(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The early history of Southampton, L. I., New York"

p 




3 1924 096 849 553 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924096849553 



In compliance with current 

copyright law, Cornell University 

Library produced this 

replacement volume on paper 

that meets the ANSI Standard 

Z39.48-1992 to replace the 

irreparably deteriorated original. 

2003 



V2r*. — ■ 





BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME 
FROM THE 

SAGE ENDOWMENT FUND 

THE GIFT OF 

1891 




JOSEPH M9D0N0U 

BOOKSELLEI 

S3 555 STATES 

-■NY . -R, 



i „ ..CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 




™ B ! - 3 - 10S 4 dob 000 07 7 



EARLY HISTORY 



OF 



SOUTHAMPTON, L I. 

NEW YORK, 

WITH GENEALOGIES. 

REVISED, CORRECTED AND ENLARGED. 

By GEORGE ROGERS HOWELL, M. A. (Yale University), 



MEMBER OP THE ALBANY INSTITUTE, CORRESPONDING MEMBER OP THE 
TROY SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, 
NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC-GENEALOGICAL SO- 
CIETY, HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENN- 
SYLVANIA, AND STATE HISTOR- 
ICAL SOCIETY OF 
WISCONSIN. 



SECOND EDITION. 



ALBANY: 
WEED, PARSONS AND COMPANY. 

1887. 

fc 



A. \W3y6- 




Presbyterian Church, Erected 1707. 



IPUtwwrij of (tor ^ions ^ntzstovs. 



PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION. 



The object of the author of this work is not. to give a complete- 
history of the town, though the work is necessarily historical. 
It is rather to present, so far as possible, a picture of the life and 
struggles of our ancestors in subduing a wilderness and progress- 
ing in the arts of civilization. It is so far an episode in the early 
history of the colonies. Besides this, it has been deemed proper 
to record any salient facts or occurrences of later date of general 
interest. The importance of the genealogical portion of the work 
can scarcely be over estimated. The far greater part of this has 
been constructed with great care by the author from an almost 
infinite number of isolated records in wills, deeds, family Bibles, 
church and town records of all descriptions, tomb-stones, and from 
whatever source afforded with certainty a name and a date. Since 
the publication of the first edition in 1866, all this material has 
been reviewed, and the addition of much genealogical information 
has made it necessary in most cases to rewrite the whole. Wher- 
ever assistance was afforded in this it is duly accredited. 

While the author has consulted Prime and Thompson, the his- 
torical portion has been derived almost wholly from original 
sources ; that is, from original MSS. documents in the town records 
and office of Secretary of State at Albany, and from the earliest 
historians of the colonial period. 

Great care has been taken to present perfect copies of the ancient 
instruments of writing relating to the history of the town ; but 
it is found by comparison that the orthography of the same docu- 
ment varies considerably, whenever it is more than once recorded. 



vi Pjeeface. 

Among the works consulted in preparation and revision of this 
history are the Colonial Eecords of Connecticut, Massachusetts, 
New Jersey and New York ; Brodhead's History of New York ; 
Denton's New York ; Drake's Pounders of New England ; Essex 
Institute Publications ; Pelt's Ecclesiastical History of New Eng- 
land; Gookin's Indians of New England; Hatfield's History of 
Elizabeth ; Hinman's Puritans of Connecticut ; Hubbard's General 
History of New England ; Johnson's Wonder-working Providenee; 
Josselyn's Two Voyages ; Lechford's News from New England ; 
Lewis and Newhall's History of Lynn ; Mather's Magnalia and New 
England; New England Historical and Genealogical Register- 
Savage's Genealogical Dictionary ; Trumbull's History of Connecti- 
cut, and "Winthrop's History of New England. 

Albany, N. Y., 1886. 



INDEX OF CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. page. 
Early Discoveries.,. 9 

CHAPTER II. 

Outline of the History of Long Island. — Accounts of the Early Set- 
tlers. — First Attempt at a Settlement at Manhasset, in North t~> 
Hempstead. — Removal to the East End 14 

CHAPTER HI. 

The Settlement of Southampton and the Settlers. — List of Inhabitants 

in 1649, 1657, 1683 and 1698 20 '-" 

CHAPTER IV. 
Character of the Settlers 46 

CHAPTER V. 

Civil Relations. — Pure Democracy. — Union with Connecticut. — With — ]^- 

New York. — Dutch Interregnum. — Again with New York 50 

CHAPTER VI. 

During the Revolutionary War.— Occupation by the British.— Per- 
sonal Incidents.— Colonies.— Soldiers of the Slaveholders' Rebel- 
lion. — New York Annex 68 

CHAPTER VII. 
Civil Laws.— Courts.— Decrees of Courts 87 

CHAPTER VIII. 
The Church.— Ministers.— Church Edifices.— Schools 97 

CHAPTER IX. 

Various Localities.— Residences of Settlers.— Changes of Residence.— 

Residences in 1864 140 V 

CHAPTER X. 

Indians — Friendly Relations with them.— Purchase of their Lands.— 
Lease of Shinnecock and the Hills.— Sale of Shinnecock Hills 164 



viii Index of Contents. 

CHAPTER XI PAOB. 
Early Customs. — Whaimg. — Burying Grounds. — Miscellaneous 176 



V 



CHAPTER XII. 
Births, Marriages and Deaths 198 f 

CHAPTER Xin. 
Genealogies 201 y~ 

APPENDIX. 

DOCUMENTS PERTAINING TO THE HISTORY OP THE TOWN. 

Disposal! of the Vessell and Agreement of the Settlers 447 

Indian Deed of December 13, 1640 450 

Indian Deed of Quogue Purchase, 1659 451 

Deed for Quogue Purchase, 1653 452 

Indian Deed for Topping's Purchase, 1662 453 

Indian Deed for Topping's Purchase, 1666 454 

Sale of Hog Neck, 1665 454 

Indian Deed for the Whole Town, 1703 454 

Deed of James Farret, 1640, April 456 

Second Deed of Farret, June 12, 1640 457 

Confirmation of Same, 7 July, 1640 457 

Lord Stirling's Confirmation, August, 1640 458 

Patent of Governor Andros, 1676 458 

Patent of Governor Dongan, 1686 460 

Laws of Early Settlers 464 



CHAPTER I. 

EARLY DISCOVERIES. 

^John Verazzano, a Florentine, sent out on a voyage of dis- 
covery in ] 524, by Francis I. of France, first makes land probably 
on the coast of South Carolina. Thence sailing northward he 
explores the coast, but overlooks, apparently, the Chesapeake and 
Delaware bays. While off the coast of Virginia or Maryland, he 
says : " Hauing our aboade three dayes in this cuntrey, riding on 
the coast for want of har boroughs, wee concluded to depart from 
thence, trending along the shore betweene the North and East, 
sayling onely in the day time and riding at ancker by night. In 
the space of 100 leagues sayling, weefounde a very pleasant place, 
situated amongst certaine little steepe Miles : from amiddest the 
which hilles there ran down into the sea a great streame of water, 
which within the mouth was very deep, and from ye sea to ye 
mouth of same, with the tyde, which wee found to rise 8 foot, 
any great vesse'l laden may passe up." 

This, of course, was the month of the Hudson, called by all the 
early navigators the " Great river." He says they passed up the 
river about half a league and found the country well peopled and 
the inhabitants received the visitors with " great showtes of ad- 
miration." This was the extent of his exploration in New York 
harbor. Again : " We weied Ancker and sayled toward the East, 
for so the coast trended, and so alwayes for 50 leagues, being in 
the sight thereof, wee discovered an Ilande in the forme of a 
triangle, distant from the main lande 3 leagues, about the bignesse 
of the Ilande of the Rodes, it was full of hilles, couered with 
trees, well peopled, for we sawe fires all along the coaste. Wee gaue 
the name of it of your Maiesties mother, [Claudia] not staying 
there by reason of the weather being contrarie." 

* Hakluyt Soo. Pub. Reprint, 1850, of the Relation of Verazzano, pub. in 1582, pp. 62, 63. 
2 



10 History of Southampton. 

It would seem from this account that Yerazzano sailed along 
the entire coast of Long Island, supposing it to be the main land 
(as it is nearly fifty leagues in length), and the island to which he 
gave the name of Claudia (the name of Francis' first wife — not 
of his mother) was afterward called Block Island, from its sub- 
sequent Dutch discoverer, Adrian Block. The astonishment of 
the Indians at the sight of Hudson's ship, the " Half Moon,' ' 
eighty-five years after, and of himself in scarlet robes, showed 
that this visit had been forgotten. Bat then the witnesses of the 
first European visit were long dead and the archives of the In- 
dians made no revelations of these matters. Yerazzano was, 
doubtless, the first European navigator who ever gazed upon the 
shores of this island, unless, perchance, the Northmen wandered 
so far to the south of their temporary occupation of the coasts of 
Newfoundland and New England. 

During the interval of eighty-one years that succeeded, western 
Europe was too much occupied at home to project colonies 
abroad. The Low Countries, Germany, France, Italy and Spain 
were one great battle-ground. Charles V. of Spain and I. of 
Germany was fighting his rival, Francis I. of France, and, after 
him, his son, Henry II., both bent on territorial conquest and the 
destruction of each other, until'the secoud treason of Maurice of 
Saxony sent Charles back to Spain completely routed, and this, 
and the gout and disappointed ambition brought him knocking at 
the gate of a convent to secure a retreat for the remainder of his 
life. The gold and silver from Mexico and Peru brought in the 
Spanish galleons that escaped the guns of Drake and Hawkins and 
Raleigh were poured into the coffers • of Philip II., only to be 
spent in establishing the Inquisition in Holland and in building 
■ fleets and palaces in Spain. France was a camp of Huguenot and 
Protestant. England, at the beginning of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, had planted a colony in Yirginia, and began to feel the 
impetus of discovery and trade with the new world. In a 
desire to participate in the trade with America that was enrich- 
ing their cotemporaries, *Henry Wriothesly, Earl of South- 
ampton, and Thomas, Lord Arundel, resolved to fit out a ship 

* Pmkerton's Voyages, vol. Xn, p. 228. 



Eaely Discoveries. 11 

for this expedition. " This vessel was called the ■ Archangel,' and 
was commanded by Captain George Weymouth, an experienced 
and skillful seaman, who sailed the last day of March, 1605, from 
Dartmouth. * * * After much expectation [of seeing land] 
on the 16th of May they obtained sight of an island of no great 
consequence, [size] and very woody along the shore ; but by the 
fruits they found, it appeared no barren nor despicable spot, more 
especially as there were streams of fresh water running down the 
cliffs in great plenty, [off Montauk probably] vast numbers of 
fowls, and fish enough all along the shore. This island is now 
called Long Island, and it was upon the eastern part of it they fell 
to their great satisfaction." This was the second visit of a 
European vessel to this Island, and the story is not without inter- 
est. And what is of more interest to the general reader, he evi- 
dently entered the bay of New York and sailed up the Hudson 
river some forty or fifty miles. 

The next explorer who touched upon the coast was Henry Hud- 
son, an Englishman, but on this particular voyage in the employ- 
ment of the Dutch West India Company. He sailed from Holland 
in March, 1609, in the ship " Half Moon," and the account of the 
voyage has been transmitted to us by ^Robert Juet, a Nether- 
lander, who accompanied Hudson in an unknown capacity. The 
object of the expedition was, as usual, to find a shorter passage to 
the riches of the east, the Indies. He at first sought a north-east 
route, but meeting interminable ice fields near Nova Zembla, he 
turned his prow to the south-west to find a western passage to the 
same point. Making land at Newfoundland, which had been 
previously discovered and named by Cabot, he skirted along the 
coast looking for a passage to the Pacific until he came to the 
English settlements in Virginia, having touched in his course at 
Cape Cod and explored the adjacent waters. Again turning 
northward (from Virginia) he discovered and explored for the first 
time, apparently by Europeans, Delaware bay. Passing on he 
came through the Narrows and entered the noble bay of New 
York, and subsequently he sailed up the magnificent river which 



* Hakluyt Soc. Pub. 



12 History of Southampton. 

now bears ms name, to the present site of Albany. On his home- 
ward passage from New York bay, Juet says he steered south-east 
by east, and was soon out of sight of land, and saw no more until 
they made the coast of England. So that Hudson could not have 
seen any more than the western end of Long Island. These ex- 
plorations of Cape Cod and Delaware bay were the basis of the 
Dutch claim to all territory lying between these two points and 
extending, inland, indefinitely to the Pacific. 

These early explorations have been noticed rather on account of 
their general historical interest than from any immediate connec- 
tion with the settlement of the town in 1640. The question has 
been asked how happened the attention of the colonists to be 
turned in the direction of the east end of Long Island, then an un- 
explored wilderness. Aside from the facts that they had resolved 
to go somewhere, and that they, as well as any others, might 
venture into a wilderness, the truth is, the friends of the colonists, 
and consequently, they themselves, had special knowledge of the 
advantages offered to thetn by this Isle of the sea. *In the sum- 
mer of 1633, Governor Winthrop had the bark "Blessing" bi.ilt, . 
and on October 2, 1633, she returns from a voyage of discovery 
to Mystic, and reports " having made a further discovery of that 
called Long Island." There they trafficked with the natives and 
" procured Wampampeag, both white and blue, it being made by 
the Indians there." 

"With these facts before us, the solution of the question becomes 
very simple, that they came on the personal recommendation of 
Governor Winthrop and his representation of the fertility of the 
soil and the abundance of food in the forests and waters of the 
Island. 

This was the heroic age of modern history, when the Old 
World was stirred up to people the new. Those who are old 
enough to remember the excitement of lS49in " the States" over 
the newly-discovered gold fields of California, and the eagerness 
with which men flocked there for sudden fortunes, may have some 
idea of the same fever for emigration to America that prevailed 
at that time in London, with its county of Middlesex, and the ad - 

* Hubbard's General History of N. E., Mass. Hist. Coll. 2 s. v. 5, p. 174. 



Eaklt Discoveries. 13 

jacent counties. After the home difficulties and troubles that so 
oppressed the middle classes of England nothing so occupied the 
popular mind as the immediate transfer of their homes to the 
New "World. This fact is conspicuous in the writings of the 
English at home and especially in their letters to their friends in 
America. 



14 Histoby of Southampton. 



CHAPTER II. 

OUTLINE OF HISTORY OF LONG ISLAND ACCOUNTS OV EAELY 

SETTLERS — FIRST ATTEMPT AT SETTLEMENT AT NORTH HEMP- 
STEAD — REMOVAL TO THE EAST END. 

The Dutch who had settled on Manhattan Island in the early 
part of the seventeenth century, soon began to build and occupy 
on the opposite shore of Long Island ; and as their population 
increased, naturally pushed out their settlements to the eastward 
on the north and south shores of the Island. Thus it happened 
that the western part of the Island came under the jurisdiction 
of the Dutch Government at New Amsterdam until the sur- 
render of New York to the English in 1664. 

But the proximity of the Island to Connecticut afforded some 
ground for the English Grown to set up a claim to it. Accord- 
ingly Charles I., April 22, 1636, requested the Corporation for 
New England, called the Plymouth Colony, to issue their patent 
to "William Alexander, Earl of Stirling, for Long Island, and the 
islands adjacent. They did so, and on April 20, 1637, the 
Earl gave power of Attorney* to James Farret to dispose of said 
lands. This, however, took effect only on the east end of Long 
Island where the English subsequently resided. 

Upon the death of Lord Stirling in 1640, his heir relinquished 
the grant above mentioned to the king, and thus it happened 
that on March 12, 1664, Charles II. granted, with other terri- 
tory, Long Island and the Islands adjacent, to his brother James, 
Duke of York and Albany. In the following August, Col. 
Richard Nicolls, at the head of a fleet, came and obtained a sur- 
render of New York to the crown of England.' Now for the 
first time the eastern towns of the Island came under the juris- 
diction of New York, Southampton having sent deputies to the 
General Court of Connecticut regularly, from 1644 to 1664. In 

* A copy of which is now in the town records of Southampton. 



Accounts of Early Settlers. 15 

July, 1673, New York was recovered by the Dutch and the 
Island followed the fate of the larger colony. Both, however, 
were again surrendered by the Dutch to the English Govern- 
ment, November 10, 1674, and so remained English Colonies 
till the war of our Independence. 

Few traces can be found of the original proprietors of the 
town prior to the settlement. They were all of English origin, ' 
and probably came from the counties of Bedford, Bucks and / 
Lincoln. The tradition that they sailed from Southampton, Eng- 
land, and for this reason adopted the name for their settlement, is 
worthless, since there is no evidence that they did sail from that 
place, but on the contrary, so far as known, they sailed from other 
ports of England, and at different times. I offer it as a conjecture 
that the town was so named from Henry "Wriothesly, Earl of 
Southampton, who was very active in colonizing the new world. 
He was director and treasurer of the Virginia Company, 1620 to 
1624, and must have been well known to and by the leading men 
of the Southampton colonists. 

The common statement derived from Cotton Mather (Magnalia) 
is, that between thirty and forty families in Lynn, Mass., finding 
themselves straitened for land, came over to Long Island and 
effected a settlement. In enumerating the settlements of New 
England, Ogilby, in his History of America, says : " About the 
year 1640, by a fresh supply of people, that settled in Long 
Island, was there erected the twenty-third town call'd Southamp- 
ton, by the Indians, Agawam." 

There is truth in both of these statements though neither is 
absolutely correct. Some of the colonists had lived in Lynn for 
years and some doubtless were new arrivals. 

Among the inhabitants of that place in 1630, were Edmund 
Farrington, Allen Breed, Daniel Howe, and John White. In 
1637, were also Christopher Foster, John Pierson, Thomas Halsey, 
Josiah Stanborough, George Welbye, Richard Wells, William 
Partridge and Philip Kertland. John Cooper was made Free- 
man, i. e., admitted to privilege of voting, at Boston, December 
6, 1636; Christopher Foster, the same, April 17, 1637 ; Edward 
Howell, the same* March 14, 1639 ;* Rev. Abraham Pierson 



* 1639-40. 



16 History of Southampton. 

arrivea in America in 1639. With some more which are men- 
tioned elsewhere, these are all the traces that can be given of the 
founders of Southampton. 

The original " undertakers," eight in number, purchased a sloop 
for the transportation of their families and their goods for £S0, 
of which Edward Howell and Daniel Howe, each contributed 
£15 ; Edmund Farrington, George "Welbe, and Henry Walton 
each £10 ; and Josiah Stanborough, Job Sayre, Edmund Need- 
ham and Thomas Sayre, each £5. Before sailing, however, the 
other proprietors disposed of their interest in the vessel to Daniel 
Howe, in consideration of his making three trips annually for 
two years for transportation of goods from Lynn to their planta- 
tion. Articles of agreement were drawn up and signed, in which 
were stated the plans and purposes of the company, and their 
several shares proportioned to the amount of money by each 
contributed. These articles, as well as those for the " Disposall 
of the Vessell" were dated March 10, 1639.* April 17, 1640f 
(a month after the confirmation of Lyon Gardiner's purchase of 
Gardiner's Island), Farrett, in behalf of Lord Stirling, made au 
agreement with Lieutenant Howe, Edward Howelland others (as 
above) by which they were authorized^: to occupy eight miles 
square of land in any part of Long Island. The amount that 
was to be paid to the Earl of Stirling, as a recognition of his 
title to the land, was to be estimated by the Hon. John Winthrop, 
Governor of Massachusetts Colony, who fixed the amount at four 
bushels of Indian corn, in consideration that the country was a 
wilderness, and that the natives pretended some claims to the land. 
This deed of Farrett was given also about a month after the dis- 
posal of the vessel and signing the articles of agreement since, as 
the reader will remember, at that time the year was reckoned to 
commence on the twenty-fifth of March. 

§ The next we hear of them, the Lynn emigrants arrived in the 
following month of May at Manhasset at the head of Cow Bay 
(or Schout's Bay, as the Dutch called it). Here they found the 
arms of the Prince of Orange erected'upon a tree, and Lieutenant 
Howe, the leader of the expedition, pulled them down. This 



* 1639-40. tTown Records. % See appendix. §N. Y. Col. Hist. 



Accounts of Eaelt Settles. 17 

was on the 10th of May, 1640.* But the Sachem Penhawitz 
who had just before ceded all his rights to the Dutch, promptly 
informed Governor Kief t that some " foreign strollers " had arrived 
at Schout's Bay, where they were felling trees and building houses, 
•and "had even hewn down the arms of their High Mightinesses." 
Commissary Van Curler (Corlear) was sent to ascertain the facts, 
and the Sachem's story was found to be true. The arms of the 
State had been torn down, and in their place had been drawn an 
" unhandsome face," " all which aforesaid appeared strange to us, 
being a criminal offense against his Majesty, and tending to the 
disparagement of their High Mightinesses." 

May 13th, the Council of New Amsterdam order Cornelius 
Van Tienhoven.to arrest and bring before them the "strollers 
and vagabonds " of Schout's Bay who had so insulted their Dutch 
dignities. On the next day, with two officers and twenty men, 
he started on his mission of ejectment, and arrived at the clearing 
May 15th, finding one small house built and another unfinished. 
" They were first asked, what they were doing there ; by what 
power or by whose authority they presumed to settle on our pur- 
chased soil, and told that they must show their commission. 
Eight men, one woman and a little child, made answer that they 
intended to plant there, and were authorized thereunto by a * 
Scotchman who had gone with their commission to Red Hill. 

Secondly they were asked, for what reason did they throw 
down their High Mightinesses' Arms and set up a fool's face in 
the stead. To which some answered, the escutcheon was cut 
down by a person who is not present ; another answered, such was 
done in their presence by order of a Scotchman, James Farrett ; 
and he and Lieutenant Howe were then at Red Hill.f Here- 
tipon six men were brought to Fort Amsterdam, leaving two men, 
and one woman and a child on the ground, to take care of their 
goods ; they arrived on the 15th of May." 

At the subsequent examination, the following facts appeared. 
They went to Long Island to settle, from Lynn, Mass., and others 

*Col. Hist, of N. T. 

tRoodeberg or Eoodenberg or Red HiJl, the name given to New Haven by the Dutch, 
probably from the appearance of East and West Rocks from the harbor. 

3 



18 History of Southampton. 

were to follow. They came under authority of James Farrett with 
consent of Governor Winthrop of Massachusetts Bay Colony. It 
was intended to bring twenty families, and "many more would come 
if the land was good." They should have lived free under their 
own laws, and would have been obedient to whomsoever was lord 
of the land. Job Sayre on examination, said, he was born in 
Bretfordshire (probably Bedfordshire — he was examined through 
a Dutch interpreter), was twenty-eight years old, and had resided 
in Lynn, Mass. George Welbye said, he was born in Northamp- 
tonshire, was twenty-five years old, and resided in Lynn. John 
Farrington said, he was born in Bockinghamshire (Buckingham- 
shire), was twenty-four years old, and lived in Lynn. Philip 
Oartelyn (Kertland) twenty-six years old, and Nathaniel Cartelyn 
(Kertland) twenty-two years old, birthplace and residence the- 
same as Farrington's. William Harker said, he was bom in Gin- 
censhire (Lincolnshire?) and was twenty-four years of age. On 
May 19th, they were discharged as not guilty of tearing down the 
arms of the Lords .States, and set at liberty on " condition that 
they do promise to depart forthwith from our territory, and never 
to return to it without the Directors' express consent." Thus 
ended the first attempt at a settlement ; the " strollers and vaga- 
' bonds " departed, and low Dutch alone was spoken in that land.* 
Now in all this, there is no intention to cast a slur upon the 
Dutch of New York, who as a nation by their bravery, fortitude 
and perseverance in long and bloody wars with Spain, when in 
the zenith of her power, for their independence and for the cause 
of protestantism, and when protestant England too stood by an 
idle spectator of the struggle, deserved and won the respect of 
all mankind. But it was nevertheless a shabby treatment of these 
New England colonists, the equals of their best in wealth, cul- 
ture and social position, who, like themselves, were seeking homes 
in the new world. If Hudson's third voyage, previously spoken 
of, gave to the Netherlands a claim to this territory, Cabot's pre- 



* Subsequently (Sept . 19, 1650) when the English settlements had increased and strengthened 
on the eastern part of the island among other questions submitted to four arbitrators for 
settlement was the boundary line between the Dutch and English in Long Island This was 
then declared to be a " line run from the westernmost part of Oyster Bay, and so a straight 
and direct line to the sea," the Dutch west and the English east. See Trumbull's Ct. vol. 1, 
p. 192. 



Accounts of Eakly Settleks. 19 

vious discovery of the continent gave the English a still greater. 
But Verazzano's voyage of discovery before Cabot's was consid- 
ered by Henry IV. of France a sufficient basis for his granting all 
the (now) Middle and New England coast states to M. des Monts. 
And still previous to this, the Pope conferred the title of the 
whole continent upon Ferdinand and Isabella. It will be remem- 
bered that the elder Cabot actually made the discovery of the con- 
tinent of America some fourteen months before *Columbus saw 
the main land. And for this reason the pretensions of the Pope 
were in 1620 treated with derision in the English Parliament. With 
all these conflicting claims, the best title seems to have been actual 
possession maintained by the sword. 

* Bancroft, Hakluyt. 



20 History of Southampton. 



CHAPTER III. 

THE SETTLEMENT AND THE SETTLERS. 

Or the movements of the English immediately after the expul- 
sion, the town records afford no clue, and tradition happily is 
dumb. I am inclined to think the leading minds of the com- 
pany, in harmony with Governor Winthrop, proposed in the begin- 
ning to plant a colony as near the Dutch settlements as possible, 
as a barrier to their further eastward progress, and failing in this, 
to establish a strong colony as a center or basis of operations on 
the eastern part of the Island. The former plan having failed, 
they immediately proceeded to execute the latter. Whether there 
was such a plan or not, the fact remains that such a course was 
actually pursued. This settlement was effected in the early part 
of the following June, and makes Southampton the first town 
settled by the English in the State of New York. The general 
impression has been that the sister town of Southold, settled in 
October (Wood) of the same year, was entitled to this distinction. 
But this impression was based upon the supposition that the 
Southampton emigrants came there in the month of December, in 
which month the deed which they received from the Indians is 
dated. Now although this is no great matter, yet as a point of 
historic interest, we may as well know, if we can, the precise date 
of the occupation of this territory by the English. The reasons 
that seem to establish the fact of this settlement in the early part 
of June are as follows : 

1. The presumption is in favor of an immediate attempt to 
secure a settlement. That was their prime business. Delay in- 
volved the loss of a planting season. They held in their hands a 
commission from Farrett authorizing them to select and occupy, 
and the land was all before them where to choose. 

2. Other instruments from Farrett show the same. June 12, 



The Settlement and the Settleks. 21 

1639* (or rather 1640), James Farrett makes a conveyance! of 
land from sea to sea between Peaconeck and Montauk Point, to 
Edward Howell & Co., for £400 already received, they having 
been (as saith the instrument) driven off by the Dutch previous 
to this transaction. This writing has that vagueness in denning 
the limits characteristic of the imperfect knowledge that might 
be acquired by the visit of the " Blessing." It is probable that 
one of the company went on to obtain this second writing from 
Farrett in person, while the others continued on their voyage 
and settlement. The memorandum, as it is called, of July 7, 
1640, appears to have been • obtained by a second embassage to 
Farrett, after actual occupation of the new plantation. We in- 
fer this from its mention of local names and the precise bounda- 
ries which could only be learned on the spot. August 20, 1640, 
Lord Stirling confirms this sale. And as he was in Scotland, suf- 
ficient time for sending by a sailing vessel across the Atlantic, the 
application for a deed of sale from him, must be allowed, so that 
this fact confirms a settlement at least as early as the first part of 
July, 1640. A temporary verbal agreement was made with the 
Indians as the deed of December intimates, for the sale of their 
lands, ratified by the said deed of December 13, 1640, which ac- 
knowledges that partial payment for the land had been made 
previous to that date. 

3. Felt,:]: in an account of Pev. Hugh Peters, says, that he 
(Peters) attended the ordination of Mr. Abraham Pierson at 
Lynn, and the organization at the same time and place of a 
church " composed of individuals who had emigrated from that 
place and settled at Southampton." This was in November, 1640, 
showing the settlement had been effected before December. The 
same historian§ says in another work that a church was formed 
in Massachusetts, part of the emigrants being there at the time of 
Pev. Abraham Pierson's ordination in November, and part on 
Long Island at their plantation. By another New England his- 

* The date of the year, 1639, ia evidently an error. It is so found in the London documents 
which are a copy. The Dutch records and those of the town are in agreement on all points. 
tCol. Hist, of N. T., v. 3, pp. 21, 22. 
tHist. and Gen. Beg., v. 5, p. 233. 
§Eccles. Hist, of N. E., v. 1, p. 418. 



22 Histoet of Southampton. 

torian it is said that on the 11th of October, 1640, Mr. Pierson 
was appointed at Boston, to be the minister of the colony then 
settled and residing at Southampton. 

4. There is another clause in the* Indian deed of December 
13, 1640, which leads to the same conclusion. It is, " as also all 
the old ground formerly planted lying eastward from the first 
creek, etc." The phrase "old ground" is used a number of 
times in the town records to signify land that the settlers them- 
selves had broken up and cropped. When this had been done 
by Indians, such land was called " the Indian field." The set- 
tlers had, therefore, come in time that season to raise one crop of 
oats and Indian corn and gather hay for their cattle. 

5. Edward Johnson in hisf Wonder Working Providence, has 
this statement which contains other points of interest. 

" Chapteb XVII — Of the Planting of Long Island. — This 
year [1640] came over divers godly and sincere servants of 
Christ, as I suppose, among whom came over the reverend 
godly Mr. Peirson. This people [of Southampton], finding no 
place in any of the former erected colonies to settle in to their 
present content, repaired to an island severed from the Continent 
of Newhaven, with about 16 miles off the salt sea, and called 
Long Island, being about 120 miles in length, and yet but nar- 
row : here this people erected a Town and called it South Hamp- 
ton, there are many Indians on the greatest part of this Island 
who at first settling of the English there did much to annoy their 
Cattel with the multitude of Doggs they kept, which ordinarily 
are young wolves brought up tame, continuing of a very ravening 
nature. This people gathered into a church and called to office' 
Mr. Peirson, who continued with them 7 or 8 yeares, and then 
he, with the greatest number of the people, removed farther into 
the Island ; the other part that remained invited Mr. Foordum, 
and a people that were with him, to come and joyne with them, 
who accordingly did, being wandered as far as the Dutch planta- 
tion, and there unsettled, although he came into the Country be- 
fore them." 

* See appendix. + Mass. Hist. Coll., 2 s. , v. 7, p. 22. 



The Settlement and the Settlees. 23 

To this it is necessary to remark : (1.) The title of the chapter 
and the first sentence presuppose this to be the first venture of 
the English into an unsettled region of the country. There could 
have been no previous settlement at Southold known to Johnson. 
(2.) The name of this settlement is almost universally written in 
the records and in New England documents of early times as 
Southampton. (3.) There is evident over-statement of the truth 
concerning the number of families who removed with Mr. Pier- 
son to Branford, Connecticut, and not to any other part of Long 
Island. Few comparatively left at that time and no considerable 
number came in with Mr. Fordham. 

6. *Lechford, in his " Plaine Dealing," 1641, speaks of a settle- 
ment by the Lynn people, but knows nothing about a plantation 
at Southold, though apparently very conversant with the affairs 
of the colonies. 

1. But Winthrop,t in his History of New England, says ex- 
pressly the second and successful attempt at a settlement was made 
in the fourth month (or June) of the year 1640. 

There is one other curious fact which fixes the dates of the 
Farrett deed, June 12, 1639, the memorandum of July 7, 1639, 
and the Stirling deed of August 20, 1639, to belong all of them 
to the year 1640. The London documents, as we have remarked, 
by some strange perversion, have them as above, in 1639. In the 
Dutch account of the attempt of the Lynn men to settle at Cow 
Bay in the Colonial History of New York, volume 2, page 149, 
it is said that on Saturday, May 19, 1640, the English were re- 
leased from captivity. Now May 19, 1640, by the Dutch reck- 
oning (as they had then adopted the new or Gregorian calendar), 
fell on a Saturday, but May 19, 1639, would fall on Thursday. 
So that this attempt to settle on the west end of Long Island was 
really in 1640, and not 1639, as it is dated in the English deed on 
page 21 of volume 3 of the same work, where the having been 
"drove off by the Dutch" is spoken of as an event which had 
occurred before June 12, 1639 (i. e. 1640), when the deed was 
given. Furthermore, May 19th of the Dutch calendar was May 
9th of the English, leaving the settlers ample time to get to South- 
ampton before June 1, 1640. 

*Mass. Hist. Col., 3 s., vol. 3, p. 98. tVol. 2, p. 4. 



24 History of Southampton. 

The English records in the office of the Secretary of State at 
Albany also correct the dates of these London documents. In the 
MSS. book marked " Court of Assizes," volume 2, page 439, is 
recorded the first deed to the Southampton settlers of date April 
17, 1640, under which they were to take up eight miles square of 
land where they should select on Long Island. This record gives 
the date 1640, and not 1639, thus being in harmony with the 
Dutch records. 

Finally, among the records in the office of the town clerk at 
Southampton a writing has been discovered which begins with the 
words " Southampton, June, 1640." The day of the month is. 
given also, but I do not remember it at the time of writing this. 

In a later edition of Winthrop's History, edited by Savage, page 
5, an account is given of another settlement somewhere on Long 
Island, effected before August, 1641. James Farrett makes a 
vigorous and solemn protest against their intrusion on the. rights 
of the Earl of Stirling. But these people had no connection 
whatever with the settlers from Lynn, as Savage, in a foot-note, 
seems to think. They were what we should now term filibusters, 
and probably soon returned to the main land. 

But to return to the movements of the little colony. Sailing 
up the Peconic Bay, they landed at what is now called Worth Sea, 
a little hamlet about three miles from the village of Southamp- 
ton, whence they took up their march through the woods to find 
a place for their new homes. It was a perilous undertaking to 
venture with their wives and little ones into a wilderness, hem- 
med in on two sides by water, and the other two by savage tribes. 
Like their brethren of Plymouth, however, they were brave men 
and Christians, resolved on doing their part toward forming an 
empire for freedom and Christianity. 

The Indians whom they found here proved to be friendly, and 
released to the settlers sufficient land for their necessities in 
" consideration of sixteen coates already received, and also three 
score bushels of Indian come to be paid upon lawful demand the 
last of September, which shall be in the year 1641, and further 
in consideration that they above named English shall defend us 
the said Indians from the unjust violence of whatever Indians 



The Settlement and the Settlees. 25 

shall illegally assail us." The date of this deed is December 13, 
1640. Two additional purchases from the natives were after- 
ward effected extending considerably the limits of the town, and 
finally when a new generation of Indians were causing trouble, 
as they saw their old hunting grounds melt away, the colonv, in 
order to preserve peace, again bought the whole township of 
them for twenty pounds, for which a deed was given of date 
August 16, 1703. The first of these purchases, known as the 
Quogue purchase, was made by the town in 1663.* The second, 
known by the name of Topping's purchase, is recorded as having 
been sold to Thomas Topping, April 10, 1662, for twenty fathoms 
of wampum by "Weany, (Sunk Squa) Anabackus, Jackanapes, 
Cobish, Toquobin and Wetaugom, all Shinnecocks except 
Weany, the widow of the Montauk Chief. The purchase ran 
from Mamuck or Canoe Place, westward to Seatuck and thence 
northward to the head of Peconic Bay. Again September 17, 
1666, a number of Indians claiming the right to Topping's pur- 
chase, gave a deed of sale of the same to the " Townsmen of 
Southampton" for such consideration as Governor Nicoll shall 
determine. 

The first attempt at a settlement here was in a place now called 
the Old Town, about three-quarters of a mile from the main 
street of the present village. Here they remained for about 
eight years as appears from the following orders. 

" June 11th, 1647, it is ordered by all the inhabitants of this 
towne, this daye, that this towne is to bee divided into fortie 
house lots, some biger, some less — as men haue put in a share 
sixe thousen pounds to be devided into fortie parts." 

" This instant, the f23d of March, 1648, it is ordered by the 
fiue men apoynted for towne affaires that the whole towne shall 
be called together on the second day next, at the setting of the 
sunne, to consider of a towne plot that shall be then and there 
presented to them, and to determine concerning the said plot or 
some others that may be presented by any other mans advice, and 
also to consider of such home accommodations as may be most suit- 

* See appendix for a copy of all these deeds. 

+ March 33, 1648, would, corrected according to new style, be April 2, 1648. 

4 



26 Histoby of Southampton. 

able to the comfort, peace & welfare of this plantation as touching 
the proportion to euery man in his taking vp acording to his valu- 
ation, & that there be men apointed forthwith to devide the 
same, and this to put in execution the order aboue written." 

March 27, 1648, three acres for a home lot was settled upon as 
to the proportion to a fifty right. 

The main street to this day retains the divisions then made of 
house lots of three acres, though, in the changes of two centuries, 
some of the old landmarks have been removed. Here, then, at 
last, they find permanent homes after all their wanderings. The 
articles of agreemeut eatered into before their departure from 
Lynn showed that they formed a joint-stock company, owning , 
the land as tenants in common until it was set apart, according to 
the regulations of the company, to individual occupation. Each 
mau was entitled to a house lot of four acres (afterward changed 
to three acres), twelve acres for cultivation, and about thirty-four 
acres of meadow and upland, together with a certain number of 
shares or rights in the undivided common land, according to the 
amount of money he had disbursed toward the expenses of the 
settlement and the purchase of the town. These were called Pro- 
prietor's Eights, and were handed down with inherited estate 
from father to son. There is no question but the land of the 
town was, from the first, and always down to the present time, 
owned in two distinct modes or tenures — first, as divided into 
certain lots, whether homesteads, meadows, uplands, arable lands 
or wood lands ; and, secondly, the remainder of the undivided 
lands within the limits of the town was owned by the proprietors, 
their heirs, assigns or successors in joint tenantry. Latterly, it 
became a question whether, under the patent of Governor Dongan, 
all of the inhabitants of the town had not each an equal right in 
the undivided lands of the town. The records preserve this dis- 
tinction of tenure, and, upon the coming of a stranger into the 
place, it appears that he simply owned what he boughb — a pur- 
chased freehold estate by no means entitled him to any share or 
right in the undivided land of the town. He might purchase a 
proprietor right, but the purchase itself proves the distinction of 
tenure. Such is the historical view of this question, the legal 
merits of which must be decided by the courts. 



The Settlemeot and the Settlers. 27 

The time came when the proprietors, however, began to claim 
the products of the bays of the town, hitherto regarded, as in 
England, as property common to all the inhabitants. This claim 
was met by a counter-claim by the inhabitants in general, not only 
to these products, but to all the rights and privileges of the pro- 
prietors in land or water in the town. The basis of this claim was 
the patent of Governor Dongan, which, in their opinion, abolished 
all the proprietor rights. Whether this claim was good we need 
not here discuss. The proprietors, however, were alarmed. De- 
cember 23, 1816, a town meeting was held, the whole matter dis- 
cussed and a committee of ten men was appointed on the part of 
the town to confer with the proprietors. It was further voted, 
" That this committee confer with the committee of the proprie 
tors, that if the proprietors will give up their exclusive right to 
the waters in the said town, the town at large will give up their 
right to the undivided land and meadows which the proprietors 
claim. Also for the town to have free access to the waters in any 
part of said town when they please, and to have all the products 
arising from said water." 

February 17, 1818, the affair, still remaining unsettled, a special 
town meeting was called in which two committees were appointed, 
respectively by the town and the proprietors, to agree upon a 
proper bill to be presented to the Legislature to settle the whole 
question forever. This bill was read and approved by both parties, 
and, being taken to Albany, passed the Legislature on the 15th 
of April of the same year. 

It vested in the trustees of the proprietors the right to superin- 
tend and manage, to sell, lease or partition, the undivided lands, 
meadows and mill-streams of the town, and that is. all it did 
give them. It further says : " Nothing in the fore-recited act 
shall be construed to give the proprietors or their trustees any 
power to make laws, rules or regulations concerning the waters 
(other than the mill-streams), the fisheries, the sea-weed, or any 
other productions of the waters of said town, or in any manner 
or way to debar the inhabitants of said town from the privilege 
of taking sea-weed from the shores of any of the common lands 
of said town, or carting or transporting to or from, or landing prop- 



28 Histoby of Southampton; 

erty on said shores, in the manner heretofore practiced ; which 
waters, fisheries, sea-weed and productions of the waters shall be 
managed by the trustees of the freeholders and commonalty of the 
town of Southampton for the benefit of said town, as they had 
the power to do before the passing of this act." 

As Shinnecock Hills was then the common undivided property 
of the proprietors, the right to the sea- weed drifted on the shores 
thereof could not be sold with the sale of that tract in 1861. The 
rights that were given to the town in 1818 have never been alien- 
ated, and cannot be, except by the town itself. The common right 
of fishery in the town pond, in the two fresh ponds on the road 
to North Sea, and to old town pond is, therefore, for the same 
reason, as good and as clear to-day as it ever was. The right to 
the productions of Mecox and Shinnecock bays also remains vested 
in the commonalty of the town, as the town has, to this day, done 
nothing to alienate its rights therein. 

From the following extract from the town records, it will 
appear there was some difficulty with the Indians concerning the 
title of the colony to the lands of the town. 

" At a town meeting held in Southampton, the 23d day of No- 
vember, 1686, — it is agreed upon by major vote of the town that 
Major John Howell shall go to New York about the present 
affair of making good our title to our lands called into question 
at Shinnecock, and Henry Ludlam is likewise chosen to wait 
upon iim. 

" At the same meeting it is ordered that the patentees concerned 
in our patent, shall make a conveyance of the land held within 
'our township to the persons respectively, according to the inter- 
est of allotment of hundred and fifties, or fifties when they hold 
in this town. 

" Also, there are chosen six men to be a committee in behalf of 
the men, to give Major Howell his instructions, and also to at- 
tend Col. Youngs when he comes to hear the Indians acknowl- 
edge our deed ; and the men so chosen are Mr. Edward Howell 
Henry Pierson, Matthew Howell, Thomas Cooper, Ob'adiah 
Kogers and Joseph Pierson." 

The immediate result of this order was the obtaining of Gov- 



The Settlement and the Settlees. 29 

ernor Dongan's Patent, dated December 6, 1686, which is given 
in the appendix. So far as the records show, this step appeared 
to quiet the Indians until 1703, when, as before narrated, they 
united in conveying the whole township again to the colonists. 

But besides this trouble with the Indians which is alluded to in 
the records above rather indefinitely, Governor Dongan issued an 
.order that the towns on the east end of Long Island should take 
out a patent from himself. Against this order the people of 
Southampton protested on the ground that they were living in 
peace and quiet possession of their lands under a patent already 
given by the Governor of the Colony of New York, and that an- 
other patent was superfluous. However, to keep the peace, and 
prevent trouble and litigation, they sent their committee as be- 
fore stated to obtain their patent. It is not easy to discover any 
good reason why Governor Dongan should issue such an order to 
these towns at that late day, unless to make a show of his official 
authority, or to increase the revenues of his office. 

As to the locality of the settlement, the mass of evidence goes 
to show it was for the first few years in the village alone. I con- 
cur with the opinion of Mr. fm. S. Pelletreau, who says on this 
point : " Notwithstanding the common impression upon this sub- 
ject, that settlements were begun simultaneously at North Sea, 
Sagabonack and Southampton, it is certain such was not the case ; 
nor is it at all probable that in the beginning of the settlement 
and at a time when there were but few families, and these in 
constant fear of the Indians, they would venture to scatter their 
numbers so widely." The first permanent one, after the one at 
Southampton, was at North Sea, in 1650, when John Ogden re- 
ceived permission from the town to settle there with six families, 
who were to have 321 acres of land, and were to form a commu- 
nity by themselves upon conditions agreed upon as follows: 
" Feb. 21, 1649 [i. e. 1649-50]. It is granted by the major 
parte of this towne that Mr. Ogden and his company shall have 
Cow Neck and Jeffery Neck for their owne proper Eight; also, 
that they shall have for their planting Land in either or both of 
said necks three hundred 24 Acres of said Land provided they set- 
tle upon it and upon the same grant they are to have all the 



30 Histoet of Southampton. 

meadow betwixt the brook by the Sachems house and Hogneck 
Spring for their proper -Right, provided it bee not above a mile 
from the sea side the North Sea : Upon these conditions follow- 
ing: first that they must pay to all Common Kates with the 
Towne after the rate of nine hundred pounds according to the 
takeings up of those men that dwell in the Towne : 21y that 
Hee shall plant there six familyes or more that shall there Live 
and have there abode : 31y that In Case the whole bounds of the 
towne come to bee stinted for Cattell, then they must bee stinted 
for summer feed as they are that live at the towne : by the same 
Rule in Common Rates as aforesaid is alsoe included the misters 
means." 

The land at Sagg or Sagabonack as it was then called, was di- 
vided in 1653, and settled very soon after, since in an order of 
the court it is mentioned that Josiah Stanbrough had a residence 
there in 1658. In 1670, there was quite a settlement upon the 
east side of Sagabonack pond (whence the present village of Sagg 
derives its name), and along the shores of Mecox bay. 

In 1679, Mecox is spoken of as "lately layed" out to the 
inhabitants, and in 1680, Hogneck to be " suddenly " (i. e. soon), 
divided. 

The names of the eight original "undertakers" are as follows: 
Edward Howell, Edmond Farrington, Edmund Needham, 
Thomas Sayre, Josiah Stanborough, George "Welbe, Henry 
"Walton, Job Sayre, and, if we include the Captain of the Ves- 
sel, Daniel How, making nine. To these were added eleven 
other heads of families before the company departed from Lynn, 
viz. : John C° P er j Allen Breed; William Harker, Thomas 
Halsey, Thomas Newell, John Farrington, Richard OdelL Philip 
Kyrtland, Nathaniel Kirtland, Thomas Farrington and Thomas 
Terry. 

During the next few years, the settlement was further in- 
creased by the coming of Richard Barrett, "William Barker, 
"William Barnes, John Bishop, Robert Bond (1643), John Bost- 
wick, Thomas Burnett, Ellis Cook, John Cory (1643), Samuel 
Dayton, Fulk Davis, Christopher Foster, John Gosmer, Thomas 
Goldsmith, James Hampton, John Hand, James Herrick 



The Settlement and the Settlees. 



31 



Thomas Hildreth, John Jagger, John Jennings, John Jessup, 
Anthony Ludlam, John Lum or Loom, Eobert Merwin, Eich- 
ard Mills, John Moore, "William Mulford, Kobert Norris, John 
Oldfields, John Ogden, Henry Pierson, Eichard Post, Joseph 
Eaynor, "William Eogers, Eobert Eose, Eichard Smyth, Eich- 
ard Stratton, Thomas Tahnage, Thomas Topping, "William "Wells 
(1643), John White, Isaac Willman and John "Woodruff. 

Many of these, however, stayed but a short time. The follow- 
ing is a list of families mentioned above, now extinct, or not re- 
siding in Southampton: Barker, Barnes, Barrett, Bond, Bost- 
wick, Breed, Cory, Davis, Dayton, Farrington, Goldsmith, Gos- 
mer, Hampton, Harker, Howe, Kyrtland, Lum, Mills, Merwin, 
Moore, Mulford, Newell, Norris, Odell, Ogden, Oldfields, Smyth, 
Stratton, Talmage, Walton, Welbe, Wells and "Willman. 

The two following lists are found in Liber A, No. 1 ; 

" A List of the ffreemen inhabiting The Towne of Southamp- 
ton, March ye 8th, 1649 : "* 



Edw. Howell, Gent. 
John Gosmer, Gent. 
John Moore, 
Rich. Odell, Gent. 
Tho. Halsey, 
John Howell, 
William Browne, 
-~John Coopfer], 



^Tho. Sayres, 

' Job Sayres, 
Edward Johnes, 
Josiah Stanborough 
Tho. Talmage, 
Rich. Smith, 
Rich. Barrett, 
John White. 



A list of all the townsmen, May the 10th, 1649. 

1. Mr. [Edward] Howell, 

2. Mr. John] Gosmer, 

3. Mr. 'Thurston] Raynor, 

4. Mr. [Richard] Odell, 

5. Thomas Halsey, 

6. John Howell, 

7. John Coop[er], 

8. Thomas Cooper, 

9. Thomas Sayer, 

10. Jobe Sayer, 

11. Edward Jones, 

12. Josiah Stanborough, 

13. Thomas Talmage, 

14. Samuell Dayton, 

15. Thomas Vayle, 



16. Richard Poste, 

17. Thomas Hildreth, 

18. Henry Pearson, 

19. John White, 

20. Ellis Cooke, 

21. Isake Willman, 

22. Richard Barrett, 

23. Richard Smyth, 

24. Thomas Burnett, 
B5. George Wode, 

26. John Jesepp, 

27. William Rogers, 

28. William Browne, 

29. Robert Merwin. 



This list appears to include only the heads of families, and 
probably those only who payed taxes on real estate. 



*We have studiously copied the old lists in each of the following," Verbatim et Litteratim? 



32 



Histobt of Southampton. 



List of Inhabitants in 1657. 

This is found in the Town Eecords, and begins at the south 
end of the town on the east side of the Main Street, and goes 
north to the end,— then returning southwards on the west side, 
and finally taking the eastern men and those of North Sea. 



1. Joseph. Rainer, 

2. Ri. Howell, 

3. Xto Foster, 

4. Joseph Foster, 

5. Edw. Howell, 

6. Jon Jessup, 

7. Tho. Goldsmith, 

8. Ri. Barrett, 

9. Tho. Topping, 

10. James Herrick, 

11. Isaak Willman, 

12. Ensign [Zerubbabel] Philips, 

13. Henr Pierson, 

14. Obadiah Rogers, 

15. Left. [Joseph] Post, 

16. Tho. Burnett, 

17. John Woodruff, 

18. John ffoster, 

19. Jonas Bowre [or Bower], 

20. Robt. Woolley, 

21. Mr. [James] Hampton, 

22. Joshua Barnes, 

23. John Bishop, 
^■24. Dan. Sayre, 
,25. Francis Sayre. 

(West Side, Main St.) 

26. Mr. Laughton [John], 

27. John Jagger, 

28. Wm Russell, 

29. Sam Johnes, 

30. Isaack Halsey 

(Up the Sill.) 

31. Ben. Davis, 

32. Corn. Voncke, 



~33. John Coop[er]. 

(West Side Main Street again.) 

34. John "White, 

35. T. Cooper, 

36. T. Sayre, 

37. Edmund Howell, 

38. Mr. ffordham [Rev. Robert], 

39. Joseph ffordham, 

40. Mr. John Howell, 
--41. Tho. Halsey, 

42. Jon[athan] Raynor.. 

(Eastern Men.) 

43. Tho. Halsey, Jr., 

44. Ben. Foster, 

45. Hen. Ludlam, 

46. Anthony [Ludlam], 

47. Ellis Cooke, 

48. Arfthur] Howell, 

49. John Tapping, 

50. Peregrine Stanfbrough], 

51. Josiah [Stanbrough]. 

(North Sea Men.) 

52. John Rose, 

53. Xto Lupton, 

54. George Harris, 

55. Ri. Smith, 

56. Charles Sturmy, 
'57. Sam Clarke, 

58. Tho Shaw, 

59. Ben. Haines, 

60. Mr. Jennings, 

61. John Davis. 



After laying out the iand in Seabonae into forty-one lots, they 
were taken up by the proprietors according to their several in- 
terests in the undivided land as follows by the Record. 



Note. — It is quite possible that Thomas Halsey, Jr., should complete the list of men on 
west side of Main Street. 



The Settlement and the Settlees. 



33 



Seabonac Division, Febeuaey 1, 1655. 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 



9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

,.13. 
14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 
19. 



Richard Barret, 

Thomas Sayre, 

Mr. ffordham, 

Mr. Odell, 

Mr. Johnes, 

John White, . 

Obadiah Rogers, 

Edward Howell, 100, and Mr. 

Stanborough in Right of 

Thomas Pope, a fifty, 
Joshua Barnes 100, and John 

Bishop, a fifty, 
John Lum 100, and Mr. Ed- 
ward Howell, fifty, 
John Jessnp 100, and John 

Cooper, Junr., fifty, 
ffm. Rogers 100, and Bartho. 

Smith fifty, 
Thomas Halsey, 
Ellis Cooke 100, John Jagger 

fifty, 
Joseph Rainer 100 Mr. Rainer 

fifty, 
Thomas Burnett 100, John 

Howell 50, 
Geo. Wood 100, Widdow 

Briggs fifty, 
Mr. ffordham, 
Mr. Smith [Richard], 



20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 

24. 
25. 

26. 

27. 
28. 
29, 
30. 
21. 

32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
-^6. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 



John Howell, 

Mr. Rainer [Thurston], 

Thomas Hildreth 100, Mr. 
Hampton fifty, 

Isack Willman 100, William 
Paine, 50, 

Henry Pierson, 100, 

Richard Post 100, Tho. Sayre 
fifty, 

Tho. Goldsmith 100, John Old- 
field fifty, 

Christopher fibster, 

Thos. Hallsey, 

Jonas Wood, 

John Cooper, Senr. , 

Mr. ffeild 100, Isack Willman, 
50, 

Sam : Dayton, 

Mr. Stanborough [Josiah], 

[• Captaine Topping [Thos.], 
Thomas Cooper, 
I Mr. Howell [Edward], 



Mr. John Gosmer, 



Mr. Gosmer £ Jonas Bower for 
the other J. 



A List of Inhabitants of Noeth Sea, 1668. 



John Jennings, 
Richard Smith, 
Deborah Scott, 
Samuel Clarke, 
Christopher Lupton, 



John Davis, 
George Harris, 
John Rose, 
Thomas Shaw, 
Benjamin Haines. 



The following list of inhabitants of North Sea in 1687, is taken 
from the Town Records : 

Inhabitants of Nobth .Sea in 1687. 



Samuel Clarke, 
Benjamin Haynes, 
John Rose, 
Joseph Lupton, 
John Davis, 
Thomas Shaw, 



Richard Smith, 
Jecomiah Scott, 
John Rose, Jr., 
George Harris, 
James White, 
Samuel Cooper. 



Soldiees. 1686. 



[From vol. 33, MSS in office of Sec. of State, Albany, No. 93.] 
The number of foot souldiers i3 142. Mostly well armed, ex- 
ercised four times a year according to law. 
5 



34 



Histoky of Southampton. 



Census, 1686. 
The number of inhabitants, men, women, children, servants, 
transient persons and slaves, 786. 
And two marchants. 
To bear arms, 176 soulders and troopers. 
The number of marriages, cristenings, burialls, 175. 
Wee find noe arrears due to his majestie. (Unsigned). 

" A list of ye Inhabitants of ye Towne of Southampton, old 
and young Christians and Hethen ffreemen and servants, white 

and black. Anno. 1698." 

[From MSS Records in office of Sec. of State, Albany, N. T.] 



3{ 



MALES. 

1 William Jennings, 

2 Samuell Jennings, 

3 Benj'n Haines, 

4 Benj'n Haines, Jur. 

5 John Haines, 

6 James Haines, Jur. 

7 Thomas Shaw, 

8 David frances, 

9 ffrances Shaw, 

10 John Shaw, 

11 Samuell Clark, 

12 Samuell Clark, Jur. 

13 Elish Clark, 

14 Eliphelett Clark, 

15 Clark, 

16 Clark, 

17 Jechamiah Scott, 

18 John Scott, 

19 George Haris, 

20 George Haris, Jur. 

24 Abiell Davis, 

25 Zachariah Davis, 
1 ") 26 John Davis, Jur. 

[ 27 Eldad Davis, 

8— 28 John Davis, 

n ( 29 Thomas Lupton, 
( 30 Joseph Lupton, 



32 Jeremiah Jager, 

33 Jeremiah Jager, Jur 

34 John Jager, Jur. 

35 John Erie, 

36 David Erie, 

41 James Cooper, 

42 James Cooper, Jur. 



10 
"I 



10 



FFEAMALES. 



f 2 Hannah Haines, 
! 3 Lidia Haines, 
( 4 inary Haines, 

j 5 mary Shaw, 

6 Susanah Shaw, 
[ 7 Jeane Shaw, 

f 8 Sarah Clark, 

I 9 mary Clark, 

I 10 Ester Clark, 

[. 11 Sarah Clark, 

- 12 mary Scott, 

i 13 Sarah Haris, 
J 14 Eunice Haris, 

J 15 Mary Davis, 
( 16 Mary Davis, 

i 31 Elizabeth Davis, 
j 32 Mahitable Davis, 
f 17 Mary Lupton, 

18 mary lupton, 

19 Hanah lupton, 

20 abigaill lupton, 

28 Hanah Jager, 

29 Sarah Jager, 

30 Hanah Jager, 



11 — 34 mary Erie, , 



"\ 



38 Elizabeth Cooper, 

39 Elizabeth Cooper, Jur. 



The Settlement and the Settlers. 



3& 



MALES. 

13 — 43 John Cooper, 



FPEA.MALBS. 



14 



15 



46 John Reeves, 

47 John Reeves, Jur. 

48 Thomas Reeves, 

49 Gershum Culver, 

50 Jermiah Culver, 

51 David Culver, 

52 Jonathan Culver, 

53 Moses Culver, 

54 Gershum Culver, 



16 — 55 John Bishope, Jur. 

<> ( 58 John Poastt, 

( 59 Richard Poast, 
18— 60 Thomas Sayre, 

( 63 ffrances Sayre, 
19 ■] 64 Ichabod Sayre, 
( 65 Caleb Sayre, 



20— 66 Caleb Gilbord, 

( 67 Daniell Sayre, 

21 ■] 68 Ephraim Sayre, 

( 69 Nathan Sayre, 

(70 John Bishop, 
71 Samuell Bishope, 
72 Josiah Bishope, 
73 John Bishope, 

n ( 74 Joshew Barns, 
■** \ 75 Samuell Barns, 



24- 



25 



26 



27 



76 Robart Wooly, 

77 John Wooly, 

78 Wooly Joseph, 

79 Isaac Bower, 

80 Jonah Bower, 

81 David Bower, 

82 Daniell Bower, 

83 John foster, 

84 John ffoster, Jur. 

85 David ffoster, 

86 Jonathan foster, 

87 John ffoster, Terts, 
, 88 Jermiah foster, 

* 89 Joseph Hildrith, 

90 Joseph Hildrith, Jur. 

91 Nathan Hildrith, 

92 Isaak Hildrith, 

93 Ephraim Hildrith, 

94 Daniell Hildrith, 

95 Jonathan Hildrith, 



jo ( 43 Johana Cooper, 
j 44 mahitable Cooper, 

14 — 46 Rachell Reeves, 



15 



( 45 mary Culver, 
( 46 mary Culver, Jr. 



48 Lidia Bishop, 
«al 49 Abigaile Bishop, 
' ' 50 marey Bishop, 
51 Eunis Bishop, 
17 , 53 Mary Post, 

j 54 Mary Post, Jur. 
18 — 55 Patience Sayre, 

{56 mary Davis, 
57 Sarah Sayre, 
58 mary Sayre, 
59 mary Sayre, 
I 62 Ellisabeth gilbord, 
20-] 63 Bethia Gilbord, 
( 64 mary Gilbord, 



23 



24 



21— 65 Hanah Sayre, 

66 Mary Bishop, 

67 Susanah Bishope, 
22 -( 68 Susanah Bishop, Jr 

69 Sarah Bishop, 

70 Mary Bishop, 

71 Patience Barns, 

72 Sarah Barns, 

73 Ann Woolly, 

74 Ann Woolly, 

75 Elisabeth Woolly, 

76 Hanah woolly, 

77 Phebe woolly, 

78 mary woolly, 

o^ ( 81 Ruth bower, 

M j 82 Mahitabell Bower, 

84 Sarah ffoster, 

85 Phebe foster, 
,, fi j 86 Hanah foster, 
~" 1 87 Hanah foster, 

88 Hanah foster, 

89 Hana ffoster, 



27— 90 Hanah Hildrith, 



36 



History of Southampton. 



28-^ 



96 John Woodrufe, 

97 S.am'11 Woodrufe, 

98 Joseph Woodrufe, 

99 Benj'n woodrufe, 

100 Nat-hall woodrufe, 

101 Jonathan woodrufe, 

102 Isaac woodrufe. 



il04 Samuell Butler, 
105 Gidian Butler, 
106 Nathanell Butler, 



30—107 Obedia Roggers, 



' 109 Ensn Joseph Peirson 

110 Henry Peirson, 

111 Joseph Peirson, 

112 Ephraini Peirson, 

113 Sam'll Peirson, g 

114 Thomas Parvine, 

115 Thomas Parvine, Jur. 



31 



32 



33—116 Lift Thomas Steephens 



34 



117 Isaack Willman, 

118 James Willman, 



35- 



36 
37 



38 



39 



40-^ 



120 Mr Will. Hericke, 

121 Will. Hericke, Jur. 

122 John Herick, 

123 Herick, 

124 Thomas Hericke, 

127 Thomas Toping, 

128 Thomas Toping, 

130 Mr. John Wick, 

131 Job Wick, 
"134 Joseph Howell, 

135 Zebulun Howell, 

136 Joseph Howell, Jr. 

137 James Howell, 

138 John Ware, 

139 Jacob Ware, 

140 John Ware, Jur. 

141 John Jessup, 

142 Isaac Jessup, 

143 Jer: Jessup, 

144 Henry Jessup, 

145 Thomas Jessup, 

146 Mr. Edward Howell, 

147 Samuel Howell, 
.-• j 148 Jonah Howell, 

41 ] 149 Edward Howell, jur. 
150 Benj'n Howell, 
1151 Tho: Howell, 



28 



29 



30 



FFEAMA1ES. 

91 Hanah woodrufe, 

92 Sarah woodrufe, 

93 Hanah Woodrufe, 

94 Abigaile Woodrufe, 

95 Elisabeth woodrufe, 

f 96 Ellisabeth Butler, 

97 martha Butler, 
\ 98 Sarah Butler, 
i Aimy Butler, 

100 mary Butler, 

101 mary Rogers, 

102 mary Rogers, Jur. 

103 mary Rogers, ter. 

104 Sary Rogers, 

105 debro Rogers, 

106 Patience Rogers, 



31 — 107 mary Peirson, 



32—108 Rebecka Parvin, 



33 
34 

35 



109 Elisabeth Stevens, 

110 Phebe Steephens, 

111 Susanah Stevens, 

112 Susana willman, 

113 hanah willmans, 

114 Elisbeth willmans, 

115 mahitable hericke, 

116 Ireniah Hericke, 

117 Phebe Hericke, 

118 mahitable Herick, 

119 Martha Herick, 



37 



36—120 Debro Toping, 

( 122 Teprance Wick, 
\ 123 Temprance Wick, 

( 124 Lidia Howell, 
38 \ 125 Bethia Howell, 
( 126 ffreelove Howell, 

39—127 Ellisabeth ware, 



I 128 Eisabeth Jesup, 
40 -I 129 mary Jessup, 
( 130 Hanah Jessup. 



( 133 mary Howell, 
41 •] 134 mary Howell, 
( 535 Ireniah Roggers, 



The Settlement and the Settlers. 



37 



MAXES. 

fl52 Joseph foster, 

I 153 Christopher fibster 
42 < 154 Joseph foster, 
155 Daniell fibster, 

(.156 nathan foster, 
43—159 John Howell, 

' 159 Richard Howell, 
160 Richard Howell, jr. 
44 J 161 Hezechia Howell, 

| 162 Edward Howell, 
163 Obadia Howell, 

1 164 Chris : Howell, 

'165 Joseph Goodale, 
i~\ 166 Jonathan Goodale, 

| 167 Joseph Goodale, 

.168 Will Goodale, 

4g ( 170 Jonathan Raynr, 

(171 Jonathan Ray nor, jur., 

i~ j 173 Isaac Halsey, 
( 174 Ephraim Halsey, 

fl75 Nathaniel Howell, 
48 ^ 176 Neheiniah Howell, 
(.177 Henry Howell, 

f 178 Ensn Joseph ffordham, 
49 -{ 179 Joseph ffordham, jur. 
|_180 Pellatia ffordham, 



55 



56- 

■A 






182 Mr. Jonah Fordham, 

183 Jonah fordham, jur. 

Mr. Joseph Whitin, 
Samuell Whitin, 
Joseph Whitin, jur. 
Benj'n Whitin, 
Job Sayre, 
Benj'n Sayre, 
John Maltby 1 , 
Ephrni Whit, 
Steven White, 
Charles White, 
Isaac Halsey, 
Isaac Halsey, jur. 
Isaac Halsey, Terts, 
Joshua Halsey, 
Thomas Halsey, 
Samuell Halsey, 
Samell Johnes, 
Samuell Johnes, jur. 
nathan Howell, 
Israeli Howell, 
Ezekill Howell, 



50 



fl84 

51 J 185 
01 1 186 

(.187 

5i \ 191 

53—192 

(193 

54 \ 194 

195 

196 



197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
'202 
;203 
204 
205 
206 



FPBAMALES. 

141 Abigail fibster, 

142 Sarah fibster, 
42 \ 143 mahitabell fibster, 

144 Damares fibster, 
[ 145 Penellopie ffoster, 
43—140 Johanah Howell, 

146 Ellisabeth Howell 

147 Dorkis Howell, 

44 \ 148 Sary Howell, 
149 Sarah Howell, 

.150 abigaile Howell, 

( 151 Elizabeth Goodale, 

45 -j 152 mary Goodale, 

( 153 Hanah Goodale, 

154 Sarah Raynr, 

155 Debrah Raynr, 

156 Hanah Rayner, 

158 Mary Halsey, 

159 mahitable Halsey, 

160 mary Halaey, 

164 Hanah Howell, 

165 mahitbl Howell, 

166 Martha Howell, 

167 mary fordham, 

168 mary fordham, Jr. 
49 -J 169 mary fordham, Ter 

170 Phebe fordham, 

171 allath* fordham, 
I 178 Ester fordham, 

50 \ 179 Keziah fordham, 
( 180 Hanah fordham, 
[172 Rebecca Whiting-, 
K1 J 173 Rebecca Whiting, 
01 1 174 Hanah Whiting, 
[175 Ellisabeth Whiting, 

53—177 Sasanah Sayre, 

53—176 Susannah Maltby, 

u ( 181 Ruth White, 
( 182 Sarah white, 



( 183 mary Halsey, 

55 < 184 Elizabeth Halsey, 

( 185 Pheby Halsey, 

-a ( 192 Ester Johnes, 
00 1 193 Phebe Johnes, 

( 194 Mrs Mary Howell 
57 1 195 Eunis Howell, 

( 196 Jerusha Howell, 



*Sic in the original. 



38 



History of Southampton. 



FFEAMALBS. 



58 



'207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
213 
213 
60—214 
f318 

61 1 220 
[221 
1222 



59 



62 



(223 



John Jager, 
John Jager, jur. 
Samuell Jager, 
Jonathan Jager, 
Benj'n J agger, 
Josiah Howell, 
Daniell Howell, 
Timoth: Hileyrd, 
Samuell Clark, 
Jermiah Clark, 
Charles Clark, 
Will Clark, 
Richard Rounsifull, 
Richard Rounsifull, 



( 226 Ephraim Howell, 

63 ^ 227 Ephraim Howell, 

( 228 Samuell Howell, 

64 — 229 Isaac Rayner, 



66 



f (230 
V 65 \ 231 
V. ( 232 

'233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
67 -j 239 

(240 

'241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 

f248 
249 
250 
251 
253 
70—253 

f254 

I 255 
256 

1257 



68 



69 



71 



Daniell Halsey, 
Richard Halsey, 
Daniell Hallsey, jur. 
Lift. Abraham Howell, 
Abraham Howell, 
Charles Howell, 
Philip Howell, 
Ebenezer Howell, 
John Say re, 
John Sayre, 
Thomas Sayre, 
Lott Burnot, 
Joseph Burnott, 
David Burnott, 
Nathan Burnott, 
Jonathan Burnot, 
Samuel Burnot, 
Isaac Burnott, 
Thomas ffoster, 
Benj'n ffoster, 
David fEoster, 
Jonathan foster, 
Isaac ffoster, 
Nathanell Hasey, 
Jonnathan Howell, 
Jonathan Howell, jur. 
Isaa Howell, 
David Howell, 



( 258 Josiah Halsey, 
72-^ 259 Josiah Halsey, jur. 
( 260 Jonathan Halsey, 



73—261 Benj'n ffoster, jur., 



~o j 197 Hanah Jager, 
08 } 198 Lidia Jagger, 



59—201 mary Howell, 
60—200 Margret Hilyard, 

c1 ( 203 Hanah Clark, 
bi } 204 Pheebe Clark, 



62 I 205 
bi } 206 

f208 

63 1 210 

[211 

(218 

64^219 

(220 

r= (215 

65-^216 

^- (217 



Hanah Rounsifull, 
Martha Rounsifull, 
Hanah Howell, 
Sarah Howell, 
Hanah Howell, 
Judith Howell, 
Mary Ranr, 
Phebe Raynr, 
Hanah Raynr, 
Hulda Erie, 
Ellisabeth Halsey, 
Debro Halsey, 



66 



i 212 Ann Howell, 
; 213 Grisill Howell, 



( 221 Sarah Sayre, 
67 < 222 Sarah Sayre, 
( 223 Damaris Sayre, 



68—224 Phebe Burnatt, 



f 225 Lidia foster, 
rc J 226 Elisabeth White, 
0J 1 227 Debro foster, 

[228 Zeruiah foster, 



70—229 Annah Halsey, 

Hanah Howell, 
Zerujah Howell, 
mary Howell, 



(230 

ni 



231 
(232 

f233 

Hit 

[236 
T237 

lyol 238 

' d 1 239 
[240 



Temprance Halsey, 
Sarah Halsey, 
Temprance Halsey, 
abigaile Halsey, 
martha foster, 
Bethia foster, 
martha foster, 
Sarah foster, 



The Settlement and the Settlers. 



39 



76 



f262 

' 4 1 264 
1.265 
(266 

75 i 267 
(268 
(269 
(270 

77—272 

78—274 

7 q j 280 
79 ( 281 

(282 

80 1 283 

(284 

81—285 

82—286 
(287 

83^288 
(289 
(290 

84 \ 291 
(292 

85 -i 393 
B5 }294 

86—295 



MAXES. 

Henry Ludlom, 
Will Ludlom, 
Henry Ludlom, jur. 
Jeremiah Ludlom, 
Abiell Cook, 
Abiel Cook, jur. 
Josiah Cooke, 
Thomas Eose, 
Israeli Rose, 
John Parker, 
William Eose, 

David Halsey, 
Abraham Halsey, 

David Rose, 
James Rose, 
David Rose, jur. 

Anthony Ludlom, 

James Heriok, 
Aron Burnot, 
Aaron Burnott, Jr 
mosea Burnat, 
Jonah Rogers, 
Jonah Rogers, 

Rogers, 

James Haines, 
Samuell Haines 

Ellis Cook. 



87 



90 



297 John Cook, 

298 John Cook, Jur. 

299 Ellias Cooke, 

300 Obadia Cook, 

301 Ellijah Cook, 

302 Ensn John Lupton, 

303 Christopher Lupton, 

304 Benj'n lupton, 

305 Samuell Loome, 

306 Mathew Loome, 

307 Samuell Loome, 

310 Thomas Cooper, 

311 Thomas Cooper, Jur. 



(314 Joseph More, 

91 < 315 Joseph more, 

( 316 Benj'n More, 



93 ( 317 Elisha Howell, 



' 318 Lemuell Howell, 



oo (322 William TarbilL 
ad (323 Will Tarbill, Jur. 



94 
05 



( 324 John Michill, 
( 325 John Michill, Jur. 
( 326 Jermiah Halsey, 
( 327 Jere: Halsey, Jur. 



PPEAMALES. 

[241 Rachell Ludlom, 
m, J 242 Jane Ludlam, 
'*) 243 Abigaile ludlom, 

[ 244 Raehell Ludlom, Jur. 



i 245 ffrances Cooke, 

[ 246 ffrances Cooke, Jur. 

or 78 I 35 * Bster Ro3e > 
77—253 Mary Parker, 



75- 
76 



( 255 Hanah Halsey, 
79 1 256 Hanah Halsey, 
( 257 Prudence Halsey, 

o n j 247 Hanah Rose, 
°" ( 248 Hanah Rose, 



81 



258 Patience Ludlom, 

259 Patience Ludlom, 
82—249 Sarah Hericke, 

( 250 Elisabeth Burnot, 

83 i 251 Elisabeth Burnott, 

( 252 Hanah Burnot, 



84 



85 



260 Phebe Rogers, 

261 Phebe Rogers, 

j 262 Sarah Haines 
( 263 Sarah Haines, 
og j 265 Elisabeth Cook, 
| 266 Susanah Cook, 

s7 ( 268 Ellisabeth Cook, 
°'} 269 Martha Cook, 

( 270 Hanah Lupton, 

88 - 271 Hanah Lupton, 
( 272 Lidia Lupton, 

( 274 Hanah Lome, 

89 - 275 Abigaile Lome, 
( 276 Hanah Loome, 

90—280 Hannah Cooper, 



f282 

91 J 383 
yl l284 

[285 

f 287 

92 J 388 
9<J 1 289 

[290 

yd ( 292 
94—264 



Sarah More, 
Elisabeth more, 
Sarah more, Jur. 
mary more, 
Damaris Howell, 
Elliner Howell, 
Penellopie Howell, 
abiah Howell, 
mary Tarbill, 
mary tarbill, 

Sarah Michill, 



'40 



History of Southampton. 



'328 Benony Nutton, 
329 Benj'n Nuton, 
96 ■{ 330 Isaac Nuton, 

331 Jonathan Nuton, 

332 John Nuton, 

333 James Hildrith, . 
97 -J 334 James Hildrith, Jur. 

335 Joshua Hildrith, 

336 Ezekill SaDford, 

337 Ezekill Sanford, Jur. 

338 Thomas Sanford. 

99—339 Samuell Barbur, 

100—340 Jonathan Strickling, 
( 341 Nathaniell Besco, Jur. 

101 1 343 Natha: Resco, 
( 344 Amij. Besco, 

102—342 Josiah Hand, 



103 



( 345 Peregrin Stanbrough, 



346 James Stanbrough, 

347 Doct. Nath. Wade, 

348 Simon Wade, 

349 Allexander Wilmott, 

350 Joseph Wickham, 

351 Joseph Wickham, Jur. 
Capt Elnathan Topping 

354 Stephen Topping, 

355 Sillvanus Topping, 

359 Josiah Topping, 

360 Josiah Topping, Jur. 

361 Hezekia Topping, 

( 362 Robert Noris, 

109 I 363 Robert Noris, Jur. 

( 364 Oliver Noris, 



104 | 
105- 

10G 

107 
108 



110 



111 



365 Mr. Ebenezer White, 
' 366 Elnath White, 
"367 Lift. Coll. Henry Peirson, 

368 John Peirson, 

369 David Peirson, 

370 Theophilus Peirson, 

371 Abraham Peirson, 

372 Josiah Peirson, 

110 (373 Bennony flint, 
lia |374 John ff lint, 

113—377 Peter Noris, 

( 378 Lift. Theophilus Howell, 
114-1 379 Theoph: Howell, Jur. 

( 380 Cilley* Howell, 
n- ( 381 Theoder Peirson, 
110 | 382 Theoder Peirson, 



FFEAMALES. 

{277 Johanah nuton, 
278 Johanah nuton, 
299 Elisabeth nuton, 
300 Phebe nuton, 



97 



(295 Deborah Hildrith, 
1 296 Deborah Hildrith, 



no ( 297 Hanah Sanford, 
1,0 I 298 Hanah Sanford, 

gg J 304 Mary barbur, 
( 306 mary barbur, 
100—307 mary Strickland, 

101—303 Johanah Resco, 

102—308 mary hand, 

f 310 Sarah Stanbrough, 

jqoJ 311 ollive Stanbrough, 
j 312 Eunis Stanbrough, 
[.313 Ellisabeth Stanbrough, 



105 — 314 mary Willmott, 
106—315 Sarah Wickham, 

( 316 mary Topping, 
107] 317- mary Baylee, 

( 318 Hannah Topping, 

( 319 Hanah Toping, 
108 -j 320 Temprance Toping, 

( 321 Toping, 

f 323 Hanah Noris, 
■jflgj 224 Hanah noris, 

] 325 mary noris, 

1 326 Sarah noris, 

110—328 Mrs. mahitable White, 

f 330 Mrs. Susanah Peirson, 
111-1 "^ abigaile Toping, 
) 332 Hanah Peirson, 



112 



113 



114 



115 



[333 Sarah Peirson,' 

' 334 mary flint, 

335 mary flint, 
; 336 Hanah flintt, 
' 337 Sarah noris, 

338 Hanah noris, 
I 339 Elisabeth noris, 

I 340 Debro Howell, 
I 341 Phebee Howell, 

( 343 ffrances Peirson, 
( 344 Ann Peirson, 



*Sic; but for what is it an abbreviation ? 



The Settlement and the Settleks. 



41 



MALES. 



., 1 R ( 383 John Stanbrough, 
110 ] 384 John Stanbrough, 



Jur. 



11' 



j 385 Daniell Savre Jur 
( 386 Daniell Sayre, Terts. 



( 387 Dan Burnot, 
118 < 888 Ichabod Burnut, 
( 389 Dan Burnot, Jur. 

21 Joseph Smith, 

22 Will Smith, 

23 Thomas Smith, 
31 Richard Minthor, 

37 Samuel Cooper, 

38 James White, 

39 Ichabod Cooper, 

40 Peeter White, 

44 Nathan Cooper, 

45 Abraham Cooper, 

56 Joseph Poast, 

57 Will Mason, 

61 Will ffoster, 

62 Charles Topping, 
103 John Burnat, 
108 Obadiah Johnes, 
119 Daniell Davis, 

125 Ropartt Patin, 

126 Ephraim Topping, 

129 Mr. William Barker Esq. 

132 Arther Davis, 

133 John Carwith, 
158 Manasa Kempton, 
169 Benj'n Marshall, 
172 Richard Wood, 
181 Jobn Willman, 

188 Will Blyeth, 

189 Benj'n Hildrith, 

215 Thomas Hongson, 

216 John Mowbry, 

217 Anning Mowbry, 

224 David Howell, 

225 John Raynr, 
f271 Humphry Huse, 

273 Abner Huse, 

275 Uriah Huse, 

276 John Masen, 

277 Jedadia Huse, 

278 James ffoster, 

279 John Huse, 

296 Charles fordham, 

308 Isaac Mills, 

309 Isaac Mills, Jur., 

312 Jonathan Miles, 

313 Richard Cooper 
319 Martine Rose, 



116 



117 



FFEAMALES. 

345 Martha Stanbrough, 

346 Martha Stanbrough, 
' 347 Sarah Sayre, 

348 Hanah Sayre, 
; 349 Sarah Sayre, 



118—350 Abigaile Burnot. 



1 Ann Peirkins, 

21 Abigaill Rose, 

22 Hanah Rose, 

23 abigaile Rose, Jur. 

24 Sarah Rose, 

25 Hanah Rose, 

26 Martha Rose, 

27 debro Rose, 
33 Jager, 

35 Mary Cooper, 

36 Sarah Cooper, 

37 Mary Cooper, Jur. 

40 Jerush Cooper, 

41 Phebe Cooper, 

42 Elisabeth Cooper, Jur. 
52 Sarah Poast, 

60 An Halsey, 

61 Abigaile Reeves, 

79 Hanah Travely, 

80 Susanah Beswick, 
83 Sarah Erie, 

121 Hanah Reeves, 

131 Martha Davis, 

132 Sarah Jessup, 

136 mindwell Erie, 

137 Mrs. Mary Howell, 

138 Sibell Howell, 

139 Elisabeth Simpkins, 
157 Sarah ffeild, 

161 Sarah min thorn, 

162 Mrs. Susanah. Howell, 

163 Prudence Howell 

186 Hanah Erie, 

187 mary Poast, 

188 Sarah Poast, 

189 Dorithee Poast, 

190 martha Poast, 

. 191 Deborah Poast, 
199 Hanah Melvine, 
202 Mistris Anning, 
207 Abigaill wilman, 
214 Aimy Halsey, 
267 Hanah Shaw, 
273 mary Laughton, 
279 Ester leeming, 
281 Sarah Toping, 



t The Huse family were at first overlooked In the roll — then inserted afterward by inter- 
lining and so scattered as above. 

6 



42 Histoet of Southampton. 

MALES. FFEAMALES. 

320 Jacob Wood, 286 Hanah Sayre, 

321 Lenard Haris, 293 mary Haris, 
352 Thomas Diamond, 294 mary haris, 

356 Edward Petty, 301 annah Halsey, 

357 Ellnathan Petty, 302 annah Halsey, 

358 Edward Pety, Jnr. 305 deliverance priest, 

375 John Morehouse, 309 Abigaile wade, 

376 John Morehouse, Jur, 322 Martha huse, 
™, , i, »r i /-h ■ x' oon 327 Hanah leeming, 
The number of Male Christians, 389. 339 Elisabetn i aug hton, 

342 hanah noris, 

feamale christians, 349. 

(flgplt will be noticed the clerk makes a mistake of one in the sum total 
of females, but the reader will bear in mind that in copying the foregoing and 
following lists from the old MSS., we have used the utmost care to present 
them Verbatim et Literatim, regardless of their numerous errors and incon- 
sistencies, in the use of capital letters, spelling, etc., etc. Gr. R. H.) 

Negro Males. 

Will, John, Peter, Dick, Tom, Peter, Guie, Jack, Jack, Dick, Ceaser, Cisto, 
Jethro, Jack, Titus, Jefery, Lewis, Brigitt, Mingo, Dick, Tittus, Tom, Will, 
Jack, ffranck, Ceser, Samson, Jehue, Nero, George, Sambo, Ned, Tobee. 40 
names. [7 names destroyed.] 

Ne&eo Females. 

Ann, bety, Isabell, Bety, Elisabeth, Perle, Mariah, Abee, Sarah, Hanah, 
Joane, Sarah, bety, Joane, Hager, bety, Hanah, Rachell, Judith, Jinny, 
Simony, Eueth, Rueth, Dorekis, Smone, Pegree, Philis, hitabel, Sarah, 
Sarah, Rose, Mayery, hanah, melly, Dinah, Bess, Simony. Female negro 
persons — 43. [6 names destroyed.] 



The number of Christian Males is 389 '■_ 

The number of Christian ffemales is 349 

The number of negro Slaves men is 040 

The number of women negro Slaves is 043 



738 
083 



1- 821 



Indian males that are upwards of fifteen years — the Squas and children, 
few of whom have any nam. 

Chice, Indian, Johnson, Indian, Arther, Indian, Anthony, In- 
dian, Thamauty, Indian, Johnaquan, Indian, queegano, Indian, Lenard, In- 
dian, Pisacomary, Indian, Jefery, Indian, Rhichoam, Indian, Red hed will, 
Indian, Pomquamo, Indian, Simon, Indian, Canady, Indian, Tohemon, Indian, 
Coyemow, Indian, ffranck, Indian, Toby, Indian, Macrobow, Indian, pabama- 
cow, Indian, Philip, Indian, Sam, Indian, Tom lenard, Indian, Dick, Indian, 
Plato, Indian, Tom-hodge, Indian, Denitt, Indian, obedia, Indian, Cuttuas, 
Indian, Abraham, Indian, Isaac, Indian, Sam, Indian, Steephen, Indian, no- 
dian, Indian, Judas, Indian, Weegon, Indian, Cough, Indian, Sam, Indian, 
William, Indian, na, Indian, Chitty, Indian, Hary, Indian, Joseph, Indian, 
Tom, Indian, waynantuck, Indian, waneno, Indian, Titus, Indian. 

Note. —The Leemings are also inserted. 



The Settlement and the Settlees. 43 

The number of Indians upwards of 15 years 52 

The Indians Informes there is about the same number of woome'n ' and as 
many Children 100 

152 

"The hethen are So Scattered To and frow that they can 
neither be Sumonsed in * 

" The above listt of the Inhabitants of ye Town of Southamp- 
ton, Taken by me this 15th day of September, 1698. 

"Mathew Howell." 

Note. — The figures prefixed to the names in the above lists are 
not found in the original, but are added for convenient reference. 

It may be remarked that of the list of males above given, the 
first thirty-six or seven lived in North Sea. From No. 38 to 
about No. 55, are given the residents on the west or hill street. 
From No. 56 to 168, residents in the town street, on the east side, 
including, it may be, a few, in the street leading to Bridge Hamp- 
ton and Toilsome Lane : the list begins at the north and progresses 
southward. From 169 to 213, commencing at the south end of 
the west side of the town street and proceeding northwards, the 
lists embrace all therein residing. From 214 or perhaps 218 to 
268 or perhaps 270, the residents of Wickapogue, Cobb, Water- 
mill and the neighboring region are given. From 270 to the 
close are recorded the inhabitants of Mecox, Sagg and Bridge 
Hampton. 

In the list of females above given we notice, the name of Mary 
occurs 61 times ; Hannah, 57 ; Sarah, 43 ; Elizabeth, 27 ; Abigail, 
14; Phebe, 14; Martha, 13; Deborah, 11 ; Susanah, 10; Mehet- 
abel, 9 ; and Joana, Temperance and Ann each 5 times. 

Among the names of the male inhabitants we find the name of 
John occurring 50 times ; Joseph, 24 ; Thomas, 22 ; Samuel, 21 ; 
Isaac, 16; Benjamin, 14; Jonathan, 14; William, 14; David 
and James, each 13 ; Daniel, 10 ; Jeremiah, Josiah and Richard, 
each 9 times ; Ephraim, 8 ; Jonah, Henry and Nathan, each 6, 
and Abraham and Edward, each 5 times. 

*Manuscript torn 



44 



History of Southampton. 



1 The Estemate of the TWne of Southampton for the yeare 



1683." 



[From Doc. Hist, of N. Y., Vol. 2, page 536.] 



No. of Polls. £ s. d. 

0. Widow Hannah How- 

ell 267 00 00 

3. John Anning 088 10 00 

3. Capt. John Howell.. . 442 10 00 
2. Lieft. Joseph Ford- 
ham 459 10 00 

' 3. Thomas Halsey 411 16 08 

> 5. Edward Howell 400 00 00 

2. Peregrine Stan- 

/ brough 320 16 08 

h. Job Sayre 164 10 00 

1. James Topping 249 06 08 

1. Benjamin Palmer 089 00 00 

1. Josiah Stanbrow 130 00 00 

3. John Davess 140 00 00 

2. John Eose 133 00 00 

1. Joseph Post 062 03 04 

1. Simon Hillyard 023 00 00 

1. Benjamin Hand 086 00 00 

1. Thomas Rose 047 10 00 

1. John Burnett 056 06 08 

1. Joseph More 083 00 00 

2. Will'm. Hakelton. ... 041 00 00 
1. Thomas Burnett 119 06 08 

1. Mr. Phillips 164 06 08 

0. Mrs. Mary Taylor, 

I widow 064 13 04 

IJ &. Francis Sayre 178 00 00 

> 2. Isaac Halsey 345 00 00 

3. John Jessup 360 06 08 

2. Henry Ludlam 203 13 04 

1. Lott Burnett 100 00 00 

1. James Hildreth 030 00 00 

1. Ezekiell Sanford 060 00 00 

1. Peter Norris 051 00 00 

1. Robert Norriss 052 00 00 

2. Joseph Marshall 058 00 00 

1. John Rainor 094 00 00 

1. John Jennings 129 10 00 

1. Isaac Rainer 064 00 00 

1. James White 092 16 08 

1. John Lupton 067 00 00 

1. Widow Mary Rainer.. 166 00 00 

1. Benonv Newton 067 00 00 

1. Samuel Mills 032 00 00 

1. Samuel Lum 076 00 00 

1 1. Edmond Clarke 056 00 10 

- 1 1. Widow Sarah Cooper. 337 06 08 

1. Obadiah Rogers, Jr.. 053 00 00 

3. Tho: Travally 229 10 00 

1. Mr. Jonah Fordham. 081 13 04 

. 1. Josiah Halsey 125 13 04 

1. Christopher Learning. 053 13 04 



No. of Polls. 
1. Jonathan Rainor .... 

