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Full text of "The manors of Suffolk; notes on their history and devolution, with some illustrations of the old manor houses"

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Th« 



Manors of Suffolk 



Notes 



Their History and Devolution 

The Hundreds of Lothingland and Mutford, 
Plomesgate, and Risbridge 

With some Illustrations of the Old Manor Houses 



BY 



W. A. COPINGER. M.A.. LLD., F.S.A, F.R.S.A. 

Of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-law, Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Law in the 

Victoria University of Manchester, Sometime President of the Bibliographical Society, Author of 

"County of Suffolk : Its History as Disclosed by Existing Records," &c. 



Vol. 5. 



Privately Printed 

and obtainable only by Subscribers 

from 

TAYLOR, GARNETT, EVANS. & CO., LTD. 

IVIANCH ESTER 

I 909 

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Lothingland and Mutford pi^mesgate Hundred. 
Mundreds. 



SAXTON, 
1576. 



*-<tW 




THE 



Manors of Suffolk. 




LOTHINGLAND HUNDRED. 

^N the civil government of the county this has been accounted 
but a Half -hundred, the other half being the district of Mutford, 
with which it was, in 1764, incorporated as one Hundred by 
Act of Parliament, for erecting a House of Industry and 

I' ameliorating the condition of the poor. In the ecclesiastical 
division it is within the diocese of Norwich, and was anciently 
one of the rural deaneries under the Archdeacon of Suffolk 
imtil the office of rural dean was abolished. 

It is a narrow tract of land at the north-eastern extremity of the county, 
having the German Ocean for its boundary on the east, the River Yare on 
the north, the Wayeney on the west, and Lake Lothing, an extensive sheet 
of water, upon the south, from which the Hundred derives its name. 

It was formerly an island, the River Waveney discharging itself into 
the ocean between Kirkley and Lowestoft at a small inlet or bay known as 
Kirkley Ham, from which it was navigable to a considerable distance beyond 
Harleston. The passage of the haven, however, gradually contracted, 
but preserved a small communication with the sea, which proved extremely 
troublesome whenever there was any unusual agitation. To prevent inun- 
dation in tempestuous weather a breakwater was constituted, but subse- 
quently fell into decay, for in the early part of the 17th century the sea 
entirely withdrew from the mouth of the river, and a firm and narrow 
isthmus was formed, which is able to resist the most impetuous attacks from 
the ocean. Lothingland, instead of an island, has now become a peninsula. 
Amongst the -State Papers of the time of Queen Elizabeth' is a Survey of 
Lothingland made in 1574. It deals with the men. residing on the island, 
armour and weapon, fertility of the soil, traitors, and the government of the 
island.^ The material portion of the Survey, as given in a recent publication,* 
is as foUows : — 

" The island is in circuit between 29 and 30 miles ; it containeth ( ) 
parishes ; it is environed near 20 miles towards the land with a great river 
and other fresh waters, which be in some places about leight score yards over 
and some places more and some places less. And in the wide waters the 
depth of some places four fadome, most of two or three fadome, some places 
are sholder, but the straightest and the sholdest places being navigable for 
lighters of great burden. Other places thereof is envirpned with Yermothe 
Haven which ebbeth and floweth and meeteth with the said fresh waters 
and is in some place a mile broad and in some places deeper and in other some 
sholder, but navigable as aforesaid. Where it is most sholder and where the 

'Vol. 171, No. 63. 'Proceedings of Suffolk Institute, vol. 

'In the same volume is a plan of the xi. p. 314. 

island, with sketches of its churphes, 

mansions, &c. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



waters besholdest It is compassed with Marshes of great breadth on both sides 
the Ryvers. And the main sea environeth the said island about six miles 
and'meeteth with the said waters at the one end of the Island and meeteth 
them at the other end with a fiighte-shoote where the ground is verie low and 
was an havens mouth sometimes. And may as it seemeth in a short space 
be cut through again without any great charge, and the passages in to and 
out of the Island are very easy to be kept. And so the island seemeth to be 
very great defence for itself, both against the Sea and by land for none can 
come to it from the sea in the night time neither in the day time without 
sufferance of the Island if it be planted for defence as it was in King Henry 
the eight his dales, by reason of the sands in the sea which be as a wall to 
the same haven a road for ships within. 

" The means for outward defence in the judgement of the wiser sort to 
have their places of defence reduced to their ancient strength even such as 
were in Her Majesty's fathers days provided to be contynued (videlt) the three 
old Bulwarks to be reared of new at the charge of the Island and country 
adjacent. The blockhouse being now eaten up of the sea, which was so 
planted as yt did beate the South and North Roade, to be built of new and 
so planted as it may serve most to avoid, and then the Bulwarks and Block- 
houses being stored with a convenient proportion of ordanance cannot (in 
our poor judgement) but make a strong resistance against all attempts of 
invasion of sea which ordanances we are humble suitors for the Island unto 
all your good lordships that you will be means for them unto Her Majesty 
that they may be once furnished of. And they be bound for ever after to 
maintain them at their own and the country's charge because the old are verie 
few and utterly unserviceable." 

The soil is in many places a rich, strong loam, on a substratum of clay, 
but a light fertile sand prevails along the eastern side and near Lake Lothing, 
with an occasional mixture of clay and brick earth in many parts, wet, and 
fuU of springs. In the vale of the Waveney is a broad tract of rich marshes. 
The length of the Hundred from north to south is 8 miles, its breadth from 
east to west 5 miles, making a circumference of 21 miles. 

It contains 16 parishes and 32 manors. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes, 


Manors. 


Ashby 


Ashby. 


Flixton 


Flixton. 




/ Belton or Gapton 


i^ j-A^^irvyxA • • • • 


Lawneys. 




Hall. 




Fritton al. Fritton 


Belton 


- Blundeston Hall. 


Fritton 


Paston's. 




Gunville's al. Blun- 




Caldecot Hall. 




ston Gunvile's. 




Gorleston. 




Bradwell. 


Gorleston . . 


Bacon's. 




Bradwell Hall. 




Spittings. 


Brad^yell . . 


Caxton Hall. 


Gunton 


Gunton. 




Browston Hall. 




Herringfleet late 


Burgh Castle 


Hobland Hall. 
Burgh Castle. 


Herringfleet 


Priory. 
Loudham and Tit- 


Corton 


Corton. 
Newton. 




sail's Herringfleet. 


Hopton 


Hopton. 



LOTHINGLAND. 



Parishes, 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 




Lothingland. 




/ Oulton or Oulton 


Lothingland 


East Leet, West 




High House. 


Leet, North Leet^ 




Fastolfs, Fas to If 




i South Leet. 


Oulton.. .. 


Hall, Oulton Hall 


Lound 


Lound. 




or Tenement 


Stalham's in Lound. 




Rolfe's, Hough- 


Lowestoft . . 


Lowestoft. 
Akethorp. 


Somerleyton 


\ ton Hall. 
Somerleyton. - 



The fee of the Hundred continued in the Crown as a Royal demesne 
from the Conquest to the reign of Hen. HL By this monarch it was granted 
in 1228 to John Baliol, who had married Devorguilla,. one of the coheirs 
of John Scott, Earl of Chester arid Huntingdon, and on his death in 1259 
passed to John Baliol, King of Scotland ; but upon his renouncing his 
homage to the Crown of England, this and all his Enghsh estates became 
forfeited to the Crown. By Edw. L the fee of the Hundred was granted in 
1306 to John de Dreux, Earl of Richmond, his sister's son. John de Dreux, 
nephew and heir of the former Earl, died in 1341, in possession of it ; and in 
1376 it appears to have been held by the Earl of Surrey. It next passed 
into the hands of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, whose descendant, 
Edmund de la Pole, lost it by attainder for high treason in the reign of 
Hen. VIIL, when it was granted by that monarch to Edmund Jernegan 
and Mary his wife, and subsequently passed through the Allin al. Anguish 
and Peto families to its present possessors, the trustees of the late Richard 
Henry Reeve, of Lowestoft. 




THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ASHBY MANOR. 

[jSHBY or Haskeby lies near the centre of the Islahd of Lothing- 
landj and contains 1,045 acres. It is not mentioned by 
name in the Domesday Survey. In 1269 Sir John de Askby 
or Ashby, son of Geoffrey de St. Sano, held the lordship, 
and was succeeded by his son Jeffrey. About 1280 we find 
a grant by Robert de Ingelose, in which he is described as 
Lord of Ashby.' That the Ashbys and Ingeloses who came 
from Loddon Inglose, in Norfolk, were related is shown from a charter in 
the Bodleian of about this same date (1280) by which Geoffrey, son of John 
de Askeby, grants to John de Ingelose, Ms nephew, lands and a miU in Ashby.^ 

In 1312 John de Ingelose presented to the church. He was succeeded 
by Sir Robert de Inglose, Knt., who was living in 1337, but died before 1363,^ 
for that year we meet with a grant by Joan described as his relict.* He 
could not therefore have been, as supposed by Suckling, that Robert Englisse 
or Inglosse mentioned by Weever as buried in Lowestoft church in 1365. 
Sir Robert de Ingelose was succeeded by John de Inglose living in 1346 
who died in 1368, when Sir Henry de Inglose, Knt., became lord. He died 
before 1394, ^^^ ^^^ followed by his widow Anne, who died that year,' and 
was succeeded by Sir Henry Inglose,* Knt. Sir Henry served in the wars 
of France, and in 1402, being then an esquire only, preferred a libel in the 
Court of the Earl Marshal against Sir John Tiptoft, who had retained him 
with 16 lances, several archers, &c., and refused to pay him, and so he, the 
said Henry, declared that " he was ready by the help of God and Saint 
George to prove against the said Sir John body to body, as the law and 
custom of arms required on that behalf." 

In 1421 he was taken prisoner at the battle of Bauge le Vieil, in France, 
where the Duke of Clarence was slain, and in 1427 he being proxy for Sir 
John Fastolf was installed a Knight of the Garter for him. 

Sir Henry Inglose married Anne, daughter and heir of Robert Gyney, 
of Haverland, in Norfolk, by Margaret his wife, daughter and heir of John 
Fastolf. He made his will dated 20th June, 1451, the year in which he died. 
He desired to be buried in the presbytery of Horsham priory by Anne his 
wife, and gives to the priory of Mount joy in Haverland 40s. ; to the vicar of 
Haverland for tithes forgotten 26s. M. ; to the repair of St. Martin's church 
by the palace in Norwich 20s. ; to Sir John Colvyle and Anne his wife a legacy, 
(she was testator's daughter) ; to Anne, daughter of Edward Wichingham, on 
her marriage £10 ; to Henry Inglose his eldest son this Manor of Ashby ; to 
Robert his 2nd son other manors in Norfolk ; to his daughter Margaret 
Beaufre a legacy ; and ordered his lordships of Gunton and Hopton to be sold 
by his executors, Edward Wichingham, Robert Inglose, and John 
Parham, clerk, to pay his debts, Robert Inglose, however, seems to have 

'Bodl. Suff. Ch.686. position with the inscription be- 

*Bodl. Suif. Ch. 677. neath; the brasses were all moved 

^Weaver says one Robert Englise or from the matrices except a small 

Inglosse esquyer who died in 1365 one, upon which were inscribed the 

was buried in Lowestoft church, initials of Robert Inglosse. 

and Gillingwater mentions that the •*Bodl. Suff. Ch. 706. 

gravestone of this person, which was 'I.P.M., 18 Rich. II. 25. 

in the middle aisle of Lowestoft ^Suckling confuses these two Henry Ing- 

church, formerly contained the effigy loses. 

of a man standing in a prasdng 



A^HBY MANOR. 5 

acquired this Manor of Ashby, for we find he presented to the church in 
1458. Amongst the Suffolk Charters in the Bodleian we find a grant by 
John Berney, sen., William Paston, and others, no doubt trustees, to Robert 
Inglose of the manor with the advowson of the church in 1460,' and a grant 
by Robert Inglelose of the same to John Yatys in 1472,'' and a demise 
of the manor for seven years by Elinor Jenny to Peter Nalbys t. Hen. VIII.^ 
Robert Inglose left a daughter Constantia, who married Richard Blundevile 
or Blomevile, and to them the manor passed. In 1514 they sold it to 
Edward Jernegan or Jerningham, and a fine of the manor was accordingly 
levied between Edward Jerningham, Sir Thomas Wyndham, Knt., Thomas 
BrewySj and John Scott complainants, and the said Ralph Blomvyle and 
Constantia his wife deforciants.'* The fine included the Manor of Ashby, 
and I messuage, 40 acres of land, 6 of meadow, 6 of pasture, 40 of briery, 
and 8s. rent in Ashby, and also the advowson of the church. Edward 
Jerningham the purchaser died in 1515,^ when the manor passed to his son 
and heir. Sir John Jerningham. 

Amongst the Suffolk Charters in the Bodleian is an acknowledgment 
by Sir William Kingeston and Mary his wife^ that John Jernegan and others, 
in 1534, were the owners of the manor.'' Sir John Jernegan died in 1558, and 
was succeeded by his grandson, John Jernegan, of Somerleyton, the son of 
his eldest son, George Jernegan and Ela his wife, 3rd daughter of Sir Henry 
Spelman, of Narborough, co. Norfolk, Knt. 

The settlement made on the marriage of George Jernegan and Ela 
Spelman in 1533 included lands in Ashby,^ and the conveyance the next 
year made pursuant to the agreement for settlement included the manor, 
which was granted by John Jernegan to Sir Thomas Bedyngfield, Knt., and 
others as trustees.' 

In 1575 this Sir John Jernegan, eldest son of George Jernegan, demised 
fish house in Ashby and two jJonds, lying on the east part of the house ; 
and the whord, called the old whord, belonging to the Manor of Ashby, and 
aU those several waters lying in Ashby and called Eritton Fen ; and two 
years later demised to one Godfrey all that his fowling, liberty, and royalty 
of fowhng upon the water of Ashby, and upon the common of the house of 
Ashby, rendering 100 couple of teals, and two couple of mallards yearly. 
In the following year he demised certain premises in Ashby, excepting hun- 
ting, hawking, fishing, fowling, and all other royalties. 

In 1582 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by Edmund Bedingfield 
and others against the said John Jernegan.'" Sir John Jernegan, who 
married the Hon. Catherine Brooke, daughter of Lord Cobham, left issue 
four daughters and coheirs, viz. : (i) Elizabeth ; (2) Catherine, who 
married Weymond CareW, of Nefold ; (3) Frances, who married ist Sir 
Thomas Bemngfield, of Bedingfield' and Oxburgh, Knt., by whom she had 
two sons, and afterwards her cousin Henry Jerningham, of Costesy ; (4) 
Margaret, the wife of Thomas Forth, of Butley. Sir John Jernegan died 
in 1587, and the manor apparently passed to his daughter Frances and her 

'Bodl. Suff. Ch. 738. ^She had been the widow of Sir John 

*Bodl. Suff. Ch. 753. Jemegaln's father. 

^Bodl. Suff. Ch. 789. '■Bodl. Suff. Ch. 773; Fine, Ttin. 26 Hen. 

* Fine, Easter, 6 Hen. VIII. _ , , -. yill. 

^See Horham Jemegitti Manor, iii fioxhe 'Bodl. Suff. Ch. 772. 

Hundred. 9 Bodl. Suff. Ch. 774. 

'"Fine, Hil. 24 Eliz. 



6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

second husband, Henry Jerningham, who sold the manor to John Went- 
worth the same year.' 

This purchase included not only the Manor of Ashby, but also the 
Manors of Cotton and Newton, with the appurtenances, consisting of 4 
messuages, 3 gardens, 50 acres of land, 20 of meadow, 40 of pasture, 10 of 
wood, 200 of furze and heath, 10 of marsh, 10 of alder^ 40s. rent, and free 
foldage in Ashby, Gorton, Newton, Oulton, Lowestoft, and Hopton, and 
also the advowson of the church of Ashby. John Wentworth purchased all 
the tenements in the town of Ashby, and enclosed 40 acres on Ashby warren 
or common, and ploughed, sowed, and reaped the same. He seems to have 
made these purchases with the object of acquiring and exercising the sole 
privilege of fishing and fowling in the water in Ashby. 

Amongst the Bodleian Charters is a lease in 1591 by this John Went- 
worth to Thomazen Cowper of his fish house in Ashby, his two ponds in 
the east part of the said house, and also a certain whorde called the old 
whorde, belonging to the Manor of Ashby, and the waters in Asheby, Herring - 
flete, and Lound for 10 years at an annual rent of 36s. Sd.'' John Wentworth 
died in i6i8-g, and his son by Elizabeth Southwell, Sir John Wentworth, 
succeeded but died without issue in 1651. On the death of his widow Anne, 
daughter of — Soame, in 1663, John Garneys, son of EUzabeth Wentworth, 
Sir John's eldest sister by Charles Garney, succeeded. His son Thomas 
Garneys, by Anne (or Elizabeth) Rugge, sold the manor in 1672 to Admiral 
Sir Thomas AUin, Bart., of Lowestoft, who died in Oct. 1685.' His ist wife 
was Alice, daughter of William Whiting, of Lowestoft, and his 2nd Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Anguish, of Moulton, co. Norfolk. By his )vill Sir 
Thomas gave all his manors to his son Thomas and the heirs male of his body, 
and in default to his friends. Sir John Rouse, Henry Bedingfield, and Thomas 
Sands in trust for such persons as his said son should by deed or wiU appoint, 
and in default for his grandchild, Richard Anguish, in tail male, with remainder 
in trust for Edmund Anguish his (testator's) grandson in tail male, with 
remainder in trust for his grandson, AUin Anguish, and his heirs. The son. 
Sir Thomas AUin, Bart., sometime M.P. for Winwick, succeeded. He married 
in 1672 Mary, daughter of John Caldwell, of London, scrivener, but died 
without issue in October, 1696,* when the manor passed to his sister and 
heir Alice, the wife of Edmund Anguish, the elder, of Moulton, in Norfolk. 
Edmund Anguish died in 1699, and his eldest son Richard took the name 
of AUin, and was created a baroaet 14th Dec. 1699. He married in 1699 
Frances, daughter of Sir HeUry Ashurst, ist Bart, of Waterstock, co. Oxford, 
and died 19th Oct. 1725,' leaving two sons. Sir Thomas AUin, Bart., who 
succeeded him, and was Sheriff for the county in 1730, and appointed 
serjeant-at-arms to the Treasury in 1733, but died unmarried iith Aug. 
1764,* and the Rev. Ashurst AUin, rector of Blundeston-cum-Flixton, who 
on his brother's death inherited the baronetcy and estate. Sir Ashurst AUin 
was rector of Blundeston-cum-Flixton, and married Thomazine, daughter 
of Colonel Playters and widow of — Norris, of Norfolk, and died 6th Nov. 
1770,'' having devised his property to his only son, Sir Thomas AUin, who 
died 30th April, 1794, a bachelor, leaving the manor by his wiU to his covisin 

•Fine, Mich. 29-30 Eliz., John Wentworth 'Will proved 1730. 

V. John Castell and others. ^Cockayne sa)^ I2tli Aug. 1765 (Will 
'Bodl. Suff. Ch. 780. • proved 1765). 

3 Will loth July, 1683, proved Oct. 1685. 'Will proved March, 1773. 

4 Admin. loth Nov. 1696, and 14th Nov. 

1698. 



ASHBY MANOR. 7 

and heir-at-lawj Thomas Anguish, descended from Edmund Anguish, 2nd 
son of Edmund Anguish, of Moulton, who had married Alice, daughter of 
the 1st Sir Thomas AUin. Thomas Anguish died unmarried in 1810, and 
was succeeded by his brother, the Rev. George Anguish, prebendary of 
Norwich Cathedral and rector of Gisleham, who died a bachelor 5th July, 
1843, when the family of Anguish became extinct. The manor passed by 
his will to his nephew. Lord Sydney Godolphin Osborne, son of Francis 
Gololphin Osborne, Duke of Leeds, K.G., by Catherine, his 2nd wife, sister 
to the Rev. George Anguish, the previous possessor. In August, 1844, the 
manor was sold to Samuel Morton Peto, of the City of London. 

In 1885 Richard Henry Reeve was lord, and the manor is now vested 
in the trustees of his will. 

There are apparently no Court Rolls extant. 




a THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BELTON. 

^UCH of the land in Belton was in the Manor of Gapton Hall, 
which lay in both Belton and Bradwell, under the head 
" Gapton " in the Domesday Survey. Wolsey held here 
2 carucates as a manor. There were 3 villeins^ 3 bordars, 
and 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, 
and 2 acres of meadow valued at 60s. 

In Domesday times, though the value remained the 
same as in Saxon days, it is evident the material prosperity of the manor 
had declined, for there was a bordar less, a villein less, and but i ploughteam 
belonging to the men. The manor was in Williani the Conqueror's hands 
in whose reign Roger Bigot had the keeping.' 

There were two other small manors here held by the King, one of which 
had been held by a freeman, Ulf, with 60 acres and i bordar, i ploughteam, 
half an acre of meadow, i rouncy, 3 beasts, 6 hogs, and 80 sheep valued at 5s., 
and the other of which had been held by a freeman, Athelstan, with 60 acres, 
half a ploughteam, i acre of meadow, 4 beasts, 3 hogs, and 30 sheep, valued 
at 4s. There were also two other small holdings here, one of 40 acres and 
I bordar and i ploughteam, an acre of meadow, wood sufficient for 3 hogs, 
valued at 4s., formerly held by a freeman, Spottulf, and the other of 30 
acres, valued at 25., formerly held by a freeman, Ulnoth.'' 

The only holdings under the head of Belton in Domesday Survey, were 
amongst the lands of King William in the reign of which Roger Bigot had 
the keeping, and consisted of i carucate of land as a hamlet, with i villein, 
4 bordars, i serf, i ploughteam in demesne, and 160 sheep. In Saxon times 
there had been i ploughteam and i rouncy, but at the time of the Survey 
only half a team. The other holding was of three freemen with 90 acres, 
formerly having 3 ploughteams, but at the time of the Survey i only, valued 
at los.^ But under the head Brockestuna we recognise Browston, a hamlet 
belonging to the parish of Belton. It was held as a manor by Ulketel, a 
freeman ; he had 40 acres of land here, with half a ploughteam, wood for the 
maintenance of 10 hogs, a rouncy, 2 beasts, 7 hogs, 30 sheep, and 3 goats, 
valued at 5s. Under him a freeman held 30 acres valued at 2s. In the 
same hamlet Broder, a freeman, who probably gave his name to the hamlet 
of Brotherton, in the adjoining parish of Hopton,held 60 acres for a manor, 
with 2 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and half a team belonging to the 
men, a rouncy, 2 beasts, 7 hogs, and 40 sheep, valued at 5s. In the same 
place Godwin, a freeman, continued under the Normans to hold 30 acres 
and half a ploughteam, valued at 3s., and two freemen here possessed 80 
acres, a bordar, and a ploughteam and a half, valued at 6s. It is most 
probable, having regard to the quantity of land recorded as lying in this 
small hamlet, that the hamlet known as Brotherton, in Hopton, was included 
in the Survey of Browston, and the ownership of Broder rather furthers the 
idea. The whole of the above property was kept in the hands of Roger 
Bigot for the King.'* 

Belton Manor or Gapton Hall Manor. 

In the time of Hen. II. we find the manor granted by that Sovereign to 
Baluri de Bosco, who exchanged it with Osbert de Gladeson and Ralph 
Gernun. Ralph Gernun founded the priory of Leighs, in Essex, about 1230, 

'Dom. ii. 284. ^Dom. ii. 2846. 

'Dom. ii. 284. ■♦Dom. ii. 2846. 



BELTON. 9 

and shortly afterwards this manor seems to have been granted to the priory 
by Osbert de Gladeson. It was returned as the lordship of the priory in 
1281, and remained with the priory until the Dissolution, when it passed to 
the Crown, and was granted in 1536 to Richard Cavendish. The grant to 
Richard Cavendish appears from the State Papers to have been to him in 
tail male.' Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a 
grant of Gapton Hall Manor in 1535." This deed is a counterpart of an 
indenture whereby Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, grants to Richard 
" Caundish, of Trymeley," certain manors in exchange for the Manor of 
" Gapton HawUe in Bredwell " (sic). It is dated ist March, 29 Hen. VIII. 
[1538].^ Richard Cavendish died in 1554, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, William Cavendish, and on his death without issue in 1572 to his 
brother, Thomas Cavendish,* who by indenture dated 14th April, 1591, made 
between Thomas Cavendish, described as of Trimley St. Martin's, of the 
one part, and Humphrey Seckford, of Ipswich, and John Wentworth, of 
Somerlejrton, in consideration of £2,000, conveyed to the said Humphrey 
Seckford and John Wentworth in fee " the manors of Wenham Combusta 
alias Burnt Wenham, West Burfield alias West Bergholt, Derneford alias 
Dirneforde Hall, in Sweffling, Capton alias Gapton Hall, in Bradwell, which 
sometime did belong and appertain to the late priory of St. John the 
Evangelist, of Leighes, in the county of Essex, suppressed and dissolved, 
and all and singular messuages, lands, tenements, mills, and knights' fees, 
advowsons, gifts, and patronage of churches, rectories, vicarages, chantries 
and chapels, tithes, oblations, pensions, portions, court leets, view of fran- 
pledge, franchises, &c., thereunto belonging, and all letters patent, deeds, 
evidences, court rolls," &c. 

From John Wentworth, the purchaser, who died in 1618-9, the manor 
passed to his son and heir. Sir John Wentworth, who died in 165 1, from 
which time to the present the manor has passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred, and is now vested in the trustees of the 
late Richard Henry Reeve, of Lowestoft. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is an action by Roger Gray against Robert Loudon and Anne his wife and 
another as to this manor.^ 

A Manor of Belton seems to have been included in the grant made 
by Hugh Fastolf to John Fastolf his brother in 2 Rich. II. In the court 
books the manor is styled " Gapton Hall with Belton," though in modern 
times it has been generally styled Gapton Hall only. In the settlement of 
1668 by Thomas Garneys of sundry estates " late of Sir John Wentworth " 
the manor is called Gapton in Bradwell, Belton, &c., as if Belton were a 
separate manor, but there is no distinct manor of that name in the Hundred. 
In an Inclosure Act in 1809 Thomas Anguish is styled Lord of " Gapton 
HaU with Belton." 

Manor of Blundeston Hall. 

Blundeston Manor was in the time of Hen. III. the lordship of Henry de 
Blundeston. The Hundred Rolls state that he held a gersumary socage 
here of the King in chief.® In 1281 the manor was held by Robert de 
Blundeston and remained in the family until 1368. In 1348 we meet with 

'S.P. 1536, p. 383 (17). ■» See Grimston Hall, Trimley St. Martin, in 

*Add. Ch. 10225. Colneis Hundred. 

sAdd.Ch. 10225. 5C.P. i. 388. 

6H.R. ii. 167. 
B 



10 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a conveyance from Osbert, rector of the church of Blundeston, Oliver 
de Wysete, to William, son of Robert de Blundeston, and the heirs of his 
body of the Manor of Blundeston with all the lands and appurtenances in 
Blundeston, Oulton, and FHxton ; together with the advowson of the church 
of the village of Blundeston with the appurtenances, all which were formerly 
of Robert de Blundeston, to hold to the said William and the heirs of his 
body lawfully begotten. From WiUiam de Blundeston the manor seems to 
have passed to Osbert de Blundeston, and in 1368 we meet with a fine levied 
of the manor and advowson by WilUam, Roger and Hugh Fastolf against 
this Robert de Blundeston.' The manor, afterwards passed to Sir Robert 
Herling, Knt.,^ who married Joan, daughter and heir of John de Gonvile, 
and on his death went to his daughter and heir Anne, married ist Sir 
WiUiam Chamberlein, who died in 1462, and 2ndly Sir Robert Wingfield, 
who died in 1480, and 3rdly John, Lord Scroope, of Bolton, who died in 1494. 

Amongst the Suffolk Charters in the Bodleian is an indenture dated 
i8th May, 6 Hen. VII. [1491] by which (in consideration of a marriage between 
John Durhaunte, gent., and Elyne, sister of John Bryghtyeve), Dame Anne 
Wingefeld, widow, late wife of Sir Robert Wingefeld, Knt., covenants to 
make to John Durhaunte a good estate in the Manor of Blundeston, and 
John Bryghtyeve covenants to pay to the said John and Elyne 24 marcs.^ 

In the middle of the 15th century the manor and advowson passed from 
the Blundeston to the Yarmouth family, and Henry Yarmouth, of Blundes- 
ton, presenting to the church in 1438, died in 1471, and was succeeded by 
his son John, who in succession was followed by his son John. This second 
John married a Miss Moore, of Essex, and was living in 1516. On his death 
the manor passed to Humphrey Yarmouth, who married Margaret Gillam, 
and died about 1557,* when the manor vested in his son and heir, Humphrey 
Yarmouth. He married Anne, daughter of John Bacon, of Hessett, and 
sold the manor to William Sydnor. The conveyance is still in existence, 
and is dated 30th September, 1570. The deed is amongst the Bodleian 
Charters.' 

The assurance is of the Manor of Blundeston cum pertinentibus and 
all other the manor, &c., of Humphrey Yarmouth, in Blundeston, Corton, 
Lound, Somerleyton, Flixton, Lowestoft, and Gunton or elsewhere. The 
manor, &c., and the messuages were found to be holden of Sir John Heven- 
ingham of his Manor of South Leet in socage. William Sydnor, the pur- 
chaser, married Bridget, one of the daughters of John Jernegan, of Belton, 
and by deed dated 19th April, 1571, granted the manor to Walter Jernegan 
and John Jenney, no doubt by way of settlement,* for by another deed 
6th Oct. 1584, in consideration of a jointure to Elizabeth, late wife of Henry 
Sydnor, his son and heir apparent, he enfeoffed John Read and others and 
their heirs of a house called Gillam' s and 90 acres of land in Blundeston and 
Flixton ; a meadow of 12 acres in Flixton, a marsh called Wrenthams and 
41 acres of land in Blundeston, two other messuages and 9 acres of land in 
Blundeston, a house called Chamber's and 104 acres of land in Henstead ; 
also the manors of Blundeston to the use of the said William for life, and after 
to the use of the said Henry and his heirs male by the said Elizabeth his wife, 
and after to the right heirs of the said William. The marriage between 
Henry Sydnor and Elizabeth was solemnized ist Feb. 1584-5. He died 
during his father's lifetime in December, 161 1. 

'Feet of Fines, 42 Edw. III. 19. ♦Will 24th Jan. 1557. 

"See Manor of Corton, in this Hundred. ^Bodl. Suft. Ch. 838. 

'Bodl. SufE. Ch. 816.. 6Bodl. Suff. Ch. 839. 



BELTON. II 

William Sydnor the father died loth (? 26th) Aug. 1613. By his will. 
dated 26th March, 1612, he gave to the poor of Blundeston, Henstead, 
Frit ton, Belton, Conisford at the Gate (Norwich), Berstete St. John's 20s. 
to each parish and to Trowse on this side the bridge los. He directed his 
body to be buried in the chancel of the church of Blundeston. He gave 
unto Dorothy Sydnor his daughter £200, some furniture, and £10 in gold, 
a cup of silver with three feet and a cover. To Alice Goldsmithe, his 
daughter, all her mother's apparel and £10 in gold, &c. Amongst other 
bequests he leaves to William Sydnor his grandchild some furniture and a 
great carved chest which lately came from Blundeston, and his next best 
salt cellar. After leaving annuities to his servants he directed " that his 
house in Christ's Church in all things be mayntayned and kept as usually 
he did for the entertainment of his children and such of his, children and 
servants as would stay and live orderly, and do their service honestly, during 
the time of their stay, for which they were to have their wages " The charges 
of such housekeeping were to be defrayed by his executors, and he desired 
that Dorothy Sydnor his daughter during the said month, should have the 
government of the said house. The inquis. p.m. of the said Wilham 
Sydnor found that he died seised in fee of the Manor of Blunston alias 
Blundeston, and that William, the son of Henry his eldest son, then deceased' 
was his next heir and of the age of 24 years.* 

William Sydnor, the grandson, by a settlement dated 13th Feb. 1613, 
in consideration of a marriage with Anne, daughter of William Harborne, 
covenanted with William Harborne, her father, to convey to him. Sir 
Anthony Drury, and others and their heirs, the Manor of Fritton and all 
lands, &c., of him, the said Williatn Sydnor, in Fritton or towns adjoining to 
the use of himself and his heirs until the marriage and after to the use of 
himself and the said Anne for jointure and the heirs male of his body, with 
divers remainders over to Robert, Thomas, and Henry his brothers, Edmund, 
William, Francis, and Paul Sydnor, his uncles, and the heirs male of every of 
their several bodies, and after to the use of the right heirs of the said 
William Sydnor, the grandfather, and the Manor of Blundeston, and all the 
lands of the settlor in Blundeston in the towns adjoining to the like uses 
and remainders as above, omitting only the said Anne and her estates for 
life. A fine was accordingly levied the following year. William Sydnor 
the grandson and settlor died 13th June, 1632, without male issue, leaving 
eight daughters, Elizabeth, Anne, Sarah, Mary, Hester, Susanna, Abigail, 
and Lydia his coheirs. All were under age at their father's death, and the 
eldest only eleven. 

He was buried in the church of St, Mary, Blundeston, where there is a 
brass with this inscription : — 

" Here lyeth buried the body of William Sidnor late of this parish 
Esq. Sonne and heire of Henry Sydnor Esq. ye son and heyre of William 
Sidnor Esq. who married Ann ye eldest daughter of William Harborne Esq. 
by whom he had issue eight daughters and departed this life the thirtieth 
day of June, 1632." 

By an indenture 3rd July, 1634, King Chas. I., under the seal of the 
Court of Wards, granted to Anthony Bury in consideration of a fine of 200 
marks, the custody, wardship, and marriages of the coheirs to his own use, 
and Bury, 20th Nov. of the same year, assigned all his interest to Dr. Talbot, 
who had married Anne, the mother of these small children. Dr. Talbot 

'He died loth Dec. 1612. "I.P.M., 12 Jas. i. 



12 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

had,. however, to pay for the interest ^^330 besides p^ioo for Bury to the 
receiver of the Court of Wards, for leave of the King's fine. 

The above eight daughters of Wilham Sydnor by fine levied and 
recovery suffered and by deed dated 19th Dec. 1651, conveyed the said 
manors of Blundeston and Fritton to Wilham Heveningham in fee. He 
was in 1661 convicted and attainted of high treason, having been one of King 
Chas. I.' s judges, and by letters patent dated 28th Sept. 1661, the King 
granted to Brian, Viscount CuUum, Sir Thomas Fanshaw, Sir Ralph Banks, 
knights, Edward Pitt and Charles Cornwallis amongst other manors the 
manors of Blundeston and Fritton to hold to them and their heirs lor ever. 
They by deed poll dated 3rd Oct. 1661, declared the use of the letters patent 
to be to the intent that they should out of the rents and profits or by sale 
raise £11,000 for the Earl of Bristol and several other trusts mentioned, 
the remainder to be for the use of the said Mary, wife of Wilham Hevening- 
ham. WiUiam Heveningham and his wife the same year levied a fine and 
suffered a recovery of the properties, and by indenture dated 24th Oct. in 
the same year declared the uses of the fine to be in favour of the patentees 
of the Crown. 

They sold in the following year to Sir John Tasburgh. The con- 
veyance was made by lease and release dated lo-iith Dec. 1662, by the 
Earl of Bristol, Brian, Viscount CuUum, Sir Thomas Fanshaw, Sir Ralph 
Banks, Edward Pitt, and Charles Cornwallis to the said Sir John Tasburgh, 
and was of the Manor of Blundeston and the capital house called Blundeston 
Hall, and the Manor of Fritton alias Fritton Past on' s, and all that the manor 
called Blundeston alias GunviUe's alias Scroope Hall, alias Gunville's 
Blundeston, and the advowson of the churches, rectories, and vicarages 
of Blundeston and Fritton, and courts leet and view of frankpledge, &c. 
The consideration was £4,000 in hand and £4,000 to be paid as mentioned. 
On 27th Dec. 1662, the said William Heveningham and Mary his wife 
granted, released and confirmed the said manors of Blundeston, Fritton, 
and Blundeston Gunville's to the said John Tasburgh and his heir for ever, 
and had a grant from the Crown of the manor declaring the uses in her 
favour by deed poll dated 3rd Oct. following. John Tasburgh in 1668 
conveyed to Sir Thomas AUin, Knt. and Bart., who held his first court for 
the manor 3rd Nov. 1668. Sir Thomas Allin died in 1686, and from this 
time to the present the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor 
of Ashby, in this Hundred, and is now vested in the trustees of the will of 
Richard Henry Reeve. 

Arms of Blundeston : Per pale. Ermine and Sable a chevron, 
counterchanged. Of Yarmouth : Quarterly i and 4 Arg. a chevron betw. 
3 lion's paws, erased and erect Sa. 2 and 3 Or guttee de sang, a bend Gu. 
Of Sydnor : Argent, a fesse nebulee Azure, between three crescents, 
jessant fleurs-de-lis, Sable. 

Manor of Gunville's al. Blunston Gunvile's. 

Roger de ColeviUe had a grant of free warren here in 1253,' and the 
manor was in 1285 the lordship of William de Gonvile, the son of John, 
the son of Nicholas de Gonvile. This William de Gonvile married Maud, 
the heiressof the Lerhngs, about 1304, and on his death the manor passed 
to his son, Sir Nicholas de Gonvile, brother of Sir Edmund Gonvile, founder 
of Rushworth College, of Gonvile HaU, in Cambridge, and probably of the 

'Chart. Rolls, 14 Edw. I. 



BELTON. 13 

Friars Preachers in Thetford, and of St. John's Hospital, at Lynn, who died 
in 1350. Sir Nicholas died nth April, 1333, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, John de Gunvyle, and from him to his son and heir, Edmund 
Gonvile, who died 4th Oct. 1402. The manor then passed to Edmund's 
son and heir, John Gonvile, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John 
Jernegan, of Somerleyton, and on his death passed to his daughter and 
heir Joan married to Sir Robert Harlyng or Herling.' His daughter Anne 
married three husbands successively, as mentioned in the account of the 
main manor, and the manor was settled in 1474 by Anne and her then 
husband, Sir Robert Wingfield. He died seised in 1480, and she in 1492 
married for her 3rd husband John, Lord Scroope, of Bolton, who died in 
1494. On the death of Anne, about 1502, without issue, the manor went to 
Margaret, sister of Sir Robert Harling, and wife of Sir Robert Tuddenham, 
Knt. 

In 1528 we meet amongst the Bodleian Charters with a final concord 
made at Westminster, whereby in consideration of a sum of £40 John 
Scrope and Felicia his wife acknowledged the right of Robert Coke and 
William Roberts to the Manor of Gunville Hall, 9 messuages, 302 acres of 
land, 16 acres of meadow, &c., in Blundeston,* and by a deed dated at 
Blundeston 12th March, 29 Hen. VHL [1538] Sir John Jernegan, Knt., 
and George Jernegan, his son, remitted and quit claim to John Jettor 
their manor called Gunvyles in the parishes of Blundeston, Flixton, 
Oulton, Gunton, and Corton.^ 

The manor subsequently passed to Robert Jettor, who by deed dated 
4th April, 1608, sold and conveyed it to William Sydnor. The parcels of 
this deed comprised the site, manor, or member of a manor, called Blundes- 
ton, Gunvilles, Blundeston, or Gunvilles cum pertin. ; and a close called 
Gunvilles, reputed to be the site of the manor, containing 6 acres ; another 
close called the Home Close in Blundeston, and four several fishponds, 
with several waters and fishings in Blundeston and Flixton. 

William Sydnor died in 1613, after which the manor devolved in the 
same Une of descent as the main manor. Amongst the Bodleian Charters 
is a grant in 1435 by Nicholas Gun vile, of Gorleston, to John Stiwardeslond, 
of Hemesby, of his Manor of Blunston, in Blunston. The deed is dated 
at Blundeston on the feast of St. Michael, 13 Hen. VL* And the Manor of 
Blundeston is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Henry Bounds in 1479.^ 

Arms of Gonville : Argent, on a chevron between couple closes, out- 
wardly engrailed, three escallops. Or. 



' See Manor of Corton, in this Hundred ; ^ Bodl. Suff . Ch. 832. 

I.Q.D., 9 Hen. V. 10. "Bodl. Suff. Ch. 809. 

'20 Hen. VIII. Bodl. Suff. Ch. 827, 828 ; n.PM., 19 Edw. IV. 63; 

Fine, Mich. 20 Hen. VIII. 



14 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




BRADWELL MANOR. 

|HE manor was apparently vested in Alexander Fastolf at the 
beginning of the 14th century, and passed to Hugh Fastolf, 
who in 1378 granted it to his brother, John Fastolf,' on 
whose death about 1445* it passed to his son and heir, John 
Fastolf, who died in 1460, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Thomas Fastolf.^ On Thomas's death the manor 
vested in his son, John Fastolf, who died seised of it 8th Dec. 
1506,* when it went to his son and heir, George Fastolf. In 1510 
George Fastolf appears to have passed, the manor to Thomas Russhe and 
others.^ There is another fine in 1514 levied of the manor by Thomas 
Franke and others against the said George Fastolf.* 

The manor, if ever a separate manor from Bradwell Hall, clearly became 
united with it, for 26th April, 1800, there, was offered for sale by public 
auction at the King's Head, Great Yarmouth, a freehold estate comprising 
" the Manor or Reputed Manor of Bradwell otherwise Bradwell Hall with 
the royalties and appurtenances belonging thereto."' 

Manor of Bradwell Hall. 

In the time of Hen. III. the lordship of Bradwell Hall seems to have 
belonged to Osbert de Daggord, and to have been held of Baldwin Filiol.^ 
However, at the end of this King's reign it seems to have been vested in 
Bartholomew D'Avilers,' and to have remained in that family until 1360, 
when a Sir Bartholomew D'Avilers died, leaving a sole daughter and heir, 
who married Sir Robert Bacon. In 1361 John, son of John de Norwich, 
held as of the Manor of Wathe and the advowson of the King in chief by 
the service of 4s. per annum to the Castle of Norwich. 

In 1474 John Jernegan, of Worlingham Parva, devised to his eldest 
son, John Jernegan, and his issue male the manors and advowson of Somer- 
leyton, Stonham Jernegan, Horham, and Bradwell with the foundation of 
the house of St. Olave's. John Jernegan the son died 26th Oct. 1503,'° 
when the manor vested in his son and heir, Sir Edward Jernegan. 

Sir Edward died in 1515, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
John Jernegan. The manor then passed to Matthew Hermen, who died 
17th May, 1534," and was succeeded by his son and heir, Francis Hermen. 
Davy states that in 1609 Sir Drue Drury, Knt., held a moiety, and in 1666 
William Vesey was lord." This year he married Mary, eldest daughter 



'See Manor of Kirkley, in Kessingland, 
Mutford Hundred. 

'I.P.M., 46 Hen. VI. 13. 

^An agreement was made t. Hen. VH. 
by the guardians of Thomas 
Fastolf, son of John, a minor, to 
convey to Hugh Fastolf, son and 
heir of Sir John and Margaret his 
wife, and after death of Sir Hugh 
to John Fastolf, of Cwehowe, son 
and heir of Hugh, and after to the 
n*inor, Thomas Fastolf. Deed in 
1830 in possession of Sir P. B. V. 
Broke. 

♦ I. P.M., 22 Hen. VH. 57. 

5 Fine, Mich. 2 Hen. VIH. 

6 Fine, Easter 6 Hen. VIIL 

7 Ipswich Journal, 19th April, 1800. 



8I.P.M., 46 Hen. Ill ; FUe 26 (16). 

9 See Erwarton Manor, Samford Hundred. 

">I.P.M., 19 Hen, VII. 48. 

" I.P.M., 33 Hen. VIIL 45. 

" Druery's statement in his Historical and 
Topographical Notices of Great 
Yarmouth is so ; that William 
Vesey, clerk, whose family were 
of considerable note in Bradwell 
in 1674, gave ;£aoo to the parish 
poor of Great Yarmouth, and 
ordered the same to be paid out 
of his estate at Bradwell within one 
year after his wife's decease, 
" which," he adds, " is recorded in 
St. Nicholas Church there," can 
hardly be correct so far as the 
date is concerned. 



BRADWELL. 15 

of John Johnson, D.D., and in consideration of auch marriage and of ;if400 
by deeds nth and 12th May, 1666, settled the manor upon himself for life 
with remainder to Mary his intended wife for life by way of jointure with 
divers remainders over. 

The will, however, of this William Vesey, which is dated 28th July, 

1670, only refers to the fee simple " of his farm and lands called Bradwell 

Hall," no mention is made of any manor. In 1670 we know that the manor 

was in Mary Vesey, and in 1684 in her and her 2nd husband, Thomas Buck, 

for they by deed this year dated 8th April conveyed " the manor or seignory 

of Broadwell or Bradwell Hall, &c.," to Johnson Burdett, eldest son of 

Theophilus Burdett, of Hallaton, co. Leicester, clerk, and of Rachael his wife, 

the niece and nearest relative of the said Mary Buck, and to the heirs male 

ot the said Johnson Burdett. They charged the estate with an annuity 

of 40s. per annum for ever to the following uses and purposes, viz., 20s. 

part thereof to the rector of Whitechapel for the time being upon every 

Lady Day lor ever for a sermon to be preached by him the said rector 

upon that day to excite the people to charity, and the other 20s. yearly on 

Michaelmas Day for ever to the schoolmaster of the school of Whitechapel 

founded and built by Ralph Davenant and the said Mary Buck, their 

friends and relations, for his encouragement in the better discharge of his 

ofiRce. By deeds 4th and 5th July, 1717, the manor passed by sale to 

John CoUins, who held it in trust (declared by indenture dated 26th Aug. 

1717) for John Ellison. It was then described as "all that the 

manor or seignory, reputed manor or seignory, and site of this Manor of 

Broadwell alias BradweU, commonly called by the name of Broadwell 

Hall, &c., with all the messuages, lands, tenements, meadows, feedings, 

pastures, waters, &c., situate lying and being in Bradwell aforesaid and in 

Belton and Burgh Castle or Hopton." 

On John Ellison's death Thomas Collins, cousin and heir of John 
CoUins and James Evelyer, surviving executor and trustee of the codicil to 
the will of John Ellison, with Richard Glover, one of the trustees of the 
will of the said John Ellison, by deeds dated 21st and 22nd Aug. 1752, 
conveyed the manor to Elizabeth Turner. She by her will dated i8th 
July, 1761, devised it to her friends, the Rev. Francis Turner and William 
MetheviUe, schoolmaster, upon trust to permit her son Thomas to receive 
the rents for life, and after his death when the youngest of his children 
should be 21 to sell. The manor was not sold, but by agreement between 
the parties interested was, by deeds dated 7th and 8th Aug. 1793, settled, 
and a fine levied Trinity Term 35 Geo. III. 

Fines of the manor were levied in 1317 and 1359, the first by Nicholas 
Fastolf against Richard de Bardewell, of the manor and advowson 
(Katherine, who was wife of Roger Fitz-Osborne, Peter Gernegan, John 
Noioun, Joan, the wife of Simon de Bradewell, app. clam.),' and the 
second by Thomas de Bradewell and Petronilla his wife against Johnde 
Bradewell, parson of Oulton church, and William Mawe, of Great Yar- 
mouth, of the manor alone.* 

We meet with three fines of " Bradwell Manor " between 1558 and 
1584 — the first in 1558 was levied by John Gierke against George Harvy and 
others,^ the second in 1564 by John Staunton and Thomas Curteys against 
John Payne and Joan his wife,* and the third in 1584 by Robert Bayspoole 

'Feet of Fines, 11 Edw. 11. 42. 'Fine, Mich. 5 Mary I. 

*Feet of Fines, 33 Edw. III. 20. ♦Fine, Hil. 6 Eliz. 



i6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

against Gregory Coppinge and others.' A " Bradwell Manor " is also 
included in a fine levied of Baylham Manor by Robert Catter against Henry, 
Lord Windesor, and others in i6oi.^ 

Manor of Caxton Hall. 

This manor belonged to the prior and knights of St. John of Jerusalem, 
where it continued until the Dissolution, when it passed to thq Crown, and 
was granted by Hen. VHI. with the Manor of Belton or Gapton Hall to 
Richard Cavendish in 1536, from which time it appears to have passed 
invariably with that manor, being now vested in the trustees of Richard 
Henry Reeve, of Lowestoft. 

Manor of Browston Hall. 

A manor of this name in Bradwell is mentioned in the chancery suit 
brought by William, Bishop of Winchester, as executor of Sir John Fastolf 
against William Paston, feoffee of the said Sir John.^ No doubt the 
manor was vested in Sir John Fastolf like the Manor of Habbelond, in 
Bradwell, and was given by him to the president and fellows of Magdalen 
College, Oxford, and thenceforth was lost sight of as a separate manor. 

Davy could discover no lords of this particular manor. Browston is 
a hamlet to Belton. 

HoBLAND Hall or Habbelond's. 

Its name has been written at various periods Hopland and Hunclounde, 
though it was called in 1286, as in the present day, Hobland. 

In the time of Hen. III. this manor was held by Henry de Hapelond 
or Hapelund, who held here of the King in chief a gersumary socage,* 
which appears to have been to socage here held by his ancestor, Gunnild 
de Habelund in the time of King John.^ In 1286 the manor was in Thomas 
de Hobland. In 1604 it seems to have vested in Sir John Fastolf, Knt., 
for he then gave it to the president and fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford, 
who leased it in 1684 to Richard Vesey. The manor is specified in the suit 
found amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings brought by William, Bishop 
of Winchester, as executor of Sir John Fastolf, against William Paston, 
feoffee of the said Sir John.^ The lessees of the manor appear to have been 
as follows : In 1724, Augustus Schutz ; in 1749, Gerrard Trotter ; in 1768, 
David Urquhart ; in 1774, David H. Urquhart f in 1793 and 1801, 
Thomas Fowler ; in 1823, John Thurkell; and 1826, N. S. Palmer; but there 
is no manor here now, or at least no tenants or rents, nor any manorial 
rights vested in the lessees. In the lease of 1801 to Thomas Fowler, the 
parcels demised were described as " all that site of the Manor of Hobland 
Hall, in the County of Suffolk, with all lands, clausures, &c., thereto belong- 
ing in Gorleston, Bradwell, South Town, Hopton, and Belton, and formerly 
in the tenure of John Pitcairne, clerk, and Gerrard Trotter, &c."^ 

'Fine, Trin. 26 Eliz. ^He died 27th June, 1774, and there is a 

"Fine, Mich. 43-44 Eliz. tablet to his memory in the south 

3 E.C.P., Bundle 20, 80. aisle of the chancel of Belton church. 

••H.R. ii. 163. ^ The arms are quarterly i and 4, 

^Ib. ' Or, three boars' heads couped Gu. 

^E.C.P., Bundle 20, 80. armed and lanqued Az. within a 

bordure Gu. and Sa. 2 and 3 party 
per fesse indented Erm. and Az. 
Crest, a boar's head as in arms. 
8 Suckling, vol. j. p. 324. 



i BRADWELL. 17 

Hobland or Hopland Hall is a good house standing at the south-east 
corner"of the parish. In 1826, when N. S. Palmer^ of Yarmouth, was the 
lessee J it was occupied by John Penrice, who married a member of the 
Palmer family. It had previously been the residence of the J arrets. We 
meet with an advertisement of sale of the Manor of Hubland Hall and 
mansion, with 362 acres of freehold, copyhold, and leasehold in 1823,' and 
with that of a sale by public auction at the Bear Inn, Yarmouth, 9th Aug. 
1823, " by order of the assignees of the estate of John Thurkell, a bank- 
rupt, of the Equity of Redemption of Estates situate at Bradwell, Hopton, 
Belton, &c., of the sites of the manors of Hobland and Hopton ; also a 
mansion house called Hobland Hall, several farms, &c., containing about 
630 acres." 



'^ Ipswich Journal, 26th July, 1823. ''Ipswich Journal, 12th July, 1823. 

C 




i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BURGH CASTLE. 

|IGEBERT, 5th monarch of the East Angles, founded a 
monastery here at the commencement of his reign in 536, 
under the direction of FeHx, his bishop, who had been 
consecrated by Honorius, Primate of Canterbury, at the 
request of the King. Fehx fixed the chair of his ecclesias- 
tical government at Dunwich, and zealously employed him- 
self in spreading the gospel and promotiijg Christianity. 
To assist him in the task of instructing the Saxons, he invited over from 
France, Furseus, an Irish monk, who, assembling a community of religious 
persons under the monastic vow, placed them in the monastery at Burgh, 
then named Cnobersburgh, from Cunoberi-Urbs, a Saxon chief, who 
formerly resided there. Furseus, upon the death of his patron Sigebert, 
who was slain in a battle with Penda, the Mercian king, retired from his 
monastery at Burgh to France, leaving behind him the monks, who main- 
tained their situation for several years, but at last abandoned it at a period 
which is uncertain. 

In the time of Edward the Confessor 4 carucates of land were held by 
Stigand, Bishop of Norwich, as a manor. 

There were 10 villeins, 5 bordars, and 2 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne 
and 4 belonging to the men, 10 acres of meadow, 3 saltpans, 3 rouncies, 
6 beasts, 17 hogs, and 160 sheep, and i church with 10 acres and an acre of 
meadow. The value was lOos. At the time of the Domesday Survey the 
value had increased to io6s. There were no serfs, but the ploughteams in 
demesne had diminished to 2, and those belonging to the men to 3. 
It was at that time vested in Ralph, the engineer, a tenant in chief of the 
Crown.' 

Burgh Castle Manor. 

Shortly after the Conquest the manor was held by Roger de Burgh, 
and passed to his son, Ralph de Burgh, they holding by serjeanty and 
the service of finding a cross-bowman with three horses for 40 days at their 
own cost for the King's use, which service was valued at loos."" Ralph de 
Burgh granted the manor to Gilbert de Wesenham,^ who also held it by 
the service of finding a cross-bowman.* Gilbert de Wesenham afterwards 
granted to the King, and Hen. III. (not Hen. I., as Blomefield inaccurately 
says) then gave the manor to Vincent, the prior of Bromholm, in Norfolk, 
reserving the advowson and the dower^ of Alicia, widow of Roger de Burgh, 
the father of Ralph, during her life.* The grant to the priory was dated 
2oth April, 1246, and was confirmed by Edw. II. by deed dated loth Sept. 
1312. 

In 1276 the prior of Bromholm was returned as holding the manor in 
chief of the King by the serjeanty by which Ralph de Burgh had formerly 
held, which service was then valued at 5^30. At this time the prior of Brom- 
holm obtained right of wreck, view of frankpledge, free warren, and assize 
of bread and beer in Burgh Castle.'' The Ministers' Accounts of the Manor 
while held by the priory, I324, will be found in the Public Record Office.* 

'Dom. ii. 443. 5I2I0-I2, Red Book of Exchequer, 13 
^T. de NeviU. B. d. ; Testa de Nevill, 283, 296. 

3 This Gilbert, 26th Hen. III., paid half a ^Bromholm Cartulary, H.R. ii. 182; Qose 

mark as a fine for not accompany- Rolls, 10 Hen. IH. 11. ; Camb. 

ing the King into Gascony. Univ. Libr. M.m. ii. 20. 

♦T. de Nevill. 'H.R. ii. 185 ; Q.W. Rolls, 728. 



18 Edw. II., Bundle 1127, No. 4. 



BURGH CASTLE. 



19 



The manor continued in the monastery of Bromholm until 1534, when 
the house was surrendered to the Crown, where it remained until Queen 
Mary sold the manor, loth May, 1560, to William Roberts, town clerk of 
Yarmouth. It was then called " manerium de Borowe Castell." From 
William Roberts the manor passed to his widow, Ann Roberts, and amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth there is the note of an 
action by Ann " Roberds," widow of WiUiam " Roberds," against the tenants 
of Burgh Castell to ascertain metes and boundaries of the manor, it having 
been settled by plaintiff's husband on her for life with remainder to his 
issue in tail." From Anne Roberts the manor passed to William Smyth, 
who married Dorothy, daughter of WiUiam Hopton, of Witham, co. 
Somerset, and died 6th Dec. 1596, when it passed to his son and heir, 
William Roberts Smyth, who was an infant in 1599, and a court for the 
manor was held 13th June, 1599, on his behalf by Nathaniel Bacon and 
Dorothy his wife (Dorothy, widow of William Smyth, having remarried), 
who were his guardians. Nathaniel Bacon in the like capacity held another 
court in 1604 ; he was not lord, as stated by Suckling.^ William Roberts 
Smyth died without issue in 1609, when the manor passed to his brother 
and heir. Sir Owen Smyth, Knt., for we find he held his first court during 
this year. He married Alice, daughter of Sir John Crofts, of Saxham, and 
was buried at Alton, 28th March, 1637, when the manor passed to his widow 
Alice. She is said to have died yth Oct. 1678, but Suckling^ mentions 
that 1st July, 1652, the Right Hon. Charles Fleetwood and Bridget his wife 
covenanted with Peter Balls and Nathaniel Shirrop to levy a fine with them 
of the Manor of Burgh Castle, and all other manors late of Simon Smyth 
and of Sir Owen Smyth, Knt., in Burgh, alias Borough Castle, Gorleston, 
Bray don and Bradwell or elsewhere. The manor, however, on the death of 
Alice Smyth, in 1678'^ (Sir Owen Smyth having died without issue), 
passed to. Frances, great-niece and heir of Sir Owen Smyth (and daughter 
of Thomas Smyth, who had died 6th June, 1639 , son of Simon Smith, 
of Wendon, co. Norfolk, and Beccles, Suffolk), brother of Sir Owen, married 
to Charles Fleetwood, of Newington, Middlesex. 

On Charles's death the manor passed to his son and heir, Smyth Fleet- 
wood. He by his will dated 25th Aug. 1697, gave the manor to trustees 
to be sold for the payment of debts and legacies in case his personal estate 
should not suffice, and the remainder in surplus to be disposed of among 
his children. He died soon after, leaving two sons and five daughters, viz., 
Charles Fleetwood and Smyth Fleetwood, Frances, Caroline, Jane, Elizabeth, 
and Anne. The trustees in 1703 sold the Manor of Burgh to 
John Smith, who held his first court i8th April, 1704. From John Smith 
the manor passed to his son, Joshua Smith. He married Judith, daughter 
of Richard Ferrier, of Great Yarmouth, and on his marriage by deeds 
14th and 15th Feb. 1725, settled the manor on himself and wife for life and 
the Ufe of the survivor with remainder to their issue in tail. Joshua Smith 
drowned himself in the North River at Yarmouth, leaving his widow 
Judith to whom the manor passed, and she held her first court 9th May 
1745. She had by Joshua Smith one son Joshua, and two daughters Judith 
and Elizabeth, and under the marriage settlement of 1725 an appointment 



'C.P.ii. 386. 
^Hist., vol. i. p. 336. 
3 Hist, of SufE., vol. i. p. 



336..] 



* It should be mentioned that Davy's own 
pedigree makes Thomas, the brother 
of Sir Owen, his son, but there is a 
correct pedigree in another place in 
Davy's account of the family. 



20 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

had been made by deed poll 4th Oct. 1738, in favour of the son, and making 
provision for the two daughters. The son Joshua, however, died intestate 
and a bachelor between 17th June, 1753, and 12th March, 1754, leaving 
his two sisters his coheirs. The daughter Judith lost through sickness her 
reason and the daughter Elizabeth, 13th Feb. 1759, married Peter Baret, 
of Itteringham, and by deeds dated 6th and 7th Feb. 1759, Elizabeth's 
moiety of the manor was conveyed to the Rev. William Garrod, of 
Stanninghall, and another as trustees to the use of Peter Baret and his 
wife, and the life of the survivor, with remainder to the children (other than 
and except their eldest son) as Elizabeth should appoint, with remainder 
to the children (except as aforesaid) as tenants in common in tail with 
remainder to the eldest son in tail. Judith the mother died, her will being 
dated 5th Nov. 1765, to which administration was granted the 15th April, 
1779. Peter Baret died 23rd Oct. 1781, when his moiety of the manor vested 
in his widow Elizabeth, who in her will described herself as of Thwaite, 
in Norfolk, widow. Judith Smith the daughter died a spinster, and 
intestate 14th July, 1804, leaving the said Elizabeth Baret her only sister 
and heir. Elizabeth Baret died 7th Jan. 1808, leaving Lydia Baret her 
only child, to whom therefore the whole of the manor passed. Lydia Baret 
by her will devised the manor to her relatives, the Rev. William Killett, of 
Kenninghall, co. Norfolk, Richard Ferrier, of Burgh Castle, and Charlotte 
Farrier, of Thwaite, upon trust for sale, and gave the proceeds as part of her 
residuary estate to the said William Killett, Mary Killett, Richard Ferrier, 
and Charlotte Turner equally. The testatrix died a spinster ist Dec. 1845, 
and her will was proved at Norwich. 

William Killett died a bachelor 14th April, 1846, leaving Mary Killett, 
his only sister, sole next of kin. It was eventually agreed between the 
parties entitled to the proceeds of sale of the manor that the manor should 
be purchased by the said Richard Ferrier with other property for the sum 
of £2,930, and the sale was effected by a deed dated ist June, 1847. Richard 
Ferrier the following year sold the manor to William CoUett Reynolds, of 
Great Yarmouth, for ;£86o, and the sale was carried out by a deed dated 
13th Nov. 1848. Reynolds got into difficulties in 1866, and a conveyance 
was 4th Dec. that year made to trustees for the benefit of creditors, the 
trustees being Jacob Henry Tillett and Joseph William Holland. Pursuant 
to the terms of the trust, they sold by deed ist May, 1871, the manor to 
Robert Seaman, of Lowestoft, for £200. Robert Seaman, by his will 12th 
Sept. 1868, devised all his estate to his trustees, Edward Porter, George 
Jay, and John Pilgrim, upon trust for sale. By a codicil 14th Aug. 1871, 
he appointed his wife, Catherine Wilson Seaman, and his brother-in-law, 
Charles Marshall, of Huntingdon, brewer, in place of Porter and Jay, and by 
a second codicil 7th July, 1873, appointed Thomas Fox Simpson, of Tun- 
bridge Wells, in place of Pilgrim. The testator died 19th April, 1874, 
and his will and codicils were proved in the Principal Registry 23rd May, 
1874. The trustees sold for ;^245 to Charles Diver, of Great Yarmouth, 
by indenture dated nth May, 1875, the description Ijeing : "All that the 
Manor or Lordship or Reputed Manor or Lordship of Burrough Castle 
otherwise Burgh Castle, in the County of Suffolk, with the rights, members, 
and appurtenances to the sarne belonging." 

Charles Diver sold the manor to James Hargrave Harrison, of Harcourt 
Grove, Burgh Castle, by indenture dated 13th Oct. 1877. James H. Harrison, 
by his will 30th March, 1894, devised all his estates to his wife, Sarah Florence 
Harrison, and appointed^her executrix. |?_He also (notwithstanding the 



BURGH CASTLE. 21 

general devise) specifically devised to her his manor or lordship or reputed 
manor or lordship of Burgh Castle, and died 20th Jan. 1896/ Sarah 
Florence Harrison, by her will 29th April, 1897, appointed her friends, 
Charles Spencer Smith and William Cornelius Harrison, executors and 
trustees, and devised to them all her estate upon certain trusts, directing 
that they should at such time and in such manner as they should think fit 
sell the same. By a codicil dated 5th May, 1897, she appointed Ernest 
Egbert Blyth to be an additional executor and trustee, and died 31st March, 
1898." The trustees sold the manor, together with other property, by 
indenture 6th April, 1906, to William Martins Wiles Fison, formerly of 
Horsham, but now of The Moyse, St. Faith's, co. Norfolk, Amongst the 
other property included in the last-mentioned conveyance is " all that 
messuage or tenement with the edifices, buildings, yards, and gardens, 
and the piece of land thereunto adjoining and belonging or therewith used 
or occupied. And the barn standing and being on the said piece of land 
as all the said hereditaments and premises are situated in Burgh Castle 
aforesaid, and were formerly in the occupation of Ambrose Palmer and late 
of Thomas Spilling, and as the same are now known as the Manor House, 
Burgh Castle aforesaid, and are in the occupation of Marion Primrose." 

The castle, or rather the remains, with 27 acres around and within it, 
was sold by the representatives of Lydia Baret in Sept. 1846, and was 
bought for ;^i,500 by Sir J. P. Boileau, Bart., who was then President of the 
Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society. This castle has been supposed 
to have been the site of the ancient Garianonum of the Romans, a station 
so called from its commanding the mouth of the river Gerionus or Yare. 
Mr. Stevenson, in his edition of Bede's Ecclesiastical History, considers 
the castle to be the Cnobheresburg of the venerable historian. 

Burgh Castle is now found standing on rising ground with the River 
Waveney at its feet, and near the junction of this river with the Yare, both 
streams insufficient for the navigation of large vessels. It is clear, however, 
that these two small rivers are the slender remains of a considerable estuary 
or arm of the sea which at the time of the Roman occupation covered what 
is now marsh land, and divided a long length of Norfolk from Suffolk. At 
that early period, being the principal entrance into the territory of the 
warlike Iceni, we find Garianonum placed oh the most conspicuous point of 
land on its southern shore, and commanding the German Ocean, the 
estuary of the Yare, and the interior country being admirably calculated 
for the purpose of offence and defence. In the adjoining marshes have been 
found anchors, rings, and other pieces of iron, all testifying to the presence 
at some time of vessels of warfare. The walls of the fortress are about 9ft. 
thick with a foundation 12ft. in width. They are constructed of flint, 
rubble, concrete, and have lacing courses of tiles, six of which may still be 
seen. These courses run two tiles deep into the wall, and are three in 
width. The spans between these tile courses vary from ift. Sin. to 2ft. lin. 
in width, showing a laced flint facing. The walls are faced on the inside, 
but the lacing courses are irregular and fewer than on the outside, and the 
flint facing is ruder. The walls are supported at intervals by six round 
towers, or rather solid cylinders about 14ft. in diameter, banded with 
bricks or tiles. Mr. J. E. Fox, writing on Roman Suffolk, points out a 
peculiarity in the construction of the wall and bastions, namely, that for a 

^Will proved Ipswich, nth May, 1896. ''Will and codicil proved P.R., 23rd June, 

1898. 



22 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



height of some 7ft. from the ground the bastions are not bonded into the 
walls, above that height for the remaining 7ft. loin. they are bonded into it. 
Mr. Ives, in his remarks on the castle, fixed the era of its erection in the 
reign of the Emperor Claudius, and conjectures that it was built by 
Publius Ostorius Scapula, who conquered the Iceni, the aboriginal 
inhabitants of this and the adjacent counties. We are informed by the 
Notitia Imperii that this station was garrisoned by the Stablesian horse, 
under the command of Prsepositus, who was sometimes styled Garienninensis 
from the estuary which he was appointed to guard. 

The castle is still probably the property of the Boileau family, and 
vested in the trustees of the late Sir Francis George Nanningham Boileau, 
Bart., of Tacolnestone Hall, Norfolk, who died in 1900. 

There are a number of Court Rolls of the manor in the Public Record 
Office.' I to 18, 26 Hen. VII. 10, 12, to 14, 16 Hen. VIII., 37 Hen. VIII. to 
2 Eliz. ; also 41 Eliz. 11, 7 Jas. I. 10 Car. I.,' and also estreats, &c,j 23, 25, 
26, 36 Hen. VIII. 3 Edw. VI.^ 

Arms of Fleetwood : Per pale nebule Sa. and Or. 6 martlets in 
pale counterchanged. 




Burgh Castle. 



'Porlfolio, 203, 93. 



^Portfolio, 203, 12, 13, 13, 17. 
Hb. 14, 16. 




GORTON. 23 

CORTON. 

|N Saxon times Alric, a freeman under Gurth's commendation, 
held here 2 carucates of land, 5 bordars, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and i belonging to the men, 2 rouncies, 5 beasts, 
12 hogs, and 50 sheep, valued at 20s. Under him were 15 
freemen holding 80 acres, 4 ploughteams (reduced to 3 at 
the time of the Survey), and wood for the maintenance of 
3 hogs. The value was los. At the time of the Survey 
this estate was kept for the King by Roger Bigot." 

The Manor of Newton is in Gorton. Newton itself formerly stood 
eastward of Gorton, but has long since been destroyed by the sea. The 
Survey mentions the holding of a freeman here of 30 acres and half a plough- 
team, valued at 3s., which at that time was kept for the King by Roger 
Bigot.' 

Manor of Gorton. 

In the time of King Hen. I. this was the lordship and estate of Sir 
Robert de Sackville, Knt., and in 1313 we find Geoffrey de Gorton levied 
a fine of this manor against John de Gorton and Thomas his brother.^ 

In 13 1 6 John de Gorton held the manor. 

In 1360 John de Herling, or Harling, of East Herling, Norfolk, had a 
grant of free warren here in his manors of Newton and Knettishall. He 
held the manor, and from him to the death of Anne, only daughter of Robert 
de Herling, about 1502, without issue, the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Knettishall, in Blackbourn Hundred. 

Sir Robert de Herling, by his will, dated 5th June, 1421, desired in 
the first place that Joan his wife should have, besides her dower, a Ufe 
interest in his Manors of Gorton, Newton, and Lound, with the patronage 
of the church of Lound aforesaid ; and that the reversion of these manors, 
&c., should be at the disposal of his executors for the fulfilling of the 
intention of his wiU, and we find this manor specially mentioned in the 
inquis. p.m. of Sir Robert Wingfield, Knt., the 2nd husband of Anne, the 
only daughter of Sir Robert de Herling." 

Sir Edward Jerningham, or Jernegan, Knt., died in 1515 seised of the 
Manors of Gorton and Newton, which he is said to have obtained by 
marriage with Margaret, daughter of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, by Margaret 
his wife, heiress of the Tuddenhams (?). From this time to the time of 
John Jernegan, in 1582, the manor passed in the same course as that of 
Ashby, in this Hundred. 

Amongst the Ghancery Proceedings is an action by Rithard Bellamye 
and Gatherine his wife against Sir Miles Gorbett, Richard Barnye, and 
Thomas Playtor concerning the Manors of Gorton and Newton, late the 
estate of John Jernegan,' and a fine was in 1582 levied against John 
Jernegan in respect of this manor by Edmund Bedingfield and others. 

In 1587 John Gastelli,who Suckling surmises was probably an executor, 
sold the Manors of Gorton and Newton to John Wentworth,^ who died in 
1618-9, when they were found to be holden of Sir John Heveningham as 
of his Manor of Gorleston. From John Wentworth the manor passed to 

' Dom. ii. .283&. ■• I.P.M., 21 E<iw.. IV. 60. 

nb. =C.P. i. 91. 

^Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. II. 9. ^Fine, Mich. 29 and 30 Eliz. 



24 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his son and heir, Sir John Wentworth, and from this time the manor has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred. 

The manor is included in the chancery suit specified in the Early 
Chancery Proceedings between Sir Robert Wyngefeld, Knt., and Anne 
his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Robert Harlyng, Knt., against Sir 
William Knyvett, Knt., feoffee to uses.' 

Manor of Newton. 

This manor belonged to Maud de Glanville, who rnarried Roger de 
Tudenham. He died before 1210, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John de Tudenham, and from him to Edmund de Tudenham, who 
married Gundreda, and he settled it upon her about 1242. He was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Sir John de Tudenham, and he by his son 
and heir. Sir Robert de Tudenham, who died in 1308, from which time to the 
time of Margaret Tudenham or Tuddenham married to Sir Edmund Beding- 
field, which Margaret died in 1474, the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Eriswell,^ in Lackford Hundred. The manor is mentioned in the 
will of Sir Robert de Herling in 1421, and was apparently included in the 
chancery suit brought by Sir Roljert Wingfield and Anne, daughter and 
the heir of Sir Robert de Herling, against Sir William Knyvett, feoffee to uses. 
On Margaret Bedingfield's death in 1474 this manor apparently vested in 
her daughter Margaret, married to Sir Edward Jerningham, or Jernegan, 
who died in 1515, and from this time passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Ashby, in this. Hundred. 



'E.C.P., Bundle 54, -219. . ''See Manor of Great Bealings, Carlford 

Hundred, and Eriswell Manor, Lack- 
ford Hundred. 




FLIXTON. 25 

FLIXTON. 

^N Saxon times there were two manors in this place. One 
was held by Hacun, a freeman under Gurth's commendation, 
and consisted of 3 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 14 bordars, 
4 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging to the 
men (reduced at the time of the Survey to 2). Also wood 
for the maintenance of 10 hogs, 3 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 
6 beasts, 15 hogs, 160 sheep, and 20 goats, valued at 30s. 
Under Hacun were 21 freemen with 3 carucates of land, 6 bordars, 10 
ploughteams (reduced to 8 at the time of the Survey), wood sufficient to 
support 10 hogs, and 4 acres of meadow, the value being 40s. 

The other manor was held in Saxon times by Edric, and consisted of 
2 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 6 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 
belonging to the men (reduced to one and a half teams at the time of the 
Survey), wood for the maintenance of 6 hogs, 2 acres of meadow, 6 hogs, 
and 40 sheep, valued at 30s. Edric also had under him two freemen with 
5 acres, valued at xod. Both these manors were held for the King by Roger 
Bigot at the time of the Survey.' Another holding in this place was that 
of the Bishop of Thetford, who held for St. Michael in alms a carucate of 
land, 13 bordars (reduced to 8 at the time of the Survey), a ploughteam 
in demesne and 4 belonging to the men (reduced to i at the time of the 
Survey), wood sufficient to support 8 hogs, 4 acres of meadow, and half a 
mill, the value being 20s. The soc belonged to Stigand.^ 

Manor of Flixton. 

Flixton was formerly a parish by itself, and had a chapel, the last 
rector of which was the Rev. Thomas Sketh in 1704. Flixton is now a 
hamlet of Blundeston. 

In the reign of Edward the Confessor Flixton was divided into four 
manors, held by Hacun, Edric, Turgar, and Siric ; but these having formed 
part of the estates of Gurth, who fell at the Battle of Hastings, were seized 
by the Conqueror, and retained as his demesnes. Suckling is of opinion 
that there was no division of the lordship subsequently to this period, though 
from the title of the manor, which is sometimes styled the Manor of Flixton 
and at other times the Manor of Lawneys, considerable confusion arises. 
" Surely," says he, " the unity of the lordship is proved by the fact that 
in the reign of Elizabeth and afterwards the advowson of the church was 
conveyed with the Manor of Flixton, though it had been possessed by the 
Lawneys and passed to the family of Hobart, their successor in the Manor 
of Lawneys, from which it does not appear to have been alienated."^ We 
fail to foUowthe force of this argument, andfind, as a matter of fact, that for 
at least 150 years the lords of Flixton were different from those of Lawneys. 

The manor belonged to Geoffrey de Anos, and on the marriage of his 
daughter Margery with Sir Bartholomew de Creke,* son of Robert de Creke, 
the manor formed part of her marriage portion, as appears from a pleading 
at Ipswich in 1240, when Robert de Pirho, William le Blund, and Robert le 
Blund were found to owe to Sir Bartholomew de Creke £14 out of these 
manors assigned for the maintenance (j>. sustentatione uxoris sues) or jointure 

^ Dom. ii. 283, 284. 3 Hist, of Sufi. vol. i. p. 349. 

''Dom. ii. 381. ■* See Manor of Helmingham Hall, Bosmere 

and Claydon Hundred. 



26 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of his wife. On the death of Sir Bartholomew the lordship passed to his 
son, Robert de Creke, and he dying without issue the same passed to his 
brother and heir Jeffrey, and from him to his brother and heir John, who 
all dying without issue it passed to Sarah, his sister and heir, married to 
Roger Fitz Peter Fitz Osbert, and we find a grant of free warren in Fhxton 
to the latter at the end of the reign of King Hen. HI. 

In 1316 Edmund Bacun was lord, and in 1340 Sir John Fastolf had 
the beneficial interest in the manor. Sir John de Holneston being his feoffee 
or trustee. 

At the beginning of the 15th century the lordship was held by John 
Jernegan, and on his death in 1406 passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas 
Jernegan, who had a grant of free warren here in 1407.' 

At the close of the century the manor vested in the Hobarts, and 
Sir James Hobart^ died seised of it in 1516, when it passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Walter Hobart. In 1537 Sir Walter Hobart and Anna his wife 
are said to have conveyed the manor to Thomas, Lord Wentworth.^ It 
subsequently passed to Richard Mighells, of Chelmondiston. 

Amongst the Bodleian Charters is a quit claim in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth by Richard Mighell to William Sydnor of all rights to rents and 
customs of Flixton Manor,* and amongst the Chancery Proceedings of that 
reign an action by Walter Hobart against Richard " Mechilles " for performance 
of agreement respecting the manor and the patronage of the church sold by 
defendant to Owen " Hobbate."^ In a charter in the Bodleian dated 1579 
Richard Mighell, sen., is named as the then lord of the Manor of Flixton, 
for at that date in consideration of £26. 13s. 4^. he granted to John Wood 
two pieces of land containing 6|- acres called Flixton Hall Land, in Blundes- 
ton." 

On Richard Mighells's death the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Robert Mighells, who sold it in 1602 to John Wentworth, of Somerleyton. 
The deed of feoffment is dated 20th Nov. 1602, and is made between the said 
Robert Mighells and Joan his wife and the said John Wentworth and 
William Southwell, the assurance being to the said John Wentworth and 
William Southwell and the heirs of the said John Wentworth. It includes 
sundry estates in Flixton, Oulton, and Blundeston, and also the Manor of 
Flixton aforesaid, with the appurtenances and the advowson of the parish 
church of Flixton aforesaid ; and all rents, court leets, view of frankpledge, 
free warren, &c. In the same year a fine was levied between the above 
parties of the Manor of Flixton, with the appurtenances, 3 messuages, 3 
gardens, 100 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 10 
acres of wood, 100 acres of heath and briery, 40 acres of marsh, 60 of alder, 
and 20s. rent in Flixton, Oulton, Blundeston, and Belton, and the advowson 
of the church of Flixton. At an inquisition post mortem held in 1618 on 
the death of John Wentworth, it was found that " the Manor of Flixton 
and the advowson of the church aforesaid were holden of Sir John Heven- 
ingham's Manor of East Leet, in free and common socage."'' 

The manor passed to John Wentworth's son and heir. Sir John Went- 
worth, from which time the manor has passed in the same course as the 

'Chart. Rolls, 8 Hen. IV. 'c.p. ii. 34. 

"See Manor of Oulton, in this Hundred. ^Bodl. Suff. Ch. 841. 

3 Tanner, cvi. 12. ^Fine, Mich. 44-45 EUz. 
tBodl. Suff. Ch. 842. 



FLIXTON. 27 

Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred. In 1676 a bill in the Exchequer was 
pleaded against Sir Thomas AUin by Lady Mary Heveningham's trustees 
for discovering the several parts of the estate late of Sir John Wentworth 
which had been conveyed to the different assignees of Sir John's heir, Mr. 
Garneys. 

There is a fine of " Flixton Manor " levied by Thomas Amyas and 
others against Owen Hobart in 1571.' 

Manor of Lawneys. 

In 1316 this was the lordship of William de Lawney, and in 1390 of Sir 
John de Lawney. In 1430 it was held by William de Lawney, and in 1473 
by another William de Lawney. This William seems to have left a daughter 
and heir Anne, who married twice, ist Henry Wode, and with him brought 
a suit in chancery respecting this manor and the advowson of Flixton 
Church against William, son and heir of John Lancastre, esquire, feoffee to 
uses."" The action was apparently continued by Anne with her 2nd husband, 
Henry Tidyngworth.^ 

The two suits referred to are amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings 
preserved in the Record Office, and we there also find another chancery 
suit as to a rent issuing out of the manor brought by Margaret " del 
Auneye," sister of John " del Auneye," Knt., against John de Clifton, 
esquire.* 

From the time of King Edw. I. the family of Lawney presented to the 
church of Flixton uninterrupted till the beginning of the fifteenth century. 

At this time the manor passed to Sir James Hobart, and on his death 
24th Feb. 1516,^ vested in his son and heir. Sir Walter Hobart.* Suckling 
mentions that in 1551 there is an entry on the Court Rolls that " Walterus 
Hobart armig. ten. man. de Lawney in Flixton, et redd. inde. p. an. 20s. /[d."^ 

From this time the manor has passed in the same course as the main 
Manor of Flixton. 

Amongst the Campbell MSS. in the British Museum is the bequest of 
a manor here in 1437.^ 



" Fine, Easter, 13 Eliz. ^ See Manor of Oulton, in this Hundred ; 

*E.C.P., Bundle 54, 139. Candelent Manor, Trimley St. 

3E.C.P., Bundle 57, 325. Mary's, Colneis Hundred; and 

4E.C.P., Bundle 69, 259. Boys Manor, Bacton, in Hartismere 

5I.P.M., 9 Hen. VHI. 25. Hundred. 

? Citing Rental of South Leet, Cur. 6 Edw. 
VI. 

^Campl. xii. 14. 




28 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

FRITTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Godwin, a freeman 
under Gurth's commendation. It consisted of 2 carucates 
of land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, 3 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and I belonging to the men, wood for the main- 
tenance of 20 hogs, 2 rouncies, 8 beasts, 16 hogs, 160 sheep, 
3 goats, and 3 hives of bees, the value being 20s. Under 
him two freemen held 60 acres and a ploughteam, valued 
at 5s. At the time of the Survey this manor was kept for the King by 
Roger Bigot. 

Another estate in Saxon times was that of two freemen holding 80 
acres, 2 villeins, 2 ploughteams, and a salt pan, the value being los. At 
the time of the Survey this estate was kept by Roger Bigot for the King, 
and there was an additional bordar, while the ploughteams were reduced 
to I. 

In the same keeping was an estate of 30 acres valued at 3s. which had 
formerly been held by Leuric with half a ploughteam.' 

Under the head Caldecot, which is a manor in Fritton, we find from 
the Survey that Ralph the Engineer held a carucate of land and 3 bordars 
(formerly there had been but i), and half a ploughteam in lieu of a full 
ploughteam, which was maintained in Saxon times, the value being 8s, 
as against the old valuation of los.- 

Manor of Fritton al. Fritton Paston's. 

The lands composing this manor and the other manor of Fritton, though 
then held as two manors, were held by Earl Gurth in the time of Edward 
the Confessor ; but this manor was held of him by a freeman named Godwin. 
The estate became by forfeiture the property of the Crown, and was 
managed for the Conqueror by Roger Bigot. 

In the reign of Hen. III. the Manor of Fritton was held by Nicholas 
de Freton. The Hundred Rolls states that he held here of the King in chief , 
one fee in free socage, and that Alicia his mother held a moiety in dower.^ 
Several actions by this Nicholas de Freton are referred to on the Patent Rolls 
in 1277, 1278, and 1279.* Agatha, widow of the said Nicholas, presented 
to the church in 1305. The very next year, however, Roger Fitz Peter 
Fitz Osbert died seised of the manor, and in 1314 Katharine his widow settled 
it by fine on herself for life with remainder to John Malteby, afterwards 
Sir John, and Elizabeth his wife.^ 

Sir John Malteby was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Robert de 
Malteby or Mauteby, who presented to the church in 1349. Sir Robert 
was succeeded by John de Mauteby. In 1374 Sir John de Mauteby, son of 
Sir John de Mauteby, Knt., by his last will, dated at Fritton, leaves his body 
to be buried in the church of St. Edmund at Fritton, before the altar of 
the blessed Virgin Mary. He bequeathed to Richard Galyerd, parson of 
the church there, whom he appoints one of his executors, /\od. to be 
expended in masses for the good of his soul. Sir John's will was proved 
ist Oct. in that year. In 1413 Robert Mauteby enfeoffed Sir Simon Fel- 
brigge, Sir Miles Stapleton, and Sir William Argentein, in divers manors, 

'Dom. ii. 284, 2846. "Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. I. ijd, and 6 Edw. I. 

"Dom. ii. 445. 7^; 7 Edw. I. 17. 

3 H.R. ii. 162. * Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. II. 30. 



FRITTON. 29 

and rents in Norfolk, and in Fritton Manor, in Suffolk, to fulfil his will made 
in the same year by which he enjoins Eleanor his wife to pay his debts, 20 
marks per annum for two years to John his son for maintenance, 5 marks 
to his brother John Ocle to serve for him and his families' soul, and John 
to pay him ^^5 per annum for life, 20s. per annum to Eleanor his daughter, 
a nun at Shouldham, ;;f8o towards the marriage of Agnes his daughter, his 
wife with the remaining profits to keep Walter, Edward, Peter, and 
Thomas his sons till of age and Agnes till married. All the manors after 
his mothter and his brothers and sisters provided for to be released to John 
his son and his heirs in tail, and if Agnes died unmarried without her 
portion, that to go for repair of the south aisle of Mauteby church. Eleanor 
the widow remarried Thomas Chambers, lord of Sparham, in her right in 
20th Hen. VI. 

Robert Mauteby' s feoffees accordingly presented to the rectory here 
in 1425, the beneficial interest in a moiety for life being then in Eleanor, 
widow of the said Robert Mauteby. John Mauteby, his son and heir, 
married Margaret, daughter of John Berney, of Reedham, but died before 
1434, for this year we find an indenture of grant by Sir Simon Felbrigge 
Knt., Oliver Groos, John Berneys, of Reedham, in Norfolk, William Paston, 
and others, executors of the wills of Robert Mauteby, of " Maunteby," in 
Norfolk, and John his son, both deceased, to Thomas Kerdeston, Sir John 
Hevenyngham, Miles Stapilton, Ralph Garneys, Thomas Berneys and others 
of the moiety of the Manor of " Freton," with reversion of the other moiety 
on the death of Eleanor, widow of the said Robert Mauteby, and the 
advowson of Freton. The deed is dated the Feast of St. Calestus the Pope,' 
13 Hen. VI. [1434].^ The power of attorney to give seisin pursuant to this 
grant is amongst the Stowe Charters.^ 

John Mauteby left an only daughter and heir Margaret, who, marrying 
John Paston, son and heir of Sir William Paston, the judge,* brought the 
manor and advowson of Fritton into her husband's family, and by a lease 
dated 12th May, 13 Hen. VI. [1435] the feoffees, Thomas Kerdeston, Sir John 
Heveningham, Miles-Stapilton, Ralph Garneys, Philip Berneys (sic) and others 
demised what was included in the grant of the previous year to William 
Paston, Robert Clere, Edmund Clere, John Paston, and others for the term 
of 60 years.' In 1445 amongst the Stowe Charters is another power of 
attorney, this time from Simon Felbrigge "miles," Oliver Groos, and William 
Paston to Roger Rychers, Thomas Grenehood, and John Estegate to deliver 
seisin to John Paston, son of William Paston, and to his wife Margaret, 
daughter and heir of John Mauteby, son and heir of Robert Mauteby, 
deceased, of a moiety of the manor.* 

Margaret Paston, by her will dated 4th Feb. 1481, and proved i8th 
Dec. 1484, bequeaths her body to be buried in the " ele of that church of 
Mauteby, in which ele rest the bodyes of diverse of myne ancestors, I wyll 
that my executors purvey a stone of marble to be leyde aloft upon my 
grave, and I wyll have four scotchyns set thereon, one at each corner thereof, 
the first Paston and Mauteby, the second Mauteby and Burney, of Redeham ; 
the third Mauteby and the Lord Loveyn, the fourth Mauteby and Sir 
Roger Beauchamp, and in the middle of the stone a scotchyn of arms alone, 

' 14th Oct. Stanstead Manor, in Babergh Hun- 

'Add. Ch. 17738. dred. 

3 Stowe Charters, No. 176. ^Add. Ch. 17739. 

■'For a fuller account of the Paston ^ Stowe Ch. -192, 21 Hen. VI. 
family and their alliances, see 



30 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and under the same ' God is my trust/ with a Scripture written in the verges 
thereof. ' Here lyeth Margaret Paston, late wief of John Paston, doughter 
and heyre of John Mawteby, squyr.' " John Paston's widow was succeeded 
by his son and heir, Sir John Paston, sen. 

In 1473 we meet with a quit claim amongst the other charters by John 
Gernyngham, WiUiam Lomnowe,and Jacob Gloys to William Bakton, of 
the Manor of Fritton and all other lands they held by grant of John Paston, 
27 Hen. VI. and others.' Sir John Paston, sen., died unmarried in 1479, 
when the manor passed to his brother and heir. Sir John Paston, jun., 
and in 1485 amongst the same charters is a defeasance of a bond from John 
Paston to Henry Colet on condition that John grants the manor to Sir 
William Knyvet, Knt., and others for the use of Henry Colet until a debt be 
satisfied and after that to the use of the said John Paston.^ Sir John 
Paston, junior, died in 1503, when the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir William Paston, who dying in 1554 the manor passed to his grandson 
Sir William Paston, Knt., who sold the manor in 1568 by conveyance 
dated 26th Oct. to John Throgmorton, of the City of Norwich.^ The con- 
veyance was of all that Manor -of Fritton called Fritton Paston's, in Fritton, 
in the County of Suffolk, and all and singular the lands, tenements, gardens, 
pastures, feedings, marshes, woods, underwoods, liberty of foliage, waters, 
fishings, rents, advowsons, rectories, parsonages, and hereditaments what- 
soever to the same belonging in Fritton, Belton, Caldecote, &c., within the 
Hundred of Lothingland, with all court leets, &c., to hold to the said John 
Throgmorton in fee of the chief lord, &c., by the accustomed services, &c. 

John Throgmorton conveyed the said manor and premises in the same 
year to William Sydnor, who by deed dated 6th Oct. 1584, by way of jointure 
for Elizabeth, the wife of Henry Sydnor, his son and heir apparent, enfeoffed 
certain trustees and their heirs, amongst other estates of all that manor 
called Blundeston and the Manor of Fritton with the appurtenances ; and 
as to the Manor of Fritton he declared the uses to be to the use of the said 
William Sydnor and Bridget his then wife, and after to the use of the said 
Henry and of his heirs male by the said Elizabeth his wife, and afterwards 
to the right heirs of the said William. The marriage between the said 
Henry Sydnor and Elizabeth took place ist Feb. 1584. Henry Sydnor 
died i8th Dec. 1612. William Sydnor granted the manor in the time of 
Jac. I. to William Tompson, the grant being amongst the Bodleian 
Charters,* and died 26th August, 1613. 

On the 30th August, 1614, it was found that William, the eldest son 
of the said Henry, was then 24 years of age, and Elizabeth was then living, 
and that the Manor of Fritton Paston's was holden of Sir John Hevening- 
ham's Manor of North Leet in socage. By an inquisition taken at Eye 
i6th January, 1633, and by another taken at Bungay 29th May, 1634, upon the 
death of William Sydnor, he was found to have died on the 13th of January, 
1632, seised inter alia of the Manor of Frytton alias Fritton Paston's, &c., 
and the advowson of the church held in socage of the Manor of Lothingland, 
and valued at £$. Dying without male issue, it was founid that Elizabeth, 
Anne, Sarah, Mary, Hester, Susanna, Abigail, and Lydia were his daughters 
and coheirs. On the 19th Dec. 1651, the eight daughters conveyed the 
manor with that of Blundeston to William Heveningham, who resold them to 
John Tasburgh, who in turn conveyed them to Thomas AUin, of Lowestoft, 
Knt., in 1668. 

» Stowe' Ch. 193, 12 Edw. IV. 3 Fine, Trin. 10 Eliz. 

^Stowe Ch. 194, 2 Rich. Ill, tBodl, Suff. Ch. 5875. 



FRITTON. 31 

From this time to the death of Sir Richard Alhn alias Anquish the 
manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Ashby, in this 
Hundred. 

In 1710 the trustees of Sir Richard AUin, by Act of Parliament, held 
the Manor of Fritton and conveyed it to Samuel Fuller. 

Richard Fuller, M.P. for Yarmouth,' devised this manor and estate 
to the Rev. Francis Turner, one of the ministers of Yarmouth Chapel, for 
life ; with remainder to the Rev. Charles Onley, of Essex ; remainder to 
Francis Turner, of Yarmouth, surgeon, for life ; remainder to James Turner 
of Yarmouth, banker, for life ; remainder to the Rev. Joseph Turner, 
Dean of Norwich, for life ; remainder to the Rev. Richard Turner, per- 
petual curate of Yarmouth, far life ; remainder to the Rev. Francis Turner. 

Francis Turner, surgeon, during the lifetime of the Rev. Francis Turner, 
purchased the life interests of those in remainder, and devised the same to 
Elizabeth his wife for life ; then one-fourth to Dawson Turner, James 
Turner, and Mr. Powell ; one-fourth to the Rev. Dean Turner ; one-fourth 
to Mrs. Dade ; and one-fourth to the Rev. Richard Turner. 

AU these persons by deed dated gth and loth of November, i8ig, con- 
veyed the manor and the bulk of the estate to Andrew G. Johnston, of 
Hempnall, in Norfolk, in fee. This gentleman, who was a West India 
proprietor, went to Jamaica soon after his purchase, and in July, 1830, 
thg manor and estate were sold by auction at Yarmouth, and were purchased 
by Francis Turner, of Lincoln's Inn, London. 

The name of the manor is Fritten alias Fritton alias Fretton alias 
Freton Paston's.'' 

In 1896 and 1900 the manor was held by the Right Hon. Sir Saville 
Brinton Crossley, Bart., P.C, M.V.O., J. P., of Somerleyton. 

Fritton Hall, which is a large mansion of red brick, stands near the 
lake from which it takes its name, and is now the residence of Col. Henry 
Edmund Buxton, V.D., J. P. The hall and about 72a. 3r. 6p. and Fritton 
Lake were offered for sale in 1831,^ and again 21st May, 1851, the contents 
being then described as 73a. 3r. 9p. and 17 acres for lake.* 

Manor of Caldecot Hall. 

Bund was the tenant under Earl Gurth in the time of the Confessor, 
and the manor was held at the time of the Survey by Ralph Balistarius. 
It consisted of a carucate of land, a bordar (increased to 3 at the time of 
the Survey), the value being formerly los., and at the time of the Survey 8s.' 

In 1270 the manor was held by Henry Caldecot, who had a grant of 
free warren and a market and a fair here and in Belton." Inthereignof Edw. I. 
this Henry Caldecot is termed a knight, and is returned as holding his 
estates in Fritton, Caldecot, and Belton of the King in chief, which estates 
he derived from his ancestors, who obtained them from Robert Estan. 

Sir Henry Caldecot left a son, William de Caldecot,' living in 1314, who 
by Joan his wife (who remarried Bartholomew Daviller) left a son, John de 
Caldecot, living in 1331. SuckUng says^ : " The family unquestionably 

'There was a Samuel Fuller, M.P. for ^ ^Dom. ii. 445. 

Yarmouth, who died in 1721, aged ^ Chart. Rolls, 54 Hen. III. 10 ; H.R., ii. 

74. He had a brother Richard. 169. 

* Suckling Hist, of Suff:, vol. i., p. 354. ''Davy makes this WiUiam Caldecot Sir 
^Ipswich Journal, 6th Aug. 1831. Henry's grandson by k son William. 

* Ipswich Journal, 26th April, 1851. ^Vol. i. p. 356. 



32 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

derived their name from this manor in Fritton, which they seem to have 
given to lordships in Onehouse and Finborough. They were also land- 
owners in Debach." 

The manor soon after, according to SuckUng, became the property of the 
Fastolfs, and Sir John de Ulverstone, Knt., was feoffee in 1390 of both 
manor and advowson for Sir John Fastolf, Knt. Amongst the Bodleian 
Charters is a quit claim in 1434 by John Pekkere to Sir John Fastolf and 
others of all right to the manor called Fritton and Caldecotes in Fritton.' 
A release by John Fastolf to Sir John Fastolf, Knt., of all right in the manor 
is dated 4th Feb. 1443-4, is mentioned in the 6tli Report of the Hist. MSS.Com. 
p. 461. Sir John Fastolf died in 1460, and is said to have presented the 
lordship to Magdalen College, but it is included in the inquis. p.m. of John 
Paston, feoffee in trust for Sir John Falstolf, who obtained a licence for 
alienation in mortmain of the manor in 1467,'' which will be found 
on the Pat. Rolls in 1479.^ The grant consisted of 10 messuages, 8 tofts, 
100 acres of land, and 4^. rent. That Paston was a feoffee or trustee for 
Sir John Fastolf is evident from the fact that amongst the Early Chancery 
Proceedings is a suit by William, Bishop of Winchester, as executor of Sir 
John Fastolf, against William Paston, " feoffee of the said Sir John," and 
probably representative of John Paston, respecting the manor.* 

Chalmer, in his History of Oxford, as cited by Suckling, says : " It is 
ascertained that the Boar's Head in Southwark, now divided into tene- 
ments, and Caldecot Manor, in Suffolk, and probably other estates in 
Lovingland, in the same county, were part of the benefactions of Sir John 
Fastolf, Knt., to Magdalen College, Oxford." Davy regards the idea of 
the manor having been given to the College by Sir John Fastolf as 
erroneous, and states that the manor was in 1430 vested in William Lawney, 
and queries whether he did not convey it by fine to Anne, his daughter and 
heir, married to Wode alias Benyngton. He also states that Robert Fitz- 
Roberts and others held in 1430, and in 1473 it was vested in William of 
Waynfleet, Bishop of Winchester, and he probably gave it to the College 
in 1478. This is a curious mixture of facts and manors — some truth, and 
much error. 

Suckling's statement rests on a vague assertion of Blomefield and of 
Chalmer in his History of Oxford. In 1430 a fine was levied of this manor 
" Caldecotes Manor in Freton and Belton," by John Fray, John Welles, 
Ralph Holand, Thomas Rolf, Thomas Haseley, Robert Fitz Robert, Richard 
Hungate, John Dautree, and William Wolf, against William Laweney.' 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings reference is made to a lease 
of the manor by him, one action being between him and John Pekker,^ 
and another being as to the manor enfeoffed by John Lawnay.'' Further 
we meet with another fine levied of the manor in 1473 by William Waynflete, 
Bishop of Winchester, Daniel Husbande, clerk, William Gifford, clerk, 
William Danvers, Thomas Danvers, and Richard Burton against Henry 
Wode alias Henry Benyngton, and Anne his wife, daughter and heir of 
WiUiam " Laweney."^ 

The president and scholars of Magdalen College were lords of the manor 
in 1814, when land was allotted to them under the Bradwell, Belton, 
and Fritten Inclosure Act, and they held in 1844 and 1885. 

' 12 Hen. VI. ; Bodl. Suff. Ch. 873. s Feet of Fines, 8 Hen. VI. 15. 

'I.P.M., 6 Edw. IV. 44. «E.C.P., 15 Rich. II. ; 10 Hen. VI. 7, 134. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 3. ''E.C.P., 10-21 Hen. VI. 11, 214. 

t E.C.P., Bundlfe 20, 80. 8 Feet of Fines, 13 Edw. IV. 27, 28. 



FRITTON. 33 

The manor is now said to be vested in the Right Hon. Sir Savile Brinton 
Crossley, Bart., P.C, M.V.O., J. P., of Somerleyton. There is a chancery 
suit by the President, &c., of the College against John Jernegan touching 
the manor amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth.' 

Charters and deeds relating to the manor are referred to in the 4th Rep. 
of the Hist. MSS. Com.' 

Caldecot Hall is a plain residence of brick now occupied by Mr. William 
Henry Ellis. 

Arms of Caldecot : Per pale^ Or and Az. a chief Gules. 



'C.P., Ser. ii. B. cxxv. 69. *P. 463, 

E 




34 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

GORLESTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Guert consisting of 
5 carucates of land, 20 villeins, 5 bordars, 5 serfs, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne, and 5 belonging to the men, wood for the 
maintenance of 5 hogs, 10 acres of meadow, 3 saltpans, 2 
rouncies, 5 beasts, and 300 sheep. At the time of the 
Survey Roger Bigot kept this manor for the King;, the 
villeins were reduced to 12, the serfs to 4, the ploughteams 
in demesne to i and those belonging to the men to 3, while the rouncies 
and beasts had disappeared. 

Another holding in this place consisted of 20 freemen with 90 acres " as 
to all customs belonging to the manor and included in its valuation." 
There were 7 ploughteams, reduced to 5 at the time of the Survey. It was 
held by Roger Bigot in keeping for the King. 

Another holding was that of four freemen, and consisted of a carucate of 
land, 2^ ploughteams, valued at 20s. At the time of the Survey the plough- 
teams were 2, and their value i6s. This estate also was kept for the King 
by Roger Bigot.' 

The Survey also states that at Yarmouth were 24 fishermen belonging 
to the Manor of Gorleston. They were enumerated amongst the estates of 
the King kept for him by Roger Bigot." 

There were at one time four manors in Gorleston — a paramount, a 
principal, and two mesne, of all of which the Jerninghams were lords. 

Manor of Gorleston. 

This was in the reign of Edward the Confessor part of the estates of 
Earl Gurth or Guert, 6th son of Earl Godwin, and at the time of the Survey 
was held by Roger Bigot for the King. With the Crown the manor 
remained until the latter end of the reign of Hen. III., when it was held 
by Warin de Montchensy by the service of one knight's fee.^ An extent of 
the lands of King Hen. III. in Gorleston will be found on the Hundred 
Rolls.* In the reign of Edw. I. John BaUiol was lord of Gorleston by a 
grant from the Crown. He was the 4th son of John de Balliol, founder of 
the college at Oxford which bears his name, who died in 1268, by 
Devorguilla, descended on her mother's side from Alexander, King of Scot- 
land. In 1292 this John Balliol the grantee was proclaimed King of 
Scotland, which dignity he held as a fief of the English Crown for four 
years, when he was deposed by Edw. I., and under a specious pretence of 
rebellion was brought prisoner to London. In a subsidy roll in the year 
1295-6 he is simply styled Sir John de Balliol, without, any reference to his 
regal dignity. 

In 13 14 an inquisition was taken respecting the rights of this John 
BaUiol in his Hundred of Lotbingland, and the rights of the towns of Little 
Yarmouth and Gorleston, he having taken for every foreign ship iM., for 
every English ship 4^. per annum, for every loaded cart or horse one half- 
penny, for every last of herrings by a foreign merchant ^d., the payage 
belonging to him was valued at /^d. He used also to take attachment of 
every ship anchoring on the Lothingland side, so far as the file of the water. 

The manor having been forfeited by John Balliol was granted by King 
Edw. I. to his nephew, John de Dreux, Earl of Richmond, and Baron de 

'Dom. ii. 283, 283*, 2846. ^T (jeN. 283. 

^Ib. •'H.R. ii. 140. 



GORLESTON. 35 

Bretagne. He was councillor for the Prince of Wales in 1307 and guardian 
and Lieutenant of Scotland the next and the following year, and died 17th 
Jan. 1333-4 without issue, when th^e manor passed to his nephew and heir, 
John de Dreux, Earl of Richmond, and Duke of Bretagne, son of Arthur, 
Duke of Brittany, by his ist wife Mary, Vicomtesse de Limoges, daughter 
and heir of Guy VI. Vicomte de Limoges, which Arthur was eldest brother 
of John, the late Earl of Richmond. 

John, Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany, married ist in 1296-7 
Isabel, sister of Philip VI., King of France, daughter of Charles, Count of 
Valois, by his ist wife Margaret, daughter of Chas. II., King of Jersualem 
and Sicily ; and 2ndly Isabel, daughter of Sancho IV., King of Castile and 
Leon ; and 3rdly Jane, daughter and heir of Edward, Count of Savoy, 
by Blanche, daughter of Robert, 2nd Duke of Burgundy. The Earl and 
Duke died 30th April, 1341, without issue. 

The manor next vested in ]\Iichael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, who 
married Katherine, daughter and heir of Sir John Wingfield, Knt., and died 
in 1388 an outlaw. Though a grant seems to have been made of the manor 
to John Holland, Earl of Huntingdon, the manor was restored with his 
other estates to Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, in 1397, and full 
restoration made to him on the accession of Hen. IV. 

He married Lady Catherine de Stafford, daughter of Hugh, Earl of 
Stafford, and on his death in 1415 was succeeded by bis son and heir, 
Michael de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, slain at the battle of Agincourt the 
same year as his father. He was succeeded by his brother, William de la 
Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk, from which time the manor passed as the Manor 
of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn Hundred, up to the time of Edmund de la 
Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, who was beheaded in 1513. On his attainder 
the manor had passed to the Crown. 

On the 28th Jan. 1510, the manor was granted in tail male by King 
Hen. VIII. to Edward Jernegan or Jerningham and Mary his wife subject 
to the annual rent of ;£i6. 17s. gd.^ 

Sir Edward Jernegan died 6th Jan. 1515' seised of the manor and the 
manors of East and West and North and South Leet in Goriest on. The manor 
passed to his widow Mary, who remarried Sir William Kingston, K.G., and died 
26th Aug. 1548,^ when the manor passed to Sir Edmund's eldest son. Sir Henry 
Jernegan, of Wingfield and of Huntingfield Hall. Sir Henry was one of the 
first amongst the Suffolk knights to espouse the cause of Queen Mary, and 
proceeded at the head of his tenants and retainers to join the Queen at 
Kenninghall, and afterwards at Framlingham Castle, having first pro- 
claimed her at Norwich on the 12th July. 

The interest of the Jernegan family in East Anglia was of no small 
account, and it was mainly through their influence that possession of the 
fleet stationed in the neighbourhood of Yarmouth for the purpose of inter- 
cepting the Queen in the event of her attempting to quit England was 
obtained at this critical time. HoUinshed in his Chronicle says : " About 
this time six ships that were appointed to lie before Yarmouth, and to have 
taken the Ladie Marie, if she had fled that way, were, by force of weather, 
driven into the haven where Maister Jerningham was, raising power on 
the Ladie Mary's behalf, who hearing thereof, came thither, whereupon the 

'S.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1446. ^i.p.M., 2 Edw. VI. 70. 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. i. 



36 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK, 

Captain took a boat, and went to their ships, but the sailors and soldiers 
asked Maister Jerningham what he would have ? and whether he would 
have their Captains or no ? and he said yea. Marrie, said they, ye shall have 
them, or we throwe them into the bottome of the sea. But the captains 
said forthwith that they would serve Queen Mary willingly, so brought 
forth their men, and conveyed with them the great ordnance. Of the 
coming of these ships, the Lady Marie was wonderfully joyous, and after- 
wards doubted little the Duke's puissance, but when news thereof was 
brought to the tower, each man there began to draw backward, and after 
that word of a greater mischief was brought to the tower ; that is to say, 
tl\at the nobleman's tenants refuse to serve their lords against Queen 
Marie." 

The Queen, recognised the assistance she had received from Sir Henry 
Jerningham, and, upon her accession, immediately appointed him Vice- 
Chamberlain, Captain of the Guard, Master of the Horse, and of her House- 
hold, and one of the Privy Council, and granted him several large manors in 
Norfolk, Suffolk, Herefordshire, and Gloucestershire, and in particular 
those of Costessey, in Norfolk, and Wingfield Castle, in Suffolk. He was 
one of the representatives for the latter county in Parliament in the first 
year of Queen Mary, and was most active in suppressing the rebellion of 
Sir Thomas Wyatt, and routed the rebels at Charing Cross after their failure 
at Whitehall in their attempt to follow their leader into the city. He 
married Frances, daughter of Sir George Baynham, of Clowerwall, in 
Gloucestershire, Knt., and dying was buried at Costessey church 7th 
September, 1572, aged 63, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Hervy 
Jerningham, of Costessey. 

Amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian is a copy of an agreement 
in 1572 between the town of Yarmouth and the liberties of Sir Henry 
Jernyngham touching Goriest on.' 

Davy states that in 1589 William Tripp and Robert Dawe had a grant 
of the manor from the Queen, and that in 1592 John Arundell and Charles 
Walgrave held the manor, and the same year Theophilus Adams and Thomas 
Butler had a grant of the reversion from Queen Elizabeth. Sir Henry 
Jernegan married ist Eleanor, daughter of Thoinas, Lord Dacres, of 
Gillesland, by Elizabeth, daughter of George Talbot, 4th Earl of Shrewsbury, 
and Ann his wife, daughter of Lord Hastings, and 2ndly Frances, daughter 
and coheir of his cousin, Sir John Jernegan, of Somerleyton, and widow of 
Sir Thomas Bedingfield, of Oxburgh. Henry Jernegan or Jerningham in 
1604 sold the manor to Thomas Hirne and Christopher Hirne, and an 
acquittance by the vendor to Thomas Hirne, described as of Heveringland, 
for ;^i,ooo paid for the releases of this manor and those of Leistoft alias 
Lowstoft, Eastleete, Northleete, Southleete, Westleete, and Mutford, and 
other lands in the Island of Lpthingland will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum." The acquittance is dated 
4th May, 1604. 

Sir John Heveningham and Bridget his wife seem to have bought in 
1609 from the Hirnes, and Sir John's son, WiUiam Heveningham, appears 
to have held the manor, and forfeited it in 1660 by reason of his having been 
one of the judges of King Chas. L 

The manor was apparently included in the grant made in favour pf 
Lady Mary Heveningham by Kifig Chas. L and her trustees held in 1661. 

'Tanner, cccxi. 35. ^Add. Ch. 14279. 



GORLESTON. 37 

In 1679 the manor was purchased by Sir Thomas AUin, and conveyed 
to him and Thomas AUin, his son and heir apparent and their heirs by deed 
dated 13th Feb. that year. Since that time it has passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred. 

SuckUng says : " The court books for the Manor of Gorleston begin 
in the year 1665 ; the style of them is ' The Court of ancient demesne.' 
From the above year till 1670 the leets are regularly entered, and chief 
pledges sworn for Gorleston, and the usual presentments and entries made. 
There were formerly a set of stewards of these leets, elected from among 
the chief tenants of the manor, and called Chievers, whose office was to 
collect the ancient demesne rents, yearly in rotation. An ancient MS., 
commencing in 1583, contains ' a particular of the Cheevers in Gorleston, 
who are to collect the ancient demesne rents there, yierlie, by and in their 
courses and orders, being xxxiiijs. and m]d. per an., there being xviij. cheevs 
in number. To be elected by the inquest of office at a court yerelie, at 
Gorleston, called the auncient demeasne court, holden for the manor of Gorles- 
ton on Fridaie in Quinquagessima weeke, to beare the office of Bayliffe for 
the said manor of Gorleston. The rents are to be collected at thanciation 
and michaelmas following after the election, and to be paid to the lorde of 
Lothingland, or to his Bayliffe yerelie by equal porcons, viz., the some of 
xxxiiijs. m]d. And the Chiever, or his deputie, is to have for his labour 
vjs. viij^., so in all there is yerelie to be collected the some xlis. as appears 
by ancient rentals.' Among the Chievers' memorandums is one dated 1595, 
' That Richard Ward did _leave the office for this chief (Hertes Chief) in 
an°. 1595, anoque Eliz. Rne Angl. xxxvij., and then did paie the whole 
rent wtout eny helpers, because he could not fynd eny lands belonging 
unto the said Tente or Chiefe, out of his owne possession or occupation.' 
Then follows a list of persons annually elected from 1645 to 1662 ; the last 
of whom was the lord himself. The chiever has not been elected nor the 
rent collected for many years, and indeed no traces remain of the custom.'" 

In 1849 the manor or reputed Manor of Gorleston and the manor called 
Gunton Hall, with about 1,060 acres of land, were offered for sale by public 
auction at the Bear Inn, Southtown.'' 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a release 
of the manor in 1608.^ 

Arms of De Dreux : Chequy, Or and Az. a Canton Ermine. 

Manor of Bacon's. 

The manor acquired its name from the ancient family of Bacon, which 
held lands here from very early times, certainly during the middle of the 
13th century.* In 1292 John Bacun, whom Suckling supposes to have been 
the warrior buried in the chancel of Gorleston church, is mentioned in the 
Inquisition Rolls "de viain Reston inter Jernemuth at Morford includenda." 

In 1335 Sir Henry Bacon appears to have been enfeoffed of this manor, 
which was held of the paramount Manor of Gorleston. It passed to Philip 
Calthorp, from whom it was acquired in 1518 by Thomas Spring,^ " the rich 
clothier " of Lavenham, and on his death in 1523 vested in his son and heir, 
Sir John Spring, who paid for his Manor of Bacon's 26s. 4^. 

"Suckling, Hist, of Suff., vol. i. p. 362. ♦H.R. ii. 161. 

''Jpswieh Journal, 4tli Aug. 1849. ^Fine, Mich. 10 Hen. VIII. 

3 Add. Ch. 14279, 



38 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John Spring in 1546 sold the manor to Richard Gunville.' Richard 
Gunville died 29th Aug. 1553/ when the manor passed to his son and heir 
WiUiam Gunville^ who died unmarried in 1559, when it went to his brother 
and heir, Henry Gunville, who died without issue in 1580, leaving a widow 
Alice to whom the manor passed for life. On her death it devolved upon 
the sister of Henry Gunville, married to Richard Ward. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in 1588 will be found an action by 
this Richard Ward against Richard Johnson to establish boundaries of land 
in Gorleston, and respecting a lease of lands there called " Smithes," the 
inheritance of the plaintiff.^ In 1602 Henry Ward was lord. 

In 1609 the manor was held by Roger Godsave or Godsalve, and in 
1633 by William Vesey, of Bradwell, younger son of WiUiam Vesey, of 
Hintlesham." He married ist Anne, daughter of — Brag, of Hatfield 
Peverell, and 2ndly Alice, daughter of Richard Jenkinson, and sister of 
Henry Jenkinson, of Oulton. His will is dated 14th Jan. 1644, in which 
year he died, when the manor passed to his widow Alice and from her to 
their son, Richard Vesey, who was lord of the manor of Hobland Hall 
in 1684. He married Anne Rachell, daughter of — Jenkinson, of Norwich, 
and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, William Vesey, who 
was lord in 1693. 

In 1723 Mary Prattant, widow, occurs as lady of the manor, and amongst 
the Exchequer Depositions taken at Great Yarmouth in 1736 we find an 
action as to the estate of James Artis, including this manor and estates at 
Gorleston. The action is between Mary " Prattant " and others and 
Samuel Artis. Soon afterwards we find the manor vested in Francis 
Larwood, who by will dated Feb. 1749, and proved in the Prerogative Court 
of Canterbury 7th May, 1750, devised it to Christopher Routh, of Norwich, 
in fee, who by will 9th July, 1774, and proved 31st July, 1783, devised it to 
his trustees for sale. The trustees conveyed the manor to Robert Harvey 
the elder, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by deeds of lease and release 
dated nth and 12th Oct. 1785. The said Robert Harvey by will dated 
8th Oct. 1810, devised it to his three sons, Robert, John^ and Charles, in 
fee as tenants in common, and they by deeds dated 9th and loth Oct. 1818, 
sold and conveyed it to Thomas Read and Robert Read, of Frettenham, 
in Norfolk, farmers, who sold and conveyed it by deeds dated 13th and 
14th Nov. 1821, to James Barber, of Hopton, and afterwards of Gorleston, 
farmer. 

James Barber, by his will dated 29th Jan. 1842, devised his Manor of 
Bacon's to trustees for sale, and they offered it for sale by auction 20th May, 
1843, at the Star Inn, Yarmouth.' It was bought by William Thurtell, 
of Great Yarmouth, and Arthur Steward, of Southtown, otherwise Little 
Yarmouth. 

Manor of Spittings. 

This manor derived its name from a lord called William Spitting. In 
1444 the manor was vested in John Fastolf, for we find this year a 
release by him to Sir John Fastolf, Knt., of all his rights in the manors 
of Caldecotes, Brocostone, Haklound, and Spylelyng. The release is 
dated 4th Feb. 22 Hen. VI.,* and in 1478 the manor became vested in 

" Fine, Mich. 38 Hen. VIII. * See Manor of Hintlesham Priory, Samford 

^I.P.M., 17th July, 2 Mary. Hundred. 

sC.P. iii. 306. ^Ipswich Journal, 22nd April, 1843. 

*6 Rep. Hist. Com. 461. 



GORLESTON. 39 

Magdalen College, Oxford.' Probably the suit amongst the Early Chancery 
Proceedings by William, Bishop of Winchester, as executor of Sir John 
Fastolf against William Paston, feoffee of the said Sir John, as to the manor 
has reference to this vesting.* 

The licence for the alienation in mortmain will be found on the Patent 
Rolls for 1478.^ 

Lands in Gorleston called " Spitelyngg " are found in the inquis. 
p.m. of Sir John Fastolf in 1460.'* As to this manor and the deeds, see 
4 Rep. Hist. MSS. Com. p. 461, 463. 



n.P.M., 18 Edw. IV. 53. 2 Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 23. 

"E.C.P., Bundle 20, 80.' ■^I.P.M., 38-39 Hen. VI. 48. 




40 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF GUNTON. 

|N the tinie of Hen. I. this manor was held by the church 
of St. Michael, at Norwich. In 1287 it was the lordship of 
Richard de Goneton, whose successor held it near the end 
of the reign of Edw. II. In 1279 we find an action by Robert, 
son of Roger de Gunton, against John, son of Richard de 
Giinton, and others as to a tenement in Gunton,' and one 
by Simon Tuteler and Anastasia his wife against John, 
son of Richard de Gunton, and others touching a tenement there.'' 

In 1301 a fine of the manor and advowson was levied by John de 
Gunton and Letitia his wife against Roger de Ludham,^ 

In 1316 the manor was vested in Roger de Loudham. The family had 
held land here from the time of Edw. I., and we find in 1277 an action 
referred to on the Patent Rolls. It was brought by Ranulph de Ludeham 
against Thomas Thurkil and related to common of pasture in Gunton.'* 

Roger de Loudham conveyed the manor by fine to John de Gorton, 
and in 1336 Geoffrey de Gorton conveyed the manor by fine to Roger de 
Loudham and Matilda his wife.' Matilda was a daughter of Richard de 
Grey. 

These assurances were probably for effecting settlements on the 
Loudham family, and in 1338 Sir Roger de Loudham presented to the church. 
Sir Roger died in 1346,^ and in 1356 William Tempervoyse, parson of 
Langenho, conveyed the manor by fine to John, son of Roger de Loudham, 
and Isabel his wife.^ 

In 1414 Thomas Kempston, no doubt a trustee, conveyed it by fine to 
Robert Palgrave and Margaret his wife,' for we find that in 1435 the manor 
was held by Nicholas de Loudham, brother and heir of John, son and heir 
of Sir Roger de Loudham,' the said John having died without issue. 

Nicholas de Loudham is made by Davy to have married Matilda, 
daughter of Richard de Grey, by some stated to be the wife of his father. 

Before 145 1, however, the manor had passed from the Loudhams, for 
we then find it vested in Sir Henry Inglose, Knt., who by his will dated 
20th June, 1451, and proved 4th July in the same year, left the manors of 
Gunton and Hopton'" with certain manors in Rutland to be sold by his 
executors to pay his debts. Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings is 
a suit by Edmund Wichyngham, Robert Inglose, and John.. Parham clerk, 
as executors 6f Sir " Harry " Inglose, Knt., against Sir John Colvyle, Knt., 
feoffee of the said Sir "Harry," as to this manor." The manor was evidently 
not sold, but passed on Sir Henry's death to his 2nd son, Robert Inglose, 
from whom in 1478 it passed to his daughter and heir Catherine, married 
to Richard Blomevyle or Blomville, of Newton Flotman. He died in 1490 
and she in 1495, when the manor passed to her son and heir, Richard 
Blomevyle, and on his death in 1503 to his brother Ralph Blomevyle, who 

'Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. I. 26d. ^pget of Fines, 2 Hen. V. 12. 

'lb. 9 Feet of Fines, 14 Hen. VI. 26. 

^Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. I. 38. "Wedo not see a manor in Hopton which 

4 Pat. RoUS) 5 Edw. I. 23^. could have belonged to him. See 

5 Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. III. 35. Manot of Ashby, in this Hundred, 
« I.P.M., 31 Edw. III. 37. for the will of Sir Henry Inglose. 

7 Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. III. 36; "S^e "E.C.P., Bundle 26, 135; 35.38 Hen^-VI. 
Matior of Loudham Herringfleet, m 
this Hundred. 



GUNTON. 41 

married Constance Gurney, and died 20th April, 1517/ when the manor 
vested in his son and heir, Edward Blomevyle. 

A fine was levied against him of the manor in 1532 by John Blomevile, 
clerk, and others, and the fine included lands in Gunton, Lowestoft, Hopton, 
Oulton, Flixton, Normenton, Mutford, and Gorleston, and the advowson 
of the chm-ch of Gunton/ Edward Blomevile married ist a daughter of 
Thomas Godsalve, of Norwich, and 2ndly Barbara, daughter of William 
Drake, of Hardley, Norfolk, and died in 1568, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Thomas Blomevyle. By his first wife, Rose Johnson, 
he had no issue, and by his 2nd, Margaret, he had only two daughters. 

In 1571 the manor was vested in Jerome Blomvyle, and was conveyed 
to Robert Wroote or Wrott.^ 

In 1580 a chancery suit was instituted by John Hoo, of Lowestoft, 
against this Robert Wroote as to certain pasture land called the Deanes 
containing 1,000 acres lying between the main sea and the cliff, which had 
formerly* been covered by the sea, and whereon time out of mind the 
inhabitants of Lowestoft had been accustomed to depasture their horses, 
sheep, and other cattle, and to take furze and sweepage thereon growing. 

This was claimed to be parcel of Lowestoft Manor by Hoo and of Gunton 
Manor by Wroote. The proceedings are fully set forth by Mr. Suckling 
in his History of Suffolk.* Gunton Manor came out the better. Robert 
Wroote died in 1591, and by an inquisition post mortem held at Ipswich 
28th of Sept. 1591, he was found to have died seised of the Manor of Gunton 
juxta Leystoft held of Henry Jernegan in free socage as of his Manor of 
Gorleston, and valued at ;^5. The manor passed to Robert Wroote' s son 
and heir, Francis Wroote, from whom it passed to Lionel Holle, of the 
Inner Temple, who married Susan, one of the daughters and coheirs of 
Thomas Harvey, of Rushmere, yeoman. 

He survived and remarried, and in 1692 Dorothy Holle, widow, presented 
to the rectory. 

In 1724 the manor was vested in William Luson, merchant, and from 
him it passed to his son and heir, Hewling Luson. Mr. Druery, in his 
Historical and Topographical Notes on Yarmouth (p. 219) informs us that 
in 1756 Hewling Luson discovered some fine clay on his estate here capable 
of being manufactured into a kind of china something superior to Delft 
ware. He erected a temporary furnace on his estate here and succeeded 
in establishing a china manufactory, although he encountered considerable 
opposition from the London artisans who apprized of his intentions executed 
a variety of schemes through fear of competition to render his attempts 
abortive. In the following year the project was revived by Messrs. Aldred, 
Richman, Walker, and Brown, at Lowestoft, who established a very 
respectable manufactory upon a more extended scale, but it was subse- 
quently relinquished. Hewling Luson sold this estate, together with the 
small parish of Fishley, in Norfolk, to Sir Charles Saunders for £16,050. 
Sir Charles was one of the Knights of the Bath, Admiral of the White 
Squadron, Lieut.-General of Marines, and a Privy Councillor, This gallant 

» I P M., 7 Hen. VIII. 61. v. Barbara Hartly, widow (Fines, 

*Fin'e, HU. 24 Hen. VIII. Trin. 13 Eliz.) 

3 Fines, Robert Wrot and Jerome Blom- tVol. ii. pp. 3-6. 
vyle and others, and Robert Wrott 

F 



42 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

officer died 7th Dec. 1775/ when the manor passed to his trustees, Sir 
Hugh PaUiser and Timothy Bret, and subsequently to Dr. Richard Huck, 
a physician of eminence, who in 1777 married the niece and heir of Sir Charles 
and assumed the name and arms of Saunders. Mrs. Huck Saunders died 
in 1780, leaving two daughters one of whom married the Hon. Mr. (after- 
wards Viscount) Dundas, and the other John, Earl of Westmoreland, of 
which ladies the manor was purchased in 1802 by Thomas Fowler. In 
the advertisement of sale, which was by public auction, at the Bear Inn, 
Yarmouth, 14th July, 1802, the property was described as consisting of 
" the Manor of Gunton and the mansion house called Gunton Hall, with 
28 acres of land in hand and 23 acres of wood in hand, also a farm of about 
627 acres and 222 acres of warren.'" 

He died in 1831, when the manor went to his widow, Mary Soame 
Fowler, for life, and then passed to his son and heir, the Rev. Frederick 
Cook Fowler. In 1885 the manor was vested in Robert Cook Fowler, and 
in 1896 and at the present time in the trustees of the late Mrs. Fowler. 

Gunton Hall is a handsome modern edifice erected by Thomas Fowler 
in 1803 on the north side of the parish, two miles from Lowestoft, and now 
occupied by Basil Arthur Charlesworth, J. P. The old hall adjoining the 
churchyard was formerly the residence of Hewling Luson, afterwards of Sir 
Charles Saunders, Knt., then of his descendant. Dr. Saunders, and subse- 
quently of J. D. Downes, a celebrated falconer, who kept here an excellent 
breed of hawks, and afforded the neighbouring gentry an opportunity of 
witnessing the ancient sport of hawking, so long the favourite amusement 
of our forefathers, but now nearly extinct, not only in England but in 
Europe. Later the hall was occupied by the Rev. Frederick Cook Fowler, 
and is now the residence of Ernest William Fowler. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is a Bill to be relieved against judgments by Henry Dengayne and Barbara 
his wife respecting the manor to which Barbara was entitled for life.' 

And we find amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings a suit by William 
Bishop, of Winchester, executor of Sir John Fastolf, against Wilham Paston, 
Esq., feoffee of the said Sir John, as to the Manor of Gunton and other 
manors.* 

Arms of Lowdham : Arg. 3 inescutcheons Sa, 2 and i, of this branch. 
Of Blomvile : Quarterly per fesse indented Or and Az., a bend Gu. 



' He was a member of the House of 4^ acres gardens, 3 acres lawns, and 

Commons at the time of his decease. 80 acres woodlands ; also 856 acres 

and Sir George Saville pronounced of land, the last let at £250 a year, 

a brilliant eulogy upon his life and being in fact a warren for rabbits." 

actions. In a description of the [Ipswich Journal, July, 1762.) 

manor and advowson in advertise- 'I-pswich Jomml, 19th June, 1802. 

ment of sale at the King's Arms, ^C.P. i. 235. , c 

Norwich, 13th Aug, 1762, the ''E.C.P. 31 HflJ. VI., Bundle 20, 80. 
property was stated to be " about 




HERRINGFLEET. 43 

HERRINGFLEET. 

MANOR was held here by Wolsey, a freeman in Saxon times, 
and consisted of a carucate of land, 2 villeins, a bordar, a 
ploughteam in demesne and half belonging to the men, 
both of which had disappeared at the time of the Survey. 
There was also enough wood to support 12 hogs, the value 
being 4s. At the time of the Survey this manor was kept 
for the King by Roger Bigot. 

" All these men rendered in the time of the Confessor 20s. to the farm 
(? of the manor), and later in Roger Bigot's time, Aluric the provost increased 
the sum to lOos., and in Hugh de Houdan's time to £50 as the men say.'" 

Manor of Herringfleet late Priory. 

In the time of the Confessor Ulsi, a freeman, held this estate, which 
was at the time of the Survey vested in the Crown, and was subsequently 
held by Catherine Fitz Osbert. In the reign of King John it was the lord- 
ship of Roger Fitz Osbert, who in the next reign founded a priory in the 
village which he dedicated to the Virgin Mary and St. Olave, the king and 
martyr. To this monastery he gave the lordship of Herringfleet. Upon 
the suppression of the religious houses this manor passed to the Crown, 
and was by letters patent dated the 26th Jan. 1546-7, granted with other 
estates in Herringfleet to Henry Jernegan and Frances his wife in con- 
sideration of ^992. Ss. 6d. As early as 1537 we find a notice amongst the 
State Papers of a lease of the manor and rectory to this Henry Jernegan' 
and Frances his wife.' 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1592 by John Arundell and others 
against Henry Jernegan, John son of the above-mentioned Henry Jernegan,* 
and others.* 

On the 7th April, 1598, the last-mentioned Henry Jernegan, described 
as the elder, of Cossey, in Norfolk, granted the manor to Henry Jernegan 
the younger, his son and heir apparent, in fee. 

In the House of Lords' Journals will be found a Bill in 1605 [2 Jac. I.J 
for sale of the manor by Henry Jernegan for payment of debts." On the 
1st Sept. 1610, licence of alienation under the Great Seal was granted to 
Henry Jernegan alias Jerningham, jun., and Eleanor his wife,' enabling 
them to convey to Matthew Bedell, citizen of London, in fee. The 
assurance was effected by a sale enrolled in the Court of Chancery, 
and dated ist Nov. following. It purported to convey the site of the late 
dissolved priory of St. Olave's, in Herringfleet, £1. 2s. rent in Thorington 
belonging to the said priory and the Manor of Herringfleet, and all the 
messuages and swan-marks, fisheries, &c., advowsons, tithes, &c., £1. 6s. 8d. 
rent from the rectory of Burgh Castle, subject to the payment of £6. 12s. 3^. 
to the King and other lords of the fee as quit rents.* 

'Dom. ii. 284b. 'Fine, Trin. 34 Eliz.vol. 10. 

'S.P. 1520, p. 558. «H.L. ii. 273, 275, 278, 305, 306, 308, 321. 

' O. 38 Hen. VIII. 3 Pars. Rot. 2 ; Add. ' She was a daughter of Thomas Throck- 

Ch. 14992. morton, of Coughton, co. Warwick. 

* See Manors of Ashby and Gorleston, in ^ Suckling, Hist., vol. ii. p. ii. 

this Hundred. 



44 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

From Matthew Bedell the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Bedell. Davy calls him Matthew's nephew, but a fine levied of the manor 
29th July, 1639,' distinctly calls Thomas Bedell the son of Matthew. 

On his death the manor passed to his sister and coheir Elizabeth Aubrey, 
widow of Hubert Aubrey, of Clehough, in Herefordshire, and she by deed 
in August, 1674, conveyed the manor to Edward Taverner. Elizabeth 
Aubrey had taken under a partition between her two sisters and herself. 
Edward Taverner had married Anne, one of the sisters of Elizabeth. On 
Edward Taverner' s death the manor passed under a settlement made 4th 
and 7th Feb. 1697, to his son and heir, Francis Taverner, who by deeds 
6th and 7th Jan. 1726, sold and conveyed the same to Sir Edmund Bacon, 
of Gillingham, in Norfolk, Bart., who by deeds dated 13th and 14th Dec. 
i733j sold it to Hill Mussenden, of Quiddenham, in Norfolk. 

On the 29th and 30th June, 1736, indentures were executed between 
Hill Mussenden, of the first part ; John Went worth, alias Creswell, William 
Lee, Carteret Leathes, and Richard Martin, of the second part ; the Right 
Honourable Martha, Baroness Wentworth, widow of Sir Henry Johnston, 
Knt., deceased, of Toddington, in the County of Bedford, of the third part ; 
and Martha Johnston, one of the sisters of the said Sir Henry 
Johnston, of the fourth part ; in consideration of a marriage intended 
between Hill Mussenden and Martha Johnston, the site, lordship, and 
rectory of Herringfieet were limited to the said Hill Mussenden for life ; 
remainder to Martha, his intended wife, for life, for her jointure; 
remainder to the issue of Hill Mussenden and Martha ; remainder to Hill 
Mussenden in fee. There was no issue of this marriage. On the 12th 
Oct. 1772, the said Hill Mussenden by his will devised all his estates to his 
brother, Carteret Leathes, of Bury St. Edmunds, in fee, who had taken the 
name of Leathes in conformity to the will of William Leathes, his uncle. 

Of the family of Leathes, Suckling writes : "It is of great antiquity, 
and appears to have been originally settled at Leathes-water, in Cumber- 
land, from which place they took their name. They enjoyed that estate 
from a period little posterior to the Norman Conquest in a direct male line 
until Adam de Leathes, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, sold his inheritance 
to the inhabitants. From him descended William Leathes, of the County 
of Antrim, in Ireland, who was born in 1674, and rose rapidly, under the Duke 
of Marlborough, to posts of considerable importance. He was Paymaster- 
General to the Forces in the reign of Queen Anne, and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary at the Courts of Brussels and the Hague during, the reign of Geo. I. 
He died at his residence. Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire, in 1727, leaving a large 
funded property, together with his Irish estates, and those of Great and 
Little Oakley, in Essex, to his eldest nephew, Carteret Mussenden, who 
\^as to assume the name and arms of Leathes. Among the pictures at 
Herringfieet Hall is a splendid full-length portrait of this distinguished 
gentleman painted while Minister at Brussels, for which the artist Heroman 
Vander Mijn is said to have received ^^1,500." ' 

Carteret Leathes was M.P. for Harwich and Sudbury, and died in 1787. 
By his marriage with Loveday, daughter of S. Garrod, of co. Lincoln, who 
died in 1758, he had one daughter and three sons, and by his will 2nd Sept. 1778, 
devised his estates in Herringfieet to John Leathes, of Reedham, co. Norfolk, 
his eldest son, in fee. He married a Miss Death, and died without issue in 1788, 

' 15 Car. I. pt. iii. 46. ' Suckling, Hist. Suff., vol. ii. p. 13 ; see 

also Burke's Landed Gentry. 



