 1534-5,^ 
it passed to his son and heir. Sir Henry D'Oyly, who was thrice married — 
1st to Joan, d?iughter and heir of John Stede, of Marshland, by whom he 
had no issue; 2ndly to Jane, daughter and sole heir of .John Elwyn, of 
Wigenhall, in Norfolk ; and 3rdly to Margaret, natural daughter of John, 
Duke of Norfolk, and relict of Sir John Timperley, of Hintlesham. Sir 
Henry D'Oyly died 13th Feb. 1563-4,'* when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Henry D'Oyly, The inquisition, dated 4th Sept. 1564, on Sir 
Henry, states that he was seised of Pond Hall, " Topsfield " Hall, in Had- 
leigh, and Cosford Manor, in Whatfield, and that Henry, his son and heir, was 
34 years old. This Sir Henry, the son, resided at Shipdam, in Norfolk, 
and was Knight of the Shire for Bucks, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and 
Sheriff for Norfolk in 1572 and 1596-7. He married Anne, daughter of 
Edmund White, of Shottisham, in Norfolk, by Margaret his wife, the widow 
of William Timperley. A fine was levied of the manor in 1585 against 
Sir Henry and others by Thomas Towneshend and others,^ no doubt on 
the occasion of some settlement. 

On the death of Henry D'Oyly the manor passed, to his son and heir, 
Edmund D'Oyly, of Pond Hall and Shottisham, who was High Sheriff for 
Norfolk in 1604, and married 1st Anne, daughter of Sir John Goodwin, of 
Winchindon, in Bucks., by whom he had a son, Henry, who died young, and 
a daughter Elizabeth, married to Charles Vesey, of Hintlesham ; and 2ndly 
Katherine, daughter of Sir Henry Nevill, of Bilhngbere, in Berks., by Eliza- 
beth his wife, daughter and heir of Sir John Gresham, of London, by Francis 
his wife, daughter and coheir of Sir Henry Thwaites, of Lound on the 
Woldes, in Yorkshire. Sir Henry Nevill was a member of the Privy 
Council to Hen. VIII. and Edw. VI., and brother to Edward, Lord 
Abergavenny. 

Edmund D'Oyly on his marriage settled the Manors of Pondhall, 
Toppesfield Hall, and Cosford Hall in jointure, and an annuity of 200 marks 
a year out of other property, the whole jointure being estimated at 1,000 
marks. He was buried 12th Oct. 1612, and the manor passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Henry D'Oyly. He married Susan, daughter ol Lionel Talmach, 
of Helmingham, and sister of Sir Lionel Talmach, the ist Bart, of that 
family, by whom he left one son, Edmund, to whom the manor passed on 
Sir Henry's death 6th March, 1616. 

Edmund D'Oyly married Bridget, daughter of John Coke, of Holkham, 
in Norfolk, and granddaughter of Sir Edward Coke, Lord Chief Justice 

' I.P.M., 6 Hen. VI. 63. ^ I.P.M., 6 Eliz. 169. 

^Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1307. 5 Fine, Easter, 27 Eliz. 

3I.P.M., 26Hen. VIII,i03. 

W 



i62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of the King's Bench, by whom he had one daughter, Susan, 3 years old 
9th Nov. 1638, who died without issue. Edmund D'Oyly died 28th Sept. 
1638, and the inquisition taken 4th Feb. following says he died seised of the 
Manor of Pond Hall, in Hadleigh, the great park, coppice, woods, and 
lands there, and mentions several lands, tenements, &c., in jointure to 
Dame Susan and Bridget, the ward's mother, with the manors of " Tops- 
field " Hall, Cosford, &c. His widow afterwards married Sir Isaac Astley, 
of Melton Constable, in Norfolk, Bart. 

Sir William D'Oyly, son and heir of William, brother of Sir Henry, 
succeeded to the lordship, and was styled Sir William the elder, and as heir 
to Susan his cousin had also Toppesfield and Cosford and Shottisham, 
GostUngs, and three manors in Warham, in Norfolk. He was knighted 
by King Charles I. in 1642 for his gallant behaviour abroad, in the service 
of the great Gustavus Adolphus, after whose death he remained in foreign 
parts till he returned to take possession of the fortune of his family. He 
was a very accomplished gentleman, and much esteemed in the county 
which he had the honour to represent in Parliament with Sir Horatio 
Townshend. He was among the most zealous in the convention Parhament 
for the restoration of the royal family, and sat afterwards in the House of 
Commons as member for the borough of Yarmouth. His name appears as 
one of the commissioners appointed by the House of Commons, out of their 
own members, to see the army disbanded in 1661, and he was chosen by 
the city of Norwich, with three other gentlemen of distinction, viz.. Sir 
Horatio Townshend, Sir John Holland, and Sir Ralph Hare, to wait on the 
King, soon after his return, with the resignation of their charter, which His 
Majesty graciously restored to them. In the year 1663, 29th July, he was 
created a baronet, and dying in Nov. 1677,' left issue by Margaret Randal, 
of Pulham and Denton, in Norfolk, stepdaughter of Sir Robert Bacon, 
Bart., six daughters and three sons. 

Sir William D'Oyly, the eldest son and 2nd Bart., of Pond Hall and 
Shottisham, was knighted 30th April, 1664, m the lifetime of his father, and 
styled Sir William the younger. Appointed one of the four Tellers of 
Exchequer in 1666-7, he married Mary, daughter of John Hadley, of East 
Barnet, in Middlesex, citizen and grocer of London, and also sister of Anne, 
the first wife of Arthur Herbert, the celebrated Admiral, Earl of Torrington, 
by whom he had 5 sons, besides daughters. On Sir WiUiam D'Oyly's 
death in 1680,^ the manor passed to his eldest son, Sir Edmund D'Oyly, 
3rd Bart., who married 13th Nov. 1684, Dorothy, eldest daughter of Philip 
Bedingfield, of Ditchingham, in Norfolk, and by her had two sons and a 
daughter, and died in Oct. 1700. To him succeeded his son and heir. Sir 
Edmund D'Oyly, 4th Bart., who died unmarried in 1763. 

The manor must, however, have been disposed of in his hfetime, for we 
find Richard Berney lord of this manor and the Manors of Toppesfield and 
Cosford Hall in 1726, as a rental which the writer has seen demonstrates. 
The manor later, and before the year 1735, was acquired by Lionel 
ToUemache, 4th Earl of Dysart, and from this time to the death of 
Louisa, Countess of Dysart, 22nd Sept. 1840, the manor passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Helmingham, in Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundred. 

On the death of the Countess the manor seems to have gone to the 
Hon. Algernon ToUemache, who sold it in 1845 to Robert Kersey, of Had- 
leigh. 

'Will 2nd June, 1677, not proved. ^ Admin. 23rd July, 1680. 



HADLEIGH. 



163 






2 


4 





6 


8 





I 


Q 





4 


8 








6 



In 1855 the manor was held by C. and R. Kersey, and in 1885 by Samuel 
Overbury Kersey, who died about 1902, and is now in the representatives 
of the last-named gentleman. 

The following is an extract from an old rental of the manor dated 
1663 :— 

Hadleigh Pond Hall Manor. 

The particulars of the quit rents payable out of the present Mr. 
Hunlake's estate to Pond Hall Manor, copied out of an old rent roll bearing 
date 1663. 

£ s. d. 

Robert Appleton Esq. for a capitall messuage wherein 

Mr. Allubaste late dwell' d at 2s. per an. and a 

capon or /\d. 
of Him for Hends Croft per annum . . 
of Him for a messuage L'. Stephen Gardiner and parall 

of Hewds Croft at i. id. per ann. and for the said 

messuage 2 capons at 8i. 
Of Him for another parcell of Hewds Croft at per ann. . . 
Of Him for a Small Tenement at ye Gate of the same 

messuage at 6i. per annum . , 

15 II 

The following is an account of the rent of the manor received in one 
year to Michaelmas, 1726 : — 

Rents of Pond Hall Manor received to Michaelmas, 1726, for 
I year only. 

Mrs. EUz. Buckenham 

Mr. George Brook 

Jon. Golsboroiigh 

Mr. Partridge L**. Coveney 

Mr. Ward . . 

J no. Smith . . 

Wm.Gaell .. 

Wm. Cutbort 

Joseph Bragg 

Wm. Deekes 

Esq. Powis . . 

Rev. Wm. Golly his part for Pond and Tops. Manors 

1 II 9 
Arms of D'Oyly : Gules, three bucks' heads caboshed Arg. attired Or. 



i 


s. 


d. 


00 


I 


00 


00 


I 


08 


00 





6 


00 


5 


10 


00 


4 


3 


00 


I 





00 





2 


00 


I 





00 





6 


00 


3 


2 


00 





6 


00 


12 


2 



Manor of Toppesfield or Toppesfield Hall. 

Among the lands of Archbishop Lanfranc was a manor which had 
formerly been held by a freewoman named Leveva, consisting of 2 carucates 
of land, 2 bordars (which at the time of the Survey had increased to 5), 
I serf, 2 ploughteams, 5 acres of meadow, and i mill. Also 7 sheep (which 
at the time of the Survey had increased to 34), 3 beasts, and i rouncy. 
The value was 60s., formerly having been 40s. Out of this land Leveva 



i64 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

gave half a carucate to Holy Trinity after her death, in return for another 
half carucate which she held of the archbishop in her Ufetime. This 
agreement was made in the time of the Confessor, and Leveva was Hving in 
King WiUiam's time, and was seised thereof. This land John, the nephew 
of Waleran, claimed. The soc and sac of it all belonged to the Abbot 
of Bury.' 

.Another holding among these lands of the archbishop consisted of 
20 acres, formerly held by a freeman,^ over whom Uluric, the predecessor 
of the Abbot of Bury, had commendation and soc in the time of the 
Confessor, and half a ploughteam, valued at 3s. id. 

This manor seems in the time of Hen. HI. to have belonged to Gilbert 
de Kirkeby and Lauretia or Letitia, his wife, and they had a grant of a 
market and fair here in 1252.^ There appears to have been a fine affecting 
at least a part of the manor in 1250 between Geoffrey de Percy and this 
Gilbert de Kirkeby and his wife. Gilbert de Kirkeby appears to have died 
before 1276, and this year we find on the Patent RoUs an action between 
William de Fankhem and John de Kirkeby and Margaret his wife touching 
a tenement in Hadleigh.* A fine of the manor was levied in 1283 between 
John de Kyrkeby and Margaret his wife and Lord de Ros.^ Amongst the 
ancient deeds of the Court of Chancery in the Public Record Ofhce is a 
grant in the 13th century by Philip Basset and Lady Lora de Ros of a 
market in Hadleigh (which had been annulled or put down according to the 
law and custom of England on the presentment of Sir Nicholas de Turzy 
and his fellow justices itinerant at Catteshall, Suffolk, in 1269) for her hfe, 
with remainders to Sir Robert Kokerel and Joan his wife, daughter and 
heir of the said Lora, and the heirs of the said Lora.* 

Joan disposed of the manor during her life to John de Kirkby, of Horton, 
and Margaret his wife. The transaction was the cause of a long suit 
between John de Kirkby and Cicely, late wife of Sir William Cokerel. The 
latter was enfeoffed in this manor upon the payment of 180 marks, and 
the defeasance of a recognisance for ;f 400 by John de " Kyrkeby " to the said 
William in 1343. On Sir William Cockerel and his widow Cecily's death, 
the manor passed to their daughter and coheir, Mary, married to Sir William 
de Clop ton, and the suit with Sir John de Kirkby seems to have continued, 
for amongst the ancient deeds of the Court of Chancery in the Public Record 
Office is another defeasance respecting the manor made in 135 1. It is for 
£200 by Sir Johnde" Kyrkiby," described as of Horton, Knight, to William 
Fitz Walter, of Clopton, and entered into in connection with the settle- 
ment of the suit between the said John and Cecily, late the wife of Sir 
William " Cokerel," by which, if the said John enfeoffed the said William of 
the Manor of Toppesfield within a specified time, William paying to John 
180 marks, the said recognisance should be void.'' In 1369 a fine was 
levied of a third part of the manor in which William de Bury and Alice his 
wife were plaintiffs and William de Clopton sen. deforciant.^ 

The feoffment referred to in the above defeasance seems to have been 
effected, for on Sir William Clopton's death in 1376 the manor passed under 
his will dated " Die Jovis in festo Sancti Vincentii martiris 1376," to his 
third son, Walter de Clopton. 

'Dom. ii. 3726. 5 Feet of Fines, li Edw. 1. 27. 

'lb- 6C. 204. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 36 Hen. III. 10; Charter ^ 24 Edw. III. C. 2482. 

confirming P.S.A. iv. 144. » Feet of Fines, 42 Edw. III. 39. 
♦Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 24^. 



HADLEIGH. 165 

The devise was " Itenij lego Waltero filio meo in Manerio de Toppisfeld 
in villa de Hadleye unam carucam cum bestiis et toto apparatu, decern 
quarteria frumenti, decern quarteria hordei, decern quarteria pisarum, et 
decern quarteria avense." 

Walter de Clopton, who was not the eldest son of Sir William, married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Pygot, and had two daughters— Alice, 
married to Thomas Bendish, of Steeple Bumpstead, and Elizabeth, married 
to John Barwick. Elizabeth, the widow, remarried Sir John Howard, 
Knt., and subject to her life interest the manor appears ultimately to have 
passed to Sir William Clopton, of Kentwell, son of Sir Thomas Clopton, of 
KentweU, brother of Sir William, the father of Sir Walter, the deceased. 

Amongst the Essex Suffolk Charters in the Bodleian we find a quit 
claim in 1412 by William, son of Edward Clopton, to Sir John Howard, Sir 
Walter Clopton, Sir Gerard Braybrook, Sir William, son of Sir Thomas 
Clopton, and John Bryan, sen., of all his right in the " Manor of Hadleigh, 
called Topesfield Hall," after the death of Elizabeth, consort of the said 
Walter Clopton, for the lives of Alice and Elizabeth, daughters of the said 
Walter and Elizabeth.' This WiUiam Clopton making the quit claim was 
the son of Sir Edmund, elder brother of Sir Walter, and he died without 
issue, and the William Clopton to whom the release was made was the eldest 
son of Sir Thomas Clopton, of Kentwell. 

We learn further from the Harleian Rolls in the British Museum' 
that there were disputes as to the title to this manor in the time of Hen. 
VI., and in 1422 we find amongst the Essex Charters in the Bodleian two 
quit claims, one by Sir Gerard Braybroke to Robert Caundyish, Thomas 
Mylde, John Smyth, and Gilbert Morell, of all right in the " manor of 
Topesfeld given to them after the death of Elizabeth Clopton by William 
Clopton of Melford, and John Brian of Hadleigh."^ 

The second quit claim is by William Clopton, son and heir of Sir Thomas 
Clopton to Elizabeth, who was the wife of Sir Walter Clopton and Alice 
Bendyssh, daughter of the said Walter, of all right in the manor.* 

Five years later the manor had passed to William de Clopton, for in 
1438 he granted to 24 trustees land called Church croft belonging to the 
Manor of Toppesfield Hall, with a building therein used as the market- 
house, and all the liberties, rights, and customs belonging to the market 
and fairs except the assize of bread, and all waifs, strays, forfeitures, &c., 
to be held by them and their heirs at the yearly rent of 6s. 8d. The property 
and privileges comprised in this grant have been transferred from time to 
time to new trustees upon trust that the rents and profits should be 
employed for the relief of the poor, the reparation of the church, and other 
public uses. The trust property comprises the town hall, corn exchange, 
and various other buildings in and near the Market Place, let for about 
£120 a year. The trustees also derive about £40 or ^^50 from stallage, &c. 
A new scheme was in 1850 sanctioned by the Court of Chancery for the 
future application of this trust, and the trustees were empowered to estab- 
lish a school for 40 poor boys, with a yearly salary of £50 for the school- 
master, and to allow £2 each per annum to the 12 occupants of the alms- 
houses in the churchyard. They have also built a new town hall adjoi(ning 
the old one. 



' 13 Hen. IV. Bodl. Essex Ch. 200. ^i Hen. VI., Bodl. Essex Ch. 201. 

'Harl. Rolls, i. 14. */&. 202. 



2 



i66 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1470 William de Clopton sold the manor to Thomas Bendish. The 
manor appears next to have vested in Edward D'Oyly^who died in 1534-5/ 
when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Henry D'Oyly, and on his death 
in 1563 went to his son, Henry D'Oyly. Davy says that in 1602 " the site 
of the manor was held by Nicholas Strutt, and on his death passed to his 
son and heir, Nicholas Strutt." But the manor on Henry D'Oyly's death 
certainly passed to his son, Edmund D'Oyly, who was High Sheriff of Nor- 
folk in 1604, and the writer has seen Court Rolls of the Manor of Courts held 
by this Edmund, the 2nd Nov. 1577; 15th Oct. 1588; and 27th May, 1589. 
these being in existence and in private hands. 

He died in Oct. 1612, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir 
Henry D'Oyly. He does not seem to have held any courts, these being 
held by Charles Vesey and Catherine his wile, as follows : 7th April, 1615; 
28th March, 1616; loth June, 1617; nth Sept. 1617 ; 5th Oct. 1618; 30th 
March, 1619 ; icJth Dec. 1619 ; and 27th Sept. 1621. From this we are 
inclined to infer that Catherine, the 2nd wife of the last Edmund D'Oyly, 
took the manor in dower or under a settlement or her husband's will for 
life, and that she had remarried Charles Vesey. A? Sir Henry D'Oyly 
died in 1616 he would therefore never have enjoyed the lordship. Sir 
Henry's ?on and heir, Edmund D'Oyly, no doubt had the manor on the death 
of his grandmother, and we find he held his first court 4th April, 1637. He 
most likely also held the court (the Court Rolls, however, do not give the 
name of the lord) 13th March, 1637. He died 28th Sept. 1638, and the 
manor went to his widow, Bridget, who held a court 26th Sept. 1639, and 
probably also 14th Jan. 1639 ; 9th April, 1640 ; and 8th July, 1640, though 
the names of the holders of the last three courts do not appear on the 
Court Rolls. On Bridget's death, the manor passed to Edmund's only 
child, Susan, who died young. A court for the manor was held 5th April, 
1642, by John Buxton and Edward Cooke, no doubt as trustees on behalf 
of the infant. 

The manor then passed to Sir William D'Oyly, eldest son of William 
the brother of Sir Henry D'Oyly, who had died in 1616. He probably 
held a court for the manor 24th Oct. 1648, though the name of the lord does 
not appear on the Rolls, and certainly under his name courts were held as 
follows : 13th Apl. 1649 ; 15th Oct. 1651 ; 15th Oct. 1652 ; 8th Apl. 1657 ; 6th 
Apl. 1658; I2th Oct. 1658; i8thOct. 13 Car. II.; 15th Jan. 13 Car. H.; 7th 
June, 1662; ist Oct. 1662; 3rd Nov. 15 Car. II.; 2nd Jan. 1668; and 13th Oct. 
1670. He died in 1677. Davy makes Sir Denner Strutt, Bart, lord" 
in 1655, and in 1658 Philip Eldred. Sir Denner Strutt was the son of John 
Strutt and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heir of Edward Denner, of 
Little Warley, in Essex. It is possible that Sir Denner Strutt was a 
mortgagee in possession, and held a court in 1655, and this may have misled 
Davy. It is curious that in the Court Rolls the writer has seen there is 
no entry between 1652 and 1657. 

In 1726 the manor was in Richard Berney. In 1735 the manor was 
vested in the Right Hon. Lionel, 4th Earl of Dysart, and he held courts as 
follows : 25th Nov. 1735; 9th Oct. 1736; 4th Oct. 1738; 30th Aug. 1739 ; 
29th Aug. 1740 ; 6th April, 1742 ; 17th Dec. 1747 ; and 9th Aug. 1748. 

All the Court Rolls above referred to are in existence and in private 
hands, having been seen by the writer. 

'See Pond Hall Manor, in Hadleigh. ^He was a delinquent in 1651 (S.P. 1651, 

com. for nioney advance 1386). 



HADLEIGH. 



167 



In .1855 this manor belonged to the Rev. Edward Daniel, from whom 
it passed to the Rev. Richard Daniel, rector of Combs, who sold the same 
to John Frederick Robinson, from whose mortgagees the manor was 
acquired in October, 1880, by, and the same is now vested in, Charles James 
Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

The following are accounts of payments of rents for this manor for 
several years to Michaelmas, 1726, and also of rents received for one year 
to Michaelmas, 1726: — 



Payments of Rents for Toppesfield Manor to Michaelmas, 1726, for 

several years. 



1726. 
Dec. 19. 

26. 
Jan. 20. 

Feb. 8. 
13- 

1727 
June 2. 
July 28. 



Reed, of Mat. Davey for Esq. Dewtrys Have 

now y^ Chequer for 8 years . . 
of Tho. Cock for 2 years 
of Mrs. Barrel Wid. for her hop ye 8 years . . 
of Mr. Dubbell 2 years Cosford Manor 
of Wm. Clover senr. for Ben. Clover? 7 years. . 
of Mr. Sam Goshawk for 9 years of Babing- 

ton Close at i6s. 8^. per ann. &c. 

of Jon. Golding jun. for Sd. Spells 2 years 
Reed, of Mr. Isaachs for 13 years and ^ lords 

rent, being jd. remaining moiety of Lady 

Land Wood . . 

Reed, att the same time of Mr. J . Dood 4 for 

I a years of ye same wood, due on Michael 

last . . 



d. 



9 


4 


5 


4 


8 





8 





2 


4 



7 10 o 



O' 10 o 



2 16 O 



Hadleigh, Toppesfield Hall. 



12 13 o 



Rents of Toppesfield Hall Manor Reed, to Michaelmas, 1726, for i year. 

Mr.Quinton , . 
Lt. J. Dowman 
Jno. Lulpeck 
Lt. Mr. Bonds 
Isaac Peeck 
Mr. Jon. Deve 
Wm. Rand 
Mr.Clark 
Mr. Gregory 
Mr. Wilson 
Mr. Johnson 
Isaac Sponer 



7 


2 


I 





I 


6 


2 


II 


I 





4 


3 


4 


4 


7 


2 


3 





I 







8 


I 


2 



Reed, of Ben, Coleman for a year Quit Rent of a Baror 
on Hill Street Lt. Mrs. Jo. Coleman or Mrs, Pinchams . . 



I 15 



o 10 



Total I 16 o 



i68 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Jo. Bragg . . 

Mr. Partridge 

Mr. Dawson . . 

Mr. Thos. Martin 

Dr. Wallace 

Esq. Powis . . 

Robt. Peason 

Robt. Norriss 

Jo. Glanfield. . 

Thos. Seaker 

J no. Turner 

James Reason 

The Meeting house 

Mrs. Jon. Parsons 

Mr. Ed. Buckenham 

Robt. Reason 

Jo. Bragg . . 

J no. Spells . . 

Esq. Power . . 

The Collector for ye Poors 

The Bayliff of ye market 

Dr. Wilkin . . 

Mr. Canychin 

Mr. Whiting 

Hen. White .. 

School meadow 

R. Reason Lt youngs 

Jno. Anne . . 

Jo. Bragg . . 

Wm. Reed . . 

Ben. Coleman 



lands 



£ s. 


d. 


I 





7 


6 


I 
I 


9 
6 


2 


II 


14 





3 







01 


2 
2 


4 
8 




6 




8 




6 


8 


2 




4 


2 







II 


I 


2 


6 


74 


I 5 
8 


3 

8 




8 


6 
3 


5 
5 
8 
6 


5 







2 


5 





I 


7 




II 



5 15 5i 



Note. — There were other payments for several years. 

Manor of Mauser's or Hadleigh in Hadleigh. 

This was probably the manor of which Walter de Bermyngham, of the 
inheritance of John de AveningtoUj died seised in 135 1.' 

On the Patent Rolls in 1386 we find mention of Amfelota, late wife of 
WiUiam Maunser, of Hadleigh, and John, son of William Maunser.^ 

In the time of Hen. VH. the manor was vested in John Timperley, the 
elder, who died in 1491. In the inquisition p.m. of this John Timperley, 
the property he died seised of is described as Manor called Mausers, and 
water mill worth lOos., and other lands in Hadleigh and Aldham, and 
another tenement called " Hadleys " in Hadleigh, held of the prior of Christ 
Church, in Canterbury.^ Sir John Timperley, was at the time of hit father's 
death, 46 years of age, and on his own death the manor passed to his nephew 
and heir, William Timperley, who died ist April, 1527,* when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Timperley. 



'I.P.M., 24 Edw. III. 106. 

'Pat. Rolls, 10 Rich. II. pt. i. 47. 



n.VM.., 8 Hen. VII. 809. 
n.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 15. 



HADLEIGH. 169 

The manor in the inquisition p.m last referred to is stated to have been 
held of the Manor of Combs by service unknown, and was valued at £10, 
and on the death of Thomas Timperley in 1593 vested in his son and heir, 
Nicholas Timperley. Nicholas' died in 1624, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Thomas Timperley, and on his death 29th April, 165 1, 
went to his son and heir, Michael Timperley. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1652 is a petition from Nicholas Timperley, 
uncle ot Michael, for Thomas, Michael's son and heir, that Michael, being only 
tenant for life, may be stayed from felling all the timber and pulling down 
the houses on the estate, as he threatened to do, and the following year 
Michael begs that some other lands may be set out for his third of his estate 
sequestered for recusancy, the lands in Hadleigh, valued at £80 a year, 
set out for him, being recovered by law from his tenant.^ Michael Timperley 
in 1653 also prays an order on his trustees, Sir Henry and Henry Beding- 
field, and his uncle Nicholas Timperley, to bring in the deeds whereby his 
father and he conveyed their lands to them, Nicholas Timperley having 
thereby recovered Hadleigh from petitioner.^ From this time to 1705 the 
manor passed in the same course as that of Hintlesham, in Samford Hundred. 
Thomas Timperley held his first court in 1661, and on his death the manor 
vested in Sir Philip Parker, Bart., John Hodges, and John Jermy, no doubt 
as trustees, and they held their first court in 1680. 

In 1699 the manor was vested in Susannah Timperley, widow, as 
mother and guardian of Henry Timperley, then a minor, and in this year 
she held her first court. In 1705 a first court was held for Henry Timperley 
by his guardian. 

The manor then seems to have been acquired by Sir Richard Lloyd, 
Baron of the Exchequer, who purchased also the Manor of Hintlesham, 
and died in 1761 ; and from this time to the present the manor has passed 
in the same course as that of Hintlesham, in Samford Hundred, and is now 
vested in Lieut.-Col. Robert Hamilton Lloyd Anstruther, of Hintlesham 
Hall. 

The manor was offered for sale by public auction, i6th June, 1908, and 
the free rents were then stated to amount to is. 2^. only, and the quit 
rents to i6s. gd. 

CosFORD Hall. 

In 1370 the manor appears to have been vested in Bernard Donate 
and Cecilia his wife, and against them this year a fine was levied by John 
de Freton, parson of Great Snoriny Church, in Norfolk, William Reed, 
clerk, and Thomas de Milford.* 

In 1398 the manor was vested in John Hermesthorp, Master of the 
College of St. Katherine, London, Roger Wolverston, and others, for this 
year they enfeoffed Edward Leget and Joan his wife, daughter of John 
Jernegan, of Somerleyton, and amongst the Additional Charters in the 
British Museum is an appointment of attorneys to deliver seisin accordingly.^ 
It is dated 6th May, 21 Rich. II. From Edward Leget the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Edward Leget, against whom a fine was levied of the 
manor, and also of the advowson of Whatfield Church, in 1423, by William 
Clopton, Robert Cavendysh, Thomas Martell, Augustus Denten, Thomas 
Benet, John Holt, and Robert Clopton.* Five years later we meet with 

'For the alliances of the Timperleys, see ^S.P. 1653; Cal. of Comp. 2134. 

Hintlesham Manor in Samford *Feet of Fines, 44 Edw. III. 18. 

Hundred. ^Add. Ch. 10571. 

*S.P., Cal. of Comp. 2133. ^peet of Fines, i Hen. VI. 3. 

X 



170 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



another fine of the manor levied by Robert Clopton, of London^ against 
Thomas, son of Elminger Leget, described as late of Essex.' 

This manor belonged to Edward D'Oyly, who died seised of it 25th 
Jan. 1534/ when it passed to his son, Sir Henry D'Oyly, against whom a 
fine was levied in 1544 by John Freman.^ Sir Henry D'Oyly, however, 
died seised of the manor in 1564. From this time to 1821, when it was 
vested in Louisa, Countess of Dysart, it went with Pond Hall Manor, the 
devolution of which has been already given. 

About i860 the manor vested in the Rev. Richard Daniel, who sold 
to John Frederick Robinson, of Hadleigh Hall, and it was sold by his 
mortgagees in 1880. 

Court Rolls for the manor held 26th Oct. 1648; i6th Oct. 1651; i6th 
Oct. 1652; 26th April, 1653; 27th Sept. 1655; and 17th April, 1657, are still 
preserved in private hands. 

The following is a copy of a rental of this manor in 1726. 

Hadleigh Cosford Hall Manor. 

Reed, for i year to Michaelmas, 1726 
Mr. Tweed . . 
Mr. Green 
Mr. Jennings 
Mr. Parsons 
Jno. Cook 

Wm. Cousins by a year's tax 2s. and in money 
Mrs. Ann Lodge 
Mr. Edmd. Stubbin 
Jo. Glanfield. . 
Mr. Robert Martin . . 
Mr. Mayhew 
Wm. Cobbold 
Mr. Livermore 
Mr. Burkit . . 
Mr. Snelling . . 
Wid. Jacob . . 
Wid. Keeble 

Total of ye abovesd . . . . . . 6 17 2 

The following is an account of quit rents of the manor of Pond Hally 
Toppesfleld Hall, and Cosford, when in the hands of Richard Berney in 
1725 :— 

An account of what Sums of Money and what Persons L J. 
Miller have Reed. Quit Rents, the Manors of Pond Hall, Topsfield Hall, 
and Cosford, forming part of the Estate of Richard Berney Esq. 

£ s. d. 
Aug. 2. Reed, of Mdme. Dawson for b years Quit Rent 

of her dwellinghouse due at Michls. last . . 00 8 00 
Oct. I. Reed, of Mr. Isaacks for Mr. Mayhews fine 

of Sr. Jo. Colemans. . . . . . . . i 5 00 

Also 7 years Quit Rent of ye same Estate 

at 5s. 3^. p. annum. . . . . . . . i 16 9 

Of Mr. Robert Reason for a Quit Rent . . 10 6 



I 


s. 

16 


d. 





2 





I 


I 


2 




18 


3 




13 
18 


4 



I 




8 


4 





I 


9 




10 







I 







I 







2 







I 


4 
8 

4 




2 






' Feet of Fines, 6 Hen. VI. 35. 
«1.P.M., 26 Hen. VIH. 103. 



3 Fine, Easter, 36 Hen. VHI. 



HADLEIGH. 



171 



Dec. 



Of Mr. Jon. Dove for his own messuages 
Of Mr. Jn. Dove for the Poor of Hadleigh 
Of Mr. Everet for Mr. Partridge's estate 
Of Mr. Jno. Bunn for the Rowe of houses in 

Churchyard Wide 
Of Mdme. Dawson 
Of Hen. White 
Of Isaac Peck . . 
Of Wm. Rand .. 
Of John Lulpeal 
Of Mr. Ed. Buckenham 
Of Jos. Dowman 
Of Jon. Golsborough 
Oct. 2. Of Mr. Robt. Martin for 2 years Rent 
Of ye Widd. Jacobs for 2 years 
Of Robt. Morrington for Lt. Hudsons ftow 

Mr. Tho. Green 
I. Reed, of Mr.Winde for 8 years Rent of Rush 

feld, i.e. Ed. Bonds. . 
4. Of James Reason 

Of Wm. Cobbold of Whatfield 
18. Of Mr. Edmd. Stubbin for 11 years 

25. Of James Amrid for 7 years . . 
Of Mr. Johnson for 2 years 

2nd page 

26. Reed, of Thos. Seeker for 2 years 
Of Mr. EUsa Buckenham 1 year 
Of Mr. J . Newman for Mr Clarke meadow i 

year . . 
Of Jon. Golding for 9 years of Mr. Whiting's 

land . . 
Of Dr. Wallace for 8 years Qt. Rent . . 
Of Mr. Tho. Martin one year . . 
Of Wm. Baker of ye Ivey Tree i year 
Of Jo. Clanfield a year and J , . 
Of Jon. Cook I year . . 
Of Robt. Archer 2 years 
Of Tho. Cutbert for Mr. Jennings i year 
Of Mr. James Martin for Mrs. Lodger estate . . 
Of Wm. Cozens 2 years in money 3s. bd. in 

Taxes 2s. for 40s. . . 
Of J. Bragg 7 years of a Tenement at iii. 

per ann. and 2 years of the rest 
Of Jon. Turner for 2 years of the market 

Rent 17s. gd., and for 2 years of Mr. 

Quintons 4s. /\d. and two years of his own 

in Dools use . . 
Of Mr. Deekes for 10 years of a piece of land 

Lt. Thos. Hunlakes where stood 2 Tenemts 

and I year of his own 
22. Of Mr. Cutbert for 7 years of ye school house 

and 6 years of the meadow , , 



28. 

29. 

30. 
2. 

9- 
II. 

13- 



19. 
20. 



21. 



4 

5 

13 


d. 
3 
3 

4 


6 





I 



4 
8 


2 





4 

I 







o o 



I 


3 


I 




I 







I 





4 


8 







I 


2 




I 


4 




5 


4 




I 







7 


2 


2 


17 


9 


I 


3 


4 




I 


6 




2 







6 


I* 




13 


4 




4 





I 


I 


2 


2 





8 



I 16 o 
19 5 

I 12 8 

172 
10 



172 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Dec. 



Jan. 



27. 



4- 
12. 

IS- 



1725-6. 
Feb. 15. 

21. 



Mar. II. 



12. 
13- 



Of Mr. Tonyson for Mr. Mayhews i year 
Of Thos. Glanfield for Mrs. Burketts 16 years 
Of Jo. Bragg for the Meeting house 2 yr. 
Of Robt. Blois for Mr. Parsons i year 
Of Mr. Campton 9 years for his messuage 
Of Mr. Quintrill for Mr. Beaumonds 7 years 
Of Wm. Clover for 8 years 
Of Dr. Wilkins for 2 years 

Sum of ye abovesd. 

Brought over . . 

Part of the next succeeding Page 

Pd. at Thetford 
[Succeeding Page.] 



s. 


d 


I 





5 


4 


I 





18 


.3 


8 


9 


8 


2 


12 


8 


I 


4 



18 





I* 


14 


3 


II 


7 07 


II 



39 II Hi 

5 4 
16 4 



Received of Mr. J no. Parsons for 8 years Quit 

Rent . . 
Of Mr. Ward for 6 years of Lt. Howes 19.00] 

and for 16 years of Hauches Lt. Wid.[ 

Wilkinsons 17. 4 . . . . . . . , j 

Of Abrm. Abbott for i6yrs of J. Smiths Lt. W 

Scot. . . 
Of Mrs. Snelling 10 years 
Of Mr. Norriss 6 years 
Of Ben. Coleman i year 
Of Mr. Gaell 9 years , . 
Of Mr. Buddie for his Lt. Father's estate 

due at Michaelmas 1724, and a Relief in 

all 8 years 

Carried to ye foregoing side , . . . 7 07 11 



16 00 

16 8 

6 

II 

I 6 



10 8 




HITCH AM. 173 

HITCH AM. 

|HERE were several holdings here belonging to the Abbot of 
Ely. One formerly consisted of eleven carucates of land, 
30 villeins, 18 bordars, 8 serfs, 4 ploughteams in demesne, 
20 ploughteams belonging to the men, and 16 acres of meadow. 
Also wood sufficient to support 20 hogs, 11 rouncies, 30 
beasts, 175 sheep, 60 hogs, 42 goats, and 2 hives of bees. 
Also a church with 2 acres, the value of the whole being 
£20. At the time of the Survey the details were altered. The villeins 
had increased to 36, the bordars to 26, and the ploughteams in demesne 
were reduced to 2. The value had doubled. 

It was a league and 4 quarentenes long and a league broad, and paid 
in a gelt 15^. In the time of the Confessor it was held by the Abbot of 
Ely, and others had holdings here. 

The second holding was that of Roger Bigot, who held of the Abbot of 
Ely 60 acres, 2\ ploughteams (which became i at the time of the Survey), 
and 3 acres of meadow, valued at los., formerly held by 5 socmen. 

In the same township were 123 acres of demesne land, 3 bordars, i 
ploughteam, and i| acres of meadow, valued at los. Also 40 acres valued 
at 5s. held at the time of the Survey by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, of 
the Abbot of Ely, and formerly by i socman.' 

Among the lands of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, at the time of the 
Survey were some holdings here. One was held of him by Ailward, son of 
Bell, and consisted of i carucate of land, 4 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams 
(which at the time of the Survey had become i), and 4 acres of meadow, 
valued at 20s. This had formerly been held by 2 freemen. 

The second holding was of 60 acres, 2 ploughteams (becoming i at 
the time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los., formerly 
held by 14 freemen.'' 

There is an entry under Babergh Hundred in the Domesday Survey 
which probably belongs to Cosford-Loos. This was a hamlet of Hitcham. 
It wiU be found amongst the entries of the lands of Ranulf Peverell, and 
consisted of a carucate and a half of land which Leustan held under the 
Confessor. It was " God's carucate " in the soc of Holy Trinity, in Canter- 
bury. 

There were in Saxon times 6 bordars, 2 slaves, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and none belonging to the men, 10 beasts, 30 hogs, and 74 sheep, valued at 
40S. By the time of the Survey though the value remained the same, the 
slaves had gone, and the horses, the beasts, the hogs, and the sheep had all 
disappeared. The length was half a league and the breadth 4 quarentenes, 
and it paid in a gelt id} 

Manor of Hitcham, 

The lordship of the place belonged in the time of Edward the Con- 
fessor to the Abbot of Ely, and later vested in the bishop of that See. 

An interesting action will be found in the Abbreviation of Pleas in the 
first year of King John. It is brought by Abbot Sampson against Sir 
Osbert de Wachesham for having unlawfully raised gallows and hung a 
man in Hitcham against the liberties of Bury St. Edmunds. The Bishop 

'Dom. ii. 3846, 385. ^Dom. ii. 4166. 

^Dom, ii, 391, 3976. 



174 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Ely having vouched to warrantry justifies under liberties granted by 
King Edgar to the church of St. Etheldreda.' 

The advowson was appendant to the manor, and the bishop presented 
until 1561, when Queen Elizabeth took the manor into her own hands in 
exchange for some impropriation in Cambridgeshire, and then first pre- 
sented, and the patronage has since remained in the Crown. 

In 1597 a lease was granted of the site of the manor to Margaret Grey, 
widow, and her sons, Wingfield and Anthony, for their three lives at the 
rent of ;£i4. 145. /{d., fine £14. 14s. 4^. f and in 1599 a survey was made 
of Her Majesty's woods in Hitcham Manor,^ and again in 1604." 

The Queen had the manor in dower in 1603,' and the same year it was 
leased to Sir Robert Hitcham for life. 

Ministers' Accounts of the bishop's temporalities in Hitcham in 14 
Edw. I. and 26 to 28 Edw. I. will be found in the Public Record Office.^ 
And an inquisition of lands of the Bishop of Ely here in the 30 Edw. HI. 
will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum.' There 
is amongst the State Papers in 1611 a letter to Sir Geo. Waldegrave to 
preserve the King's pheasants at Hitcham Manor.* A lease was in 1619 
granted of the manor to Sir Robert Houghton,® but he seems to have 
obtained the reversion. Sir Robert, who was a serjeant-at-law, died seised 
of the manor in 1623, when it passed to his son and heir, Francis Houghton, 
who died in 1629, when it went to his son and heir, Robert Houghton, who 
was living in 1644. In 1648 Giles Andrews had a grant of the manor, and 
amongst the State Papers in 1656-7 will be found amounts for procuring 
timber from him out of woods in Hitcham.'" 

Giles Andrews died unmarried and intestate, and was buried 26th 
May, 1670, when the manor passed to his brother, John Andrews, who died 
without issue, but made a settlement of his Hitcham property upon Ambrose 
Andrews, of Wen don, co. Essex, son of Giles Andrews, and as to two- thirds 
to his (Ambrose's) son John. John Andrews, the settlor, seems to have 
died before 1682, when the manor passed to his widow and executrix 
Mary, and subject to her interest went under the limitations of the settle- 
ment, and Ambrose Andrews was lord in 1688, and his son John in 1708, 
when an Act of Parliament (13 Anne) was obtained for sale of the estates. 

Before 1728 the manor passed to Thomas Buck, for this year he held 
his first court for the manor. In 1762 it was vested in Ebenezer Maurice. 
He died in 1787, and devised the manor to his great-nephew by marriage, 
Robert Mapletoft, infant son of Robert Mapletoft, son of Robert, who had 
married his (Maurice's) sister, and it vested in the Rev. Edmund Mapletoft, 
clerk, and Margaret his wife, late widow of Robert Mapletoft the elder, as 
guardians of the infant. Robert Mapletoft the younger resided at Stan- 
stead, and 31st Oct. 1808 married Lucia, 2nd daughter of William Henry 
Haggard, of Spring Hall, near Long Melford, but by 1811 the manor had 
passed to Robert Clarke, according to the Davy MSS. Page, however, 
writing in 1847, states that the manor was still vested in Robert Mapletoft, 
of Spring Hall, in Stanstead, who was also the owner of Hitcham Hall, and 
a large commodious farm house, and of Plains Farm and 102 acres of wood. 

'Abb. of PI., I John, Mich. 7. ^Add. 6165. 

= State Paper, 1597, P- 46i- *S.P. 1611, p. 95. 

^Exch. Spec. Com. 41 Eliz., D.K.R. ^S.P. 1619, p. 58. See Brettenham Hall 
38 App. p. 61. Manor, in this Hundred, and Liffey 

*Ib. 74- Hall, Buxhall, in Stow Hundred. 

'Grant i Jac. I, Add. 6693. "S.P. 1656, p. 518, 
^Bundle 1 132, No. 9, 10, 



HITCHAM. 175 

The manor was offered for sale in 1843, when the average amount of fines 
for the previous 40 years were stated to have exceeded £160 per annum 
and the quit rents were £49 per annum, subject to a fee farm rent payable 
to the Marquis Camden of £61. 10s. yd. With the manor were offered : 
The Hitcham Hall farm, 220a. 2r. 22p. ; the Plains farm, 155a. or. 35p. ; 
and Hitcham Wood, 102a. ir. i6p.' 

The manor is now vested in Mr. Charles James Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1603 will be found a letter of Edmund 
Poley, steward of Hitcham Manor, which office was claimed by Robert 
Hitcham.^ And an action as to the manor, customs, survey, &c., by 
Margaret Gage, widow of WiUiam , Burwicke, and others is to be found 
amongst the Exchequer Depositions (taken at Hitcham in 1607-8) in the 
Public Record Office. 

Manor of Witherton al. Witherton's (Barrards and Mantons.) 

This probably was the name only after the Manor of Manton came into 
the same hands as the Manor of Witherton, for Manton was certainly from 
the Conquest to the opening of the 17th century held as a distinct lordship. 
The first lord we find notice of was a Richard Witherton, and later 
the manor vested in Sir John Clere, who held in 1542, when it was 
acquired from him and others by Edmund Rous.^ It is stated that Sir 
Edmund Rous sold the manor to George Waldegrave, an attorney of the 
Common Pleas, the 2nd son of George Waldegrave and of Anne his wife, 
daughter of Sir Robert Drury, of Hawstead. This, however, seems doubtful, 
for the manor appears to have been acquired by George Waldegrave's 
widow, Mary Francis, daughter of Sir Richard Corbett, in 1557,^ six years 
after the death of her husband, who died ist August, 1551. She died 21st 
Nov. 1561, and is buried with her husband in Hitcham Church, with an 
inscription stating that they left behind them 5 sons — William, Richard, 
George, Edward, and Edmond, " which Mary Francis (the widow) caused 
this stone to be made by her executor." 

The manor passed on the death of Mary Francis Waldegrave in 1561 
to her eldest son, William Waldegrave, who married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Richard Poley, of Moorhouse, in Boxted. On his death in 1581 the manor 
passed to his son and heir. Sir George Waldegrave. 

He married ist Mary, 2nd daughter and coheir of John Moore, portman, 
of Ipswich, and had but two children. Amy, who died an infant, and Eliza- 
beth, who, 9th Feb. 1607, married Arthur Coke, to whom the manor passed 
on the death of Sir George Waldegrave, 15th Jan. 1636-7, in his 68th year. 
Arthur Coke had but four daughters — Elizabeth, Mary, Winifred, and 
Theophild. Sir George Waldegrave's 2nd wife was Elizabeth, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Jermy, of Metfield, K.B. She survived her husband, and lived 
to place upon his grave a tombstone, or, as she styles it, " small monument," 
a statement that she 

" Styal laments her losse 

And bidds these lynes declare 

His Piety, His Bounty to the Poore 

The Bench and County speaks his Publique care 

Employ' d and tryd for fourty years and more 

Late faithful mate, now blissfuU soul (quoth shee) 

Tho weeping for myself, to joy for thee."^ 

^ Ipswich Journal, 20th May, 1843. "tFine, Easter, 4 Mary I. 

«S.P. 1603, p. 52. 5 Martin MSS. 

3 Fine, Trin. 34 Hen. VIII. 



176 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Manton of Manton's. 

This was the lordship of the Abbot of St. Edmunds in Saxon times, 
and so continued until the Dissolution. The manor is mentioned in the 
Domesday Survey as a separate place, and it is stated that here and in 
Kettlebaston, the Abbot of St. Edmunds had 4 freemen holding 2 carucates 
of land, 6 acres of meadow, 8 bordars, and 3 serfs. They always ploughed 
with 3 teams, and could give and sell their land. The soc and commenda- 
tion and all customs belonged to the abbot. The value was 60s.' 

Under the Domesday entries in Babergh Hundred we find " Mane- 
tuna," specified in the lands of Ranulf Peverell, and this probably is an 
entry which should have come under the adjoining Hundred of Cosford. 
There was one freeman with 50 acres, and among them (that is, joining 
certain freemen in Acton, Waldingfield, and Honilega) they had 7 bordars. 
In Saxon times and later there had been5ploughteams,butatthe time of the 
Survey 4. The freemen were formerly valued at ^^4, but at the time of 
the Survey at 60s. Of them all, eleven could and four could not sell their 
lands, but of all of them Ranulf s predecessor in title had commendation" 
and soc, except one, which was in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 
Ranulf received them all as a land holding.^ 

On the Dissolution of the religious houses the manor passed to the 
Crown, and was granted in 1543 to Edward Elringtonand Hunsdon Metcalfe." 
They had licence to alien in 1544 to Thomas Foley, and he in 1548 to Ralph 
Chamberleyne, and he in 1561 to Robert Thorpe, and he in 1562 to Edmund 
Jermyn, and he in 1566 to William Honyng, who this year was called upon 
to show by what title he held this manor. ^ This William Honyng in 1569 
levied a fine of the manor against Robert Thorpe and others.^ 

From William Honyng^ the manor passed on his death in 1569 to his 
son and heir, Edward Honyng, who in 1576 sold the same to Edmund 
Withepole,* of Ipswich, and a claim for forfeiture was made upon him by 
the Crown the following year.^ He was lord of the Manor of Christchurch, 
and married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Hyne, of London. He died 
in 1582, his will being dated ist May and proved 26th May of that year, 
when the manor passed to his grandson and heir, Paul Withepole, eldest 
son of Paule Withepole, who had died in 1579 (^-^d was buried in St. Mar- 
garet's Church, Ipswich, gth Dec. that year), by Dorothy his wife, daughter 
of Thomas, Lord Wentworth, of Nettlestead, who afterwards remarried 
Sir Martin Frobisher. Paul Withepole died in 1585 without issue, his will 
being dated 3rd April, 27th Eliz., proved 14th April, 1585. The manor 
passed to his brother. Sir Edmond Withepole, of Ipswich, Knt., High 
Sheriff of Suffolk about 1601. 

He married Frances, eldest daughter of Sir William Cornwallis," and 
by his will dated nth Nov. 1619, proved 3rd Oct. 1621, devised the manor 
to his eldest son and heir. Sir William Withepole, of Rendlesham, Knt., 

' Dom. ii. 369. 6 Pine, Easter, 11 Eliz. 

2 Only ten freemen seem to have been ''See Manor of Carlton, in Hoxne Hundred. 

enumerated. ^Fine, Mich. 18-19 Eliz. 

3 Dom. ii. 416. 9 Memoranda Rolls, 19 Eliz., Pas. Rec. 
* Particulars of the farm of the manor for Rot. 18. 

grant to Edward Elrington will be '°A copy of her will is given in the E.A.N, 

found in the Public Record Office. and Q. x. 87. It bears date June, 

D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 206. 1625, and was proved in the P.C.C. 

= Memoranda Rolls, 8 Eliz., Mich. Rec. 6th May, 1626. 
Rot. 87. 



HITCHAM. 177 

who married Jane, daughter and heir of Sir Michael Stanhope, of Orford, and 
widow of Henry Raddiffe, Lord Fitzwater, eldest son of the Earl of Sussex. 
Sir William Withepole and others had licence to alien the manor to George 
Waldegrave. It should be mentioned that as early as 1595 a fine had been 
levied of the manor by George Waldegrave against Sir Edmond Withepole 
and others/ and one would always have thought that under this George 
Waldegrave had acquired the estate. George Waldegrave died in 1637, 
seised, when it went to his daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to Arthur 
Coke. 

A Bill was introduced into the House of Lords in 1660 [12 Car. IL] 
for confirming the sale of " Hitcham Manor " by Sir John Clarke and wife." 

Loose Hall or Loes Manor. 

Of this manor Davy supplies no lords, and little is known respecting 
it. It appears to have become extinct over 300 years since. In 1538 itwas 
the lordship of Sir Thomas Wyatt, who this year disposed of it to Sir Ralph 
Warren.^ In 1545 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by John Harwyn 
and others against Robert Spryng and others,* after which it appears to have 
passed to Sir John Crofte,^ and on his death, 15th January, 1557-8, passed 
to his son and heir, Edward Crofte.® Edward Crofte survived his father 
less than a month, and died 14th Feb. 1557-8, leaving Thomas Crofte, his 
son and heir, then aged 18 years.^ 

Shortly afterwards, the manor appears to have gone to the Spring 
family ; for in 1580 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by Robert 
Springe and others against Nicholas Springe and others.^ The estate known 
as " The Loose Hall Farm " was for many years in the possession of John 
Long, and 20th June, 1899, was offered for sale by his executors. It con- 
sisted of 394a. ir. i3p. in the parishes of Hitcham and Wattisham, and 
with this estate was purported to be sold " The Manor of, or reputed 
Manor of Loose Hall, with its rights, royalties, and appurtenances." 



' Fine, Mich. 37-38 Eliz. 5 See Manor of West Stow, in Blackbourn 
'^ House of Lords Journal, xi. 215, 219-222, Hundred. 

236. 6 1. P.M., 4 and 5 Ph. and M. 54. 

3 Fine, Mich. 30 Hen. VIII. 7 1.P.M., 4 and 5 Ph. and M. 21. 

4 Fine, HU. 37 Hen. VIII. ^Fine, Hil. 22 EHz. 



178 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




KERSEY. 

^MONG the lands of the abbey at Chateris was a holding in 
this place, consisting of 3|- carucates of land, 6 villeins, 18 
bordars, i serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 4 ploughteams 
belonging to the men, and 4 acres of meadow ; also wood 
sufficient for the support of 60 hogs, and a mill, a rouncy, 10 
beasts, 36 hogs, 140 sheep, and 3 hives of bees ; also a church 
with 3 acres. There was a socman with 2 acres, a free- 
man with 20 acres, a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow. This manor was 
formerly valued at £^, but at the time of the Survey at loos., and the 
freeman at 4s. less 4S. It was 4 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in 
a gelt y^d.^ 

The only other holding here was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, 
and consisted of 5 acres valued at lod., formerly held by a freeman. The 
predecessor of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had the soc and com- 
mendation.* 

Manor of Kersey. 

This was in the time of Hen. III. the lordship of Hubert de Roylli. 
He gave the manor to the King to secure his goodwill in a certain trespass 
he had committed against the King's peace, who in 1243 granted it to Philip 
Basset, of Wycombe, in Bucks. The grant is still in existence, and is dated 
Bordeaux, 20th April, 27 Hen. III.^ The manor was held of the king by 
the service of one pair of gilt spurs, price 6d. yearly, and the payment 
of ;^io yearly to the Prioress of Chateris, and of 8d. to the Prior of 
Canterbury. 

Philip Basset had agrantof a market here in 1253,"^ and died in 1272,' 
when Ela, his widow, claimed a. third as dower, which she released to Roger 
Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, and Aliva hi? wife, who was the daughter and heir 
of the said Philip Basset. 

Aliva, after Roger Bigot's death, remarried Hugh le Despencer. He 
was one of the barons to whom, after the Battle of Lewes, the custody of 
the captive monarch was entrusted, and to him was also given the guardian- 
ship of the castles of Orford, of Devises in Wilts, and Bernard Castle in the 
bishopric of Durham. He lost his life at the Battle of Evesham, and hi& 
estates were forfeited, but his widow, Aliva, for her father's sake, found 
favour with the King, and was allowed to retain a considerable portion of 
her husband's property, including this manor, which, on her death in 1281 
devolved, on the payment of a fine of five hundred marks, upon her son 
Hugh le Despencer the elder, so called to distinguish him from his son, who 
bore the same designation, both so well known in history as the favourites 
of Edw. II. 

Hugh le Despencer paid a fine of 2,000 marks to the King in 1287 for 
marrying without licence Isabel, daughter of William de Beauchamp, Earl 
of Warwick, and widow of Peter Cheworth. On the Patent Rolls in 1299 
we find a commission issued to inquire touching the persons who entered 
the manor of Hugh le Despencer at Kersey, fished in his stews, and carried 
away fish.^ 



' Dom. ii. 389. 
"Dom. ii. 3976. 

3 Cott. xi. 33 A. 3260. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 37 Hen. III. 9. 



5 Extent, I.P.M., 56 Hen. III. 31,01 File 

41 (20). 

6 Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. I. 26d, 23^. 



KERSEY. 179 

In 1310 we find on the Close Rolls an order not to intermeddle with 
the manor, it having come into the King's hands by seizure of lands of Hugh 
le Despencer the younger, and to restore same to Hugh le Despencer the 
elder.' 

There is on the Close Rolls in 1321 an order to deliver the manor to 
Gilbert de Eboraco, whom the King appointed to take into his hands the 
lands of Hugh le Despencer the younger.'' 

The fate of Hugh le Despencer the elder and the younger is well known, 
and on their execution in Oct. 1326 the manor was forfeited to the Crown. 

In the following year the manor was vested in Edmund of Woodstock, 
Earl of Kent, 3rd son of Edw. I., who married about 1327 Margaret, daughter 
of John Wake, ist Lord Wake, sister and heir of Thomas, 2nd Lord Wake, 
of LideU, widow of John Comyn, of Badenoch, and was beheaded 19th 
March, 1329-30, when the manor seems to have reverted to the Crown, who 
in 1331 granted it, with the advowson, to Thomas de Weston for life^ 
but the following year it was assigned in dower to Margaret, Countess 
Dowager of Kent,* and was subsequently held by Edmund Plantagenet, 
2nd Earl of Kent, son and heir of the last, who died unmarried in 1333, 
aged 5 years, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, John Planta- 
genet, 3rd Earl of Kent. He married Elizabeth, daughter of William 
Marquis of Juliers, and on his death without issue 27th Dec. 1352,^ it vested 
in his sister and heir, Joan, for her extraordinary beauty called ", the fair 
maid of Kent," married to Sir Thomas de Holand, K.G., 2nd son of Robert 
de Holand, istLord Holand. He was summoned to Parliament as a baron 
15th July, 1353, to 15th Feb. 1356-7, and as Earl of Kent 20th Nov. 1360.^ 
He died Dec. 28th 1360,' and his widow Joan survived and married^ 
Edward, the Black Prince, and was mother of King Richard II. She died 
8th July, 1385,^ when the manor went to her son and heir, Thomas de 
Holand, 2nd Earl of Kent, who distinguished himself greatly at the Battle of 
Castill, and upon the accession of his half-brother. King Rich. II. obtained 
a grant of £200 per annum out of the Exchequer, and was constituted 
general warden of all the forests south of Trent. The grant was subse- 
quently increased to £1,000 a year. He was afterwards (1380-5), made 
Marshal of England, but discharged of that office on its being confirmed on 
Thos. Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham. He married in 1366 Alice Fitz-Alan, 
eldest daughter of Richard, 5th Earl of Arundel, and dying 25th April, 
1397,'° the manor passed to his widow, Alice, in dower, who retained it until 
her death about 1416," when it went to their son and heir, Thomas, 3rd 
Earl of Kent, who, on the attainder of Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of 
Warwick, had a grant in special tail of the castle, manor, and lordship of 
Warwick, and other estates, and was created Duke of Surrey 29th Sept. 
1397, and Marshal of England 1398-99. 

He was also installed a Knight of the Garter this same year. Engaging 
in a conspiracy to subvert the government after the accession of the Duke 

I Close Rolls, 3 Edw. II. 10. ^The marriage was under Papal dispensa- 

' Close Rolls, 15 Edw. II. 16. tion loth Oct. 1361, for she was first 

^ O. 4 Edw. III. 6. cousin to the King, her intended 

■^R.P. 1331, ii. 445. husband's father. 

5I.P.M., 26 Edw. III. 54. si.P.M., with advowson of priory, Extent, 

^Joan had been divorced from her first 9 Rich. II. 54. 

husband, William Montacute, Earl 'oWill proved loth May, 1397 ; I.P.M., 20 

of Salisbury. Rich. II. 30. 

^I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 104. "Admin, at Lambeth, 30th May, 1416; 

I.P.M. 4 Hen. V. 51. 



i8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Lancaster as Hen. IV.^ he was taken prisoner and beheaded, with the 
Earl of Salisbury, by the populace, at Cirencester, 6th Jan. 1399-1400. 

Parliament passed an act of attainder by which his honours and lands 
became forfeited. He married Joan Stafford, daughter of Hugh, 2nd 
Earl of Stafford, but had no issue. His brother, Edmund Holand, appears 
to have succeeded to the Earldom of Kent, and had subsequently a special 
livery of certain castles, manors, and lands which had devolved upon him 
by virtue of an old entail made of them by his ancestors, but apparently 
this manor was not amongst them. However, he seems to have held this 
manor, and probably died seised, but without issue, i8th Sept. 1408, , 
when the Earldom of Kent became extinct, and this manor passed to 
Edmund Mortimer, 5 th Earl of March, eldest surviving son of Roger 
Mortimer, 4th Earl of March, who had married Alianore, daughter of Thomas 
Holand, 2nd Earl of Kent, and sister of Thomas, Duke of Surrey, and sister 
and coheir of Edmund, 4th Earl of Kent (both brothers having died without 
issue), the said Roger Mortimer having been slain in battle in Ireland in 
1398. (He did not therefore die, as Page states, seised of the manor, in 
the third year of Hen. VI.) 

Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, was but 6 years of age at the 
time of his father's decease, and was committed by King Hen. IV. to Henry, 
Prince of Wales, his son, out of whose custody he was shortly afterwards 
stolen by Lady de Spencer, but being discovered and recovered he was more 
strictly guarded for the future. 

He engaged in the wars of France in the time of Hen. V., and in 1492 
was constituted Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He married Anne, daughter 
of Edmund, Earl of Stafford, but died without issue in 1424,' when the 
manor passed, or at least a third in dower, to his widow Anne, and she 
retained the same until her death in 1433. 

Subject to the life interest of the widow the manor passed in moieties 
to Joan and Joyce, the two daughters and coheirs of Edward Charlton, 
Lord Powis, and Alianore, his wife (this Alianore having had as her first 
husband Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March), sister and coheir of Thomas 
and Edmund, respectively 3rd and 4th Earls of Kent. 

Joan, the elder daughter, married Sir John de Grey and died in 1426,^ 
seised of a third of the manor, when the interest passed to her son. Sir 
Henry Grey, Lord Powis, Earl of Tankerville, on whose death in 1449 ^ 
the manor passed to his eldest son by Antigone his wife, natural daughter of 
Humphrey Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, namely, Richard Grey, Lord 
Powis and Earl of Tankerville. 

On the Memoranda Rolls in 1452 is a statement as to the account of 
the issues of " Kersley " Manor, which Sir Henry Grey held at his death, 
the holding of the King by knight's service.* There is a note that his son 
Richard was then under age and the King's ward. 

This Richard Grey, Earl of Tankerville, adhering to the house of York, 
was, with divers others, attainted in 1460. We find him with the Earl of 
Warwick at the siege of Alnwick Castle in 1461. He married Margaret, 
daughter of James, Lord Audley, and dying in 1466,^ the manor passed 
to his son and heir, John Grey, who was summoned to Parliament as a 
baron under the designation of " Johanni Grey de Powes," 15th Nov. 1482. 

« I.P.M., 3 Hen. VI. 32. 4 M., 30 Hen. VI., Trin. Status et Visus, 

2 1.P.M., 4 Hen. VI. 36. Rot. i and 4. 

3 1.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 30. s I.P.M.. 6 Edw. IV. 35. 



KERSEY. 



i8i 



He married Lady Anne Herbert, daughter of William, Earl of Pembroke, 
and dying loth Nov. 1494, the manor passed to his son, John Grey, 2nd 
Baron Grey of Powis, but never summoned to Parliament, then aged 13. 

In the inquisition of Sir John Grey, the father, who died in 1494, it is 
stated that this manor was worth £11, and the Manor "of Leyham (one-third 
part of) worth £10, and held of Cecily, Duchess of York, as of the Honor of 
Clare, by fealty and 5s. rent ; and that Sir John being seised vested the 
manors in trustees in trust to pay his debts.' 

John Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Powis, married Margaret, daughter of 
Edward, Lord Dudley, and dying in 1504, the manor went to his son and 
'heir, Sir Edward Grey, 3rd Baron Grey of Powis. His lordship accom- 
panied the Duke of Suffolk in the expedition into France in 1500, and was 
present at the taking of Bray and other places. In 1536 a fine was levied 
of the manor by Robert Wyngfeld against the said Sir Edward Grey."" 
He married Lady Anne Brandon, daughter and coheir of Charles, Duke of 
Suffolk, but died in 1552 without issue. 

The manor next appears to have been vested in Sir Giles Capel, son of 
Sir William Capel, which Giles died in 1556. In 1596 Robert Wingfield 
appears as lord, and in 1609 the manor was vested in Clipsey Gaudy and 
Mary his wife, who in 1614 obtained licence to alien it to Robert Rolfe, 
from whom the manor passed to his son, Robert Rolfe. 

In the 43rd of the Deputy-Keeper's Reports will be seen under the 
head Chancery, note of the livery of a third part of lands, parcel of 
"Kersey Manor" to Robert Rolfe, son of Robert in 1631.^ A fine however 
levied the following year appears to be of a moiety of the manor.* 

Later we find the manor in one Hodges, who sold it to D'Oyly. 

In 1764 Peregrine D'Oyly was lord, and the manor was offered for 
sale in 1778, when the quit rents were stated to amount to ;£i8. 3s. iid. 
per annum. It was offered with a small farm of 14 acres. ^ Eleven years 
later another attempt was made to sell at the George Inn, Hadleigh, 4th 
May, 1789. With the manor were offered demesne lands, 32 acres, let to a 
tenant, and 15a. 2r. in hand. The timber was valued at £500, and the 
fines were stated to be arbitrary, the copyhold lands 340 acres, and about 
30 tenements.^ It does not appear whether a sale was then effected, but 
in 1804 Abraham Reeve was lord, and later the Rev. Thos. Reeve, A.M. 

In 1845 the manor was again offered for sale, the fines being stated to 
have yielded on an average of 15 years ending 1844 £59. los. per annum 
and the quit rents being stated to amount to upwards of £19.'' The sale 
took place at the White Horse, Ipswich, 5th Aug. 1845, and the purchaser 
was James Bentley, of Cheshunt, co. Herts, at the price of £2,220.^ The 
manor is now vested in Mr. Charles James Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

Manor of Sampson's Hall. 

The Sampsons had long been settled at Kersey. As early as 1382 we 
meet on the Patent Rolls with a pardon to Thomas Sampson, of Kersey, 
imprisoned in Ipswich Gaol and under sentence of death for felony.' 

Simon Sampson, of Kersey, son of Robert, married Margaret, daughter 
of Sir James Hobart, Knt., and was lord of this manor at the opening of 



• I.P.M., II Hen. VII. 1168. 
^ Fine, Hil. 28 Hen. VIII. 

3 App. p. 183. 

4 Fine, 7 Chas. II. pt. i. 44. 

i Ipswich Journal, 21st Feb., 1778. 



^ Ipswich Journal, 28th Mar. 1789. 
^Ipswich Journal, 19th July, 1845. 
'^Ipswich Journal, 9th August, 1845. 
9 Pat. RoUs, 6 Rich. II. pt. ii. 16. 



i82 THE^MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the i6th century. On his death he was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Thomas Sampson, who died in 1568, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Simon or Symond Sampson. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
John (Robert) Southwell, of Burham Hall, and dying in 1563, the manor 
went to his eldest son, Robert Sampson, though his youngest son, George, 
is described as of Sampson Hall. 

Robert Sampson married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Wingfield, 
of Upton, CO. Northampton, and dying in 1591 the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John Sampson, who married Bridget, daughter of William Clop ton, 
of Groton. Amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Calendar to Pleadings 43 Eliz. 
15 [1601] will be seen a suit as to ingress fine for this manor and "Layton " 
against John Sampson, claiming to hold the Manor of Sampson's Hall, of the 
Manor of Kersey. On John Sampson's death the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John Sampson. 

The manor was shortly afterwards acquired by John Thorrowgood, of 
Sampson Hall, who died in 1734, when it passed to his son and heir, John 
Thorrowgood, on whose death it went to his son and heir, Thomas Thorrow- 
good, High Sheriff for the County in 1760, and upon his death in Jan. 
1794, devolved upon his only child, Katherine, who died unmarried m 1802, 
and devised this manor and her other estates to Elizabeth D'Oyly, niece 
of Sir Thomas Thorrowgood and granddaughter of John, the father of Sir 
Thomas Thorrowgood, married to the Rev. Christopher Tennant, perpetual 
curate of Higham. Elizabeth Tennant died in 1803, and her husband at 
Sampson's Hall, 5th Oct. 1807, aged 67, when the manor passed to their son 
and heir, Christopher Tennant, who died unmarried in 1816, when it devolved 
on his sister and heir, Marianne, married to the Rev. Thomas Jones, of 
Enfield, in Middlesex. 

The manor subsequently passed to Dr. T. W. Jones, and under the 
name 'pi " The Manor of Lillesley with Sampson's Hall in Kersey," was 
offered for sale by the trustees of his will, in London, i6th June, 1908. 
There were 11 copyhold and free tenants, holding about 140 acres, at rents 
amounting in the aggregate to £11. is. gd. The customary fines to which the 
lord was entitled were stated to be on death two years' annual value of the 
copyhold, and on admission if the tenant on the Court Rolls were living, 
one and a half year's annual value. The lands held of the manor extended 
into Semer, Whatfield, Lindsey, Boxford, and Groton. 

In 1580 Robert Nightingale gave, by will, a tenement in Kersey, for 
one or more persons to dwell in ; and he also gave a piece of copyhold land, 
the rent to be distributed among the poor yearly, on Good Friday, and he 
charged his copyhold land, holden of the Manor of Sampson's Hall, with 40s. 
a year, for instructing poor children in learning. The cottage has been 
rebuilt at the expense of the parish, and is inhabited by three poor families. 
The copyhold land, which contains 2a. 2r. lets at ;^5. los. a year, which is 
distributed on Good Friday, as the donor directed. The annuity of 40s. 
is paid to a schoolmistress for teaching six poor children to read.' 

A fine of the Manor of Kersey (probably this manor) was in 1591 
levied by John Martyn against Robert Wyngfeld.^ 

Sampson Hall was pulled down in 1824. 
' Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 1006. * Fine, Easter, 33 Eliz. 



KERSEY. 183 

The Priory Manor. 

There seems to have been a manor attached to the priory of Kersey. 
This was a priory of AugustineSj or Black Canons, founded by the Cokefield 
family as early as 1184, the " Parvum Monasterium de Kersey/' being 
then accounted as half a leet to the Hundred of Cosford. In 1190 Sir Nigel 
de Riffley occurs as a benefactor. 

Thomas de Burgh is said to have founded a hospital or free chapel of 
St. Mary and St. Anthony here previous to the year 1218, Geoffrey de Burgh, 
his brother, archdeacon of Norwich, being witness to the grants which 
were confirmed by Pope Honorius in the following year. This Thomas 
married Nesta de Cokefield. 

It would seem that this hospital, some few years afterwards, was con- 
verted into the priory of canons we have mentioned, the denomination being 
" the Church and Canons of our Lady and St. Anthony of Kersey." Nesta, 
after the death of her husband, Thomas de Burgh, became the wife of John 
de Beauchamp, and in 1240 increased her gifts to the priory, bestowing 
among other hereditaments the mother church of Kersey.' John de 
Beauchamp shortly afterwards, and Nesta, in her widowhood, confirmed 
these donations. 

Nesta took a third husband, Matthew de Leyham, whose family were 
seated at Leyham, in this Hundred, and a last donation, with the consent of 
Matthew de Leyham, was made by Nesta to these canons, she giving them, 
with her body to be buried in their church, certain lands and services in 
Lindsey and Kersey. She died without issue about 1248. 

The grant of Nesta de Cokefield specifies the messuage, late the hospital, 
and 30 acres of land adjoining, and the tithes of the mills of Cockfield,Semer, 
Lindsey, and Kersey, to sustain the lights in the Church of St. Anthony. 
Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Exchequer and Treasury of the Receipt 
preserved in the Public Record Of&ce is a grant by Nesta de " Kokefeld " to 
the canons of St. Mary and St. Anthony, Kersey, of pasture for 6 cows m 
her park of Kersey in frankalmoin." The priory of Kersey had in 1325 a 
grant of free warren here.' Henry de Grey, Lord Powis, was empowered 
in 1444 to grant the manor to the College of St. Mary and Nicholas, Cam- 
bridge,* and in 1448 he granted the manor, with all its revenues and lands, 
to King's College, in Cambridge, and the provost and fellows of that college 
are now patrons of this parish church, and owners of the manor and priory 
estate. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1603 we find a lease of the priory to 
William Kellett,' and in the following year a request for a lease to Sir John 
Ramsey.^ 

Of the buildings of the priory there remain the south aisle of the choir, 
widened to permit the building to be converted into a private chapel, con- 
tiguous fragments of tower, choir, and transept, the west wall of the nave, 
and the kitchen, which has undergone many alterations in recent years.^ 



' See Manor of Pepers, Cockfield, in Babergh * R.P. v. 94. 