3. Daniell Sayre 

-0. Joseph Sayre 

1. Benjamin Peirson . . . 

1. John Laughton 

3. Charles Sturmey. . . . 

2. Joseph Foster 

1. Obadiah Roggers. . . . 
1. Joseph Pierson 

1. Isaac Mills 

2. Samuel Whitehead. . 
1. Robert Woolly 

1. Thomas Cooper, Jr. . 

2. Joshua Barnes and 

Sam 

2. John Jagger 

2. Thomas Cooper 

1. Widow Martha Cooke 

2. John Foster 

1. John Lawrinson 

1. John Howell, Jr 

1. JohnEarle 

1. Christo: Foster 

2. Richard Post 

1. Abraham Howell. . . . 

1. John Post 

1. David Brigs 

1. Samuel Clark: old 

towne 

1. David Howell 

1. Josiah Laughton.... 

1 . Ben ; Davess 

1. Nathanll Short 

1. Thomas Steephens. . . 

1. Gersham Culver 

1. Thomas Goodwin . . . 

1. Isaac Cory 

2. John Bishop, Jr 

2. Samuel Johnes 

1. Abraham Willman . . 

1. Henry Peirson 

1. Samuel Clarke, No. 

Sea 

1 . John Woodrouf e .... 

2. Elnathan Topping. . . 

3. John Bishop 

1. Isaac Willman 

1. Hannah Topping, 

widow 

1. Humphrey Hughes. . 

1. Thomas Reeves 

1. John Cooke 

1. John Mappem 



£ s. d. 

197 03 04 
207 03 04 

023 00 00 

051 06 08 
098 06 08 

198 10 00 
138 03 04 
200 16 08 
127 06 08 
089 03 04 

053 00 00 
118 00 00 
163 00 00 

232 13 04 
289 10 00 
209 06 08 
194 13 04 
178 06 08 
254 00 00 
121 10 00 
046 00 00 
074 00 00 

100 06 08 
043 00 00 
169 13 04 
040 00 00 

059 10 00 
077 00 00 

024 00 00 
107 06 08 
030 00 00 
080 00 00 
098 06 08 
030 00 00 
148 03 04 
055 13 00 
249 16 08 

054 10 00 
136 10 00 

113 00 00 
160 00 00 
275 00 00 
214 00 00 
187 10 00 

180 00 00 

052 06 08 

101 00 00 
169 00 00 
112 13 04 



The Settlement and the Settlers. 



45 



No. of Polls. 



1. Shamger Hand. . 

1. John Else 

1. Benony Flinte. . . 

Joseph Hildreth 

John Carwithy. . 

Richard Howell 

Thomas Shaw. . 

Edmond Howell 

Xtopher Lupton 

George Harriss. 

Richard Howell, Jr 

John Morehouse.. 

William Mason . . 

James Her-rick . . . 

William Herrike . 
3. Benjamin Foster 
1. Aron Burnett 

Widow Fowler. . . 

Benjamin Haines. 

Matthew Howell. 

Manassah Kempton 

1. George Owen 

1. Thurston Rainor . 
1. Mr. William Barker 
1. Will'm Simpkins. 
1. Mr. Henry Goreing 
1. John Gould 



1. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
1. 
3. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
2. 
1. 



0. 
1. 
1. 
1. 



£ s. d. 
089 13 04 
030 06 08 
060 00 00 
100 00 00 
040 00 00 
250 00 00 
0G0 00 00 
240 00 00 
200 00 00 
137 00 00 
030 00 00 
064 00 00 
050 00 00 
180 00 00 

059 00 00 
220 00 00 
037 00 00 
027 00 00 
140 00 00 
070 00 00 
018 00 00 
023 00 .00 
040 00 00 

060 00 00 
040 00 00 
018 00 00 
040 00 00 



No. of Polls. £ s. d. 

1. Joseph Whitehead . . 030 00 00 

1. Pamuell Cooper 035 00 00 

1. J. Barthallomew 018 00 00 

1. Onesiphorus Standley 018 00 00 

2. Abram Hanke 060 00 00 

1. Zachary Laurance. . . 018 00 00 

1. Callob Carwithy 018 00 00 

1. John Petty 030 00 00 

1. Thomas Shaw, Jr . . . 018 00 00 

1. Isaac Willman, Jr. . . 030 00 00 

0. Robert Kallem 010 00 00 

0. George Hethcote 022 00 00 

John Sanders 012 00 00 

1. John Woolley 018 00 00 

1. Edward White 030 00 00 

1. Jonat HildreiU 030 00 00 

1. John Mowberry 030 00 00 

1. Mr. Frencham 018 00 00 

Sum totall is 16328 06 08 

Zebobabell Pyllifs, Constable. 



John Jagabb, 
John Fosteb, 
John Howell, Jr., 
Joseph Piebson. 



Southampton Sept ye 1st 1683 

A true copy of ye originall by mee 

John Howell, Junr Clark. 
Endorsed, The Estemation of the town of Southampton, 1683. 



46 History of Southampton. 



CHAPTER IV. 

CHARACTER OF THE SETTLERS. 

Of the character of our ancestors there can be no question. 
They were men of sterling worth, the Puritans of England. 
They were more than mere colonists — they were the exponents 
of a new civilization founded on the idea, that under God, men 
could govern themselves. Their flight from England and self- 
exile on these shores was the strongest protest they could give 
against the divine right of kings in civil and religious govern- 
ment. That they acknowledged Christ as the only head over his 
church is not only manifest in their actions, but also in the touch- 
ing language at the close of the "articles of agreement," given 
in the appendix, " and that whensoever it shall please the Lord, 
and he shall see it good to adde to us such men as shall be fitt 
matter for a Church, that then wee will in that thinge lay our- 
selves down before the Constitutes thereof, either to bee or not to 
bee received as members thereof, accordinge as they shall discern 
the work of God to be in our heart." 

That they were men of intelligence, is seen in their free char- 
ter, their just laws, and liberal institutions. They secured in their 
patent, land [tenure by gavelkind* which had from time imme- 
morial prevailed in the county of Kent, in England. While the 
tenures in all other counties of England had been more or less 
burdened from the time of the Norman conquest with restrictions, 
liabilities, or knight service, the Kentish men had always held 
their land in free and common socage ; contributing only pro- 
portionally their share in the expenses of government. In addi- 
tion, upon the death of a landholder intestate, instead of the real 
estate devolving upon the eldest son, the more equitable and 
democratic custom prevailed of dividing it equally among all the 
surviving children. 

* 1 Blackstone, 71. 



Character of the Settleks. 47 

At the foundation of their colony they adopted for their gov- 
ernment the * " Laws of Judgment as given by Moses to the 
Commonwealth of Israel, so farre foarth as they bee of worrath, 
that is, of perpetuall and universall equity among all nations." 
Like the Jewish Commonwealth too, the form of government 
was a kind of theocracy. Church and State were united, and its 
head was the Lord Jesus Christ. Offenses which would now be 
tried (if at all) by courts ecclesiastical, were then tried by the 
General Court of Freemen. A taxation, pro rata, was levied on 
all property to raise the salary of the minister. Even the right of 
suffrage appears for some little time to have been confined to the 
members of the church. 

It was the difference of opinion on this question, whether any 
but church members should exercise the right of freemen, that 
induced the Rev. Abraham Pierson to leave them for a connec- 
tion with the New Haven Colony, in 1647, Southampton having 
united with the Hartford or Connecticut Colony, in 1644. The 
New Haven people, led by John Davenport, were for giving the 
rights of freemen only to the members of the church — the Hart- 
ford Colony would open the door to all. However this question 
may appear to us in this day, still there is something striking — 
something that reminds us of the stern uncompromising spirit of 
the old prophets in the doctrine that no man was fit to govern or 
legislate for others until he was himself obedient to the laws of God. 

They were formed into a church organization at Lynn, a few 
months after a settlement had been effected in Southampton, and 
brought over their minister with them, the Rev. Abraham Pier- 
son, and erected their first church edifice in the second year of 
their settlement. Like their brothers in New England, wherever 
they went, the school-house, too, followed in their wake. It is 
worthy of remark, that of the twenty who signed the articles of 
agreement, four only were obliged to sign by proxy, at a period 
when many a baron in England was compelled to make his mark. 
Some peculiarities they had — faults too, doubtless, and yet they 
were men to be honored for their bravery and revered for their 
virtues. 

* See Appendix. 



48 Histoet or Southampton'. 

They were also men of means and of good social standing in 
the mother country. Of one of their number, an eminent man, 
in correspondence, writes : " He was a gentlemen of coat-armor, and 
his place in the settlement always magistrate — the proprietor of 
the mill (like the old French Sieurs, and English Lords of the 
manor,) and the acknowledged head in everything, coupled with 
the style and manner of such writings of his as I have seen, suf- 
ficiently show that he was of the best class of those which came 
over — the class which included "Winthrop and Humphrey." 

In Governor Dongan's report of the Province of New Tork, in 
1687, occurs something more equivocal. He says : " The first 
year there was £52 offered for the Excise of Long Island, but I 
thought it unreasonable, it being the best peopled place in this 
Government, and wherein theres great consumption of Humin, 
and therefor I gave commission to Mr. Nieholls and Mr. Yaugh- 
ton, &c. * * * Most part of the people of that Island, espec- 
ially towards the east end, are of the same stamp with those of 
New England, refractory and very loath to have any commerce 
with this place to the great detrimnt of revenue and ruin of our 
Merchants." 

Although this village is now of but little importance in wealth 
and population compared with the large cities and towns of the 
Empire State, yet in the early times it was far different. Its 
name appears on all the old charts and maps of this period alone, 
of all the villages on the east end of Long Island. And Governor 
Andros in a letter (N. Y. Col. Hist., v. 3, p. 2(31) of answers to 
inquiries about New York says, among other things, " Our 
principall places of Trade are New York and Southampton, ex- 
cept Albany for the Indyans, &c." 

In 1703, ¥m. Yesey, in a report of the state of the churches 
in the Province of New York, says : " In Suffolk County, in the 
East end of Long Island, there is neither a church of England 
minister, nor any provision made for one by law, the people gen- 
erally being Independents and upheld in their seperation* by New 
England Emissaries." 

*SiC 



Character of the Settlers. 49 

There is one other feature in their laws which merits our 
attention. 

With all their puritanic strictness, they allowed more freedom 
of conscience than was usual in that period of intolerance, whether 
in England under the Stuarts, or in New England among the 
Independents. Toleration was practised so far as to allow the 
existence of heretical doctrine, provided the dissenter confined his 
dissent or unbelief to his own bosom. The legal prohibition was 
directed only against the promulgation of false doctrine. This 
liberality in matters of conscience and religious belief, was far in 
advance of that persecuting spirit, which stains the history of 
these times through the civilized world. 

Their puritanic principles made their mark on the civilization 
and morals of the community, that lingers even to this day, and 
for purity of morals and sobriety of life, the village will only find 
a parallel in those other villages, where dwell the descendants of 
the Pilgrim Fathers of New England. 



50 Histoby of Southampton. 



CHAPTER V. 

CIVIL EELATIONS PUEE DEMOCEACY UNION WITH CONNECTICUT 

WITH NEW YOEK DUTCH INTEBEEGNUM AGAIN WITH NEW 

TOEK. 

The civil relations of the colony afford an interesting field for 
investigation. In the very beginning the principle of self-govern- 
ment is developed in admirable perfection. For the first four 
years, these thirty or forty families formed a little republic by 
themselves. It was a pure democracy without a parallel, save in 
the short-lived republics of ancient Greece. For the time being, 
Southampton was their country, and we cannot bestow too high 
praise on their efforts to secure justice and equal rights and pro- 
tection to every individual. They reversed the maxim of Louis 
XIY., "I am the State" — with them the State was the people, 
and for the people, and not the people for the State. A town 
meeting, or General Court, as it was called, was held half-yearly, 
composed of the adult males, who were obliged to attend regu- 
larly under penalty of a fine. This court exercised the extra- 
ordinary powers of a legislature and a judiciary ; defined the limits 
and powers of the magistrate's court ; received and decided 
appeals from the same ; was the proper tribunal for trying crimes 
punishable with death (though happily they were spared from 
any such duty) ; settled civil cases ; allotted lands and elected offi- 
cers ; enacted a code of laws founded on those given by Moses 
to the Jewish nation ; made by-laws and regulations necessary to 
the safety and well-being of the community, and had general 
supervision over the interests of the body politic. These powers 
are defined in an act of the General Court, passed January 2, 1641. 

*For reasons that do not appear on the record, they deemed it 

*May 29, 1643, the plantations of Massachusetts, New Plymouth, Connecticut and New- 
Haven, with the plantations in combination with them, adopted articles of confederation for 
their mutual welfare and protection. 

Felt (Eccles. Hist, of N. E., VI, p. 563) says that on the 9th of September, 1644 the com- 
missioners of this confederation consented to the application of Southampton to come under 
the jurisdiction of the Connecticut colony. Hazard State Papers, v. 2, p 7 seems to 
assign this event to the date of September 7, 1643. 



Civil Relations. 51 

expedient to unite themselves to the colony of Connecticut, which 
union occurred in 1645, as will appear from the following order : 

March 7, 1643-4. " It was voted and consented vnto by the 
Generall Court, that the towne of Southampton, shall enter into- 
combinacon with the Jurisdiction of Conuecticote." 

The date of this union with Connecticut has been a subject of 
some difference, but the records of Southampton afford enough 
evidence to settle the question. *Trumbull in his history after 
the marginal date of October 25, 1644, says: "A little before 
this Southampton through Edward Howell, John Gosmer and 
John Moore petitioned to be received iu the jurisdiction of Con- 
necticut." 

The exact date of the union is stated in the following decision 
of the General Court. 

June 20, 1657. " At a Towne Meeting it was voated and con- 
cluded by the major part to accept of, and receave all the lawes 
of the Jurisdiction of Conneckticot, not crossing nor contradict- 
ing the limetations of our combination bearing date, May 30, 
1645." 

These articles copied from Trumbull's Colonial Records of Con- 
necticut, vol. i, p. 566, are as follows : 

"A coppie of ye combynation of Southampton, wth Harford. 

" "Whereas formerly sume Ouerturs haue by letters paste be- 
twixt sume deputed by the Jurissdiction of Conectecote and 
others of ye plantation of Southampton vpon Long Island, con- 
cerning vnion into one boddy and gouernment, whereby ye said 
Towne might be interested in ye general combination of ye vnited 
Collonies for prossecntion and issuing wherof, Edward Hopkins 
and John Haines being authorised wth power from ye Generall 
Corte for ye Jurisdiction of Conecticute, and Edward Howell, 
John Gosmer and John More, deputed by ye Towne of South- 
ampton, It was by the said parties concluded & agreed, and ye 
said Towne of Southampton doe by their said deputies, for them- 
selues and their successors assotiate and joyne themselves to ye 
Jurisdiction of Conecticote to be subject to al the lawes there es- 

*Hist. of Conn., p. 136. / 



52 History of Southampton. 

tablished, according to ye word of God and right reson wth such 
exceptions & limniitations as are hereafter expressed. 

" The Towne of Southampton by reson of ther passage by sea 
being vnder more difficulties and vncertainties of repayring 
to ye several Cortes held for ye Jurisdiction of Oonecticote, upon 
ye mayne land, wherby they may be constrained to be absent 
both at ye times of election of Magistrats, and other ocations 
wch may proue prjudicial to them : for prventing wherof, it 
is agreed yt for ye prsent, vntil more plantations be settled 
neere to ye Towne of Southampton, wch may be helpful each to 
other in publike occations, (and yt by mutual agreement betwixt 
ye said Towne and ye Generall Corteforye jurisdiction of Conec- 
tecote it be otherwise ordered,) there shall be yearly chosen two 
Magistrats inhabiting wthin ye said Towne or liberties of South- 
ton, who shal haue ye same power wth ye Prticular Courts 
vpon ye Riuer of Conectecote though no other Magistrats of ye 
jurisdiction be present for ye Administration of Justice and other 
ocations wch may concerne the welfare of ye said Towne, offences 
only wch concerne life excepted, or limbe, wch always shall be 
tryed by a Courte of Magistrats to be held at ye Eiuers mouth, 
wch said Magistrats for ye Towne aforesaid, shall be chosen in 
manner following : 

"The Towne of Southampton by ye freemen therof shall 
yerely prsent to sume Generall Courte for ye Jurisdiction of 
Conectecote, or to ye Governor thereof, before ye Courte of 
Election wch is ye second Thursday in Aprill, the names of three 
of their members of their said Towne, and such as are freemen 
therof whome they nominate for Magistrats the year ensuing, 
out of wch ye Generall Courte for' ye Jurisdiction shall chuse 
two, who vpon oath taken before one or both of ye Magistrats 
for ye prcedent yeare at Southampton, for ye due execution of 
their place, shal haue as ful power to proceede therein as if they 
had been sworne before ye Gouernor at Conectecote. It is also 
provided yt ye freemen of ye said Towne of Southampton 
shal haue libertie to voat in ye Courts of Election for ye juris- 
diction of Conectecote, in regard of ye distance of ye place, by 
proxie. But in case the Towne of Southampton shall by any 



Civil Relations. 53 

extreordinarie hand of Providence, be hindered from sending ye 
names of ye three prsons to be in Election for Magistrats, vnto 
ye Generall Court in Aprill, or hauing sent, ye same doe Miscar- 
rie, it is in such case then provided and agreed, yt ye two Magis- 
trats for ye precedent yeare shall supply ye place vntill ye next 
Generall Conrte for election. 

" It [is] agreed and concluded, yt if vpon vewe of such orders 
as are alreddy established by ye General Courte for ye Jurisdic- 
tion of Connecticoate, there be found any difference therein from 
such as are also for ye present settled in ye Towne of South- 
ampton, the said Towne shal haue libertie to regulate themselues 
acording as may be most sutable to their owne comforts and con- 
veniences in their owne judgment, provided those orders made by 
them concerne themselves only and intrence not vpon ye inter- 
ests of others or ye Generall Combination of ye vnited Collonies, 
and are not cross to ye rule of riteousness. The like power is 
also reserued vnto themselves for the future, for making of such 
orders as may concerne their Towne ocatious. 

" It is agreed & concluded, yt if any party find himself agreved 
by any sentence or judgment passed by ye Magistrats residing at 
Southampton, he may appeale to sum prticular or General Court 
vpon [the] Kiuer, provided he put in securitie to ye satisfaction 
of one or both of ye Magistrates at Southampton, spedily to prose- 
cute his said appeale, and to answer such costs and dammages as 
shal be thought meete by ye Court to which he ajspeals, in case 
there be found no just cause for his appeale. 

" It is agreed & concluded yt ye said Towne of Southampton 
shal only beare their own charges in such Fortifications as are 
necessarie for their own defence, maintaining their own officers 
and al other things that concerne themselues, not being lyable to 
be taxed for fortifications or other expences yt only apertaine to 
the plantations vpon the Riuer, or elsewhere. But in such 
expences as are of mutuall & common concernement, both ye one 
and the other shall beare an equall share in such proportion as is 
agreed by the united Collonies, vizt according to the number of 
males in each plantation from 16 to 60 years of age. 

" The oath to be taken at Southampton. — I, A. B., being an 



54 Histoey of Southampton. 

Inhabitant of Southampton by ye Providence of God, combined 
with ye Providence of God, combined with ye Jurisdiction of 
Conectecote, doe acknowledg myself to be subject to ye Gouern- 
ment therof, and do sweare by the greate and dreadfull name of 
the euerliuing God, to be true & faithfull to the same, and to 
submit both my person & estate thereunto, acording to all the 
wholesum lawes and orders yt are or hereafter shal be made and 
established by lawful Authority wth such limmitations & excep- 
tions as are expressed in ye Combynation of this Towne wth ye 
aforesaid Jurisdiction, & that I wil nether plot nor practice any 
evil against ye same, nor consent to any that shal so doe, but. 
wil timely disco uer it to lawful authority there established ; and 
yt I will, as I am in duty bound, maintaine the honner of the 
same and of ye lawfull Magistrats thereof, promoteing ye pub- 
like good of it, whilst I shall continue an Inhabbitant there ; & 
whensoever I shal giue my voate or suffrage touching any matter 
wuch concerns this Common Wealth, being cald thereunto, I wil 
giue it as in my consience I shall judg may conduce to ye best 
good of ye same, wthout respect [of] prsons or favor of any 
man ; soe help me God in ye Lord Jesus Christ.' 

" The forementioned agreements wear concluded ye day & 
yeare aboue written, betwene ye parties aboue mentioned in be- 
half of ye Jurisdiction of Conectecott, and ye Towne of South- 
ampton, wth refference to ye aprobation of ye Commissioners, 
for ye vnited Collonies, wch being obtayned the said agrements 
are to be atended and observed, according to ye true intent and 
purpose thereof, or otherwise to be voyde and of noe effect ; and 
in testimonie thereof have interchangeably [ J put to their 
hands." 

By the original charter of the Connecticut colony the executive 
power was vested in the Governor and four magistrates. As the 
colony increased, the number of magistrates was enlarged, and 
each town had one or more. It must be remembered that this, 
the colony of Connecticut, was a separate one from the New 
Haven colony, which latter was begun in the fall of 1637, when 
Mr. Theophilus Eaton with others, went out on an exploring ex- 
pedition, and settled themselves about the Quinnipiac river at the 



Civil Relations. 55 

the head of what is now New Haven harbor. *From this colony 
thus commenced, came the founders of Southold, who, about the 
middle of October, 1640, formed themselves into a church organi- 
zation at that place. 

In 1645, on the 30th of May, the articles of combination of 
Southampton were signed. This made it necessary for the South- 
ampton magistrates to attend officially the general court of elec- 
tion, which occurred at Hartford on the second Thursday in 
May. There was a second general court held in Hartford in the 
month of October, which until 1662 was presided over by the 
Governor and the bench of magistrates, for the enactment of 
all necessary laws, and for the transaction of other public busi- 
ness, f In April, 1662, a new charter was granted to or imposed 
upon the Connecticut colony, ordaining that there should be an- 
nually two general assemblies, consisting of the Governor, Deputy- 
Governor and twelve assistants (magistrates) with two deputies 
from each town. These assemblies were to be held as before, on 
the second Thursdays of May and October, and for the same pur- 
poses. About this time (1662) the New Haven was united to 
the Connecticut colony, and in the same year Southold came 
under the jurisdiction of the Connecticut colony. 

It would appear from a comparison of the Southampton and 
the Connecticut records, that while the former town uniformly 
elected three magistrates, only two of these were accustomed to 
attend the General Court at Hartford as representatives of their 
townsmen. 

*" It also appears that New Haven, or their confederates, purchased and settled Yennycock 
or Southold on Long Island. Mr. John Youngs, who had been a minister at Hingham, Eng- 
land, came over with a considerable part of his church, and here fixed his residence. He 
gathered his church anew on the 21st of October, 1640, and the planters united themselves 
with New Haven." Trumbull's Hist. Ct., vol. 1, p. 119. But this plantation ceased to be a 
dependency or a property of New Haven soon after, for (Col. Eec. of Ct., vol. 1, p. 110), at a 
General Court held at New Haven, October 23, 1643, this language is used: " And whereas 
Stamf orde, Guilf orde, Yennicock have upon the same foundations and ingagements entered 
into combination with vs," &c. There had been, therefore, at that date already, a union 
similar to that of Southampton with Connecticut, in 1645. Palfrey says the settlers came 
from Norfolk, England, and settled here October, 1640. East Hampton united with the Con- 
necticut colony in 1657, and Setauket was also admitted a member of the same October 6, 
1658. Trumbull, ibid, p. 235. 

t Trumbuirs Hist, of Conn. 



56 



History of Southampton. 



The following list of these magistrates and representatives is 
taken from the Conn. Col. records, and from the town records of 
Southampton : 

Magistrates, 1640 to 1646 inclusive, Edward Howell, and part 
of this time also, Daniel Howe and John G-osmer. 



MAGISTRATES. 

Edward Howell. 
John Gosmer. 
Edward Howell. 
Thomas Topping. 
John Ogden. 
Edward Howell. 
Thomas Topping. 
John Ogden. 
John Gosmer. 
Thomas Topping. 
Edward Howell. 

John Gosmer. 
Thomas Topping. 
Edward Howell. 

John Gosmer. 
Thomas Topping. 
Thurston Raynor. 

John Gosmer. 
Thomas Topping. 
John Ogden. 

Thomas Topping. 
John Ogden. 
John Gosmer. 
John Ogden. 
Thurston Raynor. 

Thomas Topping. 
Richard Barret. 
John Ogden. 
John Ogden. 
Thomas Topping. 
Thomas Topping. 
Thurston Raynor. 
John Ogden." ' 
Richard Barret. 
John Ogden. 
Thomas Topping. 
Thurston Eaynor. 
John Howell. 
Richard Barret. 

Thomas Topping. 
John Howell. 
Thurston Raynor. 



REPRESENTATIVES 
AT HARTFORD. 



1647tol649inclu S ive.|f o t n ar G d os H m t 



1650. 

1651. 

1652. 

1653. 

1654. 

1655. 

1656. 

1657 and 1658. 

1659. 
1660. 



, Edward Howell. 

■] John Gosmer, (Ct. Col. 

< Rec.) 

( Edward Howell, 
j Thomas Topping 

( Edward Howell. 
( Thomas Topping. 

j Edward Howell. 

( Thomas Topping, absent. 



Absent. 



( Thomas Topping, 
j John Gosmer. 

( Thomas Topping. 
( John Ogden 

( John Gosmer. 
( John Ogden. 

( John Ogden. 

} Thomas Topping. 

( Thomas Topping. 
( John Ogden. 



1661 — elected October j Thomas Topping. 
6, 1661. ( Thurston Raynor. 



1662. 



( John Ogden. 



1 Thomas Topping. 

1663-chosen May 1, j Th° m ^ s T °PP iu S- 
1 fifis i John Howell. 



1663. 



1664. 



( Thurston Raynor. 
( Thomas Halsey. ■ 
< John Jessup, elected 
( April 26. 



Civil Relations. 57 

In 1662, according to the new charter, John Howell was sent 
as deputy. In 1663 the deputy was Joshua Barnes, and in 1664, 
Thomas Halsey, Sen., and John Jessup. 

In 1658 East Hampton was first represented at Hartford by 
Thomas Baker and John Mulford. In 1659, '60 and '61 by 
Thomas Baker and Robert Bond. In 1662 and '63 by Thomas 
Baker, and in 1664 by John Mulford and Robert Bond. 

As before stated, March 12, 1664, Charles II. granted with 
other territory Long Island and Islands adjacent, to his brother 
James, Duke of York, and in the following August, New York 
was surrendered by the Dutch to Col. Richard Nicolls. Under 
the patent granted to Connecticut, November 30, 1644, that 
province claimed jurisdiction over Long Island. This question of 
boundaries was referred to Commissioners of Charles, who decided 
that " the Southern bounds of Connecticut is the sea," and that 
Long Island belonged to New York. Governor Winthrop on 
seeing the letters-patent to the Duke of York, informed the 
English on Long Island, that Connecticut had no longer any claims 
upon that Island. 

This union with New York, however, was very unacceptable 
to the inhabitants of the east end of the Island. Their inter- 
course with the towns along the Connecticut river was frequent, 
and in customs, education and religion they were identical with 
their New England brethren. A considerable trade had grown 
up between the three towns on the east end and Connecticut, and 
the efforts of his Royal Highness' officials to divert this to New 
York, met with hearty remonstrance. 

An extract from a report of Gov. Nicolls about 1669, in Doc. 
Hist, of New York, Vol. i, p. 87, will show the change effected 
in the government of the town by its union with New York. 

" 1st. The Governor and Councell with the High Sheriffe and 
the Justices of the Peace in the Court of the Generall Assizes, have 
the Supreame Power of making, altering and abolishing any Laws 
in this Government [of the province of N. Y.] The County Ses- 
sions are held by Justices upon the Bench. Particular Town 
Courts by a Constable and eight Overseers. The City Court of New 
Yorke by a Mayor and Alderman. All causes tried by Juries." 
8 



58 History of Southampton. 

A copy of the code of laws by which the government of the 
Province of New York was administered was sent to the town 
and is still in good state of preservation. 

These laws are familiarly known in the history of New York 
as the " Duke's laws," i. e., those of James, Duke of York and 
Albany. They were compiled partly from the several laws in 
force in the the Massachusetts and Connecticut colonies, but 
shaped in the interest of the government by Nicolls at the court of 
assizes, held in New York in June, 1664, Govenor Nicolls calling 
a convention or assembly representing the counties of Suffolk, 
Queens and Westchester, ostensibly for the purpose of settling 
the boundaries of the towns in these counties, but chiefly to lay 
before them this code of laws and secure their assent to the same. 
This last was grudgingly given by some of the towns of the east 
end of Long Island, inasmuch as they were not deemed as liberal 
as those of New England. This assembly met at Hempstead, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1664:-5. These laws erected Long Island, Staten Island 
and Westchester into a shire called Yorkshire, which was divided 
into three Ridings or court districts, Suffolk county being the east 
Hiding, Kings County, Staten Island, and Newtown the west Ri- 
ding, and Queens County the north Riding. 

The deputies to this assembly from Long Island, as given in a 
Mss. book in office of the Secretary of State at Albany, marked 
" General Entries, " yoI. 1, page 93, were as follows : 

East Hampton ( Thomas Baker, 

c { John Stratton. 

*■*•»*« IJotXweTr^ 

Seatalcott \ g aniel *"me, 

( Koger Barton. 

Huntington j tT S T^?°f 

( John Ketcham. 

Southold j William Wells, 

( John Youngs. 

Hempstead i £* n Hi T ct ?. 

( Kobert Jackson. 

Oyster Bay j John Underhill, 

( Mathias Harvey. 

Jamaica \ £? niel Denton, 

( Thomas Benedict. 

Gravesend ( James Hubbard, 

J J onn Bo wne. 



Civil Relations. 59 

Edward Jesaop 
John Quimby. 



Westchester i Edward Jesaop, 



New To wne J Richard Betts, 

' ' * " ( John Coe. 

flushing jElias Doughty, 

( Richard Cornhill or Cornell. 

Brookland ( Fred. Lubbertzen. 

" ' ' 7 John Evertsen. 

Bush wick i J° nn Sealman or Seaman. 

* ( Gilbert Junis. 

fflatt Bush H T ohn , St n ri ^ er ' 

( Hendnck Yorassen. 

fflatt Lands i Albert El beTt sen, 

( Koloffe Martens. 

New Utrecht f Jaques Coutilleau, 

' ' ( 1 ounger fifosse. 

^According to their requirement, among other things is the fol- 
lowing regulation in substance, which explains the appearance of 
a new set of officers on the Southampton town records. Eio-ht 
overseers were to be chosen in each town, four for two years and 
four for one year, and out of the retiring overseers the constable 
was to be chosen. An overseer on a "sudden and necessary oc- 
cation " might perform the duty of constable, provided he carried 
with him the staff of the office. The overseers were to act as the 
former assessors, and with the constable (who was also collector 
of taxes), might enact ordinances for the welfare of the towns 
not of a criminal nature. Oct. 1666. The number of overseers is 
changed from eight to four. The town marks as given in the 
same code are : For East Hampton, A ; Southampton, B ; South- 
old, ; Seatalcott, D ; Huntington, E ; Oyster Bay, F ; Hemp- 
stead, G; Jamaica, H ; Flushing, I ; Westchester, K; Newtown, L ; 
Bushwick, M. ; Brookland, 1ST ; Flatbush, O ; Flatland. P ; Ytricht, 
Q ; and Gravesend, R. 

The Episode of the Dutch interregnum is interesting as it re- 
veals the sturdy tenacity of the Long Island people in maintain- 
ing their civil and religious liberty. The following documents 
taken from the Colonial History of New York, Docs. , vol. ii, 
p. 583 ff, present of themselves a clear history of the events. 

Pursuant to previous letters and summons appeared at the 
Council the Delegates from the English towns situate on Long 
Island, east of Oyster Bay, delivering the following in writing : 

♦Chalmers 1 Political Annals, vol. 1, p. 578. N. V. Hist. Soc. Col., v. 3, pp. 307-397. 



60 History of Southampton. 

Jamaica, August the litk, 1673. 

" Whereas, wee, ye Inhabitants of the East Riding of Long 
Island, (namely, Southampton, Easthampton, South Hoold, Sea- 
taueok & Huntington) were sometime rightly & peaceffully joyned 
with Hertford jurisdiction to good satisffaction on both sides, 
butt about ye yeare 1664, Gennll Eichard Nicolls comeing in ye 
name of his Maties Eoijal Highnes ye Duke of Yorcke & by 
power subjected us to ye Governmt under wch wee have remained 
untill this present time, and now by turne off Gods providence, 
shipps off fforce belonging to ye States off Holland, have taken 
New Yorke ye 30th of the last month, and wee having noe In- 
telligence to this day ffrom or Goyernr: Fras Lovelace, Esquyr, 
off whatt hath happened or wt wee are to doe, Butt ye Gennerrall 
off ye said dutch fforce hath sent to us his declaration or Sum 
mons with a serius Commination therein contained and since wee 
understand bij* ye post bringing the said declaration that our 
Governr : is peacebly & respectfullij entertained into ye said ffort 
and City ; wee the Inhabitants of ye said East Eidijng or or 
Deputies for us att a meeting this daij doe make these or requests 
as ffollow : 

" Imprimis, That iff wee come under ye dutch Governmt, wee 
desire yt wee maij retaine or Ecclesiasticall Priviledges, vizt., to 
Worship God according to or belieffe without anij imposition. 

" 2dly. That wee maij enjoij ye small matters off goods wee 
possess, with or Lands according to or Pnrchaze of ye Natieves as 
it is now bounded out, without ffurther charge off confirmation. 

" 3dly. That ye oath off allegiance to bee imposed may bind 
us ouely whyles we are under [the dutch] Governmt but yt as wee 
shall bee bound not to act against them, soe also not to take up 
armes ffor them against or owne Nation. 

" 4thly. That we maij alwayes have liberty to chuse or owne 
officers both civil and millitarij. 

" Sthly. That these 5 Townes may be a corporation off them- 
selves to end all matters of difference between man and man, ex- 
cepting onely cases conserning Lijfe, Limbe and bannishment. 

* The " ij " for " y " is the Dutch manner of writing, as this is a copy from the Dntch rec- 
ords. 



Civil Relations. 61 

" 6thly. That noe law may be made or tax imposed uppon ye 
people at anij tijme but such as shall be consented to bij ye depu- 
ties of ye respectieve Townes. 

" 7thly. That wee maij have ffree Trade wth ye nation now 
in Power and all others without paiing custome. 

" 8thly. In everij respect to have equall previledges wth the 
dutch nation. 

" 9thly. That there be ffree liberty graunted ye 5 townes abovesd 
for ye procuring from any of ye united Oollonies ( : without 
molestation on either side ;) warpes, irons or any another neces- 
saries ffor ye comffortable earring on the whale designe. 

" lOly. That all Bargaines, covenant & contracts of what nature 
soever stand in ffull fforce, as theij would have been had there 
bene no change of Government." 

East Hampton , Thomas James, 

South Hampton | J j° ^ j e ^ er ' 

_, x , tt u (Thomas Hutchinson, 

SouthHoold llsacq Arnold, j-Deputies. 

_ , „ i Richard Woodhull, 

Brook Haven -j Andrew Miller, 

T-r ... , ( Isaq Piatt, 

Huntington j Th umas Ki dmore) 

The Delegates from East Hampton, Southampton, South- 
old, Setalcot, and; Huntington, requested an audience, and enter- 
ing, delivered in their credentials with a writing in form of a 
petition : they further declared to submit themselves to the obe- 
dience of their High Mightinesses, the Lords States-General of 
the United Netherlands and his SereDe Highness the Prince of 
Orange, etc. Whereupon the preceding Petition having been 
read and taken into consideration, it was ordered as follows : 

On the first point : They are allowed Freedom of Conscience 
in the Worship of God and Church discipline. 

2d. They shall hold and possess all their goods and lawfully 
procured lands on condition that said land be duly recorded. 

3d. Point regarding the Oath of Allegiance with liberty not to 
take up arms against their own nation is allowed and accorded to 
the petitioners. 

4th Article is in like manner granted to the petitioners, to 



62 History of Southampton. 

nominate a double number for their Magistrates, from which the 
election shall then be made here by the Governor. 

5th. It is allowed the Petitioners that the Magistrates in each 
town shall pronounce final judgment to the value of five pounds 
sterling, and the Schout with the General Court of said five towns, 
to the sum of twenty pounds, but over these an appeal to the 
Governor is reserved. 

6th. In case any of the Dutch towns shall send Deputies, the 
same shall in like manner be allowed the petitioners. 

On the 7th and 8th Articles it is ordered, that the petitioners 
shall be considered and treated as all other subjects of the Dutch 
nation and be allowed to enjoy the same privileges with them 

9th Article cannot in this conjuncture of time, be allowed. 

10th Article: 'Tis allowed that all the foregoing particular 
contracts and bargains shall stand in full force. 

Why the council of Governor Oolve chose thus to snub the 
English in these five towns in the matter of providing a few 
whale irons and necessary tackle for capturing the whales that 
happened along the coast, is inconceivable. 

The following is the oath which the Dutch government re- 
quired to be taken by the inhabitants of the eastern towns of 
Long Island. 

" Oath of Fidelity. 

" Wee do sware in the presents of the Almighty God, that wee 
shall be true and faithfull to ye high & mighty Lords ye States 
Gennerall of ye united Belgiek Provinces and his serene high- 
nesse the Prince of Orange and to their Governrs here for the 
time being, and to ye utmost of our power to prevent all what 
shall be attempted against the same, but uppon all occasions to be- 
have ourselves as true & faithfull subjects in conscience are bound 
to do, provided that wee shal not be forced in amies against our 
owne nation, if they are sent by a Lawf ull commission from his 
Majesty of England. Soo help us God." 

This oath was refused to be taken by the men of East Hamp- 
ton, Southampton, Southold and Huntington, they understanding 
that it was to be administered to their Magistrates only, in behalf 



Civil Eelations. 63 

of the people. Whereupon the Dutch sent a vessel to compel 
the people to take it in October, 1673. 

The commissioners came from New York in the frigate "Zee- 
hond," arrived at Southold, and called a meeting of the inhabit- 
ants to take the oath of allegiance to the Dutch Government. 
The flag of the Prince of Orange was brought in and displayed. 
Failing in their attempts to force the oath upon the Southold 
people, they resolved to break up the assembly and depart. An 
extract from the frigate's Journal affords an interesting item : 

" On leaving the place, some inhabitants of Southampton were 
present ; among the rest one John Cooper who told Mr. Steen- 
wyck, to take care and not appear with that thing at Southamp- 
ton, which he more than once repeated : for the Commissioners, 
agreeably to their commission, had intended to go thither next 
morning. Whereupon Mr. Steenwyck asked what he meant by 
that word thing, to which said JohnjOopper replied, the Prince's 
Flag : then Mr. Steenwyck inquired of John Cooper if he said so 
of himself or on the authority of the Inhabitants of Southampton. 
He answered, Pest satisfied that I warn yon, and take care that 
you come not with that Flag within range of shot of our village." 

They did not visit South and East Hampton fearing they would 
" do more harm than good." The commissioners, on their return 
to New York, reported that the inhabitants of these towns " ex- 
hibited an utter aversion thereto, making use of gross insolence, 
threats, &c, so that the commissioners were obliged to return 
their object unaccomplished." 

Doubtless this was a very sorry report for the countrymen of 
Van Tromp to be compelled to give of their ill-success in reduc- 
ing these truculent Puritans to subjection, and it might have been 
expected — the idea of treating these people as subdued rebels and 
subjects of executive clemency was simply ridiculous. Governor 
Winthrop did all in his power to help the Long Island people in 
this difficulty. 

In the month of August of this year, 1673, previous to the 
visit of the " Zeehond," the Southampton people addressed a let- 
ter to the New England colonies, setting forth the demand of the 
Dutch to surrender to the arms of the Prince of Orange, and 



64 HlSTORY OF SOUTHAMPTON. 

their deplorable situation, and the necessity through their weak- 
ness, to submit to these demands, this declaration serving to re- 
move any odium attaching to their sudden and unwished for 
change of allegiance. On the receipt of this John Winthrop, 
Major of the .Connecticut militia, was sent with such force as 
could be spared in a vessel to Southold, to assist the Long Island 
people. *February 25, 1673-4, Major Winthrop writes from 
Southold of a spirited engagement between his forces and the 
" Snow," a Dutch ship, with one ketch and two sloops, who first 
summoned the town of Southold to" surrender. Upon this Major 
Winthrop in command replied : 

" Sir : . . . I am here appointed by the authority of his 
Majesty's colony of Connecticutt, to secure these people, in obe- 
dience to his Majesty and by God's assistance I hope to give a 
good account thereof, and you may assure yourself that I will re- 
ceive you in the same condition as a person that disturbs his 
Majestys subjects." 

Captain John Howell, with forty soldiers from Southampton, 
and twenty from East Hampton, came promptly at the summons 
of Major Winthrop for assistance, and took part in this engage- 
ment. The Dutch withdrew their forces and the last that was 
seen of them the vessels were on their return passage through 
"PlummeGutt." 

But their High Mightinesses were soon compelled to surrender a 
second time the province of New York to the English crown. It 
was in July, 1673, that Captain Manning, commander of Fort 
James, in the absence of Governor Lovelace, made the surrender 
of New York to the Dutch, and November 10, 1674, the Dutch 
Governor Colve again surrendered it to Edmund Andros, in be- 
half of the King of England. Thus closes the history of the 
civil changes of the town down to the war of the revolution. 

Here it may be proper to relate one incident that grew out of 
the English repossession of New York, illustrating the high and 
mighty way persons in authority in those days were apt to deal 
with their subjects. As soon as the new Governor, Andros was 
firmly in his seat at New York, to increase his revenues he turns 



* Winthrop Papers, Mass. Hist. Coll., 3 s. vol. 10, p. 



Civil Relations. 65- 

on the Long Islanders and demands that the three easternmost 
towns shall take out new patents for their lands from himself. In 
response they unite in sending him the following letter, found on 
record in the State archives at Albany, Council Minutes, vol. 3, 
pt. 2, p. 7. 

" To his Honour Edmund Andros, Esq., Governor of New 
York ; 

" The humble retiirne to your letters (directed unto us, the 
subscribed) by order and advice of the three eastermost towns on 
Long Island. 

" May it please your Hono r Being informed by yo r Hon™ Let- 
ter of Novemb r 5th, that the Much desired reestablishment of his 
Ma tys Authority at New Torke to the dispossessing tht Insulting 
forraigner, is at length accomplished, by y r Hon™ Happy arrival, 
the which we heartily congratulate, and seeing by virtue of yo r 
Hon rs Receipt of tht place & Government in behalf of his Mat 7 
from the Dutch, demand is made of these three Towns in Re- 
establishing the Constable & Overseers, which were in place of 
trust amongst us when the Dutch came to Fort James in July 
1673, with all due Respect to y r Hon r be pleased to understand 
tht although Fort James was not faithfully kept for his Ma ty but 
unmanlike delivered to his and our Enimyes, whereupon the poor 
naked unheeded people of severall Townes were forced to sub- 
ject unto or suffer the fury of the Dutch, yet his Ma tys Loyall Sub- 
jects in these three Townes, putting their lives in their hands, 
with expence of great part of their poor Estates to his Mat ys ser- 
vice, back'd with the undenyable Demontration of ojj (now) asso- 
ciate Cordyall Affection, o r very loving Neighbours of his Mat yB ' 
Colony of Connecticott, Succeeded by the blessing of almighty 
God they never were in the Power of the Dutch, either to be 
Challenged as conquered by them, or to bee delivered to y* Hon 1 " 
now, o r Instrumental Saviours haveing in our Extremity not only 
Protected us, also Governed us, Establishing and Commissionate- 
ing officers here, both Civill and Military. To whom also we 
are engaged by the Oath of God, and formerly by Patent privi- 
ledge, by his Mat ys Expresse Grannte, wee cannot either in civil- 
ity or in faithfullnesse doe more or less without application to 
these his Mat yB substitutes that were so ready to take us up when 
his Royall Highnesse Lieutenant had left us miserable without 
either Aide or Councell, Starre or Compasse to be vassulaged, 
would we have suffered o r selves (as they) to have been huf t out 
of our Loyalty, Priviledge and Substance by an Insulting 
Enimy, but wee would not be too Tedious, which might abuse. 

9 



%q History of Southampton. 

yo r Hon 13 patience. Praying alway for ye health and happynesse 
of our Gracious Soveraigne, his most Excellent Majesty of Great 
Britaine, desiring yo r Hon rs compleat Felicity in your enjoyment. 
"Which is all at present from yo r Hon™ very humble Servants. 

JOHN" MULFORD, 
JOHN HOWELL, 
JOHN YOUNGS. 

Southold, November ye 18th, An 1674. 

" Hereupon ye Governor desired the advice of ye aforenamed 
Persons [the members of his Council] what Course was best to 
be taken for ye effectual asserting and settling his Matys and Eo 11 
Highnesse Authority in these three Towns, pursuant to his Mat ys 
Letters Pattents, & his Royall Highnesse Commission then pro- 
duced, authorizing him thereunto. 

"It was unnanimously advised: That the Governor should 
with all Expedicon dispatch an Expresse with reiterated orders to 
ye said Towns, for the Admission and resettling of ye Constables 
and Overseers in their places forthwith as directed in the former 
Orders, and for default to be declared rebells and prosecuted ac- 
cordingly. 

" That ye Governor by ye same Expresse send an Order com- 
manding John Mulford, John Howell and John Young, who 
signed ye said Letter forthwith to make their personall appear- 
ance before him at New Yorke, to give an account of ye said Let- 
ter, and make answer to wht may be objected against them. The 
which if they do not do presently Obey to be declared Rebells, 
and proceeded against accordingly ; as also all others within this 
Government who may or shall presume to abett or assist them in 
such Rebellious practices ag st his Mat 73 and Royall Highness Au- 
thority, to incurre the like penalty. All which, after mature de- 
liberation, was resolved on and accordingly ordered by the Gov- 
ernor." 

So far the Minutes of Council. In desiring to engage in the 
business of reissuing patents, Governor Andros, and after him 
Governor Dongan, only did on a small scale what their sovereigns 
had been doing and did all the time — that is, to issue to com- 
pany after company of applicants, or to some royal relative or fa- 



Civil Relations. 67 

vorite, patents for the same land over and over again. Thus the 
charter of Connecticut gave to that colony the land west of the 
Connecticut river to the present boundary of New York ; and the 
charter of New York, given in 1664, grants to that colony the 
tract of land eastward to the Connecticut river. So long as the 
golden stream continued to flow into the royal revenues, however, 
it mattered little to the monarch how his subjects in distant 
America settled their disputes growing out of these conflicting 
grants. Doubtless Charles the Second looked upon it all as a 
good joke. However, to complete this episode in the history of 
the three towns, we may add, they were compelled to obey the 
Governor's mandate and take out new patents. And soon after, to 
answer the many charges against him of malfeasance of ofSce, 
their lofty master was himself put under arrest and sent back to 
England, and another reigned in his stead. 



68 HlSTOEY OF SOUTHAMPTON. 



CHAPTER VI. 

DUBING THE BEVOLUTIONAEY "WAS OCCUPATION BY THE BBITISH 

PEBSONAL INCIDENTS COLONIES SOLDIEBS IN THE SLAVE- 

HOLDEES BEBELLION. 

Dueing the Revolutionary war the people of Suffolk county 
were exposed to peculiar hardships. So remote from the field of 
operations, it was a region strategically not worth defending, but 
by its wealth of forage and stock well worth the attention of the. 
enemy while in occupation of New York. Until recently it has 
not been known how extensively the inhabitants participated in 
the actual struggle in the field, nor has another element in the 
history of the Island during this period been estimated at its due 
importance in influencing the condition of the people. This was the 
oath of allegiance to the British crown exacted by Governor Tryon 
of the islanders, and will be referred to presently in the course of 
the narrative. There are four factors in the history of the war in 
Long Island, or four several points to be treated in writing this 
history. The first is the prelimirary steps showing the spirit 
with which they entered into the contest. Second, the battle of 
Long Island overthrowing all the plans of the inhabitants and of 
the commanding officer for the protection of the Island. Third, 
the oath of allegiance that sent all that could get away into exile 
within our lines on the main, chiefly in Connecticut, it being under- 
stood that a liberal representation were fighting in the field. 
Fourth, occupation by the British for seven long years while 
the land was plundered by friend and foe. In the first place 
the people of English descent on the Island were intensely loyal 
to freedom and the cause of independence. Taking Southampton 
and East Hampton as examples of the patriotic feeling generally 
pervading the east end of the Island, we learn from the records in 
the office of the Secretary of State of New York * just what was 
done in those first days that ushered in the war of independence. 



* Calendar of historical MSS. relating to the war of the Kevolution, published in 1868. 



During the Revoltjttonaey Wak. 69 

As early as the summer of 1775, associations were formed through- 
out the county composed of the male inhabitants capable of bear- 
ing arms, from 16 to 50 years of age, the members of which pledged 
themselves to the support of the measures of the provincial con- 
gress, and the union of the American colonies to resist the oppres- 
sion of the British government. Every male inhabitant in East 
Hampton and Southampton signed his name to this instrument of 
association. In Southampton two or three hesitated at first, but soon 
joined with their neighbors in this pledge of resistance to the claims 
of royalty. As the signs of war became more ominous this feeling 
crystallized in the formation of two regiments, whose services were 
ready at the call of their country. April 5, 1776, the First 
Regiment of Suffolk county reported thirteen companies, 1030 
men, officers and privates, made up from the county west and 
north of Southampton. February 10, 1776, the Second Regiment 
reported nine companies, 760 officers and privates, of whom East 
Hampton furnished two companies, Bridge Hampton two, Sag 
Harbor and Bridge Hampton jointly two, and Southampton three 
companies. Bridge Hampton doubtless furnished as many as 
three companies. In addition to these, Bridge Hampton, East 
Hampton and Southampton furnished a company of minute men 
to act as a home guard. The staff officers of the Second Regiment 
were David Mulford, Colonel ; Jonathan Hedges of Bridge Hamp- 
ton, Lieut-Colonel and Uriah Rogers and George Herrick of 
Southampton, Majors ; Adjutant, John Gelston ; Quar. Master, 
Phineas Howell ; Sergt. Major, Lemuel Pierson ; Drum Major, 
Elias Matthews. This was the first step, the preliminary work to 
the fast coming contest. 

When G-eneral Sir "William Howe awoke one morning and 
saw that General Washington had during the night occupied and 
fortified Dorchester Heights which commanded Boston and its 
harbor, he saw that for the time being New England was lost. He 
accordingly sailed away with all his forces to Halifax, pre- 
liminary to moving on New York. Washington divined his plans, 
and sent a large body of troops who were posted, some in the city 
and some, the largest body, on Long Island in the rear of Brook- 



70 PIistory of South ampton. 

lyn. guarding the approaches to the city. Four days after the land- 
ing of the troops of General Howe on Staten Island, his brother, 
Admiral Richard Howe, arrived with reinforcements, and then 
the American army of 9,000 troops was confronted with the Brit- 
ish and Hessians to the number of 30,000. The British, under 
General Clinton, landed 10,000 troops in the rear of the Americans 
on Long Island, and marched upon them in three divisions. On 
the 27th of August, 1776, the opposing forces met and began the 
famous battle of Long Island, so disastrous to the cause of the 
patriots, and one that was lost through the neglect to fortify or 
guard one of the approaches to the American position. 

In this battle were engaged, besides the two Long Island regi- 
ments before mentioned, two other bodies of troops, as follows : 

A regiment of minute men, whose officers were, Col., Josiah Smith, of 
Moriches ; Lieut. -Col., John Hulbert, of East Hampton ; 1st Major, Isaac 
Eeeve, of Southold ; 2d Major, Jonathan Baker, of East Hampton ; Adj., 
Ephraim Marvin; Qr. Mr., Ebenezer Dayton, of East Hampton. 

East Hampton Company. 

Capt., Ezekiel Mulford ; 1st Lieut., John Miller; 2d Lieut., Nathaniel 
Hand. Commissioned February 23, 1776. 

First Southampton Company. 

Capt., Zephaniah Kogers ; 1st Lieut., Nathaniel Howell, Jr. ; 2d Lieut. r 
Matthew Sayre. Commissioned February 23, 1776. 

Second Southampton Company. 

Capt., David Pierson; 1st Lieut., John Foster, Jr.; 2d Lieut., Abraham 
Rose ; Ensign, Edward Topping. Commissioned February 23, 1776. 

First Southold Company. 

Capt., John Bay ley; 1st Lieut., Joshua Toungs ; 2d Lieut., John Tuthill; 
Ensign, James Reeves. Commissioned May 3, 1776. 

Second Southold Company. 

Capt., Paul Reeves; 1st Lieut., John Corwin; 2d Lieut., David Horton; 
Ensign, Nathaniel Hodson. Commissioned May 3, 1776. 



During the Revolutionary War. 71 

Brookhaven, Smithtown, Manor of St. George and Moriches 

Company. 

Capt., Selah Strong; 1st Lieut., William Clark: 2d Lieut., Caleb Brewster; 
Ensign, Nath'l Brewster. Commissioned April 4, 1776. 

May 30, 1776, a return of this regiment gives Isaac Overton, 
2d Major, vice Baker, and Captain, Nathaniel Piatt, vice Selah 
Strong. 

The second military organization was an Artillery Company at- 
tached to Col. Smith's Minute Regiment, the officers of which 
were as follows • 

Capt., William Rogers, of B. H.; Capt. Lieut., John Franks; 1st Lieut., 
Jeremiah Rogers; 2d Lieut., Thomas Baker, of E. H. ; Lt. Fireworker, John 
Tuthill. 

The rosters of these military bodies have never been published 
excepting that of Col. Smith in Munsell's History of ISTew York, 
and it is not known whether they are in existence. 

A third regiment of Suffolk county is mentioned and commis- 
sions were issued to its officers, but no roster has been found. 

There is a paper in the archives of the State Library indorsed 
" Return of the names of the persons for officers of the Second 
Battalion in Suffolk county, taken according to the directions of 
the Provincial Congress by the committees of East Hampton and 
Southampton." 

I suppose this to be the list of the commissioned officers of the 
Second Regiment whose staff officers were before mentioned, but 
of the regiment as reconstructed after the battle of Long Island. 
The list is as follows : 

First Company. 

Capt., David Howell ; 1st Lieut., Jeremiah Post ; 2d Lieut., Paul Jones ; 
Ensign, Zephaniah Rogers. 

Second Company. 

Capt., John Dayton ; 1st Lieut., Isaac Mulford Huntting ; 2d Lieut., John, 
Miller, Jr. ; Ensign, William Hedges. 

Trtkd Company. 
Capt., David Pierson; 1st Lieut., Daniel Hedges; 2d Lieut., David Sayrej 
Ensign, Theophilus Pierson. 



72 Histoky of Southampton. 

Fourth Company. 
Capt., David Fithian; 1st Lieut., Samuel Conkling; 3d Lieut., Thomas Baker; 
Ensign, Daniel Conkling. 

Fifth Company. 
Capt., Stephen Howell; 1st Lieut, John White, Jr.; 2d Lieut., Lemuel 
Wick; Ensign, Isaac Halsey. 

Sixth Company. 
Capt., William Rogers; 1st Lieut., Jesse Halsey; 2d Lieut., Henry Halsey; 
Ensign, Nathaniel Rogers. 

Seventh Company. 

Capt., Josiah Howell; 1st Lieut., Nathaniel Howell; 2d Lieut., Matthew 
Howell; Ensign, William Stephens. 

Eighth Company. 

Capt., Samuel L'Hommedieu; 1st Lieut., Silas Jessup; 2d Lieut., Edward 
ConkliDg; Ensign, Daniel Fordham. 

Ninth Company. 
Capt., John Sandford; 1st Lieut., Edward Topping; 2d Lieut., Philip Howell; 
Ensign, John Hildreth. 

The officers above named of the " battalion " were commissioned 
September 13, 1775, and were composed of some of those of 
Colonel Smith's Minute Regiment which was disbanded as a regi- 
ment after the battle of Long Island, as it is reported, by the 
orders of "Washington, in order that such as was needed to protect 
their homes should return, and others as preferred could enlist 
under a new organization. 

The third element in the history of this war was the oath of 
allegiance exacted by Governor Tryon. This included the prom- 
ise not only to refrain from engaging actively in war, but also 
from furnishing any supplies to the American army and from 
harboring or assisting in any way those who were in the field. In 
short, as Rev. Dr. Buel of East Hampton wrote in bitter irony, they 
were " subjects of his Majesty, King George." Large numbers 
were compelled to remain for the support of their families. Many 
heads of families to avoid taking the oath of allegiance fled to 
Connecticut, and remained while their farms were tilled by slaves 



During the Revolutionary War. 73 

under the direction of the women or some neighbor who could 
not get away. These were frequently men past the age of bear- 
ing arms but utterly unwilling to take the oath of allegiance. Dr. 
Buel of East Hampton, in correspondence with Governor Tryon, 
made vigorous endeavors to mitigate the terms of this oath, but 
all his efforts seemed to be in vain. So revolting was it to the 
feelings of the people that tillage was neglected, and only enough 
land was cultivated to keep the inhabitants from starvation, while 
the heads of families above fifty years of age to escape insult and 
imprisonment of person and confiscation of property were com- 
pulsory exiles in a neighboring colony. Not all fled thither — not 
all could. Some had wives or sisters or daughters to protect, 
and some were too poor or too infirm to depart and were com- 
pelled to remain as " subjects of his Majesty King George." 
Mere neutrality did not satisfy the royal Governor. Not only the 
allegiance to the crown, but material aid in carrying on the war 
was demanded and taken. This brings us to the fourth element 
in the history, the British occupation from the battle of Long 
Island to the evacuation of New York city, November 25, 1783. 
During all this seven years the Island groaned under the oppressive 
occupation of their soil by the hostile invader. Their circumstances 
exposed them, however, to sufferings and outrages from both par- 
ties. Their forced submission to the Royal Army (their misfor- 
tune, not their fault), caused them to be viewed with suspicion by 
their brethren upon the continent, and often invited parties of 
plunder from that quarter. Multitudes fled for shelter and pro- 
tection to the shores of Connecticut. 

" Dr. Buell writes from E. Hampton, Sept'r 22, '76, that the 
People are as a torch on fire at both ends, which will speedily be 
consumed, for the Cont. Whiggs carry off their stock and pro- 
duce, and the British punish them for letting it go, — hopes the 
Whigs will not oppress the oppressed, but let the stock alone. 

" The history of that seven years' suffering will never be told. 
Philosophy has no adequate remedy for silent, unknown, unpitied 
suffering. . . . Left to the tender mercies of the foe ; plun- 
dered by countryman and stranger of their property and ripened 
harvest ; robbed of the stores which they reaped and garnered ; 
10 



74 Histokt or Southampton. 

slandered by suspicious brethren ; taunted and scoiied at by the 
mercenary victors, they never wavered. Their hearts were in 
their country's cause ; and in the memorable language of their 
great compatriot, ' sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish,' 
they were true to their country. Unterrified, unalterable, de- 
voted Americans." * 

Aside from these occasional raids, from friend and foe,, the 
winter of 1778-9 was memorable for the occupation of South- 
ampton by the British. A squadron of cavalry were quartered 
there, who, by their disregard to the rights of property and usages 
of war contrived to gain the ill-will of all the inhabitants. One 
old house standing in 1866 still bore marks on the kitchen floor 
of the axe of the British quartermaster. They constructed two 
or three small earth-works or forts overlooking , the. town, the es- 
carpments of one of which are still quite sharply defined. fThere 
were two small iron field pieces, carronades, in possession of the 
town, which the inhabitants, it is said, placed in the belfry of the 
church as weights to the town clock, to prevent them from falling 
into the hands of the enemy. It is certain one of them was re- 
moved thence in 1843, when the spire was demolished, and the 
other had been used for many years on the anniversaries of our 
nation's independence. 

Onderdonk, in his Revolutionary incidents of Suffolk and 
Kings counties, cites some of the newspapers of the day, which 
state that in February, 1779, fourteen companies of light infantry, 
700 men, were quartered at Southampton. In March the force 
was increased to 2,500 men by the coming of General Clinton with 
a body of troops. In April of the same year 500 foot and 50 
horse were in Southold, and 100 men and two field pieces at Sag 
Harbor. The number of men actually in possession was a vary- 
ing quantity, as the plans and circumstances chanced to determine. 

During the occupation by the British, such frequent calls for 
forage were made upon the farmers that sufficient food did not 
remain for their own stock. A kind Providence, however, pro- 

* Hon. Henry P. Hedges' Address at 200th anniversary of East Hampton, L. L, 1869. 
t These cannon had been probably in the possession of the town since 1691-1734, when arms 
were sent from New York to assist the people on the east end in repelling foreign privateers. 



Dtjeikg the Bevolutionaky Wab. 75 

vided for their wants. The frost came out of the ground early 
in February, and continuous warm weather brought out the grass 
abundantly, and their cattle were saved from starvation. 

However, the rigors of a military occupation were somewhat 
softened in Southampton by the presence of the commander-in- 
chief, Lord Erskine. He had his headquarters while remaining 
here in the house late the residence of "William S. Pelletreau. 
He was a man of integrity and even-handed justice and restrained 
to some degree the soldiers quartered in Southampton from com- 
mitting the depredations so common in the neighboring parish of 
Bridge Hampton. It is said that his coming here prevented the 
use of the church for stabling purposes, which was the design of 
the officer in command before Lord Erskine's arrival. At length, 
having become convinced of the injustice of the cause of Eng- 
land in her quarrel with the Colonies, he resigned his commission 
and returned to Europe. 

A Mr. Benjamin Foster, who resided in a locality known by 
the name of Littleworth, had one or more petty officers quartered 
in his house. He was a very devout man and not ashamed to own 
his Lord. One of these British officers one day asked him in 
derision to pray with him. Mr. Foster replied that he had regu- 
lar hours for prayer, and if he would come in the morning when 
the family were assembled for prayers he should be welcome. 
This the officer did, bringing with him a comarade to enjoy the 
proceeding. But his comrade soon divined the motive which led 
his brother in arms to such an unusual scene, and having at least 
a respect for religion and his worthy host, immediately after 
prayer took up a hymn book near him and read aloud : 

" If some proper hour appear, 
I'll not be overawed ; 
But let the scoffing Binner hear, 
That I can speak for God." 

Major Cochrane was the commanding officer at Bridge Hampton 
while the Island was occupied by the British. He is still remem- 
bered as a merciless tyrant. He once caused a peaceable and 
inoffensive man, William Bussell by name, to be tied up and 
whipped till the blood ran down to his feet, and this with no ade- 
quate provocation. As before remarked, the people of this parish 



76 Histoey of Southampton. 

suffered much from the lawless soldiery — not only from noc- 
turnal marauders, but from vandalism perpetrated in open day- 
light. Cattle were wantonly carried off, forage seized without 
payment, loose property appropriated and even furniture in their 
dwellings demolished. They came to the house of Mr. Lemuel 
Pierson and turned him out. Against their orders he was deter- 
mined to carry off some of his furniture, and although they stood 
over him with drawn sword, he persisted and gained his point. 
At another time they came to his house to secure any plunder that 
might offer itself. Mrs. Pierson was alone in the house with 
young children, but nothing daunted met them at the door with 
a kettle of hot water and threatened to scald the first man who 
attempted to enter her doors ; and the British, thinking discre- 
tion the better part of valor, quietly retreated. 

At another time a number of British soldiers, with blackened 
faces and coats turned inside out, came at night to the house of 
Mr. Edward Topping. Mr. Topping was awakened by their 
noise, and, seizing his gun, ran to defend his castle from the 
intruders. A window was raised from the outside and a man 
appeared about to make an entrance. Mr. Topping commanded 
him to retire and threatened to shoot if he persisted. No atten- 
tion was paid to his warning, however, and, as the man was climb- 
ing in, he shot, and the soldier fell back dead. He was carried 
off by his comrades, and the next morning word was sent to Gen. 
Erskine at Southampton. He came over to Bridge Hampton, in- 
vestigated the affair, and having learned the facts, said to the 
British soldiers around him : " Is that one of your best men ? 
Dom him, (kicking the body,) take him down to the ocean and 
bury him below high water mark." And so ended the affair, 
which under Major Cochrane might have had for Mr. Topping a 
more tragical termination. 

David Hand of this Township, residing in Sag Harbor, was a 
sailor both in privateers and vessels of the navy during the Bevo- 
lution. He experienced with many others, the horrors of the 
Jersey prison ship. On one occasion a small frigate of the navy 
was captured after a short action by a British vessel of superior 
armament, off the harbor of Charleston. Being a carpenter he 



During the Revolutionary War. 77 

was detailed to make repairs on the prize with promise of pay by 
the English commander. After the repairs were completed, he 
was taken in a boat to the British frigate. When about half way 
between the two vessels, at a signal from the coxswain, the oars 
were hove up, and after a fruitless struggle on his part, his clothes 
were taken by the sailors and divided among them. On their 
arrival at the British vessel, he marched up to the commander 
and demanded restitution of his clothing, but gained no further sat- 
isfaction than a surly, " Go and find them — I have got nothing to 
do about that." He then asked for his promised pay for repairs 
of the American frigate, and he was equally unsuccessful. Com- 
pletely disgusted with the " perfidious Albion," he said to the 
captain : "All I ask now is, to begin at your taffrail rail, and 
fight the whole ship's crew forward, and die like a man." The 
captain, of course, paid no attention to this, and he was ordered 
forward among the other prisoners. Having survived all the 
dangers of the war, he lived long, a man of note and respectability, 
honored by his fellow citizens for his bravery and manly virtues. 

Thomas and Abraham, sons of Ethan Halsey, also served in the 
war of the Revolution. 

It has been impossible up to this date to ascertain the number 
of men of the east end, who served in the Revolutionary war, 
but the number was considerable. Captain Henry Halsey, of 
Southampton, informed the writer that his grandfather, Jesse 
Halsey, and another man, on hearing the news of the battle of 
Lexington, and the movement of the British forces on Boston, at 
once started for the scene of action. Leaving their horses at Sag 
Harbor, they crossed over to New London in a small vessel, and 
from there marched to Boston where they arrived just at the close 
of the battle of Bunker Hill. They then joined the Continental 
army, and Halsey, at least, served through the war, part of the 
time as captain. He was 'present, standing near General Lee at 
the battle of Monmouth, when Washington rode up in terrible 
indignation, and, rising in his stirrups, thundered out : " In the 
name of God, Lee, what do you mean ? " The old revolutionary 
hero often spoke of it, and was certain of the language used by 
General Washington. Two other townsmen were in this battle, 



tfg Histoby of Southampton. 

and did service during the war — John and Elias Pelletreau, the 
sons of Captain Elias Pelletreau. This town also furnished four 
surgeons for the war of the Revolution, Henry White, Shadrack 
Hildreth, William Burnett, and Silas Halsey. 

Among the celebrities of these times was a negro slave by the 
name of Pompey, owned by the Mackie family. He was born in 
the colonies, was shrewd, a man of good sense, of much force of 
character, always ready for a joke and very apt to perpetrate one 
at the expense of another. Many characteristic 6tories of his do- 
ings are handed down, of which we give a few. 

Some dragoons were quartered on his master in 1778. Consid- 
ering himself insulted on one occasion, and doubtless with good 
reason by some of them, he mixed pounded glass with the feed 
of some of their horses, so that quite suddenly a number were 
found dead in their stalls. Pomp, who was cross-examined, ex- 
pressed profound ignorance of the misfortune and thus the matter 
ended. 

On another occasion he had a difficulty with a soldier who in- 
terfered with his barnyard arrangements. The dragoon drew his 
sword, but Pomp charged and routed him from the field with his 
pitchfork. 

One saying of his has become proverbial in this region. Mr. 
Mackie had a horse which being wholly in charge of Pomp, was 
pampered with good care and light work. One day the horse 
drawing a load refused duty, and suddenly stopped in tbe middle 
of the road. This was too much to be borne ; accordingly Pomp 
provided himself with a stout cudgel, marched up to the horse, 
and, shaking the stick in his face, said, " Well, old horse, if you 
won't bear prosperity, you'll have to try advarsity," and thereat 
he gave him a severe drubbing — and it is said, " Advarsity made 
the mare go." On another occasion he was at work for some one 
in the neighborhood and was invited by his employer to ask a 
blessing at the dinner table. Pomp observed a skunk served up 
to his great disgust. He complied with the request however, in 
part, asking the Lord to bless the bread, but to curse the skunk. 

This little town, besides sending out pioneers singly all over 
the United States, has even sent off its colonies at various times 



Dueing the Revolutionary "Was. 79 

in its history. The first of these was a few years after the settle- 
ment, when the Rev. Abraham Pierson was directed by the Asso- 
ciation in Connecticut to remove to Branford of that State. 
Quite a number accompanied him, and some even when after- 
ward he again removed to New Jersey where with others he 
founded the town of Elizabeth. 

The next colony was one that founded and settled the sister 
town of East Hampton in 1649. That this is true, however con- 
trary to the common impression, is evident by comparing the list 
of the settlers of East Hampton as given in Hedges' address with 
personal and genealogical notices throughout this volume. Of 
the names there given the following were known to have been 
previously residents of Southampton : John Hand, Thomas Tal- 
mage, Daniel Howe, Thomas Thomson, John Stratton, Robert 
Bond, Robert Rose, Joshua Barnes, John Mulford, "William 
Hedges, Ralph Dayton, Thomas Chatfield, William Simonds 
Eulke Davis, Nathaniel Bishop, William Barnes, Jeremiah Yeale, 
John Miller (?) Richard Shaw and Jeremiah Meacham. Besides 
these only nine heads of families are found in the list of the East 
Hampton colonists. These may have come from the two colonies 
of New Haven and Connecticut as Governors Eaton and Hopkins 
united in purchasing the land of this town from the Indians. 

Considerable numbers also removed from time to' time to New- 
Jersey, during the first hundred years dating from the settlement. 
The Southampton family names are found scattered all over the 
State. Quite a strong colony went out to Blooming Grove, 
Orange county, N. Y., about 1760. 

Another colony, strougly represented by Southampton and 
East Hampton families, was that of Achter Kol or Feversham or 
Elizabethtown, New Jersey, which settlement had successively 
all of these names. Among the inhabitants who took the oath of 
allegiance in Elizabethtown in 1665, February 19, and again 
about 1714, were the following :* 

1665. 
John Ogden, Sen., Jeremy Osborne, 

JohnOgden, Jun., Joseph Osborne, 



* Hatfield's Hist, of Elizabeth, pp. 56, 57. 



gO Histoby of Southampton. 

John Woodrofe, David Ogden 

Jonas Wood, Jonathan Ogden, 

Thomas Pope, Benj. Price, 

Thos. Tomson, Benj. Conklin, 

Moses Tomson, Bob. Bond, 

John Haynes, Joseph Bond, 

Caleb Carwithy, Isaac Whitehead. 
William Oliver, 

1714. 

Joseph Sayre, John Pope, 

Jonas Wood, Will. Oliver, 

Caleb Carwithy, Richard Painter, 

Stephen Osborne, Francis Barber. 
Joseph Osborne, 

About the year 1800 another emigration went out from South- 
ampton to Montrose, Penn. Bartlett Haines or Hinds, originally 
from Boston, but from Southampton, in 1800 married Agnes, the- 
widow of Isaac Post, and removed with her and her two sons, 
Isaac and David Post, to what is now Montrose — then a wilder- 
ness. Both of these boys lived to rear families themselves, whose 
descendants now live there. 

Among others, Daniel Poster, Ichabod Halsey and David Har- 
ris went there about the same time. Isaac P. Foster removed 
there in 1811. Austin Howell, "William Foster, Francis Fordham 
and Abraham Fordham in 1812. 

Benjamin Sayre, a native of Southampton, went to Montrose 
from Cairo, 1ST. Y., with his wife Priscilla and six children about 
this time also.' 

Judge "William Jessup, born June 21, 1797, graduate of Tale 
1815, married 1820 to Amanda Harris, emigrated there later. 
He died September 11, 1868, honored alike in church and State. 

From a sermon of Kev. Horace Eaton, of Palmyra, N. Y., we 
give the following extract concerning another Southampton 
Colony. 

" In 1788 a company was formed of eleven, in Southampton, 
Long Island. In the early spring of 1790, Elias Reeves and Joel 
Foster took their way to the far west, as their agents, — first to 
Fort Pitt, now Pittsburg, where they found Luke Foster, an ac- 
quaintance. Together they penetrated to the vast wilderness of 
Yirginia, to the Ohio, and passed down to Fort "Washington, now 
Cincinnati. There they purchased land on what was called Tur- 



During the Revolutionary War. 81 

key Bottoms. They left Luke Foster to build and make prepara- 
tion while they returned to conduct the colony to their forest 
home. 

" But a singular circumstance turned the locality and the future 
history of the projected immigration. When Joel Foster and Elias- 
Reeves, arrived at Long Island, they found William Hopkins, an 
uncle of Elias Reeves, and Abraham Foster on a visit from New- 
Jersey. Hopkins was a son of the Hon. Stephen Hopkins, whose 
trembling hand stands so prominent among the signers of the Dec- 
laration. William Hopkins had been connected with the ' Leasee 
Company,' was acquainted with the Genesee country and saw its 
prospective importance. He urged upon his friends the value of a 
God-fearing community. He told them of the colonies from New 
England, that they were descendants from the Puritans, with 
principle and purpose congenial with their own. His arguments- 
prevailed. The company relinquished the purpose of settling on 
the Ohio — and directed Elias Reeves and William Hopkins to 
pass by the northern route, beyond the military Tract, while Joel 
Foster, Abraham Foster, and Luther Sandford were to explore 
along the boundaries of Pennsylvania. The Fosters and Sandford 
started June, 1791, but found the country mountainous and forbid- 
ding. Being carpenters, on consideration of good wages, they stop- 
ped at a place called Lindley town, and engaged in the erection of 
mills, leaving the work of exploration to Reeves and Hopkins, 
who, on the 20th of August, 1791, left Long Island with their 
rifles and knapsacks, came by water to Albany — then on foot,, 
following the Indian trails to Geneva, — thence to town ' No. 12 ' 
[afterward called Swiftown — then Tolland —and finally, Pal- 
myra]. These valleys were well watered. The height and 
strength of the trees were an exponent of the depth and richness 
of the soil. They resolved to try the effect of hard work and 
honest principles upon a region more luxuriant than that from, 
which they came. Upon the tall maples and the sturdy oaks, they 
placed their names as a pre-emption mark. This done, Hopkins 
and Reeves made their way across the State to the Pennsylvania, 
line, where they found Joel Foster, Abraham Foster and Luther' 
Sanford. There they drew and signed the following bond : 
11 



82 History of Southampton. 

" This instrument of writing witnesseth, that Wm, Hopkins, of 
the State of New Jersey, Elias Reeves, Joel Foster, Abraham 
Foster and Luther Sanford, all of the State of New York, do agree 
and bind themselves severally each to the other, under the penalty 
of fifty pounds, to abide by and make good any purchase of land 
which Elias Reeves and Abraham Foster shall make of Oliver 
Phelps, Esq., or any other person, within twenty days from the 
date hereof. The proportion of land which each of us shall have 
is to be concluded among ourselves hereafter. In witness of all 
which we have hereunto set our hands and seals in Ontario County, 
State of New York, this ninth day of September, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety one. 

"William Hopkins, 
"Elias Reeves, 
" Joel Fostee, 
" Abraham Foster, 
" Luther Sanford." 

After concluding this engagement, all, save Elias Reeves and 
Abraham Foster, returned to the Island. These made their way 
back to " No. 12," stopping at the house of one Crittenden, resid- 
ing in the " Old Castle," at Geneva. From him they received a 
peck of apples, the fruit of the old Indian Orchard, as a present 
to John Swift. [Swift was the " first pioneer " in Palmyra, and 
had bought the land of the town, though it was not then entirely 
paid for.] When they arrived they were offered some of the 
apples. They craved only the seeds, and proceeding to a beautiful 
bluff on the farm now owned by Gen. Lyman Reeves, they planted 
them, which proved the first bearing orchard west of Geneva. 
Having selected then- lauds, they contracted with Phelps at Can- 
andaigna, for five thousand five hundred acres, for eleven hundred 
pounds, New York currency, one hundred of which they paid 
down. It will be noticed this was in September, 1791. The 
Durfee family had not yet arrived. As Swift could not meet his 
engagements, his title was doubtful. Hence, Reeves and Foster, 
to make the thing sure, treated with Phelps and Gorham directly. 
But when Gideon and Edward Durfee arrived, his hard money 
met the hard times, and Swift was enabled to pay his notes, and 
received a genuine title to the town. Hence we find the Long 
Island Company the next year taking their deed from John Swift. 

" Having viewed the land, the spies returned, bringing back, 



During the Revolutionary Wae. 83 

all of them, like Caleb and Joshua, a good report. This enter- 
prise was not a failure. The coming winter, Joel Foster built a 
sail boat, Cyrus Foster making the nails, and launched it on 
Heddy Creek, near Southampton. After a well-spent Sabbath, 
on Monday morning the 4th of April, 1792, the first colony, from 
Long Island, embarked on their voyage of nearly five hundred 
miles. They sailed through the sound * to New York, then to 
Albany : from Albany they transported their boat by land 16 
miles to Schnectady — with ' setting poles ' pushed the boat up 
the Mohawk to Rome. There the boat was taken from the 
Mohawk and conveyed by land something less than a mile, to 
Wood creek, thence floating down to Oneida Lake — through 
the lake and the outlet they came to Oswego River ; thence into 
Seneca River — through that to Clyde River — from Clyde River 
through Mud Creek to Saw-mill Creek, landing near the present 
residence of Hiram Foster. The whole voyage occupied twenty- 
eight days. Mrs. Joel Foster brought in her arms her eldest son, 
Harry Foster, then an infant of eleven months. 

" The way now being open, the same old hive sent out repeated 
swarms of working bees. The Clarks, Posts, Howell s, Jaggers, 
Culvers, Jessups and many others followed. ' The wilderness and 
the solitary place were glad for them.' This old boat did good 
service in going and returning, with other companies, as they ar- 
rived from Long Island at Schenectady. It was finally conveyed 
around to Seneca Lake, and used as a pleasure boat. Truly a 
noble craft ! I would go as far to see that old boat as the ship in 
which Dr. Kane penetrated the frozen North." 

Besides this colony others removed to Seneca county, N Y., 
and still others to Susquehanna county, Pa., about the beginning 
of this century. Among the latter was the Hon. William Jessup 
of Montrose, who beginning his career in his new home, rose to 
eminence and obtained a name honored widely both in church 
and State. 

Upon the discovery of gold in California, of course for a peo- 
ple who had lived like the Yikings of the north upon the sea 

* An error — they went by the bays along the south shore of the Island. 



84 History of Southampton. 

(but not like them by plunder), and engaged in the perilous en- 
terprise of whale fishery, who had circumnavigated the world, a 
trip to the mines of the modern Ophir was a trifling matter.: Con- 
sequently, besides a large company who purchased a ship, and in 
the winter of 1849-50, set sail from Greenport for San Fran- 
cisco, others followed in their footsteps from time to time, some 
of whom found there a home and some unhappily a grave. 

New Toek Annex. 

The fact that the shores of Southampton are the first coming 
from the west, to border directly on the ocean, and its beauty, 
healthfuluess and the high tone of morality pervading the place, 
all have combined to induce a large settlement of the people of 
New York seeking a country residence for the summer. The 
first to come here was a grandson of the Rev. David S. Bogart, 
before mentioned. Mr. Leon D. DeBost with his older brothers 
had spent his boyhood days here and about 1872, purchased a lot 
of Mr. Win. S. Pelletreau and built a residence. The impulse to 
a settlement, however, was given by Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, a 
well known successful physician of the city. His residence was 
built in 1877 and annually thereafter house after house has been 
erected. Though styled cottages they are of liberal dimensions, 
often finished in hard woods and elegant without and within. 
They have all two full stories and most of them have parlors on 
each side of a central hall. In general terms they belong to the 
Queen Anne style of architecture though no two are similar in 
appearance. 

A.t the time of writing this, September, 1886, nearly all the 
land bordering upon the ocean has been purchased and occupied 
by the Annex. Lawn tennis grounds were given by Dr. Thomas 
for this amusement and daily through the summer months young 
men and maidens are seen in friendly competition for the highest 
score. The people of the Annex have united with the villagers 
in a Tillage Improvement Society and the name is justified in 
the results of their labors through the streets and about the resi- 
dences of the inhabitants. 



New York Annex. 



85 



The names of such as have cottages here, or are understood to 
have such erected soon, are as follows : 



Mrs. David Babcock, 

Francis M. Bacon, 

A. H. Barney, 

Charles T. Barney, 

F. B. Beck with, M. D„ 

C. Wyllys Betts, 

Frederic H. Betts, 

Judge John R. Brady, 

A. T. Bricher, 

Nehemiah B. Cook, 

Duncan Cryder, 

Miss Julia Chalmers, 

Leon D. De Bost, 

James G. Duer. 

Mrs. Henrietta W. Fondey 

J. B. Gemmill, 

Sidney S. Harris, 

Judge Henry B. Howland, 

Edward H. Kendall, 

Mrs. D. T. Kennedy, 

Judge J. T. Kilbreth, 

J. Bowers Lee, 

Henry A. Lewis, 

Messrs. Lombard & Ayres, Water. 

mill, 
George F. Lough, 



J. Lawrence McKeever, 

Thos. M. Markoe, M. D., 

Edward S. Meade, 

Edward Mitchell, 

U. A. Murdock, 

Mrs. Emily F. Nelson, 

Arthur J. Peabody, 

Senator J. Hampden Bobb, 

Elihu Root, 

Eugene B. Sanger, 

Mrs. C. N. Schermerhorn 

George B. Schieffelin, 

Richard L. Schieffelin, 

Louis P. Siebert, 

Mrs. Susanne A. Steers, 

G. H. Studwell, 

John A. Stuart, 

General Wager Swayne, 

T. Gaillard Thomas, M. D., 

Mrs. Chas. De Kay To wnsend . 

J. R. Townsend, 

Salem H. Wales, 

Miss Wheelwright, 

Wm. H. Wickam, 

James H. Toung. 



The following have become identified with the village by 
spending their summers there with their families : 



H. M. Bishop, 
T. B. Bowring 
R. H. Derby, 
F. A. Dwight, 
William Greenough, 
William S. Hoyt, 



J. C. Jackson, 
Edward H. Moeran, 
James F. Ruggles, 
Russell Sage, 
Mrs. Morgan Smith. 



SoLDIEES IN THE SlAVEHOLDEKS' REBELLION. 

The repeated demand for men to fill the armies and sustain the 
cause of freedom during the war of the Slaveholders' Rebellion, 
from 1861 to 1865, were met in a patriotic spirit by the people of 
Southampton. Her quotas were always promptly filled, either by 
her own sons or by substitutes which her wealth nrocured, as was 
customary throughout the country. 

The limits of this work will not permit a detailed list of the 
soldiers who served in this war, but a copy taken from the origi- 
nal returns of the census of 1865, now deposited in the New York 



86 Histoet of Southampton. 

State Library, will be deposited in the office of the town clerk at 
Southampton. This list shows that from the first election district, 
including that portion of Sag Harbor lying in the town, were sent 
forty-one soldiers. From the second district, Bridgehampton, fifty 
soldiers. From the third, Southampton village, thirty-one soldiers. 
From the fourth, including Groodground, etc., twenty-nine. From 
the fifth or westernmost district, eleven soldiers. Total, 162. 
Besides these the town procured a large number of substitutes. 



Civil Laws. 87 



CHAPTER VII. 

OTVTL LAWS COUKTS DECREES OE COURTS. 

"We have seen before how the jealous care for the liberties of 
the people resulted in the institution of the General Court, the 
fundamental idea of which was that the people, being the fountain 
of power, should be invested with it. We have also seen that for 
the government of the colony they enacted a code of laws founded 
on those of the Jewish Lawgiver. Besides these are found occa- 
sional regulations for temporary purposes scattered through the 
Records. And when the union with Connecticut occurred, they 
accepted its code of laws also, so far as they did not interfere 
with their own. Again when the Island came under the jurisdic- 
tion of New York, in 1664, they received a copy of laws from 
Governor Andros, which, of course, superseded all the former. 

Of course the execution of their laws must be committed into 
the hands of proper officers. The first of these were two and 
afterward three magistrates chosen annually. A record defining 
their functions is found, dated January 2, 1641, as follows : 

" The magistrates shall govern according to the laws now 
established and to be established by General Courts hereafter. 
They and either of them shall be able to send out warrants to any 
officer to fetch any delinquent before them, and examine the 
cause and to take order by sureties or safe custody for his or then- 
appearance at court. And further, to prevent the offenders lying 
in prison, it shall be lawful for the Magistrates or either of them 
to see execution done upon any offenders for any crime that is 
not capital according to the laws that [are] established or to be 
established in this place." 

The first town meeting on record was held April 6, 1641. 

By an order of the General Court, December 22, 1644, four 
quarter courts were to be held annually, commencing on the first 
Tuesdays in March and June, the third Tuesdays in September 
and the fourth Tuesday in December. These were the Magistrates' 



gg History of Southampton. 

Courts. At the same time it was ordered to hold an annual 
General Court on the first Tuesday of October for election of 

town officers. 

For many years this was the county seat of Suffolk county, and, 
of course, county courts were held here, concerning which the 
town records are silent. 

Townsmen. 

The office of " Townsmen " appears to differ from the Magi- 
stracy. Their duties embraced those that are now divided 
between the supervisor and assessors, as will be seen from the 
following : 

" Feb. 4th, 1664. John Jessup, Edward Howell and Henry 
Pierson were chosen Townesmen until the 6th of October next. 
During wh time they have given them, and are by the Towne 
authorized to make any rate or Levvy they shall see necessary, to 
use all lawfull means they shall see meet for getting in the debts 
due from any psou or psons unto the Towne, to make any law or 
order (tht contradicts not some former order made by the Towne) 
concerning fences or any other publique occasion, and to doe or act 
any thing wh in theire judgmnts may conduce to the Townes ad- 
vantage. And whatsoever they shall act or transact as afforesaid 
the Towne doe ratify & confirme and shall observe. Moreover 
the said select men setting up theire order or orders on the Meet- 
ing house poste at the beat of the drum the same shall bee, and 
bee accompted sufficient and lawfull publishmt thereof. The 
Towne beeing to defray the cost the said 3 men shall be at in 
the premises." 

The mere insertion of the orders and decrees of the General 
Court, while it preserves the records that are yearly growing more 
illegible, also, perhaps depicts more vividly than a narrative could 
possibly do the surrounding circumstances of our founders. No 
other apology is therefore needed for the following extracts : 

Freemen. 
" South™ this 8th of the 8th month, 1647. It is ordered by 
this generall Cort that if any man be chosen to be a freeman of 
this towne shall refuse it shall paye fortie shillings for his fine. 



Civil Laws. 89 

In the New Eng. Entries, Plantation office London, the quali- 
fications of a freeman in New England about 1680 are said to be 
as follows: A freeman must be orthodox, above 20 years old 
and worth about £200* But the latter qualification was not ex- 
acted in Southampton. 

" Imprimous, at this instant G-enerall Cort, that Eichard Odell 
Gentleman was chosen freeman and Edward Joanes Josias Stam- 
bro and John White. 

" It it ordered this 7 day of October 1648 by the Generall Court 
that Mr. Eichard Smyth, Mr. William Browne, John Howell were 
chosen Freemen of this towne of Southampton. 

" This 15 day of June 1649 Mr. Thurston Eayner is chosen 
ffreeman of this towne of Southampton at the generall Coort by 
the freemen. 

" It is ordered uppon the 6th day of March 1649 by the gen- 
erall Court that William Eogers is chosen freeman of the towne 
of Southampton. 

" It is ordered uppon the 31st day of March 1650 by the gen- 
erall courte that Mr. Thomas Topping & Mr. John Ogden were 
chosen freemen of this towne of Southampton aforesayde. 

''1652 October 6 Mr. Alexander ffeild, Christopher ffeild, 
Thomas Goldsmith and John Cooper Jim. were all and every of 
them chosen ffreemen of this Towne." 

Training. 

Jan., 1642. Ordered by the General Court that the " Com- 
pany of the Towne of Southampton shall be trayned sixe tymes in 
the yeare." All men from 16 years old upwards to bear arms unless 
licensed to the contrary, and if absent upon the calling of the 
roll to be fined two shillings. " Traynings are to beginn at seaven 
of the clock in the morning from the first of March to the last of 
September, then from the last of September to the first of March 
to beginn at eight of the clock in the morning." 

" Oct. 9, 1642. It is ordered that every man in this towne 
that beareth armes shall watch and ward and come to traynings in 
their coats. 

* Chalmer's Political Annals of the United Colonies to 1763, vol. 1, p. 435. 