HERRINGFLEET. 45 

having by his will dated 5th Feb. 1786, devised the manor to Elizabeth 
his wife for life, with remainder to his first and other sons in tail, remainder 
to George Leathes, of Bury St. Edmunds, his brother, in fee. The widow 
Elizabeth remarried Anthony Merry, many years Minister Plenipotentiary 
at the courts of France, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States. George 
Leathes, the successor to Elizabeth his mother in the lordship, married 
Mary, daughter of J. Moore, of co. Worcester, and dying in 1817 the manor 
vested in his eldest surviving son and heir, John Francis Leathes, of Herring- 
fleet Hall and Reedham, D.L. for Norfolk and Suffolk.' He died without 
issue in 1848, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Henry 
Mussenden Leathes. 

He was formerly in the Royal Horse Artillery, and received honorary 
medals and clasps for the Peninsular war and Waterloo. He married in 
June, 1827, Charlotte Cook, daughter of John Fowler, of Gunton Hall, and 
died i6th Dec. 1864, and his widow ist June, 1872, when the manor vested 
in their son and heir. Col. Hill Mussenden Leathes, of Herringfleet Hall, 
and Banksea, co. Essex, who 20th Aug. 1856, married Mary Louisa, 
daughter of James Duncan Thomson, J. P., of Sunny Bank, co. Brecon. 
As lord of this manor Mr. Leathes is lay prior of St. Olave's. The Bishop 
has, consequeiilly, no ecclesiastical control therein, and Mr. Leathes is paid 
an annual sum by the rector of Burgh Castle in acknowledgment of his 
rights. 

Suckling informs us that : " The site of Herringfleet Hall was not ' 
included in the transfer of the manor and estate from Sir Edmund Bacon to 
Hill Mussenden, having been purchased of Sir Thomas Allin." The old 
manor house, originally moated in, is of the age of Elizabeth's reign, or a 
little later, and stands near the church.^ 

Arms of FiTZ Osbert : Gules, three bars gemell. Or, a canton Argent. 
Of Taverner : Argent, a bend fusillee. Sable. Of Leathes : Azure, on 
a bend between three fleurs-de-lis Or, as many mullets pierced. Gules. 

Manor of Loudham and Titsall's Herringfleet. 

This manor derives its name from its ancient possessors, John de 
Tity shall or Titshall and John de Loudham. 

The manor was held in 1275 by Robert de Loudham, who had a grant 
of free warren here by deed of Hen. HI.^ and in 1318 by John de Loudham 
who died this year, when it passed to his son and heir, Roger de Loudham, 
and from him to his son, Roger de Loudham, from whom it passed to his 
son and heir, Roger de Loudham, and on his death in 1346* to his son and 
heir. Sir Roger de Loudham,^ who diedwithoijt issue in 1357,^ when the manor 
passed to his brother and heir, John de Loudham. 

In 1356 this John and Isabel his wife had levied a fine of the manor 
and the advowson against William Tempervoyse, parson of Langenho 
church, and John Brighrrich, of Wythermundeford.' From John de 
Loudham the manor passed to his nephew, his brother Robert's son, John 
de Loudham, who was living in 1417. 

The manor then passed to Sir William Jenny,^ and a fine was levied of 
the manor in 1446 by William, son of John Jenny, sen., against John Jenny 

'Suckling, Hist, of Suff., vol. ii. pp. ii, 12. ^I.P.M., 31 Edw. III. 37. 

^Suckling,' vol. ii. p. 15. ^Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. III. 36. 

^H.R., ii. 169. ^See Manor of Knottishall, in Blything 

^I.P.M., 21 Edw. III. 7. Hundred. 

^ See Manor of Gunton, in this Hundred. 



4^ THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

sen. J and Margaret his wife^ no doubt the object being a settlement of the 
property.' Sir WilHam Jenny married ist Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas 
Cawse, and secondly Eleanor, daughter of John Sampson, of Harksted, 
and died 23rd Dec. 1483, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir 
Edmund Jenny. He married Catherine, daughter and heir of Robert 
Boys, of Cretingham, in Norfolk, and died 26th Aug. 1522,' when he was 
found to have held the Manor of " Lowdeham " by the annual rent of 6s. 8^. 
Sir Edward Jenny's son, William, had married twice — ist Audrey, daughter 
of Sir Robert Clere, of Ormesby, Norfolk, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas Britton,and had died 28th Feb. 1519, in his father's lifetime leaving 
a son, Francis Jenny, who was heir to his grandfather. Davy states that 
on Edward Jenny's death the manor passed to his brother, Richard Jenny, 
and from him to his son and heir, Robert Jenny. It seems more probable 
that Francis did succeed his grandfather, and that he parted with the estate 
to Robert his cousin, son of Richard, Sir Edmund's brother, which Richard 
had married Elizabeth, daughter of George Seckford, of Seckford Hall. 
At all events, this Robert had the manor, and we find that in 1542 he and 
Mary his wife levied a fine against Francis Jenny and Margaret his wife.^ 
Robert Jenny married Mary, daughter of John Berney, of Reedham, and 
died in 1559, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Jenny, on 
whose death it went to his brother Thomas Jenny, who died in 1590. 

The manor then passed to the Ufflet family, and 29th Jan. 1631 John 
Ufifiet the elder, and John Ufflet the younger, conveyed the Manor of 
" Titshall," &c., to John Hammond. By an inquis. taken at Harleston 
on the death of this John Hammond 6th Sept. 1632, he was found to have 
died 20th July, 1632, seised of the Manor of Tytshall's and Loudham, &c., 
in Herringfieet, and 300 acres of land in Askeby, held of the Manor of 
Lothingland in socage. The manor passed to John's son and heir, Richard 
Hammond, of Ditchingham, in Norfolk, who 24th March, 1650, conveyed 
to Sir Thomas Meadow, Knt., alderman of Great Yarmouth, who by his 
will dated 1686 gave it to his daughter Judith, who married Edward 
Reading, of Hope House, Hammersmith. In 1706 these premises having 
been mortgaged to Margaret Deeds, she foreclosed the mortgage, and by her 
will dated 24th March, 1718, devised them with other property to Thomas 
Bramston, of Screens, in Essex. He sold in 1743 to Hill Mussenden, from 
which time the manor has descended in the same course as the main manor. 



' Feet of Fines, 24 Hen. VI. 14. 3 Fine, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII. She was his 

= I.P.M., 8th June, 15 Hen; VIII. [1523]. first wife, and daughter of Sir 

Robert Peyton, of Isleham. 




HOPTON. 47 

HOPTON. 

JljT the time of the Confessor there were two manors in this place. 
The first was that of Turgar, a freeman under Gurth's com- 
mendation, and consisted of 80 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam 
in demesne, wood for the maintenance of 10 hogs, 3 acres 
of meadow, a rouncy, 5 beasts, 8 hogs, 60 sheep, and 3 
hives of bees, valued at 5s. 

The second was that of Siric, a freeman under Gurth's 
commendation, and consisted of 60 acres, a bordar, a serf, and a ploughteam, 
wood to support 10 hogs, and i^ acres of meadow. Also a rouncy, 4 beasts, 
8 hogs, and 69 sheep, valued at 5s. 

And under Turgar and Siric eight freemen had 80 acres, 3 ploughteams 
(reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 
los. 

All these estates were kept for the King at the time of the Survey by 
Roger Bigot.' 

Manor of Hopton. 

The manor and advowson of Hopton were granted by William Rufus 
to the Prior and Convent of the Holy Trinity at Norwich, which grant was 
confirmed in the reign of Hen. HI., and in 1306 the Prior obtained a licence 
of free warren in his lands here and in Lothingland.^ At the dissolution 
of the religious houses the estate was transferred to the dean and chapter 
of Norwich Cathedral, with whom the manor until recently remained. It 
paid i8(?. to the court of East Leet. 

In 1855 the manor was stated to be in S. M. Peto, and in 1885 in Thomas 
Thornhill. 

Hopton Hall is a modern mansion of white and red brick with a portico 
in the classic style. It stands in a park of about 70 acres, and is now 
occupied by Col. Harry Hutchinson Augustus Stewart, J. P. The old 
inanor h^ouse near the church has been for many years divided into cottages. 

A " Hopton Manor" is included in the inquis. p.m. of Ralph Blomville, 
who died 20th April, 1517, leaving Edward his son and heir.^ 



' Dom. ii. 284. 3 1.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 61. 

« Chart. Rolls, 35 Edw. I. 68. 




48 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LOTHINGLAND. 

|HE Survey says : " This Half-Hundred is 6 leagues long 
and 2 leagues and a half and 2 quarentenes broad. And in 
a gelt (pays) los.'" 

' A holding is mentioned in the Survey as at Bechetuna, 
which is included in Lothingland. It was amongst the 
lands of the King kept by Roger Bigot, and consisted of 
five freemen with a carucate of land and 3 ploughteams, 
reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey.* 

Wimundhala appears to be in this place, and in the Survey we find two 
holdings enumerated here — one was that of Roger Bigot, consisting of 24 
acres, belonging to Weston at the time of the Survey ;^ and the other 
that of two freemen under Burchard's commendation, and consisted of 
12 acres, and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s. At the time of the 
Survey this was the estate of Hugh de Montfort, and the value was 35. 
and 500 herrings." 

Manor of Lothingland. 

Davy gives Canute and Harold as lords, and also Kings Hen. IL, Rich. I., 
John, and Hen. IH., and states that in the reign of the last sovereign Roger 
Fitz Osbert was warden. On the Close Rolls for 1217 we find an ,order to 
give seisin of the manor to W., Earl of Salisbury,' and the following year a 
direction not to tax the manor. ^ 

In 1238 John Balliol and Devorguill his wife, sister and one of the heirs 
of John, late Earl of Chester, had a grant from the Crown. These parties 
in 1259 sued Thomas de Horsey and others for hindering them as holders 
of the manor (on the grant of the King in exchange for other lands in Chester 
belonging to them) from collecting the King's dues at Yarmouth.' From 
the Hundred Rolls we learn that attached to the manor were wreck of the 
sea, and liberty of the view of frankpledge, and liberty of gallows, and assize 
of bread and ale, a market prison where malefactors are imprisoned in 
the stocks as well as at Gorleston and Lowestoft.* The steward of this 
manor was also its coroner.' From the time of John, son of above John 
Balliol, who died in 1268, the manor went in the same course as the Manor 
of Gorleston, in this Hundred, to the death of John de Dreux, Earl of 
Richmond, without issue in 1341. 

In 1377 Sir John de Surry had a grant from the Crown for life, and in 
1379 Thomas de Holland a grant of 100 marks a year out of the manor," 
but in 1386 the manor was granted to Michael de la Pole, ist Earl of Suffolk. 
In 1397 John Holland, Earl of Huntingdon, had a grant of the reversion, 
but it does not appear to have had any operation, for in 1406 Michael de la 
Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, son and heir of Michael, held the manor, and died 
seised of it in 1415, from which time the manor passed in the same course 
of devolution as the Manor of Gorleston, in this Hundred. 

The manor is included in a fine levied of Herringfleet and other manors 
in 1592 by John Arundell and others against Henry Jernegan and others," 

' Dom. ii. 2836. '' Abbr. of PI. 44 and 45 Hen. III. 9. 

"Dom. ii. 2836. ^H.R. ii. 169. 

'Dom. ii. 336. 'H.R. ii. 169. 

♦Dom. ii. 407&. "Pat. Rolls, 3 Rich. II. pt. ii. 10. 

5 Close RoUs, I Hen. HI. pt. i. 8 ; pt. ii. 19. " Fine, Trin. 34 Eliz. (vol. 10). 

^ Close Rolls, 2 Hen. III. pt. ii. 11 ; 14 
Hen. III. 5^. 



LOTHINGLAND. 49 



Manors of East Leet, West Leet, North Leet, and South Leet. 

These are usually reckoned as in Lowestoft. There seem to be four 
distinct manors, but to have always gone together. A grant was made of 
the manor in 1386 to Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk. In 1397 John 
Holland, Earl of Huntingdon, appears as lord of East Leet, but by 1406 
Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, son and heir of Michael, seems to have 
had all four manors, which descended in the same course as the main Manor 
of Lothingland ; but we meet in 1510 with a grant of the reversion in these 
manors to Edward Jernegan and Mary his wife. 

He died seised 6th Jan. 15 15, when they passed to his son and heir 
John Jernegan,' and in 1538 Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, released 
the reversions to Henry Jernegan and Mary his wife. 

All these manors were released by Henry Jernegan, the 7th son of Henry 
Jernegan, of Costessey, in Norfolk, to Thomas and Christopher Hirne, 
and the acquittance for the purchase money in respect of this sum will be 
found amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum." The date 
of the acquittance is 4th May, 1608. 



' I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. i. ' Add Ch. 14279. 

G 




50 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

LOUND. 
JOUND is a Saxon word signifying " a plain among trees." 
The meaning of this word correspon(is exactly with the 
situation of the village. Two manors were held in this 
place in Saxon times. The first was that of Alric, a freeman 
under Gurth, and consisted of i|- carucates of land, 2 villeins, 
3 bordars, i ploughteam and i belonging to the men, and 
wood for the maintenance of 30 hogs. Also 3 acres of 
meadow, 2 rouncies, 5 beasts, 12 hogs, and 50 sheep, the value being los. 
Under him were four freemen with a carucate of land, 2 ploughteamt 
(reduced to i| at the time of the Survey), and wood sufficient to support 
10 hogs, valued at los. At the time of the Survey this manor was kept 
for the King by Roger Bigot, and the value was 20s. 

The other manor was that of Ulsi or Wolsey, a freeman under Giirth's 
commendation, and consisted of a carucate of land, 3 bordars, a plough^ 
team in demesne and i belonging to the men. There was wood for the main- 
tenance of 12 hogs, also 5 beasts, 15 hogs, 60 sheep, and 2 hives of bees, 
valued at los. Under him were 40 acres of land, and a ploughteam (reduced 
to half at the time of the Survey) valued at 5s. At the time of the Survey 
this manor also was kept for the King by Roger Bigot. 

Among the lands thus kept by Roger Bigot was a hamlet in this place 
formerly held by Gurth. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 4 bordars, 
2 serfs, a ploughteam and i belonging to the men (reduced at the time 
of the Survey to half a team), wood for the maintenance of 50 hogs, and 
I rouncy.' 

Manor of Loukd. 

This was the estate of Alric, a freeman of Gurth, in the Confessor's 
time, and was in the Crown at the time of the Survey. In 1316 the lord- 
ship was held by Sir Robert de Blundeston. 

The manor seems to have been vested in 1331 in Thomas de Ages, and 
then passed from him. to Geoffrey Wyth and Isabella his wife,* 
who then had the other Manor of Lound. He was the son of Oliver Wyth, 
a burgess of Great Yarmouth, and his wife Isabella was the daughter and 
heir of William Stalham. On his death the manor passed to his widow, 
a 2nd wife, for life, and in 1346 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by 
William, parson of " Woderysingg" church, and Sir Robert de Shelton, Knt., 
John de Asshcroft and John de Lympenhowe against Sir Oliver Wyth.^ 
Sir Oliver was the s6n and heir of Geoffrey Wyth. He married Wynesia^ 
daughter and heir of Sir John de Riveshall, lord of Hepworth, by whom 
he had a son. Sir John Wyth, who married SibUla, daughter of 
Sir Edmund de St. Omer, of Plumstead, Norfolk, and died in 1387," 
leaving an only daughter Amy. 

In 1392 Sir Johnde Tuddenham died seised of the manor in right of his 
wife, widow of Sir John de Herlyng or Harling. It afterwards reverted to that 
family, and passed to Sir Robert Herling, who died in 1435, leaving the 
manor to h^s widow Joan for life. Op her death it passed to their daughter 
and heir Anne, married ist to Sir William Chamberlain, who presented to 
the rectory of Lound in 1450, and 2ndly to Sir Robert Wingfield, who 
with his wife brought an action in the Court of Chancery against Sir 
William Knyvett, Knt., feoffee to uses as to both the manor and advowson/ 

' Dom. ii. 2836. * Will 22nd Feb. 1386, proved 30th Sept. 

2 Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. III. 32. 1387. 

3 Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. III. 24. 5 E.C.P., Bundle 54, 219. 



LOUND. 



51 



and died in 1480 seised of this manor and the advowson/ and thirdly to 
John, Lord Scrope, of Bolton. She died about 1502 without issue. 

It is, however, clear that previously to the death of Anne, Lady Scrope, 
the manor had passed to William Palmer, for we learn from the inquis. 
p.m. of Sir William Calthorp taken in if496 that he, William Palmer, being 
seised of the manor, devised it to Sir William Calthorp and Elizabeth his 
wife, who survived, and to the heirs of their bodies, with remainder 
to the heirs of his body, with remainder to his right heirs. Sir William 
Calthorp died 15th Nov. 1494, and Philip Calthorp, aged 30, his grandson, 
son of John,'' was his heir.' The manor, with Weybread and Southcove 
Manors, was the subject of a fine levied in 1535 by Richard Southwell and 
others against Sir Francis Calthorp and others.* 

In 1573 the manor had passed to Robert BayspoolCj for this. year he 
held his first court as lord of the Manor of Lound^ In 1574 he levied a fine 
against John Tyler and others of the manor,' and in 1576 another against 
Edward Shelton.* 

On his death the manor passed to his Widow Susannah, who held her 
first court in 1576, and on her death it passed to her daughter and heir 
Elizabeth, married to Sir Walter DeVereUx, Knt., who in right of his wife 
held his first court 14th NoV. 1603. 

On the 8th May, 1619, Sir Walter Devereux and Dame Elizabeth his 
wife and others Conveyed for £1,200 the said manor to John Jenney and 
Samuel Matchett in trust for Sir John Heveningham and his heirs, and Sir 
John Heveningham held his first court for the manor this year. 

He, in 1627, enfeoffed William Heveningham his sOn and heir, who held 
his first court in 1633, and was in 1660 attainted for high treason as one of 
King Chas. I.'s judges.'' The manor was included amongst those granted 
to trustees by the King for the benefit of Lady Mary Heveningham in i66t, 
and the trustees in 1679 sold the manor to Sir Thomas AUin, Bart., who 
held his first court for the manor in 1680, arid from him to the present time 
the manor has descended ifl the same course as the Manor of Ashby, in this 
Hundred, and is now vested in the trustees of the late Richard Hettry Reeve, 
of Lowestoft'. 

Manor of Stalham's in Lound. 

This was also the estate of Guert in the Confessor's day, and was vested 
in the Crown like the main manor at the time of the Great Survey. In 
1219 it was held by William de Stalham, from whom in the reign of 
Edw. I. it passed to his son and heir. Sir William de Stalham, and from him 
to his son and heir, WilUam de Stalham, of Stalham, Norfolk, who married 
Isabel, daughter and heir of Matthew de Gunton. The manor passed to 
his daughter and coheir Isabel, married to Sir Jeffrey Wyth,^ Knt., the son 



'LP.M., 2xEdw. IV. 60. 

* See Broihe Hall, in Hartismere Hundred, 

^I.P.M., II Hen. Vn. 975; see Manor 
of Wattisham Hall, in Gflsford 
Huftdred. In the accOuiit of Wey- 
brMd Hall Manor, in Hoxne Huii' 
dred, we have a Sir Wm. Calthorpe 
dying the same year and leaving 
a different heir, but See Brome Hall, 
in Hartismere. 

*Fine, Trin. 27 Hen. VIH. 



' Fine, Easter, 16 Eliz. 

«Fine, Trin. 18 Eliz. 

'See Blundeston Hall Manor, in this 
Hundred. 

^The nanie of Wyth or Wythe appears 
very ancient. In the Pipe Rolls 
of the third year of King John 
" Ric, With " is mentioned amongst 
others who were amerced by Gefiery 
Fitz-Peter, the King's Chief justice, 
in Dim'm', or half a mark. 



52 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Sir Oliver Wyth, ii Edw. I., and Wynesia his wife. Sir Jeffrey held 
this manor of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, as one knight's fee, and was one 
of those who was summoned to attend at Newcastle-upon-Tyne furnished 
with horse and arms to march against the Scots, in 1327, but this summons 
was one of service and not for consultations in Parliament. He was buried 
in the chancel of the church of Beeston, in Norfolk, and the manor passed 
to his (Sir Jeffrey's) son and heir, Sir Oliver Wyth, who held in 1350.' 

From them it passed to their son and heir. Sir John Wyth, and from him 
in 1387 to his widow Sibilla, daughter and heir of Sir Edmund de St. Omer, 
who remarried Sir WiUiam Calthorp, and subsequently to Sir John Wyth's 
daughter and heir Amy, who married ist .Sir John Colvile, of Newton, 
Isle of Ely, and 2ndly, Sir John Calthorp, of Burnham Thorpe, in Norfolk, 
son of Sir William Calthorp, and had a son, William Calthorp, aged 11 
at his grandfather's death. This grandson died in 1494. 

The manor subsequently passed to the Jernegan family, and was vested 
in Sir Edward Jernegan in 1515, in which year he died seised, and it passed 
to his son and heir, Sir John Jernegan, on whose death in 1559 it passed to 
his grandson and heir, John Jernegan, of Somerleyton, who 12th May, 1570, 
conveyed to trustees amongst other estates the Manor of Stalham's to certain 
uses. 

From him the manor probably passed to his widow Catherine, daughter 
of George Brooke, Lord Cobham, and to Katherine, the 2nd daughter of 
the last-mentioned John Jernegan, married to Wymund Carew, of Norfolk, 
who sold to John Wentworth,. On the 28th March, 1592, the said John 
Wentworth, described as of Somerleyton, for divers good and reasonable 
causes, gave, granted, and confirmed unto the master, wardens, and 
scholars of Christ's College, Cambridge, an annual rent or annuity of £4, 
issuing out of his Manor of Stalham's payable on the Feast of St. Michael 
the Archangel, with power to the said master, &c., to distrain for arrears. 
The master, &c., to distribute by half-yearly payments the said annuity 
to one scholar, being a fellow of the said house, and proceeding in degree 
of schools to be B.D. or M.A. and student in Divinity", to read a Hebrew 
lecture with the said college. On his quitting the college, the stipend to 
cease, and a new member to be elected ; and that the said John Wentworth 
should, during his life, nominate and appoint the said reader ; and after 
his death, John Wentworth, his son and heir apparent, and on his decease 
the reader should be elected and chosen from time to time by the master 
and wardens and the majority of the fellows. From the smallness of this 
salary no lecturer is now appointed by the college.'' 

It is strange there should have been this dealing by John Wentworth 
as early as 1592, as he did not acquire the whole Manor of Stalham's until 
the year 1599, but he apparently had a part of the manor before this, as is 
rather implied from the grant of the manor to him which is still preserved 
among the Charters in the Bodleian. It is dated 22nd May, 41 Ehz. [1599], 
and purports to be a grant by Catherine Jernegan, widow, to John Went- 
worth of the whole of the Manor of Stalham's, in Lound, with the advowson 
of the church of Lound, and also all lands belonging to the said manor in 
Blundeston, Herringfleet, and Hopton.^ 

' See Banks's Barones Pretermissi, p. 159 ; ^ Suckling, Hist, of Suff ., vol. ii. p. 30. 

Blomefield's Norfolk, fol. ed., vol. sBodl. Suff. Ch. 990. 

V. p. 885, 1438, 1454. 



*- LOUND. 53 

John Went worth also levied a fine of this manor against Katharine 
Jernegan and others in the Michaelmas term 41 and 42 Eliz., and another 
fine against Henry Jernegan and others in the Hilary term of the 42 Eliz. 

Amongst the Bodleian Suffolk Charters is a discharge from a bond by 
John Went worth of Katharine Jernegan, widow of John Jernegan, as to a 
covenant respecting the manor house of Stalhams. It is dated 2nd Nov. 
without year.' 

John Wentworth died seised in 1618-9 of the Manor of Stalham's, 
and the lands, tenements, and appurtenances in Lound, Ashby, Blundeston, 
and Corton, from which time the manor has passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred. 

Arms of Wyth : Gul. three griffins, passant regardant in pale Arg. 
beaked and armed Gu. 



' Bodl. Suff. Ch. 992. 



54 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




LOWESTOFT, 

jMONG the lands kept for the King by Roger Bigot was a 
hamlet here consisting of 4 carucates of land less 30 acres, 
5 villeins, to bordars, 5 serfs, io bordars (repeated like 
this in the Survey), 5 serfs (also repeated in the Survey), 
2 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to the men, 
wood to support 8 hogs. Also 5 acres of meadow, I4 beasts, 
II hogs, and 160 sheep. At the time of the Survey the 
villeins and serfs and ploughteams belonging to the men were reduced to 
3 and the beasts to 8.' 

Under the head of Akethorp, which was a manor of Lowestoft, we find 
an entry in the Great Survey. In Saxon times a freeman, Ailmar the priest, 
held 80 acres as a manor, with 3 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and half 
a ploughteam belonging to the men, wood sufficient for the support of 5 
hogs, an acre of meadow, 3 hogs, and 48 sheep, valued at los. This estate 
was at the time of the Survey in the keeping of Roger Bigot for the King."" 

Manor of Lowestoft. 

The manor continued Royal demesne until the reign of Hen. IH., 
when it was granted by that monarch to John Balliol and his wife. From 
them it passed to John Balliol, King of Scotland, who in renouncing his 
allegiance to Edw. I. lost all his English estates. It was next conferred 
on John de Dreux, Earl of Richmond, in 1306, who had a grant of a market 
and fair here in 1308,^ and was held by John, his nephew and heir, at his 
death in 1341. 

We find from the Rolls of Parliament that the Earl of Richmond 
(John de Bretagne) held a court for this manor in 1324-5,'' and the farm 
of the manor was assigned for payment of the expenses of the King's 
household.' 

In 1376 Edw. III. granted the manor with the Hundred of Lothingland, 
to Sir John de Surrey to hold with all its liberties and immunities.* The 
grant was for life only, and in 1380 a grant of the manor was made to Sir 
Thomas de Holland in lieu of certain yearly sums,' and in 1385 to Michael 
de la Pole. 

In 1386 a grant was made to Anne, Queen of Rich. II. for life " lately 
held by Michael de la Pole deceased and forfeited,"* who died in 1394. 
In 1390 a grant in reversion was made to John de Holland, Earl of Hunting- 
don, the King's brother, and Elizabeth his wife in fee tail.' 

In the reign of Hen. IV. the manor was granted to Michael de la Pole, 
Earl of Suffolk, who levied a fine with his son Michael of the manor against 
Sir John Cormvaille and Elizabeth his wife in 1406."" The fine included 
the Hundred of Lothingland and the advowson of the abbey of Leiston, 
priory of Butley church, and church of Stratford.' ' From Michael de la Pole, 
1st Earl of Suffolk, the manor passed to his widow Katharine. She did not 
die till 1419," when the manor passed to her son and heir, Michael de la 
Pole, Earl of Suffolk, and on his death in 1415'^ passed to his son and heir 



'Dom. ii. 283. 

*Doin. ii. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 2 Edw. II. 40, 44. 

♦R.P. i. 4286. 

eO. 51 Edw. III. Rot. 13. 
»Pat. RoUs, 4 Rich. II. pt. ii. 8. 



« Pat. Rolls, 13 Rich. II. pt. ii. 31 ; 

20. 
'Pat. Rolls, 14 Rich. II. pt. ii. 7. 
" Feet of Fines, 7 Hen. IV. 9. 
" Feet of Fines, 7 Hen. IV. 19. 
"I.P.M., 7Hen. V. 62. 
'3l.P>M., 3 Hen. V. 486. 



pt. iii. 



LOWESTOFT. 55 

Michael, 3rd Earl ef Suffolk, and from him to his brother, William de la 
Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk.' 

King Hen. VI. in 1442 granted to the Earl a charter for a market and 
two fairs to be held here. 

" Rex cone : Willo : de la Pole, marchioni et com : Suffolciae, i 
mercatum^et duas ferias infra villam Lothuwistoft, in Suff. : quas est de 
antiquo dnico coronige Angliae : nee non seneschallum suum ad tenend : 
curias suas mercati et fer. Et quod nuUus justiciarius, vicecomes, eschater, 
inquisitor, ballivus, seneschallus, hospit : aut clericus, mercat : vill : 
praedict : in aliquo intromittat. Ac quod omnes homines, tenentes 
et residentes infra villam prsedictam sint per totum regnum quieti de omni 
eonsuetudine et custuma bonorum et rerum suarum venalium.'" 

From the time of William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk, who died in 
1450,^ the manor passed through the de la Poles in the same course as the 
Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn Hundred, to Edmund de la Pole, who 
was attainted in 1513. 

We find, however, in the interim the following facts specially relating 
to this manor. In 1467-8 an annuity thereout was confirmed to the Queen." 

In 1483-4 John Fitzherbert was appointed as receiver-general of the 
manor and the Hundred of Lothingland,^ and in 1485 a grant was made to 
Elizabeth, Queen of England, of £(). i6s. gd. a year out of the surplusage 
of the manor and the Hundred by the hands of the heirs male of Michael 
de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk. ° The manor was forfeited by John, Earl of 
lineoln, in 1495,' and restored to Edmund de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, the 
same year.* 

The manor was granted by the Crown to Edward Jernegan by letters 
patent 14th July, 1509.' The grant was to Edward Jernegan and Mary 
his wife for their lives and the life of the longer liver of them by fealty and 
the rent of £xy. los., viz., £y to the Sheriff of Suffolk and £10. los. into the 
Treasiuy. The grant comprised " the Manor of Lowestoft otherwise 
La5?stoft, EsteLete, Weste Leet, North Leet, South Leet, Gorleston, and 
Mutford, and the Hundreds of Lothingland and Mutford, late of Johnde la 
Pool." A grant dated 28th Jan. 1510-1 extended the former grant to the 
said Edward and Mary and their heirs male from Michaelmas, 24 Hen, VII., 
at the rent of ;^i6. 17s. gd., Viz. :. £7 to the Sheriff of Suffolk, and 
£9. 17s. gd. to the Lady Katharine, the King's Consort, for her life. 

Edward Jernegan' ■ died 6th Jan. 1515, when the manor passed to his 
widow Mary for life. Amongst the State Papers we find notice of a grant 
to Lady Anne of Cleves for life of a yearly rent from this manor and the 
Manors of Gorleston and Mutford payable by Sir Edward " Jerningham " 
and Mary his wife and the heirs male of their bodies." 

Mary the widow took for a 2nd husband Sir WiUiam Kingston, and died 
26th Aug. 1548," when the manor passed to Sir Edward Jernegan's eldest 

'See Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn fR.P. vi, 4746. 

Hundred. 8/6. 475J. 

'Chart. Rolls, 21 Hen. VI. 10 ; Suckling, sO. Hen. VHI. Rot. 63. 

Hist, of Suff., vol. ii. p. 6r. " See Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred. 

3I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. "State Papers, 1340, 144 (2). 

♦ R.P. i. 6256. " I.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 70. 

5 D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 78. 

6 Privy Seal, i Hen. VII. No. 739; Pat. 

Rolls, I Hen. VII. pt. iii. 25 (3) 
and 24 (4). 



56 ' THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

son by his 2nd marriage, Sir Henry Jernegan^ on whose death in 1572 it 
went to his son and heir, Henry Jernegan, of Wingfield and Huntingfield 
Hall, who with his wife Frances, daughter of Sir George Baynham, had 
licence to alienate in 1606 to Thomas and Christopher Hirne.' 

From this time the manor passed in the same course as the Manors of 
Gorleston and Ashby, in this Hundred. Extract from the Court Rolls of 
the manor t. Elizabeth will be found amongst the Bodleian Suffolk 
Charters (1006). There was a grant in 1589 by Queen Elizabeth to William 
Tripp and Robt. Dame and their heirs of the Manors of Gorleston and the 
Manors of Leystoft and Mutford, late of Edmund de la Pole, to hold of the 
manor of East Greenwich in socage, which does not seem to have had any 
operation, and in 1592 the same Queen granted to Theophilus Adams 
and Thomas Butler and their heirs the reversion of the Manors of Lowestoft, 
East Leet, West Leet, North Leet, South Leet, Gorleston, and Mutford, and 
the Hundreds of Lothingland and Mutford, " late granted by Hen. VIIL to 
Henry Jerningham and Mary his wife and the heirs male of their bodies," 
to hold of the Manor of East Greenwich in socage. 

Manor of Akethorp. 

This in Saxon times was held by Ailmar a priest, and passed into the 
King's hands on the Norman Conquest. 

In 1460 Sir John Fastolf died seised of the manor, and in 1466 it is 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Paston,^ and Davy says that in 
1478 it passed by grant to Magdalen College, Oxford. We certainly meet 
on the Patent Rolls this year with a licence from the Crown for alienation 
of the manor in mortmain to th,e college,^ and an entry on the Escheat 
Rolls the same year.* No doubt the suit found amongst the Early 
Chancery Proceedings by William, Bishop of Winchester, as executor of 
Sir John Fastolf, against William Paston, feoffee of the said John, as to the 
manor, has reference to the vesting of the same in the college.' Suckling 
says the name of this manor is now lost, and its bounds forgotten, though 
both were recorded in surveys a few centuries past, 

A Manor of Lowestoft is included in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Walter 
Hobart, who died 27th Nov. 1538,* leaving Henry his son and heir, and in 
that of Sir Thomas Wentworth, Lord Wentworth, who died 3rd March, 
1550,' leaving Thomas, Lord Wentworth, his son and heir. 



" Release in 1608 ; Add. Ch. 14279. ' E.C.P. Bundle 20, 80. 

* I.P.M., 6 Edw. IV. 44. « I.P.M., 33 Hen. VIII. 81. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 3. n.P.M., 5 Edw. VI. 54. 

♦Wm. Wynton, &c., for Mary Magd. CoH., 
Oxon ; I.P.M., 18 Edw. IV. 53. 




OULTON. 57 

OULTON. 

JULTON is not mentioned by name in the Domesday Survey 
but probably Suckling's conjecture is correct that the 
Duneston of the Survey is identical with Oulton. 

A manor was held in this place by Ala under com- 
mendation to Manning, and consisted of 45 acres, half a 
bordar, half a ploughteam, wood for the maintenance of 4 
hogs, and half an acre of meadow, valued at los. At the 
time of the Survey it was held by R. de Vallibus of Roger Bigot, and the 
value was 3s.' 

Another holding was that of Tored, a freeman, consisting of 15 acres 
valued at ^od., the estate at the time of the Survey of Earl Alan/ 

Manor of Oulton or Oulton High House. 

In 1280 the lordship belonged to Edmund Bacon, who appears to have 
been succeeded by Sir John Bacon, Knt., who presented to the church in 
1301. His successor was Sir Adam Bacon, and to him and his brother 
Edmund Bacon the manors were conveyed by Robert de Askeby, parson of 
Ingham, by fine in 1303. In 1306 the two Bacons had a grant of a market 
and fair and free warren here.^ 

This Sir Adam and his brother Edmund were sons of Robert Bacon, 
of Baconsthorpe, and their mother, a daughter of Robert de Hingham. 
Robert's father was Richard Bacon, and his mother Alice, a daughter of 
Conan, son of Elias de Moulton. Sir Adam, who held the manor in 1306, 
married Margery, daughter of Simon Felton, and on his death* the manor 
passed to his son. Sir Edmund Bacon. ' He married twice — 1st Joan Brewse, 
who died in 1337, and 2ndly Margery Poynings. He settled the manor in 
1334, as we learn from a licence on the Patent Rolls this year. It enables 
Edmund Bacon to enfeoff Thomas de Bradewell and Robert de Jernemutha, 
the ytounger, of 4 messuages, 2 mills, 200 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow, 
20 acres of pasture, 60 acres of marsh, and loos. rent in Oulton, Carlton, 
Lowestoft, and Flixton, with the advowson of the church of Oulton, held in 
chief, and for them to regrant to Edmund, Margery his wife, and the heirs 
of the body of Edmund, with remainder to Sir Robert Bacon and Sir John 
Bacon successively in fee tail.' 

On Sir Edmund Bacon's death in 1349^ ^i^ widow Margery held the 
estate in dower as of the King in chief .^ In an order on the Close Rolls in 
1350 it is stated that the manor was held of the Countess of Pembroke in 
free socage by the service of rendering 12s. 2d. yearly to her, and that 
Robert Bacon, Knt., son of Henry Bacon, Adam's kinsman, was his next 
heir.* , 

It is clear, however, that Sir Edmund Bacon left two daughters, and 
they were evidently minors, for in 1357 the King granted to Joan, wife of 
John de Moleyns,the custody of the manor during the minority of the heirs.^ 
Sir Edmund's estates were in 1360 partitioned between his daughters, this 
manor being allotted to the daughter Margaret, married to Sir William de 
Molyns, who presented to the rectory in 1379. 

' Dom. ii. 336. ^ I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 23 ; 27 Edw. III. 2, 8 ; 
' Dom. ii. 294, 30 Edw. III. 42. 

3 Chart. RoUs, 35 Edw. I. 52. 7 Close Rolls, 24 Edw. III. pt. i. 16. 

4 He was living in 1314. I.Q.D., 7 Edw. ^ Close Rolls, 24 Edw. III. pt. i. 16. 

II. File 94, 19. 9 O. 31 Edw. III. 7. 

5 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. III. pt. i. 4. 

H 



5S 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Sir William de Molyns died in 1380,' and Margaret his widow conveyed 
the manor by fine in 1382 to Sir Simon de Burley and Sir Richard de 
Burley.'' 

In 1503 Sir James Hobart was lord and patron of Oulton. He was the 
son of Thomas Hobart, son of William, son of Thomas, son of Jeffrey, son 
of John Hobart, who was living in 1385. Sir James Hobart was Attorney- 
General i486 to 1507. He received the honour of knighthood at the creation 
of Henry, Prince of Wales, aftei;wards King Hen. VHL, i8th Feb. 1504. 
Besides his many benefactions to his parish church of Loddon, which he 
rebuilt from the ground, he laid a fine bridge over the River Waveney, 
which divides Norfolk from Suffolk, and a good causeway thereto. He is 
said to have been " a right good man, of great learning and wisdom." He 
was the friend of John Paston, and an account will be found of him in the 
Diet. Nat. Biog. xxvii. 31, where he is said to have died in 1507. He was 
the great-grandfather of Sir Henry Hobart, the more famous lawyer, 
Attorney-General 1606-13, created a baronet in 1611, and Chief Justice of 
the Common Pleas 1613-1623, still well known for his reports, first published 
in 1641.^ Sir James Hobart married Margaret, daughter of Peter Naunton, 
of Letheringham^ and if we may be permitted to disagree with the great 
Dictionary of National Biography, died 24th Feb. 1516," when the manor 
and advowson passed to his son and heir, Sir Walter Hobart, who was 
High Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1535. He married ist Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Henry Heydon, of Baconsthorpe, in Norfolk, and 2ndly 
Anne, daughter of John Radcliffe, Lord Fitzwalter. He settled the manor 
on Henry his son, and died 27th Nov. 1538,' when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Henry Hobart, who in 1544 had a fine of the manor levied 
against him by Nicholas Rokewode.* 

Amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of Philip and 
Mary we find an action for assault on plaintiff's tenants and as to cutting of 
reeds and grass in Fresh Marsh, by Hoberte against one Wade.^ Henry 
Hobart married Anne, daughter of Sir John Fineux, Knt,, Lord Chief 
Justice, which Anne died 31st Oct. 1530. 

Henry Hobart died in 1561, when he was succeeded by bis son and heir, 
James Hobart, who presented in 1569. He married in 1549 Frances, 
daughter of Sir William Drury, of Hawstead, Knt., who died in 1609, and 
was buried at Loddon, in Norfolk. James Hobart died in 1615 at the age 
of 91, and was also buried at Loddon. 

There is a warrant to Richard Berry, steward of the manor, to collect 
rents in 1598 amongst the Egerton MSS. in the British Museum.^ Amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth we find an action 
by James Hobart against William Sydnor to recover rent of a moiety of a 
marsh called Gorleston Marsh, held of this manor.' 

James Hobart seems to have been somewhat litigious, for we find 
amongst th,e Chancery Proceedings another action by him. It was brought 
against him by Henry Hobart and Edward Duke to quiet his title to 
possession during life to this manor and the Manor of Blythford, and divers 
lands in Oulton and Blythford, late the inheritance of Henry Hobart, 
plaintiff's father." 



'I.P.M., 14 Rich. II. 38. 
= Feet of Fines, 6 Rich. II. 13. 
3 See D.N.B. xxvi. 30. 
4I.P.M., Hen. VIII. 25. 
5 1.P.M., 33 Hen. VIII. 81. 



6 Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 

7 Star Cham. Proc. Ph. & M. Bundle 3, 9. 
^Eger. 2713. 

9C.P. ii. II, 53. 
"C.P. i. 396. 



OULTON. 59 

James Hobart had a son, Henry Hobart, who married Margaret, 
daughter of Thomas Rous, of Bennington, and died in his father's Hfetime 
about 1600 leaving a son and heir Anthony, who on the death of his grand- 
father, James Hobart in 1615 succeeded to the lordship of this manor. 
Anthony Hobart married Anne, daughter of George Breton, of Layer 
Breton, in Essex, and by deed dated 2nd Oct. 1631, conveyed the manor 
to Sir Edmund Reeve, of Stratton, in Norfolk, and Mary his wife. Sir 
Edmund Reeve was afterwards Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, 
to which office he was advanced 14th March, 1638, and died in 1647, when 
the manor passed to his widow Mary, who held her first court and presented 
to the rectory this same year, and died in 1657, when the manor passed to 
Sir Edmund Reeve's nephew, Christopher Reeve, clerk, on whose death in 
1690 the manor vested in his son and heir, Christopher Reeve, who died 
in 1702. 

In this year the manor was vested by Act of Parliament in trustees in 
trust for sale, which trust they exercised in 1716 in favour of Gerard Van 
Heythuson, who held a first court for the manor this same year. 

By deeds 3rd and 4th Aug. 1716, the manor was settled on Gerard Van 
Heythuson the younger for life, then on Sarah his wife for life, then on 
Gerard Van Heythuson the elder, and P. Delme and others upon trust for 
all and every the son and sons, daughter and daughters, of the marriage 
of Gerard the younger, and Sarah in tail as tenants in common, with 
remainder as to two-thirds for such persons as Sarah might by deed or will 
appoint, and in default for her in fee, and as to thfe remaining one-third to 
Gerard the younger in fee. 

The manor ultimately appears to have passed to the son and hyeir, 
Delme Van Heythuson, whose executors sold it to Thomas Anguish, of 
Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, by deeds dated 21st and 22nd Dec. 1772, 
and a fine was duly levied in Michaelmas term^ 1772. Thomas Anguish 
held his first court the following year. 

He by his will dated 3rd Sept. 1784, directed his trustees and executors, 
Sir William Henry Ashurst, Knt., and John Hare, to sell the same, and 
they duly offered the manor and mansion house called Oulton High House, 
comprising 33 acres, and also 425 acres and a free rent of 17s. 9^., by public 
auction in 1786,' and again in 1787, but did not then effect a sale. However, 
they subsequently carried into effect their trust, and by deeds dated ist and 
2nd Sept. 1789, conveyed the manor to Susanna Blackwell, then of Nor-, 
manston House. 

The description of the property conveyed was : " The manor or lord- 
ship of Oulton and the capital mansion or manor house called Oulton High 
House, &c., and certain lands in Oulton and Lowestoft, containing about 
32 acres, late Van Heythuson's, Oulton Broad and fishings, also 14 acres 
and a cottage, and all wastes, court -leets, courts-baron, view of frank- 
pledge, and rights, royalties, and appurtenances, except the advowson." 
Susanna Blackwell held her first court in 1793.'' 

Susanna Blackwell married Sir Thomas Graves, K.B., and Rear- Admiral 
of the White Squadron, and by their marriage settlement dated 19th and 
20th July, 1808, the wife had a power of appointment over the manor 
which was included in the settlement subject to the lives of herself and 
her husband. She made her will dated 28th Dec. 1813, and appointed and 
devised the manor to trustees upon trust for sale, the produce after payment 

^Ipswich Journal, 8th April, 1786. * Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. ii. p. 36. 



6o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of her debts as to one moiety to go to Robert Baxter, of Furnival's Inn, 
one of the trustees, and as to the other moiety to be invested 
for the benefit of Marianne Baxter, daughter of her friend Dudley Baxter, 
of Atherstone, in Warwickshire, and after her decease upon such trusts as 
the said Marianne Baxter should by will appoint. Robert Baxter 
died in 1824 or 1825, a^nd Marianne Baxter married General Nathaniel 
Wilmot Oliver, and they by an arrangement with the parties entitled to 
the other moiety of the proceeds of the sale of the manor, if sold, succeeded 
to the whole, and the trust for sale under Lady Graves' will was never 
carried into effect. 

In 1855 the manor was held by the executors of General Oliver, in 
1885 by Mrs. Caldecott, and it is now vested in Mrs, Copeland Tracy. 

The manorial residence, called Oulton High House, stands near the 
north-east border of this parish, and from its style must have been built by 
the Hobarts in the latter end of Queen Elizabeth's reign, or early in that 
of her successor. It has been much modernised, and perhaps disfigured, 
by the introduction of sashed windows ; but it still bears an aspect of a 
good but somewhat decayed mansion. Its interior fittings partook of 
considerable expense, if we may judge by the labour and ornament bestowed 
on a mantel or chimney-piece which still remains.' 

A fine was levied of " Oulton Manor " in 1591 by Nicholas Hare and 
others against Henry Hobart." 

Arms of Hobart : Sable, a star of eight rays. Or, between two fiaunches 
Ermine. Of Reeve : Azure, a chevron between three pairs of wings 
conjoined and elevated. Or, 

Manor of Fastolfs, Fastolf Hall, Oulton Hall or Tenement Rolfe's, 

Houghton Hall. 

We first meet with this manor under the name " Houton Manor " in 
1306, when it formed the subject of a fine levied of it and the advowson of 
the church of Oulton by Adam Bacun and Edmund Bacun against Robert 
de Askeby, parson of Ingham church.^ 

A firie was also levied of both manor and advowson in 1320 by Adam. 
Bacun and Nicholas de Olton.* Davy mentions as the first lord a Henry 
Rolf, and then Ralph Browning and William Everwood, clerk, who sold 
the manor to John Fastolf. He married Katharine, daughter of Roger de 
Welysham, by Margaret his wife, sister of Edmund Bedingfield. She was 
the widow of John Sampson, of Harkstead. John Fastolf died 31st January, 
1445. He was buried in the church of Oulton near the south door of the 
chancel. The spot is marked by the effigies of a man and woman in brass 
each about two feet in length. The knight is in armour, with a greyhound 
couchant, collared at bis feet ; the lady is a very graceful figure with a long 
veil, and beneath is ahne of brass with this inscription : — 

" Hie jacet Johes. Fastolff Armiger qui obiit ultio. die Januarii Ao. 
Din. MCCCCXLV. et Kateriiia uxor sua quae obiit IIII. die mensis Januarii 
Ao. Dm. MCCCCLXXVIII. qrm. aiabz. ppiaet. de' ame." 

Above are two shields. That over the knight is defaced and doubtless 
contained the arms of Fastolf ; on the other side over the lady are depicted, 
according to Druery, those of Bedingfield, an eagle displayed. 

But it is clear that Hugh Fastolf, the father of John, was lord of Oulton. 



'Suckling, Hist, of Suf£. vol. ii. p. 37. ^Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. I, 21. 

Fine, Trin. 33 Eliz, * Feet of Fines, 14 Ed^. II. 3, 



2 



OULTON. 6i 

On John Fastolf's death the manor passed to his widow Katharine.' 
-She and certain trustees conveyed this manor in 1477 to James Hobart. 
Suckhng states that about the middle of the 15th century Edmund Fastolf, 
son of Sir Hugh Fastolf, Knt., released to William Jermy and Katharyne 
the widow of John Fastolf and his heirs all his right in the Manor of Oulton 
called Houghton Hall, and all other things pertaining to the said manor 
in the towns qf Oulton, Lowestoft, Gunton, Flixton, Blundeston, Carlton, 
Beccles, and Westhall. 

In 1476 Thomas Fastolf , nephew and heir of the above Edmund Fastolf, 
released to John, Lord Howard, to Thomas Howard, William Jenney, 
serjeant-at-law, and others, all his right in the Manor of Oulton called 
Houghton Hall, " which was formerly the property of John Fastolf late 
of Oulton."* 

We meet in 1477 with a fine of Oulton Manor and advowson, which was 
no doubt effected on the sale by Katherine Fastolf to James Hobart. It 
is by John Howard, Thomas Howard, William Jenney, John Clopton, 
Richard Suthwell, Thomas Heigham, Edmund Jenney, John Cheke, Richard 
Heigham, James Hobart, Katherine Fastolf, widow, lately wife of John 
Fastolf, late of Oulton, Edmund Bedynfeld, John Jernyngan, Robert 
Rastwold, Thomas PayHer, William Bedynfeld, clerk, and Thomas Banyard 
against Thomas Fastolf, son, and John Fastolf, late of Nacton, and Ella his 
wife.^ 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings is a suit by James Hobart 
against William Bedyngfeld, clerk, and Simon Sampson, feoffees to uses 
as to the manor and lands in Oulton and Flixton, " sold to complainant 
by Catherine Fastolf."* 

In 1509 the manor vested in John Sampson, of Oulton, who sold it in 
1511 to William Wade, on whose death in 1520 it passed to his son and heir, 
William Wade, who died in 1556. 

In 1604 Sir Nicholas Cooke, of Dagenbaum, Essex, and Elizabeth his 
wife, daughter of Sir George Harire, held the manor, and they sold it in 1606 
to Benedict Campe, of Kessingland, who sold it in 1615 to Thomas Love, 
of EUough, He the following year enfeoffed Gisleham Woolhouse, of 
Lowestoft, sen., and Gisleham Woolhouse, jun., and in 1636 William 
Woolhouse, son and heir of Gisleham, held the lordship. He sold it in 1679 
to Sir Andrew Leake, of Lowestoft, who died in 1704, and left it by his 
will to his nephew, Andrew Leake, who died unmarried, when it devolved 
on his brother, John Leake, of Yarmouth, who died in 1732 without issue. 
The manor passed to his widow Sarah, who by her will dated 1742 devised 
it to the Rev. Thomas Macro, D.D., and the Rev. John Tanner in trust for 
sale. Tanner, the trustee, conveyed it in 1745 to Thomas Hunt, of Oulton, 
son of Thomas Hunt, by Martha Bell, of Gorleston, his ist wife. 

He died intestate, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Hunt, who died i8th May, 1808, aged 74, and was buried at Oulton. 



' She died 4th January, 1478, and her will ' Suckling, Hist, of Suff., vol. ii. p. 35. 

is dated 20th November the same ^ Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. IV. 9. 

year, being proved at Norwich 20th * E.C.P. Bundle 53, 87. 
July, 1479. 




62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK^ 

SOMERLEYTON. 

^N Saxon times there were two manors in this place. The 
first was that of Ulf, a freeman under Gurth's commendation, 
and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 4 villeins, 4 bordars, 
2 ploughteams, and half a ploughteam belonging to the 
men. Also wood sufficient to support 15 hogs, an acre of 
meadow, 2 rouncies, 6 hogs, and 80 sheep, valued at 20s. 
Under Ulf were five freemen having 40 acres, a plough- 
team, and wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs, valued at 3s. At the time 
of the Survey thjis manor was kept for the King by Roger Bigot.' 

The second manor in this place was that of Wihtred the priest, a free- 
man, consisting of 40 acres, a bordar (increased to 2 at the time of the Survey) 
a ploughteam, and wood for the maintenance of 10 hogs. Also a rouncy, 

4 beasts, 5 hogs, and 33 sheep, valued at 5s. There was also a church with 
20 acres valued at 3s. This manor was also kept for the King by Roger 
Bigot at the time of the Survey.' 

There was also a holding in this place kept for the King by Roger Bigot 
of 90 acres belonging to Gorleston.^ 

The last holding was that of Alwold, a freeman under Gurth's commen- 
dation in Saxon times. It consisted of 30 acres, half a ploughteam (which 
had disappeared at the time of the Survey), and wood for the support of 

5 hogs, valued at 2s. Ralph the engineer was the Domesday tenant.* 

Manor of Somerleyton. 

The whole village was seised into the hands of William the Conqueror, 
who retained it under the stewardship of Roger Bigot. He gave the 
manor to Baldwin, Abbot of St. Edmunds, who gave it to Frodo his brother. 

By 1239 th^ manor had come into the possession of Peter Fitz-Osbert, 
who died in 1275. From this time to the time of Sir Peter Jernegan the 
manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Uggeshall, in Blything 
Hundred. In 1303 a fine of this manor was levied against Roger Fitz 
Peter Osbert and Katherine his wife by John Blome.^ This was no doubt 
with the object of effecting a settlement, a licence to effect which is con- 
tained on the Patent Rolls this year. It enables Roger Fitz Peter Osbert 
to enfeoff John Blome of the manors of Wathe and Somerleyton, and for 
the latter to enfeoff Roger and Katherine his wife in fee tail with remainder 
to the right heirs of Roger. ^ He died without issue about 1302.^ 

There is another inquis. p.m. " Roger, son of Osbert, and Sarah his 
wife," in 1306.' On Roger's death without surviving issue (for Margaret 
his daughter died before him) the manor passed to his widow for life,, and on 
her death in 1338,' to his sister Isabella, wife of Sir Walter Jernegan, of 
Horham Jernegan, and relict of Sir Henry de Walpole, ancestor of the 
Earls of Orford. Her sister and coheir Alice married Sir John Noyoun, 
Knt., whose son, Sir John dying without issue, her portion of the Fitz 
Osbert estates reverted to the Jernegans. 

'Dom. ii. 2836, 284. 'I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 119 ; Extent 31 Edw. 

*Doin. ii. 2836. I. 9. 

3Dom. ii. 284. 8I.P.M., 34 Edw. I. 5§. 

♦Dom. ii. 445. 9I.P.M., 12 Edw. III. 15. 

5 Feet of Fines, 31 Edw. I. 20. 

«Pat. Rolls, 31 Edw. I. 24. See I.Q.D., 

30 Edw. I. File 39, 18; lb. 31 

Edw, I. File 44, 20. 



SOMERLEYTON. 63 

As early as 1314 we find the assurance made by Sir John Noyoun. 
The deed is in the Bodleian, and is dated at Stonham Jernegan the Sunday 
next after the feast of St. George the Martyr 8 Edw. II. By it John, son 
of Sir Ralph Noyoun, granted to Peter Jernegan the whole of his purparty 
of the Manor of Somerleyton, with the advowson of the churches of the said 
manor with Bradewelle, with the patronage of the priory of St.Olave, and 
with the three mills belonging to the said manor.' 

Notwithstanding this the manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Sir John de Noyoun in 1341,'' and the following year we find a grant by 
Thomas Jernegan, Peter de Belhagh, parson of Huntingfield, and Alexander, 
parson of Horham, to Peter Jernegan and Ellen his wife and John their 
son, of half of the manor with the advowson of the churches of Somerleyton 
and BradweU.^ Also in 1349 ^ grant by John, son of Peter Jernegan to 
Henry de Soterton (? Sotterlee) and others of half of the manor.* 
A moiety of the manor is also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Beatrice, 
wife of John Noyoun, in 1351,' and in that of John, son of John Noyoun, in 
1361.* 

Sir Peter Jernegan, son of Sir Walter and Isabella Fitz Osbert, succeeded 
his mother in the Manor of Somerlej^^ton, and from this time to George 
Jernegan, who succeeded his father, John Jernegan, in 1558, the devolution 
of the manor is the same as that of the Manor of Horham Jernegan, in 
Horham, in Hoxne Hundred. 

We may mention the following as specially referring to this manor : — 

In 1362 Sir John Jernegan, Knt., with Joan his wife levied a fine. 
against Thomas Osborn, parson of Horham church.' 

In 1411 we find a grant of the manor by Gilbert Debenham, John 
Rokewode, and William Bacoun to Margaret, who was wife of John 
Jernegan.^ And in 1423 a grant of the manor by John Jernegan to Sir 
William Burgate, Knt., Gilbert Debenham, John Rukwode, John Bartlot, 
and Wm. Bacon.' 

In 1435 we find amongst the Bodleian Charters a grant by John 
Jernegan to Sir John Heveningham and others of all right to the manor, 
which had by charter been conceded to the said John Jernegan and Margaret 
his wife by John Ive and Thomas BoUe, clerk.'" And the following year a 
lease by the said John Ive and Thomas BoUe to John Jernegan and 
Margaret his wife." 

Sir Thomas Jernegan had a grant of free warren here in 1407." 

George Jernegan married Elye, daughter of Sir John Spelman, of 
Narborough, co. Norfolk, Knt., and was succeeded by his son John 
Jernegan, who married Catharine, daughter of George Brooke, Lord 
Cobham. He left four daughters, viz., Elizabeth, Catharine, Frances, 
and Margaret. Frances, the 3rd daughter, married ist Thomas Bedingfield, 
of Oxburgh, by whom she had two sons, and 2ndly Henry Jerningham, of 
Cossey, in Norfolk, her cousin, who sold the Manor of Somerleyton to John 
Wentworth. He married Elizabeth Southwell, and dying in 1618-9 the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Sir John Wentworth, who resided at 
Somerleyton during the Civil War. 

' Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1036. s-Feet of Fines, 36 Edw. III. 41. 

^I.P.M., 15 Edw. III. 29. 8 12 Hen. IV. ; Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1079. 

3 16 Edw. III. ; Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1044. ? i Hen. VI. ^ Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1086. 

4 23 Edw. III. ; Bodl. Suff. 1046. ' " 13 Hen. VI. ; Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1105. 

5 1.P.M., 25 Edw. III. 52. " 14 Hen. VI. ; Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1102. 

6I.P.M., 33 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.)|58 ; see "Chart. Rolls, 8 Hen. IV. 
also Close Rolls, 25 Edw. III. 28. 



64 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




ij 

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K 

z 
o 

H 

f" 
td 

n) 

M 
H) 

S 
o 
tn 



SOMERLEYTON. 65 

Sir John Wentworth married Anne Soame, but died without issue in 
1651, and from this time the manor has descended in the same course as the 
Manor of Ashby, in this Hundred. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Ashman in 1400/ 
and a lease in 1412 of the manor by Gilbert Debynham, John Rokewode, 
and William Bacoun, clerk, to Margaret, who was wife of John Jernegan.* 
The manor is also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Arthur Rushe, who died 
2nd July, 1537, leaving Anthony his son and heir.^ 

We meet with a fine of the manor levied in 1582 by Edmund Beding- 
field against John Jernegan and others.* 

Somerleyton Hall stands in a park beautifully planted ; a fine grove 
of limes decorates it at one end, and are scattered, with other trees, in great 
variety over the whole range of this fine enclosure. Fuller, amongst the 
many " fair houses " of the gentry in this county, names " Sommerley 
Hall (nigh Yarmouth), belonging to the Lady Wentworth, well answering 
the name thereof ; for here Sommer is to be seen in the depth of winter, 
in the pleasant walks, beset on both sides with firr trees, green all the year 
long, besides other curiosities." 

The hall, which was built by the last Sir John Jernegan, who was 
living in 1579, ^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^ mansion, exhibiting a good specimen of the style 
of architecture used at the period of its erection, and conveying a just idea 
of the knightly residences of our ancestors. Several engravings of it are 
extant. 

The hall and the manor were offered for sale by public auction in London, 
29th Aug. 1844. The particulars described the property as " the manor 
and property extending over the Hundreds or Half-Hundreds of Mutford 
and Lothingland, with the rights, royalties, and franchises appertaining 
thereto, including the wreck along the sea coast in those Hundreds, the 
income of which has on an average of 21 years amounted to upwards of 
£330 per annum. The property was bought in at £86,000, but subsequently 
sold to Samuel Morton Peto. 



'I.P.M., I Hen. IV. 34. 'I.P.M., 29 Hen. VHI. 66. 

*I2 Hen. IV. ; Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1078. *Fine, Hil. 24 Eliz. 



66 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The following places in the Domesday Survey we have not been able 
to identify with certainty : — 

BOKETON. 

Among the lands of Hugh de Montfort, now in demesne, was a holding 
formerly that of six freemen under Burchard's commendation, consisting 
of 50 acres of land, a ploughteam (reduced to half at the time of the Survey). 
The value was 4s. at the time of the Confessor, and at the time of the Survey 
was " 21s. /[d. and 1,500 herrings.'" 

HORNES. 

A holding here was that of a freeman under Gurth's commendation, 
and consisted of 5 acres valued at 3s. and 160 herrings. Hugh de Montfort 
was the Domesday tenant.* 

KiSLEA. 

There was a small holding in the place of 20 freemen with a carucate 
and 10 acres of land and 3 ploughteams. 

At the time of the Survey it was kept for the King by Roger Bigot. ^ 

SouTHTOWN (Yarmouth). 

There was no manor here, and the only entry of land in the Survey is 
under the head Earetuna amongst the estates of Ralph the engineer. He 
held 40 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 4s., which in the Confessor's 
time had been held by a freeman Kettle under tJlf's commendation with 
one bordar/ 



'Dom, ii. 407. ^Dom. ii. 283. 

'Dom. ii. 4076. * Dom. ii. 445. 



THE HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 




Waveney. 
manors : — 



HIS Hundred is part of the Royal demesne. It is in the 
Deanery of Lothingland and Archdeaconry of Suffolk, and 
is one of the geldable Hundreds. It is bounded on the 
south by the Hundred of Blything ; on the east by the 
German Ocean ; on the north by the Hundred of Lothing- 
land, from which it is divided by the Lake Lothing ; and 
on the west it is separated from Norfolk by the River 

It contains the eight following villages, and 17 following 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors, 


Barnby or 
Barnaby . . 

Carlton 

Colville 

Gisleham 

Kessingland . . 


Barnaby. 

Carlton Hall. 

Broomholm Priory. 

Fastolf's. 

Gisleham Hall with 
Pie's. 

Pyes Hall. 
■ Kessingland Staple- 
ton's. 

Itchingham's or 
Echingham's. 

Kington's. 
\ Rothenhall. 


Kirkley 

Mutf ord 

Pakefield .... 
Rushmere . . 


Kirkley al. Kirkley 
Fastolf's, caUed 
also Kirkley Hall. 

' Mutford. 

Soca Bectun. 

Soca Franchevile. 
,Soca Luvel. 

Pakefield Pyes or 
Drayton. 

Rushmere. 



It contains with Lothingland 33,315 acres of land. 

The fee of the Hundred was anciently in Edmund de Hemegrave, the 
King's servant, but in 1443 it was in the possession of Sir John Tiptoft, who 
died seised thereof in that year. John Tiptoft, his son and heir, was created 
Earl of Worcester. He did not long retain it, for William de la Pole held it 
in 1450, leaving it to John, his son and heir, who died without issue, and 
Edmund his brother inherited his estate. He was beheaded in 1513, and 
this with his other property was forfeited to the crown. The Hundred 
was included in the grants to Edward Jernegan and Mary his wife 14th 
July, 1509, and 28th Jan. 15 lo-i, mentioned in the account of Lowestoft 
Manor, in Lothingland Hundred, and Mary Kingston, widow, who had been 
2nd wife of the said Edward Jernegan, died seised in 1547. 



68 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



BARNABY. 

J|MONG the lands of the King kept by Roger Bigot was a 
holding here of eight freemen with 80 acres and 3 plough- 
teamSj reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey".' 

The only other holding in this place was that of five 
freemen under Burchard's commendation, and consisted 
of 44 acreSj a ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow, 
valued at 6s. Also a church with 80 acres valued at 2s. 
At the time of the Survey this was held by Hugh, son of Norman, of Earl 
Hugh, the King and Earl having the soc over the freemen." 




Manor of Barnaby. 

This was the estate of Earl Hugh at the time of the Survey, and the 
lordship appears to have been included in the grant of Mutford, and the 
manor always passed With it. The manor, if it ever separately existed, has 
long since become extinguished. 



'Dom. ii. 283. 



'Dora. ii. 302. 




CARLTON COLVILLE. • 69 

CARLTON COLVILLE. 

jHERE was one manor here in Saxon times held by Burchard. 
It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 8 villeins, 6 bordars, 
4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the 
men, wood sufficient to support 30 hogs, and 4 acres of meadow. 
Of live stock there were one rouncy, 8 beasts, 23 hogs, and 
100 sheep, valued at 30s. At the time of the Survey this 
manor was held with the other estate here of Earl Hugh 
by Hugh, son of Norman. The villeins had then become reduced to 4, 
the bordars to 4, the ploughteams belonging to the men to i, and the value 
was 4s. It, presumably the village, was a league and 8 quarentenes long 
and 10 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 4s. 

Earl Hugh at the time of the Survey also had an estate of 2 carucates 
of land, 4 ploughteams, and 6 acres of meadow, valued at 60s., which had 
been held by 30 freemen with 8 ploughteams under Burchard's commenda- 
tion in Saxon times, when it was valued at ;^4.' 

Two other estates here belonged to Hugh de Montfort. One had formerly 
been held by two freemen under Burchard's commendation, and consisted 
of 30 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 3s. and 1,000 herrings. The other 
had formerly been held by a freeman under Burchard's commendation, 
and consisted of 30 acres, a ploughteam (which at the time of the Survey 
had disappeared), and half an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. and 300 
herrings.' 



Manor of Carlton Hall. 

The four carucates of land held in Saxon times as a manor by Burchard 
subsequently evolved into three manors — ^that of Carlton Hall, Broomholm 
Priory, and Fastolf's. The family of Colvile, interested here, descended 
from Gilbert de Colvylle, who is said to have come over with the Conqueror. 
His great-grandson. Sir Robert de Colvile, held this manor in 1227, and 
the estate passed to his son and heir. Sir Henry de Colvile, and from him to 
his son and heir. Sir Roger de Colvile. 

Sir Roger de Colvile had a grant of free warren here in 1253,^ and 
obtained a charter for holding a market and fair in Carlton in 1267.'' 

He was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and received of Robert de 
Kelling 20s. for not being a knight. He married Galiena Walpole, the King 
honouring the nuptials with his presence. Suckling says of Roger : 
This kni^t was a. person of tyrannical and arbitrary character. Upon the 
return. of Edw. I. from the Holy Land, he was charged with- an undue 
exercise of his rights of free warren, stretching his privilege beyond the 
licence allowed by his monarch ; " posuit in defense de warren : sua plus 
qua id R. ei concessit." And, moreover, that under the pretence of having 
received a writ from the Crown for conducting certain persons to London, 
he had extorted from Ralph de Becket 40s. and 12 pigs, when the said Ralph 
had never been to London ; and that he had obtained from John le 
Latimer 30s. in the same way. A further charge was exhibited against 

'Dom. ii, 303. ^ Chart. Rolls, 37 and 38 Hen. III. pt. ii. 

"Dom. ii. 4076. 9, 61 ; H.R. i. 192. 

♦ Chart. Rolls, 51 Hen. III. 7 ; 23 Edw. 1. 2. 



70 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

this rapacious knight that he had raised a certain weir in the river, called 
Wicflet, and appropriated it to his own use, having no warrant to do so." 

This manor passed from Sir Roger de Colvile to his son and heir Roger 
about 1295. In 1300 "Roger son of Robert " (? Roger) de "Coleville" and 
Dionisia his wife levied a fine of part of the manor against John, son of 
Robert de Sancrofte,' and in 1312 we meet with a fine levied of the manor 
by Richard de Weyland against Hubert le.(s*c) Bavent and Dionisia his 
wife (Geoffrey de "Colevill" and Alice, daughter of John de Bursyerd, and 
Edmund de Hemegrave app. clam.)^ 

In 1348 Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh appears as lord. He was the 
son of Bartholomew de Burghersh, Constable of the Tower, who died 2nd 
Aug. 1355, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and coheir of Theobald, 2nd 
Lord Verdon, -which Bartholomew was son of Robert de Burghersh, of 
Burghersh, in Sussex, and Chiddingstone, in Kent, Constable of Dover 
Castle, and Warden of the Cinque Ports, by his 2nd wife, a daughter of 
Guncelin de Badlesmere, Chief Justice of Chester 2 Edw. I. The lord of 
this manor was in the wars in Gascony, and distinguished himself at Cressy 
in 1346, and Poictiers in 1356. In 1349 he ^•nd his ist wife Cecily, daughter 
and heir of Thomas de Weyland, had a grant of free warren in Carlton, and 
in all their other demesne lands.* 

Sir Bartholomew died 5th April, 1369, his will being dated the day 
before.^ He left the manor to Elizabeth, his daughter and heir, who» 
married Edward Despencer, Lord le Despencer. Sir Bartholomew con- 
stituted Margaret, his 2nd wife, widow of William Pichard, sister of Bartholo- 
mew, Lord Badlesmere (who remarried William de Burcester), and Sir 
Walter Paveley his executors. Edward le Despencer, Baron Despencer, 
died seised of Carlton Hall nth Nov. 1375," and bequeathed his body to 
be buried in the abbey of Tewkesbury, near his ancestors. 

Elizabeth suo jure Baroness Burghersh, died in August, 1409,'' and 
the manor passed to her grandson and heir,. Richard Despencer, the son 
and heir of Thomas, Earl of Gloucester, and Lord le Despencer, who had been 
beheaded and attainted 5th Jan. 1399-1400, and Constance his wife, 
daughter of Edmund Plantagenet, surnamed De Langley, Duke of York, 
5th son of Edw. III. Richard Despencer married Eleanor, daughter of 
Ralph Nevill, Earl of Westmoreland, and died without issue 7th Oct. 1414, 
aged 14.* 

The manor passed to Isabel, only surviving sister and sole heir, 
being a posthumous child of Thomas Despencer, Earl of Gloucester, 
married to Richard Beauchamp, Lord Bergavenny, who in 1420 
was created Earl of Worcester, and died without issue in 1422, Isabel 
married 2ndly Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. He died 30th 
April, 1439, and she a few months subsequently.' 

Davy mentions that in 1427 Anne, wife of Sir Hugh Hastings, held of 
the grant of Elizabeth, the widow of Edward le Despencer, but also more 

'Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 238. ^His widow married Henry Percy, Earl of 

^ Feet of Fines, 38 Edw. I. 21. Northumberland. See Manor of 

^Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. II. 16. Rouse Hall, in Clopton, Carlford 

"Chart. Rolls, 23 Edw. HI. 3. and Colneis Hundred. 

5 1.P.M., 43 Edw. HI. pt. i. 14. 9 Will ist December, 1439^ proved 4th 

^I.P.M., 49 Edw. HI. pt. ii. 46. February, 1439-40. 

''WiU 4th July, proved loth August, 1409. 



CARLTON COLVILLE. 



71 



correctly states that in 1428 Richard, Earl of Warwick, in right of his wife 
Isabel, daughter and heir of Thomas le Despencer, brother of Anne, held. 

A fine was in 1430 levied of the manor by John Verney, clerk, and 
William Lee against Richard, Earl of Warwick, and "Isabella" his wife,' and 
the Earl no doubt held until his death in 1439, and his widow subsequently. 
On her death without issue male, the manor went to James Touchet, Lord 
Audley,'' from whose successors it passed to the family of Brewes, being held 
by Thomas Brewes, who died 7th Nov. 1514,' when it passed to his son and 
heir, Sir John Brewes, who held in 1541, and died 13th Feb. 1584-5." From 
him the manor passed to Robert Bungey, and at the beginriing of the 17th 
century vested in Sir Arthur Heveningham, who held in 1624. From him 
the manor passed to his son and heir, John Heveningham, and from 
him to his son and heir, William Heveningham, who forfeited in 1661.' It 
was, however, restored to the trustees of Lady Heveningham the 
following year, and they conveyed it in 1662 to John Tasburgh, who con- 
veyed it in 1668 to Sir Thomas AUin, who died in 1685. From that time 
to the present the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Ashby, in the Hundred of Lothingland. 

Carlton Hall is a modern farm-house, having been built about a century 
and a half ago on the site of the old mansion, which was destroyed by a 
foul chimney taking fire i8th April, 1736. Suckling mentions that in the 
reign of Queen Elizabeth there was a suit between the inhabitants of 
Carlton Colville and the lord of this manor, who claimed an exclusive right 
of fishery in Spratt's and other waters in Carlton Ham, when judgment 
was given in favour of the inhabitants.® 

Amongst the State Papers is a lease of the Manor of Carlton Colville 
to Robert Suthwell in 1536-7.^ 

Arms of Burghersh : Gules, a lion rampant, double queued Or. Of 
Despencer : Quarterly, Ar. and Gu. in the second and third a fret. Or. 



'Feet of Fines, 8 Hen. VI. 14. 

'His right would seem to have accrued 
tiirough his second wife, Eleanor, 
daughter of Edmund Ilolamd, by 
Elizabeth Dow, Baroness Le Des- 
pencer, daughter and heir of Sir 
Bartholomew Burghersh (Mill's Cat. 
of Honours, 1610). The author of 
" TTie Complete Peerage," vol. ii. p. 
igg, seems to consider Eleanor, 
however, to have been the illegiti- 
mate daughter of Thomas Holand, 
Earl of Kent, by Constance, daugh- 
ter of Edmund Plantagenet, Duke 
of York ; and he refers in a note to 
N. and Q., 4th Ser. iii. 608, and adds; 
" But see also Sandford's Genealo- 
^cal History, 1707, p. 379, wherein 
it is stated that Constance of York 
was the parq,mour of Edmund 
Holand, Earl of Kent, by whom 
she had been so long courted that 
at last she brought him a daughter 
Banned Eleanor, married to James 
Touchet, Lord Audley, of which 
family the Audleys of Norfolk 



were descended. Which Eleanor 
would fain have made herself legiti- 
mate, but the right heirs preferred 
their bill in Parliament, thereby 
proving her to be a bastard, as you 
may see in Polton's printed statutes, 
anno 9 Hen. VI.^ cap. XL" The Act 
is a Public Act of Bastardy, and the 
evidence is sufficiently clear that 
the wife of James Touchet, Lord 
Audley, was not a daughter of 
Edmund Holand by Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of Sir Bartholo- 
mew Burghersh, widow of 
Edward, Lord Despencer, but the 
natural daughter of Thomas Holand, 
Earl of Kent, by Constance, his 
concubine, daughter of Edmund de 
Langley, Duke of York. 

^I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 146. 

■* See Manor of Great Wenham, in Samford 
Hundred. 

= See Manor of Blundeston, in Lothingland 
Hundred. 

^Hist. of Suff. vol. i. p. 239. 

"S.P. X520, p. 577- 



72 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

over all a bend Sa. Of Col vile 5 Azure, a lion rampant. Argent, collared, 
with a label of three points. 

Manor of Broomholm Priory. 

A manor with a moiety of the tithes of the parish of Carlton Colville 
was granted at an early period to the priory of Broomholm, in Norfolk, 
probably in 1252, for in that year Gilbert, son of Thomas de Ilketshall, 
gave to that establishment his tithes in Hedenham, namely, two garbs of 
the demesne of Gilbert, and also two garbs of the demesne of Roger de 
Mohant, in Kessingland, and also of the demesne of Roger de Colville, of 
Carlton. The manor was certainly in the priory in 1303, and the Ministers' 
Accounts of the manor in 1324 will be found in the Public Record Office.' 

In 1303 the manor was held by that house up to the time of the 
Dissolution, when it reverted to the Crown. In 1541 the manor was held 
by John Harvey, of Oulton, and later by Sir John Brewes, after which it 
became united with the Manor of Carlton Hall. By a deed dated ist Apl. 
1625, between Sir Arthur Heveningham and Dame Mary his wife of the 
first part. Sir John Heveningham and Dame Bridget his wife of the second 
part. Sir John Corbett and others of the third part, the manors of Carlton 
Hall and Broomholm and the advowson of the church of Carlton were settled 
on Sir John Heveningham and Dame Bridget his wife for life and then on 
their children. 

From the time of Sir Arthur Heveningham the manor has passed in the 
same course as the main manor. 



Fastolf's Manor. 

We find a manor of this name mentioned as in Carlton Colville as early 
as the reign of King Edw. III. Amongst the Bodleian Suffolk Charters 
is one in 1355, being a quit claim by John de Kymburle, parson of Mutford, 
Roger atte Heth, parson of Todenham, and Edmund Man, Roger (? Ralph) 
Megre, parson of Kessingland, of all right in Fastolf's Manor, viz., in lands in 
Carlton Colville, Kyrkley, Pakefield, Gisleham, Mutford, and Henstead ;' 
and in the same collection another quit claim in 1358 by Ralph Megre, 
parson of the church of Kessingland, to Sir Emeric de Welyngton of all 
right in the manor. ^ 

There is another quit claim the same year by Warine de Barneby and 
Alan Reynald to Sir Robert Spenser, parson of Elgham, Sir Edmund de 
Welles, parson of Beccles, and Richard Megre of all right in the " Manor of 
Carleton Col vile called Fastolfes " and in all lands in Carlton Colvile, Mutford, 
Barnby, Lowestoft, Kirkley, Pakefield, Gisleham, Kessingland, Rushmere, 
and Hemstead.* There is also a grant in the same year by Ralph Megre, 
parson of the church of Kessingland, to Sir Robert Spenser, parson of 
Elgham, Sir Edmund de Welles, parson of Beccles, Richard Megre, Warine 
de Barneby, and Alan Reynald of his Manor of Carlton Colvile called 
Fastolfs.' 

' 18 Edw. II. Bundle 1127, No. 4. ■•32^Edw. III. Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1262. 

"29 Edw. III. Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1263. ^gg'Edw. III. Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1264. 

332 Edw, III. Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1265. r 



CARLTON COLVILLE. 73 

In 1378 Hugh Fastolf seems to have held the manor, for he then 
granted it to his brother, John Fastolf. 

In 1443 this manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John Tiptot,' 
and of William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1450." Amongst the Harleian 
Charters we find a demise of the manor in 1427,' and a release in 1435.'' 

Suckling makes the Manor of Fastolf s in the parish of Gisleham, 
and states that at the time he wrote — in 1847 — ^^ court was kept for it.' 



'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VI. 45. *Harl, 58 C. 14. 

"I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 23. 'Hist, vol, i. p. 244. 

3Harl. 43H. 9. 

K 




74 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

GISLEHAM. 

holding in this place was that of a freeman under Gurth's 
commendation, and consisted ot 15 acres, a plonghteam 
(reduced to half at the time of the Survey), 2 villeins, and 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 8s. At the time of the 
Survey this estate was held by Earl Hugh.' 

Another holding was that of two freemen under 
Burchard's commendation, and consisted of i|- acres valued 
at 2S. 6d. and 200 herrings. Another in the same township was that of a 
freeman under Burchard's commendation, and consisted of 16 acres and 
half a ploughteam, valued at 5s. and 300 herrings. At the time of the 
Survey both these estates belonged to Hugh de Montfort.' 

Manor of Gisleham Hall nov\^ Gisleham with Pies. 

In 1270 Alan de Wymenhale had free warren, with a grant of a fair 
and market in Gisleham, Carlton, &c.,^ and in 1282 William de Gisleham 
had the same in Gisleham, Kessingland, Stadenfield, and Brampton.* 

In 1311 Sir Edmund de Hemegrave held the lordship, from whom 
Suckling says it passed to Sir John de Ulveston, but this seems doubtful, 
as we do not find that Sir John had any connection with the manor before 
1356, and in the interim Sir Clement de Biskele held, and there is a Compotus 
Roll 1318-19 amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum showing 
him then to be lord.^ From Sir Clement de Biskele the manor passed to 
John de Biskele, who held in 1343 according to a charter this year, which 
is given by Suckling.^ From him the manor passed to his widow Clementia, 
and then to Sir Reginald de Biskele. 

In the British Museum is a compotus of Thomas Slettavey, serjeant 
of this Sir Reginald de Biskele, from the translation of St. Thomas Martyr 
23 Edw. HI. [1349] to Michaelmas following for 12 weeks " quo anno 
pestilencia hominum regnavit in Anglia."' 

Davy says that in 1349 Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, son and heir of 
Sir Edmund, held the manor, but it is clear that by 1356 it was vested in 
John de Ulveston, for by a deed dated at Gisleham, Ralph le Megre, parson 
of the church of Kessingland, and Richard le Megre his brother released to 
this John de Ulveston all their right and interest in the manor and in the 
lands and houses in Gisleham, Rushmere, Kessingland, Henstede, Carlton, 
Beccles, and Mutford, which they held under a demise of the aforesaid 
John de Ulveston, and by a writing dated at Frostenden 7th April, 7 Rich. II. 
[1384], Sir John Ulveston quit claim to Sir Roger Boys, Sir John de Wyng- 
feld, Knts., John Pishale, Thomas More, Guy Owkedok, Robert Grygges, 
clerk, Robert de Aisshfeld, and William Thurtone this manor which they 
held of the feoffment of Richard Dautreys and John Botild.^ 

The manor next passed to Sir William Argentein or Argentine, who 
apparently held it for the hfe of Margery his wife, daughter of Sir William 

'Dom. ii. 302. 5 Add. Ch. 25862. 

^Dora. ii. 4076. 6 Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 244. 

3 Chart. RoUs, 55 Hen. III. pt. i. 10. ^Add Ch. 26058. 

♦Chart. RoUs, 10 Edw. I. 19. sHarl. 57 D. 2. 



GISLEHAM. 75 

Calthorpe, and later the wife of John Argentine. Sir WiUiam Argentine 
died in 1418/ and the manor appears from this time to the time of Sir 
Giles Alington in 1528 to have passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Halesworth, in Blything Hundred, when this manor passed to James 
Hobart, who died seised thereof 24th Feb. 1516, leaving Walter Hobart 
his son and heir.* 

The manor is specifiGally mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John 
"Alyngton" in 1481.^ 

Sir Walter Hobart* held in 1525, and from him the manor apparently 
passed to his son and heir, Henry Hobart. Suckling makes the modest 
statement that Henry Hubbard " had possession of the manor in 33 Hen. 
VIII. [1541]," no doubt founding his statement on the fact disclosed in 
the inquis. p.m. of his father Walter, taken 30th April that year, but it should 
be remembered that the only manors mentioned in this inquisition are those 
of Oulton and Lowestoft. Henry Hobart died in 1561,^ when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, James Hobart, who died in 1615, when it passed 
to his 3rd son, Edward Hobart, of Langley, co. Norfolk, who died in 1638, 
when it passed to his son and heir, James Hobart, who died in 1664 (? 20th 
August, 1669). He seems in his lifetime to have sold the manor to Robert 
Richman or Richmond, of Hedenham, son of John Richman by his ist 
wife Anne, daughter of William Gooch, of St. Mary's, Westhall. Robert 
Richman married Catherine, daughter of Thomas Pretyman, of Bacton, 
and on his death his son and heir, John Richman, having married Mary, 
daughter of Roger Goodwin, of Stonham, and having died 6th Feb. 1640, 
in has father's lifetime, the manor passed to Robert's grandson, John 
Richman. He married Anne, sister of Sir William Cooper, Bart., and 
died leaving two children — William, who died without issue, and Mary, 
who became his heir, married to Charles Garneys, of Morningthorpe, Norfolk. 
Charles Garneys died 15th June, 1678, when the manor passed to her son 
Charles Garneys, who married Margaret, daughter of John Watts, of 
Burnham Market, and died in 1730, the manor vesting in his son and heir, 
Richmond Garneys. He married Anne, daughter of William Churchman, 
of lUington, Norfolk, and died in 1762, when the lordship vested in his son 
and heir, Charles Garneys, of Hedenham, who died unmarried in 1808. 

The manor then passed to Rachel Ives Drake, eldest daughter and 
coheir of William Drake, of Amersham (descended from the Drakes of 
Shardeloes, co. Bucks., and the Garneys of Boy land Hall), married to the 
Hon. George Irby, afterwards George, 3rd Baron Boston, and Emily Ives 
Drake, married to the Hon. Frederick Paul Irby. Rachel Ives, Lady 
Boston, died 6th April, 1830, and her husband subsequently acquired the 
whole manor, which on his death 12th March, 1856, passed to his son and 
heir, George Ives, 4th Baron Boston, who married ist 25th Jan. 1830, 
Fanny Elizabeth, eldest daughter of WiUiam R. Hopkins-Northey, of 
Oving House, co. Bucks, and 2ndly 30th July, 1861, Caroline Amelia, 
eldest daughter of John St. Vincent, 3rd Lord de Saumarez, and died 
22nd Dec. 1869. 

In 1885 the manor was vested in Richard Henry Reeve. 



' I.P.M., 6 Hen. V. 13. * See Manor of Oulton, in Lothingland 

*I.P.M., gHen. VIII. 25. Hundred. 

^I.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 58. =Will 17th Oct. 1560, proved 3rd May, 

1561. 



76 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK.^ 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a Court 
Roll 1427-1429.' 

Arms of Richman or Richmond : Erm. on a chief Sa. a griffin 
passant Or. Of Boston : Arg. fretty,Sa. on a canton Gul. a chaplet Or. 



Of the hall Suckling writes : " The site of Gisleham Hall, which abutted 
upon the extensive common, enclosed in 1799, is encompassed by a double 
moat, the outer of which includes about 4 acres. The space contained 
within the smaller moat measures 38 yards from east to west, by 45 from 
north to south. 

No traces of the ancient mansion are visible, but Mr. Button, the present 
respectable tenant, informs me that he remembers the courts to have been 
held on the site when they were adjourned to the present hall, which is a 
substantial and rather old farmhouse. His father took up the foundations 
of the drawbridge on the south about the year 1794. Under one of the 
large timbers were discovered two balls of metal, engraved with coats of 
arms, which were sent to Charles Garneys, Esq., the landlord, and disposed 
of at the sale of his effects, after his death, about forty years since. 

The site of Gisleham Hall has attained notoriety of late from having 
been the scene of a foul murder committed there on the person of James 
McFadden, an Irishman employed in the rural police. This unfortunate 
person was shot in the thigh upon the edge of the moat, in the night of 
Sunday, the 28th oi July, 1844, by one of a numerous and organized gang of 
thieves who had long infested the neighbourhood. The murderer was 
identified, and suffered the extreme penalty of the law at Ipswich, on the 
25th of March, 1845.'" 

Manor of Pyes Hall (see Pakefield Pyes). 

Sawale Trysth is mentioned by Davy as ist lord, and he then mentions 
Thomas de Drayton, from whom this manor is sometimes called the Manor 
of Drayton. His daughter and heir married John Pye. William Jenney, 
afterwards Sir Wm. Jenney, held the manor, and died in 1483, from which 
time to the death of Edward Jenney 26th June, 1523, the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Loudham, in Herringfieet, in Lothingland 
Hundred. The manor then vested in Robert Jenney, who in 1534 sold to 
Henry Hobart,^ and from him to the death of James Hobart in 1664 it 
passed in the same course as the main manor. 

From the Hobarts the manor passed by sale to Nathaniel Row, who 
sold to — Proctor. About 1645 this manor appears to have become con- 
solidated with the main manor. 



'Add. 25863. 'Fine, Easter, 25 Hen. VIII. 

' SuckUng, Hist, of Suff . vol. i. p. 245. 



2 



KESSINGLAND. 



n 




KESSINGLAND. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Burchard, and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 2 
villeins, 6 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 
I belonging to the men, an acre of meadow, and a mill. 
Of live stock there were one beast, 23 hogs, and 40 sheep, 
the whole valued at 30s. At the time of the Survey this 
manor was held of Earl Hugh by his son Norman, and the 

value was 40s. It was a league long and a league broad, and paid in a 

gelt 32^. 

In the same township was a holding of 40 freemen (11 being under 
Gurth's commendation, and the others under Burchard's commendation), 
having 3 carucates of land, 8 ploughteams (reduced to 5 at the time of the 
Survey), and an acre of meadow, valued at £4. At the time of the Survey 
it was held by Earl Hugh, and the value was lOOs.' 

Another estate was that of Osfert, a freeman under commendation to 
Edric of Laxfield, and consisted of 15 acres, 2 bordars, and half an acre of 
meadow, valued at 2S. At the time of the Survey this land was kept for 
the King by Roger Bigot." 

The other manor in this place was that of a freeman under commen- 
dation to Edric of Laxfield, and consisted of 30 acres, a ploughteam, and 
an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. At the time of the Survey this manor was 
held by Hugh de Montfort, and valued at 8s. This Hugh de Montfort 
also had an estate here which had formerly been held by four freemen 
(one being under Edric's commendation and three under Burchard's com- 
mendation). It consisted of go acres, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams, and an 
acre of meadow, valued at los. in Saxon times, and at 22s. and 1,000 herrings 
at the time of the Survey.^ 



Manor of Kessingland Stapleton's. 

In 125 1 Roger de Montalt held this lordship and had a grant from 
Hen. III. of a fair and market here.* The former was held 20th November, 
the anniversary of St. Edmund, to whom the church of Kessingland is 
dedicated, and the latter kept weekly on Tuesdays. Roger de Montalt 
died in 1260, from which time to the vesting of the manor in Isabella, Queen 
Dowager, the manor passed in the same course of devolution through the 
Montalt family as the Manor of Framsden, in Thredling Hundred. The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Robert de Montalt, 
who died in 1275.' 

In 1337 William de Montacute, 3rd Baron and ist Earl of Salisbury, 
had a grant of the reversion,^ and to him the Queen attorned tenant 6th 
Oct. II Edw. III. [1337], and released to his son.^ 

The Reeve's accounts of the lands of Isabella the Queen here, 24 and 
25 Edw. III., will be found amongst the Ministers' Accounts in the Public 
Record Office.* 



'Dom. ii. 301. 

'^Dom. ii. 283. 

^Dom. ii. 407. 

* Chart. Rolls, 35 Hen. III. 2. 

5 1.P.M., 3 Edw. I. 29. 

« Chart. Rolls, 11 Edw. III. 61. 



7I.P.M., 32 Edw. III. 43; Harl. 43 
D. 26 ; Close Rolls, 11 Edw. III. 
pt. ii. iSd, where it is stated that 
the estate in Kessingland was a 
carucate of land and £20 of rent. 

^Bundle looi, No. 4. 



7§ ' THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

William de Montacute, ist Earl of Salisbury, married Katherine, 
daughter of William, Lord Grandison, and died in 1343 of bruises received 
in a tilting at Windsor, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Wilham 
de Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury. 

He was present at the battles of Cressy and Poictiers, in the 
latter battle commanding the rear guard of the English army, and is said 
to have contended with the Earl of Warwick in the heat of action as to which 
should shed most French blood. His lordship was one of the original 
holders of the Garter, the order having been founded, according to tradition, 
in consequence of the King's affection for the Earl's Countess. He married 
1st Joan, daughter of Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Kent, and known as 
the Fair Maid of Kent,' and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of John, 
Lord Elsham, of Dunster, and died in 1397. His only son William died in 
his father's lifetime in 1383. The Earl having no other issue, the following 
year sold the manor to Sir Bryan Stapleton, Knt. 

This seems to have been his descent : — 

Herman or Herym, 
lord of Stapleton-upon-Tays. 



Alan, = dau. of John cf Tanfield 



Sir John = Mary, dau. of Sir — Mallory, Knt. 

Comptroller of House- I 
hold to King Stephen 



I 
Sir Miles = Penrodas, dau. of the King of Cyprus. 



Allan = Anne, dau. of Robert Neville. 



^ I 
Sir Bryan = dau. of Sir Henry Fitz-Henry. 



Henry John = Catherine, dau. of Sir Miles Hansard, Knt. 

d.s.p. 



Sir Miles = Barbara, dau. of Sir John Barrel, Knt. 



I 
Sir Miles = Sibil, dau. and coheir of John de Bella Aqua, or Bellew. 

Sir Miles Stapleton = Elizabeth, dau. and heir of John de Richmond, 
of Carlton, Knt. or Rismond. 

d. 1313. 



Sir Miles = Cicely, dau. of Sir Robert Ufford, Knt. 



Gilbert = Agnes, eld. dau. and coheir 
I of Bryan Fitz Alan, Baron 
of Bedale. 



Sir Bryan Stapleton = Alice, dau. of Sir John St. Philebert, 



of Carlton, Knt. 
K.G. t. Rich. 11. 



Knt. 



Sir Bryan Stapleton, Knt., 
the purchaser of the manor. 

' The Earl was divorced on account of the the wife of Edward, the Black 

lady's pre-contract with Sir Thomas Prince. 

Holland, and she eventually became 



KESSINGLAND. 79 

On the Patent Rolls we find a pardon to Sir Bryan Stapleton for 
acquiring the manor in fee simple from the Earl of Salisbury, the manor 
being held in chief.' Sir Bryan Stapleton a few years later made a settle- 
ment conveying to Richard Lescrope and others and was re-enfeoffed, and 
these assurances being made without licence a pardon was subsequently 
obtained." Sir Bryan married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir William 
Aldburgh, Knt., and on his death the manor passed to his 2nd son, Sir 
Myles Stapleton, who died in 1400.^ He married Joan, daughter and 
coheir of Sir Gerard Ufflet, of Wighill, in the Aynsty of York City, widow of 
William Brecknells, and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir. 
Sir John Stapleton, who married Margaret, daughter of — Norton, of 
Norton Conyers, and died in 1455,* when it devolved on his son and heir. 
Sir William Stapleton. He was Knight of the Shire in Parliament 28 Hen. VI. 
and having only two daughters convey'ed the manor in 1461 to his brother, 
Bryan Stapleton.^ 

There is a licence on the Patent Rolls in the i Edw. IV. enabling Sir 
William Stapleton to grant to Brian Stapleton, his brother, and the heirs of 
his body.^ 

Amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian is the fragment of the 
Court Roll of a court held by Brian Stapleton in 1473.'' Sir Brian married 
Jane, daughter of Sir Lancelot Thirkeld, and had seven sons and four 
daughters. On the death of Brian Stapleton, i8th Sept. 1518,'^ the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Christopher Stapleton, of Wighill. He married 
ist Alice, daughter of William Ask, of Ask, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter 
of Sir John Neville, of Levirsedze, co. York, Knt., and on his death the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Bryan Stapleton, who married Margery, 
daughter of Sir John Constable, of Hailsham, Knt., but dying without issue 
the manor passed to his brother and heir, Sir Robert Stapleton. Sir 
Robert Stapleton married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Mallory, of 
Studley, co. York, and in 1549 sold the manor to William Roberts,' and he 
and his wife were in 1563 called upon to show by what title they held the 
manor." From William Roberts, the manor passed in the same course as 
the manor of Burgh Castle, in Lothingland Hundred, to the time of Sir Owen 
Smith, and amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian is an acknowledg- 
ment by Sir Owen, who died 30th March, 1626, then lord of the manor, of 
the receipt of money from Thomas Parkard, his bailiff." 

Sir Owen Smith's representative conveyed the manor about 1645 to 
Robert Proctor. In 1658 Daniel Proctor appears as lord, and in 1721 the 
manor was held by Samuel Proctor, while in 1764 it was held by Daniel 
Proctor. In 1776 it was held by Bridget Hawes, and in 1786 was the 
property of her daughter, Jane Denton. Jane Denton married Randal 
Burrough€s, and about 1826 the manor was purchased by John Morse. 

'Pat. Rols, 8 Rich. II. pt. i. 38. «Pat. Rolls, 1 Edw. IV. pt. iv. 23. 

*Pat. RoUs, 8 Rich. II. pt. i. 4. ^Rawl. D. 1481. 

3I.P.M., I Hen. IV. 45. ^l.PM., 10 Hen. VIII. 53. 

♦I.P.M., 33 Hen. VI. 13, Extent. ^Fine, Easter, 3 Edw. VI. 

5 Blomefield states inaccurately that Sir " Memoranda, 5 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 9. 

Miles, son of Sir Brian Stapleton, " Rawl. D. 148. 

conveyed the manor this year to 

his brother Brian. 



8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1875 the manor was vested in his trustees, but in 1885 had passed 
to John Hall Moore Boycott. In 1896 was vested in Frederick Augustus 
Morse Boycott, and is now vested in John Watson. 

Court Rolls ol the manor are referred to in the 6th Report of the 
Deputy Keeper of Public Records.' 

On the west side bf the churchyard stood formerly the manor house, 
which according to an account given by the farmer in 1823 who occupied 
the vicarage house and glebe land, was an old building having about it 
walls similar to those on his own premises. This old house was, he said, 
a few years previously pulled down and a large red-brick house built on a 
spot adjoining the old site, and a little to the south of it. This was in 1823 
a farmhouse in the occupation of Mr. J. S. Crowfoot. 

Manor of Kessingland Itchingham's or Echinghams. 

This was the lordship of the family of Atte Tye in the reign of Edw. HI. 
In 1375 Dionysia, widow of Sir Peter Atte Tye,^ held the manor, and by 
her wiU of this date proved the same year bequeathed to her son Edward 
Charles loos. per annum out of her manor here, and to Sir Robert Tye, her 
son, the Manor of Hoo, in Monewden, in order to purchase the patronage of 
some church of the value of f2,o per annum, to appropriate it to the Cathedral 
church of Norwich, as a provision for two secular priests to celebrate for 
the souls of John de Hoo and Dionysia his wife, William their son, and all 
the faithful. 

This manor passed to Sir Robert atte Tye, son and heir of Sir Peter, 
and his will is dated in 1382 and proved in 1383. In it he desires his feoffees 
to enfeoff Elizabeth his wife with the advowson of this parish church, the 
lordship of Barsham, and his lands in Mutford and Wangford Hundreds 
for life. Sir John de Hoo is mentioned as his brother, which rather suggests 
that Dionysia his mother was the relict of John de Hoo above named, and 
not his daughter, as is stated in the account of Cretingham al. Tye's Manor. 
Elizabeth, however, the wife of Sir Robert, may have been a de Hoo also. 
This Elizabeth died in 1383, and the manor passed to Sir Robert's son and 
heir. Sir Robert atte Tye, who died in 1415. 

The manor was next the lordship of the Echinghams, of Barsham,^ 
in Wangford Hundred, and was held by Lady Margaret Echingham, wife 
of Sir Thomas Echingham, from whom it passed to her son and heir. Sir 
Thomas Echingham, on whose death in 1460 it passed to his brother and 
heir, Richard Echingham, of Barsham, Amongst the Chancery Pro- 
ceedings in the time of Hen. VI. and Edw. IV. is an action by Elizabeth, 
wife of Richard Echingham and daughter of John Gernegan, against 
Margaret Echyngham, mother of the said Richard, as to the petitioner's 
jointure out of this manor and the Manor of Blanchard." 

Richard Echingham's will is dated' 1461. He left the manor to 
Elizabeth his wife for life, and subject to her interest it passed to his son and 
heir, John Echingham, and from him to his son and heir, Edward Echingham. 
In 1528 the manor was held by John Jerningham, and then passed to Henry 
Hobart. Suckling, however, states that it passed directly from Sir Edmund 

' App. ii. p. 86. "E.C.P., 38 Hen. VI. ; 5 Edw. IV. Bundle 

*See Cretingham, (?/. Tye's Manor, in Loes 27, 277; 3 Edw. IV. Bundle 

Hundred. 29, 35. 

^See Manor of Barsham, in Wangford 

Hundred. 



KESSINGLAND. 8i 

Echingham to Henry " Hubbard," of whom it was obtained in 1645 by 
Robert Proctor. This, however, is not correct. 

There are two fines of the manor in 1546 and 1556, the first by George 
Harvy and others against Owen Hopton and others,' and the second as 
to a moiety of the manor by George Harvy against John Blenerhassett 
and others.* 

The manor was acquired most probably by Henry Hobart from George 
Harvy and others under a fine levied by the former in 1554,^ and passed 
from Herury Hobart, who died in i56i,to his son and heir, James Hobart, 
of Hales Hall, Loddon.* And in 1562 we find an order for the removal of 
process from the manor, and discharge of James Hobart,^ who died in 1615, 
aged 91. The manor later passed to Sir Owen Smith, who sold it to 
Robert Proctor, from which time the manor has devolved in the same 
course as the main manor. 

Manor of Kessingland and Kingston's. 

This was early the estate of William de Enque, afterwards of Richard 
Megre, from whom it passed to his son and heir, John Megre, who held his 
first court for the manor 6 Rich. II. The Court Roll for this court 
and also for courts held 7 to 11 Rich. II. and 16-23 Rich. II. 
will be found amongst the Bodleian Suff. Rolls [20]. The manor next vested 
in Alexander Kingston, from whom it derived its name, and then in Richard 
Kingston. It then passed to the College of Heringsby, in Norfolk, founded 
by Hugh atte Fenne in 1475.^ 

Amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of Hen. VIII. 
is an action as to a forcible entry into this manor brought by Sir Henry 
Sacheverell against John Baker.' 

In 1528 Nicholas Hasburgh was lord, and 13th April, 1545, Sir William 
Woodhouse, of Waxham, had a grant from the Crown of the manor. Par- 
ticulars of farm in Kessingland for grant to Sir Thomas Clere and Sir William 
Wodehouse will be found in the Public Record Office.^ 

A little later it vested in William Parker, who in 1575 had licence to 
alienate it to Edward Heron and William Wiseman, and the heirs of the 
said William Wiseman. In 1580 it passed to Richard Proctor under a fine 
levied this year by the said Richard Proctor against William Parker,' and 
then to Sir Edward Proctor and Katherine his wife, who had licence in 
1601 to alienate to Samuel Proctor in fee. A fine was levied in 1601 
accordingly by Samuel Proctor against Richard Proctor and others of this 
manor and the Manor of Rothenhall." In 1645 the manor vested in Robert 
Proctor, and from that time has devolved in the same course as the 
main Manor of Kessingland. 

Manor of Rothenhall. 

In Saxon times there were two manors in this place. The first was 
that of a freeman under commendation to Torech, R. Brainard's predecessor, 
and consisted of 30 acres, 5 bordars, a ploughteam and a half belonging to 
the men, wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs, i^ acres of meadow, valued 

' Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. YIII. ^See Ancient Deeds in P.R.O. A. 3159. 

"Fine, Easter, 5 Edw. VI. 'Star Ch. P. Hen. VHI. Bundle 22, 169, 

^Fine, Easter, 2 Mary I. 307, 255, 308. The answer of 

*See Manor of Oulton, in Lothingland Baker D.K.R. 49 p. 496. 

Hundred. " 36 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 191. 

'Memoranda Rolls, 4 EUz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 'Fine, Easter, 22 Eliz. 

56. "Fine, Hil. 43 Eliz. 



82 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

at 8s., but at the time of the Survey rendering 12s. The Domesday tenant 
was Earl Hugh.' 

The second manor was that of Alsac, a freeman under Burchard's 
commendation, and consisted of 40 acres, 4 bordars, a ploughteam in 
demesne and half belonging to the men, wood for the maintenance of 3 
hogs, and i^ acres of meadow, valued at 5s. At the time of the Survey 
this manor belonged to Hugh de Montfort, and was valued at 9s. and 600 
herrings.^ 

In the reign of Edw. II. this was the lordship of John de Rothenhall, 
and in 1419 it was returned that John de Rothenhall held the lordship at 
the day of his death of the King as of his Honor of Chester by the service 
of an eighth part of a knight's fee, and Thomas Rothenhall was his son 
and heir. This Thomas had a sister Elizabeth, and both being minors 
at the time of their father's death the manor escheated to the Crown in 
1427 or the following year, apparently on their decease.^ 

Elizabeth, the widow of Sir John Rothenhall, survived the issue of 
her husband. She was the daughter of Sir Philip Branch, Knt., and widow 
of John Clere, of Ormesby, in Norfolk, and the manor seems to have gone 
to her, probably by grant from the Crown, for by her will dated i6th Oct. 
1438, and proved 9th July, 1441, she gave to Robert Clere, her son by her 
first marriage, all her goods at Caistor, and her Manor of Horninghall there; 
and Henstead, Rothenhall, and Claydon manors in Suffolk, to him, his heirs, 
and assigns for ever, after payment of her debts, &c. (Blomefield). The 
lordship appears to have been shortly after in the holding of Thomas 
Bardolf, who with Alice his wife presented to the Rothenhall mediety of 
the church in 1445. Upon the death of this Thomas Bardolf Ahce his 
widow remarried John Southwell. In 1454 William Bonds, who was 
probably a trustee or executor, conveyed the manor to John Southwell 
and this Alice his wife. 

Southwell, however, had presented to the church in 145 1, which was 
two years previous to this conveyance. In this same year John Southwell 
represented the borough of Lewes in Parliament, and resided at Barham 
Hall, in Suffolk.^ 

In 1544 the manor was parcel of the possessions of the college or hospital 
of Heringsby, in Norfolk, and was granted under the Privy Seal 13th April 
in that year to Sir William Woodhouse, of Waxham, Knt. It then paid 
22s. 4|i. per annum to the college. In 1582 the manor was vested in 
George Gelyngham, who had a fine levied against him this year by Ambrose 
Jermyn and others.' 

Amongst the Stowe Charters we find a lease dated in 1623, but never 
executed, by Sir Thomas Hobart to Edward Hobart and others of this 
manor and other lands for 11 years from the death of the lessor, the proceeds 
to be applied to payment of debts and other purposes of his will." 

In 1645 the manor was conveyed by William Tasker to Robert Proctor, 
from whom it has devolved in the same course as the main manor of Kessing- 
land to the present lord. 

A fine was levied of Kessingland and Kirkley Manors in 1595 by 
Edward Duke against Henry " Hobberde" and others.' 

' Dom. ii. 302. ' Fine, Mich. 24 and 25 Eliz. 

'Dom. ii. 4076. ^ Stowe Ch. aoi. 

^Exch. 6 Hen. VI. 7 Fine, Easter, 37 Eliz. 

♦Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 280. 




KIRKLEY. 83 

KIRKLEY. 

SMALL holding in this place was kept at the time of the 
Survey by Roger Bigot for the King, and consisted of 30 
acres and a ploughteam. It was formerly held by six freemen' 
The only other holding in this place was that in Saxon 
times of a freeman, half under Burchard's and half under 
Wolsey's commendation, and consisted of 12 acres and halt 
a ploughteam valued at 2s. At the time of the Survey this 

was the estate of Hugh de Montfort, the ploughteam had disappeared, and 

the value had increased to 3s. and 200 herrings/ 

Manor of Kirkley al. Kirkley Fastolfs called also Kirkley Hall. 

In 1271 Alan de Wymundhale obtained a licence for a market 
and fair, and had a grant of free warren in his demesne lands here.^ On 
the Patent Rolls in 1280 is notice of an action brought by John de Badingham, 
parson of Kirkly, against Alan, son of Edmurid de Wymondehale, touching 
a tenement in Kirkly,* and in 1286 Edmund de "Wymonhale" claimed 
the market and fair. 

The manor afterwards passed to the family of Fastolf , for in 1378 Hugh 
Fastolf had the lordship and granted the same under the name " Old 
Kerkale " to his brother, John Fastolf.' From John Fastolf the manor 
went to Sir Hugh Fastolf, High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1390, and from him 
to his son and heir, Sir John Fastolf, who died in 1406,* when it passed 
to his son and heir. Sir Hugh Fastolf, who died in 1417,^ when it devolved 
on his son and heir, Sir John Fastolf, who died in 1445,* when it passed to 
his son and heir, John Fastolf, who died in 1460," when it devolved on his 
son and heir, Thomas Fastolf, M.P. for Ipswich in 1487, and from him it 
passed to his son and heir, John Fastolf, who died in 1506," when it vested 
in his son and heir, George Fastolf. 

George Fastolf in 15 10 sold the manor to Thomas "Russhes," and 
the sale was effected by a fine levied in Michaelmas term, 2 Hen. VIII. 
Another fine was in 1514 levied of the manor by Thomas Franke 
and others against the above-named George Fastolf." Thomas 
Rushe married ist Anne, daughter and heir of John Rivers, of 
Ipswich, and 2ndly Christian, afterwards the wife of Thomas Baldry, 
Bailiff of Ipswich. He was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk 25 Hen. VIII. 
On his death the manor passed to his son and heir, Arthur Rushe, who 
married Mary, daughter of Sir Anthony Wingfield, of Letheringham, and 
died 2iid July, 1537," when the manor passed to his son and heir, Anthony 
Rushe, who married Eleanor, daughter of Nicholas Cutler, of Eye, and 
died 3rd May, 1555, when it passed to Anthony Rushe, who sold and 
conveyed it to Henry Hobart, of Loddon, in 1558, by a fine levied in 
Michaelmas term 5 Mary I. Henry Hobart died in 1561, from which time 



'Dom. ii. 383 (Us). H.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 49. 

»Dom. ii. 4076. 8LP.M., 26 Hen. VI. 15. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 55 Hen. HI. pt. ii. 10. 'I.P.M., 38 and 39 Hen. VI. 48. 

*Pat. RoUs, 8 Edw. II. aU, vji. "I.P.M., 22 Hen. VII. 57- 

5 See Manor of Bradwell Hall, in Lothing- "Fine, Easter 6 Hen. VIII. 

land Hundred. " I.P.M., 29 Hen. VIII. 66. 

*See Brokes Hall, Nacton,in Colneis Hun- 
dred, for marriages and further 
particulars. 



84 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Gisleham Hall, in this 
Hundred, till the death of James Hobart in 1664 (? 20th Aug. 1669). 

We meet, however, with a fine levied of the manor in 1595 by Edward 
Duke against Henry Hobart.' 

The manor was then purchased by Robert Richman or Richmond, 
who was lord in 1680, and was succeeded by Robert Richmond, from which 
time to 1855 when the manor was vested in George Ives, 4th Baron Boston, 
the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Gisleham Hall, in this 
Hundred. 

By 1885 the manor had passed to Richard Henry Reeve, and is now 
vested in C. W. Willett. 

There are two inquisitions referring to the Manor of " Kyrkeleye " 
which we are not able to place. One of John Paston in 1467,^ the other 
of Matthew Hermen, who died 17th May, 1534, leaving Francis his son and 
heir.^ 

Arms of Rushe : Gu. on a fesse Or, betw. 3 colts currant Arg. 3 hurts. 



'Fine, Easter, 37 Eliz. ^ip^,^ 22 Hen. VIII. us. 

'I.P.M., 6 Edw. IV. 44. ^^ 




MUTFORD. 85 

MUTFORD. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Earl Gurth and Wolsey 
under him, and consisted of 3J carucates of land, 18 villeins, 
6 bordars, 16 serfs, 4 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging 
to the men, and wood for the maintenance of 60 hogs. Also 
6 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 7 beasts, 30 hogs, 160 sheep, 
50 goats, and 2 hives of bees, valued at 60s. At the time of 
the Survey Roger Bigot held this manor for the King, the 
serfs were reduced to 10, the ploughteams in demesne to 3, and there were 
only 2 rouncies, the value of the manor being still 60s. It was 2 leagues 
long and 9 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 4s. 

In the same township was a holding of 12 freemen under Gurth's 
commendation, and consisted of 3 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 4 bordars, 
9 ploughteams among them all (reduced to 7 at the time of the Survey), 
8 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 16 hogs. Also 2 churches 
with 43 acres. Four of the 12 freemen dwelt iaMutford, two in Rushmere, 
two in Gisleham, three in Pakefield, and two in Kirkley. At the time of 
the Survey this estate was also held for the King by Roger Bigot. 

There were 26 others in Mutford with 2 carucates of land and 4 plough- 
teams.' 

Manor of Mutford. 

WilUam the Conqueror retained this manor as part of the Royal 
demesnes, and appointed Roger Bigot his steward. It remained in the 
Crown until the reign of Hen. II., when that sovereign granted it to Balderic 
de Bosco or Bois with a moiety of the Hundred, the patronage of the 
church, the Hundred court, wreck of sea, view of frankpledge, with the 
privilege of erecting gallows and tumbrill, all privileges of high importance 
in feudal times.'' 

The manor was held by the tenure of paying an annual rent of 6 marks 
and a half under the name of "Alba firma," or white mail, a payment in 
contradistinction to black mail, rendered partly in coin and partly in 
goods. 

Upon the death of Balderic de Bosco, his daughter Hildeburga inherited 
this niianor, and left two daughters, her coheirs, of whom one married 
Stephen de Long Champ, and the other espoused Henry de Vere. Each 
of these knights held a moiety of the lordship in right of his wife. In the 
reign of King John Stephen de Long Champ joined the party of the dis- 
contented Barons, and was slain at the battle of Bouvines, fought 27th July, 
1214. On the Close Rolls is a " precipe " of John, dated at Melkesham, in 
Wiltshire, 22nd September, 1204, directing the Sheriff of Suffolk to put this 
Stephen de Long Champ in possession of the estate at Mutford, late de 
Bosco's, except it should exceed in value £12, but reserving to himself the 
corn then growing on the said lands. In consequence, however, of his 
having fallen in arms against his monarch, Long Champ's estates were for- 
feited, and 27th January, 1221, were granted by Hen. III. to one of his 
favourites. By a deed dated at Westminster on that day, he commands 
the Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk to give seisin thereof to Walter de 

'Dom. ii. 283. ''T.deN.zgS. 



86 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Evermue, to sustain him in the Royal service, and during the King's 
pleasure.' Henry de Vere, who possessed the other moiety of this manor,' 
left an only son, Henry de Vere, who died without issue, so that having no 
heirs his share also fell to the Crown. The moieties of the manor being 
thus united were granted as one lordship in 1234 to Sir Thomas de 
Hemegrave or Hengrave, who died about 1252, and -was succeeded in his 
estates by Sir Thomas, his grandson, the son of WiUiam, who had died 
before his father. He paid 1005. as relief for his grandfather's lands here.^ 

Suckling gives a copy of an inquisition of the customs and descent of 
the manor and half Hundred of Mutford taken in the reign of Edw. I."* 

On Sir Thomas de Hemegrave's death in 1264,^ he was succeeded by 
his son and heir. Sir Edmund de Hemegrave,* who claimed wreck of the sea 
in the whole Hundred.'' He married Isabel, daughter and heir of John 
de Mutford, justice of the Common Bench, and died 9th Sept. 1334,* in his 
80th year, seised of the lordship. The devolution of the manor to the death 
of Sir Francis Hemegrave in 1419 is practically the same as the Manor of 
Tuddenham, in Lackford Hundred, but we give the following additional 
information as relating more exclusively to Mutford Manor. 

Sir Edm. de Hemegrave, by Isabella his ist wife, daughter and heir of 
John de Mutford, one of the justices of the Common Bench, had Sir Thomas 
de Hemegrave his heir, and Beatrix, who married Sir Robert de Thorpe,"" 
of Ashwellthorpe, in Norfolk, whose descendants eventually became 
possessed of Mutford. Sir Thomas de Hemegrave died 3rd May, 1349,' ^^^ was 
succeeded by Sir Edmund de Hemegrave, who settled the Manor of Mutford 
on his 2nd wife AUcia, daughter of John de Insula, by a feoffment made 
to Almaric de Shirlond in 1371.'° On the Patent Rolls in 1370 we find a 
licence for Sir Edmund de Hemegrave to enfeoff Sir John Lovell and others 
of a moiety of the Hundred and manor (except one manor !) and for the 
feoffees to grant to Edmund and Alicia his wife and the heirs of Edmund." 

Alicia in her will dated 12th Aug., 1401, calls herself " Dame de 
Mutford," and bequeaths 40s. to the high altar of the church there, 6s. Sd. 
to the lights of our Lady, and 40s. to the reparation of the belfry. Her 
husband's will is dated in 1379, i^ which he gives certain moveables and 
effects, then in his house at Mutford, to AUcia his wife, who seems to 
have resided there after his decease till her 2nd marriage with Sir Richard 
Wychingham, of Witchingham, in Norfolk. This Sir Richard held the 
Manor of Mutford during the life of his wife, but the reversion of the same 
after her death being settled on the right heirs of Sir Edmund de 
Hemegrave, Sir Thomas, his surviving son and heir, inherited. 

In 1399 we find on the Patent Rolls a licence for Thomas Hemegrave 
to grant the reversion of the manor and a moiety of the Hundred of Mut- 
ford held in chief on the death of Alice, late wife of Edmund Hemegrave, to 
Edward Hunt, parson of the church of Todenham, and John Spark, of Little 
Wrothing, and for these to grant to the said Thomas and Elizabeth his 
wife and his heirs." 

'Close Rolls, 5 Hen. III. pt. i. 16. 'Q.W. 732. 

*T. de N. 300. n.PM., 8 Edw. III. 56. 

3 Suckling, Hist of Suff. vol. i. p. 270. ^LP-M., 23 Edw. III. 166. 

^Hist. vol. i. p. 271. '°LP.M., 45 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 82. 

5t. de N. 283, 291 ; r.P.M., 48 Hen. III. 21. " Pat. Rolls, 2 Rich. II. pt. ii. 13. 

6 See Manor of Tuddenham, in Lackford »*Pat. Rolls, i Hen. IV. pt. iv. 37. 
Hundred. 



MUTFORD. 87 

• 

In 1407 a fine was levied of the manor by William Ware, clerk, Jacob 
Bethingford, William Santre, William Urdale, William Weir, clerk, and 
Walter Clayle against Sir Thomas Hemegrave.' By his marriage he had 
issue Edmund de Hemegrave on whom his father entailed this lordship and 
a moiety of the Hundred in 1414 ; but this son dying shortly afterwards 
without issue, Sir Thomas vested his estates in trust for sale, the produce to be 
applied to charitable purposes. He died 17th October, 1419, and bequeathed 
for the reparation of the chancel of Mutford church lOOs., towards the 
repairs of the body of the church 20s., to the parson 6s. 8d., and to 
24 of his poor tenants there 40s. These bequests he makes for the good 
of his soul, for the soul of Joan, his mother, who lay buried there, and for 
the souls of all the faithful departed. 

His widow Joanna married shortly after his death Richard Vewetree, 
of Burnham Westgate, in Norfolk, and died in 1421. Before her decease 
she solemnly revoked her will devising the Manor of Mutford, &c., having 
executed it by constraint, and under the influence of her 2nd husband. 
Upon the extinction of the family of Hemegrave, in the person of Sir Thomas, 
their estates descended to the Thorpes, of Ashwellthorpe, in Norfolk, in right 
of Beatrix de Hemegrave, who married Sir Robert Thorpe, as before shown ; 
but the Manor of Mutford seems to have escheated to the Crown.'' 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is' a deed dated the Feast of the 
Purification of the Blessed Virgin 7 Hen. VI. [1427], by which Thomas 
Langle, Bishop of Durham, John Stafford, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 
William Morley, Richard Barbour, Richard Clopton, and John Bartram 
grant to Sir Walter Hungerford, Lord of Powys, Philipp Courteney, Simon 
Sydenham, Sir John Juyn, John Stourton, and Stourton, John Paulet, 
Robert Longe, John Fortesen, and Richard Bamfeld the Manor and 
Hundred of Mutford.^ 

Davy says Sir John Tiptoft was the next lord, and on his death in 1443 
the manor passed to his son and heir John Tiptoft. 

About the year 1447 William de la Pole, Marquis of Suffolk, had a grant 
from the Crown of the manor, and from this time to the attainder of Edmund 
de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, 25th Jan., 1503-4, the manor passed in 
the same way as the Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn Hundred. By 
a grant made by the Crown 15th June, 1509, the manor with other 
hereditaments were vested in Edward " J ernyngham " and Mary his wife 
for their lives,'' which grant they afterwards surrendered into chancery, and 
thereupon 28th January, 1510, the manor was granted to the said 
Edward " Jernyngham " and his wife and the heirs of their bodies.^ He 
died in 1515, and his widow remarried Sir William Kingston. 

A fine was levied of the manor by George Harvy and others against 
Owen Hopton and others in 1546.^ 

The widow died 26th August, 1548,' when the manor vested in Henry 
Jernyngham, eldest son and heir of the said Sir Edward Jernyngham and 
Mary his wife. From him it passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Gorleston, in Lothingland Hundred, being sold like that manor to Thomas 

'Feet of Fines, 8 Hen. IV. 35. 'See Manor of Ashby, in Lothingland 

" Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 273. Hundred. 

343 I. 50. 6 Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. VHI. 

*0. I Hen. VHI. Rot. 63. H.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 70. 



88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Hirne and Christopher Hirne/ and by letters patent 28th Oct. 1604, King 
Jas. I. on the petition of the Earl of Montgomery, granted the reversion of 
the manor to hold to Clement Hirne and his heirs by fealty only and an 
annual rent. The acquittance for the money paid for the manor and 
other manors is in the British Museum.^ It is dated 4th May, 1608, and 
given by Henry Jernegan the younger to Thomas Hirne, of Heveringland, 
who seems to have been the actual purchaser. He afterwards became Sir 
Thomas Hirne, and sold this manor to Sir John Heveningham, Knt., and 
Dame Bridget his wife, and this sale was confirmed by Act of Parliament 
7th Jas. I. Suckling's way of putting the matter is somewhat short, and 
correctly states the ultimate result, but as a matter of fact, the manor passed 
through the hands of Sir Robert Hitcham before it reached the Hirnes. 

From this time the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Gorleston to the time of Sir Thomas AUin, and from him to the present day 
has descended in the same course as the Manor of Ashby, in the Hundred 
of Lothingland, and is now vested in the trustees of the will of the late 
R. H. Reeve. 

From the Exchequer Depositions taken at Norwich in 1734 we learn 
that there was an action pending between Sir Thomas AUin, Bart., and 
Thomas Faireweather as to the manors of Mutford, Carlton, and Broom- 
holm, and lands in Gisleham and Kessingland. 

Mutford Hall stands near the edge of the marshes on rising ground, 
and is now converted into a farmhouse. It was probably built late in the 
reign of Queen Elizabeth, and many of its old chimneys remain unaltered, 
though the front is completely modernised. 

There is a grant of the manor in 1447 amongst the Harleian Charters,^ 
and grants amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum in 
1606, 1607, and 1608."* 

The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John Tiptoft in 1443,' 
and on the Rolls of Parliament is mentioned as forfeited by John, late 
Earl of Lincoln in 1495,* and restored to Edmund, Earl of Suffolk.^ 

There are also amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen 
Elizabeth three actions relating to copyholds of the manor — Hacon v. 
Henry Jernegan, John Hoo, and William Pynchbeck,® Francis Hacon v. 
Henry Jernegan,' and Mich. Taylor v. Sir Henry Jerningham and another.'" 
Extracts from Court Rolls 14 Jac. I. and 1628 will be found in the Bodleian." 



Manor of Soca Bectun. 

William the Conqueror held in demesne, and Hen. II. out of his Manor 
of Mutford gave lOos. annual rent to Nefius de Bretan, his servant. King 
John gave the manor to Hamo de Sibton. Later William Cheney held it 

' Bill 4 Jac. enabling Henry Jernegan and ' I.P.M., 21 Hen. VI. 45. 

wife to sell. H.L. ii. 458, 461. ^R.P. vi. 4746. 

''Add Ch. 14279. ■'lb. 475b. 

^Harl. 52 A. 26. ^CP. ii. 14. 

^Add Ch. 14275, 14276, 14279. There is ^cp. Ser. ii. B. xcvi. 48. 

also a grant of the manor in 1629, "^^- B. clxxv. 16. 

on the Originalia Rolls. O. 4 "Bodl, Suff, Ch. 1364, 1365. 

Car. I. Pars. Rot. 48. 



MUTFORD. 89 

for William Tentiniotj and in 1246 William de Cheney for Philip de 
Albiniaco. 

In 1253 it was held by Robert Walerand. In 1267 William de Valence, 
Earl of Pembroke, had a grant of it from the sovereign. He died in 1296, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, 
who was murdered at the court of Queen Isabella of France in June, 1323, 
when, having no issue, his vast estates came to his sisters as coheirs. 

In the i8th century the manor was vested in Sir John Rous, 2nd Bart., 
who died in 1730, when the manor passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Henham, in Blything Hundred, at least until 1827. 

Manor of Soca Franchevile. 

William the Conqueror held in demesne, and one " Framncheville " 
in the time of Hen. II. had a grant of lOOs. out of the manor. In 1201 
Ralph de Muncy and " Wateran " his brother held land here, and Maud, 
daughter of Roger de Sorpenvile was in 1286 called upon to warrant lands 
here to a Ralph de Muncy. One of the same name also held here in the 
time of Edw. Ill, 

Manor of Soca Luvel. 

WUliam the Conqueror held this also in demesne, and Hen. I. gave out 
of his Manor of Mutford loos. annual rent to his servant Luvel. William 
de Luvel sold it (apparently not the 1005. but the manor) in the reign of 
Hen. II. to William de Longo Campo, Chancellor of England, who gave it 
to Henry his son, who bestowed it as a marriage portion on his daughter, 
married to Robert Gresle. 

On the Close Rolls in 1206 We find an order to let Stephen de Longo 
Campo have land which belonged to Reginald de Bosco in Mutford, unless 
its value were more than ^^12' and also an order to give seisin for the King 
of lands in Miitford which belonged to Henry de Vere, and which had been 
delivered to Stephen de Longo Campo, and deliver same to Peter de Stoke.' 
Three years later on the same Rolls we find an order to restore to Stephen 
de Longo Campo lands in Mutford, if any, which had been seised and held 
by him in right of his wife.^ There is also an order on the Close Rolls in 
1209 to let R., the son of Roger, have lands which belonged to Henry de 
Vere in this place.* 

In 1273 the manor was vested in the abbey of St. Edmunds,' where it 
remained until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown. 



'Close Rolls, 6 John, 16, 167. ♦Close Rolls, 9 John, 17. 

*J6.i3. =H.R, ii. 192. 

3 Close Rolls, 6 John, 16, 11 ; 9 John, 12. 

M 




^6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

PAKE FIELD. 

HERE were two holdings in this place. The first consisted 
of 30 acres and a ploughteam held by six freemen, at the 
time of the Survey kept for the King by Roger Bigot.' 

The second was that of a freeman under Gurth's com- 
mendation, and consisted of 16 acres and half a ploughteam. 
Also half a church with i6|- acres, valued at 5s. At the 
time of the Survey this belonged to Earl Hugh.'' 

Manor of Pakefield Pyes, or Drayton. 

(See Gisleham and Pyes.) 

This was anciently the lordship of Sawale Frysth, and afterwards 
belonged to the family of Drayton. John de Drayton is mentioned without 
date as a lord by Davy, and then Thomas de Drayton, who left a daughter 
married to John Pye, after whom the manor was called. We find that in 
1378 Hugh Fastolf granted the Manor of Pakefield to John his brother, 
and in 1455 William Bonds and others conveyed to John Southwell and 
Alice his wife the manors of " Elgh and Pakefield." She was, it is said, 
his 2nd wife, probably daughter and coheir of Sir Edmund Berry, and widow 
of Sir Thomas Bardolph, of Eligh. In 1451 John Southwell was Member 
of Parliament for Lewes, in Sussex, and lived at Barham Hall. 

In 1502 the manor was held by Edmund Jenney, and in 1528 by 
Richard Jenney. The manor was a little later held by Matthew Hermen, 
for he died seised 17th May, 1534,' when it passed to his son and heir, 
Francis Hermen. Almost immediately after, it vested in Arthur Russhe,* 
for he died seised 2nd July, 1537,^ when it passed to his son and heir, 
Anthony Russhe, who held in 1555. 

After him followed Thomas Lowdham, and later it was vested in 
Henry Hobart, of Loddon, from which time to about 1609 the manor passed 
in the. same course as the Manor of Gisleham Hall, in Gisleham, in this 
Hundred. In 1609 Samuel Proctor held, and Davy places after him 
Nathaniel Row, who was succeeded by Mr. Row, said to have held in 1690. 

But in 1 72 1 another Samuel Proctor is said to have held, and in 1776 
Bridget Hines or Hemer, in 1786 Jane Dutton, and in 1798 Charles Garneys. 
Charles Garneys died in 1808, and from that time to 1855, when the manor 
was vested in George Ives, 4th Baron Boston, it passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Gisleham Hall, and is now vested in the trustees of 
the will of Richard Henry Reeve. 



' Dom. ii. 283. ♦See Manor of kirkley, in this Hundred. 

''Dom. ii. 302&. 'I.P.M., 29 Hen. VIH. 66. 

3I.P.M., 33 Hen. VIII. 143. 




RUSHMERE. 91 

RUSHMERE. 

MANOR was held in this place in Saxon times by Aluric, 
a freeman under Gurth, and consisted of a carucate of land, 
3 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and half belonging to 
the men, and wood for the maintenance of 10 hogs, the value 
being 5s. At the time of the Survey this manor was held 
by Earl Hugh, and the value was los.' 

A small holding here was that of four freemen having 

33 acres, and a ploughteam reduced to half at the time of the Survey, 

when the estate was held by Roger Bigot for the King." 

The last holding was that of a freeman under Gurth's commendation, 
and consisted of 16 acres and a ploughteam, which was reduced to half a 
team at the time of the Survey, when it belonged to Hugh de Montfort. 
The value was 5s. and 300 herrings. 

The Survey goes on to say : " Hugh holds in his demesne." 

" And (there is) the fourth part of a church, valued at x6d. The King 
and the Earl (have) soc (of) four of the men aforesaid. The Hundred witnesses 
that Walter de Dol (?) was seised on the day on which he made forfeiture, 
and later Earl Hugh (was seised) now Hugh de Montfort. But he does not 
hold by livery of seisin as witness the Hundred. And Hugh de Montfort's 
men say that W(alter) himself held of him."^ 

Manor of Rushmere, 

This was the estate of Gurth in Saxon times, and was held by Aluric 
his tenant, passing after the Conquest to Earl Hugh. 

In 1263 Thomas de Latimer had a grant of free warren in the lands of 
Ilketshall, Kessingland, and " Rissemere,"'* but Suckling says he does not 
appear to have held the manor, which seems to have followed the same 
descent as Mutf ord, and to have had its manorial business transacted at the 
same court. The only illustration, however, which Suckling gives is a case in 
1692, and could have no possible application to so early a period as the 13th 
century. Sir WiUiam de Latimer succeeded Thomas, and the La timers 
appear, notwithstanding Suckling's surmise to the contrary, to have 
continued for some time to hold the lordship. 

On the death of Sir William de Latimer it passed to his daughter 
Christiana, married to Sir Robert de Boys. She died about 1311, and he 
about 1313. The manor passed to their son and heir, Sir Robert de Boys, 
who died without issue in 1333, when it passed to his sister and heir Alice, 
married to Sir John Howard, jun., who died in 1371. 

In 1846 the manor was vested in Samuel Morton Peto, and has apparently 
since passed in the same course as the Manor of Ashby, in Lothingland 
Hundred. 

This is now only a reputed manor. Suckling says of Rushmere Hall : 
" It occupies a low situation in the meadows at the south of the village ; 
it is a good substantial farmhouse, about two hundred years old, but has 
been much modified in later days. It is now the property of the Rev. 
G. F. Barlow, of Burgh, near Woodbridge, and was purchased by him of 
John Lee Farr, Esq., about the year 1820. The Farrs bought it of the 



2 



Dom. ii. 4076. ^Dom. ii. 303. 

Dora. ii. 283. "Chaxt. Rolls, 48 Edw. III. 



92 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Tyrells, of Gipping ... It posse^es a fine old staircase, on the wall 
of which hangs an ancient picture of our Saviour, formerly in the possession 
of the Playter's family, at Sotterley. It is in a hard dry style, of no value 
as a painting, but is noticed as a fragment of the wreck of an old and 
honourable house. This picture was injured in the year 1843 by a flash of 
lightning which entered a chimney of the house, and, running along a bell- 
wire, passed behind the painting, the canvas of which it split, without doing 
further mischief.'" 

Arms of Latimer as in Freston Church : Az. semee of cross crosslets 
a chev. Arg. in dexter chief a cinquefoil Or. 



' Suckling Hist, of Suff. vol. i, p. 288. 



PLOMESGATE HUNDRED. 




IHIS Hundred extends about 14 miles S.S.E. from the 
neighbourhood of Framhngham and Bruisyard to the German 
Ocean, where it is about nine miles in breadth. It is in the 
Deanery of Orford, Archdeaconry of Suffolk, and Plomesgate 
Union, and is bounded on the east by the sea, on the north 
by Blything and Hoxne Hundreds, on the west by Loe^ 
Hundred, and on the south by Loes Hundred and Butley 
river, which joins the Aide in Orford Haven. It is generally a fertile 
loamy district, rising in bold undulations from the valleys and the coast, 
but in its southern parts are some sandy heaths and commons. 

The fee of this Hundred in the time of Edw. III. was in Robert de 
Ujfford, Earl of Suffolk, and continued until the death of his son, William 
de Ufford, in 1381, without male issue, when it passed to the de la Poles. 

The Hundred consists of 46,211 acres in 23 parishes and 56 manors. 



Parishes. 



Aldeburgh 
Benhall . . 

Blaxhall .. 

Bruisyard 

Chillesford 
Cransford 



Dunning- 
worth 

Farnham . . 



Friston . 



Gedgrave 

Glemham 
Great 



Manors. 



Aldborough. 

Vicarage. 

Benhall. 

Benhall St. Roberts. 

Blaxhall Hall al. 
Ashe Bigots. 

Valence. 

Bruisyard or Roke 
HaU. 

Chillesford. 

Russell's in the 
Hamlet of Carle- 
ton. 

Cransford al. Crans- 
ford Hall. 

Vicedelew's or Vis- 
delieu or Fidlers 
Hall. 

Dunningworth 

Farnham. 

Clay don. 

Friston. 

