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Full text of "New York university; its history, influence, equipment and characteristics, with biographical sketches and portraits of founders, benefactors, officers and alumni;"

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Cornell University 
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http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924092721939 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



NEW YORK 
UNIVERSITY 

ITS HISTORY, INFLUENCE, EQUIPMENT AND 

CHARACTERISTICS 

WITH 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES AND PORTRAITS OF FOUNDERS, 
BENEFACTORS, OFFICERS AND ALUMNI 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

GENERAL JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN, LL.D. 

EX-PRESIDENT OF EOWDOIN COLLEGE AND EX-GOVERNOR OF MAINE 



SPECIAL EDITORS 

Appro'ved by Authorities of the Uniiiersity 



HISTORICAL 

HENRY M. MacCRACKEN, D.D., LL.D. 
PROFESSOR ERNEST G. SIHLER, Ph.D. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 

WILLIS FLETCHER JOHNSON, A.M., L.H.D 

Class of '79 Member of the University Council 



INTRODUCTION BT 
HON. WILLIAM T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D. 

UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 

ILLUSTRATED 

Vol. II 

BOSTON 

R. HERNDON COMPANY 

1903 



7 



Copyright, igo2, by 
R. HERN DON COMPANY 



University Press, Cambridge, U. S. A. 



INTRODUCTION 



IN the first volume of this work it was the intention to set forth the general character of a 
representative American University — the inspiring motive of its establishment, its 
organization and equipment, its historical progress and development, and its large 
influence as a public institution and as a power in the social order. 

Part II of that volume was concerned with the personal factors of the case — the character 
of the men who, for the great service of their instruction, guidance and inspiration, whether 
in the communication of positive knowledge, or in the discipline of the powers, discernment of 
the aptitudes and cherishing of the nobler aspirations and faiths of their immediate pupils, 
deserve themselves to be cherished in lasting honor. 

Following in order now are the ranks of those so highly favored in being the objects of 
all this interest and devotion. From the University we turn our regard to its Sons. And in 
doing this, it cannot be expected that a complete account can be given of the character and 
career of any ; still less would it be possible, within the compass of the work, even to make 
mention of all whose names have been inscribed on these honored rolls. What is attempted 
here is an exhibition of the widely-varied results of the work of the University, in its office of 
instruction and education, as shown in its Alumni. 

This is not a selection of what may be arbitrarily considered the best examples, but a 
broad illustration from the whole range of academic preparation seen in every department of 
active life. While it may not be doubted that those who are here presented have achieved 
some eminence in their respective fields of activity, it will be borne in mind that the great 
number of those not in this list have also in manifold good works illustrated the genial influ- 
ences and positive benefits of their University training. Indeed the larger usefulness, and per- 
haps we should say the great and supremely justifying end, of the University lies in what does 
not easily respond to analysis, investigation or enumeration, but runs out into the thousand 
invisible but mighty influences that make up the daily life of man, and so have part in the 
development of human history. 

The examples herein are, then, of a representative character — not only of the influence 
of University training, but of the varied active powers in human association for well-doing. 



ii INTRODUCriON 

Although it is said by some — we think without sufficient reflection, or it may be from a too pro- 
fessional point of view — that the glory of a University is in what it offers to the best endowed, 
there is a broader truth revealed in this contemplation, which allows us to believe that the glory 
of a University is in what it does for all, of any grade and aptitude, who are objects of its con- 
cern, and in the remote effects upon the community at large. 

The time is past when a University education necessarily implied a strict following of what 
was known as the "learned professions." Indeed, this term itself has had large extension 
within recent years. Law, Medicine and Theology, which made the noble scope of the mediae- 
val Universities, no longer bound the activities of the great schools which have inherited their 
name and still bear their prestige transported in place and broadened in scope. Journalism ; 
Literary Authorship ; Teaching, in its various lines and grades ; Engineering, in the construc- 
tion and handling of the fast developing applications of modern physical. science ; even more, 
perhaps. Research, Exploration, Invention, in all fields of observation ; and among the ele- 
ments. Forces of Laws of Action, whether in the physical or psychical spheres ; all these 
demand a preparation for which the means and encouragements of the highest schools are none 
too ample. The successful prosecution of any of these aims may well deserve the rank of a 
" learned profession." 

In fact we might warrantably say that in these modern days Science, Philosophy and Art 
have all enlarged their content and their scope. Geology, Geography, Meteorology, Astro- 
nomy, have each revealed new aspects of the world ; Biology, new reaches of life ; Chemistry 
and Molecular Physics have opened to us glimpses of wondrous modes of action which we 
scarcely dignify by calling them laws, inasmuch as they seem like generative powers ; the prob- 
lems of Psychology are investigated on new lines, and even the traditions of history, in its 
monuments, relics and languages, are tried by new tests and lead to new grounds of conclusion. 

We might go even farther, and advancing to the problems arising from associated human 
effort under modern conditions of material and historic development, consider how great a part 
must belong to the schools of learning, where should be set forth the principles on which 
human intercourse and effort are to be conducted — the practical points of intersection of 
economic and moral laws, — Self-Advantage and Self-Surrender. Among these concernments, 
susceptible of study — passing from simple to complex, from near to far — are such matters as 
banking; insurance; instrumentalities of communication and transportation; methods of ex- 
change and use of products ; the enfranchisement of industry and commerce, and the large 
handling of labor and capital necessitated by our complex civilization, — all economic con- 
siderations, in fact, affecting man's work and worth in the world. 



INTR OD UCriON iii 

Nor can we stop short of taking into this account all the vast elements and interests which 
enter into the problems of modern politics, national and international, which demand the exer- 
cise of the highest powers and largest sympathies. The dealing with such interests and han- 
dling of such instruments is a great trust, the exercise of which will be held to strict account 
before the tribunals of history and of the Master of Life. Surely such things require the best 
that our great schools can gfve for doctrine, instruction and reproof It is by such things that 
civilization advances — which is, or should be, a demonstration of the power and worth of 
Manhood. 

What we have especially to remark here, without entering into discussion or detail, is the 
fact that in man's highest intellectual effort, in his mastery of knowledge, skill, and even of his 
own powers, he owes a large debt, whether recognized or not, to the great centres of instruction 
and discipline which make it their function to discover, produce, distribute and inculcate the 
truths that pertain to man's well-being. So related are human interests that no humblest 
worker in the associated effort, now so diversified and so widely correlated, can fail to be 
affected by what the masters of science and inspirers of ideals, as well as the captains of in- 
dustry and enterprise, develop and devote to practical ends out of what they know of the laws 
of things and of man. And those who have profited as they were able by years of personal, 
intimate relations with the chosen masters of knowledge in centres of educational influence, 
going out into the world in their own work and on lines opened by the public need, become in 
turn not only producers of their specialty, but new centres of influence radiating their light and 
strength into the great common life to which they belong. 

The whole reach and effect of these manifold activities it would be impossible to trace or 
estimate. But even by such mere sweep of the eye as we have given, and in such a list of 
names and services as is presented in these volumes, enough can be seen of the place and part 
in life of the Sons of our Universities to justify the foresight of the founders of these institu- 
tions, the generosity of their patrons and the fostering care of the State. Enough of the larger 
beneficial result than that limited to immediate individual advantage can surely be apprehended, 
to command not merely the affection of the alumnus, but the honoring regard of the com- 
munity. It is this belief which justifies the publishers in presuming upon the kindly reception 
of the work which they have contemplated with more than a commercial interest, and to which 
they have devoted the best abilities at their command. 

JOSHUA L. CHAMBERLAIN. 



UNIVERSITY SONS 




" It is needed that a great University keep in touch with the spirit of the nation. 
The time is past for cloister education. More and more in view of the requirements 
of the society in which we live, is the value of a University training measured by 
what it does in the making of a citizen. . . . Harvard can only keep the proud place 
she has won, by drawing her support from the whole country ; and she can only 
receive that support because the country believes that her teaching and her influence 
develop true American manhood. Let that belief be lost, and all the millions in our 
treasury, all our departments equipped for instruction in every branch of learning, 
cannot save our leadership. . . . Harvard will be judged by her children." 

Edmund Wetniore ('60) at Harvard Alumni Dinner. 



UNIVERSITY SONS 



ACHESON, James Joseph, 1812-1873. 

Class of 1833 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1812; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1833; A.M., New York University, 1836; 
M.D., New York Medical College, 1845; studied at 
Pittsburg Theological Seminary; minister. Reformed 
Presbyterian Church; physician and surgeon, 1845-73; 
died, 1873. 

JAMES JOSEPH ACHESON, A.M., M.D., 
whose name stands in chronological order at 
the head of the roll of the Alumni of New York 
University, was the son of William and Margaret 
(Graham) Acheson, and was born in New York 
City on January 25, 181 2. He was carefully pre- 
pared for college in local schools and entered the 
University of the City of New York, as New York 
University was at first called, at its organization and 
opening. He was among the first students matricu- 
lated, and he was a member of the first class gradu- 
ated, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the 
Commencement of 1833. Three years later he 
received the degree of Master of Arts. Meantime 
he studied in the Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Theolog- 
ical Seminary, and became a licentiate in the min- 
istr}' of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. The 
medical profession had, however, a stronger attrac- 
tion for him. He became a pupil of the illustrious 
Dr. Valentine Mott, who was so intimately and hon- 
orably identified with the University, and was grad- 
uated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
the New York Medical College in 1845. From 
that time until his death he was in practice as a 
physician and surgeon. He was President of the 
Brooklyn Medical Association, and a Consulting 
Physician of the Brooklyn Dispensary, and was the 
author of a treatise on the eye and its diseases. 
He was married in 1838 to Euphemia Culbert, 
daughter of John Culbert, and had seven children : 
Euphemia, James Joseph, Louise, William, Freder- 
ick, Anna, and Alexander Acheson. Two of his 
brothers were graduated from New York University, 
William Andrew in 1836, and John Crothers in 
1853. Dr. Acheson died in Brooklyn, New York, 
on November 4, 1873. 



CONE, Edward Winfield, 1814-1871. 

Class of 1833 Arts. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1814; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1833, and A.M., 1836 ; studied and 
practiced law; died, 1871. 

EDWARD WINFIELD CONE, A.M., a mem- 
ber of the first class graduated from New 
York University, came of a family long and honor- 
ably identified with the history of the United States. 
His father was the Rev. Dr. Spencer Houghton 
Cone, one of the earliest members of the Uni- 
versity Council and one of the most distinguished 
clergymen of his day. The maiden name of his 
mother was Sallie Wallace Morrell. He was born 
in the City of Baltimore, Maryland, on March 4, 
1814, and entered the University of the City of New 
York, in the College of Arts and Science, at the 
opening of that institution. He was graduated in 
its first class, in 1833, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and in 1836 received that of Master of Arts. 
He afterwards studied law, was admitted to the Bar, 
and had a successful and eminent career as a law- 
yer. He was married on October 13, 1858, to 
Mary Elizabeth Weston, daughter of John Weston, 
and had five children : Edward Wallace, Harry 
Houghton, Bessie, Lillian, and Julie Cone. His 
brother. Colonel Spencer W. Cone, was a student at 
the University in the Class of 1837, but was not 
graduated. Mr. Cone died in New York on Janu- 
ary 23, 1871. 



DODGE, Henry Swartwout, 1815-1855. 

Class of :833 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1815; entered New York Univer- 
sity, 1832; graduated A.B., 1833, and A.M., 1836; law- 
yer; died, 1855. 

HENRY SWARTWOUT DODGE, A.M., one 
of the three who formed the first class 
graduated from New York University, was the son 
of Robert and Eliza P. Dodge, and was born in 
New York on November 12, 1815. He entered the 
University in 1832, and was graduated in 1833 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Three years later 



4 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



he received the degree of Master of Arts. He 
became a practicmg lawyer and had a successful 
and honorable career. He was married to Daisy 
E. L. Moore, and had two children : Katherine M. 
and Henry M. Dodge. His brother, Robert Dodge, 
was graduated from the University in 1840, and had 
a distinguished career as a lawyer and author. Mr. 
Dodge died at Belleville, New Jersey, on September 
17. 1855. 

MATHEWS, Cornelius, 1817-1889. 

Class of 1834 Arts. 
Born at Port Chester, N. Y., 1817 ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1834; A.M., 1837; first President 
University Alumni Association ; admitted to Bar, 1837 ; 
editor, author, poet, dramatist, and copyright advocate ; 
died, i88g. 

CORNELIUS MATHEWS, A.M., one of the 
most versatile and brilliant literary men of 
his day, was the son of Abijah Mathews, and was born 
at Port Chester, New York, on October 28, 181 7. 
After . receiving a careful preparatory education he 
entered New York University and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1834, receiv- 
ing the degree of Master of Arts in 1837. In the 
latter year he was admitted to practice at the Bar, 
but in 1838 abandoned the law for a literary career 
which for many years was one of peculiar brilliance. 
In 1840-42 he was associated with Evert A. Duy- 
ckinck in editing a monthly magazine called " Arc- 
turus," and he was subsequently connected with 
various other literary periodicals. He was a volum- 
inous writer in poetry and prose, fiction, criticism, 
satire, and the drama, and was a forceful figure in 
journalism. He was the founder in 1843 o^ the 
Copyright Club, of which William Cullen Bryant 
was President, and which led the way toward the 
securing of appropriate copyright legislation. He 
was a correspondent of Dickens and the Brownings, 
and was the first American editor of Mrs. Browning's 
works. His writings are marked with much origi- 
nality, acute observation, imagination, satirical power, 
and wholesome manliness of sentiment. His bibliog- 
raphy includes "The Motley Book," 1838; "Be- 
hemoth," 1839; " The Pohticians," 1840; "Puffer 
Hopkins," 1841 ; " Wakendah," 1841 ; "Poems on 
Man," 1843; "Big Abel and Little Manhattan," 
1845 ; " Witchcraft," 1846 ; "Jacob Leisler," 1847 ; 
"Chanticleer," 1850; " Moneypenny," 1850; "Pen 
and Ink Panorama of New York City," 1853; and 
"False Pretences" and " Fairy Tales," 1868. He 
died on March 25, 1889. He was the first President 
of the Alumni Association of New York University. 



CROSBY, Robert Ralston, 1815-1892. 

Class of 1834 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1815; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1834; died. New York, 1892. 

ROBERT RALSTON CROSBY, A.B., one of 
the early alumni of the University of the 
City of New York, belonged to a family conspicu- 
ously identified with the University and with the 
City of New York. He was a son of William Bed- 
low Crosby and Harriet Ashton (Clarkson) Crosby, 
a grandson of Ebenezer Crosby, a surgeon on Gen- 
eral Washington's staff, and a brother of Clarkson F. 
Crosby, who was graduated from New York Uni- 




ROBERT R. CROSBY 

versity in 1835, and of Howard Crosby, who was 
graduated in 1844 and was afterward Chancellor of 
the University and one of the foremost theologians 
and preachers of his day. Robert Ralston Crosby 
was born in New York City on December 3, 1815, 
and was graduated from New York University with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1834. He was mar- 
ried on April 27, 1859, to Jane Murray Livingston, 
daughter of the late Colonel Henry Alexander Liv- 
ingston, of Poughkeepsie, New York, and had four 
children : Robert Ralston, ]r., Livingston, Edward 
NicoU and Cornelia Livingston Crosby, now the wife 
of Alfred Duane Pell, of New York. He died at 
Riverdale, New York, on June 25, 1892. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



GORDON, William Robert, 1811-1897. 

Class of 1834 Arts. 
Born in New York, 181 r; founder of Eucleian So- 
ciety, New York University ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1834; A.M., 1837; graduated Theo- 
logical Seminary, New Brunswick, N. J., 1837; min- 
ister of Reformed Dutch Church, 1837-80; S.T.D., 
Columbia, 1854; retired from active service, 1880; 
author. 

WILLIAM ROBERT GORDON, A.M., S.T.D., 
son of Robert and Elizabeth (Postley) 
Gordon, was born in New York City on March 19, 
181 1. He entered New York University in 1833, 




WILLIAM R. GORDON 

and was the founder of the Eucleian Literary So- 
ciety. He was graduated in 1834 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and received that of Master of 
Arts in 1837. From 1834 to 1837 he was a student 
in the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Dutch 
Church, at New Brunswick, New Jersey, and from 
1837 to 1880 was a minister of that church, with 
pastoral charges successively in Manhasset, New 
York, Flushing, New York, New York City, and 
Schraalenberg, New Jersey. He received the de- 
gree of S.T'.D. from Columbia College in 1854. In 
1880 he retired from pastoral work on account 
of failing health. He was married in 1838 to 
Matilda Onderdonk. Dr. Gordon was the author 
of numerous works on theological and patriotic sub- 



jects, including "The Supreme Godhead of Christ," 
1848, 2nd ed., 1855; "Particular Providence," 
1854, 2nd ed., 1856 ; "A Threefold Test of Modern 
Spiritualism," 1856; " Christocracy," 1867, 3rd ed., 
1878; and " Revealed Truth Impregnable," 1877. 
He died March 31, 1897, at the age of eighty-six, 
and was interred in the cemetery of the church at 
Manhasset, where he had his first charge. 



HASBROUCK, Fenelon, 1818-1861. 

Class of 1835 Arts. 
Born at Shawangunk, N. Y., 1818; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1835, and A.M., 1839; M.D., 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1838 ; physician 
and surgeon ; editor; died, 1861. 

FENELON HASBROUCK, A.M., M.D., son 
of Dr. Stephen and Ehza (Schenck) Has- 
brouck, was born at Shawangunk, New York, on 
February 10, 1818. He entered New York Uni- 
versity, was a leading member of the Philomathean 
Society, and was a Commencement orator. He re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts on graduation 
in 1835, and that of Master of Arts in 1839. Mean- 
time he studied medicine with his father and Dr. 
Rhinelander and at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, and was graduated from the latter with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1838. In 
r845-47 he was a Resident Physician at Bellevue 
and Blackwell's Island hospitals, and in 1858-61 
he was Editor of " The Highland Democrat " of 
Peekskill, New York. He was a member of the 
New York County and Westchester County Medical 
societies. On May 20, 1841, he was married to 
Matilda Demarest, daughter of Ralph Demarest, and 
had six children : Lizzie, Matilda, Euphemia, Fene- 
lon, Adele, and Clarence Hasbrouck. He died at 
Peekskill, New York, on December 15, 1861. 



HUNTINGTON, Jedediah Vincent, 1815- 
1862. 

class ol 1835 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1815; studied at Yale; graduated 
A.B., New York University, 1835, and A.M., 1838; 
graduated M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1838; 
engaged in literary work ; member of Faculty of St. 
Paul's College, Flushing, N. Y. ; studied in Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; minister of Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, 1841 ; died, 1862. 

JEDEDIAH VINCENT HUNTINGTON, A.M., 
M.D., son of Benjamin and Faith (Trumbull) 
Huntington, was born in New York City on Janu- 
ary 20, 18 15. He at first entered Yale College and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



studied there for a time, but was compelled to leave 
on account of impaired health. Later he entered 
New York University, and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1835. He then went 
to the Medical Department of the University of 
Pennsylvania and was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1838, in the same year 
receiving the degree of Master of Arts from New 
York University. He did not practice his profession, 
however, but engaged in literary work and teaching, 
being a member of the Faculty of St. Paul's College 
at Flushing, Long Island, New York. Finally he 
entered the Union Theological Seminary, New 
York, and at the end of his course was ordained 
into the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
He was Rector of a church at Middlebury, Vermont, 
until 1846, when he went to Europe to live. In 
1849 he entered the Roman Catholic Church and 
remained a member of it for the rest of his life. 
He was the author of numerous works, including 
published sermons and addresses, poems, tales and 
essays. He was married on April 21, 1842, to 
Mary Huntington, daughter of the Rev. Joshua 
Huntington. He died at Pau, France, on March 10, 
1862. 



MAGIE, Burtis Cunningham, 1813-1890. 

Class of 1835 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1813; at Union College, 1831-32; 
entered New York University, 1832; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1835, and D.D., 1875; Andover, 
Princeton, and Union Theological Seminary, 1835-38; 
minister of Presbyterian Church, 1838-90 ; died, 1890. 

BURTIS CUNNINGHAM MAGIE, D.D., was 
a son of Daniel Hull Magie and Elizabeth 
(Woodruff) Magie, and was born in New York City 
on December 4, 1813. He began his college life at 
Union College, in 1831-32, but in the latter year 
transferred himself to New York University and was 
graduated in 1835 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. In r 835-36 he was a student at the Ando- 
ver Theological Seminary, in 1836-37 at Princeton 
Theological Seminary, and in 1837-38 at the Union 
Theological Seminary, New York. He was ordained 
into the ministry of the Presbyterian church in 1838, 
and continued therein for the remainder of his life, 
filling pastoral charges at New Paltz, New York, 
Dover, New Jersey, Pleasant Grove, New Jersey, 
and Dover, New Jersey, a second time. He was 
Clerk of the Presbytery of Rockaway, New Jersey, 
for twenty-five years, and of that of Morris and 
Orange for a number of years. In 1887-90 he was 



County Superintendent of Public Education in Mor- 
ris County, New Jersey. He was a member of the 
New Jersey Historical Society and contributed some 
chapters to a " History of Morris County," and he 
was a Chaplain under the Christian Commission in 
Tennessee in 1863. He was married on Decem- 
ber 4, 1838, to Mary Cass Belden, daughter of the 
Rev. William Belden, and had six children : Susan 
Caroline, Lucy Belden, Abbey Frances, William 
Elston, Burtis Cunningham, and Mary Allen Magie. 
He died at Dover, New Jersey, on June 12, 1890. 




BURTIS C. MAGIE 

Two of his brothers were graduated at New York 
University, William H, in 1839 and Daniel E. in 
1835- 

DOREMUS, John Edwards Caldwell, 1816- 
1878. 

Class of 1836 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1816 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1836; A.M., 1849, and D.D., i860, New 
York University ; studied law with Abraham Lincoln ; 
minister of Presbyterian Church ; Professor and College 
President ; Representative of American Bible Society ; 
died, 1878. 

JOHN EDWARDS CALDW^ELL DOREMUS, 
A.M., D.D., son of Francis and Eliza de Hart 
(Canfield) Doremus, was born in New York City 
on October T5, 181 6. He entered New York Uni- 
versity and was graduated with the degree of Bach- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



7 



elor of Arts in 1836. He also received the degrees 
of Master of Arts in 1849 and Doctor of Divinity 
in i860, from the University. After graduation he 
studied law with Hugh Maxwell, in New York, and 
with Abraham Lincoln in Illinois. He became a 
minister of the Presbyterian Church, and filled pas- 
torates at Bayou Grostete and Baton Rouge, Louisi- 
ana. Next he was Professor of Languages in 
Oakland College, Mississippi, and the President of 
Goliad College, Texas. Later he was the represen- 
tative of the American Bible Society in New 
Orleans, and pastor of a church at Vienna, Louisi- 
ana. He was three times married, his wives being 
Katharine Louisa Ulrich, Mary Allen, and Elizabeth 
Wood. His children were nine in number. He 
died at Vienna, Louisiana, on November 16, 1878. 



daughter of Mark Walton, and had three children : 
Archibald, Mark Walton, and Antoinette Walton 
Maclay. He died in New York on February 19, 



MACLAY, William Brown, 1812-1882. 

Class of 1836 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1812 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1836; Instructor in Latin, New York Uni- 
versity, 1836; A.M., New York University, 1838; mem- 
ber of Council, New York University, 1838-82; admitted 
to the Bar, 1839; practicing lawyer; member of New 
York State Assembly, 1840-41-42 ; Representative in 
Congress, 1843-49, and 1857-61 ; Trustee of New York 
and Brooklyn Bridge ; died, 1882. 

WILLIAM BROWN MACLAY, A.M., long 
a member of the University Council and 
an eminent public servant, was the son of the Rev. 
Dr. Archibald and Antoinette (Watson) Maclay, and 
was born in New York City on March 20, 181 2. 
He pursued a course in the College of Arts and 
Science of New York University, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and as the Vale- 
dictorian of his class, in 1836. In the fall of that 
year he became an Instructor in the Latin Language 
and Literature in the University. In 1838 he re- 
ceived the degree of Master of Arts from the Uni- 
versity, and was elected a member of its Council, 
which place he continued to fill until his death in 
1882, a space of nearly forty-four years. He studied 
law and was admitted to the Bar in 1839, and had 
a distinguished career in the legal profession. He 
was elected a member of the Assembly of the State 
of New York in 1840, 1841, and 1842. In 1843 
he became a member of Congress, and was twice 
re-elected, serving continuously until 1849. He 
entered Congress again in 1857 and was re-elected, 
serving until 1861. Later in life he was a Trustee 
of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge. He was 
married on August 22, 1838, to Antoinette Walton, 



VAIL, Alfred, 1807-1859. 

Class of 1836 Arts. 
Born at Morristown, N. J., 1807; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1836, and A.M., 1838; colleague 
of S. F. B. Morse in inventing telegraphy; builder and 
operator of first telegraph line ; inventor of most im- 
portant telegraphic apparatus ; author ; died, 1859. 

ALFRED VAIL, A.M., who deserves everlast- 
ing fame as the co-inventor with Morse and 
Henry of the electric telegraph, was a son of 
Stephen and Bertha (Young) Vail, his father being 
the proprietor of the great Speedwell Iron Works at 
Morristown, New Jersey, the builder of the engine 
of the first steamship that crossed the Atlantic, and 
the financial backer of the first electric telegraph. 
He was born at Morristown, New Jersey, on Septem- 
ber 25, 1807, and was educated at a local academy. 
He then entered his father's iron works. On attain- 
ing his majority he felt inclined toward the Presby- 
terian ministry, and accordingly sought a collegiate 
education in New York University. He was President 
of the Eucleian Society during his undergraduate 
career, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, in 1836, two years later receiving that of 
Master of Arts. He next entered a Theological Sem- 
inary at Bloomfield, New Jersey, but soon left it and 
devoted himself to scientific pursuits. At the Univer- 
sity he had become intimately acquainted with Sam- 
uel F. B. Morse, and deeply interested in his electrical 
experiments. He was already an expert machinist, 
and made some valuable suggestions to Morse con- 
cerning mechanical devices for telegraphy. In 1837 
he formed a partnership with Morse, invited the latter 
to the Speedwell works at Morristown, and induced 
his father to supply the capital for perfecting the 
invention of telegraphy. For years thereafter Mr. 
Vail devoted his whole attention to the perfection 
of telegraphy, and probably contributed as much 
thereto as Morse himself. He devised and con- 
structed the first " Morse machine " for operating 
the telegraph, and he first applied the dot and 
dash system alphabetically. He also devised the 
system of embossing the characters on strips of 
paper. In 1843 he superintended the construction 
of the first telegraph line, between Washington and 
Baltimore, under Government patronage ; he in- 
vented the finger key for transmitting and receiving 



8 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



messages ; and he personally received at the Mount 
Claire Station, Baltimore, from Washington, the first 
message sent over the line, on May 24, 1844. 
Thereafter he devised many improvements in the 
system, supplanting the devices of Morse, so that 
the telegraph as it exists to-day is almost entirely 
the work of Vail and Joseph Henry, with, of course, 
some additions by later inventors such as Mr. Ed- 
ison. Upon the death of Mr. Vail, Amos Kendall, 
the close friend of him and of Morse, publicly 
declared that, " If justice be done, the name of 
Alfred Vail will forever stand associated with that of 
Samuel F. B. Morse in the history of the telegraph." 
Mr. Vail was the author of " The American Mag- 
neto-Electric Telegraph," published at Philadelphia 
in 1845. He was married in 1839 to Jane Eliza- 
beth Cummings, and som.e years after her death to 
Amanda O. Eno. He had three children : Stephen, 
James Cummings, and George Rochester Vail. He 
died at Morristown, New Jersey, on January 19, 
1859. 



and "Care and Discipline of Troops," 1864; 
"Fighting of Troops," 1865; and "Radical Me- 
chanics of Animal Locomotion," 1880. He died 
September 17, 1895. 



WAINWRIGHT, William Pratt, 1818-1895. 

Class of 1836 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1818; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1836; graduated M.D., College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, 1838; studied in Berlin, 1842-43; 
House Surgeon, New York Hospital; officer in army 
in Civil War; author; died, 1895. 

WILLIAM PRAIT WAINWRIGHT, M.D., 
was a son of Eli and Mary (Pratt) Wain- 
wright, and was born in New York City on June 10, 
1 818. He entered the College of Arts and Science 
of New York University, then known as the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, in 1836. 
Thence he proceeded to the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, the Medical Department of Columbia 
College, and was graduated with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1838. He also studied in Ber- 
lin in 1842-43. Dr. Wainwright served for a time 
as House Surgeon in the New York Hospital. He 
also conducted a farm at Rhinebeck, New York, on 
the Hudson River. He served in the Civil War, 
being a Major of the Twenty-ninth New York Volun- 
teers in 1 86 1, and Colonel of the Seventy-sixth New 
York Volunteers in 1862-63. He was married on 
January 10, 1854, to Cornelia Ridgely Tillotson, 
who bore him three children : John T., William P., 
and Charles Howard Wainwright. Dr. Wainwright 
translated Von Hardegg's " General Staff" from the 
German in 1853, and wrote on " Marching Troops " 



MARTIN, William Mulford, 1813- 

Class of 1837 Arts. 
Born at Rahway, N. J., 1813 ; studied at Princeton, 
1833-36; graduated A.B., New York University, 1837; 
A.M., 1840; organizer and first Principal New York 
Mathematical and Classical Collegiate School, 1838-48 ; 
studied at Union Theological Seminary, 1840; Princi- 
pal of Athenian Academy, Rahway, 1848-52; in Pres- 
byterian Ministry, 1852-67 ; Agent Home Missionary 
Society, 1867-68; Secretary Y. M. C. A., 1868-76; Pro- 
fessor, Brooklyn Lay College, 1876-78. 

WILLIAM MULFORD MARTIN, A.M., son 
of William and Ann (Laree) Martin, was 
born at Rahway, New Jersey, on June 29, 1813. 
From 1833 to 1836 he was a student at Princeton 
(College of New Jersey) . Then he came to New 
York University and was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts and with the second honors of 
his class, in 1837. In 1838 he organized in Brook- 
lyn the New York Mathematical and Classical 
Collegiate School, and was its first Principal, for ten 
years. Meantime in 1840 he received the degree 
of Master of Arts from New York University, and 
pursued a course in the Union Theological Semi- 
nary. From 1848 to 1852 he was Principal of the 
Athenian Academy at Rahway, New Jersey. He 
then devoted himself to ministerial work in the 
Presbyterian Church, and filled pastorates at Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey, Columbia City, California, and 
Virginia City, Nevada. In 1867-68 he was an 
Agent of the Home Missionary Society, from 1868 
to 1876, Secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association in Brooklyn, and in 1876-78 Professor 
of Christian Work in the Brooklyn Lay College. 
He was married on January 10, 1836, to Anna 
Elizabeth Parmenter, and had six children : William 
Wisner, Anna Maria, Ann Elizabeth, Sovereign 
Edgar, James Parmenter, and Joseph Hillyer 
Thayer Martin. His address is No. 63 West 5 5th 
Street, New York. 



SCHUYLER, George Washington, 1817- 
1888. 

Class of 1837 Arts. 
Born in 1817; graduated A.B., New York University 
1837; Union Theological Seminary, 1837-38; druggist, 
Ithaca, N. Y., 1838-88; prominent Republican politi- 
cian; Treasurer, N. Y. State, 1863-65; Superintendent 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Banking Department, N. Y., 1866-70; Assemblyman, 
1875; Auditor Canal Department, N. Y., 1876-80; 
Trustee of Cornell University, 1866-88, and Treasurer, 
1866-73; died, 1888. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON SCHUYLER, A.B., 
was born in 1817, and entered New York 
University in 1833. He was graduated in T837 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in that 
year was the author of a Hebrew poem. He was 
one of the earliest members of the Psi Upsilon 
Fraternity. The year 1837-38 was spent at the 
Union Theological Seminary, and in 1838 he en- 
gaged in the business of a druggist at Ithaca, New 
York, in which he remained for the rest of his life. 
He took an active interest in politics, being one of 
the leaders of the Republican party in the State 
of New York for many years. He was a delegate 
to the National Conventions of i860 and 1864; 
Treasurer of the State of New York in 1863-65 ; 
Superintendent of the State Banking Department in 
1866-70; Member of Assembly and Chairman of 
the Banking Committee in 1875, ^"d author of the 
Savings Bank bill of that year ; Auditor of the Canal 
Department in 1876-80 ; a Trustee of Cornell Uni- 
versity in 1866-88, and Treasurer of that institution 
in 1866—73. H^6 ^v^s a member of the American 
Historical Association and the Oneida Historical 
Society. He died at Ithaca, New York, on Febru- 
ary 8, 1888. 



WATSON, Alfred Augustin, 1818- 

Class of 1837 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1818; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1837, and A.M., 1840; studied in 
University Law School, Union Theological Seminary, 
and General Theological Seminary; admitted to Bar; 
Deacon in Protestant Episcopal Church, 1844; Priest 
in 1845, and Bishop, 1884; D.D. from University of 
N. C, 1868, and University of the South, 1884. 

ALFRED AUGUSTIN WATSON, A.M., D.D., 
a Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
son of Lesse and Hannah Maria (Tallman) Watson, 
was born in New York City, on August 21, 1818. 
He was graduated from New York University with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts and as Valedictorian 
of his class, in 1837. Afterward he studied in the 
University Law School, Union Theological Semi- 
nary, and the General Theological Seminary of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. He was admitted to 
practice at the Bar, but gave up that profession for 
the ministry, and was ordained a Deacon in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in 1844, and a Priest in 
1845. H'^ work was done chiefly in the South, 



and in the Civil War he was a Chaplain of the 
Second Regiment of North Carolina troops in the 
Confederate army. In 1884 he was consecrated 
Bishop of North Carolina. He was married on 
June 28, 1890, to Mary Catherine Lord. He re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the 
University of North Carolina in 1868, and from the 
University of the South in 1884. 



VAN NOSTRAND, Jacob, 1814-1879. 

Class of 1838 Arts. 
Born in New York City, 1814; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1838; A.M., 1841 ; Professor in Insti- 
tution for Deaf and Dumb, 1838; Union Theological 
Seminary, 1838-41 ; President of Institution for Deaf 
and Dumb, Austin, Texas, 1857-76 ; New York Insti- 
tution for Deaf and Dumb, 1876-79 ; died, 1879. 

JACOB VAN NOSTRAND, A.M., long identified 
with the welfare of the deaf and dumb, was 
the son of Jacob and Harriet (Rhoades) Van Nos- 
trand, and was born in New York City on February 
27, 1814. He was graduated from New York Uni- 
versity in 1838 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
and as Latin Salutatorian. In the same year he 
became a Professor in the New York Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb. He was a student in the 
Union Theological Seminary from 1838 to 1841, 
and in the latter year received the degree of Master 
of Arts from New York University. From 1857 to 
1876 he was President of the Institution for the 
Deaf and Dumb at Austin, Texas, and in 1876-79 
of the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. 
He was married on July 15, 1847, to H. Jane 
Richards, and had one child, Sarah Richards Van 
Nostrand. He died in New York on November 29, 
1879- 



COXE, Arthur Cleveland, 1818-1896. 

Class of 1838 Arts. 
Born at Mendham, N. J., 1818 ; graduated, A.B., New 
York University, 1838, and A.M., 1841 ; studied at 
General Theological Seminary, 1840; Deacon, Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church, 1838 ; Presbyter, 1842 ; Bishop, 
1865; D.D., and LL.D. ; author; died, 1896. 

ARTHUR CLEVELAND COXE, A.M., D.D., 
LL.D., a Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, was the son of the Rev. Dr. Samuel Han- 
son Coxe, one of the first members of the Council of 
New York University, and Abiah Hyde (Cleveland) ■ 
Coxe. He was born at Mendham, New Jersey, on 
May 10, 1818, and was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and as Valedictorian of his 



lO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



class, from New York University in 1838. In 1S41 
he delivered the Master's Oration and received the 
degree of Master of Arts. He pursued theological 
studies privately, and in the General Theological 
Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and 
was ordained a Deacon in 1838 and a Presbyter in 
1842. In 1865 he was ordained Bishop of the 
Diocese of Western New York. His career was 
honored and influential. He was a leader in the 




■ ARTHUR C. COXE 



church as Presbyter and Bishop. As a writer he 
contributed much to literature in both prose and 
poetry. He died on July 20, 1896. 



BULKLEY, Charles Henry Augustus, 1818- 
1893. 

Class of 1839 Arts. 
Born at Charleston, S. C, 1818 ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1839; A.M., 1842 ; Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1839-42 ; Home Missionary, 1842-46 ; 
pastor, 1848-82 ; Professor in Training College, Boston ; 
Professor in Howard University, 1882-91 ; Chaplain, 
Y. M. C. A. ; Chaplain and Aide-de-camp, U. S. A., in 
Civil War ; D.D., Howard University, 1881 ; died, 1893. 

CHARLE.S HENRY AUGUSTUS BULKLEY, 
A.M., D.D., son of Ashbel and Ann Eliza 
(Fanning) Bulkley, was born at Charleston, South 
Carolina, on December 22, 1818. In New York 
University he was President of the Philomathean 



Society, a member of Sigma Phi, and class poet. 
He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1839, and received that of Master of Arts in 
1842. He studied in Union Theological Seminary 
in 1839-42, and then engaged in home missionary 
work in various places for four years. From 1848 
to 1882 he was engaged in ministerial work, with 
pastorates at several places in New York State. He 
was Chaplain of the Seventieth New York Regiment, 
Sickles's Brigade, in 1861-63, and was an Aide-de- 
camp on McClellan's Staff in the Peninsular cam- 
paign. For a time he was a Professor in Dr. 
CuUis's Training College in Boston, and Chaplain 
of the Young Men's Christian Association in Brook- 
lyn, and from 1882 to 1891 he was a Professor in 
Howard University, Washington, District of Colum- 
bia, from which institution he received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity in 1881. He was the author 
and compiler of several books. He died at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, in 1893. 



WHITE, Richard Grant, 1821-1885. 

Class of 1839 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1821 ; Bristol College, Pa., 1835- 
,37; entered New York University, 1837; graduated 
A.B., New York University, 1839; studied medicine 
and law ; admitted to Bar, 1845 > editor, critic, and 
author of distinction ; A.M., New York University ; 
Superintendent Revenue Marine Bureau, New York, 
1861-78; died, 1885. 

RICHARD GRANT WHITE, A.M., one of 
the foremost literary and musical critics of 
his day, was born in New York City on May 23, 
r82i, the son of Richard Mansfield White and Ann 
Eliza (Toucey) White. He began his collegiate 
career at Bristol College, Pennsylvania, in 1835-37, 
but in the latter year entered the College of Arts 
and Science of New York University. There he was 
distinguished as a scholar, won the third prize in 
mathematics, and was an orator and Grand Marshal 
at Commencement. He was graduated in 1839 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and at a later 
date received that of Master of Arts from the Uni- 
versity. After graduation he studied medicine with 
Dr. A. C. Post, and served for a time in the New 
York Hospital. He also studied law with George 
Wood, and in 1845 ^^^ admitted to the Bar. Two 
years later he began a distinguished career in jour- 
nalism and literature as an editorial writer and 
musical critic on "The Courier and Enquirer," and 
when that journal was merged into " The New York 
World " he continued his work on the latter paper. 



UNIVERSITIES ANT) THEIR SONS 



1 1 



From 1861 to 1878 he was Superintendent of the 
Revenue Marme Bureau in New York. He was a 
Vice-President of the New Shakespeare Society of 
London, England. His bibliography is voluminous 
and forms an important part of the literary annals 
of his time. Among his best known works are a 
twelve-volume edition of Shakespeare edited by him 
in 1857-65, and "Words and Their Uses," 1870, 
2nd edition, 1872. Beside nearly a score of books 
and pamphlets he wrote innumerable articles for the 
leading American magazines, and contributed to 
Appleton's and Johnson's Cyclopsedias. He held 




RICHARD G. WHITE 

very high rank as a critic and as an authority on 
literary and artistic matters, and was regarded the 
world over as one of the representative scholars and 
literary men of the United States. He was married 
on October 16, 1850, to Alexina B. Meade, daughter 
of Charles Bruton Meade, and had two children : 
Richard Mansfield and Stanford White, the latter 
being the eminent architect who has designed the 
new buildings of New York University at University 
Heights. Mr. White died in New York on April 8, 
1885. 

PATTON, William Weston, 1821-1889. 

Class of 1839 Arts, 
Born in New York, 1821 ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1839; A.M., 1842; LL.D., 1882; D.D., 



Indiana Asbury University, 1862; Union Theological 
Seminary, 1839-42; minister of Congregational Church, 
1843-67 ; Editor " The Advance," 1867-72; District Sec- 
retary American Missionary Association; Lecturer in 
theological seminaries, 1872-74; President of Howard 
University, 1877-89; author; died, i88g. 

Wn.LIAM WESTON PATTON, A.M., D.D., 
LL.D., a distinguished theologian and edu- 
cator, was the son of William and Mary (Weston) 
Patton, and was born in New York City on Oc- 
tober 19, 1821. He was graduated from New York 
University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1839, and received the degree of Master of Arts in 
1842, the intervening time having been spent as a 
student in Union Theological Seminary. He was 
ordained a minister of the Congregational Church, 
and filled pastorates in Boston, 1843-46, Hartford, 
Connecticut, 1846-57, and Chicago, 1857-67. 
From 1867 to 1872 he was E^ditor of " The Ad- 
vance." Thereafter he was a District Secretary of 
the American Missionary Association, Lecturer at 
Oberlin and Chicago Theological seminaries in 
1872-74, and President of Howard University from 
1877 to 1889. He received the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity in 1862 from Indiana Asbury University, 
and that of Doctor of Laws from New York Univer- 
sity in 1882. He was the author of a number of 
works, one of them, " Prayer and Its Remarkable 
Answers," running through twenty editions. He 
died at Westfield, New Jersey, on December 31, 
i88q. 



SCUDDER, Henry Martyn, 1822-1895. 

Class of 1840 Arts. 
Born in Ceylon, 1822; Williams College, 1836-37; grad- 
uated A.B., New York University, 1840; Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1840-43 ; studied medicine, 1840-43 ; 
ordained minister of Congregational Church, 1843 ; 
missionary and pastor in India, 1844-63 ; pastor in 
United States, 1864-88 ; A.M., New York University, 
1843, and M.D., honorary, 1853; D.D., Rutgers, 1859; 
died, 1895. 

HENRY MARTYN SCUDDER, A.M., M.D., 
D.D., one of the best beloved pastors of 
his age, was a son of the Rev. Dr. John Scudder 
and Harriet (Waterbury) Scudder, and was born at 
Panditerripoo, Ceylon, on February 5, 1822, his 
father being a missionary there. He came to the 
United States for his education, and first entered 
Williams College, an institution peculiarly associated 
with missionaries and mission work, in 1836. The 
next year he came to New York University, where 
he was a fine student, and a member of Psi Upsilon 
and Phi Beta Kappa. In 1840 he was graduated 



I 2 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and then went 
to the Union Theological Seminary for three years, 
at the same time also studying medicine. He was 
graduated from the Seminary in 1843, received the 
degree of Master of Arts from New York University, 
and was ordained a minister of the Congregational 
Church. From 1S44 to 1851 he was a missionary 
of the American Board — the great Congregational 
missionary organization — at Madras, India, and from 
185 I to 1863 pastor of the Dutch Reformed Church 
at Arcot, India. Then he came home and was pas- 
tor of a Dutch Reformed Church in Jersey City in 
1864-65 ; of a Presbyterian Church in San Fran- 
cisco in 1865-71 ; of the Central Congregational 
Church in Brooklyn from 1871 to 1883, and of the 
Plymouth Congregational Church, Chicago, 1883- 
88. In all these charges he was highly successful, 
but most of all in Brooklyn. He had one of the 
two or three largest churches in that city, and 
ranked among the foremost of its preachers and 
pastors at the time when Brooklyn was at the height 
of its renown as a " City of Churches." He com- 
manded the respect, confidence and love of his 
congregation in an exceptional degree. He was 
married on April 18, 1844, to Fannie Lewis, who 
bore him ten children, one of whom is now a prom- 
inent Congregational minister of Jersey City, New 
Jersey. Dr. Scudder died on June 4, 1895. His 
bibliography includes a number of books in the 
Tamil language of India. 



TAYLOR, Charles, 1819- 

Class of 1840 Arts. 
Born in Boston, 1819 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1840 ; studied medicine and theology ; li- 
censed to preach, 1842 ; organized first foreign mission 
of M.E. Church South and appointed its first mission- 
ary to China, 1846-54; College Professor and President, 
1855-66; A.M., New York University, 1843, and D.D., 
1869; M.D., Philadelphia College of Medicine, 1848; 
author. 

CHARLES TAYLOR, A.M., M.D., D.D., was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, on Septem- 
ber 15, 1 8 19, the son of Dr. Oliver Swaine Taylor 
and Catharine Gould (Parsons) Taylor. He en- 
tered New York University in 1836, was President 
of Eucleian, Editor of " The .\thenaeum," and Vale- 
dictorian of his class. He was graduated in 1840 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, studied at 
the Philadelphia College of Medicine, and was 
licensed to preach in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church in 1842. He organized the first foreign 
mission of the Methodist Episcopal Church South 



and was its first missionary to China, in 1846-54. 
On his return to this country he was for a time 
a teacher in the Cokesbury, South Carolina, Con- 
ference Seminary ; Professor for two years and 
President for one year of the Spartansburg, South 
Carolina, Female College ; General Secretary of 
Sunday Schools of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South in 1858-62, and President of the Kentucky 
Wesleyan College in 1862-66, after which he re- 
tired to Courtland, Alabama. He received the 
degrees of Master of Arts, 1843, and Doctor of 
Divinity, i86g, from New York University, and 
Doctor of Medicine in 1848 from the Philadelphia 
Medical College. He was married on December 
27, 1845, ^° Charlotte Jane Gamewell, daughter 
of the Rev. John Gamewell, and had five children : 
Charles Gamewell, Henry Parsons, Martha Wilson, 
John Oliver and Charlotte Booth Taylor. He 
wrote and published a number of books, chiefly 
on religious topics. 



GEISSENHAINER, Frederick William, 
1825- 

Class of 1841 Arts. 
Born at Vincent, Chester County, Pa., 1825; gradu- 
ated A.B., New York University, 1841; A.M., 1843; 
LL.B., Yale Law School, 1846; admitted to Bar, May, 
1846; A.M., honorary, Yale, 1856; attorney and coun- 
selor at law ; officer of New York troops. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM GEISSENHAINER, 
LL.B., A.M., is a son of the Rev. Frederick 
William Geissenhainer, D.D., and Mary (Moore) 
Geissenhainer, and was born at Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, on March 20, 1825. He was gradu- 
ated from New York University with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 184 1, and received the degree 
of Master of Arts in 1843. In 1844 he entered the 
Yale Law School, and was elected a member of Lin- 
onia Society in 1845. He was graduated from Yale 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1 846, and in 
the same year was admitted to the Bar and began 
his career as an attorney and counselor at law. 
He practiced law in the City of New York for 
twenty-five years, then moved to Sea Cliff", Nas- 
sau County, I-ong Island. From 1850 to 1861 he 
was a Manager of the American Institute of New 
York, and for twelve years was a Trustee of the 
New York Juvenile Asylum. He was for seven 
years Captain and Chaplain of the First Brigade, 
New York Horse Artillery. He received the hon- 
orary degree of Master of Arts from Yale in 1856. 
He was married on June 22, 1879, t° Lucia Whit- 



UXirERSITIES JXD THEIR SOXS 




FREDERICiC \V. GEIS5E:nHADvER 

man, daughter of John Whitman, and sifter 
Judge Whitman oi Maine. His home is at 
Cliff. Lx)ng Island. Xew Vork. 



of 

■•e.5 



CARPENTER, Hugh Smith, 1823- 

ClKS of 1843 Arts. 

Bom at New Utrecht, N. Y., 1S23; graduated A.B.. 

New York University, 1842 ; Princeton Theological 

Seminary. 1842-43 ; ordained minister of Presbyterian 

Church, 1845 ; ™ ministry, 1845- ; D.D., Princeton, 1S73. 

HUGH SMITH C\RPENTER. D.D., «.is 
bom at Xew Utrecht. Xew York, in iS::^. 
He studied at Xew York University, and was grad- 
uated in 1S42 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
and .\s Latin S.ilutatorian of his class. He then 
spent three ye.irs at the Princeton. Xew Jersev, 
Theological Seniin.irv, and in 1S4; w.?s ordained 
into the ministry of the Presbyterian Church. He 
w.is p.istor of the Canal Street Presbyterian Church, 
Xew York, in 1S45-5 ; ; of .1 Congreg.uional church 
in Portland, Maine, in 1S54-57; of a Congreg.i- 
tional Church in Brookh-n, Xew York, in 1S57 ; of 
the Westminster Presbxterian Church, Brxxtklyn, in 
1S59— 69 ; in Son Fr.yicisco. California, in iS;;-;^ : 
in W.ishington. District of Columbia, in 1S75-76: 
and of the Bedford .\venue Congreg.'.tional Church, 
Brooklyn, in 1S77-. He received the degree of 
Doctor of nivinity in 1S73 from Princeton College. 



CASSEDY, George Washington, 1824-1898, 

Class of 184J Arts 
Bom in Jersey City. N. J., 1824 ; Columbia College, 
1838-39; graduated A B., New York University, 1842; 
A.M., New York University, 1S45; studied law; City 
Clerk, Jersey City. 1850-65; Registrar and Coiinty 
Clerk, 1865-70 ; U. S. Commissioner, 1S70-S7. 

GEORGE WASHIXGTOX CASSEPV. A.M.. 
w.is bom in Jersey City. Xew Jersey, on 
July ^. iS::4. He w.jj a son of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth Kermitt 1 S:r.3ch..n) C.issedy and .\ cousin of 
.\ndrew E. Suffern, who w.is gr.id-.-..3ted ttom Xew 
York University in 1S4S. He began his collegiate 
education at Columbia College. Xew York, in 1 Sj;S- 
30. and then entered Xew York University, from 
which l,".t:er he was gr.-.du.ited with the degree of 
B,ichelor of Arts in 154:^. While at the University 
he w.is a member of the Delt.5 Phi Fraternity. He 
received the degree of M.ister of Arts from the Uni- 
versity in 1S45. .\fter gr.'.du.ition he studied law, 
and spent the most of his life in the public service. 
Thus he was Citx" Clerk of Jersey City in 1550—65 ; 
Registrar and County Clerk of Hudson County. Xew 
Jersey, in 1S05— 70 j .md United St.^tes Commissioner 




GEORGE W. CASSO>V 

of Skipreme Court Commission ironi 
He w.i.s m.irried on Julv 5. iS>4. to 
Wilt, d.iughter of .\drian Heermance 
died in Elizabeth. Xew Tersev. on Ser : 



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1 


V s -. 


Addie 


C. 


De 


Pe Wit- 




He 


ember 4 


I 


5cS. 



14 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



HOUGHTON, George Hendricks, 1820-1897. 

Class of 1842 Arts. 
Born at Deerfield, Mass., 1820; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1842; A.M., 1845; S.T.D., Col- 
umbia, 1859; Prof, in St. Paul's Coll., 1843-46; studied 
Theology ; ordained, 1845 ; in ministry of Protestant 
Episcopal church, 1845-97 ; Professor in General Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1850-62 ; founder and rector of " the 
Little Church around the Corner;" died, 1897. 

GEORGE HENDRICKS HOUGH TON, A.M., 
S.T.D., best known as the Rector of " the 
Little Church around the Corner," was born at Deer- 
field, Massachusetts, in 1820. He came to New 
York University in 1838, was a member of the Psi 
Upsilon, and Valedictorian of his class, and was grad- 
uated in 1842 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
to which the University added Master of Arts in 
1845. From 1843-46 he was Professor of Greek at 
St. Paul's College, College Point, Long Island. He 
studied at the General Theological Seminary of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, and was ordained 
into the ministry in 1845. For three years he was 
an assistant to Dr. Muhlenberg in the Church 
of the Holy Communion, and in 1850-62 he was 
Professor of Hebrew in the General Theological 
Seminary. His chief life work began in 1848, 
when he organized the Church of the Transfigura- 
tion. Two years later his congregation erected the 
picturesque church building on East Twenty-ninth 
Street, New York. While it was still a small and 
struggling church, application was made to another 
wealthy and fashionable church near by for the hold- 
ing of funeral services over an actor. The rector 
refused to open his church for an actor, but said, 
"There is a little church around the corner that 
may do it." Dr. Houghton did open his church for 
the actor's funeral, and thenceforth the Church of 
the Transfiguration was universally known as " the 
Little Church around the Corner." Under Dr. 
Houghton's devoted ministrations it became one 
of the strongest and most effective churches in 
the city. Dr. Houghton received his degree of 
S.T.D. from Columbia College in 1859. He died 
in New York, universally respected and lamented, 
on November 17, 1897. 



THOMPSON, Alexander Ramsay, 1822- 
1895. 

Class of 1842 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1822 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1842, A.M., 1849, and D.D., 1866; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, 1842-45; ordained and entered 
ministry, Reformed Dutch Church, 1845 ; editor and 
author ; President Publication Board, Reformed Dutch 



Church ; member of Council of New York University, 
1872-91 ; died, 1895. 

ALEXANDER RAMSAY THOMPSON, A.M., 
D.D., a conspicuous pastor and theologian 
of the Reformed Dutch Church in America, was 
born in New York City on October 16, 1822, the 
son of William Robert Thompson and Janette (Nex- 
sen) Thompson and grandson of Captain Alexander 
Thompson, a distinguished officer in the Revolu- 
tionary Army and of Elias Nexsen, a prominent 
merchant of New York. He entered New York 
University, was a promising student and a member 




ALEXANDER R. THOMPSON 

of Delta Phi, and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1842. The University also con- 
ferred on him the degrees of Master of Arts in 
1849 and Doctor of Divinity in 1866. After leav- 
ing the University he studied at Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary, and was ordained into the ministry of 
the Reformed Dutch Church in 1845. Thereafter 
he was pastor of churches in New York, Brook- 
lyn, Morristovvn, New Jersey, Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut and Staten Island, New York. He was an 
earnest patriot during the Civil War, rendered effi- 
cient service to the Government in arousing loyal sen- 
timent and in raising troops, notably the Seventeenth 
Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, was Chaplain with 
rank of Captain on the staff' of Governor Andrews 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



15 



of Massachusetts, Chaplain of the New England Relief 
Rooms in New York City 1863-1865, and of Roose- 
velt Hospital, 1873-1895, President of the Board of 
Publication of the Reformed Dutch Church, member 
of the Board of Foreign Missions, member of the 
Council of New York University, 1 87 2-1 89 1, leader of 
movement to restore the liturgical usages of the Re- 
formed Dutch Church and one of the revisers of its 
liturgy, Editor of the "Sower and Gospel Field," of 
" Hymns of the Church," and " Hymns of Prayer 
and Praise ; " author and translator of many hymns. 
He was married October 26, 1848, to Mary, daughter 
of Dr. John Carpenter, of New Utrecht, Long Island. 
He died at Summit, New Jersey, February 7, 1895. 



DOWNER, Frederic William, 1824- 

Class of 1843 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1824; graduated A.B., N.Y.U., 
1843; in business life ; President of Amer. Fire Ins. Co. ; 
Vice-Pres. House of Refuge, Randall's Island. 

FREDERIC WILLIAM DOWNER, A.B., an 
eminent and venerable representative of the 
successful "college man in business," is a native of 
New York City, where he was born on January i, 
1824, the son of Samuel and Eliza (De Forest) 
Downer, and a descendant of the Downer family 
which came from England in early colonial days and 



BREED, William Pratt, 1816-1889. 

Class of 1843 Arts. 
Born at Greenbush, N. Y., 1816; entered New York 
University, 1839; Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa; 
graduated A.B., 1843 ; Union Theological Seminary, 
1843-44 ; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1844-46 ; 
ordained minister Presbyterian Church, 1847; pastor, 
1847-89; church officer; author; D.D., New York 
University, 1864; died, i88g. 

WILLIAM PRATT BREED, D.D., son of 
Allen and Joanna (Pratt) Breed, was 
born at Greenbush, New York, on August 23, r8i6. 
He entered New York University in 1839, and was 
a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa. He 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
in 1843, and then began his theological studies. He 
attended the Union Theological Seminary in New 
York in 1843-44, and that at Princeton, New Jersey, 
in 1844-46. In 1847 he was ordained into the min- 
istry of the Presbyterian Church and became pastor 
of a church at Steubenville, Ohio, where he remained 
until 1856, when he removed to a charge in Phila- 
delphia and there remained for the rest of his life. 
In 1864 he received the degree of Doctor of Divin- 
ity from New York University. He was Moderator 
of the Synod of Philadelphia in 1865, and of that 
of Pennsylvania in 1882; Trustee of Princeton 
Theological Seminary in 1867-70; and a member 
of the Presbyterian Board of Publication in 1875. 
He was the author of various books and tracts, 
including " Presbyterianism 300 Years Ago," " Pres- 
byterians and the Revolution," "British Reformers " 
and the "Book of Books." He was married on 
September 14, 1847, to Rebecca S. Murray, and 
had three children : John Howard, William Pratt, 
and Rebecca Anna Breed. He died in Philadelphia 
on February 14, 1889. 




FREDERIC W. DOWNER 

settled first at Norwich, Connecticut. He received 
his early education at Peugnet's School, in New 
York, and was prepared for college at the Univer- 
sity Grammar School. In 1839 he entered the Col- 
lege of Arts and Science of the University of the 
City of New York, as New York University was then 
known, and was duly graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in the Class of 1843. That class 
is perhaps the most noteworthy in the history of 
the University. Among its members, beside Mr. 
Downer, were William Pratt Breed, the eminent 
Presbyterian divine, William Allen Butler, the jurist 
and author, George Washington Dubois, a promi- 
nent Protestant Episcopal clergyman, George Long 
Duyckinck, author and editor, John Mason Ferris, 



i6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



a distinguished educator, preacher and editor, of 
the Reformed Church, Amasa Stetson Freeman, for 
more than half a century pastor of a Presbyterian 
church at Haverstravv, New York, Dillon Stevens 
Landon, physician and educator, Samuel Penniman 
Leeds, a distinguished clergyman, Benjamin Mason, 
educator, Alfred Coxe Roe, educator, Aaron John 
Vanderpoel, the eminent jurist, Henry Van Schaick, 
lawyer and financier, William Almy VVheelock, mer- 
chant and financier and President of the University 
Council, and other men of prominence in various 
honorable walks of life. It is the distinction of this 
class that it has never once omitted its yearly re- 
union dinner in all its long career. Mr. Downer, 
on being graduated in this class, studied law for a 
time and then entered mercantile and financial pur- 
suits. He was married on October 4, 1856, to 
Sarah W. Downer, daughter of Silas Potter Downer. 
He has had. four children : Frederic William, Lisa 
De Forest, Sophia, and Louis De Forest Downer. 
Mr. Downer now makes his winter home at Lake- 
wood, New Jersey. 



FERRIS, John Mason, 1825- 

Class of 1843 Arts. 
Born at Albany, N. Y., 1825; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1843 ; Theological Seminary, New 
Brunswick, N. J., 1846-49; ordained minister, Dutch 
Reformed Church, 1849; pastor, 1851-65; Professor 
Holland Academy, Mich., 1864-65 ; Corresponding Sec- 
retary Board of Missions, 1865-83 ; Editor " The 
Christian Intelligencer " since 1881 ; A.M., New York 
University, 1846, and D.D., Rutgers, 1867. 

JOHN MASON FERRIS, A.M., D.D., belongs 
to a family many of whose members have 
been identified with New York University from its 
earliest days to the present time. He is a son of 
the Rev. Dr. Isaac Ferris and of Catherine Ann 
(Burchan) Ferris, and was born at Albany, New 
York, on January 17, 1825. He entered New York 
University in 1839 and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1843. In 1846-49 
he studied at the Theological Seminary at New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, and in 1849 ^^^ ordained 
into the ministry of the Reformed Dutch Church. 
He was pastor of a church at Tarrytown, New 
York, in 1851-54, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1854-62, 
and at Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1862-65, ^nd 
in 1864-65 was also a Professor in Holland Acad- 
emy. From 1865 to 1883 he was Corresponding 
Secretary of the Board of Missions of the Reformed 
Dutch Church, and since 1881 has been Editor 
of "The Christian Intelligencer." He received the 



degrees of Master of Arts from New York Univer- 
sity in 1846, and Doctor of Divinity from Rutgers 
College in 1867. He was married in 1850 to 
Mary E. Schoonmaker, and in 187 1 to Anna M. 
Martense, and has had five children : Anna Susan, 
Ludlow, George Newton, Richard Schoonmaker and 
Charlotte Elizabeth Ferris. His address is No. 676 
Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn, New Y'ork. 



LANDON, Dillon Stevens, 1822-1873. 

Class of 1843 Arts, 1849 ^^ed. 
Born at Hague, N. Y., 1822; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1843, and M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1849; Public School Principal; 
Trustee of Polytechnic Institute ; Hospital Physician ; 
died, 1873. 

DILLON STEVENS LANDON, M.D., son 
of Seymour and Phoebe (Thompson) Lan- 
don, was born at Hague, New York, on January 31, 
1822. He entered New York University in 1839, 
and was a leading member of Psi Upsilon and an 
orator at Commencement. He was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1843, and in 
1849 received the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from the University Medical College. Thereafter 
he was Principal of Public School No. 9, in Brook- 
lyn, a practicing physician and surgeon and Visiting 
Physician to the Brooklyn City Hospital, and for 
twenty years a Trustee of the Brooklyn Polytech- 
nic Institute. He was a prominent member of 
the Long Island Medical Society. He was mar- 
ried on December 5, 1849, to Elizabeth Harper, 
daughter of Joseph W. Harper, and had two 
children : Joseph Harper and Mary Aurelia Lan- 
don. He died in Brooklyn on April 20, 1873. 



ROE, Alfred Coxe, 1823- 

Class of 1843 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1823; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1843; A.M., 1846; teacher and Prin- 
cipal, 1844-63; ordained Presbyterian Minister, 1863; 
Chaplain in army, 1863-64 ; pastor, 1864-77 i engaged 
in teaching since 1877. , 

ALFRED COXE ROE, A.M., son of Peter and 
Susan Elizabeth (Williams) Roe, was born 
in New York City on April 7, 1823. He entered 
New York University in 1839, was a member and 
officer of Eucleian, and was Salutatorian and Philo- 
sophical Orator at Commencement. He was grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1843, 
and received the degree of Master of Arts in 1846. 
From 1844 to 1853 he was employed as a teacher, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



17 



and from 1853 to 1863 was Principal of the Corn- 
wall, New York, Collegiate Institute. He was then 
ordained into the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church and for the next year was a Chaplain of 
New York State troops and Staff Officer in the 
Civil War. From 1864 to 1877 he was pastor of 
Presbyterian churches at Geneva and Clyde, New 
York, and in the latter year established a Young 
Ladies' School at Cornwall, New York, of which he 
was the head until 1885, when he became Principal 
of the Berkeley Institute for Girls in Brooklyn, 
New York. 



VAIL, Moses Mortimer, 1817-1889. 

Class of 1843 Arts. 
Born in Dutchess County, N. Y., 1817 ; graduated 
A.B., New York University, 1843, ^nd A.M., 1846; 
lawyer, 1847-89 ; died, 1889. 

MOSES MORTIMER VAIL, A.M., a distin- 
guished attorney and counselor at law, 
was a son of Moses and Phcebe (Losee) Vail, and 
was born in Dutchess County, New York, on Sep- 
tember 23, 1 81 7. He entered New York Univer- 
sity in 1839, and was a member of the Sigma Phi 
Fraternity. In 1843 he was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, and three years later he 
received that of Master of Arts. He studied law, 
was admitted to the Bar, and devoted his life to 
that profession with marked success. He was a 
Solicitor in Chancery in 1845, and a practitioner 
at the Bar of the Supreme Court of New York in 
the same year. He was admitted to the Bar of the 
United States District Court in 1864, and to that 
of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1872. 
He was married in December, 1849, to Hester M. 
Bussing, daughter of Edmund K. Bussing. He died 
at Saratoga Springs, New York, in 1889. 



DE LA MONTAGNIE, John, 1822- 

class of 1844 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1822; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1844; A.M., New York University, 
1847; New York University Medical College, 1844-46; 
graduated M.D., University of Vermont Medical School, 
1847 ; practiced medicine, 1847-59 ; Professor of Anat- 
omy ; U. S. Consul in France ; Brevet Colonel of 
N. Y. State troops. 

JOHN DE LA MONTAGNIE, son of William 
and Jane (Graham) De La MoiUagnie, was 
born in New York on August 21, 1822, and was 
graduated from New York University with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts in 1844. He received the 
VOL. II. — 2 



degree of Master of Arts from the University in 
1847. In 1844-46 he studied in the New York 
University Medical College, and then went to the 
Medical School of the University of Vermont, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1847. Thereafter he practiced his 
profession until 1859. After filling for some time 
a Professorship of Anatomy in the New York Homeo- 
pathic Medical College, and being a Major and 
Brevet Colonel of Engineers in New York State 
troops, he went abroad as United States Consul at 
Nantes and Boulogne, France, and made his home 
at Boulogne. 



FERRIS, Richard Burchan, 1827- 

Class of 1844 Arts. 
Born at Albany, N. Y., 1827; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1844, ^rid A.M., 1849 ; in business as 
banker, railroad president, etc., 1844-gg; retired, i8gg. 

RICHARD BURCHAN FERRIS, A.M., a 
member of the Ferris family so intimately 
associated with New York University, is a son of 
the Rev. Dr. Isaac Ferris, Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity, and Catherine Ann (Burchan) Ferris, and 
was born in Albany, New York, on January 6, 1827. 
He was graduated from New York University with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1844, and re- 
ceived the degree of Master of Arts in 1849. 
Immediately after graduation he entered business 
life and was actively engaged therein for the next 
fifty-five years. He served as a clerk in various 
business houses from 1844 to 1849; as clerk, 
assistant cashier and cashier of the Bank of New 
York, 1873-82, and as Vice-President of that bank 
from 1882 to 1899; Director of the Georgetown 
and Western Railroad, 1887-89; President of the 
Attica and Freedom Railroad, 1891-93; Director 
of the New England Loan and Trust Company, 
1889-98; and Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Wheeling Bridge and Terminal Company, 1892-93. 
He became an officer of the " Home Guard " of 
Brooklyn, afterward mustered into service as the 
Twenty-third Regiment, National Guard of New 
York, in 1861. In January, 1899, Mr. Ferris an- 
nounced his retirement from business life. He is 
a member of the Society of Foreign Wars. Mr. 
Ferris has for many years been an Elder in the 
Reformed Dutch Church, and is especially inter- 
ested in Foreign Missions. From its incorporation 
in 1899 until 1902, he was a Trustee and the 
Treasurer of Pringle Memorial Home for Aged 



8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Men, founded under the wills of Samuel M. Pringle 
(Class of 1836, New York University) and his 
sister, Mrs. Fenton. He was married twice. His 
first wife, in 1854, was Sarah Ann Demarest, 
daughter of the Rev. James Demarest, M.D., and 
his second, in 1883, was Marie Louise Sammis, 
daughter of William Sammis. He has five children, 
all sons : Richard, Albert Warren, James Demarest, 




RICHARD B. FERRIS 



Isaac, and John Mason Ferris. The first three are 
graduates of New York University. Mr. Ferris 
resides at Nyack, New York. 



mencement orator, and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1844, receiving 
the degree of Master of Arts in 1847. He studied 
in the Harvard Law School in 1844-45, and thence 
to 1849 was engaged in newspaper work in Boston, 
New York and New Orleans. In i85r-53 he was 
an Assistant District Attorney, and from 1855 to 
1868 District Attorney for the City and County of 
New York. From 1869 to 1872 he was Mayor 
of New York City. He was a member of the law 
firm of Brown, Hall & Vanderpoel from 1853 to 
1879. ^^ 'he end of his term as Mayor Mr. Hall 
returned to private life, and in 1879 resumed news- 
paper work as Managing Editor of "The New York 
World." In 1883 he became Editor of "Truth" 
(New York). From 1884 to 1890 he was Resident 
Correspondent of " The New York Herald " in 
London and Paris. He was a member of the 
Council of New York University from 1864 to 
1873. He was for years an officer of the Man- 
hattan Club, President of the Lotos Club, a life 
member of the New York Press Club and the Mer- 
cantile Library Association, and ex officio a trus- 
tee of the Astor Library and other institutions. He 
was a member of the New York Historical Society 
and a Fellow of the Royal Literary Society of Lon- 
don. His published works comprised " Sketches of 
Travel," 1849; " Old' Whitey's Christmas," 1851; 
"The Grand Juror's Guide," 1862; and "Horace 
Greeley Recently Dissected," 1863. He was the 
author of numerous magazine articles and several 
plays. He was married on November i, 1849, to 
Katherine Louisa Barnes, and had seven children. 
He died in New York on October 7, 1898. 



HALL, Abraham Oakey, 1826-1898. 

Class of 1S44 Arts. 
Born at Albany, N. Y., 1826; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1844, and A.M., 1847; Harvard Law 
School, 1844-45; journalist, 1845-49; Assistant District 
Attorney, New York, 1851-53, and District Attorney, 
1855-68 ; Mayor of New York, 1869-72 ; journalist, 
1879-90; lawyer, 1891-98; member of Council of New 
York University, 1864-73 ; author ; died, i8g8. 

ABRAHAM OAKEY HALL, A.M., a Mayor 
of New York City, was a son of Morgan 
James Hall and Elsie Lansing (Oakey) Hall, and 
was born at Albany, New York, on July 26, 1826. 
He entered New York University in 1840, was a 
member of Sigma Phi, Editor of Eucleian, a Com- 



SCOTT, Norman Bruce, 1819- 

Class of 1844 Med. 
Born at Bruceville, Md., 1819; studied at St. John's 
College, Annapolis, Md. ; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1844 ; Post Surgeon, 
U. S. A. ; physician and surgeon. 

NORMAN BRUCE SCOTT, M.D., was born 
at Bruceville, Maryland, on May 8, 181 9, 
the son of John Scott and Elizabeth Key (Bruce) 
Scott. His maternal grandfather, Norman Bruce, 
was born in Scotland and married Miss Key, an 
aunt of Francis Scott Key. His uncle, Upton 
Scott, M.D., was born in Belfast, Ireland, and in 
1 799-1801 was the first President of the Medico- 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. Dr. Scott was 
educated at St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



19 



and the Medical College of New York University, 
being graduated from the latter in 1844. Since 
that time his life has been devoted largely to a 
most successful pursuit of his profession. He has 
been a Post Surgeon of the United Stales army, and 
a United Slates Pension Examiner, first President 
of the Medical Society of Washington County, 
Maryland, and a member of the Medico-Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland. He was married on January 
27, 1846, to Catherine McPherson, who died on 
February 12, 1901, leaving him three children: 




N. B. SCOTT 



John McPherson, Elizabeth Key, and Norman 
Bruce Scott, Jr. Dr. Scott lives at Hagerstown, 
Maryland. 



TRASK, James Dowling, 1 821-1883. 

Class of 1844 Med. 
Born at Beverley, Mass., 1821 ; graduated A.B., 
Amherst, 1839, A.M., 1842; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1844; began practice, 1844; 
M.D., honorary, Buffalo University, 1856; a founder 
and Attending Physician, Brooklyn Dispensary; Pro- 
fessor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and 
Children, Long Island College Hospital, 1859-61 ; emi- 
nent practitioner; writer; died, 1883. 

JAMES DOWLING TRASK, A.B., M.D., one 
of the most eminent medical alumni of New 
Vork University, was a son of Oliver and Elizabeth 



(Dowling) Trask, and was born on August 16, 1821, 
at Beverley, Massachusetts, on land which was 
granted to his ancestor. Captain William Trask, 
by the Colony of Massachusetts for the part he 
had taken in the Pequod War. Captain Trask 
was one of the first military commanders in that 
colony. After receiving a careful preparatory ed- 
ucation, James Dowling Trask entered Amherst 
College at the age of fifteen years, being, with 
the exception of Richard Salter Storrs, afterward 
the famous pulpit orator, the youngest member of 
his class. He was graduated a Bachelor of Arts 
in 1839, and in 1842 the college conferred upon 
him the degree of Master of Arts. Soon after his 
graduation from Amherst he began the study of 
medicine in the Medical College of New York 
University. He was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1844, and immediately 
afterward began the practice of his profession in 
Brooklyn, New York. Two years later he removed 
to White Plains, New York, and there had a large 
practice. He succeeded to the office of County 
Physician of Westchester County, in the midst of 
an epidemic of typhus fever, to which his two 
predecessors in office had fallen victims ; he did 
notable work in checking and extinguishing the 
plague. He removed from White Plains to New 
York City in 1859, and a few weeks later re- 
moved again to Astoria, Long Island, now a part 
of New York City, where the remainder of his 
life was spent. During his professional career Dr. 
Trask filled many important offices. He was a 
founder and for some time Attending Physician 
of the Brooklyn Infirmary, an institution for surgery 
and unclassified diseases. The University of Buffalo 
gave him the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1856. In 1859 he became Professor of Obstet- 
rics and Diseases of Women and Children in the 
Long Island College Hospital, and filled that place 
for two years, when he resigned it on account of 
the pressure of work in his private practice. P'or 
the latter reason he declined election to a similar 
Professorship in the New York University Medical 
College. He was one of the founders and a Fellow 
of the American Gynecological Society, President 
of the Queens County Medical Society, a life mem- 
ber of the I,ong Island Bible Society, a Warden 
of St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, As- 
toria, and an active member of various other 
religious and benevolent organizations. Early in 
his career he found time to do much valuable 
writing on professional topics. His professional 



20 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



achievements are a part of the history of medicine 
and surgery in the United States, and indeed in 
the world. The great Enghsh surgeon, William 
Tyler Smith, in 1858 spoke of him as having 
" added much to the reliability of obstetric knowl- 
edge." Dr. T. Holmes, M.A. (Cantab.), in his 
" System of Surgery " also refers to Dr. Trask as 
an authority in cases of rupture of the uterus. 
In 1855 Dr. Trask won the prize offered by the 
American Medical Association, with his essay on 
"Statistics of Placenta Praevia." Dr. Trask was 
married in 1845 to Jane Cruickshank O'Farrell, 
a daughter of Thomas O'Farrell, K.C.B., of Belfast, 
Ireland, who bore him three children : Mary, 




JAMES D. TRASK 

George Gustavus, and James Dowling Trask. The 
last named is a graduate of New York University 
Medical College, Class of. 1876. Dr. Trask's health 
began seriously to fail in 1876, but he continued 
in active practice until only five days before his 
death, which occurred on September 2, 1883. 



War ; President New York City Bar Association, 1882- 
83 ; died, 1885. 

FRANCIS NATHAN BANGS, a leader of the 
New York Bar, was a son of Nathan and Mary 
(Bolton) Bangs, and was born in New York City on 
February 23, 1828. He attended Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, Middletown, Connecticut, in 1841-43, and 
then came to New York University and was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1845. 
He was a prominent member of Psi Upsilon, and a 
Commencement orator. From New York Univer- 
sity he proceeded in 1845 '° '^^e Yale Law School 
and was graduated in 1847. Thereafter he was 
chiefly engaged in the practice of law, in which 
he attained much distinction. He served in New 
York State troops at Fort McHenry in 1863. In 
1882-83 he was President of the Association of the 
Bar of the City of New York. He was married on 
March 12, 1855, to Amelia Frances Bull, daughter 
of Mordecai Bull, and had three children : Francis 
Sedgwick, William Nathan, and John Kendrick 
Bangs. Mr. Bangs died at Ocala, Florida, on 
November 30, 1885. 



BANGS, Francis Nathan, 1828-1885. 

Class of 1845 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1828 ; Wesleyan University, 
1841-43; graduated A.B., New York University, 1845; 
Yale Law School, 1845-47 ; lawyer ; in army in Civil 



DOWNS, Charles Algernon, 1823- 

Class of 1845 Arts. 
Born at South Norwalk, Conn., 1823 ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1845; Union Theological Semi- 
nary, 1845-48; Pastor of Congregational Church, Leb- 
anon, N. H., 1848-72; member of Legislature, 1863-64; 
State Superintendent Public Instruction, 1876-80 ; pas- 
tor, Hanover Centre, N. H., 1880; author. 

CHARLES ALGERNON DOWNS, A.B., 
clergyman and educator, was born at South 
Norwalk, Connecticut, on May 21, 1823, the son 
of Horatio Nelson Downs and Anna (Bouton) 
Downs. He entered New York University, was 
a member of Psi Upsilon, President of Eucleian, 
and English Salutatorian of his class. He was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1845, and studied in the Union Theological 
Seminary in 1845-48. From 1848 to 1872 he was 
Pastor of the Congregational Church at Lebanon, 
New Hampshire, serving meantime as a member 
of the Legislature in 1863-64, and as County School 
Commissioner and Secretary of the State Board of 
Education. From 1876 to 1880 he was State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, and in 1880 
resumed pastoral work at Hanover Centre, New 
Hampshire. He was married on November 21 
1848, to Helen Katrina Seymour, who bore him 
live children :' Charles Algernon, Anna Katrina, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



21 



Eugene Seymour, Clarence Horatio, and Allan 
Burritt Downs. In addition to his valuable official 
reports, he wrote a history of Lebanon, New Hamp- 
shire, and several historical papers which have 
become authorities. 



MARTIN, William Runyon, 1825- 

Class of 1845 Ai^s. 
Born in 1825; graduated A.B., New York University, 
1845; A.M., 1848; lawyer; member of New York Uni- 
versity Council, and Secretary, 1867-87 ; Commissioner 
and President of New York Park Board, 1875-78. 

WILLIAM RUNYON MARTIN, A.M., a 
well known lawyer, public servant and 
Councilor of New York University, was born in 
1825, and entered New York University in 1841. 
He was a member of Sigma Phi, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1845 ^"^^ 
received that of Master of Arts in 1848. He 
studied law and devoted his life largely to the 
practice of that profession. He was a Commis- 
sioner and President of the Department of Public 
Parks in New York City in 1875-78, and for the 
twenty years r867-87 was a member of the Council 
of New York University, and Secretary of the 
Council from 1870 to 1887. His two brothers, 
John L. and Howard A., were graduated from New 
York University in 1847 and 1854 respectively. 



PECK, Luther Wesley, 1825-1900. 

Class of 1845 Arts. 
Born at Kingston, Pa., 1825 ; studied in Methodist 
Conference seminaries and Wesleyan University; 
graduated A.B., N.Y.U., 1845; joined New York Con- 
ference of M.E. Church, 1845; A.M., N.Y.U., 1849; 
D.D., N.Y.U., 1878; in active service as pastor, 1845- 
1890; supernumerary, 1891-igoo; author of various 
books ; died, igoo. 

LUTHER WESLEY PECK, D.D., one of the 
foremost clergymen of his day in the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, bore a name conspicuously 
identified with the history of American Metho- 
dism. His lineage is distinctly traced to John Peck, 
of Bolton, Y'orkshire, England. Twenty generations 
later appeared Henry and William Peck, brothers, 
who came to this country with Governor Eaton, 
the Rev. John Davenport, and others, landing at 
Boston on June 26, 1637. Thence the two brothers 
went to New Haven, and were among the signers 
of the religious compact which formed the constitu- 
tion of that colony, on June 4, 1639. Henry Peck 
was active and prominent in the affairs of that col- 



ony and his name often appears in its records. 
One of his descendants, Jesse Peck, with four of his 
sons, fought in the Revolutionary War, and he and 
one of the sons died from diseases contracted in 
that service. A grandson of Jesse Peck was the Rev. 
Dr. George Peck, a prominent Methodist preacher, 
the author of several books of note, and a delegate 
to more general conferences than any other man 
has ever been. George Peck married Mary Myers, 
daughter of Philip Myers, a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War and one of the early settlers of the 
Wyoming Valley, and granddaughter of Thomas 




LUTHER W. PECK 

Bennett, one of the Wyoming pioneers, and one of 
the forty who built the stockade and blockhouse at 
Forty Fort for protection against the Indians. It may 
be added at this point that a brother of George Peck 
was Jesse T. Peck, an eminent Bishop of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. Three other brothers were 
also Methodist preachers, and the united years of 
service of the five were more than two hundred and 
fifty in number. Luther Wesley Peck was the sec- 
ond son of George and Mary (Myers) Peck, and 
was born at Kingston, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, 
on June 14, 1825. In his boyhood he was sent to the 
Methodist Conference Seminary at Poultney, Ver- 
mont, of which his uncle, Jesse T. Peck, afterward 
Bishop, was then principal. Next he attended the 



22 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



seminary at Cazenovia, New York, of which his 
father was principal. A short period at Chase's 
Grammar School, at Middletown, Connecticut, fol- 
lowed, and then, at the age of sixteen, in the fall of 
1 84 1, he entered Wesleyan University, at Middle- 
town. There he remained a year. Then his father 
was made Editor of " The Christian Advocate," in 
New York, and the boy accordingly came thither 
also and entered the University of the City of New 
York, as New York University was then known, under 
the eminent Chancellorship of Theodore Frelinghuy- 
sen. That was in the fall of 1842 and he entered 
the Sophomore class of the University. While in 
college he was distinguished as a student above all 
other members of his class. He was a prominent 
member of the Delta Chapter of Psi Upsilon at New 
York University, and was one of the founders of the 
Chapter at Wesleyan. He was the author of one of 
the Psi Upsilon songs, " Serenade," which was set 
to music by Professor Karl Harrington. He was 
also elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and was President 
of Eucleian. In 1845 he was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, as the Valedictorian of 
his class. His alma mater gave him the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1849 ^'""^ that of Doctor of Divin- 
ity in 1878. Immediately after his graduation from 
New York University he entered the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, as a member of the 
New York Conference. Thereafter he filled pastor- 
ates at the following places : Pacific Street, Brook- 
lyn, New York, 1845 J Durham, New York, 1846- 
7; Windham, New York, 1848; Rhinebeck, New 
York, 1849-50; Sheffield, Massachusetts, 185 1-2; 
Lee, Massachusetts, 1853 ; Newburgh, New York, 
1854-5; Poughkeepsie, New York, 1856-7 ; Forty- 
third Street, New York, 1858-9 ; Dobbs Ferry, New 
York, i860; Rhinebeck, New York, 186 1-2; 
Kingston, New York, 1863; Middletown, New 
York, 1864-5. He then went to the Wyoming 
Conference, in Pennsylvania, and served as follows : 
Scranton, 1866-7; Susquehanna, 1868-70; Wav- 
erly. New York, 187 1 ; Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 
1872-3; Waverly, Pennsylvania, 1874; Presiding 
Elder of Honesdale District, 1875-8; Pittston, 
Pennsylvania, 1879; Oxford, New York, 1880-82; 
Whitney Point, New York, 1883-4 ; Appalachin, 
New York, 1885-6; Harford, New York, 1887; 
Yatesville, Pennsylvania, 1888-9; and West Nanti- 
coke, Pennsylvania, 1890. After 1890 he was on 
the supernumerary list, and lived in retirement at 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, where he died on March 31, 
1900. In addition to his pastoral labors Dr. Peck 



wrote much for publication. He was the author of 
" The Golden Age," a book of poems ; " The 
Humming Bird," and "The Burial of Lincoln," 
poems ; a chapter in his father's " History of the 
Wyoming Valley," and many newspaper articles in 
prose and verse. Many of his sermons were also 
printed. During the Civil War he was a vigorous 
upholder of the Union and was much in demand as 
a public speaker. In politics he was a life-long 
Republican. He was a member of the Masonic 
Order, and of the Order of Odd Fellows. Dr. Peck 
was married on January 18, 1848, to Sarah Maria 
Gibbons, daughter of a prominent physician of 
Albany, New York. She survives him, and lives at 
No. 302 Chestnut Street, Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Three of their children died young. The others are 
Helen and Sadie M. Peck, of Scranton ; Jesse T. 
Peck, of Chicago ; Emma D. Bennett, wife of 
Charles B. Bennett, a merchant of Chicago ; 
Mary E. Williams, of Binghamton, New York, widow 
of the late Rev. John F. Williams; and George L. 
Peck, a lawyer, of Scranton, Pennsylvania. 



REDFIELD, Philip Melancthon Whelpley, 
1826-1873. 

Class of 1846 Arts. 

Born in 1826 ; graduated A.B., New York University, 

1S46, and A.M., 1849 ; Assistant Professor Mathematics, 

New York University, 1849-53; lawyer; Professor 

Natural Sciences, Normal College, 1870-73 ; died, 1873. 

PHILIP MELANC THON WHELPLEY RED- 
FIELD, A.M., was a son of David and 

Sarah (Meherg) Redfield, and was born on Janu- 
ary 12, 1826. He was graduated from New York 
University iu 1846, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts and as Salutatorian of his class. He afterward 
studied law, and received from New York Univer- 
sity the degree of Master of Arts in 1849. In 
1849-53 he was Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
in New York University. Thereafter he was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Redfield & Barnard until 1870, 
and in 1870-73 he was Professor of Natural 
Sciences in the Normal College of New York. He 
was married on July 10, i860, to Augusta Kiersted, 
and had three daughters. He died in New York 
on November 29, 1873. 



AIKMAN, William, 1824- 

Class of 1846 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1824; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1846; graduated B.D., Union Theological 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



23 



Seminary, 1849; D.D., New York University, i86g ; 
minister of Presbyterian Church, 1849-94 ; author. 

WILLIAM AIKMAN, D.D., son of Robert 
and Sarah (Smith) Aikman, was born in 
New Yorlc City on August 12, 1824. In New York 




University he was a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi 
Beta Kappa, Secretary of Philomathean, and Eng- 
hsh Salutatorian at Commencement. He was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1846. 
In 1849 he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Divinity from the Union Theological 
Seminary, and was ordained a minister of the 
Presbyterian Church. New York University gave 
him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1869. He 
was pastor of the Sixth Presbyterian Church of 
Newark, New Jersey, in 1849-57; of the Hanover 
Street Church, Wilmington, Delaware, in 1857-69; 
of the Spring Street Church, New York, in 1869-72 ; 
in Detroit, Michigan, in 1872-77; at Aurora, New 
York, 1877-81 ; and at Atlantic City, New Jersey, 
1883-94. He was Moderator of the Synod of 
Pennsylvania in 1863, and a Trustee of Wells 
College, Aurora, New York, in 1878-83. He is 
the author of numerous books and essays, published 
sermons, etc. He was married on July 25, 1849, 'o 
Anna Matilda Burns, and has had seven children. 
One of his sons, William Aikman, Jr., was graduated 
from New York University in 1872. 



SENEY, George Ingraham, 1826-1893. 

Class of 1846 Arts. 
Born at Newtown, N. Y., 1826 ; Wesleyan University, 
1842-43, A.M., 1866; graduated A.B., N. Y. U., 1846; 
banker, railroad president, etc. ; died, 1893. 

GEORGE INGRAHAM SENEY, A.M., 
banker and railroad magnate, was a son of 
the Rev. Robert Seney, and was born at Newtown, 
New York, on May 12, 1826. He studied at 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, in 
1842-43, and then came to New York University, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1846. Wesleyan gave him the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1866. After leaving 
college he engaged in banking and railioad man- 
agement. He was President of the Metropolitan 
Bank of New York, organizer of the Eastern Ten- 
nessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroad Company, 
and the builder of the Chicago and St. Louis Rail- 
road. He amassed a great fortune, and made one 
of the most notable private art collections in Amer- 
ica. He was a Trustee of Wesleyan University for 
some years, a manager of the Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the founder 




GEORGE I. SENEY 



of the Methodist General Hospital in Brooklyn, 
New York. He was married in 1849 to Phcebe A. 
Mosier, and had ten children. He died in New 
York on April 7, 1893. 



24 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ULYAT, William Clarke, 1823- 

Class of 1846 Arts. 
Born in England, 1823; graduated A.B., 1846, and 
A.M., 1849 ; Union Theological Seminary, 1846-49, and 
New York University Medical College, 1846-49 ; Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, 1850-52 ; pastor, 1850-61 ; 
librarian and editor; author. 

WILLIAM CLARKE ULYAT, A.M., son of 
William and Elizabeth Ann (Clarke) 
Ulyat, was born in Lincolnshire, England, on Jan- 
uary 15, 1823. The remains of Elizabeth Ann 
(Clarke) Ulyat were deposited in a vault in a 
Dissenting Meeting House in England, a memorial 




WILLIAM C. ULYAT 

tablet was placed in the wall on one side of the 
pulpit, and the memoirs of her life were written and 
published. He entered New York University in 
1842, was Editor of " Eucleian," and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1846. The 
next three years were devoted to study in the 
University Medical College and the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, and in 1849 the University gave 
him the degree of Master of Arts. He studied 
at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1850-52, 
and was pastor of a Baptist Church at Princeton 
in 1850-53, at Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1853-55, 
and at Hudson, New York, in 1859-61. He was 
called seven times to preside over the Baptists of 
Princeton, New Jersey, and served them five times, 



varying in length from three months to fourteen 
years. Of the work he did in Hudson, New York, in 
securing to his people a new church, of which they 
had been deprived forty years, it was said at the 
time by one acquainted with all the circumstances 
that if he never did anything else that was enough. 
In 1861-62 he acted as supply of the Vassar Church 
in Poughkeepsie, New York, during the absence of 
its pastor, with President Jewett, in Europe. In 
1856 he was an Editor of "The Christian Review," 
and for twenty years he was Editor of " The Prince- 
ton Press." For eighteen years he was Assistant 
Librarian of the Princeton Theological Seminary. 
He has written a number of ecclesiastical and his- 
torical works, magazine articles, etc. His last 
published book, issued in 1902, by the Abbey 
Press, New York, is entided, " The First Years of 
the Life of the Redeemed after Death ; A New 
Unfolding of the Christian Life and Destiny, Here 
and Hereafter." He has in the hands of his pub- 
lishers now a new work, which is called " The Life 
of Christ since His Ascension." He was married 
on December 22, 1868, to Mary Stryker Leigh, 
who bore him three children. 



BOND, John Wesley, 1824- 

Classof l846Med. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1824; studied in private 
schools and one year in College of Arts, New York 
University; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1846; practiced in Baltimore, and 
Demonstrator of Anatomy, Washington University, 
Baltimore, 1846-52 ; practiced in Ohio, 1852-56, and in 
Iowa, 1856-62; Professor in Keokuk, Iowa, Medical Col- 
lege ; surgeon in U. S. Army ; in practice at Toledo, 
Ohio, since 1863 ; Health Officer, Chief of Hospital 
Staff, etc. 

JOHN WESLEY BOND, M.D., one of the 
earliest graduates of the New York University 
Medical College, is a native of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, where he was born on May 8, 1824. His 
mother's maiden name was Christiana Birckhead. 
His father, Thomas Emerson Bond, M.D., was an 
eminent physician and surgeon. On the maternal 
side his ancestors settled in Maryland in the time 
of Lord Baltimore, and on the paternal side they 
came from England four generations before him. 
He received his early education in private schools 
in Baltimore, and then studied for a year in the 
College of Arts and Science of New York Uni- 
versity. Thence he proceeded to the New York 
University Medical College, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1846. He 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



25 



at once returned to Baltimore and practiced there 
until 1852, being at the same time a Demonstrator 
of Anatomy in Washington University in that city. 
Next he removed to Ohio, and practiced in Zanes- 
ville and Mansfield until 1856. His next move 
was to Iowa where he settled at Keokuk and prac- 
ticed there until 1862. For two years of this time 
he was Professor of Theory and Practice of Medi- 
cine in the Keokuk Medical College. He was 
elected Professor of Anatomy in the Medical De- 
partment of the University of Iowa, but did not fill 
the place owing to the fact that the outbreak of the 




J. W. BOND 

Civil War caused the closing of the college. In 
1862 he entered the army and served therein as 
Regimental Surgeon of the Thirtieth Iowa Volun- 
teers. He then settled at Toledo, Ohio, where he 
has remained in practice ever since. For several 
years he was Health Officer of that city, and was a 
member of the Board of Health when Toledo was 
securing a proper system of drainage. He was also 
for a long time Chief of the Staff of St. Vincent's 
Hospital. He is a member of the Ohio State 
Medical Society, the Northwestern Ohio Medical 
Society, the Toledo Club, the Masonic Order, the 
Loyal Legion, and the Society of the Army of 
the Tennessee. He was married to Amanda Sturges 
of Zanesville, Ohio, on June 5, 1854, and has had 



three children : Maria Allen, James, and Amanda 
Sturges Bond, the last named of whom is now 
living. 

GUERNSEY, Egbert, 1823- 

Class of 1S46 Med. 
Born in Litchfield, Conn., 1823; studied at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, and Yale University; graduated 
M.D., N. Y. U. Med. Coll., 1846; hon. degrees of M.D. 
from Univ. of State of N. Y., and LL.D. from Coll. of 
St. Francis Xavier ; editor, author, college professor, 
founder of asylums, leader in the medical profession, 
and in active practice since 1846. 

EGBERT GUERNSEY, M.D., LL.D., one of 
the foremost members of the medical pro- 
fession of his time, comes of illustrious ancestry. 
The first of his name in this countr)', from whom he 
is directly descended in the sixth generation, was 
John Guernsey, a native of the Island of Guernsey, 
who came to America in earliest colonial days, and 
in 1638 was one of the one hundred and eighty 
Puritans who removed from Boston to found the 
Colony of New Haven. John Guernsey was during 
the rest of his life a prominent member of the New 
Haven colony, and was one of the protectors of the 
" regicides " Goffe and Whalley. His descendants 
were prominent in New England in colonial times, 
and no less than thirteen of them served in the 
Revolutionary Army. His great-grandson, John 
Guernsey, who was born at Woodbury, Connecticut, 
removed to Amenia, Dutchess County, New York, 
and had a son, Noah Guernsey. The latter mar- 
ried Hannah Hollister, a direct descendant of 
William Clinton, first Earl of Huntington (1350), 
wliose descendant was made Earl of Lincoln, a title 
afterward merged into that of the Duke of New- 
castle. Noah Guernsey had a son who also bore 
the name of Noah, and who married Amanda 
Crosby, daughter of William Crosby, and a kins- 
woman of Enoch Crosby, the famous Revolutionary 
spy. To Noah and Amanda (Crosby) Guernsey, 
the subject of this sketch, Egbert Guernsey, was 
born at Litchfield, Connecticut, on July 8, 1823. 
He was carefully educated. His college preparatory 
course was pursued at the famous Phillips Academy 
at Andover, Massachusetts, whence he proceeded 
to Yale College and entered its Scientific Depart- 
ment. Before completing his course at Yale, how- 
ever, he determined to devote himself to medicine, 
and accordingly entered the office of the illustrious 
Valentine Mott as a student. He also became a 
student in the Medical College of New York Uni- 
versity, of which Dr. Mott was one of the foremost 



26 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Professors, and in 1S46 was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. He has also re- 
ceived the honorary degrees of Doctor of Medicine, 
from the University of the State of New Yorl<, and 
Doctor of Laws, from the College of St. Francis 
Xavier. Since that time, now nearly three score 
years. Dr. Guernsey has been engaged in the practice 
of his profession, while also attending to various 
other duties. He began his practice in Williams- 
burg, afterward a part of Brooklyn and now of New 
York, and was soon appointed City Physician. In 
1850, however, he removed to New York City, and 




EGBERT GUERNSEY 

has ever since been established there. At about 
this time he became interested in the then compar- 
atively new school of Homeopathy. Although he 
had been educated and had begun his work as an 
Allopathist, he quickly perceived what seemed to 
him some advantages in Homeopathy, and there- 
upon adopted the best features of that school of 
practice. Since that time he has used what have 
seemed to him the desirable features of both sys- 
tems, believing with liberal mind that in the healing 
art all beneficent means are to be employed, re- 
gardless of technical names of " schools." He also 
became a teacher of medicine, being for six years 
Professor of Materia Medica and Theory and Prac- 
tice in the New York Homeopathic Medical Col- 



lege. He was one of the founders and the first 
President of the Western Dispensary, afterward 
united with the Hahnemann Hospital, of which he 
was also a founder. In 1877 he was instrumental 
in having the Inebriates' Asylum on Ward's Island 
converted into a general hospital under the direc- 
tion of the Department of Charities and placed in 
the hands of the Homeopathic school of practice. 
Since that time he has been President of the medical 
staff of the institution, which has now been removed 
to Blackwell's Island, is known as the Metropoli- 
tan Hospital, and is ranked by the Commissioner 
of Charities as one of the best of the great public 
hospitals of New York. Dr. Guernsey was one of 
the founders of the State Asylum for the Insane at 
Middletown, New York, and was for nineteen years 
a Trustee and four years Vice-President of it. He 
was the founder also of the Training School for 
Nurses at the Hahnemann and Metropolitan hospi- 
tals and the State Asylum for the Insane at Middle- 
town. He has been President of the New York 
State and County Medical societies, and from 1864 
to 1868 was Surgeon of the Sixth Regiment of the 
National Guard of the Stale of New York. Dr. 
Guernsey's literary activities have been noteworthy. 
Before his graduation from the University Medical 
College he was City Editor of " The Evening Mir- 
ror," being thus associated with Nathaniel Parker 
Willis and George P. Morris. He founded " The 
Brooklyn Daily Times " in 1848, and for two years 
was its Editor. In 1852 he was one of the editors 
of "Jahr's Manual," and in 1872 he founded "The 
Medical Times " of New York and has ever since 
been its Senior Editor. Early in his professional 
career he wrote a school history of the United States, 
which long ranked as a standard text-book. His 
"Domestic Practice," published in 1855, has passed 
through many editions and been translated into sev- 
eral languages. His miscellaneous contributions to 
medical literature have been voluminous. Dr. 
Guernsey was one of the founders of the Union 
League Club of New York. He is a life member 
of the New York Geographical and Historical so- 
cieties, and the Academy of Science, and belongs 
to various other scientific and literary organizations. 
He was married in 1848 to Sarah Lefferts Schenck, 
a descendant of Edgar de Schencken, who was 
Seneschal to Charlemagne, and of his descendant, 
Johannes Schenck, who came to this country from 
Holland in 1683. She is descended also from the 
Lefferts family, and from the Meseroles, a Huguenot 
family of Picardy. Dr. and Mrs. Guernsey have 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



27 



had five children, of whom but one, Florence, sur- 
vives, Dr. Egbert Guernsey, Jr., being deceased, 
together with three others who died in infancy. 
Their city residence is at No. 180 Central Park 
South, New York, and their country home at 
Fishkill-on-the- Hudson, New York. 



CHILDS, Thomas Spencer, 1825- 

Class of 1847 Arts. 
Born at Springfield, Mass., 1825; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1847, A.M., 1850; graduated 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1850; D.D., 
New York University, 1862 ; ordained minister of 
Presbyterian Church, 1852 ; pastor, 1852.70; Professor, 
Hartford, and Wooster, 1871-82; pastor, 1882-90; 
entered Protestant Episcopal Church, i8go; Associate 
Rector, 1891 ; Arch-Deacon since 1894; Commissioner 
to Indians, 1888; author. 

THOMAS SPENCER CHILDS, A.M., D.D., 
son of Joshua and Susan (King) Childs, was 
born at Springfield, Massachusetts, on January ig, 
1825. In New York University he was a member 
of Psi Upsilon, President of Eucleian, winner of 
mathematical prizes in 1845-46, and Valedictorian 
of his class. He was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1847 and received the degree 
of Master of Arts in 1850. He was a charter 
member of the New York University Chapter of 
Phi Beta Kappa. He studied at Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1847-51, and received the 
degree of Bachelor of Divinity there in 1850 and 
that of Doctor of Divinity from New York Univer- 
sity in 1862. He was ordained a Presbyterian 
minister in 1852, and organized the First Presby- 
terian Church of Hartford, Connecticut, and was 
its pastor from 1852 to 1866. From 1866 to 1870 
he was a pastor at Norwalk, Connecticut. He was 
Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History at 
Hartford Theological Seminary in 1871-79, and 
Professor of Mental and Moral Science at the Uni- 
versity of Wooster, Ohio, 1880-82. In 1882-90 
he was again a Presbyterian pastor in Washington, 
District of Columbia, and in 1888 a member of the 
Commission to the Southern Ute Indians. He was 
also five times a Commissioner to the Presbyterian 
General Assembly. In 1890 he united with the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, became Associate 
Rector of Trinity Church, Washington, in i8gr, 
and has been an .Arch-Deacon since 1894, being 
the first Arch-Deacon of the Diocese of Wash- 
ington. In 1899 he became Rector of All Saints 
Church, Chevy Chase, which position he still 



fills. Dr. Childs is a member of the American 
Historical Society, the American Geographical So- 
ciety, and first Chaplain of the District of Columbia 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 
He is the author of a number of theological 
works, and many magazine articles, essays, pub- 
lished sermons, etc. He was married in Hartford, 
Connecticut, on March 7, 1855, to Mary E. Porter, 
and again in Boston on August 24, 1864, to Jane 
Lawrence Perkins. He has had five children : 




THOMAS S. CHILDS 



Mary Lowrie, Fanny Graham, Alice Lee, Helen 
Porter, and Thomas Childs. His home is at Chevy 
Chase, Washington, District of Columbia. 



LOCKWOOD, Samuel, 1819-1894. 

Class of 1847 Arts. 
Born in England, 1819; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1847; A.M., 1850; Phi Beta Kappa; Ph.D., 
1868; Theological Seminary, New Brunswick, N. J., 
1847-50; minister Dutch Reformed Church, 1850; 
pastor ; Lecturer, Rutgers College ; Superintendent 
Public Education, Monmouth County, N. J., 1867-94 ; 
died, 1894. 

SAMUEL LOCKWOOD, A.M., Ph.D., a dis- 
tinguished educator, was the son of William 
and Mary (Brockmer) Lockwood, and was born at 
Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, England, on January 20, 



28 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1819. He entered New York University in 1843, 
and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1847, being at the same time elected to Phi 
Beta Kappa. In 1850 the University gave him the 
degree of Master of Arts, and in 1868 that of Doctor 
of Philosophy. He studied at the Theological Sem- 
inary of the Dutch Reformed Church, at New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey, in 1847-50, and in the latter 
year was ordained and became a pastor of that 
church, filling charges at Cortland and Gilboa, New 
York, and Keyport, New Jersey. He was Lecturer 
on Natural Sciences at Rutgers College, President 
of the New Jersey Microscopical Society, of the 
American Postal Microscopical Club, of the United 
States Hay Fever Association, and of the New Jer- 
sey Council of Education ; a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and a member of various other learned bodies in 
this and other countries. In 1867 he was made 
Superintendent of Public Education and filled that 
place for the rest of his life. He was the author, 
from 1867 to 1892, of a large number of books and 
papers on scientific topics. He was married on 
April 6, 1847, to Elizabeth Rodamer, and had six 
children : Ferris Crosby, Annie, Elizabeth, Samuel 
A. Van Franken, Georgia Brockmer (dead) and 
Ernson Diedrich Lockwood. He died at Freehold, 
New Jersey, on January 9, 1894. 



SEDGWICK, John, 1829-1897. 

Class of 1847 Arts. 
Born in 1829 ; graduated A.B., New York University, 
18^7; studied law, 1847-50; lawyer; Assistant District 
Attorney, New York, 1856-59; Associate Judge of Su- 
perior Court, 1871-80; Chief Judge, Superior Court, and 
Justice Supreme Court, 1880-97 '• died, 1897. 

JOHN SEDGWICK, an eminent jurist of New 
York, was born in 1829, and entered New 
York University in 1843. He was a member of 
Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa, and a Commence- 
ment orator. He was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1847, studied law in 1847- 
50, and devoted his life to that profession with 
distinguished success. He was an Assistant District 
Attorney in New York in 1856-59. From 1871 to 
1880 he was Associate Judge of the Superior Court 
of the City of New York, and after 1880 Chief 
Judge of that Court, and a Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State of New York when the Superior 
Court was abolished. He died in Norfolk, Con- 
necticut, on September 11, 1897. 



ELY, Smith, 1825- 

Class of 1847 Law. 
Born at Hanover, N. J., 1825; received academic edu- 
cation ; studied in law office of Frederic De Peyster, and 
Law School of New York University, graduated LL.B. 
N. Y. U., 1847; in mercantile life since 1850; School 
Trustee, 1856; State Senator, 1858; County Supervisor, 
i860; Commissioner of Public Instruction, 1866; Repre- 
sentative in Congress, 1872 ; Brooklyn Bridge Com- 
missioner, 1875; Mayor of New York, 1877; Park 
Commissioner, 1897. 

SMITH ELY is a native of the State of New 
Jersey, having been born at Hanover, in 
Morris County, on April 17, 1825. He comes of 
historic ancestry on both sides of the house. His 
father, Epaphras Cook Ely, was a leather merchant 
of New York and was a soldier in the War of 181 2 ; 
his paternal grandfather, Moses Ely, served in the 
Revolutionary Army ; and his great-grandfather. 
Captain William Ely, and his great-great-grand- 
father. Captain Richard Ely, both served in the 
colonial wars. Mr. Ely's mother, whose maiden 
name was Julia Ann Kitchell, was a granddaughter 
of Judge Aaron Kitchell, United States Senator 
from New Jersey. Mr. Ely received in his boy- 
hood a good academic education, and afterward 
turned his attention to the study of the law. The 
latter he pursued for three years in the office of 
Frederic De Peyster, and in the Law School of New 
York University, from which latter he was graduated 
in 1847 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He 
never engaged in the practice of his profession, how- 
ever, but in 1850 entered mercantile pursuits, in 
which he has ever since remained. A large share 
of Mr. Ely's life has been devoted to the public ser- 
vice. He has been a life long Democrat, and has 
been among the foremost members of his party in 
New York. As early as 1856 he was elected a 
School Trustee in the Seventh Ward of New York, 
and held that place four years. He was in 1857 
elected State Senator for the term beginning with 
1858, by a large majority in a district which had 
never before chosen a Democrat. At Albany he 
was the only Democrat on two important commit- 
tees, that on Cities and the sub-committee of the 
Whole, and thus figured conspicuously in legislation. 
In i860 he was elected a member of the Board of 
Supervisors of the County of New York, and held 
that place for eight years, being reelected in 1867 
in opposition to both the regular Democratic and 
Republican candidates. He did much good work 
as Supervisor in raising money and troops for the 
support of the Government in the Civil War, being 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



29 



a member of the Special Committee which controlled 
that matter. He was made a Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Instruction in 1866. In 1872 he was elected a 
Representative in Congress, and was reelected in 
1874. During his two terms he served on impor- 
tant committees, and was conspicuous among the 
most efficient legislators at the national capital. 
While he was a member of Congress he was ap- 
pointed in 1875 one of the Commissioners for the 
building of the Brooklyn Bridge. The next year, 
1876, while he was still in Congress, saw him nom- 
inated for the office of Mayor of New York. His 




SMITH ELY 

Republican opponent was General and ex-Governor 
John A. Dix, but Mr. Ely was elected over him by 
more than 55,000 majority. Mayor Ely's adminis- 
tration was a wise, economical and public-spirited 
one. In each of its two years the public debt of the 
city was reduced, and, despite the increase of popu- 
lation, the amount of the tax levy was also reduced 
each year. The reduction of debt in two years was 
more than $6,000,000, and the reduction of tax levy 
was more than $3,000,000. This record in munici- 
pal finance has never been paralleled by any other 
Mayor. Before he retired from the Mayor's office 
Mr. Ely received an offer of renomination for Con- 
gress, but declined it and returned to private life. 
He has since held no public office save that of Com- 



missioner of Parks, to which he was appointed in 
1897. Mr. Ely has never married. He is a mem- 
ber of the Century Association, the Alumni Associa- 
tion of New York University, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the Sons of the Revolution, the Society of the 
War of 181 2, and the Manhattan, Democratic and 
Presbyterian clubs. His home is at No. 47 West 
57th Street, New York. 



BULL, Alexander Thompson, 1827- 

Class of 1847 Med. 
Born at BuIIville, N. Y., 1827; studied in schools in 
Sullivan, Ulster and Orange counties, N. Y. ; studied 
medicine at Newburgh, N. Y., Castleton, Vt., and in 
N. Y. U. ; graduated M.D., N. Y. U. Med. Coll., 1847; 
served at U.S. Quarantine Station; began practice, 
Monticello, N. Y., 1848 ; removed to Middletown, N. Y., 
1851, thence to London, Canada; adopted Homeo- 
pathic practice and secured its legalization in Canada ; 
received honorary degrees from several colleges ; settled 
in Buffalo, N. Y., 1864; prominently assisted in the 
founding of the City Homeopathic Dispensary, Buffalo, 
1866, and State Homeopathic Insane Asylum, Middle- 
town, N. Y., 1868; still in active practice in Buffalo. 

ALEXANDER THOMPSON BULL, M.D., the 
eminent Homeopathic physician of Buffalo, 
New York, was born at BuIIville, Orange County, 
New York, on May 3, 1827, the son of Milton 
and Esther (Crawford) Bull. His paternal grand- 
parents were Daniel and Catherine (Miller) Bull, 
the former a soldier in the Revolution and the son 
of Thomas and Mary (Kerr) Bull. Thomas Bull 
was an Ensign in the French and Indian War, and 
was a son of William and Sarah (Wells) Bull. 
William Bull was a native of Wolverhampton, Eng- 
land, and came to America and settled in Orange 
County, New York, about 17 12. Dr. Bull's native 
village, BuIIville, was named for his father's family, 
and the township, Crawford, was named for his 
mother's family. At the age of eleven years Dr. 
Bull entered the Academy at Bloomingburg, Sulli- 
van County, New York, and remained there a year. 
Next he went to the Academy at Old Paltz, Ulster 
County, and finally, for two years, to the Academy 
at Montgomery, Orange County. In 1843 he be- 
gan the study of medicine, under Dr. Isaac Garri- 
son, at Newburgh, New York. Later he attended 
lectures at Castleton, Vermont, and finally entered 
the Medical College of New York University. In 
the latter institution he enjoyed the instruction and 
friendship of those illustrious men, Valentine Mott 
and John W. Draper, and had the privilege of wit- 
nessing the first surgical operation performed in 



3° 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



America under the influence of chloroform, Dr. 
Mott having received a small quantity of that drug 
from Dr. Simpson, of Edinburgh, Scotland. He 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1847, and immediately thereafter was sum- 
moned by the quarantine authorities of the port of 
New York to attend patients stricken with ship 
fever. Three physicians had died at the station 
within the thirty days before his arrival there, 
namely, Dr. Emmet, a relative of the Irish revolu- 
tionist of that name, Dr. Van Buren, a relative of 
President Van Buren, and Dr. Porter, a member 
of an eminent New York family. Dr. Bull remained 
at quarantine for six weeks, doing his work bravely 
and well. In the spring of 1848 he began his 
private practice at Monticello, in Sullivan County, 
New York. Three months after his arrival there, 
while on a professional visit, he was thrown from a 
sulky while driving alone in the dense forest and had 
his leg and skull fractured. He was miles from any 
habitation, and lay upon the ground for several 
hours before he was found and cared for. While 
awaiting assistance he set his own leg, with only the 
rudest appliances and under the most painful con- 
ditions but with notable success, and thus established 
his reputation as a singularly skillful surgeon. In 
1849 he undertook the establishment of the Academy 
at Monticello, which has ever since been a most use- 
ful institution, and in the same year he also set afoot 
the enterprise of building the famous plank road 
from Monticello to Otisville. In 1S51 he removed 
to Middletown, Orange County, New York, and in 
addition to conducting a successful practice became 
interested in politics. He was soon elected Super- 
intendent of Schools, on the Whig ticket, by a 
majority of 156, while all the rest of the Whig 
ticket was defeated. Not long after this. Dr. Bull 
removed to London. Canada. He had recently be- 
come a convert to the principles of Hahnemann, 
and, finding a strong popular prejudice against 
Homeopathy in Canada, he appealed to the Prime 
Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, for the formal 
recognition and legalization of that school of medi- 
cine. Sir John took the matter up, and had the 
desired legislation promptly enacted. In recogni- 
tion of this achievement the Hahnemann University 
of Chicago, the Western College of Cleveland, Ohio, 
and the Hahnemanian Society of Philadelphia, con- 
ferred honorary degrees upon Dr. Bull. He was 
appointed a member of the Medical Board of Upper 
Canada, and was the first Homeopathic Coroner ap- 
pointed by the British Crown. The latter office he 



held from i860 until his removal from Canada in 
1864. He gained great reputation for himself and 
for Homeopathy in London by his successful treat- 
ment of cholera patients in that city soon after his 
arrival there, treating fifty-three without losing a 
single case. He was also one of the founders and 
editors of " The Canadian Homeopathic Monthly." 
Although he became by adoption a British subject, 
he remained a United States citizen at heart, and 
during the Civil War he was President of the Washing- 
ton Society, a Canadian organization formed to secure 
patriotic support of the United States' Government 




A. T. BULL 

from natives of the United States living in Canada. 
While at the head of this society he organized a de- 
tective system throughout all Canada for the pur- 
pose of detecting and preventing proposed raids 
upon the United States by Confederates and their 
sympathizers. Just before his departure from London 
to return to the United States the chief citizens of 
that city gave him a complimentary farewell banquet, 
at which the Mayor presided. Dr. Bull left Canada 
and established himself in Buffalo, New York, in 
1864. In 1869 he was, without his solicitation, 
appointed United States Examiner in Pensions. 
A little later he was removed from that office, 
through professional antagonism, on account of his 
being a Homeopath. He resented the slur thus 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



31 



thrown upon that school of medicine, brought the 
case before the American Institute of Homeopathy 
at Chicago in 1870, carried the matter to Washing- 
ton, and finally had the Commissioner of Pensions 
who had dismissed him himself removed from office. 
In 1866 Dr. Bull organized the City Homeopathic 
Dispensary, in Buffalo, under a State Charter. Two 
years later he, in conjunction with Dr. George VV. 
.Lewis of Buffalo and Dr. Doty of Margaretville, 
secured the establishment of the State Homeopathic 
Asylum for the Insane, at Middletown, New York. 
About 1886, in company with Dr. H. R. Hopkins, 
who represented the Allopathic school of medicine, 
he appeared before a legislative committee at Albany 
and argued in favor of the creation of a State Medi- 
cal Board, to pass upon the competency of physi- 
cians and to regulate the issuing of professional 
licenses, with the result that such a Board was soon 
created and has ever since been in effective and 
beneficent existence. In the winter of 1892, while 
visiting Florida, he was called upon to perform a 
surgical operation upon the son of the Hereditary 
Chief of the Seminole Indians, for an abscess of the 
spongy bones of the face. He did so with great 
success, and was therefor made by the tribe a Chief, 
under the name of Ocochobee. Dr. Bull is a mem- 
ber of the Erie County Homeopathic Society, and 
was for some years its President. He was also a 
founder of the Canadian Homeopathic Institute, and 
was its head in 1858-59. He is Vice-President of 
the staff and Consulting Physician of the Erie 
County Hospital, and Consulting Physician of the 
Homeopathic Hospital of Buffalo. In the revision 
of the City Charter of Buffalo he was Chairman of 
the Committee on Health and Charities. He was 
married at Middletown, New York, on December 
12, 1849, to Sarah Gale Vail, daughter of Lewis and 
Marietta Vail, and has had four children : Lewis, 
who died in infancy, Willie Sheldon, Louis Alexan- 
der, who became a prominent physician of Buffalo 
but is now deceased, and Sarah Wells Bull, now Mrs. 
A. N. MacNabb, of Bufifixlo. Dr. Bull is still actively 
practicing in Buffalo, ranking among the foremost 
members of his profession. His address is No. 184 
Franklin Street, Buffalo, New York. 



dained minister of Presbyterian Church, 1853 ; pastor, 
1853-87; author; died, 1887. 

CHARLES WASHINGTON BAIRD, A.M., 
D.D., son of Robert and Fermine Amaryllis 
(Du Buisson) Baird, was born at Princeton, New 
Jersey, on August 28, 1828. He entered New York 
University with the Class of 1848 and delivered a 
poem at Commencement, but was not graduated, 
having pursued a special course, for which he re- 
ceived a special diploma. In i860 the University 
gave him the degree of Master of Arts, and in 1876 
that of Doctor of Divinity. He studied at the Union 
Theological Seminary in 1849-52, and in 1853 was 
ordained into the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church. He was Chaplain of the American Chapel 
in Rome, Italy, in 1853-54; Pastor of the Bergen 
Hill Reformed Dutch Church of Brooklyn in 
1859-61 ; and Pastor of the Presbyterian Church 
at Rye, New York, 1861-87. He was a member 
of various historical societies and Huguenot societies 
in America and Europe, and was the author of 
numerous books and papers on ecclesiastical and 
historical topics. He was married on July 2, 1861, 
to Margaret Eliza Strang, and had two children : 
Eliza Strang and Robert Baird. He died at Rye, 
New York, on February 10, 1887. 



BAIRD, Charles Washington, 1828-1887. 