12 



90 History of Southampton. 

" Oct. 9, 1642. It is ordered that whosoever shall be found 
sleeping after he hath taken the charge of the watch shall be lia- 
ble to the censure of 4 lashes of the whippe by the Marshall or 
else forthwith to pay 10 shillings." 

Measures for the Safety of the Town. 

" May 4, 1657. It is ordered by the seven men empowered to 
devise and take means to preserve the town — that one half of the 
Inhabitants of this town shall keep centinell or ward in the town 
according as they shall be disposed by officers for that purpose for 
one day — and the other half of the Inhabitants shall have liberty 
to goe about their planting or occations, provided they goe to- 
gether and work soe neere together that in the judgment of those 
appoynted by a centinell, the company that soe goe forth may 
come together before any danger in respect of assault, as came 
upon them the other day, and so successively untill further order 
in this respect. And all those that soe goe forth are to have their 
armes with them, & it is left to Sergeant Post to see to and effect 
the aforesaid order. 

" It is further ordered that ye letting off of one gun ahall be 
sufficient Allarum in the night, and if there be any allarurn in the 
night, then all Inhabitants from ye North End of ye town to 
Thos. Sayres * shall repaire to about Mr. Gosmer's ; f all south- 
ward of Thos. Sayres unto ye lane by Kichard Barretts % shall 
repaire to the Meeting House § ; and all from thence to the south 
end of the Town to repaire to about Thos. Halsey Senior his 
house || : — none to make a wilf ull false allarum upon penalty of be- 
ing whipped. And in case there be an allarum and a man hear- 
ing it yet appeareth not to his appoynted place, as aforesaid, 
shall forfeit to the town the some of 5 shillings. 

" Jan. 30, 1667. It is ordered by the Constable and overseers 
together with the inhabitants of the Towne that if any pson soever 

*Thos. Sayre lived where is yet the homestead ol his descendant, Mrs. Sarah S. Larry. 

t The homestead of Chas. Pelletreau, deceased, now of Mr. Josiah Foster. 

X Toilsome lane. 

§ The church was on what is now the homestead of Mr. Edwin Post. 

1 This was probably (for this and other reasons) on Horse-mill lane, which ran from the 
main street to the town pond, and about 30 01 40 rods south of the residence of Mr Francis 
Cook. 



Civil Laws. 91 

shall psume to make any ffalse alarum shall for his or there De- 
fault pay twenty shillings or to be severely whipt, and that noe 
pson pretend Ignorance. 

" It is concluded that one gunne being ffired off in the night 
after the watch is set shall be accompted an Allarum : Likewise 
three being sudenly ffired one after another in the day ; and all 
psons are hereby required to be very carcumspect herein upon 
there utmost perill ; Also that if any upon the watch shall at any 
tyme hereafter bee by such psons as are upon oath hereunto, 
appointed, found sleeping or any way careless shall pay unto the 
publick 20 shillings for any default. As witnesseth our hands." 

Land Allotted. 

" October 13, 1643. Thomas Burnett hath a lott granted unto 
him one the Southeast side upon Condition that hee staye three 
years in the Towne to improve it. 

" May 6, 1648. It is ordered that Thomas Eobbinson shall be 
accepted as an Inhabitan & hath a fifty pound lot granted vnto 
him prouided the said Thomas be not vnder any scandalous crime 
wh may be layd to his charge within 6 moneths after the date 
hereof & that he carry himself heare as becometh an honest man. 

" It is further ordered that Samuel Dayton shall be accepted an 
inhabitant & hath a fifty pound lot graunted unto him prouided 
the said Samuel (being a stranger to vs) weare of good aprobation 
in the place where he last lived at meshing & do demeane himselfe 
well here for the time of aprobation namely six months next to 

come. 

" May 12, 1648, Kobert Marden alias Marvin (elsewhere called 
Merwin) granted a £100 lot upon 3 months aprobation had of 

him. 

"Dec. 10, 1678. The Town give unto Christopher ffowler 
tenn accres of land in some convenient vacant place about or 
neare the land granted to Mr. John Laughton for his brother 
Josiah at the discretion of the layers out : he the said Christopher 
continuing upon it seaven yeares and improving it." 

This is the first mention in the Records of the Fowler family. 

'< Jan. 25, 1655. It is ordered that noe Inhabitant within the 



92 History of Southampton. 

boundes of this Towne shall sell his house and Land or any part 
thereof unto any pson tht is a forrainer at any time hence forward 
except the pson bee such as the Towne doe like of." 

Benevolence. 
In 1679-80 (March 11) at a time when money must have been 
very scarce, as the usual transactions in "country pay" or barter 
of agricultural produce was called, sufficiently indicate, the peo- 
ple of Southampton contributed a fund of £18, 15sh., as a " free- 
will offering towards the reliefe of the captives which is in slavery 
in Turkey." 

Thanksgiving. 
This custom of setting apart a day for public thanksgiving to 
the Almighty for the usual or extraordinary blessings experienced 
in their lives is found quite early. As we find in the MSS. records 
at Albany* Thus June 7, 1675, and Febuary 8, 1676-7, were 
appointed as days of Thanksgiving and prayer by Governor An- 
dros. 

Voting Enfoeced. 
" October 13, 1643. It is ordered that whatsoever matters or 
Orders shall be referred to the publick vote euery man that is then 
and there prsent and a Member of the Courte shall give his vote 
and suffrage eyther against or ffor any such matters and not in 
anyCase to be a neuter." 

Lying. 
" March 8, 1654. It is ordered that if any person above the age 
of fourteene shall be convicted of lying, by two sufficient witnesses 
such person soe offending shall pay 5s for every such default : and 
if hee have not to paye hee shall sit in the stox 5 houres." 

Drunkenness. 

" March 8, 1654. It is ordered that for preventing of evill 

which is subject to fall out by reason of excessive drinking of 

stiong drinke, that whosoever shall be convicted of drunkness shall 

for the first time pay 10s the second time 20s, the third time 30s." 



* Warrants, Orders, Passes, pp. 100, 



Civil Laws. 93 

License Law. 

" March 3, 1653. It is ordered that whereas Thos. Goldsmith 
is prevailed with by the towne to keep an ordinary in this towne 
— there is no person shall retaile any liquors or wines, or strong 
drink within the bounds of this plantation but hee the said 
Thomas Goldsmith vpon penalty of ten shillings per quart." 

" Jan. 25, 1655. At a Generall Court Jan. 25, 1655. To pre- 
vent abuses by drinking liquor: It is ordered that noe liquor 
whatsoever that is distilled shall bee sould within the limitts of 
this towne by any but by our neighbour John Cooper who shall 
have liberty to sell to the people, as necessity or occasion in his 
judgment requires, whom this court did intrust that the bounds 
of moderation and sobriety bee not exceeded by any in his pres- 
ence or at his house. And that hee will carefully observe the 
quantities hee doth sell to any out of his house tht soe hee may 
prevent this great disorder at present in respect of the Indians, 
theire having liquor and abusing themselves therewith, and that 
to his best skill or understanding hee may prevent any from 
buying liquor from him that will or may sell to the Indians. 
And as for himself he will willingly depose that directly or in- 
directlyhee will not sell nor put to be sould any such said liquors 
unto any Indian or Indians. Alsoe it is ordered, that if any doe 
bring in such liquors within the bounds of this towne and sell 
them to any but unto him the said John Cooper, or put them 
ashore, excepting only case of necessity, such said liquors shall be 
forfeit one half to him that seizeth them and the other half to 
the towne. Alsoe it is concluded that hee the said John Cooper, 
shall not exceed the quantity of nine Ankers* by the yeare to 
sell to the Inhabitants of all the towne and the price thereof to 
be reasonable. And the North Sea men finding a man that shall 
ingage as the said John Cooper doth, they shall have the allow- 
ance alsoe of three Ankers by the yeare and not to exceed. And 
if any defect be in this aforesaid order soe that it reach not the 
end, the Magistrates have power to supply any deficiency herein 
according to their discretion." 

* Anker, a Dutch measure of 10 gallons. 



94 History of Southampton. 

This is the first restriction on the sale of liquor (known to the 
-writer) within the bounds of this State. 

Various Orders. 

" 1652. At a Towne Meeting Oct. 15, 1652, Isack Willman 
in a passionate manner said that some of them that voated for the 
raising of the Mill knew not more what belonged to the sea-poose 
than a dogg. A note appended says ' hee hath made satisfaction.' 

" 1653, March 3. At a generall Cort Edmund Shaw was cen- 
sured for his excess in drinking to pay unto the towne the some 
of ten shillings the same to be exacted at the discretion of the 
Magistrates according to his future behavior. 

" Same date. Thomas Saire and Joshua Barnes for speaking 
unseemly and unsavory words in the Cort or concerning the 
Cort were fined to pay 10s a peece. 

"1648, Oct. 4. Thomas Sayre was alowed for his boyes 
Drumminge the some of 13s. & his yeare begin eth the sayd daye. 

"1648. The 14th daye of November, ordered that there shall 
hereby be prouided a sufficient payre of Stokes, John "White 
haning undertaken to make them. 

" 1651. Sarah Veale, wife of Thomas Veale, was at the quar- 
ter Court held upon the 4th day of June, 1651 sentenced by the 
Magistrates for exorbitant words of imprecation to stand with 
her tongue in a cleft stick soe long as the offence committed by 
her is read and declared. 

" 1651. At a generall Court held the 13th day of August 
1651 Yf any person or persons be found or it can be proued that 
by them any fruit be stolen or taken away uniustly off from any 
mans land or ground, yf the person or persons be vnder the age of 
sixteene years of age, the parents of the saide child or children 
shall then severely correct them by whipping of them, and that 
to be done before some sufficient spectator, yf the parent or 
parents of the said child or children doe refuse soe to doe, then 
the said person or persons to be corrected before the Magistrates 
and the parents for their neglect of the children to undergoe such 
penalty as the magistrates shall lay upon them, as alsoe the offend- 
ing persons shall pay for the fruites stolen, and by them, double 



Civil Laws. 95 

of the value of the fruits stolen shall be payd to the owners of the 
saide fruites, and one sufficient witness shall serve for conviction. 

"Alaoe any person or persons that is above the age of sixteene 
yeares shall for any fruit stolen by them pay vnto the owners of 
the saide Goods fourefold as for other stolen goods. 

" Sept. 22, 1658. It is ordered by this Court that Mary Cleare 
shall hue no longer wandering to and fro from house to house, 
but that shee, shall line a year in a place, Exept shee change her 
condition by marrage. — (Query : was she sentenced previously 
to a vagabond life for some indiscretion, and this the remission of 
the sentence ? ) 

"Aug. 13, 1651. At the saide Generall Court it is ordered 
that M r . Howell shall have twentie & five shillings for the yeare 
ensneing for his sounds by the drum on the Sabath day, twice 
before the meetings on the sabath day, that is to say, half an hour 
or there abouts before both morning and evening exercise, as alsoe 
presently before the begining of the meeting, and that at every 
time of his first druming he goe from Thos. Sayres corner 
fence unto M r . ffordhams dore, at the second druming he is 
only to drum at the meeting house or the door thereof. 

" Jan. 5, 1665. (1665-6) James Herrick is agreed with to beat 
ye drum on ye Lords Daye according to custome and is to have 
20 s per yeare for the same soe long as hee dischargeth yt office — 
the Towne paying for Drum Heads and Cordidg. 

"Nov. 6, 1666. Ordered that each man shall set up a ladder 
by his chimney reaching to the top of his house." (The houses 
were usually two stories in front, always facing south, and one in 
rear — thus giving one short and one long roof — the ladder was 
placed on the long roof. So invariable was the custom of build- 
ing their houses with front to the south, that one of unusual 
antiquity demolished only a few years since, was so erected on 
the south side of an east and west street with the kitchen actually 
fronting the street.) 

Witchcraft. 
About 1683 " Thomas Travally enters a complaint agst Edward 
Lacy for that the Defend, injuriously called the Complainant's 



96 History op Southampton. 

wife a witch and said that she set his corne on fire and sat upon 
his house in the night. A witch and that hee was hagriden 3 
nights by her ; and hee was Confident 6he was an old witch, 
the charges to somons 10 

To entering and withdrawing the 

action to be paid by ye Deft 2 6 " 

It does not appear from the records or otherwise that this delu- 
sion so prevalent in New England, ever seriously troubled the 
peace of Southampton. The case above recorded stands alone — 
the only intimation on record, and in this matter tradition is. 
equally silent. 



The Early Ohtjkch. 97 



CHAPTER VIII. 

THE EARLY CHURCH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS CHURCH EDIFICES 

SCHOOLS. 

The common impression is that the early settlers of New Eng- 
land and the eastern portion of Long Island were all Congrega- 
tionalists. How contrary this is to the actual facts may be seen 
not only in the cotemporaneous histories of the emigration, but 
in the ecclesiastical histories of New England, like the Mag- 
nolia of Cotton Mather. Up to 1640 it is estimated that about 
21,200 emigrants had arrived in New England. Cotton Mather 
says that of this number 4,000 were Presbyterians. During 
the commonwealth, under Cromwell, the tide of emigration 
for about fifteen years, was much diminished as the Independents 
or Congregation alists were perfectly secure at home. After the 
restoration of Charles I., who violated all his pledges to the Pres- 
byterians, by the act of uniformity of 1662, 2,000 Presby- 
terian ministers were cast out of their pastorates, a large number 
of whom betook themselves to New England. Emigration again 
increased and for twenty years a steady stream of English, 
Scotch and Irish Presbyterians as well as English Congregation- 
alists poured into this country. Both of these denominations for 
a hundred years were thoroughly Calvinistic — of this there never 
was a doubt. As to form of government there was some diver- 
sity. It arose from the peculiar circumstances of the people. 
Almost every church in the various towns, as they were succes- 
sively planted, was in its interior organization Presbyterian. Its 
officers were pastor, ruling elders and deacons. In some cases the 
church had a teacher as well as pastor, but this custom was not 
of long continuance because found to be unnecessary and finan- 
cially burdensome. The Cambridgeplatf orm adopted by all New 
England in 1648, and received as the basis of doctrine and church 
government for nearly a hundred years throughout this section 
of country, recognized the three officers above mentioned. It 
13 



98 History of Southampton. 

says : " Of elders some attend chiefly to the ministry of the word 
as the pastors and teachers ; others attend especially unto rule, 
who are therefore called ruling elders." And again : — " The rul- 
ino- elder's office is distinct from the office of pastor and teacher." 
His " work is to join with the pastor in those acts of spiritual 
rule which are distinct from the ministry of the word and sacra- 
ments. Among his specified duties are admission of members, 
convening the church, preparing matters in private for a more 
speedy dispatch, etc." It says the government of the church is 
thus an aristocracy. The histories are full of this evidence of the 
Presbyterian form of government prevailing in the separate 
churches. But had they presbyteries and synods? Here the 
peculiarity of their condition brought about a diversity. Each 
church as it was established had a jealous regard for its own indi- 
vidual independence and wanted no metropolitan bishop or coun- 
cil to dictate to it laws or injunctions. And yet, as in all human 
affairs, cases would arise where it became necessary to appeal to 
outside churches to settle disputes between pastor and people or 
divided congregations. This necessity brought into existence the 
New England synods, or as they were later called, associations, 
to whom were often committed the same appellate powers as are 
exercised by the presbytery, and even the same powers of original 
jurisdiction. 

That the Long Island churches sympathized more with the 
Presbyterian than Congregational order can readily be conjectured 
from the evidence afforded. In the Southampton town records, of 
date 1644, occurs the collocation " John Cooper the elder," refer- 
ring to the original settler of that name. That 1jiis is not a title of 
seniority is evident from the fact that never once on the records 
is it used elsewhere, but invariably, when this is to be indicated, 
it is by the addition of Senr. But there are two documents of 
quite early date that expressly show the minds of the people on 
this question. In the purchase deed of the site for the church 
erected in 1707, a copy of which I have in my possession, occurs 
the following language : " And whereas the last mentioned partys 
to these presents having pious intentions for the founding, raising 
and building a convenient house, structure and building to have 



The Early Church. 99 

continuance forever for the worship of Almighty God by praises 
and prayer, preaching of God's word and administering of the 
sacraments according to the usage, practice, rites and discipline, 
and the forms used and approved by those churches or congrega- 
tions of Christian Protestants usually known and distinguish'd 
by the name or stile of Presbiterians, ...... and that 

the same lands and premises shall be appropriated to the only use 
of the church or congregation of Presbiterians in Southampton, 
aforesaid, and soe to be and remaine and have continuance for 
ever." (This church, by the way, is still standing, having been 
sold to the Methodists in 1846, and bids fair to stand, if not 
" forever," for a century to come.) The other evidence is the 
authoritative declaration of the town in 1712, assigning land to 
Bridgehampton " for the use of a Presbyterian ministry and noe 
other." 

Abiel Holmes's MSS. history of New England, also says ex- 
plicitly, that the settlers at Southampton were Presbyterians. 

Pat one inquiry remains, and that is as to the time and circum- 
stances of the churches of Long Island uniting formally with the 
Presbyterian church. The Jamaica church, as Dr. McDonald 
claims, had been professedly Presbyterian from the first, and 
united with the Presbytery of Philadelphia (organized in 1704 
and then the only one in America), in 1712 ; — that of Newtown 
united with the same presbytery in 1715 ; and that of Southampton 
in 1716. They all joined the presbytery then almost as soon as- 
there was a presbytery to join. Their belief, their discipline and 
sympathies had always been with this church, and as soon as op- 
portunity was afforded they enrolled themselves formally with 
their brethren. 

1. Abraham Pieesoit. 
The first minister was the Rev. Abraham Pierson, who was 
appointed, in October, 1640, at Boston, to be the pastor of this 
new church to be set up at Southampton : and subsequently in 
November, 1640, was ordained at Lynn as before narrated. Cot- 
ton Mather, in his Magnolia, says of him: "He was a Yorkshire 
man, and coming over to New England, he became a member of 



100 Histoet of Southampton. 

the church at Boston, but was afterwards employed towards the 

year 1640 Proceeding in their plantation, they 

called Mr. Pierson to go thither with them, who with seven or 
eight more of their company regularly incorporated themselves 
into the church state before going, the whole company also enter- 
ing at the same time with the advice of the Governor of Mass. 
Bay Colony, into a civil combination for maintaining government 
among themselves. Thus was then settled a church at South- 
ampton under the paternal care of that worthy man, where he 
did with a laudable diligence undergo two of the three hard 
labors, teaching and governing, to make it become what Paradise 
was called, the Island of the Innocents. It was afterwards found 
necessary for this church to be divided — upon which occasion 
Mr. Pierson referring his case to council, his removal was directed 
into Branf ord over upon the main [Connecticut] and Mr. Fordham 
came to serve and feed that part of the flock which was left at 
Southampton — but wherever he came, [i. e. went] he shone. He 
left behind the character of a pious and prudent man and a true 
child of Abraham now lodged in Abraham's bosom." 

He was graduated at the University of Cambridge in the year 
1632, and having been ordained episcopally, as it is supposed,* 
he preached for some years in England. He arrived in New 
England in 1639. The cause of his removal to Branford is thus 
given in Dr. Sprague's Annals of the American Pulpit. 

"Mr. Pierson agreed with John Davenport in wishino- to rest 
all civil as well as ecclesiastical power in the church, and to allow 
none but church members to act in the choice of the officers of 
government, or to be eligible as such. Accordingly he was anx- 
ious that the little colony at Southampton should become con- 
nected with New Haven, as Southold had been, and was dissatis- 
fied with the the agreement in 1644, to come under the jurisdic- 
tion of Connecticut. He therefore removed in 1647 with a 
small part of his congregation to Branford, Conn., and there 
uniting with others from Wethersfield, organized a new church 
of which he was pastor about twenty-three years." 



* Thus Dr. Sprague, but the ordination according to Felt in Hist, and Gen. Eegister was 
in 1640 at Lynn. V. 5, p. 233. 



The Early Church. 101 

While he was in Branford he learned the language of the 
New England Indians so that he preached to them in their native 
tongue. 

He afterward removed to Newark, and was the first pastor of 
what is now the First Presbyterian Church of that city. 

He died on the ninth of August, 1678. His son, Rev. Abra- 
ham Pierson, was the first President of Tale College. 

2. Robert Fordham. 

The second pastor over this church was the Rev. Robert Ford- 
ham, concerning whom the earliest record of April, 1649, is as 
follows : 

" The agreement between the towne of Southampton and the 
reverned and well beloved servant of the Lord Mr. Fordham con- 
cerning his anuall mayntainance for his labour in the worke of the 
Lord amongst us. 

" Imps wee the present inhabitants do ingage ourselves to pay in 
current cuntrie pay as it passeth at a common rate threescore pounds 
for this present year to beginne the first day of this present Aprill 
1649, and to make our payments halfe yearly by equall portions, 
furthermore for the yeares to come & for all & euery yeare God 
shall be pleased to continue Mr. Fordham amongst us after Aprill 
1650 from the daye of the revolution of first yeare above men-, 
coned, it is ffully agreed and hearby confirmed that the sayd 
yearly mayntainance shall be fourscore pounds per annum to be 
levied upon euery man according to their severall possessions of 
land in our plantation of Southampton and the bounds thereof. 

" Lastly if fforty lotts shall not be filled, that then proportion- 
able abatement of the sd fourscore pounds is to be made according 
to the number that is deficient, in consideration whereof Mr. 
Fordham's owne Accommodations are not to- be liable to pay any 
part of his yearly mayntainance nor yet any of his estate if the 
towne shall see cause to alter the waye of payment as concerning 
the Ministry. This agreement was consented to by all the inhabi- , 
tants, and by them appoynted to be recorded in the towne book * 
to be established in the behalfe of the whole towne." 

Farmer thinks he came to this country from England before 
1641. Lechford in his "Plaine Dealing" or, "News from New 
England," published in 1642 says he was then at Sudbury, Mass., 
out of employment. He may have accompanied Mr. Denton to 
Hempstead in 1644 as he is the first person named in Kieft's 



102 History oi* Southampton". 

Patent to that town * He had wife Elizabeth and children 
Hannah w. of Samnel Clark, Mary w. of Edward Howell, both of 
Southampton ; also sons Joseph, Eobert, Jonah and John. The 
descendants of these children are given in the genealogies in 
another chapter. He came here in the latter part of the year 1648 
or early in 1649 and here labored in the ministry until his death in 
September, 1674. Traditions concerning him* show that he pos- 
sessed an amiable disposition, a character unexceptionable, and in 
the discharge of his pastoral duties gave general satisfaction. In 
the inventory of his estate his house and lands were appraised at 
£1164, and his personal property at £33, Is. 6d, of which his 
library was valued at £53, Is. Qd, plainly indicating that he was a 
liberal patron of learning. 

His son Rev. Jonah Fordham was born in 1633, was graduated 
at Harvard 1658 and having been ordained served in the ministry' 
as pastor of the church at Hempstead from 1660 to 1680. About 
this time 1680 he probably came to live in Southampton from 
whence in September 1687 he was invited to minister to a church 
in Brookhaven. Declining* this, in 1691 he received a second call 
from the same church which he accepted and remained there for 
several years. Returning to Southampton he there died July 17, 
1696, aged 63. His daughter Temperance married the second 
Richard Woodhull of Setauket. He left a son Josiah who also 
entered the ministry and was some time the pastor of the 
Setauket church. His wife Martha died in Southampton October 
4, 1688. 

3. John Harbiman. 

The next in succession was the Rev. John Harriman, the son 
of John who was at New Haven 1646, and soon after married 
Elizabeth, and had two children; John, the subject of this sketch, 
baptized January 24, 1647-8 and Elizabeth baptized July 23, 
1648.f Showing taste for letters early in life he was prepared 
for college in New Haven and at the age of fifteen entered the 
one at Cambridge, Mass., when he was graduated in 1667. Then 

.* Thompson. + Hatfield's Hist, of Elizabeth, N. J. 



The Early Chuech. 103 

returning to New Haven he taught the Hopkins grammar school 
several years and prepared himself for the ministry. He preached 
occasionally before 1674 in New Haven. A covenant or agree- 
ment of Mr. Harriman with the church at Southampton, written 
in crabbed short hand and deciphered in 1870 by J. Hammond 
Trumbull of Hartford, Ct., corrects some errors in his biography 
as generally written, and also in the history of that church. The 
covenant is as follows : 

"Whereas at a town meeting in Southampton held May the 
29th 1674 a Committee was chosen to make a finale [convention] 
[conclusion?] witli Mr. John Herriman, the town having at the 
said meeting consented to some [further] terms than formerly 
was agreed upon ; as [may appear] by a record then made : know 
all men by these presents that We the said committee for and in 
behalf of the said town, of the one party : and the said John Herri- 
man 01[erk] of the other party, do covenant and agree as follow- 
eth.-. first that during the said John Herriman his life and offici- 
ating in the work of the ministry in the said town, he shall have 
the use of the thirty acres of land with the house lot purchased of 
John Cooper : and [presented] by the town for the use of the 
ministry for ever. - , and the four acres in the ox pasture [together] 
with the forty acres in the [common] formerly [presented] to 
him the said Mr. Herriman, shall be and remain to him his heirs 
and executors, administrators and assigns forever: secondly the 
town shall and will pay unto him the said Mr. Herriman or his 
assigns twenty pounds per annum and the half of Mr. Fordhain 
his stipend [that he] he voluntarily [conceded] for that use being 
forty pounds in like manner. - , and if providence so disposes of 
Mr." Fordham that he deceases or be totally taken off from the 
work of the ministry so that Mr. Herriman performs the work 
wholly himself, then the whole sum usually allowed to Mi - . Ford- 
nam, that is, eighty pounds per annum shall be well and [tru]ly 
paid unto him the said Mr Herriman or his assigns in current pay 
at price current with the merchant here. 

Thirdly the town do donate unto him the said Mr. John Herri- 
man one hundred and fifty pounds [commonage] for the future 
and do promise to him to inclose with a five rail fence all the 
land laid out for him and for his use in the ox pasture. 

Fourthly the town is with all [possible convenience] and ex- 
pedition to build upon the said three acres of land procured of 
John Cooper, a good house of two stories high, for the ministry, 
with a brick chimney and two chamber chimneys, the same to be 
to the use of Mr. Herriman, as the land for the ministry. - . And 
the town is to give unto the administrator or administratrix of 



104 Histoby of Southampton. 

him the said Mr. Herriman [after] his decease, one hundred 
pounds in current pay at price current with the merchant, at that 
time the said land and house for the ministry is to return unto the 
said town's disposal. - . 

Fiftly that the said Mr. Herriman upon the [premises] doth 
promise and ingage unto the said town of Southampton to cohabit 
with them and to officiate in the work of the ministry among 
them and not to remove or dwell [from thence] [unless] a council 
of judicious men mutually chosen by him and the town do find 
and adjudge that it is not only lawfful] but of necessity that he 
and the town [should part] neither shall the town dis[miss] him 
but upon the same terms and conditions of the judgment of 
a council as foresaid. 

Sixthly [Whatever] additions of building shall be made by him 
the said Mr. Herriman unto the said house to be built for his use 
on the said home lot or upon the said lot, at his decease shall be 
prized by indifferent men equally chosen by the town and the 
relict or administrator of the said Mr. Herriman [who are] to re- 
ceive of the town the value of such said additions of building 
shall be prized at. 

In witness whereof the said committee in behalf of the town 
as aforesaid and the said Mr. John Herriman have hereunto mut- 
ually set their hands this [fifth] day of June anno 1674. 
JOHN HARRIMAN JOHN HOWELL 

HENRY PEIRSON 
EDWARD HOWELL 
JOHN [J AGGER] 
OBADIAH ROGERS. 
In presence of us 
Tho Coopek 
An Halsey. 

This is a true copy of me John Howell only that [recorded] or 
the [value] is land] in the original. 
Feb. 17:74 i. e. 167f " 

Where the reading is in doubt brackets are used. 

This shows that Mr. Harriman was first settled here as colleague 
pastor with Mr. Eordham and so continued until the death of the 
latter in September 1674. He continued here until the early part 
of 1676, when he returned to New Haven* and in July of that year 
became stated supply of the church there established, and so con- 
tinued for the most of the time until 1682. Then a year or two 

* Hatfield. 



The Eaely Church. 105 

in East Haven as supply and pastor. Then employed October 
1684 in surveying the boundary line between New York and 
Connecticut, for it seems he had no small skill in this business. 
Then installed as pastor of the church in Elizabethtown, N". J. 
probably September 30, 1687. He was very exact in his accounts 
and careful in his business enterprises which were numerous. " *Not 
content with preaching, pastoral visitation, farming and carrying 
on a flour mill, he had, also, a cider press ; he had an agency for 
furnishing glass to his neighbors; he surveyed lands now and 
then ; he attended the Legislature as a Deputy, having been thus 
elected, in 1693, 1694, 1695 and 1698. Like most of his pro- 
fession, he kept a boarding school also." He married as early as 
1673 Hannah daughter of Richard Bryan of Milford, Ct. She 
was born in 1654 and her twin sister Mary married Edward How- 
ell of Southampton. He had children John b. 1674 who became 
a surveyor, Samuel b. June 25, 1676, Ann b. July 5, 1678, ISary 
in 1680, Leonard in 1683 and Eichard in 1685, and three others 
born in Elizabeth. He died August 20, 1705, in the 58th year 
of his age. 

4. Seth Fletcheb. 

The next minister of this church was the Rev. Seth Fletcher 
who was the son of Robert Fletcher* of Concord, Mass. He 
came to Southampton in 1676 and remained about three years, 
when he removed to Elizabethtown, 1ST. J., and was installed there 
in 1680. He married (1st) Mary daughter of Bryan Pendleton 
of Portsmouth, N". H, and (2d) Mary widow of Henry Pierson 
of Southampton May 1682. He died in 1682, leaving estate 
valued at £559, 5, 8, of which his books were rated at £175, 4, 4. 

5. Joseph Tatloe. 

Rev. Joseph Taylor was the son of Mr. John Taylor, of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., and was born in 1651. He was graduated at Har- 
vard in 1669, and was appointed a tutor in that institution the 
following year. He then studied for the ministry, and was em- 
ployed as a preacher in New Haven until the spring of 1679. 

* Hatfield. 

14 



106 Histoey of Southampton. 

The Rev. John Taylor buried in the Southend burying ground 
was his son. 

" At a Town meeting Aprill 1st, 1679. By Major voat it is con- 
cluded that a man shall be chosen to goe over to Mr. Tayler the 
minister, and to presente the Towne's former request by letter 
unto him, namely to come over to us and give us a visit and if 
possible to prevaile with Mr. Tayler to come along with him ; 
which sd messenger is also to follow such Instructions as shall 
bee given him touching this occation. 

" By Major voat Mr. Justice Topping is desired to be the man 
to go over on the aforesaid occation, namely to procure Mr. Tay- 
ler to give us a visit if possible as soon as may be." 

Later in the same year we find the following record : 

"Nov. 5, 1679. It is declared by a general voat, but one ex- 
cepted of the towne that ye Rev. Mr. Joseph Tayler is the man 
they pitch upon and desire in the work of the ministry amongst 
us according to former voat of the Towne and endeavours put 
forth to procure him." 

The call was accepted and he entered upon his labors, being in- 
stalled as pastor of the church about 1680. The following is an 
abstract of the " agreement " for the temporal support of Mr. 
Taylor, dated March 22, 1679-80. 

1. To be paid to him £100 per annum raised in proportion to 
each man's estate. To be paid in winter wheat at 5 shillings per 
bushel, or summer wheat at 3s per bushel, or Indian corn at 2s 
per bushel, and sundry other products with prices attached. 

2. The use of a Parsonage and four acres attached and privi- 
lege of a 150 of commonage. 

3. One hundred acres of land in woods or commons to him and 
his heirs forever; together with other four acres in fee and de- 
scribed. 

4. To do a certain amount of fencing for him. 

We cannot but take a just pride in this as in other evidences of 
our forefathers making a generous provision for the wants of their 
ministers. They believed the words of our Saviour, that " the 
laborer is worthy of his hire," and acted accordingly. 

The labors of Mr. Taylor, however, were cut short by an early 



The Eakly Chukch. 107 

death on April 4, 1682, in the thirty-second year of his age. 
His tombstone still stands in the old burying ground, in the rear 
of the residence of the late Captain James Post. 

6. Joseph Whiting. 

He was the son of Rev. Samuel, who was the second son of 
John, mayor of Boston, Lincolnshire, England, where Samuel 
was born November 20, 1597.* Samuel took the degree of B. 
A. at Emanuel College, Cambridge, 1616 and M. A. 1620. Ar- 
rived in New England in May, 1636, at Boston. He had three 
sons and three daughters who lived to maturity. Of these Sam- 
uel, born 1633, was a graduate of Harvard, entered the ministry 
and died while a pastor of the church at Billerica, Massachusetts. 
John, the second son, was also graduate of Harvard, returned to 
England and continued there until his death.* Joseph, the third 
son, was bom April 6, 1641, graduated at Harvard in 1661, and 
assisted his father several years and was installed as his successor 
in 1679. He was twice married — first to Sarah, daughter of Hon. 
Thomas Danforth, deputy governor of Massachusetts, and presi- 
dent of Maine, and again to Rebecca, who died April 21, 1726. 

Mr. Whiting wills, April 27, 1717, to wife Rebecca and children, 
eldest son John, Sarah Sparhawk, second son Samuel, third son 
Joseph, fourth son Benjamin, fifth sonEbenezer (not 21) and two 
youngest daughters, Elizabeth and Dorothy, not 18. Letters 
granted to son Ebenezer June 8, 1726, his wife Rebecca being 
then also dead. K Y. Surrogate's Office. 

On the 27th day of June, 1682, a committee were appointed to' 
go to Lynn, Mass., to invite Mr. Whiting to come over and 
preach to the Southampton people on trial. It is not certain 
when he first came, nor when he was installed as pastor, but 
probably in the year 1683. 

In 1688 we find an " agreement " with him in relation to his 
salary an abstract of which is here given. 

1. £100 per annum to be paid in same manner as Mr. Taylors. 

2. Use of the Parsonage and four acres and a 150 of common- 
age. 



108 Histoet of Southampton. 

3. If lie continue till his diseease, in the ministry in this town, 
then his widow is to have from the town £100 in money and 
merchantable produce. 

His labors in the ministry must have been acceptable to the 
people since he continued with them till the infirmities of age 
demanded a cessation of labor. His pastorate covered about 
thirty-three years, and his death occurred April 7, 1723, in the 
eighty-second year of his age. He sleeps among his flock in the 
old burying ground, and with them awaits his resurrection to 
eternal life. 

7. Samuel Gelston. 

The coming of this minister marks a change in the form of 
government of the church and in its ecclesiastical connection. 
From Webster's History of the Presbyterian Church in America, 
we obtain the following account of him : 

" He was born in the north of Ireland, in 1692, and came as a 
probationer to New England in 1715. He was received in the 
fall under the care of the Philadelphia Presbytery, and was sent 
to the people of Kent on Delaware. Though desired to stay, he 
left without the consent of Presbytery, and went to Southampton 
on Long Island. There his brother Hugh resided ; he was called 
as colleague with the pastor, Joseph Whiting, and the congrega- 
tion placed itself under the Presbytery's care. The Presbytery 
of Long Island on its organization, took him on trial, and ordained 
and installed him April 17th, 1717. His stay was about ten 
years; and Aug. 27, 1728, he was received as a member of 
Newcastle Presbytery, and took into consideration a call to New- 
castle. The next month he was called to New London, Chester 
County, Pennsylvania." 

After many changes and wanderings and some trouble, he is 
said to have died October 22, 1782, aged ninety. 

The Long Island Presbytery (being the first judicatory of that 
name in the Province of New York), was set off from the Pres- 
bytery of Philadelphia in 1716. It was organized at Southamp- 
ton April 17, 1717, and was composed of the following ministers: 
Mr. MacNish of Jamaica, Mr. Phillips of Brookhaven, Mr. 



The Early Church. 109 

Pomeroy (or Pumry) of Newtown and Mr. Gelston of Southamp- 
ton. The church of Southampton having thus united with the 
Presbyterian body has remained ever since in connection with the 
same. The Eeformed church of Holland, Independency and 
Presbyterianism appear to have occupied almost the whole ground 
throughout New York for many years after the settlement. It 
is said* that as late as 1664 there was not a single Episcopal church 
in the whole province. 

8. Sylvanus "White. 

The eighth pastor was the Rev. Sylvanus White. Webster says 
of him : " He was born in 1704. His father, Rev. Ebenezer 
White, came with his parents from England to Massachusetts at 
an early age, and was the minister of Bridgehampton, Long 
Island, from its first organization as a parish in 1695."f 

May 27, 1695. The town voted to give him fifteen acres of 
land if he came as pastor of the church at Sagg. 

Rev. Sylvanus was graduated at Harvard University in 1722, 
and ordained by a council, November 17, 1727, pastor of the 
church of Southampton. He married Phebe, daughter of Heze- 
kiah Howell of that town. 

While in every town on the island, there were confusions and 
divisions growing out of the great revival [1741-2] Southamp- 
ton seems to have dwelt in peace, united in their minister. In 
the formation of Suffolk Presbytery, Mr. White and his vener- 
able father took an active part, and Southampton promptly and 
unanimously placed itself under its care, April 27, 1747. Bridge- 
hampton was in circumstances of great difficulty : a separation 
had occurred and much animosity existed. The presbytery "treated 
with the venerable and aged minister to resign." He consented 
to do so, and then on the settlement of Rev. James Brown, they 
spent much time at Mr. Job Pierson's with the people of the sep- 
aration on the point, whether they had not violated the rules of 
the gospel in their treatment of Mr. White. " Much seeming 

* Doc. Hist, of N. Y. 

t But Webster is incorrect as to one point — the grandfather of Rev. Ebenezer was the em- 
igrant as appears in the family genealogy. 



110 History of Southampton. 

stiffness " appeared ; but at length sixteen men and twelve women 
signed an acknowledgement " that, though according to their 
present light, they were right as to the cause, they were wrong in 
the manner." The aged minister signed a full humble avowal 
that under " the sore and awful frown of a holy God, in a time of 
much disorder, temptation and provocation, he had spoken unad- 
visedly with his lips, and asked forgiveness for having spoken 
to the disparagement of a work of grace, while intending to con- 
demn what seemed fraught with evil." On the 3d of October 
he wrote to the presbytery expressing his opinion that the sep- 
aratists who had been received back had heen treated with too 
much lenity. They replied : " the object of church government 
was edification, not destruction." Still, the separating party as a 
whole, must have persisted in their separation for some time, for 
we find them soon after erecting a small church edifice in which 
Mr. Elisha Paine was installed pastor. This was known at that 
day as the " new-light " movement, and the organization was 
called the New Light church. However, as the original actors 
in the separation died off, none rose to fill their places — the or- 
ganization dwindled, and finally about the close of the eighteenth 
century, whatever remnant remained was swept away in a great 
revival, and merged into the Presbyterian church. The tomb 
stone of Mr. Paine bears the following Epitaph : 

In memory of the Rev j Mr. Elisha Paine V D M who | 
died Angst 26 A D 1775 S, 83 | was born upon Cape Cod | 
and from thence with his | Hond Father Mr Elisha Paine j 
Removed to Canterbury in | Connecticut where he prac- | 
tised the law as an Attor. | with great aprobation and ] 
Fidelity and untill 1743 | from thence became preach- | 
er of ye Gospel and was | Ordained ye first minister | 
over ye congregational | church of Christ in this j 
Place May HAD 1752 | Thenceforth he rests | 
from his labors. 

Mr. Silvanus "White " lived in uninterrupted health through a 
ministry of fifty-five years, and after a week's illness, died Octo- 
ber 22, 1782, his mind not enfeebled by age, and his hope strong 
and cheerful. He lived, honored and revered, happy in the af- 
fections of a large and warmly attached congregation. He left 



The Eakly Chuech. Ill 

seven sons and one daughter ; most of these lived to advanced 
age. They removed, but his son, Dr. Henry White, remained in 
his native town, and died there at the age of ninety in 1840." 

Some further particulars of his family are given in another 
chapter. 

Mr. White used to regard his people as his children and kept 
an eye upon the reading matter which fell into their hands. On 
one occasion hearing of a new book going the rounds, bearing 
the suspicious title of " The Devil on two Sticks," he took pains 
to ascertain where it was, and marched off at once to examine and 
confiscate it (politely of course) should it prove contraband of 
Church. 

After the death of Mr. White, October 22, 1752, it appears 
there was a vacancy in the pulpit until 1784. During this inter- 
val the pulpit was supplied by Mr. Osias Eels, and Mr. James 
Eels, of whom nothing is known to the writer save their names. 
Doubtless they are written in the Lamb's Book of Life and they 
themselves gone to their rest. 

9. Joshua Williams. 

The ninth pastor was the Rev. Joshua Williams. He preached 
as a candidate as it appears from his own record from September 
to December 1784. Tuesday December 14 the parish held a 
meeting and came to a determination to call Mr. Williams to the 
pastorate. After some time spent in negotiation an agreement 
was entered into upon the following terms :. 

" Copy of a covenant between the inhabitants of the First 
Parish in Southampton and Joshua Williams, A. M. 
" To all people to whom these presents shall come greeting : 

" Know ye that we ye subscribers inhabitants of the first Parish 
of the town of Southampton, in the County of Suffolk and State 
of New York do each of us covenant and oblige ourselves to pay 
unto Mr. Joshua Williams or his certain attorney Executors 
Administrators or Assigns yearly and every year during his con- 
tinuance in sd Parish (a Collector being appointed to collect the 
same) a full and just sum of seventy pounds current money of the 
state of New York. Likewise to deliver to sd Williams at his 



112 



History of Southampton. 



door forty loads of wood yearly. Likewise to put the fences of 
the parsonage land in good repairs, sd Williams to keep thern in 
repair hereafter so long as he shall improve said lands. Likewise 
we covenant to keep the buildings and well in repair. And (in 
case he should leave a widow) to give her the sum of forty pounds 
of ye aforesaid currency. On the receipt of which she shall quit 
the Parsonage. Sd Williams to carry no manure off sd lands nor 
cut more wood or timber than is necessary to keep the fences in 
repair or for his own firing in case he shall need more than what 
is above sd to be found him. 

" Sd Williams to have the full improvement of sd lands and the 
buildings thereon, during the above said term. And for the true 
performance of the abovesaid covenant, We the subscribers have 
hereunto set our hands in Southampton this thirtieth day of 
December anno D. 1784. 

" N. B. Be it remembered that one half of the above £70 for 
the first year is to be paid in three months from this date." 



David Burnett. 
John Bishop. 
John Bishop, Jr. 
James Bishop. 
Samuel Bishop. 
William Brewster. 

Zebulon Cooper. 

Widow Hannah Cooper. 

Moses Culver, Jr. 
[10] Caleb Cooper. 

Zophar Cooper. 

William Culver. 

Silas Cooper. 

James Culver. 

Gershom Culver. 

Charles Cooper. 

Obadiah Cooper. 

Samuel Cooper, Jr. 

Widow Ruth Cooper. 
[20] Christopher Foster. 

Benj. Foster. 

Abraham Fordham, Jr. 

Deac. David H. Foster. 

Abraham Fordham. 

Wid. Ann Foster. 

Elias Foster. 

Nathan Foster. 

Hugh Gelston. 



[30] 



[40] 



[50] 



Joseph Goldsmith. 

Silas Halsey, Jr. 
Elias Howell, 3d. 
Benj. Huntting. 
Zebulon Howell. 
Stephen Howell. 
Deac. Samuel Howell. 
Ephraim Howell. 
We. Hallock. 
Ebenezer Howell. 
Samuel HowelL- Jr. 
John Halsey.-''^ 
Elias Howell. 
Wid. Eunice Howell. 
Wid. Martha Herrick. 
Elias Howell, 2d. 
Obadiah Howell. 
Richard Howell. 
Sylvanus Howell. 
William Herrick. 
John Howell. 
Stephen Howell, Jr. 
Zebulun Halsey." 
Joseph Hildreth. 
Joseph Hildreth, Jr. 
John Howell, 3d. 
George Herrick. 
Wid. Mary Haines. 
Henry Harris. 



The Eaely Chuech. 



113 



Henry Hudson. 
Isaac Halsey. s 
[60] Daniel Hildreth. 
David Howell. 
David Howell, Jr. 
David Halsey./' 

Wid. Eleanor Jacobs. 

Wid. Mary Jones. 

Zebulun Jessup. 

Ebenezer Jagger. 

Wid. Pbebe Jagger. 

Thomas Jessup. 
[70] Lemuel Jennings. 

Samuel Jennings. 

Sylvan us Jennings. 

Wid. Rachel Jennings. 

Samuel Jagger. 

Nathaniel Jagger. 

Stephen Jagger. 

Jeremiah Jagger, Jr. 

Thomas Jones. 

Elias Pelletreau. 
[80] Elias Pelletreau, Jr. 

Timothy Pierson. 

Elias Pierson, Jr. 

Henry Post. 

Elias Pierson. 

Stephen Post. 

Samuel Pierson. 

Isaac Post. 

Isaac Post, Jr. 



Jeremiah Post. 
[90] James Post. 

John Pelletreau. 

Uriah Rogers. 

Jeremiah Rogers. 

Zephaniah Rogers. 

Adonijah Raynor. 

Stephen Reeves, 3d. 

Stephen Reeves. 

John Reeves. 

Stephen Reeves, Jr. 
[100] Moses Rose. 

David Rose. 

Wid. Deborah Rugg. 

Joel Reeves. 

Wid. Mary Reeves. 

Paul Sayre. 

Wid. Ruth Smith. 

Abraham Sayre, Jr. 

Matthew Sayre/ 

David Sayre. / .- 
[110] Abraham Sayre. •/ 

John Sayre. ^ 

Wid. Mehetabel Stevens. 

Jackson Scott. 

James White. 

Henry White. 

John White, Jr. 

William White. 

Charles White. 

Zebulun Wick. 
[120] Silas Woolley. 



/ 



On May 26, 1785, the Presbytery of Long Island met at 
Southampton, and, after examination of the pastor elect on the 
next day, proceeded to ordain and instal him over the church 
founded there in 1640. According to Mr. Williams' minutes of 
this occasion " Mr. Goldsmith made the first prayer. Mr. Buel 
preached a sermon. Mr. Goldsmith enquired concerning ye 
[rates ?] Mr. Stores the ordaining prayer. Mr. Buel the charge. 
Mr. Davenport the right hand. Mr. Hart ye exhortation to ye 
people and concluding prayer." 

The next June Thomas Jessup was chosen to be a deacon, and 
Christopher Foster and David Burnett to be elders. 

Mr. Williams labored as pastor until April, 1789, a period of 
three years and eleven months, having admitted to communion 
in that time, as he says, 486 persons. 
15 



114 History of Southampton. 

10. Heeman Daggett. 
From Dr. Sprague's Annals the following account is taken: 
He was born at Walpole, Mass., September 11, 1766. He was 
a son of Dr. Ebenezer Daggett, a highly respectable physician in 
his day, who was a brother of the Eev. Naphtali Daggett one of 
the Presidents of Yale College. The first ancestor of the family 
in this country was John Daggett, who, a. few years after the set- 
tlement of Plymouth, came and took up his residence on the 
Island of Martha's Vineyard. Dr. Daggett removed with his 
family from Walpole to Wrentham, when his son Herman was a 
boy, and there continued iu medical practice till his death, which 
occurred February 26, 1782. The son was at his father's decease 
between fifteen and sixteen years of age. He had the reputation 
of being an amiable and discreet youth, and withal had an un- 
common thirst for knowledge. Quickened however in his efforts, 
by his zeal for knowledge, he passed rapidly and successfully 
through his course preparatory to College, and became a member 
of Brown's University in 1784. His standing there as a scholar 
was highly respectable, and he graduated in 1788. In the second 
year of his college course, his mind, which had before been seri- 
ously directed by the influence of a Christian education, became 
deeply impressed with the subject of religion as a practical con- 
cern ; and it was to this period that he referred the commence- 
ment of his religious fife. His ardor in literary pursuits, seems 
not to have been at all repressed by the change in his moral feel- 
ings, though all his faculties and attainments were from this time 
evidently consecrated to the glory of God and the benefit of his 
fellow creatures. Shortly after his graduation he placed himself 
as a theological student under Dr. Emmons, who even at that 
early period, had acquired the reputation of being very learned in 
his profession. Having spent about a year in his preparatory 
studies, he was licensed to preach by the Association, holding its 
session at Northbridge, in October, 1789, and preaching for the 
first time on the succeeding Sabbath in Dr. Emmons's pulpit. 
"Within a short time after he was licensed^ he visited Long Island 
with a view of being engaged as a preacher, thinking that the 



The Early Church. 115 

climate would, prove more congenial to his health than that of 
New England. Here he was received with more than common 
favor. Eor ajear he supplied the Presbyterian congregation at 
Southold ; and though they gave him a unanimous call, yet being 
unwilling to practice on the " Half-way Covenant,"* he felt con- 
strained to decline it. Thence he was called to preach at South- 
ampton, where also he was unanimously invited to the pastorship. 
This latter invitation after considerable hesitation, he accepted, 
and was set apart by the presbytery to the pastoral office, April 
12,1Y92. On the 3d of September, following, Mr. Daggett was 
married to Sarah, daughter of Colonel Matthewson, a respectable 
and wealthy citizen of Providence, R I. Mrs. Daggett was a 
lady of fine accomplishments and most exemplary character, and 
survived her husband many years. She died, having never had 
any children, November 20, 1843. 

Mr. Daggett's continuance at Southampton was for less than 
four years. Almost immediately after his settlement, a difficulty 
arose between him and a part of his people on the subject of the 
" Half-way Covenant " (he being unwilling to practice on that 
principle), which ultimately extended to many other churches,. 
and was the principal, if not the entire cause, of his resigning his 
charge He behaved with great moderation and dignity through- 
out the whole controversy, and his character for discretion was 
never impugned. It was a sufficient evidence that he came out of 
this controversy at Southampton unscathed, that, almost imme- 
diately after he was at liberty, he was called to the pastoral care 
of the church at West Hampton, a village in the immediate 
neighborhood of the one he had left. Here he continued greatly 
respected and beloved by his people from September, 1797, to 
September, 1801, when he was dismissed chiefly on account of an 
inadequate support. 

In October following he was installed pastor of the church at. 
Fire Place and Middle Island in the town of Brookhaven, and 

* A very bad practice originated early in New England (Records of Synod of Boston, 1662), 
of administering the rite of baptism to children of baptised persons who made no preten- 
sions whatever to personal piety upon their " owning the covenant," though they neglected 
every other ordinance. This was called the " Half-way Covenant," and was productive of 
immense evil in the churches. 



116 Histoey of Southampton. 

preached alternately to the two congregations till April, 1807, 
when his health had become so far reduced that he resigned his 
charge with an intention of never resuming the responsibilities 
of the pastoral office. During the eighteen years of Mr. Dag- 
gett's residence on Long Island, and in each of the four several 
charges with which he was connected, he enjoyed a large measure 
of public respect, and his labors were, by no means, unattended 
with success. He was greatly esteemed, especially by his breth- 
ren in the ministry for the wisdom of his counsels, not less than 
for the consistency of his general deportment. 

After leaving Long Island his health was considerably improved 
so that he was able to preach frequently, and even for a consider- 
able time without interruption. For a year he preached and 
taught school at Cairo, Greene county, N. T. For some time he 
preached also at Patterson, Putnam county, and for two years he 
preached and taught an Academy at North Salem, "Westchester 
county. Thence he went to New Canaan, Conn., where he took 
charge of an Academy. 

When the Foreign Mission School was established by the 
American Board of Foreign Com., at Cornwall, Conn., Mr. 
Daggett was placed at the head of it, May 6, 1818. Here a great 
and important work devolved upon him of harmonizing and in- 
structing youth of all ages from the mere child to manhood, and 
of many various races. Although but about thirty in number, 
there were natives of Sumatra, China, Bengal, Hindostan, Mexico, 
New Zealand ; of the Society and the Marquesas Islands ; of the 
Isles of Greece and the Azores; and Cherokees, Choctaws, 
Osages, Oneidas, Tuscaroras and Senecas of the North American 
Indians. Here he labored with success for nearly six years until 
1824. Ill health then terminated his labors and for the next 
eight years he rested, waiting for his eternal Sabbath rest to 
which he was called in peace on the 19th of May, 1832. 

11. David S. Bogabt. 
The Rev. David Schuyler Bogart was born January 12, 1770, 
in the city of New York. He descended from one of the oldest 
and most respectable Dutch families. He was graduated from 



The Early Chuech. 117 

Columbia College in 1790, with the highest honors of his class. 
After his graduation he studied for the ministry with his pastor, 
Dr. John H. Livingston, and preached frequently in various 
churches of New York. In the autumn of 1795 he visited 
Southampton, and his ministrations proving acceptable to the 
people, a call was made out. On the 20th of May, 1796, Mr. 
Bogart removed with his family from New York and intended to 
accept there the pastorate. Before the Long Island Presbytery 
met, however, to install him, he received an urgent call from the 
First Presbyterian Church in Albany. After consultation with 
his friends he concluded to accept the call to Albany, where he 
remained from January to August, 1797. His health having 
been impaired at this place, and the church at Southampton be- 
ing encouraged to renew their call, he returned to the church by 
the sea, and was installed in the autumn of 1798. Dr. Thomas 
De Witt, in the sermon preached at Mr. Bogart's funeral (from 
which sermon we have obtained some of the facts herein stated), 
says that while at Southampton he received several calls but re- 
fused them on account of the united affection of his people. In- 
fluenced by the associations of his earlier years he, in 1806, 
accepted a call from the Beformed Dutch Church of Blooming- 
dale in the city of New York, but was prevented by circumstances 
of a domestic nature from moving his family. The Southamp- 
ton Church then made out a third call and he was re-installed as 
their minister and so remained till his final dismission, April 15, 
1813. 

In this year he accepted a call to the two Beformed Dutch 
Churches of Success and Oyster Bay. He continued in these 
churches, fourteen miles apart, for thirteen years until failing 
health obliged him to resign. In 1826 he returned to New York 
and there resided until his death on the 10th of July, 1S39, 
preaching as he found opportunity. 

The people of Southampton were very warmly attached t» 
him as is evident from their repeated invitations to him to settle 
among them. He is still spoken of by some of his old parishioners. 
in terms of the warmest affection. In the pulpit he used much 



118 History of Southampton. 

action, was full of vivacity, flowery in style, and graceful in 
delivery. 

During the next three years, from 1813 to 1816, the pulpit was 
supplied by Mr. Joshua Hart, Messrs. Andrews and Fuller, Her- 
man Halsey and Amos Bingham, of whom nothing except their 
names is known to the writer. 

Mr. Hart once upset a peddler's wagon which was in his way. 
The next Sunday morning he found a note on the pulpit enclosing 
a pistareen with the following distich : 

"Eighteen pence to Mr. Hart 
For overturning a tinman's cart." 

Here is another pulpit token found by a minister on his desk 
one Sabbath morning, an old riddle simple enough in itself, but 
the pertinence of which is not so evident : 

" A certain something there may be, 
Which earthly kings may often see ; 
Poor mortal worms may oft descry it, 
But God Almighty can't espy it." 

12. John M. Babbit. 

The twelfth pastor was the Rev. John M. Babbit. He was 
installed November 19, 1817, and dismissed April 18, 1821. 

Rev. James M. Huntting, of Jamaica, says, in reference to the 
revival in Mr. Babbit's day : " For some time previous to that 
revival an increased tenderness, fervor and interest in prayer, 
became manifest in the social meetings generally but seemed to me 
most manifest in one attended weekly at Miss Harriet Foster's, 
on the road leading to Bridge Hampton and opposite where the 
Messrs. Elias and "William "Woolley then lived. I had for several 
years greatly desired to see a revival such as I had seen at East 
Hampton, and which left me, much to my sorrow, without hope 
and God in the world. Hence I visited all the prayer meetings 
I could. Others noticed it. On one evening, however, when I 
was not present at the meeting above alluded to, the joyful news 
was communicated that Capt. James Post and his wife were 
rejoicing in hope. The next morning a young friend of mine 
hastened to me to tell me the joyful news. The whole village 



The Early Chueoh. 119 

soon was filled with deep solemnity and on the following Sabbath 
the sanctuary was unusually full, and the presence and power of 
the Holy Spirit were very manifest. The prayer meeting that 
evening was at Mrs. Huntting's, and so many came that the store 
and all the rooms adjoining were opened and filled with the 
solemn assemblage. Many not able to find seats, stood the 
whole evening — prominent among them, and near the front 
window, stood Oapt. James Post. When the meeting closed 
nearly all remained and many approached him to hear him 
speak of Jesus. Meetings became very frequent at once, 
and very full at evening, and the church was opened and 
largely attended one afternoon and evening each week, when the 
neighboring ministers came to help Mr. Babbit, and elders and mem- 
bers from the neighboring churches were often present, and took 
part in the prayer meetings — prominent among whom was Deacon 
Stephen Rose, of Bridgehampton. Conversions were constantly 
occurring among all classes, and the church, which I understood 
consisted of 70 members when the revival began, received an 
accession of about 45 among whom were nine husbands with 
their wives. Many of the most interesting, youth of the place 
had been gathered in Bible Classes, which the Pastor conducted 
so as greatly to increase the study of the Bible, and make the 
new members of the church able to give a scriptural and satisfac- 
tory reason of their Christian hope. The Word of God was the 
chief theme of conversation in the youthful circles I visited, es- 
pecially the lessons we recited from it weekly to the Pastor and 
Elders. Bev. Dr. McDowell's Question Book was used, and 
some of the class found out and interlined the answers with pen 
and ink, from the beginning to the end of that Question Book. 
The attachment of the new converts to each other and to Christ, 
made life pass so sweetly along, that deep regret was often ex- 
pressed when any of them had to leave the place. And on my 
return to the place to teach school, after a year's absence to study 
in the Academy at East Hampton, I found that delightful Chris- 
tian grace ' Brotherly love,' delightfully prevalent. So it re- 
mained during the two and one-half years that I remained there 
in the school." 



120 History of Southampton. 

Mr. Babbit says in answer to an invitation to be present at the 
celebration of the 225th Anniversary of the settlement of the 
town, December 13, 1865 : 

" The meetings held frequently, for the special benefit of those 
seeking an interest in Christ and indulging recently obtained 
hopes that they had found it, were very useful. The counsel 
given in them and from house to house was well adapted to lead 
all to build their hopes of heaven entirely on Christ. The views 
of the converts were elicited, and when erroneous, thoroughly 
corrected, and advice given adapted to make their practice also 
correct. Town meeting day had often been a day for social rec- 
reation by the young. On its approach that spring, some ex- 
perienced Christians counseled us to take care and not let it be in- 
juriously spent. To the delight of many it was suggested that 
the young who were not needed among the electors, should meet in 
the north school-house for social prayer. The house was soon 
filled and word reached the electors' meeting of it, and several of 
the good deacons and elders came to the school-house and de- 
lighted its, and seemed delighted themselves, as they addressed 
us and prayed with us. 

The church which had for a long time before seemed languish- 
ing, from that time grew so that I found the last time I preached 
there just four times as many members in it, i. e. 280 instead of 
70. 

May the Lord ever bless that church, as dear to my heart then 
and ever since, and make your anniversary a soul refreshing time." 

In 1815 Mr. Babbit founded the Education Society of South- 
ampton, which has since done much good in educating pious 
young men for the ministry'. 

13. Petee H. Shaw. 
The thirteenth pastor was the Bev. Peter H. Shaw, who was 
ordained and installed September 19, 1821, and dismissed June 
2, 1829. His grandfather, John Shaw, came to this country in 
1785, with two sons, John and William, the latter of whom was 
the father of Bev. Peter H. The grandfather was a ruling elder 
in the Associate Church in Greenock, Scotland, and the two sons. 



The Early Church. 121 

with their wives, were members of the same church. They 
settled by the advice of Dr. Witherspoon, of Princeton, K J., in 
Barnet, Yt. His great grandfather, Eev. John Shaw, together 
with Eev'ds Kalph and Ebenezer, formed the first Seceding or 
Associate Presbytery of Scotland. The library of this worthy 
minister brought to this country by his son, contributed much to 
moulding the mind and shaping the principles of his great grand- 
son in his youth. He graduated at Dartmouth College. 

Mr. Shaw, while pursuing his education in New York, came 
under the influence of two eminent Christian ladies, Mrs. Graham 
and Mrs. Hoffman, and from their pious efforts in establishing 
Sabbath schools for the instruction of the poor, he learned the 
value of this institution. On his instalment in Southampton, he 
first instituted the Sabbath school here, which, however, soon 
embraced all the children in the community. He also, in 1826, 
was the originator of the temperance reformation in Southampton. 
Under parental training his mind had been directed to the evils 
of intemperance, and the publication of Dr. Beecher's sermons on 
this subject, opened the way for action. "With characteristic 
modesty, he obtained these sermons, and at his third meeting on 
Sabbath evening, he read them on three successive Sabbaths. 
They caused much excitement and even opposition. Many said 
they could as well do without bread as ardent spirits. The fol- 
lowing spring the General Assembly recommended the clergy to 
preach on the subject. After a reluctant consent of the session, 
a day was appointed when Mr. Shaw would preach on the evil 
which was increasing in the community to a fearful extent. On 
the day after the appointment was made, he was informed that 
none of the neighboring ministers had co-operated with him on 
the subject, and went over immediately to Bridge Hampton, Sag 
Harbor and East Hampton, and asked the clergy to countenance 
him at least so far in the movement as to be present. But they 
all declined — he stood alone, the youngest member of the 
Presbytery, but determined, under divine assistance, to go on. 
He says of this — " The day came. It was a cold, uncomfortable 
day, I think, of November. I had endeavored to prepare myself 
with what care I could. As I entered the pulpit I saw the house 
16 



122 History of Southampton. 

was filled to overflowing. Every drunkard was staring me in the 
face I saw not onlj that attention, but that feeling was awake 
on the matter before me. I quailed under it ; but it was to be 
met. I never had had such a sensation before nor since. But 
Cod sustained me. I preached a sermon in the morning an hour 
and a half in length, and in the afternoon better than an hour. 
The object was to present the whole subject so far as I was able. 
And so large and attentive an audience I had not seen before 
nor since in Southampton. And before the blessing was pro- 
nounced, a motion was made to adjourn to- my house that even- 
ing, to draw up a constitution and form a society on the principle 
of total abstinence." 

14. Daniel Beeks. 

The fourteenth pastor was the Rev. Daniel Beers, who was in- 
stalled June 8, 1830, and dismissed April 21, 1835. On leav- 
ing Southampton he was called to the Presbyterian Church of 
Greenport, where he was installed, December 2, 1835, and re- 
mained till January 31, 1839. Thence he removed to Orient, 
preaching, as stated supply, for a number of years, having com- 
menced his labors there in February, 1839. He was a laborious, 
painstaking and useful pastor, and his labors in Southampton 
were abundantly blessed. It was in some measure owing to his 
energy and ardor in pushing on the enterprise, that the Academy 
was erected in 1831. 

15. Hugh JST. Wilson, D. D. 
The fifteenth pastor was the Eev. Hugh N". Wilson. His 
father was James Wilson, Esq., of Elizabeth, N. J. He was born 
May 7, 1813, was graduated at the College of New Jersey, in 
Princeton, in 1830, and elected tutor there in 1832. He studied 
theology in the Seminary at Princeton, and was licensed to preach 
by the Presbytery of Elizabeth, April 23, 1835. He commenced 
his labors in the ministry in this place in September, 1835, and 
was ordained October 7, 1835, and installed June 29, 1836. 
In 1837 he was married to Jane, the daughter of Capt. James 
Post of this village. He had children Eleanor, Henrietta, Julia 



The Early Churoh. 123 

A, and Mary P. The pastoral relation was dissolved in the 
spring of 1852. Sorrowfully the people parted with their pastor, 
for during his long ministry of seventeen years, his labors had 
been abundantly blessed in extensive revivals and large accessions 
to the church. In April, 1852, he departed with the good wishes 
and prayers of his congregation for his success in a new field of 
labor in Hackettstown, New Jersey. From Hackettstown he 
was called to the Second Dutch Church of New Brunswick, 
whither he went in the year 1858. Having been dismissed from 
this charge, he was invited to preach as a stated supply, once 
more to the people of his first charge, in Southampton, in the 
summer of 1863. Here he continued with acceptance, the Lord 
blessing his labors, until a call was made out for his settlement, 
which having accepted, he was again installed the second Sabbath 
of October, 1864.* The sermon of installation was preached by 
the Eev. "William H. Dean, of Amagansett, and the charge to the 
people delivered by the 6ame. Rev. Charles Sturgis, M. D., 
gave the charge to the minister. He resigned his second charge 
here May 1, 1867, and removed to Germantown. 

16. John J. A. Mor&an 

The Eev. John J. A. Morgan was first employed June 26, 
1852, and installed as pastor, January 20, 1853. The installation 
sermon was delivered by Eev. Edward Hopper, of Sag Harbor, 
the charge to the pastor and ordaining prayer by Rev. E. C. 
"Wines, D. D., of East Hampton, and the charge to the people by 
Rev. Mr. Edgar of Bridgehampton. Mr. Morgan was dismissed 
in September, 1855, and ministered to a church as pastor in 
Bridesburg, Pa. ; afterwards he accepted a call to the pastorate of 
the church in Hempstead, L. I. In 1871 he connected himself 
with the Episcopal church. 

From 1855 to 1863 the congregation had no settled pastor, be- 
ing supplied by various individuals of -whom the principal were 
Messrs. Crane, Kennedy and Cleveland. Rev. Elias N. Crane 
labored as stated supply from November 4, 1855, to April 3, 
1856. 

* Church Manual 1870 says his reinstallment took place September 25, 1864. Which is cor- 
rect 1 I will not change this as it was not here recorded without reason or care. 



124 Historit of Southampton. 

The Rev. David Kennedy began his labors here as stated sup- 
ply November 23, 1856, and continued till October 24, 1858. 
Rev. Abijah Green was employed by Mr. K. as substitute from 
December 10, 1856, to February 7, 1857. 

The Rev. William Neal Cleveland, remained" here as stated 
supply, from January 1, 1859, to July 2, 1863. He was a grad- 
uate of Hamilton College and Union Seminary of New York 
city. 

17. Hugh 1ST. Wilson, D.D. 
See notice before given of him as fifteenth pastor. 

18. F. E. Shearer, 1867-1870. 
19. Andrew Shiland, D. D. 

20. Walter Condiot. 

This church has raised up an unusual number of ministers, the 
most of whom are still laboring on earth in the Master's cause. 
Their names are : Jonah Fordham, Walter Wilmot, James M. 
Huntting, Robert Shaw, Samuel Hunt, Samuel Hampton Jagger, 
Samuel Huntting, Henry M. Parsons, Edward Halsey Sayre, 
Samuel Edward Herrick and George Rogers Howell, and from 
the Methodist Society, Barnabas F. Reeve. 

Dr. Lyman Beecher (Autobiography, vol. 2, p. 510) says in ref- 
erence to Edward Herrick, who was then in Yale College prepar- 
ing for the ministry, and a man of brilliant talent and shining 
piety : " Oh, how I remember that day when God first flashed 
deep conviction upon iny soul, and tore away the veil from my 
heart, and set my sins in order before me ! I was overpowered, 
and broken down with grief and confusion ; and when I went 
out of my room, whom should I meet but Edward Herrick of 
Southampton, Long Island, who was a student with me at Yale 
College. How he happened to know of my feelings, I can't tell, 
unless he saw it in my face, but he came up to me, and kindly 
taking my hand, began to talk with me upon the subject of 
religion. Oh, he was an angel sent from heaven to my soul ! 
You ought all to be ministering spirits too." 



The Early Church. 125 

Mr. Herrick was a brother of Mr. Micaiah Herrick, and an 
early death prevented him from entering upon that labor of love 
which he coveted. He graduated in the class of 1796. 

Rev. Paul Cuffee. 

The following account of Mm is derived substantially from 
Prime's History of Long Island. He was the second of seven sons 
of Peter Cuffee, a native Indian of the Shinnecock tribe, and grand- 
son, on his mother's side, of the Rev. Peter John, who was also a 
Shinnecock and a faithful and successful preacher of the gospel 
to the native Indians of the Island. He was born in the town 
of Brookhaven, March 4, 1757. His mother was said to have 
been an eminently pious woman, and a member of the native 
Indian Church at Wading River. She being of African 
descent, Paul was, of course, not of pure aboriginal blood. At 
an early age he was indentured as a servant to Major Frederic 
Hudson, at Wading River, with whom he labored until twenty- 
one years of age. During his minority he was reckless and much 
addicted to such low pleasures as presented themselves to him in 
his sphere of society. But it pleased the Lord to call him to a 
nobler career. During a revival in 1778-9, he was converted, 
and at once felt an ardent desire to labor for the salvation of his 
brethren on the Island. Though possessing a very limited edu- 
cation, he early commenced preaching — upon what authority, or 
licensed by whom, it does not appear. Removing from Wading 
River he went to Moriches, where he remained about two years ; 
and thence to Poosepatuck, where, in 1790, he was ordained to 
the work of the ministry, by a council of ministers from the 
Connecticut Convention. He afterward removed to Canoe Place, 
which continued to be his residence till his death. 

On the 17th of October, 1792, he was admitted a member of 
the "Strict Congregational Convention of Long Island" (what- 
ever that was), which had been organized about a year before, in 
fellowship with the " Strict Congregational Convention of Con- 
necticut." 

In 1798 he received a commission from the " New York Mis- 
sionary Society " to labor with the remnants of the Long Island 



226 Histort of Southampton. 

Indians, in whose employ he continued till his death, and annu- 
ally received a liberal compensation. The principal field of his 
labor was Montank, Canoe Place, and Shinnecock, though he oc- 
casionally visited Poosepatuck and Islip, where there were then a 
few scattered remnants of the native tribes. 

He had a retentive memory, a fertile imagination, a musical 
voice, a graceful manner, and, as Mr. Prime narrates, a most un- 
affected humility of heart. He died as he had lived under the 
smiles of his Savior. His grave marked with a plain white slab, 
and enclosed with a paling, is on the borders of the old country 
road leading west from Canoe Place, and about one mile from 
that settlement. The headstone bears the following inscription : 

Erected | by | The New York Missionary Society | In mem- 
ory of | The Pev Paul Cuffee | An Indian of the Shinnecock 
tribe | who was employed by that Society | for the last thirteen 
years of his life on the | Eastern part of Long Island | where he 
labored with fidelity and success. | Humble, pious and indefati- 
gable | in testifying the gospel of the grace of God | he finished 
his course with joy, | on the | 7th of March 1812 | aged 55 years, 
and three days. 

The Methodist Society. 

In 184.5 the old Presbyterian Church, erected in 1707, was pur- 
chased and repaired for a house of worship for a Methodist soci- 
ety, which was then organized. 

In 1884 the Methodists sold the old church to an incorporated 
company for a village hall and built a new house of worship on 
land purchased of Mr. Albert J. Post to the north of his resi- 
dence. 

This society, commencing with small numbers, has grown largely, 
chiefly, however, by immigration, and at present is vigorous and 
prosperous. It has done a good work in the village, and the re- 
lations between its members and the older church have always 
been marked with good feeling. The tolerant spirit of the fathers 
has descended to the sons, and both churches have labored cordially 
side by side for the promotion of piety and good morals in the 
community. 



The Early Church. 127 

Church Edifices. 

The first church edifice was erected in 1640 or 1641, within a 
twelve-month from the settlement of the town. Its site has been 
a matter of doubt till recently, when a deed was discovered in the 
office of the Town Clerk by Mr. "William S. Pelletrean, for a lot 
described as the " Old Meeting House Lot" bounded on the east 
by Old Town street, and north by the highway ; showing the 
site to be what is now the homestead, of Mr. Joseph T. King. 
This house, according to tradition, was thatched, as probably were 
many of the first dwelling houses. 

In 1652 (N. S.), March 20, at a General Court, steps were 
taken to build a church thirty by twenty-four feet ; posts to be 
set in the ground and to be eight and a half feet from the ground 
to the plate. This was the second church. October 14, 1667, 
John Tennison acknowledges receiving part " pay to the building 
of the Meeting House." From the records of the town again 
(Liber A, No. 2, p. 51) it appears that this church was not com- 
pleted until some time between 1669 and 1672. As to the loca- 
tion of this church, there is no doubt whatever. It stood on what 
is now the homestead of Mr. Edwin Post. Its location is given 
in a record of a settlement of a dispute between Isaac Willman 
and the town, on November 29, 1672. 

The third was erected in 1707, and stood on the south-west cor- 
ner of the land of the late Captain Albert Kogers, facing the 
main street and the lane. (See frontispiece.) It is still standing, 
after having been used as a house of worship by the Methodist 
society from 1844 to 1884. The steeple of this church, pulled 
down by ropes in 1842 or 1843, was built in 1751. 

The fourth was erected in the year 1843. 

Presbyterian Church of Bridgehampton. 
1. The first minister was the Rev. Ebenezer White, who was 
ordained here October 9, 1695. He served as a supply here for 
some time previous to this and in April of that year purchased 
ten acres of land having thereon a residence and other buildings, 
in Sagg. On May 27, 1695, the town granted him fifteen acres 



128 Histoet of Southampton. 

of land. Mr. White labored here fifty-three years and died Feb- 
ruary 4, 1756, aged eighty-four. 

2. The second pastor was the Rev. James Brown, who was 
ordained June 15, 1748. He resigned his charge March 27, 1775,* 
and removed to a farm at Scuttle Hole, now owned by George 
Strong. He died April 22, 1788, in the sixty-eighth year of his 
age, and was buried in the cemetery in Scuttle Hole. 

3. The third pastor was the Key. Aaron Woolworth, a brilliant 
scholar and one loved by all his people for his many excellent 
traits of character. He was a native of Long Meadow, Mass., 
and a graduate of Tale. He married a daughter of Rev. Dr. 
Samuel Buel of East Hampton, and one of his sons, Samuel 
Buell "Woolworth, L.L.D., was long the secretary of the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York. Dr. Woolworth 
was ordained August 30, 1787, and continued here in the minis- 
try for thirty-four years and died among his people. 

4. The fourth -pastor was the Rev. Amzi Francis, who was or- 
dained April 17, 1823, and continued here for twenty-three years 
until his death on October 18, 1845, at the age of fifty-two. 

5. Rev. Cornelius Edgar came to this place November 21, 
1845, and was ordained June 10, 1846. He resigned his charge 
October 2, 1853, and removed to Easton, Pa., where he still re- 
mains as pastor of the Reformed church. 

6. Rev. David M. Miller was installed April 27, 1854, after 
having preached about three months as stated supply. He mar- 
ried Isabel, only daughter of Judge Hugh Halsey, of this village, 
and died in June, 1855. 

7. Rev. Thomas M. Gray, son of Rev. John Gray, of Easton, 
was installed April 23, 1856. He resigned April 10, 1866. 

8. Rev. William P. Strickland, D.D., preached from May, 1866, 
to October 5, 1875, as stated supply, when he was installed as 
pastor. He resigned in October, 1878. 

9. The present pastor is the Rev. Arthur Newman. 

A Methodist church was organized here in 1820 and is now in 
a flourishing condition. 

*W. S. Pelletreau. 



The Early Church. 129 

The first church was erected probably in 1695, when the parish 
of Bridgehampton was organized. It stood about half-way be- 
tween the main north and south street of Sagg, and the street 
leading from Bull Head to the beach. It was situated on a road 
now closed up a little south of the present residence of Hon. 
Henry P. Hedges. 

The second church edifice, erected in the year 1737, stood about 
fifty rods from Francis' corner, eastward on the north side of the 
street, and half in the street and half in the lot. The stepping 
stone before the entrance door still remains in situ. It stood un- 
til 1842 when a new church was erected which is now used. In 
1764 Whitefield preached one of his great revival sermons in this 
second church. 

The " New Light " church stood about five rods from the main 
highway, between South and Bridgehampton, on Rufus Rose's 
lane, and on the west side of the lane. The building itself was 
removed to a site near the residence of Dr. Wright, and is now oc- 
cupied as a dwelling house. 

Sag Harbor Churches. 
Sag Harbor began to be settled about 1730. No full history is 
given of this place, since a work giving its history in detail is 
already prepared by Luther D. Cook, Esq. The first church edi- 
fice in this village was Presbyterian, and erected in 1766. John 
Foster, of Southampton, Wm. Hedges, of East Hampton, and 
Maltby Gelstou, of Bridgehampton, were appointed at a meet- 
ing of its inhabitants to solicit aid in their several villages. It 
stood where the present Episcopal church now stands. The sec- 
ond Presbyterian church edifice was erected in 1816, and afterwards 
was sold and became the first church of the Episcopal Society. The 
third was erected in 1843. The ministers of this Presbyterian 
church have been as follows : John Taylor, 1789 ; James Rich- 
ards, D.D. ; the first pastor, Daniel Hall, ordained September 21, 
1797, removed to Shelter Island in the spring of 1806 ; Nathaniel 
S. Prime, stated supply, October 26, 1806, to the fall of 1809; 
Stephen Porter and Mr. Gaylord stated supply each for some 
months ; John D. Gardiner, pastor, ordamed October 1, 1812, re- 
17 



130 Histoet of Southampton. 

signed June 16, 1832; Samuel King from August, 1832, till his 
death in November, 1833; Ithamar Pillsbury, stated supply, 
1834-35; Joseph A. Copp, pastor, October, 1835, to 1851 ; John 
Lowrey, 1863-67 ; William G. Barnes, 1868-72 ; Alexander W. 
Sproule, 1873 ; Edward H. Camp. There are besides those men- 
tioned, now in Sag Harbor, a Methodist and a Roman Catholic, 
and two churches for colored people. 

Church Matters. 

A few of the decrees of the General Court will throw some 
light both on ecclesiastical matters and on the constant uncertain- 
tainty and anxiety, if not peril, of our forefathers while living in 
proximity to another and a barbarous race. 

" Oct. 29, 1645. Ordered by Generall Court that there 
shall be a cessation of taking armes to the Meeting House on the 
Lord's day from Nov. 1st to the first of March ensuing. 

"Dec. 28, 1669. Whereas there was a contest in the 
towne about a piece of ground to set the meeting house upon, 
now at a towne meeting it is staked out for that purpose lying upon 
the front of Isake Willman's home lot. (Liber A, No. 2, p. 5t.) 

" Aug. 4, 1681. At a Town meeting the building of the gal- 
leries of the church was postponed till another year." 
, The salary of the ministers in early times was raised by a pro 
rata tax as appears by the following order : 

"At a towne meeting held Feb. 17, 1687, it is ordered 
and Concluded by the generall voate of the towne, that if any 
pson shall faile to pay his Respective Rates to Mr. Whiteing of 
his yearly maintenance at or before the first of Aprill next ensu- 
ing after the said Rates shall become Due that then the Constable 
for the time being shall take by distress the said proportions for 
the year past, of the severale persons so Defective for the use of 
the said Mr. Whiteing which is to be at the proper cost and Charge 
of those soe behind in their rates. 

The Parsonage. 
" Whereas the towne of Southampton by unanimous consent 
did set aparte a Certain parcell of Land lying in the ox pasture 
unto the quantity of Thirty acres and also soe purchased of John 



The Early Chukch. 131 

Cooper a house lott of three acres more or less Cituate or lying 
against the meeting house and Builte a house thereon which said, 
house and Land is now By Joint Consente of the towne put into 
the possession of Mr. John Harriman upon termes the towne and 
he hath agreed on which said house and Lands ware so set apparte 
Devoted or Dedicated by the towne to be and Remaine for ever 
to the use of the ministry of this towne that so from time to time 
for ever here after the said house and Lands may all ways be in 
Eedynes for the Entertainmente and" use of such minister or min- 
isters as being called By the towne shall Come and perform the 
work of the ministrie in this place or plantation and for as much 
as the said Lands were with much Difficulty spared and procured 
By the towne for the said use and if the towne should Be frustrate 
of theire said end By the said House and Land Being hereafter 
Disposed of otherwise it is not to be Conceved in the eye of reason 
that theire should probably be found in this towne an other 
suply for the ministry that would be acceptable to or convenient 
for any minister that should come to Inhabite and officuate here, 
wee the Inhabitants of this said towne of Southampton doe thire- 
fore heare by Declaire order unanimously agree and vltimately 
Conclude that the said house and and Lands sequestered or set 
apparte as afforesaid shall according to the Reall Intente of the 
towne Be and Remaine from time to time and for ever to ye use 
of the ministry of our said Towne as the providence of God shall 
hereafter dispose ministers of the word successively unto us and 
noe Inhabitante of this place shall ever at any time assume power 
to Dispose of the said house or Lands or any parte there off from 
the said use of the ministry without the full Consente of every 
Inhabitant of the towne that then shall be surviving and this 
present agreemente and Instrumente to be Binding and of full 
fource to us our heirs and successors for ever in witness whereof 
we have heare unto set our hands this 12 day of Aprill Anno 
Domini 1675. 

-" Thomas Halsey, John Cooper, Arthur Howell, James 
Herrick," (and 46 others.) 

The town set apart also land in Sagg for the parsonage, when 
Eev. Mr. Ebenezer "White was called as the first minister of the 



132 Histoby of Southampton. 

Bridgehampton parish. Some years later in March 20, 1712 
(or 13), the following report was made to the town : 

" March the 20th 1712-13. 

" "Wee the layers out that are hereunto subscribed doe make 
our return of laying out the twenty Acres of land granted by the 
towne to Bridge Hampton for the use of a presbyterian ministry 
and noe other, and we laid out the land on the west side the high- 
way that goeth from Mecox to Mr. Wicks and on the north side 
of the highway that is by James Hildreths lot that he had of 
Christopher ffoster and wee began at the South east corner and 
left a highway between James Hildreths and said land sixteen 
poles wide and run to the westward 50 poles and the highway att 
the South west corner is eight poles, then we run northward 60 
poles and left a highway between John Wicks lot on the North 
side of East Hampton path eleven rods wide, three poles of it is 
within Mr. Wicks fence ; then we run Eastward 50 poles, then 
we run Southward 70 poles and att the south east corner we left 
a highway between John Wicks and the said land 12 poles wide. 

" ABRAHAM HOWELL, 
" THEOPHILUS HOWELL, 
" ISAAC JESS UP, 
" ISAAC HALSEY." ■ 

By this it appears the people at Southampton called themselves 
Presbyterians, and even from the beginning they had " ruling 
elders in the church as witness, Liber A, No. 1, p. 39, where 
John Cooper is named and styled as such in 1644. 

The Presbyterian Quarterly of January, 1859, as cited by Dr. 
Stiles, in his History of Ancient Windsor, says on this point : 

" As to the constitution of the individual church in the early 
history of New England, it was Presbyterian rather than Conore- 
gational. This was the case with the mother Church of Leyden, 
of which Robinson was Pastor, and Brewster a Rulinc Elder. 
They seem to have borrowed their ideas of the proper' and scrip- 
tural organization of an individual church, with scarce a modifica- 
tion from the writings of Calvin. In the French Reformed Church 
as is well known, the principles of the Genevese Reformer 
were more perfectly and constantly carried out than in Geneva 
itself, and it is to the French Reformed Churches that the 
Leyden Church refers as the pattern from which they had drawn. 
In response to certain honorable members of his Majesty's 



The Early Ohdbch. 133 

Privy Council, Robinson and Brewster reply under their 
own signatures to the effect that ' touching the ecclesiastical min- 
istry, namely, of pastors for teaching, elders for ruling, and dea- 
cons for distributing the Church contribution, as also for two sac- 
raments, etc., we do wholly and in all points agree with the 
French Ref ormed Churches, according to their public confession 
of faith.' They add that some small differences were to be found 
in their practice, but such only as were ' in some accidental cir- 
cumstances ' and 'not at all in the substance of the things.' Yet 
in specifying these differences, they say, ' We choose none for 
governing elders, but such as are apt to teach? ' Their elders are 
annual, etc., ours perpetual.' ' Our elders administer their office 
publicly, theirs more privately.' These are the only matters of 
difference between themselves and French Reformed Churches, to 
which they refer in connection with the form of government or 
the constitution of the individual church. * * * In accord- 
ance with such views the Leyden Church was constituted. They 
were of course reflected in the Constitution of the Plymouth 
Church in this country. * * * Bailie says, the settlers did 
' agree to model themselves (i. <?., the people of Hampton, Mass.,) 
after Mr. Robinson's pattern,' and Cotton speaks of 'the Ply- 
mouth Church helping the first comers in their theory, by hear- 
ing and discovering their practice at Plymouth.' * * * The 
Cambridge Platform (1648) thus recognizes the Presbyterian 
Constitution of the Church. It says : ' Of elders some attend 
chiefly to the ministry of the Word, as the pastors and teachers ; 
others attend especially unto rule, who are therefore called ruling 
elders.' Again ; ' The ruling elder's office is distinct from the of- 
fice of pastor and teacher.' His ' work is, to join with the pastor 
in those acts of spiritual rule which are distinct from the minis- 
try of the Word and Sacraments.' Among the specified duties, 
are admission of members; convening the church; 'preparing 
matters in private ' for more speedy dispatch, etc. * * * In 
accordance with these principles the greater part of the early 
New England churches were established. * * * Of the im- 
portance of the eldership, Hooker speaks in very emphatic lan- 
guage : ' The elders must have a Church within a Church, if they 



134 History of Southampton. 

-would preserve the peace of the Church.. Nor would he allow 
questions to be discussed before the whole body, till the proper 
course had been resolved upon in the Presbytery or session of the 
elders.' " 

As this was the forming or transition period in American 
church history, irregularity in practice might be expected and is 
certainly found. Lechford (Plaine Dealing) writes that there 
was great difference in the matter of ruling elders, some churches 
being organized on the present Presbyterian form with elders and 
deacons, and some without them. The ministers even in some 
cases virtually exercised presbyterial authority. Josselyn (Two 
Voyages) says the governments of the churches were Independent 
and Presbyterial, and each church has one pastor, one teacher, 
ruling elders and deacons. 

In a MSS. written by Abiel Holmes, discovered in a cabinet 
of President Stiles, it is stated that the settlers of the east end 
of Long Island were chiefly Presbyterians. The manner of ad- 
mission to church membership frequently was by a public exami- 
nation in church, followed by a vote of the whole congregation 
upon receiving the candidate ; and in other cases the examination 
of the candidate was in private by the ministers and elders, after 
which the party was received by the votes of the whole congre- 
gation. 

Manner of Seating People in the Church of Bhidge- 

HAMPTON. 

About sixty years ago the pews of the church were free, but 
occupied according to this regulation : Men, called assessors, were 
appointed to seat the people in rank of age. The oldest and 
most venerable in the congregation were seated in the front seats 
— next the less old, and so on till all the seats below were occupied. 
In the galleries, by common consent, a similar custom prevailed. 
The young men held the front and the boys were behind them 
diminishing in age as they approached the walls. Thus a lad be- 
ginning with the back seat next to the wall would, if he lived to 
old age, by gradual promotion, have worked his way through the 
whole church, sitting in each rank successively as death thinned 



The Early Chuech. 135 

the ranks before him. The same regulation obtained with the 
female part of the congregation. A wife always sat in a seat of 
equal rank with her husband, but always on her side of the house. 
It was not till pews were annually rented that the sexes were al- 
lowed to be seated together in the same seats. 

In the Southampton church the old men sat in side seats on 
each side of the pulpit, with the small boys in their front. It was 
not uncommon for an unlucky boy at play to be arrested by a 
vigorous box of the ear by one of the old men behind him. 

" At a Towne meeting November the 5 1679 It is ordered that 
Mr. Justice Topping with the Constable and Overseers attended 
by Henry Pierson shall appoynt all the Inhabitants of this Towne 
their proper and distinct places in the meeting house on the 
Lord's day to prevent disorder." 

The order of seating has not been handed down, yet something 
is known. The pulpit was very high, supported by a shaft and 
projected in front, leaving directly under it a space large enough 
for a pew called the deacons' seat, in which these officers were 
seated in dignity, overlooking the congregation. Directly in front 
of them was the communion table, between which, and the con- 
gregation, sat the magistrates. 

The clock in the church was made in New Haven about the- 
year 1765. 

Chukch Bells. 

The following correspondence in relation to the first two bells 
from the Records is given as a curiosity : 

East Hampton July ye 25th 1693. 
Received then one bord the good shipe friends Adventure of 
Mathew Howell a small Church Bell waighing about sixty five 
pound. By order and for the proper accompt and Risque of the 
Town of Southampton aforsaid which I promise to deliver to 
Mr Walter Mico marcht In London he paying for fraight the 
danger of ye Seas and winds only excepted having given two Re- 
cepts of this tenure and deate the one being accomplished the 
other is voyed. I say Received p mee. 

Cyfbian Southalk. 