Beddings or B'leck- 

ing Hall or Blick- 

ing. 
Gedgrave. 
North Glemham al. 

Glemham Magna. 
Great Glemham or 

Lowdhgim Hall. 



Parishes, 



Glemham 
Parva 



Iken. 



Orford 
Parham. 



Rendham 



Saxmundham 



Snape 



Sternfield 



Manors. 



or 



or 
or 



Glemham Parva 

Beversham. 

Over Pistries 
Petistre - cum - Ar- 
miger's. 

Billesford Hall 
Bilston Hall 
Bilford or Bilson. 

Iken, now called 
Iken cum Fram- 
lingham. 

Orford. 

Parham Hall. 

Hickling Hall. 

Rendham. 

Barmes or Barnes. 

Hartz or Hurtz or 
Hurt's Hall. 

Murkets or Sax- 
mundham Market 

Swan's. 

Snape. 

Courtlets or Caut- 
lets. 

Bekling. 

Tastard's. 

Rysing. 

Scotts. 

Leffey. 

Mandeville's. 

Virlies or Glanville's. 



94 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Stratford 
St. Andrew 


Stratford. 
Grist on. 
Armiger's. 


Tunstall . . 


Tunstall. 

Baynard's or Ban- 
yards. 


Sudbourn . , 


Sudbourn. 








/ Sweffling, Sparkes 




/ Wantisden Hall. 




al. Leighs. 




Ingolvertctti. 


Sweffling . . 


Derneford Hall. 
Sweffling Campsey 


Wantisden . . 


Northbury. 
Preston. 




cum Snape Camp- 




Rushmere. 




\ sey. 




\ Thorpe, 






ALDEBURGH. 95 

ALDEBURGH. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Uluric, a socman 
under Edric, of Laxfield, and consisted of 80 acres, 3 bordars, 
2 ploughteahis, which had by the time of the Survey become 
reduced to i, 2 acres of meadow, 5 hogs, and 20 sheep, the 
value of the whole being 20s. There were two churches 
with 60 acres valued at 10s. 

The manor at the time of the Domesday Survey belonged 
to Robert Malet as tenant in chief, and he had also in this place 12 acres 
of free land valued at 2s., and 30 acres with i ploughteam, and i acre of 
meadow, valued at 5s., which had formerly been held by a freeman 
named Archil under commendation to Edric.' 

The only other holding mentioned as in this place at the time of the 
Survey was one of 5 acres valued at lod. held in demesne by Norman of the 
Abbot of Ely/ 

Aldborough Manor. 

In 1155 William Martel held the manor, and he and his wife Albreda, 
and Geoffrey Martel, their son and heir, granted it in frank almoin to the 
abbot and monastery of Colchester. 

At the same time and by the same deed they granted the Manor of 
Snape, the condition being that the abbot and chapter of Colchester should 
place there a prior and monks under their obedience, who should pay them 
half a marc yearly, and say two masses weekly for the grantors. The 
Abbot of Colchester should also visit the priory twice yearly with twelve 
horses, &c.' 

Amongst the rolls in the Bodleian will be found a tithe commutation 
roll dated 1263, showing that on the petition of the tenants in this manor 
the tithes had been commuted for an annual payment, the sum which each 
tenant had to pay being placed in line with his name.* 

The manor was certainly in the King's hands in 1405, for we meet 
with an entry on the Memoranda Rolls touching the priory of Snape charged 
for issues of the manor then stated to have been taken into the King's 
Jiands.^ 

Amongst the Harl. MSS. in the British Museum is a grant by Rich. III. 
of the manor to Sir John Conyers for life.'' 

Davy states that in 1508 the manor was granted by the Crown to 
Butley priory ; but it is rather strange that at the Dissolution the manor 
was treated as part of the possessions of Snape priory. In 1525 it was 
granted as such to Cardinal Wolsey by Hen. VIII. for the endowment of 
Cardinal's College, Oxford,'' and three years later in 1528 to the dean of 
the Cardinal's College at Ipswich with the consent of thej^ean of Cardinal's 
College, Oxford. , </ 

In 1530, however, the Crown resumed possession, and after granting a 
lease to Thomas Russhe in 1531 for 30 years at the rent of £45. 6s. M. 
in 1533 granted the manor to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk. There 
was an agreement in 1536 between the Duke and the Lord Wayor and 

'Dom. ii. 316. ♦Bodl. Suff. RoUs 27. 

'Dom. ii. 3886. 'M. 6 Hen. IV. Pas. Rec. Rot. 17. 

sp.R.O. Ancient Deeds, A. 3262 ; I.Q.D., ^Harl. 433. 

5 Hen. IV. r*. 'State Papers, 17 Hen. VIII. 1833, 2024. 



96 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

commonalty of the City of London by which the tenants and inhabitants 
dweUing within the town of Aldeburgh and the inhabitants of the lordship 
and Manor of Aldeburgh, while they continue and remain in the said Duke 
and his heirs, shall have free Hberty to carry in hoys or other vessels to the 
City of London, coals, herrings, corn, fish, victuals, salt, and other goods, 
such freemen and inhabitants paying yearly to the chamberlain of the said 
City the sum of i8d. only to be paid upon the first voyage they should 
make thither, the commodities aforesaid being their own goods. A 
memorandum of this is entered in the Corporation Books at the Guild- 
hall, London, which states the original to have been delivered to the 
chamberlain, but it is not extant in the office. 

There is an account of the manor as sold and purchased by the Duke 
in the State Papers.' The Duke was attainted in Parhament in 1546,' 
when his honours and estates were forfeited, but 3rd Aug. 1553, he was 
restored and installed a Knight of the Garter. He died 25th Aug. 1554, at 
Kenninghall, in Norfolk, and was succeeded by his grandson Thomas, 4th 
Duke, the son of the gifted Henry, Earl of Surrey, that most illustrious 
member of the family of Howard so iniquitously executed by the tyrannical 
monarch. The 4th Duke Thomas^ settled the manor, with the Manors 
of Snape Scotts and Tastards, by indenture dated 5th July, 1565, of which 
settlement Sir Thomas Cornwaleys, Sir Nicholas Lestrange, Thomas 
Timperley, and also William Barker, Robert Higford, and the Rev. Edward 
Peacocke were trustees and parties. Shortly afterwards the Duke was 
attainted of high treason for communication with Mary Queen- of Scots, and 
was beheaded in 1572,. leaving an only son Philip, who seems to have 
inherited this manor notwithstanding the forfeitures of his father, or perhaps 
it was granted to him in 1581 with the Manor of Benhall. He was subse- 
quently summoned to Parliament as Earl of Arundel. 

In 1588 there was an action by this Philip, Earl of Arundel, against 
Reginald Hygate as to Aldborough, South Marsh, and Orford Haven.* But 
being attainted in 1589 he died a prisoner in the Tower in 1595, leaving by 
his wife Anne, sister and coheir of Thomas, Lord Dacre, an only son Thomas, 
who was restored on the accession of J as. I. by Act of Parliament, i8th 
April, 1604, to the Earldom of Arundel and such honours as Philip, Earl 
of Arundel, his father, had enjoyed, and to most of his grandfather's estates, 
being created Earl of Norfolk 6th June, 1644. He married in 1606 Lady 
Aletheia Talbot, daughter and eventually sole heir of Gilbert, 7th Earl of 
Shrewsbury, and dying 4th Oct. 1646, the manor passed to his 2nd but 
eldest surviving son, Henry Frederick, Earl of Arundel. He married in 
1626 Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Erme Stuart, Earl of March, afterwards 
Duke of Lennox, and dying 17th April, 1652, was succeeded by his eldest 
son, Thomas Howard, who was restored to the dukedom of Norfolk by Act 
of Parliament 29th Dec. 1660, confirmed by another Act 20th Dec. 1661. 
We follow here the Davy MSS., but in the State Papers there is a statement 
that in 1668 Mr. Parker, Steward of H. Howard, kept the courts of this 
manor.' 

Thomas, 5th Duke of Norfolk, died unmarried, 1677, ^^^ was succeeded 
by his brother Henry, 6th Duke of Norfolk, who had been created 7th 

'1538, ii. 1215 {a). ^ 3 See Framlingham Manor, in Loes Hun- 

Tor a fuller account, see Tendring Hall dred. 

Manor, Stoke Nayland, in Babergh *3o Eliz. Exch. Spec. Com. D.K.R. 38 

Hundred. App. p. 41. 

5 State Papers, 1668, 588. 



ALDEBURGH. 97 

March, 1669, Baron Howard, of Castle Rising, and 19th Oct. 1672, Earl 
of Norwich. 

He married ist Anne, eldest daughter of Edward Somerset, 2nd 
Marquis of Worcester, and 2ndly Jane, daughter of Robert Bickerston, and 
died nth Jan. 1683-4,' when the manor apparently passed to his son and 
heir Henry, 7th Duke of Norfolk, K.G., who married Mary, daughter and 
heir of Henry Mordaunt, 2nd Earl of Peterborough, from whom he was 
divorced by Act of Parliament in 1700. He died 2nd April, 1701, without 
issue. 

A letter concerning the manor in 1696 will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. in the British Museum." 

The manor was acquired by Sir Henry Johnson, Knt., of Bradenham, 
CO. Bucks, and Toddington, co. Bedford, M.P. for Aldeburgh, and a ship- 
builder, of Poplar, whose will is dated in 1718. He married ist Anne, 
daughter and heir of Hugh Smithson, 3rd son of Sir Hugh Smithson, of 
Stanwick, co. York, ist Bart, of the family afterwards Duke of Northumber- 
land, and 2ndly Martha Lovelace, only surviving child and sole heir of 
John Lovelace, 3rd Baron Lovelace, of Harley, co. Berks, and successor to 
her grandmother as Baroness Wentworth, of Nettlestead. Sir Henry 
Johnson's seat was Friston Hall, three and a half miles from Aldeburgh, 
but after his marriage with Lady Wentworth he seems to have resided on 
her property at Bradenham, in Bucks. He died 29th September, 1719, 
and was buried in the Wentworth vault at Toddington, in Bedfordshire, 
where Lady Wentworth had inherited another estate. He left an only 
daughter Anne, by his ist wife, who married Thomas Wentworth, 3rd 
Baron Raby. He was the 2nd but surviving son and heir of Sir William 
Wentworth, of Northgate Head, Wakefield, co. York, and acquired con- 
siderable military distinction under William HL in Flanders, particularly at 
the battles of Steinkirk and Landen. At this last battle he was one of the 
four or five who standing by King William to the last accompanied him 
over the River Manheim after the defeat of his army. In 1698 when 
King William went to meet the Duke of Zell at the Goor, his lordship was 
chosen to be one of the few of his court to attend him thither, where he was 
in the utmost danger of his life ; for at a hunting of wild beasts he (like a 
young man of spirit) went alone to attack a wild boar, who, at his second 
thrust threw him down and would have torn him to pieces had not the 
King sent the two huntsmen who were his only seconds to his relief, who 
with their spears killed the wild boar upon him. 

He was engaged in the numerous campaigns of the great Marlborough, 
and for his services in war and in peace as Ambassador to the courts of Berlin, 
Vienna, and the States General, was created 29th June, 1711,^ Viscount 
Wentworth, of Wentworth Woodhouse, and of Stainborough, and Earl 
of Strafford, with remainder to his brother, Peter Wentworth, and his heirs 
male. His lordship was installed Knight of the Garter 4th August, 1713. 
He was highly esteemed abroad by several foreign princes, especially by 
the Princess Sophia, who often with the Queen of Prussia dined with him at 
Berlin, and when absent kept up almost a constant correspondence by letters. 
The Kings of Denmark, Poland, and Prussia, with the Queen of Prussia, dined 
together at his lordship's, and made him a present of their pictures at full 

'Will dated 29th Jan. 1681-2 to 8th Jan. "Add. 31141. 

1683-4, ^^^ proved the 15th. ^Letters patent 4th Sept. 1711. 

N 



98 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

length in a group, in memory of his having treated three kings and a queen 
at the same time. He was appointed First Lord of the Admiralty, and by 
Act of Parhament one of the Lords Justices for the administration of the 
kingdom until the arrival of Geo. I. from Hanover. He died at his seat in 
Yorkshire 15th Nov. 1739.' Anne his widow died 19th Sept. 1754, at the 
age of 70.' They left four children— William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of 
Strafford, who married in 1741 Anne Campbell, 2nd daughter and coheir 
of John, Duke of Argyll and Greenwich, but died without issue loth March, 
1791;^ Anne, -goddaughter to Queen Anne, who married in April, 1733, 
the Right Honourable WiUiam Conolly, of Castletown, in Ireland, P.C. 
and died in 1797 ; Lucy, who in 1747 married Field Marshal Sir George 
Howard, K.B., and died in 1771 ; and Henrietta, who 26th Dec. 1743, 
married Henry Vernon, of Hilton, co. Stafford, son of James Vernon, 
clerk of the Council, and nephew to Admiral Vernon. 

Henrietta had this manor on the division of the property of Sir Henry 
Johnson. She died in 1786, and was succeeded by her 3rd son, Leveson 
Vernon. An Act of Parliament was passed in 1795 for the division of the 
estates of Thomas, late Earl of Stafford. Leveson Vernon died unmarried 
in 183 1, when the manor passed to his nephew, Frederick William Thomas 
Vernon Went worth, of Wentworth Castle, co. York, son of Henry Vernon, 
the elder son of Lady Henrietta Wentworth. He was High Sheriff in 1841, 
and married 23rd Nov. 1825, the Lady Augusta Brudenell-Bruce, 2nd 
daughter of Charles, ist Marquis of Ailsbury, and died 13th Sept. 1885, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Frederick Charles Ulrick Vernon- 
Wentworth, of Wentworth Castle, co. York, who 3rd March, 1859, married 
Lady Harriet de Burgh, 5th daughter of Ulick, Marquis of Clanricarde, 
and dying ist Jan. 1902, the manor devolved upon his son. Commander 
Frederick Charles Ulrick Vernon- Went worth, R.N., J.P., of Blackheath, 
Friston. 

Court Rolls of the manor will be found in the British Museum amongst 
the Additional Charters 1559-63,* 1571-1585,' 1636-40,* 1655-64,' and 
Extracts from Court Rolls for 1662.^ The customs of the manor extracted 
from Index Press No. 18 in the Record Office at the Chapter House 4th 
July, 1809, will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British 
Museum.' It is, in fact, a survey of the manor. 

A coloured map of a back street with houses copyhold of the manor 
will also be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the same collection." 

Arms of Wentworth : Quarterly, ist and 4th Sa. chevron between 3 
leopards' faces Or., for Wentworth, 2nd Argent a fret Sa., for Vernon 3rd 
Or. on a fesse Az. Garbs of the ist, for Vernon, of Haslington. 

Vicarage Manor. 

Little is known of this manor, and the first Court Roll extant is 
believed to be of the first court of Richard Topdiff, clerk, 29th Oct. 20 Jac. 

'Will proved 1739. *Add. Ch. 26375, 26376. 

'Will 26th Jan. 1739-40, proved 1754. ^Add. Ch. 26381. 

3 Will proved April, 1791. ^Add. Ch. 10517. 

■• Add. Ch. 26338. 9 19100J fol. 69. 

5 Add. Ch. 26341, 26345, 26346. '"Add. MSS. 11802. 



ALDEBURGH. 99 

First courts were held as follows : — 

Henry Searles, clerk, 30th Dec. 1645. 
Samuel Savage, clerk, 27th Oct, 1658. 
William Smith, clerk, 7th Aug. 1686. 
John Candler, clerk, 5th June, 1696. 
Nathaniel Nobbs, clerk, 5th Nov. 1703. 

A court was held by the Rev. James Benet nth Sept. 1779 ; by the 
Rev. Thomas Emly, 7th Sept. 1796 ; by Rev. William Bradley, 13th Feb. 
1799 ; and by Rev. William Scarr, loth Dec. 1833. By the custom of this 
manor the youngest son is heir. 



100 THE Manors of Suffolk. 



BENHALL. 




UNLY one manor appears in the Domesday Record. This was 
held by Ulrod^ a freeman under commendation to Malet's 
predecessor in the Confessor's time. It consisted of 40 
acres, 2 bordars, i ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, 
valued at los. The soc belonged to the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds. This manor was in 1086 held by Norman under 
Roger Bigot, but it had belonged to William Malet, and 
after him to his son Robert. It is clear, however, that the manor subse- 
quently known as Benhall comprised a much larger area of land, and in- 
cluded parts of the following : (a) The holding of a freeman, Brictmar, 
under Malet's predecessor, with 16 acres and i bordar and an acre of 
meadow, valued at 22(?. , which was likewise held by Norman under Roger Bigot . 
Roger Bigot also had 8 acres in demesne valued at 2s. formerly the estate of 
Edric a freeman ;' (b) the holding of Earl Alan, which was of 44 acres, i 
ploughteam of the value of 6s. 8^., the soc of which was also in the abbot. 
This estate had formerly been held by seven freemen, four of them under 
commendation to Malet's predecessor (his father being seised)— Edric, 
Brictmar, Tutflet, and Magna, when the value was 8s., and there was a 
ploughteam and a half f (c) the holdings of Robert Malet which were four — 
one of 80 acres, 2 ploughteams valued at 30s., of which the soc was in the 
abbot, and formerly held by six freemen under commendation to Malet's 
predecessor, with 3 ploughteams, when it was valued at 20s.; another of 
8 acres held in demesne, valued at i6d., of which the soc belonged to the 
abbot, formerly held by four freemen under commendation ; the third 
if acres valued at 6d., the soc belonging to the abbot, held by Robert de 
Glanville, of Malet, formerly the estate of a freeman under commendation; 
and the fourth 17 acres and half a ploughteam valued at 36^. then held in 
demesne, but formerly held by three freemen under commendation.^ 

The extent of the place was 8 quarentenes in length and 6 in breadth, 
and it paid in a gelt g^d. 

Benhall Manor. 

This manor was granted by Hen. II. about 1160 to Ralph de GlanviUe, 
Justiciar of England,* and on his death in 1190 passed to his eldest daughter 
Maud, married to Sir William de Auberville. 

The Auberville family held extensive estates in various parts of England. 
Roger de Auberville, Oberville, or Othurvill, in the time of the Domesday 
Survey had 18 lordships in the counties of Essex and Suffolk, and his brother 
William held Barley in Herts by grant of the Conqueror. Sir William 
Auberville, who married Maud de Glanville, was living in 1195, but died 
before 1208. He was succeeded by his son and heir, Hugh de Auberville, 
who on his death in 1212 was succeeded by his son and heir, William de 
Auberville, who died in the reign of King John, leaving an only daughter 
Joan, married ist to Henry de Sandwich, by whom she had no issue, and 
2ndly to Nicholas de Criol, Lord of Albury, co. Herts, whose son Nicholas 

^Dom. ii. 344, 3456. *See Butley Evidences, E.A. N. and Q. 

'Dom. ii. 2976. xi. 30. 

3Dom. 3086, 309. 



BENHALL. 



lOI 



married Margaret, daughter of Gilbert de Peche. There is a grant to them 
of the manor on the Patent Rolls of Hen. III.' They were succeeded by 
their son Nicholas, who sold to Guy Frere, who was lord in 1292.* 

On the 15th June this year he obtained a grant from the Crown of a 
fair at Benhall and of a market and fair at Kelton within the same manor. 
There is a confirmation of grant in fee to this Guy Frere, called the younger, 
of the manor, with the advowsons of the priories of Butley and Leiston 
on the Patent Rolls in 1294.^ 

It is, however, stated in a petition to Parliament in 1347 that Guy 
Frere and Eleanor his wife had the manor of the gift of John Bacun and 
Adam, his brother, and there is a fine favouring this statement i Edw. 11." 
The Bacuns may, however, have been mortgagees or trustees. 

On Guy Frere's death without issue in 1323 the King granted the 
reversion expectant on his widow's decease to Robert de Ufford, Earl of 
Suffolk,^ and this resulted in various claims. John de Norwich in 1347 
claimed as heir-at-law, but unsuccessfully.* There is an extent of the 
manor as of Eye Honor in the inquisition taken after Guy's death in 1323.' 

The Close Rolls in 1323 agreeing with the Evidences of Butley Priory, 
stat6 that the manor had been limited to Guy and Eleanor his wife jointly, 
with remainder in default of issue to Simon de Borde iand the heirs of his 
body,' but we hear no more of this Simon or his heirs.' In 1334 Eleanor 
claimed the wardship of Butley Priory as appendant to Benhall Manor.'" 

Eleanor Frere died in 1349," ^.nd Robert de Ufford, who had been 
created Earl of Suffolk i6th Mar. 1336-7, succeeded. There had been an 
order in 1337 to pay to him certain money until the manor which Eleanor 
then stiU held for life,, and the reversion of which the King had granted 
1st Oct. 1349, "to him in tail male, should fall in.''' The falling in 
happened, as we have seen, in 1349, ^^^ Robert de Ufford retained 
the manor till his death in Nov. 1369.'^ He was succeeded by his son 
and heir William, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, who died 15th Feb. 1381-2, without 
issue, and was by inquisition found to have held the manors of Benhall and 
Thorndon as parcel of the Honor of Eye, which had escheated to the King 
through the failure of male issue of the said Earl. Rich. II. in 1385 granted 
the manor to Michael de la Pole, ist Earl of Suffolk,'* and later High 
Chancellor. In 1387 he was impeached and convicted by Parliament of 
treason against the State, and the grants to him became forfeited. Sentence 
of death was remitted, but on threat of a second impeachment he fled to 
France, and died in Paris in 1388-9. 

A commission was issued by the Crown to enquire touching the yearly 
value of this manor,' ^ and the King in 1390 regranted the manor to his 



I Pat. Rolls, 56 Hen. III. 22, 43. 

« Fine, "Guy Frere," jun., v. Nicholas de 
"Cryell," 20 Edw. I. 35. Fine, 
Guy "Ferre," jun., t;.Brian de Hike- 
Hnge (Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. 1. 12). 
Guy " Ferre " v. Ralph de Sauvage 
and Margaret his wife. (Feet of 
Fines, 33 Edw. I. 27). 

3 Pat. Rolls, 22 Edw. I. 14. 

*Guy Frere and Eleanor, his wife, v. John 
Bacun and Adam, his brother, of 
Benhall Manor. (Feet of Fines, 
I Edw. II. 21.) 

5R.P. ii. 85; Evidences of Butley Priory, 
E.A. N. and Q. xi. 31. 



6R.P. ii. 198. 

^I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 66. 

'There was a further remainder limited 

to WiUiam de St. Quintin and his 

heirs. 
9 Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 42. 
"R.P. ii. 85. 

" i.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 124. 
" Close Rolls, II Edw. III. pt. i. 15 ; 23 

Edw. III. pt. ii. 16 (28th Sept. 1349); 

23 Edw. III. pt. ii. 9, 14. 
'3 1.P.M., 43 Edw. ill, pt. ii. 38. 
'•t Pat. Rolls, 6 Rich. II. pt. i. 30. 
« Pat. Rolls, 12 Rich. II. pt. i. 4d. 



102 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

uterine brother, John de Holland, Earl of Huntingdon and Duke of 
Exeter, in tail.' He, however, forfeited for treason, and was beheaded 
at Pleashy, in Essex. Hen. IV. in 1401 granted the manor to Michael de la 
Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, son of Michael, ist Earl, who with his son Michael 
in 1406 levied a fine of the manor against Sir John Cornwallis and Elizabeth 
his wife,' and on the death of the 2nd Earl at Harfleur in 1415 the manor 
passed to his son Michael, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, at whose death at the Battle of 
Agincourt, 25th Oct. 1415, at the age of 23, without issue male,^ the manor 
passed to his brother William, 4th Earl of Suffolk,'' created Duke of Suffolk 
2nd June, 1448. He settled the manor by deed dated 20th Oct. 9 Hen. VI. 
[1431], the feoffees being Sir John Shardelowe, Thomas Hoo, John Roys, 
John Golafre, and others,^ and the manor was included in a writing of the 
Earl's, by which he with Sir John de Shardelowe and Thomas Hoo released 
certain manors to John Hampden, Thomas Hesley, Richard Rostwold, 
Thomas Walsyngham, and William Hervy. The deed is dated 12th Oct. 
10 Hen. VI.* The manor is included in an indenture dated loth Sept. 10 
Hen. VI. mentioned in an account of Stradbrook Manor, in Hoxne 
Hundred.' 

William de la Pole was beheaded and buried at sea 2nd May, 1449/ 
when the manor passed to his widow Alice, daughter of Thomas Chaucer, 
and granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet, who survived until 1476. 
John de la Pole, the eldest son of William, 4th Earl, having espoused 
Elizabeth, sister of Edw. IV. and Rich. III., was created Duke of Suffolk 
23rd March, 1463. His eldest son John, who had been created 13th March, 
1467, Earl of Lincoln, and who in the second year of Rich. III. had been 
appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, raised the standard of revolt and 
fell at the Battle of Stoke i6th June, 1487, in the lifetime of his father. 
The reversion having passed to the Crown by reason of the treason of the 
Earl of Lincoln, the manor and estates were on the death of John de la Pole, 
Duke of Suffolkj in 1491, restored to his 2nd, but then eldest surviving 
son, Edmund de la Pole.® 

He was beheaded 4th May, 1513," and his estates confiscated. In fact, 
in 1509 we find from the State Papers that Hen. VIII. granted the reversion 
of the manor, which is stated to have come to the hands of Hen. VII. by the 
attainder of Edmund de la Pole, to Sir John Hey don and others to be 
held to the use of Margaret de la Pole, wife of the said Edmund during her 
life." She enjoyed the manor until her death in 1516, and Sir Robert 
Southwell was found to hold of the Countess the Manor of Upton, in Norfolk, 
as of her Manor of Benhall, valued at £16 per annum. 

The manor was granted by Hen. VIII. to Charles Brandon, Viscount 
Lisle, afterwards Duke of Suffolk, who in 1538 reconveyed the same by way 
of exchange to the King," who in 1544 granted the manor to Thomas, 3rd 
Duke of Norfolk.'^ 

' Pat. Rolls, 13 Rich. II. pt. i. 26. « I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 

* Feet of Fines, 7 Hen. IV. 19. s R.P. vi. 474. 

3I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 486. "I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. i. The manor is 

+ See Wattisfield Manor, in Blackbourn said in this inquisition to be of 

Hundred, and Kettlebaston Manor, the annual value of £9. 

in Cosford Hundred. " S.P. i Hen. VIII. 485. 

sHarl. 54 I. II. '^S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. (1187, x8a.) 

^Harl. 54 I. 15. '3 Particulars for this grant, dated 24th 

7 Harl. 50 H. 27, 28. See, too, Pat. RoUs, Feb. 1544, wiU be found referred 

12 Hen. VI. pt. i. 2 ; 13 Hen. VI. to in D.K.R. 1.0 App. ii. 242. 

28. 



BENHALL. 103 

This is the greedy Duke's note : " Md. that I Thomas, Duke of Norff 
doc desire to have of the Kyngs Highnes by waye of Exchange Gyfte and 
Purchas the Manours of Benehall, Gaywood, Thorpe and Risyng in the 
Particulars hereunto annexed expressed and menconed beyng of the clere 
yerely value expressed in the same pticlers. In witness whereof I the 
said Duke have subscribed and sealed this Cedule the xxiiijth. day of 
February Anno Rs. Dni. H. viij., xxxvto. 

T. Norfolk." 

The particulars are interesting :— 

" Man. in de Benehall in Com Suff pcell Terr nup Dues Suff modo in 
Man Dni Regs existen racone Pquis. 

Val in 

Redd libor Tenen ibm p annu xxxviijs. v]d. 

Redd custom Tenen ibm p annu. . . x\n]l. xvijs. ixd. 

Ward Castn ibm p annu xvijs. Yd. q. 

Redd mobil p annu vxs. 

Firm pci ibm p annu. xx^. 

Pquis Cur ibm coilz Ann cu iiijs. ]d.\-, • , n 

de coi fine ) °^' 

D quiltz. 
Repts. in 
Feod Edwardi Glemham Ball, ibm 
ad v]7. xxd. p annu sic sibi concess 
p bras paten Dues Suff p. t. 

mio Vite sue 

Et valet clare p annu Ixvj/. xvijs. 

Thaunswere to the Articles conteyned in the Letters of the Knyg's 
Comyssioners. The seyd Mannr of Benehall is a manr of itself e and no 
pcell of any other Mannr and lieth not nere the Kyng's Majestic' s Howses 
that his Grace hath accesse unto Nor nere unto his Forrests Chacs or Pks 
by viij Miles or therabote that is to say from his Gracs Howse and Pke of 
Henham wt. in the seyd Countye and of the Valeu abovemensioned. 

Itm the seyd Pke above mensioned is now replenysside wt. Dere to the 
noumbr of iiij°- or mor and is .... Miles abowte. 

Itm ther is no Demayne Londes wtin the seyd Mannr. but suche as are 
conteyned wtin ye seyd Pke. 

Itm the Patronage of the Vicarage of Benehall aforeseyd appteyneth 
to the Kyng's Majestye as of the late 

Itm thar is no woods wtin the seyd Manr. but suche as are wtin the seyd 
Pke. 

Itm whether any have byn desyrous other than the Brynger of ye 
Letter to buy ye prmisses or eny of them I knowe notte. 

The seyd Bailly fyndyth hymselff greved wt. xxiiijs. of Rente by yere 
called Shawforde rent which hath byn payd heretofore bothe to the Kyngs 
Majestye as also to the Duke of Suff Grace wtout any Deduction and 
whether he be cessed wth. any other Rente or no we knowe nott. 



vjl. xxd. 



E-P-l&m'wtn^eld}^"*'-- 



On the attainder of the Duke of Norfolk the estate passed to the Crown, 
and King Edw. VI. granted the manor in 1548 to the Princess Mary, after- 
wards Queen, who in 1553 reversed the attainder of the Duke of Norfolk,^ 



104 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and restored to him his estates, which with this manor passed on his death 
to his grandson Thomas, 4th Duke of Norfolk.' He was beheaded in 1572, 
when the manor again became an escheat, and remained in the Crown until 
Elizabeth granted the same in 1581 to Philip Howard, of Arundel, eldest 
son of Thomas, 4th Duke of Norfolk. He was attainted in 1589-90, and died 
in prison in the Tower 1595, when the manor again escheated, but his son 
Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, was restored in 1603 and 
joined in 1610 with his two half-brothers (to whom Jas. L in his 6th year 
had granted the manor) in a sale to Ambrose Duke,'' who died 29th Nov. 
1610, and was succeeded by his son, Edward Duke, who was created a 
baronet i6th July, 1661. He married EUenor, daughter and coheir of John 
Panton, of Brunship, co. Denbigh. Blomefield says he married Catherine, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Holland, of Wortwell, Knt., so that not unlikely 
he had two wives, a matter perhaps for congratulation having regard to the 
fact that his children numbered 29, though none of them survived their 
father save Sir John, his successor. 

Mr. Cockayne, however, refers the whole of Sir Edward's 29 children 
to his wife EUenor, but as she survived Sir Edward and died in Sept. 
1671, at the age of 40, this can hardly have been the case. 

The 1st Duke Baronet died, and was buried 30th Jan. 1670,^ and Sir 
John Duke, 2nd Bart., his son, who had been M.P. for Orford in 
1679-90 and 1697-1698, married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of 
Edward Duke, M.D. He died in July, 1705,* and was succeeded 
by his only son. Sir Edward Duke, 3rd Bart. M.P. for Orford, 1721-1722. 
He married ist Dec. 1715, Mary, daughter and sole heir of Thomas Rudge, 
of Bromley-by-Bow, co. Middlesex, but died without male issue 25th Aug. 
1732,' when the baronetcy became extinct, and the manor passed to Edmund 
Tyrell, of Gipping, the son of his sister Anne, the wife of Thomas Tyrell, 
who sold it to his brother, Thomas Bokenham Tyrell, of Belstead, who in 
1738 sold it to John Rush, who dying 12th May, 1767, intestate and un- 
married, it descended to Samuel Rush, his only brother and heir-at-law. 
He died in 1781, having by his will dated April 7th, 1781, devised the manor 
to his nephew, Sir William Beaumaurice Rush, of Wimbledon, Surrey, 
Knt., who erected a magnificent mansion there at a cost of £15,000. He 
sold the manor and estate by deeds dated 8th and loth May, 1790, to his 
cousin, George Rush, formerly of Furley Park, and afterwards of Farthinghoe, 
Northampton, and he by deeds dated i6th and 17th Dec, 1801, sold the 
same to Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, Knt., of Great Cumberland Place, 
London, Knt., Admiral of the Blue, who made Benhall his residence. 
He was 2nd son of Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, Bart., who was lost in the 
" Cato " in 1782, and brother of Sir Harry Parker, Bart., of Long Melford. 
Sir Hyde Parker was knighted for his gallant services in the American War, 
and married ist Ann, daughter of John Boteler, and 2ndly Frances, daughter 
of Sir Richard Onslow, Bart. (She died in March, 1844.) He died at his 
house. Great Cumberland Place, London, i6th March, 1807, in his 67th 
year. The devisees under his will by deed dated ,22nd May, 1810, sold the 
manor to Edward HoUond, who pulled down the former house and built 
the present. He served the office of High Sheriff for the county in 1814, 

'See Framlingham Manor, Loes Hundred. ^Will proved June, 1671. 

° See Hales Manor, Brampton, in Blything * Will proved Nov. 1705, and Jan. 1705-6. 

Hundred. Page says Edward Duke ^Will gth to 15th Aug., proved 23rd Oct. 

purchased from the Glemhams, but 1732. 

he gives no authority. 



BENHALL. io^ 

and Page tells us how on 25th March of that year his seat here was the scene 
of gay festivity, upwards of 200 of the nobility and gentry being present 
at a splendid fete given by that gentleman, which in point of magnificence 
and effect surpassed anything of the kind ever offered in the neighbourhood. 

Edward HoUond died 7th Dec. 1829, unmarried, and his representatives 
sold the estate comprising the mansion, park, with farms extending to 1,644 
acres,' the manor and advowson and the impropriation of the parish with 
the great or corn tithes thereof, 19th May, 1830, to the Rev. Edmund 
Hollond," of Benhall Lodge, and 33, Hyde Park Gardens, London, for 
78,000 guineas.^ At this sale the annual quit rents of the manor were stated 
to be £2$. IIS. -^d., and the amount of the fines and other profits on an 
average of the last 18 years, £70. 115. He married 6th Feb. 1839, ist 
Isabella Hesther, youngest daughter of the Rev. Sir John Robinson, ist 
Bart, and died 19th March, 1884, when the manor passed to his eldest son, 
Edmund William HoUond, who married 20th Jan, 1876, Ada, eldest daughter 
of Robert Rygate, M.D., and on his death, 2nd Jan. 1960, the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Edmund Robert HoUond, J. P., in whom the 
same is now vested. 

Court Rolls of the manor for 23 Edw. IIL will be found in the Public 
Record Office.* There are grants of the manor. 

A suit relating to the customs of the manor will be found in the British 
Museum.^ 

The right of fishing claimed by the Lord of Benhall Manor in the river 
running from the Sweflfling Bridge to Langwade Bridge, and of sporting 
over the lands in Farnham, appears by the Rolls 34 Edw. HL and 14 and 
18 Edw. IV. 

14 Edw. IV. — ^The Lord, by his surveyor, granted unto Richard 
Colvylle, of Farnham, his warren of hares, conies, partridges, and pheasants 
in Benhall and Farnham, and the fishery on the side of the river of the said 
lord from Sweffling Bridge to Langwade Bridge, to hold the same to the said 
Richard from the Feast of St. Michael for 20 years then next following, 
paying to the lord yearly 12s. and bearing harmless and indemnified the 
Lady or Lord of the manor against their tenants for damage done by the 
conies in the warren to the blades of corn or pasture of the said tenants 
during the term aforesaid. Proviso that Richard should not come into the 
warren within the park without licence of the lord or his officers. 
Fine 12s. 

18 Edw. IV. — At this court Richard Colvylle surrenders his estate 
in the above to the lord, who grants same to Richard Colvylle and others 
for 10 years from the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel, paying yearly 
fine I2S. In this entry Sweffling is called Dernford Bridge — which is 
believed to be the same, there being a small manor in Sweffling called Dern- 
ford or Derford Hall. This Richard Colville was owner of an estate in 
Farnham called " Colvilles," and also " Hulver house."* 

As to the warren of the Lords in Benhall and Farnham, and free fishing 
in the river in the extent before mentioned, the grant of the manor was 
from the Crown. By it free warren in Farnham was supposed to be granted, 

' In an advertisement stated to be 1,718 in Bengal, and died there about 

acres at an estimated rental of the year 1756. 

£3,200. {Ipswich Journal, 25th ^ Ipswich Journal, 22pd May, 1830. 

March, 1830.). * Portfolio 203, 4. 

*His grandfather was Major in command 5 Add. 23967. 

of the East India Company's troops ^ Vid. Register Book, page 54. 

O 



lo6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

as well as free fishing in the river, and by such grants particular privileges 
would pass to the grantee, such as a liberty of sporting upon another man's 
soil, &c/ 

The above evidences show the right of the lord in sending his game- 
keeper over Farnham Walks, and the right of fishing in the river, and which 
with the customary usage and the common acceptation, may be sufficient 
to support both as against any otJier lord of a manor. None of the grants 
from the Crown described the free warren which had been from time 
immemorial attached to this manor, as appeared by the ancient Court 
Rolls and other documents, and by which it is evidenced that in the 12th 
century, " the monks of Snape and their servants were presented and 
amerced for hunting in the Lord's warren with dogs and with bows." This 
free warren was, however, lost in modern times for want of having been 
used ; for, though in a trial brought against Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, 
Knt., by Mr. Long, of Saxmundham, for trespassing in his Manor of Sax- 
mundham (which lay within the ancient free warren) there was ample 
evidence to shew that the Rush family and their predecessors had invariably 
and without molestation sported there and assisted in the preservation of 
the game ; yet it was also" proved that Mr. Long and his friends had also 
exercised the same right, which negatived the claim to an exclusive free 
warren, which is necessary to support it as against the owners of other 
estates. 

Arms of Duke : Azure, a chevron between three stems close. Argent, 
beakes and membered Gules. Of Hollond : k.z. a lion rampant, within 
an orle of trefoils Arg. 

Benhall St. Roberts Manor. 

This manor was held in 1292 by Robert de Benhall, clerk, and was most 
probably that portion held at the time of the Domesday Survey by Roger 
Bigot. 

In the Benhall family the manor continued for several generations 
until Sir Robert de Benhale died without issue about 1400, when the manor 
lapsed to the Crown, and was granted with the main manor to Michael de la 
Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, in 1401, and Michael in 1406 gave the manor to 
the master and chaplains of the college or chantry of Wingfield.'' 
On the Dissolution the manor vested in the Crown, and was granted by 
Queen Elizabeth to Sir Thomas Gawdy and Theophilus Adams. Henry 
Gawdy, eldest son and heir of Sir Thomas Gawdy, jointly with Theophilus 
Adams conveyed the manor 7th Nov.' 1595, to Nicholas Jeffreson and 
George Leicester. 

It appears from the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth that there was a contract for sale of the manor by John Jeffreson 
(probably the son of Nicholas), and George Leicester with Sir Henry Gleni- 
ham, for the latter brought an action against them for the recovery of the 
purchase money on the sale, alleging as was no doubt the fact that the 
purchase had gone off.^ 

There are also amongst the same records particulars of an action in 
which Constance Glemham, widow of Edward, claimed a life estate under 
a settlement in the Park of Benhall with a capital messuage called the 
Lodge and lands thereto belonging settled on her marriage by way of 
jointure.* 

'Vid. Black, vol. 2 p. 38. 'C.P. i. 367. 

^I.Q.D., 7 Hen. IV. 35- "C.P. i. 391- 



BENHALL. 107 

Nicholas Jeffreson and George Leicester sold 8th March, 1595-6, to 
Ferdinando Clotterbucke, a draper of London, who in 1602 sold to Thomas 
Base, son of William Base, of Benhall, who was buried at Benhall, ist Oct. 
1607, aged 85,' on whose death the manor passed to his son and heir, WilUam 
Base, who died before 1625, when it passed to his widow Susan. She seems 
to have remarried Thomas Bradstreet, for he had the manor in her right, 
and held a first court 22nd April, 1625, and on her death it passed to her 
son by her ist husband, also called WiUiam Base. He held his first court 
20th April, 1637, and conveyed the manor to his brother John Base in 1648, 
he holding his first court 13th April, 1649. He died in 1653, and it went to 
his son, John Base, the younger, who held his first court 20th Aug. 1653, and 
married Mary, daughter of John Bewley, of East Monlyn, Kent. 

The next lord was Arnold Browne, who held his first court 7th Jan. 
1680, but how he acquired the manor does not appear. 

On his death in 1682 the manor passed to his widow Margaret, who 
held her first court 13th' Jan. 1682, and by deeds 20th and 21st Dec. 1698, sold 
to Thomas Knights, of Woodbridge, and he held his first court 25th Sept. 
1701. He married Mary, daughter and coheir of Robert Goodwin, of 
Charsfield, and died in Jan. 1707, at the age of 64, when the manor passed 
to his widow, who held her first court 24th April, 1712, and after her death 
passed to Robert, the son of Thomas, who held his first court 5th Nov. 
1717. Robert Knights died without issue in 1722, and the manor passed 
to his brother, Thomas Knights, who devised the same by will 26th Aug. 
1729, to his sister, Elizabeth Knights, and she held her first court 30th April, 
1731. She married Joseph Webster, and by lease and release 26th and 27th 
July, 1736, sold the manor to John Sheppard, of Ash. Why Thomas 
Knights should have devised the manor to his sister Elizabeth is not clear, 
for he is said to have left a daughter Mary, married to John Goodwyn, of 
Martlesham, and this daughter did not die until 1769, when she left a son, 
the Rev. Thomas Goodwyn, who was rector of Martlesham, and died in 
1798. 

John Sheppard the purchaser died in 1747, and from this time the 
manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Brockford Hall, in 
Hartismere Hundred. 

There is a statement in 1587 in the Acts of the Privy Council (161) 
that Thomas Sudberic had been dispossessed of certain lands parcel of this 
manor. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is an indenture of sale from Gregory 
Pryce, of Hereford, Esq., and Thomas Kenny, of London, gent., to Thomas 
Glemham, of Glemham, of the " Manors of Stratforde, Benhale, and Farne- 
ham, CO. Suff." formerly belonging to the priory of Butley. It is dated 
20th Sept. 4 and 5 Philip and Mary [1557]. A copy, too, of a grant of 
these manors from the Crown to Gregory Price and Thomas Keny is amongst 
the Davy MSS. in the British Museum. 

There evidently, therefore, was a manor in Benhall belonging to the 
priory of Butley ; indeed it is mentioned in the fine levied by the King 
against Thomas, Bishop of Ipswich, Prior of Butley, in 1538.'' 

' Fine, Trin. 44 Eliz. "^ Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 



io8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the Davy MSS. in the British Museum' is " A Concise history 
of the possessors of the Manor of Benhall from the Conquest to the present 
period, 1803." It occupies 11 foKos. There is a similar account of Benhall 
St. Robert Manor occupying a folio and a half. 

Arms of Benhall : Arg, a cross flory Gu. over it a bend Az. frimbriated 
Or, charged with a fillet. Of Base : Gu. a chevron Arg. betw. 3 plates. 
Of Knights : Arg. 3 bendlets Gu. on a canton Az. a spur Or. 



' 19100, fol, 1 124. 




BLAXHALL. 109 

BLAXHALL. 

jN Saxon times there was no manor in Blaxhall, but there 
were at the time of the Norman Survey a number of little 
holdings ; in fact, like Boulge in this respect. There were, 
in fact, five tenants-in-chief holding amongst them no more 
than 263 acres, and these 263 acres divided into 19 separate 
tenancies. Earl Alan had four little holdings, 2 acres 
valued at ^d., which Hamo de Valenis held of the Earl, 
having been formerly held by a freeman ; 12 acres valued at 12s. held in 
demesne, but of which the Abbot of Ely had the soc formerly held by 
Brotho, a freeman ; 20 acres valued at /\od., also held by Hamo de Valenis 
and formerly held by Edric Grim, a freeman, half under protection of 
Malet's predecessor, and half of the Abbot of Ely, and 4 acres in demesne, 
valued at M., of which the Abbot had the soc formerly held by Uluric a 
freeman.' 

Robert Malet had 11 little holdings in this place — (i) 61 acres in the 
Abbot of Ely's soc, and 2 ploughteams, valued at los., held by Gilbert of 
Malet, having been formerly held by six freemen by commendation ; (2) 30 
acres, i ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 5s., of which the 
abbot had the soc formerly held by three freemen under commendation ; (3) 
14 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 28^., formerly held by two freemen, 
of whom one was wholly and one was half under commendation to the 
Abbot of Ely and half under commendation to Malet's predecessor. This 
was at the time of the Survey- held by William de Smalavilla of Robert 
Malet ; (4) 3 acres valued at 6d. held by the same William of Robert Malet, 
of which the soc was in the abbot, having been formerly held by a freeman ; 

(5) 10 acres valued at 3s. held by Gilbert of Malet, the soc being the abbot's. 
This had formerly been held by a freeman under commendation to Edric ; 

(6) 12 acres, with half a ploughteam, valued at 2s. This Gilbert also held of 
Malet, having been formerly held by a freeman under commendation, half 
to Malet's predecessor and half to the abbot, and as to this moiety he came 
to an agreement with the abbot ; (7) i acre valued at 2d. formerly held by a 
freeman by commendation • (8) 8 acres valued at i6i. held by Gilbert of 
Malet, but formerly held by two freemen, one wholly and the other half 
under commendation to Edric and half under the abbot ; (9) 6 acres valued 
at i2d., of which the soc was in the abbot, and held by the same Gilbert 
of Malet. This estate was formerly held by three freemen under com- 
mendation to Edric ; (10) 12 acres valued at 2s., the Abbot of Ely having the 
soc held by Ranulf of Malet, but formerly held by Hune, a freeman under 
commendation to Malet's predecessor ; (11) 16 acres in the demesne of Chelton 
valued at 25^., the soc belonging to the abbot.'' 

Roger Bigot had four small estates here — (i) 66 acres, eight freemen 
with 60 acres, 2 ploughteams and a half, and 4 acres of meadow, valued at 
25s., formerly held (when it was valued at 20s.) by eight freemen, of whom 
five were under commendation to Norman and two to the abbot of Ely, 
and one, Alwin by name, to Malet's predecessor ; (2) 3 acres valued at ^d., of 
which the soc belonged to the abbot formerly held by a half freeman ; 
(3) 2 acres and i serf, valued at 8^^., held by Norman of Bigot ; (4) 10 acres and 
half a ploughteam, valued at 2S., of which the soc belonged to the abbot, 
held by the said Norman of Bigot, but formerly held by k freeman Ulf under 
commendation to Norman.^ 

'Dom. ii. 296, 2966. ^Dom. ii. 344. 

^Dom. ii. 3066, 307, 307&. 



no THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The Abbot of Ely held five freemen in his soc and commendation, with 
26 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 4s.' Roger de Poictou held in 
demesne at the time of the Survey 10 acres in the soc and commendation 
of the Abbot of Ely, which a freeman had formerly held. In Saxon times 
and later there were 2 ploughteams, and by the time of the Survey there 
was but a team and a half. In this holding were 2 acres of meadow, and 
the whole was valued at 8s.' Ralph de Langtoft held of Walter Gifart 
10 acres valued at 20^., of which the soc was the abbot's, which estate had 
formerly been held by Cedric, half under commendation to the predecessor 
of Malet and half to the Abbot of Ely.' 

Out of these various small holdings the Manor of Blaxhall was carved. 

MAisroR OF Blaxhall Hall al. Ashe Bigots. 

Blaxhall was the lordship of Thomas de Weyland in the time of Edw. L* 
and he held free warren by grant in 1280.^ This manor was held as of the 
Manor of Dunningworth, which belonged to the Bigots, or at least a moiety 
of this manor was so held. 

On Thomas de Weyland abjuring the realm for felony in 1289,^ the 
manor was taken into the King's hands," and a dispute arose as to whether 
it had escheated or not. Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, claimed it as held 
of him, and it is said he obtained a verdict by means of a packed jury.^ 
John de Weyland, Thomas's son, however, in proceedings in 1290 recovered 
the manor from the King and the Earl. 

The proceedings, which are interesting, will be found in the Abbreviation 
of Pleas in 1290.' John de Weyland had a grant of free warren here in 1304'° 
and died in 1313," when the manor passed to his brother, Richard de Wey- 
land. Richard de Weyland and Joan his wife levied a fine of this manor 
and the manors of Wantisden, Middleton, and Cockfield in 13 13 against 
Alexander de Saxmundham, parson of Chyselford church, and Peter de 
Grymoneston, chaplain." 

There is an order on the Close Rolls this year not to molest "Richard 
" le Weyland ' ' for issues of a moiety of the manor that his father held, as it had 
been found by inquisition that John de Weyland held this moiefy of the 
King as of the Manor of Donningworth, which belonged to Roger le Bigod, 
Earl of Norfolk, which the King had committed to his brothers Thomas and 
Edmund.'' 

Richard de Weyland left an only daughter Cecily, married to 
Bartholomew de Burghersh, 4th Baron, and he had a grant of free warren 
here in 1349,'* and died in 1369.'^ By the marriage of his only daughter 
Elizabeth with Sir Edward le Despencer the manor was carried into the 
Despencer family. Sir Edward le Despencer was son and heir of Sir Edward 
le Despencer, of Perlethorpe, co. Notts, by Anna, daughter of Henry, Lord 
Ferrers de Groby, and was also nephew and heir to Hugh le Despencer, 

'Dom. ii. 384. 8R.P, i. 46. 

^Dom. ii. 353. 9 18 Edw. I., Trin. 62 (plea), 18 and 19 

3Dom. ii. 430. Edw. I. Mich. 54 (judgment). 

*R.P. i. 46. "Chart. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. 51. 

5 Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 2. "I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 38. 

^See Brandeston Hall Manor, Loes Hun- "Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. II. 33. 

dred. '3 close Rolls, 6 Edw. II. 5. 

''Originalia, 17 Edw. I.; I.P.M., 18 '4 Chart. Rolls, 32 Edw. III. 3. 

Edw. I. 51. «i.p.M.,.43 Edw. III. pt. i. 14. 



BLAXHALL. 



Ill 



4th Lord le Despencer. Edward was at Poictiers in 1356, K.G. about 1361, 
and summoned to Parliament from 15th Dec. 1357, to 6th Oct. 1372. He 
died nth Nov. 1375/ being buried at Tewkesbury, in Gloucestershire." 

The manor passed to his widow Elizabeth, who survived until August 
1409. Her will is dated 4th July, 1409, and in it she styles herself 
" Elizabeth de Burghersh, Dame Le Despencer."^ 

The manor never vested in her son and heir Thomas, 6th Lord le 
Despencer, created Earl of Gloucester, 29th Sept. 1397, for upholding 
Rich. II. against the party of Thomas of Woodstock, and the Earls of 
Arundel and Warwick. In 1399 he was joint commissioner for the 
deposition of the King. He was tried for his conduct in 1397, and in Oct. 
1399, deprived of his earldom. He married the Lady Constance Plantagenet, 
daughter of Edmund, Duke of York, 5th son of King Edw. III." 

Finally joining the conspiracy of the Earls of Rutland, Kent, Salisbury, 
and Huntingdon, he was taken prisoner and beheaded 17th Jan. 1399-1400, 
in the lifetime of his mother, upon whose death the manor is said to have 
passed to her daughter Anne, married ist to Sir Hugh Hastings, of Elsing 
and Gressingdale, co. Norfolk, Knt., and 2ndly to Thomas, Lord Morley. 
Thomas, Lord Morley, died in 1416, and his widow survived until 1426, 
when she died seised of this manor. 

It then passed to her niece Isabel, daughter of Thomas le Despencer, 
6th Baron le Despencer, eldest soii of the above mentioned Edward le 
Despencer, married ist to Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Worcester and Lord 
Abergavenny, and 2ndly to Richard Beauchamp, 5th Earl of Warwick. They 
were the deforciants in two fines levied respectively in 1432 and 1434 by 
John Verney, clerk, Robert Andrewe, and John Throkmorton.^ 

The 2nd husband, Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, died 30th 
April, 1438, having had by his ist wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas, 
Lord Berkeley, three daughters— Margaret, married to John Talbot, Earl 
of Shrewsbury ; Alianor, married ist to Thomas, Lord Roos, and 2ndly 
to Edmund, Duke of Somerset ; and Elizabeth, married to George Nevil, 
Lord Latimer. Richard, the 5th Earl of Warwick, by his 2nd wife, the 
above-named Isabel le Despencer, had, with a son Henry, another daughter 
Anne, who married Sir Richard Nevil, Knt. (son of the Earl of Salisbury), 
afterwards Earl of Warwick, and known in history as the King-maker. 
The son Henry succeeded his father as 6th Earl, created in 1444 by Hen. VI. 
Duke of Warwick. He married Cecily, daughter of Richard, Earl of Salis- 
buiy, and died without male issue nth June, 1445,' when the dukedom 
became extinct, and the earldom with the manor descended upon his only 
child, Anne Beauchamp, as Countess of Warwick. She died an infant, 
and unmarried four years later, 3rd June, 1449, when her aunt, Anne 
Beauchamp, wife of Sir Richard Nevil, became heir of the family. She died 
leaving two daughters only (i) Isabel married- to George, Duke of Clarence, 
by whom she had Edward, Earl of Warwick, who died without issue ; 
Richard, who died an infant ; Margaret, afterwards Countess of 
Salisbury, so barbarously executed in 1541 ; and another child who died 
young ; (2) Anne, married ist to Edward, Prince of Wales, and 2ndly to 
Richard, Duke of Gloucester, afterwards Rich. III. Richard, Earl of 



' I.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 46. 
==Will 6th Nov. 1375. 
3 Will proved loth Aug. 1409. 
t She died 28th Nov. 1416. 



5 Feet of Fines, 10 Hen. VI. 24 ; 12 Hen. 

VI. 5. 
6I.P.M., 24Hen. VI. 43. 



112 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Warwick, the King maker, died 14th April, 1471, at the Battle of Barnet. 
After the death of his widow Anne, Countess of Warwick, there was a 
chancery suit as to the manor between the descendants of Richard 
Beauchamp, 5th Earl of Warwick. The plaintiffs were Richard, Duke of 
Gloucester, and Anne his wife, daughter of Anne, Countess of Warwick, 
daughter of Richard Beauchamp, late Earl of Warwick, Edward Plantagenet 
son of Isabel, daughter of the said Anne, daughter of the said Earl, Edward 
Lord Lisle and -Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John, son of Margaret, late 
Countess of Shrewsbury, daughter of the said late Earl, and Elizabeth, 
Lady Latimer, the remaining daughter of the said late Earl. The defendant 
was John, son of Thomas Huggeford, late surviving feoffee to uses.' 

The manor subsequently passed to William Saunders, who died seised 
of it in 1638, when it passed to his son and heir, Valentine Saunders. It 
then vested in Robert Warryn, who died in 1705, when it was sold to John 
Bence, who sold to Dudley North. Dudley North died in 1729, from which 
time the manor passed in the same course of devolution as the Manor of 
Farnham, in this Hundred, until 1830, when it vested in Sophia, widow of 
Dudley, Lord North. 

The manor is now vested in the Earl of Guildford. 

Extents of the manor, 1575 and 1600, will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. in the British Museum.^ 

Manor of Valence. 

This manor probably derived its name from Hamo de Valenis, who held 
land in the parish under Earl Alan at the time of the Domesday Survey. 
It was granted by the Crown in the time of King Hen. VIII. to Sir WUUam 
Willoughby in 1543, and he the following year had licence to alienate the 
same to Sir Robert Southwell, who in 1558 sold the manor to William 
Wheatcroft or Whitcroft.^ In 1564 William Whitcroft had licence to 
alienate to Robert Cobbe and George CoUymore, who had licence in 1576 
to alienate to Francis Saunders, sen. He died in 1579, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Francis Saunders, on whose death* it passed 
to his widow Alice and son Francis Saunders. 

In 1598 we meet with a chancery action by Alexander Smith against 
this Francis Saunders and Nicholas Corbould for relief against excessive 
rent claimed by defendant Saunders as lord of Blaxhall Manor in respect of 
land called Brinckloves, parcel of Blaxhall Manor, but stated in bill to be 
claimed by defendants as belonging to the Manor of Vallence.^ 

Francis Saunders had licence in 1610 to alienate to Sir Michael Stanhope, 
Knt., on a purchase by him, and eight years later we find the manor vested 
in Dame Elizabeth ToUemache, widow, who sold it to John Brame, of Ash, 
by deed dated 24th April, 1650. 

The 3rd Nov. 1659, John Brame the elder and Ann his wife conveyed 
the manor to their son and heir apparent, John Brame the younger, and by 
a feoffment dated 14th Nov. 1662, John Brame the younger on his marriage 
with Deborah, daughter of Thomas Jacob, of Mendham, settled the manor 
on himself and wife and the survivor for life with remainder to their heirs 
male, with an ultimate remainder to the right heirs of the said John Brame. 

' E.C.P. Bundle 66, 376. *Will dated 29th Oct. 1578, i6th Feb. 

''Add. 21054. 1578-9, 7 Bakon Cur. P.C. 

3 Fine, Mich, i Eliz. 'C.P. iii. 46. 



BLAXHALL. 113 

John Brame the elder died in 1670, and John Brame the younger by his will 
dated ist Aug. 1683, devised to Thomas Brame, his youngest son, and to 
Deborah Brame, Ann, Alethea, Amy, and Eleanor Brame, his five daughters, 
£1,000 apiece, when of age, and devised his manors to his wife to pay the 
legacies and debts, &c., until his son John Brame should attain 24, and to the 
said John Brame in fee. John Brame, the devisee in fee, married Jane, daughter 
of Sir John Duke, Bart., and died in April, 1706, without male issue, but 
leaving Elizabeth his daughter and also Jane his widow then enciente with 
child which proved a daughter, and was afterwards called Jenney Braham 
{sic) who were consequently his coheirs, and upon such death without male 
issue, the manor descended to his brother, Thomas Brame, the other son 
of John Brame the father in fee tail under the settlement of 14th Nov. 
1662, subject to the said Deborah Braham (sic) the widow's interest therein. 
By deed 19th Nov. 1706, and a fine levied in Michaelmas Term 5 Anne, 
the inanor became vested in Deborah Brame and her assigns for life with 
remainder to Thomas Brame in fee. By deeds gth and loth February, 
1712, on the marriage of Thomas Brame with Elizabeth Goodwin, spinster, 
the manor was settled after the death of Deborah Brame upon Thomas 
Braine for life, with remainder to Elizabeth Goodwin for life, and by way 
of jointure with remainder in tail male and an ultimate remainder to the 
right heirs of Thomas Brame in fee. 

Thomas Brame died in 1722 without issue, leaving the aforesaid 
Elizabeth and Jenney Brame his nieces and heirs-at-law, who on failure 
of issue male of John Brame their father and Thomas Brame their uncle 
became entitled to the remainder in fee of the estates by virtue of 
the deed of settlement of 14th Nov. 1662, subject to the said Deborah 
Brame's life interest therein. Deborah died in Nov. 1729,' leaving her 
granddaughters surviving. Jenney Braham (for thus she calls herself in 
her will) by her will dated 25th Sept. 1782, devised all her estates to her 
sister, Elizabeth Braham, in fee.' Jenney. died in 1787 and Elizabeth 
7th April, 1788, leaving John Rivett, of Brandeston, her cousin and next 
heir, he being the great-grandson of Thomas Rivett and Ann his wife, who 
before her marriage was Ann Brame and was sister to the said John Brame, 
the father of Elizabeth Braham. Upon the death of Elizabeth Braham a 
pretended will dated 6th Dec. 1787, was set up by Philip Edward Braham, 
Edward Reitly, and some other devisees therein named, by which she gave 
the manor house in Campsey where she lived, and all her farms, lands, 
manors, &c., therein-named to the said P. E. Braham, formerly of Bencoolen 
but then or late of Caroline Street, Bedford Square, London, and made 
Edward Reitly, after several bequests and legacies, one of her executors 
and residuary legatee. 

Soon after the death of Elizabeth Braham, John Rivett filed a Bill in 
Chancery against all the devisees to set the will aside, but before the cause 
could be brought to a hearing an ejectment was brought on the demise 
of the said Philip E. Braham which was tried at the Lent Assizes of 1791 
for the County of Suffolk, when he obtained a verdict, but did not sue out 
any execution to get possession, the Court of Chancery having appointed a 
receiver. The above verdict not being satisfactory, an ejectment-at-law 
was brought on the demise of the said John Rivett, which was tried in Hilary 
Term, 1792, at the bar of the Court of the King's Bench by a special jury 
from the County of Suffolk, when a verdict was given in his favour. A 

'Will 3rd April, 1724, and Codicil 14th *Will proved P.C.C. 28th Feb. 1788, 
Nov, 1729. 



114 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

motion was soon afterwards made in the Court of Chancery to discharge the 
receiver appointed by the Court, for which an order was obtained and 
Mr. Rivett remained in possession. By virtue of an indenture dated 25th 
Nov. 1793 and a fine levied in Michaelmas Term 34 Geo. III., John Rivett 
limited the manor and also the manors of Ash Campsey with Haugh and 
Northlands Hacheston to the use of himself in fee. 

John Rivett later sold to John Sheppard, of Ash,' who died in 1824, 
from which time the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor 
of Brockford Hall, in Hartismere Hundred. 



' He had married John Rivett's sister Mary. 




BRUISYARD. 115 

BRUISYARD. 

^N Saxon times there were five manors here which became 
subsequently merged into one. Three of the manors were 
in the time of the Great Survey held by Earl Alan. One 
of these three consisted of 81 acres, 3 villeins, 7 bordars, 
I ploughteam in demesne, 2 belonging to the tenants, 2 
acres of meadow, wood sufficient for the maintenance of 
ID hogs, 10 rouncies, 17 beasts, 15 hogs, 6 sheep, and 15 
goats. The manor had been formerly held by Olf, when there were 2 
ploughtgams in demesne and 41 sheep, but 6 fewer hogs. 

Another of these manors was held by Hamo of Earl Alan, and con- 
sisted of 91 acres, i ploughteam, i bordar, 2 acres of meadow, and wood 
sufficient for the support of 10 hogs, valued at 60s. The manor had in the 
Confessor's day, when Ralph the Staller had the soc, been held by Edric, 
a freeman, with 2 ploUghteams. 

The third manor was also held by Hamo under the Earl, and consisted 
of 60 acres with 7 bordars, half a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging 
to the tenants, and 3 acres of meadow, valued at los., which had formerly 
been held by Starling, a freeman under commendation, half to Malet's 
predecessor (and his father was seised thereof) and half to the abbot, with 
a whole ploughteam in demesne. 

The soc was the abbot's, and the extent of the holdings 8 quarentenes 
long and 6 broad, and there' was paid in respect of it by way of gelt lod.^ 

The other two manors were those of Roger Bigot, both of which were 
held by Ralph de Tourlaville ; one consisted of 80 acres, 4 bordars, i plough- 
team in demesne, half a team belonging to the tenants, 4 acres of wood, 
wood sufficient for 40 hogs, 20 hogs, 24 sheep, and 12 goats, valued at 30s., 
which had been held in the Confessor's time by Uluric under commendation 
to Harold, when there was a ploughteam and a half in demesne, and 
additionally i rouncy, 3 beasts, but only 4 hogs and 6 goats, the value 
being 20s. 

The second manor consisted of 30 acres, half a ploughteam, i J acres of 
meadow, which, had been held in the Confessor's time by Brictmar, a free- 
man under commendation to Edric j Malet's predecessor, who had a whole 
ploughteam. 

In addition and as part of this holding were 20 acres valued at 5s. 
and a half of which had been held by a freeman and a half under commen- 
dation. The abbot had the soc." 

As the Brutge of Domesday (in Parham Half-Hundred) is said to 
be Bruisyard there would be in Saxon times two more manors both held in 
Edward the Confessor's day by Edric of Laxfield, viz., 40 acres of land and 
3 of meadow, with i ploughteam and the fourth part of a church with 6 acres. 
At the time of the Survey this manor was held by Walter de Risboil of 
Robert Malet, and had attached to it 6 beasts, 14 hogs, 20 sheep, and 8 
goats, and the value was both in Saxon and Norman times 14s. 8^. The 
soc belonged to the Abbot of Ely. The said Walter also held of Malet 
here 20 acres valued at 4s., which had been held by five freemen added to 
the manor, in the commendation and soc of the abbot, the wife of one being 
under commendation to Norman.^ 

'Dom. ii. 297. ^Dom. ii. 306. 

*Dom. ii. 329, 345. 



ii6 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



The latter manor consisting of 120 acres of land and 4 acres of meadow, 
I milljhalf a ploughteam, the fourth part of a church, with 6 acres and 8 hogs, 
valued at 20s., of which the Abbot of Ely had the soc, was held by one 
Garner of Hervey de Berri, the Domesday tenant-in-chief. It had been 
valued at 40s. when it was held by Edric under commendation to Edric, 
Robert Malet's predecessor, with 2 ploughteams which had come down 
by degrees to i, and, as we have seen, by the time of the Survey to half 
a team. To this manor had been added 20 acres held by eight freemen 
formerly having i ploughteam, later half a team, and by the time of the 
Survey none, valued at 40^. 

Concerning half of this land Hervey de Berri came to an agreement 
with the abbot, and later he held of the King. "It," says the Survey, " is 
8 quarentenes long and 6 broad) and pays in a gelt 40^.'" 

Manor of Bruisyard or Roke Hall. 

The lordship of Bruisyard was, according to the MS. of the author 
of the Magna Britannia, in the time of Edw. I. in Henry Hoe. In 1307 
it was vested in John de Bursyerd," and in 1312 in John, son of John de 
Buresyerd and Elizabeth his wife, who this year levied a fine of the manor.^ 
In 1352 the manor was vested in John de Ufford and Thomas de Hereford. 

The Manor of Rokehalle, also called Bruisyard Manor, was given to 
Campsey Ash College by Maud de Lancaster, Countess of Ulster, when she 
removed the college originally established at Campsey to Bruisyard,* and 
in 1353 we find a licence on the Patent Rolls for the alienation in mortmain 
of the manor by Sir John de Ufford and Thomas Hereford to the " Warden 
and Chaplains of the Chantry ordained in the Chapel of the Annunciation 
of St. Mary, Campsey," in satisfaction of 8 marks of £10 yearly of land 
and rent which they had the King's licence to acquire. In this licence it 
is stated that the manor was then held of the King in chief, and was of the 
value of 79s. 6^d. yearly.^ 

Pope Urban V. about 1364 permitted Maud de Lancaster to enter the 
order of St. Clare, and to leave the order of St. Austin nuns wherein she had 
made her profession at Campsey after the death of her husband. This lady 
is considered the foundress of the nunnery, but by some authorities Lionel, 
Duke of Clarence, is styled the founder. 

The manor came to Bruisyard Abbey on an exchange with Campsey 
Priory in 1386, when the former parted with the Manor of Benges in exchange.^ 
Bruisyard Manor as then taken in exchange consisted of 7 messauges, i mill, 
160 acres of land, 60 acres of meadow, 10 acres of pasture, 20 acres of 
wood, and 3s. rent. The priests had in the manor place a common refectory, 
dormitory, and a chapel dedicated to the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary. 
This college was surrendered in 1363 to tlje use of an abbess and sisters, 
minoresses of the order of St. Clare. ^ 

The manor place of Bruisyard, called Roke Hall, is still a good family 
mansion, though a large portion has been destroyed. The moat remains 
on three sides, and a large piece of water at one time existed at the back 
of the house, which no doubt furnished fish on fast days for the monks and 
nuns. The Rev. Francis Haslewood, F.S.A., in a paper on the monastery in 



'Dom. ii. 441. 

"Extent, I.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 34. 
^Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. II. 22. 
♦I.P.M., 26 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 47. 



5 Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. III. pt. i. 27. 

6 Pat. Rolls, 10 Rich. II. pt. ii. 26. 
^Monasticon Anglicanum, Dugdale, vi. 

1556. 



BRUISYARD. 117 

the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute in 1891, says : "The grounds exhibit 
many traces of former buildings, the foundations of a wall, running parallel 
with the moat, being clearly traceable. A carved mantel-piece of stone 
was discovered a few years ago behind some wainscot. The staircase to 
the attic indicates antiquity, and there is an old clock still in working order, 
which possesses this peculiarity — that it has neither face nor hands, but 
strikes the hours on a bell at the top of the building." 

The manor was surrendered as part of the possessions of the abbey in 
1539,' and was granted to Sir Nicholas Hare' and Katharine his wife in fee 
by the King in 1539.^ 

The following year Sir Nicholas Hare and his wife Katharine, daughter 
and coheir of John Basingborne, of Woodhall, co. Herts., obtained a licence 
to alienate the manor to Alan Chapman and Margaret his wife and the heirs 
of the said Alan for ever,* but no assurance seems to have been made, and 
on the death of Sir Nicholas Hare, the 31st Oct. 1557' the manor passed 
after the death of his widow Katharine to his son and heir, Michael Hare,* 
who dying without issue^ 6th April, 1611, devised by his will 20th July, 1609, 
the manor to his brother, Robert Hare, for life, with remainder to Sir John 
Rous, nephew of Michael, being the son of Thomas Rous, who had married 
Anne, daughter and coheir of Sir Nicholas Hare, and the manor thus came 
to the Rous family. Sir John Rous died in 1652, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Sir John Rous, the ist Bart., and from him it has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Henham, in Bly thing Hundred, 
and is now vested in the present Earl of Stradbroke. 

The Manor of Bruisyard is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Margaret 
Wingfield, who died 31st Aug. 1504, leaving the daughters of her son, 
Thomas Bacon, her heirs f and also in that of Sir Richard Brooke, who 
died 6th May, 1529, leaving Robert his son and heir, aged 34.' 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1565 by Sir Ambrose Jermyn against 
Edward Duke," and another in 1576 by Edmund Tyrrell and others against 
William Playters.' ' By inquisition taken 20th Oct. 26 Eliz. WiUiam Playters 
of Sotterley, was found to have died seised 6th June of the Manor of 
" Bresworth or Bruisyard," leaving Thomas his son and heir, aged 18." 

The hall seems to have been built after the Dissolution, very likely 
by Michael Hare, as his arms are found often in the glass there.' ^ 



ig.P. 1539, 311. 7 Sepulchral brasses of Hare and his two 
«See"Woodbridge Ufford Manor, in Loes wives are, or were, in Bruisyard 

Hundred. church (Add. MSS. Brit. M. 32484). 

3 S.P. 1539, 651 (22) ; Originalia, 30 Hen. « I.P.M., 21 Hen. VII. 100. 

VIII. Rot. 106. 5 1.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 60. 

+ S.P. 1540, 144 (10). "Fine, Easter, 7 Eliz. 

5 1.P.M., 4 and 5 P. and M. 31 ; Will 26th " Fine, Easter, 18 Ehz. 

Sept. 1557. " Blomefield, Hist, of Norfolk. 

6 There is an entry in the Parish Register '3 Martin's Ch. Notes- 

of Bruisyard that a Michael Hare 

was confirmed on 20th Jan. 1606. 




118 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

CHILLESFORD. 

|ARL ALAN had a manor in this place at the time of the 
Survey held in demesne. It had formerly been held by Olf, 
a freeman under soc and commendation of the Abbot of 
Ely, and consisted of 80 acres, a villein, 4 bordars, i^ plough- 
teams in demesne and ij belonging to the men, both of 
which last were reduced to i at the time of the Survey. 
There was also a church with 5 acres of free land. The value 
of the whole was 13s. /\d. Also three freemen held 20 acres and a plough- 
team, valued at 40^.' 

Under the head " Chiletuna," by which name this place is probably 
intended, the Survey mentions another manor which was held in Saxon 
times by Edric, and consisted of 4 carucates of land, 20 acres, 10 villeins, 
10 bordars, 3 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to the, men. 
Also 10 acres of meadow, a mill, 12 beasts, 30 hogs, and 100 sheep. At 
the time of the Survey this manor was held by Robert Malet, the serfs 
were not mentioned, the ploughteams in demesne were reduced to 2 and 
those belonging to the men to 4, the beasts were reduced to 2, the hogs to 
14, and the sheep to 50. Also to a socman belonged 80 acres, 2 bordars, 
and 2 ploughteams, reduced to 1^ at the time of the Survey. The value 
was formerly £8, increased, however, at the time of the Survey to £(). los. 

In the same township Robert Malet held in demesne at the time of the 
Survey 153 acres and 3|- ploughteams, valued at 20s. This estate had 
formerly been held by six freemen and a half by commendation only (and 
these were added to the manor) when there had been 8 ploughteams, and 
the value was 30s. It was g quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in 
a gelt z^dJ" 

To Chillesford belongs the hamlet of Carleton, and we find another 
manor enumerated in the Great Survey. 

It was then held by Hamo of Earl Alan, having in Saxon times been 
the estate of Edwin the Grim under commendation, half to the Abbot of 
Ely and half to Robert Malet's predecessor. William Malet was seised 
thereof. This manor consisted of a carucate of land, a villein, 3 bordars, 
a serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne, and half a team belonging to the men. 
Also half a fishery and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 60s. There were a 
rouncy in demesne and 100 sheep, increased to 170 at the time of the Survey. 
A freeman under commendation held 2 acres included in the same valuation. 
It was 9 quarentenes in length and 4 in breadth, and paid in a gelt 2od. 
There were also eight freemen in demesne, Stainus and Aluric urider com- 
mendation to Malet's predecessor, and William Malet was also seised of 
this estate. The others were under commendation to the Abbot of Ely. 
These had 60 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at 12s. ^d. The Abbot of 
Ely had the soc over the whole,^ 

Chillesford Manor. 

This estate was held prior to the Conquest by Olf, a freeman, and 
formed part of the possessions given to Alan, Earl of Brittany. From him 
to 1171 the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Nettlestead, 
in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

'Dom. ii. 2966. ^Dom. ii. 2966. 

"Dora. ii. 307 J. 



CHILLESFORD. 119 

In 1280 Sir Thomas de Weyland had the manor, and this year a grant 
of free warren here.' His unfortunate fate is well known, and the manor 
was forfeited in 1289.'' It was apparently granted to Robert de Ufford, 
who died in 1381/ after whom it seems to have vested in John de 
Staverton, who is said to have given the manor to Butley abbey in 1405, 
possibly by his will, for this year we find John de Glemham and others, 
probably Staverton's feoffees or trustees, gave it to the prior of Butley." 

On the suppression of the religious houses, it passed to the Crown,^ 
and in 1539 was granted to Thomas Wriothesley,* but the grant must have 
been limited in duration, for in 1545 we find the manor was granted to 
William Forth and Richard Goodrich. Particulars of the farm of the manor 
for the grant to Richard Goodrich in 1545 are still preserved in the Record 
Office." 

In 1567 the manor was vested in John Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, 
for he then had licence to alienate it to John Soone, of Wantisden, who 
died 6th January, 1551,^ when it passed to his son and heir, Francis Soone. 
He married Alice, 6th daughter of Sir John Spelman, of Narburgh, in 
Norfolk, and died about 1562. Subsequently Robert Soone and William 
Soone, probably trustees, had licence to alienate in 1586 to John Soone, 
son and heir of the above Francis Soone. The licence was carried into effect 
by a fine levied of the manor the same year.' John Soone had licence 
to alienate in 1592 to Sir Michael Stanhope, and the licence was carried 
into effect by a fine levied of the manor by Michael Stanhope against the 
said John Soone the following year." 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1597 by W. Reade and others against 
Sir Michael and others," no doubt on the occasion of some settlement, for 
Sir Michael Stanhope died seised of the manor in 1621, when it passed to 
his daughter and coheir Jane," married to Sir William Withipole, whose 
daughter and heir Elizabeth married Leicester Devereux, 6th Viscount 
Hereford, Premier Viscount of England and a Baronet, from whom the 
manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Earl Soham, in Loes 
Hundred^ till the time of Price Devereux, loth Viscount, who succeeded 
to thp lordship in 1740. 

His lordship died 29th July, 1748, and the manor was sold in 1753 to 
Francis Seymour Conway, ist Earl of Hertford, who 5th July, 1793, was 
advanced to the dignity of Marquis of Hertford and Earl of Yarmouth. 
He was a K.G., Master of the Horse, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, 
and 29th May, 1741, married Isabella Fitz-Roy, 2nd daughter of Charles, 
2nd Duke of Grafton, by whom he had seven sons and six daughters, and 
dying 14th June, 1794, the manor passed to his son and heir, Francis Ingham 
Seymour, 2nd Marquis of Hertford, Earl of Yarmouth, K.G., Vice- Admiral 
for Suffolk in 1822. He married ist in 1768 AUce Ehzabeth, daughter and 
coheir of Hubert, Viscount Windsor, and 2ndly in 1776 Isabella Anna 
Ingham, daughter of Charles, Viscount Irmine, and dying 17th June, 1822, 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Francis Charles Seymour Conway, 

'Chart. RoUs, 8 Edw. I. 2. 737 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 213. 

^See Manor of Brandeston, in Loes s ipji., 6 Edw. VI. 74. 

Hundred. I.P.M., 19 Edw. I. 45. 9 Fine, Mich. 38-29 Eliz. 

3 1.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 157. '° Fine, Easter, 35 Ehz. 

*I.Q.D., 6 Hen. IV. 2. " Fine, Easter, 39 EUz. 

5 Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. "See Manors of Qrford and Sudboum, in 

* Court of Augmentation, S.P. 1539-40, this Hundred. 

1032. 



120 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

3rd Marquis of Hertford. He married i8th May, 1798, Maria Fagniani, 
adopted daughter of George Augustus Selwyer, and dying ist March, 1842, 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard Seymour Conway, 4th 
Marquis of Hertford. He sold the manor before 1855, for at this date it was 
vested in Arthur Heywood, who was lord in 1896, but the manor subse- 
quently was acquired by Arthur Hubert Edward Wood, and is now vested 
in K. M. Clark, of Sudbourne Hall. 

Arms of Conway : Quarterly ist and 4th Sable on a bend cottised 
Arg., a rose between two amulets, Gules ; for Seymour, 2nd and 3rd 
quarters are quarterly ist and 4th Or on a pile, Gules, between 6 fleurs 
de lis Azure, three lions passant, gardant, Or, being a coat of augmentation, 
2nd and 3rd Gules two wings conjoined in lure. 

Manor of Russell's, in the Hamlet of Carleton. 

At the time of the Survey this was held by William Malet under Earl 
Alan. 

In 1212 William Russell and Isolda his wife passed a carucate of land 
by fine to Stephen de Chesilford. The manor was for nearly 200 years in 
the Russell family, probably it originally passed to John Russell under a 
fine levied in 1294 of the manor and advowson by him and Stephen de 
Farnham against Geoffrey le Whyte and Matilda his wife.' 

Much later we come across another John Russell, of Chilsford, who 
had the lordship, which passed at his death to his son and heir, Richard 
Russell, who died before 1428, when it passed to his son and heir, William 
Russell, from whom it probably passed to a daughter or sister, as we find 
Thomas Sampson lord in right of his wife. 

Subsequently the manor vested in William Waller, of Ipswich,' who 
died 8th April, 1535,^ when it passed to his son and heir, William Waller, 
who died in 1547. The same year Thomas Rowse had licence to alienate 
the manor to Robert Staunton. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1561 by Francis Soone against John 
Haughfen,* and in 1629 this John Haughfen, or his son with a like Christian 
name, was lord, and a little later William Baker, who died in 1637. 

In 1772 the manor was purchased by Francis Seymour Conway, ist 
Lord Conway, and Marquis and Earl of Hertford and Yarmouth, from which 
time the manor has passed in the same course as the main manor. 



» Feet of Fines, 22 Edw. I. 24. 3 1.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 25. 

« See Manor of Peyton Hall, Ramsholt, in * Fine, Easter, 3 Eliz. 
Wilford Hundred. 




CRANSFORD. 121 

CRANSFORD. • 

IHREE manors existed here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Cus, a freeman under commendation to Edric, and 
consisted of go acres, 9 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and I belonging to the men. Also 4 acres of meadow, 
13 sheep, and 16 goats, valued at 20s. At the time of the 
Survey this manor was held by Walter of Robert Malet. 
The ploughteams in demesne were reduced to i, there 

were an additional 16 hogs, the sheep had increased to 30, and the goats 

were not mentioned, while the value was 25s. 

To this manor were added two freemen with 14 acres and half a plough- 
team, valued at 3s. held by Walter, the soc belonging to the abbot.' 

Besides the manor Robert Malet had four other holdings in this place. 
The first was formerly that of a freeman by commendation, and consisted 
of 15 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s. It was held of Malet by 
Gilbert, the soc belonging to the abbot. 

The second consisted of 30 acres of Hedingham demesne land, valued 
at 5s., held of Malet by Robert, the soc belonging to the abbot. 

The third was held of Robert Malet by Durand, and formerly was the 
estate of Godric the priest under commendation of Edric, of Laxfield. It 
consisted of 40 acres, a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, valued at los. 

The fourth was held by Malet in demesne, and was formerly the estate 
of five freemen under commendation of Edric. It consisted of 35 acres 
and a ploughteam (reduced to half at the time of the Survey). Their value 
is included in the valuation of Bennington.^ 

The second manor was held by Atsur under commendation of Edric 
of Laxfield. It consisted of 80 acres of land, a bordar, 2 ploughteams, an 
acre of meadow, 2 rouncies, 24 hogs, 16 sheep, and 40 goats, valued at 20s. 
When the Survey was taken this manor was held by Hervey de Berri, the 
ploughteams and hogs were reduced to i, and the rouncies and goats 
were not mentioned, while the value was only 13s. 4d.^ 

The third manor was in Saxon times that of Olf, a freeman, and con- 
sisted of 30 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 5s. The soc belonged to the 
abbot. This manor was held at the time of the Survey by Earl Alan in 
demesne. He also had an estate of 4 acres valued at 8^. formerly held by 
two freemen."* 

Another holding in this place in Saxon times was that of Edric, a freeman 
under commendation to Edric, consisting of 14 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at 26d. At the time of the Survey this was held by Norman of Roger 
Bigot, the soc belonging to the abbot.' 

Manor of Cransford al. Cransford Hall. 

The manor was held by Robert de Ufford and Cedilla his wife at the 
beginning of the 14th century, and he died seised of it in 1316.^ 

In 1396 the manor was vested in Edmund Mondevile, and in 1401 in 
John de Stanton and Elizabeth his wife, and Richard Banyard and Catherine 
his wife, daughter of Geoffrey Mondevile, from whom it passed in 1483 to 

'Dom. ii. 3076. -^Dom. ii. 298. 

^Dom. ii. 3086, 309, 316, 3166. 5Doni. ii. 3446. 

^Dom. ii. 444. ^I.P.M., 10 Edw. II. 76. 

Q 



122 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Robert Banyard, of Spettishall, son and heir of Richard, and from him 
passed to his daughter and heir Margaret, married ist to John Bacon,' and 
2ndly to Nicholas Ratclyf. Davy enters John Wingfield, WiUiam Brandon, 
James Robert, and John Cheke as lords in 1^483, and in 1506 Margaret 
Wingfield as holding a half of the manor. She died 31st August, 1528, and 
the manor is certainly mentioned in her inquis. p.m.* Thomas Bacon, of 
Baconsthorpe, co. Norfolk, son of the above-named John and Margaret, 
next held, and on his death the manor passed to his daughters and coheirs — 
Elizabeth, married to Sir John Glemham,^ and Anne, married to Robert 
Garneys, of Kenton. A share passed from Sir John Glemham and his wife 
to their son, Christopher Glemham, who died in 155 1, and another share 
from Robert Garneys and his wife to their son and heir, John Garneys, 
who married Anne, daughter of Edward Rokewode, of Euston, and died in 
1562, when it went to his son and heir, Thomas Garneys, who married 
Frances, daughter of Sir John Sulyard, of Wetherden, and appears to have 
died seised of a third in 1567. 

In 1546 Nicholas Godbolde levied a fine of one-fourth of the manor 
against John Downes and others,* and two years later Henry Legate 
acquired the one-fourth share of the above-named Christopher Glemham.' 
In 1548 a fine of another one-fourth was levied by Robert Moyse against 
John Baxter and others.® Davy states that William Dade and Margery 
his wife, daughter and heir of Nicholas Godbold and Maruna Baxter, and 
Margery Baxter, daughter and heir of John Baxter, had the lordship, but 
omits any date. 

In 1572, however, he enters Thomas Lyatt, son of Henry Lyatt, as 
holding his first court. He had the previous year levied a fine of the mapor 
against William Grene and others.' In 1582 another fine was levied without 
specifying any shares by William Hardynge and Edmund Dodson.^ This 
William Hardynge levied another fine of the manor the following year 
against Philip Strelly and others.' The manor in this fine is called " Crans- 
ford Hall Manor." The 5th Nov. 1599, ^ fi'^st court was held by Thomas 
Garneys. In 1608 we find Robert Hare, Thomas Dade, and Thomas Lyatt 
or Legate lords, and 19th June, 1615, William Dade, John Bured, and 
Catherine Legate, widow, held their first court. The 7th June, 1620, John 
Penred or Pendred for part holds a first court, and 12th June, 1623, 
Catherine Legate, widow, for part held a first court. The 12th July, 1630, 
Thomas Lyatt for part holds a first court, and 3rd June, 1631, Elizabeth, 
widow of John Pendred. The 19th Sept. 1638, Thomas Legate, cousin and 
heir of the last-mentioned Thomas, for part held a first court, and in 1672 
another Thomas Lyatt appears as lord. The 7th June, 1687, Henry 
Damont held a first court for the whole, and gave the lordship after his wife's 
death to Thomas Alexander, of Framlingham, and his heirs. The 3rd 
April, 1716, Audry Damont, widow of Henry, held her first court, and died 
in 1729,'° when Thomas Alexander being dead the manor passed to Sarah 
Alexander as guardian of her nephew, Henry Alexander, a minor, and she 
held her first court as such 27th April, 1730. In 1742 Henry Alexander, 

'He was son and heir of John Bacon, son and +Fine, Mich. 38 Hen. VIII. 

heir of Sir Roger Bacon, Knt., son = pine, Mich, i Edw. VI. 

and heir of Thos. Bacon^ Knt., and * Fine, HU. i Edw. VI. 

of Alys his wife, se«?%n3* heir of ? Fine, Mich. 13 Eliz. 

Sir Bartholomew Antingham, Knt. ^ Fine, Easter, 24 Eliz. 

^I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 100. sFine, Mich. 30-31 Eliz, 

3 See Manor of Farnham, in this Hundred. " Will 30th Oct. 1729. 



CRANSFORD. 123 

who was an attorney at Cransford, had attained majority, and appears as 
lord. He married Amy, daughter of Anthony Wingfield, of Wingfiield Castle, 
and had a son, Wingfield Alexander, who died young in 1765 and a daughter 
Amy. 

The manor then passed to John Corbould, who held his first court 
17th Dec. 1774. 

We next find the manor vested in Richard Roofe or Rolfe, who held 
a first court 23rd Oct. 1818, and died in 1831, when his executors sold in 
1832 to Sir George LemanTuthill,M.D.,who died in 1835,' when the manor 
passed to his daughter and heir Laurie Marion, married to Thomas Borrett, 
of London. On his death the manor passed under his will to his 
executors and trustees, who appear as lords in 1885, 1896, and 1900. 

Arms of Alexander : Az. a chevron betw. 3 talbots' heads erased 
Arg. collared Gu. 

Manor of Vicedelence or Visdelieu or Fidlers Hall. 

This lordship was anciently vested in Thomas Visdelieu, and in the 
time of King Rich. II. Robert de Rendlesham paid castle-guard rent to 
Framlingham Castle for the said manor. In 1433 Theophilus Shardelow 
did the same, and in 1536 Thomas Rous, 3rd son of Reginald Rous, of 
Dennington. Thomas Rous resided here and married Margaret, daughter 
of Robert Kemp, of Gisning, in Norfolk, by Elizabeth his ist wife, and 
from him the manor passed to his son, Edmund Rous, who died in 1558, 
when it vested in his son and heir, Thomas Rous. Thomas Rous sold the 
manor to William Rickthorne in 1578, and a fine was levied for the passing 
of the property.'' On William Rickthorne's death, the manor passed to 
his nephew, Thomas Rickthorne, son of John, brother of William, who in 
1588 paid castle-guard rent for the manor to Framlingharn Castle. A fine 
was levied of this manor in 1595 by Rowsene Rickthorne against William 
Dod.^ 

In 1609 the manor was vested in George Mace or Mase, who was living 
in 1617, but by 1631 the manor had passed to Francis Warner, for this year 
he paid the castle-guard rent to Framlingham Castle. In 1655, however, 
we find William Mace, son and heir of George, lord, so probably Warner 
was merely a trustee or feoffee. William Mace died in 1664. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in one Moore. In 1829 the manor was 
vested in the Rev. Dr. Kilderbee. 



'The I-pswich Journal states that the by Sir George Tuthill for £2,525. 

estate and Manor of Cransford The property was again offered for 

Hall and 83 acres (advertised to sale by private contract in 1835, 

be sold by private contract, Ipswich Ipswich Journal, 23rd May, 1835. 

Journal, 23rd July, 1831), was sold * Fine, Mich. 20-21 Eliz. 

to Richard Rope, of Ubbeston Hall, ^ Fine, Easter, 37 Eliz. 




124 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DUNNINGWORTH. 

jHERE was one estate in this place in Saxon times held by 
a freeman and consisting of 8 acres ; and in Benhall were 
three freemen having 3 acres valued at 24^. At the time 
of the Survey this was held in demesne by Roger Bigot.' 

Manor of Dunningworth. 

We have not much information respecting this manor. It was the 
lordship of Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, in the time of Hen. III., and 
he died seised of it, with the advowson of Dunningworth, Blaxhall, Turistall, 
and Iken in 1270.' 

They were held of the Honor of Eye by the service of five knights. 
The lordship no doubt descended in the same way as the Manor of Fram- 
lingham, in Loes Hundred, until the death of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl 
of Norfolk, in 1339, when it was assigned to his 2nd wife Mary, daug:hter 
of William, Lord Roos, who survived her husband, as part of her dower. 

Subject to her interest the manor passed to Thomas de Brotherton's 
daughter Alice, who married Edward Montacute, by whose daughter and 
heir Joan it came by marriage to William de Uiford,^ Earl of Suffolk. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1367 by Sir Ralph de Hemenhale, 
John de Harleston, clerk, Reginald de Eccles, and Hugh Bandon, clerk, 
against the said William de Ufford,* and in 1371 we meet with another fine 
levied by Roger de Wolferton and Henry Sergeaunt, of Parham, against 
the said William de Ufford and Joan his wife.' The manor was included 
amongst those given by Hen. VIII. in exchange in 1544 to Thomas, Duke 
of Norfolk, and Henry his son. Earl of Arundel and Surrey, and shared 
the varying fortunes of the manors of Cratfield, Staverton, and Bromeswell, 
taken at the same time. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1558 by Sir Edward Fynes, Lord 
Clynton, against Thomas, Duke of Norfolk.^ 

In 1597 a fine of the manor was levied by W. Reade and others against 
Sir Michael Stanhope and others.' 

The manor later vested in the Right Hon. George, Lord Berkeley, and 
was purchased from him by Sir Henry Wood, who settled it with other 
hereditaments by deeds dated 22nd and 23rd May, 1671, on a marriage 
contemplated of his only daughter Mary. This deed states that with the 
approbation of King Chas. II. a treaty had been made between Sir Thomas 
Clifford on the part of Charles Palmer, Earl of Southampton, and Sir 
Henry Wood, touching the marriage to be had between the Earl and 
Mary Wood, sole daughter and heir of Sir Henry Wood, or if the said 
Charles, Earl of Southampton, should die before his marriage unto 
the said Mary Wood, on her marriage to any other person, then touch- 
ing the marriage to be had between George, Lord Palmer, 2nd son of Lady 
Barbara, Duchess of Cleveland. In consideration of the intended marriage 
Sir Henry Wood granted the manors of Whepstead, Elmswell, Woolpit, 
Drinkstone-cum-Timperley, Veales, Syleham, Ufford, Blythford, HoUesley- 



2 



Dom. ii. 345&. * Feet of Fines, 45 Edw. III. 45. 

I.P.M,, 54 Hen. III., file 38 (17). « Fine, Trin. 5 Mary I. 

3 See Parham Hall, in Plomesgate Hundred. '' Fine, Easter, 39 Eliz, 
* Feet of Fines, 41 Edw. III. 2. 



DUNNINGWORTH. 125 

cum-Sutton, Staverton-cum-Bromeswell and Eyke, Dunningworth and 
Wantisden, to Henry, Earl of St. Albans, Henry, Lord Arlington, Sir Thomas 
Clifford, Dame Mary Chester, Dr. Thomas Wood, Csesar Cranmer, and John 
Gardiner in fee upon trusts. Sir Henry Wood by his will 24th May, 1671, 
confirmed the settlement, and appointed under a power in the settlement 
that if the marriage with Charles Earl of Southampton, or with George 
Lord Palmer, or one of them should not take effect, or if the said Earl or 
Lord George should die without issue by his said daughter, or if they or 
either of them should have issue by her, then after the death of such issue 
the trustees should stand seised of the premises for his daughter, Mary 
Wood, and h^r issue in tail general with remainder to testator's brother, 
Thomas Wood, and his issue in tail general, with remainder to testator's 
sister. Dame Mary Chester, for life, and after her death to his nephew, 
Csesar Cranmer (son of the said Dame Mary Chester) and Henry and Charles 
(eldest and 2nd sons of Csesar) and their issue in tail male, with remainder 
to testator's sister, Elizabeth Webb, wife of Anthony Webb, and to her 
ist and 2nd sons, Thomas and Henry Webb, and their issue in tail male, 
with remainder to Edward and Francis Wood (ist and 2nd sons of Henry 
Wood, of Harrington, Lincoln, deceased), and their issue in tail male, 
with ultimate remainder to testator's own right heirs for ever. 

Sir Henry Wood soon after died, and his daughter Mary intermarried 
with the said Charles, Earl of Southampton, and died 15th Nov. 1680, 
without issue. Dr. Thomas Wood, brother of Sir Henry, died in April, 
1692, also without issue. Dame Mary Chester (sister of Sir Henry Wood) 
died in April, 1684, and Csesar Cranmer (afterwards Sir Csesar Cranmer) 
died in August, 1707, and the said Henry Cranmer (son of Sir Csesar) died 
in his father's lifetime without issue, and the said Charles Cranmer took 
upon himself the surname of " Wood," and became entitled to the manors 
above under the will of the said Sir Henry Wood. He also died without 
issue 8th Sept. 1743, and Elizabeth Webb (wife of the said Anthony Webb, 
and sister of the said Sir Henry Wood) died in i68g, having issue two sons 
Thomas and Henry, which Thomas afterwards died, leaving issue John Webb, 
his only son, who also died without issue, but by his will 13th July, 1711, 
made a' general devise in favour of Robert Onebye his godson, son of Robert 
Onebye, of the Inner Temple, in fee. The only other son of Elizabeth 
Webb, Henry Webb, died and left only one son Henry, who also died without 
issue. Henry Wood, of Harrington, died in the lifetime of Sir Henry 
Wood, the testator, and Edward Wood and Francis Wood, his only sons, 
both died without issue either in the lifetime or soon after the death of the 
testator. Thus were all the particular estates and limitations of the settle- 
ment and win of Sir Henry Wood determined on the death of the above- 
named Charles Cranmer, otherwise Wood, the inheritance in fee simple of 
one undivided moiety vesting in Penelope Lee, Dorothea Chester, and 
Dorothea Robinson as heirs-at-law of the said Mary Wood, who was one 
of the sisters and coheirs of Sir Henry Wood, the other undivided moiety 
vesting in Robert Oneby, Sir John Chapman, William Bressey, and Francis 
Chester as descendants and heirs-at-law of Elizabeth Webb, the other sister 
and coheir of Sir Henry — the interest of John Webb, of course, under his 
will vesting in the said Robert Oneby. On a partition made as mentioned 
in the account of the Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred, and by 
virtue of an indenture dated 5th Dec. 1747, the property and estates of 
Sir Henry Wood were partitioned, and this manor with the manors of 
Staverton-cum-Bromeswell and Eyke and Wantisden allotted in severalty 
to Robert Oneby in fee. 



126 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Robert Oneby made his will 3rd Dec. 1743, and died i6th June, 1753, 
without issue, leaving Mary Oneby his widow surviving. She died 15th 
July, 1757, and, Sir William Chapman having survived the said Robert 
Oneby, and also his said widow, upon his death, by virtue of the said will, 
entered into possession and held at his death gth Feb. 1785, without issue. 
On the death of Robert Oneby his heirs were Mary King, spinster, and Sarah 
Breton, wife of Thomas Breton, a quarter or i2-48ths as coheirs of Elizabeth 
King, wife of Benjamin King, and eldest daughter of John Onebye, the 
great-great uncle of the said Robert Oneby, and the said Mary King having 
died intestate and without issue, the said Sarah Breton thereupon became 
alone entitled to this fourth. George Wrighte was entitled to another quarter 
or i2-48ths as heir-at-law of Dorothy Wrighte, deceased wife of Ezekiel 
Wrighte and 2nd daughter of the said John Onebye. Ann Peck, widow, 
became entitled to another 48th part as one of the coheirs-at-law of Emmet 
Mason, deceased wife of Rich. Mason, M.D., deceased, and which Emmet 
Mason was the 3rd daughter of the said John Oneby. William Cradock 
became entitled to six other 48th parts as the other of the second coheirs 
of the said Emmet Mason. Catherine Ayre, deceased wife of Thomas Ayre, 
became entitled to another 48th part as one of the coheirs of Mary Stavely, 
deceased wife of Thomas Stavely, deceased, and the 4th daughter of John 
Onebye. Mary Pegge, deceased widow of Christopher Pegge, clerk, became 
entitled to another 48th part as another of the coheirs of the said Mary 
Stavely. Joanna Bliss, wife of Philip Bliss, clerk, became entitled to 
another 48th part as another of the coheirs of the said Mary Stavely. Mary 
Welstead Moore, wife of Joseph Moore, became entitled to another 3-48ths 
parts as another of the coheirs of the said Mary Stavely. The Rev. Thomas 
Walker became entitled to another 3-48th parts as another of the coheirs 
of the said Mary Stavely, and the Rev. Thomas AUeyne became entitled to 
the other 3-48th parts as son and heir-at-law of Jane AUeyne deceased, 
wife of the Rev. John AUeyne, and 4th daughter of the said Mary Stavely. 

The church has been long in ruins, and the parish is reckoned as a 
hamlet of Tunstall. 

The manor was in 1847 vested in Mrs. Gifford, of Dinton, near Ayles- 
bury. 

There is an entry in the parish register of Tunstall that " the limbs of 
Eliz. Fryer and Sarah Hillen, who were Burnt att Dunningworth Hall wer 
Buryed July ye 24th 1717." Whether the hall was destroyed this year by 
fire, or under what circumstances the above persons lost their lives, does not 
appear. 




FARNHAM. 127 

FARNHAM. 

JORMAN held here of Robert Malet an estate as a hamlet 
which had formerly been the estate of Edric, of Laxfield. 
It consisted of a carucate of land, 10 acres of meadow, a 
ploughteam in demesne, and a mill, valued at 20s. Norman 
also held of Malet another estate of 28 acres, a ploughteam, 
and an acre of meadow, valued at 5s., formerly held by nine 
freemen under Edric's commendation. It was 8 quarentenes 
long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt y^d. 

Robert de Glanville held an estate of Malet which is mixed up in the 
Survey with land in Glemham. The estate consisted of 40 acres in Farnham 
formerly held by two freemen under commendation, and 26 acres in Glem- 
ham, I ploughteam and a half, 6 acres of meadow, and 2 bordars, valued at 
21S., formerly held also by two freemen.' 

The only other holding in this place was that of Leuric in the time of 
the Confessor, and consisted of 20 acres, 3 bordars, half a ploughteam, 4 
acres of meadow, and a mill, valued at 5s. This was held later by William 
Malet and then by Robert Malet, and at the time of the Survey by Norman 
of Roger Bigot, the soc belonging to the abbot.'' 

Manor of Farnham. 

In the reign of King Hen. I. Sir Robert de Sankville or Sackville, 
ancestor of the Earls of Dorset and Middlesex, held the lordship of the 
Honor of Eye, and it passed on his death to his daughter Beatrix, married 
to William de Glanville. It was in 1171 held by Ralph de Glanville. and 
given by him on the founding of that monastery to Butley priory. With 
this house it continued, apparently up to the suppression of the religious 
houses ; for in 1513 it appears to have been in Sir John Glemham (son of 
John Glemham) and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and coheir of lliomas 
Bacon, of Baconsthorp, co. Norfolk. The Visitation condescends to details 
of this lady's ancestry in somewhat out-of-the-way terms. It says : 
" Elizabeth da. and one of the heirs of Thomas Bacon of Baconsthorpe Co. 
Norf. Esq. and heir to John Bacon and of Margaret his wife da. and heir 
of Robert Baynard of Spettishall, Co. Suff. Esq. which John Bacon was son 
and heir to John Bacon, son and heir to Sir Roger Bacon Kt. son and heir 
to Thomas Bacon, Kt. and Alys his wife, da. and heir to Sir Bartholomew 
Antingham Kt."^ 

The manor is specifically named and included in a settlement made 
this year by Sir John Glemham and Elizabeth his wife, the same, with other 
manors, being conveyed to Charles Brandon, then Viscount LTsle, Sir Robert 
Brandon, Knt., Christopher Willoughby, Humphrey Wingfield, and Chris- 
topher Jenney as trustees. Sir John Glemham died seised 15th Oct. 1537,* 
when the manor passed under the terms of the settlement to his eldest son 
and heir, Christopher Glemham, who married Margery, daughter of Sir 
Richard Wentworth, of Nettlestead, and sister to Thomas, Lord Went- 
worth, and died i8th Oct. 1549, when the manor passed under his will to 
his son and heir, Thomas Glemham,' then aged 16, who was also cousin 
and heir to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. Thomas Glemham married 
Amy, daughter of Sir Henry Parker, Lord Morley. 

'Dom. ii. 3086, 3166. *I.P.M., 29-30 Hen. VIII. 

*Dom. ii. 3446. ^xhese Glemhams are buried in Little 

3 Proceedings of Society of Antiq., 2nd Glemham with large inscriptions on 

Ser. xiii. 358. their tombs. 



128 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is what is called an indenture of sale 
made in 1557-8 by Gregory Pryce, of Hereford, Esq., and Thomas Kerry, 
of London, gent., to this Thomas Glemham. The assurance included the 
manors of Stratford and Benhall, all said to have formerly belonged to the 
priory of Butley.' 

He died in 1571, and the manor devolved on his son and heir. Sir Henry 
Glemham, who was a deputy-lieutenant of Suffolk.'' 

His letters will be found referred to in the 13th Rep. of the Historical 
MSS. Commission,^ and in the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian.* He married 
Anne, eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Sackville, Earl of Dorset, K.G., and 
Lord High Treasurer of England, by whom he had Sir Thomas and Dr. 
Henry Glemham, Bishop of St/'Asaph, a great sufferer in the Royal cause. 
Sir Henry Glemham died in 1632, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Thomas Glemham.^ Licence of entry for this Sir Thomas will 
be found in 1634 amongst the Chancery Papers in the Record Office.^ 

Sir Thomas represented Aldeburgh in the first two Parliaments of 
Chas. I. He took the Royalist side in the Civil Wars, and having reduced 
York, which had declared for the Parliament, he was appointed governor 
of that city, and defended it in 1644 for 18 weeks against the united forces 
of the English and Scotch, till the defeat of the King at Marston Moor 
compelled him to capitulate upon terms honourable to himself and 
advantageous to the citizens. He was then sent to command the garrison 
at Carlisle, which, assisted by his- gallant countrymen. Col. Gosnald, of Otley, 
and Major Naunton, of Letheringham, he defended in 1645 for nine months 
in spite of pestilence and famine, and on his surrender obtained terms no 
less honourable than those on which he had capitulated at York. At the 
close of the war, he was for some time imprisoned, and on his release fled 
to Holland, where he died in 1649, but his remains were brought to England 
and interred in Glemham Church.^ 

His letters in 1635, 1641, 1643, and 1646 are amongst the Tanner MSS. 
in the Bodleian,' :and notices of him amongst the same MSS.' Grant of 
his lands by Parliament to Lord Essex in 1645 will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. in the British Museum." 

Page, in his History of Suffolk, says Sir Thomas Glemham left a son 
Thomas, who married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir John Knevet, of 
Ashwell Thorpe, in Norfolk, K.B., by Mary his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Bedingfield, of Darsham, Knt., who died seised of this estate. He adds 
that they had an only child Thomas who survived his parents, and was 
captain of a company of Dragoons under Brigadier Pepper, in Spain, in 
the service of Queen Anne, and that he died unmarried about 1711 at 
Valhdolid, where he was buried. As Page gives no authority we cannot 
trace the source of the error, but the whole devolution is a delusion. Davy 
correctly states that the manor passed from Sir Thomas Glemham, who 
died in 1649, to his son and heir. Sir Sackville Glemham, and from him to 
his son and heir, Thomas Glemham, who with his son and heir, Thomas 
Glemham, conveyed the manor to Sir Dudley North. 

^Harl. 80 A. 52. 6D.K.R. 48 App. p. 517. 

^ 13 Rep. Hist. MSS. Com. pt. iv. 435, 437, ^ See account in D.N.B. xxi. 426. 

441, 449. 8 Tanner, lix. 205, 47 ; Ixii. 536; Ixvi. 132 ; 

3Pt. iv. 451. Ixix. 87. 

* Tanner, Ixix. 50; cclxxxiii, 65, I2r; ^Tanner, Ivii. 3, 7, 33. 

cclxxxvi. 79. '"Add. MSS. 5497. 
5 D.N.B. XX. 426. 



FARNHAM. 129 

It is clear that the Glemhams parted with the estate, and that the 
Norths were the purchasers. Sir Dudley North was the 3rd son of Dudley, 
the 4th Lord North, of Kirtling, in Cambridge, by Anne, daughter and 
coheir of Sir Charles Montague, Knt. He was born in London, i6th 
May, 1641, and pursued for many years the occupation of a Turkey 
merchant. He resided for a long time in Turkey, where he realised a 
considerable fortune, and was treasurer to the Levant Company there. 
On his return to his native country, he became memorable for his city 
contests, and in 1682 was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex 
and was afterwards appointed a Commissioner of the Customs, and subse- 
quently a Commissioner of the Treasury. 

Sir Dudley North married Anne, eldest daughter of Sir Robert Canne, 
of the City of Bristol, Bart., and widow of Sir Robert Gunning, of Cold 
Ashton, near that city,' and died 31st Dec. 1691, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Dudley North, who represented Oxford borough in 
1722. He married Catherine,' daughter and coheir of Elihu Yale, a native 
of America, who went out as an adventurer to the East Indies, and obtained 
the Presidency of Madras. Dudley North died 4th Feb. 1729, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Dudley North, who in 1730 married 
Lady Barbara, only daughter of Thomas Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, by his 
2nd wife. She died without issue in 1755, and her husband in 1764 having 
by his last wiU bequeathed, after certain legacies and donations to 
charitable uses, which were considerable, were discharged, the remainder 
of his fortune both real and personal to his two sisters Anne and Mary. 
The former married the Hon. Nicholas Herbert, youngest son of Thomas, 
Earl of Pembroke, the latter Charles Long, of Hurts Hall, Saxmundham, 
eldest son of Charles Long, of Longville, Jamaica, by Jane, his 2nd wife, 
daughter and heir of Sir WiUiam Beeston, Knt., Governor of Jamaica, and 
relict of Sir Thomas Modyford, Bart. 

The Hon. Nicholas Herbert took this estate. He represented Newport 
and Wilton in many Parliaments, and died in 1775. He had issue one son 
Elihu, who died in infancy, and two daughters, namely, Ann, who died 
unmarried in 1751, and Barbara, who married Edward Stratford, the 2nd 
Earl of Aldborough, by whom she had no issue. The Countess died in 
1785, and her mother survived until 1789, when by her will she bequeathed 
the manor to her nephew Dudley Long, requesting him to take and use 
the surname and arms of North. This Dudley Long was son of her sister 
Mary. Dudley Long, the devisee, was educated at the Grammar School, 
Bury St. Edmunds, and Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and represented 
the borough of Banbury in Parliament from 1796 to 1806, and Richmond, 
in Yorkshire, in 1812. On the decease of his aunt, and in pursuance of the 
provisions of her will, he assumed the name and arms of North, and in 1813 
on the death of his elder brother, Charles Long, of Hurts Hall, he took the 
name and arms of Long in addition to those of North. He married in 1802 
the Hon. Sophia Anderson Pelham, daughter of the ist Lord Yarborough, 
and died in 1829 without issue. He was interred in the chancel of the 
church of Saxmundham, where a beautiful monument from the chisel of 
NoUekins, is erected to his memory. It consists of a sarcophagus, over 
which is the figure of an angel seated on a rock, his right hand covering his 
eye and his left holding an inverted torch ; at the bottom of the sarcophagus 

'She died 27th Aug. 1715. 'She died 12th April, 1715, in her 23rd 

year. 

R 



130 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



are two escallop shells. There are several other memorials to members of 
this family in Saxmundham church. 

The manor passed to his widow Sophia for life, and, subject to her 
interest, to his cousin, WiUiam Long, son of Beeston, the brother of 
Dudley's father. 

This William Long was High Sheriff in 1843, and in 1830 married 
Eleanora Charlotte Montagu, sister of Sir Edward Poore, Bart., of Rushall, 
CO. Wilts, and on his death in 1875 the manorpassedtohissonandheir, Colonel 
William Beeston Long, who in 1859 married Arethusa Marianne, 4th daughter 
of Sir Charles Robert Rowley, Bart., and on his death in 1892 the manor passed 
to his nephew, William Evelyn Long, of Hurts Hall, Saxmundham, eldest son 
of Charles Poore Long, by Caroline Mary Stuart, daughter of Jonathan 
Rashleigh, of Menabilly. He married on 22nd Feb. 1898, Muriel, youngest 
daughter of Thomas F. C. Vernon- Wentworth, of Wentworth Castle. 

The lands of the copyholders are not heriotable but fineable at the 
lord's will upon the death, alienation or exchange of every tenant. The 
letting of the lands above one year without the lord's licence is a forfeiture 
of the estate. The felling of any timber tree is also a forfeiture of the 
copyholder's estate. This manor has no leet court, but merely a court 
baron. 

Arms of Glemham : Argent, a chevron Gules between three torteaux. 

Manor of Claydon, 

There seems to have been another manor here which was held in the 
time of King Edw. H. by William de Claydon, who is said to have had the 
Manor of " Farnham." 

He and Alianor his wife levied a fine of it in 1312 against Simeon de 
Deseburgh, parson of Briton (?) church.' On his death in 1330 the manor 
passed to his son, John de Claydon, who died 8th July, 1333, when it passed 
to his brother, Robert de Claydon, who in 1347 levied a fine of the manor 
against his mother Alianor. The fine states that the manor was then held 
by Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, for life.'' Robert de Claydon died in 
1350, when the manor passed to his niece and heir Eleanor, who married 
Thomas Cordel. A fine was levied of the manor in 1416 by Sir Simon 
Felbrygg, Wilham Philipp, Robert Clere, and WiUiam Clere against John 
Swanlond, parson of Wytlesham church, and Robert Sewyn, parson of 
Cleydon church. It is stated to be the " Manor of Cleydon, and Farnham 
called Farnham Manor." ^ 

In 1428 the manor vested in John Glemham, and probably soon after 
merged in the main manor. 

Arms of Claydon : Arg. on a cross Sa. 5 bezants. 



' Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. II. 17. 
'Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. III. 42. 



' Feet of Fines, 3 Hen. V. 26. 




FRISTON. 131 

MANOR OF FRISTON. 

|ITHER on the founding of Snape Priory in 1099 by William 
Mattel or later a member of the family gave the manor 
and advowson to form part of its endowment. The design 
of the founder was that the priory should be a cell to St. 
John of Colchester, and the monks there delayed the foun- 
dation until 1 155. Snape was, however, made conventual 
about 1400, and exempted from all subjection to Colchester. 
With the priory the manor remained until the suppression of the smaller 
monasteries in 1524, when it was given towards the furtherance of Cardinal 
Wolsey's great scheme. In 1528 it was granted by the Crown to Cardinal 
Wolsey with this object, and he gave it to Cardinal College, in Oxford. 
Shortly afterwards the authorities conveyed it to Cardinal College, Ipswich. 

On the fall of the great statesman the Crown granted the manor in 1532 
to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. It subsequently passed to Michael Hall, 
who built the hall and sold the estate to Sir James Bacon, a member of 
the distinguished family of that name, being a 3rd son of Robert Bacon 
of Drinkstone, by Isabel his wife, daughter of John Cage, of Pakenham, 
and younger brother of Sir Nicholas Bacon, the lord keeper. He died in 
i573j when the manor passed to his eldest son. Sir James Bacon, who 
married the daughter and heir of Francis Bacon, a younger son of Bacon 
of Hessett, and dying in 1618 was succeeded by his son and heir, Nathaniel 
Bacon, who married Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas le Gross, Knt., of Stoley, 
in Norfolk, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir Charles Cornwallis, of 
Broome. He left one son Thomas and two daughters — Elizabeth, married 
to Nathaniel, 2nd son of Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, Knt., and Anne, who 
died unmarried. Nathaniel died in 1641, and his son and successor, Thomas 
Bacon, married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Robert Brooke, of Yoxford, and 
was succeeded by his son and heir, Nathaniel Bacon, who sold the manor 
to Sir Henry Johnson, who rebuilt the Friston Hall and resided there. 
He died in 1683 and the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Henry Johnson, 
who died in 1719, leaving an only daughter and heir Anne, who married 
Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford.' He died 15th Nov. 1739, and she 
19th Sept. 1754, when the manor passed to their son and heir, William 
Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford, but dying without issue loth March, 
1791, the manor passed to his cousin and heir male, Frederick Thomas 
Wentworth, 3rd Earl of Strafford, only surviving son and heir of William 
Wentworth, Usher to the Dowager Princess of Wales, by Susanna, daughter 
of John Chamberlayne Slaughter, of Upper Slaughter Hall, co. Dorset, 
which William, who died in 1776, was only surviving son and heir of Peter 
Wentworth, of Henbury, co. Dorset, who was next brother to Thomas, 
created Earl of Strafford in 171 1. He married in 1772 Eliza, 3rd daughter 
of Thomas Gould, of Milbourne St. Andrew, co. Dorset, by Mary, daughter 
of William Freke. He died suddenly 7th August, 1799,^ without issue, 
when the Earldom of Strafford became extinct, and this manor appears to 
have passed to Richard William Howard Vyse. He was the only son of 
General Richard Vyse by his 2nd wife Anne, only surviving daughter and 
heir of Field-Marshal Sir George Howard, K.B., of Bookham, co. Surrey, 
and Stoke Place, co. Bucks, by Lucy his wife, sister and coheir of William 
Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford. Richard William Howard Vyse was 
High Sheriff for Bucks, in 1829, and a Lieutenant-General in the army. He 

'See Aldeburgh Manor, in this Hundred. ^Will proved Oct. 1799. 



132 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



married 13th Nov. iSio, Frances, 2nd daughter of Henry Hesketh, of 
Newtown, co. Chester, and was succeeded by his 2nd son, Colonel Richard 
Henry Howard Vyse, M.P., High Sheriff of Bucks, in 1867, who married 
22nd July, 1856, Julia Agnes, 3rd daughter of Wilham, ist Lord Hylton, 
and on his death in June, 1872, the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Howard Henry Howard- Vyse, of Stoke Place, Slough, Bucks, High Sheriff 
of Northampton in 1887, who 6th July, 1882, married Mabel Diana, only 
daughter of the Rev. Granville Sykes Howard- Vyse, rector of Boughton. 
The manor has been since acquired by Thomas Frederick Charles Vernon- 
Wentworth, of Wentworth Castle, Yorkshire, and of Aldborough Lodge 
and Black Heath, Suffolk, eldest son of Frederick William Thomas Vernon- 




Friston Hall. 

Wentworth, by Lady Augusta, 2nd daughter of Charles, 1st Marquis of 
Ailsbury, K.T., and is now vested in his son, Commander Frederick Charles 
Ulick Vernon- Wentworth, R.N., J. P. 

Friston Hall, formerly the manor house, is now occupied as a farm-house. 

Arms of Vyse : Arg. a buck's head cabossed Sab. between the attires 
a cross of the last. Of Howard : Gu. on a bend between 6 cross-crosslets 
fitchee Argent, an escutcheon Or charged with a demi-lion pierced through 
the mouth with an arrow within a double tressure fiory counterfiory Gu. a 
mullet Sable, charged with a crescent Or for difference. 

Manor of Becklings or Blecking Hall or Blicking. 

This was in 1308 held by Moriell Blanche, and later by Michael de la 
Pole. It subsequently passed to the Crown, and was granted by the King 
to Edmund de la Pole, or rather a moiety of it was so granted. 

At the beginning of the i8th century we find the manor vested in Sir 
Samuel Clarke, Bart., who died seised of it in 1719. A little later we find 
it vested in Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford, from whom it passed 
to his son and heir, WiUiam Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford, who died in 
1791 without issue, and the same year we find the manor in the Right Hon. 
Thomas ConoUy, Richard WilHam Howard- Vyse, and Leveson Vernon, who 
were apparently heirs. In 1812 the manor seems to have been in Leveson 
Vernon alone, and subsequently passed as the Manor of Aldeburgh, in this 
Hundred. 




GEDGRAVE. 133 

GEDGRAVE. 

OBERT MALET had two holdings in this place at the time 
of the Survey. The first consisted of 30 acres and a plough- 
team, valued at 5s., which had formerly been the estate 
of 5 bordars under Ulchetel's commendation. It was a 
league long and two quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 

The second was held by Gilbert de Wishant, freeman, 
formerly under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 30 acres, 
3 bordars, and a ploughteam, valued at 5s.' 

Another holding in this place was that of a freeman under Norman's 
commendation, and consisted of 10 acres, included in the valuation of 
Kelsale. At the time of the Survey this was the estate of Roger Bigot." 

Two other holdings in this place were, when the Survey was taken, 
among the lands of Earl Alan. The first was held by three freemen under 
commendation to Edric the Grim, and consisted of 15 acres and half a 
ploughteam. 

The second was formerly held by 2 villeins and 8 bordars, and con- 
sisted of 50 acres and ij ploughteams, included in the valuation of Carlton.* 

Manor of Gedgrave. 

From Robert Malet the lordship came down to Ralph de Glanville, 
and was given by him to the priory of Butley on his founding the same. 
Taylor tells us that according to the foundation deed of Ralph de Glanville 
20s. each per annum were assigned to two persons serving God in the 
appropriated church of Gedgrave. 

On the dissolution of Butley priory the manor passed to the Crown,* 
and was granted in 1541 to Sir Thomas Darcy. Particulars of farm of the 
manor for this grant to Sir Thomas will be found in the Record Office,^ 
and a Thomas Darcy had licence the same year to alienate in favour of 
Robert Derehaugh. Robert Derehaugh died 26th October, 1556,^ when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, WiUiam Derehaugh, who levied a 
fine of one-third i8th November, 1559.^ Later in the year we meet with 
a fine of the manor levied by William Cardinall and others against this 
William Derehaugh,^ and William had licence to alienate to 
William Cardinal and Edward Derehaugh, son and heir of WiUiam. Edward 
Derehaugh was in 1566 called upon to show by what title he held this 
manor.' He, with Henry Apulton and Faith his wife, alienated to William 
Cardinal, junior, and Miss Gierke, trustees, and a fine was levied of the 
manor in 1564 by William '' Cardinall," junior, and others against Henry 
Apulton." 

Edward Derehaugh had licence to alienate in 1585 to John Barney 
and others as trustees, and a fine of the manor was accordingly the 
same year levied by the said John Barney and others against the 
said Edward Derehaugh and others." Edward Derehaugh married Susan, 

'Dom. ii. 3266. ^Fine, 2Eliz. II. ; 

*Dom. ii. 343&. ^Fine, Hil. 2 Eliz. 

^ Dom. ii. 294. 9 Memoranda, 8 Eliz. Trin. Rec. Rot. 68. 

■*Fine, Easter 30 Hen. VIII. '"Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 

538 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. App. ii. p. 199. »'Fine, Easter, 27 Eliz. 

«Davy says 4th Mar. 1557 ; I.P.M., 4 
and 5 Ph. and M. 152. 



134 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

daughter of John Clipesby, of Clypesby, Norfolk, and died in 1598, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, WilUam Derehaugh, who had hvery in 
1600, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Francis Derehaugh, who 
conveyed it to Anthony Middleton for 1,000 years in trust to pay the 
settlor's debts. 

Francis Derehaugh appears to have died in 1616 without issue, leaving 
a brother, James Derehaugh, who succeeded to the lordship and died without 
issue in 1632, when the manor passed to his sister and heir Anne, wife of 
William Cardinal, of East Bergholt. Anne Cardinal died in 1656, her 
husband having been slain at the battle of Edgehill, leaving an only child 
Anne, married to Henry Parker, of Erwarton, 2nd son of Sir Calthorp 
Parker, to whom this manor passed. 

Later one moiety of the manor vested in Price Devereux, Viscount 
Hereford, and the other moiety was apparently in one Clyatt, and passed 
to his daughter and heir, married to George Wright. In 1764 the whole 
was purchased by Francis Seymour Conway, created Earl of Hertford, 
from which time the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor 
of Chillesford, in this Hundred (see also Earl Soham Manor, in Loes Hundred), 
to Arthur Hubert Edward Wood, and is now vested in Kenneth M. Clark, of 
Sudbourne Hall. 

Arms of Derehaugh : Sa. 3 martlets in bend betw. 2 cotises Arg. 




GLEMHAM (GREAT). 135 

GREAT GLEMHAM. 

|EVERAL manors were held here in Saxon times, three of 
them when the Survey was taken belonging to Robert Malet. 
The first was held of him by Walter, and in the time of 
the Confessor by Hune, a freeman, half under commendation 
to the Abbot of Ely and half to Malet' s predecessor. This 
manor consisted of 30 acres and a ploughteam (reduced 
to half a team when the Survey was taken), the value 
being 7s. The soc belonged to the abbot. 

The second was also held of him by Walter and was formerly in the 
possession of Sparhavoc, a freeman under commendation to Edric. It 
consisted of 60 acres, 2 bordars, and i^ ploughteams (reduced to i team 
at the time of the Survey), the value being los. The soc belonged to the 
abbot. The said Walter also held 3 acres, valued at 8^., formerly held by 
two freemen.* 

The third manor, held by Robert Malet, was formerly the estate of 
two freemen, under commendation to Leuric, and consisted of 41 acres 
and a ploughteam, which at the time of the Survey had come down to 
I ox ; also an acre of meadow valued at los.' 

Robert Malet had several other holdings in the place. The first was 
formerly that of Ulmar, a freeman under commendation to Malet's pre- 
decessor, and consisted of 100 acres, 5 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne 
and I belonging to the men, a church with 10 acres and an acre of meadow, 
also in former times a rouncy, valued at 20s. Malet also had ij acres 
valued at 26^., held by two freemen, the soc belonging to the abbot, and 

5 acres valued at lorf,, held by a freeman, the soc over this also belonging to 
the abbot. 

Another estate was held of him by Robert de Glanville, the soc being 
the abbot's, and was formerly held by Alwin, a freeman. It consisted of 
15 acres valued at 2S. 

Another of his estates held in demesne, the soc belonging to the abbot, 
was formerly that of a freeman under commendation, and consisted of 

6 acres valued at I2d. 

The last of Robert Malet's holdings mentioned in this place consisted 
of 10 acres of demesne land, valued at 2s.^ 

Another manor here at the time of the Survey belonged to Earl Alan. 
It was held by Sparhavoc, a freeman under commendation to Edric, Robert 
Malet's predecessor, and William Malet was seised thereof. It consisted of 
60 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam, and half a church, with 10 acres and half 
a ploughteam, valued at ids. Earl Alan also had here 60 acres and 3 
ploughteams, valued at los. which had formerly been the estate of eight 
freemen— Leuric, Edric, Ulmar, Hunepot (a half-freeman), Godric, Almar, 
and Leuric, all under sub-commendation to Malet's predecessor, when 
there had been 4 ploughteams, and later 3. Another estate of Earl Alan 
was 4 acres valued at 8d. formerly held by a freeman. All these estates 
of the Earl appear to have been held of him by Hamo ; and it is amongst 
the enumeration of Earl Alan's estates here that we find the statement 
in the Survey : " It is a league in length and half a league in breadth, and 
pays in a gelt 2od."* 

'Dom. ii. 308. ^Dom. ii. 309, 3166. 

' Dom. ii. 3086. * Dom- "• 297- 



136 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Two other manors were held here, one by Eudes the Steward and the 
other by Walter Giifard. The manor of the former had, in Saxon times, 
been the estate of Uluric under commendation half to the Abbot of Ely 
and half to Malet's predecessor, and WiUiam Malet was seised thereof. It 
consisted of 2 carucates of land, 7 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 
half a team belonging to the men, 8 acres of meadow, and a mill. Also 
half a church with 10 acres, 9 hogs, and 5 sheep, valued at 40s. At the 
time of the Survey the hogs had increased to 16 and the sheep to 40, the 
value having gone up to 50s. 

Eudes the Steward also had an estate here, which Pirot held of him, 
having formerly been the estate of 10 freemen formerly under commendation 
to Uluric, and subsequently added to the manor. This estate consisted of 
53 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 10s. lod. The soc belonged to the 
Abbot of Ely, and WiUiam Malet was seised of the whole. " It was 12 
quarentenes long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 20^.'" 

The manor of Walter Giffard had formerly been the estate of Starling, 
under commendation half to the Abbot of Ely and half to William Malet, 
the latter being seised thereof. It consisted of 180 acres, 11 bordars, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men. Also an acre of 
meadow, 2 rouncies, 16 hogs (increased to 26 at the time of the Survey), 
and 30 sheep (increased to 50). The value was formerly 40s., increased to 
60s. when the Survey was taken. Added to this were 24 freemen under 
commendation, having 100 acres, and 3 ploughteams valued at 40s. " It 
was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 20<^.'" 

Roger Bigot had two holdings in this place at the time of the Survey. 
The first was in demesne and was formerly the estate of five freemen, and 
consisted of 54 acres and i^ ploughteams, valued at los. Four of these 
freemen were under commendation to Malet's predecessor, and thereof was 
Malet seised and William his father before him. The soc belonged to the 
abbot. 

The second estate was held of him by Norman, -and was formerly that 
of a freeman under commendation. It consisted of 5 acres valued at I2d., 
the soc belonging to the abbot. ^ 

Another estate here was that of Roger de Poictou, consisting of a free- 
man with 5 acres valued at 12^. in demesne, the soc belonging to the abbot." 

The Abbot of St. Edmunds also had here an estate held of him by 
Norman which had formerly been held by Aluric, a freeman, and six other 
freemen and a half under commendation. It consisted of 21 acres, 2 acres 
of meadow, and a ploughteam, valued at 5s. The soc belonged to the 
abbot.^ 

Manor of North Glemham al. Glemham Magna. 

This appears to have been the lordship of Hugh de Cressy in 1263, in 
which year he died seised of it.* 

In 1287 it was the lordship of Galfrid de Aspale, but in 1324 was held 
by the priory of Thetford, and the Ministers' Accounts for that year will 
be found in the Public Record Office/ It was subsequently vested in Sir 
John de Ufford, and he died seised of the manor in 1362.° 

'Dom. ii. 403. ^Dom. ii. 3606. 

''Dom. ii. 403. '^I.P.M., 47 Hen. III. 28. 

3 Dom. ii. 345, 3456. 'Bundle 1127, No. 4. 

*Dom. ii. 353- «I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 87. 



GLEMHAM (GREAT). 137 

In 1540 the manor was granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and on 
his attainder for communication with Mary Queen of Scots in 1572 passed 
to the Crown. But either the forfeiture of this manor was not enforced 
or it was regranted to the Duke's eldest son Philip, Earl of Arundel, for in 
1583 he had hcence to alienate to Robert Buxton, of Tebenham, in Norfolk, 
who the same year levied a fine of the manor against the said Philip and 
others,' and two years later against Lord Thomas Howard and others.' 
Robert Buxton died seised of the manor 5th June, 1621, when it passed to 
his son and heir, Robert Buxton, then 19 years of age. This Robert Buxton, 
the father and purchaser of the manor, was grandson of Robert Buxton 
who was buried in the church of Tebenham in 1528, being son of John Buxton 
by Margaret Warner his wife, who was buried there in 1572. 

A little later the manor was in Thomas Smyth and Frances his wife, 
whose daughter Frances married the Right Hon. Charles Fleetwood, son 
of Major-General Fleetwood, so well known in the usurpation. He by 
indenture ist July, 1652, with Bridget his then, and probably 2nd wife, 
made a settlement of this and the manors of " Burrough Castle, Wisset, 
and Wisset Le Ros " as to the last two manors and this to the use of Charles 
Fleetwood for life with remainder to trustees for a term, remainder to 
Smith Fleetwood for life with power to make jointure, &c., remainder to 
sons in tail male, remainder to Elizabeth Fleetwood in tail general, 
remainder to daughters of Smith Fleetwood in tail general, with an ultimate 
remainder to the right heirs of Charles Fleetwood. By indenture 23rd Jan. 
1670, Smith Fleetwood (Charles' son) covenanted to levy a fine of the 
manor and the manors of Wisset and Wisset Le Ros to the use of Charles 
Fleetwood for life, remainder to Smith Fleetwood for life with power to raise 
portions and make jointure, remainder to sons in tail male, remainder to 
trustees and a posthumous son in tail male, remainder to daughters in tail 
general, remainder to trustees and a posthumous daughter in tail general, 
remainder to Elizabeth, daughter of the said Charles Fleetwood and wife 
of Sir John Hartop in tail general, remainder to the said Charles Fleetwood 
in fee, and a fine was levied in Hilary Term, 1670. 

Smith Fleetwood^ died in 1708-9 (buried 4th Feb.), and the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Charles Fleetwood, who by deeds 21st and 22nd 
Jan, 1711, and recoveries Hilary Term 10 Anne, barred the estate tail 
then existing, and by his will dated 14th March, 1726, devised to Sir John 
Hartop, Bart., and Sir Nathaniel Gould, Knt., all real and personal estate 
in trust to sell and pay debts and legacies, giving the residue to his sisters 
Elizabeth, Frances, Caroline, and Jane Fleetwood, and to his niece 
Elizabeth Fleetwood, daughter of his (testator's) brother, Smith Fleetwood 
and Elizabeth Athill his wife, which Smith Fleetwood had died 26th Oct. 
1726, equally, but niece to have ;^i,ooo more than his sisters. Charles 
Fleetwood died 27th Feb. 1727. By a decree of the Court of Chancery 
3rd June, 1731, allotments of parts of the estate of Charles Fleetwood 
were made to the parties entitled, and the niece, Elizabeth Fleetwood, 
apparently obtained this manor. She married Fountain Elwin, of Thurning, 
Norfolk. Elizabeth died and was buried 9th Dec. 1732, having by her 
will 18th May, 1732, devised all her estate to her husband. By deed 26th 
Nov. 1733, it was arranged that Fountain Elwin should from Michaelmas, 
1732, have and enjoy to him and his heirs for ever the Manor of Glemham 
Magna, and that Frances, Caroline, and Jane Fleetwood should from the 

' Fine, Trin. 23 Eliz. ^ For his will see Burgh Castle Manor. 

"Fine. Hil. 27 Eliz. 



138 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

same date have and enjoy as tenants in common in fee the Manor of Wisset. 
Fountain Elwin died 4th April, 1735, having by his will 27th Nov. 1733, 
devised all his estates to Caleb Elwin in fee. 

Subsequently the manor was purchased by Samuel Kilderbee, of 
Ipswich, attorney, the son of Samuel Kilderbee, of Framhngham, draper, 
and Aletheia his wife, daughter of Robert Sparrow, of Kettleburgh. Samuel 
Kilderbee, the purchaser, married Mary, daughter of Daniel Wayth, of 
Great Glemham, and died 14th March, 1813, at the age of 87, his widow 
having died at the same age 13th Dec. 1811, and the manor passed to his 
son and heir, the Rev. Samuel Kilderbee, D.D., rector of Ash and Trimley, 
who married loth April, 1787, Carohne, daughter of Samuel Horsey, of 
Bury, widow of Henry Waddington, of Ely, and sold the manor with 2,300 
acres in 1829 to John Moseley, of Drinkstone, for ;^34,ooo, including fur- 
niture, books, timber, &c.' 

Arms of Kilderbee : Erm. on a bend Gu. cotised Arg. betw. 3 
crosses patte 3 escallops of the last. 

Manor of Great Glemham or Lowdham Hall. 