Hundred. s s.P. 1603, p. 530. 

'A. 3749. 6S.P. 1604, addenda, p. 442. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 23. ^Suff. Institute, vol. xi. 217. 




i84 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF KETTLEBASTON. 

JHE only entry in the Domesday Survey of land in this place 
is together with Manetuna or Manton, a manor in Hitcham, 
which see. In the 12th century we find that Godwin de Kettle- 
barston enfeoffed Robert Peche, to whom succeeded his son 
and heir, Richard Peche, to whom Anslem, abbot of 
St. Edmunds confirmed his land. Nicholas Peche next 
held, and in 1207 Hawise, his widow, claimed a moiety of 
the town of Kettlebaston as dower. Subject to her interest, the lordship 
vested in Richard Peche, the brother or son of Nicholas, and to him suc- 
ceeded his son and heir. Sir Nicholas Peche, whose daughter and heii", 
Matilda, married Walter de Rydware. She was living in 1283, and the 
foUowmg year we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Ralph de Auge- 
mere, chaplain, against Matilda Peche.' 

She granted the lordship to her 2nd son. Sir Roger de Rydware, who 
about 13 1 2 was succeeded by his nephew. Sir Thos. de Rydware, for this 
year he had a grant of free warren.^ He was succeeded by his son and heir 
Sir Walter de Rydware, who was dead in 1358, when his son and heir. Sir 
Walter de Rydware, held. On the death of the last Sir Walter the manor 
passed to his daughter and heir, Agnes, married to William Cotton in 1379. 
The manor seems to have gone in the time of Hen. IV- to Henry, Lord 
Scrope, of Masham, who was attarated and beheaded in 1415. Of course 
his estates were forfeited, and this manor was granted by the Crown to Sir 
John Phelip and Alice his wife the same year. Sir John Phelip died without 
issue before the close of the year,^ and his widow Alice, daughter and heir 
of Thomas Chaucer, and granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet, 
remarried Sir William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk, from which time to 
the decapitation of Edmund de la Pole, 3rd Duke of Suffolk, in 1513, the 
manor passed in the same course as that of Gyffords and Hallymote, in 
Blackbourn Hundred. A compotus of the manor in 1471-2 will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum. "^ 

The manor was subsequently granted by the Crown to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, who by deed in 1538 granted it to the King in exchange.' 
In 1545 the manor was granted to Walter Clerke and Stephen Clerke, his son. 
Particulars of the manor for this grant will be found in the Record Office,* 
and the grant itself on the Originalia Rolls lor 1545.'' Walter Clerke was a 
clothier of Hadleigh, and his son Stephen seems to have died in the father's 
lifetime, for on his, Walter Clerke' s, death in 1554/ Edward Clerke, his son, 
was found to be his heir. He married Editha, daughter of Lionel Talmash 
and had licence to alien to his own use, and to the use of Editha his wife 
and her heirs. He died in 1590 without issue, when the manor passed to 
Henry Appleton (son and heir of Sir Roger Appleton) and Agnes his wife, 
sister and heir of Edward Clerke, and they, with others, had licence to alien 
the manor in 1598 to Francis Moore and others to the use of William 
Appleton, the brother of Henry.^ William Appleton had licence in 1623 
to alien to John Ettell and others. 

William Appleton married Elizabeth, daughter of William Waldegrave, 
of Hitcham, and in 1625 his son and heir, William, was lord, but the manor 

'Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. I. 17. ss.P. 30 Hen. VII. p. 1182 (l8a). 

■^ Chart. Rolls, 6 Edw. II. 60. 637 Hen. VII., D.K.R. 9 App. ii, p. 191. 

3I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 42. ^O., 37 Hen. VII., Par. Rot. 7. 

*Add. Ch. 16167. See, too, Rolls of Pari. n.P.M., i and 2 Ph. and M. 72. 

vi. 400. 9 Fine, Mich. 40-41 Eliz. 



KETTLEBASTON. 185 

shortly afterwards passed to Sir Robert Naunton, for he died seised of it 
in 1635, and from this time to the death of Robert Naunton in 1719 the 
manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Letheringham, in Loes 
Hundred. 

On the last Robert Naunton's death, the manor passed to his sister 
Theophila, widow of John Leman/ of Charsfield, who had died in 1688, and 
later vested in her 2nd son William Leman, of Charsfield, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Starling, and on his death vested m his 
eldest son, William Leman, of Beccles, who married Sarah, sister of his kins- 
man, Robert Leman, of Brampton, High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1744. 
William Leman was buried at Brampton, leaving three daughters only. By 
1764 the manor had passed to the Beachcrofts.'' 

In 1820 the manor was vested in Matthew Beachcroft, who died in 
1823. The 9th July of the following year the manor was offered tor sale 
by public auction by the executors of Col. Beachcroft. With the manor 
was included the Manor of Preston or Church Hall, and 931 acres divided 
into five farms, viz. Preston Hall, Chapel House, Waggers, High House, 
and Kettlebaston Hall farms, let at rents amounting to £877 per annum. ^ 
The sale was effected in lots and this manor with quit rents of £7. 12s. 7^., 
and Kettlebaston Hall Farm of 234a. 26 p. subject to fee farm and quit 
rents to Swifts Manor and Monks Eleigh Manor of £4. 6s. 2d., sold for 
£9,740 to Mr. Turner. Whether the sale was ever carried into effect we 
cannot say, or perhaps Mr. Turner bought in for the family, but in 1844 
and 1855 Mrs. Beachcroft was stated to be lady of the manor, in 1885 Thomas 
Beachcroft lord, and it is now vested in Francis Beachcroft. 

A Court Roll for the manor i Edw. VI. is mentioned in the Proceedings 
of the Society of Antiquaries.* And a fine appears to have been levied of 
this manor with the Manor of Acton in 1317 by Robert de Bures and Hillaria, 
his wife, against James de Bures and John de Bures. ^ 

Arms of Clerke : Arg. a chevron betw. 3 tigers' heads erased, Sa. on a 
chief of the last 3 martlets of the field. 



•As to this family see Brampton Manor, *See Manor of Preston, in Babergh Hun- 
in Bly thing Hundred ; and for dred. 

pedigree. Suckling's Hist, of Suff. 3 /^smcA /oMma/, 19th June, 1824. 
vol. ii. 184. ♦2nd Ser., vol i. 99; vol. ii. 79. 

5 Feet of Fines, 11 Edw. II, 17. 




i86 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LAY HAM. 

|N the time of the Confessor there were 2 manors in this place. 
One was that of Alfnod, held of Harold, and consisted of 
3 camcates of land, 4 villeins, 7 bordars, 5 serfs (6 at the 
time of the Survey), 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 
belonging to the men, and 11 acres of meadow. The live 
stock included a rouncy, 15 beasts, 15 hogs, 100 sheep, 
and 19 goats. The value was 70s., increased to iocs, at the 

time of the Survey, when the tenant in chief was Hugh de Grentemesnil. 

The manor was half a league long, and half a league broad, and paid in a 

gelt 4^d., the soc belonging to the Abbot of Bury.' 

The second manor had for a Domesday tenant Eudo the steward. 
It consisted of 4 camcates of land, 15 villeins, 3 bordars, i serf, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne, 6 belonging to the men (which at the time of the Survey were 
reduced to half), 12 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, and 
I mill. Also a church with 40 acres, i acre of meadow, and i ploughteam. 
The live stock included a rouncy, 20 beasts, 36 hogs, 180 sheep, and 23 
goats, the value of the manor being £6. It was held in the time of the 
Confessor by Alufic Campa, and was 8 quarentenes long and 6 broad, 
paying in a gelt y^d.' 

Manor of Leyham Hall or Netherbury Hall. 

This was the lordship of Hugh le Despenser in the time of King Edw. I. 
Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Exchequer and Treasury of the Receipts 
is a release by John de Merk, of Leyham, to his lord. Sir Hugh le Despenser. 
of a piece of pasture which he held from Sir Hugh in Leyham, near Deusce- 
welle.^ 

We find on the Close Rolls in 1321 an order to deliver the manor to 
Gilbert de Eboraco, whom the King appointed to take into his hands the 
lands of Hugh le Despenser the younger.'* The manor was in 1326 absolutely 
forfeited and passed to the Crown, and was granted the following year to 
Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent, son of Edw. I. He had been con- 
stituted governor of Tunbridge Castle in 1321, and was Sheriff of Rutland 
1322 to 1326. 

On the breaking out of the insurrection under Thomas Plantagenet, 
Earl of Lancaster, he was commissioned by the King to pursue the rebellious 
prince, and to lay siege to the Castle of Pontefract. On the prince being 
taken prisoner at Boroughbridge, he was one of those who condemned him 
to death, and occupied a distinguished position both in cabinet and field. 
He was sent as chief ambassador to France in 1324, which year he was also 
appointed Lieutenant of Aquitaine. After the accession of his nephew, 
King Edward III., he was arrested and sentenced to death for having con- 
spired with other nobles to deliver his brother, the deposed Edw. II., out of 
prison. Whereupon by the management of Queen Isabel and her paramour, 
Mortimer, he was beheaded at Winchester, 19th March, 1330, after having 
waited all day on the scaffold before a person could be found to act as 
executioner. The manor was granted immediately after the execution 

' Dom. ii. 432. 3 A. 7163. 

» Dom. ii. 4036. 4 Close Rolls, 15 Edw. II. 26. 



LAYHAM. 187 

of Edmund of Woodstock, to Robert de Ufford for life/ but the grant never 
seems to have taken effect, for in 133 1 we find the manor assigned to his 
widow Margaret Countess Dowager of Kent.' From the Close Rolls in 
1337 we find some further light thrown on the subject. There the manor is 
mentioned as claimed by Queen Isabel, as her right, and as having come to 
the King's hands by the forfeiture of Hugh le Despenser the younger, 
being afterwards granted in dower to Margaret, his wife, after the Earl's 
death, and that the King had granted that £31. los. o^d. at which it was 
extended yearly, should be allowed to the Queen. ^ 

Edmund and John Plantagenet, the sons of the unfortunate Edmund 
of Woodstock, were successively Earls of Kent, but died, the former in 
i333j and the latter 27th Dec. 1352,^ without issue, a? did also their sister, 
Margaret, the wife of Amaneus, eldest son of Bernard, Lord de la Brette, 
leaving Joane, " the Fair Maid of Kent," the only other child of Edmund 
of Woodstock, surviving. She married Thomas de Holand, Earl of Kent, 
and he held his first court for the manor 27th Edw. III., and the Court Roll 
is still in existence in private hands. He and his wife Joan levied a fine of 
the manor against Sir Thomas de la Sale in 1355.' He died seised of the 
manor in right of his wife, 28th Dec. 1360,* when it went to his wife, surviving. 

The manor then descended in the same course as the Manor of Kersey, 
in this Hundred, till the time of Sir Edward Grey, 3rd Baron Grey of 
Powis, who married Lady Anne Brandon, daughter and coheir of Charles, 
Duke of Suffolk, but died in 1552 without issue. 

A third of the manor is mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of William, 
Duke of Suffolk, in 1450,' in that of Richard, Duke of York, father of the 
King,* and in 1497 in that of Cecily, Duchess of York.® 

The second daughter and coheir of Edward Charlton, Lord Powis, 
namely, Joyce, married Sir John de Tiptoft. Sir John was Summoned to 
Parliament as a baron (Lord Tiptoft) from 7th Jan. 1425-6 to 3rd Dec. 1441. 

He died 27th Jan. 1442-3, when his interest in the manor, stated in his 
inquisition p.m. to be one-third, held as of the Duchy of Lancaster," went, 
on the death of his widow, 22nd Sept. 1446, to his son and heir, John de 
Tiptoft, 2nd Baron, created Earl of Worcester- i6th July, 1449. He was 
Constable of the Tower in 1461, and Chancellor of Ireland in 1464, Lord 
Deputy of Ireland in 1467-68. He had been educated at Balliol College, 
Oxford, and was a man of exceptional learning for his time. 

He travelled extensively, and on a visit to Rome is said to have delivered 
an eloquent address to Pope Pius II., which drew tears from the Pontiff's 
eyes. His lordship translated into English Publius Cornelius and Cuius 
Flaminius, and wrote several treatises which are mentioned by Bale. 
He was a staunch Yorkist, and during the temporary restoration of Hen. VI. 
was seised, condemned to death, and beheaded on Tower Hill, i8th October, 
1470," when all his honours and estates were forfeited. He married 
ist Cecily, 2nd daughter of Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury, and widow 
of Henry Beauchamp, Duke of Warwick, but had no issue. His 2nd wife 
was Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Greyndour, by whom he had a son, 
John, who died in infancy. He espoused 3rdly, Elizabeth, daughter of 

'Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. i. 25; «I.P.M., 33 Edw. III. 104. 

Originalia, 4 Edw. III. 9. ^I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 

*R. of Pari. ii. 445. n.PM., 3 Edw. IV. 14. 

3 Close Rolls, II Edw. III. pt. i. 9. ^I.P.M., 12 Hen. VII. 154. 

''I.P.M., 26 Edw. III. 54. "I.P.M., 21 Hen. VI. 45. 

5 Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. III. 9. " I.P.M., g-lo Edw. IV. 53. 



i88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Thomas Hopton,and widow of Sir Roger Corbet, of Morton Corbet, in Salop, 
by whom he had an only son, Edward de Tiptoft, who was restored in 
blood and honours by King Edw. IV. when he regained the Crown, but dying 
under age and unmarried 12th Aug. 1485, the Earldom of Worcester became 
extinct, the barony fell into abeyance, and his interest in the manor 
passed in thirds to his three coheirs, who were his paternal aunts, Philippa 
Roos," widow of Thomas, Lord Ros, then aged 62, one of the sisters and 
heirs of John Tiptoft, ist Earl of Worcester ; Joan Ingoldsthorpe, then 
aged 60, another sister and heir, married to Sir Edmund Ingoldsthorpe ; 
and Edward Dudley, Lord Dudley, then aged 26, son of Sir Edmund (son 
and heir of John, Lord Dudley), and Joyce, his wife, another sister and heir 
of the said Earl ;' and they in 1487 acknowledged that they held of the 
King in chief a third part of the manor, and one hundred and eighty acres 
of land and a half, four acres of pasture, &c., rendering one capon, and the 
third part of one capon, and the third part of one pound of pepper, and by 
the service of the one-fortieth part of one knight's fee. The third of the 
manor was stated to be held of the King by one-sixth of a knight's fee, and 
to be worth loos. 

Joan Ingoldsthorpe died seised of her ninth share in the manor 21st 
June, 1494, and John Stonor, aged 10, and Elizabeth, wife of Sir Heniy 
Wentworth, late wife of Thomas, Lord de Scroppe, Margaret, wife of Sir 
John Mortymer, Lucy, wife of Sir Thomas FitzWilliam, and Isabel, wife 
of William Hodelston, all over 23, were found to be her cousins and heirs, 
namely, John Stonor, as son of Anne, one of the daughters and coheirs of 
Isabel, Marchioness Montague, daughter and heir of the said Joan, and 
the said Elizabeth, Margaret, Lucy, and Isabel, as the other daughters and 
heirs of the said Marchioness.^ 

It is said that the manor subsequently vested in Sir Robert Peyton, and 
from him passed to his widow in jointure; but there is a Court Roll still in 
existence of a court held for this manor, in 1508 by Thomas "Hobartt," and 
stated to be his first court for the manor.^ 

In 1532 Sir Edm. Capel, son and heir of Sir William, acknowledged 
that he held a third. 

There is an inquisition p.m. in 1524 of Sir Thomas Lovell, who died 
25th May this year, in which the Manor of Leyham is included, and 
Ursula Husey, wife of William Husey, Margaret Gumey, wife of Anthony 
Gurney, Elizabeth Ballisby, wife of John Ballisby, are found to be next 
heirs, namely, daughters of Sir Robert Lovell, brother of the said Sir Thomas 
Lovell.* A fine of a third part of the manor was levied in 1536 by Robert 
Wyngfeld against Sir Edward Grey, Lord Powis.^ 

There is also a grant of Leyham Manor for life to Lady Anne of Cleves, 
in consideration of her marriage with the King in 1540, amongst the 
State Papers,^ and in the Exchequer Records we meet with a fourth part 
of the manor, " late of the possessions of Jane, Queen of England," the 
lessee being William Austen.' 

In 1544 the manor was granted by the Crown to John Clarke, or Clerke,' 
and particulars for the grant are still preserved in the Record Office.' John 

'I.P.M., I Hen. VII. 21. estate Papers, 1540, p. 144 (2) 

''I.P.M.. 9 Hen. VII. 1088. ^35 Hen. VIII. Exch. Records, D.K.R. 

3 Thomas Hobart is stated to have died 25 App. p. 4. 

seised 26th March, 1560. « O. 36 Hen. VIII. 5 Pars. Rot. 4. 

4I.P.M., 16 Hen. VIII. 35. 9 D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 191. 
5 Fine, Hil. 28 Hen. VIII. 



LAYHAM. 189 

Clarke held courts for the manor (the rolls of which are in existence in 
private hands), as follows : 29th May, i Edw. VI. ; 22nd May, 2 Edw. VI. ; 
nth June, 3 Edw. IV. ; 27th May, 4 Edw. VI. ; 12th Aug. 4th Edw. VI. ; 
29th May, 5 Edw. VI. ; 7 Edw. VI. ; i Mary. 

John Clarke died i6th March, 1555,' without issue, and the manor 
passed to his nephew and heir, Edward Clarke, then aged 38 years, and in 
1568 a claim was made by the Crown on this Edward Clarke for forfeiture 
of a third part of the manor." An action, too, will be seen amongst the 
Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth by Robert Wyngfeld 
against this Edward Clarke touching a third part of the manor.^ In 1568 
we meet with a fine levied of a third of the manor by the said Edward 
Clarke against Robert Wyngfeld." It would appear therefore that the 
grant to John Clarke from the Crown in 1555 was not of more than a 
third share in the manor, but it is certain that the courts of the manor from 
1561 to 1585 were held by this Edward Clarke in his own name, and the 
rolls are still in existence in private hands. 

The courts of Edward Clarke were held as follows : First court 4th 
Aug. 3 and 4 P. & M. ; 8th June (sic), 3 and 4 P. & M. ; 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 14 
Eliz. ; 8th Oct. 14 Eliz. (no name of lord), 16, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28. 

The manor passed from Edward Clarke about 1588 to his brother-in- 
law, Henry Apleton,' for in 1591 we find him lord and holding courts for the 
manor as follows: 23rd Sept. 33 Eliz. ; 9th Nov. 33 Eliz. ; 26th Sept. 34 Eliz. ; 
25th Sept. 1593; 9th Oct. 35 EUz. ; Oct. 3 Eliz. ; ist Oct. 39 Eliz.; 26th 
Sept. 40 Eliz. ; 30th Sept. 42 Eliz. ; — Oct. 43 Eliz. 

The record of these courts of Henry Apleton is on 22 skins. The court 
4th Oct. 2 Jac. I. [1603] is held by Henry Apleton and others. The manor 
passed the following year to Roger Apleton, who held his first court 29th 
March, 1605, and also held courts for the manor as follows : 24th April, 
4 Jac.I.; 14th Apl. 5 Jac. L; lothOct. 5 Jac. I.; nth Apl. 1606; 25th Oct. 
1608; i8th April, 1610; 21st April, 1612. 

The manor then passed to Henry Apleton, who held courts for the 
manor as follows: 8th Oct. 11 Jac. I.; 6th April, 1614; 19th April, 1615; 
12th Nov. 1616 ; 19th June, 15 Jac. I. ; 24th Oct. 15 Jac. I. From this date 
the rolls are headed " Henry Apleton Knt, and Bart.," and are : 3rd June, 
1618 ; 2nd Dec. 16 Jac.I. ; 17th July,i8 Jac. I. ; 6th Oct. 18 Jac. I. ; 8th Aug. 
19 Jac. I. [1621]. 

The manor must then have been sold to John Hodges, for the next 
court on the 6th Aug. 1622, is held by him, as are also courts 28th Aug. 1622 ; 
20th Nov. 1623 ; and 28th Sept. 1624. He also held courts 29th Apl. 1634; 
20th Oct. 1636; nth Oct. 1638; and 25th Apl. 1639 (though no names are 
fixed to the rolls for the last two courts. From John Hodges the manor 
passed to the D'Oyly family, and it is possible the last two courts referred 
to were held by a member of this family. Courts for the manor were held 
29th May, 1640 ; 4th May, 1641 ; 20th Oct. 1642 ; 19th Oct. 1643 ; 17th Oct. 
1644 ; I2th Apl. 1645 ; 8th Oct. 16464 22nd April, 1647 ; 21st Oct. 1647 ; 24th 
May, 1649 ; 4th Oct. 1649 ; and 19th Oct. 1650. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Peregrine D'Oyly, and in 1814 Charles 
D'Oyly was lord. Later it passed to A. C. Reeve, and then to Henry 
Offord, of Hadleigh. 

' I.P.M., 3 and 4 Phil, and M. 92. ■♦ Fine, Hil. 10 Eliz. 

"Memoranda Rolls, 10 Eliz., Pas. Rec. ^See Manor of Kettlebaston, in this 

Rot. 66. Hundred. 

5 C.P. ser. ii, B. cxcvi, lo. 



igo THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1855 the manor was vested with that of Overbury in the Rev. 
Richard Daniel, of Combs, and in 1885 in J. Musgrove Musgrove. 

Court rolls of " Netherbury Hall," 25 to 26 Hen. VHI., will be found 
in the Public Record Office.' 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
we find two actions touching copyholds of this manor, therein called 
" Netherbury Hall Manor." One was by John Warde and Alice his wife 
against Ralph Warde, and the other action was by Thomas Wynge and Rose 
his wife against Edward Clarke." 

Court rolls of the Manor .of Netherbury, which do not specify the name 
of the lord, are in existence and in private hands, as follows : On 113 skins, 
2 Edw. I. to I Edw. IV. ; 11 Edw. III., 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 
23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 (? 41), 
42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, and 49 Edw. III. 2 to 22 Rich. II.; Hen. V.; 
Hen. VI. j 3, 5, 6, 8, and 10 Edw. IV. 

The rolls of courts held in the 17th century were 22nd March, 1748, 
handed over by Griggly to Peregrine D'Oyly, having been left in his hands 
by his father, Peregrine D'Oyly, of Chattris, on payment of £23. 4s. 6d., 
certain costs in an action. 

Manor of Overbury Hall. 

This lordship was held by the Leyham family, who resided here, and 
had considerable estates both in Norfolk and Suffolk. 

Sir Peter de Leyham, who lived in King John's time was a benefactor 
to Langley Abbey, in Norfolk, and paid his portion in certain fees towards 
the aid for the marriage of the daughter of King Hen. III. From the 
Testa de Nevill we learn that a Matthew de Leyham held a knight's fee 
here of the Honor of " Angria,"^ and another entry states three knights' 
fees.* 

Rober de Leyham succeeded his father Peter, and was followed by 
Reginald, his (Robert's) son and heir, who died in 1244, leaving John de 
Leyham, his son and heir, a minor. This John was found to hold Overbury 
Hall, in Leyham, of the Earl Marshal, at one knight's fee,^ and he had free 
warren here,* as had also Joan de L0yham, with assize of bread and beer.'' 
John de Leyham died seised in 1289,' leaving the manor to his son John, 
then two years of age, who died in 1298,' without issue, and Sir Richard de 
Brampton was found to be his cousin and heir, who in 1305 settled the 
same upon Thomas, his son and heir. Thomas de Brampton sold the manor 
to Robert de Reydon, of Reydon, who had a grant of free warren in this 
manor in 1310." 

Robert de Reydon in 1314 had licence to settle the manor on John de 
Reydon and his wife, Hawise," and a fine was levied of the manor between 
Roger de Reydon and Ralph de Reydon against Robert de Reydon this year, 
in connection with the same.'" Robert de Reydon died in 1322.'^ Alicia, 

' Portfolio, 203, 98. '° Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 18. A Robert 

° C.P. ser. ii. B. cxcv. 90 ; lb. ser. iii. de Reydon had had a grant of free 

B. clxxxv. 26. warren here as early as 1258. 

3T. de N. 292. Chart. Rolls, 42 Hen. III. i. 

*Ib. 286. " I.Q.D., 7 Edw. II., File 100, 6. 

5H.R. ii. 151. "Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. II. 13. 

6H.R. ii. 153- '3I.P.M., I5 Edw. II. 63. See Raydon 

''lb. 199. Hall Manor and Wherstead Manor, 

8 Extent, I.P.M., 18 Edw. I. 31. in Samford Hundred. 

9 Extent, I.P.M., 27 Edw. I. 29. 



LAYHAM. 191 

daughter of Sir John de Reydon, married ist Sir Andrew de Bures/ and he 
had a grant of free warren here in 1335/ 

Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Court of Chancery preserved in the 
Public Record Office is a grant in 1336 by Sir Andrew de Bures and Alicia 
his wife to William le Schepherd, of Leyham, and Sarah his wife, and the 
heirs of the body of the said William, of a piece of land called " le Grenes- 
lond," in Leyham, by the way leading from Leyham Church towards " le 
Mochelewood." The deed is dated at Aketon (Acton), the Sunday after 
St. Martin the Bishop, 11 Edw. III.' 

Amongst the Deeds in 1346 is a grant and demise in fee farm by Sir 
Andrew de Bures to William Shepherds, Alan Donne, of Shelleye, and 
Cristina, his wife, and the heirs of the bodies of the said Alan and Cristina, 
of lands, which the grantor purchased of Sir John de la Dale in Leyham. 
The deed is dated at Aketon, loth March, 21 Edw. III.'* A third deed is a 
grant by Emma,, relict of John Prichet, of Hadleigh, to Sir Andrew de Bures 
and Alice his wife, of all her goods and chattels in all the lands which 
they had of her gift in Leyham. This deed is dated the Monday after 
St. John ante portam Latinam 23 Edw. 1 11.^ 

Sir Andrew de Bures was still living in 1357, for this year® he held a court 
for this manor, the roll of which is still extant in private hands. He died 
however, 3 years later, in 1360,'' and AUcia, his widow, married 2ndly Sir 
John, son and heir of Sir John de Sutton, and in 1362 we find amongst the 
Ancient Deeds in Chancery a grant by Sir John de Sutton the younger and 
Alice his wife to Thomas Pertrych, of Hadleigh, Juliana his wife, and 
John, their son, for their lives, of a messuage, 3 crofts, and pasture in 
the town of Leyham, adjoining land of Sir Edward, Prince of Wales, in Ley- 
ham f and in 1362 Sir John de Sutton and Alicia his wife conveyed 
Overbury Hall Manor to Sir Richard de Sutton, his brother, and others. 
The fine by which the transfer was effected is levied by Sir Richard de 
Sutton, John de Cavendissh, Roger de Wolferton, Walter Berdefeld, parson 
of Parva Elyngham Church, and Hugh Skeryere, parson of Reydon Church, 
against John, son of Sir John de Sutton and Alicia his wife.' 

Sir Richard de Sutton left an only daughter and heir, Joan, who married 
ist Sir Robert, son and heir of Sir Andrew de Bures, of Acton, and after- 
wards Sir Richard de Waldegrave. 

From the death of Sir Robert de Bures in 1361 to the death of James 
Butler, Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire, in 1457, without issue,the devolution 
of the manor is identical with that of Acton, in Babergh Hundred. This 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Alice, wife of 
Guy Bryan, who died in 1435 ;'° of Humphrey, son and heir of John, Earl of 
Arundell, who died in 1438 ;" of Annie, wife of James Butler, Earl of 
Wiltshire," who died in 1457 ; and of the Earl himself, beheaded in 
1461.'^ 

In 1462 we find a grant of this manor on the Patent Rolls to Sir John 
Howard, afterwards Duke of Suffolk, and the heir male of his body, 

' See Manor of Acton, in Babergh Hundred, ' I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 60. 

and Gaynes Manor, Wickham- ^36 Edw. III. C. 2205. 

brook, in Risbridge Hundred. 9 Feet of Fines, 37 Edw. III. 21, 

= Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 37. " I.P.M., 13 Hen. VI. 34. 

3 C. 774. " Extent, I.P.M., 16 Hen. VI. 50. 

■*C. 584. "I.P.M., 35 Hen. VI. i6. 

3 C. 2293. '3 1.P.M.. I Edw. IV. 29. 
631 Edw. III. 



192 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



provided he answers at the Exchequer for any surplus above ;{iio yearly/ 
and three years later an absolute grant in fee.'' 

Nothing, however, seems to have come of these grants,for in 1466 we 
find the manor granted to Sir William Bourchier, son and heir of Henry, 
Earl of Essex, Anne his wife, and the heirs of their bodies. The grant is 
on the Patent Rolls, and includes not only this manor, but the Manor of 
Bures, with Netherhall and Overhall, and a tenement called Ropers in 
Seynt Mary-bures, with knights' fees, " late of James, late Earl of Wilts, and 
in the King's hands." 

The grantee is to hold by services of as many knights' fees and other 
rents and services as the estates were held by before i Edw. IV. without 
fine or fee beyond 20s. /[d.^ 

The manor was shortly afterwards acquired by Thomas Hobart, son of 
William Hobart, of Leyham, and Anne his wife, daughter of Sir Philip 
Tilney, of Shelley, and of Frances Framlingham, of Crow's Hall, Debenham. 
Thomas, the purchaser, was nephew of Sir James Hobart, of Hales Hall, in 
Norfolk, the Attorney-General in 1487. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Robert Forthe, of Hadleigh, and died 27th Aug. 1515, leaving two daughters, 
Alicia and Dorothy.* 

Alicia died without issue, and Dorothy married Thomas Bendish, of 
Toppesfield Hall, Hadleigh, and had a daughter, Elizabeth. To this 
daughter Elizabeth, Thomas Hobart devised the manor. 

Elizabeth Bendish married Thomas D'Oyly, and died 2nd Aug. 1553,^ 
when the manor passed to their son and heir, Henry D'Oyly. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth is an 
action touching the manor between this Henry D'Oyly and John Grene and 
Joan his wife.* By a deed dated 20th March, 20 Eliz. [1577I, which is still 
in existence and in private hands, Henry D'Oyly settled the manor, then 
described as of the yearly value of £1/^, consisting of 4 messuages, 2 mills, 
267 acres of pasture, arable, and meadow, to the use of himself in tail male, 
remainder to the use of Edward D'Oyly in tail male, remainder to 
John D'Oyly in tail male, remainder to the use of Thomas D'Oyly the 
younger, in tail male, remainder to Francis D'Oyly in tail male, remainder 
to Charles D'Oyly, " cousin" in tail male, remainder to the next heirs of 
the said Henry D'Oyly for ever. On Henry D'Oyly's death without issue 
before 1588, the manor passed to his brother, Edward D'Oyly, and a fine 
was levied in 1589 by John Stanghowe and others against the said 
Edward D'Oyly.^ Edward D'Oyly married Audrey, 2nd daughter and 
coheir of John Stanhope, of Amringhall, co. Norfolk, and died about 
1624, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas D'Oyly. He 
married Mary, only daughter of Sir Andrew Pascall, Knt., of Spring- 
field Hall, CO. Essex, and died 20th Aug. 1636, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Peregrine D'Oyly, who died loth Jan. 1667. 

Another Peregrine D'Oyly was lord in 1725, and lived at Chattris, in 
the Isle of Ely, co. Cambridge. He was lord both of Overbury and Nether- 
bury Manors, and for the main manor held courts 28th Aug. 1728 ; ist 
Sept. 1729 ; 31st Dec. 1729 ; 19th Jan. 1730 ; 9th Nov. 1731 ; 25th Feb. 
1731- 



' Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. IV. pt. i, 3. 
'Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 29. 
3 Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. IV. pt. i. 3. 
"LP.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 46. 



5 1.P.M., 2 and 3 P. and 
«C.P. ser. ii. B. Ivii. 
Tine, Hil. 31 Eliz. 



M.72. 



LAYHAM. 193 

Courts were held by John Webb in right of his wife Elizabeth; 20th 
Oct. 1735, and 5th Oct. 1737. In 1764 the manor was vested in another 
Peregrine D'Oyly, in 1804 in another Peregrine D'Oyly, and in 1814 in 
Charles D'Oyly. In 1829 it was vested in H. C. Reeve, in 1855 in the Rev. 
Richard Daniel, of Combs, in 1885 in J . Musgrove Musgrove of Raworth, 
Leyham. Court Rolls of the Manor of Overbury, which do not specify 
the name of the lord, are in existence and in private hands as follows : 
3 Hen. VII. ; 4, 5, 8, 10, ii, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, and 
23 Hen. VII. ; 26th Jan. 2 to 5 Edw. VI. (last on three skins). Over- 
bury Hall is an ancient half-timbered house restored and modernised in 
1871, and now the property and seat of James Fairlie Thomas Dipnall, J. P. 



Ai 




194 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LINDSEY. 

SJIMONG the lands of the Abbot of St. Edmunds were ij caru- 
cates of land, i6bordars, and 2 serfs. They always ploughed 
with 5 teams, and in the time of the Confessor could give or 
sell their land, but always the abbot had the soc, commenda- 
tion, and all customs. The value was formerly 20s., 
increased to 30s. at the time of the Survey. "It" was 6 quaren- 
tenes long and 5 broad, paying in a gelt 6d. whoever was 

the tenant. There was also a church with 10 acres. In the time of the 

Confessor the abbot held 20 freemen here.' 

A small holding here was i carucate of land, 6 bordars, 2 ploughteams, 

and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 20s., belonging to Richard, son of Earl 

Gislebert, and formerly held by 6 freemen.^ 

Manor of Lillesey or Lindsey or Lindsey Hall. 

The lordship of the parish seems originally to have belonged to the 
Cokefield family.^ This family terminated in Nesta de Cokefield, Whose 
heirs were Barth. de Creke, Ralph de Berners, and William de Bellomonte 
or Beaumont ; and in 1259 Bartholomew de Creke, the eldest coheir of 
this lady, levied a fine of one-third part of the manor and advowson. 

Ralph Berners, the second coheir of Nesta, and Ralph, his son, held 
another third part in 1290, and in 1297 it is stated that John de Bellomonte 
was seised of two third parts of this manor, the share of Ralph Berners 
having been added to his own by purchase.* This hardly seems consistent 
with the entry on the Originalia Rolls afterwards cited. 

The manor became vested in William de Montchensy' on his marrying 
Beatrix, daughter of William de Bello Campo, or Beauchamp, and widow 
of Thomas Fitz-Oates. From his death in 1302 to the marriage of Jane, 
daughter of Sir Thomas de Montchensy to Sir Richard Waldegrave, the 
manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Edwardstone, in Babergh 
Hundred. We learn from the Originalia Rolls that the King in 1291 
committed to Robert Tibitotthis manor, then in the King's hand, by reason 
of the trespass of William de " Monte Canise," of Edwardstone, to hold while 
in the hands of the King, rendering £8. 15s. xd. per annum.* The manor is 
specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of this William de Mont- 
chensy,'' and in that of William, his son, who died about 1319.^ 

Sir Richard Waldegrave died in 1434,^ and from this time to the time 
of Sir William Waldegrave, who died in 1613, the devolution of the manor 
is identical with that of Smallbridge, in Bures, in Babergh Hundred. The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Sir William Walde- 
grave, who died 30th Jan. 1527," of Sir George Waldegrave, who died 
8th July, 1528," and of Sir William Waldegrave, who died 7th Nov. 1554." 

Sir William Waldegrave seems to have parted with the manor in his 
lifetime, for in 1609 we find it vested in Edward Chaphn, jun., and in 1632 



'Dom. ii. 369. 6 0. 19 Edw. I. ; 13 Pat. RoUs, 19 Edw. I. 

*Dom. ii. 3976. 14. 

3 See Priory Manor, Kersey, Cosford. 'I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 38. 

* Abbr. of PL, 25 Edw. I. Hil. 29. « I.P.M., 15 Edw. II. 36. 

5 On the Patent Rolls in 1281 is notice of sI.P.M., 13 Hen. VI. 27. 

an action by Hamo Peche against "I.P.M., 19 Hen. VIII. 44. 

this William de Montchensy of " I. P.M., 20 Hen. VIII. 18. 

Edwardstone and others, touching " I. P.M., i and 2 P. and M. 92. 

a tenement in Lindsey. Pat. Rolls, 

9 Edw. I. 18. 



LINDSEY. 



195 



we meet with notice of an ousterlemain of the manor in favour of Edmund 
" Chaplayne/' son of Edmund (? Edward).' 

In 1626 we meet with afine levied of the manor by Edmund " Chaplayne 
late of Edward his lather.'" 

In 1805 it was vested in the Rev. John Gee Smyth, somewhat later in 
the Rev. W. T. Spurdens, in 1847 in James Cuddon, of Norwich, in 1855 
in the Rev. Rich. Daniel, of Combs, in 1885 in the Rev. Thomas 
Jones, and the manor was stated to have been vested in Richard Henry 
Wood, of Belmont, Sidmouth, in 1906, and if so would now be in the 
trustees of his will ; but in view of the manor having been in 1885 
vested in the Rev. Thomas Jones, and what we have stated in the account 
of the Manor of Sampson's Hall, in Kersey, the statement is at least open 
to question. 

Manor of Beaumonds Hall or Beaumonts. 

This was the lordship of Godfrey de Bellomonte in the time of Edw. I., 
and he had a grant of free warren here in 1292.^ He does not, however, 
seem to have held more than a third of the manor. The manor is mentioned 
in the inquisition p.m. of Cecilia de Ferrariis, sometime wife of Godfrey de 
Bellomonte in 1293."^ 

The manor was given about 1474 to the College of Denston by Sir John 
Howard and John Broughton jun., and there it remained until the Dissolu- 
tion, when it vested in the Crown. A manor of this name is comprised in 
the inquisition p.m. of John Broughton, who died 24th Jan. 15 17, leaving 
John, his son and heir.^ 

In 1548 Simon Sampson seems to have held a third part, but this year 
the manor was granted to Thomas Smith and John Smith. Thomas pur- 
chased the share of John. Amongst the Proceedings in Chancery is an action 
by Thomas Smith against Margaret Smith for an account of the rents of 
a moiety of this manor.^ Thomas Smith in 1564 had licence to alien to 
Thomas Laurence, who in 1567 had licence to alien to Anthony Cage, but 
possibly the last two licences affected a moiety only, for we find that the 
manor passed to Anthony Cage in moieties, one under a fine levied by him 
in 1567 against Thomas Laurence, and others/ the other under a fine levied 
by him against Thomas Smith and others the following year.^ This latter 
year Anthony Cage had a claim made upon him by the Crown for the for- 
feiture of a moiety of the manor.^ 

In 1591 John Sampson son of Robert, is said to have had livery, 
and we do meet with a fine of " Lillesley Manor " levied in 1594 by Thomas 
Fastolfe against one John Sampson," but in 1609 we find the manor in 
William Cage. 

In 1836-7 the manor was vested in Timothy Richard Holmes, John 
Jackson, and James Sparke, sohoitors,of Bury St. Edmunds, by purchase 
from the representatives of the Hanmer family. In 1885 the manor was 
vested in James Sparke, of Bury St. Edmunds, alone, and it now belongs to 
Mr. George Frederick Beaumont, of The Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex. 



' Chancery D.K.R. 48 App. p. 467. 

2 2 Chas. I. pt. i. 58. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 33. 
4I.P.M., 21 Edw. I. 49. 
5I.P.M., 10 Hen. VIII, 148. 
«C.P. iii. 21. 



''Fine, Mich. 9 Eliz. 

Tine, Trin. 10 Eliz. 

s Memoranda Rolls, 10 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 

45 ; II Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 38. 
" Fine, Mich. 36-37 Eliz. 



196 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




MANOR OF NAUGHTON. 

|HIS place is not mentioned in the Domesday Survey. The 
author of " Magna Britannica " makes this lordship to have 
been anciently vested in Thomas de Okefield, but no 
doubt this is a mistake for Thomas de Cokefield, who cer- 
tainly held in 1316. It was for nearly two hundred years the 
inheritance of the Chamberlayne family. Ralph Chamber- 
layne was seised of it in 1383, and from him it passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Roger Chamberlayne, who was sheriff in 1441, and from 
this time to the time of Sir Ralph Chamberlayne in 1562 the manor passed 
in the same course as that of Gedding, in Thedwestry Hundred. This year 
Sir Ralph Chamberlain is said to have sold to Edmund Jermyn. Davy, 
however, states that — Chamberlayne sold the manor to — Waller, not 
very lucid information. It would appear that Ralph Chamberlayne, 
nephew and heir of Sir Ralph Chamberlayne, had licence in 1561 to alien 
to Robert Thorp, and he in 1562 to alien to Edmund Jermyn. However 
this devolution may be, the manor ultimately vested in Waller, for he con- 
veyed it in 1609 to Thomas Kemp, who in 1614 conveyed it to Josias Fann- 
ther, who had married Elizabeth, daughter of the said Thomas Kemp. 

In 1762 the manor was vested in William Dawtrey or D'Autreys. In 
1822 it was vested in Alexander Adair, from which time the manor has 
devolved in the same course as the manor of Cratfield le Ros, in Blything 
Hundred, and is now vested in Captain Sir Frederick Edward Shafto Adair, 
4th Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

A rental of parcel of this manor in the Exchequer is referred to in the 
first Report on the Public Records in 1800, p. 181. 




NEDGING. 

I HERE was no manor in this place in Saxon times; The only 
holding mentioned in the Survey was that of the Abbot of 
Ely, also his in the time of the Confessor. It consisted of 
3 carucates of land, 8 villeins, 6 bordars, 3 serfs, 3 plough- 
teams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men (reduced to 
I at the time of the Survey), 8 acres of meadow, wood to 
support 6 hogs, and 1 mill. Of live stock there were 2 
rouncies, 14 beasts, 100 sheep, and 20 hogs, also a church with 7 acres, and 

2 socmen with 14 acres and i ploughteam, which at the time of the Survey 
had come down to 2 oxen. At this time also some of the details were altered, 
for though the bordar tenants had increased to 9, the villeins were reduced 
to 6, and the serfs had come down to i. The value was formerly £4, but 
at the time of the Survey was double. This holding was a league long and 

3 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 2^d.' 



Manor of Nedging. 

This lordship, with the advowson, was held by the Abbot of Ely in the 
time of the Confessor and the Conqueror. It was in 1210 held of the Bishop 
of Ely by Robert de Insula, who had here one knight's fee," and in 1264 he 



'Dom. ii. 385- 



'1210-12, Red Book of the Exchequer, 
Z40t^. 



NEDGING. 197 

had a grant of free warren here/ Robert was succeeded by another Robert 
de Insula (who in the Hundred Rolls was stated to have held two fees 
here of the Bishop of Ely and he of the King)% and this 2nd Robert 
de Insula was succeeded by Sir Warin de Insula, who died in 1298/ 
though Davy inserts a lord between the last two, viz., William de 
Ludam. The lordship does not seem, however, to have left the 
Insula family, for we find that though the author of the " Magna 
Britannica " makes Hervey de Staunton to be lord in 1281 and Davy 
mentions him as lord in 1302, yet in 1323 Sir Robert de Insula, who 
was the son of Sir Warin, presented to the living, and in 1340 a Robert, son 
of Robert de Insula, and Thomas, his brother, levied a fine of the manor 
against Sir Robert de Insula.* The error of the author of the " Magna 
Britannica " and Davy is explained by an entry on the Close Rolls in 13 10. 
Hervey de Staunton was merely a lessee. The entry referred to is of the 
enrolment of a deed of Hervey de Staunton, who held two parts of the Manor 
of Nedging, " the inheritance of Robert, son and heir of Sir Warin de 
Insula for life," by demise from Sir Warin, and by grant of the said 
Robert granting an annuity of ^^loo a year to the said Robert.' The 
grant by Robert de Insula to Hervey de Staunton is also on the Close 
Rolls.® There is besides on the same Rolls the enrolment of a deed by 
the above Robert granting an extension of the term to Hervey,'' who held 
one-third of the manor by demise from Sir Robert Fitz Wautier and Lady 
Alice his wife, mother of the said Robert de Insula as of her dower f so 
that Sir Warin's widow had evidently remarried Sir Robert Fitz Wautier, 
and in 1349 John de Insula, his son, presented to the living. The last John 
de Insula died in 1376. A presentation of the living was made in his life- 
time — in 1362 — by Sir Robert de Lysle, son of John. 

The next parties presenting were : — 

1374 Simon de Salle. 

1399 Sir Richard Waldegrave and others. 

1403 John Preston and others. 

141 1 Richard Norton and others. 

The manor seems to have been vested in Henry, Lord Scrope of 
Masham, who was attainted and beheaded in 1415, and was granted by the 
Crown to Sir John Phelip and Alice his wife, and the heirs male of their 
bodies. Sir John Phelip died without issue this same year,' and his widow 
Alice remarried William de la Pole, Marquis of Suffolk, when they had a 
grant or confirmation of the manor. He died in 1450,'° and the manor 
continued with his widow Alice until her death in 1475 (in fact there was 
an express grant from the King of it and Kettlebaston Manor in 1467 to 
her)," when it passed to her son and heir, John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, 
and in 1492 passed to his son and heir, Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, 
who was attainted, and the manor forfeited to the Crown.'^ A grant of the 

'Chart. RoUs, 48 Hen. III. 2. Ub. 25. 

^'H.R. ii. 151. 9I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 42. 

3 Extent I.P.M., 26 Edw. I. 29. "I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 

4 Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. III. 7. "Pat. RoUs, 7 Edw. IV. pt. iii. 6. 

5 Close Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 26d. " See as to manor, Rolls of Pari. v. 470, 

^Ib.25. 246. ; vi. 4746. 

f There is an order for the retention of the 

manor by Hervey de Staunton, 

clerk, on grant of other land in 1326, 

I.Q.D. 20 Edw. II., FHe 190, 7. 



igS 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



manor was made in 1509 to Edward Nevill to hold during the pleasure of 
the Sovereign.' 

The manor is mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Edmund de la Pole, 
Earl of Suffolk, in 1513, and is there said to have been held of the King by- 
fealty, and of the value of £g per annum." In 1514 it was assigned to 
Margaret de la Pole, the widow of Edmund, for life.^ 

Amongst the State Papers is the notice of a commission touching this 
grant, it being alleged that the manor had not been forfeited on the attainder 
of the Earl.* 

Margaret de la Pole died two years later, when the manor reverted to 
the Crown. It was granted later to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, 
who in 1538 exchanged it by deed with the Crown for other property.^ 
In 1554 the manor was granted to Sir Clement Higham, of Barrow, Chief 
Baron of the Exchequer in the time of Queen Mary,* in recognition of his 
services in supporting her right to the throne. In his will, dated loth Nov. 
1570, he refers to the manor thus : " And a§ for my mannor of Nedging 
that shall wholy remayne according as y' was given vnto me by the letters 
pattente thereof y* doth and may^ playnely appere." He died 9th May, 
1570-1, and the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John Heigham. By 
the inquisition taken on the death of Sir Clement it was found that he died 
seised of the Manor of Neddynge and lands, &c., in Chelsworth, Bildeston, 
and Whatfield, holden of the Crown in capite by the 40th part of a knight's 
fee. The manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John Heigham. 

In i'6i3 we learn from the Exchequer Special Commissions that the 
manor was supposed to be escheat on account of defective title.' 

On Sir John Heigham's death 2nd May, 1626, the manor vested in his 
son and heir. Sir Clement Heigham, who died 26th May, 1634. ^ little 
later we find the manor vested in Jaspar Despotin, M.D., an Italian physican, 
of Bury, who died seised in 1650, having devised it to his widow and Catherine 
Despotin, his daughter and coheir. Despotin had settled at Bury about 
the year 1611, having been introduced into practice there by his friend. 
Bishop Bedell, whom he accompanied to England on his return from the 
chaplaincy of the embassy at Venice. He was probably a convert made 
by the distinguished prelate, for it is stated in the life of Bedell that, "being 
disgusted with the corruptions of Romish worship, he came over to breathe 
a freer air." Of his professional skill, or rather, " unskilful and unfortunate 
advice," see Autobiography of Sir Symonds D'Ewes.^ 

By his will, which is dated 13th Dec. 1648, he leaves rings of gold, 
amongst others^ to the surviving feoffees of his Manor of Nedging 
and their wives, John Brand, of Edwardston and his wife, and 
John Bruninge, of Semer, clerk, and his wife. He also gives a legacy of £5 
to Mr. William " Bedle," of Rattlesden, clerk, who was the eldest son of the 
testator's old friend, the celebrated Bishop of Kilmore. As to the Manor of 
Nedging, he says : "And whereas the said John Brand and John Bruninge, 
by virtue of a feoffment made to them and others since deceased, are lawfully 
seized to them and theire heires in fee simple, of and in all that the Manor 



'Originalia, 1 Hen. VIII. 35. 

= I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. 1. 

3S.P. 5 Hen. VIII. 4205. 

4S.P. 5 Hen. VIII. 4254. 

5S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. I182 (l8«). 



6 See Manor of Barrow in Thingoe Hundred. 

Originalia, i and 2 P. and M. 5 

Pars. Rot. 83 ; Letters Patent P. 

and M. ; M. i Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 

23- 
'38 D.K.R. App. p. 94. 
«ii. 123, 143. 



NEDGING. 199 

of Nedging, and the advousion, donation, and free disposition of the church 
and rectory of Hedging aforesaid, and diverse mesuages, lands, tenem'% 
and hereditaments in Nedginge a;foresaid in trust, neuthelesse in confidence, 
and to such intents and purposes as by the deed of feoffment thereof made 
are expressed and declared, or should at any time after, by any wryting 
by me signed and sealed in the psence of foure credible wittnesses, or by 
my last will and testam' in writeinge be expressed or declared, ^ow I 
doe hereby, in pursuance of my sayd power, and for further declaracon of 
the said trust, will, devise, and appoint, and doe desire the said John 
Brand and John Bruninge, my sayd feoffees, upon reasonable request on 
that behalfe to be made soe soone after my death as conveniently maybe, 
to convey and assure unto Susan Despotin my wellbeloved wife, and to 
Catherine Despotin and Anne Despotin my onely daughters, and heire 
apparent, and theire heires, all that the said manor of Nedging, advousion, 
and all other the said messuages, lands tenem'^ and hereditaments in 
Nedging aforesaid, with all and singuler their appurtenances, to the_uses, 
intents, and purposes, and under the provisoes, condixions, and limitacons 
in and by this my psent last will and testament hereafter hmited, declared, 
devised, or appointed ; that is to say, for and touching the demesnes of the 
said manno" of Nedginge, and all other the sayd mesuages, lands, tenem" 
and hereditaments in Nedging aforesaid, with thapptnce, to the use of 
my sayd wellbeloved wife, for and dureing the term of her iirall life. And 
from and after her decease, then for and touching all that the manno"' 
house, or mancon house, or capitall mesuage in Nedging aforesayd, now 
or late in the occupacon of Stephen Chaplayn or his assignes, and all other 
the mesuages, lands, tenem'% and hereditaments in Nedging aforesaid, 
now or late alsoe in the occupacon of the said Stephen Chaplayn or his 
assignes, with the appt°°^, to the use of the said Catherine Despotin, my 
daughter, and her heires for ev ; to the intent and purpose neuthelesse 
that it shall and maybe lawfull to and for the sayd Anne Despotin, my 
daughter, and her heires, to have, take and receive out of the same one 
aiiuity or yearely rent of thirtie pounds per annu of lawfull money of 
England, payable _at the two usuall feasts of S'. Michaell th'archangell 
and_Th'annunciacon of the blessed Virgine Mary, by even and equall 
porcons ; the first payment thereof to beginne at such of the s"* feasts 
as shall next and imediately happen after the decease of my said wife, 
with power to distreine for the same in case it shall happen to be behind 
and unpayd by the space of eight and twentie dayes next after any of the 
s"* feasts ; with provisoe neiithelesse and condicon in the sayd conveyance 
to be conteyned, that in case the said Katherine Despotin, her heires or 
assignes, shall at any of the said feasts, or within one moneth after any of 
the said feasts, accompting eight and twentie dayes to the moneth, pay 
or cause to be payd to the sayd Anne Despotin, her heires or assignes, the 
full suine of five hundred pounds of lawfull money of England, at or in the 
then mancon house or place of habitacon of the said Anne Despotin, that 
then and from thenceforth the sayd aiiuity or yearely rent of thirty pounds 
per anum shall cease and be determined. And for and concninge that 
mesuage or tenem' in Nedging aforesayd, called or knowne by the name of 
Smjrthlands, and all other mesuages, lands, tenem'^, and hereditaments in 
Nedginge aforesayd, now or late in the occupacon of Robert Rose or his 
assignes, from and after the decease of the sayd Susan Despotin, my wife, 
to the use of the sayd Anne Despotin my daughter, and her heires forev. 
And for and concninge the royallties, services, quitt-rents, courts, and 
perquisitts of the said manno' of Nedginge, and the advousion of the church 



200 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Nedginge, to the use of the sayd Catherine Despotin my daughter, her 
heires, and assignes forev, as shalbe reasonably devised or advised and 
required ; and untill such conveyance and assurance shall be made by my 
sayd feoffees as aforesayd, I doe hereby devise limitt and appoint the said 
manno"^ of Nedginge, and advouson, and all other the said mesuages, lands, 
tenem'% hereditam'% and pmisses in Nedginge aforesayd, to my sayd 
wife and daughters respectively, for such estate and estates, and to such use 
and uses, and to the intents and purposes, and under the provisoe and 
condicon hereby before limited and declared ; and that the sayd John 
Brand and John Bruninge shall from and after my decease stand and be 
seised thereof in trust, for the use of my said wife, and daughters 
respectively for such estate and estates, and to such intents and purposes, 
and under such provisoe and condicon as aforesayd.'" 

The will was proved 22nd July, 1650." 

We lose sight of the manor here, but find the following persons presented 
to the living :— 

1672 John Foley, of Boxstead. 

1726 and 1729 Richard Philips. 

1763 Samuel Bolton, of Codderham, merchant. 

In 1812 Elizabeth Colman, wife of the Rev. John Edge, clerk, was lady 
of the manor. 

1822 Rev. William Edge. This last certainly was lord of the manor 
in 1844. From him it passed to the Rev. Charles Fane Edge, and in 1885 
was vested in his executors. 

The manor is now vested in the trustees or devisee of the late 
Richard Henry Wood, of Belmont, Sidmouth, Devon. 



' Tymm's " Wills of Bury," p. 202. *Bury Lib, Ashton pars, ii., p. 339. 




SEMER. 201 

MANOR OF SEMER. 

IHERE was one manor in this place, inconsistently stated in 
the Survey to be " always valued at los." It was held in 
the time of the Confessor and also at the time of the Survey 
by the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted of 3|- acres of 
land, II acres of meadow, 6 villeins, 13 bordars, i serf, 3 
ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, i 
mill,'! 16 beasts, 24 hogs, and 97 sheep. In Saxon times it 
was valued at ;^5, and increased to ;^6 at the time of the Survey. Also a 
church with 30 acres of land. The lordship was appropriated to the use of 
the celerer of the abbey. 

In the time of Rich. I. Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, settled the 
manor on Adam, son of Robert de Cockfield, for life, but it seems to have 
been transmitted by Robert to his daughter and heir, Nesta de Cockfield, 
married to Matthew de Leyham. She died without issue, leaving her 
aunts, one married to Barth. de Creke, another, Beatrice, married to Ralph 
de Berners, and another, Alice, married to William de Bellomonte or 
Beaumont, her heirs. 

In 1285 Godfrey de Bellomonte, John de Crek, and Ralph Berners, 
representing the three aunts of Nesta de Cockfield, brought a writ of right 
against the Abbot of St. Edmunds for this and other manors, on which a 
duel was fought and the abbot's champion worsted. 

In 1290 the Abbot of St. Edmunds held 2 parts, a fine being levied 
this year between Brother John, abbot of the church of St. Edmunds, 
and Ralph de Berners.' On the Patent Rolls for 1290 will be found the 
licence for the abbey of St. Edmunds to retain in mortmain 2 parts of both 
this manor and the Manor of Groton, which two parts are identified thus : 
" which Ralph de Berners and John de Creyk deraigned against the said 
abbey by wager of battle, and afterwards released in perpetuity."^ 

Godfrey de Bellomonte^ had a grant of free warren here in 1292,* and 
died seised of the remaining third of the manor without issue in 1293, 
when Cecilia de Ferrariis, his widow, is returned as entitled to a moiety — 
not necessarily a half, as some assert.' 

The abbey ultimately obtained the remaining third, which on Godfrey 
de Bellomonte's death without issue had, subject to the interest of his 
widow, passed to his brother and heir. Sir John de Bellomonte. The 
evidence is found on the Patent Rolls for 1297, where there is a licence for 
the abbey to retain in mortmain a third part of both this and Groton 
Manors, which Godfrey de Bello Monte late deraigned by wager of duel 
against the Abbot of Bury, and which John de Bello Monte, brother and 
heir of the said Godfrey, afterwards granted to the abbey and their suc- 
cessors by charter.® 

Alice, the widow of Sir John, however, sued the Abbot of St. Edmunds 
for a moiety of a third of this manor as dower. 

In 1329 the manor or a part seems to have been vested in Henry de 
Percy, styled " King's kinsman," for on the Patent Rolls for this year we 
find a licence for him to grant in frankalmoin a messuage and land in 
Semer, said to be parcel of the Manor of Semer, held of the King in chief 

' Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. I. II. " Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 33. 

''Pat. Rolls, 19 Edw. I. 22. = Extent, I.P.M., 21 Edw. l.-^^g. 

5 See Bowfield Manor, Trimley St. Mary, ^ Pat. Rolls, 25 Edw. I. pt. i. 19. 
Colneis Hundred. 

B I 



202 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. • 

by service of a thirteenth of a knight's fee, to two chaplains to celebrate in 
the church of St. Mary for the souls of Eleanor, his mother, and his 
ancestors.' 

The manor finally rested with the abbey, and it retained the same 
until the dissolution of the religious houses, when the manor passed to 
the Crown, and was in 1542 granted to Sir Clement Heigham, of Barrow," 
Chief Baron of the Exchequer in Queen Mary's reign. John Morines, who 
was in the service of John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, was resident at 
Semer Hall in the time of Hen. VHI., and his daughter married Sir Clement 
Heigham ; possibly this inclined Sir Clement to look favourably on Semer 
Manor. 

Particulars of the manor for the grant to Sir Clement Heigham will be 
found in the Public Record Office.' By his will, dated loth Nov. 1570, he 
gives this manor to his eldest son, John, in the following terms : " Item, I 
give and bequeathe vnto John Heigham, my eldest sonne, my mannor of 
Send (Semer) with thadvowson of the Churche there, with all and singuler 
thappent'anc' whatsoever To have and to hold unto the saide John Heigham, 
and to the heires males of his bodie lawfully begotten, and for defalte of 
soche yssue male of his bodie lawfully begotten, I will the saide manor of 
Seude with all and singuler thaapp'teunce holy remayne vnto Thomas 
Heigham, my seconde sonne, and to the heires males of his bodie lawfully 
begotten, and for defalte of soche ys^ue male of his bodie lawfully 
begotten then I will the saide manor of Seude with all and singuler thapp'- 
tenance holy remayne vnto William Heigham my youngest sonne and to the 
heires males of his bodie lawfully begotten, and for defalte of soche yssue 
male of the bodie of the saide William Heigham, lawfully begotten I will 
the saide manor of Send holy remayne vnto the heires males of me the said 
Clement Heigham lawfully begotten and for defalte of soche yssue then I 
will the saide manor of Send and all other thappteunces holy remayne unto 
the right heires of me the saide Clement Heigh' m for eu'." The will was 
proved 30th June, 1571. ^ 

Sir Clement Heigham died 9th March, 1570-1, and the manor passed to 
his son, Sir John Heigham, who, with others, had licence to alienate it to 
John Bronde or Brand, senior, and Benjamin Brand, his son. 

From the time of John Brand to the time of Jacob Brand, who 
succeeded his father in the lordship in 1705, the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Polstead, in Babergh Hundred. On Jacob Brand's 
death in 1756 this manor appears to have passed not to his son and heir, 
William Beale Brand, of Bildeston, but to his only other surviving child, 
Jane, married to the Rev. Thomas Cook, rector of Semer, for he appears as 
lord in 1764. 

Thomas Cook died in 1804, when the manor went to his widow, Jane, 
and on her death in 1804 to their son and heir, the Rev. Thomas Cook, 
rector of Bildeston, and on his death to his only son and heir, Thomas 
William Cooke, of Polstead, who died in 1825 without issue. The manor 
passed to his widow, Mary Anne, who remarried Charles Tyrell, of Haughley. 
On her death in 1849 the manor passed to her first husband's uncle and heir 
the Rev. Charles Cooke, rector of Semer. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
of James Young, of Clare, and on his death in 1838 the manor passed to his 
son, the Rev. James Young Cooke, rector of Semer, who was lord in 1855. 

'Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. III. pt. i. 22. ^35 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 221. 

*See Manor of Barrow Hall, in Thingoe 
Hundred. 



SEMER. 203 

He married ist Eleanor Mary, eldest daughter of the Rev. Fairfax 
Franklin, rector of Attleboro*, who died without issue in 1830, and 2ndly 
Frances Judith, 2nd daughter of the Rev. John Briggs, rector of Greeting. 
James Young Cooke died m 1875, and the manor passed to his son by his 
2nd marriage, the Rev. Charles Russell Cooke. He married Alice, daughter 
of Richard Newman, of Hadleigh, solicitor, and died without issue in 1892, 
aged 54, when the manor passed to his trustees, and was in 1896 acquired 
by the Rev. Francis J . Eld, rector of Polstead, in whom the same is now 
vested. 

The Court Rolls from 1385 to 1399, and from i486 to the present time, 
are fortunately extant, and in the possession of the owner of the lordship. 




204 THE MANORS OF SUFFOI.K. 

THORPE MORIEUX. 

I WO manors were held here by Roger de Poictou. The first 
consisted of 4 carucates of land, 7 villeins, i bordar, 2 serfs, 
3 ploughteams, i ploughteam belonging to the men, 7 
acres of meadow, 2 horses, 7 beasts, 60 hogs, and 140 
sheep, valued at £6. It was formerly held by a freeman. 
The appurtenances of the manor had altered at the time 
of the Survey. The villeins were reduced to 3, and the 
ploughteams to 2, the ploughteam belonging to the men had become 2 
oxen, the horses had disappeared, the beasts and hogs were reduced to 
7 and 9 respectively, and the value had decreased to £4. To the manor 
Norman, son of Tancred, added 7 freemen, with 25 acres (of which the Abbot 
of Bury had the soc and commendation), i ploughteam (which had dis- 
appeared at the time of the Survey), valued at 3s. Also a church with 
50 acres and 2 acres of meadow, i ploughteam (which was reduced to 2 oxen 
at the time of the Survey), and 2 villeins, valued at 6s. The place was a 
league long and 8 quarentenes broad and paid in a gelt ^d. 

The second manor consisted of 1^ carucates of land, 6 villeins, 2 bordars, 
2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne, and i belonging to the men, 5 acres 
of meadow, wood sufficient for the support of 4 hogs, 2 beast? , 26 hogs, 30 
sheep and 13 goats, valued at 60s. 

At the time of the Survey the villeins had become 7, the serfs were 
reduced to i, the ploughteams in demesne were reduced to i, and 
those belonging to the men to only half a team, the hogs were 14, and the 
sheep 13, the value being but 40s. This manor had formerly been held by 
a freeman. Wisgar, Richard's predecessor, had the commendation and 
soc. The six forfeitures belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds.' 

The abbot also held 20 acres and i freeman, valued at 3s. 4^. He 
also had commendation and soc.'' 

Manor of Thorpe Morieux. 

This was the lordship of Roger de Poictou in the time of William the 
Conqueror. In 1200 we find that Roger de Muryeus held a fee here, which 
fee 73 years later was held by Hugh de Morieus. It seems from the Hundred 
Rolls that he held this fee of Thomas de Ardern, and of the heirs of Nicholas 
Kiriel, and the said heirs of the King as of the Honor of Lancaster.^ 

Hugh de Morieus also held another fee in Thorpe Morieux of William 
de Hastings, who held of Nicholas de Hastings, who held of the King, also 
of the Honor of Lancaster.* In 1327 both these 2 fees are mentioned in the 
inquisition p.m. of Thos. Earl of Lancaster, as held by Thomas "Merious."^ 

Hugh de Morieus had a grant of free warren in 1287, and about 1313 
he was succeeded by his son and heir, John de Morieux, who died without 
issue, and was succeeded by his brother, Sir Thomas Morieux, who was 
High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1355. He was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Thomas Morieux, who was Constable of the Forces, &c. He married 
Blanch, natural daughter of John of Gaunt, by Catherine Turneford, and 
died without issue before 1388, when the lordship passed to his sister and 
heir, Mary, married to Richard Walkf are. Amongst the Additional Charters in 
the British Museum is a lease dated 2nd Mar. 11 Rich. II . [1388], from Richard 

■ Dom. ii. 3486. *Ib. 

"Dom. ii. 369, 369&. n.TM., i Edw. III. 88. 

3H.R. ii. 151. 



THORPE MORIEUX. 205 

Waldegrave, Walter atte Lee^ and Henry Grene, to Robert Hethe, Thomas 
Hethe, and Abel Bernan of this manor, and that of Felsham, " all lands and 
tenements late belonging to Sir Thomas Morieux in Suffolk, a hostel in Bury, 
and the advowson of Thorp and Felsham" for 6 years/ Sir Richard's 
daughter and coheir Alianora or Eleanor married Sir John L'Estrange, of 
Hunstanton, about 1384. 

Sir John L'Estrange was M.P. for Norfolk in 1388 and 1389, and died 
seised in 1418, and his widow in 1420, when the manor passed to their 
son and heir, John L'Estrange, who married Alice, daughter and heir of 
Nicholas Beaumont, of Pakenham, and his wife Eleanor, daughter and heir 
of John Pyke by his wife, the daughter and heir of John Rushbrooke. 
John L'Estrange died in 1436, for his will was proved this year. 

By an inquisition taken the same year this John L'Estrange was 
found to have died seised of the manor and advowson of Thorpe Moreiux, 
with the Manors of Brook Hall and Maydenhall, in Felsham/ John 
L'Estrange was succeeded by his son and heir, Roger L'Estrange, of Hun- 
stanton and Pakenham, who married Joane Beke. On his death he was 
succeeded by his second son (John L'Estrange, his eldest son having died 
without issue about 1467),^ Sir Henry L'Estrange. He married Katherine, 
daughter of Roger Drury, of Hawstead, and his will is dated 29th Nov. 1483. 
By it he desires to be buried in the chancel of the Church of Hunstanton in 
Norfolk, north wall, and appoints Katherine his wife, and Roger Drury, of 
Hawstead, his full executors. 

He directs masses to be celebrated for the souls of Sir Hugh and Sir 
Thomas Morieux, knights. Sir Henry L'Estrange died seised of this manor 
and the Manors of Pakenham and Stowlangtoft, 25th Nov. 1485, and was 
buried, according to his desire, in the chancel of the Church of Hunstanton. 
By the inquisition taken on his death he was found to have died seised of 
the Manor of Thorpe, with lands called " Virdones " and Astpne's in Thorpe 
Felsham, andHecham,and20s. rent,andthat Roger "Strange," aged 17, was 
his son and heir." 

Katherine, Sir Henry's widow, remarried Sir Robert Ratcliffe, of Attle- 
burgh, in Norfolk, and died in 1496. Sir Roger L'Estrange, the eldest son 
of Sir Henry, was esquire of the body to King Hen. VII., was Sheriff of 
Norfolk and Suffolk in i486, and created a Knight of the Bath at the 
marriage of Prince Arthur, 17th Nov. 1501. 

Sir Roger L'Estrange married Anna, daughter of Sir Henry Heydon, 
Knight, High Sheriff 1495, and died 23rd Oct. 1505. The inquisition found 
that John was his son and heir, and then aged 4 years.^ 

John L'Estrange died 25th May, 15 14, an infant, leaving his first cousin, 
Sir Thomas, son of Sir Robert L'Estrange, his uncle, his next heir.* Sir 
Robert L'Estrange, the father of Thomas, had married Anna, daughter 
and coheir of Thomas L'Estrange, of Walton D'EiA'ile, in Warwickshire, 
and had died in 1511. 

Sir Thomas L'Estrange, who was High Sheriff of Norfolk 1532, married 
Anne, daughter of Nicholas, Lord Vaulx, and his will is dated 1544. He 
died i6th Jan. 1544-5, when the manor \yent to his son and heir,Sir Nicholas 
L'Estrange, who married ist Eleanor, daughter of Sir William Fitzwilliam, 
of Milton, and 2ndly Katharine, daughter of John Hide. This manor, 
and the manor of Felsham, had been settled on Sir Thomas L'Estrange and 

'Add. Ch. 18671. "I.P.M., I Hen. VII. 52; 

^I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 52. sI.p.M., 2I Hen. VII. 107. 

n.PM., 7 Edw. IV. 34. 6I.P.M., 6 Hen. VIII. 125* 



206 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



his heirs by the executors of his uncle. Sir Roger, in performance of his last 
will. Sir Nicholas L'Estrange was knighted in Ireland the year of his 
father's decease ; was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1547, and Knight of 
the Shire for the former county in 1547-1552. In 1550 this Sir Nicholas L' 
Estrange sold the manor to William Rysby or Risbie,' who died seised 23 rd 
Sept. 1552,'' and was succeeded by his son and heir, Robert Risbie. 