136 Histoby of Southampton. 

London, Feb. 25, 1693-4. 
Me. Matthew Howell, — 

Sir according to your Desire I have t caused a New Bell to be 
cast & itt proues of a good sound but when I came to enter itt I 
found itt to be prohipetted wth I could not ship wthout ye Lord 
Tresurers warratt wch wil be chargeable. There is now a Bill in 
the house of Parlaraett for ye free Exporteing of Bells & I be- 
leave itt will be enacted if not I will find a waye to hang itt in 
Som Ship & send it you that way. * * * 

"Walteb Mioo. 

London, May 19, 1694. Mr. Walter Mico writes to Matthew 
Howell that according to his order of July 25, 1693 for a new 
bell, he had one cast and ready to ship in November, 1693 but 
could not, it being prohibited by law. But an act for exportation 
of bells having since passed, he shipped it on that day May 39, 
1694 on board the European, John Foy, Master. The bell weighed 
173 lbs. and the bill was as follows : 

Bell weighing 173 lbs 14d per lb 
Clapper & Screw 11 lbs 7d per lb 
All other charges 

Credit for old bell 54 lbs 9d per lb 



The bell was hung in the church in 1695. It was carted from 
" Northwest " near East Hampton, by Samuel Cooper. 

The bell in the old church in 1843 weighed between 300 and 
400 pounds. 

In 1843 a bell was purchased for the new church, but broke with- 
in two years, and another was then obtained weighing about 800 
pounds. 

A Mr. Boyer came over from Havre in France, with or after 
Elias Pelletreau, and lived in Southampton. He was a merchant, 
and boarded with the Pelletreau family. In the year 1729 he had 
made and presented to the church two heavy communion cups of 
silver with the simple inscription engraved upon them, " S. church,. 
1729." Ten years later two others were' made with the follow- 



£10 01 10 

00 06 05 

01 04 11 


11 13 03 
03 08 00 


09 05 03 



The Early Chtjbch. 137 

ing inscriptions: on one "Sought Hampton Church;" on the 
other, " For the church of Sought hamton, 6 Decembr 1739." 
The inscription on the tombstone of Mr. Bojer in the Northend 
burying ground is as follows : " Here lyes ye body of Mr Stephen 
| Bowyer of Arver in France who | came to this place in ye 
year 1686 | Departed this life Oct ye 24 [ 1730 aged 73 years." 

" 1645. Ordered by General Court that each family by turns 
shall sweep out the Meeting House every week, and also from 
the 1st October to 15th April, make a fire in it on Sabbath morn- 
ing. A failure to do this to be fined 2s and 6 pence. 

" May 14, 1649. It is ordered by Generall Court that the 
inhabitants of this towne being by the clarke of the band divided 
into two parts shall accordinge to the sayd Clark's appointment, 
bring their armes to the Meeting House every Lord's day, that is 
to say, the one half the one Sabbath, & the other half the other 
next after & that every man shall be provided with 4 charges of 
powder & shot or balles, hee that fayleth after due warning is to 
pay to the clarke six pence for every fault accordinge to the for- 
mer order 3rd July 1648." 

Schools. 

From the earliest period of the settlement to this day, a deep 
interest has always been felt in sustaining the public schools. The 
character of the original settlers itself secured this in their genera- 
tion, and their descendants appreciating the importance of educa- 
tion, have always sustained the teacher. Some of the earliest 
records discovered, together with others, are here presented. 

Richard Mills who was here as early as October 7, 1650, when 
he was made freeman, and removed March, 1651-2, writes himself 
" schoolmaster " once on the town records, in January, 1650-51, 
showing there was a school here as early as this date. 

" 1663, Sept. 22. Jonas Holdsworth is engaged to keep school 
for two years at 35 lbs. per year. 

" 1664, Sept. 5. Ordered to build a school house 20 feet long 
and 15 feet wide before winter at the town's charge. 

" 1694. John Mowbray engages to teach six months from the 
1st of May to the 1st of November, for 12 shillings per ' scholler,' 
18 



138 History of Southampton. 

teaching from 8 o'clock till eleven in the morning and from one 
o'clock till five in the afternoon." 

The school-house in use for the latter half of the eighteenth 
century, and even later, was a large one-story building with a 
wide, open fireplace in each end. Capacious as the fire places 
were in the cold winter days, they were piled high with hickory 
logs, and under the genial influences thus diffused, our grand- 
fathers and grandmothers played, or studied the old school books 
that now lie dusty and mouse-eaten in strange nooks and corners, 
in ancient houses with other garret trumpery. 

About the year 1786 the people began to agitate the question 
of building an academy here, as one was much needed for all the 
surrounding country. At that time there was not a high school 
on the island, at which boys could be fitted for college, and they 
were comparatively few in New England. To undertake this 
enterprise so soon after the close of the war, when this town like 
the whole country had been drained of its resources, certainly 
shows a high appreciation of the importance of learning. But 
the undertaking was thwarted by a spirit of rivalry in the sister 
town of East Hampton, and by the superior enterprise of Dr. 
Buel, who, learning the purposes of the Southampton people, 
raised his subscriptions, and promptly obtained a charter from the 
State Legislature for the Clinton Academy. This was in 17S7. 
The academy at Flatbush was chartered on the same day, and 
Clinton Academy was one of the first two incorporated academies 
in the State of New Tork. 

However, the growth of the town at last made it necessary to 
erect a suitable building for a high school, and in the year 183 1 
such a one was erected, and for the most has met with a fair 
degree of prosperity. Since its erection it has exercised a marked 
and most beneficial influence on the community. 

This academy met with a remarkable accident in the summer 
of 1853. A thunderstorm was passing over the village, and a 
heavy bolt of lightning struck it about seven o' clock in the morn- 
ing. The charge divided, part passing down the chimney at one 
end, and on the steeple at the other. The chimney rested on two 
tough white oak posts on the ground floor ; one of these posts was 



The Eaelt Church. 139 

riven and split into whips, which were scattered over the room. 
The charge which struck the steeple also divided — part passing 
directly downward, tumbling the greater part of the steeple to the 
ground, tearing holes in the floors of the second and first stories 
and thence passing into the cellar — the other part of the charge 
running down the roof, hurled shingles at least twelve rods, and 
pushed off by main force at the north-east corner, the upper por- 
tion of the north side of the building for a little space. In the 
upper room now called the Academy Hall, nearly all the panes 
of glass in the windows were burst outward by the rarified and 
expanded air. 

Since its establishment about fifteen young men of the village 
have received their preparatory course within its walls, most of 
whom have graduated at various colleges ; many other young men 
from other villages on the Islaud have also been fitted for college 
here. 



140 Histoey of Southampton. 



CHAPTER IX. 

VAEIOUS LOCALITIES RESIDENCES OF SETTLEES CHANGES OF 

EESIDENCE RESIDENCES IN 1865. 

It is to be lamented that the language of the aborigines, the 
Shinnecock tribe of Indians, passed away and was forgotten be- 
fore some one arose to perpetuate it on record. However, it is 
perpetuated in the names of various localities, though their sig- 
nification is lost. Other local names on the town records are 
now no longer heard, and still others exist whose origin is ob- 
scure. Some changes too in the laying out of streets and the 
configuration and state of the land have taken place, since the 
first settlers erected their houses in the forest. The ocean has made 
considerable encroachments upon the land during this period, 
varioiisly estimated from forty to eighty rods. The town pond 
extended as a creek and swamp, at least as far as Huntting's lane. 
One lane or street has been opened, and another closed — the 
former Job's lane, or the Academy lane, which was originally a 
portion of the Sayre homestead, and was given to the town for 
a public highway by Job S ayre, the son or grandson of Thomas 
Sayre, the first settler of that name. The only way of reaching 
the fertile land of the " Necks " was originally around the corner 
opposite the house where Harriet Heuben Halsey formerly 
resided ; then, very soon after the settlement, Huntting's lane 
was laid out as a highway, and finally the grant of Job Sayre 
succeeded for the same purpose. The first settlers seem to have 
occupied chiefly the land in the south part of the village, in 
order to place the barrier of a pond between them and the Indi- 
ans. In 1884 a new road from the railroad station to Gin lane 
was laid out and opened, which has not been formally named, but 
which is being generally called the East road. 

The island has been known under various names. By the 
Delawares it was called Matowacks, and is so named in the grant 



The Settlers. 141 

of New Netherlands, by Charles II., to James of York, and in 
various other documents. It was sometimes called on the main 
by the name of Sewanhacky, or the Island of Shells. By the 
Montauks and Shinneeocks it was known as Paumanake. From 
Ogilby's America we learn that the town of Southampton had 
then the musical name of Agawam. March 20, 1692-93, Gov- 
ernor Fletcher requested the Council to call the island Nassau Is- 
land, in honor of the King, "William Prince of Orange, as he said 
" that the King's name may dwell among you." This chauge 
was decided npon by the Council April 10, 1693.* 

In a similar way the name of the county was changed from the 
East Riding of Yorkshire to Suffolk, in honor of James, Duke 
of York and Albany, who was also Duke of Suffolk. 

The town pond has lately been called very appropriately Aga- 
wam lake, a name which in 1865 was given to Little Fresh pond, 
between Southampton and North Sea. It is but just to give 
another name to this little lake in the woods, and Nippaug is sug- 
gested, a name which in the Indian language of Long Island sig- 
nified a small body of fresh water. The large twin lake on the 
west of the road to North Sea might appropriately be called 
Missipaug lake, the Indian equivalent of Big Fresh pond. 

Mill Neck was the local name of a tract of land about two 
miles eastward of the village, now known as Watermill. 

Eastward of this was a strong settlement from about 1660, 
and later, called Sagabonack, and now known by the name of Sagg. 

In some of the public documents of the town, we notice Shel- 
ter Island mentioned under the name of Farret's Island. 

The Indian name of Canoe Place is variously spelled as Nia- 
muck and Niamug. 

Ponquogue appears to be a corruption of the original Indian 
appellation Paugonquague, and Quaquanantuck is now abbrevi- 
ated and known as Quogue. 

Great and Little Plains. 

These names frequently appear on the early records, and as 
they are now no longer known as distinctive names of any locality, 

* Records MSS., State Library, Council Minutes, vol. 6, p. 69, 



142 Histoey of Southampton. 

it may be worth while to describe the tracts of land so denomi- 
nated by our ancestors. The Great Plains, or the General Field, 
as it was also sometimes called, were bounded on the north by Cap- 
tain's Neck lane, east by the town pond, south by the beach, and 
west by Taylor's creek ; thus it included First, Cooper's, Hal- 
sey's and Captain's necks. 

The Little Plains were bounded north by Frog pond or Gin lane, 
south by the beach, east by old town pond and west by the town 
pond. The following report of the execution of an order of the 
General Court will throw light on this matter, while for other 
reasons it contains items of interest. It is to be remembered that 
some of the land therein mentioned now lies doubtless outside of the 
breakers in the Atlantic ocean. This tract of land was originally 
three lots deep north and south and has been diminished nearly 
one-half by the encroachments of the ocean since the settlement, 
incredible as it may appear. 

" Acording to an order established by the Generall Court, held 
in Southampton vpon the 5th of March, An Dom. 1651, the 
plaine called the little plaine was layed forth in diuisions for the 
inhabitants of the saide towne per Richard Odell apoynted for the 
same, who layed forth the saide land in three seueral diuidences, 
one of euery three making two achors, which two acors lying in 
the three diuidences aforesaid was layed out to an hundred & fifty 
pound lott, the said diuidences being drawn by the Inhabitants by 
lotery in & upon the 20th day of March, 1651. 

" The first diuidence bounds with his front upon the pond at 
the West end of the saide plaine, onely a cart way being left be- 
tweene the saide front and the pond, the reeres being butted by 
the side of the first lott of the third dividence along to, or west 
of the plaine, euery lot of the saide first dividence facing acord- 
ing to the marke on the stakes, to Mr. Smiths home lott North- 
ward of the saide plaine : half an ackor in this dividence was 
layed to every hundred and fifty pound Lott." 



The Settleks. 



143 



Lb No 

Mr. John Gosmer, 400 17 

Mr. Rob't Fordhain, 300 3 

Mr. Edward Howell, 350 11 

and to have a 50 out of his son 

ward's lot 

Mr. Edward Howell, Junr, 100 38 

William Rogers, 150 16 

Capt Thos Topping, 300 18 

JoDas Wood, 150 28 

Joshua Barnes, 150 2 

Ellis Cook, 100 26 

Mr. Josiah Stanburrough, 150 20 

John White, ' 150 15 

Thomas Veale, 100 13 

John Howell, 200 24 

and a fifty from Isack Willman. 

Henery Pierson, 150 8 

-Thomas Halsey, 300 14 

Isack Willman, 100 10 



No 

32 Robert Merwin, ) 
4 Win. Browne, j 

19 Thomas Hildreth, 
Ed-. John Cooper, Sen M - 
Richard Post, 
Thomas Cooper; — ' 
Mr. Thirston Rainer, 

27 Joseph Rainer, 
Thomas Burnett, 
Richard Barret, 
Mr. Edward Joanes, 
Mr. Richard Odell, 
Richard Mills, 
Thomas Saire, — - 

a fifty out of Richard 
John Jesop, 
Mr. Smith (Richard) 

23 Thomas Gouldsmith, 
John Looine, 



Lb 


No No 


150 


21 


100 


37 


150 


9 


100 


40 


150 


12 


200 


33 


100 


5 


100 


30 


150 


22 


150 


34 


150 


41 


100 


29 


200 


25 


Mills' 


ot. 


100 


39 


150 


36 


100 


21 


100 


6 



Ox Pasture. 

This was in two divisions, north and south, and must have been 
so designated rather later than the great and little plains, since 
the southern division of the ox pasture trenched upon the north- 
ern limits of the great field. The south division lay between 
Cooper's and Halsey's neck lanes on the south, and Captain's neck 
lane on the north. The north division lay between Captain's 
neck lane on the south, and the main highway to Shinnecock on 
the north — out of which tract, however, must be excluded thirty 
acres of parsonage land. The following order will add some light 
on this point, while it shows also that the eastern boundary of 
the ox pasture, both north and south divisions, was the town 
pond. 

It was ordered " to erect a five rail fence to begin at a branch 
or creek of water belonging to Shinnecock bay, which divides the 
land of Major John Howell and Isaac Halsey Sr., at the west end 
of said plains, (Great) and so to run said fence Eastward on the 
North side of the highway which divides the North and South 
division commonly known by the name of the Ox pasture divis- 
ion, until it comes to range with the west line of the parsonage 
land, and then to turn Northward to the So. West corner thereof, 
and thence on Eastward upon the South line of both pieces of 
said parsonage land unto the town pond, which fence is to be the 



144 Histoet of Southampton. 

north bound of said general field and east bounded by the said 
pond." 

Latitude and Longitude. 
The latitude of the Presbyterian church in the village of 
Southampton, as taken during the United States Coast Survey in 
1850, is 40°, 53' north, and the longitude 72°, 26', 31" west of 
Greenwich. 

Boundaeies. 

Some little trouble was experienced quite early in establishing 
the east and west boundaries of the town ; those on the north 
and south nature had happily settled for them beyond all dispute. 
This record pertains to the eastern and put an end to all uncer- 
tainty from its date to the present time. 

" At a Court of Election May 16, 1661. 

" It is agreed between Capt. Topping, Mr. Halsey, Mr. Stan- 
borough and John Cooper in behalf of all Southampton vnsatis- 
fied about their bounds, and Mr. Baker, and Mr. Mulford in 
behalf of ye Towne of East Hampton, That ye bounds between 
the two Plantations shal for euer be and remaine at the stake set 
down by Capt : How, an hundred pole eastward from a little 
pond, the said stake being two miles or near thereabouts from ye 
east side of a great pond commonly called Sackaponack : and soe to 
run from ye South Sea to the stake and soe ouer the Island by a 
strait line to ye Eastern end of Hogneck." 

Another controversy arose with Southold in 1667, and an extract 
upon this from the town record is interesting not only for its bearing 
on the case, but for other incidental mention of Indian customs. 

September 15, 1667. 
Bichard Howell and Joseph Bainer, aged about forty years, 
deposed this 15th of September, 1667. Saith as followeth : That 
vpon a time about the latter end of May last, Capt. John Youngs 
of Southold brought over to Southampton Thomas Stanton with 
some of the chief of Southold Indians, meeting at the School- 
house, some of the chief of the Southampton Indians with the 
Sachem being there. Capt. Youngs being asked the— end of his 



The Settlers. 145 

coming, said, to finde out truth, viz.: whoe had the true right to 
ye lande, or meadows in controversie between the said two townes, 
and the debate thereupon grew on betweene the Indians, there 
being present some of the Southold Inhabitants, with divers of 
ye chief of the Inhabitants of Southampton : Thomas Stanton 
being ye Interpreter. These deponents heard the said Thomas 
ask both parties of ye Indians who had the true right to the said 
land and meaddows, and the said Indians (after long debate) 
Joyntly answered, that ye young eagles that were taken in the 
nest and the deare that were drowned or killed in the water, It 
was ye Indian Custome to carry ye sd eagles & the skins of the 
deare to those Sachems or Indians that were the true owners of 
ye land, thereupon Tho. Stanton presently replyed, saying, 
indeed the Eagles & the deare were something, but if there 
were a beare killed or drowned, that would put the matter out of 
controversie, And these deponents heard Southampton Indians 
affirme that there was a beare drowned or killed in yt same tract 
of land now in controversy between ye two sd townes : Then 
Tho. Stanton asked them to whome the skin was carryed and 
Southampton Indians answered, to Shinecock Indians. And South- 
old Indians allsoe acknowledged that ye said beares skin was car- 
ryed to Shinecock Indians by Southold Indians who took ye beare. 

Taken before me, Thomas Topping. 

Also the following : 

October ye 17th 1667, the Testimony of two Ancient women 
that formerly had lived at Accaboucke, do affirme that all the 
land and marsh ground betweene Peaeoneek and Niamocke did 
belong unto Shinecock Indians, and that there was a bear 
drowned in the meadow on the East side of Peaconocke and that 
the skinne and fatt was brought to Shinecocke Indians, and one 
doth further affirme that she eat part of the said Bare. 

In presence of AQUABAOK, i 

THO. JAMES, Interpreter. her ^C marke 

IMPEAGWAN, 

her j( marke 



Both living at Montaukut. 



19 



146 Histoby of Southampton. 

Residences Eaelt and Peesent. 
No one of our ancestors has done for Southampton what Col. 
Lyon Gardiner did for the town which he assisted to bring into 
existence, viz., leave for future generations a record of the resi- 
dences of the original settlers. Many changes in the course of 
two hundred and twenty-five years have, of course, obliterated 
some of the old land-marks, and the difficulty is no small one, to 
reconstruct at this time the town of 1650. Yet some waymarks 
are found scattered all along, by which, with other assistance, 
much can be done in solving this problem. The list of inhabi- 
tants in 1649, 1657 and 1698, which have been given, will go far 
to confirm and complete the results of investigation of the town 
records. We take the following as a sure and reliable starting 
point; the facts are ascertained beyond all dispute. 

On the East Sdde op the Town. 

Obadiah Rogers lived on the residence of Captain Albert Rogers, 
deceased, and this homestead has always been in the Rogers family. 

Henry Pierson lived on the opposite corner where the church 
now stands, or it may be a little to the south on the homestead 
now owned by Mr. Lewis Hildreth. 

Isaac Wilman lived next north of the second church and on 
the' home lot now belonging to Mr. Edwin Post. 

James Herriek lived on what is now the homestead of Mrs. 
Hannah, widow of Captain James Post. This house was proba- 
bly a little south of the dwelling of Mrs. Post. 

Thomas Topping, Sen., lived on what is now the residence of 
Mr. Albert Foster. 

On the "West Side oe the Street. 

There can scarcely be any doubt but that Edward Howell, in 
1648, built the house formerly occupied by Mr. "William P. Her- 
riek. His homestead was bounded on the north by that of 
Thomas Sayre, and south by that part of the parsonage land 
lately sold to Mrs. Amanda Hildreth. 

Thomas Sayre resided where his descendants still live, north of 
the Academy, and probably in the same dwelling, though one- 
half of the house was added many years after his death. 



The Settleks. 



147 




148 History of Southampton'. 

The Jones family resided on what is now the residence of the 
heirs of Mr. ¥m, T. Jones, and their homestead embraced also 
that of Mr. Edward Huntting, deceased. 

Besides these a large number of residences of a later period 
have been ascertained from the town records, the result of which 
investigations will appear at length in the following plot of the 
main street of the Tillage. If space would allow I would repro- 
duce the map of "W. S. Pelletreau in volume 1 of, the printed 
town records. 

Remarks in Explanation of the Following Plot. 

The relative width of the lots fronting the main street is very 
nearly preserved in the plot, from Gin lane to the Meeting House- 
lane, on both sides of the street ; but from this point northward 
no such accuracy has been attempted, from want of sufficient 
data, and the design is merely to give the relative location of the 
residences in early and later times. 

The placing of a [] in a lot is also not designed to mark the 
position of the house in that lot, but to indicate simply the fact, 
of a residence somewhere in the same. 

To the north, say of Robert Woolley, in 1648, the nomesteads 
appear to have been larger than those south of this point, and, 
therefore, it has been impossible to indicate the exact locality of 
some who there resided. It is known that north of Manassah 
Kempton, on the same side of the street, lived James Hampton, 
who gave his homestead to his son-in-law, James Mappara. North 
of him lived Joshua Barnes. North of Barnes lived John Bishop 
in 1683. 

After every attempt to make an accurate analysis of all the data 
furnished by the records, perfect certainty cannot in all cases be 
obtained — yet in the main the plot is believed to be correct in 
the location of the homes of our ancestors. 

The west fork in the main street beginning at the residence of 
the late Capt. Austin Herrick, seems to have been laid out in 1712. 

Previous to this the line on the west side of the street must have 
run directly from the south-east corner of the burying ground to- 
the south-east corner of the homestead of Captain A. Herrick. 



The Settleks. 



149 



\ I 



I ! filillilliilf^^pif 



Ill bvbh 



11 IS 












O 
d 



liltaiill 



3£ 



llli 



III 



WmmBSm 
mMKBbM 



j 4MHP 

1 1 np 

SHIP 



■IB,,, 







150 



History of Southampton. 
LITTLE PLAINS. 





Gin Lane. 


South. 






Edward 
Sayre, 1835. 

Henry 
Sayre, 1875. 


Thomas Reeves, 1670, 
Joseph Marshall, 1697 






Raynor family, 1704-1790, 
Pelletreau family, 1812-31, 
Henry Reeves, 1832. 






Edward 
Sayre, 1835. 

Henry 
Sayre, 1875. 


Joseph Raynor, [] 1676, 
John Wick, 1696, 
Raynor family, 1698-1790. 






Pelletreau family, 1812-31, 
Henry Reeves, 1832. 
Richard Howell. 






James Foster, 1810. 

Isaac P. 
Foster, 1863. 
Edward H. 
Foster, 1885. 


Joseph Raynor, [] 1676. 




CO 
■< 
&3 


Arthur Howell, 1675, 
Ben Davis, 1675, □ 
Richard Howell, Sr. 1676, 
Obadiah Howell, 1793. 


> 

1— 1 

W 


James 
Foster, 1810. 

Isaac P. 
Foster, [] 1863. 

Edward H. Foster, 
1885. 


Richard Howell, Sen., 1676, 
Jedediah Howell, j 
Christopher Foster, 1768, 
Joseph Foster, 1708. 


H 




Nathan Jagger, 1759, 
Joseph Foster, 1698, 
Daniel Foster, 1708. 






Charles 
Pelletreau, 1822. 
Wm. S. 

Pelletreau, 1863. 

Mary L. 
De Bost, 1869. 


Major John Howell, 1660-96. 
John Howell, 1708-1791. 

D 






Edward Howell, 2d, 1657. [1 
Edward Howell, 3d, 1699, 
Joseph Howell, 1726. 






Barney 
Green, [] 1863. 


John Jessup, [] 1648, 
Jessup family to 1819, 
Svlvanus Raynor, 1819, 
Albert Foster, 1842. 






Toilsome Lane. 


North. 





The Settlebb. 



151 



Eh 

m 

K 

E-< 

CO 

a 
i— i 
< 



South. 



BOAD TO THE BEACH.|^~ 



H Richard Smith, 1649, Joseph Foster, 1742, Edward 

Joseph Goodale * 1698. Thos. Jessup, 1760, Sayre 1854 

Nethaniel Howell, 1732, Sylvanus Howell, Henry Sayre 1875* 



Josiah Howell, 1690, 
Jonathan Raynor, 1697. 



Thomas Halsev, Sen., 
1648. * 



Hugh Rayor, 1742, 
James Raynor, 1780, 
Elias Pelletreau, 1812. 



[] Ben Marshall,* 1720. 



Maltby Pelletreau, 1831, □ T. Nicholas 
Olver White, 1836, White, 1865. 



[] Thurston Raynor 
1660. 



Thomas Halsey, 2d, 1678, 
Capt. Isaac Halsey, 1688-1757, 
Elias Pelletreau, 1812, 
Maltby Pelletreau, 1831, 
Oliver White, 1836. 



Thomas Halsey, Jr.,* 
□ 1657. 



T. N. White, 1874. 



Jonathan Raynor, 
□ 1657. 



Nehemiah Howell, 
□ 1720. 



Major John Howell, 1648, 

Nathaniel Howell, 1696, 

Jedediah Howell, 1740, 

Rev. Sylvanus White, 1746. Francis 



Horsemill Lane. Hervey Harris, 

A. B. De Bost, 1870. 



Wm. Brown, 1648. 

Rev. Rob. Fordham, 
1649. 



Edward Howell, 3d, 1713, Cook, 1857. 
Adonijah Raynor, 1741-70, 
Widow Norris, Hervey Harris, 1842, 
1720. Wm. Fuller, 1872. 



* The probable but not absolutely certain residence. 



O 

St 

O 
Si 

o 



152 



Histoby of Southampton. 



South. 



William Mackie, 
1865. 



Richard Barrett, 1648, 
1661, Thomas Goldsmith, [] 
Edward Howell, 2nd, 1676, 
Joseph Howell, 1699, 
Joseph Howell, 2nd, 1720. 



Charles Howell, 
1844. 



John Howell, 

1731. 
Micaiah Herri ck, 
1800. 



{Toppings 
1656-85. 



Windmill, 
[] 1650. 
Matthew Rogers, 
1807. 



Albert Foster, 
1844. 



John Howell, 

1731. 
Micaiah Herrick, 
1800. 



Thomas Topping, □ 

1657-1698, 
Wick family, 1700-18. 
Matthew Rogers, 1807. 



Mrs. Hannah 
Post [] 1865. 
Henry Post, 
1882. 



Obadiah Rogers, 

1778. 
James Post, 1818. 
Lindlay Murray, 1777. 



James Herrick, 
[] 1650. 






Edwin Post, 
[] 1855. 



Obadiah Rogers, 

1747. 
James Post 
1818. 



William Herrick, 
1680. 
[] 2nd Church, 
Isaac William [] 1650. 



George Herrick, 
[] 1865. 



Micaicah Herrick, 
1805. 



Ellis Cook, 1648, 
Thomas Stephens, [] 1690. 
Stephens family, to 1780. 



George Herrick, 
1865. 



Zerubbabel Phillips, 
Thomas Parvine, 1698. 
John White (very early), 
Edward Hunting, 1840. 



Dr. John P. Herrick, 1835. 
Mrs. E. P. Herrick, 1865. 



Henry Pierson, 1648, 
Pierson family to 1760 ? 



Lewis 

Hildreth, 

[] 1849. 



George Markie, 

1760? 
To Presbyterian Church, 
about 1883. 



Henry Pierson, 

[] 1650. 
Church, 
1843. 




3 
> 



W 



North. 



The Settlers. 



153 



Eh 
H 

H 

OS 
H 
oo 

Izi 

l-H 



South. 



Rev. Robt. Fordkam, 1649, Joseph Howell, 1727 
Major Joseph Fordham, 1673, David Howell, 1741, 

Silas Howell, 1745, 
John Pelletreau, 1795, 
James Scott, 1811. 



F. Cook, 
[] 1865. 



Joseph Howell, 1727, 
Silas Howell, 1780, 



E. Sayre, 
[J 1865. 



Joseph 

Fordham, 
[] 1673-93. 



John Mackie, 1740, 
David Mackie, 1758, 
Peter Mackie, 1817. 



Wm. Mackie, 
[]. 1865. 



Jonah Fordham, 
[] 1698. 



Gersham Culver, 1752, John Allen, 
Sylvanus Howell, 1760-1806. [J 1865. 



Joseph Fordham 1 1670, 
John Cooper, 

[] 1678. 



Rev. Sylvanus White, 1750, 

Dr. Hen'y White, 1782, Hen'y K. White, 

Sylvanus White, 1840. [] 1865. 



Richard Mills, 1648. 

~ Parsonage, 1673. 

ohn Cooper, 1651. 



s 



[] Parsonage, 
1865. 



Nathan Herrick. [] 1748. 



[] Edward Howell, 1st, 

1648. 
Edmund Howell, 1655, 



Philetus 
Pierson, 
[] 1865. 



Edward Howell, 1st, 1640, 
Edmund Howell, 1670-96, 
Nathaniel Howell, 
Stephen Reeves, 1748. 



Matthew Howell, 1601, 
Israel Howell, 1706. 



Henry 
Reeves, 
[] 1865. 



Edward Howell, 1st, 1640, 

Hugh Gelston, 1717, 
John Reeves, 1784, 
S. Whitehead, 1788. 



James Butler, 1750, 
Samuel Butler, 1701. 



Job Sayre, 1692. 



Edward 

Reeves, 
[] 1865. 



Job's Lane or Academy Lane. 



North. 
20 



>-3 
O 



O 

SI 

o 



154 



Histoky of Southampton. 



m 



South. 



Albert Rogers, 
heirs [] 1865. 



In Rogers family to 
this date. 



William Rogers, 1648. 

Obadiah Rogers, 

1655. □ 



Charles 

Howell, 
1836. 



Richard Post, 1648, 



Joseph Post, 1657. [ ] 

Edward Howell, 2d, 1688. 

Ben Foster, 1688-1694. 

Jonah Howell, 1695. 

Zebulun Howell, 1769. 



Josiah Foster, 1865. [] Samuel Butler r-, buys, 1697, of W. Melvine. 
Walter Melvine, 1695, buys of John Gould, 
who in 1686 bought of Rich Post. 



Ben H. Foster, 
[] 1865. 



Thos. Burnett, 
□ 1657. 



Abraham Cooper. 



C. Pelletreau, 

1860 
W. S. Pelletreau, 

1865. [] 
Josiah Foster, 1886. 



John Topping, 
John Gosmer, 1680. 
John Woodruff. 



[] 



F. S. Sayre, 
1865. Z3 



John Foster, 1657, 
Abraham Cooper, 1738. C3 
Samuel Huntting, 1739. 



_^J Road to Bridge Hampton. 



Rhodes, 1864. Z2 



Wm Huntting, 
Z3 1865. 



■ □ Jonas Bower, 1657. 
Uriah Rogers, 1770? 



George Post, 
□ 1865. 



Dr. Silas Halsey, 1772, 
Zebulun Jessup, 1794. 



Robert Woolley, 
□ 1657. 



George Post, 1824. 
Albert J. Post, 1865. 



Manassah Kempton. 
(Pope's Lot.) Methodist Church, 1886. 



G. Post. 1824. 
A J. Post, 1865. 



J Rogers, 1860. □ 



Wm. S. Pelletreau. 
rn 1865. 



i James Hampton, 

' ' James Mappam. 



Jesse Halsey, 
□ 1865. 



Charles H. Halsey, 1878. 



Wm. R. Post, 
□ 1852. 



Capt. James Parker, 1835. 



Jonathan Fithian, 
□ 1865. 



John Bishop, 1652. 



J. Fithian, 1865. 



North. 



> 

3 

CO 

Ed 

ts 

H 



The Settleks. 



155 



South. 



Thomas 
Sayre 1648. [] 



In Sayre family to 
this day. 



Wm. N. Sayre, 
[] 1865. 
Sarah Larry, 1886. 



Harriet Jones Rhodes, 1812, 
Emmeline Rhodes, 1837, 
Sophia Rhodes, 1837. 



Havens, 1886. 



C. Parsons, 1865. 



1755, Wm. White, I 1698, 



Stephen Howell, 1780. 



1764, Zeb. Cooper, | Maltby. 



[] 



Edwin P. Halsey, 1865. 



Nehemiah Sayre, 1820, Joel Jacobs, 1807, Wm. Sayre, 1830. 



Richard Woodhull, 1648. 
n Ephraim White, 1698, 
U John Halsey, 1756, 



Daniel Fordham, 
1865, [] 



H 
PS 

a 



John Gosmer, 1659, 
John Topping, 1660, 



Frederic Howell, 
[] 1865. 



r1 Isaac Halsey. 1698, 
U Chapman family, 1840, 



Wm. T. Jones, 1860. 
D 



Jones family, [] 1648. 



Wm. T. Jones, 1860. [] 



P Jones as above, 
U Matthew Howell. 



n Ed. Huntting, 
LJ 1840. 



Huntting's Lane. 



[] John Jagger, 



G. White, [] 1865. 



5% 
p273 



-a 

a" 
o a> 

North. 






Wm. Russell, 
Obadiah Sale, 
Caleb Heathcote. 



Burying 
Ground. 



John Laugh ton, 

D 



Wm. Fowler, 
[] 1865. 



John Laughton, 

Harriet R. Halsey, [] 1865. 



156 Histoky of Southampton. 

1679. Residence or homestead of Oapt. Mercator Cooper owned 
by Chris. Fowler. 1684, John Jennings sells same to Thomas 
Goodwin. 

Cornelius Voncke, a Dutch shoemaker lived where Mr. Thomas 
"Warren lives. He died, and his wife sold the homestead to 
Edward White, June 7, 1682, and on June 14, 1682, Edward 
White sold the same to William Mason. 

North of him on the west street running by the swamp in 
1679, lived Richard Painter; and north of his house a road was 
laid out in 1682, running at an angle of about 60° from this street 
to the hill street or main highway to the hills of Shinnecock. 

West of Yoncke, from 1646 to 1684, Thomas Cooper resided. 
Cooper must have sold a house-lot to Yoncke. 

John Tennison for a time, about 1668, resided on what is now 
the corner lot of Capt. Thomas Royce on the hill. 

South of this, about where is the residence of James Pierson, 
deceased, in 1698, lived James Cooper. 

Edmund Howell, in a deed of date about 1696, is spoken of as 
then residing in Cape May county, N. J. 

Thomas Hildreth died, leaving widow Hannah and a number 
of young children, names not given. At the time of his death 
his eldest son Joseph appears to have arrived at the age of man- 
hood, and inherited the homestead at Flying Point. But after- 
ward either Joseph or his son Joseph lived on what is now the 
residence of William Woolley, the grandfather of the late Mr. 
William Woolley. 

About 1650, Thomas Topping gives to his son-in-law, James Her- 
rick, a lot of land on his front, about two rods wide, for a house lot. 
He lived on what is now the homestead of Mr. Albert Foster. At 
this time, probably, and certainly in 1681, John Jessup lived on 
what is now the residence of the widow of Capt. James Post ; for 
in 1681 John Jessup sells this homestead to James Herrick. 
North of this, where some shops or wood houses of Mr. Edwin 
Post now stand, must have been the site of the second church. 
North of the church was the court-house and in the rear the jail. 
Still north of these, on the present homestead of Mr. Edwin Post, 
was the residence of Isaac Willman. Next to this was the house of 



The Settlers. 157 

Ellis Cook, now Mr. James Herrick's. Then next north lived 
John White very early, and north of him, embracing the late 
homestead of Mr. Lewis Hildreth and Mrs. Esther, widow of Dr. 
John P. Herriek, was the residence of Henry Pierson. 

The house lot of William Russell was sold to Obadiah Sale in 
1678, bounded north by home lot of John Laughton, east by the 
street, south by the home lot of John Jagger, and west by the 
highway leading to North Sea. Obadiah Sale sells this homestead 
to George Heathcote, and it was afterward purchased of Heathcote 
by the town for a burying ground and is still so used. 

1676. Richard Howell exchanges a lot laid out for a home lot 
of four acres, bounded north by home lot of Joseph Raynor, 
south by home lot of Mrs. Raynor or Jonathan Raynor (R. Howell 
bought this of John Lum), for six acres of Ben Davis' which he 
had of Arthur Howell and which were next to and south of 
Richard Howell's home lot. 

Arthur Howell and Hannah his wife, sell his home lot and 
house to Ben Davis, May 2, 1675, which lies .between Joseph 
Raynor and Richard Howell's, containing six acres. Arthur 
Howell removed to Sagabonach. 

We will add some statements communicated to the author, con- 
cerning the residences during the better half of the last century, 
by Mr. Charles Pelletreau, now deceased. 

South of Mr. Isaac Foster's house was the residence of Obadiah 
Howell. 

North of Mr. Isaac Foster lived Nathan Jagger. 

South of Mr. Nicholas White lived Hugh Raynor, and James 
his son lived in the present residence of Mr. White. 

North of Mr. White lived Benjamin Marshall. 

North of Horsemill lane lived Adonijah Raynor. 

South of the house of Mr. Barney Green lived John Howell. 
Deacon Thomas Jessup erected and occupied this house of Mr. 
Green. A windmill once stood on the south-west corner of the 
lot of Oapt. Charles Howell, which lies south of the homestead of 
Mr. Albert Foster. Stephen Howell lived on the present resi- 
dence of Mr. Edwin Halsey. 

Jeremiah Jagger lived on the present residence of Capt- 



158 Histoey of Southampton. 

George White. East of the homestead of Capt. Barney Green, 
deceased, lived John Fowler, Esq. Caleb Cooper lived on the 
present residence of Mr. Schroeder. Charles Cooper lived on the 
place of the late Sylvanus Marshall. Dr. Smith lived on the 
place of Mr. William Pelletreau, deceased. Joshua Sayre lived 
north of the present home of Mr. Caleb Halsey. Stephen Sayre 
lived on the present homestead of Mr. Jackson, but afterward, 
removed from the town. 

Elias Foster lived on the present homestead of Mr. Peter 
Fournier. John Foster, one of the convention to adopt the Con- 
stitution of the United States, lived on the late homestead of 
Mr. Lewis Hildreth. Deacon Samuel Howell lived on the home- 
stead now of Mr. Jeremiah Squires. 

To complete the list of present residences in the main street 
from the fork in the road opposite the burying ground, north- 
ward on the trapezoidal tract of land which forms the fork, 
lived on the end fronting the south, the widow of the late Capt. 
Austin Herrick. On the east side north of Mrs. Herrick lived 
Capt. Daniel Jagger and north of him Capt. Henry Halsey, and 
still north of him Miss Sayre. On the west side of the same 
lived Mrs. Agee Halsey. On the east side of the east branch of 
the main street line, successively advancing northward, the 
widow of Jonathan Fithian, Esq. (as in the plot before given), 
Charles Bishop, Caleb Halsey, Septa Jackson, Peter Fournier, 
James Bishop, William Jagger and Lewis Jagger. On the west 
side of the same branch live Mrs. Lewis Sanford, Albert Jagger, 
Albert Reeves and Francis Bishop. On the south end of a tract 
of land between the two branches aforesaid, and fronting south 
live Mr. Lewis Bowden, on the west, and Mr. John Burnett to 
the east of him. On the west side of the west branch, north of 
Capt. William Fowler (as in the above plot) lived Mrs. Harriet 
R. Halsey, Mr. E. Wines Payne and Captain Samuel McCorkle. 
On the east side of the same lived Mr. David Jasreer. 

Villages and Hamlets. 
Watermill. This was settled very early, the grist mill being 
erected there by Edward Howell in 1644, and the land being taken 



The Settlers. 159 

up by the sons of the first settlers. It is in the parish of Southamp- 
ton village. It maintains a prosperous district school and has a 
population of nearly 200. 

Sagg. 

This village was settled as before stated about 1660. The 
earliest settlers were Josiah Stanborough, John and Elnathan 
Topping, Henry Pierson, Christopher Learning and Rev. Ebenezer 
White. Theophilus, son of Major John Howell, settled here 
quite early on land now occupied by Gr. Clarence Topping. 
Daniel Hedges came here about 1702 from East Hampton and 
was the progenitor of those of the name in Southampton. 

Among the oldest epitaphs in the village burying ground are 
the following : 

" Here lyes buried the body of Theophilus Howell, Esq. Aged 77 years ; 
deceased March the 12, 1739." 

"Coll. Henry Peirson deceased November the 15 in the 50 year of his age. 
1701." 

"Mr. Peregrine Stanborough, Deacon in the Parish. Departed this life 
Jan. the 4, 1701, in the 62 year of his age." 

" Here lies the Body of Captain Elnathan Topping, who departed this life 
March the 26 anno Domini 1705, aged 64 years." 

" Here lieth the Body of John Topping, Justice of the Peace, aged fifty 
years, who departed this life in the 29 day of May in the year 1686." 

" Here was layed the body of Mr. Nathaniel Uusco, who dyed Avgvst the 
21st Anno 1714, in the 67 year of his age." 

Noyac. 
Isaac Jessup settled here in 1712. His homestead continued 
in this family till about 1800, when Silas Jessup sold it to Jere- 
miah Osborn and after the death of his son Judge ■ John S. 
Osborn it was sold to David Wiggins. A fulling mill was built 
here about 1690 by John Parker and in 1718 was owned by 
Jonah Rogers. The place is now well known from the fine trout 
ponds stocked and owned by G-. W. Thompson. 

Canoe Place. 
This is on a peninsula between the Shinnecock and Peconic 
bays, called Niamuck by the Indians, and Canoe Place by the 



160 History of Southampton. 

settlers from the fact that canoes were drawn here from one bay to 
another by the Indians. The present hotel property was sold by 
the trustees of the proprietors in 1739 to Jeremiah Culver. 
Until the revolution his house was the only habitation between 
Riverhead and Southampton. From the revolution to the present 
day the successive owners have been Major George Herrick, John 
Howell, grandfather of Charles Howell late of Ketchabonuck, 
George Seaman and Israel Conkling. 

Squiretovm. 

This is a small hamlet near Peconic bay north of Good Ground. 
The first settler was Ellis Squires who came from East Hampton. 

Good Ground. 
This thriving village has sprung up since 1800. It contains a 
Methodist church built in 1863 and a school-house. It is so 
named from the fact that it is an oasis amid the barren pine lands 
that surround it. 

Ponquogue, formerly Paugonquogue. 
This is a small hamlet on the Shinnecock bay and has a fine 
light-house erected in 1857. The Bay View Hotel erected here 
in 1 875 is a large structure and attractive to sportsmen on account 
of abundant game in the vicinity. 

Atlanticville. 
Formerly Fourth Neck contained in 1880 a population of 267. 
It has a small Methodist church and a school-house. The creek 
on the east called by the Indians Achabacawesuck has been 
abbreviated to Weesuck by the later inhabitants. A large board- 
ing-house frequented by sportsmen is located on Tiana bay, owned 
by Benjamin F. Squires. 

Quogue. 
This neck of fertile land was known as Quaquanantuck by the 
Indians, but as life was too short to grapple with the polysyllabic 
names of the aborigines, it soon dwindled to Quaqua and finally 



The Settlees. 161 

"to Quogue, its present appellation. Settlements began here abont 
1740 by the Cooks, Fosters, Howells and Posts from Southamp- 
ton. Among the epitaphs of the old burying ground we give the 
following : * 

"Here lies the body of Jonathan Cook, who departed this life March 7, 
1754, aged 54 years." 

" In memory of Elizabeth, wife of John Foster, who departed this life the 
18th of March 1773, in the 78th year of her age." 

" In memory of Mr. Elisha Howell, who died Sept. 7, 1777, in the 73d year 
■of his age. 

" In memory of Abigail, wife of Gapt. John Post, who died March, 17, 1772, 
in the 67 year of her age." 

[Capt. John Post, the first settler here, died Jan. 3, 1792, aged 92.] 

" In memory of Mr. Nathan Herrick, who died March 24 A. D. 1783, in the 
83d year of his age." 

This village has now numerous lai-ge boarding-houses and is a 
favorite summer resort as the neck of land extends down to the 
shores of the ocean with Shinnecoek bay on the east and Quan- 
tuck bay on the west. 

Quiogue. 

This is a small village between Aspatuck and Quantuck rivers, 
on land formerly called Little Assup's Neck. Here stands the 
Presbyterian church of the parish of West Hampton and Quogue 
where Rev. ¥m. B. Reeves, M. D., after preaching twenty years 
as stated supply was finally installed as pastor in 1875. 

Ketchdbonack. 

This is a district with farm houses scattered here and there, 
lying next west and north-west of Quogue. Jonathan Raynor was 
probably the first white resident, having a homestead here in 
1738 ; now occupied by Elisha Raynor. In this locality the late 
Governor John A. Dix had a country seat and near this was the 
summer house of Joseph Alden, D. D., ex-president of the State 
Normal School at Albany. Mr. Mortimer D. Howell has a large 
boarding-house ; has for several years been a popular summer 
resort for people of the city. 

* W. S. Pelletreau, to whom we are indebted for many facts in this sketch of the villages. 

21 



162 Histoey of Southampton. 

OnucTc and Potunk. 
These are two necks of land west of Ketchabonack. Onnck or 
Wonunk was as early as 1738 occupied by Isaac Halsey, and is 
still the residence of his descendants. Potunk was settled some 
time previous to the revolution and one of the first to move 
here was John Jessup, whose homestead was occupied by his 
grandson Deacon John S. Jessup who but a few years ago full of 
honors for a life of integrity went over to the majority. 

West Hampton. 
There is no one village of this name at present, but it is the 
name of a station on the Long Island railroad and also is applied 
as a name to all that district generally between Quogue and 
Speonk. 

Beaverdam. 

A grist mill was built here on the mill stream as early as 1748. 
"Before the mill-dams were built on Beaverdam and Speonk 
rivers the old country road crossed these streams near their heads, 
and it is supposed, at the same places the Indians had their cross- 
ings. After the dams were built the roads were turned so as to 
cross them. At the old road, some distance north of the mill at 
Beaverdam, is the corner between the ' Upper Division ' and the 
' Last Division ' in Quogue purchase. A line running from the 
center of the dam to the bridge at Piverhead separates Quogue 
and Topping's purchases, and this dam is also the corner of the 
' Speonk Division,' and ' Last Division ' in the latter." * 

A Presbyterian church was erected here somewhat previous to 
1758. Among the old monuments in the burying ground are the 
following : 

" In memory of Stephen Jagger Esq., who died April 10 1796 in the 77th 
year of his age." 

" In memory of Ephraim Halsey, who died August 20th 1764, aged 71 
years.'' 

*' In memory of Cornelius Halsey, who died April 19, 1782, in the 61 year of 
his age." 

* W. S. Pelletreau. 



The Settlers. 163 

The people of West Hampton have honored themselves in 
erecting a monument to the memory of the soldiers from that 
neighborhood whose lives were sacrificed in the slaveholders' 
rebellion. It is of brown stone, about sixteen feet high and has 
the following inscriptions : 

'■ West Hampton's tribute to the patriotism and bravery of her sons who in 
the war ior the preservation of the Union heroically fought and honorably 
fell." 

" Capt. Franklin B. Hallock, Serg't Cyrus D. Tuthill, Corp. Hiram A. Wines, 
Reeves H. Havens, Timothy W. Robinson, Thomas M. Smith, Edward 
Stephens, James E. Griffing, Henry S. Raynor." 

Speonk. 
This village was settled about 1740 and the earliest settlers 
were Abraham Halsey (son of Thomas, son of Thomas the first of 
the name in Southampton), John and James Tuthill, Joseph 
Rogers, from Bridgehampton 1760, and the Phillips family, con- 
sisting of four brothers, William, Josiah, Joseph and Moses, from 
Brookhaven in 1757. The village has a Methodist church and 
school-house and the population in 1880 was 196. 

Waterville. 
The westernmost village on the south shore of the town is. 
Waterville, formerly Seat nek. It has a population of about 200- 
engaged in farming and fishing. 

Flanders. 
This is a small settlement in the north-west section of the town 
near Riverhead. The first house was erected here about 1770 by 
Josiah Goodale. Families of Squires and Fanning came soon 
after. The population is 126. 



164 History of Southampton. 



CHAPTER X. 

INDIANS FRIENDLY RELATIONS WITH THEM — PURCHASE OF THEIR 

LANDS LEASE OF SHINNECOCK AND THE HILLS SALE OF 

SHINNECOCK HILLS. 

At the time of the settlement of Southampton, five tribes of 
Indians were living in its vicinity. The tract of land originally- 
settled was purchased of the Shinnecocks, leaving part of their 
lands still in their possession. The remainder of their territory 
was afterward purchased, and the western boundary of the town 
then was on the borders of the Poosepatuck, or Poosapatuck and 
Patchogue tribes, and the northern on the borders of the Pea- 
comes. To the east roamed the Montauk, the royal tribe of the 
island whose chief, "Wyandanch, a man of noble character, exer- 
cised supreme authority over the whole thirteen tribes who occu- 
pied the island. The aggregate population of these tribes is now 
unknown, though collateral facts confirmed by tradition afford 
good evidence of its being very great. 

The Montauks are said to have been the most numerous and 
powerful. Tradition has it, that in early times when drawn out 
in "Indian file" the warriors of the Shinnecock tribe extended 
from Shinnecock gate to the town — this being about two miles 
would give them at least 2,000 adult men — but 200 seems far 
more probable. Nowedanah, a brother of "Wyandanch, was the 
chief of the Shinnecocks, as appears in the deed of sale of East 
Hampton. 

There is no reason to suppose the Indians on the east end dif- 
fered in character from those on the main — they were bold, 
hardy and warlike. Yet never once was there any armed collision 
or serious disturbance of the peaceful relations initiated at the 
settlement of the town. There were indeed, at times, ominous 
threats and rumors, but they all originated in the machinations of 
the natives on the main, or, there is some reason to believe, of the 
Dutch in New York. This friendly feeling was owing partly to 



The Indians. 165 

the fact of the fair and equitable treatment they universally re- 
ceived from the English ; and partly from the peculiar circum- 
stances of the natives themselves. The Montauks on the east, 
and the Shinnecoeks on the west, had been harrassed by incur- 
sions of the Narragan setts of Khode Island, and were glad to 
enter into a treaty with the English for mutual protection. It 
will be seen from the Indian deed of 1640, given in the appen- 
dix, that this stipulation was made with the whites as a part of 
the consideration in the sale of the land. This understanding 
between the Indians and the English went far to secure peace 
within their borders. 

The amicable relations between the two races was seriously 
threatened in 1653, when the Narragansetts, perhaps allied with 
emissaries of the Dutch, endeavored to seduce the Indians on the 
east end of Long Island into a combination with them to extermi- 
nate all the white settlers. In this they were unsucessful, although 
the apprehensions of the English were greatly excited, and for 
some time unusual care was taken to guard against a sudden attack. 

* The Narragansetts of Khode Island exercised a kind of feudal 
authority over the Indian tribes of the east end of Long Island, 
although these in former times were said by ancient Indians to 
have mustered over 5,000 warriors. This sovereignty, however, 
was probably fluctuating and dependent on the results of their not 
unfrequent contests in the field. 

f Another writer says of them : " The Indians upon L. I. were 
more fierce and barbarous, for one Oapt. Howe about this time 
(1 642 or 3) going with eight or ten men to a wigwam there to de- 
mand an Indian that had killed one Hammond an Englishman 
[of which the Southampton records are silent] the Indian ran vio- 
lently out with a knife in his hand, wherewith he wounded one 
of the company, thinking to escape from them, so as they were 
forced to kill him upon the place, which so awed the rest that they 
durst not attempt any revenge. If they had been always so 
handled, they would not have dared to have rebelled as they did 
afterwards." Mather also says the English were obliged to 

*Gookin. Indian Tribes. t Hubbard. Gen. Hist, of N. E. 



166 Histoey of Southampton. 

arm themselves and be on the defense many days as the Indians 
-were assembled (1649) in a " hostile posture." 

Rev. Samson Occum, who belonged to the tribe of Mohegans 
originally dwelling in the territory between Norwich and New 
London, gives some account of the manners and customs of the 
Indians on the east end of Long Island. He labored among the 
Montauks and Shinnecocks as teacher and preacher. His account 
substantially agrees with that of Lyon Gardiner, and adds in sub- 
stance the following items : Marriages were often contracted by 
parents for their children in infancy, with the understanding, 
however, that the latter could ratify or ignore the parental agree- 
ment upon ariving at the age of discretion. It was usual to cele- 
brate the marriage by a feast to which the friends of both parties 
were invited. 

Children were named also at a similar gathering for a dance, 
and often a man changed the name so given and chose one for 
himself, especially to commemorate some great event in his life. 

The great and good supreme being in the account of Occum is 
called Cauhluntoownt, and the great evil god, Mutcheshesunne- 
tooh, to both of whom sacrifices were offered. 

The bodies of the dead were washed before burial and then 
decked with ornaments and the face often painted. Mourning 
was continued a year during which the women usually blackened 
their faces. The period of mourning was terminated with a 
dance. He says " they used to bury great many things with their 
dead, especially the things that belonged to the dead, and what 
they did not bury they would give away, and they would never 
live in a wigwam in which any person died, but will immediately 
pull it down."* Mr. Occum was the first Indian preacher ever 
in Great Britain. He was educated by Mr. "Wheeleck, President 
of Dartmouth College, and was ordained by the Suffolk Presby- 
tery .f He was the author of the hymn " Awaked by Sinai's awful 
sound." 

He preached with acceptance in New York and Boston. 

Mr. Prime, Hist, of L. 1., says: "The conduct of the Long 
Island Indians towards the whites, is without a parallel in the 

* Mass. Hist. Coll., 1 s. v. 10. t Idem. ». 9. 



The Indians. • 167 

listory of this country. It was to be expected that individual 
acts of aggresion would occur on the part of a barbarous people, 
for real or supposed injuries. But even these were rare ; and the 
Indians always showed themselves willing to submit to an impar- 
tial investigation, and just decision of alleged wrongs.'' 

From records of particular courts at Hartford, Ct., Liber 2, p. 
99, as published in Hist. Magazine, by Mr. Charles J. Hoadley, 
we take the following : 

" A perticular Court [at Hartford] May 11th, 1657. 

" Vpon examination of Wigwagub, hee 
Magistrates. confessed that hee was hyred to burne 

■?^°x^? st -S r Esq Gournor Mrs. Howell's house, by two Indians one 

Mr Wells Deputy , . , , . 

Mr Cullick Awabag, wnoe pmised him one gun : and 

Mr Tailcoat Agagoneagu who promised him 7s 6d and 

Mr. Ogden hee said Auwegenutn did know hee was 

Mr Allin & *° burne the house two dayes before it 

WmWadswortli was done — and that himself e and the 

three Indians were together when he was 

hyred, but Auwegenum did not heere their discourse, but Auwa- 

bag told Auweganum of it afterward. 

Vppon consideration of the motion made from or friends at 
Southampton for the prsence, countenance and assistance of 20 
men from vs, and considering their sad distressed prsent state by 
reason of the insolent and insuffrable outrage of some heathen 
vpon that Hand and neare that plantation by fyering senerall 
dwelling houses to the vn doing of seuerall members of this 
Collony. 

" This Court order that there shall be 20 men prssed forthwth 
±o goe ouer to their assistance as the case may require together 
wth necessary pruision & Amunition wch are to bee taken out of 
the seurall Townes in the pportion following : 



Hartford 

Windzor 

Wethersf — 
Farmington- 
Midltown — 
Sea Brooke- 
Pequett 



- These men to have 251b of powder & 501b of Bullets.'' 



168 Histoet of Southampton. 

These troubles began in 1655, when Ninigrate, chief of the 
Narragansetts, undertook to reduce the Long Island Indians to 
submission. The latter were obliged to appeal to the English on 
the Island and the main for assistance. 

The only other occurrence of this kind which happened in 
Southampton was the murder of Mrs. Thomas Halsey, in 1649, 
which caused some apprehension of a general insurrection against 
the English. A messenger was immediately sent to the magis- 
trates to summon Wyandanch to appear before them. " His 
counselors fearing that he would be summarily condemned to, 
death by way of retaliation, advised him not to obey the sum- 
mons. Before he expressed his own opinion, he submitted the 
case to Mr. Gardiner, who happened to be lodging in his wigwam 
that same night. By his advice he set out immediately for , 
Southampton, Mr. G. agreeing to remain as a hostage to the 
tribe, for the safety of their beloved chief. With amazing celerity, 
he not only accomplished the journey of twenty-five miles, but 
actually apprehended on his way, and delivered to the magistrates, 
the murderers of the woman ; who instead of being his own sub- 
jects, proved to be Pequot Indians from the main ; some of whom 
were generally lurking on the Island for the purpose of promot- 
ing, disturbances between the natives and the new settlers. These 
men being sent to Hartford, were there tried, convicted, and ex- 
ecuted." 

The only allusion to this murder found in the records is as 
follows : 

" I the subscriber, namely, Thomas Halsey do witness that at 
the time of the trouble in this town of Southampton by reason 
of murther committed by the Indians ; at a great assembly of the 
Indians for the settling of matters in fine, I saw Mandush (who 
was a man reputed and acknowledged generally by all Indians 
for those parts to be the great Sachem's son of Shinnecock) cut 
up a turf of ground in Southampton and delivering it to "Wyan- 
danch, gave up all his right and interest unto him. And he th& 
said Mandush with many other of the chief of Shinnecock Indians, 
as ancient men did manifest their consent and that they were con- 
tented by their ordinary sign of stroking Wyandanch on the back 



The Indians. 169 

and since that time the said Wyandanch hath acted upon the 
aforesaid interest given to him as by letting and disposing of 
lands at Qnaquanantuck and elsewhere. And I never heard any 
deny Wyandanch his right and propriety in the premises until of 
late. And this I am ready to depose when thereunto called. 
"Witness my hand the 19 day of September 1666." 

"THOMAS HALSET." 

" I the subscriber namely Thomas Sayre do also witness all that 
is above testified by Thos Halsey except only the delivery of the 
turf and further that wheri Mandush gave up hie right to Wyan- 
danch, aDd stroked him on the back, Mandush also told Wyan- 
danch that now he would be all one dog. And this I am ready 
to depose when I am thereunto called. Witness my hand this 
19 dav of September 1666." 

"THOMAS SAYEE." 

Confirmation of this relinquishment of the fee of the land 
similar perhaps to that under William the Norman, in England, 
that, according to the feudal system, the barons should hold their 
tenures of the King, is found in some documents which Weany, 
Sunk Squa (or the royal Squaw, or Squaw Regent, in court par- 
lance) the widow of Wyandanch unites in signing with the Shin- 
necocks. 

As to their religious belief, it has been found impossible to as- 
certain any information from the living representatives of the 
Shinnecock tribe. But Lyon Gardiner, the chronicler of East 
Hampton, has left on record a statement in reference to the Mon- 
tauks, who, doubtless, differed in nothing in this respect from 
other Long Island tribes. As no man was better qualified than 
he, the worthy friend of the noble Wyandanch, we give his notes 
entire. 

" They were, as I have before remarked, Polytheists. They 
had gods in great numbers ; many of lesser influence, having par- 
ticular charges, and two of exalted degree, the good and evil 
Deity, having a general superintendence and control, as well over 
all other gods as over men. There was a god of the four cor- 
22 



170 Histoet of Southampton. 

ners of the earth, and the four seasons of the year ; another of 
the productions of the earth ; another of the elements ; one of the 
day and night ; and a god of the hearth, the family and domestic 
relations. The great, good, and supreme Deity they called 
Caulkluntoowut, which signifies one possessed of supreme power. 
The great evil spirit was named Mutchesumetook, which signifies 
evil power. They worshipped and offered sacrifices to these gods 
at all times. They had small idols or images which they be- 
lieved knew the will of the gods and a regular Priesthood by 
whom these idols were consulted. The priests were called Powa- 
wows, or Powwas, and declared to the people what the gods re- 
quired of them. When dances and feasts should be made ; when 
presents should be given to the old people ; when sacrifices 
should be offered to the gods, and of what kind. These Pow- 
was pretended to hold intercourse with the gods in dreams, and 
with the evil spirits in particular, who appeared to them under 
different forms, and by voices in the air. These were the Medi- 
cine-men. They administered to the sick ; relieved those afflicted 
with evil spirits and poison, and incantations and charms, pro- 
tected the people from all harm. Subject to the Powwas' influ- 
ence, neither fire could burn them nor water drown them ; nor 
could they receive any injury whatever. The most savory sacri- 
fice made to the great Deity was the tail or fin of the whale, 
which they roasted. The leviathan, from which it was taken, 
was at times found cast "upon the sea-shore, and then a great and 
prolonged Powow or Religious Festival was held. At these fes- 
tivals great efforts were supposed to be necessary to keep the 
Evil One without the circle of their incantations. His presence, 
it was believed, would defeat the object of the Powwas in the 
procurement of the favor and particular regard of the good 
deity. Yiolent gesticulations, loud yells, and laborious move- 
ments of the limbs and body, with distortion of the features, 
were continued until the excitement produced approached to 
madness. "When the Evil Spirit was supposed to be subjugated, 
the dance and the feast commenced. It is among the Indian tra- 
ditions, that the existence of the Evil Spirit was evidenced by 
his having, when driven from the feast, left the imprint of his 
foot upon a granite rock on Montauk, and made three holes in 



The Indians. 171 

the ground, at regular distances, where he alighted, in three sev- 
eral leaps from the stone on which he had stood, and then disap- 
peared. 

" They believed in a future state of existence, that their souls 
would go westward a great distance, and many moons journey, to 
a place where the spirits of all would reside, and where, in the 
presence of their great Sawwonnuntow, beyond the setting sun. 
the brave and the good would exercise themselves in pleasurable 
singing, in feasting, hunting, and dancing forever. The coward, 
the traitor, the liar, and the thief, were also there, but the enjoy- 
ments of the favored Sawwonnuntow only added to the pain of 
the punishments visited upon the misdeeds of the wicked. Ser- 
vile labor, so painful to and so much despised by the Indian, was 
the allotment of the sinful. The making a canoe with a round 
stone, and the carrying water in a wicker basket were among the 
perplexing exercises of those who had sacrificed the happiness of 
their future existence to the will of Mutchesumetooh or the Evil 
power." 

No more hopeless fate than this, the classical student will ob- 
serve, was awarded by the grim Rhadamanthus to Sisyphus, Tan- 
talus, or the daughters of Danaus. 

In 1641 the General Court passed a law making it penal to sell 
any instrument of war, namely, guns, powder, bullets, lead, swords 
or matches to the Indians, and also against selling any liquor to 
the same. A second law was afterward passed, allowing certain 
specified parties to trade with them discreetly in these things. 

For many years after the settlement the Indians derived their 
subsistence, like their brethren in other parts of the country, 
chiefly from hunting and fishing. But gradually adopting the 
civilized life, for generations past, they have cultivated sufficient 
land to supply their wants, together with the wealth they have 
drawn from the adjacent waters. They are now generally pro- 
vided with comfortable homes, and maintain a school in their 
midst, and two small churches. 

As before stated the first purchase from the Indians was made 
on December 13, 1640. Then the Quaquanantuck or Quogne pur- 
chase of which no record appears in the town records. Thirdly, 



172 Histoky of Southampton. 

Topping's purchase of land west of Quogue, effected April 10,, 
1662, and finally a re-purchase of the whole town, August 16, 
1703, the deeds of all which will be fouud in the appendix. 

The records at Albany* show that the settlers were not with- 
out apprehensions of violence from their dusky neighbors. July 
10, 1675, Governor Andros writes to Governor "Winthrop of Con- 
necticut of a rumor that there was a conspiracy among the Indians 
of the Atlantic coast, from New England to Delaware bay, to make 
war on the whites. But in September following he writes again that 
all the danger is passed. There were general instructions to the 
magistrates to disarm the Indians of Long Island and the main, 
land of all the guns they had. On page 133 of this same book, 
Governor Andros writes to Southampton that this was a false report, 
*. s., of the Indian war, the letter being dated September 8, 1675. 

The restlessness of the Indians in regard to the title of the town 
is illustrated still further in the abstract of an entry in the town 
records in 1686, as follows : 

" At a town meeting held in Southampton the 23d day of 
November, 1686, it is agreed upon by major vote of the town 
that Major John Howell shall go to New York about the present 
affair of making good our title to our lands called into question at 
Shinnecock, and Henry Ludlam is likewise chosen to wait upon 
him. 

" At the same meeting it is ordered that the patentees concerned 
in our patent shall make a conveyance of the land held within our 
township to the persons respectively according to the interest of 
allotment of hundred and fifties, or fifties when they hold in this 
town. 

" Also there are chosen six men to be a committee in behalf of 
the men to give Major Howell his instructions and also to attend 
Colonel Youngs when he comes to hear the Indians acknowledge 
our deed, and the men so chosen are Mr. Edward Howell, Henry 
Pierson, Matthew Howell, Thomas Cooper, Obadiah Rogers and 
Joseph Pierson." 

*MSS., State Library. Warrants, Orders, Passes, p. 120. 



The Indians. 173 

The Chief of the Shinneoocks. 

In 1648 Nowedanah was the chief of the Shinnecock tribe as 
appears in the deed of sale of the town land of East Hampton. 

January 22, 1670-71, Quaquashaug having been elected their 
chief by the same tribe, was on that day confirmed to be the chief 
by Governor Francis Lovelace. The same day Cawbutt an Indian 
was appointed by the same authority constable of the Shinnecock 
tribe. (Albany Records.) 

Lease of Shinnecock to the Indians. 

In order to settle all disputes which had arisen concerning the 
title to the land of the town, and quiet the Indians in their ap- 
prehensions at the disappearance of their hunting grounds, as 
before stated, a convention of the whites and Indians was held 
at Southampton, August 16, 1703. In addition to the re-pnrchase 
of the town, the whites gave to the Indians the following lease 
of Shinnecock and the hills : 

" This indenture made between the Trustees of the common- 
alty of the Town of Southamptonin the County of Suffolk and 
province of New York on Island of Nassau on the one part 
and Pomguama, Chice, and Manaman and their people belonging 
to Shinnecock of the other part, witnesseth : That the said Trustees 
of the Town aforesaid, by and with one full consent and agree- 
ment for divers good causes thein thereunto moving, and one ear 
of Indian corn annually to be paid to the Trustees of said Town, 
for the time being, yearly, and every year, upon the first day of 
November, and for and upon the condition and proviso hereafter 
expressed, have demised, granted, and to farm letten, and by 
these presents do demise, grant, let, and let to farm unto the said 
Pomguama, Chice, Manaman, and their people abovesaid, all that 
their certain tract of land lying within the bounds of Southamp- 
ton aforesaid, called by the name of Shinnecock and Sebonac, 
bounded west by Canoe place, alias Niamug, and bounded south- 
ward by Shinnecock Bay, and eastward by a line running from 
the head of Shinnecock Creek to the north-west corner of James 
Cooper's Close, and from thence northwardly to the westward 
part of Jonathan Eaynor's land, at Sebonac old ground, and from 



174 Histoky of Southampton. 

thence on a direct line to a place called the warehouse by the 
North Bay, and on the north by the said Bay ; meadows, marshes, 
grass, herbage, feeding and pasturage, timber, stone, and conve- 
nient highways only excepted, with all and singular the privileges 
and advantages of plowing and planting, and timber for firing 
and fencing, and all other conveniences and benefits whatsoever, 
excepting what before is excepted to the only use and behoof of 
the said Indians, their heirs and successors, for one thousand years 
thence next ensuing the date bereof : Provided always the said 
Indians do not keep nor cause to be kept, any part or parcel of the 
said land within fence or enclosed from the last of October to the 
first of April, from year to year, during the whole term afore- 
said; and for the full confirmation hereof, the parties have inter- 
changeably set their hands and seals in Southampton aforesaid,! 
this sixteenth of August, Anno Dom. 1703. 

" Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of Stephen 
Bouer, Arthur Davis, Benjamin Marshall, Thomas Stephens, 
Gersham Culver, John Maltby, Daniel Halsey, Hezekiah Howell, 
Abraham Howell, Jekamiah Scott T oseph Fordham Josiah 
Howell, Joseph Howell, Trustees?'' 

Immediately after the above lease is recorded in the town rec- 
ords the following : 

""We, the trustees within named, according to the town's 
former agreement with the said Indians of Shinnecock, do hereby 
grant liberty to them and theirs, to cut flags, bulrushes, and such 
grass as they usually make their mats and houses of, and to dig 
ground nuts, mowing lands excepted, anywhere in the bounds of 
the township of Southampton aforesaid, as witnesseth our hands 
and seals this 16th day of August, 1703. 

" Witness : 

" Josiah Howell, Abraham Howell, Stephen Bowyer, Arthur 
Davis, Benjamin Marshall, Joseph Howell, Daniel Halsey, Heze- 
kiah Howell, John Maltby, Jekamiah Scott, Joseph Fordham, 
Thomas Stephens, Gersham Culver, Trustees." 

Acknowledged same day before John Wheeler, Justice. 



The Indians. 175- 

Sale of Shinnecock Hills in 1861. 

By a special act of legislature, the Indians, in 1859, were em- 
powered to sell and did sell to the proprietors, all their rights 
to the Shinnecock hills which they possessed (or their children 
were to possess) by the above lease of 1703, in consideration of 
having in themselves the fee of Shinnecock neck. On February 
19, 1861, the hills were sold by the proprietors at public auction, 
for $6,250, and purchased by a company of Southampton people, 
chiefly for purposes of pasturage. In the advertisement for the 
sale occurs the following : " Situated in the central part of said 
Town, and extending from Peconic Bay on the north, to Shinne- 
cock Bay on the south, and containing about 3200 acres. The 
Indian claim and interest in these lands have been recently extin- 
guished by agreement with the Indians, and by the consent and 
ratification of the Legislature of the State of New York, so that 
the title to the property is now undisputed and indisputable. A 
considerable portion of the land is of good quality, ready for the 
plough, and susceptible of being converted into fine farms. The 
remainder is well adapted to sheep and cattle grazing, to which 
the whole tract has been exclusively devoted for many years." 

This same tract was sold in 188 L to parties in Brooklyn who 
propose to use it as its delightful situation deserves it should be, 
as summer residences for city people. 



176 Histoby of Southampton. 



CHAPTER XI. 

EA.KLY CUSTOMS WHALING BUBYING GROUNDS MISCELLA- 
NEOUS. 

Many of the customs and peculiarities of our forefathers have 
already been noticed in various portions of this work, so that but 
little remains to say on this point. Like their friends in New 
England, it appears from the records, that they for a time aban- 
doned the use of the names of months and days as given in the 
calendar ; dating an event, e. g., on the 7th day of the week of 
the 4th month, instead of Saturday, June 4th. This custom 
originated from conscientious scruples against the use of names 
of heathen origin. 

Pope Gregory XIII. in 1582, observing that the vernal equinox 
occurred during the Council of Nice, A. Di 325, on the 21st of 
March, but happened on that year on the 10th, by the advice of 
astronomers caused ten days to be thrown out of the current year 
between the 4th and 15th of October. He further decreed that 
the year henceforth should consist of 365 days, 5 hours and 49 
minutes and that every year exactly divisible by 1 00, excepting 
those divisible by 400, should not be considered a leap year. 
This alteration in the calendar was at once accepted in all 
Catholic countries, but it took longer time to introduce the 
change into England. In the year 1752, by act of Parliament,* 
eleven days were dropped between the 2d and 14th of September 
and the year was to begin on the first of January instead of on 
the 25th of March as had been the practice. This, the " new 
style," is now universal among all civilized nations except in 
Russia, where the " old style " still prevails. In reducing old to 
new style ten days should be added from 1500 to 1700, and 
eleven days from 1700 to 1752. Previous to 1752 any day in 
March was called the 1st, 10th or 30th (as the case might be) of 
tihejirst month. But as a matter of fact, both in England and 

* See Statute 34, Geo. IL, ch. 23. 



Eaelt Customs. 177 

in her American colonies, clerks were slow to adopt the change, 
and often obstinately persisted for half a century in following the 
old mode of reckoning. This hesitation caused the use so fre- 
quent in the old records of such dates as the following : January 
16, 173$, or March 16, 164J, in which the lower of the last two 
figures represents the year according to the present mode, and the 
upper one, the old style of reckoning. 

We often find in the early records following names of the days 
of the week, dies solis, dies lunce, dies Martis, dies Mercurii, dies 
Jovis, dies Veneris and dies Saturnii, or sometimes dies Saboati. 
Although these are Eoman names it must not be supposed they 
belong to the Augustan era. Neither Homer nor Virgil nor 
their countrymen of the classic age, Greek or Latin, knew of any 
division of time into weeks. This division was of divine origin 
and known and practiced by those who had the oracles of God 
and through them gradually was introduced into other nations. 
Not until the Roman empire, in the early part of the fourth 
century, came under the influence of Christianity, in the reign of 
Constantine, was the week known to the Romans. The French 
preserve these names yet in their language, while the Teutonic 
languages preserve the thing but not the precise name. "We say 
Sunday because our Saxon ancestor said Sunnan-Daeg, and the 
Germans, Sohntag. So also Sax, Monan-Daeg ; Ger., Montag ; 
Eng., Monday. Sax., Tues-Daeg ; Ger., Dienstag ; Eng., Tues- 
day. Sax., Woden's or Woodnes Daeg ; Ger., Mittwoch or mid- 
week; and Eng., Wednesday. Sax., Thorsdaegor Thimresdaeg; 
Ger., Donnerstag ; Eng., Thursday. Sax, Friga's Daeg ; Ger., 
Freitag; Eng., Friday. Sax., Seater's Daeg; Ger., Sonnabend ; 
Eng., Saturday. Whence it may be seen that both Latin and 
Teuton have contributed each a share in our nomenclature. It 
may be added that the Roman names, dies solis, etc., crept in 
through the formal diction used in legal proceedings by the Nor- 
man conquerors and were continued long after they and their 
descendants learned and used the language of the conquered. 

The Sabbath was reckoned to begin at sunset of Saturday, and 
ended with sunsetting of Sunday. 

The autumnal thanksgiving, now customary through the coun- 
23 



178 History of Southampton. 

try, was kept in early times here, as it was in New England, as 
we have before shown. And that occasional fast days were ob- 
served, we may infer from an anecdote of some old worthy long 
departed, who wished a certain fast on account of a long drought, 
might be deferred one day until he had gathered in some hay 
that was ready for the barn ! There was some faith at least in 
the efficacy of prayer. 

An interesting question is that of the food and appliances of the 
table of the colonists of the Puritan period. They raised on the 
farm Indian corn, wheat (both winter and summer varieties), oats, 
barley, beans and pease, but no potatoes. This esculent, now bo com- 
mon, came into general use some time afterward, in the latter half 
of the eighteenth century. The waters abounded in fish, clams 
and oysters, though the shellfish seem to have been used but spar- 
ingly. Cows, oxen, goats and sheep were raised in considerable 
numbers, both for home consumption and for export. At a later 
period many horses were shipped to the West Indies. Tea and 
coffee were unknown. * The first coffee house in England was 
kept by a Jew named Jacobs, in Oxford, 1650. One was opened 
in London 1652, and the Eainbow Coffee House, near Temple 
Bar, was in 1657 considered a nuisance to that locality, f In 
1671 an Armenian set up a coffee house in Paris, but not meet- 
ing much encouragement removed to London. 

Coffee does not seem to have been known generally in western 
Europe previous to 1660, except to travelers in the Levant. In 
1554 it was introduced into Constantinople from Arabia. It is 
uncertain when it began to be used in America. Wine, cider, 
beer and ale, home brewed, milk and water were the only drinks 
used by the settlers upon the table. In Timb's Curiosities of Lon- 
don is the following : " The Earl of Arlington in the year 1666 
brought from Holland for 60 shillings, the first pound of tea received 
in England." But a comment on this states that it was known in 
England as early as 1657. It is mentioned in an act of Parliament 
1660.- Pepys in his Diary, September 25, 1660, speaks of send- 
ing out for a " cup of tea (a China drink) of which I had never 
drunk before." 

* Notes and Queries, 4 ser., v. 1, p. 140. t Notes and Queries, 1st sei\, v. 1, p. 28. 



Eakly Customs. 119 

Heavy farm work was done by oxen. The only vehicle in use 
for a long time was the two-wheeled ox-carfr. Men and women 
traveled on horseback, and when the horse was wanting, on one 
occasion at least, a bovine was pressed into service. An inhabitant 
of ■ North Sea in early times rode on the back of his bull to New 
York to obtain from the colonial Governor a commission of jus- 
tice of the peace for himself. The bull, it may be supposed, car- 
ried him safely and pranced in state to the Governor's gate post, 
since in due time a shout was heard in the town street of South- 
ampton announcing his return. Waving his commission above his 
head, as he sat on his horned steed, he said in a loud voice, " Now 
I'll make Southampton fear and all North Sea tremble ! " And 
yet, as legend hath told, man, bull and commission all failed to- 
produce this effect on the inhabitants. 

The transmission of news was only by letter and the last comer. 
For twenty years after the settlement not a newspaper was yet in 
existence in the mother country. 

June 25, 1647. In an order on the affairs of the town, the 
word its is used, showing that this pronoun was in use more or less 
common, although it is not to be found in the Bible of King James 
— our present version. But the apostrophe is never employed 
with the possessive case of a noun, though the final " s " is so used. 

Fairs in Olden Time. 

In 1692 the Governor of the province together with the colo- 
nial legislature enacted a law for the establishment of fairs to be 
held on Long Island at stated intervals. 

In Kings county one fair annually was to be held at Flatbush. 
froin the second Tuesday of October to the following Friday, 
both days included. 

In Queens county two fairs a year were to be held, both at 
Jamaica, from the first Tuesday in May to the following Friday, 
and from the first Tuesday of October to the following Friday. 

In Suffolk two fairs were to be held annually, one at South- 
ampton from the first Tuesday of July to the following Friday, 
one at Southold from the first Tuesday of September to the fol- 
lowing Friday. 



180 History of Southampton. 

These were not fairs for the exhibition of the products of the 
country such as we have in these days, but a reproduction here 
of the fairs of old England. It was the occasion for everybody 
to offer for sale whatever he wished to dispose of for money or 
by way of exchange. These fairs were frequented by peddlers 
on whom the ladies depended for articles of finery and light silk 
goods. 

The old English custom of having the Yule or Christmas log, 
was retained in some families, at least, until old-fashioned wide 
fire-places went out of vogue. This was an unusually large hickory 
back-log which was cut and selected for this purpose in the 
woods, and took its place on Christinas morning, though it was 
not customary, as in England, to preserve the charred remains 
for lighting the next year's Christmas fire. 

Another singular custom prevailed which arose in England 
from the fact that the bakers there, when they came to supply 
their customers on Christmas morning, presented to the children 
little dough-boys fried as " dough-nuts." These dough children 
were to commemorate the anniversary of our Savior's birth. In 
course of time the customers took the hint and prepared these 
delicate sweets for their children themselves, and deposited them 
in the little stockings suspended in the chimney corner for the 
friendly visits of St. Nicholas. 

Whaling Squadeon. 

From various scattered records, it appears that the number of 
whales that in a year drifted on the coast, have been considerable. 
How soon the settlers procured boats and tackle for capturing 
them on the ocean is not known. 

This was really the beginning of the enterprise of whale fishing 
(to use a common but incorrect term) which became in after years 
of such immense proportions in our country. In 1687* there 
were fourteen whaling companies of twelve men each in the town' 
of Southampton who reported an estimate of the oil then in their 
possession, the result probably of the catch of one season. 

' MSS., State Library, Albany. 



Early Customs. 181 

Att Ketchabonad ,, . .John Jessup & Co 96 bbls 

Att Quaquanantuck Thomas Stephens & Co 364 " 

' James Cooper & Co 144 " 

Att ye Pines Joseph Pierson & Co 240 " 

John Poast & Co 228 " 

Att Towne Francis Sayre & Co 132 " 

Att Weepaguge [Wickapogue] . . . Isaac Ray nor & Co 48 " 

" Abraham Howell & Co 36 " 

Att Meacocks John Cooke & Co 72 " 

" Joseph Moore & Co 120 " 

Att Sagahonick Lift Henery Peirson & Co... . . . 276 '<■ 

Robert Norrise & Co 108 " 

" James Topping & Co 84 " 

" " Shamgar Hand & Co 300 " 



Total - 2,148 bbls. 



April 15, 1687, East Hampton reports also 1,456 barrels on 
hand. 

In 1711, on the 18th of April, the total amount of oil on hand 
in the towns of South and East Hampton was 252 barrels. But 
it is probable that the greater part of the oil of that season had 
then been shipped either to New York or London. The records 
show oil was sometimes shipped at that early day direct from 
Southampton to London. 

There are a few people in this country in favor of a monarch- 
ical form of government in place of our republic. To such it 
may be of interest to learn of one of the many thousand inven- 
tions growing out of a monarchy and necessary to its existence, 
for those in power to take to themselves under form of law the 
hard, earned substance of the people. As appears in the State 
records at Albany Governor Robert Hunter in 1711 claimed and 
took one-half of the oil and bone of the whales captured by the 
companies in Southampton licensed by himself. The same year 
to Richard Wood was granted the sole privilege of claiming the 
chance whales stranded on the beach, the governor reserving to 
himself as before one-half of the bone and oil. This burden was 
only removed by the personal application of Samuel Mulford of 
East Hampton, as agent for East and Southampton, to the Parlia- 
ment of Great Britain, as a high court of judicature, in 1715. 
This business is still followed, as an episode, however, to the 
daily employment in agricultural pursuits and a few whales are 
generally taken every year during the winter or early spring, but 



182 History of Southampton. 

no royal governor now takes half by way of toll to support his 
dignity. 

Considerable attention was also given at an early period, even 
extending well into the eighteenth century, to catching seals; 
both along the coast and in more distant regions, where they were 
found. Denton (History of New York) says a great multitude 
of seals wintered on Long Island, lying on the meadow bottoms 
and sand bars near the salt waters. A few were seen and 
captured there about 1871. 

The following lists are given, copied from the town records : 

" March 7, 1644. Yt is ordered by this present Court that yf 
by the providence of God there shall bee henceforth within the 
bounds of this plantacon any whale or whales cast vp for the pre- 
uention of Disorder yt is Consented vnto that there shall be foure 
"Wards in this Towne eleaven persons in each ward. And by lott 
two of each ward (when any such whale shall be cast vp) shall be 
imployd for the cutting out of the sayd whale who for their 
paynes shall haue a double share. And every Inhabitant with 
his child or servant that is above sixteen years of age shall haue 
in the division of their part an equall proportion prouided that 
such person when, yt falls into his ward [be] a sufficient man to 
be imployed aboute yt. 

" And yt is further agreed vpon that there shall be in each 
ward eleuen nersons." 

" Ffor ye First Ward." 
William Barnes, Geo. Wood, Thomas Cooper, Richard Strat- 
ton, Job Sayre, Thomas Burrnett, John White, William Mul- 
ford, Thomas Halsey, Junr., Thomas Talmage, Senr. & Mr. 
Johnes. 

"Ffor ye Second Ward." 
Richard Jaques, Thomas Talmage, Junr., Mr. Peirson, Robert 
Rose, Mr. Gosmer, Thomas Halsey, Senr., Mr. Stanborough, 
Richard Barrett, Richard Post, Thomas Tomson & Robart Tal- 



Early Customs. 



183 



"Ffor te Third Ward." 
Richard Gosmer, Arthur Bostock, Henry Peirson, John 
Hande, Thomas Hildreth, John Mulford, John Moore, Ellis 
Cooke, Robert Bond, ffulk Daues (i. e. Davis) & Mr. Howe. 

"Ffor te Fourth Ward." 
John Cooper, Senr. [Tris]trum Hedges, John Cooper, Junr., 
John Cory, Mr. Howell, Mr. Odell, John Howell, Richard 
Smith & Thomas Sayre. 

Squadrons for Cutting- up Whales that Might Drift up 
upon the Shores. 1653. 



First Squadron. 


Third Squadron. 


Fifties. 


Fifties. 


3 Mr. Richard Smith 


3 Capt. Topping [Thos.] 


4 Mr. Rainor 


3 Mr. Fordham 


3 Mr. Odell 


2 Ellis Cook 


2 John Lum 


3 John White 


1 John Jagger 


3 Henry Pierson 


1 Jonas Bowre 


1 John Cooper Jr. 


2 Joseph Rainer 


3 Mr. Howell [Edward Sen.] 


3 Thomas Habey 


4 Thomas Sayre 


4 John Howell 


3 Mr. Gosmer [John] 


3 Jonas Wood 


3 William Rogers 


1 BarthTmew Smith 


3 Thomas Burnett 


3 Christopher Foster 


1 Thomas Post 


1 The Miller [Wm Ludlarn, 




Second Squadron. 


Fourth Squadron. 


4 Mr. Howell [Edward, Sen] 


2 Thomas Goldsmith 


2 Mr. Gosmer [John] 


3 Thomas Halsey 


2 Richard Post 


2 Edward Howell Jr. 


2 Thomas Vale (?) 


2 John Jessup 


1 Thomas Wood 


3 Richard Barrett 


2 Samuel Dayton 


3 Mr. Topping 


2 Robert Merbin 


3 Mr. Fordham 


3 Mr. Johnes 


4 Mr. Field 


3 Thomas Cooper 


2 Isaak Willman 


3 Mr. Stansborough 


3 John Cooper Sen. 


2 Joshua Barnes 


1 Widdow Briggs 


1 John Bishop 




2 Thomas Hildreth 




1 John Oldfields 




1 Mr. Hampton [James] 





" A List of te Inhabitants yt are to Cutt Whales." 
(This list shows the residences very clearly. It occurs imme- 
diately after an entry dated 1657, but the list is not dated.) 
Mr. Rainer; Tho. Halsey, Jun'r; Tho. Halsey, Sen'r; Mr. 



184 History of Southampton. 

ffordham; Joseph ffordham; John Coop[er]; Edw. Howell; 
Tho. Sayre ; Isack Halsey — 10. 

Tho. Coop [er] ; Ben. Davis ; Sam. Johnes ; Jon. Jagger ; "Win. 
Eussell; ffran. Sayre; Jon. Laughton; Dan. Sayre; John Bpp 
(Bishop) Josh. Barnes — 10. 

Mr. Hampton ; Bob. "Woolley, Jonas Bowre, Jon. ffoster ; Jon. 
Woodruff; Tho. Burnett; Left. Post; Ob. Rogers, Hen. Pier- 
son, En. Phillips — 10. 

John White; Ellis Cook; Isack Wilman ; Ja. Herick; Tho. 
Toping; Capt. Toping; Jon. Toping; Per. Stanboro, Tho. Gold- 
smith ; Jon. Jessup — 10. 

Edw. Howell, Xto. Foster ; Ri. Howell ; Joseph ffoster ; Ben. 
ffoster ; Jos. Rainer ; Hen. Ludlam ; Joseph Ludlam ; An. Lud- 
lam, Ar. Howell — 10. 

Sam. Clark ; Xto Lupton ; Mr. Scott ; Jon. Rose ; R. Smith ; 
Ben. Haines ; Tho. Shaw ; G. Harris ; John Davis ; Mr. Jen- 
nings — 10. 

March 23d, 1667, the town was divided into six squadrons to 
cut up dead whales, as follows : 

First Squadron. 
Mr. Rainer, Thomas Halsey, Jr., Thomas Halsey, Sen., Joseph 
Rainer, Richard Howell, Capt. Howell, [John], Christopher Fos- 
ter, Joseph Foster, Benjamin Foster, Edward Howell. 

Second Squadron. 

Mr. Fordham, Joseph Fordham, John Jessup, Thomas Gold- 
smith, John Cooper, Thomas Topping, Capt. Topping, John 
Topping, Peregrine Stanbrough, James Herrick. 

Third Squadron. 
Isaac Wilman, Edmund Howell, Ellis Cook, Ensign Phillips, 
John White, Henry Peirson, Obadiah Rogers, Lieut. Post, 
Thomas Cooper, Thomas Sayre. 

Fourth Squadron. 

Isaac Halsey, Thomas Burnett, Johu Woodruff, John Foster, 
Jonas Bowre, Samuel Johnes, Ben. Davis, Henry Ludlum, 
Anthony Ludlam, Joseph Ludlam. 



Early Customs. 185 

Fifth Squadron. 
John Jagger, Mr. Laughton, William Russell, Eobert Wool- 
ley, Mr. Hampton, Joshua Barnes, John Bishop, Daniel Sayre, 
Francis Sayre, Arthur Howell. 

Sixth Squadron. 