This was the lordship of John de Lowdham, who died seised of it in 
1319, when it passed to his son and heir, Sir John de Lowdham, who died 
in 1356,* when the manor went to his widow Joan for life, and on her death 
in 1372^ passed to her grandson and heir, John de Lowdham, who died in 

I374-* 

The manor then seems to have gone to John Glemham, who with 
others gave the same in 1406 to the priory of Butley.^ On the suppression 
of that house the manor went to the Crown,- and was granted to Anne 
of Cleves by way of dower. She did not die until 1557, but in 1545 a grant 
was made by the Crown of the reversion to William Edgar, son of Nicholas 
Edgar, of Great Glemham. Particulars for this grant are still preserved 
in the Record Office.'' 

William Edgar married Alice, daughter of Nicholas Wolmer, of Great 
Glemham,^ and died 1559, and was buried in the church of Glemham Magna, 
3rd September this year. The manor passed to his son and heir, Nicholas 
Edgar, who married Elizabeth,' daughter of Jonathan Chapman, of 
Frostenden. On the Memoranda Rolls in 1562 is an order that this Nicholas 
Edgar render an account of the issues of the manor to the death of Lady 
Aune of Cleves." Nicholas Edgar had licence to alienate in 1593 to his 
2nd son, Thomas Edgar. His eldest son William had married the sister 
of Francis Saunders, of Blaxhall^, and had died in his father's lifetime, 
leaving two children, Francis and Robert, both of whom died without 
issue, 

Thomas Edgar married Thomasine, daughter of — Greene, of Norfolk," 
and is said to have sold to Sir Henry Glemham in 1606, but in 1601 a fine 
was levied of the manor by Richard Foster against this Sir Henry Glemham," 

' See Ipswich Journal, 19th April, 1828 ; " She was buried there 20th Dec. 1539. 

^ 14th June. .1828 ; 4th July, 1829. sShe was buried at Great Glemham 17th 
'I.P.M., 3oEdw. III. 19. , ^,, Aug. 1589. 

3I.P.M., 46 Edw. III. 35. "Memoranda, 4 Eliz. Mich. Rec. Rot. 83. 

* See Manor of Tuddenham, Carlford " Her will is dated 6th June, I634^and she 
■ «. Hundred. was buried at Great-Glemham<25th 

3I.Q.D., 7 Hen. IV. 40. Sept. 1638. . - ;-. .c- ^aapfi-- 

^Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. "Fine, Easter, 43 Eliz. 
''37 Hen, yill. P.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 205. 



GLEMHAM (GREAT). 139 

and Davy enters Francis Edgar, son and heir of William Edgar,' son of 
Nicholas, as lord, stating that he died in 1605 without issue. Further 
we find from the Chancery Papers in 1630, referred to in the Deputy 
Keeper's 43rd Report,* that this year livery of lands in Great Glemham and 
Stratford was made to Thomas Edgar, who was the 2nd son of Thomas 
Edgar. Of course, this was not necessarily of the manor. Sir Henry 
Glemham died in 1632, from which time to the time of Sophia North the 
manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Farnham in this 
Hundred. In 1896, however, the manor was vested in the late Duke of 
Hamilton and Brandon, Knt., who this year died seised, and it is now vested 
in his trustees. 



' This William was the eldest son and heir * App. i. p. 171. 
of Nicholas, and brother of Thomas. 




140 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

GLEMHAM PARVA. 

[DRIC in Saxon times held in demesne in this place 20 acres 
belonging to Kettleburgh, valued at 40^., the soc belonging 
to the abbot. This estate belonged to Earl Alan when the 
Survey was taken." 

Earl Alan had another estate in this place held of him 
by Hamo, the soc belonging to the abbot. It had formerly 
been held by two freemen, Wacra under sub-commendation to 
Malet's predecessor, and Ulveva under commendation to Malet's predecessor. 
It consisted of 20 acres and a ploughteam valued at 'js.'' 

Under the heads Thieve Gliemham in the Survey is another holding of 
Earl Alan, namely, the estate formerly held by Ustred,a freeman under 
commendation to Bishop Ailmar. It consisted of 20 acres, half a plough- 
team (increased to a team when the Survey was taken), and i| acres of 
meadow. Also a holding of 5 acres was that of two freemen under com- 
mendation, the value being 6s., reduced to 5s. at the time of the Survey.* 

Manor of Glemham Parva. 

In the reign of Edw. I. this was the lordship and inheritance of Sir 
William de Kerdeston,'* and passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Bulchamp, in Blything Hundred, till the death of Sir William de Kerdeston, 
2nd Baron, in 1361, when it passed to his daughter Maud, married to John 
de Burghersh, and passed to Bartholomew de Burghersh, who with Cecily 
his wife had a grant of free warren here in 1350,^ and died in 1355," when the 
manor vested in his son and heir, Bartholomew Burghersh, Lord Burghersh, 
who died in 1369, when it passed to his daughter and heir Elizabeth, married 
to Edmund, Lord le Despencer.' 

The manor then devolved on Sir John Phelip, of Bennington, who had 
married Alice, daughter and heir of Thomas Chaucer, by Maud his wife, 
daughter and coheir of Sir John de Burghersh and Maud his wife, one of the 
daughters of Sir William de Kerdeston, 2nd Baron. He died without issue 
in 1415, when the manor passed to Sir William Phelip, who founded the 
chantry at Dennington, and gave this manor as part of the foundation 
grant. ^ 

On the suppression of the chantry of Dennington the manor vested in 
the Crown, and was granted in 1545 to Sir Richard Fulmerston. 

A little later the manor passed to Christopher Glemham, who died i8th 
Oct. 1549,' fro"^ which time the manor has descended in the same course 
as the Manor of Faiinham, in this Hundred, to the Hon. Sophia North, of 
Glemham Hall, who held the lordship in 1855. From the State Papers 
in 1646 we find that Sir Thomas Glemham and Sackville his son had to 
compound for dehnquency," and in 1655 we find that Sackville Glemham, 
of Glemham, was sent prisoner to Lymm." 

The manor was subsequently acquired by Francis, 6th Earl of Guildford, 
son and heir of the Hon, Brownlow North, Bishop of Winchester, by 

'Dom. ii. 297. ' See Blaxhall Hall Manor, in this Hundred. 

'Dom. ii. 297. ^ Manor of Dennington, in Hoxne Hundred. 

'Dom. ii. 297. 9I.P.M., 4 and 5 Edw. VI. D.K.R. 10; 

* See Manor of Griston, Stratford St. App. ii. p. 129. 

Andrew, in this Hundred. " S.P. Cal. of Comp. 1570. 

5 Chart. Rolls, 23 Edw. HI. 3. " S.P. 1655, 368. 

^See Manor of Carlton Hall, Carlton 

Colville, Mutford. 



GLEMHAM PARVA. 



141 



Henrietta Maria, daughter and coheir of John Bannister of London, which 
Brownlow was 2nd son of the ist Earl Francis, Earl of Guildford, married 
2oth Feb. 1798, Esther, daughter of the Rev. John Harrison, and andly 
4th May, 1826, Harriet, daughter of Lieut.-Gen. Sir Henry Warde, G.C.B., 
and dying 29th Jan. 1861, aged 88,' the manor passed to his grandson, 
Dudley Francis, 7th Earl of Guildford, son of Dudley, styled Lord North 
(eldest son of the 6th Earl), and Charlotte Maria, 3rd daughter of the Hon. 
and Rev. WiUiam Eden, rector of Bishopsbourne, by his wife, the Dowager 
Lady Grey de Ruthyn, who had died 28th January, i860, in his father's 
lifetime. 

Dudley Francis, 7th Earl of Guildford, was an officer in the Royal 
Horse Guards from 1868 to 1871, and married 4th May, 1874, Charlotte, 
2nd daughter of Sir George Chetwynd, 3rd Bart., and dying 19th Dec. 1885, 
from a fall from his horse the previous day,'' the manor passed to his 2nd 
but eldest surviving son, Frederick George North, 8th Earl of Guildford, 
the present lord. 

Glemham Hall, a large and ancient mansion built of brick, is surrounded 
by a well-wooded park of 350 acres and is occupied by Charlotte Maria, Lady 
North. 

Arms of Earl of Guildford : Azure, a lion passant Or between 3 
fieurs-de-lis Argent. 

Beversham Manor. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Aluric, a freeman, in the 
soc and commendation of the Abbot of Ely. It consisted of 60 acres, a 
ploughteam, and 3 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. (reduced to 5s. at the 
time of the Survey, when it was held by Hervey de Berri). 

In the same township was an estate of two freemen under commenda- 
tion to the aforesaid Aluric. It consisted of 10 acres and half a ploughteam 
(which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), valued at 2S. At the 
time of the Survey Tarner held this of Hervey de Berri, who came to an 
agreement with the abbot concerning the aforesaid manor.^ 

Beversham Manor was the lordship of the Phelip family in the time 
of Edw. II., and probably earlier. William Phelip seems to have died 
seised of it, when it passed to his widow Isabel, who in 1333 levied a fine of 
the manor against Ralph Everard, of Blaxhall, chaplin.* This fine included 
lands in Great and Little Glemham, Marlesford, and Stratford juxta Benhall, 

In 1340 the manor was held by Richard Phelip, who had a quarter 
of a fee here, held of Mary, Countess of Norfolk, The estate passed 



'The Earl was in Holy Orders and held 
the rectory of Alresford, co. Hants, 
1797-1850; of St. Mary's, Southamp- 
ton, 1797-1850 ; besides being 
Prebendary of Winchester, 1802-27, 
and Master of St. Cross Hospital, 
Winchester, 1808 to 1861. It has 
been shown that up to 1853 he had 
received from the rectory of Aires- 
ford £84,000, from St. Mary's 
£121,000, and from his prebendary 
stall £ig,ooo. These appointments 
he had received from his father. 
Bishop North. He appears also to 
have received £go,ooo, the surplus 



funds of the college of which he 
was master, and which surplus had 
been directed to be distributed 
amongst the needy. In 1853, 
however, he was made, by the 
Master of the Rolls, to refund a 
small portion, viz., that taken 
during the previous four years. See 
Howard Evan's "Old Nobility," 
sub "The Norths," cited by Mr. 
Cockayne in his Complete Peerage, 
vol. iv. p. 125, note (a). 

*Admon. March, 1886. 

^Dom. ii. 441. 

*Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. III. 27. 



142' THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to Sir John Phelip, of Bennington, and from him to his son and heir, 
Sir William Phelip.' On his founding the chantry at Dennington he gave 
this manor as part of the endowment. 

On the suppression of the chantry the manor passed to the Crown and 
was granted to Sir John Glemham. As part of the chantry lands it is 
referred to amongst the Exchequer Special Commissions in 1599.* Sir 
John Glemham died in 1638, and from this time to the time of Sir Henry 
Glemham the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Farnham, in this Hundred. 

Manor of Over Pistrie or Petistre-cum-Armiger's. 

This was the inheritance of Sir John Glemham in the time of Hen. VHI., 
and in 1513 the said Sir John Glemham and Elizabeth Bacon settled the 
manor by an assurance to Charles Brandon, then Viscount L'Isle, Sir Robert 
Brandon, Knt., Christopher Willoughby, Humphrey Wingfield, and 
Christopher Jenney.^ On Sir John's death in 1538 the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Christopher Glemham, from which time the manor has 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Glemham Parva. 

Manor of Billesford Hall or Bilston Hall or Bilford or Bilson. 

The demesne of Hazlewood was in 1316 in Clemence TitlershaU. He 
was probably of the same family as the William de " Tynteshale," of 
Hazlewood, who complained in 1300 that Thomas, prior of Snape, and 
others carried away his goods at Hazlewood and assaulted Henry le 
Montford, his serjeant, there.* 

It is now regarded as a hamlet of Aldborough, as the church has been 
long in ruins. In the middle of the 14th century we find the lordship had 
passed to the Abbot of Leiston, where it continued until the dissolution of 
that house, when the manor passed to the Crown, and was given to Cardinal 
Wolsey for the purposes of his educational scheme. In 1528 it was granted 
by the Dean and Canons of Cardinal College, Oxford, to William Capon, 
Dean of Cardinal College, Ipswich. 

On the fall of the great Cardinal, the manor again went to the Crown, 
and this time was granted in 1536 to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. 
A. fine was in 1587 levied of a " Glemham Manor " by Margaret, Viscountess 
Hereford, against Sir Wm. Drury and others,^ and this may possibly be of 
this manor. 

Davy says that in 1609 the manor was vested in Thomas Okeley, but 
we venture to question this. The improbability is apparent from an action 
about this time though certainly earlier than 1609, which appears amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings. It is an action to protect the title of Thomas 
Okeley to copyholds held of the Manor of " Byllysforde, in Haslewood," 
which manor was the inheritance of William Hunaberston.® It is pretty 
clear that towards the end of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, at least, William 
Humberston was lord. 

The manor subsequently passed to Sir Arthur Jenney,' son of Francis 
and grandson of Arthur Jenney, who died in 1605. Sir Arthur married 

' See Manor of Dennington, in Hoxne ^ Fine, Trin. 29 Eliz. 

Hundred. ^C.P. ii. 279. 

*4i Eliz. D.K.R. 38 App. p. 61. ''See Knottishall Manor, in Blything 

5 Fine, Trin. 5 Hen. VIII. Hundred. 

''Pat. Rolls,' 28 Mw. 1. i^d. 



GLEMHAM PARVA. 143 

four times : ist Anne, daughter of Sir Robert Barber, of Trimley ; 2ndly, 
Catherine, daughter of Sir John Porter ; 3rdly, Helen, daughter of Francis 
Stonard, of Stappleford Abbot, Essex, widow of John Freeman ; and 4th 
Mary, daughter of Thomas Hull, of Godalming, Surrey. Sir Arthur Jenney, 
by his will in 1667, proved the following year, devised the manor to his son 
by his 1st wife, Francis. Francis Jenney married Sibella, daughter of 
Francis Norris, of Norwich, and made his will ist Aug. 1698. He died 
without issue 20th April, 1706, when the manor possibly went to his widow 
who survived until 30th Sept. 1716. This at least is Davy's inference, 
for he makes — Jenney widow without a date, and a Capt. Jenney, 1706, 
and Robert Jenney, who died in 1741, lords. We, however, suspect that 
Davy is mistaken, for 16 years before the death of Francis Jenney in 1690 
by deed dated i8th Feb. we find evidence that Elizabeth Pegge, widow of 
Thomas Pegge, of Yeldersley, co. Derby, and Thomas Pegge her son 
mortgaged the manor to John Bence, then of Blaxhall. 

Whatever may be the solution of the difficulty (it is no doubt that Alex. 
Bence was a mortgagee) it is clear that in 1719 the manor was in Alexander 
Bence, as he then sold it by agreement 19th Nov. 1719, to Thomas 
Wentworth, Earl of Strafford, K.G., for ;^3,6oo. 

The Earl and the Hon. Peter Wentworth the same year by deed dated 
4th March, 1719-20, mortgaged the manor and advowson to the Hon. 
Elizabeth Wentworth, spinster, of the parish of St. James, Westminster, 
a sister of the Earl. The deed is amongst the Additional Charters in the 
British Museum.' 

The Earl married Anne, daughter and heir of Sir Henry Johnson, 
Knt., of Bradenham, in Bucks, and dying in 1739 the manor passed to 
his son and heir, William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford, who died 
without issue in 1791, from which time the manor has descended in the 
same course as the Manor of Aldborough, in this Hundred, and is nOw 
vested like that manor in Commander Frederick Charles de Vernon 
Wentworth, R.N., J.P. 



'Add. Ch. 13747. 



144 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




IKEN. 

Manor of Iken, now called Iken cum Framlingham. 

|HIS was the lordship of Sir WiUiam Esturmy in 1225. He 
held here and in Buxhall three knights' fees. From Sir 
William the manor descended to Sir William Sturmy in 1339 
in the same course of descent as indicated in the account of 
Buxhall Manor, in Stow Hundred. 

In the Testa de Nevill (283) Roger Esturmy is said to 
hold a knight's fee here of the Honor of Lancaster.' An 
extent is given of this manor in the inquis. p.m. of Roger de Sturmy in 1254.' 
He is called in this inquisition " Roger de Sturmy al. Esturmy al. Le 
Esturmy," and the manor is said to be held of the King in chief by the 
service of one knight's fee, and to be held of the priory of Ely. William 
his son was found to be his heir, and of the age of 30 and upwards. The 
property is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, 
as held in 1297 by Roger le " Sturmin."^ 

In 1340 we find an order on the Close Rolls to the escheator to deliver 
to Mary, late wife of Thomas, Earl of Norfolk, in dower, the moiety of a 
fee in Iken which William Sturnyn held extended at 50s. yearly ; also a 
further part of a fee in Iken which Roger Fausebroun held extended at 25s.* 
yearly. 

The manor was either disposed of by Sir William Sturmy the last of 
his family holding here, or shortly after his death, to John Ruley, and passed 
from him and his wife Margaret in 1363 to Sir Thomas de Felton and Joan 
his wife.^ This Sir Thomas de Felton had a grant of free warren here in 
1363.* Eleven years later we meet with a fine of the manor levied by John 
de Pysha,le, clerk, against William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and Sir Roger 
de Boys.* 

About 1400 the manor appears to have been vested in Sir Robert 
Wingfield, who died in 1409,* when it passed to Sir Robert Wingfield, his 
son and heir, and on his death in 1431 vested in his son and heir, Sir 
John Wingfield, of Letheringham. Particulars respecting the liberties of 
the manor as parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster in 1479 will be found in 
a proclamation of Edw. IV. confirming the privileges of the Duchy 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.^ 

On Sir John Wingfield's death in 1481'° the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Thorpe Hall, in Hasketon, in Carlford Hundred, 
to the time of Sir Robert Wingfield, 3rd Bart., who died in 1671. 

In 1542 Sir Anthony Wingfield passed the manor to Richard Randall," 
and in 1545 by virtue of a deed dated 28th April. 37 Hen. VIII. made 
between Maurice Denys and Elizabeth his wife, and Robert Kaylwey and 
Richard " Randalle,"" and a fine levied in Michaelmas Term of the same year 
it appears to have become vested in the said Robert Kaylwey and Richard 
Randall, but apparently only as trustees. On the death of Sir Robert 
Wingfield, 3rd Bart., unmarried, he was succeeded by his half-brother. Sir 
Henry Wingfield, who married Lady Eleanor Touchet, daughter of Mefwyn, 



' T. de N. 291. H.R. ii. 199. 
'I.P.M., 38 Hen. III. 23. 
3I.P.M., 25 Edw. I. 51. 
* Close Rolls, 13 Edw. III. pt. i. 33. 

5 Feet of Fines, 36 Edw. III. 

6 Chart. Rolls, 36 Edw. III. 18. 



' Feet of Fines, 47 Edw. III. 29. 

n.VM., loHen. IV. 28. 
9 Add. Ch. 16565, 
■o I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 
" Fine, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII. 
" Add. Ch. 25269. 



IKEN. 



145 



Earl of Castlehaven, and died in 1677, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Henry Wingfield, 5th Bart., who sold the same to WiUiam 
Henry Nassau, ist Earl of Rochford, from which time to the time of the 
Hon. Richard Savage Nassau the devolution is the same as that of the 
Manor of Easton in Loes Hundred. This Richard Savage Nassau sold 
the manor about 1761 to Francis Seymour Conway, ist Marquis of Hertford, 
who died in 1794, from which time to the time of the 4th Marquis of Hertford 
the devolution is identical with the Manor of Chillesford, in this Hundred. 
The manor possibly descended from the 4th Marquis to his cousin, Francis 
Hugh George Seymour, 5th Marquis of Hertford, who married Lady Emily 
Murray, 6th daughter of William, 3rd Earl of Mansfield, and died 25th 
January, 1884, but certainly the following year we find it stated that the 
manor was held by Sir Richard Wallace, Bart., from whom before 1896 it 
passed to Arthur Ha3rward, and was before 1900 acquired by Arthur Herbert 
Evelyn Wood. It is now vested in Kenneth M. Clark, of Sudbourne Hall. 

We meet with a fine levied in respect of " Sturmyns Manor," which 
may be this, in 1554 by Sir WiUiam Willoughby, Lord Willoughby, of 
Parham, against John Gurdon and others.' 

A suit as to the franchises and return of writs in the manor will be 
found amongst the Chancery Proceedings relating to the Duchy of Lancaster 
in 1577." Amongst these same proceedings may be seen a suit by Wymond 
Cary, the Queen's lessee, against Richard Bunting as to illegal holding of 
courts leet in Iken and Otley ;^ also a suit relating to copyholds of the 
manor between William Harrolde, Elizabeth his wife, and another, and 
Edward Crosse will be found amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth.* 



' Fine, Mich. 2 Mary I. 

^Cal. to Pleadings, 15 Eliz. g. 



3 Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 39 

Eliz. 6. 
■*C.P. Ser. ii. B. Ixxxix. 16. 




14^ THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF ORFORD. 

|HIS manor was held at the time of the Survey by Robert 
Malet, though no mention is made in it of either Orford, 
its manor or castle. It seems to have been held under him 
by Peter de Valoines, who was one of the companions of 
the Conqueror. He married Albreda, daughter or sister of 

Enorde Rye, steward of the household to Hen. I., and had 

a grant or confirmation of the lordship. He was succeeded by his son 
Robert or Roger, who by Agnes his wife had issue four sons— Peter, Robert, 
Geoffrey, and John. 

Robert de Valoines succeeded his father and obtained a confirmation of 
the manor from the Empress Maud. The eldest son Peter had married 
Gundreda de Warren, but had had issue three daughters only — Lora, wife of 
Alexander de Baliol ; Christiana, married ist to William de Mandevil and 
afterwards to Peter Maine ; and Elizabeth or Isabel to David Comyn. 
Robert, the inheritor of his father's estates, by Hawise or Heleuise his wife 
left an only daughter Gunnora, who married Robert Fitz Walter, and was 
heir to her uncle Geoffrey, of whose lands she had livery in the gth year of 
King John. 

Robert de Valoines died in 1184, and was succeeded by his brother, 
John de Valoines. He, by Isabella his wife, daughter of Sir Robert de 
Creke, of North Creke, in Norfolk, had a son Robert, who succeeded him. 
Robert de Valoines married Roesia, one of the sisters and coheirs of Sir 
William de Blund, of Ixworth, and left issue Robert, who was slain at the 
Battle of Lewes in 1264. In right of his mother this Robert de Valoines 
was lord of Ixworth, and marrying Eva de Creketot had issue two daughters, 
Roesia, married to Sir Edward or Edmund de Pakqnham, and Cecily, 
married to Sir Robert de Ufford, who died in 13 16. 

In the year 1204 Hugh Bigod and John Fitz Robert were appointed 
joint governors of this and Norwich Castle, and upon their removal in 1215 
the command of both was given to Hubert 'de Burgh, and Roger Bigot, 
Earl of Norfolk, in 1264, appears to have had the castle as governor. 

The manor does not appear in the grant on the Patent Rolls in 1304 
to Roger de Bigot, Earl of Norfolk,' nor in the committal of the castle 
and town to the custody of William de Clydon in 1315," nor in that to 
John de Sturmin in 1318.^ The grant to Robert de Ufford is also limited 
to thfe castle and town, and is moreover for life only, and for his better 
maintenance in the King's service.* 

In the case of John le Sturmy his custody could not have been for 
long, for in 1318 the King granted him lands in recompense for the custody 
of the castle and town which he had as of the yearly rent of £21. 2s. ii^d., 
and which had been resumed by the King; no doubt with the object of 
committing the custody to Robert de Ufford.^ 

Against this devolution we have some facts difficult to harmonise. 
For instance, Robert de Ufford, the father, held the farm of the manor, if 
nothing more, and he died in 1298, and his interest certainly passed to 
his son and heir, Robert de Ufford, who married Cecily, one of the daughters 
and coheirs of Robert de Valoines.^ Then again, Davy states that Nicholas 

'Pat. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. 3. "^Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. i. 23. 

''0., 9 Edw. II. 3. =Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. pt. ii. 12. 

3 0., 12 Edw. II. 2 ; Pat. Rolls, i Edw. « Extent, I.P.M., 26 Edw. I. 32. 
III. pt. i. 17. 



ORFORD. 147 

de Segrave had the manor for Ufe in 1312. He probably means 1314, 
as this is the date of the grant of the castle and manor.' Also William de 
Cleidon held in 1316^ and on his death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John de Cleydon/ when it went to his daughter and heir Eleanor. 
Yet in 1321, Madox,in his work on the Exchequer/ states that this year 
the manor and castle were in the custody of John de Sturmy. 

There can be no doubt as to Robert de Ufford, who died in 1316, having 
the nianor, and it then passed to his son and heir, Robert de Ufford, who 
at this time appears to have obtained a grant of the town and castle of 
Orford for his hfe through the favour of King Edward III. in 1331. The 
grant was made to him for his services in the wars in Gascony.* 

He was created Earl of Suffolk i6th March, 1336-7, with an " habendum 
sibi et hseredibus suis," thereby conferring upon him the earldom descendable 
to his heirs general. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Walter de 
Norwich and widow of Thomas de Cailly, Lord Cailly, and died 4th Nov. 
1369,= having had issue— Robert, who died in his father's lifetime ; William, 
his successor ; Thomas, who died without issue, and three daughters— Cicely, 
married to John, 3rd Lord Willoughby de Eresby ; Katharine to Robert, 
3rd Lord Scales ; and Margaret, to William, 3rd Lord Ferrers, of Groby. 

William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, was a Knight of the Garter 
in July, 1375, and in 1377 Admiral of the North, and served in the French 
wars with distinction. In 1380 he succeeded to Mettingham Castle and other 
estates of the Norwich family on the death of his mother. 

He married twice— ^ist Joan, daughter and coheir of Edward de Monta- 
cute. Lord Montague, by Alice his wife, daughter and coheir of Thomas 
de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk ; and 2ndly, Isabella, 5th daughter of Thomas 
de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, widow of Sir John le Strange, Lord 
Strange de Blackmore, but died suddenly in ascending the steps of the 
House of Lords, 13th Feb. 1381-2,® without leaving any issue, whereupon 
the manor passed to his widow. Lady Isabella, who had amongst the 
possessions assigned to her in dower a grant of the castle and town of 
Orford. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is a deed dated the Friday after St. 
Valentine's Day, i Hen. IV. [1400], in French, by which William Phelip, 
Robert de Asshfeld, Thomas Wroxham, clerk, and Henry Serjeant permit 
Isabel de Ufford to do waste to the value of 100 marks in the manors of 
Parham, Ufford, the castle and town of Orford " held by her for life." There 
is also a confirmation by William de Willoughby, Lord of Eresby, to whom 
had been granted the reversion of the said manors.^ Isabel de Ufford, 
Countess of Suffolk, died seised 29th Sept. 1416," when the castle and town 
and manor passed with the estates of William, Earl of Suffolk, to his sisters 
and coheirs, and this manor fell to Robert de Willoughby, 6th Baron, son 
of William, 5th Baron (who had died in 1409), son of Robert, 4th Baron (who 
had died in 1396),' son of John, 3rd Lord Willoughby de Eresby, which John, 

' O., 8 Edw. II. 21. had four sons — Robert, Thomas, 

''I.P.M., 24 Edw. III. 80. William, and Edward by his first 

^ Vol. i. 383. wife, but they all pre-deceased their 

* See Manor of Bawdsey, in Wilf ord father without issue. 

Hundred. ''Harl. 55 H. i. 

'Will, 29th June, 1368, proved at Lambeth, ^Will, 26th Sept. 1416. 

nth Nov. 1369. ® His will is dated at Eresby 5th June, 

^Will, 12th and 13th June, 1381, proved I395> and it was proved at Stowe 

at Lambeth, He is said to have Park 12th Aug. 1396. 



148 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

3rd Baron, had married the eldest sister Cecily. Robert de Willoughby, 
6th Baron, had accordingly livery of the castle and town of Orford and the 
possessions of the de Uffords. 

By a deed dated ist June, 5 Hen. V. [1417] he settled the manor, 
granting the same to Henry Fitz Hughe, Lord of Ravensworth, Sir Miles 
Stapultone, Sir Simon Felbrigge, Knt., and John Spenser, John Wilbey, 
Master of the College of Mettingham, Henry Tutlewey, clerk, and others.' 

By another deed amongst the Harleian Charters we find in 1439 Sir 
Robert de Willoughby had licence from Hen. VL to assign by way of settle- 
ment the castle and town of Orford, the Manor of Wykes Ufford, Sogenho#, 
and " Wyndevele le Kay ac Stagnum de Wodbrigge," and also the 
advowson of the church of Ufford held of the King in chief. The trustees 
were Sir Thomas Combirworth, Robert Sheffield, John Langholm, Thomas 
Fitz William, John Stayndrape, and Robert Foranan, and the date of the 
deed ist Oct. 18 Hen. VI. The Manor of Orford does not appear to be 
included. 

Robert de Willoughby married ist Elizabeth, daughter of John 
Montagu, Earl of Salisbury, and andly Maud, daughter of Sir Richard 
Stanhope, cousin and heir of Ralph, Lord CromweU, of Tatshall, and died 
upon the festival of St. James the Apostle in the 30th year of Hen. VL 
[1452]," leaving Joan, the wife of Sir Richard Welles, Knt., son and heir 
apparent of Leo, Lord Welles, his only daughter and heir, 27 years of age. 

Sir Richard Welles was summoned to Parliament in the lifetime of his 
father by the title of De Eresby in 1455 and in 1460 and 1463. Amongst 
the Harleian Charters is a document dated 12th Dec. 39 Hen. VL [1460], 
by which Alice, Duchess of Suffolk, constitutes William Harlestone, William 
Stanley, and John Suliard to receive seisin of the castle and town of Orford 
which the said Alice had recovered against Robert Willoughby by a decision 
of the Court of Common Bench.' 

The manor seems to have been held by Alice's grandson, Edmund de 
la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, but it subsequently vested in Margaret, daughter 
of Sir William Jenny, of Knottishall, widow of Sir Christopher Willoughby, 
K.B., son of Robert Willoughby by Cecily his wife, daughter of Leo, Lord 
Welles, which Robert was son of Sir Thomas Willoughby by Joane his wife, 
daughter and heir of Sir Richard Arundel, which Sir Thomas was a younger 
brother of Robert Willoughby, Lord Willoughby, who died in 1452. Sir 
Christopher left five sons — William, Christopher (father of William, who 
was created Lord Willoughby, of Parham), John, George, and Thomas. 
William Willoughby, the eldest son, on failure of issue of Sir Robert Welles, 
who had married Joane, daughter and heir of Robert, 6th Lord Willoughby, 
came to be one of the coheirs and to re-enjoy the barony of Eresby which 
had before descended to Sir Richard Welles, and was accordingly summoned 
to Parliament 17th Oct. 1509, as Lord Willoughby, of Eresby. 

He married ist Mary, daughter of Sir William Hussey, of Sleaford, Co. 
Lincoln, Chief Justice of England, 1481-95, and 2ndly Mary Salines, a 
Spanish lady (maid of honour to Katharine of Arragon), and dying 19th 
Oct. 1525,* left a sole daughter and heir, Katharine. 

It was on behalf of this lady Mary that Katharine wrote so piteously to 
her father. King Ferdinand, in Sept. 1505, entreating him to command her 
to be paid, " since I have nothing wherewith to pay her." 

'Harl. 58 B. 13. ^Harl. 54 I. 17. 

"■Will, 9th Jan. 1448, and 6th June, 1452, ^He was buried at Mettingham. Will, 
proved at Lincoln, May, 1524, proved 1527. 



ORFORD. 149 

By his will Lord Willoughby settled on his wife amongst other 
possessions Orford, according to the covenants of the marriage settlement 
made between them. Lady Willoughby continued faithful to her unfor- 
tunate mistress, and when she was dying made her way through terrible 
winter weather to Kimbolton, and insisted on remaining with the Queen 
during her last hours, despite the opposition of the King's agents. 

In 1529 Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, obtained the wardship of 
Katharine, the daughter, who making proof of her age in 1535 had livery 
of the lands of her inheritance, and afterwards became the 4th wife of the 
celebrated Duke. He died 24th Aug. 1545, leaving issue by this marriage 
two sons, Henry and Charles, who both of them died on the same day, 
14th July, 1551, in the Bishop of Lincoln's house at Bugden of the sweating 
sickness, under age and without issue. 

The Duchess and Willoughby heiress afterwards married Richard 
Bertie, sometime M.P. for Lincoln. The pair were eminent for their suffer- 
ings in the cause of the Reformation, and in the time of Queen Mary had to 
fly the kingdom. Their hardships were so singularly severe as to be com- 
memorated in a curious old ballad, entitled " The most rare and excellent 
History of the Duchess of Suffolk, and her husband's, Richard Bertie's, 
calamities to the time of ' Queen Dido' ;" published in the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, reprinted in 1738 and again in 1806. 

After relating their escape from London through Flanders to Germany 
with nurse and child, the " History " continues : — 

Thus as they travell'd still disguised 

Upon the highway suddenly 
By cruel thieves they were surprised. 

Assailing their small company ; 
And all their treasures and their store 
They took away, and beat them sore. 

The nurse, in midst of all their fright. 
Laid down their child upon the ground. 

She ran away out of their sight 
And never after that was found ; 

Then did the Duchess make great moan 

With her good husband all alone. 

After vainly seeking for shelter they were compelled to take refuge 
in a church porch, the cjiurch of St. Willebrode, at Wesel, one of the Hans 
towns in the Duchy of Cleveland, where a Latin inscription records the 
truth of the story. She died 9th Sept. 1580. 

In 1562 we meet with a fine levied of the manor.' 

Peregine Bertie, her son and heir, so called from his birth in a foreign 
country, viz., at Wesel, upon the death of his mother claimed the dignity 
and title of Willoughby of Eresby, which was allowed, and he was 
summoned to Parliament accordingly. 

He was the " brave Lord Willoughby " of the ballad who so greatly 
distinguished himself in the Low Countries.'' It is related as a proof of his 

'Richard Bertie and his wife against Sir 'See Motley's United Netherlands, vol. 
William Willoughby, Lord Wil- ii. pp. 48, 515. 

loughby, of Parham, and his wife 
(Fine, Mich. 4 Eliz.) 



150 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

courage that " he offered to meet a person who sent him a very impertinent 
challenge when he had the gout in his hands and feet with a piece of a 
rapi§r in his mouth." 

It was by the marriage of Peregine, Lord Bertie with Mary de Vere, 
aunt and eventually heir of John, Earl of Oxford, that the hereditary great 
chamberlainship of England passed into the family of Willoughby d'Eresby. 

He died in June, 1601/ leaving issue Robert, his son and heir, and four 
other sons aijd a daughter. On the 22nd Nov. 1626, Robert, 12th Lord 
Willoughby de Eresby, was created an earl by the title of Earl of Lindsey, 
but before this the manor had been purchased by Sir Michael Stanhope, 
Knt., youngest son of Sir Michael Stanhope, Knt., and brother of John, 
the 3rd son, created the ist Lord Stanhope. Sir Michael served in the 
fleet of Queen Ehzabeth and in her Privy Council for 20 years, and in the 
early part of the reign of her successor. 

A Survey was made of the manor with the other manors of Sir Michael 
in 1600 by J. Norden, the well-known cartographer. His lands included 
the manors and parishes of Staverton Eyke, Bromeswell, Wantisden, Chilles- 
ford, Sudbourne, Orford, and Dunningworth. 

In 1603 we find on the Memoranda Rolls an order for removal of process 
on annual rent of ^^420 out of Orford Castle and Honor and discharge of 
Michael Stanhope.' 

Sir Michael Stanhope married Elizabeth,- daughter of Sir William 
Read, of Osterley, co. Middlesex, Knt., and on his death the manor passed 
to his daughter and coheir Jane, married ist to Henry, Lord Fitz Walter, 
son and heir of Robert Ratcliffe, Earl of Sussex, and 2ndly to Sir William 
Withepol, of Ipswich, Knt., by whom she had a daughter Elizabeth, 
married to Leicester Devereux, Viscount Hereford, from which time to the 
present the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Chillesford, in this Hundred (except that before vesting in Arthur 
Hayward it was vested in Sir Richard Wallace, Bart.), and is now 
vested in Arthur Herbert Edward Wood. 

There is a precipe on a covenant concerning rent from the castle and 
manors in 1561 amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum." 



'Will, 7th Aug. 1599, proved 12th Sept. ^ Anne on monument at Sudbourn, 

1601. *Add. Ch. 25301, 

^Memoranda, i Jac. I., Rec. Rot. 260. 




PARHAM. 151 

PARHAM. 

lEVERAL manors were held here in Saxon times. One 
formed part of the estate of Earl Ralph, kept in hand for 
the King by Goodrich the Steward. It had formerly 
been held by Thurmot and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 
4 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging 
to the men, 8 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to 
support 20 hogs. 

Also 50 hogs, 5 beasts, 24 sheep, and 50 goats, the value of the whole 
being iocs. At the time of the Survey there were a few differences in these 
details — the serfs were reduced to i, there was wood for the support of 
only 10 hogs, there were 30 hogs, 38 sheep, and 58 goats, while the value 
having been first increased to £7 was still further increased to ;^io (blanche 
money), and 20s. by tale as gersum. 

Amongst the same lands was an estate formerly belonging to six free- 
men. It consisted' of 24 acres and half a ploughteam included in the 
above valuation. Thurmot had the soc over the manor and three freemen, 
and the Abbot of Ely over three. This manor was 11 quarentenes long and 
6 broad, and paid in a gelt 40^.' 

Another manor was enumerated in the Survey amongst the possessions 
of Earl Alan. It had been held in the time of the Confessor by Aluric, 
the King's thane, and consisted of a carucate of land, 3 bordars, a serf, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and half a team belonging to the men. Also 4 
acres of meadow and 20 sheep, the value being 20s. When the Survey was 
taken this manor was held by Hamo of Earl Alan, the half ploughteam 
belonging to the men was not mentioned, and there were 8 hogs, the value 
having increased to 40s. 

Earl Alan had also 16 acres here valued at 32^. which had formerly 
been held by three freemen.'' 

Another estate was that of Earl Hugh and had formerly been that of 
four freemen under commendation to Earl Hugh's predecessor. It con- 
sisted of 20 acres valued at 4s., and at the time of the Survey was held by 
Roger Bigot of Earl Hugh.^ 

Robert Malet possessed three manors in this place at the time of the 
Survey. One was held of him by Walter, son of Aubrey, having formerly 
been the estate of Alnod, a freeman under commendation to Edric. It 
consisted of a carucate of land, 4 villeins, a ploughteam in demesne and i 
belonging to the men, and 3 acres of meadow. When the Survey was taken 
the villeins were reduced to 2, the ploughteam in demesne had disappeared, 
and that belonging to the men was reduced to half a team. To the church 
belonged at that time 24 acres of free land. The value was 30s. 

The second manor was also held of him by Walter, son of Aubrey, and 
was formerly the estate of Blaccheson, a freeman under commendation. 

This consisted of 40 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 6s. M., 
increased to ys. at the time of the Survey. 

The third of Malet' s manors here was formerly the estate of Ernulf, 
a freeman under commendation, and also consisted of 40 acres, half a 
ploughteam, and an acre of meadow valued at ys. 

'Dom. ii. 285. ^Doju {;_ 299. 

''Dom. ii. 296, 2966. 



152 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Other of Malet's holdings cojisisted of 40 acres in the demesne of Newton 
valued at 6s. 8d. ; 12 acres valued at 2S. formerly held by two freemen under 
commendation, and in the abbot's soc ; 40 acres, half a ploughteam, and an 
acre of meadow, valued at 7s., formerly held by Ernulf, a freeman under 
commendation ; 30 acres, half a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, valued 
at 5s., formerly the estate of Alnot, a freeman under commendation; 40 
acres, i ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, valued at ys., in the soc of the 
Abbot of Ely, formerly held by two freemen under commendation, but at 
the time of the Survey held by Walter, son of Aubrey, of Malet ; and 12 
acres valued at 2s. held by Gilbert of Malet, the one belonging to the abbot, 
which estate had formerly been held by a freeman under commendation.' 

Manor of Parham Hall. 

This was probably the lordship of Ralph de CoUevill, who held also the 
advowson of the parish church in the time of Hen. H. They passed to his 
nephew, Gilbert de Colville, and in 1208 were granted by him to Theobald 
de Valoines. In the reign of King John we find an action between this 
Gilbert de Colville and Theobald de Valoines touching the title to the 
advowson of Parham church, the former alleging that the last presentation 
to the same had been made by Ralph de CoUevill, his uncle, whose heir he 
was.'' 

Theobald was the son of Robert, Lord Valoines, and on his founding 
Hickling priory in Norfolk, in 1185, he endowed it with the churches of 
Parham and Hasketon. He was a descendant of Peter de Valoines, a Baron 
in the Conqueror's time.^ Robert de Valoines held in the time of Edw. L, 
and on the Patent Rolls in 1280 will be found a commission issued to enquire ' 
into the persons who broke his park at Parham and carried away deer.'* 
His daughter and one of his coheirs Cecily married Sir Robert de Ufford, 
created by writ 13th Jan. 1308-9, Lord Ufford. He was steward of the 
household to King Edw. H., and took this estate in right of such marriage. 
He had a grant of free warren here in 1304.' It seems that William, son 
of Robert Cokerell, was accused by him of breaking his park at Parham, 
hunting and carrying away deer, for on the Patent Rolls in 1305 we meet 
with a pardon for this offence.^ 

The chief lordship, however, at this time seems to have been held by 
John de Vaux or Vallibus, who died in 1288,'' when it descended to his 
daughter and coheir Petronella, married to William de Nerford. We 
find as late as 1377 the manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of the Nerfords 
as, for instance, in that of John de Nerford." Sir Robert de Ufford died 
gth Sept. 1316,' and Cecily his widow in 1325,'° and from this time to the 
death of William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, in 1382," the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Orford, in this Hundred. 

This earl built Parham church, and bequeathed his body to be buried 
at Campsey abbey, under the arch of St. Nicholas chapel, behind the tomb 
of his father and mother. The reversion in the manor expectant on the 
death of Isabel, Countess of Ufford, was vested in Robert, 4th Baron 

'Dom. ii. 3066, 307. ^I.P.M., 16 Edw. I. 41. 

'Abbr. of Pleas-, 7 and 8 John in dorso. 'I.P.M., 50 Edw. III. 46. 

3 See Manor of Orford, in this Hundred. ^l.VM.., 10 Ed. II. 

^Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 3^. ■" Extent, I.P.M., 19 Edw. II. 74. 

5 Chart. Rolls, 32 Edw. I. 67. " I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 

6 Pat. Rolls, 33 Edw. I. pt. ii. 5. 



PARHAM. 



153 



Willoughby. He married ist Alice, elder daughter of John Skipwith, 
of Colthorp, son of Sir William Skipwith, Knt., Chief Baron of the Ex- 
chequer in the time of Edw. III. ; 2ndly, Margaret, daughter of William, 
Lord Zouch, of Harringworth ; and ardly, Elizabeth, daughter and heir 
of William, Lord Latimer, and widow of John Nevill, Lord Nevill de Raby. 
He died gth Aug. 1391,' and the reversion in the manor passed to his son 
and heir WiUiam, 5th Baron Willoughby, who was summoned to Parliament 
30th Nov. 1396, to 26th Oct. 1409. He married ist Lucy, daughter of 
Roger, Lord Strange de Knockyn, by Aiwa, daughter of Edmund Fitzalan, 
Earl of Arundel ; and 2ndly Joan, 2nd daughter of Thomas Holand, 2nd 
Earl of Kent, " the Fair Maid of Kent," and widow of Edmund Plantagenet 
(de Langley), Duke of York, son of Edward IIL 

In 1401 he was retained to attend the King in his expedition then 
made into Scotland. William de Willoughby, Lord D'Eresby, died 30th 




Parham Hall. 



Nov. 1409,' and the reversion in the manor passed^ to his son and heir 
Robert, 6th Baron Willoughby, who was one of the greatest worthies of 
his age. He attended Hen. V. when he took Harfleur, and at the great 
victory of Agincourt, 25th Oct. 1415. The year following he was retained 
again for foreign wars, and in the interim upon the death of Isabel, widow 
of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, had livery of the castle ^nd town 
of Orford with the Manor of Ufford and a considerable portion of other 
lands. In 1417 he was in another expedition into France, and was one 
of the chief commanders at the siege of Caen, in Normandy, receiving in 
consideration of his services a grant of ;^300 per annum. The following 
year he was at the siege of Rouen. 

For his gallant conduct in the wars of Hen. VI. he was created Lord 
Willoughby of Monblay and Beaumesguil, and Earl of Vendosme and 
Beaumont, and installed a Knight of the Garter." 



' Will proved 12th Aug. 1396, at Lincoln. 

*I.P.M., II Hen. IV. 

3 The manor may have passed as the 
Manor of Combs, in Stow Hundred 
did to his widow Joan, who after- 
wards married Henry le Scrope, 



3rd Lord Scropie, of Masham, and 
subsequently Sir Henry Bromflete, 
Lord Vesey. 
*For his wives see Orford Manor, in this 
Hundred. 



154 



THE MANORvS OF SUFFOLK. 



Amongst the Harleian Charters is a deed dated ist June, 5 Hen. V. 
[1417] by which he granted this manor with those of Ufford and Orford to 
Henry Fitz Hughe, Lord of Ravenesworth, Sir Miles Stapultone, Simon 
Felbrigge, John Hevenyngham, Knts., John Spencer, John Wilbey, master 
of the College of Mettingham, Henry Tutlewey, clerk, and others. 

He died 25th July, 1452, leaving an only daughter, and the manor 
passed in possession (for Isabel, the widow of William de Ufford, Earl of 
Suffolk, had died in 1416) to his next heir male, his nephew Sir Robert, 
son of Sir Thomas Willoughby, by Joan his wife, daughter and coheir of 
Sir Richard Fitz Alan, Knt., son of John Fitz Alan, Lord Maltravers, 2nd 
son of Sir Richard Fitz Alan, 3rd Earl of Arundel. 

Sir Robert Willoughby married Cecily, 2nd daughter of Leo, Lord 
Welles, and eldest sister and coheir of Richard, Lord Welles, and dying 
30th May, 1465,' the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Robert 
Willoughby, who dying two years later, 23rd March, 1466-7,' the manor 
passed to his brother. Sir Christopher Willoughby, who assumed the title 
and was known as the 8th Lord Willoughby. 

Christopher Willoughby was made one of the Knights of the Bath at 
the coronation of Rich. III. In 1487 he brought forces to the aid of the 
King against the Earl of Lincoln, Lambert Simnel, and their adherents, and 
was in the Battle of Stoke, near Newark-upon-Trent, i6th June, when they 
were defeated and the Earl of Lincoln slain. 

By his will bearing date ist Nov. 1498,^ he ordered his body to be buried 
in the church of the nuns at Campsey, in the County of Stafford, before the 
high altar where his father lay interred, bequeathing to the prioress there 
£20, to each of the old nuns 6s. 6d., to each of the young nuns 3s. 4d. He 
also left 10 marks for making another tomb for Robert, late Lord Willoughby 
(his uncle) at Metyngham, and to William Willoughby, his eldest son, 
or to him who after his death should be his heir, half his plate and 
jewels. 

He married Margaret, daughter of Sir William Jenney, of Knottishall, 
one of the Judges of the Court of King's Bench, and dpng in 1498 the manor 
passed to his widow Margaret for life, and on her death i6th May, 1515,* 
went under the will of Christopher to his 2nd son. Sir Christopher 
WiUoughby, Knt. 

In 15 13 he was nominated by Act of Parliament as one of the most 
discreet persons, justices of the peace (as the words of the Act run), for 
assessing and collecting a subsidy of £163,000 by a poll tax, &c. The same 
year being with the King in his expedition against the French, he was 
knighted for his valiant behaviour at the sieges of Teroven and Tourflay. 
By his will dated in 1527 he gave £4 per annum to the church of Parham 
in satisfaction of all tithes and offerings negligently forgotten. Notice and 
particulars of Sir Christopher's goods at Parham in 1527 will be found 
amongst the State Papers.' Amongst the Tanner MSS'. in the Bodleian 
we find the grant by Christopher Willoughby to Edward Whyte of a certain 
annuity out of the manor in 1527.® 

There is amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in 1530 an action 
by Lady Willoughby against Sir Christopher Willoughby as to this manor.' 



' I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 35. 
n.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 37. 
3 Proved 13th July followingi 
■^I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 29. 



= S.P., 19 Hen. VIII. 3474. 
^Tanner, cvi. 11. 

'''>" Hen. VIII., Star Chamber 
ceedings, Bundle 17, 399. 



'23 



Pro- 



PARHAM. 155 

Sir Christopher Willoughby resided in the parish, and married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir George Talbois, Knt., and sister and heir of Gilbert, Lord 
Talbois, of Kime, co. Lincoln, by whom he had issue Sir William Willoughby, 
Knt., his son and successor, who i6th Feb. 1546, was created Baron Wil- 
loughby, of Parham, and having distinguished himself in the wars of King 
Henry VIII. was 4th of Edw. VI. made Lieutenant of Calais and the 
marshes adjacent, where he resided during the remainder of that reign. 
In the reign of Queen Mary he was removed from the government of Calais^ 

In 1553 a fine was levied of the manor by Richard Heywoode and 
others against William Willoughby, Lord Wentworth.' The fine included 
the advowson of the church of Parham. Sir William Willoughby, ist 
Baron, married ist Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Heneage, 
of Hainton and Knaitb, co. Lincoln, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter of 
Robert Garneys, of Kenton, and widow of Richard Devereux, Viscount 
Hereford, father of Walter, Earl of Essex. In 1570 on the insurrection 
in the north by the Earls of Northumberland and Westmorland he marched 
with the Earl of Sussex against them, having under his command a great 
chairge of footmen as Stowe in his annals relates. His will bears date at 
Doncaster loth Dec. 1569,'' wherein he directed his body to be buried at 
Parham. He died in Aug. 1574, leaving Margaret, his 2nd wife, surviving, 
and the manor passed to his son and heir Charles, 2nd Lord Willoughby, 
subject to her life interest. The widow made her will 13th Feb. 1593-4, 
which was proved 28th Jan. 1599-1600. 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1580 by Sir William Skipwith and 
others against this Charles, Lord Willoughby.^ 

Charles, 2nd Baron, married Margaret, daughter of Edward Clinton, 
1st Earl of Lincoln, by whom he had issue five sons — William, who died in 
his lifetime. Sir Ambrose Willoughby, Knt., Edward Willoughby, Charles 
Willoughby, and Sir Thomas Willoughby, and three daughters. William 
the son died in 1601, and by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heir of Sir 
Christopher Hildyard, Knt., of Winestead in Holderness, had issue with 
other children, a son WiUiam, who succeeded on the death of his grands 
father Charles in 1603. 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1596 by Thomas Hatcliffe and others 
against William Willoughby and others,* and another in 1597 by Sir Henry 
Constable and others against the said William.' William Willoughby, 3rd 
Baron, married Frances, daughter of John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland, 
and was father of three successive lords Willoughby. 

A first court for the manor is said to have been held 21st July, 1600, by 
Robert Barker, and another29th March, 1614, a first court was held by Robert 
Barker, serjeant-at-law, who died in 1618, when he was succeeded by his 
son and heir, Bestnen Barker, who held a first court 12th June, 1618. But 
if these were lords of this manor, they must have held their courts as trustees 
or mortgagees, for we find that 26th Oct. 1614, William, 3rd Lord 
Willoughby of Parham, held his first court. He died 28th Aug. 1617, 
leaving his eldest son and heir Henry, 4th Lord Willoughby, an infant of 
the age of 4 years and n months. Henry died shortly after his father in 
infancy, and the manor passed to his brother Francis, 5th Lord Willoughby, 
2nd son of the 3rd Lord, who loth Oct. 1639, held his first court. He 

' Fine, Easter, 7 Edw. VI. ♦Fine, Trin. 38 Eliz. 

^Proved August, 1574. ^Fine, Mich. 39-40 Eliz. 

3 Fine, Mich. 22-23 Eliz. 



156 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

sided with the ParUament on the breaking out of the Civil War, and was 
a commander in the army of the Commonwealth. He was, however, 
accused by Parliament of high treason in 1647, and made his peace with 
the King the following year. 

His correspondence will be found amongst the Tanner MSS. in the 
Bodleian,' and notices of it will be found in the same collection.'' He 
married Elizabeth, 2nd daughter and coheir of Sir Edward Cecil, Viscount 
Wimbledon. Francis, 5th Lord Willoughby, of Parham, sold the manor 
to Barnabas Bowtell, who held his first court in 1649. In 1687 Henry 
Webb is stated to have been lord, but shortly afterwards the manor was 
purchased by John Corrance, of Rendlesham. He died in London 7th 
April, 1704,^ and was buried at Parham 6th May, the manor passing to his 
son and heir, Clement Corrance, who represented Orford in Parliament from 
1708 to 1714. 

He married in 1705 Mary, eldest daughter of Sir Robert Davers, 2nd 
Bart, of Rougham, and made that parish his future residence. His will 
is dated 1723, and he died in 1724, and was buried in Rougham church, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Corrance, of Rougham, 
who by a 2nd marriage with Anne, daughter of Robert Chester, of Coken- 
hatch, CO. Herts, left an infant daughter Anne, his sole heir. John Corrance 
died 31st July, 1742, and by his will dated the same year left the manor 
to his widow Anne for life. She died in 1745, when the manor devolved on 
her daughter Anne, who dying unmarried 6th Aug. 1748, it passed to 
Elizabeth, another sister of John Corrance and daughter of Clement, who had 
married Israel Long, of Dunstan, near Norwich. Elizabeth Long died at 
Bury St. Edmunds 30th December, 1792, aged 87, when the manor passed 
to her cousin Mary, eldest daughter and coheir of Major John Corrance, a 
distinguished officer at Dettingen, Fontenoy, and CuUenden (son of Richard 
Corrance, 2nd son of John Corrance, of Rendlesham, M.P. for Oxford), and 
wife of Snowden White, M.D., of Nottingham, eldest son and heir of Snowden 
White, of Newton Flottman, co. Norfolk, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter 
of Dr. Latham, of Derbyshire, and grandson of Samuel White, of St. Ives, 
who was a younger son of Thomas White, of Pirton, co. Herts, an officer in 
the Parliamentary army, and the officer who at Cromwell's command 
removed the mace from the table of the House of Commons in 1653. 
Snowden White the son died in 1797, and his widow in 1837, leaving an 
only son, Frederick White, of Loudham Hall and Parham Hall, J. P. and 
D.L., who 27th Sept. 1819, married Frances Anne, 3rd daughter of William- 
Woodley, Governor of Berbice and of Great Kitts, who i6th May, 1837, 
assumed the name of Corrance, He died in October, 1873, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Capt. Frederick Snowden Corrance, of Parham 
Hall, J. P., D.L., M.P. for East Suffolk 1863 to 1873, who in i860 married 
Frances Maria, daughter of Capt. Charles Du Cane, R.N., of Braxted Park, 
Essex, and had an only son, Charles Frederick, born 1862 and died 1876. 

There are in the British Museum grants in 1417* and 1429' of the 
manor. Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum, too, is 
a release of the manor in 1548.* 

' Tanner liv. 147 ; Iv. 70 ; Ivi. 209, 210, 240 ; *Harl. 58 B. 13. 

Ixii. 208, 229, 232. 5 Harl. 58 B. 17. 

^ Tanner liv. 44; M. i. 11 : cclxxxvi. 132. *Add. Ch. 14991. 
^ Will 23rd April, 1704. 



PARHAM. 157 

Arms of Willoughby : Or, fretty Azure. Of White : Argent, 
on a chevron, between three wolves' heads erased, Sable, a wolf's head Or. 

Manor of Hickling Hall. 

This was the lordship of Robert de Valoines, Lord Valoines, and passed 
to his son and heir, Theobald de Valoines, who when he founded the priory 
of Hickling, in Norfolk, gave the advowson and land here in 1185 to the 
priory. At the dissolution of the religious houses the manor passed to the 
Crown, and was granted in 1536 to the Bishop of Norwich, who had licence 
in 1541 to grant it to Sir William Woodhouse. He and Thomas Woodhouse 
his brother (?) had licence to alienate 24th June, 1548, to William Naunton' 
and Elizabeth his wife and to the heirs of the said William for ever. 
William Naunton and Elizabeth his wife had licence 2nd April, 1550, to 
alienate to John Bacon. The sale was effected by a conveyance dated 
2ist May, 4 Edw. VI. in consideration of £420, and a fine was duly levied 
1551 by the said John Bacon against the said William Naunton, and 
it included the advowson of the vicarage of Parham, and lands in Hacheston, 
Euston, and elsewhere.'' John Bacon died in 1558, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, George Bacon. He had licence 24th July, 1603, 
to alienate to Edmund and Edward Warner. The conveyance was made 
1st May, 3 Jac. Further, in 1607, Edmund released to Edward. Edward 
Warner was a citizen and merchant of London, the 2nd son of Francis 
Warner, of Parham, by Mary his 2nd wife, daughter and coheir of Sir Edward 
Rous, Knt. He died in 1628, and made Francis Warner, of Parham, his 
nephew and next heir, his executor and chief heir to his estate. Francis 
Warner died, and was buried 13th Sept. 1658, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir John Warner, who was created a baronet, and married 
Treva, only daughter of Sir Thomas Hanmer, Bart., of Hanmer, in the 
County of Flint, and having only two daughters, who both took the veil, 
he settled the manor on his brother, Francis Warner, who died without 
issue. 

In 1699 the estate was bought under the authority of an Act of Parlia- 
ment by John, son of John Corrance, of Rendlesham, who then held the 
Manor of Parham Hall, from which time the manor has descended in the 
same course as that manor. 

Arms of Warner : Or, a bend engrailed between 6 roses Gu. barded 
Vert. 



'There is a quit claim of the manor this his wife, in the British Museum 

year "by Sir Anthony Wingfield (Add. Ch. 14991.) 

to William Naunton and Elizabeth ' Fine, Mich. 4 Edw. VI. 




158 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

RENDHAM. 

[HERE were several manors in this place in Saxon times. 

One was that of Ostula^, a freeman under commendation to 

Malet's predecessor, his father William being seised thereof, 

and consisted of 40 acres, a villein, 2 bordars, a ploughteam 

in demesne and half a team belonging to the men. The 

value was 7s, At the time of the Survey this manor was 

held by Earl Alan, the soc belonging to the abbot. 

Earl Alan held two other manors in this place. The first in the same 

township was formerly held by Hune, a freeman under commendation to 

Ralph the Staller, and consisted of 30 acres, half a ploughteam and an 

acre of meadow, valued at 5s. 

The second was formerly held by nine freemen under commendation to 
Malet's predecessor, his father William being seised of them. This manor 
consisted of gi acres, 2 bordars, 4^ ploughteams, and 4 acres of meadow, 
valued at 20s. (increased to 27s. at the time of the Survey). The soc 
belonged to the abbot.' 

Robert also held a manor in this place of Robert Malet at th^ time 
of the Survey. It consisted of a carucate and 69 acres of land as a hamlet, 
3 villeins, 2 bordars, 2 serfs (reduced to i when the Survey was taken), 2 
ploughteams in demesne and ij teams belonging to the men (reduced to i 
when the Survey was taken), 6 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 
40 hogs (and only for 30 when the Survey was taken), a rouncy, 24 hogs, 
18 sheep, and 30 goats, valued at ^3. los. 

There was also a church with 24 acres and a ploughteam. Added to 
this manor were 13 freemen with 80 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at 
the time of the Survey), and 3 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. 

The manor was a league in length and 7 quarentenes in breadth, and 
paid in a gelt 20^. The soc belonged to the abbot, "* 

Two other manors in this place were held at the time of the Survey by 
Roger Bigot. The first was held of him by Norman and formerly belonged 
to Olf, a freeman under commendation to Norman. It consisted of 30 
acres, a bordar, and an acre of meadow, valued at 5s. The soc belonged to 
the abbot. 

The second was held of him by Ralph, and formerly belonged to Blacson, 
a freeman under commendation to Edric, Malet's predecessor, William 
being seised thereof. This consisted of 66 acres, a villein, 3 bordars, ij 
ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to support 4 hogs, 
valued at 12s. The soc belonged to the abbot. 

Another estate of Bigot held of him by Ralph formerly belonged to four 
freeman and a half, and consisted of 35 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 
5s. lod. Three of these freemen were under commendation to Malet's 
predecessor — Gadric, Godric, and Tulf ; William Malet being seised thereof. 
The soc belonged to the abbot. Roger Bigot also held a bordar here with 
10' acres valued at 10^.^ 

u 

Manor of Rendham. 

This was the estate of Olf, a freeman in the time of the Confessor, and 
of Roger Bigot at the time of the Survey when one Norman held it of him. 

'Dom. ii. 297&. ^Dom. ii. 344, 344&, 345. 

'Dom. ii. 3076. 



RENDHAM. 159 

In 1316 it was vested in John de Brusiardor Bruseyard, of Shaddingfield, 
in Wangford Hundred^ and somewhat later in Ralph de Ufford, Earl of 
Suffolk, who granted it to John Warde. Extent of the lands belonging to 
Sibton abbey in Rendham in 1324 will be found amongst the Additional 
MSS. in the British Museum.' But the manor was not acquired by the abbey 
until i355j and the licence to alienate will be found amongst the Harleian 
Charters in the British Museum/ It is given by indenture under the seal of 
Sir Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, to John Warde, parson of Wodeton, 
Roger Almot, of Mellis, and others, and authorises the alienation to the 
monastery of this manor which the licensees held immediately of the said 
Earl. The licence is dated at Perham and Sybton on Sunday after the 
Feast of the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr [7th July] 29 Edw. Ill 

The manor was then held by service " ad wardam " of Richmond Honor. 
With the monastery of Sibton the manor continued until the suppression 
of that house, when it vested in the Crown, and was granted in 1547 to Sir 
Arthur Denny. He had licence the same year to grant the same to Edmund 
Rous. A fine was levied of the manor in 1576 by William Grene against 
Andrew Jennour and others.^ 

In 1805 it was vested apparently in Thomas Trusson, later in Catherine, 
sister and heir of Anthony CoUett, and after in his son and heir, the Rev. 
Anthony Collett, who died in 1838, and whose executors advertised to sell 
by auction the manor, 8th June, 1838. ■• 

In 1847 the manor was vested in Frederick W'hite Corrance, of Parham 
Hall. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Margaret Wingfield, 
who died 31st August, 1504, leaving Elizabeth, wife of John Glemham, and 
Katherine Bacon, wife of Robert Garneys, Eleanor Bacon, daughter of 
Thomas Bacon, next heirs as daughters of Thomas Bacon, son of the 
said Margaret.' 

Manor of Barmes or Barnes. 

Early in the 15th century this lordship seems to have been held by 
John Berney, but by 1481 it was vested like the main manor in the Abbot 
of Sibton. After the suppression of the religious houses the manor was 
granted in 1547 to Anthony Denny and subsequently vested in Sir Edmund 
Rous. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
will be fotmd an action by Henry Denny against Sir Edmund Rouse touching 
this Manor of Barnes,^ who had licence in 1552 to alienate it to Robert 
Hacon. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1558 by Robert Norton against Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk." 

In 1609 the manor seems to have been in Philip, Earl of Arundel, but 
by the beginning of tlje i8th century we find it vested in Seth Powell, son 
of the Rev. William Powell), vicar of Rendham. Seth Powell was buried 
at Rendham 2nd Dec. 1719, and by his will dated i8th Sept. 1719, gave 
the manor to his wife Anne for life, then to his daughter Anne for life, with 



2 



'Add. 34560. n.PM., 21 Hen. VII. loo. 

Harl. 84 B. 11. *C.P. Ser. ii. B. liv. 8. 

3 Fine, Trin. 18 Eliz. ^Fine, Trin. 5 Mary I. 
* Ipswich Journal, 28th April, 1838. 



i6o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

remainder in tail male, and in default to his nephew, the Rev. Francis 
Powell (rector of All Saints', Colchester), son of his late brother Joseph 
for life, with remainder to his issue in tail male, with remainder to his 
(testator's) own right heirs. Anne, the widow of Seth, died and was buried i6th 
Oct. 1787. The manor would seem to have been sold during her lifetime, 
for William Turton held his first court 4th Oct. this same year. 

In 1855 the manor was vested in J. Crabtree, and in 1885 in the Misses 
Crabtree. 



SAXMUNDHAM. 



i6i 




SAXMUNDHAM. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times, both of which 
when the Survey was taken were held by Roger Bigot. 
The first had been the estate of Norman, and consisted of 
140 acres, 2 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and 2 belonging to the men, and 3 acres of meadow. Also 
a church with 15 acres valued at 30s. When the Survey 
was taken Norman held this manor of Roger Bigot and had 
the soc. The Survey says : " This is one manor of three which the King 
gave back to Norman, and now he holds it of Roger." 

The second manor was formerly the estate of Algar, the Confessor's 
thane, and consisted fo 2 carucates of land, 40 acres, 5 villeins, 10 bordars, 
3 serfs (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 3 ploughteams in demesne 
and 3 belonging to the men, which latter had become 2^ at the time of the 
Survey. Also 5 acres of meadow, 2 churches with 24 acres and half a 
ploughteam, 2 rouncies, 3 beasts (which were not mentioned in the Survey), 
16 hogs (then increased to 30), and 80 sheep. 

Roger Bigot also had another holding here at the time of the Survey, 
consisting of 30 acres belonging to the Kelsale demesne.' 

Manor of Hurts or Hurtz or Hurt's Hall. 

This was the lordship of Algar, a thane of the King, in the time of the 
Confessor, and formed part of the estate of Roger Bigot at the time of 
the Survey. 

In 1336 the lordship was vested in Sir John de Wingfield, who had a 
grant of free warren here this year,' and also a grant of a fair here in 1348.^ 

The manor passed to his daughter Katherine, who married Michael de 
la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk, and on his death in 1388* the manor passed to 
Sir Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk.' 

In 1408 he settled this and other manors, and amongst the Harleian 
Charters is a writing whereby he constituted Roger Grys to deliver seisin 
of the manor to Master Edmund de Stafford, Bishop of Exeter, Randulph 
de Nevylle, ist Earl of Westmoreland, Sir Thomas Erpyngham, Sir Edmund 
de la Pole, Master John de la Pole, Robert de Boltone, and others. The 
document is dated ist June, 9 Hen. IV." The manor was then held of the 
Castle of Framlingham by knight's service. The Earl of Suffolk died at 
the siege of Harfleur, 14th Sept. 1415, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Michael de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, whp died shortly after- 
wards, on the 25th October, 1415, leaving daughters only, whereupon the 
manor passed to his brother, William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk, 
from which time to the execution of Edmund de la Pole, 2nd Duke 
of Suffolk, 30th Sept. 1513, the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of 'Wattisfield, in Blackbourn Hundred. Amongst the Harleian 
Charters is a deed in 1430 by which William de la Pole, 6th Earl of Suffolk, 
Robert Boltone, clerk, and Robert Boltone demised to Sir John Shardelow, 
Thomas Hoo, and others, this with other manors. It is dated 20th Oct. 
9 Hen. VI .^ Amongst the same Charters is a quit claim dated the same 

' Dom. ii. 3386, 339. ' For further particulars of the de la Poles 

^ Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 30. see Manor of Wingfield, in Hoxne 

3 Chart. Rolls, 21 Edw. III. 21. Hundred. 

♦I.P.M., 13 Rich. II. 41. *Harl 54 I. 7. 

^Harl. 54 I. 10. 



W 



l62 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



year, ist Feb. 9 Hen. VI., from Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and Robert, 
Lord Willoughby, to Sir John Shardelowe, Thomas Hoo, John Golafre, 
Richard Wyot, Andrew Sperlyng, and Robert Danvers, of the manor.' 
By a deed the following year the Earl of Suffolk, Sir John Shardelowe, and 
Thomas Hoo released the manor with others to John Hampden, Thomas 
Hasley, Richard Rostwold, Thomas Walsyngham, and William Hervy. 
This deed is dated loth Oct. 10 Hen. VL," and this as well as the 
deeds of 1430 included the manors of Swans in Saxmundham and Maunde- 
villes and Glanvilles in Sternfield, in this Hundred. Three further deeds 
relating to all these manors are in the Harleian Collection. They are all 
dated 1431. The ist, which is dated 20th Sept. 10 Hen. VL, is a deed 
whereby John Golafre, Andreas Sperlyng, and Robert Danvers demise to 
John Hampdene, Thomas Hasley, and others the manors.^ The second 
bears the same date, and is a power to deliver seisin ; while the 3rd is a 
release from Cardinal Henry Beaufort, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, 
Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, Robert, Lord de Willoughby, and 




Hurts Hall, Saxmundham. 



others to Sir John Shardelow, Thomas Hoo, John Golafre, Richard 
Wyot, Andreas Sperlyng, and Robert Danvers of all the above manors. 
The date is 20th Nov. 9 Hen. VL" 

The manor was assigned to Edmund's widow, daughter of Richard, Lord 
Scroope, for life, after which it devolved on the Crown, and was in 1546 
granted to Sir Nicholas Hare and John Hare.' The beneficial interest 
was Sir Nicholas Hare's, and from this time to the death of Robert Hare 
about 1625 the manor passed in the same way as that of Woodbridge 
Ufford, in Loss Hundred. The manor then passed to Benjamin Cutler, 
who sold it before 1650 to John Base, from whom it passed to his son and 
heir, John Base. 



' Harl. 45 I. 12. 
'Harl. 54I. 15. 
3 Harl. 54 H. 27. 
*Harl. 43 E 19. 



538 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. 308, 
where the valuation of file rectory 
on the grant to them is referred to. 



SAXMUNDHAM. 



163 



Amongst the State Papers in 1648 we find an entry no doubt referring 
to this John Base. It is apparent from this entry that he compounded for 
lands worth l^ a year purchased of Grace Bedingfield, two-thirds of which 
were sequestered for her recusancy.' 

He was in 1654 appointed Commissioner for Sequestrations.' 

It is possible, however^ that John Base's manor was only that of Swan's. 
Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth we find 
an action by John Woode, Phillippe, his wife, and others against Edmund 
Keble touching the " manor place of Hurtes in Saxmundham."^ 

The manor was then purchased by and passed to Charles Long, of 
Longville, a member of the council, and Colonel of Horse in the Island of 
Jamaica. He was the son of Samuel Long, Chief Justice and Speaker of 
the House of Assembly in the island. Charles Long came to this county 
and settled at Saxmundham, and was chosen as a representative in Parlia- 
ment for Dunwich in 1714. He married in 1699 Amy, eldest daughter of 
Sir Nicholas Lawes, Knt., Governor of Jamaica, by whom he had issue one 
son and one daughter. He married 2ndly Jane, only daughter and heir of 
Sir William Beeston, Knt., Governor of Jamaica, and relict of Sir James 
Molyford, Bart. On his death in 1723 the manor passed to his eldest son 
by his 2nd marriage, Charles Long, who married Mary, 2nd daughter and 
coheir of Dudley North, of Glemham,and dying in 1778 the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Charles Long, who married in 1786 his first cousin Jane, 
daughter of Beeston Long, of London, and dying in 181 2 the manor passed 
to his widow Jane for life, and on her death in 1834 passed by will to William 
Long, and has since devolved in the same course as the Manor of Farnham, 
in this Hundred, and is now vested in William Evelyn Long.'* 

Hurt's Hall, originally built in the 15th century, was destroyed by fire 
in 1890, and three years later rebuilt as a mansion in the Elizabethan style. 
It stands in a park of about 200 acres, and is the seat of the lord of the 
manor. 

Manor of Murkets or Saxmundham Market, 

This was the estate of Roger Bigot at the time of the Great Survey, 
and in 1273 the lordship was vested in John de Ramsey e, who had in that 
year a grant of a market and fair. He died in 1275, and in 1311 we find 
the manor vested in Thomas de Verley, who had a grant of a market and 
fair here this year.' The same year we find an order on the Close Rolls 
as to the market held upon a portion of the estate of Thomas de " Verlay " 
here. It is an order to pay to him the profits of a market and fair held upon 
seven acres in Saxmundham, whilst in the King's hands, the land having 
been so taken for his trespass in acquiring same in fee from William de 
Brykeleye without the King's licence, of whom it was held in chief." 

In 1347 the manor was vested in Sir John de Wingfield, and from this 
time to the execution of Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1513, 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Hurt's or the main manor 
and the Manor of Wingfield, in Hoxne Hundred. 



'S.P. 1648, Cal. of Comp. 1851. 
"S.P. 1654, Cal. of Comp. 691, 693. 
^C.P. Ser. ii. B. cxcv. 21. 



■*For account of this family, see Burke's 
Landed Gentry, 793. 

5 Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 38. 

6 Close Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 8. 



i64 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1510 the manor was granted by the Crown to Sir Robert Brandonj 
but in 1538 it was granted to King Hen. VHI. by Charles Brandon, Duke 
of Suffolk, in exchange.' 

In 1609 a Thomas Johnson appears to have been lord, and in 1673 
Nicholas Sheppard, woollen draper, held the lordship. In 1724 the manor 
was evidently vested in Deborah Brame, of Marlesford, widow, for by her 
will dated 3rd April this year she gave and devised unto Ofifiey Jenney, 
her grandson, " All that my Manor of Saxmundham Markett with the 
rights, members, &c., with the profits of the Fairs or Markets and all fines 
rents, issues, tolls, &c. To hold to him, his heirs, and assigns for ever." 

The manor subsequently vested in Charles Long, who died in 1778, 
from which time it has devolved in the same course of descent as the main 
manor. 

Manor of Swan's. 

In 1308 this was the lordship of Robert Swan, who founded a chantry 
here. The licence for the alienation in mortmain of land here by him 
will be found this year on the Patent Rolls. It enabled the grant to be made 
to a chaplain celebrating daily in his (Robert Swan's) chapel at Saxmundham 
of 60 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, 2 acres of wood and 4s. rent in 
Saxmundham held in chief as of the Manor of Framlingham.'' 

The manor seems to have passed to Roger Swan, who held in 1323, 
and later to Robert Swan, who died in 1377.^ His holding here was of 
I messuage, 60 acres of land, 3 of meadow and pasture, and 2s. 6d. rent 
in Saxmundham. Not only are these particulars found in the inquis. p.m. 
of the last-mentioned Robert Swan, but also in the inquis. p.m. of 
another Robert Swan, who died in 1385.* 

The particulars are practically the same as those contained in the grant 
for the chantry, and this is explained by an entry on the Patent Rolls in 1385, 
where it is made clear that by reason of the withdrawal of the chantry the 
land and endowment had been seized into the hands of Edw. III. In 1385 
the lands were granted by Rich. II. to Edmund de Wyghtham.' 

In 1408 the lordship was held by Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, 
and was included in the settlement made in 1408 referred to under the account 
of Hurt's Manor, in Saxmundham.^ He died in 1415, when the manor 
passed in the same course of devolution as the main manor to John de la 
Pole, Duke of Suffolk, who was beheaded in 1491. 

In 1508 the manor was granted to Sir George Nevil, Lord Bergavenny. 
The grant is dated 21st Feb. 23 Hen. VII. It included the Manor of Combs, 
and is amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum.' In 15 14, 
however, the manor is found again in the de la Pole family, being included 
in the inquis. p.m. of Edmund, Earl of Suffolk, 1513,* when it is stated to 
be held of the King by fealty and of the value of £g per annum ; and also 
included in the grant made to Margaret, widow of Edmund de la. Pole, 
Earl of Suffolk, for life. See notice of grant in the State Papers in 1514.' 

The following year the manor went to the Crown on the death of 
Margaret, and was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who in 
1538 exchanged the same by deed with Hen. VIII. for other manors." 

'S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (i8a). ^Harl. 54 I. 7. , \ 

"Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. II. pt. ii. 14 ; I.Q.D., 'Harl. 51 H. 18. 

2 Edw. II. 27. 'I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. i. 

'I.P.M., I Rich. II. 46. 'S.P. 3 Hen. VIII. 4254. 

n.P.M., 9 Rich. II. 66. '°S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (i8ai). 
' Pat. Rolls, 9 Rich. II. pt. i. 30. 



SAXMUNDHAM. . 165 

There are three fines between 1579 ^^^ ^5^4 levied of the manor. The 
first in 1579 was levied by Sir Valentine Browne against Thomas Heyford' ; 
the second in 1580 by Edward Glemham against Sir Valentine Browne 
and others,' and the third in 1584 by John Stubbe and others against 
Edward Glemham and others.' 

[In 1601 leases of the manor for ninety-nine years were granted, and 
again in 1602. J 

In 1609 Alice Cartwright, widow, is entered by Davy as lady of the 
manor. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find a claim by Thomas Johnson 
against Robert Alcocke as to the site of this manor held under a lease granted 

by the Duke of ,* and amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time 

of Queen Elizabeth an action by Reginald Duxe against Anthony Hayford 
as to a place called " Swannes " in Saxmundham.^ 

In 1682 and 1694 we meet with certain entries in the Exchequer 
Depositions taken at Saxmundham and Yoxf ord, which show a connection 
of John Base with the manor at these dates. The first is an action by Roger 
Coke against him as to the manors of Swan's and Benhall Saint Roberts, 
and sums of money alleged to be owing by the defendant to the estate of 
Thomas Bishop, deceased^ late of Cokeley.® The second is an action 
by Roger Coke against John Bishop and others relating to the Manor of 
" Swans," and copyhold lands held by John Base. Surrender of lands to 
Thomas Bishop deceased as security, &c.'' 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Dudley North, and no doubt passed 
to his daughter Mary, married to Charles Long, who died in 1778, when 
it passed to his son and heir, Charles Long, who died in 1812, and subse- 
quently in the same course as the main manor, being now vested in William 
Evelyn Long. 



'Fine, Hil. 21 Eliz. 'C.P. Ser. ii. B. liv. f. 

*Fine, Easter, 22 Eliz. *Exch. Dep. 33 Chas. II. 

^Fine, Hil. 26 Eliz. ^Exch. Dep. Yoxford, 1694.- 
♦C.P. ii. 90. 




i66 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

SNAPE. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Edric of Laxfield, 
and consisted of 4 carucates of land, 8 villeins, 16 bordars, 
5 ploughteams in demesne and 8 belonging to the men. 
Also wood sufficient to support 6 hogs, 6 acres of meadow, 
a mill, 2 rouncies, 6 beasts, 24 hogs, and 160 sheep, valued at 
£6. At the time of the Survey Walter held this manor of 
Robert Malet, the latter having the soc. The ploughteams 
in demesne had disappeared, but some might be made up, those belonging 
to the men were reduced to 4, 2 rouncies, hogs and sheep were not 
mentioned, and the beasts were reduced to 2. The manor was 3 leagues 
in length and 4 in breadth, and paid in a gelt 40^. 

Robert Malet also at the time of the Survey had here an estate formerly 
belonging to 25 freemen under commendation to Edric of Laxfield. It con- 
sisted of 108 acres, and 6 ploughteams among them (reduced to 4 when the 
Survey was taken). The value was formerly 23s. and only 20s. at the time 
of the Survey. 

Another estate of Malet was at the time of the Survey held of him by 
Gilbert the Blond, having in Saxon times been held by 21 freemen under 
Edric's commendation. It consisted in former times of a carucate of land, 
30 acres, and 6 ploughteams, valued at 20s. When the Survey was taken 
the ploughteams had come down to half, but the value had increased to 
40s. There was also a church with 8 acres valued at i6d.' 

There is another entry relating to Snape in the Survey under 
the head " Becclinga." It was amongst the lands of Roger Bigot, and 
consisted of a socman holding 20 acres, valued at 2s. This socage belonged 
to Kelsale. It was held in demesne by Ranulf, the soc belonging to the 
abbot.' 

Manor of Snape. 

This was in the Confessor's time the estate of Edric of Laxfield, and at 
the time of the Survey Robert Malet's, Walter holding under him. 

In 1099 William Martel, Albreda his wife, and Geoffrey their son and 
heir, gave the manor with the benefit of wrecks of the sea from Thorp to 
Orford Ness to the abbot and convent of St. John at Colchester, for the 
purpose of founding in the parish of Snape a priory which should be a cell 
to that abbey. A copy of the grant is still preserved amongst the ancient 
deeds in the Public Record Office.^ The endowment included the Manor of 
Aldeburgh also. The grant states that the abbot and chapter of 
Colchester shall place at Snape a prior and monks according to the possi- 
bility of the place under their obedience, who shall pay them half a mark 
yearly, and say two masses weekly for the grantors. The Abbot of 
Colchester should also visit the priory twice yearly with 12 horses, &c. 
The witnesses to the deed are : William, Bishop of Norwich, Walchelin the 
archdeacon, Edward the dean, Osbern Martel, and others named. 

By the deed of gift it appears that the founder intended to have his 
design immediately carried into execution, but the monks of Colchester 
delayed until 1155, at which period a prior and some Benedictine monks 
from that house settled here. 

'Dom. ii. 316 (bis). 3 A. 3262. 

"Dom. ii. 3S86. 



SNAPE. 



167 



Isabel, Countess of Suffolk, and patroness of this priory, preferred a 
complaint to Pope Boniface IX., which stated that the abbot and convent 
of Colchester did not maintain a sufficient number of religious here according 
to the intention of the founders, and in response this house was made con- 
ventual and exempt from subjection to Colchester. This occurred in 1286, 
but in 1377 we find that the King confirmed the priory to the Abbot of 
Colchester, and on the Patent Rolls in 1400 we find an order for the arrest 
of John Mersey, of St. John's, Colchester, for scheming to separate Snape 
priory, a cell of the abbey, therefrom.' In 1405 the manor was again in the 
prior of Snape, for this year it was taken into the King's hands, and on the 
Memoranda Rolls we find an order touching the prior of Snape being 
charged for the issues at that time." 

In 1508 Hen. VII. granted the manor to the prior of Butley, but he 
resigned it in 1509, and in 1524 at the Suppression, it passed to the Crown, 
and was granted to Cardinal Wolsey for his great educational scheme. 

A terrier of the suppressed monastery of Snape will be found amongst 
the State Papers in 1525,^ and rents, &c., in Snape lands of Wolsey's College 
will be found in the State Papers for the same year.* Inquisitions upon 
lands of the suppressed monastery at Snape will be found also in the State 
Papers for 1527.' \ 

In 1525 the manor was granted by the Cardinal to the dean of Cardinal 
College, Oxford, who in 1529 granted it to the dean of Cardinal College, 
Ipswtch. 

The transfer to the college at Ipswich was made by a Bull confirmed 
by the King.* 

On Wolsey's faU the grant of the manor was resumed by the Crown, 
and in 1530 we learn from the State Papers that a lease was granted to 
Thomas Rushe and Thomas Alverd for 30 years.'' But in 1533 we 
find the manor granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk.' The grant will be 
found entered on the Originalia Rolls this year,' and notice of the grant 
appears amongst the State Papers the same year.'" From this time to the 
death of William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford, without issue in 1791, 
the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Aldeburgh, in this 
Hundred, and from that time to the present has passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Friston, in this Hundred, and is now vested in T. F. C. 
Vernon Wentworth. 

Amongst the Bodleian Charters we find a lease for six years dated 
ist March, 9 Anne, by which Sir Henry Johnson, described as of Friston 
Hall, demised to one Robert Hayward, of Snape, certain land there at an 
annual rent of ;f35." 

There are Court Rolls of the manor in the British Museum for the 
following periods: 1391-1448," 1487-1507,'^ 1602,'* 1686-7,'' and Compotus 
Rolls of the manor 1279-81,'" 1288-9,'' 1310-1,'^ and 1421-23.'' 



' Pat. Rolls, I Hen. IV. pt. vi. 4d.; pt. viii. 

28d. 
'M. 6 Hen. IV. Pas. Rec. Rot. 17. 
^S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1534 (211). 
*S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 2024. 
5S.P. 19 Hen. Villi 3537. 
6S.P. Hen. VIII. vol. iv. App. 172; 

S.P. 20 Hen. VIII. 4307 (3) ; see 

S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 47 (4). 
7 S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 6803 (21). 
*See account of him, Stoke .by Nayland 

Manor, in Babergh Hundred. 



9 0. 24 Hen. VIII. Rot. 31. 
"S.P. 24 Hen. VIII. 418(3). 
" Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1371. 
" Add. Ch. 10508, 10510, 10512. 
•3 Add. Ch. 26297-26308. 
'*Add. Ch. 13693. 
"Add. Ch. 26390. 
•6 Add. Ch. 10504, 10505. 
'^Add. Ch. 10506. 
»8Add. Ch. 10507. 
'9 Add. Ch. 16511. 



i68 TH^ MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Courtlets or Cautlets. 

The first lord we meet with of this manor is John Okolte. In 1430 we 
find Henry Beaufort, Cardinal of England, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, 
Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and others released to Sir John 
Shardelowe, Thomas Hoo, John Golafre, Richard Wyot, Andrew Sperlyng, 
and Robert Dan vers.' There is also amongst the Harleian Charters a 
quit claim by Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and Robert, Lord 
Willoughby, to the same parties to whom the last-mentioned release was 
given. It is dated ist Feb. 9 Hen. VI. [1431].' The feoffees above had 
licence to grant the manor to William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, and Alice 
his wife, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to the Earl's right heirs. ^ 

WiUiam de la Pole, then Duke of Suffolk, died in 1449,* when the 
manor passed to his son and heir John, and from him to Edmund de la 
Pole, Duke of Suffolk, as the Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn Hundred. 

At the beginning of the i8th century the manor was purchased by Sir 
Henry Johnson, who died in 1719, from which time it has devolved in the 
same course as the main manor. 

Manor of Bekling. 

This manor was in 1408 vested in Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, 
and was included in the several deeds of 1408, 1430, and 1431 referred to in 
the account of the Manor of Hurt's, in Saxmundham. There is a Survey 
and particulars of this manor taken from a MS. in the Cambridge Public 
Library amongst the Davy MSS. in the British Museum.* 

Manor of Tastard's. 

The manor was 6th July, 1405, given by William Worstede to the 
prior of Snape.^ Court Rolls relating to the manor when belonging to the 
priory, from 1487 to 1507, will be found amongst the Additional Charters 
in the British Museum.' 

Henry VII. granted the monastery of Snapewith all its members to the 
prior of Butley in 1508, and it seems that in such grant this manor was 
included. 

It vested in the Crown on the surrender of the prior of Butley in 1524, 
and was granted to Cardinal Wolsey for his College at Oxford, and he settled 
the same in 1525 on the dean of Cardinal College accordingly. The dean 
in 1529 granted it to the dean of Cardinal College, Ipswich, and on 
Wolsey's fall the King resumed the Wolsey grant. In 1533 the King 
granted the manor to" Thomas, Duke of Norfolk,* frbm whom it descended 
in the same course as the main manor to Henry, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, 
who died in 1652. 

Manor of Rysing. 

This was the inheritance of Robert de Rising, and in 1428 was vested 
in William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk. In 1430 the manor was released by 
Henry Beaufort, Cardinalof England, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Richard 
Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and others to Sir John Shardelowe and 
others as mentioned in the account of the Manor of Courtlets, in Snape.' 

' Harl. 43 E. 19. The deed is dated the s Add. MSS. 19101, fol. 2316. 

20th Nov. 9 Hen. VL « I.Q.D. 6 Hen. IV. 20. 

'Harl. 45 I. 12. 7 Add. Ch. 26297-26308. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 12 Hen. VI. pt. i. 2 ; 13 Hen. « S.P. 24 Hen. VIII. 418 {3). 

VI. 28. 9 Harl. 43 E. 19. 3 

4 See Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn 

Hundred ; I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25- 



SNAPE. 169 

Early in the i8th century the manor was purchased by Sir Henry 
Johnson, who died in 1719, and from this time the devolution of the manor 
has been identical with that of the main manor. 

Conveyances, &c., of " Beklyng, Cauteles, and Rysnges " manors in 
1408, 1431, and 1435 will be found amongst the Harleian and Additional 
Charters in the British Museum.' And extracts from the Court Rolls of 
these manors in 1609 will be found amongst the same Additional Charters. "^ 

Manor of Scotts. 

The devolution of this manor, so far as we are able to gather, has been 
identical with that of the Manor of Tastard's, at least so far as we have been 
able to trace the descent of that manor. 

Court Rolls for 1487-8, 1490, 1491, of the first court of Sir Thomas de 
Walley will be found in the British Museum.^ 

Manor of Leffey. 

All Davy says of this manor is that William, Lord Howard, had Ucence 
to alienate it in 1552 to Robert Richers, gent. This is not a large amount 
of information to work upon, and unfortunately this little has, we fear, a 
poor foundation. There can be no doubt that the manor referred to is not 
in Snape, but the Manor of Leffey, in Buxhall, in Stow Hundred. 



One of the manors of Snape was known as Snape Hall. It was vested 
in Nicholas Launce, of Fressingfield, possibly by virtue of a fine levied by 
him and his wife Joan in 1332 against Richard de Bernyngham and John 
de Hedersete.* It related also to lands in Fressingfield, Metfield, Strad- 
broke, Mendham, Esham, and Syleham. 

Nicholas Launce appears to have died before 1352, and the manor to 
have descended to his daughters and coheirs in shares, for in 1352 a fine was 
levied of a fifth part of the manor by John de Wyngefeld and Alianora his 
wife,' and in 1356 another fine was levied of the manor by John de Wynge- 
feld and Alianora his wife against Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Launce. 
The fines also included three parts of the market of Fressingfield.'' 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum are the Court 
Rolls of a manor in Snape belonging to Campsey Ash Priory, 1405-1448.'' 



' Hari. 54 I. 7 ; 54 1. 10 ; 45 1. 12 ; 50 * Feet of Fines, 6 Edw. III. 24. 

H. 27, 28 ; Add. Ch. 20, 16. 'Feet of Fines, 25 Edw. III. 25. 

«Add. Ch. 2634. *Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. III. 7. 

sAdd. Ch. 26297-26300. 'Add. Ch. 10509, 10513, 10514. 




I70 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

STERNFIELD. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Leuric under 
commendation to Norman. It consisted of 50 acres, 3 
bordars, ij ploughteams, and an acre of meadow. There 
was also here an estate of two freemen under sub-commen- 
dation to Norman, consisting of 3 acres valued at 20s. This 
was held at the time of the Survey by Norman of Roger 
Bigot, the soc belonging to the abbot. William Malet held 
the manof at the time of his death, and Robert his son succeeded him. 

Roger Bigot had two other estates in this place at the time of the 
Survey. The first was held in demesne, and was formerly the estate of 
Edric, a freeman under Norman's commendation. It consisted of 34 
acres, half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los. 8^. William 
Malet was seised thereof, and Robert in like manner, the soc belonging to 
the abbot. 

The second had formerly belonged to 16 freemen and a half, and con- 
sisted of 130 acres and 5 ploughteams, valued at 305. Norman had com- 
mendation over 7|- in the Confessor's time, and Roger held over them in 
demesne, Robert Malet's predecessor having commendation over 3^, 
Oschetel, Leuric, Osiet, and Leuric Snip the half freeman. Of these William 
Malet was seised, and his son in like manner.' 

Earl Alan had two holdings in this place both held in demesne when 
the Survey was taken. The first was formerly the estate of Osbern a free- 
man, and consisted of 24 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 4s. The 
second was formerly the estate of two freemen, and consisted of 8^ acres 
valued at 18^., the soc belonging to the abbot." 

Robert Malet had two holdings here at the time of the Survey. The 
first was of a socman with 30 acres and an acre of meadow, valued at 55.^ 

The second, which was held by William of Robert Malet, consisted of 
100 acres, an acre of meadow, and 4 ploughteams, valued at 44s. It had 
formerly been held by 15 freemen under Edric's commendation, when 
there were 5 ploughteams and the value was but 205." 

Mandeville's Manor. 

This was the estate of Leuric under the protection of Norman in the 
time of the Confessor and of William Malet at the time of the Survey. From 
William Malet the estate passed to his son, Robert Malet. 

William Gulafre held the manor in the time of Hen. I., and it passed 
to his son and heir, Roger Gulafre, and from him to his son and heir, William 
Gulafre, on whose death it went to his daughter and heir Philippa, married 
to Robert, son of Ralph Brito.^ On the death of Robert Brito the manor 
passed to his son and heir, William Brito, or Breton, and from him to his 
son and heir, William Breton, who died in 1258. William Breton's daughter 
and coheir Nicholaa or Scholastice married ist Sir Robert Mundeville or 
Amoundeville, and 2ndly Roger de Huntingfield. 

Roger de Huntingfield and Nicholaa his wife by fine in 1290 settled the 
manor on Robert de Mundeville or Amoundeville, the son of Sir Robert 
Amoundeville Nicholaa's ist husband. This statement is not verified, 

'Dom. ii. 344. *Dom. ii. 3166. 

• Dom. ii. 297. ^ See Manor of Okenhill Hall, Badingham, 

' Dom. ii. 316. in Hoxne Hundred. 



STERNFIELD. 



171 



but is founded on the result of consideration of the actual devolution coupled 
with the fine levied in 1290.' Of course it is possible that Sir Robert Munde- 
ville and Roger de Huntingfield had married two sisters, daughters of 
William Breton. 

From this time to the death of Sir Richard Mundeville in 1350 the 
manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Okenhill Hall, Badingham, 
in Hoxne Hundred. But we find that in 1330 and 1333 John de Mundeville 
presented to the living of Sternfield, and it is doubtful whether Sir Richard 
de Amoundeville, who died in 1350, was not his son and heir rather than, 
as stated in the account of Okenhill Hall, the son of Richard. 

In 1384 we find the manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Michael 
de la Pole " for the parson of Sternfield Church.'" Richard de " Mounde- 
vyle " was at that time the parson of Sternfield. Michael de la Pole died 
seised of the manor apparently in 1388,^ and it passed to his son and heir. 
Sir Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, and was included in the settlement 
made in 1408 referred to in the account of Hurt's Manor in Saxmundham.* 
Sir Michael died in 1415, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Michael 
de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, and on his death in October of the same 
year to his brother, William de la Pole, ist Duke of Suffolk, who died in 
1450.' 

In 15 13 the manor was held by Edmund de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk.* 
Amongst the State Papers in 1530 is a grant in fee of " Sternfield Manor " 
to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, which manor is there said to be in the King's 
hands by the attainder of Wolsey.'' 

In 1546, however, the manor had passed to the Framlingham family, 
and was held by Francis Framlingham, who died in 1544, when it passed 
to his son and heir. Sir Charles Framhngham, who died in 1595,° when the 
manor passed to his grandson, Framlingham Gawdy. He married Lettice, 
daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Knowles, and died 25th Feb. 1654-5, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir William Gawdy, ist Bart., 
so created 13th July, 1663, who married ist Sept. 1636, Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of John Dufiield, of East Wretham, co. Norfolk, and died in August, 
1669,' when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John Gawdy, 2nd 
Bart., married to Anne, 2nd daughter and coheir of Sir Robert de Girey, of 
Merton, co. Norfolk, and died in Jan. 1708-9. Sir John, however, in his 
lifetime sold the manor with the advowson for £400 to William Johnson, 
brother of Sir Henry Johnson. Upon William Johnson dying in Africa, 
Dudley North, of Glemham Hall, purchased the manor in 1719. 

He died in 1729, from which time the manor has descended in the 
same course as the Manor of Farnham, in this Hundred, and is now vested 
in William Evelyn Long, of Hurt's Hall, Saxmundham. " 

There are conveyances of this and Glanville's manors amongst the 
Harleian Charters and Additional Charters in the British Museum in 
1408," 1430," and 1431." 



'Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. I. 18. 
"I.P.M., 8 Rich. II. 57. 
3 LP.M., 13 Rich. II. 41. 
* Harl. 54 I. 7. 
5I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 23. 
«I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. i. 
7S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 220 (11). 



' As to these descents, see Crows Hall Manor, 
Debenham, in Thredling Hundred — 
but a different baronetcy. 

'Will proved Feb. 1670. 

" Harl. 54 I. 9. 

" Harl. 43 E. 19 ; 54 I. 10. 

» Harl. 45 1. 12 ; 50 H. 27, 28 ; 54 1. 15. 



172 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Manor of Virlies or Glanville's. 

This was the estate of Edric, a freeman, in the Confessor's day and of 
WiUiam Malet in the time of the Conqueror, and passed from William to 
his son Robert. 

Gilbert Glanville,' Baron of Bromholm, and sometimes called Earl of 
Suffolk, held the manor, and it passed on his death in 1266 to his 2nd son, 
Gilbert de Glanville, from whom in 1280 it went to his son and heir, Sir 
Gilbert de Glanville, from whom it passed to his daughter and heir Eleanor, 
married to Sir John de Wingfield, of Wingfield Castle, who had a grant of 
free warren here in 1335.* On Sir John de Wingfield's death the manor 
passed to his widow Eleanor, and then to their daughter and heir Katherine, 
married to Michael de la Pole, created Earl of Suffolk 6th August, 1385. 
He had licence to make a castle of his mansion here, and on his death the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, 
and the devolution from him to Margaret, the widow of Edmund de la Pole, 
Earl of Suffolk, is the same as that of the Manor of Mandeville's just given. ^ 
In 1494 Edmund, Earl of Suffolk, held a first court. 

In 1513, however, we find Sir Robert FitzLewis, Knt., had a grant, 
probably of the reversion, and he in 1515 by deed dated i8th Feb. 6 Hen. VIII. 
sold to Oliver Pole, Chancellor to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and to 
Humfrey Wyngefeld, "generall attorney to the said Duke," for^^ioo sterling. 
The conveyance was made to the use of the said Duke, "who held his first 
court in 15 15, and then exchanged the manor for other estates with King 
Hen. VIII. The manor was forthwith granted by the King to Anne of 
Cleves, who held her first court, 3rd June, 1541. 

Davy says that in 1543 Mary Glemham, probably wife of Edward, 
held the manor, and died in 1571, but he also states that Edward Glemham 
had the manor and held his first court in 1558, and further that he was a 
purchaser from the Crown and died in 1560. His next statement is that in 
1561 John Glemham, son and heir of Edward, held and died in 1563. This 
Edward Glemham was of Benhall. His wife Mary was the daughter of 
Henry Barnes, of Malgruoes, in Essex, and died 31st May, 1571. They had 
two sons, John and Edward. 

As John was buried 3rd April, 1563, if Davy be correct, he must have 
succeeded his father in 1560, and during the lifetime of his mother, who 
did not die till 1571. There is no doubt that in 1572 Richard Conyngsby, 
executor of the will of Mary Glemham, held the manor during the minority 
of Edward Glemham, the 2nd son and heir of Edward Glemham, and brother 
of John Glemham. Edward Glemham, the son, married Ehzabeth, daughter 
of George Bateman, of Flixton, and they in 1584 had licence to alienate, 
and sold to Francis Bacon and William Philips. 

A fine was levied of this manor in 1584 by Francis Bacon and others 
against Edward Glemham and others.' William Philips died in 1590 
seised of a moiety, iand Francis Bacon had licence the same year to alienate to 
James Bacon. Thomas Philips, son and heir of William, had livery in 1591, 
but this same year Thomas Philips and James Bacon held a first court. 

In 1605 Sir John Watts and others had licence to alienate a moiety 
to Thomas Wjrthe, and in 1607 Sir James Bacon and Thomas Wythe were 

' See Sutton Hall Manor, in Wangford 3 See Pat. Rolls, 12 Hen. VI. pt. i. 2 : 
Hundred. 13 Hen. VI. 28. 

Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 30. * Harl. 54 I. 17. 

5 Fine, 26 EUz. 



STERNFIELD. 173 

lords. Sir James Bacon appears to have acquired the whole. He was 
knighted at Whitehall in July, 1604, and married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Francis Bacon, of Hessett, and died 17th Jan. 1618, when this manor, which 
had evidently been given to him by his father-in-law, passed to his 2nd son, 
James Bacon, rector of Burgate, who held his first court in 1619. He 
married Martha Honeywood, and died 9th Nov. 1649,' leaving the manor 
to his widow Martha, who held her first court 22nd April, 1650. She 
remarried the Rev. Robert Packe, and died 25th Aug. 1670, aged 74, when 
the manor passed to her son by her first marriage, Nathaniel Bacon, 
baptised at St. Mary, Bury, 26th Aug. 1620. He was a merchant, and 
possibly the Nathaniel Bacon later described as the elder, of Virginia, for 
in 1763 we find the manor vested in Thomas Sheriffe, and in 1772 in Mary 
Sheriffe. In 1782 the manor was vested in Charles Long, from which time 
it has apparently passed in the same course as the Manor of Farnham, in 
this Hundred, and is now vested in William Evelyn Long, of Hurt's Hall, 
Saxmundham. 

There is a sale of this manor in 15 15 amongst the Harleian Charters in 
the British Museum.'' 



'Will 24th Sept. 1647, proved 23rd Jan. 'Harl. 54 I. 27. 
1649. 




174 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK- 

STRATFORD ST. ANDREW. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
that of Heme, a freeman under commendation to Edric, 
and consisted of 80 acres, a ploughteam, 5 bordars, half a 
ploughteam belonging to the men, and 4 acres of meadow. 
Also a rouncy, 12 hogs, 16 sheep, and 27 goats, valued at 
20S. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by 
Robert Malet, the rouncy was not mentioned, there were an 
additional 2 beasts, the hogs had increased to 15, and the sheep to 30, while 
the value was 25s. 

Robert Malet also had an estate here which formerly belonged to a 
freeman and a half Alwin, and consisted of 14 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at 3s. 4^. The soc belonged to the abbot.' 

The second manor in Saxon times was that of Starling, and consisted 
of a carucate of land, 5 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne, and half a team 
belonging to the men. Also 4 acres of meadow and a mill, valued at 40s. 
The Domesday tenant was Walter Giffard. This Giffard had also here 
74 acres and a ploughteam and a half, valued at 75., held of him by Ralph 
de Langtoft. It had formerly been the estate of 13 freemen and a half 
under commendation. The soc belonged to the Abbot of Ely.* 

Manor of Stratford. 

This was the estate of Heme under commendation to Edric in the 
time of the Confessor, and of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey. The 
manor came to Randulph de Glanville, and on his founding Butley priory 
he probably made this manor part of the endowment. With the priory 
the manor remained until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown,^ 
and was granted by Hen. VHI. to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. He 
exchanged it with the King in 1538 for other lands, and later* the King 
granted it to Anne of Cleves for life. The manor or the reversion in it (as 
Anne of Cleves did not die until 1557) was granted in 1557-8 to Gregory Pryce 
and Thomas Kerry, and they sold to or were possibly trustees for Thomas 
Glemham, of Glemham,^ who died in 1571, when the manor descended in 
the same course of devolution as the Manor of Farnham, in this Hundred, 
to the time of the Hon. Sophia North, who had it in 1830, from which time 
to the present it has passed in the same course as the Manor of Glemham 
Parva, also in this Hundred, and is now vested in the Earl of Guildford. 

Manor of Griston. 

This was the estate of Starling in the Confessor's day and of Ralph 
Langtoft under Walter Giffard at the time of the Survey. In the reign 
of Hen. III. the lordship was held by William de Kerdeston, and passed to 
his son and heir. Sir Roger de Kerdeston, and from him to his son and heir. 
Sir William de Kerdeston, as to whom see the Manor of Bulchamp, in Blyth- 
ing Hundred. A fine was levied of the manor in 1317 by Stephen de 
Cressingham, chaplain, against Wilham de Kerdeston and Thomas his son.® 
Thomas does not seem to have inherited, for it is stated that on the death 
of Sir William de Kerdeston the manor passed to his son, Sir Roger de 

'Dom. ii. 3086. *S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (i8a). 

^Dom. ii. 430. 'Harl. 80 A. 52. 

'Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. «Feet of Fines, 11 Edw. II. 44. 



STRATFORD ST. ANDREW. 



175 



Kerdeston, who was created a Knight of the Bath (with Prince Edward of 
Carnarvon, son of King Edw. I.), and was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk 
in 1331. He was summoned as a Baron to Parliament in 1332, and died in 
1337/ when the manor passed to his widow Maud as part of her dower. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1338 will be found an order to deliver to this 
Maud, there called Matilda, late wife of Roger de Kerdeston, tenant in 
chief, the advowson of Stratford church, extended at 10 marks yearly 
assigned in dower by the King with the assent of William de Kerdeston.'' 
Subject to his mother's interest the manor and advowson descended to her 
son and heir, William de Kerdeston, aged 30 at the decease of his father, 
and in 1342 he had licence to alienate in mortmain the advowson to certain 
chaplains to celebrate in his Manor of Claxton, and for appropriation of 
Stratford church.^ In 1339 he obtained a licence to make a castle of his 
manor house at Claxton, in Norfolk ; he was summoned to Parliament inj 
1354, and in 1359 was summoned to be of council to Thomas de Wood- 
stock, Duke of Gloucester, the King's son, and Custos of England during 
the King's absence in France. He died seised of this manor in 1361.* 

In 1353 he formed the design of settling this manor on the master and 
chaplains of the chantry of St. Mary in Claxton church,^ and in 1448 a 
patent was granted to settle the said manor, with tenements here, for the 
foundation of a chantry there, which manor was said to be held of the 
prior and monks of Thetford, probably in trust for that purpose. This 
house had an interest in the tithes of this parish, under a gift of Ralf Fitz 
Walter and Maud his wife. 

WiUiam de Kerdeston was found to be son and heir of the above William 
by Maud his ist wife. And on the Originalia Rolls in 1373 is an order to 
take fealty of William de Kerdeston, son of William, deceased, of the manor 
and also the advowson of the church of Stratford.^ But by another 
inquisition John, son of John de Burghersh, and Maud his wife, daughter 
and coheir of Sir WiUiam de Kerdeston, and of Margaret his 2nd wife, 
daughter of Edmund Bacon, of Gresham, was found to be his heir ; and 
various law suits ensued upon these inquisitions in order to prove this 
William to be illegitimate/ 

In 1425 a fine was levied between Thomas Chaucer (son of the poet) 
and Maud his wife, one of the daughters and coheirs of Sir John Burghersh, 
querents, and Sir Thomas Kerdeston and Elizabeth his wife, deforciants, 
of this manor, under which it became vested in Thomas Chaucer and Maud, 
and they conveyed the manor by way of settlement to Sir Thomas and 
Elizabeth in tail to be held of the heirs of Maud. Sir Thomas Kerdeston 
died in 1447, and we learn from the Escheat Rolls in 1451 that the jury found 
that he was not seised of the manors of Bulchamp, Henham, and Stratford 
at his death f but that William de la Pole, late Duke of Suffolk" and Alice 
his wife as her right entered on and received the profits during the life of 



' I.P.M., II Edw. III. 43. 

*Pat. Rolls, II Edw. III. pt. ii. 19. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 15 Edw. III. pt. i. 6. 

♦I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 106. 

= I.P.M., 26 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 41. 

6 0. 46 Edw. III. 7. 

The proceedings will be found set forth 
in Blomefield's Hist, of Norfolk. 
The allegation was that Sir Wm. de 
Kerdeston was the son of Alice, 



daughter of — Norwich, his father's 
concubine, though others alleged he 
was his father's son born before 
marriage. The latter was certainly 
proved by a jury in Trinity Term, 
38 Edw. III. See further Bulchamp 
Manor, in Blything Hundred. 

'I.P.M., 29 Hen. VI. 31. 

9I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 



176 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir Thomas, and that Alice, late wife of the said Duke, and Sir John 
Howard were his next heirs. Alice was the daughter and heir of the above 
Thomas Chaucer and Maud his wife, and ist married Sir John Phelip, of 
Bennington, in Hoxne Hundred. The manor and advowson are mentioned 
in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Chaucer and " Matilda " his wife in 1435,' and 
also in that of the said Matilda alone in 1437.^ 

John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, son and heir of WilUam, next 
held, and the manor passed as the Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn 
Hundred, to Edmund de la Pole, on whose attainder it passed to the Crown. 
The manor was granted by King Hen. VHI. to Anne of Cleves for life, and 
on her death in 1557 it reverted to the Crown, and Davy states was granted 
in 1599 by Queen Elizabeth to Richard Forth and Edward Hawtayne. 
There seems to be considerable doubt whether Davy's entry refers to this 
manor, for he enters Thomas Glemham as lord, stating he died in 1571. A 
grant could not well have been made by the Crown in 1599, if the manor were 
vested in Thomas Glemham in 1571. 

Amongst the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum is an entry which 
shows that Stratford Manor formed part of the possessions of the prior of 
Butley, and was rated 3rd July, 1557, ^o^ t^^ said Thomas Glemham.^ 

It may, we think, be taken as certain that the manor vested in Thomas 
Glemham, and on his death in 1571 passed to bis son and heir. Sir Henry 
Glemham, who died in 1632, from which time it has passed in the same 
course of devolution as the main manor, and is now vested in the Earl of 
Guildford. 

, Manor of Arniger's. 

We find one William Arniger interested in lands in Stratford mentioned 
without date amongst the Chancery Proceedings. The action was William 
Arniger v. John Lucas, and it related to lands in Stratford called Pheyties, 
of which Henry Betts held a lease from the Crown, which Betts had agreed 
to assign to Arniger. Lucas required Arniger to let him have one parcel 
called Plenney pasture for one year.* 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth the manor became vested in Thomas 
Glemham, who died seised thereof in 1571, and descended to his great-great- 
grandson, Thomas Glemham, in the same way as the manor of Farnham, 
in this Hundred. The manor was really annexed to the manor of Over 
Pistries in Glemham Parva during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, under the 
title of Pistries or Over Pistries cum Arniger's, and has since passed 
with that manor, the title to which has been already deduced. 



'I.P.M., 13 Hen. VI. 35. 3Harl. 607. 

"I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 53. ^CP. i. 21. 




SUDBOURN. 177 

SUDBOURN. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor by the 
Abbot of Ely. It consisted of 6 carucates of land, 14 villeins, 
15 bordars, 2 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 12 
belonging to the men. Also 4 acres of meadow, wood 
sufficient to support 12 hogs, a rouncy, 7 beasts, 17 hogs, 
and 120 sheep, valued at £y. At the time of the Survey the 
manor was still held by the abbot, but some of the details had 
altered. The bordars had increased to 21, the serfs were not mentioned, the 
ploughteams in demesne were reduced to i, and those belonging to the 
men to 6, but 6 might be restored. The rouncies had increased to 2, 
and the value was the same. 

There was also a church with 8 acres. The manor was a league in 
length and half a league in breadth and paid in a gelt 20^.' 

At the time of the Survey Robert Malet had two estates in the place. 
The first was held of him by Gilbert de Wishant and had formerly been 
the estate of 12 freemen (formerly under Edric's commendation). It 
consisted of 60 acres and 3 ploughteams (reduced to 2 when the Survey 
was taken), valued at 20s. To one of these freemen had belonged a manor 
with 20 acres, a beast, 30 hogs, 40 sheep, a ploughteam which might be made 
up, and a mill, valued at los. There was also a church with 16 acres, 
valued at 2s. 

The second was held of Malet by Walter de Caen. This consisted of 
30 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam, a fishpond, an acre of meadow, and a 
salt-pan, valued at 12s., formerly the estate of a freeman under Edric's 
commendation.' 

Manor of Sudbourn. 

King Edgar gave this manor to Ethelwold, Bishop of Winchester, for 
translating the rule of St. Benedict into the Saxon or English tongue. 
He gave the manor about g8i to the Monks' Church of Ely. Hervey, 
Bishop of Ely, in dividing the possessions of the church of Ely, assigned 
this to the monks,' and in 1229 Pope Gregory confirmed the manor to the 
prior and convent of Ely. 

The manor somehow seems to have gone to the Bishop of Norwich, for 
Page informs us that the manor and advowson were appropriated to the 
prior and convent of Ely by William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich (he died 
in 1355), in exchange for a certain inn or hostel in Cambridge with John 
Crawdone (or Craudene), the 22nd prior of Ely, who had bought and used 
it as such for the reception of the young monks of Ely coming thither to 
improve in learning, and upon the site of which the bishop designed the 
foundation of Trinity Hall, for which purpose he afterwards permitted 
John de Aslakby, rector of the parish of Sudbourn," with the chapel of 
Orford to resign them and receive a pension of ^^40 per annum out of the 
prior's manor in Sudbourn,^ and then that rectory was appropriated by 
the bishop to the prior of Ely and a vicarage instituted in Sudbourn. On 
the dissolution of the monasteries this manor went to the Crown, and was 
granted in 1550 to the Bishop of Norwich, but the grant was resumed 

'Dom. ii. 384. *Harl. 43 I. 22. 

*Dom. ii. 316&. 'loth April, 25 Edw. III. 6; Rep. Hist. 
^1109-31, 1133-69. Copies of Confirraa- MSS. Com. 300. 

tion. Had. 43 H. 4-5. 



178 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by Queen Elizabeth. The manor possibly was vested in 1587 in Reginald 
Heigate, for amongst the Exchequer Special Commissions in the Record 
Office we meet with a suit this year by Heigate against Philip, Earl of 
Arundel, as to the manor and the marshes there.' The action appears from 
the Exchequer Depositions taken at Snape Bridge this year (1587) to 
have involved land in Sudbourn, Aldborough, and Orford, and to have 
related to marsh lands, meets and bounds, customs of manor and tithes. 
And seven years later, amongst the State Papers, we find a complaint by 
Heigate that 50 tenants holding by copy of Court Roll of this manor had 
withdrawn their service from Sudbourn Manor and done service as of 
Aldborough Manor.' From another entry in the State Papers this same 
year we gather that Heigate was only a farmer of the manor for the Queen ; 
for we find a complaint by him that certain marsh lands parcel of the 
" Queen's manor of Sudbourn " whereof he (Heigate) was farmer, are 
withheld from him.^ Yet another entry in the same place informs us 
that the Earl of Arundel and others claim marsh called Overy Slips and 
Catmarsh as copyhold, and admit they do not know Larderne Marsh by 
the bounds, but claim South Marsh, and if Larderne Marsh lies within 
those bounds, then they claim that also as freehold of the Earl of Arundel. 
And another entry in the same place tells us that the bounds between 
Sudbourn and Aldborough manors are not perfectly known. 

The manor appears subsequently to have been granted to Sir Michael 
Stanhope,* and on his death in 1621 passed to his daughter and coheir 
Jane, married to Sir Edmund Withipol, whose daughter and heir married 
Leicester Devereux, 6th Viscount Hereford, from which time to the 
present the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of Earl 
Soham, Loes Hundred, and later as Chillesford, in this Hundred. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1661 we find a request by Sir Allan 
Apsley for a warrant for the Earl of Hereford for preservation of game 
20 miles round his house,' and in JJ^^ we find a warrant appointing the 
Earl gamekeeper within 20 miles of his house at Sudbourn." The manor, 
was, 24th July, 1753, offered for sale pursuant to a decree of the Court of 
Chstncery, under which the estate of Pryce, late Viscount Hereford, was 
directed to be sold. At that sale Lot 2 comprised the castle of Orford 
and the manors of Sudbourn, Orford, Chillesford, and Gedgrave.' 

The manor is now vested in Kenneth M. Clark, who resides at Sudbourn 
Hall. 

Of the hall, Martin, in his " Church Notes," says : " Sudborne Hall 
(where the late Lord Hereford dyed) is a good bricked building, handsomely 
fitted Up and well seated with a fine park and good gardens. It is within 
a mile of ye Burgh of Orford. There are some good pictures in it of the 
famiUes of Price, Devereux, Martin, Withipole, &c. An extraordinary 
good picture of ye Nativity with one of the Withipols kneeling at our 
Savipur feet, as he hes along. The babe holds a little bird in his right 
hand, w*''" I take to be a red cap (or goldfinch), commonly caU'd a King 
Harry Red cap, and this might probably be done in honour of K. Henry 
the 7th or 8th about w""" time I believe this picture was drawn." 

'£xch. Spec. Com. 30 Eliz. D.K.R., 38 * See Manor of Orfprd, in this Hundred. As 
App. pp. 40, 41 ; 31 Eliz. lb. p. 43. to tomb of Sir Michael Stanhope, see 

= S.P. 1595,24. S.I. V. 119, 

3S.P. 1595,24- =S.P. 1661, 594. 

«S.P. 1664, 617. 

''Ipswich Journal, 23rd June, 1753. 



SUDBOURN. 179 

The customs of the manor are : An heriot, the best Uving creature, 
and for want of such the best moveable. Forfeiture to cut timber without 
hcence nth April, 1636. Half part for dower, 14th April, 1637. Custom 
to pay every new lord at his first entrance the sum of £10 to be collected of 
the several copyholders rateably according to their respective tenancies, 
30th Oct. 1735 ; common recoveries suffered 32 Edw. III. 21 Jac. I. 
Tenant by curtesy, 32 Edw. I., 4 Hen. VH., 15 Jac. L 



i8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



SWEFLING. 




I HERE were four manors here in Saxon times. The first 
was that of Osmund, a freeman under commendation 
to Malet's predecessor, and consisted of 30 acres in the 
abbot's soc, 3 bordars, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 5s. WiUiam Malet was seised thereof, and the 
soc belonged to the abbot. Five freemen held 54 acres, 
two of them, namely, Aluric and Dot, being under sub- 
commendation to Malet's predecessor, with 10 acres, and one Buric being 
under commendation and soc of Ralph the Staller, with 24 
acres. There were 2 ploughteams and 4 acres of meadow, valued 
at los., the soc belonging to the abbot. Also 14 freemen held 94 acres 
and 3 bordars. Over three and a half Malet's predecessor had commenda- 
tion and half the sub-commendation, and William Malet was seised thereof. 
There were 4 ploughteams, and 6 acres of meadow valued at 30s. (reduced 
to 25s. 4^. at the time of the Survey). The soc belonged to the abbot. 
It was a league long and 6^ quarantenes broad and paid 20^. in a gelt. 
Earl Alan held this manor and the above estates at the time of the Survey, 
and others held land therein." 

Earl Alan had another estate in this place, formerly belonging to three 
freemen. It consisted of 41 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam, and an acre 
of meadow, valued at 6s. 8d. ; at the time of the Survey at 5s. lod.' 

The second manor was held in Saxon times by Osbern, a freeman under 
Edric's commendation, and consisted of 60 acres and 2 ploughteams (reduced 
to ij at the time of the Survey). The value was 20s. When the Survey 
was taken Robert de Glanville held this of Robert Malet. In the same 
township was an estate of Brictnot, a freeman by commendation, consisting 
of 5 acres, valued at lod., held at the time of the Survey of Robert Malet 
by Robert, son of Fulchered, 

The third manor was held by Ailwi, under commendation to Robert's 
predecessor. This consisted of 60 acres, a ploughteam, and 4 acres of 
meadow, valued at 10s. ; but at the time of the Survey valued at 5s., when 
the ploughteam seems to have disappeared. Robert Malet held this 
manor when the Survey was taken, the soc belonging to the abbot. Amongst 
the possessions of Robert Malet we find also mentioned a holding of 11 
freemen, under commendation to Malet's predecessor, except one who 
was under commendation to Harvin, Roger Bigot's predecessor. This 
consisted of 90 acres, 3 ploughteams (reduced to i| at the time of the 
Survey), and 4 acres of meadow. Also a church with 15 acres. The 
value was formerly los., but at the time of the Survey only 6s. The soc 
belonged to the abbot. ^ 

The fourth manor was that in Saxon times of Uluric, a freeman under 
Harold, and consisted of 60 acres, 3 bordars, and a ploughteam in demesne. 
Added to it were three freemen under commendation with 9 acres, a 
ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, a rouncy (not mentioned at the Survey, 
when there were 2 beasts), 10 hogs, and 15 sheep, valued at 15s. At the 
time of the Survey Ralph held this manor of Roger Bigot.* 

'Dom. ii. 298. 3£)om. ii. 308. 

^Dom. ii. 2976. ♦Dom. ii. 343. 



SWEFLING. i8i 

Manor of Swefling, Sparkes al. Leighsji 

We learn from the Nomina Villarium of 1316 that William de Dalizone 
was lord here at that time, but we meet with a fine of Swefling Manor levied 
in 1311 by Walter, son of Alan de Gislingham, clerk, and William his 
brother, and Gerard, son of Giles de Wachesham.' The manor at the 
beginning of the 15th century was vested in the Wingfields, and passed 
to Margaret Wingfield at the opening of the i6th century. She died 
seised of it 31st August, 1504, leaving Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Glemham, 
and Katherine, wife of Robert Garneys, and Eleanor Bacon, daughters 
of Thomas Bacon, next heirs, being daughters of Thomas Bacon, son of 
the said Margaret.'' 

In 1529 we meet with a fine of this manor levied by John Pakyngton 
and others against Robert Purslowe and others.^ And in 1594 another 
fine of the manor levied by Peter Leigh and others against John Leigh.'* 
Davy makes John Leigh lord in 1609, but this seems doubtful. Peter 
Leigh married ist Katherine Aston, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of 
Hugo Wymington, and held the manor till his death, 22nd Oct. 1629, when 
he was succeeded by his son and heir, John Leigh. The manor shortly 
after this passed to Henry Stebbing, of Wissett, who seems to have held 
in 1658, and died in 1680, when it passed to his daughters and coheirs 
Sarah, married to George Fleetwood, and Elizabeth, married to Richard 
Jenkinson. Davy has in his collection of pedigrees a hopeless little descent 
of these Jenkinsons, and he obviously makes Richard Jenkinson, who 
died in 1748 at the age of 51, take a wife, daughter of Henry Stebbing, 
who died in 1680, a wife too who belonged to Richard Jenkinson the father. 

There can be no doubt that Richard Jenkinson, of Chediston, married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Stebbing, of Wissett, and by virtue of that 
marriage held a moiety of this manor. He seems to have died about 
1701, and the manor went to his widow, who died in 1720. It then 
apparently passed in moieties to the two sons of Richard, namely, Thomas 
Jenkinson and Richard Jenkinson. Richard Jenkinson the son conveyed 
his moiety of a moiety to his aunt, Sarah Fleetwood, widow, and she by 
her will 21st Sept, 1716, devised the same to Richard Jenkinson, the younger 
son and heir of the Richard Jenkinson who had conveyed to her. Thomas 
Jenkinson by his will dated i8th May, 1746, devised his moiety of a moiety 
to his brother, Richard Jenkinson, and died and was buried at Saxmundham 
3rd Sept. 1746. Richard Jenkinson, the brother of Thomas, by his will 
dated ist March, 1748, directed his moiety of a moiety (that devised to 
him by his brother Thomas) to be sold, and he died 2nd May and' was buried 
at Swefling 7th May, 1748, at the age of 51. 

The result of the transactions above appears to have been that the 
moiety of the manor derived from the marriage of Richard Jenkinson 
with EHzabeth Stebbing became vested in his grandson, Richard Jenkinson, 
in 1748. 

In 1805 Davy enters Thomas Trusson as lord with a ? 

Arms of Jenkinson : Or, 2 bars gemelles betw. 3 bulls' heads erased Sa. 

Manor of Derneford Hall. 

In the reign of King Edward I. Robert de Derneford held one fee 
in Derneford, and subsequently the manor seems to have vested in the 
prior of Leighs in Essex. 

'Feet of Fines, 5 Edw II. 40. ^Fine, Easter, 21 Hen. VIII. 

'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VII. 100. ♦Fine, Easter, 36 Eliz. 



i82 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1536 this manor was granted by the Crown to Richard Cavendish, 
but the family held land in the parish of Swelling from a much earlier 
date, for we find in 1391 Roger de Cavendish held half a knight's fee here, 
and paid castle guard rent for the same to Framlingham Castle, and in 
1465 Richard Cavendish held the same by a like payment. 

From Sir Richard Cavendish to the sale to John Wentworth in 1591 
the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Grimston Hall, 
Trimley St. Martin, in Colngis Hundred, and the purchase deed of 1591 
will be found under the account of the Manor of Belton,in Lothingland 
Hundred. The first court of William Cavendish was held 26th April, 
1563, and of Thomas Cavendish 27th March, 1583. The 30th April, 1604, 
Sir John Wentworth held his first court. Amongst the Chancer)? Pro- 
ceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth we find an action by Richard 
Lamb against Ann Manby, widow, for relief against a bond in connection 
with this manor or the site of the manor demised by Thomas Cavendysh, 
deceased, to Robert Manby, deceased, the reversion having since vested in 
John Wentworth. 

In 1622 the manor was vested in Thomas Freston, for the 17th May this 
year he held his first court, and died in 1635,' when it passed to his widow 
Mary, one of the daughters of John Duke, of Worlingham, who, 3rd Oct. 
1636, held her first court, and on her death in 1643 passed to their son 
and heir, Thomas Freston, who held his first court 17th Oct. 1614, and 
died 8th Aug. 1647, aged 25 . This Thomas Freston seems to have died without 
issue, and the manor went to his sisters and coheirs Mary, wife of Nicholas 
Garneys, Susan, married to Edward Warner, Anne Freston, and Frances, 
married to Edward Garneys, who held their first court 22nd Dec. 1653, 
and the manor was sold 25th May, 1657, ^or £Ij330 to Thomas Edgar, 
Recorder of Ipswich and M.P. for Orford 1658-9, who held his first court 
for it 2nd Sept. 1657. He married Mary, daughter and heir of Philip 
Powle, of London, and died the 12th April, 1682, when the manor passed 
to his son, Devereux Edgar, who loth Oct. this year held his first court, 
and died in 1739, when the lordship passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Burwash, Witnesham, in Carlford Hundred, until the time of Mileson 
Edgar, who sold it about 1792 to Thomas Ives, otherwise Denny, who 
sold it before 1841 to John Moseley. 

Page, however, states that in 1764 William Plummer was owner 
of this manor and that it subsequently became the estate of Edward 
Holland, of Benhall. 

Manor of Swefling Campsey cum Snape Campsey. 

Queen EUzabeth leased this manor to WiUiam Barrett. In 1609 the 
manor was vested in King James, and in 1640 in Thomas Cutler, who 
married ist Anne, daughter of Thomas Dandy, of Combs, and 2ndly Ursula, 
daughter of Robert Gosnold,of Ottley,and on his death it passed to his 
son and heir, Benjamin Cutler, who held his first court nth Aug. 1646, 
and died in 1679, when it went to his widow Alice, who held her first court 
in 1680. She remarried the Rev. Samuel GoUie, who died in 1683. Alice 
the widow died in 1693, when we find the manor passed to George Monson 
and Anne his wife, who in 1711 (?) held their first court. 

'Abstract of his will, 4th Dec. 1635, will be found amongst the Tanner MSS. 
in the Bodleian (Tanner xcviii. 42). 



SWEFLING. 183 

Before 1725 the manor was acquired by Walter Plumer, who i8th 
Sept. this year held his first court, and from this time to the death of Jane 
Plumer, who remarried Robert Ward, the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Metfield, in Hoxne Hundred. Robert Ward sold 
the manor to James Cuddon, of Higham, who held in 1834. 

In 1842 John Moseley held the manor, but from June, 1896, to the 
present time it has been held by R. Brettell and H. E. Paine, of Chertsey, 
Surrey. 



i84 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




TUNSTALL. 

HOLDING in this place was that of Godric, a freeman 
by commendation, half to Edric and half to the abbot. 
It consisted of 4 acres, valued at 8^. It was held at the 
time of the Survey by Gilbert of Robert Malet.' 

Manor of TunstaLl. 

In the time of King Henry I. Hugh de Tunstal is 
mentioned in connection with the place. 

The manor was held by Sir Thomas de Weyland, an account of whom 
is given in Brandeston Manor, in Loes Hundred." An action is mentioned 
on the Patent Rolls in 1272 by Thomas de Weyland against Richard Bell 
and Beatrice his wife and Robert Sort, touching a tenement in Tunstall.^ 
From the time of Sir Thomas de Weyland to the death of Sir Edward le 
Despenser in 1375, the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Blaxhall, in this Hundred. Bartholomew, Lord Burghersh, in 1349 ^^^ ^ 
grant of free warren here for himself and Cecily his wife and others their 
heirs.* 

The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Philip le Despenser, 
Knt., who died in 1424,^ when it devolved on his only daughter Margery, 
wife of Sir Roger Wentworth, of Nettlestead, and from this time to the 
time of Thomas Wentworth, created Lord Wentworth, the manor passed 
in the same way as the manor of Nettlestead, in Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundred. It is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Margaret, 
wife of Roger Wentworth, in 1479,* and in that of Sir Richard Wentworth 
who died seised of it 17th Oct. 1528.'' 

Manor of Baynard's or Banyard's. 

In the 14th century Richard de Holbroke seems to have held this 
manor, which by the opening of the 15th century passed to Richard 
Baynard, of Spexhall, on whose death about 1428 it passed to his son 
and heir, Robert Baynard. His daughter and heir Margaret married 
John Bacon, of Baconsthorpe, and on his death in 1462 the manor passed 
to their son and heir, Thomas Bacon, of Baconsthorpe, who died about 
1485, and his widow Margaret, to whom the manor passed, appears to 
have married a Wingfield.* She died 31st August, 1504, leaving grand- 
daughters only— Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Glemham, Katherine, wife of 
Robert Garneys, and Eleanor Bacon, daughters of Thomas Bacon, son of 
the said Margaret Wingfield.' The manor seems to have been taken by 
Sir John Glemham and his wife Elizabeth, or at least a moiety of it seems 
to have ultimately vested in them. In 15 13 they settled the manor with 
various others on Charles Brandon, Viscount LTsle, Sir Robert Brandon, 
Knt., Christopher Willoughby, Humphrey Wingfield, and Christopher 
Jenney. 

Sir John Glemham died 15th October, 1537/° and from this time to the 
time of the Hon. Sophia North, of Glemham Hall, the manor passed in the 



'Dom. ii. 307. 
^I.P.M., 19 Edw. I. 45. 
3 Pat. RoUs, I Edw. I. 14. 
* Chart. Rolls, 23 Edw. III. 3. 
5I.P.M., 2 Hen. VI. 31. 



n.P.M., 18 Edw. IV. 35. 
'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 60. 
*See Manor of Swefling, in this Hundred. 
'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VII. 100. 
„I.P.M.,3oHen. VIII.i. 



TUNSTALL. 185 

same course as the Manor of Farnham, in this Hundred, and from the last- 
mentioned period to the present time in the same course as the Manor 
of Glemham Parva, and is now vested in the Earl of Guildford. 

We meet with a fine of a one-fourth part of the manor in 1545 
levied by William Whetcrofte against John Downes and others,' and 
another fine in 1549 by the same William Whetcrofte against John Baxster 
and others of another fourth of the manor / 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1582 by George Haughfen against 
Francis Saunders and others.' 

Extents of the manor in 1575 and 1600 will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. in the British Museum.* 



' Fine, Mich. 37 Hen. VIII. ' Fine, Trin. 24 EUz. 

■"Fine, Hil. 2 Edw. VI. *Add. Ch. 21054- 




i86 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

!• WANTISDEN. 

|HERE was no manor in this place in Saxon times, but 
several small holdings. 

At the time of the Survey 4 of these were in the posses- 
sion of Earl Alan, in the Abbot of Ely's soc. The first was 
held by him in demesne and was formerly the estate of 
16 freemen, half under commendation to Malet's pre- 
decessor and half to the Abbot of Ely. It consisted of 
60 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at los. 

The second, also held in demesne, was formerly the estate of Edwin, 
a freeman, and consisted of 14 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 
2s. 8d. 

The third was at the time of the Survey held by Oslac, a freeman 
of Earl Alan, and consisted of 5 acres, valued at 6d. ; and the fourth, held 
by the Earl in demesne, was in the possession of Edilt, a freeman, and 
consisted of 8 acres, valued at 16^.' 

Four more holdings were those of Robert Malet, when the Survey was 
taken. The first was the estate of 22 freemen, under commendation in 
the abbot's soc, and consisted of 121 acres and that was half a church, 
with 20 acres of free land, also 10 ploughteams (reduced by half at the 
time of the Survey), and i serf, valued at 30s. Of the freemen, five and 
a half were held by Hubert, four and a half were held by Gilbert, seven 
by Gilbert de Wishant, and five by William de Malavilla. The holding 
was 8 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 40^. 

The second consisted of 16 acres in the demesne of Staverton, and 
included in the same valuation. 

The third holding was formerly the estate of two freemen, Alwin 
and Alflet, under commendation to Malet's predecessor, and consisted of 
7 acres, valued at 14^. Also the fourth part of a church with 10 acres. 

The fourth holding was formerly the estate of Aluric, a freeman, and 
consisted of 4 acres, valued at 8^?., held of Malet at the time of the Survey 
by Gilbert.'' 

Roger Bigot had two estates here. The first was held of him by 
Norman, and was formerly the estate of Aluric, Brictric, and Edilt, free- 
men under commendation to Bigot's predecessor. It consisted of 11 
acres valued at 2s. The soc belonged to the abbot. The second was also 
held of Bigot by Norman, and consisted of the fourth part of a church 
with 10 acres, which someone under Norman's commendation had held in 
the time of the Confessor.^ 

Roger de Poictou held here an estate of 40 acres in demesne which had 
formerly been held by 14 freemen in the soc and commendation of the 
Abbot of Ely.-* 

The two last estates in this place were those of the Abbot of Ely. The 
first consisted of 12 acres belonging to the demesne of Sudbourn, valued 
at 24^. ; the second was of two acres valued at 4^. formerly held by 
Morewin, a freeman, and at the time of the Survey still held by him but 
unto the abbot. ^ , 

' Dom. ii. 296, 2966. 3 Dom. ii. 344. 

^Dom. ii. 306&, 307 JWs), ♦Dom. ii. 353. 