He married Margery, daughter of Edward Rosse, of Nayland, and 
died 3rd May, ^ 1557, being succeeded by his son and heir, William Risbie. 
This William " Rysbye " held a court for the manor ist Sept. 17 Elizabeth 
[1575], and the roll of the same is in private hands. He married Katherine, 
daughter of George Smith, coheir to her mother, a daughter of Castleton, 
and died in 1596, when the manor passed to his son and heir, William 
Risbie, who had livery of the same this year. He married Bridget,daughter 
of Sir John Higham, of Barrow, being married at Barrow 21st March, 1592. 
He died 7th June, 1625," when he was succeeded by his son and heir, John 
Risby, who married at Kettlebaston, 2nd Oct, 1638, Margaret, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Jenny, of Brightwell, and on his death the manor passed 
to his son and heir, John Risby. He married Elizabeth, only 
daughter of Francis Cornwallis,' and held a court for the manor 25th 
April, 14 Car. II. [1662], the roll of which court is in private hands. 

On John Risby's death ist May, 1687, in his 49th year, he was succeeded 
by his son and heir, John Risby, who died 21st Jan. 1727, at the age of 64, 
and was succeeded by Catherine Risby, spinster, who died in 1747, also at the 
age of 64 years. In 1764 Johti Risby was lord. 

The manor subsequently went to James Goodeve Sparrow, descended 
from the Risbys. He married ist, 1799, Anne, youngest daughter and 
coheir of James Crowe, of Lakenham, Norwich, and 2ndly, i8th Dec. 1817, 
Dorothy, daughter of Rev. Basil Bury Beridge, of Algarkirk, co. Lincoln, 
and died 3rd Oct. 1838, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry 
Weare Sparrow, who assumed the name of Beridge by royal licence 31st 
May, 1882, on inheriting Algarkirk from his uncle, and dying without issue 
in 1895 the manor passed to his trustees and then to his nephew, Basil 
James Harold Sparrow, son of Basil Sparrow (by JuHa, daughter of James 
Scratton, of Prittlewell Priory), who had died 21st Sept. 1880. Basil James 
Harold, M.A., of Gosfxeld Place, Halstead, Essex, assumed by royal licence 
in 1895 the name and arms of Beridge in lieu of Sparrow. He married 
in 1882 Mafgaret Louisa, daughter of Henry Capel Elliot. 

Arms of Morieux : Gu., a bend Arg. billetee Sa. Of L'Estrange : 
Gu., two lions passant Arg. Of Risby : Gu. on a bend Arg., 3 cross- 
crosslets Sa.^ Of Beridge : Arg., a saltier nebuly between two bears' 
heads erased in pale, and as many escallops in f esse Sablen 



Manor of Gorget's or Gorges* 

This manor seems to have gone with the main manor, so far as we can 
gather, until 1609, when the site of the manor was held by John Brond, 
after which we do not find any information touching it. 



' Fine, Easter, 4 Edw. VI. 
*I.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 65. 
3 1.P.M., 3 and 4 P. and M. 
* I.P.M., I Car. I. I, 102. 



137- 



5 She died 13th Jan. 1705. 
^Davy, in his pedigree of the family of 
Risby assigned it a different coat. 



THORPE MORIEUX. 



207 



Mention is made in the inquisition p.m. of John L'Straunge and 
Alice his wife, in 1437, of the tenement called " Gorges in Thorpe Morieux/" 
and in the inquisition p.m. of William Risbie, who died 23rd Sept. 1552, 
leaving Robert, his son and heir/ and of Robert Risbie, who died 3rd May, 
1557, leaving William, his son and heir.^ 

The property was described in 1789 as consisting of two freehold farms 
in Thorpe Morieux. " The homestall, a great farm, is a manor farm with 
its free rents, quit rents, and manorial rights and privileges, and consists 
of 203a. 3r. 24p., and is called or known by the name of the Manor of 
Gorgetts.* In 1818 the manor farm of Gorgets was stated to consist of 
290 acres, while in 1828 the description runs, "The Manor and Manor Farm 
of Gorgets, containing 212 acres. "^ 

Manor of Throgton aL Thruton al. Castell's. 

In 1289 Bartholomew de Castello appears to have acquired this manor 
under a fine levied this year against Robert de Burgate and Juliana his 
wife.* He was living in 1325, for we find from the Close Rolls of this year 
that he acknowledged owing John de Shirbourn £50, to be levied in default 
of payment on his lands in Suffolk.' 

Bartholomew de Castello by Alienora his wife, had a son John 
living in 1351, for he then paid 50s. for half a fee held here of the Earl of 
Oxford, who held of the Earl of Clare. 

This manor subsequently passed to Ralph Chamberlain," and from him 
passed in the reign of Hen. VI. to his son and heir, Sir Roger Chamberlain. 
From his death in 1464 to about 1580 the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Gedding, in Thedwestry Hundred. 

A fine was in 1580 levied of " Casteleyn's Manor," which may possibly 
relate to this manor. It was levied by John Godsalf against John Havell 
and others, and included lands in Kersey, Hadleigh, Lindsey, Semer, and 
Whatfield.' 

By 1597 the manor had been acquired by John Brond, who was then 
lord, and the descent of the manor is given in the Rawlinson MSS. in the 
Bodleian." In 1602 we find amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Records, Cal. 
to Pleadings, a suit as to relief for this manor, and suit and service to Court, 
Layton v. Bronde."^' 

In 1414 we meet with a fine of a moiety of the Manor of Thorpe Morieux 
and that of Felsham and the advowson between William Clopton, WiUiam 
Rokewood, Thomas Hethe of Mildenhall, Edmund Wynter, Thos. Hethe of 
Saxham, Giles de Perye and Walter, against Richard Hethe and Elizabeth 
his wife. It affected lands in Thorpe Morieux, Felsham, Gedding, Bradfield 
St. Clare, Preston, Kettlebaston, Brettenham, Hitcham, Bildeston, and 
Rattlesden.'^ 



' I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 52. 
''I.P.M., 6Edw. VI. 65. 
3I.P.M., 3 and 4 Phil, and M. 137. 
* Ipswich Journal, 27th June, 1789. 
^ Ipswich Journal, 12th July, 1828. 
6 Feet of Fines, 15 Edw. I. 51. 
"Close Rolls, 3 Edw. III. iid. 



" See Manors of Chamberleyns, in Stoke by 
Nayland, in Babergh Hundred, and 
Gedding Manor, in Thedwestry 
Hundred. 

'Fine, Easter, 22 Eliz. 

" Rawl. B. 319. 

" [44] Eliz. 8. 

"Feet of Fines, 2 Hen. V. 10. 




208 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WATTISHAM. 

jMONG the lands of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, was a 
holding consisting of 80 acres^ 3 bordarSj i serf, i ploughteam 
in demesne and 1^ acres of meadow. The live stock con- 
sisted of 3 rouncies, 8 beasts, 3 hogs, and 80 sheep, and the 
latter were considerably altered at the time of the Survey, 
the rouncies having increased to 5, the beasts to 11, and the 
hogs to 25, while the sheep had disappeared. The value 
was 25s. The soc belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. This holding 
formerly belonged to Uluric, a freeman, and at the time ot the Survey 
belonged to Phin's fee.' 

In the same township were 15 acres, valued at 2s. 6d., formerly held 
by a freeman. The soc belonged to Wisgar, and the six forfeitures to the 
Abbot of Bury. 

Eudo, son of Spirwic, had a holding in this place, consisting of i caru- 
cate of land, 3 bordars, i ploughteam, and 3 acres of meadow, valued at 
20s. The six forfeitures belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It was 
held at the time of the Survey by Jarnac, and at the time of the Confessor 
by a freeman over whom the Abbot of Ely had the commendation and 
soc.^ 

Manor of Wattisham Hall. 

This was the holding of Uluric, a freeman, in Saxon times, and of 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert de Clare, in the time of ttie Survey. The 
ancient family of Wachesham, which derives its name from hence, became 
very early seated in this place, and held this manor by the serjeanty 
of the peculiar character under which the Manor of Hemingston, in Clay don 
Hundred, was held. Giles de Wachesham is mentioned in the Testa de 
Nevill as holding 30 acres here.^ 

In the early part of the 13th century the manor was vested in Osbert 
de Wachesham, son of Gerard. The Red Book of the Exchequer assigned 
to him a knight's fee of the Bishop of Ely here.* But at the same time 
Beatrice, widow, was holding 3 knights' fees of the bishop.' Osbert died 
seised in 1227, and Isabel de Wachesham, his widow, in 1234 resided here. 
The manor passed to Osbert' s son and heir. Sir Giles de Wachesham,* who 
had a grant of free warren here 1248.'' He held part of this manor of 
Sir Peter de Taleword in chief, by the service of one knight's fee, and the 
residue of the Bishop of Ely in chief by a like service. 

He died in 1267,^ and the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Giles de 
Wachesham, on whose death in 1272,' it went to his son and heir. Sir Gerard 
de Wachesham." From the Patent Rolls for 1299 we learn that a commission 
was issued on the complaint of John de Bocland that this Gerard de Wache- 
sham, and others had entered his manor at Wattisham and carried away 
his goods." Possibly this was the Manor of Loose, which apparently was 
formerly a Manor of Wattisham. On Sir Gerard de Wachesham' s death" 

'Dom. ii. 391. ^I.P.M., 52 Hen. III. 14, or File 35 (10). 

^Dom. ii. 433. 9I.P.M., i Edw. I. 9 ; 3 Edw. I. 28. 

3T. de N. 286. "H.R. ii. 151. See Stanstead Manor, in 

+ 1210-12, Red Book of the Exchequer, Babergh Hundred. 

Mod. " Pat. RoUs, 27 Edw. I. 21 ; 28 Edw. I. 

5 lb. 33d., zgd. 

6 He gave to Castleacre Priory, in Norfolk, " See Stanstead Manor, in Babergh Hun- 

two parts of the tithes of this dred, and Manor of Wortham Hall, 

parish. in Hartismere Hundred. 

7 Chart. Rolls, 32 Hen. HI. pt. i. 6. 



WATTISHAM. 209 

in 1294, the manor passed to his son, Sir Gerard or Sir Giles, and on his death 
to his son and heir, Sir Giles de Wachesham, who was Sheriff of Norfolk, 
and M.P. in 1326 and 1333. The manor shortly afterwards vested in Sir 
Robert de Wachesham. He was a cousin of the last-mentioned Sir Giles, 
being the great-great-grandson of John, the brother of Sir Giles de Wache- 
sham, great-grandfather of Sir Giles, the last holder of the manor. We 
meet with a fine levied of the manor in^ I3'40 by this Robert de Wachesham 
and Joan his wife against William de Hedersete, parson of Attleburgh 
Church, and Walter Laurenz, parson of Nauelton Church.' 

Sir Robert de Wachesham married Joan, daughter and heir of Simon 
Hetherset, justice, 1314, and died in 1366, when the manor passed to his 
daughter and coheir, Winesia, or by some called Jane, married to Sir 
Oliver Wythe. From them it passed to Sir John Wythe, who, dying in 
1387, it went to his daughter and coheir Agnes, married to Sir William 
Calthorpe. 

There seems to have been another daughter, married first to Sir Henry 
Inglose and secondly to Sir William Besset. 

In 1471 Roger Townshend and William Calthorpe held a moiety. Sir 
William Calthorpe, son and heir of Sir William, was lord, and in 1494 Sir 
Philip Calthorpe, girandson and heir. From an inquisition taken in 1495 
we learn that the manor was worth 20 marks, and was held of the Bishop 
of Ely, that William Palmer being seised, enfeoffed trustees to use of Sir 
William Calthorpe's will. Sir William Calthorpe died 15th Nov, 1494,^ 
and Philip Calthorpe, aged 30, his grandson, was his heir, being the son of 
John, his son.^ Sir Philip Calthorpe died in 1535, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir Philip Calthorpe. He died 7th April, 1549, when the 
manor passed to his daughter, Elizabeth, widow of Sir Henry Parker.* 
Elizabeth seems to have married 2ndly Sir William Wodehouse of Waxham, 
and 3rdly Drue Drury. 

At the opening of the 17th century we find the manor vested in Thomas 
Dandy, and amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Records will be found a suit 
in 1602, as to relief for this manor, and suit and service to Court. The 
suit is Layton v. Dandy J' Thomas Dandy died in 1607, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Edmund Dandy. 

A little later we find Hugh Lancaster, of Lidgate, seised, from whom the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Lancaster, and subsequently we 
find Simon Blomeville or Blomfield, of Coddenham, lord. He died seised 
in 1633, when the manor passed to his son and heir, William Blomeville, of 
Bildeston, and from him, on his death in 1672, to his son and heir, John 
Blomeville,* who married Mary, daughter and heir of Henry Whiting, of 
Ipswich, and died in 1696. 

Mr. Porter, of Ipswich, held the manor by purchase about 1825. The 
manor was advertised for sale at the White Horse, Ipswich, 27th Aug. 1829, 
when it was stated that there was held with the manor the principal part of 
the capital mansion house, 27 messuages, and other buildings, and 420 
acres. The amount of quit and free rents was stated to be £20. 12s. lo^d. 
per annum, the average of fines for the eight years previous to be £70^. See 

' Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. III. 4. ' Duchy of Lane, Cal. to Pleadings, [44] 

* See Manor of Brome Hall, in Hartismere Eliz. 7. 

Hundred, and Lound Manor, in *For Blomeville family see Bridge Place 

Lothingland Hundred. Manor, Coddenham, in Bosmere 

3 Inquis., II Hen. VH. 975. and Claydou Hundred. 

4 1.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 148. ^I^swich Journal, 1st Aug. 1829. 

C I 



210 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

also another sale advertised to take place in London in 1838.' The manor 
was about 1834 sold to Richard Wilson, of Bildeston. 

He was the son of George Wilson, of Hepscot, co. Northumberland, and 
had been elected M.P. for Ipswich in 1806, with the Hon. Capt. Stopford. 
He practised as a solicitor in Gray's Inn, and acted for several years as 
steward to Lord Chedworth, during which time he succeeded in recovering 
for that nobleman upwards of £60,000, which his predecessor had fraudu- 
lently put out in his name. On his patron*s death in 1804, he was left by 
will (the validity of which was unsuccessfully attacked) the sum of ;f 40,000. 
His wife was Haimah Selby, who had previously carried on business as a 
milliner at Ipswich. 

Richard Wilson died June, 1834, ^S^^ 74> ^^^ was buried in a vault 
near the centre of the Church of Bildeston. The manor passed to his son 
and heir, Richard Percy Wilson, who died unmarried in 1837 ^^ ^^^ early 
age of 39, leaving his two sisters, Sarah and Elizabeth, his coheirs. Sarah 
married the Rev. John Heywood, Randolph, 2nd son of the Bishop of London ; 
and Elizabeth married the Rev. Montagu Oxenden, son of Sir Henry 
Oxenden, Bart., of Wingham, co. Kent. The manor was advertised for sale 
at the Golden Lion, Ipswich, 17th May, 1842, when it was stated that about 
2O0 acres were held of it, and that the free and quit rents then amounted 
to £ti. 3s. 3^^. per annum.'' 

In 1847 the manor was held by Messrs. Last, Wallace, & Last, 
solicitors, of Hadleigh. In 1855 the Rev. Richard Daniel, of Combs, was 
lord. In 1885 the executors of J . F. Robinsbn held the manor, and it recently 
belonged to the late Richard Henry Wood, of Belmont, Sidmouth. The 
hall, occupied as a farmhouse, is still surrounded, or partly so, by a moat. 

Arms of Wachesham : Arg. a fesse and a chief 2 crescents Gu. 



^Ifswich Journal, 14th April, 1838. ^ Ipswich Journal, 7th May, 1842. 




WHATFIELD. 211 

WHATFIELD. 

I WO holdings in this place were those of Robert Blunt. The 
first consisted of 60 acres and 2 ploughteams (which had 
become i at the time of the Survey). It was valued at 
6s., and at the time of the Survey at 20s. The estate had 
formerly been held by 5 freemen. Over one the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds had commendation, and over all the soc. 
Robert Blunt'spredecessor had neither commendation nor soc. 

The second holding consisted of 63 acres and 2 ploughteams (which had 
become half a team at the time of the Survey), valued at 10s. 8d. This 
estate had formerly been held by 4 freemen.' 

Among the lands of Robert, Earl of Mortaign, were 15 acres, valued at 
4od., formerly held by a freeman. The soc belonged to the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds." 

Among the lands of Roger Bigot was an estate of 15 acres, valued at 
2s. 6d., which he held from Hosdenc. In the time of the Confessor it 
had been held by a freeman, over whom the Abbot of St. Edmunds had 
commendation and soc complete.^ The Abbot of St. Edmunds had a hold- 
ing in thisplaceof 18 freemen, having 2|-carucates of land, 7 acres of meadow, 
6 bordars, and 4 ploughteams, valued at 40s. (which at the time of the 
Survey had increased to 50s.). Of this land Berard held i carucate, 3 
freemen, and i ploughteam, valued at 20s., out of the said value. The soc 
and sac and commendation belonged to the abbot. It was 6 quarentenes 
long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt 5^^. Others had holdings here." Another 
holding mentioned was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and con- 
sisted of 60 acres, 3 bordars, i| ploughteams (which at the time of the 
Survey were 2 teams), valued at los. It had formerly been held by 3 free- 
men. Over these Richard, son of Earl Gislebert's predecessor, had com- 
mendation and soc and sac in the time ot the Confessor, the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds having the six forfeitures.' 

Roger de Oburville had an estate in this place, consisting of 60 acres, 
2 bordars, i ploughteam (which was reduced to half a team at the time 
of the Survey), and i acre of meadow, valued at los. The commendation 
and soc belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The estate had formerly 
been held by a freeman.^ 

Another holding was that of Ranulf Peverell, consisting of 20 acres, 
valued at 2od., formerly belonging to Lestan, of which the soc belonged to 
the Abbot of St. Edmunds.' 

The last estate was that of a .socman of the abbey, consisting of 100 
acres and i ploughteam (which had gradually disappeared at the time of 
the Survey), valued at ids., held by Berard, the abbot's man, of the abbot 
Robert, son of Corbuzzo, being the Domesday tenant in chief.^ 

Manor of Whatfield Hall. 

This was the lordship of Thomas de Cokefeld in 1314, and in 1428 was 
still in the same family in the person of Richard de Cokefield. A fine was 
levied of the Manor of Whatfield in 1357-8 by Giles de PateshuU against 
Sir WilUam de PateshuU,^ and another in 1367 by Roger de Bello Campo, 

' Dom. ii. 440. ^Dom. ii. 405. 

^Dom. ii. 292. 'Dom. ii. 4176. 

3 Dom. ii. 330&. 8 Dom. ii. 426. 

■^Dom. ii. 369. 9 Feet of Fines, 31-32 Edw. III. 19. 

5 Dom. ii. 3976. 



212 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



sen., and Sibilla his wife, against Thos. Wake, of Blysworth, and Alice his 
wife, but it relates only to a fourth part of the manor.' There is also a 
third fine levied of the manor and advowson, or rather of a moiety of these, 
in 1379, between Wilham Berard and John Crispyngg and Joan his wife."" 
A fourth part is mentioned in the inquisition p.m., of Thomas Faucombrige, 
in 1382,^ and a half in that of Roger de Bello Campo the following year." 

In the beginning of the i6th century the manor was acquired by Sir 
James Hobart, and from him descended to Henry Hobart, who died in 1561, 
in the same course as the Manor of Trimley St. Mary, in Colneis Hundred. 
Henry Hobart, with others, levied a fine of the manor in 1531 against Nicholas 
Rokewode and others/ and in 1546 sold the manor to Sir John Spring.^ 
The fine included the Manor of Milding, and also the advowson of Milding 
Church. Sir John Spring died 7th Feb. 1547, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir William Spring, who died in 1599, when it vested in 
John Spring, who in 1601 just before his death sold the manor to Nicholas 
Strutt.^ 

In 1602 we meet with a suit as to relief for the manor and lands and 
tenements in an action between Layton and Strutt amongst the Duchy of 
Lancaster Records.^ From Nicholas Strutt the manor passed to John 
Strutt about 1609. It later vested in William Vesey, who died in 1699, 
and afterwards passed to William Mayhew, of Colchester, who held in 1764. 
Later we find the manor vesfted in Mr. Cooke, and in 1847 ^^ was held by 
Mary Anne Tyrrell, of Polstead. In 1855 the manor was vested in Charles 
Tyrrell, and in 1885 in Miss Cooke. 

Leases of this manor in 1388 and 1497 are amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum." 



Manor of Berrard's Hall. 

This was vested in the early part of the i6th century in Thomas Spring, 
who died 29th June, 1523," when it passied to his son and heir. Sir John 
Spring. A fine was levied of the manor in 1536 by Sir Thomas Jermyn 
against Edmund Lee." It is, of course, possible that this fine related to a 
manor of the same name in Old Newton. Sir John Spring" died 12th Aug. 
1547,'^ when the manor passed under his will dated 8th June, 1544/" after a 
devise to his executors for eleven years, to his son and heir. Sir William 
Spring, then aged 18. 

A fine of the manor was in 1570 levied against him by John Higham 
and others.'^ Sir William Spring died 3rd Feb. 1599. He seems, however, 
to have sold during his lifetime, for in 1588 we find the manor vested in 
Bridget Rolfe, widow, and from her it passed in 1624 to her son and heir, 
William Rolfe, of Hadleigh. 

In 1637 Sir George Waldegrave, of Hitcham, died seised, and the manor 
passed to his daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to Arthur Cooke. 



' Feet of Fines, 41 Edw. III. 
2 Feet of Fines, 3 Rich. 20. 
3 1.P.M., 6 Rich. II. 180. 
4I.P.M., 7 Rich. II. 22. 
sFine, Hil. 23Hen. VIII. 

6 Fine, Mich. 38 Hen. VIII. 

7 Fine, Easter, 43 Ehz. 

8Cal. to Pleadings, [44] Eliz. ( 
9 Add. Ch. 18672, 18673, 9132. 
ioI.P.M., 15 Hen. VIII. 17. 



" Fine, Hil. 28 Hen. VIII. 

"See Manors of Netherhall, Little Walding- 
field, Babergh Hundred, and Manors 
of Woodhall, in Rattlesden and 
Pakenham, in Thedwestry Hun- 
dred. 

'3 1.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 65. 

'< Proved aist May, 1549. 

'SFine, Mich. 12 Eliz. 



WHATFIELD. 



213 



Later the manor vested in Thomas Martin, and subsequently vested 
in Robert Bower, and later in George Henry Bower, of Rossington, and 
John William Bower, of Barmston, both in Yorkshire, who each held 
jointly one fourth part. 

In 1885 this manor was vested in W. H. Nunn, and it is now vested in 
Mr. Charles James Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

Manor of Peyton's or Mannor's. 

Of this lordship William Timperley died seised in 1528, and from this 
time to the death of Nicholas Timperley, in 1624 the manor passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Hintlesham, in Samford Hundred, shortly 
after this date becoming extinguished. 

Manor of Hornham. 

We learn little of this lordship save that it belonged to Robert Barwell, 
and later to Sir Robert Pocklington, of Chelsworth, Knt. 

Manor of Furneaux. 

This was the estate of Robert de Furneaux, from whose family it derived 
its name in the opening of the 14th century. Robert Furneaux died seised 
in 1313 of a messuage and200 acres of land, 5 acres i rood of meadow, 5 acres 
of wood, and 13s. jd. rent, and 40 acres of the Manor of " Neddings," 20 acres 
land and pasture." On the Close Rolls of the following year we find a 
demise by Hervey de Staunton and Thomas de Essex for the use of Sir 
William de Vallibus and Burgia his wife of the custody of the lands in 
Whatfield, that Sir Robert de Furneaux held of Hervey in chief of the Manor 
of Nedging during the minority of John, son and heir of the said Robert. '' 

Sir John Furneaux died in 1349. I^ ^3^8 he had levied a fine of the 
manor with his wife Maria against William Visdelieu and Saier Suyllard, 
parson of Rendlesham Church.^ He was succeeded by his son John. 

In 1388 we find the manor vested in Thomas Hethe, 3rd son of John 
Hethe, for in that year he, with Ralph Hemenhal, Reginald de Nanton, 
John Wryghte of Hecham, John Cokebred of Hecham, Thomas Tumour 
of Combs, and Thomas Cainer, granted a lease of it for 7 years. The lease 
is dated the Monday after Michaelmas, 12 Rich. III., and has affixed 6 
seals.* On the death of Thomas Hethe in 1440,^ the manor passed to his son, 
George Hethe, of Mildenhall. He, prior to 145 1, granted the manor to 
Laurence Cheyne, Philip Bottilere, John Cheyne, Robert Borle, and John 
Wryght, of Mildenhall, as trustees, who by deed dated ist May, 1451, 
granted the same to the said George Hethe and Margaret his wife, and the 
heirs of their bodies.* 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a lease of 
the manor, granted by George Hethe, 7th August, 36 Hen. VI. [1458], 
for seven years to Augustus Parker of Nedynge, Henry Parker of Semere, 
and John Parker, of Aldeham. The lease is dated at " Blydeston," and has 
three seals.^ On the death of George Hethe, the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Francis Hethe,' who died in 1480,^ when the manor passed to his 



' I.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 12. 
^CloseRolls, 8Edw. II. 

3 Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. 

4 Add. Ch. 18672. 

5 Will 1st March, 1440. 



II. 40. 



6 Add. Ch. 9129. 

'Add. Ch. 18756. 

'See Timworth Manor, in Thedwestry 

Hundred. 
9I.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 24. 



214 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

daughters and coheirs, Margaret and Agnes.' Margaret married George 
Bokenham, of Snetherton, in Norfolk, and amongst the Additional Charters 
in the British Museum is a deed indented dated the rst March, 12 Hen. VII. 
[1497], by which the said George Bokenham and Margaret his wife assure 
to Humphyrey Catesby and Grace his wife, formerly wife of Francis " Hey th ' ' ' 
and mother of the said Margaret, this manor for the term of the life of the 
said Grace, rendering annually i sol.^ 

No doubt the Bokenhams acquired the whole manor, for on the death 
of George Bokenham, 21st Sept. 1525, it passed to his widow, Margaret. 
Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum we find a lease of 
the manor from this Margaret, described as " Margaret Bokynham of Sny- 
terton, co. Norfolk, widow of George Bokynham," to Robert Snellynge, of 
Elmesset, John Snellyngsof the same, and Robert Laundeswan, of Marty- 
sham, yeoman for 20 years. The lease is dated 24th Sept. 27th Hen. VIII. 
[1535].* Subject to the widow Margaret's interest, the manor passed to her 
son and heir, Thomas Bokenham, and from this time to the time of Sir John 
Carryll, his grandson, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Thelnetham, in Blackbourn Hundred. It is specifically mentioned in the 
inquisition p.m. of John Bokenham, who died 1st Aug. 1551.' 

Sir John Gary 11 by a deed dated 26th July, 25 Eliz. [1583], in which 
he is described as of Warneham, in the county of Suffolk, sold and conveyed 
the manor to Thomas Robertes and Alicia his wife. This deed of conveyance 
is still in existence, and in private hands."^ 

Amongst the Records of the Duchy of Lancaster is a suit as to ingress 
fine, and suit and service to Court for this manor, which Thomas Robertes 
had purchased from Sir John Carrill, and claimed to hold of Sir John Higham 
as of the Manor of Nedging. The suit is " Layton v.' Roberts" and was 
brought in the 44th year of Queen Elizabeth.^ 

We also find amongst the Chancery Proceedings an action by John 
Greenwood against this Thomas Robertes to obtain admittance to copy- 
holds held of this manor, " late the estate of Thomas Greenwood, pltfs 
father "^ Thomas Robertes died seised in 1636, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas Robertes, who died in 1680. This manor was 
in 1855 vested in Lady Austen, and is now vested in Mr. Charles James 
Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

There are leases of this manor in 1451-1458 and 1535, amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum.® 

There seems to have been a manor called Tudenham's, of which Robert 
de Tudenham died seised,'" of a fourth part. Sir Thomas Tudenham" and 
Margaret Bedingfield." 

It is said by Kirby that there is another Manor, called Cosford, which 
formerly belonged to Sir Henry D'Oyly, and later to the Countess of Dysart, 
but Cosford Manor is in Hadleigh. 

Arms of Furneaux : Gu. a bend betw. 6 cross-crosslets, Arg. 

'There seems to have been another ^See, too, Fine, Mich. 25-26 Ehz. 

daughter, Elizabeth, married to 7Cal. to Pleadings, 44 Eliz. 24. 

Osbert Mundeford. sc.p. i. 385. 

"She was a daughter of Thomas Saye, of sAdd. Ch. 9129, 18756, 18819. 

Layer-de-Ia-Hay, Essex. "I.Q.D., 5 Hen. V. 2; I.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 

3 Add. Ch. 9132. 42. 

4 Add. Ch. 18819. " I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

5 1.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 86. " I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 



HARTISMERE HUNDRED. 



Httchm 

COXS. 
QCetttelia/hm 



^ HV i^^ 




SAXTON, 
1576. 




_^^_. Ai 0i3e I 






tim 



Bu^^' 



(Pii^raue 






^it. 



HERTE SME 'ARE yKe%/iM ' 
^^^^ -BrvifW ,^^e^ irtr- 









"'BrfKt^lCTi- 



^ '«m _ d. "jfe.. 

"C COiSjirFOB.D\ 




SPEED, 
1610. 












^iTtHfiitrvo ■Fynreymtham 






-.JiaStfn 



Mrn/iyim. 





' • ' • i' ^ ' 

S^F OR D 



BOWEN, 

Mil. 



















TTurrnfun 



.y 



',f>' 



WMe 



r4». ^^ - 1' 

A, Ajim" ■••- '^ '" 







HARTISMERE HUNDRED. 
Hartesmere, Hartsmere, Hertesmere, Hertismere. 

|HIS Hundred is bounded on the east by that of Hoxne, on 
the west by that of Blackbourn ; on the north by the River 
Waveney, which divides it from Norfolk, and on the south 
by the Hundreds of Bosmere and Clay don and Stow. It 
forms a Union under the Poor Law, and a Deanery which 
was formerly in the Archdeaconry of Sudbury, but was 
added to the Archdeaconry of Suffolk in i83;7, ^■nd is still 
in the diocese of Norwich. It is a fertile district averaging about lo miles 
in length and breadth, and has generally a strong loamy soil, with a sub- 
stratum of impervious blue clay lying at the depth of from i to 2 feet. It 
is one of the Geldable Hundreds of Suffolk, and the fee of it was granted in 
tail male by Edward III. to Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk in 1337. 
In 1369 on Robert's death,' his son William inherited, and it reverted on his 
death'' to the Crown, who granted the same to the De la Poles. It later 
vested in Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who granted it to the Crown 
in exchange in 1538.^ In 1844 it was vested in John Henry Heigham of 
Hunston Hall. 

Hartismere contains 50,088 acres, divided into 32 parishes, and 81 
manors. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Aspall 


Aspall. 




Eye or Eye Sode- 


Bacton 


Bacton. 

Boys or Horinger's. 




mere Netherhall. 




Flemworth Hall. 




/ Old Hall. 


Eye 


Cranley al. Cranley 




New Hall. 


Hall. 


Braiseworth 


Bowell'sHallor 




Eye Hall al. Eye 




Boville's. 




Priory. 




Barnies or Rooky's. 




' Finningham Hall or 
Coniers. 
Necton Hall or Nor- 


Brockford . . 


Brockford Hall, now 
with Wetheringset 


Finningham - 




Stoneham's. 




[ ton Hall. 




Brome Hall or Da- 




/SwatshallHall. 


Brome .... 


villers. Ling Hall. 




Rushies now with 




Monk's Brome. 




Jennies. 


Burgate .... 


Burgate. 
Higham. 




Jennies. 
Gislingham,Golding- 




/ Cotton Briseworth. 


Gislingham . . 


< ham, or Golding- 




Cotton Hempnall or 




ham Hall. 


Cotton 


j Caldecott. 




Lawford and CoUes- 




Campine's or Cham- 




ford. 




pain's. 




Gislingham and 




> Gipswich. 




\ Heighams. 



'I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. ii. 38. 
'I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 



3S.P. ii. 1 182, i8fl. 



2l6 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 



Mellis 



Mendleshani 



Oakley . 



Occold 

Palgrave 

Redgrave . 
Redlingfield 

Rickitighall 
Superior 

Risharigles . 
Stoke Ash . 



Stuston 



Manors. 



Mellis. 
St. John. 
Lancaster al. Werts 

or Pountneys. 
Heigham Hall, called 

Barrington's. 
Mendlesham. 
Winchesters. 
Cordeboef s or Free 

Tent. Corbornes. 
Busshes or Buces al 

Busses. 
FledeHallorFledd's 

Hall. 

Oakley or Hoo Hall 
Beauchamps in Oak- 
ley (? Woodhall). 
Occold or Occold 

Hall. 
Bedingham or Ben- 

ningham. 
Palgrave. 
Fenhouse. 
Redgrave. 
Redlingfield. 
Facon's Hall. 
St. John's or Fitz 

John. 
Crowe's Hall. 
Rishangles. 
Stoke Hall. 
Stoke Ash with 

Thorpe. 
Wood Hall. 
Faucon's al. Fakons 

or Falcons. Bezil- 

lers or Boyland's. 
Beauchamps. 
Hugh or Hoo, Mar 

garet's al. Stuston 

Hall. 



Thorndon 

All Saints 



Thornham 
Magna 

Thornham 
Parva 



Thrandeston 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Thwaite 
Westhorpe 
Wethering- 
sett cum 
Brockford 



Wickham 
Skeith 



Wortham 
Wyverstone 

Yaxley. . . . 



Godrich's Thofpe al. 

Claxton Hall al. 

Colston Hall al. 

Lampets. 
Hesteley Hall. 
Thorndon Parva. 

Thornham Hall al. 

Briseworth's. 
Thornham. 
Hemenhall, or 

Hemenhales. 

[ Woodhouse. 

/ Thrandeston- Wood- 
hall. 
Welholme's. 
Maveson's. 
Gossold's or Gos- 
nold's or Gos- 
woald's. 
^ Ampner's. 

Thwaite. 
Westhorpe Hall. 

Wetheringsett. 

Wickham Skeith al. 

W. Spey. 
Wickham called 

Skeith's or Skeith 

Hall. 

Wortham Hall. 
Wortham Abbot's. 

f Wyverstone. 
I Hovells. 

Yaxley. 

Bull's Head with 

Blodgates al. 

Boles. 




ASPALL. 217 

ASPALL. 

jN Saxon times there were two small manors in Aspall. One 
was held in the time of Edward the Confessor by Brictmar, 
a freeman under commendation to Edric, with 30 acres. 
There were in connection with this manor a ploughteam, 
an acre of meadow,' and 24 sheep, and the value was 10s. 
The King and the Earl had the soc. The manor was held 
at the time of the Domesday Survey by Robert Malet as 
tenant of his mother, who held in chief/ 

The other manor was held by Siric, a freeman with 30 acres, and to it 
were attached 3 bordars, i ploughteam, 4 acres of meadow, wood sufficient 
for 60 hogs, and 13 beasts, and the value had been los., but at the time of 
the Norman Survey the value was 15s. Stigand had the soc, and Robert 
Malet was the holder in chief.* 

Robert Malet had also another holding in this place. One was of 3 
acres, valued at 6d., the King and the Earl having the soc. It had formerly 
been held by a freeman under commendation. At the time of the Survey 
it was held by William Gulafra. In the same township Robert Malet had 
two parts of a church. 

Among the lands of the Bishop of Bayeux were two holdings in this 
place. One consisted of 20 acres valued at 4s., held by Roger Bigot, and 
by Ralph de Savigni under him. It had formerly been held by Leveva 
under commendation to the Abbot of Ely and in his soc. 

The other holding was in the same township, and consisted of 12 acres 
of the demesne of Debenham and 5 bordars. These were included in the same 
valuation. 

Among the lands of Ranulf Peverell were two holdings, the first con- 
sisting of 16 acres of the demesne, and included in the valuation of Ulverston 
(Ulverston Hall), 4 bordars, and half a ploughteam, the second in the same 
township was the third part of a church, and the third part of a fair. 

The last holding mentioned in Aspall is in the Domesday under the 
heading, " Concerning the claims in dispute between the Bishop of Bayeux 
and Robert Malet's mother." It consisted of 86 acres, 7 bordars, 3 plough- 
teams, 2 acres of meadow, valued at 40s. It had formerly been held by 4 
freemen : Derulf, under commendation to the Abbot of Ely ; Thurstan, 
under commendation to Sachs ; Marculf, under commendation to Edric, 
the predecessor of Robert Malet, and Grunulf, under sub-commendation to 
Robert Malet's predecessor. The survey goes on to say : "Of this land 
William Malet was seised — ^so the Hundred witnesses — before the Bishop of 
Bayeux, and later came Hubert de Port, and adjudged the land free, and 
seised the Bishop of this land because the freemen used to hold it, and on 
the day on which Earl Ralph made forfeiture, Robert Malet's mother was 
seised thereof, witness the Hundred, and up to the date of the plea (held) at 
Odiham, now it is held, just as the King ordered, in pace Regis between the 
Bishop and Robert's mother."^ 

Manor of Aspall. 

In the Davy MSS. Ralph Peverell is regarded as lord at the time of 
the Domesday Survey, but it does not appear that he held more than 16 

'Dom. ii. 320b. ^Dom. ii. 450. 

'Dom. ii. 3226. 

PI 



2l8 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



acres in demesne. The manor did undoubtedly come to the Peverell 
family, but somewhat later. 

One of the manors seems to have been the lordship of William le 
Botillier, or de Butler, 9 Edw. I. The other seems to have been the inheri- 
tance of Walter de Langton, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, who in 1301 
levied a fine of this and Debenham and Brampton Manors, and the advow- 
son of Brampton Church, against Adam de Hodeleston, Adam Bacon, 
Henry de Clysewell and AUce his wife (John de la Faleyse, of Dunwich, and 
Robert de Sefeld, app. clam),' and in 1303 granted this manor to Thomas 
de Grauncourt and Agnes his wife for life of Agnes, with remainder to the 
Bishop's heirs. From the Close Rolls of 1316 it appears that the Bishop had 
demised this manor with that of Debenham to Matthew de Huddescham, 
as well as to Thomas de Grauncourt and Agnes his wife. Matthew surren- 
dered to the Bishop his share. ^ In 1328 we meet with a fine levied of 
Aspall and Debenham Manor between William de Hoddeshagh and Agnes, 
his wife.^ 

AUce, sister and heir of Walter de Langton, married Edmund Peverell. 
Edmund left a son and heir, John, and also a daughter, Margaret. On the 
Patent Rolls will be found the rectification of a lease and confirmation of a 
grant of the manor during the minority of this John.* He seems to have died 
under age, or without issue, and the manor passed to Margaret, his sister, 
married to William de la Pole. These last were owners in 1352. They were 
succeeded by Sir John de la Pole, Knt., their son and heir, who left a 
daughter, Joan, who married 4 times, ist Sir Robert Harnengdale, who left 
no surviving issue ; 2ndly, Sir Reginald Braybroke, by whom she had one 
surviving daughter, Joan, Baroness Cobham, married to Sir Thomas 
Brooke, Knt., who became Lord Cobham in right of his wife Joan. Sir 
John de la Pole's daughter married 3rdly Sir Nicholas Hawberke, but by 
him had no surviving issue, and 4thly Sir John Oldcastle, Knt. Sir John 
Oldcastle was summoned to Parliament jure uxoris as Baron Cobham in 
1409, for his wife's mother was the only daughter of John de Cobham, 
2nd Baron Cobham. He is celebrated in history as the leader of the 
Lollards, eventually laying down his life in maintenance of his principles. 
He was known as the good Lord Cobham, a man of whom Walpole says 
" his virtues made him a reformer, whose valour made him a martyr, whose 
martyrdom made him an enthusiast." 

Lord Cobham was taken in 1417 in Wales, within the territory of Lord 
Powys, and brought to trial, when he was convicted and sentenced to be 
drawn, hanged, and burnt on the gallows. The manor then seems to have 
passed to Sir Edward Brooke, son of Sir Thomas Brooke, and of Joan, his 
wife, only daughter of Sir Reginald Braybroke, who in 1445 was summoned 
to Parliament as " Edward Brooke de Cobham Chevalier." He was a 
zealous upholder of the House of York, participated in the victory of St. 
Albans in 1454, and commanded the left wing of the Yorkshiremen at 
Northampton. He married Elizabeth, daughter of James, Lord Audley, 
and dying in 1464 without issue, was succeeded by his brother Reginald.^ 
Reginald Broke married Anne Everton and died in 1482,* when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Edward Brooke. He married Florence, daughter 
of Robert Ashfield of Stowlangtoft, and on his death in 1541 the manor 



" Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. I. 29. 
^ Close Rolls, 10 Edw. II. jd. 
3 Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. III. 32. 



■'Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. III. pt. i. 35 ; 10 

Edw. III. pt. i. 37. 
n.P.M., 4 Edw. IV. 26. 
^I.P.M., 22 Edw. IV. 21. 



ASPALL. 219 

passed to his son and heir, George Brooke, who married Anne, daughter of 
John Carewe, son of Sir William Carewe, of Somersetshire. He died 15th 
Dec. 1554,' and was succeeded by his son and heir, George Brooke, who 
married ist Alice, daughter of Sir John Tyrrel, of Gipping, Knt., and 2ndly 
EUzabeth, daughter of Edmund Withipole, of Ipswich. He died in 1557, 
and was succeeded by his son, John Brooke, who held the manor, and 
died without issue. John was succeeded by his brother and heir, George 
Brooke, who married Mary, daughter and heir of Edward Jobson, of Doni- 
land, in Essex, and on his death about 1580 the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Edward Brooke. He married Agnes, daughter of Thomas Fastolf, of 
Pettaugh, and was succeeded by a son and heir, Edward, who married 
Rebecca Wiseman, who died 12th August, 1699, and was buried at St. 
Margaret's, Ipswich. Edward Brooke died in 1679, and was buried at 
Aspall, 12th Nov. 1679, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Brooke, who married Mary, daughter of George Green, of Athelington, and 
sold the manor to Temple Chevallier in 1702. He died 5th Dec. 1722, at 
the age of 47, and was succeeded by his cousin, Clement Chevallier. Amongst 
Sir John CuUum's MSS. is the following note respecting Clement and his 
family : " This family came from Jersey, and brought with them hither 
the Spirit of Cyder-making. About the house are several acres of apple 
trees. The stones of the circular trough in which the apples are bruised 
before they are pressed were brought from Jersey ; one of them is 10 feet 
long. Date on it 1728. It was to this gentleman (Clement Chavallier) 
that Bishop Hoadley addressed a letter in 1758 concerning a forgery of 
one Fournier, who intended to defraud his Lordship of £8,800. This 
Fournier (who had been a Papist convert, and Curate in Jersey) resided for 
some time at Debenham in the neighbourhood, and after he had been 
most clearly convicted of the forgery continued to enjoy the countenance 
and favour of his old patron Mr. C. Mr. C's character suffered much on 
this account in the opinion of the world ; but those who knew him best 
thought he was only a Dupe of his crafty and knavish countryman." 

The writer has a copy of this Somewhat remarkable letter to Clement 
Chevallier. The date is not 1758, but 1757. Fournier was clearly a 
desperate villain, and swore so recklessly that his perjury is apparent. 
This man obtained signatures of Francis Payne, Dean of Jersey, probably 
to some public documents, and filled in above these signatures four promis- 
sory notes for sums amounting to £1,000. Fournier began an action on 
these notes, and the Dean was actually arrested in May, 1741. Upon the 
Dean swearing that he owed Fournier nothing, and that the notes were 
forgeries, Fournier's attorney refused to proceed further, and the action 
was dropped. Fournier then tried the same process on with Hoadley, then 
Bishop of Winchester, this time employing a portion of an envelope which 
had been franked, writing a note for £8,800 over the signature of the Bishop, 
and erasing the word " free," which stood over the signature. Mr. Cheval- 
lier supported the impostor and perjurer long after any sensible man would 
have discovered his true character. Like most weak men, he was obstinate, 
and would not listen to anything against his countryman ; and when the 
Bishop offered to give proof of the rascal's guilt, Mr. Chevallier replied : 
" I have had very little experience in any affair of importance, and therefore 
am very unfit to have a case stated to me of so intricate a nature that I 
have heard men of far better education and learning than I have, say that 
they were at a loss what to say about, and that it is one of the most extra- 

'Will 24 Nov. 1554. 



220 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ordinary cases that they ever heard of." This, of course, left him justly 
open to the Bishop's retort, " If you had really such an opinion of your 
own unfitness to have the case stated to you by me, and on my part, how 
came you to think so well of your fitness to have the case on his (Fournier's) 
part stated to you ; and even to judge him to be worthy of your patronage, 
which you could not have done without first judging him to be an innocent, 
injured man ? Was your fitness just great enough to hear his side of the 
question only ; and too little for any one fact, or evidence of a fact, on 
the other ? " 

Clement Chevallier died 6th May, 1762, at the age of 64, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, the Rev. Temple Fiske ChevaUier, who died 
in 1804, and was succeeded by his widow, Mary. To her succeeded her 
son and heir, the Rev. Temple Chevallier, who died in 1816, when the 
manor passed to his brother, John Chevallier, M.D., who died in 1846.' 
He was followed by his widow, and ultimately by the Rev. Charles Henry 
Chevallier, Rector of Aspall and Hon. Canon of Norwich, who married in 
1854 Isabella Frances, only daughter of the Rev. Francis Cobbold. He 
died in 1885, leaving Isabella Frances, his widow, to whom the manor 
passed, and a son, John Barrington Trapnell ChevalUer, born 1857. 

Arms of ChevaUier : Arg. on a cross Gu. 5 escallops Or. 



'D.N.B. X. 215. 




BACTON. 221 

B ACTON. 

^N the time of Edward the Confessor, Lewin, a freeman under 
Harold held 3 carucates of land and 40 acres. There were 
17 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 serfs, and in demesne 2 plough- 
teams, while there were 3 belonging to the men. There 
were 6 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 100 
hogs, 9 rouncies, 8 beasts, 60 hogs, 16 sheep, and 40 goats. 
Also a church with 24 acres, valued at 3s. This land was 
then valued at £8. By Domesday time the value was placed at £g. 10s., 
but there seems to have been a continual falling off in other respects. The 
villeins from 17 had come down to 8, but it is true the bordars had increased 
from 5 to 12, and the serfs had gone up one, but there was a ploughteam 
less belonging to the men, the rouncies had come down one, the hogs had 
decreased by 20 and the goats by 4, while the sheep had risen from 16 to 
100. Besides this land, there were 80 acres and 4 bordars held in the 
Confessor's time by 40 freemen under commendation to the above Lewin. 
They had 3 ploughteams, which in Norman time was reduced to 2, and i 
acre of meadow. The value had risen very considerably, for from 20s. 
it had gone up to £4. los. These lands were held by Walter the Deacon 
as the Domesday tenant in chief, but the King and the Earl had the soc. 

It was a league long and 4 quarentenes broad, and in a gelt paid 6d.^ 
The lands subsequently became divided into two manors, the manor of 
Bacton and the Manor of Horringers. 

Manor of Bacton. 

The lordship of the parish was in early times part of the possessions 
of the Bishop of Norwich, it apparently having been an escheat. In 1235 
Thomas de Blumville or Blundeville, then Bishop of Norwich, gave to 
Hen. III. £100 to have this manor confirmed to his Bishopric. In 1239 
William de Raleigh was lord, in 1245 Walter de Suf&eld, in 1258 Simon de 
Wanton, and in 1265 William de Middleton, all B'shops of Norwich, were 
lords. In 1281 we meet with a suit claiming that part of the manor in the 
barony of the Bishop of Norwich at South Elmham, and the residue in the 
barony of Valonii." In 1289 Ralf de Walpole was lord, and in 1299 John 
de Salmon, both being Bishops of Norwich, and in I3r8 we find this John 
had a grant of free warren here.^ The following were the lords during the 
time the manor was held by the Bishop of Norwich : 1335, William de 
Armine or Agrenynne ; 1337, Anthony de Beck ; 1344, William Bateman ; 
1356, Thomas Percy ; 1370, Henry Despencer ; 1407, Alexander de Totting- 
ton died 28th April, 1413 ; 1413, First Court of Richard Courtney, Bishop 
of Norwich, died 15th Sept. 1415 ; 1415, the King during vacancy by Henry 
of Winton, Bishop ; 1416, Aug., John Wakeryngg, Bishop of Norwich, first 
court, died 9th April, 1425 ; 1424, the King by the Duke of Exeter; 1426, 
William Alnewyk, Bishop of Norwich, Aug., first court;* 1438, Thomas 
Broune, Bishop of Norwich, Feb., first court, by Papal Bull, did,d 6th 
Dec. 1445 ; 1445, Walter le Herle, Bishop of Norwich, first court, by Papal 
Bull, Jan. 1445, died 1472 ; 1472, the King, by keepers of the temporalities ; 
1473, James Goldwell, Bishop of Norwich, first court, until 1498, by Papal 
Bull ; 1499, Thomas Jane, Bishop of Norwich, died Feb. 1499, first court 

'Dom. ii. 4266. ^Bp. by Papal Bull, 27 Feb. 1426. Trans- 

"Abbr. of PL, 9-10 Edw. I. 7. lated to Lincoln 19 Sept. 1436. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 12 Edw. II. 58. 



222 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

October ; 1500, the King, i8th October ; 1501, Richard Nykke or Nix, 
Bishop of Norwich, first court July, died Jan. 1536. 

Page informs us that in the i6th of Edw. IV., Sir Edward Hungerford, 
John Hey don, and Humphrey Forster, released by deed to John de la 
Pole, Duke of Suffolk, and Elizabeth, his wife, WiUiam Hastings, Robert 
Chamberlain, and others to the use of the said Duke and Duchess, the lord- 
ship of this parish, Frostenden, and Greeting St. Olave's, which the said Sir 
Edward, &c., stood seised of, to the use of William de la Pole, late Duke of 
Suffolk, and the lady Alice, his wife, deceased. And further that on the 
attainder of Edmund de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, in 15 13 these estates became 
forfeited to the crown. Unfortunately, Page gives no authority for this 
statement. The manor would seem to have continued with the Bishops of 
Norwich until 1535, when Bishop Nix, having incurred a praemunire, 
the possessions of the Bishopric were forfeited to the Crown, and this manor 
was by Act of Parliament' given to the King. 

The manor was granted in 1535 by the Crown to Charles, Duke of 
Suffolk, who held his first court 20th June, 1536. In 1539 it was again in 
the Crown, and Hen. VIII. held a court 29th Sept. 1539, and Edw. VI. his 
first court in June, 1547. Anne of Cleves was lady of the manor in 1553, 
holding her first court 17th May that year, and in 1557, Philip and Mary 
held their first court 9th Sept. after Anne of Cleves' death. In 1558 Queen 
Elizabeth held her first court, and by Letters Patent 15th Feb. 1560 granted 
the manor to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and he the same year (19th Sept.) 
conveyed it to Sir John Tyrrell, of Gipping, and his son, John Tyrrell, in 
exchange. From Sir J ohn Tyrrell the manor, 1565 , passed to Lord Wentworth 
and others as trustees, ultimately in 1573 vesting in Sir John's son and heir. 
Sir John Tyrrell," who in 1586 sold the manor to William Pretyman (son of 
Thomas Pretyman, of Cotton, lord of Boys, in Bacton),^ who held his first 
court 28th March, 1587.'* Wilham Pretyman married ist Feb. 1562 Ann, 
daughter of John Howe, of Stowmarket, and 2ndly Katherine of Witchen- 
ham Magna, co. Norfolk, and died in Sept. 1594,^ when the manor passed to 
his son and heir. Sir John Pretyman, who held his first court 2nd Oct. 
1595. There was an action in Chancery in the time of Elizabeth, brought 
by Katherine Pretyman against John Pretyman, as to the will of William 
Pretyman, father of the defendant, by which he devised lands in Bacton, 
Thornham Magna, Gislingham, Cotton, Wickham, Finningham, and New- 
ton.® The manor was in 1597 for the period of about a year, held by Sir 
Robert Drury, of Rougham, the father-in-law of Sir John Pretyman, his 
ist wife having been Dorothy, Sir Robert's fourth daughter. Sir John's 
2nd wife was Mary, daughter of Sir Wm. Bourchier, of Barnsley, co. 
Gloucester. 

Sir John having removed to Driffield Abbey in Gloucestershire, sold the 
manor by deed dated 25th Oct. 1636 to Henry Pretyman, son of Thomas 
Pretyman, of Bacton. He married Mary, daughter of Richard Pretyman, 
of Bacton, and died in Feb. 1666, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Pretyman, who married ist Catherine, daughter of Almott 
Clenche, of Gt. Beahngs, and 2ndly, Anne, daughter of John Brames, and 
died in 1678, when the manor vested in his son Henry, who married Mary, 
daughter of Sir John Sedley, of St. Clere, Kent, Bart., and sold the estate to 

' 27 Hen. VIII. Feb. ^ The purchase was effected by deed dated 

^See Gipping Manor, in Stow Hundred, 12 Nov. 28 Eliz. 

3 Fine, Mich. 28-29 Eliz. ^^viu 13th Sep. 1594. I.P.M. 37 Eliz. 

^C.P. ii. 303. 



B ACTON. 223 

George Pretyman, of the elder branch of the family, 30th April, 1703. 
George Pretyman held his first court this year. He married Elizabeth 
daughter and coheir of Edward Garneys, of Redisham Hall, and died 3rd 
Sept. 1727,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, George Pretyman. 
He married Jane, daughter and coheir of Rev. John Pistor, Rector of 
Cleydon. He rebuilt Bacton manor house on its present site, and died 
15th Feb. 1732^ (the inscription on his tomb says 15th March), when 
the manor went to his widow Jane, who this year held her first court. 
She survived until 6th Aug. 1738, but in 1736 the manor appears to 
have been vested in Baron Pretyman, son and heir of the last-mentioned 
George Pretyman. He was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1741 and 
apparently dissipated the family fortune. He married Arabella, only 
child of Maurice Shelton, of Barningham, widow of Thomas Taylor, of 
Westhorpe, and died 15th Feb. 1758,^ without issue, when the manor passed 
to his cousin and heir at law, George Pretyman, son and heir of Peter, 
brother of George Pretyman who had died in 1732. He married Susan, 
daughter of John Hubbard, of Finningham. He was Alderman and Chief 
Magistrate of Bury in 1773. Amongst the CuUum MSS. is the following 
curious note respecting this George Pretyman : " Being in company nth 
Jan. 1805, with George Pretyman Esq., he told me that being a weakly 
child and when three years old he was so extremely ill that one day he 
was supposed to be dead, and the tolling bell was passed for him in the 
Parish of St. Michael, Batinghall Street, London. The nur?e, in going 
backward and forwards through the room where he was laid out, observed 
that the child moved one of his arms ; upon this warm flannels and other 
means were used, and the young one recovered, and has lived to be the 
father of a Bishop, and is at this time in his 84th year of his age in good 
health and spirits. F. G. C." George Pretyman lived five years after this 
note was made, and was buried at Finningham, 14th Dec. 1810, when the 
manor devolved in his son and heir, George Pretyman, Bishop of Lincoln, 
who held his first court in 1810. The Bishop was born at Bury St. Edmunds 
in 1750, and received his education at the Grammar School of that town. 
He occupied the position of tutor to Mr. Pitt, at Pembroke College, Cam- 
bridge, and when Mr. Pitt became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1782 
George Pretyman, as he then was, resided constantly with him until the 
former's marriage two years later, not, as sometimes asserted, as private 
secretary, but as a confidential friend. It is well known that when the See 
of Canterbury became vacant in 1805, Mr. Pitt recommended the Bishop of 
Lincoln to the King for that important station, but his Majesty had pre- 
determined to appoint Dr. Manners Sutton, Bishop of Norwich and Dean 
of Windsor, to the Primacy. The Bishop of Lincoln married, 3rd Sept. 
1784, Elizabeth, elder daughter and co-heir of Thomas Maltby, of Germains, 
CO. Buckingham. The Bishop in 1803 assumed the additional surname of 
Tomline, in comphance with the testamentary injunctions of Marmaduke 
TomUne of Riby Grove, co. Lincoln, who without any alliance whatever 
bequeathed to the Bishop a large landed property. The Bi?hop is styled 
"Sir George Pretyman-Tomline,Bart.," the title having been assumedin 1823 
in consequence of a decision of a jury at Haddington, which found the 
Bishop " heir male in general of Sir Thomas Pretyman, Baronet of Greenes 
Farme, Line, who died about the middle of the i8th century, and his lordship 
also established his right to the ancient baronetcy of Nova Scotia, conferred 

' Will 12 Aug. 1727, proved 25 Jan. 1728. 3 Will 8 Mar. 1757. 
'Will 2 Jan. 1732, proved 5 May, 1733. 



224 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by Charles the First on Sir John Pretyman of Loddington, the male ancestor 
of Sir Thomas.'" He died 14th Nov. 1827/ and was succeeded by his son 
and heir, William Edward Tomline^ F.R.S., M.P. for Truro, who held his 
first court in 1827, and married 18th April, 1811, Frances, daughter and heir 
of John Amler, of Ford Hall, co. Salop. He died 28th May, 1836, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Col. George Tomline, R.A., of Orwell 
Park and Riby Hall, High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1832, for Lincolnshire in 
1852, M.P. for Sudbury 1840 to 1841, for Shrewsbury from 1841 to 1847 and 
1852 to 1868, and for Great Grimsby from 1868 to 1874. On his death 
unmarried, 25th Aug. 1889, the manor passed under his will, May, 1889, 
to his cousin. Captain Ernest George Pretyman, R.A., of Orwell Park and 
Riby Grove, M.P. for Woodbridge (son of the Rev. Frederick Pretyman, 
Canon of Lincoln, and Georgina Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of Edward 
Knight, of Chawton House, Hants, and Godmersham Park, Kent, D.L., 
which Frederick was son of the Rev. George Thomas Pretyman, Chancellor 
and Canon Resid. of Lincoln, and Amelia, his wife, daughter of Christopher 
Tower, of Weald Hall, Co. Essex, which George Thomas was the brother 
of William Edward Tomhne, father of George Tomline who died in 1889), 
who is the present lord. He married, 28th June, 1894, Lady Beatrice 
Adine, eldest daughter of the Right Hon. George Cecil Orlando Bridgeman, 
4th Earl of Bradford, and with other issue has a son, George Marcus 
Tomline Pretyman, born 23rd April, 1895. 

The Custom of this manor is to the youngest son, or Borough English, 
that is, all copyhold land owned by his father at his death intestate and 
not otherwise determined by surrender during his lifetime goes to the 
youngest son, whilst on the other hand all free lands held by " free socage," 
passes as of right to the eldest son. The Leet Fine was at the disposal of 
the lord. The tenement of any copyholder at each death was (in early days) 
heriotable by the best beast, and the heir took his inheritance by fine, and 
" held it by the rod at the will of the lord." An heir was of full age at 15 
years, and was fined if he did not attend courts. The widow of the copy- 
holder during the minority of the heir was his guardian by custom. The 
lord has right of gallows and stocks, view of frankpledge, Leet and Baron 
Courts, right to all waifs and strays, and had assize of bread and beer,freedom 
of entry of King's officers within the bounds of the Manor; also a Coroner 
and Prison. By an arrangement made in 1566 between the lord and the 
copyholders, the latter were empowered to cut down timber of every kind 
growing in the tenant's copyhold without the licence of the lord being 
necessary. The quit rent on succession or on new ownership was then 
fixed at 2\, and copyhold tenure fixed in its ownership. 

The Bacton Court Rolls still in existence are in 384 membrances. 
Up to the death of King Charles L they are as follows : 20 membrances 
t. Hen. v., 74 t. Hen. VL, 28 t. Edw. IV., 35 Hen. VH., 35 Hen. VHL 
(i Edw. VL), 5 Philip and Mary, 68 t. Eliz., 51 1. James I., 3,6 1. of Charles L 
A Bacton Roll of the 9th Hen. VHL was known to exist in the Suffolk 
bags amongst the Miscellanea at the Chapter House. 

Boys or Horinger's Manor. 

It is mentioned in the Great Survey as 80 acres of land held time of 
Edward the Confessor by Lewin, a freeman of Harold's, and was no doubt a 

' Gent. Mag. 1828, i, 202 ; Notes and Queries, ^ Will pr. Nov. 1827. 
3rd series, xii. 421, E.A.N. & Q. 
(N.S.) vol. I, 209. 



BACTON. 225 

parcel of the main manor of Bacton. The manor was held in the early 
part of the 13th century by the family of de Bois al. Bosco or Boys or Du 
Bois. Sir Robert de Bois, son of Sir WiUiam de Bois of Fersfield, Norfolk, 
was the first of the family apparently owning land in Bacton. A certain 
Sir Robert de Du Bois held the manor in 1256 from his niece Joan and her 
husband, Willia,m de Bovile. The Manor continued in the family until 
its extinction in the person of Alice, heiress of Sir Robert de Bois (who died 
in 1311), in 1371, though a Roger de Boys is mentioned from 1371 to 1383, 
as also a John Bous. A few years later, towards the close of the 14th century, 
we find the manor vested in John Honningsherth or Horny ngeshierth, of 
Bacton, who is mentioned in the Patent Rolls of the 19th year of Edw. 
HI." A subsequent John Honingsherth held the manor and died in 1456,* 
when he is said to have left it to his brother, Thomas " Horningserth," who, 
dying in 1464, left it to Richard Dryver, who sold it to Sir James Hobart, 
Chief Steward of Bacton Manor (who left it in 1473 to his son and heir, 
Robert Hobart). Sir James Hobbart (another Chief Steward of Bacton 
Manor) died 24th Feb. 1516,' leaving this manor to his son and heir, Sir 
Walter Hobart. He settled this manor on his son and heir, Henry Hobart. 
Sir Walter died 27th Nov. 1538,* and was succeeded by the said Henry 
Hobart, accordingly. 

He was lord in 1550, and sold the manor to Thomas Pretyman of Cotton 
and Needham, co. Norf ., whose ist wife was Ahce Tyrrell, and whose 2nd 
was Margaret Clerk, of Needham. He died in 1563,' and left the manor by 
his will to his eldest son, William Pretyman.® The death of Thomas 
Pretyman is presented by the Jury at a court held at Bacton, 14th March, 
7th Eliz., thus " said Thomas also held of this manor one tenement called 
' Boyes ' of 80 acres of wood and pasture in Bacton by Knight's Service 
and for the Ward of the Castle (Norwich), and that William Pretyman is his 
son and next heir and of full age." 

In the Rental of Bacton Manor, 1565, is this entry: " Ter lib. William 
Pretyman for the tenement Boyes of 80 acres free land late of Henry 
Hubbards and formerly of John Horngzerths by Socage, and yearly of 
one pound of Cumming " (seed). 

William Pretyman wrote out his own rent roll on a piece of paper some 
six feet long (now at Orwell Park), and in it he gives his field notes for his 
property of Boys, which he estimates at 85 acres, and which lay on the con- 
fines, if not in, the parish of Wetherden, and adjoined the Manor ot 
Haughley. It was this William Pretyman who afterwards acquired the 
Manor of Bacton by deed dated 12th Nov. 28 Ehz., and Newhall in Braise- 
worth, 1586, which manors, with Boys, have remained in the Pretyman 
family up to the present time, and are now owned by Capt. Ernest George 
Pretyman, of Orwell Park.' 

The Manor of Boys consisted of about 85 acres. 

Bodesdale is a hamlet of Redgrave, and with it the lordship of Botesdale 
has always passed. 

'Pat. Rolls, 19 Edw. III. pt. ii. id. (1345). ''See Oulton Manor, Lothingland Hundred. 

*His will is dated 1456, and he died ^Will lo Dec. 1561, proved 1563. 

shortly afterwards, and is said by ^P.C.C. 23 Chayre, " My manor of Boyes 

some to have been succeeded in in Suffolk to William my son." 

the lordship by his son William ^From notes supplied by Mr. William 

Horningsurth. Pretyman, of Bournemouth, and 

^I.P.M., 9 Hen. VHI. 25. Muskett's Manorial Families, vol. ii. 

E I 




226 THE MANORS 01? SUFFOLlC. 

BRAISEWORTH. 

JLVEVA held this manor in Saxon times, and had the soc 
under Stigand. It consisted of 60 acres and i villein, i 
ploughteam, 4 acres of meadow, and a mill. Also half a 
church and 17 acres, with half a ploughteam, 4 beasts, and 
7 hogs. The value was 15s., and it formed part of the 
great possessions of Robert Malet. In the valuation above 
was included a freeman in Braiseworth holding 3 acres 
under Malet. Malet also held 140 acres and i bordar, with 3 ploughteams 
(where there had formerly been 4), i acre of meadow, and half a church with 
15 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 30s., which had formerly belonged 
to 15 freemen, the soc belonging to the King and the Earl. This was 6 
quarentenes long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt gd. 

Another small manor which had been in Saxon times held by Alestan, 
a freeman under commendation to Ulveva, with 30 acres, also formed part 
of the Malet possessions. There were in it i ploughteam and i acre of 
meadow, and the value was 5s., the soc belonging to the King and the Earl. 
Of both these manors Robert Malet was the Domesday tenant in chief, 
and he also had 4 other small holdings here. One was of 38 acres, formerly 
held by 4 freemen under commendation to Edric, when it had a ploughteam 
and a half, but at the time of the Survey had only one team. The value 
was ys. 6d., and the King of the Earl had the soc. 

A second was of 17 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 3s., formerly 
held by 3 freemen under Edric's commendation. 

The third was of 5 acres valued at I2d., of which the King and the 
Earl had the soc, formerly held by 8 freemen. 

The fourth was of 20 acres, valued at 5s., of which the King and the 
Earl had the soc, formerly held with half a ploughteam by Brichtmar 
Bubba, a freeman under Harold.' The two manors here became subsequently 
known as Braiseworth Old Hall, and New Hall with Barnes. 

Manor of Old Hall. 

This was the manor of Ulveva before the Conquest, and in the time of 
the Conqueror was held by Geoffrey de Braiseworth, and in the time of 
Hen. I. by Geoffrey's son, Giles de Braiseworth, from whom it passed in 
the same reign to Sir Robert de Sackville, one of Malet's knights, being held 
of the Honor of Eye. 

He was the third son of Herbrand de Salchevilla, who came over 
with the Conqueror, and who is ranked in old MSS. as the seventh great 
military officer who attended William the Conqueror in his invasion of this 
country. This Robert's descendants continued the male line in this 
county. He is called Robertus de Salkevilla in a charter to which he was 
first witness, granted by King Stephen, when Earl of Moretaign, by which he 
gave the church of Lillechurch to the monks of St. John of Colchester. 
This probably was the Robert de Sackville who, with another knight, 
called Walter according to Ordericus Vitalis, was saved by sudden indis- 
position which the Earl contracted after he was on board ship on his way 
-to England, and which obliged him to return to shore attended by these 
two knights, from the fate which befel them who did sail, the vessel being 
lost and all save one on board perishing. It appears that in 1219 Sir Robert, 
held several manors in Essex, and those of Rishangles, Witham, Mellis, 
Clopton, Braiseworth, Cotton, Brockford, Rudham, Fornham, " Faltham," 

' Dom. ii. 320&, 321, 3236. 



BRAISEWORTH. 227 

and Wickham, in Suffolk, by the service of one knight's fee of the Honor of 
Eye, and was also seised of another fee in Mendham in the same county, as a 
plea in the 12th of Hen. HI. shows. It is impossible, however, that he 
could be the Robert Sackville who is mentioned in an old ballad as attending 
Rich. I. in his expedition to the Holy Land, because this Robert appears 
from the book of the abbey of Colchester to have professed himself a monk 
in the monastery of St. John there in the time of King Stephen. He granted 
to these monks his Manor of Wickham by the advice of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury and the Bishops of London and Norwich. The witnesses to this 
charter are Eustace, Jiing Stephen's son, Ingellus the Chancellor, and 
Jordan and Stephen, two of Sir Robert's sons. Besides the two last- 
mentioned sons, he had by Lettice, daughter of Sir Henry Woodville, two 
other sons, Nigel and Helias Sackville. Nigel is remarkable in history for 
having been, though a person of great consideration and incumbent of the 
Church of Berges, 1171, excommunicated by Thomas a Becket, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, on pretence of his having unjustly detained a manor belonging 
to that See, and Helias de Sackville is witness to the Earl of Clare's grant of 
the Church of Tunbridge to the monks of Lewes. But the case of the 
excommunication has been wretchedly misrepresented by most historians. 
WiUiam Fitz-Stephens, who lived at that time, and who wrote the life of 
Thomas a Becket, and therefore not likely to be mistaken as to the facts, 
informs us " that two of the Sackvilles were excommunicated on that 
occasion, Robert and Nigel ; and that they were regis sigilliferi," an office, 
which, we presume, may correspond with that of the lord privy seal of later 
days. The same Fitz-Stephens tells us that " they died soon after in the 
flower of their age," and by their both being called Keepers of the Seal, 
it appears as if the office had been hereditary in the family or held in com- 
mission. Jordan, the eldest son of Robert de Sackville, who probably 
entered into possession of the manor and other estates when his father 
retired from the world, is called in a charter by which he confirms the 
grant made by his father to the monks of Colchester, and adds others of 
his own, " Jordanus de Saukevil Miles, baro de Bergholt Saukevil, filius 
et haeres Roberti Saukevil." His wife brought a great accession of fortune 
and honour to the family. Her name was Ela or Hela, and she was daughter 
and coheir of Ralph de Den, lord of the Manor of Buckhurst, whose father 
was Robert, living in the 20th year of William the Conqueror, and then 
denominated Pincerna or the. Butler. At the time of her marriage her 
father bestowed with her a hide of land in Waldene, with the advowson 
of the church and common of pasture in Sudpark,near Chalventure, and other 
lands. When this Ela became coheir to her father, she brought to the Sack- 
villes the manors of Buckhurst, Claverham, Briggeley, Horsey, and Ombe- 
ford, which were parcels of six knight's fees held by Robert Pincerna in 
Chalventure. Upon the death of her husband Jordan de Sackville, being 
a widow, she gave licence to the abbot and convent of Otteham to translate 
their convent to Bageham, both in Kent ; and she not only confirmed all 
the lands which had been given them by her father and her brother Robert, 
but added some considerable gifts of her own, her son, Jeffery de Sackville 
being a witness to the grants. The church of Bageham was till the reign 
of Hen. II. the burying place of the Sackville family, and was dedicated 
to the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

In the time of Edw. I. the manor was vested in Sir George de Thorpe, 
who had free warren here in the time of King Edw. II.' 

'Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw, II, 20, 



228 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

His daughter Alice married Sir Simon de Felbriggs. His grandson, 
Sir Simon de Felbriggs, who was standard bearer to Rich. H., left to Alanor 
or Helene, his second daughter, this estate. She married ist Sir William 
Tyndale, of Deom, in Northamptonshire, and in 143 1 was the wife of Sir 
Thomas de Wanton. On the death of Alanor the manor passed to her son 
and heir, Thomas Tendale. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Wilham 
Yelverton, C.J., of the King's Bench, 1471, and on his death the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir William Tindale, K.B., who married Mary, 
daughter and heir of Egbert Montford or Mundeford, of Hockwold, and on 
his death in 1497 passed to his son and heir, Sir John Tindale, who married 
Amphrelicia, daughter of Humphrey Coningsby, one of the Justices of 
the King's Bench in 1510. Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings we 
find an action as to waste done in this manor. It was brought by Will. 
Tindale (Tyndale), son of Thomas, son of " Alana," daughter of Sir Simon 
Felbrigge Knt., against Godfrey Joy, Will. Clyflond, John Tray veil, and 
Augustine Boys, executors of Dame Katherine, late wife of the said Sir 
Simon.' 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1523 by Richard Belamey and others 
against John Tyndale and others.' 

The manor then passed to Christopher Playters, who died nth Sept. 
1547,^ when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Playters. A little later 
we find the manor vested in Alexander Newton, who married Anne, the 
daughter of Sir Humphrey Wingfield, Knt., and died in 1569. 

There is a sepulchral brass to his memory in the Church of Braiseworth,* 
an etching of which is given in Cotman's " Suffolk Brasses." 

In 1576 a fine was levied of the manor and the manors of Newhall and 
Barneys by Thomas Gawdye against John Rochester and others,' and the 
following year we meet with a fine of this manor and of Newhall Manor 
levied by Anne Warner, widow, against Henry Ferrour, and others.® 

In 1609 the manor was vested in William Coleman, who married 
Catherine, daughter of Edmund Bacon, of Hessett. William Coleman's 
daughter Eliza married Robert, eldest son of John Green, of King's Lynn, 
Norfolk, by whom he had Elizabeth, Katherine, and Susan, his coheirs. 
Robert Green died in 1640, and was buried in the parish church of Braise- 
worth, and William Coleman died in 1643. The lordship subsequently 
vested in Earl Cornwallis, created Marquis, who died in 1805, when it 
passed to his son Charles, 2nd Marquis Cornwallis, who died in 1823. 

In 1825 the manor was purchased by Matthias Kerrison, of Hoxne 
Hall and Breckles Hall, Norfolk, and on his death in 1827 passed to his son 
and heir. Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart. From this time to the present the 
manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of Thelnetham, in 
Blackbourn Hundred, and is now vested in William Spencer, Lord Bateman, 
3rd Baron, of Breckles Hall, Norfolk. 

Arms of Sackville : Quarterly, Or, and Gules, a bend wavy. Of 
Tindale : Argent, on a fesse Gu. betw. 3 garbs, Sa., a martlet. 

Manor of New Hall. 

The full title of this manor seems to have been in early days " Bresu- 
neth Nova Aula in Veteri Bacton," but in the reign of Edw. IV. " Brese- 

'E.C.P., 5 Edw. IV.— 49 Hen. VI., Bundle "Add. 32483, 32490; I.P.M., 12 Eliz. I, 

31, 190. 85. 

= Fine, Mich. 15 Hen. VIII. ^pine, Mich. 18-19 Eliz. 

n.PM., 2 Edw. VI. 66. 6 Fine, Easter, 19 Eliz. 



BRAISEWORTH. 229 

worth " only. This was the lordship of Alestan before the Conquest, and 
of Robert Malet at the time of the Domesday Survey. In 1268 it was 
vested in William le Parker, and this year we meet with a fine of the manor 
levied by Hubert, son of Wilham de Bysewrth, against Robert, son of 
John and Matilda his wife, and the said William le Parker and Margery 
his wife.' Another William Parker held here in 1316.^ 

In the time of Hen. VI. the manor was vested in Thomas Tengaine 
or Dengaine, and later in John Dengaine, son and heir of Alice Dengaine. 
In 1478 it was vested in Henry Everard and Nicholas Parker, and in the time 
of Queen Elizabeth in Alexander Newton, who died seised 30th Aug. 
1569, and on his death passed to his widow Anne, the daughter of Sir 
Humphrey Wingfield, who remarried Robert Warner, and they held a court 
13th Ehzabeth. By 1586 the manor had passed to William Pretyman,^ 
who held his first court 28th Sept. this year. He held other courts in 1587, 
3rd April and 14th Aug. ; 1589 ; i7thFeb. ; 35 Eliz. 27thMar. He diedin Sept. 
1594, and was succeeded by his son. Sir J ohnPretyman, who on 5th Oct. 1624, 
held a court.* Sir John Pretyman sold the manorin 1636 to Henry Pretyman 
from whom it passed like the Manor of Bacton, to his son and heir, John 
Pretyman, and on his death in 1678 vested in his son and heir, Henry 
Pretyman, who sold the same to George Pretyman in 1703. On his death 
in 1727 the manor passed to his son and heir, George, and from him in 1732 
to his son and heir. Baron Pretyman, who died unmarried 15th Feb. 1758. 
Subsequently the manor seems to have passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Old Hall, and is now vested, as is that manor, in Lord Bateman. 
The manor is specifically mentioned in a fine levied in 1576 by Thomas 
Gawdye against John Rochester and others.^ A fine was levied of this 
manor in 1587 by WiUiam Pretyman, sen., against Alexander Huggen 
and others.® 

In 1653 a rental on the court rolls is headed, " Bresworth New Hall 
cum Horringer," and a Court Roll 8th Apl. 1686 is headed, " Horringer 
in Old Bacton and Bresworth Nova Aula in Old Bacton." The court last 
referred to was held by Mary Pretyman and Margaret Pretyman, sisters of 
Henry, who had given a charge over his manors to satisfy his sisters' 
portions. A court was held 20th Oct. 1690, by Henry Pretyman, the then 
lord, the title of the court on the rolls being " Bresworth Nova Aula in 
Bacton Veteri." 

Arms of Newton : Arg. a lion rampant Sab. langued and armed Gu, 
charged on the shoulder with a cross pattee Or. 

Manor of Bowell's Hall or Boville's. ' ^ 

The manor passed to Humphrey Wyngfeld in 1530 under a fine levied 
by him and others against Sir John Wiseman and others.^ About this time 
we find the manor in Humphrey Wingfield, Edmund Beaufre, William 
Congsby, and Robert Jener. Alexander Newton died seised of the manor 
in 1569, leaving John RoUeston, Elizabeth Spilman, and Grace Prety his 
heirs, but by his will the said Alexander Newton seems to havQ devised 

'Feet of Fines, 52 Hen. III. 48. ^Fine, Mich. 18-19 Eliz. 

"LQ-D., 10 Edw. II. 60. 6 Pine, Easter, 29 Eliz. 

3 See Bacton Manor, in this Hundred. ^Fine, HU. 22 Hen. VIII. 

* Original admittances to this last court 

and the court held 14th Aug, 1589, 

are in the writer's possession. 



230 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the manor to Alexander Huggen, in case his, Alexander Newton's, wife 
should not be with child. 

Manor of Barnies or Rooky's. 

We learn little of this manor save that it was vested in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth in George Cawsey, who sold it to Alexander Newton, who 
died in 1569 ; later, we find it vested in Charles, Earl Cornwallis, ist Marquis, 
and it then descended in the same course of devolution as the Manor of Old 
Hall. The manor is specifically mentioned in a fine levied in 1576 by 
Thomas Gawdye against John Rochester and others.' 

One of the manors of Braiseworth, but it is not clear which, was vested 
in 1538 in Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, for this year he granted 
" Braiseworth Manor " to the Crown in exchange by deed 30 Hen. VIH.^ 
This was also one of the manors in 1555 vested in John Wiseman, for he 
died seised on 27th May this year, leaving Edward Wiseman his heir at law.^ 
There are two fines levied of Braiseworth Manor in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth, one in 1578 by Leonard Casson against Philologus Fourthe,* 
and the other in 1586 by Isaac Preston and others against Edmund Boken- 
ham and others.' 



•Fine, Mich. 18-19 Eliz. Fine, Trin. 20 Eliz. 

«S.P. 1538, 1182 (182). 5 Fine, Hil. 28 Eliz, 

3 1.P.M., 2 and 3 Ph. and M. 59. 




BROCKFORD HALL. 231 

MANOR OF BROCKFORD HALL, NOW WITH WETHERINGSETT. 

GREAT part of Brockford anciently belonged to Bury 
Abbey by the gift of Athulf or Eadulf j Bishop of Elmham 
about 963, and a successor of Ailfric, the 2nd Bishop of 
that name, surnamed the Black, who died in 1038, gave his 
part in Brockford to the abbey, so that by the time of the 
Domesday Survey the abbey held as in Edward the Con- 
fessor's time 3 carucates and 43 acres of land and 4 acres of 
meadow here. Attached to the manor were 14 bordars, 3 serfs, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 2 belonging to the tenants, wood sufficient for the 
maintenance of 40 hogs, 8 beasts, 6 hogs, 20 sheep, and a like number of 
goats, valued at loos.' But it does not appear that the abbey held as a 
manor. In the time of Hen. L the lordship was held by Sir Robert de 
Sackville, Knt., as in Braiseworth,'' and from him passed to his son and heir, 
Jordan de Sackville ; but the author of the Magna Britannia from his MS. 
states that in 1286 the lordship belonged to the abbey of Bury. It is 
quite true that as late as the time of Queen Mary the manor is stated to have 
formed part of the possessions of the dissolved monastery of Bury, and as 
such was purported to be granted, i Mary, to Lady Anne of Cleves,^ and the 
Abbot of Bury had free warren, view of frankpledge, and assize of bread 
and beer in the time of Edw.I.,'^but for all this it is not clearthat the Manor 
of Brockford was actually vested in the abbey. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth the manor was vested in Thomas 
Gawdy, and later in the same reign in Nicholas Hare and Arthur Penning, 
who held their first court for the manor in 1580. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find an action by Anthony " Pennynge " against Anthony Gawdy and 
others to set aside a claim to an annuity out of plaintiff's Manor of Brockford 
which Anthony Gawdy claimed as charged thereon,' and a little later 
amongst the same Proceedings an action by Anthony Russhe against the 
said Anthony Penning, lord of Brockford Manor, to compel admittance to 
land held of the manor.^ Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time 
of Queen Elizabeth is an action by John Reve against Edward Turpyn 
touching the site of this Manor of Brockford.'' 

Arthur^ Penning died seised in 1593, when the manor vested in his 
son and heir Arthur Penning, who had licence to alien the manor in 1624 
to Sir William Soame, Knt. On Sir WiUiam Soame's death in 1655 it passed 
to his son and heir, Stephen Soame, of Thurlow, who married ist Mary, 
daughter of Sir — Denham, Knt., and 2ndly Anne, daughter of Ambrose 
Copinger, D.D., Rector of Buxhall, and widow of Isaac Crane, of Lavenham. 
Anne married a third time. Sir George Reeve, of Thwaite, Bart., and carried 
the manor into that family. On the death of Sir George Reeve the manor 
passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert Reeve, Bart.^ 

In 1687 we find amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Diss, 
notice of an action as to metes and bounds of the manor, and as to rents and 
arrears, &c., by Sir Robert Reeve, Bart., against James Harvey and others.'" 

= Dom. ii. 361. ^Ib. 401. ^^ 

*See Old Hall, Braiseworth, in this ^C.P. Ser. ii. B. civ. 2. 

Hundred. ^Sometimes called Anthony, and the son 

i I Mary, M. Trin. Rec. Rot. 68. Arthur. 

4 Quo Warranto Rolls, 733. 'See Manor of Thwaite, in this Hundred. 

5C.P. ii. 369. "3 Jas. II. at Diss, Exch. Dep.' 



232 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

On the death of Sir Robert Reeve the manor passed to his daughter 
and heir J Anne^ who held her first court for this manor in 1688 . She married 
ist Phihpj 5th Earl of Leicester, and 2ndly, John Sheppard, of Ash. In 
1702 the manor was held by Philip, Lord Lisle, afterwards Earl of Leicester 
in right of his wife, and he held a court 7th Oct. 1702 and 8th Oct. 1703. 
John Sheppard, the Countess of Leicester's 2nd husband, had the lordship, 
and held a court 12th Oct. 1708. She died in 1726, and he in 1747, when the 
manor passed to his second wife and widow, Hannah, who remarried Sir 
Samuel Prime, Knt.' He died in 1776, and his widow, Hannah, survived, 
and as "Dowager Lady Prime" held a court i6th Aug. 1781. On her death 
the manor passed to John Sheppard, who married twice, and had by his 
second wife, Mary Rivett, of Brandeston, a son, John Sheppard, who 
succeeded to the lordship on the death of his father in 1793 . John Sheppard, 
the son, held his first court 8th Dec. 1795, and in 1797 married Letitia, 
daughter of Col. Wilson, of Didlington Hall, Norfolk, and sister of Robert, 
Lord Berners. He died 31st Jan. 1824, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John Wilson Sheppard, of Campsey Ash, J. P. and D.L., who in 
April, 1823, married Harriet, daughter and coheir of Col. George Crump, of 
Alexton Hall, co. Leicester (by Mary Wilson, his wife, sister of Robert, 
Lord Berners), and dying 2nd Apl. 1830, while attending the assizes at 
Bury St. Edmunds as High Sheriff, the manor vested in his son and heir, 
John George Sheppard. 

Page, writing in 1847, states that the manor then belonged to Sir 
Edward Kerrison, Bart., of Oakley Park, but this seems doubtful, as we 
find the manor in 1855 still in the above-named John George Sheppard, of 
Campsey Ash, J. P. and D.L., High Sheriff in 1859, who married 4th Aug. 
1846, Harriet Anna, 2nd daughter of Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt Jones, Bart., of 
Stanley Hall, co. Salop, and in her the manor appears to have been vested 
in 1885. 

In 1905 it was apparently vested in W. W. Westwood, but of this we 
are not certain. 

Page, quoting from a MS. in the possession of W. S. Fitch, of Ipswich, 
the well-known antiquarian, says : " In Brockford Street is a great house, 
which long since was an Inne, and hung out the signe of the Swanne. It is 
now commonly called Brockford House, since the Signe was pulled down 
by Thomas Revett Esq., a Justice of the Peace for the county of Suff. in 
the time of'Q. Elizabeth.' Edmund his eldest sonne, sold to John Turner, 
whose son Gregory sold it to Mr. Leman,of Brame's Hall, now owner of it. 

" Robert Revett, 2nd son of Thomas Revett, Esq., married — , daughter 
of John Revett, of Bildeston, Esq. Thomas Revett, sonne of this Robert, 
lives now in a House neare Brockford Green, and is Chief Constable of the 
Hundred of Hartismere this Yeare, 1657." 

Perhaps the house referred to above is that known, also as Shrubland 
House, now occupied as a farmhouse, which was for over 300 years the 
residence of the Rivett family, the walls of one of the rooms being 
decorated with paintings representing various kinds of birds. 

'See Manor of Thwaite, in this Hundred. *I.P.M., 20-21 Hen. VHI., D.K.R. 10 App. 

ii. p. 125. Land in Brockford is 
included in the inquisition p.m. of 
Thomas Rivett, who died about 
1529- 



BROCKFORD HALL. 233 

Court Rolls of the manor are referred to in the 6th Report of the Deputy 
Keeper of the Public Records, Appendix ii. p. 86, and extracts from Court 
Rolls 20 Edw. IV. and i Edw. VI., will be found in the Public Record 
Office.' 

Arms of Sheppard : Sa., a fesse Or, between 3 talbots passant, Arg., 
each carrying in the mouth a bird-bolt, of the 2nd. 

Stoneham's Manor. 

A manor called Stonham in Brockford, or rather a moiety of the 
reversion in this manor, expectant on the death of Anne Warner, seems to 
have been sold by John Richester to Sir Thomas Gawdy in the time of 
Queen Ehzabeth, but it may not have been a manor.* 



'Portfolio, 203, 8. 'C.P. ii. 417. 

FI 




234 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BROME. 

|HERE were three manors here in Saxon times. One belonged 
to Goda, a freewoman under commendation to Stigand, and 
consisted of 2 carucates of land (one in Brome and the other 
in Oakley), i villein, 7 bordars, i serf, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, and half a ploughteam belonging to the men, 
8 acres of meadow, i rouncy, 10 hogs, and 40 sheep, valued 
at 30s. (which at the time of the Survey had increased to 
61S.). There was half a church with 14 acres, valued at 2s. The Domesday 
tenant was Roger Bigot. 

In the same township, also belonging to Roger Bigot, and formerly held 
by 25 freemen, and 3 half freemen under commendation of Stigand, were 
g6 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, 3 ploughteams (reduced to i^ at the time 
of the Survey), valued at 30s., but at only 20s. at the time of the Survey. 
William Scutet held this of Roger Bigot. It was 5 quarentenes long and 
4 broad, and paid in a gelt ^^d. 

The second manor was held at the time of the Survey by Hugh de 
Corbun of Roger Bigot. It had been held in the time of the Confessor by 
a freeman Aluric under Gurth'is commendation. It consisted of 60 acres, 
3 bordars, i ploughteam in demesne and half a ploughteam belonging to the 
tenants, 3 acres of meadow, valued at ids., and 16 acres which had been 
held by a freeman under commendation to Aluric, and valued at ltd. The 
wife of this freeman was under commendation to Robert Malet's predecessor.' 

The third manor was held in the time of the Confessor by Anand, and 
consisted of 60 acres, 4 bordars, half a ploughteam in demesne, and half 
belonging to the men, and 4 acres of meadow, valued at los. ; and 3 freemen 
and a half under commendation to Anand held 14 acres and i ploughteam, 
valued at 'is. 2d. AX the time of the Survey, when i serf had been added 
to the manor it was in the King's hand, and included in those lands held for 
him by Roger Bigot.'' 

Robert Malet had 4 small properties here at the time of the Survey. 
The first was of 6 acres, valued at xzd. ; the second 7 acres, valued at z/^d., 
held of him by William Scutet, and formerly held by three half freemen. 

The third consisted of 30 acres, i ploughteam, ij acres of meadow, 
valued at 5s. It had formerly been held of Robert Malet by Ulmar, a free- 
man under commendation to Edric. And 14 acres, valued at 2s., formerly 
held by 5 freemen under Edric's commendation. Both the above were at 
the time of the Survey held by Guarin of Robert Malet. 

The fourth holding consisted of 4 acres in the King's soc, valued at 8^., 
held at the time of the Survey by Walter, and formerly by 2 freemen under 
commendation to Edric. ^ 

Amongst the lands of Ralph de Bellafago was a small holding in this 
place, consisting of i bordar, with 8 acres, belonging to Wortham, and 
valued at 12^.* 

Another small holding of the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was i 
acre, valued at /\d., formerly held by a freeman under the abbot.' 

The last holding mentioned here was of the fee of the Bishop of Thetford, 
and consisted of 6 acres, valued at izd., formerly held by a freeman under 
commendation to one himself under commendation to Bishop Aylmar.^ 

'Dom. ii. 339. "tDom. ii. 3546. 

''Dom. ii. 282. 5Dom. ii. 371. 

^Dom. ii. 310, 321. 6Dom. ii. 381. 



BROME. 235 

Manor of Brome Hall or Davillers. 

By the time of Hen. III. two manors only appear, Ling or Lyng Manor 
and Brome Hall. It appears from the will of John Cornwallis in 1506 that 
he then resided at Lyng Hall, the present Brome Hall not being built till 1550. 
The main manor, Brome Hall, was in the time of Hen. III. held by 
Bartholomew D'Avilers, he holding by serjeanty of the King.' 

The extent of land then forming the lordship was i messuage with a 
garden and underwood, 50 acres of arable land, two of meadow, and 2 of 
pasture, and the service that " if the King should wish to have Patalium 
of the towns of Norfolk and Suffolk in his army in Wales, then he shall con- 
duct the said Patalium from the ditch of St. Edmunds into Wales, and 
receive at the said ditch fourpence a head for their maintenance for forty 
days." The manor passed from Bartholomew to his son Richard about 
1227. 

Richard Davillers died in 1269, from which time to 1330 the manor 
passed as the Manor of Erwarton, in Samford Hundred. Bartholomew 
Davillers had a grant of free warren and of a fair and market in Brome 
as early as 1253,'' and the manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition 
p.m. of Bartholomew, who died in 1287,^ and an extent of the manor given. 
It is also specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of John Davillers, 
who died in 1288,* and of Bartholomew Davillers, who died in 1330.' 
This last Bartholomew, son of the last John Davillers, left four daughters 
only — Isabel, Cecilia, Margaret, and Joan, his coheirs. One seems to have 
died an infant, for Isabel did homage for her third (sic),^ but her sisters 
were apparently under age, and the manor being held in chief of the King 
he granted the custody of two parts to Robert de Ufford.'' 

The service by which this manor and the Manor of .Erwarton were 
held is then stated to have been the " leading all the men (200) of the 
counties of Suffolk and Norfolk to the King's wars in Wales, from the Ditch 
of St. Edmunds by Newmarket, withsoever the said Lord the King shall go 
in the wars in Wales, taking for every man for his expenses four pence for 
40 days, so that after 40 days he and the other men at the expense of the 
King shall remain." There is a MS. in the British Museum formerly belong- 
ing to R. Sparrow, and said to be by John Wodderspoon, which gives 
extracts from the inquisition p.m. relating to Suffolk from i Edw. I. to 6 
Edw. IV. It is by no means a reliable authority, and has misled many 
who have trusted to it without comparing with or verifying by the original 
documents. For instance, this MS,, which is relied on by Page, or more 
probably, the printed source from which Page derived his information, has 
two errors in this one entry, first that the payment was 3^. and not 4d. a 
day for the service, and that Bartholomew Davillers left three daughters, 
whereas he left four. 

Cecilia married Brian de Hiklyng, and there is an inquisition p.m of 
her under this description in 1345,^ and this same year there is on the 
Patent Rolls a pardon to William Coleman, parson of the church of Onhous 
(Onehouse), and Augustine Arnold, for acquiring for the life of Joan, late 
wife of Bartholomew Davillers, Knt., from Cicely de Hykelyng, £10 of rent 

'1210-12, Red Book of the Exchequer, ♦I.P.M., 16 Edw. I. 22. 

132 Bd. n.PM., 5 Edw. III. 76. 

''Chart. RoUs, 37-38 Hen. III. pt. i. 11, 37; ^q. 5 Edw. III. 14 ; 6 Edw. III. 14. 

T. de N. 285, 296. 'O. 5 Edw. III. 14. 

3I.P.M.. 15 Edw. I. 16. ^l.PM., 19 Edw. III. 33. 



236 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

out of Brome Hall without licence/ How Coleman and Arnold could acquire 
a rent from a person out of possession— a rent issuing out of land in the 
holding of another— is not easy to see^ but it may have been hmited out of 
the third which had descended to her, subject to her mother's right to 
dower. 

Joan, the 4th daughter, or, as Davy says, the daughter and heir of 
Cecilia, married ist Bartholomew Bacon, and 2ndly Sir Edmund Barkley, 
and died without issue, when Sir Edmund Barkley held a 3rd in right of 
his wife until his death without issue in 1380.' 

The entirety of the manor ultimately became vested in Isabella, the 
eldest daughter of Bartholomew Davillers, who married ist Sir Robert 
Bacon about 1350. Sir Robert was knight of the shire in 1363 and 1369, 
and left one son. Sir Bartholomew Bacon, who married Joan, the daughter 
of— Heveningham, and died ini392 without issue, leaving his sister Isabel 
his sole heir. A fine was levied in 1374,' "Sir John de Hevenyngham and 
Hugh Verdon, parson of Goldhangre Church v. Sir Bartholomew Bacon," 
of both manor andadvowson, but as Joan, the other daughter of Bartholomew 
Davillers, did not die till 1380," the whole could not have been dealt 
with in possession. Evidently the fine was limited in order to resettle the 
property, for we find on the Patent Rolls a pardon to Bartholomew Bacon, 
Knt., and Joan his wife, for having acquired from John de Hevenyngham, 
Knt., the manor and advowson without licence.^ Joan, the widow of Sir 
Bartholomew Bacon did not die till about 1435.* 

Isabel, the sister and heir of Sir Bartholomew Bacon, married Sir 
Oliver Calthorpe, of Burnham Thorpe, in Norfolk, Knt. He died in the 
latter part of the reign of Rich. II., and his wife survived until 1411.^ 

On Sir Oliver Calthorpe's death, the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir William Calthorpe, who married Eleanor, daughter of Sir John Mantly, 
and died in 1420, when the manor descended to his son and heir, Sir John 
Calthorpe, who married Amy, daughter and heir of Sir John Wythe, and 
on his death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir William Calthorpe, 
who, dying in 1494,' left by Elizabeth, his first wife, daughter of Reginald, 
Lord Grey of Ruthyn, a son. Sir John Calthorpe, who married Elizabeth^ 
daughter of Roger Wentworth, of Nettlestead, and died in his father's 
lifetime, and on Sir William's death the manor passed to his grandson and 
heir, the son of Sir John, Sir Philip Calthorpe, who married ist Mary, sister 
and heir of Sir William Say, and 2ndly Jane, daughter of John Blenerhasset, 
and dying in 1535 the manor passed to his son and heir by his first wife. Sir 
Philip Calthorpe. He married Jane (? Amata or Amy), daughter of Sir 
William Boleyn, of Bhckley, in Norfolk, and aunt of Queen Anne Boleyn, 
and died 7th April, 1549," leaving an only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, 
married to Sir Henry Parker, K.B., son and heir of Lord Morley, who sold 
the manor in 1550 to Robert Hyde,'° from whom it passed to Sir Thomas 
Cornwallis, eldest son of Sir John Cornwallis. He had received the honour 
of knighthood at Westminster ist Dec. 1548, and on the insurrection in 
Norfolk, under Kett, the tanner, in 1549, bringing forces to the assistance 

'Pat. Rolls, 19 Edw. III. pt. ii. 19. ei.P.M., 13 Hen. VI. 29. 

'I.P.M., 4 Rich. II. 10. 7 See Pat. Rolls, 14 Hen. VI. pt. i. 14. 

348 Edw. III. 23. 8 See Manor of Lound, in Lothingland 
■•Inquis. p.m. Edw. de Berkley and Joan Hundred. 

his wife, 4 Rich. II. 10. sI.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 148. 

5 Pat. Rolls, 15 Rich. II.pt. i. 9; I.P.M., "Fine, Easter, 4 Edw. VI. 

Sir Bartholomew Bacon and Joan 

his wife, 15 Rich. II. pt, i. 10. 



BROME. 237 

of the Marquis of Northampton, at that time sent to suppress those rebels, 
behaved with great bravery in entering the city of Norwich, together with 
Lord Sheffield, who was there slain, and Sir Thomas, being overpowered, 
was taken prisoner, and detained till the King's forces relieved him. He was 
Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in the last year of the reign of Edw. VI., and 
coming to the aid of Queen Mary, with the forces of those counties, who at 
the time of the decease of King Edward, was at Framlingham Castle, in 
Suffolk, was the principal means of advancing that princess to the throne. 

He was also very instrumental in suppressing Wyat's insurrection, and, 
with the Earl of Sussex and Sir Edward Hastings was commissioned for 
the trial of Sir Thomas Wyat. He was made a privy councillor, and con- 
stituted Treasurer of Calais ; from whence he was recalled shortly before the 
taking of that town by the French. He served in Parliament for Gatton, in 
Surrey, and was elected one of the knights for the county of Suffolk. A 
fine of the manor was in 1554 levied against Sir Thomas Cornwallis by 
Thomas Gaudy.' On 25th Dec. 1557, he was made comptroller of the 
household ; on the decease of Sir Robert Rochester, Knight of the Garter, 
being in great favour with the Queen, whose confidence he greatly enjoyed. 
He was sent to the Princess Elizabeth at Ashbridge, to acquaint her with 
the Queen's pleasure that she should immediately repair to London. And 
when it was debated in council to send that princess out of England, with 
the object of excluding her from the succession, Sir Thomas Cornwallis, 
by his arguments, dissuaded the Queen from it, alleging that the people 
oi^England would take it very ill, nay, would not at all endure that the next 
heir to the crown should be conveyed out of the land. Nevertheless, on 
Queen Elizabeth's accession to the Crown, not being of her religion, he was 
left out of the privy council, and removed from his place of comptroller 
of the household, which induced him to retire to the country, where he 
rebuilt his mansion-house of Brome Hall ; departing this life 26th December, 
1604, in the 86th year of his age. A fine marble tomb is erected to his 
memory against the north wall of the chancel of the church of Brome, 
whereon are the statues of him and his lady carved in stone ; he in armour, 
and at his feet a white buck couched, with a wreath about his neck of green 
acorns proper, wounded in his left shoulder. And at her feet is a falcon 
issuantj secant, out of a crown Or. This inscription is on the tomb : — 

" Here lies Sir Thomas Cornwallis, son of Sir John, 

who was of Queen Mary princely councell, and 

Treasurer of Cales, and after Controler of her 

■ Majestic' s household, in especial grace and trust 

of his mistress at her untimely death." 

He took to wife Anne, daughter of Sir John Jerningham, of Somerley- 
ton, Knt., and of Bridget his wife, daughter of Sir Robert Drury^ of 
Halsted, by whom he had issue two sons, William and Charles ; as also 
three daughters — Elizabeth, married to Sir Thomas Kitson, of Hengrave, 
Knt. ; Anne, wife of William Halse, of Devonshire ; and Alice, wedded 
to Richard Southwell. 

Sir William Cornwallis, the eldest son, embarking with Robert 
Devereux, Earl of Essex, in his expedition against the rebels in Ireland in 
1599, was, for his services in that kingdom, knighted at Dublin, 5th 
August the same year. He married ist Lucy, eldest daughter and coheir 

' Fine, Easter, i Mary I. 



238 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to John Nevil, Lord Latimer, and of Lucy his wife, daughter of Henry, Earl of 
Worcester, by whom he had issue William, who died young in 1565, and 
was buried at Hengrave, as a gravestone in that church shows. Also 
Thomas, 2nd son, and four daughters— Frances, married to Sir Edward 
Withipole, Knt. ; Ehzabeth, wedded to Thomas Sands ; Catherine, to 
Richard Turner; and Dorothy, to Archibald, Earl of Argyle. By his 2nd 
wife, Jane, daughter of Hercules Mewtas, who survived him, and was after- 
wards the wife of Sir Nathaniel Bacon, of Culford, Knight of the Bath, 
he had issue Frederick Cornwallis, who for his eminent services was created 
Lord CornwalUs ; but his father, Sir William, was succeeded in the greater 
part of his estate by Thomas, his son and heir by Lucy, daughter of the 
Lord Latimer. This manor, however, passed to the son Frederick. He 
was in his youth introduced by his uncle. Sir Charles CornwalHs, into the 
service of Prince Henry, eldest son of King James the First, when Prince 
of Wales, waiting on lum in his journey to Spain, After succeeding his 
brother, he was created a baronet by letters patent bearing date 4th May, 
1627, and received the honour of knighthood at Whitehall 2nd December, 
1630. He was elected to Parliament for the borough of Eye in 1639, 
and in 1640, when, discerning that the violent measures of the predominant 
party tended to the ruin of his country, he opposed their proceedings with 
some warmth, and thereupon was inserted in the list of those who were 
mahgned under the title of Stafiordians. He retired with his Majesty, and 
sat among those members assembled at Oxford in January, 1643 ; about 
which time, his first lady departing this life was buried in Christ Church in 
that city. 

Being of too warm a temper to sit still in those times of confusion, he 
was concerned in most of the principal actions in the Civil War, and was dis- 
tinguished for his gallant behaviour on several occasions, particularly in 
the fight at Cropredy Bridge in Oxfordshire, 30th June, 1644, where he 
rescued the Lord Wilmot, then taken prisoner by the rebels. And, when 
all places had surrendered to the Parliament, and his estate was sequestered, 
he followed King Charles the Second in his exile, and took part in his 
triumphant return and entry through London, 29th May, 1660, the next 
day being declared treasurer of his Majesty's household, and sworn of his 
privy council. On Saturday afternoon, 20th April, 1661, three days before 
his Majesty's coronation, he was created, with other nolile persons, in the 
banqueting-room at Whitehall, a Baron of the realm, by the title of Lord 
Cornwallis, of Eye, in co. Suffolk, "having (as the preamble to the patent 
sets forth) from his youth with great fidelity, served King Charles the First 
in court and camp, for which he suffered the loss of his estate, imprisonment, 
and exile ; and, in testimony of the high esteem his Majesty had of his 
merits he advanced him to the said degree and dignity." 

But soon after he departed this life, dying suddenly of an apoplectic 
fit, 31st Jan. 1661-2, generally lamented, being as one characterises him, 
" a man of so chearful a spirit, that no sorrow came next his heart ; and of 
so resolved a mind, that no fear came into his thoughts ; so perfect a master 
of courtly and becoming raillery, that he could do more with one word in 
jest than others could do with whole harangues in earnest ; a well-spoken 
man, competently seen in modem languages, and of a comely and goodly 
personage." This noble lord Ues buried with his ancestors in the chancel 
of the church of Brome. 

For the subsequent devolution of this manor see the account of the 
Manor of Ingham, in Blackbourn Hundred, until the days of Charles, 2nd 



BROME. 239 

Marquis Cornwallis, who sold the manor in Sept. 1823 for £80,000,' to 
Matthias Kerrison, of Bungay, who married Mary, daughter of Edward 
Baines, and on his death in 1827 the said manor passed to his son and 
heir. General Sir Edward Kerrison, of Oakley Park, G.C.B. and G.C.H., 
and has since passed in the same course as the Manor of Thelnetham, in 
Blackbourn Hundred, being now vested in William Spencer, Lord Bateman, 
3rd Baron, of Breckles Hall, Norfolk. 

Sir Richard Gipps states that the family of Bucton was seated at 
Brome Hall by marriage with Brampton, and continued there till Robert 
Bucton left two daughters and heirs — Philippa, the eldest, married to John 
Cornwallis, the London merchant, and Ann, the second, to Mountney. 
Under the head " Broome," Gipps says : "This ancient family was seated at 
Brome HaU, in Hartismere Hundred, but was extinct about 3 Rich. IIL 
[1485], when Hen. Broome Esq. left two daughters and heirs, viz., Ann the 
eldest married to John Brampton Esq. of ... in Norf., and Mary the 
2nd to John Jenny of Hardwyck in Norf." 

Under Braham, Gipps says : "Sir John Braham, dying about 49 Edw, 
111. left his sole daughter and heir married to Robert Bucton." The 
Visitation of 1561 makes John Cornwallis, son and heir of Thomas, who died 
in 1384, marry this daughter of Bucton, and describes the son Thomas as 
of Brome, and Page makes this John the representative in Parliament of 
Suffolk in the reign of Rich. IL, and deceased in 1446. He further states 
that he, John Cornwallis, brought the manor into the family by this 
marriage ; but we are inclined to think that what was acquired through the 
Bucton alUance must have been land in Brome, not Brome Hall Manor. At 
all events this latter manor did not in the time of this John, nor, indeed, 
until 1550, pass into the Cornwallis family. 

The Cornwallis family certainly held land in Brome in 1448, for there 
is the record of an enquiry as to the enclosure of a certain way by a Cornwallis 
in this place and Occold at this time.* (, 

Extracts from Court Rolls of Brome HaU Manor in 1608 and 1686 
will be found in the British Museum.^ 

Arms of Cornwallis : Sa. guttee d'eau, on a fesse Arg. three Cornish 
doughs ppr. 

Manor of Ling Hall. 

Of this manor Hugh de Cressy died seised in 1263." Not unlikely this 
is the lordship of Brome which is usually supposed to have come to the 
Cornwallis family by the marriage of John Cornwallis with Philippe, 
daughter and one of the heirs of Robert Bucton, who died seised 17th Dec. 
1408, whose wife was daughter and heir of Braham, who married the daughter 
and heir of Sir Robert Tye. This John Cornwallis was one of the knights 
of the shire for Suffolk in the time of Rich. H., and died in August, 1436, 
his will being dated loth Aug. 1436, and proved on the 23rd of the same 
month. To him succeeded his eldest son, Thomas Cornwallis, who married 
Philippe, daughter and heir of Edward Tyrrel, of Downham, co. Essex, 
and died the year after his father, leaving Thomas, his son and heir. This 
last Thomas was a knight of the shire for Suffolk in 1450, and on his death 
was succeeded by his son John Cornwallis. He died without issue the 

^Cambridge Chronicle, Sept. 19th, 1823. ^Add. Ch. 10502, X0501. 

'Inquis. Quod Damnum, 27-33 Hen. VI. ^I.P.M., 47 Hen. HI. 28. 
17; I.P.M.. t. Hen. VI. A 52. 



240 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

loth Sept. 1506/ and the following is a copy of his will, in which it will be 
seen he refers to Ling Hall : — 

" In the name of God, Amen. I John Cornwaleys, of Broome in 
the county of Suff. Squyer, being of whole mynde and good memory, 
the xvi day of August, the yere of our Lord God MV°.VI. make 
my testament in this wise. First, I bequeth my soule to Almighti 
God, our Lady Seint Mary, and to all the holy company of hevyn ; my 
bodie to be buried in the chauncell of the churche of our Lady of Broome, 
next Ey, in the said county of Suff . before our Lady, nygh to the walle of 
my chapell there, if that I die in the said parish of Brome, or nygh to it. 
And if I die elliswhere, as it shall please God, to be buried where myn 
executor or assign shall think most convenient. I bequeth to the parson 
of the saide churche of Brome, for breking of the grounde in the highe 
chauncell, vis. viiid. I bequeth to the highe altar in the said churche 
vis. viii^., for my tiths forgotten, and other dutyes neglected. Item, I 
bequeth to the belles of the saide churche of Broome xx"s. Item, I 
bequeth to the reparacions of the saide churches of Okely xxs., Sturston 
xxs., and Thranston xxs., to the churche of Bartyllesdon xxs. in Essex. 
Item, I bequeth to Ellyn Barkar, my servant, vis. viiid. Item, I bequeth 
to my nece, Elizabeth Froxmore x''', and to hyr serstenaunce Ixvis. -viiid., 
and to my nece Elizabeth Cornwalleys Ixvis. viti^., and to Agnes Fastall 
x'*'. to hir mariage. Item, I will and bequeth that myn executors shall 
leve at Lyng-Hall, theireas now I dwell, to hym that shall be myn hey re 
these pressis following : First, in the chapell my great masse booke, a 
vestiment of silke, one chalice, one corparas case with a corps therein. In 
the hall, the table, formys, and all the brewying vessell and standards in 
the brewhouse, and bakehouse, one hole plow, a cart, and v horse to go 
withall. A gilt goblet with a cover, that was my faders, and a gilt cuppe 
with a cover standing. A grete potte of brasse, and a secunde potte of 
brasse ; II spits, a grete and a lesse ; II coberdy, and a garnish of vessell in 
the chambyr ovyr the parlour ; the Ijedde of bokkys tester seder, corteyns, 
counterpoynt, fether-bedde, bolster, and II pelowes, and one payre of 
blanketts. Item, I bequeth to the priour and monkys of Ey abbey xxs. 
Item, I bequeth to the churche of Ey, four combe whete ; to the churche of 
Oxon, nil combe whete ; to the churche of Dysse, IIII combe whete ; to 
the churche of Palgrave, one combe whete ; to the churche of Shotle, one 
combe whete ; to the churche of Billingford, one combe whete ; to the churche 
of Yaxley, a combe whete ; the residue of my goodes and corn at BartiUis- 
don, at London, or elliswhere in the realme of England, not bequethide, my 
dettis and my bequessts payde, I give frely unto Elisabeth, now my wife. 
Item, I bequeth to a preest to syng and pray for my soule, my faders soule, 
my moders soule, all my frendys soules, and all christeyn soules for III 
yeres, xxiiii marc sterling. Item, I ordeyn and make to the execution of 
mys testament and other my last wille, Elizabeth now my wife, my broder 
William Cornewalleys, and Robart Melton, to whom I give for their labour 
eche of them Ixvis. viii^., and my brother Robart Cornewaleys. 
Theise bearing witnesse, John Whitte, Doctour, William Singulton, John 
Constable, Clerk, parson of Brome, John Clerk. Also, I bequeth to the 
abbote of Bury myn ambulling nagge, that I bought of John Revet. Also, 
I bequeth to John Reve, my godson, xxs." 

His brother, Edward Cornwaleys, succeeded to the estate, and died 
without issue four years after him, as appears by a gravestone at the upper 

' I.P.M., aa Hen. VII. 14. 



BROME. 241 

end of the chancel of the church of Brome (where he was buried), which 
had this inscription engraved on brass : — 

" Orate p aia Edwardi Cornwallys Arm 

qui obyit III die Septembris Anno dni MDX. 

Cujus Aia propitietur Deus. 

To whom succeeded Robert Cornwaleys, his brother and heir, who 
married a daughter of the family of Mountney, and dying hkewise without 
issue, was succeeded by his younger brother William/ 

This WiUiam Cornwallis, though his brethren were hving, was among 
those gentlemen of the county of Suffolk who were certified in 1501 to have 
an estate sufficient to support the degree of a Knight of the Bath, several 
having to take that order on the creation of Henry, Prince of Wales. In 
1513 he was among the principal persons of the county of Suffolk nominated 
by Act of Parliament, as most discreet persons, justices of the peace, for 
assessing a subsidy of £163,000, by a poll-tax, &c., for defraying 
the expense of taking Terouanne and Tournay. He took to wife Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of John Stamford, and died 20th Nov. 1519." 

By his will dated 8th November, 1519 (proved 29th following), he 
orders his body to be buried in the church of St. Nicholas, of Oakley, 
and bequeaths iiis. ivd. to the high altar of that church, and vis. viiid. 
to the high altar of the parish church of Broome. He also wills that an 
honest priest be provided to sing for his soul, and all his friends' souls, in 
the church of Oakley, for the space of one year, and that viii. mark vis. 
viiii. be given him for his wages. He bequeaths to Elizabeth his wife the 
manor of Bixley, with the appurtenances and purchased lands thereunto 
belonging, for term of her life, as also her own inheritance in Bedfordshire, 
with aU the purchased lands thereto belonging ; and after the decease of the 
wife of his brother John, his place in London called Barones, but that the 
residue of his sister-in-law's jointure should, as to the rents, go yearly to the 
fulfilling of his will. He bequeaths legacies to his daughters. Prudence, 
Edith, Affra, Catherine, and Dorothy ; and the residue of his purchased 
lands to John, his son and heir, and to his heirs males, in default to his next 
heirs, ordaining the Lord Bishop of Norwich supervisor of his will, and his 
wife Elizabeth and Thomas Goolding, clerk, his executors. 

He was buried, according to his desire, at Oakley, as is evident from a 
gravestone in the east end of the chancel of the church, whereon is engraved 
the following inscription ; but the time of his death is not truly set down : — 

" Orate pro animabus Willielmi Cornwalles et Elisabethe 
uxoris sue qui quidem Willielmus obiit Anno Domini MDXX 
Quorum animabus propitietur Deus. Amen." 

The said Elizabeth his wife lived a widow upwards of seventeen years, 
and describing herself as of Thrandeston, makes her will 30th May, 1537, 
ordering her body to be buried in the chancel of the church of Thrandeston, 
and ordains Thomas Cornwallis, Archdeacon of Norwich, her second son, 
executor. She had other sons, Edward, William, and Francis 
Cornwallis, of Peckham, in the parish of Camberwell, in Surrey, who 
succeeded his brother Edward in the place of groom-porter to Queen 
Elizabeth. 

'The Inquis. p.m. of Edward Cornwallis 'I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 6. 
seems to make his brother WilUam 
his heir; I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. 

G I 



242 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John Cornwallis, eldest son and heir of WilHam, was in the expedition in 
1521 with the Earl of Surrey, Lord High Admiral, who, after scouring the 
seas, landed at Morlaix, in Bretagne,and Mr. Cornwallis, behaving himself 
with great bravery in storming the town, had then the honour of knighthood 
conferred on him by the said Earl. 

About the 46th year of his age he was by King Hen. VHL called to be 
steward of the household to Prince Henry his son, in which of&ce he served 
six years, and departed this life at Ashruge, in Buckinghamshire, 23rd April 
1544. His last will bears date loth April, 1544, and the probate the 9th 
July following. " He first commends his soul to Almighty God, and to the 
whole company of heaven, and his body to be buried with Christian burial, 
where it shall please God to suffer him to depart this world. He orders his 
executors to distribute within one month after his decease, five pounds 
among poor householders within the parishes of Broome, Oaleye, Stuston, 
Thrandeston, Yaxley, and other towns adjoining, wherein any of his lands 
lie, to be divided equally between them. He bequeaths to Thomas, his 
son and heir, all the furniture of his houses at Broome, in Suffolk, Frense, in 
the county of Norfolk, or elsewhere within the realm of England ; likewise 
all his cattle, corn, &c., upon condition that he gives to his two sisters, Anne 
and Mary, their double marriage apparel, according to the degree of every 
such person or persons they should marry withall. He bequeaths to his 
daughter, the wife of the said Thomas, his wife's gown of black velvet. To 
his son Henry, his own gown of tawney taffata. To his son Richard, his 
ward, Margaret Lowthe, which he bought of my Lord of Norfolk, to marry 
her himself, if they both will be so contented; but if not, that he should have 
the wardship and marriage of her, with all advantages and profits. And 
whereas he had a grant from Richard, late Bishop of Norwich, of the advow- 
son and presentation of the archdeaconry of Norwich, he wills that when it 
falls void, his executors present his son William to it, if so be he takes upon 
him priests' orders \ but if he be not minded so to do, that he should have the 
nomination to the said archdeaconry. He moreover bequeaths to his 
daughter Anne, his ring with the rock ruby in it, and 300 marks to her 
marriage portion ; as also to his daughter Mary three hundred marks, to 
be paid on the day or days of their marriages; and if one dies, the other to 
have her portion. He gives to his daughter Hasset, his wife's gown of 
black satten ; and to my Lady Hasset, his gUt cup, with the cover, that 
had the two ears with an antick boy with a child in his hand on it. He 
bequeaths to his brother Edward his gown of black damask wealted with 
velvet and furred with marterns. To his brother Francis, his gown of 
black satten lined with velvet ; and to his brother WilUam, such of his apparel 
as his executors shall think fit, and that he should have an annuity of 
£5. for life out of his lands in Broome, payable at the four usual feasts, as 
also his board with his son Thomas, or on refusal a further annuity of £6. 
13s. /[d. The rest of all his goods, moveable and immoveable, with all his 
manors, lands, &c., in the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk, Middlesex, and Lon- 
don, he disposes by deed of settlement on Thomas, his son and heir, and 
constitutes him, with the Lady Blennerhasset and John Blennerhasset, his 
son-in-law, executors." 

A fine tomb is erected to the memory of this testator in the chancel of 
the church of Brome, the figures of him and his lady lying thereon, under 
an arch, he in complete armour, with a white staff in his hand and a spotted 
greyhound, dun and white, couched at his feet ; and at her feet, a hound, 



BROME. 243 

spotted red and white, with four escutcheons on either side, and three on 
the west end, with this inscription round the tomb : — 

Johannes CornwaUis miles Willielmi Cornwalleis 

Armigeri filius in Domi Principis Edowardi Deconomus, 

et uxor ejusdem Maria Edwardi SuUiard de Essex 

Fiha. Qui quidem Johannes xxiii. Aprilis, Anno 

Dom. M.D. xliiii. obiit Astrugie in Comitatu Buckingham, 

cum ibidem Princeps Edwardus versaretur/ 

The manor passed on Sir John's death to his eldest son, Thomas Corn- 
waUis, and a fine was levied of this manor in 1595 by Sir Thomas Kytson 
and others against Sir Thomas CornwaUis.' Sir Thomas CornwaUis 
died 26th Dec. 1604, and from this time the manor has passed with the 
main Manor of Brome Hall. 

Extracts from the Court Rolls of Ling Hall Manor in 1656 will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.^ 

Manor of Monk's Brome. 

This manor in the time of Hen. I. belonged to Robert of Essex and 
Gunnora his wife, and was given by them to the priory of Thetford, when 
the lordship continued until the Dissolution, when it vested in the Crown, 
and was granted by Hen. VHI. first to the Duke of Norfolk, and later to 
John CornwaUis, eldest son of William CornwaUis, and from the time of 
his death in 1544 has passed with the Manor of Ling Hall. 



'Collins, vol. iv. p. 267-271. ^Add. Ch. 10495. 

'Fine, Easter, 37 Eliz. 




244 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



BURGATE. 

HERE is an entry in the Domesday Survey under Buresgate, 
placed in Plomesgate Hundred, which probably refers to this 
place. It is amongst the lands of Robert Malet, and con- 
sisted of one acre, valued at 3^.' 

BuRGATE Manor. 
Robert de Burgate was lord in the time of Hen. HI., 
and he was succeeded by Peter de Burgate, who had a grant of a market 
and fair for this manor in 1272.'' 

Robert was heir of Peter, and held in 1286, Davy enters Richard de 
Boylaund as lord in 1296, but another Peter de Burgate and Amicia held the 
manor in 1301 •,^ this Peter was probably the son of Baldwin, a brother of 
Robert de Burgate, To Peter succeeded Andrew de Burgate, and to him 
Sir William de Burgate, son of Peter, and probably brother of Andrew. He 
married Ahanor, daughter of Sir Thomas Visdelieu, and died in 1409,* 
leaving Margaret, his daughter and coheir, who married Sir Robert Swyn- 
ford, and they held a moiety, according to Davy. We find that as early as 
1342 a fine was levied of part of the manor by Sir Robert de '' Swynesford," 
Knt., and Margaret his wife, against Edmund de Playford, vicar of Keneton 
church, and Thomas de Swynesford.' 

Davy also states that Eleanor, another daughter and coheir of Sir 
William de Burgate, married John Rookwood, and had the other moiety 
of the manor. Gipps says that Sir William left an only child, Joan (but 
according to other authorities Eleanor) married to John Rookwood, of Stan- 
ningfield. As a matter of fact. Sir William Burgate left three daughters 
— Eleanor, married as stated above to John Rokewood or Rookwood; 
Margaret, married to Sir Robert Swynford ; and Jane, married to Sir 
Walter Tyrell, Knt., though some pedigrees, add a fourth daughter, 
Katharine, married to Robert Stonham, of Stonham Aspal, who died in 
1397. Sir William certainly died the 24th July, 1409. He was interred 
under an altar monument in the middle of the chancel of Burgate 
church. Under a handsome double canopy with finials are the figures in 
brass of Sir William and Alianor, his wife. He is armed with a painted 
helmet, mail gorget, plated armour, and short sword and dagger, and lion 
at his feet; she has the veil, headdress, with puffs of hair plaited in mat form 
above her ears, and a fillet of zig-zag on her forehead, close gown with long 
mitton sleeves, mantle ; dog, or as Martin says, a wolf, with a collar of 
bells, looking up, at her left foot, and round them an inscription. An 
engraving of the monument is given in Gough's " Sepulchral Monuments," 
and in the first volume of the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute, p. 213. 

We meet with a fine levied of a moiety of the manor and advowson in 
1415 by Robert Leversegge, Thomas Glanton, and Edmund Hook, against 
John Spenser and Katherine his wife,® and another in 1427 by Thomas 

' Dojn. ii. 3 17 • Baldwin de Burgate = only child of Robert 

''Chart. Rolls, 56 Hen. III. 3. | de Swynford. 

3 Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. I. 42. Peter de Burgate 

*The pedigree of Sir William Burgate as | 

given in the Collectanea Top. et Sir William de Burgate, d. 1409. 

Gen. ii. 130, is— ^'Beei of Fines, 16 Edw. III. 23. 

^ Feet of Fines, 3 Hen. V. 24. 



BURG ATE. 245 

Bryghtyene, clerks and John Bolton, against John Tirell and Katherine 
his wife.' The manor certainly seems to have gone in shares, but even the 
shares are not certain, for Davy informs us that in 1479 John Broughton 
had a moiety, his mother being Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Robert 
Stonham and Catherine his wife, daughter and coheir of Sir William Bur- 
gate— consequently another daughter is assigned to Sir William. 

The share of John Rookwood, whatever it was, passed on his death in 
1423 to his son and heir, John, and on his death without issue to his brother 
and heir, William Rookwood (who married EUzabeth, daughter of Sir Henry 
Coggeshall, Knt.), and later to his cousin, Thomas Rookwood, who released 
to Robert Knyvet and John West a moiety in i486, but in 1522 we find 
Elizabeth Rookwood, widow, holding for life. That John Broughton had 
a moiety is certain, for he died seised of it in 1479,° ^^^ ^^ widow, Anna 
Broughton, two years later.^ 

This moiety passed to Sir Robert Broughton, son and heir of John, and 
on Sir Robert's death to his son and heir, John Broughton, who died in 
1517.* In 1545 the manor was granted to Thomas Bacon.' 

Thomas Bacon had licence in 1549 to alien to Sir Nicholas Bacon, the 
Lord Keeper. He no doubt acquired the manor in moieties, one moiety in 
1564 under a fine levied of it by him against Sir William Poulett and Agnes 
his wife.,* and the other under a fine levied by him the following year against 
Sir Henry Cheyne.^ We meet in 1571 with a fine levied by Sir Nicholas 
Bacon and others against Robert Rokewood and others of a moiety.^ Sir 
Nicholas Bacon died in 1579, when the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Nicholas Bacon, Bart., and he was lord in 1597,^ and the descent of the 
manor is given in the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian.'" 

From Sir Nicholas Bacon, the Lord Keeper, this manor has devolved 
in the same course of descent as the Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackbourn, and 
is now held by George Holt Wilson, of Redgrave Hall. 

Arms of Burgate : Paly of 6 Arg. and Sa. 

Manor of Higham. 

We have little information respecting this manor save that it was held 
by Sir James Hobart, Knt., who died seised of it in 1516, when it passed to 
his son and heir. Sir Walter Hobart, from whom on his death in 1541 it 
went to his son and heir, Henry Hobart." A fine was levied of the manor 
in 1573 by Henry Woodhouse against Milo Hobart," and another in 1579 
by Richard Davye and others against the said Milo Hobart.'^ 

This is probably the manor referred to in the Calendar of Suffolk 
Fines as the Manor of "Hegh Hamhale, with appurtenances in Burgate, 
Gyssingham and Mellis," levied in 1328 by Robert, son of Herbert Weylaund 
and Isabella his wife against Simon de Heyford.'* 

' Feet of Fines, 3 Hen. VI. 22. against Robert Rokewood and 

'A moiety of Burgate Manor, John others. Fine, Easter, 5 Eliz. 

Broughton. J.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 46. 'Fine, Easter, 7 Eliz. 

n.PM.. ai Edw. IV. 44. 8 Pine, Mich. 13 Eliz. 

''See Manor of Denston Hall, in Risbridge ^Rawl. MSS. B. 80. 

Hundred. "Rawl. B. 319. 

'Particulars for Grant, 37 Hen. VIII., "See Manor of Oulton, Lothingland 

D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 162. Hundred. 

*Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. A moiety of the "Fine, Hil. 15 Eliz. 

manor is included in a fine levied '3 Fine, Trin. 21 Eliz. 

in 1563 by Christopher Haydon '♦ Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. III. 19. 




246 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

COTTON. 

jHERE were two manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by i8 freemen ; over one Alwin by name, with 
10 acres, the abbot had half commendation, and consisted 
of I carucate and 15 acres of land, 3 ploughteams, and i 
acre of meadow valued at los. The Domesday tenant was 
Earl Ralph, and the lands were kept by Goodrich, the 
steward, in hand for the King. The value then was 
6s. M. The soc belonged to the King and Earl. It was 6 quarentenes 
and 8 perches long, and 6 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt i2i. The 
Survey says : " And the Hundred bears witness that in truth the King and 
the Earl had the soc and sac in the time of the Confessor. But the men of 
that town bear witness that Burchard had soc in like manner over the 
freemen as over his own villeins ; and they have not any testimony except 
themselves ; and yet they will prove it by every means." 

Also among these lands of Earl Ralph were four more holdings in this 
place. The first consisted of 10 acres and half a ploughteam, and wood 
sufficient for 2 hogs, valued at 2od., included in the valuation of Mendlesham, 
formerly held by half a freeman, and the second of 5 acres, valued at i2d., 
which had formerly been held by 2 freewomen under Burchard's commen- 
dation. The third consisted of an acre and a half, valued at 3^., formerly 
held by a bordar under Burchard's commendation. The fourth holding con- 
sisted of 8 acres, half a ploughteam, wood sufficient to support 2 hogs, and 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 2s., held in the Confessor's time by three 
freemen under Burchard's commendation. Also a church with 11 acres 
valued at 2s. The soc belonged to the King and Earl.' 

More holdings in this place were those of Robert Malet. The first 
consisted of 20 acres, half a ploughteam, wood sufficient to support 4 hogs, 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. It had formerly been held by a 
freeman under commendation to Edric, and been valued at 40^. Under 
him 3 freemen held 5 acres, valued at 10 penny pieces. In the same township 
were 7 acres, half a ploughteam, and wood sufficient to support 2 hogs, 
valued at 14^., formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commendation. 
All this was valued at 21s. 

The second manor was held by Robert Malet, and consisted of 30 acres, 
I ploughteam (which at the time of the Survey was reduced to half a 
team), i acre of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 6 hogs. In the 
time of the Confessor this had been held by a freeman under commendation 
to Lewin of Bacton. There were also 16 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at los., formerly held by three freemen under commendation, the 
soc belonging to the King and Earl.^ 

In the ?ame township were also 8 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 
4s., the soc belonging to the King and Earl. It had formerly been held by 
Teu, half under commendation to Edric, the King's provost, and half under 
commendation to the predecessor of Malet.^ 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of Bury were 2 holdings, one of 8 
acres, valued at i6d., belonging to Ashfield, formerly held by a viUein ; the 
other of 3 acres, formerly held by 3 freemen in the abbot's soc and under 
his commendation.* 

'Dom. ii. 2856, 286, 286&. sDom. ii. 3226. 

»Dom. ii. 309&. 4 Dom. ii. 370&, 



COTTON. 247 

Belonging to Richard, son of Earl Gilbert, were 7 acres, valued at 14^., 
held by Walter the deacon, and formerly by Fader.' 

There was a small estate belonging to Hugh de Montfort, consisting of 
20 acres, i ploughteam (which at the time of the Survey had become half a 
team), half an acre of meadow, and wood to support 2 hogs. And it is 
included in the valuation of the demesne of Newton. It had been held in 
the time of the Confessor by a freeman Saxwin, under Burchard's commen- 
dation.^ 

Manor of Cotton Briseworth. 

This was the lordship of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey, the 
time of Edw. L, and of William de Briseworth. 

In 1300 we find on the Patent Rolls a commission issued on complaint 
by this William de Briseworth that Roger Rokermi, of Beccles, and Isabella 
his wife, Robert, son of Roger Rokermi, John Cumpeigne of Cotton, Thomas 
Osemund and Andrew Woderowe of Cotton, Adam Aunger of Wetheringsett, 
William Neel of Thomham Parva, Henry Aired of Mellis, Robert Derled of 
Brockford, John de Gerardeville, of Stoke, and John de Stowe Market, and 
others, entered hisManor of Cotton, cut down trees, and carried them and other 
goods away.' At the beginning of the 15th century the manor was vested 
in Robert Hemenhale, from whom it passed to Sir William Wolfe, who was 
lord in 1437. 

In 1447 the manor was vested in William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, 
who died seised of it in 1448. His son John, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, was lord in 
1488, and he in 1490 granted a lease of it to William Pratyman. It subse- 
quently passed to the Crown, and in 1511 was held by Sir Sampson Lowe, 
for he held a court for the manor on 9th July this year. Later we find the 
manor in King Hen. VIII., who probably granted it to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, for he held in 1537, ^^ ^i^ year he granted Cotto^ Hall 
to Thomas Pratyman for 99 years. In 1539 Hen. VIII. was lord, and 
granted the manor in 1541 to Anne of Cleves, who also held the Bacton 
Manor. In 1558 or 1559 it was granted by the Queen to Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, who hadhcence to alien in 1561 to Sir John Tyrell, of Gipping. 
The transaction was in reality an exchange. Sir John granting all his right 
in the Manors of Marshalls, at Barham, in Norfolk, with divers lands there 
for the Manors of Cotton and Bacton. , 

On Sir John Tyrell's death in 1573 this manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir John Tyrell, who made a lease of the manor with that of Cotton 
Hempnalls, to his brother, Thomas Tyrell, by deed dated ist Oct. 31 Eliz. 
[1589]. On the death of Sir John in 1590 without issue the manor passed to 
his brother and heir, Thomas Tyrell.* 

He had hcence in 1592 to ahen to William Pretyman, jun., and effected 
the sale the following year.^ William Pretyman held his first court 17th 
Sept. 1594, and married Margaret, daughter of William Longe, of Cotton. 
He died and was buried at Bacton, 4th July, 1617,^ when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Peter Pretyman, He married ist Anne, daughter of 
Thomas Harwell, of Felsham, and 2ndly Elizabeth Wilson, and died in 

'Dom. ii. 391. Tyrell, however, held one court 

*Doin. ii. 408. for this manor, viz., on Friday, 

3 Pat. Rolls, 28 Edw. I. 28d. 23rd Apl. 23 Eliz. (1581). 

■♦See Gipping Manor, in Stow Hundred. ^Fine, Hil. 35 Eliz. 

Lady Mary Corbett, widow of John ^Will, 3rd July, 1617. I.P.M., 15 Jac. 



248 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Aug. 1636/ when the manor passed by his will to his son, George Pretyman, 
to whom his cousin left the Manor of Old Newton, in Stow Hundred. He 
held his first court for this manor 26th Oct. 1636, and levied a fine 25th 
Feb. 1639.'' In 1658 he entailed his property on Peter, his heir, with 
remainder to his sons Thomas and Tyrell. He died i8th July, 1688,^ and 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Peter Pretyman, who held his first 
court in 1688. He married Frances, 2hd daughter and coheir of Samuel 
Baron, M.D., of Lynn, Norfolk, and died 6th Oct. 1705, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, George Pretyman, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter and coheir of Edward Garneys, of Redesham Hall, and died 3rd 
Sept. 1727,^ when the manor passed to his son, George Pretyman, who held 
his first court i8th Oct. 1727, and died in 1732, when the manor passed to 
his widow, Jane Pretyman, who held her first court the same year, and died in 
1738, when the lordship vested in her son. Baron Pretyman, who held his first 
court 23rd Oct. 1738, and died in 1758, when the manor passed, under his will, 
to his natural son, John Jacob, who was lord in 1770. About 1776 the 
manor was purchased for ;^i,ooo by Charles Maverley before a Master 
in Chancery in a suit, Jacob v. Braham. 

Edward Venn seems to have purchased, and died in 1830, when the manor 
went to Edward Beaumont Venn. 

In 1885 the manor belonged to C. Tyrell. 

Cotton Hall, though now a farmhouse, is an ancient mansion encom- 
passed by a broad and deep moat, which appears to have been walled on 
both sides. A gold cup was found in the moat about 120 years ago, and 
a curious old brass key was discovered about the year 1850. The Cotton 
court rolls were acquired by the late H. Trigg at the sale of the effects of 
Professor Babington, and were deposited by his coheirs and daughters in 
the Moyses Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds. The Rolls are : 9 mem- 
brances, t. Edw. IV. [i8th Feb. 1469 to 21st Apl. 1482] ; i membrance, 
Rich.JII. [29th Aug. 1483]; — membrances. Hen. VIII.; 5 mem., Edw. VI. 
1553 Mary ; i mem. in men 5 h. Edw. VI. ; 7th Aug, 1553 ; Eliz. Oct. 1562 ; 
Trin. 1562 ; 4th May, 1563 ; Oct. 1563 ; 6th Dec. 1563 ; 26th Jan. 1564 ; 
Wilsim, 1564 ; 6th Oct. 1564 ; 15th Nov. 1564 ; 15th March, 1565 ; 20th 
Sept. 1565 ; 28th Oct. 1565 ; 4th Dec. 1565 ; 25th March, 1566 ; 6th Aug. 
1566 ; 2nd Sept. 1566 ; 6th Oct. 1566 ; 24th Feb. 1567 ; 25th March, 
1567 ; loth June, 1567 ; 6th Oct. 1567 ; i8th March, 1568 ; 26th May, 1568 ; 
2ist Sept. 1568 ; 30th Dec. 1568 ; 25th March, 1569 ; 27th Sept. 1569 ; 
(gap) ; 13th Nov. 1577 ; 12th Dec. 1577 ; 23rd Jan. 1578 \ 23rd Apl. 1581 ; 
24th Oct. 1581 ; 26th March, 1583 ; 6th Oct. 1583 ; 25th March, 1584 ; 
6th Oct. 1584 ; 6th Oct. 1584 ; 6th Oct. 1585; 26th March, 1586 ; Easter, 

1587 ; 13th June, 1587 ; 17th Oct. 1587 ; 21st March, 1588 ; 15th Apl. 

1588 ; 6th Oct. 1588 ; 26th March, 1589 ; 27th Aug. 1589; 28th March, 
1590-1 ; Nov. 1590 ; i6th Sept. 1591 ; 28th Sept. 1591 ; 17th Sept. 1594 ; 
17th Sept. 1595 ; 27th Sept. 1596 ; 6th Oct. 1597 ; 9th Oct. 1598 ; 2nd 
Oct., 1599 ; 2nd March, 1600 ; 7th Oct. 1600 ; 20th Sept. 1601 ; 20th Sept. 
1602 ; 12th Oct. 1604 ; 4th Apl. 1605 ; 20th Aug. 1605 ; 9th Oct. 1605 ; 
8th Apl. 1606 ; i6th Oct. 1606 ; 20th May, 1607 ; ist Oct. 1607 ; 2nd Apl. 
1608 ; 4th Oct. 1608 ; 17th Oct. 1609 ; 3rd Oct. 1610 ; 8th Oct. 1611 ; 7th 
Apl. 1612 ; 6th Oct. 1612 ; 31st March, 1613 ; 4th Oct. 1613 ; 4th Oct. 1614 ; 
31st Oct. 1615 ; 9th Oct. 1616 ; 8th Oct. 1617 ; 26th March, 1618 ; 6th 
Oct. 1618 ; 4th Oct. 1619 ; 12th Apl. 1620 ; 3rd Oct. 1620 ; nth Apl. 1621 ; 

'Will, 7th Aug. 1636, proved 9th Feb. 1637. ^Will, 14th March, i586, proved 22nd 

I.P.M., 12 Car. Aug. 1688. 

Tine, 15 Car. I. pt. ii. 10. ■'See Manor of Bacton, in this Hundred. 



COTTON. 249 

5th Oct. 1621 ; ist Apl. 1622 ; 2nd Oct. 1622 j 7th Apl. 1623 ; ist Oct. 1623; 
22nd Oct. 1623 ; 6tn Oct. 1624 J lo^h Apl. 1625 ; loth Oct. 1625 ; 26th 
Apl. 1626; 3rd Oct. 1626; 27th March, 1627 ; 8th Oct. 1627; ist Oct. 1828; 
1st Oct. 1629 ; 19th April, 1630 ; 2nd Oct. 1630 ; 4th Oct. 1631 ; 8th Oct. 
1632 ; ist March, 1633 ; 14th Oct. 1633 ; 30th Sept. 1634 ; 8th Oct. 1636 ; 
22nd Oct. 1636; 6th Oct. 1637 J 17th Oct. 1638; 2nd Oct. 1639; 14th 
Oct. 1640; i8th Oct. 1641 ; 19th July, 1642; 3rd Oct. 1642; 19th Oct. 1643 ; 
27th Nov. 1642 ; 14th Oct. 1644 J 20th Oct. 1645 ; 23rd Dec. 1645 ; 8th 
Oct. 1646 ; nth Oct. 1647 ; 2nd Oct. 1649 ; 12th Nov. 1649 '> 9^ Oct. 
1650 ; 15th Oct. 1651 ; 3rd Dec. 1651 ; 22nd Oct. 1652 j i8th Oct., 1653 ; 
20th Oct. 1654 ; 3rd April, 1656 ; 3rd Nov. 1656 ; ist Oct. 1657 ; 14th 
April, 1658 ; i8th Oct. 1659 ; 24th Oct. 1660 ; 7th Apl. 1662 ; ist Sept. 
1662 ; 24th Sept. 1662 ; 25th Aug. 1663 ; ist May, 1665 ; i6th Oct. 1665 ; 
28th March, 1666 ; ist May, 1666; 25th March, 1667; 19th Aug. 1667; 15th 
Oct. 1667 ; 28th July, 1668 ; 26th Oct. 1668 ; 23rd Aug. 1670 ; i6th May, 
1671 ; ist Oct. 1672 ; 27th Jan. 1673 ; 4th May, 1675 ; 23rd Aug. 1675 ; 
5th Sept. 1676 ; loth Sept. 1677 \ 15th Oct. 1678 ; i6th Dec. 1678 ; 29th 
Sept. 1679 ; 3rd March, 1679-80 ; 23rd Aug. 1680 ; 23rd Aug. 1680 ; 22nd 
April, 1681 ; 31st Oct. 1681 ; 17th April, 1683 ; 8th Oct. 1683 ; 6th Oct. 
1685 ; 2ist May, 1686 ; 3rd Apr. 1687 ; 12th Oct, 1688 ; 26th Oct. 1688 ; 
22nd Oct. 1689 ; 28th Oct. 1690 ; 8th May, 1691 ; 6th Oct. 1691 ; 21st 
Oct. 1692 ; 9th Oct. 1693 ; 19th Oct. 1695 ; 9th July, 1697 ; 23rd Jan, 
1699 ; 3rd Feb, 1701 ; i6th Sept. 1702 ; 27th Apl. 1703 ; loth Oct. 1703 ; 
9th May, 1704 ; 28th April, 1705 ; 13th Oct. 1705 ; 17th May, 1709 ; 25th 
Oct. 1711 ; 28th Sept. 1714 ; loth Nov, 1714 ; 14th Oct. 1715 ; 24th Nov. 
1715 ; 15th May, 1718 ; loth Apl. 1719 ; i6th Oct. 1719 ; 13th Jan, 1720 ; 
4th Aug. 1721 ; 3rd Oct. 1721 ; 25th Oct. 1721 ; 19th June, 1722 ; 19th 
July, 1722 ; 2rst May, 1724 ; 19th Nov. 1724 ; 17th Dec. 1724 ; 12th 
Oct. 1725 ; 25th Oct. 1726 ; 25th Oct. 1726 ; i6th Feb, 1726 ; 13th June 
1727 ; i8th Oct. 1727 ; 23rd April, 1728 ; 3rd Oct. 1728 ; 12th June, 1729 ; 
22nd Oct. 1729 ; 2nd Oct. 1730 ; 5th Oct. 1731 ; 17th Dec. 1731 ; 25th 
Jan. 1731-2 ; 6th Oct. 1732 ; 31st Oct, 1732 ; ist Jan. 1732-3 ; 29th 
Jan. 1733 ; 3rd June, 1733 ; 25th July, 1735 ; 30th Sept, 1734 ; 2nd 
June, 1735 ; 20th Oct, 1735 ; 8th Nov, 1736 ; 30th Nov, 1736 ; 22nd 
Dec. 1736 ; 20th Oct. 1738 ; loth Sept, 1739 ; 24th Oct. 1739 ; 9th Feb. 
1739-40 ; 13th Oct. 1740 ; 22nd Dec. 1740 ; 19th Oct. 1741 ; ist Nov. 
1742 ; 23rd Nov. 1742 ; 15th Aug. 1743 ; 2ist Nov. 1743 ; i6th May, 
1744 ; 29th Aug. 1744 ; 4th Oct. 1744 ; I2th Nov, 1744 ; 31st Oct. 1745 ; 
13th Oct. 1746 ; 19th Oct. 1747 ; 7th March, 1747-8 ; 24th Oct. 1748 ; 17th 
March, 1748-9 ; loth Oct. 1749 ; 27th April, 1750 ; 19th May, 1750 ; 2nd 
July, 1750 ; 2nd Oct. 1750 ; 8th Nov. 1730 ; 22nd Oct. 1753 ; 20th Oct. 
1755 ; 1st Nov. 1756 ; 19th July, 1770 ; 20th Aug. 1770 ; 2nd June, 1772 ; 
30th May, 1774 ; 20th July, 1775 ; loth Oct. 1775 ; Jan, 1779-80 ; i8th 
Sept. 1780 ; loth June, 1782 ; 2nd Nov. 1782 ; 7th Feb. 1783 ; 12th May, 
1783 ; 20th Apl. 1784 ; nth April, 1785 ; 13th June, 1785 ; 23rd June, 
1786 ; 19th May, 1786 ; 17th Feb. 1787 ; 2nd April, 1789 ; 30th March, 
1790 ; 4th May, 1791 ; 28th June, 1791 ; 7th April, 1792 ; 4th May, 1793 ; 
8th April, 1794 ; ist July, 1794 ; 28th July, 1794 ; i8th April, 1796 ; 17th 
May, 1799 ; 3rd April, 1801 ; 14th May, 1802 ; 3rd May, 1804 ; 3rd May, 
1806 ; 4th Dec. 1807 ; 6th May, 1808. 