John Eose, Christopher Lupton, Eichard Smith, George Harris, 
Mr. Scott, Samuel Clarke, Thomas Shaw, Ben. Haines, Mr. Jen- 
nings, John Davis. 

It will be noticed that these squadrons of 1667 are formed of 
men in order of their residences. Beginning at the south end of 
the town, the first squadron embraces all the men as far as the 
old house lot next south of the residence of Barney Green. The 
second squadron includes the men who lived thence northward to 
the present residence of Mr. Henry Post. The third includes 
the men who lived northward to Job's lane. The fourth thence 
northward to Huntting's lane. The fifth embraced all who dwelt 
north of this lane. The sixth embraced all the North Sea men. 

It was customary, later, to fit out expeditions of several whale 
boats and cruise along the coast in the whaling season and camp 
out during the night. These expeditions did not usually consume 
more than a week or two on any one voyage. Indians were often 
employed by the whites on these expeditions) the latter furnish- 
ing boats and whaling gear, and the former receiving a certain 
proportion of the oil for their services. 

The following order is suggestive of the bountiful provisions of 
nature, ere man had thinned her exuberant resources : 

" Feb. 9th, 1645. Yt is ordered by the General Court that yf 
by the province of God, there shall bee henceforth cast up within 
the limits of this towne of Southampton any whale or whales, or 
any part or piece of a whale, that noe man shall presume to take 
or carry any part thereof, upon the forfeiture of twentie shillings 
and to stand to the further censure of the Cort, without order 
from the Magistrate or Magistrates. And whosoever shall finde 
or espie eyther whale or whales or any part or peece of a whale, 
cast up, upon notice given unto the Magistrate or Magistrates, 
shall have for his paynes allowed unto him five shillings, but yf 
24 



186 History of Southampton. 

yt shall be by the Magistrate or whom he shall appoint, adjudged 
not to be worth five shillings, then the sayd parties which shall 
give information, shall have yt for his paynes. And that from 
yeare to yeare the Marshall give notice after any form or accord- 
ing to his discretion, unto two persons in whose ward by turne yt 
shall belong or appertaine. And yt is further ordered that yf 
any shall finde a whale or any peece thereof upon the Lord's day 
then the aforesaid shillings shall not be due or payable."* 

The officers of three militia companies in the town in 1732-3 
as ascertained from the records at Albany were as follows : 

Southampton village, 1st comp., John Post, captain ; Ephraim 
White, lieut.; Obadiah Rogers, Jr., ensign. South comp., John 
Howell, capt.; Hezekiah Howell, lieut.; Stephen Herrick, ensign. 

Bridge Hampton, Stephen Topping, capt.; Ezekiel Sandford, 
lieut.; Josiah Topping, ensign. 

Burying Grounds. 

These are numerous and indicate a rapid colonizing of the 
inhabitants over the territory embraced in the town. There are 
two in the village ; two at North Sea, one at Wickapogue, one at 
Watermill, two at Mecox, two in Sagg, two in Bridge Hampton, 
one at Scuttle Hole, and others west of the village of Southamp- 
ton. Of these the oldest is that known as the South end burying 
ground, in the village of Southampton, the earliest record concern- 
ing which is as follows : 

" January 5th, 1665. The overseers have agreed with James 
Herrick that hee shall have one acre of land at the reare of his 
home lott in consideration of a foot way for people upon his 
lott to the burying place where the towne have one acre for that 
use, & James Herrick is to have the herbidge of it.'' 

The earliest graves here have no stones to mark them, unless 
they have fallen and been covered by the soil and overgrowing 
vegetation, — there is not a monument, indeed, to mark the spot 
where a single one of the first settlers was buried. The graves of 
their children, the men of the second generation, however, are 
marked with tombstones still standing. 

*This last clause appears to be a very shrewd thrust at "mooning 11 on the beach on 
Sundays. 



Early Customs. 187 

Three different varieties of stone were used — the hlne slate, so 
common in the old cemeteries of New England, a red sandstone 
that quite well withstands the ravages of time, and a gray sand- 
stone, which, on the contrary, very poorly preserves its original 
inscriptions, Most of the graves have now become level with 
the ground, and many of the monuments covered with masses. 
The inscriptions even of some are fast becoming illegible, so that 
it seems a work of charity to preserve here the remembrance of 
our ancesters for future generations. The following are copies of 
the inscriptions of all the stones that are visible in the older por- 
tion of the yard. Those marked with a * have, in addition to 
the epitaph, the family arms engraved upon them. Some are 
surmounted with the conventional cherub of the old graveyards, 
and others by skull and cross-bones : 

" Here lyes ye reverent Joseph Whiting who died April 7 1723 
in ye 82nd year of his age. 

" Here lyes the body of Mrs Eebecca Whiting, wife to Mr 
Joseph Whiting aged 63 years 2 months deceased April 21st, 1726. 

" * Here Lyeth the body of Coll Matthew Howell, and one of 
the House of Representatives for their Majesties province of New- 
York. Deceased May the 4th Anno 1706 iEtas-sua-55. 

" Here lies the body of Mr Samuel Whiting who died July 
ye 12th 1729 in ye 40th year of his age. 
— " Here lies the body of Abigail Halsey aged 26 years who died 

the 10th of October 1696. 
-^ " Here lyes Buried ye- body of Mrs Hannah Halsey, wife to 
Capt Isaac Halsey who died Augst 29th Anno Domini 1723 aged 
62 years. 

— " In memory of Capt Isaac Halsey who died May ye 18th A. 
D. 1757 in ye 97th year of his age. 

~-" Here lyeth the body of Timothy Halsey who dyed July the 
12th 1723 about 20 year of his age. 

" Here lyeth the body of Eobert Patton which deceased on the 
12th day of May 1700. * * ■* 

" Here lyeth buried the body of Capt Thomas Stephens aged 
about 51 years. Departed this life November ye 26th 1701. 

" Here lyes ye body of Sarah Malbey daughter Mr John and 



188 Histoby of Southampton. 

Mrs Susanna Malbey who deed September ye 8th 1723 in ye 19th 
year of her age. 

"Here lies Interred the body of Mr John Mai by who died 
June 27th 1706 aged 33 years. 

" Here lyeth the body of Bethia Coper wife of Mr * * * 
Coper who died January the 14th Anno 1716-17 JEtas-sua- 27. 

" Here lies buried the body of Mrs Mehetable Herrick who 
deed July 17th 1734 aged 60 years. 

"*Here lies ye body of Mr William Herrick Esqr who 
departed this life August the 19th Anno 1708 JEtas-sua-54. 

" Here lyes ye body of Susannah Howell aged 83 years. Died 
March ye 24th 1711. 

" * 1696 Here lies the body of Major John Howell deceased 

November aged 71. 

" Here lies interred ye body of ye reverend Mr John Tailor 
who died August ye 10 1701 aged 23 t years. 

" * 1692 Mr John Howell aged 44 years and dyed in March 
the 8th. 

" In memory of Lieut. Hezekiah Howell died Dec. ye 4th 
1744 in the 68 th year of his age. 

" Daniel Foster deed Nov ye 5th 1744 aged 68 years. Phil. 
1st : 21st. 

" Interred here lyes the blessed Bemains 
Of one who did with Freedom die, 
To be relieved from all his pains, 
And dwell with God Eternally. 

" Here Lyes burie"d ye body of Mrs Phebe Howell wife of 
Lieut. Hezekiah Howell who died July 16th Anno Domini 1732 
ae;ed 62 years. 

" Here was layed the body of Mr Thomas Sayre who dyed 
December the 10th Anno 1715, in the 49th year of his age. 

" Here lyes ye body of Reverend Joseph Taylor aged 31 who 
deceased April 4th 1682. 

"Here lyeth buried ye body of Abigill Howell ye wife of 
Abraham Howell aged 27 years, deceased ye 19th of June 1688. 

" Here lyeth ye body of William Ludlam son of Anthony 
Ludlam who died Aprill 27 1716 in ye 13th year of his age. 



Eablt Customs. 189 

" Here lies buried the body of Mr Obadiah Rogers who deed 
May ye 8th 1729 aged 74 years. 

" In memory of Capt Obadiah Rogers who died Oct 31st 1783 
in the 84th year of his age. 

" In memory of Mrs Abigail wife of Capt Obadiah Rogers 
who died May 6th 1782 in the 80th year of her age. 

" Beneath this stone Death's prisoner lies, 
The stone shall move, the prisoner rise 
When Jesus with Almighty word 
Calls his dead saint to meet *his Lord. 

"Here lyeth the body of Capt John Cooper who dyed 
December the 14th Anno 1715 in the 30th year of his age. 

" In memory of John Howell Esq died December 23 1747 in 
ye 71st year of his age. 

"Here * * * of Ann Howell wife to * * * Howell 
* * * 44 year of her age. deceased May ye 17 1714." 

To these we may add the inscriptions on a few stones found in 
the lot of Mr. Hedges Sanford, of Watermill. 

" Here lyes buried the Body of Mr David Halsey. Died ffeb. 
ye 18 1731 in ye 69th yeare of his age. 

" Here lyes the Body of Mrs Temperrence Cook wife to Mr 
Ellis Cook who deced Dec. 9 1723 in ye 19th year of her age. 

" Here lyes ye Body of Mrs Temperence Ludlam wife to Mr 
Jeremiah Ludlam who deced April ye 21st 1726 in ye 29th year 
of her age." 

The two following are given with no other apology than their 
beauty — the one expressing a noble tribute to the virtues of a 
wife and mother, the other a pious wish which has come down to 
us from a still greater antiquity. The first is taken from the 
North-end burying ground of Southampton, the second was found 
in the catacombs of Rome. 

" In memory of Amy wife of Zebulun Howell Esq who died 
Dec 15 1752 in the 59th year of her age. 

" She was a faithful wife and good mother." 

The pious wish engraved on the Roman Christian's monument 
is, " Qui legerit, vivat in Christo." 



*Sic. 



190 Histoby of Southampton. 

The Cobb or Wickapogoe Burying Ground. 

The only record of this is as follows : 

" 1686 April 1st At a town meeting, it was granted to the in- 
habitants of Cobb to have 6 poles square of land for a burying 
ground." 

This cemetery lies about equally distant from Cobb and Wicka- 
pogue. It is, like all the others in the village, inclosed, and con- 
tains some old monuments. 

Mecox Burying Ground. 

This contains a few monuments to the men of the second gene- 
ration and in antiquity ranks next to the old one in Southampton 
village. Many of the stones are doubtless overthrown and covered 
with soil and vegetation. Among the oldest monuments yet 
standing, are the following : 

" Here Lyeth the Body of Anthony Ludlam who dyed March 
the 17th Anno 1681 in the 31st year of his age. 

" Here lies the body of Lemu'el Howell who died September 
the 22 (?) 1712 aged 35 years. 

" Here Lyeth the Body of Ellis Cook who departed this life 
November the 10th Anno 1706 aetatis 44." 

Sagg Burying Ground. 

The cemetery in Sagg Street, south, is quite ancient, and is 
kept with commendable care. Among the oldest stones are the 
following : 

" Here lyes buried the body of Theophilus Howell Esq aged 
77 years. Deced March ye 12th 1732. 

" In memory of Mrs Martha the wife of Mr Lemuel Peirson 

who died Augst the 26th 1753 in the 72th year of her age. 

" My sun is set, 

My Glass is run, 
My Candle's out, 
My work is done " 

North End Burying Ground. 
This lot now used for a cemetery was originally laid out as a 
homestead. Its first owner was "William Russell who sold the 
same to Obadiah Sale, and he moving to Boston, sold it to George 



Eaely Customs. 191 

Heathcote. Dec. 13, 1712, Caleb Heathcote, cousin of George, 
sells his home lot and house (4 acres), between Jeremiah Jagger 
on the south, and John Laughton on the north, for £20 to the 
trustees of the town. The deed of sale states that part of this 
land northward and eastward, shall be common to the town for 
a highway to North Sea. This is where the road now runs. 

The first interment in this ground, however, was not till 1721, 
as appears from an old stone on the south side with the following 
inscription : 

"HE ARE LYES | ye BoDY OF IoSEPH | PoST DE- 

seased | io November | aged aboVT 1 72 1721." 

Upon the foot stone of this grave is the following : 
" PoST IoSEPH I THE FIRST | ENTARED IN THIS 
I PLAS." 

Miscellaneous. 
Wolves. — 1652. It appears from various records, that wolves 
must have been sufficiently numerous in the early times to cause 
considerable annoyance. 

The following records show what means were employed to 
abate the nuisance : 

"March 3rd, 1651. (1651-2.) It is ordered by the Generall 
Court that in consideration of Robert Merwin his care and paynes 
about killing of Wolves by setting of guns and watching or other- 
wise hee shall haue 30 shilling per Wolfe for every one it appeares 
hee killeth, provided that if any beast bee killed in probability 
by the Wolves and hee the said Robert haue notice thereof, that 
he repaire vnto the place where the beast is slaine whether at 
Mecocks Sagabonack or elsewhere within such a compass, and vse 
his best endeavour to kill the said destroyer, allsoe if it happen at 
any time he the said Robert bee warned to any court or meeting 
during the time hee is vppon the foresaid designe that hee shall 
bee discharged and acquitted from such said meeting, hee is not 
to sett his gun within half a mile of the towne, and if his gun kill 
any beast he shall do his best to finde it, and the whole towne to 
beare the losse. 

" 1652. Oct. 6th, 1652. It is ordered that whosoever makes 



192 History of Southampton. 

it appeare hee killeth a woolf within the bounds of this towne 
shall haue paid vnto him by the towne the some of twenty shill- 
ings, and hee that lykewise shall kill a woolf at Quaquanantuck 
shall have 10s. in like manner." 

These extracts, and others as below, however ludicrous they may 
appear in subject-matter or minute detail, show at least an 
admirable equipoise of justice. See this : 

" May 5th, 1658. Att the same towne meeting there was a 
stray hogg supposed to be Mr. Smiths and by the towne sould at 
an outcry for 17s Id and that to goe as farr as it will goe, for the 
payment of the damage done by that hogg to the Indians. 

" Again, May 23, 1659. It is ordered that if any mans lott in 
this towne bee in the Judgment of men sufficiently fenced, and 
little piggs bee permitted by the owner (notwithstanding warn- 
ing) to come within such lottment, then vpon the oath of the 
trespassed before one of the Magistrates the owner of such piggs 
shall pay 6d per pigg for every time any such piggs doe trespass 
as afforesaid. 

" 1647. May the third, it is ordered by the five men apoynted 
for the affaires of this towne for this present yeare that cowes and 
goates shall not be kept together neither by cowkeepers nor goate 
keeps nor all nor any of them, at no time all this present summer 
vpon the payne of twelve pence a person for euery such default, 
also that if the goate keepers doe willfully mingle theire goates 
they shall be lyable to the same penalty. 

" May 10, 1652. It is concluded by the maior pt of the towne 
that the calf heard shall be left for this ensueing year att Saga- 
bonack where they were kept the yeare last past." 

Reception of Governor Lovelace. 
" Southampton, Sept. 23, 1668. Whereas wee the subscribers 
the Inhabitants of the sd Southampton do understand that our 
honrbl Governr Genrll Lovelace is to come down into this 
Country amongst vs this Spring wee doe at this Towne meeting 
apoynt ffirstly that his honr be reed and entertained with the 
greatest respect whereof we are possibly capable and soe con- 
ducted to the place appoynted for his residence comfort and most 



Early Customs. 193 

convemeucy. Nextly whereas our sd Towne of Southampton 
have by right of equity and of law also many privilidges which 
many plantations on this Island hath not, as not only Indian 
Interest of or plantation but alsoe pattent right therein, and 
whereas It seemes to vs as if wee were like to be deprived of 
those our privilidges which at great rate we have procured and 
with much difficulty and danger wee have so many years pos- 
sessed, and alsoe wee heareing by or Neighbours of the great 
goodnes Clemency and righteous proceeding of him our sd 
Governr wee do constitute & appoynt our aproved and well 
beloved friends Mr Robert Fordham Capt John Howell, Joshua 
Barnes & Mr Henry Pierson to represent unto his honr the true 
& reall state of vs our plantation and of all our Concernes hopeing 
his honr will accept ye psons of our sd deputies and theire argu- 
ment reasons on our behalf, and grant our reasonable petitions by 
them to bee presented and demonstrated ; soe shall we all be- 
ingaged ever to remaine his honrs faithfull friends & servants. 

" Edward Howell, John Topping, Thomas Halsey, Richard 
Barrett, Richard Howell, Samuel Johnes, Edmund Howell, 
Robert "Wolley, ffrancis Sayer, John Jennings, Christp (his X 
mark) Lupton, Isack Willman, William Russell, Thomas Burnett,. 
Obadiah Rogers, John Foster, Joseph Fordham, Thomas Sayer,. 
Jonas Bower, John Jessupp, Thomas Gouldsmith, John "Wood- 
ruffe, John Bishop, James Herreck, John Cooper, Benjamin 
Hayens, Thomas Shaw, John Davis, G. Harris, Zorobabell 
PhiUips." 

A Case of Shaep Practice. 

John Kelly, a carpenter, was examined in court for an at- 
tempt at bigamy, and for having spoken falsely in declaring his 
wife was dead. He excused himself by saying she was dead in 
trespasses and sins. Pie had come here from the Barbadoes leav- 
ing a wife behind him. 

The Christmas Storm of 1811, and Other Events. 
This winter was memorable for the severest storm within the 
memory of the present generation. It came on during the night 
of Christmas. The evening before had been warm and hazy, so- 
25 



194 History of. Southampton. 

mild, indeed, that sheep and cattle were left out in the lots. 
About ten o'clock in the evening it began to rain, and about two 
o'clock the next morning it became intensely cold, and snow fell 
abundantly and continually with a high wind, until banks were 
formed six and ten feet deep. All the next day the weather was 
too severe even in the blinding snow and cold to rescue the sheep, 
many of which were smothered and perished. 

Another severe storm is spoken of in tradition, called Bower's 
snow storm, from the circumstance that at the time of its occur- 
rence there was a wedding at the home of Jonas Bower on the hill, 
in the house now owned by Mr. Bufus Sayre. It began to snow 
during the festivities, and so severe was the storm that many of 
the guests remained over night, but only in the morning to be 
obliged to clamber out of second story windows, so deep drifted 
was the snow about the house. 

In 1815, occurred the greatest September gale within the mem- 
ory of man in Southampton. Many trees were overthrown by 
its violence, and one house unroofed, while the roofs of two 
others were kept from meeting the same fate by lashing timbers 
across them to the beams within. The two houses thus saved 
were those now the residences of Mrs. Wm. T. Jones and Mr. 
Isaac P. Poster. 

A Pot of Gold. 1790, June 28, a young man at South- 
ampton last week dug up a stone and under it he saith, was a pot 
full of dollars : he divulged the secret to two more young men, 
who last Monday night (as we conclude) took up one if not two 
pots of gold. The stone and inscription on it I have seen. It 
appears to be a ballast-stone. The engraving on it is much blurred 
We think it was buried by Kidd. It was dug up within a quar- 
ter of a mile from our south shore on a flat piece of ground. 
The engraver must have been illiterate, and the inscription can- 
not be imitated with printing types. The stone has a rude dag- 
ger scratched on it and words of the following import. " Under 
this pot there lies another twice as good." The pot was three feet 
under ground. —[Correspondence of New London paper.] 

Money Vessel. On October 31, 1816, a Spanish brig came 
ashore with a a part of her sails standing a little to the westward 



Eaelt Customs. 195 

-of the village. She had been abandoned by her crew, a part or 
all of whom came ashore in her boats to some place west of South- 
ampton. From papers found aboard, it was supposed that she 
was captured by a Carthaginian privateer. Her lockers had been 
torn up and searched, several barrels of coffee and provisions 
were fouild on board of her, and a number of masks. She was 
much damaged, and was wrecked, i. e., taken to pieces slowly by 
the inhabitants. In the month of December following, her sid- 
ing began to be broken off by the waves, and a stream of Spanish 
dollars poured out into the sand. For a time mining in this novel 
region was as lively and as profitable as the later operations in 
California. The vessel was supposed by some to have been a 
pirate, and that the specie taken from plundered vessels had 
been hidden (unknown to the crew) in the ceiling by the captain, 
who had been made way with in a mutiny. Now and then a 
"sand dollar" is still picked up in the vicinity. 

Parmenas Howell, Painter. 
He was one of nine children of Capt. Ezekiel Howell, and was 
born March 24, 1784. Having shown considerable talent in 
drawing while yet a youth, he was sent to New York to receive 
the advantages of instruction in the studio. Here he remained some 
time profitably employed in the study of his arts, his proficiency 
exciting hopes of a brilliant career. Returning to Southampton, 
however, at an early age, he fell a victim to consumption — a dis- 
ease which swept off the whole family of children as they suc- 
cessively reached maturity. 

Daniel Halset. 
Mr. Daniel Halsey was born on the old homestead of his fathers 
in Wickapogue, April 1, 1796. He received a good school edu- 
cation, and pursued the study of Latin and Greek languages 
under his pastor, Rev. David Bogart, in which he made very 
respectable attainments. He was much employed as a teacher, 
and with success and acceptance to scholar and parent. That 
some of the old poetic fire dwelt in him, the following spirited 
lyric will testify, written for the occasion of celebrating our coun- 
try' s birthday, July 4, 1831 : 



196 History of Southampton. 



When the Goddess of liberty found not a place 

Where the sole of her foot in the old world could rest. 
She directed the daring Columbus to trace 
A path to the New World unknown in the West ; 
In the wilds which she chose 
An Empire arose, 
As by magic, of freemen redeemed from their foes, 
Redeemed from the hand of oppression and wrong, 
To the rights which by nature to all men belong. 

Here freedom and science and virtue expand, 

And plenty and peace are their constant attendants, 
Whilst the Genius of Liberty smiles on the land 

Of her choice, with a glorious and godlike resplendence, 
It was here she designed 
The oppressed of mankind, 
And the exile a home and a refuge should find ; 
With laws mild and equal her subjects are blest, 
And under her banner the lowly find rest. 

Let the wanderer then to her standard repair, 

We have room, ample room, to extend our dominion, 
And be free as the songsters that tenant the air, 
The masters of action, of word and opinion, 
Let us ever rejoice 
In the land of our choice, 
And our rulers elect by the popular voice. 
That the servants who serve us may act in the fear 
Of the Judge before whom they will shortly appear. 

Ye sons of Columbia, come bail the glad day, 

The festival day of our land's Independence, 
Our fathers determined to spurn lawless sway, 

And purchase fair freedom for us their descendants, 
By the favor of heaven 
The blessing was given 
To endure till the globe shall in sunder be riven ; 
For freedom is man's indisputable right, 
Of man in his weakness or man in his might. 

Then ye sons of America forever revere 

The names of your Country's most gallant defendants, 
Their blood was the price of a purchase most dear. 
For millions this day of their happy descendants, 
Who swear to maintain 
Their noble domain, 
Unpolluted by tyrants while time shall remain ; 
Nor will tarnish the glory their ancestors won, 

While the worlds in their orbits revolve round the sun. 

Though the despots of Europe still rivet the chains, 

On the necks of their vassals and crush them to dust. 
Shall not heaven forbid that America's plains 

With the foot of a tyrant should e'er be accursed ? 
Be her freedom the same 
Till the angel proclaim, 
Time ends, and the world is enveloped in flames, 
And the empires of earth in one ruin are hurled 
At the great and the last winding up of the world. 



Early Customs. 197 

Here is a fragment which, in its easy flowing style, reminds one 
of Pope : 

Hear when the widow and the orphan cry, 
And with a liberal hand the poor supply ; 
Nor with an envious eye the rich behold, 
None are the better for their sums of gold. 
A virtuous mind should be our only test, 
He is the worthiest man who is the best. 
Wealth can no real happiness bestow, 
How few in higher life contentment know ; 
Then to the will of heaven be thou resigned, 
Enjoy thy fortune and contentment find. 

When once requested to write an appropriate device for his 
sign, by a tavern-keeper, Mr. Halsey sent him the following grim 
effusion : 

Rum, whisky, brandy, cordial, porter, beer, 

Ale, applejack and gin are dealt out here, 

Diluted, raw or mixt in any measure, 

To all consumers : come and act your pleasure, 

The above specifics will, in time, God knows, 

Put to a period all your earthly woeB, 

Or would you bring life to a splendid close 

Take double, swigs, repeating dose on dose ; 

A panacea this for every ail, 

'Twill use you up, 'twas never known to fail, — 

Use up your property, ere scarce you know it, 

Use up your character or sadly blow it, 

Use up your health, and strength and mind's repose, 

And leave mayhap your carcass to the crows. 



198 History of Southampton. 



CHAPTER XII. 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS. 

(The following abbreviations are used : " b " born, " d " died, and somtimes daughter, " s " 
son, " m " married, " w " wife, " eh " children.) 

These records are gathered chiefly from the Town Records and 
given as a supplement to the genealogies. 

Births. 

Ruth d of Richard Howell was b June 23 1669. 

Elizabeth d of Richard Smith was b Jan 1 1670. 

George Haaris had d b Apr 6 1670. 

William Russell had s Oliver b May 7 1670. 

Samuel s of Samuel Whitehead b Feb 29 1684. 

John Earle had s David b Jan 11 1685. 

Samuel Whitehead had d Mary b Feb 14 1686, and d Johana 
b Aug 2 1690. 

Benoni Flint had ch. Benjamin b Feb 2 1679, John b Sept 10 
1680, Sarah b July 14 1683, and Mary b Aug 21 1685. 

Nathaniel Rusco had ch. Johana b Jan 20 1684, Mary b Sept 
2 1685, Nathaniel b Sept 6 1686, and Ebenezer b Oct 10 1688. 

John Campbell Had d Sarah b Dec 11 1687. 

Walter Melvine had ch. John b Jan 3 1685, Hannah b March 
18 1688, and Martha b July 1 1691. 

Samuel Butler had ch. Martha b Jan 18 1687, Sarah b Apr 4 
1690, Amy b Sept 15 1692, Mary b April 5 1694, Nathaniel b 
April 4 1698, James b May 18 1700, and Gideon b Dec 11 1701. 

John Cook had d Mehetabel b Feb 8 1713. 

Thomas Reed had ch. Sarah b Aug 1 1706, Ashur b Sept 18 
1711, Thomas b Apr 23, 1714, John b Apr 25 1717, Sybil b Jan 
24 1720, Amy b Feb 8 1723 and David b Aug 10 1725. 

Humphrey Hughes had s Humphrey b Oct 2 1669. 

Ezekiel Sandford had ch. Ezekiel b Apr 9 1681 and Thomas b 
Aug 9 1684. 



Bieths, Marriages and Deaths. 199 

Samuel Bigelow had w Mehetabel, and eh. Abigail b Feb 10 
1722-3, Timothy b Sept 19 1724, Mary b Sept 18 1726, Isaac b 
June 15 1730 and Samuel b Jan 12 1733-4. 

Marria&es. 

Daniel Poster m Lydia "Wood, May 23, 1710. 

Jeremiah Culver m 2d w Damaris d of Joseph Foster deeed 
Dec 9 1714. 

David Haines m Abigail daughter of Christopher Foster Apr 
25 1717. 

Samuel Jones Jr m Hannah d of Christo. Foster Oct 20 1715. 

Thomas Reed m Sarah d of Isaac Cory May 30, 1704. 

John Jessup was married June 16 1669. 

Thomas James " " Sept 2 1669. 

John Wheeler " " Dec 9 1669. 

John Post " " Nov 3 1670. 

Job Sayre m Sarah Oct 27 1670. 

Richard Woodhull of Brookhaven m Temperance Topping 
Nov 20 1684. 

Thomas Baker of E Hampton m Ann Topping April 29, 1686. 

John Laughton m Sarah Conkling of Southold July 28 1680. 

Benoni Flint m Mary Browne d of William B June 10 1675. 

Lot Burnett m Phebe Mills Oct 20 1675. 

John Howell Jr m Martha White June 12 1673. 

Samuel Whitehead m Mary Cooper Sept 12 1682. 

Josiah Halsey m Sarah Topping Sept 12 1678. 

John Earle m Sarah Ray nor Nov 1678. 

Obadiah Rogers Jr m Sarah Howell Dec 20 1683. 

Thomas Jessup m Mary Williams Nov 23 1683. 

Jonas Bower m Ruth Howell Apr 12 1686. 

Joseph Hildreth m Hannah Jessup Sept 11 1678. 

Job Sayre m 2nd w Wid Hannah Howell, June 18 1685. 

John Larrison m Jemima Halsey May 22 1683, also he m 2nd 
w Wid Mary Howell Dec 20 1686. . 

Joseph Marshall m Elizabeth Howell March 18 1674. 

Jon Campbell m Sar'h Hakelton d of Obad'h Rogers Mar 9 1687. 

Samuel Whitehead m Joanah Beebe Oct 24 1869. 



200 History of Southampton. 

Isaac Halsey m Abigail Howell Nov 28 1689. 

Joseph Fordham married Mary Maltby Dec 5 1689. 

John Howell Jr m Wid Mary Taylor Jan 30, 1690. 

Rev. Jabez Wakeman of East Jersey m Eunice d of Matthew 
Howell Sept 29 1702. He died and s'he m Joseph Talcot of 
Hartford Ct June 26 1706. 

Deaths. 

John Shepherd d March 24 1683. 

David Howell d May 2 1684. 

Sarah w Job Sayre d Oct 29 1684. 

Sarah d Edmund Howell d Apr 10 1685. 

Samuel Mill d April 1 1685. 

Sarah w Obadiah Rogers d Oct 11 1685. 

William Hakelton d Sept 6 1685. 
— Mary w Samuel Whitehead d*Apr 20 1687. 

Samuel s of Samuel Whitehead d Aug 13 1685. 
. Phebe d of Samuel Whitehead d Apr 14 1694. 

Martha w John Howell d June 7 1688. 

Mary w Thomas Topping d June 9 1688. 

Sarah w Edmund Howell d Aug 29 1688. 

Mary w Isaac Willinan d Sept 3 1688. 

Martha w Jonah Fordham d Oct 4 1688. 

Amy w Joseph Pierson d Oct 3 1692. 

Sarah w Samuel Johnes d Oct 3 1692. 

Hannah w Christopher Foster d Feb 7 1697. 

Mary w Jeremiah Culver, d Feb 23 1707. 

Joseph Foster d Jan 30 1708. 

Mary w Israel Howell d March 26 1716. 

Jeremiah Foster d May 25 1732 ae 24. 

Robert Patton d May 12 1700. 

Benoni Newton d March 4 1706 ae 53. 

Robert Norris d July 23 1729. 

Manassah Kempton d Nov 28 1737 ae 86. 

Caleb Dayton d Oct 4 1688. 

Richard Wood d May 16 1734 ae 57. 

Joana w Benoni Newton d May 1710 ae 56. 

Isaac Bower d Jan 20 1746 ae 78. 



Genealogies. 201 



CHAPTER XIII. 

GENEALOGIES. 

(The same abbreviations used in this as in the preceding chapter. The figures orefixed to 
the names serve only to identify them wherever found. % verfmany instlnoS ? hS been 
found impossible to obtain the names of all the children of a man who, in a deed of eift rner 
th? S ante ) mformatlon on record concerning his family], merely mentions the name of 

At this distance of time it cannot be hoped to construct com- 
plete family records from the fragmentary and indirect facts pre- 
served in the records of the town ; and yet much has been accom- 
plished from this source. In some instances the author has 
received valuable assistance in his labor from members of families 
now living. Nearly all such persons consulted could contribute 
their family record for two or three generations back, but earlier 
than that but few could give any reliable information. 

The old family records, if any were kept, have mostly perished 
in the lapse of ages, and it became necessary to collate and com- 
pare individual facts and statements without number, spread over 
hundreds of pages of manuscript, before what has been given 
could be ascertained with certainty. 

It has frequently happened that while the relationship of father 
and son is clearly established from records, yet the date of birth 
can nowhere be found. In some cases the date of birth can only 
be determined proximately from tombstone inscriptions. The 
genealogies would have been fuller if letters of inquiry had been 
answered. 

Abbreviations used in the following genealogies : 

abt.= about. Used in dates ascertained from census. 

ae. =aetatis=aged. 

b.=born. 

bap.=baptized. 

ch.=child or children. 

d.=daughter or died, according to context. 

d. s. p. =died without issue. 

m.=married. 
26 



202 Histoet of Southampton. 

s.=son. 

w.=wife. B. H.=Bridge Hampton. 

wid.=widow. E. H.=East Hampton. 

Coat Aemoe. 
The names of nearly all the old 'families of Southampton are 
found in Burke's General Armory as entitled to coats of arms. 
None are given in this work, however, unless there is evidence 
that these particular families are hy descent entitled to use them. 
This evidence is from seals, old pictures of arms on parchment, 
gravestones, or from establishing connection with an English 
family using the arms at the time of the settlement. Doubtless 
if the families here could be identified and located in England 
many more would be found entitled to coat armor. When it is 
said that Burke mentions in his General Armory coats of arms of 
different families, it is to be understood that all these are there 
described in detail. 

Baenes Family. 

The name of William Barnes, planter, first occurs in 1644. In 
1652 he sells his homestead at the "north end" to James Hamp- 
ton of Salem, and apparently removes from the town. The same 
year also a Richard B., living next to Joshua, and probably his 
brother, also sells his homestead and disappears. Joshua is first 
mentioned in 1649 when the town pays him money for his boat 
hire. 1 William 1 then probably had children 2 Joshua 2 and 3 
Richard 2 . 

2 Joshua 2 had w. Prudence and ch. 4 Samuel 3 and 5 William 3 . 

4 Samuel 3 m. Patience Williams Nov. 9, 1676, and had ch. 
6 Patience 4 b. Aug. 31, 1677, 7 Temperance 4 b. Jan. 16, 1679, and 
8 Joshua 4 b. Apr. 8, 1683. 

5 William 3 lived in Sagg. In 1683 he bought land of his father, 
and in 1684 or 5 he removed to the town and county of West- 
chester, New York. 

The homestead of 1 William Barnes was the lot now belonging 
to Albert J. Post north of his house and south of the homestead of 
William S. Pelletreau. 

The homestead of Joshua Barnes was that now owned by William 
S. Pelletreau. 



Genealogies. 203 

The family of this name in E. H. do not appear to be con- 
nected with the Barnes's of Southampton. 

Bishop Family. 

The first of this name in Southampton was John Bishop who is 
first mentioned on record Nov. 2, 1652, where he had a house lot of 
three acres granted him by the town, next north of the home lot 
of Joshua Barnes. The homestead of John Bishop was the late 
residence of Jonathan Fithian, Esq. This grant of a house lot 
only signifies that he was not a farmer. 

1 Bichard Bishop 1 of Salem, Massachusetts, freeman May 18, 
1642, residing there as early as 1635, d. Dec. 30, 1674, had. w. 
Dulsabell who d. Aug. 23, 1658 ; he mar. again, Mary wid. of Wil- 
liam Gott, July 22, 1660. He had ch. 2 Thomas 8 , 3 John 8 and 4 
Nathaniel 2 , the latter of whom may have come to E. H. where 
where was one early of this name. 

3 John 2 came to Southampton and had ch. 5 Bichard 3 b. Oct. 17, 
1669, 6 John 3 , 7 Samuel 3 and 8 Josiah 3 , and if any more I know 
not, nor the order of their birth of those named. 

6 John 3 a weaver had w„ Lydia and ch. 9 Mary 4 b. May 31, 
1682, 10 Abijail 4 b. July 8, 1683, 11 Bethia 4 b. Feb. 27, 1684-5, 12 
Experience 4 b. Nov. 30, 1686, 13 Mary 4 b'. June 29, 1688, and 14 
Eunice 4 b. June 17, 1690. 

7 Samuel 3 d. 1734, an old man, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 15 
Samuel 4 , 16 John 4 , 17 Daniel 4 , 18 James 4 , 19 Susanna 4 , 20 Mehet- 
abel 4 , 21 Phebe 4 , 22 Abigail 4 , 23 Hannah 4 , 24 Deborah 4 and 25 
Elizabeth 4 . 

A Samuel, probably 15 Samuel 4 , had ch. 26 John 5 , 27 James 6 and 
28 Samuel 5 . 

26 John 5 had ch. 29 Pamela 6 , 30 John 8 , 31 Jerusha 6 and 32 
Mercy 9 . 

30 John 8 had w. Jerusha and ch. 33 Maria' w. of Peter 
Fournier, 34 John', 35 Sarah' w. of Agee Halsey, 36 Nancy', w. 
of Benjamin Howell of Michigan, 37 Mary' w. of Capt. Nathan 
White and 38 Sophia 7 w. of Stephen Burnett. 

34 Capt. John' m. Miranda d. of David White and had ch. 39 
Elmira 8 w. of Albert Hildreth, 40 Matilda 8 , 41 Jeannette 8 , 42 

Augusta 8 w. of Halsey and 43 Agnes 8 w. of Henry A. 

Halsey. 



204 Histoet of Southampton. 

28 Samuel 6 had ch. 44 Samuel 6 and 45 Jeremiah 6 . 

44 Samuel 6 m. 1st, Hannah d. of Zephaniah Rogers, and 2d, 

Mary , and had ch. 46 Francis R. 7 b. 1807, 47 Eliza 7 , 48 

Emily 7 , 49 James R. 7 b. 1813, 50 Mary 7 , 51 Jetur R. 7 b. 1718, 52 
Charles 7 b. 1820, 53 Maria 7 and 54 Caroline , b. 1841, w. of Wm. 
F. Fordham and after his death she m. Theodore Haynes of B. 'H. 

46 Francis R. 7 had w. Julia and ch. 55 Charles H. a b. 1840, 56 
Emily J. 8 b. 1842, 57 Samuel F. e b. 1845 and 58 Jeremiah 8 b. 
1850. 

49 James R. 7 m. Theodosia b. 1827 d. of William French and 
had ch. 59 James H. 8 b. 1854 and 60 Benjamin H. 8 b. 1860. 

51 Jetur R. 7 of B. H. had w. Lucy H. b. 1829 and ch. 61 Egbert 
R. 8 b. 1856 and B2 Frank L. 8 b. 1861. 

61 Egbert R. 8 m. Oct. 19, 1881, Mary Alice b. 1852, d. of 
Edward A. and Mary A. (Sayre) Gray, and had son 63 Edward Mal- 
colm 9 b. Jan. 6, 1886. 

52 Charles 7 m. Jane d. of William French and had ch. 64 Edward 
R. 8 b. 1848, 65 William F. 8 b. 1850, 66 Henry B. 8 b. 1854, 67 Mary 
J 8 b. 1857, 68 Ada L. 8 b. 1860 and 69 Nettie 8 who, I should guess, 
was b. about 1852 (unless it is an abbreviation of Mary J. or Ada L). 

i 8 Josiah 3 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 70 Mary 4 , b. Nov. 1, 1709, 
71 Elizabeth 1 b. Sept. 20, 1715, and 72 William 4 b. Dec. 8, 1718. 

A James, probably 18 James 4 had son 73 James 5 . 

73 James 5 d. 1785, had w. Susanna and ch. 74 George 6 and 75 
Stephen 6 . 

A Daniel, probably 17 Daniel 4 , had s. 76 James 5 . 

76 James 5 of Brookhaven and an old man in 1813, had ch. 77 
Daniel 6 , 78 Mary 6 and 79 Sarah 6 . 

77 Daniel 6 had ch. 80 Uriah', 81 Joshua 7 and 82 Daniel 7 , all of 
Brookhaven. 

16 John 4 had ch. 83 John 5 , 84 David 5 , 85 Timothy 5 , 86 Nathan 
and 87 Armstrong 6 . 

83 John 6 d. 1811, had w. Mary and ch. 88 John 6 , 89 Isaac 6 , 90 
Charity 6 and 91 Solomon 6 . 

89 Isaac 6 had ch. 92 Mary A. 7 , 93 Louisa 7 , 94 Josiah H. 7 , 95 
Sarepta 7 , 96 Rebecca 7 , 97 John 7 , 98 Nancy 7 , 99 Caroline 7 , 100 
Isaac 7 , 101 Hiram 7 and 102 Elmira'. 

94 Josiah H.' m. Nancy Ellison of Moriches and had ch. 103 
Ellison 8 , 104 Hallock T. a and 105 Laura 8 . 



Genealogies, 205 

97 John' has d. 106 Sarah 8 . 

100 Isaac' of Jamesport had ch. 107 Edgar 8 and 108 Thomasal 8 . 

84 David 5 of Huntington had ch. 109 David" and 110 Edward 6 , 
who moved to the west. 

85 Timothy 6 also had ch. who moved west. 

86 Nathan 6 m. Huldah Culver and had ch. Ill Nathan 6 b. 1788, 
112 Phebe 6 , 113 Deborah 6 b. 1791, 114 Nancy 6 , 115 James 6 , 116 
Herman D. 6 b. 1798, 117 Stephen 6 b. 1800, 118 Hannah 6 , 119 
Franklin 6 b. 1806, 120 William 6 , 121 Elizabeth 6 , 122 Huldah 6 and 

123 Sarah 6 . 

117. Stephen 6 of West Hampton, b. 1801 had w. Melissa and ch. 

124 P. Warren' b. 1825, 125 William' b. 1831, 126 Eachel', 127 
Rogers', 128 Stephen', b. 1836, 129 Charles', b. 1840, 130 Sarah', b. 
1845, and 131 Hermon 7 , b. 1854. 

119 Franklin 6 had w. Laura and ch. 132 James' b. 1834 and 133 
Hannah'. 

124 F. Warren' had w. Elmira. 

125 William' had w. M. Jane and ch. 134 Hattie M. 8 b. 1857, 
135 George 8 b. 1859 and 136 Flora b. 1861. 

4 Nathaniel 2 of E. H. d. 1685, had ch. 137 Nathaniel 3 , 138 
Daniel 3 b. 1655, 139 Mary 3 and 140 another d. who m. James Hand 
but was dead in 1685. 

137 Nathaniel 3 had ch. 141 John 4 bap. 1699 and 142 Abigail 4 
bap. 1702. 

138 Daniel 3 m. Aug. 21, 1704, Sarah and had ch. 143 

Elizabeth 4 bap. 1706. 

There are five families of this name in England mentioned in 
Burke's General Armory as using coat armor. 

Bowden' Family. 
In 1817 George Bowden came here from England after a tem- 
pestuous voyage of one hundred and ten days duration. He 
married first Hannah Jagger, by whom he had two children, 
Edward and Lewis, the former of whom removed to Brooklyn. 
Lewis m. Helen Davidson of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and had ch. 
Harriet and Livingston. Mr. George Bowden m. 2d w. wid. 
Hannah Tuthill. 



206 Histoky of Southampton. 

Btjbnett Family. 
Thomas Burnett, the first of this name in Southampton, had a lot 
granted him October 13, 1643. He probably came here not long 
before this time. Savage mentions him as a resident of Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, though Lewis and Newhall make no mention of him. No 
record of his emigration has been found to show from what county 
in England he came. The record of the branch in New Jersey has 
been furnished by Mr. John K. Burnett of South Orange, New 
Jersey. 

1 Thomas 1 d. about 1684 had first w. Mary and second w. Mary 
■ Pierson prob. d. of John Pierson of Lynn, m. in Lynn Dec. 3, 1663, 

he had ch. oldest 2 John 2 , 3 Aaron 2 b. 1655, 4 Lot 2 , 5 Joel 2 , 6Dan 2 , 
7 Mordecai 2 , and 8 Matthias 2 b. 1674. (I do not know the order of 
the births of the ch. excepting John's, who is called the oldest son.) 

2 John 3 d. before 1684 and probably left no ch. 

3 Aaron 2 b. 1655 d. 1755 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 9 Aaron 3 , 10 
Elizabeth 3 , 11 Hannah 3 and 12 Moses 3 . 

9 Aaron 3 had w. Sarah and ch. 13 James", 14 Matthias 4 , 15 
William 4 and 16 Aaron 4 . 

13 James 4 had s. 17 Matthias b. 1747. 

17 Matthias was b. (according to Thompson's History of Long 
Island) at Bottle Hill, New Jersey, in 1747, graduated at Princeton, 
in 1769, and was settled in Jamaica as pastor of the Presbyterian 
church, where (says Thompson) he continued highly respected and 
useful till 1785, when he removed to Norwalk, Connecticut, and 
took charge of the Congregational church there and died in 1800. 
He had 1st w. Ann who d. July 7, 1789 ; married 2d wife Fanny d. 
of Rev. Azel Eoe of Woodbridge, New Jersey, June 30, 1792. Had 
ch. James b. on Long Island Jan. 1, 1779, John Dec. 10, 1781, and 
Ann b. in Norwalk April 11, 1786. "Whether he had any more ch. 
I know not. 

15 William 4 had son 18 Eliezur 5 who was b. , gradu- 
ated at Princeton college 1799 and was ordained minister in the 
Presbyterian church at Newburgh, New York, Nov. 20, 1805, and 
died in New Brunswick, New Jersey, of consumption Nov. 22 of 
the following year. 

12 Moses 3 d. 1741 had ch. 19 Justus 4 , 20 William 4 , 21 John' and 
22 Samuel". Most or all of these four ch. of Moses probablj 
removed if they attained maturity. 



Genealogies. 207 

4 Lot 8 , cordwainer, m. Phebe Mills Oct. 20, 1675, and he d. 
June 16, 1702. He had as per will, oldest son 23 Joseph 3 , 24 David 3 , 
25 Sarah 3 (who m. a Fithian), 26 Jonathan 3 , 27 Nathan 3 , 28 
Ephraim 3 and 29 Samuel 3 . 28 Ephraim 3 was b. according to town 
rec. June 8, 1693, and 29 Samuel 3 was b. May 3, 1695. 4 Lot 2 had 
also as by town rec. a s. 30 Isaac 3 who probably d. s. p. 

23 Joseph 3 had ch. 31 David 4 b. 1711, 32 Joseph 4 and 33 Stephen 4 b. 
1708. 

[Note. I have no positive evidence that these three ch. ,• Nos. 31 
to 33, were not the eh. of 26 Jonathan or 27 Nathan, but it is prob- 
able they were the ch. of 23 Joseph as I give them. Also, the 
order of the ages is probably Joseph, Stephen, David. ] 

31 David 4 b. 1711, d. Nov. 1, 1735, had w. Jerusha and a child 
not named in his will. 

32 Joseph 4 , d. 1770, had ch. 34 David*, b. 1741, and 35 Joseph 5 . 
34 David 5 , b. 1741, d. Jan. 9, 1807, had w. Sarah and ch. 36 

David 6 , b. 1786, and 37 Matthias 6 , b. 1782. Sarah w. of 34 David 
d. Mar. 27, 1826, ae. 81. 

36 David 6 , b. 1786, d. Mar. 8, 1842, had w. Sibyl (who d. 1858 
ae. 73) and ch. 38 David', 39 John F.', 40 Mary' and 41 George'. 

38 David', b. 1808, d. , had w. Sophronia and ch. 

42 Levi H. 8 , b. 1843, and 43 David H. 8 , b. 1847. 

43 David 8 m. 1st Mary d. of Philetus Pierson (and d. 1877) and 
had ch. David Pierson 9 . He m. 2d w. Minnie d. of James and Ade- 
line Rogers and had son Charles Rogers 9 . 

39 John F.', b. 1811, d. , had 1st w. , 

and 2d w. Eliza, d. of David Jagger, and had ch. by first wife, 44 
William Harrison 8 , b. 1837, 45 Jedidiah 8 , d. s. p., 46 Sarah J. 8 , b. 
1839, 47 Mary E. 8 , b. 1845, and 48 Ella J. 8 , b. 1850. 

37 Matthias 6 , b. 1782, d. Jan. 15, 1843, had w. Mary (who d. Jan. 
27, 1816, ae. 28) and s. 49 Stephen'. 

49 Stephen', b. 1810, had w. Sophia, d. of 27 John Bishop and 
ch. 50 Luther D. 8 , b. 1834, 50£ Mary Ann 8 , b. 1837, 51 James 8 , b. 
1835, 52 Nelson 8 , b. 1839, 53 Elizabeth 8 , b. 1843, 54 Rowena 8 , b. 
1845, Allen, b. 1847, and Annette, b. 1851. 

33 Stephen 4 , b. 1708 d. Mar. 22, 1734, m. Mehetabel Parsons of 
of E. H. Sept. 6, 1733, but whether there was issue I know not. 

24 David 3 of E. H. m. wid Sarah Mulford of E. H. Nov. 24, 



208 Histoby of Southampton. 

1726, and had ch. 55 Puah 4 bap. April 13, 1728, 56 Sarah 4 bap. 
1730, and 57 Puah 4 again, bap. 1733. 

28 Ephraim 3 b. 1693, d. Feb. 1761, of E. H. a cordwainer, had 

w . , and ch. 58 Sibyl 4 w. of [Abraham ?] Cook and 

59 Stephen 4 bap. Jan. 29, 1726-7. 

59 Stephen 4 of E. H. m. Hannah Merry Oct. 9, 1745, and had ch. 
60 Stephen 6 bap. Jan., 1753, 61 Hannah 6 b. 1764, 62 Stephen 6 again, 
bap. Nov. 1776, and 63 Benjamin H. 5 b. May 1778. 

[Note. There is nothing in the E. H. church rec. to show 
-whether 62 Stephen was the son of 59 Stephen or 60 Stephen, 
except the age as before given, and this may be the relationship. J 

29 Samuel 3 had s. 64 Samuel 4 who had ch. 65 Joseph 6 , 66 
Samuel 5 b. 1753, d. 1819, and 67 David 5 . 

66 Samuel 5 b. 1753 had s. 68 Samuel 6 who had ch. 69 Samuel 
H.' and 70 John E.' of Orange, New Jersey. 

69 Samuel' bad s. 71 Samuel 8 . 

64 Samuel 4 removed to New Jersey, where his descendants now 
live. 

5 Joel 2 lived in Southampton and prob. d. s. p. 

6 Dan 2 had 1st w. Abigail who d. May 26, 1698, and 2d w. 
Elizabeth and ch. 72 Daniel 3 and 73 Ichabod 3 b. 1693 and 74 Dan. 3 

72 Daniel* had s. 75 Daniel 4 who removed to New Jersey and 
there had a family. 

73 Ichabod 3 of Blizabethtown, New Jersey, physician, b., as Hat- 
field says, about 1684, d. July 13, 1774, aged 90, had w. Hannah who' 
was b. 1702 and d. 1758, had ch. 76 William 4 b. Dec. 2, 1730, and 
77 Ichabod 4 about 1732, who was a physician, and d. Mar. 12, 1756, 
aged 24, leaving no issue. 

76 William 4 was a physician of Newark, New Jersey, a graduate 
of Princeton in 1749 and d. 1791. He m. 1st Mary, d. of Nathaniel 
Camp, 1753 ; she died and he m. 2d Gertrude, wid. of Col. Phillip 
Van Cortlandt of Newark and d. of Nicholas Gouverneur, at the 
close of the revolutionary war. He had ch. 78 William 6 b. about 
1756, 79 Ichabod 5 b. about 1758, 80 John 5 b. 17C0, 81 Jacob 5 of 
Cincinnati, a judge, United States senator, etc., 82 George White- 
field, 6 graduate of Princeton 1792, of Dayton, Ohio, 83 Isaac 5 , 84 
Staats 6 , 85 David G. 5 , first president of Texas in 1836, and 86 
Hannah w. of Kinney. [Note. This account of the family 



Genealogies. 209 

of 76 William is from Judge Joseph P. Bradley's sketch of Doctor 
William Burnett iu Penn. Mag. of Hist., vol. 3, p. 308.] 

81 Jacob 5 was born in Newark, New Jersey, Feb. 22, 1770, was a 
graduate of Princeton college 1791, and d. May 10, 1853, in Cin- 
cinnati. 

7 Mordecai 2 was one of the associate settlers of Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, in 1699-1700. See Hatfield's History of Elizabeth. 

8 Matthias 2 b. 1674 d. Oct. 4, 1765, of E. H. had w. Elizabeth 
and d. 87 Mary 3 bap. May, 1702, w. of Eleazar Miller of E. H., who 
had a large family, for which see genealogies of E. H. families. 

1 Thomas 1 , the first settler, must have had one other ch. at least, 
a d. Miriam, who, June 25, 1675, m. Enoch Pithian of E. H. 

12 Moses 3 removed to Brookhaven, Long Island. 

76 William 4 was a surgeon in the Continental army in the revo- 
lution. 

50 Luther D. 8 b. 1834 has w. Mary A. b. 1831 and ch. Egbert 
L. 9 b. 1860, and Elsie 9 b. 1863. 

52 Nelson 6 b. 1839 m. Maria L. d. of Edward W. Halsey April 
12, 1871, and has ch. 88 Louisa H. 9 b. Sept. 14, 1862, 89 Frank 
W. 9 b. Sept. 1874, 90 Nellie F. 9 b. Feb. 5, 1877, and 91 Jennie 
E. 9 b. July 18, 1880. 

Burke's General Armory mentions thirteen families in England 
of the name of Burnet and Burnett as having coats of arms. I have 
a copy of a bookplate of John Burnet, attorney of New York 
previous to 1792, which contains a coat of arms, as follows : 

Argent : Three holly leaves in chief proper, and a hunting horn 
in base, sable garnished gules. 

Crest: A hand issuing out of a cloud about to prune a vine 
fruited, all proper. 

Motto : Virescit vulnere virtus. 

Butlbe Family. 

The name of Samuel Butler first appears on the list of 1698. 
He was a merchant and lived on the former residence of Mr. Josiah 
Foster. In 1704 he wills to w. Sarah and ch. Martha, Sarah, Amy, 
w. of Zubulon Howell, Mary, Nathaniel and James. Samuel 
bought house and lot of Walter Melvine in 1697, the present home 
of Josiah Foster. In 1753 James Butler of Branford, Ct., is men- 
27 




210 Histoky of Southampton. 

tioned in the Southampton records as the son of Nathaniel then 
deceased. The name has been extinct in the town for many years. 
See Chapter XII. 

Chatfield Family. 

Thomas Chatfield, the first of this name on Long Island, came to 
E. H. quite early. He had a brother Francis who settled in Guil- 
ford, Ct., and another brother George, who settled in Killingworth. 
Thomas removed from Guilford to New Haven, where he married 
Ann d. of Eev. Francis Higginson, and thence to E. H. 

Mr. John Chatfield of B. H. has an old 
parchment having thereon a picture of the 
arms of the family, probably brought to this 
country by his ancestor Thomas Chatfield 
above mentioned. The description of these 
'Wjf arms in heraldic language is : Or, a griffin 
segreant sable, on a chief purpure three escal- 
lops argent. Crest : An heraldic antelope's 
bead, erased, argent, attired and ducally gorged 
gules. 

1 Thomas 1 d. before 1687 and had ch. 2 

Anna 2 b. 1649, 3 Thomas 2 b. 1652 and 4 John 2 

ciiatfieid coat of Arms. w ho had w. Mary, but whether ch. I know not. 

3 Capt. Thomas 2 d. Mch. 20, 1712, had s. 5 Thomas 3 b. 1686. 

5 Thomas 3 (called Judge on the E. H. records) d. Jan. 12, 1754, 

m. May 26, 1707, Hannah Stratton b. June, 1687, and had ch. 6 

Mary 4 (who m. 1st Joseph King who d. 1732 and m. 2d Francis 

Pelletreau Sept. 4, 1734, and he d. in London 1737 leaving one d. 

Hannah b. Nov. 12, 1735), 7 Anna 4 b. Oct. 8, 1709, 8 Thomas 4 

b. Sept. 12, 1712, 9 John 4 b. Mch. 8, 1716, and 10 Esther 4 bap. 

1720. 

8 Thomas 4 d. Jan. 1, 1743, m. Not. 1, 1735, Abigail Mulford and 
had ch. 11 Phebe 5 b. June 21, 1737, 12 Abigail 5 b. Oct. 31, 1738, 
13 Thomas 5 b. Dec. 25, 1740, and 14 Elnathan 5 bap. 1742. 

9 John 4 m. Dec. 18, 1739, Jane d. of Lewis Mulford b. 1716 d. 
1753 and had ch. 15 Mary 5 b. Sept. 16, 1740, 16 John 5 b. Nov. 30, 
1741, 17 Thomas 5 b. July, 1743, 18 Hannah 5 b. Jan. 1, 1745, 19 
Lewis 5 b. July 25, 1746, 20 Jane 5 b. June 1, 1748, 21 Henry 5 b. Jan. 
1750, and 22 Elizabeth 5 b. Sept. 29, 1751. 




Genealogies. 211 

21 Oapt. Henry 5 had ch. 23 Henry 6 and 24 John. 6 

23 Henry 6 had s. 25 Henry M.' b. 1801. 

25 Henry M.' d. 1867 and had ch. 26 John' and a d. who m. 
Samuel Howell of B. H. where also have resided the last three gen- 
erations of Chatfields mentioned. 

13 Thomas 6 b. Dec. 25, 1740, had ch. 27 Thomas 6 bap. 1760, 28 
John 6 bap. 1772 and 29 Juliana bap. 1775 in E. H. 

Motto with coat of arms : Che sara sara. 

Clakk Family. 
This family has had no representatives in Southampton for gen* 
erations, having disappeared by death and removal. The name of 
Samuel Clark first appears on a jury list of 1654 and again on the 
list of 1657. Two of the name appear in the second generation, 
possibly brothers, as two in the same family were not unfrequently 
given the same name at that period — but more likely cousins. 

1 Samuel 1 (of the list of 1657) had w. Susanna and d. between 
May and July, 1679, and willed to ch. 2 Samuel 2 , 3 Edmund 2 , 4 
Sarah 2 , 5 Susanna 2 , 6 Mary 2 , 7 Martha 8 and 8 Hannah. 2 

2 Samuel 2 of Worth Sea had w. Sarah and d. Mch. 1, 1699. He 
left as by will ch. 9 Samuel 3 , 10 Eliphalet 3 , 11 Elisha 3 , 1£ Susanna 3 , 
13 Eachel 3 , 14 Mary 3 , 15 John 3 and 16 Esther 3 , the last four being 
then under age. 

9 Samuel 3 had ch. as by his will 17 Samuel 4 , 18 Job 4 , 19 Phebe 4 

w. of Eose, 20 Matthew*, 21 Mary 4 w. of Thomas (?) Lnp- 

ton and 22 Nathan. 

17 Samuel had probably a son 23 Elisha 5 , as in 1771 an Elisha is 
mentioned in record as the son of Samuel C. 



The other Samuel of age to belong to the second generation may 
be marked as 24 Samuel 2 . He lived at Old Town, m, 1st Esther or 

Hester White July 11, 1678, and 2d Hannah , and had 

ch. 25 James 3 b. Apr. 19, 1679, 26 Phebe 3 b. Aug. 17, 1681, 27 
Jeremiah b. Feb. 18, 1685, and as by will other ch. 28 William 3 , 29 
Charles 3 , 30 Daniel 3 , 31 Samuel 3 , 32 Hannah 3 . His will was proved 

Apr. 21, 1709. 26 Phebe 3 m. a Meaker or Meacham. The 

order of the ages of the ch. is not known beyond those given above. 

25 James 8 had w. Althea and ch. 33 Joseph 4 and 34 Stephen 4 



212 Histoby of Southampton. 

under age Dec. 17, 1715, when the will of his father was made. 
25 James d. Mch. 17, 1617. 



Another family of this name appears in the second generation in 
the person of Eichard Clark, whom we designate as 35 Eichard 2 . 
He had a son 36 Eichard 3 who moved to Elizabeth, N. J., b. about 
1661. 36 Eichard 3 had ch. 37 Eichard 4 , 38 John 4 , 39 Samuel 4 , 40 
Joshua 4 , 41 Ephraim 4 , 42 Thomas 4 and 43 Benjamin 4 . 

42 Thomas 4 had son who had s. 44 Abraham 6 who was one 

of the signers of the declaration of independence, as a representa- 
tive of New Jersey. 

Cook Family. 

1 Ellis 1 Cook was one of the early settlers, his name appearing 
on the list of 1644. In 1663 he made his will, having w. Martha 
d. of John Cooper of Southampton and ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Ellis 2 , 4 
Martha 2 , 5 Elizabeth 2 and 6 Mary 2 . His youngest son 7 Abial 2 or 
Abiel was born soon after his death. 1 Ellis 1 lived on the residence 
of the late George Herrick. "While retaining this homestead he 
removed to and resided at Mecox as early as 1659 and after his 
death (which occurred as I suppose about 1663), in 1690 his widow 
and son Abial unite in exchanging the Southampton homestead for 
one in Mill Keck (as Watermill was then called) belonging to 
Thomas Stephens, who had m. 5 Elizabeth 2 Oct. 20, 1675. 

2 John 2 b. about 1656 d. 1719 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 8 John 3 , 
9 Obadiah 3 b. 1687 and d. s. p. 1733, 10 Elias 3 , 11 Jonathan 3 b. 1700 
and 12 Martha 3 who m, Joseph Pordham. 

In 1716, Sept. 6, 2 John 2 wills to w. Elizabeth i rents of buildings, etc., 
beds, negro Kitty and £30. To s. John the house and barn formerly owned 
by Ellis C. deceased, brother of the testator, and land at Killis's pond and a 50 
commonage. To s. Elias land in Hogneck and Bridge Hampton and a 50 
commonage. To s. Obadiah land at Scuttlehole and at Sag Harbor (then 
called Great Meadow) and a 50 commonage. To s. Jonathan his own dwelling, 
house after death of his wife and a 50 commonage. To d. Martha his slave 
Abby, and all residue to be divided equally among his four eons. 

8 John 3 had ch. 13 Mehetabel 4 b. Feb. 8, 1713, and-14 John 4 b. 
1722 and perhaps others, of whom I find no trace. 



Genealogies. 21S 

14 John 4 , a deacon, d. Feb. 5, 1804, and. had w. Mary and s. 14 
John 6 and perhaps others. 

14 John 8 had ch. 15 John" b. 1784 and 16 Henry 6 . 

15 John 6 of Mec'ox d. Jan. 26, 1856, and had w. Elizabeth and 
ch. 17 John Lawrence', 18 Samuel 7 and 19 William'. 

17 John L. 7 has son 20 John 8 . 

19 William 7 has ch. 21 Caroline 8 and others. 

16 Henry 6 had s. 22 William 7 who has d. 23 Elizabeth 8 . 

10 Elias 3 d. 1734 had w. Mehetabel and ch. 24 Elias 4 , 25 David 4 
b. 1720 d. 1812, and 26 Nathan 4 . (I know not. the order of birth.) 

24 Elias 4 of Mecox had s. 27 Elias 6 . 

27 Elias 6 had ch. 28 Stephen 6 , 29 Henry 6 and 30 Elias 6 . 

28 Stephen 6 had ch. 31 Hervey' and 32 Baldwin. 7 

31 Hervey 7 had ch. 33 Baldwin 8 , 34 Elmer 8 , 35 Henry 8 , 36 Mary 8 , 
37 Electa 8 , 38 Lucy 8 , 39 Helen 8 and 40 Jane 8 . 

30 Elias 6 had ch. 41 Henry 7 , 42 Jeremiah' and 43 Sylvanus'. 

25 David 4 had ch. 44 Samuel 6 , 45 David 5 (who removed), 46 
Jonathan 6 (who removed) 47 Theophilus 5 and 48 Topping 6 . 

44 Samuel 6 had ch. 49 Sullivan 6 , 50 Jeremiah H. 6 , 51 Samuel 6 , 52 
Baldwin 6 , 53 Linsley 6 , 54 Edward 6 , 55 Elizabeth 6 and 56 Albert 6 . 

49 Sullivan 6 had ch. 57 Eichard 7 , 58 Elizabeth 7 w. of Henry 
Martyn Rose and 59 Rogers 7 . 

57 Richard 7 has w. and ch. 60 Eliza 8 w. of Rev, 

Wm. H. Rose, 61 Elizabeth 8 , 62 Alice 8 w. of , 63 

Kate 8 , 64 Emily 8 and 65 William 9 . 

59 Rogers 7 , has w. and ch. 66 Samuel 8 , 67 Helen 8 w. 

of David Pierson, 68 Harriet N. 6 , 69 Mary 8 , 70 Annie 8 and 71 Ella 8 . 

51 Samuel 6 had s. 72 Lawrence'. 

53 Linsley 6 had ch. 73 William' and 74 Nehemiah 7 . 

56 Albert 6 has ch. 75 Theodore', 76 Edward', 77 Adelaide' and 78 

Phebe J. 7 

47 Theophilus 6 had ch. 79 Silas 6 , 80 Charles 6 , 81 David 6 , 82 
Nathan 6 b. 1768 d. Jan. 13, 1822, and had w. Mary, 83 Alfred 6 , 84 
Hedges 6 and 85 Hubbard 6 . 

79 Silas 6 b. 1783, d. Oct. 13, 1842, had w. Marv and ch. 86 
Nathan', 87 Lodowick' and 88 Hubbard'. 

81 David 6 had ch. 89 Thomas' and 90 Harriet E. w. oi Charles 
Osborn of E. H. 



214- Histoet of Southampton. 

48 Topping 5 had ch. 91 Alanson 6 , 92 Williams 6 , 93 Howell 6 and 
94 Lyman 6 . 

91 Alanson 6 had s. 95 Addison M.' 

93 Howell 6 had ch. 96 Henry 7 and 97 Williams'. 

11 Jonathan 8 b. 1700, d. 1754, removed to New Jersey and 
thence again to Quogue, L. I., where he bought land of William 
Jones in 1748 and settled. He had ch. 98 Daniel 4 and 99 Jona- 
than 4 . 

99 Jonathan 4 had ch. 100 Daniel 5 b. 1761, 101 David 5 b. 1763, 
102 Esther 5 b. 1765, 103 Nehemiah 5 b. 1766, 104 Hannah 5 , 105 
Phebe 6 b. 1778, "w. of James Foster, 106 Jonathan 5 b. 1779, 107 

Kichard 5 b. 1781, 108 Mary 5 w. of Bliss of Michigan, 109 

Isaac 5 , 110 David 6 b. 1787, and 111 Eliza 5 b. 1789. 

100 Daniel 5 had ch. 112 Ebenezer 6 , 113 Eev. Nehemiah 6 , 114 
Luther 6 , 115 Melinda 6 and 116 Jane 6 . 

114 Luther 6 had ch. 117 Hannah', 118 John', 119 Sarah' and 120 
Daniel B.' 

106 Jonathan 6 m. Miriam d. of William Halsey and had ch. 121 
Edwin 6 and 122 Emeline 6 , 123 Mary 6 w. of Henry Tabor of Brook- 
lyn, 124 William 6 , 125 Grover 6 , 126 Ezra 6 and 127 Francis W. 6 

127 Francis W. 6 m. 1st Mary d. of Hervey Harris and had s. 128 
Henry F.'. Francis W. m. 2d w. Eliza J. Beckwith and had ch. 
129 William' and 130 Lyllis 7 , and one other daughter. 

107 Kichard 6 had ch. 131 Jane 6 w. of Jordan, 132 Eliza 6 

w. of H. Jennings, and 133 John 6 . 

109 Isaac 6 had ch. 134 Floyd 6 and 135 Hudson 6 . 

110 David 6 had ch. 136 William 6 , 137 Anne 6 , 138 Margaret 6 , 139 
Harriet 6 w. of Charles Miller, had ch. Edwin, William, Charles, 
Annie and Mary. 

7 Abial 2 b. 1663 had ch. 140 Abial 3 and 141 Josiah 3 . 

140 Abial 3 d. 1740 in April and had as by will 142 Ellis 4 b. 1703, 
143 Matthew 4 , 144 Abial 4 , 145 Phebe 4 , 146 Susana 4 , 147 Zebulon 4 , 
147 Samuel 4 , 148 Elemuel 4 , 149 Abigail 4 and 150 Anne. 4 

Note. This is probably a correct statement of the descendants of 7 Abial 2 , 
although, both he and his son 140 Abial 3 must have married quite young. 

An Abraham whose son I know not, let us designate him as 151 
Abraham 4 , m. Sibyl d. of Ephraim Burnett Oct. 3, 1740, with what 
issue I cannot say. 



Genealogies. 9 15 

142 Ellis 4 probably was the Ellis who m. Mary d. of John "Wil- 
liams of "Watermill (Southampton) 1740, removed to Hanover, 
Morris Co., New Jersey, about 1747, and had ch. 152 Williams 5 , 153 
Ellis 5 , 154 Jonathan 6 , 155 Epaphras 5 and 156 John 5 . 

Temperance w. of Ellis Cook d. Dec. 9, 1723, ae. 18. If she was 
the w. of 142 Ellis 4 he must have had three wives. Temperance 
was buried in a small inclosure on the homestead of the late Hedges 
Sanford of Watermill. 

152 Williams 5 had ch. by a first w. 157 Ellis 6 , 158 Williams 6 , and 
by a second w. 159 Calvin 6 and two daughters, of Troy, N. J. 

157 Ellis 8 had w. Isabella and ch. 160 Samuel 7 of Vermout, 161 
Sarah' and 162 Martha 7 , both successively wives of Cyrus Ball. 

160 Samuel 7 had ch. 163 Martindale 8 and 164 James 8 , who had s. 
Raymond of Hoboken. 

163 Martindale 8 had s. 165 Raymond 9 of Hoboken, N. J. 

153 Col. Ellis 5 b. 1732 d. Apr. 7, 1797, in Hanover, N. J., m. 
Margaret G. Cocker, had ch. 166 Zebulun 6 b. Mch. 22, 1755, 167 
James 6 b. Mch. 25, 1760, 168 Jabez 6 and 169 Ambrose 6 , and also 
Margaret w. of W. Kitchell, Matilda w. of David Plum, Ruletta 
and George Whitfield, M. D., of Hudson, N. Y. 

166 Zebulon 6 d. in Hanover Dec. 12, 1810, m. Mary Jones and 
had ch. 170 Ellis 7 b. Jan. 26, 1784, 171 John 7 b. Sept. 28, 1786, 
and 172 Jabez 7 b. Sept. 12, 1789, and ds. Clarissa 7 b. Apr. 4, 1776, 
Margaret G. 7 b. Jan. 20, 1779, Mary 7 b. 1781 and Phebe 7 b. Aug. 12, 
1792. 

170 Ellis 7 had ch. 173 Jabez 8 b. 1811, 174 Lindsley G. 8 b. Jan. 
1818 and Jeannette. 

173 Jabez 8 of Newark, N. J., had ch. 175 William 9 and 176 
Horace. 9 

174 Lindsley G. 8 had ch. Henry, 177 Charles 9 , 178 Edward 9 and 
179 Prank. 9 

171 John 7 of Hanover d. Feb. 12, 1863, had ch. 180 Isaac M. 8 b. 
Oct. 3, 1813 (and d. in Alabama June 15, 1841), 181 David T. 8 b. 
Oct. 18, 1815, 182 George H. 8 b.. Jan. 5, 1818, 183 John H. 8 b. Jan. 
26, 1823, 184 Matthias M. a b. Mch. 17, 1825, Sarah M. 8 and Joana 8 . 

181 David T. 8 of Hanover had eh. 185 Isaac 9 , who has one ch., 
186 George 9 of Hanover, who has two ch. 187 Samuel 9 of Mandarin, 
Pla., and Sarah. 9 

182 Prof. George H. 8 of Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. 



216 History of Southampton. 

(who furnished me the record of the descendants of 142 Ellis 4 ), has 
ch. 188 Paul 9 b. Sept. 13, 1847, Sarah 9 b. Oct. 13, 1849, John W.» 
b. Aug. 27, 1852, Emma W.' b. 1854, Anna B. 9 b. 1857, and 189 
Eobert A. 9 b. Apr. 7, 1861. 

188 Paul 9 of Lansingburgh, N. Y., has ch. 190 William G. 10 and 
191 George H. 10 . 

172 Jabez 7 of Newark had s. 192 Edward. 8 

167 James 6 of Sucasunua, Morris Co., N. J., m. 1 Eliz. P. Con- 
dit and m. 2 Euth Pierson and had s. 193 Silas' b. Dec. 25, 1791. 

193 Silas', M. D., of Hackettstowu, m. Mary d. of James Hynd- 
shaw 1816 and had ch. 194 James H. 8 of Easton, Pa., who d. 1880, 
195 Lewis C, M. D., of Hackettstown, b. 1818 d. 1874, 196 Silas 
O. 8 of Easton, Pa., d. 1864, and 197 John S. 8 , M. D., of Hacketts- 
town and 198 Joseph S. s , M. D., of Washington, 1ST. J., b. Mch. 26, 
1830. 

168 Jabez 6 of Auburn, 1ST. Y., had s. Geo. Whitefield. 

169 Ambrose, 6 M. D., of Bound Brook, had ch. Maria', 199 
Robert', M. D., 200 Edward', 201 George Wheeler', M. D., of 
Hudson, N. J., 202 Richard', M. D., 203 John', Theresa A.' and 
Aletheia B.' 

199 Robert', M. D., of Holmdell, had ch. 204 Henry G. 8 , M. D., 
who had ch. 205 Ambrose 8 , 206 Robert W. 8 of Holmdell, who has 
ch., and Sarah E. 8 

154 Jonathan 6 had ch. 207 Jonathan 6 and 208 Williams. 6 

208 Williams 6 had ch. 209 Benjamin' of Hanover and ds. Eliza- 
beth and Jane. 

209 Benjamin' has ch. 210 Williams 8 and others. 

155 Epaphras 5 of Livingston b. Jan. 20, 1738, d. Apr. 13, 1809, 
had ch. 211 Peter 6 b. 1768 and 212 Abram 6 b. Feb. 17, 1782. 

211 Peter 6 d. Apr. 11, 1841, had ch. 213 James H' and 214 
George.' 

212 Abram 6 d. Mch. 11, 1825, had ch. 215 Ashbel' and 216 
James.' 

156 John 6 had s. 217 Silas 6 of Montville. 

217 Silas 6 had ch. 218 Frederic', 219 Charles', 220 Silas' and 221 
Isaac' 

218 Frederic' had s. Albert S. 8 of California. 

144 Abiel 4 of Upper Freehold, N. J, had ch. 223 Abiel 5 b. Nov. 
15, 1723, and 224 Nathaniel 6 b. Apr. 10, 1728, who removed to- 



Genealogies. 217 

Saratogo Co., N". Y, where his descendants now live. He also had 
ds. Sarah, Frances, Susanna, Mary, Phebe and Abigail. 

223 Abiel 5 m. Mary Thompson and had ch. 225 William 6 b. Feb. 
26, 1769, 226 Samuel 6 b. Jan. 30, 1775, and 227 Nathaniel 6 and ds. 
Sarah, Susanna, Hannah and Elizabeth. 

226 Samuel" of Holmdell had s. 228 William B.' who died in Illi- 
nois, leaving ch. 

188 Paul 9 m. Apr. 28, 1875, Esther M. Gurley and has ch. 229 
William G."> b. Apr. 3, 1876, 230 Sarah W. b. Apr. 20, 1878, 231 
Margaret O. 10 b. Mch. 23, 1880, 232 George H. 10 b. July 2, 1883, 
and 233 Mary" b. July 8, 1885, d. Aug. 7, 1885. 

Seven families of the name of Cook and five of the name of Cooke 
are mentioned in Burke's Gen. Armory as using coat armor. 

Ellis Cook, s. of Ellis the first, when a young man, cleared up a 
place, built a house on it, and then (maidens, it is said, being 
scarce in Southampton) went over to Connecticut for a wife. 
After staying there for some time, and having found a young 
lady to suit him, her father asked a friend one day what young 
Cook's business was that detained him so long in that neighbor- 
hood. He was told that the young man was courting his daughter. 
" Why don't he ask me then ? " said the father. And seeing Cook 
shortly afterward he repeated the question to him. "That is 
just what I was about to do," said Ellis ; and thereupon the follow- 
ing dialogue ensued : " Where do you live ?" " In Southampton, 
L. I." "Have you a church there?" (meaning a church organiza- 
tion.) "Yes." "A minister?" "Yes." " A meeting-house ? " 
" Yes." " Have you got a house to live in ? " " Yes." " Well, 
then, young man, you may have my daughter," and, the maiden 
assenting, the marriage soon followed, and Ellis led his bride to 
her new home in the forests of Southampton. 

Coopek Family. 
John Cooper of Lynn came over from England in 1635 in the 
Hopewell, aged 41, with w. Wibroe and ch. Mary, aged 13, John, 10, 
Thomas, 7, and Martha, 5. He was from Olney in Buckinghamshire. 
He was one of the twenty heads of families who formed the associa- 
tion for the settlement of Southampton in 1639. He was made 
freeman at Boston Dec. 6, 1636 ; was one of the elders of the 
church when it was organized at Lynn, and in 1638 he is recorded 
28 



218 Histoey of Southampton. 

as owning 200 acres of land in that town. Some New England 
writers have mistaken him for another John Cooper, who was one 
of the settlers of New Haven in 1638. But the New Haven Cooper 
does not appear to have had a son Thomas, while we have trace not 
only of every one of his children as above given, in Southampton, 
but also at least of three others, daughters, born in this country 
and married in Southampton. Twenty-four families of this name 
in England are mentioned in Burke's Gen. Armory as bearing coats 
of arms. 

As above 1 John 1 b. 1594 d. 1662 had w. Wibroe and ch. 2 
Mary 8 b. 1622 w. of Henry Pierson, 3 John 8 b. 1625, 4 Thomas 2 b. 
1628, 5 Martha 2 w. of Ellis Cook, 6 a d. who m. Thomas Top- 
ping, 7 a d. who m. John Topping, and 8 a d. who married James 
or John White. The last three are known only through the will 
of 1 John 1 , which gives legacies to Thomas Topping's son Thomas, 
to John Topping's d. Sarah, to his d. White's ch., to his d. Cook's 
ch., to his son, Henry Pierson, and closes thus : " And give the 
same counsell to all and every of you as Joseph gave unto your 
brethren that you fall not at difference." The date of the will is 
May 6, 1662, and speaks of the testator as being sick and infirm. 



£f°^ {ghvto&t. 



2 John 2 b. 1625 d. 1677 had w. Sarah (who d. prob. 1688) and 
ch. 9 Samuel 3 , 10 James 3 and 11 Thomas 3 and perhaps ds. 

9 Samuel 3 died intestate and letters of admin, were granted to his 
wid. Mary Aug. 4, 1714. He was probably the grandfather of a 
Samuel C, whom we designate as 12 Samuel. 5 I find no trace of 
the intermediate generation omitted. 

12 Samuel 6 d. 1786 and had w. Abigail and ch. 13 SamueTS 14 

Stephen 6 , 15 Elihu 6 , 16 Zophar 6 , 17 Elizabeth 6 w. of ^"Sayre>jU 

18 Abigail 6 w. of Hathaway, 19 Mary 6 w. of Ayres, vl 

and 20 Phebe 6 w. of Jagger. 

14 Stephen 6 was perhaps the Stephen who was apprenticed to 
Jonathan Baker, Jr., of East Hampton and who m. Eunice d. of 
John Edwards of Amaganset Nov. 15, 1744, and had ch. bap. in E. 
H. 21 Stephen' Dec. 1746, 22 William' July, 1760, 23 Sarah' Jan. 
1770, and 24 Stephen' Apr. 1777. 



Genealogies. 219 

16 Zophar 8 had ch. 25 Ananias,' 26 Mary Hathaway, 7 27 Nathan,' 
28 Ruth' w. of Philip Marshall, 29 Hannah' w. of Gamaliel 
Marshall and 30 Lucinda.' 

27 Nathan' m. Olive d. of Jonah Howell and had ch. 31 Frank- 
lin 8 , 32 Sarah 8 , 33 Mercator 8 b. , 34 Margaret 8 and 

35 Gilbert. 8 

33 Mercator 8 d. Apr. 24, 1872, and m. 1st Maria J. d. of John 
Green and had son 36 Nathan B. 9 who d. young and ch. that sur- 
vived to adult age, 37 Maria Jane" w. of John Fletcher Howell and 
38 Sarah Elizabeth 9 . He m. 2d Sophia J. d. of Josiah Foster. He 
was a sea captain in the whaling enterprise and when in command 
of the Manhattan of Sag Harbor, having rescued twenty-two ship- 
wrecked Japanese from starvation and death, repaired with his ship 
boldly to the port of Jeddo to deliver there those he had saved. 
This was the first visit of an American vessel to the harbor of that 
city and occurred in the year 1845 . The act made a great and 
favorable impression on the minds of that people and doubtless 
made a negotiation of a treaty of commerce with the United States 
by Commodore Perry more easy of accomplishment in his subse- 
quent visit. He died Apr. 24, 1872, at Barranquilla, Colombia, S. 
A., where he had gone a few months previous in the hope of a 
restoration to health. 

10 James 3 d. about 1722 and had ch. 39 Nathan 4 , 40 James 4 - b. 
about 1700, prob. a d. 41 Hannah 4 who m. Thomas Stephens, 42 

Elizabeth 4 w. of Marshall and 43 Susanna 4 not 21 years of 

age in 1722, and perhaps also a s. Richard. The will of 10 James 3 
was written in 1719, which names a d. Elizabeth. A codicil was 
added in 1722 which speaks of her as Elizabeth Marshall. The 
will was proved Mch. 29, 1723. 

A Nathan, prob. 39 Nathan 4 , m. Mary Miller of E. H. Oct. 8, 
1717, and had ch. bap. in E. H. 44 Mary 5 in 1724, 45 Elizabeth 5 
1724, 46 Nathan 6 Mch. 7, 1725, and 47 Hannah 6 1728. 

40 James 4 d. about 1753 (will proved Jan. 25, 1754) had 1st w. 
Abigail who d. 1734, ae. 32, and 2d w. Mary and ch. 48 James 6 , 49 
Zebulon 5 , 50 Stephen 5 , 51 Moses 5 , 52 Elizabeth 5 , 53 Ezekiel 6 , 54 
Silas 5 , 55 Benjamin 5 , 56 Philip 5 , 57 Abigail 5 , 58 Mary 5 and 59 
Selah 5 . At the time of the writing of the will of 40 James 4 his two 
ch., Ezekiel and Silas, were under age, and Selah was infirm and 
entrusted to the care of one of his brothers The order of naming 



220 Histoky of Southampton. 

the ch. follows that of the will and may not be the order of their 
births. Some of these doubtless moved away, as no traces of their 
descendants are on record. 40 James 4 resided in Southampton 
village. 

A Stephen, prob. 50 Stephen 5 above, m. Eunice d. of John 
Edwards of East Hampton and had ch. there bap. 60 Stephen 6 1746, 
61 William 6 1760, 62 Sarah 6 1770 and 63 Step'hen 6 again 1777* 

51 Moses s of Southampton removed with all of his family to 
Washington Co., Penn., about 1777, crossing the mountains on 
horseback, but died just before reaching his destination. He m. 
Mary Coleman and had ch. 64 Zebulon 6 , 65 Moses 6 , 66 Nathaniel 6 , 
67 Lemuel 6 , 68 Ephraim 6 , 69 Eunice 6 and 70 Mary 6 w. of Jeremiah 
Jagger of Southampton and possibly one of the oldest ch. 

64 Zebulon 6 m. Mary d. of John White of Southampton and had 
ch. 71 Zebulon', 71| John', 72 Sylvanus 7 , 73 Stephen 7 , 74 Susanna 7 , 
75 Mary 7 , 76 Jerusha 7 and 77 Hannah. 7 64 Zebulon 6 lived in 
Washington Co., Penn. 

71 Zebulon 7 had ch. 78 Zebulon 8 , 79 Sylvanus 8 , 80 Mary 8 and 
81 Hannah. 8 

71| John 7 m. Martha Atkinson and had ch. 82 Selina 8 , 83 Mary 8 , 
84 Ephraim 8 , 85 Thomas 8 , 86 Harriet 8 , 87 Nancy 8 , 88 Amelia 8 , 89 
Martha" and 90 Sarah. 8 

72 Sylvanus 7 m. Mary Bryant and had ch. 91 Zebulon 8 , 92 Catha- 
rine 8 , 93 David 8 , 94 Jane 8 , 95 Mary 8 , 96 Sarah 8 , 97 James M. 8 , 98 
Elizabeth 8 , 99 Caroline 8 , 100 Rev. Charles White 8 , 101 John 8 and 
102 Henrietta B. s These ch. are widely dispersed. 

100 Rev. Charles W. 8 m. Sarah F. Duyckinck of New Brunswick, 
N. J., and has ch. 103 Mary D. 9 and 104 Charles Bryant, 9 

73 Stephen 7 m. Hannah Bean and had ch. 105 James 8 , .106 Wil- 
liam 8 , 107 Charlotte 8 , 108 Amzi 8 , 109 Josiah 8 , 110 Lewis 8 , 111 
Stephen 8 and 112 David. 8 

68 Ephraim 6 had s 113 Jonas.' 

11 Thomas 3 (called the youngest s. of 2 John 2 ) d. Nov. 22, 1691, 
and had w. Johana who, after her husband's death, m. Lieut. 
Joseph Pierson, and ch. 114 John 4 b. 1685, 115 Joana" w. of John 
Howell and 116 Abraham 4 b. 1688 or 1689. 

* 63 Stephen may have been the son instead of the brother of 60 Stephen The E H, 
records are often vague . 



Genealogies. 221 

114 Oapfc. John 4 d. Dec. 14, 1715, had w. Hannah and eh. 117 
Hannah 6 , 118 Thomas 6 b. 1710, 119 John 6 , 120 Mehetabel 5 and 121 
one ch. unborn Dec. 10, 1715, when he made his will. 

118 Thomas 6 Esquire d. May 7, 1782, had w. Mary and ch. 122 
Elias 6 b.' Sept. 30, 1734, 123 Mary 6 and 124 Hannah 6 , twins, b. 1736, 
125 Thomas 6 b. 1738, 126 Mehetabel 6 b. 1741, 127 John 6 b. 1743, 
128 Caleb 6 b. 1745 and 129 Jane. 6 

122 Elias 6 d. Mch. 19, 1777, m. Ruth Rogers Apr. 11, 1758, who 
was b. Sept. 8. 1734, and had ch. 130 Charles' b. Aug. 19, 1759, 
131 Obadiah' b. Dec. 22, 1760, 132 Susanna' b. Nov. 19, 1762, 133 
Apollos' b. Feb. 2, 1767, 134 Elias' b. May 21, 1769, and 135 
Hannah' b. May 19, 1773. 122 Elias 6 prob. was a refugee in Con- 
necticut, where he died Mch. 19, 1777. 

131 Obadiah' had ch. 136 Elias 8 , 137 Oliver 8 of Quogue and 138 
Apollos. 8 

133 Apollos 7 moved to TJtica, N. Y., where he had a family. 
(See at the end.) 

128 Caleb 6 had w. Abigail and ch. 139 William', 140 Caleb' and 
141 Huntting.' 

139 William 7 of Sag Harbor had ch. 142 William 8 and 143 Gil- 
bert 8 and perhaps others. 

141 Capt. Huntting' of Sag Harbor and later of Montrose, Penn., 
had w. and ch. 144 William 8 of Montrose, Penn. 

116 Abraham 4 b. 1688 or 9 d. Dec. 28, 1773, m. 1st w. Bethia 

who d. Jan. 4, 1716 (prob. 17}$), ae. 27, and 2d w. ? , and 

had ch. 145 Bethia 6 w. of Nehemiab Sayre and 146 Abraham 5 b. 
about 1717. 

146 Abraham 6 d. 1784, had w. Hannah Howell, according to copy 
of his will in surrogate's office, New York city, but Johana Howell, 
according to his gr. grandson, Howell Cooper, of Watertown, N. Y., 
and ch. 147 John 6 b. May 23, 1758, 148 Abraham 6 b. Jan. 1, 1761, 
149 Gilbert 6 b. Feb. 26, 1763, 150 Hannah 6 b. Aug. 1765, w. of 
Henry Rhodes, 151 Mehetabel 6 b. Feb. 9, 1768, w. of Benjamin 
Huntting, 152 Foster 6 and 153 Jane 6 b. Sept. 10, 1770. 

147 John 6 d. 1821, m. Susanah d. of Zebulon Howell Aug. 12, 
1778 (she was b. Apr. 20, 1759, and d. Aug. 8, 1846), and had ch. 
154 Juliana' b. Aug. 4, 1779, 155 Abraham 7 b. June 14, 1781, 156 
Cordelia 7 b. Aug. 22, 1783, 157 Sophia 7 b. Sept. 12, 1785, 158 
Hannah 7 b. Nov. 5, 1787, and 159 Zebulon 7 b. 1792 and of TJtica, 



222 Histoet of Southampton. 

N. Y. 147 John 6 had three children born in Southampton, and 
then removing to Montgomery, Ulster Co., N". Y., he there resided 
for several years, during which the youngest three were born. He 
removed again to Oxbow, N". Y., where both he and his wife 
remained until their death. 