^Dom. ii. 384. 



WANTISDEN. 



187 



Manor of Wantisden Hall. 

This manor was vested in Sir Thomas Weyland in the time of Edw. I., 
and from him to the time of Ehzabeth, wife of Edward le Despenser, passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Blaxhall, in this Hundred. And we 
find from the Patent Rolls in 1290 that a commission was issued to enquire 
into the persons who pulled down the houses of John, son of Thomas 
" Weylond," in Wantisden Manor, and did other damage.' 

John de Weyland had a grant of free warren here in 1301/ and died 
seised in 1313.^ Bartholomew de Burghersh had a grant of free warren 
here in 1349.* 

We find that in the middle of the 14th century the priory of Butley 
held a considerable amount of land here/ and the prior had a grant of free 
warren in 1358.* 

In 1406 the estate of the priory was augmented by a grant from John 
Glemham and others of land here,' and this manor was not unlikely included, 
for this same year we find the prior mentioned as lord. 

On the Dissolution the manor passed to the Crown," and was in 1539 
leased for 21 years to George Carleton, of London ;" but in 1544 the manor 
and advowson were granted to Lionel Talmach as part of the possessions 
of Butley priory. Particulars of farm of the manor and rectory for this 
grant will be found in the Public Record Office." Lionel Talmach had 
licence to alienate to John Soone and Francis Soone. John Soone" died 
on the 6th January, 1551," and Francis, son and heir, succeeded. We 
meet with a fine levied of the manor in 1562 by Richard Wynfeld and others 
against this Francis Soone. '^ Francis Soone, however, seems to have 
died seised this same year, and the manor to have passfed to his son and 
heir, John Soone, for he had licence to alienate in 1593 to Michael Stanhope, 
afterwards Sir Michael.'* His daughter and coheir Ehzabeth married 
George, Lord Berkeley, and they sold the manor to Sir Henry Wood, Bart., 
who died in 1671. From the time of Sir Henry's death in 1671 to the time 
of the death of Sir William Chapman, Bart., in 1785, the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred, and 
Dunningworth, in this Hundred, and on the partition of his estates in 1743 
this manor was allotted to Robert Oneby in fee. It was afterwards held 
by William Moriris,'^ who sold it to Edward Leedes, a master in Chancery. 
On his death he left the manor by his will to Nathaniel Barnardiston, who 
died in 1837, from which time to the time of Nathaniel Barnardiston, who 
held in 1885, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Alpheton, 
in Babergh Hundred, but before 1896 it had been acquired by Lord 
Rendlesham, in whom the same is now vested. 



'Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. I. 
'Chart. Rolls, 29 Edw. 
3I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 34 
♦Chart. Rolls, 23 Edw. 
sHarl. 54 E. 28. 
« Chart. Rolls, 
U.Q.D., 7 Hen. IV. 40, 
8 Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. 



izd. 
1.7. 

III. 3. 



VIII. 



9 State Papers, 1539, 1355. 
"35 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 282. 
" See Chillesford Manor, in this Hundred. 
"I.P.M., 6Edw. VI. 74. 
'3 Fine, Hil. 4 Eliz. 
'4 Fine, Easter, 35 Eliz. 
"See Manor of Bromeswell, in Wilford 
Hundred. 



i88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The following estates are mentioned in the Domesday Survey under 
the Hundred of Plomesgate, but we have not been able with certainty 
to locate the same. 

Ingolverton. 

At the time of the Survey Robert Malet had 6 acres in this place, 
valued at 12^.' 

NORTHBURY. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Edwin the priest, a socman 
under the abbot. It consisted of 30 acres, a ploughteam, 4 beasts, 8 hogs, 
and 60 sheep (which were reduced to 40 at the time of the Survey), the 
value being 20s. and 49 freemen were added to this manor, with 266|a. 
and 2a. of meadow (Dom. ii. 353). 

In the same township 49 freemen were added to this manor with 
260^ acres, 10 ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient to 
support 8 hogs. The value was formerly los., which went up to lis. at 
the time of the Survey. These men were all in the abbot's soc and com- 
mendation, and one named Godric was wholly a socman. 

At the time of the Survey this manor was held by Roger de Poictou.'' 

Preston. 

(There is a Preston in Babergh Hundred.) 
Robert Malet held a bordar in this place at the time of the Survey, 
having 3 acres of land and half an acre of meadow, valued at 6d.^ 

RUSHMERE. 

(There is a Rushmere in Carlford Hundred.) 

A holding in this place was that of eight freemen under Edric's com- 
mendation, consisting of 52 acres of land and 3 ploughteams (reduced to 
2 at the time of the Survey). The value was 7s., but the holding rendered 
17s. At the time of the Survey WiUiam held this of Robert Malet.* 

Thorp (The). 

A holding in this place was that of four freemen under Edric's com- 
mendation, consisting of 24 acres, and a ploughteam and 3 bordars with 
6 acres. All these included in the valuation of Leiston. Robert Malet 
was the Domesday tenant. 



3 



'Dom. ii. 317 *Dom. ii. 3166 

Dom. u. 353 5 Dom. ii. 3166 



z 

'Dom. ii. 317 



RISBRIDGE HUNDRED. 




SAXTON, 
1576. 



.^Jk 'Vtnhm 



cheater 




\ X Deiiiitm 



rmLmf tXA. RiSBRYGE J 






iiL V -^ • ' 



bailey I 






Dmliti* \ HaiiUrn 



-• ii/ra/fina N J.UJ /ri.s BRTCUE j^ 



^.tJilffB 



ir%-v cUif 



<w^«l(' 



ix 



Stjki, 



^^?!!!:&s 



SPEED, 
1610. 












rw.^ 









BOWDEN, 

1777. 









Btvirfx 






'cJi/i 



1 H. >U ITN i-I> RED, 



Tf r,n- *-''*'^ '5'or>*' fM--fll 






RISBRIDGE HUNDRED 

S in the South-western Division of Suffolk, and is of an irregular 
figure extending 15 miles from north to south, and varying 
from nine to less than four miles in breadth. It is bounded 
on the west by Cambridgeshire ; on the south by the River 
Stour, which divides it from Essex ; on the east by Babergh, 
Lackford, and Thingoe Hundreds ; and on the north by 
Lackford Hundred and a small part of Cambridge. It is 
in the franchise or liberty of St. Edmund, and in the Archdeaconry of Sud- 
bury, Deanery of Clare, and Diocese of Ely. The soil varies from a clayey 
to a good mixed soil. The fee of the Hundred was in 1281 in the Abbot of 
St. Edmund ; but since the dissolution of the monasteries has been in the 
Crown, and the government in the Sheriff and his officers. It consists of 
59,762 acres in 29 parishes and 66 manors. 




Parishes. 



Manors. 




Manors. 



Bamardiston 



Bradley 
Gt. and 
Little 



Chedburgh 

Clare . . f. 

Cowling . . 
Dalham . . 
Denham . . 

Denston . . 
Depden . . 



Gazeley 



Barnardiston. 
Chilborne. 
Gt. Bradley. 
Little Bradley or 

Overhall a I. 

Harveys. 
Netherhall al. Nor- 

ley Mote. 
Chedburgh Hall and 

Arneboroughe. 
Clare. 
Stone Hall al. Stone 

house or Manse. 
Cowling. 
Shardelowes. 
Dalham with Dun 

stal's. 
Denham. 
Abbotts. 
Denston Hall. 
Beaumond's. 
Stonehall and 

Shepcote. 
Depden. 

/ Gazeley. 
Desning Hall al 

Castle Hall. 
Higham Hall. 
Gazeley Rectory. 
Althorpe's or Appie- 

thorpe al. Bovill's 
Talmag's al. Talmy- 

ties and Passe- 

lowes. 



Haverhill 



Hawkedon . 

Hundon . . . 

Kedington . 

Lidgate . . . 
Moulton . 
Ousden . . . 
Poslingford 

Stansfield . . 
Stoke . . . , 



Haverhill voc' the 
Castle. 

Hersham. 

Helions or Helyon 
Haverhill. 

Hawkedon Hall. 

Thurstanton al. 

Thursturston 
or Thurston Hall. 

Cresseners. 

Swans Hall. 

Hundon. 

Purowe al. Sorreles- 
or Penowe Hall. 

Kedington. 

Cotton or Cottenhall 

Palmers. 

Kennet and Kent- 
ford. 

Lidgate. 

Moulton or Stone- 
hall. 
French Hall. 

Ousden or Newhall 

Poslingford HaU. 

Overhall. 

Netherhall. 

Stansfield. 
Gatesburies or 

Catesbye's. 
Priditon Hall. 

Stoke (by Clare). 
Eibury or Erbury. 



igo 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 



Straddishall 



Thurlow 
Gt. and 
Little. 



Wickham- 
brook . 



Manors. 



Straddishall. 
Cockrell's al. 

Foster's. 
Shardelowes. 
Thurlow Great. 
Wadgell's Hall. 
Temple End. 
Thurlow Parva. 
/ Badmondisfield Hall 
Gaynes Hall al. 

Attilton. 
Gifford's Hall. 
Clopton Hall or 
Chappeley. 



Parishes. 



Withersfield 



Wixoe 



Wratting 
Gt. and 
Little . . 



Manors. 



f Withersfield Pelle- 
grues al. Petti- 
crues. 

f Wixoe al. Wickesher 
I or Watherhall. 

I WiJatting Magna. 

Little Wratting or 
Capell's. 

Blunt's Hall. 
I Wilsey Hall. 



BARNARDISTON. 



191 




BARNARDISTON. 

jHERE is no manor of this name in the Domesday Survey, 
but the ancient name of Barnardiston was Chilbourne, and 
no doubt this is the place called Cileburna in the great 
record. No manor, however, is mentioned, and there are 
but two entries. The first is of the lands of Earl Ralph, 
which Goodrich the Steward kept in Suffolk in the King's 
hand. It consisted of a socman holding 30 acres. There 

were a bordar, a ploughteam, and 6 acres of meadow, formerly valued at 

los. then at 20s.' 

The other is part of the great possessions of Richard, son of Earl Gisle- 
bert. Goodwin, a freeman, held 2 carucates of land, i villein, 4 bordars, 
formerly 2 ploughteams then i only, 6 acres of meadow, i mill, and i 
rouncy. The value had been 40s., but was then 50s. Geoffrey, son of 
Hamon, then held over Goodwin.^ 

BARNARDISTON MANOR. 

The manor is said, by the author of the Magna Britannia, to have been 
the lordship of Margaret de Willoughby 9 Edw. I., but afterwards of Thomas 
de Woodstock, 6th son of King Edw. III., Earl of Buckingham and Duke 
of Gloucester. He also states that Thomas de Woodstock when he endowed 
the college of priests in Pleshy, in the County of Essex, in 1392, gave to 
it this manor. 

This is quoted by Page, but seems to be a delusion. The manor was 
probably held by A. de Barnardiston in the time of Rich. I., then by Simon, 
son of A. de Barnardiston, and then by his son Walter, and most certainly 
his (Walter's) son, Alexander de Walpole, for we find in 1312 a fine levied 
whereby this Alexander de Walpole, son and heir of Walter de Barnardiston, 
granted the manor with the advowson to Margery " Wileghby," and Thomas 
de Barnardiston her son. 

This Thomas de Barnardiston was the son of Thomas de Barnardiston, 
the son of Geoffrey de Barnardiston, son of William, the brother of the 
Simon de Barnardiston above-mentioned. He had a girant of free warren 
here in 1347,* and presented to the church in 1332 and 1349. From this 
time to the time of the Swabeys in 1837 the manor passed in the same 
course of devolution through the Barnardistons as the Manor of Kedington, 
in this Hundred. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is a grant of 
seisin of the manor in 1397.'* 

A. fine was levied of part of the manor and also of Kedington Manor by 
Sir John Bussy, Sir John Leek, and Sir John de Birton against Sir Edmund 
Perponnte and Francisa his wife.^ In 1403 there is the record of a fine 
levied of the manor by Sir Thomas Hawley and others against Roger de 
Barnardiston. The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Thomas 
Barnardiston in 1542.^ 

Amongst the Harleian MSS.is a surrender of the manor by Sir John 
Cheke to the Queen, rated for Francis Knighton 31st May, 1557.' 



'Dom. ii. 284&. 

^Dom. ii. 3896. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 21 Edw. III. 29. 

^Harl. 47 F. 9. 



5 Feet of Fines, 10 Rich. II. 14. 
6I.P.M., 34 and 35 Hen. VIII. 

10 App. ii. p. 128. 
''Harl. 606. 



D.K.R. 



192 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK, 

Subsequently to 1837 the manor vested in W. Bromley, and is now 
vested in Lady Malcolm, of Poltallock, who resides at Barnardiston Hall. 

Chilborne Manor. 

Davy mentions this as a manor distinct from Barnardiston, and we 
certainly find in the Public Record Office, Court Rolls of the manor 
I Mary, to i and 2 Ph. and Mary, Duchy of Lancaster,' and extracts from 
Court. Rolls of the manor then called " Chilborne Manor," in 1574, amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum \ but we have no sub- 
sequent record, and the probability is that Cileburna being the ancient 
name of Barnardiston, the manor was one with the main manor. 



'Bundle 117, 1820 General Series, Port- "Add. Ch. 1277. 
folio 213-7-6. 




BRADLEY. 193 

BRADLEY. 

MANOR was in Edward the Confessor's day held by Olf 
the thane, but in the time of the Norman Survey was held 
by Roger in demesne under Robert de Todeni as tenant in 
chief. It consisted of 7 carucates of land, and there were 14 
villeins, 12 bordars, 6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne, 
7 ploughteams belonging to the men, 13 acres of meadow, 
wood for 500 hogs, i rouncy, 12 beasts, 60 hogs, 20 sheep, 
7 goats, and i hive of bees. These numbers were somewhat varied by the 
time of the Survey. The beasts had increased to 18, the hogs to 53, and 
the sheep to 63. There was a church with 15 acres of free land, and the 
whole was valued at £6 formerly but at the time of the Survey at £8. It 
was a league long and 7 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 6i.' 

Other holdings here were two of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, namely, 
eight freemen holding 80 acres, i bordar, 2 ploughteams, and i acre of 
meadow, valued at 11s. 3^., and four freemen holding 60 acres, i bordar, 
2 ploughteams, and i acre of meadow, valued at los. The abbot had 
commendation and soc and sac.^ 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, also had four freemen— Ulwin, Leuric, 
and Lewin, with 15 acres. The fourth was Bundo, having a carucate of 
land. To this holding belonged 2 ploughteams and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 22s. 6d. Of these Richard's predecessor had not commendation 
in the Confessor's time. The abbot had the entire soc.^ This last holding 
is also entered amongst the invasions upon the King."* 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, also held two freemen with 69 acres, 
an acre of meadow, and a ploughteam, valued at 17s. 6d.^ 

Both the manors of Great and Little Bradley belonged to the Bygots, 
and a gratit of free warren therein was made in 1270 to William Bygot, 
son of Thomas/ and proceedings relating to the manors between Thomas 
le Bygot and William le Bygot and between Oliver le By god and William 
le Bygod, are referred to on the Patent Rolls in 1275 and 1281.'' 

Great Bradley Manor. 

This was the lordship of Robert de Todeni, lord of Belvoir castle, 
who died about 1088, when it passed to his son WiUiam, who assumed the 
name of Abini Brito. 

There are three charters in the Harleian Collection in the British 
Museum, from which it appears that the manor was in the time of Hen. III. 
in the Bigot family, though the first of these charters is most probably a 
forgery, or an erroneous copy made at the end of the fourteenth century. 
This first purports to be a deed by which William Bigot, " Earl of Norfolk 
and Suffolk and Marshal of England," grants the manor to Thomas Bigot. 
The only William Bigot of this family was neither Earl nor Marshal, but 
Steward of the Household to Hen. I. and died in 1119.'' 

The second deed is by the same, releasing all right,^ and the third is a 
deed by which Thomas le Bigot, son of William, grants to " Galfrido filio 

'Dom. ii. 429. « Chart. Rolls, 54 Hen. III. 6. 

^^Dom. ii. 371&. ''Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. I. iid ; 9 Edw. I. 7 ; 

3Dom. ii. 397. 9 Edw. I. 24d, 18, xzd. 

*Dom. ii. 4476. 'Harl. 46 D. 43. 

5Dom.ii. 3966. 397- 'Harl. 46 D. 44. 

AI 



194 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Radulfi Farewelle," two messuages and two crofts which Richard Carce- 
tarius and William Russell held in Bradley.' This deed is supposed to have 
been executed in the time of Hen. IIL 

There is a fourth deed dated 25th July, 1357, by which Margaret 
" Bygot, cousin and heir of Thomas Bygot," quit claims to John " Butte- 
tourt, Seigneur de Wesleye," and Dame Joyouse his wife, the Manor ot 
Great Bradley, and the advowson of the church belonging to the manor.^ 

On the opening of the fourteenth century the manor belonged to Sir 
Hugh de Lopham, who by deed in 1305 granted the same together with the 
advowson of the church to Sir John Boteturte, Knt., and Matilda his wife 
for life, rendering yearly two marks. 

The deed is dated at Bradley die Jovis prox. post. fest. S. Edm. regis 
34 Edw. I., and is preserved amongst the Harleian Charters.^ 

Sir John was Governor of St. Briavel's Castle, co. Gloucester, and 
Admiral of the King's Fleet in the reigns of Edw. I. and II. He was 
summoned to Parliament as a Baron loth March, 1308. His wife Matilda 
was daughter of Thomas Fitz Otho by Beatrix his wife, daughter and coheir 
of William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, and sister and heir of Otho 
Fitz Thomas. 

The quit rent reserved by the last deed was released by Sir Hugh de 
Lopham by deed dated at Lopham die Dom. prox. p. fest S. Barthol. Apost. 
10 Edw. II. [1318].* 

Sir John Botetourte's life interest seems to have become an interest 
in fee. There is a deed. amongst the Harleian Charters of Thomas Bote- 
tourte granting to Lord John his father and Lady Matilda his mother, wife 
of the said John, the manor ; this interest it has been suggested was acquired 
from Joan, Thomas's wife, possibly on release of the quit rent, for we find 
the manor later vested in Sir Thomas Botetourt's widow Joan, daughter 
of Roger de Somery, and sister and coheir of John de Somery, Baron of 
Dudley, and in 1332 we meet with a quit claim from Mabille, " late wife 
of Hugh de Lopham," to this Joan, late wife of Sir Thomas " Butetourt " 
of the manor.' 

Sir Thomas had died in his father's lifetime, leaving a son, John de 
Botetourt, who succeeded his grandfather as 2nd Baron, and probably 
had the manor on the death of his mother Joan. 

John de Botetourt attended the King in the expedition into France in 
the train of Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and was summoned 
to Parliament from 25th Feb. 1342 to 3rd Feb. 1385. 

He married JoyCe, daughter of William, Lord Zouche, of Haryngsworth, 
and had a son John, who married Maud, daughter of John, Lord Grey, 
of Rotherfield, and predeceasing his father, left a son John, who died 
also before his father and grandfather, and a daughter Joyce, who married 
Sir Hugh Burnell, Knt., and with him levied a fine of the manor in 1359.* 

John, Lord Botetourt, probably made a settlement of the manor in 
1370, for amongst the Harleian Charters are letters of attorney from him 

^ Harl. 46 D. 49. 5 Dated at St. Edmund's, ist May, 6 Edw. 

''Harl. 46 B. 25&. III. Harl. Ch. 53 B. 26. 

3 Harl. Ch. 53 B. 24. eSir Hugh Burnell and Joyce his wife v. 

*Harl. Ch. 53 B. 25. Sir Thomas Blount and Isabel his 

wife. Feet of Fines, 13 Rich. II. 14. 



BRADLEY. 195 

styled "Seigneur de Wesleye "to William Message, of Bradley, to receive 
seisin of the manor. The date is Wednesday, F. of' Corpus Christi, 44 
Edw. III.' John, Lord Botetourt, died in 1385. 

Davy suggests that Thomas Scroope, son of Joan, who -married Thomas 
de Botetourt, had this manor of the gift of Joan his mother and died 
seised of it in 1491. Page states distinctly that Joan survived her husband, 
and during the minority of John her eldest son and heir procured a charter 
of free warren in this and all her other demesne land, and left this manor 
so privileged to her son Thomas Scroope, the noted Carthusian monk. 

He adds of Scroope : "He was a native of this parish, and derive from 
the illustrious family of Scroope, in Yorkshire. He was first a monk of 
the Benedictine Order ; afterwards aspiring to greater perfection, he 
embraced the profession of a Dominican ; and subsequently submitted 
himself to the discipline of the Carmelites, and after preaching about the 
country clothed in sackcloth withdrew to a house of that order in Norwich, 
where he continued twenty years, leading the life of a recluse. After this 
he travelled abroad, and was advanced to the Bishopric of Dromore, in 
Ireland, which he afterwards resigned and returned into these Eastern 
Counties, became Suffragan to the Bishop of Norwich, and vicar of 
Lowestoft, where he died in 1491, and was buried in the chancel of that 
parish church, being nearly 100 years of age." 

The idea of Davy and Page is peculiar, for the manor must certainly 
have passed to Joyce and her husband. Sir Hugh Burnell. Amongst the 
Harleian Charters in 1390 are letters of attorney by Sir Hugh Burnell, 
Knt., and " Joiosa " his wife to Richard Ruton to receive seisin of the 
manor with the advowson of the church. The deed is dated at Bradly 
" die Merc. p. p. f. S. Geo. Mart. (23rd April), 13 Rich. II.'' In 1401 we 
meet with a fine of the manor and advowson levied by John Rome, clerk, 
John Hide, clerk, Thomas Skynnere, Thomas Cruwe, and William Corley, 
clerk, against Sir Hugh Burnell and Joyce his wife.^ Joyce Burnell died 
in 1407 without issue, and we next find the manor vested in Bartholomew 
Brokesby, sen., who died in 1524, when it went to his grandson and heir 
Bartholomew Brokesby. 

We meet with three fines levied of the manor in 1561, 1565, and 1580. 
The first was by John Farwell and others against Francis Clopton and others,* 
the second by Robert Peyton against Thomas Brokesbye,^ and the third 
by Peter Osborne and others against Robert Peyton and others.^ 

In 1609 the manor was vested in Sir John Peyton, Knt., and in 1764 in 
Thomas Brand, of The Hoo, co. Herts, who 20th April, 1771 married the 
Hon. Gertrude Roper, sister of Charles Trevor Roper, i8th Lord Dacre, 
and on his death 21st Feb. 1794, the manor passed to his eldest son, Thomas 
Brand, 20th Lord Dacre. He married in 1819 Barberina, daughter of 
Admiral Sir Chaloner Ogle, Bart., and widow of Valentine Wilmot, of 
Farnborough, Hants, but died without issue 21st March, 1851, when the 
manor passed to his brother, Henry Otway, 21st Lord Dacre, C.B., who 
distinguished himself in the Peninsular War, and in 1806 married Pyne, 
eldest daughter of the Hon. and Very Rev. Dean Crosbie, sister of Lord 
Brandon, and widow of Sir John Gordon, Bart. He assumed by sign 
manual in 1824 the surname of Trevor, and dying 2nd June, 1853, 

'Harl. Ch. 47 E. 17, *Fine, Mich. 3 Eliz. ] 

" Harl. Ch. 47 E. 46. ' Fine, Mich. 7 Eliz. 

3 Feet of Fines, 2 Hen. IV. 11. ®Fine, Mich. 22-23 Eliz. 



196 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Crosbie WiUiam 
Trevor, 22nd Lord Dacre, who 12th Jan. 1837, married Susan Sophia, 
eldest daughter of Charles Compton, ist Lord Chesham. His lordship 
was by Royal licence dated 12th April, 1851, authorised to take the 
surname of Trevor only, and to bear the arms of Trevor. He died 
without issue in 1890 and the manor passed to his brother, Henry Bouverie 
William, M.P. for Lewes 1852-68, and for co. Cambridge 1868-84 ; Speaker 
of the House of Commons 1872-84. He was a P.C, and was created m 
1884 Viscount Hampden. He married i6th April, 1838, Eliza, daughter 
of Gen. Robert EUice, and died in 1892, when the manor passed to his 
eldest son Henry Robert Brand, 2nd Viscount Hampden, M.P. for Herts 
and later for Stroud Division, co. Gloucester, and Captain in the Cold- 
stream Guards, who married ist 21st Jan. 1864, Victoria Alexandrina 
Leopoldine, eldest daughter of his Excellency Silvain Van de Weyer, Belgian 
Minister of State, and 2ndly, 14th April, 1868, Susan Henrietta, younger 
daughter of Lord George Henry Cavendish. The 2nd Viscount Hampden 
is the present lord of the manor. 

There is a deed amongst the Harleian Charters dated 26th Aug. 9 
Edw. IV. [1469] by which AUcia, Duchess of Suffolk, granddaughter of 
Geoffrey Chaucer, the poet, and wife of William de la Pole, ist Duke of 
Suffolk, constitutes Humfrey Foster and Henry Doget to receive seisin of 
John Bernard in respect of the manor of Bradley.' 

Arms of Brand : Az. two swords in saltire, arg. pommels and hilts 
Or ; within a bordure engrailed of the second. 

Little Bradley Manor or Manor of Overhall al. Harveys. 

This manor is said by the author of " Magna Britannia " to have been 
the lordship of Jourdan Witherfield in 1281. In 1322 the manor was 
vested in Gilbert Peche, for this year he died seised of it," and from this time 
to the time of William Geddyng married to Mirabel, only child of Sir John 
Aspall and Katherine his wife, the manor passfed in the same course as the 
Manor of Thurlow Magna, in this Hundred. 

In 1365 Sir John de Aspall by deed settled this manor, therein called 
the " Manor of Overall in Little Bradley," upon himself and Katherine 
his wife in tail. Of that marriage there was issue but one child Mirabel, 
married to William Geddyng.^ 

William Gedding was succeeded by his son, Thomas Gedding, who 
with Anne his wife had a grant of free warren here in 1437, and on their 
death the manor passed to their son and heir, John Gedding, who in 1467 
conveyed Overhall Manor to John, Duke of Suffolk, Sir JohnHeveningham 
and other trustees. 

The wardship of Robert Gedding, John's son and heir, was granted to 
Anthony, Earl Rivers, and Elizabeth his wife. To Robert succeeded his 
uncle, William Gedding, the brother of John Gedding. He died in 1499, 
when the manor passed to his daughter and heir Constance, wife of John 
Allen, of Icklingham, and afterwards wife of Henry Poley, of Badley. 
Henry Poley died in 1487,* when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Edmund Poley, and on his death in 1548' passed to his son and heir, John 

'Hart. 54 I. 18. ♦See Woodhall Manor, Stoke Ash, Hartis- 

" See Manor of Thurlow Magna, in this mere Hundred, and Badley Manor, 

Hundred. in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

3 See Manor of Lackford, in Thingoe =I.P.M., 3 Edwl VI. 127. 

Hundred. 



BRADLEY. 197 

Foley, who in 1565 sold the manor to John le Hunte.' A fine was levied 
against him in 1570 by Sir Thomas Golding and others, probably by way 
of some settlement,' as in 1571 he levied a fine of the manor against 
Margaret Hunt al. Knyghton,^ and died i6th May, 1605. He is probably 
the John " Hunt," of Bradley, mentioned in the Visitation of 1612, son ot 
Richard Hunt, of Ashen, in Essex, and of Ann liis wife, daughter and heir 
of Thomas Knighton, of Bradley. If so, he married Jane, daughter of 
Henry Colte, of Coltes Hall, in Cavendish. The manor on John Hunte's 
death passed to his son and heir, Sir George le Hunte, who married Barbara, 
daughter of Sir Ralfe Shelton, of Shelton Hall, in Norfolk, Knt., and on his 
death vested in his son and heir, John Hunte. This John Hunte offered 
his whole estate to Parliament's free disposition, and his sequestration was 
discharged in 1644.* John Hunte was a delinquent we find in 1647.^ He 
compounded for £600. The family long continued in the parish, the last 
appearing to have been Thomas le Hunte, son of Sir George le Hunte, 
Knt., of this parish, who died in 1703, aged 76, and is interred under an 
altar tomb on the south side of the churchyard in the parish of Ca^eton 
Rode, Norfolk, with Margaret his wife, who died in 1716, aged 80 years. 
In 1747 Francis Duckins, of Cowling, died seised of the manor." 

The manor appears to have been acquired by Charles Lamprell, who 
was buried at Little Bradley nth Nov. 1760, and to have later vested in 
his two sons, Charles and WiUiam. William Lamprell resided at the hall, 
and his brother Charles lived at Canning's Farm near the church. William 
died nth May, 1850, and Charles married Mary Anne Wrigglesworth, 
and on his death the manor vested in his son and heir, the Rev. Charles 
Wrigglesworth Lamprell, incumbent of the church of Little Bradley. He 
married 24th July, 1837, Catherine Frances, 2nd daughter of Frederick 
Mortlock, of Cambridge. 

In 1885 Ebenezer Bird Foster, of Anstey Hall, Trumpington, Cam- 
bridge, was lord, and the manor is apparently still vested in him. He is 
the eldest son of George Ebenezer Foster, of Brooklands, co. Cambridge, 
High Sheriff of co. Cambridge 1868, who died in 1870. Mr. Foster in 1870 
married Mary Campbell, daughter of the Rev. Prebendary Richard Snowden 
Smith. He was High Sheriff of Cambridge and Hants in 1882, and is a 
D.L. for the County of Cambridge. 

A rent roll of this manor in the time of Rich. II. — Hen. IV. will be 
found amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum.'' 

Arms of Le Hunte : Vert, a saltier. Or. 

Manor of Netherhall al. Norley Mote. 

We learn little of this manor beyond the fact that it was amongst the 
hereditaments of which John le Hunte died seised in 1606, from which 
time the manor seems to have passed in a Uke course with the Manor of 
Overhall, in Bradley. It is, however, probably the Manor mentioned in 
the inquis. p.m. of Henry Turner, who died 4th Feb. 1543, leaving Henry 
Turner his next heir, namely, son of Henry, son of John, son and heir of 
the said Henry.^ 

Arms of Turner : Erm. on a cross Sa. quarter-pierced of the field 
4 fers-de-moline Arg. 

' Fine, Hil. 7 Eliz. ^ Com. for money advance, 811. 

^ Fine, Hil. 12 Eliz. " See Manor of Cowling, in this Hundred. 

^Finei Hil! 13 Eliz. ^-Add. Ch. 24719. 

^S.P. Cal. of Comp. 843. ^I.P.M., 28 Hen. VIH. 50. 




198 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

CHEDBURGH. 

|W0 manors were held here in the time of the Confessor by 
two freemen, and taken together consisted of 2 carucates of 
land, 2 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and half 
a team belonging to the men, 8 acres of meadow, and wood 
sufficient to support 12 hogs. At the time of the Survey 
Frodo, brother of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, held these 
manors of the Abbot of Ely, the bordars had increased 
to 5, and the ploughteams in demesne to 4. When Frodo took them over 
there were 4 rouncies (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), 
8 beasts (which had increased to 14), and 20 sheep. All this land lay in 
the demesne of the abbey in the Confessor's time, with every kind of custom 
except the six forfeitures of the Abbot of St. Edmund. The value was 
formerly 40s., increased to 60s. at the time of the Survey. It was half a 
league in length, and 3 quarentenes in breadth, and paid in a gelt j.\d. 
Others held land here.' 

Chedburgh Hall and Arneboroughe. 

In 1315 this was the lordship of Thomas Verdon, having been acquired 
apparently under a fine levied in 1306 by him against Magister Bugo de 
Cuccill (?), parson of Brisingham church.* It was held of the Bishop of 
Ely for half a fee.^ 

The manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Netherhall, in 
Stanstead, Babergh Hundred, to the time of Margaret, who married ist 
Hugh de Bradshaw, who died about 1383. She married, 2ndly Sir John de 
Pilkington, who died i6th Feb^ 1421. By her ist husband Margaret de 
Verdon had a son, Sir William de Bradshaw, who died 2nd Oct. 1415,** 
leaving a daughter Elizabeth, married to Sir Richard Harrington, of Wolfage 
and Brixworth, co. Northampton, and of West Leigh, co. Lancaster. The 
manor was settled by fine in 1430 upon Robert Pilkington, 3rd son of 
the heiress Margaret, in tail male, with remainder to Elizabeth, daughter 
of Sir William de Bradshaw, in tail, with remainder to Sir John Pilkington, 
eldest son of the said Margaret by her 2nd husband, in fee. Margaret 
died on the Vigil of St. Katharine the Virgin, 24th Nov. 1436.' Robert 
Pilkington had a son John, but whether he succeeded to the lordship or 
not it is impossible to say. Elizabeth Bradshaw seems to have held, but 
not apparently her son, Sir William Harrington. Her daughter Margaret 
married Sir Thomas Pilkington, who does appear to have held the 
manor ; but whether in his own right or in right of his wife we have not 
been able to ascertain. Sir Thomas was son of Edmund Pilkington and 
Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Booth, which Edmund (who 
died before 1451) was son of John de Pilkington and Katherine his 2nd wife, 
sister of John de Assheton, which John was the son of Sir John de Pilkington 
and Margaret his wife, the Verdon heiress. John de Pilkington the 2nd 
had by his ist wife Margaret a son, John de Pilkington, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Edmund de Trafford, but had died without 
issue. Sir Thomas Pilkington .was slain at the battle of Stoke i6th June, 
1487, leaving a son. Sir Roger Pilkington, married to AHce, daughter of 
Sir John Savage .■ 

'Dom. ii. 3846. *I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 

*Feet of Fines. 34 Edw. I. 36. 'I.P.M., 21st Feb. 1437,, 

3H.R. ii. 151. ' 



CHEDBURGH. 199 

In 1460 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by Ralph Lever and 
Nicholas Nabbe, clerk, against ^ir William Haryngton and Elizabeth his 
wife, Thomas Pilkington and Margaret his wife, and Arthur Pilkington.' 

The manor subsequently vested in William Hunt, and was acquired 
from him and his wife Anna in 1510 by Sir Robert Drury," who died in 1535, 
when it passed to Sir William Drury, his son and heir, and on his death in 
1589 vested in his son and heir. Sir Robert Drury, who died in 1615.^ 

In 1764 the manor was vested in William, 2nd Earl of Bristol, and from 
that time to the present the devolution has been identical with that of 
Ickworth Manor, in Thingoe Hundred. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a precipe 
on a covenant concerning the manor in 1422.'* 

Arms of Pilkington : Arg. a cross botonee voided Gu. 



' Feet of Fines, 39 Hen. VI. 28. ^See Manor of Hawstead, in Thingoe 

^Fine, Mich. 2 Hen. VIH. Hundred. 

■tAdd. Ch. 25257. 




200 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



CLARE. 

MANOR was held in this place in Saxon times by Aluric, 
and consisted of 24 carucates of land, 40 villeins, 10 bordars, 
20 serfs, 12 ploughteams in demesne, and 36 belonging to 
the men. Also 37 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to 
support 12 hogs, a mill, 5 arpents of vineyard, 6 rouncies, 
10 beasts, 12 hogs, 60 sheep, and 12 hives of bees. There 
was also a market. At the time of the Survey this manor 
was held by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and some of the details had 
changed. The villeins had gradually decreased, first to 35 and then to 30, 
the bordars had increased to 30. The ploughteams in demesne had dropped 
to 6 and then risen again to 7, and those belonging to the men had dropped 
gradually to 30 and then to 24. The live stock had all increased, the beasts 
to 14, the hogs to 60, and the sheep to as much as 480. There were an 
additional 43 burgesses mentioned in the Survey. The Survey goes on to 
say : " Aluric, son of Wisgar, gave this manor to Saint John in King 
Edward's time, his son consenting thereto, and put in Ledmar the priest 
and others with him. Having also made a charter he committed the church, 
and the whole place' into the hands of Leustan the abbot to keep, and into 
the keeping of Wisgar his son. But the clerks could neither give nor 
forfeit this land away from Saint John. However, after King William 
came he seized it into his own hand." To this manor also belonged 5 socmen 
with all customs, having i^ carucates of land, i| ploughteams, and 6 acres 
of meadow. The value was £/\o. It was 2 leagues in length and i in breadth 
and paid in a gelt x^d.'^ 

i ! Manor of Clare. 

This was the lordship of Aluric in the Confessor's time, and formed 
part of the estate conferred by William the Conqueror on his kinsman, 
Richard Fitz Gilbert, who from that time was sometimes designated 
Richard de Clare. From this Richard Fitz Gilbert, the manor descended 
through the Earls of Clare, Hereford, and Gloucester,* and the Mortimers 
in the same course as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred, until it 
finally vested like that manor in the Crown in the person of King Edw. IV. 

It is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Richard de Clare, Earl of 
Gloucester in 1263,' of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, and jointly with 
Joan his wife, an extent being given.* Joan, Countess of Gloucester, 
held a court for this manor in Jan. 1297.^ The castle and manor were 
restored to the heirs of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 1316.^ 

In 1331 there is an order enabling Elizabeth de Burgo to retain the manor 
on grant of other lands.'' 

In 1462 the manor, castle, and lands were granted for life to the King's 
mother Cicely, Duchess of York, in full recompense for the jointure.^ 

'Dom. ii. 3896. U.F.M., 47 Hen. IV. 34. 

''The manor is specifically mentioned in *I.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 47. 

the inquis. p.m. of Rich, de Clare, ^ close Rolls, 25 Edw. I. 8 schedule. ' 

Earl of Gloucester and Hereford in ^ Close Rolls, 10 Edw. II. 4. 

the time of Hen. III. I.P.M.,Hen. U.Q.J)., 5 Edw. III., File 215-17. 

III. File 27 (5). »Pat. Rolls, 2Edw.IV.pt. iv. I. 



CLARE. 201 

In 1541 the manor was granted to Queen Katherine for life/ and in 
1553 to John Cheke, afterwards Sir John. 

In the reign of Queen Mary, however, it was taken in exchange for 
other lands,' and was annexed to the Duchy of Lancaster, to which it has 
remained attached to the present day. 

From the Exchequer Special Commissions we learn that the manor 
granted to Sir John Cheke in 1553 was supposed to be escheat on account 
of defective title. ^ 

The site of the castle was parcel of the possessions of the Crown from 
the accession of Edw. IV. to the grant to Sir John Cheke, in which it was 
included ; but it was recovered to the Crown by Queen Mary in the first 
year of her reign, and for a long period was in the possession of the 
Barnardiston family.* 

From the Barnardistons the castle passed to the family of Elwes, of 
Stoke College, from which time it has descended in the same course as the 
Manor of Stoke by Clare, in this Hundred, and is now vested in John Payne 
Elwes, of Edmondsham, Cranborne, co. Dorset. 

Court Rolls of the Honor in the time of Edw. II. will be found in the 
Public Record Office,^ Edw. II. — 26 Geo. III. ; Duchy of Lancaster, P.R.O. 
Bundles 116-125, Edw. II., III., Rich. II., Hen. IV., V., VI., Edw. IV., 
Hen. VII., VIII., Edw. VI. ; P.R.O. Portfolio 212, 32-52, 213, 214-1410, 
1427; Add. Ch. 16541 t. Eliz. Chas. I. and II., and from 1731 to 1745; 
D.K.R. 30 App. p. 35 ; Extracts from Court Rolls, 1501-1587, Add. Ch. 
15613.-1581, Add. Ch. 1278; 1582, Add. Ch. 1279; Office of Stewardship 
of the Honor, S.P. i Hen. VIII. 222, S.P. 23 Hen. VIII. 945. As to 
Court Leet of the manor, see Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute ii. 103. 
Receivers-General accounts of lands east of the Severn belonging to Roger, 
Earl of March, 21 Rich. II., will be found amongst the Ministers' Accounts 
in the Record Office,* also the Ministers' Accounts of lands in the wardship 
of Henry, Prince of Wales, during the minority of Edmund Mortimer in 
Clare will be found in the same depository.'' 

In 1725 we find a petition of Lieut.-Col. George Howard, touching lands 
in Clare and elsewhere, granted by King Wilham for 21 years having fallen 
into popish hands, and profits converted to superstitious uses, praying for a 
reversionary grant of the manor for 31 years.^ 

Arms of Clare : Or, three chevronels, Gules. Of Mortimer, Earl of 
March : Barry of six, Or and Azure ; on a chief of the first, three pallets, 
between twogyronnies of the second : an inescutcheon Argent. Of Elwes : 
See Stoke by Clare Manor in this Hundred. 

Stone Hall al. Stonehouse al. Manse Manor. 

This manor was granted by the Crown to Thomas Golding and George 
Golding in 1553, and George Golding had licence to aUenate it in 1588 to 

' S P 1541 503 (25) * Bundle 1112, No. 6 to 7, Hen. V. ; lb. 23 

2 Fine, Easter, 4 Mary I. 7 and 8 Hen. VI. Bundle 1163, 

3 II Tac. I, D.K.R. 38 App. p. 94. No. 3. 

4 See Manor of Keddington, in this ^g and 10 Hen. IV. Bundle ii 12, No. 18. 

Hundred. "T.P. 373- 

5 Portfolio 204, I. 

B I 



202 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Thomas Golding.' The first-named Thomas was the son of Roger Golding. 
He resided at Cavendish and PosUngf ord, and married Katherine, daughter 
of Robert Gosnall, of Ottley, and was succeeded by his son, George Golding, 
who married Eleanor, daughter of Sir Henry Gray, of Wreston, in Bedford- 
shite, and died in 1562, when he was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas 
Golding, who married Frances, daughter of Thomas Bedingfield, of Darsham. 
The licence in 1588 was possibly for some trustee, George Golding, to assign 
to Thomas, the son of George Golding, who had died in 1562. The writer 
will not guarantee the correctness of the devolution of this manor. 



'See Manor of Poslingford, in this Hundred, 




COWLING. 203 

COWLING. 

}^ MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the thane Mann 
the Swarthy. It consisted of 9 carucates of land, 19 villeins, 
16 bordars, 6 serfs (reduced to 3 at the time of the Survey), 
2^ ploughteams in demesne (increased to 3 at the time of 
the Survey), and 9 belonging to the men (reduced at that 
time to 6). There were also 60 acres of meadow, wood 
sufficient to support 60 hogs, a church with 50 acres and half a 
ploughteam, also 7 beasts, 40 hogs, 40 sheep, and 40 goats. The value 
was formerly £9, which value had gone up to ^^20 when the Survey was taken. 
The manor was a league long and 8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 
i2^d. At the time of the Survey this was held in demesne by Earl Alan. 

Another estate here was that of a freeman under the Confessor, consist- 
ing of 140 acres, a bordar, and a ploughteam valued at ros., held at the time 
of the Survey by Earl Ralph of Earl Alan.' 

Cowling Manor. 

This lordship was the inheritance of William de Eureux, 2nd Earl of 
Salisbury, by his marriage with Alianora de Vitrei, daughter of Tirrel de 
Mainers, and passed to William Longespee, illegitimate son of King Hen. II. 
by Fair Rosamond, who married Ela, only daughter of the said William de 
Exireux and Alianora his wife. William Longespee became in his wife's 
right Earl of Salisbury. 

In 1207 we find an order to the sheriff to give seisin to the grant of the 
King to his brother, the Earl of Salisbury, of this manor, which belonged 
to the Countess Alianora,' and in 1223 we find a grant by Alianora de Vitrei, 
sometime Countess of Salisbury, to Roger de London, clerk, of the assart 
called Le Frith in Cowling, abutting on the wood of Badley Magna, and the 
land which Hugh de Bosco, William de Bocy, Matilda de Monasterio, 
and others held in this manor.^ We also find on the Close Rolls in 1225 
an order to the sheriff on a grant being made by the King to the said 
Alianora, Countess of Salisbury, of a fair for two days in Cowling." William 
Longespee about 1213 had a grant of the Honor of Eye, in Suffolk, and was 
the same year a witness to the agreement made between King John and 
the barons, as guarantee for the former. He was likewise a witness to the 
charter whereby John resigned his kingdom to the Pope. After this we 
find him a principal leader in the Royal army, until the very close of John's 
reign, when he swerved in his loyalty and joined for a short period the 
ranks of Louis of France. Upon the accession, however, of Hen. III., he 
did homage to that monarch, particularly for the County of Somerset, 
which the King then gave him ; and joining with William Marshall raised 
the seige of Lincoln ; when he was constituted Sheriff of Lincolnshire and 
Governor of Lincoln Castle, being invested at the same time with 
sheriffalty of the County of Somerset, and governorship of the Castle of 
Shirburne. His lordship soon afterwards accompanied the Earl of 
Chester to the Holy Land, and was at the battle of Damieta, in which the 
crescent triumphed. He served subsequently in the Gascon wars, whence 
returning to England, Dugdale relates : " There arose so great a tempest 
at sea, that, despairing of life, he threw his money and rich apparel over- 

I j)oiu_ ii. 2926. * Close Rolls, 9 Hen. III. pt. ii. 3 ; 11 Hen. 

'9 John 6. Ill- 7- 

3D.K.R., 25 App. p. 31- 



204 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

board. But when all hopes were passed they discerned a mighty taper of 
wax, burning bright at the prow of the ship, and a beautiful woman standing 
by it, who preserved it from wind and rain, so that it gave a clear and 
bright lustre. Upon sight of which heavenly vision both himself and the 
mariners concluded of their future security, but everyone there being 
ignorant What this vision might portend except the Earl ; he, however, 
attributed it to the benignity of the Blessed Virgin by reason that upon the 
day when he was honoured with the girdle of knighthood he brought a taper 
to her altar, to be lighted every day at mass, when the canonical hours 
used to be sung, and to the intent that for this terrestrial light, he might 
enjoy that which is eternal." A rumour, however, reached England of 
the Earl's having been lost, and Hubert de Burgh, with the concurrence 
of the King, provided a suitor for his supposed widow ; but the lady in the 
interim, having received letters from her husband, rejected the suit with 
indignation. The Earl soon after came to the King at Marlborough, and 
being received with great joy, he preferred a strong complaint .against 
Hubert de Burgh, adding that unless the King would do him right therein, 
he should vindicate himself otherwise to the disturbance of the public 
peace. Hubert, however, appeased his wrath with rich presents, and invited 
him to his table, where it is asserted that he was poisoned, for he retired to 
his castle of Salisbury in extreme illness and died almost immediately after 
anno 1226.' 

William his son and heir succeeded, " commonly called," says Sir 
William Dugdale, by " Matthew Paris, and most of our other historians. 
Earl of Salisbury, but erroneously ; for all records wherein mention is made of 
him do not give him that title, but call him barely William Longespee. Nay, 
there is an old chronicle who saith expressly, that in anno 1233'' he was 
girt with the sword of knighthood, but not made Earl, of Salisbury." This 
William made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1240 — and again in 1247, 
having assumed the cross for a second pilgrimage, proceeded to Rome, 
and thus preferred a suit to the sovereign pontiff : " Sir, you see that I am 
signed with the Cross, and am on niy journey with the King of France, 
to fight in this pilgrimage. My name is great, and of note, viz., William 
Longespee ; but my estate is slender ; for the King of England, my kins- 
man and liege lord, hath bereft me of the title of Earl, and of that estate ; 
but this he did judiciously, and not in displeasure, and by the impulse of 
his will ; therefore I do not blame him for it. Howbeit I am necessitated 
to have recourse to your Holiness for favour, desiring your assistance in 
this distress. We see here (quoth he) that Earl Richard (of Cornwall) 
who, though he is not signed with the Cross, yet, through the especial grace 
of your Holiness, he hath got very much money from those who are signed, 
and in want, do intreat the like favour. 

The Pope taking into consideration the elegance of his manner, 
the efficacy of his reasoning, and the comeliness of his person, conceded in 
part what he desired; whereupon he received above a thousand marks 
from those who had been so signed. In about two years after this, in 
1249, having received the blessing of his noble mother Ela, then Abbess 
of Lacock, he commenced his journey at the head of a company of 200 
English horse, and being received with great respect by the King of France, 
joined that monarch's army. In Palestine he became subsequently 
pre-eminently distinguished, and fell in 1250 in a great conflict with the 
Saracens, near Damieta, having previously killed above 100 of the enemy 

' Burke's Ext. Peerage, Ed. 1831, p. 175. " 17 Hen. III. 



COWLING. 205 

with his own hand. It was reported that, the night before the battle, his 
mother Ela, the abbess, saw in a vision the heavens open, and her son armed 
at all parts (whose shield she well knew), received with joy by the angels. 
Remembering the occurrence when news of his death reached her in six 
months after, she held up her hands, and with a cheerful countenance 
said : "I, thy handmaid, give thanks to thee, O Lord, that out of my 
sinful flesh thou hast caused such a champion against Thine enemies to 
be born." It was also said that in 1252, when messengers were sent to 
the Soldan of Babylon for the redemption of those who had been taken 
prisoners, he thus addressed them : "I marvel at you, Christians, who 
reverence the bones of the dead, why you inquire not for those of the 
renowned and right noble William Longespee, because there be many 
things reported of them (whether fabulous or not I cannot say), viz., that 
in the dark of the night there have been appearances at his tomb, and that 
to some, who called upon his God, many things were bestowed from heaven. 
For which course and in regard of his great worth and nobility of birth, 
we have caused his body to be here intombed." Whereupon the messenger 
desiring it, the remains were delivered to them by the Soldan, and thence 
conveyed to Acres, where they were buried in the church of St. Cross. 
This eminent and heroic personage married Idonea, daughter and heir of 
Richard de Carnville.' 

The manor passed to his son and heir, William de Longespee, who 
married Maud, daughter of Walter Clifford, and died in 1257, leaving an 
only daughter and heir Margaret, commonly called Countess of Salisbury. 
She married Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, who surviving her enjoyed 
the manor during his lifetime. He died in 1310,^ and the manor passed to ^ 
his only daughter and heir Alice, married to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, * 
who being outlawed King Edw. II. seized upon the lands which Alice had 
made over to her husband and other manors. This manor does not seem 
to have been seized,, and Alice, the heiress of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, 
remarried Eberlon le Straunge.^ 

The manor seems next to have vested in Robert de Aspale. The 
family had previously held land in Cowling, for we find that Master 
Geoffrey de Aspale had free warren here in 1272,* and Master Giles de Aspale, 
rector of the church of Cowling, claimed to have warren in his lands in Cow- 
ling.' Geoffrey de Aspale also held here, and on the Patent Rolls in 1275 
will be found an action by him against Richard, son of Godfrey de Culynge 
touching a fosse levied in Cowling.^ 

This Geoffrey de Aspale died in 1287,'' and in the inquisition taken 
after his decease the Manor of Cowling is mentioned. A fine was levied 
of customs and services out of part of the manor in 1326 by Ebuld le 
Strange and Alice his wife against Robert de Aspale,^ and another in 1329 
of the manor by the said Robert de Aspale and AUce his wife against Thomas 
son of Robert de Aspale.' 

The manor passed from Robert de Aspale to his son and heir. Sir 
John de Aspale, who had a grant of free warren here in 1337.'° 

'Burke's Ext. Peerage, ed. 1831, p. 175. ^Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. I. z^d. 

'I.P.M., 4 Edw. II. 51. ''I.p.M., 15 Edw. I. 35. 

^I.P.M., 2 Edw. II. (2nd Nos.) loi. ^Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. II. 2. 

* Chart. Rolls, 56 Hen. III. i; H.R. ii. s Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. III. 36. 

196. «> Chart. Rolls, 11 Edw. III. 4; 21 Edw. 
'H.R. ii. 153, 173. III. 4. 



2o6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

As the Manor of Stonham Aspall,in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred, 
the manor passed to his two daughters, and in 1408 John Spencer, the 
3rd husband of the daughter Katherine, together with her released to Sir 
Edmund de Thorp and Joan his wife, daughter of the said Katherine by 
her 2nd husband, Sir Robert (? John) de Northwode, a moiety of this manor. 
Joan de Thorp died in 1415, and by her will ordered her debts and legacies 
to be paid out of her Manor of Stonham if her lord would permit ; if not, 
then her Manor of Cowling should be sold for that purpose, but if the 
legacies were paid out of Stonham, then she gave the Manor of Cowling to 
her said husband. Lord Edmund de Thorp, and his heirs for ever. The 
debts and legacies would appear to have been paid out of Stonham, and 
the interest of Joan in the manor passed to her husband in fee, and on his 
death passed to his daughter Isabel, married to Philip Tilney, of Burton, 
CO. Lincoln. 

On Philip Tilney's death in 1453 it passed to his son and heir, Frederick 
Tilney, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Laurence Cheney, of Cam- 
bridgeshire, and passed to their only daughter Elizabeth, married to 
Humphrey Bourchier, Knt., eldest son of John, Lord Berners, slain at the 
battle of Barnet in 1471. Elizabeth afterwards married Thomas, son and 
heir of John, Lord Howard, later Earl of Surrey and Duke of Norfolk, and 
made her will in 1506' under the name of Elizabeth, Duchess of Norfolk.! 
The Duke held this moiety of the manor until his death in 1524, when Sir 
John Bourchier, son and heir of Sir Humphrey Bourchier, 2nd Lord Berners, 
succeeded. He married Katharine, daughter of John Howard, Duke of 
Norfolk, and in 1515 was made Chancellor of the Exchequer for life. He 
translated by command of Hen. VHL the Chronicle of Sir John Froissart 
and other works from the French, Spanish, and Italian. He died i6th 
March, 1532-3,^ and the manor devolved (subject to the interest of his 
widow, who died 12th March, 1535-6) upon his two daughters — Mary, married 
to Alexander Unton, son and heir of Sir Thomas, of Wadley, in Berks. A 
settlement dated loth June, 1516, was made by Sir John Bourchier, Lord 
Berners, who had the reversion in the manor subject to the estate by the 
curtesy of Thomas, Earl of Surrey, on this marriage, whereby the Manor of 
Cowling, with the Manors of Horham and Thorpe Hall, were to be limited 
to the use of Jane Bourchier and the heirs of her body, and for lack of such 
issue to the use of the said Mary and the heirs of her body, with remainder 
to the use of the said Lord Berners and the heirs of his body, with divers 
remainders over to the use of Sir Thomas, Lord Howard, Sir Edward 
Howard, Edmund Howard, brothers, in tail male' one after the other, after ' 
to Lady Muriell, Viscountess Lyell, Anne, Lady Dacre, wife of Thomas, 
Lord Dacre, of the South, Dame Elizabeth Boleyn, wife of Sir Thomas 
Boleyn, and Dame Margaret Bryan, wife of Sir Thomas Bryan, and the heirs 
of their bodies with divers remainders over. 

Mary died without issue. Jane married Edmund Knevet or Knyvet, 
2nd son of Edmund Knevet, of Bukenham Castle, in Norfolk. He hel4 
a moiety of this manor in right of his wife, and died ist May, 1539, his 
widow surviving until 17th Feb. 1561.* 

'I.P.M., Duchy of Lancaster, 50 (Hen. ^Will 3rd March, 1532-3, proved 4th 
VII.) 126. Feb. 1533-4. 

^ For copy of her will, see Stonham * Will 6th April, 1560, proved gth March, 
Aspall Manor, in Bosmere and 1561. 

Claydon Hundred. 



COWLING. 207 

The manor does not appear in the deeds of the Knyvets subsequently 
to this. Jane's eldest son John, who died in his mother's lifetime, 
married Agnes, daughter of Sir John . Harecourt, of Elnhalle, co. 
Stafford, and the settlement dated 14th Feb. 1537-8, does not refer to the 
manor. John and Agnes's son and heir, Sir Thomas K;^:^vet, does not seem 
to have had the manor,' though he is entered by Davy among its lords. 

The other moiety of the manor passed from Margery, daughter and 
coheir of Sir John de Aspale, who had remarried Sir George Felbrigg, of 
Playford, to her daughter Margery (by her ist husband. Sir Thomas 
Naunton), who married Sir Roger Drury, of Rougham, Knt., and passed 
from them to their son and heir. Sir William Drury, Knt., who was found 
to be heir of Margaret Felbrigg in 1422 ."^ Sir William Drury, by his will dated 
14th June, 1450, left his moiety of the manor to his widow Katherine for 
life with remainder to his grandson, John Drury. Katherine the widow 
died in 1479,^ and John Drury died in 1498."* 

John Broughton^ seems to have died seised of the manor 24th Jan. 
1517, leaving John his son and heir,® but possibly only as trustees, for we 
find it subsequently held by John Drury, who in 1546 sold the same to 
John Fastolf,^ who died seised 6th Dec. 1548, leaving Thomas his son and 
heir.' 

In 1553 the manor seems to have been acquired by John Worliche, of 
Wickhambroke, great-grandson of Sir William Wolrich alias Worliche, of 
Ludlow, CO. Salop, and we meet with a fine levied of a moiety of the manor 
this year by him against Thomas Fastolf.' , John Worliche married 
Katherine Monynge, and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Charles Worliche, who resided at Cowling, and married Honor, daughter of 
Thonias Worliche, of Hunts. A fine was levied of the manor in 1564 by 
the said Charles Worliche against Edmund Peyton and Katherine his wife.'° 

In 1591 we meet with another fine of the manor by Thomas Felton 
and others against Charles Worliche and others." On Charles Worliche's 
death the manor passed to his son and heir Thomas, against whom in 1594 
a fine was levied by the said Thomas Felton and others." 

The whole manor appears subsequently to have vested in Sir Stephen 
Soame, Knt.,'^ 2nd son of Sir Stephen Soame, the Lord Mayor of London in 
1598. Sir Stephen the son married 31st Dec. 1619, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Playter, of Sotterley, Bart., and died 19th Jan. 1639, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Peter Soame, Bart., who married 
30th Dec. 1656, Susanna, youngest daughter of Ralph Freeman, of Aspeden, 
CO. Herts.,'* and died in 1697, leaving a son. Sir Peter Soame, 3rd Bart., 
who married Joan, daughter and heir of George Shute, of Stockwell, co. 
Surrey, and died in 1709 of the smallpox. 

'I.P.M., 26th Aug. 16 Jac. I. His will ^LP-M., 3 Edw. VI. 142. 

was dated 30th Jan. 1617, proved ''Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. VI. 

6th March, 1617. '°Fine, Trin. 6 Eliz. 

" I.P.M., Duchy of Lancaster, 9 Hen. V. 27. " Fine, Mich. 33-34 Eliz. 

3I.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 37. "Fine, Hil. 36 Eliz^_^^ 

■^See Manor of Weston Market, in Black- '3 See Manor of Comerlh, in Bnrer and 

bourn Hundred. Overhall, in Cavendish, Babergh 

5 See Manor of Denston Hall, in this Hundred. 

Hundred. '* Correction on vol. i. p. 62. 
6I.P.M., loHen. VIII. 148. 
'See Manor of Pettaugh Hall, in Thredling 

Hundred; Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. 

VIII. 



^v< 



2o8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Prior to 1747 the manor was purchased by Francis Dickins, a bencher 
of the Middle Temple, who also held the Manor of Little Bradley. He was 
a son of Francis Dickins, of Ripplington, co. Hants. An inscripton 
to his memory states that, " in private life he was seriously religious, an 
affectionate husband, a hearty friend, a kind master ; with natural endow- 
ments increased by knowledge of the laws, he was a magistrate upright without 
severity, in preventing suits and procuring reparation for the injured, 
ending strife in content. He was a shining ornament to his profession by 
deep learning and solid judgement ; he was a guide to many, a pattern to all. 
He repaired and ornamented the church and built the steeple at his own 
expense." 

He married Rachel only daughter and heir of Thomas Dickins, also a 
bencher of the Middle Temple, and died 27th May, 1747, at the age of 76, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Francis Dickins, and from 
him to his son and heir, Francis Dickins, who sold it in 1816 to John Kemp, 
by whose assignees it was sold in 1817 to Henry Usborne, High Sheriff for 
the county in 1823. The estate then consisted of the manor, great and 
small tithes, and 2,176 acres of land including the park. The manor was 
again offered for sale 24th July, 1828,' and again in 1841 and 5th June, 1845. 

The Ipswich Journal of i6th Aug. 1845, states that Branches Park, 
the seat of the late Henry Usborne, of close upon 1,600 acres, and Manor 
of Cowling, extending over 3,000 acres, and producing a rent of nearly 
£2,280, sold for £60,500 to " a gentleman from Manchester." 

In 1855 the manor was vested in James Simpson, and in 1885 in James 
Alfred Simpson. 

In 1896 the manor was vested in James Dundas Cockburn, and is now 
vested in Gilbert Augustus Tonge, who resides at Branches Park, a fine 
mansion here standing in about 200 acres of land well timbered. 

Arms of De Longespee : Arg. six lions or lionels rampant, Or, third, 
second, first. Of Wolrich or Worlich : Gules, a chevron betw. 3 geese 
volant, Argent. Of Dickins : Erm. on a cross fleury Sa., a leopard's 
face Or. 

Shardelowes Manor. 

This was the lordship in the time of King Edw. III. of Sir John de 
Shardelowe, and he died seised of it in 1335,^ from which time to the time 
of Sir John de Shardelowe, who died without issue in 1433,^ and, indeed, 
to the death of William Brewse, who died in 1489, the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Shardelowes, in Lackford Hundred. 

Shortly afterwards the manor was acquired by John Clopton, of 
Melford, who by a deed dated ist August, 1539, granted the manor, called 
in such deed the " Manor Oif Shardlowes in Wroting," with lands in 
Wratting, Stradishall, Otley, Great Thurlow, Little Thurlow, Stansfield, 
Lidgate, Tunstall, and elsewhere, to his son, William Clopton and Margaret 
his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn.* William Clopton died in 1562, 
but sold the manor in 1545 to Sir Edward North,' son of Roger North, 
who died in 1509, and Christian his wife, daughter of Richard Warcup, of 
Sconington, near Appleby, in Kent, widow of Ralph Warren. 

^ Ipswich Journal, 28th June, and 2nd Aug. ^I.P.M., 11 Hen. VI. 12. 

1828. *Harl. 48D. 33. 

^I.P.M., 8 Edw. III. 37. 5 Fine, Mich. 37 Hen. VIII. 



COWLING. 209 

Sir Edward North was a lawyer, and in 1531 was appointed one of the 
clerks of the Parliament. In 1536 he became one of the King's serjeants- 
at-law, being so styled by the King in a grant then made to him, and on 
the surrender of his office of clerk of the Parliament in 1540 was made 
Treasurer of the Court of Augmentations, an office created on the dissolu- 
tion of the monasteries. The following year he was a knight, and elected 
one of the representatives for the County of Cambridge, and three years 
later was Chancellor of the Court of Augmentations jointly with Sir Richard 
Rich. Within a few months following he became sole Chancellor of that 
court by the resignation of the said Sir Richard Rich. He was called to the 
Privy Council, and had frequent grants of land from the King as a testimony 
of his favour and of the good services rendered to his sovereign. King 
Hen. VIII. constituted him one of his executors, and appointed him to 
be of council to his son and successor Edw. VI., leaving him a legacy of £300. 

On King Edward's accession to the Crown, Sir Edward was again elected 
one of the knights of the shire for the County of Cambridge, in the Parlia- 
ment then called, in which an Act being passed for the alteration of religion, 
and a Communion Book printed in English, he was one of the Privy Council 
who signed the letters missive, dated 13th March, to be sent to the several 
Bishops in England for the use of if; to commence at Easter following. 
He continued of the Privy Council all King Edward's reign, and was chosen 
again Knight of the Shire for Cambridge in the second and last Parliament 
called by that King, being specially recommended by his letters to the 
sheriff of that county. When by the Duke of Northumberland's practices 
the Lady Jane Grey was proclaimed Queen, he was one of the council 
who signed the letter sent to the Lady Mary, afterwards Queen, wherein 
they acknowledged the Lady Jane to be their lawful sovereign. But this^ 
was no hindrance to Queen Mary's favour, having otherwise manifeste(|' 
himself a faithful subject, so that on her accession he was of her Privy 
Council ; and in the first year of her reigUj in consideration of his great 
merits and abilities, he was advanced to the dignity of a baron of the realm 
by summons to Parliament 17th Feb. 1553-4, ^.nd took his place in the 
House of Peers on 17th April. 

The i8th of December, 1558 he was appointed one of the lords 
commissioners to consider and allow of the claims which those should 
make who were to perform any service by tenure, on the day of that 
Queen's coronation ; and was constituted Lord Lieutenant of Cambridge- 
shire, and the Isle of Ely, which was confirmed to him by another patent 
in the second year of her reign. By his will dated 20th March, 1563-4,' he 
bequeathed his body to be buried at Kirtling, in the County of Cambridge, 
and gave to his son and heir. Sir Roger North, knight, his Parhament robes, 
beseeching God to bless him and give him His grace truly and faithfully 
to serve the Queen and this realm, and to beware of pride and prodigal 
expenses. He was so fearful of both his sons' unthriftiness that he entailed 
his estate to prevent alienations as strictly as the law of those times 
would allow, with a remainder to his kindred of Walkeringham. 

He married ist Alice, daughter of Oliver Squire, of Southby, near 
Portsmouth, widow of Edward Myrffyn, of London, son of an alderman 
of that city, and also the widow of John Brigadine, of Southampton, with 
whom he had a considerable fortune. 

' Proved 23rd Feb. 1564-I; I.P.M., 26th April, 1565. 
CI 



210 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

His 2nd wife was Margaret, daughter of Richard Butler, of London, 
widow of Sir David Brooke, knight, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, 
who survived him, and was buried in the chancel of St. Lawrence Jewry, 
London, where on her tomb is this epitaph : — 

Lo here the Lady Margaret North, 

in tombe and earth doth lye ; 
Of husbands four the faithful spouse, 

whose fame shall never dye. 
One Andrew Fraunces was the first, 

the second Robert hight, 
Sirnamed Chartsey, Alderman ; 

Sir David Brooke, a Knight, 
Was third. But he that passed all, 

and was in number fourth. 
And for his virtue made a lord, 

was call'd Sir Edward North. 
These all together do I wish 

a joyful rising day ; 
That of the Lord, and of his Christ, 

all honour they may say. 
Obiit 2 die Junii, An. Dom. 1575. 

The said Edward, Lord North died at his house called the Charter- 
house, in the suburbs of London, on Sunday, the last of December, 
1564, and was buried in a vault under the chancel at Kirtling, on the south 
side, which he had caused to be made for that purpose, where is this 
memorial on a monument of black marble : — 

Serva Fidem 
Edvardum finxit Northum natura beatum 
addidit et Magnas gracia Regis opes 
providus et sapiens claros suscepit honores 
et tamen in tanto comis honore fuit 
quae natura dedit quce gracia principis auxit 
omnia mors una sustulit atra die 
que obiit ultimo Decembris 
AnHo Domini 1564. 

Habuit filios Rogerum nunc Dominum North, et Thomam filias vero 
Christianam et Mariam quarum altera Willi Comitis Wigorniae uxor altera 
Henrica diio Scroop nupta. 

" By his picture, whereof there is yet a copy remaining,' he appears 
to have been a person of a moderate stature, somewhat inclined to cor- 
pulency, and a reddish hair. As to his character, it can only appear from 
what has been said of him ; and his letters show he rather affected the 
delivery of a full and a clear sense than any curiosity of style or ex- 
pression. The bravery of his mind may best be judged of by his delight 
to live in an equipage rather above than under his condition and degree ; 
and by his magnificence in buildings, which were very noble for materials 

' In Peterhouse College, Cambridge. 



COWLING. 211 

and workmanship, as may appear by the two houses he set up at KirtUng 
and Charterhouse. His piety, charity, and love of learning is evident from 
his bestowing the parsonage of Burwell on the University of Cambridge ; 
as also the vicarage of Burwell. And to Peter House, the ancientest 
college of that university, as a token of his gratitude for what he gathered 
there in the way of learning, the parsonage of Ellington. He provided 
chapels in such houses he built, which shews a desire in him of an assiduity 
in the service of God by himself and family, which care of providing peculiar 
places for divine service, within families, was too much neglected in the 
following age, as may be witnessed by many great and stately houses then 
built. He also built a chapel for the interment of his posterity, adjoining to 
the south part of the chancel in Kirtling Church ; for though the main super- 
stition was expired, yet burials in those days were attended with the per- 
formance of much religious duty." Under his portrait at Peterhouse is this 
distich : — 

" Nobilis hie vere fuerat, si Nobilis uUus, 
Qui sibi principium Nobilitatis erat." 

On the inquisition taken 26th April, 7 Eliz. the jury found that he died 
seised in the County of Middlesex of the Manor of " Charlelotte," with the 
appurtenances in Cowling. 

The manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Roger North, who in 1566 
had summons to Parliament, and took his place there accordingly. He 
had been elected in 1555 one of the knights of the shire for the County of 
Cambridge, and having on Queen Elizabeth's accession to the throne 
received the honour of knighthood, was again elected one of the knights 
for that county in her first Parliament, as also in her second Parliament 
which met at Westminster in 1562. 

In 1566 he accompanied the Earl of Sussex with the Order of the Garter 
to Maximilian, the Emperor, then at Vienna ; and in 1572 was one of the 
peers who then sat on the trial of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. In 1585, 
having accompanied the Earl of Leicester, General of the Forces, sent to 
the assistance of the States, he was, for his valour made a knight banneret, 
and gained great reputation in the wars in the Netherlands. In the 
engagement before Zutphen, 1586, where Sir PhiUp Sidney received his 
death wound, he behaved with the greatest bravery, as appears by the 
Earl of Leicester's letter to Sir Thomas Heneage relating the hazardous 
enterprises of this Lord North, " who, though he had before been bruised 
on the knee with a musket shot, yet leaving his bed hastened to this 
skirmish, one boot on, and the other off, and went to the matter very 
lustily," saith the Earl. 

His intimacy with that great peer is evident from his memorial on 
his examination to prove the marriage of the Earl with the Lady Lettice, 
Countess of Essex ; and by his will he had a legacy of a basin and ewer 
of £40 value. His deposition is somewhat curious : — 

" On the 13th of March, a.d. 1580, 23 Eliz. Roger North, Baron of 
Kirtling, of the age of forty years, saith. That he has byne very conversant 
with the erle of Leicester, by the space of theis ten or twelve yeares last 
passed. And that by reason of such familiaritie, the said erle of Leicester 
did sondry times, by manie good and godlie speeches, both acknowledge 
unto this deponent, and also humbly thank the Lord God for his infinite 
mercy and goodness, which he had bestowed and powered upon him in great 
measure of his blessing, still devising and studying how he might walk in 



212 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

those ways that might be most pleasing to his merciful God. And with all 
told this deponent, that there was nothing in this liefe which he more 
desyred then to be joyned in marriage with some godUe gentlewoman with 
whom he might lead his liefe to the glory of God, the comfort "of his soule, 
and to the faithfuU service of her majestic, for whose sake he had hitherto 
forborn marriage, which long held him doubtful!. Theis and such like 
speeches, passed from the said erle to this examinant ; who, for his part, 
as he saith did ever Uke this godlie dispositon, and ever comforted bis lord- 
ship therein, and hartned him thereunto. Whereupon, as he saith, the said 
erle did divers times impart to this deponent, the hartie love and affection 
which he bare unto the countess of Essex, whom he knew to be a most godUe 
and virtuous gentlewoman adding with all, that he greatly desyred and 
longed after some yssue of his owne boddy, yf so itt please God to 
contynue and hold up his house and name. And after manie con- 
ferences passing between them to this purpose, the said erle of Leicester 
brake with this deponent, as he saith (on a tyme) and tould him plainlie, 
that he was resolved to marry and take to wief the countesse of Essex, 
which in a short tyme he performed. For he sayeth, that on a Saterdaie 
the 20th September, an. Dni. 1598 (as far as he now remembreth) the 
queen's majestic then lying at Stovers-house in the forrest, the erle of 
Leicester went to his house at Wainsted, to bedd, and tooke this deponent 
with him. In which night there was also at Wainsted, the cries of Warwick 
and Pembroke, Sir Francis KnoUes, and the countess of Essex. At which 
tyme and place the said erle of Leicester told this deponent after supper, 
that he intended to be married the next morning, by the leave of God, and 
therefore prayed this deponent to ryse somewhat betimes for that purpose. 
Whereupon the dale following beinge Sundaie, this examinant rose early, 
and came to the said Erie, whom he found walkinge in a little gallery 
looking towards the garden. And after ordinary salutation, the Erie of 
Leicester said to this deponent, that he should presently solemnize, yf the 
Lords and Sir Francis KnoUes were reddy. And thereupon departed from 
this examinant to fetch them together, and gave this deponent his double 
key, praying to go downe, and to bring up thither, by the privy wai, Mr. 
'Tindall, a chaplain of his lordship's, which this deponent (as he sayeth) 
did accordinglie, insomuch as this deponent and Mr. Tindall, were in the 
said gallery first ; and ymediately after came the Erles of Leicester, War- 
wick, and Pembroke, Mr. Treasurer KnoUes, and then the Countess of 
Essex ; In which time and place, and in the presence of the persons 
aforerecited, Mr. Tindall did marry the aforesaid Erie of Leicester and 
Countess of Essex together, by the booke of Common Prayer, after the due 
order of the same. And Mr. Treasurer KnoUes, father of the Countess, did 
give her. And further this deponent sayeth, he well remembreth, that as 
he looked aside, he saw Mr. Richard KnoUes, brother to the Countess, stand 
in the door which came out of the Erie's chamber, with his body half in 
the gallery and half out, who, together with the persons beforementioned, 
both saw and heard tiie solemnization of the said marriage. And other 
the deponent knows not." 

This Lord North was Ambassador Extraordinary from Queen Elizabeth 
to Chas. IX. King of France, and was sworn of the Privy Council to the 
Queen ; also constituted Treasurer of the Household in 1597 on the death 
of Sir Francis KnoUes, Knight of the Garter. His last wiU bears date 
20th October, 1598, wherein he bequeathed his body to be buried in the 
church of Kirtling, which was done 20th December following, by Garter 



COWLING. 213 

King at Arms, and a monument erected to his memory, with this 
inscription : — 

Durum pati 
Rogerus dominus North de KirtHnge 
Thesaurarius Hospitii Regii et e Sacris 
Conshis sub Regina EUzabetha uxorem 
Duxit Winifridam filiam Ricardi domini, 
Rich, de Lees in Com Essex, Summi Anghas 
Cancellarii ; exqua fiUos genuit Johannem, et 
Henricum, Milites, et fiham unicam Mariam 
quae decessit innupta. 
Diem obiit extremum 
Anno Aetatis LXXmo 
et Anno Domini M.D.Cmo. 

He died in the 70th year of his age, 3rd December, 1600 ; and Camden 
(in his History ol Queen Elizabeth) gives this character of him : " That he 
was a person of great briskness and vivacity, with an head and heart fit 
for service." 

The manor passed to Roger, Lord North's grandson and- heir, Dudley 
North, son of Sir John North, eldest son of Roger and of Sir John's wife 
Dorothy, daughter and coheir of Sir Valentine Dale, D.C.L., Master 
of the Requests. Sir John had been slain in the Flemish wars 5th June, 
1597 ; as his burial in St. Gregory's, London, is 6th June, 1597, much 
expedition seems to have been exercised ! Dudley, Lord North, married 
Frances, 6th daughter and coheir of Sir John Brocket, of Brocket Hallj 
CO. Hereford, being the only child of his 2nd wife Elizabeth, daughter and 
coheir of Roger Moore. He was nominated in 1645 by both Houses of 
Parliament, with the Earls of Northumberland, Essex, Warwick, and 
others to_ manage the affairs of the Admiralty. He died 18 July, 1666, 
in his 85th year, and was buried at Kirtling. 

Subsequently we find the manor vested in Sir Jacob Downing, Bart., 
who died without issue in 1764. 

In 1808 the manor was vested in John Kemp, and in 1811 in the 
Master and Fellows of Downing College, Cambridge. 




214 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DALHAM. 
|N this place in Saxon times a socman had an estate con- 
sisting of 2 carucates of land, a villein, 5 bordars, 2 serfs, 
2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, 
which latter became i| at the time of the Survey. There 
was also wood for the maintenance of 60 hogs, 2 rouncies, 
10 beasts, 24 hogs, 100 sheep, and 50 goats. At the time of 
the Survey the beasts had increased to 15, the hogs to 30, and 
the sheep became reduced to 40. The value was formerly 40s., but at the 
time of the Survey 6is. There was also a church with 40 acres of free land, 
and half a ploughteam valued at 5s. WiUiam the Sinner held this over the 
socman, and when the Survey was taken the ^tate belonged to Richar-d, 
son of Earl Gislebert.' 

^ I Manor of Dalham with Dunstal's. 

■ From the Domesday tenant, Richard Fitz Gilbert, this manor came 
down to William Peche, who held of the Honor of Clare, and in iigi was 
held by Sir Hamon Peche, Sheriff of Cambridge 1156 to 1160. He married 
Alice, daughter and coheir of Pagan Perevell and sister and coheir of 
William Perevell, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Gilbert Peche,. 
who married Alice, daughter of Sir Robert Fitz- Walter. Gilbert was dead 
by 1213, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Hamon Peche on whose 
death in 1240 it vested in his son and heir, Sir Gilbert Peche,^ who gave 
this manor with his other lands to the King and Eleanor his then Queen. 

Serjeants' accounts of lands of Lady Joan Peche^ in Dalham, 21 and 
22 Edw. I. will be found amongst the Ministers' Accounts in the Record 
Office.* 

Page (in his History of Suffolk) says that in the gth E'dw. I. Queen 
Margaret held the manor, but he labours under a delusion, of course, as 
Margaret was not Queen until 1299, the 27 Edw. I. 

The manor, however, was by letters patent, dated Hertford, aoth 
Feb. 1303, granted to her as part of the lands wherewith the King dowered 
his 2nd Queen Consort " at the church door " for life. As Margaret was 
married to King Edward, at Canterbury, 8th Sept. 1299, this was a post- 
nuptial grant made to her in compensation for other lands which were for 
State reasons withdrawn. But the grant was made to her in the same 
form as if she had obtained it "at the church door " on the day of her 
marriage. 

It was in conformity with the ancient custom in compliance with 
which Royal brides of England demanded and received a formal inves- 
titure of lands and other endowments from their Kings in the face of the con- 
gregation assembled to see the settlement as well as the nuptial rite. 
Margaret was the youngest daughter of Philip the Bold, King of France, 
and is said to have been the first Queen of England who bore her arms 
with those of her husband on one shield. 

The grant was more probably at this time of £^0 value from the manors 
of Dalham and Bradfield,^ but in 1309 a grant was made by King Edw. IL 
to Queen Margaret of the two manors in lieu of other manors.^ 

On the Patent Rolls in 13 13 we meet with a commission issued on the 
complaint of Queen Margaret to enquire touching the persons who forcibly 

' Dom. ii. 390. ■• Bundle 995, No. 13. 

^ T. de N. 293. . = Pat. Rolls, 31 Edw. I. 34, and 32 Edw. I. 

,^ She was Gilbert's 2nd wife and daughter 12. 

of Simon de Grey. "Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. II. 13 and 14. j 



DALHAM. 315 

entered her closes at Dalham, Bradfield, and Stoke Nayland, broke her 
houses, and did other damage.' 

The Queen died 14th Feb. 1318-9 at the age of 36, and a grant was 
made in 1320 by the Crown of the manor with the advowson to Sir Walter 
de Norwich for life. He was one of the Barons of the Exchequer and 
Treasurer of the Exchequer. He married Catherine Hedersete and was 
summoned to the Parliament of 8 Edw. IL when the judges and others 
of the King's Council were intermixed with the Earls and Barons in the 
same writ/ from which it may be inferred that he was not by that writ 
created Baron of the Realm, especially as thereafter his name was always 
included among those of the justices and others of the King's Council. 
The grant above mentioned included also the Manor of Bredfield, and was 
for the rent of £40 per annum to the Exchequer. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1318 we find a grant to John de Norwich, 
King's yeoman, son of Walter de Norwich, if he survive his father, that he 
may hold for life the Manors of Dalham and Bredfield formerly held by 
Queen Margaret, which the King had granted to the said Walter for life 
subject to a render of £$0 a year.^ The grant in fee was not made until 
1320, when the advowson was included at the rent of ;^40.'' The rent of 
^50 on one of the rolls is an error. 

Sir Walter de Norwich did survive his father 10 years, and died in 1326, 
not 1329, as Dugdale and Cockayne state,' when the manor passed to his 
son and heir. Sir John de Norwich, Knt. And on the Close Rolls in 1329 
is an order to restore to John de Norwich, ^on and heir ot Walter, all 
issues from the manor as it was not held in chief ; but at the fee farm of £40."^ 
This rent of ^^40 is of sufficient importance to receive several notices on 
the Close and Patent Rolls of King Edw. III. The King granted the 
;f40 fee farm rent to John de Monte Gomery,'' and on the Close Rolls in 1338 
is a command to Sir John de Norwich " to be attendant upon the said 
John de Monte Gomery " in respect of this yearly rent.' 

Sir John de Norwich' was in 1334 appointed Admiral " versus partes 
orientates," and served in the wars in Scotland in 1336, and in 1338 in those 
of Gascoigne, by reason of which he had respite for payment of 
his debts until the festival of St. Peter advincula next ensuing. He was 
for some time Governor of Angouieme, in France. In 1339 in further 
consideration of his services he had an allowance of £60. 14s., the surplusage 
of which was due to him from the time he had been Admiral of the whole 
Fleet to the Northwards. He also had an allowance of 50 marks per 
annum, and had granted to him a licence for a market on Friday weekly 
and a fair for three days annually at his Manor of Great Massingham, in 
Norfolk. 

It seems that about 1340 Sir John de Norwich settled the manor and 
advowson, and the reversion of the Manor of Bredfield expectant on the 
decease of Katharine, late wife of Sir Walter de Norwich, on his son, Walter 
de Norwich and Margaret his wife in tail, for in respect of this alienation 

' Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. pt. ii. 22d ; 8 Edw. = I.P.M., 3 Edw. III. 58. 

II. pt. i. 3od, 2(jd. ° Close Rolls, 3 Edw. III. 16. 

^Dug. Lists of Sum. ^Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. 20. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. II. pt. ii. 27 ; O. 12 =Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. 21. 

Edw. II. 12 and 14; 13 Edw. 1^1. ^See Manor of Mettingham Castle, in 
I ; 14 Edw. II. 17. Wangford Hundred. 

■* Chart. Rolls, 14 Edw. II. 27. 



2i6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

without licence we find a pardon entered on the Patent Rolls in 1341 to 
Walter de Norwich and Margaret.' 

He was summoned to ParHament as a baron 25th Feb. 1341-2 and 3rd 
April, 1360. In 1344 he had licence to fortity his houses at Metti.ngham, 
in Suffolk, and Blackworth and Lyng, in Norfolk. He later served in the 
wars in France under Henry of Lancaster, Earl of Derby, and founded a 
chantry in the church of Raveningham consisting of one master 
and eight priests to the honour of the Blessed Virgin, and to Andrew the 
Apostle, and All Saints to celebrate divine service for the health of his soul 
and the soul of Margaret his wife, &c. 

He married ist Alice, daughter of William de Huntingfield, by whom 
he had no issue, and 2ndly Margaret Mortimer, of Attleborough, co. Norfolk. 

Rent Rolls of the manor in 1345 will be found amongst the Suffolk 
Rolls in the Bodleian.'' 

Sir John de Norwich died 15th Aug. 1362, and the manor passed to his 
widow Margery or Margaret, and Sir John's eldest son (and on her decease 
in 1366 Walter, having died in his father's lifetime in 1360)^ to Sir John's 
grandson and heir, Sir John de Norwich, the son of Walter. Walter is said 
to have married Woliona, daughter of Miles Stapleton, of Bedale, in York- 
shire, but at the date of the above settlement in 1340 his wife's name seems 
to have been Margaret. 

Sir John had livery of his lands in 1374, being then seised of the manors 
of Bredfield, Dalham, Ilketshall, " Schip-medway," Redesham, Mellis, 
Wenhaston, Brunfeld, Dallinghoo, Thorington, and the Castle of Metting- 
ham, all in Suffolk; He died the same year* without issue, by his wiU. 
dated 1373 appointing his body to be buried at Raveningham by the side 
of his father. Sir Walter, " there to rest till it could be removed to the new 
church of Norton-coupe cors," to the building of which he left £450.- 

Sir John de Norwich leaving no issue, Katherine de Brews, daughter of 
Thomas, brother of Sir John, grandfather to the last Sir John, his cousin, 
was his next heir and then aged 32, and on her doing homage she had 
livery of the manor.' However, being then or shortly afterwards becoming, 
a nun at Dartford, in Kent, she resigned her right and claim to the manor 
i8th May, 1378, in favour of her aunt Margaret (daughter of Sir Walter,^ 
who died in 1326, and sister of Sir John and Thomas the father of the said 
Katherine), who had married ist Thomas Caily, and 2ndly Robert de Ufford, 
ist Earl of Suffolk,^ the reversion vesting in her son, William de Ufford, 
2nd Earl of Suffolk. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is a deed by 
which " Katerina de Breouse, cousin and heir of Sir John de Norwich, 
Knt.," grants to Sir John de Burgh, Nicholas de Gernoun, William Phelip, 
John Boll, clerk, Robert Grigge, clerk, Robert Gosselyn, clerk, William le 
Rous, and Thomas de Wroxham, the reversion of this manor and that of 
Bredfield, and the advowson of the church of Dalham, " which Margaret, 
sometime wife of Sir Walter de Norwich, held for the term of her life." 
The deed is dated London, loth Nov. 48 Edw. HL [1374].^ 

' Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. iii. 7 ; Deed Margaret to be the daughter of 

of John de Norwich, 14 Edw. IV. • Sir John de Norwich, and not his 

M. Pas. Rec. Rot. sister, but this is not correct, as if 

''18 Edw. III., Bodl. Suff. Rolls 9. so, she would have been aunt to 

^I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. Sir John, who died in 1574, and 

* I.P.M., 48 Edw. III. 53. consequently his heir. 

5 Fine, Rot. 48 Edw. III. 15. ^See Parham Hall Manor, Plomesgate 

"Suckling, in a Pedigree in the Suckling Hundred. 

Collection in the Brit. Mus., makes ^ Harl. 47 B. 18. 



DALHAM. 217 

On William de Ufford's death, 15th Feb. 1381-2, without issue, the 
reversion in the manor (for Margaret, Robert de Ufford's widow, did not 
apparently die until 1390)' passed to his sisters and coheirs— Cecily, wife 
of John, 3rd Lord Willoughby de Eresby, Catherine, wife of Robert, 
Lord Scales, 3rd Baron ; and Margaret, wife of William, Lord Ferrers, 
3rd Baron, of Groby, or their real representatives, who apparently 
were Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron, Henry de Ferrers, 4th Baron, 
and Roger de Scales, 4th Baron. John Marlere and William Bateman 
then purchased of Robert Willoughby and Roger de Scales their 
two shares in the manor. The fine levied to effect this purchase 
clearly shows the then existing condition of the title. It is levied by John 
Marlere, clerk, William Bateman, Nicholas de Massyngham, and Robert 
Rykedown in 1384, against Sir Robert de " Wylughby," and Sir Roger 
Scales, of two parts of both manor and advowson, " which Margaret, who 
was wife of Sir Walter de Norwych, held for life.'" 

The nature of the transaction is also made clear by the licence on the 
Patent Rolls in 1384.^ The purchasers of these two parts sold them to 
Thomas Stutevill in 1417, and the said Thomas Stutevill afterwards pur- 
chased the remaining third of the manor of William Ferrers, 5th Baron, 
the son of Henry de Ferrers, 4th Baron, to whom the same had descended 
from his father in 1387. Thomas Stutevill or Stotevill married Edith, 
daughter of — Heath, of Suffolk, and died in 1447,* when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas Stotevill, who married Maude, daughter of 
— Dracott, and dying in 1468,^ the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Richard Stotevill, who married Grace, daughter and coheir of — Borley, 
and of his wife, daughter and heir of — Walkfare, of Isleham, and dying 
the 14th Oct. 1506,* the manor devolved upon his son and heir, Thomas 
Stotevill, who married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Underbill and 
Thomasin his wife, daughter and coheir of Henry Caldebeke, and relict of 
John Turner. Thomas Stotevill died i8th Sept. 1514,^ when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Stotevill, who married Anne, daughter 
and coheir of Edward Bird, of Gazeley, who died nth May, 1571, and on 
the south side of the chancel of Dalham church is a stone erected on an 
altar monument thus inscribed : — 

Here lyeth Thomas 
Stutevyle Esquyer 
late lord of this 
Toune and Patron 
of this Churche and 
Ann his Wyfe. They 
continewed and kept 
Hespitalitye in the 
Manor Place here 
40 yeares together 
and her 15 children 
viz. 7 Sonnes and 8 
Daughters . he died the 
II of Maye 1571 his age 

65 
and the said Anne .... 

'I.P.M., 19 Rich. II. 35. ^I.P.M., 26 Hen. VI. 5. 

^Feet of Fines, 8 Rich. II. 2 ; I.P.M., 7 ^I.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 22. 

Rich. II. 132. ^I.P.M., 22 Hen. VII. 48. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 8 Rich. II. pt. i. 42. ^.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 53. 

D I 



2l8 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Thomas Stotevill was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas Stotevill, 
on whose death in 1606 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Martin 
Stotevill,' on whose death 13th June, 1631, at the age of 62, it vested in 
his son and heir, Thomas Stotevill, who dying in 1649 it went to his widow 
Judith for life, and on her death in 1696 left the Stotevill family after a hold- 
ing of 280 years. It is true Charles Stutevill seems to have been residing 
at Dalham Hall in 1702, for amongst the Rawhnson MSS. in the Bodleian 
we find allegations, &c., in a suit by Charles Stutevill, of Dalham Hall, 
against Elizabeth Beecher, claiming to be his widow 1702-8.^ 

Davy mentions that in 1531 Christopher Slihgsby and others had 
licence to alienate to Leonard Cotton and others, and that in 1536 Margaret 
Slingsby, widow, and others held. 

An entry such as this is somewhat distressing where otherwise the 
links in the devolution appear satisfactory, but an entry on the State 
Papers in 1516 and 1517, and an entry on the Memoranda Rolls in 1536, 
clear the matter up, and disclose, as we had already a,nticipated, that the 
parties referred to Were not beneficial owners. The short entry from the 
State Papers in 15 16 is a grant of the reversion and custody while heir a 
minor, of Dalham Manor, for Christopher Slyngesby,^ and the entry from 
the Memoranda Rolls in 1536, on the strength of which no doubt Davy 
enters the unfortunate Margaret Slingsby as a lady, is a call upon her, 
probably widow of Christopher, and on others to show title to the manor." 

In 1697 the manor was acquired by Gilbert Dolben, but he did not hold 
for long, as in 1702 the manor was purchased by Simon Patrick, D.D., 
Bishop of Ely, who erected in 1705 the present Dalham Hall of red brick. 
It stands upon an erninence, and commands an extensive view of the 
surrounding country. The Bishop died in 1707 when the manor passed 
to his widow Penelope, and later to his son Simon Patrick, who sold in 1714 
to John Affleck, son of Thomas Affleck, or Auchinlech, by Ann, daughter 
of Matthias Peterson, of Ocland, in Sweden. 

The sale was under the authority of an Act of Parliament 10 Anne, 
c, 17.= 

John Affleck the purchaser married Neeltie, daughter of Gilbert Schape, 
a merchant of Amsterdam, and died 26th March, 1718, at the age 
of 67,* when the manor passed to his 2nd but eldest surviving 
son and heir, Gilbert Affleck, of Dalham Hall, M.P. for Camlbridge, 
who had married 'in 1705 Anne, daughter of John Dolben, and niece of 
Sir Gilbert Dolben, Bart., and dying in 1764, the manor passed to his 
son and heir, John Affleck, M.P. for Suffolk. He married Sarah, only 
daughter of James Metcalfe, of Roxton, co. Bedford, and dying 17th Feb. 



"A letter of his, in 1624, "^^^ be found 
amongst the Egerton MSS. in the 
Brit. Mus. (Eger. 2715). A letter 
of this Martin Stotevill to Framling- 
ham Gawdy, dated the 14th Sept. 
1624, as to repair of the steeple 
of the church of Dalham is men- 
tioned in the loth Rep. of the 
Historical Com. (pt. iii. 116). In 
John Rous's diary is the following 
entry made June 13th, 1631 : 
" That day at night Sir Martin 
Stutvill, of Dalham, comming from 
the Sessions at Bury, with Sir 



George le Hunt, went into the 
Angell, and there being mery in a 
chayer, either readie to take tobacco 
or having newly done it (ut fertur), 
leaned backward with his head, 
and died immediatlie." 

"Rawl. B. 382. 

3S.P., 8 Hen. VIII. 528; 9 Hen. VIII. 

3195- 
* Memoranda, 28 Hen. VIII., Mich. Rec. 

Rot. 3. 
^See House of Lords Journals, xix. 413, 

421, 423, 424> 434. 435. 453, 456. 
'She died 27th Oct. 1729, aged 66. 



DALHAM. 219 

1776, the manor passed to his son and heir, Gilbert, who in 1787 succeeded 
his uncle, Sir Edmund Affleck, as 2nd Bart, of this family. He married 
Mary, daughter of Thomas Clark, of New York, and relict of Richard 
Vassal, of Jamaica, but died without issue in 1808, when the manor with 
the baronetcy devolved upon his first cousin and heir, Sir James 
Affleck, a Lieutenant-General in the army and Colonel of the i6th 
Dragoons, who dying unmarried loth Aug. 1833, the manor passed to his 
brother and heir, the Rev. Sir Robert Affleck, 4th Bart., rector of Tresswell, 
CO. Notts., vicar of Silkstone, Yorkshire, and Prebendary of York, who 
married i6th May, 1800, Maria, 2nd daughter of Sir Elijah Impey, Knt,, 
of Newick Park, in Sussex, formerly Chief Justice of Bengal, and on his 
death the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Gilbert Affleck, 6th Bart. 
He married 20th Dec. 1834, Everina Frances, eldest daughter of Francis 
Ellis, of Bath, but died without issue in Nov. 1854, when the manor passed 
to his brother and heir. Sir Robert Affleck, 7th Bart., who married 9th 
April, 1850, Maria Emily, eldest daughter of Edmund Singer Burton, of 
Churchill, co. Northampton, and dying 9th Oct. 1882, the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir Robert Affleck, 8th Bart. He married 9th March, 
1886, Julia Georgina, 2nd daughter of John Sampson Prince, of Cornwall 
Mansions, South Kensington. Shortly before his death the manor was 
purchased by the late Cecil Rhodes for, it is said, £130,000. 

At a court held 22nd May, 1727, the customs of the manor were 
declared to be : — 

1. That the husband after the death of the wife an inheritrix is tenant 
by the Curtesy. 

2. That the wife ought to have freebench of those lands whereof the 
husband died solely seised. 

3. That all the trees growing upon the Wastes of the Manor are the 
lord's. 

4. That all Estrays taken within this Manor are the lord's, 

5. That the lands called Blacklands ought of right to lay fresh and 
unsown every winter for the foldings and feed of the lord's sheep. 

6. That the tenant of such lands as are heriotable who is not possessed 
at the time of his death of a beast there is due to the lord for every heriot 
2S. 8d. 

7. That if any tenant of this manor cut down any Oak or Pollard trees 
and converts them to pales the lord of the manor may seize his copyhold 
lands for the same. 

8. That no copyhold lands of this manor may be exchanged without 
the lord's licence. 

9. That the Parsonage House has no right of Common, &c., &c., &c. 
including a declaration " that the lord of the Manor of Dalham is the only 
lord of the Soyle of the Village of Dalham with the bounds thereof and 
none other." The custom is to the eldest son. 

Arms of Stotevill : Bary of ten, Argent and Gules, a lion rampant, 
Sable. Of Affleck : Arg. three bars, Sa. 




220 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DEN HAM. 

|N Saxon times 2 socmen had an estate in this place. It 
consisted of 3 carucates of land^ 5 villeins, 13 bordars, a 
serf, 4 ploughteams in demesne (reduced at the time of the 
Survey to 3) ai^d 4 belonging to the men. Also 6 acres 
of meadow, wood sufficient to support 20 hogs, and a church, 
without land, a horse, 15 hogs, 72 sheep, and 38 goats, 
valued at £3. At the time of the Survey the horses were 
increased to 2, there were 4 beasts, and the hogs were increased to 33, 
while the value was £^. los. W. Hurant held this estate over the socmen, 
and at the time of the Survey it was held by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert.' 

Manor of Denham. 

This was the estate of Richard Fitz Gilbert, of Clare, at the time of 
the Survey, and passed to. his son and heir, Gilbert de Clare. In 1275 Sir 
John de Say held the lordship, and Galfrid -de Aspale appears to have 
died seised of it in 1287. 

Davy enters dubiously Matilda de Multon in 1293, and Thomas de 
Multon, son and heir, as holding in 1295, supposing they possibly may have 
reference to Denham, in Hoxne Hundred. No doubt he was strengthened 
in his doubt by finding that in 1318 the manor was still in the de Say family, 
being then held by Margaret de Say. He might have been more doubtful 
still had he known of the fine levied of the manor in 1287 by Margaret de 
CrioUys against John, son of Geoffrey de Say,"" and another fine levied of 
the manor in 1343 by John de Say and Agnes his wife and Agnes, who was 
wife of Geoffrey de Say, against William de Ryseby, chaplain, and John 
atte Lane, of Lakenheath.^ 

In 1380 the manor appears to have been vested in John de Denham.* 
Five years later it had passed to Matilda de Denham,^ who continued to hold 
until 1395. « 

The manor was the following year vested in the Hethe family.' By 
deed dated in 1396 Robert de Hethe enfeoffed Thomas Astley and others 
in certain lands therein named, comprehending among other property the 
Manor of Denham, and the feoffees regranted the same to the said Robert 
and Margery his wife and his heirs. He only survived a few days, and 
Thomas was found to be his son and heir of the age of 13 years." In 1439' 
this Thomas conveyed by deed his Manor of Denham juxta B;arrow to Sir 
Brian Stapleton and others, after the decease of himself and Anne his wife, 
to fulfil his will. There not being any male issue of this Thomas Hethe, 
or of Elizabeth, his sole daughter and heiress, the wife of William Berdewell, 
the trust for sale took effect. 

Thomas Hethe's will is dated 1439, and the trust for sale under the 
deed of 1439 seems to have been exercised after the death of Anne his 

' Dom. ii. 390J. Shardelow, who died in 1432. This 

* Feet of Fines, 15 Edw. I. 24. cannot well be correct. See Harl. 

3 Feet of Fines, 16 Edw. III. 29. MSS. 7356, where the sale is said 

♦Add. Ch. 5500, 5501, 5502, 5503. to have taken place in 18 Hen. VI., 

^Add. Ch. 5504. and that the manor subsequently 

^Add. Ch. 5505, 5506, 5507, 5508. vested in Sir John Shardelow. 

'Davy says that the very year of Robert ^I.P.M., 20 Rich. II. 28. 

de Hethe's settlement in 1396, Ela, ^ See Manor of Hengrave, in Thingoe 

widow of Sir Robert Shardelow, • Hundred. 

granted this manor to Sir John 



DENHAM. 221 

widow by William Cotton in 1481, selling to Thomas Higham or Heigham/ 
on whose death 21st March, 1480-1/ the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Heigham. The Heighams, however, had considerable property 
in the parish of Gazeley prior to their acquiring this manor. " Thomas 
Hygham held temp. Hen. VI. of De Vere, Earl of Oxford, two knights' 
fees in Denham juxta Gaselee, which John Delamare formerly held." 

Thomas Heigham married Catherine, daughter of William Cotton, 
of Lanwade, and died at Colne, in Essex, in 1492, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas, who died without issue 28th July, 1504, when 
the manor devolved on his brother and heir, John Heigham, of Heigharn. 
He married Mary Terringham, and died the last day of Feb. 1522, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Heigham, who married Philisj 
daughter of George Waldegrave, of Smallbridge, and died in 1553, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Heigham. He married 
Martha, daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrooke, Knt., by his ist 
wife Anne, daughter of Thomas Spring, of Lavenham, and died 9th Aug. 
1557, leaving four daughters and coheirs — Anne, Mary, Lucy, and Susan. 
Mary and Lucy both died before 1587 unmarried, Anne married Thomas 
Clere, of Stokesbee, in Norfolk, and Susan married Sir Edward Lewkenor, 
Knt., of Kington Bousey, in Sussex, son of the unfortunate Edward 
Lewkenor, groom-porter to Edw. VI. and Queen Mary, who being implicated 
in Sir Thomas Wyatt's rebellion, had been arraigned and condemned in 
1553, but died a prisoner in the Tower before execution. By the inquisition 
taken on the death of Thomas Heigham it was found that Mary, Anne, Lucy, 
and Susan were his daughters and heirs, and that he died seised of this 
manor and lands in Dalham, Needham, and Gazeley, holden of the Earl of 
Oxford as of his Honor of Hedingham Castle by two knights' fees, and of 
other estates. 

Sir Edward Lewkenor seems to have acquired the whole manor, and 
left the family estate in Sussex to reside here. He was,- as we have said, the 
son of Edward Lewkenor, by Dorothy, daughter of Sir Robert Wrothe, 
of Dureance, in Enfield, co. Middlesex, which Edward was the son of 
Edward Lewkenor and Margaret, one of the daughters of Roger Copley, 
which Edward was the son of Edward Lewkenor, the son of Nicholas 
Lewkenor, of Parham, and Elizabeth or Isabel his wife, daughter and coheir 
of Ralph Radmylle and Margaret his wife, daughter and coheir 
of Sir Richard Camoys, which Nicholas was son of Sir Thomas Lewkenor, 
of Goringe, co. Sussex, and Phillippe, daughter and heir of Walter Dalingrige, 
which Sir Thomas Lewkenor was son of Sir Thomas Lewkenor and Margaret 
or Elizabeth, daughter of John Carew, of Mallerforde, co. Bucks., which 
Sir Thomas was son of Sir Thomas Lewkenor and Joan his wife, daughter 
and sole h£ir of Sir John Doyly, of Stoke Doyly and Rant on, which Sir 
Thomas was son of Roger Lewkenor, temp. Edw. III., by Katherine his 
wife, daughter and heir of — Bardolphe.^ Sir Edward Lewkenor died 
3rd Oct. 1605, and was buried at Denham, according to the register, 5th 
Oct. 1605, which was the day after the burial there of his wife Susan. 

^ For his father, see Higham Hall, Gazeley, the son of Thomas Heigham and 

in this Hundred. The purchaser Alice his wife, daughter and heir 

was the son of Thomas Heigham, of John Hune, of Tunstall, which 

of Heigham, and Isabella, daughter Thomas was the son of Thomas, the 

and one of the heirs of Sir Hugh son of Richard Heigham, who died 

Franceys, which Thomas was the 25th March, 1340. 

son of Thomas and Ahce, and his 'I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 11. 

wife daughter and heir of Boys ^ See descent in 1597. Rawl. B. 319, 321. 
alias de Boyes, which Thomas was 



222 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In a small chapel on the north side is a large altar or table monument 
to Sir Edward Lewkenor, Knt., and Dame Susan his wife^ 2nd daughter 
and coheiress of Thomas Heigham, of Heigham, Esq., by Martha, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrooke, Knt. The monument 
stands on the floor against the north wall, and consists of a large 
table of stone, on which are ten figures, all kneeling, facing to the 
east, and with their hands joined before them in prayer — in front 
Sir Edward Lewkenor and his wife, immediately behind them two 
sons, and behind the sons six daughters, two and two — the father 
is in armour, but bareheaded, the hair short and with large ruff ; 
the sons are also in armour, all the figures are black, and kneeling on green 
and gold cushions. Over these figures is a heavy canopy of stone, supported 
by six stone pillars, painted to resemble porphyry. The tablet on the front 
or south side of the monument is divided into two compartments and 
bears the following inscriptions : — 

In hoc sacello nuper Koitxnrripiov ergo exstructo conditi jacent in 
suis distinctis et seperatis tumulis clarissimus ille vir Edwardus Lewkenor 
Eques Auratus et Selecta domina Susanna ipsius uxor — ambo et parentum 
et familiarum splendore illustres, ambo pietate et omnium virtutum choro 
insignes et peronati — quorum ilia immatura morte extincta est quum 
quinquaginta trium annorum curriculum vix confecisset die viz. Octobris 
2° Anno Salutis 1605 — ille vero postridie occubiit quam sexaginta 
tres annos aetate complevisset. Antequam naturae cessit vir egregius multis 
praeclaris muneribus per functus est in aula regia in parliamento in republica 
idque fideliter et cum summa laude atque bonoriim omnium approbatione 
inter cseteras autem justi prasconii causas haec maxime eduxit et sempi- 
terna memoria digna quod ejus opera in perexiguam hanc villam obscu- 
ramque evangelii praedicatio est introducta cujus luce et beneficio ad 
extremum vitae terminum fruebatur. 

Faemina vero praecellentissima a sincera evangelicae veritatis pro- 
fessione nanquam defuit sed earn multis christianis virtutibus modestia 
castitate 'LTopyia in pauperes misericordia in omnes munificentia 
commendavit atque in tam faelici statu tandem expiravit non dubium 
igitur est quin in perenni gloria ambo triumphent ultimam resurrectionem 
ardentibus votis expectantes quum plena ipsorum redemptio perficietur. 
Reliquerunt superstites filios binos filias vero sex praeclaram sane sobolem 
parentum vestigiis insistantem atque omnes virtutes talium parentum. 
. . . exprimentem cujus luculentum specimen .... quod viz. 
filius natu maximus praeclarum hoc .... non exiguis suis sumptibus 
excidendum et artificiosa manu .... hoc fano locandum curavit in 
perpetua .... parentum .... Reliquerunt etiam multos 
amicos et familiares tristes et Ipsoru morte defientes. 

(The last lines of the inscription are nearly, obliterated by damp). 
On the south side raised above the canopy, is a large shield of arms, 
namely, Lewkenor, of 12 coats. 

1. Lewkenor : Azure, 3 chevroriels, Argent, a mullet for difference. 

2. Bardolphe : Azure, 3 cinquefoils Or. 

3. Tregose : Azure, 2 bars gemelles Or, in chief a lion passant of the 
second. 

4. Dalingridge als. Delahache : Or, a cross engrailed Gules. 

5. Broos, alias Bruce : Gules, 3 bars vairee Argent and Azure. 

6. Echingham : Azuire, a fret Argent. 



DENHAM. 223 

7. Camoys : Or, on a chief Gules, 3 bezants. 

8. Radmylde : Barry of 6, Ermine and Gules. 

9. D'Oyley : Gules, 3 bucks' heads, cabossed Or, 2 and i. 

10. Noell : 3 pales Gules in a field Or. 

11. Halsham : Argent, a chevron Gules between 3 torteaux. 

12. Lewkenor : as above. 

On the frieze on the south side of the canopy are four shields : — 

1. Blank : impaling Lewkenor. 

2. Quarles : Or, a fesse dauncettee Ermine between 3 birds Vert, 
impaling Lewkenor. 

3. Rhodes : Argent, a lion passant guardant, in bend Gules, between 
2 cotises Ermine, impaling Lewkenor. 

4. Gournay, alias Gurney : Argent, a cross engrailed Gules, impaling 
Lewkenor. 

At the west end of the canopy, on the frieze, 2 shields :— 

1. Blank, impaling Lewkenor. 

2. Steward : Argent, a lion rampant Gules, debruised by a bend 
raguled Or, impaling Lewkenor. 

Above the frieze, a large shield, with Heigham, of 8 coats, 
(i) Heigham ; (2) Francys ; (3) Terringham ; (4) Pabenham ; (5) 
Lucy ; (6) Chamberlain ; (7) Tolthorpe ; (8) Heigham. 

At the east end of the canopy, on the frieze, 2 shields : — 

1. Lewkenor, impaling Blank. 

2. Lewkenor, of 12 coats (the same quarterings as before, except 
that the 12th coat is Heigham) impaling Blank. 

Above the frieze, a large shield — Lewkenor, of 12 coats, impaling 
Heigham of 8 coats/ 

The manor passed to Sir Edward Lewkenor's son and heir. Sir Edward. 
There is a letter of his written in 1594 to B. Gawdy amongst the Egerton 
MSS. in the British Museum.'' 

Sir Edward Lewkenor 6th Aug. 1607, married Mary, 2nd daughter of 
Sir Henry Nevill, of Billingbere, in Berkshire, Ambassador to France 1599 
to 1601, by Ann, daughter of Sir Henry Killigrew, Knt., and had two sons 
and three daughters. He was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1618, and died 
ist May that year, being buried at Denham 3rd May following.^ 

A sermon lamenting the death of Sir Edward Lewkenor preached 
upon a lecture day at Canham in Suffolk, by Bezaleel Carter, was printed 
by C.L. in 1618, and dedicated to the " Right worshipful! and godlie Ladie, 
the Lady Lewkenor, of Denham, and to the right worshipful! and religious 
gentleman Sir Robert Lewkenor, of Acris, in Kent, to Mrs. Gourny, of 
Great EUingham, to Mrs. Steward, and Mrs. Catlin, of Denham." 

It appears from the sermon that the subject of it died not long before 
at the age of 32 after having lately served the office of High Sheriff for the 
County — that he was Lord of the Manor of Canham and had presented the 
Preacher to the Living, at his great cost and expenses — that he was 
wise, learned, religious, prayed extempore in his family, erected a 

'Howard's Visit, of Suff. vol. ii. 230, 231, ^His will is dated 23rd July, 1617, and 
compared with the Cullum MSS. his I. P.M. was taken i6th James I. 

^Eger. 2713. 



224 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

building near his house with a large Table to the only use and relief of 
the Poor ; and the last year of his hfe, being 32 years old, clothed 
as many poor persons, &c., " He lives lewdly in these days, says the 
Preacher " that cannot have one Parasite or others, to make a Funeral 
Sermon in his praise and commendation ; but for myself, if I speak false, 
when I come down from my Pulpit, accuse me before this Congregation ; 
and if I speak but true then give Glory to God, and testify with me." 

The manor passed to Sir Edward's only surviving son and heir, Edward 

Lewkenor, who married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir William Russel, 

Bart., of Chippenham, in Cambridgeshire, by whom he had a daughter 

, and heir Mary married to Sir Horatio Townshend, of Raynham, co. Norfolk, 

Bart., created Viscount Townshend, nth Dec. 1682. 

Edward Lewkenor died and was buried at Denham the 23rd Dec. 1634, 
his funeral sermon being preached by Timothy Oldmayne, rector of Denham, 
and printed in 1636, with an elegy and epitaph by John Garnons, D.D. 
His widow survived, remarried John Ganden, D.D., afterwards Bishop 
of Worcester, and died in 1662. 

By the inquisition on Edward Lewkenor's death 10 Chas. I. it was 
found that Maud Lewkenor was his only ^ughter and heir, and was at the 
time of his death of the age of three months and six days. Her father died 
at the early age of 21. In 1654 shortly after the marriage of the Lewkenor 
heiress with Lord Townshend, a fine was levied by her and her husband of 
the estates of which by the inquisition on the death of her father, Edward 
Lewkenor, he was found to have died seised. They are described in this 
fine as the Manors of Denham, Desynynge, otherwise Desyning, Sharde- 
lowes in Cavenham, o'rwise Shardelows in Cavenham, Cressiners, Talmaches, 
o'rwise Talmages, Pashelowes, and the scite of the Manor of Abbotts ; and also 
20 messuages, 10 cottages, one windmill, one watermill, 6 dovecotes, 30 
gardens, 30 orchards, 2,600 acres of land, 400 acres of meadow, 800 acres of 
pasture, 400 acres of wood, 600 acres of furze and heath, common of pasture 
for all manor of cattle, and ten f buld courses in Denham, Barrow, Gazeley, 
Higham, Needham, Kentford, Moulton, Cavenham, Elveden, Kennet 
otherwise Kenelt, Dalham, Hargrave, and Tuddenham, and the rectory 
of Denham in the County of Suffolk, and of the Manor of Kennett otherwise 
Kenelt, in the county of Cambridge. 

Lady Townshend died in 1673 without issue, and the manor passed to 
her husband, Lord Townshend. Lord Clarendon says of him that : "He 
was a gentleman of the greatest interest and credit in that large County of 
Norfolk, and was able to bring in a good body, he had been under age till 
long after the end of the war, and so liable to no reproach or jealousy, yet 
of very worthy principles and of a noble fortune, when he engaged very 
frankly to borrow money and laid it out to provide arms and ammunition, 
and all the King's friends in those parts were ready to obey him, and the 
Lord Willoughby of Parham (whom he had brought over to his side) in 
whatsoever they undertook." 

He greatly facilitated General Monk's advance into England, and his 
reception into the City of York. When the Long Parliament was dissolved 
and another called to be held at Westminster 29th April, 1660, Sir Horatio 
and the Lord Richardson were elected knights for the County of Norfolk, 
and he was nominated by the House of Commons with six lords (sons of 
peers) of their body, and five other commoners to attend the King at the 
Hague, " to desire his Majesty to make a speedy return to his Parliament, 
and take the government of the kingdom into his hands." 



DENHAM. 225 

The 19th August, 1661, he was constituted Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk 
and the City and County of Norwich. He was also made Commander-in- 
Chief of the Royahst forces on the coast of Norfolk. He died in Dec. 1687, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir (by his 2nd wife Mary, daughter 
of Sir Joseph Ashe, Knt., of Twickenham, co. Middlesex), Charles, 2nd 
Viscount Townshend. In 1706 he was one of the commissioners to treat 
of the union between the, two Kingdoms, and i6th Nov. 1707, appointed 
Captain of the Yeomen of Her Majesty's guard, and was sworn of the Privy 
Council 2oth May, following. He was Ambassador Extraordinary at the 
Hague in the reign of Queen Anne, and after the accession of Geo. L occupied 
the position of Secretary of State, and was appointed 23rd Jan. 1716-7 
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, but declining going over to that kingdom, 
resigned 19th April following, and nth June, 1720, he was constituted 
President of the Council. He was installed a Knight of the Garter at 
Windsor 28th July, 1724. He married ist Elizabeth, only surviving 
daughter and sole heir of Thomas, Lord Pelham, father of Thomas, Duke 
of Newcastle, and 2ndly in July, 1713, Dorothy, daughter of Robert Walpole, 
of Houghton, in Norfolk, and sister of the Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, 
afterwards Earl of Orford, and dying in June, 1738, the manor passed to 
his son and heir Charles, 3rd Viscount Townshend, who was in his father's 
lifetime summoned to the House of Peers under the title of Baron 
Townshend, of Lynn- Regis, in the County of Norfolk, 24th May, 1723. 
He was at the same time appointed one of the gentlemen of the bedchamber 
in the room of Lord Teynham deceased. In 1730 he was appointed Master 
or Treasurer of his Majesty's jewels. In May, 1723, he had married Audrey, 
only daughter and sole heir of Edward Harrison, of Balls, co. Herts., who 
had been Governor of Fort St. George, in the East Indies, and dying 12th 
May, 1767, the manor passed to his son and heir George, 4th Viscount 
Townshend, godson of King Geo. I. He became a Field Marshal, Privy 
Councillor, Governor of Jersey, and Lieutenant-General of the Ordnance. 
His lordship married ist in Dec. 175 1, Charlotte Compton, only surviving 
child of James, Earl of Northampton, who brought into the family, besides 
dowry of a useful description, upwards of 250 quarterings, including the 
Royal one of Plantagenet, inherited from her mother, Elizabeth Shirley, 
Baroness Ferrars, of Chartley. He married in 1773 Anne, daughter and 
coheir of Sir William Montgomery, Bart., of Maybie Hill, co. Peebles. 

The Viscount was 3rd Aug. 1767, appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 
and 31st Oct. 1786, was advanced to the dignity of Marquis Townshend 
in the County of Norfolk, and dying 14th Sept. 1807, the manor passed to 
his son and heir, George, 2nd Marquis, born i8th April, 1753, who had been 
created in 1784 Earl of Leicester. He married in 1777 Charlotte, daughter 
of Eaton Main waring EUerker, of Risby Park, co. York, and coheir of her 
uncle, Roger Mainwaring EUerker. He appears to have sold the manor, 
or his interest in it, in 1795, in the lifetime of his father. 

We next find the manor vested in Samuel Farmer, Mr. Samuel 
Farmer, who was for many years M.P. for Huntingdon, purchased also the 
estate of Nonsuch, Surrey, long a Royal residence. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Joseph Easton Meeke, of Rotherhithe, and had a son, William 
Meeke Farmer, who was M.P. for Huntingdon. He married Frances, 
daughter of Michael Barstow, of Fulford, co. York, and died in October, 
1836, in his father's lifetime, leaving amongst other issue a son, William 
Francis Gamul Farmer, who succeeded his grandfather in the lordship of 
this manor. He was High Sheriff for Surrey in 1849, and married in July 

EI 



226 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

1837, Matilda, daughter of Robert Wilkinson, and died loth March, i860, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Capt. William Robert Gamul 
Farmer, of Nonsuch Park, who was High Sheriff, for Surrey in 1877. He 
married 20th July, 1861, Charlotte Maria, 2nd daughter of Capt. Robert 
Griffith WiUiams, brother of Sir Richard B. Williams-Bulkeley, loth Bart, 
of Bacon Hill, Beaumaris, and has a daughter Alice Matilda Mary. 

Arms of Lewkenor : Argent, three chevronels. Azure. Of 
TowNSHEND : Az. a chevron, Erm. between three escallops, Arg. Of 
Farmer : Arg. a fesse Sa, betw. 3 lions' heads erased Gu. 

Manor of Abbotts. 

The manor belonged to Thomas, Lord Howard, in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth, and in 1586 he sold the lordship to Thomas Stuteville, of 
Dalham, the manor being described as the Manor of Abbot's Denham, 
and included the park and enclosed ground called Southwood Park, which 
has since passed as part and parcel of the Dalham estate. Page states that 
Little Southwood Park which was excepted out of the sale from Thomas, 
Lord Howard, to the Stutevilles, was conveyed by Lord Thomas to Sir 
John Heigham, of Barrow, and is described as lying in this and adjoining 
parishes and as parcel of the Manor of Abbot's Denham ; also Leasure 
Grove, with customary land called Peppers and other lands parcel of the 
same manor. The fine affecting the assurance was levied in the Michaelmas 
term 28 and 29 Eliz.,and the deforciant is described as "Thomas Howard, 
son of Thomas, late Duke of Norfolk." 

There is amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum a 
release of Southwood Park, Abbot's Manor, &c., 2nd Mar. 1607. The 
release is made by Edward Lewkenor, of Denham, to Sir Martyn Stuteville, 
of Dalham, Knt. ;' and by an indenture dated 19th Nov. 1628, Sir Martyn 
Stuteville conveys to dame Mary, widow of Sir Thomas Lewknor, of 
Denham, &c., and to Richard Cattelyne and Thomas Cattelyne, of Norwich, 
Combey Park, and other lands in Suffolk. "^ 

Davy enters the three Edward Lewkenors, and Mary the daughter of 
the last, married to Viscount Townshend, as holding the lordship, and 
then he enters Thomas Stuteville, who died in 1649. We, however, fail 
to see how this could be correct in face of the sale above mentioned. On 
Thomas Stuteville's death in 1649, the manor passed to his widow Judith, 
and on her death in 1696 no doubt to trustees, for we find a first court held 
for the manor this very year by Charles Stuteville, John Beecher, Charles 
Becher, and John Bridger. The manor was probably sold, and was acquired 
by Gilbert Dolven in 1697, from which time to the present the manor has 
devolved and passed in the same course as the Manor of Dalham, in this 
Hundred, and is now vested in Sir Robert Affleck, 8th Bart., of Dalham. 



'Add. Ch, 9275. "Add. Ch. 9281. 



DENSTON. 



227 




DENSTON. 

|HERE were two manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by a socman under Robert, and consisted of 
2 carucates of land, 10 acres, 3 bordars, 2 serfs, 3 plough- 
teams (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), 2 acres of 
meado\v, and wood for the maintenance of 10 hogs. Also 
13 beasts, 28 hogs, 32 sheep, and 4 goats, valued at los. 
When the Survey was taken there were 2 additional rouncies, 

the value of the manor was 50s., and it was held by Richard, son of Earl 

Gislebert. 

Denston was a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, and paid in a 
gelt 2id.' 

The second manor was held as a hamlet in Badmondisfield by Earl 
Algar. This consisted of 2 carucates of land, 4 villeins, a bordar, 3 serfs, 
2 ploughteams in demesne, valued at 60s. There "were also a rouncy, 2 
beasts (increased to 15 when the Survey was taken), 24 hogs, and 44 sheep. 
The Domesday tenant was Girold the Marshall, and the value then was 705.^ 

Manor of Denston Hall. 

This manor descended from Richard, Earl of Gislebert, the Domesday 
tenant in chief to Gilbert de Clare, 3rd Earl of Gloucester, who died in 1275, 




Denston Hall, 1676. 



in the same course as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred. It 
then passed to Thomas de Grey (being held of the Honor of Clare), who 
had a grant of free warren here in 1301,^ and died in 1321, when the manor 
went to his son and heir. Sir Roger de Grey, whose will is dated in 1371." 
It was executed at Dover, and he directed that his feoffees. Sir William 
Bawd, Robert Kedyntone, Jeffrey de Hundon, and William Keteryngham, 
clerk, and William Hore should out of the profits of the Manor of Denston 
pay an annuity of xx. marks to his brother, Thomas Grey, for his life, and 
after his death to be at their disposal. He was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Thomas de Grey, who died unmarried in 1384.' Davy says that 
Margaret or Alice, widow of Sir Roger Grey, held in 1405, but this seems 



'Dom. ii. 390. 

""Dom. ii. 4386. 

^ Chart. Rolls, 30 Edw. I. 33. 



*I.P.M., 45 Edw. III. 27. 
5I.P.M., 7 Rich. II. 41. 



228 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



to be incorrect ; for in 1395 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by 
John Godewene and John Hethecote against Thomas Culpeper and Jocosa 
his wife.' 

We find amongst the Harleian Charters two in 1405, which being some- 
what pecuKar we give the substance shortly. They are both dated on the 
Feast of St. George, and though in the MS. catalogue of the Harleian 
Charters in the MS. department of the British Museum one is stated to be 
dated 6 (?) Hen. VI. [1428] they will be found to be both dated in 1405. 
One^ is a release from Joyeuse, daughter of John Vyne, to her mother 
Joyeuse, daughter of Thomas Corner de and to the right heirs of Thomas 
Cornerde, of the Manors of Cornerde, near Bures and Denarston (Denston), 
CO. Suffolk. The other^ is a release from Joyce Vyne, daughter of John 
Vyne, to Sir Thomas Culpeper and Joyce his wife, mother of the said Joyce 
Vyne, and to the heirs male of the body of the said Joyce Culpeper of the 
manors of Cornerde and Denherston. 

It is clear the manor was, before 1479, vested in John Broughton and 
Anne his wife, daughter of J. Denston, for this year he died seised, and the 
manor passed to his widow Anne, at whose death in 1481* it went to John 
Broughton's brother and heir. Sir Robert Broughton, and on his death 
17th Aug. 1505,^ vested in his son and heir. Sir John Broughton, who died 
24th Jan. 1517," when it passed to his son and heir, John Broughton, who 
died in 1529. Anne (? Alice) the widow of John Broughton, seems to have 
married John, Lord Russell, afterwards created Earl of Bedford, and we 
find him occupying the position of lord in 1548. He died 14th March, 
1554, and she in 1558. 

The manor then passed to Henry Cheyne, from whom it was acquired 
in 1564 by William Burd, a citizen and mercer of London, and Mirabetia 
his wife.'' In 1556 an order is found on the Memoranda Rolls for the 
removal of the process from this manor and discharge of William Burd and 
wife.^ William Burd died 12th June, 1591, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, William Burd. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of 
this period we find an action by Robert Lovell and Elizabeth his wife, widow 
and administratrix of Thomas Burd, deceased, against William Burd and 
William Burd, his son, as to stock, as late in the occupation of William 
Burd, father of the said Thomas." 

The manor was taken from William Burd" for a debt due from him 
to the Crown, and a lease of the manor is said to have been made in 1617 
by the Crown to William Robinson. 

From William Robinson the manor passed to John Robinson, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund AUeyn, son of Sir Edward AUeyn, 
Bart., of Little Lees, Essex, who afterwards married Sir William Jones, 
Attorney-General to King Chas. II. John Robinson died in 1659, when he 
was succeeded by his son and heir. Sir John Robinson, who died 19th Dec. 
1704, at the age of 49. According to an inscription given in the Suffolk 
Institute," the manor would appear to have been purchased by John 



' Feet of Fines, 19 Rich. II. 25. 
*Harl. 78 D. 12. 
3Harl. 80 H. 27. 
^I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 44. 
5I.P.M., 22 Hen. VII. i. 
61 P.M., 10 Hen. VIII. 148. 
y Fine, Easter, 6 Eliz. 



8 M., 8 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 99. 

9C.P. ii. 148. 

"See Manor of Stonham Aspal, called 

Broughton, in Bosmere and Claydon 

Hundred. 
" Vol. vi. p. 410. 



DENSTON. a?9 

Robinson in the latter part of the sixteenth century of WilUam Burd, 
and that he died in 1609 before the granting of the lease above referred to. 
Further, that his only son John lived to the age of 96 and did not die till 

1673. 

Sir John Robinson, who died in 1704, was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Col. John Robinson, who married Frances, daughter of Ralph Bromsal, 
of Northhill, co. Bedford, by Frances his wife, daughter of Sir Gervase 
Elwes, Bart., of Stoke by Clare, and died 21st Oct. 1734, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Robinson, who died in 1772, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Lieut. -General John Robinson, who married 
Rebecca, eldest daughter of Robert Lord Clive, and died in Paris 28th 
May, 1819, aged 62. He represented Bishop's Castle, co. Salop, in Parlia- 
ment for many years. On his death the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William Henry Robinson, who died 23rd Nov. 1826, when the manor 
passed to Henrietta Jeaffreson, daughter and heir of Lieutenant-General 
Christopher Jeaffreson and Henrietta his wife, sister of General 
Robinson. She married William Pigott, 3rd son of Sir George Pigott, 
Bart., of Knapton, Queen's County, in 1827, and died in 1838, leaving one 
son, Christopher William Robinson, of DuUingham House, Newmarket^ 
who took the name of Jeaffreson on the death of Mrs. Pigott, and that of 
Robinson on coming of age and under the will of William Henry Robinson 
in 1857. 

The manor was in 1896 and 1900 vested in John Dunn Gardner, eldest 
son of John Dunn Gardner, of Chatteris, and grandson of Wm. Dunn 
Gardner. He was High Sheriff, 1859, and M.P. for Bodmin from 1841 to 
1847. He married ist in Nov. 1847, Mary, daughter of Andrew Lawson, of 
Borobridge Hall, co. York, formerly M.P. for Knaresborough, by Anna 
Maria his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Gooch, 5th Bart., of Benacre, and 
2ndly 15th March, 1853; Ada, daughter of William Pigott, of DuUingham 
House, CO. Cambridge, and granddaughter of Sir George Pigott, ist Bart, 
of Knapton, Queen's County. On his death the manor passed to his son, 
and is now vested in Algernon Dunn-Gardner, of Denston Hall. 

A view of the old hall of Denston, from a drawing made in 1676, is given 
in the Suffolk Institute.' The Hall is approached by a fine avenue of trees 
and situated within half a mile of the church. 

" The mansion," says the late Mr. Haslewood, in his paper before the 
above Society, in 1887, " has been altered from time to time, and the front 
possesses no special features ; the offices, however, at the back are of 
considerable extent, and the windows and doorways furnish good examples 
of early brickwork. These long corridors have suggested the idea that they 
once formed a part of the old college ; but this theory requires confirmation. 
Traces of the ancient moat are clearly visible, and upon one side water still 
flows up to the foundations of the outbuildings. The two central towers 
resemble those now existing at Gissinghurst Castle, Kent, leading one to 
suppose that the mansion was originally built after the same style."" 

Arms of Broughton : Arg, a chevron between 3 mullets Gules. Of 
Robinson : Vert, a chevron between three bucks standing at gaze. Or. 

Beaumond's Manor. 

A college or chantry of regular canons consisting of a warden and a 
certain number of priests was founded here by John Denstori, on the day 

'Vol. vi. p. 433, and see p. 227 ante. 'Archseojogia Canti^na ix., xci. 



230 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of whose anniversary 40s. were customarily given here to the poor. In or 
about 1475 Sir John Howard, Knt.j and John Broughton, jun., are styled 
iounders. 

By the licence on the Patent Rolls in 1474 the chaplains were to 
celebrate daily in Denston, and do other works of piety according to their 
ordinance, and the chantry was to be called " Denstons Chauntery." The 
warden and lady were authorised to hold in mortmain to the value of ;^4o 
yearly.' 

The college was endowed with this manor and with lands in Lillesley, 
Monk's Eleigh, Groton, and Bradley Parva ; the gross value in " Liber 
Valorum " and " Valor Ecclesiasticus " was £2$. 9s. 2^d. 

In 1549 Sir Thomas Smith, Knt., and John Smith obtained a grant of 
the college and manor/ 

Sir Thomas Smith sold the manor to Thomas Smith, and he had licence 
in 1564 to alienate a moiety of it to T. Lawrence, but in 1567 the manor, 
vicarage, and site of the college were sold by the said Thomas Smith to 
William, son of William Burd, citizen and mercer of London, who died in 
1591 and was buried at Denston. The manor passed to William Burd's son 
and heir, William Burd, who sold it to John Robinson, who died in 1659,^ 
when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir John Robinson, from which 
time the manor has passed with the main manor. 

Stonehall and Shepcote Manor. 

This manor was held by Sir Robert Broughton of the Honor of Clare 
by the service of half a knight's fee. He died seised in 1507, when it passed 
in the same way as the main manor until the holding of it by John, Lord 
Russell in right of his wife Anne or Alice, widow of John Broughton. 

In 1553 a grant was made by the Crown of the manor to Thomas and 
George Goldingby. 

In 1591 it was vested in William Burd, for this year he died seised of 
it, when it passed to his son and heir, William Burd, as did the main 
manor. 



' Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 5. ^Not 1609, as Page says. 

"■O., 3 Edw. VI. 4 Pars. Rot. 133. 




DEPDEN. 231 



DEPDEN. 

MANOR was held here by Toka the Tisane in the Confessor's 
time, and consisted of 3 carucates of land, 16 villeins, 7 bordars, 
4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne, which were doubled 
by the time of the Survey, and 4 belonging to the men. 
There were also 12 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient 
to support 100 hogs. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 
22 beasts, 40 hogs, and 24 sheep, and at the time of the 
Survey the beasts were reduced to 17, the hogs increased to 72, and the 
sheep to 112, while there were in addition 13 hives of bees. There was 
also a church with 24 acres of free land. The value was £4 in Saxon times, 
but when the Survey was taken it had increased to £6, the manor being 
then held by Hugh de Wancey of William de Varennes. 

It was a league in length and 8 quarentenes in breadth, and paid in a 
gelt SW 

Another holding in this place was that of Brictric Black, a freeman 
of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and it was held over him by Frodo, the 
abbot's brother, and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 7 bordars, a serf, 2 
ploughteams in demesne, and half a team belonging to the men with 3 
acres of meadow. Of live stock there were 7 beasts, 15 hogs, 37 sheep, 
and 3 hives of bees. At the time of the Survey the particulars of the live 
stock were different — the beasts and hogs were doubled, the sheep had 
increased to 80, whilst in addition there were 10 beasts and i rouncy. The 
value was 60s." 

Under the same tenant in chief was a holding of Osbern, formerly that 
of Blackwin and Goodwin, two freemen, Osbern holding over them. This 
consisted of 2 carucates of land, 3 bordars, ij ploughteams (increased to 2 
teams at the time of the Survey), 3 acres of meadow, a rouncy (which had 
disappeared at the time of the Survey), and 6 beasts. Also 16 hogs and 
40 sheep, the hogs being increased to 26 at the time of the Survey, and 
the sheep having disappeared. The value was formerly 30s,, and at the 
time of the Survey 5os.^ ' , \ 

Manor of Depden. 

At the time of the Survey Hugh de Wancey held an estate here, and 
the de Wancey family were long lords of the parish. In 1275 William de 
Wancey, son of Sir Walter, son of Sir Ralph de Wancey, held the lordship 
and had free warren in Depden and in the free lands of the men of Depden.* 
From him the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Walter or William de 
Wancey, against whom a fine was levied of the manor in 1315 by Giles, 
parson of Depden church.' 

In 1329 he presented to the living, andhad a son. Sir Edmund de Wancey, 
who was buried at Bury in 1372. Davy makes Sir Nicholas Damery lord 
in 1367, and the manor to have passed on his death in 1381 to his widow 

'Dom. ii. 398&. ^H.R. ii. 173, 196. 

" Dom. ii. 396. ' Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. II. 29. 

^Dom. ii. 396. 



232 THE MANOkS OF SUFFOLK. 

Joan. We have little guide further than the presentations which are given 
by Davy as follows : — 

1428. Alice Wildesher, formerly de Wancey. 

1443. Thomas Gournay, of W. Barsham, Norf. died 1447. 

1471. Margaret his widow and Wm., son and heir, presented. 

1479. WilUam Gournay presented. 

1505. Alice Gournay, widow, presented. 

1513. — - Dymoke presented. 