Compotus Rolls of Cotton Manor in 1402-3, will be found amongst the 
Harl., RoUs in the British Museum,' Also in 1438-9.' 

'Harl. Rolls, A. 37. ""Harl. RoUs, K. 24. 

HI 



250 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The customs of the manor were : — 

Custom to the youngest ; i.e., copyhold went to the youngest son, according 
to the custom of " Borough English," and the land held free, 
to the eldest;' examples, Rolls, 1469, 1599, 1657-1662, and two cases 
as late as 1729 ; but this may be taken as " custom," when the father 
died intestate, because we find in a Roll of 1599 that the eldest son is 
admitted heir, according to " common law " by direction of the 
father. 

Common Fine went to the lord, and in a roll of Edw. IV. we learn that 

the tenements which paid the fine were then part of the lord's land. 

A° 9 Edw. IV. (The Jury), who say that they give nothing by 

r^^ £ way of common fine, because the tenements which were 

Common nne t t a j. • j ^u -c 

nothing- formerly wont to give and pay the common fine are now 

°' and have been for several years past in the lord's hands. 

Timber Reserved, under fine, if cut on copyhold lands without the lord's 
licence. Early example, A° 16 Edw. IV., m. 4. 

" Reserving to the lords all timber growing in and upon the 
aforesaid pasture by them felled or cut down for the future," 
There are several late examples ; but earlier ones, 1641-65-72. 
The father is daughter's heir. Vide rolls A° 8 Edw. IV. 8, 1656. 

Heriot. — This Danish custom is attached to one tenement called Boles'' 
and 8 acres, and is mentioned as early as a court held 1469, which 
quotes another held 1417. 

It is no longer the warrior's horse and armour of Saxon times, but 
in 1658 it is the price of a horse, 40s. ; later the " service " at death 
of owner becomes, " ye price of a fat red fallow heifer," and " honest 
Tom "^ in 1724 records the service " at ye price of a silver tankard." 

Licences. — A licence was required from the lord by payment of "fine," not 
only for cutting timber, as we have said, but also — 

To join two pieces of land, "ditch out," it was called. Vide 1658. 

To alienate land, A° 17 Edw. IV. Thos. Tyrell, 1542. 

To lease copyhold. 

To cut a dyke. A° 19 Eliz. 

To take in waste. Vide 1705. 

No meadow land ploughed up. 

Fines. — For " non service " — not attending the Manor Court 3^., 1732. For 
attornment 2d. "As relief " on succession to free land, the amount 
of one year's rent. This " relief " seems to have been raised in the 
i8th century to an arbitrary amount, at the will of the lord, i.e., 
at two years' rent." 

Privileges. — The Manor of Cotton Bresworth carried with it the following 
privileges : — 

Court Leet, or court of justice in the King's name. This court was 
attached only to the greater Barons' rights, and did not belong to 
either of the Manors of Hempnall and Skeith. See bounds of jurisdiction, 
1669. 

Frankpledge.— -1584. 

Assize of Beer. — Many examples, Oct. 1473. 

'See fol. 8. ^ Thomas Martin, of Palgrave, Steward. 

*See fol. 8. *Vide "Case," dated 1782. 



COTTON. 251 

Free Warren. — From mention of the lord's game and a hare warren. 
" Leporum," A° 34 Hen. VIII. (?) Grant to Robt. de Thorpe 1266. 

. , " That Thos. Palmer is a common hunter and poacher 

Amercea -^ ^j^^ hare-warren within the afforesaid lordship, and 

injunction ^^^^ ^^^^^ breaks the hedges of the lord's tenants. Fined 

witn penalty. ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ -^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ penalty of 6s. 8^." 

A " hare- warren " is mentioned in Domesday (Birch), 

Waste. — The lord could fine any tenant who did not keep his tenement 
and enclosures (ditches included) in proper repair. A° 17 Edw. IV. m 5, 
proceedings in court. 

" and that Margaret Cook has not repaired her tenement called 

' Pepres/ for default in repairing the woodwork and plaster ; 

through which default the aforesd. tenement is in great 

delapidation." 

Strays. — All beasts without owners, after having remained in the manor 
for one year and a day were judged as the property of the lord, at a 
certain price. A° 19 Ehz. ; 4 Edw. VI. Example, A° 4 Edw, VI., 
m. 2. 

" And that a horse coloured ' bay ' remains within the manor 
as a stray (extra de hura), and proclamation having been made, after 
one year and a day, day is set to appraise (the value) at which it shall be 
taken in capite." 

Ward and Marriage. — No doubt a survival of the " villeins " condition in 
post Norman days, when his female children could not be married 
without the lord's consent to what was considered a damage to the 
property. Vide copy of C Roll, A °, 5 Hen. VII. It is one of the excep- 
tions made by John, Duke of Suffolk, in his lease of the manor to 
William Pratyman. 

The Presentation to Cotton Church, mentioned in same. This 
presentation remained to this Manor of Bresworth [Cotton] during the 
period it was held by the Pretyman family. 

Trial by Jury. — The tenants could claim the right to be judged by 12 
of their fellow tenants in all common law cases, and this was no doubt 
a right granted at an early date. There is an instance of their demand- 
ing an appeal to this right of trial by jury, A° 2 Edw. VI., against a 
verdict of the Court of Common Pleas, Note chan%e of name. 

" And now Johan and Robert [Johan Hoggar one of the 
daughters and heirs of Robert Hoggar defunct and Robert Bacon 
his son and heir] make protest against the ruling in Common Law 
of the high court of the Lord King Edward following this quarrel on 
the death of an ancestor and petition proceedings therefrom 
against aforesaid John Pretyman at the next Court (of the Manor) 
in accordance with the custom of this manor by the bailiff sum- 
moning twelve just and legal men tenants of the said manor, 
&c," Also vide 1564, Thurbarne v. Pretyman. 

Villages as Tenants. — Among the list of tenants, the towns or 
villages of Eye, Wyverstone, and Cotton are mentioned as owing suit 
at court, or rent for some land. A° 6 Eliz. 

Gilde Hous. — The Guild House of Cotton is often mentioned, especially at 
a court held by Tyrell. In 1477 it is called " le geldehous," used much 
as a parish room of to-day. 



^52 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Cotton Hempnall or Caldecott. 

Among the lands of Robert Malet was a holding in this place, consisting 
of 74 acres, i bordar, i J ploughteams, and i acre of meadow, valued at iis. 
It had formerly been held by 6 freemen under commendation to Lewin of 
Bacton, and under them were 7 freemen by commendation with 6^ acres. 
The soc belonged to the King and Earl, except over Ulveva and her son. 
Walter de Dol was seised on the day on which he made forfeiture.' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was a holding of 
6 acres, under the abbot's soc and commendation, valued at I2d., formerly 
held by a freeman.' 

All these do their customs at Rickinghall. 

Also belonging to the fee of the abbot was a holding of 4^ acres, valued 
at I2d., formerly belonging to Aluric, a freeman under sub-commendation.^ 
Among the lands of Walter the deacon were 19 acres of Bacton demesne 
land, valued at 3s. 3<^. It was 9 quarentenes long and 2 quarentenes and 
5 perches broad, and paid in a gelt 6d.* 

Among the lands of Hugh de Montfort were 2 holdings in this place. 
One consisted of a freeman with 2^ acres, valued at 6d.j the other 3^ acres 
in demesne, valued at 6d.^ 

In the time of King Hen. I., Sir Robert de Sackville" held this lordship 
of the Honor of Eye. 

In 1266 King Hen. III. confirmed to Robert, son of John de Thorp, 
free warren in his demesne here, and in 1272 Sir Phihp de Bocland was 
lord. In 1367 Sir Ralph de Hemenhale' held the manor, and had a grant of 
free warren here that year.^ A fine of this and Wickham Skeyth Manor 
was levied in 1369 by Sir Thomas de la Dale, Reg. de Eccles, Adam Hauboy, 
parson of Cockfield Church, John de Herlaston, parson of Blaksale Church, 
Roberi: Davy of Ashefeld, Thomas del Ook, John Muriel, parson of 
Wortham Church, and William Phehp, against Sir Ralph de Hemenhale.' 
This same year, amongst the Harleian Charters, we find a writing by which 
William Philip quits claim to Adam Hauboys, parson of the Church of 
Thorndon, John de Harlestone, parson of the Church of Blaxhall, and John 
de Pysale, parson of the Church of Alderton, of the Manors of Cotton and 
Wickham, which they had acquired of Richard (sic) de Hemenhale. It is 
dated at Cotton " die Jovis in vigil S. Bartholomsei 43 Edw. III. [1369].'° 
This was probably by way of settlement, for the manors did not leave the 
Hemenhale family. 

Sir Ralph de Hemenhale died in 1370," when the manor passed to his 
son and heir. Sir Robert de Hemenhale, who in 1389 released the manors in 
the parishes of Cotton, Wickhamskeith, and Yaxley to Sir George Felbrigg 
and other trustees, and all the possessions of his father. Sir Ralph. He 
married Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John, son of Sir William de la Pole 
and Joan his wife, and appears to have died before 1406, when the manor 
passed to his widow Joan, who remarried Reginald de Braybroke. 

Sir Thomas Morley, Robert Bacton, John Glemham, and Hugh 
Lancastre, clerk (no doubt trustees), by an indenture dated at Cotton, 3rd 

'Dom. ii. 3216. 7 See Manor of Hemenhale, Thornham, 
*Dom. ii. 371. in this Hundred. 

3Dom. ii. 371. 8 Chart. Rolls, 41 Edw. IH. 2. 

*Dom. ii. 4266. 9 Feet of Fines, 42 Edw. III. 40. 

^Dom. ii. 408. "Harl. 54 G. 50. 

^See Old Hall, Braiseworth, in this "See Manor of Hemenhale, in Thornham, 
Hundred. in this Hundred. 



COTTON. 253 

Jan. 4 Hen. IV. [i402-3]j demised the manor to the said Joan Braybroke for 
the term of her life.' And by an agreement dated 5th July, 4th Hen. IV. 
[1403] between Sir Reginald de Braybroke and Joan his wife of the one part, 
and John Stauntone, John Cokerelle of Orforde, John Berton, clerk, Simon 
de Blyaunt, and Hugh Lancastre, clerk, of the other part, an exchange for 
the reversions of certan manors in Essex, Oxfordshire and Hampshire, 
for the manors of "Cottone,Skeythe, Boles, and Newtone, was arranged,' 
and in the following October, by a deed dated at Cotton the loth, Simon 
Blyaunt quit claim to Hugh Lancastre, clerk, all right in this manor and the 
manors of Bolys and Skeyth.' By another wfiting, dated at Cotton, 3rd 
Jan. 5 Hen. IV. [1403-4], Sir Thomas de Morley,lord of Morley, Robert Bucton, 
John Glemham, and Hugh Lancastre, clerk, constituted William Hatfield 
and Robert Floteman to deliver seisin to Joan Braybroke, late wife of Sir 
Robert de Hemenhale of the manors of Cotton and Wickham Skeith.* A 
fine was levied of the manor in 1404 by John Staverton, John Cokerell of 
Orford, John Bertori, clerk, and Simon Blyant, against the said Reginald 
Bray brook and Joan his wife.^ Under this fine the exchange was finally 
effected and the manor vested in Simon Blyant, or Bleaunt, and this year 
he granted it to his son, John Bleaunt, and Agnes his wife, daughter and 
heir of John Hemenhale. They died without issue. Sir Robert de Hemen- 
hale's son and heir was William de Hemenhale, an idiot, who died before 
1419, when his cousin, Ralph de Hemenhale, succeeded to his uncle's 
(Sir Robert) estates. 

In 1418 W^illiam Wingfield is said to have djed seised of the manor,* 
and it passed to his widow, Catherine, described as "late wife of William, son 
of William Wyngefeld," when she, the same year, released it to John 
Horseld and others. 

In 1442 it was vested in Robert Crane, for this year he conveyed it 
to William Clopton.^ 

The manor subsequently vested in Sir John Falstolf, who died about 
1460,^ and seems to have been vested later in John Paston, for it is mentioned 
in his inquisition p.m. in 1465.^ 

A deed is preserved amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum 
as follows : — 

" Carta Thomae Cantuar. Archiepiscopi, et aliorum tradens Johanni 
[de la Pole] Duci Suff. et 10 aliis, terras Johannis Fastolff militis ; scilicet 
manerium de Cotton vocatum Hempnales in Cotton, et manerium de Skeyth 
in Wykham Skeyth. Dat. 10 Jan. 8 Edw. IV. [1469].'"° 

The manor passed from the De la Poles, no doubt with the forfeiture of 
their other Suffolk estates, and was from 1522 to 1536 probably in Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. In 1539 and 1540 it was in the Crown, and 
was granted to Anne of Cleves. In 1556 it was vested in the Crown, and 
in 1560 a grant of it was made to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. He had 
licence to alien it to John Tyrell and John his son. In 1562 Sir John 
Tyrell was called upon to render an account in respect of the manor from 
the death of Anne of Cleves." A little later we meet in the Chancery 
Proceedings with a bill by Thomas Colby e against John Tyrrell to compel 

' Harl. 53 E. 36. 7 Feet of Fines, 20 Hen. VI. 27. 

"Harl. 47 B. 15. 5 i.p.M., 38-39 Hen. VI. 48. 

^Ib. 9I.P.M., 6 Edw. IV. 44. 

4 Harl. 53 E. 33. i°Harl. 43 G, 36. 

5 Feet of Fines, 5 Hen. IV. 4. " Memoranda Rolls, 4 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 
6 1.P.M., 6 Hen. V. 20. 23. 



254 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK 

admittance to copyholds held of the manor of which the defendant was 
stated to be lord, and late the estate of Robert Colbye, plaintiff's father.' Also 
the following Chancery actions relating to copyholds of the manor in the 
time of Queen Ehzabeth : John King v. Sir John Tyrrell and another/ 
Henry Kynge v. Sir John Tyrrell and another/ and Robert Rose v. Sir John 
Tirrell and another/ 

The manor passed from Sir John Tyrell to his son John in 1573, and in 
1589 John, then Sir John Tyrell, made a lease of this manor, and the manor 
of Cotton Briseworth, by deed dated ist Oct. 31 Eliz. to his brother 
Thomas Tyrell for 10 years.^ On the son's death the manor went in 
1591 to his brother and heir, Thomas Tyrell, who sold to John Rudlande 
at. Mathewe, and others, and they had licence to alien the same year to 
Dame Mary Corbett, widow. 

In 1606 Sir Edmund Cleere seems to have held, for he then had licence 
to alien to John Wroth and John Binge. 

In 1802 the manor was vested in — Clarke, and in 1827 James Matthew 
offered it for sale at Stowmarket, 26th July, and again igth May, 1828,® 
when Edward Venn seems to have purchased, for he died seised in 1830, 
when it passed to Edward Beaumont Venn, and is now vested in George 
Frederick Beaumont, of The Lawn, Coggeshall, in Essex. 

Court Rolls of the manor are referred to in the 6th Report of the Deputy 
Keeper of the Public Records,^ and rolls and rentals for 1331 will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.^ 

Some of the rolls for the manor, when held separately from Cotton 
Braiseworth, are preserved in Moyses Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds. 

Amongst these rolls are entries of courts held 28th Oct. 1546 ; 25th 
March, 1550 ; 20th Oct. 1551 ; ist May, 1552; Ascen. 1553 ; 5 Edw. VI. ; 
6th Oct. 1561 ; Trin. 1562 ; &c. 

Arms of Blyant : Gu. 3 lozenges in fesse, Erm. betw. 3 martlets Arg. 

Manor of Campine's or Champains or Cumpyns. 

In 13 16 this was vested in Richard Champaigne, and in 1367 Ralph 
Champaigne and others released it to Sir Ralph de Hemenhale, who died 
in 1370, when it went to his son and heir. Sir Robert de Hemenhale, who 
died before 1406,' when it went to his son and heir, William de Hemen- 
hale, an idiot, from whom it passed to his cousin, Ralph de Hemenhale. 

There is a statement in the inquisition quod dannum in 1407 that 
Isabella, Countess of Suffolk, held the manor, which Simon Blyant sold to 
her, lately belonging to Rad. Hemenhale," and the manor is mentioned in 
the inquisition p.m. of Sir Robert de Hemenhale in 1407." 

In 1410 by deed dated i6th Feb. Simon " Bleaunt " of Thornham, granted 
the manor to John Bleaunt, his son, and Agnes his wife, daughter and heir 
of John Hemenhale, who was a son of Ralph de Hemenhale, with remainder 
to Walter Deye and Joan his wife and their heirs. It seems to have gone 
afterwards (John and Agnes having had no issue) to Walter Deye, who had 
married Joan, eldest daughter of the said Ralph Hemenhale, and then to their 
daughter Isabella, married to another Simon Blyant, to whom succeeded 
their son and heir, John Blyant, who was dead by i486, when the manor 
went to his son and heir, John Blyant. 

'C.P. i. 199 ; C.P. ser. ii. B. xlvi. ix. ''App. ii. 86. 

•C.P. ser. ii. B. C.V. 3. sAdd. Ch. 26519. 

3 lb. B. cvi. 5. 9 See I.Q.D.. 5 Hen. IV. 3-7 Hen. IV. 26. 

*Ib. B. cliv. 6. '°I-Q.D., 8 Hen. IV. 6. 

5 Lease in possession of the writer. "I.P.M., 8 Hen. IV. 65. 

6 Ipswich Journal, 30th June, 1827 and 

19th April, 1828. 



COTTON. 



255 



Davy, however, states that John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, dis- 
possessed Simon and Isabel, and died seised in 1492, when the manor 
passed to Edmund de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk. This appears from a 
petition of John Blyant to Hen. VII., " that said Deye and his wife were 
seised and has issue Isabella married to Simon Blyant, who was also 
seised, that after the death of the said Simon and Isabella, John Simon 
(son and heir of the petitioner) should have been seised as son and heir of 
the said John, but that during the life of the said Simon, John late Duke of 
Suffolk wrongfully entered the said manor, and after his death Edmund 
Earl of Suffolk also entered and was seised." Petitioner prayed justice. 

A manor of Cotton is certainly mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of 
William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1450.' In 1510 we find from the 
State Papers there was a petition for a commission to be issued to enquire 
into the claim of John " Blyaunt " to the manor .^ The manor seems to 
have been granted by the Crown to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, or he 
had acquired it in some other way, for from the State Papers in 1538 we 
find a grant by him to the Crown in exchange.^ 

Arms of Champayne : Arg. 3 lozenges, Gu. 2 and i. 

Manor of Gipswich. 

This manor was the lordship of Sir Robert Hemenhale, who died before 
1406, when it went to his son and heir, William Hemenhale, the idiot, and 
from him to his cousin and heir, Ralphj Hemenhale, " cousin of William "* 
when the manor went in the same course as the last manor. 

There is a fine in 1371 of the Manor of Cotton (but which manor in 
Cotton we cannot say), levied by Sir William de Wyngefeld and Joan his 
wife against William Berard, William Charnell, parson of Denyngton 
church, Edmund, parson of Horsett church, in Cambridgeshire.' 

An admission to land held of Cotton Manor in 1548 will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.^ 




Cotton Hempnalls Hall. 



'I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 

"S.P. 2 Hen. Vni. 1375, 1534; 4 Hen. 

Vin. 3309. 
3S.P. 30 Hen. Vni. vol. ii, I182 (i8a). 



*I.P.M., Sir Robt. (?) Hemenhale, 8 Hen. 

IV. 65. 
= Feet of Fines, 45 Edw. III. 32. 
6 Add. Ch. I9371. 




256 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



EYE. 

IHERE were three manors held here in Saxon times, the 
Domesday tenant being Robert Malet. The first con- 
sisted of 12 carucates of land, held in demesne by Robert 
Malet, and his mother held loo acres, i villein, 3 bordars, 
9 socmen with 16 acres, and 2 ploughteams, which at the 
time of the Survey were reduced to i, the value being 
20S. In Saxon times this manor was held by Edric, and 
there were also 38 villeins, 9 bordars, 12 serfs, 8 ploughteams in demesne, 
and 15 belonging to the men, and the other teams might be made up again. 
Also 50 acres of meadow, wood to support 120 hogs, a mill, fishery, market, 
and a park, and in the market 25 burgesses had their dwellings. Of live 
stock there were 7 rouncies, 24 beasts, 50 hogs, and 80 sheep. At the time 
of the Survey the appurtenances of this manor were considerably altered. 
The villeins were reduced to 20, the bordars had increased to 16, the serfs 
had disappeared, also the ploughteams in demesne were reduced to 5, 
and those belonging to the men to 6. Of live stock there was wood to 
support 60 hogs, there were i rouncy, no beasts, 17 hogs, and 90 sheep. 
Belonging to this manor were 48 socmen, with 121 acres of land. Of these 
socmen 37 were in demesne, and Herbert held 9 with 20 acres, Walter one 
with 5 acres, and Walter the engineer one with 16 acres. The whole was 
valued at 9s. There were 4 ploughteams (at the time of the Survey reduced 
to 3), and an acre of meadow, valued formerly at £15, increased to £21 at 
the time of the Survey. Edric had soc and sac of the bishopric, which the 
bishop ought to have had. Also belonging to this manor in the time of the 
Confessor were 9 freemen, with no acres of land, in Edric's soc and com- 
mendation, 4J ploughteams (reduced to 4 at the time of the Survey), 3 
acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 16 hogs (which at the time 
of the Survey was reduced to 6). The value of this was 20s. The 9 freemen 
were called Alston, Woolrich, Godwin, Lewin, Edric, Alsey, Alrich, Goodrich, 
and D5mechaie. 

In the same township Woolrich, a freeman under commendation to 
Edric, held the other manor in the time of the ConfessOr, consisting of 30 
acres, 2 bordars, and i ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time of 
the Survey), the value being 20s. At the time of the Survey Walter de 
Caen held this of Robert Malet. 

In the same township held in demesne by Robert Malet was the third 
manor, consisting of 120 acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteam in demesne, 4 
acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 3 hogs, the whole valued at 
20s. It was 2j leagues long and i|- broad, and paid in a gelt 2s. In the 
time of the Confessor it had been held by Suartric, a freeman under Harold's 
commendation, and in his soc' This manor appears to be entered again 
in the Domesday Survey under " Invasions upon the King's land," with the 
substitution of " wood for 13 hogs," for " wood for 3 hogs."^ 

In the same township was St. Peter's Church, to which belonged 2 
carucates of free land, 7 bordars, i ploughteam in demesne (increased to 3 
at the time of the Survey), i ploughteam belonging to the men, 3 acres 
of meadow, and i mill, the whole valued at 405.^ 

'Dom. ii. ziOfb. ^Dom. ii. 3196. 

''Dom. ii. 4496. 



EYE. 257 

Manor of Eye or Eye Sodemere. 

This was the lordship of Edric in Saxon times, and of Robert Malet at 
the time of the Survey, and he held until the time of Hen. I., in whose 
reign he was Great Chamberlain of England. In the second year of this 
sovereign Malet was banished, and deprived of all his large possessions 
in England, for his adherence to Robert Curtois, the King's eldest brother, 
Duke of Normandy. This portion of his estate was given by Hen. I. to 
Stephen, Earl of Boulogne, afterwards King of England, who devised it to 
his natural son, William, Earl of Boulogne, who dying in 1160 
without issue, the manor again reverted to the Crown. King Hen. H. 
made a grant of it to Thomas a Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, but 
evidently for a limited period, as it was a little later granted to Richard, 
Earl of Cornwall, son of King John,' but soon after returned to King Rich. I., 
who granted it to Henry, 5th Earl of Brabant and Loveyne. In 1207 the 
manor was granted to Henry's son and heir, Godfrey de Loveyne,'' but he 
was dead in 1226, when it seems to have been again vested in Henry, Earl 
of Brabant, the father, after whose death it appears to have gone to Matthew 
de Love5nie, the son and heir of Godfrey. In 1229 the Honor was vested 
in Hubert de Burgh,^ but the following year was granted by the King to 
Richard, Earl of Cornwall, during pleasure.* In 1236 Henry, Duke of 
"Lotharing" seems to have had it,^ and in 1258 Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, 
son of the old holder, Richard, held the same.^ Edmund died in 1300, 
without issue,'' when tiie manor went to his widow Margaret for life,^ and 
in 1316 was again in the Crown, the following year being granted to Hugh 
de Audeley and Margaret his wife, late wife of Piers de Gaveston. Three 
years later we find the manor held in dower by Isabel, Queen of Edw. I. 

In 1330 King Edw. III. gave the manor to John de Eltham, Earl of 
Cornwall, his brother,' and the following year we find on the Patent Rolls 
a gift to John de Eltham in enlargement of the late grant to him (there stated 
to be of Eye and Haughley Manors, and the hamlets of Thorndon and 
Clopton) of all com, livery of servants, in the same manors at the time of 
their surrender to the King by Queen Isabella.'" On the Earl's death without 
issue the King granted the manor in 1337 to Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. 
The grant will be found on the Patent Rolls, and is of Eye Castle, town, 
manor. Honor, and Thorndon Manor, of the yearly value of £207. 12s. o^d., the 
Hundred of Hartismere and Stoweasof the yearly value of £20, and the rever- 
sion of the Manor of Benhall, then held by Eleanor, late wife of Guy Ferre, 
of the yearly value of ;^i33. 6s. 8(?." The order to deliver the above to him 
is also on the Patent Rolls for this year.'^ From an entry on the Patent 
Rolls two years later we find that the grant to Robert de Ufford was even 
more extensive, for the recital of the last grant there shows that the town 
and manor of Haughley, of the value of ^^126. 5s. y^d., were included, and 
also £253. 6s. 8d., at the Exchequer, until the reversion of the Manor of 
Benhall should fall in ; £11. 3s. 4^. of rent from a fee farm and 15s. of rent 
from a yearly scutage paid at the Exchequer by John, son of Robert de 

» Red Book of the Exchequer concerning ? I.P.M., 28 Edw. I. 44, 50. 

serjeanty. ^The Castle and Manor were extended at 

* Pat. Rolls, 9 John, 2, 5 ; Close Rolls, 47s. Sfd. yearly. Close Rolls, 29 

15 John, pt. ii. 8. Edw. I. 14. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 13 Hen. HI. 12. sPat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. ii. 4. n 

4 Close Rolls, 14 Hen. III. 17, 9. " Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. pt. i. 27^. pt. ii. 9. 

5 Pat. RoUs, 20 Hen. III. 11, 15. " Pat. Rolls, 11 Edw. III. pt. i. 15 ; pt. ii. 7. 
6H.R. ii. 186, 193. "Pat. Rolls, 11 Edw. III. pt. i. 15. 



258 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Thorpe, for a moiety of the Manor of Combs, and a quit rent of In. i8s. 4^., 
of rent due by the Earl for the other moiety of the said manor.' In 1343 
a commission was issued to enquire as to the lees and services pertaining 
to the manors and estates granted as above to Robert, Earl of Ufford, 
in tail male, on his being created Earl of Suffolk, as these manors and 
estates would revert to the King if the Earl were to die without heirs male/ 
On Robert de Ufford' s' death in 1368 the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William de Ufford, and on his death in I381'* without issue it reverted 
to the Crown. 

The same year King Rich. II. granted for life to Queen Anne in part 
of her dower. Eye Castle, town, manor, and Honor, &c., of the yearly value 
of £200, the Hundreds of Hartismere and Stow, of the yearly value of £16, 
a yearly farm of £23. i6s. M. from the Manor of Combs, and £60 from the 
farm of Ipswich.* 

In 1385 (6th Aug.), Sir Michael de la Pole, then Chancellor of England, 
was created Earl of Suffolk, and the King granted the castle, town, manor, 
and Honor of Eye to him and the heirs of his body, with ^^20 per annum 
out of the profits of the county of Suffolk, ;^5oo per annum out of the heredi- 
taments of William Ufford, late Earl of Suffolk, for which the following 
property was conveyed and confirmed to the said Earl, namely : the 
Hundreds of Hartismere and Stow, the Manors of Combs, Haughley, Thorn- 
don, Lowestoft, and Lothingland Hundred.^ The assignment was only 
expectant on the decease of Queen Anne and Isabella, Countess of Suffolk. 
In the grant the Manor of Haughley was valued at £97. los. izd. a. year, 
Thorndon Manor at £^5. 13s. y^d., and the Manor of Lowestoft and 
Hundred of Lothingland at 100 marks a year. The grant was to Michael in 
tail male. He fled the kingdom, was outlawed, and died at Paris 5th 
Sept. 1389 ; but his son. Sir Michael de la Pole in 1397 obtained an annulment 
of the judgment against his father, and on the accession of King Hen. IV. 
was fully restored to the castle, manor, and Honor of Eye, with the other 
lands of the late lord his father, as also to the Earldom of Suffolk, with a 
reversionary proviso that those lands and honors should in default of male 
issue devolve upon the male heir of his deceased father. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1401 is a mandate to permit the tenants of 
Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, of Eye Honor, to be quit of toll, stallage, 
cheminage, pontage, pavage, piiage, murage, and passage throughout 
the realm, as they had been time out of mind.^ Sir Michael de la Pole spent 
most of his time in the French wars, and married Catherine Stafford, 2nd 
daughter of Hugh, 2nd Earl of Stafford. He died 14th Sept. 1415, at the 
seige of Harfleur. The manor passed to his eldest son, Michael de la Pole, 
3rd Earl of Suffolk, and on his death at the battle of Agincourt, 25th Oct. 
1415,* passed to his brother, William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk.® On 
his death, 2nd May, 1450," the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
de la Pole, created Duke of Suffolk, and on his death in 1491 passed to his 

•Pat. Rolls, X3 Edw. III. pt. i. 5. See ^pat. Rolls, 9 Rich. II. pt. i. 32. See 

13 Edw. III. pt. i. 35 ; Close Rolls, 9 Rich. II. pt. i. 35 ; R.P. iii. 2086. 

14 Edw. III. pt. ii. 55. 7 Pat. Rolls, 2 Hen. IV. pt. ii. 9. 
' Pat. Rolls, 17 Edw. III. pt. ii. 27^. s i.p.M., 3 Hen. V. 48^. 

3 See Parham Hall Manor, Plomesgate sSee Kettlebaston Manor, in Cosford 

Hundred. Hundred. 

♦I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. "I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 
'Pat. Rolls, 5 Rich. II. pt. ii. 6, 5. 



EYE. 259 

son and heir, Edmund de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, beheaded on Tower 
Hill, April 30th, 1513,' when the manor reverted to the Crown/ 

The same year it was granted to Sir Henry Manny during the life of 
Margaret, widow of Edmund de la Pole,^ and the following year the reversion 
was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, 30th Sept. 30 Hen. VHI.,* 
but was reconveyed to the Crown in exchange by the Duke in the same 
year.^ He died in 1545, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry 
Brandon, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, who died during minority, 14th July, 1551, 
at the residence of the Bishop of Lincoln at Bugden, in Huntingdon, of the 
sweating sickness, when the Dukedom of Suffolk became extinct, and the 
manor for want of male heirs reverted to the Crown. In 1553 Mary, 
daughter of King Hen. VHI., afterwards Queen Mary, had a grant of 
the manor for life. 

There is amongst the Salisbury MSS. a letter of John Brown, Deputy 
Surveyor to Lord Burghley, as to the custom of taking lops of trees in this 
manor, and as to the repair of palings of Eye Park. It is dated 15th July, 
1578.® In 1598 a lease in reversion was granted of the manor to Edward 
Honing for 40 years at the rent of £35. i6s.6Jd.,and a fine of £46,^ and in 1610 
Henry, Prince of Wales, son of James I. had a grant.^ In 1625 the manor 
formed part of the jointure of Henrietta Maria, Queen of Charles I., and 
when the King's lands were sold Serjeant Dendy purchased this lordship. 
In 1686 the manor was held by Katherine, Queen Dowager of Charles II., 
but in 1698 Charles, 4th Lord Cornwallis, obtained a grant from the Crown. 
He died in 1722, when it passed in the same course as the Manor of Culford, 
in Blackboum Hundred, to the time of Charles, 2nd Marquis Cornwallis, who 
sold the manor to Matthias Kerrison, on whose death in 1827 it passed to 
his son and heir, General Sir Edward Kerrison, of Oakley Park, and it has 
since passed in the same course as the Manor of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn 
Hundred, and is now vested in Lady Bateman. 

Court Rolls of this manor will be found in the Public Record Office,' 
and also in the British Museum, as foUows : 1559, Add. Ch. 19666 ; 1619, 
Add. Ch. 10483 ; 1621, Add. Ch. 10485 ; 1623, Add. Ch. 10486 ; 1649, Add. 
Ch. 10489 ; 1650, Add. Ch. 10492 ; 1655, Add. Ch. 10494 ; 1663, Add. Ch. 
10497. 

Manor of Netherhall. 

This belonged to John Thorpe in the early part of the 14th century, 
and on his death passed to his son and heir, Robert de Thorpe, who died 
seised of the manor in 1330.'° 

We learn from an inquisition p.m. in the time of Hen. VII. that this 
manor was worth 20 marks, and held of John, Duke of Suffolk, as of Eye, 
and that it stood limited to the use of Sir John Sulyard for life, with remain- 
der to Edward Sulyard, Mirabilia his wife, and others for life of the said 
Mirabilia to her use, with remainder to the heirs of the body of the said 
Edward. Sir John Sulyard, who was Lord Chief Justice of the Common 
Pleas, died i8th March, 1487^ leaving Edward Sulyard, aged 28, his son and 
heir." 

' ? May 4th, 1512. 8 There was a distraint in 1618 on the 

« I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. i. manor by N. Shene, Exch. Spec. 

3 0. 5 Hen. VIII. Rot. 14, 15; and 0. 6 Com. 16 Jac. I.; D.K.R. 38, App. 

Hen. VIII. Rot. 17. p. loi, 17 Jac. I. ; lb. p. 103. 

♦S.P. 651 (45). 9 Portfolio 203, 81. 

5S.P. 1538, ii. 1182 (l8a). "I.P.M., 4 Edw. III. 34. 

«Rep. on Salisbury MSS. pt. ii. 188. "I.P.M., 4 Hen. VII. 439. 
?S.P. 1598, 62. 



26o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor appears to have been extensive, for this inquisition refers 
to it as being in, or extending into the parishes or hamlets of Eye, Langton, 
Suddon, Cranley, Cockinley, Yaxley, Thrandeston, Brome, Hoxne, Occolt, 
Beningham, and Denham. 

About 1524 the manor was vested in Robert Garneys, son of John 
Garneys and Ehzabeth his wife, daughter of Sir John Sulyard ;' from 
which time for some generations the manor passed in the same course 
through the Garneys family as the Manor of Kenton, in Loes Hundred. 
This manor is specifically mentioned in a fine levied nth Nov, 1560, by 
Thomas Garneys,'' and in a fine levied by Nicholas Garneys in 1567.^ In 
1583 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by Thomas Brampton, senior, 
against Philip Strelley and others."" We next find the manor vested in Sir 
Robert Rous, ist Bart., who died in 1735, from whom the manor has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Henham, in Blything Hundred, 
and is now vested in the Earl of Stradbroke. 

Manor of Flemworth Hall. 

The manor is chiefly in Eye, but, as it formed part of the Bedingfield 
estate it was afterwards added to the Manor of Denham, by the style of 
" Denham cum Flymworth." 

In the early part of the 15th century this manor was held by Michael 
Brett and Dionysia his wife, and in 1428 by John Stratton. We next 
find the manor held by William Harleston, who died in 1481. It passed 
from him to his widow, Philippa Harleston, for life, and the remainder 
after her decease was sold to one John Sulyard. A chancery suit was 
instituted by this John Sulyard against Philippa Harleston, Robert Crane, 
Robert Restwold, Richard Yaxle, and Richard Gerard, as to this manor, and 
that of Denham, in Hoxne Hundred.^ Subsequently the manor passed to 
Thomas Bedingfield, of Oxburgh, co. Norfolk, son and heir of Edward 
Bedingfield, who died seised of it 3rd Apl. 1590,® when it passed to his son 
and heir, Henry Bedingfield, then aged but 3 years 10 months and 18 days. 
From him, then Sir Henry Bedingfield, the manor was taken by Parliament, 
and leased in 1649 by Sir David Watkins and other trustees, for the relief 
of Ireland for 3 years to Francis Bromewell. In 1684 it was again with the 
Bedingfields, in the person of Sir Henry Bedingfield, ist Bart., son and heir 
of the last Sir Henry. Sir Henry, ist Bart., died 6th Feb. 1684, when the 
manor passed to his widow. Dame Margaret, who held her first court for it 
in 1688, and died 14th Jan. 1702, when the manor passed for some genera- 
tions further through the Bedingfield family in the same course as the 
Manor of Bedingfield Hall, in Hoxne Hundred. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Charles, Viscount Ma5mard, from 
which time it has descended in the same course as the Manor of Hoxne, in 
Hoxne Hundred, to the Kerrisons, and through them to the present lady 
of the manor. Lady Bateman, as shown in the account of the Manor of 
Thelnetham, in Blackbourn. 

A copy of a Survey made of the manor in 1651 is given in the Davy 
MSS., and also a copy of a rental for 1635. 

'As to these Garneys see Kenton Manor, ♦Fine, Mich. 25-26 EUz. 

in Loes Hundred. 5£c_p_^ Bundle 35,48. 

'Fine, 2 Eliz. 63. ^I.P.M., 30 July, 32 Eliz. , ^ 

3 Fine, 6 Feb. 10 Eliz. 



EYE. 261 

Manor of Cranley al. Cranley Hall. 

Among the lands of Ralph de Limesi was a manor in Cranley, which is a 
hamlet of Eye, consisting of 100 acres of land, 10 bordars, i ploughteam in 
demesne, i belonging to the men, wood sufficient to support 6 hogs, valued 
at 20S. In the time of the Confessor it had been held by Aluric, a freeman, 
who had half the soc, the other moiety belonging to the King.' 

The manor was about 1156 vested in Peter de Bedingfield, who was a 
son of Oger de Pegeys, a Norman knight, who held the manor in the time 
of WiUiam the Conqueror. He was succeeded in the time of Hen. II. by 
his son and heir, Arnald de Bedingfield, and he by his son and heir, Adam 
de Bedingfield. The next holder of the manor we hear of was William 
fitz Robert, and then his widow Alice, remarried to William de Bluncheville, 
holding in dower. 

In 1280 the manor was held by John de Cranley, and in 1342 by Richard 
de Cranley, who was succeeded by his son and heir, Robert de Cranley. We 
then lose sight of the manor for some time, but in 1530 we meet with a 
fine levied by Sir John Cornwallis and others against Sir John 
Wiseman and others.'' In the time of Queen Elizabeth the lordship was 
vested in Nicholas Everard, as we learn from the Chancery Proceedings of 
this reign. There we find an action by Thomas London against this 
Nicholas Everard to obtain admittance to copyholds in Eye, held of the 
Manor of Cranley Hall, in Eye, surrendered to plaintiff's use by Robert 
London, his father, the defendant being lord.^ There is another action 
later between Robert London and others, bailiffs of Eye, against Thomas 
Graye, touching a place called " Cranley," in Eye." 

Somewhat later we find the manor vested in Miles Edgar,^ who died in 
1676, when it passed to his son and heir, Henry Edgar. From the loth 
Report of the Historical Commissioners,® we find that there is in existence 
an answer in Chancery of Thomas Deye, the elder, and John White to the 
suit of this Henry Edgar and one Richard Hardinge, 2nd Feb. 32 Car. II. 
By deed ist Oct. 1686 the manor was conveyed to Devereux and William 
Edgar, in trust for the seven daughters of Henry Edgar, son and heir of 
Miles Edgar, to be equally divided between them, but this settlement was 
revoked 21st April, 1696, and the manor revested in Henry Edgar in fee. 
Henry Edgar by his will 30th July,' 1705, gave the manor to his son-in-law, 
Robert Britiffe for life, with remainder to his (testator's) godson, Henry Edgar 
Britiffe, son of the said Robert, in fee. 

Robert Britiffe, by will dated 2n^ Dec. 1747, devised the manor to his 
grandson, John, Lord Hobart, and his heirs, and in default to Lady Dorothy, 
his granddaughter, and her heirs, with remainder to Lady Elizabeth 
Harbord, his daughter, and her heirs in fee. In 1805 Charles, ist Marquis 
Cornwallis, died seised of the manor, and from this time it has descended 
in the same course as the main Manor of Eye. 

Manor of Eye Hall al. Eye pRioR-^f Manor. 

Robert Malet, the Norman, to whom such extensive grants were made 
in Suffolk and Norfolk by William the Conqueror, built a monastery upon 

' Dom. ii. 439. ' See Manor of Capel, in Trimley St. Martin, 

'Fine, Mich. 22 Hen. VIII. in Carlford Hundred. 

^C.P. ii. 153. *Pt. V. 521. 

*C.P. ser. ii. B. cix. 72; 10 Rep. Hist. 
Com. pt. iv. 525, 530. 



262 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his lordship of Eye, and conferred upon it the Church of St. Peter in Eye, 
with divers other churches, lands, liberties, and franchises. ' In 1138 
King Stephen confirmed the same." 

This monastery was originally an alien priory, subordinate to the 
Abbey of Bernay, in Normandy,^ whose abbots were the patrons of those in 
Eye, and in token of their dominion during the vacancy of a prior they used to 
place a porter at the gate to be maintained out of the revenues of the house, 
and who, at the instalment of the next prior was entitled to receive 5s. to 
buy him an ox. This priory was in 1384 made denizen by King Rich. II., 
being released from its foreign dependency.* Ministers' accounts of the 
manor as held by Eye Priory, for the 18th Edw. II., will be found in the 
Public Record Office.^ The site of the house, with the courtyard, orchard, 
gardens, and houses belonging to it, contained about 10 acres. 

The clear value, according to Dugdale, was £161. 2s. 3|^. ; but 
Speed and " Valor Ecclesiasticus," A.D., 1534 makes the gross value 
to be £184. 9s. yld., the amount of fixed charities £14. 12s. 4^., given 
to the poor on certain days, according to ancient custom; for a lamp 
burning in the church of Yaxley, 2s. annually, and the same in the 
church of Laxfield, 2s. In 1537 Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, 
obtained a grant in tail of the lordship.^ The manors included in this 
grant to Charles Brandon were those of Eye, Stoke, Laxfield, Bedfield, 
Occolt, and Fressingfield, and the advowsons of vicarages of the churches of 
All Saints in Dunwich, Playford, Laxfield, Yaxley, and Eye, and chantries, 
lands, glebes, &c.^ The "Boke of Sale," of Eye Monastery, viz., of goods 
and chattels at the suppression is referred to in the State Papers for 1537.* 
A rental and survey in the time of Elizabeth is in the Public Record Office.' 
A Parliamentary survey also of the manor in 1650 is referred to in the 
8th Report of the Deputy Keeper." 

Several manors and estates were also granted to Edmund Bedingfield 
at the same time as part of the possessions of this priory. In 1538 Charles 
Brandon exchanged this manor with King Hen. VIII. , by deed 30 Hen. 
VIII." 

In 1576 the manor was vested in the Queen, and this year it is stated 
to have been " restored to Thomas Willows." By letters patent dated agth 
June, 1598, the Manor House of Eye Hall called the Priory or Abbey of Eye, 
together with the demesne lands thereto belonging were granted to Edward 
Honing, Ursula his wife, and Winfield, their son, during their lives, and for 
40 years after the death of the longest liver of them, at the yearly rent of 
^20. 2s. gd. The particulars for their lease, as contained in a MS. in the 
writer's possession, are as follows : " Eye. The Manor of Eye Hall, alias 
Eye Priory, the yearly value whereof arise th thus : — 

Quit rents per annum . . . . . . £iy 11 4^ 

Perquisites and profits of courts . . 400 

Reprisals 21 11 4^ 

The owner of the priory land is bound to maintain a causeway leading 

towards the church of Eye, and five timber bridges, viz., the three Abbey 

Bridges, Largate Bridge, and Botsford Bridge. 

'12 Rep. Hist. Com. pt. ix. 137. ^S.P. 1537,!. I103 (11) 

^Bodl. 4174. 7/&. 

3I.Q.D.. 7 Edw. II. 152; Close Rolls, ^S.P. 1537, i. 510. See S.P. 1538, ii. 1195. 

I Edw. III. pt. i. 22; 10 Rep. sExch. Rep. on Publ. Rec. (1800) pp. 178, 

Hist. Com. pt. V. 529. 195. 

♦Pat. Rolls, 8 Rich. II. pt. i. 3. "App. ii. p. 67. 

5 Bundle II27, No. 4. "S.P. 1538, ii. 1182 (i8a). 



EYE. 263 

There is paid out of the priory lands to Lady Bacon, for a certain 
meadow in Eye, 5s. per annum ; out of Do. to John Wiseman for exchange 
lands in Cranley Hamlet, 4s. 3^^. To Thomas Mason for 6 acres in the nine 
acre close is. 2d. To William Sulyard, for a meadow there 2s. To — 
Yaxley for exchange lands in Yaxley, parcel of the Manor of Eye, ^d. per 
annum. To Agnes Pretty for lands in Eye per annum 2s. 

Memorandum. By the custom the youngest son inherits the copyholds 
of his parents. The lands belonging to the priory are tithe free. The 
fines at the will of the lord. 

There are several reprisals thereout, amounting to £4. 14s. lod." 

This manor later formed part of the jointure of Henrietta Maria, Queen 
of Charles I. In Oct. 1650, the Honor, manor, and premises were, by order 
of the contractors sold by the trustees appointed by several Acts of Parlia- 
ment for the sale of the honors, manors, and lands theretofore belonging 
to King Charles, Queen Henrietta Maria, and the Prince of Wales to Edward 
Dendy, of Whitehall. 

From the Exchequer depositions taken at Eye in 1701 we learn that 
there was an action as to the site or house of the late monastery or Priory 
of St. Peters, " Eye Abbey," between Martin Foulkes and others and 
WiUiam Sherrington, " one of the defendants," and the Attorney-General 
Loftus, against William Sherrington. The manor subsequently vested in 
Charles, 4th Lord Cornwallis, who died in 1722, since which time it has 
passed in the same course as the main manor. 

There are several matters relating to " Eye Manor," which have an 
application to one of the manors of Eye, but to which we are unable to 
determine. Thus we find on the Rolls of Parliament, without date, that 
the bailiffs of Thomas de Arundel seized the manor,' and also that John 
Howard enfeoffed Richard Wankeleyn with it.'' There is on the Patent 
Rolls in 1331 a commission issued to enquire into the alleged wastes within 
"Eye Manor."^ Also a surrender of "Eye Manor" in the time of Hen. VHL'* 
There are also in the Public Record Office, ministers' accounts of " Eye 
Manor," 15 to 21 Rich. II., 11 to 12 Hen. IV.^ Also in 1625 livery of 
lands, part of " Eye Manor " to Mary Seckford, sister of Thomas.* Also 
actions as to a wood called " Goosewood or Goosehould " Wood, parcel of 
" Eye Manor." One of these, in 1631, we learn from the Exchequer 
Depositions at Eye is between Leonard Nix and others and John Gray ; 
another is eight years later, and between Grey and Grey ; while the third is 
referred to amongst the Exchequer Special Commissions in 1647.'' 



'R.P. ii. 394. ^Bundle 996, Nos. 15, 16, 18, 19, 20. 

'lb. ^Chancery, D.K.R., 43 App. i. p. 9. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. pt. ii. 34^. ''D.K.R. 38 App. p. 129. 

"D.K.R. 8 App. ii. p. 6. 




264 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

FINNINGHAM. 

jHERE was no manor in this place in Saxon times. A 
holding of 3 acres was that of a freeman who could not 
sell his land, and 5 acres and i bordar of another freeman, 
included in the same valuation, the soc belonging to the 
King and Earl. The Domesday tenant was Robert Malet. 
Another small holding of Robert Malet was 2 acres, 
valued aX^d., formerly held by a freeman under commendation. 
Another estate here was held of Robert Malet and the Queen's fief, 
by his mother, and consisted of 18 freemen, with i|- carucates of land. One 
of these was called Almar, whose wife was under commendation of the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds, and two, called Lewin and Brihtmar, were under 
Lewin's commendation. The others in the time of the Confessor were 
under commendation of Leverich and Ulveva, and under them were three 
freemen with 5 acres, i bordar, 3J ploughteams, wood sufficient to support 
16 hogs, and 5 acres of meadow, formerly valued at 3s., and at the time of 
the Survey at 5s. It was half a league long and half broad, and paid in a 
gelt 8^., the soc belonging to the King and Earl. 

The Domesday tenant was Robert Malet.' Among the lands belonging 
to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds were two holdings in this place. 
The first consisted of 68 acres, 1^ ploughteams, 2 bordars, 4 acres of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 8 hogs, the value being 12s. There was 
also a church, with 26 acres, valued at 4s. This estate had formerly been 
held by II freemen under the soc and commendation of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds. 

The second holding was 8 acres, valued at i6d., formerly held by a 
freeman.'' 

Belonging to Robert the Blond were two acres in this place of the 
demesne land of Walsham.^ 

Manor of Finningham Hall, or Coniers Manor. 

Robert Malet was chief lord here in the time of the Conqueror. 

In 1239 Robert Conyers granted the manor by fine to John Conyers. 
He was succeeded by Robert de Conyers, who held in 1286. Robert claimed 
view of frankpledge and assize of bread and beer here.* 

Adam de Conyers was lord in 1325. 

Davy makes Nigel de Kenton lord in 1325 and Edmund de Thorp in 
1340, and Page says that in the time of Edward III. Sir Edmund de 
Thorp was lord of Finningham, and in 1358 he enfeoffed his estates for the 
payment of his debts, and to raise portions for his daughters ; when it was 
settled that John, his second son, who married Mary, daughter of Sir John 
Argentein, of Halesworth, Knt., was to have all his lands in Suffolk, to him 
and his heirs. Adam de Conyers, he adds, held two fees in Westhorp and 
Finningham of the fees of Sir Edmund de Thorp's Manor of Helmingham. 
There is some confusion here. The Manor of Finningham was merely held 
by the Conyers of Sir Edmund de Thorp's Manor of Helmingham. We are 
quite aware of the fact of the manor being mentioned in the inquisition 
p.m. of John de Thorp and AUcia his wife in 1323.^ But it is clear that 

'Dom. ii. 309, 321, 3236. -fQ.W. 725. 

^Dom. ii. 390&. 5I.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 61. 

^Dom. ii. 440. 



FINNINGHAM. 



265 



Nicholas Conyers, the grandson of the above Adam, held this manor, and 
that it passed about 1418 to his son and heir, Nicholas Conyers. 

That the manor did not pass from the Conyers family, as generally 
alleged, is perfectly obvious, for in 1332 we meet with a fine levied of this 
manor by Alan de Conyers and Catherine his wife against Nicholas de 
Conyers and William Gobald/ The fine included also the advowson of 
the parish church. 

On the death of Nicholas Conyers, the son, the manor passed to his 
widow, who remarried, and on her death it went to Nicholas Conyer's 
son and heir, Robert Conyers, who died in 1480.* On his death the manor 
passed to his daughter and heir Ela, married ist to Edmund Cotton, 3rd son 
of Sir John Cotton, Knt., of Lanwade, co. Cambs., and 2ndly to Edmund 
Lee. Ela died 2nd Aug. 1535,^ when the manor passed to her son and heir 
by her first husband, George Cotton. He lived at Barton, and married 
Jane, daughter of John Goldingham, of Belstead, and on his death the 
lordship went to his son and heir, Edmund Cotton, who died in 1585,* 
when it passed to his son and heir, Edmund. He died in 1609, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Edmund Cotton. He died 31st March, 
1639 ; his only son, George, having died at the age of 17 years, themanor 
passed to Edmund's brother, Robert Cotton, who, with others, sold it 
in 1660 to John Frere, son of John Frere, of Green Farm, Finningham, by 
Anne his wife, daughter of John Sandwich, of Finningham. John Frere, 
the purchaser, married in 1634 Ehzabeth, daughter of John Sheppard, of 
Mendlesham, and died 9th March, 1679, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, John Frere. He married in 1669 Anne, daughter of George 
Pretyman, of Bacton, by Susan his wife, daughter of Thomas Tyrell, of 
Gipping, and dying in January, 1709, the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Edward Frere, who resided at Thwaite Hall. He married EUenor, 
daughter and coheir withher sister Maria, wife of Lord Chief Baron Reynolds, 
of Thomas Smyth, of Thrandeston, and on his (Edward's) death, 6th May, 1766, 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Sheppard Frere. He lived at Roydon 
Hall, in Norfolk, and in 1739 married Susanna, daughter of John Hatley, of 
London, and Kirby Hall, Essex, by Isabella his wife, daughter of Robert 
Reynolds, of Bunstead Hellions (second son of Sir James Reynolds) and 
Kesia, his wife, daughter of Thomas Tyrell, of Gipping, by Kesia, his wife, 
daughter of Thomas Tyrell, of Gipping, by Kesia his wife, daughter 
of William Hervey, of Ickworth. Sheppard Frere died 14th July, 
1780, and the manor passed to his elder son, John Frere, F.R.S., F.S.A., 
of Roydon Hall, Norfolk, and Bedington, co. Surrey, High Sheriff for 
Suffolk in 1776, and M.P. for Ipswich in 1799, and for Norwich in 1800. 
He married in 1768 Jane, daughter and heir of John Hookham, of Beding- 
ton by his first wife, Jane, daughter of Stephen Pomfret, of Abingdon. 
John Frere died 12th July, 1807, and the manor passed to his eldest son, 
the Right Hon. John Hookham Frere, under-Secretary of State for Foreign 
Affairs in 1799, Envoy to Lisbon 1800, Minister to Madrid 1802 to 1808. He 
married in 1816 Jemina Elizabeth, Countess Dowager of Erroll, daughter 
of Joseph Blake, of Ardfry, co. Galway, afterwards Lord Wallscourt, and 
widow of George, Earl of Erroll. He died at Malta, 7th Jan. 1846, without 
issue, when the manor passed to his brother, Edward Frere, of Clydach, co. 
Brecon. He married Mary Anne, daughter of James Greene, of Turton 



'Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. III. 
^I.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 74. 
3I.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 308. 

KI 



26. 



♦ Not 1594, as stated in the account of 
Norton Hall, in Hepworth, in Black- 
bourn Hundred. 



266 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Tower, and Clayton Hall, co. Lancaster, M.P. for Arundel in 1759, and 
had seven sons and five daughters, and on his death the manor passed to 
his eldest son, Edward Frere, rector of Finningham, who died unmarried 
23rd July, 1 841, when the manor passed to his brother, George Edward 
Frere. He married in 1840 Isabella, daughter and coheir of William 
Tudor, of Kelston Knoll, Bath, and dying in 1887 the manor devolved upon 
John Tudor Frere, the present lord. He married ist in 1869 Constance, 
2nd daughter of Forbes Winslow, M.D., D.C.L., and 2ndly in 1893 Agatha 
Mary Gabrielle, fourth daughter of the Rev. Edmund Thomas Daubeny, of 
Market Weston. 

Court Rolls of the manor 15 and 16 Jac. L will be found in the Public 
Record Office.' 

Arms of Conyers : Azure, a maunch. Or. Of Cotton : Sable, a 
chevron betw. 3 griffins' heads erased, Arg. Of Cotton : Quarterly, i and 4, 
a chevron betw. 3 griffins' heads erased, 2 and 3 Gu. a chevron betw. 3 pears Or. 
Of Frere : Or, two leopards' faces in pale. Gules between as many flaunches 
of the last. 

Necton Hall Manor or Norton Hall. 

This manor formed part of the land held in chief by the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds at the time of the Domesday Survey. Rental and customary of 
lands of the monastery in Finningham in 1387 will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. in the British Museum.' 

In 1480 it became vested in Sir Robert Conyers, and has since devolved 
in the same course as the main manor. In 1510 a fine was levied of the 
manor by William Wotton and others against Edmund Lee and Ela his 
wife. It included the advowson of Finningham.^ 



'Portfolio 203, 81. 3 Fine, Mich. 2 Hen. VIII. 

'Add. 14849. 




GISLINGHAM. 267 

GISLINGHAM. 

|HERE were three manors in this place in Saxon times. 
One was held by Alviet, a freeman under commendation to 
Alsey, nephew of Earl Ralph, and consisted of 30 acres, an 
acre of meadow, and a ploughteam (which had disappeared 
at the time of the Survey). The second was held by Ringulf, 
a freeman under commendation to Alsey, Earl Ralph's 
nephew, and consisted of 30 acres and a ploughteam (which 
had disappeared at the time of the Survey). Of this land, Lewin, son of 
Ringulf, held 3 acres and the fourth part of a wood. The Domesday 
tenant of both these manors was Robert Malet. 

In the same township was a holding of 7 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at i6d., belonging to Robert Malet, and formerly to three freemen, 
over two of whom Alveva had commendation. 

Robert Malet had several other holdings here. One consisted of 26 
acres and half a ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), 
valued at 4s. It had formerly been held by two freemen, one called Coleman, 
who was under commendation to Ulveva, with 6 acres. 

Another holding consisted of 13 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 
20S., but at the time of the Survey at 12s. It had formerly been held by 6 
freemen under commendation to Alviet. 

Another holding consisted of 10 acres, half a ploughteam, 4 acres of 
meadow, and wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, valued at los. It was 
formerly held by 4 freemen under commendation to Ringulf, when it was 
valued a.t 20s. 

Another holding consisted of 16 acres, and i ploughteam, (which had 
disappeared at the time of the Survey), valued at 6s. 8d. Of this land 
Aubrey de Vere's predecessor held 5 acres, the King and the Earl having the 
soc. It had formerly been held by Beso, a freeman. 

In the same township a freeman Sorches held 6 acres under commen- 
dation to Ulveva, valued at I2d. ; and Chipping, a freeman under commen- 
dation to Ulwin, the predecessor of Aubrey de Vere, and in his soc, held 
12 acres, also an acre of land out of Ulwin's demesne, and the fourth part 
of another acre, and at the time of the Survey the estate of Chipping was 
held by Robert Malet's mother, the value being 2s. The soc belonged to 
the King and the Earl. 

Another holding of Robert Malet consisted of 30 acres in the soc of the 
King and Earl, 2 bordars, i|- ploughteams (reduced to i team at the time 
of the Survey), and i^ acres of meadow, also wood sufficient to support 
5 hogs. The value was 45. in Saxon times and 5s. at the time of the Survey. 
Robert's mother held this last estate, which had formerly been held by two 
freemen, Stannard and Stubbard, under commendation to Edric. 

The last holding of Robert Malet mentioned in the Survey consisted 
of 3 acres, valued at i2d., the soc belonging to the King and Earl. This 
had formerly been held by a freeman under commendation to Alsey, nephew 
of EarlJRalph.' 

The third manor in this place was held by Gilbert Balistarius, and 
consisted of 2 carucates of land, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
(reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 2 acres of meadow, and wood 
sufficient to support 4 hogs, valued at 40s. It had been held by Alsey, a 
freeman, in the time of the Confessor. The Survey goes on to say : " This 

'Dom. ii. 3206. 322, 324. 



268 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor belonged in the lifetime of King Edward to the demesne of Abbot 
Lefstan^ of St. Edmunds, and Abbot Lefstan leased it to Alsey and his 
wife by such an agreement after their deaths the Abbot should have his 
manor back again and another Manor of Alsey's, Euston by name." The 
soc belonged to the King and Earl. 

In the same township was a holding of i6 acres, and i ploughteam 
(which was reduced at the time of the Survey to half a team). This was 
formerly held by 8 freemen under commendation to Alsey, and is included 
in the above valuation. 

Also in the same township was an estate of 6 acres, valued at i2i., 
formerly held by three freemen under commendation to the predecessor 
of Aubrey de Vere, the soc belonging to the King and Earl. It was a 
league long and 7 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt lOi?.' 

Amongst the lands of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was a holding consisting 
of 30 acres, i ploughteam, i bordar, and an acre of meadow, valued atios., 
formerly held by Aluric, a socman. Also an estate of 8 acres (out of the 
30 acres in the above soc, the land and commendation belonging to the 
abbot), 3 ploughteams (which at the time of the Survey were reduced to 
2), and an acre of meadow, valued at los. It had formerly been held by 
12 freemen and a socman. "" 

Hugh de Montfort had here a freewoman (formerly under commenda- 
tion to Goodmund), with 15 acres and an acre of meadow, valued at 2s.^ 
Aubrey de Vere held here a freeman named Edric, and an estate of 23 acres, 
and I ploughteam, valued at 4s. 8^., held of him by Adelalmus. It had 
formerly been held by 3 freemen — Ulmar, Lestan, and Lefquena.* 

Among the lands of Robert the Blond were two estates in this place. 
The first consisted of 30 acres "of the demesne land of Walsham, held by 
Achi, and an acre of meadow, valued at 2s. 8^^. The second consisted of 53 
acres, formerly held by 3 freemen, under Achi's commendation, namely, 
Alger, Godric, and Godwin, and a freeman under them held i acre. 
Also 2 ploughteams (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), 
and wood sufficient to support 24 hogs, the value of the whole being i6s. 
Over two women (wives of these men) the Abbot of St. Edmunds had half 
the commendation and half the soc.^ 

Amongst the King's lands in the region kept by Roger Bigot was an 
estate of 3 acres, valued at 6d., formerly held by Leverich, a freeman, and 
7 acres, held at Diss by W. de Burnoville.® 

Amongst the lands of Earl Ralph, kept in hand for the King by Good- 
rich the steward, was an estate in this place of an acre, valued at 2d., held 
by a freeman.' 

There are now six manors in Gislingham. 

Manor of Swatshall Hall. 

This was the lordship of Alsius, a freeman, in the time of the Confessor, 
and of Gilbert Balistarius in the time of the Conqueror. In the early part 
of the 13th century it belonged to William de Gislingham, and passed to his 
son Robert, who in 1255 settled the manor by way of dower on his marriage 
with Amable his wife, daughter of Sir Robert de Craneley. The settlement 

'Dom. ii. 444&. ^j^qj^^^ jj_ ^^^ 

'Dom. ii. 361. 6 Dora. ii. 282. 

3 Dora. ii. 408. 7Dom. ii. 286. 
*Dom. ii. 419. 



GISLINGHAM. 



269 



is still in existence, and will be found amongst the Harleian Charters in the 
British Museum/ 

The date is the day of Pentecost, in the month of May, 39 Hen. III. 

By a deed about 1 260 William, son of Robert de ' ' Gisleham ' ' and Elizabeth 
his wife, quit claim to Robert his son, no doubt the Robert of the last- 
mentioned deed, for 48s. per annum, the manor and mill of Raysis, in Gisling- 
ham.'' A little later we find a deed by which William, son of Robert de 
Gishngham, quit claim for himself and Elizabeth his wife, to William, son 
and heir of Robert de Gishngham, of a messuage, and a carucate of land in 
Reysses, in Gishngham, and other lands in Swarteshaye and Bedingfeud 
for 12 marks annually.^ 

This is probably the " Manor of Gishngham " of which Roger de Bello 
Campo died seised in 1281/ In 1347 the manor was included in a fine 
levied by John de Gishngham against John de Westle and Joan his wife.' 

In 1380 the manor was vested in Richard del Chirche, and Katherine his 
wife, and by a conveyance dated ist Feb. 1381, they conveyed it with 
the manors of " Rishes and Bedyngfeld," to Sir WiUiam de Burgate, John 
Muriel, parson of the church of Wortham, John Huberd, parson of the 
church of Burgate, and Hugo de Lancastre.* A fine was levied in 1382-3 
between Sir WilUam de Burgate, Hugh de Lancastre, and John Hoberd, 
clerk, and Richard del Chirch and Katherine his wife, extending to the 
manors of " Resshes and Swartsame.'"' 

In 1391 we meet with another deed by which Richard del Chirch " of 
Gishngham " grants to Sir William Burgate, John Huberd, clerk, Wilham 
Clontynge, John Glemham, John Lynge, William Lampet, John Say, clerk, 
and John Messynar, this manor and the Manor of Wodehous in Parva 
Thornham, with appurtenances in Magna Thornham, Gishngham, Finning- 
ham, Wyverstone, Parva Thornham, MeUis, Burgate, Wortham, and Gazley. 
The deed is dated at Gishngham, Sunday p.p.f . Con. S. Pauli, 14 Rich. II.' 

The same year, but at the end, by deed dated 2nd Feb. 14 Rich. II., 
Sir WiUiam Burgate and the other trustees named in the last grant demised 
to Richd. del Chirche this manor and that of " le Wodehous" with the other 
property comprised in the last grant.' 

In 1398 a fine was levied of the manor by Sir William. Burgate, John 
Hobert, clerk, WiUiam Clontyng, John Glemham, John Lynge, and William 
Lampet, against Thomas Poley and Matilda his wife." 

By a deed in 1410 John Glemham quit claim to John Huberd and three 
others all his right in this manor and the manor of " Le Wodehous," in 
Thornham Parva and of Gishngham, in Bedingfield." 

By deed dated 29th June, 1412, Sir John Hevenyngham, William 
Pelyp, Thomas Mystirtone, Wilham Harlestone, John Huberd, parson of 
Burgate, Wilham Clontyng, John Lynge, WiUiam Lampet, Edmund 
Kattone, John Massynge, Thomas del Cross, and Edward Balle, released to 
Richard Chirche and Margaret his wife not only this manor but the Manor of 
Wodehouse, in Thornham Parva, with lands in Gishngham, Thornham 
Magna, Thornham Parva, MeUis, Burgate, Wortham, Thrandestone, 
Yaxley, and Wyverstone. The releasors were no doubt trustees of the 
Chirches." 



'Harl. 50 G. 53. 
=HarI. 50 G, 54. 
'Had. 50 G. 55. 
*I.P.M., 9 Edw. I. 2, 9. 
'Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. III. 22. 
"Harl. 48 A. 42. 



'Feet of Fines, 5-7 Rich. 11. 7. 
SHarl. 48 A. 43. 
^Harl. 47 E. 13. 
'°Feet of Fines, 22 Rich. II. 18. 
"Harl. 50 H. 2. 
"Harl, 51 E. 52. 



270 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Five years later by a deed dated ist July, 1417, Sir John Hevenyngham, 
and such of the others living who were releasors under the last deed, except 
WiUiam Lampet, quit claim to him all their right in the manor, and other 
the hereditaments mentioned in the deed of 1412. The manor was by the 
trustees, William Lampet and Thomas Misterton, subsequently granted to 
Richard Chirche and Margaret his wife.' 

Richard Chirche died in 1428,* leaving a daughter and heiress Mary, 
married to William Toppesfield. The manor passed to Margaret, widow of 
Richard, and then to WilUam Toppesfield in right of his wife. He died in 
1449 and she in 1473, when the manor passed to her son and heir, William 
Toppesfield. On his death the manor passed to Elizabeth and Joan, his 
daughters and coheirs. 

This may be the devolution, but amongst the Early Chancery Pro- 
ceedings we meet with a suit respecting this manor and that of Wodehous 
in Thornham Parva, by Henry Bernard and Margaret his wife, daughter 
of Raulf Toppisfield and . . . another of the daughters of the said 
Raulf, against William Toppisfeld, cousin of Dame Jane Toppisfeld and 
Simon . . .^ 

John Wiseman next held the manor, and died 27th May, 1555, when 
it passed to his son and heir, Edward Wiseman, who died in 1561, when the 
manor went to his sisters and coheirs, Mary and Barbara. Barbara married 
Edmund Bokenham, of Thornham. She died in 1617, and he in 1619,* 
when the manor went to his son and heir. Sir Henry Bokenham. Davy 
says Sir Henry Bokenham died in 1648 and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Wiseman Bokenham, who died in 1670 ; but we find from the State 
Papers, the Calendar of Compounders,^ that Anthony Bedingfield sought 
to compound for Gislingham and Swatshall Manors, which he had purchased 
December, 1649, of Henry Bedingfield, for whose recusancy two-thirds 
were sequestered. A little later the manor was held by — Bedingfield, 
widow, who sold it to Anthony Bedingfield, a merchant in London. He 
gave it to his brother. Sir Thomas Bedingfield, who, when he bought Dars- 
ham Hall, in Blything Hundred, of Philip Bedingfield, his eldest brother, 
gave him this estate and other lands in part payment for that purchase. 