Class of 1848. 
Born at Princeton, N. J., 1828; special course di- 
ploma, New York University, 1848, A.M., i860, and 
D.D., 1876; Union Theological Seminary, 1849-52; or- 



LANE, Smith Edward, 1829- 

Class of 1848 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1829 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1848, and A.M., 1851 ; admitted to Bar, 
1E52; lawyer; Park Commissioner, 1878-83; member 
of New York University Council, 1875-1890; member 
of learned societies ; decorated by Government of 
Venezuela for services to that country. 

SMITH EDWARD LANE, A.M., son of Smith 
and Susan (Fardon) Lane, was born in the 
City of New York on July 22, 1829. On his 
paternal side George Lane, from whom Mr. Lane 
is fifth in descent, was the first known ancestor. 
He came from England. The Rev. Dr. Charles W. 
Baird, who was Mr. Lane's classmate in college, in 
his " History of Rye," County of Westchester, New 
York, says that George Lane resided therein from 
1666 to 1716, when he died. He founded the 
first church there for all orthodox people, and was 
a senior warden. Mr. Lane's paternal great-grand- 
father and grandfather were enrolled in His Majesty's 
Fourth Regiment in the County of Westchester, 
State of New York, between the years 1755 to 1760, 
to fight the French and Indians. The original 
muster rolls of that date still exist. Subsequently 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



they served in regiments organized in the County 
of Westchester, State of New York, during the War 
of the Revolution, from 1775 to 1783. Mr. Lane's 
paternal grandfather was sworn in as one of the 
freemen of the City of New York before Mayor 
James Duane and the Recorder at the then City 
Hall of the metropolis on April 6, 1784. His 
earliest maternal ancestor was a Huguenot noble- 
man, driven out of France by the Edict of Nantes, 
who came to New York about the year 1686, where 
his lineal descendants have continued to reside. 
Thus on both the paternal and maternal sides his 




SMITH E. LANE 

ancestors have resided continuously in and near 
the City of New York for more than two hundred 
years and Mr. Lane may therefore be claimed to 
be a genuine New Yorker. His early education 
was obtained at the celebrated school of Jeremiah 
Jay Greenough in the City of New York. Thence 
in 1844 he entered the University of the City of 
New York, as New York University was then called. 
That institution was then in its early years and 
was presided over by Chancellor Theodore Freling- 
huysen, a former United States Senator from the 
State of New Jersey. Mr. Lane pursued its regular 
classical course, which was a high one for those 
days, and was graduated in 1848, receiving the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1851 the Univer- 



sity conferred upon him the degree of Master of 
Arts. In 1875 he was elected a member of the 
Council of the University and occupied that place 
for about fifteen years. In June, 1898, at the annual 
meeting of the alumni representing the five survivors 
of his class of thirty-two graduates, he delivered the 
semi-centennial address. The year after his gradu- 
ation from the University Mr. Lane began the study 
of law in the office of James W. Gerard, who in his. 
day was one of the most distinguished lawyers of 
New York, and in 1852 he was admitted to practice 
at the Bar of the State of New York. He has 
since been a practicing lawyer in the City of New 
York, where he has always resided. Mr. Lane has 
been actively engaged in politics since 1851, having 
been identified with the Democratic party and 
frequently a delegate to its State conventions from 
the City of New York. He is an old member of 
the " Society of Tammany, or Columbian Order." 
and a member of the General Committee of Tam- 
many Hall for thirty years. He was appointed 
a Commissioner of Parks of the City of New York 
in 1878, and held the office for five years. In 
this capacity he became well known by displaying 
two traits of character that are well fitted for such 
a position — activity and sound judgment. In Jan- 
uary, 1898, Mayor Van Wyck appointed him one 
of the Commissioners of the New East River Bridge, 
and at the organization of the Commission he was 
elected its Secretary and was actively engaged in 
furthering the work of the construction of the 
bridge for four years. For services rendered to 
the United States of Venezuela in 1887, the Pres- 
ident of that Republic by and with the advice and 
consent of the Federal Council, conferred upon him 
the Order of "El Busto del Libertador," of the 
class of Officer, and in 1889, for further services, 
he was advanced to the higher class of Commander. 
He was also appointed an honorary foreign mem- 
ber of the government institution " La Academia 
Nacional de la Historia " of Venezuela. He has 
travelled extensively in this country and in Europe. 
He is an old and active member of the Union Club 
of the Borough of Manhattan ; of the Delta Phi 
Club, the Saint Nicholas Society, the Society of the 
Sons of the Revolution, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the New York Historical Society, and many 
other kindred institutions. 



MOSS, John Hall, 1829-1902. 

Class of 1848 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1829 ; studied in Public School 
No. 9, and under tutorship of M. L. Taft (N. Y. U., 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



33 



1842); graduated A.B., N. Y. U., 1848; teacher in 
public schools, 1849-51 ; clerk and contractor in civil 
engineering works, 1852-65, 1871-73, and 1882-83 j whole- 
sale grocer, 1867-69; coal mine operator, 1870; Man- 
ager Harlem Gas Light Co., 1879-88 ; manufacturer, 
1888-94; retired from business 1894; ^i^d in New York, 
1902. 

JOHN HALL MOSS, A.B., one of the veteran 
alumni of New York University and one of 
the founders of University Heights, was born in 
New York City on September 21, 1829, the son of 
William Polden and Leah (Demarest) Moss. He 
traces his descent from Governor Jonathan Law, of 




JNO. H. MOSS 

Connecticut, as follows : Governor Jonathan Law; 
Ann Law, who married the Rev. Samuel Hall ; Ann 
Hall, who married Lemuel Moss ; John Hall Moss, 
who married Ann Rile ; William Polden Moss, who 
married Leah Demarest, as above. Leah Deraarest's 
ancestors were French Huguenots and settled in 
New Jersey. Ann Rile's father was a soldier in the 
Revolution. Mr. Moss attended in boyhood Public 
School No. 9, in New York, and was afterward pre- 
pared for college under the private tutorship of 
Marcus Lorenzo Taft, the eminent physician and 
surgeon who was graduated from New York Univer- 
sity in 1842 and from the University Medical Col- 
lege in 1845. He entered New York University, 
then the University of the City of New York, in 
VOL. 11. — 3 



1844, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1848. During his student life he was 
successively Librarian, Treasurer, and President of 
the Philomathean Society. The annals of his busy 
after life maybe briefly told. In 1849-50 and 1851 
he was a teacher in the Eighth and Twelfth Ward 
Public Schools of New York City. For the next 
three years he was clerk and manager on contract 
for the construction of the Summit Tunnel on the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, and then for three years more 
was employed on tunnel contracts on the Washington 
aqueduct, above Georgetown, District of Columbia. 
In 1863-64 and 1865 he was manager on con- 
tract for the building of the Pan-Handle Tunnel, 
through and under a part of the city of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. The years 1867, 1868 and 1869 
were devoted to the business of a wholesale grocer 
in New York, and then for a year he was Secretary 
and Treasurer of the St. Bernard Coal Company, 
engaged in opening mines at Earlington, Kentucky. 
In 1871-72 and 1873 he was again manager on con- 
tract for building the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad 
tunnels through and under a part of the city of Bal- 
timore, Maryland. From 1879 to 1888 he was Man- 
ager of the Harlem Gas Light Company, of New 
York, which entered the Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany in 1884. From 1882-83 he was the con- 
tractor for building various tunnels, bridges, etc., on 
the West Pennsylvania Railroad and from 1888-94, 
when he retired from business, he was treasurer of a 
manufacturing company in New York. In politics 
he voted for all Republican Presidents since the 
first election of Lincoln, with the exception that he 
twice voted for Grover Cleveland, on the tariff 
issue. He was married on May 5, 1853, to Char- 
lotte Rutter, daughter of John Rutter. They have 
had four children. His three sons died in early 
manhood, and his daughter, Grace Demarest Moss, 
is now the wife of William L. Turner. Mr. Moss 
died May 28, 1902. 



PARSONS, John Edward, 1829- 

Class of 1848 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1829; grad. A.B., N.Y.U., 1848 ; 
A.M., from N.Y.U. and Yale ; lawyer; philanthropist ; 
member of University Council, 1865-98. 

JOHN EDWARD PARSONS, A.M., one of the 
foremost lawyers of New York, was born in 
New York City on October 24, 1829, the son of 
Edward Lanibe Parsons and Matilda (Clark) Par- 
sons. He entered New York University in 1844, 



34 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and was a member of Sigma Phi, President of Philo- 
mathean, and English Salutatorian at Commence- 
ment. He was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1848, and received the degree 
of Master of Arts from the University in 185 1. He 
has also received the degree of Master of Arts from 
Yale. Since 1851 he has been engaged in the 
practice of the law, and has long stood in the fore- 
most rank of that profession. He has also devoted 
much time and labor to philanthropic work as a 
Trustee of the Cooper Union, President of the 
Woman's Hospital of the State of New York, Presi- 
dent of the New York Cancer Hospital, and in 
various other capacities. He was a member of the 
Council of New York University from 1865 to 1898. 
Mr. Parsons was married on November 5, 1856, to 
Mary D. Mcllvaine, who has borne him six children : 
Mary, Edith, Helen R., Herbert, Gertrude, and 
Constance Parsons. His home is No. 30 East 
36th Street, New York. 



ROGERS, John Newton, 1830-1887. 

CJass of 1848 Arts. 
Bom in New York, 1830; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1848, and A.M., 1851 ; LL.D., New York 
University, 1879 ; admitted to Bar, 1852 ; member Iowa 
Legislature, 1855 ; City Attorney, Davenport, Iowa, 
1873; Professor, Iowa State University, 1876; Judge, 
Iowa, 1887; died, 1887. 

JOHN NEWTON ROGERS, A.M., LL.D., was 
a son of Edmund J. and Rebecca (Piatt) 
Rogers, and was born in New York City on Novem- 
ber 7, 1830. At the age of fourteen he entered 
New York University, was a member of Sigma Phi, 
won mathematical prizes in 1845-46-47, and was 
Valedictorian of his class. He was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1848, and received 
that of Master of Arts in 1851. In 1879 the Uni- 
versity gave him the degree of Doctor of Laws. He 
studied law at Ballston, New York, and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of New York and of Massachusetts 
in 1852, and to that of loiva in 1857. He was 
elected to the Iowa Legislature in 1855, was City 
Attorney of Davenport, Iowa, in 1873 ; Professor 
of Constitutional Law in the Iowa State University in 
1876; President of the Board of Education of 
Davenport, Iowa ; and Judge of the Seventh Judi- 
cial District of Iowa in 1887. He was married on 
May 12, 1857, to Mary Norman Van Derveer, 
daughter of the Rev. Ferdinand H. Van Derveer, 
D.D., and had one child, Ferdinand Rogers. He 
died at Davenport, Iowa, on May 22, 1887. 



SWIFT, Edwin Dwight, 1825-1901. 

Class of 1843 Med. 
Born at Cornwall, Conn., 1825 ; studied in public 
schools; graduated M.D., N. Y. U. Med. Coll., 1848; 
began practice, 1848; married to Sarah Louisa Punder- 
son, 1849 (who died, 1865) ; again married to Julia M. 
Swift, 1869 (who died, 1898) ; Health Officer of Hamden, 
Conn., 1870-95 ; died, 1901. 



E 



DWIN DWIGHT SWIFT, M.D., was born 
at Cornwall, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 
on May 8, 1825, the son of Augustus Buel Swift 
and great-grandson of General Heman Swift. His 
mother's maiden name was Rebecca Munson. His 




EDWIN D. SWIFT 

early education was received in the public schools 
of Cornwall, from which he came to New York Uni- 
versity and pursued a course in its Medical College, 
where he was a pupil of the illustrious Valentine 
Mott. In 1848 he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, and in the same year settled 
at Hamden, Connecticut, and began the practice of 
his profession in which he continued with distin- 
guished success for fifty-three years. He was mar- 
ried at New Haven, Connecticut, in 1849, to Sarah 
Louisa Punderson, who bore him three children. Of 
these two died in infancy. The third is Dr. Edwin 
E. Swift, a practicing physician of New York. Mrs. 
Swift died in 1865, and in 1869 he was again mar- 
ried at Wethersfield, Connecticut, to Julia M. Swift, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



35 



who died in 1898. During his long career at Ham- 
den Dr. Swift was for a term of years General Super- 
intendent of the public schools. He was also Health 
Officer of the town from 1870 to 1895. He was a 
member of the New Haven County Medical Society, 
and of the Mount Carmel Congregational Church. 
In politics he was an earnest Republican, and he 
took an active interest in public affairs, both state 
and national, though his professional duties debarred 
him from accepting office. In the Civil War he was 
most desirous of becoming an army surgeon, but was 
constrained to remain at home on account of the ill- 
ness of his wife. He was noted for his generous and 
conscientious care of the families of those who fell in 
the war. His long life was marked throughout with 
great usefulness to his fellowmen, with patience, and 
benevolence, and unfailing kindness to the poor 
and unfortunate. His home life, as a husband and 
father, was beautiful and exemplary. His life in this 
world came to an end on April 19, 1901, after several 
weeks of painful illness. 



CORNING, James Leonard, 1828- 

Class of 1849 Arts. 
Born at Albany, N. Y., 1828; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1849; graduated B.D., Union Theolog- 
ical Seminary, 1852 ; minister Congregational Church, 
1852-69; Art Student, 1869-80; Lecturer at Vassar 
College, Union Theological Seminary and Meadville 
Medical Seminary, 1877; Art Director, Chautauqua, 
1880-85; pastor, 1885; United States Vice-Consul at 
Munich. 

JAMES LEONARD CORNING, A.B., B.D., was 
born in Albany, New York, on August 21, 1828. 
He entered New York University in 1845, and was 
a member of Psi Upsilon and a Commencement 
orator. In 1849 he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He studied in Union Theological 
Seminary in 1849—50, at Yale Theological Seminary 
in 1850-51, and at Union again in 1851-52, being 
graduated in the latter year with the degree of 
Bachelor of Divinity. He was ordained into the 
ministry of the Congregational Church in 1852, and 
filled pastorates successively at Quinnebaug and 
Stamford, Connecticut, Buffalo, New York, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, Woodstock, Connecticut, and 
Poughkeepsie, New York. From 1869 to 1880 he 
was engaged in studying art in Europe, with the 
exception of 1877, when he was Lecturer on Art at 
Vassar College, at Union Theological Seminary and 
at Meadville Medical Seminary. From 1880 to 
1885 he was Director of the History and Literature 
of Art at Chautauqua. In 1885 he was pastor of 



a church at Terre Haute, Indiana, and he was United 
States Vice-Consul at Munich, Bavaria, from 1892 
to 1897 inclusive. 



LOTT, Abraham, 1831-1889. 

Class of 1849 Arts. 
Born at Flatbush, N. Y., 1831 ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1849, and A.M., 1852; lawyer; Sur- 
rogate of Kings County, N. Y., 1885-89 ; died, 1889. 

ABRAHAM LOTT, A.M., lately Surrogate of 
Kings County, New York, was a son of 
John A. and Katharine L. Lott, and was born at Flat- 
bush, New York, on October 28, 1831. He entered 
New York University in 1845, and was graduated 
in 1849 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, receiv- 
ing that of Master of Arts in 1852. He was a mem- 
ber of Zeta Psi. After graduation he studied law 
and was admitted to the Bar, where he had an emi- 
nently successful career. In 1885 he was elected 
Surrogate of Kings County, New York, comprising 
the City of Brooklyn, and filled that important office 
with distinction until his death in 1889. He was 
married in 1855 to Gertrude Bergen, daughter of 
John C. Bergen, and had three children : John A., 
Maria B., and Katharine L. Lott, the first named 
being an alumnus of New York University, Class 
of 1875. He died at Flatbush, Long Island, on 
January 13, 1889. 



SOMMERS, John B. Yates, 1829-1863. 

Class of 1849 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1829 ; entered New York Univer- 
sity ; founder of Zeta Psi ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1849, and A.M., 1852; lawyer and teacher; 
died, 1863. 

JOHN B. YATES SOMMERS, A.M., founder of 
the Zeta Psi Fraternity, was the son of the Rev. 
Dr. Charles G. Sommers and Sarah L. (Skelding) 
Sommers, and was born in New York City on 
August 15, 1829. He entered New York University 
in 1845, 3-nd was the founder of the Zeta Psi Fra- 
ternity. In 1849 he was graduated from the 
University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
in 1852 he received that of Master of Arts. After- 
ward he studied law and had a successful career at 
the Bar. For two years he was teacher in a young 
ladies' seminary at Mobile, Alabama. He was 
a member of the Masonic Order and rose to high 
official place therein. He was married on October 
5, 1859, to Emma A. Heath, and had two children : 
Frederick Skelding and Henry Cantine Heath. He 
died in New York City on November 23, 1863. 



36 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



CLUTE, Robert Frary, 1829-1892. 

Class of 1850 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1829 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1850, and A.M., 1853; Theological Seminary, 
Alexandria, Va., 1850-53 ; teacher, 1853-63 ; Professor 
in Rose Gates College, Oklahoma, Miss.; President 
of College of the Holy St. John; author; D.D., St. 
Mary's College, Miss., i860, and St. John's College; 
LL.D., St. John's College, La., i86g; died, 1892. 

ROBERT FRARY CLUTE, A.M., D.D., LL.D., 
educator, was born in New York City on 
October 23, 1829, the son of Jacob Douw Clute and 
Ann Van Brunt (McCarty) Clute. He was a student 
in New York University and a member of Zeta Psi. 
Li 1850 he was graduated from the University with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and three years later 
received that of Master of Arts. In 1850-53 he 
was a student in the Theological Seminary at Alex- 
andria, Virginia, and for the next ten years was 
engaged in teaching. He was Professor of Moral 
and Intellectual Philosophy in Rose Gates College, 
Oklahoma, Mississippi, and for two years President 
of the College of the Holy St. John, in Louisiana. 
St. Mary's College, Mississippi, gave him the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity in i860, and the College of 
the Holy St. John gave him the same degree and 
also that of Doctor of Laws in 1869. He was the 
author of several historical works. He was married 
on December 22, 1856, to Diana Hardin, and had 
ten children. He died at Quantico, Maryland, on 
November 15, 1892. 



HARTLEY, Marcellus, 1827-1902. 

Member of Council, 1895-1902. 
Born in New York, 1827 ; studied in classical and 
public schools ; entered mercantile life ; established 
firm of Schuyler, Hartley & Graham, 1854; special 
agent of U. S. Government, with commission of Briga- 
dier-General, in Civil War ; a conspicuous figure in the 
business and financial world for many years ; officer of 
numerous corporations ; member of Council of New 
York University, 1895-1902 ; died in New York, 1902. 

MARCELLUS HARTLEY, Councilor of New 
York University, was a descendant of 
David Hartley, founder of the English Association 
of Psychologists and author of "Observations on 
Man," a physician and philanthropist of London 
and Bath, England. One of Dr. Hartley's sons 
was David Hartley, the English diplomat who was 
a member of Parliament and was the Plenipotentiary 
who arranged, with Jay, Franklin and Laurens, the 
terms of peace with America at the end of the 
Revolutionary War and signed the Definitive Treaty, 
on the part of Great Britain. Another son was 



James Hartley, of Boughton, England, a manu- 
facturer and philanthropist. His son, Robert, also 
a manufacturer, married Martha Smithson, a mem- 
ber of the family which endowed and gave its 
name to the Smithsonian Institution, at Washington, 
District of Columbia. A son of Robert and Martha 
Hartley was Isaac Hartley, who removed from 
England to the United States and settled at Perth, 
New York. To him and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Isabella Johnson, was born Robert Milham 
Hartley, of New York, one of the founders of the 
New York City Temperance Society, the New York 
Association for Improving the Condition of the 
Poor, and other institutions, and largely instru- 
mental in the founding of the De Milt Dispensary, 
the Juvenile Asylum, the Presbyterian Hospital, and 
many other charities. He was one of the fore- 
most philanthropists of his day in New York. He 
married Catherine Munson, daughter of Reuben 
Munson, a New York merchant and member of 
the State Legislature, and was the father of the 
subject of this sketch. Of such ancestry Marcellus 
Hartley was born in New York City on September 23, 
1827. He was educated in classical and public 
schools, and at an early age entered the counting 
room of Francis Tomes & Son, importers of fire- 
arms. In 1854 he established the firm of Schuyler, 
Hartley & Graham, which has with various changes 
of name continued to the present day, being now 
known as the M. Hartley Company. For nearly 
half a century it has been one of the foremost 
American firms in the fire-arms trade, and from 
its organization to the hour of his death Marcellus 
Hartley was its dominant member. During the 
Civil War this house came into great prominence 
through its supplying arms to the Federal Govern- 
ment and Northern States. Mr. Hartley was com- 
missioned as Brigadier-General and was sent abroad 
as a special agent of the United States Government, 
and rendered great services by purchasing vast 
quantities of arms and ammunition in Europe and 
thus preventing the Confederate Government from 
getting such supplies. Apart from the management 
of this company, Mr. Hartley was for many years 
a leading figure in the business and financial world 
of New York. He was prominently connected 
with the Manhattan Elevated Railway Company, 
and was President of the Remington Arms Com- 
pany, the Bridgeport Gun Implement Company, 
and the Union Metallic Cartridge Company. He 
was Vice-President of the Western National Bank, 
and a Director of the American District Telegraph 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



37 



Company, the American Ordnance Company, the 
Audit Company of New York, the Equitable Life 
Assurance Society, the Fifth Avenue Trust Com- 
pany, the German-American Bank, the Lincoln 
National Bank, the Mercantile Trust Company, 
the Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing Company, 
and other corporations. He was a member of the 
Union League, Republican, Lawyers' and other 
clubs, the American Fine Arts and New England 
Societies, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and 
the American Museum of Natural History. He 
was a benefactor of the Hartley House, which was 
organized by the Association for Improving the 
Condition of the Poor and was named for his 
father, and was interested in many other philan- 
thropic enterprises. He was married to Frances 
Chester White, daughter of the late Dr. S. Pomeroy 
White, of New York, and had four children, of 
whom only one is now living, the wife of George 
W. Jenkins, President of the American Deposit 
and Loan Company. In 1895 Mr. Hartley was 
elected a member of the Council of New York 
University, and served in that capacity until his 
death, which occurred suddenly, while he was 
attending a business meeting on January 8, 1902. 



MOTT, George Scudder, 1829-1901. 

Class of 1850 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1829; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1850, and A. M., 1853 ; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, 1850-53; pastor, 1853-69; D.D., Princeton, 
1874; President of Van Rensselaer Institute, 1871-82; 
President N. J. Charities Aid Association, 1889-91 ; 
author. 

GEORGE SCUDDER MOTT, A.M., D.D., was 
a son of Lawrence S. and Christiana (Vail) 
Mott, and was born in New York City on November 
28, 1829. He entered New York University and was 
a member of Zeta Psi, President of Eucleian, and 
fourth honor man at Commencement. He was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1850, and received the degree of Master of Arts in 
1853. In 1850-53 he studied at the Princeton 
Theological Seminary, and in the latter year was 
ordained into the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church. Thereafter he was a pastor at Rahway, 
New Jersey, 1853-58, at Newton, New Jersey, 
1859-69, and at Flemington, New Jersey, in 1869. 
In the last named year he became a Trustee of 
Lincoln University, and in 1871-82 he was Presi- 
dent of the Van Rensselaer Institute. He was 
Vice-President of the New Jersey Historical Society, 



and President of the New Jersey Sabbath Union in 
1880, and of the New Jersey Charities Aid Associa- 
tion in 1889-91. He was the author of a number 
of published works. He was married on May 17, 
1854, to Isabella Acken, daughter of John Acken, 
and had three children. His home was at No. 4, 
Winthrop Terrace, East Orange, New Jersey. He 
died October 12, 1901. 



NEIL, James, 1828- 

Class of 1850 Med. 
Born at Steubenville, Ohio, 1828 ; graduated M.D., 
N. Y. U. Med. Coll., 1850; in practice since 1850; in- 
ventor of surgical needle, and treatment for appendi- 
citis. 

JAMES NEIL, M.D., one of the veteran alumni 
of the New York University Medical College, 
is a son of James and Elizabeth (Kerr) Neil, who 
came from Belfast, Ireland, about 1820. His father 
was a linen weaver in the old country, but here 
became a farmer, for the first ten years in Ohio, and 
afterward in West Virginia, in the latter state being 
an innkeeper as well as a farmer. Dr. Neil was 
born at Steubenville, Ohio, on January 9, 1828. He 
received in his youth an academic education of 
excellent quality and scope, and at the age of seven- 
teen began teaching school and studying medicine. 
In 1847 he entered the Medical College of New 
York University, from which he was graduated in 
1850 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Since 
that time he has been steadily engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession. For the first twenty-five 
years he devoted his attention largely to obstetric 
work, and the treatment of diseases of women and 
children. Later his practice as a physician and 
surgeon has been general in character and scope, 
though he has continued to rank as a specialist in 
gynecology. Many years ago he invented an im- 
proved needle and handle for ligating deep-seated 
arteries. In this device the needle was liberated 
by pressing on a button at the end of the handle, 
instead of tediously unscrewing the handle from the 
needle as was done with the Mott and other deep 
artery needles hitherto used. Dr. Neil's needle 
was made by Wade & Ford, then of Fulton Street, 
New York, and was immediately adopted by the 
illustrious Valentine Mott, M. D., Professor of Sur- 
gery in New York University, and by James R. 
Wood, M. D., Professor of Surgery in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College. Dr. Neil did not at- 
tempt to profit by his invention, but gave it freely 
to the medical profession. He was also the origi- 



38 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



nator of a highly successful method of treating 
appendicitis and typhlitis without a surgical opera- 
tion. As described by Dr. Neil in an address 
before the Medical Society of the State of New 
York at its semi-annual meeting at the Academy of 
Medicine in New York on October i6, 1901, the 
process is as follows : The patient is placed with 
the hips elevated at an angle of 45 degrees, or as 
nearly so as he can bear. A warm flaxseed muci- 
lage or some similar fluid is then injected into the 
bowels, slowly and without much force. After a 
time the patient is placed on the right side and in 




JAMES NEIL 

a horizontal attitude, until the injected fluid comes 
away. Then the process is repeated, until the im- 
pacted faeces have been surrounded, when a large 
dose of castor oil and peppermint is given. This 
causes the emptying of the coecum and colon, 
whereupon the appendix empties itself, and in two 
or three days the patient entirely recovers. Dr. 
Neil has found this treatment efficacious in a large 
majority of cases. Dr. Neil is a member of the 
Medical Society of the County of New York, and 
of the Harlem Medical Association, of which latter 
he was one of the founders. From 1862 to 1867, 
inclusive, he was a United States Pension Surgeon. 
For the five years ending with 1889 he was a Trus- 
tee of Calvary Presbyterian Church, New York. In 



politics he is a Republican. He has been twice 
married. His first wife, to whom he was married 
in 1849, was Elizabeth Montgomery, who died after 
bearing him four children : E. Jennie, James, Jr., 
D.D.S., William, and Edwin Neil, M.D. His second 
wife, to whom he was married in 1890, was Jessie 
Tift, who has borne him three children : Virginia, 
Albert, and Violet Neil. His address is No. 74 
West 131st Street, New York. 



TUCKER, John Jerome, 1828-1902. 

Member of University Council, 1898-1903. 
Born at Shark River, N. J., 1828; educated by private 
tutors; contractor and builder, 1851-1902; officer of 
financial and other corporations ; builder of many nota- 
ble edifices ; member of Council of New York Univer- 
sity, 1898-1902; died, igo2. 

JOHN JEROME TUCKER, one of the fore- 
most members of the building trade in New 
York and a valued Councilor of New York Univer- 
sity, was born at Shark River, New Jersey, on Feb- 
ruary 26, 1828. On the side of his father, Curtis 
Tucker, he was descended from English ancestors 
who came to this country from Kent in 1634, and 
on the side of his mother, whose maiden name was 
Letitia West, his ancestors came from Jiolland in 
1686. Mr. Tucker's education was received at the 
hands of private tutors, and at the age of seventeen 
years he settled in New York City as an apprentice 
to his uncle, Joseph Tucker, a builder. He thus 
became well grounded in the principles and details 
of the building trade, and practiced them in an emi- 
nently thorough and highly successful manner. Upon 
the retirement of his uncle, in 185 1, Mr. Tucker 
succeeded to the headship of the business, and re- 
mained in it until the day of his death. He was the 
builder of many of the most notable and most cred- 
itable specimens of the builder's art in New York, 
among them being the Lenox Library, the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, the Hall of Fame at 
New York University, the Naval Branch of the 
Young Men's Christian Association in Brooklyn, and 
the residences of George Gould and Charles L. Tif- 
fany. His eminence in his chosen calling, and his 
rare executive ability and high integrity caused Mr. 
Tucker to be chosen for many places of trust and 
influence in the business world and in public life. 
He was for twenty-five years Vice-President of the 
Bank for Savings, for twelve years a Director of the 
United States Life Insurance Company, for fifteen 
years President of the Mason Builders' Association, 
and for ten years a member of the New York City 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



39 



Aqueduct Commission, appointed by Mayor Hewitt. 
He was also at various times a Director of the Bond 
and Mortgage Guarantee Company, President of tlie 
Building Trades Club, President of the Mechanics' 
and Tradesmen's Society, President of the National 
Association of Builders, and a Trustee of the New 
York Orphan Asylum. In 1898 he was elected a 
member of the Council of New York University, and 
was thereafter until his death one of the most active 
and efficient members of that body. He was mar- 
ried on April 17, 1856, to Mary A. Spear, who bore 
him two sons : Edwin and Walter Curtis Tucker. 




JOHN J. TUCKER 

Mr. Tucker died suddenly, as the result of a stroke 
of apoplexy, at his home in New York on February 
19, 1902. 



ZABRISKIE, Francis Nicoll, 1832-1891. 

Class of 1850 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1832; prize winner and Saluta- 
torian in New York University; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1850, and A.M., 1853; law student, 
1850-52 ; New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1852- 
55; pastor, editor, author; B.D., New Brunswick, 1855; 
D.D., New York University, 1868; died, 1891. 

FRANCIS NICOLL ZABRISKIE, A.M., D.D., 
a son of George and Susan Van Campen 
(Romeyn) Zabriskie, was born in New York City 



on April 29, 1832, and entered New York Univer- 
sity in 1846. He was a member of Psi Upsilon 
and Phi Beta Kappa, Editor of " The College Tablet," 
mathematical prize winner, and English Salutatorian 
at Commencement. He was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1850, and delivered 
the Master's oration and received the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1853. He was a law student in 
1850-52, and in 1852-55 a student in the Theological 
Seminary of the Reformed Dutch Church at New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, from which he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 
1855. In 1868 New York University gave him the 
degree of Doctor of .Divinity. He was pastor of 
Dutch Reformed churches at Livingston, New York, 
1855-59, Coxsackie, New York, 1859-63, Ithaca, 
New York, 1863-66, and Claverack, New York, 
1866-72. He was pastor of Congregational 
churches at Saybrook, Connecticut, in 1873-76, 
and Wollaston Heights, Massachusetts, 1876-79. 
In 1880-83 he was Editor of "The Christian 
Intelligencer," and until 1889 was engaged in 
journalistic and literary work. He was the author 
of numerous published books, sermons and essays. 
On June 4, 1863, he was married to Maria Reed, 
and had three children. He died at Princeton, 
New Jersey, on May 13, 1891. 



CRAWFORD, David McLean, 1826- 

Class of 1851 Med. 
Born at MifBintown, Penn., 1826; studied in local pri- 
vate schools ; studied medicine with his father, and 
practiced with his elder brother, 1849-50; entered New 
York University Medical College, and was graduated 
M.D., 1851 ; in constant practice since 1851 ; Surgeon to 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company since 1852; State 
Senator, Penn., for two terms. 

DAVID McLEAN CRAWFORD, M.D., a 
veteran and distinguished physician and 
surgeon of Pennsylvania, comes, as his name indi- 
cates, of the Scottish stock which has so largely 
contributed to the growth and greatness of that 
commonwealth. His father. Dr. David Crawford, 
was a son of James and Ann (Black) Crawford, and 
his mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Brown, 
was a daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (Murray) 
Brown. He was born at Mifflintown, Juniata County, 
Pennsylvania, on March 30, 1826, and received a 
careful education in private schools of that place, 
including a classical course under the Rev. John 
Hutchinson, an eminent teacher and preacher. He 
then became a student of medicine in the office of 



40 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



his father, who was an accomplished practitioner, 
for three years, and for two years, 1849-50, during 
his studies, actually practiced with his elder brother. 
Dr. E. Darwin Crawford, at Thompsontown, Penn- 
sylvania. Finally he entered the Medical College 
of New York University, in 1849, and completed 
the full course of lectures and clinics then required. 
He was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 185 1, and at once estabhshed himself 
in practice at Millerstown, Perry County, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he remained until 1864. In the latter 
year, upon the death of his elder brother. Dr. E. 




DAVID M. CRAWFORD 

Darwin Crawford, he succeeded to the latter's prac- 
tice at Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, and accordingly 
removed thither, where he still remains in active 
and successful practice. Since 1852 he has been a 
Surgeon to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and 
since 1886 he has had associated with him his son. 
Dr. Darwin McLean Crawford, an alumnus of the 
Medical College of New York University. His three 
brothers, all now deceased, were also alumni of the 
same institution. They were Dr. Samuel B. Craw- 
ford, Dr. E. Darwin Crawford, and Dr. James VV. 
Crawford, and they were graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in the respective classes of 
1848, 1850, and 1865, the last named being an 
honorary bestowal. Dr. Crawford was married on 



May 10, 1853, to Ellen Eliza Jackman, and has 
four children living : Darwin M. Crawford, M.D., 
his partner in practice ; Martyn Paine Crawford, 
Ph.G., who owns and conducts a drug store in Mif- 
flintown, Pennsylvania; Dr. E. Druitt Crawford, a 
practicing dentist of Philadelphia, and Rebecca 
Crawford, now the wife of Colonel John K. Robi- 
son. Dr. Crawford passed the chairs in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows in 1850 in Sincerity 
Lodge at Thompsontown, Pennsylvania. In politics 
he is a Democrat, and has been a delegate to three 
National Conventions of his party. He was elected 
to the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1870 and served 
for the three years 1871-72-73, and was again elected 
in 1876 and served in 1877-78-79. His address, 
as for nearly forty years past, is Mifflintown, Juniata 
County, Pennsylvania. 



THOMPSON, Edwin Belknap, 1831-1888. 

Class of 1851 Arts, 1857 Med. 

Born in New York, 1831 ; graduated A.B., New York 

University, 1851, and M.D., New York University 

Medical College, 1857; Dispensary Surgeon, 1857-62; 

Army Surgeon, 1862-66; in practice, 1866-88; died, 1888. 

EDWIN BELKNAP THOMPSON, A.B., M.D., 
was the son of Martin E. and Mary (Kitchell) 
Thompson, and was born in New York City on 
P'ebruary 4, 183T. He was graduated from New 
York University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 185 T, and from the University Medical College 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1857. 
In 1857-59 he was Surgeon to the Northwestern 
Dispensary, and in 1859-62 to the Northern Dis- 
pensary, of New York. In 1862-66 he was an 
Acting Assistant Surgeon in the United States 
army. After the Civil War he practiced in Orange, 
New Jersey, from 1866 to 1882, and in 1873-82 
was a member of the Medical Staff of the Orange 
Memorial Hospital. In 1882 he removed to Kala- 
mazoo, Michigan, and spent the rest of his life in 
practice there. He was married on January 19, 
1864, to Helen E. Osborne, daughter of Milo 
Osborne, and had three children : Mary Helen, 
Annie Sayre, and Susan Louise Thompson. Dr. 
Thompson died at Kalamazoo on March 24, 1888. 



WIGHTMAN, Frederick Butler, 1831- 

Class of 1851 Arts. 
Born at Middletown, Conn., 1831 ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1851 ; admitted to Bar, 1853 ; 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



41 



practicing lawyer since 1853; member of Harlem Guard, 
1861-65. 

FREDERICK BUTLER WIGHTMAN, A.B., 
was bom at Middletovvn, Connecticut, in 
1831, the son of Stillman King Wightman and 
Clarissa Sage (Butler) Wightman. He entered 
New York University in 1847, ^'^^ ^^^^ a member 
of Psi Upsilon and President of Philomathean. In 
1 85 1 he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. He then studied law, was admitted to 
the New York Bar in 1853, and has been in 
practice as an attorney and counsellor at law ever 
since. In 1861-65 he was a member of the military 
organization known as the Harlem Guard. Mr. 
Wightman was married on October 28, 1857, to 
Abbie Hartley, daughter of Robert M. Hartley 
and sister of the Rev. Dr. Isaac Smithson Hartley 
(New York University, 1852), who bore him four 
sons : Frederick Hartley, Percy Butler, Orrin Sage 
and Robert Stillman Wightman. Percy B., Orrin S., 
and Robert S. Wightman were graduated from New 
York University with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1893, 1895 ^'""^ 1^97 respectively. While 
in college they were conspicuous members of Psi 
Upsilon and leaders in the general life of the Uni- 
versity. Mr. Wightman's office is at No. 229 
Broadway, and his home is at No. 68 East 131st 
Street, New York. 



the Rev. Dr. George Danielson Baker, was grad- 
uated from New York University in the Class of 
i860. 



BAKER, Frederic, 1830- 

Class of 1852 Arts. 

Born at Watertown, N. Y., 1830; graduated A.B., 

New York University, 1852 ; merchant at Watertown, 

1854-68; merchant in New York since 1868; President 

of Alumni Association, New York University, 1892-94. 

FREDERIC BAKER, A.B., A.M., merchant of 
New York, was born at Watertown, New 
York, on November 30, 1830, the son of Josiah 
Whitney Baker and Abigail (Bates) Baker. In 
New York University he was a member of Psi 
Upsilon and President of Eucleian, and he was 
graduated in 1852 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He was engaged in mercantile pursuits 
at Watertown, New York, in 1854-68, and after 
1868 was a merchant of New York City. In 
1892-94 he was President of the Alumni Associa- 
tion of New York University. Mr. Baker was 
married on May 17, 1854, to Sarah Price Pyewell, 
who died May 5, 1872. In June, 1887, he married 
Mrs. Lake, daughter of James Steers. His two 
children were Abbie and Ellen Baker. His brother, 



DUMONT, Robert Swartwout, 1832-1873. 

Class of 1852 Arts. 
Born in 1832; graduated A.B., New York University, 
1852; studied law; practiced law, 1855-61 and 1864-73; 
served in army and navy, 1861-64; died, 1873. 

ROBERT SWARTWOUT DUMONT, A.B., was 
one of the many alumni of New York Uni- 
versity who served the nation in the Civil War. He 
was born in 1832, and entered New York University 
in 1848, where he was a member of Psi Upsilon and 
a Commencement orator. In 1852 he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then 
studied law, was admitted to the Bar, and practiced 
successfully from 1855 to 1861. In the latter year 
he went to the war as a Captain in the Fifth Regi- 
ment, New York Volunteer Infantry. Thus he 
served until 1862, when he was transferred to the 
navy, as Secretary and Aide to Admiral Bell, on the 
Pacific Squadron. In 1863 he was Naval Judge- 
Advocate-General of that squadron. He returned 
to New York and resumed law practice in 1864, 
and thus continued until his death, which occurred 
in 1873. 



HARTLEY, Isaac Smithson, 1830-1899. 

Class of 1852 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1830 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1852; Union Theological Seminary, 1853- 
54; Andover, 1854-56; pastor Congregational Church, 
1856-57; Union Theological Seminary, 1857-58; pastor. 
Reformed Dutch Church, 1864-99; D.D., Rutgers Col- 
lege, 1873; author; died, 1899. 

ISAAC SMITHSON HARTLEY, D.D., son of 
Robert M. and Catherine (Munson) Hartley, 
was born in New York City on September 24, 1830. 
He entered New York University, and was a mem- 
ber of Psi Upsilon and President of Eucleian. In 
1852 he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He studied at Union Theological Seminary in 
1853-54, and at Andover, 1854-56, and was pastor of 
a Congregational church at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, 
in 1856-57. He returned to Union Theological 
Seminary as a resident licentiate in 1857-58, visited 
Europe in 1858, was in New York in 1859-62, and 
in Europe again in 1862-63, ^'^^ ^.Iso in 1889. In 
1864 he was ordained into the ministry of the 
Reformed Dutch Church, and filled pastorates in 
New York, 1864-70, Philadelphia, 1870-72, Utica, 
New York, 1872-89, and at St. James's Church, 



42 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Great Barrington, Massachusetts, 1 89 1-99. In 1873 
he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Rutgers College. He was a Trustee of Rutgers 
College, President of the General Synod of the Re- 
formed Dutch Church and President of the Oneida 
Historical Society of Utica, New York, for several 
years. He was married on April 26, 1866, to Isa- 
bella Asten White, daughter of George Robert White, 
and had two children : Isaac Smithson and George 
Derwent Hartley. His brother, Marcellus Hartley, 
was for some years a member of the Council of 
New York University. Dr. Hartley died at Great 
Barrington, Massachusetts, on July 3, 1899. He 




ISAAC S. HARTLEY 

was the author of a number of books, among them 
a " History of the Reformed Church of Utica, New 
York," magazine articles, and published sermons 
and addresses, on ecclesiastical and historical topics. 



VAN HOESEN, George M. 

Class of 1852 Arts. 
Born in New York City; studied at school of Prof. 
Solomon Jenner ; graduated A.B., New York Univer- 
sity, 1852; LL.B., State and National Law School, 
Poughkeepsie, 1855 ; instructor in law ; in practice, 
and editor, Iowa, 1858-61 ; served with distinction in 
Civil War; in practice, New York, 1865-75; Judge of 
Court of Common Pleas, New York, 1875-89 ; in practice 



since i88g; formerly School Commissioner, and Pres- 
ident New York University Alumni Association. 

GEORGE M. VAN HOESEN, A.B., LL.D., 
comes of old Knickerbocker Dutch stock, and 
was born in New York City. His early education 
was acquired at the school of Professor Solomon 
Jenner, and in 1S48 he entered New York University, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1852. He studied law at the 
State and National Law School at Poughkeepsie, 
and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1855. For a time he was an Instructor in 
Pleadings and Practice in that institution, and then 
went west to practice his profession. He settled at 
Davenport, Iowa, and practiced law and did edito- 
rial work on " The Iowa State Democrat " until the 
outbreak of the Civil War. In the summer of 1861 
he recruited a company of volunteers, of which he 
was made Captain, and went to the front. He 
served under Grant in Missouri, and followed him 
to Shiloh, where he was promoted to the rank of 
Major for good conduct on the field of that colos- 
sal battle. He was afterward appointed by General 
Thomas Provost- Marshal at Corinth, and still later, 
by General Halleck, Acting Provost-Marshal-General 
of the armies in the field in the military division of 
the Mississippi. At the close of the war he returned 
to New York and engaged in the practice of his 
profession with marked success. In 1875 he was 
elected to the Bench of the Court of Common Pleas, 
and filled that place for a term of fourteen years. 
Since 1889 he has been engaged in legal practice. 
It is recorded that it was he who drafted and had 
introduced into the New York Legislature the first 
bill for the incorporation and construction of an 
elevated railroad in New York. That bill passed 
the Assembly by a large majority, but was defeated 
in the Senate. However it fixed the name " ele- 
vated railroads " upon structures of that kind. 
Judge Van Hoesen has filled many places of trust 
and honor in New York, including those of School 
Commissioner, Judge-Advocate of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, in the Department of New York, 
President of the Holland Society and a Trustee of 
it since its foundation, Trustee of the Holland Trust 
Company, and of the Grant Monument Association, 
and President of the Alumni Association of New 
York University. He has been a life-long Democrat 
and is Chairman of the Tammany Hall General 
Committee. He is a member of the City and State 
Bar associations, the Democratic and Union clubs, 
and the Liederkranz Society. His office is No. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



43 



45 Broadway, and his home No. 62 West 47th 
Street, New York. 



ABBOTT, Lyman, 1835- 

Class of 1853 Arts. 
Born in Roxbury, Mass., 1835; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1853; began the practice of law in 
1856; ordained to the ministry in i860; Pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Terre Haute, Ind., until 
1865; Secretary of the American Union (Freedmen's) 
Commission until 1868; resigned the pastorate of the 
New England Church, New York City, in i86g to en- 
gage in literary work; edited the Literary Record 
of " Harper's Magazine " and also " The Illustrated 
Christian Weekly;" associated with the Rev. Henry 
Ward Beecher in the Editorship of " The Christian 
Union " (now " The Outlook "), becoming Editor-in- 
Chief after his colleague's death ; succeeded Mr. 
Beecher in the pastorate of Plymouth Church, which 
he resigned in 1898; was preacher to Harvard, 1890-93; 
and has contributed largely to the religious and secular 
literature of the present day ; D.D., New York Univer- 
sity, 1876, and Harvard, 1891. 

LYMAN ABBOTT, D.D., LL.D., clergyman 
and author, the third son of Jacob and Har- 
riet (Vaughan) Abbott, was born in Roxbury, Mas- 
sachusetts, December 18, 1835. He was graduated 
from the University of the City of New York, as 
New York University was then known, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, in the Class of 1853 
in the eighteenth year of his age, and after prepar- 
ing himself for the legal profession he entered into 
practice with his brothers, Benjamin V. (Class of 
1850) and Austin Abbott (Class of 185 i), in 1856. 
Discovering that his ambition lay in the direction of 
the Pulpit rather than the Bar, he studied theology 
with his uncle, the Rev. John S. C. Abbott, and in 
i860 was called to his iirst pastorate, that of the 
Congregational Church in Terre Haute, Indiana, 
where he remained for the ensuing five years. Ac- 
cepting in 1865 the Secretaryship of the American 
Union (Freedmen's) Commission, which necessi- 
tated his removal to the metropolis, he was partially 
occupied with the duties of that position for the 
next three years, having in the meantime responded 
to a call from the New England Church, New York, 
of which he was pastor until 1 869. At this period 
of his life the love and capacity for literary pursuits, 
for which the Abbott family has long been noted, 
combined with other circumstances to cause his 
relinquishment of the parish and he engaged in 
literature and journalism. The Literary Record of 
" Harper's Magazine " was edited by him for a 
number of years, and at the same time he con 



ducted "The Illustrated Christian Weekly," sever- 
ing his connection with the latter paper for the 
purpose of taking charge of " The Christian Union," 
the Editorship of which he shared for a time with 
the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. After the death 
of his distinguished associate he became Editor-in- 
Chief of that journal, which is now known as " The 
Outlook," meanwhile preaching as supply in the 
pulpit of the Presbyterian Church of Cornwall, New 
York, where he had made his home. The pastorate 
of Plymouth Church, so long occupied by the famous 
Brooklyn preacher, Henry Ward Beecher, came to 




LYMAN ABBOTT 

Dr. Abbott almost as an inheritance, as the society 
seemed to regard him as the only eligible successor 
to Mr. Beecher, and his acceptance of the charge 
gave general satisfaction to the great mass of out- 
siders who are almost regular attendants, as well 
as to the members themselves. His labors at 
Plymouth Church, together with his hterary work, 
the extent of which can only be known to those 
whose freedom from the cares of business enables 
them to occupy their time in reading the current 
writings of the day, at length produced such a 
strain upon his health as to make absolutely neces- 
sary the curtailment of his work, and with feelings 
of reluctance he resigned his pastorate in 1898. 
In 1876 New York University bestowed upon him 



44 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the degree of Doctor of Divinity, and in 1891 Har- 
vard, to which he was preacher for four years, con- 
ferred upon him a similar honor. Besides the two 
novels, "Cone-Cut Corners" and "Matthew Car- 
aby," written in collaboration with his two brothers, 
Benjamin and Austin, his more notable published 
works consist of : " Jesus of Nazareth : His Life 
and Teachings ; " " Old Testament Shadows of New 
Testament Truths ; " " A Dictionary of Bible Knowl- 
edge ; " "A Layman's Story ; " " An Illustrated 
Commentary on the New Testament," in four vol- 
umes ; " A Life of Henry Ward Beecher ; " " For 
Family Worship," a book of devotions ; " In Aid of 
Faith ; " " The Evolution of Christianity ; " " Christi- 
anity and Social Problems; " "The Theology of an 
Evolutionist ; " " The Life and Letters of Paul the 
Apostle ; " and two volumes of sermons. Among 
several pamphlets which he has issued at different 
times perhaps the most notable is, " The Results of 
Emancipation in the United States ; " and he has 
edited two volumes of sermons by Henry Ward 
Beecher ; and morning and evening exercises selected 
from the writings of the same author. 



ACHESON, John Crothers, 1832-1900. 

Class of 1853 Arts. 
Born in New York City, 1832; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1853, A.M., 1856; M.D., College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, 1859 ; in practice 1859-igoo ; 
extended hospital and Health Board service; died, 
1900. 

JOHN CROTHERS ACHESON, M.D., son of 
William and Mary (Stuart) Acheson, was 
born in New York City on October 17, 1832. He 
entered the College of Arts of New York University 
in the fall of 1849, ^"^1 ^^^s President of Philo- 
mathean and a charter member of Zeta Psi. In 
1853 he was graduated with the Baccalaureate 
degree in Arts, and three years later he received 
the Master's degree. The Acheson family has 
had long and intimate connection with New York 
University. James Joseph Acheson, an uncle of 
the subject of this sketch, was one of its first 
graduates, and his father, William Acheson, was 
instrumental in its foundation. When the institu- 
tion was struggling to gain a foothold the Acheson 
family gave it substantial support and is recognized 
as one of its prominent benefactors. Various mem- 
bers of the family have received degrees from the 
University, among them James Joseph and William 
A. Acheson, elder brothers of John Crothers Ache- 
son, who were graduated in 1833 and 1836 re- 



spectively. Dr. Acheson's professional studies were 
pursued in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
which later became the Medical Department of 
Columbia University, and he was graduated there- 
from in 1859 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
From that time until his death in 1900 he was 
engaged in the practice of his profession in New 
York City. At the beginning of his career he 
served as an Interne and House Surgeon in the 
New York Hospital, and he was an organizer and 
the first paid physician of the Health Board of 
New York, and for eleven years Visiting Physician 




J. C. ACHESON 

to the Eastern Dispensary. He was a member of 
the New York County Medical Association and 
a founder of the Medical Association of Greater 
New York. On June i, 1864, Dr. Acheson was 
married to Emily A. Mead, who bore him two 
sons : John Charles and Harold Stuart Acheson. 
Dr. Acheson died on October 12, 1900, being at 
the time the physician with the longest record 
of continual practice in New York. 



BUTLER, Abraham Ogden, 1834-1856. 

Class of 1853 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1834; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1853 • studied law ; Founder of the Butler 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



45 



Eucleian Essay prizes ; member of Psi Upsilon and 
Eucleian ; died, 1856. 

ABRAHAM OGDEN BUTLER, A.B., son of 
Charles Butler, the distinguished benefactor 
of New York University, was born in New York 
in 1834, and entered New York University in the 
Class of 1853. He was a member of Psi Upsilon, 
and of Eucleian, and a Commencement orator. 
He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1853, and afterward studied law. He 
was the founder of the Eucleian Essay prizes 
which bear his name. He died at Scarsdale, New 
York, on June 6, 1856. 



DENISON, Ellery, 1827- 

Class of 1853 Med. 
Born at Floyd, Oneida County, N. Y., 1827 ; studied at 
common school and Whitestown Seminary ; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1853; 
Attending Physician of Northern Dispensary, New 
York, 1855 to 1865 ; Attending Physician to Home for 
Old Men and Aged Couples, New York, for twenty- 
two years; Trustee of public schools in New York for 
eighteen years; practicing physician in New York 
since 1853. 

ELLERY DENISON, M.D., was born at Floyd, 
Oneida County, New York, on December 
22, 1827, a descendant of some of the earliest 
colonists in North America. His ancestry is traced 
from William Denison, who was born in ?2ngland 
in 1586, came to America in 1631 and settled 
in Roxbury, Massachusetts. From him the line of 
descent runs through George Denison, born in 
1 61 8, John Denison, born in 1646, and George 
Denison, born in 167 1. The last named in 1694 
married Mrs. Mary (VVetherell) Harris, daughter 
of Daniel Wetherell of New London, Connecticut. 
Her mother was Grace Brewster, a daughter of 
Jonathan Brewster, the latter a son of Elder William 
Brewster of the " Mayflower." A son of George and 
Mary Denison was Daniel Denison, who was born 
in 1703 and in 1726 married Rachel Starr. She 
was a daughter of Thomas Starr, son of Samuel 
Starr and Hannah Brewster, the latter being a 
daughter of Jonathan Brewster and a son of Elder 
William Brewster. In the next generation came 
.Daniel Denison, Jr., born in 1730, and in the next, 
Samuel Denison, who was born in Rensselaer 
County, New York, on October 24, 1774, and who 
married Nancy Burlingarae, who was born on 
March 3, 1798. The son of this last named couple 
is the subject of the present sketch. Dr. Denison 



received his early education in the common school 
of his native place and at Whitestown Seminary. 
During the years 1 848-1 849 he attended night 
school in Oneida County while working on his 
father's farm. Afterward he came to New York 
University and was graduated from its Medical 
College in 1853 with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. Since that date he has been steadily 
engaged in the practice of his profession in New 
York City. He was an Attending Physician of the 
Northern Dispensary for the Diseases of Children 
from 1855 'o 1865. For twenty-two years he was 




ELLERY DENISON 

Attending Physician to the Home for Old Men 
and Aged Couples, and for eighteen years he was 
a Trustee of public schools in the Ninth Ward of 
New York City. He has been an earnest Repub- 
lican since the organization of that party and was 
an ardent supporter of the National Administration 
during the Civil War. He is a member of the 
American Medical Association, of the New York 
State Medical Association and of the Masonic 
Order. He was married on May 20, 1857, to 
Ellen K. Gibb, who has borne him seven children : 
Charles Ellery, Emma K., George B. (deceased), 
Henry Avery (deceased), Edward Gibb (deceased), 
William Samuel and Ellen Louise Denison. Dr. 
Denison's present address is New York City. 



46 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



LEWIS, John Benjamin, 1832- 

Class of 1853 Med. 
Born at Greenport, N. Y., 1832; studied at Powell- 
ton Seminary, Newburgh, N. Y., and under tutor; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1853; in practice, 1853-61; in active service as 
Surgeon in United States Army, 1861-65 ; resumed 
practice in 1865; Medical Director of Travelers' 
Insurance Company since 1869; author of various 
works. 

JOHN BENJAMIN LEWIS, M.D., son of John 
and Alathea (Overton) Lewis, was born at 
Greenport, Suffolk County, New York, on March 
10, 1832. His father, born at Canterbury, Con- 
necticut, was a teacher in the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, from about 1S23 to 1826. 
His grandfather, Benjamin Lewis, lived at Canter- 
bury, Connecticut, until 181 1, when he removed 
to Pennsylvania, and was interested in the experi- 
mental use of anthracite coal. His great-grand- 
father, Eleazar Lewis, was a soldier in the War 
of the Revolution and was honorably discharged 
from the army on December 14, 1780. Dr. Lewis's 
mother was a lineal descendant of Isaac Overton, 
who came from England and settled at Southold, 
Long Island, before 1650. At the age of thirteen 
years John Benjamin Lewis became a student in 
the Powellton Seminary at Newburgh, New York, 
a boarding school of which Merritt Bradford was 
principal. Subsequently he continued his studies' 
under a private tutor, the Rev. John Woodbridge. 
His professional studies were pursued in the New 
York University Medical College, where he spent 
three years under the preceptoiship of Dr. William 
Darling, F.R.C.S., and was graduated on March 10, 
1853, the twenty-first anniversary of his birth. Im- 
mediately afterward he settled at Vernon, Tolland 
County, Connecticut, where he formed a business 
partnership with Dr. Alden Skinner, who had an 
extensive practice in that and the adjacent towns. 
In 1859 he removed to the Village of Rockville, 
now a city in the Town of Vernon, and was there 
engaged in the general practice of medicine and 
surgery until the outbreak of the Civil War. He 
then accepted appointment as Surgeon of the Fifth 
Regiment of Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, his 
commission dating from July 3, 1861. On July 29th, 
following, the regiment left for the scene of war, and 
he was on duty in the field during all the following 
fall, winter, and spring. On April 4, 1862, the 
President commissioned him Brigade-Surgeon of 
United States Volunteers with orders to report to 
Major-General Banks, and he was assigned to the 



Second Brigade of General Shields's Division. Soon 
afterward he was promoted to the rank of Medical 
Director of the Division on the staff of General 
James Shields, and remained in service in that capac- 
ity until the division was incorporated with the Army 
of the Potomac at Harrison Landing, when he was 
assigned to temporary duty as Medical Inspector. 
On September 16, 1862, while in charge of a field 
hospital, he received orders to proceed at once to 
the headquarters of General McClellan, and there 
report to Dr. Letterman, Medical Director, where, 
during September 17 th and 18th, he was on duty at 




JOHN B. LEWIS 

the Battle of Antietam. A few days later he vvas 
assigned to duty as Surgeon in Charge of the United 
States General Hospital No. 6 at Frederick, Mary- 
land, and served in that capacity until the discon- 
tinuance of the hospital, in February, 1863. There- 
upon, on February 18, 1863, he was appointed 
Surgeon in Charge of the United States General 
Hospital at Cumberland, Maryland, where he re- 
mained until the close of the war. During that 
time this hospital became one of the largest in the 
military service. While in charge at Cumberland, 
he also served for a time as Medical Director of the 
Department of West Virginia, and in that capac- 
ity, in company with General Crook, he visited 
and inspected the military posts and hospitals of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



47 



that Department. Captain William McKinley, Jr., 
afterwards President of the United States, was 
then a member of General Crook's Staff, and was 
one of this party of inspection. In the course 
of his field service Dr. Lewis was present, and 
was on duty in the battles of Winchester, March 
23, 1862, Port Republic, June 9, 1862, Antietara, 
September 17, 1862, and ten other engagements 
and skirmishes. On October i, 1865, he was 
commissioned Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, United 
States Volunteers. By special orders of the War 
Department on October 7, 1865, he was " honor- 
ably discharged out of the service of the United 
States." The war being over, he returned to Rock- 
ville, Connecticut, and resumed the general practice 
of his profession. He remained at Rockville about 
three years. At the end of that time he removed 
with his family to Hartford, Connecticut, and soon 
afterward went to Europe. On his return to this 
country in 1869 he entered the service of the Trav- 
elers' Insurance Company of Hartford as its IVIedi- 
cal Director, and Adjuster in charge of its Claim 
Department. In November, 1901, after a contin- 
uous service of thirty-two years, he retired from the 
active charge of the Claim Department which had 
been organized and built up under his management, 
and has since given his entire time to the Medical 
Department of the Company, of which Department 
he, as Medical Director, is the official head. Dr. 
Lewis is a member of the Hartford Medical Society, 
of the Hartford County Medical Association, of the 
Connecticut Medical Society, of the New York 
Medico-Legal Society, of the Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion, of the Society of the Army of the 
Potomac, of the Army and Navy Club of Connecti- 
cut, of the Grand ."Xrmy of the Republic, and of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. Dr. Lewis's bib- 
liography includes " Contusions, Ecchymoses, Cuta- 
neous Hypostases, and Their Relations to Legal 
Medicine," New York Medico- Legal Journal, 1885 ; 
" Intra-Cranial Hemorrhage in its Medico-Legal 
Aspects," Proceedings of Connecticut Medical So- 
ciety, 1886; and "Stratagems and Conspiracies to 
Defraud Life Insurance Companies," pp. 423, 1878, 
with second edition, pp. 682, 1898. He was mar- 
ried on June 13, 1855, to Mary Kingsbury Mann, 
daughter of the Hon. Jerauld N. E. Mann, of Ded- 
ham, Massachusetts, and has three children, one son, 
William Jerauld, a practicing physician, and two 
daughters : Mary Bradford, and Gertrude Overton 
Lewis. His home is No. 312 Farmington Avenue, 
Hartford, Connecticut. 



NIMMO, Joseph, 1831- 

Class of 1853. 
Born at Huntington, N. Y., 1831 ; special course 
diploma, New York University, 1853, A.M., 1859, and 
LL.D., 1899; Civil Engineer; Professor of Mathe- 
matics; Special Agent, Chief of Division, and Chief of 
Bureau, U. S. Treasury Department, 1864-85; author 
of numerous reports and books. 

JOSEPH NIMMO, A.M., LL.D., eminent as a 
Civil Engineer and Government Statistician, 
is a son of the Rev. Joseph Nimmo and Hannah 
(Dickson) Nimmo, and was born at Huntington, 
Long Island, New York, on April 11, 1831. He 
studied in New York University, where he was 
a member of Zeta Psi, and in 1853 received a 
special course diploma, to which the University 
added the degrees of Master of Arts in 1859 and 
Doctor of Laws in 1899. He was a Civil Engineer 
from 1853 to 1865, in railroad employ from 1853 
to 1857, Professor of Mathematics in Cooper Insti- 
tute, New York, in r 860-6 2, and a Civil Engineer 
in private practice at Flushing, New York, in 
1863-64. In the latter year he entered upon his 
long and notable career in the service of the 
Treasury Department of the United States Govern- 
ment, which continued unbroken until 1885. In 
those years he served successively as Special Agent, 
Chief of the Division of Tonnage, Supervising In- 
spector-General of Steam Vessels, and Chief of the 
Bureau of Statistics. He is the author of innumer- 
able reports, many of which are Of permanent 
value, dealing with commerce, transportation, labor, 
immigration, the tariff, railroads, Canadian and 
Mexican relations, and the trust question. He 
is President of the National Statistical Association. 
Mr. Nimmo has for many years been a resident of 
Washington, District of Columbia, but his home 
is at Huntington, New York, his native place. 



TALMAGE, Thomas Be Witt, 1832-1902. 

Class of 1853. 
Born at Bound Brook, N.J., 1832; special diploma. 
New York University, 1853, and A.M., 1862 ; New 
Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1853-56 ; minister 
Reformed Dutch Church, 1856-69; Pastor Brooklyn 
Tabernacle, Presbyterian, 1869-94; VVashington, D.C., 
1894-1902; D.D., University of Tennessee, 1884; lecturer, 
editor and author; died, 1902. 

THOMAS DE WITT TALMAGE, A.M., D.D., 
one of the most widely known preachers 
and writers of his day, was born at Bound Brook, 
New Jersey, on January 7, 1832. He entered New 
York University as a special student in the Class 
of 1853, and was not graduated but received a 



48 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



special course diploma. The University in 1862 
gave him the degree of Master of Arts. He studied 
theology at the Theological Seminary of the Re- 
formed Dutch Church at New Brunswick, New 
Jersey, in 1853-56, and in the latter year was 
ordained into the ministry of that church and filled 
pastorates at Belleville, New Jersey, 1856-59, 
Syracuse, New York, 1859-63, and Philadelphia, 
1863-69. In the latter year he became Pastor of 
the Central Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn, New 
York, thereafter known as the Brooklyn Tabernacle. 
To accommodate the great audiences which flocked 




T. DE WITT TALMAGE 

to hear him, three enormous buildings were erected, 
which were all in turn destroyed by fire. After 
a unique career in Brooklyn he removed in 1894 
to Washington, District of Columbia, where he was 
engaged in pastoral work for the remainder of his 
life. Besides preaching weekly to thousands, he 
was often heard on the lecture platform in all parts 
of the vforld. For thirty years his sermons were 
published weekly in a syndicate of papers, reaching 
30,000,000 readers. He was the author of nearly 
a score of books of very wide circulation. He was 
the Editor, at various times, of " The Christian at 
Work," " Frank Leslie's Sunday Magazine," " The 
Advance," and " The Christian Herald." He died 
at Washington, District of Columbia, in 1902. 



c 



WALLACE, Charles Clark, 1832-1889. 

Class of 1853 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1832; graduated A.B , New York 
University, 1853, and A.M., 1856; Union Theological 
Seminary, 1853-56; minister of Presbyterian Church, 
1856-88; D.D., 1881, Rutgers; died, 1889. 

IHARLES CLARK WALLACE, A.M., D.D., 
was born in New York City on June 3, 
1832, and entered New York University in the 
Class of 1853. He was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1853, and received that of 
Master of Arts in 1856. He was a student in the 
Union Theological Seminary in 1853-56, and in 
the latter year was ordained and became pastor 
of a Presbyterian Church at Tremont, New York, 
where he remained until i860. Subsequent pastor- 
ates were at Perth Amboy, New Jersey, 1860-64, 
Placerville, California, 1864-68, Watertown, New 
York, 1868-70, Mahopac Falls, New York, 1870-80, 
and Newburyport, Massachusetts, 1880-88. In 
1888 he retired from pastoral work on account 
of failing health, and he died at Westfield, New 
Jersey, on December 22, 1S89. 



CROLY, David Goodman, 1829-1889. 

Class of 1854. 
Born in Ireland, 1829; special course diploma, New 
York University, 1854; journalist and author; died, 
1889. 

DAVID GOODMAN CROLY, a distinguished 
journalist, was born at Olovakiltey, Ireland, 
on November 3, 1829, the son of Patrick and 
Elizabeth Croly. He came to this country in early 
life, studied in New York University but was not 
graduated, and received a special course diploma 
in 1854. He was a member of Zeta Psi. His life 
was devoted chiefly to newspaper work and author- 
ship. He was a reporter for " The New York 
Herald " and " Evening Post " in 1855-58 ; Editor 
of "The Daily News," at Rockford, Illinois, in 
1859-60; City Editor and Managing Editor of 
"The New York World" in 1860-72; Managing 
Editor of "The New York Daily Graphic" in 
1872-78. He was one of the founders of the 
Lotos Club of New York. He was the author of 
"The Modern Thinker," " Glimpses of the Future," 
and "The Positivist Catechism." He was married 
in 1857 to Jennie Cunningham, daughter of Joseph 
H. Cunningham, a lady who attained eminence as 
a writer and journalist under the pen name of 
"Jennie June." Mr. Croly died in New York on 
April 29, 1889. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



49 



GIBSON, Hanson Cox, 1835- 

Class of 1854 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1835; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1854, and A.M., 1857; lawyer since 1857; 
officer in Civil War; Provost-Judge, Savannah, 1865; 
Secretary of New York University Alumni Association 
for many years. 

HANSON COX GIBSON, A.M., was bom in 
New York City on September 22, 1835, 
the son of James Renwick Gibson and KatVierine 
(Van Keuren) Gibson. He entered New York 
University in 1850, and was a member of Psi 
Upsilon, and President of Philomathean. He was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1854, and three years later received that of Master 
of Arts. Meantime he studied law, and began the 
practice of that profession in 1857. Excepting 
for the period of his service in the army he has 
ever since been engaged in legal work. He par- 
ticipated in the Civil War as a Second Lieutenant 
of the One Hundred and Sixty-Fifth New York Vol- 
unteers — the Second Duryea Zouaves — and was in 
active service at Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, 
Fort Delaware, Maryland Heights, Winchester, Cedar 
Creek, and the whole Virginia campaign of 1864- 
65. In 1865 he was Provost-Judge at Savannah. 
Since the war he has pursued his profession, and has 
been President of the Harlem Eye, Ear and Throat 
Infirmary, Vice-President of the Harlem District 
Telegraph Company, and counsel for several banks 
and other corporations. For many years he was 
Secretary of the New York University Alumni Asso- 
ciation. He was married on October 10, 1872, to 
Mary B. Wharton, and has had three children : Grace 
Wharton (died, 18S8), F"rederick Seward (died, 
1900) and itenneth Morrison Gibson. His office 
is No. 48 Wall Street, and his home No. 27 Waver- 
ley Place, New York. 



STEPHENSON, William Wilson, 1831-1889. 

class of 1854 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1831 ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1854, and A.M., 1858; Albany Law 
School, r854-56; lawyer; soldier and officer in Civil 
War; New York State Assemblyman, 1877-79; died, 
1889. 

WILLIAM WILSON STEPHENSON, A.M., 
was a son of Dr. Mark Stephenson, and 
was born in New York City on November 18, 1831. 
He entered New York University in 1850, and was 
a member of Psi Upsilon. In 1854 he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 
VOL. 11. — 4 



1858 he received that of Master of Arts from the 
University. He studied law at the Albany Law 
School in 1854-56, and had a successful career 
in that profession. In 1862 he enlisted as a 
private in the New York Seventh Regiment, was 
Captain in the One Hundred and Sixty- Fifth New 
York Volunteers in 1862-64, Major in 1864-65, and 
Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel in 1865. He was a 
member of the New York State Assembly from the 
Fifth District of Kings County in 1877-79, and was 
a member of the Republican General Committee 
of Kings County, the Seventh Regiment War Vet- 
erans, the Loyal Legion, and the Grand Army of 
the Republic. He was for many years Secretary of 
the Alumni Association of New York University. 
He died in Brooklyn, New York, on March 4, 
1889. 



TUTHILL, David, 1829-1888. 

Class of 1854 Arts. 
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., 1829; Wesleyan University, 
1850-52 ; graduated A.B., New York University, 1854, 
and A.M., 1857; Custom House, New York, 1855-59; 
pastor and missionary, M.E. Church ; Professor in 
University of the Pacific, 1860-61 ; Principal, Female 
Collegiate Institute, Santa Clara, Cal., 1864-69 ; Presi- 
dent of car companies, 1869-83 ; died, 1888. 

DAVID TUTHILL, A.M., was born in Brook- 
lyn, New York, on October 31, 1829. He 
first entered Wesleyan University, at Middletown, 
Connecticut, in 1850-52, but in the latter year 
came to New York University, where he was a 
member of Delta Phi, and from which he was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1854. Three years later he received the degree 
of Master of Arts from the University. He was 
employed in the New York Custom House in 
1855-59, and for the next two years was a mission- 
ary and pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in Arizona and California. He was Professor of 
Natural Sciences in the University of the Pacific 
in 1860-61, and Principal of the Female Collegiate 
Institute at Santa Clara, California, in 1864-69. 
He then became interested in the Santa Cruz, 
California, Car Company, and was its President 
from 1869 to 1883, and also President of the 
Salem, Oregon, Car Company from 1874 to 1883. 
In 1876-78 he was a member of the City Council 
of Santa Cruz. He was married in 1861 to Carrie 
Van Wyck Taylor, and had two children : Joseph 
and Thomas Tuthill. He died at Santa Cruz, Cali- 
fornia, on August 7, 1888. 



50 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



BRUNDAGE, Amos Harrison, 1828- 

Class of 1855 Med. 
Born at Benton, Pa., 1828; attended public and 
private schools, and Central College, McGrawville, 
N. Y. ; taught school, conducted drug store, and studied 
medicine privately ; studied at University of Michigan ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1855; graduated New York Ophthalmic {Regular) 
Hospital, 1855; began practice in 1855; served as 
surgeon during Civil War; resumed practice in 1865, 
and continued until 1902. 

yt MOS H.ARRISON BRUNDAGE, M.D., was 
J^\ born at Benton, Pennsylvania, on October 
6, 1828, the son of Parmenas Brundage. He studied 




and 1 86 1 he practiced his profession at Bethany, 
Pennsylvania, Ithaca. New York, Danby, New York, 
and Candor, New York. In the last named place 
he had built up a fine practice when the Civil War 
began. Forthwith he entered the service of the 
nation as a Substitute Surgeon in the One Hundred 
and Seventy-Ninth New York Volunteers. Later he 
was Assistant and Acting Surgeon of the Sixth New 
York Veteran Cavalry, under General Sheridan. At 
the close of the war he resumed practice at Candor. 
In 1870 he removed to Cohoes, New York, and in 
1872 to Newark, New Jersey, where he had an 
extensive practice and was one of the City District 
Physicians. Finally, in 1881, he removed to Brook- 
lyn, New York, where he still lives and where he 
was in practice down to the beginning of 1902. He 
is a member of the Brooklyn Medical Society, and 
of the New York Medical Association, and was 
one of the founders of the latter. He was 
also one of the organizers of the Centennial 
Lodge, Knights of Honor, at Newark, in 1876. 
He was married in 1855 to Sarah Mervina Dim- 
mick, Principal of the High School at Benton Cen- 
tre, Pennsylvania, and a descendant of the famous 
English family of Dymoke of Scrivelsby, which for 
centuries has furnished, by hereditary right, the 
" King's (or Queen's) Champion " at royal corona- 
tions. He has had three sons : Orville Parmenas 
(deceased), Albert Harrison, and Henry Eber 
Brundage. He also has an adopted daughter, 
Grace. His wife died on May 18, 1901, after a life 
of conspicuous philanthropic public work in New 
Jersey and New York. His address is No. 962 
Gates Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



AMOS H. BRUNDAGE 

in the schools of Benton, at Madison Academy (Ab- 
ingdon Centre, Pennsylvania), at Frame's Select 
School, Montclair, New Jersey, and at Central Col- 
lege, McGrawville, New York. For several years he 
taught school in Pennsylvania, and conducted the 
post-office and a drug store at Benton Centre, now 
Fleetville, Pennsylvania. While in the latter work 
he studied medicine with his brother. Dr. Albert T. 
Brundage. In 1853-54 he studied medicine at the 
University of Michigan, and the next year studied 
in the Medical College of New York University, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, in March, 1855. At about the 
same time he was graduated from the New York 
Ophthalmic (Regular) Hospital. Between 1855 



CARR, Gouverneur, 1837-1889. 

Class of 1855 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1837 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1855; journalist; lawyer; soldier; died, 
1889. 

GOUVERNEUR CARR, A.B., was born in 
New York City in 1837. He entered New 
York University and was a member of Psi Upsilon. 
In 1855 he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts, and thereafter devoted most of his 
life to newspaper work. From 1858 to 1861 he 
practiced law in New York, and from 1861 to 1865 
he was an officer of New York troops in the Civil 
War, rising to the grade of Brevet Colonel. In 
1862-65 he served also as a war correspondent 
of "The New York Times," and in 1865 became 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



51 



City Editor of tiiat paper. Afterward lie was 
editorially connected with " The Evening Post," 
"The Evening Mail," "The Daily Graphic," "The 
Guardsman," and "The New York Tribune." He 
died on September 23, 1889. 



KNIGHT, Charles Calvin, 1833- 

Class of 1855 Med. 
Born at Stafford, Conn., 1833 ; studied at Monson 
and Westfield academies, Mass.; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1855; served 
in Randall's Island Hospital, 1855-56; Physician to St. 
Joseph's Home since 1876; Consulting Physician to 
Peekskill Hospital since igoo. 

CHARLES CALVIN KNIGHT, M.D., son of 
Calvin and Mary (Temple) Knight, of Eng- 
lish and Scotch ancestry, was born at Stafford, 




CHARLES C. KNIGHT 

Connecticut, on April 16, 1833. His general edu- 
cation was acquired in academies at Monson and 
Westfield, Massachusetts. He studied medicine in 
the New York University Medical College, and was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1855. In 1855-56 he was Resident Physician 
to the Randall's Island Hospital, New York, and 
thereafter engaged in private practice for a number 
of years with marked success. Since 1876 he has 
been Physician to St. Joseph's Home, an institution 



containing twelve hundred children, and since 1900 
he has also been Consulting Physician to the Peeks- 
kill, New York, Hospital, of the Medical Staff of 
which he is President. He is a member of the 
Westchester County Medical Society, and Elder 
in the Second Presbyterian Church of Peekskill. 
He is a Republican in politics. He was married 
in June, 1859, to Lucy VV. Brown, and has three 
children : Lucy B., Charles A., and Mable Temple 
Knight. His address is Peekskill, New York. 



ROBINSON, Edward, 1836-1894. 

Class of 1855 Arts. 
Born in Boston, 1836; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1855; admitted to Bar, 1857; journalist, 
1854-58; lawyer; officer in Civil War; U. S. Consul 
at Strasburg, i866-6g, and at Hamburg, 1869-73 ; School 
Commissioner; died, 1894. 

EDWARD ROBINSON, A.B., son of Edward 
and Theresa Albertina Louise (Van Jacob) 
Robinson, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on 
September 19, 1836. In New York University 
he was President of his class and Philosophical 
orator at Commencement. He was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1S55, and 
from 1854 to 1858 was a writer for "The New 
York Times." He also studied law and in 1857 was 
admitted to the Bar. His legal practice was sus- 
pended in 1862, when he went into the Civil War 
as a Second Lieutenant of the Eighth New York 
Volunteers. He was promoted to be Captain and 
Adjutant-General of Volunteers, and Brevet Major. 
After the war he was United States Consul at 
Strasburg in 1866-69, ^"d at Hamburg in 1869-73. 
He then returned to New York and practiced his 
profession. He served as a Trustee, Inspector, 
and Commissioner of Public Schools. On June 21, 
1873, he was married to Emma Marie Weismann, 
and had three children : Edward W., Hope E., and 
Herman Robinson. He died in New York on 
February 14, 1894. 



STRONG, Robert Grier, 1837-1892. 

Class of 1855 Arts. 
Born at Flatbush, N.Y., 1837; graduated A.B., Nev/ 
York University, 1855 ; studied at New Brunswick 
Theological Seminary ; minister of Dutch Reformed 
Church, 1858-73; Principal of school, 1873-92; died, 
1892. 

ROBERT GRIER STRONG, A.B., was a son 
of the Rev. Thomas Morris Strong and 
Elizabeth Cooper (Grier) Strong, and was born 



52 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



at Flatbush, now a part of the City of New York, 
on March 8, 1837. He was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts from New York Univer- 
sity in 1855, and for the next three years studied in 
the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Dutch 
Church at New Brunswick, New Jersey. In 1858 
he was ordained into the ministry of that church, 
and was pastor at Flatbush in 1858-60, at New 
Baltimore, New York, in 1861-69, and at Flatbush 
in 1871-73. From 1873 to 1879 he was Principal 
of a private school at Flatbush, and from 1879 to 
1892 Principal of the Erasmus Hall Seminary at 
that place. He was married in 1862 to Harriet 
Lydia Zabriskie, who bore him five children. His 
two brothers were graduated from New York Uni- 
versity, Mason R. in 1855 and Selah W. in 1862. 
He died at Flatbush on April 22, 1892. 



1827. His ancestors were English, settled in this 
country at an early date. He was educated in a 
private academy at Greenwich, and in 1856 was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from the Medical College of New York University. 
The next two years were spent in post-graduate 
study in New York, and then, in 1859, he estab- 
lished himself in practice in St. Louis, Missouri, 
where he has ever since remained. After the 
Battle of Shiloh, in the Civil War, many wounded 
soldiers were brought to St. Louis, and Dr. Dwelle 
volunteered his services in caring for them. He 
was put in charge of the La Clede Hospital, under 
Dr. Hodgen and was thence transferred to the New 
House of Refuge Hospital, and finally to Benton 
Barracks, where he remained until the end of 
the war. 



DWELLE, Henry Bolivar, 1827- 

Class of 1856 Med. 
Born at Greenwich, Washington County, N. Y., 1827 ; 
studied in private academy at Greenwich ; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1856; 
spent two years in post-graduate studies ; in practice 
since 1859; hospital service in Civil \A^ar. 

HENRY BOLIVAR DWELLE, M.D., son of 
Alphonso and Elizabeth ('I'efft) Dwelle, 
was horn at Greenwich, New York, on July 13, 



MACOUBREY, Anthony Robinson, 1835- 

Class of 1856 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1835; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1856 ; Theological Seminary, Allegheny 
City, Pa., 1856-58; Presbyterian minister, 1 858-1 902 ; 
author ; D.D., New York University, 1890. 

ANTHONY ROBINSON MACOUBREY, D.D., 
is a son of Robert and Jane (Macmillan) 
Macoubrey, and was born in New York City on 
December 6, 1835. He entered New York Uni- 





H. B. DWELLE 



ANTHONY R. MACOUBREY 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



53 



versify in 1852, was a member of Zeta Psi, and was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1856. He studied theology in the A. R. Presby- 
terian Seminary at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
from 1856-58, and in the latter year was ordained 
into the ministry of the Presbyterian Church. He 
has been pastor at Brewster, New York, at New 
Rochelle, New York, and for many years at White 
Plains, New York. Failing health induced him to 
retire from the active pastorate in White Plains 
in 1902, and he is now pastor emeritus of that 
church. He is an honorary member of the West- 
chester County Historical Society, and has written 
and published a " History of South East, Putnam 
County," "The Relation of Presbyterianism to the 
Revolutionary Sentiment in the Province of New 
York," "The History of the White Plains Presby- 
terian Church," etc. He received the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from New York University in 
1890. He was married on October 17, i860, 
to Elizabeth Kane, daughter of Matthew Kane, 
of New York, who died in 1898, and in 1901 he 
was married to Sarah E. Denton, of Brewster, New 
York. His present address is Brewster, New York. 



SMITH, Daniael Winans, 1839- 

Class of 1856 Med. 
Born at Union, N. J., 1839; studied in private schools 
and academies; graduated M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1856; in practice in Newark, 
N. J., since 1856. 

DANIAEL WINANS SMITH, M.D., one of the 
veteran physicians of Newark, New Jersey, 
is a son of Daniael R. and Susan D. (Scudder) 
Smith, both natives of New Jersey. His paternal 
great-grandfather was a Captain on Washington's 
staff in the Revolution, and his maternal great- 
grandfather was a Colonel in the same service. 
He was born at Union, in Union County, New 
Jersey, on January 15, 1839, and received his 
academic education at private boarding schools and 
seminaries. In 1853 he entered the New York 
University Medical College, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1856. He 
had already studied under Dr. Jobs and Dr. Whit- 
tingham, at Springfield, New Jersey. Immediately 
upon graduation he established himself in practice 
at No. 201 Walnut Street, Newark, New Jersey, 
and has ever since remained there in the enjoyment 
of a highly successful practice. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association, the New Jersey 




DANIAEL W. SMITH 



State Medical Association, and the Essex County 
Medical Society. In politics he is a Jeffersonian 
Democrat. 



VAN BRUNT, Charles H., 1835- 

Class of 1856 Arts. 
Born at Fort Hamilton, N. Y., 1835 ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1856; admitted to Bar, 1858; 
practiced law; Judge of Court of Common Pleas, New 
York, 1869-83; Justice of Supreme Court, N. Y., since 
1883; Presiding Justice, Appellate Division, since 1895; 
member of University Council, 1882-gi ; LL.D., New 
York University, 1887. 

CHARLES H. VAN BRUNT, LL.D., one of 
the most eminent jurists of New York, was 
born at Fort Hamilton, now a part of the City 
of New York, on December 26, 1835, ^^^ ^o" of 
Albert N. Van Brunt. He entered New York Uni- 
versity and was graduated with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts in 1856. Afterward he studied law, 
was admitted to the Bar in 1858, and for some 
years practiced his profession with much success. 
His ample learning and judicial qualities of mind 
marked him for the Bench, and in 1869 he took 
his place as a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas 
for the City and County of New York. Thus he 
served until 1883, when he was elected to the 
Supreme Court, in which he has served ever since, 



54 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



having been re-elected in 1897. He was appointed 
Presiding Justice of tlie General Term of tlie Su- 
preme Court, First Department, in 1886, and con- 
tinued as such until the reorganization of the court 
in 1895, when he was appointed Presiding Justice 
of the Appellate Division, which office he has ever 
since held. In 1887 he received the degree of 
Doctor of Laws from New York University. He 
was married in June, 1875, to Jennie E. Bull, 
of Rochester, New York. His address is No. 10 
East Forty-sixth Street, New York. From 1882 
to 1 89 1 Justice Van Brunt was a member of the 
Council of New York University. 



FARRINGTON, Joseph Oakley, 1829- 

Class of 1857 Med. 
Born in New York, 1829; studied in public and high 
schools; graduated M.D., New York University Med- 
ical College, 1857 ; served in Hospital of St. Vincent 
and St. Paul; President of Harlem Medical Associa- 
tion, 1872; in practice in New York since 1858. 

JOSEPH OAKLEY FARRINGTON, M.D., is a 
son of John G. and Louisa (Brady) Farring- 
ton, and was born in New York City on December 
23, 1829. His father was the son of Thomas Far- 
rington and Frances (Guion) Farrington, of East 
Chester, New York, and his mother was the daugh- 
ter of William Brady and Mary (Vermilyea) Brady, 
of New York. He was educated in the public 
schools of the city until he was fourteen years of 
age. Then he entered a high school, and was grad- 
uated from it at the age of eighteen. Later he 
decided to enter the medical profession, and ac- 
cordingly became a student in the Medical College 
of the University of the City of New York, as New 
York University was in those days named. This 
was in the spring of 1853, and he remained in the 
institution until 1857, a period of four years, thus 
securing an especially thorough training, since the 
usual course at that time was only two years in 
length. He was graduated with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine on March 4, 1857. He had a year 
and a half of hospital practice under Dr. Thomas C. 
Finnell, in the Hospital of St. Vincent and St. Paul, 
in New York, and then, in 1858, began the medical 
practice in which he has ever since been steadily 
engaged. Dr. Farrington was chosen President of 
the Harlem Medical Association in 1872. He is 
also a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, the New York State Medical Association, the 
Medical Association of the Greater City of New 



York, the New York County Medical Society, the 
Academy of Medicine, the Society of Medical Juris- 
prudence, the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, 
the Masonic Order, the Knights Templars, and the 
Harlem Republican Club. He was married on 
April 23, 1867, to Henrietta Barry, who has borne 
him four children: John B., Nettie (deceased). 




J. O. FARRINGTON 

Kittie L. and Mildred B. Farrington. He is at 
present, and always has been, a resident of New 
York City. 



GILLETTE, James J., 1838-1880. 

Class of 1857 Sci. 
Born in Philadelphia, 1838; Union College, 1853-57; 
graduated B.S., New York University, 1857; A.M., 
Union, 1869; Civil Engineer, 1857-61 ; in army, 1861-69 ; 
lawyer, surrogate, judge, etc., 1869-80; died, 1880. 

JAMES J. GILLETTE, B.S., A.M., was a son 
of the Rev. Abram D. and Hannah (Jenkins) 
Gillette, and was born in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, on July 26, 1838. Most of his collegiate 
hfe was spent at Union College, from 1853 to 
1857, but in the latter year he entered New York 
University and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. In 1869 Union College gave 
him the degree of Master of Arts. Until 1861 he 
was a Civil Engineer. Then he entered the army 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



55 



for the Civil War, as a Private in the Seventy-first 
New York Volunteers. For five months he was a 
prisoner in Libby Prison. After his liberation he 
was, in 1862, a Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 
Third Maryland Volunteers, and Commissary of 
Subsistence with the rank of Captain. In 1865 
he was promoted to the rank of Major, and to that 
of Lieutenant-Colonel by brevet in 1866. He was 
commissioned a Captain in the regular army in 
1867, and Major by brevet for gallant conduct 
at Chancellorsville, in 1868. After the war he 
practiced law, and was Surrogate and Judge of the 
Chancery Court, United States Supervisor of Elec- 
tions, and United States Commissioner, in Alabama. 
He died in New York City on November 25, 1880. 



HUTTON, Mancius Holmes, 1837- 

Class of 1857 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1837; studied in private schools; 
graduated A.B., New York University, 1857 ; Union 
Theological Seminary, 1857-59 ; New Brunswick Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1859-60; post-graduate at Union, 
i86o-5i ; minister of Reformed Dutch Church since 
1864; writer; D.D., Rutgers, 1879. 

MANCIUS HOLMES HUTTON, D.D., a 
distinguished clergyman of the Reformed 
Dutch Church, was born in New York City, on 
October 13, 1837, the son of the Rev. Dr. Mancius 
S. Hutton and Gertrude (Holmes) Hutton. After 
a careful preparation at private schools he entered 
New York University, and had a brilliant career 
as a student. He was a meinber of Psi Upsilon 
and Phi Beta Kappa, President of his class. Editor, 
Censor and Vice-President of Eucleian, winner of 
the Latin Prize and of the Webster Prize for oratory, 
and Latin Salutatorian at Commencement. He 
was graduated in 1857 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts and thereafter spent some years in theo- 
logical studies; at Union Seminary in 1857-59, 
at New Brunswick in 1859-60, and again at Union 
for a post-graduate course in 1860-61. He was 
ordamed a minister of the Reformed Dutch Church 
and was a pastor at Mount Vernon, New York, in 
1864-79, ^ncl since 1879 has been a pastor at 
New Brunswick, New Jersey. He was President 
of the General Synod of the Reformed Dutch 
Church in 1888-89, ^ind has been President of the 
Middlesex County, New Jersey, Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Children since 1887, Chaplain 
of the New York State Society of the Cincinnati 
since r88o, Chaplain-General of the General So- 



ciety of the Cincinnati since 1897, and President 
of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed 
Dutch Church since 1896. He has also been 
President of the Arabian Mission of his denomina- 
tion since 1894, and is a Superintendent of the 
Theological Seminary at New Brunswick. He is 
a member of the New Brunswick Greek Club, of 
the New Brunswick Historical Club, and of the 
New Jersey Microscopical Society. He is also 
Recording Secretary of the Western Section of 
the Alliance of Churches holding the Reformed 
Doctrine and the Presbyterian Policy. Dr. Hutton 
has written many articles for " The Christian In- 
telligencer," "The Presbyterian," "The Treasury," 
"The Reformed Review," and other periodicals. 
He was married on October 8, 1879, to Mary 
Eleanor Clark, daughter of John Woodruff Clark. 
His home is at No. 26 Union Street, New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey. 



MAXWELL, John Allen, 1833-1890. 

Class of 1857 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1833 ; Union College, 1853-54 ; 
graduated A.B., New York University, 1857; Union 
Theological Seminary, 1857-60; minister of Presby- 
terian Church, 1860-90; editor and author; D.D., La- 
fayette, 1884; died, 1890. 

JOHN ALLEN MAXWELL, D.D., was a son 
of John Allen Maxwell and Ann May (Alston) 
Maxwell, and was born in New York City on 
December 29, 1833. He was a student at Union 
College in 1 85 3-54 and at New York University 
in 1854-57, and was a member of Psi Upsilon. 
He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from New York University in 1857, and spent 
the next three years at Union Theological Seminary. 
In i860 he was ordained a minister of the Presby- 
terian Church, and devoted the remainder of his 
life chiefly to that service. He was a pastor at 
South Orange, New Jersey, in 1860-71 ; at Hazle- 
ton, Pennsylvania, in 1871-74; at Bridgeton, New 
Jersey, in 1874-81 ; at Titusville, Pennsylvania, 
in 1881-87 ; ^nd at Danbury, Connecticut, in 
1887-90. He was also engaged in editorial work 
at Bridgeton, New Jersey, in 1876-77, and was the 
author of various publications. He was a member of 
the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions, and in 1884 received the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity from Lafayette College. He was twice 
married, in 1854 to Euphemia Kelley and in 1871 
to Rena L. Brown. He had four children : Robert 



56 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Allen, Irving, Grace, and Mabel Maxwell. Dr. 
Maxwell died at Danbury, Connecticut, on Novem- 
ber 27, 1890. 

NEFF, John, 1832- 

Class of 1857 Med. 
Born at Frostburg, Md., 1832; graduated A.B., Al- 
leghany College, 1855, and A.M., 1857; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1857; in hos- 
pital practice 1858-59 ; in private practice since i860. 

JOHN NEFF, A.M., M.D., son of John and 
Harriet (Hoffman) Neff, of German ancestry, 
was born at Frostburg, Maryland, on February 11, 
1832. His early education was acquired in the 
local schools and academy, whence he proceeded 
in 1 85 1 to Alleghany College, at Meadville, Penn- 
sylvania. There he pursued the classical course 
and was graduated in 1855 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Two years later the same college 
gave him the Master's degree in Arts. Upon 
graduation from Alleghany College he entered the 
Medical College of New York University, and was 
graduated from it with the Doctor's degree in 1857. 
In 1858-59 he performed a year's service in the 
public hospitals of New York City, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. W. W. Sanger, and then, in June, i860, 
established himself for private practice in Baltimore, 
Maryland, where he has ever since lived and worked 
at his profession. Dr. Neff has been a Republican 
ever since the foundation of that party, but has 
never sought political preferment. He was Acting 
Assistant Surgeon, United States Army, in the 
Camden Street General Hospital, Baltimore, in 
1861-63, and in the Jarvis United States Army 
General Hospital in the same city in 1863-65. 
For forty years he has been a member of the 
Baltimore Medical Association and of the Maryland 
Medico-Chirurgical Society, and for thirty-five years 
of the American Medical Association. He has been 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 
early manhood, and held the office of steward for 
thirty-five years. Dr. Neff was married on Decem- 
ber 20, i860, to Abby H. Brownson, of Huntington, 
Connecticut, and has had two children : Lillian, who 
died in infancy, and Ernest Brownson, who died 
at the age of twenty years. His address is No. 701 
North CarroUton Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland. 



New York University, 1858; engaged in mercantile 
pursuits in New York since 1861. 

JOSEPH LEGGETT FRAME, is a native of 
New York City, where he was born on No- 
vember 27, 1840, and where practically all of his 
life has been spent. His father, Joseph L. Frame, 
Sr., was the son of Jesse and Mary (Leggett) 
Frame, of Little Neck, Long Island. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Joanna Heard, was the 
daughter of James and Maria (Sickles) Heard, of 
New York City, James Heard having been a native 
of Devonshire, England, and Maria Sickles a de- 




FRAME, Joseph Leggett, 1840- 

Class of 1858 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1840; studied in New York Uni- 
versity Grammar School ; graduated B.S. and C.E., 



JOS. L. FRAME 

scendant of early Dutch settlers of New York. The 
subject of this sketch was educated at the New York 
University Grammar School, and in New York Uni- 
versity, from which latter he was graduated in the 
Class of 1858 as a Bachelor of Science and Civil 
Engineer. Instead of adopting a professional career, 
however, Mr. Frame turned his attention to mercan- 
tile pursuits, and in 1861 became an importer of 
linens, in New York, in which business he is still 
prosperously engaged. He has devoted a great 
deal of his leisure time to music, and is considered 
among the best amateur flutists of New York. He 
was married in February, 1890, to Eleanor E. Pen- 
fold, of London, England, and lives in New York 
City. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



S7 



GRAY, George Zabriskie, 1838-1889. 

Class of 1858 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1838; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1858, A.M., 1861, and D.D., 1876; 
Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Va., 1858-61 ; Phil- 
adelphia Divinity School, 1861-62 ; clergyman of Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, 1862-76 ; Dean and Professor, 
Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Mass., 
1876-89; author; died, i88g. 

GEORGE ZABRISKIE GRAY, A.M., D.D., 
a distinguished preacher and teacher of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, was born in New 
York City on July 14, 1838, the son of John A. C. 
and Susan Maria (Zabriskie) Gray. He entered 
New York University in 1854, was a member of 
Psi Upsilon and a Commencement orator, and was 
graduated with tiie degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1858, being made a Master of Arts in 1861. He 
studied theology at the Seminary at Alexandria, 
Virginia, in 1858-61, and at the Philadelphia 
Divinity School in 1861-62, and was ordained into 
the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
He was rector at Vernon, New York, in 1862-63, 
at Kinderhook, New York, in 1863-65, and at 
Bergen Point, New Jersey, in 1865-76. From 
1876 to the end of his life he was Dean and Pro- 
fessor of Systematic Divinity of the Protestant 
Episcopal Theological School at Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts. He was a member of various learned 
societies, and was the author of several books and 
numerous magazine articles. He was married in 
1862 to Kate Forrest, and had three children : Sarah 
Forrest, George Zabriskie, and Arthur Romeyn Gray. 
He died at Sharon Springs, New York, on August 4, 
1889. His two brothers, Albert Z. and John C, 
were graduated from New York University in 1S60 
and 1865. Two of his uncles and four of his 
cousins, of the Zabriskie family, are also enrolled 
among the alumni of the University. 



TINSLEY, Alexander, 1832- 

Class of 1858 Med. 
Born in Virginia, 1832; graduated Ph.D., William 
and Mary College, 1852 ; studied at Medical College 
of Virginia and University of Virginia ; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1858; 
in hospital practice, 1858-59; surgeon in Confederate 
Army during Civil War ; Coroner of Baltimore, 1880-84 ; 
in practice at Baltimore. 

ALEXANDER TINSLEY, M.D., who was born 
in York County, Virginia, on November 22, 
1832, is a son of Thomas Garland Tinsley and 
Harriet Washington (Bryan) Tinsley, his father 



having been descended from Thomas Tinsley, who 
came from Yorkshire, England, to Virginia, about 
1650, and settled on a plantation in Hanover County 
about ten miles from Richmond. That plantation 
was a grant from the Crown, and it has ever since 
been in the possession of the Tinsley family, as it 
is to-day, having been handed down through nine 
generations. Dr. Tinsley received his preparatory 
education at the Washington Henry Academy in 
Hanover County, Virginia, in 1842-46, and at the 
Pike Powers School, Staunton, Virginia, 1847-48. 
Next he entered the College of William and Mary, 




A. TINSLEY 

and was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1852. He studied medicine in the 
Medical College of Virginia at Richmond, and in 
the University of Virginia, and finally in the Medical 
College of New York University, from which last 
he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1858. He was a Resident Surgeon in 
the Brooklyn, New York, City Hospital in 1858-59, 
and for a time in the latter year Acting Assistant 
Surgeon to the United States Coast Survey. At 
the outbreak of the Civil War Dr. Tinsley joined 
himself to the fortunes of his native State. He was 
the first medical officer at Yorktown, Virginia, in 
charge of the Virginia troops, and was afterwards 
placed in charge of the hospitals of Confederate 



5« 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Soldiers. He was the first surgeon of the Confed- 
erate Army. He served in that capacity through- 
out the war, and was surgeon in charge of the 
Union prison hospitals at Richmond at the time 
of the capture of that city and for six weeks after 
by special request of the United States military 
authorities. Since the war Dr. Tinsley has been 
engaged in the practice of his profession in the 
City of Baltimore, Maryland. He was Coroner of 
Baltimore in 1880-84, and is a member of the 
Chirurgical Society of Maryland. In politics he 
is a Democrat. He was married on January 22, 
1863, to Mary Dare Parran, who has borne him 
five children : Alexander Lee, Richard P., Laura P., 
Hallie G., and Rosa D. Tinsley. His address is 
No. 2102 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 



BILL, Curtis Harvey, 1835- 

Classo{i859 Med. 
Born at Albany, Vt., 1835 ; studied in public schools, 
Barre Academy, in a doctor's office, at Dartmouth 
College, at University of Vermont, and in New York 
University; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1859; U. S. Army Surgeon through- 
out Civil War; in practice in Tennessee, 1865-71, and 
in Bridgeport, Conn., since 1871 ; in hospital service ; 
writer on medical topics. 

CURTIS HARVEY BILL, M.D., comes of a 
long line of English and American ancestors, 
nearly every generation of whom for centuries has 
furnished at least one member of the medical pro- 
fession. He is directly descended from Thomas 
Bill, M.D., who was born in Bedfordshire, England, 
about 1490, and was one of the physicians of King 
Henry VIII. and his children Edward VI. and 
Ehzabeth. The family was planted in America 
seven generations ago by John and Dorothy Bill, 
from whom the line of descent runs through Philip 
and Hannah Bill, John and Mercy (Fowler) Bill, 
Benejah and Mary Bill, Eliphalet and Dorothy 
(Marsh) Bill, and Dr. Dyer and Ruth (Coburn) 
Bill, parents of the present subject. Dorothy 
(Marsh) Bill was sixth in descent from John Mason, 
the conqueror of the Pequots. Dr. Dyer Bill was 
prominent as a physician and also as a politician 
and member of the Vermont Legislature. Curtis 
Harvey Bill was born at Albany, Vermont, on July 
2, 1835, and studied in public schools and Barre 
Academy. His professional studies were pursued 
under Dr. Charles B. Chandler at Montpelier, Ver- 
mont, at Dartmouth College, at the University of 
Vermont, and at New York University. From the 



Medical College of the last named he was graduated 
in 1859 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, 
and at once began practice at Clarksville, Tennessee. 
In May, 1861, a surgeon's commission in the Con- 
federate Army was offered to him. He declined it, 
being a Unionist, and was in consequence driven 
from the state by a Vigilance Committee within 
twenty-four hours. Thereupon he reported to Gen- 
eral Sherman and on October i, 1861, was appointed 
Acting Assistant Surgeon in the United States Army. 
He served with the Fifteenth United States Infantry, 
Army of the Ohio, until September, 1862, then with 




CURTIS H. BILL 

the Army of the Cumberland. He was in the 
Battle of Shiloh, at the Siege of Corinth, in the 
Perryville campaign, at Dog Walk, at the relief 
of Nashville, in the Murfreesboro campaign, at 
Stone River, and at Stewart's Creek. He was 
especially commended for gallant service on the 
battlefield, and remained in the service until August 
14, 1865, when, with the full rank of Surgeon, he 
was honorably mustered out. For five years he re- 
mained in Fayetteville, Tennessee, practicing med- 
icine and conducting a cotton plantation. Then, 
in the fall of 1871, he removed to Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, where he has ever since remained 
and where he has attained distinction in his pro- 
fession. He is a member of the American Medical 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



59 



Association, of the Connecticut State Medical Asso- 
ciation, of the County Medical Association, of which 
he was President in i88o-8i,and of the Bridgeport 
Medical Association, of which he was President in 
1879. He has been connected with the Bridgeport 
Hospital since its organization in 1884, and has 
been official examiner for various life insurance 
companies. He is the author of numerous pub- 
lished papers, including monographs on "Treat- 
ment of Hospital Gangrene with Bromine," and 
" Exsection of Joints." He has been a Republican 
since the foundation of that party, and is a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Brooklawn 
Country Club, the Contemporary Club, the Scientific 
Society, and the American Art Society. He was 
married on September 20, 1865, to Mary J. Worces- 
ter, a niece of Dr. Joseph E. Worcester, author of 
" Worcester's Dictionary " and a descendant of 
Captain Noah Worcester who fought at Bunker Hill. 
Dr. and Mrs. Bill have three children living : Mary 
E., Philip W., and Harold C. Bill. 



DRAYTON, Henry Sinclair, 1839- 

Class of 1859 Arts. 
Born in Jersey City, N. J., 1S39; studied in local 
schools; graduated A.B., New York University, 1859; 
LL.B., New York University Law Department, 1861 ; 
A.M., New York University, 1563; in business and 
legal practice, 1861-66 ; in literary and scientific pursuits 
1866-73; graduated M.D., New York Eclectic Medical 
College, 1877; M.D., New York Medical Society, 1889; 
lecturer, author, and member of various learned so- 
cieties. 

HENRY SINCLAIR DRAYTON, M.D., whose 
versatile career has siiccessfully embraced 
business enterprise, legal practice, editorial work, 
literary authorship, medical practice and instruction, 
lecturing, and scientific research, comes of English 
ancestry. His father, William R. Drayton, was of 
English birth, while his mother, whose maiden name 
was Mary Miranda Shipman, belonged to an old 
New England family, which, with its numerous con- 
nections, was well known in colonial and revolu- 
tionary times. The old family homestead was near 
Morristown, New Jersey, where ancestral and martial 
mementoes were familiar to the eyes of the subject 
of this sketch throughout his boyhood. Dr. Dray- 
ton was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on Septem- 
ber 16, 1839, and received his early education 
chiefly in the local schools, his college preparatory 
course being pursued in the Jersey City Lyceum, an 
excellent institution of those days. At the age of 



fifteen he was fitted for college and was matriculated 
in the School of Arts and Science of the University 
of the City of New York, as New York University 
was then known. His student career was highly 
creditable to him, and his abilities were recognized 
in his election as Class Secretary and his appoint- 
ment as a Commencement orator. He was a mem- 
ber of the Delta Phi Fraternity, and was also elected 
to the honorary fraternity of Phi Beta Kappa. After 
his graduation in 1859 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts he turned his attention to the study of law, 
at the same time having business relations. He was 







HENRY S. DRAYTON 

graduated from the Law Department of the Univer- 
sity in 1 86 1 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
and thereafter until 1866 was engaged in business 
and legal practice. In the latter year he began to 
give his attention to literary work and editorship, 
and also to physiological and medical studies. 
Meantime he received the degree of Master of Arts 
from his Alma Mater in 1863. About 1873 he 
began the systematic study of medicine, and was 
graduated from the Eclectic Medical College of New 
York in 1877, with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. The same degree was again conferred in 1889 
by the New York County Medical Society. The 
activities of Dr. Drayton's busy life include, in addi- 
tion to those already mentioned, much research in 



6o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



anthropology and physio-psychology, lecturing on 
the Physiology of the Nervous System before the 
American Phrenological Institute ; giving service as 
a Visiting Physician in the Bellevue Hospital clinics ; 
lecturing in the free lecture course of the New York 
public schools ; and the authorship of many papers, 
articles and books upon scientific subjects. His 
bibliography includes the following books : " Brain 
and Mind," 1878, 2nd edition, 1888; "Light in 
Dark Places," 1S79; "The Indications of Charac- 
ter in Head and Face as Accepted by Science," 
1881,2nd edition, 1883; "Nervousness: Its Na- 
ture, Causes," etc., 1887; "Masterpieces of Eng- 
lish Poetry, with notes," 1889 ; " Human Magnetism : 
Its Nature, Physiology and Psychology," 1891 ; 
"Vacation Time: How to Spend it," 1892; "In 
Oudemon," 1901 ; " Notes of Travel in the East," 
1902. His published essays include : "The Physical 
Factors of Character," 1887; "The Servant Ques- 
tion," 1888; "Conscientiousness," 1888; "Com- 
plete Man," 1S89; "Self Study and Mental 
Improvement," 1890. Many of his lectures and 
papers on similar topics have also been published. 
Dr. Drayton was one of the original members of the 
New York Press Club. He is also a member of 
the New York Society of Phi Beta Kappa ; of the 
New York County Medical Society ; of the New 
York State Medical Society ; and of the American 
Medical Association ; and a Fellow of the New 
York Academy of Anthropology ; and Honorary 
Fellow of the Society of Science and Letters of 
London, etc. In politics he has always been an 
independent, taking a deep interest in municipal, 
state and national affairs, but never holding or seek- 
ing official place. He was married to Almira E. 
Guernsey on September 21, 1864, and has two 
children : Mrs. Grace D. Smith and Albert I. 
Drayton. 



FRANCIS, Valentine Mott, 1834- 

Class of 1839 Med. 
Born in New York City, 1834; studied in private 
schools and under tutors; teacher, traveller, farmer, 
author, etc.; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1859 ; practiced medicine ; U. S. Army 
Surgeon; in real estate business since 1873. 

VALENTINE MOTT FRANCIS, M.D., is a 
son of John Wakefield Francis, A.M., M.D., 
LL.D., and Maria Eliza (Cutler) Francis. His 
father, a native of New York City, was a son of 
Melchior and Susannah (Somers) Francis, the 
former a native of Nuremberg, Bavaria, who spent 



most of his life in America and was a merchant, 
philanthropist and fine musician, and the latter a 
native of Philadelphia, of Swiss extraction, being 
descended from the Yackley family of Berne. Dr. 
F'rancis's maternal grandparents were Benjamin 
Clark Cutler, of English descent, born in Boston, 
and High Sheriff of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, 
and Sarah (Mitchell) Cutler, daughter of Esther 
Marion, a sister of the famous Revolutionary Gen- 
eral, Francis Marion. He was born in the City 
of New York, on April 25, 1834, and received 
his education in private schools at Flushing, New 




V. MOTT FRANCIS 

York, now a part of New York City, at Nyack, 
New York, Newport, Rhode Island, New York 
City, Savannah, Georgia, and under tutors. He 
became for some time a teacher of calisthenics 
and gymnastics, and then set out upon extended 
travels. In this country he went from Maine to 
Florida, and through Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. 
Thence he went abroad, through Canada, Nova 
Scotia, Ireland, England, Wales, Scotland, Holland, 
Belgium, Germany, France and Italy. He visited 
Mexico, crossed the Nicaragua Isthmus in 1850, 
and the Panama Isthmus twice, went around Cape 
Horn and three hundred and sixty-four miles 
south of it, and was one hundred and sixty-nine 
days without seeing land. Although a passenger 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



6i 



he accepted the position of Quartermaster during 
the voyage. After crossing the Nicaragua route he 
took passage on the merchant brig " Metamora," 
and when the second officer was taken ill the Doctor 
was appointed in his place and served in that 
capacity until the vessel cast anchor in Charlestown 
Harbor. He then settled for a time in California. 
He was chief clerk of an express company at Sacra- 
mento, California, in 1850, and as there was no 
city delivery at that time was virtually Acting Post- 
master of the place. Ill health brought him back 
to the east, and in the winter of 1851-52 he was 
engaged in farming at East Greenwich, Rhode 
Island, and for a short time taught in the town 
school. In 1852 he went to Providence, Rhode 
Island, and pursued classical studies. He next 
became a wholesale drygoods merchant in New 
York. A little later he entered the Medical Col- 
lege of New York University, and was graduated in 
1859 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He 
at once entered upon the practice of his profession, 
in New York, and continued therein until 1862, 
when he removed to Newport, Rhode Island. 
There he continued in medical practice for a 
number of years. Since 1873 ^^ '^^s been engaged 
in the real estate business at Newport. While in 
California, in 1850, he enhsted in the United States 
Army, under Captain Magruder, who afterward was 
a General of the Confederate Army. He was honor- 
ably discharged from the service on account of ill 
health, but re-entered it for a time in 1862, when, 
on a business visit to California, he was appointed 
Acting Assistant Surgeon of the army by Surgeon 
Shorb, U. S. A., and served for a short time in that 
capacity. He has travelled over most of Northern 
California, dug and washed for gold in the mountains 
near Columbia, and has been in Nevada and in 
the Bonanza mines, and in the New Almaden quick- 
silver mines. He also drilled recruits for the war 
at Newport. He has revisited Europe twice, and 
in 1869-70 was engaged in correspondence for a 
newspaper. He published in 1862 a book on 
" Hospital Hygiene," the first exclusively on that 
subject in the United States, and in 1863 he pub- 
lished a poem, "The Fight for the Union." He 
has also contributed hymns, short articles and obit- 
uaries to a number of papers. In politics Dr. 
Francis was first a Whig, then a member of the 
" American " party, and finally a Republican. He 
has for many years been identified with the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church, as communicant, vestryman, 
and delegate to Convocation and the Rhode Island 



Episcopal Convention. He has been President 
of the Newport Medical Society, and is President of 
the Newport Historical Society, Vice-President of 
the Rhode Island Genealogical Society, a life mem- 
ber of the New York Historical Society, and a 
member of the Order of Odd Fellows and other 
organizations. In the Order of Odd Fellows he 
has been Warden, Vice Grand, Noble Grand, Past 
Grand of the Subordinate Lodge, and Senior Warden, 
High Priest, Chief Patriarch of Aquidneck Encamp- 
ment No. 5, Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
No. I, and a District Deputy Grand Patriarch of 
Rhode Island. He was the first candidate initiated 
in Excelsior Lodge No. 49, on June 30, 1891. In 
1862 he was a member of the New York Sanitary 
Commission. Dr. Francis was married on April 16, 
1857, to Sarah Faulkner Carville, of New York, 
who bore him two sons who died in infancy. She 
herself died on May 27, 1861. He was again 
married, on February 7, 1865, to Anna M. de La 
Roche, of Philadelphia, who bore him three sons, of 
whom the first and second died in infancy. The 
third, Claude, is now living, and is a well known 
writer, and has just finished an elaborate " History 
of London " in two volumes for Coates & Company, 
of Philadelphia. Dr. Francis's home is No. 82 
Rhode Island Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island. He 
was present on July 4, 1895, at the meeting held 
in the Senate Chamber of the Rhode Island State 
House in Newport, called to found the Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution in Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantation, and was elected Acting 
President. He served in that capacity for over 
a year, when he resigned, not having at the time 
leisure to attend to the office. The Doctor corre- 
sponded with the officials of the General Society 
of Colonial Wars in 1896, regarding the founding 
of a society in Rhode Island. He obtained seven 
candidates, and on July 5, 1897, a meeting was 
held in the Senate Chamber of the Rhode Island 
State House, Newport, and a Provisional Secretary 
elected. On August 12th, the Society of Colonial 
Wars in the State of Rhode Island and Providence 
was founded and Dr. Francis, its founder, was 
elected Governor. On December 30, 1897, the 
General Society met in Boston, granted the Rhode 
Island Society a charter, and Dr. Francis was for- 
mally elected Governor, in which capacity he served 
for two years. In 1899 he was elected Surgeon- 
General of the General Society, which position he still 
holds. Dr. Francis has also been a publisher. He 
has published the second volume of a large quarto of 



62 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



some four hundred and fifty pages of the " Annals 
of Trinity Church," with illustrations and portraits 
of several of its rectors. He is now collecting facts 
for a third volume, the two first having sold out, and 
he is also preparing material for the publication of 
his father's biography. In November, 1902, he was 
elected a member of the Republican City Conven- 
tion, a member of the Nominating Committee for 
legislative nominations, and a delegate to the Rhode 
Island State Republican Convention. He was 
nominated by his party third Representative to the 
Legislature, and lost his election by only eighty-six 
votes, owing to a local ward trouble of disgruntled 
Republicans. Dr. Francis's brother, John Ward 
Francis, was a graduate of Columbia College. He 
died on January 20, 1855, withui six weeks of gradu- 
ation from the University Medical College, from 
typhus fever taken through attendance on the 
poor. His younger brother. Dr. Samuel Ward 
Francis, was graduated from Columbia College, and 
from the University Medical College in March, 
i860. He practiced in New York for several years 
and for many years in Newport, Rhode Island. 
He was a musician, and an author. He wrote 
two novels : " Inside Out, a Curious Book by a 
Singular Man," and also " Life and Death." He 
was an original inventor of the typewriter, and was 
Vice-President of the Newport Medical Society and 
a member of the New York Academy of Medicine 
and the British Victoria Institute. He died on 
March 25, 1886. Dr. Francis has a diploma from 
New York University, under date of June, 1859, as 
a practical and analytical chemist, a diploma for one 
year's attendance in the wards at Bellevue Hospital, 
a diploma for extra clinical attendance in the Uni- 
versity Medical College, and a diploma from the 
school of Drs. William Rice Donagee and Theodore 
Gaillard Thomas for students of the University Med- 
ical College. In September, 1902, he was elected 
an honorary member of the Rhode Island Medical 
Society. 



ISAACS, Myer Samuel, 1841- 

Class of 1859 Arts, 1862 Law. 
Born in New York, 1841 ; studied at Forrest's Collegi- 
ate School, New York ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1859 ; LL.B., New York University Law 
School, 1862; admitted to New York Bar, 1862; Judge 
of Marine Court, 1880; leader in political reform and 
educational and philanthropic work ; President of Baron 
de Hirsch Fund ; Lecturer in New York University Law 
School ; received degrees of A.M. and LL.M. from New 



York University ; author of various pamphlets ; in prac- 
tice in New York since 1862. 

MYER SAMUEL ISAACS, A.M., LL.M., 
jurist and philanthropist, is of Dutch 
ancestry on the paternal side, his grandfather hav- 
ing been born at Leeuwarden, on the Zuyder Zee. 
His father was the Rev. Samuel Myer Isaacs, a 
prominent theologian of the Jewish faith. On the 
side of his mother, whose maiden name was Jane 
Symmonds, he is of English extraction. He was 
born in the City of New York on May 8, 1841, was 
educated in it, and has been identified with it dur- 
ing his whole career, though his beneficent activi- 
ties have by no means been confined within its 
limits. His early education was received at For- 
rest's — afterward Forrest & Quackenbos's — Colle- 
giate School, then existing at Fourteenth Street and 
Sixth Avenue, New York, and there he was prepared 
for a career of exceptional brilliancy at the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York, as New York Univer- 
sity was then styled. He was matriculated in the 
University in 1856, took all the prizes of the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years, and was graduated as the 
Valedictorian of his class in 1859, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. The University has since con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts in 
recognition of his scholarly attainments. From the 
School of Arts of the University he passed to the 
Law School, and was graduated from it in 1862, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, which the 
University has since raised to Master of Laws. 
Upon the twenty-first anniversary of his birthday, 
May 8, 1862, he was admitted to the Bar of the State 
of New York, at which he has ever since — save 
while he was on the Bench — practiced with distinc- 
tion. He began his practice in the office of J. H. 
& S. Riker, at No. 150 Nassau Street, whence he re- 
moved to No. 78 Nassau Street, where he was asso- 
ciated with Adolph L. Sanger, in the firm of Isaacs 
& Sanger, and later with his brother, Isaac S. Isaacs, 
when the firm name was changed to M. S. & I. S. 
Isaacs and so continues. Julien M. Isaacs became 
associated with the firm in 1902. Mr. Isaacs's spe- 
cialty in legal practice is the line of real estate, wills 
and trusts, and in that he has won an enviable degree 
of success and has long ranked as one of the fore- 
most authorities. In politics Mr. Isaacs is a Repub- 
lican, though he has been much identified with 
non-partisan work for municipal reform. He has 
held no public office, however, save that of Judge of 
the Marine Court of New York City, to which he 
was appointed by Governor Cornell in 1880. He 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



63 



was nominated by the Republicans and Citizens 
Union, in 1895, for a place on the Bench of the 
Supreme Court, and although he was not elected he 
ran several thousand votes ahead of the rest of the 
ticket. He served on the Citizens' Committee in 
r884, and has at various other times been actively 
interested in movements for political reform. Mr. 
Isaacs has devoted a considerable part of his busy 
life to educational and philanthropic work. For a 
number of years he was one of the most highly 
esteemed lecturers before the New York University 
Law School on " Examination of Titles to Real 





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MYER S. ISAACS 

Estate " and other topics. He was President of the 
Board of Delegates of American Israelites and in 
1 88 1 he was elected to the Central Committee of 
the Alliance Israelite Universelie. He was in 1865 
one of the founders of the Hebrew Free School As- 
sociation, and was its President in 1881-92. He 
was one of the organizers in 1873 of the United 
Hebrew Charities. He was also one of the founders 
of the Montefiore Home, of the Hebrew Technical 
Institute, and of the Purim Association, of which 
latter he was the first President. He called, in 1881, 
a meeting to devise relief for the persecuted Jews of 
Russia, and was one of the committee which estab- 
lished colonies of them in New Jersey, Kansas, Da- 
kota and elsewhere. He was at the head of the 



committee in charge of the Cremieux Memorial, and 
is President of the Baron de Hirsch Fund, founded 
in 1 89 1 and endowed with three million dollars by 
Baron and Baroness de Hirsch. Its activities are 
mainly educational. It maintains a Trade School in 
New York and an Agricultural School at Woodbine, 
New Jersey, and contributes to educational organi- 
zations preparing Russian and Roumanian Jews for 
American life. He was one of the founders, and at 
one time President, of the Educational Alliance. 
He is a member of the American, New York State 
and New York City Bar associations, of the Acad- 
emy of Social and Political Science, of the Civil 
Service Reform Association, and of the Republican, 
City, and Social Reform clubs, of New York. He 
has written and published a number of pamphlets, 
including " The Persecution of the Jews in Rou- 
mania," 1875 ! " '^e Jewish Question in Russia," 
1882; and " American Israelites," 1886. He was 
married on February 10, 1869, to Maria Solomon, 
and has had seven children, of whom one, Grace 
Aguilar, died in 1880 at the age of ten years. Two 
of his sons, Julien Myer and Lewis Montefiore, are 
graduates of New York University, and are members 
of the New York Bar. A third, Stanley Myer, is a 
member of the Columbia University, Class of 1903. 
One daughter, Minnie, is Secretary of the Jewish 
Women's Council and Kindergarten Society ; 
another, Alice, is tutor in Botany in the Normal 
College of New York, and has been President of the 
Barnard Botanical Club ; and the third, Estelle M. 
Isaacs, is a member of the Religious School Com- 
mittee of the Educational Alliance. 