1522. William Gournay presented. 

1522. Ant. Gournay, son of Wm., son of Wm. Gournay, sen., cousin 
and heir, presented. 

This is the list given by Davy, but there appears to be something wrong. 
Why should a presentation be made to the living by Alice Gournay in 1505, 
and one Dymoke in 1513, when we know that William Gournay died seised 
of the manor 26th Feb. 1507, and Anthony, son of W^illiam Gournay or 
Gourney, son of William, sen., was his son and heir,' unless, indeed, Alice 
Gournay had a life estate under some settlement, and in the early part of 
1522 the heir Anthony was an infant, and Dymoke his guardian in 1513, 
and William Gourney his guardian in 1522. Anthony Gournay married 
Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Lovell, and died 4th Jan. 
1555, being buried at Depden. The manor Was then held of Thomas, 
Earl of Arundel, for one knight's fee, and valued af ;£20. 

The manor was certainly vested in Anthony Gournay or Gurney in 
1528, for we then meet with a fine levied of the manor by Thomas 
Barnardiston and others against him and others.'' The fine included the 
advowson of the church of Depden. 

The manor towards the end of the sixteenth century became vested in 
John Jermyn, of Depden. He died in 1588, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Thomas Jermyn, who died in 1607, when it passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Jermyn, and from him to his son and heir, Robert Jermyn, 
who sold it to Thomas Coell, of Bury St. Edmunds, who in 1609 had married 
Susan, daughter of John Jermyn, of Depden. 

Thomas CoelP died in 1646, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Sir John Coell, Knt. Court Rolls, both of views of frankpledge and courts 
baron, when held by Thomas Coell and his son. Sir John Coell, during the 
years 5-24 Chas. I. and 4-9 Chas. II. (1629-1657), are in the British Museum.* 
Sir John Coell died 28th Aug. 1688, and wias buried at Depden, according 
to the register there, 27th Aug. 1688, a very unfortunate position for poor 
Sir John if the entry be accurate. The manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Coell, of Depden Hall. He married ist Cecily, daughter of Sir 
Henry Crofts, of Saxham, sister of Lord Crofts. She died 4th May, 1677, 
and was buried at St. James, Bury St. Edmunds. Thomas Coell married 
2ndly Anne, daughter of John May, of Rawmere, co. Sussex, who died in 
March, 1714-15 > Thomas Coell, " after an exemplary life," as his inscrip- 
tion in Depden Church, runs, " having acquitted himself as became a good 
patriot, a good son of the Church of England, an uniform good Christian," 
departed 5th October, 1698, without male issue, when the manor passed 
to his daughter and heir by Cecily his ist wife. She married Richard 
Thorhhillj of OUantigh in Kent, and Coell Thornhill, their son, sold this estate 



' I. P.M., 13 Hen. VIII. 122. ^ See Ampton Manor, Thed'^estry Hundred. 

'Fine, Easter, 19 Hen. VIII. "Add. Ch. 26703. 



2 



DEPDEN. 233 

to Hutchison Mure, of Great Saxhanij who presented to the incumbency 
in 1769. The manor was subsequently acquired by George Chenery, 
and later passed to Alexander Adair, who died in 1835, from which time to 
the time of Sir Robert S. Adair, who was lord in 1855, the manor devolved 
in the same course as the Manor of Cratfield Le Ros, in Blything Hundred. 

Before 1885 the manor had been acquired by the Marquis of Bristol, 
in whom the same is now vested. 

Arms of Wancey : Gules six gauntlets. Argent, 3, 2, i. Of Coell : 
Argent a bull passant. Gules, in a bordure Sable, bezantee. Of Thornhill : 
Two bars gemelles. Argent, a bend of the last, on a chief of the second, a 
tower Argent. 



FI 




234 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

GAZELEY. 

jOTHING appears in the Survey under the head Gazeley, 
but under the head " DeseUnga," which is Desning Hall in 
Gazeley, we have one entry. A manor was held here in 
Saxon times by Wisgar. It consisted of 20 carucates of 
land, 28 villeins, 91 bordars, 20 serfs, 10 ploughteams in 
demesne and 32 belonging to the men. Also 15 acres of 
meadow, wood for the maintenance of 80 hogs, and 5 mills 
(reduced to 4 at the time of the Survey). There were also 2 churches with 
i^ carucates of land and i^- ploughteams. Also 8 rouncies, 18 beasts, 100 
hogs, 840 sheep, and 9 hives of bees. Valued at £30. At the time of the 
Survey the rouncies were reduced to 5, the beasts increased to 40, the hogs 
were 80, the sheep 960, and the value £40. The Survey goes on to say : 
" But yet he gave it to a certain Steward to farm for sixty five pounds. 
But the manor could not bear it." It was 2^ leagues long and a league 
broad, and paid in a gelt '^yd. in two Hundreds. The Domesday tenant was 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert.' 

Manor of Gazeley. 

This was the lordship in chief of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, at the 
time of the Great Survey, and descended from him to Gilbert de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester, who died in 1314, in the same course as the Manor of 
Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred. On the death of Gilbert de Clare, in 1314, 
the manor passed to his widow Matilda, Countess of Gloucester. The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Richard de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester, in 1262,^ where, however, it is stated that it was held 
by the Earl in wardship through the death of Robert de Halsted, and he 
had nothing there in his own demesne. 

In 1348 the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Passelewe, for this year 
he enfeoffed Walter Grapnall and John Ram as trustees, from whom the 
Heigham family appear to have purchased, as Thomas Heigham was seised 
of this manor in 1429 as heir of Robert Heigham. 

In 1827 the manor, according to Davy, was vested in Sir James Affleck, 
Bart., and, if so, it has since descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Dalham, in this Hundred. 

Desning Hall al. Castle Hall Manor. 

This was the estate of Wiscar in the time of the Confessor, and of the 
Clare family, at the time of the Survey. From Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, 
it descended in the same course as the Manor of Sudbury in Babergh 
Hundred, until the death of Gilbert, Earl of Gloucester, in 1314. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Richard de 
Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 1263,^ where an extent is given with the names 
of the tenants. The manor was then held of the King in chief of the Honor 
of Clare."* In 1290 it was surrendered by Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, 
to the King, and on the Patent Rolls is a mandate to the Sheriff to take 
the manor accordingly.^ 

There is an exemplification appearing on the Patent Rolls in 1320 
made at the request of Hugh le Despenser, the younger, the husband of 

' Dom. ii. 390. 3 1.P.M., 47 Hen. III. 34, or File 27 (5). 

'I.P.M., 47 Hen. HI. 36; new reference, ■•H.R. ii. 171. 

File 27 (5). 5 Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. I. 32. 



GAZELEY. 



235 



Eleanor, of Hugh de Audele, the younger, the husband of Margaret, and 
of Roger Damory, the husband of Elizabeth, the sisters and coheirs of 
Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, of a deed in 1290, and we learn from 
it that the King 27th May, 18 Edw. I., regranted the manor to the said 
Earl and Joan his wife and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to 
the right heirs of the Earl.' 

We find the manor also specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 1296,'' and an extent given in that 
of Joan his wife jointly with him in 1306,^ also in that of Gilbert de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester in 1314.* In 1325 the King committed to John de 
Boneton the custody of the manor for three years, rendering ^^loo per 
annum.^ 

The manor was subsequently held by Hugh de Audley, Lord Audley, 
who had married Margaret, sister and coheir of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of 
Gloucester, and widow of Piers, of Gavestone, and was created by virtue of 
such marriage Earl of Gloucester, the 23rd April, 1337. On the Patent 
Rolls in 1329 we find a commission issued on the complaint of this Hugh 
de Audley that certain evildoers broke his close at Desning Manor and 
took II horses, 12 oxen, and 400 sheep, worth 104 marks.® 

Hugh de Audeley died in 1347,^ and from this time to the execution of 
Edward, Duke of Buckingham, 17th May, 1521, the manor passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Cavenham, in Lackford Hundred, It is 
specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Ralph de Stafford, ist 
Earl, in 1372,* in that of Thomas, 3rd Earl, who died in 1392,' of WiUiam, 
4th Earl, in 1395," of Edmund, 5th Earl, in 1403," and of Humphrey, 
1st Duke of Buckingham, in 1460." 

We find on the Patent Rolls in 1387 a grant to Thomas de BeUo Campo, 
Earl of Warwick, and others, from the death of Hugh, Earl of Stafford, until 
the morrow of Michaelmas 10 (?)Rich. II. of certain lands called Talmaches, 
Cresseneres, and Passelewes in Desning Manor. '^ And on the Patent Rolls 
in 1483 an appointment of Master Edmund Chaderton as receiver of the 
manor and also of the manors of Shardelowes in Cavenham, Cresseners, 
Talmages, and Passelowes, " late of Henry, Duke of Buckingham.'"* 

This manor was granted with the advowson in 1535 to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, and Mary his wife.'^ Charles Brandon had licence in 1538 
to alienate to Sir Thomas Audley, Lord Chancellor, who died seised in 1544, 
when the manor passed to his daughter and heir Margaret,'* married ist to 
Lord Henry Dudley, by whom she had no issue, and 2ndly to Thomas 
Howard, Duke of Norfolk. The Duke sold to Robert Payne, grocer, of 
London, who sold in 1592 to Sir Edward Leukener, Knt.'^ Sir Edward 
Leukener died in 1605, and from this time to the death of George, Marquis 



' Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. II. pt. i. 3. 

^I.P.M., 24 Edw. I. 107. 

3 i.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 47. 

"I.P.M., 8 Edw. II. 68. 

5 0., 19 Edw. II. 13. 

« Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. III. pt. i. zgd. 

n.P.M., 21 Edw. III. 59. 

8 1.P.M., 46 Edw. III. 62. 

9 Extent, I.P.M., 16 Rich. II. 27. 
'° I.P.M., 22 Rich. II. 46. 
" I.P.M., 4 Hen. IV. 41. 
" I.P.M., 38 and 39 Hen. VI. 59. 



« Pat. Rolls, II Rich. II. pt. i. 11. 

'4 Pat. Rolls, I Rich. III. pt. v. 18. 

«S.P. 1535, 1063(7)- 

'^She died loth Jan. 1564. 

'7 Add. Ch. 25444. 25445; Fine, Trin. 34 
Eliz. There were two fines in 
Trinity term 34 Eliz. levied by 
Edward Leukener, one was against 
Robert Payne and others, and the 
other was against Sir Thomas 
Howard and others. 



236 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Townshendj in 1807, the devolution of the manor was identical with that 
of the Manor of Denham, in this Hundred, and it is now vested in Capt. 
W. R. G. Farmer. 

Page says that in the 29th of Queen Elizabeth the Manor of Desning 
Hall was held by Robert Tailour. Amongst the Additional Charters in 
the British Museum is a release of land, parcel of Desning Manor, in 1607.' 
Amongst the State Papers is a mention of the grant of a lease of this manor 
in 1589 to William Kirkham.' 

Ministers Accounts of lands in the manor will be found 3 and 4 Edw. IV. 
in the Record Office.^ 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find an action by Thomas 
Stuteville against Robert Elye as to Southwood Park, parcel of the manor." 

HiGHAM Hall Manor. 

In the time of Edw. I. the manor was held by the Earl of Gloucester, 
and in 1348 it belonged to Sir Thomas Passelewe, Knt., for at this time he 
enfeoffed Walter Grapnel and John Ram as trustees. Subsequently we 
find the manor vested in Robert Heigham,' who died seised of it in 1429, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Heigham, and from him to his 
son and heir, Thomas Heigham. The manor no doubt passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Denham, in this Hundred, as later we find it vested in 
Sir Edward Leukenor, who died seised of it in 1618, from which time to 
the time of George, Marquis Townshend, who died in 1807, it passed as 
did the manors of Desning and Denham, in this Hundred, and is now vested 
in Captain W. R. G. Farmer. 

Manor of Gazeley Rectory. 

This was the estate of Richard, son of Gislebert, at the time of the 
Survey. Roger de Clare, Earl of Hereford, granted the church of Gazeley 
to the monastery of Stoke by Clare, and in 1225 Pope Honarius confirmed 
the great tithe of Gazeley to that house. Ministers' Accounts of "Gazeley 
Manor and Church," when held by Stoke juxta Clare priory in 1324, will 
be found in the Record Office.'' 

The manor passed to the Crown at the Dissolution, and in 1544 the 
King leased the tithe and manor for 40 years to John Paston. In 1579 
Queen Elizabeth leased the rectory to Joan Peyton, widow, for 21 years. 
Her majesty granted another lease of it in 1589 to William Kirkham, junior, 
for 40 years, and in 1602 a lease for 60 years to George Baker. In 1612 
the King granted the rectory to Francis Morrice and Francis Philippe. 

The manor subsequently vested in Charles, 6th Duke of Somerset.^ 
He was married twice ; by his ist wife Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir 
of Joseline Percy, the last Earl of Northumberland of that family, whom he 
married 30th May, 1682, he was father of three sons and four daughters, 
and by his 2nd wife Charlotte, 3rd daughter of Daniel Finch, Earl of 
Winchelsea, and 2nd Earl of Mettingham, to whom he was married 4th 

'Add. Ch. 9275. 5 No doubt father of the Thomas Higham 

* State Papers, 1589, 606. who held Denham Manor, in this 

2 Bundle 1117, No. 11. Hundred. 

■^CP. iii. 26. 618 Edw. II., Bundle 1129, No. 4. 

''See Manor of Withersfield Pellegrues, in 
this Hundred. 



GAZELEY. 237 

Feb. 1725-6, he was father of two daughters only, Frances and Charlotte. 
The latter married 6th Oct. 1750, Heneage, Earl of Aylesford. The Duke 
was installed a Knight of the Garter in 1684, and was one of the Privy 
Councillors who signed the proclamation in favour of Jas. II. 

In 1685 he was associated with many of the nobility in raising the 
militia in opposition to the Duke of Monmouth, but in 1687 fell under the 
displeasure of the King. It seems that Signior Ferdihando D'Adda, 
domestic prelate, and assistant to the Pope, who was the Queen's favourite 
and had followed the court from the time of the King's accession to tne 
Crown, was declared apostolical Nuncio in 1686, though in a private manner. 
But to complete the character with more pomp and lustre, he was conse- 
crated Archbishop of Amasia, in the Royal chapel at Whitehall, by Bishop 
Ivcyburne, vicar-apostolic in England, assisted by two other Irish Bishops. 
And though by law it was high treason for anyone to assume the 
character of the Pope's Nuncio, he made his public entry as a foreign 
Ambassador 3rd July, 1687, at Windsor, with great solemnity. 
This being a sight that had not been seen in England for 150 years 
before, the concourse of people upon the occasion was very great ; 
and it is hard to say whether their surprise at the pomp and grandeur 
of the solemnity was greater than their indignation at beholding the Nuncio 
in his pontificals, preceded by a cross bearer and a great number of priests 
and monks in the habits of their respective orders. 

The Duke of Somerset was then in waiting, and the King, having 
ordered him to attend the Nuncio to his audience, he desired His Majesty 
to excuse him from an office which the laws of the land made criminal. 
The King reiterated his orders, but the Duke persisting in his denial, His 
Majesty told him in a passion : " That he would trouble him with no 
more commands, and therefore expected he would resign his places of 
Gentleman of the Bedchamber and Colonel of the Dragoons." To which 
the Duke was obedient, preferring to preserve his conscience and honour 
to retaining his position and the King's favour. 

His Grace succeeded the Duke of Albemarle in the Chancellorship 
of Cambridge in 1688, and joined in the invitation to the Prince of Orange, 
after whose accession to the Throne he presided at the Grand Council 
Board of the nation. He was a member of the Privy Councdl of both 
Geo. I. and Geo. II., and died 2nd Dec. 1748, at his seat at Petworth in 
Sussex, being buried 26th of the same month in Salisbury Cathedral.' 
A fine marble statue to the Duke by Rysbrack was presented by his daughters 
by his 2nd marriage to the University of Cambridge, and placed in the 
Senate House in July, 1756, with the following inscription on the front 
of the pedestal in capitals : — 

Carolo 
Duci Somersetensi 
Strenuo juris academici defensori 
Acerrimo libertatis publicse vindici 
Statuam 
Lectissimarum matronarum munus 
L.M. ponendam decrevit 
Academia CantabrigieUsis 
Quam praesidio suo munivit 

Auxit munificentia 
Per annos plus sexaginta 
Cancellarius. 

' Will proved 1748. 



238 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

And on the reverse : — 

Hanc statuam 

Suae in parentem pietatis 

In academiam studii 

Monumentum 

Ornatissimae feminae 

Francisca Marchionis de Granby conjux 

Charlotta Baronis de Guernsey 

S.P. faciendam curaverunt 

M.D.C.C. L. VI. 

The manor on the death of the 6th Duke of Somerset passed to his 
youngest daughter Charlotte, married to Heneage, 3rd Earl of Aylesford, 
who died in 1771, when it passed to his son and heir Heneage, 4th Earl of 
Aylesford. 

Manor of Althorpe's or Applethorpe al. Bovill's. 

One Joyce Bovile held this manor according to Davy, but he furnishes 
no date. 

In 1315 it was held by Robert de Althorp, who had here one fee of 
the Earl of Clare. Strangely in 1425 we find Robert " Apthorp " held 
but half a fee, which passed to his widow Anne, and of the same John 
" Alwthorpe " died seised in 1499, when it passed to his daughters and 
coheirs Margaret and Elizabeth. 

In 15 1 1 we meet vsdth a fine levied of this manor by William Tomlyn, 
clerk, and others against John Hervy and Elizabeth his wife. The fine 
relates not only to this manor, but also to lands in Gazeley, Higham, 
Needham, Kentford, Dalham, Melton, Barrow, Troston, Magna and Parva 
Livermere, Ixworth Thorp, Sapiston and Honington.' 

Davy says that in 1548 Edward Page was lord, and we certainly 
meet with a fine of the manor in 1549 levied by William Tassell against an 
Edward Page.^ Under this fine the manor passed from Edward Page to 
William Tassell, and he sold it to Reginald Tison. 

From an inquis. p.m. in 1564 we learn that Reginald Tison .^being 
seised to him and the heirs of his body, and of the body of his" wife 
Joan, only daughter of Richard Hadenham and Alice his wife, by will gave 
this manor to Joan his ynie, afterwards wife of Richard Rampton, with 
remainder for 10 years to John (? James) Tison, son of the said Reginald. 
By the same inquisition John Tison was found to be the deceased brother 
and heir,^ so apparently John (? James), the son of Reginald, had died. 
In 1572 we meet with a fine levied by John Tison of the manor " late of 
James his brother.'"* 

John Tison sold the manor in 1595 to William Cooke,^ and on William 
Cooke's death the manor apparently passed to John Cooke, for Davy says 
John " Cokie " was lord in 1609. 

The manor was before 1749 vested in Charles, 6th Duke of Somerset, 
for he died seised of it this year, and from this time it has passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Gazeley Rectory so far as this has been deduced, 
and is now vested in Colonel Francis William Rhodes, C.B., D.S.O., of 
Dalham Hall. 

'Fine, Mich. 3 Hen. VIII. ^14 Eliz. 9. 

^Fine, Hil. 2 Edw. VI. ^ping, Mich. 37-38 EHz. 

3I.P.M., 6Eliz. 173. 



GAZELEY. 239 

Talmags al. Talmyties and Passelowes. 

In the time of King Edw. III. the manor was held by WiUiam Talmache, 
who is mentioned on the Patent Rolls 12-14 Edw. III. 5, and in the reign of 
Hen. IV. it vested in Edmund, 5th Earl of Stafford, who died in 1403. 
From this time to the death of Thomas Audley, Lord Audley, in 1544, it 
has passed in the same course of devolution as the Manor of Desning, in 
Gazeley, in this Hundred, and is now one of its members. 



240 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




BAVERHILL. 

MANOR was held in this place in the time of the Confessor 
by Clarebold. It consisted of 2^ carucates of land, 6 
villeins, 4 bordars, 10 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 
1 belonging to the men. Also wood sufficient to support 
20 hogs, 6 acres of meadow, the third part of a market having 
in it 10 bordars. At the time of the Survey this manor was 
held by Tehell de Herion, and the details were different. 
The villeins were reduced to i, the bordars had increased to 10, the plough- 
teams belonging to the men had become reduced to half a team. There 
were also 5 acres belonging to the church. The manor was valued as 405., 
and the market at 13s. 4^. It was a league long and half a league broad, 
and paid in a gelt 6d. Others held land here.' 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had three estates in this place at the 
time of the Survey. The first was held of him by Pagan, who held it over 
Fredebern, a freeman. It consisted of 5 bordars having 80 acres, a plough- 
team in demesne, 2 oxen belonging to the men, and 2 acres of meadow. 
The value had formerly been 13s. /\d., but at the time of the Survey was 
increased to 15s. "^ 

The second was held of him, and also in Saxon times by 13 freemen, 
and consisted of a carucate and 60 acres of land, i J ploughteams, and wood 
for the maintenance of 7 hogs, valued at 30s. 

The third was formerly held by two freemen, and consisted of 26 acres 
valued at 4s. 6d. The Survey goes on to say : " These could all sell and 
give their lands. But Wisgar had in King Edward's time both soc and sac, 
except the six forfeitures of Saint Edmund."^ 

Amongst the lands of the Abbot of St. Edmunds was one estate in this 
place, formerly that of two freemen. It consisted of 5 acres valued at yd., 
the soc and commendation belonging to the abbot." 

Belonging to the Bishop of Bayeux was a holding of a freeman, con- 
sisting of 24 acres, and hall a ploughteam, the freeman being valued at 3s. 
The Survey says : " Him Tihell holds of the Bishop. His (the Bishop's) 
predecessor in King Edward's time had commendation. Saint Edmund 
had the soc forfeitures.' 

Haverhill Manor called the Castle. 

This was the estate of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare at the time of the 
Survey, and descended in the same way as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh 



'Dom. ii. 428. 
*Dom. ii. 396, 397. 
^Dom. ii. 397. 



'^Dom. ii. 3716. 
^Dom. ii. 373. 



HAVERHILL. 



241 



Hundred, to the death of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester, in 1314,' and 
then in the same way as the Manor of Cavenham, in Lackford Hundred, 
until the attainder and execution of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of 
Buckingham, in 1521, when this manor was granted by the Crown in 1523 
to Sir Richard Jerningham,Knt,, and Anne his wife, and the heirs male of 
their bodies. On Sir Richard's death without male issue it went to his 
widow Anne for life. In 1528 a grant of the manor was made (no doubt 
of the reversion expectant on the decease of Anne Jerningham, for she was 
living as late as 1539) to John, Lord Russell." 

We learn from the Exchequer Special Commissions in 1614 the fact 
stated that the manors included in the grant of the 15 Hen. VIII. to Richard 
Jerningham were supposed to escheat on account of " defective title. "^ 
Lord Russell had licence in 1543 to' alienate^to John Smyth, of Cavendish, 
and the assurance was effected by a fine levied by the said John Smyth 
against "Sir John Russell" in 1546.* 

The fine included also the rectory of Haverhill and the advowson of 
St. Mary in that place. From John Smyth the manor passed to his widow, 
Margaret, who was called upon in 1588 to show by what title she held this 
and the Manors of Hersham and Helyon.^ On Margaret's death the manor 
passed to her son and heir, George Smyth, who had licence to alienate to 
Thomas Cole, to whom the manor was granted or confirmed in 1616 by letters 
patent from the Crown. ^ He died in 1624, ^'^^ ^he manor passed to his 
son and heir, Thomas Cole, who had livery of the manor in 1634.^ He 
levied a fine of a moiety of the manor in 1642.° 

In 1784 the manor was held by George Howland, and later by Sir 
George Howland Beaumont, 7th Bart., D.C.L. and F.S. A., who in 1778 had 
married Margaret, daughter of John Willes, of Astrop, co. Northampton, 
and granddaughter of Lord Chief Justice Willes, but dying without issue 
in 1827 the manor passed with the title to his cousin and heir. Sir George 
Howland Willoughby Beaumont, who had married in 1825 Mary Anne, eldest 



'The manor is mentioned in the I. P.M. 
of Gilbert de Clare in 1307 (I. P.M., 
35 Edw. I. 47) ; also in that of 
Hugh de Audley, Earl of Gloucester 
in 1348 (I.P.M., 21 Edw. III. 59) ; 
also of Ralph, Earl of Stafford, and 
Margaret his wife, daughter and 
heir of Hugh de Audley, Earl of 
Gloucester, in 1373 (I. P.M., 46 Edw. 
III. 62) ; Thomas, Earl of Stafford in 
1392 (I.P.M., 16 Rich. II. 27), and 
of William, brother and heir of 
Thomas, Earl of Stafford, in 1398 
(I.P.M., 22 Rich. II. 46) ; of Edward, 
Earl of Stafford, in 1403 (I.P.M., 4 
Hen. IV. 41) ; of Humphrey, Duke 
of Buckingham in 1460 (38 and 39 
Hen. VI. 59). Ministers' Accounts of 
possessions of contraisants (late of 
Hugh de Audley) in Haverhill and 
Hersham (one of the other manors 
of Haverhill) (16 to 17 Edw. II.) 
will be found in the Record Office, 
Bundle 1147, No. 9.' There is on 
the Patent Rolls in 1462 a con- 
firmation without any fine or fee 



to Anne, Duchess of Buckingham, 
late wife of Humphrey, Duke of 
Buckingham, of letters patent, 
being a grant to her for life in 
dower of this manor (Pat. Rolls, 
I Edw. IV. pt. i. 20). Amongst the 
deeds in the Record Office is a 
grant for life to Thomas Delahay 
of the office of baihff of the lordships 
of Haverhill and Hersham with the 
custody of the park of Combey, 
late of the Duke of Buckingham, 
described as the traitor (1483-4 
D.K.R., 9 App. ii. p. 39). This 
grant appears on the Patent Rolls 
(i Rich. III. pt. ii. 8). 

"O., 20 Hen. VIII. 122. 

^11 Jac. I. Exch. Spec. Com. D.K.R. 38 
App. p. 95. 

*Fine, Easter 37 Hen. VIII. 

5 Memoranda RoUs, 22 Eliz. Hil. Rec. 
Rot. 17. 

« M., 14 Jac. I. Hil. Rec. Rot. 260. 

y Chancery, D.K.R. 48 App. p. 495. 

8 Fine, 18 Car. II. pt. ii. 22. 



GI 



242 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



daughter of Dr. William Howley, Archbishop of Canterbury, and dying in 
1845 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir George Rowland Beaumont, 
9th Bart., of Stoughton Grange, co. Leicester. He, in 1850, married Pauhna 
Menzies, 3rd daughter of W. Hallows Belh, and niece ol Dr. Howley, 
Archbishop of Canterbury, and dying in 1882 the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir George Howland William Beaumont, ioth Bart., of Cole-Orton, 
CO. Leicester. He married in 1880 Lillie Ellen, 2nd daughter of Colonel 
George Ayton Craster, R.E., and has a son, George Arthur Hamilton, born 
in 1881. 

Page says that i Rich. HL Henry, Lord Grey, obtained a grant of the 
Manors of Haverhill and Hersham Hall, in Haverhill.' The manor is 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Margaret, wife of Philip Seintclere, and 
John, son of the same, in 1422.^ A survey of the manor and rectory in 
1566 will be found amongst the Exchequer Special Commissions.^ 

Arms of Howland : Argent ; two bars, and three lions rampant. 
Sable in chief. Of Beaumont : Azure ; semee of fleurs-de-lis, a lion 
rampant, Or. 

Manor of Hersham. 

The devolution of this manor is the same as that of the main manor, 
except that Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas de Lacey, Knt., 
released all right in the manor to Matilda de Hawkedon, according to Davy, 
and that in 1363 Sir Gilbert le Despenser, Knt., and others held the manor. 
It, however, passed through the de Clares, the Staffer ds, the Jerninghams, 
the Smyths, and the Howlands in the same way as the main manor. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1539 is notice of a grant made in tail male 
to Sir Robert Jerningham, of " Haverhill, Hersham, and Helyon Haverell 
Manors," formerly of the Duke of Buckingham, and granted by patent 
25th May, 1523, to Sir Richard Jerningham and Anne his wife, the said Sir 
Richard having died without heirs male of his body and his wife Anne still 
surviving.* 

> Manor of Helions or Helyon Haverhill. 

This was the estate of Clarebald in Saxon days, and the lordship of 
Tehell de Herion at the time of the Survey. 

In the reign of Hen. II. Robert de Helion held the manor, which passed 
at his death to his son and heir, William de Helion, who held one fee here in the 
time of King Rich. I. He was succeeded by his son and heir, Andrew de 
Helion. On the Patent Rolls in 1281 will be found an action by this Andrew 
de Helyon, there called " Elyan," against the prior of Castle Acre touching 
the church of St. Mary, of Haverhill.^ Andrew de Helion died in 1289,^ 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry de Helion, who died in 
1303,'' when a third part went to his widow Alice for life, and subject 
thereto the manor vested in their son and heir, Henry de Helion, who died 
in 1332.^ On Henry de Helion's death a third part of the manor passed - 
to his widow Agnes for life in dower and subject thereto vested in her son 



'Hist, of Suff. p. 875. 
"I.P.M., I Hen. VI. 30. 
3 8 Eliz. D.K.R. 38 App. p. 
■♦S.P. 1539, 905 (5). 
= Pat. Rolls, 9, Edw. I. 30*?. 



6I.P.M., 17 Edw. I., 23, Extent; T.deN. 
291 ; H.R. ii. 151. In the Hundred 
Rolls he is said to have held of the 
King one knight's fee of the value 
of X. U. a year (H.R. ii. 271). 

^I.P.M., 32 Edw. I. 41. 

^I.P.M., 6Edw. III. 61. 



HAVERHILL. 243 

and heir, John de Helion. John Helion in 1345 enfeoffed Edmund de 
Northtoft and Gilbert Huberd of a messuage, a mill, 60 acres of land, 10 
acres of meadow, 9 acres of wood, and £/^ rent in Haverhill, no doubt this 
manor, stated to be held in chief of the Honor of Helyon, and they regranted 
the same to him and Agnes his wife in tail, with remainder to his right 
heirs. The licence for these assurances will be found on the Patent Rolls 
for this year.' John de Helion died in 1349,^ when the manor devolved on 
his son and heir, Henry de Helion, who died in 1391.' The inquisition 
taken after his death states the estate then to consist of one messuage, 
66 acres of land, 9 of meadow, 3 of pasture, 8 of wood, 62s. rent, and i mill. 
On Henry's death the manor passed to his son and heir, John de Helion. 
He married Alice, daughter of Sir Robert Swinborne by Joan, daughter and 
heir of John Botetourt, and on his death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John de Helion, who married Editha, only daughter and heir of Thomas 
Rolf, of Gosfield, and died in 1449"^ without male issue, leaving two daughters 
and coheirs, Philippa, married to Sir Thomas Montgomery, of Falkborne 
Hall, K.G., who died without issue, and Isabel married to Humphrey 
Tyrell, of Little Warney, Essex, 3rd son of Sir James Tyrell. Humphrey 
Tyrell and Isabel left a daughter Anne, married to .Sir Roger Wentworth, 
of Codham. The manor was at this time acquired by Edward Stafford, 
3rd Duke of Buckingham, who was attainted and beheaded in 1521, and 
the Crown in 1523 granted the manor to Sir Richard Jerningham and Anne 
his wife, from which time it has passed with and in the same course as 
the main Manor of Haverhill. 

The manor was, however, included in the grant to Sir Robert 
Jerningham in 1539, as mentioned in the account of the Manor of Hersham, 
in Haverhill. 

Arms of Helion : Or, a stag's head cabossed Sa. 



'Pat. RoUs, 18 Edw. III. pt. ii. 33. ^i.p.M., 13 Rich. II. pt. i. 35. 

'I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 36. +I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 31. 




244 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HAWKEDON. 

MANOR was held here by Olf in Saxon times. It con- 
sisted of 2 carucates of land, 2 bordars, 3 serfs, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne, 3 acres of meadow, and wood for the 
support of 4 hogs. Of live stock there were i rouncy, 2 
beasts, 16 hogs, 40 sheep, and 12 goats. Also half a church 
with 15 acres of free land. The value of the whole was 30s. 
increased at the time of the Survey to 40s., when it was held 
of Roger de Poictou. It was a league long and half a league broad, and 
paid 13^^. in a gelt. Others had land here.' 

Four estates in this place belonged to Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, 
at the time of the Survey. The first was formerly that of a socman, and 
consisted of a carucate of land, 2 villeins, a serf, a ploughteam in demesne 
and half a ploughteam belonging to the men, the value being 20s. This 
was held by Gislebert. The second was held -by Fulkered, having been 
formerly the estate of a socman. It consisted of a curacate of land, 3 
bordars (introduced since Saxon times), a serf, a ploughteam in demesne, 
and 4 acres of meadow, valued at 20s. The third was formerly held by 
Alwine, a freeman, and at the time of the Survey Folkard held over him. 
This estate consisted of 40 acres, half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 6s. %d. The last of these holdings was formerly the estate of 
eight freemen, who also held it at the time of the Survey from Richard. 
It consisted of 30 acres, 2 bordars, and a ploughteam, valued at 13s. 4^.^ 

Manor of Hawkedon Hall. 

This was the estate of Olf in Saxon times and of Roger de Poictou 
at the time of the Survey. In 1272 it was vested in Thomas de Moleton 
or Multon, who held one fee here of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. Thomas 
de Multon died in 1293, when the lordship passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Multon, who died in 1295, when it went to his son and heir, Thomas 
de Multon. From the last Thomas the manor passed with the advowson 
to John de Multon, and on his death to his widow Alice ; and on the Close 
Rolls in 1336 we find an order to the escheator to deliver to Alice, late wife 
of John de Multon, of Egremound, the advowson of Hawkedon church, 
extended at £xo yearly.^ 

In 1364 we find that William Breton and two others released all right 
in the manor to Sir William Clopton. Davy enters John Cobham as lord 
in 1407, and says that in 1409 Sir William Clopton released all right in the 
manor to Robert Clark and others. The manor was held in the beginning 
of the sixteenth century by William Cokkeshall, and he died seised of it in 

1518/ 

We meet with a fine of a fourth part of the Manor of Hawkedon levied 
in 1549 by William Hedgeman against Francis Luttell and others,^ and 
another in 1571 levied by John Holdyche and others against William 
Hedgman." 

At the close of the sixteenth century the manor must have been vested 
in Jasper Taverner, for in 1599 he sold it to Edmund Plume,' who was a 



2 



'Dom. ii. 3486. 'Fine, Easter, 2 Edw. VI. 

^Dom. ii. 3906, 3966, 397. 6 Fine, Trin. 13 Eliz. 

3 Close Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 33. 'Fine, faster, 41 Eliz. 

♦I.P.M., 9 and 10 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 
App. ii. p. 123. 



HAWKEDON. 245 

grandson of Robert Plume, who was tenant of John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, 
in the time of Hen. VIII., of the manor and estate of G. Yeldham, in Essex. 
Edmund's brother Thomas was grandfather of Thomas Plume, D.D., who 
founded the Plumian Professorship at Cambridge in 1704. Edmund Plume 
died 20th Jan. 1641, and was succeeded by Edmund Plume, who died 13th 
March, 1681, the very same date with his wife Elizabeth, he aged 87 and 
she aged 85, and they were buried together at Hawkedon. The manor 
passed to their son and heir, another Edmund Plume, who married Anne, 
sister of Philip Hamond, of Hawkedon, and died 28th Aug. 1722, aged 91, 
having survived his brother Robert and sister Martha. 

We next meet with the manor vested in Philip Hamond, who was 
probably the son or grandson of Martha Plume, sister of Edmund, who had 
married Philip Hamond, of Hawkedon. She had died 22nd Aug. 1679, 
at the age of 44, and he the 28th of the same month and year at the age 
of 46, both being buried at Boxstead. Philip Hamond the successor to 
Edmund Plume, died 5th May, 1756, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Philip Knight Hamond, who died in 1758, and was buried at 
Hawkedon, 9th Oct., when it passed to his son and heir, Philip Hamond, 
who married Harriet, daughter of Thomas Richardson, of Long Melford, 
and dying i8th July, 1779, without surviving issue, left the manor to his 
widow, who remarried John Oliver. 

In 1853 the manor belonged to Joseph Enton Hale, of Somerton, 
who married Sarah Forrester, daughter of the Rev. Thomas Prosser, rector 
of Dorston, and dying in 1874, the manor passed to his son and heir, J. 
Prosser Hale, on whose death without issue the manor passed to 
his brother, Thomas Prosser Hale, of Somerton Hall, who in 1885 married 
EUen Isabel, daughter of Thomas Mingaye Golding, of Walsham-le- Willows, 
and on his death in 1900 the manor passed to the trustees of his will, in 
whom it is still vested. 

Arms of Plume : Erm. a fesse wavy Or and Gu. betw. 2 cotises Vert. 
Davy gives — Erm. a bend vaire Or and Gu. cotised Vert. 

Manor of Thurstanton or Thursturston or Thurston Hall. 

This manor is specified in the Domesday Survey. It was held in 
Saxon times by Etmar, Earl Algar's thane, and consisted of 2 carucates 
of land, 2 villeins, 6 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, and half belonging 
to the men (the latter not mentioned in the Survey). Also 3 acres of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 6 hogs, 2 beasts, 13 hogs, 40 sheep, and 
6 hives of bees. At the time of the Survey the beasts, hogs, and sheep had 
increased to 5, 20, and 50 respectively. There was also half a church with 
15 acres of free land, the whole valued at 40s. Roger de Poictou was the 
Domesday tenant in Chief/ 

In 1280 it was vested in Thomas de Multon, son of Lambert de Multon, 
and Annabel his wife, daughter and coheir of Richard de Lucie and sister 
of Alice de Lucie, who then held the main manor, and he had this year a 
grant of the market, fair, and free warren here. The manor passed on 
his death to his son and heir, Thomas de Multon, junior, and from him to 
his son and heir, Thomas de Multon, and on his death to his son and heir, 
John de Multon, who died without male issue in 1334, when it went to his 
widow Alice in dower. John de Multon left three daughters (Davy says 

'Dom. ii.^3486. 



346 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




o 

o 

w 

< 

ii 

< 

K 

■a 

o 

to 

b: 

B 

s 
H 



HAWKEDON. 



247 



sisters) and coheirs — Elizabeth, married to Robert de Haverington or 
Harrington ; Joan, married to Robert Fitzwater ; and Margaret, married 
to Thomas de Lucy, son and heir of Anthony de Lucy. In 1350 we find 
the lands specified as belonging to Robert, son of Robert de "Harrington " 
and Elizabeth Multon, Joan, Lady of Egremont, wife of Robert Fitzwalter, 
and Sir Thomas de Lucy, Knt., holding in right of his wife Margaret. They 
each held a third. 

As to the de Lucy third. Sir Thomas de Lucy was summoned to 
Parliament in his father's lifetime in 1341, and the two following 
years, and from thence to 1363. He died in 1364, and Anthony 
de Lucy was his son and heir. He married Joan, widow of William, Lord 
Greystoke, and died in 1367, leaving an only child Joane, who died an 
infant at the age of three years, when the third passed to her aunt and heir, 
sister of Anthony, namely, Maud, married ist to Gilbert de Umfreville, 
3rd Earl of Angus. 

This Gilbert was son of Robert, 2nd Earl of Angus, and Lucie de Kyne 
his ist wife, which Robert was son of Gilbert, ist Earl of Angus, summoned 
to Parliament as Earl in 1297, who wa"s the son of Gilbert de Umfreville, 
who died in 1244, by Maud, Countess of Angus. The 3rd Earl had 
summons to Parliament by that title from 5 Edw. HL to 4 Rich. IL, 
being occasionally a trier of petitions.' He, with Maud his wife, levied 
a fine of two parts of a third of the manor in 1376 against Sir Matthew 
de Redmane and Joan his \yife.^ 

Sir Gilbert Umfreville died in 1380^ without leaving surviving issue, 
his only son Robert having married Margaret, daughter of Henry, Lord 
Percy (which Margaret after her ist husband's death married William de 
Ferrers), and died in his father's lifetime without issue." 

Maud, the widow of Gilbert de Umfreville, 3rd Earl of Angus, after his 
death married Henry Percy, ist Earl of Northumberland, and died in 1398 
without issue. 

As to the Harrington third. Robert Harrington in 1350 was lord in 
right of his mother.' He married Isabel, daughter of Sir Nigel Loring, 
K.G., and died in 1406, when his share passed to his son and heir. Sir John 
Harrington, Knt., who died without issue, when it passed to his brother. 
Sir William, who both served King Hen. V. in his wars with France, and on 
Sir William's death, apparently the share went over equally to the owner 
of the other two shares. 

As to the Fitz Walter third. Robert Fitz Walter, Knt., died in 1328, and 
J oan his widow in 1362, when the share passed to her grandson. Sir Walter Fitz 
Walter, Knt., her son and Walter's father, having been summoned to Parlia- 
ment from 15th to 34th Edw. III. inclusive, and died in 1361 in his mother's 
lifetime, and from this time to the time of Sir Thomas Ratcliffe, 4th Lord 
Fitz Walter, 3rd Earl of Sussex, who succeeded his father in 1556, the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Shimpling, in Babergh 
Hundred. Of this last particular we meet with a fine in 1512 by Robert, 
Duke of Buckirigham, and others against Sir Robert Ratcliffe and 
Elizabeth,^ when probably the interest of Sir Robert was settled, and in 
1543 a fine was levied of " a moiety " of the manor against Sir Henry 



'Rot. Pad. 

^Feet of Fines, 50 Edw. III. 8. 

3I.P.M., 4Rich. 11.37. 



" Banks's Baronia Anglica Concentrata, vol. 

i. pp. 104, 105. 
5 Close Rolls, 25 Edw. III. 18. 
^Fine, Trin. 4Hen. VIII. 



248 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Ratcliffe, 2nd Earl of Sussex, by Sir Thomas Wriothesley.' Another fine 
was levied the following year by Henry Payne against Henry Grey, 3rd 
Marquis of Dorset, and others of a "third part of a moiety of a third part of 
the manor " \ and the following year another fine was levied of " Thur- 
stanton Manor or Thurston Hall," by Thomas Wriothesley, Lord 
Wriothesley, against Henry, Earl of Sussex.^ 

In 1556 Sir Thomas Ratcliffe, 4th Lord Fitz Walter, and 3rd Earl of 
Sussex, had licence to alienate to Richard Everard a moiety of the manor. 
Richard Everard died in 1559, when it is stated that his son and heir, 
Ambrose Everard, had a moiety. He levied a fine of the manor 27th May, 
12 Eliz. (69). Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of this period we find a 
claim by this Ambrose Everard to be relieved against tithes for lands in 
Hawkedon, lately due to Robert Shawe, clerk, late parson of the parish." 
Ambrose Everard died in 1676, when his interest passed to his son and heir, 
Richard Everard, and from him went to his widow, Dorothy Everard, 
eldest daughter of Thomas Golding, for life. She died in 1678, when the 
manor passed as to one moiety to Jeffery Malty ward, of Rougham, in right 
of Frances his wife, eldest daughter and coheir of Richard Everard, and as 
to the other moiety to Thomas Smyth, of Hawkedon, and Mary his wife, 
the other daughter and coheir of the said Richard Everard. These parties 
by deed dated ist Jan. 1679, exchanged certain lands known as the Hop- 
grounds belonging to the manor for a barn in Hawkedon. Jeffery seems 
later to have acquired the whole manor. Everard, son of the above Jeffery 
Maltyward, was incumbent of the church of Hawkedon on the presentation 
of his father in 1709. Page says : " He," presumably Everard Maltyward, 
" died in 1728. Alice Maltyward (probably his widow) presented " ; but 
if so Jeffery must have given the advowson to his son Everard, and away 
from the manor, for Jeffery died in 1719, when the manor went to his son 
and heir, Robert Maltyward, who died in 1728 without issue, when the 
manor vested in his sister and coheir Elizabeth, married to William Gilby, 
and from them passed to their son and heir, William Gilby, who died in 
1782, and was succeeded by his son and heir, the Rev. William Gilby, who 
sold the share in 1798^ to John Gotts, of Tim worth. 

We find that John Hedgman held a part in 1584, when it passed to his 
son and heir, William Hedgman, who died in 1599, when it went to his 
brother and heir, John Hedgman. 

When the entire manor became vested in one person, and in whom is 
not clear, but the whole no doubt was purchased in 1790 by John Gotts, 
farmer, of Timworth, for £2,000, and passed under the will of the purchaser 
to John Wiseman, and he sold to Orbel Ray Cakes, of Nowton, from which 
time the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor of Nowton, in 
Thingoe Hundred, and is now vested in Lieut.-Col. Orbell Henry Cakes. 

Page says Plampin Richardson held the manor and advowson in 1736. 

Thurston Hall is a fine specimen of an old manor house. It is built 
with studwork filled up with brick nogging. Upon the porch and over a 
chimney-piece in one of the rooms is a date 1607, the period at which most 
probably the present house was erected. The gables are well proportioned 
and the chimney of graceful design. In a paper on the Hall, by the Rev. 

' Fine, Easter, 35 Hen. VIII. * An advertisement of the sale, 23rd July, 

''Fine, Easter, 36 Hen. VIII. 1787, of Manor of Thurston Hall 

3 Fine, Mich. 37 Hen. VIII. and farm, called Thurston Hall 

''C.P. i. 282. Farm, 128 acres, appeared in the 

public press of the time. 



HAWKEDON. 249 

Francis Haslewood/ he says : " Some of the wood carving is worthy of 
careful examination. What remains of the building testifies to the skill 
of those who erected it^ and it would serve as a good model for those who 
were about to rear or reconstruct a manor house." 

Manor of Cresseners. 

This was the estate in the days of the Confessor of Alwine, a freeman, 
and formed part of the possessions of Richard Fitz Gilbert at the time of 
the Survey. 

In 1315 John de Cressner seems to have had the manor. His holding 
here was the third part of a fee and half a fee of the Honor of Clare. In 
1398 the manor was vested in John Cressener. 

In tjie tinie of King Hen. IV. the manor was held by Robert de 
Cressener, and passed in 1410^ to his son arid heir, William de Cressener. 
He married Margaret, widow of Richard, Lord Scrope, of Bolton, and 
daughter of Ralph Nevil, ist Earl of Westmoreland, from whom the 
Cresseners of Morley, in Norfolk, and those of Earls' Colne in Essex, are 
lineally descended. William Cressener died in 1454,^ and his wife survived 
until 1461. Alexander Cressener, their eldest son, succeeded, and was Sheriff 
of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1466 and 1482. He was one of the gentlemen 
summoned in 1483 to be created K.B. at the intended coronation of 
Edw. v., for the family were much attached to the House of York. He 
held this manor, with 200 acres of land, and also the manors of "Morti- 
mers," " Netherhall," and " Cresseners," in Norfolk and Suffolk. He married 
Cecily, daughter of Sir John Ratcliffe, ancestor of the Earls of Sussex, and 
died i8th June, 1498. John, his eldest son and heir, died in 1497 in his 
father's lifetime, and John Cressener, born in 1484, succeeded his grand- 
father. He was a military man, and attended King Hen. VIII. to the 
Siege of Tournay in 15 13, where he received the honour of knighthood for 
his bravery. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Lestrange, 
and died in 1536, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Cressener, 
who had livery in 1540. This year a fine was levied against him by Thomas 
Heigham.'^ 

In 1548 we find the manor vested in John Cawson. His daughter 
Anne married Thomas Hamond, and by feoffment dated 6th Feb. 1561, 
his father-in-law granted this manor to him. He died ante 28th March, 
1611, for this is the date of his widow's will, which was proved at Bury St. 
Edmunds, 23rd Nov. 1612. The manor passed to their grandson and heir, 
Thomas Hamond, son of Thomas Hamond, who had died in the 
lifetime of his father. The grandson Thomas married Sarah, daughter 
of Sir John Paschall, of West Hanningfield, co. Essex, and dying in 
1662 the manor passed to his son and heir, John Hamond, of 
Cresseners and of East Bergholt, who died without issue before ,29th 
Sept. 1696, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Walter 
Hamond, who dying loth May, 1718, it devolved on his son and heir, John 
Hamond, who 22nd June, 1704, married Mary, daughter of Edward Branch, 
of Snail well, co. Cambridge, and the manor in default of issue of his eldest 

' S.I. Vol. viii. p. 258. manor was 80 acres of land, 4 of 

''I.P.M., 12 Hen. IV. 33; the holding then meadow, 10 of pasture, 2 of wood, 

consisted of a messuage and 200 and I2d. rent in Hawkedon and 

acres of land. Depden. 

^I.P.M., 32 Hen. VI. 16. All that was *Fine, Mich. 32 Hen. VIII. 

apparently held by him with the 

HI 



250 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

son John vested in his (John the father's) 3rd son, Thomas Hamond, who 
resided at Newmarket. He married 6th July, 1738, Rebecca Pleavance, 
and dying i8th Nov. 1772, the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Hamond, of Ashley, co. Cambridge, and of Newmarket and Denston, both 
CO. Suffolk, who dying 27th Feb. 1809, it vested in his son and heir, John 
Hamond, of . Ashley, who married Mary, eldest daughter of William 
Harlock, of Ely. On his death the manor apparently went to his 5th son 
John, who nth April, 1850, married Emily, 5th daughter of Robert James 
Peck, of Newmarket, and died 25th July, i860, leaving with other issue a 
son, Thomas Hamond. 

Amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Pleadings we find an action in i594 
by William " Hedgeman," by descent against Ralph Turner, bailiff, of the 
Honor of Clare, as to alienation fine for lands parcel of this manor as 
holder in chief.' 

Arms of Cressener : Arg, on a Bend engr. vSable 3 cross-crosslets 
fiitch^e of the first. 

Manor of Swans Hall. 

Davy's list of lords is not particularly informing. It is " — Swan, — 
Abbot, Rev. Charles Edward Steward sold in 1814 to Roger Kedington, 
Esq." The manor was long in the family of Abbot, and was subsequently 
purchased by the Stewarts, who held the same in 1764. The Rev. Charles 
Edward Stewart sold, as stated by Davy, in 1814 to the Rev. Roger 
Kedington, of Rougham, who died in 1818. 

In 1847 the meaner was vested in George Weller Poley, of Boxstead 
Hall. 



' Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 36 Eliz. 8. 




HUNDON. 251 

HUNDON. 

MANOR of considerable size was held here in Saxon times 
by Wisgar. It consisted of 25 carucates and 20 acres of 
land, 54 villeins J 30 bordars, 14 serfs, 9 ploughteams in 
demesne and 31 belonging to the men. Also 45 acres of 
meadow, wood sufficient to support 160 hogs, and a mill. 
Also a church with half a carucate of free land, and another 
church with 4J acres, a ploughteam, and 3 acres of meadow. 
Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 14 beasts, 130 hogs, 80 sheep, and 17 
hives of bees, the whole valued at £30. When the survey was taken this 
manor was held by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and several details were 
different. The villeins were reduced to 41, the ploughteams in demesne 
having been reduced to 4 were increased again to 7, and those belonging to 
the men were reduced to 23. Of the live stock the rouncies had increased 
to 6, the beasts to 31, the hogs to 160, and the sheep to 480, while the value 
of the manor had increased to ^^40. 4s. It was 2 leagues and 2 quarentenes 
in length, and a league in breadth, and paid in a gelt 15^^. Others held land 
here. Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had two other estates in this place, 
when the Survey was taken. The first Hamo held over a socman, who 
formerly held it; and it consisted of a carucate of land, 2 bordars, a plough- 
team, and 30 sheep, increased to 50 at the time of the Survey, the value 
being 27s. The second was formerly held by 10 socmen. It consisted 
of a carucate of land, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued 
at 20S.' 

Manor of Hundon 

(now HuNDEN with its members, Stradishall, Farley, and Chilbum). 

The estate continued in the De Qare family and the Royal House of 
York, descending in the same course as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh 
Hundred, until the time of King Edward IV., in whose person it became 
vested in the Crown. 

The following entries specifically refer to this manor during the 
devolution through the Clares and Mortimers referred to : Earl Gloverine 
held Hundon Manor of the King in chief as of the Honor of Clare." It 
is included in the inquis. p.m. of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 
1363/ of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, in 1296," of Joan, wife of 
Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, jointly with him, in 1307,' and of 
Elizabeth de Burgo, wife of Theobald de Verdon, in 1360.^ 

In 1315 there is an order on the Close Rolls assigning the manor in 
dower to Matilda, Countess of Clare,^ and again in 1318.^ 

The manor is included specifically in the inquis. p.m. of the Duke of 
Clarence in 1369,^ and in that of Phillippa de Mortimer, Countess of March, 

' Dom. ii. 3896, 3906. prior of Stoke had the church to 

'H.R. ii. 151, 171. , his own use. 

^I.P.M., 47 Hen. III. 34. New reference, *I.P.M., 24 Edw. I. 107, and an extent 

file 27 (5), an extent is given in given. 

this inquisition from which should = I.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 47. 

be substracted 9 marks, which ^I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 83. 

Avice Pojmdel receives for life ^ Close Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 23 ; O. 8 Edw. 

for the land of Angod (extent given) II. 27. 

bought by the Earl, which the ^ Close Rolls, 11 Edw. II. 9 ; 12 Edw. II. 

same Angod held of the Earl by 23. 

service of one-fourth of a Knight's ^I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. i. 23. 

fee. It is also stated that the 



252 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



in 1381.' It was also confirmed for life to Cecily, . Duchess of York, in 
1483-4,^ and in 1495 was held in dower by the Queen/ but in 1509 was again 
in the Crown. 

In 15 1 1 a fine was levied of the manor by the King against Katherine 
Courteney, Countess of Devon, one of the daughters of Edw. IV. and 
Thomas Haward and Anne his wife, another daughter of Edw. IV.* 

In 1540 the manor was granted for life to Lady Anne of Cleves, in 
consideration of her marriage with the King.' And in 1546 was in Queen 
Katherine. In 1549 John Cheke, afterwards Sir John, had a grant, but 
it was taken from him by Queen Mary. It was afterwards restored, and 
then exchanged with him by the Queen for other lands. "^ Amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum will be found extracts from the 
courts of the Queen held at Hundon 20th Feb. 15th Eliz. [1573], also 21st 
Jan. 1574, view of frankpledge 23rd Apl.'' in same year and 1580, 1581, 
1582, and court leet in 1583.' 

In 1584 Queen Elizabeth leased the manor to Sir Edward Walgrave, 
Knt., but it must have been for a short term, or the reversion only dealt 
with, for the manor was in 1556 annexed to the Duchy of Lancaster. 

In 1603 a grant was made by the Crown of the manor and three parks 
in Hundon, part of the Duchy of Lancaster, to John Erskine, Earl of Mar, 
in fee.^ In 1611 the said Earl of Mar sold the manor to the King. Amongst 
the State Papers in 1611 we find a warrant to pay to the Earl of Mar £15,000 
as purchase money for the manor.'" The King then granted the manor, 
and a licence to the Earl of Mar to alienate it to William, Lord Cavendish. 

Before 1756 the manor had been acquired by James Vernon," of 
Hundon, for this year he died seised of it, and it passed to his son and heir, 
Henry Vernon. He married twice, ist the eldest daughter and coheir of 
Thomas Payne, of Hough, co. Line, and sister of Lady Cust, the widow 
of the Speaker of the House of Commons. " She departed this life," 
according to the inscription to her memory, "ye 11 Aug. 1773 aged 53 having 
devoted near 30 years of her life to the Honour and happiness of her now 
lamenting husband, who as a Proof of his affection caused this Monument 
to be erected," and as a further proof took as a 2nd wife Jane, 3rd daughter 



' I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 43. 
'D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 83. 
3R.P. vi. 462. 
4 Fine, Mich. 3 Hen. VIII. 
,5S.P. 1540, 144 (2). 
^ Fine, Easter, 4 Mary. 

7 Add. Ch. 1277. 

8 Add. Ch. 1278, 1279, 1280, 1281, 1282, 

1283, 1284. 

9S.P. 1603, 45. 

'"S.P. 1611, 35. 

"A James Vernon had been a benefactor 
as early as 1737 in Hundon. By 
deed enrolled in Chancery, dated 
in 1737, James Vernon, after 
reciting that he had largely, con- 
tributed towards erecting and fitting 
up of three workhouses in Hundon, 
Wickhambrook, and Stradishall, 
for the encouragement and support 
of the industrious poor residing in 
those parishes, and was desirous 
that certain yearly sums shoujd be 



paid for the better support and 
carrjdng on of the said charitable 
designs, granted certain rent 
charges for that purpose. The sum 
he appropriated for this parish, 
was £22 a year, for the purpose 
of maintaining and keeping in 
repair the monument house and 
the monument which the said 
James Vernon had lately erected 
for himself and family, near the 
parish church of Hundon, the 
surplus to be laid dut, ;^o a year 
towards the salary of a person to 
have the charge of the workhouse, 
and the residue was to be expended 
in teaching so many poor children 
as the parish officers for the time 
should think fit. Sixteen poor 
children receive instruction under 
this charity. (Page, Hist, of Suff. 
p. 881). 



HUNDON. 253 

of Sir John CuUum, of Hawstead Place, Bart. By this 2nd marriage 
Henry Vernon had two sons — Henry, who died i6th March, 1787, at the age 
of 13 years, and John, and one daughter Arethusa, born after her father's 
death, which occurred i8th Dec. 1776.' Jane the widow did not die until 
22nd Oct. 1826, when in her 83rd year. 

The manor, on the death of Henry Vernon, the son, in 1787 passed to 
his brother and heir, John Vernon, of Wherstead Lodge, and of Great 
Thurlow and Hundon, who died at Brighton 25th May, 1818, without issue, 
when it devolved upon his sister and heir Arethusa, who married 
- Sir Robert Harland, Bart. In 1853 the manor was vested in Lady Harland. 
In 1885 it was in the Right Hon. W. H. Smith, M.P. He married Emily, 
daughter of F. D. Danvers. Mr. Smith was M.P. for Westminster 1868-85, 
elected for the Strand Division 1885, Secretary to the Treasurer, First 
Lord of the Admiralty, Chief Secretary of Ireland, Secretary of State for 
War, and First Lord of the Treasury in 1887. The manor passed in 
1896 and 1900 to the Hon. W. F. D. Smith, M.P., of Greenlands, Henley- 
on-Thames. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. in 1400 of Sir John de 
Bourchier.^ 

Court Rolls of the manor will be found in the Record Office, 12, 13, 17 
Edw. 11.,^ 2 to 4, 7 to 9, II, 12, 16, 17 Rich. II., 39 to 39 Hen. VI., i, 2, 
7, 8, 10, II, 15, 16, 21, 22 Edw. IV.* And amongst the papers relating 
to the Duchy of Lancaster in the Record Office i Mary to i and 2 P. and M.,^ 
14 to 21 Eliz.* 25 to 26 Eliz.,'' 27 to 29 Eliz.^ with Stradishall, Farley, and 
Chilburn, 31 to 32 Eliz.' Also extracts from Court Rolls will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum in the years 
1573-1582'° and 1652." 

The office of steward of this manor is referred to in the State Papers 
in 1509,'^ and in 1542 we find a grant to Michael Stanhope to be keeper of 
Hundon Great Park.'^ And amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the 
Duchy of Lancaster are several actions as to rights and offices respecting 
the manor and park.'* 

Manor of Purowe, formerly called Gorreles or Penowe Hall. 

The Gorel family held lands here in the time of Edw. I. In 1280 we 
find an action referred to on the Patent Rolls as pending between Robert, 
son of Radulph Gorel and Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, 
and others touching a tenement in Hundon.'^ 

In 1315 Hugh Gorell held the fourth part of a fee here, and in 1425 
Walter de Gazeley held half a fee, which at one tinie was held by William 
de Gazeley, and this went subsequently to William Coggeshall, who held, 
however, only the fourth part of a fee, and died in 1428. 

It is not possible to say whether the above persons held the manor. 

'Will made at Bury, 21st Oct. 1775, and 'Bundle 119, 1838. 

codicil at Lille, in Flanders, 13th ' Bundle 119, 1842. 

Dec. 1776. "Add. Ch, 1277-1283. 

'I.P.M., I Hen. IV. 9. "Add. Ch. 10567. 

3 Portfolio 203, 87. "S.P. I Hen. VIII. 36, 222. 

"Portfolio 203, 89, 90, 213, 57. 66, 76. '3S.P. 1542, 443 (16). 

'Bundle 117, 1820. '■* Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings. 

« Bundle 118, 1832. 'sPat. RoUs, 8 Edw. I. 25<i. 

'Bundle, 119, 1836. 



254 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1548, however, the manor was vested in John Coggeshall. Amongst 
the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of Hen. VHI. is an action as to 
forcible ouster at Hundon by John Cokysall against Thomas Carr and 
others, and this probably is the same man with John Coggeshall.' He died 
in 1558, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Coggeshall, who 
had livery in 1579. 

The manor was subsequently vested in John Smith, who died in 1603, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Smith. 

Page says : " Here was a reputed manor parcel of the possession of 
the College of Stoke by Clare which was granted in 1548 to Sir John Cheke 
and Walter Mildmay with Great Park, Estry Park and Broxley Park in 
this parish. The church was also appropriated to the said college by the 
gift of Alostan, priest of Hundon, and granted with the said reputed manor 
at the suppression of the said college. The patronage of the vicarage now 
belongs to Jesus College, Cambridge." He does not, however, give the 
name of the reputed manor. Perhaps the manor was that of Hagden Hall, 
for we find an action amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth as to this manor and land in Hundon by Roger Coggeshall 
against William Higham."* 



'Star C.P, Hen. VIII. vol x. ioo-io2i ^C.P. ser. ik B. xxxi. 47. 




KEDINGTON. 255 

KEDINGTON. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor by Ailad. 
It consisted of 5 carucates of land, 13 villeins, a bordar, 
9 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 8 belonging to the men. 
Also 20 acres of meadow, a mill, 4 rouncies, 15 beasts, 27 hogs, 
and 52 sheep, valued at l^. When the Survey was taken 
this manor was held by Ralph Baynard, the villeins had 
become reduced to 11, the bordars had increased to 2, the 
serfs and the mill had disappeared, the ploughteams in demesne were 
reduced to 2, and those belonging to the men to 2| teams. The rouncies 
were 3, the beasts 4, the hogs 18, the sheep were increased to 150, and there 
were 6 hives of bees. The value was ^j. 5s. 

Ralph Baynard had an estate here which had formerly been that of 
25 freemen. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 5 bordars, 2 serfs, 11 
ploughteams, and 6 acres of meadow, valued at "40s. Ralph Baynard's 
predecessor had commendation, sac and soc, except as to St. Edmund's 
six forfeitures, and of one the predecessor of Richard, Earl Gislebert's son, 
had commendation, Baynard claiming the whole by exchange. There was 
also a church with 40 acres of free land and i| acres of meadow, valued at 
6s. It was 12 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt i2i. Others 
had land here.' 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had two small estates in this place at 
the time of the Survey. The first was formerly that of a socman, consisting 
of 30 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 5s., the second that of 10 free- 
men, who held in Saxon times and also at the time of the Survey a carucate 
of land and 2 ploughteams, valued at 20s. ^ 

The last holding here was amongst the possessions of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, who held a freeman with 5 acres, he being valued at Tzd. The 
commendation, soc and sac belonged to the abbot.' 

Manor of Kedington. 

This was the estate of Ailad in the tinie of the Confessor and of Ralph 
Bainard at the time of the Survey. From Ralph the lordship passed to 
his son and heir Jeffrey, and from him to his son and heir, William Bainard, 
who in the reign of Hen. I. forfeited his barony, as mentioned in the account 
of Shimpling Manor, in Babergh Hundred. The manor was thereupon 
granted by the Crown to Robert, younger son of Richard Fitz Gilbert, 
ancestor of the ancient Earls of Clare. In the time of Rich. I. it was held 
by Adam de Novo Mercato or Newmarch or Newmarket, from whom it 
passed to his son and heir, Adam de Newmarch, and from him to his son 
and heir, John de Newmarch. 

In 1306 a fine of the manor was levied by Gilbert de Stapleton against 
this John de Newmarch and Amicia his wife.* The fine included the 
advowson of the church of Kedington. On John's death the manor passed 
to his widow Amicia for life. 

On the Close Rolls in 1310 we find the manor claimed by Amicia for 
life, and notification that Margery de Willugby and John her son desired 
to levy a fine.' Subject to the interest of Amicia the manor devolved on 

'Dom. ii. 4136. *Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. I. 23. 

'Dom. ii. 390&. 5 Close Rolls, 3 Edw. II. 4. 

^Dom. ii. 3716. 



256 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Roger de Newmarch, brother and heir of John, who by deed dated at West- 
minster, in October, S. Trin. 4 Edw. II. [1311] granted the manor and 
the advowson to John de Sandale, clerk, subject to the hfe interest of 
Amicia,' and he regranted the same by deed dated at Westminster 
in October, S. Mich. 5 Edw. II. [1311], to Margaret de Willoughby 
and John her son, and the heirs of his body, on failure of issue to 
the right heirs of the said Margery, subject, however, to the life 
interest of Amicia." There had been previously a fine levied in 1310 
by John de Sandale against Roger,^ but the settlement above was no 
doubt effected by the fine levied the following year by Margaret de 
Willoughby and John her son against the said John de Sandale.* This 
Margaret de Willoughby was widow of Thomas Barnardiston, who was son 
and heir of Geoffrey de Barnardiston, and his wife daughter and heir of 
(? Roger) de Newmarket or de Novo Mercato. 

In 1331 we meet with a fine levied of the manor and advowson by 
Walter Grapmel and Simon atte Hall, of Retheresthorp, against Margaret, 
who was wife of Simon de Kynardesle.^ 

Thomas de Barnardiston, brother and heir of the above John, held 
the manor, and had a grant of free warren here in 1347.^ He was one of 
the knights of the shire for the County of Lincoln in 1357. 

He appears to have been engaged in the wars of Edw. III. l^y writ 
dated at Roxburgh ist February, 9th Edw. III., he was summoned with 
91 others named, to attend the King, with horses and arms, at Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, to aid him against his enemies the Scots. The King complains 
that they had not attended him at Roxburgh as he expected, that 
he had dismissed others, and that he was almost alone. Thomas 
Barnardiston had letters of protection, 30th Edward III. as " Thomas 
de Bernardiston, Cheval," in the company of Edward, Prince of Wales, 
serving the King in Gascony. " Johannes de Havering, miles," is also 
named in the letters.' Thomas Barnardiston married Lucy, daughter 
and heir of Robert Havering, Esq., of Norfolk, and his portrait was formerly 
in a window in Ketton church, in a kneeling posture in armour, with arms 
on his surcoat, viz., Barnardiston ; Havering (Argent, a lion rampant, 
tail forked, Gu.) ; Peynell (Argent, two bars Az. between six martlets 
Gules) ; and Hanchett (Sable, three right hands Argent). 

On his death the manor passed to his son and heir Walter de Barnar- 
diston, who married Frances, daughter of Thomas Kingsman, and on his 
death the manor passed to his son and heir, John de Barnardiston. 

We meet with a fine levied of part of the Manors of Barnardiston and 
Kedington in 1386 by Sir John Bussy, Sir John Leek, and Sir John de Birton 
against Sir Edmund Perpounte and Francisa his wife." 

John de Barnardiston married Margerie, sister of Sir John Bussey, Knt., 
and this Sir John Bussy and John de Leek, knights, appointed by letters 
of attorney, Thomas Alger, clerk, and Sir Thomas Godall, parson of the 
church of Barnardiston, to deliver seisin to John de Barnardiston and 
Margerie his wife, of the Manors of Barnardiston and Kedyngton, 

'Harl. 55 B. 17. =Feet of Fines, 4 Edw. III. 11. 

^Harl. 58 A. 44. « Chart. Rolls, 21 Edw. III. 29. 

3 Feet of Fines, 4 Edw. II. 53. 'Rymer's Feed. vol. v. p. 384. 

••Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. II. 20 ; Harl. 55 ^Feet of Fines, 10 Rich. II. 14. 
G. 17, 58 A.,44. 



KEDINGTON. 257 

according to the form and effect of a charter' made by them. This is 
dated at " Cotes," Monday next after the Feast of S. Hilary [13th 
Jan.] 20 Rich. II. [1397]. It is sealed with arms, three bars for Bussey, 
and on. a saltier engrailed nine annulets, for Leek.'' John de Barnardiston 
appears to have died without issue, and his widow married William de 
Ingham.^ 

On John Barnardiston's death the manor passed to his cousin, Roger 
Barnardiston, son of Sir Thomas Barnardiston, and Joanna his wife, daughter 
and coheir of Sir Wilham Frank, Knt., of Grimsby, which Sir Thomas was 
2nd son of Sir Thomas Barnardiston, the grandfather of the said John 
Barnardiston, last lord. 

In 1403 we meet with a fine levied between Sir Thomas Hawley, Knt., 
WiUiam Kelke, of Bafnetby, Robert Tirwhyt, John Turnay, and 
Roger de Barnardiston, of the manors of Kedington and Barnardiston, 
and advowsons of the churches of the same manors, in Suffolk; one 
messuage, 200 acres of land, 20 acres of meadow, 20 of pasture, and 10 
marks of rent in Whittle, Danecastre, and Balderton, in the county of York ; 
William Ingham, and Margery his wife holding the Manor of Kedington 
for the life of Margery. The same year we meet with another fine levied of 
the Manors of Kedington and Barnardiston and the advowson by Roger 
de Barnardiston and Robert Tyrwhyt against William Ingham and Margaret 
his wife.* 

Roger Barnardiston married Isabella, daughter of William Kelke, of 
Barnetby, near to Great Cotes and Grimsby, and a brass with her effigy 
remains at Great Cotes. In 1430 Sir William Clopton, Knt., brought an 
action in the King's Bench" against Robert Eland and his wife (they were of 
Raitby, co. Lincoln), and Roger Barnardiston, for having to his damage 
to £1,000, caused to be published at Kedington and at Melford two false 
deeds, under which Eland and his wife claimed the manor and advowson 
of Hawstead.^ The wife of Eland claimed as heiress of Sir John Fitz 
Eustace, and this dispute had been previously carried on with considerable 
fighting, according to the fashion of the day, and " enormous outrages " 
set out in a roll six feet long. The matter was finally left to arbitrators 
(he being Sir Will. Clopton's uncle by marriage) that he " myght not hav 
the dede of Eland, to se it out in the light agenst the sonne," but the 
arbitrators did see it and describe minutely the " feble yuke to seme old, 
and the yuke'untrewly gommyd," &c., and having heard what " a wor- 
shipful person that dwelled with Sir William Clopton," said, they decided 
that the charge was " proved upon Eland," so it is to be hoped that Roger 
Barnardiston believed the deed to be genuine. 

Roger Barnardiston died about 1442, when the manor went to his son 
and heir, Thomas Barnardiston. He married Alice, daughter of Sir Henry 
Vavasour, of Hazlewood, co. York, by Margery, daughter of Sir William 
Skipwith, Knt., of Armesby, co. Lincoln, Chief Justice of England. 

A fine was levied, no doubt for effecting a settlement of the manors in 
1457, of the manors of Kedington and Barnardiston, and the advowson, 
by Thomas Barnardiston, John Vavasour, and Walter Barnardiston, clerk, 
against Roland Neweton and Elizabeth his wife."' Thomas Barnardiston's 

'MSS. original charter in British Museum. *Feet of Fines, 4 Hen. IV. 28. 

''Harl. 47 F. 9. ^See Sir John CuUum's Hawstead, p. 121. 

^ Suff. Inst. vol. iv. p. 128. ^ Feet of Fines, 33 Hen. VI. 19. 

JI 



258 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

will is dated the Feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, April, 1461, and he 
mentions his Manor of Kedington. He was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Thomas Barnardiston, who is said to have married a daughter of Sir 
Thomas Waterton, Knt., and on his death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Thomas Barnardiston, Knt., who married Elizabeth, daughter of 
George Newport, of Brent Pelham, co. Herts., and at Ketton is a monument 
with the effigies of this Sir Thomas and his wife in stone full length and he in 
complete armour. The writer of an article on the Barnardiston family 
in the Suffolk Institute,' says : " In a south window over this monument 
was formerly, in painted glass, this Sir Thomas and his wife kneeling with 
his armorial bearings on his breast, and behind him seven sons, and his 
wife, with her coat armour. Also on her dress. Argent, a fesse between 
three crescents Sable, and behind her seven daughters." This painted glass 
was removed from Ketton church some years since, and placed in 
Brent Eleigh Hall, the seat of Edward Goate, Esq., who married Mary 
Barnardiston. On Sir Thomas's death the manor passed to his son and 
heir. Sir Thomas Barnardiston, who married Anne, daughter of Thomas 
Lucas, of Little Saxham, Solicitor-General to Hen. VII. He was on the 
Sheriff's Roll for Suffolk and Norfolk in 1511, and for Lincolnshire in 1513. 
By his will 1542 in which he is described as " Thomas Barnardiston, Knight, 
the elder," he desires to be buried in the church at Ketton, and gives 
directions for the keeping an obiit at Cotes or Ketton, for his soul and the 
souls of his wife, father, and mother. He died ist Nov. 1543,'' and his 
widow survived him, and presented to Ketton rectory, 1555. Her will, 
which was proved in 1560, contained many bequests to members of the 
Barnardiston and Lucas families, with directions that she should be buried 
in the church at Ketton, by her husband, and that " the tomb Where he 
lieth buried shall be honestly reedified." 

On this Sir Thomas Barnardiston's death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Thomas Barnardiston. He married Mary, daughter of Sir Edmund 
Walsingham, Knt., of Sixdbury, in Kent, Lieutenant of the Tower. He had 
a grant from the King^ of the Manor of Great Wratting and the wood 
called Ashburnhay Coppice, by estimation 80 acres, and Thurlow Coppice, 
by estimation 16 acres, and Oakfield Coppice, 2 acres in Wratting, Thurlow, 
and Withersfield, to be held of the King by knight service. A fine was levied 
of the manor and advowson in 1549 by Henry Turnour and others against 
Sir Thomas Barnardiston and others.* This Sir Thomas Barnardiston's 
will is dated 1551, and he died during the minority of his son and heir 
Thomas. In 1553 Sir John Cheke obtained from Edw. VI. the wardship 
of the heir and his estates in Suffolk and Bedfordshire, and on the death 
of Sir John, his widow obtained it in 1557, then stated to be worth 500 
marks. The writer in the Suffolk Institute above referred to gives an 
interesting account of this Thomas : " On the death of Edw. VI.," he says, 
" his guardian sent him to Geneva to avoid the danger, being a Protestant. 
Although this Thomas was brought up under Calvin himself, yet he was in 
the latter part of his life so^ little attached to the Genevan system, that his 
grandson. Sir Nathaniel, induced him to give up to him the patronages of 
the churches in his gift, to prevent the presentation of men inclined to the 
Church of England. When abroad, his portrait by Carolo Maratti, well 
known by an engraving, must have been taken, as Maratti was never in 
England. On attaining his majority, he had much litigation with Henry 



Vol. iv. p. 132. ^38 Hen. VIII. 

Cotton Manor, I.P.M., 35 Hen, VIII. 4. *Fine. Hil. 2 Edw. VI. 



KEDINGTON. 259 

McWilliams, who had married his guardian, the widow Lady Cheke, 
respecting the right of fishing in Sturmer Mere, " late parcell of the 
dissolved House and College of Stoke, Keddington Lordship and 
Kedington River," in Essex and Suffolk,' and Sir Thomas being 
the defendant, " asseized in fee of the Manor of Ketton," and McWilliams 
claiming as the Queen's lessee, loth Eliz., there was more litigation on this 
subject, Thomas Barnardiston claiming in right of the Queen as seised in 
fee, and Henry McWiUiams as the Queen's farmer, and claiming under the 
Dean and Chapter of the College of Stoke.' He was knighted at Bury, 
1578. In his time this family was in its greatest affluence, the estate being 
then as much as £4,000 a year, a large sum according to the present value 
of money, and this estimate probably did not include the Lincolnshire 
estate. He married ist Ehzabeth, daughter of Thomas Hanchet, of 
Hamells, inBraughing, Herts., and 2ndly Ann Bigrave. 

In 1565 we find amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the Duchy of 
La.ncaster a suit by Henry Mackwilliam claiming as Queen's lessee against 
this Thomas Barnardiston as lord of the Manor of Kedington, a pond and 
fishing called " Sturmer Meare," late part of the College of Stoke.^ 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1586 by Sir Richard Knightly and 
others against Sir Thomas Barnardiston.* Sir Thomas died in 1619, and 
his eldest son. Sir Thomas, was the High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1580, and 
knighted in 1603, having died in the lifetime of his father 29th July, 1610, 
the manor passed to his grandson, Sir Nathaniel, 2nd but eldest surviving 
son of Sir Thomas by his ist wife Mary, daughter of Sir Richard Knightly, 
of Fawsley, in the county of Northampton, Knt. 

Sir Nathaniel was knighted at Newmarket 15th December, 1618, and 
was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1623, M.P. for Sudbury in 1625, and in three 
Parliaments for the county of Suffolk in the reign of Chas. I. He was a 
great champion for civil liberty,^ and was put under confinement in Sussex 
in 1626 for refusing to subscribe and lend money which the King required 
by way of loan. He continued in confinement until 1628, when with many 
others he was released. The family is said to have given rise to the name 
of Roundhead. According to a note in Rapin's History of England, 
" the (London) apprentices wore the hair of their head cut round ; and the 
Queen observing out of a window Samuel Barnardiston among them, 
cried out, ' See what a handsome Roundhead is there ! ' and the name 
came from thence, and was first publicly used by Capt. Hide." Sir 
Nathaniel's portrait was engraved by Van Hove.* 

On his death a volume was published entitled " Suffolk Tears or 
Elegies, on that renowned knight. Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston." He 
married Jane, daughter of Sir Stephen Soame, Knt., of Little Thurlow 
Hall, near Ketton, and dying at Hackney, near London, 25th July, 165,3, 
the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas Barnardistonj who was 
knighted by Chas. I. in 1641, and created a baronet 7th April, 1663. 

' See Cal. to Pleadings, 7 Eliz. fishing of Kedyngton. This docu- 

*This was the continuance of an old ment has six seals, with arms, and 

dispute. In the British Museum is is in beautiful preservation, I3 

an original Deed of Arbitrament of Edward III. 

Thomas Grey, Edward de Cretynge, ^ Cal. to Pleadings, 7 Eliz. 5 ; see 10 Eliz. 7. 

John Dappell, William de Clopton, ^Fine, Hil. 28 Eliz. 

and Johan de Hertford, between =D.N.B. iii. 242. ' 

Thomas de Ba:rnardiston and Sire * Granger's Biog. Hist, of England, iii. 39. 

Edward de Wannoff, as to the 



26o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1663 we find the grant referred to, and the 
dignity is said to be worth ;£2oo, and there is a cfischarge of £1,095 usually 
paid for the same.' 

He married Anne, 2nd daughter of Sir William Armyne, ist Bart, of 
Osgodby, CO. Lincoln, and dying 4th October, 1669,'' the manor went to his 
son and heir, Sir Thomas Barnardiston, 2nd Bart., who was M.P. for 
Grimsby 1685-87 and 1689-90 and for Sudbury 1695-1698. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter and sole surviving child of Sir Robert King, Knt., 
of Boyle, co. Roscommon, by Sophia, Viscountess Wimbledon, and dying 
7th^ October,'* 1698, the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Thomas 
Barnardiston, 3rd Baronet. He was M.P. for Suffolk, and married Anne, 
daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Rothwell, Bart., of Stapleford, co. 
Lincoln, and dying 12th Nov. 1700, without male issue, the manor passed 
to his next surviving brother, Sir Robert Barnardiston, 4th Bart. He 
married Elizabeth Cheeke, and died without issue i6th July, 1728,^ and 
the manor passed to his next brother. Sir Samuel Barnardiston, 5th Bart. 
He married in Aug. 1730, Catherine, eldest daughter of Sir Rowland Winn, 
3rd Bart., of Nostell, and died without issue, at Ketton Hall, 4th February, 
1735-6, when the manor devolved on his widow Catherine for life, and on 
her death in 1757,® it passed to his nephew and heir. Sir John Barnardiston, 
6th Baronet, son of John, the youngest brother, by Sophia Rich, widow of 
William Grey. The 6th Bart, married Ehzabeth, daughter of \^^iUiam 
Blakeway, of Stepney, sailmaker, and mortgaged the estate and sold the 
equity of redemption in the reversion to one Merteus, of London, gold- 
smith. Sir John Barnardiston died without issue in Sept. 1745. 

We find the manor subsequently held by one Bird as mortgagee, and 
later in chancery, and offered for sale in 1780 under a decree in a certain 
suit, " LoyA v. Bird" and " Bird v. Butler." The sale was effected, and 
the manor appears to have become the property of Maurice Swaby, of 
Doctor's Common, who had married a Miss Bird. Davy says that in 1805 
the manor was vested in Maurice Swaby and Robert Bird, and in 1837 i''^ 
Maurice Swaby's sons, William Swaby and Henry B. Swaby. 

" Kediton " Manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Richard de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, in 1262 or 3 (for it is undated), and is stated 
to be held by the Earl in wardship through the death of John de Essex, 
who held of him in chief, and he (the Earl) had nothing there in his own 
demesne.^ Court Rolls of the manor 22 to 23 Hen. VI. will be found in 
the Record Office.^ 

Arms of Barnardiston : Az. a fesse dancettee, Erm. between six 
cross-crosslets, Arg. 

Manor of Cotton or Cottenhall. 

This was the lordship of Hugh Peche,' who died seised of it in 1292,'° 
when it passed to another Hugh Peeche, who died in 1309.'^ 

Somewhat later Davy enters a Walter Vancy and Walt. Paye. 

'S.P. 1663. 92> 96- "She was buried at Ketton 3rd Dec. 

"Adm. 6th Nov. 1669. WiU proved 1707. 

^eth in M.I. 'I.P.M. (46), Hen. III., file 27 (9). 
*Will 17th Aug. 1696, proved 4th Jan. 'Portfolio 203, 92. 

1698-9. "T. de N. 292. 

^Will 23rd Feb. 1726, proved 20th Jan. '°I.P.M., 20 Edw. I. 37. 

1728-9. "Extent, I.P.M., 3 Edw. IL 31. 



KEDINGTON. 261 

Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is an award 
concerning a fishery and this manor in 1338.' The award is made by Sir 
Thomas de Grey, Sir Edward de Cretyngge, John Dapphall, Wilham de 
Cloptune, John de Hertford, and Henry Pane, and is between Sir Thomas 
de Barnardiston and Sir Edward de Wanney or Wantier, giving to the 
latter for his Ufetime the right of fishing in Keddington near the bridge, 
but it is provided that this shall not interfere with the right of the heir of 
Sir Thomas nor with the reversion of this Manor of " Gotten halle." The 
award is dated Wednesday after Palm Sunday, 12 Edw. III. 

Towards the end of the 14th century the manor was vested in Sir 
John Tuddenham, who died in 1392, when it passed to his widow, Margaret, 
who died in 1416, when it went to her grandson, Sir Robert Tuddenham,^ 
who, however, died the following year without issue, when the manor went 
to Thomas, his brother and heir, from which time to the time of Sir 
Edmund Bedingfield about 1540 the devolution of the manor is the same 
as that of Brandeston Manor, in Loes Hundred. 

Sir Edmund Bedingfield died in 1554, when the manor went to his son 
and heir. Sir Henry Bedingfield, and on his death in 1583 passed to his son 
and heir, Edmund Bedingfield, against whom a fine was levied in 1584 by 
Robert Constable and others.' Edmund Bedingfield died in 1585, when 
the manor passed to John Bedingfield. 

In 1805 we find the manor vested in Maurice Swaby and Robert Bird. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1574 by Thomas Touneshend and 
others against Sir Henry Bedyngfeld and others." 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Margery, 
wife of John Tudenham in 1422/ and of Sir John Tudenham the same 
year," and a loft 80 acres in Kedington in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Thomas 
Tudenham in 1466,^ and of Margaret Bedingfield, widow, (i toft and 
86 acres) in 1476.' 

Palmer's Manor. 

Of this manor it is said that William Felton, of Sudbury, son of Robert 
Felton, of Coddenham, and Elizabeth his wife died seised 23rd 
December, 1495, but the inquisition on which no doubt the statement is 
based does not justify one in assuming Palmers to be a manor. The 
inquisition finds that William Felton died seised of a tenement called 
" Palmers " in Kedington worth £^, held of William Berneston in socage 
by the service of 45., also that Edmund Felton, aged 32, was his son and 
heir.' 

WilUam Felton had married Anne, daughter and heir of Ralph Bancke, 
and the so-called manor or tenement passed to William's son and heir, 
Edmund Felton. He married ist Anne, daughter of John Borough 
(? Broughton), and 2ndly Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Lucy, and resided 
at Glemsford. He died in 15 19, when the manor passed to his son, Edmund 
Felton, who married Frances, daughter of Francis Butler, Recorder of 
Coventry, and died loth Dec. 1542, when the manor vested in his son, 
George Felton, who married Margaret, daughter of John Carew, of Bury. 

'Harl. 50 I. 48. 6I.P.M., 10 Hen. V. 26b. 

n.VM., 5 Hen. V. 42. ^i.p.M., 5 Edw. IV. 34. 

3Fine, Mich. 26-27 Eliz. « I.P.M., 15 Edw. IV. 38. 

♦Fine, Hil. 16 Eliz. 9I.P.M., 10 Hen. VII. 1014. 
= I.P.M., 10 Hen. V. 38. 



262 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

From George Felton the manor would appear to have been acquired 
by John Spring, of Hitcham, for by his will dated 8th June, 1544, he devises 
the manor by name to his executors for 11 years, and subject to the term 
it vested in his son and heir, Sir Wilham Spring, Knt., of Pakenham. 

Arms of Felton : Or, on a bend Az. cotised Gu. 3 bezants. 

Manor of Kennet and Kentford al. Kennett al. Kentford. 

Held by Tochil, the King's Thane, in the Confessor's time, it was part 
of the great estate of William de Warren at the taking of the Great 
Survey, one Nichol then holding of him. 

About the middle of the 13th century it passed to Roger Bigot, Earl 
of Norfolk, who died seised of this manor in 1278, and from this time to 
the death of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, in 1461, the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Framlingham, in Loes Hundred. The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John, Duke of Norfolk, 
and Eleanor his wife in 1462,' and of John alone in 1478.'' 

The manor then vested in Sir William Berkeley, son of James de 
Berkeley, Lord Berkeley, and Isabel de Mowbray his wife, daughter of 
Thomas, ist Duke of Norfolk, and widow of Henry Ferrers. 

Sir William stood in such favour with Edw. IV. that he was advanced 
by him to the dignity of a Viscount 21st April, 1481, by the title of Viscount 
Berkeley, and soon after for his attendance at councils had a grant from the 
King of 100 marks per annum during life to be paid out of the customs of 
the Port of Bristol. He found favour also with Rich. III., who created him 
Earl of Nottingham 28th June, 1483. But soon after joining -Henry, Duke 
of Buckingham, in the design of dethroning King Richard, he fled into 
Brittany, forming one of those disaffected Englishmen who attached 
themselves to the Earl of Richmond. Consequently, when that Earl 
ascended the throne as Henry VII. he was rewarded 19th Feb. 1485-6, by 
being made Earl Marshal of England, with limitation of that office to the 
heirs male of his body, and a fee of ;if20 per annum, and by letters patent 
28th Jan. 1488-9, was created Marquis of Berkeley. 

The Marquis had divers law suits and references with the Countess of 
Shrewsbury in regard to his right to Berkeley Castle and other estates. 
The dispute was continued on the death of the Countess by her grandson, 
Thomas Talbot, Viscount LTsle, who succeeded to her estates. The 
Viscount challenged the Marquis, and they accordingly met the 20th 
March, 1469-70, and the Viscount LTsle's vizor being up, he was slain by 
an arrow shot through the head.^ This did not, however, determine the 
dispute, for it was continued by the Viscount's widow, and afterwards by 
Sir Edward Grey, created Baron and Viscount Lisle, who had married 
EUzabeth, eldest sister and coheir and eventually sole heir of the deceased 
Viscount. As the result of arbitration the Marquis retained the castle, 
but had to make certain payments to the respective claimants. 

His lordship married three times — ist in 1466, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Reginald West, Lord de la Warr, from whom he was divorced by John 
Carpenter, Bishop of Worcester, before he had any issue ; 2ndly in 1468, 
Joan, daughter of Sir Thomas Strangways, Knt., and widow of Sir William 
Willoughby, Knt. (by whom he had issue Thomas and Catherine, who both 

' I.P.M., I Edw. IV. 46. 3 See " Bristol and Gloucester Arch. Soc," 

*I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. vol. iii. p. 305. 



KEDINGTON. 263 

dying young were buried in Berkeley' church with their grandfather James, 
Lord Berkeley), but this lady dying in 1483 was buried at St. Augustine's 
Friars, in London, and her husband married 3rdly, about i486, Anne, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Fienes, son and heir of Richard, Lord Dacre, of the South, 
who survived him, afterwards marrying Sir Thomas Brandon, Knt. 

His lordship died 14th Feb. 1491-2, having long before made his will 
whereby, having no issue himself, and being irreconcilably displeased with 
his natural heir, his brother Maurice, for not having married a person of 
rank, he devised his castle at Berkeley, with many lordships, lands, and 
estates, to the King and his heirs in order to prevent his brother's 
succession. 

This manor he had settled on Richard de Willoughby and his heirs, 
and to Richard it accordingly passed. On his death it devolved on John 
de Willoughby, who died in 1557. Page assumes these were beneficial 
interests, but the Willoughbys were not unlikely trustees for the Berkeleys 
for we find that in 1560 Henry, Lord Berkeley, who was the great-grandson 
of Maurice Berkeley, the brother of Wilham, Marquis of Berkeley, had 
licence to alienate the manor to William Petre. Among the Chancery 
Proceedings in the time of Elizabeth we find an action by this Lord Henry 
Berkeley and others against Thomas Lukas and EdmOnd Markaunte 
respecting the manor.' 

Possibly this manor had been included amongst the estates the 
beneficial interest in which had been in 1488 given by William, Marquis of 
Berkeley, to the Crown, for these estates, together with Berkeley Castle, 
reverted to Henry Berkeley as the heir male of the Marquis on the death 
of King Edw. VL, who was the last heir male to King Hen. VIL These 
estates Henry Berkeley had livery of by Royal warrant of Queen Mary, 
the 8tl; September, 1554, and before, indeed, Henry had arrived at full age. 
The estates had been in the Crown for 61 years, 4 months, and 20 days, 
and were at the time of the livery to Henry Berkeley of the value of 
£69)'j. 5s. per annum in old rents, not reckoning the parks and chases 
therein contained. It is clear the manor passed in 1560 from the Berkeleys 
to Sir William Petre. Sir William Petre was one of the principal Secretaries 
of State in the reigns of Hen. VHL, Edw. VL, Mary, and Elizabeth. 

In 1535 he was put into commission by Cromwell, the general visitor, 
to repair to all the monasteries throughout England, and to enquire into 
their government and the characters of their inmates. His reports being so 
favourable to the King's wishes he was rewarded with various pickings from 
the spoil of the religious houses. He had granted to him and Gertrude 
his wife, in fee, the priory of Clattercote, in the county of Oxford, the 
Manor of Gynge Abbots, in the county of Essex, parcel of the possessions 
of the then dissolved monastery of Berkyng, in that county, with the 
advowson of the rectory of "Ingarston, alias Gyng ad Petram." 

In 1549 he was constituted treasurer of the court of first-fruits for 
life, and in 1550 one of the commissioners to treat of peace with the French 
at Guisnes. He was also commissioned with the Archbishop of Canterbury 
and others to punish and correct all rectors, vicars, and other ecclesiastics, 
as well as laymen, of what condition soever, who should despise or evilly speak 
of the book called, " The Book of the Common Prayer, and administration 
of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the Church, after the 
use of the Church of England," with power to imprison the guilt}^', and load 

' C.P. ser. ii. B. xviii. 8. 



264 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

them with irons^ if necessary, or admit them to bail. He was also in 
several other commissions relating to ecclesiastical affairs. 

Queen Mary made him Chancellor of the Garter, with the fee of loo 
marks per annum, but being keen enough to discern that the restoration 
of the Romish religion might endanger his enjoyment of the abbey lands 
which had been granted him, he provided against this contingency by 
obtaining a special dispensation from Pope Paul IV. for their retention, 
affirming that " he was ready to employ them to spiritual uses," as appears 
from the Pope's bull, bearing date 4 cal. Dec. anno i555- 

HoUinshed, in his Chronicle, gives these further particulars of Sir 
William: " The 13th of January, 1572,' deceased Sir William Petre, 
knight, who, for his judgment and pregnant wit, had been secretary, and 
of the privy council, to four kings and queens of this realm, and seven 
times ambassador abroad in foreign lands : he augmented Exeter College, 
in Oxford, with lands to the value of an hundred pounds by year ; and 
also builded ten alms-houses in the parish of Ingerstone for twenty poor 
people ; ten within the house, and ten out of the house ; having every one 
two-pence the day, a winter gown, and two loads of wood, and among them 
feeding for six kine, winter and summer, and a chaplain to pay them service 
daily." 

Camden, in his Britannia, speaking of Sir William under Essex says 
" that he was a man of approved wisdom and exquisite learning, and 
not so much memorable for those honourable places and offices of state 
which he bare, and for his oftentimes being sent in embassage to foreign 
princes, as for that, being bred and brought up in good learning, he well 
deserved of leairning in the University of Oxford, and was both pitiful and 
bounteous to his poor neighbours about him, and of Ingerston, where he 
lies buried." 

By the will of Sir WiUiam Petre, dated i6th April, 1571, and the 
preamble thereof, it appears that he died a Protestant. He orders his 
body to be buried " in the new isle of the church of Ingerston, if it should 
fortune him to die within 50 miles thereof, or otherwise to be committed to 
the earth in such place, order, and sort as his executors think most con- 
venient. And that, in the same new isle of Ingerston, there be erected 
some monument, with the names of him and his two wives, the ordering 
whereof he wholly commits to the discretion of his executors. He wills 
that immediately after his death there be bestowed on the poorest inhabitant 
of Ingerston, alias Ging-Petre, Writtle-Ging hospital, Buttersbury, Stoke, 
Ging-Mounteney, Ging-Margaret, East Thorneden, and Heron-Green, and 
other places within the county of Essex, the sum of .£40 to be distributed 
by the direction of his executors. And to the poorest inhabitants of Gorriton 
Magna, in Devonshire, £5. To the poorest inhabitants of Hawkehurst, 
in the county of Kent, 5 marks. To the poorest inhabitants in the parishes 
of Montagu and Tyntenhulf (being lord of the said manors), in the 
county of Somerset, ^6. 13s. 4^. To the poorest inhabitants of 
Kingsbridge and Thurstoe, in Devonshire, £4. To the poorest inhabitants 
of his manor of Brent, alias South- Brent, in the said county, £4. To the 
poorest inhabitants of St. Botolph without Aldersgate in London, 
^6. 13s. 4d. To the prisoners in London and Southwark £20, and the 
like sum to the relief of the poor in the hospitals belonging thereto. He 

'The " Complete Peerage " says 1574. 



KEDINGTON. 265 

was also bountiful to his servants, bequeathing them a whole year's 
wages, besides legacies." 

" To his good and loving wife, dame Anne Petre, he bequeathed 
much plate, and one ring with a diamond, given him by Queen Mary, of 
good memory. To his son and heir, John Petre, his other jewels, plate, &c., 
but if he died without issue, before he arrived to twenty-two years, to be 
divided into four parts ; one part to his wife, if living ; another among 
his daughters and their children then living ; as also his wife's part, if 
not living ; and the third and fourth parts among the poor, and in deeds 
of charity, in such sort, as to his executors and supervisors of his will, or 
the survivor of them, shall seem best." 

His manor of Kentford in Suffolk he entails on " John his son and 
heir, and the heirs male of his body, and in default thereof, on the son and 
heir of his brother John Petre, of Torbrian, in Devonshire." 

" He constitutes his wife's son-in-law, Richard Baker, esquire, and his 
brother Robert Petre, executors ; and Sir William Gerrard, alderman 
of London, and Edmund Tirrell, esquire, overseers.'" 

Sir William Petre was buried at Ingatestone, according to his desire, 
where a monument is erected to his memory. He left issue by Gertrude, 
his first wife (who died 28th May, 1541), daughter of Sir John Tirrell, 
of Warley, co. Essex, Knt., a daughter, Dorothy, married to Nicholas 
Wadham, of Merrifield, co. Somerset, who, having no issue by her, they 
were the founders of Wadham College, in Oxford, " he beginning, she 
finishing, and both richly endowing it ; whereby it is become as rich as 
most, and more uniform than many, in England." 

Sir William, by Anne his second wife (who survived him, died in 1581, 
and was interred at Ingatestone), daughter of Sir William Browne, Knt. 
Lord Mayor of London in 15 14, and widow of John Tirrell, of Heron Place, 
in Essex, had with other issue an only son John, to whom the manor was 
devised by the will. 

Sir William's son, John Petre, M.P. for Essex 1585-86, was elevated 
to the peerage as Lord Petre of Writtle 21st July, 1603. He married 
17th April, 1570, Mary, eldest daughter of Sir Edward Waldegrave, Knt., 
of Borley, in Essex, by Frances, daughter of Sir Edward Nevill, and dying 
nth Oct. 1613,^ the manor passed to his eldest son William, 2nd Baron, 
elected one of the knights of the shire for Essex in 1597. He took to wife 
8th Nov. 1596, Catherine, 2nd daughter of Edward Somerset, 4th Earl of 
Worcester, and dying at Thorndon, in Essex, 5th May, 1637,^ the manor 
passed to his eldest surviving son, Robert Petre, 3rd Baron, who in 1620 
married Mary, daughter of Ajithony Mary Browne, 2nd Viscount Montagu 
(she survived until 13th Jan. 1654-5), and died 23rd Oct. 1638,* when the 
manor passed to his eldest son William, 4th Baron. 

William, 4th Lord Petre, who married ist Elizabeth, eldest daughter 
of John Savage, 2nd Earl Rivers, by whom he had no issue, and 2ndly 
Bridget, daughter and coheir of John Pincheon, of Writtle, co. Essex, by 
whom he had issue an only child Mary, born in Covent Garden, 25 th March, 
1679. William, Lord Petre, was committed to the Tower with Lords 

'The will was proved 29th Jan. 1572. '^I.P.M., 14 Charles II., 14th Dec. at 

^Will 1st Sept. 1612, proved i8th Nov. Stratford, co. Essex. His will is 

1613. dated the 7th and 20th Oct. 

3 Will loth Jan. 1632, proved 23rd June, 1638,' and proved 25th Oct. and 4th 

1637. Dec. 1638, and again ist July, 1700. 

K I 



266 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Stafford and Powis and others, and in 1678 was impeached by the Commons 
of treason and other high crimes and misdemeanours. He died during his 
confinement 5th Jan. 1683-4/ when it devolved on his only daughter and 
heir, the said Mary, married to George Heneage, of Hainton, co. Lincoln. 
Their only daughter died without issue in 1717. 

Subsequently the manor vested in a Barnardiston, and in 1759 was 
held by John Williams, who took the name of Onslow, and sold it about 
1777 to Oliver Godfrey. Oliver Godfrey by his wife Sarah had a son, 
William Godfrey, to whom the manor passed on the death of his father. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of James Gift, of Barnham, and on his 
death the manor passed to his son and heir, the Rev. William Godfrey, M.A., 
rector of Kennet. He married in 1857 Agnes Leathes, daughter of Sir John 
C. Mortlock, Knt., and granddaughter of John Mortlock, of Abington Hall. 

The manor now seems to be vested in Capt. George H. Pering, J. P., 
of Kennet Hall. 

In 1533 Thomas Trye and Leonard Spencer were called upon to show 
by what title they held the manors of Kennett and Kentford,"" and there is 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum a precipe on a 
covenant concerning the manor in 1561.^ 

Arms of Petre : Gu., a bend Or. between two escallops, Arg. 



'Will 20th Dec. 1683, proved 29th Jan. ^M. 25 Hen. VIII. Mich. Rec. Rot. 31 
1683-4. ^Add. Ch. 25298. 




LIDGATE. 267 

LIDGATE. 

|W0 manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Story, and consisted of 4 carucates and 60 acres of 
land, 9 villeins, 12 bordars, a serf, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and 3 belonging to the men (reduced to 2 at the time of 
the Survey). Also 10 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to 
support 15 hogs, a rouncy, 25 hogs, 33 sheep (increased to 
140 at the time of the Survey), and 13 goats. At the time 
of the Survey there were also 5 beasts when the manor was held by William 
de Wateville as tenant in chief. The value was 80s. It was a league long 
and 8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt i-^^^d. Others had land here.' 

The second manor was held at the time of the Survey by'Rainald the 
Breton, and was claimed by him in alms of the King. 

It was formerly the estate of three^freemen, and consisted of 4 carucates 
of land, 9 villeins, a bordar, 3 serfs, 3 "ploughteams and 7 belonging to the 
men, wood enough to maintain 10 hogs, 10 acres of meadow, 2 hogs, and 
7 sheep, valued at 80s. At the time when the Survey was taken the 
villeins had gradually become less, first falling to 7 and finally to 3 ; the 
bordars, on the other hand, had increased, first to 4 and then to 6, while 
the serfs became i and then disappeared altogether. The ploughteams 
were reduced to i and those belonging to the men to 2, and the hogs had 
increased to 30. The value was now 60s. This land Wateville's men 
claimed as belonging to his fee.^ 

Manor of Lidgate, 

This was the estate of Story in the time of Edward the Confessor, and 
of Wilham de Wateville at the time of the Norman Survey. William the 
Conqueror seems towards the end of his lifetime to have given this lordship 
with Blunham to Ralph to hold in fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds by the 
service of Dapifer or Steward, and Abbot Albold between the years 11 15 
and 1119 granted the lands with the office held by the said Ralph to Maurice 
de Windsor and bis heirs, which grant King Stephen confirmed. Writing 
of this place in 1779, Sir John Cullum, in his MS. Church notes, says : " Here 
was a castle formerly, but the only remains of it above ground is a piece 
of wall that forms part of the eastern fence of the churchyard. In this as 
well as in some parts of the church are wrought up some Roman bricks, 
which shows that there must have been some very ancient fortress here. 
Ten years ago when I was here, they were digging up some foundations 
(in which were also some Roman bricks) as they now are likewise to mend 
the roads in this dirty country." There is a rough plan of Lidgate Castle 
in the Davy MSS.' 

In 1 130 Maurice de Windsor and Egidia his wife gave to the Cathedral 
of Norwich a chapel of St. Edmund with lands at Hoxne that therein might 
be placed a convent of monks to pray for the soul of Ralph the Dapifer, 
who had rebuilt the same from the ground. Henry de Hastings claimed to 
be hereditary steward of the Liberty of St. Edmund as heir of Maurice 
de Windsor, and copies of the charters under which he claimed will be found 

'Dom. ii. 435. ^Add.^MSS. igizoz.fol. 328&. 

''Dom. ii. 445- 



268 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

amongst the Davy MSS. in the British Museum.' King Hen. II., by his 
writ or charter, confirmed to the Queen's Dapifer, Ralph de Hastings, 
the land and tenement of his predecessor, Ralph, steward of St. Edmund's, 
and of Maurice de Windsor, his maternal uncle. And by another 
charter, at a later time, the King confirmed to WiUiam de Hastings, 
the stewardship of St. Edmund's, and the lands belonging to it, as the same 
had been held by his respective paternal and maternal uncles, Ralph and 
Maurice. This William de Hastings married ist Margery, daughter of 
Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, and 2ndly Ida, daughter of Henry, Earl of Eu. 
He held of the Abbot of St. Edmund's, five knights' fees, including Lidgate 
and Blunham ; and these descended with the stewardship to Henry, his 
son and heir, the claimant of the privilege. He was' a minor in 1188, his 
office being then filled by Robert de Flamaville, who held it at the time of 
his being one of the wardens of the abbey, during the vacancy. Henry 
accompanied King Richard to the Holy Land ; and dying without issue 
William de Hastings, ancestor of the Earls of Pembroke, in the 6th Rich. I. 
[1196] paid 100 marcs as his relief for the lands and office of his brother Henry. 

He was one of the peers in the Parliament held at Lincoln in the first 
year of King John, wherein William, King of Scotland, did homage to the 
English monarch. He died in 1225, and the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Henry de Hastings, who married Ada, 4th daughter of David, Earl of 
Huntingdon, and of Maud his wife, daughter of Hugh, and one of the 
sisters and coheir of Ranulph, Earl of Chester, and dying in 1250 the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Overhall, in Otley, in Carlford 
Hundred, to the time of George Nevill, Lord Abergavenny, who died in 
i535j when the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry Neville, Lord 
Abergavenny, who in 1553 or 1562 sold the manor to Sir John Cotton, Knt.° 

He was the son of Sir Robert Cotton, Knt., and was Sheriff of Cam- 
bridge and Huntingdon. He died in 1584, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir John Cotton. Sir John married Isabel, daughter of Sir 
William Spencer, Knt. She died 2nd Nov. 1578, and he 21st April, 1593, 
in his 8ist year. They are buried under a sumptuous canopied tomb' 
with recumbent effigies in the church of Landwade, about three miles north 
of Newmarket. Round the cornices are the following shields : — 

I. — (i) Cotton, quarterly of six. Cotton, Sab. a chevron between 3 
griffins' heads erased, Arg. (2) Abbott, G\x. a chevron between 3 pears Or. 

(3) Sharpe, Arg. 3 griffins' heads erased, 2-1 and a border engrailed Sab. 

(4) Calverley, Sab. a cinquefoil within an orle of martlets Arg. ; or Staunton ? 

(5) Fitz Symon, Kz. 3 eagles displayed Or, 2-1, a canton Erm. (6) Baget, 
Erm. on a bend Gu. 3 eagles displayed Or. 

\l.— Cotton, quarterly of 6 as last. 

III. — Cotton only. 

IV. — Cotton only, impaling Spencer,of Althorpe,Az. a fesse Erm. between 
6 doves' heads erased Arg. 3-3. 

Y. —Spencer, quarterly of six. (i) S^mcey, quarterly Arg. Gu. on 2-3 
qrs. a fret Or, over all on a bend Sab. 3 mullets Arg. (2) Spencer of Althorpe. 
(3) D ever ell, Gu, 3 stirrups in pale Or. (4) Lincolne, Or, on cross Gu. 5 
mullets Arg. (5) Grant, Erm. on chevron Gu. 5 bezants. (6) Arg. on a 
bend between 2 hons ramp. Sab. a Salamander Or. 

VI. — Cotton, a quantity of 6, impaling Spencer, quarterly of 6. 

'Add. MSS. 19102, fol. 327. "Fine, Trin. 6 Edw. VI.; Fine, Mich. 4 

Eliz. See Exning Manor, Lackford 
Hundred. 



LIDGATE. 



269 



The manor passed to Sir John's son and heir, Sir John Cotton, Knt. 
He married three times— ist EHzabeth, daughter of Thomas Carrell, of 
Warneham, in Sussex ; andly EHzabeth, daughter of Sir Humphrey Brad- 
burne, Knt., of Bradburne, co. Derby ; and 3rdly Anne, daughter of Sir 
Richard Houghton, Bart., of Houghton Tower, co. Lancaster. He died 
in 1620 in his 77th year, and was buried at Landwade, leaving an only 
son surviving, Sir John Cotton, the distinguished loyalist. He was entrusted 
with the conveyance of the college plate from Cambridge to the King at 
Oxford, which he safely accomplished. He was created a baronet 14th 
July, 1641, and married Jane, 3rd daughter and eventual heir of Sir Edward 
Hende, Knt., of Madingley, co. Cambridge, and died 25th March, 1689, 
in his 74th year. 

On the opening of the i8th century the manor is found vested in 
Thomas, Lord Jermyn, of Rushbrook, who died seised of it in 1703, when 
it passed to his daughter Mary, married to Sir Robert Davers, Bart., who 
died in 1722, when it passed to his son and heir. Sir Jermyn Davers, 4th 
Bart., who sold the manor to Charles, 6th Duke of Somerset, K.G., who. 
Page says, gave the manor with other property in this vicinity in marriage 
with his daughter. Lady Frances Seymour, to John, Marquis of Granby, 
in 1750, but as the marriage referred to was solemnized 3rd Sept. 1750, 
and Charles, 6th Duke of Somerset, died before the marriage, in 1748, 
this is hardly likely to be correct. 

The manor probably passed to Algernon, 7th Duke, only surviving 
son of the 6th Duke, and on his death in 175b without male issue, no doubt 
the manor did rest in his half sister, Frances Seymour, wife of John, Marquis 
of Granby, and on the death of the Marquess in the lifetime of his father, 
the 3rd Duke of Rutland, in 1770, passed to his eldest son and heir, Charles 
Manners, who in 1779 succeeded his grandfather as 4th Duke of Rutland. 
From this time the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Argentines, Newmarket, in Lackford Hundred. 

Amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum are papers relating 
to the manor, being copies of inquisitions, lists of tenants, rentals, &c., 
to the year 1612.' This manor is specifically mentioned and an extent 
given in the inquis. p.m. of Henry Hastings, ist Baron, who died in 1268,'' 
and his son, John Hastings, 2nd Baron, claimed free warren here.^ It is 
also mentioned in his inquis. p.m. in 1313,'' when it passed to his widow 
Isabel in dower. And on the Close Rolls in 1313 is an order to deliver to 
Isabel in dower with the assent of John, the son and heir of her late husband, 
this manor of the yearly value of £17,' and on the Patent Rolls in 1316 we 
find a commission issued on the complaint of Isabel touching the persons 
who broke her park at Lidgate, hunted therein, and carried away deer.® 
The manor is also mentioned in her inquis. p.m. in 1316.^ It is mentioned 
also in that of John Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, in 1375,' in that 
of his widow Ann in 1383," of Joan, widow of William Beauchamp, in 
1436,'° and of Sir Edward Nevill in 1476." 

Arms of Hastings, Earl of Pembroke : See Overhall in Otley, in 
Carlford Hundred. Of Seymour, Duke of Somerset : Quarterly first and 



'Add. MSS. 22058. 
^I.P.M., 52 Hen. III. 63. 
^H.R. ii. 173, 196- 
♦I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 56. 

5 Close Rolls, 6 Edw. II. 8. 

6 Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. II. pt.1i. 13d. 



n.P.M., 9 Edw. II. 44. 
8 1.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. 
9 1.P.M., 7 Rich. II. 67. 
" I.P.M., 14 Hen. VI. 35- 
" I.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 66. 



1. 70. 



270 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

fourth Or on a pile Gules, between six fleurs-de-lis Azure, three lions of 
England, second and third Gules, two wings conjoined in lure tips downwards. 
Or. Of Manners, Duke of Rutland : Or two bars Azure, a chief quarterly of 
the last and Gules, on the ist and 4th two fleurs-de-lis Or, on the 2nd and 
3rd a lion of England. 




MOULTON. 271 

MOULTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Stigand the 
Archbishop. It consisted of 7 carucates of land, 32 villeins, 
7 borders, 6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging 
to the men, 8 acres of meadow, wood for the support of 20 
hogs, 2 rouncies, 12 beasts, 40 hogs, 270 sheep, and 4 
hives of bees, valued at £x$. The soc, sac, and customs 
belonged to Stigand. At the time of the Survey this manor 
was held by Archbishop Lanfranc for the monks' food, the villeins had 
become reduced to 22, and the serfs to 2, but the bordars had increased 
to 16 ] the value had come down to £12. It was a league long and 7 quaren- 
tenes broad, and paid in a gelt 13 J(^.' 

Manor of Moulton or Stonehall Manor. 

From the Red Book of the Exchequer we learn that in 1210-12 the 
heirs of Adam de Kokefeld held two fees here, and they no doubt had the 
manor.^ From the Testa de Nevill we find that Robert de Cokefeld 
held one fee of the Honor of Gloverine or Gloucester.^ 

In 1275 the manor was held by Adam de Cokefeld,'' who married 
Agatha, one of the four daughters and coheirs of Sir Robert Aquillon and 
Agatha his wife, and on his decease in the early part of the reign of King 
Edw. I. the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert, who died in 1297,^ 
when it passed to his sister and heir Joan, wife of William de Beauchamp, 
who held the manor in 13 16. 

In 1313 Joan gave half a mark for licence to agree with William de 
Wengrave for the Manors of Moulton and Waldingfield, in Suffolk, and 
Feltwell, in Norfolk. By their daughter and heir the manor passed to Sir 
John de Chyverston, who was made, by King Edw. III. on his taking of 
Calais, the first Governor or Captain thereof. In 1351 Sir John de 
Chyverston settled this lordship upon himself tor life, remainder to Hugh de 
Chyverston, his 2nd son, and his heirs. 

In 1370 Sir John de Chyverston sold the manor to Lady Elizabeth, 
wife of Sir Andrew Lutterell,* who about 1373 had a grant of free warren 
here and in Debenham. She was the daughter of Hugh Courteney, Earl of 
Devonshire, by Margaret his \vife, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of 
Hereford and she had married ist Sir John de Vere, 3rd son of John, Earl 
of Oxford. She died in 1395 . 

On the Patent Rolls in 1425 we find a confirmation to Sir Hugh Lutterell, 
son and heir of Elizabeth, late wife of Sir Andrew Lutterell, of a charter 
50 Edw. III. granting to her free warren in her demesne lands of Moulton, 
Debenham, and Waldingfield Manors.^ 

There seems some doubt whether the Manor of Stonhall was the same 
as Moulton Manor, for we find " Stonehall " (though it is true not called a 
manor) in three inquisitions on the Earls of Stafford, who are supposed to 
have held French Hall Manor in Moulton. These three inquisitions are those 
of Thomas, Earl of Stafford in 1392;^ William, brother and heir of 
Thomas, Earl of Stafford, in 1398 f and Edward, Earl of Stafford, in 1403." 

'Dom. ii. 3726. ®See Manor of Woodhall al. Walding- 

' 2Zod. field Parva, in Babergh Hundred. 

3T. de N. 292. :;, ''Pat. Rolls, 3 Hen. VI. pt. ii. 11. 

^H.R. ii. 151. ^I.P.M., 16 Rich. II. 27. 

5I.P.M., 25 Edw. I. g. 9I.P.M., 22 Rich. II. 46. 

'° I.P.M., 4 Hen. IV. 41. 



272 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

We are lortified in our doubt by a suit as to fines, and suit and service 
of court amongst the Duchy of Lancaster papers. There we find a suit by 
the Attorney-General against Cotton in 1599 as to " Chevertons al. Stonehall, 
in Moulton."'" 

Sir Hugh Lutterell died in 1428/ and his inquis. p.m. calls the manor 
distinctly " Stonhall Hall," and gives a full extent. 

John Lutterell was found to be the son and heir of Sir Hugh Lutterell. 
He married Katherine, widow of Sir John Stretch, Knt. Davy says that in 
1408 the manor was held by John Gower, the poet, but, if so, it could only 
have been as trustee. 

Sir John Lutterell died in 1431,^ when a third of the manor went to his 
widow Margaret (no doubt a second wife) in dower, and on her death in 
1439'* the manor passed to Sir John's son and heir, James Lutterell, who 
was attainted on the accession of Edw. IV. In 1464 the manor was 
granted to William, Lord Herbert. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1468 we find a grant to John Kendale and the 
heirs male of his body of all lands and possessions in Moulton, Gazeley, 
Needham, Kenttord, Dalham, Denham, and Exning, late of James Lutterell, 
Knt., in the King's hands by forfeiture to hold by the rents and services 
of so many knights' fees, and other rents and services as they were held by 
before i Edw. IV. with all issues from that date.^ 

The estate, however, appears to have been restored to the Lutterells, 
for we find the manor subsequently vested in Hugh Lutterell, who died 
seised of it in 1521, when it passed to his son and heir, Andrew Lutterell, 
on whose death in 1538 it passed to his son and heir. Sir John Lutterell. 
A fine of the manor was levied against him in 1545 by John Rice and others.^ 
Sir John Lutterell died without issue, when it devolved upon his brother, . 
Thomas Lutterell. A fine was levied of the manor in 1565 by John Wyncoll 
and others against Hugh Lutterell and others. Thomas Lutterell is said to 
have sold the manor to Sir Clement Higham, Knt., who died in 1571, 
devising it by his will to his 2nd son, William Higham. We next find the 
manor vested in Sir John Higham, Knt., who died in 1640, when it passed 
to Sir Richard Higham, Knt. 

In 1847 the manor was vested in the Duke of Rutland, descending until 
1885 like the Manor of Argentines, Newmarket, in Lackford Hundred. 
The manor was shortly after this date sold to Harry Leslie Blundell 
McCalmont, of Cheveley Park, Newmarket, and Bishopswood, Hereford- 
shire, only son of Hugh B. R. McCalmont, barrister-at-law. He married in 
1885 Amy Hyacinth, daughter of General Miller, and was M.P. for the 
Newmarket Division of Cambridge in 1895. He died in 1902, when the 
manor passed to the trustees of his will in whom it is now vested. 

A fine was levied of a third part of " Moulton Manor " in 1334 ^Y Sir 
William, son of Walter Beauchamp, against Roger Aunger, chaplain, 
and John Payne, of Caneford, clerk.' 

Court Rolls of the manor for 19 Edw. II., i to 3, 5, 6, 10, 14, 15, 23, 31 
Edw. III. ; 9 to 13, 15, 18 Hen. VIII. will be found in the Public Record 
Office.^ 

' Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 5 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. IV. pt. i. 12. 

41 Eliz. 5. "Fine, Easter, 37 Hen. VIII. 

'I.P.M., 8 Hen. VI. 32. ''Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. III. 

3I.P.M., 9 Hen. VI. 51. 'Portfolio 203, loi, 102, 213-59, 76, 78, 
4I.P.M., 17 Hen. VI. 14. 214, 2, 3, 11, 32. 



MOULTON. 273 

Arms of Cockfield : Azure, a cross, counter-compony, Argent and 
Gules. Of LuTTERELL : Or a bend, between six martlets in a bordure 
engrailed Sable, differing from the arms of the Waldingfield, Babergh, 
branch. 

French Hall Manor. 

This was the estate of Sir Robert de Agnellis in 1210-12, who held 
here a fee of the Honor of Gloucester,' and the Testa de Nevill informs us 
that at the time of the compiling of that record Master " Radolphus de 
Agneus " held a knight's fee here.* This fee was held in 1275 by Robert 
de " Agneus " or " Dyvenes."^ 

In 1298 John de " Agneaus " held a fee and had the grant of a market 
and free warren here that year." 

A fine was levied in 1324 of the manor by William, son of William de 
Hoo and John his brother against John, son of John " Davyeus," of 
Cretingham,^ and in 1336 by William de Holbeche against Sir Peter de 
Viel and Elizabeth his wife." 

William Talmach is next mentioned as lord, and in 1386 Hugh, 2nd 
Earl of Stafford, held a fee, and died in this year, when it passed to his son 
and heir Thomas, 3rd Earl of Stafford. 

In 1403 Edmund, 5th Earl of Stafford, held a fee here, and was slain 
that year.^ It is not clear that the Staffords held the manor, but in 1392 a 
fine of the manor was levied by Thomas Ewell, of Bury, William Bragge, 
of Freckenham, Reginald, vicar of Iselham, Henry atte Roche, of Iselham, 
Robert Warnere, of Higham, William Dome, of Lakenheath, and Richard 
atte Lane, of Herringswell, against John atte Lane, of Herringswell and 
Beatrice his wife.^ 

In 1428 Henry Traas or Trace is said to have been lord. 

The manor was held in the beginning of the i6th century by Robert 
Trace,' who died seised of it 13th July, 1519,'° when it passed to his son 
and heir, George Trace, against whom a fine was levied of this manor by 
John CoUyn, clerk, in 1541." George Trace died in 1567, when the manor 
vested in his son and heir, John Trace, who levied a fine of the manor 12th 
February, 1567-8." 

Towards the close of the i8th century the manor was acquired by Sir 
Edmund Affleck, Bart., a gallant naval officer, created a baronet the 28th 
May, 1782, with remainder to the male issue of his father, in consideration 
of his being in command of the centre division of the great victory of Admiral 
Rodney in that year. He likewise had the thanks of both Houses of 
Parliament. Sir Edmund married twice, ist Esther, daughter of John 
Ruth, and 2ndly Mary, widow of William Smythies, of Colchester, but dying 
in 1788 without issue the manor passed with the title to his nephew. Sir 
Gilbert Affleck, 2nd Bart., from which time the manor has passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Dalham, in this Hundred. 

'Red Beok of the Exchequer, 132&. ^Feet of Fines, 16 Rich. II. 18. 

*T. de N. 292. 9 See Manor of Blunts, in Herringswell, in 

^H.R. ii. 151. Lackford Hundred. 

"Chart. RoUs, 26 Edw. I. 2. '°I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 25. 

5 Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. II. 30. " Fine, Mich. 33 Hen. VIII. 

6 Feet of Fines, 31 and 32 Edw. III. 10. "9 Eliz- <23). 

7 See Desning Hall Manor, in Gazeley, in 

this Hundred) 

LI 




274 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

OUSDEN. 

UN Saxon times a manor was held in this place by Leuric the 
thane. It consisted of 6 carucates, 22 villeins, 2 bordars, 
8 serfs, 4 ploughteams in demesne and 10 belonging to the 
men, 6| acres of meadow, wood sufi&cient to support 20 hogs, 
4 rouncies, 15 beasts, 22 hogs, and 164 sheep. There was 
also a church with 30 acres of free land and half a plough- 
team. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by 
Earl Eustace ; the villeins were reduced to 15, the serfs to 2, the plough- 
teams in demesne to 2, the ploughteams of the men first to 8 and then to 6, 
the beasts to 5, and the sheep to 88, the rouncies also had disappeared. 
There had, however, been a slight increase in some of the details. For 
instance, the bordars had increased to 9 and the hogs to 30. The value had 
formerly been £6, but at the time of the Survey was £7, but it was given to 
farm for £14. It was 8 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt 
6^d. Others had land here. ' 

The only other holding named in this place was that of Stanard, son of 
Alvey, who held 30 acres, a bordar, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 20s. ^ which in the Confessor's time had been held by Wisgar." 

Manor of Ousden or Newhall. 

In the reign of Hen. II. it vested in William de Criketot, and passed 
in the reign of John to William's son and heir, Humphrey de Criketot. 
He held one knight's fee of the Honor of Boulogne. The Red Book of the 
Exchequer 1211-12 as printed assigns the fee to Reynfredus de Criketot, 
but this is evidently a misreading of the original record.^ 

On Humphrey's death the manor went to his son and heir, William 
de Criketot, who we find from the Patent Rolls in 1225 brought an action 
against Giles de Mere as to 100 acres of land in Ousden.* He died in 1234, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir William de Criketot, who 
had a grant of a market and fair here in 1253.' Sir William Criketot died 
in 1269,® when the manor passed to his son and heir, WilUam de Criketot. 
He married Agnes, sister and coheir of Sir William le Blund,^ of Ixworth, 
who was slain at the battle of Lewes in 1264, and on William de 
Criketot's death in 1298' he was found to hold this manor in socage 
of Hugh, Lord Bardolph, and it passed to his son and heir, William 
de Criketot, who dying in 1307,^ the manor passed to his son and 
heir, William de Criketot,"" against whom and his mother Maria a 
fine was levied of the manor in 1308 by Walter, parson of Ousden 
church, and Robert de Ashfeld, chaplain." The object of the fine is 
explained by a licence on the Patent Rolls in 1307. It is for William, son 
of William de Criketot, and Mary, ''late wife of William de Criketot," to 
enfeoff Walter, parson of the church of Ousden, and Robert de Asshefeld, 
chaplain, of the manor held in chief as of the Honor of " Bononia," and for the 

'Dom. ii. 303. 'See Manor of Ixworth, in Blackbourn 

*Dom. ii. 4456. Hundred. 

^Red Book of the Exchequer, 150^. 'I.P.M., 27 Edw. I. 47, extent. i 

♦Pat. Rolls, 9 Hen. III. 2d. si.P.M., 35 Edw. I. 133. 

'Chart. Rolls, 37 and 38 Hen. III. pt. '"LQ-D., 35 Edw. I. File 65, 5. 

ii. 3. 18. " Feet of Fines, i Edw. II. 5 ; Karl. 57 E 3. 
^I.P.M., 53 Hen. III. 17; new reference: 

File 36 (18), extent given. 



OUSDEN. 



275 



feoffees to regrant it to the said Mary for life with remainder to the said 
William and Joan his wife and the heirs of their bodies, with 
remainder to the right heirs of the said William the settlor.' William 
de Criketot died in 1310/ and on the Close Rolls is an order to 
deliver the manor to Joan his wife, " the same having been granted by 
Walter, parson of the church of Ousden, and Robert de Asshefeld to Mary, 
late wife of William de Criketot, for life, with remainder to WiUiam, son of 
WiUiam de Criketot and to the said Joan his wife and their heirs."' 

The manor, subject to Joan's interest, passed to her son and heir, 
William de Criketot, on whose death in 1343 it passed to his son and heir, 
William de Criketot, who dying in 1354 the manor went to his widow Joan. 

Shortly after this it must have passed to Thomas Fitz Eustace, but 
how acquired we know not, for he died seised of it in 1361,* leaving his 
widow Agnes (to whom the manor went for life) and two sons, Thomas his 
son and heir and John. John survived his brotheir, who died without issue. 
On thedeathof Agnes his mother, John was found to be the heir and of the 




Ousden Hall. 



age of 22 years. John Fitz Eustace died in 1369,^ leaving Philip Fitz 
Eustace, his son and heir, aged half a year and upwards. Christina, the 
widow of the deceased, in the same year had the custody of the lands of her. 
son here, as we learn from the Originalia Rolls. The order is made by 
the King, who commits to Chiistina the custody of two portions of this 
manor." Christina remarried Sir William Borland, and we find on the 
Patent Rolls in 1384 an order remitting in his favour a rent payable by 
Christina, then his wife, for the custody granted her by the late King of 
two-thirds of the manor.'' 

The manor seems to have vested a little later in Richard de Bokenham, 
for in 1377 we meet with a fine levied of the manor and advowson by John 
de Rokwode, Robert de Aisshefeld, Robert de Kedyton, and Geoffrey de 
Hundon, against this Richard de Bokenham and Joan his wife.^ 



' Pat. Rolls, I Edw. II. pt. i. 6 ; I.Q.D., 
I Edw. II. 106 ; new reference . 
File 69, 13. 

«I.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 52. 

3 Close Rolls, 3 Edw. II. 10. 



■♦I.P.M., 33 Edw. III. 84. 
'I.P.M., 45 Edw. III. pt. i. 41. 
6 0. 43 Edw. III. 25. 
''Pat. Rolls, 8 Rich. II. pt. ii. 41. 
^Feet of Fines, i Rich. II. 4. 



276 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is a power to 
take seisin of Ousden and Newhall manors, the latter in Norfolk, with the 
advowson of the church of Ousden in 1410.' It is given by Sir Richard 
Waldegrave to WiUiam Clerk, of Burgh St. Mary, and is dated 9th May, 
II Hen. IV. This was no doubt the time that Sir Richard Waldegrave 
acquired the manor, and in 1420 he had a grant of free warren here and 
vested the manor in trustees by way of settlement. He died in 1434,'' 
from which time to the time of Sir WiUiam Waldegrave, who died in 1613, 
the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Smallbridge, Bures, 
in Babergh Hundred. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of this period we find a suit 
instituted by the executors of Thomas Barker as to a lease of Ousden Manor 
demised to Thomas by Sir William Waldegrave, " owner of the fee.'" 

Sir WiUiam Waldegrave in 1567 sold the manor to Humphrey Moseley, 
of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, Secondary of Wood Street Counter, London, 
2nd son of Nicholas Moseley, of the Mere at EnviUe, in Staffordshire.* He 
married Margaret, 2nd daughter of Sir Clement Heigham, of Barrow, Knt., 
Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer in Queen Mary's reign. He died in 
1594, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard Moseley, who 
removed to Ousden in 1614. He married ist Letitia, daughter and coheir 
of — Clarke, of Farnham, in Sussex, and 2ndly AbigaU, daughter of Sir 
Arthur Heveningham, Knt., and widow of Sir Augustine Pettus, Knt. He 
died in 1630, and was buried at Ousden, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Richard Moseley, who married Judith, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Playters, Bart., of Sotterley, and dying in 1642 the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Humphrey Moseley, who married Lucy, daughter of — Gipps, 
of St. Edmunds, Bury, and dying in 1663 the manor devolved on his son 
and heir, Richard Moseley. He married Mary, daughter of — Cooke, of 
London, and dying in 1717 the manor passed to his son and heir, William 
Cooke Moseley. He and his brothers Richard and Stephen died without 
issue, and Sarah the only sister married in 1700 George Goodday, of Farnham 
All Saints, and had issue George Goodday^ and Sarah, who married her 
cousin, Thomas Moseley, who was son of Thomas Moseley, of the City of 
London, younger brother of the above-named Richard, to whom the repre- 
sentation of the family passed upon the decease of her cousins without issue. 
Thomas Moseley had issue by Sarah, William who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Abraham Cocksedge, of Drinkstone, and by her had issue 
John Moseley, to whom the manor passed on the death of his father in 1785. 
He in 1800 sold the manor to John Smith, of Staffordshire, who sold it in 
1804 to the Rev. James Thomas Hand, who died in 1835 without issue 
and devised the manor to his nephew and heir, Thomas James Ireland, 
who held in 1855. 

In 1885 the manor had passed to Sir Herbert Bulkeley Mackworth 
Praed, Bart., of 29, St. James's Place, London, who is the present lord. 

Ousden Hall was erected in Queen Elizabeth's time. The porch at 
the north entrance is, however, all that remains of the original structure 
that has not been modernised. It is pleasantly situated on rising ground 
commanding an extensive prospect over the adjoining country, and is now 
the residence of Lawrence C. Chalmers. 

'Harl. 57 D. 34. "Fine, Mich. 9 Eliz. 

'I.P.M., 13 Hen. VI. 27. 'See Manor of Rattlesden, in Thedwestry 

3C.P. ii. 164. Hundred. 



OUSDEN. 277 

Arms of Moseley : Sable : a chevron between three mill picks^ Argent. 

Amongst the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum and in the Bodleian 
are transcripts of various old deeds relating to the manor borrowed from 
Richard Moseley, lord of the manor.' 



'Harl. 639; Bodl. 4180. 




278 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

POSLINGFORD. 

T the time of the Survey Ralph Baynard held four estates 
in this place. The first consisted of a carucate and 20 
acres of landj 7 bordars, i^ ploughteamSj and wood sufficient 
for the support of 5 hogs^ valued at 31s. This estate had 
been formerly held by three freemen ; of two of these Baynard's 
predecessor had commendation in the Confessor's time^ and 
soc and sac except St. Edmundj six forfeitures^ and the 
Abbot had commendation over the third in the Confessor's time. The 
Survey says : " The King granting him the land. About this we saw 
the writ." The second consisted of a carucate and a half of land, 6 bordars, 
and a ploughteam in demesne. The estate had formerly been held by a 
freeman, but was at the time of the Survey held by Noriolt of Ralph Baynard. 
Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 6 beasts, 16 hogs, and 20 sheep, valued 
in Saxon times at 20s., but at the time of thq Survey at 25s. 

The third consisted of a carucate and a half of land, 3 bordars, i^ 
ploughteams, 4 acres of meadow, 4 beasts, 20 hogs, and 29 sheep, with the 
addition when the Survey was taken of 2 rouncies. The whole was valued 
at 30s., and was formerly the estate of a freeman, but at the time of the 
Survey was held of Baynard by Walter. 

The fourth consisted of 160 acres, 8 bordars, and a ploughteam, valued 
at 26s. 8d., formerly held by two freemen, but at the time of the Survey 
held of Ralph Baynard by Richer. Also a church with 40 acres of free land 
valued at 6s. The six forfeitures belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmund, 
and the soc to Baynard. This was 13 quarentenes long and 12 broad, and 
paid in a gelt 15^. Others held land here. " This," says the lucid Survey, 
" was on account of the exchange.'" Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had 
two estates in this place at the time of the Survey. The first consisted of 
35 acres, half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 8s,, formerly 
the estate of Edric, a freeman, but at the time of the Survey held over him 
by Loher. The second, which had always been held by six freemen, con- 
sisted of 85 acres, 3 bordars, and a ploughteam, valued at 14s. 2d.' 

The Abbot of St. Edmund had an estate here at the time of the Survey, 
which had formerly been held by 12 freemen under the abbot by com- 
mendation, soc, and sac. It consisted of 60 acres, a bordar, and 2 plough- 
teams valued at los.^ 

Manor of Poslingford Hall. 

This estate passed from Ralph Baynard, the Domesday tenant, to his 
son and heir Jeffrey, and was forfeited by Jeffrey's son and heir, William 
Baynard, in the time of Hen. I., when it passed to the Crown." 

It is stated that the over-lordship was vested in Gilbert de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester, in 1275, as he then claimed free warren in Baynard's 
fee.' But at the same time we find that Robert Fitz Walter held Poslingford 
of the fee of Baynard.® It was held with the advowson of the church. 