Philip Bedingfield died seised in 1660, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Thomas Bedingfield, who, dying in 1661 without issue, it 
devolved upon his brother and heir, Philip Bedingfield, who died in 1673, 
when it went to his second son, Charles Bedingfield. Charles Bedingfield 
rebuilt Swatshaugh Hall, or Swattisfield, and married Agatha, daughter and 
coheir of Sir William Cooke, Bart., of Brome Hall, in Norfolk, and was 
succeeded by his eldest son and heir, William Bedingfield, who died in 1754, 
and was interred with divers of his ancestors in the parish church here. 

Letitia and Mary Bedingfield, his sisters and coheirs, inherited this 
estate. The former died at Norwich in 1782 unmarried. Mary, the other 
sister, married the Rev. Charles Pleijs, rector of the parish of Gislingham. 
On his death the manor passed to his son and heir, the Rev. Charles 
Bedingfield Pleijs, who died in 1781. Whether the manor continued 
with the Bokenhams, or passed to the Bedingfields as above, is by no means 

'Cott. xxvii. 208. 3E.C.P., Bundle, 32, 177. 

« In his will, l6th Jan., 2 Hen. VI, proved 4 566 Thornham Hall/ Manor, in this 

20th May, 1428, he states that he Hundred. 

had purchased the manor of John s 1648, p. 1852. 

Erpyngham and Henry Erpyngham, 

sons of John Erpyngham. 



GISLINGHAM. 271 

clear. We have thought there might possibly be two manors of this name, 
one in Gislinghamj and the other in Great Thornham, but the townships 
are too near together to justify this surmise. Further doubt is thrown 
on the Bedingfield devolution by a deed in the writer's possession dated 25th 
July, 1732, in which Charles Killigrew is described as of " Great Thornham 
HaU in the County of Suffolk, Esquire, and Lord of the Manor or Manors of 
Swatshall, Woodhouse, and Bresworth, in the said town," the " said town " 
being presumably Great Thornham. 

The manor subsequently passed to Lord Henniker,by whose representa- 
tive the same is now held. 

Arms of Gislingham : Azure a fesse Or between three swans Argent ; 
beaked and legged Gules. Of Chirche : Sa. on a fesse engrailed Arg. 3 
escallops Gu. betw. 3 fleurs-de-lis Or. Of Pleijs : On a bend wavy, three 
anchors. 

Manor of Rushes, now united with Jennies. 

One Godard de Gislingham is supposed to have held this at the time 
of the Conquest, and his son and heir, Robert de Gislingham, in the reign of 
Hen. IL 

In 1268 William de Gislingham and Elizabeth his wife exchanged 
it with their son Robert, who was succeeded by William, and he by his son 
and heir, John. 

It is said that John de Wayland held about 1383, and sold the manor 
to Thomas, son of Sir Thomas de Geney, who vested it in trustees by way 
of settlement. Davy says in 9 Rich. II., but it is certain that in 1383, 
Richard del Chirche and Katherine his wife conveyed it to Sir William de 
Burgate and others as trutees.' 

In the time of Edw. IV. the manor is said to have been vested in 
George Seckford, and that he died seised of it in 1463. But it would 
appear to have passed in 1452 to William Alyngton under a fine levied by 
him against Walter Wymere and Margaret his wife, daughter and heir of 
John ToUe.' 

By the time of Hen. VIII. it had passed to the Hobart family. Sir 
James Hobart probably acquired it in 1511 by virtue of a fine levied of the 
" Manor of Gi^ingham " against Sir Giles Alyngton and Maria his wife.^ 
Sir James Hobart died seised 24th Feb. 1516,* when the manor passed to 
his son and heir. Sir Walter Hobart. From the State Papers in 1531 we 
learn that relief was taken from Walter Hobart in respect of this manor.' 
Sir W^alter Hobart settled it and the manor of Jennies, with other manors, on 
his son and heir, Henry Hobart, who succeeded his father in the lordship 
in 1538, and a fine was levied against him by Nicholas Rokewode in 1544.^ 
Henry Hobart died seised in 1561. The manor then passed to his son and 
heir, James Hobart, of Hales Hall, in Lodne, who in 1585, sold the manor to 
Sir Nicholas Bacon,'' against whom in 1593 a fine was levied of this and 
Jennies Manor by Sir Giles Wootton and others.^ No doubt this was on 
occasion of some settlement of the property. From this time the manor 
has probably passed with the Manor of Redgrave, in this Hundred, in the same 
course as the Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackboum Hundred. 

' Feet of Fines, 5-7 Rich. II. dred ; also Boys Manor, Bacton, 

*Feet of Fines, 30 Hen. VI. 33. Hartismere Hundred. 

'Fine, Easter, 3 Hen. VIII. 'S.P. 23 Hen. VIII. 653. 

♦See Manor of Oulton, in Lothingland «Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 

Hundred, and Candelent Manor, ^Fine, Mich. 27-28 Eliz. 

Trimley St. Mary's, Colneis Hun- «Fine, Mich. 35-36 Eliz. 



272 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1802 it was certainly vested in George Wilson, of Redgrave Hall, 
Admiral of the Red, and is now vested in George Holt Wilson, of Redgrave 
Hall. 

Manor of Jennies. 

In the middle of the 14th century this was the lordship of Sir Thomas 
de Geney, Gyney, or Jenney, and passed on his death to his son and heir, 
Thomas Jenney, who vested it in trustees by way of settlement, and died in 
1403- 

The manor passed to Sir Thomas Gyney, or Jenney, whose will is dated 
1417, and proved 1420. He was succeeded by his daughter and heir, 
Margery, who was lady of Guton, in Norfolk, and presented to Brandeston 
church, in that county, in 1431, as such. 

By the time of King Hen. VIII. the manor had passed to the Hobart 
family, and Sir James Hobart died seised of it in 1516, from which time the 
manor has passed with and is now united with the Manor of Rushes. 

Manor of Gislingham, Goldingham, or Goldingham Hall. 

Robert Brito gave to the priory of Eye tithes in Gislingham, and the 
lordship on his death passed to his son and heir, William Le Breton. His son 
and heir, William Le Breton, in 1230 purchased half a knight's fee here 
by fine, 14 Hen. III., and died about 1246. Alice, his daughter and heir, 
married Sir William de Goldingham, who died before 1286, for this year we 
find his son and heir, John de Goldingham, lord." 

In 1316 Fulke de Goldingham, John's brother, held the lordship, and 
was succeeded by his son, Sir Adam Goldingham, Sheriff of Essex. In 1333 
we meet with a fine levied of " Gislingham Manor," probably this, by Roger 
de Bourne and Elen his wife against Robert Whitford, clerk, and Robert 
Balle, clerk,^ and in 1341 a fine levied by John Hardel and Alice his wife 
against John, son of Falcon de Goldynghara of the manor and a mill in 
Gislingham.^ 

In 1363 Sir Walter de Manny and Margaret his wife had assigned to 
them half a fee, which Mary (?), widow of Thomas de Brotherton, Countess 
of Norfolk, late held in dower, and which Fulk de Goldingham held. 
Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is a writing in 1386, 
indented by which John Tendryng, having enfeoffed Thomas Sampson, 
Nichole Co terell, chaplain, and Estephene Hervy, chaplain, in the Manor of 
Gislingham, with the advowson of the church, authorises them to make 
estate of the same to Esmon Lackyngheth. The document, which is in 
French, is dated at Gislingham the Friday after Easter, 9 Rich. II.* Sub- 
sequently we find amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings a suit by Thomas 
Assheman, heir of Johane Lakynghyth against John Burys and others, 
feoffees to uses as to the manor.^ 

In the time of Hen. VI. the manor belonged to the Tyrrell family, and 
in 1435 we meet with a fine levied of this and the Manor of Hemenhall, by 
Sir John" Tirell" andKatherine his wife. Sir William Phylyp, Sir John Clyf ton, 
Sir John Hevenyngham, Edward " Tirell," Wilham Rokewode, Robert Asshe- 
feld, Richard Doget, Thomas Suigleton,'5John Pyrye, and Gregory Wery, 

'As to Goldingham family, see Little 3 Feet of Fines, 15 Edw. III. i5. John, 
Belstead Manor in Samford Hundred. son of Nich. de Twinstede app cl 

' Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. III. 23. ■» Harl. 56 H. 35. 

5E.C.P., Bundle 69, 152. 



GISLINGHAM. 273 

clerk, against Roger Felice and Margaret his wife.' In the reign of Henry 
VIII. the manor was held by Sir John Tyrrell, and on his death in 1573 
passed to his son and heir, Sir John Tyrrell.'' 

In 1592 we meet with a fine levied by Thomas Bedyngfeild and others 
against T. "Tyrell" and others." 

In 1802 the manor was vested in John Frere, and on his death in 1807 
passed to his son and heir, the Right Hon. John Hookham Frere, from 
which period the manor passed for a time in the same mode as the Manor 
of Finningham Hall, but before 1845 had passed to the Henniker family, 
and is now vested in Lord Henniker. 

Manor of Lawford and Collesford. 

This manor belonged to Sir Robert de Burgate, and was given by him 
to the Knight Templars, who had a house here ; in 1286 the Master of the 
Knight Templars was seised, and claiined view of frankpledge and assize 
of bread and beer in Gislingham.* On the Close Rolls in 1313 is an order 
to the Keeper of late Templars' Manor of " Gyselingham" to pay a sum to the 
Bp. of Norwich, for a Templar in the monastery of St. Edmunds.' Later 
the lordship vested in the Knights Hospitalers, and subsequently to the 
preceptory at Battisford. 

In 1509 it was in the King's hands. 

In 1544 Nicholas Bacon had a grant of the manor from the Crown 
in exchange, and particulars of the manor for this grant are still preserved 
in the Public Record Office.^ In 1553 John Greene and Richard Hall 
had a similar grant, but Sir Nicholas Bacon certainly held the manor in 
1566. 

Manor of Gislingham and Heighams. 

Robert Crane held this manor in the time of Hen. VII., and died seised 
of it 26th Oct. 1447, when it passed to his brother and heir, John Crane.^ 
John Crane died seised i6th August, 1504,^ when it passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Crane. A fine was levied against him in 1534 of this manor 
and the Manor of Chilton al. Waldingfield, by William Wystouse and others. 
It included the advowson of Chilton church.' Robert Crane died in 1550.'° 
when the manor passed to hi? son and heir, Robert, who, dying in 1591, it 
went to his son and heir, Henry Crane, of Chilton." 

In 1802 this manor was vested in George Wilson, and has since passed 
in the same course as the Manors of Rushes and Jennies. 

An abstract of the customs, &c., of Gislingham Manor, in the i6th 
century, will be found amongst the Additional MSS.in the British Museum." 



' Feet of Fines, 13 Hen. VI. 21. ? I.P.M., 16 Hen. VH. 

'See Gipping Manor, Stow Hundred. ^i.p.M., 20 Hen. VHI. 

3 Fine, Trin. 34 Eliz. 9 Fine, Mich. 26 Hen. VHI. 

4 Q.W. 725. '" I.P.M., 4 Edw. VI. 84. 

5 Close Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 18. "See Chilton Manor, Babergh Hundred. 

6 36Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. 162. "Add. 31970. 

LI 




274 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MELLJS. 

|N Saxon times there was one manor in this place held by 
Leverich, consisting of 60 acres, and i ploughteam, which 
had disappeared at the time of the Survey. Three freemen 
under commendation held 15 acres and half a ploughteam 
(which at the time of the Survey were reduced to a team 
of 2 oxen). The value was formerly 20s., reduced to 
half at the time of the Survey. Ulwin, the predecessor of 
Aubrey de Vere had half the commendation and half the soc, and Ulveva 
had half the commendation and the King half the soc. The Domesday 
tenant was Robert Malet. 

Another holding here of Robert Malet consisted of 27 acres, i bordar, 
I ploughteam, an acre of meadow, and half a church, with 8 acres, valued at 
los. Robert Malet's mother held it over him, and the soc belonged to the 
King and Earl. It had formerly been held by Fulchard, a freeman, half 
under commendation to Edric' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was a small estate 
in this place,''consisting of i J acres, valued at bd., held by a freeman under 
the abbot's commendation and soc.'' 

Another estate in this place was that of Aubrey de Vere, and consisted 
of 14 acres of free land held by Menleva, a freewoman, who, in the time of the 
Confessor, gave that land to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 

Altogether others had 90 acres, 6|- ploughteams, and an acre of 
meadow, valued at 60s. Adelalmus held the whole of this under Aubrey 
de Vere, whose predecessor had soc and commendation over the freemen, 
having the go acres in the time of the Confessor. Aubrey de Vere also had 
here 4^ f reem^en, Leuric, Godric, Ulward, Lewinbenne, and Furcard, the half 
freeman.^ 

Manor of Mellis. 

This was the lordship of Leverich in Saxon times, and of Robert Malet 
after the Conquest. 

In the time of Hen. I. Sir Robert de Sackville* held, and in 1240 Wydo 
de Verdon. Davy makes Peter de Melles lord in 1286, and John de Swyni- 
ford lord in 1316 ; on the other hand, Page says that in 9 Edw. I. the demesne 
of the parish was held by John de Sywnford, but subsequently by Sir John 
Norwich, who held the same at one fee, as of Sir John de Thorp's Manor of 
Fundenhall, in Norfolk, he of the Earl Marshal, and he of the King. Davy's 
inaccuracy probably arises from confounding this manor with that of Mells. 

Peter de MeUs held Mells in Blything Hundred, not this manor. 

This manor was the lordship of Sir John de Thorp and Alice his wife. 
He died seised in 1323,^ when it passed to his son and heir, Robert de Thorp, 
who died in 1330.* 

A " Mellis Manor " is mentioned amongst others, of which Edward 
Cornwallis died seised 3rd September, 1510, leaving William, his brother 
and heir,' but which this manor was, or that it was not Mells Manor, in 
Blything Hundred, we are unable to say with certainty. 

In the time of King Hen. VIII. the manor was vested in Henry Denny, 
who appears to have parted with it in 1562 to Walter Norton,^ and on his 

' Dom. ii. 3236. 5 1.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 61. 

"Dom. ii. 371. 6 See Manor of Thorpe Hall, Horham, in 

3Doni. u. 419- Hoxne Hundred, 

*See Old Hall, Braiseworth, in this ^U.^,^ 2 Hen. VIII. 
Hundred, ^Yine, Mich. 4 Eliz. 



MELLIS. 275 

death in 1609 it passed to his son and heir, Henry Norton,' who had licence 
to alien it in 1594 to John Wilsher and others, probably as trustees on some 
settlement, for we find that in 1638 Walter Norton, of Chediston, succeeded 
his father Henry. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth is 
an action relating to the manor, or rather parcel thereof, brought by Walter 
Norton against Thomas Thurston/ 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Rowland Holt, who died in 1786, 
and from him it has devolved (like the Manor of Redgrave, in this Hundred), 
in the same course as the Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackbourn Hundred, 
and is now vested in George Holt Wilson, of Redgrave Hall. 

Manor of St. John's. 

In the time of King Hen. III. the Master and Brethren of the Temple 
had a grant of liberties, &c., here, and in the time of Edw. I. Master Milicie, 
of the Templars, claimed view of frankpledge and assize of bread and beer 
in Mellis.^ 

At the Dissolution the manor passed to the Crown, and was granted 
in 1554 to Sir Thomas Cheney and Augustine Curtis. In 1764 it was vested 
in Rowland Holt, and has since passed in the same course as the last manor. 

In this manor the custom of " Borough English " prevails. 

Manor of Lancaster al. Werts or Pountneys. 

This manor belonged to Anthony Yaxley, or Yaxlee, in the time of 
Hen. VIII. John, eldest son and heir of Richard, only son of John Yaxlee (al. 
Harbord), of the adjoining parish of Yaxley, being the first of that house who 
appears to have resided here. He was a serjeant-at-law, and by Elizabeth his 
wife, daughter of Richard Brome, had issue an only son, Anthony Yaxlee and 
two daughters, namely, Mary, who married George Fastolf, and Elizabeth. 
From the time of Anthony Yaxlee to Charles Yaxlee, in 1650, the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Yaxley, in this Hundred. A fine 
was levied of this manor in 1568 by Edmund Bedingfield and others 
against William Yaxley,* and the following year between the same 
parties.' 

The manor subsequently passed to, and was held for several generations 
by the Clarke family. Upon the death of Thomas Clarke it passed to the 
Rev. Edward Jermyn, rector of Carlton Colville, and is now vested in 
Lord Henniker. 

In this manor the custom of " Borough English " prevails. The 
mansion and park of the Clarke family were at the west end of the green ; 
the former was almost entirely pulled down many years ago, and the 
remainder converted into a farm house; a small portion of the old part 
remained in Page's time [1847], and he says " a few years ago " many 
fine trees adorned the grounds. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a deed 
relating to this manor in 1624.^ 

Arms of Clarke : Ermine ; on a fesse, Gules, three bezants. 

' See Manor of Bavents al. Norton Bavents, ♦ Fine, Trin. 10 Eliz. 

in Chediston, in Blything Hundred. s Fine, Mich. 11 EHz. 

«C.P. ser. ii. B. cxxxi. 16 ; lb. B. cxxxiii. 5. e Add. Ch. 32953. 
3 Q.W. 725. 



276 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Heigham Hall, called Barrington's. 

Brian de Hikelin or Hickling held this manor in 1318, and it passed on 
his death to his son and heir, John de Hickling/ It was subsequently 
held by Richard Blome and later by Adam Blome, in 1428 vesting in Robert 
Werk. 

Later the manor passed to Miles Hobart, 2nd son of Sir James, who 
with others levied a fine of the manor in 1533 against Francis Thirkyll/ 
Miles Hobart, by his will dated 6th Aug, 1557, gave the manor to his widow 
Helen, daughter and coheir of John Blennerhassett, of Frenze, in Norfolk, 
for life, and appointed her executrix, and John Corbet supervisor of his will, 
which was proved 22nd Feb. 1557.^ Thomas Hobart, son and heir, married 
Aubrey, daughter and heir of William Hare, of Beeston, in Norfolk, by whom 
he had two sons. Miles and Henry. By an inquisition p.m. he was found to 
have died 26th March, 1560. His widow remarried Sir Edward Warner, 
Lieutenant of the Tower, who dying 7th Nov. 1565, she married WilUam 
Blennerhasset. Blomefield informs us that Thomas Hobart died lord of 
Heigham, and his widow died in 1581. Henry, the 2nd son, was Lord Chief 
Justice of the Common Pleas. Miles Hobart, the eldest son of Thomas, 
was a minor at his father's death. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir 
Thomas Woodhouse, Knt., of Waxham, in Norfolk. 

The manor, notwithstanding what Blomefield implies, does not seem 
to have continued in the Hobart family through these descents, for apparently 
it was vested in Anthony Yaxley at the time of his decease in 1558-9, when 
it passed to William, son of Richard, and grandson of Anthony, and on 
William's death in 1588 vested in Henry Yaxley, his son and heir. This 
manor is included in a fine levied in 1569 by Edmund Bedyngfeld against 
William Yaxley.* A Manor of Mellis is included in a fine levied of Rushes 
and Jennies Manors, in Gislingham, in 1593 by Sir Giles Wootton and others 
against Sir Nicholas Bacon.' 



' See Rishangles Manor, in this Hundred. ■* Fine, Mich. 11 Eliz. 

« Fine, Trin. 25 Hen. VHI. s pine, Mich. 35-36 Eliz. 

3 Reg. Hastings, Norw. p. 60. 




^ MENDLESHAM. 277 

MENDLESHAM. 

[^MONG the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King 
by Goodrich the stewardj was one manor in this place. 
It consisted of 7 carucates and 42 acres of land, 33 villeins, 
19 bordars, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 15^ belonging 
to the men, 12 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to 
support 1,000 hogs. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 
II beasts, 90 hogs, and 35 goats. Also a hamlet with 26 
acres, i bordar, and i ploughteam. At the time of the Survey the appur- 
tenances of this manor were different, with the exception of the live stock, 
which remained the same. The villeins had decreased by degrees, first to 
27 and then to 24, the ploughteams in demesne had come down to 2, and 
those belonging to the men to 13, and there was only wood enough to support 
800 hogs. The value was formerly £25, when Goodrich took it over at 
£20, and at the time of the Survey it was worth £25 white money by tale, and 
40s. as gersumary. The manor was a league and 6 quarentenes long and 
a league broad, and paid in a gelt %d. The soc belonged to Burchard, by 
whom the manor was previously held. 

Amongst other lands of Earl Ralph which Goodrich the steward kept 
in Suffolk in the King's hand and enumerated under Stow Hundred, was a 
freeman with 3 acres belonging to Thorney, valued at bd., of which the soc 
and sac were in the Hundred.' Mendlesham later became divided between 
5 lordships. 

Manor of Mendlesham. 

King Hen. I. granted this manor to Manasser or Mansey de Danmartin. 
It is said that Odo de Danmartin held the same manor in the reign of Hen. 
II., and that Basilia, his wife, in the ist year of that King, gave 60 marks of 
silver to have her dower, and Odo, the son of Odo, paid 100 marks for his 
father's lands in this parish. This is all very true, but it does not relate 
to the manor. There were two branches of the Danmartin family holding 
lands in Mendlesham at the same time. Thus the Red Book of the Exchequer 
informs us that in 1210-12 William de Warenna held one knight's fee in 
Mendlesham, which was WiUiam de Danmartin's, but at the same time it 
also informs us that Manasser de Daimiartin held of the King in chief one 
fee here. This latter was the manor.* 

An entry in the Hundred Rolls makes the whole matter clear. It 
states that Hen. I. gave the manor to " Manser " de Danmartin, and that in 
the time of King John a daughter of this Manser, named Galyena, being 
under age, the King gave the custody and marriage to WiUiam de Bruera, 
who married her to his brother John, who died without heirs. Galyena 
being still under age was then married to Robert de Burgate, who also 
dying without heirs, she married Ernald de Maundevill, and the manor 
was given to her son, Hugh de Maundevill, who sold it to Nicholas de 
Lewkenore, at whose death in 1268^ it came to Patrick de Cadurcis.* The 
inquisition p.m. of Nicholas de Lewkenore states that the manor had been 
wholly given by him about 1263 to his son, Sir Roger de Lewkenore, 
who did homage for it to Hugh de Maundevill, and held it of him by the 
service of one knight, paying yearly 32s. to Roger de Cotton and others, 
and 5s. Sheriff's aid. 

'Dom. ii. 285&. ^I.P.M., 52 Hen. III. File 35 (12). 

'132 B. ♦H.R. ii. 193. 



278 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

We find on the Close Rolls in 1226 an order for seisin to be given to 
Galyena of lands in Mendlesham/ so it is clear that by this time Robert 
de Burgate was dead. It seems that in 1257 Galyena granted by fine this 
lordship to her son, Hugh de Maundevillj and he at her request granted the 
same to Nicholas Lewkenore^he paying 30s. per annum for life, in exchange 
for lands in Hertfordshire granted to Hugh. Davy makes Robert de Burgh, 
who married the daughter and heir of William de Danmartin, lord. He no 
doubt arrived at that conclusion from the somewhat obscure entry in the 
Testa de Nevill." It is there stated that Mendlesham was given by Hen. I. 
to Odo de Danmartin by service of a knight's fee, and by King John under 
the same service to Robert de Burgh ; but it is clear that Hugh, the son of 
Otho de Danmartin, or Hugh Fitz Otho, as he was more usually called, 
had the lordship in the early part of the reign of King Edw. I., for in 
the ninth year of this sovereign a patent was granted to him for a 
market and a fair in Mendlesham.^ He was master of the King's mint, 
and died without issue in 1283,* when the manor went to his sister and heir 
Maud,' married to Sir John de Botetourt, who had livery of this lordship 
in 1302 in his wife's right, and was summoned to Parliament as a Baron in 
1308. From the Abbreviation of Pleas we learn that in 1314 Sir Peter de 
Biirgate released all right in the manor to Sir John de Botetourt and Matilda 
his wife.® 

Botetourt was admiral of the Norfolk coast in 1295, and stood in high 
favour with King Edw. I., being appointed wih Matilda his wife to attend at 
Ipswich upon the King's daughter Elizabeth, with John, Earl of Holland. 
He was also one of those 104 Earls and Barons who, in the name of the 
Commonalty of England, sent a letter to the Pope, asserting that the King- 
dom of Scotland was not of his fee, and denying him all jurisdiction in tem- 
poral matters. He was also a Justice of Trayl Baston in several counties. 
In 1310 a licence was granted to Sir John empowering him to alienate lands 
and' rents here in mortmain to the value of loos. for a chaplain to celebrate 
in Mendlesham church.' 

In 1322 a fine was levied of the manor by Sir John Botetourt and 
Matilda his wife against Hugh Pirpount.^ Sir John de Botetourt died in 
1324.' And on the Close Rolls in 1325 we find an order not to intermeddle 
further with the manor, and to restore same to Matilda, late wife of John 
" Botecourt," as they were jointly enfeoffed by Hugh Pirpount." 

The manor passed to his fifth son, Otho de Botetourt. In 1330 we find 
on the Patent Rolls a hcence empowering this Otho de Botetourt to alienate 
in mortmain a messuage, 30 acres, and 30s. rent in Mendlesham to a chap- 
lain to celebrate in the parish church for the souls of John de Botetourt 
and Matilda his wife, and the same year authority for him to retain the 
manor on grant of other lands." 

Otho de Botetourt died in 1345," when the manor went to his son and 
heir. Sir John de Botetourt, who married Catherine, 2nd daughter of 
Sir Robert (? William) de Weyland, and Cecilia his wife, daughter of 
Thomas de Baldock. Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum 

'Close Rolls, 10 Hen. III. 18. sAbbr. of PI. 8 Edw. II. Mich. 48. 

*P. 296. 7 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. pt. il. 17. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. I. 78. speet of Fines, 16 Edw. II. 36. 

♦I.P.M., 11 Edw. I. 20. 9I.P.M., 18 Edw. II. 56. 

5 The author of " The Complete Peerage " "Close Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 20. 

states that she was sister of Otho " I.Q.D., 4 Edw. III., File 210, 2. 

Fitz Thomas and daughter of "I.P.M., 19 Edw. III. 9, 

Thomas Fitz Otho or Oates. 



MENDLESHAM. 279 

is a deed in 1355 by Sir John " Botourte," granting to Sir Ralph de Hemen- 
hale an annual rent out of this manor. The deed is dated die Dom. in 
Passione Dom. 29 Edw. III.' Sir Johndiedabout 1377, and Joan Botetourt, 
his daughter and coheir, married John Knyvet, son of Sir John Knyvet, 
of Buckenham Castle, in Norfolk, Lord Chancellor of England in 1371. 

John Knyvet was one of the knights of the shire for co. Huntingdon, 
21 Rich. II. A shield on the stone work of the west door of Mendlesham 
Manor, much worn, appears to bear the arms of John Knyvet. The brass, 
which now lies in the nave, but which not long ago lay in the south aisle, 
probably represents this John Knyvet., 

The brass is that of a knight in the plate armour of the beginning of the ' 
15th century. The only coat upon the brass still remaining, viz., 3 piles 
within a bordure sable, charged with besants,is that of his mother, Eleanor, 
wife of the Lord Chancellor, and one of the coheirs of Ralph Basset, of 
Welledon. But when Sir J. Blois made his church notes, there were two 
other coats of arms, viz., Knyvet, impaling Fitz Otho, or Botetourt 
(Bendy of 6 a canton) and Knyvet impaling Basset. It also bore this : 
" Hie jacet John Knyvet A. Dom. istius villae qui obiit 1417." Upon 
the west door the two coats, noted by Sir J. Blois as Botetourt, impaling 
Weyland and Knyvet quartering Botetourt, seem to imply that the church 
tower was completed, if not built, by John Knyvet. It is pleasant to think 
that he may have used his ample fortune to complete church work begun 
by the family, the heiress of which he married. The Knyvet hall is said to 
have stood to the east of the church. Mendlesham remained in the Knyvet 
family for several generations. After the Reformation they appear to]have 
become possessed of the advowson, which had been originally granted by 
William Rufus to the Abbey of Battle. 

Joan died in 1417, when the manor passed to her son and heir. Sir John 
Knyvet. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Constantine de Clifton, 
2nd Baron Clifton (by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Robert, Lord Scales), 
by whom he ultimately acquired Buckenham Castle, in Norfolk. He became 
sheriff for the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1391. A fine of the manor 
was levied in 1441 between William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, Sir Thomas 
Tudenham, John Heyton, and Thomas Shuldeham, against Sir John Knyvet, 
senior, and John Knyvet, junior, and Alice his wife.'' Sir John Knyvet, 
senior, died in 1441, when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John 
Knyvet, who married Alice, daughter and heir of WiUiam Lynnes.^ He 
died in 1489-90, and his inquisition p.m. states that Richard Brenamon 
gave the manor to John Knyvet and Alice his wife, who survived, with 
remainder to his heirs, that he died 5 Hen. VII., when the reversion 
descended to Sir William Knyvet, aged 50, as son and heir. It is also 
stated that the manor was worth £20, held of the King as of the Duchy of 
Lancaster, by fealty and id. rent. On Sir WiUiam Kny vet's death the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Edmund, who married Eleanor, daughter of 
Sir William and sister of Sir James Tyrell, Knt., of Gipping, and was killed 
in a fight at sea in the time of Hen. VIII., when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Thomas Knyvet, Master of the Horse and Standard Bearer 
to Hen. VIII. He married Muriel, daughter of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, 
and on his death the manor devolved on his son and heir, Sir Edmund 
Knyvet, who married Joan, daughter of Sir John Shelton, and dying the 
manor vested in his son and heir, Sir Thomas Knyvet, of Buckenham Castle.* 

I Haxl. 47 F. 15. ^Mon. at Buckenham. 

*Feet of Fines, 19 Hen. VI. 24. "Inq. 5 Hen. VH. 624. 



28o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir William was attainted i Rich. III., but afterwards restored. He 
married Alice, daughter of John, brother of Reginald, Lord Grey of Ruthyn, 
and 2ndly Joan, daughter of Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, 
and widow of William, Viscount Beaumont. In the 5th Report of the 
Historical Commissioners' an agreement in 1564 is mentioned between this 
Sir Thomas Knyvet, described as lord of the Manor of Mendlesham, of the 
one part, and the tenants of the said manor of the other part, for euiding 
controversy respecting the customs of the manor, and defining the rights 
of the lord and the liabilities of tenants. It is dated Mock-Mundaye 6th 
of Elizabeth. Sir Thomas Knyvet's will is dated 22nd Sept. 1569. He died 
the same year, having devised his Manor of Mendlesham to his next heir. 
By his will he appears also to have held the advowson of the vicarage. 

The next heir was the testator's son. Sir Thomas Knyvet, by Catharine, 
daughter of the Earl of Derby. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of 
the time of Queen Elizabeth will be found a suit between Richard Garnyshe 
and Sir Thomas Knyvet, and another, touching copyholds of this manor,^ 
and another, also touching copyholds of the manor, between William Hunte 
and Sir Thomas Knyvet.^ Sir Thomas Knyvet married Catharine, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Lovel, of East Herling,and died in 1594, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Philip Knyvet, created a Bart. 22nd 
May, 1611. He married Katherine, daughter and heir of Charles Ford, of 
Butley Abbey, and sold most of the Suffolk property of the Knyvets. 

This manor was acquired by John Eldred, of the city of London, and 
he sold it to Thomas Goodwyn, of Little Stonham,, and conveyed the 
property to him by indenture dated 31st January, 1615, enrolled in the 
High Court of Chancery 3rd Oct. following. 

In 1616 we find an agreement referred to in the 5th Report of the 
Historical Commissioners* made between this Thomas Goodwyn, described 
as lord of the Manor of Mendlesham, of the one part, and the tenants of the 
said manor of the other part, for settling controversies respecting the customs 
of the manor, and fixing the rights and liabilities of the lord and his 
tenants. 

The indenture recites the earlier agreement between Sir Thomas Knyvet 
and the tenants, and states that after purchasing the manor of Sir Thomas, 
John Eldred, Esquire (from whom Thomas Goodwyn bought the manor), 
endeavoured to set aside the arrangement made between Sir Thomas and 
the tenants. The Report referred to also mentions an inspeximus of the enrol- 
ment of the above agreement, and of proceedings m the Court of Chancery, 
together with the final decree of the court, giving effect to the agreement. 
The great seal of this charter is perfect. The same Report also mentions 
an inspeximus of the enrolment of the same indenture, with record of 
proceedings and decree in the court of the Duchy of Lancaster. 

On Sir Thomas Goodwyn' s death the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Ambrose Goodwyn, of Little Stonham, and a mortgage was made by 
him 5th Oct. 1642, to Dame Jane Bacon, relict of Sir Nathaniel Bacon, of 
Culford, K.B., for securing a sum of £640. The mortgage was made by 
demise for a thousand years at a pepercorn rent. Ambrose Goodwin's 
wife was named Mary. The manor subsequently vested in Sir Edmund 
Duke, Bart., from whom it passed by his will to his nephew, Edmund 
Tyrell, of Gipping, who held in 1740. From Edmund Tyrell, the manor 

' p. 595- ^Ih. B. xlvi. 43. 

'^C.P. ser. ii, B. lxxvii.^19. *p. 595. 



MENDLESHAM. 281 

passed in the same line of devolution as the Manor of Gipping Hall, in Stow 
Hundred, to Charles Alexander Browne, R.N., and Walter WiUiam Browne, 
R.N., who sold the same to Messrs. Beaumont and Son, the present lords. 

As to customs ot the manor, and rolls, see 5th Report Hist. Com. 
295, K.R. 6 App. ii. p. 88. Also as to the manor house of Mendlesham 
and Proceedings in Court see 5th Rep. Hist. Com. 295, 296. Extracts from 
Court Rolls of the manor will be found amongst the Additional Charters in 
the British Museum for 1530-31,' for 1539," for 1548,^ and for 1629.'* A 
Roll of Proceedings in the Manor Court of Mendlesham 15 Eliz. 
before the homage and jury, John Heigham being a special steward, to 
determine the custom with the verdict of the jury, was exhibited at a meet- 
ing of the Suffolk Institute, 4th July, 1855.^ 

Amongst the Parish Papers of Mendlesham are 15 copies (on parch- 
ment) of proceedings in the court of the manor of Mendlesham, all of them 
recording the admission of customary tenants of the manor.* 

Arms of Botetourt : Ermine ; a saltier engrailed. Gules (Guillim 
says. Or ; a saltier engrailed, Sable). Of Knyvet : Arg. a bend within 
a bordure engrailed, Sa. 

Manor of Winchesters. 

In 1285 Roger de Winchester appears to have had land here, and a little 
later Thomas Wynchestre. 

In 1317 we find on the Patent Rolls an exemption for life to John de 
Wyncestre, of Mendlesham, from being put on juries, assizes, or recogni- 
tions, and from being sheriff, coroner, bailiff, Scc.,^ but it does not appear 
that he was ever lord. 

In the reign of Edw. III. Sir John Gardevile, Knt., held the manor, and 
later Clarice Sexte5m, of Stoke by Ipswich, widow, cousin and heir of 
John Lynne (or Zymme), chaplain. 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings will be found an action 
relating to the manor with lands in Mendlesham, Stonham Parva, and 
Wetheringsett, by this Clarice Sexteyn, described as of Stoke by Ipswich, 
widow, against Richard Poley.^ Amongst the Additional Charters in the 
British Museum is a release in 1456 by Sir Philip Wentworth, Henry Want- 
worth, Gilbert Debenham, and others, to William Tyrell, John Clopton, 
and others, of this manor.^ The deed is dated 19th Jan. 34 Hen. VI., and 
has eight seals. 

In 1458 a lease for 21 years was made of the manor by John, Duke of 
Norfolk, Thomas, Bishop of Ely, Richard, Earl of Warwick, Ralph, Lord 
Cromwell, and others, to John Knyvet, Thomas Colke, William Brandon, 
and others; and the following year Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury, 
John, Duke of Norfolk, Richard, Earl of Warwick, Ralph, Lord Cromwell, 
and others, conveyed to George Lampet and John Senyele ; and the following 
year Sir John Wentworth, Henry Wentworth, Gilbert Debenham, John 
Bernard, Nicholas Parker, Thomas Devyle, William Meyth, and Simon 
Poley, released to WiUiam Tyrell, senior, John Clopton, Robert Whetyng- 
ham, Nicholas Husy, Thomas Cornwaleys, and Thomas Brun. In the 

'Add. Ch. 10473. *5th Rep. Hist. Com. p. 596. 

"Add. Ch. 10471. ='Pat. Rolls, il Edw. II. pt. ii. 32. 

3 Add. Ch. 19371, 19404. 8E.C.P., 8 Hen. IV.— 35 Hen. VI. Bundle 

4 Add. Ch. 10487. 17.342- 

5 S.I. ii. 209. 9 Add. Ch. 10469. 

MI 



282 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

reign of Hen. VITI. the manor was vested in Richard Garneys, 2nd son of 
Thomas Garneys, of Kenton Hall. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
William Topesfield, and of Eleanor his wife, who was daughter and heir of 
Richard Clinche, of Gishngham. Richard Garneys died seised of the manor 
14th May, 15 15, when it passed to his son and heir, John Garneys.' He 
married Ursula, daughter of Thomas Berney, of Reedham, in Norfolk, and 
purchased the Manor of Moringthorp and Boyland Hall in that county, and 
about the year 1534 removed from Mendlesham. On his death this manor 
went to his son and heir, Richard Garneys, of Boyland and Mendlesham, 
and he in 1571 built Boyland Hall, where he continued to reside. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of this period is an action touching 
the manor between Richard " Garners " and Wilham Dunkon." Richard 
Garneys died without issue in 1586, leaving a widow Margaret, and John 
Downes and Thomas Shurland, his cousins and heirs ; and in 1590 a fine 
was levied of the manor by the widow Margaret Garneys against the said 
John Downes.^ 

In 1602 we find the manor vested in John Seaman, and this year a fine 
of it was levied against him by W. Battes and others.* 

Cordeboef's Manor or Free Tent, Corbornes. 

This manor in the time of King John was vested in John de Cordeboef. 
He held by the serjeanty of serving the King of England on the Marches 
for 40 days, with a cross bowman and two horses at his own cost. On the 
death of John de Cordeboef the manor descended to his son and heir, 
Hubert de Cordeboef. 

The Red Book of the Exchequer calls him Hubert Cornu Bovis, and 
states that he held his land by the service of Arblaster.^ The Testa de 
Nevill adds the information that he had in Mendlesham a carucate under 
the gift of William I. of the value of cs.* The next lord was Hubert's 
son and heir. Sir John de Cordeboef, who in 1247 compounded with the 
King in respect of the serjeanty by paying to the Crown 30s. yearly. On 
Sir John de Cordeboef's death in 1250,'' the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Hubert de Cordeboef, from whom it went to Thomas de Cordeboef, 
He died in 1280 seised of one messuage, 60 acres of land, 10 acres of wood, 
and 9 acres of pasture, with the appurtenances in this parish, which he held 
of the King in chief, " by the service of one archer to serve our lord the King 
for forty days at the Castle of Ipswich."^ He was succeeded by his son, 
John de Cordeboef, who died in 1300,^ when the manor passed to John 
"Quendeboef," who died in 1319. Page says : " Nicholas Cordeboef died 
seised, and about 1285, Thomas, his son and heir, deceased also ; when 
the King granted his heir in ward to Roger de Wincheter, who conveyed 
his wardship to John de Melles and Margerey his wife, late widow of Thomas 
de Cordeboef; and Joan, Basil, Roisia, Maud, and Alice were their 
daughters and heiresses. Though this branch centered in these daughters, 
yet another male branch, at this parish, remained till the death of John 
Cordeboef, in 1319, where Agnes, wife of William de Roydon, was his sister 
and heir." Page unfortunately omits to tell us who Nicholas de Cordeboef 
was. 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 114. ^T. de N. 296, 300. 

'C.P. ser. ii. B. Ixxvii. 15. ''I.P.M., 34 Hen. III., File 10 (12). 

3 Fine, Mich. 32-33 Eliz. sj pji _ g ^^j^ j jg 

♦Fine, Easter, 44 Eliz. ^I.P.M., 28 Edw. I. 25. 

'I2I0-I2, 132 Bd. 



MENDLESHAM. 



283 



Davy informs us that Agnes, who married WiUiam de Roydon, was 
the sister of John de Cordeboef who died in 1300. We find in 1382 that 
Robert de Bernham died seised of a tenement called Cordebef, in Mendles- 
ham, held as of Norwich Castle.' 

Davy suggests that in the time of Hen. VII. Richard Garneys may have 
had the manor, as also John, his son, and subsequently Richard Garneys. 

In 1566 the manor was apparently in William Atwood, for he had licence 
this year to alien " Cutts and Corboes," to John Shurland. He by will 
devised the manor to his executors for a term, and then to his son, John 
Shurland, who died without issue in 1584. 

In 1609 the manor was vested in Sir Stephen Soame. 

Manor of Busshes or BuceSj al. Busses. 

In 1303 this was the lordship of Simon Busshe, or Busch, who is mentioned 
on the Patent Rolls in 1314." He had acquired a considerable portion of 
the estate with Richard Busch from John de Wynchestre and Margery 
Cordebeof, and the property was hmited to Simon Busch and Richard 
Busch, and the heirs of Richard. 

It seems that Richard died in the lifetime of Simon without male issue, 
and Richard devised the estate to (his nephew) John Busch, at whose death 
the lands were taken into the King's hands. Richard Busch, it seems, left 
a daughter Matilda, who married Richard de Remshales, and John Busch 
made a fine with him and granted that Richard and Matilda should have the 
premises to hold to them, and the heirs of Matilda -^ and the same year we 
find on the Close Rolls an order to the escheator not to intermeddle with a 
messuage, 120 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, and 3 acres of wood in 
Mendlesham, restoring the issues thereof to Matilda, late daughter of John 
(sic) Busche.'' 

The Originalia Rolls throw further light on the subject, for there we 
learn that the King took fealty of Richard de Romshale (Remshale), who 
had married Matilda, daughter of Richard Busch, deceased, for i messuage, 
60 acres of land, 10 of meadow, and 10 of wood in Mendlesham, which they 
held in chief by service of i cross-bowman for 40 days, in the King's wars 
in Wales, and 30s.,' and on the same Rolls is a pardon to Richard de Rem- 
shale for acquiring certain tenements.® 

Though the estate seems to have been limited to Simon Busch and 
Richard Busch, and the heirs of the latter only, Simon appears to have 
acquired in some way an estate of inheritance in a half. 

He died in 1323,^ when he was succeeded by his nephew John, the son 
of Martin Busch, the brother of Simon, and from the OriginaUa Rolls this 
same year we find that the King took homage of " John, son of Martin 
Bussh, brother and heir of Simon Busshe," of all lands, which the said 
Simon held.^ 

John Busshe or Busch died in 1336,' and was succeeded by his brother 
Martin, and he by his son John, who died in 1364."" 

The messuage, 60 acres of land, 10 of meadow, and 10 of wood, passed 
subsequently to Robert de Bernham, and were acquired from him by John 



I I.P.M., 6 Rich. II. 86. 

« Pat. RoUs, 8 Edw. II. pt. i. 25. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 10 E^dw. III. pt. i. 37. 

4 Close Rolls, 10 Edw. III. 39. 

5 O. 10 Edw. III. 4. 
6 /J. 22. 



7 1.P.M., 17 Edw. II. II. 

8 O. 17 Edw. II. 21. 

9I.P.M., 10 Edw. III. 20. 

'080 acres in Mendlesham, as of Castle of 

Norwich, John Busshe. I.P.M., 38 

Edw. III. 7- 



284 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Herlyng and others in fee, for we find a pardon on the Patent Rolls in 
1381 to John Herlyng in respect of the purchase.' 

In the i6th century the manor was vested in the Docker family. 
Myles Docker had acquired from Thomas Gawdy and other? in 1579," 
and amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Elizabeth is a claim 
by descent of Bridget, wife of Henry Edgar, of Dinnington, and Ahce, 
wife of Thomas Keble, daughters and heirs of Myles Docker, against the said 
Anthony Gawdy to the manor.^ Later the manor was vested in Miles 
Edgar,* son and heir of Henry, and passed to his son and heir, Henry Edgar, 
of Eye. He married Dorothy, daughter of Robert Richmond, of Heden- 
ham, CO. Norfolk, and by his will, dated 1705, gave the manor to Mary, his 
daughter, wife of Charles Gibson, clerk, for life, with remainder in fee to 
Edgar Gibson, her son, and testator's godson. On Mary's death the manor 
went to her son and heir, Edgar Gibson. The manor, or reputed manor, with 
163 acres, was offered for sale by private contract m 1834 and 1835.' 

Manor of Flede Hall or Fledd's Hall (? or Walkames). 

Possibly this is the same manor as Fleed or Flude Hall, in Stonham, 
in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. The first family we meet with holding 
this lordship is the family of Sentlowe, and in 1448 we find amongst the 
Early Chancery Proceedings a suit by one Sentlowe, Esq., against Edmund 
Sentlowe, petitioner's brother, as to the ma nor. ^ 

There is the difficulty that Robert Crane is said to have died seised 
of the manor 26th Oct. 1447. Whether this manor is meant is not clear, 
but it is certain Robert's brother and heir, John Crane, died seised i6th 
August, 1504,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Crane, on 
whose death in 1550 it passed to his son and heir, Robert, who, dying in 
1591, it went to his son and heir, Henry Crane, of Chilton.'' 

The following is the provision in the will of Robert Crane, 7th Oct. 
1590, as to this manor : "And Whereas I saied Robert Crane, by Indenture 
bearinge date the last daye of December, in the one and thirtithe Yere of 
the Raigne of o*" soueraigne Ladie Ehzabethe, the quene's Mate that nowe ys, 
made betwene me the saied Robert Crane of the one partie, and the saied 
Robert Reue of the other partie, by me sealed and as my deede Delyuered 
before the approuinge and publishinge of this my last will and testament, 
for the considerac'on in the same Indenture expressed, haue demysed, 
graunted, and to ffearme letten to the saied Robert Reve all those my 
manners of ffledhall and waltam hall, with th' appurtenances and all the 
freehoulde and Charter landes, tenements, meadowes, pastures, feedinges, 
woodes, vnderwoodes, rentes, suites, services, and hereditaments, with 
theire appurtenances whatsoeuer, thereunto belonginge, or otherwise 
accepted, reputed, Demised, letten, or taken as parte, p'cell, or member 
thereof, in the saied Countie of Suffolke, and all other the freehould and 
charter Landes, tenements, and heredytaments of me the saied Robert Crane, 
with the appurtenances whatsoeuer, situat, lyinge, and beinge in little 
Stonham and Mendlesham, in the saied county of Suff. being an other 
part of the possessions of me the saied Robert Crane, to haue and to houlde 
the saied Manners of ffiedhall and waltam hall, and all and singuler other 
the saied Demised premises, with their and euery of theire appurtenances, 

1 Pat. Rolls, 5 Rich. II. pt. ii. 10. ^ Ipswich Journal, 28th June, 1834, and 

2 Fine, Hil. 21 Eliz. 6th June, 1835. 

sC.P. i. 281. 6E.C.P., 27 Hen. VI. Bundle 16, 202. 

*See Capel Manor, in Trimley, in Carlford 'I.P.M., 20 Hen. VII. 

Hundred. ^Ste Chilton Manor, in Babergh Hundred. 



MENDLESHAM. 285 

to the saied Robert Reue, his executors, Administrators, and assignes, 
from and after the end, expirac'on, surrender, fforfeiture, or other Deter- 
minac'on of one Lease or graunte heretofore made by me the saied Robert 
Crane, of the saied Demised premises to John Warberton, gent, untill the 
full end and tearme, and by the whole tearme and space of twentie and one 
yeres from thenceforth next and ymediatlye foUowinge, and fuUie to be 
compleate and ended as by the saied Indent's at Large, yt dothe and maye 
appeare My minde and desire ys that I do hereby require that all and euery 
person and persons which haue or shall haue any Interest of and in the 
saied demised premises, by or from me the saied Robert Crane, shall and 
will ralifie, approue, and confirme the sayed graunte and tearme to the 
saied Robert Reve, his exequutors. Administrators, and assignes, and euery 
of them, peaceablie and quietlye, to haue, houlde, and enioye all and singuler 
the saied Demised premises with the appurtenances, and the yssues and 
profittes of them and euery of them, according to the purporte and true 
meaninge of the saied Indenture. And I do hereby demise, lymitt, and 
declare, and my will and meaninge ys that after the saied tearme of twentie 
and one Yeres, entered or Determyned, and after the decease of the sayed 
Robert Crane, then the Reuerc'on or Remayndr of the freehould of all and 
singuler the Demised premises, together with the Yerelie Rente in and by the 
saied Lease reserued, shalbe to the only vse and behoof e of the saied Catherine 
and of her assignes, for and duringe the tearme of her naturall life. And yf 
it shall fortune the saied Catherine to Dye during the minoritie of the saied 
Robert, her Sonne, the sayed Robert Reve shall or maye Reteyne and kepe 
in his handes so muche of the sayed yerely Rent, reserved in and vppon the 
saied Demise to hym made as aforesaied, as shall accrue after the Decease 
of the saied Catherine during and vntill th'endor determynac'onof the saied 
Demise (yf the saied Robert Reve shall so long liue). And my Will and 
mynde ys, and I do hereby Demise, ordeyne, and appoynte that yf both the 
saied Catherine and Robert Reue shall departe this naturall life before the 
end or expirac'on of the foresaied Lease made to the saied Robert Reue, 
Then such person or persons as then shalbe righte heire to the saied Robert 
Reue shall haue and take to his or theire propper vse so muche of the saied 
yerehe rent as after the decease of the saied Catherine and Robert Reue 
shall growe due duringe the residue of the minoritie of the saied Robert 
Crane, sonne of the saied Catherine. And my will and mynde ys that 
the saied Catherine, during her naturall life, at her propper costs and 
chardges, to the best of her skill and lawfuU power, shall Defende, awnswere, 
and withstand all such sewtes, Acc'os, quarrells, titles, trespasses, and all 
other trebles whatsoeuer, shall or maye at any tyme Duringe her estate in 
the premises, be attempted, commenced, or broughte against her the saied 
Catherine, or any her ffarmer or ffarmers, for vppon or against any partie 
of the same. And shall allso after that she shall haue and enioye the actuall 
possession and mayntenance of the premises to her before Lymited, duringe 
her estate in the same premises well and sufhcientlye uphould, maynteyne, 
and repayre at her proper costes and chardges, all the houses, buildinges^ 
pales, Rayles, gates, and quicksetts, which at the tyme of her comming 
to the possession of the premises so to her before Lymited, shalbe standinge 
or being vppon any parte of the same, at all tymes and from tyme to tyme 
during her estate therein, as neede shall require. And in the end of her saied 
estate shall so leaue and Yealde vp the same, and shall allso paye all manner 
of outrents goyng out of the same premises, or any parte theirof, duringe 
her saied actuall possession and mannoraunce of the same premises or any 
parte thereof." 




286 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

OAKLEY. 

jHE manor held in this place in the time of the Domesday 
Survey is enumerated therein together with Brome^ it being 
composed of 2 carucates^ one in Brome and the other in 
Oakley. The description and particulars have been already 
given under Brome. Another estate in Oakley was that 
of Robert Malet, and held of him by William Gulafra. It 
consisted of 30 acres and 2 freemen, with half an acre, half a 
ploughteam, i^ acres of meadow, and a mill, valued at los. It had formerly 
bee'n held by Godman, a freeman under Edric's commendation.' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmund's were three estates 
here. The first had formerly been held by a freeman, Gooding the steward, 
under commendation to the abbot, having neither the power to sell nor give 
his estate. It consisted of 90 acres of land, 5 bordars, i ploughteam 
in demesne and half belonging to the men, wood sufficient to support five 
hogs, 2 acres of meadow, a mill, a rouncy, 2 beasts, and 5 sheep, valued at 
20s. Under him were 10 freemen holding 30 acres, i|- ploughteams, and 2 
acres of meadow, valued at los., the soc, sac, and commendation being 
held by the abbot ; also two (third) parts of a church, with 12 acres, 
valued at idd." The second had formerly been held by Leuseda, a free- 
woman under Gotselin, who could neither sell nor give the same away. It 
consisted of 30 acres, 3 bordars, half a ploughteam, wood sufficient 
for the support of 4 hogs, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 321^. Moreover 
the abbot had here and in Stuston 15 freemen under soc and commenda- 
tion, with a carucate and 10 acres of land, 11 bordars, 3 ploughteams, 
wood to support 2 hogs, and 6 acres of meadow. Also a church with 24 
acres, valued at 4s., and with half an acre of meadow, always valued at 20S.^ 
The last holding mentioned in this place belonged to the fee of the Bishop 
of Thetford, and consisted of 14 acres, half a ploughteam, and half an acre 
of meadow, valued at 2s. It had formerly been held by Algar, a freeman 
by commendation to the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and was held at the time 
of the Survey by Drogo over him from the bishop.* 

Manor of Oakley or Hoo Hall, in Oakley. 

This was the estate of Goda, a freewoman under the protection of 
Stigand the Archbishop in Saxon times, and of Roger Bigot at the time 
of the Survey. 

In the reign of King Edw. I. the lordship was held by Goscelin de 
Lodne, from whom it passed to his fourth daughter and coheir Emma, 
married to Ralph de Hoo. They were succeeded by their son and heir, 
Reyner de Hoo, and he by his son and heir, WiUiam de Hoo, and he by his 
son and heir, John, who held in 1316. In 1347 a fine was levied of the manor 
by John de Hoo, of Laxfield, and Katherine his wife, against Roger de 
Swathyngg, parson of Northcreik church, and Thomas de S . . .^ 
(Robert, son of John de Hoo, of Laxfield, app. clam.) 

Nearly a hundred years later the manor was held by Robert Bucton, 
who died 17th Dec. 1408, and was buried in the chancel of the church of 
Oakley, when the manor passed to his daughter Philippa, married to Sir 
John Cornwallis, son and heir of Thomas CornwaUis. He died in 1436, 

'Dom. ii. 310. ''Dom. ii. 380. 

" Dom. ii. 3706. 5 Fget ^f Fines, 21 Edw. III. 3. 

^Dojn. ii. 3706. 



OAKLEY. 287 

from which time the manor passed in the same course as the Manors of 
Lings Hall and Brome Hall, in Brome, in this Hundred/ and is now vested in 
Lady Bateman. 

Arms of Bucton : Arg. 3 bars gemelles Sable, on a Canton of the last, 
a crescent of the field. 

Manor of Beauchamps in Oakley (?) Woodhall. 

This was the lordship of Arnold de Charnels in the time of King John, 
and in 1234 was vested in John de Charnels. 

In the time of Edw. I. it was vested like the main lordship in Goscelin 
de Lodne, and passed to his eldest daughter and coheir, Alice, married to 
Wilham, son of Ralph de Beauchamp, from whom this manor derived its 
name. 

There is notice on the Patent Rolls in 1276 of an action between Matilda 
de Beauchamp, Aleanora, and Etheldreda, daughters of the aforesaid 
Matilda, against John de Hoo, touching a tenement in Oakley.^ 

In 1299 the manor was vested in John de Beauchamp de Fifelude, and 
in 1319 in Nicholas de Beaufoe. There appears to have been some connec- 
tion between this manor and that of " Broomdavillers known as Beauchamp," 
granted in the time of Rich. II. by Sir John Heveningham to Bartholomew 
Bacon and Joan his wife and his heirs. Bartholomew died in the lifetime 
of Joan without heirs of his body, whereupon the reversion descended 
after Joan's death to Isabel, widow of Sir Oliver Calthorp, Bartholomew's 
sister and heir. Isabel in Joan's lifetime granted the reversion to feoffees.^ 

In 1519 the manor is said to have been vested in Sir John Cornwallis, 
and has since passed in the same course as the main manor. 

Sir Phihp Calthorp, son of Sir Philip, who died in 1535, seems to have 
died seised of the manor of " Okeley, in Suffolk." Sir Philip, the son, died 
7th April, 1549, leaving Elizabeth Parker, widow, and Henry Parker, her 
son and heir.* 



'Refer also to the Manor of Culford, in ^Pat. Rolls, 14 Hen. VI. pt. i. 14. 

Blackbourn Hundred. *I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 148. 

"Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 17. 




288 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

OCCOLD. 

IN Saxon times there were two manors in this place. One 
was held by a freeman, and consisted of 33 acres, i plough- 
team, and 2 bordars, and a freeman held i acre and wood 
sufficient to support 4 hogs. The value was formerly 
los., but had increased to 15s. at the time of the Survey, 
when the manor belonged to Earl Ralph, being kept in 
hand for the King by Goodrich the steward. 

The manor rendered $s. as part of the above valuation.' 

The other manor was held by Goodmund from Aluric, his brother, 
the Abbot of Ely, and consisted of a carucate of land and 40 acres, 5 villeins, 
8 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, 
3 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 40 hogs, also a church with 
8 acres of land and half a ploughteam. Of live stock there were i 
rouncy, 8 beasts, 60 hogs, 40 sheep, and 21 goats. 

The details of the manor were different at the time of the Survey, 
when it was held of Hugh de Montfort by Roger de Candos. Then 
there were apparently no serfs, the ploughteams in demesne were reduced 
to I, and those belonging to the men to i|-, the hogs had come down as low 
as 13, and the sheep to 28. 

The value originally was 60s., which later increased to £4, and at the 
time of the Survey to loos. 

To this manor were added 8 freemen with 40 acres, and 2 ploughteams 
(reduced to i J at the time of the Survey), and a church with 12 acres, the free- 
men being valued at los. The soc over the whole belonged to Goodmund. 
The manor was 10 quarentenes long and 8 broad, and paid in a gelt gi." 
Under the heading in the Survey " Concerning the Claims in dispute between 
the Bishop of Bayeux and Robert Malet's mother," were two entries of 
holdings in this place. The first was that of Brictere, a freeman under 
Stigand, and consisted of 20 acres, and i bordar, valued at 401;^. This land 
Stigand gave to Robert Malet's mother, who later held it of the Queen. 
" Now it is . . , " Thus the Survey. 

The second was that of Cheric, a freeman half under sub-commendation 
to the predecessor of Robert Malet and half under commendation to Sachs, 
the predecessor of Ralph, the little piper. It consisted of 20 acres, 2 bordars, 
and I ploughteam valued at 40^.^ Amongst the estates of Robert Malet 
was one consisting of 46 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to ij at the time of 
the Survey), wood to support 6 hogs, and an acre of meadow, valued at los. 
It was held formerly by 5 freemen under commendation to Edric, and in 
his soc — Siward, Raven, Pinstan, Goodrich, Lefsi, and Alveva. Robert 
Malet's mother held it over them. Another estate of Robert Malet was 50 
acres, formerly held by 7 freemen under commendation to Ulveva. There 
belonged to this estate 2 ploughteams (reduced to i|- at the time of the 
Survey), and i acre of meadow, valued at 9s., the soc belonging to the King 
and Earl.* 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds were 3 acres in 
demesne in this place. ^ Ralph de Limesi also held here one freeman under 
commendation having 8 acres, valued at i6ff. It was held by Ralph in 
demesne, and the King and the Earl had the soc. He also held 2 acres. 

'Dom. ii. 2855. "00111.11,320,323. 

*Dom. ii. 410&. sDom. ii. 371. 

3 Dom. ii. 450. 



OCCOLD. 289 

valued at ^d., which had formerly been held by a freeman under commenda- 
tion to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The King and the Earl also had the 
soc of this.' 

Manor of Occold or Occold Hall. 

This manor seems to have been given to the Prior of Ely in Saxon 
times, but was usurped by Hugh de Montfort in the time of the Conqueror, 
and Roger de Candos held it of him. It was one of the 18 lordships, which 
were granted to William, Earl Warren and Surrey, in the county of Suffolk. 
He gave it to the monastery of Eye, and William, his grandson, confirmed 
it to them in King Stephen's reign. It was certainly with the priory in the 
time of Edw. II., for the Ministers' Accounts of the manor as held by the 
priory for 18 Edw. II. are preserved in the Public Record Office.^ With 
the priory of Eye the lordship remained until the Dissolution, when it 
vested in the Crown, and was granted by Henry VIII. to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, in 1536. 

Shortly afterwards he exchanged it with the King for other manors,^ 
and it was in 1540 granted to Anne of Cleves for life.* About 1557 the 
manor was granted to Nicholas Cutler, for we find amongst the Harleian 
MSS. in the British Museum the rating of the manor dated 15th Dec. 
1557, previous to, and in view of the grant.' From Nicholas Cutler, who 
died in 1568, the manor passed to Charles Cutler, who in 1570 was called 
upon to show by what title he held.* 

Charles Cutler died in 1581, when the manor passed to his two daughters 
and coheirs, Eleanor and Mary, from whom it went to their uncle, Henry 
Cutler, against whom a fine was levied in 1593 by Johanna Blosse, widow, 
and others.' 

Nicholas Marshall held in the time of James I., and died in 1621, 
when the manor passed to his daughter and heir Mary. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Mileson Edgar,^ who by will dated 
2nd March, 1770, devised it to his 2nd son, John Edgar, who was living in 
1837. The manor was offered for sale, 25th Jan. 1785, with the farm 
called Occold Hall, containing 230 (later stated to be 241) acres. The 
fines received during the previous 30 years had averaged £6. 4s., and the 
quit rents £4. lis. 3^d.^ 

The manor subsequently passed to the Rev. Benedict Chapman, and 
from 1855 to 1896 was vested in the Rev. Charles Chapman. The manor is 
now vested in the trustees of the last-named gentleman, who was vicar of 
Church Coniston, in Lancashire. 

A commission was issued in 1615 touching the temporal and spiritual 
possessions of the manor." 

Arms of Cutler : Azure, three lions' heads erased, Or. Of Edgar : 
See Burwash Manor, Witnesham, in Carlford Hundred. 

Manor of Bedingham or Benningham. 

This lordship belonged to William the Conqueror, and in the time of 
Hen. II. was held by Philip de Columbers, from whom it passed to Mitada, 

»Dom. ii. 429. 'Fine, Mich. 35-36 Eliz. 

« Bundle I127, No. 4. ^ See Manor of Burwash, Witnesham, in 

3 S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. 1538, ii. I182 (iSa). Carlford Hundred. 

♦ S.P. 1540-I, p. 1500. ^Ipswich Journal, 28th May, 1785. 

'Harl. 607. "Memoranda, 13 Jac. I. Trin. Rec. Rot. 

^Memoranda Rolls, 12 Eliz. Trin. Rec. 279. 
Rot. 33. 

ni 



290 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his widow, daughter and heir of Walter de Candos, of Stowey, and grand- 
daughter of Robert de Candos.' 

In 1232 Philip, son and heir of Philip de Columbers, succeeded, and 
died in 1261, when the manor passed to Sir Philip de Columbers, his son 
and heir. 

The Testa de Nevill informs us that he held half a knight's fee here of 
the Honor of Haughley.^ 

He enfeoffed in 1275 the abbot and convent of St. John's, Colchester, 
in which abbey the lordship remained until the dissolution of the religious 
houses, when it passed to the Crown. 

In 1545 the manor was granted by the Crown to John Kene, who had 
licence to alien to Thomas Cornwallis and John Smart in 1550. This was 
a licence, no doubt, obtained with the object of effecting a settlement, 
and in 1564 John Kene and his wife sold to George Chything,^ and George 
Chything and his wife Judith had in 1574 licence to alien the manor to 
Charles Cutler, of Eye, who this year levied a fine against George Chitting, 
under which it passed." Charles Cutler died in 1581, when the manor 
passed to Eleanor and Mary, his daughters and coheirs, and shortly after- 
wards was vested in Henry Cutler, their uncle, who had licence in 1586 to 
alien two parts of the manor to William Appleton and John Appleton. 
Possibly the remaining third was vested in Susan Cutler and others for they 
had licence to alien in 1601 to John Dusset, who duly levied a fine in 1602, 
under which the manor passed to him.^ 

John Bade, Mary Brooke, widow, Mary Warner, widow, and Mary 
Wately, widow, had licence to alien the manor in 1691 to William Stebbing 
and Henry Stebbing. By indenture dated 15th June, 1700, and made 
between Lisle Hackett, of MoxhuU, co. Warwick, of the one part, and John 
Hackett, of Trinity College, Cambridge, clerk, youngest son of Sir Andrew 
Hackett, of MoxhuU, Knt., and brother of the said Lisle Hackett, this manor 
was released. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in the Malyn family, and in 1855'in Miss 
Howman, and is now in Mrs. Burrows. 



There appears to be also a rectory manor, which in 1829 was stated 
to be vested in the Rev. John Ward. 



a 



'See Banks's BaroniaAnglicaConcentrata, ^Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 
vol. i. 162. 4 Fine, Hil. 15 Eliz. 

T. de N. 290. 5 Fine, Hil, 44 Eliz. 




PALGRAVE. 291 

PALGRAVE. 

I HERE was one manor in this place in Saxon times belonging 
to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of 4 carucates 
of land, 9 villeins, 17 bordars, 3 serfs (reduced to 1 at the 
time of the Survey), i ploughteam in demesne, and 4 
belonging to the men, and 6 acres of meadow. Also two 
churches with 30 acres and half a ploughteam. Of live 
stock there were 2 rouncies, 12 beasts, 6 hogs, and 8 sheep, 
valued at £6, and at the time of the Survey at £8. The soc belonged to 
the abbot. In the same township were 2 carucates of land less 12 acres, 
8 ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 40s., the soc and commen- 
dation being the abbot's. It had formerly been held by 29 freemen. It 
was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt I2«i.' 

Manor of Palgrave. 

The third part of this lordship was granted by Athulf (Adulf or Eadulf), 
Bishop of Elmham, to the abbot and monks of St. Edmunds, and the residue 
thereof was given by Earl Wolfstan and others in 962 to the abbey. Peter 
de Burgate held the lordship probably under the abbot. The manor 
remained with the abbey until the dissolution of the reUgious houses, when 
it passed to the Crown, and was granted in 1554 to Sir Thomas Comwallis 
and Anne his wife. The grant was in tail male,* and the lordship in 1604 
passed to their son and heir. Sir Wilham Cornwalhs, who died in 1613, 
and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Frederick Comwallis, created 
Lord Comwallis, from whom the manor has descended in the same course 
as the manor of Brome Hall, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Lady 
Bateman, of Brome Hall. 

Compotus of the manor 1348-49 will be found amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum,^ and an extent and customary of the lands 
of the monastery of St. Edmunds, in Palgrave, in 1357 will be found amongst 
the Additional MSS. in the British Museum.* 

Manor of Fenhouse. 

This manor was also given by Earl Wolfstan to the abbey of St. 
Edmunds in 962, and remained with that house until the Dissolution, when 
it vested in the Crown. 

In 1762 we find the manor in Charles, 2nd Earl Cornwallis, created 
Marquis, and on his death in 1805 it passed to his son and heir, Charles, 
2nd Marquis, from which time it has passed in the same course as the 
main Manor of Palgrave. 



' Dojn. ii. 361. » Add. Ch. 32934- 

» I and 2 Ph. and M. 8 Rep. Hist. Com. ■» Add. 14849. 
277. 



292 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




REDGRAVE. 

|HERE was one manor here in the time of the Confessor, held 
by the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of 6 carucates 
of land, 10 villeins, 19 bordars, 8 serfs (reduced to 6 at 
the time of the Survey), 4 ploughteams in demesne and 
6 belonging to the men, 8 acres of meadow, and wood suffi- 
cient to support 120 hogs. Also a church with 30 acres 
of free land and half a ploughteam. Of live stock there 
were 2 rouncies, 12 beasts, 30 hogs, 60 sheep, and 30 goats, the value of the 
whole being £10. In the same township were 80 acres under the soc and 
commendation of the abbot, and eight ploughteams, valued at 30s. It was 
a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 8d. 

It was formerly held by twenty-four freemen, and at the time of the 
Survey the Abbot of St.' Edmunds held over them in demesne.' 

Manor of Redgrave. 

This lordship with the patronage of the rectory was anciently vested 
in the abbot and monastery of St. Edmunds by the grant of Ulfketel, 
Earl of the East Angles, who fell in 1016 at the battle of Assendun, in Essex, 
with Canute the Dane. In 1211 Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, erected 
a mansion here which became the occasional residence of the future prelates 
of that house. The abbey had a grant of a fair and market here in 1227.* 
Rentals, &c., of the manor extracted from the registers of Abbot Thomas 
[de Totingtone] and John Norwolde [1279-1312], 17 Edw. I. [1288], and 
12 Hen. VI. [1433], will be found amongst the MSS. in the British 
Museum,^ as will also be found an extent and customary of the lands of 
the abbey in Redgrave, in 1357." Page says that after the Dissolution the 
manor was granted by Hen. VIII., in the last year of his reign, to Sir Thomas 
D'Arcy, Knt., from whom it passed to the Bacon family. This does not 
seem to be correct. The manor was granted directly from the Crown in 
1544 to Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and the 
same year we find livery of Redgrave Park given in exchange by Sir Nicholas 
Bacon to the King.^ 

Particulars for this grant in exchange are still in existence, and may be 
seen in the Public Record Office.* A book of receipts of money for tithes 
due from this and Wortham Manor, belonging to Sir Nicholas Bacon, 
and others to Sir Edmund Bacon, 1592-1632, will be found mentioned in 
the 13th Rep. of the Hist. Com. pt. iv. p. 420. From this time the manor 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackbourn 
Hundred, and is now vested in George Holt Wilson.' By letters patent, 
dated 28th July, 3rd of Queen Elizabeth, licence was granted to 
Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt., Lord Keeper, to erect a grammar school in 
Redgrave, for instructing boys living there and in the neighbourhood in 
grammar, and by indenture, dated the 19th of the same reign. Sir N. Bacon 



»Dom. ii. 3606. 

« Chart. Rolls, 11 Hen. III. pt. i. 11 ; 

Close Rolls, ir Hen. HI. 13. 
3 Add. 14850. 
■•Add. 14849. 