MARSH, Walter Raymond, 1838-1872. 

Class of 1859 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1838; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1859, and A.M., 1865; graduated LL.B., 
Albany Law School, i860; officer in army, 1861-64; in 
law practice, 1864-72; died, 1872. 

WALTER RAYMOND MARSH, A.M., LL.B., 
son of James and Mary (Fardon) Marsh, 
was born in New York City on February 25, 1838, 
and entered New York University in 1855. He 
was a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa, 
and a Commencement orator. In 1859 he was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and 
in 1865 received that of Master of Arts from the 
University. He entered the Albany, New York, 
Law School in 1859 and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in i860. In 1861-64 



64 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



he was a First Lieutenant of tlie Fifteenth Engineer 
Brigade, New York Volunteers. After the war he 
engaged in legal practice until his death, which 
occurred at Cornwall, New York, on June 24, 1872. 
He was married on October 11, 1866, to Mary S. 
Denniston, daughter of Robert Denniston, and had 
two children : Antoinette and Agnes Marsh. 



TALCOTT, Edward N. Kirk, 1840-1901. 

Class of 1859 Arts. 
Born at Cuba, N. Y., 1840; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1859; officer in Civil War, 1861-65; 
Civil Engineer; superintendent of various industrial 
establishments ; Superintendent of Military Academy, 
Morgan Park, 111., 1876-90; in private practice 1890-1901. 

EDWARD N. KIRK TALCOTT, A.B., was 
born at Cuba, New York, on June 10, 1840, 
the son of William Hubbard Talcott and Harriet 
Newell (Williams) Talcott. He was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts from New York 
University in 1859, and afterward studied Civil 
Engineering with his father, who was engaged in 
that profession. He entered the military service 
in 1 86 1 as a member of the New York Seventh 
Regiment, and was a Captain of Engineers on 
active duty at Washington, Baltimore, and in Vir- 
ginia, the Carohnas, Georgia and Florida during the 
Civil War. He was Assistant Superintendent of the 
Thomas Iron Works, in Pennsylvania, in 1865-66, 
and for the ensuing ten years was superintendent of 
other large iron works. From 1876 to 1890 he was 
Superintendent of the Military Academy at Morgan 
Park, Illinois, and from 1890 up to the time of his 
death was in private practice as a Consulting Engi- 
neer. He was a member of the Loyal Legion, and 
the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was 
married in 1867 to Antoinette M. Watkins, of Grass 
Lake, Michigan, and in 1884 to Lillian Baird, of 
Morgan Park, Illinois, and had seven children : 
William Hubbard, Rebecca Williams, Julia, Emily, 
Ralph Emerson, Henry Buxton, and Dorothy Baird 
Talcott. Mr. Talcott died suddenly in Brooklyn, 
New York, on March 2, 1901. 



ABBOTT, Edward, 1841- 

Class of i860 Arts. 
Born at Farmington, Maine, 1841 ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, i860; Andover Theological 
Seminary, 1860-62; Congregational Minister, 1863-78; 
Editor " Congregationalist," 1869-78 ; Editor " Literary 
World," 1878-1888, 1896-1902; ordained into ministry 
of Protestant Episcopal Church, 1879; Rector of St. 



James's Church, Cambridge, Mass., since 1879; de- 
clined Bishopric of Japan, i88g; author; D.D., New 
York University, 1890. 

EDWARD ABBOTT, D.D., a brother of Ben- 
jamin Vaughan Abbott, Austin Abbott, and 
Lyman Abbott, all distinguished alumni of New 
York University, was born at Farmington, Maine, 
on July 15, 1 84 1, the son of Jacob and Harriet 
(Vaughan) Abbott. In New York University he 
well maintained the traditions of his family for 
scholarship, and was class poet, prophet and marshal, 
and a member of Psi Upsilon. He was graduated 
in i860 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
then entered Andover Theological Seminary, where 
he spent two years. In 1863 he was ordained into 
the ministry of the Congregational Church, and was 
in 1863-64 Chaplain of the public institutions of 
Boston. He founded the Pilgrim Congregational 
Church at Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1865, and 
was its pastor until 1869. From 1869 to 1878 he 
was Associate Editor of "The Congregationahst," 
and from 1878 to 1888 he was Editor of "The 
Literary World," a place which he also filled from 
1896 to 1902. In 1879 he was ordained a Deacon, 
and in 1880 a Presbyter, in the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, and since 1879 he has been Rector of St. 
James's Church, Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1889 
the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church elected him Bishop of Japan, but he de- 
clined the office. He was a member of the Cam- 
bridge School Committee in 1869, Chaplain of the 
Massachusetts State Senate in 1872-73, and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Visitors of Wellesley College 
in 1884. He has been Dean of the Eastern Con- 
vocation of Massachusetts since 1889, a member of 
the Missionary Council of the. Protestant Episcopal 
Church since 1886, and a Clerical Deputy or 
Provisional Deputy from Massachusetts to the Epis- 
copal General Convention since 1892. He re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1890 
from New York University. Dr. Abbott has followed 
the bent of his family in authorship. Among his 
published works are " The Baby's Things," a story 
in verse, 187 1; "Conversations of Jesus," 1875; 
"A Paragraph History of the United States," 1875 ; 
" A Paragraph History of the American Revolution," 
1876; "Revolutionary Times," 1876; "The Long 
Look Series" (juvenile), 1877-80; "History of 
Cambridge," 1880; "Memoir of Jacob Abbott," 
1882 ; and " Phillips Brooks," 1900. He has also 
written much for magazines and other periodicals. 
He was married February 16, 1865, to Clara E. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



65 



Davis, and, being left a widower, was again married 
on August 21, 1883, to Mrs. Katharine Kelley 
Dunning. He has three children : Edward Apthorp, 
Madeline Vaughan (Mrs. C. E. Bushnell) and 
Eleanor Hallowell Abbott. His home is at No. 1 1 
Dana Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 



in-Chief of the First Brigade, First Division of the 
Sixth Army Corps, on July 5, 1865. He was mar- 
ried on June 8, 1875, '° Anna Virginia Reed, and 
now lives at No. 3719 Powelton Avenue, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 



FITCH, George D., 1838- 

Class of 1860 Med. 
Born in Warren County, N. J., 1838 ; studied in 
public schools ; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, i860; in practice since i860; served 
in New Jersey Volunteers, U. S. Army, 1865. 

GEORGE D. FITCH, M.D., of Philadelphia, 
son of Dr. James Clark and Sarah (Drake) 
Fitch, was born on April 7, 1838, at Hope, Warren 




GEORGE D. FITCH 

County, New Jersey, and received his early education 
in the public schools. He was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine from the Medical Col- 
lege of New York University in i860, and has since 
that date been successfully engaged in the practice 
of his profession. He was commissioned Assistant 
Surgeon in charge of the Fifteenth Regiment, New 
Jersey Volunteers, United States Army, on March 
14, 1865, Surgeon of the Second Regiment, New 
Jersey Volunteers, on June 21, 1S65, and Surgeon- 

VOL. II. — 5 



GARDINER, Asa Bird, 1839- 

Class of i860 Law. 
Born in New York, 1839 ; educated in public schools ; 
graduated A.B., College of City of New York, 1859; 
graduated LL.B., New York University Law School, 
i860 ; admitted to Bar, i860, and began practice ; in 
active and distinguished service. United States Army, 
1861-88, including Professorship of Law at West Point, 
1874-78, and assistant to Secretary of War, 1887-88 ; 
District Attorney of New York, 1897-1902; author of 
various works, papers and addresses; A.M., College 
of City of New York, 1862, Dartmouth, 1864, Columbia, 
1869; LL.D., New York University, 1875; L.H.D., 
Hobart College, 1896. 

ASA BIRD GARDINER, LL.D., L.H.D., is a 
native of the City of New York, where he 
was born on September 30, 1839. His education 
was begun in the grammar schools of the city and was 
continued through the regular classical course of the 
College of the City of New York, from which he was 
graduated in 1859 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He then entered the Law Department of New 
York University and was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Lavvs in i860. On November 20th 
following he was admitted to the Bar of the Supreme 
Court of the State of New York and at once entered 
upon the practice of his profession. In the follow- 
ing year, on invitation of the faculty, he delivered 
the alumni address at Commencement of the gradu- 
ating Class of 186 1 of the New York University Law 
School. At the outbreak of the Civil War, upon 
the President's first proclamation for volunteers, he 
offered his services and was mustered into the state 
service as First Lieutenant of the Thirty-first Regi- 
ment, New York Volunteer Infantry, on May 21, 
1861, and into the United States' service on May 
27th. He was under fire in the field on July 17, 
1 86 1, in a skirmish near Fairfax Court House, Vir- 
ginia, and in the action at Blackburn's Ford, on 
July 1 8th, and the Battle of Bull Run on July 21st, 
and was mentioned by name for good conduct in 
action by the colonel commanding his regiment in 
his official report. On July 30th he was ordered on 
recruiting service in New York City and on August 
7 th resigned from the army and resumed the prac- 
tice of law. In May, 1862, however, he returned 
to the army as Captain of the Twenty-second New 



66 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



York Volunteer Militia Infantry and served in the 
Eighth Army Corps in Maryland and Virginia. On 
September 5, 1862, he was honorably mustered out 
with his regiment but returned to service with it in 
the same rank June 18, 1863. He participated in 
the fight at Sporting Hill, Pennsylvania, against 
Jenkins' Confederate Mounted Infantry and in the 
bombardment and defence of Carlisle, in which he 
was wounded, and in the fight at Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, and received a medal of honor from Congress 
for distinguished services in the Gettysburg cam- 
paign. Honorably mustered out by reason of ex- 




ASA BIRD GARDINER 

piration of service he returned to service as a First 
Lieutenant and Adjutant of the United States 
Veteran Reserve Corps, February 11, 1865, and 
served in the Twenty-second Army Corps. There- 
after his duties were both military and judicial, as 
Acting Judge-Advocate and Acting Assistant Adju- 
tant-General. In August, 1873, he was promoted 
to be Judge-Advocate, United States Army, with the 
rank of Major. From July, 1874, to August, 1878, 
he was Professor of Law at the West Point Military 
Academy with the rank of 1-ieutenant-Colonel. In 
1885 the Secretary of War requested him to prepare 
a text book for the West Point cadets on the sub- 
ject of military and martial law and the practice and 
procedure of military courts and boards under the 



laws of the United States and International Law, 
and he was accordingly relieved of other duty until 
1887, when he was assigned to duty as assistant to 
the Secretary of War in the War Department at 
Washington. After many other services in con- 
nection with the military administration he was 
finally honorably retired from active service on 
December 8, 1888, because of disability contracted 
in the line of duty. Since that time Colonel Gar- 
diner has been a prominent figure at the Bar of 
New York. He was admitted to the Bar of the 
Supreme Court of the United States on January 2 7, 
1865. From 1866 to 1890 he had many important 
cases in the civil courts of the northern states affect- 
ing the army and navy, and frequently acted as an 
Assistant United States Attorney-General. He was 
Government Counsel in the investigation ordered 
by Congress of Major-General Oliver O. Howard's 
administration of the Freedman's Bureau, and also 
in the Fitz John Porter case and trial by general 
court martial of the colored Cadet Whittaker, 
and trial of Judge-Advocate-General D. G. Swaim, 
United States Army. He was sole counsel for 
General U. S. Grant and General Philip H. Sheridan, 
who were the respondents in the Court of Inquiry 
in General G. K. Warren's case. Upon the election 
of United States District Attorney Noah Davis to be 
Justice of the Supreme Court, President Grant 
tendered the appointment as District Attorney for 
the Southern District of New York to Colonel Gar- 
diner, who felt constrained to decline the same 
because of holding other political principles. In 
the fall of 1897 he was elected District Attorney of 
New York and served from the beginning of 1898 
to the end of 1901. He is the author of a treatise 
on the " Jurisdiction and Powers of the United 
States and State Courts in Reference to Writs of 
Habeas Corpus as Affecting the Army and Navy," 
and another on " Evidence and Practice in Military 
Courts," and " Practical Forms for Use in Courts 
Martial and Remarks as to Procedure." He has 
delivered a number of historical addresses, some of 
which have been published, including " The Rhode 
Island Continental Line in the Revolution ; " " Uni- 
forms of the American Army from 1775 ; " '•' Mar- 
tial Law during the Revolution ; " " Biographical 
Sketch of Colonel and Brevet Brigadier-General 
Henry Burbeck, Commandant United States Artil- 
lerists and Engineers ; " " Chaplains of the Ameri- 
can Army from 1775;" "The Allied Forces of 
France in America during the Revolution," and 
" The Society of the Cincinnati in France." He 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



67 



also was by invitation orator of the day and delivered 
the address before the Legislature of Georgia and 
Joint Special Committee of the Legislature of Rhode 
Island at Savannah, November 14, 1902, on the 
occasion of the final interment of the remains of 
Major-General Nathanael Greene under the monu- 
ment erected to his memory. He is a member of 
the American Ethnological, Phi Beta Kappa and 
New York Historical societies, and a Companion, 
since 1867, of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States. He was one of the 
incorporators of the Military Service Institution of 
the United States, a founder and incorporator of 
the Society of the Sons of the Revolution, insti- 
tuted in 1875. Since May, 1884, he has been Sec- 
retary-General of the Society of the Cincinnati. He 
is President of the Rhode Island State Society of the 
Cincinnati, and Vice-Commandant of the Military 
Society of the War of 1812 ; an honorary member 
of the Newport and Georgia Historical societies ; a 
corresponding member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, and of the Rhode Island, 
Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Chicago and other 
historical societies ; and in New York City a mem- 
ber of the Union, Metropolitan, Democratic, Man- 
hattan, West Point, Seventh Regiment Veteran, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and Church clubs. 



GRAY, Albert Zabriskie, 1840- 1889. 

Class of i860 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1840; graduated A.B., New York 
University, i860; graduated B.D., General Theological 
Seminary, 1864; Chaplain U. S. Army, 1864-65; rector, 
1866-68, and 1873-82 ; Warden of Racine College and 
rector, 1882-89; author; S.T.D., Columbia, 1887; died 
i88g. 

ALBERT ZABRISKIE GRAY, A.B., S.T.D., 
was a son of John A. C. and Susan Maria 
(Zabriskie) Gray, and was born in New York City 
on March 2, 1840. He entered New York Univer- 
sity in 1856, and was a member of Psi Upsilon 
and Salutatorian of his class. He was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in i860, and 
then entered the General Theological Seminary of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Divin- 
ity in 1864. In 1864-65 he served as a Chaplain 
in the United States Army, in 1866-68 was rector 
of a church at Bloomfield, New Jersey, and travelled 
in Europe in 1868-73. On his return to the 
United States he became rector of a church at 
Phillipstown, New York, until 1882. In the latter 



year he became Warden of Racine College, Wiscon- 
sin, and Rector of St. John's Chapel. He was the 
author of several books. In 1887 he received the 
degree of Doctor of Sacred Theology from Colum- 
bia College. He was married in 1866 to Harriet 
Guion, daughter of Covington Guion. He died on 
February 17, 1889, in Chicago, Illinois. 



SHRADY, Jacob, 1839- 

Class of i860. 
Born in New York, 1839; studied in public schools 
and University Grammar School ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, i860; LL.B., Columbia Law School, 
1863; A.M., University of New York, 1864; in legal 
practice in New York since 1863; author of numerous 
papers, essays and addresses. 

JACOB SHRADY, A.M., LL.B., son of John and 
Margaret (Beinhauer) Shrady, comes of Ger- 
man stock, which was transplanted from Wurtem- 
burg to this country about 17 15. His grandfather, 
John Shrady, served throughout the Revolutionary 
War under Colonel Peter Gansevoort, and his father, 
John Shrady, served in the War of 181 2. He was 
born in New York City on March 24, 1839, and 
received his early education in the public schools 
and in the University Grammar School, in which 
latter he was prepared for college. In the fall of 
1856 he was matriculated in the College of Arts 
and Science of the University of the City of New 
York, now more conveniently known as the Univer- 
sity College of New York University. There he 
elected the classical course, and distinguished him- 
self as a scholar and a leader of college life. He 
was secretary of his class, and Editor and Vice- 
President of the Eucleian Literary Society, and a 
member of the Zeta Psi Fraternity. In i860 he 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
and four years later the University gave him the 
degree of Master of Arts. After graduation at the 
University he entered the Law School of Columbia 
College, and was graduated from it with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1863. Admission to the 
Bar immediately followed, and since that time he 
has been engaged in the practice of his profession in 
New York, with marked success, and with the high 
esteem of the Bar and laity. He has also been 
active in politics, as a Republican, in Brooklyn and 
in New York (Manhattan), especially in the Thirty- 
first Assembly District of New York, though he has 
neither held nor sought public office. He is Vice- 
President of the Medico- Legal Society, and a mem- 
ber of the Society of Medical Jurisprudence, the St. 



68 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Nicholas Society, the Sons of the Revolution, the 
Brooklyn Art Society, and the Central Republican 
Club. He has been twice married ; first, to Emma 
M. Grigg, on November 8, 1871, and after her 




JACOB SHRADV 

death to Jennie Kempton, on September 13, 1882. 
He has two children : Florence Maud and Marjorie 
Faunce Shrady. Mr. Shrady has been a frequent 
contributor to current literature, both professional 
and popular. Among his papers and other publica- 
tions may be mentioned "The Steinecke Poison- 
ing Case," "Civil and Criminal Responsibility for 
Malpractice," "Mental Unsoundness as Affecting 
Testamentary Capacity," "The Battle of Ridge- 
field," "The Old Coat," "Ramblings on the 
Hudson," etc. 



DAVIS, William Henry, 1836- 

Class of 1861 Med. 
Born at Elmira, N. Y., 1836 ; studied in common 
schools and Elmira Academy; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1861 ; began practice 
in Pennsylvania; surgeon in United States Army 
during Civil War ; practiced at Horseheads, N. Y., 
until 1892, since then in Brooklyn. 

WILLIAM HENRY DAVIS, M.D., son of 
Calvin L. and Amelia Sanford Davis, of 
English ancestry, was born at Elmira, New York, 



on October 4, 1836, and was educated in the com- 
mon schools and in Elmira Academy. Thence he 
came to the Medical School of New York Univer- 
sity, and was graduated from it with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1861. He immediately 
began the practice of his profession in Pennsylvania, 
but was interrupted in ordinary practice by the 
Civil War, which carried him into the service of the 
state and nation. He became in i86i an Assistant ' 
Surgeon of Pennsylvania Volunteers. On Decem- 
ber 20, 1862, he was appointed Surgeon of the 
Fourth Regiment, Pennsylvania Reserves, McCall's 
Division, and served in that capacity until the ex- 
piration of that regiment's term of service. Then 
he became Surgeon of the One Hundred and Ninety- 
fifth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, in July, 
1864, and served until the end of the war. His civil 
practice was then resumed, at Horseheads, Chemung 
County, New York, and was maintained there with 
much success until 1892. From 1877 to 1892 
he was a member of the Board of Education of 
Horseheads, and for part of that time President of 
the Board. In 1892 Dr. Davis removed to Brook- 




VV. H. DAVIS 



lyn. New York, where he has ever since been in 
successful practice. He is a member of the Medi- 
cal Society of Chemung County, New York ; of the 
New York Academy of Medicine ; of the Medical 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



69 



Society of the County of Kings ; and of the Stuy- 
vesant Heights Repubhcan Club of Brooklyn. He 
was married on June 8, 1870, to Sarah Lawrence, 
who has borne him two children : Amelia and Henry 
Lawrence Davis. His address is in Brooklyn, New 
York. 



NEWELL, William Whiting, 1839-1894. 

Class of 1861 Arts. 
Born in Boston, 1839; Hamilton College, 1857-59; 
graduated A B., New York University, 1861 ; Union 
Theological Seminary, 1861-64; minister Presbyterian 
Church, 1864-94; died, 1894. 

Wn.LlAM WHITING NEWELL, A.B., was 
a son of the Rev. Dr. William Whiting 
Newell and Edna Shaw Newell, and was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, on August 23, 1839. He 
studied at Hamilton College in 1857-59, and then 
came to New York University, from which he was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1 86 1. He was in Union Theological Seminary in 
1861-64, and in the latter year became a minister 
of the Presbyterian Church. His pastorates were 
at Cooperstown, New York, 1864-65; Wappinger's 
Falls, New York, 1865-68 ; Monroe, Michigan, 
1869-71; New York City, 1871-74; and New- 
buryport, Massachusetts, 1874-81. From 1881 to 
1894 he was General Secretary for French Evangel- 
ization in the American and Foreign Christian 
Union, and minister of St. Luke's chapel, Paris, 
France. He was married on September 25, 1864, 
to Helen Peet, daughter of Luther R. Peet, and 
had three children : George Kennedy, William 
Whiting, and Oliver Shaw Newell. He died in 
Paris, France, on January 23, 1894. 



SCOTT, Rufus Leonard, 1835- 

Class of i86i Law. 
Born at Lanesborough, Mass., 1835 ; studied at 
Lenox Academy and East Williston Seminary; taught 
school ; studied law in various offices ; graduated New 
York University Law Department, 1861 ; in practice 
since 1861 ; Registrar of Arrears, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
1877-79; Alderman at Large, Brooklyn, 1884-85; mem- 
ber of Board of Education, i886-8g. 

RUFUS LEONARD SCOTT, who was born at 
Lanesborough, Massachusetts, on March 31, 
1835, is the youngest son of Learned and Fanny 
(Dickinson) Scott. On the paternal side he is 
descended from WilHam Scott, who settled at Hat- 
field, Massachusetts, about 1668, and on the mater- 
nal side from Nathaniel Dickinson, who removed 
from Wethersfield, Connecticut, to Hadley, Massa- 



chusetts, in 1659 and was one of the founders of 
the latter place. He was educated at the Lenox 
Academy and the East Williston Seminary, and 
then, at the age of eighteen, became teacher of the 
public school in his native town. Preferring the 
law to teaching, however, he made his way to New 
York, and thence to Illinois, studying and teaching, 
and finally back to New York again. He studied in 
the offices of Attorney-General Chatfield and Judge 
Neilson, and was graduated from the Law School of 
New York University in 1861. Since that time he 
has been constantly engaged in the practice of his 




RUFUS L. SCOTT . 

profession, save for the time spent in the public 
service. He has long made his home in Brooklyn, 
New York, and has been a prominent figure in the 
public affairs of that community. In 1877 he was 
appointed Registrar of Tax Arrears and held that 
office two years. While in that office he proposed 
the advertisement of tax sales in pamphlet form 
instead of in the newspapers, which proposition was 
vigorously opposed, but finally adopted and proved 
to be a most beneficent reform. He also recom- 
mended the enactment of a law enabling the city to 
compromise claims for taxes on over-burdened and 
unimproved property. At a later date such a law 
was enacted, with the result of bringing large sums 
into the city treasury, reducing the municipal indebt- 



7° 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



edness, increasing the taxable resources of the city, 
and stimulating real estate values. Mr. Scott was a 
member at large of the Brooklyn Board of Alder- 
men in 1884-85, during the second administration 
of Mayor Low, receiving the largest vote on the 
ticket, but he declined a renomination for another 
term. He was a member of the Brooklyn Board of 
Education from October, i886, to May, 1889, and 
then resigned in order to be free to travel abroad. 
At the present time he is one of the Tax Commis- 
sioners of the City of New York, by appointment of 
Mayor Low. He has been prominently interested 
in various public movements in Brooklyn, especially 
those for securing rapid transit, and for building 
more bridges across the East River. He was one of 
the founders of the East Brooklyn and Bushwick 
Dispensary, and of the Bushwick Savings Bank, 
of which latter he is a Trustee and counsel. He 
was married on June 26, 1866, to Maria E. Hull, 
daughter of William M. and Phoebe Weiant Hull, 
of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and has three children : 
Clara Louise, Rufus L., and Howard Dickinson 
Scott. His office is at No. 93 Nassau street. New 
York. 



AMERMAN, James Lansing, 1843- 

Class of 1862 Arts. 
Born at Farmingdale, Long Island, 1843 ; graduated 
New York University, School of Arts, 1862 ; Theolog- 
ical Seminary, New Brunswick, N. J., Class of 1868; 
pastor of churches at Richboro, Pa., 1868-71, and Jersey 
City, N. J., 1871-76; missionary to Japan; Theological 
Professor in Meiji Gakuin, Tokio, 1877-93 ; Financial 
Secretary, and later Assistant Treasurer, Board of 
Foreign Missions, Reformed Church in America, since 
1893; A.B., New York University, 1862, A.M., 1865; 
D.D., Rutgers, 1885; author of various works. 

JAMES LANSING AMERMAN, A.M., D.D., is 
descended in the sixth generation from Dirck 
Jansen Amerman, who came to this country from 
Holland in 1650 and settled at Araersfoort, later 
known as Flatlands and now a part of the Borough 
of Brooklyn, New York City. His father was 
Charles Henry Amerman, and his mother's maiden 
name was Elsie Maria Lansing. He was born at 
Farmingdale, Long Island, New York, on August 13, 
1843. After passing through primary courses of 
education he entered the University Grammar 
School, where he was prepared for entrance into 
the University of the City of New York, as New 
York University was then known. In the Univer- 
sity he pursued the regular classical course of the 
School of Arts, and was graduated in the Class of 



1S62. In his Junior year he began the work of 
teaching in addition to studying, and was thus en- 
gaged until 1864, and in 1864-65 was employed as a 
book-keeper. Then, his inclinations turning strongly 
toward the ministry, which for several years he had 
regarded as possibly his life work, he entered the 
Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church, at 
New Brunswick, New Jersey, and was there gradu- 
ated in the Class of 1868. Pastoral work immedi- 
ately followed. From 1868 to 1871 he was in 
charge of the Reformed Church at Richboro, Penn- 
sylvania, and from 1871 to 1876 he was Pastor of 
the Old Bergen Reformed Church, in Jersey City, 
New Jersey. Dr. Amerman's career as a foreign 
missionary began in 1876, when he was sent to 
Japan under the auspices of the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Reformed Church in America. 
His work in that country was of peculiar impor- 
tance, and was most .successfully performed, he serv- 
ing as Theological Professor in the Meiji Gakuin at 
Tokio from 1877 to 1893. In the latter year he 
returned nome, and was made Financial Secretary 
of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed 
Church in America, becoming Assistant Treasurer 
later on, which position he still holds, with offices 
at No. 25 East 22nd Street, New York. While in 
Japan he was Treasurer of various benevolent or- 
ganizations. He was President of the Board of 
Directors of the Meiji Gakuin, Tokio, and was Dean 
of its Theological Faculty in 1890-1891 ; and he 
was Vice-President of the Asiatic Society of Japan 
for seven years and President of it in 1 888-1 890. 
In this country he is a member of the Holland 
Society of New York, and a corresponding member 
of the American Society of Comparative Religion. 
He was married on October 12, 1870, to Rebecca 
Ely, who has borne him four children : Eleanor 
Belville, George Ely, Bessie Ely and James Donald 
Amerman. His home is at Bloomfield, New Jersey. 
Dr. Amerman received the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts and Master of Arts from New York University 
in T862 and 1865, respectively, and that of Doctor 
of Divinity from Rutgers College, New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, in 1885. His bibliography includes a 
" Memorial Sermon on Acton Cyril Price, Jersey 
City, New Jersey," 1875; "Sketch of Japan Mis- 
sion of the Reformed Church of America," r88o; 
Translation into Japanese of Van Osterzee's " Bibli- 
cal Theology of the New Testament," 1880, with a 
third edition in 1896 ; and seven tracts and volumes 
on Theology, 1883 to 1890, there having been sev- 
eral editions of some of these last. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



71 



CHAMBERLAIN, Dwight S., 1839- 

Class of 1862 Med. 
Born at Kent, Conn., 1839; graduated M.D,, New 
York University Medical College, 1862; ship's surgeon, 
1863; in U. S. Army service, 1862-65; in charge of 
Soldiers' Home and Hospital, Syracuse, N. Y., 1865; 
in practice at Lyons, N. Y., 1865-68; studied law and 
admitted to Bar, 1874; engaged in legal practice and 
business pursuits since 1874. 

DWIGHT S. CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., was 
bom at Kent, Litchfield County, Connec- 
ticut, on February 22, 1839, '" the same house in 
which his father and paternal grandfather had also 




D. S. CHAMBERLAIN 

been born. His great-grandfather was an officer in 
the Revolution and served for a time on Washing- 
ton's staff. Dr. Chamberlain was educated at the 
Genesee Seminary and College at Lima, New York, 
and thence came to New York University for his 
professional instruction. He entered the University 
Medical College, and was graduated from it with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1862. Soon after 
he sailed for England as surgeon on a passenger 
vessel. In the summer of 1862 he returned to the 
United States and entered the service of the nation 
as an Assistant Surgeon of the One Hundred and 
Thirty-Eighth Regiment, New York Infantry Vol- 
unteers, afterward the Ninth New York Heavy 
Artillery. This regiment was part of the Second 



Brigade of the Third Division of the Sixth Army 
Corps, and during his service with it Dr. Chamber- 
lain was in many engagements, including the battles 
of Monocacy Junction, Cold Harbor, Winchester, 
Cedar Creek, Fisher's Hill (Sheridan's famous Shen- 
andoah campaign), the siege and capture of Peters- 
burg and Richmond, and the final engagement at 
Saylor's Run, near Appomattox. He was promoted 
to be Major and Surgeon in February, 1865, and 
was honorably mustered out of the service with his 
regiment in July, 1865. He then settled at Syra- 
cuse, New York, for a few weeks and took charge of 
the Soldiers' Home and Hospital there, but was per- 
suaded by some of his friends to remove to Lyons, 
New York. He began practice at the latter place 
on September 5, 1865, and remained there until the 
spring of 1868. At the latter time he began the 
study of law, and in 1874 was admitted to the Bar 
and began the practice of the legal profession. In 
the latter he has ever since been more or less en- 
gaged, being at the same time interested in various 
other business pursuits. He has been connected 
with the Lyons National Bank for many years, as 
Director, Vice-President, and President, which last- 
named office he now occupies. In conjunction with 
his father-in-law, the late D. W. Parshall, he has 
largely assisted in the promotion of numerous busi- 
ness enterprises. He and his wife are heavily inter- 
ested in real estate at Lyons and in its vicinity. 
They own the principal business buildings of 
Lyons, including a beautiful edifice on William 
Street, erected as a memorial to Mr. Parshall. It 
is said they have in all one hundred tenants. They 
also own a number of farms, including the " Old 
Shaker Tract" of 1,600 acres, on Great Sodus Bay, 
thirteen miles from Lyons, one of the finest farms in 
that part of the State. Dr. Chamberlain is a mem- 
ber of the New York Commandery of the Loyal 
Legion, the Grand Army of the Republic, and other 
organizations, in all of which he takes an active and 
beneficent interest. He was married to Katharine 
M. Parshall on October 17, 1868, and has three 
children : Dwight P., Frederick W., and Grace S. 
Chamberlain. One of the sons is Vice-President of 
the Lyons National Bank, and the other looks after 
the real estate business and other matters. The 
daughter is the wife of John David, of Rochester, 
New York. 

LORD, Matthias Lane, 1839- 

Class of 1862 Med. 
Born at Brighton, N. Y., 1839 ; studied in common 
school and at Wesleyan Seminary, Lima, N. Y. ; 



72 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



graduated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1862; practiced in Rochester, N. Y., until 1863; in 
army service until 1865; practiced at Fairport, N. Y., 
until i858; Superintendent of Monroe County Asylum 
for Insane, Rochester, N. Y., until 1885 ; retired since 
1885. 

MATTHIAS LANE LORD, M.D., one of the 
veteran alumni of the University Medi- 
cal School, was born at Brighton, New York, on 
April t6, 1839, the son of Nathaniel Anson and 
Huldah (Hurd) Simonds Lord. He was educated 
in the local public school and at Wesleyan Serai- 
nary at Lima, New York. Then, inclining toward 




M. L. LORD 

the medical profession, he entered the New York 
University Medical College, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the spring of 
1862. For the remainder of that year he practiced 
his profession at Rochester, New York, and then, in 
February, 1863, entered the service of the United 
States Army in the Civil War. From that date to 
June, 1865, he was connected with the Army of 
the Potomac, as Assistant Surgeon of the One Hun- 
dred and Fortieth New York Volunteers, and from 
July I, 1864, to April i, 1865, he was Surgeon-in- 
Chief of the Fourth Division of the Fifth Army 
Corps, in the hospital at City Point, Virginia. At 
the end of the war he returned to civil practice, and 
from August, 1865, to December, 1868, was settled 



at Fairport, New York. In 1867 he was Health 
Officer of the Town of Perinton. On December i, 
1868, Dr. Lord became Superintendent of the Mon- 
roe County Asylum for the Insane, at Rochester, 
New York, and filled that place until April i, 1885, 
at which date he retired to private life and with- 
drew permanently from the practice of his profes- 
sion. He is still a member of the Monroe County 
Medical Society, of which he was President in 1877. 
He has been married twice. His first wife, whom 
he married on December 31, 1864, was Charlotte 
Anna Rey. After her death he was again married 
on August 3, 1896, to Addie Elizabeth Forsaith. 
His address is No. 27 Oxford Street, Rochester, 
New York. 



STRONG, Selah Woodhull, 1844-1884. 

Class of 1862 Arts. 
Born at Flatbush, N. Y., 1844; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1862 ; New Brunswick Theological 
Seminary, 1862-65 ; pastor, Reformed Dutch Church, 
1865-84; Vice-President General Synod of Reformed 
Dutch Church; died, 1884. 

SELAH WOODHULL STRONG, A.B., was a 
son of the Rev. Dr. Thomas M. Strong and 
Elizabeth (Grier) Strong, and was born at Flatbush, 
now a part of New York City, on September 2, 1844. 
He entered New York University, was a member 
of Zeta Psi, and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1862. He then became a stu- 
dent in the Theological Seminary of the Reformed 
Dutch Church at New Brunswick, New Jersey, and 
was graduated from that institution in 1865. There- 
after he was a minister of that church. His pas- 
torates were at Rochester, Ulster County, New York, 
from 1865 to 1870, and at West Troy, New York, 
from 1870 to 1884. He was Stated Clerk of the 
Classis of Saratoga and the Particular Synod of 
Albany, Vice-President of the General Synod of the 
Reformed Dutch Church, member of the Board of 
Foreign Missions, and Primarius to the General 
Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church. He 
was married on January 17, 1866, to Eleanor H. 
Van Deusen, and died on November 6, 1884. 



WARM AN, David, 1836- 

Class of 1862 Med 
Born at Franklin, N. J., 1836; studied in public 
schools and Belvidere Classical Academy ; taught 
school for three years ; studied at College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, Columbia University ; graduated 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



73 



M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1862; in 
practice, 1862-64 ; surgeon U. S. Army, 186^-65 ; in prac- 
tice, Trenton, N. J., since 1865; member of Trenton 
Board of Education ; Manager of New Jersey Chil- 
dren's Home Society. 

DAVID WARMAN, M.D., son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Vroom) Warman, is of English 
ancestry on the paternal side, being descended from 
Sir Christopher Warman, Bart., of London, Eng- 
land. On the maternal side he is of Dutch descent, 
his first American ancestor having been Heinrich 
Vroom, who came from Holland in 1620, settled on 




DAVID WARMAN 

Long Island, and afterward removed to New Jersey, 
in which state the Vroom family has been conspicu- 
ous for many years. Dr. Warman was born on Jan- 
uary 29, 1836, at Franklin, Warren County, New 
Jersey, and received his general education in the 
public schools and at the Belvidere Classical Acad- 
emy, at Belvidere, in his native county. After 
leaving the academy he engaged in teaching for 
three years, in the public schools of New Jersey. 
Finally he began the study of medicine, at first at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons — the Med- 
ical Department of Columbia University — and later 
at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, then an 
independent institution of high rank, but now a 
part of New York University. From the latter he 



was graduated in 1862, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine, and immediately thereafter he began 
the practice of his profession at Milford, in Hunter- 
don County, New Jersey. In the fall of 1862 he 
removed to Morrisville, Bucks County, Pennsyl- 
vania, opposite to the City of Trenton, New Jersey. 
There he remained until April, 1864, when he 
became a Contract Surgeon in the United States 
Army, and was assigned to duty in the Chesapeake 
Hospital, at Fortress Monroe, where he served until 
the end of the war. With the restoration of peace 
he returned to his practice and settled in Trenton, 
New Jersey, where he has ever since remained, con- 
ducting an extensive and successful general practice 
as physician and surgeon. He has always taken a 
lively interest in sanitary science and the promotion 
of the public health through sanitation. To that end 
he has been an earnest advocate of public and pri- 
vate bathing establishments. He has written much 
for the press upon the latter subject, in order to 
arouse or create a favorable public sentiment, and 
at present is President of the Trenton Turkish and 
Russian Bath Company, and expects to maintain 
extensive public and private baths. Dr. Warman 
is a Manager and Vice-President of the New Jersey 
Children's Home Society, a member of the State 
Charities Aid Society, and for many years President 
of its Mercer County branch, and a member of the 
Trenton Board of Education, the Mercer County 
District Medical Society, the Trenton Medical As- 
sociation, the New Jersey State Medical Society, the 
New Jersey Sanitary Society, the Trenton Sanitary 
Association, the Trenton Board of Trade (Chair- 
man of its Sanitary Committee since its organiza- 
tion), and other bodies. He served for a period 
of time as a United States Pension Examiner, and 
Secretary for New Jersey of the National Confer- 
ence of Charities and Correction. He was the 
founder of the sewer system of Trenton, having pub- 
licly advocated it many years in advance of its 
adoption. He was always particularly active in 
church work. For forty-two years he was a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, serving as a Ruling Elder 
much of the time, and for many years a teacher 
and superintendent of Sabbath School work. He 
was married on March 25, 1862, to Rebecca Fair 
Love, daughter of Rev. Robert Love, of Harmony, 
Warren County, New Jersey, who has borne him 
seven children : Lizzie, Anna, Robert, Cora, Arthur, 
Richard and Wilbur Warman, four of whom are 
living. His address is Chestnut Avenue, corner 
of Tyler Street, Trenton, New Jersey. 



74 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ELLIOTT, William Saint George, 1838- 

Class of 1863 Med. 
Born in New York, 1838; studied under tutors, in 
private schools and at Columbia College Grammar 
School ; served in U. S. Army as Lieutenant, Captain, 
and Major, 1861-62; graduated M.D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1863 ; Acting Inspector and 
Surgeon U. S. Volunteers ; graduated in Dentistry, 
1870 ; practiced in various foreign countries, 1870 to 
i8go ; in practice in New York City since 1895. 

WILLIAM SAINT GEORGE ELLIOTT, 
M.D., comes of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 
His father, Samuel McKeiizie Elliott, a celebrated 




W. ST. GEORGE ELLIOTT 

oculist of New York for forty years, was born in 
Scotland, and his mother, whose maiden name was 
Letitia Irvin, belonged to a North of Ireland family. 
He was born on a farm in Forty-second Street, New 
York, on October 24, 1838, and was educated under 
tutors, in private schools and at Columbia College 
Grammar School. On leaving the last named insti- 
tution, instead of proceeding to college he entered 
business life in the Novelty Iron Works in New 
York and later in the Perse & Brooks Paper Works. 
He entered the army as First Lieutenant of the 
Seventy- ninth Regiment of New York (Highland- 
ers) of which his father was Lieutenant-Colonel. 
With this gallant and distinguished command he 
fought in some ten battles and was promoted suc- 



cessively to the grades of Captain, Major and 
Inspector-General. At the Battle of Chantilly, in 
1862, he was seriously wounded and soon after was 
mustered out of the service for disability, with the 
rank of Major and Inspector-General. In 1863 he 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine from the Medical College of New York Uni- 
versity, having taken a two years' course before the 
war in the New York Medical College. A little 
later he re-entered the United States Army as Act- 
ing Assistant Surgeon. In 1864 he was promoted 
to be Assistant Surgeon and in the same year was 
made Surgeon in Charge of the Ninth Army Corps 
Hospital, where he served until the end of the war 
and was then honorably mustered out of the ser- 
vice. With the return of peace Dr. Elliott resumed 
professional life at Morristown, New Jersey, and in 
1870 was graduated in Dentistry. He then went 
abroad and practiced his profession in Japan from 
1870 to 1876; travelled with his wife and family 
through Japan, China and the Straits Settlements ; 
practiced in Singapore ; travelled through Penang, 
Ceylon, Egypt, India and Europe and reached Eng- 
land in 1876. He then resumed his professional 
travels and visited Panama, Equador, Peru, Chili, 
Patagonia, the Argentine Republic, Brazil and the 
West Indies. In 1879 he took up practice in 
London, England, with such success that he was 
enabled to retire in 1890. He returned with his 
family to the United States and in 1895 resumed 
practice in New York, where he still remains, his 
address being No. 573 Fifth Avenue. Dr. Elliott 
was a member of the original Union League Society 
of the United States. In politics he is an inde- 
pendent Republican. He was married to Annie 
R. Lee and has six children : Annie L., William 
Saint George, Richard Irvin, Mary Lee, McKenzie 
and Maud Elliott. 



LUDLUM, Charles Henry, 1843- 

Class of 1863 Arts, 1865 Med. 
Born at Jamaica, N. Y., 1843; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1863, and A.M., 1866; M.D., New 
York University Medical School, 1865; in hospital 
service, 1865-67; in private practice since 1867; Presi- 
dent of Board of Education, Hempstead, N. Y. 

CHARLES HENRY LUDLUM, A.M., M.D., 
is a son of Daniel and Judith (Smith) Lud- 
lum, and was born at Jamaica, now a part of New 
York City, on February 21, 1843. His paternal 
ancestors came from England about the middle of 
the Eighteenth Century, and settled near Jamaica, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



75 



New York. Another branch of the Ludlum family 
came over about a century earlier, and is still settled 
at Oyster Bay, Long Island. Dr. Ludlum received 
his early education at the district school at Hollis, 
Long Island, for two years, at a private school at 
Jamaica for three years, and at the Union Hall 
Academy, at Jamaica, where he was prepared for 
college. He then entered New York University, 
where he won the Freshman Mathematical and 
Sophomore Greek and Mathematical prizes, was 
Latin Salutatorian at Commencement, and was 
elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He was graduated in 




CHAS. H. LUDLUM 

1863 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 
the following fall entered the Medical College of 
New York University, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1865. 
In 1866 his Alma Mater conferred upon him the 
degree of Master of Arts. The two years 1865-67 
were spent as an Interne at the Charity and Belle- 
vue hospitals, New York, and in 1867 he established 
himself in private practice in that city. In addi- 
tion to his private work he was a Visiting Physician 
to the Northern Dispensary in 1868-74, and to 
the Out-door Department of Bellevue Hospital in 
1867-74. In 1874 he removed to Boonton, New 
Jersey, and practiced there for four years, being 
meantime a member of the Boonton Board of 



Education. Finally, in 1878, he removed to 
Hempstead, New York, where he is still engaged in 
practice. He has been a member of ihe Hemp- 
stead Board of Education since 1888, and its Presi- 
dent since 1890. At Boonton he was a member 
of the Morris County Medical Society, and since 
1878 has been a member of the Queens County 
Medical Society. He is a Republican in politics, 
and is a member of and Elder in the Presbyterian 
Church. He was married on May 20, 1868, to 
Mary Jane White, and has five children living : 
Clinton White, Herbert Aymar, Walter Denton 
(N. Y. U., 1895), Marion Carter, and Alice Car- 
rell Ludlum. His address is No. 145 Main Street, 
Hempstead, New York. 



MARTIN, Daniel Strobel, 1842- 

Class of 1863 Arts 
Born in New York, 1842; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1863, and A.M., 1866; Union Theological 
Seminary, 1863-66; School of Mines, Columbia, 1868; 
Professor of Greek and Latin, Rutgers Female College, 
1867-68, and Professor of Geology, 1868-95; Regents' 
Examiner, 1882-87 ; Lecturer at Cooper Union, 1888-92; 
Professor in Presbyterian College for Women, Colum- 
bia, S. C, since 1895; author; Ph.D., University of 
State of New York, 1881. 

DANIEL STROBEL MARTIN, A.M., Ph.D., 
is a son of Benjamin Nicholas Martin and 
Louisa Caroline (Strobel) Martin, his father having 
been that Professor Martin who was so much be- 
loved by many classes of students at New York Uni- 
versity and whose memory is precious to the alumni. 
He was born in New York City on June 30, 1842, 
and in 1859 was matriculated at New York Univer- 
sity. There he won the Freshman Greek Prize, and 
was Junior orator, English Salutatorian at Com- 
mencement, and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 
He was graduated in 1863 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, and received that of Master of 
Arts from the University in r866. From 1863 
to 1866 he was a student in the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, and in r868 in the School of 
Mines of Columbia College. He was Professor of 
Greek and Latin in the Rutgers Female College, in 
New York City, in 1867-68, and Professor of Geol- 
ogy and Allied Sciences in the same institution from 
1868 to 1895. He was also a Regents' Examiner 
of law students in English branches in 1882-87. 
He has been engaged in geological instruction work 
at various times in the Cooper Union, New York 
Academy of Sciences, and Brooklyn Institute. Since 
1895 he has in winters been Professor of Geology in 



76 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the Presbyterian College for Women at Columbia, 
South Carolina, spending his summers in the north 
in literary, scientific and missionary work. He re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1881 




D. S. MARTIN 

from the Regents of the University of the State of 
New York. He has published a geological map of 
the City of New York and its environs, and has 
written many magazine and review articles, etc. He 
spends his winters at Columbia, South Carolina, 
near the place where his first progenitors, on both 
sides, in America lived. The Martins and Strobels 
came to Carolina from Bavaria in the Eighteenth 
Century. Dr. Martin's grandfather, John Peter 
Martin, and his great-grandfather, Daniel Strobel, 
both fought for independence in South Carolina as 
officers in the Revolutionary War. In summer Dr. 
Martin lives at No. 756 Quincy Street, Brooklyn, New 
York, the Cuban Home Training School, a mission 
house for evangelical work among Spanish-Ameri- 
cans in Greater New York. He has long been 
deeply interested in the religious needs of Latin- 
America and is President of the Trustees of the 
above named institution. 



K 



privately, and at Jefferson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, 1863 ; in practice since 1863. 

UDOLPH MYERS, M.D., was born near 
Lewistown, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, on 
August 2, 1840, the son of Michael and Catherine 
(Holtzapple) Myers, and the great-grandson of an- 
cestors who came from Germany and settled in 
Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. His early educa- 
tion was acquired in public schools, until he was 
sixteen years old, and at the Shirleysburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, Academy under the tuition of Professor J. B. 
Kidder. He began his medical studies under Dr. 
Robert Baird at Shirleysburg, was matriculated at 
the Jefferson Medical College, at Philadelphia, in 
i860, and studied there, and finally entered Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, in 1862, and was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine on March 2, 1863. 
Since that date he has been continuously engaged in 
the practice of his profession. For two years he was 
at Three Springs, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. 
At the beginning of 1865 he moved to Burlington, 




R. MYERS 



-.-.___, „ J , , „ Indiana. For four years he was ni Keedyville, Mary- 

MYERS, Rudolph, 1840- , , r . ■ r^ c. tt ■ j A 

Class of 1861 Med land, for five years ni Grafton, Huntmgdon County, 

Born in Mifflin County, Pa., 1840; studied in public Pennsylvania, and since 1879 at Huntingdon, Penn- 

school and Shirleysburg Academy; studied medicine sylvania, where he has served a term of three years 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



77 



on the local school board. He is a member of the 
Huntingdon County Medical Society, and was its 
President for one year. He is also a member of 
the Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania, 
and of the American Medical Association. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. He has written and read 
before the Huntingdon County Medical Society 
papers on "Puerperal Fever," "Dyspepsia, with 
Some of Its Sequelae," and " Appendicitis." He 
was married on September 22, 1864, to Mary A. 
Lovell, of Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania, and has had 
five children : Ethelda Alleyne, deceased ; Ida May, 
deceased ; Alice Gertrude, now Mrs. E. P. Jones ; 
Lena Lovell, and Ernest Roland Myers, the last 
named a practicing physician. His address is Hunt- 
ingdon, Pennsylvania. 



PLYMPTON, Gilbert Motier, 1835- 

Class of 1863 Law. 
Born in New York, 1835 ; educated under tutors, and 
a student for a time at Theodore Sedgwick's School, 
New York; graduated LL.B., New York University 
Law School, 1863 ; in legal practice, 1863-89 ; one of 
the founders of and a member of banking house of 
Redmond, Kerr & Co. since 1892. 

GILBERT MOTIER PLYMPTON, lawyer and 
banker, is a son of Joseph and Eliza Ma- 
tilda (Livingston) Plympton, and was born at Fort 
Wood, on Bedlow's Island, New York Harbor, on 
January 15, 1835. His father was an officer of the 
United States Army, who served in the War of 181 2 
as Lieutenant, in the Seminole War as Major, and 
in the Mexican War as Lieutenant-Colonel, with a 
brevet as Colonel for gallantry at Cerro Gordo. Mr. 
Plympton's education was begun at Fort Snelling, 
Minnesota, under the Post Chaplain, and was con- 
tinued in a private school at Sackett's Harbor, 
New York. Later he was a student in Theodore 
Sedgwick's School in New York City preparatory 
to entering West Point. This he abandoned and 
read law with McKinstry and Lovell, New York 
City, and was admitted to the Bar in i860, but 
still further to perfect himself in his profession he 
entered the Law School of New York University and 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1863. Thereafter he was engaged in practice, 
largely in the Federal courts, and was counsel in 
many important htigations until 1889, when, finding 
his health impaired by the strain of professional 
work, he retired from practice. In 1892 he fur- 
nished the capital and organized, with his present 
partners, the banking house of Redmond, Kerr & 



Co., of New York, with branches in other cities, 
and has since devoted himself largely to its affairs. 
He is a director in various corporations. He was 
one of the founders of and Vice-President of the 
St. Nicholas Club, of New York, and he is a mem- 
ber of the Union, Metropolitan, Riding, Westchester 
Country, New York and Larch mont Yacht clubs, 
the Sons of the Revolution, the Society of Colonial 
Wars, the St. Andrew's Society, the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural 
History, the Chamber of Commerce of the State 
of New York, and the St. Nicholas, New York His- 




G. M. PLYMPTON 

torical, Zoological, Botanical, American Historical, 
and other societies. He is the author of numerous 
pamphlets and articles in periodicals. He was mar- 
ried in 1863 to Mary A. Stevens, daughter of Linus 
W. Stevens, a merchant of New York and first 
Colonel of the famous New York Seventh Regi- 
ment. They have one child living, Mary Living- 
ston Plympton. 



STEDMAN, Joseph, 1835-98. 

Class of 1863 Med. 

Born at Medfield, Mass., 1835 ; studied in grammar 

and high schools, Medfield, and Lawrence Academy, 

Groton, Mass. ; graduated C.E., Military Academy, 

Norwich, Vermont, 1859 ; studied at Dartmouth ; left 



78 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



college to serve in Civil War, 1861, Lieut.-Col. 42nd 
Mass. Vols., 1862; graduated M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1863 ; Trustee of Jamaica Plain 
Dispensary; practiced in Boston, 1863-98; died at 
Watkins Glen, N. Y., 1898. 

JOSEPH STEDMAN, C.E., M.D., a veteran of 
the Civil War and for many years a distin- 
guished physician of Boston, was born at Medfield, 
Massachusetts, on October 13, 1835, the son of 
Cyrus and Mary (Jordan) Stedman. He was 
descended from John Stedman, one of the eleven 
children of Thomas Stedman, the latter being one 
of the four children of Isaac Stedman, the pioneer 
of the family in America. Isaac Stedman came 
from London, England, m 1635 and setded at Scit- 
uate, near Boston, Massachusetts. He sold his farm 
at Sciluate m 1650 and removed to Muddy River, 
now Brookline, where he died in 1678. Dr. Sted- 
man, the subject of the present sketch, received a 
careful education in the grammar and high schools 
of Medfield, and at the Lawrence Academy at 
Groton, Massachusetts. Thence he proceeded to 
the Military Academy at Norwich, Vermont, and 
was graduated therefrom with the degree of Civil 
Engineer in 1859. In the fall of 1859 he entered 
Dartmouth College, intending to pursue its full 
course, but left it to enter the army at the outbreak 
of the Civil War in 1861. He was successively, in 
1 86 1, Captain of a company in the Sixth Massachu- 
setts Volunteers and ui the Forty-Second Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, and in 1862 Lieutenant-Colonel of 
the Forty-Second Massachusetts Volunteers. In the 
latter year he returned to civil life and to his stud- 
ies, entering the Medical College of New York 
University. He was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1863, and at once began, at 
Jamaica Plain, Boston, Massachusetts, the practice 
of his profession in which he continued until the 
end of his life. He was a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society, the Norfolk District Medi- 
cal Society, the Society for Medical Improvement, 
the Boston Obstetrical Society, the Loyal Legion, 
the Eliot Club of Jamaica Plain, and the Royal 
Arcanum. He was a Trustee of the Jamaica Plain 
Dispensary, and in politics was a life-long Republi- 
can. He was married on October i, 1862, to Mar- 
garet Annette Stevens, and had four children : Annie 
Chapin, Joseph Cyrus, M.D., Mary Stedman (Cooke), 
and Edward Heminway Stedman. Dr. Stedman's 
active professional career extended from March, 
1863, to May 16, 1898, on which latter date he 
died, at Watkins Glen, New York. 



STOKES, James. 

Class of 1863 Arts, 1865 Law. 
Born in New York ; graduated A.B., New York Uni- 
versity, 1863, and LL.B., New York University Law 
School, 1865; travelled in America, Europe, Asia and 
Africa; banker; director of various business corpora- 
tions ; philanthropist. 

JAMES STOKES, A.B., LL.B., comes of a family 
long conspicuous in the United States in busi- 
ness, philanthropy, and public affairs generally. His 
ancestor, Thomas Stokes, a retired London mer- 
chant of wealth, came to New York in 1798. In 
London he had been a founder of the London Mis- 
sionary Society and had been associated with Robert 
Raikes in the Sunday School movement, and on 
settling in New York he similarly interested himself 
in religious and philanthropic work as a founder of 
the American Bible Society, the American Tract 
Society, etc. To him and his wife, Elizabeth Ann 
(Boulter) Stokes, was born a son, James Stokes, who 
for about half a century was one of the foremost 
merchants and bankers of New York, and was like 
his father conspicuous in benevolent enterprises. 
He married Caroline Phelps, daughter of Anson 
Greene Phelps, a prominent merchant and philan- 
thropist of New York and Founder of the City of 
Ansonia, Connecticut, and a descendant of George 
Phelps, one of the founders of Boston, and of three 
early colonial Governors, Thomas Dudley, John 
Haynes, and George Wyllys. James Stokes, the 
subject of the present sketch, is a son of James and 
Caroline (Phelps) Stokes, and was born in New 
York City. He entered New York University in 
1859, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1863. Two years later he was graduated 
from the New York University Law School with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. Instead of practicing 
his profession, however, he devoted some time to 
travel in America, Europe, Palestine and Egypt, and 
then, on returning to New York, engaged in the 
business of a banker. He is also a director in a 
number of financial and manufacturing corporations. 
He maintains the family interest in religious and 
philanthropic work, having been a Director and 
Trustee of the Young Men's Christian Association, 
an organizer and officer of the Palestine Exploration 
Society, and a member of the New York Historical, 
Genealogical and Geographical societies. Mr. 
Stokes was married on November 22, 1882, to 
Grace Hartley, daughter of Marcellus Hartley of 
New York, and has two children : Emma Hartley 
and Marcellus Hartley Stokes. His home is No. 
68 Park Avenue, New York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



79 



BLAUVELT, Cornelius Ryckman, 1843- 

Class of 1864 Arts 
Born in New York, 1843; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1864; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
1864-66; Union Theological Seminary, 1866-67; rnin- 
ister Reformed Dutch Church since 1868; Assistant 
Editor " Christian Intelligencer," 1877-80 ; A.M. 1871, 
and Ph.D., 1891, New York University; author and 
editorial writer. 

CORNELIUS RYCKMAN BLAUVELT, A.M., 
Ph.D., son of David T. and Adeliza (Wil- 
liams) Blauvelt, of Dutch stock, was born in New 
York City on May 6, 1843. I1 New York Univer- 




CORNELIUS R. BLAUVELT 

sity he was a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta 
Kappa, President of Eucleian, of the Young Men's 
Christian Association and of his class, Junior orator, 
and English Salutatorian at Commencement. He 
was graduated in 1864 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, to which the University added those of 
Master of Arts in 1871 and Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1 89 1. He studied in the Princeton Theological 
Seminary in 1864-66, and in Union Theological 
Seminary in 1866-67, and in 1868 was ordained 
a minister of the Reformed Dutch Church. He 
was a pastor at East New York, Long Island, in 
1868-74, in Newark, New Jersey, in 1874-77, 
and at Hyde Park, New York, in 1880-83. I" 
1877-80 he was an Assistant Editor of "The Chris- 



tian Intelligencer." He has been Secretary of the 
American Society of Comparative Religion. He is 
the author of " The Spencerian Theory of the Re- 
ligion of Israel" and of " Theosophy and Christian- 
ity Irreconcilable " (" Homiletic Review," May, 
1895), and has contributed many editorials, reviews 
and other articles to "The Christian Intelligencer" 
and other periodicals. On April 16, 1868, he was 
married to Aurelia Sage, daughter of George E. 
Sage, and had two children : Addie Aurelia and 
Mary Sage. His home is at Nyack, New York. 



CORNELL, George Boardman, 1833- 

Class of 1864 Med. 
Born at Edgartown, Mass., 1833; studied in common 
schools; employed in mercantile pursuits; studied at 
Madison, now Colgate, University; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1864; since 
then steadily engaged in medical practice; since 1888 
in Brooklyn, New York. 

GEORGE BOARDMAN CORNELL, M.D., 
was born at the quaint old town of Edgar- 
town, Massachusetts, on the Island of Martha's 
Vineyard, on April 24, 1833. He is the son of 
Gardner Thurston Cornell, and a direct descendant 
of Thomas Cornell, the first of the family in Amer- 
ica, who came from Essex, England, and arrived in 
Boston about 1638. Dr. Cornell's mother was, 
before her marriage, Mary Cofiftn, a member of the 
well-known Coffin family which for many genera- 
tions has been prominent on the Island of Nantucket. 
She was in the seventh generation from Tristram 
Coffin, of Nantucket, the progenitor of the entire 
Coffin family of the United States. Dr. Cornell's 
father served, at the early age of twelve years, in the 
Revolutionary War, in the fort at Newport, Rhode 
Island. George Boardman Cornell began his edu- 
cation in the common schools of his native village. 
At the age of seventeen he entered business life as 
a clerk and afterward salesman in the mercantile 
house of D. M. Knight & Company, now Calhoun, 
Robbins & Company, of New York. There he 
served for seven years. His desire for higher edu- 
cation and for a professional career proved stronger, 
however, than his business interests, and he left the 
counting-room for college. A two years' course was 
pursued with profit at Madison, now Colgate, Uni- 
versity, and then, in 1861, he entered the Medical 
College of New York University. There he was 
graduated with a Doctor's degree in 1864, and he 
at once began the practice of his chosen profession. 
The first two years were spent in New York. Then 
he accepted a medical contract for practice at 



8o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Inagua, in the West Indies. Later he practiced in 
Santo Domingo, where he familiarized himself with 
the treatment of yellow fever and other tropical 
diseases. On his return to the United States he 




of typhoid and other fevers, and in such success 
realizes an ample reward for his investigations and 
partial departure from the teachings of his revered 
Alma Mater. He was married in 1865 to Millie 
Josephine Overton, a daughter of Gilbert D. Over- 
ton, the organizer of the system of Custom House 
Brokerage in New York, and step-daughter of Cyrus 
Ramsay, M.D., for ten years Registrar of Records 
in New York. The children of Dr. and Mrs. Cor- 
nell now living are : Albert Boardman Cornell, of 
Chicago, Illinois, Theodore Sterling Cornell, of 
Brooklyn, New York, and Etelka Josephine Cornell 
of Brooklyn. Dr. Cornell's address is Brooklyn, 
New York. 

FINCH, Richard L'Hommedieu, 1842- 

class of 1864 Law. 
Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1842; studied in private and 
public schools of New York; graduated LL.B., New 
York University Law School, 1864 ; in practice in New 
York since 1864 ; Director of Bank of Staten Island ; 
Trustee of Richmond County Savings Bank. 

RICHARD L'HOMMEDIEU FINCH, son of 
William and Frances Mary (Young) Finch, 
and a descendant of some of the earliest settlers of 



GEORGE B. CORNELL 

estabUshed himselt on Jersey City Heights, Jersey 
City, New Jersey, and there conducted a highly 
successful practice for sixteen years. Thence, for 
the sake of rest and quiet, he removed for a time to 
Martha's Vineyard, but after two and a half years 
there, in 1888, he settled in Brooklyn, New York, 
where he still remains in practice. Dr. Cornell was 
led by Divine Providence, in 1855, while he was 
engaged in his business career in New York, to join 
with another young man named Dean in the estab- 
lishment of a noonday prayer-meeting for business 
men. He was thus the founder of the now famous 
Noonday Prayer Meeting in the Old Dutch Church 
on Fulton Street, New York, a meeting which has 
been daily maintained to the present time and has 
long been well known all over the Christian world. 
Dr. Cornell was educated in medicine in the " old 
school," or Allopathy. After practicing it for 
about seven years he was moved to investigate the 
" new school," or Homeopathy, with the result that 
in 1 87 1 he avowed himself a disciple of Hahnemann, 
whose system of medical treatment he has chiefly 
followed since that date. He has had great success 
in his professional work, especially in the treatment 




RICHD. L'H. FINCH 



Connecticut, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 
July 4, 1842. His boyhood was spent in New 
York City, where he was educated in private schools, 
and in the celebrated Grammar School No. 35, in 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



8i 



Thirteenth Street. Thence he went to the Law 
School of New York University, and was graduated 
therefrom with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
March, 1864. Since the latter date he has been in 
active practice of his profession in New York City 
and on Staten Island. He has also been prominent 
in public and business affairs on Staten Island. He 
was Counsel to the Village of New Brighton, and 
to the Board of Assessors of Richmond County, for 
several years prior to the consolidation of the island 
with New York City. He is and has for some time 
been a Director of and Counsel to the Bank of 
Staten Island, and a Trustee of and Counsel to the 
Richmond County Savings Bank. He is a member 
of the Thomas Hunter Association of Grammar 
School No. 35, and of the New York University Law 
School Alumni Association. He was married on 
August 29, 1870, to Hannah B. VV. Cook, who died 
on October 27, 1897, leaving one child, William 
Young Finch, M.D., of Brooklyn, New York, a 
graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of New York. Mr. Finch was again married on 
June 25, 1901, to Mary H. Field Lindsay. His 
home is at New Brighton, Borough of Richmond, 
and his office is in the Borough of Manhattan, New 
York. 



JENKS, Edward Watrous, 1833- 

Class of 1864 Med. 
Born at Victor, N. Y., 1833 ; studied in common 
schools and in LaGrange Collegiate Institute, Ind. ; 
New York University Medical College, 1852-53; grad- 
uated M.D., Castleton Medical College, Vt., 1855, and 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1864; LL.D. Albion 
College, Michigan, 1879; Founder and President of 
Detroit Medical College; Professor in various medical 
colleges ; writer on medical and surgical topics ; State 
Commissioner of Charities and Corrections, Michigan, 
since 1895. 

EDWARD WATROUS JENKS, M.D., LL.D., 
Founder of the Detroit, Michigan, Medical 
College and Commissioner of Corrections and Char- 
ities of the State of Michigan, is a direct descend- 
ant of Joseph Jencks, Colonial Governor of Rhode 
Island in 1727-32, and is a son of Nathan and 
Jane (Bushell) Jenks. He was born at Victor, 
New York, on March 31, 1833, and had his early 
education in the common schools. From 1846 to 
1850 he pursued a classical course in the LaGrange 
(Indiana) Collegiate Institute, and soon afterward 
turned his attention toward the profession which he 
has now for nearly half a century greatly adorned. 
He was a student in the Medical College of New 
VOL. II — 6 



York University in 1852-53, and was the private 
pupil of Dr. William Darling and was also in the 
office of Dr. James R. Wood. It was his intention 
to return to New York and be graduated from the 
University in 1855, but during a visit to New Eng- 
land he was persuaded by friends to remain there 
and complete his course at the Castleton (Vermont) 
Medical College. This he did, receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine from that institution in 1855. 
He then returned to New York, to complete his 
course in the University Medical College, but fell ill 
and was compelled to change his plans. Instead of 




EDWD. W. JENKS 

re-entering the University he went to Ontario, La- 
Grange County, Indiana, and there practiced his 
profession until 1863. Then, realizing the desir- 
ability of further study, he once more returned to 
New York, and followed his old friend and preceptor. 
Dr. James R. Wood, into the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, which has now become a part of 
New York University. From that institution he was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1864, and he then established himself in practice in 
the City of Detroit, Michigan, where he has since re- 
mained and where he has had a distinguished career. 
He was the Founder and President of the Detroit 
Medical College, and was its Professor of Obstetrics 
and Diseases of Women from 1868 to 1879. He 



82 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



filled a similar Professorship in Bovvdoin College, 
Maine, in 1871-75, and was Professor of Gynecology 
in the Chicago Medical College in 1879-82. He 
is the author of numerous writings on professional 
topics. In 1895 he was appointed Commissioner 
of the State Board of Corrections and Charities for 
the State of Michigan, and still fills that place, be- 
ing now in his second term of office. He is a Fel- 
low (and Founder) of the American Gynecological 
Society, a Fellow of the London, England, Obstetri- 
cal Society, a Fellow (and Founder) of the Detroit 
Academy of Medicine and formerly was its Presi- 
dent, an honorary member of the Maine Medical 
Association, of the Ohio State Medical Society, of the 
Cincinnati Obstetrical Society and of other organi- 
zations, and a member of the American Medical 
Association, of the Michigan State Medical Society 
(and formerly its President), of the American Social 
Science Association, associate member of the Na- 
tional Institute of Art, Science and Letters, Honor- 
ary Vice-President of the National Prison Association, 
and a member of various other professional societies. 
He is also a member of the Detroit Club, one of the 
leading social organizations of that city. In politics 
he is a Republican. In recognition of his attain- 
ments and achievements, Albion College, Michigan, 
gave him in 1879 the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Laws. Doctor Jenks was married in 1859 to 
Julia L. Darling, of Warsaw, New York, who died 
childless in 1866. In November, 1867, he was 
again married to Sarah Reed Joy, eldest daughter 
of the late Hon. James F. Joy, of Detroit, who died 
in September, 1900, leaving him two children: Dr. 
Nathan and Martha Reed Jenks. His home is at 
No. 84 Lafayette Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. 



MATSON, Nathaniel, 1839- 

Class of 1864 Med. 
Born at Schodack Landing, N. Y., 1839; studied at 
Schodack Academy, Kinderhook Academy, and Willis- 
ton Seminary; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1864; surgeon in U. S. Army, 1864-5; 
in practice in Brooklyn, N. Y., since i866. 

NATHANIEL MATSON, M. D., son of 
Stephen J. and Esther (Van Bergen) 
Matson, was born at Schodack Landing, Rensselaer 
County, New York, on March 6, 1839, and comes 
of English and Dutch ancestry. He is descended 
from Thomas Matson, who came from England to 
Boston among the early colonists, and was gunsmith 
to the ship which brought to America John Win- 
throp, first Governor of Massachusetts. On the 



maternal side it is recorded that the first of the 
Van Bergens in this country received from the gov- 
ernment of Holland a grant of land in Greene 
County, New York. Dr. Matson attended in his 
boyhood the Schodack Academy, until he was about 
twelve years old, and then for a year the Kinder- 
hook Academy. For three years thereafter he was 
a student at Williston Seminary, at East Hampton, 
Massachusetts, pursuing a scientific course and pre- 
paring himself for his professional studies. The 
latter were pursued in the New York University 
Medical College, from which he was graduated with 




NATHANIEL MATSON 

the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1864. Im- 
mediately upon receiving his diploma he was 
appointed Assistant Surgeon of the First Connecti- 
cut Artillery Regiment. That regiment was at that 
time in garrison in the forts around Washington, 
District of Columbia, but it presently went to the 
front, and Dr. Matson accompanied it to the James 
River and was under General Butler at Bermuda 
Hundred until General Grant crossed the river. 
He remained in that service until September, 1865, 
when he was honorably mustered out, at Hartford, 
Connecticut. In May, 1866, he began the regular 
practice of his profession in the City of Brooklyn, 
New York, and has remained therein ever since. 
He is a member of the Brooklyn Medical Society, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



8 



3 



the Kings County Medical Society, the Kings 
County Medical Association, the New York State 
Medical Association, the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, the Masonic Order, the Veteran Masons' Asso- 
ciation, and the Invincible Club. He was married 
to Anna Glover, of Brooklyn, in 1872, and has had 
four children : Esther, Clarine, Nathalie, and Irving 
Glover Matson, the last named dying in infancy. 
His address is No. 415 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, 
New York. 



THORN, Samuel Springate, 1831- 

Class of 1854 Med. 
Born at Utica, N. Y., 1831 ; studied in Utica Academy 
and Utica French Academy; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1854 ; pursued post- 
graduate courses in hospitals, 1854-56 ; in medical and 
surgical practice since 1855; Railway Surgeon ; Army 
Surgeon in Civil War; Dean of Faculty, Toledo School 
of Medicine ; Dean and Professor of Surgery, North- 
western Medical College ; editor and author. 

SAMUEL SPRINGATE THORN, M.D., an 
eminent physician and surgeon of Toledo, 
Ohio, is a son of Stephen and Mary Ann (Bennett) 
Thorn, his ancestry being English, though on the 
paternal side remotely from Holland. He was born 
at Utica, Oneida County, New York, on September 
22, 1831, and received his general education in 
two local institutions, the Utica Academy and the 
Utica French Academy. He also began the study 
of medicine in Utica. Thence he came to New 
York University in the fall of 1849, and attended 
lectures in the old Medical College at No. 659 
Broadway. He was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine on March 8, 1854, and for 
two years thereafter pursued post-graduate studies 
in Bellevue Hospital, the New York Hospital, the 
Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, and elsewhere. 
He began work in 1855 as a Medical Examiner 
for the New York Life Insurance Company, and 
from that time to the present has been thus en- 
gaged, being examiner for about a score of com- 
panies. In the same year he began work also as 
a Railway Surgeon, and has continued in that service 
until the present time, being now one of the oldest 
Railway Surgeons in the United States in point of 
service. He is or has been a surgeon on the New 
York Central, the Toledo, Ann Arbor & Michigan, 
the Toledo, Waldhoning & Ohio, the Michigan 
Central, and the Toledo & Ohio Central railroads, 
and Chief Surgeon to the Toledo, St. Louis & 
Western, Cincinnati, Jackson & Mackinaw, and 
Wheeling & Lake Erie railroads. His other serv- 



ices include being Coroner of Lucas County, Ohio ; 
Major-Surgeon of the One Hundred and Thirtieth 
Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil 
War ; Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Surg- 
ery of the Toledo, Ohio, School of Medicine and 
of the Northwestern Medical College, Toledo; 
Surgeon of the Toledo Hospital, and of St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital, Toledo ; United States Pension 
Examining Surgeon for twenty-two years ; Associate 
Editor for a number of years of "The Toledo 
Medical and Surgical Journal;" and author of 
numerous papers on professional topics. Dr. Thorn 




SAML. S. THORN 

has long been intimately identified with many 
professional organizations. He joined the Amer- 
ican Medical Association in 1855 at Detroit, being 
a delegate from the Milwaukee Medical Society. 
He was President of the Milwaukee Medical Asso- 
ciation in 1857. In that year he went to Lock- 
port, New York, and became President of the 
Lockport Medical Society. In i860 he removed 
to Toledo, Ohio, and soon afterward joined the 
Ohio State Medical Society, and the Toledo Med- 
ical Society, and was President of the latter for the 
four years 1866-69. He was also for a year Pres- 
ident of the Northwestern Ohio Medical Society. 
He is a member of the Mississippi Valley Medical 
Society, the Tri-State Medical Society, and others. 



84 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



He was the original organizer of the International 
Association of Railway Surgeons, and was President 
of its Executive Committee for several years, and 
also for a time President of the Association. In 
politics he was at first an Old Line Whig, but has 
been a Republican ever since the organization of 
that party. He was married on October 15, 1856, at 
L.ockport, New York, to Fannie Peckham, daughter 
of the late Peleg B. Peckham, of Utica, New York, 
and has had six children : Walter H., Mary Elsie, 
George Leeds, Anna Louise, Laura, and Alice 
Margaret Thorn, of whom the last named three 
are living. After so long and active a career Dr. 
Thorn is still practicing his profession with assi- 
duity and high success in Toledo, Ohio. 



ACKER, Thomas Jefferson, 1837- 

Class of 1865 Med. 
Born at Sing Sing, N. Y., 1837 ; studied in public and 
private schools and Claverack College ; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1865; in 
practice since 1865. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON ACKER, M.D., who 
was born at Sing Sing, New York, on July 27, 
1837, is a son of John Banker Acker and Jane Maria 
(Tompkins) Acker. The .Ackers were among the 
early Dutch settlers of Long Island and New York, 
this particular branch of the family being descended 
from Wolfert Acker, who came from Holland in the 
Seventeenth Century and settled first at Flatbush, 
Long Island, and afterward removed to Westchester 
County and built the house which has long been 
famous as " Sunnyside," the home of Washmgton 
Irving. Wolfert Acker's name is immortalized in 
Irving's sketch of " Wolfert's Roost." Various 
members of the Acker family served in the Revolu- 
tionary Army. On the maternal side Dr. Acker is 
descended from the Tompkins family, which came 
from England in early colonial times and settled 
at Plymouth and Concord, Massachusetts, Fairfield, 
Connecticut, and in Westchester County, New York, 
one of its members being Daniel D. Tompkins, 
Governor of the State of New York. Thomas Jeffer- 
son Acker was educated at public and private schools 
at Sing Sing, New York, and at Claverack College 
and Hudson River Institute, at Claverack, New 
York. After studying medicine privately with Dr. 
George J. Fisher, at Sing Sing, he entered the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, which has since 
been incorporated with New York University, and 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1865. On April loth of that year he began 



the practice of his profession, and is still engaged 
therein. For two years he was settled at Pine's 
Bridge, Westchester County, New York, and in 
February, 1867, removed to Croton-on- Hudson, hi 
the same county, where he has ever since remained. 
He has won a wide reputation as a highly success- 
ful general practitioner, and is an esteemed and 
influential member of the community. His essa3's 
on " Diphtheria " and " Animal Products Used as 
Medicines " have been printed in the " Transac- 
tions " of the New York State Medical Association. 
He is a Fellow of the New York State Medical Asso- 




T. J. ACKER 

elation, permanent member of the American Medi- 
cal Association, honorary member of the New York 
State Association 01 Railway Surgeons, and a mem- 
ber of the Westchester County Medical Association, 
the Improved Order of Red Men, and the Order of 
Foresters. For forty years he has been a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a Trustee 
of the church at Croton-on-Hudson in 1872-76 and 
1894-96, was a member of the Building Committee 
that erected the church building, and is now Presi- 
dent of the Epworth League of that church. Dr. 
Acker was married on May 10, t866, to Frederica 
Mason, and has one daughter, Ella May Acker, born 
on November 24, 1883. His address is Croton-on- 
Hudson. New York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



85 



BAYLISS, Benjamin Holmes, 1842-1897. 

Class of 1865 Arts. 
Born in Rochester, N. Y., 1842 ; soldier in Civil War, 
1862; graduated A.B., New York University, 1865, and 
A.M., 1866; journalist, 1865-70; lawyer; President 
Brooklyn Sunday School Union, 1877-82; Trustee and 
Vice-President Berkeley Institute, Brooklyn, 1886-97 '> 
died, March 7, 1897. 

BENJAMIN HOLMES BAYLISS, A.M., an 
honored alumnus of New York University 
and a conspicuous member of the Psi Upsilon Fra- 
ternity, was the son of Samuel and Sarah (Bishop) 
Bayliss, and was born in Rochester, New York, on 
July 22, 1842. In New York University he was 
prominent as a member of Psi Upsilon, President of 
Eucleian, President of his class, and Eucleian Junior 
orator. His college life was interrupted by a term 
of service as a member of the Thirteenth Regiment, 
National Guard of New York, at Suffolk, Virginia. 
In 1865 he was graduated from the University with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts and for five years 
thereafter he was engaged in journalistic work. In 
1870 he began the practice of the law, and attained 
great success and honorable distinction in that pro- 
fession. He was a member of the Psi Upsilon Club 
of New York, and one of the most earnest and effi- 
cient supporters of that fraternity. He was a mem- 
ber and officer of the Memorial Presbyterian Church 
in Brooklyn, President of the Brooklyn Sunday 
School Union in 1877—82, and a Trustee and Vice- 
President of the Berkeley Institute, Brooklyn, from 
1886 to the end of his life. Mr. Bayliss was mar- 
ried on October 6, 1868, to Ellen P. Birdseye, who 
bore him five children : Lucien Samuel, Harold 
Holmes, Ernest Birdseye, Donald, and Katherine 
Bayliss. He died in Brooklyn on March 7, 1897. 
His sons, Lucien S. and Harold H. Bayliss, are 
alumni of New York University and members of 
Psi Upsilon, and the former has been a member of 
the New York State Legislature. 



CARRIER, Albert E., 1841- 

Class of 1865 Med. 
Born at Cape Vincent, N. Y., 1841 ; studied in public 
schools and Gouverneur, N. Y., Seminary ; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1865; began 
practice in 1865 ; Demonstrator in Detroit, Mich., Col- 
lege of Medicine, 1880-82, and Professor since 1882; 
writer on medical topics. 

ALBERT E. CARRIER, M.D., Professor of 
Dermatology and Clinical Medicine in the 
Detroit, Michigan, College of Medicine, was born 
at Cape Vincent, Jefferson County, New York, on 



May r6, 1841, the son of Augustus and Frances 
Murilla (Ainsworth) Carrier. His ancestors came 
from England, and several of them served in the 
Revolutionary Army and in the War of 181 2. His 
paternal grandfather was a Collector of Customs for 
twelve years in the northern district of New York 
State. Dr. Carrier studied in the public schools of 
Detroit, Michigan, and at Gouverneur Seminary, 
Gouverneur, New York. In 1862 he entered the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part of 
New York University, and was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1865. He im- 




ALBERT E. CARRIER 

mediately began the practice of his profession in 
Detroit, Michigan, but was soon compelled to sus- 
pend it on account of poor health. He then 
engaged in lumbering in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, 
and Canada for three years, and again undertook 
medical practice, in Detroit. Again his health 
failed, and he relinquished his practice and opened 
a drug store at Batavia, Illinois, which he conducted 
for three years. At the end of that time he re- 
turned to Detroit and resumed medical work, in 
which he has ever since been engaged. In 1880 
he was appointed Demonstrator of Anatomy in the 
Detroit College of Medicine. He was made Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy in 1882, and Professor of Anat- 
omy and Dermatology in 1883. Since 1892 he has 



86 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



been Professor of Dermatology and Clinical Med- 
icine. In 1886 he was appointed Visiting Physician 
to Harper Hospital, but resigned the place in 1888 
since which time he has been Dermatologist to that 
hospital and also to St. Mary's Hospital and to the 
Woman's Hospital and Infant's Home. He was 
Coroner of Wayne County, Michigan, in 1882-83, 
President of the Detroit Medical and Library 
Association in 1890, Vice-President of the Wayne 
County Medical Society in 1898-99, and Vice- 
President of the Michigan State Medical Society 
in 1 89 1. Beside the organizations already men- 
tioned he belongs to the American Medical Associ- 
ation, the Fellowcraft Club of Detroit and the 
Masonic Order. His writings include, " The Thera- 
peutics of Cutaneous Diseases," in "The Medical 
News " ; " Eczema : Its Treatment," in " The Ann 
Arbor Register " ; " Pigmentation Following the Use 
of Arsenic," in "The Medical News"; " Erysipelas 
and Its Treatment," in "The Physician and Sur- 
geon " ; " Recurring Exfoliative Dermatitis," " Bald 
Heads," and "Management of Eczema in Chil- 
dren," read before the Michigan State Medical 
Society. He was married on January 3, 1866, to 
Irene Scott Hibbard, and has had five children, 
of whom two, Augustus and Irene Carrier, are now 
living. His address is Suite 423, Stevens Building, 
corner Washington and Grand River avenues, 
Detroit, Michigan. 



York City. He was married in 1883 to Mary 
Vincent, and died on October 22, 1890, at Tre- 
mont, New York. 



CAVARLY, John Folks, 1845-1890. 

Class of 1865 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1845; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1865; Instructor, Flushing Institute, 1865-70; 
chemist, 1870-89; in insurance business, 1889-90; died, 
iSgo. 

JOHN FOLKS CAVARLY, A.B., was born in 
New York City in 1845, the son of John 
Philip Cavarly and .\lice (Van Schaick) Cavarly. 
In New York University he won the Freshman 
Latin and Mathematical prizes and the Sophomore 
Mathematical Prize, and was a Junior orator and 
Valedictorian of his class at Commencement. He 
was a member of Zeta Psi. He was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1865, and for the 
next five years was Instructor in Mathematics and 
Natural Sciences in the Flushing Institute, at Flush- 
ing, New York. Thereafter he was engaged as a 
chemist in chemical works in Long Island City, 
New York, until 1889. In 1889-90 he was asso- 
ciated with the Queens Insurance Company in New 



DOWNEY, William Stewart, 1840- 

Class of 1865 Med. 
Born in Canada, 1840 ; educated in public schools 
and under tutor; graduated A.B., Victoria University, 
Canada, 1862, M.D., 1865, A.M., 1866; M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1865, and Toronto University, 
i8go; in practice since 1865; Army Surgeon and School 
Trustee in Canada. 

WILLIAM STEWART DOWNEY, A.M., 
M.D., son of Robert and Frances (Stew- 
art) Downey, both of whom were born in County 




W. S. DOWNEY 

Fermanagh, Ireland, was born in Simcoe County, 
Ontario, Canada, on March 17, 1840. He at- 
tended public schools, and studied under a private 
tutor, the Rev. Arthur Hill, A.B. (Oxford). He 
was graduated from Victoria University, Cobourg, 
Canada, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in . 
1862, and received from the institution the degrees 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1865 and Master of 
Arts in 1866. He was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine from the Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, in 1865, and received the same degree 
from Toronto University in 1890. He is a licen- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



87 



tiate of the Illinois State Board of Health and of 
the Ontario Medical Council. He began practice 
at St. Catharines, Canada, on October i, 1865, 
and remained there until October 16, 1891, when 
he removed to Chicago, where he still remains. 
In Canada he was a Militia Surgeon in 1871-73, 
and a Marine Hospital Surgeon from 1886 to 1891. 
During the latter period he was also a Trustee of 
the public schools of St. Catharines. He is a 
member of the Ontario and the Chicago Medical 
societies, of the Illinois Club, and of the Masonic 
Order. He was married on September 7, 1870, 
to Lydia St. John, and has three children : William 
St. John, Archibald Stewart, and Edyth Louise 
Downey. His address is No. 550 Jackson Boule- 
vard, Chicago, Illinois. 



DOYLE, Gregory, 1840- 

Class of 1865 Med. 
Born at Killena, Ireland, 1840 ; brought to U. S., 1841 ; 
educated at St. James's Academy, Binghamton, N. Y., 
and Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, Suspension 
Bridge, N. Y.; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1865 ; LL. D., Niagara University, i8g8 ; 
Health Officer, Pensions Examiner, etc., in practice 
since 1865, now at Syracuse, N. Y. 

GREGORY DOYLE, M.D., LL.D., son of 
James and .Anne (Roche) Doyle, was 
born at Killena, County Wexford, Ireland, on 
March 28, 1840. In the following year, his pa- 
rents, who lived on a small farm in Ireland, came 
to the United States, bringing him with them. His 
first schooling was received at St. James's Academy, 
at Binghamton, New York, from 1850 to 1857. 
Thence he went to the Seminary of Our Lady of 
Angels, now known as Niagara University, at Sus- 
pension Bridge, Nevv York, and there from 1857 to 
1 86 1 pursued a thorough classical course. He then 
repaired to New York City for the study of medi- 
cine. His studies were pursued in the office of Dr. 
Lewis A. Sayre, in the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, and in the Medical College of New York 
University, from which last named he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1865. 
Thereafter he continued for some time as an assist- 
ant to Dr. Sayre, thus adding to his medical and 
surgical knowledge and practical skill. His inde- 
pendent practice was begun in Binghamton, New 
York, whence he removed to Syracuse, New York, 
in which latter city he has since been settled, in the 
enjoyment of a large and important practice. He 
has been Health Officer and Health Commissioner 



of the City of Syracuse, Surgeon of the Fifty- First 
Regiment, National Guard of New York, and Presi- 
dent of the United States Examining Board for Pen- 
sions, at Syracuse. For many years he was Official 
Surgeon to the New York, West Shore & Buffalo 
Railroad Company, and at present he is Surgeon to 
the House of Providence and to St. Vincent's Asy- 
lum, at Syracuse. He is a member of the American 
Medical Association, the Onondaga County Medical 
Association, the Syracuse Academy of Medicine, and 
the Syracuse Citizen's Club. Dr. Doyle has con- 
tributed many addresses and papers to the current 




GREGORY DOYLE 

literature of his profession. In November, 1880, he 
read a paper before the New York Central Medical 
Association, recommending the dressing of Colle's 
fracture, and fractures of the leg, with Plaster of 
Paris splints made in section so as to be easily 
removable without pain. This paper was published 
in " The International Journal of Medicine and Sur- 
gery." Dr. Doyle invented at about that time a 
spiral spring rotator, for the automatic eversion of 
talipes, and has been the inventor of various other 
orthopaedic appliances. He has four times visited 
Europe and made valuable observations in foreign 
institutions of learning, beside travelling much in 
the United States. He was married in 1868 to 
Urania Morel, daughter of Justin Morel, a French 



88 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



merchant of St. Louis, Missouri, and has had one 
child, a son, who died at the age of fourteen years. 
His address is No. 307 West Genesee street, Syra- 
cuse, New York. 



GRAY, John Clinton, 1843- 

Class of 1865 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1843; University of Berlin, 1860-61 ; 
graduated A.B., New York University, 1865, and A.M., 
1868; graduated LL.B., Harvard, 1866; practiced law 
in New York, 1866-87; Judge of Court of Appeals, 
New York, since 1888. 

JOHN CLINTON GRAY, A.M., one of the fore- 
most jurists of the State of New York and 
occupant of one of its highest judicial offices, is a 
son of John A. C. and Susan Maria (Zabriskie) 
Gray, and on both the paternal and maternal sides 
belongs to families long eminently identified with 
New York University and with the public life of New 
York and the United States. He was born in New 
York City on December 4, 1843, ^nd received 
a particularly thorough education. In 1860-61 he 
was a student at the University of Berlin, whence 
he came to New York University. In the latter he 
was a member of Psi Upsilon. He was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1865, and in 
1868 received the degree of Master of Arts from the 
University. Thence he proceeded to the Law 
School of Harvard University, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1866. From 
that time to the end of 1887 he practiced his pro- 
fession in New York City with success. At the 
beginning of 1888 he took his place on the Bench 
of the Court of Appeals of New York State, by ap- 
pointment of the Governor, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of Judge Rapallo. He was elected for 
a full term in the fall election of 1888 and has there 
remained ever since, being re-elected for another 
term in the fall of 1902. His office is at Albany, 
New York, but his residence is in New York City, 
where he is a Fellow of the National Academy of 
Design, a patron of the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, and of the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, a member of the New York Historical Society, 
and of the New York State Bar Association. 



AINSWORTH, Herman Reeve, 1841- 

Class of i366Med. 
Born at Erieville, N. Y., 1841 ; studied in common 
schools at Brookfield and Earlville, N. Y., Cortland 
Academy at Homer, N. Y., and Madison University; 
taught school, 1857-63 ; graduated M.D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1866; in practice since 1866 at 



Addison, N. Y. ; President of Steuben County Medical 
Society, 1874-75 ; member of Board of Education of 
Addison for fifteen years ; President of Addison Public 
Library. 

HERMAN REEVE AINSWORTH, M.D., is 
a descendant of New England stock, who 
had four great-grandfathers and one great-great 
grandfather in the Revolutionary Army. The 
founder of the Ainsworth family in America was 
Edward Ainsworth, of Woodstock, Connecticut, 
whose youngest son was Nathan. The latter had a 
son also named Nathan, who was a Revolutionary 
soldier, and died a prisoner in the hands of the 




H. R. AINSWORTH 

British in 1777. A posthumous son of the second 
Nathan Ainsworth was Abial Ainsworth, who in 
1800 left Woodstock, Connecticut, for New Wood- 
stock, New York, where fourteen years later was 
born to him a son whom he named Sorannus Corbin. 
The last named became a minister of the Baptist 
church, married Caroline Martha Hawkins, and was 
the father of the subject of this sketch. Herman 
Reeve Ainsworth was born at Erieville, Madison 
County, New York, on September 29, 184 1. In his 
boyhood he attended the public schools at Brook- 
field and Earlville, New York, and later the Cortland 
Academy at Homer, New York, where he was under 
the direction of the late Stephen W. Clark, Master of 
Arts (Amherst). A year at Madison, now Colgate, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



University completed his purely academic training, 
and prepared him to enter upon his professional 
studies. Meantime, from 1857 to 1863, he taught 
a public school while pursuing his own studies. He 
began the study of medicine in 1862, under Drs. 
Nelson and Newcomb, of Truxton, New York, and 
later entered the Medical College of New York Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine in March, 1866. Since 
the time of his graduation Dr. Ainsworth has been 
steadily engaged in practice at Addison, New York, 
and throughout a wide contiguous territory, his 
patrons, either for attendance or consultation, being 
found in many places in the states of New York 
and Pennsylvania. In June, 1866, he became a 
meniber of the Steuben County Medical Society, 
and in 1 874-1 875 was its President. He also 
joined the Elmira Academy of Medicine at an early 
date. He has been a member of the New York 
State Medical Society for twenty-five years, and of 
the American Medical Association for twenty-three 
years. He is a member of the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, of Addison 
Lodge and Chapter of Masons, and of St. Omar 
Commandery, Knights Templar, at Elmira, New 
York. For fifteen years he was a member of the 
Addison Board of Education, and was influential and 
largely instrumental in securing commodious brick 
school buildings at the cost of more than ^30,000, 
and has been for many years President of the 
Addison Public Library. In politics he is identified 
with the Republican party but he has never sought 
or accepted political office. While busied with his 
practice he has found time to write occasional arti- 
cles for the professional press on medical and surgi- 
cal topics. Dr. Ainsworth was married on May 25, 
1871, to Emma Younglove, daughter of Timothy M. 
and Matilda (Hoyt) Younglove, of Hammondsport, 
New York, and has two children : Carolyn M., wife 
of William Reynolds Park, of Addison, and Myra, 
wife of Wilfrid I. Booth, of Elmira, New York. His 
address is Addison, New York. 



ALLEN, Henry Bigelow, 1843- 

Class of 1866 Med. 
Born at Baldwinsville, N. Y., 1843; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1866; post-gradu- 
ate study, 1866-67; practiced medicine in St. Louis, 
Mo., 1867-68, at Euclid, N. Y., 1869-70, at Baldwinsville, 
N. Y., 1871-92, at Wickes, Montana, in charge of hospi- 
tal, 1892-93, at Syracuse, N. Y., 1893-97 ; Lecturer on 
Obstetrics, Syracuse University, 1885-86; Professor of 
Obstetrics, 1886-1902 ; Obstetrician to Hospital of the 



Good Shepherd, Syracuse, 1894-1902 ; Hospital Stew- 
ard, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment, New 
York Volunteers, 1865 ; President Onondaga County 
Medical Society, 1886. 

HENRY BIGELOW ALLEN, M.D., comes of 
New England ancestry. On the side of his 
father, Henry Young Allen, he is descended from a 
Quaker family of New Bedford, Massachusetts, his 
paternal grandparents having been James and Han- 
nah (Howland) Allen. On the side of his mother, 
whose maiden name was Marie Louise Bigelow, Dr. 
Allen is a grandchild of the Hon. Otis Bigelow, who 
was born at Worcester, Massachusetts, and Mary 




HENRY B. ALLEN 

(Payn) Bigelow, his wife, who was born at Fort 
Miller, on the Hudson River. The family names of 
Allen, Bigelow, Howland and Payn are still widely 
and well known in the respective localities named, 
as well as elsewhere. Dr. Allen was born at Bald- 
winsville, Onondaga County, New York, on Septem- 
ber 12, 1843, and in his early boyhood attended the 
free public school of that village. At the age of ten 
years he was placed under the care of a private 
tutor. Philander Durkee, at Saratoga Springs, and 
thus completed his general education to so good 
effect that in 1861, being then eighteen years of 
age, he was well qualified to teach school, at Pleas- 
ant Valley, New York. He had, however, a profes- 
sional career in view, and to that end he began the 



90 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



study of medicine under Dr. J. O. Slocum and Dr. 
J. P. Shuraway. From their preceptorships he pro- 
ceeded to the Albany Medical College for one year 
and then to Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and 
was there graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine, in 1866. A year of post-graduate study 
in the same institution followed before he consid- 
ered himself satisfactorily fitted for the practice of 
his profession. His practice began at St. Louis, 
Missouri, 186 7-1 868. Thence he returned to his 
native state and practiced at Euclid, New York, 
1869-1870. His third scene of activity was his 
birthplace, Baldwinsville, where he was in contin- 
uous practice from 1871 to 1892. From January, 
1892, to November, 1893, he was in charge of a hos- 
pital at Wickes, Montana, and finally, from 1893 
to 1897, he was at Syracuse, New York. From 
1894 to 1902 he was Obstetrician to the Hospital 
of the Good Shepherd, at Syracuse. Meantime he 
was a teacher as well as a practitioner. In 1885- 
1886 he was Lecturer on Obstetrics in the Syracuse 
College of Medicine, the Medical School of Syracuse 
University, and from 1886 to 1902 he was Professor 
of Obstetrics in the same institution. Dr. Allen's 
career was seriously interfered with in 1897 by ill 
health. He had contemplated an extended trip 
abroad, for the purpose of studying in the hospitals 
and medical schools of Europe. Instead, in the 
year named the state of his health compelled him 
to abandon those plans, to withdraw from the active 
practice of his profession, and to retire to his old 
home at Baldwinsville. He was able, however, to 
continue his college work until February, 1902, when 
increasing illness compelled him to forego further 
labors. In addition to the professional work already 
noted, Dr. Allen was Hospital Steward to the One 
Hundred and Forty-Ninth Regiment, New York 
Volunteers, in 1865. He is a member of the Onon- 
daga County Medical Society, and was its President 
in 1886. He is also a member of the .American 
Medical Association, of the Medical Association of 
Central New York, of the Syracuse Academy of 
medicine and of the Iota Chapter of the Alpha 
Kappa Kappa Fraternity. He was married on June 
15, 1870, to Julia Charlotte Smith, who bore him 
one child. The latter, James Howland Allen, was 
born on November 21, 1871, and died on July 
3. 1S94. 

FRITTS, John Thomas, 1844- 

Class of 1866 Med. 
Born at New Hampton, N. J., 1844 ; studied in public 
schools, and Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. ; 



graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1866; in practice since graduation; Surgeon for Central 
Railroad of N.J. since 1878; also Chief Surgeon to 
Plainfield Street Railway Company and Westfield and 
Elizabeth Street Railway Company. 

JOHN THOMAS FRITTS, M.D., is of Hol- 
land Dutch ancestry, his progenitors having 
come to America early in the Seventeenth Century. 
They were chiefly engaged in agriculture, and were 
substantial and progressive people. Some of them 
took part in the Revolutionary War. His father's 
name was John A. Fritts, and his mother's maiden 
name was Elizabeth Banghart. He was born on 




JNO. T. KRITl'S 

May 4, 1844, at New Hampton, Hunterdon County, 
New Jersey, and received his early education in the 
local public schools. Next he went to Pennsyl- 
vania College, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and was 
a student there when that village in 1863 became 
the scene of one of the greatest of the " decisive 
battles of the world." During his vacations he worked 
on his father's farm. After his interrupted career at 
Gettysburg, he entered Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, New York, now a part of New York Uni- 
versity, and was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine on March i, 1866. Since that dale he 
has been steadily engaged in the general practice 
of his profession in the City of Plainfield, New 
Jersey. Since 1878 he has been Surgeon to the Cen- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



91 



tral Railroad of New Jersey, and he is also Chief 
Surgeon to the Plainfield Street Railway Company 
and to the Westfield and Elizabeth Street Railway 
Company. From 1892 to 1896 he was a Pension 
Medical Examiner. In politics he has always been 
an earnest Republican. He is a member of Jerusa- 
lem Lodge, F. and A. M., Jerusalem Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, and Trinity Commandery, Knights 
Templar. He was married on February 26, 1868, 
to Margaret Hunt Suydam, and has three children : 
Lilian Earl, Mary Malvina, and Andrew Suydam 
Fritts, M.D. His address is No. 423 Park Avenue, 
Plainfield, New Jersey. 



HALL, Archibald Westervelt, 1846- 

Class of 1866 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1846; studied at Mechanics' 
Society School, 1857-59, and University Grammar 
School, 1859-62; graduated A.B., New York University, 
1866; studied law, and admitted to Bar in 1867; in 
practice since 1867. 

ARCHIBALD WESTERVELT HALL, A.B., 
son of Edward D. and Mary Jane (Wester- 
velt) Hall, is of Scotch ancestry on the paternal and 
Dutch on the maternal side. He was born in 
Bethune Street, New York City, on March 6, 1846, 
and studied in 1857-59 at the Mechanics' Society 
School in Crosby Street, New York, and in 1859- 
62 at the University Grammar School. In the 
fall of 1862 he entered the College of Arts and 
Science of New York University, then known as the 
University of the City of New York, and pursued 
the regular classical course with distinction. He 
won the Freshman Latin Prize, was a Junior orator, 
was President of his class in the Senior year, and 
was a Commencement orator. He was also Presi- 
dent of the Philomathean Society, and a member of 
Zeta Psi and Phi Beta Kappa. He was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in 1866, studied 
law, was admitted to the New York Bar in 1867, 
and has been in practice ever since. His address 
is No. 879 Clinton Avenue, Irvington, New York. 
Mr. Hall is unmarried. 



HALL, Ernest, 1844- 

Class of 1866 Lav^r, 
Born in London, England, 1844; came to America 
in 1850; educated in public schools of New York; 
served in Civil War ; graduated LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1866; began practice in 1866; 
Corporation Counsel of Morrisania, 1872-74; Justice 



of City Court, New York, 1882-88; Referee in Bank- 
ruptcy, 1898; Supreme Court Justice, 1902. 

ERNEST HALL, LL.B., lawyer and judge, was 
born in London, England, on October 24, 
1844, the son of Henry Bryan Hall and Mary Ann 
(Denison) Hall. His father was one of the best 
known steel engravers of his time. In 1850 the 
family removed to the United States, and Ernest 
was educated in the public schools of New York 
City. He served in the Civil War with three of his 
brothers, being a member of the New York Seventy- 
first Regiment, and taking part in the Gettysburg 
campaign and also in the two battles at Fort Fisher, 
in these latter being in the naval service on the 
warship " Mohican." After the war he entered the 
Law School of New York University, and was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1866. 
He at once began the practice of his profession in 
the Village of Morrisania, now a part of the Borough 
of The Bronx, New York City, and quickly rose to 
prominence at the Bar. He was Corporation Coun- 
sel of Morrisania from 1872 to 1874, in which latter 
year the village was annexed to New York City. In 
1882-88 he was a Judge of the City Court of New 
York, and in i8g8 he was appointed a Referee in 
Bankruptcy. In 1902 he was appointed to a place 
on the Bench of the Supreme Court of the State of 
New York, to fill a vacancy, and served until the 
end of that year. He has been counsel for a num- 
ber of important corporations, and has been engaged 
inmany cases of great interest. He is a member of 
the Lawyers', New York Athletic, North Side Re- 
publican and other clubs, and the Grand Army of 
the Republic. Justice Hall was married on October 
13, 1869, to Charita M. Talient, and has two chil- 
dren. His office is at No. 62 William Street, and 
his home at No. 1087 Boston Road, Borough of 
The Bronx, New York. 



HENDRICKSON, Asa Chichester, 1845- 
1886. 

Class of 1866 Sci. 
Born at Hempstead, N. Y., 1845; graduated B.S., 
and C.E., New York University, 1866 ; Civil Engineer 
in Central America, and in Brooklyn Water Depart- 
ment ; died, 1886. 

ASA CHICHESTER HENDRICKSON, B.S., 
C.E., was a son of George W. and Abigail 
(Chichester) Hendrickson, and was born at Hemp- 
stead, New York, on September 16, 1845. He was 
conspicuous as a student in New York University, 
being winner of the Sophomore Mathematical 



92 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Prize, Junior orator, Vice-President of Pliiloma- 
thean, Englisli Salutatorian at Commencement, and 
a member of Zeta Psi and Plii Beta Kappa. He 
was graduated in 1866 with the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Civil Engineer. Thereafter for some 
years he was employed by the governments of 
Nicaragua and Guatemala as a Civil Engineer on 
railroad and canal enterprises. On his return to 
this country he became an Assistant Engineer in 
the Water Department of Brooklyn, New York, and 
he died in that city on June 24, 1886. He was 
married on September 16, 1868, to Phoebe W. 
Jones, daughter of Israel Jones, and had three chil- 
dren ; Paul J., Edna, and Ada G. Hendrickson. 
His brother, Skidmore Hendrickson, was a member 
of the New York University Class of 1863. 



ROOSEVELT, Charles Yates, 1845-1883. 

Classof iSee Arts. 
Born in New York, 1845 ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1866, and A.M., 1869; U. S. Consul at 
Copenhagen, 1866-67; lived in Paris after 1867; died, 
1883. 

CHARLES YATES ROOSEVELT, A.M., a 
member of the distinguished New York 
family of that name, was born in New York City in 
1845, and entered the College of Arts and Science 
of New York University in the fall of 1862. He 
was a member of Psi Upsilon, and ranked high in 
point of scholarship. In 1866 he was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and three years 
later the University bestowed upon him that of 
Master of Arts. He was United States Consul at 
Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1866-67, ^^^ after the 
latter year resided in Paris, France, where he died 
in November, 1883. 



SELL, Edward Herman Miller, 1832- 

Classof 1866 Med. 
Born in Lehigh County, Pa., 1832 ; studied in various 
schools and seminaries; graduated A.B., Pennsylvania 
College, 1856, and A.M., 1859; graduated Theological 
Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa., 1858; studied medicine at 
Bellevue, Columbia and New York University ; gradu- 
ated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1866; 
studied for some years abroad ; graduated Master of 
Obstetrics, Vienna, 1872 ; in hospital and private prac- 
tice in New York since 1866; voluminous contributor 
to medical literature. 

EDWARD HERMAN MILLER SELL, A.M., 
M.D., one of the distinguished physicians 
of the time, was born in Upper Saucon Township, 



Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, on August 16, 1832. 
He is the son of Samuel Sell, grandson of Peter 
Sell, who was born in Northampton (now Lehigh) 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1757, and great-grandson 
of Henry Sell, who came to this country in 1739 
from The Palatinate, to which country he had for- 
merly gone from Switzerland. The Sell family was 
originally French Huguenot. On the maternal side 
Dr. Sell is tlie son of Mary Miller Sell, grandson 
of George Miller, a soldier in the War of 181 2, 
great-grandson of Conrad Miller, a drummer boy in 
the Revolution, and great-great-grandson of Jacob 




EDWARD H. M. SELL 

Miller, who in 1 740 came to this country from 
Wiirtemberg, Germany. Dr. Sell was first sent to 
the local public school. At the age of nine years he 
spent one term in a Moravian school at Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania ; from his fourteenth to his sixteenth 
year he was in a Friends' school at Quakertown, 
Pennsylvania ; and two years more were spent at 
Allentown (Pennsylvania) Seminary, now Muhlen- 
berg College. At the age of sixteen he taught 
school for three terms, attending school during the 
winter. In 1852 he was admitted to the Freshman 
class of Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, from which he was graduated in 1856 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, delivering the Ger- 
man Oration at Commencement. Thence he went 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



93 



to the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg for two 
years, and was graduated from it in 1858. During 
the winter of 1858-59 he taught school a fourth 
term. He spent his college and seminary vacations 
in missionary and colporteur work. He received the 
degree of Master of Arts from Pennsylvania College 
in 1859. On being graduated from the Theological 
Seminary he entered the ministry and devoted five 
years to that calling with much energy, often preach- 
ing as many as five times in a day. At length, how- 
ever, he decided to turn his attention to the practice 
of medicine, and accordingly began his studies there- 
for, under Dr. John Floto, at Allentown, Pennsyl- 
vania. Later he attended a summer school of 
medicine, conducted by a number of physicians. 
He attended two winter courses and one summer 
course of lectures at the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College ; the lectures of Professors Alonzo Clark, 
T. Gaiilard Thomas and others at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons (Columbia) ; and the lec- 
tures of Drs. Abraham Jacobi, Valentine Mott and 
Charles Budd at the New York University Medical 
College. He also visited classes at the De Milt 
Dispensary. He received his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, now a part of New York University, in 1866. 
Dr. Sell practiced his profession for four and a half 
years in New York City, after graduation, and then 
went abroad for further study. Three and a half 
years were spent in the principal hospitals of Europe, 
notably those of Paris, Vienna, Berlin, London, Edin- 
burgh, Glasgow, Dublin, etc. In these he made 
many special and original researches. At the Uni- 
versity of Vienna in 1872, upon the presentation of 
a number of these he received the degree of Master 
of Obstetrics. At later dates he has revisited Europe 
for further study and research, especially in gyne- 
cology, obstetrics, and chronic diseases, including 
the alcohol and opium habits. He served through 
the cholera epidemic of 1866 in New York, and 
also the small-pox epidemic of 1869, having been 
specially appointed for the service by the New York 
Board of Health. In 1870-71 he was in Paris dur- 
ing the siege, and later in the latter year he organ- 
ized at the University of Vienna the first and, at 
that time, the only practical gynecological operative 
course in the world. From 1869 to 1880 he was 
Editor of "The Physician and Pharmacist." On his 
return from Europe he was, from 1873 to 1876, 
Physician to the Northeastern Dispensary of New 
York for Diseases of the Head and of the Abdomen, 
and also for Diseases of Women. From 1874 to 1884 



he was Physician to the Eastern Dispensary for Dis- 
eases of Women. In 1876 he was one of the seven 
physicians who organized, at the Centennial Expo- 
sition in Philadelphia, the American Academy of 
Medicine. About the same time he discovered and 
brought to the attention of the medical profession 
the properties of Avena sativa, the common oat, for 
the cure of alcoholism and the opium habit. He is 
a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and 
has been Chairman of its Section on Theory and 
Practice of Medicine ; a Fellow of the American 
Academy of Medicine, and its Vice-President and 
Treasurer ; a permanent member of the American 
Medical Association ; a member of the New York 
County Medical Society, and formerly one of its 
Board of Censors ; a member and for a number of 
years a Trustee of the Medico- Legal Society of New 
York ; a Fellow of the Obstetrical Society of Lon- 
don ; a member of the Socie'te Francjaise d'Electro- 
therapie, of Paris ; a member of the Society of 
German Naturalists and Physicians, of Germany, 
and a delegate to its forty-fifth annual meeting at 
Leipsic in 1872 ; a member of the Medical Society 
of the Greater City of New York; a delegate from 
the American Medical Association in 1870, 1873, 
and 1876, to the meetings of the British Medical 
Association, and also its delegate to the Interna- 
tional Medical Congress of 1890 at Berlin and that 
of 1894 at Rome. He is also a life member of the 
Huguenot Society of America, a member of the 
Republican Club of New York ; and a member and 
first President of the Gettysburg Club of New York. 
His published writings include treatises on " Puer- 
peral Eclampsia," " Opium Poisoning in Children, 
with Recovery by Use of Electricity," " A Case 
of Complete Uterus Bicornis," " Fibroid Polypus 
Uteri," "Intestinal Obstruction," "Tapping Ova- 
rian Cysts," " Ovariotomy," " Ulcerations of Oesoph- 
agus and Duodenum," " Amputation of Neck of 
Uterus by Electro-cautery," " Obstetrics in Vienna," 
"Cystic Tumor of the Vagina," "An Interesting 
Case of Ovariotomy," " The Opium Habit," "Pro- 
cidentia Uteri," etc. He has performed many nota- 
ble operations in surgery, as well as cures without 
operation. He has been a wide and observant 
traveller in nearly all parts of the world. His tour 
of 1886-87 took the doctor sixty thousand miles 
" around the world." Dr. Sell was married on Jan- 
uary 17, 1894, to Anna J. Lloyd, of Delphos, Ohio, 
who has borne him two sons : Edward Lloyd and 
Charles Samuel Sell. His address is No. 137 West 
94th Street, New York. 



94 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



SPELLMEYER, Henry, 1847- 

Class of 1866 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1847; studied at University 
Grammar School ; graduated A.B., New York Univer- 
sity, 1866, and A.M., 1869 ; Union Theological Seminary, 
1867-69; minister of Methodist Episcopal Church since 
1869; member of General Conferences of 1896 and 1900, 
and of Ecumenical Conference, London, 1901 ; Trustee 
of Syracuse University, Secretary of Board of Trustees, 
Drew Theological Seminary, etc.; D.D., Syracuse 
University, 1878. 

HENRY SPELLMEYER, A.M., D.D., a promi- 
nent minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, was born in New York City on November 




HENRY SPELLMEYER 

25, 1847. His father, the late Matthias Henry Spell- 
meyer, was a native of Germany, and his mother, now 
deceased, whose maiden name was Mary Jamison, 
was born in Scotland. Dr. Spellmeyer was educated 
in the University Grammar School in New York, 
and thence proceeded in 1862 to New York Uni- 
versity. He was a member of Delta Upsilon, 
Treasurer of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and Junior orator, and was graduated in 1866 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Three years 
later the University gave him the degree of Master 
of Arts. From the University he went to the Union 
Theological Seminary, where he was a student in 
1867-69. Finally, on March 26, 1871, he was 
ordained an Elder in the ministry of the Methodist 



Episcopal Church, by Bishop Randolph S. Foster, 
at the session of the Newark Conference at Port 
Jervis, New York. To the work to which he was 
thus called he has chiefly devoted his life since 
that time. He has been pastor of the following 
churches : Stapleton, Staten Island, New York, 
1869-72; Bloomfield, New Jersey, 1872-75; Cen- 
tral Church, Newark, New Jersey, 1875-78; St. 
James's, Elizabeth, New Jersey, 1878-81; Trinity, 
JerseyCity, New Jersey, 1881-84; Central, Newark, 
New Jersey, 1884-87 ; Calvary, East Orange, New 
Jersey, 1887-92; Central, Newark, 1892-97; and 
Roseville, Newark, since 1897. Thus in every place 
he has remained the entire period permitted by the 
rules of the church. All his charges have been 
within sight of the City of Newark, New Jersey, 
and ten miles or less therefrom. He has declined 
to accept frequent calls to prominent churches of 
his own and other denominations in large cities in 
other parts of the country. He was a member of 
the Methodist General Conferences of 1896 and 
1900, and a delegate to the Ecumenical Conference 
in London in 1901. In 1896-1902 he was a mem- 
ber of the Book Committee of the Methodist 
Church, which has charge of the publishing interests 
of the entire church, fixes the salaries of bishops 
and editors, and transacts much other important 
business. He is also Chairman of the Commission 
on Entertainment of the General Conferences for 
the years 1900-04. Dr. Spellmeyer is a Trustee of 
Syracuse University, which gave him the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1878, a Trustee of the Cen- 
tenary Collegiate Institute at Hackettstown, New 
Jersey, and Secretary of the Board of Trustees of 
Drew Theological Seminary at Madison, New Jersey. 
At the Methodist General Conference of 1900 he 
was a prominent candidate for the office of Bishop, 
receiving 372 votes out of 684, or considerably 
more than a majority. On two successive ballots 
only eighty votes additional were required for an 
election. The rule, however, required a two-thirds 
majority to elect. Dr. Spellmeyer was married on 
November 8, 187 1, to Matilda M. W. Smith, daugh- 
ter of the late Rev. Thomas H. Smith, and has had 
four children, of whom only one is now living, 
Luella Gladwin, wife of James Burgess Boote of 
East Orange, New Jersey. His address is No. 97 
Fourth Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. 



WOOD, James Robie, 1838- 

Classof 1866 Med. 
Born in New York, 1838 ; studied in private schools, 
Macon, Ga. ; Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., Med- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



95 



ical College of Virginia, and Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College; graduated M.D., 1866; received degree LL.D. 
from St. Francis Xavier College, 1897 ; served in Con- 
federate Army in Civil War; one of the founders of 
Hahnemann Hospital, New York ; frequent contributor 
to current medical literature. 

JAMES ROBIE WOOD, M.D., was born in New 
York City on February 7, 1838. His father, 
James Wood, M.D., a native of South Carolina, 
was a graduate of the Harvard University Medical 
School in 1829, and served on the hospital staff in 
Boston. His mother, whose maiden name was 
Charlotte Mary Walley, was a descendant of General 




JAMES ROBIE WOOD 

John Walley, one of the original owners of the 
Mount Hope lands in Rhode Island and founders 
of the City of Bristol, and was commander of the 
land forces which attacked Frontenac at Quebec. 
Dr. Wood's early life was spent largely in the South. 
He attended private schools at Macon, Georgia, and 
was then sent north again to the Phillips Academy 
at Andover, Massachusetts. His professional studies 
were begun at the Medical College of Virginia. 
He entered the Confederate Army and served 
throughout the Civil War. He was attached to 
the Medical Department of General Lee's Army, 
and was wounded many times while attending 
wounded soldiers on battlefields. Upon the evacu- 
ation of Richmond by General Lee he was left by 



that commander to surrender the sick and wounded 
of the Georgia hospitals to the Federal forces, and 
was requested by the United States medical officers 
to remain in charge of the " hospital gangrene 
tents," whereupon all cases of gangrene from the 
Richmond hospitals were put under his care. After 
the war he entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, which has since been incorporated with 
New York University, and was graduated from it 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1866, 
since which time he has been engaged in practice 
in New York. In 1867 he volunteered to and did 
take charge of Asiatic cholera patients. He was 
one of the founders of the Hahnemann Hospital in 
New York. He was also for some time a Visiting 
Physician to the Ward's Island Hospital, where in 
1875 he conducted a series of experiments, in which 
he aimed to justify the theories of the early " Iso- 
paths " (which were not unlike the antitoxin theories 
which have grown out of Pasteur's researches) by 
inoculating animals with germs of disease, particu- 
larly tuberculosis, and obtaining from them a serum 
with which to inoculate persons suffering from the 
same disease. He is at present Visiting Physician 
to the Metropolitan and Consumptive hospitals on 
Blackwell's Island. He has written many articles 
for the medical press, chief among them being 
a series on " The Probable Future of Therapeutics," 
and some articles on the use of sulphur in medicine. 
Ill 1897 he received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from St. Francis Xavier College. He was married 
on June 14, 1873, to Katherine E. O'Donoughue, 
and has three children : Alfred Trenchard Wood, 
M.D., Paul Trenchard and Marie Trenchard Wood. 
His office is at No. 43 West 19th Street, New York, 
and his home at No. 13 Franklin Avenue, New 
Brighton, Staten Island, New York. 