In one place on the Hundred Rolls there is a distinct statement that 
the Manor of Poslingford at the time of those returns was, with the advowson, 
vested in Robert Fitz Walter, and held by him of the King in chief. '' 

'Dora. ii. 4136. ^H.R. ii. 173. 

'Dom. ii. 3966. ^H.R. ii. 151, 171. 

3 Dora. ii. 3716. ''H.R. ii. 195. 

•'See Manor of Shimpling, in Babergh 
Hundred. 



POSLINGFORD. 279 

Prior to 1322 the manor was held by Gilbert Peche' and Isolda his wife 
and he died seised this year/ and we find an order on the Close Rolls in 
1324 in a suit respecting the manor, in which Isolda, late wife of Gilbert Peche, 
suggested that Stephen, brother of Sir Thomas de la Charmere, granted 
the same to the said Gilbert.^ The manor passed to Gilbert Peche's son 
and heir, Gilbert Peche, who died in 1360. 

The manor in the time of King Edw. IV. was vested in Henry Went- 
worth, of Codham Hall, co. Essex. He married ist Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of Henry Howard, and 2ndly Joan, daughter and heir of Robert 
FitzSimon, of co. Essex. Henry Wentworth died 22nd March, 1482," 
when the manor passed to his son and heir. Sir Roger Wentworth, Knt,, 
who married Anne (daughter and heir of Humphrey Tyrell, of Little Warley, 
3rd son of John Tyrell, of Herons, in Essex), who died 28th Aug. 1534. He 
died 9th Aug. 1539, and is interred with his wife under a sumptuous monu- 
ment in the chancel of Gosfield church. 

The manor passed to their son and heir. Sir John Wentworth, who 
married Anne, daughter of John Bettenham, of Pluckley, in Kent, and died 
15th Sept. 1567, leaving an only daughter Anne, who had married ist 
Sir Hugh Rich, 2nd son of Sir Richard Rich, Lord Chancellor, and Baron 
Rich ; 2ndly Henry Fitz Alan, Lord Maltravers ; and 3rdly Sir William 
Deane, of Dean's Hall, Great Maplestead, in Essex. By deed dated 24th 
Sept. 1577, she demised the manors of Overhall, Netherhall, Horton, Impey, 
and Bulley Hall, in Poslingford, with other manors for 200 years next after 
her death. She died 5th Dec. 1580, and according to her desire was buried 
in the church of Gosfield, loth Jan. 1580, in the tomb of her ist husband, 
having ordered 660 marks to be bestowed at her funeral. Leaving no issue 
by any of her three husbands, the manor passed to her cousin, John Went- 
worth, son of her uncle, Henry Wentworth, who thereupon went to live 
at Gosfield, being the first of the family to make that the place of residence. 
He was knighted, and married twice, but the surname of the ist wife only is 
known. She was Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher St. Laurence, Baron 
of Howth, in Ireland. He died 13th April, 1588, and the manor passed to 
his son and heir, John Wentworth, who married Cecily, daughter of Edward 
Upton. He died loth Feb. 1613, and the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Wentworth, knighted in 1603, and created a baronet 29th J une, 
1611, who died in Oct. 1631, leaving by Katharine his wife, daughter of 
Sir Moyle Finch, Knt. and Bart., four daughters and coheirs, two of whom 
died unmarried. 

In 1635 Thomas Golding held the manor and the advowson, and there 
is this year a distinct statement of his being then both lord and patron.' 
As early as 1573 George^ and Henry Goldinge had been called upon to show 
by what title they held the rectory of the church of Poslingford,' and 
probably the manor was in the family at that date. 

Towards the end of the i8th century the manor passed to Richard 
Moore, who died in 1782, when it went to his son and heir, Richard Moore. 

In 1823 Hart Logan was lord, but in 1847 the manor was vested in 
Samuel Ware, of Hendon Hall, in the county of Middlesex. He died in 

'See Manor of Little Bradley, in this ^s.p., 1635, 185. 

Hundred. ^See Manor of Stone Hall, Clare, in this 

"Extent, I.P.M., 16 Edw. H. 48; Hundred, but not the same George. 

3 Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 22, 9. ''Memoranda Rolls, 13 Eliz. Trin. Rec. 

"I.P.M., 22 Edw. IV. II. Rot. 29. 



28o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

i860j when the manor passed to his nephew, Charles Nathaniel Cumberlege- 
Ware, 3rd son of Capt. John Cumberlege by Anne his wife, daughter of 
Samuel Ware, of Highgate, who assumed by Royal Hcence in 1862 the 
name and arms of "W are. He married Caroline, eldest daughter of Richard 
Hooton, of Leamington, co. Warwick, and on his death, 22nd Sept. 1888, 
the manor passed to, and is now vested in, his grandson, Charles Edward 
Cumberlege-Ware, of Hendon Hall, Hendon, and 86, Lancaster Gate, 
London, son and heir of the Rev. Charles Cumberlege-Ware, vicar of 
Astwood, CO. Bucks, (and of Elizabeth Anne his wife, daughter and heir 
of Mrs. Montgomery WiUiams, of Crawley Grange, co. Bucks.), wJio had 
died in ,1871 in his father's lifetime. C. E. Cumberlege-Ware in i88g 
married Beatrice, daughter of John Bell, of Lancaster Gate. 

Arms of Ware : Per pale Arg. and Gu. two lions, passant, within an 
orle of roses and escallops all counterchanged. 

Manor of Overhall. 

In 1448 this manor was vested in Richard Martyn, and just 100 years 
later in Sir John Wentworth, Knt., of Gosfield, in Essex, from whom it 
probably passed in the same course as the main manor until the time of 
Sir John Wentworth, ist Bart., in 1612. 

In 1577 we find that Anne, daughter and heir of Sir John Wentworth, 
Knt., conveyed by indenture the manors of Overhall and Netherhall^ with 
other property, to Jerome Bettenham and James Walton, for 200 years 
next after her decease,' which happened in 1580. 

The manor subsequently vested in Sir Edward Villiers, Knt. He was 
the 2nd son of Sir George Villiers by his ist wife Audrey, daughter, and heir 
of William Saunders, of Harrington, co. Northampton. He was knighted 
at Windsor in 1616, and in 1620 sent ambassador to Bohemia. The 27th 
May, 1625, he was, through the interest of his half-brother, the Duke of 
Buckingham, made President of Munster, in Ireland. He married Barbara, 
daughter of Sir John St. John, of Lydiard Tregoze, co. Wilts, and niece 
of Oliver St. John, who was created Viscount Grandison in Ireland with 
limitation of that honour to her posterity. Sir Edward Villiers died 7th 
Sept. 1626," lamented by the whole province, wherein he had lived greatly 
and hospitably since the time of his appointment as governor, and was 
buried in the Earl of Cork's chapel, at Youghal, where these lines are 
inscribed to his memory : — 

Munster may curse the time that Villiers came, 

To make us worse, by leaving such a name ; 

Of noble parts, as none can imitate 

But those whose hearts are married to the State ; 

But if they press to imitate his fame, 

Munster may bless the time that ViUiers came. 

The manor passed to Sir Edward's son and heir, William Villiers, 
who succeeded his uncle, OHver St. John, as 2nd Viscount Grandison, in 1630. 
Upon the breaking out of the rebellion he espoused the Royal cause, and 
signalised himself in the service on several occasions, but at the siege ol 
Bristol, 26th July, 1643, was unfortunately wounded, from whence he was 
carried to Oxford, where he died the August following in the 30th year of 
his age, and has a noble monument erected to his memory in the Cathedral 

'Fine, Trin. 19 Eliz, ""His will is dated 3rd Aug. 1625. 



POSLINGFORD. 281 

of Christchurch, where he was buriedj by Barbara, Duchess of Cleveland, 
his only daughter and heir (by his wife Mary, daughter of Paul, Viscount 
Banning, who after his death married Charles Villiers, Earl of Anglesey). 

In 1782 the manor was vested in Richard Moore, and then passed as 
the main manor. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Bury St. Edmunds in 
1606-7, we find notice of an action as to this manor and the Manor of 
Netherhall, the question being, did tithes from them belong to the late 
College of Stoke and priory of Dunnowe ? The action was by John 
Mallowes against Thomas Golding. 

Manor of Netherhall. 

This manor was in the reign of Edw. III. held by Roger de Wridewell 
and Margaret his wife, and in 1376 a fine was levied of it against them by 
Walter Amyas, clerk, Robert de Kedyton, Geoffrey de Hunden, William 
Aylmer, John Sibill, William Fuller e, and William Hore.' 

In 1548 the manor became vested in Sir John Wentworth, of Gosfield, in 
Essex, from which time the manor has apparently passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Over hall, in Poslingford. We meet with a fine levied in 
1573 of Netherhall Manor, which may possibly refer to this manor. It 
was levied by John Wentworth against Robert Sampson and others." 



■Feet of Fines, 50 Edw. III. 20. 'Fine, Easter, 15 Eliz. 

MI 



282 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




STANSFIELD. 

|OUR estates in this place at the time of the Survey were held 
by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. The first consisted of 
a carucate of land formerly belonging to a socman, but at 
the time of the Survey held over him by Roger. Attached 
to it were 2 bordars, a ploughteam, and 3 acres of meadow. 
When Roger took over this socman there were 3 rouncies, 
4 beasts, 7 hogs, and 40 sheep, valued at 20s., but when the 
Survey was taken the live stock had increased considerably ^he beasts 
had increased to 6, the hogs to 30, and the sheep to 80, while the value had 
gone up 105. 

The second estate, which was held by Gislebert, consisted of 2 carucates 
of land, 2 bordars, 3 serfs, 2 ploughteams, 2 acres of meadow, 4 sheep, and 
25 hogs, valued at 60s., formerly held by Edric Spucla, when there were 
4 sheep only, and the value was 40s. 

The third estate consisted of a carucate of land, a ploughteam, and 
4 acres of meadow, valued at 30s., formerly held by Ulfiet, a freeman, but 
at the time of the Survey by Robert over him.' 

The fourth estate consisted of 60 acres of land, a serf, a ploughteam, 
3 J acres of meadow, and a mill, valued at 15s., formerly held by Crow, a 
freeman, but at the time of the Survey by Roger. There was also a church 
with 15 acres of free land. Stansfield as a whole was 12 quarentenes 
long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt iS^d." 

The Abbot of St. Edmund had one estate here. This consisted of 
75 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at lis. 3^., the commendation and soc 
belonging to the abbot. It had formerly been held by seven freemen.^ 



Stansfield Manor. 

This was the estate of Richard Fitz Gilbert at the time of the Survey, 
and passed in the same course as the Manor of Denston Hall, in this Hundred, 
and Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred. Sir Thomas de Grey, Knt., had a grant 
of free warren here in 1302.* 

We find that in 1349 Sir William de Clopton had free warren in his lands 
in Stansfield.^ He married Agnes, daughter of Sir Thomas Grey, and died 
in 1378. 

in 1403 Sir Thomas de Grey gave a part of the manor to his widow 
Margaret for life, and subject to her interest it devolved upon his son, 
Roger de Grey and Margaret his wife.® 

The following year Margaret, wife of Roger, son of Sir Thomas de Grey, 
appears to have died seised of the manor. ^ 

In the beginning of the i6th century the manor vested in Sir Robert 
Broughton, Knt.,* who died seised of it 17th Aug. 1506,^ when it went to his 
son and heir, John Broughton, who died 24th January, 1517,'° when the 
manor passed to his widow Alice (? Anne), and subject to her interest 



'Dom. ii. 3906, 3956. 
='Dom. ii. 390S, 395&. 
^Dom. ii. 371&. 
* Chart. Rolls, 30 Edw. I. 33. 
= Chart. Rolls, 22 Edw. III. 37. 
n.Q.D.. 5 Hen. IV. 14. 



7I.P.M., 6 Hen. IV. 24. 

^ See Manor of Denston Hall, in this Hun- 
dred, and Manor of Stonhams, in 
Rattlesden, in Thedwestry Hundred. 

9I.P.M., 22 Hen. VII. i. 
'"I.P.M., 10 Hen. VIII. 148. 



STANSFIELD. 283 

vested in their son and heir, John Broughton, who died in 1529. 
The widow remarried John, Lord Russell, and appears to have survived 
till 1558. Subsequently the manor vested in the Westhroppes, who had 
held lands in Stansfield as early as the time of Hen. VI., for we find amongst 
the Early Chancery Proceedings an action as to a messuage here, brought 
by Robert Westhorp and WiUiam Grey, executors of Thomas Westhorp, 
against Thomas Hinton, feoffee to uses,' and another action about the same 
time as to lands in Stansfield by Agnes, late wife of Thomas Westhorp, 
against Thomas Hookton and William Grey.' Later, in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth, we meet with two fines levied of the manor. The first was 
in 1564 by John Westhroppe against Henry Cheyne and Jane his wife f 
the second in 1602 by Francis Crawley and others against Abraham 
Westroppe and others.* 

The Manor of Stansfield has been for some years past in the Crown, 
but it has been stated to have been vested in J. G. Weller Foley. A manor 
of " Stansfield " was included in a demise made 24th April, 19 Eliz. by 
Ann, daughter of Sir John Went worth, and Jerome Bettenham and James 
Walton for 200 years next after her decease, she being then Lady Matrevers, 
The lady was buried at Gosfield, in Essex, loth Jan. 1580. 

Gatesburies or Catesbye's Manor. 

In 1235 Richard de Muntfichet had the fee, and it passed to his 
daughter Margaret, who married Walter de Bolebee. If, however, Davy's 
date for the death of this Walter, namely 1187, be correct, this is scarcely 
possible. The manor passed to their son and heir,, Hugh de Bolebee, who 
died in 1262, leaving four daughters -Philippa, married to Roger de 
Lancaster ; Margery, married ist to Nicholas d'e Corbet and 2ndly to William 
de Grimesthorpe ; Ahce, married to Walter de Huntercombe ; and Matilda, 
married to Hugh de la Val. The two latter died without issue. 

In 1319 Richard de Gatesbury had a grant of free warren here,' and 
in 1420 a John de Gatesbury held the manor. He seems to have left two 
daughters and coheirs, one married to Henry Elvedon, of Ivy Mount] oy, 
Essex, and the other to John Lavingham, of Gatesbury, co. Herts. 

In 1506 the manor was vested in Sir Robert Broughton, Knt., who 
died seised of it this year, when it passed to his son and heir. Sir John 
Broughton, and then passed as the main manor until the death of Alice, 
wife of John, Lord Russell, in 1558. 

In 1706 the manor was in Sir Edward Atkins, and in 1770 was in 
John Mavor, passing this year to Charles Bigg, who in 1795 granted the 
same to Bateman Bigg, who sold it to the Marquis of Bristol, in whose 
representative it is now vested. 

Manor of Priditon Hall. 

This was held in 1275 by Walter de Priditon, of Stansfield, steward 
of the Earl Marshal, and later in the reign of Edw. I. passed to Sir Roger 
de Priditon. 

In 1317 the manor belonged to the Gatesbury or SaUsbury family, 
a fine this year being levied by Adam, son of Richard de Gatisbury, against 
Richard de Gatisbury f and in 1454 a fine of the manor was levied by 

'E.C.P., 5 Edw. IV.; 49 Hen. VI. 3i> 204. ''Fine, Hil. 44 Eliz. 

^Ib. 31, 262. 'Chart. RoUs, 12 Edw. II. 88. 

3 Fine, Easter, 6 Eliz. 'Feet of Fines, 11 Edw. II. 46. 



284 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John NotebemCj William Sheldrake, clerk, William Jerold, chaplain, 
Thomas Cranevyle, John Smyth, of Cavendish, Robert Hucton, of Stans- 
field, John Gylmyn, jun., and Thomas Pouncy, against John Jolker and 
Elizabeth his wife, relative and one of the heirs of Adam de Gatesbury, 
and Henry Elveden, kinsman and other heir.' Amongst the Early 
Chancery Proceedings we find a suit pending between Harry, son of Harry 
Elveden, and John Twyn, surviving feoffee to uses respecting the manor.'' 

At the beginning of the i6th century the manor was vested in the 
family of Broughton, and Sir Robert Broughton died seised of this manor 
17th August, 1506, leaving Sir John his son and heir.' Robert's son. Sir 
John Broughton, died seised 24th January, 1517, leaving John his son and 
heir.* 

In 1564 a fine of the manor, under the head " Predyngton Hall Manor," 
was levied by Robert Westhrope and John Sparowe against Henry Cheyne 
and Jane his wife.^ 

Abel de St. Martin held a third part of a fee in Priditon, according to 
Davy, but he gives no date, and in 1825 he enters Bateman Pigg [Bigg], 
gent., who died possessed of " Purton Hall," It later vested in Richard 
Plate, and from him passed to the Cumberlege- Wares, whose representative 
now holds.* 



'Feet of Fines, 32 Hen. VI. 6. 4I.P.M., 10 Hen. VIII. 148. 

^E.C.P., Bundle 55, 88. 5 Fine, Easter, 6 Eliz. 

3 1.P.M., 22 Hen. VII. i. 6 See Manor of Poslingford, in this Hundred. 




STOKE. 285 

$TOKE. 

HERE were two holdings in this place. The first was that 
of a socman and consisted of 37 acres and half a ploughteara 
(altered to 2 oxen at the time of the Survey), and 3 acres 
of meadow, valued at 6s. 2d. The Survey says : " In 
King Edward's time Wisgar held these socmen with all 
customs except the six forfeitures of St. Edmund." The 
Domesday tenant was Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. 

The second estate was held by 21 freemen, and consisted of a carucate 
and 68 acres of land, i^ ploughteams (altered to 2 teams at the time of the 
Survey), and 10 acres of meadow, valued formerly at 205., and at the time 
of the Survey at 31s. /[d. There was also a church with 60 acres, valued 
at IDS. This estate also was amongst the lands of Richard, son of Earl 
Gislebert, in the Great Survey." 

Manor of Stoke (by Clare). 

This estate passed from the Domesday tenant, Richard Fitz Gilbert, 
to his son and heir, Gilbert de Clare. Gilbert's son and heir, Richard de 
Clare, Earl of Hertford, in 1124 removed the monks of Bee, whom his 
father had placed in the castle of Clare, first into the parish church of 
St. Augustine, and afterwards into their priory here, which he founded 
for them and endowed with the Manor of Stoke Ho. It was afterwards 
released by King Rich. II. in 1395 from its subjection to the foreign abbey. 
There is an exemplification of the letters patent effecting this on the 
allegation that the original letters had been lost, on the Patent Rolls in 
1400 -^ and in 1415 Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March, its patron, obtained 
the King's permission to change this institution into a college for secular 
priests.^ 

Ministers' Accounts of the manor when held by the Priory 18 Edw. II. 
will be found in the Public Record Office,* and Compotus of the College 
1456-1458, 1470-1471,= and 1544.' 

Richard de Clare, in addition to the original endowments of this 
monastery, enriched it with the churches of Stoke, Stoke Ho, Cavenham, 
and Denham ; tithes in Denham, the mills of Clare and Stoke, 12 houses 
in Clare, &:c. Papal Bull for foundation of the college and confirmation 
by the Bishop of Lincoln in 1422 will be found amongst the Parker MSS. 
in Corpus Christi Coll., Camb., cviii. 25-27, and the tithes concerning the 
foundation wiU be found amongst the same MSS.^ 

It consisted of a dean, from six to 10 prebendaries (or canons), eight 
vicars, four clerks, six choristers, besides officers and servants. The 
constitutions framed for this college were made by Thomas Barnesley, in 
1422, who was then dean, by the command of the founder and patron. 
Sir Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March, and of Ulster, who was interred in 
this college. The site thereof, with the courtyard, orchard, and divers 
houses within the precincts contained at the Dissolution about 6 acres of 

'Dom. ii. 3906. * Bundle 1127, N0.4. 

''Pat. RoUs, I Hen. IV. pt. ii. 29. 'Add. Rolls, 1253-1255- 

3 Deed as to erection of college in 1415 is *Add. Rolls, 1290. 

in Corpus Christi Coll., Camb. ''Ih. p. 129. 

Muse. O. p. 103; Parker MSS. 

cviii. 18, 24, 26. 



286 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

land, with lands and rents in various counties, and portions, pensions, 
tithes, &c., in about 56 parishes. Its clear value, " Valor Ecclesiasticus," 
in 1534, was ;£324. 4s. i^d. This collegiate church was in the patronage 
of the Queens of England. A Kst of its deans, with some brief notices of 
each, was drawn up by Matthew Parker, who was the last dean of this 
college, and afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury. Their names were as 
follows :— 

1415. Thomas Barnesley. 1497. John Ednam, S.T.P. 

1454. Walter Blaket, A.M. 1517. Robert Bekensa we, S.T.P. 

1454. William Wilflet, S.T.P. 1525. WiUiam Grene, S.T.P. 

1470. Richard Edenham, S.T.P. 1529. Robert Shorton, S.T.P. 

1493. William Pykenham, LL.D. 1534-5- Matthew Parker, S.T.P.' 

Inventories of the college in 1534 and 1537 will be found amongst the 
Parker MSS. in the Corpus Christi College, Camb.° 

The college was dissolved in 1548 f and the same year granted to 
Sir John Cheke and Walter Mildmay.* 

In 1552 Sir John Cheke by grant resigned it to the Exchequer, and 
9th April, 1554, the Queen held her first court. In 1556 Philip and Mary 
by letters patent annexed the manor to the l)uchy of Lancaster. The fine 
of the manor was not levied by the King and Queen against Sir John Cheke 
and others until 1557.* This fine included the borough of Clare and site 
of the late College of Stoke, and of several manors, with the office of feodary 
of the Honor of Clare. Queen Elizabeth held her first court " die Lune voc. 
Hokmondaye," 1559. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of this time will be found a Bill 
by Dame Mary Cheke against Agnes Porter to establish life estate in the 
site of the manor and college of Stoke by demise from the Crown.® And 
amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the Duchy of Lancaster in 1598 an 
action by the Attorney-General at the relation of Lady Mary Cheke against 
Robert Bridge as to land called Walebanke lands and as to f eUing timber.'' 
In 1604, however, the King granted the manor to James Fullerton and 
James Maxwell, and a little later Jane Murray, widow, and the said James 
Fullerton and James Maxwell and William Trigge conveyed it to Sir 
William Whitmore, Knt., George Whitmore, and William Gibson, who in 
1634 conveyed it to William Trigge, of Highworth, co. Wilts., M.D. William 
Trigge was living in 1652, for amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum will be found an extract of the view of frankpledge and court baron 
held by him 26th April this year.* His daughter and heir. Amy, married 
Sir Gervase Elwes, ist Bart., of Stoke College,^ who died in May, 1706 (? 5), 
having by his will dated 24th Sept. 1678, proved 25th October, 1706, given 
a certain sum for the augmentation of the perpetual curacy of the parish of 

'Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 895. ^His petition to be a Baronet will be 

*cviii. 41, p. 181. found amongst the State Papers in 

3 Parts were here let to John Cheke 1660 (S.P. 1660-7, and the creation 

28th Aug. 2 Edw. VI. [1547]. is 22nd June, 1660). He was M.P. 

(Harl. 605), for Sudbury 1677 to ^679, for 

*0. 5 Edw. VI. 2 Pars. Rot. Suffolk 1679, for Sudbury again 

'Fine, Easter, 4 Mary I. 1679-1681, for Suffolk again 1690- 

^C.P. i. 213. 1698, and for Sudbury again 1700 

'Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, till death. He was sometime Lieut . 

40 Eliz. 53. of the Tower of London. 
8 Add Ch. 10567. 



STOKE. 287 

Stoke, in respect of which ;^30 a year was subsequently paid by the owner of the 
testator's property at Stoke to the minister for the time being. The 
manor passed to Sir Hervey Elwes, 2nd Bart., his grandson and heir, being 
the son of Gervase Elwes by Isabella his wife, eldest daughter of Sir Thomas 
Hervey, Knt., of Ickworth, and sister to John, ist Earl of Bristol. Sir 
Hervey Elwes died unmarried 22nd Oct. 1763.' He is said to have died 
worth £250,000 at least. The manor devolved on his nephew, John Elwes al. 
Meggott, the son of Sir Hervey's sister Amy, who had married George 
Meggott, M.P. for Southwark, a brewer on an extensive scale. This John 
Meggott assumed the name and arms of Elwes by sign manual 6th July, 
1751, and was the celebrated miser M.P. for Berks.'' He was sent early 
to Westminster school, and afterwards went to Geneva, where he distin- 
guished himself by his skill and prowess in horsemanship. While there he 
became acquainted with Voltaire, whom he was thought to resemble in 
person. Returning to England, after an absence of three years, he became 
the frequent visitor of his miserly uncle, at Stoke, and succeeded in 
ingratiating himself into his favour by always exchanging his ordinary 
dress for one of a humbler and meaner appearance before he reached the 
mansion. Mr. Elwes's usual residence was at his family seat at Marcham, 
in Berkshire, which county he represented in three successive Parliaments, 
and for the space of 12 years. On his retirement from public business he 
went to Stoke, where he remained till 1788. The infirmities of age coming 
upon him, he was prevailed upon to remove first to London and lastly to 
Marcham, where his son then resided. Here, worn down equally by bodily 
infirmities and mental imbecilities, he died at the age of 75,26th November, 
1789 ; having bequeathed by will to his two natural sons ;^5oo,ooo. The 
character of Mr. Elwes was a singular compound of qualities, apparently 
the most heterogeneous and incompatible. He is chiefly, and, indeed, 
almost exclusively, known to popular fame as a miser of the first order. 
And certainly the facts recorded of him, as to his habits and mode of life, 
but too fully justified his claim to this character. At his mansion at Stoke 
everything was conducted with the most parsimonius attention to economy. 
The house was suffered to fall into decay for want of common repairs. 
The domestic establishment was limited to two females and one man- 
servant. The greatest act of extravagance was the keeping of a pack of 
hounds, but this was not allowed to entail the charge of an additional 
servant. All the duties of the house, the stable, the cowhouse, and the 
field devolved on the same person, who in the course of the same day 
successively milked the cows, prepared breakfast, saddled the horses, 
unkennelled the hounds, conducted them to the chase, rubbed down the 
horses on their return, laid the cloth, waited at dinner, again milked the 
cows, and fed and littered the horses for the night ; and yet this man his 
master called an idle dog, who wanted to be paid for doing nothing. Every 
practicable expedient was resorted to in order to save fuel. In cold weather 
Mr. Elwes would walk in an old greenhouse, or sit with the servants in the 
kitchen ; and on the approach of winter he used to collect stray chips or 
straw, and was once detected in taking a crow's nest for firing, with some 
risk of broken limbs. The same economy extended to the food of the 
family and also to his dress, which was as httle expensive as possible. It 
is said that he once wore for a fortnight a wig which had been picked up 
in the rut of a lane. In travelling he rode on horseback, avoiding all turn- 

'Will 3rd March, 1756, proved 25th Nov. 'See his life by Ed. Topham, 12th ed. 1805. 
1763- 



288 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

pikes and public-houses, carrying with him for food hard-boiled eggs and 
dried crusts, or other portable edible of the hke description ; and his horse 
was fed with the graSs that fringed the margin of the spring or rivulet 
which furnished the master with drink. But with all this meanness, Mr. 
Elwes displayed on many occasions a real generosity of spirit, and an 
extraordinary readiness to part with his money. He sometimes became 
the dupe of artful adventurers, and once embarked and sacrificed no less a 
sum than £25,000 in an ironworks, in America, of which he knew nothing ; 
and several instances are recorded of his prompt and voluntary advances 
of large sums to assist his friends in their difficulties. He was also an 
occasional gambler, strict in the payment of his losses, but never asking for 
his winnings when they were withheld. In pubHc life his conduct was 
irreproachable. He attached himself to no party in Parliament, but voted 
with or against the minister, according to the judgment he formed of the 
merits of each case.' He died unmarried, and was succeeded by his 
great-nephew. The miser's sister Amy Meggott had married John 
Timms, a merchant in the Turkey trade, and had a son, Richard 
Timms, Lieut.-Colonel in the Royal Horse Guards, who married 
May, daughter of Thomas Hughes, M.D., of Eltham, co. Kent, and died 
at Colchester 22nd Dec. 1817, leaving a son, John Timms, who at the 
death of his great uncle succeeded to all his entailed property. This John 
Timms, 24th May, 1793, took the name and arms of Elwes, and 4th June, 
1814, became a Lieut. -General in the army. He married ist Frances 
Payne and 2ndly 15th March, 1815, Sara,h, eldest daughter of Rev. Wm. 
Sadler, vicar of Clare, and on his death at Stoke College in 1824, the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Payne Elwes, born 13th May, 1798, High 
Sheriff for Suffolk in 1826, M.P. for North Essex 1835-37. He married 
17th July, 1824, Charlotte Elizabeth, 4th daughter of Isaac Elton, of 
Stapleton House, co. Gloucester, and on his death at his seat, Stoke College, 
in 1849, ^he manor passed to his son and heir, John Elton Hervey Elwes. 
He married in July, 1852, Isabella, 2nd daughter of Hector B. Munro, of 
Ewell Castle, Surrey, and dying in 1869 the manor passed to Robert Hervey 
Munro Elwes, J. P., D.L., co. Essex. He married in 1875 Louisa Emily 
Julia, eldest daughter of Capt. Frederick C. Herbert, R.N.," and on his 
death in 1889 without issue the manor passed to his brother and heir, 
Gervase Paget Elwes, of Edmondsham, Cranborne, Dorset, born 4th 
Nov. 1855, B.A., St. John's College, Oxford, 1876. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the Duchy of Lancaster in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth will be found an action by John Layton as lessee 
against Barnaby Rande and John Cadge as to lands in the manor,^ and a 
precipe on a covenant concerning the manor in 1592 will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum.* 

Ministers' Accounts of the manor as part of Clare Honor 5 and 6 Phil, 
and Mary and i Eliz., will be found in the Record Office.^ 

Court Rolls of the Manor of Stoke with Chilton i Mary to i and 2 Phil, 
and Mary,^ and 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary to 27 Eliz. and 25 to 26 Eliz., 27 

' Excursions in Suff . Of this singular appear in the " Anecdotes of the 

personage Capt. Topham, of the Aristocracy." 

Horse Guards, wrote an interesting " She died in 1893. 

memoir, which exhibits one of the ^ Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings, 
most extraordinary characters to 29 Eliz. 5. 

be found in the whole range of ^Add Ch. 25015. 

British biography. Full detai^ also ^ D.K.R. 45 App. p. 64. 

^ Duchy of Lancaster. 



STOKE. 289 

to 29 Eliz. will be found in the Record Office.' Extracts from Court Rolls 
will be found amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum, 
1581-1638/ 1582/ 1545/ and 1610.^ Charters of the Priory will be found 
referred to in the Archaeological Journal/ and Cartulary of the Priory will 
be found amongst the Cotton MSS. in the British Museum.' Also three 
Charters of the Priory are amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian.' 

Arms of Elwes : Or, a fesse, Azure, debruised by a bend, Gules, 

ElBURY OR ErBURY MANOR. 

This at the date of the Survey was the estate of Richard Fitz Gilbert 
and probably descended through the Clares and the Royal House of York 
until vested in the Crown in the person of King Edw. IV. in the same course 
as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred, and remained in the Crown 
till the time of Queen Mary. 

A fine was levied of the manor by the King in 15 11 against Katherine 
Courteney, Countess of Devon, one of the daughters of Edw. IV., and Thomas 
Haward and Anne his wife, another daughter of Edw. IV.^ The fine 
included the castle and borough of Clare and Erbury, Hundon, Wodhall, 
Sudbury, and Southwold Manors with appurtenances and tenements in all 
these places. The manor was in 1553 granted to Sir John Cheke, Knt." 
The grant does not appear to have been a source of remuneration to Sir 
John, for the following year her gracious Majesty granted a lease of the 
manor to Ambrose Gilbert, William Fryer, and John Fenne, and by letters 
patent in 1556 annexed the manor to the Duchy of Lancaster. 

The fine, however, levied by the King and Queen against Sir John 
Cheke as to this manor was not levied until Easter term, 4 Mary. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth we 
find a claim made under the lease by William Weakes and ElUn his wife, 
showing that John Fenne survived and bequeathed the lease to his children, 
one of whom married the plaintiff Ellin, and by his will gave her the said 
lease." 

King Chas. I. in 1625 granted the manor to Robert Dixon and William 
Walley, of London, who conveyed to WiUiam Trigg in 1627, from which 
time the manor devolved in the same course as the main manor. 

There is a compotus of the manor amongst the Harleian Charters in 
1407-8." The manor is then said to have belonged to Sir Thomas 
Erpyngham. 

George Daniel, of " Stoke nexte Clare," by his will dated i3th Oct. 
1563, refers to his Manor of Stoke called " Scarborowes in Stoke aforesaid." 
He says : "I give and bequeathe to John Danny ell my sonne in base other- 
wise called John Lyttle Childe all that mysaide manner in Stoke aforesaid, 
called Scarborowes withe my capitall messuage and all other my landes and 
tenementes, as well free as copy medowes, pastures and feedings with all 
and singular their appurtenances and all other my hereditaments, as well 

'Bundle 117, 1822-1829 ; Bundle 118, ^Ivi. 231. 

1826, 1829-1835 ; Bundle 119, 1836- ? Cotton, App. xxi. 

18^8 : General Series, Portfolio « r^wI. C. 728. 

213. sPine, Mich. 3 Hen. VIII. 

^Add. Ch! 1278-1279, 1282-1289. '°Harl. 6853. 

3 Add. Ch. 1284. "&^i"i?,4t^- 

4 Add. Ch. 1286. "Harl. Roll E. 13. 

5 Add. Ch. 10565- 



290 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

in possession as in reu'cione. sett lying and being in Stoke aforesaide and 
Asshen in the counties of Suff. and Essex to have and to holde the saide 
manner capitall messuag landes tenementes medowes pastures and ffeedings 
withe all and singular their appurtenances to the said John during all the 
Terme of lief of the sayde John withoute impechement of Waste and after 
the decease of the saide John, Thenne I will the saide Maner capitall messuage 
landes and tenementes and all other the said premisses shall remayne to 
theyres males of the bodie of the said John lawfully begotten. And yf 
it shall fortune the said John to decease withoute heires males of his bodie, 
lawluUie begotten, Then I will that my saide maner capitall messuages 
landes tenementes meadowes pastures and feedinges shall remaine to 
Thomas Dannyell my sonne base otherwise called Thomas Kydde. To 
have holde and enioye the saide manor capitall messuage landes tenementes 
meadowes pastures and feedinges to the saide Thomas during all the terme 
of lief of the saide Thomas wytheout ympeachment of waste And after his 
decease I will that all the said p'mysses shall remaine to the heires males 
of the bodie of the said Thomas lawfuUie begotten." There is a gift in 
remainder to testator's nephew Frances Tyrrell, son of Thomas " Terrell " 
and Margaret, " his late wief my syster." The base sons had to take 
the name of Daniel. 

We find no other mention of this manor. 




STRADISHALL. 291 

STRADISHALL. 

HOLDING here in Saxon times was that of 16 freemen, 
and consisted of a carucate of land, 3 ploughteams, and 
2 acres of meadow, valued at 205. Also a church with 
30 acres, valued at 5s. 

The Domesday tenant was Richard, son of Earl 
Gislebert.' 

Manor of Stradishall. 

This manor descended from the Domesday tenant in the same course 
as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred, to the time of Elizabeth de 
Burgh, wife of John de Burgh. 

About this time Stradishall became a member of Hundon Manor, 
and has since descended with it. 

In 1470 Davy enters Thomas Crawfield and John Clopton as lords. 

At the commencement of the i8th century the manor, with the 
patronage of the church, was vested in the house of Cavendish, Earls of 
Devonshire. 

In 1756 the manor was vested in James Vernon, of Hundon, for this 
year he died seised of it, and it passed to his son and heir, Henry Vernon, 
who died in 1776, when it went to his son and heir, John Vernon, who died 
in 1818, when an Act of ParUament was obtained for sale of the manor. 

The manor is now vested in Thomas Bower. 

Court Rolls of the manor i Mary to i and 2 Phil, and Mary will be found 
amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Papers in the Public Record Office,'' and 
extract from a Coiu"t Roll in 1574 amongst the Additional Charters in the 
British Museum.^ Also fines of tenants about 1582 will be found in the 
same collection.* 

Manor of Cockrell's al. Foster's. 

This was held by Sir Robert Broughton, Knt., who died seised of it in 
1506, when it passed to his son and heir. Sir John Broughton, who died 
24th January, 15 17,' when it went in the same course as the Manor of 
Stansfield, in this Hundred, to John Broughton, and was vested in his 
mother on her death in 1558. 

There are three fines levied of the manor in the time of Queen Elizabeth. 
One in 1562 by Richard Peartre and his wife against Sir William Willoughby, 
Lord WiUoughby, of Parham, and his wife f the second in 1572 by Charles 
Wurlyche against Sir William Poulett, Lord St. John, and others,' and the 
third in 1580 by Henry Frenche against Nicholas Genne and others.' 

Manor of Shardelowes. 

This was the lordship of Sir John Shardelow, Knt., who made his will 
in 1391.' He was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Robert Shardelow, 
who died in 1399, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir John 
Shardelow, who died in 1433," without issue, leaving Sir Thomas Brewse 

'Dom. ii. 397. *Fine, Mich. 4 Eliz. 

'Bundle 117, 1820 ; General Series, Port- 'Fine, Mich. 14 Ehz. 

folio 213, 76. 'Fine, Mich. 22-23 Ehz. 

^Add. Ch. 1277. 'See Shardelowes Manor, Little Barton, in 

*Add Ch 1280 Lackford Hundred. 

'LP.M., io Hen. VHI. 148. '"I.P.M., 11 Hen. VI. 12. 



/ / 



2^2 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his heir, the devolution being practically the same as the Manor of Sharde- 
lowes, in Little Barton, in Lackford Hundred. 

In the reign of King Hen. VH. the manor vested in Thomas Shrevyn 
or Scriven, who died 8th October, 1494,' when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Edward Scriven, then aged 28. The manor was then said to be 
worth ■£/[, and to be held of Cicely, Duchess of York, as of the Manor of 
Hundon. From Edward Scriven the manor apparently passed to William 
Scriven. In 1582 a fine was levied of the manor by Eichard King against 
R. " Scryver,'" and in 1584 by John " Shrivener," sen., against Richard 
" Scryvener,"^ and in 1638 was held by a Richard Scriven, who died this 
same year, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Higham Scriven. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken 4 J as. II. at Stradishall, 
we find pending an action as to this manor and the rectory of Stradishall, 
and lands called " Fulpitts " and " Willows," formerly belonging to Mr. 
Hall, and since to John Parsey. Whether lands were parcel of the manor ? 
The cause was William Sheene v. Roger Grouce 



'I.P.M., 10 Hen. VII. 1013. 3 Fine, Easter, 26 Eliz. 

" Fine, Easter, 24 Eliz. 




THURLOW. 293 

THURLOW. 

MANOR was held in this place in the time of the Confessor 
by Edith, a freewoman. It consisted of 7 carucates of land, 
16 villeins, 6 bordars (increased at the time of the Survey 
to 9), 2 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 7 belonging to 
the men, 18 acres of meadow, and wood for the maintenance of 
80 hogs. Also 10 beasts, 36 hogs, 46 sheep, and 33 goats. 
There was also a church with 32 acres of free land and half a 
ploughteam. And five freemen held a carucate of land, 2 bordars, 3 plough- 
teams, and 3 acres of meadow. The manor was valued then at £g and the 
freemen at 20s. as " gersum " by tale. By the time of the Survey the value 
of the manor had increased to £16, and it was enumerated amongst the lands 
of Earl Ralph, kept in the King's hand by Goodrich the Steward. It was 
a league long and 7 quarentenes and 10 perches broad, a,nd paid in a gelt 7^.' 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had two estates here. The first was 
both in Saxon and Norman times held by 10 freemen, and consisted of a 
carucate of land, a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, and a church with 29 
acres, all valued at los. The whole township was a league in length and 
paid in a gelt i2d. The other estate was held by Widard, having formerly been 
the estate of two socmen under Edith with all customs, whom Ralph held 
when he forfeited. It consisted of 25 acres and half a ploughteam valued 
at 4s. 4d.' 

The only other holding here was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 
It consisted of 95 acres, 4 ploughteams, 4 acres of meadow, and wood for 
the maintenance of 6 hogs, valued at 15s., formerly held by nine freemen. 
The soc and commendation belonged to the abbot.^ 

Thurlow Magna Manor. 

In Edward the Confessor's reign this was the estate of Edred, a free- 
woman, and was granted by the Conqueror to Ralph de Gael or Guader, 
Earl of Norfolk, but whom we find in 1071 styled Earl of Norwich. His 
wife was Emma, daughter of William Fitz Osborn, Earl of Hereford, by 
Adeliza, daughter of Roger de Toni. He joined with Roger de Breteuil 
in the rebellion of 1074 against the Conqueror, when his estates were 
forfeited to the Crown, and he retired to Brittany, subsequently joining in 
the crusade in the time of Pope Urban, and dying on his way to Palestine. 
This estate was at the time of the Survey still in the King's hands. 

In 1272 Sir Gilbert Peche* had the manor,' and a market and fair here, 
and claimed free warren.* 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1281 by Magister Richard and 
Magister William de Clifford against Gilbert Peche,' and another in 1284 
by the said Gilbert de Peche and Joan his 2nd wife, daughter of Simon de 
Grey, against the said Richard de Clifford and WiUiam his brother.^ Gilbert 
de Peche died in 1291,' when the manor passed to his 3rd son. Sir Gilbert 

'Dom. ii. 286. 'H.R. ii. 151, 171. 175- , ^ ^^ ^^^ 

*Dom ii. 397. *H.R. ii. 173 ; Chart. Rolls, 56 Hen. III. 3. 

^Dom! iil 3716. ^Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. I. 33. 

*He was possibly the Sir Gilbert Peche, ^Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. I. 13. 

son of Hamon de Peche, who died si.P.M., 20 Edw. I. 43. 

in 1240, mentioned in the account 

of the Manor of Dalham, in this 

Hundred. 



294 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Peche, of Brunne, co. Cambridge, and of Poslingworth, the elder sons having 
been disinherited. Sir Gilbert was summoned to Parliament as a Baron 
(Lord Peche) 29th Dec. 1299, to 3rd Nov. 1306, and again 14th March, 
1321-2. In 1314 he was taken prisoner at the Battle of Bannockburn. 
He married Isolda, and died in 1322/ when the manor, subject to an interest 
allotted by the King to Isolda the widow as dower for life,'' passed to his 
son and heir, Gilbert Peche, then aged 16. He had licence in 1332 to 
enfeoff William de Gretton, chaplain, and Thomas le Graunt of the manor 
said to be held in chief, and for them to regrant to him and Sibilla his wife 
in tail, with remainder to his right heirs. ^ 

This settlement was effected by a fine this same year levied by the said 
Gilbert Peche and Sibilla his wife against the said WiUiam de Gretton and 
Thomas le Graunt.* 

Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Record Office is a release made in 
1335 by John Turle, of London, fishmonger, to Sir Gilbert Peche of all 
right in this manor.^ Sir Gilbert seems to have married again, for in 1337 
we find on the Patent Rolls a licence for him to enfeoff Simon, parson of 
the church of Ousden, and John de Kirkeley, of the manor, and for them to 
regrant to him and Joan his wife in fee tail with remainder to his right 
heirs.* 

This settlement was carried into effect by a fine levied this same year 
by Simon, parson of Ousden church, and John de Kyrkeley, chaplain, 
against the said Gilbert Peche and Joan his wife.'' Upon Sir Gilbert's 
death the manor passed to his son and heir, Roger Peche, who died under 
age and without issue 30th Aug. 1360,^ when the manor passed to his two. 
sisters and coheirs, Katharine and Elizabeth. Katharine' married ist 
Sir John Aspal, of Lackford, and 2ndly Sir Thomas Notheme. The same 
year there is an order on the Originalia Rolls to take fealty of Katharine, 
one of the sisters and heirs of Roger Peche, deceased, concerning her part 
of the manor held in chief ; it is there stated to be held of the King of the 
Honor of Boulogne by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee.'° 
Elizabeth died seised in 1362," when her moiety passed to her sister Katharine, 
and on the Originalia Rolls for this year is an order to take fealty of 
Katharine, sister and heir of Elizabeth Peche, deceased, in respect of a 
moiety of the manor." 

Katharine died seised of the manor in 1406.'^ By her ist husband 
she left an only daughter Mirabel, aged 36, the wife of William Gedding, 
and by her 2nd marriage another daughter and coheir Margaret, aged 26, 



' I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 48, Extent. 

2 Close Rolls, 16 Edw. II. 29. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. pt. ii. 9. 
■^Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. III. i. 

5 8 Edw. III. A. 3336. 
«Pat. Rolls, 10 Edw. III. pt. i. 33. 
^Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. III. 22. 
^Extent, I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 25. 

"The author of the " Complete Peerage " 
says that any Barony in fee that 
may have been created by sum- 
mons and sitting as aforesaid [that 
is, by Katharine's grandfather, for 
it does not appear that her father 
was ever summoned to Parliament] 



devolved on Katharine ; and in a 
note he informs us that the repre- 
sentation of this lady, through the 
families of Aspall, Gedding, and 
Lucas, is set forth by Courthorpe in 
an elaborate pedigree of the family 
of Peche, compiled by him in a book 
marked "W. C. 12," among his 
MSS. in the College of Arms. In 
1706 the eldest representative of 
this Baron was William Lucas, of 
Hersecroft, co. Suffolk (vol. vi. 193.) 

'°0. 34 Edw. III. 10. 

" I.P.M., 36 Edw. III. pt. ii. 22. 

'^ 0. 36 Edw. III. 8. 

'3LP.M., 7Hen. IV. 5. 



THURLOW. 295 

the wife of John Hynklegh. WiUiam Gedding' and Mirabel 'his wife 
passed by fine their share of the above manor to John Hynklegh and 
Margaret his wife. He died in 1432 j she survived until 1442, and they 
were both interred in the parish church of Great Thurlow. 

Margaret at the time of her decease held the manor, and left two 
daughters coheirs — Alice, wife of John Marshall, and Cecily, wife of Henry 
Caldebeck. 

The latter became the possessor of the manor, and left two daughters 
coheirs — Thomasine, married to John Turner, of Haverhill, and Margaret, 
married to Geoffrey Bladwell, of Great Thurlow, and the latter inherited 
that portion of the estate which included this manor. Geoffrey 
Bladwell and Margaret left an only daughter Margery, who married 
Robert Geddyng, and there was issue of the marriage again an only child 
Margery, whose wardship having been obtained by the Solicitor-General, 
Thomas Lucas, of Little Saxham, he married the heiress to his eldest son, 
Jasper Lucas. This is the devolution given by Page. That given by Davy 
differs materially. He infers that instead of John Hynklegh and Margaret 
his wife acquiring the moiety of William Gedding and Mirabel the reverse 
was the case, and the latter acquired the moiety of the former. He says : 
" On the death of William Gedding and Mirabella his wife the manor passed 
to their son and heir, Thomas Gedding,'' who died in 1465, when it passed 
to his son and heir, John Gedding,^ who died in 1469, when it vested in his 
son and heir, Robert Gedding," who died in 1494, when it devolved on his 
daughter and heir Margery, married to Jasper Lucas. Both Davy and 
Page agree in bringing the manor into Jasper Lucas and Margery his wife, 
but Davy's devolution is to be preferred, and can be verified as follows : — 

1st. Page says that John Hynklegh and Margaret acquired the 
Gedding moiety. He died in 1432, and she survived until 1442. 
But the inquis. p.m. of Margaret in 1443 only deals with a 
moiety.' 

2nd. Page says that Margaret left two daughters, Alice married to 
John Marshall, and Cecily to Henry Caldebeck, and the latter 
became possessed of the manor ; but we find a moiety in the 
inquis. p.m. of this Alice Marshall in 1454.* 

3rd. The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of John Gedding, who 
died 4th Feb. 1469.'' 

4th, The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Robert Gedding 
(son of the last John Gedding) in 1494, when it is stated that the 
manor was worth ^fio, and held of the King in chief by knight's 
service, and that Robert Geddyng, the son and heir, being under 
age, the manor came into the hands of King Edw. IV., and was 
then, in 1494, in the hands of the King.^ 

• See Manor of Lackford, in Thingoe 3 He married Margaret, daughter of Sir 
Hundred. „ John Heveningham. 

« He married twice-ist Ann, daughter of 4 He married Margery, daughter of 
Thomas Hethe, of Mildenham, and Geoffrey Bladwell. 

2ndly Anne, daughter of Thomas sl.P.M., 21 Hen. VI. 23. 

Ashley, of Melton Constable, in H.-PM., 32 Hen. VI. 3- 

Norfolk. n.PM., 8 Edw. IV. 17. 

^ " n.PM., 10 Hen. VH. looi. 



296 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Margaret Lucas died 21st Sept. 1515, and Jaspar Lucas held the manor 
by the curtesy of England until his death 17th February, 1529/ when it 
passed to their son and heir, Thomas Lucas, then a minor ; and amongst 
the State Papers in 1530 we find a grant to Thomas Lucas, the minor's 
grandfather, of the custody of the manor, with wardship of his grandson 
Thomas, son and heir of Jaspar and Margery Lucas, and an annuity of 
20 marks out of the manor.' Thomas Lucas the minor had licence to 
alienate the manor in 1567 to Jaspar Warren, of Barrow, co. Cambridge, 
and Antonia his wife. 

The conveyance of the property was effected by a fine levied this same 
year by the said Jaspar Warren against the said Thomas Lucas. ^ This 
same year Jaspar was called upon to show by what title he held the manor.* 
On the sale by Thomas Lucas to Warren the vendor reserved a yearly rent 
of ;^40, and this he sold in 1574 to Anthony Cage, citizen and salter of 
London, by deed dated the 17th May, 16 Ehz. [1574].' 

Jaspar Warren had Ucence to alienate in 1592 to John Smyth, his son's 
father-in-law, as trustee. Jaspar Warren died in 1603-4., ^^^ ^^ ^613 
Thomas " Wareyn," son and heir of Jaspar, had livery, and on his death 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Jasper " Wareyn." 

In 1715 John King presented to the living, and Davy mentions a 
Waldgrave as lord without Christian name or date. 

Towards the middle of the i8th century we find Sir Cordel Firebrace 
sold to John Vernon, who died in 1756, and from that time the manor has 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Hun don, in this Hundred, and 
is now vested in the Hon. W. F. D. Smith, of Henley-on-Thames, M.P. 

A rent roll of John Inkle for tenements called Wadeselio and lands 
belonging to the Manors of Thurlow Magna and Parva and Bradley Parva, 
15th century, will be found amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum.'^ 

Manor of Wadgell's Hall. 

This was the lordship of Sir William de Clopton, Knt. 

In 1402 Agnes, Lady Bardolph, " late wife of Sir Thomas de Mortimer, 
Knt.," released all right to all her lands here, except Wadeseles, to Edmund 
de Mortimer and others. 

In 1804 the manor was vested in Thomas Summonds. 

Manor of Temple End. 

In the reign of King Edw. I., Roger le Bretun and Wilham le Bretun 
aliened 80 acres of land and 4 acres of meadow to the Templars, and probably 
this manor went with the grant. 

In 1542 the manor was granted by the Crown to Thomas 
Barnardiston. 

In 1805 the manor was apparently held by Stephen Hemsted. 

Thurlow Parva Manor, 

This lordship was vested in the Abbot of St. Edmund from a period 
prior to the time of Edw. I., and we know of its being vested in him in 1316. 

'I.P.M., 22 Hen. VIII. 34. ■•Memoranda, 9 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 27. 

''S.P. 1530, 6600 (19). 5 Add. Ch. 13566. 

3 Fine, Hil. 9 Eliz. 'Add. Ch. 24719. 



THURLOW. 



297 



At the Dissolution the manor vested in the Crown, and was granted 
to, and had become vested in, Henry Turner,' of Wratting, before 1536 
for 4th Feb. this year he died seised of it. Henry Turner was found to be 
his heir, being son of Henry, son of John, son and heir of Henry Turner,' 
and on his death in 1572 the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Turner. 

Shortly afterwards the manor was acquired by Thomas Wisbicke 
and was sold by him to Sir Stephen Soame, Knt., Sheriff of London in 
1589, and Lord Mayor in 1598. He was the 2nd son of Thomas Soame, 
of Bottley al. Beetley, co. Norfolk^ and Anne his wife, daughter and heir 
of Francis Knighton, of Little Bradley, and widow of Richard Lehunt, of 
the same place. Sir Stephen restored and reglazed the great north window 
of St. Paul's Cathedral, and at his own cost renovated the roof of the Grocers' 
Hall, giving to the same company ;^io to be bestowed weekly in bread upon 
the poor prisoners of the counter in the Poultry of London for ever. He 
also built a new free school with £20 maintenance for a master and ;^io 
for the usher in Little Thurlow. 

He was knighted 25th April, 1599, was M.P. for London in 1601, and 
m.arried Anne, daughter of William Stone, of Segenhoe, in Bedfordshire, 
by whom he had a numerous family. He must have purchased this manor 
before 1595, for this -year we find from the Chancery Proceedings that he 
brought an action against Thomas Long for discovery, and to protect his 
title, as lord of this manor, to a piece of land parcel of the manor and 
messuage in Little Thurlow " purchased by him of Thomas Wisbricke.'" 
The manor was probably acquired by Sir Stephen in 1582, for we meet with 
a fine this year levied by him against WiUiam Walpole and others.* He 
died 23rd May, 1619, aged 75, and was buried in the parish church of Little 
Thurlow.' He erected a fine mansion here, but it was destroyed by fire on 23rd 
Jan. 1809, supposed to have been occasioned by a large fire kept in an open 
chimney of the great hall during the severe weather to prevent firearms 
from rusting, which fire communicated with some cross beams on the 
second floor.* This hall had been built in the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
and after the year 1572, but the architect is unknown. Sir Stephen, 
by his will dated 15th Jas. I., declared that an almshouse which he 
had built in this parish should be for the habitation of eight poor 
unmarried persons, men and women ; and for the ninth room in the 
midst of the almshouse he appointed it for the habitation of a ninth 
person, such an one as could read, and who he willed should every day, 
both forenoon and afternooon, read prayers there, with the rest of the alms- 
folk ; and he gave for the maintenance of the said eight or nine poor persons 
and to every of them 14^. a week ; and for payment thereof, his executors 
were to purchase land worth £-^0 a year, or a rent charge of ;^30 a year, out 
of some manor or lordship ; and should by the same purchase provide that 
every year eight loads of good faggots should be brought and laid in at 
the almshouse for the use of the poor people, every one to have a load, 
and that every two years every one of the poor persons should have a gown. 
of cloth worth 5s. a yard, made and given to them ; and after reciting that 
he had erected a schoolhouse in Little Thurlow, the same should be 

'See Manor of Wratting Parva, in this ^ There is a monument in St. Thomas 
Hundred. Aeons, London. For inscription 

^I.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 50. on tomb in Little Thurlow, see 

^C.P. iii. 57. Cornerth Hall, Bures, in Babergh 

*Fine, Mich. 24-25 Eliz. Hundred. 

"Page, Hist, of Suff. 902. Ipswich Journal, 
nth Feb. 1809. 

O I 



298 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

employed as a free school for that and several adjoining parishes, and all 
other towns in the county of Suffolk ; and he bequeathed to the school- 
master ;^20 a year, and to the usher £lo a year.' 

The manor passed on the death of Sir Stephen Soame to his son and 
heir, Sir WiUiam Soame, who was Sheriff of Suffolk in 1632, and is 
said to have had an estate of ;^4,ooo a year. He married Bridget, 
4th daughter and coheir of Benedict Barnham, of London, alderman, 
and died in 1655, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Stephen 
Soame, who married ist Mary, eldest daughter and coheir of Sir John 
Dynham, of Bourstall, co. Bucks, and widow of Laurence Banaster, son 
and heir of Sir Robert Banaster, of Passenham, in Norfolk, and 2ndly 
Anne Copinger, widow of Isaac Crane, of Lavenham, and made his will in 
1657, and on his death the manor passed to his only son. Sir WiUiam Soame, 
created a baronet 5th Feb. 1684-5. He married Beata, daughter of Thomas 
Pipe, 3rd Earl of Downe, and 2ndly Mary, daughter of Sir Gabriel How, 
of Wotton-under-Edgej co. Gloucester, and died without issue at Malta 
in 1686. His will is dated in 1685, and it was proved Dec. 1686. The 
manor passed by devise to his uncle, Bartholomew Soame. From 
Bartholomew we suspect, but have no evidence of the fact, that the manor 
passed to his nephew, Stephen Soame (son of John), who married Susan, 
daughter of — Nash, of Shrewsbury, and was buried at Thurlow 25th Sept. 
1727, when the manor vested in his son and heir, Stephen Soame, who 
married Anne, 2nd daughter of Joseph Alston, of Edwardstone, and died 
at Reading 3rd Nov, 1764,'' when the manor devolved on his son and heir, 
another Stephen Soame, who married Frances, daughter of Sir John Wynn, 
Bart., and sister of Lord Newburgh, and died nth Aug. 1771, leaving an 
only daughter, Frances, who died 5th Jan. 1772, aged 5 months and 3 days. 
Stephen was but 34 when he died, and the following hues, inscribed on his 
monument by Frances his widow in 1771 and 1772, explain the 
circumstances : — 

Stop, Passenger, and drop one pitying Tear, 
O'er the lamented Form that moulders here 
Sad Proof, alas ! how soon our Bliss is flown 
And but just tasted e'er for ever gone. 
Yet, stay, lov'd Shade ! ah, yet a Moment stay !_ 
(A Moment, and we all shall haste away) 
Thy Frances only waits the Child to rear. 
Sweet Pledge of all on Earth My heart held dear 
When she can spare me, I will gladly come. 
Follow thy Summons to the awful Tomb, 
Where we may rest secure from mortal strife, 
Where none will wish to part the Man and Wife. 

Frances Soame 1771 
The Tomb scarce clos'd, my Tears scarce ceas'd to flow, 
When 'twas th' Almighty's Will t'increase my Woe. 
A few short Months He spar'd my Darling Child, 
That his Corrections might be slow and mild 
His Will be done, and may this keen felt Smart 
Prove the tri'd Furnace to refine my Heart. 
When that is done. Lord, be it thy Decree, 
To take me from this suff'ring World to THEE. 

F. S. 1772. 

'Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 903. =Will 8th June, 1762, proved i6th Jan. 1765. 



THURLOW. 299 

The manor passed to the last Stephen's brother, the Rev. Henry 
Soame, who 15th June, 1765, married Susannah, eldest daughter of the 
Rev. Sir William Bunbury, Bart., and died 29th March, 1813, without 
issue, his only child, Henry Francis Robert Soame, having died at Madras 
in 1803 unmarried. 

In 1855 the manor was vested in Thomas Soame, in 1885 in Miss 
Soame, in 1896 in Roger William Bulwer Jenyns, eldest son of the Rev. 
Charles Fitzgerald Gambler Jenyns, of Bottisham Hall, rector of Kneb- 
worth (who died in 1888), by his 2nd wife. Rose Emily Lytton, eldest 
daughter of William Earle Lytton Bulwer, of Heydon Hall, Norfolk. The 
manor is now vested in Charles Foster Ryder. 




3P0 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WICKHAMBROOK. 

JHERE was only one estate in this place under this head in 
the Survey. It was that of a freeman holding 60 acres, 2 
bordars, a ploughteam, and 4 acres of meadow, valued at los. 
At the time of the Survey this land belonged to Richard, 
son of Earl Gislebert.' 

There were, however, other estates in this place in 
Saxon times under different heads ; as, for instance, Bad- 
mondisfield, Clopton, and Farley Green, all of which are in Wickhambrook. 
Under the head Bademondesfelda — ^no doubt Badmondisfield Hall — we 
find Algar holding it in the Confessor's time as a manor and as 10 carucates 
of land. There were 18 villeins (reduced to 14 at the time of the Survey), 
14 bordars, 4 serfs, 5 ploughteams in demesne and 10 belonging to the men, 
7 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for the support of 60 hogs, 2 rouncies, 
7 beasts, 88 pigs, 24 sheep, and 25 goats. Also a church with 10 acres of 
free land, and there were 12 freemen with 2|- carucates of land. 

Algar had soc and commendation, and the freemeii did not render 
payment in the Confessor's time. There were attached to this estate 3|- 
ploughteams, and 9 acres of meadow, valued at £'/. By the time of the Survey 
the ploughteams had come down to 2^, but the value had gone up to ;^io. 
The freemen rendered 40s. The estate was 12 quarentenes long and 8 
broad, and rendered in a gelt is^d. It was land of the King, of which 
Bigot had the charge.'' 

Under the head Copletuna, Cloptuna, which is stated to be a league 
long and 3 quarentenes broad, paying in a gelt 6^d., we have five entries, 
three of these amongst the lands of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, viz., the 
following : — 

An estate in Saxon times held by two socmen, consisting of a carucate 
and 81^ acres of land, 9 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne (increased 
to 3 when the Survey was taken), and half a ploughteam belonging to the 
men. Also 3 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to support 4 hogs, 2 rouncies, 
6 beasts (doubled at the time of the Survey, when there were an additional 
30 hogs), 40 sheep (also doubled at the time of the Survey), and 3 hives 
of bees. The value was in Saxon times 20s., but when the Survey was 
taken 4015. 

A second estate had been that of Xevett, a freeman, and consisted of 
1^ carucates of land, a villein, a bordar, and 3 serfs, a ploughteam (increased 
to 2 at the time of the Survey), 4 acres of meadow, a rouncy, 10 beasts, and 
83 sheep. At the time of the Survey there were also 34 hogs. The value 
was 20s., increased at the time of the Survey to 30s., when Roger held 
over the freeman above mentioned. 

The^third of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert' s estates here, was a property 
formerly held by Roc, a freeman, and at the time of the Survey by William 
Peccatum over him. It consisted of 13 acres valued at 2s.^ 

Among the lands of William de Varennes at the time of the Survey 
was an estate held by Hugh de Wancy, and formerly by Toka the thane. 
It consisted of a carucate of land, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at 205."* 

'Dom. ii. 397. ^Dom. ii. 390, 396, 3966. 

*Dom. ii. 2896. ^Dom. ii. 399. 



WICKHAMBROOK. 301 

Belonging to the Abbot of Ely was a holding formerly that of three 
freemen. It consisted of 20 acres valued at 2s. The soc^ sac, and com- 
mendation belonged to the abbot, who also held the six forfeitures.' 

The entry under the head Farley in the Survey was amongst the lands 
of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. It consisted of 7 acres valued at 14^., 
and had formerly been held by a socman.'' 

Manor of Badmondisfield Hall. 

Badmondisfiield Manor, or the Manor of Bansfield, as it was originally 
called, was given by Hen. I. with the Honor of Montgomery to Baldwin de 
Boulers orBulers on his marriage with Sibil de Falaise, to be held of the 
King in chiel,^ and the lord at the time of the compiling of the Hundred 
Rolls claimed free warren here.* Maud, the daughter and heir of Baldwin 
and Sibil, married Richard Fitz Urse, and they were succeeded by their 
son and heir, Reginald Fitz Urse, who left a daughter and heir Maud, 
married to Robert de Curtenai, who left a son, William de Curtenai, who 
died without issue. He died before 1242, as at that date lUaria Trusebut, 
widow of Robert de Bellers, held it in dower, and a partition was made of 
the estates of William de Curtenai between his heirs, William de Cantilupe 
and Vitalis Engaine.^ 

Vitalis Engaine, who had a moiety, died about 1249.° 

George de Cantilupe, grandson and heir of WiUiam, had a moiety, and 
died in 1273, leaving an infant heir,^ for in 1274 a grant was made by the 
King to Eleanor, his consort, of the manor during the minority of the heir 
of George de Cantilupe, late tenant in chief.^ In 1292 John Engaine, 2nd 
son of VitaUs, sold his interest to Robert de Bures, Alice his wife, and 
James brother of Robert.® The infant heir of George de Cantilupe, seems 
to have died young, and he was succeeded by his father's nephew and 
heir, John de Hastings, 2nd Baron, who died seised of the lordship in 
1312, leaving his wife Isabella and a son John.'" 

There is an order on the Close Rolls this year to deliver to Isabella, 
late wife of John de Hastings, in dower with assent of John, son of the said 
John, this manor, then of the yearly value of £19. 2s. 8d." On the death 
of his mother John de Hastings, 3rd Baron, took the manor, and from this 
time to the death of Sir George Somerset in 1560 the manor devolved in 
the same course as the Manor of Reydon, in Blything Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John de 
Hastings, 3rd Baron, in 1325," of Laurence Hastings, 4th Baron, in 1375/' 
and of Anne, widow of John, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, in 1382.'' 

The year previous to the extinction of the earldom of Pembroke by 
the venturous act to which we have referred in the account of Overhall 
Manor, in Ottley, the King exercised his right as guardian of the infant 

'Dom. ii. 3846. ^Pa-t- RoUs, 30 Edw. I. 22. Extent, 

^Dom ii.' 3Qo6. Robert de Bures and Alicia his 

3WR ii" Tt;n T'7'7 wife and James his brother. 

^H R Si if3' ^ J (I-P-M-> 30 Edw. I. 131.) 

50." 26 Hen. III. 2. • =1 '°]:7-^-h^^^'^^hV- fr « 

«I.P.M., 33 Hen. HI. file 9 (3). " Close Rolls, 6 Edw. II. 8. 

'The Complete Peerage, by G. E. C. "I.P.M., 18 Edw. II 61. 

states that George died unmarried. '3 1.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. 1. 70. 

8 Pat. RoUs, 2 Edw. I. 2. '4LP.M., 7 Rich. U. 67. 



302 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

tenant in chief to present to the church of Badmondisfield. The presenta- 
tion was of WilUam Bauky " to the free chapel of Badmonsfield " void by 
resignation of Simon Gaunstede/ 

On the Patent Rolls we find this same year, no doubt shortly after 
the 3rd Earl of Pembroke's death, a grant for Hfe to Thomas Upton of the 
keepership of the parks of Badmondisfield and Lidgate so long as they 
remain in the King's hands." 

In 1541, the year his stepmother died, Sir George Somerset was called 
upon to show by what title he held the manor. ^ He died in 1560, and 
was succeeded by his son and heir Charles. A fine, was levied of the manor, 
1565, by William Humberston against this Charles.'^ Charles Somerset, 
it is said, sold the manor to Sir Henry North, 2nd son of Roger, Lord North. 

In a letter written by PeterLeNevetoSir John Rous, July 12th, 1725, 
referring to the descent of this manor, he says, strangely, that it came to 
" Reginald Lord Grey, of Ruthyn, his son John, Lord Grey, of Ruthyn, and 
grandson Edmund, ist Earl of Kent, of this family ; his son George and his son 
Richard, both Earls of Kent, succeeded in the possession thereof, but the 
last Earl consumed most of his great estate at play, and among the rest 
he first mortgaged and then sold this manor, &c., and Reydon, to Charles 
Somerset, Earl of Worcester, then Lord Chamberlain to King Henry VIII., 
ancestor of the Duke of Beaufort, who by will dated 21st March, 1574, 
and 16 Hen. VIII., gave it to his countess Ehnor for hfe. Sir George 
Somerset, 3rd son to the said Earl, had it and Reydon by settlement, lived 
and died here loth May in the 2nd year of Elizabeth (1560) ; his son and 
heir Charles had livery of Badmondisfield, who I suppose was possdst 
thereof 11 Eliz. (1569) and after of the Queen, sold this and all other his 
lands, for I can find nothing of him after. In the ist year of K. James 
(1603) or thereabouts Sir Henry North, Knt., youngest son of the Lord 
North, lived here in or about the year 1620, when he was High Sheriff of 
Suffolk. He left it to his son, Sir Roger North, Knt., and he to his son, 
Henry North, Esq., after a baronet, who lived here before his father's death, 
and then removed to Mildenhall, so I suppose it is enjoyed by Sir Thomas 
Hanmer, Bart., with the rest of the estate of that family. Mr. North, 
of Benacre, was a younger branch of this family." 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1596 by George Thomson and others 
against George Somerset,^ and in 1600 by Roger North, Lord North, and 
others against the said George Somerset and others.® Probably the manor 
had before 1596 passed from Charles Somerset to George, and the sale 
was made by the latter and not by the former to Lord North. However 
this may be. Sir Henry North held the manor and died here 20th Nov. 
1620, being succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Roger North.^ He was 
in 165 1 succeeded by his son and heir. Sir Henry North, afterwards baronet, 
who, dying in 1671, was succeeded by his son and heir. Sir Henry North, 
Bart., who died in 1695 without issue. He seems to have sold before his 
death, probably to Francis Warner, 2nd son of Robert Warner, of Cratfield, 
and Ehzabeth his wife, daughter of Alexander Courthorp, of Cromebroke, 
in Kent. Francis Warner married Alianora, daughter of Thomas Andrews, 

> Pat. Rolls, 12 Rich. II. pt. i. 6. ^Fine, Mich. 38-39 Eliz. 

2 Pat. Rolls, 13 Rich. II. pt. ii. 2. "Fine, Hil. 42. Eliz. 

3 Memoranda Rolls, 33 Hen. VIII., Pasch. 'i'See Manor of Mildenhall, Lackford 

Rec. Rot. 36. Hundred. 

■• Fine, Mich. 7 Eliz, 



WICKHAMBROOK. 303 

alderman of London and Lord Mayor, and died 17th Feb. 1684, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Andrew Warner, who married 15th 
April, 1683, Ehzabeth, only surviving child of Richard Cutts, of Clere, by 
Ehzabeth his wife, only daughter and heir of Henry Paulet, of Preston 
Forles, co. Somerset. He died 17th Dec. 1717, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Poulett Warner, who married 12th May, 1713, Margaret, 
daughter of Joseph Broksbanke, of London, and died 26th Aug. 1721, 
leaving three daughters, all of whom died without issue, and the manor 
vested in Poulett's brother, Nathaniel Warner, who married Anne Parman 
and died without issue 8th Aug. 1753. 

In 1789 the manor seems to have been vested in Nathaniel Barrett, 
and it belonged to Warner Bromley in 1837. The manor in 1855. was 
held by Nathaniel Warner Bromley, who in 1861 married Henrietta 
Martha, daughter of Thomas Bradbury Winter, of Brighton, and died in 
1896, leaving a son, Nathaniel Barrett Bromley, and the manor passed to 
his mother, who is now lady of the manor. 

The manor house of Badmondisfield was surrounded by a moat and 
a park of the same extent, which according to a map in 1598 appears to 
have extended considerably into Lidgate, to the rector of which parish 
this estate had immemorially paid a modus of 2s. 6d. in lieu of tithes. A 
free chapel known as St. Edward's chapel, belonged to the hall, and stood 
within the moat. It was erected on a Httle island called St. Edward's 
Island within the moat before the hall door on the right hand. It was 
built of timber, panelled with brick, and covered with tiles. In 1591 a 
dispute arose as to the possession of tithes between the vicar of Wickham- 
brook and the owners of the Manor of Badmondisfield Hall, and the 
Exchequer Depositions in this suit disclose particulars respecting this 
chapel. It was alleged that of the tithe corn two sheaves were given to 
the chapel and one to the vicar. William Randall, of Thurlow Parva, aged 
74, made deposition to the following effect : "He doth remember when he 
was a child he did see our old decayed chapel standing within the great 
moat of Badmondesfield Hall, environed also by itself within a little island, 
which chapel being utterly decayed was pulled down by the appointment 
of Sir George Somerset. He well remembereth that about 50 years past, 
when Sir George came to live at Badmondesfield Hall, there was used in 
place of a chapel a little chamber over the porch, called the chapel chamber, 
unto which the gallery at the end of the hall did adjoin, and lie in part open, 
and that the household servants unto Sir George Somerset, and divers of 
the inhabitants of Badmondesfield each repairing unto the said gallery 
did usually hear divine service there, which they had notice of by the 
ringing of a bell which did hang next unto the said chapel chamber.'" 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of Elizabeth is a bill by Richard 
Everard against Edward Hovell and others to set aside a conveyance as 
to lands held by Kath. Andrewe of this manor,'' and also a claim by Sir 
Henry North for the performance of a will relating to the manor. ^ 

Arms of Cantilupe : Gu. 3 leopards' heads, inverted jessant 
3 fleurs-de-lis, Or. 

Manor of Gaynes Hall al. Attilton. 

The de Bures family held lands here from the time of King Edw. I., 
and Robert de Bures had the lordship and obtained a grant of free warren 

'Suff. Institute, xii. 6. 'C.P. ii. 257- 

"C.P. i. 277. 



304 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

in 1314,' He died in 1331, when his estate passed to his son and heir, Sir 
Andrew de Bures, Knt., and Ahce his wife. Sir Andrew had a grant of 
free warren here in 1335/ 

In 1353 a grant was made under the name of the " Manor of Nether 
Attylton " by Sir Andrew de Bures, Knt., to Sir Wilham de Bures, vicar 
of the church of Brecham, his brother, for hfe. The deed is dated Easter 
Day, 26 Edw. HI., and is amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Pubhc Record 
Office.^ 

Sir Andrew de Bures died seised in fee in 1360,* when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Sir Robert de Bures, Knt., who died in 1361, when the 
manor passed to his widow Joan, who remarried Sir Richard de Waldegrave, 
Knt. In 1420 Sir Richard Waldegrave granted to Sir WiUiam Bardwell, 
Sir John Heveningham, and others this manor with those of Smallbridge 
in Bures, and Newhall, in Ousden, and the following year Sir Richard 
Waldegrave, jun., released to Sir Richard Waldegrave, sen., and Joan the 
wife of Sir Richard, sen., all his right in his manor for the life of Joan. 
On the death of Sir Richard and Joan the manor apparently went to Sir 
Andrew de Bures, brother of Sir Robert, and on his death passed to Sir 
Richard de Waldegrave, Knt., son and heir of Sir Richard, and on his 
death went to his son and heir. Sir William Waldegrave, to whom succeeded 
his son and heir. Sir Richard Waldegrave, from whom the manor descended 
to Sir William Waldegrave in 1567, in the same course as the Manor of 
Smallbridge, in Babergh Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir William 
Waldegrave, who died 30th January, 1527,^ leaving George his son and 
heir, and in that of Sir George Walde'grave, who died 8th July, 1528,^ 
leaving William his son and heir. Also in that of Sir William Waldegrave, 
who died 7th November, 1554,'' leaving William his son and heir. Sir 
William Waldegrave sold the manor this year to Humphrey Moseley, the 
sale being effected by a fine levied between them in Michaelmas Term 9 Eliz. 
This manor subsequently went in the same course as Ousden Manor, in 
this Hundred, through the Moseley family to John Moseley, who succeeded 
his father in 1785. 

In 1837 James Moseley held the lordship. In 1847 and 1855 it 
belonged to Mrs. Sarah Sparke, widow of Ezekiel Sparke, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and all the copyholds had been enfranchised and the manor 
extinguished. 

Manor of Gifford's Hall. 

In the reign of King Edw. I. Peter Giffard held half a fee here, and in 
1321 William Giffard had a grant of free warren.' Subsequently the lord- 
ship was vested in Sir William Clopton, Knt., who died seised of the manor 
in 1377, when it passed to his widow for hfe, and subject to such 
interest vested in his son and heir. Sir William Clopton.^ 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1393 by Sir WiUiam Brian, Sir 
Richard Waldegrave, the younger. Sir WiUiam Berdewelle, Thomas 
Pynchebek, Robert Asshefeld, Richard Howe, John Yelverton, and John 
Palmere against Sir William de Clopton.'" 

'Chart. RoUs, 7 Edw. II. 10. n.PM., 20 Hen. VIII. 18. 

^Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 37. ^l.'PM., i and 2 P. and M. 92. 

^C. 498. 8 Chart. RoUs, 15 Edw. II. 29. 

■* See Manor of Acton, in Babergh Hundred, ^See Hawstead Manor, in Thingoe 

and OverhaU Manor, Layham, in Hundred. 

Cosford Hundred. "Feet of Fines, 17 Rich. II. 25 ; Harl. 58 
= I.P.M., 19 Hen. VIII. 44. H. 9 ; A. 37, 99. 



WICKHAMBROOK. 305 

The fine was levied for effecting an assurance of the manor to the 
petents at the death of Mary, the wife of Sir WiUiam Clopton, as the right 
of the said John Palmere.' The parties were, however, obviously' trustees 
on some resettlement of the property, for in 1409 Sir William de Clopton 
granted the manor to Sir WiUiam Berdwell, Robert Cressner, and others, 
again, no doubt, as trustees and by way of resettlement. 

In 1428 the manor was vested in Sir Hugh Franceys or Francis, Knt., 
whose daughter and coheir Isabel married Thomas Heigham. He was the son 
of Thomas Heigham, of Heigham, and Alice Boys, which Thomas was the son 
of Thomas Heigham, who died 7th Feb. 1409, by Alice his wife, daughter and 
heir of John Hume, of Tunstall, which Thomas was the son of Thomas 
Heigham, who died 24th May, 1404, and Maud his wife, which Thomas 
was the son of Richard Heigham who died 25th March, 1340, by Joan his 
wife, who died 23rd Aug. 1361. Isabel, wife of Thomas Heigham, died 
26th March, 1452, and he 21st March, 1480, when the manor passed to 
their 2nd son, Clement Heigham, who married Joan, daughter of William 
Cotton, of Landwade, co. Cambridge, and died 20th March, 1520,' when 
the manor went to his 2nd son but heir, William Heigham, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of WiUiam Mordaunt, of Henstead, co. Essex, by 
Anne, daughter and coheir of Thomas Huntingdon, of Henstead,^ and died 
17th Oct. 1558, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Heigham, 
who married Anne, daughter of WiUiam Yelverton, of Rougham, co. Norfolk, 
by Anne, daughter and heir of Sir Henry Fermor, Knt., of East Barsham, 
CO. Norfolk, and died and was buried at Wickhambrook 21st July, 1597, 
at the age of 69, when the manor passed to the 3rd son, Thomas Heigham, 
a valiant soldier in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 

We meet with a fine levied in 1602 by John Jackson and others against 
Clement Heigham and others.* 

Thomas Heigham married Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John Fynche, 
of Gestingthorpe, co. Essex, and died rgth August, 1630, without issue. 
In the chancel of the church of Wickhambrook against the south wall 
within the communion rails is a large altar tomb on which is a figure in 
marble life-size of a man in armour with his sword by his side, bareheaded, 
with fuU beard. The figure is in a recumbent position, resting on the left 
arm. Above the figure, on a black marble tablet, is the following inscrip- 
tion : — 

Dedicated to the Memory 
of 

The worthy and weU deserving Souldier, Thomas Higham, Esquire, 
A Gentleman of auntient Descent and noble AUyance, suted to both with 
an HeroycaU spirit, who in his younger yeares entred- into the profession 
of Armes, at the Syege of Nimigen when Queene Elizabeth, of glorious 
memory, received the Hollanders into her protection, and when her most 
sacred M'tie sent over the Earl of Essex with Forces, to establish King 
Henry the 4th of France on his throne. This Gentleman, in the action before 
the Cyttye of Roan, was shott with a buUett and maymed, and her M'atie, 
upon just imformacon of his merritts, remumerated him with a good Pension, 
and appointed him to take charge of a Company in Ireland, when Sir William 
RusseU went over Lord Deputye. In those warres he is worthy to be 

'Harl. 58 H. 9. ^Her will is dated in 1574. 

''I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 123. *Fine, Trin. 44 Eljz. 

P I 



3o6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

remembred for his good Service ; at the taking in of Belney-Breket, 
Etnay and Skillen, and at the Winning of Slego Castell, in Connaugh, 
and at the Curlew did brave Service, when some Enghsh Commanders 
were slayne in the attempt against Clein Castell with much difficulty and 
losse of most of his Company, he escaped the Enemyes Surprise, and at 
the overthrow given the Rebellious Irish, assisted by Spanish Forces at 
Blackwater, he fighting single With Sir Edward Stanley, that was a 
Commander of some of those trayterous Troopes (and took part against 
his Soveraigne) gave him the Guerdon of his Disloyalty, and deprived him 
both of Life and Honour," 

On a tablet below the figure : — 

" That Kingdome being brought into obedience this noble Souldier 
returned for England, where he happily and worthely lived till he came 
to "the 63 yeare of his age and upon the 15 day of August 1630, like a good 
and faithful Servant entered into his Master's and Redeemer's Joy. 

Sir Robert KnoUys, of Stanford in the County^ of Berkshire, Knight, 
and Nephew to the Deceased, hath caused this Monument to be erected 
as a memoriall due unto the Fame of this well-deserving Gentleman." 

Above the monument, supported by a bracket, is his helmet, sur- 
mounted with his crest — On a wreath a horse's head erased Argent. The 
shield, which some years since was in like manner suspended above the 
monument, has been removed.' 

The manor subsequently passed to John Owen, and in 1764 belonged 
to George Chinery, but four years later was acquired by the trustees of 
William Baron Baynard with money left by him in 1698 to the parish of 
Thaxted, in Essex, for charitable uses. Gifford's Hall was not included 
in this purchase. 

Arms of Franceys : Gules, a chevron engrailed Ermine between 
3 falcons displayed Argent, beaked and membered Or. 

Manor of Clopton Hall or Chappeley Manor. 

Richard Fitz Gilbert held land here in the time of WiUiam the 
Conqueror, and in the time of Hen. I. William Clopton had the manor 
and resided here. He was succeeded by his son Walter and he by his 
son WiUiam. Walter, son of William, succeeded and held in the time of 
Rich. I. and Hen. IH., being succeeded by his son William, who left a 
son Walter, who was lord in 1298. He married ist Alice, youngest 
daughter and coheir of Warin Fitz Hugh, and 2ndly Ivetta, daughter and 
heir of Edmond de Weyland, and died in 1326, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir. Sir WiUiam Clopton, who married ist Ivetta, daughter 
of Thomas de Grey, of Buckenham Castle, Norfolk, and 2ndly, Mary, 
daughter of Sir William Cockerel, Knt., and died in 1377,'' and the manor 
passed to his third son. Sir Walter Clopton, of Toppisfield Hall, in 
Hadleigh, whomarried EUzabeth, daughter of Sir JohnPygot, and diedleaving 
two daughters only— AUce, married to Thomas Bendish, and Elizabeth, 
married to John Barwick. Davy says that in 1548 the manor was vested in 
John, Lord RusseU, who held it of the Honor of Clare, but it does not seem 
to have left the Clopton family at this date, as in 1550 we meet with a fine 
of the manor levied by Francis Clopton against WiUiam Clopton.^ There 

'Howard's Visit, of Suff. ii. 233-4. ^Fine, Mich. 4 Edw. VI. 

'Will 1376, proved 14th Jan. 1377, which 

does not support the marriage as 

given in Howard's Visit, of Suff. ii. 
.126. 



WICKHAMBROOK. 



307 



are three fines levied of the manor of " AUfeld Hall " or " Aldersfield/' all 
the lands being in Wickhambrook, it therefore seems not unlikely this manor 
was referred to. The first was in 1553 by Robert Grey and others against 
Thomas Carewe/ the second was in 1570 by Thomas Carewe against George 
Carewe/ and the third was in 1582 by Robert Page and others against 
Thomas Carewe and others.^ 

The manor towards the end of the 17th century became vested in 
Major Robert Sparrow, who died in 1684, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Captain Robert Sparrow, who died in 1690, when the manor passed 
to his sister and heir. Temperance, married to Devereux Edgar,"* of Ipswich. 
He died in 1739 (buried at St. Mary's Tower, Ipswich, 31st Aug. 1739), and 
she in 1754 (buried at St. Mary's Tower, 26th Dec. 1754), when the manor 
vested in his son and heir, Robert Edgar, who died in 1750, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Mileson Edgar. 

In 1855 the manor formed part of the charity estates of Lord William 
Maynaxd, and it is now vested in the Trustees of the Thaxted Charities. 
It is doubtful if the Sparrows had the manor. 



'Fine, Easter, 7 Edw. VI. 

*Fine, Easter, 12 Eliz. 

3 Fine, Mich. 24-25 Eliz. (vol. 8). 



+See Manor of Burwash, Witnesham, in 
Carlford Hundred. 




3o8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WITHERSFIELD. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Wimer, who 
held it still at the time of the Survey from William de 
Varennes. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 5 villeins, 
5 bordarSj 3 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging 
to the men, 2 acres of meadow, and wood for the maintenance 
of 20 hogs. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 
20 hogs, 80 sheep, 16 goats, and 6 hives of bees, valued 
at ys. When the Survey was taken the serfs had disappeared, the plough- 
teams in demesne had increased to 3, and there were 3 rouncies, 12 beasts, 
30 hogs, and 100 sheep, while the value was £4. William de Varennes 
also held 24 acres and half a ploughteam which had been held by a freeman, 
valued at 4s.' 

All the other estates in this place belonged at the time of the Survey to 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. The first was held by Pagan over the 
former owner, Woolmar, a freeman, and consisted of 51 acres, a bordar, 
half a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, valued at 8s. 

The second was held by Goddard over the former owner, Lemara, a 
freeman, and consisted of 100 acres, a bordar, and a ploughteam. 

The third was held by Wilard over the former owner, Alwin, a freeman, 
and consisted of 3 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 11 bordars, 3 serfs, 3 plough- 
teams in demesne and i belonging to the men. Also 2 acres of meadow, 
wood for the maintenance of 20 hogs, 2 rouncies, 22 beasts, 60 hogs, 60 sheep, 
and 60 goats. At the time of the Survey the ploughteam belonging to 
the men was reduced to half a team, the beasts to 20, the hogs to 45, and 
the goats to 57, while the rouncies had risen to 3 and the sheep to 123. 
The value was 60s. The whole township was a league long and half a 
league broad, and paid in a gelt bd. The last holding consisted of i| 
carucates of land, and 2^ ploughteams, valued in Saxon times at 20s., but 
at the time of the Survey 30s. It had formerly been the estate of nine 
freemen.^ 

A place named Haningehet in the Survey is no doubt Hanchett Hall, 
in Withersfield. 

Here Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had an estate of 100 acres, a 
bordar, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 15s. It had 
formerly been held by Alwine, a freeman, when it was valued at los. only.^ 

Manor of Withersfield Pellegrues al. Petticrues. 

This was the estate of Wimer in the Confessor's day, and he held under 
WiUiam de Warrena at the time of the Survey. The lordship was held 
in the time of Hen. III. by WiUiam de Stutevile, and on his death in 1259 
passed to his son and heir, Robert de Stutevile,* who was a firm adherent 
of King Hen. III. during his war with the Barons. Robert was taken 
prisoner by Henry de Montford, and reduced to the expedient of disposing 
of this manor to Sir Giles Argentine, one of the Barons' party, in order to 
redeem himself from captivity. In 1266, however, he had the manor 
restored to him by the King.= Robert de Stutevile died in 1273, when the 
manor passed to his nephew, Jordan FoUot, who, the Hundred Rolls state, 
appropriated to himself warren in his demesne here."* He shortly after- 

'Dora. ii. 2986. ♦T. de N. 292. 

"Dom. ii, 3966, 397. =Pat. RoUs, 50 Hen. III. 42, 124. 

^Dom. ii. 396. en.R. ii. 153, 173, 196. 



WITHERSFIELD. 309 

wards sold the manor to Roger Luneday, who had a grant of free warren 
here in 1280/ and died in 1287/ when the manor so privileged passed to 
his widow Sibil for life, and subject thereto passed to his son and heir, 
Richard Luneday. There is an order this year on the Originalia Rolls 
that Sybil should have the manor as she and her husband were jointly 
seised.* 

From certain proceedings which are recorded as pending in the time of 
Edw. I., it appears that the manor formerly belonged to Alice le Blund. 

We find amongst the Abbreviation of Pleas in 1300 an action between 
Sybil, widow of Roger Loveday, plaintiff, and Ralph de Morthemer, Earl 
of Gloucester and Hereford, and Joan his wife, and Gilbert de Clare, son 
of Gilbert de Clare, sometime Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, and two 
other defendants, for one messuage and one carucate of land in Withersfield, 
also as to matters touching the Manor of V/ithersfield "which once belonged 
to AHce le Blund."* And we find in 1285 also a deed of release of Warren 
MartiU de Dunmawe to Lord Roger Loveday (the husband of the above- 
mentioned Sybil) and his heirs relating to lancfe which belonged to Alice 
le Blund.' Sybil remarried WiUiam de Ormesby, and in 1308 an action 
was brought by Margery, widow of Jordan " Folyat," against Sybil described 
as widow of Roger Loveday and Richard, son and heir of the said Roger, 
for a third part of the manor and advowson of Withersfield, when the 
defendants pleaded a feoffment of the same to the said Richard and his 
heirs. Judgment had been given against the said Richard by reason of 
his laches, but the said Sybil, then wife of WilUam de Ormesby, obtained 
an order that they should recover their old seisin on proof that they were 
mentioned in the aforesaid judgment.^ 

We next find the manor in the Pulteney family. Sir John de Pulteney, 
Knt., had a grant of free warren here in 1338," and died in 1349.^ Roger, 
son of Roger de Tychebourne, in 1342 released all his right to Sir John de 
Pulteney and Margaret his wife, and Sir John's heirs. The release included 
the advowson, and is enrolled on the Close Rolls." Sir WiUiam de Pulteney, 
Knt., granted the manor in 1362 to John de Barnet, Bishop of Worcester, 
John de Ludham, and WiUiam de ChurchuU. 

In 1371 Sir Nicholas de Lovayne, Knt., quit claim to Sir Aubrey de 
Vere, Andrew PevereUe, Arnande Savage, Renande de Malyns, Knights, 
and six others aU his estate in this manor. The document is dated 4th 
July, 45 Edw. III." , ,. ^ . 

Sir Philip de St. Clere, Knt. (son of Sir John St. Clere), who died m 
1408 "probably held in right of his wife Margaret, daughter and heir of 
Sir Nicholas de Lovayne, of Burston, co. Surrey. Margaret de St. Clere died 
in 1420 " when the manor, passed to her son and heir, Sir John St. Clere, 
on whose death without issue it passed into the King's hands, as we learn 
from the Memoranda RoUs in 1421.'' 

The manor, however, subsequently passed to Sir John s brother, 
Thomas St. Clere, who died seised of it 4th May, 1434, * leaving three 

Thart Rolls 8 Edw. I. 20. «I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 45- 

n^M., T^Edw I. 33. ;Close Rolls 16 Edw. III. pt. i. 24^. 

3Q T« Edw I 14 "Add. Cn. 15748. 

* Abbr of PI.' 28 and 29 Edw. I. Mich. 46. " LP-M-. 9 gen. IV. 44- 

= Abbr of PI. X3 Edw. I. Minus Rec. ;; J^^ g^.^^x^ H^n.^L ^0. ^^^ ^ 

6Abbr. of PI. 2 Edw. II. East. 93- '*IP-M-> ^7 Hen. VI. 56. 

'Chart Rolls, i2 Edw. III. 38- 



310 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

daughters and coheirs, EUzabeth, Alianora, and Editha, when it was 
assigned in 1446 as part of her father's estate to his eldest daughter and 
coheir EUzabeth. 

She married ist WilUam Lovel, 2nd son of John, Lord Lovel of 
Tidmarsh, and 2ndly Richard Lewkenor, who died seised 13th February, 
1502,' leaving her great-nieces Ehzabeth and Agnes, daughters of Henry 
her son, her coheirs. 

In 15 12 we meet with a fine of the manor and the advowson levied by 
George Honour against John Emson and Agnes his wife, she probably 
representing one of the above three daughters and coheirs.'' 

We next find the manor vested in Sir Giles Alington, Knt., of Horse- 
heath, who died in 1522, and from him the manor descended in the same 
course as the Manor of Halesworth, in Blything Hundred, until the time of 
Hildebrand, 4th Lord Alington. It passed to Charles, 6th Duke of Somerset. 
The manor is specifically included in the fine levied by Richard Catlyn and 
others against Sir Giles Alyngton and others in 1554.^ 

On the 6th Duke's death in 1748 this manor passed to his only surviving 
son Algernon, 7th Duke, who was created Baron Warkworth and Earl of 
Northumberland 2nd October, 1749, with a special remainder in default 
of male issue to his son-in-law. Sir Hugh Smithson, Bart., and his heirs 
male by Lady Elizabeth Seymour. Algernon, 7th Duke, died without 
male issue 7th Feb. 1749-50,* and the manor passed by Act of Parliament 
to his half-sister Charlotte, youngest daughter of Charles, 6th Duke of 
Somerset, married to Heneage, 3rd Earl of Aylesford.^ At this time the 
amount of the quit rents was ^(^. lis. 4^., and the estimate yearly of 
fines the same. 

In 1847 the manor and advowson were vested in Thomas Duffield, 
and 8th May, 1849, were offered for sale at the Mart in London under the 
following description: "The Withersfield Hall, Manor, and. Estate, with 
lands comprising about 1,325 acres, producing with the woodlands and 
Manor about ;f955 p.a., but which together with a right of shooting are of 
the estimated value of ;£i,335 p.a. Also the Advowson of the Rectory. 
The wood contains 225 acres."* 

In 1855 the manor was vested in the Rev. William Mayd, in 1885 in 
WiUiam Mayd, in 1896 in Colonel WilUam Taylor, V.D., of Glenleigh, 
Hastings, who had married in 1874 Winifred Mary Letitia, only daughter of 
Louis Schill, of Stuttgart and Rose Cottage, Hanham, Hastings. 

The manor is now vested in Charles Foster Ryder, of Great Thurlow 
Hall. 

We meet with two fines of the manor difficult to fit in ; one in 1522 
levied by Sir Andrew Windsor and others against Anthony Windsor and 
others ;' and the other in 1534 levied by Robert Wrythe and others against 
Sir Edward Bray and others of both manor and advowson.^ 

The writer has seen Court Rolls of a " Manor of Wethersfield," 27 Eliz., 
when John Went worth was lord, in 1603 when Walter Wentworth and 
Edmund Thompson held a court as " olim Fermariorum Manerij,"^ John 
Wentworth, lord, holding a court 23rd Jan. 4 Jac. I., and John Gierke, 19th 
July, 1652, and nth June, 1671. 

'I.P.M., 18 Hen. VII. ^I-pswich Journal, 14th April, 1849. 

«Fine, Trin. 4 Hen. VIII. ^Fine, Easter, 14 Hen. VIII. 

3 Fine, Easter, 3 Mary. spine^ Mich. 26 Hen. VIII. 

*Will proved 1750. »23rd Sept. i Jac. I. 
' See Manor of Gazeley Rectory, in this 
Hundred. 



WITHERSFIELD. 3" 

The descent of lands called Hanchet Hall in 1567 is given in the 
Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian.' 

Arms of St. Clere : Or, a lion rampant, tail forked and no wed Gu. 
collared Arg, Of Taylor : Or, three annulets Az. on a chief of the last, 
two lions passant of the first. 



'Rawl. B. 319. 




312 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WIXOE. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Godwin the thane. 
It consisted of 3 carucates and 15 acres of landj 6 villeins, 
4 bordars, 6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 2J 
belonging to the men. Also wood sufficient to support 10 
hogs, 12 acres of meadow, a mill, 24 beasts, 40 hogs, 60 
sheep, and 5 hives of bees, with a church having 5 acres 
attached. At the time of the Survey this manor was held 
by Ralph Baynard, and the details were considerably altered. The bordars 
had increased to 5, the serfs reduced to 4, and the ploughteams in demesne 
come down to 2. There were in addition 2 rouncies, but the beasts were 
just half what they had been, the hogs were only 12, and there were but 
40 sheep. 

Two freemen held 25 acres, a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, 
Baynard's predecessor having commendation and soc. The six forfeitures 
belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The value was 83s. This place 
was half a league long and 3J quarentenes broad, paying in a gelt 3d. Others 
had land here.' 

Manor of Wixoe al. Wickesher al. Waterhall in Wixoe. 

In the time of Rich. I. the lordship appears to have been vested in 
the Chevre or Capra family. We find that in 1195 the prior of St. Leonard, 
at Gaures, in Essex, demanded a mill of William, son of Jeffrey Capra, in 
the parish of Wixoe, the priory having been founded by Michael de Capra 
and Rohesia his wife. Jeffrey de Capra was lord of Wixoe. By a fine 
levied in 1206 Hamon, son of Nicholas de Capra and Marietta his wife, 
is shown to have held three parts of a fee here of Walter Fitz Robert.'' 

The estate of Hamon Chevre or Capra passed to his son and heir, 
Hamon Chevre, who had a grant of free warren here in 1267.^ 

From the Patent Rolls we learn that in 1275 there was a suit between 
Hamon Chevre and the prior of Stoke touching a pond in Wixoe.* There 
was also an action between them touching a fosse.' 

From him the estate passed probably to his widow Joan, for we find in 
1280 she brings an action as to a tenement here against Robert Fitz Walter 
and others.^ An action touching the manor itself was in 1279 brought by 
Hamo de Redenhal and Kamilla his wife, WiUiam de Rothinge and Joan 
his wife, and John " Chevere " against this Robert Fitz Walter and Joan, 
described as late wife of Hamo Chevere.'' 

An action touching the manor was also brought in 1280 by John de 
Cokefeld against William de Rothing and others.^ 

Subject to Joan his widow's interest, the manor passed from Hamo 
de Chevre to William de Chevre, whose daughter and heir Isabel married 
Sir William de Sutton, Knt., who died in 1302, when he was succeeded by 
his son and heir. Sir Hamo de Sutton, Knt., who in 1306 levied a fine of a 
third part of the manor against William Chevre.' The manor passed to 

' Dom. ii. 414. = Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. I. 6d. ; 4 Edw. I. 24^. 

^T. de N. 284, 292. 6 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 22^. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 51 Hen. III. pt. i., i; ^Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. I. 2d. 

H.R. ii. 173, 196. 8 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 8d. 

■»Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. I. 28. "Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. I. 42. 



WIXOE. 313 

Edmund de Sutton, son of Hamo/ and then on to Sir Hamo de Sutton, 
for we meet with three fines levied of the manor in 1330, 1371, and 1374, 
the first by Edmund de Sutton and Petronilla his wife against Nicholas 
de Sutton f the second by Henry Helyoun, Thomas Ewell, and William 
Colbayn against Sir Hamo de Sutton and Petronilla his wife 5' and the 
third by Sir Hamo de Sutton and Petronilla his wife against the said William 
Colbayn, Thomas Ewell, and Henry Helyon/ 

This last Sir Hamo's daughter and heir Joan married John Pevton, 
son and heir of Sir John de Peyton, Knt., and Margaret his wife, daughter 
and coheir of Sir John Gernon, Knt., of Lees, in Essex. From this time to 
the time of Sir John Peyton, who was created a baronet in i6ii,the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Peyton Hall, Boxford, in Babergh 
Hundred. In the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Peyton, who died the ist August, 
1490/ the manor is specifically mentioned, and is then said to be worth 
£10 and to be held of the Manor of Peyton Hall. It is also specifically 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Robert de Peyton, who died the 27th 
March, 1518.^ 

Shortly afterwards the manor is found vested in John Soame, son of 
Thomas Soame, of Burnham, in Norfolk (whose will was proved in 1654), 
the son of John Soame, brother of Sir Stephen Soame, who died in 1639, 
and later in Hugh Middleton, son of Simon Middleton, of Hackney, created 
a baronet 6th Dec. 1681. 

By deeds dated 13th and 14th July, 1677, he settled the manor, under 
the description of the " Manor of Wixoe al. Wickesho al. Waterhall in Wixoe ' ' 
upon his marriage with Dorothea, daughter of Sir William Oglander, 
Bart., to the use of himself for life, then to Dorothea for life by way 
of jointure, with remainder to sons in tail male. They were divorced 
by Act of Parliament. By deeds 22nd and 23rd Dec. 1702, made 
on the marriage of their daughter Dorothy with Henry Berkeley, of 
the Inner Temple, one third of the manor was granted to trustees to the_ 
use of Dorothy, the daughter, until her marriage, then to the use of Berkeley 
and Dorothy for their lives and the life of the survivor, then to sons in tail 
and to daughters in tail with an ultimate limitation to the said Berkeley 
and Dorothy in fee. Dorothy, the daughter, by her will dated loth Feb. 
1710,^ gave all her estates to her husband. By deeds dated 8th and 9th 
April, 1713, the remaining two-thirds of the manor were conveyed by 
Berkeley and his wife (Dorothy the wife having been the only child and 
heir of her parents) to trustees, that a recovery might be suffered, and 
enure to the same uses as the deed of 23rd Dec. 1702, except that Berkeley 
and wife might during life jointly appoint the two-thirds by way of mortgage. 
The recovery was suffered Easter term 12 Anne. On the death of Dorothy, 
Henry Berkeley became entitled to the whole manor in fee, there being no 
issue of the marriage. Henry Berkeley, then of Eichmond, co. Surrey, 
by his will dated 26th July, 1749, subject to certain charges, devised 
the manor to the use of Samuel Berkeley, eldest son of Samuel Berkeley, 
of the parish of St. Ann, Westminster, during hfe, then to his sons in tail 
male, with remainder to the use of Charles, 3rd son of Samuel, the father, 
for life, with remainder to his sons in tail male, with remainder to the use 
of William, 2nd son of Samuel the father, then to his sons in tail male, with 

'Close RoUs, 26 Edw. III. Sd. sI.P.M., 6 Hen. VII. 740. 

'Feet of Fines, 3 and 4 Edw. III. 35- ^I.P.M., 10 Hen. VIII. i. 

^Feet of Fines, 45 Edw. III. 22. 7 Proved P.L.P. 2nd Oct. 1749. 
4 Feet of Fines, 48 Edw. III. i. 



314 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

remainder to the use of John Berkeley, son of John Berkeley, of Warwick 
Street, St. James, Westminster, for life, then to his sons in tail male, with 
remainder to Samuel Berkeley the father in fee. 

On the marriage of Samuel Berkeley the younger, son and heir 
apparent of Henry Berkeley, of Richmond, withEUzabeth Mayne, in 1750, 
Henry Berkeley granted two-thirds of the manor to trustees to the use of 
Henry Berkeley until the marriage, then to the use of trustees for 500 years 
if the said Henry Berkeley and Elizabeth Mayne should so long live upon 
trusts mentioned, then to the use of Henry Berkeley for life, then to Elizabeth 
Mayne for life, and byway of j ointure,' with divers remainders over, including, 
in default of issue, limitations to Samuel Berkeley, jun. in tail general, to 
Charles Berkeley, younger son of the said Samuel the father for life, and 
then to his sons in tail male. 

Of this marriage there was no issue, and Samuel Berkeley, jun., 
Charles Berkeley, younger son of Samuel Berkeley the father, and others 
named in the settlement, died without issue. Henry Berkeley, who made 
the settlement on the marriage of Samuel Berkeley the younger with 
Elizabeth Mayne, died in 175 1, and on his death the reversion in fee of the 
whole of his estates not comprised in the settlement devolved on Samuel 
Berkeley the elder under the limitations contained in the will of 26th 
July, 1749. 

Samuel Berkeley the father died in 1764, and by his will dated 24th 
March, 1760,' gave the manor to his widow, Beaumont Mariana Berkeley, 
who died in 1773. It will be noted that Henry Berkeley held the manor 
until his death in 1751, when Samuel Berkeley the younger entered and 
held the same under the settlement of 1750, until his death in 1764, when his 
widow entered upon and held it under the same settlement until her death 
in 1773, when Mariana, wife of James Bromfield (and daughter of Samuel 
Berkeley the father, and entitled under the settlement of 1750 in default 
of issue of Charles Berkeley) entered and enjoyed under the same settle- 
ment until her death in 1786, when William Berkeley, son of the said 
Beaumont Mariana Berkeley by the said Samuel Berkeley deceased, 
entered and enjoyed under a settlement made by the said B. M. Berkeley, 
5th and 6th Sept. 1764, until her death, which happened in May, 1790. On 
her death without issue, the manor passed to Mrs. Finetta Mattingley, 
daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Berkeley, and widow of Thomas Mattingley, of 
Cirencester, in Gloucestershire, who entered and held the manor. She con- 
veyed it in 1792 to Thomas Mattingley, her eldest son, and he sold by deeds 
dated 25th and 26th May, 1797, to John Timms Hervey Elwes, from which 
time the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of Stoke 
by Clare, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Gervase Paget Elwes, of 
Edmondsham, Cranborne, Dorset. 

Arms of Sutton : Or, a chevron Gu. on a chief Az. three crescents of the 
field. Of Berkeley : Gu. a chevron betw. 10 crosses pattee Arg. 



'She died 8th Feb. 1773. 'Will and cod. 31st May, 1764, 4th July, 

1764, proved 8th Aug. 1764. 




WRATTING. 315 

WRATTING. 

ICHARD, son of Earl Gislebert, had three estates in this 
place when the Survey was taken. The first was held by 
Ulmar over the former owner, a socman. It consisted of 
a carucate of land, a villein, 3 bordars, a serf, a ploughteam 
in demesne and half belonging to the men (reduced to 2 
oxen at the time of the Survey). Also 4 acres of meadow 
and a church with 32 acres of free land valued at 20s. 
The second was held by Pagan over the former owner Goda, a free- 
woman. It consisted of 2 carucates and 30 acres of land, 9 bordars, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and half belonging to the men, 7 acres of meadow, 
and a mill. Of live stock there weie i rouncy, 4 beasts, a hog, 80 sheep, 
and 4 goats, valued at 30s. When the Survey was taken the rouncies were 
doubled, the beasts had increased to 10, there were 52 hogs, 100 sheep, 
and 40 goats, while the value was 40s. The township was a league long 
and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt I2d. 

The last estate mentioned here was held by Albern, a freeman, and 
consisted of 3 carucates of land, 5 villeins, 10 bordars, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and i belonging to the men, 12 acres of meadow, wood sufficient 
for the support of 8 hogs, and a mill. Also 2 rouncies, 9 beasts, 24 hogs, 
60 sheep, and 6 hives of bees. Under him were nine freemen with half a 
carucate of land and half a ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time 
of the Survey), and an acre of meadow, also a church with 13 acres. When 
the Survey was taken several of the details of this estate had been altered. 
The ploughteams in demesne were reduced to 2, the rouncies were increased 
to 3, the beasts to 13, the hogs to 48, and the sheep to 700. The value 
was formerly 50s. increased to 60s. at the time of the Survey.' 

Another holding here at the time of the Survey was that of the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds, formerly held by a freeman, valued at I2d. It consisted 
of 7 acres.* 

WRATTING Magna Manor. 

This was the estate of Richard Fitz Gislebert at the time of the Survey, 
and passed to his son and heir, Gilbert de Clare, who died in 1151, as the 
Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred. Page says : "In the 31st 
of Hen. II., Gilbert, son of Walter Pykard, was in the custody of Gilbert 
de Vere, by grant from the Crown ; of whom they held in chief. Great 
Wratting,^ and was of the age of twenty years. The Pykards were tenants 
of the Earls of Oxford. In the 14th of Edw. I . , Walter Pykard, of Wratting, 
held 100 acres of land of the King in chief by the serjeanty of finding tor 
him one footman with a bow and four arrows, as often as the King went 
into Wales with his army, for forty days, at his own proper cost."* 

But the Pykard estate was sold to Gilbert Peche.' 

The lordship appears in the latter part of the reign of Edw. I. to have 
been in Sir Peter de Talewithe, Knt., and we find that his son, Robert de 
" Thalewithe "* held a knight's fee here of the Honor of Clare.^ 

In 1316 the manor was vested in Sir Richard de " Talworth," Knt., 
but by 1341 it had passed to John Bourchier, archdeacon of Essex. 

•Dom. ii. 3906, 396. 396&. ^g-?- V^^l^^'T' '93- 

3 See T. de N. 285, 286. 'T. de N. 292. 

♦Page's Hist, of Suffolk, p. 908. 



3i6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

There is an order on the Patent Rolls in 1340 for the arrest of persons 
who lately imprisoned John de " Bouser," archdeacon of Essex, and after- 
wards beseiged him in Wratting Manor to extort money.' The following 
year on the Close Rolls we find the enrolment of a grant by John de 
Bourchier, archdeacon of Essex, to Sir Robert de Bourchier, Knt., his 
brother, of £30 yearly rent to be received of his Talworth Manor in 
Wratting, and of all his lands called " Gannok in Bernaston and Great 
Wrattyng." The deed is dated the year previous to the enrolment."" 

At the end of the 14th century the manor was vested in Sir Thomas 
Mortimer, Knt., who forfeited on his attainder, when it was granted in 1397 
by the Crown to Sir John Bursey, Knt. It was, however, restored to Sir 
Thomas Mortimer, who was dead by 1401, for we find that this year Agnes, 
Lady Bardolf, late wife of Sir Thomas Mortimer, released all her right to 
the manor to Edmund Mortimer and others. Edmund Mortimer was 
attainted, and the manor granted by King Hen. IV. in 1403 to his son 
Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester. 

From the Rolls of Parliament in 1455 we learn that the Commons 
prayed that the profits of this manor might be applied to pay the debts of 
the late Duke of Gloucester.^ 

The manor again vested in the Crown. In 1466 we find a grant on 
the Patent Rolls for life to Queen Elizabeth of £y yearly from the farm of 
Talworth Manor, in Wratting, "* and in 1470 we find on the Patent Rolls a 
grant for life to George, Duke of Clarence, of the manor. ^ A grant by 
Hen. VII. to Thomas Lovell and Thomas Underhill of the custody of the 
manor for 21 years at the yearly rent of £7. 3s. 4d., and improved rent of 
8d. appears on the Originalia Rolls in i486.* The same year we find a 
grant to Elizabeth, Queen of England, for life of the manor.'' 

Amongst the State Papers in 1540 is a grant for life to Lady Anne of 
Cleves of the manor in consideration of her marriage with the King,^ and in 
1542 a lease of the manor was granted to Thomas Barnardiston.® 

In i543,however, the manor was granted in fee to Thomas Barnardiston," 
from which time to 1764, when the manor vested in Catherine Lady Bar- 
nardiston, widow of Sir Samuel Barnardiston, Bart., the devolution is 
the same as that of the Manor of Kedington, in this Hundred. 

We meet with a fine of the manor in 1600 by J. Bankes and others 
against Thomas Barnardiston." 

The manor was about 1770 acquired by Edward, Lord Thurlow, Lord 
High Chancellor, who was elevated to the peerage 3rd June, 1778, as Baron 
Thurlow, of Ashfield. He was the eldest son of the Rev. Thomas Thurlow, 
B.A., rector of Ashfield, and afterwards of Knapton and Worden, co. 
Norfolk, by Elizabeth, daughter and eventually coheir of Robert Smith, 
descended paternally from a family named Hovell, of Ashfield. Lord 
Thurlow held the Great Seal, with the exception of a short interval, from 
1778 until 1792. 

'Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. III.pt. ii. 34^, 26d; 'Privy Seal, i Hen. VII. No. 739; Pat. 

pt. iii. 5d. Rolls, i Hen. VH. pt. iii. 25 (3) and 

"^ Close Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. iii. sd. 24 (4). 

3R.P.V. 339- 'S.P., 1540, 144 (2). 

*Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. IV. pt. i. 5, pt. ii. 934 Hen. VIII. Exch. Dep. D.K.R. 23 

8 and 7 ; R.P. v. 627. App. p. 3. 

5 Pat. Rolls, 49 Hen. VI. 5, 4. '"Particulars of this grant will be found 

6 0. I Hen. VII. m. 8. in the Record Office (D.K.R. 9, 

App. ii. p. 164, 35 Hen. VIII.) 
" Fine, Easter, 42 EUz. 



WRATTING. 317 

His reputation as a lawyer is not ranked very high, and Foss terms him 
a political chancellor. In one matter, however, he is said to have been 
pre-eminent, namely, in hard swearing, which gives force to the retorts 
made to his asseveration that : " When I forget my debt of gratitude to 
the King, may God forget me," on which Fox remarked : " The very best 
thing he could do for you." Wilkes adding : " He'll see you damned 
first." 

He was created nth June, 1792, Baron Thurlow, of Thurlow, with a 
special remainder, failing heirs male of his body, to his three nephews, 
Edward Thurlow and Thomas Thurlow, sons of Thomas, late Bishop, of 
Durham, and to Edward South Thurlow, clerk, prebendary of Norwich, 
and died unmarried 12th September, 1806,' when the manor passed to his 
nephew, Edward Thurlow, 2nd Baron, who married 13th Nov. 1813, Mary 
Katharine, eldest daughter of James Richard Bolton, of Long Acre, 
attorney. 

Lord Thurlow in 1814 assumed the surname of Hovell as a descendant 
maternally from Richard Hovell of the body of King Hen. V. He died 
4th June, 1829, ^-^d the manor passed to his son, Edward Thomas Hovell- 
Thurlow, 3rd Baron, who married 8th Nov. 1836, Sarah, only daughter of 
Peter Hodgson, and died 2nd March, 1857, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Edward Thomas Hovell-Thurlow, 4th Baron. He died 
unmarried 22nd April, 1874, and was succeeded by his brother and heir, 
Thomas John Hovell-Thurlow, 5th Baron, afterwards Hovell-Thurlow 
Cumming-Bruce, the additional names being assumed by Royal licence in 
1870 in consequence of his wife's descent, he having married in 1861 
Elinor, eldest daughter of James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin, only surviving 
child and heir by his ist wife Elizabeth Mary, only child of Charles Lennox 
Cumming-Bruce, of Roseisle, Dumphail, and Kinnaird, in Scotland. 

The manor was before 1885 acquired by the late Right Hon. W. H. 
Smith, M.P. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1617 is a licence to Sir Stephen Soame 
to hold court in Great Wratting Manor and elsewhere.' 

There are two fines of " Wratting Manor " we have not been able to 
place — ^the one was levied in 1596 by WiUiam Heigham and others against 
Roger Thornton and others,^ and the other was levied in 1601 by W. 
Heigham and others against Dudley Fortescue and others." 

Arms of Talworth : Barry of 6 Or and Az. a chevron Gu. 

Manor of Little Wratting or Capell's. 

This was the estate of Richard Fitz Gislebert, and passed to his son, 
Gilbert de Clare, who died in 115 1, as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh 
Hundred. 

In 13 16 it was the lordship of Alberic de Capel, who held it of the Honor 
of Clare, and died this year, when the heir of Alberic being an infant, and 
the heir of Gilbert de Clare, of whom the manor was held, being also an 
infant, the King granted the custody of the manor to John de Sandq,le, 
Bishop of Winchester, the Honor of Clare being then in the King's hands.' 

"Will proved 1806. 'Fine, Easter, 43 Eliz. 

'S.P. 1617, 434. ^P^t. Rolls, 10 Edw. II. pt. 11. 15. 

3 Fine, Mich. 38 and 39 Eliz. 



3i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Two years later the King committed the custody of the manor to Robert 
de Watevill.' 

The manor was next vested in Edmund de Hengrave, Knt./ who 
seems in 1371 to^have enfeoffed Almain de Shilond with some interest 
in the manor/ but it apparently passed to his 2nd son but heir, Sir Thomas 
Hengrave, Knt., on his death in 1379. Sir Thomas Hengrave sold the 
manor to Laurence, rector of Snaylwelle in 1404, and in 1414 it was vested 
in Thomas Rolfe and others. It subsequently passed to Philip Caxton, 
who died seised of the manor in 1432,* when it passed to his son and heir, 
Philip Caxton. On Philip Caxton' s death the manor appears to have 
passed to his widow Dionise, who remarried Thomas West, and amongst 
the Early Chancery Proceedings in 1452 we meet with a suit by them 
against John Veer, Earl of Oxford, and Sir Richard and Sir Robert Veer, 
Knts., stated to be feoffees of Philip Caxton and Dionise as to the manor. 
The suit extended also to the advowson of the church, and lands in Great 
Michell and Little Wratting, Thurlow, Withersfield, Haverhill, Hanchett, 
Steeple Bampstead, Clare, Kedington, and Barnardiston.^ 

The manor was in the time of Hen. VIH. vested in Henry Turner, 
who died seised of it 4th February, 1536, leaving Henry Turner his great- 
grandson his heir, namely, son of Henry, son of John, son and heir of the 
said Henry Turner.* 

This great-grandson, Henry Turner, died in 1572, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Turner.^ The manor was apparently 
vested in Giles Lewster in 1596, for that year we meet with a fine of it levied 
by Hugh Lancaster and others against him and others.* 

The manor, or at least a moiety of it, next vested in Sir Stephen Soame, 
Knt., who died seised in 1639. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Catherine, Lady Barnardiston, and 
is now vested in John James Sainsbury, of London. 

Manor of Blunt's Hall. 

This was at the time of the Domesday Survey the estate of Richard 
Fitz Gislebert, and continued in the Clare family until the death of Gilbert 
de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, in 1295, descending in the same 
course as indicated in the devolution of Sudbury Manor, in Babergh 
Hundred. At that date, 1295, this manor passed to Gilbert's widow 
Joan of Acres. In 1380 the manor was vested in Robert Kempe and 
Margaret his wife, and Robert Noble and Joan his wife, and they for 100 
silver marks acknowledged in a final concord the manor to belong to Edmund 
Lackynghethe, Edmund Hethe, and Robert Hethe in fee." 

We next find the manor, like the last treated of, in the time of 
Hen. VIII. vested in Henry Turner, and passing to his great-grandson, 
Henry Turner, and from him to his son and heir, Thomas Turner. 

In 1837 the manor was vested in Robert Bird, and is now vested in 
the trustees of Major Bird, deceased. 

'O. 12 Edw. II. I, 3. 61.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 50. 

^See Manor of Hengrave, in Thingoe 7 See Manor of Thurlow Parva, in this 

Hundred. Hundred. 

SI.P.M., 45 Edw. III. (2nd Nos.) 82. 8 Fine, Easter, 38 Eliz. 

♦I.P.M., 10 Hen. VI. 18. »Add. Ch. 6258. 

'E.C.P., Bundle 21, 31. 



WRATTING. 319 

WiLSEY Hall Manor. 

This also was the estate of Richard Fitz Gislebert at the time of the 
Survey, and passed to his son and heir, Gilbert de Clare, who died in 1151, 
as the Manor of Sudbury, in Babergh Hundred. 

Little is known respecting this manor. Davy gives the lords as 
follows, mostly without any date : — 

John Felee. 

John Cornwall, gent. 

Thomas Cornwall, son and heir. 

In 1553 the manor was vested in Robert Cornewall, and a fine,was this 
year levied against him by William Berners.' The manor in 1556 was held 
by Sir Giles Alington, against whom a fine was levied this year by Richard 
Catelyn and others.* Sir Giles Alington in I558 sold to Henry Turner, 
and the fine for effecting the transfer was levied in Hilary term, 5 Mary. 
Henry Turner^ died in 1572, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Turner, from whom it appears to have passed to John Turner, 
who it seems sold in 1599 to John Skinner,* and he sold two years later to 
William Smythe.^ 

Arms of Cornwall : Arg. a lion rampant Gu. crowned Or, over all 
a bend Engrailed, Sa. eight bezants. 



The following places mentioned in the Domesday Survey we are not 
able to identify with certainty : — 

BOYTON. 

There were two holdings in this place in Saxon times. The first was 
that of a socman, consisting of 60 acres, 3 bordars, a ploughteam, and 2 
acres of meadow, valued at los. The second was that of Ulgar, a freeman, 
consisting of 8 acres valued at i6d., held over him at the time of the Survey 
by Ralph. 

Both these estates belonged to Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, at the 

time of the Survey.* 

In the other Boyton was a holding of Almar, a freeman, consisting of 
34 acres valued at 4s., and held over him at the time of the Survey by 
W. Peret. This estate also belonged to Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, 

at that time.^ 

Brockley. 

A holding here was that of a socman having half a carucate of land, 
a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow. The value was 8s., but when the 
Survey was taken it hadincreased to double, and was the property of Richard, 

son of Earl Gislebert.'' 

Lafham. 

Woolmer had two estates in this place at the time of the Survey. 
The first consisted of 24 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 45., the soc 

'Fine. Trin. i Mary. I. 'Fi^e. Jrin. 43 Eliz. 

^Fine Easter, 3 Mary, I. Dom u 3966. 

3 See main manor. 'Dom. u. lb. 

^Fine. 41-42 Eliz. ^P°"i- "• 39o6. 



320 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The second in the same township 
Woolmer took in pledge in King William's time, from Ralph Pinel's pre- 
decessor, for 2IS. It consisted of 9 acres valued at i2d. Roger the sheriff 
had a heriot from his father.' 

WiMUNDSTON (?). 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had two estates here at the time of 
the Survey. The first was formerly that of 3 socmen, and consisted of 
65 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at los. From them Richard's 
predecessor had all customs.'' 

The second was formerly that of six freemen, and the Survey puts it 
as follows : "Of the sixth, who is called Brictric, the Hundred knew not 
if he could sell his land or not in King Edward's time ; but bear witness 
that they saw him swear that he could not give (or) sell his land away 
from Richard's predecessor." This estate consisted of 2 carucates and 11 
acres of land, 2 ploughteams, 7 acres of meadow, 2 cows, 6 hogs, and 16 
sheep. When the Survey was taken the live stock had considerably 
increased. There were 3 cows, the hogs were 30, the sheep 62, and there 
were an additional 2 rouncies. The whole was valued at 60s. at the time 
of the Survey, and was held by Ceroid.^ 

RisBRiDGE Hundred. 

Among the lands of Earl Alan the Survey sa5^ : " In this same Hundred 
were 9 acres and a villein included in the valuation of Weston in Cam- 
bridgeshire."* 

Another entry in the Survey among the lands of Richard, son of Earl 
Gislebert, under this heading is as follows : " These are the freemen who 
in King Edward's time could sell and give their land. Wisgar, Richard's 
predecessor, had (over them) commendation and soc and sac, except the 
six forfeitures of Saint Edmund." 



End of Vol. V. 



'Dom. ii. 4456. 3Dom. ii. lb. 

«Dom. ii. 391, 3976. *Dom. ii. 2926. 



INDEX RERUM. 



A£fleck Arms, zig 

,, Sir Edmundj under Admiral Rodney, 273 
" Alba firma," Payment of, in early times, 85 
Aldeburgh sends Vessels, &c., to London, 96 
Alexander Arms, 123 
Almshouse, Curious Devise of an, 297 
Audley Family of Norfolk, 71W. 
Bacon Family, 131 

Badmondisfield Hall, Description of, 303 
Bardolphe Arms, 223 
Barnardiston Arms, 260 

,, Family, 191, 256-260 

,, Sir Nathl., Champion of Civii 

Liberty, 259 
„ Sir Thomas, Account of, 258 

Will of, 1542, 258 
,, Thomas de. Account of, 256 

Base Arms, 108 
Beaumont Arms, 242 
Benhall Arms, 108 
,, Family, 106 
,, Manor-house rebuilt, 104 
„ ,, Various claims to, loi 

Berkeley Arms, 314 

Bertie, Peregrine, Claims Title of Willoughby, 
149 
,, ,, Remarkable Courage of, 150 

,, Sir Will, in great favour with Edward 
IV., 262 
Bigot Family, 193, 194 
Blomvile Arms, 42 
Blundeston Arms, 12 
Boar, Wild, Attacked by one man, 97 
Boston Arms, 76 

Botetourte, Sir John, Admiral, 194 
Brame Family, 112, 113 
Brand Arms, 196 

„ Family, 195, 196 
Bridge over the Waveney built, 58 
Broomholm Priory, 72 
Broos al. Bruce Arms, 222 
Broughton Arms, 229 
Burgh Castle, Situation and Description of, 21 

,, „ View of, 22 
Burghersh Arms, 71 
Bussey Arms, 257 
Butley Priory, Foundation of, 133 
Caldecot Arms, 33 
Camoys Arms, 223 

Campsey Ash, Founder of Nunnery at, 1 16 
Cantilupe Arms, 303 

Carlton Hall Destroyed by Fire, 1736, 71 
" Cato," The, Loss of, 104 
Chaucer the Poet, 102 
Chievers, Office of, in a Manor, ■^'j 
China, Fine clay found for making, 41 
Clare Arms, 201 
„ Castle, 201 
Claxton, Licence to make a Castle at, 175 
Claydon Arms, 130 
Cockfield Arms, 273 
Coell Arms, 233 

„ Thomas, Inscription on, 232 
Colvile Family, 69 . 

Sir Roger de, Tyrannical Character of, 

69 
RI 



Conway Arms, 120 
Cornwall Arms, 319 

Cotton, Sir John, conveys College Plate to the 
King, 269 
,, ,, ,, Shields on Tomb of, 268 
Cressener Arms, 250 

,, Sir John, at Siege of Tournay, 249 
Custom, Ancient, as to Settlement on Royal 

brides, 214 
Customs of Dalham Manor,, 219 
Dalham Hall built in 1705, 218 
Dalingridge al. Dalahache Arms, 222 
Daniel, George, Will of, 1563, 289-290 
De Dreux Arms, 37 
Denston Hall, Description of,, 229 

,, ,, View of, in 1676, 227 

Denston's Chantry, 230 
Depden Church, List of Presentations to Liying 

of, 232 
Derehaugh Arms, 134 

„ Family, 133, 134 

Despencer Arms, 71 
Dickins Arms, 208 

,, Francis, Inscription on, 208 
D'Oyley Anns, 223 
Duke Arms, 106 
„ Family, 104 

,, Sir Edward, has 29 children, 104 
Dunningworth Church in ruins, 126 
Dunwich, Bishop's Seat at, 18 
Echingham Arms, 222 
,, Family, 80 

Edgar Family, 138, 139 
Elwes Arms, 201, 289 

,, John (Meggott), the celebrated Miser 
M.P., 287, 288 
Ely, Hostel for young Monks of, 177 
Englise or Inglosse, Robert, Gravestone of, i,n. 
Esturmy, Sir William, Estates of, 144 
Farmer Arms, 226 

,, Samuel, Purchases a Royal Residence, 
225 
Fastolf Family, 83 

,, John, Inscription on, 60 
Felix, Bp., zealous in promoting Christianity, i8 
Felton Arms, 262 
Fishing, Right of, claimed by Lord of Benhall, 

10$, 106 
Fish-ponds at Ashby, 5, 6 
Fitz-Osbert Arms, 45 
Fleetwood Arms, 22 

„ Charles, Will of, 137 
„ Family, 137 

,, Rt. Hon. Charles, Marriage Settle- 
ment of, 137 
Flixton and Lawneys Manors often confused, 25 
Footmen, Army of. Commanded by Baron 

Willoughby, 155 
Forgery of Deeds, Action respecting, 257 
Franceys Arms, 306 
Friston Hall built by Mich. Hall, 131 

„ „ rebuilt by Sir Hen. Johnson, 131 

„ „ View of, 132 

Froissart's Chronicle translated by comm^id, 

206 
Furseus, an Irish Monk, at Dunwich, 18 



11. 



INDEX RERUM. 



Gisleham Hall, Discovery at, 76 
„ „ Double Moat at, 76 

,, ,, Murder at, 76 

Glemham Arms, 130 
,, Family, 127 

„ Hall, 141 

,, Sir Thomas, Distinguished services 

of in the Civil Wars, 128 
Gloucester, Thomas, Earl of, beheaded, in 
Gonville Arms, 13 

Gorleston Manor, Curious Court Books of, 37 
Gournay al. Gurney Arms, 223 
Grocers' Hall, Roof of, renovated, 297 
Guildford, Earl of. Arms, 141 

,, Francis, E. of. Remunerative Ap- 

pointments of, 141^. 
Halsham Arms, 223 
Hastings, E. of Pembroke, Arms, 269 
Hawking carried on at Gunton, 42 
Hazlewood Church in ruins, 142 
Heigham Family, 221 

,, Thomas, Inscription on, 305-306 
Helion Arms, 243 
Hemegrave Family, 86 
Hereford, E. of, appointed Gamekeeper at 

Sudbourn, 178 
Hickling Priory, Foundation of, 152, 157 
Hobart Arms, 60 
„ Family, 58, 75 

,, Sir Henry, C. J. of Common Pleas, 58 
,, Sir James, Account of, 58 
Hollond Arms, 106 

„ Edward, Fete given by, 105 
Howard Arms, 132 
Rowland Arms, 242 
Hurt's Hall Destroyed by Fire, 163 

,, „ View of, 162 
Inglose Family, 4 

,, Sir Henry, Will of, 4 
Jenkinson Arms, 181 

Jenney, Sir Arthur, four times married, 143 
Jernegan Family in East Anglia, 35 

„ Sir Henry, Efforts of, on behalf of 
Q. Mary, 35, 36 
Kerdeston Family, 174, 175 

J, Sir Will, de, Lawsuits cone, 175 
Kessingland Manor-house rebuilt, 80 
Kilderbee Arms, 138 
Knights Arms, 108 
Latimer Arms, 92 
Leathes Arms, 45 

„ Family, Antiquity of, 44 
„ H. M., at Waterloo, &c., 45 
,, William, Large Estates of, 44 
Leek Arms, 257 
Le Hunte Arms, 197 
Le Neve, Curious Letter of, 302 
Lewkenor Arms, 222, 226 

,, Edward, a prisoner in the^Tower, 221 
„ ,, Sermon on Death of, 224 

,, Family, 221-224 
,, Sir Edward, Description of Monu- 

ment to, 222 
„ „ ,, Sermon on Death of, 

223 
Lidgate Castle, Remains of, 267 
Loddon Parish Church rebuilt, 58 
Long, Dudley, Description of Monument to, 129 
„ Family, 129, 130, 163 



Longespee Arms, 208 

„ William, Account of, 203; 

,, ,, Doubt as to his being E. of 

Salisbury, 204 
,, ,, in the Crusades, 204 

,, „ Petition of, to the Pope, 

204 
Lothingland Hundred, 1-66 

,, ,, Entries of, unidentified, 

66 
,, ,, Map of, I 

^, ,, Parishes and Manors of, 

2-3 
,, Island, Freedom of, from attack, 

2 
Lowdham Arms, 42 

Luson, Hewling, establishes a China Manufac- 
tory, 41 
Lutterell Arms, 273 
Manners, Duke of Rutland, Arms, 270 
Markets and Fairs, Charter for, in 1442, 55 
Mauteley Family, 28, 29 

,, Robert, Will of, 29 
Montacute, see Salisbury 
Mortimer, E. of March, Arms, 201 
Moseley Arms, 277 
Mutford Hall, 88 

,, Hundred, 67-92 
„ „ Map of, I 

,, ,, Parishes and Manors of, 67 

Noell Arms, 223 

Norfolk, Thos., 3rd D. of. Note of, as to Ben- 
hall Manor, &c., 103 
,, „ 4th D. of, 'attainted and be- 

headed, 96 
North, Lady Margaret, Epitaph on, 210 
,, Sir Dudley, a Turkey merchant, 129 
,, Sir Edward, Account of, 209 
,, ,, „ Chapels built by, 211 

,, ,, ,, Monument to, 210 

„ „ „ Will of, 209 

,, Sir Roger, created Knight Banneret, 211 
„ ,, ,, Curious Deposition of, 211 

,, ,, ,, Monument and Inscription 

to, 213 
Norwich, Sir John de. Account of, 215 
Oulton High House, Description of, 60 

,, Manor, Sale Particulars of, 59 
Ousden Hall, Ancient Porch of, 276 

„ „ View of, 27s, 

Parham Church built by E. of Suffolk, 152 
,, Hall, View of, 153 
,, Park, Theft of Deer from, 152 
Parker, Sir Hyde, Gallant Services of, in 

American War, 104 
Paston, Margaret, Curious Will of, 29 
Peche, Gilbert, Lord, Prisoner at Bannockburn, 

294 
Pembroke, Hastings, E. of. Arms, 269 
Petre Arms, 266 
Petre Arms, 266 
,, Sir Will., Account of, 263-265 
,, „ ,, Commissioned to inquire into 
state of the Monasteries, 263 
„ „ Will of, 1571, 264 
PiUcingtOn Arms, 199 
Plomesgate Hundred, 93-188 

,, ,, Entries of, unidentified, 

187, 188 
„ „ Map of, I 

,, ,, Parishes and Manors of, 

93, 94 



INDEX RERUM. 



m. 



Plume Armsj 245 

Pole, Michael de la, E. of Suffolk, Death Sen- 
tence of, remitted, loi 
Powell, Seth, Will of, 159-160 
Quarles Arms, 223 
Radmylde Arms, 233 

Raveningham, Foundation of a Chantry in, 216 
Reeve Arms, 60 
Rhodes Arms, 223 
Richman or Richmond Arms, 76 
Risbridge Hundred, 189-320 

), ,, Entries of, unidentified, 

319, 320 
), ,, Map of, 189 

,) „ Parishes and Manors of, 

189, 190 
Robinson Arms, 229 
Roke Hall, Description of, n6, 117 

,, ,, Fish in Moats at, 116 
Roundhead, Origin of the Term, 259 
Rushe Arms, 84 

Rushmere Hall, Description of, 91 
Rutland, Manners, D. of. Arms, 270 
St. Benedict, Rule of, translated into English, 

177 
St. Clere Arms, 311 
St. Edward's Chapel at Badmondisfield erected 

within the Moat, 303 
St. Paul's Cathedral, Restoration of North 

Window of, 297 
Salisbury, Will., E. of. Military Exploits of, 

78 
,, ,, „ Supposed Poisoning 

of, 204 
Scroope, Thomas, the Carthusian Monk, 195 
Sermon, Bequest for preaching of, 15 
Seymour Arms, 120 

,, D. of Somerset, Arms, 269 
Snape Priory, 131 
„ „ Complaint respecting, 167 

,, „ Foundation of, 166 

Soame Family, 297-299 

,, Stephen, Pathetic Lines on Monument 

of, 298 
„ Sir Stephen, Account of, 297 
Somerleyton Hall, Description of, 65 

„ ,, Sale Particulars of, 65 

„ „ View of, 64 

Somerset, Chas., D. of, loses the King's favour, 

237 
„ „ ,, Marble Statue of, 237 

„ Seymour, D. of. Arms, 269 
Stapleton Pedigree, 78 
Steward Arms, 223 
Stoke-by-Clare Priory, 285 

,, ,, List of Deans of, 286 

Stotevil'l, Arms, 219 

„ Sir Martin, Letters of, 218, 2i8w. 