536 Hen. Vni. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 162. 
636 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 162. 
■^For descent of the Wilson fainily, see 
Burke L.G. In 1734 the bodies of 



the Bacons buried in the chancel 
of AU Saints' Church, in Garboldis- 
ham (then taken down), were taken 
up, and carried to a vatilt belonging 
to the family in Redgrave Church, 
but the marbles which lay over 
them were removed and placed in the 
vestry of St. John's Church, in 
Garboldisham. 



REDGRAVE. 293 

assured the Manors of Stody and Burningham, in Norfolk, for the payment, 
among other things, of £20 a year for the schoolmaster's salary, and £8 a 
year for the usher's salary, and 40s. to the governors for repairs of the school- 
house and premises. The other possessions of the school consist of a 
dwelling-house in Botesdale, contiguous to and under the same roof 
with a building there used as a chapel ; and a cottage in Botesdale, let by 
the master of the school at ^3. 3s. a year. 

Abstracts of the customs, &c., of this manor, i6th cent, will be found 
amongst the MSS. in the British Museum,' and an exemplification of a 
record as to divers liberties in the manor on the Memoranda Rolls in 1559.* 

Redgrave hall was rebuilt about 1770 by Rowland Holt, who also 
embellished the park, at an expense of £30,000, in a manner so as to render 
it one of the most charming spots in the county. 

The mansion is a spacious, handsome structure built of Woolpit brick, 
and the centre, which projects, is adorned with a pediment supported by 
four Ionic columns. The park is magnificently wooded and is adorned with 
a fine piece of water in front of the house. 

It is said that the custom of gavelkind, under which the lands of the 
father are equally divided at his death amongst his sons, or the land of one 
brother among all his brothers if he have no issue of his own, prevails in 
this manor. 



'Add. 31970. 'X Eliz. Pas, Rec. Rot. 56. 




294 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

REDLINGFIELD. 

IHERE was one manor in this place in Saxon times, held by 
Aluric, a freeman under commendation to Edric. It con- 
sisted of 3 carucates of land, ii villeins, 4 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, wood 
sufficient to support 100 hogs, 6 acres of meadow, and 
a church with 12 acres. Also i rouncy, 12 hogs, 24 sheep, 
and 34 goats, the whole valued at 60s. 
At the time of the Survey this manor was held by William de Archis 
of Robert Malet, and the details were different. The serfs had disappeared, 
the ploughteams in demesne were increased to 3, the wood was sufficient 
for 50 hogs only, and the rouncy was not mentioned. The value then had 
increased to loos. The soc belonged to the King and Earl. The place 
was 7 quarentenes broad and 7 long, and paid in a gelt 6i.' 

Manor of Redlingfield. 

In the year 1120 Manasses de Gratia, Earl of Ghisness (or Guisnes) and 
Emma his wife, daughter of William de Arras, built here, upon a lordship 
belonging to the said William, a Benedictine nunnery, which was endowed 
with portions of the churches of Milton, Walpole, Levington, Redlingfield 
and Rishangles, with the manors of the last two named places, and lands 
and tithes in about 30 other parishes. 

The site of the monastery contained about 2 acres, 120 acres of pasture, 
valued at i6d. per acre, 148 acres of arable land at I2d. per acre, and 18 acres 
of meadow at 25. per acre in the parish, in the occupation of the priors, 
288 acres valued in all at £iy. 5s. The clear value, according to Speed, of 
their gross revenues was ;£8i. 2s. S^d., and " Valor Ecclesiasticus " gives 
the same figures as to yearly value, being less than £200.* From the Quo 
Warranto Rolls we learn that the prioress claimed view of frankpledge and 
assize of bread and beer here.^ 

On the Dissolution the manor devolved on the Crown, and was in 
1536 granted by Hen. VIII. to Edmund Bedingfield. The grant was in 
fee to Sir Edmund Bedingfield and Grace his wife, who was a daughter of 
Henry, Lord Larney, and particulars will be found among the State Papers 
for 1537.* Amongst the ancient deeds of the Treasury of the receipt of the 
Exchequer in the P.R.O. is an appointment by Edmund Bedingfield of 
Richard Hoo, as auditor and steward of all his lands, &c., in Norfolk and 
Suffolk, for Richard's life, with a further grant to him of a yearly rent out 
of this manor.' In 1539 the manor is said to have been vested in Robert 
Bedingfield, clerk, brother of Sir Edmund, and he had licence to alien the 
same to his nephew. Sir Henry Bedingfield. He married Catherine Towns- 
hend, and had licence to alien the manor to his grandson, Thomas Beding- 
field.^ Thomas was the son of Edmund and of Anne his ist wife, daughter 
of Sir Robert Southwell, of Hoxne, which Edmund died in 1585. Thomas 
married 9th Oct. 1588, Frances, daughter and coheir of John Jernegan, of 
Somerleyton, and died 9th April, 1590. 

'Dom. ii. 320. 'Q-W. 724. 

■^ State Papers, 1536, p. 1238; and for the *S.P. i. 795 (39). 

inventory on suppression, State = 29 Hen. VIII. A. 5339. 

Papers, 1536, viii. 95; and for ^See Hesteley Manor, Thorndon, in this 

"Book of Sale" State Papers, Hundred, and Bedingfield, in Hoxne 

1537. i- 510. Hundred. 



REDLINGFIELD. 295 

In 1609 the manor is stated to have been vested in another Thomas 
Bedingfield, possibly the last Thomas's grandson, and later in John 
Bedingfield, who died seised of it before 1626, for this year livery of the 
manor was made to his son, Thomas Bedingfield.' 

In 1636 a fine of the manor was levied by Francis Bedingfield." 

In 1764 the manor was vested in John Willis, by purchase from the 
Bedingfields, and later it was acquired by Wilham Adair, who died in 1787, 
when the manor passed by devise under his will to his cousin Alexander 
Adair, from whom it passed in the same course of descent as the Manor of 
Cratfield Le Ros, in Blything Hundred, and is now vested in Sir Frederick 
Edward Shafto Adair, 4th Bart., of Flixton Hall, Bungay. 



' Chancery 1636, D.K.R. 48 App. p. 556. * 19th May, 12 Chas. I. pt. i. 40. 




296 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

RICKINGHALL-SUPERIOR. 

MONG the lands of Robert Malet was an estate in this 
place, consisting in the time of the Confessor of a carucate 
of land and 30 acres, i villein, 3 bordars, i serf, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne and half a ploughteam belonging to the men, 
wood sufficient to support 8 hogs, and 2 acres of meadow. 
Of live stock there were 4 rouncies, 6 beasts, 20 hogs, 60 
sheep, and 16 goats. The value was 20s., and at the time of 
the Survey had increased to 60s., the soe belonging to the King and Earl. It 
had formerly been held by Britfleda, a freewoman under Edric of Laxfield. 
In the same township were 5|- acres, valued at izd., formerly held by 2 
freemen under commendation to the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and at the time 
of the Survey held by Hubert of Robert Malet.' Among the lands of the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds was an estate here consisting of 80 acres, 3 plough- 
teams, 2 acres of meadow, and the fifth part of a church with 5 acres, the 
whole valued at 20s. It had formerly been held by 14 freemen under the 
soc and commendation of the abbot. ^ The Survey also mentions a holding 
here without land — a freeman, Brictmar, being held by Aubrey de Vere.^ 

Manor of Facon's Hall. 

This was the lordship of the Talbots of Hintlesham in the 13th century, 
and was held by Talbot, son of William Talbot, of Hintlesham,* in 1284. 
We find mention of an action on the Patent Rolls in 1272 between Henry 
Talebet and Hugh Fitz-John and Adam del Hog, touching a tenement in this 
place.' A fine was levied of this manor this year between Talbot, son of 
William Talbot, and John Crowe and Sarah his wife.* Talbot died in 
1285, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Fitz Talbot, 
and on his death in 1305^ passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Fitz Talbot, who died in 1314,^ and there is an order to the Escheator 
on the Close Rolls this year not to meddle with the manor and 
advowson, but to deliver to Joan, late wife of Thomas Fitz Talbot, as 
they were jointly enfeoffed, and the manor was held of John le Burser by 
knight's service.' Thomas's son and heir, Peter Talbot" presented to the 
living in 1361, and died about 1377, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Edmund Talbot. Edmund Talbot, then of Hintlesham, enfeoffed 
Robert de Boxford and others of the manor in 1379." 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum we find articles 
of agreement made 8th Jan. 16 Hen. VII. [1501] in the presence of John 
de Vere, Earl of " Oxenforde," between Sir James Tyrelle, Knt., and Thomas 
Lucas respecting this manor and the advowson and lands in Over 
Rikkingalle, Nether Rikkingale, and Bottisdale." Peter Talbot's widow 
Maud was buried in the church of the Friars Preachers, Thetford. He left 
a son Edmund, who was 30 years of age at his father's death, and a daughter 
Thomasine, married to John Hadley, of London, who held the Manor of 
Hintlesham, but died without male issue, leaving two daughters and 

'Dom. ii. 3096. 8I.P.M., 8 Edw. II. 50. 

«Doin. ii. 361. 'Close Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 28. 

3 Dom. ii. 419. " See Manor of Crow's HaU, Debenham, 

4 See Hintlesham Manor, in Samfcr ' in Thredling Hundred, and Hintle- 

Hundred. sham Manor, in Samford Hundred. 

5 Pat. Rolls, I Edw. I. 10 " I.P.M., 3 Rich. II. 97. 

« Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. I. 20. " Add. Ch. 16570, 16571. 

n.VM., 34 Edw. I. 210. 



RICKTNGHALL-SUPERIOR. 297 

coheirs — J oane, married to Sir William Peche,Knt., father of Sir JohnPeche, 
who subsequently had the Manor of Hintlesham ; and Katherine, married 
1st to William Wingfield, of Bennington, and 2ndly to Sir William Wolfe, 
Knt., but died without issue in 1445-6. 

Of the manor Anthony Yaxley' died seised in 1568-9, when it passed to 
his grandson William, son of Richard, son of Anthony Yaxley. A fine was 
levied in 1583 by William Danyell against this William Yaxley and others,* 
but William Yaxley died seised in 1588, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Henry Yaxley, against whom a fine was in 1597 levied by Thomas 
Bedyngfeild and others.^ 

In 1609 the manor was acquired by Sir Nicholas Bacon, ist Bart., who 
died in 1624, ^^^ from this time the manor has devolved in the same course 
as the Manor of Redgrave, in this Hundred, and Hinderclay, in Blackbourn 
Hundred, and is now vested in George Holt Wilson. 

Facon Hall is now a farmhouse. 

Manor of St. John's or Fitz John's. 

This was in ancient times held by John Fitz John, and in 1428 we find 
that it vested in the Bishop of Chichester, who held what was " late John 
Fitz John's." 

The manor was in 1526 vested in Henry Daunce for he died seised of it 
5th June this year.* His next heir was unknown. A little later the manor 
was vested in Richard Yaxley, who died seised of it 4th May, 1556, when it 
passed to his son and heir, William Yaxley, who levied a fine of the manor 
6th May, 1567.^ It is however asserted that in 1566 the manor was 
acquired by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, from which time it has 
devolved in the same course as the main manor, and is now vested in 
George Holt Wilson, of Redgrave. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is an action by Robert Foster 
against Humphrey and Henry Hewlett, to complete title by purchase 
respecting land held of the manor of Fitz James (? Fitz John's), sold by 
defendant to John Foster, plaintiff's late father,^ and another action being 
a claim under a will by George Foster against Ann Foster, widow, and 
others, to lands held of the manor of Fitz- Johns, " late the estate of John 
Foster, plaintiff's father."^ 

Manor of Crowe's Hall. 

In 1275 this was the lordship of John Crowe and Mary his wife, who 
claimed view of frankpledge and assize of bread and beer here that year.^ 
In 1428 the manor was vested in Thomas Harvey, after which we learn 
nothing respecting it. 



'See Yaxley Manor, in this Hundred. spine, 9 Eliz. 24. 

"Fine, Easter, 25 Eliz. ^C.P. i. 296. 

3 Fine, Mich. 39-40 Eliz. ?C.P. i. 324. 

♦I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 96. =Q.W. 732. 



01 




298 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

RISH ANGLES. 

jHERE was a manor in this place in Saxon times held by 
Ulveva under commendation to Stigand. It consisted of 
220 acres, 3 villeins, 7 bordars, 3 serfs, 3 ploughteams in 
demesne and 2 belonging to the men, 4 acres of meadow, 
and wood sufficient to support 240 hogs ; also a church with 
20 acres and a ploughteam. Of live stock there were 2 
rouncies, 7 beasts, and 30 goats, valued at 50s. At the time 
of the Survey this manor was held by Robert Malet, and the details were 
altered ; the serfs were reduced to two, there was wood to support 120 hogs 
only, and there were 7 hogs. The value had increased to 60s. Ulveva 
had the soc of Stigand. 

In the same township, also part of the estate of Robert Malet, were 40 
acres formerly held by four freemen under commendation to Ulveva. There 
were 2 ploughteams, i acre of meadow, and wood sufficient for 6 hogs, 
valued at 6s. 8^., the soc belonging to the King and Earl. It was 14 
quarentenes long and 10 broad, and paid in a gelt gi.' 

Manor of Rishangles. 

In the time of Hen. I. Sir Robert Sackville held the manor of the Honor 
of Eye.* Later it passed to Bryan de Hickling, and a fine was levied 
of the manor in 1302 between Peter de Malteby, parson of Rishangles 
church, and this Brian de Hickling.^ In 1316 the manor was held by 
Brian's son and heir, Thomas de Hickling, and Dionysia his wife. He died 
in 1323,* and from the Close Rolls this year we learn that the great chamber 
at the head of the hall, with the moat on the east, and the kitchen within 
the moat, and the chapel between the moat, &c., and many acres part of 
the manor were assigned in dower to Dionysia, his widow. ^ The manor, 
subject to Dionysia's interest, passed to Thomas' son and heir, Bryan 
de Hickling, and in 1368 Reginald de Eccles and Richard de Waterden 
released to Sir Edward de Berkley and his heirs all their right in this lordship, 
with the third part of the Manor of Netherhall, at Hickling, in Norfolk. 
The releasors were probably trustees for Sir Edward de Berkley, who was 
entitled for life in right of his wife, Joan, daughter and heir of Brian de 
Hickling. Joan died without issue, and Sir Edward died in 1380. 

The manor and advowson subsequently became vested in Redlingfield 
nunnery ; the licence for alienation in mortmain of the manor to Sir William 
de Kerdeston will be found in the Patent Rolls in 1380.^ That it was a 
third part only granted by Sir William de Kerdeston is clear from the 
Escheat RoUs.^ The remaining two parts were vested in Roger Assheford, 
Roger Wolfreston, and Henry Sergeant, and were held of Queen Anne as of 
the Honor of Eye, as we learn from a licence to the grantors to alienate in 
mortmain to be found on the Patent Rolls in 1390.^ 

The manor went to the Crown on the suppression of the rehgious 
houses, and in 1540 was granted by the Court of Augmentations to William 

' Dom. ii. 333. 5 Close Rolls, 16 Edw. II. gd. 

2 See Old Hall, Braiseworth, in this ^ Pat. Rolls, 4 Rich. II. pt. ii. 27. 

Hxmdred. 7 1.P.M., 4 Rich. II. 117. 

3 Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. I. 7. s pat. Rolls, 14 Rich. II. pt. ii. 46; I.P.M., 
4 Extent as of Eye Honor; I.P.M., 16 14 Rich. II. 90. 

Edw. II. 55. 



RJSHANGLES. 299 

Tyrrell,' In 1543, however^ Robert Chichester and Agnes Philipp had a 
grant for their lives, and the life of the longer liver ; and in 1557 William 
Honing and Nicholas Cutler had a grant of the reversion/ However, the 
same year a grant was made of the manor on its purchase to Edward 
Grimston.^ He married for his 2nd wife Mary, daughter of William Drury, 
of Rougham, by whom he had issue four sons and three daughters, by the 
eldest of whom, Edward Grimston, he was succeeded. Edward Grimston, 
the son, died 17th March, 1599, and was interred in the parish church of 
Rishangles, where we find the following lines below his arms : — 

" By twice two Kings and Queenes his life was gract, 
Yet one Relligion had from first to last. 
Justice and Truth he lov'd, and common good 
No lesse then th'issve of his privat bloode. 
His yeares more then himselfe did others please 
For covncell and discovrse of warre and peace. 
His life was rvlet to lives, his death a mirror, 
One felt noe vaine care, nor the other terror." 

The manor passed to his son and heir, Edward Grimston, who married 
Joan, daughter and coheir of Thomas Risby, of Lavenham, granddaughter 
maternally of John Harbottle, of Crowfield,and inherited in her right the 
Bradfield estate, when he removed thither. He was M.P. for the Borough 
of Eye in the 31st of Elizabeth, and died i6th August, iGio.* 

The lines to his memory at Rishangles are : — 

" The Sonne paied to his father's part increase, 
Wittie and wise he was, vs'd lawe for peace, 
What first he chvs'd for good he changed never 
His care was temperate, his zeale fervent ever. 
And theise fayer gifts yt. heare his power did give 
Did make the father in the sonne to lyve 
What truth hath writt that envie cannot blot 
The name of Grimeston cannot be forgot."^ 

The manor passed on Edward Grimston's death to his son and heir, 
Sir Harbottle Grimston, created a baronet 25th Nov. 1612. He was Sheriff 
of Essex 1614-15, M.P. for Harwich 1614, for Essex 1626 and 1628-29, 
for Harwich again April to May, 1640, and Nov. 1640 till his death. He 
was imprisoned in 1627 for refusing to contribute to the forced loan of that 
year. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph Copinger, of the Buxhall 
family, but resided at Stoke, co. Kent, and died 19th Feb. 1647-8,^ when 
he was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Harbottle Grimston, 2nd Bart. 

He was successively Recorder of Harwich 1634, of Colchester 1638-53, 
and of Harwich again 1660 ; Speaker of the House of Commons 1660 ; 
Master of the Rolls 1660 to 1685. He married ist Mary, daughter of Sir 
George Croke, of Waterstock, Oxford, Justice of the Common Pleas and 
later of the King's Bench ; and 2ndly Anne, daughter and at length heir of 
Sir Nathaniel Bacon, K.B., of Culford, and widow of Sir Thomas Meautys, 
of Gorhambury, co. Herts.^ 

' State Papers, 1540, p. 1032. * Brass in Rishangles Church, Add. 32483. 

2 Originalia Rolls, 4 and 5 Ph. and M., ^ E. A. N. and Q. vol. viii. p. 146. 

5 Pars. Rot. 16. ^Will proved 1648. 

3Harl. 607. ^Add. MSS. 4109. 



300 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Page says : " About this time (1665) John Revett, Gent., a younger 
brother of William Revett, Esq., late of Bildeston, in Cosford Hundred, 
occupied the ancient seat of the Grimston family in Rishangles.'" 

Later the manor and advowson were vested in Edward Vernon, the 
Admiral, who presented to the living in 1720, and died in Oct. 1757, when 
the manor passed to his nephew and heir, Francis Vernon, Lord Orwell, 
afterwards Earl of Shipbroke (son of James Vernon by his wife, Arethusa, 
daughter of Chas. Lord Clifford), who, dying in 1783 without issue, it passed to 
his nephew and heir, John Vernon (son of Henry Vernon by his 2nd wife, 
Jane, daughter of Sir John CuUum), who died at Brighton 25th May, 1818. 
Shortly after his death the manor was sold to Richard Dalton. 

In 1853 the manor belonged to Frederick Hayward, sohcitor, of Need- 
ham Market, and subsequently passed to the Rev. Frederick Lawson 
Hayward, LL.B., rector of Tunstall, who died in 1904, when the same passed 
to and is now vested in his trustees. 

Arms of Grimston : Argent ; on a fesse. Sable, three mullets of six 
points Or, pierced. Gules ; in the dexter chief point, an Ermine spot. Of 
Vernon : Or. ; on a fesse. Azure, three garbs of the first. 



■ Hist, of Suff . p. 484. 




STOKE ASH. 301 

STOKE ASH. 

[HERE was a manor held here in Saxon times by Ulveva 
under commendation to Stigand, consisting of i carucate 
of landj 40 acreis, 4 bordars, 2 serfs, 3 ploughteams in 
demesne, 4 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 
8 hogs. Also a church with 15 acres, having a plough- 
team, which had come down to half a team at the time 
of the Survey. 

The live stock consisted of i rouncy, 6 beasts, 12 hogs, and 20 goats, 
but the details had considerably altered by the time of the Survey — the 
bordars and rouncies were doubled, and the beasts had come down to half. 
The value was always loos. 

Also 5 freemen under commendation held 32 acres, i ploughteam 
(reduced to half at the time of the Survey), and an acre of meadow, valued 
at 5s. /{d. It was 10 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 6d., 
the soc belonging to Ulveva, and that over the freemen to the King and 
Earl. The Domesday tenant was Robert Malet. Robert Malet also held 
here 20 acres, 2 bordars, and half a ploughteam in demesne, with 2 acres of 
meadow, valued at 5s., of which Stigand had the soc. This had formerly 
been held by Siric, a freeman who had i ploughteam in demesne.' 

Three holdings in this place at the time of the Survey belonged to the 
fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. One consisted of 14 acres, valued at 
3s., formerly held by Buchard, the abbot's socman. The Survey goes on 
to say : " This land Robert Fardene, Goodrich the steward's man, claims 
as belonging to the King's Manor of Mendlesham, and says that Walter de 
Dol held it when he made forfeiture, and this he will prove against the 
whole Hundred by all kinds of law." Another holding consisted of 24 
acres, i ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 5s., formerly held 
by eight freemen under commendation and soc. The third holding con- 
sisted of 33^ acres, 2 ploughteams, and an acre of meadow, valued at 6s., 
formerly held by 14 freemen. The soc and commendation were the abbot's 
except over one.' 

Among the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King by Goodrich 
the steward in this place were 8 acres and half an acre of meadow, valued 
at 2s. 4d., formerly held by 4 freemen under Burchard's commendation.^ 
Among the lands of the Abbot of St. Edmund's were 10 acres and half 
a ploughteam, wood for the support of 2 hogs, and half an acre of meadow, 
valued at 3s. It had formerly been held by 7 freemen under the soc and 
commendation of the abbot.* 

We have given all the entries under Stoke, in Hartismere Hundred, but 
the better opinion seems to be that only two of the holdings relate to 
this Stoke Ash, namely, the land of the King and the lands of Robert 
Malet. , 

Manor of Stoke Hall. 

The lordship of this parish was given by Robert Malet to the priory 
of Benedictine Monks at Eye, of which he was the founder, and we find 
in 1396 a grant of free warren here to the priory.* 

Ministers' accounts of the manor, when held by Eye priory, 18 Edw. II., 
will be found in the Public Record Office.* At the dissolution of that 

'Dom. ii. 321&, 322&. •*Dom. ii. 371. 

'Dom. ii. 370, 371. 5 Chart. Rolls, 20 Rich. II. 4. 

^Dom. ii. 286. 6 Bundle 1127, No. 4. 



302 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

monastery, this manor passed to the Crown, and a grant was made in 1536 
to Edmund Bedingfield. Coulsey Wood, in the parish of Stoke Ash, was 
the residence of a branch of the Bedingfield family. Henry Bedingfield, 
of Coulsey Wood, married Mary, daughter of William Havers, lord of 
Thilton in Norfolk, whose daughter Mary married Thomas Woode, of Bracon 
Ash, in the same county. The Bedingfields do not seem to have held this 
lordship for any length of time, for in 1558 we find a grant of it to John 
Parker.' The catalogue of the Harleian MSS. states that the manor was 
rated 22nd June, 1558, for Rpbert Parker.^ John Parker died in 1573, 
when the manor passed to his widow Mildred, and there is amongst the 
Chancery Proceedings an action relating to the manor brought by this 
Mildred Parker against Nicholas Cutler.^ Subject to Mildred's interest, 
the manor passed to her son and heir, John Parker. 

In 1596 John Parker sold the manor to Edmund Bokenham," and in 
1609 it appears to have been held by John Bokenham, possibly as a trustee, 
for this year he aliened it to the said Edmund Bokenham and Barbara his 
wife ; and amongst the Chancery Proceedings is an action for claim and 
delivery of deeds relating to this manor by Edmund Bokenham against 
John Parker.^ The manor subsequently passed as Stoke Ash with Thorpe, 
the devolution of which is next given. 

Manor of Stoke Ash with Thorpe. 

This was the lordship of John Bokenham, of Thornham, and on his 
death in 1609 passed to his son, Edmund Bokenham, who died in i6ig, 
when it passed to his son and heir. Sir Henry Bokenham, and on his death 
in 1648 passed to his son and heir, Wiseman Bokenham, on whose death 
in 1670 it vested in his son and heir, Paul Bokenham.® 

The manor subsequently passed to Charles Kelligrew, who by his 
will gave it to Charles Tyrell, who sold it to John Major, afterwards 
created a baronet, who died in 1781, when it passed to his daughter and 
heir, Anne, married to John Henniker, afterwards created a baronet, and 
from them has since devolved in the same course as the Manor of Great 
Thornham, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Lord Henniker. 

Manor of Woodhall. 

In 1206 Eustace de Gerardvile conveyed by fine a carucate and a, half 
of land here to William de Gerardvile, who in 1210 by fine passed the advow- 
son to the priory of Eye. 

Thomas de Gerardvile later held the lordship, which passed to his son 
and heir, William de Gerardvile, who in 1270 disputed the title of the prior 
of Eye to present, but ultimately the same year conveyed or confirmed the 
advowson by fine to the priory. 

We next meet with Sir John Gardevile, or Gerardvile, holding the 
manor. At the end of the 14th century, it had passed to the Poley family,' 
and in 1397 Thomas Poley held his first court. From him the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Richard Poley, and from him to his son and heir, Simon 

» Originalia, 5 and 6 Ph. and M., 2 Pars. ^ See Manor of Thelnetham in Blackbourn 

Rot. 32. Hundred. 

»Harl. 608. 7 See Boxstead Hall Manor, Boxstead, in 

3 C.P. ser. ii. B. cxi. 19. Babergh Hundred, and Badley, in 

tFine, Trin. 38 Eliz. Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 
5 C.P. i. 83. 



STOKE ASH. 303 

Foley, who died in 1485, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry 
Foley/ who died in 1487, when it went to his son and heir, Edmund Foley, 
on whose death in 1548' it passed to his son and heir, John Foley, who died 
in 1589, when it appears to have passed to his 2nd son, Richard Foley, 
who married Mary, eldest daughter of Sir John Brewse, of Little Wenham, 
and then on Richard's death, 14th Feb. 1592, to have passed to his son 
and heir, Edmund Foley, of Badley, who, dying in 1640', it vested in his 
son and heir. Sir Edmund Foley. 

Davy says that Sir Henry Crofts and Francis Warner were lords in 
1640, but this is not correct, for they were the trustees of a settlement made 
i8th May, 1640, on Edmund Foley's second marriage, which was to Frances, 
2nd daughter of Sir John Crofts, of Saxham. Edmund Foley sold the 
manor for £2,800 to Edmund Harvey, of Wickham Skeith, and the con- 
veyance to him was dated 30th Jan. On Harvey's death the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Henry Harvey, who died about 1669, 
when it passed to his widow Elizabeth, who held a first court this year as 
guardian of her son, Edmund Harvey. He and his wife Anne held their 
first court in 1671 ; he disentailed the estate in 1674, and by deed 22nd 
and 23rd March, 1706, sold to William Ellis, of Cotton, for £2,305, who 
with Ann his wife held their first court this same year. WilUam ElHs died 
in 1719, and his widow Ann remarried John Heigham, and they held their 
first court in 1723. The year before his mother's death John Ellis, son and 
heir of William, in consideration of marriage with Frances Harland, eldest 
daughter of Robert Harland, and of £1,600 by deed dated 27th Aug. 1737, 
conveyed the manor to Robert Harland and Fhilip Broke, of Nacton, as 
trustees and by way of settlement. The deed states that Anne Higham, 
mother of the said John, then dwelt in the manor house. 

She died in 1738, when the manor passed to John Ellis, the son and heir, 
and he and his wife Frances held their first court in 1739, in which year he 
died, his will being dated 17th Oct. 1739. His widow remarried William 
Gage, afterwards Sir William Gage, Bart., and they sold the manor by deeds 
dated i6th and 17th March, 1752, to George Turner. He died in 1781, 
when it passed by his will to his cousin and heir, George Turner, who dying 
in 1797, it went by his will to his son and heir, the Rev. George Turner, of 
Kettleburgh, who held his first court in r8o2. 

The manor subsequently passed to Captain Henry Lewis Round- 
Turner, of Grundisburgh, who assumed the name of Turner in 1872, by 
royal licence, and succeeded to the estates of his cousin, the Rev. George 
Turner. He married in 1874 Clara Wortley, 4th daughter of Capt. Samuel 
Stong, R.N., and died 9th July, 1881, leaving, with other issue, George 
Henry Round-Turner. The manor is now apparently in the trustees 
of the will of the late Capt. Round-Turner. A rental for 1763 of this manor 
will be found in the Davy MSS.^ 

Arms of Gardeville : Argent ; a fesse between three garbs, Gules. 

A manor called " Woodhall " was included in a fine levied in 1595 
by Sir Thomas Kytson and others against Sir Thomas Cornwalhs.* 



'See Little Bradley Manor, in Risbridge ^Add. MSS. I9090, p. 123. 

Hundred. *Fine, Easter, 37 Eliz. 

*I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 127. 




304 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

STUSTON. 

[HERE was a manor in this place in Saxon times held by 
Wolsey^ a freeman under Gurth's commendation^ con- 
sisting of 2 carucates of land, 4 villeins, 4 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
I ploughteam belonging to the men, 6 acres of meadow, 2 
beasts (also reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and 
5 hogs. The value was 60s., reduced to 405. at the time of 
the Survey, when the tenant was Ralph de Felgeris. 

There was also here a small estate belonging to Ralph de Felgeris, 
consisting of 12 acres, valued at 2s., formerly belonging to 3 freemen under 
Wolsey's commendation. The soc belonged to the King and Earl.' 

Manor of Faucon's al. Fakons or Falcons. 

This manor was appropriated to the nunnery of Flixton or St. Mary, 
South Elmham, at an early date, and remained the lordship of that house 
until its suppression by the Bull of Clement VII. in 1528. 

In 1544 the manor was granted to John Eyre. Particulars for the 
grant to him are still preserved in the Public Record Office.'' 

John Eyre had licence to alien it to Sir Thomas Cornwallis^ the same 
year, and on the death of Sir Thomas in 1604 the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir William Cornwallis, who died in 1613, from which time the 
manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of Brome Hall, in this 
Hundred, and is now vested in Lady Bateman, of Brome Hall. 

Arms of Eyre : Argent on a chevron, Sable, three quarterfoils. Or. 

Manor of Bezillers or Boyland's. 

This manor was granted by the Crown to Ranulph, Earl of Chester, 
for life, and on his death in 1232 again vested in the Crown, and was granted 
by Hen. III. to Ingerand de Fane for life, and on his death soon afterwards 
to Sir William de Syvay, or Synagon, for life, and after his death to Sir 
Almaric, or Aylmer de Berriles or Beziles — probably Almaric took a hmited 
interest, or died without heir, for on his death in 1279 the manor went again 
to the Crown, and in 1284 King Edw. I. granted the same to Sir Richard 
de Boyland and his heirs at half a knight's fee.* Notice of the grant is on 
the Patent Rolls, and it is made to Richard de Boyland, as regards his grant 
of the lands late of " Almaric Bezill, deceased, tenant in chief in Stuston," 
that he and his heirs be quit as to all issues received from the death of the 
said Almaric.^ 

This was styled Boyland's fee, one third of which lay in this parish, 
and nearly the same quantity in Frenze, and the rest in Osmundeston or 
Scole, in Norfolk. 

Sir Richard de Boyland died in 1295 or 1296,^ when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, John de Boyland, From an entry on the Patent Rolls 
in 1330 we find that John de Lowdham and Joan his wife had acquired 

'Dom. ii. 432. •^ Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. I. 47. 

'3.6 Hen. VIII., D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 207. s Pat. Rolls, 15 Edw. I. 11. 

2 A Manor of Stuston is mentioned in the ^l.FM., 24 Edw. I. 60. 
Inquisition p.m. of Edward Corn- 
wallis, who died 3rd Sept. 1510, 
leaving William his brother and 
heir. (I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII.) 



STUSTON. 305 

for themselves, and the heirs of John, from John de Boyland an acre and 
a half and 8 librates of land, and a rent of £8. 5s. in Osmundeston and 
Stuston, which were held in chief ; for a pardon was then granted for the 
acquisition without licence/ and we find that in 1345 the said John de 
Lowdham paid los. for his relief for the manor " late Sir John Boyland's, 
son of Richard, called Boyland Fee," and in 1351 Sir John, his son and heir, 
held the same. He died in 1355, and Joan, his widow, held it at her death 
in 1371, of Edmund, son of Sir Thomas de Ufford, Lord of Eye. The 
manor next passed to John Lowdham, son of Thomas, son of the last- 
mentioned John, and from his death in 1374 to the marriage of Mary, 
daughter of George Blenerhasset, with Thomas Culpepper, the manor 
devolved in the same course as Tuddenham Manor, in Tuddenham, in 
Carlford Hundred. 

This manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of John 
Blenerhasset, who died 8th Nov. 1510,^ Sir Thomas Blenerhasset, who 
died 27th June, 1531,^ and George Blenerhasset, who died i8th Feb. 1543.* 

The manor afterwards went to John Blenerhasset,^ son of Sir Thomas 
and brother of George, who sold his moiety in 1548 to Sir Thomas Corn- 
wallis,* whose heirs purchased the other half after several conveyances 
from Wodehouse to Gryme, and from them to Rant and others. Sir 
Thomas Cornwallis died in 1604, when the manor went to his son and heir, 
and from this period the manor passed in the same course of devolution 
as the Manor of Faucon's, and is now vested in Lady Bateman, of Brome 
Hall. 

Arms of Boyland : Azure, a saltier engrailed Or. 

Manor of Beauchamps. 

This was the lordship of John de Bellocampo,'' and later passed to Brian 
de Hickling. His widow Cecilia, daughter and coheir of Sir Bartholomew 
Davillers, died in 1345, when the manor passed to Brian's son and heir, 
John de Hickhng, who died without issue. 

Later we find the manor vested in John Cornwallis. 

Manor of Hugh or Hoo Margaret's al. Stuston Hall. 

John de Hoo, of Laxfield, and Joan his wife, held messuages and 
lands here in 1331, which in 1339 were held by William de Hoo and Mar- 
garet his wife. These parties probably held the manor, which in the early 
part of the i6th century became vested in John Mynster Chamber, who 
died 26th Jan. 1543,^ and was succeeded by his son and" heir, Humphrey 
Monster Chamber, then aged 28. William Methwold, who was probably 
a trustee, conveyed the manor to Humphrey Mynster Chamber and Anne 
his wife, who was sister of the said William. Humphrey Mynster Chamber 
died 24th Oct. 1564, leaving an only daughter Frances, then aged two 
years." Frances, the daughter, married Nicholas Gislingham, and a fine 
of the manor was levied by them in 1578." 

' Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. i. 23. 7 in 1279 we find on the Patent Rolls an 

« I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. 33. action by Aldreda de Beauchamp 

3 1.P.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 63. against Robert del Perer and others, 

4 1.P.M., 36 Hen. VIII. touching a tenement in Stuston. 

5 See Lowdham Manor, Wilford Hundred. Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. I. si. 

6 Fine, Mich. 2 Edw. VI. n.FM., 34 Hen. VIII. pt. iii. 224. 



9I.P.M., 6 Eliz. 168. 
"Fine, 20 Eliz. 39. 



P I 



3o6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is an action by Nicholas and his wife, Frances, described as " sole heir of 
Humphrey Mynster Chamber deceased," against Sir Thomas Cornwallis 
to establish manorial rights of Frances as to this manor and the advowson 
of the church of Stuston and copyhold lands, held of defendant as of his 
Manors of Boylands and Faucons, also Stuston Common and other appur- 
tenances of Stuston al. Hoo Margarett's Manor, which common was claimed 
by defendant as held of a manor called Asmundstons and Stuston, but 
which the bill charges is called in ancient records Osmondston in Scole/ 
and we find also amongst the same Proceedings an action at law between 
Nicholas Gislingham and Robert Warren as to land, parcel of Stuston Manor, 
sold by plaintiff to defendant, the said manor stated to belong to the 
plaintiff in right of his wife." A fine was levied of the manor in 1579 by 
William Peigham against Nicholas Gislingham and others.^ A fine was 
levied of the manor in 1581 by Robert BedyngfeldagainstNicholas Gislingham 
and others.* Frances took for a second husband Christopher Bedingfield, of 
Wighton, in Norfolk, and Henry Bedingfield seems to have succeeded to the 
lordship of this manor. He died in 1595, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Philip Bedingfield. Somewhat later Sir John Castleton, 2nd Bart, 
of the family, inherited the estate by his marriage 26th Apl. 1642, with 
Margaret, daughter and heir of Robert Morse, by Margaret his wife, daughter 
of Henry Bedingfield. 

He resided at Stuston Hall, a good old mansion erected by Richard 
Nix, Bishop of Norwich, from 1500 to 1535. Sir John Castleton had i^sue 
Sir John Castleton, 3rd Bart., his successor, who married Bridget, daughter 
of Thomas Read, of Berdwell, sister to Sir Charles Crofts Read, Knt., but 
died without issue in June, 1705 ; George and Charles, who died without 
issue. Sir Robert, 4th Bart., and Sir Philip, 5th Bart., who died in July, 
1724, all of whom leaving no issue. The estate does not appear to have 
remained in the Castleton family' for more than two descents, and from 
this family passed to the Marriots, and was afterwards purchased by Samuel 
Traverse, whose trustees held the manor in 1764. 

They sold the manor to Christ's Hospital, with whom the lordship 
has continued ever since. 

Arms of Castleton : Azure, on a bend, Or, three snakes of the field. 



' C.P. i. 369. 4 Fine, Mich. 23-24 Eliz. 

= C.P. i. 361. 5 As to this family see E. A. N. and Q. iii. 

3 Fine, Easter, 21 Eliz. 249. 




THORNDON. 307 

THORNDON. 

I HE name Torentuna in Domesday Survey is clearly an 
error for Torneduna, though it is often rendered Thorington, 
which is not in Hartismere^ but in Blything Hundred, 
There were two manors in his place in Saxon times. The 
first was held under Stigand by Ulvevaj and consisted of 

3 carucates of land, 40 acres, 4 villeins, 16 bordars, 4 serfs, 

4 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging to the men, 6 
acres of meadow, wood to support 200 hogs, and i mill. Also a church 
with 50 acres of free land, i ploughteam, and an acre of meadow. Of live 
stock there were 2 rouncies, 15 beasts, 40 hogs, and 60 sheep. The holding 
was valued at ;^5. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by Robert 
Malet, and some of its details had altered. The serfs were reduced to 
half, and there was enough wood to support 120 hogs only, the hogs had 
come down to 31, and the sheep to 24, while the value had increased to £8. 
The soc belonged, under Stigand, to Ulveva. 

The second manor was held by Turchetel, a freeman under commenda- 
tion to Ulveva. It consisted of 30 acres, 2 bordars, i|- ploughteams, and 
an acre of meadow, valued at los. This also belonged at the time of the 
Survey to Robert Malet, the King and Earl having the soc. Also in the 
same township held by Robert Malet were 88 acres, 2 ploughteams, and 
2 acres of meadow, valued at 205., formerly held by 7 freemen. The soc 
belonged to the King and Earl,' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was a small estate 
in this place, consisting of 16 acres, valued at 3s., formerly belonging to 
6 freemen under the abbot's soc and commendation,'' 

There is a holding mentioned in the Survey as in Hestley. This, no 
doubt, belongs to Thorndon, as Hestley was a Manor of Thorndon. The 
holding is of 2 freemen under commendation, and consisted of 10 acres, 
valued at 201^. Ralph de Limesi held this in demesne as the Domesday 
tenant in chief.^ 

Manor of Thorndon. 

This was probably the lordship of Robert Malet, and was later held by 
Henry, Duke of Lothier, from whom it passed to his brother, Godfrey de 
Lovaine, who died in 1224, when it passed to his son and heir, Matthew 
de Lovaine, who took under the gift of his uncle. He was followed by 
Henry, Duke of Lothier, and then the manor was vested in Edmund Planta- 
genet, Earl of Cornwall, from whom it passed to his widow Margaret in 
1301, and on her death reverted to the Crown. 

In 1320 the manor was granted in dower to Isabel, Queen of England, 
in exchange. She surrendered it to the King in 1330, who in 1337 granted 
it to Robert de Ufford, on whose death in 1369"* it passed to his son and heir, 
William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk.' On Wilham's death 15th Feb. 
1382, the manor was assigned in dower to his widow Isabel, daughter of Sir 
Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. 

In 1385 the reversion of the manor, after the death of Isabel the widow, 
was granted to Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk,^ and on his death in 

'Dom. ii. 323. 'See Extent. William de Ufford and Joan 
2 Dom. ii. 370. his wife, 1381 ; I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 

sDom. ii. 429. 57- 

4 Extent. I,P,M,. 43 Edw. III. pt, ii.38. ^R.p. ijj. 208. 



3o8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

1441' the manor passed to William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk, created 
Duke of Suffolk, who was beheaded in 1450/ 

The manor passed from William de la Pole to his son and heir, John, 
2nd Duke of Suffolk, and on his death in 1491 passed to his son and heir, 
Edmund de la Pole, 3rd Duke, who was beheaded in 1513.' The manor had, 
however, before this gone to the Crown, though Edmund had before his 
attainder attempted to grant the manor away, for from the State Papers 
in 1 5 13 we learn that a commission was issued to inquire into the 
circumstances of this grant/ 

A grant was made 20th Jan. 2 Hen. VHI. [1510] of the manor to Sir 
Robert Brandon, with a warren in Thorndon, the park of Ryshangles, 
advowsons of Thorndon, and Wattelesfield, with the fair, market, and 
advowson of Saxmundham,' but in 1514 an assignment of the manor in 
dower was made to Margaret dela Pole, widow of Edmund, and on her death 
in 1516 the manor is said to have again reverted to the Crown. This may 
have been the case, but it certainly was vested in Charles Brandon, Duke of 
Suffolk, in 1538, for we find amongst the State Papers for this year a grant 
of the manor by him to the Crown in exchange.* 

In 1557 the Queen leased the manor to Francis Yaxley, who left his 
interest to his cousin Walter and his cousin Sherman. 

In 1574 the Queen granted the lordship to Sir Thomas Heneage and 
Roger Greenwade, which grant proving defective the King in 1615 granted 
the manor to Sir John Pretyman, Richard Pretyman, Henry Grey, and 
William Coleman. Either the others named were trustees for Sir John 
Pretyman, or he acquired their interests, for he was certainly sole lord 24th 
June, 1629, when he held a court, a copy court entry from which is in the 
writer's possession. Further, he sold the manor. We meet with a fine 
of the manor in 1589 levied by Sir John Highton and others against J. 
Pretyman, sen., and others.^ 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Rowland Holt, and in 1837 in Frederick 
Hayward, solicitor, of Needham Market, and from this time has passed in 
the same course as the manor of Rishangles, in this Hundred. 

Manor of Godrich's Thorpe al. Claxton Hall al. Colston Hall 

al, Lampets. 

In the time of the Confessor this estate belonged to Turchetel, a 
freeman under the protection of Ulveva, and was part of the estate of 
Robert Malet in the Conqueror's day. 

In 1312 it was the lordship of John Lampet, of Thorndon, and passed 
to his son and heir, William Lampet. In 1588 the manor passed to William 
Smythe under a fine levied by him against John Homberston and others.^ 

In 1608 the manor was vested in John Lavyle, for this year he granted 
it to the King. 

John Jeggon, master of Bennett College, Cambridge, and Bishop of 
Norwich, died in 1617 seised of the manor and other estates in the county, 
leaving a widow, daughter of Richard Vaughan, Bishop of London, who 
remarried Sir Charles Cornwalhs, of Beeston, in Norfolk. Robert Jeggon, 

' See Manor of Kettlebaston, in Cosford ♦ S.P. 5 Hen. VIII. 4254. 

Hundred, and Manor of Gyfford's sS.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1453; Harl. 51 H. 20. 

Wattisiield, Blackbourn Hundred. eS.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (iSa). 

« I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 7 Fine, Mich. 31-32 Eliz. 

3I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. I. spine, Trin. 30 Eliz. 



THORNDON. 309 

son and heir, was then about 10 years of age. John, the 2nd son, died in 
1631, and Dorothy, his daughter, was wife to Robert Gosnold, of Otley. 

Arms of Jeggon : Argent, two chevronels Gules ; on a canton Azure, 
a falcon rising. Or. 

Manor of Hesteley Hall. 

In the time of William the Conqueror Ralph Limesi had land here. As 
early as 1273 the Bedingfields are mentioned as holding land in this place, 
for on the Patent Rolls we find an action by Adam, son of Hubert de Beding- 
field against Walter de la Hagh, touching a messuage and land in 
Thorndon.' 

In the 13th century the manor belonged to Sir Adam de Bedingfield, 
steward of the Honor of Eye, 1265, and passed on his death to his son and 
heir, Peter de Bedingfield, who died in 1331. On the Originalia Rolls this 
year we meet with a grant by the King of all the grass growing on land 
of the Manor of Hestley which belonged to Peter de Bedyngfeld.* On 
Peter de Bedingfield' s death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir 
Edmund Bedingfield, who married Maud, daughter and heir of William de 
Hemenhale, and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir 
Peter Bedingfield, who married Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas Bacon, 
and died in 1371,^ when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Beding- 
field. He married Elizabeth, daughter of — Norton, of Rendham, and 
on his death the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Bedingfield, 
who was living in 1417, and from him to his son and heir, Edmund Beding- 
field. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Robert de Tudenham and 
sister of Sir Thomas Tudenham, and died in 1451,'* when the manor probably 
went to his widow Margaret, who died in 1474,^ when it vested in her 
grandson. Sir Edmund Bedingfield, son and heir of her son, Thomas Beding- 
field (who had died 12th Oct. 1453 in his mother's lifetime), by his wife 
Anne, daughter and heir of John Waldegrave, of Walgrave, co. 
Northampton. 

Sir Edmund Bedingfield was made a K.B. at the coronation of Rich. III. 
and married twice — ist Alice, daughter of Sir Ralph Shelton, by whom he 
had a daughter Margaret, who married Sir Edward Jernegan, of Somerley- 
ton ; and 2ndly Margaret, daughter of Sir John Scott, of Scot's Hall, co. 
Kent, comptroller of Calais. Sir Edmund, by his will dated at Calais, 
12th Oct. 1496,® devised the manor to his son and heir. Sir Thomas. He 
married ist Margaret Clifford, and 2ndly, Alice, daughter of William London, 
widow of Edmund Rookwood, of Euston, and afterwards wife of Lord 
Burgh, and died without issue in March, 1538, when the manor seems not to 
have passed to the next brother, Robert, who was rector of Oxburgh in 
1512 and of Eriswell in 1533, and died 19th July, 1539, but to the younger 
brother. Sir Edmund Bedingfield, knighted by Charles Brandon in France 
in 1523. He married Grace, daughter of Henry, Lord Marney, and dying 
in 1551, the manor is said to have passed to his 2nd son, Francis, who 
married Dorothy, daughter of John Wodehouse, of Kimbolton, probably 
by virtue of a settlement made upon him of this manor on the death of his 
uncle. Sir Thomas Bedingfield in 1538, by his (Francis's) father, for this year 
we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Francis and others against Sir 

'Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. I. gd. 'See Eriswell, Lackford Hundred. 

*0. 5 Edw. III. 16. 6 Proved 28th Jan. following, buried at 
5 Will proved 1371. Oxburgh. 

♦ Will 4th June, 1451, proved 20th July, 1451 . 



310 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLKs 

Edmund Bedingfield and others.' But as Sir Francis died 21st Dec. 
1549/ if he enjoyed at all it must have been during his father's lifetime, for 
Sir Edmund did not die, as we have said, until 1551. At all events on the 
death of Sir Edmund and Francis, the manor passed to Francis's son and 
heir, Edmund Bedingfield, then aged 11 years. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of — Stinson, of Mayhland, co. Norfolk, and levied 
a fine 29th June, 1561. Two years later he sold the manor to John 
Pretyman.^ 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Elizabeth is a claim as 
heiress-at-law by Nicholas Bateman and Sibill his wife against John 
" Prettyman " the elder, as to a messuage called Hestley House and lands 
in Thorndon held of the Manor of Thorndon, late the estate of W. Bysshope, 
plaintiff Sibill' s grandfather."* Later in 1595 we meet with another claim 
amongst the same Chancery Proceedings. It is a claim as heirs in 
coparcenary by Agnes Wynter and Alice Wynter, daughters of Simon 
Wynter, against John " Pretiman," lord of the manor of Much Bradfield, to 
a messuage called Hestley Hall and lands in Thorndon, held of Thorndon 
Manor, sometime the estate of William Bishoppe, the plaintiff's great-grand- 
father.^ 

John Pretyman was the son of John " Pratyman " and Margaret his 
wife, daughter of John Frere, of Wickham Skeith, which John Pratyman 
was the son of John Pratyman and Margaret his wife, daughter of Hugh 
Smythe, of Cotton, which last-mentioned John Pratyman was the son of 
John Pratyman, sen., the son of William Pratyman, of Bacton, living in 
1476. The purchaser, the 4th John Pretyman in succession married 
Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Garnham, of Gernoun, and died at Bylaugh, 
in Norfolk, in May, 1607,° when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
John Pretyman, of Cranworth, co. Norfolk, who married Mary, daughter 
of George Sayre, of Colchester, and died loth March, 1611,^ when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, the 6th John Pretyman in succession. He 
married Bridget, daughter of John Futter, of Thuxton, and having issue 11 
children probably deemed it advisable to dispose of the manor, for he sold 
it in 1 614, with the Manor of Brames' Hall, in Wetheringsett, to Sir John 
Pretyman, and removed to Bury St. Edmunds, where he was living in 
1655. Thomas Bishop who was the purchaser of Hestley Hall made that 
his place of residence. Thomas Bishop married, 7th July, 1589, Dorothy 
Nunn, and had a son Thomas to whom this mansion-house passed, and 
two daughters — Grace married ist Henry Marsham, of Stratton, in Norfolk, 
and 2ndly John Cornwallis, of Wingfield College. The 2nd daughter Mary 
married Francis Alpe, of Burston, in Norfolk, and died in 1687, being 
buried at Stratton aforesaid. Thomas Bishop, the son, died in August. 
1664, and Hestley Hall passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bishop, who 
died unmarried in April, 1682. 

In 1837 the manor was vested in Frederick Hayward, solicitor, and 
has since devolved in the same course as the Manor of Rishangles, and is now 
vested in the trustees of the will of the Rev. Frederick Lawson Hayward. 

Hestley Hall is an ancient mansion embowered in trees, 4J miles south 
of Eye. 



' Fine, Trin. 30 Hen. VIII. 5 c.P. iii. 263. 

'I.P.M., 4 Edw. VI. 82. 6I.P.M., 5 Ja 

3 Fine, Easter, 5 Eliz. 7Will9thMar( 

•»r.P. i. T27. 



, ^ Jas. 

. _ ^ Will gth March, proved 13th March, 1611. 

♦C.P. i. 127. 



THORNDON. 311 

The Manor of Thorndon Parva. 

John Cullum gave this lordship to Tobias Frere, of Harleston, and later 
it was vested in Peter Houblin, whose daughter married John Littele, who 
held the manor in her right, and on their death it passed to their son and 
heir, John Lawbridge Littele. His daughter Elizabeth married Sir Robert 
Clarke, of Freckenham, Bart., and from this time to the present the manor 
has passed in the same course as the Manor of Alpheton, in Babergh Hun- 
dred, being now vested in Col. Nathaniel Barnardiston, of the Ryes, Sud- 
bury. 



There is also a small manor belonging to the rector of Thorndon, 
and extracts from the Court Rolls of this manor in 1706 will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum." 



'Add. Ch. 10503. 




312 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

THORN HA M MA GNA . 

^N Saxon times there was one manor in this place, held by 
Leuric under commendation to Bristric, steward to the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of a carucate of 
land, 2 bordarSj 2 ploughteams (which was reduced later 
to half a team and at the Survey had risen again to i), 
2 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 30 hogs (but 
at the time of the Survey enough for 2 only), and 2 rouncies ; 
also the fourth part of a church with 3^ acres, the value formerly being 30s. 
and at the time of the Survey only 20s. Over the land the abbot had three 
parts of the soc, and the King the fourth part. The Domesday tenant was 
Isaac. 

Isaac also held in the same township 4^ acres, valued at 8d., formerly 
held by three freeman. The township seems to have been 8 quarentenes 
long and 8 broad, and it paid in a gelt 8Ji.' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds were several holdings. 
The first consisted of 35 acres under the soc and commendation of the abbot, 
i| ploughteams, and half an acre of meadow, valued at 6s. 

It was formerly held by a freeman. The second was held by Leuric, 
a freeman under commendation to the abbot, and consisted of a carucate 
of land, 6 bordars,2 ploughteams in demesne and half a ploughteam belonging 
to the men, and an acre of meadow, also wood sufficient to support 8 hogs. 
The value was 20s. The third was that of 5 freemen under the abbot's 
soc and commendation, and consisted of 44^ acres, i| ploughteams, 2 
acres of meadow, and wood to support 4 hogs, the value being 8s, The last 
was that of a freeman by soc and commendation, and consisted of 2 acres 
valued at ^d.^ 

Among the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King by Goodrich 
the steward was a holding here of 4 acres, valued at 4^., held by a freeman.^ 

The Survey also mentions a holding here without land, a freeman Ulmar 
held by Aubrey de Vere.* 

Among the lands of Robert Malet were 4 holdings. The first was of 
4 acres, valued at i2d., held by Robert Malet's mother, and formerly held 
by Stannard, a freeman under commendation to Edric, the soc belonging 
to the King and Earl,^ 

The second consisted of i carucate of land and 12 acres, 6 plough- 
teams (reduced at the time of the Survey to 4 full teams and a team of 2 
oxen), and 4 acres of meadow, valued at 23s. It was formerly held by 24 
freemen. Over all these (except one, Ulrich, who was half under commenda- 
tion to the Abbot of St. Edmunds), Ulveva had commendation. The soc 
belonged to the King and the Earl.® 

The third estate consisted of 26 acres and half a ploughteam, formerly, 
when held by Brictmar under commendation to Ulveva, valued at 5s., 
but at the time of the Survey valued at 7s, Of this the King and the Earl 
had the soc. 

The fourth estate of Malet's consisted of 108 acres, 4 ploughteams 
(reduced by the time of the Survey to 2), i^ acres of meadow, i rouncy, i 
beast, 25 hogs, 16 sheep, and 27 goats, valued at 20s., the King and the Earl 
having the soc. This estate had formerly been held by 4 freemen, and 

' Dom. ii. 4376. * Dom. ii. 419. 

*Dom. ii. 370, 370&. 'Dom. ii. 3206. 

3 Dom. ii. 285&. ^Doxa. ii. 321&. 



THORNHAM MAGNA. 



313 



over one, a half-freeman, Brungart by name, Walter de Dol was seised when 
he made forfeiture, and over 2|- Ulveva had commendation, and over the 
half-freeman the Abbot of St. Edmunds had commendation, and over the 
fourth Burchard.' 

Manor of Thornham Hall al. Briseworth's. 

This was the estate of Leuric, under the protection of Bristric the bailiff 
of St. Edmunds prior to the Conquest, and was held by Isaac at the time of 
the Survey. 

By the time of Edw. III. the manor was vested in William de Brise- 
worth, and passed to his daughter and heir, married to Simon Blyant, whose 
daughter and heir married Nicholas Wiseman. The manor from them 




Gkeat Thornham Hall. 

passed to their son and heir, George Wiseman, and from him to his son and 
heir, Simon Wiseman, and from him to his son and heir. Sir John Wiseman. 

Amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of King Hen. VIII. 
is an action by Sir John Wyseman against John Sherman and others for 
riot and assault at Swattishall in Thornham.* 

There is a second action in the sam6 court and reign, said to be as to 
a field in Thornham called " Swartsawfield " between Sir John Wyseman 
and Thomas Tyrell, clerk, and others,^ and in the same court in 1523 we find 
an action by Thomas Tyrrell against Sir John Wiseman and others as to 
tithes in " Swatteshave " Manor in Thornham.'* Sir John Wiseman married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir James Hobart, and on his death the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Wiseman, and amongst the Bodleian 
Charters we find a quit claim dated 30th Dec. 38 Hen. VIII. [1545] by 
Richard Frere, of Mendham, and William Freston, citizen and grocer, of 
London, to Thomas Wyseman, of all right to rents and services issuing 
out of lands of the said Thomas in Thornham or elsewhere in Suffolk.^ 
Thomas Wiseman married Anne, daughter of John Garneys, of Kenton 
Hall, and on his death the manor passed to his eldest son, John Wiseman. 
He married EUenor, sister and coheir of Charles Cutler, of Eye, and widow 
of Francis Ernley, of Eye, who afterwards married Anthony Rush, of Chap- 
mans. 



'Dom. ii. 332. 
^Bundle 23, 206. 
^Bundle 23, 221. 



♦ D.K.R., 49 App. p. 573. See, too, 
Star Chamber Proceedings, Henry 
VIII. Bundle 31, 123. 

3 Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1377. 



314 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John Wiseman had three sons and two daughters, Thomas, Edward, 
and Nicholas, all of whom died without issue/ It is true Davy makes 
Edward Wiseman lord, and the manor did apparently pass to Edward 
Wiseman, and only went to his sisters on his death in 1561. There is a 
chancery suit amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Elizabeth 
which is seemingly against this. It is a bill for partition between Philologus 
Forthe against Edmund Buckenham [Bokenham] as to lands in Thornham, 
late the estate of John Wiseman, which on his decease descended to his 
daughters Barbara and Mary, the wives of the plaintiff and defendant as 
coparceners^, also as to lands held of the Manors of Brockford and Stoke 
Ash belonging to plaintiff and claimed by defendant/ But there is 
also amongst these Proceedings an action concerning deeds, &c.,of manors, 
lands, &c., in Great Thornham, of which Edmund Wiseman was seised. 
It was brought by Edmund Buckenham against Tasborough and others.^ 

This manor seems to have been allotted to Barbara and her husband, 
Edmund Bokenham, and from this time to the death of his grandson, Wise- 
man Bokenham, in 1669, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn Hundred. The manor apparently passed 
on Wiseman's death to his son Paul Bokenham, or at least he claimed it. 
He died in Oct. 1681, intestate, leaving a son Guilford his heir, and a 
daughter Jemina, both infants, and the said Guilford Bokenham died 
without issue, when the manor passed to Jemina, married to Charles 
Killigrew. Jemina being only four years old at the time of her father's 
death, the administration of this estate was granted to Anthony Bokenham 
during the infant's minority, and Richard Bokenham, her uncle, managed 
the real estate. 

A branch of the Killigrew family had settled here some time previously. 
Robert Killigrew, of Arnenich, in Cornwall, son of Thomas and Charlotte, 
page of honour to King Charles II., Brigadier-General of his Majesty's 
forces, killed in Spain in the battle of Almanza, 14th April, 1707, in the 47th 
year of his age, was a member of the family. 

The last representative of the family, Charles Killigrew, grandson of 
the above Robert, died a bachelor, 9th March, 1756, and by his will gave 
the manor to his godson, the Rev. Charles Tyrrel, who afterwards succeeded 
to the Gipping estate. Mr. Killigrew was in the habit of making wills 
frequently, and every will appointed a different heir ; he died suddenly, 
and had sent a few days before to his lawyer to make another will. 

Charles Tyrrel sold the manor to Sir John Major, Bart. He was the 
only surviving son of John Major, of Bridlington, co. York, and represented 
the borough of Harborough in Parliament. He was created a baronet 15th 
July, 1765, by the title of Sir John Major, of Worlingworth Hall, in Suffolk, 
Bart., the limitation being to his heirs male, and in default of such issue 
to his son-in-law, John Henniker, of Newton Hall, in Essex, and his male 
heirs. He accompanied Captain Anson in his voyage round the world. 
Sir John married Elizabeth, only daughter of Daniel Dale, of Bridlington, 
by whom he had issue two daughters, Anne and Elizabeth. The latter 
married in 1767, Henry Bridges, 2nd Duke of Chandos, and Anne, the eldest 
daughter and coheir, married 24th Feb. 1747, John, son of John Henniker, 
an eminent Russian merchant of London, and of Westham, co. Essex, 
and upon the decease of Sir John Major, i6th Feb. 1781, his title and a 
moiety of his estate, including this manor, passed to his said son-in-law. 

' See Manor of Swatshall Hall, in Gisling- » C.P. i. 288, 289. 
ham, in this Hundred. 3 C.P. i. 53. 



THORNHAM MAGNA. 315 

Sir John Henniker, Bart., was elevated to the peerage of Ireland, as 
Baron Henniker, of Stratford-upon-Slaney, 31st July, 1800, and dying 
i8th Apl. 1803,' was succeeded by his eldest son, John Henniker-Major, as 
2nd Baron. 

He was a well-known antiquary, a barrister-at-law, and a prominent 
member of many literary societies. By royal licence loth Aug. 1792, he 
took the name of Major after that of Henniker, in compliance with the 
will of his maternal grandfather. He was M.P. for Romney 1785-90, for 
Steyning 1794-1802, for Rutland 1805-12, and for Stamford 1812-18. He 
married 27th Apr. 1791, Emily, daughter of Robert Jones, of Duffryn, co. 
Glamorgan. 

The day on which George III. completed the 50th year of his reign 
was celebrated in this parish by Lord Henniker with that characteristic 
loyalty and munificence which so constantly marked his lordship's con- 
duct. The most prominent festivity of the day was an ox roasted whole, 
and afterwards distributed to the populace, in the presence of the Duchess 
of Chandos, Lord and Lady Henniker, and other members of that family. 
The number of people assembled to witness this display of British hospitality 
was estimated at between four and five thousand, on Oct. 25th, 1810. His 
lordship died without issue 5th Dec. 1821,' when the manor passed to his 
nephew, JohnMinet Henniker, 3rd Baron, son and heir of Major Henniker, 
merchant, of London, and of Streatham, co. Surrey, by Mary, daughter of 
John Phoenix, of Rochester, which Major was 2nd son of the ist lord. 

He married ist Jan. 1799, Mary, eldest daughter of the Rev. William 
Chafy, minor canon of Canterbury. He assumed by royal licence 27th 
May, 1822, the additional surname of Major, and died 22nd July, 1832,^ 
when he was succeeded by his eldest son, John Henniker-Major, as 4th 
Baron, who married 5th Jan. 1837, Anna, eldest daughterof Lieut. -General 
Sir Edward Kerrison, ist Bart., K.C.B. and G.C.H., of Oakley and Brome. 

The 4th Baron represented East Suffolk in Parliament 1832 to 1847, 
and was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1853I He was created Baron Hartis- 
mere,of Hartismere,co. Suffolk, in the peerage of the United Kingdom, 13th 
July, 1866. His lordship died i6th April, 1870, when the manor passed 
to his eldest son. Sir John Major Henniker-Major, 5th Baron Henniker, 
M.P. for East Suffolk, 1866-1870. He was lord-in-waiting to the Queen in 
1877 to 1880-1885, and from 1886 to 1893, reappointed 1895. In October, 
1895, he was appointed Governor of the Isle of Man, Knight of Justice of 
the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. He married 14th Jan. 1864, at West- 
minster Abbey, Alice Mary, only daughter of John Otway O'Connor Cuffe, 
3rd Earl of Desart, and died 27th June, 1902, when he was succeeded by his 
eldest surviving son. Sir Charles Henry Chandos Henniker-Major, 6th 
Baron, 3rd Baron Hartismere, who is the present lord. 

Arms of Bokenham : Argent ; a lion rampant. Gules ; over all, a 
bendlet. Azure, charged with three bezants. Of Killigrew : Argent ; 
an eagle displayed. Sable, within a bordure of the second Bezantee. Of 
Major: Azure, 3 columns of the Corinthian Order 2 and i, on the top of 
each a ball. Or. Of Henniker : Or, on a chevron Gules between 2 crescents 
in chief, and in base an escallop Azure, 3 estoils Argent. 

Thornham Hall is a Tudor mansion, consisting of a central block 
with wings, but has been altered, and additions have been made to it 

'Will proved 1803,. ' ^Will proved Aug. 1832. 

'Will proved 1822. 



3i6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

from time to time. Both the 4th and 5th Barons made additions, but 
part of the old house remains untouched. It is probable that 
Elizabeth slept here in one of her progresses through East Anglia, 
as it is said " she lay at Thornham." Charles II. also spent a night or 
more here. The hangings of the bed in which he is said to have slept are 
still to be seen, in Thornham Hall, and with the chair coverings in the 
apartment, are of linen ornamented with beautiful old crewel work. The 
portion of the mansion erected by the 4th Baron is built of white bricks, 
made on the estate, and in style resembles an old French chateau. 

The park is between 300 and 400 acres in extent, and the gardens 
cover about 25 acres. 

Manor of Thornham. 

This was the inheritance of Robert Malet at the time of the Domesday 
Survey, and he by his charter of foundation conferred the same on the 
Priory of Eye, and in 1275 the prior had view of frankpledge 
here, in 1396 having free warren also confirmed to him.^ 

The manor went on the Dissolution to the Crown, and was granted 
by Hen. VIII. in 1536 to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. It returned 
to the Crown subsequently, and was granted in 1566 to Edmund, Lord 
Clinton and Saye, and Leonard Irby, and the same year they had licence to 
alien to Nicholas Mirnno and Henry Golding, who the following year had 
licence to alien to Thomas Gawdy, of Redenhall, and others. It seems 
again to have returned to the Crown for in 1584 the Queen leased it to 
Ralph Bomes for 40 years. However, a little later we find the manor in 
Thomas Butts, for he had licence to alien it in 1592 to Sir Nicholas Bacon. 
In 1597 the manor was granted to John Athowe and Henry Becke, after 
which it disappears. 

Manor of Hemenhall, or Hemenhales. 

This was the lordship of Sir Ralph de Hemenhale at the beginning of 
the 14th century.'' He died in 1329, when it passed to his son and heir, 
John de Heminghale, who died in 1347, when it passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Ralph Heminghale, who had a grant of free warren here in 1367.^ 
He married Katherine, daughter and coheir of Sir John de Aspal, and died 
in 1370," when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert, who married 
Joan, daughter and heir of John de la Pole, and dying before 1406 the 
manor vested in John or William de Heminghale, an idiot, who was dead 
by 1419, when the manor was vested in his cousin and heir. Sir Ralph 
Heminghale. He was son of Thomas, a brother of the Sir Robert who 
died before 1406. 

In 1435 a fine was levied of this manor by Sir John Tirell and Katherine 
his wife. Sir William Phylyp, Sir John Clyfton, Sir John Hevenyngham, 
Edward Tirell, William Rokwode, Robert Asshefeld, Richard Doget, Thomas 
Sengleton, John Pyrye, and Gregory Wery, clerk, against Roger Felice and 
Margaret his wife.^ 

Arms of Hemenhale : Or, on a fesse, between two chevronels, Gules, 
three escallops, Argent. 



'Chart. Rolls, 20 Rich. II. 4. ^See Manor of Cotton Hempnall or 
'He was the son of Ralph, son of Sir Ralph Caldecott, in Cotton, in this Hun- 

de Hemenhale. dred. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 41 Edw. III. 2. ^Feet of Fines, 13 Hen. VI. 21. 




THORNHAM PARVA. 317 

THORNHAM PARVA. 

J|MONG the lands of Robert Malet were several holdings. 
One was of 7 acres, valued at i6d. It was formerly held by 
Robert Malet's mother over 2 freemen under Edric by sub- 
commendation. Another consisted of 28 acres and 2 plough- 
teams (reduced to i^ at the time of the Survey), valued at 
5s. It was formerly held by 8 freemen under commenda- 
tion to Ulveva. In the same township was a holding of 15 
acres, and a ploughteam, valued at 40^., increased at the time of the Survey 
to 5s. It had formerly been held by 2 freemen, one under commendation 
to Ulveva and the other half under sub-commendation to Malet's 
predecessor. 

In the same township was a holding of 14 acres and a ploughteam 
(reduced to half at the time of the Survey). It was formerly valued at 3s., 
increased to 4s. at the time of the Survey. It had been held by Siric, a free- 
man under commendation to Ulveva. 

Also here were three parts of a church, with 10 acres and half a plough- 
team. The soc of all this belonged to the King and Earl.' 

Manor of Woodhouse. 

This seems to have been the lordship of the parish of Thornham Parva, 
and was held in the middle of the 14th century by Richard del Chirche, 
and was included in the conveyance of 1391 to Sir William Burgate, John 
Huberd, and others as trustees, mentioned in the account of the Manor 
of Swatshall Hall, in Gislingham, and the deed of 2nd Feb. 14 Rich. II.,'' 
and passed in the same way with that manor until it vested in Edmund 
Bokenham by his marriage with Barbara, sister and coheir of Edmund 
Wiseman, who died in 1561, from which time it has devolved in the same 
course as the Manor of Thornham Hall. 

There are conveyances of this manor amongst the Harleian Charters in 
the British Museum as follows : 1391, Harl. 47 E. 13 ; 48 A. 43 ; 1410, Harl. 
50, K. 2 ; 1412, Harl. 51 E. 52 ; 1417, Harl. 51 E. 52 ; 1417, Harl. 51 E. 
55 ; Cott. xxvii. 208 ; and a fine was levied of the manor in 1586 by Isaac 
Preston against Edmund Bokenham and others.^ 



'Dom. ii. 320b, 322b. 3 Fine, Hil. 28 Eliz. 

'Harl. 48 A 43; 47 E 13- 




3i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

THRANDESTON. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
that of Anselm, held of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and 
consisted of 2 carucates of land, 6 bordars, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne and i belonging to the men, and 8 acres of 
meadow. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 2 beasts, 12 
hogs, 55 sheep. Also here 12 freemen and a half held 42 
acres, having the power to sell. 
There was also a church, with 8 acres, valued at i6i., also 3 ploughteams, 

wood sufficient to support 4 hogs, and an acre of meadow, valued at 40s. 

(which value had increased to 605. at the time of the Survey). 