WOOLLEY, James Van Siclen, 1843- 

Class of 1866 Arts, 1868 Med. 
Born at Jamaica, N. Y., 1843; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1866 ; Long Island College Hospital, 
1867; graduated M.D., New York University Medical 
College, 1868; physician, 1868-80; architect and builder 
since 1880. 

JAMES VAN SICLEN WOOLLEY, A.B., M.D., 
is a son of William Henry Woolley and Joanna 
Wyckoff (Van Siclen) Woolley, the former of Eng- 
lish and the latter of Dutch descent, and was born 
at Jamaica, now a part of New York City, on No- 
vember 5, 1843. He entered New York Univer- 
sity in i860, won the Sophomore Latin Prize and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



was Junior orator, President of Eucleian, a member 
of Zeta Psi and Phi Beta Kappa, and Valedictorian 
of his class. He was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1866. He was in the Engineer- 




JAMES V. S. WOOLLEY 

ing Department of the Long Island Railroad in 
1866. He studied medicine in the Long Island 
College Hospital in 1867 and in 1868 was gradu- 
ated from the Medical College of New York Uni- 
versity with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
Thereafter he practiced his profession in New York 
City until 1880, being meantime Attending Surgeon 
to the North East Dispensary, and Visiting Phy- 
sician to the Presbyterian Hospital. Since 1880 
he has been in the business of an architect and 
builder. He was married on December 19, 1878, 
to Emma Josephine Walsh, n^e Brinckerhoff, and 
has had seven children : James Stanley, Emma, 
Estelle, Helena, William Henry, Edwin Ruthven 
and Charles Chester Woolley, of whom Helene and 
Edwin Ruthven died in infancy. His address is 
No. 75 East Seventy-ninth Street, New York. 



1865; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, 1866; in practice since 1866; Lecturer, Univer- 
sity of Vermont, 1870, and Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, 1867-93 ; popular writer on medical and hygi- 
enic subjects. 

LEROY MILTON YALE, A.M., M.D., is a 
descendant of Thomas Yale, the father of 
Elihu Yale, whose name is borne by Yale Uni- 
versity, also of Henry Luce, who came from Jersey 
or Guernsey and settled on the Island of Martha's 
Vineyard about 1670 or earlier. His father was 
Leroy Milton Yale, M.D., and his mother's maiden 
name was Maria Allen Luce. He was born at 
Holmes's Hole, now known as Vineyard Haven, 
Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts, on Febru- 
ary 12, 1 84 1, and received his early education in a 
public school and later at the Kimball Union Acad- 
emy, Meridan, New Hampshire, in 1855-58. In 
the fall of the latter year he was matriculated at 
Columbia College, New York, and in 1862 was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 
1865 Columbia gave him the degree of Master ot 
Arts. Upon receiving his Baccalaureate degree he 
began the study of medicine at the Bellevue Hospital 




LEROY MILTON VALE 



YALE, Leroy Milton, 1841- 

Class of 1866 Med. 
Born at Holmes's Hole, Mass., 1841 ; studied in 
public school and Kimball Union Academy, Meridan, 
N. H.; graduated Columbia, A.B., 1862, and A.M. 



Medical College, which now forms a part of New York 
University, and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in i866. Meantime, in 1864-5, 
he served on the House Staff of the Brooklyn City 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



97 



Hospital, and in 1866 he similarly served at the 
Charity Hospital on Blackwell's Island. Since 1866 
he has been engaged in practice in New York 
City. Dr. Yale's hospital and teaching services have 
been considerable. He was Physician, and later 
Surgeon, to the Charity Hospital, Blackwell's Island, 
in 1871-77, Surgeon at Bellevue Hospital in 1877- 
82, and Surgeon to the Presbyterian Hospital in 
1880-85. I"^ 1870 he was Lecturer on Obstetrics 
at the University of Vermont, and from 1867 to 1893 
he was an Instructor and Lecturer in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College. He has also since 1884 
done much popular writing on medical and hygienic 
topics, especially in connection with the magazine 
" Babyhood." Compilations of his writings have 
several times been published in book form, the 
latest being "The Century Book for Mothers," 1901. 
He has also written popular articles on angling and 
other out-of-doors sports, chiefly for " Scribner's 
Magazine." He is a member of the Century Asso- 
ciation, the New York County Medical Society, the 
American Pediatric Society, and other bodies, and is 
a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. 
He was married on December 6, 1881, to JuUa 
Meriam Stetson, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, 
and has two children living : Leroy Milton and Julia 
Meriara Yale. His home is at No. 432 Madison 
Avenue, New York. 



BAKER, Flavius J., 1843- 

Class of 1867 Med. 
Born at Andover, N. Y., 1843; studied at Lima, now 
Syracuse University; graduated M.D., New York Uni- 
versity, 1867, and in gynecology, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1888 ; practiced medicine at Andover, Suffern, 
Youngstown, Buffalo and Lockport, N. Y. ; was Presi- 
dent of Niagara County Medical Society, and Health 
Officer of Lockport, N. Y. ; Owner and Surgeon of 
Walnut Hospital, Lockport ; engaged in general surgi- 
cal practice, with special attention to gynecology. 

FLAVIUS J. BAKER, M.D., is on both sides 
of the house descended from the earliest 
New England colonists. On the paternal side his 
first American ancestors were Alexander and 
Elizabeth Baker. Their son, Joshua Baker, mar- 
ried a sister of Elizabeth Touge, the wife of Fitz 
John Winthrop, Governor of Connecticut and son 
of John Winthrop, Governor of Massachusetts. 
Alexander and Elizabeth Baker had also a daughter, 
Mary Baker, who was the mother of Ethan Allen, 
the hero of Ticonderoga. Dr. Baker is directly 
descended from Mary Baker, in the fifth generation. 
His paternal grandfather, while surveying a large 
VOL. II. — 7 



tract of land for the Poultney Estate in New York 
State about 1802-04, selected a half mile square on 
the present site of Andover, New York, and removed 
his family thither from Poultney, Vermont. He 
was the first Justice of the Peace of Andover, and 
was a conspicuous leader in the anti-slavery and 
abolition movement. His son, Thaddeus Baker, 
who was six months old at the time of the removal 
from Poultney to Andover, became a prominent 
physician in that part of New York for half a cen- 
tury, and was the father of the subject of this sketch. 
On the side of his mother, whose maiden name was 




F. J. BAKER 

Sarah Storrs Spicer, Dr. Baker is descended directly 
from "Mayflower" Pilgrims. His maternal grand- 
father was both a physician and an ordained Con- 
gregational clergyman, who had a prominent part 
in mission work in the early history of Western New 
York. The son of Thaddeus and Sarah S. Baker, 
Flavius J. Baker, was born at Andover, New York, 
on July t8, 1843. , His early education was re- 
ceived in the common schools of his native town. 
Later he pursued a course in the University at Lima, 
New York, which has since been developed into 
Syracuse University. Feeling a strong inclination 
toward the medical profession, he began studying 
for it in his father's office at Andover. Thence he 
went to the Medical Department of the New York 



)8 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



University, and was duly graduated from it with iiis 
Doctor's degree in the Class of 1867. Twenty-one 
years later he took a special course in gynecology at 
the University of Pennsylvania, and was graduated 
there. It may be added that during his school and 
college career he himself taught school for a con- 
siderable time in his native town and county. Upon 
graduation from New York University, Dr. Baker 
engaged in the practice of his profession for five 
years in partnership with his father, at Andover, 
New York. For the greater part of that time he 
was Secretary of the Allegany County Medical So- 
ciety, and also a member of the Medical Union of 
Hornellsville. Next he practiced at Suffern, Rock- 
land County, New York, for two years, and then 
returned to Andover for a short time. His next 
move was to Buffalo, New York, where he remained 
for two years. Failing health then compelled him 
to retire to the country, and for a year he was a 
partner of Dr. A. G. Skinner at Youngstown, New 
York. At the end of that time he succeeded to his 
partner's entire practice, and held it for four or five 
years. Finally, in 1882, he settled at Lockport, 
New York, where he has ever since remained. He 
is there the Proprietor and Surgeon of the Walnut 
Hospital, on Walnut Street. He is engaged in gen- 
eral operative surgery, but devotes especial attention 
to gynecology and the diseases of women. He en- 
joys a lucrative practice, and because of his recog- 
nized abilities his services are in frequent demand 
in council and in court as an expert on medical 
questions. He is a member of the New York State 
Medical Society, of the Niagara County Medical 
Society, of the Economic League of Lockport, and 
of the Allegany Club of Buffalo. He is an honorary 
member of the Medical Union of Buffalo, and has 
been President and Secretary of the Niagara County 
Medical Society and Health Officer of Lockport. 
He is President of the Board of Directors of the 
Young Men's Christian Association of Lockport, and 
a Trustee and Superintendent of the Sunday School 
of the First Congregational Church of that city. In 
politics he is and has ever been a staunch Republi- 
can, deeply interested in all questions of local or 
national good, but has never aspired to public office. 
He was married on May 24, 1863, to M. Louise 
Preston, who bore him two children : F. Edith and 
S. Agnes Baker. Mrs. Baker died in 1870, after 
which he was married to Hattie A. Howard. After 
her death he was for the third time married to Isa 
B. Oliver, who has borne him four children : Mary 
L., Rollin O., Gertrude O., and Florence P. Baker. 



BURKET, George Washington, 1832- 

Class of 1867 Med. 
Born at Smicksburg, Pa., 1832 ; studied at Brookville 
Academy, Pa. ; employed in Prothonotary's office, Jef- 
ferson County, Pa. ; graduated at Cleveland Medical 
College, Cleveland, Ohio, 1857; practiced medicine from 
1857 to 1866; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medi- 
cal College, 1867; engaged in medical practice at 
Tyrone, Pa., since 1867. 

EORGE WASHINGTON BURKET, M.D., 
was bom at Smicksburg, Indiana County, 
Pennsylvania, on March 4, 1832. His father, Jacob 
Burket, was the son of a farmer in York County, 



G' 




G. W. BURKET 

Pennsylvania, and removed with his parents to Blair 
County, whence he went to Smicksburg, Indiana 
County, and was there engaged in a number of 
enterprises. Finally he settled, for the remainder 
of his life, at Brookville, Jefferson County, Pennsyl- 
vania. He married Katherine Miller, daughter of 
John and Elizabeth Miller, John Miller being a 
farmer at Smicksburg. George Washington Burket, 
son of Jacob and Katherine Miller Burket, was edu- 
cated at the public schools until he reached the age 
of seventeen years. Then he went to the Brookville 
Academy, at Brookville, Pennsylvania, for three 
years. On leaving the academy he found employ- 
ment in the office of the Prothonotary of Jefferson 
County, Pennsylvania, for two years, after which he 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



99 



began the study of medicine, with a view to a pro- 
fessional career. He began attending lectures at 
the Cleveland Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 
1855, and was graduated from that institution in 
1857. He then settled at Elderton, Armstrong 
County, Pennsylvania, and practiced medicine there 
until the fall of 1866. At that time he determined 
to seek further expert instruction and training, and 
accordingly entered Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1867 with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. Thus prepared for 
professional duties, he established himself at Tyrone, 
Blair County, Pennsylvania, and has ever since been 
engaged in practice there, with eminent success, not 
only in the sense of making money, but also in that 
higher one of winning a large and steadfast patron- 
age of those who appreciate his skill and worth. 
Dr. Burket was a Pension Examiner during the ad- 
ministration of President Arthur. He is a member 
and ex-President of the Blair County Medical So- 
ciety ; of the Academy of Medicine of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania ; of the Medical Society of the State 
of Pennsylvania ; of the American Medical Associa- 
tion ; and of the Masonic Order. He was married 
in 1856, but has no children. His address is 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 



CHAMBERLAIN, Myron Levi, 1844- 

Class of 1867 Med. 
Born at Greenwich, Mass., 1844; prepared for college 
at New Salem, Mass., Academy; served in army in 
Civil War, 1863 ; studied medicine at Berkshire Med- 
ical College ; medical cadet in U. S. Army, 1865-66 ; 
attended lectures at Maryland Institute, Baltimore ; 
graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1867 ; in practice since 1867 ; inventor and author. 

MYRON LEVI CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., is 
a son of Levi Chamberlain, M.D., and 
grandson of Zachariah and Sarah (Carroll) Chamber- 
lain, of New Salem, Massachusetts. Through his 
mother, whose maiden name was Abigail Felton, he 
is in the sixth generation of direct descent from 
Nathaniel Felton, Sr., of FeJtonville, Old Salem, 
(now Peabody), Massachusetts, the founder of the 
Felton family in this country. He is also in the sixth 
generation from John Proctor, Jr., of Proctor's Cross- 
ing, Old Salem (now Peabody), Massachusetts, the 
last victim of the witchcraft delusion of 1692. He 
was born at Greenwich, Massachusetts, on September 
22, 1844, and was prepared for college at the New 
Salem, Massachusetts, Academy. Instead of enter- 
ing college, however, he enlisted in the Tenth Regi- 



ment of Massachusetts Volunteers, for service in the 
Civil War, in 1863. Before the end of that year, 
however, he was honorably discharged from the ser- 
vice on account of impaired health. He then be- 
gan the study of medicine in the Berkshire Medical 
College, at Pittsfield, Massachusetts. In February, 
1865, he was appointed a medical cadet in the 
regular army, and was stationed at the Dale General 
Hospital, at Worcester, Massachusetts. Later he 
was stationed at the Hicks General Hospital, in 
Baltimore, Maryland, and while there, in the winter 
of 1865-66, he attended lectures in the Medical 




MYRON L. CHAMBERLAIN 

Department of the Maryland Institute. He received 
an honorable discharge from the military service in 
February, 1866, and then entered the Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, and was graduated from it with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in March, 1867. He 
began professional practice in the following month, 
April, 1867, at Southbridge, Massachusetts, and 
remained there until 1874. In the latter year he 
went abroad, and spent two years in travel and 
study, devoting several months to hospital practice 
in London, Paris and Vienna. Returning to the 
United States, he established himself permanently 
in Boston, Massachusetts, in April, 1877. During 
the year 1885 he was Visiting Physician to the 



lOO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Carney Hospital, Boston, but apart from that service 
he has devoted himself to private practice. He has 
invented numerous medical and surgical appliances 
which are now in general use, and he has also written 
much for various medical magazines. He is a mem- 
ber of the Massachusetts Medical Society, of the 
American Medical Association, of the Boston Art 
Club, and of the Eastern and Misery Island Yacht 
clubs. In politics he is a Republican. He was 
married in 1874 to Charlotte Pynchon Wales, 
daughter of Royal S. Wales, of Wales, Massachusetts. 
His city residence, in the winter, is at No. 19 F^xeter 
Street, Boston, and his country home, at which he 
spends the summer, is at Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, 
Massachusetts. 



DE FRECE, Abram Brougham, 1850-1903. 

Class of 1867 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1850 ; studied in public schools and 
University Grammar School ; graduated, New York 
University, B.S. and Ph.B., 1867; M.S., 1870; Ph.D., 
iSgi ; in mercantile and manufacturing pursuits 1868- 
1903 ; President and Director of business corporations ; 
officer of social and benevolent organizations ; officer 
of 22nd Regiment, N. G., N. Y., 1871-1903 ; Director- 
General of numerous fairs and exhibitions ; died, 
1903. 

ABRAM BROUGHAM DE FRECE, M.S., 
Ph.D., a business man of exceptionally 
versatile activities, was descended from Dutch fam- 
ilies which came from Amsterdam, Holland, and 
settled in New York many generations ago. His 
parents, Benjamin and Mary (Velleraan) de Frece, 
'were residents of New York, and in that city he 
was born on May 8, 1850. His early education 
was acquired in Grammar School No. 35, from 185,7 
to 1863. Thence for a year he went to the Univer- 
sity Grammar School, where he was prepared for 
matriculation in New York University. He entered 
the University in the fall of 1864, taking the scien- 
tific course in the School of Arts and Science, and 
in June, 1867, was graduated with the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Philosophy. In 
1870 the University gave him the degree of Master 
of Science and in 1891 that of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. With such academic training, Mr. de Frece 
entered business life in 1868 as a commission 
merchant and manufacturer. In 1870 he was an 
importer of fancy goods; from 1871 to 1876 a 
manufacturer of pearl buttons and whalebone, and 
from 1876 to 1886 President of the National Paper 
Bag Company of New York. From 1886 until his 
death in 1903 he was President of the American 



Healtheries Corfipany ; Vice-President of the Euro- 
pean Express Company, and of the Citizens' Mutual 
Life Insurance Company ; Secretary of the New 
York Casino Company, and of the Automaton Piano 
Company ; Director of the Novelty Iron Works ; 
Consulting Manager of the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York ; Manager of " The Mail and 
Express," of New York ; Associate Editor of "The 
New Rochelle Press ; " a correspondent of " The 
Commercial Advertiser ; " General Commissioner of 
the Edison General Electric Company ; and Hono- 
rary Vice-President and Delegate-General for the 




A. B. DE FRECE 

United States of the Soci6t6 des Sauveteurs des Der- 
nier Adieu, of Paris, France, in connection with the 
work of which he received in 1894 the decoration 
of the Croix Rosette. For thirty-two years he was 
an officer of the Twenty-second Regiment, New York 
National Guard, active and veteran corps ; for four- 
teen years Treasurer of the Alumni Association of 
New York University, for ten years President of the 
St. Mark's Hospital Association, and Treasurer of 
the Mutual Benefit Society ; for five years a Trustee 
of the New York Press Club; and for three years a 
Governor of the International League of Press Clubs, 
and Vice-President of the Thomas Hunter Associa- 
tion. At the time of his death he was Managing 
Director of the Kindergarten and Potted Plant 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



lOI 



Association, and of tlie Grant Monument Associa- 
tion, and honorary member of the German Hospital, 
the Central Turn Verein, the St. John's Guild, the 
Shakespeare League, the Magnetic Club, the Actors' 
Fund of America, and the Hotel Men's Association. 
Mr. de Frece was the Director-General of a large 
number of fairs and exhibitions, for charitable and 
other purposes, which he managed with exceptional 
success. Among these may be mentioned the 
fairs for the Montefiore Home, in 1886; for the 
German Hospital, in 1887; for the Central Turn 
Verein, in 1888; for the Hahnemann Hospital, and 
for the Teachers' Fund, in 1889; for the Educa- 
tional AUiance, in 1890; and for the Actors' Fund, 
in 1892 ; also the Edison Electric Exhibition, and 
the Charity Doll Show, in 1890; the Letter Car- 
riers' Fair, in 1892 ; the Thirteenth Regiment Fair, 
in 1894; and the Commercial Travellers' Fair, 
in 1896. He was the originator and Director- 
General of the first Food and Health Exhibition 
given in America. He also organized and managed 
numerous receptions, entertainments, and other 
gatherings, and through such activities netted more 
than $3,000, 000 for various worthy charities. Be- 
sides all these activities, Mr. de Frece found time 
to write magazine articles, and numerous songs 
and pieces of instrumental music which have at- 
tained wide popularity. He was a member of many 
clubs, and a familiar and favorite figure in New 
York society. On May 9, 1871, he was married to 
Sophia Burnsteed, and had three children : Benjamin 
Franklin, Marie Louise, and Bonnie Blanche de 
Frece. Mr. de Frece died at his home at Pelham 
Manor, in the suburbs of New York, on January 9, 
1903- 

JOHNSON, Joseph Taber, 1845- 

Class of 1867 Med, 
Born at Lowell, Mass., 1845; studied at Rochester 
Academy, Mass., Columbian College, Washington, 
Medical Department Georgetown University, Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, and University of Vienna ; 
graduated M.D., Georgetown University, 1865, and 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1867 ; U. S. Army 
Surgeon and Professor in Howard University, 1869-75; 
Professor for many years in Georgetown University ; 
Professor of Gynecology in Washington Post-Graduate 
School of Medicine ; author of various works. 

JOSEPH TABER JOHNSON, M.D., Professor 
of Gynecology and Abdominal Surgery in 
Georgetown University, comes of typical New Eng- 
land stock. He is on the paternal side a direct 
descendant of John Alden and his wife, Priscilia, 
who came over in the "Mayflower" in 1620, while 



on the maternal side he is descended from Thomas 
and Dorothy Burges, who came to this country from 
England in 1630, and many of whose descendants 
have ever since lived in and around Plymouth, 
Massachusetts. Dr. Johnson is the son of the Rev. 
Lorenzo Dow Johnson, a clergyman of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, and Mary (Burges) Johnson, 
and was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, on June 30, 
1845. Until his fifteenth year he lived on a farm 
at Rochester, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, and 
attended the academy in that place. The family 
then removed to Washington, District of Columbia, 




JOS. TABER JOHNSON 

in i860, and he entered the Columbian College 
and studied there until that institution was closed 
by the Civil War and transformed into a hospital. 
He then entered the Medical Department of George- 
town University, Georgetown, District of Columbia, 
and was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1865. Thence he proceeded to the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part of 
New York University, and was graduated from it 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1867. 
He then established hmiself in practice m Washing- 
ton, District of Columbia, and has been hard at 
work there ever since, with the exception of a time 
in 1871 when he visited Vienna, Austria, for study 
and practice in the university and hospitals, and 



102 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



there received a degree in operative obstetrics. He 
was appointed by tlie Secretary of War in 1869 a 
Contract Surgeon in the United States Army, and 
was assigned to the Freedmen's Hospital in Wash- 
ington under General O. O. Howard. In the same 
year he was elected Professor of Obstetrics and Dis- 
eases of Women and Infants in the Medical Depart- 
ment of Howard University. These places he held 
for six years. He has now been for more than 
twenty-five years Professor of Gynecology in the 
Medical Department of Georgetown University, for 
ten years Professor of Abdominal Surgery in that 
institution, and is one of the Professors of Gyne- 
cology in the Washington Post-graduate School of 
Medicine and a member of its Executive Commit- 
tee. He is the author of the chapter on " Surgical 
Diseases of the Ovaries and Tubes " in Dennis's 
Surgery, of that on "Ovariotomy " in Reed's Gyne- 
cology, and of scores of papers in medical jour- 
nals, college addresses, etc. He was for ten years 
Gynecologist of Providence and for one year Gyne- 
cologist of Columbia Hospital, both of which posi- 
tions he resigned on account of the exactions of a 
large private practice. He has been President of 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the Georgetown University Alumni Society, 
the Medical Society of the District of Columbia, the 
Obstetrical Society of the District of Columbia, the 
American Gynecological Society, and the Southern 
Surgical and Gynecological Society. He has been 
President of the Georgetown University Medical 
School for the last ten years, and is Chief of 
its hospital gynecological service ; is President of 
the Woman's Free Dispensary of the District of 
Columbia, Consulting Gynecologist of the Freed- 
men's Hospital and one of the Consulting Physi- 
cians of the Children's Hospital. In addition to the 
organizations already mentioned, he is a member 
of the American Medical Association and Chairman 
of its Gynecological Section, an Honorary Fellow of 
the Maryland and Virginia State Medical societies, 
and a member of the British Gynecological Society, 
the British Medical Association, the Metropolitan 
and Cosmos clubs of Washington, the Sons of the 
American Revolution, the Society of Colonial Wars, 
the Society of the War of 181 2, the Society of 
" Mayflower" Descendants, the Society of Army Sur- 
geons, the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Wash- 
ington Board of Trade, the Washington Academy of 
Sciences, the American Academy of Political and 
Social Science, the National Forestry and Irrigation 
Association, and other organizations. He is a mem- 



ber of the Board of Examiners for medical licen- 
tiates in Washington, is on the Board of Directors 
of the Emergency Hospital and of the Eye, Ear and 
Throat Hospital, a Director of the Old Dominion 
and Great Falls Railroad Company, and the head 
of a hospital of his own for Gynecology and Abdom- 
inal Surgery. He was married on May i, 1873, to 
Edith Maud Bascom, and has five children : Lo- 
renzo, Bascom, Edith, Margaret and Josephine 
Johnson. His address is No. 926 Farragut Square, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 



JONES, Samuel Seabury, 1846-1902. 

Class of 1867 Arts, i86g Med. 
Born at Oyster Bay, L. I., 1846; studied at Christ 
Church School, Oyster Bay, and Fairchild Institute, 
Flushing ; graduated A.B., New York University, 1867; 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1869; at 
University of Edinburgh, 1869; Berlin, 1870; Vienna, 
1871 ; in practice in New York since 1872; connected 
with various hospitals ; died in New York, January 21, 
igo2. 

SAMUEL SEABURY JONES, M.D., was born 
at Oyster Bay, Long Island, on June i, 1846. 
On the side of his father, Elbert Haring Jones, 
he was descended from Thomas Jones, who removed 
from his ancestral home in Wales to Strabane, Ire- 
land, and thence in 1690 to this country, where he 
settled on Long Island. His grandfather, Samuel 
Jones, was an eminent lawyer in Revolutionary 
times. Chancellor, and sometimes called the Father 
of the New York Bar. What is now known as 
Great Jones Street, New York, was once his country 
estate. His father when a young man was private 
secretary to John Jay. He married late in life and 
spent his remaining years at his country place at 
Oyster Bay, where Samuel Seabury Jones, the thir- 
teenth and youngest child, was born. On the side 
of his mother, whose maiden name was Marjory 
Fleet Youngs, he was descended from the Rev. 
John Youngs, who came from England and settled 
at New Haven and thence removed to Southold, 
Long Island, in 1638. His early education was 
acquired in Christ Church School, at Oyster Bay, 
and in the Fairchild Institute at Flushing, New 
York. In the fall of 1863 he entered the School of 
Arts of the University of the City of New York, as 
New York University was then called, and through- 
out his four years' course was distinguished as a 
scholar. He won the Freshman Latin Prize, was 
Vice-President of the Eucleian Literary Society, was 
a member of the Zeta Psi Fraternity, and was a 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



103 



Commencement orator in 1867, when he was grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the 
fall of that year he entered the New York University 
Medical College, and received from it the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in the spring of 1869. He 
then went abroad for further study, and was at the 
University of Edinburgh in 1869, Berhn in 1869-70 
and Vienna in 1870-71. He returned to New 
York in 1872 and engaged there in the practice of 
his profession. He was a Visiting and Consulting 
Physician to the Workhouse and Almshouse hos- 
pitals. He belonged to the New York Academy 




S. S. JONES 

of Medicine, the New York County Medical Society, 
the Manhattan Medical Society and the Lenox Med- 
ical Society. In politics he was an independent 
Republican, but held no political office. In March, 
1877, he married Maud Matthews, of New York 
City, and had two children : Beatrice Cleveland 
and Natalie Rathbone Jones. He died at his 
residence, 712 Madison Avenue, New York, on 
January 21, 1902, after a brief illness of pneumonia. 



and merchant ; Presidential Elector, 1892 ; member of 
Council of New York University, 1881-95. 

EDWARD HUBBARD LITCHFIELD, B.S., 
is a son of the Hon. Edwin C. Litchfield 
and Grace Hill (Hubbard) Litchfield, and was born 
at Utica, New York, on November 15, 1845. He 
entered New York University in 1863, won the First 
Sophomore Duryea Essay Prize, was Librarian of 
Eucleian and a member of Zeta Psi, and was gradu- 
ated in 1867 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Three years later he was admitted to the Bar of the 
State of New York, but has since paid more atten- 
tion to financial and mercantile pursuits than to 
legal practice. He is a director of various banks 
and business corporations, and is the head of an 
extensive mercantile firm. He was a member of the 
Council of New York University in 1881-95, ^^^ 
in 1892 was a Presidential Elector. He is a 
member of the Brooklyn and Hamilton clubs of 
Brooklyn, the Metropolitan Club of New York, the 
Brooklyn Historical Society, and other organizations. 
He was married on February 2, 187 1, to Madeline 
Middagh Sands, daughter of John M. Sands, and 
has four children : Madeline Sands, Edward Hubert, 
Marion, and Payard Sands Litchfield. His home is 
at No. 2 Montague Terrace, Brooklyn, New York. 



LITCHFIELD, Edward Hubbard, 1845- 

Class of 1867 Sci. 
Born at Utica, N. Y., 1845; graduated B.S., New 
York University, 1867; admitted to Bar, 1870; 



banker 



MILLS, Andrew, 1848- 

Class of 1867, 
Born in New York, 1848; special course diploma 
from New York University, 1867; President of Dry 
Dock Savings Bank and of State Trust Company; 
officer in National Guard. 

ANDREW MILLS, banker, is a son of Andrew 
and Eliza (Easton) Mills, and was born in 
New York City on September 7, 1848. He entered 
New York University in the Class of 1867, as a 
special course student, and was a member of Delta 
Phi, President of Philomathean, Philomathean Junior 
orator, and President of his class in the Junior year. 
He delivered a dissertation at Commencement and 
received a special course diploma, in 1867. Since 
that time his attention has been given chiefly to 
financial affairs, as President of the Dry Dock Sav- 
ings Institution, and of the State Trust Company, 
of New York City. He has also been a Captain in 
the Seventh Regiment, New York National Guard. 
Mr. Mills was married on October 16, 1872, to 
Gertrude E. Moran, daughter of Edward G. Moran, 
and has five children : Andrew, Herbert Law- 
rence, Ruth Carter, Gertrude Edith, and Dorothy 
Mills. 



I04 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ROOT, Elihu, 1845- 

Class of 1867 Law. 
Born at Clinton, N. Y., 1845; graduated A.B., Ham- 
ilton College, 1864; graduated LL.B., New Yorlc Uni- 
versity Law School, 1867; began law practice, 1867; 
U. S. District Attorney, 1883-85; political leader and 
reformer ; Delegate at large and Chairman of Judiciary 
Committee, New Yorl< Constitutional Convention, 1894; 
Secretary of War of United States, since 1899; LL.D., 
Hamilton College, 1894; LL.D., Yale University, 1900. 

ELIHU ROOT, LL.D., Secretary of War in the 
Government of the United States, is of Eng- 
lish and New England ancestry. His father, Oren 
Root, one of the most eminent educators of his day, 




ELIHU ROOT 

was for many years Professor of Mathematics in 
Hamilton College, and for a time also Professor of 
Geology and Mineralogy. Ehhu Root was born at 
Clinton, Oneida County, New York, on February 
15, 1845, and acquired his early education at home 
and in local schools. At the age of fifteen he en- 
tered Hamilton College, and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1864. It may be 
added that he ranked among the best students of 
his class. He studied law in the New York Univer- 
sity Law School, paying his way by tutoring, and 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1867. In that year he was admitted to the Bar 
and began practice. He rapidly rose to the fore- 
most rank at the New York Bar, and was the suc- 



cessful counsel in many important suits, both public 
and private. He was a candidate for Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas in 1879, ^"'^ polled a large 
vote, though he was defeated with the rest of the Re- 
publican ticket. In 1883 President Arthur appointed 
him United States District Attorney in New York 
City, and he served in that office until 1885, when 
he resigned. Since that time he has been a par- 
ticularly influential leader of the Republican party 
in New York City, and has been conspicuous in 
various reform and reorganization movements. In 
1894 he was Delegate at large and Chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee at the New York Constitu- 
tional Convention. He was appointed Secretary of 
War by President McKinley in July, 1899, and still 
occupies that place, in which he has shown himself 
an exceptionally able and energetic administrator. 
Mr. Root is a member of the Bar Association, the 
New England Society, the Union League, Republi- 
can, Century, Metropolitan, Players', Lawyers', Uni- 
versity and other clubs of New York, and other 
organizations, and has often been the orator of the 
day on important occasions. He has long been a 
Trustee of Hamilton College. He received the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from that insti- 
tution in 1894 and from Yale in 1900. 



SHAFFER, Newton Melman, 1846- 

Class of 1867 Med. 
Born at Kinderhook, N. Y., 1846; studied in public 
schools, Hudson River Institute, and New Yorlc Free 
Academy; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1867; in hospital service, 1867-68; 
druggist, 1868-71 ; in practice as Orthopaedic Surgeon 
since 1871 ; Professor of Orthopasdic Surgery; Founder 
of New York Orthopaedic Society ; Founder of New 
York State Hospital for Crippled and Deformed Chil- 
dren; inventor of important instruments; author of 
several books and numerous essays ; recognized leader 
in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

NEWTON MELMAN SHAFFER, M.D., the 
eminent Orthopaedic Surgeon, is of Dutch 
and English ancestry. One of his great-grand- 
fatherSj William Shaffer, came from Holland in 
1750 and established the first paper mill on Man- 
hattan Island, New York, in which city his son and 
grandson, the grandfather and father of Dr. Shaffer, 
were born. On the paternal side Dr. Shaffer is also 
descended from the Newton family, while on the 
maternal side he comes from the Hales and Mel- 
mans, his maternal grandfather having been Major 
Lewis Hale, of Glasco, Ulster County, New York. 
Dr. Shaffer is the son of James Newton Shaffer and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



105 



Jane Emeline (Hale) Shaffer, and was born at Kin- 
derhook, New York, on February 14, 1846. He 
studied in the public schools of Dutchess and Co- 
lumbia counties, and in the Hudson River Institute 
at Claverack, New York, until 1862. In the latter 
year he removed to New York City and entered the 
Free Academy, now known as the College of the 
City of New York, in which he remained one year. 
In 1864 he entered the Medical College of New York 
University, and was graduated from it in 1867 with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. In the Uni- 
versity he was under the tutorship of Dr. James 




NEWTON M. SHAFFER 

Knight, the Founder of the Hospital for the Rup- 
tured and Crippled, and immediately after gradua- 
tion he was made Assistant Resident Surgeon to 
that hospital. He there served for nearly two 
years, leaving it in 1868 to continue his studies 
and to enlarge his scope of professional observation. 
For the next two years he conducted a drug store 
and gained a thorough knowledge of pharmacy. 
Finally, in 187 1, he began his career as an Ortho- 
paedic Surgeon, as an Assistant Surgeon to the 
Orthopsedic Dispensary and Hospital. He served 
in that capacity until 1876, and then until 1878 
was Surgeon-in-Chief, when he resigned in order to 
devote his attention more fully to other work. 
Meantime he was in 1872 elected Orthopsedic 



Surgeon to St. Luke's Hospital, New York, the 
office being created for him and being the first of 
its kind. He filled the place with distinguished 
success until 1888, when he resigned it and was 
made Consulting Orthopaedic Surgeon. Since early 
in his career at St. Luke's he has devoted himself 
exclusively to Orthopaedic Surgery, and has attained 
world-wide eminence as a leader in that important 
department of science. He was the first to propose 
the organization of the New York Orthopaedic So- 
ciety, now the Orthopedic Section of the Academy 
of Medicine. He also took the first steps towards 
the organization of the American Orthopaedic As- 
sociation, and secured its admission to the Congress 
of American Physicians and Surgeons. He was a 
delegate to the International Medical Congress at 
Berlin in 1890, and secured the formal recognition 
of Orthopaedic Surgery by that body, himself defining 
it to the Congress as " That department of General 
Surgery which includes the prevention and the 
mechanical and operative treatment of chronic or 
progressive deformities for the proper treatment of 
which special mechanical devices are necessary." 
In 1900 he founded and organized the New York 
State Hospital for Crippled and Deformed Children, 
and has since devoted his energies largely to the 
development of that institution. His work closely 
resembles that of the celebrated Dr. Lorenz of 
Vienna, in that he long contended and has practi- 
cally demonstrated that many of the cutting opera- 
tions commonly performed for the relief of the 
deformed are unnecessary. When Dr. " Lorenz 
visited the United States in 1902, he was in close 
association with Dr. Shaffer, and a number of his 
operations in New York were performed at the 
instance of the latter. Dr. Shaffer has invented 
many important instruments and mechanical de- 
vices for use in Orthopaedic Surgery, and has 
written many essays upon professional topics. His 
three most important works are " Polk's Disease, Its 
Pathology and Mechanical Treatment; " "The Hy- 
sterical Element in Orthopaedic Surgery ; " and 
"Brief Essays on Orthopaedic Surgery." He has 
also given much time to instruction. In 1882 he 
was appointed Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery in 
the New York University Medical College, and 
served until 1886, when he resigned. He was 
again appointed to the place in 1894, and served 
until 1896, when he resigned and joined the staff of 
the Cornell University Medical School, on which he 
has since been Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
He is now Surgeon-in-Chief to the New York State 



[o6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Hospital for Crippled and Deformed Children, and 
Consulting Orthopjedic Surgeon to St. Luke's Hos- 
pital, the Presbyterian Hospital, and the Infirmary 
for Women and Children. He is a member of the 
Century Association, the University Club, the Con- 
gress of American Physicians and Surgeons (of which 
he has been an executive officer for years and is now 
Treasurer), the American Orthopaedic .\ssociation, 
the American Medical Association, the New York 
State Medical Association, the New York County 
Medical Society, the New York Academy of Medi- 
cine, the Medical Society of the Greater City of 
New York, and the Neurological Society. Dr. 
Shaffer was married on October 15, 1873, to Mar- 
garet Hyde Perkins, daughter of the Hon. William 
Perkins, of Gardiner, Maine, and has one son, 
Newton Melman Shaiifer, Jr. 



SULLIVAN, John Daniel, 1841- 

Class of 1867 Med. 
Born at Middletown, N. Y., 1841 ; worked on farm, 
and attended common and normal schools; taught 
school; studied at Springfield, Mass., English and 
Classical Institute ; studied medicine privately, and at 
University of Michigan ; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1867; in hospital service, 
1867-59 ; in private practice in Brooklyn, N. Y., since 
i86g; author of numerous papers. 

JOHN DANIEL SULLIVAN, M.D., son of 
Peter and Julia (Harrington) Sullivan, was 
born at Middletown, New York, on September 4, 
1 84 1. Seven months later his parents removed to 
a farm at Bethel, New York, and there his boyhood 
was spent. When he was ten years old his father 
died, and thereafter until he was nineteen he worked 
on the farm in summer and attended school in win- 
ter. At the age of nineteen he became a school 
teacher, and in order to prepare himself the better 
for that work he attended the State Normal School 
at Albany, New York, for one course. Then he 
decided to study medicine, and with that end in 
view went to Springfield, Massachusetts, and pur- 
sued a course in the English and Classical Institute 
there. In 1864 he returned to Bethel and began 
the study of medicine under Dr. A. A. Gillespie 
and Dr. William L. Appley. He also attended lec- 
tures and pursued a laboratory course at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. Finally, in 
1865, he entered the Medical College of New York 
University, and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in March, 1867. Immediately 
thereafter he was appointed, upon competitive ex- 



amination, to a place on the Resident Staff of the 
New York Charity (now City) Hospital, and served 
there from April, 1867, to April, 1868. For the 
next year, until April, 1869, he was Resident Physi- 
cian to the New York Fever Hospital, and then 
began private practice in Brooklyn, New York, in 
which he has since remained. Dr. Sullivan is one 
of the most successful physicians of Brooklyn. He 
has much natural ability, but is withal a close 
student, believing thoroughly in the maxim that 
" there is no excellence without labor." His devo- 
tion to the duties of his profession, therefore, com- 




J. D. SULLrVAN 

bined with a comprehensive understanding of the 
principles of the science of medicine, has made him 
a most successful and able practitioner, whose prom- 
inence is well deserved. He has been Attending 
Physician to St. John's Home, in Brooklyn, since 
1870, Surgeon to St. Mary's Hospital since 1882, 
Surgeon to the Police Department since 1887, and 
Medical Examiner to the Catholic Benevolent Legion 
since 1881. He made a tour in Europe, for rest 
and recuperation, in 1884. He is-a member of the 
Kings County Medical Association (President in 
1892), the Kings County Medical Society, the 
Brooklyn Pathological Society, the New York State 
Medical Association, the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, the New York Physicians' Mutual Aid Asso- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



107 



ciation, the Bedford Literary Union (President in 
1 8 78), the Holy Name Society (President in 
1 880-1 892), and the Catholic Benevolent Legion. 
He has been a Trustee of the Brevoort Savings 
Bank, Brooklyn, since 1893. He was married on 
April 21, 1875, to Ellie Sullivan, of New York City. 
They have seven children living : Francis Joseph, 
Raymond Peter, Eugene Leo, Hester Eleanor, Julia 
Harrington, Grace Marie, and May Irene Sullivan. 
Dr. Sullivan's practice has been of a general charac- 
ter, but since, 1882 he has paid particular attention 
to surgery, and he has performed many important 
operations. In 1889 he introduced the treatment 
of gangrene of the mouth by the application of sub- 
sulphate of iron and glycerine. He has written 
" Therapeutic Effects of Ammonium Salicylate, with 
Cases," Gaillard's Medical Journal, July, 1887. 
" Stomatitis Gangrenosa, with Special Reference to 
Its Treatment with Liquid Ferri Subsulphatis," New 
York Medical Journal, August 23, 1890; "Acute 
Purulent Pleurisy," ibid., September 13, 1890; 
" Clinical Observations on Appendicitis, ibid., April 
15, 1893 ; and " A Report of Two Cases of Neph- 
rectomy, Sarcoma and Pyonephrosis," Journal of 
the American Medical Association, January g, 1892. 



CARR, David Cole, 1844- 

Class of 1868 Med. 
Born in New York, 1844 ; educated in public schools 
and under private tutor; graduated M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1868, served in Charity and 
Blackwell's Island hospitals; Attending Surgeon New 
York Orthopaedic Hospital and Dispensary, 1868-72; 
Attending Surgeon Harlem Hospital and Dispensary, 
1876-79 ; entered United States Army in 1861 and 
served with distinction throughout Civil War ; mem- 
ber of first Board of Health of New York City ; still 
in active practice of profession in New York. 

DAVID COLE CARR, M.D., was born in New 
York City on November 7, 1844, the son 
of John and Mary A. (Cole) Carr. His ancestors 
were of Scotch and Irish blood, and one of his 
great great-uncles served in the Revolutionary War, 
though his direct progenitors did not come to this 
country until after that struggle. He attended the 
public schools of New York, and of New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, and received private instruction from 
Professor Skinner, of Trenton, New Jersey. In 1868 
he was graduated witli the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
now a part of New York University, and has ever 
since that time been engaged in the practice of his 
profession in New York.' His earliest service was 



performed in the Charity Hospitals in New York 
and on Blackwell's Island. From 1868 to 1872 he 
was Attending Surgeon to the New York Orthopaedic 
Hospital and Dispensary, and he filled a like place 
at the Harlem Hospital and Dispensary from 1876 
to 1879. Much of his early career was devoted to 
orthopaedic practice and minor surgery. Prior to 
his professional career Dr. Carr had a distinguished 
record in the military service of his country. He 
was only seventeen years of age when he enlisted, 
in i86x, in the Thirteenth Regiment of New Jersey 
Volunteers and hastened to the front. He partici- 




DAVID COLE CARR 

pated in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, 
Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Kelly's 
Ford, and various others. In 1863 he was made a 
hospital steward in the United States Army and put 
on duty at Fortress Monroe. He also served at Ports- 
mouth, Virginia, and at other army hospitals, as a 
medical cadet. At the close of the Civil War in 
1865 he remained with the regular army for another 
year. Then, in 1866, he returned to New York 
City to be a member of it-s first Board of Health 
and to serve under Dr. Dalton through the cholera 
epidemic of that year. In politics Dr. Carr is a 
Republican. He has been a Trustee of the New 
York City Board of Education since March, 1892, 
and is a member of Alexander Hamilton Post of 



lOl 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



the Grand Army of the RepubHc. He also belongs 
to the medical societies of New York City and 
New York County, the Harlem Medical Association, 
the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, and other 
organizations. He has been twice married. His 
first wife was Elizabeth Remsen, to whom he was 
married in 1870 and who died in 1873. In 1881 
he was married to Margaret Blauvelt, a descendant 
of Captain Abraham Herring, who served under 
Washington in the Revolution. Dr. Carr's address 
is New York City. 



O'NEIL, Daniel Edwin, 1847- 

Class of 1868 Med. 
Born at Shark River, N. J., 1847; graduated A.B., 
Manhattan College, 1868; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1868; House Surgeon to 
St. Vincent's Hospital, i86g; in practice since 1870, 
with much hospital service. 

DANIEL EDWIN O'NEIL, A.B., M.D., who 
was born at Shark River, New Jersey, on 
November 26, 1847, is a son of Michael O'Neil, a 




DANIEL E. O NEIL 



native of Ireland, and Enieline (Atkinson) O'Neil, a 
native of the United States. After pursuing thorough 
preparatory courses he entered Manhattan College, 
in the regular classical course, and a year later he 
also entered the Medical College of New York Uni- 



versity. For the three years 1865-68 he was a 
student of both colleges, and in the latter year was 
graduated from them both, receiving from Manhat- 
tan College the degree of Bachelor of Arts and from 
New York University that of Doctor of Medicine. 
The next year he was appointed a House Surgeon 
in St. Vincent's Hospital, in New York, and served 
there for a year. In 1870 he began private practice 
in New York, and has ever since continued therein. 
While his practice is general in character he has de- 
voted especial attention to obstetrics, and has at- 
tended more than three hundred cases a year. He 
has also been Physician to St. Joseph's Home for 
many years, Physician-in-Chief to the Catholic 
Women's Benevolent Legion, etc. He is a member 
of the Medico-Legal Society, the Medical Association 
of Greater New York, the New York State Medical 
Association, and the Alumni Association of Man- 
hattan College. He was married in 1884 to Anna 
Eliza Redmond, daughter of a New York merchant, 
and has two children : Mary Edna and Edwin Henry 
O'Neil. His address is No. 35 West 88th Street, 
New York. 



PINGRY, Frank Kip, 1848- 

Classof 1868 Arts, 
Born at Fishkill, N. Y., 1848; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1868, and A.M., 1875; Civil Engineer, 
1868-73 and 1885-92 ; teacher in Pingry School, Eliza- 
beth, N. J., 1874-85 ; Professor of Mathematics, Mac- 
alester College, Minneapolis, Minn., since 1893. 

FRANK KIP PINGRY, A.M., Civil Engineer 
and educator, was born at Fishkill, New York, 
on May t2, 1848, the son of John Francis Pingry 
and Caroline Gilfert (Oakley) Pingry. He entered 
New York University in 1864, was a member of 
Zeta Psi and Phi Beta Kappa, and Secretary of Phil- 
omathean, won the Sophomore Mathematical Prize 
and the One Hundred Dollar Prize for greatest 
excellence in his college course, and was Junior 
orator and Valedictorian of his class. He was grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1868, 
and received that of Master of Arts from the Uni- 
versity in 1875. From 1868 to 1873 he practiced 
as a Civil Engineer, and again from 1885 to 1892. 
The interval from 1874 to 1885 was spent as a 
teacher in the Pingry School at Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, and since 1893 he has been Professor of 
Mathematics in the Macalester College, at Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. He was married on June 28, 
1 88 1, to Anna Rebecca Richardson, daughter of 
Daniel Richardson, and has two children : Frank 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



109 



Richardson and Lucy Carpenter Pingry. His 
brothers, James O. and John, were graduated from 
New York University in 1862 and 1868 respectively. 
His address is No. 1904 Hawthorne Avenue, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. 



TALMAGE, John Beekman, 1847- 

Class of i368 Arts, 1869 Law. 
Born at White House, N. J., 1847; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1868, and LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1869 ; lawyer. 

JOHN BEEKMAN TALMAGE, A.B., LL.B., is a 
son of George and Anna (Beekman) Talmage, 
and a nephew of the late Rev. Dr. Thomas DeWitt 
Talmage. He was born at White House, New 
Jersey, on July 21, 1847, and entered New York 
University in 1864. He was a member of Delta 
Upsilon, Librarian of Eucleian, Junior orator, and 
Commencement orator fourth in rank. He was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1868, and then entered the University Law School, 
from which also he was graduated in 1869 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to 
practice at the New York Bar in 1868, and has since 
pursued his profession in New York with much 
success. He was married on June 13, 1887, to 
Hannah D. See, daughter of John L. See, and has 
four children : Goyn, Sarah Mariette, John Beek- 
man, and Cornelia Rapelye Talmage. 



VON BRIESEN, Arthur, 1843- 

Class of 1 863 Law. 
Born at Borkendorf, Prussia, in 1843; educated in 
German schools; served in Federal Army in American 
Civil \A^ar, 1861-63; in office of " Scientific American," 
1864-73; graduated LL.B., New York University Law 
School, 1868 ; practicing lawyer, with specialty for 
patent law, since 1873 ; President of Legal Aid Society 
since i8go. 

ARTHUR VON BRIESEN was born at Bork- 
endorf, in Prussia, on July 11, 1843, the 
son of Richard von Briesen and his wife, Adeline 
von Briesen (n6e) Bandtke. He comes from an 
ancient family of the Prussian nobility, whose mem- 
bers all possessed landed estates and were most of 
them in the military service of the kingdom. The 
estate of Gross-Behren, near Berlin, and some large 
holdings near the City of Rathenow, belonged to 
his grandfather, Franz von Briesen, and were be- 
queathed to the latter's eldest son, Robert von Brie- 
sen, whose sons have inherited them. Richard, 
father of Arthur von Briesen, was a younger son 



and therefore inherited none of the landed estates. 
The subject of this sketch \\as carefully educated in 
a German Gymnasium, at Hohenstein, and at an- 
other at Braunsberg, Prussia. He came to the 
United States in 1858 and served in the Federal 
Army in the Civil War from 1861 to 1863, inclusive, 
having the rank of Sergeant of Engineers. On leav- 
ing the army he entered, in 1864, the office of " The 
Scientific American," in New York, and remained 
there until 1873. Meantime he turned his atten- 
tion to legal studies. He entered the Law Depart- 
ment of New York University, and was graduated 




ARTHUR v. BRIESEN 

as a lawyer in 1868. Since he left "The Scientific 
American" in 1873 he has been engaged in the 
practice of his profession on his own account, devot- 
ing his attention chiefly to cases involving inventions, 
patents, trademarks and copyrights. Since 1890 he 
has been President of the Legal Aid Society of New 
York, an organization of incalculable beneficence in 
providing legal services for deserving people who 
are too poor to employ lawyers in the usual way. 
Mr. von Briesen performed a valuable service to 
New York University in 1901 when he was Chair- 
man of the Committee on the Oswald Ottendorfer 
Memorial Fellowship. His committee collected 
and paid to the University Corporation a fund 
of $20,000, the income of which is to be paid 



I lO 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



in furtherance of studies and research to that stu- 
dent of any university or college of good standing 
who shall prove himself most proficient in Germanic 
studies. This endowed fellowship is a worthy memo- 
rial of Oswald Ottendorfer, who was a benefactor of 
New York University and who gave to it a unique 
and priceless Germanic library. In politics Mr. von 
Briesen is an Independent, who takes deep and 
active interest in the cause of good government 
for city, state and nation. He earnestly supported 
Grover Cleveland for President of the United States, 
Theodore Roosevelt for Governor of New York 
State, and William L. Strong in 1894, and Seth 
Low in 1897 and 1901, for Mayor of New York 
City. He is a member of the Lotus, German, Re- 
form and City clubs. He was married on October 
22, 1875, to Anna Goepel, of New York, who has 
borne him two sons and three daughters. The sons, 
Fritz and Hans, are both practicing lawyers in New 
York. The daughters are Gretchen, now Mrs. S. 
Stanwood Menken, Gertrude and Hedwig von Brie- 
sen. Mr. von Briesen's home is in New York City. 



WEBSTER, David, 1842- 

Class of 1868 Med. 
Born at Cambridge, Nova Scotia, 1842; studied in 
public and normal schools; graduated M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, i858 ; hospital service, 1869- 
1873 ; in practice since 1873 ; Professor of Ophthalmol- 
ogy, Dartmouth College ; Emeritus Professor in New 
York Polyclinic ; frequent contributor to current med- 
ical literature. 

DAVID WEBSTER, M.D., the eminent Oph- 
thalmologist, was born at Cambridge, Kings 
County, Nova Scotia, on July 16, 1842, the son of 
Asael and Hephzibah (Pearson) Webster. His 
father was descended from John Webster, a Colo- 
nial Governor of Connecticut, and his mother was 
a cousin of Sir Charles Tupper, lately Prime Min- 
ister of Canada. He was educated in the public 
schools and in the Normal School at Truro, Nova 
Scotia, and then removed to New York to study 
medicine in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
which is now a part of New York University, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in i868. He was after graduation 
the first House Surgeon of the Brooklyn Eye and 
Ear Hospital, and later was the third House Sur- 
geon of the Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital. 
After three and a half years thus spent he entered 
upon the regular practice of his profession, making 
ophthalmology his specialty. He was associated 



in practice with the late Dr. Cornelius Rea Agnew 
for the last fifteen years of the latter's life. In ad- 
dition to his large private practice Dr. Webster has 
filled vvith distinction many places in hospitals and 
educational institutions. Thus he is Professor of 
Ophthalmology in Dartmouth College, Emeritus 
Professor of Ophthalmology in the New York Poly- 
clinic Medical School and Hospital, ex-President 
of the New York County Medical Society, and of 
the New York Ophthalmological Society, Surgeon 
to the Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital and to the 
Hackensack, New Jersey, Hospital, and Consulting 




D. WEBSTER 

Surgeon to the Paterson, New Jersey, Eye and Ear 
Hospital. He is a member of the Union League 
Club, the New York Historical Society, the Physi- 
cians' Mutual Aid Association, the Society for the 
Relief of the Widows and Orphans of Medical Men, 
the American Medical Association, the New York 
State Medical Society, the New York State Medical 
Association, the New York County Medical Society, 
the New York County Medical Association, the 
New York Academy of Medicine, the New York 
Ophthalmological Society, the American Ophthalmo- 
logical Society, the International Ophthalmological 
Society, and the American Otological Society. In 
politics he is a Republican. He has contributed 
copiously to current medical literature, chiefly upon 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



III 



ophthalmological subjects. He was married in 1876 
to Genevieve Macfarlane, and lives at No. 327 
Madison Avenue, New York. 



WINSOR, Thomas, 1846- 

Class of 1868 Arts, 1869 Law. 
Born at Rahway, N. J., 1846; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1868, LL.B., i86g, and A.M., 1872; 
lawyer; Alderman, Elizabeth, N. J., 1873-74; Superin- 
tendent of Public Schools, Elizabeth, 1875 ; lawyer in 
Chicago since 1876. 

THOMAS WINSOR, A.M., LL.B., son of 
George and Harriet (Oimstead) Winsor, 
was born at Rahway, New Jersey, on November 13, 
1846. In New York University he was a member 
of Zeta Psi, President of Philomathean, and of his 
class. Junior orator. Commencement orator, and 
Master's orator in 1872. He was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1868, and with 
that of Bachelor of Laws from the Law School of 
the University in 1869, and received the Master's 
degree in Arts from the University in 1872. After 
graduation he was admitted to the New Jersey Bar 
and practiced law at Elizabeth, New Jersey. He 
was an Alderman of that city in 1873-74, and 
Superintendent of Public Schools in 1875. Since 
1876 he has been engaged in legal practice in 
Chicago, Illinois. He was married on June 24, 
1874, to Henrietta Esther Johnson, who died on 
January 27, 1877. On October 5, 1880, he was 
again married, to Julia Ann Winant. He has one 
child, Harold Marsh Winsor. 



CHILDS, Samuel Belash, 1843- 

Class of i86g Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1843 ; studied in Brooklyn 
Public School and High School at Portsmouth, N. H. ; 
clerk in United States naval service three years; grad- 
uated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1869; in practice in Brooklyn since 1869; Secretary and 
Trustee of Faith Home, Brooklyn. 

SAMUEL BELASH CHILDS, M.D., is a native 
of the community with which he has for most 
of his active life been identified, having been born 
in Brooklyn, New York, on September 13, 1843. 
His father, James R. Childs, was a native of Balti- 
more, Maryland, and was for more than sixty years 
an officer of the United States Navy. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Harriet Woods, was of 
New England origin. Dr. Childs studied in Public 
School No. II, in Brooklyn, down to i860, and from 



i860 to 1863 in the High School at Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. For the next three years he was 
a clerk in the United States naval service, and then 
he entered the Medical College of New York Uni- 
versity. From the latter he was graduated in 1869 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He im- 
mediately began practice in Brooklyn, and has con- 
tinued therein in that city ever since. For the last 
twenty-five years he has been a Trustee and Secre- 
tary of the Faith Home in Brooklyn. He is a 
member of the Kings County Medical Society and 
the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association. He was 



^^^^^K 


■ 


■ 


F 


' 








1 


< 




s. 






i 

■ 



S. B. CHILDS 

first married on January 20, 1870, to Josephine L. 
Brown, who bore him a son, Albert Ewing Childs, a 
graduate of New York University and a practicing 
physician in the Borough of The Bronx, New York. 
After Mrs. Child's death he was again married, on 
May 14, 1881, to Hattie E. Hickcox, who has borne 
him a daughter, Edna Childs. His address is No. 
498 Classon Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



HAND, David Bishop, 1848- 

Class of i86g Med. 
Born at Hawley, Pa., 1848 ; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1869; in practice 
since 1C69; largely interested in lumber trade, mining 



1 I 2 



UN I vers; TIES AND THEIR SONS 



and manufacturing ; President and Director of various 
corporations. 

DAVID BISHOP HAND, M.D., is a descen- 
dant of John Hand, who was born at Maid- 
stone, Kent, England, in 1611 and settled at Lynn, 
Massachusetts, in 1648, whence with others he 
afterward removed to the eastern end of Long 
Island and founded the Town of Shinnecock on land 
purchased from the Indians. In a later generation 
Nathan Hand settled in Sussex County, New Jersey, 
and was a farmer and drover. Robert Hand, son of 
Nathan Hand, was born in Sussex County, Newjer- 




DAVID B. HAND 

say, and was a farmer there for a time, then removed 
to Hawley, Pennsylvania, in 1830, and engaged in 
farming and lumbering. He married Susan Goble, 
who on March 31, 1848, bore him a son, David 
Bishop Hand, the subject of this sketch. The boy 
was sent to private and public schools at Hawley, 
and for a time studied medicine under Dr. G. B. 
Curtis, at Hawley. Finally he entered the New York 
University Medical College, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in May, 1869. He 
was then in uncertain health, but at once entered 
upon the practice of his profession, at South Canaan, 
not far from Hawley, in Wayne County, Pennsylvania. 
Three years later h; removed to Carbondale, Penn- 
sylvania, and practiced there for eight years. Then 



he removed again to Scranton, Pennsylvania, where 
he still remains in practice. In addition to his 
medical practice Dr. Hand has long been actively 
engaged in various business enterprises. Since his 
early life he has had a taste and aptitude for the 
lumber business, in which his father was engaged. 
He began it by investing in a tract of timber land 
in Pennsylvania, which he afterwards sold at a hand- 
some profit. This operation was repeated many 
times. While at Carbondale he made a specialty 
of investing in land available for building sites, and 
he has followed the same business with much suc- 
cess at Scranton. In partnership with some others 
he invested in a tract of 36,000 acres of timber 
land in the western part of Pennsylvania. He is a 
Director of the United States Lumber Company, 
with a capital of $4,000,000 ; of the Lackawanna 
Lumber Company, with a capital of ^750,000; of 
the J. J. Newman Company, of Mississippi, with a 
capital of Ji, 000,000; of the Peck Lumber and 
Manufacturing Company, of Scranton, with a capital 
of ^100,000; of the Eureka Cash Register Com- 
pany, of Scranton, with a capital of $100,000; and 
of the Scranton Board of Trade Building, with a 
capital of ^250,000. He is Vice-President of the 
National Graphite Company, with a capital of 
$250,000 ; and President of the South Lincoln Coal 
Company, with a capital of $250,000 ; of the Penn 
Quarry Company, with a capital of $100,000, and 
the Dr. Hand's Condensed Milk Company, with 
a capital of $5,000,000. The Condensed Milk 
Company was incorporated by him in 1899, and 
the idea of incorporating with the milk phosphates 
and hypophosphites originated with him. He 
claims that as a result of such mixture children 
fed upon that condensed milk are free from the 
rickets, scurvy and other disorders which often 
appear when they are fed upon condensed milk not 
thus medicated. Some fifteen years ago he became 
convinced that in the care and medication of young 
children less judgment was often exercised than in 
the rearing of animals, and accordingly he con- 
ceived the idea of preparing and putting upon 
the market various medicines for children, which 
were to take the place of castor oil, opiates, and 
other harsh and injurious drugs. He accordingly 
resigned from the medical society to which he 
had belonged, in order to engage in such business 
without violating its rules, though he continued his 
regular medical practice. After several years he 
sold his prescriptions to certain Philadelphia firms, 
on a royalty. He is at the present time about com- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1 1 



pleting a voluminous work of common sense advice 
to parents on the care and rearing of children, 
including their hygiene, food, clothing, and care in 
case of accidents or illness. Dr. Hand is a Repub- 
lican in politics, but has never held public office, 
though often urged to do so. He is, or has been, a 
member of the Lancaster Medical Society, of Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania ; of the Lackawanna Medical 
Society ; of the Anatomical Society ; of the Rod 
and Reel Club of Scranton ; of the Scranton Club, 
and of the Elks, Odd Fellows, and Masons. He 
was married several years ago to Sarah Titus 
Cromwell, of Hawley, Pennsylvania, a member of 
an old Quaker family, and a descendant of the 
family of the illustrious Ohver Cromwell. He 
has had four children : May Isabella, who died 
at the age of six years ; Frederick Cromwell, a mer- 
chant in Scranton, Elizabeth Longstreet, and Howard 
David Hand. Dr. Hand's mother, whose maiden 
name, as stated above, was Susan Goble, was a 
daughter of Nathan Goble, a farmer and drover of 
Sussex County, New Jersey, a niece of ex-Governor 
Price, of New Jersey, a granddaughter of Francis 
Price, for thirty-two years Judge in Sussex County, 
and a great-granddaughter on the maternal side, of 
the patriot, Stephen Roy, who gave his entire fortune 
to Washington and his army at Valley Forge, and 
who, when Congress afterward proposed to reim- 
burse him, declined, saying, " My country's freedom 
is sufficient pay." 



HEWITT, Milo Ruben, 1844- 

Class of 1869 Med. 
Born at Conneaut, Ohio, 1844; studied in common 
school and Conneaut Academy; graduated M D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1869; in practice 
since i86g; Pension Examiner, 1892-94; Professor of 
Obstetrics, Milwaukee Medical College, 1895-1901. 

MILO RUBEN HEWITT, M.D., son of 
Ruben and Rebecca (Smith) Hewitt, was 
born at Conneaut, Ashtabula County, Ohio, on 
November 25, 1844. He studied in the common 
school, and was graduated from the Conneaut Acad- 
emy in 1862. A few years later he began the study 
of medicine, and in the spring of 1869 was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, which is 
now a part of New York University. On July i, 
1869, he began the active practice of his profession 
at Pewaukee, Wisconsin, and there remained until 
March, 1892, at which time he removed to Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, where he is still engaged in profes- 

VOL. II. — 8 



sional work. From 1892 to 1894 he was a member 
of the Board of Pension Examiners. In January, 
1895, he was elected to the Chair of Obstetrics in 
the Milwaukee Medical College, which place he 
filled with marked ability until June, 1901, when 
he resigned it. He has also been a Trustee of the 
Johnson Emergency Hospital, and Consulting Ob- 
stetrician to the County Hospital. He is a member 
of County, State and National Medical societies. 




M. R. HEWITT 



He was married on November 25, 1873, to Martha 
Currie, daughter of Dr. John Currie, and has two 
children : Maude I. and Grace L. Hewitt. 



LEO, Simeon Newton, 1847- 

Class of i86g Med. 
Born in New York, 1847; studied in public and 
private schools. New York Free Academy, School for 
Oriental Literature and Modern Science, and Long 
Island College Hospital; graduated M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, i86g; in practice since i86g, 
with extensive hospital and army service ; Founder of 
Society for Chemical Research. 

SIMEON NEWTON LEO, M.D., son of Henry 
and Hannah (Lewis) Leo, was born at the 
corner of Nassau and Ann streets, New York City, 
on December i, 1847. His parents were natives 
of London, England. His mother's ancestors were 



114 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Dutch, and his father's traced their descent from 
the De Leos of Barcelona, Spain, where Miguel de 
Leo was a Grandee of Spain, an adviser of King 
Ferdinand, and a conspicuous figure at Court. Dr. 
Leo was educated at the Greene Street Educational 
Institute, .at Ward School No. 38, at the New York 
Free Academy, now the College of the City of New 
York, among his preceptors being Dr. M. Middle- 
man, the Rev. Dr. Ansel Leo, and the Rev. Dr. 
Raphael, and at the School for Oriental Literature 
and Modern Science. His professional education 
was begun in the Long Island College Hospital, in 
Brooklyn, and was continued in the Bellevue Hospi- 
tal Medical College, now a part of New York Univer- 
sity, from which he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1869. Since that date he 
has been constantly engaged in practice, and has 
done much service in hospitals and in the army. 
Thus he was Surgeon of the Fifty-fifth Regiment, 
New York National Guard, in 1869 ; Sanitary In- 
spector for the Health Board of New York in 1870 ; 
Visiting Physician to the Hospital for Nervous Dis- 
eases, on Blackwell's Island, and Surgeon to the 
Western Dispensary in 1875, Obstetrician and Sur- 
geon to the Society for the Relief of Indigent 
Females from 1870 to 1875, and Physician and 
Surgeon to the Home for Aged and Infirm Hebrews 
for twenty-nine years. He has also been Honorary 
Inspector and Secretary of the Society for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor. He was the Founder 
of the old Society for Chemical Research, and was 
assistant to the Surgeon-General of the State of 
New York. Dr. Leo is a member of the New York 
County Medical Society, the Society of Medical 
Jurisprudence, the Society for the Relief of Physi- 
cians, the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, the 
Northwestern Medical and Surgical Society, and the 
Neurological Society, and a Fellow of the New York 
Academy of Medicine. He was married in April, 
1874, to Florence Nightingale Stines, of Jamaica, 
West Indies. There are no children from the 
union. His home is at No. 103 West 55th Street, 
New York. 



OAKLEY, John Greenleaf, 1843- 

Class of 1869 Arts. 
Born at Verbank, N. Y., 1843 ; studied at Troy- 
University, 1861-62; Professor of Latin and Greek, 
Saugerties Academy, 1862-63; ordained into Methodist 
Ministry, 1864; graduated A.B., New York University, 
1869, and A.M., 1872; honorary A.M., Wesleyan Uni- 



versity, 1871 ; Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1881 ; D.D., 
Grant Memorial University, 1889. 

JOHN GREENLEAF OAKLEY, A.M., D.D., 
Ph.D., a distinguished clergyman of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, was born at Verbank, New 
York, on May 17, 1843, the son of Solomon Wilmot 
Oakley and Mary Ann (Dutcher) Oakley. He 
commenced his college course at Troy University 
in 1 86 1, and was Professor of Latin and Greek in 
Saugerties Academy, New York, in 1862-63. In 
1864 he was ordained into the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he has 



..«S^ 




JOHN G. OAKLEY 

ever since remained. Feeling the need of more 
extensive culture he entered New York University, 
and was graduated from it with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1869. Two years later he re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Master of Arts from 
Wesleyan University, and in 1872 took the degree 
of Master of Arts in course from New York Uni- 
versity. In 1875 he studied in Europe. He spent 
seven years in completing the Latin course as 
required by the University of Bonn, but passed his 
final examinations and took the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy at Syracuse University in 1881, and in 
1889 he received the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Divinity from the Grant Memorial University. 
In 1892 he made a very extensive tour of investi- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



115 



gation ill Europe, Asia, and Africa, including 
Egypt and the Holy Land. Dr. Oakley has been 
prominent as a lyceum lecturer for more than 
twenty years. Since 1864 he has been chiefly en- 
gaged in the ministerial work of the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. During eighteen 
years of this time he was pastor in the City of New 
York. He is now (1903) Pastor of St. Paul's 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Tarrytown, New Vork. 
He was married on November 22, 1864, to Susie 
A. Hoffman, daughter of the late Charles Hoffman, 
of Claverack, New York. He has five children : 
Edith Elizabeth, wife of Recorder R. P. Martin, 
Hartford, Connecticut ; Mary Hester, wife of the 
Rev. Dr. T. H. Baragwanath, Pastor of Trinity 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Newburgh ; Rev. 
Charles S., a member of the New York Conference ; 
Susie Teresa, wife of Prof. George H. Kingsbury, 
New York, and Ida Augusta, wife of Benjamin R. 
Gilmour, Yonkers, New York. Dr. Oakley has 
been prominent in the Masonic Fraternity, and was 
one of the original company who organized the now 
famous New York Quill Club of which he is still a 
member. He possesses rare social, intellectual and 
ministerial qualities, and is an excellent organizer. 
He is in demand for various important tasks. 



ROOT, John Wellborn, 1850-1891. 

Class of 1869 Sci. 
Born at Lumpkin, Ga., 1850; graduated B.S. and 
C.E., New York University, 1869; architect, i86g-gi ; 
Architect of Columbian Exposition Buildings, Chicago; 
died, i8gi. 

JOHN WELLBORN ROOT, B.S. and C.E., 
architect, was born at Lumpkin, Georgia, on 
January 10, 1850, the son of Sydney and Mary 
(Clark) Root. He entered the scientific course of 
New York University in 1865, and was a member 
of Delta Upsilon, Vice-President of Eucleian, winner 
of the First Butler Eucleian Essay Prize in 1868, 
Junior orator, and Commencement orator fifth in 
rank. He was graduated with the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer in 1869, and 
thereafter devoted himself with distinguished suc- 
cess to the career of an architect. He followed 
that calling in New York in 1869-72, and thereafter 
in Chicago. In the latter city he was the designer 
of nnany important business buildings, such as The 
Rookery, The Rialto, the Phoenix Building, the Insur- 
ance Exchange, the Art Institute, the Rand-McNally 
Building, the Chicago Hotel, the Women's Christian 



Temperance Union Building, and the Masonic 
Temple. He was appointed architect and designer 
of the buildings for the Columbian Exposition, but 
died before that great work was completed. He 
was twice married : First, in 1879, to Mary Walker, 
and second, in 1882, to Dora Louise Monroe, and 
had three children : Margaret, John Wellborn, and 
Mary Louise Root. He died in Chicago on Janu- 
ary 15, 1891. 



SIZER, Nelson Buell, 1846- 

Class of i86g Sci., 1871 Med. 
Born at Avon, Conn., 1846; graduated at Connecticut 
Literary Institution, Suffield, 1866; graduated B.S., 
New York University, i86g, and M.D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1871 ; served in Roosevelt and 
Presbyterian hospitals. New York, and studied in 
London and Paris, 1871-73; in practice since 1873, with 
extensive hospital work ; Professor in American Insti- 
tute of Phrenology. 

NELSON BUELL SIZER, B.S., M.D., son 
of Nelson and Sarah Hale (Remington) 
Sizer, is of New England origin, having been born 
at Avon, Connecticut, on December lo, 1846. His 
preparatory education was acquired at the well 
known Connecticut Literary Institution, at Suffield, 
and he was graduated from it in 1866. Thence 
he came to New York University, and pursued the 
scientific course in the College of Arts and Science. 
He was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity, 
and ranked well as a student. In 1869 he was 
graduated with the Baccalaureate degree in Science, 
and then went on with his professional studies 
in the University Medical College, which he had 
begun during his Senior year in the College of Arts 
and Science. He was graduated a Doctor of 
Medicine in 187 1, and afterward pursued post- 
graduate courses in London and Paris. In 1871-72 
he was a House Surgeon in Roosevelt Hospital, 
and in 1872-73 in the Presbyterian Hospital, in 
New York, and in the last named year went to 
Europe. Since his return to this country he has 
been constantly engaged in practice, in general 
surgery, though paying especial attention to diseases 
of the eye, ear, throat and skin. During his pro- 
fessional career Dr. Sizer has done much hospital 
and educational work, including some years as 
Attending Physician to the Atlantic Avenue Dispen- 
sary, Brooklyn, and many years in the Brooklyn 
Eye and Ear Hospital, the Long Island College 
Hospital as .Assistant Surgeon, in the Chinese Hos- 
pital as Surgeon, in the Bushwick Dispensary as 
Senior Surgeon, in the American Institute of -Phre- 



ii6 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



nology, New York, as Professor of Anatomy and 
Physiology, and, at the present time, as Assistant 
Surgeon to the Bushwick Central Hospital, Brook- 
lyn. He was an original Fellow of the New York 
State Medical Association, and still belongs thereto, 
as well as to the Kings County Medical Society, 
the Kings County Medical Association, and the 
Masonic Order. He was married on March 24, 
1875, to Georgiana Mitchell, daughter of George 
Mitchell, of Brooklyn. His address is No. 336 
Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



SWEZEY, Gilbert Hopkins, 1842- 

Class of 1869 Med. 
Born at Yaphank, N. Y., 1842; studied at Academy 
at Jamaica; graduated M.D,, 1869, Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College; extended hospital practice; in prac- 
tice in New York, 1869-83, and at Yaphank, N. Y., 
since 1883. 

GILBERT HOPKINS SWEZEY, M.D., is a 
native of Yaphank, Long Island, New York, 
where he was born on April 22, 1842. On the 




G. H. SWEZEY 

side of his father, Van Rensselaer Swezey, his ances- 
try is traced to the earliest settlers of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, whence the family removed to Southold, 
Long Island. His mother, whose maiden name 
was Dorothy Catherine Davis, was seventh in direct 



descent from Stephen Hopkins, who came over in 
the " Mayflower." In his boyhood Dr. Swezey at- 
tended the Miller Place Academy, afterward the 
Union Hall Academy, of Jamaica, Long Island. 
He was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1869, from the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, now a part of New York Univer- 
sity, and forthwith began practice in New York City. 
He served as Attending Physician to the Out-door 
Poor at Bellevue Hospital, at the New York State 
Hospital for Nervous Diseases, and at the De Milt 
Dispensary. In 1883 he removed from New York 
to Yaphank, and has since been in practice there, 
spending his winters, from November ist to May ist, 
at No. 83 Hardenbrook Avenue, Jamaica, New 
York. Dr. Swezey was married on October 21, 
1873, t<^ Susan Emily Miller, and has seven children. 



ALEXANDER, Welcome Taylor, 1848- 

Class of 1870 Med. 
Born in Kentucky, 1848; studied in schools at Louis- 
ville, Ky., and St. Louis, Mo., two years at Jefferson 
College, Canonsburg, Pa., and two years in Berlin and 
elsewhere abroad ; graduated M.D., 1870, Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College ; served as Interne at Bellevue 
Hospital; three years in Europe; in practice in New 
York since 1874. 

WELCOME TAYLOR ALEXANDER, M.D., 
son of Junius B. and Lucy Fitzhugh 
(Dade) Alexander, both Virginians, was born in 
Davies County, Kentucky, on February 4, 1848. 
He attended schools in Louisville, Kentucky, and 
St. Louis, Missouri. Two years were spent at Jef- 
ferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, and two 
years more in study in Europe, chiefly in Berlin. 
He pursued the regular course of the Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, now a part of New York Uni- 
versity, and was graduated from that institution with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1870. For a 
year and a half thereafter he was an Interne in 
Bellevue Hospital, and for three years more he 
studied in London, Paris, Vienna, Berlin, and Stras- 
burg. He then returned to New York and since 
1874 has been steadily engaged in the practice of 
his profession. He was married in 1880 and has 
three children. His address is No. 940 St. Nicho- 
las Avenue, New York. 



DONLIN, Philip Eugene, 1849-1892. 

Class of 1870 Med. 
Born in New York, 1849; studied in public schools. 
School of Art, and New York Free Academy; grad- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



iij 



uated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1870 ; House Physician and Surgeon, St. Vincent's 
Hospital, 1870-71; Coroner's Physician, 1878-92; Alder- 
man in 1884; in practice in New York, 1871-92; died, 
1892. 

PHILIP EUGENE DONLIN, M.D., son of 
Michael and Annie (Reilly) Donlin, was 
of Irish ancestry and was born in New York City on 




PHILIP E. DONLIN 

October 13, 1849. He attended the public schools 
of the city, and Plassman's School of Art, in which 
latter he studied modelling and drawing. A course 
in the New York Free Academy, now the College 
of the City of New York, followed, from which 
institution he was graduated in 186S. He then 
entered the Medical College of New York Univer- 
sity, and was graduated from it with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1870. A year of service in 
St. Vincent's Hospital followed, as House Physician 
and Surgeon, and then, in 187 1, he began the prac- 
tice of his profession in New York City and con- 
tinued therein until the end of his life. Dr. Donlin 
was a Democrat in politics, and was a member of 
the Board of Aldermen of New York City for a 
month, in September and October, 1884, but re- 
signed the place. He was a Coroner's Physician 
from 1878 until his death. From 1882 to 1884 he 
was Curator and Pathologist to the Medico-Legal 
Society, of which he was a member, and he was the 



first to read a paper before that society on " Patho- 
logical Lesions in Electrical Deaths." He was a 
member of the New York Pathological Society, the 
New York County Medical Society, the New York 
Academy of Medicine, the New Amsterdam Club, 
the New York County Democracy, Tammany Hall, 
the Monticello Club, and the Irish Land League of 
America, of which last named he was the organizer 
and first President. He was never married. He 
died in New York on June 12, 1892. 



FRASER, Alexander Watkins, 1846- 

Class of 1870 Arts, 1871 Law. 
Born in New York, 1846; studied in private schools ; 
graduated A.B., New York University, 1870; graduated 
LL.B., New York University Law School, 1871 ; admit- 
ted to Bar, 1871 ; in practice in New York City. 

ALEXANDER WATKINS FRASER, son of 
Alexander and Sarah (Watkins) Fraser, was 
born in New York City in 1846, and received his 
early and secondary education in Dr. Morris's and 
N. E. Cornwall's private schools in his native city. 
He was matriculated in the School of Arts of New 




ALEXANDER W. FRASER 



York University, and was graduated from it with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1870. In the follow- 
ing year he was graduated from the New York Uni- 
versity Law School, and was admitted to practice at 



ii8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the Bar. For the next year he was a law clerk in 
the office of Hawkins & Cothren, and for another 
year he was engaged as managing clerk in the law 
office of Judge Speir. Since then he has been in 
practice in New York City. He is a Republican 
in politics, and is a member of the Bar Association 
of New York City, of the -Nyack Country Club, 
and of the Delta Phi fraternity. He was married 
in 1870 to Celestina Malten, and has one child, 
Lucile Fraser. 



HEBBARD, EUery Cola, 1847- 

Class of 1870 Med. 
Born in Adrian, Mich., 1847 ; studied in public 
schools of Boston and private boarding schools; grad- 
uated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1870; 
practicing physician in Boston, Mass., since 1870; 
author of various medical essays. 

ELLERY COL.'^ HEBBARD, M.D,, traces his 
descent from Robert and Joan Hibbard, 
who came from Salisbury, England, between 1635 
and 1639, and settled at Salem, then Beverley, 
Massachusetts. Their son, John, and his wife, Ruth 
Walden, had a son, John, who married Dorothy 
Graves, and who appears to have changed the spell- 
ing of his name from Hibbard to Hebbard. This 
latter couple had a son also named John, who mar- 
ried Hannah Pattle, or Pottle, and lived at Methuen, 
Massachusetts. The fourth of the seven children of 
John and Hannah Hebbard was James, who mar- 
ried Sarah Merrick, and lived, and was deacon of 
the church, at Durham, Maine, for more than fifty 
years. The third of his five children was Timothy 
Merrick Hebbard, who married Mary Dyer and had 
eleven children. The sixth of these, born at Lis- 
bon, Maine, was William Wallace Hebbard, one of 
the notable men of his day and generation. The 
son of a hard-working lumberman with a large 
family, he began to support himself by manual labor 
at the age of six years, and at twelve years of age 
dealt in logs on his own account and thus earned 
money for schooling. A few years later he was him- 
self a teacher. At eighteen he studied for the 
ministry and was a little later licensed to preach. 
Next he studied medicine at Harvard, and became 
a successful physician. He was an earnest temper- 
ance advocate, and wrote much in prose and verse. 
He married Martha S. Benjamin, daughter of Dr. 
Daniel Benjamin, of North Granby, Connecticut, 
and died at Nashua, New Hampshire, in T889. 
His only son is the subject of this sketch. EUery 
Cola Hebbard was born at Adrian, Michigan, 011 



March 20, 1847, and received his early education 
in the public schools of Boston, Massachusetts, and 
in various boarding schools. On approaching the 
age of manhood he found his tastes and aptitude 
inclining strongly toward the medical profession, 
of which his father and maternal grandfather were 
conspicuous members. Accordingly he repaired to 
New York City, becoming a pupil of Dr. James R. 
Wood. He entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, and was duly graduated from it with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in March, 1870. He 
then returned to Boston, in which city his home had 




E. C. HEBBARD 

been since 1858, and there began the practice of 
his profession, in which he has been continuously 
and successfully engaged ever since. He is a Fel- 
low of the Massachusetts State Medical Society, the 
American Medical Association ' and the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science ; is a 
Thirty-third degree Mason and a member of the 
Supreme Council of that Order. He was married 
on October 19, 1887, to Mrs. Ida M. Simpson, of 
Brooklyn, New York. Dr. Hebbard has written and 
published a number of essays on medical topics, 
including two on " A Scientific Basis for Medicine," 
entitled respectively, " Ufe and Its Association with 
Matter ; Matter not Vital but Absolutely Chemi- 
cal," and " Compatible Medication, or the Physical 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



ri9 



Forces in Scientific Formulation." In these papers 
he argues to prove that hfe and matter are separate 
entities ; that life is continuous and only abides with 
matter for a limited time, so proving its immortality. 
The ideas promulgated in these papers have excited 
considerable interest among scientific thinkers. Dr. 
Hebbard claims that medicine can be made strictly 
scientific by these teachings. The Doctor is the 
owner of a most beautiful country home on the 
Kennebec River, consisting of some one hundred 
and seventy acres, two-thirds of which are primeval 
forest. Some of the pine trees on the estate are one 
hundred and fifty feet in height, and some of the 
oaks measure nineteen feet around their base and 
are estimated to be six or eight hundred years old. 
The history of the place dates back to the time 
of the Pilgrims. 



LEVENTRITT, David, 1845- 

Class of 1870 Law, 
Born at Winnsboro, S. C, 1845; studied in public 
schools, College of City of New York and New York 
University Law School; graduated A.B., College of 
City of New York, 1864; graduated LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1870 ; in prominent practice in 
New York for nearly thirty years ; Justice of Supreme 
Court of New York since iSgg. 

DAVID LEVENTRITT, A.B., LL.B., one of 
the Justices of the Supreme Court of the 
State of New York, was born at Winnsboro, South 
Carolina, on January 31, 1845. I" 1854 his family 
removed to New York, and he was educated in the 
public schools of that city, and in the Free Acad- 
emy, now known as the College of the City of New 
York. He was graduated from the latter in 1864, 
with the second honors of the class and with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then began the 
study of law and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, in 1870, from the Law School of 
New York University. Admission to the Bar fol- 
lowed, and for nearly thirty years he was a success- 
ful and prominent practicing lawyer in New York 
City. He was nominated by the Democratic party, 
of which he has been a life-long member, in 1898, 
for a place on the Supreme Court Bench from New 
York City, and was elected by a handsome majority, 
running ahead of the rest of the ticket. He took 
his place on the Bench at the beginning of 1899, 
and was at once designated as one of the Jus- 
tices of the Appellate Term, a distinction not 
hitherto accorded to a Judge in his first year of 
service. 



MARTIN, Tilly Alexander, 1849- 

Class of 1870 Med. 
Born at Miami, Mo., 1849; studied in public schools 
and Pritchett's Institute, Glasgow, Mo. ; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1870; in 
hospital practice in New York; Lecturer on Diseases 
of Children in Missouri Medical College, St. Louis ; in 
general practice in St. Louis since 1885. 

TILLY ALEXANDER MARTIN, M.D., son 
of Morris and Catherine Mary (Cole) Mar- 
tin, was born at Miami, Missouri, on January 11, 
1849, being descended from old colonial stock. 
He was educated in the public schools and in 
Pritchett's Institute at Glasgow, Missouri. For 
three years he studied in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, which has now been incorporated 
into New York University, and was graduated from 
it with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1870. 
For a year following he was an Interne and House 
Physician in Bellevue Hospital and in the hospital 
on Blackwell's Island, and then went to St. Louis 
and became Lecturer on the Diseases of Children 
in the Missouri Medical College. Since 1885 he 
has been successfully engaged in general practice in 
St. Louis. He is a member of the St. Louis Medi- 
cal Society, the Missouri Medical Association, the 
American Medical Association, the Masonic Order 
and the Knights Templar. 



NICHOLS, William Henry, 1852- 

Class of 1870 Sci. 
Horn in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1852; graduated Brooklyn 
Polytechnic Institute ; student at Cornell University, 
1368-69; graduated B.S., New York University, 1870, 
and M.S., 1873; manufacturing chemist. 

WILLIAM HENRY NICHOLS, M.S., is a 
son of George Henry Nichols and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Harris) Nichols, and was born in Brook- 
lyn, New York, on January 9, 1852. He graduated 
at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and was a 
student at Cornell University in r 868-69. He 
then entered New York University, from which he 
took the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1870. 
Three years later he received from the University 
the Master's degree in Science. He was a member 
of the Delta Phi Fraternity. Since graduation he has 
been a manufacturing chemist. He is President of 
the Nichols Chemical Company, which he founded ; 
President of the General Chemical Company, of the 
Chemical Trading Company, of the Nichols Chemi- 
cal Company of Canada, and is Vice-President of 
the Manufacturers' Trust Company. He is Vice- 



I 20 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



President and a Director of the San Carlos Copper 
Company, of tlie Corn Products Company and of 
the New York Glucose Company. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and a Director of the 
Corn Exchange Bank, of the Read Phosphate 
Company, of the United States Wood Preserving 
Company and of several other financial and manu- 
facturing corporations. He is a Trustee of the 
Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, of the Congrega- 
tional Church Building Society and of various other 
religious and charitable institutions. He is also 
President of the Congregational Church Extension 




WILLIAM H. NICHOLS 

Society and of the Board of the Clinton Avenue 
Congregational Church, Brooklyn. He was married 
on February 18, 1873, to Hannah Wright Hensel, ' 
and has three children living. His home is at 
No. 353 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



PECKHAM, William Gibbs, 1849- 

Class of 1870 Law. 
Born at Newport, R. I., 1849; graduated A.B., Har- 
vard, 1867 ; studied law in New York and at Heidelberg, 
Germany; graduated LL.B., New York University 
Law School, 1870; in practice since 1870; prominent in 
politics and tariff reform ; auttior. 

WILLIAM GIBBS PECKHAM, A.B., LL.B., 
lawyer and publicist, is a native of New- 
port, Rhode Island, where he was born on Febru- 



ary 7, 1849. Through his father, William Gibbs 
Peckham, he is directly descended from Elder Wil- 
liam Peckhani, who was Pastor of the first Baptist 
Church in Rhode Island, and through his mother, 
whose maiden name was Mary Hull Perry, he is a 
grandson of Judge Joseph Perry and a descendant of 
Edmund Perry, who was an ancestor of Commodore 
Oliver Hazard Perry, Commodore Matthew Gal- 
braith Perry, and General Nathanael Greene. Mr. 
Peckham entered Harvard University at the early 
age of fourteen years. He was the first Editor of 
"The Harvard Collegian" and its successor, "The 
Harvard Advocate," and was thus a pioneer in col- 
lege journalism. He was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1867, and thereupon devoted 
himself to the study of the law. He was a student 
in John Norton Pomeroy's Law School, and under 
William Maxwell Evarts and Joseph H. Choate in 
New York. In 1868-69 he was at the University 
of Heidelberg, Germany, where he received a certif- 
icate in Roman Law. Finally he pursued a course 
in the New York University Law School, and was 
graduated with the Baccalaureate degree in Law in 
1870. He was admitted to the Bar in 1870, and 
has been in active practice ever since. His practice 
deals largely with the affairs of corporations, and in 
cases concerning marine insurance. He has been 
notably successful in suits against the New York 
Elevated Railroads for damages to property. He 
also won all the suits in connection with the flimous 
Northampton Bank robbery, recovering from stock- 
brokers and others who had received the purloined 
securities, and defending the bank against various 
suits. While he was a student in the office of Mr. 
Choate, Mr. Peckham took part in the prosecution 
of the Tweed Ring by the Committee of Seventy. 
Later he was a colleague of George William Curtis 
and Carl Schurz in the independent political move- 
ment in support of Grover Cleveland for President, 
and in the tariff reform movement. He is a mem- 
ber of the New York State Bar Association, the 
New York City Bar Association, and the Harvard, 
Lawyers', Reform and Commonwealth clubs of New 
York. He is the author of some volumes of poems, 
including a collection of his college poems at Har- 
vard. His office is at No. in Broadway, New 
York, and his home at Westfield, New Jersey. 



POWELL, Seneca Daniel, 1848- 

Class of 1870 Med. 
Born in Alabama, 1848; studied in University of 
Alabama; served in Confederate Army in Civil War; 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



121 



graduated Medical Department of University of Vir- 
ginia, 1869; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1870; in practice since 1871, with 
much hospital service ; Professor in New York Post- 
Graduate Medical School ; author. 

SENECA DANIEL POWELL, M.D., LL.D., is 
a native of Wilcox County, Alabama, and was 
bom on January 5, 1848. His father, Augustus H. 
Powell, was a planter, and served as Quartermas- 
ter in the Confederate Army in the Civil War and 
afterward was a member of the Missouri Legislature 
and President of the Kansas City, Missouri, Savings 
Association. Dr. Powell is a descendant of Colo- 




SENECA D. POVl'ELL 

nel Honorius Powell, of South Carolina, and his 
grandparents were among the earliest settlers of 
Alabama assisting in the building of Fort Madison. 
At the outbreak of the Civil War Dr. Powell was a 
cadet in the University of Alabama. He left that 
institution to enter the Confederate Army as a vol- 
unteer, and served until the end of the war. At the 
age of seventeen he engaged in farming and mer- 
cantile pursuits for a time, meanwhile privately 
preparing himself for a medical career. He was 
graduated from the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia in 1869, and the next year was 
graduated with the Doctor's degree from the Medi- 
cal College of New York University. While in the 
University he was a House Surgeon in Bellevue 



Hospital, serving there for a year and a half. In 
1871-72 he was an Assistant Inspector for the 
Health Board of New York City, and at the same 
time was Clinical Assistant to the Chair of the 
Theory and Practice of Medicine in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College. From 1871 to 1875 he 
was Attending Physician to the Central Dispensary 
of New York, and filled the same place at the North- 
western Dispensary from 1875 to 1889. In 1875 he 
was appointed Surgeon, with the rank of Major, to 
the Second Brigade of the National Guard of the 
State of New York. From 1878 to 1882 he was 
Chief of Staff to the Chair of Surgery in the New 
York University Medical College. In 1882 he be- 
came connected with the New York Post-Graduate 
Medical School as a Lecturer on Surgical Dressings ; 
in 1883 he was an Instructor; in 1885-87 he was 
Professor of Minor Surgery, and since 1887 he has 
been Professor of Clinical Surgery in this institution. 
In 1898 he was elected Secretary of the Faculty, 
which position he holds at present. Since 1886 he 
has been Visiting Surgeon to St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 
since 1887 to the New York Infant Asylum and 
since 1890 to St. Mark's Hospital. He was Vice- 
President of the New York County Medical Society 
in r89i, and its President in 1893. He was Vice- 
President of the Pan-American Medical Congress at 
Washington in 1893, and President of the New York 
State Medical Society in 1897-98. He has written 
much for publication, especially on brain surgery, 
and the use of carbolic acid in the treatment of blood 
poisoning and infected wounds. His discovery, in 
1894, that alcohol is an antidote, externally and in- 
ternally, to the action of carbolic acid has advanced 
surgery far beyond its narrow limits in the treatment 
of infectious diseases. 



REID, John, 1850- 

Class of 1870 Arts. 
Born at St. John, N. B., 1850; studied in New York 
public schools ; prepared for college in University 
Grammar School; entered New York University, i856; 
Junior orator, Commencement orator, etc.; elected to 
Phi Beta Kappa; graduated A.B., New York Univer- 
sity, 1870 ; entered Princeton Theological Seminary, 
1870 ; graduated, 1873 ; ordained to Presbyterian minis- 
try, 1873 ; in active service as pastor since 1873 ; Mod- 
erator of Presbytery, Commissioner to and Clerk of 
General Assembly, Delegate to General Council, mem- 
ber and Secretary of Council of New York University, 
etc; D.D., New York University, 1888. 

JOHN REID, D.D., an eminent son of New 
York University and one of the foremost 
clergymen of the Presbyterian Church, is a son of 



122 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Robert and Jane (Wallace) Reid, whose names cor- 
rectly indicate their Scottish ancestry, and was born 
at St. John, New Brunswick, on November 19, 1850. 
When but a few weeks old he was brought to New 
York City, where his parents' home was already 
established. His first education was acquired in 
the public schools of the city. His college pre- 
paratory course was pursued in the University 
Grammar School, and in the fall of 1866 he was 
matriculated in the Freshman class of the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York, as New York Univer- 
sity was at that time known. He pursued the 




JOHN REID 

classical course in the School of Arts and ranked 
high among his fellows as a student and as a leader 
in the best social life of the University. He was a 
member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity, a member 
and for a time Treasurer of the Eucleian Literary 
Society, and received the honor of election to Phi 
Beta Kappa. He was one of the Junior orators of 
his class and was also a Commencement orator at 
the University Commencement of 1870, when he 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He had already felt himself called to the work of a 
Christian minister, and accordingly, to prepare him- 
self therefor, he entered the Princeton (New Jersey) 
Theological Seminary in the fall of 1870, and was 
graduated in the spring of 1873. His or<lination to 



the ministry by the Presbytery of Morris and Orange, 
New Jersey, promptly followed, on May 6, 1873, and 
he was thereupon installed as pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church at Lower Valley, New Jersey. There 
he served for a little over a year and then, in 1874, 
removed to the City of Paterson, New Jersey, where 
his pastorate of the Third Presbyterian Church 
lasted for about two years. In 1876 he went to 
Hoboken, New Jersey, and was there pastor for 
three years. His next call was to a church with 
which he was long identified and in which his pas- 
torate was a memorable one. It was in 1879 that 
he was installed in the historic First Presbyterian 
Church of Yonkers, New York, and for sixteen years 
he served it faithfully and was a conspicuous and 
influential citizen of that beautiful and cultured city. 
That memorable pastorate came to an end, how- 
ever, in 1895, when he accepted an urgent call to 
the Fort Street Church in Detroit, Michigan, one 
of the principal churches in the northwest, where 
he labored with marked success for the following 
four years. Finally, in 1900, he returned east and 
became pastor of his present charge, the Memorial 
Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn. During his min- 
isterial career Dr. Reid has been repeatedly called 
upon to serve beyond the limits of his own pastorate. 
In 1876 he was the Moderator of his Presbytery. 
He was sent as a Commissioner to the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 1876, 1884 
and 1888, and was one of the clerks of that body in 
the last named year. It was in t888 that he re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Divinity, in which 
year also he was sent as a Delegate to the Fourth 
General Council of the Presbyterian Churches, held 
in London, England, when he was made a member 
of the Western Executive Commission of the same 
for the four years 1888-92. In connection with his 
Alma Mater Dr. Reid has been called to maintain a 
constant service which has been at once intimate 
and beneficent. He was elected to the Council of 
New York University in 1889, and the next year 
became the Secretary of that body. In that capacity 
he served the University with exceptional faithful- 
ness and ability, at a critical time in its history, and 
largely contributed to the successful establishment 
and development of the institution in its new home 
on University Heights. Upon his removal from 
Yonkers to Detroit, and to the great regret of his 
associates, he retired from the Council, but was 
promptly and enthusiastically re-elected upon his 
return to New York in 1900. He still remains one 
of the most earnest and efficient members of the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



123 



Council, and is also the President of the College 
Alumni Society of the University, to which office he 
was re-elected upon the expiration of his term. 
During his incumbency of this office the General 
Alumni Society of New York University, embracing 
all its schools and departments, was organized ; an 
important movement with which he was closely 
identified. Dr. Reid has four children : Robert 
Warren, a son by a former marriage ; Edith May, a 
graduate of the Class of 1900 from Smith College ; 
John, graduated Bachelor of Arts from New York 
University in 1900; and Mary Reid, a member of 
the Class of 1904 in Smith College. Dr. Reid was 
married to his present wife, formerly Mary Jamieson, 
on December 19, 1876. His home is at No. 863 
President Street, Brooklyn, New York. 



SAYRE, Lewis Hall, 1851-1890. 

Class of 1870. 
Born in New York, 1851 ; received special course 
diploma from New York University, 1870 ; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1873; phy- 
sician and surgeon, 1873-90 ; died, iSgo. 

LEWIS HALL SAYRE, M.D., was a son of the 
eminent physician and instructor. Professor 
Lewis A. Sayre, M.D., and Eliza Ann (Hall) Sayre. 
He was born in New York City on September r2, 
185 1, and entered New York University in the 
Class of 1870 as a special course student. He was 
President of his class and a member of Delta Phi. 
In 1870 he received a special course diplomn, and 
then went to the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
which has since been incorporated into New York 
University. There he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1873, and he at once en- 
tered upon a most promising career as a physician 
and surgeon. He was Assistant to the Chair of 
Orthopaedic Surgery in the Bellevue Hospital Medi- 
cal College in 1877-90, and President of the Alumni 
Association of that institution, Consulting Surgeon 
to the Hackensack, New Jersey, Hospital in 1889- 
90, and Secretary of the American Orthopedic 
Association in 1887-88. He was a Fellow of the 
New York Academy of Medicine, and a member of 
the Pathological Society, and the American, New 
York State, and New York County Medical associa- 
tions. He was married on January 15, r879, '^o 
Mary Ahce Pomeroy, daughter of William Pomeroy, 
and had three children : William P., Lewis A., and 
Frances Sayre. He died in New York City on Jan- 
uary 2, 1890. 



SPENCER, James Decker, 1849- 

Class of 1870 Med, 
Born at Denmark, N. Y., 1840; studied at Jefferson 
County Institute and Phillips Exeter Academy; gradu- 
ated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1870; in 
practice since 1870 ; President of Medical Board of City 
Hospital, Watertown, N. Y., since 1899. 

JAMES DECKER SPENCER, M.D., son of 
Henry G. P. and Emily Antoinette (Decker) 
Spencer, traces his descent from Michael Spencer, 
of Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England, in the middle 
of the Sixteenth Century. His ancestor, William 
Spencer, a grandson of Michael Spencer, with his 




JAMES D. SPENCER 

brothers, Thomas and Jared, came to this country 
in 1631 and were among the early settlers of Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, and Hartford, Connecticut, 
and conspicuous in colonial affairs. His grandfather, 
Gordon Percival Spencer, first of Salisbury, Connec- 
ticut, and then, at the close of the War of 181 2, of 
Champion, New York, was a graduate of Williams 
College, an eminent physician and surgeon, and a 
surgeon of the American Army in the War of 181 2. 
His son, Henry Gordon Percival Spencer, of Water- 
town, New York, was a graduate of Jefferson Medi- 
cal College, Philadelphia, an army surgeon in the 
Civil War, and one of the foremost physicians and 
surgeons in the northern part of New York State. 
He was the father of the subject of this sketch, who 



124 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



was bora at Denmark, Lewis County, New York, on 
April 14, 1849. Dr. Spencer was carefully educated, 
attending the Jefferson County (New York) Insti- 
tute, and the famous Phillips Exeter Academy at 
Exeter, New tiampshire. From the latter he pro- 
ceeded to the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
New York, now a part of New York University. 
During his medical studies he enjoyed the precep- 
torship of Professor James R. Wood, M.D., LL.D., 
of New York, and also that of his own father. He 
was graduated from Bellevue with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in B'ebruary, 1870, but his 
diploma was dated May i, 1870, on account of his 
age, as he was actually graduated before he was 
twenty-one years old, and it was not permissible to 
date the diploma before that age was attained. Im- 
mediately upon receiving his diploma Dr. Spencer 
began the practice of his profession at VVatertovvn, 
New York, and has ever since been thus engaged, 
with distinguished success. He was on July 15, 
1872, commissioned by Governor Dix a surgeon, 
with the rank of Major, in the Thirty-fifth Regiment 
of the New York State National Guard. In 1888 
he was elected President of the Jefferson County 
Medical Society, and in 1896 he was elected Presi- 
dent of the Medical Society of the State of New 
York, of both of which organizations he is still a 
member. Since 1899 he has been President of the 
Medical Board of the City Hospital of Watertown, 
New York. He is a member, also, of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, and the American 
Public Health Association, and is Surgeon of the 
Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg Division of the 
New York Central & Hudson River Railroad. He 
was a member of the Pan-American Medical Con- 
gress at Mexico in 1896. He is a Free Mason, a 
Knight Templar, and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. 
He was married on October 31, 1877, to Frances 
Eleanor Phelps. His address is Watertown, New 
York. 

STEVENSON, Eugene, 1849- 

Class of 1870 Arts, 1870 Law. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1849 ; graduated A.B. and 
LL.B., New York University, 1870; taught school 
Paterson, N. J., 1870-74; in legal practice since 1874; 
Prosecutor of the Pleas, Passaic County, N. J., 1881-86; 
President N. J. State Bar Association, igoo; Vice- 
Chancellor, N. J., 1901 ; A.M., New York University, 
1873- 

EUGENE STEVENSON, A.M., LL.B., Vice- 
Chancellor of the State of New Jersey, was 
born in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York, on 



June 28, 1849, the son of Paul Eugene and Cornelia 
(Prime) Stevenson. After a careful preparatory 
education he entered the Sophomore Class in New 
York University in 1867 and had a distinguished 
career as a student. He won the Sophomore Greek 
Prize, and divided the Sophomore Latin Prize with 
Howard DeWolf Woodruff", and was a Junior orator 
and President of Eucleian, was elected to Phi Beta 
Kappa, and was Latin . Salutatorian at the Com- 
mencement of 1870. At the latter date he was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
the College of Arts and Science, and at the same 




EUGENE STEVENSON 

time received the degree of Bachelor of Laws from 
the Law Department of the University. Three 
years later the University conferred upon him the 
degree of Master of Arts. The four years following 
his graduation were devoted to teaching school at 
Paterson, New Jersey, but since 1874 he has been 
engaged in legal and judicial duties. He began 
practice as a lawyer in Paterson, New Jersey, in 
1874, and continued in it until his elevation to the 
Bench. From 1881 to 1886 he was Prosecutor of 
the Pleas, or District Attorney, of Passaic County, 
New Jersey. In 1900 he was made President of the 
Bar Association of the State of New Jersey. Finally, 
on April 16, 1901, he was commissioned Vice- 
Chancellor of the Court of Chancery of the State 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



125 



of New Jersey. He was married on June 1 1, 1884, 
to Helen Hornblower, daughter of the late Rev. 
Dr. William H. Hornblower. His home is in the 
City of Paterson, New Jersey. 



WILE, William Conrad, 1847- 

Class of 1870 Med. 
Born at Pleasant Valley, N. Y., 1847; studied in 
public and private schools and academies ; served in 
army in Company G, 150th New York Volunteers 
from 1862 to end of Civil War; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1870; Founder and 
Editor of "New England Medical Monthly;" author 
of numerous papers; A.M., Center College; LL.D., 
Rutherford College ; President Board of Trade, Post 
Commander G. A. R., etc. ; practicing physician since 
1870. 

WILLIAM CONRAD WILE, A.M., M.D., 
LL.D., was born at Pleasant Valley, 
Dutchess County, New York, on January 23, 1847. 
His father, Benjamin Franklin Wile, was born in 
Philadelphia, the son of an Amsterdam Dutchman. 
His mother, whose maiden name was Betty Buckley, 
was born in England and was brought to this coun- 
try when she was three years old. Dr. Wile studied 
in boyhood in public and private schools, including 
the famous institution on College Hill, Pough- 
keepsie. New York, the school at Cornvvall-on-the- 
Hudson, New York, of which the Rev. A. C. Roe 
was Principal, and the old Germantown, Pennsyl- 
vania, Academy, which celebrated its hundredth 
anniversary while he was a student there. At the 
age of fifteen he enlisted in Company G, One Hun- 
dred and fiftieth New York Volunteers, as a private, 
and was the youngest member of the regiment who 
carried a musket. He was at Gettysburg, followed 
Sherman in the march to the sea, and was honor- 
ably mustered out at the end of the war. After the 
war he entered the Medical College of New York 
University, and was graduated in 1870 with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, since which time he 
has been actively engaged in practice. He was the 
Founder and is the Editor of " The New England 
Medical Monthly," which has been successfully pub- 
lished for more than twenty-two years, and is the 
author of a large number of papers on medical and 
surgical topics. He was Medical Examiner, or 
Coroner, for Danbury and Newtown, Connecticut, 
for twenty years. School Visitor for several years. 
President of the Danbury Merchants' Board of 
Trade, Surgeon- General of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, Commander of Custer Post of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and Medical Director of 



the Connecticut Department of the Grand Army 
of the Repubhc. Center College, Kentucky, has 
bestowed upon him the honorary degree of Master 
of Arts, and Rutherford College, North Carolina, 
that of Doctor of Laws. He is a Republican, 
but has held and has wanted no political office. 
He has been President of the Medical Editors' 
Association, of the Fairfield County Medical Society, 
and of the Danbury Medical Society, and Vice- 
President of the American Medical Association and 
of the Connecticut State Medical Society. He is a 
member of the organizations named, and also of the 




WILLIAM C. WILE 

British Medical Society, the New York Society of 
Medical Jurisprudence, the Bridgeport Medical Soci- 
ety, and the Lotos Club of New York. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Wile was 
first married to Eliza Garretson, of New York, who 
bore him one child, Alice Buckley Wile. After his 
first wife's death he was again married, to Hattie 
Adele Loomis, of New Haven, Connecticut. His 
address is Danbury, Connecticut. 



BOWNE, Borden Parker, 1847- 

Class of 1871 Arts. 
Born at Leonardville, N. J., 1847 ; studied in district 
school and at Pennington, N. J., Seminary, 1865-66; 



26 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



prize winner in New York University ; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1871, and A.M., 1876; teacher 
in New York, 1871-72 ; pastor of Methodist Episcopal 
Church, 1872-73 ; studied at Halle, 1873-74; Paris, 1874; 
Goettingen, 1875; Instructor in Modern Languages, 
New York University, 1875-76; Assistant Editor of 
" The Independent," 1875-76 ; Professor of Philosophy 
in Boston University since 1876, and Dean of Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences since 1884; LL.D., Ohio 
Wesleyan University, 1881 ; author of important books. 

BORDEN PARKER BOWNE, A.M., LL.D., 
Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in Boston 
University, and one of the most distinguished of 




BORDEN V. BOWNE 

American metaphysicians, is a son of Joseph and 
Margaret (Parker) Bowne, and was born at Leonard- 
ville, New Jersey, on January 14, 1847. He began 
his education at the district school, and spent the 
academic year, 1865-66, at Pennington Seminary, 
Pennington, New Jersey. A year later he entered 
New York University, and was there one of the 
most promising students of that or any other time. 
He won the Sophomore Latin Prize, divided with a 
classmate the Mathematical Prize, and won honor- 
able mention in Greek, the special prize for the 
greatest improvement in the first two years of the 
college course, the special prize for greatest excellence 
in the entire college course, and the Webster Oratory 
Prize. He was also Valedictorian of his class. He 



was a member of Delta Upsilon and of Phi Beta Kappa. 
He received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 187 1, 
and spent the next year in teaching in New York, 
and the year following that as pastor of a Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Whitestone, New York. He 
then went to Europe to continue his studies, espe- 
cially in philosophy and languages. He was at the 
University of Halle, Germany, in 1873-74, at 
the University of Paris, France, in 1874, and at 
the University of Goettingen, Germany, in 1875. 
He returned home in 1875 '° become for a year 
.Assistant Professor of Modern Languages in New 
York University, and Assistant Editor of " The In- 
dependent " of New York. At the Commencement 
of 1876 he received the degree of Master of Arts 
from New York University. Those who were pres- 
ent at the time remember well the enthusiasm with 
which the students of New York University greeted 
the announcement, made by the Chancellor, Howard 
Crosby, in chapel one morning in the early fall of 
1876, that Professor Bowne had been appointed to 
the professorship of Philosophy in Boston Univer- 
sity. The feeling was generally shared among edu- 
cators, for despite his comparative youth Professor 
Bowne was even then widely recognized as one of 
the ablest metaphysicians of his time. He has filled 
that chair at Boston University ever since that date, 
serving also since 1884 as Dean of the Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences. Meantime he has fre- 
quently been heard upon the lecture platform, and 
has contributed some very important works to theo- 
logical and philosophical literature. He has re- 
ceived, but has declined, a number of calls to high 
educational places in other institutions. Dr. Bowne 
possesses the rare and precious gift of investing even 
the most profound and abstruse subjects with an 
interest amounting almost to fascination, so that 
his philosophical writings, while commanding the 
utmost respect of scholars for their solidity of 
thought and accuracy of logic, are to the general 
public almost as entertaining as works of fiction. 
This peculiar charm of style marks alike his 
books, his addresses and his ordinary conversation. 
Among his published works may be mentioned : 
"The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer," "Studies 
in Theism," " Principles of Ethics," "Metaphysics," 
" Introduction to Psychological Theory," " Philos- 
ophy of Theism," " Theory of Thought and Knowl- 
edge," "The Christian Revelation," " The Christian 
Life," and " The Atonement." Professor Bowne's 
philosophical system is set forth in the " Theory of 
Thought and Knowledge " and the revised edition 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



I 27 



of the " Metaphysics." The " Philosophy of The- 
ism " was revised in connection with the author's 
delivery of a course of lectures on the Deems Foun- 
dation under the auspices of New York University, 
and thus made a fuller expression of his mature 
thought on this subject. He has also contributed a 
great number of articles on' these and cognate topics 
to " The New Englander," " The Methodist Quar- 
terly Review," "The Princeton Review," and other 
periodicals. Professor Bowne received the degree 
of Doctor of Laws from the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity in 1 88 1. His home is at No. 380 Longwood 
Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts. 



DADIRRIAN, Markar Gevork, 1839- 

Class of 1871 Med. 
Born at Cesarea, Asia Minor, 1839 ; studied in local 
Armenian school ; graduated at Bebek Seminary, now 
Robert College, Constantinople, 1862 ; taught Armenian 
school at Yosgat one year ; Pastor of Armenian Evan- 
gelical Church, Yosgat, five years; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1871 ; received 
diploma from Medical College, Constantinople, 1872; 
practiced medicine in Constantinople, 1873-84; prac- 
ticed in New York since 1884; Surgeon in Turkish 
Army, 1872; Surgeon, with rank of Lieutenant, in 
Turkish Army in Russian War of 1877 ; served in 
De Milt Dispensary, New York, 1884 ; Attending Phy- 
sician in Eastern Dispensary, New York, 1885-86; 
Attending Physician to St. George's Parish, New 
York, 1885-92; Attending Physician Children's Aid 
Society, New York, 1888-90; proprietor of " Zoolak " 
or " Matzoon." 

MARKAR GEVORK DADIRRIAN, M.D., 
was born at Cesaren, in Asia Minor, on 
August 2, 1839, the son of Gevork and Diroohi 
Dadirrian, the latter born Armaghanian. His father 
was a merchant of Smyrna, engaged in the foreign 
trade, and was a friend and associate of the Ameri- 
can missionaries, Goodell, Schauffler and Dwight, 
and joined with them in establishing at Cesarea the 
Evangelical Armenian Church. The subject of this 
sketch was first sent to an Armenian school at 
Cesarea, and then, at the age of fourteen, entered 
his father's business office at Smyrna. After two 
years, however, his father saw that he was more 
inclined toward study than toward commerce, and 
so sent him to the American Bebek Seminary, now 
Robert College, at Constantinople. There, after 
four years of scientific and three more of theological 
study, he was graduated in 1862. For one year 
he then taught in the Armenian school at Yosgat, 
after which he was chosen to be the Pastor of the 
Evangelical Armenian Church in that city, and 



served in that capacity for five years. In 1868 he 
made the important move of leaving his native land 
and coming to the United States. On reaching 
New York he found a staunch and sympathetic 
friend in that noble and honored man, Howard 
Crosby, Pastor of the Fourth Avenue Presbyterian 
Church and Chancellor of New York University. 
Under Dr. Crosby's influence and through his aid 
Dr. Dadirrian entered the New York University 
Medical College and pursued its regular course, at 
the end of which he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 187 1. He then returned 




MARKAR G. DADIRRIAN 

to Asia Minor, to serve his countrymen in both 
body and soul. For a time he practiced medicine 
at Yosgat, receiving a diploma entitling him to do 
so at the Medical College at Constantinople in 1872. 
At the same time he preached for his old church 
there, without compensation. But in 1873 his 
health began to fail and he was thus constrained to 
seek the more favorable climate of Constantinople. 
In the latter city he practiced medicine for eleven 
years, ranking as one of the foremost physicians of 
Constantinople and having among his patrons many 
of the most distinguished members of the Turkish 
nobility. He also served the Turkish Government 
as a military surgeon. He had already been an 
array surgeon at Yosgat in 1872. During the Russo- 



128 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Turkish war in 1877 lie was an army surgeon, with 
the rank of Lieutenant, and served in the Kooleli 
Hospital, on the Bosphorus, Constantinople. His 
success was marked, but it brought upon him the 
jealousy and wrath of the court physicians in the 
Sultan's palace, who three times organized conspira- 
cies against his life. Accordingly he retired from 
his lucrative practice in the Turkish capital, and 
once more came to the United States. Here he 
decided to settle permanently. His first medical 
work here was done in the De Milt Dispensary, in 
New York, in 1884. After a year in that institution 
he went to the Eastern Dispensary, of New York, 
and for two years was an Attending Physician to it. 
During the seven years 1885 to 1892 he served 
without charge as an Attending Physician to the 
parish benevolent organizations of St. George's 
Protestant Episcopal Church, on Stuyvesant Square, 
of which he and his family are members. In 1888 
to i8go he was an Attending Physician to the 
Children's Aid Society. Dr. Dadirrian began in 
1885 the enterprise with which his name is now 
particularly associated : the manufacture of a fer- 
mented milk food, to which he gave the name of 
" Matzoon." In this work he was aided by his two 
sons, who were graduates in chemistry and pharmacy. 
A large and profitable business was presently built 
up, based upon the real merits of the article. On 
account of various imitations which were put upon 
the market, and in order to protect himself and his 
patrons against them, in 1899 he gave to " Mat- 
zoon" an additional trade name, " Zoolak." This 
preparation has won great popular favor, and is 
widely used and recommended by the medical 
profession. Dr. Dadirrian also invented and placed 
upon the market an emulsion of cod liver oil with 
fermented milk, which he called " Matzol." Both 
of these preparations were exhibited at the World's 
Fair at Chicago in 1893, and received medals and 
diplomas. In the year 1898 he invented a third 
preparation, combining calisaya bark with wine, and 
calUng it " Vin Shartone." These three prepara- 
tions have been introduced into use chiefly through 
the medical profession and hospitals, and their 
merits have thus been amply demonstrated. The 
business of manufacturing them was incorporated in 
1899 under the laws of New York, the concern 
taking the name of Dr. Dadirrian & Sons Company. 
Of this corporation Dr. Dadirrian is President, and 
his two sons respectively Vice-President and Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. Dr. Dadirrian is a member of 
the New York County Medical Society, the Physi- 



cians' Mutual Aid Association of New York, the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Imperial 
Medical Society of Constantinople. He was mar- 
ried on September 9, 1862, to Hosanna Shishmanian, 
daughter of Nigoghos Shishmanian, of Yosgat, and 
has two sons and one daughter. The sons Hayga- 
zoon Markar and Dicran Louis are associated with 
him in business. The daughter, Araksia Olympia 
Maria, is the wife of H. G. Gumchian, of Marseilles, 
France. Dr. Dadirrian's address is New York City. 



FOWLER, George Ryerson, 1848- 

Class of 1871 Med. 
Born in New York, 1848; studied in public school, 
Jamaica, Long Island; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, 1871 ; in practice in Brooklyn 
since 1871 ; served in army; practitioner in various 
hospitals; officer of numerous professional societies, 
etc. ; voluminous contributor to surgical literature. 