155 Abraham 7 b. 1781 d. Feb. 7, 1861, at Oxbow, N. Y., m. 1st 
Susanah d. (prob.) of Stephen Howell and had by her three ch. 
She died and he m. 2d w. Harriet d. of Phineas Howell and had by 
her four ch., all as follows : 160 Emeline 8 , 161 Abraham 8 , 162 
Howell 8 of Watertown, N. Y., 163 Nicol J. 8 , 164 John J. 8 of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., 165 Elias P. 8 and 166 George. 8 Most, if not all, of 
these of the eighth generation have children. 

4 Thomas 2 b. 1628 d. 1687 had w. Mary, prob. d. of Thurston 
Eaynor, and ch. 167 Thomas 3 , 168 Benjamin 3 , 169 Ichabod 3 and 170 
Elizabeth. 3 

167 Thomas 3 of B. H. (will proved March 8, 1748) had w. 
Hannah and ch. 171 Thomas 4 , 172 John 4 , 173 David 4 , 174 

Ebenezer 4 , 175 Phebe 4 w. of Culver, and 176 Mary 4 w. of 

William Jones. The order of names here given is according to will 
of 167 Thomas 3 . 

171 Thomas 4 had s. 177 Ananias 5 . 

177 Ananias 5 had ch. 178 Matthew 6 b. 1757 or 8, and 179 
Ananias. 8 

178 Matthew 6 d. Feb. 13, 1842, ae. 84, and had ch. 180 Patty' 
and 181 John H.' b. 1792. 

181 John H. 7 d. July 23, 1850, ae. 58, and had w. Harriet and s. 
182 Thomas H 8 of Mecox, who lives on the old homestead of 167 
Thomas 3 and has several children. 

172 John 4 of B. H. m. Margaret Conkling of E. H. May 19, 1720, 
and had ch. 183 John 6 and 184 Ananias 6 and other ch. (two d.'s 
and perhaps another son) mentioned but not named in will of 183' 
John, who probably d. s. p. 

Ananias Cooper, " doctor," is witness of will of John Lupton, 
1755. Ananias Cooper, Jr., " doctor," is witness of will of Ezekiel 
Sandford, 1755, all of B. H. 

173 David 4 b about 1704 had ch. 185 Silas 5 b. Aug. 1, 1746, 186 

Josiah 5 , 187 David 5 188 Simon 5 , 189 Mary 6 w. of Eogers, 

190 Hannah" w. of Moses Rose, 191 Phebe 5 and 192 Jerusha 6 w. of 
Foster. 



Genealogies. 223 

185 Silas 5 d. Meh. 13, 1797, m. Elizabeth d. of Eev. James 
Brown of B. fl. Dec. 22, 1774, and had eh. 193 James Brown 6 b. 
March 11, 1777, and il. s. p. Jan. 5, 1810, 194 Simon Wheeler 6 b. 
Sept. 29, 1779, 195 Silas 6 b. March 28, 1782, and d. s. p. Sept. 22, 
1839, 196 Peleg 6 b. Apr. 1785 (d. s. p. March 24, 1871, resident of 
Babylon, L. I.), 197 Sarah Brown 6 b. July 24, 1789, w. of Nathan 
Raynor of Southampton, and subsequently of Oarbondale, Pa., 198 
Eliza 6 b. March 1, 1793, w. of Hon. Almon H. Reed of Montrose, 
Pa., 199 Samuel 6 b. Oct. 9, 1794, and d. at Babylon, L. I., May 6, 
1842, and 200 Nathaniel 6 b. Feb. 7, 1797, of Babylon, and d. there 
Mch. 4, 1886. 

194 Simon Wheeler 6 of Babylon, L. I., m. Grace Dibble of Stam- 
ford, Ct., Jan. 29, 1825. He d. Jan. 16, 1852, leaving s. 201 James 
B.' b. Dec. 1, 1825, Simon W. 7 b. Feb. 25, 1829, d. June 24, 1869, 
and George D.' b. Jan. 5, 1832, d. Oct. 17, 1860. 

201 James B. 7 m. Glorianna S. Rice June 9, 1863, and has ch. 
202 Simon Wheeler 8 and James B. 8 

186 Josiah 5 , a soldier in the Revolutionary War, afterward lived 
at New Paltz, Ulster Co., N. T., and had a s. 203 Elias Matthews 
Cooper. 6 

188 Simon 6 was master of a ship which was "wrecked on Nan- 
tucket Shoals, where all on board perished. 

194 Silas 6 served in the U. S. navy for twenty-five years and died 
at sea on board the frigate John Adams Sept. 22, 1839. 

199 Samuel 6 of Babylon m. Maria Cornell and had ch. Samuel 7 , 
Michael 7 , Elbert 7 , Mary 7 w. of Samuel Mott and Edward 7 of Hemp- 
stead. 

The Dr. Ananias Cooper of B. H. was probably the son of 172 
John 4 of that place. Bolton, in his history of Westchester county, 
N. Y., speaks of a Dr. Ananias Cooper of Rhinebeck who had a 
brother, Dr. Jeremiah Cooper, of Fishkill, N. Y., and a sister who 
married and settled in Pennsylvania, prob. the ch. of 172 John 4 . 

This Dr. Ananias of Rhinebeck had ch. 204 Thomas 6 , 205 John 6 , 
d. s. p., 206 Henry 6 , 207 Charles Dekay 6 of Albany, 208 William 6 , d. 
s. p., 209 George Dekay 6 , 210 Mary 6 , 211 Francis 6 , d. s. p., 212 
Eliza A. 6 , 213 Joseph C. 6 , 214 Gabriel 6 of Albany, d. s. p., 215 
Fayette 6 of New York, 216 Margaret 6 , 217 Christina 6 . 

204 Thomas 6 of New York m. Catherine Colden and had ch. 218 
Colden 7 , 219 Edward 7 , d. s. p., 220 Alice' and 221 John 7 , d. s. p. 



224 Histoey of Southampton. 

207 Charles Dekay 6 of Albany m. Margaret Verner and had ch. 
222 Gen. John Taylor' of Albany, 223 William 7 , 224 Rev. Charles 
Dekay 7 of Rochester, K T., 225 Margaret 7 and 226 Elizabeth. 7 

209 George D. 6 m. Elizabeth Bayard and had ch. 227 Catherine 7 , 
228 Thomas 7 , 229 William B. 7 , 230 Edward 7 , 231 Eliza 7 , 232 Mary 7 , 
233 Elizabeth J. 7 , 234 Harriet B. 7 , 235 Francis B. 7 , 236 Georgiana 
D. 7 , 237 George D. 7 , 238 Matilda W. 7 , 239 Alice A. 7 

213 Joseph C. 6 had w. Dorothea and ch. 240 Thomas G.' and 241 
Charles S. 7 

Another reason for believing that 184 Ananias 5 Cooper was son 
of 172 John 4 is that his brother, Dr. Jeremiah of Fishkill, said the 
father of these two physicians, Ananias and Jeremiah, was named 
John. The descendants of Dr. Jeremiah, whom we will distin- 
guish as 183| Jeremiah 5 , are as follows : 

183| Dr. Jeremiah 5 m. Sarah Green about 1766 and had ch. 242 
Margaret 6 , d. young, 243 Joseph Conklin 6 b. Oct. 12, 1770, 244 
Margaret 6 , 245 Elizabeth 6 , 245| John 8 , 246 Jemima 6 and 247 
Harriet. 6 

243 Dr. Joseph C. 6 d. June 14, 1856, m. Sept. 6, 1795, Elizabeth 
Storm, b. Dec. 11, 1779, had ch. 248 Harriet 7 b. June 10, 1797, w. 
of Charles A. Jackson, 249 John William 7 b. June 10, 1799, 250 
George Edward 7 b. Dec. 20, 1801, 251 Charles 7 b. Dec. 4, 1803, 252 
Ann 7 b. Feb. 20, 1806, 253 James 7 b. Aug. 11, 1808, 254 Thomas 
Storm 7 b. July 22, 1810, 255 Catherine E. 7 b. July 24, 1812, w. of 
Thomas Storm, 256 Henry A.' b. Nov. 1, 1814, 257 June 7 b. July 
10, 1819, w. of Doras W. Warren, and 258 Mary 7 b. May 1, 1822, 
w. of James Moore. 

249 John William 7 d. Jan. 29, 1879, m. Catherine Bailey and had 
ch. 259 John Bailey 8 and 260 Elizabeth. 8 

259 John B. 8 rn. Elizabeth Cooper Moore June 9, 1857, and had 
ch. 261 Elizabeth 9 d. young, 262 Mary Moore' b. Dec. 28, 1861, 263 
Catherine 9 and 264 John William 9 b. Apr. 1870. 

250 George E. 7 m. Margaret Fields and had ch. 265 Henry 
Augustus 8 , 266 Charles Barkley 8 , 267 James 8 , 268 John Aikin 8 , 269 
William T. 8 , 270 Ann E. 8 and 271 George E. 8 

251 Charles 7 d. June 1, 1868, m. Mary Denton and had ch. 271 
Mprtimer 8 b. Apr. 1845, 272 Augusta, 273 Frances F. 8 and 274 
Charles Denton 8 b. 1852. 



Genealogies. 225 

253 James' m. Oct. 16, 1838, Lavina Westervelt b. May 2, 1817, 
and had ch. 275 Joseph Conklin 8 b. Aug. 29, 1839, and 276 Laura 
Frances 8 b. Apr. 22, 1852. 

275 Joseph C. 8 m. Harriet C. Earl Oct. 3, 1865, and had ch. 277 
John William 9 b. Sept. 21, 1866, d. Aug. 11, 1867, 278 Florence 9 b. 
June 2, 1868, 279 Harriet C. 9 b. Apr. 8, 1870, 280 Emma L. 9 b. Oct. 
3, 1872, d. July 19, 1873, 281 Thomas Ashley 9 b. July 23, 1874, d. 
Nov. 20, 1879, 282 Albert Sydney 9 b. Jan. 18, 1877, and 283 Todd 9 
b. Sept. 1879. 

312 Laura F. 8 m. Jan. 1, 1883, George Pyer and had s. George 
Albert 9 b. Feb. 16, 1884, d. Oct. 6, 1885. 

254 Thomas S.' d. July 2, 1861, m. Eliza Winkau July 3, 1839, 
and had ch. 284 Emily A. 8 b. Sept. 1849, d. Sept. 1865, and 285 
John W. 8 d. young. 

245-J John 6 m. Louisa Haxton and had ch. 286 Jeremiah', 287 
George' and 288 Charles.' 



39 Nathan, 4 before mentioned, removed to Chester township, 
Morris Co., N. J., with his family and bought a tract of 1,600 acres, 
much of which is still owned by his descendants. 

His son Nathan 6 b. Feb. 22, 1725, d. Dec. 30, 1797, m. Mehetabel 
Seward 1748 and had ch. 289 Abraham 6 and five others, names not 
known to me. 

242 Abraham 6 b. Feb. 18, 1762, d. Sept. 13. 1818, m. Anna Wills 
1799 and had ch. 290 Beulah A. 7 and 291 Nathan A.' b. Apr. 20, 
1802. 

291 General Nathan A.' d. July 25, 1879, m. Mary H. d. of John 
W. Leddel and had ch. 292 Anna E. 8 , 293 Abraham W. 8 , 294 
Beulah S. 8 , 295 Mary L. 8 , 296 Tillie E. 8 , 297 Laura H. 8 and 298 
Nathan A. 8 

The record of 133 Apollos 7 , as given by Mr. William B. Cooper of 
Fort Edward, New York, is as follows : 

133 Judge Apollos' b. 1779, went to Utica a young man. d. 1839, 
m. 1797 Sibyl Ellis b. 1777, d. 1829, and had ch. 299 Hiram 8 b. 
1798 d. in infancy, 300 Benjamin F. 8 b. 1801, 301 Elias 8 b. 1803, 
302 Albert Ellis 8 b. 1807, d. 1815, 303 Charles 8 b. 1811 and 304 
Cornelia 8 b. 1814. 

300 Benjamin F. 8 d. 1864, m. 1829 Mary A. Brantley and had ch. 
29 



226. History of Southampton. 

305 William B. 9 b. 1830, 306 Helen 9 b. 1833 and 307 Henry 9 b. 
1835. 

305 William B. 9 m. 1867 Frances Dewey and had d. 308 Lulu b. 
1870 d. 1883. 

303 Charles 8 m. Cornelia Medberry 1849 and had ch. 309 Cornelia 
E. 9 b. 1850 w. of Dewit Conger and 310 Kate L. 9 died young. 

304 Cornelia 8 m. B. A. Graham and had ch. Louise Cooper b. 
Mch. 16, 1836, and Edmund Banks Graham b. Nov. 23, 1842. 

Louise C. Graham m. Dr. Samuel E. Schauts May 21, 1868, and 
had d. Cornelia Graham b. Mch. 26, 1869. 

Edmund B. Graham d. Nov. 11, 1884, m. Nov. 9, 1870, Helen 
McKelvie Le Mon of Red Bank, N. J., and had ch. Louis Malcom 
b. Oct. 19, 1871, Edmund McKelvie b. Oct. 3, 1874, d. July 31, 
1875, Laura Margaret b. Mch. 24, 1876, and Elizabeth Marie b. 
Dec. 19, 1878. 

Coewith Family. 

The family of this name at Bridgehampton, where almost all of the 
name in Southampton reside, have a tradition that their first ancestor 
was a French Huguenot, hut the name is decidedly of Welsh origin. 
The first of this family on Long Island was a David Carwithy, as 
the name was then written, who resided at Southold. His will, 
dated Aug. 30, 1665, and proved the same year, mentions ch. 
Caleb (who had d. Martha), Elizabeth Cromer, David and Sarah 
Curds, then living at Hashamomeck. Caleb above was a mariner 
and (according to Hatfield) made voyages previous to 1654 between 
New Haven and Boston. He was made freeman at Huntington 
1664. He was in Southampton in 1661. In 1665 he removed to 
Elizabeth, N. J., but returned to Southampton ahout 1673. 

1 David 1 was constable at Marblehead, Mass., in 1643 and resi- 
dent there in 1648, where his name is written Corwithen, and 
member of the church at Salem in 1649 and d. at Southold, L. I., 

in 1665, and had ch. 2 Caleb 2 , 3 Elizabeth 2 w. of Crowmer [or 

Corwin ?J, 4 David 2 , 5 Sarah 2 w. of Curtis, and 6 Martha. 2 

2 Caleb 2 m. a d. of William Ludlam and had a d. 7 Martha 3 and 
perhaps other ch. 

4 David 2 of East or Bridge Hampton, b. in Boston 1661, had ch. 8 
David 3 , 9 James 3 and 10 John 3 , all bap. in E. H. in 1711, when 4 
David 2 is called on the church records of E. H. David Maekarwithy. 



Genealogies. 227 

10 John 8 in 1682 is mentioned as a carpenter living in Southamp- 
ton, and in 1696 he was a resident in Oape May Co., N. J. 

8 David 3 born about 1700 m. a sister of Dea. James Haines and 
lived in Rufus Rose's lane, where he had a store. According to 
Miss Sarah Oorwith of B. H. he had ch. 11 Caleb 4 and 12 David. 4 

11 Caleb 4 had ch. 13 Caleb 6 and 14 John. 5 

13 Caleb 6 had ch. 15 James 6 b. Feb. 24, 1781, 16 Silas 6 (who d. s. 
p.), 17 William 6 (who d. s. p.), 18 Luther 6 (who removed) and 19 
John. 6 

15 James 6 of Watermill m. Harmenia, d. of Joseph and Sarah 
Goodale, Sept. 8, 1813, and had ch. 20 Caleb Howell' b. Aug. 1, 
1814, and d. young, 21 Silas W. 7 b. July 11, 1816, 22 Charles W.' 
b. Jan. 19, 1821, 23 Caleb Howell 1 again b. June 25, 1825, 24 Mary 
A.' b. July 24, 1828, 25 Samuel J.' b. Apr. 17, 1831, and 26 Leander 
J.' b. July 13, 1836. 

21 Silas W. 7 of Wisconsin m. 1st Amanda Kellogg b. 1818 ; he 
m. 2d Catharine Smith b. 1828 ; he m. 3d Anna Albrecht b. July 
29, 1837. He has ch. 27 Harriet R. 8 , 28 Sarah 8 , 29 James 8 , 30 
Kate 8 , 31 Mary 8 and 32 William. 8 

22 Charles W. 7 of Watermill m. Susan M. d. of Daniel Talmadge 
of Hayground, b. 1829, and has ch. 33 Charles Beach 8 b. Feb. 12, 
1855, and 34 Lilian Mayo 8 b. Dec. 20, 1862. 

23 Caleb H. 7 of Southampton village m. 1st Caroline d. of Daniel 
and Mary Hildreth of Seven Ponds, May 5, 1857 (she was b. Apr. 
25, 1857), and he m. 2d Harriet d. of Merit and Caroline Culver, 
Feb. 25, 1875 (she was b. Feb. 5, 1848). He has ch. 35 Mary 
White 8 b. July 7, 1858, 36 Caroline Harmenia 8 b. May 9, 1862, 37 
William Austin 8 b. Mch. 25, 1864, and 38 Frank Howell 8 b. Aug. 
27, 1876. 

25 Samuel J. 7 m. Sarah H. d. of Hervey and Hannah Rose 1860 
and has ch. 39 Mary A. 8 b. Apr. 16, 1861, 40 Frederic Rose 8 b. 
Oct. 19, 1864, 41 Annie Rose 8 b. May 11, 1867, 42 James H. 8 b. 
Apr. 14, 1869, and 43 Florence T. 8 b. Nov. 30, 1877. 

26 Leander J. 7 m. Helen d. of Bartlett and Sarah Payne Oct. 20, 
1858 (she was b. Nov. 16, 1837), and has ch. 44 Nellie 8 b. Jan. 6, 
1860, and 45 Mabel 8 b. Aug. 22, 1867. 

19 John 6 of B. H. had ch. 46 Silas 7 , 47 William Henrj 7 , 48* 
Luther 7 , 49 Egbert 7 , 50 James 7 and 51 John. 7 
46 Silas 7 had s. 52 Silas. 8 



228 ' History of Southampton. 

14 John 6 had s. 53 Samuel 6 who d. s. p. 

12 David 4 had ch. 54 David Burnett 6 , 55 Henry 5 and 56 Caleb. 5 

54 David B. 5 had s. 57 Burnett. 6 

55 Henry 6 had ch. 58 David 6 , 59 Prank 6 , 60, Gordon 6 and 61 Wil- 
liam. 6 

60 Gordon 6 had ch. 62 Henry', 63 Nathan', 64 Susan', 65 Mary', 
66 Phebe', 67 John', 68 Edward', 69 Sarah' and 70 John Erastus.' 

61 William 6 m. Hannah, b. 1792, d. of Elias and Jerusha Halsey 
and had s. 71 William Augustus.' 

71 William Augustus' m. Susan H. Beard and had ch. 72 Anabel 
J. 8 b. Aug. 15, 1861, 73 Eliza Miller 8 b. Sept. 23, 1862, 74 William 
S. 8 and 75 Lucy M. 8 b. Feb. 14, 1866, and 76 Cornelia Edgar 8 b. 
Mch. 19, 1870. 

56 Caleb 6 had ch. 77 Nathan 6 , 78 David 6 and 79 Sarah. 8 

The absence of female names from a portion of this pedigree 
arises from the fact that it was given to me verbally by various 
members of the family where the records were not at hand to give 
fuller information. 

Burke's Gen. Armory mentions a Carwithen family as using 
coat-armor. 

Culver Family. 

Edward Culver of Dedham, Mass., wheelwright, was the first of 
this family known to be in America. His first three ch. appear to 
have been born in Dedham. He then removed to Rox.bury, where 
the next two were born. Thence he removed to ~New London and 
there had prob. two other ch. born. He died at Mystic in 1685. 

1 Edward 1 had w. Ann and ch. 2 John 2 b. Apr. 15, 1640, 3 
Joshua 2 b. Jan. 12, 1643, 4 Samuel 2 b. Jan. 9, 1645, 5 Gersham 2 
bap. Dec. 3, 1648, 6 Hannah 2 b. Apr. 11, 1652, 7 Joseph 2 and prob. 

8 Edward. 2 

The only one of these who appears in Southampton is Gersham, 
whose name first occurs on the list of 1668. 

5 Gersham 2 had w. Mary and ch. as by will proved July 2, 1716, 

9 Jeremiah 3 , 10 David 3 , 11 Jonathan 3 , 12 Moses 3 , 13 Mary*, 14 Ger- 
sham. 3 

9 Jeremiah 3 , a carpenter, m. 1st Mary d. of Joseph Pierson Dec. 
25, 1700 (who d. Feb. 13, 170f ) and he m. 2d Damaris d. of Joseph 
Foster Dec. 9, 1714, and had ch. 15 Jeremiah 4 b. April 23, 1702, 



Genealogies. 229 

16 Mary 1 b. Feb. 5, 170£ (and w. of Poster ?) and 17 Jesse 4 b. 

Feb. 20, 1707, who had s. 18 Edward. 5 

15 Jeremiah 4 had ch. 19 Jeremiah 5 and 30 Ebenezer. 5 

19 Jeremiah 5 had s. 31 Jeremiah. 6 

21 Jeremiah 6 had ch. 22 Austin 7 and 23 Susan 7 w. of Thomas 
Isaacs of East Hampton. 

22 Austin 7 of East Moriches had ch. 24 Josiah 8 , M. D., and 25 
Julia. 8 

14 Gersham 3 had s. 26 Gersham 4 who had s. 27 Gersham 6 who had 
s. 28 William 6 and probably 29 Zephaniah. 6 

28 William 6 had s. 30 Merit' who had w. Caroline and ch. 31 

William 8 b. , 32 a d. , 33 George 8 b. , 34 Charles 8 and 

others. 

A letter of inquiry to the family remains unanswered and hence 
the imperfect record. 

12 Moses 3 had s. James 4 who m. Phebe Bishop Jan. 6, 1762, and 
had ch. 35 Deacon Moses 5 b. Oct. 15, 1762, 36 Deborah 5 b. May 17, 
1764, 37 Huldah 5 b. Oct. 25, 1768, 38 Mark 5 b. Jan. 3, 1771, 39 
George 5 b. Dec. 24, 1772, 40 Joyce 5 b. July 14, 1775, 41 Lucretia 5 b. 
Nov. 17, 1778, and 42 Stephen. 5 

35 Deacon Moses 5 d. May 3, 1839, ae. 76 and hadl w. Mehetabel 
who d. Sept. 3, 1796, ae. 29 (perhaps 2d w. Prudence) and 3d (or 
2d) w. Phebe who d. Mch. 8, 1856, ae. 90, and ch. 43 Mehetabel 6 w. 
of White and 44 Phebe 6 w. of Sanford. 

39 George 5 and 42 Stephen 5 removed to Palmyra, N. Y. 

Jerusha w. of 29 Zephaniah Culver d. Jan. 5, 1794, ae. 56. 

23 Susan w. of Thos. Isaacs of E, H. had ch. Phebe w. of John 

Parsons of E. H., Susan M. w. of and Sarah C. w. of 

Jeremiah L. Fordham, 1st of Southampton, then of Scranton, Penn. 

The name Culver in Anglo-Saxon signifies a dove. 

Dayton Family. 

Ralph Dayton was for a short time a resident of Boston, from 
whence he removed to New Haven in 1639. From there he went 
to Southampton. Soon after, or at the time of colonizing East 
Hampton he removed to that place, but his son Samuel remained 
in Southampton and was a resident of North Sea until about 1658. 
The family is English and the name is a Bedfordshire name ; but I 
have not learned from what county they came. 



230 Histoet of Southampton. 

1 Ralph 4 d. 1658 had ch. 2 Robert 2 and 3 Samuel. 2 

2 Robert 2 b. 1628 d. Apr. 16, 1712, had ch. 4 Elizabeth 3 w. of 
Leek, 5 Samuel 3 b. 1665 and 6 Beriah 3 b. 1674. 



5 Samuel 3 d. Jan. 30, 1746, had. w. Dorothy and ch. 7 Robert 4 b 

1692, 8 Daniel 4 , 9 Joana 4 w. of Serle, 10 Nathan 4 b. 1699, 11 

Jonathan 4 bap. 1701, 12 Samuel 4 bap. 1707, and 13 Elizabeth 4 w. of 
William Osborne. 

7 Robert 4 d. Sept. 28, 1722, had ch. 14 Hannah 5 bap. 1701, 15 
Mary 6 bap. 1701, and 16 John 5 bap. 1702. 

8 Daniel 4 d. 1763 m. 1st Deborah Brown Jan. 8, 1717 ; she died 
'Nov. 6, 1717, and he m. 2d Mary Parsons Nov. 9, 1720, and had 
ch. 17 Henry 5 b. 1718, 18 Deborah 5 , 19 Hannah 5 , 20 Daniel 5 bap. 
1723, 21 Samuel 5 , 22 Jonathan 5 bap. 1727, and 23 Mary bap. 1733, 

w. of Mulford, who had ch. Mary, Jonathan and Nathan 

Mulford. 

17 Henry 5 m. Dec. 4, 1738, Hannah Parsons and had ch. 24 
Deborah 6 bap. 1739, 25 Hannah 6 bap. 1743 and 26 Samuel. 6 

20 Deacon Daniel 5 bap. 1723 m. Rachel Miller and had ch. 27 
Jonathan 6 bap. 1764, and 28 Miller 6 bap. 1766. 

27 Jonathan 6 d. 1842 and had s. 29 Daniel. 7 

29 Daniel 7 had s. 30 Dr. Charles B., who m. Mary Jessup and d. 
Aug. 17, 1886. 

28 Miller 6 d. 1847 had s. 31 Ralph. 7 

21 Samuel 5 had d. 32 Mary 6 w. of Jonathan Stratton. 

10 Nathan 4 b. 1699 d. 1764 m. Amy Stratton Nov. 11, 1725, and 
had ch. 33 Samuel 5 bap. 1726, 34 Nathan 5 bap. 1728, 35 Amy 5 bap. 
1730, 36 Elizabeth 5 , 37 Abraham 5 bap. 1735, 38 Joana 5 bap. 1737, 
39 Abraham 5 bap. 1740, and 40 Jonathan 5 bap. 1747. 

34 Nathan 5 d. 1764, m. Phebe Mulford June 27, 1751, and had 
ch. 41 Nathan 6 bap. 1754, 42 Jonathan 6 , 43 Samuel 6 , 44 Elizabeth 6 , 
45 Mary 6 bap. 1763, 46 Abraham 6 bap. 1766, 47 Elias M. B bap. 1769, 
and 48 Joana. 6 

41 Nath a 6 had ch. 49 Hannah 7 bap. 1779, 50 Phebe 7 bap. 1783, 
51 Samuel H. 7 bap. 1790, 52 Lewis Mulford 7 (of.Rensselaerville, N. 
Y., and d. in Jersey City at residence of his s. May 8. 1876, ae. 83). 

51 Samuel H.' had s. 53 Jesse C. 8 of Troy, N. Y., who was State 
senator in 1875. 

46 Abraham 6 d. Nov. 1825 at Middle Granville, N. Y., m. Desire 
Delight Vail and had ch. 54 Mulford 7 b. 1795, 55 May 7 b. 1797, 



Genealogies. 231 

1815, 56 Desire' b. 1800, d. 1822, 57 Hiram 7 b. 1800, and 58 Max- 
illa' b. 1804, d. 1847, w. of A. Alford. 

54 Mulford' d." Feb. 14, 1836, m. Roxana Hitchcock Feb. 14, 1817, 
and had ch. 58 Mary Helen 8 b. Mch. 31, 1820, 59 Jane E. 8 b. Feb. 
24, 1824 (w. of Rev. David B. Hall), 60 James Mulford 8 b. Nov. 9, 
1826, and d. Oct. 9, 1863, and 61 Sarah Maria 8 b. Feb. 9, 1833, w. 
of Silas Hall of Granville, N. Y. 

57 Hiram' of Madrid, N. Y., d. May 1, 1849, m. Maria Under- 
wood and had ch. 62 Edwin A.« b. 1825, A. 1873, 63 Ool. Lewis 
Mulford 8 of Cincinnati, Ohio, 64 Desire Delight 8 , 65 Harriet 8 w. of 
Henry, and 66 Henry 8 of Richmond, Va. 

47 Elias M. 6 of Middle Granville, N. Y., removed to Lockport, 
N. Y., d. Nov." 9, 1839, m. Ruth Higgins of Haddam, Ct., and had 
ch. 67 Jonathan' b. 1791, d. 1857, 68 Elias' b. 1793, 69 Nathan' b. 
Aug. .10, 1794, 70 Abraham' b. 1796, 71 Cornelia M.' b. 1800, w. of 
J. L. Woods, 72 Russell A.' b. 1804, and 73 Minerva M.' b. 1810, 

68 Elias' d. at Lockport, m. 1820 Sarah Wright and had ch. 74 
Ursula Webb 8 b. 1826, d. 1859, w. of Allen C. Wright, 75 Russell 
Mulford 8 b. 1830, and 76 Cornelia M. 8 b. 1835, w. of Joseph Christy. 

69 Judge Nathan' of Lockport d. Apr. 26, 1 859, m. 1, 1823 Sarah 
T. Boise, 2, m. her sister Hannah E. and had ch. 77 Harriet M. 8 b. 
1826, 78 Sarah J. 8 b. 1830, 79 Nathan 8 b. and d. 1833, 80 Charles 
N. 8 b. 1845, d. 1880, and 81 Francis M. 8 b. and d. 1848. 

70 Abraham' m. Harriet B. Taylor and had ch. 82 Charles H 8 , 
83 Rollin W. 8 , 84 Jane M. 8 , 85 Lydia A. 8 , 86 Julia 8 and 87 Nathan. 8 

72 Russell A.' d. 1840, m. Julia T. Burrows and had s. 88 Edwin 
A. s of Chicago, 111. 

11 Jonathan 4 bap. 1701 had d. 89 Joana 5 w. of Mulford. 

6 Beriah 3 of Pantago, E. H., b. 1674, d. Apr. 30, 1746, had w. 
Jane and ch. 90 Rachel 4 b. 1700, 91 John 4 bap. 1700, 92 Martha 4 

bap. 1702 w. of Brown, 93 Mary 4 (or Maria) w. of Cornelius 

Conkling, 94 Beriah 4 bap. 1709, 95 Esther 4 w. of Biown, 96 

Jeremiah 4 bap. 1716, 97 Jane 4 bap. 1720, and 98 Mary 4 bap. 1722. 

91 John 4 d. 1776 m. 1, Joana Parsons Mch. 2, 1721, m. 2, Abigail 
Parsons June 8, 1754, and ch. 99 Joana 5 bap. 1722 w. of Seth 
Parsons, 100 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1725, 101 Phebe 5 bap. 1727, 102 John 5 
bap. 1727, and 103 Martha 5 bap. 1734. 

102 Capt. John 5 d. Feb. 19, 1825, m. Sept. 1754 Mary Mulford 
and had ch. 104 John 6 , 105 David 6 and 106 Josiah 6 b. 1766. 



232 Histoey of Southampton. 

104 John 6 had ch. 107 John' bap. Mch. 1787 and 108 Samuel 
Stratton' bap. Jan. 6, 1789. 

108 Samuel S. 7 had ch. 109 David 6 , 110 John H. 8 and 111 Eliza- 
beth. 8 

106 Josiah 6 d. 1839 and had ch. 112 John Thomas 7 b. 1795 and 

113 Josiab' b. 1797. 

112 John T. 7 m. Cynthia Hand of Durham, Greene Co., N. Y., 
and had ch. 114 Edward 8 b. 1822 and 115 John 8 b. 1823. 

114 Edward 8 m. Elizabeth, b. 1824, d. of Stephen Hedges, and 
had ch. 116 Rosalie 9 b. 1846, 117 Edward H.' b. 1855, 118 Nathan 
H. 9 b. 1858, 119 Josiah 9 b. 1862, and 110 Nellie C. 9 b. 1865. 

115 John 8 m. Elizabeth d. of Nathaniel Huntting and had ch. 
121 Elizabeth H. 9 b. 1851 and 122 Mary H. 9 b. 1852. 

113 Josiah 7 m. Abbie d. of Abraham Hand and had ch. 123 
Charles R. 8 b. 1829, 124 Jane 8 b. 1833, 125 Kate H. 8 b. 1837, and 
126 Julia C. s b. 1839. 

123 Charles R. 8 m. Sarah d. of Hiram Sherrill and has s. 127 
Charles S. 9 b. 1860. 

96 Jeremiah 4 bap. 1716 m. Mary d. of Cornelius Conkling Dec. 
29, 1742, and had ch. 128 Jeremiah 5 bap. 1745, 129 Mary 6 bap. 
1746, and 130 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1752. 

128 Jeremiah 5 had ch. 131 Hervey 6 bap. 17S6 and 132 Jeremiah. 6 

132 Jeremiah 6 had ch. 133 Jeremiah 7 and 134 Abraham.' 

134 Abraham 7 m. Rebecca d. of Ellis Parsons and had ch. 135 
Abraham 8 , 136 Ellis Parsons 8 and 137 Phebe. 8 

94 Benah 4 bap. 1719 had ch. 138 David 5 bap. 1731, 139 Jesse 5 
bap. 1735 and 140 Mary 5 bap. 1741. 

139 Jesse 5 had w. Hannah and ch. 141 Susanna 6 , 142 Jacob 6 , 143 
David 6 , 144 Jane 6 bap. 1764, 145 Martha 6 bap. 1768, 146 Hannah 6 
bap. 1761 and 147 Jasper. 6 

This completes the record, so far as I have it, of the descendants 
of 2 Robert 2 , the oldest son of the first settler, Ralph. 

His second son, 3 Samuel 2 , remained in Southampton for a 
while, residing at North Sea ; then removed to Brookhaven, on L. 
L, where he died in 1690. He had w. Wilhelmina and ch. 148 
Ralph 3 , 149 Jacob 3 b. about 1657 and removed to New Jersey, 150 
Caleb 3 b. about 1659 and d. in Southampton 1688, and 151 Isaac. 3 

The following record is taken from G. F. Tuttle's Tuttle Family: 

151 Isaac 3 removed to Setauket ; afterward removed to New 



Genealogies. 233 

Haven where he m. Eebecca Tuttle Sept. 10, 1664, and he died 
between 1715 and 1722. He had ch. 152 Isaac 4 , 153 Hezekiah 4 b. 
1710, 154 Jonathan 4 b. abt. 1815, 155 Mary 4 , 156 Charity 4 and 157 
Sarah. 4 

152 Isaac 4 m. Elizabeth d. of Michael Todd and had ch. 158 
Elizabeth 5 b. Sept. 25, 1711, 159 Eebecca 5 b. Apr. 12, 1713, 160 
Israel 5 b. Mch. 12, 1715, 161 Sarah 5 b. July 27, 1716, 162 Hannah 5 
b. Aug. 4, 1718, 163 Isaac 5 b. Aug. 30, 1720, 164 Michael 6 b. June 
4, 1722, 165 Deborah 5 b. Aug. 8, 1724, 166 Jonathan 5 b. Jan. 31, 
1727, 167 Charity 5 b. Sept. 29, 1730, and 168 Giles 5 b. Feb. 20, 1731. 

160 Israel 5 m. Dinah Bishop and had ch. 169 Jehiel" b. Dec. 22, 
1737, 170 Israel 6 b. Mch. 30, 1744, 171 Dinah 6 b. 1746 and 172 
Samuel 6 b. Dec. 19, 1750. 

170 Israel 6 had ch. 173 James Z. 7 and 174 Sherman', twins, b. 
1791, and 175 Giles.' 

172 Samuel 6 had s. 176 Samuel' b. 1777. 

163 Isaac 5 of Newport, R. I., had w. Mary and ch. 177 Isaac 6 b. 
1753, 178 Benedict 6 , 179 Henry 6 , 180 Hezekiah 6 , 181 Samuel 6 of 
Salisbury, N. C, and 182 Elizabeth. 6 

177 Isaac" m. 1774 Sarah Irish of Hudson, N. Y., m. 2d, 1783, 
Matilda Gardiner and had ch. 183 Isaac', 184 John' b. May 25, 
1777, 185 Charles' b. May 10, 1779, 186 Giles' of Hudson b. 1780, 
187 Samuel 7 b. June 2, 1784, 188 Sarah 7 b. 1787, 189 Benjamin' b. 
Feb. 17, 1791, 190 Edward' b. Feb. 17, 1793, 191 Henry' b. Aug. 
8, 1795, of Chautauqua, N. Y., 192 Matilda', and 193 Gilbert.' 

, 185 Charles' d. 1809 m. Harriet Jackson and had ch. 194 Harriet 8 , 
195 Caroline 8 and 196 Charles 3 b. July 8, 1808. 

196 Charles 8 had ch. 197 Joseph D. a b. Oct. 12, 1832, of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 198 Charles A. 8 and 199 Mary E. 9 b. Apr. 13, 1837. 

187 Samuel' had s. 200 William." 

200 "William 8 m. Caroline, sister of the poet, Alfred B. Street, 
and had d. 201 Ida 9 w. of Prof. Wm. G. Peck, of N. Y. city. 

190 Edward' m. Julia A. Parker and had ch. 202 Isaac 8 and 203 
Miln P. 8 b. 1821. 

202 Isaac 8 of New York had w. Emmeline and ch. 204 Eobert A. 
B. 9 , 205 Julia 3 and 206 Edward H. G. 9 

203 Miln P. 8 of New York m. Sarah F. Townsend and had ch. 
207 Frank 9 b. Aug. 13, 1851, 208 Albert E. 9 b. Jan. 17, 1854, and 
209 Euretta C. 9 b. June, 1856. 

30 



234 History of Southampton. 

164 Michael 8 had eh. 210 Charles 6 b. Nov. 3, 1747, 211 David 6 b. 
July 23, 1749, 212 Miriam 6 b. Jan. 6, 1751, 213 Michael 6 b. Sept. 11, 
1752, 214 Justus 6 b. June 30, 1754, 215 Mehetabel 6 b. 1756, 216 
Loly 6 b. 1758, 217 Elizabeth 6 b. 1759, 218 Isaac 6 of Harpersfield, N. 
Y., b. 1761, 219 Samuel 6 b. 1762, 220 Lyman 6 b. Aug. 17, 1764, and 
221 Olive. 6 

210 Charles 6 of Harpersfield, N. Y., m. Jan. 29, 1746, Mehetabel 
Doolittle and had ch. 222 Phrymest' b. Oct. 17, 1774, 223 Charles 7 
b. Sept. 17, 1776, 224 Mary' b. Nov. 11, 1778, 225 Eoxana 7 b. Nov. 
17, 1781, 226 Chauncey' b. Mch. 1783, 227 Matthew', 228 John G. 7 
and 229 Asenath. 7 

222 Phrymest m. Sarah Bryan and had ch. 230 Harriet 3 b. 1798, 
231 Bryan 8 b. 1800, 232 Bennett S. 8 b. May 2, 1809, 233 Edmund 
O. 8 , 234 Sarah A. s , 235 Harriet C. 8 , 236 Shaler H. 8 , 237 Norman 
S. 8 , 238 James S. 8 , 239 Zachariah W. 3 , 240 Hiram S. 3 , 241 Stephen 
E. 8 and 242 Adeline J. 8 

223 Charles 7 of Harpersfield, N. Y., m. Mary Smith and had ch. 
243 Dr. Charles E. 8 of Berne, 244 George A. 8 , 245 Chauncey 8 of 
Albany, 246 Mary A. 8 , 247 Maxamilla 8 , 248 Hezekiah 8 and 249 
Emily. 8 

226 Chauncey 7 had ch. 250 Chauncey L. 8 b. Feb. 19, 1815, and 
251 Mary. 8 

214 Justus 6 m. Hannah Titus 1777 and had ch. 252 Spencer 7 b. 
Oct. 21, 1778, 253 Russell 7 b. 1780, 254 Rhoda' b. 1782, 255 Jonah 7 
b. July 31, 1783, 256 Henry 7 , 257 Justus', 258 Chester 7 , 259 Archi- 
bald 7 and 258 Elizabeth. 7 

253 Russell 7 had s. 259 Chester. 6 

255 Jonah' m. Mary Flint and had ch. 260 Arvid 8 b. 1814 and 
261 Marcus. 8 

256 Henry 7 had ch. 262 Spencer 8 of West Virginia, b. 1820, and 
263 Lewis 8 . 

258 Chester 7 had s. 264 William. 8 
220 Lyman 6 had ch. 265 Isaac' and 266 Samuel. 7 
166 Jonathan 6 d. July 31, 1804, m. Mary Yale 1751 and had ch. 
267 Thankful 6 b. Dec. 6, 1753, 268 Jonathan 6 b. Mch. 10, 1756, 269 
Nathaniel 6 , 270 Cornelius 6 b. Feb. 25, 1763, 271 Mary 6 , 272 Beza- 
leel 6 b. Mch. 15, 1768, 273 Sarah 6 , 274 Miriam 6 , 275 Bedotha 6 and 
276 Darling. 6 



Genealogies. 235 

268 Jonathan 6 had oh. 277 Enos B.' and 278 Lois. 7 

269 Nathaniel 6 had ch. 279 Jude 7 , 280 Joshua', 281 Sarah', 282 
Margaret', 283 Pierpont' b. 1795, 284 Harriet 7 and 285 Mabel.' 

270 Cornelius 6 m. Mary Bachelor and had ch. 286 Susan 7 , 287 
Lydia', 288 Mary', 289 Sarah', 290 Lewis', 291 Jeremiah 7 and 292 
Cornelius.' 

272 Bezaleel 6 d. Sept. 20, 1850, m. Sophia Johnson and had s. 
293 Jonathan H. 7 and three d's. 

153 Hezekiah 4 of Setauket b. 1710 had ch. 294 William 5 b. abt. 
1734, 295 Bebecca 6 b. 1736, 296 Hezekiah 6 b. 1738, 297 Spencer 5 b. 
1740, 298 Mary 5 b. 1743 and 299 Ann 5 b. 1745. 

297 Spencer 5 of St. George's Manor, L. I., had ch. 298 "William 6 
b. 1768, 299 Phebe 6 b. 1774 and 300 Robert 6 b. 1784. 

298 William 6 of Middletown Point, Monmouth Co., N. J., m. 
Elizabeth Herbert and had ch. 301 Spencer' b. Mch. 4, 1795, 302 
Hannah', 303 Obadiah 7 , 304 Eliza H.', 305 John Herbert 7 and 306 
William. 7 

301 Spencer 7 had ch. 307 Adelia 8 , 308 Sarah 8 , 309 Herbert 8 b. Mch. 
21, 1829, 310 Hannah 8 and 311 William Spencer 8 b. Jan. 10, 1832, 
of G-reenport, who m. Sarah Brown. 

303 Obadiah' of Wading River, L. I., had ch. 312 Sereno 8 b. 
Dec. 1, 1845, who m. Hattie Floyd, 313 Sarah W. 8 and 314 Kate. 8 

305 John Herbert' had s. 315 John J. b. 1836 who m. Mary 
Seward. 

300 Robert 6 of Speonk d. Apr. 24, 1826, m. Hannah Phillips and 
had ch. 316 Noah 7 , 317 Orrin 7 b. 1808, 318 Celinda 7 and 319 Mari- 
etta J.' 

317 Orrin' had w. Mehetabel and ch. 320 Elizabeth 8 b. 1833, 321 
George W.' b. 1836 and 322 John R. 8 b. 1842. 

154 Nathaniel 4 b. abt. 1715 of Setauket, had s. 323 Tuttle. 5 

323 Tuttle 5 m. Elizabeth Turner and had ch. 324 Tryphena 6 , 325 
Isaac 6 , 326 Nathaniel 6 b. 1770, and 327 Samuel 6 b. 1772. 

326 Nathaniel 6 of Riverhead d. 1809 had ch. 328 Miriam 7 w. of 
John Edwards, 329 Nathaniel 7 of Manor, 330 William 7 , 331 Ruth 7 , 
332 Eleazer' and 333 Tuttle. 7 

329 Nathaniel 7 had ch. 334 Richard 8 , 335 William 8 , 336 Elizabeth 8 , 
337 Jemima 8 and 338 Mary. 8 

330 William 7 had ch. 339 David 8 , 340 Andrew 8 and 341 George 8 
of Port Jefferson. 



236 Histoky of Southampton. 

327 Samuel 6 d. in Port Jefferson Mch. 25, 1853, m. Mary Good- 
win and had oh. 342 Tuttle' b. Aug. 20, 1796, 343 Joseph' b. Jan. 
1798, 344 Mary', 345 Robert W.', 346 Samuel', 347 Louisa', 348 
Charles', 349 Tryphena', 350 Elizabeth' and 351 Orange Webb.' 

342 Tuttle' d. June 24, 1861, m. Ruth Tucker and had ch. 352 
Tuttle Orrin 8 , 353 Charles Edwin 9 , 354 George M. 8 b. Jan. 10, 1831, 
355 Erastus Gardiner 8 , 356 Joshua 1ST. 8 , 357 Mary C. 8 , 358 Eliza 
M. 8 , 359 Ruth A. 8 and 360 Hannah M. 8 

352 Tuttle Orrin 8 of Pt. Jefferson m. Mary Jones and had ch. 361 
Charles E. 9 who m. Mary Lee, 362 Mary E. 9 , 363 Margaret L. 9 , 364 
Georgiana M. 9 , 365 Mary T. 9 , 366 Ruth I. 9 and 367 Tuttle O. 9 

353 Charles Edwin 8 m. Amy S. Roe and had ch. 368 Ruth E. 9 , 
369 Amy T. 9 , 370 Charles E. 9 , 371 Erastus G. 9 and 372 William 

Roe. 9 

354 George M. 8 had ch. 373 George Tuttle 9 , b. June 22, 1856, and 
d's who d. young. 

355 Erastus G. 8 of Athens, K Y., m. Sarah M. Slater and had 
s. 374 Orm S. 9 

343 Joseph 7 of Moriches m. Jemima Robinson and had ch. 375 
Jemima 8 w. of Thos. Tuttle, 376 Joseph 8 and 377 David. 8 

376 Joseph 8 m. Catherine Tattle and had s. 378 Joseph. 9 

377 David 8 m. Cynthia Holhday and had ch. 379 Isanna, 345 
Robert W." b. Apr. 22, 1803, m. Hannah De Wick and had s. 380 
Samuel G. 8 of City Island, N. Y., who m. Louisa Ales. 

346 Samuel' d. 1866 had s. 381 Dallas 8 of Delta, Mich., who d. 
1868. 

351 Orange Webb' had ch. 382 Mary 8 , 383 Elizabeth M. s and 384 
George Warren 8 of New York b. Jan. 9, 1836. 

Burke'3 Gen. Armory mentions a Dayton family of Bedforshire 
and one family of Deighton also as using a coat of arms. 

Dimon Family. 
The first of this name in Southampton was Thomas Diamond, as 
the name was then spelled. He is first mentioned in 1658, has a 
a grant of land Feb. 1659-60 and in 1663 moves to East Hampton. 
The first knowledge obtained of Thomas locates him in Wethers- 
field, Ct., where he m. Mary Sheaff July 24, 1645. Thence he 
removed to Farmlngton, Ct., and then to Southampton. 



Genealogies. 237 

1 Thomas 1 wills in. 1682 to w. Mary (who d. Aug. 21, 1706), and 

ch. 2 James 2 b. 1646, 3 Thomas 2 , 4 Sarah 2 w. of Headley of 1ST. 

J, 4 Abigail 2 , 5 Hannah 2 w. of Bird or Budd, 6 Elizabeth 2 w. 

of Miller, 7 Ruth 2 w. of Dayton and 8 John 2 who d. s. p. 

before 1682. 

2 James 2 d. Dec. 13, 1721, m. 1st Hannah d. of Rev. Thomas James, 
about 1677, and she d. Sept. 20, 1706. He m. 2d w. Elizabeth 
Davis Sept. 18, 1707, and had ch. 9 Mary 3 w. of Matthias Hopping, 
10 Thomas 3 , 11 John 3 , 12 Hannah 3 m. Joseph Moore or More of 

Bridgehampton Jan. 17, 1705-6, 13 Abigail 3 w. of Lupton 

and 14 Nathaniel." 

10 Thomas 3 m. Hannah Pinny of Bristol, R. I., Jan. 14, 1706- 
7, and had ch, 15 Jane 4 bap. Oct. 20, 1707, 16 Rebecca 4 bap. Mch. 
1708-9, 17 Jeremiah 4 bap. Dec. 10, 1710, and 18 Jonathan 4 bap. 
May 11, 1712. 

11 John 3 d. 1765 m. 1 Deborah Hedges Dec. 17, 1718. She d. 
Feb. 18, 1722, b. 1696. He m. 2d Elizabeth Davis Dec. 25, 1722. 
He married 3d Rachel Dayton 'Apr. 23, 1730, and had ch. 19 

Deborah 4 bap. 1724 w. of Miller, 20 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1726, 21 

John 4 bap. 1727, 22 Elizabeth 4 again (d. of his 3d w.) bap. 1731 

w. of Hand, 23 Rachel 4 bap. 1734, 24 Abraham 4 and 25 Isaac 4 , 

twins, bap. 1735, and 26 Mary 4 bap. 1742. 

24 Abraham 4 m. Hannah Foster of Southampton and had ch. 27 
John 5 , 28 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1771, 29 Jeremiah 5 bap. 1789 and 30 
Abraham 5 bap. 1792. 

27 John 6 had s. 31 John. 6 

31 John 6 b. 1797 had w. Margaret and ch. 32 Mary 7 w. of James 
Madison Huntting of East Hampton and 33 John 7 b. 1831, 34 
Theodore 7 b. 1841 and 34| Margaret 7 b. 1839. 

25 Isaac 4 m. Eunice Foster, sister of Hannah, his brother Abra- 
ham's wife, and had ch. 35 Jacob 5 bap. 1776, 36 Rachel 5 bap. 1784, 
37 Joseph 5 , 38 Isaac 5 and 39 David 5 , who moved to Tully, Genesee 
Co., N. Y. 

37 Joseph 5 m. Mary Hedges and had s. 40 Charles. 6 

40 Charles 6 b. 1806 m. Phebe Lester and had ch. 41 David F. 7 b. 
1826 and 41£ Mariette H. 7 b. 1828. 

41 David 7 m. Amelia G-unn and had s. 42 Charles. 8 

38 Isaac 6 b. 1781 removed to Southampton, m. Elizabeth Miller 
and had s. 4=3 Isaac Conklin. 6 



238 Histoey of Southampton. 

43 Isaac 0. 6 had w. Clarissa W. and ch. 44 Ann Maria' b. 1835, 
45 Samuel' b. 1837, 46 Elmira W.' b. 1846, 47 Caroline H.' b. 1854 
and 48 Charles C b. 1859. 

Joseph H.' b. 1829, s. of , had w. Mary F. and ch. 50 

Agnes 8 b. 1858 and 51 Joseph H. 8 b. 1863. 

52 Nathan H.' of Bridgehampton b. 1822 had w. Eoxana and 
mother Hannah b. 1790 and ch. 53 Mary J. 8 b. 1843, 54 Nathan 
H. 8 b. 1847, 55 Eleanor A. 8 b. 1849, 56 Elizabeth H. 8 b. 1852, 57 
Koxana 8 b. 1854, 58 Joseph 8 b. 1856, 59 John 8 b. 1858 and 60 Wil- 
liam H. 8 b. 1861. 

52 Nathan' had father Joseph Dimon and brother Charles, the 
latter of Vineland, N. J. 

Burke's Gen. Armory gives the coat of arms of one Diamond 
family and of two families of the name of Dimond. 

Edwaeds Family. 

The first of the name of this family on Long Island was "William 
Edwards, who came to East Hampton from Lynn with his wife in 
1653. The East Hampton branches have not been carried out in 
this record, but will be (D. V.) in a later work. 

1 William 1 d. about 1685, had w. Ann and ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Sarah 2 
w. of Nathaniel Dominy, 4 Anne 5 w. of John Squires, 5 Ephraim 2 
(who had w. Sarah, but whether ch. I know not), 6 Thomas 2 and 
7 Elizabeth 2 w. of Baker. 

2 John 2 d. 1693 m. Mary d. of Josiah Stanbrough and had ch. 8 
Thomas 3 b. 1668, 9 Josiah 3 , 10 William 3 and 11 John 3 b. 1678. 

8 Thomas 3 d. 1736 had w. Mary and ch. 12 John 4 , 13 James 4 b. 
1696, 14 Thomas 4 , 15 Sarah 4 bap. 1702, 16 David 4 bap. 1703, 17 
Mary 4 bap. 1706, 18 Jeremiah 4 bap. 1707, 19 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1709, 
20 Daniel 4 bap. 1711, and 21 Hannah 4 bap. 1712. 

12 John 4 m. Mary Dibble and had ch. 22 Thomas 5 bap.. 1717, 23 
Joseph 6 , Zi Jacob 5 , 25 Eunice 5 , 26 Lewis 6 , 27 Elizabeth 5 , 28 Jere- 
miah 5 , 29 Mehetabel 5 , 30 Hannah 5 , 31 Jane 5 , 32 John 5 bap. 1739, 
33 Stephen 5 , 34 Mary 5 , 35 Phebe 5 and 36 Elizabeth 5 b. 1744. 

22 Thomas 5 had ch. 37 Thomas 6 bap. 1752, 38 Elizabeth 8 bap. 
1763, 39 Phebe 6 and 40 Samuel 6 bap. 1778. 

33 Stephen 5 had ch. 41 Ehhu 6 bap. 1774 and 42 Miller 6 bap. 1778. 

13 James 4 d. 1739 m. Abigail Johnson Jan. 31, 1723, and had ch. 
43 Joseph 5 , 44 Abigail 6 and 45 Phebe 5 bap. 1733. 



Genealogies. 239 

43 Joseph 5 had s. 46 John 8 bap. 1762. 

46 John 6 had ch. 47 John' bap. 1790, 48 Joseph' bap. 1791 and 
49 John D.' bap. 1798. 

20 Daniel 4 m. Kachel Conklin Jan. 13, 1736, and had ch. 50 
Temperance 6 bap. 1737, 51 David' bap. 1738 and 52 Elizabeth 6 bap. 
1740. 

9 Josiah 3 d. 1713 had w. Mary and ch. 53 Josiah 4 bap. 1700, 54 
Churchill 4 bap. 1703, 55 William 4 bap. 1706 d. 1726, 56 David 4 bap. 
1707, 57 Mercy 4 bap. 1710, 58 Nathaniel 4 , 59 Mary 4 , 60 Joseph 4 and 
61 Jonathan. 4 

56 David 4 m. Alice Leek May 28, 1729, and had ch. 62 Mercy 5 
bap. 1733, 63 Alice 5 bap. 1735, 64 Abraham 8 bap. 1740 and 65 
Richard 5 bap. 1744. 

64 Abraham 5 had ch. 66 Mary 6 bap. 1772, 67 Else 6 bap. 1779 and 
68 Daniel 9 bap. 1786. 

10 William 3 m. (perhaps 1st w.) Alice Dayton and had ch. 69 
William 4 bap. 1701 and d. young, 70 William 4 bap. 1705 and 71 
Ebenezer 4 bap. 1708. 

71 Ebenezer 4 had ch. 72 Ebenezer 5 bap. 1733, 73 Hannah 6 , 74 
Timothy 6 bap. 1738, 75 Ebenezer 5 bap. 1740, 76 Alice 5 , 77 William 5 
bap. 1747, 78 Phebe 5 , 79 Daniel 6 and 80 David. 5 

11 John 3 b. 1678, d. Nov. 20, 1728, had w. Anne and ch. 81 John 4 

b. 1707 d. 1727, 82 Anne 4 w. of King, 83 Elishabah 4 , 84 

Frances 4 , 85 Phebe 4 , 86 Esther 4 , 87 Jerusha 4 , 88 Elizabeth 4 , 89 Tim- 
othy 4 , 90 Henry 4 and 91 John 4 again. 

89 Timothy 4 of Bridgehampton, afterward of Dutchess Co., N. 
Y., had w. Rath and ch. 92 John 5 , 93 Henry', 94 David 5 , 95 Jona- 
than 6 and 96 Timothy. 5 

90 Henry* had ch. 97 Daniel 5 , 98 Ann 6 , 99 Polly 5 and 100 Joseph 5 . 
97 Daniel' had ch. 101 Esther 6 , 102 Henry 6 b. 1800, 103 Samuel 6 , 

104 George 6 , 105 Daniel 6 , 106 Maltby 6 , 107 Elizabeth 6 , 108 Charles 6 , 
109 Thomas 6 b. 1817, 110 Silas 6 , 111 Sarah 6 and 112 Joseph. 6 

102 Henry 8 had w. Eliza and ch. 113 Esther Chatfield', 114 
Jesse' b. 1833, 115 Sarah', 116 Charles', 117 William' and 118 
Phebe' b. 1843. 

104 George 6 had ch. 119 A. Smith' b. 1838, 120 Charles' and 
daughters; 

119 A. Smith 7 of Southampton has w. Sarah E. and ch. 121 
Mary F. s b. 1862, 122 George E. 8 b. 1863 and 123 a s. b. 1865. 



240 History of Southampton. 

105 Daniel 6 had ch. 124 Charles', 125 Winfield 7 and 126 Law- 
rence.' 

109 Thomas 6 had w. Mary b. 1820 and ch. 127 Alice', b. 1846, 128 
Samuel 7 b. 1848, 129 William' b. 1850, 130 Gilbert' b. 1855, 131 
Mary' b. 1857 and 132 Melvin 7 b. 1861. 

112 Joseph 6 had ch. 133 Silas' and 134 Walter'.' 

100 Joseph 6 had ch. 135 Nathaniel 6 , 136 Lewis 6 , 137 Jehiel 6 , 138 
William 6 , 139 James 6 b. 1810, M0 Arnold 6 b. 1817, 141 Jemima 6 and 
142 Mary A. 6 

139 James 6 had w. Eliza and ch. 143 James Lewis' b. 1837, 144 
Edmund D. 7 and 145 Lucy 7 b. 1842, 146 Charles 7 b. 1839, 147 
Nettie 7 b. 1846, 148 Alice' b. 1851 and 149 Annie' b. 1853. 

140 Arnold 6 had ch. 150 Elbert P. 7 b. 1843, 151 Charles N.' b. 
1845, 152 Louisa H. 7 b. 1852, 153 Ella M. 7 b. 1854, 154 Olin M. 7 b. 
1858, 155 Mary 7 b. 1860 and 156 Otis' b. 1862. 

91 Johu 4 b. 1727 d. 1798 had ch. 157 Russell 5 . 158 Martha 5 and 
159 Patience. 5 

157 Russell 5 had ch. 160 Jeremiah 6 , 161 Eliza 6 , 162 John 6 , 163 
Joshua 6 , 164 Lydia 6 , 165 Charles 6 , 166 Sarah 6 , 167 Maria 6 , 168 
Lewis 6 and 169 Phebe. 6 

160 Jeremiah 6 had ch. 170 Charles', 171 John 7 , 172 Catherine 7 , 
173 Esther 7 , 174 Celia 7 , 175 Sarah 7 and 176 Jeremiah. 7 

163 Joshua 6 had d. 177 Emily J. 7 

165 Charles 6 had d. 178 Harriet. 7 

168 Lewis 6 b. 1809 had w. Emmeline b. 1811 and ch. 179 Reuben 7 
b. 1833, 180 William H. 7 b. 1835, 181 Mary' b. 1842, 182 Delia 7 , 183 
Emily' b. 1845, 184 Oscar', 185 Charles', 186 Frank', 187 Lewis 
M.' b. 1847 and 188 Elizabeth' b. 1850. 

179 Reuben' has w. Hannah and ch. 189 Evelyn 8 b. 1856, 190 
Isabel 8 b. 1858, 191 Harriet 8 b. 1860, 192 Walter 3 b. 1862, 193 
Daniel 8 b. 1863 and 194 Anna 8 b. 1865. 

6 Thomas 2 d. Apr. 16, 1698, had w. Abigail and ch. 195 Ephraim 3 , 
196 Thomas 8 , 197 Daniel 3 , 198 William 3 of Cape May Co., N". J., 
199 Alice 8 , 200 Abigail 3 , 201 Jane 3 , 202 Elizabeth 3 and 203 Esther. 3 

195 Ephraim 3 , in 1702, was of Cape May Co., N. J., had ch. 204 
Elizabeth 4 bap. 1700 and 205 Esther 4 bap. 1701. 

197 Daniel 3 had w. Jane and s. 206 Daniel 4 bap. 1715. 

Forty-five families of this name are mentioned in Burke as having 
coats of arms. 



G-ENEALOGIES. 241 



Ellsworth Family. 

1 Roswell Ellsworth resided in Rhode Island. His son, 2 Ros- 
well, removed to Washington county, N. Y. 3 Noah D., son of 
the second Roswell, removed to Southampton about 1836. He had 
by his first w. s. 4 Alvah Nash ; by his second w. Harriet, d. of 
William Woolley, he had ch. 5 Robert, 6 John Henry, 7 William R., 
8 S. Egbert and 9 Elizabeth. 

6 John H. m. Jan. 1866 Nancy d. of William Huntting and 
removed to McGregor, Iowa, and has ch. 

8 S. Egbert m. Harriet Jessup, d. of Huntting J. and Susan 
(Fordham) Post, Sept. 8. 1875, and has ch. 10 Alvah Day b. Oct. 
5, 1877, and 11 Frank Post b. Aug. 9, 1880. 

Fanning Family. 

Most of the following genealogy is taken from the South Side 
Signal of Aug. 21, 1880, which gives the record as taken from a 
gravestone in Riverhead. According to this the Fannings of Long 
Island are descended from 1 Dominicus Fanning, who was a mayor 
of a city in Ireland and was beheaded by Cromwell in the civil 
war. He had s. 2 Edmund 2 who removed from Kilkenny in Ire- 
land to Stonington, Ct. 

2 Edmund 2 m. Catherine, d. of Hugh Hays, earl of Connaught, 
and had ch. 3 Edmund 3 , 4 John 3 , 5 Thomas 3 , 6 Mary 8 w. of Ben- 
jamin Hewett and 7 William. 3 

5 Thomas 3 had ch. 8 Catherine P. 4 and 9 James. 4 

9 Capt. James 4 m. Harriet Smith, of Smithtown, L. L, and had 
ch. 10 Phineas 5 , 11 Thomas 5 , 12 Gilbert 8 of Stonington, Ct., 13 
Edmund 6 , Lieut.-Gov. of Nova Scotia, 14 James 6 of L. L. 15 Cath- 
erine 6 w. of Mumford, 16 Bertha 6 w. of Terry, 17 Sarah 5 w. 

of Capt. Joshua Lupton and 18 Nancy 5 w. of Major John Wickham. 

10 Phineas 5 had s. 19 Phineas. 6 

19 Phineas 6 , grad. of Yale 1769, had ch. 20 William 1 of New 
York and 21 P. W. Fanning' of Wilmington, N. C. 

14 James 6 had ch. 22 John 6 and 23 James. 6 

22 John 6 had s. 24 James.' 

24 James' had oh. 25 Harlan Page 8 of Goodground and 26 
Daniel W. 8 
31 



24:2 HlSTOKT OF SOUTHAMPTON. 

23 James 6 , a merchant three miles east of Eiverhead, had ch. 2? 
James' of East Moriches, b. 1776 d. 1848, 28 Nathaniel 7 of South- 
ampton, b. 1808, 29 Israel' of Riverhead, 30 Dr. Joshua 7 of Green - 
port and 31 Franklin T.' of Southampton, b. 1825, 

28 Nathaniel' m. Abigail d. of David Goodale and had ch. 32 
James Horace 8 b. 1834, 33 Prances M. b. 1838, 34 Charlotte A. 8 b. 
1841, 35 Nathaniel B. 8 b. 1844, 36 Gilbert 8 b. 1846, 37 Emma J. 8 b 
1848, 38 Nancy E. s b. 1850 and 39 Frederic L. 8 b. 1853. 

31 Franklin T. 7 b. 1825 had w. Sarah J. b. 1832 and ch. 40 
George T. 8 b. 1851, 41 Henrietta J. 8 b. 1854, 42 Sarah E. 8 b. 1855 ' 
and 43 Lucy 8 b. 1864. 

According to Francis M. Oaulkin's History of New London, 9 
James 4 must have had a brother who had ch. 44 Oapt. Edmund 6 , a 
navigator and discoverer of islands, and 45 Nathaniel. 5 

This family is said to have a coat of arms, but I have been unable 
to ascertain what it is. 

Fithiak Family. 

The first settler of this name on Long].Island was William. 
According to the tradition in the family he was a native of Wales, 
then afterward a soldier in Cromwell's army ; present at the execu- 
tion of Charles I., aud after the restoration of Charles II. was pro- 
scribed as a regicide and obliged to flee his country. He came to 
Boston, thence to Lynn, thence to New Haven, thence to East 
Hampton, where he remained until his death. 

1 William 1 had w. Margaret and d. 1678 and had ch. 2 Martha 5 d. 
in 1678, 3 Enoch 2 b. 1646, 4 Sarah 2 , 5 Hannah 2 and 6 Samuel. 1 

3 Lieut. Enoch 2 d. Feb. 20, 1726-7. He "m. Miriam Burnett 
June 25, 1675, who was b. 1656 and d. Apr-. 1, 1717. They had 
ch. 7 William 3 (not living in 1700), 8 John 3 , 9 David 3 , 10 Aaron 3 , 
11 Esther 8 bap. 1701, 12 Sarah 3 and 13 Jonathan 3 of Philadelphia. 

9 David 3 had ch. 14 Eunice 4 bap. 1709 w. of ■ Howell, 15 

Phebe 4 bap. 1711, 16 Sarah 4 bap. 1713 and 17 John 4 bap. 1715 and 
d. s. p. 

10 Aaron 3 b. 1684 d. May 1, 1750, m. Bethia Gardiner Sept. 22, 

1714, and had ch. 18 Mary 4 w. of Talmage, 19 Esther 4 bap. 

1701 w. of Johnes and 20 David 4 b. 1728. 

20 Capt. David 4 d. Sept. 1805 m. Esther Conkling 1747, who d. 
Nov. 24, 1700, ae. 71. They had ch. 21 Esther 5 bap. 1748, 22 



Genealogies. 243' 

David 6 , 23 Aaron 5 bap. 1752, 24 Jonathan 6 bap. 1763 and d. young, 
25 Jonathan 6 bap. 1768, 26 Blisha 6 b. 1774 and 26£ Lucretia. 6 
23 Aaron 6 d. Feb. 2, 1779, and had s. 27 Enoch 6 bap. 1779. 

27 Enoch 6 had ch. 28 Abraham 7 and 29 David' of New York. 

28 Abraham' b. 1813 had w. Elenora and ch. 30 Isabella 8 b. 1842 
w. of Stafford Tillinghast, 31 Jerusha H. b. 1848, 32 Ella G. 8 b. 
1854 and 33 Clara A. 8 b. 1859. 

25 Oapt. Jonathan 6 bap. 1768 had ch. 34 Mary 6 bap. 1795, 35 
Elizabeth 6 bap. 1795, 36 Jonathan 6 b. 1796, 37 Aaron 6 and 38 
Jerusha 6 w. of Patrick Gould of East Hampton. 

36 Jonathan 6 went to Southampton when a young man and 
was engaged as assistant teacher in the academy of that village. 
He m. there Abbie, d. of Thomas Sayre, b. 1801, and had ch. 39 
Elizabeth' w. of Kev. Samuel Hampton Jagger, 40 Harriet' w. of 
Oapt. David R. Drake, 41 Louisa' b. 1830, 42 Mary' b. 1832 w. of 
William E. Post, Esq., and 43 Margaret' b. 1836 and w. of Dr. 
Charles N. Woolley of Newburgh. 

37 Aaron 6 had w. Mary A. b. 1808 and ch. 44 Mary A.' b. 1833, 
45 Jonathan' b. 1837, 46 William' b. 1840 and 47 Jerusha' b. 1843. 

26 Elisha 6 b. 1774 d. Mch. 7, 1816, m. Zilpah Miller 1795 and 
had s. 48 Samuel 6 of Southold. 

48 Samuel 6 had s. 49 William Y. 7 b. 1828. 

49 William Y.' m. Sept. 25, 1851, Sarah A. Brown, b. 1830, and 
had ch. 50 Herbert N. s b. 1854 and 51 Annie H. 9 b. 1860. 

6 Samuel 2 b. in East Hampton removed to Oohanzie, Cumber- 
land Co., New Jersey, about 1698, d. 1702, m. Mch. 6, 1679, Pris- 
cilla, d. of Thomas and Mary Barnes of E. H., and had ch. 52 
Josiah 3 b. May 6, 1685, 53 Samuel 8 b. Apr. 17, 1688, and two or 
three other sons, and one d., probably the eldest ch. 

52 Josiah 3 d. Apr. 3, 1741, m. Nov. 7, 1706, Sarah, d. of Rev. 
Philip Dennis, and had ch. 54 Samuel 4 b. Oct. 12, 1715, 55 Joseph 4 , 
and perhaps 56 Lot b. Mch. 4, 1728. [But this Lot may have been 
son of one of the sons of 6 Samuel 2 , whose names are unknown to- 
me, but it has been thought that he was the son ot 52 Josiah. 3 ] 

54 Samuel 4 d. Nov. 2, 1777, m. Sept. 3, 1741, Phebe, d. of 
Ephraim Seeley, who d. Mch. 12, 1764. They had ch. 57 Hannah 6 
b. Aug. 4, 1742, who m. Nathan Leake, of Deerfield and d. Nov. 8, 
1842, 58 Rachel 6 b. July 7, 1744, and m. Daniel Clarke of Hopewell 
and d. Oct. 22, 1822, 59 Amy 5 b. July 16, 1746, m. Joseph More of 



244 Histoet of Southampton'. 

Deerfield and d. Nov. 20, 1824, 60 Joel 5 b. Sept. 29, 1748, 61 Eliza- 
beth 5 b. Dec. 13, 1750, m. Ephraim Seeley and d. Feb. 6, 1788, 62 
Mary 6 b. Apr. 1, 1752, m. Joshua Brick of Brickborough and d. 
Nov. 1793, 63 Sarah 5 b. Mch. 3, 1754, m. Thos. Brown of Hope- 
well and d. Nov. 23, 1779, 64 Ruth 5 b. May 25, 1756, m. David 
Bowen and d. Dec. 3, 1846, and 65 Seeley 5 b. Oct. 15, 1758. 

60 Joel 5 d. Nov. 9, 1821, m. 1st, Sept. 3, 1771, Rachel, d, of 
Jonathan and Anna Holmes, and had one ch. After death of 
Anna he m. 2d, Mch. 4, 1780, Elizabeth, d. of Rev. Ohas. Beatty 
and wid. of Rev. Philip V. Fithian. His children were 66 Josiah 6 
of Bridgeton, N. J., b. Sept. 30, 1776, d. July 14, 1842, 67 Ohas. 
B. 6 b. Dec. 18, 1782, d. Nov. 21, 1858, 68 Samuel 6 b. Feb. 26, 1785, 
•d. Sept. 28, 1806, 69 Philip 6 b. Jan. 20. 1787, d. Jan. 16, 1868, 70 
Erkuries B. 6 b. Aug. 14, 1789, d. May 26, 1816, and 71 Dr. Enoch 6 
of Greenwich, N. J., b. May 10, 1792. 

65 Seeley 5 d. Mch. 14, 1819, m. 1st, Ruth, d. of John and Eliza- 
beth Burgin. She d. Oct. 24, 1793. He m. 2d, Esther, d. of Bar- 
tholomew and Margaret Hunt, who d. Mch. 29, 1830. He had ch. 
72 John Burgin 6 b. Oct. 1793, 73 Ruth 6 b. Apr. 7, 1798, 74 Reuben 6 
b. Jan. 20, 1800, 75 Joel 6 b. Oct. 20, 1802, and 76 Robert 6 b. Jan. 
6, 1805, and d. Sept. 27, 1871. 

55 Joseph 4 d. Feb. 7, 1772, m. Hannah Vickers and had ch. 77 
Rev. Philip Vickers 5 , 78 Amos 5 , 79 Enoch 5 who d. s. p., 80 Thomas 5 
who d. s. p., 81 Philip 5 and 82 Jonathan. 5 

77 Rev. Philip V. 5 d. s. p. Oct. 8, 1776, m. Elizabeth, d. of Rev. 
Chas. Beatty. He was a grad. of Princeton College, licensed to 
preach, Dec. 6, 1774, and a chaplain in the revolutionary war. 

78 Amos 5 of Oedarville, N. J., had ch. 83 Dr. Joseph 6 of Wood- 
bury, N. J., b. 1795 and 84 Joel 6 of Oxford, Ohio. 

83 Dr. Joseph 6 m. Hetty G. Cattell and had one daughter. 

56 Lot 4 , supposed to be son of 52 Josiah 3 , b. Mch. 4, 1728, d. 
Mch. 29, 1765, had w. Judith b. Feb. 14, 1728, and ch. 84 Glover 5 
b. Sept. 20, 1753, 85 Israel 5 b. Aug. 13, 1755, d. July, 1807, 86 
Isaac 6 b. July 20, 1757, d. Jan. 16, 1834, 87 Ellis 5 b. Mch. 20, 1761, 
and 88 Elizabeth 5 b. Mch. 18, 1764. 

84 Glover 6 d. May 9, 1809, and had ch. 89 Israel 6 of Illinois, who 
had a family, 90 David 9 , 91 Samuel 6 , 92 Rebecca 6 , 93 Benjamin 6 and 
S4 Elizabeth 6 . 

90 David 6 d. 1865 had s. 95 Edwin, 0. E., U. S. N. 



Genealogies. 245 

93 Benjamin 6 m. Mary Judd and had ch. 96 Freeman J.' of New- 
York, 97 Isaac' of Buffalo and 98 Maria.' 

Fordham Family. 

An account of the Rev. Eobert Fordham, the ancestor of this family 
in Southampton, has been given before in chapter VIII. He died 
in Sept. 1674 and had w. Elizabeth and ch. 2 Captain Joseph 2 , 3 
Robert 2 , 4 Rev. Jonah 2 b. 1633, 5 John 2 who d. s. p. in 1683, 6 
Mary 2 w. of Edward Howell and 7 Hannah 2 w. of Samuel Clark. 

5 Oapt. Joseph 2 d. Sept. 7, 1768, had ch. 8 Major Joseph 3 b. July 
30, 1669, 9 Elizabeth 3 , 10 Nathan 3 and 11 Pelatiah. 

8 Major Joseph 3 m. Mary Maltby Dec. 5, 1689 : she d. Mch. 10, 
1719, and had ch. 12 Mary 4 b. Mch. 11, 1691, 13 Joseph 4 b. Sept. 
19, 1693, 14 Phebe 4 b. July 22, 1696, 15 Alexander 4 b. Oct. 3, 1700, 
16 John 4 b. Oct. 27, 1703, and 17 Hannah 4 b. July 19, 1707. 

13 Joseph 4 d. 1726 had w. Martha, d. of John Cook, and ch. 18 
Joseph 5 and 19 Abraham. 5 

19 Abraham 5 had s. 20 Abraham 8 and probably other ch. 

20 Abraham 6 had ch. 21 Daniel', 22 Charles', who d. s. p., 23 
George W. 7 of New York city, 24 Merit' and 25 Mehetabel.' 

21 Daniel' m. Mary, d. of Ananias Halsey, and had ch. 26 Mary 8 , 
27 Nancy 8 w. of Silas Tuthill of Southold, 28 Susan 8 w. of Huntting 
J. Post of Palmyra, N. Y., 29 Elizabeth 8 w. of George G. White, 
30 Eli Pierson 8 , 31 Henry Augustus 8 and 32- William Francis. 8 

30 Eli P. 8 m. Ann",Eliza, d. of Capt. William Post, and has ch. 

31 Henry A. 8 m. Harriet, d. of Capt. William Post, and has ch. 

32 William F. 8 m. Caroline, d. of Samuel Bishop, but d. s. p. 

23 George W.' had s. 33 Sidney E. s 

24 Merit m. Mary A., d. of Elias Harris, and had ch. 34 Orlando 8 , 
who d. s. p., 35 Jeremiah L. 8 , grad. of Amherst, who m. Sarah C, 
d. of Thomas Isaacs of East Hampton, and has ch., 36 Elenora 8 w. 
of , 37 John H. 8 and 38 Mary Jane 8 w. of . 

10 Nathan. Here the authority for the genealogy is mainly 
verbal (not documentary) from Sag Harbor, where the descendants 
of 10 Nathan mostly have resided, and I will not answer for its 
correctness. 10 Nathan 3 had ch. 39 Nathan 4 and 40 John. 4 

39 Nathan 4 had ch. 41 George 6 , 42 Nathan 6 and 43 Daniel. 6 

42 Nathan 6 had ch. 44 Nathan 6 and 45 Jairus. 6 



246 History of Southampton. 

44 Nathan 6 had ch. 46 Robert', 47 Jeffrey', 48 Nathan', 49 
Hugh' and, 50 Henry.' 

46 Eobert' had ch. 51 Charles 8 , 52 Eobert Bruce 8 and 53 Lodo- 
wick. 8 

47 Jeffrey' had ch. 54 Nathan 8 and 55 Thomas 8 . 

48 Nathan' had ch. 56 Samuel 8 , 57 Oscar 8 , 58 John 8 and 59 

Elbert. 8 

49 Hugh' had d. 60 Rowena 8 w. of Alfred Eobinson of South- 
ampton. 

50 Henry' had s. 61 Nathan. 8 

45 Jairus 6 had ch. 62 Hubbard', 63 Nicholas' and 64 Frederick.' 
63 Nicholas 7 had s. 65 William. 8 

40 John 4 had ch. 66 Capt. Ephraim 6 , 67 John 6 and 68 Pelatiab 5 , 
who d. apparently in 1725 s. p. 

67 John 5 had s. 69 John. 6 

69 John 6 had w. Charity, d. of Jesse Halsey, and ch. 70 Pelatiah', 
71 Nathan Y.' and 72 Charles' and 72£ Eoxana.' 

70 Pelatiah' had ch. 73 Charles 8 and 74 John. 8 

41 George 5 had ch. 75 George 6 , 76 Jared 6 , 77 Caleb 6 b. 1758 and 
78 Silas. 6 

77 Caleb 6 had ch. 79 George' of N. Y., 80 Caleb' of N. Y., 81 
Jacob 7 and 82 Eliza' w. of Silas Rose of Hadlyme, Ct. 
66 Capt. Ephraim 5 had ch. 83 James 6 and 84 William. 6 
83 James 6 had s. 85 John' who had w. Emma and ch. 86 Sarah 8 , 
87 Henry 8 and 88 Emily. 8 



The genealogy above given of the descendants of 10 Nathan 3 
appears to lack wofully the usual female element, but as I received 
so I hand in the story in its incompleteness. 

Notes of Wills. 

Pelatiah P. of Southampton, tailor, wills Aug. 10, 1725, to 
cousins Nathan P. and Daniel P. Proved Mch. 31, 1726. 

Joseph P., Jr., of Southampton, yeoman, wills Nov. 19, 1725, to 
w. Martha and ch. Joseph and Abraham, both under 21. Proved 
Nov. 19, 1726, in life-time of his father. 

Nathan F. of Southampton, yeoman, wills Jan. 9, 1772, to w. 



Genealogies. 247 

Abigail and ch. Sarah Bowditch and others not named. Proved 
Dec. 19, 1774. 

Burke's Gen. Armory gives the coat of arms used by John Ford- 
ham, bishop of Ely, 1388. 

Foster Family. 

1 Christopher 1 Foster, styled a farmer on the shipping list, em- 
barked in London, June 17, 1635, in the Abigail. He was 32 years 
of age, with w. Frances, 25, and ch. Bebecca, 5, Nathaniel, 2, and 
John, 1. He was made freeman at Boston April 17, 1637. In the 
same year he was a resident of Lynn, where in 1638 (according to 
Lewis' Hist, of Lynn) 60 acres of land were allotted to him. He 
came to Southampton in 1651. His son Nathaniel removed to 
Huntington, L. 1., and there resided. 

Thirty-eight families of this name are mentioned in Burke's Gen 
Armory as having coats of arms. 

The following is believed to be the coat armor of this family : 
Argent on a bend, wavy sable, three bucks' heads cabossed, or. 



^)Q^s^/^o2^cr^^X-oJ 



IT 



1 Christopher 1 , b. 1603, d. 1687, had w. Frances and ch. 2 
Rebecca 2 b. 1630, 3 Nathaniel 5 b. 1633, 4 John 8 b. 1634, 5 Ben- 
jamin 2 , 6 Hannah 2 w. of Daniel Sayre, 7 Joseph 2 and 8 Sarah 2 w. of 
Samuel Johnes. 

3 Nathaniel 2 b. 1633 removed to Huntington and had ch. 9 
Nathaniel 3 and 10 Samuel 3 and perhaps others. . Oct. 10, 1781, a 
John Foster of Huntington wills, to eldest son Samuel (not 21 years 
of age) and other ch. John, William, Henry, Gloriana and Eliza- 
beth and to his w. Sarah. Recorded, N. Y". Mch. 16, 1782. 

4 John 3 b. 1634 had ch. 11 John 3 b. Feb. 8, 1662, 12 Sarah 3 b. 
Jan. 29, 1664, 13 Hannah 3 b. Jan. 2, 1667, 14 Jeremiah 3 b. Mch. 2, 
1671, 15 Patience 3 b. Mch. 7, 1673, w. of Abraham Howell, 16 
Rachel 3 b. Feb. 2, 1675, 17 Jonathan 3 b, Apr. 2, 1677, 18 David 3 b. 
Mch. 15, 1679, 19 William 3 b. Apr. 2, 1681, 20 Phebe 3 b. Apr. 1, 
1683, and 21 Abigail 3 b. Feb. 1685. 



248 History of Southampton. 

11 John 3 b. 1662 rn. Hannah Abbott Dec. 5, 1689, and had ch. 
22 John 4 b. 1695, 23 Hachahah 4 b, 1700 and perhaps others. 

22 John 4 b. 1695, d. 1762, had 1st wife Sibyl, prob. d. of Major 
John Howell, who d. Feb. 20, 1733, aged 32, and leaving one s. 
John, and 2d w.- Elizabeth. He had ch. 24 John 6 , 25 James 6 , 26 

Cleo 6 , 27 Keturah 6 w. of Cason, 28 Josiah 6 b. Jan. 22, 1737, 

and 29 Samuel. 5 

24 John 6 m. Mary d. of Ephraim White. 

28 Josiah 6 b. Jan. 22, 1737, m. in 1768 Esther Post b. Mch. 3, 
1743, and had ch. 30 Josiah 6 b. Aug. 10, 1769, and d. young, 31 
Justus 6 , b. Nov. 3, 1770, 32 Josiah 6 b. Sept. 2, 1772, 33 James 6 b. 
Aug. 28, 1774, 34 Cephas 6 b. Nov. 7, 1776, 35 Elizabeth 6 b. Nov. 22, 
1778, 36 John 6 b. Mch. 16, 1781, who d. s. p., 37 Molly 6 b. July 
13, 1783, 38 Mary 6 b. Sept. 24, 1784, and 39 Isaac 6 of Honesdale, Pa., 
b. Mch. 28, 1788. 

28 Josiah 5 was one of a few families who removed to Quogue and 
made a settlement there, the land having been purchased at a later 
date than the eastern part of the town, and colonized by the sons of 
the several proprietors. 

31 Justus 6 b. Nov. 3, 1770, had ch. 40 Halsey 7 , 41 Horace', 42 
Josiah 7 , 43 John P. 7 b. July 12, 1807, 44 Solon 7 , 45 William 7 of 
New Orleans, La., and 46 Franklin. 7 

40 Halsey 7 of Atlanticville, b. Nov. 2, 1785 or 1795, m. Prudence 
Beeves Jan. 5, 1825, and had ch. 47 Josiah 8 b. Mch. 25, 1827, 47£ 
Frances Cordelia 8 b. Mch. 21, 1829, d. July 8, 1832, 48 Wm. Henry 8 
b. May 8, 1830, and 48£ John Wickham 8 b. Aug. 10, 1838, and d. 
Aug. 30, 1838. 

47 Josiah 8 m. Mary Ann Fanning Apr. 25, 1853, and has ch. 
Alice, Clifford, Martin and Flora. 

48 William Henry 8 m. Elizabeth A. Davis Nov. 20, 1852, and has 
ch. Wickham, Elizabeth, Everett and Horace. 

Elizabeth m. George Eockafellow. 

41 Horace 7 m. Joana Howell Nov. 11, 1823, and had ch. Eliza- 
beth A. b. Aug. 11, 1824, William George b. May 26, 1843, and d. 
May 2, 1846. 

Elizabeth A, b. Aug. 11, 1824, m. 'Isaac C. Halsey Apr. 2, 1845. 

42 Josiah 7 b. about 1804 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 49 Josiah 8 b. 
about 1839, 50 Nancy 8 b about 1841, 51 Susannah 8 b. about 1845 
and 52 Harriet H. 8 b. about 1847. (These and some others of this 



Genealogies. 249 

family are said to be bom about such a year because their ages are 
obtained from the census returns of 1855 or 1865 — no other sources 
of information being at hand to ascertain the exact record — and 
letters of genealogical inquiry being so rarely answered that the 
author has ceased to write them.) 

43 John F.' of Quogue m. Hettie Woodhull Jan. 9, 1833, and 
ch. 53 Margaret 8 b. about 1835, 54 Sophia W. 8 , b. about 1839, w. of 
Rev. Samuel E. Herrick, D. D., of Boston, and 55 Fanny 8 b. about 
1848. 

32 Josiah 6 b. Sept. 2, 1772, d. May 19, 1831, m. Aug. 7, 1805, 
Abigail, d. of Major Zebulou Jessup, and she was b. May 23, 1785, 
and d. Apr. 17, 1850, and had ch. 56 Mehetabel Schellinger 1 b. July 
6, 1806, and d. May, 1851, 57 Benjamin Huntting 7 b. July 6, 1808, 
58 Mary' b. Sept. 30, 1810, 59 Sophia Jessup' b. July 5, 1813, and 
m. Capt. Mercator Cooper, 60 George' b. Sept. 10, 1815, and d. 
Aug. 23, 1867, 61 Josiah' b. May 9, 1819, and m. Caroline Cook May 
5, 1856, and 62 Jeremiah Post 7 b. Sept. 19, 1826, and m. Oct. 4, 
1859, and d. Mch. 8, 1886. 

57 Benjamin Huntting 7 m. Phebe, d. of Oliver Post of Quogue, 
Nov. 16, 1841 (she d. May 7, 1881), and had ch. 63 Oliver Post 8 b. 
Apr. 27, 1844, 64 Benjamin 8 b. May 16, 1846, and 65 James 
Edward 8 b. July 8, 1851. 

60 George 7 resided in Susquehanna county, Penn. He d. Aug. 
23, 1-867 ; m. Jan. 21, 1842, Maria Bennett and had ch. 66 George 
Bennett 8 b. Aug. 27, 1848, 67 Maria Louise 8 b. Aug. 23, 1855, 68 
Henry Jessup 8 b. Oct. 14, 1860. 

58 Mary' m. Rev. Samuel Hunt and ch. May Agnes b. Sept. 21, 
1839, Abbie C. b. Nov. 19, 1845, and Elliot b. Nov. 22, 1847. 
Mary Hunt d. Dec. 21, 1849. 

33 James 6 b. Aug. 28, 1774, d. Nov. 6, 1863, m. Phebe d. of 
Jonathan Cook (she was b. Sept. 15, 1778, and d. Jan. 10, 1866), 
and had ch. 69 Albert' b. Dec. 19, 1805, 70 James Harvey 7 b. 
Aug. 10, 1810, 71 Isaac Pose 7 b. Dec. 8, 1815, 72 Esther Post' b. 
July 5, 1813, and w. of Dr. John Pierpont Herrick (who had ch. 
Louisa, John P., Henry P. and others who died in infancy), and 
73 Cornelius 7 b. Sept. 29, 1819. 

69 Albert' m. Nancy, second d. of Capt. Matthew Rogers (she was 
b. Mch. 24, 1808, and d. Aug. 30, 1861), and had ch. 74 Mary 
Frances 8 and 75 James Hervey. 8 
32 



250 History of Southampton. 

71 Isaac P. 7 m. Mary Rose, d. of Micaiah Herrick, May 12, 1842, 
and had ch. 76 Edward Herrick 8 b. June 17, 1844, and 77 Clara 
Rogers b. July 26, 1849, who m. Charles E. Benton of Sharon, Ct., 
Oct. 6, 1870, and had a d. Clara Foster b. June 11, 1872. The 
mother d. June 13, 1872, and the child d. Nov. 1, 1872. 