This manor belonged to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, he having 
the soc and commendation. It was 8 quarentenes long and 7 broad, and 
paid in a gelt 8i.' 

The second manor at the time of the Survey was held of Robert Malet 
by Halward (?) and consisted of 36 acres, i ploughteam (reduced at the time 
of the Survey to a team of 2 oxen), and an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. 
The soc belonged to the King and Earl. It had belonged at the time of 
the Confessor to Hayward(?)a freeman under commendation to Edric. In 
the same township held by Walter of Robert Malet, was an estate of 15 
acres and half a ploughteam, in the soc of the King and Earl, valued at 
2bd. It had formerly been held by 2 freemen, Goodrich and Lestan, under 
commendation to Edric. 

Walter also held two villeins, with 24 acres out of the Eye demesne, 
valued at 4s. 

Robert Malet had several other holdings in this place. One consisted 
of 16 acres, valued at 2s., held of him by William Gulafra. There was 
also a church, with 6 acres, valued at i2d. This estate had formerly been 
held by Godman, a freeman. 

Another was held of him by William de Caen, and consisted of 5 acres, 
valued at X2d., the soc belonging to the King and Earl. This had formerly 
been held by a freeman under commendation to Edric. 

Another estate consisted of 9 acres, valued at izd., held of Robert 
Malet by Hugh.' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was a small holding 
in this place, consisting of 3 acres, valued at 6d., formerly that of Uluric, 
by commendation.^ 

Among the lands of Ralph de Felgeriswas a holding of 6 acres, valued at 
i.2d^ 

There was also mentioned without land, a holding of Aubrey de Vere, of 
2 freemen, Fulcard and Alwin.^ 

Manor of Thrandeston-Woodhall. 

This was the estate of Hayward, a freeman under the protection of 
Edric, in the time of Edward the Confessor, and was held by Robert 
Malet in the time of the Conqueror. 

In 1234 John de Dagworth seems to have had the lordship, Osbert de 
Dagworth having a grant of free warren herein 1253.^ He is mentioned in 

' Dom. ii. 371. * Dom. ii. 432&. 

*Dom. ii. 310, 320&. 5 Dom. ii. 419. 

3 Dom. ii. 371- « Chart. Rolls. 37-38 Hen. III. pt. i. i. 



THRANDESTON. 319 

the Testa de Nevill as holding a knight's fee here of the abbey of Bury/ 
He died before 1262/ 

In 1316 Sir JohnDagworth held the lordship, and it probably descended 
in the same course as the Manor of Dagworth, in Stow Hundred, for two or 
three generations. The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquisition 
p.m., of Nicholas Dagworth, who died in 1351.^ His son and heir. Sir 
John Dagworth, in 1353 enfeoffed Thomas, Bishop of Durham and others.* 
and in 1356 the manor appears to have passed from the Dagworths, a fine 
being levied of both manor and advowson by Edmund de Paston, of St. 
Edmunds, against Sir John Dagworth.^ 

Again, in 1381, we find another fine, both of manor and advowson, 
levied by Sir William Wynkefeld, John Bacon, and John Aleyn, chaplain, 
against Edmund de Paston, of St. Edmunds.^ 

At the end of the 15th century we find the manor vested in Thomas 
Cornwallis, and from him it passed to his son and heir, John Cornwallis, 
who^died without issue in 1506, after which the devolution is the same as 
that of Lings Hall and Brome Hall, in Brome,^ and it is now vested in 
Lady Bateman, of Brome Hall. 

The manor is specifically referred to in the inquisition p.m. of Edward 
Cornwallis, who died 3rd September, 1510, leaving William, his brother 
and heir.* 

Manor of Welholme's. 

In 1507 Margaret Woodhall died seised of this manor, when it passed to 
her son and heir, Richard Woodhall. It seems then to have gone in fourths, 
and we find four fines levied of the manor between 1546 and 1550. The 
first was by Robert Kene against Robert Berkeley,' the second was by 
Robert Kene against Richard Breyne, and others,'" the third was by John 
Lane against Richard Poderych," the fourth was in 1550 by Robert Kene 
against Anne Reyner, widow." 

The manor, according to Davy, subsequently vested in Edmund 
Bedingfield, and from him passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bedingfield, 
who died in 1590, when it passed to his son and heir, Henry Bedingfield; 
but Davy also more correctly makes Robert Keene, of Thrandeston, lord, 
and states that in 1558 and in another place that he died in 1565.'^ The 
manor then, Davy states, passed to Robert's son and heir, John Keene. 
This may be so, but in 1590 Thomas Keene would appear to have had 
the lordship, for this year we meet with a fine levied of the manor against 
him by William Duncan'* ; and seven years later another fine levied against 
the said Thomas Keene by W. Kellam.'^ John Keene was dead by 1593. 

By the opening of the 17th century, the manor had vested in the 
Smith family.'* Richard Smith, of Carlton Road, Norfolk, 5th son of 
Richard Smith, of Bacton, and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John 

' T. de N. 291. '° Fine, Mich, i Edw. VI. 

« See Manor of Dagworth,in Stow Hundred. " Fine, Easter, 1 Edw. VI. 

3 Extent. I.P.M. 25 Edw. III. 33. " Fine, Easter, 4 Edw. VI. 

4 1.P.M., 27 Edw. III. 2nd nos. I7. '3 1.P.M., 7 and 8 Eliz. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. 

5 Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. III. 37. p. 132. 

6 Feet of Fines, 5 Rich. II. 7. ^-t Fine, Easter, 32 Eliz. 

7 Refer ako to the Manor of Culford, in 's Fine, Mich. 39-40 Eliz. 

Blackbourn Hundred. '« As to this family, see E. A. (N, S.) iv. 

8 1.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. 15, 31, 360. 380. 

9 Fine. Hil. 38 Hen. VIII. 



320 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Chester (alias Cressy), of Royston, and a sister of Sir Robert Chester, Knt. 
He was for 50 years PhiHser for the county of Norfolk in the Court of 
Common Pleas. His will is dated 8th Dec. 1621, and it was proved 7th 
January, 1621-2. He died 9th Dec. i62i,and and was buried in St.Botolph's, 
within Aldgate. He married Ehzabeth, sole daughter and heir of John 
Longe, of Livermere, and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, 
John Smith, who married Philippa, daughter of William Smith, of Thel- 
netham, and died without issue. 

We next find Thomas Smyth, of Thrandeston, holding. He was the 
son of Richard Smith, of Thrandeston, by his 2nd wife, Eleanor, daughter 
of John Braham, of Campsea Ash, which Richard was the son of Thomas 
Smith, of Thrandeston, the brother of the last-mentioned lord, John Smith, 
who died in 1621, by Margaret his wife, daughter of John Cooke, of 
Pakenham. 

This Thomas Smith married Mary Everard, and had two daughters 
only — Mary, married to Sir James Reynolds, Lord Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer, and had an only child Mary, who died May 26th, 1726, her 
mother dying i8th July, 1736 ; and Eleanor, married to Edward Frere, of 
Finningham and Thwaite Hall. She died 28th Sept. 1763, and he on 6th 
May, 1766, when the manor vested in their son and heir, Sheppard Frere. 
From this time the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Finningham Hall, in Finningham, in this Hundred. 

Arms of Keene or Kene: Az. a talbot passant Or, on a chief 
dancette Arg., 3 cross crosslets Sa. ; (or) Or, a chevron engrailed Gu. 
betw. 3 cinquefoils Az. on a chief of the 2nd a lion passant guardant, Arg. 

Manor of Maveson's. 

t' This was the lordship of Peter Mauveisyn in 1316, and nearly 200 years 
later was held by John Herbert al. Yaxley, of Yaxley, who died seised of it 
in 1505, when it passed to his son and heir, Anthony Yaxley, who died in 
1568-9, when it vested in his grandson, WiUiam Yaxley, son of Richard, 
son of Anthony. 

William Yaxley died in 1588, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Henry Yaxley.' 

In 1688 we find from the Exchequer Depositions taken at Diss, in an 
action between Margaret Yaxley and John Reynolds, that this manor lately 
belonged to Henry Yaxley, and Margaret Yaxley claimed for 2s. 2d. for 
defendant's lands, on the ground that they were parcel of the manor of 
" Mavisons.'"' Subsequently the manor vested in Charles, ist Marquis 
Cornwallis, who died in 1805, from which time the manor has passed in 
the same course as the main Manor of Thrandeston. 

Manor of Gossold's or Goshold's or Goswoald's. 

This manor was granted by William the Conqueror to Walter D'Bowyer, 
and was subsequently the lordship of Roger de Goshold, and seems to have 
been held in the reign of Hen. VL by Peter Harfye, who had here the third 
part of a fee, which passed on his death in 1463 to his son and heir, Peter 
Harfie, and from him to his daughter, who married Richard Grey, of Gosnold. 

The next holder was Thomas Grey, of Thrandeston, second son of John, 
and amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of Hen. VIH. is an 
action between him and Sir John Cornwallis respecting a forcible dispute 

' See Yaxley Manor, in this Hundred. " Exch. Dep. at Diss, 4 Ja,c. II. 



THRANDESTON. 321 

as to a watercourse, &c., at Thrandeston.' Thomas Grey married Anne 
Plumstead, and his youngest son Roger held the manor in 1585, and the 
following year a fine of the manor was levied against him by Francis Sher- 
man/ Roger married Margery, daughter of Thomas Billingford, of Blackford 
Hall, CO. Norfolk, and died in 1609, when he was succeeded by his son and 
heir, John Grey ; he married at Eye, 17th July, 1606, Mary, daughter of 
Edward Homings, of Carlton, and on his death the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Edward Grey, and from him to his brother, Timothy Grey, whose 
daughter Frances married John Rix. Thomas Rix, of " Goswoald" Hall, died 
seised of the manor in 1776, and his heir carried the manor into the Blakely 
family, and we find John Rix Blakely, of Goswoald Hall, died lord in 1810. 

In 1820 the manor was sold to Thomas French, of Eye. 

Goswold Hall is an ancient moat-house in the village. 

Arms of Grey : Gu., a lion ramp. Erm. double queeued within a 
border engrailed Arg. Of Rix : Az., a fesse betw. 2 unicorns' heads erased 
in chief, and a cross pattee in base all Or. 

Manor of Ampner's. 

In 1609 this manor was vested in Sir William Cornwallis, who died 
in 1613, from which time it has passed in the same course as the main 
Manor of Thrandeston. 



' Star C.P. Hen. VIII. vol. xvi. 199-202. ' Fine, Mich. 28-29 Eliz, 

RI 




322 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF THWAITE. 
jO mention is made of this place in the Domesday Survey. 
In 1316 the manor was vested in the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
and seems to have continued with the monastery until 
the dissolution of the religious houses, when it passed to 
the Crown. It was granted to Anne of Cleves as part of 
her dower, and she presented to the living in 1557. The 
manor for several descents was held by the family of 
Wright al. Reeve.' 

In the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of King Edward VI. we 
find an action by John Wryght al. Reve against Robert Gyldensleve and 
others as to the felling of trees at Thwaite/ and in the Chancery Proceedings 
in the time of Queen Elizabeth is an action by Thomas Reve against Adam 
Cossett al. Turner, and Elizabeth his wife, to recover lands in Thwaite, 
which plaintiff claimed as his inheritance, and which defendant claimed in 
right of his wife Elizabeth.^ The" family of Reeve resided at Thwaite 
Hall. Page* says : " Edward Wright (alias Ryve) married Margaret, 
daughter of Edward Singleton, of Mendlesham, and was succeeded by John, 
his only son, who married Elizabeth, daughter of John Rokewood, of 
Coldham Hall, in the parish of Stanningfield, in this county. George Reeve, 
Esq., their eldest son and heir, was created a baronet in 1662-3."^ This 
does not agree with that most careful and accurate genealogist, " G. E. C," 
the author of the Complete Baronetage. He stated that Sir George Reeve, 
of Thwayte, created a baronet 22nd Jan. 1662-3, was the 2nd, but ist sur- 
viving son and heir of Robert Reeve or Reve by Mary, sister of Sir Everard 
Digby ; also that he was M.P. for Eye 1660 and 1661 till death. Mr. 
Richard W. Read Reeve, of Wisbech, has kindly pointed out that 
Foss, in his " Judges of England," citing from Phillips' " Grandeur of the 
Law," 1684, p. 87, states that Sir George Reeve, of Thwaite, 
was descended from Sir Edmund Reve, of Long Stratton. Sir George 
"Reve" is mentioned in the State Papers in the Cal. of Compounders 
in 1653.* In 1671 a writ was issued to John Clarke, Sheriff of Suffolk, for 
inquisition ad quod damnum, if franchise of holding two markets or fairs a 
year at Thwaite were granted to Sir George Reeve,'' and the following 
year he requested an advertisement to be inserted in the Gazette as to the 
holding of a fair at Thwaite.^ He married 1st Anne, daughter of Robert 
Bacon and sister of Sir Edmund Bacon, 4th Bart., of Redgrave, and 2ndly 
in 1660 Anne, daughter of Ambrose Copinger, of Buxhall and Lavenham, 
and widow of Stephen Soame, of Little Thurlow, and of Isaac Creame. He 
died in Oct. 1678,^ when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert 
Reeve, 2nd Bart. He was M.P. for Eye, Nov. 1675 to 1679 and 1679 to 
1681, and married Mary, daughter of Sir Arthur Onslow, ist Bart., of West 
Clandon, in Surrey, and sister of Richard, 1st Baron Onslow, but died 
without male issue 19th Aug. 1688,'° at the early age of 36 years, when the 
title became extinct, and the manor devolved on his daughter and coheir 
Anne, who married, ist the Right Honourable Philip Sydney, 5th Earl of 

'As to this family, see N. and Q., 6th ser. SS.P., Cal. of Comp. 1653, p. 3079 
viii. 429, 477. 7 State Papers, 1671, p. 385. 

'Star C.P. Edw. VI. Bundle 7, 102. ^S.V. 1672, p. 469. 

^CP. ii. 377- sWiU proved 1679. 

♦History of Suffolk, p. 493. "Will proved Oct. 1688. 

'The warrant for the creation wiU be 
found amongst the State Papers in 
1662. (S.P. 1662, p. 573.) 



THWAITE. 323 

Leicester, and 2ndly, John Sheppard, by whom she had no issue. By her 
ist husband the Countess had issue two children, who both died in infancy. 
She died 13th April, 1726, and was interred in the chancel of the parish 
church of Thrandeston. Her 2nd husband, John Sheppard succeeded her. 
He had served the office of High Sheriff for the county in 1704, and again 
in 1714, and presented to the rectory in 1722. He married 2ndly Hannah 
Wilmot, by whom he had no issue, and dying in 1747 was interred in Mendle- 
sham church. 

The manor passed to his widow Hannah, who, the year following her 
first husband's death, married Sir Samuel Pryme, of whom Cole in his 
"AthensB Cantabrigiensis," thus remarks: "He was educated at St. John's 
College, born at Bury St. Edmunds, son of a tallow chandler. He flung up 
his profession in disgust that Lord Camden was put over his head, and 
married the widow Sheppard, of Suffolk, with a jointure of ;^ij8oo a year, 
the daughter of Mr. Wilmot, of Bunstead, an heiress of £20,000. He 
bought the estate at Whitton, in Twickenham, Middlesex, formerly Sir 
Godfrey Kneller's, and died at Whitton, 24th Feb. 1776, leaving a son 
formerly of St. John's College, to whom he bequeathed ;£7o,ooo." Sir Samuel 
never proceeded to a degree. In 1736 he was made a serjeant-at-law, and in 
1757 King's Serjeant; In 1775 he presented, with his lady, to this rectory. 

Miss Hawkins, in the first volume of her " Anecdotes, Biographical 
Sketches, and Memoirs," gives an interesting characteristic of Sir Samuel 
and his lady. The former is much too long for reprinting ; we cannot, 
however, resist transcribing the latter. 

" Lady Pryme I must sketch. There are portraits remaining of her 
which show her to have been what was called a prodigiously fine woman. 
Lady Pryme's remains were on a grand scale, but tempered to the observer 
by every evidence of good nature. Her first husband had been a Suffolk 
gentleman of large property ; and I have heard her speak, with a recollection 
as melancholy as her buoyant spirits could admit, of the time when she 
inhabited the since dilapidated mansion of Thwaite Hall. She talked 
with a true relish of the one o'clock dinners, and nine o'clock suppers. I am 
sorry I can recollect very little of the many terms in which she was wont 
to describe the soil of that part of Suffolk which she inhabited, and which, 
I believe, though no inhabitants will confess themselves to live in High 
Suffolk, though they may be near it, is literally in that disavowed portion 
of a county, the beauties of which are not sufficiently known. Speaking of 
her equestrian prowess, she described the clay to be of such a nature 
that her horse succeeding in getting his foot out of it resembled the drawing 
of a cork out of a bottle ; and that when she could compel him into a trot 
it made the very swamp roar." 

Sir Samuel died in 1776, and in 1792 Lady Pryme again" presented to 
this rectory, by which it appears this estate was held as a part of her dower.' 
It afterwards passed to a branch of the Sheppard family, seated atWethering- 
sett, with the Campsey Ash estate. 

John Sheppard, of Campsey Ash, held the lordship, and on his death 
in 1793 it passed in the same course as the manor of Brockford Hall, in 
this Hundred, to John George Sheppard, who held the lordship in 1855. 

Arms of Reeve : Sable, on a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis Or, as 
many spears' heads,* Azure. Edmundson in his Alphabet, makes the 
charges on the chevron " cronels of spears." 

^ See Manor of Brockford Hall, in Brockford ' Guillim says " pheons." 
with Wetheringsett, in this Hundred. 




324 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WESTHORPE. 

jHERE was one manor in this place in Saxon times held by 
Ulric Hagana, consisting of a carucate of land, i bordar, 
I serf, i^ ploughteams in demesne, wood to support 12 
hogs, 6 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 2 beasts, 31 hogs, 50 
sheep, 15 goats, and 5 hives of bees, valued at 20s. (increased 
to 30S. at the time of the Survey.) 

It belonged at the time of the Survey to Eudo, son of 
Spiruic, and was held by Geoffrey. And 15 freemen here, under Ulric's 
commendation, held 33 acres, i ploughteam, wood for the support of 2 
hogs, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los. The Survey states further : 
" Over this manor St. Edmund had in King Edward's time soc and sac 
and commendation ; and (Ulric) could not sell or give it away from the 
church ; and over the 15 freemen and over Ulric (?) Robert Malet's prede- 
cessor had commendation, witness the Hundred, and (Ulric) (?) could not 
sell or give his land away from him.'" 

Among the lands of Robert Malet were several holdings in this place. 
One was held of him by Hubert, and consisted of 42 acres, 3 bordars, i 
ploughteam, wood sufficient to support 8 hogs, i^ acres of meadow, 
valued at los. (increased at the time of the Survey to 30s.). 

It had formerly been held by Leverich, a freeman under commendation 
to Edric of Laxfield. Under him 4 freemen held 12 acres and half a plough- 
team, included in the above valuation. 

Another holding consisted of 28 acres and i ploughteam, and an acre 
of meadow, valued at 4s., increased to 5s. at the time of the Survey. It had 
formerly been held by 4 freemen under commendation to Edric. 

In the same township were 7 acres, valued at 14^., formerly held by a 
freeman under commendation to Edric, and he could not sell his land. 

Another holding consisted of 30 acres, i ploughteam, and an acre of 
meadow, valued at 50^. (increased to 5s. at the time of the Survey), the 
soc belonging to the King and Earl. It had formerly been held by 3^ 
freemen. Of these the Abbot of St. Edmunds claimed one, Erdric, with 
10 acres ; and the others were under the commendation of Uluric, the 
predecessor of Eudo, son of Spiruic* 

Belonging to Peter de Valoignes was an estate in this place of 9 acres, 
and wood sufficient to support 2 hogs, valued at i8d., formerly held by Alti, 
a freeman under commendation.^ 

Among the lands of Walter the deacon was a small holding of 6 acres, 
valued at Z2d., formerly held by Brictric, a freeman under commendation.* 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was a holding of 60 
acres, ij ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 
4 hogs, valued at los. This had formerly been held by 8 freemen under the 
soc and commendation of the abbot. 

In the same township were 7 acres, valued at 14^., formerly held by a 
man who could not sell.^ 

Among the lands of Robert the Blond was a holding of 4^ acres, valued 
at i6d., formerly that of 4 freemen under Achi's commendation.* 

'Dom. ii. 4346. ^Dom. ii. 4266. 

''Dom. ii. 3096, 321. 'Dom. ii. 3706. 

^Dom. ii. 3216. «Doin. ii. 440. 



WESTHORPE. 



325 



Manor of Westhorpe Hall. 

This was the estate of Ulric Hagana in the time of King Edward the 
Confessor, and at the time of the Domesday Survey was held by Eudo, son 
of Spiruic. Page, however, asserts that at the period of the Domesday 
Survey Robert le Blund held the lordship of the parish ; and in the first 
year of Edw. I. Margery, daughter of Jeffrey de Anos, lord of Hillington, 
in Norfolk, and relict of Sir Bartholomew de Creke, heldhalf a fee in Westhorpe. 
She was foundress of Flixton nunnery. As the worthy historian quotes 
no authority, we cannot conceive on what he bases his statement, but its 
inaccuracy is pretty obvious. The total holding of Robert le Blund in 
Westhorpe, was four and a half acres, valued at i6d. — not much of a 
lordship ! 

In 1240 we find that Walter de Westhorpe, brother of Roger, was 
seised of two parts of a fee here, but it is not clear that he had the lordship. 
A little later, however, John de Westhorpe did hold this, for there is still 
extant a deed of his whereby he granted to Philippo de Eya this manor, 
with the advowson of the church.' 

In 1323 the manor was held by John de Thorp, for he died seised of it 
this year,* when it passed to his widow Alicia, and there is an order on the 
Close Rolls in 1325 to deliverto "Ahce," late wife of John de Thorp in dower, 
a fee in Westhorpe, which Adam Coniers then held of the yearly value of 
£S.^ Sir John de Thorp, grandfather of the above John, married Margaret, 
sister of Sir Bartholomew de Creke and his coheir. The manor probably 
passed to John's son Robert, who died in 1330,* and may have passed to 
his son, John de Thorp, who died in 1350,' but if so, was certainly not held 
by him at the time of his death. There is a petition for damages, on a 
recovery of the manor, 1328-1330, amongst the Cotton MSS. in the British 
Museum,* which might throw light on the subject. It is clear that in 1338 
it belonged to Matthew de Cambridge, and was this year purchased of him 
by Robert Hovel, son of Bartholomew Hovel, of Wyverston, and Alianora 
his wife. The fine included 15 tofts, 300 acres of arable land, 15 acres of 
meadow, 30 acres of pasture, 30 acres of wood, and a rent charge in Westhorpe, 
Cotton, Finningham, Gislingham, and Nether Rickinghall, and the Manor 
of Westhorpe and the advowson of the church of that manor .^ 

By a fine in 1347 Peter de Scales, Richard de Blogate, Richard le 
Spencer, and Peter le Clerke, of Euston, convey the manor to Robert and 
Alianora his wife, and warrant it to them and their heirs for ever against 
all claimants, and for this recognisance Robert and Alianora gave them 
100 marks of silver.^ There is another fine affecting this manor the same 
year ; it was levied by Robert de Benhale, Richard de Blogate, Peter de 
Scales, Richard le Spencer, and Peter le Clerke, of Euston, against Thomas 
de Felsham and Joan his wife.' 

This Robert Hovell was a man of substance, and the year he acquired 
the manor of Westhorpe he also purchased of Sir Roger de Bavent and 
Hawisia his wife a messuage with 26 acres of arable land, &c., in Combs 
and Battisford, together with the advowson of the chapel of Combs for 
the lives of the said Sir Roger and Hawisia.' ° 



'j!. Edw. I. Harl. 576.4- 
« I.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 61. 
3 Close Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 
4 1.P.M., 4 Edw. III. 34. 
5 1.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 164. 



«Cott. iv. 23. 

7 Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. III. 26. 
*Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. III. 6. 
'Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. III., 32. 
'°Feet of Fines, 11 E^dw. III. HiL and Mich. 



326 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



On the Patent Rolls in 1345 we find a commission issued on the com- 
plaint of Thomas de Folsham that this Robert Hovel, described as of 
Wyveston John his brother, Adam Scoos, parson of the church of Westhorp, 
John Foxlee of Westhorp, Henry Belle of Eye, John de Hornyngeshierth 
of Baketon, Roger Bacoun of Mickelfeld, John Blome of Little Thornham, 
Walter Celestre of Westhorpe, Walter Balle of Westhorpe, Henry Hattele 
of Wyverston, William, son of Andrew Godhous of Wyverston, William 
Rampoile of Walsham, John "of the Welle V of Wolpit, William Kymbald 
of Walsham, William Brown of Westhorpe, John Densy of Wyneston, 
John Scot of Cotton, Richard Reynbald of Jakeslee, and others, broke his 
close at Westhorpe, and committed an assault.' 

Davy, however, states that the manor was held in 1307 by Philip de 
Eye, and he follows this with the list of lords : — 
1312. Barth. de Elmham had free warren.' 
1316. Adam de Cornies; 1334. He released all right to 
1330. John, son of Robert Pollard. 
1330. Henry de Elmham, son and heir of Bartholomew, held a 

manor here. John de la Ryvere died seised 35 Edw. III. 
1361. Richard de la Ryvere, brother and heir. 
1388. Sir William de Elmham, son and heir of Henry, died 1403. 
It is perfectly obvious that much of this cannot be correct, though 
it is possible there may at this time have been two manors in Westhorpe. 

We meet in 1371 with a fine levied of the manor by Sir William de 
Elmham and Anna his wife against John, son of Thomas de Aspale,^ and 
in 1375 with a fine of Mershall and Leveney Hall Manors by Sir 
Robert Marny, Sir Bartholomew de Naunton, John Leche, clerk, John de 
Heylesden, Edmund Gournay, Richard Daucres, Clement de Brettenham, 
Reginald de Bungeye, and Nicholas de Hoo, clerk, against Sir William 
Elmham." However, there can be no doubt about the lordship being that 
of Sir William de Elmham, son of Henry in 1371, and in this or the following 
year he had a grant of a market fair and free warren.^ Sir William de 
Elmham held command in the army which Spencer, the warlike Bishop of 
Norwich, led into Flanders, ostensibly to support the Italian Pope, Urban VI. 
against the nominee of France, Clement VII. The expedition failed, 
chiefly through the jealousy of the Duke of Lancaster, and on the return of 
the Bishop and his knight they were condemned in a heavy fine. Sir 
WiUiam de Elmham' s share of this fine was 3,080 golden francs, which the 
Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk was directed to levy. This occurred in 1384.^ 
Sir William died in 1403, and was buried in the abbey at Bury, leaving his 
estate to his widow (probably his 2nd wife) Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John 
Ingoldes;thorp, Norfolk, who died in 1419, and was also buried in the 
abbey of St. Edmunds, in the conventual church in a chapel at the lower 
end of the shrine of St. Edmund.'' He appointed his wife executrix with 
Sir John Ingoldesthorp, who presented to the church in 1403, and Elizabeth 
herself in 1408. 

Their wills are extant. That of Sir William is short, mentioning his 
children, but not naming them. The will of Elizabeth, dated at Westhorpe, 
ist Dec. 1419, is in French, with numerous specific bequests, by one of 
which she assigns to the altar of St. James, at Westhorpe, " Un vestiment 



' Pat. Rolls, 19 Edw. III. pt. ii. id. 
== Chart. RoUs, 5 Edw. II. 29. 
3 Feet of Fines, 45 Edw. III. 46. 
♦ Feet of Fines, 49 Edw. III. 27. 



5 Chart. Rolls, 46 Edw. III. i. 

^Rymer, Ann. I384. 

7 Suff. Institute, vol. v. p. 255. 



WESTHORPE. 327 

entier de rouge drape soie, &c.,avec ij chandelers de laton." She gives 
legacies also to Dame Margaret Kerdeston, her mother, and the relations 
of Thomas Catteston, or Cateston, her first husband. The Elmham pedigree 
is given as follows : — 

Alexander de Elmham = ? 

Bartholomew de Elmham, owner of Westhorpe 3 Edw. II. 

Henry de Elmham = Elizabeth, dau. and coheir of Sir William de Hackford. 
4 Edw. III. I 

Sir William de Elmham = Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Hugh Hastings, of Elsing. 



Admiral of the North 
Sea. 6 Rich. II. Will 
proved 1403. 



Will proved 1419. 



? Elmham = ? 

Robert de Elmham, 
of North Walsham. 

I 
Margaret = — Willoughby. 
wid. 1543. 

It is not clear what became of the estate on the death of Elizabeth, 
widow of Sir William de Elmham, in 1419, but not many years afterwards 
the manor was held by Sir William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk. 

This Earl held high position in the reigns of Hen. V. and Hen. VI., being 
successively created Marquis of Suffolk, Lord High Admiral, and finally 
Duke of Suffolk in 1448. He was found seised of the manor at the time of 
his mock trial and death in the cockboat off Dover.' 

Sir William was succeeded by his son, John de la Pole, who married 
the sister of Edw. IV., and John was succeeded by Edmund de la Pole, 
attainted 25th Jan. 1503, and beheaded in 1513.^ 

Amongst the State Papers in 1511 will be found a commission to 
enquire into the circumstances of a grant of this manor made by Edmund 
late Earl of Suffolk.^ 

The same year we find one of those frequent grants of these days having 
little effect, a grant to Robert Washington and Anne his wife for life and 
two years later in fee.* The grant was made at the annual rent of one red 
rose.' 

The estate was in 1514 assigned by the Crown to the widowed Countess 
Margaret, daughter of Lord Scroope, for life, and on her death in 1515 
passed under a grant made in 1514 of the reversion to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, who resided here with his wife, Mary Tudor, sister of Hen. 
VIII., in the noble mansion of Westhorpe Hall, which is now demolished. 
The cloister, the chapel, with its painted windows, and the original furniture, 
were preserved till about one hundred and fifty years ago, when it was 
entirely pulled down. 

During its demolition it was visited by the well-known Thomas 
Martin, " honest Tom of Palgrave," who, in a note left among his papers, 
says: "I went to see the dismal ruins of Westhorp Hall, formerly the seat 
of Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. The workmen are now pulling it 
down as fast as maybe, in a very careless and injudicious manner. The 
coping, bricks, battlements, and many other ornamental pieces are made 
of earth and burnt hard, and are as fresh as when first built ; they might 

'I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 4 0. 3 Hen. VHI. Rot. 10; 5 Hen. VHI. 

= I.P.M., 3 Hen. VIII. 217 ; 5 Hen. VIII. i. Rot. 23. 

3 S.P. 5 Hen, VIII. 4254. s S.P. 3 Hen. VIII. 3087 ; lb. 5 Hen. VIII. 

4872. 



328 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

with care have taken them down whole, but all the fine chimneys and 
ornaments were pulled down with ropes, and crushed to pieces in a most 
shameful manner. There was a monstrous figure of Hercules, sitting 
cross-legged, with his club and a lion beside him, but all shattered to pieces, 
and the painted glass is likely to share the same fate. The timber is fresh 
and sound, and the building, which was very lofty, stood as erect as when 
first built. It is a pity that care is not taken to preserve some few of our 
ancient fabrics ; to demolish every old piece of architecture is quite bar- 
barous.'" 

The family of Charles Brandon is represented to be of great antiquity, 
and to have assumed its name from the lordship of Brandon, in this county. 
He was endowed by nature with eminent qualities, both of body and 
mind, and was remarkable for the dignity and gracefulness of his person, 
and his robust and athletic constitution. He distinguished himself iji 
tilts and tournaments (the favourite exercise of his sovereign, Hen. VHT) 
by his consummate dexterity, gallantry, and valour. Having been brought 
up with that Prince, he studied his disposition, and exactly conformed 
to it, which produced so close an intimacy that his advancement 
in Royal favour and honours was rapid and extraordinary. His first 
creation to nobility was to the title of Viscount Lisle, in the 5th of King 
Hen. VHL, for his eminent services in the campaign against France ; and 
soon after he was elevated to the dignity of Duke of Suffolk. On the disso- 
lution of the greater monasteries, he obtained a considerable share of their 
possessions. In the 36th of the above reign, he was appointed general of 
the army sent to France, and took Boulogne. During the capricious reign 
of Hen. VIII., he preserved his influence to the last, and died, in the 
estimation of his King and country, with this character, that " although a 
better courtier than a statesman, yet he used his Prince's favours with so 
much moderation as not to disoblige anyone." 

The Duke married four times, and by the Princess Mary, the 2nd 
daughter of King Hen. VII., and widow of Louis XII., King of France, his 
3rd wife, he had a son Henry, created Earl of Lincoln, 17th Hen. VIII., 
who died in the lifetime of his father, and unmarried ; and two daughters, 
of which Frances married ist Henry Grey, afterwards Duke of Suffolk, 
and 2ndly Adrian Stokes ; and Eleanor, married Henry, Earl of Cumberland.'' 

The story of Charles Brandon's marriage with Mary, the sister of 
Hen. VIII., and Dowager Queen of France, need not be repeated ; but after 
their return to England Charles and his Royal wife appear to have spent 
much of their time at Westhorpe, the Queen amusing herself by laying out 
her garden after the fashion she had learnt in France, and occupying her 
later years in the education of her children. 

Here Mary died 25th June, 1533, and in the month following she was 
buried with royal honours in the neighbouring abbey of St. Edmund's, 
Bury. On the dissolution of the monastery her remains were removed to 
St. Mary's Church, and her tomb was re-opened in 1731, and again in 1784. 
Full notice of these proceedings is given in the late Mr. Tymm's History of 
St. Mary's Church. The Duke died in 1545, and was buried in the south 
aisle of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.^ 

: Kirby, Suff. Traveller, 3rd ed., p. 314. ^paper read by Lord John Hervey before 

^ Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 496. the Suffolk Institute in 1874 ; 

S.I. V. 255. 



WESTHORPE. 



329 



Charles Brandon appears in 1538 to have granted the manor to the 
Crown in exchange for other heriditaments/ and a grant of the manor was 
made to Anne of Cleves as part of her dower. In 1554 Sir Thomas Cornwallis 
had a grant of the reversion in fee by letters patent/ with power to alienate 
which he did in favour of John Cowell and others. 

Amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian will be found certain articles 
of agreement between Sir WiUiam CornwalUs and his brother Charles 
touching the manor.^ 

In 1566 Sir Nicholas Bacon had a grant of the manor^ and later in the 
reign of Ehzabeth the manor is found in the possession of William Barrow. 
The Barrows were a family of position in Norfolk and Suffolk. Thomas 
Barrow, who was living at Cranworth, in Norfolk, 1581, married Mary, 
daughter and coheir of Henry Bures, by whom he had a son, William, 
whose monument is on the north side of the chancel. From this time to the 
time of Maurice Shelton the devolution of the manor is the same as 
that of Newton Hall, in Babergh Hundred. 

On the marriage of Henry Shelton in 1687 with Hester, daughter of 
Sir John Churchman, of lUington, the manor was settled. Maurice Shelton 
settled the property upon his daughter Arabella* on her marriage in 
1727, and we find it held by her husband, Thomas Taylor, as of her right. 
Arabella's 2nd husband was Baron Pretyman, of Bacton, who died in 1758. 
She, by her ist husband, had two daughters, Maria Rebecca and Arabella, 
who married William Garrod, and died without issue. Maria Rebecca 
married ist Richard Dillon, who died without issue, zndly, John Reilly, of 
Ireland, who held this manor in right of his wife, and died in Ireland, 2nd 
Nov. 1795. Maria Rebecca died seised of the manor 8th Apl. 1810, at the 
age of 81, and was buried at Westhorpe, when the manor passed to her son, 
Thomas Reilly, who resided at Bury St. Edmunds, and 19th July, 1799, 
married Anne, a daughter of one Steele. Thomas Reilly died at Thornton 
Heath in Surrey, 6th Dec. 1831, at the age of 72. 

The manor subsequently passed to Sir Miles Nightingale, and in 1855 
was held by Lady Nightingale. It is now vested in Messrs. Beaumont and 
Sons, of Coggeshall, Essex. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
we find an action by Nicholas Raynberd against Robert Mulley and George 
Cooke to obtain a conveyance of freeholds and copyholds in Westhorpe and 
Finningham, the latter being held of the Manor of Westhorpe.' Westhorpe 
Manor was the subject of a fine levied in 1597 by John Cowell and others 
against Sir Thomas Cornwallis and others.® 

Arms of Elmham : Argent ; a fesse. Gules, between three eagles, dis- 
played Sable. Of Brandon : Barry of ten. Argent and Gules ; over all a 
lion rampant. Or. ; crowned per pale. Argent, of the second. 



' S.P. 30 Hen. Vril. vol. ii. 1182 (i8a). 

"I and 2 P. and M., 8 Rep. Hist. Com. 
277. 

^Tanner, xcviii. 99. 

* She was baptised at Benhall, 29th Nov. 
1709. The writer has seen a lease 
dated 4th Nov. 1718, made by 
Maurice Shelton of the one part, 
and John Randall, of Shelton, in 
Norf., clerk, and James Harvey, 
of Cockfield, Esq., of the other part, 
which was evidently a lease on 

S I 



which a release was founded, and 
this possibly formed part of the 
settlement referred to. In this 
lease, Westhorpe HaU, with the 
appurtenances is stated to be then 
in the occupation of Edward Grim- 
wood, at the rent of £130 per annum, 
and a messuage and premises 
then in the occupation of Richard 
Matthews, at a rent of £56. 

'C.P. ii. 418. 

^Fine, Mich. 39-40 Eliz. 




330 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WETHERINGSETT. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of Ely, 
and consisted of 4 carucates of land, 10 villeins, 9 bordars, 
4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging to the 
men, 4 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 500 
hogs. Also a church with 16 acres and half a ploughteam. 
There were of live stock 2 rouncies, 8 beasts, 30 hogs, 107 
sheep, and 18 goats, valued at £10. These details were not 
very different at the time of the Survey, when Ralph de Savigni held the 
fourth carucate of Ranulf Peverell ; the serfs were reduced to 2, and the 
wood was only enough to support 400 hogs. 

In the same township were 40 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at 
los., the soc belonging to the Abbot of Ely. This was formerly held by four 
freemen under commendation, Goodwin, Brictmar, Osulf, and Deerwulf. 
The holding was i^ league long and i league broad, and paid in a gelt gd. 
Others had, holdings therein.' 

Amongst the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King by Good- 
rich the steward were two holdings in this place. 

One consisted of 12 acres and a half, a ploughtearn, valued at 2s., as 
part of the valuation of Mendlesham (?). It had formerly been held by two 
half -freemen. 

The other consisted of 33 acres, i ploughteam, and 5 bordars, and ren- 
dered 40^. as part alsoof the valuation of Mendlesham (?). This was formerly 
held, by four freemen.^ 

A small estate in this place was that of Robert Malet, consisting of 7 
acres, valued at 45. It had formerly been held by Goodrich, a freeman.^ 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds were two estates. 
One consisted of 40 acres, 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams, and an acre of meadow, 
and wood to support 3 hogs, valued at 6s. 8^. This had formerly been 
held by ten freemen. 

The other consisted of 3 acres on the abbot's demesne, valued at 6d., 
and held by Godwin." 

Manor of Wetheringsett. 

In the time of 'King Edw. the Confessor, Thurston gave this manor 
to the church of Ely, but at the time of the Domesday Survey a fourth 
was held by Ralph de Savigni of Ranulf Peverell. The chief lordship was, 
however, retained by the Bishop of Ely, who had a grant of free warren 
here in 125 1, and claimed view of frankpledge and assize of bread and beer 
as well here.' 

On the Patent Rolls in 1297 we find a commission issued touching the 
persons who entered the park of William, Bishop of Ely, at Wetheringsett, 
hunted there and carried away deer,^ and the ministers' accounts of the' 
Bishop's temporaUties here 14 Edw. I. and 26 to 28 Edw. I., will be found 
in the PubUc Record Office.'' An inquisition of the lands of the Bishop 
of Ely in Wetheringsett in 1356 will be found amongst the Additional 
Manuscripts in the British Museum.^ 

In the time of Hen. VIII. the manor passed to the Crown, and the King 
in 1528 granted a lease of it for 61 years. Queen Elizabeth took the manor 

'Dom. ii. 384&. 'Q-W. 724. 

^Dom. ii. 2856. .^Pat. Rolls, 23 Edw. I. pt. i. 22, 21. 

3Dom. ii. 324. ^Bundle 1132, Nos. 9, 10. 

*Dojn. ii. 370, 371. 8 Add. 6165 



WETHERINGSETT. 331 

away from the See of Ely for a pension, and in 1575 it was granted to Lady 
Dorothy Stafford, widow. 

Amongst the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum is a note of the 
privileges granted by Kings of England and Queen Elizabeth to the Bishop 
of Ely " exemplify ed " for Wetheringsett Manor in 1590 for Lady Dorothy 
Stafford, then owner thereof.' We find amongst the Chancery Proceedings 
in the time of Queen Elizabeth an action by Anthony Gosnolde against 
Richard Haggard, parson of Wetheringsett church, to establish a modus for 
tithes as to a messuage called Wetheringsett Lodge and park called Wether- 
ingsett Park, the estate of Dame Dorothy Stafford, widow.^ 

Amongst the same Proceedings is an action by Richard Blenerhaysett 
against John Prettyman concerning deeds relating to copyholds, parcel of 
Wetheringsett and Brockford Manors, of which complainant's father was 
seised, the Lady Dorothy Stafford, widow, being lady of the Manor of 
Wetheringsett.' 

Lady Dorothy Stafford had licence in 1598 to alien to Sir Stephen 
Soame, Lord Mayor of London, while sale was effected in 1600.* He died 
in 1619,' when Sir William Soame, Knt., his eldest son and heir, succeeded 
to the said estate and died seised thereof in 1655, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Stephen Soame. His widow Ann, daughter and coheir 
of Ambrose Copinger, of Buxhall and Lavenham, married in 1659 George 
Reeve, of Thwaite, and possessed Wetheringsett Hall. George Reeve was 
created a baronet in 1662-3, ^^nd died in i678,and his widow by her will, dated 
1691, gave the manor to her kinsman, Henry Edgar, who held a court for the 
manor loth March, 1696. By his will, dated 1705, Henry Edgar devised 
it to his daughter, Mirable, married to Arthur Jenney, of Bredfield. She 
died in 1724 and he in 1739, when the manor passed to their son and heir 
Edmund Jenney, of Bredfield, who died in 1745, when it went to his son 
and heir, Edmund Jenney, and in 1764 it was vested in Charles M. Lord 
Maynard, as trustee for Edmund Jenney. 

In 1885 Mrs. Robert Moore was lady of Wetheringsett, in 1896 Mrs. 
Brooke, and the lordship is now vested in William Walter Westwood. 

Wetheringsett manor house, situated near the church, is a handsome 
mansion in the Elizabethan style, standing upon an acclivity. 

A description of the manor will be found amongst the Harleian MSS. 
in the British Museum.^ 



'Harl. 358. 'See Little Thornham Manor, in Risbridge 
"C.P. i. 358. Himdred. 

3C.P. i. 55. *Harl. 358. 
*Fine, Hil. 42 Eliz. 




332 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WICKHAM SKEITH. 

I HERE was one manor here in Saxon times held by Alfleda, 
a free woman under commendation to Harold. It consisted 
of 2 carucates of land, 21 bordars, 6 serfs, 3 plpughteams 
in demesne, and 6 belonging to the men, wood for the support 
of 40 hogs, and 4 acres of meadow. Of live stock there 
were 2 rouncies, 18 beasts, 46 hogs, 260 sheep, and 60 
goats, valued at loos. At the time of the Survey this manor 
was held by Roger de Poictou, and the details were a little different. 
There was only i ploughteam in demesne and 2 belonging to the men ; 
the rouncies and goats were not mentioned, the beasts were reduced to 
I, the hogs to 14, and the sheep to 33, while the value had come down to 
40S. 

Another holding of Roger de Poictou consisted of 16 acres, half a 
ploughteam, i bordar, and half an acre of meadow, valued at 3s. Also a 
church with 12 acres, valued at 2s. This estate was formerly that of a 
freeman and three half -freemen under commendation to Harold.' 

Among the lands of Earl Ralph kept in hand for the King by Goodrich 
the steward was a holding of 18 acres on the Mendlesham demesne, and 
I ploughteam, held at the time of the Survey by 8 bordars. And 
8 acres were held by two half -freemen and two freemen, it all being 
included in the valuation of Mendlesham. In the same township 
was a holding of 37I acres, and i J ploughteams held by 6 freemen. They 
had formerly been valued at 20s., but had been reduced to 12s., and were 
included in the above valuation. The soc belonged to the King and 
Earl. 

Another estate of Earl Ralph was a hamlet belonging to the demesne of 
Mendlesham, having 61 acres and an acre of meadow."" Robert Malet had 
one holding in this place which consisted of 16 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at 3s., the soc belonging to the King and Earl. Robert Malet's 
mother held it as of the same fee, and it was formerly held by two freemen 
under commendation to Ulveva.' 

Belonging to the fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds were two estates. 
One consisted of 60 acres under the abbot's soc and commendation, 2 
ploughteams, an acre of meadow, and wood to support 4 hogs, valued at 
los. It had formerly been held by 14 freemen. 

The other estate consisted of 5|- acres, valued at lod., the soc belonging 
to the King and Earl. Over them it was held by Orger, the abbot's steward, 
and Aluric the steward before him invaded them. It had formerly been 
held by Brunloc and Hervart, two freemen under commendation to Bur- 
chard, of Mendlesham.* 

Manor of Wickham Skeith al. W. Skey. 

This was the estate of Alfleda, a freewoman under the protection of 
Harold in the time of the Confessor, and formed part of the possessions 
of Roger de Poictou at the time of the Great Survey. 

In 1120 Robert, the 3rd son of Herbrand or Herdebrand de Sackville, 
held fourteen manors in this county of the Honor of Eye, by the service 
of one knight's fee ; but being displeased, it is said, at the nation's rejection 

' Dom. ii. 348. ' 3 Dom. ii. 323^. 

2 Dom. ii. 2856, 286. ♦ Dom.- ii. 370, 371. 



WICKHAM SKEITH. 333 

of Maud the Empress, and placing King Stephen on the throne, he forsook 
the world, and entered the abbey of St. John at Colchester.' We venture 
to doubt the alleged reason for the retirement from the world of Robert 
de Sackville, in view of the fact that one of the witnesses to his deed of 
gift to the abbey is Eustace, King Stephen's man, who by way of dis- 
tinction, is named Comes or the Earl. 

To the abbey Robert de Sackville granted the lordship of this parish, 
with the advowson of the church, and Jordan de Sackville, his son and heir, 
confirmed the said grant. The grant is still in existence and may be seen 
in the Bodleian.' 

The mandate of King Stephen concerning this grant, which was of half 
a hide of land and two men, will be found amongst the Essex Charters in 
the Bodleian,^ and in the same collection will be found a command of 
King Hen. II. to Hugh Pincerna without delay to return to the monks of 
Colchester their land in Wickham Skeith, so that they may hold the same 
in peace and freely, as the charters of King Henry, his grandfather, and 
of himself testify. The date is about 1160.* In the same collection is also 
the confirmation of Hugh Pincerna to the abbey of certain lands in Wick- 
ham, formerly held by Ralph, his grandfather. Adam Pincerna, son of 
Ralph, confirmed the gift.' By another deed Adam Pincerna granted 
to the abbey in frankalmoin the donation which Ralph his father made 
to them of half a hide and two men within the Manor of Wickham, and 
finally Jordan de Salcovilla, or Sackville, granted and confirmed to the 
abbey in frankalmoin the manor, which Robert, with the consent of 
Lettice his wife and his sons and heirs had given to the monks of Colchester.® 

This Jordan de Sackville was ancestor of the Earls and Dukes of Dorset. 
Sir Robert de Sackville died in the said abbey, and was buried there. 

An old chronicler refers to the gift in this way : " The manor was given 
in the reign of Stephen to the abbey of Saint John at Colchester, by a knight 
of great note in those days, named Robert de Salco Villa, who at last turned 
monk, upon condition that four monks of that house should be settled 
here to pray for his soul ; and in the next reign his son Jordan consented 
that the religious should be withdrawn from hence, and removed to 
Colchester, where the convent was to be increased with four religious 
above their own number." 

In 1258 the Abbot of St. John's, Colchester, had a grant of free warren 
here.^ 

Amongst the Essex Charters in the Bodleian is an appointment by 
Robert, son of William Gemun, of Pylecot, of Walter, keeper of the Manor 
of Wickham, and a monk of the abbey of Colchester, his attorney to pay to 
Sir Richard de Hecham 2id. of annual rent, &c., from a tenement in 
Wycham. The date is about 1260.' From the Quo Warranto Rolls we 
learn that the Abbot of St. John, Colchester, claimed view of frankpledge 
and assize of bread and beer in Wycham. 

At the Dissolution the manor passed to the Crown, and the State 
Papers for 1536 disclose the fact that in that year Sir Anthony Wingfield 
petitioned for a grant of the manor.^ He does not seem to have been 
successful, for in 1542 the manor was granted to Sir Richard Freston, with 

' See Old Hall, Braiseworth, in this s lb. 86. 

Hundred. ^ Bodl. Essex Ch. 86, 88. 

»Bodl. Essex Ch. 87. ^ Chart. Rolls, 37 Hen. IH. 2. 

3 Bodl. Essex Ch. 84. ^Bodl. Essex Ch. 96. 

*Bodl. Essex Ch. 85. ^S.P. 1536, p. 1493- 



334 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the rectory and advowson of the vicarage as parcel of the possessions of the 
above monastery. 

The grant will be found entered on the Originalia Rolls as made 34 
Hen. Vni. [1542]/ but strangely enough. Sir Richard Freston had granted 
a lease of lands, portion of the manor, before obtaining his own grant. This 
lease is still preserved amongst the Bodleian Charters. It bears date 20th 
April, 33 Hen.Vni.,and by it Richard Freston, described as of Mendham, 
demises to Nicholas Godard, of Wickham Skeyth, a meadow, part of the 
Manor of Wickam Skeyth, for 42 years at an annual rent of 3s. 4^.^ Sub- 
sequently to the grant to him of the manor, Richard Freston grants six 
more leases of portions of it, all of which leases are preserved amongst the 
Bodleian Charters. They are as follows : Indenture made 14th May, 
35 Hen. VIII., by which Richard Freston of Mendham, Esq.,, demises to 
Thomas Bedwall and Elizabeth his wife, and their sons, the site of the Manor 
of Wykham arid lands, &c., for 99 years, at an annual rent of £10.^ 

Indenture made loth November, 35 Hen. VIII., by which Richard 
Freston, of Mendham, Esq., lord of the Manor of Wickham Skeyth, in 
consideration of the receipt of £90, demises unto John Braine, of Stoke- 
asshe, yeoman, certain land in Wickham Skeyth, for the term of 300 
years, at an annual rent of m.]d^ 

Indenture dated 7th December, 35 Hen. VIII., by which Richard 
Freston, of Mendham, Esq., lord of the Manor of Wickham Skeyth, in con- 
sideration of the receipt of £6, demises to Edward Dove, of Wickham 
Skeyth, a small close of land in Wickham Skeyth, for the term of 99 years 
at an annual rent of iiij^.' 

Indenture dated 8th January, 35 Hen. VIII., witnesseth that Richard 
Freston, of Mendham, lord of the Manor of Wickham Skeyth, in considera- 
tion of the payment of ^12, grants to Nicholas Godard, of Wickham Skeyth, 
3 acres of land in Wickham Skeyth for 300 years, at -^d. annual rent.® 

Indenture dated loth December, 37 Heri. VIII., by which Richard 
Freston, of Mendham, lord of Wickham Skeyth, demises to John Braine of 
Stokeasshe, for £10. 14s. 6i., in hand paid, one close called Grenecroft, 
lying in Wickham Skeyth, for 1,000 years, at an annual rent of T.d7 

Indenture dated 21st April, 14 Q. Eliz., by which Richard Freston 
demises to John Bedwell his lands, pastures, &c., in Wickham for 3 years, 
at an annual rent of 305.^ 

There is also in the Bodleian a rental of the manor " renued for ayeare 
due at St. Michael 1627.'" 

Amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian is a quit claim of the manor 
by Richard andWiUiam Freston to Thomas Wyseman in 1546," and another 
lease in 1547 of part of the manor is also contained in the same collection. 

It is granted by Richard Freston to John " Prattyman."" 

Richard Freston had licence in 1547 toalien the manor to his cousin 

William Freston, who died in 1551, when the manor passed to his son and 

heir, William Freston, who died in 1564. 

'0. 4 Pars. Rot. 11. 7Ch. 1430. 

'Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1425. 8Ch. 1431. 

3Ch. 1427. sBodl. Suff. Ch. 1432. 

*Ch. 1428. "Tanner, cclxxxiv. 48. 

^Ch. 1429 "Tanner, cclxxxiv. 96. 

6Ch. 1426. 



WICKHAM SKEITH. 335 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Elizabeth are several 
actions respecting this manor in which Richard Freston is referred to as 
then lord. Three are as follows : — 

1. Proceedings by Robert Heywarde against Richard Freston 
to ascertain fine on admission to copyholds in Wickham Skeith, held of 
Manor of Wickham Skeith, purchased of devisees of will of John 
Bartlett.' 

2. Claim for possession pursuant to decree by Robert Heywarde 
against John Grene and others, as to lands in Wickham Skeith, held 
of Wickham Manor, Richard Freston being lord." 

3. Action by Elizabeth Reeve, widow of John Reeve and Edward 
Reeve, Mary and Thomasyn Reeve, his children, as to admission to 
lands in Wickham Skeith, held of Manor of Wickham Skeith, by John 
Reeve deceased, who surrendered same to divers uses, Richard 
Freston being lord.^ 

From Wm. Freston the manor passed to his cousin and heir, William 
Freston, who died in 1621, when it went to his brother and heir, Richard 
Freston, who died in 1634. 

The manor then devolved upon Richard Freston' s daughter and heir 
Elizabeth, married to Sir Nicholas Bacon, ist Bart., of Gillingham. He 
died 3rd Aug. 1666,* and she married, 14th Apl. 1670, Sir Wm. Godbold, of 
Mendham, and died in 1679, when the manor went to her son and heir, 
Sir Edmund Bacon, 2nd Bart., who died unmarried and was buried at 
Gillingham 5th Nov. 1683,^ when the manor passed to his brother and heir. 
Sir Richard Bacon, 3rd Bart., of Gillingham, who married his cousin Anne, 
daughter of Sir Henry Bacon, 2nd Bart., of Mildenhall, and died without 
issue, being buried at Gillingham 8th Oct. 1685. By his will, dated in 
1685* he devised the manor to his cousin. Sir Henry Bacon, of Herringfleet, 
for life with remainder to his son. Sir Henry Bacon, married 29th June, 
1671, to Sarah, daughter of Sir John Castleton, 2nd Bart. Sir Henry, the son, 
was buried at Gillingham 13th Jan. 1685-6, when the manor devolved on his 
son and heir. Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart., of Gillingham, who married ist in 
1688, Philippa, 4th daughter and coheir of Sir Edmund Bacon, 4th Bart., of 
Redgrave, and 2ndly i6th Apl. 1713 Mary, daughter of John Castell, of 
Raveningham, co. Norfolk. He died loth and was buried 17th July, 1721, 
at Gillingham, having by his will, dated 1718, directed the manor to be sold. 
In 1723 his son and heir. Sir Edmund Bacon, became the purchaser, and he 
sold the manor the same year to Sir Edmund Bacon, 6th Bart., of Garboldis- 
ham, CO. Norfolk, who died in 1758. 

This Sir Edmund Bacon, however, settled the manor on his daughter 
Lcetitia upon her marriage with Sir Airmine Wodehouse, Bart, son of Sir John 
Wodehouse, of Kimberley, Bart. Sir Airmine Wodehouse died 21st May, 
1777^ when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John Wodehouse, 
Recorder of Falmouth, M.P. for Norfolk 1784-97. He married, 30th March 
1769, Sophia, only daughter and heir of Hon. Charles Berkeley, of Bruton 

1 c,p. ii. n. + Will proved 1666, 

2 c.p. ii. 40. 5 Admin. 25th June, 1684. 
3C.P. ii. 399. Blomefield says Richard eproved May, 1686. 

Freston, lord of Wickham Skeith, ? Will proved 1777. 

died on 27th Nov. 1616, and was 
bm-ied at Mendham. 



336 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Abbey, Somerset. He was, 26th Oct. 1797, created a peer as Baron 
Wodehouse, of Kimberley, but previously to this in 1786 his trustees had 
sold the manor to Edmund, Lord Thurlow, who died in 1806, having by his 
will devised it to Edward, second Lord Thurlow, his nephew, in fee. 

By Act of Parliament 48 Geo. IIL [1808] the manor was vested in 
trustees for sale. 

In 1855 the manor belonged to the Rev. C. Garrad, who resided at the 
hall, which he had rebuilt a few years previously. Certainly from 1885 
the manor has been vested in the Henniker family, and Lord Henniker 
is the present owner. 

Court Rolls of this manor 4 Edw. IIL will be found amongst the 
Bodleian Suff. Rolls (36) and Rolls time of Elizabeth are referred to in 
Suffolk Institute.' 

Particulars of the manor will be found amongst the Tanner MSS. in 
the Bodleian.'' 

Amongst these same MSS will be found a lease by the abbey of St. 
John's (Colchester) to Simon Wyseman of part of the manor in 1490.^ 

And amongst the Essex Charters in the Bodleian is a grant dated the 
20th July, 1533, by Thomas, the abbot and convent of St. John's, Colchester, 
to Roberd Braine, of Wickham Skeith, and John, his son, of five acres copy- 
hold in Wickham, to be held according to the custom of the manor, paying 
the usual rent.* 

Manor of Wickham called Skeith's or Skeith Hall. 

This appears to have been the lordship of Robert de Ufford in 1298,' 
for that year he died seised of the manor and advowson," and is mentioned 
in the inquis. p.m. in 1316 of Robert de Ufford and Cedelia his wife,^but we 
find it also mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of Henry de Bradenham 
in 1304.^ 

In the time of Edw. III. the manor was vested in John de Hemenhale, 
and on his death in 1347' passed to his son and heir. Sir Ralph Hemenhale, 
who had a grant of free warren here in 1367.'° From this time to the time 
of John de Hemenhale, the idiot, the devolution of the manor is the same 
as that of Cotton Hempnall, in Cotton, in this Hundred. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is a quit claim dated loth Oct. 4 Hen. 
IV. [1402] from Simon " Blyaunt " to Hugh Lancaster, clerk, of all right in 
this manor and the Manors of Bolys and Cotton " quoe nuper fuerunt 
domini Radulphi Hemenale." And further, from the Inquisition Quod 
Damnum in 1407 we learn that at that date Isabella, Countess of Suffolk, 
held the manor, " which Simon Blyant had sold to her, and which late 
belonged to Ralph Hemenhale." The manor, however, is mentioned in the 

' iv. 373, and D.K.R., App. ii. p. 86. ^I.P.M., lo Edw. II. 76. 

'Tanner, cclxxxiv. 82. ^I.P.M., 32 Edw. I. 189. 

^Tanner, cclxxxiv. 81. 'I.P.M., 21 Edw. III. 22. 

" Bodl. Essex Ch. 157. ><> Chart. Rolls, 41 Edw. III. 2. 

5 See Parham HaU, Plomesgate Hundred. " I.Q.D., 8 Hen. IV. 6. 
e Extent. I.P.M., 26 Edw. I, 32. 



WICKHAM SKEITH. 



337 



inquisition p.m. in 1420 of Sir Robert Hemenhale.' The fact is, there were 
two Simon Blyants, and each had sons called John, thus : — 

Ralph Hemenhale 

1 \ I 

Joan = Walter Davie, John Hemenhale, Katherine = Simon Blyant = 1st wife. 



Isabella = Simon Blyant, Agnes, = John Blyant, 

of Ringhall, d.s.p. son and heir, 

1465. d.s.p. 



r" 

John, d. 1486. 



John = Anne, dau. of Thomas Jernegan, 

I of John, son of Sir John Jermy, Knt. 



I 
Richard = Anne Shalton. 

We next find the manor vested in John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, 
from whom it passed to his son and heir, Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, 
and from him to his widow Isabella, Countess of Suffolk, who held in 1497. 

In 1572 Sir James Wyngfelde seems to have had the manor, for that 
year he was called upon to show by what title he held.'' 

In 1573 the manor and advowson were vested in Richard Freston, 
Martin Calthorp and Joan his wife, and by a fine levied in Hilary (? Easter) 
term 15 Elizabeth, they were conveyed to Edward Huggens, Thomas Cordell, 
Robert Heath, and John Sulyard. There is an exemplification of this 
fine 24th Jan. 22 Jac. I., amongst the Bodleian Norf. Charters.^ 

The manor later became vested in John Tirrell, from whom it passed 
to Sir Edward Cleere, as appears from the Chancery Proceedings in the time 
of Queen Elizabeth, where we find an action to establish custom of the manor 
of " Skeith in Wickham " by John Godard and other copyholders against 
Sir Edward Cleere, " lord of the manor and successor to John Tirrell."* 

Other Chancery actions are John Brame v. John Bedwall, touching 
the site of Wickham HalP ; John Bedwall v. John Brame* ; Ellis Brame v. 
Martin Calthorpe, touching offices of bailiff of the manor,^ and Robert 
Copping V. John Brame, touching bailwick of the manor.^ 

In 1840 the manor was vested in Castell Gerrard and Harriet Maria 
his wife, who held a court loth March this year. 

Releases of this manor will be found amongst the Harleian Charters 
in the British Museum as follows : 1369, Harl. 54 G. 50 ; 1402, Harl. 46 E. 
40 ; 1403, Harl. 47 B. 15, 53 E. 35, 36 ; 1469, Harl. 43 G. 36. 



'I.P.M., 8 Hen. V. 65. sC.P. sen ii. B. x. 46. 

» Memoranda Rolls, 14 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. ^Ib. B. viii, 82. 

81. 'lb. B. X. 65. 

3 Bodl, Norf. Ch. 252. » lb. B. xlii. 19. 
4C.P. iii. 127. 



TI 




338 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WORTH AM. 

|HERE were several manors in this place in Saxon times. 
One was held in the time of the Confessor by Modgeva, 
a freewoman under commendation to the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and consisted of i| carucates of land, i8 bordars, 
2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the 
men, wood sufficient to support lo hogs, and 2 acres of 
meadow. Of live stock there was a rouncy, 3 beasts, 20 
hogs, and 20 goats, valued at 40s. This land Modgeva could neither sell 
nor give away from the church. At the time of the Survey the manor 
was held of Ralph de Bellafago by Richard de St. Clair, and was valued 
at loos., the soc belonging to the abbot. 

In the same township was another manor held in the Confessor's time 
by Godgeva, a freewoman under the commendation, soc, and sac of the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of 80 acres, 6 bordars, i ploughteam 
(which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), and i belonging to the 
men. Also 4 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. There were also 2 churches, 
with 40 acres, valued at 7s. At the time of the Survey this manor was held 
by Ralph de Bellafago. 

In the same township was an estate held by Richard de St. Clair of 
Ralph de Bellafago, consisting of 90 acres, 3 ploughteams, and an acre of 
meadow, valued at 13s. This was formerly held by 14 freemen under 
commendation to the Abbot of St. Edmunds.' 

There were other manors among the possessions of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds at the time of the Survey. One estate was held as two manors, 
and consisted of 60 acres, 8 bordars, 2| ploughteams 4 acres of meadow, 
and wood to support 14 hogs, the whole valued at 20s. This had formerly 
been held by two socmen. 

The other manor consisted of 30 acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteam, and 
an acre of meadow, valued at los. This had formerly been held by 
Alfah, a freeman under the abbot's soc and commendation. 

Another holding was that of Uluric, a freeman, in the time of the Con- 
fessor. It consisted of 30 acres under the abbot's soc and commendation, 
6J bordars, i ploughteam in demesne and half belonging to the men, and 
an acre of meadow, valued at los. 

Another holding was of 25 freemen having 3 carucates of land, and 6 
ploughteams, valued at 30s., the soc and commendation belonging to the 
abbot. It was a league long and 10 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 

Robert Malet had two estates in this place at the time of the Survey. 
One consisted of 4 acres, valued at 8d., the soc belonging to the King 
and Earl. This was formerly held by Algar, a freeman under commenda- 
tion to Edric. The second consisted of 20 acres, 2 bordars, half a plough- 
team, an acre of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 6 hogs (at the time 
of the Survey for 2 only), valued at 5s. In the time of the Confessor this 
was held by Siric, a freeman under Stigand, and under him were three 
freemen with 6 acres, the soc belonging to Stigand.^ The Survey also 
mentions here a holding without land, a freeman, Coleman, held by Aubrey 
de Vere.'* 

' Dom. ii. 3546. 3 Dom. ii. 361. 

2 Dom. ii. 3206, 322&. 4 Pom. ii. 418. 



WORTHAM. 



WoRTHAM Hall Manor. 



339 



This was the estate of Modgeva, a freewoman in the time of the Con- 
fessor, and of Richard de St. Clair, holding under Ralph de Bellafago at the 
time of the Great Survey. By the time when Sampson de Tokington was 
made abbot in 1182 the main lordship of the parish had become vested in 
the abbey of St. Edmunds, and Sampson, the abbot, enfeoffed Osbert de 
Wachesham in the half of the parish with Marlingford in Norfolk, which 
was to be held of him and his heirs at one fee, he paying to every scutage 
20S., and castle guard to Norwich Castle ; two parts of it were laid at 
Marlingford and a third here. 

The Testa de Nevill states that Giles de Wachesham held a fourth 
part of a knight's fee in Wortham of Bury abbey,' and it also mentions 
that this manor was taken into the King's hands on the death of Giles de 
Wachesham." 

In 1247 Giles,^ son and heir of Osbert de Wachesham, had a charter of 
free warren in the manor. He held the manor partly in chief of the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds by the service of T2d. and quarter of a knight's fee, and 
the residue of the barony of Le Ryly by the service of a quarter of a knight's 
fee. Giles de Wachesham died in 1267,* and the manor passed to his son 
and heir. Sir Giles de Wachesham. He it was of whom Hugh de Creeping 
held a moiety of the Manor of Depham, Norfolk, "as of his Manor of 
Wortham in Suffolk " in 1272. Sir Giles de Wachesham died in 1272,^ 
when the manor passed to his widow Joan, and as he left his son and heir. 
Sir Gerard or Giles de Wachesham, an infant, the manor was taken into 
the King's hands, and on the Close Rolls for 1272 is an order to deliver to 
Joan as dower, this manor, retaining in the King's hands in the name of 
custody, £4. I2S. if ^. of the rent assize of the free tenants until the heir of 
Giles came of age, as the King assigned to Joan £ig. 6s. z^d., in the said 
manor, extended at £23. i8s. /[d., as her dower of the lands that belonged to 
Giles extended at £57. i8s. y^d.^ Giles, the son, inherited. He was 
Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1290, and died in 1294, leaving Giles or 
Gerard de Wachesham, his son and heir, who in 1301 settled the lordship 
upon himself for life, and then on Giles his son and Amicia or Amy his wife, 
and their heirs. A fine for effecting this settlement was levied by Gerard 
de Wachesham against Giles de Wachesham and Amicia his wife.^ 

In 1345 Sir Robert de Wachesham, cousin of the last Giles or Gerard, 
was lord and patron, and it is said that in 1358 a fine was levied between 
Sir Robert and Joan his wife, daughter of Simon de Hetherset, Ralph de 
Dunton, and others, whereby this lordship, and a moiety of the advowson 
were settled on themselves and their issue, remainder to John de Wachesham 
(brother of Sir Robert), and Margery his wife. 

Sir Robert de Wachesham left a daughter* Elizabeth, who married Sir 
Thomas Gerberge (Gerbridge), and it is said by some that he inherited in 
her right. 

Thev-^dvowson of this parish church, with the manor, was anciently 
held in moieties ; and the above Sir Giles de Wachesham, who deceased 

' T. de N. 291. = I.P.M., I Edw. I. 9 ; 3 Edw. I. 28. 

'T. de N. 194. ^ Close Rolls, l Edw. I. 7. 

3 See Manor of Stanstead, in Babergh ''Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. I. 37. 

Hundred, and Culpho, in Carlford ^Not an only daughter as stated in vol. 

Hundred. I, in the account of Stanstead 

4 Extent. I.P.M., 52 Hen. HI. 14, or File Manor. 

35 (10). 



340 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

in 1272, granted to William de Hereford, rector, a mediety of the 
church of Wortham, Richard, son of Hervy Ingald, with all his family, 
and all his chattels, for two marks ; and the said WilUam, who had purchased 
him, made him and all his descendants free, on condition that he and his 
successors for ever should pay a penny a year to the church of St. Mary, 
at Wortham, upon the day of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, at the high 
altar, to find a light at that altar ; and to the said WilHam and his succes- 
sors three roots or races of ginger every Michaelmas-day. 

We find that in 1340 Robert de Wachesham and Joan his wife levied 
a fine of the manor, in which William de Hederset, parson of Attelburgh 
church, and Walter Laurenz, parson of Neuelton church, were deforciants.' 
Sir Robert died in 1366, when the manor passed to his widow Joan in* 
dower. And in 1379 there is a fine of a moiety of the manor and advow- 
son levied by William Hare and Robert Wayte against John Blundell 
and Avicia his wife, which George Felbrigg and Margery his wife held for 
Margery's life." 

And in 1383 another fine of a moiety of the manor was levied, in which 
Sir Edmund de Thorp, Sir Robert Corbet, Andrew, parson of the church 
of Mateshale, and Thomas Moreyn, of Langele, were petitioners, and Sir 
Thomas " Gerberge " and Elizabeth his wife, were deforciants, in which it 
is stated that it relates to the moiety which George and Margery de Felbrigge 
held for the life of Margery.^ It seems pretty clear from these fines that the 
manor had gone to two coheiresses, Margery married to Sir George Felbrigge, 
and Elizabeth, married to Sir Thomas Gerberge. In 1384 Sir George and his 
lady acquired the moiety of Sir Thomas Gerberge and Elizabeth, the former 
being petitioners and the latter deforciants in a fine levied this year of a 
moiety of the manor." 

This year Sir George Felbrigg had a grant of free warren here.' From 
the time of Sir George Felbrigg to the time of Sir Henry Felton, who 
inherited in 1613, and was created a baronet in 1620, the devolution of the 
manor is the same as that of Playford, in Car