GEORGE RYERSON FOWLER, M.D., one 
of the foremost physicians and surgeons of 
his lime, is of English ancestry and was born in 
New York City on December 25, 1848, the son of 
Thomas Wright Fowler and Sarah Jane (Carmen) 
Fowler. His general education was acquired in a 
public school at Jamaica, Long Island, after which 
he entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
which is now consolidated with the Medical College 
of New York University. From it he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in February, 
1 87 1, and since that date he has constantly been 
engaged in. the practice of his profession in Brook- 
lyn, New York. This brief statement gives but a 
hint at the multiplicity of achievements of Dr. 
Fowler's busy life. From 1884 to 1896 he was 
Attending Surgeon to St. Mary's Hospital, Brooklyn, 
was for five years Professor of Surgery in the New 
York Polyclinic Medical School, and he is at the 
present time Surgeon to the Methodist Episcopal 
Hospital ; Surgeon-in-chief of the Brooklyn Hospi- 
tal ; Senior Surgeon of the German Hospital ; Con- 
sulting Surgeon to St. Mary's Hospital, the Relief 
Hospital, and the Norwegian Hospital, and Exam- 
iner in Surgery of the Medical Examining Board of 
the Regents of the University of the State of New 
York. Dr. Fowler became Secretary of the Ana- 
tomical and Surgical Society in March, 1878 ; Pres- 
ident of that Society in 1880; President of the 
Medical Society of the County of Kings ; first Pres- 
ident of the Red Cross Society of Brooklyn in 
1890; President of the Brooklyn Surgical Society 
in 189T ; Treasurer of the American Surgical Asso- 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



129 



ciation from May 15, 1897, to date ; Trustee of the 
Medical Society of the County of Kings, 1901 ; 
Captain and Assistant Surgeon, Fourteenth Regi- 
ment, New York National Guard, 1877; Major 
and Surgeon, Fourteenth Regiment, 1886; Major 
and Surgeon, Second Brigade, 1886 ; Major and 
Chief Surgeon, United States Volunteers, Seventh 
Army Corps, in Spanish-American War, June 4, 
1898, to January 31, 1899 ; Lieutenant-Colonel and 
Surgeon, Second Brigade, New York National Guard, 
1898; Colonel and Surgeon, on staff of the Major- 
General commanding New York National Guard, 
1902. He is a member of the American Surgical 
Association, the New York Surgical Society, the 
Brooklyn Surgical Society, the American Medical 
Association, the New York Academy of Medicine, 
the Society of Medical Jurisprudence, the New York 
State Medical Society, the Medical Society of the 
County of Kings, the National Association of Rail- 
way Surgeons (honorary member), the Medical 
Association of the Greater City of New York, the 
New York Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, the 
Associated Physicians of Long Island, the Associa- 
tion of Military Surgeons of the United States, the 
Montauk Club of Brooklyn and the Nassau County 
Club of Glen Cove, Long Island. Dr. Fowler has 
contributed much to professional literature, includ- 
ing papers upon the following topics : " Extirpation 
of Superior Maxillary Nerve and Meckel's Ganglion, 
for Facial Neuralgia;" "Antiseptic Excision of 
Knee-joint ; " " Surgical Treatment of Facial Neu- 
ralgia ; " " Fractures of the Elbow-Joint ; " " The 
Wire Suture in Fracture of the Patella ; " " Excision 
of the Rectum for Carcinoma ; " " The Listerian 
Treatment of Wounds ; " " Antiseptic Excision in 
Abscesses of the Liver;" " Haemathrosis of the 
Knee ; " " Lumbar Colotomy ; " " Neurectomy for 
the Relief of Facial Neuralgia ; " " Importance of 
Early Removal of Caseous Lymphatic Glands;" 
" Dry Wound Dressing ; " " Compound Commi- 
nuted Fracture of Patella ; " " Explorative Lapar- 
atomy ; " " Alexander's Operation for Shortening 
the Round Ligaments;" "Surgical Infection;" 
" Laparatomy for Extra Uterine Pregnancy ; " " Gun- 
shot Wounds of the Brain ; " " Operative Treatment 
of Acute Intestinal Obstruction ; " " Transplanta- 
tion of Skin;" "Resection of Knee-joint in Chil- 
dren ; " " Drainage of the Bladder ; " " Gunshot 
Wound of the Head ; " " Location of Bullet by 
Means of the Telephone Probe ; " " Hallux Val- 
gus ; " "Laryngectomy;" "Radical Cure of Her- 
nia ; " " Nephrectomy ; " " Sterilization of Catgut ; " 

VOL. II. — 9 



" A Case of Elephantiasis of the Lower Extremity 
Cured by Ligature of the External Iliac Artery ; " 
"The Origin of Carcinoma;" " Interscapulo-tho- 
racic Amputation for Osteomyelitis of the Humerus ; " 
" Cocain Analgesia from Subarachroid Spinal Injec- 
tion, with a Report of Forty-four Cases; " "Obser- 
vations on the Radical Cure of Hernia ; " " The 
Surgery of Intrathoracic Tuberculosis ; " "A Case 
of Thoracoplasty for the Removal of a Large 
Cicatricial Fibrous Growth from the Interior of the 
Chest, the Result of Old Empyema ; " " Prolapse, 
Procidentia and Invagination of the Rectum ; " 




GEORGE RYERSON FOWLER 

" Decortication of the Lung for Chronic Empyema ; " 
" A Case of Gunshot Wound of the Head, in which 
the Bullet was Located by Means of the Roentgen 
Rays and the Telephone Probe, and Removed by 
Operation — Recovery;" "A Case of Incomplete 
External Dislocation of the Elbow-Joint, in which 
Skiagraphy Failed to Reveal the Lesion," and 
" Gunshot Wounds of the Long Bones." He has 
also published " A Treatise on Appendicitis," with 
a second edition revised and enlarged, which work 
received the unusual compliment of a translation 
into German and a large sale in Europe. Dr. 
Fowler was married on June 10, 1873, to Louise 
Rachel Wells, and has three children : Russell Story, 
Florence Grace and Royal Hamilton Fowler. His 



130 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



office is at No. 301 DeKalb Avenue, and his city 
home at No. 302 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, 
New York, and his country residence at the North 
Country, Glen Cove, Long Island. 



HART, Harmon Hendricks, 1851- 

Class of 1871 Law. 
Born in New York, 1851 ; studied in New York Uni- 
versity Grammar School; graduated L.L.B., New York 
University Law Department, 1871 ; in legal practice, 
1871-77; broker and member New York Stock Ex- 
change since 1878. 

HARMON HENDRICKS HART, lawyer and 
financier, is the son of Benjamin Seixas 
Hart, grandson of Bernard Hart, Division Quarter- 




HARMON H. HART 

master, appointed by Governor Tompkins, in the 
War of 181 2, and one of the founders of the New 
York Stock Exchange in 1792, and great-grandson of 
Benjamin Seixas, who was also one of the founders 
of the Stock Exchange. The maiden name of Mr. 
Hart's mother was Hannah Hendricks. He was born 
in New York City on February 27, 185 1, and re- 
ceived his general education in the New York Uni- 
versity Grammar School. Having finished his 
academic course he entered the Law Department of 
New York University, and was graduated from it 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1871, where- 



upon he began the practice of his profession in New 
York and continued successfully therein until the 
end of 1877. At that time he decided to enter 
the business with which his grandfather and great- 
grandfather had been so conspicuously identified. 
He accordingly became a member of the New York 
Stock Exchange in June, 1878, and has ever since 
been active in Wall Street affairs. In politics he is 
a Democrat, and he has participated actively in the 
affairs of that party. He was Secretary of the New 
York Stock Exchange Cleveland and Hendricks 
Club in 1884, of the Stock Exchange Cleveland and 
Thurman Club in 1888, and of the Stock Exchange 
Cleveland and Stevenson Club in 1892. He makes 
his home in South Orange, New Jersey, and was a 
member of the Board of Trustees of that village in 
1890-92, a School Trustee in T896-98, and Presi- 
dent of the village in 1896-98. He is a member 
of the South Orange Field Club, and of the New 
York Reform Club. Mr. Hart was married in 
December, 1877, to Constance Hart, and has six 
children : Hannah H., Florence, Rosalie, Harold 
H., Lilian C, and Arthur H. Hart. 



HEXAMER, Charles Adolph, 1852- 

Class of 1871 Sci. 
Born in Hoboken, N. J , 1852; attended Hoboken 
Academy, Dr. Gerkes's School, and Hasbrouck Insti- 
tute ; graduated B.S. and C.E., New York University, 
1871 ; in professional and business work since 1871. 

CHARLES ADOLPH HEXAMER, B.S., C.E., 
was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, on May 
22, 1852, the son of William and Marie (Roth) 
Hexamer. His early education was acquired at the 
Hoboken Academy, at Dr. Gerkes's School in New 
York, and at the Hasbrouck Institute, in Jersey City. 
From the last named he proceeded to the College 
of Arts and Science of New York University, and 
pursued the scientific course. He was graduated in 
1871 with the degrees of Bachelor of Science and 
Civil Engineer, and immediately entered business 
life. He was an assistant engineer on various rail- 
roads from 1871 to 1874, and in the latter year for 
the Cumberland Coal and Iron Company of Penn- 
sylvania. From 1874 to 1881 he was with E. 
Hexamer, insurance surveyor, and thereafter was an 
inspector for the Hartford (Connecticut) Fire 
Insurance Company until 1890. He was subse- 
quently a inember of the firm of Henry W. Brown 
& Co., in the insurance business, until 1894, Secre- 
tary of the Philadelphia Fire Underwriters' Associa- 
tion until 1896, and since the latter date Manager 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



131 



of the Philadelphia Department of the Hartford Fire 
Insurance Company. He is a member of the 
Franklin Institute, the Insurance Society, and the 
German Society, of Philadelphia, the National Fire 




CHAS. A. HEXAMER 

Protection Association, and the Board of Consult- 
ing Engineers of the National Board of Fire Under- 
writers. He has written and read at meetings of 
insurance organizations numerous papers on insur- 
ance engineering, which have been published in 
trade and professional Journals. He was married in 
May, 1881, to Annie C. Kellner, and has three 
children : William G., Marie R., and George C. 
Hexaraer. His office is at No. 414 Walnut Street, 
and his home at No. 874 North 22nd Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 



HOTCHKISS, Sidney B., 1840- 

Class of 1871 Med. 
Born in Crawford County, Pa., 1840 ; studied in com- 
mon and normal schools ; taught school for several 
years; graduated A.B., Allegheny College, 1871, and 
A.M., 1875; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 187 1; in practice at Edinboro, Pa., 
since 1871. 

SIDNEY B. HOTCHKISS, M.D., is a son of 
Henry and Esther P. (St. John) Hotchkiss, 
the Hotchkiss family being of New England origin 



and having been transferred from Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, to Crawford County, Pennsylvania, about the 
year 1800 by the father of the subject of this sketch, 
who was a farmer by occupation. Dr. Hotchkiss 
was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, in 1840 
and grew up on his father's f;irm, accustomed to 
hard work, much of which was done in order to 
secure an education. His education was indeed 
self-secured and self-paid for. At first he went 
to the district school. Then he himself taught 
school for a few years. In this way he made 
enough money to put him through a two years' 
course at the State Normal School at Edinboro, 
Pennsylvania. Thence he went to Allegheny Col- 
lege, and was graduated from it in 1871 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Four years later, in 
187s, his Alma Mater gave him also the degree of 
Master of Arts. Meantime he entered the New 
York University Medical College, and was gradu- 
ated from it with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1 87 1. Since the latter date he has practiced 
medicine with success at Edinboro, Erie County, 
Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Erie County 




S. B. HOTCHKISS 



and Pennsylvania State Medical societies, and has 
for a number of years been a member of the State 
Normal School Board. In politics he has always 
been a Republican, of independent proclivities. He 



132 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



was married in 1881 to Jennie E. Hatch. There 
are no children from the union. His address is 
Edinboro, Erie County, Pennsylvania. 



INGLE, Joseph Lowrie, 1846- 

Class of 1871 Med. 
Born in Washington, D.C., 1846; studied at Ritten- 
house Academy, Washington, Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., Greenwood Academy, Virginia, Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and New York University; grad- 
uated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1871 ; Hospital Physician, Baltimore, 1871-72; State 
Medical Examiner, Maryland, 1892-98; in practice in 
Baltimore since 1872. 

JOSEPH LOWRIE INGLE, M.D., President of 
the Baltimore Medical and Surgical Associa- 
tion, is a son of the late Joseph and Susan (Childs) 




J. LOWRIE INGLE 

Ingle, and was born in Washington, District of 
Columbia, on August 16, 1846. His education was 
particularly thorough, being acquired at the Ritten- 
house Academy, in Washington, the Phillips Acad- 
emy at Andover, Massachusetts, the Greenwood 
Academy, Virginia, the Academic Department of 
the University of Virginia, 1865-66, the Medical 
Department of the University of Virginia, 1868-69, 
and the Medical College of New York University, 
1870-71. He was graduated with the degree of 



Doctor of Medicine in 1871, and for the next year 
was Resident Physician at Bay View Hospital, Balti- 
more, Maryland. Since 1872 he has been engaged 
in private practice in the City of Baltimore. From 
1892 to 1898 he was a member of the State Board 
of Medical Examiners, but resigned the place be- 
cause of the pressure of his private practice. He is 
a member of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
and of the Clinical Society, and is President of the 
former Baltimore Medical Association, and of the 
Baltimore Medical and Surgical Association. Dr. 
Ingle was married on October 22, 1878, to Rebecca 
Covington, daughter of the late William Meade 
Addison, of Baltimore, a prominent lawyer and 
United States District Attorney, whose wife was 
Eliza W. Girault, of Natchez, Mississippi. Dr. 
Ingle has two children ; Joseph Lowrie Ingle, Jr., 
and Mary Pechin Ingle, the former at one time a 
Lieutenant in the United States Revenue Cutter ser- 
vice, and now a Civil Engineer in the employ of 
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Dr. Ingle's ad- 
dress is No. 1007 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 



LOCHNER, John, 1840- 

Class of 1871 Med. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1840; studied in Albany 
public schools and Academy, and Union College ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1871 ; in practice since 1871 ; City Physician of 
Jersey City, 1871-go. 

JOHN LOCHNER, M.D., a prominent physician 
of Jersey City, New Jersey, is a native of Albany, 
New York, where he was born on August 3, 1840, his 
father, George Philip Lochner, being a distinguished 
Professor of Languages. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Albany, and the Albany 
Academy. During his boyhood it was his privilege 
frequently to visit the home of Thurlow Weed and 
there to meet many eminent men, including Daniel 
Webster, General Scott, Erastus Corning, William 
H. Seward, and Abraham Lincoln. In 1868 he 
took a course in chemistry in preparation for his 
medical studies, which latter he began at Union 
College. From the latter institution he came to 
New York University and in 1871 was graduated 
from its Medical College with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. He also pursued a special course of 
study under the eminent lung and fever specialist, 
Dr. Alfred A. Loomis. He began the practice of 
his profession in Jersey City in 1871, and has con- 
tinued therein ever since. In 187 1 he was appointed 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



'33 



City Physician of Jersey City, and held that place 
until 1890, when he resigned. For many years he 
was an energetic member of the Board of Health 
of Jersey City. He was instrumental in securing 
the establishment of the Hudson County Bureau of 
Vital Statistics, and performed most valuable ser- 
vices during the small-pox epidemic of the winter 
of 1871-72. In 1873 a nomination for member 
of Assembly was offered to him, but he declined it 
on account of the pressure of his professional duties. 
For the same , reason he has declined other offers 
of public place. He is a member of the Hudson 




JOHN LOCHNER 

County Pathological Society, of which he was 
Treasurer in 1875, the Hudson County Medical 
Society, and the New York Medico-legal Society. 
He is Medical Examiner for the Actors' Fund of 
America, the Hudson County Life Insurance Com- 
pany, the Jersey City Fire Department, and the 
Sharp Shooters' Association of New York. He was 
formerly Medical Examiner for the American Legion 
of Honor and the Knights of Honor. He is much 
interested in the Jersey City Home for the Home- 
less. For some years he was its Visiting Physician, 
and is now its Consulting Physician. For years he 
gave his professional services without charge to all 
veterans of the Civil War living in Jersey City, and 
these were so touched by his unselfish zeal that at 



a meeting on December 12, 1882, they unanimously 
adopted the following resolutions : 

To John Lochner, M.D., Surgeon of Veteran Company 
of Jersey City, Testimonial : Dr. Lochner having so long 
officiated as surgeon of this company, and with remarkable 
self denial and generosity exercised his professional skill 
for, and given his valued advice, attendance and services with- 
out hesitation and delay, and always gratuitously to, the 
members of our company who had not the means or ability 
to compensate him, the Veteran Company of Jersey City 
appointed the undersigned a committee to present to him the 
following resolutions, unanimously adopted, September 12, 
1882: Resolved: that the Veteran Company of Jersey City 
hereby express our high appreciation of our kindest gratitude 
to and our respect and affection for Dr. John Lochner, our 
brother and associate member. We esteem him for his un- 
blemished character as a citizen, his superior qualities as the 
surgeon of this company, his social excellencies and his un- 
tiring devotion in ministering professionally as a skilled and 
able physician to the sick. Especially we render heartfelt 
thanks to Dr. Lochner for his gratuitous, faithful and devoted 
attention, year after year, rendered cheerfully and patiently to 
the members of our company, who by misfortune were unable 
to return him the compensation he earned. Like an angel 
of mercy, he has all along these years, by day and by night, 
given comfort, advice, consolation and liis most valued pro- 
fessional services without money and without price to the 
poor. We, as members of this company, in common with 
the citizens of Jersey City, honor him for his sterling worth 
and self-earned unsullied character. 

For the Veteran Company of Jersey City, 

By Henry F. Crawford 

Walter Van Derzee, Jr. 

Thomas R. Beck 

Committee. 

Dr. Lochner has twice been married. On Decem- 
ber 23, 1879, he was married to Kittie E. Hall, of 
Newark, New Jersey, who died four years later. In 
1898 he was again married, to Mrs. Anna (Morton) 
Sparry, of Albany, New York, whose father. Dr. 
Morton, was Surgeon-General on the staff of \V. S. 
Hancock in the Civil War. 



MITCHELL, John Waite, 1848- 

Classof 1871 Med. 
Born at Norwich, N. Y., 1848 ; studied in public 
schools and Williston Seminary; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1871 ; in practice 
since 1872, at Providence, R. I. ; extended hospital 
service. 

JOHN WAITE MITCHELL, M.D., was born at 
Norwich, Chenango County, New York, on 
April 6, 1848, the son of John and Caroline D. 
(Foote) Mitchell. The Mitchell and Foote families 
are both of New England stock, the former having 
originally come from Scotland. Dr. Mitchell's 
paternal grandfather removed from Connecticut to 



134 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



New York State. A maternal ancestor, Isaac Foote, 
was a Revolutionary officer who served with Wash- 
ington at Valley Forge, and was afterward a Judge 
in Chenango County, New York. The subject of 
this sketch attended the public schools of his native 
place, and was prepared for college at Williston 
Seminary, East Hampton, Massachusetts, from which 
latter he was graduated in 1868. Thence he pro- 
ceeded to the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
now a part of New York University, and was gradu- 
ated from it with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1871. For the next year he served as an Interne 
at Bellevue Hospital under Dr. James R. Wood and 
Dr. John J. Crane as preceptors. Since October, 
1872, he has been in active and successful practice 
as a physician and surgeon in the City of Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. He was Attending Surgeon 
of the Rhode Island Dispensary in 1873-75, ^"^ 
Visiting Physician to the Rhode Island Hospital in 
1873-82, and since 1882 has been Visiting Surgeon 
to that hospital. He is now also Consulting Physi- 
cian to St. Joseph's Hospital, St. Elizabeth's Home, 
and the Catholic Orphan Asylum. He was one of 
the original incorporators of the Providence Lying- 
in Hospital, and has been its Consulting Physician 
and President of its Board of Trustees ever since. 
He is an influential member of the Providence 
Medical Association and the Rhode Island Medical 
Society, and is a frequent contributor to current 
professional literature. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. He was married on April 15, 1875, to Fran- 
ces E. Mason, who died in 1876. He was again 
married, in August, 1878, to Lydia Pearce, and has 
one child, John Pearce Mitchell. 



BLAINE, John Eliot, 1850- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born at Beaver, Pa., 1850; studied in public schools, 
Beaver Academy, Washington and Jefferson College, 
and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from which 
last he was graduated M.D., 1872; in practice since 
1872. 

JOHN ELIOT BLAINE, M.D., son of John 
Reed Blaine and Julia Swift (Logan) Blaine, 
comes of Scotch- Irish stock on the paternal side and 
from the same family as the late James Gillespie 
Blaine. On the maternal side he is of old New 
England ancestry descended from John Eliot of 
Plymouth. He is also descended from Colonel 
Swift of Washington's Army in the Revolution. Dr. 
Blaine was born at Beaver, Pennsylvania, on Octo- 
ber 4, 1850, and received his early education in the 



local public schools and Beaver Academy. He also 
studied at Washington and Jefferson College, Wash- 
ington, Pennsylvania, and was a private pupil in 
medicine of Dr. David Stanton, of New Brighton, 
Pennsylvania. Finally he entered the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1872. Since that time he 
has been in continuous practice. For ten years he 
was at Tionesta, Pennsylvania, for seven in Denver, 
Colorado, and for eight years Chief of Staff in the 
Keeley Institute at Dwight, Illinois. From Dwight 




J. E. BLAINE 

he went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he still remains. 
He has been a member of the American, Illinois 
State, Pennsylvania State, and Chicago Medical 
societies, and of the Masonic Order. In pohtics he 
is an Independent, with leanings toward "Gold 
Democracy." He was married on May 26, 1873, 
to Ella Stow, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and has three 
children : Augusta M., Julia F., and John E. 
Blaine, Jr. 



BOGART, Joseph Hegeman, 1846- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born at Roslyn, N. Y., 18^6; graduated A.B., Am- 
herst, 1869, and M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, 1872 ; in practice at Roslyn, New York, since 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



35 



1872 

etc. 



Health Officer, President of Board of Education, 



JOSEPH HEGEMAN BOGART, A.B., M.D., 
was born at Roslyn, Long Island, New York, on 
November 11, 1846. His father was Daniel Bogart, 




J. H. BOGART 

son of Daniel, son of Isaac, son of Isaac, son of Tunis, 
son of Gysbert, son of Tunis Bogart, who came to this 
country from Heidkop, Holland, in 1652 and settled 
at the Wallabout, now a part of the Borough of Brook- 
lyn, New York City, and married Sarah, daughter of 
Joris Rapalie. His mother, whose maiden name 
was Jane Rapelye Hegeman, was a daughter of Jere- 
miah Hegeman, son of Joseph, son of Rem, son of 
Joseph, son of Adrian, son of Joseph, son of Adrian, 
who came from Holland in 1650 and married 
Catherine Margits. Dr. Bogart received his early 
education in the Roslyn public school, and from 
1862 to 1865 studied at the Flushing Institute, 
Flushing, New York. In the fall of 1865 he entered 
Amherst College, and in 1869 was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then entered 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part 
of New York University, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1872. Since 
the latter date he has been engaged in the practice 
of his profession at Roslyn. He was Attending 
Physician to the Queens County Insane Asylum 
from 1882 to 1894. For eighteen years he has 



been a member, and for several years President, of 
the Roslyn Board of Education, and at present he 
is Health Officer of the Town of North Hempstead 
and local Surgeon to the Long Island Railroad. 
He is a member of the Associated Physicians of 
Long Island, the Queens-Nassau Medical Society, 
the New York State Association of Railway Sur- 
geons, the Masonic Order, and the Holland Society 
of New York. In politics he is a Republican. He 
was married on February 21, 1884, to Ethelena T. 
Albertson, of Mineola, Long Island, and has two 
children : Jennie and Ethelena T. Bogart. 



BUELL, Marcus Darius, 1851- 

Class of 1872 Arts. 
Born at Wayland, N. Y., 1851 ; graduated with high 
distinction, A.B., New York University, 1872, and 
A.M., 1873; graduated S.T.B., Boston University 
School of Theology, 1875; pastor in Methodist Church, 
1875-83 ; Cambridge University, England, 1884, and 
Berlin University, Germany, 1885 ; Professor of New 
Testament Greek and Exegesis, Boston University, 
since 1884, and Dean of Theological Faculty since 1889; 
D.D., New York University, 1889. 

MARCUS DARIUS BUELL, A.M., D.D., 
Dean of the School of Theology of Boston 
University, was born at Wayland, New York, on 




MARCUS D. BUELL 



January i, 1851, the son of Enoch George Buell 
and Maria (Brownson) Buell. After a careful prep- 



136 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



aration in the Rochester Free Academy, Rochester, 
New York, he entered New York University in 
1868, and was one of the most brilliant students of 
his time. He won the second examination prize, 
the Freshman Greek and Latin prizes and honorable 
mention in mathematics, the Sophomore Greek and 
Latin prizes, and the First Fellowship. He was a 
member of Delta Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa, 
Librarian of Philomathean, Junior orator, and Vale- 
dictorian of his class. He was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1872, and in 1873 
received his Master's degree, to which in i88g the 
University further added the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity. From New York University he went to 
the Boston University School of Theology, and 
was graduated from it in 1875 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Sacred Theology. Thenceforward, 
down to 1883, he was engaged in pastoral work in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1884 he 
studied at the University of Cambridge, England, 
and in 1885 at the University of Berlin, Germany. 
In 1884 he was elected Professor of New Testa- 
ment Greek and Exegesis in Boston University, and 
has ever since filled that place. Since 1889 he has 
also been Dean of the Faculty of Theology of Bos- 
ton University. He is a member of the Harvard 
Biblical Club, the Society of Biblical Literature and 
Exegesis, and the American Oriental Society. He 
was married on December 30, 1875, '" Edith V. 
Houghton. His home is at No. 72 Mount Vernon 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 



BUTLER, Frank Herbert, 1850- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born at East Avon, N. Y., 1850; studied at Munroe 
Collegiate Institute, Clinton Liberal Institute, and 
Cazenovia Seminary; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, 1872; in practice since 1872. 

FRANK HERBERT BUTLER, M.D., is a son 
of William Chauncey Butler, M.D., and 
Eunice A. (Robinson) Butler, and was born at East 
Avon, Livingston County, New York, on February 
16, 1850. He was educated at the Munroe Col- 
legiate Institute, the Clinton Liberal Institute, and 
Cazenovia Seminary, all in New York State. He 
first studied medicine with Alfred Mercer, M.D., 
Emeritus Professor of State Medicine in the College 
of Medicine of Syracuse University. He then en- 
tered Bellevue Hospital Medical College, which is 
now a part of New York University, and was grad- 
uated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine on 



March i, 1872. Since that time he has been steadily 
and successfully engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. He was married on October 12, 1874, to 
Zitella K. St. John, and has had nine children, of 
whom five are living : Florence Zitella, Frank Her- 




FRANK H. BtJTLER 



bert, Jr., Edna May, Arthur St. John, and Charles 
Ernest Butler. His address is No. 204 Seymour 
Street, Syracuse, New York. 



BUTTS, Thomas Wilson, 1851- 

Class of 1872 La^v. 
Born at Cattaraugus, N. Y., 1851 ; studied in common 
schools until i865; employed in stores in New York, 
i866-6g ; studied law in law office and Law School of 
New York University; graduated LL.B., Law School 
of New York University, 1872 ; in legal practice in 
New York City since 1872. 

THOMAS WILSON BUTTS was born at Cat- 
taraugus, New York, on March 5, 1851, 
the son of Benjamin and Jane (Wilson) Butts. His 
paternal grandfather, John Henry Butt, a sailor, was 
born at Hongen, near Bremen, Germany, in 1770, 
came to New York in 1790 where he married 
Hannah Newhouse, and ten years later, at the re- 
quest of his aged parents, returned to Hongen 
where, in 1811, his son Benjamin was born. The 
latter learned the trade of cooper in England, and 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^2,7 



came to New York in 1831, where, on May 19, 
1850, he married Jane Wilson, who was born at 
Worksop, Nottinghamshire, England, in 1827, the 
daughter of Thomas Anthony Wilson, a cobbler, and 




IHOMAS W. BUTTS 

Sarah Wilson (n^e Applestone) who came to 
America in 1842 with her parents and settled at 
Foster's Meadow on Long Island. Thomas Wilson 
Butts spent his early years on Staten Island, where 
he attended a public district school until he was fif- 
teen. During the next three years he was employed 
in stores in New York City, at the same time attend- 
ing night schools in Brooklyn. When eighteen he 
entered the law office of Newhouse & Whelp as a 
student, continuing his other studies under private 
tutors, entered the Law School of the University in 
iSyr, and was admitted to the Bar in May, 1872. 
Since that time he has devoted himself to the prac- 
tice of his profession in New York City and lives 
in Brooklyn. From 1878 to 1888 he was associated 
with Hays & Greenbaum and since the latter year 
with Townsend Wandell, with whom in 1897 he 
formed a partnership, the firm doing a steady and 
profitable business in conveyancing, investments and 
the care of estates. Mr. Butts was married in June, 
1872, to Georgiana Schultz Thompson and has seven 
children. He is a member of the Republican 
County Committee, the Ethical Society, the Masonic 



Fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Third Unitarian Congregational Society, and is 
identified with various charitable organizations of 
Brooklyn. 



CHAMBERLIN, Ward Bryan, 1843- 

Class of 1872 Law. 
Born at Amenia, N. Y., 1843; educated in private 
academies and colleges at Pittsfield, Mass., Alger, 
Conn., and Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; graduated LL.B., 
New York University Law School, 1872; in practice 
in New York City. 

WARD BRYAN CHAMBERLIN is a direct 
descendant of Henry Chaniberlin, who 
came to this countt-yfrom England in 1638, through 
John Chamberlin, Judah Chamberlin, and Calvin 
Chamberlin, respectively his great-grandfather, 
grandfather, and father. Calvin Chamberlin was 
a man of uncommon versatility of talents and force 
of character, and was highly successful not only as 
a farmer but also as an inventor and manufacturer, 
and he amassed a substantial fortune. He married 
Charlotte Finch, who bore him the subject of this 




WARD B. CHAMBERLIN 



sketch on June 25, 1843, at Amenia, Dutchess Coun- 
ty, New York. Ward Bryan Chamberlin attended 
school at the Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Institute, the 
Alger Institute in Connecticut, and the old college 



138 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



on College Hill, Poughkeepsie, New York. Later he 
pursued the course of the New York University Law 
School, and was graduated from it with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1872. He was at once 
admitted to the Bar, and since that time has been 
prominently and profitably engaged in the practice 
of his profession in New York City. He is now at 
the head of the law firm of Ward B. and George F. 
Chamberlin. This firm makes a specialty of real 
estate matters. The partners are members and 
examining counsel of the Lawyers' Title Lisurance 
Company, and act as legal advisers to a number of 
large estates and properties owned by individuals or 
corporations. Mr. Chamberlin is a member of 
various professional and social organizations, but is 
not a club man in the common application of that 
term. He was married in 1871 to Elizabeth Barker, 
daughter of James W. and Abigail Barker, her fluher 
being a retired and wealthy merchant of New York. 
Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlin have one child. Ward 
Bryan Chamberlin, Jr., who is now a student in 
Princeton University. 



DUNCAN, James Alexander, 1848- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born at Lordstown, Ohio, 1848; studied at Lordstown 
Academy; graduated M.D., University of Michigan, 
1871 ; and M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1872 ; in practice at Toledo, Ohio, since 1872. 

JAMES ALEXANDER DUNCAN, M.D., son of 
Thomas and Susan (Leach) Duncan, of Scotch 
descent, was born at Lordstown, Ohio, on January 
8, 1848. He studied at the Lordstown Academy, 
and was graduated from the University of Michigan 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1871. 
In 1872 he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine from the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, now a part of New York University, and 
since that date has been successfully engaged in 
practice at Toledo, Ohio. For many years he has 
been Division Surgeon of the Wabash Railroad at 
Toledo, and in 1901 he became Chief of Staff of 
the Toledo Hospital. For two years, 1888-89, h*^ 
was President of the Toledo Medical Association, 
and in 1897 he was President of the Northwestern 
Ohio Medical Association. He has been Lecturer 
on Proctology in the Toledo Medical College for 
several years. He was Treasurer of the Ohio 
State Medical Society in 1893, and still holds that 
office, and in 1901-02 was also Treasurer of the 
International Association of Railway Surgeons. He 




JAMES A. DUNCAN 

was married on April 16, 1879, to Nellie W. 
Jacobs, and lives at No. 1107 Broadway, Toledo, 
Ohio. 



HAYDON, Joseph Hiem, 1851- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born in New Orleans, La., 1851 ; studied at College 
of Mobile, Ala. ; graduated Academic Department, 
University of Virginia, i855; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1872; in hospital 
practice. New York, 1872-75; in practice in Newark, 
N. J., since 1875; largely engaged in hospital and life 
insurance work. 

JOSEPH HIEM HAYDON, M.D., President of 
the Medical Board of the Prudential Life In- 
surance Company of America, is a native of New 
Orleans, Louisiana, where he was born on April 12, 
185 1, the son of William B. and Mary Elizabeth 
Whiting (Jewett) Haydon. He studied in the 
College of Mobile, Alabama, and in the University 
of Virginia, and was graduated from the Academic 
Department of the latter in 1866. Thence he came 
to New York University, and entered its Medical 
College, from which he was graduated a Doctor of 
Medicine in 1872. Thereafter until 1875 he was en- 
gaged in the Charity Hospital on Blackwell's Island, 
in the City Asylum for the Insane on Ward's Island, 
and in the Colored Home Hospital and the Hos- 
pitals for Epileptics and Paralytics, in New York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



139 



In 1875 he established himself in practice in Newark, 
New Jersey, and has since remained there. He has 
been a medical examiner for numerous life insurance 
companies, and Chief of the Medical Staff of St. 




JOSEPH H. HAYDON 

James's Hospital, Newark. He is President of the 
Medical Board of the Prudential Life Insurance 
Company, of America, and also of the Chatelet 
Social Club, of Newark. In politics he has always 
been a Democrat. He was married in 1874 to 
Sarah C. Green, of Ashby, Massachusetts. His 
home is No. 22 Breinthall Place, Newark, New 
Jersey. 



ber of a large family engaged in cotton manufac- 
tures in the west of Scotland, who joined the Clark 
Thread Company in 1866, when it was organized 
in the United States. The family of Dr. Hendry's 
mother, whose maiden name was Agnes Campbell, 
was a branch of the great Campbell family of 
Argyle. Dr. Hendry was born in the City of Glas- 
gow, Scotland, on November 12, 1849, and received 
his early education, down to 1866, at the Bathgate 
Academy. Thence he proceeded to the University 
of Glasgow, and there spent the two years 1867-69. 
The next two years, 1869-71, were spent at the 
University of Edinburgh, and in the last named 
year he was House Surgeon at the Royal Infirmary, 
Edinburgh, under the distinguished Professor (now 
Lord) Lister, the founder of the system of antisep- 
tic surgery. From Edinburgh Dr. Hendry came to 
America, and spent the year 1871—72 at the Belle- 
vue Hospital Medical College, which is now a part 
of New York University. He was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1872, and 
since that time has been actively engaged in the 
practice of his profession in Newark, New Jersey, 



HENDRY, Hugh Campbell, 1849- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born in Glasgow, Scotland, 1849 ; studied at Bath- 
gate Academy until 1866; at University of Glasgow, 
1867-69 ; University of Edinburgh, 1869-71 ; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1872; House 
Surgeon, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, 1871 ; House 
Physician, St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, N. J., 1873, 
and House Surgeon, 1875 ; Attending Physician to 
Newark City Hospital ; surgical expert in many court 
cases ; surgeon in National Guard ; School Commis- 
sioner of Newark ; Manager of State Asylum at 
Morristown, N. J., 1884-89; in practice since 1872. hjg practice being chiefly surgical. Dr. Hendry 

HUGH CAMPBELL HENDRY, M.D., one of was in 1873 House Physician, and in 1875 House 
the foremost physicians of the State of Surgeon, at St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, and 
New Jersey, is the son of Hugh Hendry, a mem- was also Attending Physician to the Newark City 




HUGH C. HENDRY 



140 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Hospital. For twenty-five years he was Surgeon to 
the Clark Thread Company, at its great works in 
Newark, and for fifteen years he was expert Surgeon 
for the Erie Railroad Company. For some years 
he was Police Surgeon in Newark. He has often 
been engaged in court as a surgical expert. He 
became in 1875 Surgeon of the Second Regiment 
of the New Jersey National Guard, and in 1876 
Surgeon of the First Regiment. In 1881 he be- 
came a School Commissioner of the City of Newark 
and held that office for two years. From 1884 
to 1889, by appointment of the Governor of the 
State, he was Commissioner and Manager of the 
State Asylum at Morristown, New Jersey. The 
Governor in 1891 appointed him to be a member 
of the State Board of Medical Examiners, at its 
organization at Trenton. The next year saw him a 
member of the Board of Street and Water Commis- 
sioners, of Newark, and in 1893 he was made Pres- 
ident of that Board. In politics Dr. Hendry has 
always been a consistent Democrat, but his profes- 
sional attainments have won him fullest recognition 
regardless of party lines. He was married on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1888, to May E. Ward, and has three 
children ; Julia C, Hugh C, and Archibald Hendry. 
His home is at No. 60 Halleck Street, Woodside, 
and his office at No. 481 Broad Street, Newark, 
New Jersey. 

HILL, Lester Seneca, 1843- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born at Foster, R. I., 1843 ; studied in public schools ; 
served in Civil ^N&r, 1861-65 ; graduated Wesleyan 
Academy, Wilbraham, Mass., 1870; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1872 ; in prac- 
tice since 1872 ; member Rhode Island Legislature, 
1872-73. 

LESTER SENECA HILL, M.D., was born at 
Foster, Rhode Island, on December 19, 
1843, '^is son of Jerah and Amey Whipple (Orms- 
bee) Hill. His early education was acquired in 
the district school, while his father's farm, a bit of 
rugged New England soil, supplied ample physical 
training. Although still in his teens when the Civil 
War broke out, he promptly offered his services to 
the nation, and in September, 1861, became a pri- 
vate in Battery E, First Rhode Island Light Artil- 
lery, and served with that body in the First Division 
of the Third Corps of the Array of the Potomac. 
In December, 1863, he was appointed Second Lieu- 
tenant of Company F, of the Fourteenth Rhode 
Island Heavy Artillery, and served with that organ- 
ization until October, 1865, when he was honorably 



mustered out of the service. He participated in 
the Siege of Yorktown, the Battle of Williamsburg, 
the Seven Days' battles before Richmond, and the 
great conflicts at White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, 
Bull Run (second battle), Chantilly, Fredericksburg, 
and Gettysburg. On the return of peace he re- 
sumed his studies, entering the Wesleyan Academy 
at Wilbraham, Massachusetts, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1870. He then entered the Medical Col- 
lege of New York University, and was graduated 
in 1872 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
Thereupon he established himself in practice in the 




LESTER S. HILL 

City of Providence, Rhode Island, where he still re- 
mains. In 1872-73 he was a member of the General 
Assembly of Rhode Island, and since 1879 he has 
been a member of the School Committee of Provi- 
dence. He was Major and Surgeon of the First 
Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry in the war with 
Spain in 1898. He has been Grand Master of the 
Odd Fellows of Rhode Island, and is a member 
of the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter of the 
Masonic Order in that state. For three years he 
was Medical Director of the Rhode Island Depart- 
ment of the Grand Army of the Republic. He is a 
member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, 
the Sons of the American Revolution, the Spanish 
American War Veterans, the Military Order of For- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



141 



eign Wars, and the Rhode Island Medical Society. 
Since 1894 he has been Assistant Surgeon-General 
of the Rhode Island National Guard, with the rank 
of Lieutenant-Colonel. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. He was married in 1872 to Elfrida E. Rem- 
ington, and has three children : Leonora, Lester 
S., and Prescott T. Hill. His address is No. 221 
Broad Street, Providence, Rhode Island. 



HURD, William Beers, Jr., 1851- 

Class of 1872 Arts. 
Born at Birmingham, Conn., 1851 ; Colgate (then 
Madison) University, 1866-68; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1872; admitted to Bar, 1874; lawyer; 
Judge of Kings County Court, Brooklyn, 1896-1932. 

WILLIAM BEERS HURD, JR., A.B., son 
of William Beers Hurd and Elizabeth 
(Ambler) Hurd, was born at Birmingham, Con- 
necticut, on February g, 1851. After a careful 
preparation he entered college at Colgate, then 
known as Madison, University, in i866, and re- 
mained there two years. Later he came to New 
York University, where he was President of Philo- 
mathean and a Commencement orator. He was 
a member of Delta Kappa Upsilon, and Phi Beta 
Kappa. In 1872 he was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. He then studied law, and 
was admitted to practice at the Bar of the State 
of New York in 1874. He soon acquired an ex- 
tensive patronage and became a prominent figure 
at the Bar in the City of Brooklyn. His ability 
as a lawyer in time led to his elevation to the 
Bench, and he was a Judge of the Kings County 
Court, in Brooklyn, from 1896 to 1902. His first 
wife was Eloise Vanderwater, daughter of John W. 
Vanderwater, whom he married on April 19, 1880. 
By this union there is one child, Katherine Hurd. 
He was married a second time, on December 23, 
1899, to Mary A. Whitney. 



LA GARDE, Louis Anatole, 1849- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born at Thibodaux, La., 1849 ; studied at Louisiana 
State Military Academy, 1866-68; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1872; in surgical 
service U. S. Army since 1874; Professor of Military 
Surgery, New York University and Bellevue Medical 
College, since 1899 ; also Professor of Ophthalmology 
and Skioscopy and Lecturer in Army Medical School, 
Washington, D. C. 

LOUIS ANATOLE LA GARDE, M.D., Major, 
United States Array, is of French descent, 
the son of Jules and Aurelia (Dospit) La Garde, 
and was born at Thibodaux, Louisiana, on April 15, 



1849. He studied from 1866 to 1868 at the 
Louisiana State Military Academy, at Alexandria, 
Louisiana, an institution which has since been 
moved to Baton Rouge and is now known as the 
Louisiana State University. He then entered the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part of 
New York University, and was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1872. From 
1872-74 he was Interne at the Roosevelt Hospital, 
New York. In April of the latter year he entered 
the United States Army as Acting Assistant Surgeon ; 
on June 6, 1878, he was made Assistant Surgeon 




LOUIS A. LA GARDE 

with the rank of First Lieutenant, and at the present 
time he is a Surgeon with the rank of Major. 
Since 1899 he has been Professor of Military 
Surgery in the New York University and Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College ; also Professor of Oph- 
thalmology and Skioscopy and Lecturer on the 
Duties of Medical Officers in Peace and War in 
the Army Medical School, Washington, District 
of Columbia. He is a Fellow of the Society of 
American Surgeons, and a member of the Associa- 
tion of Military Surgeons of the United States. He 
was married to Fanny Neely, of Franklin, Ken- 
tucky, and has two sons : Richard and Louis A. 
La Garde, Jr. His address is the Soldiers' Home, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 



142 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



LIVINGSTON, Thomas Moore, 1844- 

Class of 1872 Med. 
Born in Huntingdon County, Pa., 1844; studied at 
Martinsburg Academy and Millersville Normal School, 
Pa. ; served in army in Civil War ; attended lectures 
at Kansas City Medical College ; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1872 ; practiced at 
Mountville, Pa., 1872-84; since 1884 at Columbia, Pa. 

THOMAS MOORE LIVINGSTON, M.D., 
born in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, 
on October 16, 1844, comes of the strong Scotch- 
Irish stock which is prominent in that region, and 
is the son of William Wilson Livingston and his 




v. M. LIVINGSTON 

wife, whose maiden name was Martha Moore Lloyd. 
He was educated at the Martinsburg Academy, in 
Blair County, Pennsylvania, and at the State Normal 
School at Millersville, Pennsylvania. Scarcely had 
he completed his studies in these institutions when 
the Civil War, then invading his native state, called 
him into the military service of the nation. He 
enlisted as a private in Company A of the Inde- 
pendent Battalion, Pennsylvania National Guard, 
on July 7, 1863, just after the Battle of Gettys- 
burg. A year later, on July 12, 1864, he became 
a member of Company H, First Battalion of 
Infantry, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was dis- 
charged by reason of re-enlistment on September 
9, 1864. He then served as a clerk at the head- 



quarters of the Department of Pennsylvania, from 
November, 1864, to August, 1865. With the return 
of peace he resumed his studies, giving them a 
professional direction. He attended his first course 
of medical lectures at the Kansas City Medical 
College under the preceptorship of Dr. John M. 
Forest. Then he entered the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, now a part of New York Univer- 
sity, and was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine on March 2, 1872. Immediately 
thereafter, on April i, 1872, he began the practice 
of his profession, at Mountville, Pennsylvania, and 
there continued in it until October i, 1884. Since 
November, 1884, he has been in practice at Col- 
umbia, Pennsylvania, where he is a member of the 
staff of the Columbia Hospital. He is a member 
and ex- President of the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 
City and County Medical Society ; a member and 
ex- Vice-President of the Medical Society of the 
State of Pennsylvania ; a member and Vice-Pres- 
ident of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Columbia, Pennsylvania, and a member of the 
American Medical Association. In politics he is 
a Republican, but he has held no political office. 
He was married on October 15, 1874, to Barbara 
H. Grider, and has two children : Edna Elizabeth 
and John Grider Livingston. His address is at 
Columbia, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. 



MACLAY, William Walter, 1846- 

Class of 1872 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1846; studied in University 
Grammar School; graduated U. S. Naval Academy, 
1863; Commissioned Ensign, 1863, and Master, 1865; 
served in Civil War ; made cruise around the world, 
1865-69; Lieutenant, i865, Lieutenant-Commander, 
1868; Acting Fleet Captain, 1868; Lighthouse Sur- 
veyor, Japanese Government, 1868; A.M., New York 
University, 1868; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
U. S. Naval Academy, 1869; entered New York Uni- 
versity, and graduated C.E., 1872; Engineer of New 
York Department of Docks since 1873 ; President of 
Glens Falls Portland Cement Company since 1893 ; 
author of professional works. 

WILLIAM WALTER MACLAY, A.M., C.E., 
is a son of Archibald Maclay, M.D., and 
Julia Ann (Walker) Maclay, and was born in New 
York City on March 27, T846. He was prepared 
for college at the University Grammar School in 
New York, and then went to the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, where he was grad- 
uated and commissioned Ensign in 1863. He 
served during the remainder of the Civil War, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



H3 



taking part in the attacks upon Fort Fisher, and 
was promoted to be Master in 1865. He then 
went on a four years' cruise around the world with 
Commodore Goldsborough, serving as Navigating 
Officer. He was promoted to the rank of Lieuten- 
ant in 1866, and to that of Lieutenant-Commander 
in 1868, in the latter year also receiving the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts froni New York 
University. In 1868 he was appointed by the 
Japanese Government a member of the Lighthouse 
Survey Board for Yeddo Bay, the other members be- 
ing Commodore Goldsborough and Captain Hewitt 
of the British Navy. He was also made Acting 
Fleet Captain of the Asiatic Squadron, United 
States Navy. On his return to the United States 
he was made Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
in the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, 
but resigned that place and his commission in the 
navy in order to enter New York University and 
study Civil Engineering. He was graduated a 
Civil Engineer from New York University in 1872, 
and since that time has devoted himself chiefly 
to that profession. For a number of years he was 
Assistant Engineer and First Assistant Engineer to 
the Department of flocks of New York City, and 
is now Consulting Engineer to that department. 
Since 1893 he has been President and Manager 
of the Glens Falls, New York, Portland Cement 
Company, and makes his home at Glens Falls, with 
an office at No. 44 Pine Street, New York City. He 
is a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, 
of London, England, of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, and of the International Society 
for Testing Materials, and a Corresponding Member 
of the New York Historical Society. He is the 
author of " Notes and Experiments on the Use 
and Testing of Portland Cement" (1877), "Port- 
land Cement for Engineering Works" (1890) and 
" Hot Tests for Determining Change of Volume in 
Portland Cement" (1892). He was married on 
September 16, 1874, to Marian Bensel, daughter of 
Brownlee Bensel, and has two children, a daughter, 
Alice E., and a son, Walter Maclay. 



I 



RUSSELL, Israel Cook, 1852- 

Class of 1872 Sci- 
Born at Garratsville, N. Y., 1852; graduated B.S. 
and C.E., New York University, 1872, and M.S., 1875; 
Columbia College School of Mines, 1872-74 ; U. S. Ex- 
pedition to observe transit of Venus, 1875-77 ! Assist- 
ant in Geology, Columbia College, 1878 ; Assistant 
Geologist, New York University, 1878-79; Geologist, 



United States Geological Survey, 1883-90; Professor of 
Geology, University of Michigan, since 1891; author. 

'SRAEL COOK RUSSELL, C.E., M.S., Geolo- 
gist, was born at Garratsville, New York, on 
December 10, 1852, the son of Barnabas and 
Louisa Sherman (Cook) Russell. He was gradu- 
ated from New York University in 1872 with the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer, 
and received the Master's Degree in Science in 
1875. He studied in the School of Mines of 
Columbia College in 1872-74, and in 1875-77 ^vas 
Photographer to the United States Expedition to 




ISRAEL C. RUSSELL 

Queenstown, New Zealand, to observe the transit 
of Venus. On his return to New York he was in 
r878 an Assistant in Geology in the Columbia 
College School of Mines, and in 1878-79 he was 
Assistant to Professor J. J. Stevenson, of the Chair 
of Geology in New York University. Thereafter 
he was attached to the United States Geological 
Survey as Assistant Geologist, and Geologist, and 
in i8gi he was elected to the Professorship of 
Geology in the University of Michigan which place 
he continues to fill. He is a member of the chief 
geological and other scientific societies of the 
United States, and has contributed voluminously 
to the scientific literature of the time, his bib- 
liography comprising scores of titles. He was 



144 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



married on November 27, 1886, to Julia Augusta 
Olmstead, and has two children : Ruth and Helen 
Russell. 



TAYLOR, James, 1852- 

Class of 1872 Law. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1852; studied in public 
schools; graduated LL.B., New York University Law 
School, 1872 ; in legal practice since 1872 ; member of 
Assembly, New York State, 1882-83-84-85-94. 

JAMES TAYLOR, LL.B., lawyer and state legis- 
lator, is a native of the City of Brooklyn, New 
York, with which he has all his life been identified. 
He was born on September 27, 1852, the son of 
John and Ellen (Binney) Taylor, of Scotch an- 
cestry, and received his general education in the 
public schools. Thence he came to New York 
University and was graduated from its Law School 
with the Baccalaureate degree in 1872. On attain- 
ing his majority he was admitted to the Bar, and 
has ever since been engaged in the practice of his 
profession. He was elected and repeatedly re- 
elected to represent a Brooklyn district in the 
House of Assembly of the New York State Leg- 
islature, serving in 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, and 
1894. Mr. Tfiylor is a member of the Euclid 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, Brooklyn 
Council, Royal Arcanum, the American Legion of 
Honor, the Logan Club, and the Twelfth Assembly 
District (Brooklyn) Republican Club. He was mar- 
ried to Lillian Morford on December 23, 1875, and 
has three children ; Franklin, Blanche, and Douglas 
Taylor, the first named of whom was a member of 
the Astor Battery in the Spanish American War in 
1898. Mr. Taylor's home is at No. 185 Prospect 
Park West, Brooklyn, New York. 



VAN HORNE, John Garret, 1853- 

Class of 1872 Sci. 
Born in Jersey City, 1853 ; studied at Hasbrouck 
Institute ; entered New York University, 1869 ; gradu- 
ated B.S. and C.E., New York University, 1872; in 
practice as Civil Engineer since 1872. 

JOHN GARRET VAN HORNE, B.S., C.E., 
was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on 
December 10, 1853, the son of Garret L and 
Mary J. (Britton) Van Home, and the descend- 
ant of progenitors who came from Holland prior to 
1675. He was prepared for college at the Has- 
brouck Institute, Jersey City, and in 1869 entered 
New York University, in the Scientific Department of 
the College of Arts and Science. He was a member 
of Delta Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa, Vice-President 



of Philomathean, Junior orator, and Commencement 
orator, and was graduated in 1872 with the degrees 
of Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer. Ever 
since that time he has been successfully engaged in 
his profession as a Civil Engineer. He was engaged 
on the New York and Boston Air Line Railroad in 
location and construction work, on the Harlem Rail- 
road improvements in Park Avenue, New York, on 
the extension of the Bradford Branch of the Erie 
Railroad, on construction of the Second, Sixth and 
Ninth Avenue Elevated railroads in New York, 
on surveys for the New York Steam Heating Com- 




JOHN G. VAN HORNE 

pany, and on surveys for underground railroads in 
New York. Since 1880 he has been engaged in 
private practice as a Civil Engineer and City Sur- 
veyor. He is a member of the Holland Society, the 
Colonial Club, the Engineers' Club, and the Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers. He was married 
on April 12, 1882, to Susan VVorthington Russell, 
daughter of A. VV. Russell, Pay Director, United 
States Navy. His residence is at No. 53 West 
69th Street and his office at No. 29 Broadway, 
New York. 



ELLISON, Charles Ruxton, 1847- 

Class of 1873 Med. 
Born in New York City, 1847 ; studied in public 
schools, high school, and under tutor ; graduated M.D., 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^^5 



New York University Medical College, 1873; served 
in Bellevue Hospital ; in practice since 1874. 

CHARLES RUXTON ELLISON, M.D., son 
of Thomas Bingham Ellison and Anna 
(Ruxton) Ellison, was born at New York City on 




C. R. ELLISON 

December 8, 1847. His ancestors were Scotch- 
Irish. He was educated in the public schools and 
high school, and under the private preceptorship of 
Professor Renwich, of Edinburgh University. His 
professional instruction and training were acquired 
in the New York University Medical College, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine on February 27, 1873. After some 
service in the wards and Out-door Dispensary of 
Bellevue Hospital he entered upon private practice 
in 1874, and has continued therein ever since. He 
is a member of the New York County Medical So- 
ciety, the New York State and New York County 
Medical associations, and the Masonic Order. He 
was married on September 25, 1878, to Mary Gallon 
Brown, and had one child, Robert C. Ellison (de- 
ceased). His address is No. 206 East i i6th Street, 
New York City. 

FANNING, William Joseph, 1850- 

Class of 1873 Law. 
Born in New York State, 1850; studied at Halfmoon 
Academy, Saratoga County, N. Y.; graduated LL.B., 
VOL. II — 10 



w 



New York University Law School, 1873 ; in practice 
at Cohoes, N. Y., 1873-80, and in New York City since 
1880; School Trustee, New York, 1888-93. 

'ILLIAM JOSEPH FANNING, LL.B., 
Attorney and Counselor at Law, is of 
Irish ancestry, his parents, James and Johanna 
(Fitzgerald) Fanning, having come to the United 
States from Ireland in 184S. He was born in New 
York State on July 12, 1850, and received his gen- 
eral education in the Halfmoon Academy, in Sara- 
toga County, New York. Thence he came to New 
York University, and was graduated from its Law 
School with the Bachelor's degree in 1873. Imme- 
diately thereafter he was admitted to the Bar and 
was engaged in practice at Cohoes, New York, in 
partnership with James F. Crawford until 1880. 
In the latter year he removed to New York City, 
where he has since conducted his practice alone, 
with marked success. In 1888-93 he was a Public 
School Trustee in the Eighteenth Ward of New 
York. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a mem- 
ber of the Manhattan, Democratic and Catholic 
clubs of New York, the Board of Trade and Trans- 




WM. J. FANNING 

portation, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
He was married to Annie Ashman on October 19, 
1 88 1, and makes his home at the Sinclair House, at 
Broadway and Eighth Street, New York. 



146 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



GUNNING, Josephus Henry, 1847- 

Class of 1873 Med. 
Born in New York, 1847; studied at Trenton Acad- 
emy and New Jersey State Model School, Trenton, 
N. J.; graduated New York Homeopathic Medical 
College, 1867; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1873; member of Faculty New York 
Homeopathic Medical College, 1867-68 ; Surgeon U. S. 
Army, 1869-78; in charge of Texas State Lunatic 
Asylum, 1870; in practice in New York since 1878; 
member of Faculty Columbia School of Comparative 
Anatomy, 1881-82; Dean of the Faculty since 1883; 
Instructor in New York Post-Graduate Medical School, 
1890-92 ; associate author of " Practical Treatise on 
Electricity in Gynecology," 1891. 

JOSEPHUS HENRY GUNNING, M.D., was 
born in New York City on May 9, 1847, the 
son of Edwin and Elizabetli (Bastow) Gunning. 
He is descended from the oUi English families of 
Gunning and Brewer, the name Gunning being de- 
rived from two Anglo-Saxon words, meaning a white 
meadow. Among his direct ancestors were an Earl 
of Digby and a Duke of Argyle. Many members of 
the Gunning family were military men and govern- 
ment officials. One relative of Dr. Gunning was 
Lieutenant-Colonel R. H. Gunning who was killed 
while leading his regiment against the Boers near 
Dundee, Natal, in the fall of 1900. He had seen 
service in the Zulu War and in India. One of 
Dr. Gunning's great-uncles was Bishop of London, 
England. Dr. Gunning received his early educa- 
tion in Trenton, New Jersey, in the Trenton Acad- 
emy and the New Jersey State Model School. He 
then entered the New York Homeopathic Medical 
College and was graduated therefrom in 1867. 
Afterward he entered the Medical College of New 
York University and was graduated from it with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1873. Immedi- 
ately after his graduation from the Homeopathic 
Medical College, in 1867, he was appointed Assistant 
to the Chair of Physiology in that institution and the 
next year he was appointed Assistant to the Chair 
of Surgery. In 1869 he entered the United States 
Army as an Acting Assistant Surgeon and served in 
the departments of Texas and Louisiana, California, 
and the East. In 1870 he was in charge of the 
Texas State Lunatic Asylum. He was engaged in 
many military movements against the Indians and 
for some months spent most of his time in the 
saddle. He was present at the capture of the 
chiefs at Salt Creek in 187 1 during General Sher- 
man's tour of the frontier posts. His last army 
service was performed in 1878, in the fall of which 
year he established himself in practice in New York 



City. In addition to his medical practice, which 
has been continuous since 1878, Dr. Gunning has 
devoted some attention to teaching and authorship. 
He was appointed Professor of Obstetrics in the 
Columbia School of Comparative Anatomy in 1881 
and filled the place for two years. In 1883 he was 
elected Dean of the Faculty and still holds that 
office, though the school is not now on the active 
list. In 1890-92 he was an Instructor in Eleclro- 
Therapeutics in the New York Post-Graduate Medi- 
cal School. Having been a pupil of Dr. J. Marion 
Sims, he has made the diseases of women a special 




JOSEPHUS H. GUNNING 

feature of his practice. He was associated with 
Dr. Egbert H. Grandin in the authorship of " Prac- 
tical Treatise on Electricity in Gynecology," pub- 
lished in 1 89 1, a work which has been translated 
into Spanish by Dr. Gill of Malaga. He has also 
written various papers on medical and surgical 
topics. He is a member of the New York County 
Medical Society, the New York Obstetrical Society, 
the New York Medical Surgical Society, the New 
York Neuro-Physiological Society, the New York 
Haematological Society and other organizations, and 
is Electro-Gynecologist to the Northeastern Dis- 
pensary, and Electro-Therapeutist to the French 
Hospital, New York. He was formerly Physician 
to the Riverview Rest, a hospital for neurasthenics 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



'47 



and chronic diseases of the stomach. He has for 
some time been Superintendent of the Sunday 
School of the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church and has 
been an active and efficient worker there. Dr. 
Gunning was married on July 6, 1870, to Frances 
Murray Forst, daughter of Daniel Parry Forst, of 
Trenton, New Jersey, and has four children : Fred- 
erick Henry, Clarence Joseph Forst, Emeline 
Augusta and Frances Maude Gunning. His home 
is at Scarsdale, Westchester County, and his office is 
in New York City. 



HOFF, William Moore, 1854- 

Classof 1873 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1854 ; prize winner in New York 
University; graduated A.B., New York University, 
1873, and A.M., 1876; instructor, 1872-73; student in 
Union Theological Seminary, 1873-74; teacher, 1874-go; 
in United States Customs Service since 1887. 

WILLIAM MOORE HOFF, A.M., educator 
and United States Customs Officer, is a 
son of WiHiam Moore Hoff and Jane Augusta Hoff, 
and was born in New York City on June 3, 1854. 
He had a distinguished undergraduate career in 
New York University, winning the entrance exam- 
ination prize, the Freshman Greek and Latin prizes, 
the Sophomore Greek and Latin prizes, and honor- 
able mention in mathematics, and the special prize 
for the greatest improvement in the first two years 
of college life. He was a member of Delta Upsilon 
and Phi Beta Kappa, Secretary of Philomathean, 
Treasurer of his class. Junior orator, and Valedic- 
torian at Commencement, winning also the First 
Fellowship. He was graduated with the Baccalau- 
reate Degree in Arts in 1873, and received the 
Master's Degree in 1876. While in the University 
he served as an Instructor in the University Gram- 
mar School, in 1872-73; and in 1873-74, and in 
1877, he was a student in the Union Theological 
Seminary. He taught Greek and Latin in the New 
York Collegiate School in 1874-76, and was an In- 
structor in the Princeton Preparatory School in 
1877-78, in Churchill's School, New York, in 1878- 
83, and in the Columbia College Grammar School 
in 1883-90. Mr. Hoff entered the service of the 
Government as an Assistant Weigher and Clerk in 
the Custom House in 1887, and remained there 
until 1890, since which latter date he has been in 
the office of the Surveyor of the Port of New York. 
Mr. Hoff was married on July 2, 1883, to Anna 
Louise, daughter of Thomas Edwards, and has one 
child, Howard Crosby Hoff. His residence is at 
No. 1779 Madison Avenue, New York. 



LIGNOT, Charles Albert Julius, 1852- 

Class of 1873 Sci., 1876 Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1852; studied in public 
schools and University Grammar School ; graduated 
B.S., New York University, 1873 ; M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1876; served in hospital; 
studied in Paris and Vienna, 1877-78; in practice since 
1879. 

CHARLES ALBERT JULIUS LIGNOT, M.D., 
B.S., son of Pierre Joseph Jules and Cathe- 
rine (Weber) Lignot, is on the paternal side de- 
scended from a family long settled in the Province 
of Champagne, France, and on the maternal side 




C. A. J. LIGNOT 

from one dwelling in the Grand Duchy of Luxem- 
bourg. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 
October 3, 1852, and studied in ihe public schools 
and in the University Grammar School in New York. 
In 1869 he was matriculated in the College of Arts 
and Science, of New York University, and pursued 
the Scientific Course. He was Junior orator and a 
Commencement orator, and was graduated in 1873 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science. There- 
upon he went into the University Medical College 
and was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in February, 1876. For a time after 
graduation he served in the surgical wards of Roose- 
velt Hospital, and then, in 1877-78, studied under 
the Faculty of Medicine in Paris, and at the Univer- 



148 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



sity of Vienna. Returning to the United State he 
entered upon the practice of his profession in 
Greenville, New Jersey, a part of Jersey City, and 
has ever since remained there. He is an Examiner 
for the Royal Arcanum, Knights of Honor, Knights 
and Ladies of Honor, Foresters of America, Com- 
panions of the Forest, Germania Schuetzen Bund, 
Hudson County Schwabische Verein, and other 
organizations. He is President of the Greenville 
Building and Loan Association, a Trustee of the 
Greenville Building and Loan No. 2, a Director 
of the Greenville Banking and Trust Company, and 
Treasurer of the Columbia Club of Greenville. In 
1892 he was appointed one of the commissioners 
for the condemnation of land for the great Hudson 
County Boulevard, and has similarly served in other 
condemnation proceedings. He has never been 
active in politics, but has been a particularly public- 
spirited citizen of the community with which he has 
so long been identified. His address is No. 269 
Garfield Avenue, Jersey City, New Jersey. 



Priscilla, Eleanor, and William Wisner Lockwood, 
the last named having died in infancy. His home 
is at No. 550 Park Avenue, New York. 



LOCKWOOD, Isaac Ferris, 1855- 

Class of 1873 Sci. 
Born in Dubuque, Iowa, 1855 ; graduated B.S. and 
C.E., New York University, 1873 ; Civil Engineer, 
1873-76; Assistant Principal of Lockwood School, New 
York, 1883-93 ; Superintendent of Lenox Library, 
1893-96 and Business Superintendent of New York 
Public Library since 1896. 

ISAAC FERRIS LOCKWOOD, B.S., C.E., is a 
son of George Edward Lockwood and Cathe- 
rine Burchan (Ferris) Lockwood, and was born at 
Dubuque, Iowa, on February 23, 1855. He at- 
tended New York University, of which his grand- 
father, Isaac Ferris, was Chancellor, and was 
graduated with the degrees of Bachelor of Science 
and Civil Engineer in 1873. For some years he 
practiced civil engineering, and then, in 1876, 
became a teacher. Later he was one of the prin- 
cipals of the Lockwood School in New York City. 
In 1893 he became Superintendent of the Lenox 
Library, and is now Business Superintendent of the 
New York Public Library, which resulted from the 
consolidation of the Astor, Lenox and Tilden libra- 
ries in 1896. He has written for publication, and 
is a member of the Century Association, the Grolier 
Club, the Connecticut Society of the Cincinnati and 
the Sons of the Revolution. Mr. Lockwood was 
married on June 5, 1889, to Sarah Wisner, daughter 
of William H. Wisner, and has had three children : 



LOUGHRAN, Elbert Hatten, 1852- 

Class of 1873 Med. 
Born at Ashland, N. Y., 1852 ; studied in public 
schools; studied medicine privately; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1873 ; practiced 
at New Paltz, N. Y., 1874; in practice at Kingston, 
N. Y., since 1874. 

ELBERT HATTEN LOUGHRAN, M.D., son 
of Ferdinand and Margaret (Rodgers) 
Loughran, is of Scotch and English ancestry. His 
paternal grandfather, a wool-carder, came from 
Scotland by way of the North of Ireland, and set- 
tled in Delaware County, New York, whence he 
afterward removed to Hensonville, Windham Town- 
ship, Greene County, New York, in which Catskill 
Mountain hamlet he spent the remainder of his 
days. In the next generation, Ferdinand Loughran, 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Delaware County, and afterward lived at Ashland, 
Greene County, New York, and was a wool-carder, 
as his father had been. He married Margaret 
Rodgers, daughter of John Rodgers, an English- 
man who followed the trade of a tanner at Palen- 
ville, New York. It was after his marriage that he 
settled at Ashland. In 1859 he removed to Mat- 
teawan. New York, and much later in life he settled 
at Fishkill-on-Hudson, where he and his wife still 
reside. Of the seven children of this couple one, 
Ferdinand, Jr., is a druggist at Fishkill ; Irving H. 
is a lawyer at Walden, New York ; Frances is the 
wife of Robert Machan, of Matteawan, New York ; 
Emma is the wife of William J. Morrison, of Fish- 
kill ; Elbert H. is the subject of this sketch ; Irwin 
and Edwin died, the one at the age of sixteen years 
and the other in infancy. Dr. Loughran was born 
at Ashland, Greene County, New York, on March 
17, 1852; and received his education in the public 
schools of that place and of Fishkill. At the age of 
seventeen years he went to Kingston, New York, 
and began the study of medicine in the office of 
his uncle, Dr. Robert Loughran. Later he pursued 
a course in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
now a part of New York University, and was grad- 
uated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1873. He at once began the practice of his 
profession at New Paltz, New York, but in 1874 
removed to Kingston, where he has ever since re- 
mained. For six years he was in partnership with 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



149 



his uncle, but since 1880 he has been in practice 
alone, and, applying himself earnestly and exclu- 
sively to professional work, he has built up a large 
and profitable practice. For one year he was 
Health Officer of Kingston, and for seventeen years 
consecutively he was City Physician. He is now a 
United States Examiner for Pensions, and Medical 
Examiner for the Civil Service of New York State. 
He is a member of the New York State, Ulster 
County, and Kingston City Medical societies, the 
Masonic Order, and the Reformed Church, of which 
latter he has been a Deacon and Elder for several 




E. H. LOUGHRAN 

years. He is a Director of the Kingston National 
Bank and a Trustee of the Ulster County Savings 
Institution. He was married at Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, in December, 1879, to Jessie F. Hall, 
daughter of Mortimer G. and Mary DuBois (Palen) 
Hall, who has borne him three children : Elbert 
DuBois, who is a practicing physician, Margaret, 
and Roger Loughran. Dr. Loughran's address is 
Kingston, New York. 



Interne in Bellevue Hospital, 1873-75 I in practice since 
1875 ; Assistant and Adjunct Professor of Obstetrics, 
Gynecology and Pediatrics, New York University Med- 
ical College for ten years ; surgeon and physician to 
hospitals, etc. ; author of various papers. 

ROBERT ALEXANDER MURRAY, M.D., 
physician and surgeon and instructor, was 
born in New York City on January 7, 1852, two 
years after his parents, Alexander and Catherine 
(Cumming) Murray, came hither from Scotland. 
He studied in the public schools, and in 1866 was 
graduated from Grammar School No. 52 into the 
College of the City of New York, from which in 
turn he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in 1871. In the fall of the latter year 
he entered the Medical College of New York Uni- 
versity, and two years later was graduated with the 
Doctor's degree, at the same time winning the prize 
in obstetrics. He then became an Interne of Bel- 
levue Hospital, and was graduated from that posi- 
tion and began regular practice in 1875. ^"^ addi- 
tion to his private practice he has been for ten years 
an Assistant and Adjunct Professor of Obstetrics, 
Gynecology and Pediatrics in the University Medi- 
cal College ; for fifteen years Visiting Surgeon to 
the Workhouse and Almshouse, and Obstetric 
Surgeon to the Maternity Hospital on Blackwell's 
Island ; for twelve years Visiting Surgeon to the 
Department of Gynecology of the Western Dispen- 
sary ; and for a number of years Physician to the 
Department of Diseases of Women in the French 
Hospital, New York. He has written a number of 
articles which have been published in the medical 
journals and in the Transactions of the American 
Gynecological and Obstetrical societies and of the 
Obstetric Section of the Academy of Medicine of 
New York. He is a Fellow of the New York 
Academy of Medicine, the Obstetrical Society, and 
the American Gynecological Society, and a member 
of the New York County Medical Society, of which 
latter he vifas Vice-President, in 1892. He is a 
Republican in politics, and is a member of the 
Republican Club of New York and the West 
Side Republican Club. His address is No. 112 
West 80th Street, New York. 



MURRAY, Robert Alexander, 1852- 

Class of 1873 Med. 
Born in New York, 1852; studied in public schools; 
graduated B.S., College of City of New York, 1871; 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1873; 



WILLIAMS, Herbert Franklin, 1850- 

Class of 1873 Med. 
Born at Groton, Mass., 1850 ; studied at public schools, 
Lawrence Academy, Groton, and Williams College ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1873; served in Kings County Hospital, N. Y., 



15° 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1873-75 ; in general practice and specialist in pulmonary 
diseases, Brooklyn, since 1875. 

HERBERT FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, M.D., 
who was born at Groton, Massachusetts, on 
April 5, 1850, is a son of Samuel and Clarissa 
Shattuck (Hartwell) Williams. He comes of sturdy 
New England stock. His maternal great-grand- 
father, Job Shattuck, was an officer in the American 
Army in the Revolution, and afterward a leader in 
Shay's Rebellion. .\ paternal great-uncle, Jason 
Williams, was a soldier in the Revolutionary Army 
and fought at Bunker Hill and Bennington. Dr. 




HERBERT F. WILLIAMS 

Williams was educated in the public schools and at 
Lawrence Academy, Groton, Massachusetts, and 
took a partial course at Williams College with the 
Class of 1 87 1. Then he entered the Medical Col- 
lege of New York University, and was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1873. 
He served as Assistant Physician in the Kings 
County Hospital, New York, in 1873-75, and in 
the latter year established himself in private practice 
in Brooklyn, paying especial attention to pulmonary 
diseases. He was President of the Medical Staff of 
the Atlantic Avenue Dispensary, Brooklyn, in 1878- 
80, and Consulting Physician to the Bushwick and 
East Brooklyn Dispensary in 1885-90. He has 
been President of the Medical Alumni Association 



of the Medical Department of New York Univer- 
sity, and is a member of the Kings County Medical 
Society, the New York State Medical Society, the 
American Medical Association, the Congress of 
.American Physicians and Surgeons, the American 
Climatological Association, and the Medical Society 
of Greater New York, and a Fellow of the New 
York Academy of Medicine. He has been an occa- 
sional contributor of papers and essays to current 
medical literature, especially between 1885 and 
1890. He was a strong advocate of aeropathy in 
the treatment of pulmonary and cardiac diseases, 
and presented to the profession his pneumatic cab- 
inet for the practice of the pneumatic differential 
process. He is a member of the Marine and Field 
Club of Brooklyn, and was President of the Lincoln 
Club in 1901 and 1902. He was married in June, 
1885, to Julia Whitehead Howard, of Savannah, 
Georgia, and has two children : Isabel Lathrop and 
Alline Howard Williams. His address is No. 197 
Gates Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



BLOOD, Nelson DeLoss, 1847- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born at Guilford, N. Y., 1847; studied at Guilford 
Centre Academy, at Auburn graded schools and at 
University of Michigan; graduated M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1874; engaged in drug busi- 
ness, 1868-71 ; practicing physician since 1875. 

NELSON DELOSS BLOOD, M.D., son of 
Orson and Elizabeth Humphrey Blood, of 
English ancestry, was born at Guilford, Chenango 
County, New York, on July 7, 1847. Until the age 
of fourteen years he attended the academy at Guil- 
ford Centre. The next six years were devoted to 
study in the graded schools of the City of Auburn, 
New York. He then turned his attention to the 
drug business, and from 1868 to i87r spent much 
of his time as a clerk in a drug store. In the fall of 
the last named year he was married to Cornelia A. 
Warrick, daughter of William Warrick, of Cayuga, 
New York. Soon afterward, intent upon a profes- 
sional career, he became a student in the University 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and devoted 
himself to medical studies. Thus he spent the 
year 1871— 1872. The following year was spent in 
practical medical work with Dr. David Monro, at 
Ira, Cayuga County, New York. Finally, in the 
fall of 1873, he entered the Bellevue Hospital Med- 
ical College, and was there graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1874. He then 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



151 



at once began the practice of his profession at Ira, 
New York, and for ten years enjoyed a lucrative 
patronage. He then removed to Auburn, New 
York, in which larger field he has since been engaged 




NELSON D. BLOOD 



with proportionately increased success. His home 
and ofifice are in Auburn. He is a Republican in 
politics, and a member of the Masonic Order. 



stock. To them the subject of this sketch was born 
on June 7, 1855. In due time he entered New 
York Univeisity, where he was a member of Delta 
Phi, President of Eucleian, of his class in the Soph- 
omore year, and a Commencement orator. He 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1874, and then went to the New York University 
Law School, where he won the Two Hundred and 
Fifty Dollar Essay Prize and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1S76. In 1877 he 
received the Master's degree in Arts from the Uni- 
versity. He was admitted to the Bar in 1876, and 
has ever since been practicing his profession in New 
York City with marked success. He is now the 
head of the firm of Bull, Edgar & Mathews, at No. 
27 William Street, New York. He is a member of 
the New York Bar Association, the Calumet Club, 
the New York Historical Society, and various other 
organizations, and is a Trustee of the Society for the 



BULL, Charles Cornelius, 1855- 

Class of 1874 Arts, 1876 Law. 
Born in New York, 1855; prize winning student in 
New York University ; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1874; A.M., 1877; LL.B., New York Uni- 
versity Law School, 1876; lawyer. 

CHARLES CORNELIUS BULL, A.M., LL.B., 
is the second of the three sons of one of 
the most honored alumni and Professors of New 
York University, Richard Harrison Bull. The lat- 
ter, who is affectionately remembered by innumer- 
able alumni of New York University as their teacher 
of mathematics, and also by thousands of depositors 
in the New York Savings Bank as for many years 
President of that institution, came of sturdy colonial 
stock, originally from England, his forefathers hav- 
ing been among the earliest settlers of Orange 
County, New York. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary Schouten, came of Knickerbocker Dutch 




CHAS. C. BULL 

relief of the Destitute Blind. His brothers, Richard 
H. and J. Edgar Bull, are alumni of New York 
University, classes of 1870 and 1878 respectively. 



DENHARD, Charles Edward, 1849- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born at Schluchtern, Germany, 1B49; studied in 
public schools and gymnasium at Schluchtern ; grad- 



152 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



uated in pharmacy, 1871 ; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1874; served on staffs of 
Charity, Bellevue and Park hospitals ; Commissioner 
of Relief to the Poor, 1875 ; helped to found German 
Poliklinik and St. Mark's Hospital ; in medical practice 
in New York since 1874. 

CHARLES EDWARD DENHARD, M.D., 
was born at Schluchtern, Germany, on July 
15, 1849, the son of Adam and Lisetta (Zimmer) 




CHARLES EDWARD DENHARD 

Denhard. He was educated in the public schools 
of his native place until he was twelve years old and 
then spent four years in a gymnasium, or college. 
He next pursued a course in pharmacy, from which 
he was graduated in 1871. Finally he pursued the 
regular course in the Medical College of New York 
University, then known as the University of the 
City of New York, and was graduated with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine in 1874. Temporary 
service on the staffs of the Charity Hospital, Belle- 
vue Hospital and the Park Hospital followed, and 
in 1875 he was appointed a Commissioner of Relief 
to the Poor. He helped to found the German 
Poliklinik, of which he is a Consulting Physician, 
and also St. Mark's Hospital, of which he is a 
Visiting Physician. He is a member of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, the Obstetrical Society, 
the New York County Medical Society, the New 
Y'ork Medical Union (of which he has been Presi- 



dent), the German Medico-Chirurgical Society, the 
New York Physicians' Mutual Aid Society, the 
Medical-Legal Society and the Society of Medical 
Jurisprudence. Dr. Denhard was married on April 
19, 1877, to Christina Louise Lauer, and lives in 
New York City. 



DOHERTY, Jacobus Josephum Stanford, 
1851- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born at New Haven, Conn., 1851 ; studied at public 
and high schools and Military Academy, New Haven ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1874; practiced at Meriden, Conn., 1874; practiced 
at New Haven, Conn., since 1875 ; Registrar of Vital 
Statistics, New Haven, 1876 to 1883 ; Physician to New 
Haven County Prison, 1878 to 1883. 

JACOBUS JOSEPHUM STANFORD 
DOHERTY, M.D., born at New Haven, Con- 
necticut, on September 20, 185 1, is the son of 
Michael Doherty and his wife, Margaret Mason 
Stanford. He is descended from the old Irish 
family of the O'Dohertys. The O'Dohertys were 
of the Kinel Conel and were powerful chiefs of 




J. J. S. DOHERTY 

Innishowen, Adime, and Tirenda in Tyrconnel, 
Donegal, Ireland. The O'Dohertys expelled from 
that region the Killowens, tributaries of the O'Don- 
nells. The pedigree of the O'Dohertys is traced 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



153 



back to Null, one of the Nine Hostages, from whom 
they were descended through twenty-seven genera- 
tions down to Conor and Einigh, who died in 1413. 
A later Conor, the great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, served as a seaman with the O'Brien 
brothers, who, at Machiasport, Maine, in 1775, took 
from the British the first two naval prizes in the 
Revolutionary War. Dr. Doherty received his 
early education in the public and high schools 
and at General Russell's Military Academy, at New 
Haven, Connecticut. Thence he came to New 
York University and was graduated from its Medical 
Scliool on February 17, 1874. In the following 
April he began practice at Meriden, Connecticut, 
and there remained until October, 1875, when he 
removed permanently to New Haven, in which latter 
city he has since been steadily engaged in medical 
work. He was Registrar of Vital Statistics in New 
Haven from 1876 to 1883, and was Physician to 
the New Haven County Prison from 1878 to 1883. 
He is a member of the Young Men's Republican 
Club of New Haven, and also of the Knights of St. 
Patrick, of which latter organization he was one of 
the thirty-nine original founders. He was married 
at Worcester, Massachusetts, on May 16, 1874, to 
Sara Rafferty, and has two children : George Michael 
and Margaretta Sara Doherty. 



DOUGHERTY, William, 1844- 

Class of 1874 Vet. 
Born in Ireland, 1844 ; studied in public schools, 
Lowell, Mass.; graduated D.V.S., New York College 
of Veterinary Surgeons, 1874, and American Veterinary 
College, 1876; in army service, 1854-65; in practice in 
Baltimore since 1876. 

WILLIAM DOUGHERTY, D.V.S., is a son 
of John and Catherine (Cassidy) Dough- 
erty, and was born at Gortion, County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, on October 18, 1844. After studying in the 
public schools of Lowell, Massachusetts, he en- 
tered the United States Army service, and was 
in charge of the transportation work of the 
Quartermaster's Department, Department of the 
Gulf, in 1864-65. From 1865 to 1870 he con- 
ducted livery stables at Lakesvood, New Jersey, 
and from 1870 to 1876 was a trainer of run- 
ning horses for the turf. He began the study of 
veterinary medicine under Dr. Alexander Liautard 
and Dr. James L. Robertson, of New York. He 
entered the New York College of Veterinary Sur- 
geons in 1872, and was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Veterinary Surgery in 1874. In 1875- 



76 he studied in the American Veterinary College 
and was graduated from it with a similar degree in 
1876. Both those institutions are now embodied in 
New York University. Immediately after gradua- 
tion in 1876 he settled in Baltimore, Maryland, 
being the first graduate practitioner in that city, 
and has ever since remained there engaged actively 
in practice. He was President of the Maryland 
State Veterinary Medical Society for several years, 
and Vice-President of the American Veterinary 
Medical Association, and has contributed much to 
professional literature. He was married in 1888 to 




WILLIAM DOUGH ERTV 



Matilda Sproul, of Philadelphia, who died on May 
30, 1899. His address is No. 1035 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 



FISHER, George Russell, 1852- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born in Rhode Island, 1852 ; studied in public schools 
and Lapham Institute; graduated A.B., Brown Uni- 
versity, 1872 ; studied medicine at Yale and Bellevue ; 
graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1874; in practice since 1874. 

GEORGE RUSSELL FISHER, M.D., was 
born at North Scituate, Rhode Island, on 
May 28, 1852. His father, Charles Harris Fisher, 
was a surgeon, for many years represented Scituate 



154 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



was 
His 



in the State Legislature, and at his death 
Secretary of the State Board of Health, 
mother, whose maiden name was Sophia Remington 
Smith, was descended from the West family, one of 
whose members was Lieutenant-Governor of Rhode 
Island, and her grandfather was a soldier in the 
Revolution. Dr. Fisher began his education in the 
common schools, and was prepared for college at 
the Lapham Institute, Scituate. Thence he went 
to Brown University and was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1872. His profes- 
sional studies were pursued at the Yale Medical 
School and the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
and from the latter, now a part of New York Uni- 
versity, he was graduated in 1874 with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. Since that time he has 
been a practicing physician in Providence, Rhode 
Island. From 1876 to 1879 he was Town Physi- 
cian there. He was Assistant Surgeon-General from 
1876 to 1879, and since May, 1895, has been 
Assistant Surgeon of the United Train of Artillery. 
He belongs to the Masonic Order, the Knights of 
Pythias, and the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. He was married on December 6, 1886, to 
Annie Wilkinson Hale. 



FUNKHOUSER, Robert Monroe, 1850- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1850; studied in public and 
private schools and under tutor; studied in University 
of Virginia, Dartmouth College, Columbia University 
Law School and New York University; graduated 
A.B., University of Virginia, A.M., Dartmouth, LL.B., 
Columbia, and M.D., New York University; admitted 
to Bar; in medical practice since 1874; Coroner of St. 
Louis. 

ROBERT MONROE FUNKHOUSER, physi- 
cian and surgeon, was born on December 10, 
1850, in St. Louis, Missouri, his father having been 
the well known banker and merchant, R. M. Funk- 
houser. His ancestors on his father's paternal side 
came from Berne, Switzerland, emigrating in 1692 
to Holland and remaining there until 1698, when 
they went to England, whence they proceeded to 
New York about 1 700. On his father's maternal 
side the family came from England in 1646, Zacha- 
riah Cross, his great-grandfather, having served and 
attained distinction in the patriot army during the 
Revolutionary War. He is a descendant in the 
maternal line of the Spencer and Russell families 
of England, his mother having been Sarah Johnson 
Selmes Funkhouser, a daughter of Colonel Tilden 



Russell Selmes, who served in the Union Army 
during the Civil War, and his great-grandfather 
on his mother's maternal side having been John 
Ennis, who served in the New Jersey troops dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War. Reared in St. Louis, 
Dr. Funkhouser received his early educational 
training in a public and private school of that city 
and under the tutelage of the late Bishop Dunlap. 
He is an alumnus of the University of Virginia 
(1868-69), of Dartmouth College (1871), of the 
Law Department of Columbia University (1873), 
and of the Medical Department of New York Uni- 




ROBT. M. FUNKHOUSER 

versity (1874), having received the degrees of 
Bachelor of .Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Laws, 
and Doctor of Medicine respectively. He was sub- 
sequently admitted to the bars of New York and 
St. Louis, but preferring medicine to the law, after 
serving as Interne in the hospitals of New Vork, he 
returned to St. Louis and entered upon the practice 
of his chosen profession. He immediately began 
laying the foundations of the practice which has 
since grown to such large proportions, and at the 
same time identified himself with medical educa- 
tional work, being one of the founders of the Beau- 
mont Hospital Medical College, in which institution 
he filled the Chair of Clinical Surgery from 1876 until 
1 89 1. Beginning in 1875 'is served three years as 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



5S 



Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in the Missouri 
Medical College, has held the Chair of Surgery in 
the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons 
and has been Consulting Physician to a number of 
St. Louis Hospitals. He has made original researches 
in physiology, psychology and surgery, and has since 
given freely of his time and professional labor in aid 
of numerous charitable and beneficial institutions. 
At present his practice is confined principally to 
surgery and gynecology. He is a member of the 
.'\merican Medical Association, the Missouri Medi- 
cal Association, the Medico-Chirurgical Society of 
St. Louis, a Director of the St. Louis Medical 
Library, ex-President of the St. Louis Medical So- 
ciety, and is now entering upon his second term of 
service as Coroner of St. Louis. He is also identi- 
fied with various other associations and societies, 
scientific, fraternal and otherwise, among which are 
the Society of Sons of the Revolution, the Royal 
League and the Masonic Order, of which last he is 
a Knight Templar, a Shriner, and a Thirty-third 
degree Scottish Rite Mason. Dr. Funkhouser was 
married first to Virginia Cantrell and after her 
death to Alice Goodding Cantrell, both daughters of 
Dr. A. M. Cantrell, of Virginia, and great-grand- 
daughters of Leonard Daniel of Cumberland County, 
Virginia, who at the age of seventeen served under 
Washington at the Siege of Yorktown. 



GILLETT, Charles Ripley, 1855- 

Class of i8;4 Arts, 1876 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1855 ; graduated from New York 
University with A.B., 1874, B.S., 1876, C.E., 1876, and 
A.M., in cursu, 1876 ; graduated Union Theological 
Seminary, 1880; at University of Berlin, 1881-83; Li- 
brarian of Union Theological Seminary since 1883 ; 
also from 1893 to igoi Instructor in Theological Propae- 
deutics, and since 1898 Secretary of Faculty; D.D., 
New York University, 1898; L.H.D., Beloit College, 
1899. 

CHARLES RIPLEY GILLETT, A.M., D.D., 
L.H.D., is a son of the eminent and hon- 
orable theologian, preacher and teacher, the Rev. 
Professor Ezra Hall Gillett, D.D., whose history is 
recounted elsewhere in the annals of New York 
University. His mother's maiden name was Mary 
Jane Kendall. On the paternal side the family is 
of Huguenot origin, and was transplanted to New 
England in 1631. On the maternal side it is 
English and Welsh. Dr. Gillett was born in New 
York City on November 29, 1855, and was privately 
educated by his father. In his fifteenth year he 



entered the College of .Arts and Science of New 
York University, and was graduated from the Arts 
or Classical Course in 1874 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. In 1876 he was graduated from 
the Scientific and Engineering courses, with the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer, 
and also received the degree of Master of Arts 
If! cursu. From the University he went to Union 
Theological Seminary, with which he has since been 
conspicuously identified. He pursued the regular 
course with exceptional success, and was graduated 
in 1880 with the^first honors of his class, receiving 




CHARLES R. GILLETT 

the prize fellowship which entitled him to two years 
of study abroad. He spent the years 1881-83 at 
the University of Berlin, in the Theological and 
Philosophical faculties. Upon his return to New 
York in 1883 he was elected Librarian of Union 
Theological Seminary, as the successor of Henry 
B. Smith, Edward Robinson and Charles A. Briggs, 
and still holds the place. From 1893 to 1901 he 
was Instructor in Theological Propaedeutics in the 
Seminary, serving as the successor of the late Dr. 
Philip Schaff, and since 1898 he has also been 
Secretary of the Faculty and Registrar. In 1898 
he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
New York University, and in 1899 that of L.H.D. 
from Beloit College. Since 1901 he has been en- 



156 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



gaged in special work for the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art in New York, preparing, first, "The Cata- 
logue of Egyptian Antiquities," a volume of one 
hundred and fifty pages, which is about to appear 
in its third edition ; and, second, the third volume 
of "The Descriptive Atlas of the Cypriote Antiqui- 
ties in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New 
York City," generally known as " The Cesnola 
Collection." The work covers descriptions of the 
objects in gold, silver, bronze, engraved gems and 
seals, rock crystal, glass, alabaster, basalt, Egyptian 
pottery, lead, ivory and the inscribed stones con- 
taining inscriptions in Phoenician, Cypriote and 
Greek. During this time he has been rated as 
Temporary Curator in the Department of Sculp- 
ture. Ever since his connection with the Library 
of Union Theological Seminary he has written at 
times in connection with the Critical and Literary 
departments of various periodicals. From 1891 
to 1897 he was Literary Editor of the "Magazine 
of Christian Literature." He has been a contribu- 
tor to the columns of such papers as "The Nation," 
"The New York Independent" and "The New 
York Evangelist," and to such reviews and maga- 
zines as "The Presbyterian Review," "The New 
World," "The Andover Review," "The Presby- 
terian and Reformed Review," " The Biblical 
World" and "The American Journal of Theol- 
ogy." He has published several books as a com- 
piler and translator. Among these are two editions 
of " The General Catalogue of the Alumni of the 
Union Theological Seminary," one in 1886 and the 
other in 1898. In 1895 ^^ published a translation 
of Adolf Harnack's " Monasticism, its Ideal and its 
History," and in 1897 he published a translation of 
Kriiger's " History of Early Christian Literature." 
Since the latter date his time has been mainly de- 
voted to the duties of his librarianship, his secre- 
taryship and to his extra work at the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art. He was married on April 26, 1881, 
to Kate Van Kirk, who has borne him five children : 
Carrie Richardson (deceased), Ezra Kendall, Mary 
Marshall, Robert and William GiUett. His office is 
at No. 700 Park Avenue, New York, and his home at 
Pelham Manor, Westchester County, New York. 



vue Hospital Medical College, 1874; conducted drug 
store, 1874-75; in practice since 1875; President of 
Crawford Oil and Gas Co. 

CLARENCE CORLET HILL, M.D., of Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania, is a native of Middlebury 
Township, Knox County, Ohio, where he was born 
on August 16, 1852, the son of Harrison and Helen 
(Bateman) Hill. His paternal grandparents, Joseph 
and Sarah (Bancroft) Hill, were natives of New 
Jersey, and his maternal grandparents, Alvin and 
Flora Bateman, were natives of Vermont. He was 
educated in the public schools, from the age of 




HILL, Clarence Corlet, 1852- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born in Knox County, Ohio, 1852 ; studied in public 
schools ; studied medicine privately and in Jefferaon 
Medical College, Philadelphia; graduated M.D., Belle- 



C. C. HILL 

twelve years to that of twenty, at Warren, Penn- 
sylvania, and then began the study of medicine 
with Dr. Bartholomew, at Warren. In 1872-73 he 
studied at the Jefferson Medical College, in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, and finally entered the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from which 
institution, now a part of New York University, 
he was graduated in 1874 with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine. For a year following his gradua- 
tion he conducted a drug store at Sligo Furnace, 
Clarion County, Pennsylvania, for Dr. Reichart, and 
then, in the spring of 1875, began the practice of 
medicine at Johnsville, Ohio. There he remained 
for two years, and then removed to Levering, Knox 
County, Ohio, until 1887. In the latter year he 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^57 



went to Philadelphia and pursued post-graduate 
studies for a year, especially in diseases of the 
eye. In 1888 he established himself at Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, where he has since remained. His 
practice is now confined to diseases of the eye, ear 
nose and throat. In addition to the practice of his 
profession he has engaged in various business enter- 
prises, especially in the production of oil in Penn- 
sylvania and West Virginia, and he is now President 
of the Crawford Oil and Gas Company, a corpora- 
tion chartered under the laws of West Virginia. He 
is a member of the Board of Health of the City of 
Meadville, and of the Meadville Chamber of Com- 
merce, and is an Elder in the Presbyterian Church. 
In politics he is a Republican. He was married on 
December 31, 1885, to Lelia Brown. 



KIERNAN, James George, 1852- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born in New York, 1852 ; studied in public schools 
and College of City of New York; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1874; Assist- 
ant Physician, New York Asylum for Insane, 1874-78; 
editor, writer, instructor. Asylum Superintendent, and 
expert Alienist. 

JAMES GEORGE KIERNAN, M.D., the emi- 
nent Alienist, is a son of Francis and Mary 
(Aiken) Kiernan, and was born in New York City 
on June 18, 1852. The Kiernans are a Celt- 
Iberian Irish clan, and were supporters of the 
Stuarts for Ireland's sake. The branch to which 
Dr. Kiernan belongs intermarried with descendants 
of the English "regicide," Harrison, and in 1722 
came to this country, settling in Maryland, Virginia 
and New York. The Aikens are a Scottish family 
of Scandinavian origin, settled in Ayrshire, and 
were opponents of the Stuarts from Mary to James 
VII of Scotland. Dr. Kiernan was educated in the 
public schools of New York, and in the College of 
the City of New York. In the latter he remained 
until the end of his Junior year, in 1871. • While 
there he made a special study of biology, geology, 
and other sciences, and received the Ward medal 
in 1868 for proficiency therein. He was an active 
member of the Scientific Society and of two of the 
literary societies of the college. At home he had a 
thorough training in the history and literature of the 
English-speaking peoples, and in Calvinistic The- 
ology. In 1871 he entered the Medical College of 
New York University, and was graduated from it 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in June, 
1874. For the next four years he was an Assistant 



Physician in the New York City Asylum for the 
Insane, and there, in conjunction with Dr. E. C. 
Spitzka, were made the studies on which Dr. 
Spitzka's " Somatic Etiology of Insanity " was based. 
This work anticipated the modern school of Lom- 
broso, but was free from the exaggerations of the 
latter. In 1877 Dr. Kiernan read before the New 
York Neurological Society a paper corroborating, 
though in some details differing from, Kahlbaum's 
theory of katalonia, and in 1878, in a discussion of 
certain "Trophic Disorders of the Insane" he first 
demonstrated that paretic dementia produced the 




JAS. G. KIERNAN 

same trophic neuroses as locomotor ataxia, and that 
there were close relations between those neuroses. 
In 1880 he demonstrated the clinical existence of 
transitory frenzy and of psychoses secondary to 
syphilis which had a non-specific nature. In 1881 
he corroborated Kraepelin's theory of the relation- 
ship between insanity and rheumatism. In 1883 he 
critically analyzed Fournier's theory of the relation- 
ship of syphilis to paretic dementia, and pointed 
out that syphilitic paretic dementia could not be 
differentiated from that of any other origin, a view 
afterward adopted by Fournier himself. These few 
citations of his investigations and announcements 
are an indication of the general character and scope 
of a vast amount of work which has been done by 



158 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Dr. Kiernan in the last quarter of a century. Dr. 
Kiernan became editorially connected with " Gail- 
lard's Medical Journal" in 1880 and retained that 
connection until 1885. In 1881 he removed from 
New York to.Chicago and was in 1881-82 Manag- 
ing Editor of "The Chicago Medical Review" and 
Assistant to the Chair of Nervous and Mental Dis- 
eases in the Medical College of the Northwestern 
University. In 1882 he was appointed an Inspector 
of the National Board of Health. From 1882 to 
1886 he was an Editor of "The Journal of Nervous 
and Mental Diseases " and of" The American Jour- 
nal of Neurology and Psychiatry," and since 1892 
he has been an Editor of " The Alienist and Neu- 
rologist." In 1887 he founded "The Medical 
Standard" and edited it until 1896. From 1891 
to 189s he was an Editor of " The Review of Ner- 
vous and Mental Diseases" and from 1896 to 1899 
he was a member of the editorial staff of the Jour- 
nal of the American Medical Association. From 
1894 to 1896 he was Professor of Mental and Ner- 
vous Diseases in the Milwaukee Medical College, 
and since 1890 he has been Professor of Forensic 
Psychiatry in the Union, now the Kent, College of 
Law in Chicago. He is a member of the .American 
Medical Association and has twice been Chairman 
of its Section on Mental and Nervous Diseases ; and 
he was Honorary President of that section in the 
Pan-American Medical Congress of 1893. In 1895 
he was elected a foreign associate member of the 
French Medico-Psychologic .Association. In 1890 
he helped to found the Chicago Academy of Medi- 
cine, of which he has been Secretary since 1892, 
and of which he was the chosen representative at the 
International Medical Congress of 1900. He is a 
member of the Chicago Medical Society, and an 
honorary member of the Chicago Neurological So- 
ciety, and has been a member of the New York Neu- 
rological Society, the New York Society of Medical 
Jurisprudence, and the New York County Medical 
Society. He has been a frequent contributor of 
authoritative essays and discussions to nearly all the 
leading medical journals of the United States, espe- 
cially those devoted to nervous and mental disorders. 
In sociologic anthropology he has maintained that 
environment before and after birth is more influen- 
tial in determining character than is heredity. He 
has opposed the views of Lombroso, Nordau and 
others, that genius is a product of neuropathy, hold- 
ing that where the two coexist neuropathy mars 
genius. Dr. Kiernan has long ranked as an author- 
ity in forensic medicine, in which he strongly main- 



tains the English common law principle that the 
responsibility of the insane is a question of evidence 
and not of judicial dicta. In 1880 he testified in 
the Frank Leslie Will Case. In the Guiteau Case 
in 1 88 1 he expressed the now generally accepted 
opinion that the accused was a morally imbecile 
paranoiac. In 1889 lie was medical counsel for 
the defence in the Cronin Homicide Case. In 
various other important cases he has largely con- 
tributed to the development of a consistent and 
scientific code of principles in medical jurisprudence 
vi-here mental disorders are concerned. He is a 
Democrat of the school of Jefferson in politics, but 
has held no public office save that of Superintendent 
of the Cook County (Chicago) Insane Hospital, in 
1884-89, in which place he was the leader of the 
reform movement which led to the Chicago " boodle " 
trials and convictions and the rectifying of abomin- 
able abuses in the administration of County .■Asylums 
in Illinois. Dr. Kiernan was married on February 
10, 1881, to Jane A. Trumper, who bore him three 
children : Anna Louise, Mary Louise, and Edward 
Spitzka Kiernan. Of these only the second named, 
now Mrs. VV. \V. Edwards, survives. Dr. Kiernan 's 
address is Suite 910, 103 State Street, Chicago, 
Illinois. 



RUSSELL, Adelbert Noyce, 1850- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born at Toddsville, N. Y., 1850; privately educated; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1874; in medical practice since 1874. 

ADELBERT NOYCE RUSSELL, M.D., was 
born at Toddsville, Otsego County, New 
York, on May 20, 1850. His father, Levi Noyce 
Russell, and his mother, whose maiden name 
was Phylenia Joslin, were of New England stock, 
and their fathers served in the Revolutionary War. 
His education was chiefly acquired privately and 
under tutors, and at an early age his mind showed a 
decided tendency toward scientific and philosophical 
pursuits. At times he himself taught school in 
winter, while pursuing advanced studies. At length, 
in 1870, he entered the Medical College of New 
York University, and in 1874 was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For six years 
he practiced in Otsego County, New York, and 
then removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he has 
since remained. His work is devoted to the treat- 
ment of nervous and mental ailments, and he is a 
deep and constant student of psychological prob- 
lems. He has been a City Councilman, and Presi- 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



159 



dent of the Social Club and of the Progressive 
Thought Society. He is a member of the Masonic 
Order. In politics he is a Republican. He was 
first married in 1873 to Anna Miller, a woman of 




ADELBERT N. RUSSELL 

noble character. After her death he was again 
married, in 1878, to Annie Butler, a relative of 
the late General Benjamin F. Butler, who has borne 
him one child, May Russell. Dr. Russell's office is 
in The Arcade, Cleveland, Ohio, and his home is in 
the suburbs of that city. 



THOMPSON, Alexander Ramsay, 1854- 

Class of 1874 Arts, 1876 Law. 
Born on Staten Island, N. Y., 1854; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1874, LL.B., New York Univer- 
sity Law School, 1876; lawyer and specialist in real 
estate law. 

ALEXANDER RAMSAY THOMPSON, A.B., 
LL.B., is a son of the Rev. Dr. Alexander 
Ramsay Thompson (New York LIniversity, 1842) 
and Mary (Carpenter) Thompson, and was born on 
Staten Island, New York, on March 29, 1854. He 
was a member of Delta Phi, and was graduated 
from New York University with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1874. He then entered the 
New York University Law School, and was gradu- 
ated from it with the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1876. Thereafter, for ten years, he devoted him- 



self to the practice of his profession. In 1886 he 
became a Manager of the Title Guarantee and 
Trust Company, and was thus engaged for a year. 
From 1887-1894 he was the Brooklyn Manager of 
the German-American Real Estate Title Guarantee 
Company. He is now practicing his profession at 
No. 15 Wall Street, New York. He is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of 
New York, and is Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Brevoort Real Estate Company. He was married 
on June 4, 1890, to Mrs. Dora Stebbins, widow of 
John J. Hellker, and lives at No. 438 West 23rd 
Street, New York. 



WILLIAMS, James Jeremiah, 1845- 

Class of 1874 Med. 
Born at Clinton, Ohio, 1845; studied at academy, 
Huntington, Ind., 1859-62, Franciscan College, Loretto, 
Pa., 1867-69, and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1872-74; graduated M.D., 1874; Health Officer of Mor- 
risania, N. Y., 1874-1877 ; Sanitary Inspector, New 
York, 1882-86 ; in practice since 1874. 

JAMES JEREMIAH WILLIAMS, M.D., son of 
Jeremiah and Lucy Ann Williams, was born at 
Clinton, Ohio, on November 23, 1845. He studied, 




J. J. WILLIAMS 

from 1859 to 1862, at an academy at Huntington, 
Indiana, and in 1867 he entered the Franciscan 
College at Loretto, Cambria County, Pennsylvania. 
He received his testamur from that college in 1869, 



i6o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and at once began the study of medicine. In 1872 
he entered the Bellevne Hospital Medical College, 
which is now a part of New York University, 
and was graduated from it with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1874, since which time he has been 
engaged in the practice of his profession. He was 
Health Officer of the Town of Morrisania, now a 
part of New York City, in 1874- 187 7 and in 1878 
was appointed Visiting Physician to the Twenty- 
sixth Street city prison, and to the Infants' Hospital 
and the Hospital for the Feeble-Minded and Crip- 
pled Children on Randall's Island. He served 
thus until 1882, when he was made Visiting Phy- 
sician to Bellevue Hospital, and he held that place 
until 1886, when failing health forced hnn to resign 
it and devote all his available strength to his private 
practice. He was also Sanitary Inspector for the 
New York Health Board from 1882 to i886. He 
is a member of the National, New York State and 
New York County Medical associations, and of the 
Sagamore Club of New York. He was married on 
December 28, 1869, to Elizabeth Jane Dougherty, 
who has borne him five children : Daniel Paul 
Joseph, Lewis Cass, James Jeremiah, Lucy Gene- 
vieve and Aetelia Carlotta Williams. His address 
is No. 1980 Madison Avenue, New York. 



CANTOR, Jacob A., 1854- 

Class of 1875 Law. 
Born in New York, 1854; studied in public schools, 
high school, and New York University ; engaged in law 
office, 1870-72; journalist, 1872-77; graduated LL.B., 
New York University Law School, 1875 ; lawyer^; 
member of Assembly, State of New York, 1884-87; 
State Senator, 1887-95; President of State Senate, 
1892-93; President of the Borough of Manhattan, New 
York City, 1902-03. 

JACOB A. CANTOR, LL.B., President of the 
Borough of Manhattan, City of New York, 
is the son of Henry and Hannah (Hanau) Can- 
tor, respectively of English and Austrian ancestry, 
and was born in the City of New York on De- 
cember 6, 1854. His education was acquired in 
the public schools, including a high school, and 
in New York University. At an early age he mani- 
fested a strong inclination toward the legal profes- 
sion, and in 1870 he was employed in the office of 
Webster & Craig, attorneys. Next he turned his 
attention to journalism, and from 1872 to 1877 was 
a member of the staff of "The New York World." 
At the same time he pursued courses in the Law 
School of New York University, and was graduated 



from it in 1875 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
He did not begin independent practice, however, 
until 1879, since which time he has been steadily 
engaged therein, excepting while in the public 
service. He is now ,the head of the law firm 
of Cantor, Adams & Mclntyre. Much of Mr. 
Cantor's life has been spent in the service 
of the public. In 1884 he became a member 
of Assembly in the New York State Legislature, 
having been elected as a Democrat from the Twenty- 
third District of New York City. He was repeat- 
edly returned to the Assembly, in 1885, 1886, and 




JACOB A. CANTOR 

1887, and ranked among the most influential mem- 
bers of that body. In 1887 he was elected to the 
New York State Senate from the Tenth District of 
New York City, and was four times re-elected, in 
1889, 1891, 1893, and 1895. Throughout his career 
he was one of the foremost Democratic Senators. 
In 1892-93 he was President of the Senate, and in 
other years he was the leader of the Democrats in 
that body. After 1895 Mr. Cantor was for a time 
retired from public life, owing largely to his separa- 
tion from and opposition to Tammany Hall, the 
dominant Democratic organization of New York 
City. In 1 90 1, however, he came forward as the 
leader of a strong Anti-Tammany Democratic organi- 
zation, and allied himself with the Fusion movement 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



i6i 



of that year against Tammany Hall. He was nomi- 
nated for the important office of President of the 
Borough of Manhattan, on the Fusion ticket, and 
was handsomely elected. He entered upon that 
office on January i, 1902, for the terra of two years, 
1902-03. Mr. Cantor was married on September 
23, 1897, to Lydia M. Greenbaum, and has two 
children : Margaret and Ruth Cantor. His home is 
at No. 8 West 70th Street, New York. 



1897 to 1900 he taught Physiology in the Barnes 
Medical College, St. Louis, and then in 1900 be- 
came Professor of Dermatology and Syphilis in the 
Marion Sims Beaumont College. He is a member 
of the Missouri State Medical Association, has been 
its Vice-President and Assistant Secretary, and in 
1895-96 was its President. He was President of 
the Academy of Medicine in Kansas City. He 
is also a member of the American Medical Associ- 
ation, the Missouri Medical Society, and the St. 



DUNCAN, John Harris, 1852- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born at Columbia, Mo., 1852 ; studied in private 
school; graduated from William Jewell College, A.M., 
1872; M.D., University of Missouri, 1874; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1875; began 
practice, 1875 ; Assistant to Chair of Physiology, Uni- 
versity of Missouri, 1875 ; Professor of Physiology, 
1875-83 ; Professor of Dermatology and Physiology, 
University Medical College, Kansas City, 1883-93 J 
Professor of Dermatology and Physiology, St. Louis 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1893-94 '< Professor 
of Physiology in Barnes Medical College, St. Louis, 
1897-igoo; Professor of Dermatology in Marion Sims 
Beaumont Medical College since igoo. 

JOHN HARRIS DUNCAN, A.M., M.D., phy- 
sician and educator, comes of old colonial 
stock, of Scottish origin. He is a son of Dr. 
William Henley Duncan and Susan Woods (Harris) 
Duncan, and was born at Columbia, Missouri, on 
August 16, 1852. He studied in a private school 
and then entered the University of Missouri for four 
years. He then attended the William Jewell Col- 
lege, from which he received the degree of Master 
of Arts in 1872. Two years later he was graduated 
from the Medical Department of the University of 
Missouri with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, 
and the next year he received the same degree 
from Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a 
part of New York University. . In the spring of 
1875 he began practice in conjunction with his 
father, at Columbia, Missouri, at the same time 
being appointed Assistant to the Chair of Physiol- 
ogy in the University of Missouri. In the fall of 
that year he was promoted to fill the Chair as Pro- 
fessor, and was thus engaged until 1883, mean- 
time also occupying other important places in the 
Faculty. From 1883 to 1893 he was Professor of 
Dermatology and Physiology in the University Med- 
ical College at Kansas City, Missouri, and in the 
latter year moved to St. Louis, where he became 
for a year Professor of Dermatology and Physiology 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. From 

VOL. 11. — II 




JOHN H. DUNCAN 

Louis Medical Society. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. He was married on December 21, 1881, to 
Susan Isabelle Dulany. 



EDWARDS, William D., 1855- 

Class of 1875 Arts. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1855 ; studied in public 
schools and Hasbrouck Institute, Jersey City, N. J.; 
graduated A.B., New York University, 1875; A.M., 
1878; LL.B., Columbia College Law School, 1878; ad- 
mitted to New Jersey Bar, 1878, and to United States 
Supreme Court Bar, 1884; Corporation Attorney, Bay- 
onne, N. J., 1882-86 ; State Senator, New Jersey, 1886-89 ; 
Corporation Counsel, Jersey City, 1889-95 J practicing 
lawyer in Jersey City since 1878. 

WILLIAM D. EDWARDS was born in the 
City of Brooklyn, New York, on Decem- 
ber 17, 1855. On the side of his father, William 



l62 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



W. Edwards, he comes of Welsh stock, while his 
mother, whose maiden name was Emma J. Nation, 
was of English ancestry. In boyhood he attended 
a public school in Jersey City and later was pre- 
pared for college at the well known Hasbrouck 
Institute in the same city. In 1871 he was ma- 
triculated at New York University, then known as 
the University of the City of New York, and pur- 
sued the regular classical course of the School of 
Arts. He was graduated in 1875 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, and three years later received from 
his Alma Mater the degree of Master of Arts. After 
leaving the University he entered the Law School 
of Columbia College and was graduated from it in 
1878 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He also 
studied law in Jersey City in the office of William 
Brinckerhoff. Soon after his graduation in 1878 
he was admitted to practice at the New Jersey 
Bar, and in 1884 was admitted to practice before 
the Supreme Court of the United States. Since 
1878 he has been engaged in the practice of his 
profession in Jersey City. From 1879 to 1888 he 
was a member of the firm of Walhs & Edwards; 
thence to 1900 he was a member of the firm of 
Wallis, Edwards & Bumsted. Mr. Edwards is a 
Democrat in politics and has long taken a leading 
part in political affairs in the State of New Jersey. 
He was Corporation Attorney of the City of Bay- 
onne in 1882-86. In 1886-89 he was State 
Senator from Hudson County, and from 1889 to 
1895 he was Corporation Counsel of Jersey City. 
He is a member of the Carteret Club of Jersey City 
and of the Reform Club of New York. He was 
married on November 29, 1881, to Lizzie R. 
Roberts and makes his home in Jersey City. 



GOODMAN, Jacob James, 1853- 

Classof iSysMed. 
Born in Yonkers, N. Y., 1853 ; studied in public 
schools of New York and College of City of New York ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1875; in active practice in New York since 1875. 

JACOB JAMES GOODMAN, M.D., son of 
Samuel and Mina Goodman, is of Prussian 
ancestry, and was born in the City of Yonkers, New 
York, on September 27, 1853. His early education 
was acquired in Public School No. 2, Yonkers, of 
which he was in 1869 the first male graduate, and 
in Public School No. 4, New York City, of which 
he is also a graduate. For two years he studied in 
the College of the City of New York, and then pro- 



ceeded to the Medical College of New York Univer- 
sity, being meantime a licensed pharmacist. He was 
graduated from the University with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1875, and has since that 
date been actively engaged in the general practice 
of his profession in New York. He is a member of 
the Masonic Order, Past Master of Emanuel Lodge 
654, and has been active in politics as a Democrat, 
being Chairman of the General Committee of the 




J. J. GOODMAN 

Greater New York Democracy in the Ninth Assem- 
bly District. He was married on June 3, 1885, to 
Rose Levene, and lives in New Y'ork City. 



HENDRICKSON, George Skidmore, 1856- 

Class of 1875 Sci. 
Born at Floral Park, New York, 1856 ; studied in 
public schools and Union Hall Academy, Jamaica, 
N. Y. ; graduated B.S. and C.E., New York Univer- 
sity, 1875 ; stock broker. 

GEORGE SKIDMORE HENDRICKSON, 
B.S., C.E., is a son of Peter and Sarah A. 
Hendrickson and a grandson of Skidmore Hendrick- 
son, and was born at what is now Floral Park, Long 
Island, New York, on July i, 1856. He studied in 
the district school, and in the Union Hall Academy 
at Jamaica, New York, and then entered New York 
University, where he was a Junior orator and a 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



163 



member of Zeta Psi. In 1875 he was graduated 
with the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Civil 
Engineer, and thereafter gave his attention to finan- 
cial pursuits in Wall Street, From 1875 to 1878 




GEORGE S. HENDRICKSON 

he was a broker's clerk. Since May 31, 1878, he 
has been a member of the New York Stock Ex- 
change and a broker at the head of a business of 
his own. He was married on October 17, 1878, to 
Elizabeth Frost, and has had two children : Clif- 
ford Valentine, who died in childhood, and Charles 
Le Roy Hendrickson. His home is at No. 197 St. 
John's Place, Brooklyn, New York. 



KALISH, Richard, 1854- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born in New York, 1854; graduated M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1875; on staff of Bellevue 
Hospital, 1875-77; in practice since 1877 as Ophthal- 
mologist, with extended hospital service; A.M., Rutgers 
Female College, 1884; author of important papers and 
reports. 

RICHARD KALISH, M.D., physician, surgeon 
and ophthalmologist, was born in New York 
City on June 20, 1854. He was matriculated at 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, which is 
now consolidated with New York University, and 
was graduated as a Doctor of Medicine in 1875. 
After a competitive examination he was appointed a 



member of the Resident Staff of Bellevue Hospital, 
in which place he served for two years, being grad- 
uated as House Surgeon in 1877. Since that date 
he has been engaged in private practice, and has 
also done much service in hospitals and elsewhere. 
Thus he was Assistant Visiting Surgeon to the New 
York Eye and Ear Infirmary from 1878 to 1890; 
Lecturer on Therapeutics in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College in 1878; and has been Visiting 
Ophthalmic Surgeon to the Charity (now City) 
Hospital since 1880. At the latter institution Dr. 
Kalish instituted his investigations into the cause 
and growth of cataract, which culminated in his dis- 
covery of a method of checking the progress and of 
causing the absorption of unripe cataract, and in 
1890, before the Section on Ophthalmology of the 
New York Academy of Medicine, he announced this 
discovery in a paper entitled " The Arrest and 
Partial Resorption of Immature Cataract with Res- 
toration of Reading Power." A second commu- 
nication to the medical profession was made at 
the annual meeting of the Medical Society of the 
County of New York, under the heading " The 




RICHARD KALISH 



Absorption of Immature Cataract by Manipulation 
Conjoined with Instillation." Both of these papers 
were published in " The Medical Record." Sub- 
sequently a third paper entitled "The Absorption 



164 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



of Uncomplicated Immature Cataract by Conjoined 
Manipulation and Instillation," was read before the 
Northwestern Medical and Surgical Society, and 
was published in " The Medical News." These 
reports attracted widespread interest both at home 
and abroad, and have established the basis from 
which arise all plans of treatment looking toward 
the absorption of cataract and the avoidance of the 
use of the knife. In addition to the papers above 
named Dr. Kalish is the author of " Ophthalmic 
Hints for the General Practitioner," read before the 
Society of Alumni of Bellevue Hospital and pub- 
lished in " The New York Medical Journal," and 
■" Some Rheumatic Diseases of the Eye," read be- 
fore the Northwestern Medical and Surgical Society. 
Dr. Kalish having for many years taken an active 
part in educational matters, notably in the higher 
education of women, the Rutgers Female College 
in 1884, in recognition of his efforts in that direc- 
tion, conferred upon him the degree of Master of 
Arts. Since 1891 Dr. Kalish has been Consulting 
Ophthalmic Surgeon to St. John's Hospital, Long 
Island City; since 1898 Consulting Ophthalmic 
Surgeon to the J. Hood Wright (formerly Man- 
hattan) Hospital; and since 1892 Consulting Oph- 
thalmic Surgeon to the Health Department of the 
City of New York, to the Riverside Hospital, North 
Brothers Island, and to the Willard Parker Hospi- 
tal. He has been Secretary, Vice-President and 
President of the Bellevue Hospital Medical College 
Alumni Association, President of the Society of 
Alumni of Bellevue Hospital, Vice-President and^ 
President of the Medical Board of the City Hospi- 
tal, and Secretary of the New York Academy of 
Medicine. In addition to the organizations named 
he is a member of the American, New York State 
and New York County Medical associations, the 
Medical Society of the County of New York, the 
Northwestern Medical and Surgical Society, the New 
York Medico-Surgical Society, the Society of Alumni 
of the City (formerly Charity) Hospital, the Physi- 
cians' Mutual Aid Association, the New York 
Yacht Club, the Manhasset Bay Yacht Club, the 
Manhattan Club, and the New York Genealogicail 
and Biographical Society. 