,, Thomas, Inscription on, 217 

Stutevile, Robert de. Prisoner of Hen. de 

Montford, 308 
Sudbourn Hall, Martin's Description of, 178 
Suffolk, Duchess of. Curious ballad relating 
to, 149 
„ Earl of, Robert de Ufford created, 147 

Sutton Arms, 314 
Sydnor Anns, 12 

„ William, Inscription on, 11 

„ Curious Will of, 11 
Tai worth Arms, 317 



Taverner Arms, 45 
Taylor Arms, 311 
Thornhill Arms, 233 

Thurlow, Edward, Baron, L.C. Account of, 317 
Thurlow Magna, Manor, Differences in Devo- 
lution of, 29s 
,, Parva Hall destroyed by Fire, 1809, 
297 
Thurston Hall, Description of, 248 

,, ,, View of, 246 

Tilting at Windsor in 1343, 78 
Townshend Arms, 226 

,, George, Marquis, Account of, 225 

,, Lord, Clarendon's Account of, 224 

Tregose Arms, 222 
Trevor, Surname assumed by Lord Dacre, 

19s, 196 
Tunstall Parish Registers, Curious Entry in, 

126 
Turner Arms, 197 
Tye, Dionysia Atte, Will of, 80 
Ufford Family, 146, 147 

,, Will., E. of Suff., Distinguished Ser- 
vices of, 147 
Urquhart, D. H., Tablet to, in Belton Ch., i6«. 
Vernon Arms, 98 

„ James, Charitable Donations of, in 
1737, 252M. 
Villiers, Sir Edward, Lines to Memory of, 280 
Vision at Sea, Dugdale's Account of, 203 

,, .before a Battle, Account of, 205 
Vyse Arms, 132 
Wancey Arms, 233 
Ware Arms, 280 
Warner Arms, 157 
Wentworth Arms, 98 

,, John, Gift of, to Christ's College, 

Cambridge, 52 
,, Thomas, Baron Raby, Highly 

Esteemed by Foreign Princes, 97 
,, Thomas Baron Raby, in favour 

with Royalty, 98 
Thomas, Baron Raby, Military 
Distinction at Landen, &c., 97 
White Arms, 157 

Will, Pretended, sought to be set up, 1 13 
Willoughby Arms, 157 

Family, 153-1 5 S 
,, Francis, Lord, a Commander under 

Cromwell, 156 
,, Robert, Baron, at Agincourt, &c., 

•S3 
,, Sir Christopher, Assessor of Poll- 

tax, 154 
,, „ „ Defeats Lambert 

Simnel, &c., 154 
„ „ Will of, 154 

,, William, Baron, attends Hen. IV. 

in Scotland, 153 
Wood Family, 124-125 

„ Mary, Marriage Settlement of, 124 
„ Sir Henry, Will of, 125 
Wolrich, or Worlich, Arms, 208 
Workhouses, Three, erected by James Vernon, 

252M. 
Wyth Arms, 53 
„ Sir Jeffrey, ordered to march against the 
Scots, 52 
Yale,- Eihu, President of Madras, 129 
Yarmouth Arms, 12 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



Abbotts M., 189, 224, 226 

Abbotts Denham, M., 226 

Abington H., 266 

Acres, 205, 318, 

Acris, CO. Kentj 223 

Acton M., 304«. 

Africa, 171 

Agincourt, 35, 102, 153 

Akethorp M., 3, 54, 56 

Albury, co. Herts., 100 

Aide River, 93 

Aldeburgh, 93, 95-99, 128, 

131W., 132, 142, 143, 166, 

167, 178 
Allfeld H. or Aldersfield M., 

307 

Alpheton M., 187 
Alresford, co. Hants., i^m. 
Althorpe, 268 

Althorpe's or Applethorpe al. 
BovilPs M., 189, 238 

Alton, 19 

America, 129, 288 

Amersham, 75 

Ampton M., 232«. 

Amsterdam, 218 

Angod, 251^. 

AngoulSme, 215 

Anstey H., co. Camb., 197 

Antrim, co., 44 

Appleby, co. Kent, 208 

Argentine's M., 269, 272 

Armesby, co. Line, 257 

Armiger's M., 94 

Arneborough, 189 

Arniger's M., 176 

Ash, 107, 112, 114, 138 

Ashburnhay Coppice, 258 

Ashby or Haskeby, 2, 4-7, 9, 
12, 23, 24, 27, 31, 37, 4on., 
43Mm 51. S3, 55»-) 56, 65, 71, 
87M., 88, 91 

Ashen, co. Essex, 197 

Ashfield, 316 

Ashley, co. Camb., 250 

Ashwellthorpe, 86, 87, 128 

Ask, 79 

Askeby, 46 

Aspeden, co. Herts., 207 

Asshen, 290 

Astrop, CO. Northants., 241 

Astwood, CO. Bucks., 280 

Atherstone, co. Warw., 60 

Attleborough, co. Norf., 216 

Aylesbury, 126 

Babergh Hund., 29M., g6n., 
167W., 187-189, 198, 200, 
207«., 227, 234, 240, 247, 
251, 2SS) 271M., 273, 276, 
278??., 282, 289, 291, 297W., 
304, 304«., 313, 315, 317-319 

Babylon, 205 



Bacon Hill, Beaumaris, 226 
Bacon's M., 2, 37-38 
Baconsthorpe, co. Norf., 57, 

58, 122, 127, 184 
Bacton, 27^., 75 
Badingham, 170W., 171 
Badley, 196, 196^. 
Badley Magna, 203 
Badmondisfield, 190, 227, 300- 

303 
Balderton, co. York, 257 
Balls, CO. Herts., 225 
Banbury, 129 
Banksea, co. Essex, 45 
Bannockburn, 294 
Bansfield, see Badmondisfield 
Barham H., 82, 90 
Barley M., co. Herts., 100 
Barmes or Barnes M., 93, 159- 

160 
Barnardiston, 189, 191-192, 

256, 257, 318 
Barnby or Barnaby, 67, 68, 72 
Barnet, 112, 206 
Barnetby, 257 
Bamham, 266 
Barrow, 220, 224, 226, 238 
Barrow, co. Camb. 296 
Barsham, 80, Son. 
Barsham, E., co. Norf., 305 
Barsham, W., co. Norf., 232 
Barton, Little, 2gin., 292 
Bath, 219 
Bauge le Vieil, 4 
Bawdsey M., 147^. 
Baylham M., 16 
Baynard's or Banyards M., 94, 

184-185 
Bealings, Gt., M., 24M. 
Beaumaris, 226 
Beaumesguil, 153 
Beaumond's M., 189, 229-230 
Bee Priory, 285 
Beccles, 19, 61, 72, 74 
Becclinga, 166 
Bechetuna, 48 
Becklings or Blecking H. or 

Blicking M., 93, 132-133 
Bedale, co. York, 216 
Bedford, co., 44, 97, 202, 218, 

229, 258, 297 
Bedingfield, 5 
Beeston, co. Norf., 52 
Bekling M., 93, 168 
Belney-Breket, 306 
Belstead, 104 
Belton, 2, 8-13, 15-17, 26, 30- 

32, 182 
Bel voir Castle, 193 
Benacre, 229, 302 
Bencoolen, 113 
Bengal, 105M., 219 



Benges M., 116 

Benhall, 93, 96, 100-108, 124, 

128, 165, 172, 182 
Berbice, 156 
Bergholt, E., 134, 249 
Bergholt, W., al. W. Burfield 

M., 9 
Berkeley Castle, 262, 263 
Berks., co., 97, 206, 223, 287, 

306 , 
Berkyng Mon., Essex, 263 
Berlin, 97 
Bernaston, 316 
Berstete St. John's, 11 
Beversham M., 93, 141-142 
Billesford or Bilston or Bil- 

ford of Bilson M., 93, 142- 

143 
Billingbere, co. Berks, 223 
Bishopsbourne Ch., 141 
Bishop's Castle, co. Salop, 

229 
Bishopswood, co. Heref., 272 
Blackboum Hund., 23, 35, 55, 

55M., 87, 102, 161, 168, 

i6Sn., 176, 207«., 274«. 
Black Heath, 132 
Blackheath, Friston, 98 
Blacklands, 219 
Blackwater, 306 
Blackworth, co. Norf., 216 
Blanchard M., 80 
Blaxhall, 93, 109-114, 124, 

138, 140W., 141, 143, 184, 187 
Bloomsbury, 59 
Blundeston, 2, 6, 9-13, 25, 26, 

30, 5in.-S3, 61, 71W. 
Blunham M., 267, 268 
Blunt's M., 190, 273«., 318 
Blythford M., 58, 124, 125, 

187 
Blything Hund., 45M., 62, 67, 

75. 89, 93, io4n., 117, 125, 

140, 142W., 174, 187, 233, 

301, 310 
Bbdmin, 229 
Bohemia, 280 
Boketon, 66 
Bolton, 10, 13, 51, 249 
Bookham, co. Surrey, 131 
Borley, co. Essex, 265 
Borobridge H., co. York., 229 
Bosmere and Claydon Hund., 

25«., 118, 184, 196W., 206, 

2o6n., 22&n. 
Bottisham H., 299 
Bottley al. Beetley, co. Norf., 

297 
Boughton Ch., 132 
Boulge, 109 

Boulogne Honor, 274, 294 
Bourstall, co. Bucks, 298 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



V. 



Bou vines, 85 

B oxford, 313 

Boxstead, 245, 250 

Boyland Hall, 75 

Boyle, CO. Roscommon, 260 

Boys M., T.'jn. 

Boyton, 319 

Bradburne, co. Derby, 269 

Bradenham, co. Bucks., 97, 

143 
Bradfield, 214, 215 
Bradley, 193-197 
Bradley, Gt., 189, 193-196 
Bradley, Little, 189, 196-197, 

208, 230, 279W., 296, 297 
Bradwell, 2, 8, 9, 14-17, 19, 

32, 38, 63, 83«. 
Brampton, 74, 104M. 
Branches Park, 208 
Brandeston, now., 113, 119M., 

184, 261 
Braughing, co. Herts., 259 
Braxted Pk., co. Essex, 156 
Braydon, 19 
Brecham M., 304 
Brecon, co., 45 
Bredfield M., 215, 216 
Brent al. S. Brent M., 264 
Brent Eleigh H., 258 
Brent Pelham, 258 
Brighton, 253, 303 
Brinckloves, 112 
Brisingham Ch., 198 
Bristol, 129, 262, 262W., 280 
Briton (?) Ch., 130 
Brittany, 262, 293 
Brixworth, co. Northants., 

198 
Brocket H., co. Heref., 44, 213 
Brockford H. M., 107, 114 
Brockley, 319 
Brocostone M., 38 
Brokes H. M., 83M. 
Brome H., 5i«. 
Bromeswell, 124, 150, 187M. 
Bromley-by-Bow, 104 
Brooklands, co. Camb., 197 
Broome, 131 
Broomholm Priory M., 67, 

69, 72, 88 
Brotherton, 8 
Broughton M., 228^. 
Browston, 2, 8, 16 
Broxley Park, 254 
Bruisyard, 93, 115-117 
Brunfeld M., 216 
Brunne, co. Camb., 294 
Brunship, co. Denbigh, 104 
Brussels, 44 
Brutge, 115 

Buckenham Castle, 206, 306 
Bucks., CO., 75, 97, 131, 132, 

143, 221, 280, 298 
Bugden, 149 
Bulchamp M., 140, 174, i7S> 

175W. 
Bulley H. M., 279 
Bures, 207«., 228, 276, 297, 

304 
Burgate Ch., 173 
Burgh, 91 



Burgh Castle, 2, 15, 18-22, 43, 

45. 79. 137. mn. 
Bui;gh St. Mary, 276 
Burghersh, co. Sussex, 70 
Burnham, co. Norf., 313 
Burnham Market, 75 
Burnham Thorpe, 52 
Burnham Westgate, 87 
Burston, co. Surrey, 309 
Burton, co. Line, 206 
Burwash M., 182, 307W. 
Burwell Ch., 211 
Bury St. Edmunds, 44, 45, 

62, 129, 130, 156, 173, 194W., 

21 8m., 231, 232, 249, 2S3>«., 

259, 261, 268, 273, 276, 281, 

304 
Bury Abbey, 89 
Butley, 5 
Butley Priory, 54, 95, loow., 

101, \o\n., 107, 119, 127, 

128, 133, 138, 174, 187 
Butley River, 93 
Buttersbury, co. Essex, 264 
Buxhall, 144, 169 
Caen, 153 
Caistdr, 82 
Calais, 155, 271 
Caldecot, 2, 28, 30-33 
Caldecotes M., 38 
Cambridge, 12, 52, 177, 197, 

2i8, 245, 269 
Cambridge, co., 129, 189, 196, 

197, 206, 209, 211, 214, 224, 

229, 249, 250, 268, 269, 272, 

294, 296, 305, 320, 
Cambridge, Christ's Coll., 52 
Cambridge, Corpus Christi 

Coll., 285, 285^., 286 
Cambridge, Downing Coll., 

213 
Cambridge, Emmanuel Coll., 

129 
Cambridge, Gonville H., 12 
Cambridge, Jesus Coll., 254 
Cambridge University, 211, 

237 
Campsey, 113, 114 
Campsey Ash Coll., 116 
Campsey Ash Priory, 152, 169 
Campsey, co. Staffs., 154 
Candelent M., 27W. 
Caneford, 272 
Canham, 223 
Canning's Farm, 197 
Canterbury, 18, 38, 214 
Capton al Gapton H. M., 9 
Carleton Hamlet, 93, 118, 120 
Carleton Rode, 197 
Cariford Hund., 24«., 70W., 

138W., 144, 182, 188, 268, 

269, 307«. 
Carlisle, 128 
Carlton, 57, 61, 67, 69-72, 74, 

78, 88, 133. 140W. 
Carlton Colville, 67, 69-73, 

\i,on. 
Carlton Ham., 71 
Castle Rising, 97 
Castletown, Ireland, 98 
Catmarsh, 178 



Cavendish, 197, 202, 207W., 

284 
Cavenham, 224, 235, 241, 285 
Caxton H. M., 2, 16 
Chalelotte M., 211 
Chamber's, 10 
Charing Cross, 36 
Charsfield, 107 
Chartley, 225 
Chatteris, 229 
Chedburgh, 189, 198-199 
Chediston, 181 
Chelmondiston, 26 
Chelton, 109 

Chertsey, co. Surrey, 183 
Chester, 48, 70 
Chester, co., 132 
Chester Honor, 82 
Cheveley Park, 272 
Chevertons al. Stonehall, 271 
Chiddingstone, co. Kent, 70 
Chilborne M., 189, 192 
Chilbourne, 191 
Chillesford, 93, 118-120, 134, 

145. 150. 178. i87'«- : 
Chippenham, co. Camb., 224 
Churchill, co. Northants., 219 
Chyselford Ch., no 
Cileburna, 191, 192 
Cinque Ports, 70 
Cirencester, 314 
Clare, i8g, 200-202, 220, 285, 

288, 318 
Clare Castle, 289 
Clare Honor, 214, 227, 230, 

234, 249-251, 286, 288, 306, 

315.317 
Clattercote Priory, 263 
Claxton M., 175 
Claydon M., 82, 93, 130 
Clehough, CO. Heref., 44 
Clein Castell, 306 
Clere, 303 

Cleveland, Duchy, 149 
Cleydon Ch., 130 
Clopton, 7o«., 190, 306-307 
Clowerwall, co. G'los., 36 
Clypesby, co. Norfolk, 134 
Cushersburg, 18, 21 
Cockfield M., no 
Cockrell's al. Foster's M., 

190-291 
Coddenham, 261 
Codham, 243 

Codham H., co. Essex, 279 
Cokeley, 165 

Cokenhatch, co. Herts, 156 
Colchester, 160, 173, 288 
Colchester Abbey, 95, 131, 

166, 167 
Cold Ashton, 129 
Cole-Orton, co. Leic, 242 
Colne, CO. Essex, 221 
Colneis Hund., 9M., 27^., 

70«., 83W., 182 
Co'ltes Hall, 197 
Colthorp, 153 
"Colvilles," 105 
Combey Park, 226, 241W. 
Combs ilin., 164, 182 
Conisford at the Gate, n 
Connaught, co., 306 



VI. 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



Cornerde M., 228 
Cornerth M.j 207W., 297W. 
Gorton, 2, 6, 10, ion., 13, 

13»., 23-24, 53 
Cosford Hund., 5i«., i02w., 

. 304«- 

Cossey, co. Norf., 43, 63 

Costessey, 36, 49 

Costesy, 5 

Cotes, Great, 257, 258 

Gotton M., 189, 258M., 260- 

261 
Coughton, CO. Warw., 43W. 
Gourtlets or Gautlets M., 93, 

168 
Cove, South, M., 51 
Covent Garden, 265 
Coventry, 261 
Cowling, 189, 197, 197M., 2t3- 

213 
Cranborne, co. Dorset, 201, 

288-314 
Cfansford, 93, 121-123 
Gratfield, 124, 302 
Cratfield le Ros M., 233 
Crawley Grange, 280 
Creke N., co. Norf., 146 
Cresseneres, 235 
Cresseners M., 189, 224, 235, 

249-250 
Cressy, 70, 78 
Cretingham, 80, Son., 273 
Cretingham, co. Norf., 46 
Cromebroke, co. Kent, 302 
Crow's H. M., lym. 
Cullenden, 156 
Cumberland, co., 44 
Gwehowe, i/[n. 
Dagenbaum, co. Essex, 61 
Dalham, 189, 214-219, 22 j, 

224, 226, 234, 238, 272, 273, 

293W. 
Dallinghoo M., 216 
Damieta, 203, 204 
Danecastre, co. York, 257 
Darsham, 128, 202 
Dartford, co. Kent, 216 
Deanes, 41 

Dean's H., co. Essex, 279 
Debach, 32 
Debenham, Jyin., 271 
Delft, 41 

Denbigh, co., 104 
Denham, 189, 220-226, 236, 

236M., 272, 285 
Denmark, 45 
Dennington, 59, 121, 123, 140, 

140W., 142, 142W., 176 
Denston, 189, zojn., 227-230, 

250, 282, 282W. 
Depden, 189, 231-233, 249W. 
Derby, co., 143, 156, 269 
Derneford H. M., 9, 94, 181- 

182 
Dernford or Derford, 105 
Desning M., 189, 224, 234-236, 

239, 273M. 
Dettingen, 156 
Devon, co., 264, 265 
Dinton, co. Bucks, 126 
Ditchingham, co. Norf., 46 
Dorset, co., 131, 201, 288, 314 



Dorston Ch., 245 

Dover, 227 

Dover Castle, 70 

Drayton M., 76 

Drinkstone, 124, 131, 138, 276 

DuUingham, co. Gamb., 229 

Duniphail, 317 

Duneston, 57 

Dunningworth, 93, no, 124- 
126, 150, 187 

Dunnowe Priory, 281 

Dunstan, co. Norf., 156 

Dunster, 78 

Dunwich, 18, 163 

Dureance, co. Middx., 221 

Earetuna, 66 

Earls Colne, co. Essex, 249 

Earl Soham M., 119, 134, 178 

East Anglia, 35 

East Indies, 129, 225 

East Monlyn, co. Kent, 107 

Easton M., 145 

Edgehill, 134 

Edmondsham, co. Dorset, 
201, 288, 314 

Edwardstone, 298 

Egremound, 244 

Eibury or Erbury M., 189, 
289-290 

Elgh M., 90 

Elgham Ch., 72 

Eligh, 90 

Ellingham, Gt., 223 

Ellington Ch., 211 

Ellough, 61 

Elmswell M., 124 

Elnhalle, co. Staffs., 207 

Elsing, CO. Norf., in 

Eltham, co. Kent, 288 

Elveden, 224 

Ely, 189, 250 

Ely, Isle of, 52, 209 

Ely Priory, 144, i77 

Enfield, co. Middx., 221 

Enville, co. Staffs., 276 

Eresley, 147M. 

Eriswell M., 24, 24«. 

Erwarton, 14M., 134 

Esham, 169 

Essex, CO., 8-10, 44-46, 59, 61, 
100, 102, 143, 156, 172, 181, 
189, 191, 197, 221, 228, 243, 
24s. 249, 259, 263-26s«., 
279-281, 283, 288, 290, 305, 
306, 312, 313, 315, 316 

Estry Park, 254 

Etnay, 306 

Euston, 122, 157 

Ewell Castle, 288 

Exning, 268W., 272 

Eye, 30, 83 

Eye Honor, ,101, 124, 127, 203 

Eyke, 125, 150 

Falkborne H., 243 

Farley, 251, 253, 301 

Farley Green, 300 

Farnborough, co. Hants, 195 

Farnham, 93, 105, 107, 112, 
127-130J 138, 140, 142, 163, 
17I) ^73, 174, 176, 185 

Farnham Walks, 106 

Farnham, co. Sussex, 276 



Farthinghoe, 104 

Fastolfs, &€., M., 3, 60-61, 67, 

69, 72-73 
Fawsley, co. Northants, 259 
Feltwell M., co. Norf.,' 271 
Finborough, 32 
Fishley, co. Norf., 41 
Flanders, 97, 149, 253«. 
Flint, CO., 157 
Flixton, 2, 10, 13, 25-27, 41, 

57, 61, 172 
Fontenoy, 156 
Fornham All Saints, 276 
Fort St. George, 225 
Framlingham,'93, 96??., i04«., 

122, 124, 138, 164, 262 
Framlingham Castle, 35, 123, 

161, 182 
Framsden M., yy 
France, 4, 18, 45, loi, 153, 

175, 194, 203, 215, 216, 223, 

247 
Freckenham, 273 
French H. M., 189, 271, 273 
Fresh Marsh, 58 
Fressingiield, 169 
Freston Ch., 92 
Frettenham, co. Norf., 38 
Friston, 93, 97, 98, 131-132, 

167 
Fritton, 2, 11, 12, 28-33 
Fritton Fen, 5 
Frostenden, 74, 138 
Fulford, CO. York, 225 
Fulpitts, 292 
Furley Park, 104 
Furnival's Inn, 60 
Gannok in Bernaston, 316 
Gapton H. M., 8, 9, 16 
Gascony, i&n., 70, 215, 256 
Gatesburies or Catesbye's M., 

189, 283 

Gatesbury, co. Herts, 283 
Gaures, co. Essex, 312 
■Gaynes H. al. Attilton M., 

190, 303-304 
Gaywood M., 103 
Gazeley, 189, 217, 221, 221^., 

224, 234-239, 272, 273n., 

3io«. 
Gedgrave, 93, 133-134, 178 
Geneva, 258, 287 
Germany, 149 
Gestingthorpe, 305 
Gifford's H. M., 190, 304-306 
Gillam's, 10 
Gillesland, 36 
Gil'lingham, co. Norf., 44 
Ging-Margaret, 264 
Ging-Mounteney, 264 
Gipping, 92, 104 
Gisleham, 7, 67, 72-76, 84, 85, 

88, 90 
Gisning, co. Norf., 123 
Glanvilles M., 162, 171 
Glemham, 107, 127, 128, 140, 

141, 163, 171, 174, 184 
Glemham Gt., 93, 135-139, 

141 
Glemham Parva, 93, 127^., 

140-143, 174, 176, 185 
Glemsford, 261 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



vu. 



Gloucester, co, 36, iii, 194, 

196, 262»., 388j 298, 314 
Gloucester House, 271, 273 
Godalming, co. Surrey, 143 
Goor, The, 97 
Goringe, co. Sussex, 221 
Gorleston, 2, 13, 16, 19, 23, 

34-39) 41, 43«-, 48, S5> S6; 

58, 61, 62, 87, 88 
Gorriton Magna, 264 
Gosfield, CO. Essex, 243, 279- 

281, 283 
Great Park, 254 
Greenwich, E. M., 56 
Gresham, 175 

Gressingdale, co. Norf., iii 
Grimsley, 257, 260 
Grimston H. M., 92, 182 
Griston M., 94, i4o«., 174-175 
Groby, 147, 217 
Groton, 230 
Guisnes, 263 
Gunton, 2, 4, 10, 13, 37, 40- 

42, 4S) 45«-j 61 
Gunville's al. Blunston Gun- 

vile's M., 2, 12-13 
Hacheston, 114, 157 
Hackney, 259, 313 
Hadleigh, 306 
Hagden H. M., 254 
Hague, 44, 224, 225 
Hailsham, 79 

Hainton, co. Line, 155, 266 
Halelound M., 38 
Hales, 81, 104W. 
Halesworth M., 75, 310 
Hallaton, co. Leic, 15 
Hamells, co. Herts, 259 
Hammersmith, 46 
Hampshire, co., i4i«., 195, 

197, 208 
Hanchett H., 308, 311, 318 
Hanham, 310 
Haningehet, 308 
Hanmer, co. Flint, 157 
Hanningfield, West, 249 
Hanover, 98 
Harcourt Grove, 20 
Hardley, co. Norf., 41 
Harfleur, 102, 153, 161 
Hargrave, 224 
Harklington, 125 
Harkstead, 46, 60 
Harleston, i 
Harley, co. Berks, 97 
Harrington, 280 
Harringworth, 153 
Hartismere Hund., 27??., 

51W., 107, 114, 196W. 
Hartz or Hurtz or Hurts H. 

M., 161-164 
Harwich, 44 
Haryngs worth, 194 
Haskeley, see Ashby 
Hasketon, 144, 152 
Haslington, 98 
Hastings, 25, 310 
Hatfield Peverell, 38 
Haugh M., 114 
Haverhill, 189, 240-243, 295, 

Haverland, co. Norf., 4 



Hawkedon, 189, 244-250 
Hawkehurst, co. Kent., 264 
Hawstead, 58, i99«., 253, 

257, 257«., 304«. 
Hazlewood, 142 
Hazlewood, co. York, 257 
Hedenham, 72, 75 
Hedingham, 121 
Hedingham Castle Honor, 221 
H«igham, 221, 221W., 222, 

30s 
Helions or Helyon Haverhill 

M., 189, 241-243 
Helmingham H. M., 25». 
Helyon Honor, 243 
Hemesley, 13 
Hempnall, co. Norf., 31 
Henbury, co. Dorset, 131 
Hendon, 280 

Hendon, co. Middx., 279 
Hengrave M., 220W., 3i8«. 
Henham, 89, 103, 117, 175 
Henley-on-Thames, 253, 296 
Henstead, 10, 11, 72, 74, 82 
Henstead, co. Essex, 305 
Hepworth M., 50 
Hereford, 107, 128 
Hereford, co., 36, 44, 213, 272 
Heringsley College, 81, 82 
Heron-Green, co. Essex, 264 
Heron Place, co. Essex, 265 
Herons, co. Essex, 279 
Herringfleet, 2, 6, 43-46, 48, 

52, 76 
Herringswell, 273 
Hersecroft, ig^n. 
Hersham M., 189, 241-243 
Hertford, 214 
Hertford, co., 44, 100, 117, 

156, 195, 196, 225, 258, 259, 

283 
Hessett, 10, 131, 173 
Heveningham, 304 
Heveringland, 36, 88 
Heydon H., co. Norf., 299 
Hickling H. M., 93, 157 
Hickling Priory, 152, 157 
Higham, 183, 189, 221W., 224, 

236, 238, 273 
Highgate, 280 
High worth, co. Wilts., 286 
Hilton, CO. Staffs., 98 
Hintlesham, 38, 38^. 
Hitcham, 262 
Hobland, &c., M., 2, 16-17, 

38 
Holderness, 155 
Holland, 128 

Hollesley-cum-Sutton M., 125 
Holy Land, 203, 204, 268 
Home Close, 13 
Honington, 238 
Hoo Manor, 80 
Hope House, 46 
Hop Grounds, 248 
Hopton, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15-17, 38, 

40, 40W., 4ij 47, 52 
Horham, 14, 63, 206 
Horham Jernegan, 5«., 62, 

63 
Homes, 66 
Horninghall M., 82 



Horseheath, 310 

Horsham, 21 

Horsham Priory, 4 

Horton M., 279 

Hough, CO. Line, 252 

Houghton, CO. Norf., 225 

Houghton Tower, 269 

Howth, Ireland, 279 

Hoxne,-267 

Hoxne Hund., 5«., 51K., 63, 

93, 102, 140W., 142W., itin., 

163, 170W., 171, 176, 183, 

220 
" Hulverhouse," 105 
Hundon, 189, 251-254, 289, 

291, 292, 296 
Huntingdon, 20, 225 
Huntingdon, co., 207, 268 
Huntingfield, 35, 56, 63 
Hurts, &c., M., 129, 130, 

161-163, 168, 171, 173 
Icklingham, 196 
Ickworth,,i99, 287 
Iken, 93, 124, 144-145 
Ilketshall, 91, 216 
•Illington, CO. Norf., 75 
Impey M., 279 
India, West, 31 
Ingarston al. Gyng ad Pet- 
ram 263, 264 
Ingerston, co. Essex, 264, 265 
Ingham Ch., 57, 60 
Ingolverton, 94, 188 
Inner Temple, 41, 313 
Ipswich, 9, 21W., 41, 76, 83, 

95, 120, 138, 150, 182, 307 
Ipswich, Cardinal's College, 

95, 131, 142, 167, 168 
Ireland, 44, 98, 102, 195, 225, 

279, 280, 305 
Isleham, 46^., 217, 273 
Itteringham, 19 
Ivy Mountjoy, co. Essex, 283 
Ixworth, 146, 274, 274M. 
Ixworth Thorp, 238 
Jamaica, 3.1, 129, 163, 219 
Jernemuth, :^y 
Jersey, 225 
Jerusalem, 16 
Kedington, 189, 191, 20in., 

255-266, 316, 318 
Kelsale, 133, 161, 166 
Kelton, loi 
Kennet, 224, 266 
Kennet and Kentford al. Ken- 

nett al. Kentford M., 189, 

224, 262-266 
Kenninghall, co. Norf., 20, 

35, 96 
Kent, CO., 70, 107, 153, 208, 

216, 223, 232, 258, 264, 279, 

288, 302 
Kentford, 224, 238, 265, 272 
Kenton, 122, 155 
Kossingland, 14W., 61, 67, 72, 

74, 77-82, 88, 91 
Kettlebaston M., io2w. 
Kettleburgh, 138, 140 
Ketton, 256, 257, 259, 260, 

260W. 
Kimbolton, 149 
Kime, co. Line, 155 
Kingsbridge, co, Devon, 264 



vm. 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



Kington Bousey, Sussex, 221 
Kington's M., 67 
Kinnaird, 317 
Kirkley, i, i4n., 67, 72, 82- 

85, gon. 
Kirkley Ham, i 
Kirtling, co. Camb., 129, 209- 

213 
Kislea, 66 • 
Kitts, Great, 156 
Knaith, co. Line, 155 
Knapton, co. Norf., 316 
Knapton, Queen's co., 229 
Knaresborough, 229 
Knebworth Ch., 299 
Knettishall M., 23 
Knottishall, 45^., 142W., 148, 

154 
Lackford, 294 
Lackford Hund., 24, 24W., 86, 

86w., i8g, ig6n., 208, 235, 

241, 268«., 269, 272, 273??., 

291^., 292, 29SW., 302W. 

Lafham, 319-320 
Lakenheath, 220, 273 
Lambeth, 147M. 
Lancaster, co., 198, 269 
Lancaster Duchy, 144, 145, 
, 201, 252, 286 
Lancaster Honor, 144 
Landen, 97 
Landwade, co. Camb., 221, 

268, 269, 305 
Langenho Ch., 40, 45 
Langley, co. Norf., 75 
Langwade Bridge, 105 
Lardeme Marsh, 178 
Lavenham, ^y, 221, 298 
Lawneys M., 2, 25, 27 
Laxfield, 77, 95, 115, 121, 127, 

166 
Layer Breton, co. Essex, 59 
Layham, 304^. 

Leamington, co. Warw., 280 
Leasure Grove, 226 
Leathes-Water, co. Cumb., 44 
Lees, CO. Essex, 313 
Leet, East, M., 3, 26, 35, 36, 

47> 49> 55, 56 
Leet, H. M., 3, 30, 35, 36, 49> 

55, 56 
Leet, S., M., 3, 10, 27n., 35, 

36, 49, 55, 56 
Leet W. M., 3, 35, 36, 49, 55, 

56 
Leffey M., 93, 169 
Le Frith, 203 
Leicester, co., 15, 242 
Leigh, W., CO. Lane, 198 
Leighs Priory, 8, 9, 181 
Leistoft al. Lowstoft M., 36 
Leiston, 188 
Leiston Abbey, 54, loi 
Letheringham, 58, 83, 128, 

144 
Levirsedze, co. York, 79 
Lewes, 82, 90, 146, 196, 274 
Lidgate, 189, 208, 267-270, 303 
Lidgate Castle, 267 
Lidgate Park, 269, 302 
Lille, Flanders, 253M. 
Lillesley, 230 
Lincoln, 148M., 149, 203, 268 



Lincoln Castle, 203 

Lincoln, co., 44, 125, 148, 155, 
203, 206, 252, 256-260, 266 

Lincoln's Inn, 31 

Little Lees, co. Essex, 228 

Livermere Magna, 238 

Livermere Parva, 238 

Loddon, co. Norf., 58, 81, 83, 
90 

Loddon Inglose, 4 

Loes Hund., Son., 93, 96^., 
I04n., lion., iijn., 119, 
iign., 124, 134, 145, 162, 
178, 184, 261, 262 

London, 6, 7, 31, 34, 41, 43, 
65, 69, 96, 104, 105, 107, 
113, 123, 128, 129, 141, 149, 
156, 157, 163, 182, 187, 207, 
209, 210, 213, 216, 228, 230, 
235, 259, 260, 263-265, 276, 
280, 286^., 287, 289, 294, 
296-298, 303, 310, 318 

Long Acre, 317 

Longville (Jamaica), 129, 163 

Lothing, Lake, 2, 67 

Lothingland, 3, 46-49 

Lothingland Hund., 1-66, 
b-jn., 7in., T^n., 76, 79, 
Sm., 83W., 87, 87W., 88, 91, 
182 

Lothingland Island, 4, 36 

Loudham, 2, \on., 45-56, 76, 
156 

Lound, 3, 10, 23, 50-53 

Lowestoft, I, 3, 4, 4w., 6, 9, 
10, 16, 20, 30, 4i«., 42, 48, 
49, 51, 54-57, 59, 61, 67, 72, 
75, 19s 

Ludlow, CO. Salop, 207 

Lydiard Tregoze, 280 

Lymm, 140 

Lyng, CO. Norf., 216 

Lynn, 13 

Lynn-Regis, co. Norf., 225 

Madingley, co. Camb., 269 

Madras, 129, 299 

Malgruoes, co. Essex, 172 

Mallerforde, co. Bucks., 221 

Malta, 298 

■Manchester, 208 

Mandeville's M., 93, 170-172 

Manheim, River, 97 

Maplestead, Great, 279 

Marcham, co. Berks, 287 

Marlborough, 204 

Marlesford, 141, 164 

Marston Moor, 128 

Martlesham, 107 

Massitigham Gt. M., 215 

Maundeville's M., 162 

Maunteby, co. Norf., 29 

Mauteby Ch., 29 

Maybie Hill, co. Peebles, 225 

Melford, Long, 104, 208, 245, 

257 
Melkesham, co. Wilts, 85 
Mellis, 159, 216 
Melton, 238 

Melton Constable, 295^. 
Menabilly, 130 
Mendham, 112, 169 
Merrifield, co. Som., 265 
Merton, co. Norf., 171 



Metfield, 169, 183 
Mettingham, i48«., 216 
Mettingham Castle, 147,' 

215;?., 216 
Mettingham Coll., 148, 154 
Michell, Great, 318 
Middlesex, co., 19, 104, 129, 

150, 211, 221, 225, 279 
Middle Temple, 208 
Middleton M., no 
Milbourne St. Andrew, 131 
Mildenhall, 302, yi2n. 

Monblay, 153 
Monewden, 80 
Monk's Eleigh, 230 

Montagu, co. Som., 264 

Montgomery Honor, 301 

Morford, 37 

Morley, co. Norf., 249 

Morningthorpe, 75 

Mortimer's M., 249 

Moulton, 189, 224, 271-273 

Moulton, CO. Norf.,, 6, 7 

Mountjoy Priory, 4 

Munster, Ireland, 280 

Mutford, 36, 41, 55, 56, 67, 
68, 72, 74, 85-87, 91 

Mutford Hund., ii,ni, 65, 67- 
92, 140^. 

Nacton, 61, 83K. 

Narborough, 5, 63, 119 

Needham, 221, 224, 238, 272 

Nefold, 5 

Netherhall M., 189, 197, 198, 
249, 279-281 

Nettlestead, 97, 11 8, 127, 184 

Newark-upon-Trent, 154 

Newcastle-on-Tyne, 52, 256 

Newhall M., 276, 304 

Newick Park, 219 

Newington, co. Middx., 19 

Newmarket, 229, 250, 259, 
268, 269, 272 

Newport, 129 

Newton, 26, 23, 24, 52, 152 

Newton Flotman, 40, 156 

Newtown, co. Ches., 132 

New York, 219 

Nimigen, 305 

Nonsuch, CO. Surrey, 225, 226 

Norfolk, CO., 4-6, 18-23, 29, 
31, 36, 38, 41, 43-46, 49- 
52M., 58, 59, 63, 67, 69, 
7i«., 72, 75, 81-83, 85-87, 
96, 102, III, wyn., 119, 122, 
123, 127, 128, 131, 134, 137, 
138, 146, 152, 156, 157, 171, 
175, 175^-, 197, 206, 215, 
216, 221, 224, 225, 232, 249, 
256, 258, 271, 276, 295M., 
297-299, 305, 306, 313, 316 

Norgate Head, Wakefield, 97 

Normandy, 153 

Normanston House, 59 

Normenton, 41 

North, River, 19 

Northampton, co., 104, 132, 
198, 219, 241, 259, 280 

Northbury, 94, 188 

Northhill, co., Bedf., 229 

Northlands M., 114 

Norton Conyers, 79 

Norton-Coupe Cors Ch., 216 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



IX. 



Norwich) i, 4, 7, ii, 14, 20, 
21) 3O) 31, 35. 38, 40, 41, 
42M., 47) 6i»-) 80, 88, 143, 
iS6r 225, 226, 267, 317 

Norwich Castle, 14, 146 

Nostell, 260 

Nottingham, 156 

Nottingham, co., no, 219 

Nowton, 248 

Oakfield Coppice, 258 

Oakley Great, 44 

Oakley, Little, 44 

Ocland, Sweden, 218 

Okenhill H. M., 170W., 171 

OUantigh, co. Kent, 232 

Onehouse, 32 

Orford, 93, 104, iign., 146- 
150, IS2-I53W., 154, 156, 177) 
178, 178M., 182 

Orford Castle, 146-148, 150, 

153) 178 
Orford Haven, 93, 96 
Orford Honor, 150 
Orford Ness, 166 
Ormesby, co. Norf., 46, 82 
Osgodby, CO. Line, 260 
Osterley, co. Middx., 150 
Otley, Ottley, 128, 145, 182, 

202, 208, 268, 269, 301 
Oulton, 3, 6, 10, 13, IS, 26- 

27M., 38, 41) 57-6I) 72) 75) 

75W., 8i«. 
Oulton Broad, 59 
Ousden, 189, 274-277, 294, 

Overhall M., 189, 207W., 268, 
269, 279-281, 301, 304». 

Over Pistrie or Petistre-cum 
Armiger's, 93, 142, 176 

Overy Slips, 178 

Oving Ho., CO. Bucks, 75 

Oxburgh, 5, 36, 63 

Oxford, 34, 156) 269, 280; 
Cardinal's Coll., 95, 131. 
142, 167, 168 ; Christ 
Church, 281 ; Exeter Coll., 
264; Magdalen Coll., 16, 32, 
39. 56. 56«- ; St. John's 
Coll., 288; Wadham Coll., 
265 

Oxford, CO., 6, 213, 263 

Oxford University, 264 

Pakefield, 67, 72, 85, 90 

Pakefield Pyes, 76 

Pakenham, 131, 262 

Palestine, 204, 293 

Palmers M., 189, 261-262 

Parham, 93, 124, i24«., US. 
i47-i49«., 151-157. '59. 
2i6m., 221, 224, 291 

Parham Half Hund., 115 

Paris, loi, 229 

Pashelowes M., 224 

Passelewes, 23 s 

Passelowes M., 235 

Passenham, co. Norf., 298 

Peebles, co., 22s 

Penda, 18 

Peppers, 226 

Perlethorpe, co. Notts, no 

Pettaugh H. M., 207W. 

Petworth, co. Sussex, 237 

Peyton H. M., i20«., 313 

SI 



Pheyties, 176 

Pirton, CO. Herts, 156 

Playford, 207 

Plenny, 176 

Pleshy, CO. Essex, 102, 191 

Plomesgate Hund., 93-188, 

216;?. 
Pluckley, co. Kent, 279 
Plumstead, co. Norf., 50 
Poictiers, 70, 78, in 
Poltallock, 192 
Poplar, 97 
Portsmouth, 209 
Poslingford, 189, 202, 202M., 

278-281, 284W. 
Poslingworth, 294 
Preston, 94, 188 
Preston Forles, 303 
Priditon H. M., 189, 283-284 
Purowe al. Gorreles or 
Penowe H. M., 189, 253-254 
Pyes H. M., 67, 76, 90 
Queen's co., 229 
Quiddenham, co. Norf., 44 
Raitby, co. Line, 257 
Ramsholt, 120W. 
Ranton, 221 

Rattlesden, 276«., 282W. 
Ravenesworth, 154 
Raveningham Ch., 216 
Ravensworth, 184 
Rawmere, co. Sussex, 232 
Raynham, co. Norf., 224 
Reading, 298 
Redesham M., 216 
Reedham, co. Norf., 29, 44-46 
Rendham, 93, 158-160 
Rendlesham, 156, 157 
Reston, 37 
Retheresthorp, 256 
Reydon M., 301, 302 
Richmond Honor, 159 
Richmond, co. Surrey, 313, 

314 
Richmond, co. York, 129 
Ripplington, co. Hants, 208 
Risbridge Hund., 189-320 
Risby Pk., co. York, 225 
Risyng M., 103 
Roan, 305 
Roc, 300 
Rome, 204 

Roscommon, co., 260 
Rothenhall M., 67, 81-82 
Rotherfield, 194 
Rotherhithe, 225 
Rouen, 153 

Rougham, 156, 207, 248, 250 
Rougham, co. Norf., 305 
Rouse H. M., 7o«. 
Roxburgh, 256 
Roxton, CO. Bedf., 218 
Rushall, CO. Wilts., 130 
Rushbrooke, 221, 222, 269 
Rushmere, 41, 67, 72, 74. 85, 

91-92, 94, 188 
Rush worth College, 12 
Russell's M., 93, 120 
Rutland, co., 40 
Rysing M., 93, 168-169 
St. Augustine's Friars, 263 
St. Botolph Without Alders- 
gate, 264 



St. Briavel's Castle, 194 
St. Edmund Liberty, 367 
St. Edward's Chapel, 303 
St. Edward's Island, 303 
St. Faith's, co. Norf., 21 
St. Ives, 156 
St. Leonard Priory, 312 
St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, 276 
St. Olave's Priory, 14, 62 
St. Paul's Cathedral, 297 
Salisbury Castle, 204 
Salisbury Cathedral, 237 
Salop, CO., 207, 229 
Samford Hund., 14W., 38;^., 

yin. 
Sapiston, 238 
Saxham, 19, 232 
Saxham, Great, 233 
Saxham, Little, 258, 295 
Saxtnundham, 93, 106, 129, 
130, 161-165, 168, 171, 173, 
181 
Scarborowes M., 289 
Sconington, co. Kent, 208 
Scotland, 35, 153, 215, 317 
Scotts M., 93, 96, 169 
Screens, co. Essex, 46 
Seckford Hall, 46 
Segenhoe, co. Bedf., 297 
Shaddingfield, 159 
Shardeldes, co. Bucks, 75 
Shardelowes M., 189, 190, 
208-213, 224, 23s, 291-292 
" Shawforde rent," 103 
Shelton H., co. Norf., 197 
Shimpling M., 247, 255, 

278M. 
Shipmeadow M., 216 
Shirburne Castle, 203 
Shouldham, 29 
Shrewsbury, 298 
Sibton Abbey, 159 
Silkstone, co. York,. 219 
Skillen, 306 

Slaughter, Upper, H., 131 
Sleaford, co. Line, 148 
Sligo Castle, 306 
Slough, CD. Bucks, 132 
Smallbridge, 221, 276; 304 
Smithes, 38 

Snail well, co. Camb., 249 
Snape, 93, 95, 96, 166-169 
Snape Bridge, 178 
Snape Priory, 95, 131, 166- 

168 
Snaylwelle Ch., 318 
Soca Bretun M., 67, 88-89 
Soca Frandhevile M., 67, 89 
Soca Luvel M., 67, 89 
Sogenhoe M., 148 
Somerleyton, 3, 5, 9, 10, >3, 
14, 26, 31, 33, 36, 52, 62- 

Somerset, co., 19, 203, 2t4, 

265, 303 
Somerton, 245 
Sotterley, 92, 117, 207, 276 
Southampton, 141W., 209 
Southby, 209 
South Kensington, 219 
South Marsh, 96, 178 
South Town, see Yarmouth, 

Little-. 



X. 



INDEX LOCORUM. 



Southwark, 32, 264, 287 

South wold M., 289 

South wood Pk., 226, 236 

Spain, 128 

Sparham, 29 

Spettishall) 122, 127 

Spexhall, 184 

Spittings M., 1, 38-39 

Spratt's, 71 

Stadenfield, 74 

Stafford, co., 98, 154, 207, 276 

Stainborough, 97 

Stalham's in Lound M., 3, 51- 

53 
Stalham, co. Norf., 51 
Stanford, co. Berks, 306 
Stahninghall, 19 
Stansfieldj 189, 208, 282-284, 

291 
Stanstead, 29??., 198 
Stanwick, co. York, 97 
Stapleford, co. Line, 260 
Stapleton Ho., co. Glos., 288 
Stapleton-upon-Tays, 78 
Stappleford Abbot, 143 
Staverton, 124, 125, 150, 186 
Steeple Bampstead, 318 
Steinkirk, 97 
Stepney, 260 

Sternfield, 93, 162, 170-173 
Stockwell, CO. Surrey, 207 
Stoke, I02, 189, 198, 285-290 
Stoke College, 201, 254, 259, 

281, 285, 286, 288 
Stoke Ash, \{)(m. 
Stoke by Clare, 189, 201, 229, 

236, 285, 289, 314 
Stoke by Clare Priory, 236, 

289, 312 
Stoke Nayland, 96^., 167K., 

215 
Stoke, CO. Essex, 264 
Stoke, CO. Notts, 154 
Stoke Doyly, 221 
Stoke Ho, 285 
Stoke Place, co. Bucks, 131, 

132 
Stokesbee, co. Norf., 221 
Stoley, CO. Norf., 131 
Stone, &c., M., 189, 201-202, 

230, 279«. 
Stonham, 75 
Stonham Aspal M., 206, 

2o6;j., 228M. 
Stonham Jernegan M., 14, 63 
Stonhams M., 282^. 
Stoughton Grange, 242 
Stour, River, i8g 
Stovers House, 212 
Stow Hund., 144, 153??., 169 
Stowe Park, 147;!. 
Stradbroke, 102, 169 
Stradishall, 190, 208, 251-253, 

291-292 
Stratford, 54, 94, 107, 128, 

141, 174 
Stratford St. Andrew, 94, 

140M., 174-176 
Stratford, co. Essex, 255«. 
Stratton, co. Norf., 59 
Stroud, CO. Glos., 196 
Studley, co. York, 79 
Sturmer Mere, 259 



Sturmyns M., 145 

Stuttgart, 310 

Sudbourn, 94, wyn., 120, 

134, I4S, ISO) iSo«-) «77-i79> 
186 
Sudbury, 44, 189, 200, 227, 
234, 240, 251, 259, 260, 282, 
286>2., 289, 291, 315, 317- 

319 
Sudbury, co. Kent, 258 
Sunny Bank, co. Brecon, 45 
Surrey, co., 104, 131, i43= 

183, 207, 225, 226, 288, 

309> 313 
Sussex, CO., 70, 90, 219, 221, 

232, 237, 259, 269, 276 
Sutton H. M., 172K. 
Swan's M., 93, 162-165, 189, 

250 
Sweden, 45, 218 
Swefling, 9, 94, 105, 180-183, 

184W. 
Syleham, 124, 169 
Tacolnestone H., co. Norf., 

22 
Talmaches al. Talmages M., 

224, 235 
Talmag's al. Talmytie's - and 

Passelowe's M., 189, 239 
Talworth M., 316 
Tanfield, 78 

Tastard's M., 93, 96, 168, 169 
Tatshall, 148 
Tebenham, co. Norf., 137 
Temple End M., 190, 296 
Tendring H. M., ()i>n. 
Teroven, 154 
Tewkesbury, 70, in 
Thaxted, co. Essex, 306, 307 
Thedwestry Hund., 232M., 

2y6n., 282». 
The Hoo, CO. Herts, 195 
Thetford, 13 
Thetford Priory, 136 
Thieve Glemham, 140 
Thingoe Hund., 189, 196M., 

199, 199W., 22on., 248, 

295W., 3o4«., 3 1 8m. 
Thorington M., 216 
Thorndon M., loi 
Thorndon, co. Essex, 265 
Thomeden, East, 264 
Thorp, 166 
Thorp, The, 188 
Thorpe M., 94, 103, 144, 206 
Thredling Hund., yy, 171W., 

207K. 
Thurlow, 258, 293-299, 317, 

318 
Thurlow Coppice, 258 
Thurlow, Gt., 190, 196, jg6n., 

208, 253, 293-296, 310 
Thurlow, Little, 190, 208, 

259, 296-299, 303, 3i8n. 
Thurning, co. Norf., 137 
Thurstanton, &c., M., 189, 

245-249 
Thurstoe, co. Devon, 264 
Thurston H. M., 248«. 
Thwaite, co. Norf., 20 
Tidmarsh, 310 
Timworth, 248 
Toddington, co. Bedf., 44, 97 



Todenham Ch., 72 
Toppisfield H., 306 
Torbrian, co. Devon, 265 
Tournay, 154, 249 
Tower, The, 70, 96, 104, 221, 

258, 265, 286/4. 
Tresswell, co. Notts, 219 
Trimley, 9, 138, 143 
Trimley St. Martin, ggn., 182 
Trimley St. Mary, 2yn. 
Troston, 238 
Trowse, 11 
Trumpington, 197 
Tuddenham (Todenham), 86, 

S6n., 138M., 224 
Tunbridge Wells, 20 
Tunstall, 124, 126, 184-185, 

208, 22in., 305 
Turkey, 129, 288 
Twickenham, 225 
Tyntenhulf, 264 
Ubbeston H., 123^. 
Ufford, 124, 147, 148, 153, 

154 
Uggeshall M., 62 
United States, 45 
Upton M., CO. Norf., 102 
Valence M., 93, 112-114 
Valhdolid, 128 
Veales M., 124 
Vicarage M., 93, 98-99 
Vicedelence or Visdelieu or 

Fidlers H. M., 93, 123 
Vienna, 97, 211 
Virginia, 173 
Virlies or Glanville's M., 93, 

172-173 
Wadeseles, 296 
Wadgell's H. M., 190, 296 
Wadley, co. Berks, 206 
Wainsted, 212 
Wakefield, co. York, 97 
Waldingfield, 271,' 273 
Walebanke Lands, 286 
Wales, 315 
Walkeringham, 209 
Walsham le Willows, 245 
Wangford Hund., 80, 8o«., 

159, 172^., 2I5«. 
Wantisden, 94, no, 119, 125, 

150, 186-187 
Warley, Little, 243, 279 
Warley, co. Essex, 265 
Wameham, co. Sussex, 269 
Warwick, co., 43«., 60, 280 
Waterloo, 45 
Waterstock, co. Oxon, -6 
Wathe M., 14, 62 
Wattisfield, M., 35, 55, 55M., 

87, I02M., 161, 168, i68m., 

176 
Wattisham H. M., 51M. 
Waveney, R., 1, 2, 21, 58, 67 
Waxham, 81, 82 
Wendon, co. Norf., 19 
Wenham Combust, &c., M., 

9 
Wenham, Great, yin. 
Wenhaston M., 216 
Wentworth Castle, 98, 130, 

132 
Wentworth Woodhouse, 97 



INDEX LOCORUM 



XI. 



Wesel, 149 

Westhall, 61 

Westhall, St. Mary's, 75 

Westminster, 13, 85, 143, 211, 

224, 253, 256, 287, 313, 314 
Weston, CO. Camb., 320 
Weston Market M., 207M. 
Wetherden, 122 
Weybread M., 51, 51^. 
■Whepstead M., 124 
Wherstead Lodge, 253 
Whitechapel, 15 
Whitehall, 36, 173, 237 
Whittle, CO. York, 257 
Wicflet, River, 70 
Wickhambroke, 190, 207, 

252K., 300-307 
Wighill, CO. York, 79 
Wilford Hund., 120W., i47«., 

i87». 
Willows, 292 
Wilsey H. M., 190, 319 
Wilton, 129 

Wilts, CO., 85, 130, 280, 286 
Wimbledon, co. Surrey, 104 
Wimundhale, 48 
Wimundston ( ?), 320 
Winchester, 140, 141M. 
Windsor, 78, 225, 237, 280 
Winestead, 155 



Wingfield, 35, 56, itin., 163 
Winj^field Castle, 36, 123, 172 
Wingfield College, 106 
Winwick, 6 
Wissett, 137, 138, i8i 
Witchingham, co. Norf., 86 
Witham, co. Som., 19 
Withersfield, 190, 236M., 258, 

308-311, 318 
Witnesham, 182, 307W. 
Wixoe, 190, 312-314 
Woderj'singg Ch., 50 
Wodeton Ch., 159 
Wodhall M., 289 
Wolf age, CO. Northants, 198 
Wolsey's College, 167 
Woodbridge, 91, 107 
Woodbridge Ufford M., 

ii7«., 162 
Woodhall M., i96»., 271W. 
Woodhall, CO. Herts, 117 
Woolpit M., 124 
Worcester, co., 45 
Worden, co. Norf., 316 
Worlingham, 182 
Worlingham Parva, 14 
Wortwell, 104 
Wotton-under-Edge, 298 
Wratting, 208, 258, 297, 315- 

319 



Wratting Magna, 190, 258, 

31S-317 
Wratting Parva, 190, 2gyn., 

317-318 
Wrenthams, 10 
Wreston, co. Bedf., 202 
Wretham, E., co. Norf., 171 
Writtle, 265 
Writtle-Ging, 264 
Wrothing, Little, 86 
Wykes Ufford M., 148 
Wyndevele le Kay ac Stag- 

num de Wodbrigge M., 

148 
Wythermundeford, 45 
Wytlesham Ch., 130 
Yare or Gerionus R., i, 21 
Yarmouth, i, 7, 19, 30, 31, 

iin., 34-36, 41, 42, 48, 61, 

65, 66 
Yarmouth, Great, 14-15, 19, 

20, 38, 46, 50 
Yarmouth, Little, or South 

Town, 16, 34, 37) 38, 66 
Yeldersiey, co. Derby, 143 
York, 79, 128, 219, 224 
York, CO., 79, 97, 98, 129, 132, 

195, 216, 219, 225, 229, 257 
Youghal, 280 
Yoxford, 131, 165, i65«. 
Zutphen, 211 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Abbot, 250 
Abbott, 268 
Abergavenny, Lord, 

111, 268 
Adair, 233 
Adams, 36, 56, 106 
Affleck, 218, 219, 226, 

234, 273'' 
Affleck, or^Auchinlech, 

218 
Ages, so 
Agnellis, 273 
Agneus, or Dyvenes, 

273 
Ailad, 255 
Ailmar, 54, 56, 140 
Ailsbury, Marq. of, 98, 

132 
Ailur, 180 
Aisshefeld, 275 
Aisshfeld, 74 
Ala, 57 
Alan, E., 57, 100, 109, 

112, 115, 118, 120, 
121, 133) 135) 140, 
151, 158, 170, 180, 
186, 203, 320 

Albemarle, D. of, 237 
Albern, 315 
Albiniaco, 89 
Albold, Abbot, 267 
Alcocke, 165 
Aldborough, E. of, 129 
Aldburgh, 79 
Aldred, 41 
Alexander, 63, 122, 

123 
Alflet, 186 
Algar, 161, 227, 245, 

300 
Alger, 256 

Alington, 75, 310, 319 
Allen, 196 
Alleyn(e), 126, 228 
Allin, 6, 7, 12, 27, 30, 

37) 45) 5I) 7I) 88 
Allin, al. Anguish, 3, 

31 
Almar, 135, 319 
Almot, 159 
Alnod, 151 
Alnot, 152 
Alostan, 254 
Alric, 23, 50 
Alsac, 82 
Alston, 298 
Althorp, 238 
Aluric, 43, 91, 118, 136, 

14I) 151, 180, 186, 

200 
Alverd, 167 



Alvey, 274 

Alwin, 109, 13s, 174, 

186, 308 
Alwine, 249, 308 
Alwold, 62 
Alwthorpe, 238 
Alyngton, 75, 310 
Amasia, Archbp. of, 

Amoundeville, 170, 171 

Amyas, 27, 281 

Andre we, iii, 303 

Andrews, 302 

Anglesey, E. of, 281 

Anguish, 6, 7, 9, 59, 
see Allin 

Angus, Title, ■z/^'j 

Anos, 25 

Antingham, i22«., 127 

Apsley, 178 

Apthorp, 238 

Apulton, 133 ' 

Aquillon, 271 

Archill, 95 

Argentein, or Argen- 
tine, 28, 74, 75) 308 

Argyll and Greenwich, 
D. of, 98 

Arlington, Lord, 125 

Armyne, 260 

Arniger, 176 

Arragon, Katherine of, 
148 

Artis, 38 

Arundel, 148 

Arundel, E. of, 96, 
104, III, 137, 153, 
154, 159. 178) 232 

Arundel and Surrey, E. 
of, 104, 124, 1 58 

Arundell, 36, 43, 48 

Ashe, 225 

Ashfeld, 274 

Ashley, 295«. 

Ashman, 65 

Ashurst, 6, 59 

Ask, 79 

Askby, or Ashby, 4 

Askeby, 4, 57, 60 

Aslakby, 177 

Aspal(e), 136, 205, 207, 
220, 294 

Aspall, 196, 294M. 

Asshcroft, 50 

Asshefeld, 274, 275, 
304 

Assheton, 198 

Asshfeld, 147 

Astley, 220 

Aston, i8i 



Athelstan, 8 

Athill, 137 

Atkins, 283 

Atsur, 121 

Auberville, Oberville, 

or Othurvill, 100 
Aubrey, 44, 151, 152 
Audele, 235 
Audeley, 235 
Audley, 71, jm., 235, 

239, 24I«. 
Auneye, 27 
Aunger, 272 
Aylesford, E. of, 237, 

238, 310 
Aylmer, 281 
Ayre, 126 

Babylon, Soldan of, 

205 
Bacon, 10, 14, 19, ij 

44) 45) 57) "7) 122, 

I22W., 127, 131, 142, 

157) 159) 172, 173, 

17s, 181, 184 
Bacoun, 63, 65 
Bacun, 26, 37, 60, loi, 

lom. 
Badingham, 83 
Badlesmere, 70 
Baget, 268 
Bainard, 255 
Baker, 120, 236, 265, 

281, 281W. 
Bakton, 30 
Baldry, 83 
Baldwin, Abbot, 62 
Baliol, 3, 146 
Balistarius, 31 
Balliol,- 34, 48, 54 
Balls, 19 
Bamfold, 87 
Banaster, 298 
Bancke, 261 
Bandon, 124 
Bankes, 316 
Banks, 12, 53W., 247«. 
Banning, Vise, 281 
Bannister, 141 
Banyard, 61, 121, 122 
Barber, 38, 143 
Barbour, 87 
Bardewell, 15 
Bardolf, 82, 316 
Bardolph(e), 90, 221, 

222, 274, 296 
Bardwell, 304 
Baret, 20, 21 
Barker, 96, 155, 276 
Barlow, 91 



Barnardiston, 131, 187, 

191, 201, 232, 256, 

261, 266, 296, 316, 

318 
Barneby, 72 
Barnes, 172 
Barnesley, 285, 286 
Barnet, 309 
Barney, 133 
Barnham, 298 
Barnye, 23 
Barrett, 182, 303 
Barrow, 276 
Barstow, 225 
Bartlot, 63 
Bartram, 87 
Bar wick, 30C 
Base, 107, 108, 162, 

163, 165 
B asingborne, 117 
Bateman, 172, 177, 217 
Baths and Wells, Bp. 

of, 87 
Banky, 302 
Bavent, 70 
Bawd, 227 
Baxster, 185 
Baxter, 60, 122 
Bayeux, Bp. of, 240 
Baynard, 127, 184, 255, 

278, 306, 312 
Baynham, 36, 56 
Bayspoole, 15, 51 
Beauchamp, 29, 70, 

III, 112, 119, 147, 

162, 168, 194, 269-272 
Beaufort, 1C2, 168 
Beaufort, D. of, 302 
Beaufre, 4 
Beaumont, 241, 242 
Becher, 226 

Becket, 6g 

Bedale, Baron of, 78 

Bede, 21 

Bedell, 43) 44 

Bedford-, Title, 194, 228 

Bedingfield, Bedyng- 
feld, &c., 5, 6, 23, 24, 
36, 60, 61, 63, 65, 128, 

163, 202, 261 
Beecher, 218, 226 
Beeston, 129, 163 
Bekensawe, 286 
Belhagh, 63 
Bell, 61, 184, 280 
Bella Aqua, or Belle w, 

78 
Bellamye, 23 
Bellers, 301 
Belli, 242 
Belle Campo, 235 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



xm. 



Bence, 112, 143 
Bendish, 306 
Benet, 98 
Benhall, 106, 108 
Benyngton, see Wode 
Berdewell(e), 220, 304 
Berdwell, 305 
Bergavenny, Lord, 70 

164 
Berkeley, iii, 124, 187, 

262, 263, 313, 314 
Bernard, 196 
Berners, 206, 319 
Bemeston, 261 
Berney, 5, 29, 46, 159 
Berneys, 29 
Bernyngham, 169 
Berri, 116, 121, 141 
Berry, 58, 90 
Bertie, 149, 149M., 150 
Bethingford, 87 
Bettenham, 279, 280 
Belts, 176 
Bewley, 107 
Bickerston, 97 
Bigg, 283, 284 
Bigot, 8, 23, 25, 28, 

34, 43> 47, 48, 50, 54, 
57, 62, 66, 68, ^^, 83, 
85, 90, 91, 100, 106- 
109, 110, 115, 121, 
124, 127, 133, 136, 
146, 151, 158, 161, 
163, 166, 170, 180, 
186, 193, 262, 268, 
300 

Bigrave, 259 

Bird, 217, 260, 261, 318 

Birton, 191, 256 

Bishop, 165 

Biskele, 74 

Blaccheson, 151 

Black, 231 

Blackmore, 147 

Blackwell, 59 

Blackwin, 231 

Blacson, 158 

Bladwell, 295, 295W. 

Blaket, 286 

Blakeway, 260 

Blanche, 132 

Blenerhassett, 81 

Bliss, 126 

Blome, 62 

Blomefield, 52M., 79;^., 
82, 104, 117;?., 175W. 

Blondoyle, or Blon- 
ville, &c., 5, 40, 41, 
i,\n., 42, 47 

Blount, I94«. 

Blund, 25, 146, 274, 

309 
Blundeston, g, 10, 12, 

SO 
Blundevile, or Blon- 

virle, 5 
Blyth, 21 
Bocy, 203 
Bohun, 271 
Boileau, 21, 22 
Bokenham, 275 
Bolebee, 283 
Boleyn, 206 



Boll(e), 63, 2i6 
Bolton(e), 161, 3x7 
Bonds, 82, 90 
Boneton, 235 
Boniface IX., Pope, 

166 
Booth, 198 
Borde, loi 
Borland, 275 
Borley, 217 
Borough ( ? Brough- 

ton), 261 
Borrett, 123 
Bosco, or Bois, 8, 85, 

89, 203 
Boston, Title, 75, 79, 

84, 90 
Boteler, 104 
Botetourt(e), 194, 195, 

243 
Botild, 74 

Boulers or Bulers, 301 
Bounds, 13 
Bourchier, 206, 253, 

315= 316 
Bouser, 316 
Bovile, 238 
Bower, 291 
Bowtell, 156 
Boycott, 80 
Boys, 46, 74, 91, 144, 

305 
Boys al. de Boyes, 

221M. 
Bradburne, 269 
Bradewell, 15, 57 
Bradley, 98 
Bradshaw, 198 
Bradstreet, 107 
Brag, 38 
Bragge, 273 
Braham, 113 
Brainard, 81 
Brame, 112, 113, 164 
Bramston, 46 
Branch, 82, 249 
Brand, 195, 196 
Brandon, 9, 102, 122, 

127, 142, 149, 164, 

172, 174, 184, 195; 

235, 263 

Bray, 310 

Brecknells, 79 

Bressey, 125 

Bret, 42 

Bretagne, Title, 35, 

54 
Bretanj 88 
Breteuil, 293 
Breton, 59, 126, 170 

171, 244, 267 
Brettell, 183 
Bretun, 296 
Braves, 71, 72 
Brews (Breouse), 216 
Brewse, 57, 208, 291 
Brewys, 5 
Brian, 304 
Brictmar, 100, 115 
Brictric, 186, 320 
Bridge, 286 
Bridger, 226 



Brigadine, 209 
Brighrrich, 45 
Bristol, Title, 12, 199 

233, 283, 287 
Brito, or Breton, 170, 

193 
Brittany, Title, 35, 118 
Britton, 46 
Brocket, 213 
Broder, 8 
Broke, ii,n. 
Brokesby(e), 195 
Broksbanke, 303 
Bromfield, 314 
Bron[iflete, 153W. 
Bromholm, Baron of, 

172 
Bromholm, Prior of, i8 
Bromley, 192, 303 
Bromsal, 229 
Brooke, 5, 52, 63, 117, 

131, 210 
Broos al. Bruce, 222 
Brotherton, 124, 147 
Brotho, 109 
Broughton, 207, 228- 

230, 282-284, 291 
Brown, 41 

Browne, 107, 165, 265 
Browning, 60 
Bruce, 317 

Bruce, Brudenell-, 98 
Bruce, Gumming-, 317 
Brusiard, or Bruse- 

yard, 159 
Bryan, 206 
Bryghtyeve, 10 
Brykeleye, 163 
Buck, 15 
Buckingham, Title, 191, 

235, 241-243, 247, 

262, 280 
Bulkeley, Williams-, 

226 
Bulwer, 299 
Bunbury, 299 
Bund, 31 
Bundo, 193 
Bungey, 71 
Bunting, r45 
Burcester, 70 
Burchard, 48, 66, 68, 

69> 74, n, 82, 83 
Burd, 228-230 
Burdett, 15 
Bured, 122 
Bures, 301, 301K., 303, 

304 
Buresyerd), 116 
Burgate, 63 
Burgh, 18, 98, 146, 204, 

216, 291 
Burghersh, 70, 71, 

7i«., no, m, 140, 

17s, 184, 187 
Burgo, 200, 251 
Burgundy, D. of, 35 
Buric, 180 
Burke, AAn., ityi., 

204W., 205M. 
Burley, 58 



Burnell, 194, i94«., 

195 
Burroughes, 79 
Bursey, 316 
Bursyerd, 70, 116 
Burton, 32, 219 
Bury, II, 12 
Bury St. Edmunds, 
• Abbot of, 100, 136, 
189, 193, 198, 240, 
255, 267, 268, 278, 

282, 293, 256, 312, 

315, 320 
Bussey, 257 
Bussy, 191, 256 
Butler, 36, 56, 210, 260, 

261 
Butley, Prior of, 107, 

119, 167, i68, 176 
Buttetourc, 194 
Button, 76 
Buxton, 31, 137 
Bygot, 193, 194 
Cadge, 288 
Caen, 177 
Cage, 131, 296 
Cailly, 147 
Caily, 216 
Caldebeck, 295 
Caldebeke, 217 
Caldecot(t), 31, 3i«., 

33, 60 
Caldwell, 6 
Calthorp(e), 37, 51, 

SiK., 52, 75 
Calverley, 268 
Calvin, 258 
Camden, 213, 264 
Camoys, 221, 223 
Campbell, 98, 197 
Campe, 61 
Candler, 99 
Canne, 129 
Canterbury, Abp. of, 

242, 263, 286 
Cantilupe, 301, 303 
Canute, 48 
Capel, 317 
Capon, 142 
Capra, 312 
Carcetarius, 194 
Cardinal (1), 133, 134 
Carew(e), 5, 52, 221, 

261, 307 
Carleton, 187 
Carnarvon, Pr. Edw. 

of, 17s 
Carnville, 205 
Carpenter, 262 
Carr, 254 
Carrell, 269 
Carter, 223 
Cartwright, 165 
Gary, 145 
Castell, dn. 
Castelli, 23 
Castile and Leon, King 

of, 35 
Castle Acre, Pror. of, 

242 
Castlehaven, E. of, 

I4S 



XIV. 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Catelyn, 319 

Catlin, 223 

Catlyn, 310 

Cattelyne, 226 

Catter, 16 

Caundishj 9 

Cavendish, 9, 16, i82j 
196, 252, 2gi 

Cawse, 46 

Cawson-, 249 

Caxton, 318 

Cecil, 156 

Cedric, no 

Chaderton, 235 

Chalmer, 32 

Chalmers, 276 

Chamberlain, 50, 223 

Chamberlein, 10 

Chambers, 29 

Chapman, 117, 125, 126, 
138, 187 

Charlesworth, 42 

Charmere, 279 

Chaucer, 102, 140, 175, 
176, 196 

Cheeke, 260 

Cheke, 61, 122, 191, 
201, 252, 254, 258, 
259, 286, 286W., 289 

Chenery, 233 

Cheney, 88, 89, 206 

Chesham, Lord, 196 

Chesilford, 120 

Chester, 125, 156 

Chester, E. of, 48, 203, 
268 

Chester and Hunting- 
don, E. of, 3 

Chetwynd, 141 

Chevere, 312 

Chevre, or Capra, 312 

Cheyne, 228, 283, 284 

Chilburn, 251, 253 

Chinery, 306 

Churchman, 75 

Churchull, 309 

Chyverston, 271 

Clanricarde, Marq. of, 
98 

Clare, 200, 200M., 201, 
220, 234-236, 240-242, 
251. 253, 260, 278, 
279??., 285; 289, 315, 

317-319 
Clare, E. of, 200, 238, 

255 • 
Clarebald, 242 
Clarebold, 240 
Clarence, D. of, 4, in, 

116, 251, 316 
Clarendon, 224 
Clark, 120,- 134, 145, 

178, 219, 244 V 
Clarke, 132, 276 
Claudius, Emperor, 22 
Claydon, 130 
Clayle, 87 
Cleidon, 147 
Clere, 29, 46, 81, 82, 

130, 221 
Clerk, 276 
Clerke, 15, 133, 310 



Cleveland, Duch. of, 

124, 281 
Cleves, Anne of, 55, 

138, 172, 174, 176, 

252, 316 
Cleydon, 147 
Clifford, 124, 125, 205, 

293 
Clift, 266 
Clinton, 155 
Clipesley, 134 
Clive, Lord, 229 
Cloptoh, 61, 87, T95, 

208, 244, 2S7, 259W., 

281, 291, 296, 304- 

306 
Cloptune, 261 
Clotterbucke, 107 
Clyatt, 134 
Clydon, 146 
Clynton, Lord, 174 
Cnoberi-Urbs, 18 
Cobbe, 112 

Cobham, 5, 52, 63, 244 
Cockayne, 141W., 215 
Cockburn, zoS 
Cockerel, 306 
Cockfield, 273 
Cocksedge, 276 
Coell, 232, 233 
Coggeshall, 253, 254 
Coke, 13, 165, 238 
Cokefeld, 271, 312 
Cokerell, 152 
Cokkeshall, 244 
Cokysall, 254 
Colbayn, 313 
Colchester, Abbot of, 

95, 166, 167 
Cole, 241 
Colet, 30 
Coleville, 12', 7b 
Collett, 159 
CoUevill, 152 
Collins, 15 
Collymore, 112 
Collyn, 273 
Colte, 197 
Colvile, 52, 69, 72 
Colville, 72, 105, 152 
Colvyle, 4, 40 
Colvylle, 69, 105 
Combirworth, 148 
Compton, 196, 225 
Comyn, 146 
Conolly, 98, 132 
Constable, 79, 155, 261 
Conway, 119, 120, 134, 

145 
Conyers, 95 
Cook(e), 45, 61, 238, 

276 
Cooper, 75 
Copinger, 298 
Copley, 221 
Coppinge, 16 
Corbet(t), 23, 72, 283 
Corbould, 112, 123 
Cordel, 130 
Cork, Earl of, 280 
Corley, 195 
Cormvaille, 54 



Cornerde, 228 
Cornwaleys, 96 
Cornwall, 319 
Cornwall, E. of, 204 
Cornwallis, 12, 102, 131 
Corrance, 156, 157, 159 
Corton, 23, 40 
Cotton, 218, 221, 268, 

269, 272, 305 
Courteney, 87, 252, 

271, 289 
Courthorp(e), 294^., 302 
Cowper, 6 
Crabtree, 159 
Crane, 298 
Cranevyle, 284 
Cranmer, 125 
Craster, 242 
Crawdone, or Crau- 

dene, 177 
Crawfield, 291 
Ciawley, 283 
Creke, 25, 26, 146 
Creketot, 146 
Cressener, 249, 250 
Cressingham, 174 
Cressner, 249, 305 
Cressy, 136 
Creswell, see Went- 

worth 
Cretynge, 259«. 
Cretyngge, 261 
C.riketot, 274, 275 
Criol, 100 
Criollys, 220 
Crofts, 19, 232 
Cromwell, 148, 263 
Crosbie, 195 
Crosse, 145 
Crossley, 31, 33 
Crow, 282 
Crowfoot, 80 
Cruwe, 195 
Cryell, lom. 
Cuccill (?), 198 
Cuddon, 183 
Cullum, 12, 223M., 253, 

2S7W., 267 
Culpeper, 228 
Culynge, 205 
Cumberlege, 280 
Curtenai, 301 
Curteys, 15 

CUS, 121 

Cust, Lady, 252 
Cutler, 83, 162, 182 
Cyprus, King of, 78 
Dacre, 36, 96, 195. 

196, 206, 263 
D'Adda, 237 
Dade, 31, 122 
Daggord, 14 
Dale, 213 
Dalingridge al. Dela- 

bache, 223 
Dalingrige, 221 
Dalizone, 181 
Dame, 56 
Damery, 231 
Damont, 122 
Damory, 235 
Dandy, 182 



Daniel, 289, 290 
Danvers, 32, 162, i68, 

2S3 
Dappell, 259«. 
Dapphall, 261 
Darcy, 133 
Barrel, 78 
Dautree, 32 
Dautreys, 74 
Davenant, 15 
Davers, 156, 269 
D'Avilers, 14 
Daviller, 31 
Davyeus, 273 
Dawe, 36 
Deane, 279 
Death, 44 
Debenham, 63 
Debynham, 65 
Deeds, 46 
Delahay, 241/7. 
Delamare, 221 
Deline, 59 
Dengayne, 42 
Denham, 220 
Denmark, King of, 97 
Denny, 159, see Ives 
Denston, 228, 229 
Denton, 79 
Denys, 144 
Derby, Earl of, 216 
Derehaugh, 133, 134 
Derneford, 181 
Deseburgh, 130 
Despencer, 70, 71, 7i«., 

no, HI, 140 
Despenser, 184, 187, 

234, 242 
Deverell, 268 
Devereux, 51, 119, 134, 

150, 155, 178 
Devon, Title, 252, 271, 

289, 291 
Dickins, 208 
Diver, 20 
Dixon, 289 
Dod, 123 
Dodson, 122 
Doget, 196 
Dol, 91 
Dolben, 218 
Dolven, 226 
Dome, 273 
Dorset, Title, 127, 128, 

248 
Dot, 180 
Dow, "jin. 
Downe, E of, 298 
Downes, 42, 122, 185 
Downing, 213 
D'Oyley, 223 
Doyly, 221 
Dracott, 217 
Drake, 41, 75 
Drayton, 76, 90 
Dreux, 3, 34, 35, 37, 48, 

54 
Dromore, Bp. of, 195 
Druery, 14^., 41, 60 
Drury, 11, 14, 58, 142, 

199, 207 
Du Cane, 156 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



XV. 



DuckinSj 197 
Dudley, 235 
Dudley, Baron oi, 194 
Duffield, 171, 310 
Dugdale, ii6«., 203, 

204, 215 
Duke, 58, 82, 84, 104, 

io4«., 106, 113, 117, 

182 
Dundas, 42 
Dunmawe, 309 
Dunn-Gardner, 229 
Durand, 121 
Durham, Bp. of, 87, 317 
Durhaunte, 10 
Dutton, 90 
Duye, 165 
Dymoke, 232 
Dynham, 298 
Eccles, 124 
Echingham, 80, 222 
Eden, 141 
Edenham, 286 
Edgar, 138, 139, 182, 

307 

Edilt, 186 

Edith, 293 

Ednam, 286 

Edred, 293 

Edric, 25, ■]■], 95, 100, 
109, 115, n6, 118 
121, 127, 133, 135 
140, 151, 158, 166, 
170, 172, 174, 177, 
180, 184, 188, 278 

Edward, 166 

Edward the Black 
Prince, 78». 

Edwin, n8, 186, 188 

Egremont, Title, 247 

Eland, 257 

Elgin, E. of, 317 

Ellerker, 225 

Ellice, 196 

Ellis, 33, 219 

Ellison, 15 

El sham, 78 

Elton, 288 

Elveden, 284 

Elvedon, 283 

Elwes, 201, 229, 286- 
289, 314 

Elwes al. Meggott, 287 

Elwin, ly], 138 

Ely, Abbot of, 95, 109 
no, 115, 116, 118, 

13s. 136, 141, 151 

152, 174, 177, 186, 198, 

301 
Ely, Bishop of, 177, 198, 

218 
Ely, Prior of, 177 
Elye, 236 
Emly, 98 
Emson, 310 
Engaine, 301 
Englise, or Inglosse, 

4«. 

Englisse or Inglosse, 4 
Enque, 81 
Eresby, Title, 147-15° 

iS3> 217 



Ernulf, 151, 152 

Erpfngham, 161-289 

Erskine, 252 

Essex, 260 

Essex, Title, 128, 155, 

211-213, 305 
Estan, 31 
Estegate, 29 
Esturmy, 144, see 

Sturmy 
Etchingham, 81 
Ethel wold, Bp., 177 
Etfliar, 245 
Eu, Earl of, 268 
Eudes, 136 
Eureux, 203 
Eustace, Earl, 274 
Evan, \i,\n. 
Evelger, 15 
Everard, 141, 248, 303 
Evermue, 86 
Everwood, 60 
Ewell, 273, 313 
Exeter, Bp. of, i6i 
Exeter, Duke of, 102 
Fagniani, 120 
Faireweather, 88 
Falaise, 301 
Fanshaw, 12 
Farewelle, 194 
Farmer, 225, 226, 236 
Farnham, 120 
Farr, 91 
Farwell, 195 
Fastolf, 4, 9, 10, i4'-i6, 

32; 38, 39> 42, 60, 61, 

n, 83, 90, 207 
Fausebroun, 144 
Felbrigg(e), 28, 29, 148, 

154, 207 
Felbrygg, 130 
Felee, 319 
Felix, Bp., 18 
Felton, 57, 144, 207, 

261, 262 
Fenne, 81, 289 
Ferdinand, King, 148 
Fermor, 305 
Ferrars, 225 
Ferre, \o\n. 
Ferrers, no, 147, 217, 

247, 262 
Ferrier, 19, 20 
Fienes, 263 
Filiol, 14 
Finch, 236, 279 
Fineux, 58 
Firebrace, 296 
Fison, 21 
Fitz Alan, 78, 153, 154, 

279 
Fitz Eustace, 257, 275 
Fitz Gilbert, 200, 214, 

220, 249, 255, 282, 

28s, 289, 306 
Fitz Gislebert, 315, 317- 

319 
Fitz-Henry, 78 
Fitz-Herbert, 55 
Fitz Hugh(e), 148, 154, 

306 



Fitz Lewis, 172 

Fitz Osbertj 26, 28, 43 

45, 48, 62, 63 
Fitz-Osborn(e), 15, 293 
Fitz Otho, 194 
Fitz-Peter, 51W. 
Fitz Robert, 32, 146, 312 
Fitz-Roberts, 32 
Fitz-Roy, 119 
Fitz Simon, 279 
Fitz Symon, 268 
Fitz Thomas, 194 
Fitzwalter, 58, 146, 150, 

17s, 214, 247, 248, 278, 

312 
Fitzwater, 247 
Fitz William", 148 
Fitz Wise, 301 
Flamaville, 268 
Fleetwood, 19, 22, 137, 

181 
Foliot, 308 
Folkard, 244 
Folyat, 309 
Foranan, 148 
Forrester, 245 
Fortescue, 317 
Fortesen, 87 
Forth, 5, 119, 176 
Foss, 317 

Foster, 138, 196, 197 
Fowler, 16, 42, 45 
Fox, 21, 317 
Framlingham, 171 
Framncheville, 89 
France, K. of, 35, 203, 

204, 214 
France, Q. of, 89 
Franceys, 7.iin. 
Franceys, or Francis, 

305= 306 
Francys, 223 
Frank(e), i;4, 83, 257 
Fray, 32 
Fredebern, 240 
Freeman, 143, 207 
Freke, 131 
Frenche, 291 
Frere, loi, loiw. 
Freston, 182 
Freton, 28 
Frodo, 62, 198, 231 
Froissart, 206 
Fryer, 126, 289 
Frysth, 90 
Fubchered, 180 
Fulkered, 244 
Fuller(e), 31, ^m., 65, 

281 
Fullerton, 286 
Fulmerston, 140 
Furseus, 18 
Fynche, 305 
Fynes, 124 
Gadric, 158 
Gael, or Guader, 293 
Galyerd, 28 
Ganden, 224 
Gardiner, 125 
Gardner, 229 
Garner, 116 



Garneys, 6, 9, 27, 29, 75, 
76, 90, 122, 155, 159, 
181, 182, 184 

Garnons, 224 

Garrod 20, 44 

Gatesbury, or Salisbury, 
283, 284 

Gatisbury, 283 

Gaunstede, 302 

Gavestone, 235 

Gawdy, 106, 171, 2i8«., 
223 

Gazeley, 253 

Gedding, 196, 294-295 

Geddyng, 196, 295 

Gelyngham, 82 

Genne, 291 

Geoffrey, 191 

Gernegan, 15, 80 

Gernon, 313 

Gernoun, 216 

Gernun, 8 

Gernyngham, 30 

Gerold, 320 

Gerrard, 265 

Gibson, 286 

Gifart, no 

Giffard, 136, 174, 304 

Gifford, 32, 126 

Gilbert, 109, 121, 152, 
166, 184, 186, 289 

Gilby, 248 

Giles, Parson of Dep- 
den, 231 

Gillam, 10 

Gillingwater, \n. 

Gipps, 276 

Girold, 227 

Gislebert, E., 191, 193, 
200, 214, 220, 227, 231, 
234, 236, 240, 244, 251, 
255) 278, 282, 285, 291, 
293. 300> 301, 308, 315, 
319. 320 

Gisleham, 74 

Gislingham, 181 

Gladeson, 8, 9 

Glanville, 24, 100, 127, 

i33> i35> 172, 174, 180 

Glemham, 103, io4«., 
106, 107, n9, 122, 127- 
130, 138, 140, 142, 
159, 165, 172, 174, 176, 
181, 184, 187 

Gloucester, Title, 70, 
in, n2, 162, 168, 175, 
191, 200, 2oora., 227, 
234-236, 241, 241M., 
251, 278, 316 

Gloucester and Here- 
ford, E. of, 253, 260, 
309= 318 

Glover, 15, 223 

Gloys, 30 

Goate, 258 

Goda, 315 

Godall, 256 

Godbold-(e), 122 

Goddard, 308 

Godewene, 228 

Godfrey, 266 



XVI. 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Godric, 121, 135, 158, 

184, 188 
Godsalve, 41 
Godsave, or Godsalve, 

38 
Godwin, 8, 28, 34, 312 
Golafre, 102, 162, 168 
Golding, 197, 201, 202, 

245, 248, 279, 281 
Goldingley, 230 
Goldsmithe, 1 1 
Gollie, 182 
Goneton, 40 
Gonvile, Gonville, 10, 

12, 13 
Gooch, 75, 229 
Goodday, 276 
Goodrich, 119, 151, 191, 

293 
Goodwin, 75, 107, 113, 

191, 231 
Goodwyn, 107 
Gordon, 195 
Gorel, Gorell, 253 
Gosnall, 128, 202 
Gosnold, 182 
Gosselyn, 216 
Gotts, 248 
Gould, 131, 137 
Gournay, Gourney, or 

Gurney, 223, 232 
Gower, 272 
Grafton, Duke of, 219 
Granby, Title, 238, 269 
Grandison, Lord, 78, 

280 
Granger, 259;?. 
Grant, 268 
Grapmel, 256 
Grapnall, 234 
Grapnel, 236 
Graunt, 294 
Graves, 59, 60 
Gray, 9, 202 
Greene, 138 
Gregory, Pope, 177 
Grene, 122, 159, 286 
Grenehood, 29 
Gresle, 89 
Gretton, 294 
Grey, 40, 141, 171, 194, 

209, 214MJ, 227, 242, 

248, 259»T, 262, 282, 

283, 293, 303, 306, 307 
Greystoke, Lord, 247 
Grigge, 216 
Grim, 109 
Grimesthorpe, 283 
Groby, no 
Groos, 29 
Gross, 131 
Grouce, 292 
Grygges, 74 
Grymoneston, no 
Grys, 161 

Guernsey, Baroness, 238 
Guert, see Gurth 
Guildford, E. of, 112, 

140, 141, 174, 176, 185 
Gulafre, 170 
Gunning, 129 
Gunton, 40, 51 



Gunvile, 13 
Gunville, 38 
Gunvyle, 13 
Gurdon, 145 
Gurney, 41 
Gurth, or Guert, 23, 25, 

28, 31, 34, A7, 5o> Si> 
62, 66, 74, 77, 85, 90, 

91 
Gylmyn, 284 
Gyney, 4 
Habelund, i6 
Hacon, 88, 159 
Hacun, 25 
Hadenham, 238 
Hale, 245 
Hall, 131, 256, 292 
Halsham, 223 
Halsted, 234 
Hamilton, 242 
Hamilton and Brandon, 

D. of, 139 
Hammond, 46 
Hamo, 115, 118, 135, 

140, 151, 251 
Hamon, 191 
Hamond, 245, 249, 250 
Hampden(e), io2, 162, 

196 
Hanchet(t), 256, 259 
Hand, 276 
Hanmer, 157, 302 
Hansard, 78 
Hapelond, or Hape- 

lund, 16 
Harborne, 11 
Hardynge, 122 
Hare, 59, 60, 117, \iyn., 

122, 162 
Harecourt, 207 
Harire, 61 
Harland, 253 
Harleston(e), 124, 148 
Harling, 13 
Harlock, 250 
Harlyng, 24 
Harlyng, or Herling, 13 
Harold, 48, 05, 180 
Harrington, 198, 247 
Harrison, 20, 21, 141, 

225 
Harrolde, 145 
Hartly, 41M. 
Hartop, 137 
Harvey, 38, 41, 72 
Harvin, i8o 
Harvy, 15, 81, 87 
Haryngton, 199 
Hasburgh, 81 
Haseley, 32 
Haslewood, 116, 229, 

249 
Hasley, 162 
Hastings, 36, 70,^ 1 1 1< 

267-269, 301 
Hatcliffe, 155 
Haughfen, 120, 185 
Havering, 256 
Haverington, or Har- 
rington, 247 
Haward, 252, 289 
Hawes, 79 



Hawkedon, 242 
Hawley, 191, 257 
Hawtayne, 176 
Hayford, 165 
Hay ward, 145, 150, 167 
Heath, 217 
Hedersete, 169, 215 
Hedgeman, 244, 250 
Hedgman, 244, 248 
Heigate, 178 
Heigham, 61, 221-223, 
226, 234, 236, 249, 

276, 30s, 317 

Helion, 242, 243 

Helyon, 242, 313 

Helyoun, 313 

Hemegrave, 67, 70, 74, 
86, 87 

Hemegrave, or Hen- 
grave, 86 

Hemenhale, 124 

Hemsted, 296 

Hende, 269 

Heneage, 155, 211, 237, 
238, 266 

Hen grave, 318 

•Herbert, 129, 272, 288 

Hereford, 116 

Hereford, Title, 119, 
134, 142, ISO, 155, 178, 
200, 20on., 236, 271, 

293 

Herion, 240, 242 

Herling, 10, 23, 24, 50 

Herling, or Harling, 23 
SO 

Herman, or Herym, 78 

Hermen, 14, 84, 90 

Heme, 174 

Heron, 81 

Hertford, 259^., 261 

Hertford, Title, 119, 
120, 134, 145, 28s 

Hervey, 177, 287 

Hervy, 102, 162, 238 

Hesketh, 132 

riesley, 102 

Heth, Atte, 72 

Hethe, 220, 22o«., 
29SW., 318 

Hethecote, 228 

Heveningham, 10, 12, 
23. 26, 27, 30,- 36, SI, 
63> 71. 72, 88, 196, 
276, 295M. 

Hevenyngham, 29, 154 

Heydon, 58, 102 

Heyford, 165 
Heywood(e), 120, iss 
Hide, 19S, 2S9 
Higford, 96 
Higham, 221, 236«., 

2S4, 272, 305 
Hikelinge, lOin. 
Hildebrand, 310 

.-lildyard, iss 
Hillen, 126 
Hines or Hemer, 90 
Hingham, S7 
Hinton, 283 
Hirne, 36, 49, 56, 81 
Hitcham, 88 



Hobart, 25-27, 56, 58- 
61, 75, 76, 81-84, 90 

Hobbate, 26 

Hobberde, 82 

Hobert(e), 58, 122 

Hobland, 16 

Hodgson, 317 

Hoe, 1 16 

Holand, yin., 153 

Holbeche, 273 

Holbroke, 184 

Holdychej 244 

Holland, 20, 32, 35, 48, 
49, 54, 78«., 102, 104, 
182 

Holle, 41 

Hollinshed, 35, 264 

Hollond, 104-1,06 

Holneston, 26 

Honeywood, 173 

Honorius, Pope, 18, 
236 

Hoo, 41, 81, 88, 102, 
161, 162, 168, 273 

Hookton, 283 

Hooton, 280 

Hopton, 19, 81, 87 

Hore, 227, 281 

Horsey, 48, 138 

Houdan, 43 

Houghton, 269 

Hovell, 303, 316, 317 

How(e), 298, 304 

Howard, 61, 91, 95-98, 
104, 131, 132, 137, 169, 
176, 201, 206, 223W., 
226, 230, 235n., 279, 
306W. 
Howard-Vyse, 132 
Howland, 241, 242 
Howley, 242 
Howth, Baron of, 279 
Hubbard, 75, 81 
Huberd, 243 
Hubert, 186 
Huck, 42 
Huctcm, 284 
Huggeford, 112 
Hugh, E., 68, 69, 74, 

77, 82. 90, 91, 151 
Hughes, 288 
Hull, 143 

Humberston, 142, 302 
Hume, 305 
Hunden, 281 
Hundon, 227, 275 
Hiine, 135, 158, 22 iw. 
Hunepot, 135 
Hungate, 32 
Hungerford, 87- 
Hunt, 61, 86, 199, 2i8«. 
Hunt al. Knyghton, 197 
Hunte, 197 
Huntercombe, 283 
Huntingdon, 305 
Huntingdon, E. of, 35, 

48, 49, 102, III, 268 
Huntingfield, 170, 171, 

216 
Hurant, 220 
Husbande, 32 
Hussey, 148 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



xvu. 



HygatB) 96 
Hylton, Lord, 132 
Hynklegh, 295 
Ilketshall, 72 
Impey, 219 
Ingelose, 45 
InghaiHj 257 
Inglose, 4, 4w., 5, 40 

40W. 
Inglosse, see Englisse 
Inkle, 296 
Insula, 86 

Ipswich, Bp. of, 107 
Irley, 75 
Ireland, 276 
Irmine, Viscount, 119 
Isabella, Queen, yj 
Ive, 63 

Ives, 22, 84, 90 
Ives al. Denny, 182 
Jackson, 305 
Jacob, 112 
Jay, 20 

Jeaffreson, 229 
Jeifreson, 106, 107 
Jenkinson, 38, 181 
Jenney, 10, 51, 61, 76, 

90, 127, 142, i43> 154, 

164, 184 
Jennour, 159 
Jenny, 5, 45, 46, 148 
Jenyns, 299 
Jermy, 61 
Jermyn, 82, 208, 221, 

222, 232, 269 
Jernegan, or Jerning- 

ham, 3, s-6, 10, 13, 14, 

23. 24, 26, 33-36, 41, 

43, 48, 49j S2> 53) 55) 

56, 62, 63, 65, 67, 88, 

88«., 241-243 
Jernemutha, 57 
Jernygon, 61-87 
Jerold, 284 
Jerusalem and Sicily, 

King of, 35 
Jettor, 13 
John, 78 
Johnson, 15, 38, 41, 97, 

98, 131, 143) 164, 165, 

167-169, 171 
Johnston, 31, 44 
Jolker, 284 
Jones, 228 
Juyn, 87 
Kaylwey, i44 
keble, 163 
Kedington, 250 
Kedyntone, 227 
Kedyton, 275, 281 
Kelke, 257 
Kelling, 69 
Kemp(e), 123, 208, 213, 

318 
Kempston, 40 
Kendale, 272 
Kenny, Keny, 107 
Kent, E. of, 71M., 78, 

III, 153. 302 
Kerdeston, 29, 140, i74> 

17s, i75«- 
Kerry, 128, 174 
JCeteiyngham, 227 

TI 



Kettte, 66 
Kilderbee, 123, 138 
Killett, 20 
Killigrew, 223 
King, 126, 260, 292, 296 
Kingeston, 5 
Kingsman, 256 
Kingston, 35, 55, 67, 

81, 87 
Kirkeley, 294 
Kirkham, 236 
Kirtling, Baron of, 211 
Knevet, Knyvet, 128, 

206 
Knightly, 259 
Knighton, 191, 197, 297 
Knights, 107, io8 
Knockyn, Title, 153 
KnoUeSj 212 
Knollys, 306 
Knowles, 171 
Knyvet, 7, 24, 30, 50; 

207 
Kokefeld, 271 
Kydde, 290 
Kymburle, 72 
Kynardesle, 256 
Kyne, 247 
Kyrkeley, 294 
Lacey, 242 
Lackynghethe, 318 
Lacock, Abbess of, 204, 

205 
Lacy, 205 
Lamb, 182 
Lamprell, 197 
Lancaster, 116, 216, 283, 

318 
Lancaster, E. of, 52, 

144) 205, 244 
Lancastre, 27 
Lane, 220, 273 
Lanfranc, Abp., 271 
Langholm, 148 
Langle, 87 

Langley, 70, 7111., 153 
Langtoft, no, 174 
Larwood, 38 
Latham, 156 
Latimer, 69, 91, 92, in, 

112, 153 
Launce, 169 
Laurence, 31S 
Lavingham, 283 
Laweney, 32 
Lawes, 163 
Lawney, 27, 32 
Lawrence, 230 
Lawson, 229 
Layton, 288 
Leake, 61 

Leathes, 44, 45, 266 
Ledmar, 200 
Lee, 44, 7") 125 
Leedes, 187 
Leeds, Duke of, 7 
Leek, 191, 256, 257 
Legate, 122 
Lehunt, 297 
Le Hunte, 197 
Leicester, 106, 107 
Leicester, E. of, 211 

212, 225 



Leigh, 181 

Leighs, Prior of, 181 
Leiston, Abbot of, 142 
Lemara, 308 
Le Neve, 302 
Lennox, Duke of, 96 
Lerlings, 12 
Lescrope, 79 
Lestrange, 96, 249 
Leukener, 235, 235W. 
Leukenor, 236 
Leurie, 28, 127, 135, 

170, 193, 274 
Leustan, 200 
Lever, 199 
Levett, 300 
Lewin, 193 
Lewkenor, 221-224, 226, 

310 
Lewster, 318 
Leyburne, Bp., 237 
Limoges, Title, 35 
Lincoln, Bp. of, 149, 

285 
Lincoln, E. of, 55, 88, 

102, 154, 155, 205 
Lincolne, 268 
Lindsey, E. of, 150 
L'Isle, Title, 102, 112, 

127, 142, 184, 262 
Logan, 279 
Loher, 278 
Lomnowe, 30 
London, 203 
Long, 106, 129, 130, 

156, 163-165, 171, 173, 

297 
Long Champ, 85, 89 
Longe, 87 
Longespee, 203-205, 208 
Lopham, 194 
Loring, 247 
Loudham, 40, 45 
Loudon, 9 

Louis, King, 203, 204 
Lovayne, 309 
Love, 61 
Loveday, 309 
Lovel, 310 
Lovelace, 97 
Lovell, 86, 228, 232, 316 
Loveyn, Lord, 29 
Lowdham, 42, 90, 138 
Loyd, 260 
Lucas, 176, 258, 294M 

296 
Lucie, 245 
Lucy, 223, 247, 261 
Ludham, 40, 309 
Lukas, 263 
Luneday, 309 
Luson, 41, 42 
Luttell, 244 
Lutterell, 271-273 
Luvel, 89 

Lyatt, or Legate, 122 
Lyell, Viscountess, 206 
Lympenhowe, 50 
Lytton, 299 
McCalmont, 272 
McFadden, 76 
Mace, or Mase, 123 
MackwilHam, 259 



Macro, 61 

McWilliams, 259 

Madox, 147 

Magna, 100 

Maine, 146 

Mainers, 203 

Malavilla, 186 

Malcolm, Lady, 192 

Malet, 95, 100, 109, no, 
115, n6, 118, 120, 
121, 127, 133, 13s, 
136, 140, 146, 151, 
152, 158, 166, 170, 
172, 174, 177. 180, 
184, 186, 188 

Mallory, 78 

Mallowes, 281 

Malteby, or Mauteby, 
28-30 

Maltrevers, 154, 279 

Maltrevers, Lady, 283 

Maltyward, 248 

Malyns, 309 

Man, 72 

Manby, 182 

Mandevil, 146 

Mann, 203 

Manners, 155, 269, 270 

Manning, 57 

Mansfield, E. of, 145 

Mar, Earl of, 252 

Maratti, 258 

March, Title, 96, 201, 
251, 285 

Markaunte, 263 

Marlborough, D of, 44, 

97 
Marlere, 217 
Marshall, 20, 203, 295 
Martel, 95, 131, 166 
Martin, 44, 178 
Martyn, 280 
Masham, Title, 153^. 
Mason, 126 
Massyngham, 217 
Matchett, 51 
Mattingley, 314 
Mavor, 283 
Mawe, 15 

Maximilian, Emp., 2n 
Maxwell, 286 
May, 232 
Mayd, 310 
Maynard, 307 
Mayne, 314 
Meadow, 46 
Mechilles, 26 
Meeke, 225 
Meggott, 287, 288 
Megre, 72, 74, 81 
Menzies, 242 
Mere, 274 
Merry, 45 
Mersey, 167 
Merteus, 260 
Message, 195 
Metcalfe, 218 
Metheville, 15 
Mettingham, E. of, 236 
Middlesex, E. of, 127 
Middletori, 134, 313 
Mighell(s), 26 
Mijn, 44 



XVUl. 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Mildenham, 2g^n. 
Mildmay, 254, 286 
Miller, 272 
Modyford, 129 
Mohant, 72 

Moleton, or Multon, 244 
Moleyns, 57 
Molyford, 163 
Molyns, 57, 58 
Monasterio, 203 
Mondevile, 121 
Monk, 224 

Monmouth, D. of, 237 
Monour, 310 
Monson, 182 
Montacute, 77, 78, 124, 

147 
Montagu(e), 129, 130, 

147) 148, 265 
Montall, 77 
Montchensy, 34 
Monte Gomery, 215 
Montford, 142, 308 
Montfort, 48, 66, 69, 74, 

77> 82, 83, 91 
Montgomery, 225, 243 
Montgomery, E. of, 88 
Monynge, 207 
Moore, 10, 45, 123, 126, 

213, 279, 281 
Mordaunt, 97, 305 
More, 74 
More win, 186 
. Morley, 87, iii, 127 
Morrice, 236 
Morris, 187 
Morse, 79 
Morthemer, 309 
Mortimer, 200, 201, 216, 

251, 285, 296, 316 
Mortlock, 197, 266 
Moseley, 138, 182, 183, 

276, 277, 304 
Motley, 149W. 
Moulton, 57 
Mowbray, 262 
Moyse, 122 
Multon, 220, 244, 245, 

247 
Muncy, 89 
Mundeville, or Amoun- 

deville, 170, 171 
Munro, 288 
Muntfichet, 283 
Mure, 233 
Murray, 145, 286 
Mussenden, 44-46 
Mutford, 86 
Myrffyn, 209 
Nabbe, 199 
Nalbys, 5 
Nash, 298 
Nassau, 145 
.^Naunton, 58, 128, 157, 

157W., 207 
Nerford, 152 
Nevil, III, 164, 249 
Nevill, 70, 153, 223,265, 

268, 269 
Neville, 78, 79 
Nevylle, 161 
Newburgh, Lord, 298 
Newcastle, D, of, 225 



Neweton, 257 

Newmarch, 255, 256 

Newmarket, or Novo 
Mercato, 256 

Newport, 258 

Nichol, 262 

Nobbs, 98 

Noble, 318 

Noell, 223 

Noioun, 15 

NoUekins, 129 

Norden, 150 

Norfolk, Title, 95-97, 
102-104, no, 124, 131, 
137, 141, 144, 146, 
159, 167, 168, 171, 
193, 206, 2H, 226, 
235, 262, 268, 293 

Ndriolt, 278 

Norman, 68, 69, 77, 95, 
100, 109, lis, 127, 
133, 136, 158, 161, 

170, 186 
Norris, 6, 143 
North, 112, 128, 129, 

139-141W., 163, 165,, 

171, 174, 184, 208-213, 

302, 303 
Northampton, E. of, 

225 
Northey, Hopkins-, 75 
Northtoft, 243 
Northumberland, Title, 

70w.,97, 155, 209, 213, 

236) 247, 310 
Northwode, 206 
Norton, 79, 159 
Norwich, loi, 147, 

175M., 215-216M. 
Norwich, Bp. of, 18, 

157, 166, 177, 195 
Norwich, E. of, 97, 293 
Norwych, 217 
Notebeme, 284 
Notheme, 294 
Nottingham, E. of, 262 
Novo Mercato, or New- 
march, or Newmar 

ket, 25s 
Noyoun, 62, 63 
Oakes, 248 
Ocle, 29 
Oglander, 313 
Ogle, 195 
Okeley, 142 
Okolte, 168 
Oldmajfne, 224 
Olf, 115, 118, 121, 158, 

J93, 244 
Oliver, 60, 245 
Olton, 60 

Onby(e), 125, 126, 187 
Onslow, 104, 266 
Orford, E. of, 62, 225 
Ormesby, 309 
Osbern, 170, 180, 231 
Osbert, 10 

Osborn{e), 7, 63, 195 
OscheteJ, 170 
Osfert, 77 
Osiet, 170 
Oslac, 186 
Osmund, i8o 



Ostula, 158 

Otway, 19s 

Owen, 306 

Owkedok, 74 

Oxford, E. of, 150, 221, 

245) 27i> 31S) 318 
Pabenham, 223 
Packe, 173 
Pagan, 240, 308, 315 
Page, 238, 307 
Paine, 183 
Pakenham, 146 
Pakyngton, 181 
Palgrave, 40 
Palliser, 42 
Palmer(e), 16, 17, 21, 

51, 124, 125, 304, 305 
Pane, 261 
Panton, 104 
Parham, 4, 40 
Paris, 204 
Parkard, 79 
Parker, 81, 96, 104, 106, 

134, 286 
Parman, 303 
Parsey, 292 
Paschall, 249 
Passelewe, 234, 236 
Paston, 5, 16, 29, 2gn., 

30, 32, 39, 42, 56, 58, 

84, 236 
Patrick, 218 
Paul IV., Pope, 264 
Paulet, 87, 303 
Pavely, 70 
Paye, 260 
Payne, 15, 235, 235W., 

248, 252, 272, 288 
Payter, 61 
Peacocke, 96 
Peartre, 291 
Peccatum, 300 
Peche, loi, 196, 214, 

260, 279, 293-294W., 

■ 315 

Peck, 126, 250 

Peeche, 260 

Pegge, 126, 143 

Pekker(e), 32 

Pelham, 129, 225 

Pembroke, Title, 57, 

89, 129, 212, 268, 269, 

301, 302 
Penjent, 103 
Penred, or Pendred, 122 
Penrice, 17 

Pepper, Brigadier, 128 
Percy, 70K., 236, 247 
Peret, 319 
Perevell, 214 
Pering, 266 
Perpounte, 191, 256 
Peterborough, E. of, 97 
Peterson, 218 
Peto, 3, 7, 47, 65, 91 
Petre, 263-266 
Pettus, 276 
Peverelle, 309 
Peynell, 256 
Peyton, 46«., 195, 207 

236. 313 
Phelip, 140-142, 147, 
176, 216 



Philip the Bold, 214 

Philipp(e), 130, 236 

Philips, 172 

Pichard, 70 

Pigg see Bigg 

Pigott, 229 

Pilgrim, 20 

Pilkington, 198, 199 

Pincheon, 265 

Pinel, 320 

Pipe, 298 

Pirho, 25 

Pirot, 136 

Pishale, 74 

Pitcairne, 16 

Pitt, 12 

Plantagenet, 70, yin., 
78, HI, 112, 153 

Plate, 2S4 

Playter, 92, 207 

Playters, 6, 117, 276 . 

Playtor, 23 

Pleavance, 250 

Plume, 244, 245 

Plumer, 183 

Plummer, 182 

Poictou, HO, 136, 186, 
1 88, 244, 24s 

Poland, King of, 97 

Pole, 3, 35, 48, 49, 54- 
56, 67, 73, 87, 93, lOI, 
102, • 106, 132, 148, 
i6in., 163, 164, 168, 
171, 172, 175, 176, 196 

Poley, 196-197, 250-283 

Pool, ss 

Poore, 130 

Porter, 20, 143, 286 

Poulett, 291 

Pouncy, 284 

Powell, 31, 159, 160 

Powis, Lord, 266 

Powle, 182 

Powys, Lord of, 87 

Poyndel, 25 1«. 

Poynings, 57 

Praed, 276 

Prattant, 38 

Pretyman, 75 

Price, 107, 178 

Priditon, 283 

Primrose, 21 

Prince, 219 

Proctor, 76, 79, 81, 82, 
90 

Prosser, 245 

Prussia, K. and Q. of, 

97 
Pryce, 107, 128, 174 
Pulteney, 309 
Purslowe, 181 
Pye, 76, 90 
Pygot, 306 
Pykard, 315 
Pykenham, 286 
Pynchbeck, 88 
Pynchebek, 304 
Pyshale, 144 
Quarles, 223 
R., 89 

Raby, Title, 97, 153 
Radcliffe, 58 
Radmylde, 223 



\ 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



XIX. 



Radmylle, 221 

Rainald, 267 

Ralph, 18, 28, 62, 66, 

lis, 158, 180, 267, 

268, 319 
Ralph, E., 151, 191, 

203, 293 
Ram, 234, 236 
Rampton, 238 
Ramsey e, 163 
Randall, 144, 303 
Rande, 288 
Ranulf, 109, i66 
Rapin, 259 
Rashleigh, 130 
Rastwold, 61 
RatclifFe, 150, 247-249 
Ratclyf, 122 
Read(e), 10, 38, 119, 

124, 150 
Reading, 46 
Redenhal, 312 
Redmane, 247 
Reeve, 3, 7, 9, 12, 16, 

51, 59, 60, 75, 84, 88, 

90 
Reginald, 273 
Reitly, 113 

Rendlesham, 123, 187 
Reynald, 72 
Reynolds, 20 
Rhodes, 219, 223, 238 
Rice, 272 

Rich, 209, 260, 279 
Richard, 191, 193, 200, 

214, 220, 227, 231, 234, 

236,240,244,251,255, 

278, 282, 285, 291, 293, 

300,301,308,315,319, 

320 
Richardson, 224, 245, 

348 
Richer, 278 
Richers, 169 
Richman, 41 
Richman or Richmond, 

75. 76, 84 
Richmond, 84 
Richmond or Rismond, 

78 
Richmond, E. of, 3, 34, 

3S> 48, 54, 262 
Rickthome, 123 
Risboil, 115 
Rising, 168 
Rivers, 83 
Rivers, E., 196, 265 
Riveshall, 50 
Rivett, 113, 114, ii4«- 
Roberds, 19 
Robert, 180, 227, 282 
Roberts, 13, 19, 79 
Robinson, 105, 125, 228- 

230 
Roche, Atte, 273 
Rochford, E. of, 145 
Rodney, Admiral, 273 
Roger, 89, 193, 282, 300, 

320 
Rokewode, 58, 63, 65, 

122 
Rokwode, 275 
Rolf(e), 32, 60, 243, 318 



Rome, 19s 

Roofe or Rolfe, 123 

Roos, Lord, iii, 124 

Rope, 123M. 

Roper, 195 

Rosamond, Fair, 203 

Rostwold, 102, 162 

Rothenhall, 82 

Rothing(e), 312 

Rothwell, 260 

Rous, 59, 89, 117, 123, 

157. 159, 216, 2i8w., 

302 
Rouse, 6, 159 
Routh, 38 
Row, 76, 90 
Rowley, 130 
Rowse, 120 
Roys, 102 
Rudge, 104 
Rugge, 6 
Rukwode, 63 
Ruley, 144 
Rush(e), 65, 83, 84, 104, 

106, 167 
Russel, 224 
Russell, 120, 193, 228, 

230, 241, 283, 305, 306 
Russhe, 14, 90, 95 
Russhes, 83 
Ruth, 273 

Ruthyn, Title, 141, 302 
Rutland, Title, 1 1 1 

155, 269, 270, 272 
Ruton, 195 
Rychers, 29 
Ryder, 299, 310 
Rye, 146 
Rygate, 105 
Rykedown^ 217 
Rymer, ^^dn. 
Rysbrack, 237 
Ryseby, 220 
Sacheverell, 8i 
Sackville, 23, 128 
Sadler, 288 
Sainsbury, 318 
St. Albans, E. of, 125 
St. Asaph, Bp. of, 128 
St. Clere, 309, 311 
St. Edmund, 240, 255, 

278, 285, 320 
St. John, 200, 280, 291 
St. Laurence, 279 
St. Leonard, Prior of, 

312 
St. Martin, 284 
St. Michael, 25 
St. Olave, 43 
St. Omer, 50, 52 
St. Philibert, 78 
St. Quintin, 201M. 
St. Sano, 4 
St. Vincent, 75 
Salines, 148 
Salisbury, Title, 48, 77- 

79, III, 148, 203-205 

{see Gatesbury) 
Sampson, 46, 60, 61, 

120, 281 
Sancrofte, 70 
Sandale, 256, 317 
Sands, 6 



Sandwich, 100 
Sankville or Sackville, 

127 
Santre, 87 
Saumarez, 75 
Saunders, 41, 42, 112, 

138, 185, 280 
Sauvage, ioi«. 
Savage, 99, 198, 265, 

309 
Saville, 42W. 
Savoy, Count of, 35 
Saxmundham, 110 
Say, 220 
Scales, 147, 217 
Scapula, 22 
Scarr, 98 
Schape, 218 
Schill, 310 
Schutz, 16 
Scotland, K. of, 3, 34, 

54, 268 
Scots, Q. of, 96, 137 
Scott, 3, 5 
Scriven, 292 
Scroop(e), 10, 13, 162, 

195, 210 
Scrope, 13, 51, 163M., 

249 
Scryvener, 292 
Scryver, 292 
Seaman, 20 
Searles, 99 
Seckford, 9, 46 
Segrave, 147 
Seintclere, 242 
Selwyer, 120 
Sergeaunt, 124 
Serjeant, 147 
Sewyn, 130 
Seymour, 119, 120, 145, 

269, 310 
Shardelow(e), 102, 123, 

161, 162, 168, 208, 

220»., 291 
Sharpe, 268 
Shawe, 248 
Sheene, 292 
Sheffield, 148 
Sheldrake, 284 
Shelton, 50, 51, 197 
Sheppard, 107, 114, 164 
Sheriff e, 173 
Shilond, 318 
Shirley, 225 
Shirlond, 86 
Shirrop, 19 
Shorten, 286 
Shrevyn or Scriven, 292 
Shrewsbury, Title, 36, 

96, III, 262 
Shute, 207 
Sibill, 281 
Sibton, 88 

Sibton, Abbot of, 159 
Sidney, 211 
Sigsbert, 18 
Simnel, 154 
Simon, 294 
Simpson, 20, 208 
Siric, 25, 47 
Sketh, 25 
Skinner, 319 



Skipwith, 153, 155, 257 
Skynnere, 195 
Slaughter, 131 
Slettavey, 74 
Slingsby, 218 
Slyngesby, 218 
Smalavilla, 109 
Smith, 19-21, 79, 81, 99, 

112, 197, 230, 253, 

254, 276, 296, 316, 317 
Smithson, 97, 310 
Smyth, 19, 137, 241, 

242, 248, 284, 296 
Smythe, 319 
Smythies, 273 
Snape, Prior of, 142, 

i66-i6S 
Snip, 170 
Soame, 6, 65, 207, 259, 

297-299, 3'3. i^7, 318 
Somerset, 97, 265, 301- 

303 
Somerset, D. of, iii, 

236-238, 269, 310 
Somery, 194 
Soone, 119, 120, 187 
Sophia, Princess, 97 
Sorpenvile, 89 
Sort, 184 
Soterton ( ? Sotterlee), 

63 
South, Title, 206, 263 
Southampton, E. of, 

124, 125 
Southwell, 6, 26, 51, 63, 

82, 90, 102, 112 
Sparhavoc, 135 
Spark(e), 86, 304 
Sparowe, 284 
Sparrow, 138, 307 
Spelman, 5, 63, 119 
Spencer, 154, 206, 266, 

268 
Spenser, 72, 148 
Sperlyng, 162, 168 
Spilling, 21 
Spitting, 38 
Spottulf, 8 

Spring, 37, 38, 221, 262 
Spucla, 282 
Squire, 209 
Stafford, 35, 87, 161, 

235, 241-243 
Stafford, E. of, 35, 98, 

23s, 239j 241W-, 266, 

271, 273 
Stainus, 118 
Stalham, 50, 51 
Stanard, 274 
Stanhope, 112, 124, 148, 

150, 178, 178W., 187, 

253 
Stanley, 148, 306 
Stanton, 121 
Stapilton, 29 
Stapleton, 28, 78, 79, 

79«., 216, 220, 255 
Stapultone, 148, 154 
Starliiig, 115, 136, 174 
Staunton, 15, 120, 268 
Stavely, 126 
Staverton, i ig 
Sta!yndrape, 148 



XX. 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



Stebbing, i8i 
Stevenson, 21 
Steward, 38, 223, 234, 

250 
Stewart, 47, 250 
Stigand, i8, 25, 271 
Stiwardeslond, 13 
Stoke, 89 
Stoke, Prior of, 251TC., 

312 
Stonard, 143 
Stone, 297 
Story, 267 
Stotevill, 217-219 
Stourton, 87 
Stowe, 155 

Stradbroke, E. of, 117 
Strafford^-E. of, 97, 98; 

131. 132, 143, 167 
Strange, 147^ 153, 205 
Strangways, 262 
Stratford, 129 
Straunge, 205 
Strelly, 122 
Stretch, 272 
Stuart, 96, 130 
Stubbe, 165 -^ 

Sturmin^ 146 
Sturmy, 144, 146, 147 
Sturmy al. E sturmy al. 

Le Esturmy, 144 
Sturnyn, 144 
"Stutevile, 308 
Stutevill, or Stotevill, 

217 , 
Stutevill-e, 226, 236 
Suckl ing, 2i.6M . 
Sudberic, io7'\^ 
Suffolk, Archdn. of, i 
Suffolk, Title, 9, 35, 

48, 49, 54, S5> 73> 8?. 
88, 93, 101-103, 106, 
124, 127, 130, 142, 

144, 147-149: 152-134, 
159, 161-164, 166, 168, 
171, 172, 174-176, 196, 
216, 235 

Suliard, 148 

Sulyard, 122 

Summonds, 296 

Surrey, 54 

Surrey, E. of, 3, 96, 206 

Surry, 48 

Sussex, E. of, 150, 
iSS, 211, 247-249 

^Suthwell, 61, 71 

Sutton, 312-314 

Swabey, 191 

Swaby, 260, 261 

Swan, 164, 250 

Swanlond, 130 

Swinborne, 243 

Sydenham, 87 

Sydnor, 10-13, 30, 58 

Tailour, 236 

Talbois, 155 

Talbot, II, 36, 96, III. 
262 

Talewithe, 315 

Talmach(e), 187, 239, 

273 
Talworth, 315, 317 
Tanner, 61 



Tarner, 141 
Tasburgh, 12, 30, 71 
Tasker, 82 
Tassell, 238 
Taverner, 44, 45, 244 
Taylor, 88, 133,310, 3" 
Tempervoyse, 40, 45 
Templars, 296 
Tentiniot, 89 
Terringham, 221, 223 
Teynham, Lord, 225 
Thetford, Bp. of, 25 
Thetford, Prior of, 175 
Thirkeld, 79 
Thompson, 310 
Thomson, 45, 302 
Thornhill, 47, 232, 233 
Thornton, 317 
Thorp(e), 86, 87, 206 
ThrockmortoHj 43??. 
Throgmorton, 30 
Throkmorton, 11 1 
Thurkell, 16, 17 
Thurkil, 40 
Thurlow, 316, 317 
Thurlow, Hovell-, 317 
Thurmot, 151 
Thurtell, 38 
Thurtone, 74 
Tidyngworth, 27 
Tibell, 240 
Tillett, 20 
Tilney, 206 
Timms, 288 
Timperley, 96 
Tindall, 212 
Tiptoft, 4, 67, 87, 88 
Tiptot, 73 
Tirrell, 265 
Tirwhyt, 257 
Tison, 238 
Titlershall, 142 
Tityshall, or Titshall 

4S 
Tochil, 262 
Todeni, 193 
Toka, 231, 300 
Tollemache, 112 
Tolthorpe, 223 
Tomlyn, . 238 
Tompson, 30 
Tonge, 308 
Toni, 293 
Topdiff, 98 

Topham, 287«., 288^. 
Torech, 81 
Tored, 57 

Touchel, 71, 7i«., 144 
Touneshend, 261 
Tourlaville, 115 
Townshend, 224-226, 236 
Traas, or Trace, 273 
Trace, 273 
Tracy, 60 
Trafford, 198 
Tregose, 222 
Trevor, 195, 196 
Trigg(e), 286, 289 
Tripp, 35, S6 
Trotter, 16 
Trusebut, 301 
Trusson, 159, i8i 



Trye, 266 

Trysth, 76 

Tudenham, or Tudden- 

ham, 13, 23, 24, 50, 

261 
Tulf, 158 
Tunstal, 184 
Turgar, 25, 47 
Turle, 294 
Turnay, 257 
Turner, 15, 20, 31, 197, 

217, 250, 295, 297, 318, 

319 

Tumour, 258 

Turton, 165 

Tuteler, 40 

Tutflet, 100 

Tuthill, 123, i23«. 

Tutlewey, 148, 154 

Twyn, 284 

Tychebourne, 309 

Tye, 80 

Tyler, SI 

Tynteshale, 142 

Tyrell, 92, 104, 243, 279 

Tyrrell, 117, 290 

Tyrwhyt, 257 

UfHet, 46, 79 

Ufford, 78, 93, loi, 116, 
119, 121, 124, 130, 
136, 144, 146-148, 152- 
154, 159, 216, 217 

Ulchetel, 133 

Ulf, 8, 62, 66, 109 

Ulflet, 282 

Ulgar, 319 

Ulketel, 8 

Ulmar, 135, 315 

Ulnoth, 8 

Ulrod, 100 

Ulsi, 43, 50 

Ulster, Countess of, 116 

Uluric, 9S, 109, 115, 
136, 1 80 

Ulverstone, 32 

Ulveston, 74 

Ulveva, 140 

Ulwin, 193 

Umfreville, 247 

Underbill, 217, 316 

Unton, 206 

Upton, 279, 302 

Urban, Pope, 116, 293 

Urdale, 87 

Urquhart, 16 

Usborne, 208 

Val, de la, 283 

Valance, 89 

Valenis, 109, 112 

Vallibus, 57 

Valoines, 146, 152, 157 

Vancy, 260 

Van de- Weyer, 196 

Van Heythuson, 59 

Van Hove, 259 

Varennes, 231, 300, 308 

Vassal, 219 

Vaux, or Vallibus, 152 

Vavasour, 257 

Veer, 318 

Vendosme and Beau- 
mont, E. of, 153 



Verdon, 70, 198, 251 
Vere, 85, 86, 89, 150, 
221, 245, 271, 309, 315 
Verley, Verlay, 163 
Verney, 71, in 
Vernon, 98, 132, 252- 

253, 291, 29.6 
Vesey, 14-16, 38, iS3,n. 
Vewetree, 87 
Viel, 273 
Villiers, 280, 281 
Vincent, Prior, 18 
Visdelieu, 123 
Vitrei, 203 
Voltaire, 287 
Vyne, 228 
Vyse, 131, 132 
Wachesham, i8i 
Wacra, 140 
Waddington, 138 
Wade, 58, 61 
Wadham, 265 
Walchelin, Archdn., 

166 
Waldegrave, 221, 265, 

276, 304 
Waldgrave, 296 
Walerand, 89 
Wales, Prince of, 58, 

III, 201, 256 
Wales, Princess of, 131 
Walgrave, 36, 252 
Walker, 41, 126 
Walkfare, 217 
Wallace, 145, 150 
Waller, 120 
Walley, 169, 289 
Walpole, 62, 69, 191, 

225, 297 
Walsingham, 258 
Walsyngham, 102, 162 
Walter, 121, 135, 151, 

152, 166, 274, 275, 278 
Walton, 280, 283 
Wancey, 231-233 
Wancy, 300 
Wanney, or Wantier, 

261 
Wannoff, 259». 
Warcup, 208 
Ward, 37, 38, 183 
Warde, 141, 159 
Ware, 87, 279 
Ware, Cumberlege, 280, 

284 
Warenna, 308 
Wareyn, 296 
Warkworth, Baron, 310 
Warner, 123, 137, 157, 

182, 302, 303 
Warnere, 273 
Warr, Lord de la, 262 
Warren, 146, 208, 262, 

296 
Warryn, 112 
Warwick, Title, 70, 71, 

78, III, 112, 119, 147, 

162, 168, 194, 212, 

213, 235 
Waterton, 258 
Watevill(e), 267, 318 
AVatson, 80 



INDEX NOMINUM. 



XXI. 



Watts, 75, 172 

Waynfleet, 32 

Waynflete, 32 

Wayth, 138 

Weakes, 289 

Webb, 125, 156 

Webster, 107 

Weever, 4, 4^. 

Weir, 87 

Welles, 32, 72, 148, 154 

Welyngton, 72 

Welysham, 60 

Wengrave, 271 

Wentworth, 6, 6m., 9, 
23, 24, 26, 44, 52, S3, 
56, 63, 65, 97, 98, 127, 
131, 132, 143, 155, 167, 
182, 184, 243, 2Z9::28i^ 
283, 310 

Wentworth, Vernon-, 
98, 130, 132 

Wentworth al. Cres- 
well, 44 

Wesenham, 18 

Wesleye, Title, 194, 195 

West, 262, 318 

Westhorp, 283 

Westhrope, 284 

Westhroppe, 283 

Westmoreland, E. of, 
42. 7O) 155. 161, 249 

Weston, 48 

Weyland, 70, no, 119, 
184, 187, 306 

Wheatcroft, or Whit- 
croft, 112 

Whetcrofte, 185 

White, 156, 157 

Whiting, 6 

Whitmore, 286 



Whyte, 120, 154 
Wichingham, 4 
Wichyngham, 40 
Widard, 293 
Wihtred, 62 
Wilard, 308 
Wilbey, 148, 154 
Wildesher, 232 
Wimet, 286 
Wilkes, 316 
Wilkinson, 226 
Willes, 241 
Willett, 84 
William, 50, 196, 214 
Williams, 226, 266, 280 
Williams, Bulkeley-, 

226 
,Willoughby, 112, 127, 

142, I4S, 147-150= 153- 
157, 162, 168, 184, 191, 
217, 224, 256, 262, 263, 
291 

Willughby, 255 

Wilmot, 195 

Wimbledon, Title, 156, 
260 

Wimer, 308 

Winchelsea, E of, 236 

Winchester, Bp. of, 16, 
32. 39. 42, 56> J40, 
177. 317 

Windesor, Lord, 16 

Windsor, 267, 268, 310 

Windsor, Viscount, 119 

Wingefeld, 10 

Wingfield, 10, 13, 23, 
24, 35. SO. 83, 117, 
122, 123, 127, 142, 

144. 145. i57»-. '59 
161, 163, 172, 181, 184 



Winn, 260 
Winter, 303 
Wisbicke, 297 
Wisbricke, 297 
Wiscar, 234 
Wiseman, 81, 248 
Wisgar, 200, 234, 2403 

251, 274, 285, 320 
Wishant, 133, 177, 186 
Withepol, 150 
Witherfield, 196 
Withipol(e), 119, 178 
Wode, 27 
Wode al. Benyngton. 

32 
Wolf, 32 
Wolferton, 124 
Wolmer, 138 
Wolrich al. Worlich(e), 

207, 208 
Wolsey, 8, 43, 50, 83, 

85.95. 131. 142, 167, 

168, 171 
Wood, 26; 120, 124, 125, 

134. 145. 150, 187 
Woode, 163 
Woodhouse, 81, 82, 157 
Woodley, 156 
Woodstock, III, 175, 

191 
Woolhouse, 61 
Woolmar, 308 
Woolmer, 319, 320 
Worcester, Bp. of, 224, 

262, 309 
Worcester, Title, 67, 

70, 97, III, 210, 265, 

302 
Worliche, 207 
Worstede, 168 



Wridewell, 281 
Wrigglesworth, 197 
.Wright(e), 126, 134 
Wriothesley, 119, 248 
Wroote al. Wrot(t), 41, 

4i». 
Wrothe, 221 
Wroxham, 147, 216 
Wrythe, 310 
Wurlyche, 291 \ 

Wyatt, 36, 221 \ 

Wychingham, 86 
Wyghtham, 164 
Wymenhale, 74 
Wymington, 181 
Wymondehale, 83 
Wymonhale, 83 
Wymundhale, 83 
WyncoU, 272 
Wyndham, 5 
Wynfeld, 187 
Wyngefeld, 24, 169, 172 
Wyngfeld, 74, 103 
Wynn, 298 
Wynton, 56M. 
Wyot, 162, 168 
Wysete, 10 
Wyth(e), 50-53, 172 
Yale, 129 

Yarborough, Lord, 120 
Yarmouth, 10, 12 
Yarmouth, E. of, iig, 

120 
Yatys, 5 
Yeldham, 245 
Yelverton, 304, 305 
York, Title, 70, 7 in., 

Ill, 153, 200, 252, 292 
Zell, Duke of, 97 
Zouch, Lord, 153, 194 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



VOL. I. 

Page 211, line 18, after 1437 add : " when the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Chedburgh, in Risbridge Hundred, to the time of Thomas Pilkington in 1460, when a fine 
was levied in Sept., 39 Hen. VI., between R. Lever and Nicholas Nabbe and Sir William 
Harrington and Elizabeth his wife, Thomas Pilkington and Margaret his wife and Arthur 
Pylkyngton. 

VOL. III. 

Page 174, add to " Hitcham Manor, " Hecham als. Hitcham Manor or Lordship with the site of 
the manor, Eastheywood, Oxney Wood, and Westley Wood, being in the tenure of Sir 
Robert Naunton, Knt., was granted by letters patent of 9th September, 4 Car. I, to Edward 
Ditchfield, John Higlord, Humphrey Clerk, and Francis Moss, and their heirs, to be held of 
the Manor of East Greenwich under the fee farm rent of £75. 12s. 75d., which fee farm rent 
was by the contractors and trustees for the Commonwealth sold and conveyed to Giles 

Andrews, of Mount , in County Suffolk, for £666. 15s. 5Jd., by deed dated 20th March, 

1650. 

VOL. IV. 

Page 6, line 5 from bottom, for " hair lomb " read " heirlomb." 
„ 45, line 18, for " Denston " read " Dunston." 
„ 69, line 32, for " Beney " read " Berney." 
,, 73, line 24, for " Coope " read " Cooper." 

,, 111, lines 5 and 7 from bottom, for " Jermingham" read " Jerningham." 
,, 112, line 1, ditto. 

,, ,, line5, for "1566" read "1556." 
„ ,, line 6, for " Ellington " read " Elsington." 
„ ,, line 15, for " Dorothy" read " Mary." 
,, ,, line 20, for " Kirkelyham " read " Kirkletham. 
„ 127, lines 34, 36, and 38, for " Coyle" read " Coyte." 
,, 138, line 5, for " Guisney " read " Giesiny," 
,, 149, and throughout for " Elvedpn" read " Elveden." 

150, after line 29 introduce the following information which has been kindly furnished by 
His Highness Prince Frederick Duleep Singh : — 
"It would seem that all the manors in Elveden became consolidated under the Cockes. In 
1655 John Cocke (son of the Robert Cocke, who purchased Elveden Manor in 1610, and 
brother of the Robert who had livery of it in 1624), sold 'The manors and lordships of 
Monkshall, Staynes, and Elveden als. Elden, Rushworth als. Rushford Hastings, in Suffolk," 
to his brother-in-law. Suckling Jay, of Holveston, in Norfolk, and Christopher Jay, of 
Norwich. In 1708, John, son of Suckling Jay, sold these manors to Thomas Breese, of 
Barnhara Broom, co. Norfolk. In 1724, the Rev. John Breese, son of Thomas Breese, 
sold the whole to Edward Owen, of Bradwell Abbey, co. Bucks. Edward Owen, who had 
also purchased property in Icklingham, died before 1740, leaving two daughters and coheirs, 
one of whom, Jane, married Daniel Gwilt, and carried the Icklingham property to that 
family ■ the other, Mary, who married in 1730 Thomas Crispe, of Parbold, m Lancashire, 
inherited Elveden. Their daughter and heir married Sir John Tyrrell, Bart., who died in 
1766 and two years afterwards the whole passed by purchase to Viscount Keppel." 
Page 151, add to 2nd paragraph, " Lord Iveagh purchased the estate from the late Maharajah 
Duleep Singh's trustees in 1894." ^ , „. 

Incorporated in the present hall, which has been greatly enlarged by Viscount Iveagh, is 
a portion of Viscount Keppel's mansion, especially a beautiful room of Adam decorations, 
with a plaster ceiling emblematic of his talents and achievements. The present house is on 
the same site (and probably part of the original walls still exist) as the ancient " Monkshall 
or Elveden Manor," the Manor House of the Abbots of Bury. ^ , . „ _, ^ . _,„ 
This is clearly shown by a descriptive survey of " the enclosed lands at Elveden in 1618. 
Pace242, notes, for "Weary "read "Wearg." _,„„,.„ . „ 

,; 329, lines 18 and 19, for " Burtin Buroughe" read " Burkin Burroughes. 



TAYLOR. GARNETT, EVANS 

AND COMPANY, LIMITED. 

54, FLEET STREET, LONDON, 

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