76 Edward H. 8 in. Adelaide E. d. of Capt. Thomas Sayre of Fly- 
ing Point, Nov. 19, 1874, and has ch. 78 Clara Rogers 9 b. Sept. 20, 
1875, and 79 Grace Herrick 9 b. Feb. 25, 1879. 

34 Cephas 6 of Quogue, b. Nov. 7, 1776, m. Abigail d. of Zepha- 
niah Rogers of Southampton and had ch. 80 Erastus 7 b. about 1807, 
Elizabeth and Harriet w. of George O. Post, 

80 Erastus 7 d. May, 1862, m. Sasah Howell and had ch. 81 Julia 
P. 8 b. about 1848, 82 Abby R. 8 b. 1850 and 83 Sarah 8 b. about 1856. 

39 Isaac 6 of Honesdale had d. 84 Emmeline 7 and perhaps other 
children. 

23 Hachaliah 4 b. 1700, d. Apr. 5, 1775, had w. Mary, who d. June 
13, 1796, aged 92. 

14 Jeremiah 3 b. Men. 2, 1671, and d. 1757, had ch. 85 Stephen 4 , 

86 Nathan 4 , 87 Sarah 4 , 88 Jerusha 4 w. of Pierson, 89 Abigail 4 ", 

90 Mehetabel 4 and 91 Eunice. 4 

85 Stephen 4 , d. 1784, had w. Sarah and ch. 92 Jeremiah 6 , 93 
Stephen 6 , 94 Temperance 5 , 95 Hannah 6 , 96 Sarah 5 , 97 Jerusha 5 , 98 
Phebe 6 and 99 Ruth. 6 This line I can follow no further. 

5 Benjamin 2 d. Jan. 28, 1704-5, had w. Lydia and ch. 100 Ben- 
jamin 3 , 101 Jonathan 8 , 102 Isaac 3 , 103 David 3 (of Cohanzy, N. J., 

in 1704), 104 Mary 3 w. of Chatfield, 105 Deborah 3 , 106 

Susanna 3 and 107 Sarah 3 [or Loriah 3 J. 

The will of 5 Benjamin 3 , made Jan. 26, 170$, mentions that the 
last three above-named daughters were not then eighteen years of 
age, and the name of the last is somewhat uncertain ; it looks like 
Loriah, but as the name is unusual the characters may be intended 
for Sarah. 

100 Benjamin 3 m. Martha d. of Richard Post Apr. 38, 1691. 
She d. June 16, 1741. They had ch. 108 Martha 4 b. May 8, 1692, 

and w. of Cook, 109 Bethia 4 b. July 13, 1694, and w. of 

Burnett, 110 Sarah 4 b. Feb. 1, 1697, and w. of Johnes, 111 

Ephraim 4 b. July 25, 1699, and d. s. p. Feb. 15, 1726, 112 Ben- 
jamin 4 b. Oct. 24, 1701, 113 William 4 b. Dec. 30, 1704, and 114 
Stephen 4 b. Jan. 27, 1708. 



Genealogies. 251 

113 William 4 m. Irene d. of Joshua Halsey and had ch. 115 
Ephraim" and 116 Stephen. s 

115 Ephraim 5 had ch. 117 William 6 b. 1759 and 118 David. 6 

117 William 6 b. 1759 d. Mch. 3, 1826, had w. Hannah b. 1767 and 
d. Mch. 18, 1826. They had ch. 119 Selden 7 , 120 William', of 
Montrose, Pa., and 121 Ann 7 , 1st w. of William Huntting. 

119 Selden 7 had d. 122 Maty w. of Robert E. Topping. 

118 David 6 had ch. 123 Nancy 7 b. 1805 and 124 David 7 b. about 
1807. 

124 David 7 had w. Mary b. 1807 and ch. 125 Benjamin 0." b. 
about 1836 and 126 Harriet 8 b. about 1844. 

114 Stephen 4 , b. Jan. 27, 1708, had s. 127 Stephen 6 b. about 1738 
and perhaps others. 

127 Stephen 6 , d. about 1821, had w. Jerusha d. of David Cooper of 
Bridge Hampton and s. 128 Matthew 6 b. 1767. 

128 Matthew 6 , d. 1852, had w. Hannah who was b. 1776 and d. 
Dec. 5, 1863. They had ch. 129 Benjamin Halsey' b. 1796 and 130 
Stephen 7 b. 1797. 

129 Benjamin Halsey' d. Nov. 22, 1863, m. Fanny d. of Rufus 
Sayre and had ch. 131 Phebe 8 , b. about 1828, w. of Theodore Pierson, 
132 William Sayre 8 b. about 1831, 133 Thomas 8 b. about 1832, 134 
Clara 6 b. about 1838, 135 Annette 8 b. May 10, 1839, w. of Gilbert C. 
Huntting, 136 George 8 b. about 1843, and 137 Electa 8 b. about 1845. 

132 William Sayre? m. Harriet Amelia Silliman and has ch. 138 
William C. 9 b. about 1859 and* 139 Thomas H." b. about 1863 and 
139^ May S. 9 b. 1868. 

130 Stephen 7 b. 1797 had w. Ann Eliza and ch. 140 James R. 8 b. 
about 1833, 141 Ann Eliza 8 b. about 1835, w. of Andrew Jennings, 
and 142 Samuel P. 8 b. about 1840. 

140 James R. s has w. Sarah L. b. 1835 and ch. 143 James N." b. 
about 1857, 144 Eugene W. 9 b. about 1861, and 145 Francis E. 5 b. 
about 1863 and a s. b. 1865. (From the census of 1865.) 

142 Samuel P. 8 has w. Mary H. d. of Benj. F. Rogers of Bridge 
Hampton and has ch. 146 Melania G. 9 and 147 James R. 9 b. about 
1867. 

1 Joseph 2 b. about 1638 d. Jan. 30, 1708, had ch. 148 Joseph 3 b. 
about 1665, 149 Christopher 3 b. 1668, 150 Daniel 3 b. 1676, 151 
Nathan 8 of Elizabeth, N. J., 152 Jeremiah 3 , 153 Peter 8 , 154 
Damaris 3 , who m. Jeremiah Culver Dec. 9, 1714, and 155 Penelope. 8 



252 History of Southampton. 

148 Joseph 3 , b. about 1665 d. 1704, had ch. 156 Deborah 4 b. 
Sept. 17, 1701 (perhaps 157 Christopher 4 ), and 158 Joseph 4 b. July 
27, 1704. 

158 Joseph 4 d. 1767 and left ch. 159 Abigail 5 b. 1726, w. of 

Culver, 160 Damaris 6 b. 1730, 161 Hannah 6 b. 1733, w. of 

Dimon, 162 Prudence 6 b. 1736, 163 Eunice 5 b. 1739, w. of Dimon, 

164 Christopher 5 and 165 Mary. 5 

149 Christopher 3 b. 1668, d.' 1748, m. 1st w. Hannah d. of 
Samuel Pierson of East Hampton, Nov. 26, 1691. She died Feb. 
7, 1697. He m. 2d w. Wid. Abigail Topping, d. of Christopher 
Lupton, Aug. 19, 1697. He had ch. 166 Abigail 4 b. Oct. 27, 1692, 
w. of David Haines, and 167 Hannah 4 b. Oct. 28, 1694, w. of 
Samuel Jones. 

1713 4™. tffru^ 

150 Daniel 3 b. 1676, d. Nov. 5, 1744, m. Lydia Wood, May 23, 
1710, and had ch. 168 Jonas 4 b. 25, 1711, 169 Lydia 4 b. Apr. 30, 

1713, 170 Mehetabel 4 b. Jan. 24, 1715, w. of Campfield, 171 

Abigail 4 b. Oct. 8, 1719, 172 Daniel 4 b. Mch. 22, 1722, 173 Phebe 4 
b. Sept. 27, 1724, 174 Christopher 4 b. Feb. 23, 1727, and 175 Oba- 
diah. 4 

168 Jonas 4 had ch. 176 Jedidiah 5 , 177 Abraham 6 , 178 Daniel 5 and 
179 Wakeman. 5 

176 Jedidiah 5 removed to Palmyra near the beginning of this 
century and had w. Elizabeth d. of Jonah Howell and ch. 180 Joel 6 , 
181 Abraham 6 , 182 Cyrus 6 , 183 Zenas 6 and 184 Pliny. 6 

179 Wakeman 5 m. 1st w. Martha Sawyer, who had 2 ch. and d. 
He then m. 2d w. Phebe Cleaves. He and his ch. and gr. ch. lived 
about Canoe Place and Good Ground. He had ch. 185 John S. 6 b. 
April 1789, 186 Phebe 6 w. of Joseph Penny, 187 Maltby 6 , 188 
Lydia 6 w. of Abraham Edwards and 189 Jemima 6 w. of Eogers 
Squires. 

185 John S. 6 d. Jan. 15, 1853, m. Dec. 15, 1812, Phebe d. of 
Joseph Penny and had ch. 190 Edward H. 7 b. Jan. 20, 1815, 191 



Genealogies. 253 

Phebe A.' b. May 30, 1817, 192 Mary Jane' b. Oct. 22, 1818, 193 
John H. 7 b. Mch. 9, 1820, 194 Joseph L. 7 b. Feb. 7, 1822, 195 "Wil- 
liam S.' b. Oct 14, 1824, 196 Deborah A. 7 b. Apr. 1, 1825, 197 
Nancy M.', 198 Nathan P. 7 b. Oct. 26, 1829, 199 James R. 7 b. Jan. 

1, 1832, 200 Emeline P. 7 b. Sept. 16, 1834, 201 Rosetta M. 7 b. Feb. 

2, 1836, 202 Frances A.' b. May 16, 1840, and 203 Alonzo 7 b. Oct. 
15, 1842. 

190 Edward H. 7 m. Mary Bellows and had ch. 204 George 8 , 205 
Emeline 8 , 206 Anna 8 , 207 Charles 8 and 208 Nellie. 8 

191 Phebe A. 7 m. Joshua Oorwin and had ch. Phebe S., Joshua 
E., John H., Alonzo H. and George E. 

192 Mary Jane 7 m. Theodore Conkling and had ch. William T., 
John 'S., Joseph L. and Harriet B. 

193 John H. 7 m. Mary Smith and had ch. 209 Maria D. 8 , 210 
Adelaide " J. e , 211 Anna B. s , 212 Lelia S. 8 , 213 Laura F. 8 , 214 
Antoinette S. 8 , 215 Bertha L. 8 , 216 Frederic H. 8 and 217 Milicent 
A. 8 

194 Joseph L. 7 m. Deborah A. Davis and had ch. 218 Benjamin 
D. s and 219 Maria L." 

195 William S. 7 m. Mary A. Penny and had ch. 220 Henrietta 8 , 
221 Anna M. 8 , 222 Maria E. 8 and 223 Cora B. 8 

196 Deborah A. m. 1st William Stratton and had ch. Pamela S. 
and Mary E. She m. 2d S. R. Jackson and had ch. William W. 
and Georgia I. 

197 Nancy M. m. Lorenzo D. Bellows and had ch. Margaret I., 
James W., George R., Phebe L., Joseph F., Charles L., Edwin C, 
Austin A. and Frances M. 

198 Nathan P. 7 m. Electa M. Wells and had d. 224 Sarah F. 8 

199 James R. 7 m. Sarah L. Phillips and had ch. 225 James N. 8 , 
226 Eugene W. 8 , 227 Frances E. 8 , 228 Robert L. 8 , 229 Edward L. 8 , 
230 John P. 8 , 231 Mary E. 8 and 232 Sarah E. 8 

200 Emeline P.' m. Henry P. Carter and had ch. Rosa E., Jacob 
A., Frances F., Carrie C, Alonzo E., George F., Edward M. and 

Annie L. 

201 Rosetta M. 7 m. Allen P. Squires and had ch. Charles A., Sey- 
mour L., Riley P., Florence M. and Alvin F. 

202 Frances A. 7 m. 1st William N. Raynor and had one d. 
Marion E. She m. 2d Silas Topping and had s. William N. Top- 
ping. 



254 History of Southampton. 

203 Alonzo' m. Wid. Georgiana Penny, nee Squires, and had ch. 
233 Grace H. 8 and 234 Clarence D. 8 

187 Maltby 6 , d. 1861, m. Hannah Dickerson and had ch. 235 
Abigail' w. of David Carter, 236 Mary 7 w. of Uriah Raynor, 237 
Clarissa' w. of Lewis Wells, 238 Julia' w. of Ransford Wells, 239 
Josiah', who m. Susan Jacobs. 

172 Daniel 4 b. Mch. 22, 1722, had s. 240 Rufus 6 and perhaps 
other ch. 

240 Rufus 5 had ch. 241 Maria 6 , 242 Jabez 6 b. about 1795 and 243 
Herman D. 6 

242 Jabez 6 of Quiogue had w. Cynthia and ch. 244 Henry R.' b. 
about 1830 and 245 Mary K.' b. about 1834 and perhaps others. 

243 Herman D. 6 of Riverhead had ch. 246 Louise 1 w. of James 
H. Tuthill and 247 Nathaniel W. 7 of Riverhead, who has a w. 
and ch. 

174 Christopher 4 b. Feb. 23, 1727, m. Phebe Hildreth 1756 and 
had ch. 248 Paul 5 b. 1768, 249 Obadiah 5 , 250 Jabez 5 , 251 Julius 5 and 
252 Luther 5 b. 1770 and perhaps others. 

248 Paul 5 b. 1768 had w. Hannah and ch. 253 Josiah 6 and 254 
Elizabeth 6 b. 1815. 

253 Josiah 6 had w. Cordelia and s. 254 Julius' b. about 1845. 

254 Julius' m. Susan b. about 1843, d. of Alanson Goodall, and 
has ch. 255 William H. 8 b. 1869 and 256 Julius 8 b. 1871. 

i 252 Luther 5 b. 1770, in Southampton, m. Ruth Hedges. They 
lived successively in Montague, N. J., in Owego and Danby, N. 
Y. ; then went to Warsaw, N. Y., 1823, where he died, Nov. 16, 
1846, and his wid. d. Mch. 7, 1860. They had ch. 257 Silas 6 , 258 
Josiah H. 6 , 259 Elizabeth 6 , 260 Mehetabel 6 , 261 Jabez 6 (who d. s. 
p.), 262 Julius 6 , 263 Luther 6 , 264 Solon 6 , 265 Ruth 6 and 266 
Phebe. 6 

257 Silas 6 m. Fanny Smith and had ch. 267 Harriet' w. of Dr. 
Rowley Morris of Wis., 268 Esther' w. of Lucien Putnam, 269 
Celinda' d. unm. ae. 26, 270 Alfred J.' of Cherry Valley, III, 271 
Mary 7 , a grad. of Mt. Holyoke and a teacher in Ohio, 272 Laura 7 w. 
of Wm. B. Manly ot Hebron, 111., 273 Elizabeth 7 , 274 Helen 1 w. of 
G. Miller of Flora, 111., and 275 Susan 7 w. of M. M. Howe of Cherry 
Valley, 111. 

258 Josiah H. 6 m. 1st Hannah M. Barbara and 2d Sarah Skeer. 
262 Julius 6 was grad. of Hamilton College 1833 and of Princeton 



Genealogies. 255 

Theol. Seminary 1837. Pastor at Towanda, Pa., Nov. 1837 to Jan. 

16, 1865, when he died. He m. Pnscilla Brunette, Oct. 19, 1840. 

263 Luther 6 m. 1st Lamira M. Lyon and 2d Oalista Smith. By 
the first w. he had ch. 276 Carson A. T and 277 Roxie. 7 By the 
second w. he had ch. 278 Lamira M. 7 , who d. July 27, 1854, ae. 

17, 279 Samuel 7 , 280 Josiah H. 7 , 281 Sydney 7 , 282 Charles H. 7 , 283 
Eliza Jane 7 , 284 Mary D. 7 , 285 Fanny P. 7 and 286 Hetty S. 7 

264 Solon 6 resided (1877) in Salt Lake city and had a wife and 
several children. 

259 Elizabeth 6 m. Ira Gilmore of Wethersfield. 

260 Mehetabel" m. Robert Barnett. 

265 Ruth 6 m. 1st Zerah Tanner, 2d John Munger and 3d Oliver 
Cleveland. 

266 Phebe 6 m. Ethan E. Bartlett. 

This account of the family of 253 Luther 5 was taken from 
Young's History of Warsaw, N. Y. 

The following record of a branch of this family was received 

from Mr. Algernon Sydney Poster of . Mr. Foster says his 

father told him that his {i. e. A. S. Foster's) grandfather Timothy 
was the son of Thomas Foster, who was (as he further said) the son 
of John Foster. Supposing this to be correct, tne pedigree would 
run as follow : 

11 John 3 , besides the children 22 John 4 and 23 Haohahah 4 , would 
have a s. 287 Thomas. 4 

287 Thomas 4 m. Hannah d. of Ephraim Hildreth and bad ch. 
288 Timothy 5 , 289 Thomas 5 and 290 Phiueas. 5 

288 Timothy 6 m. Bethia d. of Jonah Howell and bad ch. 291 
Asa 6 , 292 Luke 6 , 293 Gabriel 6 , 294 Zebulon 6 , 295 Hannah 6 , 296 
Jane 6 and 297 Ruth. 6 

291 Asa 6 was a soldier in the revolutionary war. He m. Sarah 
Trowbridge of Ct. In 1819 he went to Glendale, Hamilton Co., 
Ohio. He had ch. 298 Edward 7 , 299 Thomas Fitch 7 , 300 Hannah 7 , 
who m. Philander Allen of Ct., 301 Mary 7 , 302 Elizabeth 7 and 303 

Chloe.' 

298 Edward 7 bad ch. 304 Charles Sydney 8 and two daughters. 

299 Thomas F. 7 had a s. Benjamin Franklin 8 ol Indianapolis, 
who has a family. 

292 Luke 6 m. 1st Esther Hubbell, Jan. 4, 1792 ; she d. Nov. 18, 



256 Histoet of Southampton. 

1799, ae. 24, leaving four ch., 305 John C. S. 7 , who d. s. p., 306 
Seneca 7 , 307 Amanda 7 , 308 Belinda w. of Isaac Sanford, formerly of 
near Sag Harbor, L. I., now of Illinois, 309 Narcissa 7 b. Jan. 31, 
1802, 310 Laura' b. Aug. 3, 1803, and d. Mch. 10, 1809, 311 Algernon 
Sydney' b. Mch. 18, 1805, 312 Thomas Jefferson 7 b. Aug. 21, 1807, 
313 Laura J.' b. July 15, 1812, w. of D. Lawrence, and d. May 30, 
1865. 

306 Seneca 7 had ch. 314 Alonzo 8 , who d. s. p., 315 Alonzo 8 , who 
d. s. p., 316 Laura 8 , 317 Amanda 8 , 318 Narcissa 8 and 319 Sophronia. 8 

293 Gabriel 6 had ch. 320 Hiram 7 , who lived near Madison, Ind., 
321 William 7 of near Cincinnati, and 322 Asa 7 of Iowa. 

322 Asa 7 of Iowa had two sons and a d. 323 Hannah 8 w. of N. 
Smith. 

294 Zebulon 6 m. a Miss Wingate and had ch. 324 Elias 7 , 325 
John 7 , who d. s. p., 326 Milton 7 of Prairie City, III., 327 Madison 7 
of the same place, 328 Harvey 7 of Iowa, and 329 Allen. 7 

326 Milton 7 had one s. Algernon who d. in the civil war of 1861- 
65 and one other ch. 

179 Wakeman 5 lived alone with his family at Ponquogue during 
the Revolutionary War. On one occasion some British troops 
appeared at his house and commanded him to yoke up his oxen and 
draw a boat over from the Peconic to Shinnecock Bay. He did so 
— got the boat and started with a British guard in the rear. On 
the journey across, evening came on, and Wakeman took advantage 
of the darkness and played the guard a Yankee trick. All the time 
crying whoa! at the top of his voice, he began to brad up the oxen 
with his goad until they ran at their utmost speed. The British, 
thinking from his cries the oxen would soon stop, did not attempt 
to overtake him, and, as soon as he was beyond their hearing, he 
turned the cattle into the brush, and that was the last they ever saw 
of their boat. 

Fouknier Family. 
The family have a tradition that a Francis Fournier came with 
others from France during our revolutionary war and assisted in 
the struggle for our independence. After peace took place he 
resided at Red Creek. He had ch. 2 John*, 3 Joshua 2 , 4 Barnabas 2 
and 5 Peter 2 , who resided at North Sea. 



Genealogies. 257 

2 John 2 had ch. 6 Ann 3 w. of Deac. John White, 7 Francis 3 and 
8 Oliver. 3 

4 Barnabas 2 had ch. 9 Barnabas 3 and 10 Joshua. 3 

5 Peter 2 had ch. 11 Hiram 3 b. 1800, 12 Peter 3 b. 1805, 13 John 3 
and 14 Franklin. 3 

12 Peter 3 m. Maria d. of John Bishop and had ch. 15 Frances 4 , 16 
Arabella 4 b. 1832, 17 John F. 4 b. 1834, 18 Justina 4 b. 1839, w. of 
James L. Sanford, 19 Fanny M. 4 b. 1844, w. of John Albertson, 
and 20 Anne E.' b. 1849. 

Burke's Gen. Armory gives the coat of arms of one family of thi3 
name in England. Bat the name is French and doubtless the 
English family sprang from a French ancestor, either Huguenot or 
royalist, both of whom emigrated to England in the troublous 
times in France. 

Fowler Family. 

Dec. 10, 1678, a house lot of ten acres of land was granted by the 
proprietors of the town to Christopher Fowler on condition of his 
remaining here seven years. This was the ordinary method for the 
young colony to make desirable additions to itself. The town 
records make mention of his death on March 24, 1683, that is, of 
168f, because the rate list of September, 1683, contains the name 
of Widow Fowler. The rate list of 1694 contains the name of 
Bichard Fowler, but not the name of the Widow Fowler. We 
infer, therefore, that Richard was his son. 

This 2 Richard 2 had son 3 John 3 , who died Dec. 18, 1799, and 
had w. Abigail and ch. 4 John 4 b. Sept. 26, 1749, 5 Zebulon 4 b. 
Jan. 19, 175 1, 6 Richard 4 b. Dec. 1, 1754, 7 George 4 b. Aug. 14, 
1759, 8 Submit 4 b. Apr. 27, 1762, and 9 William 4 b. Jan. 8, 1764. 

6 Richard 4 had w. Mary and ch. 10 John 6 b. Jan. 25, 1777, 11 
Oliver 6 b. July 1, 1778, 12 Apollos 5 b. Aug. 26, 1781, 13 George 5 and 
14 Mary 5 (twins) b. Oct. 28, 1783, 15 Sibyl 6 b. Jan. 10, 1785, and 
16 Jeremiah 6 b. Feb. 18, 1787. 

10 John 6 had w. Zipporah and ch. 17 Mary 6 b. Sept. 7, 1811, and 
18 William 6 b. Aug. 21, 1813. 

18 Oapt. William 6 m. Elizabeth P. d. of Charles Fithian Halsey 
and had ch. 19 Charles F. 7 b. Feb. 1840, and d. at sea, 20 Phebe' 
b. Mch. 19, 1842, w. of Chas. F. Duryee, 21 William H.' b. Apr. 28, 
33 



258 Histoet of Southampton. 

1844, 22 Edward W.' b. Jan. 30, 1849, 23 Mary B.' b. June 22, 1851,. 
24 Evelyn H.' b. Dec. 12, 1855, and 25 Jesse H. 7 b. Apr. 17, 1860. 

25 Jesse H. 7 b. 1860, m. Lucy d. of Jetur White, Apr. 17, 1883, 
and has s. 26 Lewis W. 8 b. Sept. 7, 1885. 

The will of a William Fowler of East Chester, in Westchester Co., 
N. Y., is found recorded in the surrogate's office in New York city. 
He wills Dec. 8, 1712, to w. Judy and s. William. Has brother 
George at Hempstead on L. I. Will proved Mch. 17f§. 

Fifteen families of this name are mentioned in Burke's Gen. 
Armory as having coat armor. 

Gelston Family. 

The following genealogy of this family is taken from a paper in 
the New York Genealogical and Biographical Eeeord, vol. 2, pp. 
131-138, contributed by Benjamin W. Dwight, of Clinton, N. Y. : 

Rev. Samuel Gelston and Judge Hugh Gelston, brothers, emi- 
grated from Belfast, Ireland, and settled in Southampton. An 
account is given elsewhere of Rev. Samuel. Some of the descend- 
ants of Hugh fled to Connecticut during the occupation of Long 
Island by tlie British in the revolutionary war, and there remained. 

1 Hugh Gelston 1 , b. in Belfast, 1697, was a merchant in South- 
ampton, where he came in 1717, or not long previous to this date. 
He was for twenty-one years judge of the Court of Common Pleas 
for Suffolk county, having been appointed to that office in 1752. 
In 1717 he m. Mary Maltby, b. about 1698, d. of John Maltby, Jr., 
of Southampton, and Susannah Clark. She d. July 23, 1737, and 
he m. 2d Mrs. Mary, wid. of Francis Pelletreau, and had ch. 2 
Mary 2 b. Jan. 19, 1719, d. Oct. 9, 1740. 3 Susannah 2 b. Mch. 28, 
1721, w. of Col. Josiah Smith of Moriches, 4 Deac. Maltby 2 b. Mch. 
20, 1723, 5 Sarah 2 b. Mch. 10, 1725, m. Elias Pelletreau Dec. 20, 
1748, 6 Samuel 2 b. Mch. 24, 1727, 7 Jane 2 b. Apr. 13, 1729, m. 
June 7, 1753, Rev. Joseph Strong, 8 Hugh 2 b. July 19, 1730, d. 1734, 
9 John 2 b. July 17, 1732, d. May 19, 1734, 10 Thomas 2 b. May 15, 
1734, d. Apr. 1, 1752, 11 Hugh 2 b. Sept. 13, 1735, 12 Mary 2 b. 
Aug. 10, 1746, 13 Jerusha 2 b. Aug. 28, 1748, and 14 Thomas Chat- 
field 2 d. ae. 16. 

4 Deacon Maltby 2 d. Sept. 22, 1783, had w. Mary, who d. Feb. 
28, 1781, and ch. 15 David 3 b. July 7, 1744, 16 Elizabeth 3 b. Nov. 
30, 1746, w. of David Pierson of Sag Harbor, 17 Jane 3 b. Aug. 9, 



Genealogies. 259 1 

1748, w. of David Sayre of B. Hampton, 18 John 3 b. Aug. 1, 1750, 
19 Thomas 8 b. Apr. 7, 1752, 20 Hugh 8 of Sag Harbor, b. Nov. 19, 
1754, d. s. p. Apr. 26, 1828, 21 William 8 b. Sept. 3, 1756, 22 Mary 8 
b. July 3, 1758, w. 1st of Jas. Green of East Haddam, 0t., 2d of 
Caleb Eogers of Bridge Hampton, and 23 Abigail 8 b. Sept. 28, 1763, 
d. Jan. 2, 1781. 

15 David 8 d. Aug. 21, 1828, m. Phebe d. of John Mitchell of B. 
H. and had d. 29 Phebe w. of Nicoll Floyd of Mastic. 

18 John 3 d. 1831, m. 1st Phebe wid. of Nathan Morehouse, wee 
Foster, and 2d Phebe Herrick, and had one s. 30 John 4 b. and d. 
1779. 

19 Thomas 3 m, Mary d. of David Corwith of B. H. and had ch. 
31 Sarah 4 , 32 Richard', 33 Laura 4 w. of Capt. Jeremiah Ludlow of 
B. H, 34 Thomas 4 of St. Louis and 35 Leander 4 of St. Louis. 

21 William 8 of Bast Haddam, Ct., d. June 24, 1840, m. Scena S. 
Warner (who d. 1846) and had ch. 36 Abigail 4 b. Sept. 3, 1781, w. of 
Joseph S. Brainerd, 37 Matilda 4 w. of Timothy Wright, 38 Larissa 4 

w. of Welles, 39 William 4 , 40 Hugh 4 b. Aug. 30, 1794, of 

Baltimore, Md., 41 Maltby 4 b. Nov. 23, 1797, of Charleston, S. C, 
42 Richard D. 1 b. June 21, 1800, of B. Haddam, 43 Henry 4 b. Feb. 
26, 1803, and 44 George S." of Fort Hamilton, N. Y. 

39 William 4 of E. Haddam m. Oct. 21, 1821, Lucy B. Spencer, 
and had ch. 45 Larissa 5 , 46 Abigail A." w. of Henry B. West of New 
London, Ct., 47 Maltby 6 of New York, 48 Mary J. s , 49 John B. 5 " 
and 50 Lucy. 5 

43 Henry 4 of New York m. Ann M. Howell and had ch. 51 
Helen 6 , 52 Emma A. 5 , 53 Jessie 5 and 54 William.' 

11 Hugh 2 d. Dec. 1, 1815, m. 1, Phebe, d. of David and Phebe 
Howell, and she d. Sept. 18, 1772. He m. 2, in Nov. 1773, Mary 
S., d. of Hachaliah and Mary (Culver) Foster, and she d. Apr. 
1803. He had s. 55 Rev. Maltby 3 b. July 17, 1776. 

55 Rev. Maltby 8 d. Dec. 15, 1856, grad. of Yale 1792, m. July 17, 
1798, Jane [M. Bordwell, who d. Apr. 26, 1850. He had ch. 56 
Hugh 4 b. Dec. 17, 1799, 57 Elizabeth 4 b. Mch. 7, 1801, w. of H. 
Fairchild, 58 Phebe 4 b. Sept. 15, 1803, w. of J. A. Potter, 59 Rev. 
Maltby 4 b. Apr. 30, 1805, 60 Jane 4 b. Feb. 7, 1808, w. of D. W. 
Northrup, 61 Mary 4 b. May 13, 1812, w. of S. C. Conn, and 62- 
Rev. Miles B. 4 b. Aug. 27, 1817. 



260 History of Southampton. 

56 Deacon Hugh 4 m. May 21, 1828, Cornelia Gaylord, and had ch. 
63 Mary E. 5 , 64 Jane A. 5 , 65 Elizabeth 5 w. of P. Leach, 66 Pauline 
W. 5 and 67 Maltby Gaylord." 

59 Rev. Maltby 4 , grad. Yale 1827, of Ann Arbor, Mich., m. Oct. 
20, 1834, Maria H. Merwin, and had ch. 68 Antoinette B. 6 , 69 Ade- 
laide M. 5 , 70 Gratia M. 5 , 71 Sarah G. 6 , 72 Joseph M. 5 and 73 Henry 
W. 5 

62 Eev. Miles B. 4 , grad. Yale 1843, m. Caroline E. Fanning, 
Sept. 10, 1851, and had ch. 74 Mary C. 5 , 75 William F. 5 , 76 Anna 
B. 6 , 77 Arthur M. 5 and 78 Caroline L. 6 

Goodall Family. 

The first appearance of this name is that of Joseph Goodale, on 
the rate list of 1694. The Goodales of the census of 16.98 appear to 
form one family of husband, wife and five children, and the data 
furnished by the family confirm this supposition. Assuming this 
to be true, 1 Joseph 1 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 2 Jonathan 2 , 3 
Joseph 2 , 4 William 2 , 5 Mary 2 and 6 Hannah. 2 

One of these, possibly 3 Joseph 2 , had ch. 7 Joseph 3 and 8 Josiah.' 

7 Joseph 3 had ch. 9 Jehiel 4 , 10 Silas 4 , who removed to Orange 
Co., N. Y., 11 Stephen 4 , 12 Joseph 4 , 13 Mary 4 and 14 Nancy. 4 

9 Jehiel 4 had ch. 15 Alanson 5 , 16 Frances 6 , 17 Charles 5 b. 1814, 
18 Hannah 5 , 19 Sarah 5 w. of Albert Harris. 

15 Alanson 5 , b. 1811, had w. Nancy and ch. 17 Edward 6 and 18 
Susan 6 w. of Julius Foster. 

17 Charles 5 m. Eliza Talmage, b. 1826, and had ch. 19 Charles 6 b. 

1845, 20 James M. 6 b. 1849, 21 Emma F. 6 b. 1851, w. of Myers, 

22 Harriet C. 5 b. 1853, 23 John 6 b. 1854, 24 Stephen 6 and 25 Eliza. 6 

19 Charles 6 was a soldier in the 10th regiment, N. Y. V., in the 
civil war of 1861-65, and died July 17, 1862, in hospital at David's 
Island. His brother James, also a soldier in the Fifth Connecticut 
regiment, died Aug. 29, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 

8 Josiah 3 died in Jan. 1786, had w. Sarah and ch., as by his will 
appears, 26 Josiah 4 , 27 Joseph 4 , 28 Diadema 4 and 29 John. 4 He 
lived in the western part of the town. 

A Robert Goodale came over from Ipswich, Eng., in the Eliza- 
ieth, April, 1634, aged 30, with w. Kathrine, ae. 28, and ch. Mary, 
ae. 4, Abraham, ae. 2, and Isaac, £ year. A Richard Goodale 
came from Yarmouth, Eng., and settled in Newbury, Mass., in 



Genealogies. 261. 

1638, removed to Salisbury, Mass., as early as 1644 and d. in 1666. 
(Drake and Farmer.) The family of late years hare spelled their 
name Goodall. 

From the census of 1855 we extract the following relating to 
families in the western part of the town, giving the age in that 
year. 

Grover Goodall, ae. 38. 

Jehiel, 26, wife Bulalie, 24, ch. Bckford, 2. 

Patty, 64, ch. Josiah, 23, Augusta, 26, Frances, 20, Oscar, 34, 
Betsey, w. of Oscar, 20, gr. sons, Manassa, 10, and Joseph, 5. 

George, 39, w. Anna, 30, ch. Elma, 8, Clarence, 5, Jesse, 2. 

Joseph, 69, w. Huldah, 62. 

Joseph F., 27, w. Ellen, 24, ch. Franklin H., 5. 

Polly (wid.), 55, ch. Benjamin W., 22, Elizabeth, w. of Ben- 
jamin W. , 18, and Amanda D., 18. 

Jehiel, of Canoe Place, or west, 59, w. Mary, 57, ch. Howell, 23, 
Mary S., 18. 

Two families of the name of Goodall are mentioned in Burke's 
Gen. Armory as having coat armor. 

Greew Family. 

1 John Green 1 came to Southampton from England a young man 
about the time of the revolutionary war. He married and had ch. 
2 Henry 2 , 3 Barney 2 , 4 Aaron 2 , 5 William 2 , 6 James 2 , 7 Maria J. 2 , w. 
of Capt. Mercator Cooper, and 8 Florinda. 2 

2 Henry 2 removed to Southold, married and had children. 

3 Capt. Barney 2 , b. 1803, had w. Maria E., b. 1806, and ch. 9 
Justina B.° b. 1836 (who m. Everett A. Carpenter, of Sag Harbor), 
and 10 Mary L. 3 , w. of Ira B. Tuthill of Southold. 

4 Aaron 2 m. Ann Kickerson and had ch. 12 Henry J. 3 b. 1826, 13 
Adeline 3 , w. of James 'Rogers, who had d. Mary, w. of David 
Bnrnett,"14 George H. 3 b. 1830, 15 Albina E. 3 b. 1833, 16 Barney J. a 
b. 1835, 17 William 3 b. 1837, 18 Mercator 3 b. 1839. 

16 Capt. Barney J. 3 m. Eliza, d. of James M. Hildreth, and has 
ch. 19 Annie Frances 4 b. June 16, 1862, 20 Monroe Hildreth 4 b. 
Dec. 29, 1866. 

6 Capt. James 2 m. Elizabeth Chapman and had ch. 21 James 3 , 22 
Elizabeth 3 , 23 Edgar 3 , 24 Ella 3 , 25 Kimball 3 and 26 Florinda. 3 



262 



Histoky of Southampton. 




Halsey Family. 

There is scarcely any doubt at the present 
time but that this family is descended from 
the Halseys of Great Gaddesden in Hert- 
fordshire, England. Cussan, in his history 
of that county, mentions a Thomas Halsey 
who was baptized Jan. 2, 1592, who was a 
mercer in London ; living in Naples in 
1621, and afterward, it is believed, an 
emigrant to America. The first mention 
of this family found by Cussan was of a 
Richard Halsey of Great Gaddesden in 
1458. In 1559, when the parish registers 
commence, there were four families of this 
Coat of Arms. name in that place : Halsey of the Parson- 

age ; Halsey of the "Wood ; Halsey of Northend and Halsey of the 
Lane. The descent to Thomas Halsey, the Southampton settler, 
is as follows : 

John Halsey of the Parsonage, living in 1512, had s. William, 
who d. in 1546, and who had w. Alice, who d. 1557, and ch. 
Robert, William, Thomas, Harry, Isabel, Jane and Elizabeth. 

William, the second son of William, d. May, 1596, had w. Anne 
and ch. John, William, Robert, Ralph, Edward, Thomas, Triamore, 
Philip, Joan and Anne. 

Robert, the third son of the second William Halsey, died Oct. 
1618, and m. Dorothy, d. of Wm. Downes of Linslade, Co. of 
Bucks. She d. Sept. 1620. They had ch. William bap. June 23, 
1690, Thomas bap. Jan. 2, 159£, Duncombe, James, Edward, Jane, 
Joane, Mary, Amy, Ann, Avis, Hester, Sara and Dorothy. 

Thomas, the second son of Robert, is the one identified as the 
Southampton emigrant. 

The arms of this family are said by Cussan to have been granted 
to "William Halsey, the elder brother of .Thomas of Southampton, 
in 1633, and are as follows : 

Argent, on a pile sable, three griffin's heads erased of the first. 
Crest: A cubit arm gules, cuff argent, hand proper, holding a 
griffin's leg erased or. 



Genealogies. 263 

Motto : Nescit vox missa reverli.* 

It may be remarked here that no arms are pictured in this work 
but such is are known to belong to the families with which they 
*re given by indisputable evidence, and have not been selected from 
Burke nor obtained from any American herald. 

This family, like many others of Southampton, was of high 
social position in the mother country. One of its representatives 
in England is now in Parliament. 

1 Thomas 1 d. Aug. 27, 1678. His first wife was murdered by 
the Indians ; either by some from New England who wished to 
excite a war in the Southampton settlement, or by some in Long 
Island at their instigation. He married for his second wife Ann, 
the wid. of Edward Johnes, July 25, 1660. In 1648, when the site 
of the village was changed from Old Town street to the present 
main street, Thomas Halsey's residence was south of the present 
homestead of Francis W. Cook. He had ch. 2 Thomas 2 , 3 Isaac 2 , 
4 Daniel 2 and 5 Elizabeth 2 w. of Eichard Howell. His property, 
by inventory, after his death, amounted to £672 9s. 2d. 



<H 



Q/j/ia 




2 Thomas 2 made his will Aug. 3, 1688, and his property 
amounted to £248 15s. He had w. Mary and ch. 6 Mary 3 b. Aug. 
29, 1654, and w. of Col. Matthew Howell, 7 Elizabeth 3 b. Oct. 15, 
1655, 8 Josiah 3 b. Feb. 15, 165f, 9 Sarah 3 b. Oct. 29, 1658, 10 
IsaMib. Aug. 29, 1660, 11 David 3 b. Apr. 12, 1663, 12 Hannah 3 b. 
Feb. 5, 1665, 13 Jeremiah 3 b. Sept. 7, 1667, 14 Jonathan 3 b. Dec. 
22, 1669, 15 Phebe 3 b. Dec. 29, 1671, 16 Abigail 3 b. Apr. 19, 1673, 
17 Nathaniel 3 b. June 1, 1675. 

8 Josiah 3 b. Feb. 15, 165$, d. 1 732, m. 1st Sarah Topping, Sept. 

12, 1678, m. 2d Mary , and had ch. 18 Martha 4 , 19 Elizabeth 4 , 

20 Josiah 4 b. 1692, and 21 Mary." 

20 Deacon Josiah 4 b. 1692, d. 1744, had ch. 22 Zebulon 5 b. 1730 
^,nd 23 Israel. 5 

* A good word for gossips also : " A word once uttered cannot be recalled." 



2G4 History of Southampton. 

22 Zebulon 5 b. 1730, d. May 6, 1806, had w. Sarah Sayre (d. of 
Deacon John Sayre ?) and she d. Jan. 12, 1815, ae. 84. They had 
ch. 24 Zebulon 6 b. 1755, 25 Edward 6 , 26 Paul 6 , 27 Philip 6 and 28 
Peter. 6 

24 Zebulon 6 b. 1755, d. Dec. 21, 1817, had w. Pamela, who d. 
June 2, 1843, ae. 89. They had ch. 28£ Harriet' b. 1791, 29 
Edward' b. 1790, and 30 Andrew. 7 

29 Edward' b. 1790, d. Dec. 7, 1858, had w. Hannah b. abt. 
1792, and ch. 31 Stephen 8 b. abt. 1818, 32 Susan 8 , w. of Edwin 
Post, 33 Maria 8 b. 1825 and 34 Samuel B. 8 bap. 1826. 

31 Stephen 8 " b. abt. 1818 had w Mehetabel and ch, 35 William 
H. 9 b. abt. 1845, 36 Selden H. 9 b. abt. 1847, 37 Jeremiah" b. abt. 
1850, 38 George 9 b. abt. 1853, and 39 Jane 9 b. abt. 1857- 

34 Samuel B. 8 b. abt. 1826 had w. Maria J. and ch. 40 Anna 9 b. 
1861 and 41 Samuel 9 b 1863. 

30 Andrew' b. abt. 1793 had w. Proculy b. abt. 180? md ch. 42 
Harriet 8 b. 1825, 43 Amanda 3 w. of Lewis Hildreth, 44 Henry 4..* 
b. abt. 1832, 45 Elizabeth 8 b. abt. 1835 and 46 Abigail 8 b. abt. 1837. 

44 Henry A. 8 m. Agnes Bishop d. of Oapt. John Bishop. 

26 Paul 6 had w. Abigail b. 1769 and ch. 47 Harriet 7 b. 1791, 48 
Caleb 7 b. abt. 1795 and 49 Cordelia' w. of Capt. Albert Rogers. 

48 Caleb 7 had w. Maria b. abt. 1795 and ch. 50 Caroline 8 w- of 
Samuel Griffin of Riverhead, 51 Edwin 8 b. 1830, 52 Charles Selden 8 
b. 1834 and 53 Mary R. s b. 1835. 

51 Edwin married and removed to Kansas. 

52 Charles Selden m. Ellen Sayre, d. of James Sayre, b. 1840,. 
Jan. 18, 1865, and has ch. 54 Charles R. 9 b. 1865, 55 Nellie M. 9 b. 
1869, 56 Carrie 9 and 57 Millie 9 , twins, b. 1873. 

27 Philip 6 removed to "Windsor, Ct., and wa3 a captain in the 
revolutionary war. He had ch. 58 Henry 7 b. July 8, 1784, of 
Windsor, and 59 James Roderick.' 

59 James R. 7 had s. 60 Frederic Philip 8 , who had s. 61 Frederic 
Philip 9 , now of Atchison, Kansas. 

28 Peter 6 removed to Cairo, K T., and had ch. 62 Peter 7 , of 
Bath, Steuben Co., N. Y., 63 George O. 7 , of Riverhead, b. 1802, 
and 64 Oliver 7 , of Riverhead. 

23 Israel 5 d. 1774 and had w. Mary, d. of Joshua Halsey, and had 

ch. 65 Josiah 6 , 66 Willman 6 b. 1750, 67 John 6 , 68 Mary 6 , w. of 

Rogers, and 69 Stephen 6 , who d. s. p. 



Genealogies. 265 

66 Willman 6 b. 1750, d. 1786, had w. Ruth and ch. 70 Susanna', 
71 Jane 7 , 72 Barzillai' b. 1776, 73 Sylvanus 7 and 74 Willman 7 bap. 
Jan. 28, 1786. 

72 Barzillai 7 b. 1776, d. 1849, had w. Fanny and ch. 75 Enoch 8 b. 
1801 and 75-J Eliza 7 , w. of Capt. Henry Halsey. 

75 Enoch 8 , b. 1801, had w. Clara, b. 1811, and 76 Fanny M. 9 b. 
1846 and 77 Juliana A. 9 b. 1848. 

Here end the descendants of 8 Josiah 3 , the son of 2 Thomas 2 and 
grandson of 1 Thomas 1 , so far as we have been able to trace them. 
We now take up the line of 10 Isaac 3 the second son of 2 Thomas. 2 

10 Isaac 3 b. Aug. 29, 1660, m. 1st Abigail, d. of John Howell, 
Nov. 25, 1689 ; he m. 2d Hannah Stratton, of East Hampton, Oct. 
19, 1699 ; he m. 3d Wid. Mary Hudson, July 14, 1736." He had 
ch. 78 Isaac 4 b. 1693, d. Jan. 3, 172£, 79 Ephraim 4 b. 1693 or 1694 
and possibly a s. 80 Silas. 4 

79 Ephraim 4 d. Aug. 21, 1764, and m. Martha Conkling, of East 
Hampton, Dec. 22, 1713 or 14, and she d. 1771, ae. 73. He had 
ch. 81 Lemuel 5 b. Dec. 14, 1715, and d. 1735, 82 Cornelius 5 b. June 
15, 1721, 83 Matthew 5 b. Mch. 3, 1718, and d. 1722, 84 Sylvanus 6 
b. 1722, 85 James 5 b. Nov. 16, 1724, d. 1746, 86 Timothy 5 b. 
Sept. 23, 1727, d. 1732, 87 Waitglil 5 b. Dec. 28, 1729, d. 1731, 88 
Zephar 5 b. Mch. 15, 1735, d. 1752, and 89 Mary 5 b. June 19, 1738. 

82 Cornelius 5 b. 1721, d. 1782, m. Milicent, d. of Obadiah 
Rogers, b. 1732, d. 1814, and had ch. 90 Timothy 6 b. Jan. 1, 1753, 
91 William 6 b. Aug. 14, 1754, 92 Mary 6 b. Jan. 9, 1756, 93 Mili- 
cent 6 b. Aug. 27, 1757, 94 Martha 6 b. Jan. 19, 1759, 95 Rev. Fred- 
eric 6 , of Pittsburgh, N. Y., b. Mch. 2, 1761, 96 Cleopatra 6 b. Apr 
13, 1763, 97 Ruth 6 b. June 6, 1765, 98 Zophar 6 b. Apr. 8, 1767, 99 
Solon 6 b. May 18, 1769, aud 100 Susanna 6 b. Oct. 5, 1774. 

90 Timothy 6 b. 1753, m. Abigail Jagger, Nov. 8, 1780, and had 
ch. 101 Apollos 7 b. Dec. 22, 1781, 102 Cephas 7 b. Oct. 25, 1783, and 
d. 1848, 103 Hiram 7 b. Nov. 6, 1785, and d. 1807, 104 Walter 7 , of 
Orange Co., N. Y., b. Dec. 18, 1789, 105 Nancy 7 and 106 Sophia 7 , 
twins, b. Dec. 6, 1792. 

101 Apollos 7 b. 1781, d. 1824, m. Mary Helme and had ch. 107 
Martha 3 t. Sept. 29, 1806, 108 William Augustus 8 b. Sept. 14, 1810, 
109 Nathan H. 8 b. Mch. 3, 1812, 110 Eunice 8 b. June 11, 1818, and 
111 Apollos 8 b. Mch. 24, 1824, and d. 1852. 
34 



266 History of Southampton. 

91 William 6 b. Aug. 14, 1754, d. 1823, had ch. 112 Shepard' b. 
Oct. 25, 1789, and 113 Harvey 7 b. 1798. 

112 Shepard' b. 1789, d. July 17, 1849, m. Nov. 28, 1814, 
Jerusha Conklin, b. Jan. 21, 1792, and had ch. 114 Elizabeth J. 8 b. 
Apr. 13, 1816 (who m. Charles Howell, of West Hampton, Dec. 11, 
1832), 115 Isaac C. 8 b. Apr. 15, 1818, 116 Mary 8 b. Apr. 4, 1820, w. 
of S. Childs, of New Orleans, 117 Margaret 8 b. Mch. 18, 1822, w. 
of P. Werlaine, of New Orleans, 118 Jerusha 8 b. Mch. 7, 1824, w. 
of Timothy Eobinson, 119 Harriet 8 b. Oct. 18, 1826, w. of John J. 
Woodhull, 120 William S. 8 b. Aug. 28, 1828, of Texas, 121 Ger- 
trude 8 b. Nov. 26, 1830, d. 1832, and 122 Edwin 0. s b. June 9, 
1833. 

115 Isaac C. 8 b. 1818, m. Elizabeth A. Foster, Apr. 2, 1845, and 
has ch. 123 William F. 9 b. July 8, 1846, 124 Shepard H. 9 b. Nov. 1, 
1849, 125 Franklin C. 9 b. Oct. 7, 1854, and 126 Helen A. 9 b. Aug. 
10, 1859. 

122 Edwin C. 8 b. 1833, m. Bertha, d. of John Howell of Quogue, 
Dec. 14, 1858, and has ch. 127 Edwin H. 9 b. Apr. 12, 1863, and 
128 Mary Christine 9 b. Dec. 2, 1870. 

113 Harvey' b. 1798, had w. Sarah L. b. 1803 and ch. 129 Dennis 
K. 8 b. 1825 or 26, 130 George F. 8 b. abt. 1838, 131 Sophia 8 b. abt. 
1841 and 132 Augustus 8 b. abt. 1844. 

129 Dennis K. 8 has w. Josephine A. b. abt. 1829 and ch. 133 
Mary 9 b. 1852, 134 Fanny G. 8 b. 1855 and 135 Sarah L. 9 b. 1859. 

84 Sylvanus 6 b. 1722, d. 1815, had ch. 136 Zehaniah 6 and 137 
Jabez 6 

This ends the record of 10 Isaac 3 , son of 2 Thomas 5 , son of 1 
Thomas. 1 

Descendants of 11 David 3 , third son of 2 Thomas 2 . 

11 David 3 b. Apr. 12, 1663, d. Feb. 18, 173-J, had w. Hannah and 
ch. 138 Abraham* b. 1696, 139 Abigail 4 , 140 Sarah 4 , 141 Hannah 4 
and 142 Mehetabel. 4 

138 Abraham 4 b. 1696, d. 1759, had ch. 143 David 6 b. Oct. 6, 
1722, 144 Amy 5 b. Aug. 24, 1724, 145 Jonathan 5 b. May 1, 1727, 
146 Elias 5 b. Feb. 3, 1730, 147 Hannah 5 b. Jan. 7, 1732, 148 Dr. 
Stephen 6 b. Apr. 13, 1733, and 149 Lemuel. 6 

143 David 5 b. Oct. 6, 1722, had ch. (order of births not known) 
150 Mehetabel 6 , 151 Caleb 6 b. 1765, 152 Abraham 6 , 153 Daniel 6 , 153£ 
Amy 6 and 154 David. 6 



Gexealogiks. 267 

151 Caleb 6 b. 1765 had ch. 155 Abraham 7 b. 1799, 156 Ruth 7 b. 
1800 and 157 Augustus B.' b. 1801. 

155 Abraham 7 b. 1799 had 1 w. Eliza b. 1804 and 2 w. Mary 
Woodruff and ch. 158 William 8 , 159 Mary 8 b. 1833, 160 Abraham 8 
b. 1835, 161 Charles A. 8 b. 1837, 162 Silas 8 b. 1843 and 163 Jane 8 
b. 1846. 

160 Abraham 8 b. 1835 m. Mary M. Youngs, Oct. 10, 1864. 

161 Charles A. 8 b. 1837 has w. Ella C. b. 1843 and ch. 164 Frank 
H. 9 b. 1869, 165 Abraham 9 b. 1871 and 166 William S. 9 b. 1874. 

157 Augustus B. 7 b. 1801 had w. Harriet b. 1809, d. of Capt. Her- 
rick Rogers, and ch. 167 Harriet R. 8 b. 1837, 168 Helen M. 8 *b. 1840 
and 169 Theodore A. 8 b. 1843. 

169 Theodore A. 8 m. Laura C. b. 1839, d. of William French, 
and has ch. 170 Nellie b. 1875 and others. 

154 DaTid 6 b. 1776 had ch. 171 David 7 b. 1808, 172 Jonathan' b. 
U810, 173 Elizabeth 7 b. 1811 or 12, 174 Charles' b. 1814 and 175 
Mary 7 b. 1817. 

145 Jonathan 6 b. May 1, 1727, had ch. 176 David 6 and 177 
William. 6 

176 David 6 had ch. 178 Hiram' b. 1799 and 179 Oliver 7 b. 1802. 

178 Hiram 7 b. 1799, of Speonk, m. Melissa Tuttle b. 1805 and had 
ch. 180 William D. & b. 1827 ; 181 David 8 , who d. s. p., 182 Mary 8 , 183 
Charlotte 8 , 184 Hiram 8 , 185 Charles H. 8 b. 1836, 186 Eliza 8 b. 1838, 
187 Frances M.' b. 1843 and 188 John T. 8 b. 1845. 

180 William D. 8 b. 1827 m. Aurelia D. b. 1832, d. of Daniel Hil- 
dreth, of Southampton, and has ch. 189 William F. 9 b. 1852, 190 
Ida M. 9 b. 1855, 191 Alice W. 9 b. 1858 and 192 Daniel H. 9 b. 1861. 

184 Hiram 8 , of Cutchogue, m. Miranda Howell and has ch. 193 
Elizabeth 9 and 194 Benjamin.' 

185 Charles H. 8 m. Sarah. Tuttle b. 1839 and has ch. 195 Lizzie 
T. 9 b. 1863, 196 Isabella 9 b. 1864 and 197 Laura. 9 

188 John T. 8 , of Speonk, m. Ella Topping and has s. 198 Sidney 

179 Oliver 7 b. 1802 m. Miranda Youngs b. 1807 and had ch. 199 
'Lydia M. 8 b. 1831, 200 Oliver 8 b. 1833, 201 Amanda 8 b. 1836 and 

202 Mary A. 8 b. 1839. 

200 Oliver 8 has. w. Victoria and d. 203 Lydia 9 b. 1865. 

177 William 6 had s. 204 John Jay 7 who had s. 205 Edmund 
Tryon, of Louisville, Ky. 



268 History of Southampton. 

148 Dr. Stephen 5 b. Apr. 13, 1733, of Bridge Hampton, had ch. 

206 Dr. Stephen 6 , of Bridge Hampton, and 206£ Henry, ot Old 
Town in Southampton. 

206 Dr. Stephen 6 m. Hamutal, youngest d. of Philip Howell, of 
B. H., and his w. Cleopatra Herrick, of Southampton, and had eh. 

207 Mary 7 , d. 1819, w. of Dr. Nathl. Topping, of B. H., 208 Rev. 
Herman' b. July 16, 1793, and 209 Judge Hugh 7 b. 1795. 

208 Rev. Herman 7 , grad. of Williams Coll. 1811 and Andover 
1815, m. Sophia, w. of Rev. Dr. Aarou Woolworth, of B. H., June 
15, 1820, and had ch. 210 Samuel W. a b. June, 1821, 211 Calvin 
Colton 8 b. Mch. 1823, 212 Elizabeth 8 b. Jan. 1825, 213 Stephen H. 8 
b. May, 1827, 214 Mary 8 b. May, 1829, 215 Charlotte 8 b. June, 1832, 
and 216 Charles S. 8 , of Canandaigna, b. Dec. 1834. 

209 Judge Hugh 7 , of B. H., b. 1795, m. Phebe Mitchell b. 1795 
and had ch. 217 James M. 8 b. 1825, 218 Arabella 8 , w. of Rev. Mr. 
Miller, 219 Dr. Charles E. 8 b. 1834 and died while acting as assist- 
ant surgeon in the U. S. service during the late rebellion, and 220 
E. Sidney 8 b. 1838 and died in the same service. 

217 James M. 8 m. Mary A., d. of Dr. Levi D. "Wright, and has 
ch. 221 Phebe'b. 1858, 222 Levi W. 9 b. 1861 and 223 Hugh 9 b. 
1864. 

222 Dr. Levi W. 9 m. Florence, d. of Orlando Hand, and has ch. 
Mildred and Lillas Katherine. 

206£ Henry had s. 224 Sylvanus, of Durham, Greene county, 
N. Y. 

This finishes the record of the descendants of 11 David 3 , third 
son of 2 Thomas. 2 
*■ Descendants of 13 Jeremiah 3 , son of 2 Thomas 2 : 

13 Jeremiah 3 b. Sept. 7, 1667, had 1st w. Ruth and 2d w. Deborah 
and ch. 225 Jeremiah 4 , 226 Elijah 4 , 227 Experience 4 , 228 Abigail 4 , 
229 Jerusha 4 and 230 Nathan 4 , order of birth of the last five ch. not 
known. 

225 Jeremiah 4 d. 1768, m. 1 Mary Conkling, of East Hampton, 

Nov. 25, 1721, and 2 Hannah , and had ch. 231 Paul 6 , 232 

Jeremiah 5 , 233 Stephen 6 , 234 Matthew 5 , 235 Isaac 5 , 236 Jabez 5 , 237 
Amos 5 , 238 Hannah 5 and 239 Martha. 5 ^ 's«A \ 

231 Paul 5 had ch. 240 Paul 6 , 241 Sylvester 6 and 242 Lemuel 
Hudson. 6 



Genealogies. 269 

240 Paul 6 had ch. 243 Sarah P.' b. 1808 and 244 Watson' b. 
1823. 

244 Watson 7 had w. Caroline b. 1823 and ch. 245 Anna C. 8 b. 
1853 and 246 Allen A." b. 1855. 

242 Lemuel H. 6 had ch. 247 Erastus 7 , 248 Robert 7 b. 1812 and 
249 George. 7 

248 Robert 7 had w. Phebe H. b. 1816 and ch. 250 Robert 8 b. 1837, 
251 Elmer Erastus 8 b. 1842, 252 Phebe W. 8 b. 1850, 253 Anna 
Lottie 8 b. 1853 and 254 Thomas J. 8 b. 1855. 

> 232 Jeremiah 6 , of Bridge Hampton, d. 1782, had w. Elizabeth 
and ch. 255 Elizabeth 6 , 256 Jeremiah 6 , 257 Jerusha 6 , 258 Luther", 
259 Eunice 6 , 260 Amos 6 and 261 Simeon. 6 

233 Stephen 6 d. 1786, had ch. 262 Phebe 6 , w. of Sanford, 

263 Rogers 6 , 264 Jonathan 6 d. s. p., 265 Caleb 6 , 266 Stephen 6 , 267 

'Jeremiah 6 , who moved away, 268 Hannah 6 , w. of Sanford, and 

269 Mary. 6 

263 Rogers 6 had ch. 270 Herman R. 7 and 271 Henry H. 

270 Herman R. 7 had s. 272 Henry R. 8 b. 1842, who has w. Ade- 
laide C. b. 1845. 

266 Stephen 6 moved away ; he had ch. 273 Henry 7 , 274 Benjamin 7 , 
275 David 7 , 276 Stephen 7 and 277 John. 7 

274 Benjamin 7 had s. 278 Samuel 8 , of Marlboro, N. Y., who had 
s. 279 Lewis 9 , of Newburgh. 

234 Matthew 6 m. Sarah Haines and had ch. 280 Matthew 6 , who 
moved away, 281 Job 6 , of Sag Harbor, 282 Isaac 6 , who moved away, 
283 Levi 6 , 284 Jacob 6 and 285 Samuel. 6 

281 Job 6 , of Sag Harbor, had ch. 286 Eliphalet 7 and 287 George. 7 
286 Eliphalet 7 had s. 288 Thomas. 8 

284 Jacob 6 b. 1769, d. Apr. 10, 1847, had w. Sarah Woodruff and 
ch. 289 Haynes 7 , of B. H., and 290 Gurden 7 b. Feb. 12, 1797. 

289 Haynes 7 , of B. H., had ch. 291 Daniel S. 8 b. 1817 and 292 
Capt. Benjamin 8 b. 1821. 

291 Daniel S. 8 b. 1817 had w. Amanda M. b. 1821 and ch. 293 
Jane 9 b. 1843 and 294 Cornelius 9 b. 1851. 

292 Capt. Benjamin 8 b. 1821 had w. Mary S. b. 1822 and ch. 295 
Harriet R. 9 b. 1852 and 296 Benjamin H. 9 b. 1855 and d. abt. 1882. 

290 Gurden 7 b. 1797, d. Sept. 25, 1852, m Elizabeth Osborn, of 
E. H., and moved to New York city, and had ch. 297 George A. 8 , 



270 History of Southampton'. 

of N. Y., 298 Polly 8 d. young, 299 Sarah 8 d. young, 300 Jacob L. 8 , 
of Orange, N. J., b. Aug. 18, 1828, 301 Harriet 8 , 302 Elizabeth 8 , 
303 Jonathan O. 8 , of Orange, N. J., and 304 Phebe. 8 

303 Jonathan O. 8 m. Virginia B. Nichols and had ch. 305 
Virginia 9 d. young, 306 Harriet 9 d. ae. 17, and 307 Mary. 9 

285 Samuel 6 , of B. Hampton, had ch. 308 Ledyard' b. 1799, 309 
Albert 7 , of Mecox, 310 Lawrence', 311 Samuel', of Sag Harbor, 312 
Job', 313 Eichard' b. 1805 and 314 Philetus' b. 1812. 

308 Ledyard' b. 1799 had 1st w. and 2d w. Maria and ch. 

315 Margaret 8 b. 1829, 316 Lafayette 8 b. 1848 and 317 Mary 8 b. 
1850. 

309 Albert', of Mecox, had ch. 318 Samuel L. 8 b. 1831, who has. 
w. Sarah B. b. 1833, and s. 319 Ashbury." 

313 Richard' b. 1805 had w. Prances and ch. 320 Leander P. 8 b. 
1838, 321 Edward P. 8 b. 1839, 322 William M. e b. 1841, 323 Erskine 
M. 8 b. 1842, 324 Charles S. 8 b. 1844, 325 Gabriel 8 b. 1846 and 326 
Richard 8 b. 1850. (Dates from census.) 

314 Philetus' b. 1812 had w. Margaret M. b. 1833 and ch. 327 
Annie E. 8 b. 1853 and 328 Howard S. 8 b. 1856. 

This ends the record of the descendants of 225 Jeremiah 4 , unless 
he had a son Elisha, who d. 1705, having w. Phebe and minor ch. 
Naomi, Jerusha, Anna Paine, Elizabeth and Elisha, as learned 
from his will on record. 

Descendants of 230 Nathan 4 , son of 13 Jeremiah 3 : 

230 Nathan 4 , of Bridge Hampton, d. in 1759 or 1760, had w. 
Charity and ch. 329 Theophilus 5 , 330 Timothy 5 and 331 Nathan" 
or Nathaniel 5 (prob. the latter name is correct). 
_ 330 Timothy 6 , of B. H., b. Oct. 16, 1730, d. 1812, m. Phebe 
Topping, Dec. 19, 1754, b. Apr. 1, 1733, and d. 1818, and had ch. 
332 Sylvanus 6 , of Hayground, b. Dec. 5, 1755, 333 James 6 b. Aug. 
19, 1757, 334 Charity 6 b. June, 1760, 335 Sarah 6 b. Jan. 8, 176£, 
336 Nathan 6 b. Jan. 16, 176$, 337 Timothy 6 , of the Genesee country, 
b. Jan. 10, 1764, 338 "William 6 b. Oct. 15, 1766, 339 Abigail b. 
Sept. 1767, 340 Jesse 6 , of B. H., afterward of Sag Harbor, b. 1769, 
341 David 9 b. 1772 and 342 Elisha 6 , of Hayground, b. Sept. 11, 
1776. 

332 Sylvanus 6 b. 1755, d. 1850, had ch. 343 Elihu', 344 Phebe 7 , 
345 Frederic 7 and 346 Catherine.' 

343 Elihu 7 had ch. 347 Henry Allen 8 b. Jan. 7. 1817, 348 Allen 



Genealogies. 271 

E. s , 349 James 8 , 350 Capt. Augustus E. e , of Southampton, 351 
Edward 8 , 352 William 8 and 353 Samuel. 8 

347 Henry A. 8 b. 1817, d. 1872, had ch. 350 Jennie 9 and 351 
Ada. 9 

350 Capt. Augustus E. 8 b. 1823 had w. Harriet b. 1824 and ch. 
355 Emma O. 9 b. 1854, 356 Andrew A. 9 b. 1859, 357 James L. 9 b. 
1860 and 358 William H. b. 1863. 

351 Edward 8 b. 1826 m. Augusta b. 1840, d. of Capt. John 
Bishop, and had d. 359 Nettie (Janette ?) B. 9 b. 1871. 

345 Eredenc' had son Albert. 

333 James 6 , of B. H., b. Aug. 19, 1757, had cb. 360 Job Haines', 
361 Richard', 362 Stephen' and 363 Cynthia.' 
r~ 337 Timothy 6 b. Jan. 10, 1764, removed to " Genesee country" and 
had ch. 364 Hubbard', 365 Bartlett', 366 Benjamin', of Ithaca, and 
367 Mary.' 

338 William 6 , of B. H, b. Oct. 15, 1766, d. 1847, had ch. 368 
Oliver' b. 1790, 369 Sarah', 370 Huldah', 371 Alvah' b. 1795, 372 
Eoxana', 373 Elmira' and 374 William' b. 1811. 

368 Oliver' b. 1790 had w. Sophia b. 1801 and ch. 375 Roxana 8 
b. 1828, 376 Sarah 8 b. 1829, 377 Eugenia 8 b. 1830, 378 Charles C. 8 
b. 1833, 379 Oliver 8 b. 1835, 380 Egbert 8 , who moved away, and 381 
Caroline. 8 

371 Alvah' b. 1795 had w. Mehetabel b. 1815 and ch. 382 John 
T. 8 b. 1834 and 383 Henry W. s b. 1842. 

340 Jesse 6 , of Sag Harbor, b. 1769, d. 1840, m. Elizabeth, d. of 
Lemuel Pierson, and had ch. 384 Lemuel', 385 Maria', 386 Laura', 
387 Samuel P.' b. 1801, 388 Jesse R. 7 b. 1807, 389 Elizabeth', 390 
Nancy', 391 Cornelius', of California, and 392 Charles', of New 
York city. 

387 Samuel P.' b. 1801, of Marlboro, N. Y., had ch. 393 Oscar 8 , 
394 Mary 8 , 395 Lavina 8 and 396 Jesse. 8 

388 Jesse R.', of Sag Harbor, b. 1807, had w. Bathsheba and ch. 
397 Mary L. 8 b. 1837, 398 Esther 8 b. 1841, 399 Sarah 8 b. 1846, 400 
Jesse C. 8 b. 1847, 401 Oscar 8 b. 1850 and 402 Edward 8 b. 1859. 

341 David 6 , of B. H., b. 1772, had ch. 403 David P.', 404 Henry 
P.' and 405 Sophia.' 

342 Elisha 6 , of Hayground, b. Sept. 11, 1776, m. Hannah Pierson 
and had ch. 406 Betsey', 407 Caroline' and 408 Frances.' 



272 Histobt of Southampton. 

331 Nathaniel 5 (will proved 1768) had w. Mary and ch. 409 
Daniel 6 , of Scuttle Hole, 4=10 Moses 8 , 411 Mehetabel 6 and 412 
Sarah. 6 

409 Daniel 6 had s. 576 Gabriel.' 

576 Gabriel 7 had w. Elizabeth b. 1790 and s. 577 Noah 8 b. 1820. 

577 Noah 8 m. 1st Caroline A. b. 1822 and 2d Adeline b. 1828, 
and had ch. 578 Mary Elizabeth* b. 1846, 579 Caroline C. 9 b. 1848, 
580 Nathan 9 b. 1851, 581 Ella 9 b. 1854, 582 Anna 9 b. 1857, 583 
"William D. 9 b. 1861 and 584 Louisa 9 b. 1862. 

This ends the record of the descendants of 13 Jeremiah 3 , son of 
2 Thomas. 2 

No families have been traced to 14 Jonathan 3 and I cannot say 
whether he removed or died on L. I. without issue. 
Descendants of 17 Nathaniel 3 , son of 2 Thomas 2 : 
17 Nathaniel 3 b. June 1, 1675, d. 1746, m. Dec. 15, 1697, Anna, 
d. of Josiah Stanborough, and had ch. 413 Elishal 4 (or Elisha) b. 
Sept. 3, 1699, s. 414 Eecompence 4 b. Aug. 19, 1700, 415 Ezekiel 4 b. 
Nov. 12, 1703, 416 Ananias 4 b. Jan. 10, 170|, 417 Anna 4 b. July 29, 
1707, 418 Eunice 4 b. Mch. 3, 1709, 419 Deborah 4 b. Feb. 7, 1710, 
420 Nathaniel 4 b. Dec. 15, 1712 (town records say 1713), 421 
Phebe 4 b. May 31, 1714, and 422 Moses 4 b. July 12, 1716. 

414 Eecompence 4 b. Aug. 19, 1700, moved away. He had s. 423 

Elihu 6 , who had s. 424 Dr. Abraham 6 , who had s. 425 Samuel B.', 

whb had s. 426 Edmund D. s , of Rockaway, Morris Co., N. J. 

416 Ananias 4 b. 1706, prob. had ch. 427 Ananias 5 and 428 Joel. 5 

420 Nathaniel 4 prob. had w. Experience, d. of Joshua Halsey, 

and prob. ch. 429 Joshua 5 and 430 James. 6 

429 Joshua 6 had ch. 431 Ananias 6 , 432 "William 6 and 433 Joshua. 6 
431 Ananias 6 had ch. 434 Uriah 7 bap. Sept. 10, 1787, 435 Eli 
Pierson 7 and 436 Mary, w. of Daniel Pordham. 

434 Uriah 7 m. Sophia, d. of George Mackie, and had ch. 437 Wil- 
liam 8 , 438 Elizabeth 8 , w. of Capt. dwell, 439 Edward 8 d. s. -p., 440 
Mary A. 8 , w. of John Sherry, of Sag Harbor, and 441 Sophia w. of 
Horton, of Southold. 

435 Eli Pierson 7 m. Susan, d. of Abraham Sayre, and had s. 442 
Edwin P. 8 

433 Joshua 6 had ch. 443 Capt. Schuyler Bogart 7 (who m. Mary, 
d. of Oliver Howell, and d. s. p. ), and 444 Agee, who had w. Achsa 
and d. s. p. 



Genealogies. , 273 

430 James 6 had & 445 Nathaniel . 8 

445 Nathaniel 6 , of B. H., had w. Pamela and ch. 446 Edward' b. 
1815 and 447 Albert 7 b. 1817. 

446 Edward 1 b. 1815 m. Lucy b. 1820, d. of Hervey Howell, and 
t had ch. 448 Edward Howell 8 b. 1843 and 449 Nathan 8 b. 1846. 

447 Albert', of B. H, b. 1817, m. 1st Hannah, d. of Wm. 
Eogers, 2d Mary, d. of Capt. Nathan White, and 3d Arabella, d. of 
Peter Pournier, and had ch. 450 James B. 8 b. 1847, 451 Albert R. 8 
b. 1850 and 452 Mary L. 8 b. 1854 (all the ch. of his first wife). 

This ends the record of the descendants of 2 Thomas 2 , the eldest 
son of 1 Thomas 1 , as far as I have been able to ascertain the facts. 

Descendants of 3 Isaac", son of 1 Thomas 1 : 

3 Isaac 2 d. abt. 1703, had w. Mary and ch. 453 Isaac 3 b. 1665, 454 
Joseph 3 b. 1668, d. Apr. 1725, in Elizabeth, N. J., where he had 
removed, 455 Joshua 3 b. 1675, 456 Mary 3 , w. of =£lA* Post? 457 
Samuel 3 , 458 Elizabeth 3 , w. of Howell, and 458 Thomas. 3 

453 Isaac 3 b. 1765, d. Mch. 23, 1752, had w. Phebe (d. of Edward 
Howell ?) and ch. 459 Joseph 4 , 460 Jonah 4 , 461 John 4 , 462 Phebe 4 , 
463 Mary 4 and 463 Job 4 b. 1714 and d. s. p. 1750. 

461 John 4 had s. 465 Dr. Isaac. 6 

455 Joshua 3 b. 1675, d. abt. 1734, m. Martha, d. of Abraham 
Willman, and had ch. 466 Abigail 4 , w. of John Post, 467 Irene 4 , w. 
of "William Foster, 468 Experience 4 , w. of Nathaniel Halsey, 469 
Mary 4 , w. of Israel Halsey, 470 Martha 4 , w. of Joshua Sayre, and 
471 Prudence 4 , w. of David Woodruff. 

458 Thomas 3 (will proved Jan. 23, 1764) had ch. 472 Phebe 4 , w. 

of Topping, 473 Ethan 4 , 474 Martha 4 , w. of Stephen Eogers, 

of B. H., and afterward of Westhampton, 475 Mary* and 476 
Mehetabel. 4 

473 Esther 4 had ch. 477 Ethan 5 b. 1755 (478 David 5 ?), 479 Abra- 
ham 5 , 480 Absolom 5 and 481 Thomas 5 . 

477 Ethan 5 b. 1755, d. 1827, had w. Jane and ch. 482'Ethan 6 , 
483 Jasper 6 , 484 David 6 , 485 James 6 and 486 Luther. 6 

482 Ethan 6 m. a d. of Peter Howell and had s. 487 Thomas.' 

483 Jasper 6 had w. Harriet b. 1790 and ch. 488 Harriet' b. 1822, 
489 Abraham' b. 1825 and 490 Preelove' b. 1830. 

489 Abraham' b. 1825 had w. Elizabeth and a d. 491 Hannah 

M. 8 b. 1871. 
35 



274 History of Southampton. 

485 James 6 had ch. 492 Stephen', 493 Jeremiah 7 and 494 Oliver 7 .. 

486 Luther 6 had w. Harriet h. 1795 and ch. 495 Josephus' b. 1724 
and 496 Helen M.' b. 1839. 

495 Josephus 7 had w. Mary E. b. 1839. 
This ends the record of 3 Isaac. 2 

The record now takes up the descendants of 4 Daniel 2 , the 
youngest son of 1 Thomas 1 Halsey. 

4 Daniel 2 d. 1682, had w. Jemima and cb. 497 Daniel 3 b. Aug. 
31, 1669, and 498 Eichard. 3 

497 Daniel 3 b. 1669, d. 1734, m. Amy, d. of John Larison and 
had ch. 499 Daniel 4 b. Mch. 21, 169|, 500 Henry 4 b. Feb. 28, \U$, 
501 Amy 4 b. Aug. 17, 1702, 502 Elias 4 b. May 16, 1707, 503 Jesse 4 
b. Aug. 5, 1710, and 504 Silas 4 b. Jan. 17, 1718. 

499 Daniel 4 b. 1697 had ch. 505 Daniel 6 b. 1732 and 506 Ichabod* 
b. 1734. 

505 Daniel 6 , of Wickapogue, b. 1732, had s. 507 Daniel. 6 . 

507 Daniel 6 had s. 508 Daniel 7 , of Wickapogue, the poet. 

508 Daniel' m. Louisa b. 1805, d. of William Eogers, of Bridge- 
hampton, and had eh. 509 Mary 8 , w, of Elbert Eose, 510 Daniel 8 b. 
1829, 511 Emma J. 8 , w. of Eev. Samuel Huntting, 512 William 8 b. 
1831 and 513 Josephine 8 2d w. of Elbert Eose. 

-*- 512 William 8 b. 1831 m. Abigail b. 1841, d. of Andrew Halsey, 
and has ch. 514 Elizabeth 9 b. 1862, 515 Daniel 9 b. 1866 and 516 
William 9 b. 1871. 

500 Henry 4 b. Feb. 28, 1699 (new style, 1700), d. 1740, m. Sarah 
or Phebe, one of the d's of David Fithian, and had ch. 517 Jesse 6 b. 
May 18, 1739, 518 David Fithian 6 , 519 Sarah 6 , 520 Henry 6 and 521 
Keturah. 5 * 

517 Jesse 6 b. May 18, 1§39. d. 1818, m. Charity White, Jan. 14, 
1761, and had ch. Charity 6 b. Nov. 18, 1763, w. of John Fordham, 
of Sag Harbor, Jesse 6 b. Mch. 10, 1769, d. Aug. 7, 1769, 523 
Charles Fithian 6 b. Feb. -16, 1771, Keturah 6 b. Dec. 11, 1773, w. of 
Samuel Grey, of N. J., Sarah 6 b. Nov. 6, 1776, w. of David Haynes, 
of B. H., Hannah 6 b. May 13, 1780, w of Lewis Eogers, of Noyac, 
and Abigail 6 b. Aug. 19, 1783, w. of Anthony Ludlow, of B. H. 
*522 Jesse 6 , of Millpond Head, b. 1780, had w. Azubah b. 1785, 
and ch. 52,4 Lemuel 7 b. 1815, 525 David 7 b. 1817 and 526 Abigail 7 
b. 1830, w. of John Sweezey, of Eiverhead. 

* Son of 149 Lemuel • 



Genealogies. 275 

524 Lemuel 7 b. 1815, of Millpond Head, had w. Ellen b. 1819 
and ch. 527 Melvin 8 b. 1845 and 528 Charles Everett 8 b. 1846, who 
has w. Catherine b. 1852. 

523 Charles Fithian 6 m. Phebe Rogers and had ch. 529 Henry' b. 
Aug. 19, 1803, 530 Elizabeth P. 7 b. July 4, 1815, w. of Capt. Wil- 
liam Fowler, 531 Capt. Jesse 7 b. Aug. 8, 1805 (who m. Mary Budd, 
Apr. 27, 1837, and he d. s. p. Mch. 1, 1878), 532 Edward "W. 7 b. 
Nov. 24, 1811, Mary 7 b. Apr. 21, 1807, d. 1809, and Hannah 7 b. 
Dec. 10, ] 839. 

529 Henry (Capt. Harry, of North End) b. 1803, m. Jan. 21,. 
1828, Eliza b. 1803 and had ch. 533 Charles Henry 8 b. Oct. 10, 
1830, 534 Amanda 8 b. 1833, 535 Wilman 8 b. Jan. 12, 1836, 536 
Mary 8 b. June 21, 1839, w. of D. Harold Eose, d. Nov. 5, 1866, 
and 537 Jesse 8 b. Apr. 18, 1845, and d.'s. p. Mch. 10, 1861. 

533 Charles Henry 8 b. 1830, m. Dec. 24, 1863, Melvina D. b. 
June 5, 1842, d. of Thomas Terry, and has ch. 538 Harry Thomas' 
b. Nov. 12, 1864, 539 Lizzie May 9 b. Apr. 6, 1869, 540 Abbie 
Fithian 9 b. Oct. 2, 1873, and 541 Jesse 9 b. May 3, 1882. 

535 Wilman 8 b. 1836, m. Feb. 9, 1871, Augusta J. Terry, b. Dec. 
25, 1845, and has d. 542 Edna A. 9 Feb. 20, 1874. 

532 Edward W. 7 m. Louisa Miller, Sept. 23, 1847, and had ch. 
Maria L. 8 b. Aug. 26, 1848, Phebe R. 8 b. Jan. 22, 1852, d. Nov. 20,. 
1852, and Edward J. 8 b. July 3, 1854. 

Edward J. 8 b. July 3, 1854, m. Fannie S. Harlow, July 28, 1881, 
and has ch. Dora H. 9 b. Feb. 4, 1883, and J. Howard 9 b. Nov. 20, 
1884. 

504 Silas 4 b. 1718, d. 1785 or 6, had w. Susana and ch. 543 Dr.. 

Silas 5 b. Oct. 6, 1743,' 544 Susana 5 and 545 Catherine.' 

--"-> 543 Dr. Silas 6 b. in Southampton, removed to Lodi, N. Y., 1793, 

had ch. 546 Nicol 6 , 547 Oliver 6 , 548 Jehiel Howell 6 bap. Jan. 1789, 

in Southampton, 549 Dr. Lewis 6 , 550 Fanny 6 and 551 Mary A. 6 ~ 

546 Nicol 6 , of Seneca Co., N. Y., m. Sarah, d. of Dr. Jared San- 
ford, and had ch. 552 Robert 7 , of New York, 553 William 7 , of 
Ithaca, N. Y., and 554 Warren 7 , of Trumansburg, N. Y. 

547 Oliver 6 , of Lodi, N. Y., had ch. 555 Gilbert 7 , Henry 7 and 
556 Silas 7 , all of Seneca Co., N. Y. 

548 Jehiel Howell 6 had ch. 557 Charles 7 , of San Francisco, 558 

Ermina 7 , w. of Gibbs, of California, and 559 Caroline 7 , married 

and living in Michigan. 



276 History of Southampton. 

549 Dr. Lewis 9 had ch. 560 WilliamV>of Trumansburg, 561 San- 
ford', of the same place, and 562 Key/Lewis 7 , of Parmer Village, 
N Y. c<*W„pi/<5^. 

502 Elias 4 or 503 Jesse 4 was father of 563 Nathaniel 5 , as he is 
called, or was known as cousin of 543 Dr. Silas. 5 

563 Nathaniel 5 had w. Lydia and ch. 564 Isaiah 6 , of Trumansburg, 
b. 17.97, 565 John 8 and 566 Lydia. 6 

564 Isaiah 6 b. 1797 had ch. 567 John 7 , of Trumansburg, 568 
C [harles?] E. 7 , of Fall Brook, Penn., 569 Nathaniel 7 , of Union 
Springs, N. Y., 570 Robert 7 , of Peun Yan, N. Y., 571 Eleazar 7 , of 
Trumansburg, 572 Lydia 7 , 573 Margaret 7 and 574 Mary. 7 - — 

This ends the record of the descendants of 4 Daniel 2 Halsey. 

Additional Notes. 

A Stephen Halsey, said to have been of Southampton town and 
who removed, m. Mary Ford, of Morristown, N. J. 

This 575 Stephen Halsey was b. about 1760 and would, therefore, 
be of the 6th geueration, and had ch. 576 Maria 7 b. 1787, w. of 
Pruddon Allen, and had a d. Margaret Crane who m. Andrew J. 
Colvin, of Albany, N. Y., 577 Catherine 7 , 578 Charles 7 , who d. s. 
p., 579 Lewis, d. s.p., and 580 Matilda 7 b. 1790 and m. a Rosekrans. 

575 Stephen had brother 581 John 6 , who had ch. 582 Henry 7 , 583 
William 7 and other ch. 

543 Dr. Silas 5 , b. in Southampton Oct. 6, 1743, studied medicine 
in Elizabethtowu, N. J. He practiced medicine in Southampton 
from 1764 to 1776, when he fled with other patriots to Connecticut 
and lived for three years in Killingworth. His wife died in 1778, 
leaving him four small children. He returned by permission of 
Gen. Erskine to his home, dilapidated by the British, in South- 
ampton, in 1779, and was subsequently sheriff of Suffolk county, 
and. held other offices till 1792. In that year he removed to the 
town of Ovid (now Lodi). Was member of assembly eight years, 
from Seneca county ; member of Congress during the administra- 
tion of Jefferson and afterward State senator, and for forty years 
held offices of trust and responsibility. He died Nov. 19, 1832. 

209 Judge Hugh 7 Halsey was a graduate of Yale College and an 
npright lawyer and judge of Suffolk county. He held also the 
offices of surrogate, assemblyman, State senator and surveyor-gen- 



Genealogies. 277 

eral of the State. He was a man of sterling worth and honored 
rather than was honored by the offices bestowed upon him by the 
people. 

27 Philip 6 Halsey was in the army of the revolution and was a 
member of the last company which evacuated New York city in the 
memorable retreat of the American army on Long Island. He was 
soon after discharged at White Plains and returned home. Hear- 
ing that a company of British dragoons were billeted in the village 
of Southampton near his father's home, he with some companions 
crossed the island to Oyster Pond Pt. and took a boat across the 
sound in the night, entered the Connecticut river and pushed on to 
Windsor. Here he remained and married Esther, d. of Elisha 
Moore, and died in 1846. 

Prom Kulp's Families of the Wyoming Valley I find the follow- 
ing : 

280 Matthew 6 had ch. 584 Rufus', 585 Harriet', 586 G-aius 7 b. 
May 4, 1793. 

584 Rufus' had s. 587 Thomas. 8 

586 Dr. Gams' m. Mary Church and had ch. 588 Richard 
Church" b. 1817, 589 Gaius Leonard 8 b. 1819 and 590 Nelson Gay- 
lord. 8 

588 Dr. Richard C. 8 had ch. 591 Lavantia 9 and 592 Gaius Leon- 
ard 9 b. 1845. 

589 Dr. Gaius L. 8 had ch. 593 Francis W. 9 , 594 Frederic A. 9 and 
595 Lavantia. 9 

590 Nelson Gaylord 8 had ch. 596 Helen 9 , 597 Winfield Scott 9 , 598 
Nelson G. 9 and 599 Rebecca. 9 

Hand Family. 

The first of the family of this name in Southampton was John 
Hand, on the whaling list of 1644. At the time of the settlement 
of Bast Hampton, in 1648, he was one of the company from South- 
ampton to found a new plantation. He was, according to the 
East Hampton records, originally from Stanstede, in the county of 
Kent, England. The arms of the family, as given by Judge 
Alfred Hand, of Scranton, to a descendant of John Hand, are as 
follows : 

Argent : a chevron azure between three hands gules. 

Crest : on a wreath argent and gules a buck trippant or. 



278 Histoet of Southampton. 

1 John 1 d. 1663, m. Alice, sister of Josiah Stanbrough, who, 

after her husband's death, m. Codnor, and had ch. 2 John 2 , 3 

Stephen 2 , 4 Mary 2 , 5 Joseph 2 , of Guilford, Ct., 1693, 6 Benjamin 2 , 
7 Thomas 2 , 8 Shamgar 2 and 9 James. 2 

3 Stephen 2 d. 1693 had ch. 10 Stephen 8 b. 1661, 11 Joseph 5 b. 
1664, d. 1713, of West Jersey in 1705, 12 Samuel 3 and five daugh- 
ters not named in his will. 

10 Stephen 3 , of Wainscot in 1684, d. 1740, had ch. 13 Daniel 4 b. 
1690, d. 1709, 14 John 4 bap. 3701, 15 Abigail 4 bap. 1701, 16 Phebe 4 
bap. 1701, 17 Lydia 4 bap. 1701, 18 Pamela 4 bap. 1706 and 19 
Mary 4 bap. 1709. 

14 John 4 d. 1755, had 2d w. Hannah and ch. 20 Daniel 5 bap. 
1721, 21 John 5 , 22 Mary 5 bap. 1725, 23 Phebe 5 bap. 1729. 24 
Mercy 5 , 25 Esther 6 bap. 1733, 26 Henry 5 bap. 1735 and 27 Mary 5 
again bap. 1739. 

20 Daniel 5 had ch. 28 Daniel 6 bap. 1744 and 29 Sylvanus 6 b. 1753. 

21 Johu 5 had w. Rebecca and ch. 30 Jehiel 6 bap. 1753 and 31 
Esther 6 bap. 1760.* 

12 Samuel 3 had w. Elizabeth and s. 32 Stephen. 4 
32 Stephen 4 had ch. 33 Damaris 5 bap. 1713, 34 Rebecca 5 bap. 1716, 
35 Abigail 5 bap. 1719/36 Martha 5 bap. 1723 and 37 Stephen 5 bap. 1725. 

6 Benjamin 2 removed with his family to Cape May Co., N. o. He 
had ch. 38 Elizabeth 3 b. 1672, 39 Sarah 3 b. 1673, 40 Abraham 3 b. 
1675, 41 Benjamin 3 b. 1677, 42 Richard 3 b. 1679, 43 Mary 3 b. 1680, 
44 Rachel 3 b. 1682 and 45 Peter 3 b. 1683. 

7 Thomas 2 moved from Wainscott to Cape May Co., N. J., and 
associated with him there in 1697 were the following, whom I sup- 
pose to be his children : 46 Isaac 3 , 47 Daniel 3 , 48 Jeremiah 3 , 49 
Joseph 3 and 50 Thomas. 3 

8 Shamgar 2 moved to Cape May Co., N. J., being there in 1699, 
taking one s. 51 Shamgar 3 b. Mch. 27, 1671, while another s. 52 
Josiah 3 settled in Bridgehampton. 

52 Josiah 3 d. 1739, had w. Mary and ch. 53 Mary 4 , w. of 

Mulford, 54 David 4 , 55 Matthew 4 , 56 Thomas 4 , 57 Sarah 4 and 58 
Joana 4 , w. of Flint. 