Medical College, 1875 ; Interne, New York Charity 
(now the City) Hospital, 1875-76; in practice in St. 
Louis, Mo., since 1876; Professor of Anatomy, St. 
Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1883-84; 
Professor of Anatomy and Clinical Surgery, Beau- 
mont Hospital Medical College, St. Louis, from 1894 
until its consolidation with Marion Sims College of 
Medicine in 1901. 

JOHN THOMAS LAREW, M.D., physician and 
educator, is a descendant qf French Huguenot 
stock which was planted in this country at an early 
date. His parents were Baldwin Clifton Larew and 
Lydia (Perrine) Larew and he was born to them 




LAREW, John Thomas, 1851- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born in Kentucky, 1851 ; studied in private school, 
and Baptist Institute, Maysville, Ky., and Louisville 
Medical College; graduated M.D. Bellevue Hospital 



JOHN T. LAREW 

in the State of Kentucky on March 9, 1851. His 
general education was acquired in Mason County 
and at Maysville, Kentucky, in a private school of 
Maysville and the Baptist Institute. He read medi- 
cine with Dr. Thomas E. Pickett, took one course 
of lectures at the Louisville Medical College and 
then entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, now a part of New York University, and was 
graduated from it in 1875 with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine. The next year was spent as an 
Interne in the New York Charity (now the City) 
Hospital on Blackwell's Island, and in 1876 he 
began practice in St. Louis, Missouri, in which he 
has since continued. In addition to his practice 
he has devoted much time to instruction. He was 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



165 



Demonstrator of Anatomy and Minor Surgery in 
the St. Louis College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons from 1880-83 3'id Professor of Anatomy 
in 1883-84. He was Professor of Anatomy and 
Clinical Surgery in the Beaumont Hospital Medical 
College, of St. Louis, from 1894 until its consolida- 
tion with the Marion Sims College of Medicine in 
1 901, and for six years was Secretary of its Fac- 
ulty. He is a member of the St. Louis Medical 
Society, the Obstetrical and Gynecological Society 
of that city, the Missouri Medical Association and 
the American Medical Association. In politics he 
is a Democrat. He was married to Emma Alice 
Van Norstrand, of St. Louis, on June 29, 1895. 



McINTYRE, John Francis, 1855- 

Class of 1875 Law. 
Born in New York, 1855; educated in public schools, 
under private tutors and at St. Francis Xavier's Col- 
lege (graduated, A.B., 1873); graduated LL.B., New 
York University Law School, 1875 ; in practice since 
1876; member of New York State Assembly, 1886-87; 
counsel to Comptroller; Assistant District Attorney of 
New York for many years; prominent in Democratic 
politics. 

JOHN FRANCIS McINTYRE, LL.B., long 
Assistant District Attorney of New York 
County, was born in New York City in January, 
1855. His father, John B. Mclntyre, was a well 
known architect of New York, and was the grand- 
son of the first of the Mclntyre family in America, 
who came from Ireland in 1798. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Frances Virginia Esquirol, 
was the grandchild of Jean Esquirol, who came from 
France with Lafayette and fouglit in the Revolu- 
tionary War. Mr. Mclntyre attended the public 
schools of New York and was also instructed by 
private tutors. His college course was pursued at 
the College of St. Francis Xavier, in New York, 
where he was graduated in 1873 ^'''^ the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. His legal studies were begun 
in 1873, in the law office of Luke A. Lockwood, 
and also in the Law School of New York University, 
from which latter he was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1875. Beginning in 1876, 
Mr. Mclntyre has ever since been continuously 
engaged in the practice of his profession, save for 
the time when he has been occupied with public 
services as a legislator. His practice has been 
chiefly that of a trial lawyer, and has involved both 
civil and crilninal cases. Mr. Mclntyre's public 
life began with his service in the State Assembly, 
to which he was elected for two years, in 1886-87. 



He was a member of the Judiciary Committee, and 
ranked among the most efficient legislators of his 
time. Afterward he was appointed counsel to the 
Comptroller of New York City, and then began his 
long and distinguished career in the District At- 
torney's office. He was an Assistant District 
Attorney under Delancey Nicoll, John R. Fellows, 
and W. M. K. Olcott, and was Chief .Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney under Asa Bird Gardiner. During 
his incumbency of that office he prosecuted more 
murderers, probably, than any other man of his 
time. Among these were many notorious and sen- 




JOHN F. McINTYRE 

. sational cases, including those of Dr. Meyer, Burton 
C. Webster, Mrs. Fleming, Dr. Kennedy, Maria 
Barberi, and others. In his management of these 
cases Mr. Mclntyre won a brilliant reputation as a 
prosecuting officer, and made himself a terror to 
evil doers. In 1897 he was retained by the Irish 
Societies of the United States to go to England and 
defend Edward J. Ivory, who was charged with a 
capital crime. The trial was held before Justice 
Sir Henry Hawkins, at the Old Bailey (Queen's 
Bench), and after an exciting struggle resulted in 
the acquittal of the defendant. At the present 
time Mr. Mclntyre is credited with trying more 
civil cases than any other lawyer at the New York 
Bar. In politics he is a Tammany Hall Democrat, 



i66 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and he has long been active and conspicuous in 
the affairs of his party as a delegate to its State 
and National conventions and in other directions. 
He is a member of the Manhattan, Democratic and 
Algonquin clubs. He was married years ago to 
Katherine C. Wilson, and has three children : Glan- 
vil Gregory, Charles Carroll, and Florence Adele 
Mclntyre. His office is at No. 25 Broad Street, 
New York, firm of Cantor, Adams & Mclntyre. 



MEYERSBURG, Adolphus Gustavus, 1848- 

Class of 1875 Med, 
Born in Gottingen, Germany, 1848; came to America, 
1863 ; engaged in pharmacy ; studied medicine and 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1875 ; in practice since 1875. 

ADOLPHUS GUSTAVUS MEYERSBURG, 
M.D., is a native of the historic City of 
Gottingen, in Hanover, Germany, where he was 
born in 1848, the son of Gustavus and Julia (Frank) 
Meyersburg. His father was a tobacco manufac- 
turer and merchant. As far as his fifteenth year he 
was under private tuition. Then, in 1863, he came 
to the United States and settled in New Vork. 



Medical College in the spring of 1875. Since that 
date he has been constantly engaged in the practice 
of his profession, as a general practitioner. Since 
1880 he has been an Examiner for the Prudential 
Life Insurance Company, and since 1896 a United 
States Examiner for Pensions. He is an earnest 
Republican in politics, but has held no political 
office. He is a member of the Kings County 
Medical Society, and the Brooklyn Pathological So- 
ciety. He was married on December 3, 1876, to 
Rosa Bovvsky, and has now living three daughters 
and six sons. His address is No. 102 Bradford 
Street, Brooklyn, New York. 



PARMLY, Randolph, 1854- 

Class of 1875 Arts. 
Born at Burlington, N. J., 1854; studied at Hasbrouck 
Institute, Jersey City ; graduated A.B., New York Uni- 
versity, 1875; graduated LL.B., Columbia Law School, 
1878; in practice of law since 1878. 

RANDOLPH PARMLY, A.B., LL.B., is a son 
of \Vheelock Hendee Parmly, who was for 
forty years Pastor of the First Baptist Church of 





A. G. MEYERSBURG 



RANDOLPH PARMLY 



For some years he was engaged in the business of 
pharmacy, but finally turned his attention to medi- 
cal studies, and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from the New York University 



Jersey City, New Jersey, and who was the son of 
Randolph Parmly and Elizabeth (Murray) Parmly, 
the first Randolph Parmly being the first male 
child born at Randolph, Vermont, and being in 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



167 



consequence named after that place. The Rev. 
Wheelock H. Parmly married Katherine Dunbar, 
daughter of the Rev. Duncan Dunbar, for many 
years Pastor of the McDougal Street Baptist Church 
in New York, and she was born in Aberdeen, Scot- 
land. Randolph Parmly, son of Wheelock H. and 
Katherine D. Parmly, was born at Burlington, New 
Jersey, on April 2, 1854, and was prepared for 
college at the Hasbrouck Institute in Jersey City, 
from which he was graduated in 1871. In the fall 
of that year he entered New York University, and 
in June, 1875, he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. The next three years were spent 
in law studies, in a Jersey City law office and at 
Columbia College, from which latter he was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1878. From 
1878 to 1888 he practiced law in Jersey City, and 
since the latter date has been established in New 
York, devoting his attention chiefly to corporation 
law, and being counsel for a number of important 
corporations. Mr. Parmly is a member of the Bar 
Association of New York City, and of the University, 
Phi Beta Kappa, and Lawyers' clubs. He was 
married in 1898 to Mary S. Olmstead, daughter of 
Garrick M. Olmstead of Jersey City, and lives in 
New York City in the winter and on the Shrewsbury 
River in New Jersey in the summer. His office is 
at No. 160 Broadway, New York. 



PARSONS, John, 1842- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born at King's Borough, N. Y., 1842 ; studied in 
public and private schools, King's Borough Academy, 
Gloversville Seminary, Albany Medical College, Chi- 
cago Medical College, etc. ; graduated College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, Keokuk, Iowa, 1864; graduated 
M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1875; med- 
ical cadet in United States Army during Civil War, 
serving under Gen. Grant at Vicksburg; in private 
practice since 1865 ; ex-member of Kansas State Legis- 
lature ; Brevet Captain U. S. Volunteers. 

JOHN PARSONS, M.D., of King's Bridge, 
New York City, is a son of Hiram Addison 
Parsons, of King's Borough, New York, and Lucy 
Elizabeth (Brown) Parsons, of Bloomfield, Connec- 
ticut. He is ninth in descent from Sir Thomas 
Parsons, of Great Milton, Oxfordshire, England, and 
seventh from Deacon Benjamin Parsons, one of the 
first settlers of Springfield, Massachusetts. On the 
maternal side he is descended from Peter Brown, one 
of the Mayflower Pilgrims in 1620. He was born at 
King's Borough, New York, on April 12, 1842, and 
in boyhood attended the local schools, both public 



and private, and also the King's Borough Academy. 
He also pursued a course at the Gloversville, New 
York, Seminary. He began the study of medicine 
under Dr. G. J. Newton, at Gloversville, New York, 
and continued it under Dr. J. H. Schoon, at ^Vest 
Galway, New York, and at the Albany, New York, 
Medical College. He was graduated from the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, 
on February 10, 1864, from the Chicago Medical 
College, with an honorary degree, on ' March 4, 
1868, and from the Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, now a part of New York University, on March 




JOHN PARSONS 

I, 1875, receiving from the last named the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. From the Albany Medical 
College Dr. Parsons entered the United States Army 
as a medical cadet. He was under General Grant 
at the siege and surrender of Vicksburg, and also 
served in the Southwest, in the Northwest, and in 
Eastern Tennessee. After the war he practiced 
medicine for six years in Kansas, and was there 
Vice-President and President of the Kansas State 
Medical Society and a Representative in the Legis- 
lature. In 1 87 1 he established himself in his 
present home at King's Bridge, New York City, 
where he has been Justice of the Peace, and for 
many years a Vestryman of the Church of the 
Mediator. During the war he held the rank of 



i68 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Medical Cadet, U. S. A., Acting Assistant Surgeon, 
U. S. A., and Assistant Surgeon, United States 
Volunteers. He was made a Brevet Captain of 
United States Volunteers "for faithful and meri- 
torious services." He was for a time Executive 
Officer of the McDougall General Hospital, at Fort 
Schuyler, New York, and Chief Medical Officer on 
Hart's Island, New York. He was Vice-President 
and President of the Kansas State Medical Society, 
and has been Secretary, Vice-President and Presi- 
dent of the Yonkers Medical Association. He is an 
honorary member of the Jenkins Medical Society, 
a Fellow of the Academy of Medicine and Original 
Fellow of the New York State Medical Association, 
and a member of the American Medical Association, 
the New York County Medical Society, the New York 
County Medical Association, the Westchester County 
Medical Society, the Public Health Association, the 
Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, and other 
organizations. He is Medical Director of the 
Grand Army of the Republic in the State of New 
York, Dictator of the Knights of Honor, a Regent 
in the Royal Arcanum, and a member of the Knick- 
erbocker Athletic Club and the Army and Navy 
Club. His address is No. 2882 Bailey Avenue, 
King's Bridge, New York City. 



RAPP, Samuel, 1855- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born in Ne'w York, 1855; studied in New York 
public school; Assistant Surgeon, Colorado National 
Guard, 1881-1887 ; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, 1875 ; in practice since 1875. 

SAMUP:L RAPP, M.D., son of Solomon and 
Henrietta (Strauss) Rapp, was born in New 
York City on May 15, 1855, and acquired his 
preliminary education in Grammar School No. 40 
in New York City. He was graduated a Doctor of 
Medicine from the Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, now a part of New York University, in 1875, 
having already been in 1874 a Junior Assistant in 
the Mount Sinai Hospital, and since that time has 
been steadily engaged in professional practice. He 
was Coroner of Rio Grande County, Colorado, in 
1876-78, and of Hinsdale County in the same state 
in 1880-86, and an Assistant Surgeon in the Second 
Battalion of the National Guard of Colorado with 
the rank of Captain from 1881 to 1887. He is 
now settled in New York City, and is a member 
of the New York County Medical Society, the 
New York German Medical Society, the Metropoli- 




SAMUEL RAPP 



tan Medical Society, and the Society of Medical 
Jurisprudence. He was married on March 14, 1880, 
to Caroline Steifel, and has one child, Jessie Rapp. 



ST. JOHN, David, 1850- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born at Berne, N. Y., 1850; attended public schools; 
studied medicine privately, and at Albany and Buffalo 
Medical colleges ; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, 1875; in practice since 1875 at Hack- 
ensack, N. J.; a founder of Hackensack Hospital; 
officer of various business corporations. 

DAVID ST. JOHN, M.D., one of the lead- 
ing physicians of Bergen County, New 
Jersey, was born at Berne, Albany County, New 
York, in March, 1850, the son of David and Mary 
(Johnson) St. John. His mother was of Scotch 
descent, and his father was descended from Matthias 
St. John, who came from England in 1635 and 
settled in New England. Dr. St. John's paternal 
grandfather, Noah St. John, married Elizabeth 
Waterbury, of Waterbury, Connecticut, and was the 
pioneer of the family in New York State. In his 
boyhood Dr. St. John attended the schools of 
Albany, New York. His medical studies were be- 
gun under Dr. H. W. Bell, of Berne, New York, 
and were continued in the office of Professor 
James H. Armsby, one of the foremost surgeons of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



169 



Albany. Courses of lectures followed, at the Albany 
Medical College, the Buffalo Medical College, and 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College. From the 
last named institution, which has since been incor- 
porated with New York University, he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1875. 
Thereupon he settled at Hackensack, Bergen 
County, New Jersey, where he has since remained, 
conducting one of the most extensive and most 
successful practices in that part of the state. In 
1888, chiefly through his efforts, the Hackensack 
Hospital was organized, an admirable institution of 




D. ST. JOHN 

great value. He is President of its Medical Board, 
as well as Visiting Physician and Surgeon, and 
under his direction it has recently been housed in a 
new building which compares favorably with any in 
the state. One wing of this building, containing 
two wards, bears the name of the " St. John Wards," 
he having personally borne the expense thereof. 
Dr. St. John is a member of the Bergen County 
Medical Society, and has been its President. He is 
also a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, 
and a member of the New Jersey State Medical 
Society, the New York State Medical Association, 
and the American Medical Association. He is, 
under appointment of the Governor, one of the 
managers of the New Jersey State Hospital for the 



Insane at Morris Plains, and is also Surgeon for the 
Erie Railroad Company. He is First Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Hackensack Trust Company, a Director 
of the Hackensack Bank, President of the Bergen 
County Gas and Electric Company, and President of 
the Hackensack Heights Association, a large real 
estate corporation. In these capacities as well as in 
the practice of medicine he has shown untiring 
energy, and as a resident of Hackensack he has 
always been actively identified with all movements 
for its interest and advancement and enjoys the 
confidence and respect of his numerous patients as 
well as of the entire community. He was married in 
1879 to Jennie Angle, daughter of the late John H. 
Angle, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and has three 
children : Olive Graham, Fordyce Barker, and 
Florence Angle St. John. 



SLADE, Francis Page, 1856- 

Class of 1875 Arts, 1877 Law. 
Born in San Francisco, Cal., 1856; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1875; A.M., 1878; LL.B., New 
York University Law School, 1877; lawyer. 

FRANCIS PAGE SLADE, A.M., LL.B., son 
of Calvin and Mary Emily (Jennison) Slade, 
was born in San Francisco, California, on March 14, 
1856. In New York University he was a member 
of Zeta Psi, Editor of " The Philomathean," and 
President of his class in the Senior year. He was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1875, and from the University Law School with 
that of Bachelor of Laws in 1877. In 1878 he re- 
ceived his Master's degree in Arts. Since gradua- 
tion from the Law School he has been in successful 
practice as an attorney and counselor at law. He 
was married on April 7, 1880, to Louise F. Hackett, 
and has three children : Francis Henry, Marjorie, 
and Louise Slade. 



STEINERT, Henry, 1853- 

Class of 1875 Law. 
Born in New York, 1853 ; studied in public schools 
and College of City of New York ; law clerk, 1868-75 '• 
graduated LL.B., New York University Law School, 
1875; in practice since 1875; Attorney and Counsel to 
Board of Health, 1892-98 ; Assistant Corporation Coun- 
sel, New York, 1898-1902. 

HENRY STEINERT, LL.B., son of Herman 
and Rose Steinert, was born in New York 
City on December 22, 1853. He was graduated 
from Grammar School No. 27, and for two years, 
1866-68, attended the College of the City of New 
York. He then turned his attention to the study of 



170 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



law. From 186S to 1875 he was a clerk and 
student in the law offices of W. G. Bryan and George 
M. Curtis. He also entered the Law Scliool of 
New York University, and was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1875. Since the 
latter date he has been successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession in New York. From 1892 
to 1898 he was Attorney and Counsel to the New 
York Board of Health, and from 1898 to March 15, 
1902, an Assistant Corporation Counsel of New 
York. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a mem- 
ber of the Manhattan, Democratic and Home clubs. 




HENRY STEINERT 

He has been married but is a widower, and lives at 
No. 667 Lexington Avenue, New York. His father 
was a practicing lawyer for just fifty years, and he 
has three brothers, Joseph, Morris and Max, engaged 
in the same profession. 



TOMLINSON, John Canfield, 1856- 

Class of 1875 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1856; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1875, and A.M., i386; LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1877 ; lawyer; examiner in Uni- 
versity Law School, etc. 

JOHN CANFIELD TOMLINSON, A.M., LL.B., 
is a son of Theodore E. and Abby Esther 
(Walden) Tomlinson, and was born in New York 



City on December 28, 1856. He was a prominent 
member of the noteworthy Class of 1875 in New 
York University, being Philomathean Junior orator 
and winner of the Webster Prize, President of Phi- 
lomathean, representative of the University in the 
Intercollegiate Literary Association in 1874-75, win- 
ner of the first prize in the Intercollegiate Oratorical 
Contest in 1875, and President of his class in the 
Sophomore year. He was a member of the Zeta Psi 
Fraternity. He was graduated from the University 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1875, and 
received the Master's degree in Arts in 1886. He 
entered the University Law School in the fall of 
1875, 3"d was graduated from it with the Baccalau- 
reate degree in Law in 1877, and was in the same 
year admitted to the Bar. Ever since that time 
Mr. Tomlinson has been actively and successfully 
engaged in the practice of his profession, his office 
being at No. 15 Wall Street, New York. He has 
been an examiner in the New York University Law 
School, Historian of the New York Society of the 
Sons of the Revolution, and he was a member of 
the New York City Committee on the Centennial 
Celebration of the Constitution in 1889. He was 
married first to Fannie Adams, on November 10, 
1879, ^i^d after her death to Dora Morrell Grant, 
on July 20, 1888. He has three- children : John 
Canfield, Jr., Esther Walden, and Daniel Tomlinson. 
His home is at No. 45 West 57th Street, New York. 



TROTTER, Alfred Williams, 1856- 

Class of 1875 S^i- 
Born in New York City, 1856 ; graduated B.S. and 
C.E., New York University, 1875; Civil and Manu- 
facturing Engineer and officer of business corporations. 

ALFRED WILLIAMS TROTTER, B.S., C.E., 
is a son of Jonathan T. and Esther Malvina 
(Williams) Trotter, and was born in New York City 
on June 10, 1856. He pursued the scientific course 
in New York University, and was graduated with the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Civil Engineer in 
1875. He has been professionally connected with 
the Metropolitan Elevated Railroad in New York, 
the New York, West Shore and Buffalo Railroad, the 
Southern Pennsylvania Railroad, the Genesee and 
Wyoming Valley Railroad, the Acme Liquid Fuel 
Company, the Saratoga Gas and Electric Light 
Company, and other corporations. He has been 
Vice-President of the Bank Building Company of 
New York, and an officer of other concerns. He 
promoted and was Chief Engineer of the Retsof 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



171 



Mining Company, which opened and operated great 
salt deposits in Western New York. He is a vet- 
eran officer of the Seventh Regiment, New York 
National Guard, in which he served twelve years, and 
a member of the New York Academy of Sciences, 
the American Society of Civil Engineers, and other 
organizations. His office is at No. 71 Broadway, 
New York, and his home in the City of Mount 
Vernon, New York. 



VAN SANTVOORD, Richard, 1853- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born in New York, 1853 ; studied in private and 
public schools and College of City of New York (grad- 
uated A.B., 1872) ; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, 1875 ; in hospital work and European 
study, 1875-78; in practice since 1878. 

RICHARD VAN SANTVOORD, M.D., son of 
Cornelius and Susan (Varick) Van Sant- 
voord, was born in New York City on May 19, 1853. 




Van Santvoord was educated at various private 
schools and at Grammar School No. 39, in New 
York, and at the College of the City of New York, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1872. In 1875 he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, which has 
since been incorporated with New York University. 
For the ensuing two years he was a member of 
the House Staff of Bellevue Hospital, and for another 
year studied abroad, chiefly at Bonn and Vienna. 
Since his return to this country in 1878 he has been 
continuously engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession, settling at his present address, No. 106 
West 122nd Street, New York, in March, 1881. 
He has been an Attending Physician to the House 
of Refuge, and Visiting Physician to the Workhouse, 
Almshouse and Randall's Island hospitals. Since 
July, 1885, he has been Visiting Physician to the 
Harlem Hospital. He is a member (and has been 
Vice-President) of the New York County Medical 
Society, and also of the Harlem Club, the New York 
Pathological Society, and the Harlem Medical 
Association, and is a Fellow of the New York Acad- 
emy of Medicine. In politics he has been active in 
the Good Government Club movement. He was 
married in April, 1886, to Hattie Willis Roberts, 
and has one child, Richarda Van Santvoord. 



RICHARD VAN SANTVOORD 

As the name indicates, he is of Holland Dutch an- 
cestry. The family was transplanted to America in 
1 7 1 8 by the Rev. Cornelius Van Santvoord, a grad- 
uate of the University of Leyden and a clergyman 
of the Reformed Dutch Church. A grand-uncle of 
Dr. Van Santvoord's mother was Colonel Richard 
Varick, who was at one time Private Secretary to 
Washington, and also Mayor of New York. Dr. 



WIENER, Richard George, 1854- 

Class of 1875 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1854; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1875, and A.M., 1878; graduated M.D., 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1877; extensive 
hospital practice ; Assistant to Chair of Clinical Surg- 
ery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1879-86; in 
active practice. 

RICHARD GEORGE WIENER, A.M. M.D., 
son of Solomon and Theresa (Falkman) 
Wiener, was born in New York City on June 13, 
1854. He studied in the New York public schools, 
and in 1871 entered the College of Arts and Science 
of New York University. He was a member of Psi 
Upsilon, and Eucleian Junior orator, and was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1875, 
receiving that of Master of Arts in 1878. He was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
from the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
(Columbia) in 1877. He was Resident Physician 
at the Colored Home and Hospital, New York, in 
1877-78; Attending Physician to the Out-door 
Department of the New York Hospital, 1879-82 ; 



172 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Assistant to the Chair of Clinical Surgery in the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, 1879-86; Surgeon 
to the Charity Hospital, 1890-95 ; and Physician 
to the Harlem Hospital since 1898. He is a Fel- 
low of the New York Academy of Medicine, and a 
member of the American Medical Association, the 
Pathological Society, the New York County Medical 
Society, and the German Medical Society. He has 
written numerous articles for medical journals. Dr. 
Wiener was married on February 28, 1884, to 
Fanny Hirsh, and has four children. His address is 
No. 48 East 65th Street, New York. 



ALVORD, Henry Clay, 1854- 

Class of 1876 Arts. 
Born at Bolton, Conn., 1854; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1876, and A.M., 1879; graduated Hart- 
ford Theological Seminary, 1879 ; minister of Congre- 
gational Church since 1879. 

HENRY CLAY ALVORD, A.M., is a son of 
Henry and Mary Williams (Gillette) Al- 
vord, and was born at Bolton, Connecticut, on April 




HENRY C. ALVORD 

30, 1854. He entered the Sophomore Class of 
New York University in 1873, after some preliminary 
study with the Freshman Class, and was a leading 
member of the distinguished Class of 1876. He 
had previously been Valedictorian of the Hartford 



High School Class of 1873. ^^ 'he University he 
was President of the class in the Junior year, Secre- 
tary, Editor and President of the Philomathean 
Society, Editor of " The Philomathean " in 1873-74, 
a Junior orator. University Contestant in Essays 
in the Intercollegiate Literary Contest of 1875, 
representative of the University in the Intercollegi- 
ate Literary Association in 1875-76, and Greek 
Salutatorian and winner of the Second Fellowship 
at Commencement. He was a prominent member 
of Psi Upsilon and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 
Mr. Alvord was graduated with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts in 1876, and received that of Master of 
Arts from the University in 1879. In the latter 
year he was graduated from the Hartford Theologi- 
cal Seminary and was ordained into the ministry of 
the Congregational Church. From 1879 to 1886 
he was Pastor of the first Congregational Church at 
Montague, Massachusetts, and since 1886 has been 
settled over the Old South Church at South Wey- 
mouth, Massachusetts. He was married on October 
6, 1880, to Alice C. Bissell, and has three children: 
Henry Bissell, Ruth Gillette, and Robert Williams 
Alvord. 



BENJAMIN, John Halsey, 1855- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Bom at Riverhead, N. Y., 1855; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1876; Assistant 
House Physician, Nursery and Child's Hospital, New 
York, 1876-77 ; in practice at Riverhead, N. Y., since 
1878. 

JOHN HALSEY BENJAMIN, M.D., a dis- 
tinguished physician and surgeon of River- 
head, Long Island, New York, is a son of Caleb 
Halsey Benjamin and Hannah (Young) Benjamin. 
His earliest American ancestor was John Benjamin, 
of Watertown, Massachusetts, who was made a free- 
man of that place on November 6, 1632, was for 
several years constable of the town, and was one 
of the proprietors of Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
On the maternal side Dr. Benjamin's ancestors 
came to this country from England seven genera- 
tions ago. Dr. Benjamin was born at Riverhead, 
New York, on June 22, 1855. He attended the 
public schools from 1864 to 1870, the Northville 
Academy in 1870-71, and the Bridgehampton 
Literary Institute in 1871-72. In 1872-73 he 
studied privately under the Rev. Mr. Edwards, and 
in the fall of the latter year entered the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, which is now a part 
of New York University. There he pursued a 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



173 



three years' course, and was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1876. For 
about a year after graduation he served as an 
Assistant House Physician in the Nursery and 




BRADNER, Wesley Kenney, 1852- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1852 ; studied at Newark 
Academy, Pennington Seminary, N. J., and Dickinson 
College, Carlisle, Pa.; M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, 1876; in medical practice since 1876; in drug 
business since 1887 ; Physician to Newark City Dis- 
pensary, 1876-78 ; President Board of Health, Bradley 
Beach, N. J., 1894-95; member of Board of Education, 
Neptune Township, N. J. 

WESLEY KENNEY BRADNER, M.D., is a 
son of William Benedict and Mary H. 
McKinney Bradner. His first American ancestor 
was the Rev. John Bradner, who was at one time a 
tutor in the family of the Earl of Caldwell, and who 
eloped with that nobleman's daughter, Christian, 
from Newcastle, England, and came to America. 
For a time John Bradner was a teacher at Cape 
May, New Jersey. In 1722 he removed thence to 
Goshen, Orange County, New York, and was Pastor 
of the First Presbyterian Church there. William 
Benedict Bradner, his descendant and father of the 
subject of this sketch, was born at Florida, Orange 
County, New York, in 181 1 and died at Newark, 



JOHN H. BENJAMIN 

Child's Hospital in New York, and in 1878 set- 
tled at Riverhead, where he has ever since re- 
mained in active and successful practice as a 
physician and surgeon. At a meeting of the Suf- 
folk County Medical Society on April 26, 1894, 
he read a report of the first case of ovariotomy 
ever performed in Suffolk County. This operation 
was for the removal of a multilocular ovarian cyst 
weighing forty pounds, the patient being a dwarf 
only four feet tall. On February 4, 1895, he per- 
formed what he believes to have been the first 
hysterectomy in Suffolk County, for the extirpation 
of a fibroid tumor. The operation was highly suc- 
cessful and the patient made a complete recovery 
and is now living. Dr. Benjamin joined the Suffolk 
County Medical Society in 1878, and has been its 
President since 1901. He is also a member of the 
Associated Physicians of Long Island. From 1894 
to 1897 he was a member of the Riverhead Board 
of Education. He married Florence Williams, of 
Brooklyn, New York, in 1880. She died in 1888, 
and in 1889 he married Armida M. Wood, of 
Brooklyn. 




WESLEY K. BRADNER 



New Jersey, in 1893. Dr. Bradner was born in the 
City of Newark, New Jersey, on April 28, 1852, and 
from 1858 to 1861 attended a public school there. 
The next five years were spent in the well known 



174 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Newark Academy, and in 1867-68 he was at 
Pennington Seminary, at Pennington, New Jersey. 
In 1869-70 he was under the instruction of a 
private tutor, in Newark, and then went to Dickinson 
College, at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, which he left in 
his Sophomore year to pursue a course in the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part of 
New York University, from which he was graduated 
in 1876 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
Since that time he has been continuously engaged in 
the practice of his profession, and also, in late years, 
in the business of a druggist. His first two years of 
practice, 1876-1878, were spent in his native City 
of Newark, during which time he was Physician to 
the Newark City Dispensary. Thence he removed 
to the City of Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he prac- 
ticed from 1878 to 1887, and was identified with 
the Union County Medical Society, of which he is 
still a member. In 1887 he removed to Bradley 
Beach, New Jersey, and there engaged in the drug 
business in addition to the practice of his profession. 
He is thus engaged at that place at the present 
time. In 1894-95 he was President of the Bradley 
Beach Board of Health, and he is now Collector of 
Taxes for that borough, and a member of the Board 
of Education of Neptune Township. He was 
married on March 18, 1878, to Jennie E. Rhodes, 
and has three children : Hiram Rhodes, William 
Benedict, and Edna Elizabeth Bradner. 



General Abercrombie, of Revolutionary fame. He 
was born in Russell County, Alabama, on December 
25, 1853, and received his early education under 
private tutors and in private schools. His collegiate 
course was pursued at Emory College, Oxford, 
Georgia, from which he was graduated with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts in 1873. He then pro- 
ceeded to New York for a professional training, and 
entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1876. After receiving his diploma 
he was engaged for a year and a half as a member 



CHAMBERS, Porter Flewellen, 1853- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born in Russell County, Ala., 1853; graduated A.B., 
Emory College, Oxford, Ga., 1873; M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1876; on House Staff of 
Presbyterian Hospital, and of Woman's Hospital ; 
associated with Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas in practice, 
1881-91; Assistant Surgeon to Woman's Hospital, 
New York, 1884 to 1901 ; full Surgeon since igoi ; 
practicing and consulting surgeon in New York. 

PORTER FLEWELLEN CHAMBERS, i\LD., 
comes on the side of his father, William 
Henry Chambers, from Scotch-Irish stock. His 
paternal grandparents were James M. and Martha 
Chambers, the latter born Alexander and a descen- 
dant of U'illiam Alexander, Lord Stirling, who came 
to Virginia from the old country in 1659. On the 
side of his mother, whose maiden name was Anne 
Lane Flewellen, Dr. Chambers is of Welsh descent, 
the Flewellen family having come from Wales to 
Virginia just before the Revolutionary War. Through 
his mother Dr. Chambers is a great-grandson of 




p. F. CHAMBERS 

of the House Staff of the Presbyterian Hospital, in 
New York, and then for a similar term in a similar 
capacity at the Woman's Hospital. Soon after this 
service he formed a professional connection that was 
of incalculable value to him. This was a partner- 
ship with Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, one of the most 
distinguished physicians of his time. This associa- 
tion lasted for ten years, and to it Dr. Chambers 
attributes a large share of the great success he has 
achieved in his professional work. In 1884 Dr. 
Chambers was made Assistant Surgeon to the 
Woman's Hospital, and filled that place until 1901, 
when he was made full Surgeon to the same institu- 
tion, in succession to Dr. T. Addis Emmett, resigned. 
Dr. Chambers has had exceptional success in Opera- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



'75 



live, and especially in Abdominal, Surgery, his record 
for his last one hundred and fifty cases showing a 
mortality of less than two per cent. This success he 
attributes to his training under Dr. Thomas and to 
his experience in the Woman's Hospital. He now 
enjoys a large consulting practice in New York and 
other cities, and he has contributed much to current 
and standard medical literature upon the subject of 
diseases of women. He is a member of the Southern 
Society of New York, and of the Century and Driv- 
ing clubs. He was married on June i, 1893, to 
Alice Ely, daughter of William H. Ely and niece of 
ex-Mayor Smith Ely, of New York. She has borne 
him three children : William Ely, Ambrose Ely, and 
Alice Ely Chambers. Dr. Chambers's home and 
office are in New York City. 



COOKE, Baldwin Gardiner, 1855- 

Class of 1876 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1855; graduated C.E., New York 
University, 1876; graduated M.D., College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, 1879 ; in practice as physician 
since 1879; writer. 

BALDWIN GARDINER COOKE, M.D., C.E., 
is a son of Horace and Esther Louisa 
(McCurdy) Cooke, and was born in New York City 
on December 5, 1855. He was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Class of 1876 in New York University, 
being its President in the Senior year, President of 
the Athletic Association, Eucleian Junior orator and 
winner of the Webster Prize, winner of honorable 
mention in the Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest in 
1876, winner of the Butler Eucleian Essay Prize, 
Censor and Treasurer of Eucleian, and Marshal at 
Commencement. He was graduated from the Uni- 
versity in 1876 with the degree of Civil Engineer, 
and three years later was graduated from the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, of Columbia University, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Since that 
date he has been steadily engaged in the practice of 
his profession. From 1883 to 1893 he was con- 
nected with the Sanitary Department of the New 
York Board of Health. He is a member of the 
New York County and Harlem Medical societies, 
and was formerly a member of the Seventh Regi- 
ment, New York National Guard. Dr. Cooke has 
written on " Tuberculosis in Children," " Hysteria as 
a Symptom of Insanity," and other professional 
topics. He was married on October 9, 1879, to 
Sarah Alice Trainer, daughter of Arthur Trainer, 
and has five children : Esther Gardiner, Olive 



Gardiner, Evelyn Gardiner, Baldwin Gardiner, and 
Hazel Gardiner Cooke. His address is No. 136 
West II ith Street, New York. 



CROSBY, Ernest Howard, 1856- 

Class of 1876 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1856; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1876, and A.M., 1879; graduated LL.B., 
Columbia College Law School, 1878; lawyer; member 
of New York State Assembly, 1887-89; Judge of In- 
ternational Court, Egypt, 1889-94; Major in National 
Guard, Inspector of Rifle Practice; first President of 
Social Reform Club, 1894-95 ; President of New York 
Anti-Imperialist League, 1900-03 ; social reformer, lec- 
turer and author. 

ERNEST HOWARD CROSBY, A.M., LL.B., 
lawyer, jurist, social reformer and author, is 
a son of Chancellor Howard Crosby, of New York 




ERNEST H. CROSBY 

University, and of Mrs, Margaret E. (Givan) 
Crosby, and was born in New York City on Novem- 
ber 4, 1856. He entered New York University dur- 
ing the Chancellorship of his distinguished father, 
and ranked high as a student. He was President 
of the Philomathean Society and Editor of " The 
Philomathean " in 1873-74, representative of the 
University in the Intercollegiate Literary .Association 
in 1875-76 and President of that association; Uni- 



176 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



versity contestant in Greek, with honorable men- 
tion in 1876; Junior orator, and Valedictorian and 
winner of the first fellowship at Commencement. 
He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1876, and received the Master's degree in 
1879. He studied in the Columbia College Law 
School, and was graduated with its Baccalaureate 
degree with honors in 1878. Thereafter for a 
number of years he devoted himself to the practice 
of law in New York City. He was a Major in the 
National Guard, and Inspector of Rifle Practice in 
1880-82. In 1887-89 he was a member of the 
New York State Assembly, and attained prominence 
in that body. He was nominated by President 
Harrison and appointed by the Khedive as Ameri- 
can member of the International Court at Alexan- 
dria, Egypt, and served in that capacity until 1 894. 
On his return home he made a visit to Count Lyolf 
Tolstoi, the Russian writer and social reformer, and 
became profoundly imbued with the social and reli- 
gious philosophy of that extraordinary man, so much 
so that he has since devoted his attention largely to 
social and humanitarian questions. He was one of 
the founders, and the first President, of the Social 
Reform Club in 1894-95, is President of the Anti- 
Imperialist League of New York and of the New 
York Vegetarian Society. He is also active in the 
peace movement. He has written much for the 
press, lectured frequently, and has published several 
volumes of verse and prose, including " Plain talk 
in Psalm and Parable," " Swords and Plowshares " 
and "Captain Jinks, Hero." He was married in 
1 88 1 to Fanny Kendall Schiefielin, daughter of H. 
Maunsell Schieffelin of New York, and has children. 
His office is No. 19 Liberty Street, New York, and 
his home at " Grasmere," Rhinebeck, New York. 



cal College of New York University and was gradu- 
ated from it with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1876, in the same year receiving the degree of 
Master of Arts from Manhattan College. For a 
year following his graduation Dr. Donlin was House 
Physician and Surgeon at St. Vincent's Hospital, 
and has ever since been practicing his profession in 
New York City. From 1892 to 1901 he was a 
Coroner's Physician, and at the present time he is a 
Police Surgeon. He is a member of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, the New York State 
Medical Society, the New York County Medical 




E. J. DONLIN 



DONLIN, Edward J., 1852- 

Class of 1 876 Med. 
Born in New York, 1852 ; studied in public schools ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1876; A.M. Manhattan College, 1876; House Physi- 
cian and Surgeon, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York, 
1876-77; Coroner's Physician, New York, 1892 to 1901 ; 
Police Surgeon; practicing physician in New York 
since 1877. 

EDWARD J. DONLIN, M.D., of Irish ances- 
try and son of Michael and Anne (Reilly) 
Donlin, was born in New York City on July 24, 
1852. His early education was received in the 
public schools of the city, from which he proceeded 
to Manhattan College. Later he entered the Medi- 



Society, the Physicians' Mutual Aid Society, the 
Catholic Knights of America, the Knights of Colum- 
bus, the Empire Mutual Aid Association, and the 
Monticello Club. In politics he is a Democrat. 
He was married on November 20, 1889, to Ann E. 
McGinley, who has borne him seven children : 
Loretta, Ann, Rosalie, Kathleen, Philip E., Florence 
and .i^gnes Donlin. Dr. Donlin's address is No. 
129 West Houston Street, New York City. 



DOUGLAS, William Edward, 1854- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at Franklin, N. Y., 1854; studied at Delaware 
Literary Institute ; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^71 



Medical College, 1876; in practice since 1876; author 
of various papers. 

WILLIAM EDWARD DOUGLAS, M.D, is a 
great-great-grandson of Major Asa Doug- 
las, and also of Private Stephen Hine, and a great- 
grandson of Captain William Douglas, all veterans 
of the Revolution. He is a son of Amos and Mari- 
ette (Hine) Douglas, and was born at Frankhn, 
Delaware County, New York, on July 14, 1854. 
His academic education was acquired at the 
Delaware Literary Institute, at Franklin, and his 
professional training in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, now a part of New York Uni- 




WILLIAM E. DOUGLAS 

versify, from which he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1876. Since that 
date he has been constantly engaged in the practice 
of his profession, at Lisle, New York, until 1881, 
and at Middletown, Orange County, New York, since 
1 88 1. In 1884 he was appointed Examiner in 
Lunacy. From 1892 to 1900 he was a member of 
the Medical Staff of the Thrall Hospital, in Middle- 
town, and is now Consulting Physician to that insti- 
tution. He is an examiner for several life insurance 
companies, and has one of the largest practices in 
Middletown. From 1888 to 1893 he was a member 
of the Board of Water Commissioners of Middle- 
town, in 1886 he was President of the Orange 
County Medical Society, and he has been a Director 
VOL. 11 — 12 



of the First National Bank there for ten years and a 
Trustee of the Congregational Church for eight 
years. In politics he is a Republican. He has 
read and published a number of papers on pro- 
fessional topics, including " A Case of Double 
Uterus," " Decayed Teeth a Cause of Cancer of the 
Stomach," and " An Interesting Case of Melancholia 
Agatans." He is a member of the American Medi- 
cal Association, the New York State Medical Asso- 
ciation,' the Orange County Medical Association, 
the New York State Medical Society, the Orange 
County Medical Society, the Middletown Club, and 
the Society of the Sons of the Revolution. He was 
married in 1883 to Katherine B. Whitney, of Lisle, 
New York, who died in 1898, leaving one child, 
Amos Stanley Douglas. His address is No. 38 
South Street, Middletown, New York. 



FISHER, William Henry, 1854- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at Spencer, N. Y., 1854 ; studied at Spencer 
Academy; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Med- 
ical College, 1876; in practice since 1876; Coroner of 
Tioga County, N. Y., 1880-83 J first President of Village 
of Spencer. 

WILLIAM HENRY FISHER, M.D., comes 
of two families, those of Fisher and Carr, 
long settled in the United States. His ancestor 
John Phihp Fisher was born in Ortting, near Frank- 
fort, Germany, in 1725, was married to Ann Maria 
Eberlin, and brought his family to America in 1754, 
settling at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His youngest 
son, Leonard Fisher, born at Ortting in 1753, served 
in the Revolutionary War, married Susannah Rieg- 
ler, daughter of Dr. Riegler, of New York, and had 
fifteen children. Of these the fifth was George 
Fisher, born in Philadelphia in 1782, who married 
Lucinda South, of Albany, New York, and was in 
1810 one of the first settlers of Spencer, Tioga 
County, New York. George Fisher was a Brigadier- 
General of New York State troops for many years, 
a member of the State Assembly, and a Judge of 
Tioga County. His son, Charles James Fisher, 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born at 
Spencer, New York, in 18 16, and married Ann 
Elizabeth Carr, of Dryden, New York. The Carr 
family is traced to William Carr, of London, Eng- 
land, who married Susan Rothschild, came to 
America in 162 1 with 'Roger Williams, and settled 
at Bristol, Rhode Island. His nephew, Robert Carr, 
born in London, came to America in 1635, and 
with his brother, Caleb, settled at Newport, Rhode 



178 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Island, and was one of the original purchasers of 
Conanicut Island. His brother, Caleb Carr, was 
Governor of Rhode Island in 1695. ^'^ ''^^ "s^' 
generation came Caleb Carr, 2nd, of Jamestown, 
Rhode Island, who married Phyllis Green, daughter 
of Deputy-Governor John Green. In the fourth 
generation was Caleb Carr, 3rd, of Jamestown, 
Rhode Island, who married Joanna Slocum, and 
settled at West Greenwich, Rhode Island. The 
fifth generation produced Caleb Carr, 4th, who 
married Elizabeth Pierce. His son, Eleazer Carr, a 
soldier in the Revolution, married Eleanor Stafford, 




Vf. H. FISHER 



and settled in Rensselaer County, New York. One 
of his six children was the Rev. Stutely Carr, who 
married Sybil Dyer, and setded at Salisbury, New 
York. One of his sixteen children was Stutely Carr, 
2nd, who married Elizabeth Tyler, of Dryden, New 
York. Finally, in the ninth generation, came Ann 
Elizabeth Carr, mother of the subject of this sketch. 
She was born at Dryden, New York, on March 9, 
1832, married Charles James Fisher on October 27, 
1852, and had three children, of whom the eldest 
and only survivor is Dr. W. H. Fisher. Dr. Fisher 
was born at Spencer, Tioga County, New York, on 
January 31, 1854, and was educated in local schools, 
being graduated from the Spencer Academy in 1873. 
In the fall of that year he entered the Bellevue 



Hospital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, and was graduated from it with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1876. From that 
time until 1892 he practiced his profession at 
Spencer, but since 1892 has been settled in Elmira, 
New York. He was the first President of the 
Village of Spencer, upon its incorporation, and in 
1880-83 w^s Coroner of Tioga County. He is a 
member of the Tioga and Chemung County Medical 
societies, the Masonic Order, and the Century 
Club of Elmira. He was married on November 14, 
1877, to Alice Gertrude Knight, who has borne him 
two children : Elizabeth Gertrude, and Karl Wil- 
liam Fisher. His address is No. 410 South Main 
Street, Elmira, New York. 



HUNT, Charles Warren, 1858- 

Class of 1876 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1858; graduated B.S. and C.E., 
New York University, 1876; Civil Engineer, engaged 
in railroad, municipal and Federal works in States of 
New York, Virginia, and Wisconsin; Secretary of 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 

CHARLES WARREN HUNT, B.S., C.E., 
Secretary of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, was born in New York City on May ig, 
1858. His father was Charles Havens Hunt, a 
member of a well known New York family, and his 
mother, whose maiden name was Anna de Peyster 
Livingston, was a member of two of the most 
eminent families of New York. Mr. Hunt entered 
New York University and was graduated at eighteen. 
He was a member of Delta Phi and a Junior orator. 
He received the degrees of Bachelor of Science and 
Civil Engineer in 1876, and entered upon the 
practice of Civil Engineering. He was successively 
engaged in the Department of Docks of New York 
City, in the Park Department of Brooklyn, on rail- 
roads in Virginia and West Virginia, on United 
States Government works in Wisconsin and on the 
Mississippi and Delaware rivers, on the elevated 
railroads of New York and Brooklyn, and on the 
water-works of the City of New Rochelle, New 
York. He has for eight years been Secretary of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers, at No. 220 
West 5 7th Street, New York. He was married on 
September 8, 1883, to Mary Osgood Riggs, daugh- 
ter of George S. Riggs, of Baltimore, Maryland, and 
has two children : Alice Riggs and Charles Warren 
Hunt, Jr. His home is at No. 171 West 88th 
Street, New York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



179 



JACKSON, James Hathaway, 1841- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at Peterboro, N. Y., 1841 ; studied at Dansville, 
N. Y., Seminary; on Nebraska ranch, 1858-59; com- 
mercial college, 1859-60; graduated M.D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1876; connected with Jack- 
son Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y., since i860, Chief of 
its Medical Staff since 1876 ; President of Village of 
Dansville, 1895 ; author and editor. 

JAMES HATHAWAY JACKSON, M.D., of the 
Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, New York, 
comes of distinguished American ancestry, trans- 
planted many generations ago from England. The 
first of the line probably came over in the ship 
Defiance, in 1635. In the second generation in this 
country was John Jackson, an innkeeper at Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, in 1672-95. " The son of 
John and Deborah Jackson was John Jackson, 2nd, 
a deacon of the church at Tyringham, Massachu- 
setts, who married Mercy Chadwick, of, VVatertown, 
Massachusetts. His son was Colonel Giles Jack- 
son, a member of the first Continental Congress, a 
Colonel in the Revolutionary Army, the field officer 
at Saratoga who engrossed the articles of Burgoyne's 
surrender, the husband first of Anna Thomas and 
second of Sarah Atwood Orton, and the father of 
twenty-one children. One of those children was 
James Jackson, a physician and surgeon of note, 
who served in the War of 181 2 as an Army Surgeon, 
and who married Mary Ann Elderkin Clark, a widow. 
In the next generation was James Caleb Jackson, 
who was Corresponding Secretary of the American 
Anti-Slavery Society, Editor of " The Madison County 
Abolitionist" and of "The Albany Patriot," and a 
Hydropathic Physician, writer and editor, and 
Founder of the Sanatorium at Dansville, New York. 
He married Lucretia Edgerton Brewster, a descend- 
ant of Elder William Brewster, of the " Mayflower," 
who bore him, at Peterboro, Madison County, New 
York, on June 11, 1841, the subject of this sketch. 
Dr. Jackson completed a good academic education 
at the Dansville Seminary, and then went west for 
some ranch life in Nebraska, 1858-59. In 1859-60 
he pursued a business college course, and then 
became for two years, 1860-62, book-keeper of the 
Jackson Sanatorium, at Dansville, New York. 
Thereafter he was General Superintendent of the 
sanatorium in 1862-64, and Manager of it from 
1864 to 1882. He became owner of one-fourth 
interest in it in 1864, one-third in 1868, one-half in 
1872, and ninety-eight one-hundredths in 1888. 
Meantime in 1873 he entered the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, now a part of New York Univer- 



sity, and was graduated from it in February, 1876, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, since which 
time he has been Chief of the Medical Staff of the 
sanatorium. He was publisher of " The Laws of 
Life and Journal of Health," a widely circulated 
periodical, from 1858 to 1893, and was Editor of 
it from 1883 to 1893. In politics he has always 
been a Republican, and in 1895 he was elected the 
first Republican President of the Village of Dans- 
ville. He is a member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, and Royal Arch Masons, of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, of the Society of Colonial 




JAMES H. JACKSON 

Wars, and of the Society of Mayflower Descend- 
ants. He was married on September 13, 1864, to 
Kate Johnson, and has one son, James Arthur 
Jackson. 

KEOGH, Martin Jerome, 1854- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born in Ireland, 1854; came to New York and worked 
on newspapers while studying law; graduated LL.B., 
New York University Law School, 1876; practiced law 
with marked success; Presidential Elector in 1892; 
Justice of Supreme Court of the State of New York 
since 1895. 

MARTIN JEROME KEOGH, LL.B., Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court of the State of 
New York, is a native of the South of Ireland, where 



i8o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



he was born in 1854. The family was a Roman 
Cathohc one, and he accordingly went for his edu- 
cation to a branch of the Catholic University 
founded by Cardinal Newman. That institution 
failed, however, and his studies had to be completed 
elsewhere. He came to the United States and 
settled in New York City, where he engaged in 
newspaper work for support while he studied law. 
In 1876 he was graduated from the Law School of 
New York University with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, as the Valedictorian of his class. Immediately 
thereafter he was admitted to the Bar and began 
the practice of his profession in Westchester County, 
New York. He there met with great success, in 
both civil and criminal practice, and soon rose to 
the foremost rank at the Bar. It is recorded that 
he secured the acquittal of his clients in no fewer 
than twelve capital cases in succession. In 1895 
he was elected to a place on the Bench of the 
Supreme Court of the State of New York, receiving 
an overwhelming vote without regard to party lines, 
and he has since occupied that position with dis- 
tinction. In politics he is a Democrat, but he has 
filled no political office save that of Presidential 
Elector in 1892. He was married in 1893 to 
Katherine Temple Emmett, a great-granddaughter 
of Thomas Addis Emmett, and makes his home at 
New Rochelle, New York. 



LINSON, Lyman Sewall, 1856- 

Class of 1876 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1856; studied in public schools 
and Mount Washington Collegiate Institute; gradu- 
ated A.B., New York University, 1876; A.M. in 1879; 
studied law with Class of 1881, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, but did not graduate ; in publishing house, 
1876-81 ; railroad auditor's office, 1882-83 ; Prefect at 
Girard College, 1883-84; in bank, 1885-90; in various 
business enterprises at Albion, N. Y. 

LYMAN SEVVALL LINSON, A.M., can boast 
an ancestry of English, Welsh, Dutch and 
French origin. On the side of his father, William 
Van Keuren Linson, he is of English descent through 
the Linsons, and the Tomlinsons of Massachusetts, 
Dutch through the Van Keurens of Kingston-on-the- 
Hudson and the Colyers of Brooklyn, and French 
through the De Vines of Brooklyn. On the side of 
his mother, whose maiden name was Maria Louisa 
Knapp, he is of Welsh ancestry through the Knapps 
of New York, and English through the Corwins, 
Chases, Ramseys, Mortons and others, of New Eng- 
land. All the families named were settled in this 



country before 1650. Of such ancestry Mr. Linson 
was born in New York City on September 30, 1856. 
Up to the age of thirteen years he was educated in 
the public schools. Then he went to the famous 
old Mount Washington Collegiate Institute, in New 
York, and was there prepared to enter the School of 
Arts and Science of the University of the City of 
New York, now the University College of New York 
University. He was only fifteen years old when he 
was graduated from the Mount Washington Collegiate 
Institute and was matriculated in the University, but 
he soon made his mark among his classmates Jtnd 




LVMAN S. LINSON 

made fine progress as a scholar under the instruc- 
tion of the superb company of men who then com- 
posed the faculty of the University. He was a 
member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity, and its 
President and delegate to the Convention in his 
Senior year. He was Treasurer of his class in that 
year, and was Marshal of the Junior Exhibition. In 
1 876 he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, and three years later he received that of Master 
of Arts. Immediately upon leaving the University 
in 1876 he entered the agency of the publishing 
house of A. S. Barnes & Company, at Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, and remained there until 1881. For 
a time also he was a student in the Law School of 
the University of Pennsylvania, in the Class of 1881, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



i8i 



but he did not complete the course and was not 
graduated. Instead, he went west, and in 1882-83 
was employed in the Auditor's Office of the B. & M. 
River Railroad, at Omaha, Nebraska. In 1883-84 
he was in Philadelphia again, as Prefect in Girard 
College, and then, from 1885 to 1890, was book- 
keeper of the Orleans County National Bank, at 
Albion, New York. In the last named year he 
entered mercantile life, and has since been engaged 
therein, dealing in produce, coal, etc., being inter- 
ested in the cold storage business, and being a 
Director in the Buffalo Land Company and the 
Niagara Falls Land Company. While in Philadel- 
phia in 1880 he was interested in politics as a Ward 
Committeeman, and at Albion he was Chairman of 
the Republican County Committee in 1890. He 
has been a member of the Board of Education of 
Albion since 1900, and has been Secretary of the 
Orleans County Lincoln Club. He is a member 
and Treasurer of the First Baptist Church of Albion 
and Superintendent of its Sunday School, a Past 
Master of a Masonic Lodge, a Royal Arch Mason, 
a Knight Templar, a Thirty-second degree Mason, 
and a member of the Anthropological Society of 
Washington, District of Columbia. His address is 
Albion, Orleans County, New York. 



MEYER, Leo Theodore, 1840- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at Thorn, Prussia, 1840 ; studied in German 
schools and academies ; officer in German Army ; grad- 
uated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1876; Assistant in Faculty, University Medical College, 
1876-80; author; in practice in New York. 

LEO THEODORE MEYER, M.D., was born at 
Thorn, Prussia, on November 9, 1840, the 
son of Ernst and Johanna (Sturmer) Meyer. His 
paternal ancestors were for several generations 
officers in the Prussian Army. He attended a Latin 
School at Marienburg, and the Polytechnicum at 
Karlsruhe, and also the Kriegesschnle or Military 
School at Neisse, and at the close of his course in 
the last named passed his examination and became 
an officer in the Prussian Army. Instead of devot- 
ing himself to the service of arms, however, he came 
to America, entered the Medical College of New 
York University, and was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in March, 1876. For the 
next four years he was assistant to Professor William 
Darling and dissector in his lectures at the Univer- 
sity Medical College, and assistant, also, to Professor 
E. Mason. In February, 1880, he brought forth 



his book, " Guide to the Study of Anatomy." Since 
that time he has been successfully engaged in pri- 
vate practice, and as a medical examiner for several 
fraternal and benefit organizations and life insurance 
companies. He was married to Emilie Captuller in 
1868. His address is No. 691 East isgth Street, 
New York. 



MILLER, Franklin Pierce, 1854- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at JanesviUe, Wis., 1854; studied m public and 
private schools and New York University; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1876; in 
practice since 1876. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE MILLER, M.D., is de- 
scended from Captain John Miller, an Eng- 
lishman, who married Hannah Webb, also of English 




FRANKLIN P. MILLER 

parentage. A son of this couple, Ezra Wilson Miller, 
married Hannah Ryerson, of New Jersey, and to 
them was born Ezra Miller, father of the subject of 
this sketch. Ezra Miller's wife was his cousin, 
Amanda Jane Miller, daughter of Seth Miller and 
niece of Captain Ellis, after whom Ellis Island, New 
York, is named. Dr. Miller was born at JanesviUe, 
Wisconsin, on December 31, 1854, and from 1S65 
to 1870 attended public schools. A year in a pri- 
vate preparatory school and one in New York 



82 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



University followed, and then he entered the New 
York University Medical College. He was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1S76, and 
has since been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. He is a member of the Kings County, 
New York, Medical Society, the Brooklyn Medical 
Society, the Crescent Athletic Club of Brooklyn, 
and the Masonic Order, Thirty-second degree. He 
was married on December 3, 1878, to Lizzie Ara- 
bella Berdell, and has had two children : Theodore B. 
and Franklin P. Miller, the former of whom is de- 
ceased. Dr. Miller's address is No. 314 Stuyve- 
sant Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



MORRISON, Ephraim, 1852- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born in St. John, N. B., Canada, 1852 ; studied in 
private schools ; graduated M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1876; in practice since 1876 at 
Newton, N. J. ; Bank Director, School Trustee, and 
member of Board of Health. 

EPHRAIM MORRISON, M.D., son of Daniel 
and Margaret (Smith) Morrison, was born 
in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, on August 18, 
1852, and was educated in private schools in that 
city. He entered the Medical College of New 
York University in 1872 and was graduated in 1876 
with the Doctor's degree. During his University 
career he was a student with Dr. J. C. Morton of 
New York. In 1875 he won the first prize of Fifty 
Dollars at Bellevue Hospital for highest excellence 
in anatomy and dissection, in a contest open to all 
medical students in the City of New York. Since 
graduation he has been constantly engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Newton, New Jersey, 
where he has also been a Director of the Merchants' 
Bank, a School Trustee, and a member of the Board 
of Health. He is also a. surgeon for the Lackawanna 
Railroad. He is a member of the American Medi- 
cal Association, the Tri-County Medical Society, 
the Sussex County Medical Society, and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He was married 
in March, 1878, to Charlotte Bolten, and has two 
children : Frederic H. and Lola M. Morrison. His 
address is Newton, New Jersey. 



New York University Medical College, 1876; served in 
Bellevue and Charity hospitals ; in practice since 1876. 

HENRY SELDEN NORRIS, M.D., is de- 
scended from a family seated in Lanca- ' 
shire, England, and the North of Ireland, one of 
whose members, Nicholas Norris, came to America 
before 1663, and settled at Exeter, New Hampshire. 
From this pioneer was descended Hiram Ariel 
Norris, who was born at Waterville, Maine (then a 
Province of Massachusetts), in 1806, was a Civil 
Engineer, educated at West Point, and died in 
Brooklyn, New York, in 1853. The latter married 




NORRIS, Henry Selden, 1847- 

Classofi876Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, New York, 1847; studied in private 
schools; in business pursuits, 1864-73 ; graduated M.D. 



HENRY S. NORRIS 

Frances Henrietta Dutcher, who was born in 
Albany, New York, in 1816 and died in Brooklyn 
in i8g8. She came of a family which removed 
from Holland early in 1600 and settled at Tarry- 
town, New York, and her grandfather, William 
Dutcher, was a Captain in the American Army 
throughout the Revolutionary War. Dr. Norris, 
son of Hiram A. and Frances H. (Dutcher) Norris, 
was born in the City of Brooklyn, New York, on 
August 29, 1847. He was educated in boarding 
schools in the State of New Jersey, and was pre- 
pared to enter Princeton College. At the age of 
seventeen, however, he gave up his studies and 
entered business life. From 1864 to 1873 he 
was engaged in business pursuits. Two of the 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^83 



years he spent in the West, on the Pottawatomie 
Indian Reservation, which was then on the extreme 
frontier. At that time the Atchison, Topeka & 
Sante F6 Railroad, which now has 5000 miles of 
road, was only twenty-eight miles long. In 1873 
Dr. Norris began the study of medicine, and in 
1876 he was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine from the New York University Medical 
College. He was an Interne at Bellevue Hospital 
in 1875-77, and a Visiting Physician to the Charity 
(now City) Hospital from 1882 to 1894, when he 
resigned the place. He is a Republican in politics, 
but has held no public office. For seven years he 
served in the National Guard of New York as a 
member of the Seventh Regiment. He is a mem- 
ber of the Academy of Medicine, the New York 
County Medical Society, the Greater New York 
Medical Association, the New York State Medical 
Society, the St. Nicholas Society, the Colonial 
Order, the Century Association, and the Union, 
Players', St. Nicholas, Strollers', New York Yacht, 
and Richmond Hill Golf clubs, of New York. His 
address is No. 10 West 49th Street, New York. 



PLATZEK, Max Warley, 1854- 

Class of 1876 Law. 
Born in North Carolina, 1854 ; studied under tutors 
and in public schools in the South ; graduated LL.B., 
New York University Law School, 1876; admitted to 
practice in South Carolina, 1875, and New York, 1876; 
m practice chiefly in commercial and corporation law; 
for ten years on Examining Committee, New York 
University Law School; member of New York Con- 
stitutional Convention, 1894; leader in political, educa- 
tional and philanthropic work ; writer and lecturer ; 
LL.D., Rutherford College, N. C, 1899. 

MAX WARLEY PLATZEK, LL.B., LL.D., 
son of the late Isaac and Sarah (Wilson) 
Platzek, was born in North Carolina on August 27, 
1854. He studied under a private tutor m South 
Carolina, in a public school at Fayetteville, North 
Carolina, and in a high school in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws from the New York University Law School 
in 1876, and in the same year was admitted to 
practice at the Bar of the State of New York. He 
had already, in 1875, been admitted to the South 
Carolina Bar, and in 1899 he received from Ruther- 
ford College, North Carolina, the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Laws. Since graduation he has been 
engaged in the practice of his profession in New 
York, with marked success. His attention is de- 



voted chiefly to corporation and commercial law, 
and he makes a specialty of the trial of cases before 
juries. He is a prominent figure in the legal pro- 
fession of New York, and for ten years was a mem-_ 
ber of the Exainining Committee of the New York 
University Law School. In addition to his pro- 
fessional work, Mr. Platzek has devoted much time 
and attention to political and social matters. He is 
a Democrat, and stands high in the councils of the 
party. He was a member of the New York State 
Constitutional Convention in 1894. In 1901 he 
was a member of the committee appointed by Tani- 




M. WARLEY PLATZEK 

many Hall to investigate social vice in New York, 
and m 1902 he was a member of the Citizens' 
Committee for the prosecution of the Beef Trust. 
He has been President of the Young Men's Hebrew 
Association of New York, and of the Progress Club. 
He was one of the organizers of the Educational 
Alliance, and of the Aguilar Free Library. He is a 
Director of the Montefiore Home, a Trustee of the 
Mount Sinai Training School for Nurses, and a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Bar 
Association of New York State. He is connected 
also with the St. John's Guild, the Lebanon Hospi- 
tal, the Beth Israel Hospital, the Hebrew Orphan 
Asylum of New York, the Brooklyn Hebrew Hospital 
and Orphan Asylum, and the Society for the Pre- 



184 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



vention of Cruelty to Children. He is a member of 
the Harmonie, Progress, Jefferson, Reform, Crite- 
rion, Mohican, Democratic, and Wawayanda Boating 
and Fishing clubs, the Municipal Art League, the 
Columbian Order, and the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art. He has lectured much and written various 
essays, and a monologue " Israel and Islam." He 
lives at No. 439 Fifth Avenue, and his office is at 
No. 320 Broadway, New York. 



SPOR, George Doraphe, 1837- 

Classof 1876 Med. 
Born in Paris, France, 1837 ; studied in public schools 
at Forbach, Lorraine, 1843-49; graduated at College of 
Bitche, Lorraine, 1857; teacher in Paris, 1857-60, in 
Norwich, Conn., 1860-66, and in New York after 1867; 
graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1876 ; in practice since 1876. 

GEORGE DORAPHE SPOR, M.D., is a 
son of George and Susanne (Fritz) Spor, 
and was born in Paris, France, on March 22, 1837. 




GEO. D. SPOR 

From 1843 to 1849 he studied in public schools at 
Forbach, Lorraine, and from 1849 to 1857 in the 
College of Bitche, Lorraine. After being graduated 
in 1857 he became a teacher in Paris, from 1857 to 
i860, when he came to the United States. He was 
a teacher of ancient and modern languages in the 



Norwich, Connecticut, Free Academy from i860 to 
1866. In the latter year he returned to France for 
a short time, resigned his position there, and came 
to New York, where he taught in various schools 
from 1867 until he embraced the medical profession. 
He was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1876 from the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, which is now a part of New York 
University, and has since been engaged in practice 
in New York. He was married in 1859 to Alex- 
andrine Doraph6 Lecoindre, and has two daughters : 
Josephine and Alexandrine Spor. His address is 
No. 354 East S3rd Street, New York. 



SPRAGUE, Welcome Whipple, 1828- 1884. 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at South Sutton, Mass., 1828; educated in 
public schools; served in Civil War; member of 
Massachusetts Legislature, 1868-69; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1876; in practice 
in New York, 1876-84; died in New York, 1884. 

WELCOME WHIPPLE SPRAGUE, M.D., 
a son of Jonathan and Mary Ann (Whip- 
ple) Sprague, was descended from Edward Sprague, 
of Upway, Dorsetshire, England, who landed at 
Salem, Charlestown or Boston in 1628. Jonathan 
Sprague, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
removed from Smithfield, Massachusetts, to East 
Douglas, Massachusetts, in 1800, and his son, Jon- 
athan, father of Dr. Sprague, was born at the latter 
place, in 1801, and was married to Mary Ann 
Whipple in 1826. Welcome Whipple Sprague was 
born at South Sutton, Massachusetts, on February 9, 
1828, and was educated in the public schools of 
East Douglas and Whitinsville, Massachusetts. On 
reaching manhood he engaged in business pursuits. 
During the Civil War he served as a member of the 
Twenty-fifth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, 
as Sergeant and later in the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment. From 1868 to 1869 he represented Worcester 
County in the Massachusetts Legislature. From 
1873 to 1876 he was a student at the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, and in the latter year he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. From that 
time until the end of his life he practiced his pro- 
fession in New York City, where he was a member 
of the New York County Medical Society, the New 
York County Medical Association, and the Physi- 
cians' Mutual Aid Association. He was a Free- 
mason, and a Knight Templar, and a member of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



185 



the Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he was 1880 he received the degree of Bachelor of Phar- 

a Republican. He was married in 1850 to Mary macy from St. Louis University. For two years he 

Taft Rawson, of East Douglas, Massachusetts, and served as an Interne in St. John's Hospital, St. Louis, 

had two children, who survive him: Homer B. and in 1878 entered upon the general practice of 





W. W. SPRAGUE 



JUSTIN STEER 



(a graduate of Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
Class of 1 881) and Fred A. Sprague. He died in 
New York on March 26, 1884. 



STEER, Justin, 1849- 

Class of 1875 Med. 
Born in St. Louis, Mo., 1849; studied in public, pri- 
vate and high schools ; graduated Ph.G., St. Louis 
College of Pharmacy; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1876; in hospital practice, 
1876-78; Ph.B., St. Louis University, 1880; in private 
practice since 1878; Professor of Clinical Medicine, 
Washington University, St. Louis. 

JUSTIN STEER, M.D., Ph.B., is a son of John 
and Catherine (Heitzig) Steer, of German 
descent, and was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on 
March 21, 1849. He was educated in public and 
private schools and a high school of his native city, 
and in the St. Louis College of Pharmacy, from 
which he received the degree of Graduate in Phar- 
macy. Thence he proceeded to the Medical Col- 
lege of New York University, and was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1876. In 



his profession in that city, in which he still con- 
tinues. He is Professor of Clinical Medicine in the 
Washington University of St. Louis, Physician to 
St. Louis University, Visiting Physician to St. John's 
Hospital, and was Consulting Physician to the City 
Hospital. He is a member of the St. Louis Medical 
Society, the Missouri State Medical Society, and the 
American Medical Association, and in politics is an 
Independent. He was married on May 25, 1885, 
to Helen M. Reston of St. Louis. 



TRASK, James Bowling, 1851- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at White Plains, N. Y., 1851 ; studied at 
Quackenbos's School, New York, and Cornell Univer- 
sity; graduated M.D., New York University Medical 
College, 1876; in practice since 1876; in hospital prac- 
tice ; Commissioner of Education and President of 
Board of Education, and Water Commissioner, Long 
Island City. 

JAMES BOWLING TRASK, M.D., is a son 
of James Dowling Trask and Jane O'Farrell 
Trask, his father having been the eminent physician 



i86 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of that name whose biography is printed elsewhere 
in this volume. He was born at White Plains, New 
York, on July 12, 185 1, and studied at the well 
known school of Professor Quackenbos, in New 




WOODEN, Charles D., 1849- 

Class of 1876 Med. 
Born at Chili, N. Y., 1849; studied in district school, 
Rochester Free Academy, and Cornell University; 
medical courses at Long Island College Hospital and 
Bellevue; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, 1876; U. S. Marine Hospital Service, 1876-77; 
in general practice since 1877. 

CHARLES D. WOODEN, M.D., is a son of 
James and Sophia (Beaman) Wooden, the 
former a descendant of James Wooden, who came 
from England to Baltimore, Maryland, early in the 
Eighteenth Century, and the latter descended from 
Gamaliel Beaman, who came from England to 
Massachusetts in 1635. He was born at Chili, 
Monroe County, New York, on October 28, 1849, 
and began his studies in the district school. Later 
he was a student in the Rochester Free Academy, 
and Cornell University. His professional training 
was had as an Interne in the Rochester City Hospi- 
tal, in the Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn, 
New York, and in the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, now a part of New York University. From 
the latter he was graduated in 1876 with the degree 



JAMES D. TRASK 

York, and also for a time at Cornell University. 
He was graduated from the Medical Department 
of New York University in 1876 with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, and has ever since been en- 
gaged in practice in Long Island City, now a part 
of the Borough of Queens, New York City. He 
was an Attending Physician to the Astoria Hospital 
and an Attending Surgeon to St. John's Hospital, 
Long Island City, for ten years, and is now Con- 
sulting Surgeon to St. John's. He has also been 
Commissioner of Education, President of the Board 
of Education, and Water Commissioner, of Long 
Island City. He was President of the Queens- 
Nassau Medical Society in 1 899-1 900, and is a 
member of that Society, and of the Medical Asso- 
ciation of Greater New York, the Associated Phy- 
sicians of Long Island, the Long Island City Medical 
Society, and (Corresponding) the Kings County 
Medical Society. Dr. Trask was married on April 
19, 1888, to Julia Hartshorne, and has three chil- 
dren : Benjamin H., James D., and Robert H. 
Trask. His address is now No. 112 East 30th 
Street, New York City. 




CHARLES D. WOODEN 



of Doctor of Medicine. In 1876-77 he practiced 
in the United States Marine Hospital service, and 
since 1877 has been engaged in general private prac- 
tice in Rochester, New York. He is a member of 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



187 



the Rochester Pathological Society, the Monroe 
County Medical Society, the Flower City Driving 
Club, and the Cornell University Alumni Associa- 
tion, of Rochester. In politics he is an indepen- 
dent Republican. He was married on April 18, 
1881, to Anna R. Robinson, of Rochester, and has 
two children : Hiram and Warren Wooden. His 
address is No. 129 Frank Street, Rochester, New 
York. 



AUSTEN, David Elwell, 1841- 

Class of 1877 Law. 
Born in New York, 1841 ; studied at Swinburne Insti- 
tute, White Plains, N. Y. ; engaged in business life ; 
studied chemistry and engaged in manufacturing; 
graduated LL.B., New York University Law School, 
1877 ; admitted to the Bar ; Secretary and Treasurer 
of Mutual Trust Company ; Auditor of Accounts in 
Finance Department, New York City ; Receiver of 
Taxes, New York City; joined N. Y. National Guard, 
1859 ; served through Civil War ; Colonel of 47th Regi- 
ment, and of 13th Regiment for many years. 

DAVID ELWELL AUSTEN, LL.B., best 
known, perhaps, as Colonel of the Thir- 
teenth Regiment, of Brooklyn, New York, and as 
Receiver of Taxes of the City of New York, is a son 
of David and Mary Adeline (Elwell) Austen, and 
was born in the house occupied by his father and 
grandfather, on Bowling Green, New York, on 
February 6, 1841. His father and grandfather were 
prominent merchants of New York, and his mater- 
nal grandfather, Robert Elwell, was a well known 
ship-owner of Wiscasset, Maine. He was educated 
at the institute conducted by John Swinburne, at 
White Plains, New York, and then for three years 
was clerk in a dry-goods house. Later he studied 
chemistry, and became the manager of a large coal oil 
manufacturing company. Then, after a short term 
in the Customs Service, he entered the Law School 
of New York University, where he had as classmates 
Joseph S. Auerbach, John C. Tomlinson, and Isaac 
FrankUn Russell. He was graduated a Bachelor of 
Laws in 1877, and was admitted to the Bar, but 
instead of pursuing his profession he engaged in 
business as Secretary and Treasurer of the Mutual 
Trust Company of Brooklyn, New York. Later he 
became an Auditor of Accounts in the office of the 
Comptroller of the City of New York, and finally 
was appointed Receiver of Taxes for the city, an 
important office which he filled with admirable suc- 
cess. Colonel Austen's long military service began 
in 1859, when he became a member of the Seventh 
Regiment, of New York. He went to the front in 



1 86 1 and served through the Civil War. After the 
war he organized a company for the Forty-seventh 
Regiment, of Brooklyn, and in 1868 was commis- 
sioned Colonel of that regiment, being only twenty- 
seven years old and the youngest Colonel in the 
state. He remained Colonel of the Forty-seventh 
until 1877, when he was elected Colonel of the 
Thirteenth Regiment of Brooklyn, and thus served 
for six years. He was recalled to the Colonelcy of 
the Thirteenth in 1877, and filled the place until 
1895. When he then resigned he had been in the 
service thirty-six years, and had been Colonel for 
twenty-eight years. During his Colonelcy of the 
Thirteenth Regiment he was engaged with that com- 
mand in the suppression of several grave riots, in 
Brooklyn, in Buffalo, and at Babylon and Fire Island, 
Long Island, and showed himself a particularly com- 
petent and efficient officer. He was also chiefly 
instrumental in securing the erection of the fine new 
armory of the regiment. In politics Colonel Austen 
is a Democrat and a member of the Tammany 
Society. He is also a member of the Democratic 
Club, the Atlantic Yacht Club, and other or- 
ganizations. 



CARPENTER, Walton Jay, 1852- 

Class of 1877 Med, 
Born at Duanesburg, N. Y., 1852; studied in public 
schools, Delaware Literary Institute, and Union Col- 
lege; graduated M.D., New York University Medical 
College, 1877; private pupil of Dr. Loomis, 1877-78; 
in practice at Katonah, N. Y.; member of Katonah 
Board of Health and President of Board of Education. 

WALTON JAY CARPENTER, M.D., a prom- 
inent physician of Katonah, Westchester 
County, New York, is a son of Charles D. and Rachel 
M. (White) Carpenter, of English and Welsh descent, 
and was born at Duanesburg, Schenectady County, 
New York, on September 11, 1852. He studied in 
the local public schools, in the Delaware Literary 
Institute, Delaware County, New York, and at 
Union College, Schenectady, New York. From the 
latter he came to the Medical College of New York 
University, completed its three years' course, and 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1877. For a year thereafter he attended a 
special course of lectures at the University and was 
a private pupil of Dr. A. L. Loomis. Since gradu- 
ation he has been in constant and highly successful 
practice at Katonah, New York, with an extensive 
clientage in various other villages in that part of 
Westchester and Putnam counties, and he has at- 



i88 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



tained distinction by his achievements in difficult 
surgical cases. He has been a member of the 
Katonah Board of Health for twenty-two years, and 
of the Board of Education for five years, and has 
been for two years President of the latter. He is a 
member of the New York University Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the Westchester County, New York State 
and American Medical associations, and the Ma- 
sonic Order including the Knights Templar and the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was married on 
April 30, 1883, to Anna L. Green, who died in 




W. J. CARPENTER 

1896, and in 1900 he was again married to Mrs. 
Ella H. Dean. He has one child, Walton T. 
Carpenter. 



CHILD, Edward Moses, 185 1- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born at Woodstock, Conn., 1851 ; studied at Wood- 
stock Academy; studied in Yale Scientific Department 
with Class of 1874; studied in Yale Medical School; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1877; served in Brooklyn City Hospital, 1877-78; 
in practice since 1878. 

EDWARD MOSES CHILD, M.D., of Brook- 
lyn, New York, is a native of the beautiful 
and historic Village of Woodstock, Connecticut, 
where he was born on August 24, 1851, the son of 
A. T. and Roxana (Lyon) Child. His paternal 



ancestors, or some of them, were prominent in the 
Revolution, Captain Willard Child having assisted 
in constructing the fortifications of Boston. His 
maternal ancestors, the Lyons, were also in the 
Revolution. They settled in Woodstock, from Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts, in the latter part of the Seven- 
teenth Century. Dr. Child lived on a farm in his 
youth, and worked on it during his school vacations. 
He was prepared for college at the Woodstock 
Academy, from which he was graduated in 1870, 
and thence went to Yale College, where he pursued 
a course in the Scientific School with the Class of 
1S74. In 1874-75 he took a one year's course in 
the Yale Medical School, and then came to New 
York University and entered its Medical College. 
He was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1877, and for the year following served 
in the Brooklyn City Hospital. He then, in 1878, 
began general practice in Meriden, Connecticut, and 
remained there until 1886, when ill health com- 
pelled him to remove to a rural region in Wyoming 
County, New York. There he remained until 1896, 
when, with health restored, he returned to New York 
City and pursued a course in the Post-Graduate 
Medical School and Hospital, after which he es- 
tablished himself in practice in Brooklyn, where he 
still remains. He is a Mason, and an Odd Fellow, 
and a member of the Connecticut, the New Haven 
(Connecticut) County, the Massachusetts, the 
Hampshire (Massachusetts) County, the Wyoming 
(New York) County, and the Kings (New York) 
County Medical societies. He was married in 1889 
to Carrie Nichols, of Albany, New York, and has 
one child, Bradley Lyon Child. His address is 
No. I Revere Place, Brooklyn, New York. 



CONKLIN, Douglas, 1855- 

Class of 1877 Sci. 
Born at Huntington, N. Y., 1855; graduated B.S. 
and C.E., New York University, 1877; LL.B., Albany 
Law School of Union College, 1880 ; lawyer ; banker 
since 1888. 

DOUGLAS CONKLIN, B.S., C.E., LL.B., is 
a son of Jonas P. and Hannah (Douglas) 
Conklin, and was born at Huntington, Long Island, 
New York, on July 15, 1855. In New York Uni- 
versity he was a member of Psi Upsilon. He pur- 
sued the scientific course, and was graduated with 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Civil 
Engineer in 1877. Thence he proceeded to the 
Albany Law School, the Law Department of Union 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



189 



College, and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1880. Since that time he has 
been prominently identified with his native town. 
He has been Town Clerk of Huntington, School 
Commissioner for six years (1881-1887) and 
Cashier of the Bank of Huntington since 1888. He 
was married on July 15, 1882, to Bertha Underbill, 
daughter of Alfred Underbill, and has had two 



in Pennsylvania, and was graduated from it in 1873. 
Four years later, in 1877, he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine from the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, and since that date has been engaged in 
the practice of his profession. He is a member and 
President of the Lackawanna (Pennsylvania) County 
Medical Society, a member of the Pennsylvania 





DOUGLAS CONKLIN 



A. J, CONNELL 



children : Eva Douglas, who died at the age of 
four years, and Hadley J. Conklin, who died at the 
age of eight years. 



CONNELL, Alexander James, 1856- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born at Scranton, Pa., 1856; graduated at ^Wyoming 
Seminary; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Med- 
ical College, 1877 ; in practice since 1877. 

ALEXANDER JAMES CONNELL, M.D., of 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, was born in that 
city on September 18, 1856, the son of James and 
Jessie May (English) Connell. His paternal grand- 
father was born in Scotland, and was married to a 
Miss Melvin in Nova Scotia. James Connell came 
to this country in boyhood, settled in Pennsylvania, 
and became a successful coal operator. Alexander 
James Connell was educated at Wyoming Seminary, 



State Medical Society, and of the American Medical 
Association. He is Consulting Surgeon to the Moses 
Taylor Hospital, Scranton, and Chief of the State 
Hospital of the Northern Anthracite Coal Region of 
Pennsylvania, and a Trustee of the State Hospital 
for the Insane at Danville, Pennsylvania. Dr. Con- 
nell was married in 1878 to Fanny N. Horton, and 
has two children : Edgar W. and Margaret E. Con- 
nell. His address is Scranton, Pennsylvania. 



DARLINGTON, James Henry, 1856- 

Class of 1877 Arts. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1856 ; studied at Newark 
High School ; graduated A.B., New York University, 
1877; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1880; Ph.D. 
from Princeton for post-graduate course; assistant min- 
ister of Christ Church, Protestant Episcopal, Brooklyn, 
1881-82; rector since 1882; Chaplain of the Forty- 
seventh Regiment of the National Guard of New York, 



igo 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



If 91-98; Archdeacon of Northern Brooklyn, 1895-98; 
author of various publications. 

JAMES HENRY DARLINGTON, Ph.D., who 
was one of the brilhant young men who gave 
distinction to the student body of New York Uni- 
versity in the later years of Howard Crosby's 
Chancellorship, comes of New England colonial 
ancestry on the side of his father, Thomas Darling- 
ton, who was an attorney and counselor at law, and 
of direct English ancestry on the side of his mother, 
whose maiden name was Hannah Anne Goodliffe. 
One of his ancestors was Deputy Governor of Mas- 




social and religious organizations generally. On 
leaving the University he went to Princeton and 
pursued a three years' course in the Theological 
Seminary, being graduated in 1880. He received 
from Princeton University the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in recognition of his work in that post- 
graduate course. Returning to Brooklyn, he be- 
came in 1881 assistant minister of Christ Church, 
the largest and most influential Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the Williamsburg district of the city. In 
1882 he became rector of that church, and has 
continued to fill that place with distinguished suc- 
cess down to the present time. From 1891 to 1898 
he was Chaplain of the Forty-seventh Regiment of 
the National Guard of New York, one of the best 
Brooklyn Regiments, and from May, 1895, to May, 
1898, he was Archdeacon of Northern Brooklyn. 
Among his published works may be mentioned : 
" The Hymnal of the Church," a volume of verses 
for children, and a number of special sermons and 
occasional addresses. He is a member of the 
Society of Colonial Wars, the St. Nicholas Society, 
the Hanover Club of Brooklyn, the Huguenot 
Society, the Amphion Musical Society, the Prince- 
ton Club, and the American Academy of Sciences. 
He was married in the Cathedral of the Incarna- 
tion, at Garden City, on July 26, 1888, to Ella 
Louise Beams, daughter of James Sterling Beams, 
and has six children : Harry Vane, Alfred William, 
Gilbert Bancroft, Eleanor Townsend, Elliott Chris- 
topher, and Kate Brampton Darlington. He lives 
in the winter in the Christ Church rectory, Brook- 
lyn, and in summer at Old Field Manor, Old Field 
Point, Setauket, Long Island. . 



JAMES HENRY DARLINGTON 



sachusetts in colonial times, one fought in King 
Philip's War, and seven fought in the Revolution. 
Dr. Darlington was born in Brooklyn, New York, 
on June 9, 1856, and was prepared for college 
in a four years' course in the High School of 
Newark, New Jersey. In 1873 he entered New 
York University, School of Arts, and after a brilhant 
career was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1877, with a double first honor at 
Commencement, being appointed by the Faculty as 
the University representative to the Intercollegiate 
Competitive Examinations in two departments, viz., 
Essay Writing and Mental Philosophy. During his 
college course he was a leading member of the Psi 
Upsilon Fraternity, of the University choir, and of 



GATES, Henry Augustine, 1849- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born at Treadwell, N. Y., 1849; studied at Delaware 
Literary Institute ; taught in district schools ; gradu- 
ated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1877; 
in practice since 1877. 

HENRY AUGUSTINE GATES, M.D., son 
of William H. and Maryette (Strong) 
Gates, was born at Treadwell, Delaware County, 
New York, on December 9, 1849, and was educated 
at the Delaware Literary Institute at Franklin, New 
York. Some years thereafter were spent on a farm, 
and in teaching in the public schools. Finally he 
entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
which is now a part of New York University, and 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



191 



cine in 1877, since which date he has been con- 
stantly engaged in practice, paying special attention 
to diseases of the eye and ear and to operations for 
appendicitis. He was Coroner of Delaware County, 




HENRY A. GATES 

New York, for three years, and Examiner for 
Pensions for eight years. He is a member of the 
New York State and the Delaware County Medical 
societies, and President of the latter. In politics he 
is a Republican. He was married in 1880 to Jennet 
C. Heutson, and lives at Delhi, New York. 



GLASS, James H., 1854- 

Class of 1877 Med. 

Born at Mohawk, N. Y., 1854; studied in public 
schools and University of Michigan; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1877; in practice 
since 1877, with extensive hospital work. 

JAMES H. GLASS, M.D., was born on June 15, 
1854, at Mohawk, New York, the son of 
Robert and Emily Merrell Glass, and a descendant 
of the Rev. John Glass, a distinguished divine of Eng- 
land in the Eighteenth Century, and of Governor 
John Webster of Connecticut, an original proprietor 
in Hartford in 1626. His early education was ac- 
quired in the public schools and through private 
instructors until 1872, when he entered the Univer- 



sity of Michigan. In 1874 he entered the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College and was graduated from 
that institution, which is now a part of New York 
University, in the spring of 1877, with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. Beginning the practice of 
his profession at Watkins, New York, he removed 
to Utica, New York, in 1880, where he continued 
in general practice for a number of years with much 
success. In 1893 he was appointed Surgeon in 
Charge of Faxton Hospital in Utica and has re- 
tained that place ever since, devoting his attention 
exclusively to the practice of surgery. The recent 
construction, at that hospital, of the Fox-Hayward 
Surgery, the Florence Nightingale Home, and School 
for Nurses, together with the enviable reputation 
which the institution has acquired may be taken as 
substantial evidence of the energy and skill which 
have marked his administration. Dr. Glass was 
from 1882 to i8go Attending Surgeon at St. Luke's 
Hospital, Utica ; from 1886 to 1891 Physician and 
Surgeon in Charge of the Utica City Hospital ; from 
1888 to 1891 Assistant Surgeon in the National 
Guard, and from 1890 to 1895 Attending Surgeon 




JAMES H. GLASS 

at St. Elizabeth's Hospital. He has been Consulting 
Surgeon to the Utica City Dispensary since 1883, 
and Surgeon for the New York Central and Hudson 
River Railroad since 1896. He is a member of the 



192 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



American Medical Association, the New York State 
Medical Society, the National Association of Railway 
Surgeons, and an honorary member of the medical 
societies of Schuyler, Jefferson and Montgomery 
counties. He was married on May 31, 18S2, to 
Anna Wells, daughter of the late Hon. John and 
Margaret Stewart Wells of Johnstown, New York. 



HOCHHEIMER, Emanuel, 1854- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born at Olive, N. Y., 1854; studied in New York 
public schools; graduated A.B. and B.S., College of 
City of New York, 1872; A.M., 1877; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1877; in service 
at Bellevu'e Hospital, 1877-79 ; in practice since 1879. 

EMANUEL HOCHHEIMER, A.M., M.D., son 
of Joseph and Miriam (Strauss) Hochheimer, 
was born at Olive, Ulster County, New York, on 




E. HOCHHEIMER 

December 9, 1854, and received his early education 
in the public schools of New York City. He pur- 
sued a course in the College of the City of New 
York, and was graduated therefrom with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in 1872. 
Five years later he was graduated a Doctor of Medi- 
cine from the New York University Medical College 
and in the same year received the degree of Master 
of Arts. In 1877-79 he was a member of the 



House Staff of Bellevue Hospital, and since then 
has been in practice at No. 131 1 Madison Avenue, 
New York. He was married on May 19, 1880, to 
Sophia Gans, and has four children : Bertha, Helen, 
Rita, and Lawrence Hochheimer. 



JOHNSON, Marcus Morton, 1844- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born at Malone, N. Y., 1844; studied at Franklin 
Academy; graduated Ph.B., Brown University, 1870; 
Instructor in the Connecticut Literary Institute, Suf- 
field, Conn., 1870-75; graduated M D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1877 ; studied in London, 
Vienna and Berlin; in practice at Hartford, Conn., 
since 1880; author of numerous papers; Founder of 
Woodland Sanatorium, Hartford, Conn. 

MARCUS MORTON JOHNSON, Ph.B., 
M.D., Founder of the Woodland Sana- 
torium at Hartford, Connecticut, and one of the 
foremost physicians of that city and state, is de- 
scended from Sir John Johnson, an English sea- 
captain, who settled in Connecticut, and whose son, 
John Johnson, Jr., married Mehitabel Sperry and 
settled at Rutland, Vermont. Silas Johnson, son of 
the latter couple, settled at Malone, New York, as 
one of the pioneers of that place, and had a son, 
Marvin L. Johnson. The last named married Polly 
Chapman, and was the father of the subject of this 
sketch. The Chapmans trace their descent from a 
Dean of Canterbury, England, through some of the 
earliest settlers of Norwich, Connecticut. Joshua 
Chapman, of Norwich, was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. His son, Joshua Chapman, Jr., settled 
at Malone, New York, and was the father of Polly 
Chapman, mother of Dr. Johnson. The Johnson 
and Chapman families have both for many genera- 
tions been noted for longevity, as well as for high 
intellectual and moral qualities. Marcus Morton 
Johnson was born at Malone, New York, on April 
21, 1844, and was prepared for college at Franklin 
Academy, at Malone. Thence he went to Brown 
University, Providence, Rhode Island, and was 
graduated from it in 1870 with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Philosophy. For the next five years he was 
Instructor in Mathematics and the Sciences in the 
Connecticut Literary Institution, at Suffield, Connecti- 
cut, an institution vi'ith which he is still connected in 
an official capacity. He entered the Medical College 
of New York University in 1875 and in 1877 was 
graduated a Doctor of Medicine, receiving the 
Valentine Mott gold medal, the highest prize for 
excellence of work in anatomy and dissections. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



193 



During the next year he was House Surgeon in the 
Hartford, Connecticut, Hospital. Then he went to 
Europe for two years of study and hospital work, 
and received instruction from Thomas Keith in 
Edinburgh, Joseph Lister in London, Billroth in 
Vienna, and Martin and Von Langenbeck in Berlin. 
Li 1880 he returned home and settled in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, where he has since remained. 
His practice has been general in character, though 
he has largely devoted himself to advanced surgical 
work. Two years after his settlement in Hartford, 
in 1882, that city was visited by an epidemic of 




MARCUS M. JOHNSON 

diphtheria, and Dr. Johnson distinguished himself 
by his highly successful introduction of the bi-chlo- 
ride of mercury treatment. His studies under Sir 
Joseph Lister having impressed him with the im- 
portance of sanitary and antiseptic surroundings for 
the sick, Dr. Johnson erected at No. 122 Woodland 
Street, Hartford, the fine sanatorium of which he has 
for some years been the proprietor ; an institution 
admirably designed and equipped for the care of 
patients, especially of those needing surgical treat- 
ment. As an operating surgeon Dr. Johnson has 
been notably successful. He has performed hun- 
dreds of abdominal sections, with a high percentage 
of recoveries. On July 29, 1899, at St. Francis's 
Hospital, Hartford, he performed a remarkable 
VOL. II. — 13 



operation for strangulated inguinal hernia, the strang- 
ulation having existed for thirty-five hours, and the 
patient being a child nineteen days old who had 
been born prematurely and weighed only five pounds 
at birth. The result was a complete recovery. 
Among the papers prepared and read by Dr. John- 
son before professional societies may be mentioned : 
" Diphtheria, Its History, Etiology and Treatment," 
Connecticut State Medical Society, May 26, 1892 ; 
" The Technique of Removing the Vermiform Ap- 
•pendix, with a Report of One Hundred Consecutive 
Cases, with Two Deaths," American Medical As- 
sociation, May, 1896; "Treatment of Pus Cases in 
Operating for Appendicitis," Connecticut State 
Medical Society, 1897; "Ventral Hernia after Ap- 
pendicitomy," American Medical Association, June, 
1898 ; " History of the First Twenty-three Cases of 
Gastrotomy, with a Successful Case by the Writer," 
Connecticut State Medical Society, 1899 ; " Report 
on the Progress of Surgery," ditto, 1899 ; "Etiology 
of Hernia of the Ovary, with the Relation of Two 
Cases," Hartford Medical Society, 1899 ; " Gastrot- 
omy," and " Improved Technique for Cure of 
Ventral Hernia," American Medical Association, 
1900 ; " History and Treatment of a Unique Injury 
of the Face," Connecticut State Medical Society, 
1900. Dr. Johnson is a member of the American 
Medical Association, of the American Electro-Ther- 
apeutic Association, and of the Connecticut State, 
Hartford County, and Hartford City Medical so- 
cieties, a Fellow of the New York Academy of 
Medicine, a Surgeon to St. Francis's Hospital, Hart- 
ford, and to the First Company of Governor's Foot 
Guards, Connecticut, and a member of the Con- 
necticut Society of Sons of the American Revolution 
and of the Masonic Order of Knights Templar. 
He was married on February 14, 1884, to Mrs. 
Helen Lyman Jackson, and has two children : 
Helen Gaylord and Ethel Chapman Johnson. 



KAMPING, John Adolphus, 1842- 

Class of 1877 Law. 
Born in Hanover, Germany, 1842; studied in public 
schools of Cincinnati, Ohio ; Principal of public school 
in Cincinnati ; served in army in Civil War ; in busi- 
ness in New York, 1866-75; graduated LL.B., New 
York University Law School, 1877; in practice since 
1877. 

JOHN ADOLPHUS KAMPING, LL.B., son of 
Frederick William and Clara Catherine (Sol- 
man) Kamping, was born in Hanover, Germany, 
on March 29, 1842, and was brought to this coun- 



194 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



try in early life. He received his education in the 
City of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the public schools, 
Hughes High School, and night high school. He 
became a teacher and in 1861 Principal of the pub- 
lic school in the Third District of that city. In 
1 866 he removed to New York and followed the 
business of importing Italian wines and other prod- 
ucts. Finally he decided to engage in legal 
practice, and accordingly entered the New York 
University Law School, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1877. Since that date he has been in 
active practice, devoting his attention chiefly to 




JOHN A. KAMPING 

corporation and real estate work. Mr. Kamping's 
career as a teacher in Cincinnati was interrupted by 
the Civil War, when, in 1864, he became a private 
in Company E (the Teachers' Company) of the 
One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Ohio Volunteers, 
and went to serve in the campaign around Richmond 
until October, 1864, when his regiment was mus- 
tered out and he returned to his school duties. 
Since settling in New York he has paid much atten- 
tion to musical matters, and from 1870 to 1878 was 
Secretary of the New York Vocal Society, and in 
1890-91 was Vice-President of the Music Club of 
New York, of which Anton Seidl was President. 
He is a member of the Society of Medical Juris- 
prudence, the New York University Law School 



Alumni, the Music Club, the Manhattan Chess Club, 
and the Lafayette Post of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. In politics he is a Republican. He was 
married in 1863 to Cornelia Reynolds, whose mother, 
Julia A. Reynolds, was a sister of William Dennison, 
the famous " War Governor " of Ohio and also Post- 
master-General of the United States in President 
Lincoln's Cabinet. His address is No. 21 West 
83rd Street, New York. 



KENNEY, William Francis, 1854- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1854; studied in public 
schools in Hartford, Conn., and Georgetown Univer- 
sity; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hosijital Medical Col- 
lege, 1877 ; in practice since 1877 in Providence, R. I.; 
ex-member Providence Common Council; ex-surgeon 
R. I. National Guard.- 

WILLIAM FRANCIS KENNEY, M.D., was 
born in Brooklyn, New York, on February 
19, 1854, the son of Francis W. and Margaret M. 
(Daley) Kenney. His father came to this country 
from Ireland in 1834, and for forty-five years was 
engaged in the tin, sheet iron and copper trade at 
Hartford, Connecticut. He was the inventor of 
several labor-saving machines. Dr. Kenney studied 
in the public schools of Hartford, and in George- 
town University, District of Columbia. Later he 
pursued a course in the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, now a part of New York University, and 
was graduated from it with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine and with class honors in 1877. In 1876- 
77 he acted as a substitute House Surgeon at the 
Bellevue and Charity hospitals, in New York, and 
then, on April i, 1877, established himself in pri- 
vate practice in Providence, Rhode Island, where 
he has ever since remained. He was appointed Sur- 
geon of the Fifth Battalion of Infantry, Rhode Island 
National Guard, in 1879, and filled the place for 
three years. In 1885-86, and again in 1895-96, 
he was a member of the Common Council from the 
Third Ward of Providence, being elected as a Demo- 
crat. He was Surgeon of Court Canonicus, Ancient 
Order of Foresters, in 1889-93 \ Medical Examiner 
of Court Roger Williams, Ancient Order of Foresters 
of America, 1893-95 ; Supreme Surgeon-General of 
Supreme Conclave K. S. F. of the World, 1893- 
95 ; is Medical Examiner of St. George Lodge, 
No. 14, Knights of Pythias, and of Endowment 
Rank, Section 81, Knights of Pythias; Past Com- 
mander of Knights of the Mystic Chain, a member 
of the Select Castle of that order and of the Rhode 
Island Medical Society, the Westminster Lodge of 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



195 



Odd Fellows, and of the Wolf Tone Literary Asso- 
ciation and a Fellow of the Georgetown Alumni 
Association and the Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege. Dr. Kenney is often called in court as an 
expert on medico-legal questions. He was mar- 
ried on July 17, 1876, to Elizabeth M. A. Murray, 
and has nine children : Maud A. E., Blanche M., 
William F., Stephen C, Francis J., Margaret M., 




WILLIAM F. KENNEY 

David A., Elizabeth and W. Warwick Kenney. 
The two first named are graduates of Tufts Dental 
College. 

MacCAULEY, Hugh Boumonville, 1856- 

Class of 1877 Arts. 
Born in Philadelphia, 1856 ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1877 ; Union Theological Seminary, 
1877-81 ; minister of Presbyterian Church since 1881. 

HUGH BOURNONVILLE MacCAULEY, 
A.B., is a son of Hugh Beard MacCauley, 
whose ancestors came from Elkton, Cecil County, 
Maryland, and Eugenia Abadie (Boumonville) Mac- 
Cauley, whose father and mother came from France. 
He was born in Philadelphia on November 16, 
1856. In New York University he ranked high as 
a student. He was Secretary of Philomathean, 
President of Eucleian, University Representative 
in the Intercollegiate Literary Association in 1876- 
77, Regent of the Association in 1877, and Secre- 



tary of it in 1877-80. He was a Junior orator and 
Commencement orator, a prominent member of 
Psi Upsilon and one year on its Executive Council, 
and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He was gradu- 
ated from the University with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1877, and thence went to the Union 
Theological Seminary in New York, from which he 
was graduated in i88i with high rank. On June 17, 
1881, he was ordained a minister of the Presby- 
terian Church, and has since devoted his life to that 
work. He was pastor at Hackensack, New Jersey, 
in 1881-82 ; at Bound Brook, New Jersey, in 1883- 
90 ; at Fifth Avenue Church, Newark, New Jersey, 
1890-96; at Freehold, New Jersey, 1896-1900, 
and since April i, 1900, he has been Pastor of the 
Fourth Church of Trenton, New Jersey. He has 
published two sermons entitled, " Ebenezer the 
Stone of Help " and " The Weaver ; " also historical 
pamphlets entitled, "The Westminster Standards, 
Their History, Contents and Influence," and "The 
Old Scots Memorial near Freehold," besides many 
articles on Sunday School work and young people's 
societies. He was married on May 17, 1881, to 
Sarah Lavinia Harvey, daughter of the Rev. Francis 
Baker Harvey, of Oxford, Pennsylvania, and has 
three children : Harvey, Eugenia, and Morris Baker 
MacCauley. His home is at No. 19 North Clinton 
Avenue, Trenton, New Jersey. 



MAYER, Emil, 1854- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born in New York City, 1854; studied in New York 
College of Pharmacy; graduated M.D., New York 
University, 1877 ; surgeon and specialist ; Assistant 
Surgeon Throat Department New York Eye and Ear 
Infirmary, 1880-93, arid Surgeon latter year to present 
time ; prominently identified with various medical 
bodies ; editor and author of recognized ability. 

EMIL MAYER, M.D., was born in New York 
City on May 23, 1854, the son of David 
and Henrietta (Rosenbaum) Mayer. His parents, 
who were married in New York on December 3, 
1849, were natives of Germany. His father was 
born in Staudernheim, Prussia, in December, 1819, 
son of Emanuel and Belle Mayer, and his mother 
was born in Kips, Bavaria, on October 8, 1827, 
daughter of Gabriel and Jetta Rosenbaum. Early 
in life David Mayer went to Paris and thence 
emigrated to the United States in 1848, settling in 
New York City, where he became a prosperous 
merchant. He "retired from business some years 
ago and is now residing in Lincoln, Nebraska. 
David and Henrietta Mayer reared a family of five 



196 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



sons and four daughters, all of whom are living 
except one daughter. Dr. Mayer's mother died in 
Lincoln on January 8, 1896. Erail Mayer attended 
public and private schools in New York City, and 
was a student at the College of the City of New 
York, which he left during the Sophomore year to 
enter the New York College of Pharmacy. He was 
graduated in 1873, and was for the succeeding two 
years employed as Apothecary at the Blackwell's 
Island Insane .Asylum. Meanwhile taking up the 
study of medicine, he was graduated from the Med- 
ical Department of New York University in 1877^ 




EMIL MAYER 

Prior to graduating he served for some time as 
House Physician at the Epileptic and Paralytic 
Hospital, and after completing his professional prep- 
arations he engaged in the practice of medicine in 
the metropolis, subsequently, in 1892, giving his par- 
ticular attention to the treatment of diseases of the 
ear, nose and throat. For thirteen years from 1880 
he was Assistant Surgeon to the Tliroat Department 
of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and in 
1893 he was advanced to the post of Surgeon, in 
which capacity he is still serving. Dr. Mayer is a 
Fellow of the American Medical Association, and 
was Chairman of its Section on Laryngology and 
Otology in 1898-99 ; of the American Laryngo- 
iogical Association ; of the New York Academy of 



Medicine, and now Chairman of its Section on 
Laryngology ; of the New York State Medical Asso- 
ciation and President of its Fifth District Branch 
in 1901 ; ex-officio Vice-President for the years 
1901-02 and member of the House of Delegates 
of the American Medical Association for 1902-04. 
He is a member of the Harlem, German, Metro- 
politan, Manhattan and New York County Medical 
societies, and the New York Physicians' Mutual 
Aid Association. His contributions to American 
literature are numerous and among the more notable 
are : " Congenital Stricture of the Esophagus, with 
Report of a Case" (American Journal of the .Amer- 
ican Sciences, November, 1893) ; " The Treatment, 
of Follicular Pharyngitis, with Report of Cases 
Operated upon by the Pharyngeal Curette " (New 
York Eye and Ear Infirmary Reports, January, 
1894); "Primary Lupus of the Larynx" (New 
York Medical Journal, January i, 1898) ; "Catarrh 
of the Upper Air Passages" (New York Medical 
Examiner, November, 1892); "The Asch Opera- 
tion for the Deviations of the Cartilaginous Nasal 
Septum, with Report of Two Hundred Operations " 
(Medical Record, February 5, 1898); "The 
Tonsils as Portals of Infection " (Journal of the 
American Medical Association, December 2, 1899) ; 
" Recrudescing Angina due to Friedlander's Bacil- 
lus" (New York Medical Journal, December 22, 
1900); "Anginen Durch Den Friedland' Schen 
Bacillus" (Archiv. f. Laryngologie, 11 Bd. 2 Heft) ; 
"Bacillus and Spirillum of Vincent" (American 
Journal of the American Sciences, February, 
1902); article on "Neuroses of the Upper Air 
Passages in Diseases of the Nose and Throat," 
edited by Jonathan \Vright (Lea & Co.) ; and he 
is the American Editor of the " Internationales 
Centralblatt flir Laryngologie," Sir Felix Seraon, 
London, Editor-in-Chief. He is the originator of 
splints used in the " Asch Operation," known as 
Mayer's Tubes, and a new curette for the cure of 
Follicular Pharyngitis. In April, 1883, he was 
married to Louise Blume. They have no children. 



McGUIRE, Francis Augustine, 1851- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born in New York, 1851 ; studied at De La Salle 
Institute, and Manhattan College; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1877; in prac- 
tice in New York since 1877. 

FRANCIS AUGUSTINE McGUIRE, M.D., 
son of James, a flour merchant of New York 
City, and Catherine Ann (Thomas) McGuire, is of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



igy 



Irish ancestry on the paternal side, and American 
and Welsh on the maternal. Daniel Joshua Thomas, 
his grandfather on the maternal side, was born in 
Carnarvon, Wales, and was a soldier in the artillery 




FRANK A. MCGUIRE 

of the War of 1S12 on the American side. He 
was born in New York City on July i, 1851, 
and was educated at the De La Salle Institute, 
and Manhattan College. In 1877 he was grad- 
uated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
the New York University Medical College, and 
has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
in New York City ever since. He is a Visiting 
Physician of the Department of Correction, of the 
Borough of Manhattan. He is a member of the 
Celtic Medical Society, and was its President in 
1894 and 1895, ^iid of the Metropolitan Medical 
Society, of which he was President in 1891. He 
is also a member of the New York County Med- 
ical Association, the New York State Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, 
and the Society of Medical Jurisprudence. He 
was married on August 16, 1873, to Emma Louise 
Denmark, a daughter of Alexander Denmark, and 
has five children : Emma F., James Alexander, 
Harriet L., L. Marion, and Gertrude E. McGuire. 
He resides at No. 124 East 55th Street, New 
York, 



MORGENTHAU, Maximilian, 1847- 

Class of 1877 Law. 
Born in Manheim, Germany, 1847; studied in Grand 
Ducal Lyceum, Manheim; graduated LL.B., New 
York University Lav/ Department, 1877 ; admitted to 
Bar, 1877; dry goods business, 1878-97; real estate 
business since 1897; President of Hudson Realty 
Company. 

MAXIMILIAN MORGENTHAU, LL.B., son 
of Lazarus and Babette (Guggenheim) 
Morgenthau, was born in the stately old City of 
Manheim, in the Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany, 
on October 23, 1847. His academic education was 
acquired in the Grand Ducal Lyceum of Manheim, 
an institution equal in scholastic rank to an Ameri- 
can college, and then, at the age of eighteen years, 
in 1865, he came to the United States. After some 
years in business pursuits he entered the Law School 
of New York University for a professional training, 
and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws on May 15, 1877. In the following month 
he was admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court of 
New York. Instead of practicing his profession, 
however, he re-entered mercantile pursuits, and 




MAXIMILIAN MORGENTHAU 



from 1878 to 1897 was at the head of the retail dry 
goods firm of Morgenthau, Bauland & Co., doing 
business chiefly in Chicago. Since 1897 he has 
been successfully engaged in the real estate business 



»8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in New York City, and is now President of the 
Hudson Realty Company, a corporation organized 
under the laws of New York with a capital of 
^1,000,000. For more than twenty-five years he 
has been strongly identified with the Republican 
party, and has been much interested in the move- 
ment for reform in the city administration. He is a 
Past High Priest of King Solomon Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, and a member of the Society for 
Ethical Culture, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
the German Society, and other organizations. He 
was married on July 10, 1872, to Fannie Ehrich, 
and has seven children : Mrs. Alice M. Strauss, 
Adele M., Minna J., Beatrice F., Dorothy R., Maxi- 
milian, and William Whitall Morgenthau. His office 
is at Nos. 135-137 Broadway, and his home at No. 
248 West 103rd Street, New York. 



RHODES, Charles Alexander, 1855- 

Class of 1877 Sci., 1884 Med. 
Born in New York, 1855 ; educated in private schools 
and Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute; graduated B.S., 
New York University, 1877, and M.S., 1882 ; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1884; 
served in Bellevue and St. Francis's hospitals ; in 
practice since 1885 ; connected with various hospitals ; 
author of " Diseases of Children," 1892. 

CHARLES ALEXANDER RHODES, M.S., 
M.D., is paternally descended from Zacha- 
riah Rhodes, who landed at Plymouth in 1634, and 
from Roger Williams, Dr. John Greene, William 
Arnold, John Lippitt, and Richard Waterman, 
founders of Providence, Rhode Island. On the 
maternal side he is descended from Herman Schune- 
man, who arrived in New York in 1708, and from 
Jonas Bronk, Martin Gerritsen Van Bergen, Kilian 
Van Renssalaer, Wauter Van Twiller, John A. Wit- 
beck, and John Finch, of New York, Albany, and 
Catskill. He is a son of Charles Fox Rhodes and 
Cornelia Henrietta (Schuneman) Rhodes, and was 
born in New York City on December 30, 1855. 
His early education was acquired in private schools 
in Brooklyn, and he was prepared for college in 
the Brooklyn Polytechnic and Collegiate Institute. 
In New York University, which he entered in .1873, 
he pursued the scientific course, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science in T877. In 
1882 he received the Master's degree in Science, 
and in 1884 he was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from the University Medical 
College. For a year thereafter he served in Belle- 
vue and St. Francis's hospitals, and then in 1885 



began the general practice of medicine, in which he 
has since continued. He was Clinical Assistant in 
diseases of children at the New York Polyclinic in 
1888-89, Attending Physician in diseases of chil- 
dren at the De Milt Dispensary in 1889-95, I'^- 
structor in diseases of children at the New York 
Post-Graduate Medical School in 1890-99, and has 
been Visiting Physician and Vice-President of the 
Medical Staff of St. Luke's Home for Females 
since 1888. He is a member of the New York 
County Medical Society, the Alumni Association of 
New York University, and the Delta Phi Fratern- 




C. ALX. RHODES 

ity. In politics he is a Republican. He is the 
author of a handbook on " Diseases of Children," 
published in 1892. His address is No. 1126 Park 
Avenue, New York. 



TRAUTMAN, Alexander, 1850- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born in Wiirzburg, Germany, 1850; studied in com- 
mon and Latin schools and University, Wiirzburg; 
graduated M.D., 1877, New York University Medical 
College ; in practice since 1877, largely in asylums for 
insane. 

ALEXANDER TRAUTMAN, M.D., son of 
Thomas and Anna M.' (Zink) Trautman, 
was born in Wiirzburg, Germany, on October 24, 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



199 



1850, and studied in various institutions of his 
native city, including a common school, Latin 
school, and the Royal Maximilian University. He 
then came to the United States, and in 1877 was 
graduated a Doctor of Medicine from the Medical 
College of New York University. Since then he 
has been constantly in practice, largely in asylums 
for the insane. Thus he was an Assistant Physician 
to the Hospital for the Insane on Ward's Island, 
New York, in 1878, and to the State Hospital for 
the Insane at Winnebago, Wisconsin, in 1881. In 
1882 he returned to Ward's Island as Resident 
Physician to the State Emigrant Asylum, in 1883 
he became Assistant Medical Superintendent of the 
Hospital for the Insane there, and in 1884 Medical 
Superintendent of that institution. He is a member 
of the New York Medical Union, the Medical 
Association of Greater New York, the New York 
County Medical Association, and the New York 
State Medical Association. He is married to Jean 
Davis, but has no children. His address is No, 369 
Lexington Avenue, New York. 



WARNER, Millard. Fillmore, 1848- 

Class of 1877 Med. 
Born at Warwick Township, Tuscarawas County, 
Ohio, 1848; studied in public schools, Ohio Wesleyan 
University, and Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, 
N. J.; graduated M.D., New York University Medical 
College, 1877 ; minister of Methodist Episcopal Church, 
1873-98 ; Professor English Literature and Philosophy, 
1884-98; President of Baldwin University, 1894-98; in 
medical practice since 1898; State Senator, Ohio, 1902. 

MILLARD FILLMORE WARNER, M.D., 
was born in Warwick Township, Tuscara- 
was County, Ohio, on October 15, 1848, the son of 
Jonas and Catharine (Lister) Warner and the de- 
scendant of some of the earliest settlers of Ohio. 
He studied in the public schools, at Ohio Wesleyan 
University, and at the Drew Theological Seminary 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Madison, 
New Jersey. From 1873 to 1898 he was a minister 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church ; for the last 
fourteen years of that time he was Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature and Philosophy at Baldwin University, 
Berea, Ohio; and from 1894 to 1898 he was Presi- 
dent of that institution. He also studied medicine 
and was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the New York University Medical 
College in 1877. Since 1898 he has been engaged 
in the practice of medicine, for the first year at 
Berea, Ohio, and since then in Cleveland. In 1902 



he was a State Senator in the Ohio Legislature, on 
the Democratic side. He was married on January 
5, 1876, to Mabel G. De Witt, of Harmony, New 
Jersey, and has two children : Faith, now Mrs. R. 




MILLARD F. WARNER 



B. Newcomb, and Carl Norman Warner. His 
home is at No. 349 Genesee Avenue, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 



AMADOR, Martin, 1857- 

Class of 1878 Med. 
Born at Ci^naga de Oro, Colombia, 1857 ; educated 
at private college at Carthagena, Colombia ; graduated 
New York University Medical Department, 1878 ; as- 
sistant in Charity Hospital, Blackwell's Island, 1879 ; 
Consul-General of Colombia in Holland and Belgium, 
1880-83 ; Professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Sur- 
gery, University of Carthagena, Colombia, 1883-85; 
Vice-Consul of United States in Colombia, 1885-87 ; 
County Physician and Police Surgeon, Colon, 1887-89 ; 
Secretary of Colombian delegation to International 
American Congress, 1889; practiced medicine in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., 1889-91; Health Inspector of the Port at 
Punta Arenas, Costa Rica, 1891-92; practicing phy- 
sician in Brooklyn, N. Y., since 1893. 

MARTIN AMADOR, M.D., the subject of 
this sketch, has had thus far a career not 
marked with monotony and not circumscribed by 
the habits, thoughts and customs of some narrow 
community, but greatly varied and replete with the 



200 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



many interesting incidents which naturally occur 
through wide travel and extensive intercourse with 
the world. Born in South America and prepared 
for his profession in New York, he has visited the 
Old World and many parts of the New, and is now 
settled in the Metropolitan Borough of Brooklyn, as 
an eminent and representative physician. Dr. 
Amador was born at Ci^naga de Oro, in the Repub- 
lic of Colombia, South America, on March lo, 1857, 
coming of a family long conspicuous in the affairs 
of that country. His father was the late Manuel 
Amador Fierro. One of his ancestors was shot, 




MARTIN AMADOR 

with eight comrades, at Carthagena, in 18 16 for 
having proclaimed the independence of the country 
from Spain. Another ancestor was Governor of 
Carthagena, and his heart is still preserved in the 
Hail of Assemblies. Manuel Amador Fierro, Dr. 
Amador's father, was President of the State of 
Bolivar from 1867 to 1870, and was also Secretary 
of War, Secretary of Public Instruction, a member 
of the House of Representatives, a Senator, and 
First Designado, or Vice-President, of Colombia. 
At the time of his death he was again candidate for 
the Presidency of Bolivar, and would have been 
elected without opposition had he lived. His great 
oratorical gifts made him one of the foremost 
statesmen of Colombia, and he commanded the 



respect and confidence of the State of Bolivar in an 
exceptional degree. He married Estevana Salcedo 
de Jinie'nez, and had eleven children. Of these the 
first, Manuel, born in 1856 and died in 1900, was a 
Colombian Consul, a British Vice-Consul, and direc- 
tor and manager of several large commercial enter- 
prises. The second is the subject of this sketch. 
The third, Virginia, died in childhood. The fourth, 
Crist6bal, an eminent jurist and legislator of 
Colombia, died in 1897. The fifth, Anibal, died at 
the age of twenty-one. The sixth, Stephen, is a 
merchant in Brooklyn, New York. The seventh, 
Simon, is a merchant in Costa Rica. The eight, 
Sarai, is a resident of Brooklyn. The ninth, Fran- 
cisco de Paula, is a jurist and school inspector in 
Costa Rica. The tenth, Adriano, lives at Panama, 
and the eleventh, Coriolano, died in infancy. Dr. 
Martin Amador, the second of this family, was 
educated up to the age of sixteen years in a private 
college at Carthagena, Colombia. On December 
30, 1874, he landed at New York and presently 
entered the Medical Department of New York Uni- 
versity. There he pursued the regular course, and 
was duly graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1878. The next six months were spent 
in special preparation for hospital work, and then 
he entered the Charity, or City, Hospital, on Black- 
well's Island, at first as Junior and then as Senior 
Assistant. A year later he temporarily forsook 
medicine for the public service, becoming in 
September, 1880, Consul-General of Colombia in 
Holland and Belgium, residing partly at Amsterdam 
and partly at Brussels. He filled this place until 
1883, and meantime travelled extensively in Europe, 
especially in France, Germany and Great Britain. 
He returned to America in 1883 and for the next 
two years was Professor of Anatomy, Physiology 
and Surgery in the University at Carthagena, 
Colombia. In 1885 he was appointed Vice-Consul 
of the United States at Carthagena, and filled that 
place for two years, during which time he also 
practiced medicine, taught in the University, and 
was secretary of a steamship company for the navi- 
gation of the Sinii and Atrato rivers. In 1887 he 
went to Colon, and was for two years there 
County Physician and Police Surgeon. He then 
resigned his position, returned to the United States 
in September, 1889, and began the practice of his 
profession in Brooklyn, New York. Two months 
later he was Secretary of the Colombian Delegation 
to the International American Congress. He re- 
mained in practice in Brooklyn until 1891, when ill 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



20 r 



health compelled him to leave that city. He there- 
upon went to Punta Arenas, Costa Rica, and there 
served for one year as Health Officer. In 1893 
Dr. Amador again returned to Brooklyn and re- 
sumed the practice of his profession. He was 
married in the Church of the Sacred Heart, Brook- 
lyn, by the Rev. Father McCollum, on August 14, 
1879, his bride being Mary McElhenny, daughter 
of Michael and Catherine McElhenny. He and 
Mrs. Amador have numerous friends in Brooklyn 
and other parts of New York. He devotes the 
major part of his time to an earnest practice of his 
profession. He is a member of the Kings County 
Medical Society and of the Physicians' Mutual Aid 
Association, and is a Medical Examiner for Unity 
Council of the Knights of Columbus. 



ATWOOD, John Abiel, 1857- 

Class of 1878 Sci. 
Born at Chatham, Mass., 1857 ; graduated B.S. and 
C.E., New York University, 1878; Civil Engineer in 
railroad service since 1878. 

JOHN ABIEL ATWOOD, B.S., C.E., a son of 
John Williams Atwood and Abbie (Doane) 
Atwood, was born at Chatham, Massachusetts, on 
February 8, 1857. In New York University he 
was a Junior orator, and Captain of the Lacrosse 
Club in 1878. He was graduated with the degrees 
of Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer in 1878, 
and has ever since been engaged in Civil Engineer- 
ing for various railroads. His services have been 
performed for the New York elevated roads in 
1878-79 ; the Elizabeth City and Norfolk Railroad, 
in Virginia, 1 880-8 1 ; the West Shore Railroad 
at Syracuse, New York, 1881-84 ; the Tenth Avenue 
cable road in New York City, 1884-86 ; the Chau- 
tauqua Lake Railroad at Jamestown, New York, 
1886-88; the Lake Shore and Michigan South- 
ern Railroad, 1889, and the Pittsburg and Lake 
Erie Railroad since 1889. He is a member of the 
Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania, and 
also of the American Society of Civil Engineers. 
Of the latter he has been Chief Engineer since 
1S96. He was married on December 30, 1880, 
to Jennie Ivers, and has three children : William 
Bartlett, Julia, and Edna Cleveland Atwood. His 
address is Beaver, Pennsylvania. 



graduated LL.B., New York University Law School, 
1878; in practice since 1878; General Attorney of New 
Jersey Central Railroad Company. 

JOHN LIVINGSTON CONOVER, LL.B., 
General Attorney of the Central Railroad of 
New Jersey, was born near Freehold, Monmouth 
County, New Jersey, on February 21, 1849, ^ mem- 
ber of a family long settled and prominent in that 
region. He is a son of Alfred Livingston Conover 
and Eleanor S. (Conover) Conover, and a descend- 
ant of Wolfertz Gerritse Van Kouwenhoven, who 
came from Holland to the " New Netherlands " in 
1630. He was educated in the public schools, and 
at the age of twenty-one years engaged in banking. 
Later he was an examiner of real estate titles. 
Finally he entered the Law School of New York 
University, and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1878. He was admitted to 
the Bar in New York in June, 1878, and in New 
Jersey in 1880. In 1881 he entered the service of 
the Central Railroad of New Jersey, in its Law 
Department, and has continued therein ever since, 
having been its General Attorney since January i, 
1902. His office is at No. 143 Liberty Street, New 
York, and his home is at AVickatunk, New Jersey. 



CONOVER, John Livingston, 1849- 

Classof 1878 Law. 
Born near Freehold, N. J., 1849; studied in public 
schools ; engaged in banking and title examination ; 



DALLAS, Alexander, 1850- 

Class of 1878 Med. 
Born at Nairn, Scotland, 1850; educated at parochial 
school, at Nairn Academy, and at Owens College, 
Manchester, England ; pursued course at Edinburgh 
University; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1878; spent one year in law office, 
four years in bank, four years in commercial pursuits, 
practiced medicine in the West for one year, and for 
two years in New York City ; practicing in Bayonne, 
N. J., since 1881 ; Visiting Surgeon to Bayonne City 
Hospital until 1891, then Consultmg Surgeon until 
1898; organized St. Luke's Hospital in 1898 and 
now Surgeon thereof; Surgeon to numerous large 
corporations. 

ALEXANDER DALLAS, M.D., son of Wil- 
liam and Margaret (Eraser) Dallas, was 
born at Nairn, Scotland, on April 25, 1850, with an 
ancestry which, as he whimsically expresses it, dates 
from Adam and possesses a strong Scotch flavor. 
He attended the local parochial schools, and the 
Nairn Academy, in which latter he ranked among 
the best students and won a gold medal in token of 
that fact. Thence he proceeded to Owens College, 
Manchester, England, where his career was similarly 
brilliant, and where he won a prize in English Liter- 
ature. Returning to Scotland, he pursued a course 



202 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in the University of Edinburgli, liaving won a prize 
for excellence in the local entrance examinations. 
From Edinburgh he came to New York University, 
and pursued the course of its Medical College. 
There, in his Junior year, he won a gold medal and 
four other prizes. He was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1878. Between 
Edinburgh and New York University there was, 
however, a hiatus of several years, in which he was 
engaged in various pursuits. For one year he was 
a student and clerk in a law office. For four years 
he was employed in a bank, and for four years more 




ALEXANDER D.4LLAS 

he was engaged in mercantile houses. Having at 
last centred his attention upon medicine, he devoted 
himself steadfastly to it, and with marked success. 
After graduation he practiced for a year in the 
West, and then for tvvo years in New York City. 
Finally, in 1881, he settled in the City of Bayonne, 
New Jersey, with the medical profession of which 
he has ever since been conspicuously identified. 
Down to 1 89 1 he was Visiting Surgeon to the Bay- 
onne City Hospital, and then down to 1898 he 
filled the place of Consulting Surgeon to the same 
institution. In the last named year he severed his 
connection with the City Hospital and organized 
St. Luke's Hospital in Bayonne, which has become 
one of the best equipped hospitals in the State of 



New Jersey. Of that institution he is now Presi- 
dent and Surgeon. He is also Surgeon to the 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, the Standard Oil 
Company, the Tidewater Oil Company, the General 
Chemical Company, the Bayonne Sulphur Works, 
and other corporations, and is President of the 
Board of Examining Surgeons of the Pension 
Bureau. He is a Fellow of the New York Acad- 
emy of Medicine, and a member of the New York 
County, New York State, and Hudson County 
(New Jersey) Medical societies, and of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association ; also of the Newark Bay 
Boat Club. He is a Republican in pohtics, but has 
held no public office. He was married on January 
23, 1878, to Gilberta A. Fraser, the eldest daughter 
of the Rev. D. Fraser, of Serwick, Scotland. Mrs. 
Dallas died, childless, on April 20, 1898. Dr. 
Dallas's address is Bayonne, New Jersey. 



DILL, James Brooks, 1854- 

Class of 1878 Law. 
Born in Spencerport, N. Y., 1854; graduated A.B., 
Yale, 1876; graduated LL.B., New York University 
Law School, 1878; corporation law specialist in New 
York City since 1878 ; counsel for numerous trust com- 
panies and large corporations ; actively interested in 
financial and business enterprises. 

JAMES BROOKS DILL, lawyer, was born in 
Spencerport, Monroe County, New York, on 
July 25, 1854, the son of the Rev. James Horton 
and Catharine (Brooks) Dill. Her father was a 
native of Boston, Massachusetts, and his mother of 
Cheshire, Connecticut. He was prepared at the 
Cheshire Episcopal Academy for Yale, where he 
took his Bachelor's degree with the Class of 1876. 
His legal studies were subsequently pursued in the 
Law Department of New York University, where he 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1878. Locating in New York, he turned his 
attention to corporation law, making at the outset a 
specialty of that particular branch of practice, and 
later devoting himself almost entirely to financial 
and business corporations and the legal questions 
arising in connection with their organization and 
maintenance. Nearly ten years ago he withdrew 
from general court practice, going into court only 
on matters relating to the corporation laws. He has 
argued before the United States courts and before 
the Supreme Court of the United States many im- 
portant propositions of corporation law, such as the 
question arising under the War Revenue Tax, as to 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



203 



whether the express companies should pay the tax, 
or the shipper. He is counsel for a number of 
banks and trust companies and a Director in the 
North American Trust Company of New York, and 
the Corporation Trust Company of New Jersey, 
and other financial institutions. He is interested 
as a director and stockholder, and as counsel, in 
a large number of recently organized industrial cor- 
porations, including the American Tin Plate Com- 
pany, the National Steel Company, the New England 
Street Railway Company and the R. & G. Corset 
Company. He is also counsel to the Merchants' 
Association of New York and the Registration & 
Trust Company of the same city. He is a member 
of the Bar both of New York and New Jersey, and, 
residing in the latter state, has served upon many 
important state commissions charged with the duty 
of revising the corporation laws of that state. He 
was Chairman of the Commission to revise the 
Banking and Trust Company Laws, and is the 
author of" Dill on New Jersey Corporations," a book 
of standard authority upon that subject. He is a 
member of the Merchants' and Lawyers' clubs in 
New York City. In politics he is Republican. In 
October, 1880, he was married to Mary W. Dill and 
has three daughters. 



DIVINE, Michael William, 1856- 

Class of 1878 Sci., 1880 Law. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1856; studied in public 
school and Newark Academy, Newark, N. J., 1866-74; 
School of Mines, Columbia College, 1874-75; graduated 
B.S. and C.E., New York University, 1878; graduated 
LL.B., New York University Law School, 1880; prac- 
ticing lawyer in New York. 

MICHAEL WILLIAM DIVINE was born in 
the City of Brooklyn, New York, in 1856. 
His father, Michael William Divine, was of Irish 
parentage and his mother, whose maiden name was 
Angelina Elizabeth Donne, was of English ancestry, 
being a descendant of the distinguished poet and 
Dean of St. Paul's, Dr. John Donne. He acquired 
his preliminary education in a public school in 
Newark, New Jersey, in 1866, and from 1867 to 
1874 was a student in the well known Newark 
Academy, where he was prepared to enter college. 
In the fall of 1874 he entered the School of Mines 
of Columbia College and there spent one year. Later 
he spent three years in New York University and 
was graduated in 1878 with the degrees of Bach- 
elor of Science and Civil Engineer. He then 
turned his attention to the study of law, pursued a 



course in the New York University Law School, and 
was graduated and admitted to the Bar in 1880. 
Meantime he had become a self-taught expert sten- 
ographer. During his first year after leaving the 
University he worked as a Surveyor and Civil En- 
gineer with the United States Coast Survey and on 
the Second Avenue Elevated Railroad in New York. 
He then became a stenographer and law clerk for 
the old firm of Martin & Smith and remained in that 
connection for more than sixteen years. At the 
end of that service he engaged in general law prac- 
tice on his own account. His office is in New 




MICHAEL W. DIVINE 

York City. Mr. Divine is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum and also of the Masonic Order, and was 
Master of Constitution Lodge, No. 241, F. & A.M., 
in 1901. He was married on April 28, 1892, to 
Louisa Henrietta Vega and has one child, Marga- 
ret Angelina Divine. 



HEROLD, Herman Christian Henry, 1854- 

Class of 1878 Med. 
Born in New York, 1854; attended private and public 
schools and high school, Newark, N. J. ; worked in 
stores and conducted grocery store ; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1878; in practice 
in Newark, N. J., since 1878; member of Newark Health 
Board since 1883 and President since 1895 ; member of 



204 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Passaic Pollution Commission, 1898-igoo; Internal 
Revenue Collector, 5th District, N. J., since 1899. 

HERMAN CHRISTIAN HENRY HEROLD, 
jM.D., a prominent physician of Newark, 
New Jersey, is a son of Louis Herman Herold and 
Maria Louisa (Oilman) Herold, of German ances- 
try and was born in New York City on March 4, 
1854. The family removed to Newark, New Jer- 
sey, while he was a child, and he has ever since 
resided there. He attended a German and English 
school founded by his father in Newark, in 1859, 
and afterward attended the Newark public schools 




HERMAN C. H. HEROLD 

and High School. At the age of eleven he was left 
an orphan, the second in age of six children, and 
had thereafter to support himself and help care for 
his younger brothers and sister. He was a clerk in 
a grocery store while attending the Newark High 
School, and at the age of nineteen he left school and 
started a grocery store of his own. In that he 
prospered, and thus enabled himself on his twenty- 
first birthday to begin the study of medicine in the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part of 
New York University. He was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in March, 1878, 
and immediately began the practice of his profession 
in Newark, and has thus been engaged ever since. 
He soon built up a large practice, and assisted his 



younger brother to become established in the same 
profession. He has been a member of the Newark 
Health Board since 1883, and its President since 
1895, ^"d in that place has done much for the sani- 
tation of Newark. From 1898 to 1900 he was a 
member of the Passaic River Pollution Commission, 
appointed by the Governor of the State. In 1899 
he was appointed by President McKinley Collector 
of Internal Revenue for the Fifth District of New 
Jersey, and still fills that place. For fourteen years 
he was connected with the New Jersey National 
Guard as Surgeon, and is now Treasurer of the Order 
of Military Surgeons in New Jersey. He has been 
prominent in politics, as a Republican, as a delegate 
to conventions and otherwise, and has more than 
once been proposed as a candidate for Mayor of 
Newark. He is a Visiting Surgeon to St. Michael's 
Hospital, Newark, President of the Security Build- 
ing and Loan Association, and a member of the 
Essex County Medical Society, the Masonic Order, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and other organizations. He 
was married on November 6, 1882, to Louisa Kur- 
fess, of Newark, and has his office and residence at 
Nos. 77 and 75, Congress Street, respectively. 



HINCKLEY, Livingston Spraker, 1855- 

Class of 1878 Med. 
Born in Albany, N. Y., 1855 ; studied in public schools ; 
graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1878; served in Blackwell's Island Insane Asylum; 
served in private hospital in New York, and at sani- 
tarium at Avon Springs, N. Y.; in charge of Essex 
County, N. J., hospitals lor the insane, 1884-1900; in 
practice at Newark, N. J. 

LIVINGSTON SPRAKER HINCKLEY, 
M.D., the head of the great system of hos- 
pitals for the insane in Essex County, New Jersey, 
IS of distinguished ancestry on both sides of the 
family. His father was Dr. John Warren Hinckley, 
for thirty years a prominent physician of Albany, 
New York, and the son of John Hinckley, who 
married Eunice VVarren, granddaughter of Joseph 
Warren, the hero and martyr of Bunker Hill. The 
Hinckley family came from Tenterden, in Kent, 
England, and in the person of Samuel Hinckley was 
transplanted to this country in 1639. Samuel 
Hinckley settled first at Scituate and later at Barn- 
stable, Massachusetts, and his son, Thomas Hinck- 
ley, was in 1645 Deputy, in 1658-80 Magistrate at 
Plymouth, and in 1681-92 Governor of the Colony. 
On the maternal side Dr. Hinckley is the son of 



UNIFERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



205 



Maria Schuyler, a direct descendant of John Schuy- 
ler, father of the famous General Philip Schuyler. 
He is also a younger brother of that Isabella Hinck- 
ley who a generation ago was one of the most bril- 
liant singers of her time, in choir, concert and grand 
opera, and was hailed as " the Jenny Lind of 
America." For the sake of Isabella's education in 
music, her mother took her and the subject of this 
sketch to Italy when the latter was an infant, and 
spent some years there. Then Isabella, who had 
married Captain Susini, of the Italian Army, died, 
and at nearly the same time her father also died. 




LIVINGSTON S. HINCKLEY 

whereupon, bereft of both husband and daughter, 
Mrs. Hinckley returned to America with her young 
son. The latter had been born in Albany, New 
York, on August 15, 1855, and at the time of his 
return to America was scarcely five years old. He 
attended a private school in Jersey City, New 
Jersey, for a time, and then a public school in York 
Street in that city. A course in the Thirteenth 
Street Grammar School in New York, whither the 
family had removed, followed, and then, at the age 
of seventeen, owing to straitened circumstances, 
he had to give up his studies for work. For a time 
he was employed in mercantile business, but he 
spent his evenings and spare time in studying medi- 
cine, his ambition being to enter the profession 



with which his father had been identified. In this 
he was greatly aided and encouraged by his friend, 
benefactor and preceptor. Dr. James L. Perry, of 
New York. In 1873 he began studying in the Belle- 
vue Hospital Medical College, which is now incor- 
porated with New York University. In 1874 he 
was matriculated, and in 1878 he was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. It is 
worthy of remembrance, in view of his after career, 
that his graduating thesis was on '• Puerperal In- 
sanity." Immediately upon receiving his diploma. 
Dr. Hinckley was appointed a Junior Assistant 
Physician in the Insane Asylum on Blackwell's 
Island, New York, where there were some 1,300 
female patients. He quickly made his mark there, 
through his devotion and skill, and was advanced to 
be a Senior Assistant, and then Assistant Superin- 
tendent under Dr. A. E. Macdonald. In 1881, 
however, he resigned his place on Blackwell's Island 
in order to take charge of a private hospital in New 
York. Next he took charge of a sanitarium at Avon 
Springs, New York. It was while he was thus en- 
gaged, in 1884, that he saw and improved the great 
opportunity of his life. He learned at that time 
that the authorities of Essex County, New Jersey, 
which includes the great City of Newark, desired 
to find a physician competent to take charge of the 
County Asylum for the Insane and to develop it to 
the proportions necessary in so populous a com- 
munity. He at once applied for the place and re- 
ceived the appointment, and thus entered upon the 
great work which has ever since chiefly occupied 
his attention. At the time when he became its 
head, the Essex County Asylum was small, over- 
crowded, and in a discreditable condition. In 1885 
he secured the addition of a commodious wing to 
the building, and in 1891 a second wing was built. 
The name of the institution was changed in 1890 
from asylum to hospital. In 1896 the enlarged 
building was again overcrowded, and the first of a 
great group of buildings for a branch hospital was 
erected at Verona, New Jersey. The latter is gener- 
ally esteemed to be one of the most perfectly 
equipped hospitals in the United States. There is 
also connected with the main hospital in Newark a 
fine Training School for Nurses for the Insane, the 
second of its kind in the United States. Besides 
managing these institutions, with more than 1,000 
insane inmates. Dr. Hinckley has written much for 
publication, on alienist topics, he has frequently been 
called upon to testify in court as an expert, and he 
has cultivated his rare musical talents both as a per- 



206 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



former and a composer. He resigned from the 
Superintendency of the county hospitals in February, 
1900, and is now practicing his profession in 
Newark. He is a member of the Newark Medical 
and Surgical Society, and was its President in 1869 ; 
of the West End Club, of Newark, of which he was 
President in 1897-98 ; of the American Medico- 
Psychological Association, of the American Medical 
Society, of the Practitioners' Club, and of the 
Masonic Order. From 1874 to 1881 he was a 
member of the Twenty-second Regiment, New 
York National Guard. He was married in 1890 to 
Barbara Halber, and has one child, Livingston S. 
Hinckley, Jr. 



and has two children : Lucy Macdonald and Mildred 
Elizabeth Howell. His address is No. 345 Fifth 
Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. 



HOWELL, William Augustus, 1859- 

Class of 1878 Sci. 
Born in Newark, N. J., 1859; graduated B.S. and 
C.E., New York University, 1878, and M.S., 1881 ; Civil 
Engineer in railroad and mining work since 1879. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS HOWELL, AI.S., 
C.E., was born in Newark, New Jersey, 
on June 16, 1859, the son of George \Vashington 
Howell and Mary Elizabeth (Ward) Howell. In 
New York University he was Vice-President of 
Philomathean and a member of Delta Upsilon. He 
was graduated with the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science and Civil Engineer in 1878, and received 
the degree of Master of Science in 1881. Since 
1879 he has been engaged in civil engineering, as 
follows : For the Pennsylvania Railroad in Jersey 
City, Harsimus Cove and Bergen Cut Improvements, 
1879-82, at New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1882-84, 
at York, Pennsylvania, 1884-86, at Pottsville, Penn- 
sylvania, 1 886-88, and at Trenton, New Jersey, 1 888- 
89 ; for the New York, Susquehanna and Western 
Railroad, 1889 ; for the Jamaica Railroad Company, 
Jamaica, West Lidies, 1889-90; for the Kentucky 
Coal and Iron Company, Pineville, Kentucky, 1890; 
for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, 1890- 
91 ; for the East Jersey Water Company at Pater- 
son, New Jersey, 1891, and for the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, in charge of the Newark and Jersey City 
Electric Railroad, since 1892. Since 1893 he has 
been connected with the Department of Streets and 
Sewers of the City of Newark, New Jersey, in the 
capacity of Assistant Engineer, and since January i, 
1902, he has been Engineer of Track Elevation in 
Newark, eliminating grade crossings along the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, New Jersey Central Railroad and 
the Lackawanna Railroad, through Newark. He was 
married on May 11, 1884, to Katherine Macdonald, 



LEE, Charles Rowe, 1856- 

Class of 1878 Med. 
Born at Phoenix, N. Y., 1856; studied at Falley 
Seminary, Fulton, N. Y. ; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1878 ; served in Charity 
Hospital, New York, 1878-79 ; in practice at Fulton, 
N. Y., 1879-84 ; Physician to Batopilas Mining Co., 
Mexico, 1884-go; at Fulton, 1890-98; retired from 
practice, 1898. 

CHARLES ROWE LEE, M.D., one of the 
best known physicians, now retired, of Os- 
wego County, New York, is of American parentage 




CHAS. R. LEE 

and of English and French Huguenot ancestry, and 
is the son of Charles M. and Elizabeth P. (Hotch- 
kiss) Lee. He was born at Phoenix, Oswego 
County, New York, on April 15, 1856, and received 
his education in the public schools, the High School, 
and Falley Seminary at Fulton, New York. Having 
the practice of medicine in view, he entered the 
New York University INTedical College, and was 
graduated from it with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1878. A year of service in the Char- 
ity Hospital, on Blackwell's Island, New York, fol- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



207 



lowed, and then he settled, in 1879, at Fulton, New 
York, and was there engaged in general practice for 
five years. In 1884 he left Fulton to become Phy- 
sician to the Batopilas Mining Company, of Batopi- 
las, Mexico, in which latter service he remained until 
1890. Then he returned to Fulton and resumed 
his practice there, finally retiring from it in 1898, 
after the death of his father-in-law, the Hon. 
George M. Case, of the Citizens' National Bank of 
Fulton. Dr. Lee was married to Eva Dale Case on 
May 17, 1893. He has been President of the 
Oswego County Medical Society. His home is at 
No. 181 South First Street, Fulton, New York. 



SWANSTROM, John Edward, 1853- 

Class of 1878 Law. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1853; graduated LL.B., 
New York University Law School, 1878; in general 
practice of law since 1878 ; President of Board of 
Education of City of Brooklyn, 1893-97, of the School 
Board of the Borough of Brooklyn, 1898, and of the 
Board of Education of the City of New York, 1899 J 
President of Borough of Brooklyn, City of New York, 
1902-03. . 

JOHN EDWARD SWANSTROM, LL.B., Pres- 
ident of the Borough of Brooklyn, City of 
New York, and long identified with the public 
school system of the metropolis, is of Swedish ances- 
try, his parents, John P. and Anna B. Swanstrom, 
both having been natives of Sweden. His father 
was a well-known clergyman, who served in various 
pastorates in the United States. Mr. Swanstrom 
was born in the City of Brooklyn, New York, on 
July 26, 1853, and received a careful and thorough 
education. His professional studies were pursued 
in the law office of Miller, Peet & Opdyke, in 
New York, and in the Law School of New York 
University. He was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1878, winning the first prize 
and the highest honors of his class in the University. 
In July of that year he entered upon the practice of 
law in New York City, and has ever since continued 
therein with much success, devoting his attention to 
the general work of his profession. For a number 
of years Mr. Swanstrom has taken an active and 
important interest in educational affairs, especially 
pertaining to the public schools. He was appointed 
a member of the Board of Education of the City of 
Brooklyn in 1888, and in 1893 became President 
of that body, occupying that place for five years 
ending with 1897. During his administration he 
effected many important reforms in the educational 



system of the city, and greatly advanced its general 
interests. At the beginning of 1898 the City of 
Brooklyn was consolidated with New York, and 
became the Borough of Brooklyn in the great 
metropolis. During that year Mr. Swanstrom was 
President of the School Board of the Borough of 
Brooklyn, and in 1899 was President of the Board 
of Education for the whole Greater City of New 
York. In the fall of 1901 he was elected President 
of the Borough of Brooklyn, for the two-year term 
1902-03, and now fills that important office. In 
politics he is a Democrat, of independent proclivi- 




J. EDWARD SWANSTROM 

ties. He is a member of the City Club of New 
York, and the Brooklyn, Hamilton, and Crescent 
Athletic clubs of Brooklyn. He was married on 
May 14, 1878, to Frances N. Harris, and has two 
children : Mrs. Walter Howard Winter and Arthur 
Swanstrom. His home is at No. ^7 Halsey Street, 
Brooklyn, New York. 



TRUE, Frederick William, 1858- 

Class of 1878 Sci. 
Born at Middletown, Conn., 1858; graduated B.S., 
New York University, 1878, and M.S., 1881 ; attached 
to United States Fish Commission and United States 
National Museum since 1878; Curator in Department 
of Mammals since 1881 ; Head Curator in Department of 



2o8 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Biology since 1897 ; voluminous writer on zoological 
topics; LL.D., New York University. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM TRUE, M.S., LL.D., 
the distinguished Zoologist of the United 
States National Museum, was born at Middletown, 
Connecticut, on July 8, 1858, the son of the Rev. 
Dr. Charles Kittredge True and Elizabeth Bassett 
(Hyde) True. He was noted as a careful student 
in New York University, was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 1878, and received 
the Master's degree in Science in 1881. Immedi- 
ately upon graduation he entered the service of the 




FREDERICK W. TRUE 

United States Government as Clerk to the Fish 
Commission, In 1879-80 he was Special Agent of 
the Census Bureau on Fisheries, and in the latter 
year also Assistant to the Commissioner to the Berlin 
Fisheries Exhibition. He was Librarian of the 
United States National Museum in 1881-83, Curator 
of the Division of Mammals since 1881, and Execu- 
tive Curator, 1892-1902, and has been Head Cura- 
tor of the Department of Biology since 1897. He 
was representative of the Museum and of the Smith- 
sonian Institution at the exhibitions at Nashville in 
1897, Omaha in 1898, and Buffalo in 1901, and has 
been appointed to serve in the same capacity for the 
St. Louis Exposition. He is a fellow and member 
of many important scientific societies in this and 



other lands, including the Zoological Society of 
London, the American Philosophical Society and 
the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, 
the Washington Academy of Sciences, the American 
Society of Naturalists, the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science and the Society of Sons 
of the American Revolution. He has received the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from his Alma 
Mater. Dr. True has made a special study of marine 
mammalia, and has written a treatise on the Del- 
phinidse, a family of the Cetacea. His bibliography, 
including contributions to official reports and to the 
transactions of learned societies, is voluminous, in- 
cluding scores of titles. He was married on Febru- 
ary 16, 1887, to Louise E. Prentiss, and has two 
children : Webster Prentiss and Marion True. His 
home is at No. 1320 Yale Street, and his office at 
the United States National Museum, Washington, 
District of Columbia. 



VALK, Francis, 1845- 

Classof 1878 Med. 
Born at Flushing, N. Y., 1845; studied at Washing- 
ton College, Chestertown, Md. ; served in Civil War; 
in drug business, 1868-76; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1878 ; in practice since 
1878; Eye and Ear specialist since 1888; Instructor in 
New York University Medical College, and Post- 
Graduate Medical School and Hospital. 

FRANCIS VALK, M. D., was born at Flushing, 
Long Island, New York, on October 28, 
1845, the son of William Whiteman Valk and Jane 
(Sherwood) Valk. His paternal ancestry in this 
country begins with Jacob Valk, gentleman, who 
came from Holland about 1780 and settled at 
Charleston, South Carolina. In the next generation 
was Jacob R. Valk, gentleman, who accompanied 
his father from Holland, and was in 1821 Consul of 
the Netherlands in the United States. In the third 
generation in this country was William Whiteman 
Valk, M.D., of Charleston, South Carolina, a grad- 
uate of Charleston Medical University, Surgeon on 
the United States Warship Constellation, Repre- 
sentative in Congress in 1852, and Surgeon of the 
Second and Fourth Regiments of Maryland Volun- 
teers from 1 86 1 to 1865. He was the father of 
the subject of this sketch. Dr. Francis Valk re- 
ceived his general education at Washington College, 
at Chestertown, Maryland. In 1862 he was a pri- 
vate in the Second Regiment of Maryland Volunteers. 
In t868 he entered the drug business and continued 
therein until 1876. In the latter part of his career 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



209 



as a druggist he studied medicine, in the Medical 
College of New York University, and was graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1878, since 
which time he has been engaged in practice as a 




FRANCIS VALK 

physician and surgeon, his attention since 1888 
having been devoted exclusively to diseases of the 
eye and ear. In addition to his private practice, 
which is extensive and important, he has been 
Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, and Assistant 
to the Chair of Ophthalmology, in the New York 
University Medical College, Visiting Ophthalmolo- 
gist to the Randall's Island Hospital, Assistant 
Surgeon to the Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, 
Ophthalmologist to the New York Dispensary, and 
to the Thrall Hospital at Middletown, New York ; 
and Professor of Diseases of the Eye in the New 
York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital. 
He is the author of "Errors of Refraction" and 
many articles pertaining to the eye. He was ap- 
pointed Surgeon of Lafayette Post, Grand Army of 
the Republic, in 1891, and is a member of the New 
York County Medical Society, the New York State 
Medical Society, the Medical Society of Greater 
New York, the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association, 
and the Society of Medical Jurisprudence, and a 
Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine ; also 
a member of the New York Athletic Club, and the 
VOL. II. — 14 



Southern Society of New York City. In politics he 
has been a life-long Democrat. He was married on 
August 4, 1874, to Marian C. Easby, and has three 
children : Francis M., Elizabeth B., and Jane Sher- 
wood Valk. His address is No. 164 East 6ist 
Street, New York. 



BOLDT, Hermann J., 1856- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born in Germany, 1856; came to United States in 
childhood; studied and practiced pharmacy ; graduated 
M.D., New Yorlc University Medical College, 1879; 
in active practice since 1879, with special attention to 
Gynecology; Professor of Gynecology, Post-Graduate 
Medical School ; Gynecologist to several hospitals ; 
author of various essays and inventor of surgical in- 
struments. 

HERMANN J. BOLDT, M.D., was born on 
June 24, 1856, at Neuentempel, near Ber- 
Hn, the estate of his father, Hermann Boldt, who 
was a prominent German agriculturist. In his 
childhood he was brought by his parents to the 
United States, and long before reaching manhood 
was thrown upon his own resources. For years he 




H. J. BOLDT 

allowed himself no more sleep than three or four 
hours a day, and thus was able to do much work 
and to pursue his studies. He aimed at the medi- 
cal profession, and not having the means to pursue 



2IO 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



at once a course of medical study he made phar- 
macy a stepping-stone thereto. He studied and 
practiced pharmacy until he had acquired the 
necessary means. Then he entered the Medical 
College of New York University, and was graduated 
in the Class of 1879. He ranked high as a student, 
and his abilities were recognized by Dr. Fallen, of 
the University, who made him his assistant. Later 
he became an Instructor in the Post-Graduate 
Medical School and Hospital, and is now Professor 
of Gynecology there. He is also Gynecologist to the 
German Poliklinik and to St. IMark's Hospital, and 
Consulting Gynecologist to the Beth Israel Hospital. 
From this it will be seen that he makes a specialty 
of gynecological practice, in which he is now recog- 
nized as one of the foremost authorities, but for 
which he laid the broad foundation of twelve years 
of general practice. He usually spends three months 
of each year in Europe, and thus keeps himself in 
touch with the best medical and surgical knowledge 
of the old world. He was the first physician in 
America to investigate the physiological action of 
cocaine, one of the first operators to remove in toto 
the fibromyotamous uterus, and is one of the leading 
advocates of vaginal hysterectomy for cancer. He 
has invented a number of surgical instruments for 
gynecological use, and also an operating table. 
Among his important published papers are those 
on " Salpingitis," " The Treatment of Suppurative 
Disease of the Uterine Appendages," " The Advan- 
tage of doing Intermediate Traelorraphy," " Cardiac 
Neurosis due to Uterine Displacements," " Histology 
of the Uterine Mucosa," " The Manual Treatment 
of Pelvic Diseases," "Exfoliative Cystitis," and 
" The Treatment of Posterior Displacements of the 
Uterus." He is ex-Chairman of the Gynecological 
Section of the New York Academy of Medicine, 
ex-President of the New York Obstetrical Society 
and a member of the American, the International, 
and the British Gynecological societies, and the 
Obstetrical and Pathological societies. He was 
married in 1891 to Hedwig Kruger, of Berlin. 



BRUNNER, William John, 1854- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born at Felsberg, Germany, 1854; studied in public 
schools; graduated M.D., New York University Medi- 
cal College, 1879 ; in practice since 1879. 

WILLIAM JOHN BRUNNER, M.D., son 
of Henry and Elizabeth (Reichhardt) 
Brunner, was born on June 30, 1854, at Felsberg, 



Hesse-Cassel, Germany, and was educated in public 
schools. He studied and practiced pharmacy until 
1876, and then turned his attention to the medical 
profession. He was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from the Medical College of 
New York University on February 18, 1879, and 
has been in practice since that date. His practice 
is an extensive one, especially in the down-town 
region of New York City. He is a member of the 
New York State, New York County, and German 
Medical associations, the Physicians' Mutual Aid 
Association, the Masonic Order, the Knights of 




WILLIAM J. BRUNNER 

Honor, and the Knights and Ladies of Honor. He 
was married to Mrs. Anna V. (Schmelzle) Mundorff 
on March 3, 1881, and has one daughter, Elizabeth 
Brunner. His address is No. 232 East isth Street, 
New York. 



CARMAN, Albro Richard, 1847- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, New York, 1847; studied in public 
schools and at Fort Edward Institute, N. Y. ; in mer- 
cantile life, 1865-75; graduated M.D., Medical College 
of New York University, 1879; practicing physician, 
New York, since 1879. 

ALBRO RICHARD CARMAN, M.D., comes 
of a family conspicuous in the history of 
the United States. His paternal great-grandfather, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



±1 1 



Thomas Carman, was a Captain in the Revolution- 
ary Army, under General Greene, his grandfather, 
Richard Carman, was a Colonel in the War of 1812, 
stationed at Fort Greene, Brooklyn, and his father, 
Valentine Carman, was a merchant of Brooklyn. 
On the side of his mother, whose maiden name was 
Adaline Albro, he is descended in the second genera- 
tion from James Albro, an officer in the War of 
1812 and the first manufacturer of oilcloth in the 
United States, and in the third generation from 
Joshua Crandal, a sea captain who took an early 
part in the Revolutionary War and was captured by 



Medical Society, of the New York State Medical 
Society, and of the Physicians' Mutual Aid Society. 
He was married to Gertrude Horton on March 9, 
1881. 




A. R. CARMAN 

the British. Dr. Carman was born in Brooklyn, 
New York, on April 25, 1847, ^nd was educated in 
the public schools and at the well known Fort 
Edward Institute, at Fort Edward, New York. On 
leaving school he entered mercantile life and was 
engaged therein for the ten years from 1865 to 
1875, six of them being spent as a travelling sales- 
man. Then he turned his attention to the study of 
medicine. He entered the Medical College of New 
York University, and was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1879, since which date he 
has been engaged in the general practice of his pro- 
fession, in New York City. He is a member of the 
Harlem Club, of the Academy of Medicine, of the 
New York County Medical Society, of the Harlem 



CARMAN, Theron Lawrence, 1858- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born in New York, 1858 ; studied at Columbia 
Grammar School, Anthon's Grammar School, New 
York, and Holbrook's Military Academy, Sing Sing, 
N. Y. ; graduated L.L.B., New York University Law 
Department, 1879; employed and studied in office of 
Judge Birdseye; admitted to Bar, 1880; practicing 
lawyer. New York, since 1880. 

THERON LAWRENCE CARMAN is a direct 
descendant of John and Florence Carman, 
who came to this country from England in 1631 in 
the ship Lion and settled at Roxbury, Massachusetts. 
From that place they removed to Hempstead, Long 
Island, in 1643. I" later years members of the 
family owned a large part of the northern end of 
Manhattan Island, where a considerable village, 
now of course absorbed into New York City, long 
bore the name of Carmansville. Mr. Carman's 
mother was, before her marriage, Jeannie D. Camp- 
bell, a descendant of the famous Campbell clan of 
Scotland, of which the Duke of Argyll is the head. 
His great-great-grandmother, Mrs. Jane Campbell, 
was with her mother and children taken prisoner 
at the massacre of Cherry Valley, New York, in 
1778, while her husband. Colonel Samuel Campbell, 
an officer in the Colonial Army, was away at the 
war. The mother, being old and feeble and unable 
to travel, was tomahawked by the Indians the day 
after the massacre. The mother and children were 
distributed among the Indian tribes, but later ex- 
changed for English prisoners and returned to their 
home. The subject of this sketch, son of Theron 
Lawrence Carman and Jeannie D. C. Carman, was 
born in New York City on December 12, 1858. In 
boyhood he attended the Columbia Grammar School, 
and Anthon's Grammar School, in New York, and 
Holbrook's Military Academy, at Sing Sing, New 
York. Then, deciding upon a professional career, 
he entered the Law School of New York University, 
and was graduated therefrom with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1879. He was not yet of age, 
and therefore had to wait for admission to the Bar. 
The time of waiting was spent as a clerk and student 
in the law office of Judge Birdseye, in New York 
City. Admission to the Bar came at last, in January, 
1880, and he immediately began the practice of the 
profession and has maintained it with much success 



212 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ever since. While his practice deals principally with 
corporation, Surrogate's, and real estate law, he has 
appeared in many prominent litigations. Mr. Car- 
man is Secretary of the Carman Family Association, 




THERON L. CARMAN 

which was formed by the descendants of John and 
Florence Carman in 1881 at the celebration of the 
two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of their land- 
ing in America. He was formerly a member of the 
new Manhattan Athletic Club, of New York. He 
belongs to the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity. He 
was first married to Leonora McCarthy, a relative 
of the historian and novelist Justin McCarthy, who 
bore him a daughter, Gladys. His second wife was 
Elizabeth Mcintosh, by whom he has a son, Theron 
Lawrence Carman 3d. Mr. Carman lives in New 
York City. 

CLARK, Franklin Henry. 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born at Cleveland, Ohio ; studied at Willoughby 
College, Oberlin College, and Harvard ; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1879; 
served and studied in Bellevue Hospital and in Europe ; 
in active practice, in nervous and chronic diseases; 
City Physician, Cleveland, 1880-84; Surgeon, National 
Guard, 1885-90. 

FRANKLIN HENRY CLARK, M.D., who was 
born at Cleveland, Ohio, is a son of Daniel 
and Jane Elizabeth Clark, both natives of the Isle 



of Man, who came to this country in 1820 arid 
settled at Cleveland. He pursued a literary course 
at Willoughby College for two years, and afterward 
studied for two years at Oberlin College and one 
year at Harvard. Then he entered the Medical 
College of New York University, pursued its three 
years' course and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1879. His training for pro- 
fessional life comprised two years' study and service 
in Bellevue Hospital, a private course under Dr. 
Alfred L. Loomis at Bellevue, a private course in 
surgery under Dr. Darby at Bellevue and New York 
hospitals, a private course in chemistry under Dr. 
John T. Draper at New York University, a private 
course in physiology and pathology, under Professor 
Arnold, at New York University, and special study 
in London, Paris, Berlin and Vienna. Ever since 
receiving such preparation he has been in the active 
practice of his profession,- paying especial attention 
to nervous and chronic disorders, and being much 
in demand as a consulting physician. He is also in- 
terested in real estate operations in Cleveland, being 
the owner of a large apartment house and a number 




FRANKLIN H. CLARK 



of fine residences in that city. He was a City Phy- 
sician in Cleveland from 1880 to 1884, and Surgeon 
of the Fifth Regiment, Ohio National Guard, from 
1885 to 1890. He has been a member of the 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



213 



National Guard Medical Corps for fifteen years. He 
is also a member of the Cuyahoga County Medical 
Society, the Euclid Avenue Social Club, and other 
organizations. In politics he is a Republican, and 
he is a member of the Cleveland Republican Club. 
He was married on February 24, 1896, to Corinne 
M. Peck, of Cleveland, and has one son, Francis H. 
Clark. His home is at No. 475 Russell Avenue, 
and his office at No. 327 Prospect Street, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 



COMSTOCK, Ira Morris, 1856- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born at Salisbury, N. Y., 1856 ; studied in district 
school, Whitestown Seminary, and Utica Business 
College; read medicine privately; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1879 ; post- 
graduate course, New York University, 1880; engaged 
in general medical practice at New York Mills, N. Y., 
since 1880. 

IRA MORRIS COMSTOCK, M.D., was born at 
Salisbury, New York, on January i, 1856, the 
son of Morris William and Sarah Rice Comstock, 




IRA M. COMSTOCK 

and a descendant of some of the earliest settlers of 
Connecticut and Rhode Island. His earliest edu- 
cation was acquired in the local public school, whence 
he went to the Whitestown (New York) Seminary, 
and the Utica Business College. He began to 



read medicine in the office of Dr. William M. James, 
of Whitesboro, New York, in 1876, and thence went 
to the Medical College of New York University, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine on February 18, 1879. In the 
winter of 1879-1880 he took a post-graduate course 
in the same institution. Thus equipped for profes- 
sional work, on May i, 1880, he began the general 
practice of medicine at New York Mills, New York, 
and has ever since been engaged therein in the 
same place. He was Visiting Physician to the Fox- 
ton Hospital from 1894 to 1900, and is a medical 
examiner for several life insurance companies. He 
is a member of the Oneida County Medical Society; 
of Oriental Lodge, of Masons, at Utica, New York ; 
of Schuyler Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; of Whiting Lodge, of United Workmen ; of 
the Independent Order of Foresters, and of various 
other social organizations. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. He was married on April 7, 1880, to 
Emma Bartlett, of Williamstown, New York. Their 
children are : Morris W., May Asenath, Aletha 
Emma, and Charles Ward Comstock. Dr. Com- 
stock's address is New York Mills, New York. 



DALL, William Brand, 1858- 

Class of 1879 Arts. 
Born in Baltimore, Md., 1858; studied in private 
school, Burlington College, N. J., and Hasbrouck In- 
stitute, Jersey City; graduated A.B., New York Uni- 
versity, 1879 ; LL.B., Columbia College Law School, 
1882; in legal practice since 1882. 

WILLIAM BRAND DALL, A.B., LL.B., son 
of Austin and Mary (Brand) Dall, of 
Scotch and Enghsh ancestry, was born in the City 
of Baltimore, Maryland, on June 13, 1858. He 
attended the private school, " Penn Lucy," of 
Richard Malcolm Johnson, Burlington College at 
Burlington, New Jersey, and the Hasbrouck Insti- 
tute, Jersey City, New Jersey. In 1875 he entered 
the College of Arts of New York University, where 
he was a member of Delta Phi, an officer of Eucleian, 
Editor of " The University Quarterly," and Junior 
orator. He was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in 1879. In 1882 he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws from the 
Law School of Columbia College, and since then 
has been engaged in legal practice in New York 
City. He is a member of the Masonic Order and 
the Royal Arcanum, and in politics he is a Demo- 
crat. He was married on April 28, 1886, to Vir- 



214 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



ginia S. Wilbert, and has one son, William Brand 
Dall, Jr. His home is at No. 22 South Elliott Place, 
Brooklyn, New York. 



ECCLESINE, Joseph Brodie, 1820- 

Class of 1879 Law. 
Born at Wicklo'W, Ireland, 1820; engaged in life in- 
surance before 1859 ; editor and publisher, 1859-77 ; 
graduated LL..B., New York University Law School, 
1879 ; in practice since 1879. 

JOSEPH BRODIE ECCLESINE, who was born 
in Wicklow, Ireland, on February 29, 1820, is 
the son of Robert and Elizabeth (McClelland) 
Ecclesine, and comes of a family which was origi- 
nally French, which was transplanted to Scotland and 
known as Egglesoine, and finally brought to the 
United States by the way of the North of Ireland. 
He was educated in private schools and by tutors, 
and then became the representative of the British 
Commercial Life Insurance Society at Washington, 
District of Columbia, and a frequent contributor to 
periodical literature. From 1859 to 1877 he was 
Editor and Publisher of "The New York Under- 
writer and General Joint Stock Register," and in 
1864 he edited and published "A Compendium of 
Laws and Decisions Affecting Fire Insurance Com- 
panies in Relation to Mobs, Riots and Invasions." 
An interesting contrast in topics is presented by one 
of his latest works on " Discrepancies and Anach- 
ronisms in Shakespeare's ' Henry IV., Part I,' " 
which was published in 1900. Mr. Ecclesine finally 
turned his attention to legal studies, and was in 
1879 graduated from the Law School of New York 
University. In politics he is a Democrat, but he 
has not been active therein save to assist his son, 
Thomas Ecclesine, in his election to the New York 
State Assembly in 1877 and to the State Senate in 
1878. He has held no public place, save a clerk- 
ship in the New York County Clerk's office for a 
few months in 1878. Mr. Ecclesine was married in 
December, 1845, to Marcella Keatinge, and has 
two sons : Thomas and Joseph Ecclesine. His 
office is at No. 203 Broadway, and his home at No. 
129 East 15th Street, New York. 



HANNEMAN, Louis, 1858- 

Class of 1879 Law. 
Born in New York, 1858; studied at De La Salle 
Institute, 1867-69; public school, 1869-74; College of 
City of New York, 1874-75; New York University, 
1877-79; graduated LL.B., New York University Law 
School, 1879; practicing lawyer in New York since 



1879; Attorney for City of New York during adminis- 
trations of Mayors Grant and Gilroy ; Chairman General 
Committee of Tammany Hall, 1886 ; one of the organ- 
izers of Greater New York Democracy, and Chairman 
of the County Committee. 

LOUIS HANNEMAN is through his father, 
Andrew Paul Hanneman, a descendant of 
the illustrious physician Hahnemann, the Founder 
of Homeopathy, and through his mother, whose 
maiden name was Christina Kirschner, a descendant 
of the royal house of Bavaria and a great-nephew of 
General Wallot of Bavaria. He was born in New 
York City on October 22, 1858, and was first sent 




LOUIS HANNEMAN 

to school at the De La Salle Institute of the Christian 
Brothers, in 1867-1869. From 1869 to 1874 he 
was in a public school and in 1874-1875 in the 
College of the City of New York. He then turned 
his attention to legal studies, reading law in the 
office of the Hon. Jacob A. Gross and ex-Judge 
Michael C. Gross, and also studying in the Law 
School of New York University from 1877 to 1879. 
In May of the last named year he was graduated 
from the University with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws, and since that time has been engaged in legal 
practice in New York. He was Corporation 
Attorney for the City of New York during the 
administrations of Mayors Grant and Gilroy and 
during a part of that of Mayor Strong and he has 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



215 



also been an officer of Company B. of the Twenty- 
second Regiment, New York State National Guard. 
Mr. Hanneman is a Democrat in politics and has 
been prominent and active in political affairs. In 
1886 he was Chairman of the General Committee 
of Tammany Hall. Later he became one of the 
organizers of the Greater New York Democracy, in 
antagonism to Tammany Hall, and as Chairman of 
the County Committee took a prominent part in the 
campaign which resulted in the election of Seth 
Low as Mayor. In 1901 he became Chairman of 
the County Committee of the Greater New York 
Democracy and also leader of that party in the 
Tenth Assembly District. He is a member of the 
Municipal Art Society of New York, the Royal 
Arcanum, the Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Masonic Order, the Democratic 
Club, the Veteran Association of the Twenty-second 
Regiment, the Gravesend Bay Yacht Club, and 
other organizations. He is President of the Bath 
Beach Real Estate Association and a Director of 
the Little Joe Mining Company and the Ne Plus 
Ultra Mining Company. He was married on March 
12, i8g8, to Amanda M. Ludeman and has one 
child, Elsie Louise Hanneman. His city home is in 
New York and his summer home at Bath Beach, 
Long Island. 



KOENIG, Adolph, 1855- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born in Switzerland, 1855 ; studied in public schools 
and Tarentum Academy, Pennsylvania ; Medical De- 
partment, University of Louisville, Ky., 1877-78; grad- 
uated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1879; 
in hospital service, 1879-80 ; in general practice since 
1880; Professor in Pittsburg College of Pharmacy 
since 1885. 

ADOLPH KOENIG, M.D., is a son of Chris- 
tian and Magdalena (Iseli) Koenig, and 
comes of a family chiefly devoted to agricultural 
pursuits, though in each of several generations one 
member of it was a physician. He was born at 
Wiggiswyl, Switzerland, on October 30, 1855, and 
was brought to the United States in his childhood. 
His early education was acquired in the public 
schools of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, and in 
Tarentum Academy, in the same county. He 
began his professional studies under the direction 
of Dr. James McCann, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
In 1877-78 he studied in the Medical Department 
of the University of Louisville, Kentucky, and in 
1878-79 he was in the Bellevue Hospital Medical 



College, which has since been incorporated with 
New York University. He was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1879, and for the 
following year was Resident Physician in the West- 
ern Pennsylvania Hospital, in Pittsburg. For a 
short time in the summer of 1880 he practiced in 
San Francisco, California, and in September of that 
year settled in Pittsburg, where he has since re- 
mained in the general practice of medicine. He 
has been Professor of Botany and Materia Medica 
in the Pittsburg College of Pharmacy since 1885. 
From 1886 to 1897 he was one of the editors of 




ADOLPH KOENIG 

"The Pittsburg Medical Review" and since the 
latter year has been Editor and Publisher of " The 
Pennsylvania Medical Journal." He was a Public 
School Director in Pittsburg in 1 899-1 900 and again 
in 1902. Since 1892 he has been Visiting Physician 
to the Roselia Foundling Asylum, and since 1898 
Assistant Surgeon to the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 
1893-94 he was First Vice-President of the Medical 
Society of the State of Pennsylvania, in 1895 he was 
President of the Western Pennsylvania Botanical 
Society, and in 1897 he was President of the Alle- 
gheny County Medical Society. In 1889 he was 
married to Fannie M. Low, who died a year later. 
In 1895 he was again married to Mary B. Jeffcoat. 
He has five children : Adolphus, Jr., Eugene Jeff- 



2l6 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



coat, Rhoda Victoria, Beatrice Iseli, and Olivia 
Koenig. His address is No. 122 Nintli Street, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



LEONARD, Milton Hall, 1858- 

Classof 1879 Med. 

Born in New Bedford, Mass., 1858 ; studied in public 

schools and under private tutor; graduated M.D., New 

York University Medical College, 1879; in practice 

since 1879 ; Physician to Town of Dartmouth, Mass., etc. ' 

MILTON HALL LEONARD, M.D., has the 
distinction of being descended from no 
fewer than ten members of the "ALayflower" company 




MILTON HALL LEONARD 

of pilgrims who landed at Plymouth in 1620. These 
were the Hon. John Howland, John Tilly and Bridget 
Van der Water his wife, Elizabeth Tilly, their daugh- 
ter who married the Hon. John Howland, James 
Chilton and Susannah his wife, and Mary Chilton 
their daughter, Edward Winslow and Elizabeth his 
wife, and Thomas Rogers. He is also descended 
from James Leonard, who came from Wales in 
1636 and landed at Salem, Massachusetts, afterward 
establishing at Taunton, Massachusetts, the first suc- 
cessful iron works in North America, the line running 
from James Leonard through his son Benjamin, his 
son Joseph, his son Philip, his son George, his son 
Samuel, and his son Henry Taber Leonard. The 
last named married Deborah Allen Butler, and to 



them the subject of this sketch was born in New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, on April 17, 1858. He was 
educated in the public schools of New Bedford and 
under the private instruction of Miss Betsey B. 
Winslow. Thence he came to the Medical College 
of New York University, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine on March 17, 
1879. Since that time he has been engaged in 
practice in Massachusetts. , He was Physician to 
the Town of Dartmouth in 1885-89; Physician to 
the Bristol County Jail and House of Correction in 
1880-97 ; Visiting Physician to St. Luke's Hospital, 
New Bedford ; and President of the Bristol South 
District Medical Society in 1901. He is a member 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society, the American 
Medical Association, the Alumni Association of New 
York University, the Old Colony Historical Society, 
and the Leonard Family Genealogical Historical 
and Memorial Association. He has published a 
pamphlet on the subdermic use of morphia in infan- 
tile convulsions. Dr. Leonard was married on Sep- 
tember 13, 1892, to Sarah Parthenia Gafford, of the 
Gafford family of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. 
His address is No. 62 Fifth Street, New Bedford, 
Massachusetts. 



PITKIN, Leonard Fox, 1858- 

Class of 1879 Med, 
Born in Montgomery, Ala., 1858; studied in public 
schools, high school at Middletown, Conn., and Wes- 
leyan University ; graduated M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1879 ; served in hospitals three 
years ; studied abroad one year ; in general practice in 
New York since 1883. 

LEONARD FOX PITKIN, M.D., though born 
in the South, is a member of an old New Eng- 
land family of distinguished history. For more than 
two centuries the Pitkins have been conspicuously 
identified with the history of New England, and 
especially of the State of Connecticut. In his " His- 
tory of East Hartford " Mr. J. O. Goodwin says : 
" Seldom is it the fortune of one family to have 
numbered so many individuals raised to distinction 
in the affairs of a State by their own abilities as in 
the case of the Pitkin family. . . No other family 
of our commonwealth stood so constantly and for so 
long a time in the front of current events, unless it 
was the Wolcott family of Windsor." And the 
Wokott family is descended from Martha Pitkin 
Wolcott, sister of the first American progenitor of 
the Pitkin family. Dr. Pitkin is a son of Leonard 
and Eliza Anne (Fox) Pitkin, and a direct descend- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



217 



ant of William Pitkin, who came from England and 
settled at East Hartford, Connecticut, in 1648, and 
also of William Pitkin, who was Commander-in-chief 
of the Colony of Connecticut under King George 
III. The Fox family, to which his mother belonged, 
also came from England in early times and figured 
largely in the Colonial and Revolutionary eras. 
Dr. Pitkin was born at Montgomery, Alabama, on 
August 23, 1858, and received his general education 
at Middletown, Connecticut, in the common schools, 
the high school, and, for a part of the undergraduate 
course, in Wesleyan University. Leaving Wesleyan 




LEONARD F. PITKIN 

without graduating, he entered the Medical College 
of New York University, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1879. For 
three years thereafter he served in New York City 
hospitals as an Interne, and for a year studied 
abroad, in London and Paris. Since then he has 
been engaged in a lucrative and successful general 
practice in New York City. Since 1899 he has 
been Surgeon to the corporation which is construct- 
ing the Rapid Transit Subway. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association, and other organ- 
izations. On April 14, 1880, he was married to 
Helen Langman, of New York, and has one child. 
Marguerite Pitkin. His address is No. 911 Seventh 
Avenue, New York. ■ 



SWAINE, Edgar Lacy, 1857- 

Class of 1879 Sci. 
Born in New York, 1857; graduated B.S. and C.E., 
New York University, 1879 ; Civil Engineer in railroad 
service since 1879. 

EDGAR LACY SWAINE, B.S., C.E., was born 
in New York City on July 31, 1857, the son 
of Colonel Peter Swaine and Cornelia (Lacy) 
Swaine. In New York University he was President 
of his class in the Junior year. Junior orator. Presi- 
dent of the Lacrosse Club, and a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa. He was graduated with the degrees 
of Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer in 1879, 
and since that time has been engaged as a Civil 
Engineer in railroad work. He was engaged on the 
Santa F6 Railroad in 1879-81 : an engineer and 
United States Deputy Mineral Surveyor in New 
Mexico in 1881-85 '> o" ''"'s Silver City, Deming 
and Pacific Railroad, 1885-88; on a Cable Street 
Railway in Los Angeles, California, 1888-89; and 
on the Southern Pacific Railroad, Resident Engineer 
at Los Angeles, since 1890. He is a member of 
the Military Order of Loyal Legion of the United 
States. He was married in 1883 to Florence Par- 
ker, and has one child, Le Roy Parker Swaine. He 
lives at Los Angeles, California. 



THOMPSON, Rufus Allen, 1853- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born at Sidney, N. Y., 1853 ; studied in various 
schools and academies ; taught school ; studied med- 
icine ; graduated M.D., New York University Medical 
College, 1879; in practice since 1879; President of 
Board of Health, Norwich, N. Y., since 1900. 

RUFUS ALLEN THOMPSON, M.D., is a son 
of Rufus Alden Thompson, who was a son 
of Zenus Thompson and Sarah Thompson, the latter 
a daughter of Abner and Betsey (Cross) Wood. 
Zenus Thompson was a son of Caleb Thompson and 
Lydia Thompson, the latter a daughter of Elder 
Noah Alden, a Baptist clergyman. Caleb Thompson 
was an Aide to his uncle. Captain David Thompson^ 
at Forts Ticonderoga, and Stanwix, and Crown Point, 
and himself became a Captain before the end of the 
Revolution, and he was a grandson of Hur Thomp- 
son, who came from Scotland in 1686 and settled 
at what is now Thompsonville, Connecticut. Dr. 
Thompson's mother, Samantha Sylvia (Clark) 
Thompson, was a daughter of Joseph Allen Clark 
and Eleanor (Wilson) Clark, the latter a daughter 
of Samuel Wilson and Eleanor (Morris) Wilson. 
The Wilson and Morris families were settlers in 



2l8 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



Cherry Valley, New York, and Eleanor Morris, an 
infant at the time, was one of the few who escaped 
the awful massacre there in 1778. Joseph Allen 
Clark was a son of Simon and Sarah (Allen) Clark, 
who moved from New Bedford, Massachusetts, to 
Schenectady, New York, in 1790. Of such ancestry 
Dr. Thompson was born in the Town of Sidney, 
Delaware County, New York, on November 30, 1853. 
He studied at the Delaware Literary Institute at 
Franklin, New York, the New York State Normal 
School at Cortland, and Lowell's Commercial College 
at Bingharaton, New York. At the age of sixteen 




R. A. THOMPSON 



he began teaching school during his own vacations 
and in evenings. In 1874 he went to Iowa, and 
thence the next year to Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
There he determined to become a physician, and 
accordingly returned to the east and began studying 
medicine in the office of Dr. H. J. Travis at Mason- 
ville, New York. Thence he came to the Medical 
College of New York University, from which he was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1879. During his course he was much under 
the influence of Dr. Alfred L. Loomis, and has ever 
since felt that he owed to him and to Dr. Travis a 
great debt of gratitude for their encouragement and 
direction. Immediately after graduation he began 
practice at his native place, Sidney, New York, and 



there remained until the fall of 1883, when he re- 
moved to Franklin, New York. In the fall of 1886 
he suspended practice and devoted a year to special 
studies, and then, in 1888, established himself at 
Norwich, New York, where he still remains. He 
was for many years prior to 1895 active in politics, 
as a speaker and delegate to conventions. He was 
in 1892 a candidate for State Senator, In 1890 he 
was elected Coroner of Chenango County, New 
York, and he is now in the third term of his Presi- 
dency of the Norwich Board of Health. He is a 
member of the Chenango County Medical Society, 
the New York State Medical Association, and the 
American Medical Association, and has been Presi- 
dent of the first named. He has written occasional 
articles for newspapers and magazines on political 
and medical topics. He was married on December 
25, 1878, to Rose B. Moulton, daughter of Henry 
and Huldah (Peck) Moulton of Mount Upton, 
New York, and has one child, Elizabeth Moulton 
Thompson. 



WEISS, George Conrad, 1861- 

Class of 1879 Med. 
Born in New York, 1861 ; studied in public schools; 
graduated A.B., College of City of New York, 1879, 
and M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1879; 
Interne, Charity Hospital, New York, 1882-84 ; i" gen- 
eral practice since 1885 ; Health Officer, President of 
Board of Health, and Alderman, Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

GEORGE CONRAD WEISS, M.D., a promi- 
nent physician of Mount Vernon, New York, 
was born in New York City on May 20, 1861, the 
son of Conrad and Franceska Weiss. He was grad- 
uated from the public schools of Mount Vernon, 
New York, and of New York City, and also from the 
College of the City of New York with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1879. In the same year he 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
now a part of New York University. From 1882 to 
1884 he was an Interne in the New York Charity 
Hospital on Blackwell's Island. Since 1885 he has 
been engaged in general practice in the City of 
Mount Vernon, New York, where he has been 
Health Officer in 1885-88, Alderman in 1895-97, 
and President of the Board of Health since igoo. 
He is President of the Medical Association of 
Mount Vernon and its environs, and a member of 
the Westchester County and New York State Medi- 
cal societies. His address is No. 154 Stevens 
Avenue, Mount Vernon, New York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



219 



EERIER, De Lagnel, 1859- 

Class of 1880. 
Born at Fort Hamilton, N. Y., 1859 ; studied at Trin- 
ity School, Brooklyn, and Trinity Church School, New 
York ; pursued special course. New York University, 
and received diploma, 1880; LL.B., Columbia Law 
School, 1882 ; in legal practice, Brooklyn and New 
York, since 1882. 

DE LAGNEL EERIER, a member of the Bar 
of the State of New York and of the United 
States, was born at Fort Hamilton, now a part of 
the City of New York, on October 5, 1859, the son 
of Francis E. and Julia Ann (Stanton) Eerier. His 




DE L. EERIER 



early instruction was received at Trinity School, 
Brooklyn, and at the Trinity Church School, New 
York. From the latter institution he proceeded to 
New York University, and pursued a special or 
eclectic course of study in the School of Arts, at the 
end of which, in 1880, he received a special course 
diploma, without degree. During his course in the 
University he was a member of the Eucleian Lite- 
rary Society, and was for a time Secretary and Vice- 
President of the same. Upon leaving New York 
University Mr. Eerier took up the study of law, in 
the offices of Messrs. Hubbard & Rushmore, in 
Brooklyn, and also in the law school of Columbia 
College, where he was one of the charter members 
of the Story Chapter of the Phi Delta Phi Fra- 



ternity and also a member of the Beta Theta Pi 
Fraternity, in the Columbia Chapter. He was grad- 
uated from the law school with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws in 1882, and thereupon began the 
practice of his profession. Until 1885 he practiced 
in Brooklyn, and since that date has been profes- 
sionally settled in New York. From 1890 to 1894 
he was associated with the late Edward McCarthy, 
in the firm of McCarthy & Eerier, at No. 50 Wall 
Street. Thereafter for two years he was an attorney 
for the Fidelity and Casualty Company, at No. 97 
Cedar Street. At the present time his offices are at 
No. 149 Broadway, New York. He was admitted 
to the Bar of the State of New York in 1882, and 
to that of the Supreme Court of the United States 
in 1892. So far as Mr. Eerier has a specialty in 
his profession it is admiralty. He has held no 
political office. Until 1896 he was a Democrat, but 
since that date he has been a member of the Re- 
publican party. He is a member of the Lawyers' 
Club of New York, and of the American Ornithol- 
ogists' Union. He was married in 1887 to Isabella 
Webb Parsons, and now makes his home at Ridge- 
wood, New Jersey. 



BLAKE, Henry Sargent, 1860- 

Class of 1880. 
Born at Middletown, Conn., i860; studied at In- 
stitut Dupont-Truffier, Paris, and Anthon's Grammar 
School, New York ; spent Sophomore and Junior years 
in Class of 1880, New York University, but left without 
graduating to enter business ; engaged in banking since 
1879. 

HENRY SARGENT BLAKE, banker, was born 
at Middletown, Connecticut, on March 10, 
i860. His father, John Ellis Blake, Doctor of 
Medicine, and his mother, whose maiden name was 
Elizabeth Stone Gray, were both of English ances- 
try, the former tracing his descent from Robert de 
Blakeland, in 1347. Mr. Blake studied at the Insti- 
tut Dupont-Truffier, in Paris, France, and at Dr. 
Anthon's Grammar School, in New York, and at the 
latter was prepared for advanced entrance into New 
York University. He became a member of the 
Class of 1880, and pursued the courses of the 
Sophomore and Junior years in the University. On 
March 10, 1879, however, he withdrew in order to 
engage in business. Upon that date he entered the 
banking house of Blake Brothers & Co., of New 
York, arid has since that time been constantly 
identified with it. He is a member of the Green- 
room Club, and of the Amateur Comedy Club of 



220 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



New York, and is married but has no children. 
His office is at No. 25 Broad Street, New York, and 
his home at " Hillside Ranch," Granton, New Jer- 
sey, where the June, 1900, reunion of the Class of 
1880 was held and was attended by sixteen members 
of that class. He has also a summer home on the sea- 
side at Clinton, Connecticut, in connection with an 




following with a course in the American Veterinary 
College, from which latter institution, now a part of 
New York University, he was graduated a Doctor of 
Veterinary Surgery on February 27, 1880. He then 
devoted himself to his profession, founding the 
David W. Cochran Vet-erinary Hospital, at first at 
No. 15 Vestry Street, and now at No. 19 Vestry 




HENEY S. BLAKE 



DAVID W. COCHRAN 



extensive shore property there, on which he has 
built up the cottage colony of "Beach Park," the 
management of which is entirely in his hands. 



COCHRAN, David William, 1854- 

Class of 1880 Vet. 
Born in New York, 1854; studied in public school 
and College of City of New York ; graduated D.V.S., 
Columbia Veterinary College, 1879; D.V.S., American 
Veterinary College, 1880 ; Founder and head of David 
W. Cochran Veterinary Hospital, New York. 

DAVID WH.LIAM COCHRAN, D.V.S., is a 
son of John Stewart Cochran and Catherine 
H. Cochran, of Scotch- Irish origin, and was born in 
New York City on July 23, 1854. He studied in 
Public School No. 34, and the College of the City 
of New York, and for seven years worked in the 
architectural iron trade. He then entered the 
Columbia Veterinary College and was graduated a 
Doctor of Veterinary Science on April 23, 1879, 



Street, New York. He was for a time Lecturer on 
Pathological Horseshoeing at the American Veterin- 
ary College. He is a member of the Masonic 
Order, including Knights Templar and Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He was married on August 21, 
1884, to Isabelle A. Warwick, and has three chil- 
dren : Edith C, Jessie I., and Davetta A. Cochran. 
His home is at No. 120 West 12th Street, New 
York. 



CRUIKSHANK, William Joseph, 1859- 

Class of i8Sa Med. 
Born in St. John, N. B., 1859; studied in public 
schools, Portland, Me., and New York; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1880; 
in practice since 1880. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH CRUIKSHANK, M.D., 
son of John and Matilda Josephine (Irwin) 
Cruikshank, of Scotch and Irish ancestry, was born 
at St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, on April 2, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



221 



1859. His academic education was received in the 
public schools of Portland, Maine, and New York 
City, and he was graduated with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine from the New York University 
Medical College in 1880. Immediately thereafter 
he settled in Brooklyn, New York, in the practice 
of his profession, and has there since remained. 
For about five years he was a Sanitary Inspector on 
the staff of the Department of Health of Brooklyn, 
having been appointed to that place by Mayor Low. 
He is a member of the Kings County Medical Soci- 
ety, the New York State Medical Association, and 
the Brooklyn Pathological Society. In politics he 
is an Independent. He was married on Decem- 
ber 2, 1885, to Maud Foster, and has one daugh- 
ter, Marion Cruikshank. His address is No. 102 
Fort Greene Place, Brooklyn, New York. 



DOLD, William Elliott, 1856- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born at Harrisonburg, Va., 1856; studied in private 
schools, Washington and Lee University, University 
of Virginia, New York University, and University of 
Vienna; graduated M.D., New York University Med- 
ical College, 1880; extensive hospital and asylum prac- 
tice ; Physician in charge of River Crest Sanitarium, 
Astoria, New York. 

WILLIAM ELLIOTT DOLD, M.D., a well 
known alienist of New York, is a native of 
Virginia, and on the side of his father, Samuel 
Miller Dold, M.D., a descendant of a family settled 
in the Valley of Virginia for many generations. On 
the side of his mother, whose maiden name was Sue 
Heneberger, he is of Dutch descent. He was born 
at Harrisonburg, Rockingham County, Virginia, on 
July 25, 1856, and received a practical and thorough 
education. He first attended private schools in 
Virginia, under the Rev. A. P. Boude, the Rev. R. 
T. Barton, and others. In the three years 1873-76 
he pursued an academic course at the Washington 
and Lee University, at Lexington, Virginia ; studied 
medicine under Dr. John Graham, of Virginia, in 
1877-78, and in 1878-79 continued his professional 
studies at the University of Virginia. Thence he 
came to New York University, pursued the course 
of its Medical College in 1879-80, and in the latter 
year was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. He pursued special courses of study 
under Professor Draper, Professor A. L. Loomis, 
Dr. William Welch, Dr. Bosworth, and Dr. Joseph 
Winters. Later, in 1885-S7, he did special work 
in European asylums for the insane, and studied at 



the University of Vienna, receiving from that insti- 
tution special diplomas. His hospital and asylum 
work, to which his professional career has been 
chiefly devoted, was begun immediately after gradu- 
ation, in the Randall's Island Hospital, New York. 
Thereafter he was Assistant Physician at the Man- 
hattan State Hospital for Men, in 1880-81 ; Assist- 
ant Physician at the Northern Hospital for the 
Insane at Winnebago, Wisconsin, in 1881-82; 
Junior Assistant Physician at the Bloomingdale Asy- 
lum, New York, in 1882-85 > ''^ asylums in Europe, 
as already stated, in 1885-87 ; Senior Assistant 




W. E. DOLD 

Physician at Bloomingdale Asylum, in 1888-98, 
and Acting Medical Superintendent of Blooming- 
dale for a time ; Medical Superintendent of the 
Oakwood Sanitarium, at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 
in 1 899-1 900 ; and Physician in charge of the River 
Crest Sanitarium, Astoria, Long Island, (New York 
City, Borough of Queens), since 1900. In the last 
named work he is associated with Dr. John Joseph 
Kindred, a fellow Virginian. In addition to his 
office and home at the sanitarium, he has an office 
at No. 1 1 25 Madison Avenue, New York City. He 
is a member of the Southern Society of New York, 
the sons of Confederate Veterans, the Medico- 
Psychological Society of the United States, the 
American Medical Association, the New York 



222 



UNIFERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 



County Medical Society, the New York Society of 
Medical Jurisprudence, and the Medical Society of 
the Greater New York ; a fellow of the New York 
Academy of Medicine, and a member, and formerly 
Vice-President, of the Wisconsin Central Medical 
Society. He was married on April 27, 1887, to 
Willy T. Brown, of Albemarle County, Virginia, and 
has two children : Douglas Meriwether and William 
Elliott Dold, Jr. Mrs. Dold died on July 2, 1902. 



FEENEY, Michael Bernard, 1859- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born in New York, 1859 ; studied in public schools 
and College of City of New York; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1880; served 
at Bellevue Hospital, 1879-80; Chief Sanitary Inspector, 
Borough of Manhattan, New York, since 1898; Editor 
of " Public Health Record " ; in practice in New York 
since February, 1881. 

MICHAEL BERNARD FEENEY, M.D., 
comes from the families of Feeney and 
Hafafl which were settled in Sligo, Ireland, since 
the titlnes of the Druids. His father and mother, 
Michael and Mary (Haran) Feeney, came to 
AmeriiJft about 1840, and settled in New York, 
where he was born on January 4, 1859. His edu- 
cation was begun in the public schools of his native 
city, and was continued through three years in the 
College of the City of New York. Then, selecting 
the medical profession for his life work, he entered 
the Medical College of New York University, and 
was graduated there with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in t88o. Meantime he did ambulance 
service at Bellevue Hospital in 1879-1880. On 
February i, 1881, he began the practice of his pro- 
fession in New York, and has been steadily and suc- 
cessfully engaged therein ever since. Since 1898 
he has been Chief Sanitary Inspector of the Borough 
of Manhattan. He is a member of the New York 
County Medical Society, and of the New York Phy- 
sicians' Mutual Aid Society, and is Editor of " The 
Public Health Record." Dr. Feeney is a Democrat 
in politics, and has been active in party affairs, 
though he has held no public office save that of 
School Trustee in the fourteenth Ward of New York, 
from 1884 to 1892. From 1892 to 1895 ^^ ^''^^ ^ 
member of the Executive Committee of the New 
York State Democracy and leader of the Seventh 
Assembly District in that organization and since 
then has been Chairman of the General Committee 
of Tammany Hall in the Sixth Assembly District. 
He is a member of the Democratic Club of New 



York, the Metamora Club, the Naphthali Lodge, 
No. 752, F. & A. M., and other fraternities and 
organizations. He was married on January 4, 1883, 
to Margaret M. M. Tierney, of New York, who 
bore him four children : Margaret M., Adelaide M., 
Joseph M., and Bernard M. Feeney. Mrs. Feeney 




M. B. FEENEY 



died on July 17, 1894. On July 29, 1899, Dr. 
Feeney was again married, to Juliette I^. Fitzgerald. 
His address is No. 30 East 7th Street, New York. 



FINCH, Charles Hervey, 1852- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born in New York, 1852 ; in telegraph service, 1865-74 ; 
graduated Ph.B., Brown University, 1877; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1880; 
practicing physician, Fall River, Mass., 1880-87, and 
East Providence, R. I., 1887-90; Medical Missionary 
of Baptist Board in China, 1890-1900 ; driven from China 
by Boxer uprising, 1900; resumed practice in United 
States, igoi. 

CHARLES HARVEY FINCH, A.B., M.D., 
son of Robert T. and Emma (Case) Finch, 
was born in New York City on August 21, 1852, 
and received his early education in public and 
private schools in Norwich, Connecticut. When 
only a little more than thirteen years old, however, 
in September, 1865, he was compelled to go to 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



223 



work for his own support, as a telegraph messenger 
boy. For three years he was thus engaged, and 
then became a telegraph operator, at Norwich. 
Two years later, in 1870, he removed to Boston and 
was there employed by the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company until 1874. Meantime he had 
diligently pursued his studies, so that he was able 
to enter Brown University, Providence, Rhode 
Island, and be graduated in 1877 with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. He then became a 
student in the New York University Medical Col- 
lege, and in 1880 was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately thereafter he 
began the practice of his profession at Fall River, 
Massachusetts, and remained there from 1880 to 
1887. For the next three years he was in prac- 
tice in East Providence, Rhode Island. In 1890 
he went to Sui Fu, in the western part of China, 
as a Medical Missionary, under the auspices of the 
Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, and labored 
there with much devotion and success, though 
with serious injury to his health, for ten years. In 
1900 came the terrible Boxer outbreaks, which 
extended to the part of China in which Dr. Finch 
was living. The Vice-Governor of the province was 
in league with the Boxers, and planned a general 
massacre of all Christians. Other counsels pre- 
vailed, however, to a sufficient extent to permit 
Dr. Finch, with his wife and youngest child, to 
escape. The refugees came to America, and here, 
in 1901, Dr. Finch resumed his medical practice. 
He was married on June 29, 1888, to Clara Blake 
Whitmarsh, and had four children : Stuart Reynolds, 
Myron Whitmarsh, Harvey Case, and Arthur Blake 
Finch. Of these Stuart died in infancy, at East 
Providence, and Harvey at the age of two years, in 
China. 



HENDRICKSON, Nathaniel Carpenter, 
1860- 

Class of 1880 Arts. 
Born at Jamaica, N. Y., i860; eminent for scholar- 
ship in New York University ; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1880 ; A.M., 1883; Ph.D., 1888; LL.B., 
Columbia College Law School, 1884; instructor in 
University Grammar School, 1884. 

NATHANIEL CARPENTER HENDRICK- 
SON, A.M., Ph.D., LL.B., was born at 
Jamaica, Long Island, now a part of New York City, 
on May 8, i860. He entered the College of Arts 
of New York University, and was there conspicuous 
for his scholarship. He belonged to Delta Phi and 



Phi Beta Kappa, and was Secretary of Eucleian, 
Junior orator, Editor of " The University Quarterly," 
University Contestant in Greek in the Intercolle- 
giate Literary Association in 1880, and Greek Salu- 
tatorianand Second Fellow at Commencement. He 
was graduated in 1880 with the Baccalaureate 
degree in Arts, and received the Master's degree in 
1883. He was graduated from the Columbia Col- 
lege Law School with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1884, and after a post-graduate course 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
New York University in 1888. In 1884 he became 
an instructor in the University Grammar School, 
and later became its Principal. His home is at 
Jamaica, New York. 



LEVY, Samuel D., i860- 

Class of 18S0 Law. 
Born in New York City, i860; studied in public 
schools; graduated LL.B., New York University Law 
Department, 1880; studied in law offices; in practice 
since 1880 ; Director of United Hebrew Charities, 18S2-95, 
and free counsel to same, 1889-95 ; President of Hebrew 
Sheltering Guardian Society since i8g6. 

SAMUEL D. LEVY, LL.B., comes of Bohe- 
mian stock on the side of his father, who was 
educated to be an instructor and was a fine classical 
scholar. On the side of his mother, whose maiden 
name was Babetta Koenigsberg, and who was born 
at Waldsdorf, Bavaria, he comes of German ancestry. 
He was born in New York City in i860, and was 
educated in the public schools, including four years 
in the evening high schools. He was an apt scholar 
in all branches, but paid especial attention to politi- 
cal economy, German, law, and book-keeping. In 
the fall of 1879 he entered the Law Department of 
New York University, and because of his admirable 
preparation and by dint of hard work and earnest 
efforts, he was able to complete the two years' course 
in one year and be graduated in 1880. He had at 
that time been employed in law offices, in one 
capacity or another, since 1873, and of course had 
thus acquired a considerable knowledge of the pro- 
fession. In the law class of 1880 he was one of 
only two Jews who entered the Prize Examinations, 
though there were more than a dozen other Jews in 
the class, all older than he. Mr. Levy has been 
steadily and successfully engaged in the practice of 
his profession in New York City ever since his grad- 
uation and admission to the Bar, and is now counsel 
for several large corporations. His practice deals 
with corporation, commercial and real estate law, 



224 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



negligence suits and equity cases. In addition to 
the exacting duties of his profession, Mr. Levy has 
found time and strength to devote much attention 
to various public services. He was for seven years 




S. D. LEVY 

a Public School Trustee in the Eleventh Ward of 
New York. For two years he was Secretary of the 
Charity Organization Society in District No. 4. 
From 1882 to 1895 ^^ ^^''"^^ ^ Director of the United 
Hebrew Charities, and from 1889 to 1895 he was 
counsel, without pay, for the same beneficent organ- 
ization. Not only did he give his services as coun- 
sel without remuneration, but he personally bore 
all the expenses of his office. In 1896 he was 
elected President of the Hebrew Sheltering Guard- 
ian Society (Orphan Asylum) of New York, and 
has been re-elected every year since. That insti- 
tution affords a home to nine hundred children, 
orphans, half-orphans, abandoned and destitute, and 
spends more than gioo,ooo a year for their support 
and education. Mr. Levy is also an Associate 
Patron of the United Hebrew Charities, a Patron 
of the Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids, a 
Donor of the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, 
and a member of the societies of the Hebrew 
Orphan Asylum, the Mount Sinai Hospital, the 
Hebrew Infant Asylum, the Hebrew Technical Insti- 
tute, the Association for the Aid of Jewish Prisoners, 



the East Side Ladies' Society, the Seaside Home, 
and various other charitable organizations. He was 
married on February 3, 1889, to Millie Irene Berg, 
sister of the distinguished physicians and surgeons, 
Drs. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg. His home is 
at No. 77 West 119th Street, and his offices are in 
the Dun Building, at Broadway and Reade Street, 
New York. 



MOLLENHAUER, Richard, 1854- 

Class of i83o Med. 
Born in New York, 1854; studied in private and 
public schools; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, 1880; in practice since 1880; Visiting 
Physician to St. Mark's Hospital; Attending Physician 
to the North Eastern Dispensary and to the German 
Polyclinic; author of papers on medical topics. 

RICHARD MOLLENHAUER, M.D., is a son 
of Edward MoUenhauer, a native of Erfurt, 
Germany, and Agatha (Lenz) MoUenhauer, a 
native of Berlin, and is one of a family of four 
sons and one daughter. The father, Edward Mol- 
lenhauer, was a musician, and came to the United 
States as soloist in 1852 with Julian and his famous 




R. MOLLENHAUER 



orchestra. Richard MoUenhauer, the youngest of 
the four sons, was born in New York on February 
28, 1854, and was educated in public and private 
schools, under Professors Marx, Leiferts, Rossi, 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



225 



Dalurai, and others. He entered the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, in 1877, and was graduated a Doctor of 
Medicine in 1880. Since that time he has been 
steadily and successfully engaged in practice in 
New York City. He has been a Visiting Physician 
to St. Mark's Hospital, and an Attending Physician 
to the North Eastern Dispensary, and to the German 
Polyclinic. He has published papers on " Bacteria 
and Disease," " A Singular Case of Vertebral 
Disease," " Leprosy," and "The Germ of a Com- 
municable Disease Derived from a Rabid Dog." 
He is a member of the New York County Med- 
ical Society, the Manhattan Medical and Surgical 
Society, the German Medical Society, the Society 
of Medical Jurisprudence, and the Neurological 
Society. Dr. MoUenhauer was married on January 
6, 1892, to Adelaide G. Bauer, and has two chil- 
dren : a daughter, Marguerite Florence, and a 
son, Richard Frederick William Grant MoUenhauer. 
His address is No. 250 East 53rd Street, New 
York. 



PUTNAM, Frederick Wallace, 1856- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born at Truxton, N. Y., 1856; graduated Homer 
Academy, Homer, N. Y., 1876; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1880; in practice 
since 1880; School Commissioner of Binghamton, 
1882-84; Thirty-third degree Mason. 

FREDERICK WALLACE PUTNAM, M.D., 
of Binghamton, New York, is the son of 
William Wallace Putnam and Philinda (Pierce) 
Putnam, and is descended from John Putnam, of 
Aston Abbotts, Bucks, England, who came to 
America, and died at Danvers, Massachusetts, on 
December 30, 1662. Dr. Putnam was educated at 
the Homer Academy, Homer, New York, and was 
graduated from it, in the classical course, in June, 
1876. He then entered the office of Dr. H. C. 
Hendrick, of McGranville, New York, and thence 
came to New York University, and was graduated 
from its Medical College with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine, in February, 1880. Since that date 
he has been steadily engaged in private practice, at 
Binghamton, New York. He was a School Com- 
missioner of Binghamton in 1 882-1 884. He was 
one of the founders of the New York State Medical 
Association, and a Vice-president in 1894; a mem- 
ber of the Binghamton Academy of Medicine, and a 
life member of the Broome County (New York) 
VOL. 11 — i; 



Medical Society, of which he was President in 1886. 
He has been an Examining Physician for the Con- 
necticut Mutual, and the Prudential Life Insurance 
companies for the past eighteen years, and is still in 
the service. Dr. Putnam is an eminent member of 
the Masonic Fraternity, having risen to the Thirty- 
third degree. He is a member of Binghamton 
Lodge, No. 177, F. & A.M., Binghamton Chapter, 
No. 139, R.A.M., Malta Commandery, No. 21, K.T., 
Otseningo Bodies A.A. Scottish Rite, and Otseningo 
Chapter, No. 14, Order of the Eastern Star; and 
he has held office in some of them for twenty years. 




FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 

being Past High Priest R.A.M., Past Master Cryptic 
Rite, Past Commander K.T., Past Master Rose 
Croix, Past Commander-in-chief of the Scottish 
Rite, and Past Patron Order of the Eastern Star. 
For the past six years he has been the Foreign 
Correspondent of the Grand Chapter of the Order 
of the Eastern Star, and still continues in that 
relation. He has a library of 3,000 volumes, of 
which 700 are on Freemasonry, including the most 
complete collection of Eastern Star literature in the 
State of New York and one of only four private col- 
lections in existence. Dr. Putnam was married on 
March 18, 1880, at Newark Valley, New York, to 
M. Libbie Tubbs. They have no children. His 
address is Binghamton, New York. 



226 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



REID, Adrian Young, 1848- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born at Crawfordsville, Georgia, 1848; educated at 
Flechyville Institute, Ga. ; served in Confederate Army 
in Civil War ; employed by Western Union Telegraph 
Co., and D. Appleton & Co., 1868 to 1880; entered New 
York University Medical College, 1878, and graduated 
M.D., 1880; in practice in New York since 1880. 

ADRIAN YOUNG REID, M.D., son of Dr. 
James Ransom Reid and Araminta (Thomas) 
Reid, was born at Crawfordsville, Georgia, on Novem- 
ber 3, 1848, and at an early age removed with his 
family to Thomasville, Georgia, where he received a 




A. Y. REID 

good English, classical and scientific education at 
the Flechyville Institute. At the age of sixteen he 
was drafted into the Confederate Army for the clos- 
ing campaigns of the Civil War, and was thus com- 
pelled abruptly to abandon his books. After the 
war, the family having been much impoverished 
through the vicissitudes of the conflict, he set out 
for the Nortli to make his own way in the world, 
and to seek further education. He reached New 
York in the fail of 1868, and at once entered the 
service of the Western Union Telegraph Company, 
as error clerk in the operating room. He soon 
became a proficient operator, and was put in charge 
of a telegraph office in the service of D. Appleton 
& Co., the publishers. His connection with that 



firm was of inestimable advantage to him. Sur- 
rounded with books and in contact with authors and 
publishers, his intellectual progress was greatly stimu- 
lated. He studied, meanwhile, in night schools, 
pursuing courses in Anatomy, Physiology, Chemistry, 
and Electricity. He also took private lessons in 
German, and attended many lectures by eminent 
scientists. After a year's study under Dr. M. B. 
Early of New York, he was inatriculated in the New 
York University Medical College in the fall of 1878. 
The Western Union Telegraph Company kindly 
gave him a night office, with hours from six to nine 
p. m., and he thus continued in its employ during 
his college course. His salary being insufficient for 
his needs, however, he hit upon the plan of making 
more money by reporting college lectures for the 
benefit of others and his own profit. He thus made 
copious notes of the lectures of Professor Darling, 
of the Chair of Anatomy, and, with the Professor's 
permission, made copies thereof for sale among the 
other students. With a copying press he made 
five hundred copies of some four hundred pages of 
notes, and realized more than three hundred dollars 
from the enterprise. He did the same with the 
lectures of Professor Thomson, of the Chair of 
Materia Medica, performing the work in partner- 
ship with William Van Dyke, of Beyrout, Syria, 
and between them they realized about six hundred 
dollars. After graduating with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1880, Dr. Reid became for two 
years Visiting Physician to the De Milt Dispensary, 
and since then has been steadily engaged in private 
practice in New York City, with constantly increas- 
ing success and prosperity. He is a member of 
the Medical Society of the County of New York. 
He was married in June, 1880, to Mary Belle 
Polley, and has one child, Araminta Florence Reid. 
His address is No. 104 Lexington Avenue, New 
York. 



ROBERTS, William Henry, 1860- 

Class of 1880 Arts. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., i860; graduated A.B., 
with honors, New York University, 1880; A.M., 1885; 
banker, 1881-84; Union Theological Seminary, 1884-87; 
Presbyterian minister since 1887. 

WILLIAM HENRY ROBERTS, A.M., is a 
son of Hugh and Catharine (Morris) 
Roberts, and was b'orn in Brooklyn, New York, on 
April 14, i860. In New York University he was a 
member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa, and 
was conspicuous for his scholarship. He was Treas- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



227 



urer of his class, an officer of Eucleian, University 
Contestant in Mathematics in the Intercollegiate 
Literary Association in 1880, Junior orator, and 
Philosophical orator at Commencement. He was 
graduated in 1880 with the Baccalaureate degree in 
Arts, and received the Master's degree in 1885. 
In 1881-84 he was Assistant Secretary of the Green- 
point Savings Bank, in Brooklyn, and in 1884-87 
was a student in the Union Theological Seminary. 
In the latter year he was ordained into the ministry 
of the Presbyterian Church, and became pastor of a 
church at Port Jefferson, Long Island. He was 
married on October 17, 1888, to Athenias M. 
Giffing. 



SWIFT, Edwin Elisha, 1855- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born at Hamden, Conn., 1855 ; studied in Hamden 
public schools, New Haven High School two years, 
Hopkins Grammar School three years ; entered Yale 
College, 1874, but left after half year on account of ill- 
ness ; tutored for one year ; studied njedicine with 
father, 1877-78, at Yale 1879, and at New York Univer- 
sity, 1879-80; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1880; in practice since 1881, with ex- 
tensive hospital service. 

EDWIN ELISHA SWIFT, M.D., a well known 
New York physician, is a son of a notable 
member of the medical profession in the last gener- 
ation, Dr. Edwin Dwight Swift (New York Univer- 
sity, 1848), of Hamden, Connecticut, and Sarah 
Louise (Punderson) Swift. His paternal grand- 
father, great-grandfather, and great-great-grand- 
father were respectively Augustus Buel Swift, Philo 
Swift, and General Heman Swift. On the maternal 
side the line runs backward as follows from his 
mother : Elisha Punderson, Samuel Punderson, 
Thomas Punderson, Jr., Thomas Punderson, Sr., 
John Punderson 2n 1, John Punderson ist, the last 
named having come to this country from Yorkshire, 
England, about 1637. Dr. Swift was born at Ham- 
den, Connecticut, on March 23, 1855, and began 
his education in the public schools of that town. 
Later he attended the New Haven High School for 
two years, and the Hopkins Grammar School for 
three years, thus preparing himself for college. He 
entered Yale College in 1874, but after half a year 
was compelled to leave on account of impaired 
health. Next he was a tutor for a year, and then 
he began the study of medicine. That was in 
1877, and his preceptor was his father, under whose 
capable instruction he remained for two years. In 



1879 he attended the Yale Medical School, and 
from it came to New York University Medical Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1880. The next year he 
began the practice of his profession with his father, 
at Hamden, Connecticut. In 1882 he served in 
the Blackwell's Island Hospital for the Insane, and 
in 1883 opened an office for private practice in 
New York City, where he still remains. In addi- 
tion to his private practice he has done much hospi- 
tal service, including seventeen years as Attending 
Physician to the Old Ladies' Home on Amsterdam 




EDWIN E. SWIFT 

Avenue, eight years as Attending Physician to the 
Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, (Neurological 
Department, with Dr. E. C. Seguin), one year as 
Assistant in the Neurological Department of the 
Vanderbilt Chnic, and one year as Assistant in the 
Throat Department of St. Bartholomew's Clinic. 
For a year he was a member of Troop A, National 
Guard of New York. He is now a member of the 
Sons of the Revolution, the Republican Club, the 
Manhattan Athletic Club, the New York County 
Medical Society, and the Academy of Medicine. 
In politics he is a Republican. He was married on 
October 28, 1891, to Virginie Mignon Bancroft, and 
has one child, Elizabeth M. Swift. His address is 
No. 112 West 8ist Street, New York. 



228 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



TAYLOR, John Linbarger, 1856- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born at Rahway, N. J., 1856 ; studied in public schools 
and Rahway Institute ; began study of medicine pri- 
vately, 1876; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital Med- 
ical College, 1880; in practice in Morris County, N. J., 
since 1885. 

JOHN LINBARGER TAYLOR, M.D., a gen- 
eral practitioner of Boonton, New Jersey, was 
born at Rahway, New Jersey, on October 22, 1856, 




JOHN L. TAYLOR 

and is the son of Josiah and Jane Brown ( Linbarger) 
Taylor. He received his early education in the 
public schools of Rahway and the Rahway Institute, 
and in 1876 began the study of medicine under 
Dr. J. J. Daly, of Rahway. Later he entered the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, now a part of 
New York University, and was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1880. Until May, 
1881, he was associated in practice with his former 
preceptor. Dr. Daly. In 1882 he went to China to 
teach medicine, but returned home the next year on 
account of impaired health. When again able to 
work he resumed the practice of his profession, in 
1885, in Morris County, New Jersey, near Lake 
Hopatcong, where in addition to his general prac- 
tice he was Surgeon to the Forcite Powder Company 
and to several mining companies in that region. 
In 1894 he removed to Boonton, in the same 



county, where he now resides and practices his pro- 
fession. He is a member of the Morris County 
Medical Society. He was married on August 10, 
1882, to Adelaide T. Kanouse, daughter of the Hon. 
John L. and Eliza T. Kanouse, of Boonton, who has 
borne him one child, Edward C. Taylor. 



WILLSON, Joseph Clarence, 1854- 

Class of 1880 Med. 
Born at Canton, N. Y., 1854 ; studied at Canton public 
and high schools; graduated A.B., St. Lawrence Uni- 
versity, 1878; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1880; in practice since 1880; Coroner 
in 1881 ; Chemist for New York State Agricultural 
Department since 1893. 

JOSEPH CLARENCE WILLSON, A.B., M.D., 
is descended from Jonathan Willson, son of 
Benjamin Willson. Jonathan was born about 1740, 
served in the French and Indian War for two years 
under General Putnam, and also in the Revolution. 
He removed from Warwick, Massachusetts, to Shore- 
ham, Vermont, in 182 1, and died there in 1830. 
He married Lucy Blondin, of Rehoboth, Massachu- 
setts, and had ten children. Of these the youngest, 




J. C. WILLSON 

Reuben Willson, was born at Warwick, Massachu- 
setts, in 1 784, and died at Canton, New York, in 
1857. He was married to Lucinda Rich, of Shore- 
ham, Vermont, daughter of Thomas and Millicent 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



229 



(Conant) Rich, and had issue. One of his chil- 
dren, Ezekiel Willson, married Marcia Ann Simonds, 
daughter of Joel and Rhoda (Meade) Simonds, and 
was the father of the subject of this sketch. Dr. 
Willson was born at Canton, New York, on Novem- 
ber 9, 1854, and was prepared for college at the 
public and high schools of that place. He then 
entered the St. Lawrence University, at Canton, and 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in 1878. In the fall of the latter year he entered 
the New York University Medical College, and was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1880. Since graduation he has been steadily 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Can- 
ton, New York, with the exception of one year in 
1883-84, when he practiced at Burneyville, Indian 
Territory. In 1881 he was elected Coroner of 
St. Lawrence County, and served for one term. 
Since 1893 he has been Chemist for the New York 
State Agricultural Department. In politics he is a 
Democrat. He is a member of the St. Lawrence 
County Medical Society, "The Club" of Canton, 
and Beta Zeta Chapter of Beta Theta Pi. He has 
been married twice. His first wife was Ida M. 
Robinson, and his second was his cousin, Ella M. 
Willson, great-granddaughter of his great-grand- 
father, Jonathan Willson, through his fifth child, 
Christopher, and the latter's son Elisha. 



BALDWIN, Frederick Augustus, 1846- 

Class of 18S1 Med. 
Born in New York, 1846; graduated M.D., Belle- 
vue Hosp. Med. Coll., 1881 ; Attending Physician 
Eastern Dispensary, 1883-84, and Attending Surgeon, 
1884-86; Attending Surgeon, Out-door Department, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1884-95 ; Assistant to Chair of 
Clinical Surgery, Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
1885-89 ; in continuous practice of profession since 
1881. 

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS BALDWIN, M.D., 
was born in New York City on January 7, 
1846, the son of Abner Wade and Mary Ann Bald- 
win, the latter born Mode. His ancestors came 
originally from England and settled in Connecticut 
in colonial days, and thence removed to New Jer- 
sey. His education, prior to his professional train- 
ing, was acquired in common and high schools in 
New York and New Jersey and his life, up to man- 
hood, was chiefly spent on a farm in the latter state. 
Upon leaving the high school he did not at once 
begin the study of medicine, but instead engaged in 
business pursuits in New York City, for the space of 
five years. During this time, however, he prepared 



himself by reading and study for entrance into a 
medical college, and finally was matriculated at the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, then an inde- 
pendent institution. There he was graduated in 
the Class of 1 88 1, with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. He at once entered upon the practice of his 
profession and has continued therein without cessa- 
tion to the present time. In 1883-84 Dr. Baldwin 
was Attending Physician to the Eastern Dispensary 
of New York, for the diseases of children, and in 
1884-86 he was Attending Surgeon to the same in- 
stitution. From 1884 to 1895 he was Attending 




FREDERICK A. BALDWIN 

Surgeon to the Out-door Department of Bellevue 
Hospital, and from 1885 to 1889 he was Assistant 
to the late Dr. Alexander B. Mott in the Chair of 
Clinical Surgery in Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege. He is a member of the American Medical 
Association, of the New York State Medical Asso- 
ciation, and of the New York County Medical Asso- 
ciation, and is actively engaged in practice in New 
York. He was married to Mary Ehzabeth Field, 
of New York, in April, 1895. 



BUCHANAN, Walter Duncan, 1859- 

Class of 1881 Arts. 
Born in Milwaukee, ^A^is., 1859; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1881; A.M., 1884; studied at 



230 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



Union Theological Seminary; minister of Presbyterian 
Church since 1884. 

WALTER DUNCAN BUCHANAN, A.M., 
Minister of the Fourth Avenue Presby- 
terian Church of New York City, is a son of the 
Rev. Dr. John Mairs Buchanan and Jane McElderry 
(Douglass) Buchanan, whose names amply indicate 
their Scottish origin. He was born in Milwaui<ee, 
Wisconsin, on April 13, 1859, and came to New 
York University in 1877. He was President of his 
class in the Freshman year, and a prominent mem- 
ber of the Glee Club. In 1881 he was graduated 
with the Baccalaureate degree in Arts, and in 1884 
he received the Master's degree. Meantime he 
studied in Union Theological Seminary, and in 1884 
was ordained into the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church. Since then he has been successively 
Pastor of the Seventh Avenue Chapel of the Fifth 
Avenue Presbyterian Church, of the Chalmers Pres- 
byterian Church, of the Thirteenth Street Presby- 
terian Church, and at present of the Fourth Avenue 
Presbyterian Church, of which Howard Crosby, 
Chancellor of New York University, was for many 
years the pastor. He was married on May 16, 
1882, to Grace Mortimer, daughter of John H. 
Mortimer, and has two children : Grace Douglass 
and Mary Dun Buchanan. His address is No. 54 
East 50th Street, New York. 



Vermont Episcopal Institute, and Trinity School, 
New York. Then he entered the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, now a part of New York Univer- 
sity, and was graduated with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1881. He served for a time as 
Clinical Assistant under Dr. Joseph W. Howe, 
Professor of Surgery in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, and as an Interne in the Charity 
and New York Maternity hospitals on Blackwell's 
Island. Since 1883 he has been engaged in private 
practice in New York, and in addition has done 
much educational and hospital work. For many 



COLLYER, Herman Livingstone, 1857- 

Class of 1881 Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, New York, 1857; studied in public 
schools and private academies ; graduated M.D., Belle- 
vue Hospital Medical College, 1881 ; in hospital ser- 
vice, 1882-83; in private practice since 1883; Assistant 
and Lecturer in New York Polyclinic, 1883-95 J Pro- 
fessor in New York School of Medicine ; in hospital 
practice. 

HERMAN LIVINGSTONE COLLYER, M.D., 
was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 
March 9, 1857, the youngest of four sons in a family 
of eight children. His father, William M. Collyer, 
was a leading shipbuilder of New York and Brook- 
lyn, and was the great-grandson of English ancestors 
and of a veteran of the Revolution. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Josephine G. Holman, 
was a stepdaughter of General Charles W. Sandford 
and the only daughter of Joseph G. and Mary S. 
(Latour) Holman, the one a prominent actor and 
the other an eminent opera singer, both of English 
birth. Dr. Collyer studied in the public schools of 
Brooklyn, the Williamsburg Business College, the 




HERMAN L. COLLYER 

years he was connected with the New York Poly- 
clinic, as Assistant to Professor Elsberg in Laryn- 
gology, 1883-84; Clinical Assistant to Dr. Munde, 
Professor of Gynecology, 1885-88; and Lecturer 
on Gynecology, 1888-95. He has also been Pro- 
fessor of Gynecology in the New York School of 
Medicine, Attending Gynecologist to the German 
West Side Dispensary, Associate Gynecologist to 
the French Hospital, etc. In his private practice 
Dr. Collyer has made gynecology his specialty, and 
has attained an extensive and profitable practice. 
He has also done much charity work, and has 
contributed numerous articles to current profes- 
sional literature. He is a fellow of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, was the Chairman of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



231 



its Library Committee in 1899 and has been its 
Treasurer since 1899. He is a member of the 
New York County Medical Society, of which he has 
been Censor ; a member of the MetropoHtan Medi- 
cal Society, the New York State Medical Society, 
the New York Obstetrical Society, the Eastern Med- 
ical Society, the Charity Hospital Alumni Society, 
and the New York Athletic Club. As was his father 
before him, he is a staunch Republican in politics. 
He was married on February 26, 1878, to Susie G. 
Collyer, youngest daughter of John Collyer, and has 
had three children: Frances (deceased), Homer 
Lusk, and Langley Collyer. His address is No. 109 
East S4th Street, New York. 



DE LACY, George Charles, 1859- 

Class of 1881 Law. 
Born in New York, 1859; studied in public schools ; 
graduated LL.B., New York University Law School, 
1881 ; in general practice since 1881 ; Director of bank 
and various corporations. 

GEORGE CHARLES DE LACY, LL.B., is a 
son of William Henry and Delia (Raftery) 
De Lacy, his father having been a son of Professor 
William De Lacy, of Dublin University, Ireland, a 
native of France who went to live in Dublin in 
1837. He was born in New York City on February 
18, 1859, and was educated in the public schools, 
being graduated from the old Chrystie Street 
Grammar School. In 1876 he began the study of 
law in the office of the Hon. William Mitchell, 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New 
York, and remained in that connection until 1881. 
Meantime he entered the Law School of New York 
University in 1879 ^"i^ ^^^ graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1881. Upon grad- 
uation he entered upon the active and general 
practice of his profession, and has been engaged 
therein ever since. For twenty years he was 
counsel for the North American Mercantile Agency 
Company, and at the present time he is counsel for 
many corporations, including the Troy Laundry 
Machinery Company, Limited, the New York 
National Exchange Bank, the New York Mercantile 
Exchange, the Italian Chamber of Commerce in 
New York, the Merchants' Refrigerating Company, 
and others. He has also a large practice in pro- 
bate and bankruptcy cases, and has been retained 
as counsel in bankruptcy proceedings not only in 
New York, but also in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Illinois, and Wisconsin. He has been admitted to 
practice in the Federal Courts, including the 



Supreme Court of the United States. In connection 
with his legal practice, Mr. De Lacy has grown to 
exercise large influence in the financial world and is 
sought by many prominent financiers for advice and 
counsel both of a legal and commercial character. 
Within the last few years he has had complete con- 
trol of the organization of a number of corporations 
representing millions of dollars in capital. He is a 
Director of the New York National Exchange Bank 
of New York, of the Merchants' Refrigerating Com- 
pany, and of the corporation of James Rowland & 
Company. He is a member of the New York 




GEO. C. DE LACY 

Athletic Club, the Hardware Club, and the Harlem 
Democratic Club. In politics he is a Democrat, 
and holds a prominent place in the inner coterie of 
counselors who guide and direct the policy of his 
party in City and State. Although frequently urged 
by the leaders of the Democracy to take office of 
rank commensurate with his ability and influence 
he has always hitherto declined to accept either 
appointment or nomination to public office. In 
religious matters he is a Roman Catholic. He was 
married on October 10, 1893, to Nellie Lincoln, 
and has three children : George Charles, Jr., Wil- 
liam Burr, and May Lincoln De Lacy. His office 
is at No. 220 Broadway and his home is at No. 238 
West 132nd Street, New York. 



232 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



DIXON, David Jeffrey, 1856- 

CIassofi88i Vet. 
Born in Franklin County, Pa., 1856; studied in public 
schools; graduated from Mercersburgh College, 1878; 
graduated D.V.S., American Veterinary College, 1881 ; 
in practice and business since 1881. 

DAVID JEFFREY DIXON, D.V.S., son of 
William Dunlop Dixon and Martha (Gillan) 
Dixon, of Scotch- Irish ancestry, was born on March 
19, 1856, at St. Thomas, Franklin County, Penn- 
sylvania. He attended the public schools and 
Mercersburgh College, and was graduated from 
the latter in June, 1878. He then entered the 
American Veterinary College, which has now been 
incorporated with New York University, and was 
graduated from it with the degree of Doctor of 
Veterinary Surgery in 1881. Since the latter date 
he has been engaged in professional practice and 
in business. His address is No. 106 First Streer, 
Hoboken, New Jersey. 



DUNCAN, George Martin, 1857- 

Class of 1881 Arts. 
Born in Haledon, N. J., 1857; studied at Paterson 
Seminary, Paterson, N. J.; graduated A. B., New York 
University, 1881, and A.M., 1884; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School, 1884; Graduate Fellow of Yale; studied in 
German and French Universities; Editor on "The 
New York Examiner"; Professor of Philosophy in 
Yale. 

GEORGE MARTIN DUNCAN, M.A., Pro- 
fessor of Mental and Moral Philosophy at 
Yale, was born in Haledon, New Jerse)', on Novem- 
ber 26, 1857. He is the son of James and Jane 
Martin (Torhet) Duncan, both of Scotch descent. 
His early training was at Paterson Seminary, Pater- 
son, New, Jersey, where he was fitted for College. 
From there he went to New York University, where 
he won the First Butler Eucleian Essay prizes in 
1880 and 1 88 1, and where he was Junior orator 
with honorable mention, was Junior Regent in 
1879-80, was University Contestant in Mental 
Science in the Intercollegiate Literary Association 
in 188 1. He was President of his class, was Secre- 
tary, Librarian, Vice-President and President of 
Eucleian, was a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternities, and was English Salutatorian at 
the commencement of 1881, when he was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Three years 
later the University gave him the degree of Master 
of Arts. Having decided to pursue philosophical 
and theological studies Mr. Duncan went to the 
Yale Divinity School for three years. At the end 



of this time he was given a fellowship and the 
degree of Bachelor of Divinity, and during the year 
of 1884-85 he pursued advanced studies in phi- 
losophy under President Porter, and in theology 
under the professors of the Divinity School. He 
then went abroad and continued his work in the 
universities of Germany and France, studying in 
1885 at the University of Jena, Germany; in 1886 
at Leipzig University and Heidelberg; in 1886- 
1887 at Berlin University, and in 1887-1888 in the 
University of Paris, France. During this period of 
foreign study and until 1895 Mr. Duncan travelled 




GEORGE M. DUNCAN 

extensively, visiting among other countries Egypt, 
Palestine, Syria, Greece and Norway. For some 
time he was on the editorial force of "The New 
York Examiner." From 1 888-1 891 he was an 
Instructor of Philosophy at Yale, and in 1894 he 
was appointed Professor of Philosophy in that Uni- 
versity. In 1890 he published the philosophical 
works of Leibnitz, translated from the Latin and 
French, with notes. He is a member of the 
American Psychological Association. He was mar- 
ried on August 29, 1889, to Mary A. Carter, 
daughter of Theodore R. Carter, of Montclair, New 
Jersey. In politics Mr. Duncan is an independent 
Republican. He now makes his home at New 
Haven, Connecticut. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



FERGUSON, James Alexander, 1860- 

Class of i83i Med. 
Born in New York City, i860; educated in New York 
public schools and College of the City of New York ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1881 ; in practice since 1881. 

JAMES ALEXANDER FERGUSON, M.D., is a 
son of James Thompson Ferguson and Celia 
(Terry) Ferguson, of Scotch and EngUsh descent, 
and was born in New York City on July 3, i860. 
He studied in the pubhc schools of New York, and 
in the College of the City of New York, and in 




JAS. A. FERGUSON 

1877 entered the Medical College of New York 
University. In 1881 he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, and has been engaged 
in practice ever since. He was House Surgeon at 
the Reception Hospital in Ninety-ninth Street in 
1881-83, 3"d for the last eight years has been Visit- 
ing Surgeon to the Fordham Hospital. He was a 
Public School Trustee in 1890-96, and a School 
Inspector in 1896-1901. He belongs to the Ameri- 
can, New York State, and New York County Medi- 
cal associations, the New York State and New York 
County Medical societies, the Harlem Medical 
Society, the Physicians' Mutual Aid Society, the 
Masonic Order, the Borough Club of the Bronx, the 
Schnorers' Club, and the Fordham Club. He was 



married to Mary A. Turner on April 3, i88f 
lives on Lind Avenue, High Bridge, New 
City. 



3, and 
York 



G 



HAMMOND, Graeme Monroe, 1858- 

Class of 1881 Med., 1899 Law. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., 1858 ; studied in private 
schools ; Columbia College of Mines, 1875-78 ; gradu- 
ated M.D., New York University Medical College, 
1881 ; and LL.B., New York University Law School, 
1899 ; in practice of medicine since 1881 ; specialist in 
nervous diseases since 1885 ; Professor of Nervous and 
Mental Diseases, New York Post-Graduate Medical 
School, since 1886 ; author. 

RAEME MONROE HAMMOND, M.D., 
LL.B., the eminent specialist and in- 
structor in diseases of the brain and nervous system, 
is a son of the late Dr. William Alexander Ham- 
mond and Helen (Nesbit) Hammond, who were 
respectively of English and Scotch extraction, and 
was born in the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
on February i, 1858. He was educated in Farrand's 
and Everson's private schools from 1868 to 1875, 
and then entered the School of Mines of Columbia 
College, where he spent three years. Thence, in 
1878, he came to the Medical College of New York 
University, and was graduated from it with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 188 t. Immedi- 
ately upon graduation he engaged in the practice 
of his profession, in New York City. For a time 
his practice was general in character, but in 1885 
he adopted as his specialty the study and treatment 
of diseases of the brain and nerves, and in that im- 
portant branch of medical and surgical science has 
made himself one of the foremost authorities. Since 
1886 he has been Professor of Nervous and Mental 
Diseases in the New York Post Graduate Medical 
School and Hospital. He is also Neurologist to 
the Charity Hospital of New York. He has con- 
tributed much to current professional literature, and 
is the author of a standard work on " Diseases 
of the Nervous System." Dr. Hammond is a mem- 
ber of the American Neurological Association, and 
was its President in 1898. He is also a fellow of 
the New York Academy of Medicine, and a mem- 
ber of the New York Neurological Association, the 
New York County Medical Society, the New York 
State Medical Society, the Society of Medical Juris- 
prudence, the New York Athletic Club, and the 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, Yacht Club. After attain- 
ing distinction in the medical profession Dr. Ham- 
mond decided to add to his knowledge of that 
science a more complete knowledge of law, and 



234 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



accordingly in 1897 entered the Law School of New 
York University as a student and was graduated a 
Bachelor of Laws in 1899. He was married in 
1881 to Louise Elsworth, and has four children: 
Helen, Dorothea, Louise, and Claire Hammond. 
His home is at No. 60 West 55th Street, New York 
City. 



HANN, George Valentine, 1846- 

Classof 1881 Med. 
Born at Marthasville, Mo., 1846 ; educated in private 
schools ; served in Union army throughout Civil War ; 
engaged in piano, organ and music trade, 1871-79; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1881 ; in practice in New York since 1881. 

GEORGE VALENTINE HANN, M.D., born 
at Marthasville, Warren County, Missouri, 
on February 14, 1846, is the son of John and 




GEORGE V. HANN 

Catherine Ann (Berg) Hann, people of Hesse- 
Darmstadt parentage. His maternal grandfather 
was Dr. Berg, a prominent surgeon and dentist. 
He was educated at private schools in St. Charles 
County, Missouri, down to the middle of the Civil 
War. Then, though only seventeen years of age, he 
joined the Missouri Mounted Infantry, Company B, 
Sixty-seventh Regiment, and served until the end of 
the war. In 187 1 he became interested in the 
piano, organ and music trade, and was successfully 



engaged in it until 1879, when he decided to devote 
himself to the profession of medicine. He accord- 
ingly entered the New York University Medical Col- 
lege, and was graduated from it with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in February, 1881. He at once 
began the practice of his profession, at No. 518 
West Fifty-first Street, New York. Later he re- 
moved to No. 313 of the same street, where he has 
ever since remained, enjoying a large and prosper- 
ous family practice throughout the west side of the 
city. He is a member of the New York State Medi- 
cal Association, of the Physicians' Mutual Aid Asso- 
ciation, of the National Accident Society, of the 
Knights of Honor, of the American Legion of 
Honor, and of the Order of Chosen Friends. In 
politics he has always been a Democrat, though 
inclined to regard with toleration and respect sin- 
cere men of all parties. He was married on August 
I, 1882, to Sophia Frederika Rosanna Seibert, and 
has one child : Ursula Mabel Hann, born on July 
26, 1883. 



HENRIQUES, Julian Nunes, 1860- 

Class of 1881. 
Born in Cleveland, Ohio, i860; studied at Mount 
Washington Collegiate Institute, New York ; spent 
three years in New York University, Class of 1881, 
leaving in 1880 ; engaged in banking and stock broker- 
age since 1880. 

JULIAN NUNES HENRIQUES, a successful 
example of " the college bred man in busi- 
ness," is a native of Cleveland, Ohio, where he was 
born on October 10, i860. His father was Solo- 
mon Nunes Henriques, son of Abraham Nunes and 
Rachel (Aflelo) Henriques, and his mother's maiden 
name was Amelia Birdsall Pratt. He received his 
preparatory education in New York City, at the 
famous old Mount Washington Collegiate Institute, 
v/hich was in its day one of the foremost secondary 
schools in America and which boasts among its 
alumni — or whose alumni roll boasts, for the insti- 
tute is no longer in existence — an exceptional 
proportion of eminent men. From the Mount 
Washington Institute Mr. Henriques came to New 
York University, as a member of the Class of 1881, 
and pursued his course of study successfully until 
well into the Junior year. Then he deemed it ex- 
pedient to divert his attention at first to professional 
and then to business pursuits. For a time he studied 
in a lawyer's office, and then, in 1880, engaged in 
the banking and brokerage business, in which he 
has ever since been occupied with enviable success. 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



235 



He is a partner of the well known financial house of 
Ailing, Reynolds & Co., at No. 33 Wall Street, New 
York. Mr. Henriques is a devoted alumnus of the 
Mount Washington Collegiate Institute, and has 




JULIAN N. HENRIQUES 

done much to promote the welfare of its Alumni 
Association, of which he lias long been Secretary 
and Treasurer. He has manifested a similar interest 
in the affairs of New York University, and of the 
Delta Chapter of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity of which 
he was an active member in his undergraduate days. 
In politics he is a Republican, but he has sought 
and held no public office. He was married on 
April 22, 1897, to Grace Green, of New York, and 
has one child, a daughter, who bears the name of 
Grace Green Nunes Henriques. 



HOSKINS, William Horace, 1860- 

Classof 1881 Vet. 
Born in Rockdale, Pa., i860 ; studied in public schools ; 
graduated D. V.S., American Veterinary College, 1881 ; 
employed in book and stationery store ; in practice and 
business since 1881 ; active in politics ; editor. 

WILLIAM HORACE HOSKINS, D.V.S., 
was born at Rockdale, Delaware County, 
Pennsylvania, on July 23, i860. His father, John 
Taylor Hoskins, was of English and Welsh ancestry, 
and his mother, whose maiden name was Jane Brown, 



came of English and Irish stock. His early educa- 
tion was acquired in the public schools of his native 
place. Later he entered the American Veterinary 
College, which has since been incorporated with 
New York University, and was graduated from it in 
1 88 1 with the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Sci- 
ence. He had already been employed in a country 
book and stationery store. Since 1881 he has been 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession 
and in business pursuits, being much interested in 
Building Association matters and being President of 
three commercial corporations. He is Editor of 
" The Journal of Comparative Medicine " and 
" Veterinary Archives." He has long been active 
in political life, being a member of the Civil Service 
Reform Association and of the Ballot Reform As- 
sociation, having been Democratic candidate for 
Mayor of Philadelphia. He is or has been Pres- 
ident and Secretary of the United States, Penn- 
sylvania State, and Keystone Veterinary Medical 
associations, of the American Veterinary College 
Alumni Association, and of the Pennsylvania State 
Board of Veterinary Examiners. He is an honorary 




W. HORACE HOSKINS 



member of the New York County and New Jersey 
State Veterinary associations, and a member of the 
Faculty Club of the University of Pennsylvania and 
of the Crescent C'ub of Philadelphia. He was 



236 



UNIVERSITIES ANT) THEIR SONS 



married in Apri), 1885, to Annie Evans Clieever, 
and has three children-: Horace Preston, Margaret 
Evans, and Cheston Morris Hoskins. His home 
is at No. 3314 Powelton Avenue, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 



JAMIESON, Walter Wilson, 1857- 

Class of 1881 Med. 
Born at Amboy, N. Y., 1857 ; studied in public school, 
Pulaski Academy, Syracuse Medical College, and New 
York University; graduated M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1881 ; in practice. New Bremen, 
N. Y., 1881-93 ; at Syracuse, N. Y., since 1893. 

WALTER WILSON JAMIESON, M.D., was 
born at Amboy, Oswego County, on May 
8, 1857. His father John Jamieson, was born in 




W. W. JAMIESON 

Scotland, and was brought to this country in infancy 
by his parents, John and Mary Jamieson. His 
mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Codner, 
was of Dutch descent, and was born in the State 
of New York, the daughter of John and Margaret 
(Carney) Codner. Dr. Jamieson's early education 
was acquired in the common schools, and was con- 
tinued through a four years' course ni Pulaski 
Academy, at Pulaski, New York. He began his 
medical studies under Dr. F. S. Low, at Pulaski, 
continued them at Syracuse Medical College, in 



1878, and completed them in New York Univer- 
sity Medical College in 1880-81, being graduated 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine on March 8, 
1 88 1. Immediately thereafter he began the prac- 
tice of his profession at New Bremen, Lewis County, 
New York, and soon acquired an extensive patron- 
age, embracing nearly all parts of the county. 
There he remained until 1893, when he removed 
to his present home and field of practice, in the 
city of Syracuse, New York. While in New Bremen 
he was, in 1885, elected Supervisor of that town, on 
the Republican ticket, over a rival who had never 
before been defeated, although the vote of the town 
was usually Democratic by a majority of about two 
to one. He was afterward elected Justice of the 
Peace, and was President of the United States 
Board of Examiners for Pensions, resigning the 
latter place on his removal to Syracuse in 1893. 
Dr. Jamieson is a member of the New York State 
Medical Society, the Masonic Order, and the Order 
of Foresters. He was married on June 15, 1893, 
to Minnie M. Lefevre, daughter of M. R. Lefevre, 
and a descendant of French Huguenots. He has 
three children, Lucile, Marion, and Donald Jamie- 
son. His address is No. 304 Hawley Avenue, 
Syracuse, New York. 



LEAVITT, John Fremont, 1856- 

Classof iSSi Med. 
Born at Baptistown, N. J., 1856; studied in public 
schools, and at Pennington Seminary, Pennington, 
N. J., and State Model and Normal schools, Trenton, 
N. J. ; studied medicine privately, and served in drug 
store ; studied at University of Vermont and at New 
York University Medical College ; graduated M.D., 
New York University Medical College, 1881 ; in prac- 
tice at Baptistown, 1881-84; at Bristol, Penn., 1885; 
at Camden, N. J., since 1885; President of Camden 
County District Medical Society, 1900-01. 

JOHN FREMONT LEAVITT, M.D., one of 
the leading physicians of the City of Camden, 
New Jersey, was born at Baptistown, New Jersey, 
on October 8, 1856. His paternal family was set- 
tled in New England several generations ago, and 
his grandfather, John Leavitt, was a farmer in Rock- 
ingham County, New Hampshire. His father, John 
Leavitt, M.D., was born in New Hampshire, but on 
reaching manhood entered the New York University 
Medical College and was graduated. He thereafter 
practiced his profession successfully in various places 
in New Jersey for more than twenty-five years, until 
his death. He held high rank in his profession, 
and for some time was President of the Hunterdon 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



237 



County, (New Jersey) Medical Society. Dr. John 
Leavitt married Atarah Smith, who survives him. 
She was one of the fifteen children of James Smith, 
of Milford, New Jersey, all of whom lived to be 
more than fifty years old. She bore Dr. Leavitt two 
children, the subject of this sketch and a daughter, 
Mary Jenness, who became the wife of A. B. Cham- 
berlin, a merchant. John Fremont Leavitt at first 
attended the public school at Baptistown. Later 
he went to Pennington Seminary, at Pennington, 
New Jersey, and also to the New Jersey State Model 
and Normal schools at Trenton. In these institu- 




JOHN F. LEAVITT 

tions he acquired an excellent general education. 
The study of medicine was begun by him in his 
father's office, with his father as preceptor. For 
two years he was employed by Dr. Pittinger, of Glen 
Gardner, New Jersey, in his drug store. Following 
that service he attended a course of lectures in the 
Medical School of the University of Vermont, at 
Burlington. Finally he entered the New York Uni- 
versity Medical College and was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1881, since which 
time he has been steadily and successfully engaged 
in the practice of his profession. Until 1884 he 
was settled at Baptistown. Then he removed to 
Bristol, Pennsylvania, for a short time, when, not 
being satisfied with the outlook there, he went to 



Camden, New Jersey. That was in 1885. Since 
that time he has remained in Camden, and has won 
a place in the foremost rank of his profession in 
that city. He began his practice there, and also 
conducted a drug store, at the corner of Third and 
Elm streets. A few years later he removed the 
store to Third and Mount Vernon streets, where 
Dr. Howard F. Palm purchased a Jialf interest in it. 
After two years the store was sold and the partner- 
ship dissolved. In 1899 Dr. Leavitt purchased a 
lot on Elm Street and there built a house which is 
now his home and office. In politics Dr. Leavitt 
has always been a strong Republican and he has 
taken an active interest in the work of that party. 
In 1896 he was appointed Health officer of the City 
of Camden, by the Health Board, and in 1900 he 
was re-appointed for a term of three years. He is 
also Physician in charge of the Municipal and Small- 
pox hospitals of Camden. He is a member of the 
Hunterdon County District Medical Society, the 
Camden County District Medical Society (of which 
he was President in 1900-01), the Camden City 
Medical Society (of which he is now President), the 
Camden Medico- Surgical Society (of which he was 
President in 1898), the New Jersey State Medical 
Society, the American Medical Association, the New 
Jersey State Sanitary Association, the Camden Re- 
publican Club, the First Ward Republican Club, the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Royal 
Arcanum, and the Shield of Honor. He was mar- 
ried on June 25, 1885, to Clara B. Kachline, daugh- 
ter of Edward B. and Mary Elizabeth Kachline, of 
Frenchtown, New Jersey, and has one child, Flor- 
ence May Leavitt, born on June 2, 1886. His 
address is No. 522 North Third Street, Camden, 
New Jersey. 



LEMON, Andrew, 1859- 

Class of 1881 Law. 

Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1859 ; studied in public 

schools and high school; graduated LL.B., New York 

University Law School, 1881 ; admitted to Bar, 1882 ; in 

practice since 1882 ; Police Justice and City Magistrate. 

ANDREW LEMON, LL.B., Lawyer and City 
Magistrate, comes of Scotch-Irish stock, 
and is the son of David B. and Bessie (Britton) 
Lemon. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 
October 2, 1859, and studied in the public schools 
and high school. Thence he proceeded to the Law 
School of New York University, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1881. The 
next year he was admitted to the Bar of the State 



238 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of New York, and he has been in active practice 
ever since. During his professional career he has 
served for two years as a Police Justice and for 
three years as a City Magistrate. In politics he is a 




ANDREW LEMON 

Republican. He is a member of the Bar Associa- 
tion, the Bushwick Club, the Canarsie Yacht Club, 
the Masonic Order, and the Order of Odd Fellows. 
He was married in 1889 to Ida A. Lang, and has 
had three children, only one of whom, Andrew 
Lemon, Jr., is now living. His office is at No. 93 
Nassau Street, New York, and his home at No. 45 
Linden Street, Brooklyn, New York. 



of Scotland, and the son of William and Nicholas 
(Paul) McClelland. He was born on December 
19, 1854, and at an early age was brought to the 
United States. His academic education was gained 
in the public schools, and then he was thrown 
entirely on his own resources for his maintenance 
and further education. For a number of years he 
did double duty, working as a clerk in the daytime 
and diligently prosecuting his studies at night. In 
this way he made steady progress, though it some- 
times seemed slow. At last, in 1881, he completed 
his course in the Law School of New York Univer- 
sity, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. Since that time he has been steadily and 
successfully engaged in the practice of his profession, 
excepting for the periods spent in the public ser- 
vice. Mr. McClelland early developed a taste for 
politics and for public life. He made his home in 
Westchester County, and became one of the leaders 
of the Democratic party there. In the fall of 1884 
he was elected to the State Assembly from the First 
District of Westchester County, for the year 1885. 
He quickly made his forceful presence felt in that 



McClelland, Charles Paul, 1854- 

Class of 1S81 Law. 
Born in Scotland, 1854 ; studied in public schools ; 
graduated LL.B., New York University Law School, 
1881 ; member of New York State Assembly, 1885, 
i885, and iSgi ; leader of majority in 1891 ; State Sen- 
ator in 1892-93 ; member of Greater New York Con- 
solidation Commission ; Special Deputy Collector of 
Port of New York, 1886-1890 ; President of Village 
of Dobbs Ferry, and member and President of Dobbs 
Ferry Board of Education; practicing lawyer in New 
York. 

CHARLES PAUL McCLELLAND, LL.B., 
who has long been prominent as a lawyer 
and political leader in New York State, is a native 




CHARLES P. MCCLELLAND 



body at Albany, and served his constituents so well 
that he was re-elected the next fall for the year 
1886. At the end of that session he retired from 
the Assembly for a time, but remained in the public 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^39 



service, as a Manager of the Hudson River Hospital 
for the Insane, which place he filled from 1886 to 
1896, and also as Special Deputy Collector for the 
Port of New York, from December, 1886, to April, 
1890. He was recalled to the legislative service of 
the State in the fall of 1890, when he was elected 
to the State Assembly again from the same district 
as before, and served during the session of 1891. 
During that session he was Chairman of the Ways 
and Means Committee and leader of the majority 
party on the floor of the Assembly. In the fall of 
1 89 1 he was elected to the State Senate, for the 
years 1892-93, from the district composed of West- 
chester and Rockland counties. In the Senate he 
was Chairman of the Committee on Insurance, and 
in that capacity framed the existing codification of 
insurance laws of the State of New York. In addi- 
tion to these state and national services Mr. McClel- 
land has been active in local affairs. His home for 
thirty-two years has been in the beautiful suburban 
Village of Dobbs Ferry, on the Hudson River. For 
two years he was President of that village. Since 
1890 he has been continuously a member of the 
Dobbs Ferry Board of Education, and since 1897 
he has been President of that board. He is also 
counsel to the Dobbs Ferry Bank, and to the Green- 
burgh Savings Bank at Dobbs Ferry. He is a 
prominent member of the Dobbs Ferry Athletic 
Club, and in other respects is among the foremost 
citizens of that village, where he has an attractive 
home on Clinton Avenue. His office is at No. 32 
Nassau Street, New York City, and there, of course, 
the bulk of his professional work is done. He is a 
member of the Democratic Club of New York, of 
the Burns Society, and of the St. Andrew's Society 
of the State of New York, of which latter represen- 
tative Scottish organization he has been a member 
of the Board of Managers for the last five years. 
Mr. McClelland was married at Natick, Massachu- 
setts, on September 6, 1879, ^° Meta Janet Bab- 
cock, and has four children: George William, 
Myra Belle, Clarence Paul, and Meta Josephine 
McClelland. 

PEARCE, Eugene Frederick, 1858- 

Class of 1881 Arts. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1858 ; studied in public 
schools and Adelphi Academy; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1881 ; graduated M.D., Long Island 
College Hospital, 1883; in practice since 1884. 

EUGENE FREDERICK PEARCE, A.B., 
M.D., is the son of Frederick and Marga- 
retta (Keane) Pearce, the former a native of Wes- 



ton-super-Mare, England, and the latter of Limerick, 
Ireland. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 
September 12, 1858, and studied in public schools 
Nos. 8, 31 and 15, of that city, being graduated 
from the last named in 1875 as valedictorian of his 
class. He was prepared for college at the Adelphi 
Academy, in Brooklyn, and was graduated from it 
in the class of 1877. He then entered New York 
University, in the College of Arts. There he was 
a member of the Delta Chapter of Psi Upsilon, a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa, of Eucleian, and of the 
Lacrosse team which at that time was doing much 




EUGENE F. PEARCE 

to popularize that fine sport in the United States. 
He won the first fellowship, three hundred dollars, in 
the classical course, and in 1881 was graduated with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, as Valedictorian of 
his class. In the following fall he entered the Long 
Island College Hospital, in Brooklyn, and in 1883 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine, as one of the honor men of his class. With 
this brilliant record for scholarship. Dr. Pearce 
began professional work. In 1883-84 he served as 
an Interne at the Long Island College Hospital, and 
also as an Ambulance Surgeon to the City of Brook- 
lyn. He became associated with Dr. George H. 
Atkinson in medical and surgical practice in 1884, 
and has ever since continued in that practice. In 



240 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



1885-86 he was Adjunct Surgeon to the Long Island 
College Hospital Dispensary, and for several years 
was Assistant Sanitary Inspector of the Brooklyn 
Health Department. Since 1887 he has been Phy- 
sician to the Order of the Sons of St. George and to 
the Foresters of America, and since 1890 to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is, of 
course, a member of those organizations, and also 
of the Royal Arcanum ; and he has been the chief 
officer of each of the lodges. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Kings County Medical Society, the New 
York State Medical Association and the American 
Medical Association. He was married on Febru- 
ary 3, 1S85, to Emily S. Lyons, and has three 
children : Frederick K., Edna S., and Harry L. 
Pearce. His address is No. 95 Henry Street, 
Brooklyn, New York. 



PILGRIM, Charles Winfield, 1855- 

Class of 1881 Med. 
Born at Turner, N. Y., 1855 ; studied at Monroe 
Institute and under private tutors ; studied medicine 
at Bellevue Hospital Medical College ; graduated 
M.D., 1881 ; studied in Vienna, Munich and Berlin, 
1885-86 and 1889; practitioner in mental and nervous 
diseases in various hospitals and asylums since 1881 ; 
Superintendent of Hudson River State Hospital, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., since 1893. 

CHARLES WINFIELD PILGRIM, M.D., 
specialist in mental and nervous diseases, 
is a son of Roe C. and Frances (Wilkes) Pilgrim, of 
Dutch descent, and was born at Turner, Orange 
County, New York, on March 27, 1855. His aca- 
demic education was acquired at the Monroe In- 
stitute, Monroe, New York, and under private tutors. 
In 1877 he began the study of medicine under the 
preceptorship of Dr. Herman Canfield and Dr. 
Beverley Livingston, in New York City. He at- 
tended lectures at the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, now a part of New York University, and 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1 88 1. Afterward, from May, 1885, to June, 
1886, and in the summer of 1889, he studied in 
Vienna, Munich, and Berlin. Dr. Pilgrim's profes- 
sional practice began in 1881, when he became 
House Physician in Bellevue Hospital. In the 
spring of 1882 he became Assistant Physician to 
the State Asylum for Insane Criminals, at Auburn, 
New York, and thus entered upon what has been 
the chief work of his life — the care of the insane. 
From 1883 to 1890 he was Assistant Physician to 
the State Hospital for the Insane at Utica, New 



York, with intervals of study and service abroad, as 
already noted. During his stay in Munich, Bavaria, 
in the summer of 1885, he was a Volunteer Physi- 
cian in the Frauenklinik, or hospital for women, in 
that city. In 1890-93 he was Superintendent of 
the Willard State Hospital for the Insane, at Willard, 
New York, and since May i, 1893, he has been 
Superintendent of the Hudson River State Hospital 
for the Insane, at Poughkeepsie, New York. His 
entire career has thus been given to public institu- 
tions, and he has never engaged in private practice. 
He was associate editor of " The American Journal 




CHAS. W, PILGRIM 

of Insanity " from 1882 to 1890, of "The State Hos- 
pital Bulletin" in 1896-98, and of "Archives of 
Neurology and Psychopathology " in 1898-1901. 
Among his publications may be noted papers on 
"A Study of Suicide," "Schools for the Insane," 
" Genius and Suicide," and " Communicated In- 
sanity," in "The Popular Science Monthly," and 
on " The Treatment of the Insane," " The Statistics 
of Insanity," "Does the Loco Weed Produce In- 
sanity?" and various other allied topics in other 
periodicals. He is a member of the American 
Medico-Psychological Association, the New York 
Academy of Medicine, the New York State Medical 
Society, the Dutchess County Medical Society, the 
Alumni Society of Bellevue Hospital, and the Lotos 



UNIFERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



241 



Club of New York. He was married on June 12, 
1889, to Florence Middleton, of Utica, New York, 
and has one child, Florence M. Pilgrim. 



SCHOLLDERFER, Edmund, 1855- 

Class of l83i Med. 
Born at Yorktown, N. Y., 1855; studied at Peekskill 
Military Academy; graduated M.D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1881 ; in practice since 1881. 

EDMUND SCHOLLDERFER, M.D., a prom- 
inent physician of Westchester County, 
New York, is a son of Leonard and Mary Elizabeth 




EDMUND SCHOLLDERFER 

(Fisher) Schollderfer, both natives of Germany, 
and was born on December 31, 1855, ^' Yorktown, 
Westchester County, New York. He attended the 
common school at Peekskill and Annsville, and 
afterward the Peekskill Military Academy. About 
1878 he began the study of medicine under Dr. 
John N. Tilden, of Peekskill, New York, and Dr. 
Ambrose L. Ranney, of New York, the latter an 
uncle of Professor A. L. Loomis. Finally he entered 
the Medical College of New York University, and 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1881. For two years thereafter he practiced 
his profession at Peekskill, and then removed to 
Yorktown Heights, Westchester County, New York, 
VOL. 11. — 16 



where he has ever since remained, and where he has 
a wide and successful practice. He is a member 
of the Westchester County Medical Society and the 
Masonic Order. He is also a member and officer 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was mar- 
ried on February 21, 1889, to Marietta (Tompkins) 
Jordan, a widow, who died on March 10, 1891. 
Later, on October 10, 1901, he was again married 
to Mary Louise Lee. His home is the Meadbrook 
Farm, formerly the home of General Montross, at 
Yorktown Heights, New York. 



SKEEL, Franklin Deuel, 1851- 

Classof i83i Med. 
Born at Sterling Valley, N. Y., 1851 ; studied at 
Falley Seminary and elsewhere; graduated A.B., 
Wesleyan University, 1875, and A.M., 1879; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1881 ; 
in practice since 1881, chiefly as ophthalmologist. 

FRANKLIN DEUEL SKEEL, A.M., M.D., 
Ophthalmologist, comes of a long line of 
American ancestors, and is the son of Harlow and 
Lucy L. (Deuel) Skeel. He was born at Sterling 
Valley, New York, on February 7, 1851, and was 
educated at the Falley Seminary, Fulton, New 
York, and elsewhere. In 1 8 7 1 he entered Wesle)'an 
University, at Middletown, Connecticut, and was 
graduated a Bachelor of Arts in 1875, receiving the 
Master's degree in 1879. In the summer of 1875 
he was an assistant to Professor G. Brown Goode in 
the work of the United States Fish Commission. 
Finally he entered the Medical College of New 
York University, and was graduated from it with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1881, since 
whiQh time he has been engaged in the practice of 
his profession. He has long paid especial attention 
to ophthalmology. In 1884 he became an Assistant 
Surgeon to the New York Eye Infirmary, and since 
1893 has been Surgeon to that institution. He has 
also served as Ophthalmologist to St. Joseph's 
Hospital, and to the New York Institution for the 
Deaf and Dumb, and as Professor of Ophthalmology 
in the New York School of Clinical Medicine. He 
is a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, 
an associate member of the Arctic Club, and a 
member of the Aldine Association, the Camera 
Club, the New York Microscopical Society, the 
American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, the American Ophthalmological Society, 
the New York Ophthalmological Society, the New 
York Academy of Sciences, the Salmagundi Club, 



242 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



the Medical Society of Greater New York, the New 
York County Medical Association, the Medical 
Society of the Borough of the Bronx, and the New 
York State Medical Society. He has contributed 
occasional scientific and medical articles to the 
medical press. He was married in December, 
1882, to Mary A. Robertson, and has one child, 
Henry Robertson Skeel. His address is No. 361 
Mott Avenue, and also No. 58 East 25 th Street, 
New York. 



SMITH, Frederick Walter, 1858- 

Classof 1881 Med. 
Born at Lisle, N. Y., 1858; graduated Lisle Union 
School and Academy, 1878; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1881 ; served in St. 
Luke's Hospital; in practice in Syracuse, N. Y., since 
1881 ; Demonstrator of Anatomy, Syracuse University 
Medical College, 1882-85; Coroner, Onondaga County, 
1888-91 ; Health Commissioner, Syracuse, 1892-97 ; 
member New York State Board of Health, 1895-igoi ; 
author of numerous publications. 

FREDERICK WALTER SMITH, M.D., one 
of the foremost physicians of the central 
part of New York State, is a son of John Lewis and 
Rose (Walter) Smith, both of whom came of New 
England stock early settled in New York. His 
grandparents on both sides came from New Eng- 
land and were pioneers in Broome County, New 
York, where they were interested in the lumber 
trade, and a maternal great-grandfather was Captain 
Asa Morse, of the Revolutionary Army. He was 
born at Lisle, Broome County, New York, on 
August 24, 1858, being the only son of his parents, 
and at the age of fourteen years was thrown entirely 
upon his own resources through the sudden death 
of both his parents, within a few days of each other, 
in an epidemic of cerebro-spinal meningitis. He 
was able, however, not only to support but to edu- 
cate himself thoroughly in the local schools, and in 
1878 he was graduated from the Lisle Union 
School and Academy. Then he entered the 
Medical College of New York University, and in 
1881 was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. A brief period of service as an Interne, 
by substitution, in St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 
followed, and then, in June, i88r, he established 
himself in the practice of his profession in Syracuse, 
New York, where he has since remained and where 
he now stands in the forefront of his profession. 
He went to Syracuse a stranger, but soon won high 
success in his professional, business and social 
relations, and is now a large property owner in that 



city and one of its representative men. Beside 
attending to liis large general practice, Dr. Smith 
has filled the following places : Demonstrator of 
Anatomy in Syracuse University Medical College, 
1882 to 1885; Coroner of Onondaga County, 1888 
to 1891, inclusive; Commissioner of Health of the 
City of Syracuse, 1892 to 1897, inclusive ; member 
of the New York State Board of Health, 1895 to 
1901, inclusive, and Secretary of its Committee on 
Tuberculosis, 1896 to i9or. He is at this time 
Health Officer of the City of Syracuse. He is a 
member of the Onondaga County Medical Society, 




fred'k w. smith 

the Syracuse Academy of Medicine, the American 
Public Health Association, the Syracuse Chamber 
of Commerce, the Citizens' Club of Syracuse, the 
Masonic Order, the Order of Odd Fellows, and the 
Congregational Church. In politics he is_ an earn- 
est Republican, and has often represented his city 
and county in conventions of that party. He is 
the author of numerous papers on Tuberculosis and 
other medical and surgical topics. He was married 
to Hattie M. Smith, daughter of Lewis S. Smith, of 
Lisle, New York, on October 11, 1882, and has 
four sons : Walter Lewis, Leon Frederick, George 
Kellogg, and Lyman Stephen Smith. His address 
is No. 606 South Salina Street, Syracuse, New 
York. 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



243 



SPRAGUE, Homer Baxter, 1859- 

Class of i83l Med. 
Born at South Sutton, Mass., 1859 ; studied in public 
schools of Worcester, Mass., and New York, and Col- 
lege of City of New York, 1876-79; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1881 ; druggist at 
Fall River, Mass., 1881-82; practicing physician in 
New York since 1882. 

HOMER BAXTER SPRAGUE, M.D., is a 
son of Welcome Whipple Sprague, M.D., 
and Mary Taft (Rawson) Sprague, and was born 
at South Sutton, Massachusetts, on August 22, 1859. 
The family is descended from Edward Sprague of 




HOMER B. SPRAGUE 

Upway, Dorsetshire, England, who came to America 
and landed at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1628. Dr. 
Sprague's paternal grandparents were Jonathan and 
Mary Ann (Whipple) Sprague, of South Sutton, Mas- 
sachusetts. He was educated in the public schools 
of Worcester, Massachusetts, and of New York City, 
including the College of the City of New York, in 
which he spent the three years 1876-79. Thence 
he proceeded to the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, now a part of New York University, and 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1 88 1. The next year was spent in the drug 
business in Fall River, Massachusetts, and in 1882 
he returned to New York and engaged, in partner- 
ship with his father, in the practice of his profession, 



in which he has ever since been engaged. He is at 
the present time Visiting Surgeon to St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, New York City. He is a member of 
the Lenox Medical and Surgical Society (Presi- 
dent in 1900-01), the New York County Medical 
Society, the New York County Medical Association, 
and the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association. He 
was married on November 19, 1884, to Matilda 
Eliza Clinch, of New York, and has one child, 
Emma Mildred Sprague. His address is No. 1383 
Lexington Avenue, New York. 



STANIFORD, Charles Wilkinson, 1861- 

Class of l88i Sci. 
Born at Rockport, Mass., 1861 ; graduated B.S. and 
C.E., New York University, 1881 ; engaged in civil 
engineering, railroad and dock work, since 1880. 

CHARLES WILKINSON STANIFORD, B.S., 
C.E., is a son of Daniel and Caroline Cecilia 
(Fawcett) Staniford, and was born at Rockport, 
Massachusetts, on February 19, 186 r. He entered 
New York University in 1877, was a member of 
Delta Phi, and was graduated in 1881 with the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Civil Engineer. 
He was engaged in engineering work on the Coney 
Island Elevated Railroad in 1880; for the Mutual 
Union Telegraph Company in 1881-83; for the 
South Pennsylvania Railroad in 1883-86; for the 
Lake Chautauqua Railroad in 1886; for the Lehigh 
Valley Railroad, and the North Western and South 
Atlantic Railroad, 1886-87; and for the Louisville 
and Nashville Railroad in 1888. Since 1888 he has 
been an Assistant Surveyor of the Department of 
Docks of New York. He is a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers. He was mar- 
ried on June 8, 1886, to Julia M. Schrock, daughter 
of Captain William M. Schrock, and has two chil- 
dren : Charles Wilkinson, Jr., and Foye Fawcett 
Staniford. His home is at No. 30 Berkeley Place, 
Brooklyn, New York. 



UNDERWOOD, Horace Grant, 1859- 

Class of 1881 Arts. 
Born in London, England, 1859; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1881 ; A.M., 1884; D.D., 1892; 
LL.D., 1901 ; Theological Seminary, New Brunswick, 
N. J., 1881-84; post-graduate course, Rutgers College, 
1882-84; ordained into ministry of Reformed Dutch 
Church, and pastor at Pompton, N. J., 1884; mission- 
ary to Korea since 1885; Professor of Chemistry and 
Natural Philosophy, Royal Korean College, 1887-90; 
Pastor of Union Church, Korea, i888-8g ; Translator 



244 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of Bible into Korean, Treasurer of Korean Presbyte- 
rian Mission, etc., author. 

HORACE GRANT UNDERWOOD, A.M., 
D.D., LL.D., the distinguished missionary 
and scholar, is a native of London, England, where 
he was born on July 19, 1859, the son of John and 
Elizabeth (More) Underwood. He entered New 
York University in 1877, and was an admirable 
student. He won the Webster Junior Oratory Prize 
and was a Commencement orator ; v^-as Editor and 
Vice-President of Philomathean, and was Editor of 
" The University Quarterly." He was a member of 
the Delta Upsilon Fraternity. In 1881 he was 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
then went to New Brunswick, New Jersey, to con- 
tinue his studies in the Theological Seminary of the 
Reformed Dutch Church from 1881 to 1884, and in 
a post-graduate course in Rutgers College in 1882- 
84. In the latter year he received the degree of 
Master of Arts from New York University, was 
ordained a minister of the Reformed Dutch Church, 
and was settled as pastor of a church at Pompton, 
New Jersey. In 1885, however, he became a mis- 
sionary to Korea, and thus began the work to which 
his life has since been signally devoted. In 1887- 
90 he was Professor of Chemistry and Natural 
Philosophy in the Royal Korean Medical College 
at Seoul. In 1888-89 he was Pastor of the Union 
Church there, and in 1887-91 he was Chairman of 
the Korean Bible Commission and was one of the 
two who translated the Scriptures into Korean. He 
was Treasurer of the Korean Presbyterian Mission 
from 1885 to 1889, Chairman of the Mission in 
1888-90, and Corresponding Secretary of the Korea 
Tract Society in 1889. He is, beside being a 
translator of the Bible into Korean, the author of 
a Korean-English and English-Korean Dictionary, a 
Korean Grammar, and other works in Korean and 
English. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from New York University in 1892, and 
that of Doctor of Laws in 1901. He was married 
on March 13, 1889, to Dr. Lilias Sterling Horton, 
daughter of James Mandeville Horton, and has a 
son, Horace Horton Underwood. 



VAN FLEET, Frank, 1860- 

Classofi88l Med. 
Born in New York, i860; studied in public schools 
and under tutors; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, 1881 ; in general practice, i88i-gi ; 
ophthalmologist since iSgi ; Surgeon to Manhattan 
Eye and Ear Hospital; Professor in New York Post- 



Graduate Medical School; active promoter of legisla- 
tion affecting the public health ; frequent contributor 
to current medical literature. 

FRANK VAN FLEET, M.D., son of Henry 
Sweitzer Van Fleet and Esther (Flandreau) 
Van Fleet, is a descendant of Adrian Geritsen Van 
Vlied, who came from Utrecht, Holland, in the ship 
" De Trouw," landed in this country on March 24, 
1662, and settled at Wiltwyck, New York. In 
1725 a branch of the family removed to New Jersey, 
and there Henry S. Van Fleet was born. He re- 
turned to New York City in 1846 and engaged in 
the publishing business, and in that city his son, the 




FRANK VAN FLEET 

subject of this sketch, was born on March 31, i860. 
The boy attended the public schools, and also stud- 
ied under private tutors. His professional training 
was acquired in the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, which is now a part of New York Univer- 
sity, and in the office of Dr. David C. Cocks, who was 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye in that college and 
also a Surgeon to the New York Eye and Ear Infir- 
mary. Dr. Van Fleet received his degree from 
Bellevue in 1881, and for ten years thereafter was 
engaged in the general practice of his profession. 
Since then he has been engaged exclusively in 
ophthalmological practice, in which he ranks as a 
leading authority. He is Professor of Diseases of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



245 



the Eye in the New York Post-graduate Medical 
School and Hospital, Surgeon to the Manhattan Eye 
and Ear Hospital, and a Governor of the Methodist 
Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn. He is a fellow of 
the New York Academy of Medicine, a member 
of the Medical Society of the State of New York, 
the Medical Society of the County of New York, 
the New York Ophthalmological Society, and a 
Trustee of the Park Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
Church of New York. In the professional organiza- 
tions named he has long been active in promoting 
their interests and the welfare of the public health. 
He was for several years a member of the Board of 
Censors of the County Medical Society, and was 
President of that Society in 1901-02. For five or 
six years he was Chairman of the Committee on 
Legislation of the State Medical Society, and in that 
capacity frequently appeared before Legislative 
Committees to argue for or against measures affect- 
ing the public health. He has also been a frequent 
contributor to current professional literature, espe- 
cially on the two topics of ophthalmology and state 
regulation of medical and sanitary affairs. Dr. Van 
Fleet was married in 1883 to Carrie Blair Oakley, 
daughter of Daniel T. Oakley, of Orange, New 
Jersey, who has borne him three children : Harry, 
Raymond Oakley, and James Flandreau Van Fleet. 
His address is No. 60 East 77th Street, New 
York. 




JULIUS WEISS 

fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and 
a Republican in pohtics. He lives at No. 329 West 
28th Street, New York. 



WEISS, Julius, 1858- 

Class of i83i Med. 
Born in Hungary, 1858 ; graduated grammar school 
No. 27, New York, 1873 ; graduated A.B., College of 
City of New York, 1878; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1881 ; graduated Mt. Sinai 
Hospital, 1883 ; in practice since 1883. 

JULIUS WEISS, A.B., M.D., son of Samuel and 
Josephine (Silberstein) Weiss, was born in 
Hungary on May 24, 1858. He came to the United 
States in boyhood, and was educated under the 
New York public school system, being graduated 
from Grammar school No. 27 in 1873, and from the 
College of the City of New York, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1878. He then entered the 
New York University Medical College, and was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1 88 1. The next two years were spent in Mount 
Sinai Hospital, from which he was graduated in 
1883. Since the latter year he has been engaged 
in private practice of a general character. He is a 



ARNDT, John Stover, 1860- 

Class of 1882 Arts. 
Born at Paterson, N. J., i860; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1882, and A.M., 1885 ; reporter, Fi- 
nancial Editor. 

JOHN STOVER ARNDT, A.M., is a son of 
Ralph Stover Arndt and Sarah Walker (King) 
Arndt, and was born in Paterson, New Jersey, on 
August 21, i860. In New York University he was 
a member of Zeta Psi, President of Philomathean, 
Editor of " The University Quarterly," and a Com- 
mencement orator. He was graduated in 1882 
with the Baccalaureate degree in Arts, to which the 
University added the Master's degree in 1885. 
Immediately after graduation he became for a year a 
reporter for "The Pittsburg Telegraph." In 1883 
he became a financial writer for " The Philadelphia 
Inquirer," and in 1889 became Financial Editor of 
that paper. In 1899 he retired from editorial work 
and has since been connected with several local 
corporations. He was married on December 15, 
1887, to Jessie W. Stephens. 



246 



UNIVERSITIES JND THEIR SONS 



BAILEY, Fred De Forest, 1861- 

Classof 1882 Med. 
Born at Sidney, N. Y., 1861; studied in school at 
Norwich and Bainbridge, N. Y., and under private 
tutors; studied medicine privately and at New York 
University Medical College ; graduated M.D., New 
York University, 1882; in practice since 1882; founded 
Brooklyn Medical Journal, 1888, and edited it since 
that date ; Surgeon to Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hos- 
pital; Surgeon to Eastern District Hospital and Dis- 
pensary; Surgeon of the Forty-Seventh Regiment of 
the New York State National Guard, 1892. 

FRED DE FOREST BAILEY, M.D., was born 
at Sidney, New York, in 1861, tiie son of John 
and Helen Jennie (De Forest) Bailey. Hisfatherwas 




FRED D. BAILEY 

of English birth, while his mother was descended 
from some of the first settlers of Columbia County, 
New York, about 1760. He was educated in acad- 
emies at Norwich and Bainbridge, New York, and 
under private tutors, until he reached the age of 
eighteen years. Then he began the study of medi- 
cine in the office of his uncle, Dr. George C. Bailey, 
at Westerley, Rhode Island. Finally he entered 
the Medical College of New York University, and 
was there graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1882. He forthwith began the prac- 
tice of his profession, and has been actively engaged 
therein ever since, with more than ordinary success. 



In 1888 he founded "The Brooklyn Medical Jour- 
nal," and has for the fourteen years since that date 
been one of its editors. He is Assistant Surgeon at 
the Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hospital, and Surgeon at 
the Eastern District (Brooklyn) Hospital and Dispen- 
sary, Eye Department. In 1892 he was Surgeon of 
the Forty-seventh Regiment of the New York State 
National Guard. Dr. Bailey is a member of the 
Union League Club of Brooklyn, of the Eastern 
Parkway Golf Club, of the New York State, Kings 
County and Brooklyn Medical societies, of the Asso- 
ciated Physicians of Long Island, of the Brooklyn 
Pathological Society, of the Ophthalmological Soci- 
ety of Brooklyn and of the Physicians' Mutual Aid 
Association of New York. He was married on 
October 4, 1882, to Margaret Bancker, of Brooklyn, 
who has borne him two sons, one of whom, William 
Bancker Bailey, is living. His home and office are 
in Brooklyn, New York. 



BASSETT, John Nelson, 1850- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Canton, N. Y., 1850; graduated A.B., St. 
Lawrence University, 1878; M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1882; practicing physician at 
Canton, N. Y., since 1882; member of Board of Educa- 
tion, Canton Union School, 1882-94; President of Board 
of Trustees of Village of Canton, 1892 and 1893. 

JOHN NELSON BASSETT, M.D., son of John 
Nelson and Almira Rawson Bassett, and a 
descendant of New England stock, was born at 
Canton, St. Lawrence County, New York, on August 
II, 1850, and received his early education in the 
local public schools. Thence he went to St. I,aw- 
rence University, at Canton, and was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1878. His 
inclination leading him toward a professional career, 
he matriculated at the Medical College of New 
York University, and was graduated from that insti- 
tution in 1882, with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. Immediately upon receiving his degree he 
returned to Canton to begin the practice of his pro- 
fession, and has been continuously and successfully 
engaged in it there ever since. In addition to his 
professional work he has taken an active interest in 
public affairs. From 1882 to 1894 he was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education of the Canton Union 
School, serving a part of the time as President of 
the Board. In 1892 he was elected President of 
the Board of Trustees of the Village of Canton, and 
he was re-elected to that office in 1893. He is a 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



247 



Republican in politics. He is a Fellow of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, and a member of the 




JOHN N. BASSETT 

St. Lawrence County Medical Society. He was 
married in 1882 to Lillian Alice Wright, and has one 
son, Harry VV. Bassett. 



BLAISDELL, Silas Canada, 1856- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Winterport, Maine, 1856; studied in public 
school and Hampden, Me., Academy ; worked at 
clothing trade and in sugar refinery ; prize winner in 
New York University Medical College ; graduated 
M.D., 1882 ; in practice since ; Demonstrator and 
Lecturer in New York University Medical College ; 
Surgeon-in-Chief of Eastern District Hospital, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Sn.AS CANADA BLAISDELL, M.D., a prom- 
inent physician and surgeon of Brooklyn, 
New York, is a native of Winterport, Waldo County, 
Maine, and the son of Ebenezer Ferren Blaisdell 
and Nancy (Chase) Blaisdell. He was born on 
May 20, 1856, in a house which has belonged to 
the family for more than a hundred and ten years, 
and in which his father and grandfather and all 
their children, and all the children of his great- 
grandfather Blaisdell, were born. His great-grand- 
father, Ebenezer Blaisdell, went to Maine from New 



Hampshire soon after the War of the Revolution, 
in which he rendered valiant service, and was one 
of the first settlers of Frankfort, Maine. He was a 
retired sea-captain. He is said to have been the 
first to plant an apple orchard in the State of Maine, 
and he was the builder of the house in which the 
subject of this sketch was born. His son, the 
grandfather of Dr. Blaisdell, was also named Ebene- 
zer, and married Annie Ferren, of Kennebunkport, 
daughter of Jonathan Ferren, who fought in the 
French and Indian War, in the Revolutionary 
War, and was a member of Arnold's expedition 
to Quebec. The son of the latter couple, and 
father of Dr. Blaisdell, is Ebenezer Ferren Blaisdell, 
who was married in 1847 to Nancy Chase, a 
daughter of Mark L. Chase and a descendant of the 
same family as that of Salmon Portland Chase, Chief 
Justice of the United States Supreme Court. 
Mark L. Chase was an advanced Free Thinker, and 
an inventor of note. He devised the method of 
applying the motion of the compass to the centre 
of the upper millstone and adjusting it to the lower 
stone — the method universally in use in this coun- 




SILAS C. BLAISDELL 



try for grinding grain until the introduction of the 
steel roller process a few years ago. Mr. Chase also 
invented the side-hill plow. His wife was a daugh- 
ter of John Spearin, a veteran of the Revolution 



248 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and of the War of 181 2. She was also descended 
through her grandmother from General Kendall, who 
founded the City of Waterville, Maine, erecting there 
Kendall's Mills, the first saw mills on the Kennebec 
River. Silas Canada Blaisdell received his early edu- 
cation in the public school at Winterport, and then 
studied for a short time at the Hampden, Maine, 
Academy. The limited means of his parents com- 
pelled him to go to work at an early age, and for four 
years he was apprenticed to a cooper. Next he 
worked for a tailor for a year and a half, and then 
went to Brooklyn, New York, and for a year worked 
in the clothing trade, fourteen hours a day, for six 
dollars a week. Finally he entered the employment 
of the Havemeyer and Elder Sugar Refining Com- 
pany, and remained in it four years, saving in that 
time enough money to enable him to pursue a course 
in a medical college and thus gratify the ambition 
which he had cherished from early childhood. Dr. 
Blaisdell cannot remember of having in the whole 
course of his life had as much as a twenty-five cent 
piece given to him, for which he did not give the 
full equivalent of value in labor of some kind. He 
entered the Medical College of New York Univer- 
sity in 1879, and in his first year, after a competitive 
examination of more than seven hundred students, 
was appointed Demonstrator of Anatomy, and won 
a silver medal. In his second year he won the gold 
medal, and was thus the only man in the history of 
the institution to win those medals in his first and 
second years. In the third year he won honorable 
mention, and the offer of a hospital appointment. 
He was graduated in 1882 with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine. Since that time he has been 
steadily engaged in practice in the City of Brooklyn, 
New York. He was for a time a Lecturer on 
Applied and Comparative Anatomy in the New York 
University Medical College, Lecturer on Regional 
Anatomy in the New York College of Dentistry, 
and Visiting Surgeon to the Eastern District Hos- 
pital of Brooklyn, New York. He is now Surgeon- 
in-Chief of the latter institution. He is a member 
of the Kings County Medical Society, the Physi- 
cians' Mutual Aid Society, the Hanover Club, and 
the Seawanaka Boat Club. In politics he is an 
Independent. He has written various articles for 
publication including a notable paper on " Head 
Injuries " in " The Brooklyn Medical Journal" of 
April, 1900. Dr. Blaisdell was married on January 
29, 1883, to Ella Rebecca Fisher, daughter of Elan- 
son Fisher, the portrait painter. His home is at 
No. 500 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



BOYD, James, 1863- 

Class of 1882 Sci. 
Born in New York City, 1863; graduated B.S., New 
York University, 1882; engaged in manufacturing 
since 1882. 

JAMES BOYD, B.S., son of John and Mary 
Ellen (Gillis) Boyd, was born in New York 
City on May 11, 1863, and entered New York 
University in 1878. He was a member of Zeta Psi, 
Vice-President of his class, an officer of Philo- 
mathean, and Marshal at Commencement. He was 
graduated in 1882 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science, and since that time has been prosperously 
engaged in manufacturing in New York City. He 
was married on January 25, 1887, to Agnes Jessie 
Gray, and has two children : Katharine and John 
Boyd. His office is at No. 408 West 26th Street, 
and his home at No. 64 West 77th Street, New 
York. 



CURIE, Charles, 1842- 

Class of 1882 Law. 
Born at Audencourt, France, 1842; studied in public 
schools and business college; served in U. S. Army, 
1861-65; m mercantile life, 1859-61, and 1866-68; custom- 
house broker, 1868-90 ; graduated LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1882; in legal practice. 

CHARLES CURIE, LL.B., son of Frederic 
and Dorothea M. (Diemer) Curie, of 
French Huguenot ancestry, was born at Audencourt, 
France, in 1842, and a year later was brought by 
his parents to the United States. He studied in the 
public schools in Paterson, New Jersey, and in a 
business college in Cleveland, Ohio, and then, in 
1859, entered mercantile life. Two years later he 
entered the United States Army, and served through 
the Civil War. He was a member of Hawkins's 
Zouaves, and was mustered out in 1865 with the 
rank of Captain which he had held since May, 1864. 
In 1866-68 he was again in mercantile pursuits, 
and from 1868 to 1890 he was a custom-house 
broker in New York. Meantime he studied law, 
entered the New York University Law School, and 
was graduated with the Bachelor's degree in 1882. 
He is now engaged in the practice of his profession. 
He is a member of the Union League Club of 
New York, the Union League Club of Brooklyn, 
the Army and Navy Club of New York, the Hamil- 
ton Club of Brooklyn, and the Hamilton Club of 
Paterson, New Jersey. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. He was married to Jennie Andrews, of 
Paterson, New Jersey, in 1870, and has two child- 
ren : Charles and Laura Curie. His office is at 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



249 



No. 22 William Street and his residence at No. i Halstead is a brother of John C. and Fletcher 
West 94th Street, New York. His summer home is Halstead, who were graduated from New York Uni- 
" Idlewild," at Cornwall-on- Hudson, New York. versity in 1880 and 1884 respectively. 



FRENCH, John Herndon, 1859- 

Class of 18S2 Med. 
Born at Fredericksburg, Va., 1859; graduated Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, 1879; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, 1882; Interne at 
Bellevue Hospital, 1884-85 ; Attending Physician, De 
Milt Dispensary, 1893-1900; in practice since 1882. 

JOHN HERNDON FRENCH, M.D., is a son of 
Seth Barton French, and through his mother, 
whose maiden name was Ellen Mercer Herndon, he 
is a great-great-great-grandson of General Hugh 
Mercer of Revolutionary fame. He was born at 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, on August 8, 1859, and 
was educated m the schools of his native state. On 
July 4, 1879, he was graduated from the Virginia 
Military Institute, and then came to New York 
University to pursue a course in its Medical College. 
In March, 1882, he was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, and since that time has been 
engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1884- 
85 he was an Interne at Bellevue Hospital, and from 
1893 to 1900 he was an Attending Physician at the 
De Milt Dispensary, in the general medical class. 
He is a member of the Bellevue Hospital Alumni 
Society, the Southern Society of New York, and the 
Union, Metropolitan, and New York Athletic clubs. 
He was married on November 14, 1888, to Sadie 
Cochrane, and has four children : Seth Barton, 
Hilah Cochrane, Ellen Mercer, and John Herndon 
French. His address is No. 43 West 51st Street, 
New York. 



HALSTEAD, Jacob, 1860- 

Class of 1882. 
Born at Harrison, Westchester County, N. Y., i860; 
studied in New York University for two years in Class 
of 1882; entered Columbia Law School in 1881, grad- 
uated in 1883 ; in practice at the New York Bar since 
1883. 

JACOB HALSTEAD is a son of David P. and 
Fannie Halstead, and was born at Harrison, 
Westchester County, New York, on April 9, i860. 
For two years he v/as a student in New York Uni- 
versity, in the Class of 1882. He entered Colum- 
bia Law School in 1881, and was graduated in 1883. 
Since 1883 he has been a practitioner at the New 
York Bar. His office is at No. 76 William Street, 
New York City, and his home is at Orienta Point, 
Mamaroneck, Westchester County, New York. Mr. 



HIGBIE, Robert Winf^eld, 1863- 

Class of 1882 Arts. 
Born at Springfield, N. Y., 1863; graduated A.B., 
Valedictorian of class, New York University, 1882; 
employed in New York Savings Bank, 1882 ; Hanover 
National Bank, 1883-85; partner in retail lumber firm, 
Jamaica, N. Y., 1885-95 ; in wholesale lumber trade 
since 1895 ; member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta 
Kappa; A.M., New York University. 

ROBERT WINFIELD HIGBIE, A.M., a fine 
example of the college man in business, is a 
direct hneal descendant of John Higbie, who lived 




R. W. HIGBIE 

at Middletown, Connecticut, from 1660 to 1694, 
and of his son, Edward Higbie, who in 1674 settled 
at Jamaica, Long Island, New York, and he is in 
the eighth generation of the Higbie family in the 
United States. On the maternal side he is in the 
fourth generation from Robert Davison, a patriot 
soldier in the Revolution. He was born at Spring- 
field, in the Town of Jamaica, now a part of the 
Borough of Queens, New York City, on March 
5, 1863, the son of Alexander and Sarah Frances 
(Davison) Higbie, and received his early educa- 
tion in the local public school. He was prepared 



250 



UNIVERSITIES ANB THEIR SONS 



for college in Professor E. Vienot's Preparatory 
School, and in 1878 was matriculated in the School 
of Arts of New York University. There he ranked 
high among his classmates, being Secretary of 
his class during the Sophomore year and its Presi- 
dent in the Junior year. He was a member of 
Delta Chapter of the Psi Upsilon P>aternity, and in 
due season was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He 
was graduated in 1882, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and as the Valedictorian of his class. Later, 
in recognition of his continued scholarship, he re- 
ceived from the University the degree of Master of 
Arts. In this Mr. Higbie takes just pride, and he 
is confirmed in his early behef that a college educa- 
tion, with the highest and broadest culture, is profit- 
able to the business man as well as to the member 
of a learned profession. The exceptional esteem in 
which Mr. Higbie was held by the Faculty as well 
as by his fellow students was shown in the fact that 
the very day after his graduation he was employed by 
Professor Richard Bull as a clerk in the New York 
Savings Bank, of which institution the venerable 
professor was President. Dr. Bull had been Mr. 
Higbie's instructor in Mathematics, and was a keen 
judge of human nature and very exacting in his 
requirements. To be thus chosen by him for a place 
of trust was therefore a high tribute to the young 
man's character and attainments. After a short 
term of service in the savings bank Mr. Higbie 
entered the employment of the Hanover National 
Bank of New York, and remained there until 1885, 
being advanced meantime from place to place. In 
the year named he voluntarily retired from the bank 
in order to become partner in a retail lumber firm 
at Jamaica, New York, in which business he was 
successfully engaged for the following ten years. 
Then, seeking a wider field, he left his Jamaica 
office to engage in the wholesale lumber trade in 
New York City. He is still occupied with the 
latter business at No. 45 Broadway, New York, and 
is also interested in manufacturing, and is the owner 
of extensive lumber lands in West Virginia. Mr. 
Higbie has not interested himself in politics beyond 
performing the duties of a private citizen. He has 
declined election to various clubs, preferring to re- 
main domestic in his tastes and habits. He is a 
member of the First Presbyterian Church of Jamaica, 
the oldest church of that denomination in North 
America, and is President of its Board of Trustees. 
He has held the office of Vice-President of the 
Chautauqua Literary Society of Jamaica. He was 
married on September 12, 1888, to Anna Augusta 



Pearsall, daughter of Hamilton W. Pearsall, and has 
two children : Hamilton Alexander and Robert Win- 
field Higbie. He now makes his home at Jamaica, 
New York. 



HOPKINS, James Swinburne, 1859- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Carthage, N. Y., 1859; studied at Carthage 
High School; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1882 ; Professor in New York Uni- 
versity; in practice in New York since 1882. 

JAMES SWINBURNE HOPKINS, M.D., is a 
descendant of Stephen Hopkins, a signer of 
the Declaration of Independence, his paternal grand- 




J. S. HOPKINS 

parents having been Solomon and Levina Hopkins 
of Rhode Island, and his father, Joel Rice Hopkins. 
His mother's maiden name was Prudence Swinburne, 
daughter of Peter and Artemisia Swinburne, the 
former of whom was born in Ireland and was a 
merchant in Dublin, but came to the United States 
in the early part of the last century. Peter and 
Artemisia Swinburne had twelve children, one of 
whom, a brother of Prudence Swinburne Hopkins, 
was Dr. John Swinburne of Albany, New York, who 
for a number of years was Health Officer of the 
Port of New York, as well as Mayor of Albany and 
a Representative in Congress. It was Dr. John 
Swinburne who conceived the idea of constructing 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



251 



two artificial islands in New York Bay for quarantine 
purposes and who secured the legislation necessary 
for the execution of the plan. One of the islands 
is named for him, and the other for Governor 
Hoffman, who was in office at that time. The 
Swinburne family is of ancient origin, having been 
planted in England from the continent many 
centuries ago. Two brothers of the family were 
settled in Ireland in Cromwell's time, and from 
them the family under present consideration is 
descended. Dr. Hopkins, son of Joel Rice Hop- 
kins and Prudence Swinburne Hopkins, was born 
at Carthage, New York, on February 25, 1859. 
After completing his course at the Carthage High 
School he entered the New York University Medical 
College, and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1882, since which date he 
has been successfully engaged in the practice of his 
profession in New York City. He was Professor 
of Ophthalmology in the American Veterinary Col- 
lege, now a part of New York University, for nearly 
ten years, until 1900, when he resigned. He was 
also Instructor in Ophthalmology in the Medical 
College of New York University for some years. 
He is a member of the New York County Medical 
Society, the New York County Medical Associa- 
tion, the Medical Society of Greater New York, and 
the Physicians' Mutual Aid Association. On April 
II, 1894, he was married to M. E. Quimby, and 
has two children : James Wyatt, and Margaret Lois 
Swinburne Hopkins. His address is No. 52 West 
84th Street, New York. 



KEITH, Hanford Charles, 1858- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Havelock, N. B., Canada, 1858; studied in 
common schools and Normal Academy ; school teacher ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 
lege, 1882 ; in practice since 1882 ; specialist in nervous 
diseases. 

HANFORD CHARLES KEITH, M.D., was 
born at Havelock, New Brunswick, Canada, 
on August 3, 1858, the son of George and Victoria 
Keith. His ancestors were Scotch, the first of 
them in this country coming over in the " Mayflower." 
At the time of the Revolution the family removed 
to New Brunswick, its members taking the British 
side in that conflict and not being willing to remain 
under American rule. Dr. Keith studied in the 
common and high schools of New Brunswick and 
the Normal Academy at Fredericton, and for a time 
was a teacher in the common and high schools. 



Later he entered the Medical College of New York 
University, and was graduated with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in March, 1882. He at once 
engaged in practice in New Brunswick, and remained 
there until 1886. From 1886 to 1894 he practiced 
at Rhinelander, Wisconsin; in 1894-95 he was 
Resident Physician in the Mt. Clemens Sanitarium, 
at Mt. Clemens, Michigan ; he practiced at Rich- 
mond, Indiana, in 1895-98; and since the last 
named year has been settled in Toledo, Ohio, 
making a specialty of nervous diseases. He is a 



>%// 







H. C. KEITH 

Thirty-second degree Mason, a Knight Templar, 
a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, an Odd Fellow and a 
Knight of Pythias. In politics he is a Republican. 
He was married to Elizabeth Simpson, of Richmond, 
Indiana, on December 21, 1897. His address is 
No. 811 Monroe Street, Toledo, Ohio. 



LEWENGOOD, Jacob, 1861- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born in New York, 1861 ; studied in public schools 
and College of the City of New York ; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1882; Interne in 
Bellevue Hospital, 1882-83 ; iu practice since 1883. 

JACOB LEWENGOOD, M.D., is a son of Louis 
and Helen (Lawthein) Lewengood, and a 
twin brother of Dr. Samuel Lewengood whose 



252 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



biography also appears in this volume. His fore- 
fathers were German. He was born in New York 
City in i86i, and studied in the public . schools, 
from which in 1876 he was graduated into the 
College of the City of New York. In the latter he 
remained until his Senior year, when he left it for 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College. From the 
latter, now a part of New York University, he was 
graduated with the Doctor's degree in 1882. The 
ensuing year he spent as an Interne in Bellevue 
Hospital, and then, in 1883, began the general 
practice of his profession, in which he has ever since 
been engaged. His address is No. 11 18 Madison 
Avenue, New York. 



LEWENGOOD, Samuel, 1861- 

Class of 18S2 Med. 
Born in New York, 1861 ; studied in public schools 
and College of the City of New York; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1882; Interne at 
Bellevue Hospital, 1882-83 ; in practice since 1883. 

SAMUEL LEWENGOOD, M.D., son of Louis 
and Helen (Lawthein) Lewengood, of Ger- 
man ancestry, was born in New York City in 1861, 
and studied in the public schools and in the College 
of the City of New York. Leaving the latter in 
his Senior year, he entered the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, which is now a part of New York 
University. He was graduated a Doctor of Med- 
icine in 1882, and spent the next year as an Interne 
in Bellevue Hospital.' Since 1883 he has been 
engaged in the general practice of his profession. 
His address is No. 137 West 78th Street, New 
York. 



OYLER, William H., 1858- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Arendtsville, Pa., 1858 ; studied in public 
school and State Normal School, Shippensburg, and 
Stevens Institute, Gettysburg, Pa.; taught school for 
two years; graduated M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1882 ; in practice and hospital service 
since 1882. 

WILLIAM H. OYLER, M.D., son of Jacob 
K. and Julia Ann (Beamer) Oyler, of 
Dutch ancestry, was born at Arendtsville, Pennsyl- 
vania, on June 10, 1858. He studied in a public 
school, in the State Normal School at Shippens- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and in the Stevens Institute at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He also taught in pub- 
lic schools for two years. His professional studies 
were pursued in the New York University Medical 



College, from which he was graduated a Doctor of 
Medicine in 1882. Since that date he has been in 
practice, serving much in hospitals. He was a Clin- 
ical Assistant in the Harlem, New York, Eye, Ear 
and Throat Infirmary from 1887 to 1892, and a 
Visiting Physician to the Harlem Hospital Dispen- 
sary from 1887 to 1902. He is a member of the 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Harlem Democratic 
Club, and the New York County Medical Society. 




WILLIAM H. OYLER 



He was married in June, igoo, to Mary V. Watson, 
of Fairfield, Pennsylvania, and lives at No. 216 
West 124th Street, New York. 



PHILLIPS, Albert Louis, 1862- 

Class of 1882 Sci. 
Born in New York City, 1862; graduated B.S., New 
York University, 1882; LL.B., Columbia College Law 
School, 1885 ; admitted to Bar, 1884 ; lawyer. 

ALBERT LOUIS PHILLIPS, B.S., LL.B., is ason 
of Jacob L. and Augusta (Bernstein) Phillips, 
and was born in New York City on August i, 1862. 
In New York University he was a member of Zeta Psi. 
He was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in 1882, and then entered the Columbia 
Law School, from which he was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1885. He was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1884, and has since that time 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



253 



been engaged in the practice of his profession in 
New York, his office being at No. 99 Nassau Street. 
He was married on October 28, 1890, to Isabella 
Manheims, and has a daughter, Gertrude Augusta, 
and a son, Morris K. Phillips. His home is at No. 
114 East 82nd Street, New York. 



PHILLIPS, Wendell Christopher, 1857- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at South Hammond, N. Y., 1857; studied in 
common schools and Potsdam, N. Y., Normal School- 
school teacher for four years; graduated M.D., New 
York University Medical College, i88z; in practice 
since 1882; extended hospital service; Adjunct Pro- 
fessor of Otology, Post-Graduate Medical School, 
1894-gg, and Professor since 1899 ; author of numerous 
papers ; officer of various professional organizations. 

WENDELL CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS, 
M.D., is descended through his father, 
Samuel Phillips, from the family of Ethan Allen, and 
through his mother, whose maiden name was Mary 
Sophronia Merrill, from Nathaniel Merrill, who was 
born in England in 1610, came to America in 1633, 
and settled at Newbury, Massachusetts, in 1635. 
He was born at South Hammond, St. Lawrence 
County, Nevv York, on June 9, 1857, and received 
his early education in the common schools. He 
was prepared for college at the State Normal School 
at Potsdam, New York, and then for four years was 
engaged as a teacher in the public schools. Finally 
adopting the medical profession, he entered the 
New York University Medical College and was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1882. Immediately tliereafter, in June, 1882, he 
began the practice of his profession in New York 
City, where he has since remained. In October of 
that same year he was appointed Clinical Assistant 
in the Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, Throat 
Department; in 1884 he was appointed Assistant 
Surgeon in that institution, and in 1899 he was 
appointed Surgeon to its Aural Department. Mean- 
time he also became a teacher of his profession. 
In 1886 he was appointed lecturer on diseases of 
the nose and throat in the New York Post-Graduate 
Medical School and Hospital. In 1894 he became 
Adjunct Professor of Otology there, and in 1899 he 
was appointed Professor of Otology in the same 
institution, which place he continues to hold. He 
is also Consulting Surgeon to the Bedford Dispen- 
sary and Hospital in Brooklyn, and Consulting 
Surgeon to the General Hospital at Perth Amboy, 
New Jersey. Dr. Phillips is a Fellow of the New 
York Academy of Medicine, and in 1900 was Chair- 



man of its Section on Laryngology ; Fellow and Sec- 
retary of the American Laryngological, Rhinological 
and Otological Society ; member and Vice-President 
of the New York Physicians' Mutual Aid Society; 
inember of the Medical Association of the Greater 
New York, of the New York State Medical Society, 
the New York County Medical Society, and member 
of its Board of Censors. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, but he has held no public office. He has 
written numerous papers upon topics relating to the 
ear, nose and throat, and has been active in the 
management of the New York County and State 




WENDELL C. PHILLIPS 

Medical societies. He was married on April 21, 
1885, to Sarah Wakeman, who died in childbirth 
on March 16, 18S7, the child, named for her 
mother, dying on August 21st following. He was 
again married on October 3, 1889, to Lucia Maria 
Taggart, who has borne him three children : Helen 
Irving, born on May 30, 1892, Lucia Edith, born 
on December 22, 1895, and Charlotte Alice Phillips, 
born on October 16, 1897. His address is No. 40 
West 47th Street, New York. 



PISEK, Vincent, 1859- 

Class of 1882 Arts. 
Born at Malesow, Bohemia, 1859; studied in common 
school, Malesow, High School, Kutna Hora, Bohemia, 



254 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



and public school, New York City ; graduated Chapin 
Collegiate School, New York, 1877; graduated A.B., 
New York University, 1882; graduated Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1883; Presbyterian Pastor since 1883; 
Savings Bank Trustee since 1888 ; editor and pubhsher. 

VINCENT PISEK, A.B.; Pastor of the John 
Huss Bohemian Brethren Presbyterian 
Church of New York, is a son of Anton and Barbara 
(Musil) Pisek, and was born on March 29, 1859, at 
Malesow, Bohemia. He attended the common 
school at that place, and the High School at Kutna 
Hora, Bohemia, and then came to America and 
studied for a year in a New York public school. Next 




VINCENT PISEK 

he entered Dr. Henry B. Chapin's Collegiate School, 
in New York, and was graduated from it in 1877. 
Thence he came to New York University, where 
he was a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternities, was Junior orator, and Greek 
Salutatorian. He was graduated in 1882 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, and the next year was 
graduated from the Union Theological Seminary 
and ordained into the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church. In the same year he was installed as 
Pastor of the John Huss Bohemian Brethren Pres- 
byterian Church, which place he still fills. He 
erected the present building of that church, and 
founded and organized many Bohemian missions 
and churches in the West. He is the editor and 



publisher of a weekly paper for children. He was 
Moderator of the first Assembly of the Bohemian 
ministers of the Presbyterian and Reformed churches 
in America in 1893. Since 1888 he has been a 
Trustee of the American Savings Bank of New York 
City. He is a member of the Comenius Society of 
Prague, Bohemia. In politics he is a Republican. 
His home is at No. 347 East 74th Street, New York 
City. His brother, Godfrey Pisek, was graduated 
from New York University in the Class of 1894. 



TAYLOR, Charles Edgar, 1858- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Muncie, Ind., 1858 ; studied in public and 
normal schools ; graduated M.D., New York Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1882 ; in practice since 1882. 

CHARLES EDGAR TAYLOR, M.D., comes of 
a line of physicians, his father, John C. 
Taylor, grandfather, D. D. Taylor, and great-grand- 
father, Silas Taylor, having all been members of the 
medical profession. His mother's maiden name 
was Xenia Bossart. Dr. Taylor was bom at Muncie, 
Indiana, on April 28, 1858, and began his studies 
in the public schools. Later he pursued a two 
years' course at the Indiana State Normal School, 
where he was fitted to enter upon his professional 
studies. He entered the Medical College of New 
York University in the fall of 1880, and was gradu- 
ated with the Doctor's degree on March 7, 1882, 
since which time he has been steadily engaged in 
the practice of his profession at Irwin, Westmore- 
land County, Pennsylvania. He is a member and 
President of the Irwin Medical Society, and a mem- 
ber of the Westmoreland County Medical Society 
and the Pennsylvania State Medical Society. 



THOMPSON, Edmund Burke, 1859- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Springdale, Ohio, 1859 ; studied in public 
schools and under tutors; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, 1882 ; in practice and in 
hospital and asylum service, 1882-1896. 

EDMUND BURKE THOMPSON, M.D., son 
of Marcus and Mary A. (Gross) Thompson, 
was born at Springdale, Ohio, on February i, 1859, 
and received an excellent education in public schools 
and under private tutors. In 1879 he entered the 
Medical College of New York University, and was 
graduated from it with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1882. He was thereafter a member of 
the Medical Staff of the Hartford, Connecticut, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



255 



Retreat for the Insane in 1882-S3 ; in private prac- 
tice with Dr. Edwin B. Leyon, of New Britain, Con- 
necticut, in 1884-85 ; Resident Physician at St. 
Joseph's General Hospital, St. Paul, Minneapolis, 




WALDO, Ralph, 1860- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Scotland, Conn., i860; studied in private 
and public schools and Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute ; 
graduated M.D., New York University Medical Col- 



lege, 1882 ; hospital service, 1882-83 ; Bellevue Dis- 
pensary Staff, 1883-89; Instructor and Professor in 
Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital since 
1888. 

RALPH WALDO, M.D., Professor of the Dis- 
eases of Women in the New York Post- 
Graduate Medical School and Hospital, was born 
at Scotland, Windham County, Connecticut, on 
September 24, i860, the son of Roger Williams 
and Charlotte B. (Gager) Waldo. Through his 
father he is descended from Cornelius Waldo, who 
came from England in 1647 and settled at Ipswich, 
Massachusetts. The Waldo family was conspicuous 
in colonial wars and in the Revolution, and in each 
generation of it some member has been identified 
with educational affairs. Dr. Waldo was educated 
in private and public schools of Brooklyn, New 
York, and the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 
From the latter he came to the New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, and was graduated with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1882. For 
eighteen months, in 1882-83, he was on the House 
Staff of the Charity and Maternity hospitals, and for 



EDMUND B. THOMPSON 

1885-86; Assistant Superintendent of the Northern 
Hospital for the Insane, Winnebago, Wisconsin, 
1886-87 ; Assistant Superintendent of the Iowa 
Hospital for the Insane, Independence, Iowa, 1887- 
90 ; Assistant Superintendent of the Asylum for the 
Insane at Topeka, Kansas, 1892-94, and Physician 
to the New York (Bloomingdale) Asylum, and to 
Sanford Hall, Flushing, Long Island, 1894-96. In 
the last named year he resigned his place and re- 
tired from practice. He was married on June 4, 
1890, to Mae A. Clark, of Independence, Iowa, who 
died on April 9, 1891. On October 22, 1896, he 
married Frances M. French, of New York, who has 
borne him two children : Edmund Burke, Jr., and 
John French Thompson. Dr. Thompson is a mem- ' 
ber of the New York County Medical Society, and 
lives at No. 316 West 105 th Street, New York. 




RALPH WALDO 



the six years 1883-89 he served on the Dispensary 
Staff of Bellevue Hospital. In 1888 he was made 
Clinical Assistant to the Department of Diseases of 
Women in the New York Post-Graduate Medical 



256 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



School and Hospital, under the late Professor C. C. 
Lee. Later he was an Listructor, and Adjunct 
Professor, and in 1900 was made Professor of the 
Diseases of Women in the same institution. Since 
1900 he has been a Trustee of the Washington 
Savings Bank of New York. He is a member of 
the Unitarian Club, the New York State Medical 
Association, the New York State Medical Society, 
the New York County Medical Society, the Academy 
of Medicine (Fellow), the Obstetrical Society, the 
Harlem Medical Association, the Lenox Medical 
and Surgical Society (of which he has been Chair- 
man), the Charity Hospital Alumni Society, the 
Medical and Surgical Society, the Medical Union 
(of which he is now Chairman), the Medical Board 
and Board of Managers of Lebanon Hospital (of 
which he is now chairman), and the New England 
Society. He is also Gynecologist to the Lebanon 
and Post-Graduate hospitals. He was married on 
April 22, 1890, to Fanny Hall, and has had four 
children : Ralph Hall, Susan Butcher (deceased), 
Fanny Hall, and Alfred Williams Waldo. His 
address is No. 68 West 50th Street, New York. 



He is a Free Mason (Past Master), and a member 
of the Monmouth County Medical Society and the 



WARNER, William Bray, 1860- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Keyport, N. J., i86o; educated in public 
schools and College of City of New York; graduated 
M.D., New York University Medical College, 1882; 
hospital service, 1882-83 ; in practice since 1883. 

WILLIAM BRAY WARNER, M.D., son of 
William and Sarah Elizabeth (Bray) War- 
ner, was born at Keyport, New Jersey, on January 3, 
i860. His ancestors, who came to America in early 
colonial times, were English on both sides, and 
both families were well represented in the American 
Array in the Revolution and War of 1812. His 
paternal great-grandfather served in the navy under 
John Paul Jones, and his father was a First Lieuten- 
ant in the Twenty-ninth New Jersey Volunteers in 
the Civil War. He received his education in the 
public schools of Jersey City and New York, and 
in the College of the City of New York, in which 
latter he remained until the beginning of his Senior 
year. He then entered the New York University 
Medical College and was graduated with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine in 1882. After a year of hos- 
pital service in the old Jersey City Charity Hospital, 
since destroyed, and brief practice in Jersey City, he 
settled at Red Bank, New Jersey, in August, 1884, 
and has since remained there in successful practice. 




\VM. B. WARNER 



Practitioners' Society of Eastern Monmouth, New 
Jersey. He was married on November 25, 1890, 
to Jessie Lincoln Eraser. 



WILLIAMS, Horace Newell, 1861- 

Class of 1882 Med. 
Born at Uxbridge, Mass., i85i ; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1882; graduated 
Surgical Department Bellevue Hospital, 1884; in prac- 
tice since 1884. 

HORACE NEWELL WILLIAMS, M.D., son 
of Nicholas B. and Charlotte E. (Newell) 
Williams, was born at Uxbridge, Massachusetts, on 
January 2, 1861, and was educated in the public 
schools and high school of his native town. In 
1882 he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College 
of New York, now a part of New York University. 
The next eighteen months were spent in the Surgical 
Department of Bellevue Hospital, from which he 
was graduated in 1884. Since the latter date he 
has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1885-88 he was 
Assistant Surgeon to the First Light Infantry Regi- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



^S7 



ment, Rhode Island National Guard. He is a 
member of the Rhode Island State Medical Society, 
the Providence Medical Association, the Society of 
Alumni of Bellevue Hospital, and the Masonic Order, 




HORACE N. WILLIAMS 



including R.A. and K.T. He was married on April 
30, 1890, to Carrie L. Pierce, and has two children : 
Charlotte Pierce and Francis P. Williams. 



ABBOTT, James, 1861- 

Class of 1883 Arts. 
Born in New York City, 1861 ; member of Psi 
Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa; graduated A.B., New 
York University, 1883 ; connected with The Century 
Co., New York, since 1883; Vice-President of New 
York Bible Society, 1891. 

JAMES ABBOTT, A.B., son of Robert and Eliza 
(Nightingale) Abbott, was born in New York 
City on October 2, 1861. He entered New York 
University in 1879, and was a conspicuous member 
of his class, holding several offices as an undergrad- 
uate and being its permanent secretary since gradu- 
ation. He was also a Junior orator. President of 
Eucleian, Editor of " The University Quarterly," 
and a member of Psi Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa 
fraternities. He was graduated with the Bacca- 
laureate degree in Arts in 1883, and ever since that 
time has been connected with The Century Co., 
VOL. 11.— 17 



publishers, at No. 33 East 17th Street, New York. 
In 1891 he was elected Vice-President of the New 
York Bible Society. For five years (1897-1902) 
he was Treasurer of the corporation which built the 
Chapter House for the Delta Chapter of Psi Upsilon 
at University Heights, and for three years (1899- 
1902) he was President of the Yonkers Choral 
Society. He was married on March i, 1887, to 
Jessie Niver, daughter of Henry M. Niver, and has 
a son, Stanley Niver Abbott, and a daughter, Grace 
Abbott. 



ACKERLY, George Briggs, 1851- 

Class of 1883 Law. 
Born at Centreport, N. Y., 1851 ; studied in High 
School at Huntington, Long Island; graduated L.L.B., 
New York University Law School, 1883; in practice 
since 1883. 

GEORGE BRIGGS ACKERLY, LL.B., was 
born at Centreport, Long Island, New York, 
on October 26, 1851. His father, Gilbert Ackerly, 
came of an English family whose name has been 
variously spelled Ackerly, Akerly, Ackley, and Och 




GEO. B. ACKERLY 



Leigh or " Field of Oaks." The family was set- 
tled in the New Haven Colony at an early date and 
removed thence to Long Island. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Catherine Jane Feltch, was 



258 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



of" Welsh ancestry. Mr. Ackerly studied in, and was 
graduated from, the High School at Huntington, 
Long Island, being the marshal of his class, and 
being also a classmate of Wilmot M. Smith, Justice 
of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. 
He then entered the Law School of New York Uni- 
versity, and was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1883. Since that date he has 
been steadily engaged in the practice of law. He 
is a member of the Order of the Golden Cross, and 
in politics is a Republican of independent proclivi- 
ties. He was married to Nannie S. Brown, and has 
five children : Mary Lavinia, Willard Clark, Wesley 
Glover, Samuel Spafford, and George Ackerly, Jr. 
His home is at No. 819 Quincy Street, Brooklyn, 
New York. 



ATWOOD, Charles Edwin, 1861- 

Class of 1883 Med. 
Born at Shoreham, Vt., 1861 ; graduated B.S., Cornell 
University, 1880; M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, 1883 ; served as Physician in Department of Public 
Charities, New York; Assistant Physician, Hudson 
River State Hospital, 1885-87; Utica State Hospital, 
1887-92 ; Bloomingdale Hospital since 1892 ; Clinical 
Assistant Columbia University ; Associate Editor, 
" American Journal of Insanity," 1887-92. 

CHARLES EDWIN ATWOOD, M.D., is a 
native of Shoreham, Vermont, where he 
was born on July 21, 1861. His mother, whose 
maiden name was Laura Roxana Moore, was de- 
scended in the fourth generation from an English 
earl. His father, Edwin Simons Atwood, was de- 
scended from a daughter of Jonas Parker, the first 
man killed in the Revolutionary War at Lexington. 
Jonas Parker was a cousin of Captain John Parker, 
the Commander of the Minute Men at Lexington. 
The memorial tombs of both are at Lexington, and 
Jonas figures in the oil painting in the town hall at 
that place. It will be recalled that Edward Everett 
in one of his orations said, referring to Jonas Parker's 
refusal to retreat before the British, that " History, 
Roman History, does not furnish an example of 
bravery that outshines that of Jonas Parker." Born 
of such ancestry, Charles Edwin Atwood was edu- 
cated first at the Newton Academy, Shoreham, then 
at the High School at Ithaca, New York, and finally 
at Cornell University, at Ithaca, where he pursued a 
scientific course and was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in 1880. Thence, for his 
professional training, he went to the Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, in New York, and was gradu- 
ated from it with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 



in 1883. Immediately upon his graduation, Dr. 
Atwood entered the service of the Department of 
Public Charities of New York City, and performed 
duty in various clinics. Then, in 1885, he received 
an appointment as Assistant Physician at the Hud- 
son River State Hospital (for the Insane) at Pough- 
keepsie, New York. This appointment was made 
after a severe civil service competitive examination 
lasting three days and embracing the higher branches 
of liberal education, such as Geology, Astronomy, 
Ancient and Political History, etc., as well as the 
usual medical subjects. He remained in that place 




CHAS. E. ATWOOD 

for two years, and then entered for similar service 
the State Hospital at Utica, New York, where he 
remained from 1887 to 1892. Since the latter date 
he has been upon the staff of the Society of the 
New York Hospital, in what is popularly known as 
Bloomingdale Asylum, at White Plains, New York. 
He is also Clinical Assistant in the Department of 
Nervous Diseases in the Medical College of Colum- 
bia University, and Medical Examiner for several 
New York life insurance companies. He has written 
a number of articles for the medical press on the 
causation of insanity, expert testimony, the training 
of nurses and other topics. From 1887 to 1892 he 
was Assistant Editor of " The American Journal of 
Insanity." He is a member of the American Social 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



259 



Science Association, of the National Institute of Art, 
Science and Letters, of the American Medico- 
Psychological Association, of the New York County 
Medical Society, of the Cornell Club, and of the 
New York Cornell Alumni Association. In politics 
he is an independent Republican. He was married 
OH February 5, 1896, to Helen Pearce Jarvis, daugh- 
ter of the late Algernon Sydney Jarvis. In addition 
to his office in the asylum at White Plains he has 
one in New York City. 



BLEYER, J. Mount, 1859- 

Class of 1883 Med. 
Born at Pilsen, Austria, 1859 ; studied at University 
of Prague; came to United States in 1866; in law 
office, 1875-78 ; graduated M.D., Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, 1883 ; studied in Europe ; in practice 
in New York since 1884; specialist in diseases of res- 
piratory organs. 

J. MOUNT BLEYER, M.D., F.R.A.M.S., LL.D., 
an eminent specialist in diseases of the res- 
piratory organs, was born in the City of Pilsen, 
Austria, in 1859, and received his early education 
in a local high school and at the University of 
Prague. In 1866 his father, Samuel Bleyer, a mer- 
chant, came to the United States with all his family, 
and the boy continued his education in New York. 
In 1875 he entered as a student the law office of 
Richard E. Mount, and remained there three years, 
when, not finding the legal profession altogether to 
his liking, he turned his attention to medicine and 
surgery. Accordingly, he became a student in the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, which has since 
been incorporated with New York University. At 
this time he was entirely dependent upon his own 
resources, and for support engaged in literary work. 
He wrote short stories, poems, plays, etc., largely 
for the daily press, and was thus enabled to support 
himself and pay his way through college. Among 
his writings were a dramatic poem on Edgar Allan 
Poe, a play entitled "The American M.D.," which 
was produced in New York, " The Spectacles of 
Truth," a philosophical story, and "The Wizard's 
Pantheon," a story of a weird character based upon 
the electrical inventions of the day. In 1883 he 
was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine, and then went to Europe for a period of 
further study. There he became acquainted with 
fflany eminent men and increased his knowledge 
of his profession. On his return to the United 
States he engaged in the practice of his profession 
in New York City, and has ever since been thus en- 



gaged, with exceptional success. Dr. Bleyer was 
one of the first to adopt the practice of intubation in 
cases of diphtheria, and was so markedly successful 
therein that he not only secured a large patronage 
in such cases but also was often called in for consul- 
tation. He sometimes operated in as many as six 
or seven cases a day. In 1890 he made a report 
to the International Medical Congress at Berlin 
upon the first five hundred cases treated by his 
method. Another important innovation with which 
he was conspicuously identified was that of the 
electric killing of criminals as a substitute for hang- 




J. MOUNT BLEYER 

ing. His first paper on this subject was pubHshed 
in the " Humboldt Scientific Library " and in the 
"Transactions" of the Medico-Legal Society of 
New York. Later came his studies on "Tone 
Blindness," or the causes of what is termed '•' false 
ear." A communication on this subject was sub- 
mitted by him to the Royal Academy of Medicine 
and Surgery, of Naples, Italy, and gained him elec- 
tion to membership in that body. Continuing his 
researches in this field, he soon gave a remarkable 
report on the pathological changes in the human 
voice, as indicated by the phonograph. He per- 
fected that machine for his purposes and planned 
the creation of what might be called a " vocal pan- 
theon," or a museum in which the voices of emi- 



26o 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



nent men and women should be preserved. This 
idea has since been practically considered by the 
Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Bleyer wrote his first 
paper on this subject for "The American Athe- 
nseum." Following this came his experiments re- 
sulting in photography of the human voice and the 
making of " voice pictures." He found that sound 
can be recorded by photographing the vibrations of 
a membrane acted upon by the sound, and in this 
ingenious fashion he discovered a new chromatic 
scale. Upon the discovery of the " X Rays " Dr. 
Bleyer became deeply interested therein, and soon 
began the practice of fluoroscopy of the chest wall, 
demonstrating the possibility of thus examining and 
ascertaining the condition of the lungs. At present 
this system is widely used in hospitals. Next he 
gave his attention to the study of the violet rays of 
light. His application of such rays to the cure of 
tuberculosis has attracted wide attention through- 
out the world. For the generation of such rays he 
has invented several kinds of lamps. His system 
of treatment includes, also, the fullest possible use 
of sunlight through properly colored glass, and he 
has had a number of sanatoria thus equipped. 
Electric sterilization of the blood is another of his 
inventions which is receiving much attention from 
physiologists. This system consists in generating 
in the blood an excess of ozone. These and other 
researches and achievements of Dr. Bleyer have 
won for him wide recognition. He has been chosen 
to membership in the Electrical Society of New 
York, the Soci6t6 Electrique ThtSrapeutique and 
the Sociit^ Laryngologique of Paris, the National 
Academy of Medicine of Mexico, and other learned 
bodies. He has also received the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Laws. 



side he is descended from Puritan stock, his grand- 
parents having moved into New York from Ver- 
mont. His education was begun in the common 
schools of his native place. From 1874 to 1878 he 
was a student in the State Normal School at Pots- 
dam, New York, and he was graduated from it in 
the classical course in the spring of 1878. Intent 
upon higher culture and a professional career he 
entered McGill University, in Canada, in 1880, but 
the next year left it for the Medical College of New 
York University. In the latter institution he pur- 
sued the full course and was duly graduated with the 




.SILAS E. BROWN 



BROWN, Silas Edgar, 1856- 

Class of 1883 Med. 
Born at Lisbon, N. Y., 1856; graduated at Potsdam 
State Normal School, 1878 ; studied at McGill Uni- 
versity ; graduated M.D., New York University Medi- 
cal College, 1883; in general practice of medicine, 
1883-92 ; in gynecological and surgical practice since 
1892 ; established private sanitarium mainly for dis- 
eases of women, Ogdensburg, N. Y., 1897. 

SILAS EDGAR BROWN, M.D., is the son of 
John and Rosalinda Barter Brown, and was 
born at Lisbon, St. Lawrence County, New York, 
on February 24, 1856. His father came from the 
North of Ireland and settled in the United States 
when he was thirty years of age. On the maternal 



degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1883. Thereupon 
he settled at Ogdensburg, New York, and entered 
upon the practice of his chosen profession. Down 
to 1892 he was in general medical and surgical 
practice, but in that year he began to devote his 
attention almost exclusively to gynecological work 
and general surgery. In pursuance of this latter 
plan he established at Ogdensburg, in 1897, a pri- 
vate sanitarium, devoted chiefly to the cure of 
women's diseases. This institution he is now suc- 
cessfully conducting. Since 1887 he has been 
Coroner of St. Lawrence County, and since 1898 
he has been Acting Assistant Surgeon of the United 
States Marine Hospital Service. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Municipal Civil Service Commission of 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



261 



the City of Ogdensburg. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. He is a member of the Ogdensburg Club, 
of the Ogdensburg Medical Society of the St. 
Lawrence County Medical Association, and of the 
Northern New York Medical Association. Of each 
of the two last named organizations he has been 
President. Dr. Brown was married in September, 
1883, to Mary C. Bacon, daughter of Captain George 
Bacon of the United States Navy. She has borne 
him three children : Josephine C, Marion H., and 
George B. Brown. 



DOREMUS, Cornelius, 1862- 

Class of 1883 Law. 
Born at Areola, N. J., 1862 ; studied in public schools, 
and Stevens Institute ; graduated LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1883 ; admitted to New York 
Bar, 1883; New Jersey attorney, 1884; counselor, 18E9; 
in practice since 1883. 

CORNELIUS DOREMUS, LL.B., a promi- 
nent lawyer of Hackensack, New Jersey, 
and New York, was born at Areola, Bergen County, 
New Jersey, on January 22, 1862, his parents being 
Jacob W. and Sophia E. (Van Dien) Doremus. He 
is descended in the fifth generation from Johannes 
or John Doremus, who was born at Middleburg, 
Island of Walcheron, Holland, came to America in 
1709, settled first at Acquackanonck, New Jersey, 
and later at Hackensack, married at the latter place 
on August 19, 1710, and was the owner of large 
tracts of land at Preakness and on the Saddle River 
near Paramus, New Jersey. In the next generation 
was Joris or George Doremus, who lived at Passaic 
and married Mary, daughter of Dan Berdaen 
(Berdan). Later descendants have become numer- 
ous throughout Bergen and Passaic counties. On 
the maternal side Mr. Doremus is descended from 
Dirck Garretsen Van Dien, of Utrecht, Holland. 
His paternal grandparents were John B. and Mar- 
garet (Westervelt) Doremus, and his maternal grand- 
parents Cornelius G. and Susan E. (Post) Van 
Dien. Mr. Doremus received his primary education 
in the public schools of his native county, and 
thence proceeded to the Stevens Institute, Hoboken, 
New Jersey, in 1878, where he completed his aca- 
demic studies. In 1880 he became a student in 
the Law School of New York University, and was 
graduated from it with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws in 1883. In that same year he was admitted 
to the Bar of New York State, and began the practice 
of his profession in New York City. The next year 
he was admitted to the New Jersey Bar as an 



attorney, and in 1889 as a counselor. For a 
number of years he has successfully practiced his 
profession in both states, having offices in Hacken- 
sack, New Jersey, and at No. 120 Broadway, New 
York. For four years he was counsel to the Board 
of Chosen Freeholders of Bergen County, Now 
Jersey, and was also counsel for the village and 
township of Ridgewood. At the present time he is 
counsel for Saddle River, Maywood Borough, and 
other municipalities. In his general practice his 
ample preparation for his profession and his earnest 
devotion to the interests of his clients have won for 
him an enviable success. He has never aspired to 
public office, but in 1895 ^^^^ persuaded by his 
friends to accept a nomination for State Senator. 
He is a member of the Reformed Church of Ridge- 
wood, New Jersey, and is one of the most public- 
spirited and highly esteemed citizens of that place, 
where he makes his home. He was married on 
December 6, 1885, to Jennie M. Lake, of Monsey, 
New Jersey, and has had three children : Florence 
L. (deceased), Mabel, and Nellie Budlong Doremus. 



FREEMAN, Rowland Godfrey, 1859- 

Clinical Lecturer Med. Coll. 
Born in New York, 1855; studied under private 
tutor until 1874 ; Lawrenceville School, N. J., 1874-76 ; 
Packard Business College, 1876-78; tutor, 1878-79; 
Columbia College, 1879-83, graduated A.B., 1883; Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, 1883-86, graduated 
M.D., 1886; Interne at Bellevue, 1886-87; Berlin, 
Vienna and Paris, 1887-88 ; Roosevelt Hospital, 1888-96 ; 
St. Mary's Hospital, 1890-98 ; New York Foundling 
Hospital, 1893-99 ; Physician to St. John's Guild, 1899 ; 
Visiting Physician to Nursery and Child's Hospital, 
1902; Clinical Lecturer on Pediatrics, and Chief of 
Pediatric Clinic, New York University and Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College since igoi ; author of num- 
erous papers. 

ROWLAND GODFREY FREEMAN, A.B., 
M.D., a member of the Faculty of the New 
York University and Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College, was born in New York City on June 11, 
1859, the son of Alfred and Amelia (Taylor) Free- 
man, and of English ancestry. He received a par- 
ticularly careful and thorough education, being 
under a private preceptor until 1874, and then for 
two years at the well known Lawrenceville School, 
at Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Another period of 
two years was spent in the Packard Business College, 
in New York, and then a private tutor completed 
his preparation for Columbia College. He was 
graduated from the latter institution with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in 1883, and in the following 



262 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



fall entered its Medical Department, the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, from which he was grad- 
uated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1886. The remainder of 1886 and part of 1887 
were spent as an Interne at Bellevue Hospital, after 
which he went abroad for eighteen months' study 
in Berlin, Vienna and Paris. Returning to New 
York in 1888 he became Physician to the Out-door 
Patient Department of Roosevelt Hospital and 
served in that capacity until 1896. From 1890 to 
1898 he was Pathologist to St. Mary's Hospital, and 
from 1893 to 1899 Pathologist to the New York 




ROWLAND G. FREEMAN 

Foundling Hospital, to which latter he has, since 
1899, been Attending Physician. In 1899 he also 
became Attending Physician to the Seaside Hospital 
of St. John's Guild, and in 1902 Visiting- Physician 
to the Nursery and Child's Hospital. Since 1901 
he has been Clinical Lecturer on Pediatrics, and 
Chief of the Pediatric Clinic in New York Univer- 
sity and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. He 
is a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine 
and Chairman of its Section on Pediatrics. He is 
also a member of the American Pediatric Society, 
the American Public Health Association, the Society 
of American Bacteriologists, the New York County 
Medical Society, the New York Pathological Society, 
and the Century Association, His bibliography in- 



cludes " Milk as an Agency in the Conveyance of 
Disease," "Medical Record," March 28, 1896; 
" Low Temperature Pasteurization of Milk," " Ar- 
chives of Pediatrics," August, 1896; "Sterilization 
of Milk at Low Temperature," " Medical Record," 
July 2, 1892; " Sterilization of Milk at Seventy-five 
Degrees Centigrade," " Medical Record," June 10, 
1893; "Dangers of the Domestic Use Other than 
Drinking of Contaminated Water," " Albany Medical 
Annals," March and April, 1897 ; "The Straus Milk 
Charity of New York," " Archives of Pediatrics," 
November, 1897 ; " A Bottle of Improved Form for 
the Pasteurization of MiW," I'ii'd., 1897; "Should 
All Milk Used for Infants be Heated?" tfiid., July, 
1898 ; "A Preliminary Communication on the Sepa- 
ration of Bacteria from Milk," li/W., June, 1899; 
" A Study of Lesions of the Liver in Young Chil- 
dren," lilt/., 1900; "Acute Nephritis Following 
Influenza," iiiW., October, 1900, and the article on 
" Vaccination " in the " Cyclopaedia of the Dis- 
eases of Children." Dr. Freeman was married on 
March 26, 1887, to Henrietta Elizabeth Taylor, and 
has two children : Elizabeth Gwinnett and Rowland 
Godfrey Freeman, Jr. His address is No. 205 West 
57th Street, New York. 



HAYES, Charles S., 1858- 

Class of 1883 Law. 
Born in New York, 1858; studied in private, in public 
school, and in law office; graduated LL.B., New York 
University Law School, 1883; in practice since 1883. 

CHARLES S. HAYES, LL.B., son of Rickard 
Hayes, a builder and contractor, and Ehza- 
beth Hayes, was born in New York City on Christ- 
mas Day, 1858. He studied under a private 
instructor, in a public school, in the law office 
of Chauncey B. Ripley, and in the Law School 
of New York University. From the last named 
he was graduated in 1883, and at about the same 
time he was admitted to practice at the Bar. He 
is now engaged in the practice of civil law, largely 
in association with Benjamin Steinhardt, of the firm 
of Howe & Hummel. He is especially expert in 
corporation law, having been secretary of many cor- 
porations. In politics he is a Democrat and a 
member of Tammany Hall. His offices are in the 
Park Row Building, New York. 



HUBBARD, LeRoy Watkins, 1857- 

Classof 1883 Med. 
Born at Malone, N. Y., 1857; studied in public 
schools, Franklin Academy, Malone, and Polytechnic 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



263 



Institute, Brooklyn; graduated A.B., Amherst College, 
1879, and A.M., 1881^; M.D., New York University 
Medical College, 1883 ; served in Bellevue Hospital, 
New York, 1883-84; New York Orthopaedic Dispensary 
and Hospital, 1884-95 ; New York Juvenile Asylum, 
, 1891-1901 ; in active medical practice in New York. 

LEROY WATKINS HUBBARD, M.D., son 
of Charles LeRoy and Eunice (Watkins) 
Hubbard, is descended from George Hubbard, who 
came from England and settled in Massachusetts in 
1633. The family was later settled in Connecticut 
and Vermont, and about 1835 Abel Hubbard, grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, moved from 




LEROY W. HUBBARD 

Putney, Vermont, to Malone, Franklin County, 
New York, where Dr. Hubbard was born on 
January 22, 1857. As a boy Dr. Hubbard at- 
tended the public schools of Malone, and also the 
Franklin Academy in that place. In 1873-75 he was 
a student at the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic 
Institute, and was there prepared for college. He 
was matriculated at Amherst College in 1875, ^"^1 
four years later was graduated in the Class of 1879, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He received 
the degree of Master of Arts from Amherst in 1884. 
From Amherst he came to New York University, 
and spent the years 1880-83 i" its Medical College, 
from which, in 1883, he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, standing second in 



his class. The next two years were spent in service 
in Bellevue Hospital, New York. ' For the eleven 
years 1884-95 he was Attending Surgeon to the 
New York Orthopedic Dispensary and Hospital, 
and for the ten years 1891-igoi he was Examining 
Physician to the New York Juvenile Asylum. He 
is now in active practice in New York City, with 
offices at No. 67 West 48th Street and No. 123 
West i2ist Street, and pays especial attention to 
Orthopaedic Surgery. Dr. Hubbard is a member 
of the New York Academy of Medicine, of the 
American Orthopaedic Society, of the New York 
Medical Union, of the Harlem Medical Association, 
and of the Society of the Alumni of Bellevue Hos- 
pital. He has written various professional articles 
for the leading medical journals. He was married 
on November 10, 1892, to Fannie Louise Tyler, 
and has one child, Stanley Tyler Hubbard. His 
home is at No. 1935 Madison Avenue, New York. 



HULSE, William Augustine, 1858- 

Class of 1883 Med. 
Born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1858; studied in public 
schools and Hudson River Institute; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1883 ; House Phy- 
sician, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, N. Y., 1883-84 ; 
in practice at Bay Shore, Long Island, since 1884 ; in 
Revenue Marine Service, Health Officer, Supervisor, 
President of Board of Education, etc. 

WILLIAM AUGUSTINE HULSE, M.D., a 
son of Van Buren and Frances (Wells) 
Hulse, was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 
27, 1858. He attended the public schools of 
Brooklyn, and also the Hudson River Institute at 
Claverack, New York, completing his course in the 
latter in 1876. Later he entered the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, which is now a part of 
New York University, and was graduated from it 
with the Doctor's degree in 1883. The following 
year he spent as House Physician at St. John's 
Hospital, Yonkers, New York, and then in 1884 
established himself in private practice at Bay Shore, 
Long Island, New York, where he has ever since 
remained. In the interval between his academic 
and his professional studies he served for a year 
and a half in the Revenue Marine Service, in active 
duty on land and water, and in special duty in the 
United States Life Saving Service. While practicing 
his profession at Bay Shore he has filled various 
public places, such as Health Officer of the Town 
of Islip for three years. Supervisor of the same town 
for five years, and President of the Board of Edu- 



264 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



cation for three years. He is now First Vice- 
President of the Patchogue Savings Bank, of 
Patchogue, New Yorl<. He is also Fleet Surgeon 
of the Pentaquit Corinthian Yacht Club, of Bay 




W. A. HULSE 

Shore, and a member of the New York State Med- 
ical Association, the Society of Physicians of Long 
Island, and the Suffolk County Medical Society. In 
politics he is a Republican. He was married on 
September 21, 1885, to A. Louise Ferris, and has 
two children : Hilda Louise and Cornelia Stuyvesant 
Hulse. His address is Bay Shore, Long Island, 
New York. 



HYDE, George Henry, 1854- 

Class of 1883 Law. 
Born at Woodstock, Conn., 1854; educated in public 
school, Woodstock Academy, and Connecticut Literary 
Institution at Suffield ; worked at farming and school 
teaching ; studied law in private offices and in New 
York University Law School; graduated New York 
University, LL.B., 1883 ; admitted to Connecticut 
Bar, 1883, and to New York Bar, 1886; in practice in 
New York City since 1886. 

C~>EORGE HENRY HYDE, son of William 
J Ira Hyde, was born in the historic Town of 
Woodstock, in Windham County, Connecticut, on 
August 7, 1854. On his father's side he is de- 
scended from a family settled in New England for 



several generations. On the side of his mother, 
whose maiden name was Sarah Maria Potter, he is 
descended from the Potters who settled at Plymouth, 
Rhode Island, in the early colonial days, and he is 
also related to the Williams and Sprague families of 
the latter state. In his boyhood he attended the 
local public school at Woodstock, and also the 
Woodstock Academy, and later pursued a course at 
the Connecticut Literary Institution, at Suffield, Con- 
necticut. Meantime he was accustomed to hard 
work on a farm, and thereafter he was engaged at 
school teaching and other occupations. Finding his 
inclination drawing him toward the legal profession, 
he began the study of law in the office of the late 
John J. Penrose, of Central Village, Connecticut, 
and pursued it later with the late Andrew J. Todd, 
of New York City. Then he entered the Law De- 
partment of New York University, and was gradu- 
ated from it with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1883. He was admitted to the Connecticut Bar at 
Brooklyn, Windham County, on September 19, 1883, 
and to the New York Bar in New York City, in 
March, 1886. Mr. Hyde formed, on January i. 




GEO. H. HYDE 



1887, a partnership with John C. Clegg, a well 
known New York lawyer practicing mostly in real 
estate matters and before the Surrogate. The firm 
of Clegg & Hyde lasted until November i, 1889, 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



265 



when it was dissolved, Mr. Clegg then retiring from 
business on account of his advanced age, and Mr. 
Hyde continuing the business individually. He has 
a large clientage, including a considerable propor- 
tion of German-Americans. His work is chiefly 
done in his own office, and in the Surrogate's and 
Equity courts. His office is in the Emigrant Indus- 
trial Bank Building, at No. 51 Chambers Street, 
New York. Mr. Hyde is a member of the New 
England Society of New York, tlie New York Uni- 
versity Law School Alumni Association, and the 
Presbyterian Union of New York. In politics he is 
a Republican in national affairs and independent 
in local matters. He was married at Glasgow, Mis- 
souri, on October 13, 1887, to Emma Duke Lewis, 
and has two children : George Gordon and Richard 
Lewis Hyde. 



KINGSLEY, William Morgan, 1863- 

Class of 1883 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1863; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1883; A.M., New York University, 1886; 
banker since 1883 ; member of University Council 
since igoo. 

WILLIAM MORGAN KINGSLEY, A.M., 
banker and member of the Council of 
New York University, is a native of New York City, 
where he was born on December 16, 1863. He 
entered New York University in 1879, and was one 
of the most prominent members of his class. He 
was President of Eucleian, President of his class 
in the Junior year. Junior orator. Editor of " The 
University Quarterly," and Captain of the Lacrosse 
Teai)i in 1882-83. He was a member of Psi 
Upsilon and Phi Beta Kappa, and has for years been 
a member of the Council of Psi Upsilon. At Com- 
mencement he was Greek Salutatorian, and received 
the Second Fellowship. He was graduated in 1883 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and received 
the degree of Master of Arts in 1886. Soon 
after graduation he entered the counting-house of 
Messrs. Brown Brothers, of New York, and there 
remained until 1891. In the latter year he organ- 
ized the present firm of Kingsle^', Mabon & Co., 
Bankers, in New York. 



LAMBERT, Benjamin Lott, 1856- 

Class of 1S83 Med. 
Born in New Haven, Conn., 1856 ; studied in public 
schools, high school and Hopkins Grammar School, 
New Haven, and at Yale two years; graduated M.D., 



New York University Medical College, 1883 ; served 
several years in Bellevue Hospital ; Alderman, New 
Haven, 1895-98, and President of Board and Acting 
Mayor of city, 1897-98; Park Commissioner, 1897; 
Chairman of Park Improvement Commission since 
1895 ; in medical practice since 1883. 

(ENJAMIN LOTT LAMBERT, M.D., one 
of the foremost physicians of New Haven, 
Connecticut, was born in that city on February 16, 
r856. His mother's maiden name was Jane Adams 
Hinman. His father, Denison David Lambert, 
could trace his genealogy in an unbroken line to the 
time of William the Conqueror, one of the family 



B 




BENJAMIN L. LAMBERT 

being Cardinal Lambertini, who in 1 730 became 
Pope Benedict XIV. Jesse Lambert, the founder 
of the family in America, settled at Milford, Con- 
necticut, in 1680. Dr. Lambert was educated in 
the public schools of New Haven, including the 
high school. Thence he proceeded to the Hop- 
kins Grammar School, and from it to Yale Univer- 
sity, where he remained for two years. From Yale 
he came to the New York University Medical Col- 
lege, and was graduated from it with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1883, since which time he 
has been constantly engaged in the practice of his 
profession. For two years after graduation he was 
with Professor A. L. Loomis, in a private class in 
Bellevue Hospital, and he was also under Dr. Jarvis 



266 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in the same hospital. Then he returned to New 
Haven and has ever since been identified with that 
city. His specialty in practice is the diseases of 
children, and in that he has been eminently success- 
ful. He has also been a conspicuous figure in the 
public life of the city. He was the first Republican 
Alderman elected from the Fourth Ward of New 
Haven, and served from 1895 to June, 1898. From 
1895 'o June, 1897, he was a member of the Board of 
Finance. From 1895 'o June, 1898, he was Chair- 
man of the Committee on Lamps. In 1897-98 
he was President of the Board of Aldermen, and 
Acting Mayor of the City of New Haven. In 1897 
he was a member of the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, and since 1895 he has been Chairman of 
the Commission for the Improvement of Beaver 
Ponds Park. Dr. Lambert is a member of the New 
Haven City Medical Association, the New Haven 
County Medical Society, the Connecticut State Medi- 
cal Society, the American Medical Association, the 
Young Men's Republican Club, the Masonic Order 
(including Free and Accepted Masons, Royal Arch 
Masons, Knights Templar, Thirty-second Degree, 
and Mystic Shrine), the Order of Odd Fellows, 
and the Knights of Pythias. He is a Past Master 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, a Past 
Archon of the Heptasophs, Medical Examiner of 
the National Fraternal League, and Supreme Medi- 
cal Director of the American Mutual Life Society 
of New Jersey. He was married on December 15, 
i88r, to Mary Durant Gilbert, and has had one 
child, Harold Denison Lambert, who died in 1899 
at the age of sixteen years, and to whom a memo- 
rial window has been erected in the Howard Avenue 
Congregational Church. Dr. Lambert's address is 
No. 358 Howard ."V venue. New Haven, Connecticut. 



chaplain of that monarch and received from him 
many marks of favor. Dr. Leland was brought to 
the United States in his boyhood, in 1865, and 
afterward returned to Dublin and studied at Trinity 
College. Later he pursued a course in Manhattan 
College, New York. He spent many years in teach- 
ing in various institutions of learning, including St. 
John's College and St. Francis's College, Brooklyn, 
New York, St. Joseph's College, Buffalo, New York, 
Troy Academy, Troy, New York, the Christian 
Brothers' College, at Memphis, Tennessee, and 
Manhattan College, New York, in which last he was 




M. J. LELAND 



LELAND, Matthew John. 

' Class of 1883 Med. 

Born in Ireland; came to United States in 1865; 
studied at Trinity College, Dublin, and Manhattan 
College, New York; graduated M.D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1883 ; instructor in various 
colleges; author. 

MATTHEW JOHN LELAND, M.D., is a 
native of Dublin, Ireland, and is the son 
of Cornelius and Ellen (McDermott) Leland. His 
mother was the daughter of John McDermott, of 
Kilterra, who was the brother of the Prince of Kool- 
avin, in the West of Ireland. His father was de- 
scended from John Leland, the famous antiquarian, 
who lived in the reign of Henry VIII. and was the 



for ten years Professor of Sciences and Languages. 
In 1883 he was graduated from the Medical College 
of New York University with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine, and since 1886 has been engaged in 
the practice of that profession. He has written a 
trea,tise on " La Grippe " which has received much 
favorable notice. He was married in 1888 to Anna 
Frances Adelaide Kleider, of Brooklyn, and lives at 
No. 220 Sixth Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 



McKEW, John Joseph, 1859- 

Class of 1883 Med. 
Born in New York, 1859; studied in public schools of 
New York, Mt. Cesaire College, Canada, and College 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



267 



of St. Francis Xavier, New York ; graduated M.D., 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1883 ; engaged in 
newspaper work; in practice of medicine since 1883. 

JOHN JOSEPH McKEW, M.D., son of Cor- 
nelius and Margaret (McGee) McKew, comes 
of old Irish stock and was born in New York City 
on November 12, 1859. His father owned a large 
plantation near Charleston, South Carohna, where 
the boy spent the first five years of his life, from the 
age of one month, but the estate was confiscated in 
the Civil War and the elder McKew lost everything. 
He came with his family to the North, and there the 




JOHN J. McKEW 

subject of this sketch spent his boyhood. He was 
educated in the public schools of New York, in Mt. 
Cesaire College, Canada, and in the College of St. 
Francis Xavier, New York. In 1880-81 he was a 
reporter for several daily papers in New York. He 
then began the study of medicine under Professor 
Joseph W. Howe, M.D., and in the Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, now a part of New York 
University, from which he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine in March, 1883. In 
the following month he entered upon the practice 
of his profession and has ever since remained therein. 
He served in the Charity Hospital of New York in 
1883-84. He is a member of the New York State 
Medical Association, the New York County Medical 



Association, the American Medical Association, the 
Medical Association of the Greater City of New 
York, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Foresters of America, the Knights of Columbus, 
and the Catholic Benevolent Legion. He was mar- 
ried on November 12, 1893, to Lillian Kehoe, and 
has four children : Lillian, Marguerite, May, and 
Rosalie McKew. His address is No. 153 East 6ist 
Street, New York. 



PATON, James Morton, 1863- 

Class of 1883 Arts. 
Born in New York, 1863 ; distinguished student at 
New York University; graduated A.B., New York 
University, 1883, and Harvard,. 1884; Ph.D., Harvard, 
1887; Professor of Latin and French, Middlebury Col- 
lege, Vermont, 1887-91 ; student of Classical Philology 
and Archaeology at Bonn University, 1891-92 ; author 
of introductions to edition of the lUiad and Odyssey. 

JAMES MORTON PATON, A.B., Ph.D., phi- 
lologist and archaeologist, was born in New 
York City on May 12, 1863, the son of Thomas C. 
Morton Paton and Elizabeth Lee (Allen) Paton. 
In New York University, which he entered in 1879, 
he was distinguished for scholarship. He won the 
Second Butler Eucleian Essay Prize in 1882 and the 
First in 1883. He was a Junior orator, Treasurer of 
his class, Secretary and Vice-President of Eucleian, 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Lacrosse Team, Edi- 
tor of" The University Quarterly," and Valedictorian 
and winner of the First Fellowship at Commence- 
ment. He was a member of Delta Phi and Phi 
Beta Kappa. He was graduated from the Uni- 
versity with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1883, 
and the next year received the same degree from 
Harvard University. He remained at Harvard, in 
the Graduate Department, from 1884 to 1887, 
receiving the Doctor's degree in Philosophy in the 
last named year. From 1887 to 1891 he was 
Professor of Latin and French in Middlebury 
College, Middlebury, Vermont, and then went 
abroad to study Classical Philology and Archaeology 
at the University of Bonn. In 1888 he wrote intro- 
ductions to the Chiswick edition of the lUiad and 
the Odyssey (New York, four volumes). 



POMEROY, Charles Donaldson, 1861- 

Classof 1883 Med. 
Born at Brockville, Ontario, Canada, 1861 ; studied 
in high school, Brockville; graduated A.B., Albert 
University, Belleville, Canada, 1879 ; studied in Belle- 
vue Hospital Medical College; graduated M.D., New 



268 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



York University Medical College, 1883; Attending 
Surgeon in Guy's Hospital, London, England, 1883-84, 
and in Eastern Dispensary, New York, 1884-88; in 
practice since 1888 at Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

CHARLES DONALDSON POMEROY, A.B., 
M.D., is a son of Peter Berry Pomeroy, A.M., 
Ph.D., and Isabella Jane (Donaldson) Pomeroy, 




CHARLES D. POMEROY 

and is descended from Sir Berry Perry Pomeroy, 
Bart., K.C.B., of England, and from General David 
Donaldson, of Glasgow, Scotland. He was born 
on August II, 1 86 1, at Brockville, Ontario, Canada, 
and was prepared for college in the high school of 
that place. In 1879 he was graduated a Bachelor 
of Arts at the Albert University, Belleville, Canada, 
and thereafter studied medicine in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College and the Medical College 
of New York University. From the latter he was 
graduated in 1883, with the Doctor's degree. For 
a year following he was an Attending Surgeon in 
Guy's Hospital, London, England, and then for 
four years at the Eastern Dispensary, New York 
City. Since 1888 he has been engaged in the 
general practice of his profession at Ogdensburg, 
New York. He is a member of the Masonic Order, 
the Odd Fellows, and the Order of Foresters. In 
politics he is a Democrat. He was married to 
Mercy Randies Muddell on September 25, 1895. 



POTTER, Julius Howard, 1856- 

Class of 1881 Med. 
Born at New Lisbon, N. Y., 1856; studied in public 
and private schools, Haxtwick Seminary, and Albany 
State Normal School; graduated M.D., New York 
University Medical College, i88r ; in practice since 
1881. 

JULIUS HOWARD POTTER, M.D., was born 
at New Lisbon, Otsego County, New York, on 
October 26, 1856. His father, Chauncey A. Potter, 
was of English descent, and his mother, whose 
maiden name was Loucina Wright, was descended 
from early English settlers of the Eastern States. 
He attended in boyhood the local district school 
and also a select school. Two terms were spent 
at Hartwick Seminary, and then he pursued a course 
at the New York State Normal School at Albany, 
from which he was graduated in the spring of 1877. 
For a few terms he taught a public school, and then 
began the study of medicine in the New York Uni- 
versity Medical College. He was graduated with 
the Doctor's degree in 1881, and since the fall of 
that year has been in the active practice of his pro- 




JULIUS HOWARD POTTER 

fession, for the first two, years at Mount Vision, New 
York, and since May, 1883, in the City of Buffalo, 
New York, where in 1884 he was a City District 
Physician. He is a member, and has been Presi- 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



269 



dent, of the Buffalo Medical Union, the Roswell 
Park Medical Club, and the Buffalo Clinical Labor- 
atory, and is also a member of the Erie County 
Medical Society, the New York State Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Wabash Railroad Surgeons' Society, and 
other organizations. He was married on September 
21, 188 1, and has had three children : Elizabeth P., 
Beatrice E. (deceased) and Julius H. Potter, Jr. 
His address is No. 177 Dearborn Street, Buffalo, 
New York. 



resigned and was chosen Secretary Emeritus. He 
has for many years been the editor of all the publi- 
cations of the Society, and is also the author of a 
" Bible Dictionary " and other works. He was 
married on September 28, 1 841, to Marcia Scott 
Dunning, and had two children : George Thorndike 
and Frances Harriet Rand. He was a member of 
the Peucinian Society at Bowdoin, and of the Phi 



RAND, William Wilberforce, 1816- 

Class of 1883 Honorary. 
Born at Gorham, Me., 1816; studied at Boston Latin 
School and Lowell High School; graduated A.B., 
Bowdoin, 1837, and Bangor, Me., Theological Sem- 
inary, 1840; ordained minister of Dutch Reformed 
Church, 1841 ; in pastoral work, 1841-48 ; editorial work 
for American Tract Society, 1848-72; Secretary Amer- 
ican Tract Society since 1872 ; author of various works ; 
honorary degree of D.D., New York University, 1883. 

WILLIAM WILBERFORCE RAND, D.D., 
the venerable Secretary of the American 
Tract Society, is a native of Gorham, Maine, where 
he was born on December 8, 18 16. His father, the 
Rev. Asa Rand, the son of a farmer, was a Dart- 
mouth graduate, pastor of the church at Gorham, 
and afterward successively Editor of " The Christian 
Mirror," at Portland, Maine, and of " The Boston 
Recorder," "The Volunteer," and "The Youth's 
Companion," in Boston. His mother, whose maiden 
name was Grata Payson, was a daughter of the Rev. 
Dr. Seth Payson, a pastor. State Senator of New 
Hampshire, and Trustee of Dartmouth College, and 
a sister of Dr. Edward Payson, of Portland, Maine. 
Dr. Rand was educated in the grammar and Latin 
schools, Boston, the high school at Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, and at Bowdoin College, from which latter 
he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 1837. Thence he proceeded to the Ban- 
gor, Maine, Theological Seminary, and' was gradu- 
ated from it in 1840. In the following year, 1841, 
he was ordained and settled as Pastor of the 
Reformed Dutch Church at Canastota, New York, 
where he remained until 1844. Thereafter he 
preached at Richmond, Bethel and Standish, Maine, 
until May, 1848. At the latter date he engaged in 
editorial work for the American Tract Society, in 
New York, and thus began a connection which has 
continued unbroken for more than half a century. 
In 1872 he was elected Secretary of the Society, 
and occupied that office until 1902, when he 





WM. W. RAND 



Beta Kappa (Alpha of Maine). In 1S83 he re- 
ceived the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from New York University. 



RICHARDS, Seyrriour S., 1860- 

Class of 1883 Med. 
Born at Newport, N. Y., i860; studied in public 
schools, Fort Edward Institute, and University of 
Michigan ; graduated M.D., 1883, New York Univer- 
sity Medical College ; Surgeon for \Arest Shore Rail- 
road, 1884-94; Coroner of Herkimer County, N. Y. 

SEYMOUR S. RICHARDS, M.D., was born at 
Newport, New York, on December 23, i860. 
On the side of his father. La Fayette Richards, he is 
of Welsh descent. On the side of his mother, 
whose maiden name was Sarah Mason Haskell, he 
is descended from Sampson Mason, who came from 
England in 1649 and settled in Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts, after having served in Cromwell's Army 



270 



UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR SONS 



in the English civil war, and whose descendants 
served in the American Army in the Revolution. 
Dr. Richards attended the public schools in his 
boyhood, and the Fort Edward Institute, at Fort 




SEYMOUR S. RICHARDS 

Edward, New York. He was also for a time a stu- 
dent at the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. 
On April 13, 1883, he was graduated with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine from the New York 
University Medical College, and has ever since been 
engaged in the practice of his profession. For the 
ten years beginning with 1884 he was a Surgeon for 
the West Shore Railroad Company. For ten years, 
also, he was Coroner of Herkimer County, New York. 
He is a member of the Herkimer County Medical 
Society, the New York State Medical Society, the 
New York State Medical Association, the New York 
State Medical Association of Railway Surgeons, the 
Masonic Order, the Knights Templar, and the 
Mystic Shrine. In politics he is a Republican. He 
was married on April 25, 1883, to Marianetta Skiff, 
daughter of Dr. Perrin Akin Skiff. His address is 
Frankfort, Herkimer County, New York. 



ROOT, Arthur Lewis, 1859- 

Class of 1883 Med 
Born at Gilbertsville, N. Y., 1859; studied at local 
academy; graduated M.D., New York University- 



Medical College, 1883 ; in hospital service, 1883-84 ; 
in private practice since 1884. 

ARTHUR LEWIS ROOT, M.D., son of Major 
Charles Porter Root and Elizabeth Ann 
(Scotten) Root, was born at Gilbertsville, Otsego 
County, New York, on May 24, 1859. He was pre- 
pared for college at the Gilbertsville Academy and 
then came to the New York University Medical Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1883 with the 
degreeof Doctor of Medicine. The following year he 
spent as a member of the staff of the Ward's Island 
Hospital. Since April, 1884, he has been success- 
fully engaged in private practice in New York City. 
He has also been a Visiting Physician to the Metro- 
politan Hospital since 1889 and to the Hahnemann 
Hospital since 1892. He is a member of the Clini- 
cal, Colonial, Riding and Driving, West Side Re- 
publican, and Hopatcong Count! y clubs, and the 
West End Association. In politics he is a Republi- 




'^^^^^^^ 



ARTHUR L. ROOT 

can. He was married on October 23, 1888, to 
Frances Robinson, and lives at No. 114 West 8ist 
Street, New York. 



SMITH, Harrie Eugene, 1860- 

CUss of 1883 Med. 
Born in Jersey City, N. J., i860; studied in public 
and private schools, Rutgers College, and College of 



UNIVERSiriES AND THEIR SONS; 



City of New York; graduated M.D., New York Uni- 
versity Medical College, 1883 ; in practice since 1883 ; 
Health Officer of Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

HARRIE EUGENE SMITH, M.D., a promi- 
nent physician of Mount Vernon, New 
York, is a son of Henry Clay Smith and Marie Louise 




H. EUGENE SMITH 

(Fleming) Smith, and was born in Jersey City, New 
Jersey, on July 4, i860. His ancestors were New 
England colonists and Revolutionary patriots. He 
studied in public and private schools in New York, 
and in the College of the City of New York, and 
Rutgers College. In 1880 he entered the Medical 
College of New York University, and was graduated 
from it in 1883 with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. For a year he practiced in New York, and 
then removed to his present home, in Mount Ver- 
non, New York, of which city he is Health Officer. 
He has been Police Surgeon, City Physician, mem- 
ber of the Board of Education, and a Director of 
the First National Bank of Mount Vernon. He is 
a Surgeon, with rank of Captain, in the First Regi- 
ment,