54 David 4 , of E. H., d. 1767, had w. Sarah and ch. 60 Josiah 5 , 61 
David 5 , 62 Silas 6 , 63 Isaac 5 and 66 Elizabeth 5 , w. of Pierson. 

Note. — Nos. 59, 64, 65, 67 and 68 "are not used. 

* See further along for additions to this, 



Genealogies. 279 

9 James 2 b. 1651, d. Mch. 13, 1733, m. 2d w. Elizabeth Dibble, 
Dec. 12, 1704, had ch. 69 James 3 b. about 1680, 70 Nathaniel 8 b. 
as early as 1692, 71 Mary 3 bap. 1700 and 72 Elias 3 bap. 1701. 

69 James 3 d. 1761 and his 1st w. d. June 17, 1727. He m. 2d 
Rebecca Wheeler, Jan. 11, 1728, and had ch. 73 James 4 b. 1701, 74 
Samuel* b. 1709, 75 Ezekiel 4 bap. 1711, 76 Desire 4 b. 1713,' 77 

Mary 4 b. 1716, w. of Thorpe, 78 Sarah 4 , w. of Talmage, 

79 Jeremiah 4 b. 1729 and 80 Rebecca 1 bap. 1735. 

73 James 4 d. 1757, m. Nov. 13, 1735, Mary Hand, and had ch. 81 
Elizabeth 6 bap. 1736, 82 Jemima 5 bap. 1738 and 83 James 5 bap. 
1742. 

74 Oapt. Samuel 4 d. 1746, m. Elizabeth, d. of Ammi Ruhama 
Rusco, b. Aug. 12, 1718, and had ch. 84 Nathaniel 6 b. Mch. 27 or 
Apr. 7 (both statements appear on record), 1739, 85 Abraham 5 , 86 

Esther 5 b. May 7, 1743, w. of Edwards, 87 Silas 5 and 88 

Nathan. 5 

84 Nathaniel 5 Esq., of Amagansett, d. Sept. 1824, m. Esther 
Mulford, b. Apr. 27, 1743, d. Feb. 1824, d. of Samuel and Zerviah 
Mulford, and had ch. 89 Esther 6 b. Mch. 15, 1764, w. of Benjamin 

Conklin, 90 Elizabeth 6 b. July 20, 1766, w. of Bunce, 91 

Mary 6 b. June 6, 1769, w. of John Saxton, 92 Mulford 6 b. Jan. 24, 
1772, 93 Rebecca 6 b. Aug. 2, 1774, w. of David Oonklin, and 94 
Nathaniel 6 b. Jan. 26, 1776. 

92 Mullord 6 had w. Mary and ch. 95 Charles R. 7 b. 1796, 96 
Caroline', w. of Harry Schellinger, 97 Mary 7 , w. of John Stratton, 
98 Harriet 7 , w. of Talmage Barnes, 99 William C. 7 b. 1805, 100 
Augustus 7 , of Brooklyn, and 101 Alfred. 7 

95 Charles R.', of Amagansett, had w. Betsey D. b. 1797 and ch. 

102 Eliza C. 8 b. 1820, w. of Cartwright, 103 George, L. 8 b. 

1821, 104 Nathaniel 8 b. 1824, 105 Eliza 8 , w. of Mulford, 106 

Charles 8 , 107 Joana 8 , w. of Jeremiah Huntting, and 108 Fanny 8 , w. 
of Benjamin Barnes. 

103 Capt. George L. 8 m. Harriet, d. of Thomas J. Mulford, and 
had ch. 109 Clara M. 9 b. 1858, 110 Thomas J. 9 b. 1861 and 111 
Hannah M. 9 b. 1863. 

104 Nathaniel 8 m. Phebe E., d. of Jeremiah Conklin, and had ch. 
112 Theodore H. 9 b. 1854, 113 George C. 9 b. 1858, 114 Charles S.« 
h. 1860 and 115 Elizabeth. 9 

99 William C. 7 had w. Nancy and d. 116 Mary 8 b. 1833. 



280 Histoky of Southampton. 

94 Nathaniel 6 d. 1862, m. Elizabeth, d. of Thomas Baker, and 
had ch. 117 Thomas B.' b. Mch. 11, 1803, 118 Juliet', w. of 
Charles H. Miller and 119 Marcus B.' b. Aug. 1824. 

117 Capt. Thomas B.', of Bridgehampton, d. July 26, 1873, m. 
Harriet K., d. of Nath. and Lucinda Hedges and had ch. 120 Henry 
C. 8 , 121 Maurice 8 , 122 Orlando 8 b. Nov. 11, 1826, and 123 Eliza- 
beth 8 b. Nov. 29, 1828, w. of Rev. "William H. Lester, and has ch. 
Bev. Wm. H. Lester, Jr., Nathaniel and Essie. 

122 Major Orlando 8 , m. Dec. 3, 1850, Elizabeth, d. of Benjamin 
P. Howell, and has ch. 124 Harriet E. 9 b. June 18, 1852, 125 
Fanny 9 b. Dec. 31, 1855, 126 Lucretia 9 b. Oct. 17, 1857, 127 
Nathaniel H. 9 b. Dec. 3, 1860, 128 Florence 9 b. Mch. 12, 1864, and 
129 Minnie 9 b. Mch. 25, 1868. 

122 Orlando, at the beginning of the civil war, raised, at his own 
expense, a company of 100 men for the 11th N. Y. Cavalry; was 
mustered into service Mch. 30, 1862, as captain of Co. E, and bre- 
veted Major of N. Y. Volunteers, for meritorious conduct, Mch. 5, 
1867. 

85 Abraham 6 had ch. 130 Abraham 6 bap. 1766 and 131 Eleazar. 6 

130 Abraham 6 moved to Ovid, N. Y., and had s. 132 Ovid. 7 

131 Eleazar 6 , of East Hampton, m. a sister of Josiah Dayton, and 
had ch. 133 George' b. 1813 and 134 Catherine', who illustrates 
what a good woman may be in the world. 

133 Capt. George' m. Abigail, d. of Henry White, of Sagg, and 
had ch. 135 George H. 8 b. 1857 and 136 John White 8 b. 1865. 

87 Silas 5 had ch. 137 James 6 , 138 Silas 6 , 139 Gideon 6 , 140 David 6 
and 141 Josiah. 6 

137 James 6 had s. 142 Albert.' 

142 Albert' had ch. 143 John 8 , 144 George 8 and 144£ Charles. 8 

138 Silas 6 had ch. 144f Watson', 145 Pierson' and 146 Sylvanus.' 
144| Watson' had s. 147 Watson 8 , of Texas. 

140 David 6 d. 1767, had w. Sarah and ch. 148 Capt. David', of 
Sag Harbor, b. 1759, d. Feb. 29, 1840, and 149 Forrest', of Sag 
Harbor. 

75 Ezekiel 4 of E. H. had ch, 150 Ezekiel 5 bap. 1755, 151 Phebe 5 , 
152 Elizabeth 6 and 153 Samuel 5 bap. 1761. 

79 Jeremiah 4 m. Mary Squires Sept. 20, 1750. 

72 Ehas 3 had ch. 154 Lemuel 4 bap. 1724 and 155 Elias 4 bap. 1727. 

155 Elias 4 had ch. 156 Elias 6 bap. 1761 and 157 Aaron 5 bap. 1768. 



Genealogies. 281 

70 Nathaniel 3 , of Wainscot, had ch. 158 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1708, 159 
Nathaniel 4 bap. 1711 and 160 Blisha 4 bap. 1713. 

Note. — In giving the family of 21 Johnc some of his children were omitted. The record 
is here rewritten with new numbers, discarding the numbers 30 and 31, previously 
used. 

21 John 6 had w. Rebecca and ch. 161 Jehiel 6 b. Dec. 10, 1753, 
162 John 6 b. Sept. 31, 1754, 163 Joseph 6 b. Dec. 20, 1755, 164 
Rebecca 6 b. Oct. 19, 1757, 165 Esther 6 b. May 16, 1760, 166 
Jemima 6 b. Mch. 18, 1762, 167 Mary 6 b. Feb. 16, 1764, 168 Jere- 
miah 6 b, Sept. 22, 1765, 169 Phebe 6 b. July 7, 1767, 170 Reuben 6 b. 
July 8, 1770, 171 Aaron 6 b. Apr. 27, 1773, and 172 Israel 6 b. June 
10, 1776. 

162 John 6 d. May 29, 1809, m. Mch. 6, 1778, Mary Jones, b. 
Nov. 1, 1760, and had ch. 173 Alfred' b. Jan. 1, 1784, 174 Elisha 
J.' b. July 8, 1790, 175 Cynthia' b. Apr. 18, 1793, 176 Betsey G.] 
b. Jan. 18, 1796, and 177 Ezra' b. Aug. 9, 1799. 

173 Alfred 7 , of Durham, Greene Co., N Y., d. May 22, 1845, m. 
Feb. 1, 1812, Harriet Farmer, and had ch. 178 Edward 8 b. Dec. 13, 
1813, 179 John A. 8 , of Albany, b. May 24, 1817 (who m. May 22, 
1855, Marietta B. Hawley), and 180 Thomas F. b. Feb. 22, 1826, 
and d. Mch. 11, 1831. 

178 Edward 8 d. Nov. 4, 1865, m. Apr. 18, 1837, Elizabeth Vose 
Thompson, and had ch. 181 Edward T. 9 b. July 9, 1838, and d. 
young, 182 Catherine T. 9 b. Aug. 26, 1843, and 183 John T.' b. 
Apr. 19, 1846. 

177 Ezra', of Scranton, Pa., had s. 184 Alfred 8 , a judge in 

Scranton. 
171 Aaron 6 had ch. 185 Rev. Hicks', 186 Lemuel P.' and 187 

Isaac P.' 

186 Lemuel P. 7 d. in Albany 1850, had ch. 188 B. E. Hand, 8 of 
Indianapolis, b. Dec. 9, 1845, and 189 Henry E. 8 

An Elias b. 1770, whom we will designate as 190 Elias 5 , d. 1842, 
had ch. 191 Hervey 6 and 192 Bartlett. 6 

191 Hervey 6 of B. H. had ch. 193 John', 194 Richard' and 195 

88 Nathan 5 b. May 14, 1747, m. 1768 Anna, d. of Isaac Barnes, 
moved to Shoreham, Vt., and had ch. 196 Samuel 6 b. 1769, 197 
Isaac 6 bap. 1772, 198 Frances 6 bap. 1777 and 199 Nathan c bap. 1791 
and five other ch., names unknown to me. 
36 



282 History of Southampton'. 

196 Samuel 6 m. Elizabeth, d. of Rev. Richard Sill, and had ch. 
200 Rev. R. C. T of Brooklyn and 201 Augustus' b. 1805. 

201 Hon. Augustas', of Essex Co., N. Y., d. Mch. 1878, had eh. 
202 Judge Samuel 8 of Albany, who d. 1886, 203 Clifford C. 8 of New 
York and 204 Richard' L. B , of Elizabethtown, Essex Co., N Y. 

Harris Family. 

George Harris, the first of this family in Southampton, is first 
mentioned in the list of 1657 with the residents of North Sea. In 
April, 1635, George Harris, aged 17, takes passage in the Falcon of 
London for the Barbadoes. As communication between New Eng ; 
land and these islands was frequent in those days, this emigrant 
might have been the one who subsequently is found in Southampton. 

Dec. 6, 1683, 1 George 1 wills to ch. 2 George 2 , 3 Henry 2 , 4 
Mary', 5 Elizabeth' and 6 Jane 2 . One of these daughters was 
recorded as having been born Apr. 6, 1670, but is not named on 
the record. The inventory of his estate amounted to £139 18s. Od. 

2 George 2 , 1 conjecture, was born about 1660 and prob. d. in 1753, 
as his will was proved in that year and dated Sept. 17, 1748. In the 
census of 1698 the names of George Harris and George Harris, Jr., 
and Sarah and Eunice are found with the residents of North Sea. 
His will mentions as his ch. only Eunice and Henry, and we infer, 
therefore, that George, his son, died young without issue. "We, 
therefore, conclude that 2 George 2 had w. Sarah and ch. 7 George 3 , 
8 Eunice 3 and 9 Henry. 3 

The will of 2 George 2 mentions a grandd., Abijail Gess, and we 
may infer that 8 Eunice 3 m. a Gess. 

9 Henry 3 , not in list of 1698 and born perhaps in 1699, is known 
to have the following named ch. from his will, dated in 1769 and 
recorded in Dec. 1781 : 

9 Henry 3 had w. Lydia (as by will) and ch. 10 George 4 , 11 Henry 4 , 
12 Daniel 4 , 13 John 4 b. 1727, 14 Benjamin 4 , 15 Lydia 4 , ,16 Sarah 4 
and 17 Mary. 4 (Order of birth not known.) ' 

11 Henry 4 had ch. 18 Henry 5 b. 1764, 19 a daughter, who m. 
Judge W. H. Jessup, of Montrose, Penn., and 20 Elias." 

18 Henry 5 b. 1764, d. Nov. 21, 1851, had w. Phile and ch. 21 
Hervey 6 b. 1795, 22 Joseph R. s b. 1803 and 23 Harriet. 6 

21 Capt. Hervey 6 b. 1795 m. Sarah Scott b. 1799 and had d. 24 
Mary', w. of Francis W. Cook. 



Genealogies. 283 

22 Capt. Joseph E. 6 b. 1803 m. Harriet, d. of Deacon John 
White, and had d. 25 Eloise 7 b. 1834, w. of James Post of New 
York. 

20 Elias E had ch. 26 William Henry 6 b. 1807 and 27 Mary A. 6 , w. 
of Merit Fordham. 

26 William Henry 6 b. 1807 had w. Maximilla and oh. 28 Sarah 
J. 7 b. 1841, 29 Mary A. 7 , 30 Hiram 7 b. 1845, 31 Irene A. 7 b. 1847 
and 32 Henry M. 7 b. 1851. 

12 Daniel 4 b., I conjecture, about 1730, had ch. 33 Daniel 5 and 
34 Thomas. 5 

33 Daniel 5 had ch. 35 Albert 6 and 36 George. 6 

35 Albert 6 had w. Sarah b. 1805 and ch. 37 Benjamin F. 7 b. 1833, 
38 Edward' b. 1836, 39 George W.' b. 1842 and 40 Margaret 7 b. 
1845. 

34 Thomas 5 of Sag Harbor had ch. 41 Daniel J. 6 b. 1790, 42 
Thomas 5 and 43 Henry/ 

41 Daniel J 6 of Sag Harbor, b. 1790, had w. Elizabeth D. b. 1790 
and ch. 44 Henry E. 7 b. 1815, 45 Joseph 0. 7 b. 1819, 46 James A.' 
b. 1821 and 47 Mary E. 7 b. 1824. 

44 Henry E. 7 of Sag Harbor, b. 1815, had w. Nancy b. 1814 and 
ch. 48 Julia B." b. ] 836, 49 Daniel J. 8 b. 1838 and 50 Eichard 8 b. 
1849. 

45 Joseph C.' of Sag Harbor, b. 1819, had w. Maria P. b. 1816 
and ch. 51 Charles C. 8 b. 1843, 52 Maria P. 3 b. 1844, 53 William P. 8 
b. 1846 and 54 Henry O. 8 b. 1848. 

46 James A. 7 of Sag Harbor, b. 1821, had w. Mary b. 1829 and 
ch. 55 Emily J. 8 b. 1849 and 56 Kate E. 8 b. 1853. 

13' John 4 b. 1727, d. 1791, had w. Lydia and s. 57 Stephen 5 b. 
1759. 

57 Stephen 6 b. 1759, d. Dec. 20, 1813, had w. Jane and ch. 58 
Harmonia 6 bap. Aug. 18, 1785, 59 Apollos 6 b. 1788, 60 Eleanor 6 , w. 
of Charles Parsons, and 61 Luther 6 , of Goshen, Orange Co., N. Y. 

59 Apollos b. 1788, d. Feb. 18, 1837, had w. Minerva b. 1784 and 
s. 62 Stephen 7 b. 1820. 

62 Stephen 7 b. 1820, m. Harriet b. 1824, d. of James and Phebe 
Eogers Brown, and had ch. 63 Arthur A. 8 b. 1842, 64 Charles P. s b. 
1844, 65 Jane A. 8 b. 1849, 66 William B. 8 b. 1852, 67 Ellen M.» b. 
1854, 68 David H. 8 b. 1857 and 69 Everett b. 1861. (Births taken 
from census and proximately correct.) 



284 Histobt of Southampton. 

3 Henry 2 b. I conjecture, about 1663, probably moved away, as 
he is not on the census of 1698. 

In the census of 1698 occurs the names of Lenard Harris, associ- 
ated with Mary Harris, and Mary Harris, Jr., residing in Bridge- 
hampton. I know not their connection with this family. 

A Henry Harris is among the first settlers of Elizabeth, N. J., in 
1665, but he could not be related to this family unless he was a 
brother or cousin of 1 George. 1 

Thirty-four families of this name are mentioned in Burke's Gen. 
Armory as having coats of arms. 

Haynes ob Haines Family. 

James Haines, or Hinds, as it was often written, came from 
England to Salem, Mass., as early as 1637, where he was made a 
freeman. He married in 1638 and removed to Southold a few years 
after its settlement, and died there Mch. 165f, and his widow Mary 
married Ealph Dayton in June, 1656. Balph Dayton lived first in 
Southampton, then in East Hampton, then a few years in South- 
old and again in East Hampton, where he died. 

In 1655 the inventory of estate of James Haines in Southold 
amounted to £123 5s. 4d. 

1 James 1 had w. Mary and ch. 2 John 2 bap. in Salem Aug. 22, 
1639, 3 James 2 bap. in Salem Apr. 6, 1641, 4 Benjamin 2 bap. in 
Salem Aug. 28, 1643, 5 Mary 2 bap. in Salem Apr. 19, 1644, 6 
James 2 again bap. in Salem Dec. 27, 1647, 7 Jonathan 2 , 8 Sarah 2 
and 9 Thomas. 2 

2 John 2 and 3 James 2 removed to Elizabeth/N. J., and were 
among its first families there, and I believe had families there. 

4 Benjamin 2 of Southampton, bap. 1643, d. 1687, had w. Joana 
and ch. 10 Benjamin 3 , 11 Samuel 3 , 12 James 3 b. 1673 and 13 Han- 
nah 3 . Inventory of estate £105 7s. Od. 

10 Benjamin 3 d. 1714, had w. Lydia and ch. (as by will) 14 
Benjamin 4 , 15 John 4 , 16 David 4 , 17 Hannah 4 , 18 Phebe 4 , 19 Lydia 4 , 
20 Joseph 4 , 21 Nathan 4 and 22 Susanna. 4 

15 John 4 (will proved Oct. 6, 1774) had ch. 23 John 5 , 24 

Anthony 5 , 25 Temperance 5 , w. of Scott, 26 Mary 5 , w. of 

■Beeves, and 27 Abigail 5 . His will gives to John his "great Bible" 
and mentions "brother Henry Harris." 



Genealogies. 285 

23 John 5 (will proved July 3, 1782) had w. Mary and ch. 28 
Hannah 6 , 29 Lydia Lane 6 , 30 Mary Smith 8 , 31 Eunice 6 and 32 
Susanna. 6 

24 Anthony 6 had ch. 33 Benjamin 6 and 34 Henry. 8 

33 Benjamin 6 had w. Mehetabel and ch. 35 Hannah', w. of Isaac 
Shearman, and 36 Samuel 7 b. 1804. 

36 Samuel 7 b. 1804 had ch. 37 George W. 8 b. 1844, 38 Mary E. 8 b. 
1846 and 39 "William F. 8 b. 1847. 

16 David 4 (will proved 1756) had w. Abigail and ch. 40 Lydia 
Foster 5 , 41 Abigail Dayton 5 and 42 Puah Clark. 5 

11 Samuel 3 (will proved Oct. 10, 1732) had ch. 43 Silas 4 , 44 
John 4 , 45 Isaiah 4 , 46 Mary 4 , 47 Euth 4 and 48 Samuel. 4 

12 James 3 of Bridgehampton b. 1673 (will proved Oct. 13, 1732) 
had 1st w. Sarah and 2d w. Temperance and ch. 49 James 4 b. 1702, 
50 Stephen 4 b. 1704, 51 Daniel 4 , 52 Ann Newcomb 4 , 53 Sarah 
Woodruff 4 , 54 Phebe Balding 4 and 55 Edith. 4 

49 Deacon James 4 b. 1702, d. 1779-82 (will proved July 3, 1782), 
had w. Martha and eh. 56 Sarah 5 , 57 Elizabeth 5 , 58 James 5 59 
David 5 , 60 Samuel 5 and 61 Daniel. 5 

58 James 5 had ch. 62 Jared 6 of New Jersey and 63 Job. 6 

59 David 5 had ch. 64 Jeremiah 6 b. 1785, 65 David 6 , 66 Stephen 6 
(whose sons removed), 67 Austin 6 of Southold. 

64 Deacon Jeremiah 6 of Bridge Hampton, b. 1785, had w. Mehet- 
abel b. 1785 and ch. 68 William 0. 7 b. 1817, 69 Clarissa J. 7 b. 1812 
and 70 Jeremiah. 7 

68 William C. 7 b. 1817 had w. Frances M. b. 1836 and ch. 71 
Elizabeth R. 8 b. 1859, 72 Jeremiah 8 b. 1860, 73 Mehetabel 8 b. 1862 
and 74 Richard 8 b. 1864. 

65 David 6 had s. 75 Stephen. 7 

75 Stephen 7 of Brooklyn had ch. 76 Lucius 8 b. 1823 and 77 
Samuel A. 8 b. 1829 (who m. Abbie Hildreth of Sag Harbor). 

76 Lucius 8 b. 1823 had w. Helen and ch. 78 Stephen 9 b. 1856, 79 
Walter 9 b. 1858 and 80 Lemuel 9 b. 1860. 

67 Austin 6 of Southold m. Harmony Halsey and had s. 81 
Edward W. 7 

81 Edward W. 7 had ch. 82 William A. 8 , 83 Charles H. 8 and 84 
Mary H. 8 , w. of Rackett. 

60 Samuel 5 had w. Sarah, who d. 1794, and a s. 85 Job. 6 

85 Job 6 had ch. 86 James B. 7 b. 1814 and 87 William L. 7 b. 1820. 



286 History of Southampton. 

86 James L. 7 b. 1814 had w. Harriet M. b. 1816 and ch. 88 
George W." b. 1836, 89 Samuel A. 8 b. 1838, 90 Theodore 8 b. 1844, 
91 Edgar I. 8 b. 1847, 92 Harriet 8 b. 1851 (w. of Edward A. Hildreth) 
and 93 James A. 8 b. 1854. 

87 William L. 7 of Sag Harbor, b. 1820, had w. Sarah J. b. 1824 
and ch. 94 Elbertina 8 b. 1844, 95 Henry E. 8 b. 1848 and 96 Mary 
S. 8 b. 1851. 

61 Daniel 6 of Connecticut had s. 97 Lemuel 6 (who returned to 
Bridgehampton) b. 1767, d. 1856, had ch. 98 Daniel Howell 6 b. 
1789 and 99 William 6 of New Jersey. 

50 Stephen 4 of Elizabeth, 1ST. J., b. 1704, had w. Esther and ch. 
100 Stephen 5 b. Feb. 11, 1733, 101 Phebe 5 b. 1741 and 102 Mary 5 b. 
1747 and perhaps others. 

100 Stephen 5 b. Feb. 11, 1733, m. Joana Sale and had ch. 103 
Job 6 of Elizabeth, b. Aug. 10, 1756, 104 Stephen 6 b. July 7, 1760, 
and d. s. p., 105 Joana 6 b. Jan. 14, 1763, 106 Elias 6 b. Dee. 31, 
1766, and 107 Daniel 6 b. Feb. 20, 1773, and d. s. p. 

103 Job 6 m. Margaret Thomas and had ch. 108 Margaret', w. of 
J. K. Goodman of N Y. city, 109 Mary', w. of Wm. Hall of 1ST. Y. 
city, 110 Gen. Ezekiel 7 of Ohio, 111 Elias 7 of Ohio and 112 Joana 7 , 
w. of 0. Lytle. 

106 Elias 6 m. Sarah, d. of Robert Ogden, and had ch. 113 Sarah 7 , 
w. of Thos. C. Doremus, 114 Elizabeth 7 , w. of J. C. Nixon of N. 
J., 115 Daniel 7 of Hamburg, N. J., and 116 Henrietta' of N. Y. 
city. 

115 Daniel (governor of New Jersey) had ch. 117 Eev. Alanson 8 , 

118 Capt. Thomas 8 , who d. in the civil war from wounds in battle, 

119 Sarah 8 and 120 Henrietta. 8 

A Daniel of the fifth generation in this L. I. family of Haines had 
s. 121 Benjamin 6 , who had s. 122 Richard T.' of New Jersey and 
later of New York city, who had ch. 123 Benjamin 8 and others. 

A David of Newburgh, N. Y, of the fifth generation, b. 1750, 
also of the L. I. Haines family, had eh. 124 Elsie 6 , w. of John 

Beattie, 125 Jackson 6 , 126 David 6 , 127 Sarah 6 , w. of Morell, 

and 128 Susan 6 , w. of Jackson Oakley of Newburgh. 

125 Jackson 6 of Newburgh, N. Y, had ch. 129 Achea 7 , 130 Isa- 
bella 7 , w. of Ramsay, 131 Alexander F. 7 , 132 Eugene S. 7 , who. 

d. s. p., and 133 Sarah 7 , w. of Brown. 

131 Alexander F.' had s. 134 Eugene M. 8 of Albany, N. Y. 



Genealogies. 287 

A Silas (probably 43 Silas 4 ) who had a brother Samuel living on 
Long Island, lived in New Jersey and died Jan. 17, 174f. He m. 
1st w. and had ch. 134 Silas 6 and 135 Jemima 5 . After death of 
first w. he m. 2d Ruth Tuttle b. Apr. 9, 1722, and d. Sept. 4, 1780, 
and had ch. 136 Uzal 6 b. 1746, 137 Stephen 6 b. 1748, 138 Zenas 5 b. 
and d. 1765 and 139 Abigail. 5 

136 Uzal 6 d. Jan. 22, 1813, m. Anna Tuttle and had ch. 140 
David 6 b. May 28, 1770, d. s. p. 1793, 141 Abigail 6 b. 1772, 142 
Jabez 6 b. 1775, d. 1779, and 143 Julia 6 b. 1781. 

137 Stephen 5 d. Oct. 16, 1822, had w. Hannah and ch. 144 Tim- 
othy 6 , M. D., b. Aug. 1, 1798, of Whippany, ~8. J., 145 Ezekiel 6 , 
146 Joseph 6 , 147 Jemima 6 , 148 Susan 6 and 149 Zenas. 6 

Three families of the name of Haines are mentioned in Burke's 
Gen. Armory and twelve families of the name of Haynes as having 
coat armor. 

Hedges Family. 
The ancestor of the Hedges families in Southampton and Bast 
Hampton was William Hedges, and when we have said this we have 
said all that is known of him, except that like his neighbors he was 
an Englishman and a Puritan. Like others of the time he was, 
perhaps, obliged to leave his native shores without permission of 
royal authority, as they looked with no favor on the departure of 
substantial citizens from the kingdom. New England was never a 
penal colony. His name has never been found on any lists of pas- 
sengers to America hitherto published. He came at first to South- 
ampton, where he resided for a short period, and when in 1649 the 
colony to settle another town to the eastward was projected, he was 
one of the first to join it. He is on the list of inhabitants of 
Southampton in 1644. This is the earliest record known of his- 
* jr appearance in America at the date of this writing in 1886. 

1 William' d. in 1674 leaving, as by his will, w. Eose and ch. 2 
Stephen 2 b. Jan. 163$, 3 Isaac 2 and four daughters not named in 
his will. 

2 Stephen 2 d. July 7, 1734, had ch. 4 Daniel 3 b. 1677, 5 William 3 
b. 1679, 6 John 3 b. 1670. 

Note —By an oversight I have carried out the descendants of the two younger sons of 2 
Stephen* before those of the oldest son 6 Johns. But it is too late to correct this and after all 
does not affect the true story of the genealogy. 



288 History of Southampton. 

4 Daniel 3 of Sagg b. 1677, d. 1734, m. Sept. 20, 1703, Abigail 
Baker and had ch. 7 Daniel 4 b. 1709, 8 Jonathan 4 b. 1725 and 9 
Mary.* 

7 Daniel 4 d. Apr. 12, 1766, and had ch. 10 Daniel 5 b. May 11, 
1734, 11 David 5 b. 1744, 12 Abigail 6 , w. of Pierson, 13 Eliza- 
beth 5 , w. of Pierson, 14 Sarah 5 , 15 Abraham 5 and 16 Stephen. 5 

10 Daniel 5 m. 1, Oct. 27, 1756, Sarah Baker b. Aug. 6, 1735, and 
m. 2, Susanna Pierson (who was mother of his last two ch.), and 

had ch. 17 Sarah 6 b. Aug. 17, 1757, w. of Palmer, 18 Nathan 6 

b. June 5, 1759, 19 Daniel 6 b. Nov. 24, 1760, 20 Abigail 6 b. Nov.. 13, 

1762, w. of Stevens, 21 Phebe 6 b. Mch. 28, 1765, w. of Theoph. 

Cook, 22 Caleb 6 b. Sept. 16, 1770, 23 Abraham 6 b. July 7, 1768, 24 
Hannah 6 b. Aug. 12, 1772, w. of John Pierson, 25 Nathaniel 6 b. 
Sept. 12, 1774, of Hartford, Ct., 26 Susanna 6 b. Mch. 22, 1778, 27 
Martha 6 and 28 Abraham O. 6 , twins, b. Apr. 24, 1780. 

19 Daniel 6 of Brooklyn had s. 29 James S.' 

29 James S.' of Sag Harbor had s. 30 James S. 8 of Sag Harbor. 

30 James S. 8 b. 1827 had w. Hannah b. 1833 and ch. 31 Maurice 9 
b. 1856, 32 John H.° b. 1858 and 33 Edward M. 9 b. 1865. 

23 Abraham 6 had s. 34 Nathan.' 

11 Deacon David 5 b. 1744, d. Nov. 8, 1817, had w. Phebe and ch. 
35 Zephaniah 6 b. 1768, 36 David 6 , 37 Jesse 6 , 38 Wilkes 6 , 39 Sarah 6 , 
40 Eunice 6 , w. of John White, 41 Mary 6 , w. of Hiram Sanford, 42 
Abigail 6 , 43 Charity 6 , w. of Jeremiah Huntting, and 44 Elizabeth 6 , 
w. of Dr. Nathaniel Topping. 

35 Zephaniah 6 - d. Sept. 16, 1847, had w. Phebe b. 1782 and ch. 
45 Henry P. 7 b. 1818, 46 Jeremiah 7 b. 1820, 47 Thomas Sanford 7 
and 48 Edwin. 7 

45 Henry P. 7 grad. of Yale, county judge, etc., has w. Gloriana 
b. 1821 and ch. 49 Samuel Osborn 8 b. 1845, 50 Edwin 8 b. 1849 and 
51 Rev. William 8 b. 1852, the last two grad. of Yale. 

46 Jeremiah 7 has w. Eliza and ch. 52 Harriet B. s b. 1844, 53 
Susan M. 8 b. 1846, 54 John B. 8 b. 1850 and 55 Marcus Osborn 8 b. 
1854. 

47 Thomas Sanford 7 had s. 56 Henry E. 8 

48 Edwin 7 m. Nancy K. Topping b. 1814 and ch. 57 Hervey 
Topping b. 1838 and 58 Maria P. b. 1843. 

36 David 6 had ch, 59 Hervey 7 b. 1798, 60 Mary 7 , w. of Eev. Amzi 
Erancis, and 61 David 7 b. 1804. 



Genealogies. 289 

59 Col. Hervey' m. Laura Topping b. 1809 and had ch. 62 
Henry Topping 8 b. 1849 of Plum Creek, Nebraska, and 63 Mary 8 b. 
1843. 

61 David 7 had w. Clarissa and ch. 64 Cassander 8 b. 1834 and 65 
, David Anson, M. D., of New York, b. 1836. 

37 Jesse 6 had ch. 68 Albert G. 7 b. 1800 and 69 Charles S. 7 , both 
of Sag Harbor. 

68 Albert G. 7 had w. Elmira and ch. 70 Frances 8 b. 1838, 71 
Harriet 8 b. 1829, 72 Mary 8 b. 1831, 73 Juliette 8 b. 1833, 74 Helen 8 
b. 1839, 75 Sarah 8 b. 1842 and 76 George. 8 

69 Charles S. 7 had s. 77 Charles. 8 

38 Wilkes 6 had ch. 78 Eliza 7 b. 1801, 79 William 7 b. 1805, 80 
David Wilkes 7 b. 1811 and 81 Huntting M. 7 b. 1809, who had w. 
Abigail b. 1822. 

79 Capt. William 7 of East Hampton had w. Mary G. and ch. 82 
James M. 8 b. 1832, 83 Mary E. 8 b. 1834, 84 William 8 b. 1840 and 85 
Huntting M. 8 b. 1837. 

82 James M. 8 had w. Catherine and d. 86 Phebe E. 9 b. 1860. 

80 David Wilkes 7 had w. Julia b. 1809 and ch. 87 John Wilkes 8 
b. 1844, 88 Anna E. 8 b. 1846 and 89 Esther M. 8 b. 1848. 

15 Abraham 5 of Newark, N. J., had s. Nathan of Newark. 

16 Stephen 6 had ch. 90 Jared 6 b. 1770 and 91 Stephen 6 b. 1765. 

90 Jared 6 had w. Ruth b. 1783 and ch. 92 Robert 7 b. 1811, 93 
John N. 7 b. 1812, 94 Jared D.' b. 1814 and 95 Charles O. 7 b. 1823. 

92 Robert 7 had w. Phebe b. 1817 and ch. 96 Robert L. 8 b. 1842, 
97 Samuel P. 8 b. 1846 and 98 Stephen I. 8 b. 1848. 

93 John N.' had w. Caroline b. 1819 and ch. 99 Elisha O. 8 b. 1842, 
100 Mary L. 8 b. 1843, 101 John N. 8 b. 1848, 102 Adaline A. 8 b. 1850, 
103 Elizabeth O. 8 b. 1852 and 104 Abbie H. 8 b. 1858. 

94 Jared D.' had w. Caroline b. 1820 and ch. 105 Frances 8 b> 
1843, 106 Ebenezer 8 b. 1846, 107 Nathan 8 b. 1848, 108 Elias M. 8 b. 
1851, 109 Ruth E. 8 b. 1854, 110 Wilbur 8 b. 1856, 111 Carll 8 b. 1860 
and 112 Edward 8 b. 1862. 

95 Charles O. 7 had w. Charity b. 1839 and ch. 113 Charles 8 b. 
1859, 114 Harriet 8 b. 1861, 115 Edwin 8 b. 1863 and 116 Hubert 8 b. 
1865. 

91 Stephen 6 b. 1765, d. 1826, had s. 117 Levi. 7 

8 Col. Jonathan 4 b. 1725, d. June 3, 1804, m. Phebe Sept. 

11, 1746, and had ch. 118 Phebe 5 b. July 27, 1747, 119 Jonathan 5 
37 



290 Histoey of Southampton. 

of Newark Valley, Tioga Co., K Y, b. May 2, 1749, d. Apr. 10,. 
1835, 120 Elias 5 "b. Feb. 15, 1751, 121 Job 5 b. Mch. 4, 1753, 122 
Mary 6 (w. of Henry Moore) b. Feb. 4, 1755, 123 Cynthia 5 b. Oct. 
10, 1754, w. of Elisha Miller, 124 Abigail 5 b. July 10, 1759, 125 
Stephen 5 b. Apr. 10, 1764, and 126 Euth 5 b. Dec. 31, 1766, w. of 
¥m, Pierson. 

121 Job 5 had ch. 127 Lyman 6 , 128 Deacon Job 6 , 129 Howell 6 and 
130 Phebe 6 , w. of Babcock. 

127 Lyman 6 had s. 131 Stephen of Michigan. 

129 Howell 6 of Sag Harbor had ch. 132 Sarah A. 7 , w. of Capt. 
Prank Sayre of Southampton, and 133 a d. who m. Hannibal 
French of Sag Harbor. 

This ends the record of the descendants of 4 Daniel 3 , son of 2 
Stephen 2 , son of 1 William 1 , and these are mainly of Bridge- 
hampton. 

5 William 3 b. 1679, d. 1768 or 1771, m. Abiah Mulford, Mch. 2, 
1705 (but his will dated Jan. 28, 1765, mentions w. Zerviah), and 
had ch. 134 William 4 ! of Bast Hampton (as are all the descendants of 
5 William 3 ) bap. 1706, 135 Hannah 4 bap. 1708, 136 Mary 4 bap. 1710,, 
137 Jeremiah 4 bap. 1713, 138 David 4 bap. 1715, 139 Abiah 4 bap. 
1717, 140 Ezekiel 4 of Patchogue bap. 1719, 141 Lewis 4 bap. 1722 
and 142 Stephen 4 bap. 1724. 

134 William 4 had ch. 143 William 5 b. 1737 and 144 Thomas. 5 

143 William 6 d. 1825, had ch. 145 William 6 of Lansingburgh, N. 
Y., 146 David 6 b. 1779, 147 Jane 6 bap. 1782 and 148 John r b. 1789. 

146 Col. David 6 had s. 149 Dr. John Chatfleld' b. 1823, who m. 
Esther Mulford, b. 1825. 

137 Jeremiah 4 d. Oct. 14, 1738, ae. 25, m. Jerusha Mulford Apr. 
13, 1736, and she d. May 21, 1742, ae. 28 ; they had s. 150 David 5 
bap. Oct. 1737. 

142 Stephen 4 m. Jan. 1, 174f, Mary Miller and had ch. 151 
Jane 5 bap. 1762, 152 David 5 b. 1762 and 153 Joseph' bap 1767. 

152 Capt. David 5 d. 1846, had s. 154 Stephen 6 bap. 1791. 

154 Stephen 6 d. 1877, had w. Esther b. 1790 and ch. 155 Stephen 
L: b. 1815, 156 William 7 , 157 George 7 and 158 Nathan 7 . 

155 Stephen L.' had w. Minerva and ch. 159 David E. 8 , 160 
Fanny C. 8 , w. of Albert Payne, 161 Lawrence 8 , 162 Henry D. 8 and. 
163 William 8 . 



Genealogies. 29 i 

We come now to the descendants of 6 John, the oldest son of 2 
Stephen, which inadvertently had been arranged by numbers after 
those of his brothers Daniel and William. 

6 John 3 of Bast Hampton b. 1670, d. Jan. 9, 1737, m. Ruth 
Stratton. His will, dated Jan. 31, 173f, mentions only ch. John, 
Stephen and Lemuel, but the church records mention others, as fol- 
lows : He had ch. 164 Mary 4 bap. 1699, 165 John 4 bap. 1701, 166 
Stephen 4 bap. 1702, 167 Sarah 4 bap. 1705, 168 Lemuel 4 bap. 1707, 
d. Oct. 5, 1808, 169 Abigail 4 bap. 1711, 170 Daniel 4 bap. 1712 and 
171 Lemuel 4 bap. 1714. 

165 John 4 d. Mch. 25, 1786, ae. 84, m. Dec. 4, 1723, Elizabeth 
Talmadge, and had ch. 172 John 6 bap. 1724 (who d. s. p. 1742), 
173 Josiah 5 bap. 1726, 174 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1728, 175 Daniel 6 bap. 

1742, 176 Mary 5 bap. 1730, w. of Isaacs, and 177 Ruth 5 bap. 

1733, w. of Howell. 

175 Daniel 6 had ch. 178 Jerusha 6 bap. 1767, 179 Stephen 6 , who 
removed, 180 Daniel 6 bap. 1772, 181 Elizabeth 6 bap. 1776, 182 John 
N. 6 bap. 1785, 183 Lucinda 6 bap. 1778 and 184 Josiah 6 bap. 1770. 

182 John N. 6 had w. Eliza b. 1808 and ch. 185 Harriet' bap. 1832 
and 186 John D.' b. 1839. 

166 Stephen 4 bap. 1702, d. 1760, m. Dec. 21, 1727, Amy Mul- 
ford, and had ch. 187 Amy 5 bap. 1728, 188 Stephen 5 bap. 1731, 189 
Timothy 5 bap. 1733, 190 Matthew 5 bap. 1735, 191 Nathaniel 6 b. 
1737, 192 Esther 5 bap. 1740, 193 John 5 bap. 1743, 194 Elias 6 bap. 
1746, 195 Ruth 5 bap. 1748, 196 Mary 5 bap. 1749 and 197 Elizabeth 5 
bap. 1753. 

188 Stephen 5 m. Jan. 1, 1748, Mary Miller, and had ch. 198 
Jane 6 bap. 1762, 199 David 6 bap. 1762 and 200 Joseph 6 bap. 1767. 

189 Timothy 5 had ch. 201 Sarah 6 bap. 1761, 202 Lucretia 6 bap. 
1766 and 203 Jeremiah 6 

203 Jeremiah 6 had s. 204 Oapt. Jeremiah' of Sag Harbor. 

190 Matthew 6 had ch. 205 Juliana 6 bap. 1761, 206 Hannah 6 bap. 
1766, 207 Paul 6 of Ohio, 208 Matthew 6 , who removed, 209 Esther 6 , 
210 Stephen 6 of New York city, 211 Timothy 6 bap. 1780, 212 
Sophia 6 bap. 1782, 213 Samuel B. 6 bap. 1786, of Washington Co., 
N. Y., 214 Clarinda 6 bap.'l789, 215 John W. 6 bap. 1791 and 216 
Nathaniel 6 bap. 1795. 

■woth — Dr Buel's records in East Hampton are so slipshod that the last two eh. may be 
the ch 'of 308 Matthew^ instead of his brothers, born in E. H. before he removed. They are- 
recorded simply as the ch. of a Matthew Hedges. 



292 History of Southampton. 

171 Lemuel 4 bap. 1714 m. Jan. 8, 1740, Amy Dimon of South- 
old, and had ch. 217 Amy 6 bap. 1742, 218 Mary 5 bap. 1746, 219 
Lydia 5 bap. 1748, 220 Abigail 6 bap. 1750 and 221 Sarah 5 bap. 1752. 

The descendants of 3 Isaac 2 , the second son of William the settler: 

3 Isaac 2 b. abt. 1636, d. between Jan. 1 and Mch. 24, 1676-7, m. 
Joana, d. of Joshua Barnes. 3 Isaac' at his death left a family of 
young ch., number, sex and ages unknown, but among them was 
222 Isaac 3 . 

222 Isaac? d. Nov. 22, 1726, had ch. 223 Samuel 4 b. 1685, 224 
Abraham 4 b. 1692, d. Jan. 1722-3, 225 Isaac 4 b. abt. 1695, 226 
Jacob 4 b. 1698, d. 1723, 227 Jeremiah 4 bap. 1702, d. Jan. 4, 1722-3, 
228 Johana 4 or Jemima 4 (name scarcely legible on church record) 
bap. 1704, 229 Mary 4 bap, 1706, 230 Gideon 4 bap. 1711, 231 Henry 4 
bap. 1713, 232 David 4 bap. 1715 and 233 John 4 bap. 1718. 

233 Samuel 4 d. Mch. 9, 1755, ae. 70, m. May 8, 1701, Lois Par- 
sons, who d. Dec. 25, 1718, and had ch. 234 Jonathan 6 b. 1706, 235 
Samuel 6 b. abt. 1707 and 236 Benjamin 6 of Montauk b. 1714 and 
perhaps daughters. 

234 Jonathan 6 d. Jan. 16, 1763, m. Hannah Oonklin Oct. 9, 1729, 
and hadch. 237 Jonathan 6 bap. 1730, 238 Lois 6 bap. 1733, 239Mehet- 
abel 6 bap. 1737, 240 Barnaby 6 , 241 Abigail 6 and 242 Beuben 6 b. 1750. 

242 Reuben 6 had ch. 243 Dr. George 7 bap. 1790, 244 Robert L. 7 
bap. 1792, 245 Mehetabel' bap. 1798, 246 Hannah 1 and 247 Mary.' 

235 Samuel 5 d. Aug. 27, 1735, m. Experience Talmage July 6, 
1732, and had ch. 248 Experience 6 bap. 1734 and 249 Samuel 6 bap. 
Eeb. 1735-6. 

236 Benjamin 6 d. Mch. 24, 1812, m. Alethea, d. of Daniel Miller, 
June 16, 1741, and "had ch. 250 Philip 6 bap. 1742, 251 Thomas 6 
bap. 1744, 252 Nathan 6 bap. 1746, 253 Elihu 6 b. 1745, bap. 1749, 
and 254 Christopher. 6 

250 Philip 6 d. Mch. 3, 1834, ae. 92, and had s. 255 Benjamin 7 of 
Amagansett, b. 1790. 

255 Benjamin' had w. Janette and d. 256 Mary A. 6 b. 1840. 

251 Thomas 6 had d. 257 Keziah' bap. 1767. 

252 Nathan 6 had ch. 258 Phebe 7 bap. 1775, 259 Nathan 7 bap. 1777 
and d. young, 260 Temperance 7 bap. 1780, 261 Nathan 7 bap. 1783 
and 262 Hannah 7 bap. 1790. 

253 Elihu 6 d. Aug. 23, 1823, and had ch. 263 Mary 7 bap. 1777, 264 
Elihu 7 bap. 1784, 265 Esther 7 bap. 1788 and 266 Sarah 7 bap. 1791. 



Genealogies. 



293 



254 Christopher^ had ch. 267 Lyon G.' bap. 1779, 268 Hannah' 
bap. 1783, 269 Sylvanus 7 bap. 1786, 270 Elizabeth 7 bap. 1788 and 
271 Sylvanus 7 bap. 1789. 

225 Isaac 4 b. abt. 1695, m. Feb. 6, 1722-3, Phebe Parsons, and had 
ch. 272 Abraham 5 bap. Dec. 1723, 273 Isaac 6 b. 1728, 274. Mary' 
bap. 1731, 275 Joana 6 bap. 1734 and 276 Jacob 5 bap. 1738. 

272 Abraham 6 m. Oct. 25, 1747, Esther Miller, and had ch. 277 
Elizabeth 6 bap. 1748 and 278 Esther 6 bap. 1753. 

276 Jacob 5 had ch. 279 Abraham 6 bap. 1777, 280 Isaac 9 bap. 1778 
and 281 Jacob 6 bap. 1784. 

281 Deacon Jacob 6 had. ch. 282 Albert L. T b. 1820, 283 Jacob', 
284 Clarissa E. 7 b. 1827 and 285 Abraham. 7 

282 Albert L. 7 had w. Mary and ch. 286 Abraham E. 8 b, 1852 and 
287 Mary E. 8 b. 1859. 

283 Jacob 7 had ch. 288 Albert 8 and 289 Charles. 8 

.From the church records of East Hampton we learn that a Phi- 
letus Hedges had s. Benjamin bap. 1789. 

Also, that an. Ebenezer Hedges m. Mch. 20, 1740, Mehetabel 
Conklin, and had ch. Hannah bap. 1743, Lucretia bap. 1748 and 
Ebenezer bap. 1752. 

The second Ebenezer m. Nov. 5, 1793, Puah Tillinghast, and had 
ch. John Tillinghast bap. 1796 and Hannah bap. 1798. 

Four families of this name in Englaud are mentioned in Burke's 
Gen. Armory as having coat armor. , 

Heerick Family. 

This family is without question de- 
scended from the Herricks of Leicester- 
shire in England, as the crest of that 
family is engraved on the tombstone of 
William Herrick, the son of James 
Herrick, the first of the name in South- 
ampton. This is said because at the 
time ot the death ot William Herrick 
men in this country had not begun to 
use arms, as they did at a later period 
and do now, to which they are not en- 
titled. From the Genealogical Eegister 
of the Herrick family, issued by Jede- 




294 History of Southampton. 

diah Herrick in 1846, we learn that " in the year 1598 was granted, 
from the Herald's office, unto Robert and William Herick, the 
sonnea of John Herick, the sonne of Thomas Herick alias Erick 
of Houghton, in the countie of Leicester, gentleman, and their 
posteritie forever, a certeyne crest or badge, namelie : on a wreathe 
of their couloures a bull's head argent, yssuing forthe of a laurell 
garland. The mussel, eares and homes tipped sable. To be 
annexed and borne with their auncient coat of armes, whichis silver, 
a fesse verray, orr and gules. Motto : Virtus omnia nobiliiat." 

James Herrick came to Southampton in 1653 probably a young 
man and unmarried, and, it is conjectured, was the brother of 
Henry Herrick, who settled a little earlier in Salem, Mass. He 
soon married Martha, d. of Thomas Topping, who gave the young 
people a homestead carved out of his larger homestead, embracing 
now the residences and home lots of James H. Foster and Henry 
Post, the latter being the one given to James Herrick. 1 James 1 d. 
in 1687 and had w. Martha and ch. 2 James 5 , 3 William 2 b. 1654, 

4 Mary", w. of Howell, 5 Sarah 2 , w. of Petty, 6 Thomas 2 , 

who d. s. p., and 7 Martha 2 , who in 1087 m. Zerubbabal Phillips. 
The inventory of his property was £74 12s. Od. 




etjh 




(IM&T* s&JxffJ'c 



2 James 2 d. Aug. 16, 1701, had w. Sarah, d. of Peregrine Sfcans- 
brough, and one d. 8 Sarah 3 , not 18 years of age at time of her 
father's death. 

3 William 2 b. 1654, d. 1708, had w. Mehetabel, who d. 1736, and 
had ch. 9 William 3 , 10 Stephen 3 , 11 Nathan 3 b. 1700, 12 James 3 , 13 
Irene 8 , w. of Jonathan Raynor, 14 Phebe 3 , 15 Mehetabel 3 , w. of 
Topping, and 16 Abigail 3 , w. of Obadiah Rogers. 

10 Stephen 3 d. 1756, m. 1st Deborah Conkling of East Hampton, 

Dec. 24, 1719, and m. 2d Dorothy , and hadch. 17 Cleopatra 4 , 

18 Deborah 4 , 19 Ann 4 , 20 Stephen 4 of New Haven, 21 Ashbel 4 , 22 
George 4 b. 1734, 23 Hugh 4 b. 1742 and 24 Abigail. 4 

22 George 4 d. 1786, m. Mary, d. of Obadiah Rogers, and had ch. 
25 William 5 b. 1760 and 26 Austin 5 b. 1771 and d. 1793. 



Genealogies. 295 

25 William 5 b. 1760, d. Nov. 25, 1825, m. Phebe, d. of Timothy 
Pierson, b. 1760 and d. 1846, and had ch. 27 Stephen 6 of Utica, N. 
Y., 28 Hiram 6 , 29 William P. 6 , 30 George 6 , 31 Austin 6 , 32 Edward 6 
and 33 Abigail. 6 

27 Stephen 6 had ch. 34 John 1 , 35 William 7 , 36 Charles', 37 
George 7 and 38 Elizabeth. 7 

29 William P. 6 had w. Esther and ch. 39 William', 40 Elizabeth', 
41 Abigail 7 and 42 Cephas. 7 

31 Capt. Austin 6 b. Apr. 12, 1796, m.Mary W. b. Oct. 12, 1808, 
d. of Samuel Jagger, and had ch. 43 Samuel Edward' b. Apr. 
6, 1841, and 44 Mary A.' b. Mch. 6, 1846, and w. of Henry P. 
Herrick. 

43 Rev. Samuel Edward', D. D., of Boston, grad. of Amherst, m- 
Sophia, d. of John Poster of Quogue, and has one d. 45 Margaret 
P. 8 b. Peb. 21, 1868. 

11 Nathan 3 b. 1700, d. 1784, had ch. (order of births not 

known), 46 Mehetabel 4 , w. of Sayre, 47 Martha 4 , w. of 

Woolley, 48 Eunice 4 , w. of White, 49 Nathaniel 4 (who had w. 

Elizabeth, and he died 1784) and 50 Henry 4 b. 1737. 

50 Henry 4 had ch. 51 Claudius 5 , of New Haven, b. 1775, 52 
Selden 5 and 53 Eunice. 6 

51 Claudius 5 of New Haven had ch. 54 John Pierrepont 6 b. 1807, 
55 Edward Claudius 6 , the eminent scientist and librarian of Yale 
College and 56 Henry. 6 

54 Dr. John P. 6 , grad. of Yale, m. Esther, d. of James Poster, 
and had eh. 57 James C, 58 Louisa P.' b. 1842, 59 John C b. 
1845 and 60 Henry P.' b. 1847. 

Dr. John P. Herrick was a man of high character and loved as a 
friend as greatly as he was esteemed as a physician by the entire 
village. 

59 Dr. John C m. Ellen Topping and has ch. 

60 Henry P. 7 m. Mary, d. of Capt. Austin Herrick, and had ch. 
Esther Pierpont, who d. young, and John Austin. 

56 Rev. Henry 6 had ch. 61 Charles' and 62 Lydia', and others, 
names unknown to the writer. 

52 Selden 5 had ch. 63 Clarissa 6 , 64 Sarah M. 6 , 65 Mehetabel 6 and 
66 Jerusha. 6 

12 James 3 d. 1783, had w. Abigail b. 1715, d. Apr. 6, 1795, ana 
s. 67 Micaiah 4 b. 1739. 



296 History of Southampton. 

67 Micaiali 4 d. Sept. 16, 1782, had w. Martha and ch. 68 James 5 
b. Oct. 23, 1769, 69 Edward 6 b. Jan. 28, 1773, d. Aug. 31, 1796, 70 
Hiram 5 b. Nov. 6, 1775, d. Feb. 23, 1790, 71 Clarissa 5 b. Jan. 2, 
1778, d. Nov. 30, 1856, w. of Obadiah Jones Eogers, and 72 
Micaiah 6 b. Nov. 31, 1781. 

72 Micaiah 5 d. Aug. 19, 1840, m. Nancy, d. of David Kose, and 
had ch. 74 James 6 b. Feb. 25, 1809, d. s. p. Feb. 13, 1849, 75 Cor- 
nelia 6 b. Oct. 18, 1810, w. of William Huntting, 76 Elizabeth 6 b. 
Jan. 4, 1813^ d. May 21, 1884, 77 Mary 6 , w. of Isaac P. Foster, b. 
Sept. 8, 1815, 78 George 6 b. Dec. 9, 1818, and 79 Edward 6 b. Feb. 
28, 1821, d. July 31, 1838. 

78 George 6 d. Oct. 5, 1873, m. Charlotte E., d. of George Meade, 
and had ch. 80 Cornelia A. 7 b. July 25, 1844, d. Sept. 9, 1858, 81 
James M. 7 b. Sept. 24, 1846, 82 Emily Louisa 7 b. Nov. 6, 1860, and 
83 Mary Elizabeth 7 b. Dec. 3, 1862. 

81 James M. 7 m. Susan Eose, d. of "William R. and Caroline 
(Osborne) Howell, Oct. 29, 1884, and has d. 84 Cornelia 8 b. July 
27, 1885. 

58 Louisa P. Herrick d. in 1872, a yoang lady endowed with 
every trait of character that wins the love and high esteem of man- 
kind. In grateful remembrance of her friendship, which any man 
might be proud to possess, this faint tribute to her is given. 

In Memoriam. 

Toll for the loved and lost. 

Who the stream of death has crossed. 

Swift came the terror king 

The best of us summoning, 

Stilling the throbbing breast, 

Now in her cerements dressed. 

Hark I what sounds are these, 
Wafted by the ocean breeze ? 
Weeping, as the broken-hearted, 
For a soul to heaven departed ? 
When the Lord Christ calls his bride. 
And the gates are open wide 1 

Now lift our hearts in praise, 
Loud our song triumphant raise ! 
Onward to the fields of light, 
There waits the Lamb in white. 
Tonder gleams the jasper sea — 
Hark ! High heaven's jubilee 1 



Genealogies. 297 



Hildreth: Family. 

Thomas Hildreth was the progenitor of the Long Island family, 
and must have been born in England, as no connection can be dis- 
covered with any of the name in New England. He is first men- 
tioned in the Southampton records in 1643, and might have come 
a little earlier. One of his descendants, Dr. Shadrach, was a sur- 
geon in the American army of the revolution, and died in the 
service. 

1 Thomas 1 d. 1657, had w. Hannah (who after death of Thomas 
rn. Jonas Bower), and ch. 2 Joseph 2 , 3 Hannah 2 , 4 James 2 and 5 
Peter 2 - 

2 Joseph 2 , the ancestor of the Southampton village families of 
this name, m. Hannah, d. of John Jessup, Sept. 11, 1678, and 
had ch. 6 Joseph 3 b. July 27, 1679, 7 Nathan 3 b. Mch. 17, 1684-5, 
8 Benjamin 3 b. Sept. 22, 1681, 9 Ephraim 3 b. 1689, 10 Daniel 8 , 
11 Jonathan 3 , 12 Joseph 3 , 13 John 3 probably, b. 1702, d. s. p. Oct. 
1, 1722, and 14 Isaac 3 . 

7 Nathan 3 d. June 13, 1746, had w. Sarah and ch. 15 John 4 , 16 
Daniel 4 , 17 Sarah 4 , 18 Abigail 4 , 19 Hannah 4 , 20 Manassah 4 , 21 
Joseph 4 b. 1727 and 22 Benjamin 4 . 

21 Joseph 4 d. June, 1788, had w. Sarah and ch. 23 Daniel 5 , 24 
Dr. Shadrach 5 , 25 Joseph 5 , 26 Samuel 5 , 27 Nathan 5 and 28 Philip 6 , 
who d. 1789. 

23 Daniel 5 had ch. 29 Shadrach 6 and 30 Daniel 6 b. 1800. 

29 Shadrach 6 had s. 31 Nathan' b. 1815. 

31 Nathan' had w. Phebe L. b. 1817 and ch. 32 Oscar 8 b. 1840, 
33 Charles N. 8 b. 1842, 34 John H. 8 b. 1844 and 35 Susan J. 8 b. 

1847. 

33 Charles N. 8 has w. Miranda and ch. George W. 9 b. 1862 and 
Edward A. 9 b. 1864. 

30 Daniel 8 had w. Mary b. 1799 and ch. 36 Caroline B. b. 1837, 
37 Lucy and others. 

25 Joseph 6 d. 1789, had ch. 38 Joseph 6 b. 1776, 39 John 6 and 40 
Daniel 6 bap. 1787. 

38 Joseph 6 m. Beulah, d. of Abraham Sayre, and had ch. 41 Albert' 
b. 1812, 42 Lewis' b. 1814 and 43 Elmira', w. of Thomas Warren, 
who had son Capt. Thomas. 
38 



298 Histoey of Southampton. 

41 Albert' m. 1 Mehetabel b. 1820, d. of Samuel Sanford, andm. 
2 Elmira, d. of Capt. John Bishop, and had by his first w. ch„ 44 
Eleanor J. 8 b. 1844, w. of David Harold Rose, and 45 Samuel L. 8 b. 
1847 and d. young. 

42 Lewis 7 m. Amanda, d. of Capt. Andrew Halsey of Cobb, b. 
1827 and had ch. 46 Edgar A. 8 b. 1852, 47 Henry H. 8 b. 1855, 47£ 
"William 8 , who d. in infancy, 48 Harriet E. 8 w. of Jeremiah Tuthill 
of Outchogue, and 49 Charles L. b. 1864 and d. young. 

46 Edgar A. 8 m. Clara, d. of Albert Jagger, and has son Lewis 
Pelletreau. 

47 Henry H. 8 m. Mary, d. of Albert Jagger, and has s. William 
Warren. 

9 Ephraim 3 b. 1689, d. Jan. 16, 1771, had w. Abigail b. 1695 and 

d. Mch. 21, 1737, and ch. 50 Abigail 4 , w. of L'Hommedieu, 51 

Sibyl 4 , w. of Poster and 52 Phebe. 4 

12 Joseph 3 had 1st w. Hannah, who d. Dec. 22, 1725 ae. 23, 
and 2d w. Deborah, and ch. 53 Hannah 4 , 54 Mary 4 , 55 Deborah 4 , 
56 Sarah 4 and 57 Anne. 4 

14 Isaac 3 had s. 58 John 4 , of Bridgehampton. 

58 John 4 had ch. 59 Isaac 6 , 60 Luther 5 , 61 John 5 and 62 Septi- 
mus 6 , and probably three daughters before 62 Septimus 5 to warraDt 
his name. 

59 Isaac 5 had ch. 63 Luther 6 b. 1785, 64 Abigail 6 , 65 Ann 6 , 66 
Shadrach 6 , 67 Isaac 6 b. 1791, 68 Lester" b. 1793, 69 John 6 and 70 
Matthew 6 b. 1798. 

70 Matthew 6 m. Hannah Topping b. 1801, and had ch. 71 
Samuel' b. 1826, 72 Clara T. 7 b. 1827, 73 Maria 7 , w. of E. Jones 
Ludlow, 74 Caroline H. 7 , w. of Capt. Henry E. Huntting, 75 Abra- 
ham T. 7 76 Egbert H. 7 b. 1837, 77 Mary G. 7 b. 1839 and 78 John 
Howard 7 b. 1843. 

76 Egbert H. 7 m. 1, Dec. 28, 1864, Etta Miller, who d., and he 
m. 2 Adaliza S. Hawkins, Mch. 21, 1882, and has s. Frederic P. 8 b. 
Nov. 7, 1865. 

60 Luther 6 had s. 79 Samuel T. 6 of Sag Harbor, b. 1797. 

79 Samuel T. 6 had w. Phebe b. 1797 and ch. 80 Samuel T. 7 b. 
1830, 81 Augustus P. 7 b. 1840, 85J Abbie E. 7 b. 1839 and 83 Wil- 
liam H. b. 1841. 

The families of this name residing mostly in Bridgehampton are 
descended from 4 James. 2 



Genealogies. 299 

4 James 5 had s. 84 James. 3 

84 James 3 d. abt. ] 722 had w. Deborah and ch. 85 Noah 4 , 86 
Deborah 4 w. of Israel Rose, 87 Hannah 4 , 88 Sarah 4 89 David 4 and 
90 Joshua. 4 

85 Noah 4 d. 1735-6 hadw. Hannah and probably a son 91 Peter, 6 
as 84 James 3 mentions a gr. son of this name. 

90 Joshua 4 d. 1758, m. Ann Stratton of B. H. Jan. 26, 1721, and 
had ch. 92 James 6 , 93 Daniel 5 and 94 Ann 6 , w. of Alison. 

92 James 6 d. 1778-9, m, Phebe Howell and had ch. 95 Noah 6 , 96 
David 6 , 97 James 6 , 98 Joshua 6 , 99 Mary 6 , 100 Eebecca 6 , 101 Phebe 6 
and 102 Levi. 6 

98 Joshua 6 had ch. 103 David' and 104 Patrick G.' of New York. 

102 Levi 6 m. Mary Jennings and had ch. 105 Henry Lawrence', 
b. 1807, 106 Mary', w. of David Burnett, 107 Phebe, w. of Arnold 
Douglas of New York, and 108 James M.' b. 1803. 

105 Henry Lawrence 7 had w. Jernsha and ch. 109 Phebe 8 b. 1836, 
and 110 Edward A. 8 b. 1853, who m. Sept. 9, 1873, Hattie N., d. 
of James Haynes, and had ch. Edward Eaymond b. May, 1877 and 
Henry L. b. July 13, 1882. 

108 James M.' m. Frances A., d. of Silas Cook of Bridgehamp- 
ton, and had ch. Ill Mary Prances 8 b. 1832, 112 Eliza 8 b. 1835, w. 
of Capt. Barney Green, 113 Laura 8 b. 1838, 114 James A. 8 b. 1841, 
115 Ella C. 8 b."l844 and 116 Annie M. 8 b. 1847. 

5 Peter 9 had s. 117 Peter. 3 

117 Peter 3 had ch. 118 Peter 4 and 119 David. 4 

118 Peter 4 had s. 120 Jonathan. 5 

120 Jonathan 6 had ch. 121 James Halsey 6 b. 1801 and 122 Alfred. 6 

121 James Halsey 6 had w. Mary P., b. 1808 and ch. 123 James 
H.' b. 1828, 124 Charles H. 7 b. 1830, 125 Solon H.' b. 1833, 126 
Wm. Wallace' b. 1838, 127 Sarah' b. 1840, 128 George A.' b. 1841 
(who m. Caroline A. Pierson, Nov. 23, 1864), 129 Nathaniel' b. 
1845, 130 Lucy' b. 1848 and 131 Mary R.' b. 1852. 

124 Charles H.' has w. Julia A. and ch. 132 Abbie 8 b. 1860 and 
133 James E. 8 b. 1861. 

West of the hills a 134 Joseph P. (whose ancestors I know not) 
b. 1810 had in 1855 w. Armenia b. 1811 and ch. 135 Joseph P. b. 
1837, 136 Charles E. b. 1839, 137 James E. b. 1842, 138 Mary H. 
b. 1844, 139 Samuel R. b. 1847 and 140 George W. b. 1850. 



300 



History of Southampton. 




Howell Family. 

Edward Howell of Marsh 
Gibbon, Buckinghamshire, 
England, was the ancestor 
of this family of Southamp- 
ton. A Richard Howell 
came to Southold with his 
mother, a widow, it is said 
by Rev. "William Hallock, 
D. D., late of New York, 
who married Peter Hallock, 
the ancestor of the Long 
Island family of Hallocks. 
No relationship is known to 
exist between these two pio- 
neers. Edward Howell dis- 
posed of considerable estates in Bucks county in 1639, among 
which was the manor of Westbury in Marsh Gibbon, purchased by '•' 
his grandfather, "William Howell, in 1536. The old stone manor 
house is still standing, though the remains of an old foundation 
near it show that some portions of it have been taken down. It is 
of two full stories and what is called a double house, now nearly 
covered with ivy. Edward Howell came in 1639 with his family . 
to Boston, where he was made freeman, March 14, 1639-40. He 
soon removed to Lynn, where he had a grant of 500 acres. During 
the winter of 1639-40 a new settlement was projected on Long 
Island, of which he seems to have been the leader, as the compact 
or agreement of terms of founding the plantation is in his hand- 
writing, as well as the laws adopted by the first settlers, and to the 
last year of his life he was always a magistrate and member of the 
colonial legislature at Hartford. The manner in which his name 
is mentioned in the colonial records of New England and New 
York point to the same conclusion. 

The arms of this family, as found on an old family seal now in 
possession of one of the descendants and on several old tombstones 
of the seventeenth century in Southampton, are as follows : Gules, 
three towers triple-towered, argent. 



Genealogies. 301 

Crest used by] some branches. Out of a ducal crown or, a rose 
argent stalked and leaved vert, between two wings, indorsed of the 
last. 

Motto : Tenax propositi. 

William Howell of Wedon, in county of Bucks, m. 1st Maude, who 
died and left ch., John the elder and John the younger. William 
m. 2d Anne Hampton and had s. Henry. He had besides, but by 
which wife I cannot say, ch. Jacob and Eachel, w. of Eev. Thomas 
Willis, and Isabel, Jane, Cecil, Agnes, Anne, Joane and Alice. 
His will of date Nov. 30, 1557, directs his body "to be buried in the 
parish church of Wingrave, in the chancel before the high altar." 
Gives legacies to the poor of Aylesbury, the poor of Whitechurch 
and the poor of Marsh. Gives his wife Anne his lands in Watton 
and Hamme for her life, and at her decease they are to go to 
Henry. Gives his eldest son John his lands in Marsh Gibbon and 
in default of issue to his son Henry, and in default of issue to son 
Jacob. To each of his daughters £20 and a legacy for bells for the 
Hardwick church. He d. in 1557 and John the eldest son inheri- 
ted the manor, and himself died without issue 1576. 

From the parish register of Marsh Gibbon the following extract 
is taken : 

Henry Howell, Gent.^ was buried ye twenty day of July, 1625. 

Edward Howell was baptized the 22d of July, 1584. 

Francis Howell, wife of Edward Howell, Gent.; buried 2d of 
July, 1630. 

1 Edward 1 , the son of Henry Howell, had 1st w. Frances and ch. 
2 Henry 2 bap. Dec. 20, 1618, and buried 29 Aug. 1619, 3 Margaret 5 
bap. Nov. 24, 1622, w. of Rev. John Moore of Southold, L. I., 4 
t 'John 2 bap. Nov. 22, 1624, "5 Edward 2 bap. Sept. 1626, 6 Margery 2 
bap. June 1, 1628, 7 Richard 2 bap. 1629. Edward Howell m. 2d 
Eleanor and by her had ch. 8 Arthur 2 bap. 1632 and 9 Edmund. 2 

Edward Howell built in 1648 the house occupied in his life-time 
by William P. Herrick, nearly opposite the present residence of 
Capt. James M. Herrick, and had the two adjoining house lots to 
the north, his front extending to Job's lane, as he had purchased 



302 History of Southampton. 

three shares in the corporation of the settlement. This house was 
taken down about twenty-five years ago by Capt. Philetus Pierson, 
who purchased the homestead. His three shares entitled him to 
over 3,000 acres within the boundaries of the town. 

4 Major John 2 d. Nov. 3, 1696, had w. Susannah and ch. 10 
John 3 b. Nov. 28, 1648, 11 Edward 3 b. Mch. 2, 1649-50, and d. s. 
»., 12 Matthew 3 b. Nov. 8, 1651, 13 Abraham 3 b. Jan. 22, 1653-4, 
14 Ephraim 3 b. Jan. 1, 1655-6, 15 Susannah 3 b. July 15, 1658, 16 
Hannah 3 b. Oct. 28, 1660, 17 Theophilus 3 b. Dec. 18, 1662, 18 
Nathaniel 3 b. Aug. 29, 1664, 19 Prudence 3 b. Dec. 27, 1666, and 20 
Abigail 3 b. July 5, 1670. 

Major John Howell was a man of distinction and one who more 
than any of his coutemporaries in Southampton was entrusted with 
the management of public business, especially in its graver relations 
with New England and the colonial government of New York. 

10 John 3 d. Mch. 8, 1692, m. 1st Martha, d. of John White, and 
she d. June 7, 1688. He m. 2d Mary, wid. of Eev. Joseph Taylor, 
Jan. 30, 1690, and had ch. 21 Mehetabel 4 b. Mch, 12, 1674, 22 
John 4 b. July 11, 1676, 23 Phebe 4 b. Sept. 5, 1678, 24 Susannah 4 b. 
Nov. 20, 1680, 25 Stephen 4 b. May 10, 1683, 26 Henry 4 b. Mch. 18, 
1684-5 (and removed to Boston, where he had ch.), 27 Elizabeth* 
b. Feb. 4, 1687, and 28 Sibyl 4 b. Aug. 9, 1691. 

22 John 4 d. 1748, m. 1st Joana Cooper and 2d Eebecca , 

and had ch. 29 John 5 b. 1711, 30 Ebenezer 6 , 31 Catherine 5 , 32 
Charles 5 , who removed to Cohanzy, N. J., 33 Timothy 6 , 34 Joana 5 
b. 1722, w. of Zebulon Howell, 2d, and 35 Eebecca. 5 

29 Capt. John 5 d. June 16, 1791, m. Desire, d. of Ephraim 
White, and had ch. 36 John 6 b. Apr. 20, 1743, 37 Henry 6 b. Jan. 
22, 1745, 38 Stephen 6 b. Nov. 23, 1746, 39 James 6 , 40 Nathan 6 and 
41 Mary 6 , w. of David Sayre. 

36 John 6 m. Mehetabel Jessup and had ch. 42 John 7 , 43 Horace', 
44 Orson 7 , 45 Frederic 7 b. 1803, 46 Philo, 47 Dr. Thomas 7 and 48 
William. 7 

43 Horace' of Eusbville, Yates county. N. Y., had s. 49 Elisha 
Carpenter 8 of Ovid, Seneca Co., N. Y. 

49 Elisha C. s has s. 50 William C. 9 

45 Frederic 8 m. for his third wife Milicent, d. of Ebenezer Jag- 
ger, and left one son, 51 William F. 9 , who m. and has ch. living 
now in Corydon, Wayne Co., Iowa. 



Genealogies. 303 

37 Henry 6 removed to Elizabeth, N. J., and had ch. 52 Ann' and 
53 David. 7 

33 Timothy 5 had w. Deborah and ch. 54 Eunice 6 , 55 Anna 6 , 56 
Ezekiel 6 , 57 Jonathan 6 and 58 Prudence. 6 

12 Ool. Matthew 8 was a representative for Suffolk Co. in the 
Colonial Legislature in 1691, 1692, and from 1694 to 1706 inclusive. 
April 17, 1701, he was honored with an expulsion from that body 
by the Governor, for presenting a paper considered " disloyal to his 
Majesty, and disaffected to his government," a paper, however, 
which we should now regard simply as breathing only the senti- 
ments of a larger liberty than that vouchsafed to the colonists at 
that day. Col. Henry Pierson, also a member of the same Assem- 
bly, and three others were rebuked for signing it, among who was 
Kiliaon Van Rensselaer, then the head of the distinguished family 
of that name in Albany. Col. Howell was, to the credit of his 
constituents, promptly re-elected, and sent back to the same As- 
sembly, and remained throughout all his term of office an able de- 
fender of the rights of the colonists. After his death at Newtown 
on his way home, his body was taken to Southampton and buried 
in the Southend burying-ground, where a massive tombstone, re- 
maining to this day, and bearing the family arms, marks his last 
earthly resting-place. 

12 Matthew 3 b. Nov. 8, 1651, d. May 4, 1706, m. Mary Halsey 

Nov. 8, 1677, and had ch. 59 Eunice 4 b. Aug 18, 1678, w. of 

Wakeman, 60 Nathan 4 b. Nov. 24, 1681, 61 Jerusha 4 , 62 Israel 4 b. 
Apr. 17, 1686 and 63 Ezekiel" b. Jan. 21, 1688-9. 

62 Israel 4 lived in Southampton till the death of his first wife ; 
then soon after moved to Islip, then to Moriches, where he d. May 
2, 1739. He m. 1st Mary Eogers Nov. 22, 1711, and she d. Mch. 26, 
1716. He m. 2d July 1, 1719, Abigail Cooper or Abigail Howell 
(statements vary) who d. 1773, ae. 77, and had ch. 64 Matthew" b. 
Aug. 23, 1712, and d. Dec. 14, 1715, 65 Eunice 6 b. Dec. 11, 1713, 
66 Israel 5 b. Mch. 14, 1715-6, 67 Jerusha 5 b. July 30, 1720, 68 Abi- 
gail 5 b. Jan. 9, 1722, 69 David 5 b. June, 1724, 70 Matthew 5 b. Feb. 
14, 1726, 71 Nathaniel 6 b. July 12, 1728, 72 Selah 5 and 73 Eunice 5 
b. Jan. 10, 1734. 

66 Israel 5 m. Anna White of Southampton, and lived in Islip and 
had ch. 74 Lemuel 6 , 75 Smith 6 , 76 Mowbray 6 , 77 Patrick 6 and 78 
Ruth. 6 



304 Histoet of Southampton. 

77 Patrick 6 had ch. 79 John 7 , 80 William'' and 81 Hannah.' 
79 John' had ch. 82 William 8 and 83 Mary. 8 

69 David 6 d. Feb. 13, 1803, m. Elizabeth Havens, and had ch. 84 
Elizabeth 6 b. 1756, d. 1780, 85 Aigail 6 (who m. Rev. Joshua Hartt, 
Jan. 13, 1773), 86 Nicoll 6 b. 1760, d. 1764, 87 Oapfc. Charles 6 of 
Moriches, b. 1766, d. 1788, 88 Frances 6 , 89 Margaret 6 b. 1763 and 
89£ Mary Catherine 2d w. of Josiah Smith of Brookhaven town. 

88 Frances 6 m. Jan. 13, 1773, Eev. Joshua Hartt, who for a time 
was stated supply of the Presbyterian church m Southampton. 
They had a d. Frances 1 , who m. Col. Hunt of Sag Harbor, and had 
ch. John Alexander and others. 

89 Margaret 6 m. Ebenezer Hartt and had a d. Elizabeth Eose 
Hartt 7 , who m. Horace Jerome. 

Horace Jerome had s. David Howell Jerome 8 , who m. Lucy A. 
Peck and had s. Thomas Spencer Jerome 9 of Cambridge, Mass. 

70 Matthew 6 d. Mch. 5, 1786, m. 1st Mary Allison and 2d Mar- 
garet Carr, and had ch. 90 Matthew 6 b. Jan. 9, 1756, 91 Mary 6 b. 
Sept. 20, 1758, 92 Theophilus 6 b. May 2, 1760, 93 Margaret 6 b. Apr. 
17, 1762, 94 Elizabeth 6 b. May 17, 1764, 95 Philetus 6 b. Jan. 17, 
1767, 96 Jane 6 b. July 19, 1773 and 97 William 6 b. Apr. 25, 1775. 

72 Selah 5 had ch. 98 Henry 6 and 99 Charity. 6 

98 Henry 6 had ch. 100 Selah', 101 George', 102 Edward', 103 
Nancy 7 , 104 Sarah A. 7 and 105 Mary. 7 

100 Selah' had ch. 106 John 8 and 107 Emma. 8 

108 James 5 was of this branch, descended from Col. Matthew, and, 
was probably the son of 60 Nathan 4 or of 63 Ezekiel 4 , as the other y 
children of Col. Matthew are accounted for. 

108 James 5 of Sag Harbor, b. Oct. 15, 1734, d. Dec. 12, 1808, 
and had ch. 109 Lucretia 6 b. 1760, d. 1767, 110 Mary 6 b. 1762, w. 
of Nathan Fordham of Sag Harbor, 111 Matthew 6 b. Jan. 24, 1764, 
112 Jerusha 6 b. Sept. 6, 1768, w. of Stephen Holt of New York, 113 
Elizabeth 6 b. Dec. 23, 1770, w. of Samuel Kip of New York and 
114 Abigail 6 b. May 9, 1776, w. of John Price of Sag Harbor. 

Ill Matthew 6 m. Hannah Latham of Sag Harbor, and had s. 115 
Charles J.' b. 19, 1797. 

115 Charles J. 7 of New York had s. 116 William P. 8 of New York, 
the well-known dealer in gunpowder, in Front St. 

13 Capt. Abraham 3 b. Jan. 22, 1753-4, d. Mch. 18, 1712, m. 1st 
Oct. 19, 1682, Abigail, d. of John White, and she d. June 19, 1688. 



Genealogies. 305 

He m. Oct. 2, 1690, ad Ann, d. of Rev. Thomas James of East 
Hampton, and she d. May 17, 1714 ae. 43. He had ch. 117 Abra- 
ham 4 b. July 30, 1683, 118 Charles 4 b. Men. 19, 1686, 119 Philip 4 b< 
Sept. 25, 1691 and 120 Ebenezer 4 b. June 2, 1693. 

117 Abraham" of Sagg, d. 1741 and had 1st w. Mary and 2d 

w. Patience and ch. 121 David 5 b. 1715, 122 Silas 5 b. 1719, 

123 Charles 6 , 124 John 5 , 125 Dorothy 5 and 126 Abigail. 5 

Note.— The reasons for changing the record of. this family from that given in the first 
edition are as follows, as derived from testimony of wills read since the former publication . 
1st. A David Howell in 1735 wjlls to w. Lydia and ch. Abigail and Phebe, both under 18 years 
of age; and mentions "my two uncles Hezekiah and Josiah," plainly placing him in the 
family of liichard Howell. 2d. There was but one other David at this time, and he is men- 
tioned in the will of 117 Abraham and also has a son Abraham living in the western part of 
the town. 

121 ("Money") David 5 d. Apr. 25, 1795, had w. Phebe, who was 
b. 1715, and d. 1801, and ch. 127 David 6 , 128 Stephen 6 , 129 Abra- 
ham 6 , 130 Matthew 6 , 131 Damaris 6 , w. of Elisha Mulford, and 132 
Pamela. 6 

127 David 6 had w. Mehetabel, b. 1742, d. June 2, 1783, and ch. 
133 David 7 , 134 Charles 7 b. 1766, 135 Silas 7 and 136 Paul.' 

134 Charles 7 d. Oct. 29, 1822 had w. Catherine Gardiner (who d. 
Dec. 16, 1842, ae. 75, and ch. 137 Henry 6 138 John 8 b. 1797, 139 
Lewis 8 , 140 Charles 8 b. 1805 and 141 David. 8 

138 John 8 of Littleworth had w. Elizabeth and d. 142 Sarah, b. 
1849. 

128 Oapt. Stephen 6 m. 1st Susanna, of Sag Harbor, who d. Mch. 
11, 1711, ae. 22, and 2d Eunice, d. of Abner Howell, and had ch. 
143 David 7 , 144 Lewis 7 , who d. s. p. and 145 Silas. 7 

143 David 7 had s. 146 Matthew. 8 

145 Silas 7 had ch. 147 Mary 8 , w. of Benjamin Huntting, 148 
Elmira 8 , w. of Nathaniel Gardiner, 149 Stephen 8 , 150 Cornelius 8 , 
151 Gloriana 8 , 152 Nathan P. 8 , 153 Silas 8 , 154 John E. 8 , 155 Gil- 
bert 8 and 156 Augustus 8 b. 1818. 

156 Augustus 8 had vv. Phebe R. and d. 157 Anna 9 b. 1853. 

130 Deacon Matthew 6 of "Wickapogue, b. 1756, d. Feb. 13, 1836, 
m. Phebe, d. of Stephen Rogers, and she d. Nov. 21, 1825, ae. 63, 
and had ch. two d's., who m. Mr. Woodhouse and Frank Fordham 
both of Mon trose, Pa. 

123 Charles 5 or 124 John 5 had ch. 158 Silas 6 and 159 Charles 6 as 
they are mentioned in 117 Abraham's will as his gr. ch. 

14 Ephraim 3 b. Jan. 1, 1655, m. Hannah Coe, Nov. 10, 1684, 
and had ch. 160 Ephraim 4 b. Oct. 10, 1685 and 161 Samuel. 4 
39 



306 History of Southampton. 

160 Ephraim 4 had s. 162 Samuel. 5 

162 Deacon Samuel 5 d. Oct. 22, 1788, had w. Sarah and ch. 163 

Lemuel 6 d. s. p., 164 Hannah 6 , w. of Fordham, 165 Prudence 6 , 

w. of Hurlbert, 166 Eunice 6 , w. of Eev. Mr. Babbit, 167 

Marah 6 , w. of Poster, 168 Mehetabel 6 , 169 Ephraim 6 d. s. p., 

and 170 Sarah. 6 

17 Dr. Theophilus 3 of Bridgehampton, b. Dec. 18, 1662, d. 1739, 
had 1st w. Abigail (who d. Oct. 24, 1750, ae. 77) and 2d w. "Wid. 
Conkling of E. H., m. Aug. 1751, and ch. 171 Theophilus 4 b. 1697, 
d. s. p. 1764, w. Mary, 172 Elihu 4 , 173 Prudence 4 , w. of Pier- 
son, and 174 Deborah 4 , w. of Cooper. 

172 Elihu 4 d. 1761 or 1762 and had chi. 175 Abigail 5 , w. of 

Woodruff, 176 Hannah 5 , w. of Halsey, 177 Dr. Theophilus 5 of 

B. H., b. 1738, d. s. p. 1775, w. Phebe, and 178 Abraham. 5 

178 Abraham 5 had ch. 179 Elihu 6 b. 1764 and 180 Theophilus. 6 

179 Elihu 6 d. 1831 and had ch. 181 Nathan 7 , 182 Septimus 7 and 
183 Theophilus. 7 

18 Nathaniel 3 b. Aug. 29, 1664, d. 1725 or 6, had w. Hannah and 
ch. 184 Mehetabel 4 , w. of John Cook, 185 Martha 4 , 186 Nehemiah 4 
187 Nathaniel 4 , 188 Susannah 4 and 189 Eunice. 4 

187 Nathaniel 4 of Southampton sold his homestead in 1748 to 
Stephen Beeves and probably removed. He had s. 190 Edward. 5 

This finishes the record of the descendants of John, the eldest 
son of the settler, Edward Howell. 

5 Edward 2 b. 1626, d. 1699, m. 1st Mary, d. of Bev. Eobert Ford- 
ham, and 2d Mary, d. of Bichard Bryan of Milford, Ct., and had 
ch. 191 Joseph 3 b. about 1660, 192 Jonathan 3 , 193 Samuel 3 , 194 

Deborah 3 , w. of Topping, 195 Phebe 3 , w. of Halsey, 196 

Jonah 3 , 197 Edward 3 , 198 Benjamin 3 , 199 Mary 3 , 200 Sarah 3 , w. of 
Obadiah BogefsTand she d. Oct. 11, 1685, and 200£ Thomas 3 . To 
each of his sons he gives in his will a farm and house. He also in 
his will directs that his body be laid beside his father's, in the old 
burying-ground at the south end. Tbe same direction also was 
given in the will of his brother John as to the disposition of his 
body. 

191 Joseph 3 d. prob. about 1734, m. Lydia Stocking of Con- 
necticut, and had ch. 201 Zebulon 4 b. 1694, 202 Bethia 4 , 203 Free- 
love 4 , 204 Joseph 4 and 205 James. 4 



Genealogies. 307 

201 Zebulon 4 , a schoolmaster and farmer, d. 1761, m. Amy, d. of 
Samuel Butler, a merchant in Southampton, b. Sept. 15, 1692, and 
d. Dec. 15, 1752, and had ch. 206 Silas 5 b. May 20, 1719, and d. s. 
p. or removed, 207 Zebulon 6 b. Mch. 3, 1721, 208 Mark 5 d. s. p. and 
209 Luke 5 , who removed to Providence, R. I. 

207 Zebulon 5 d. Apr. 1811, m. Joana, d. of John Howell, b. 1722, 
d. July 10, 1800, and had ch. 210 Phebe 6 b. Mch. 21, 1743-4, who 
m. fm. Paine of Boston Aug. 22, 1765, 211 Silas 6 b. July 4, 1745, 
and removed to Portland, Me., 212 Joana 6 b. Jan. 30, 1747-8, w. 
of Stephen Herrick of New Haven, Ot., 213 Peter 6 b. Dec. 9, 1749, 
and lost at sea, 214 Mary 6 b. May 11, 1752, m. Silas Cooper Sept. 
20, 1769, and went to Central New York, 215 Jane 6 b. Feb. 24, 1754, 
m. George Mackie Jan. 14, 1773, 216 Dr. George 6 b. June 27, 1757, 
and d. in Missouri, 217 Susanna 6 b. Apr. 20, 1759, m. John Cooper 
of Oxbow, Seneca Co., N. Y., Aug. 12, 1778, and 218 Oliver 6 b. 
Feb. 1, 1764. 

218 Capt. Oliver 6 d. Oct. 23, 1805, m. Mehetabel, d. of Stephen 
Rogers, Nov. 25, 1792, she being b. Dec. 27, 1768, and d. June 6, 
1846, and had ch. 219 George' b. Aug. 15, 1793, 220 Mary', w. of 
Capt. Schuyler Bogart Halsey, b. Oct. 20, 1794, 221 Peter 7 b. Aug. 
29, 1797, and d. s. p. in New Orleans, 222 William Rogers' b. Aug. 
24, 1799, 223 Charles 7 b. Sept. 9, 1801, and 224 Nancy 7 b. Feb. 9, 
1804. 

219 Capt. George 7 m. 1st Elizabeth, d. of Thomas Sayre, who d. 
in childbirth, as did the child also ; he m. 2d Ursula Mulford of 
East Hampton and had ch. 225 Elizabeth 8 , w. of Julius Hitchcock, 
226 George Henry 8 , who d. s. p., 227 John "Wesley 8 , who d. s. p., 
and 228 Harriet 8 , w. of Van Clief of Poughkeepsie. 

222 "William R. 7 of East Moriches m. 1st Clarissa, d. of Rufus 
Sayre of Southampton, and had d. 229 Caroline 8 , w. of Thomas J. 
Glover (who had ch. Ada and "William H.). He m. 2d Caroline, d. 
of Henry Osborn of Moriches, and had by her ch. 230 Clara Sayre 8 
b. Jan. 17, 1846, 231 Egbert Osborn 8 b. May 28, 1847, 232 Susan 
Rose 8 b. Mch. 9, 1849, w. of James M. Herrick of Southampton, 
233 Mary Niles 8 b. June 10, 1851, and 234 William Jay 8 b. Feb. 8, 
1854, who m. Sarah L. Hand Dec. 23, 1884. 

223 Capt. Charles 7 b. Sept. 9, 1801, m. 1st, June 11, 1831, Mary, 
d. of Capt. Matthew Rogers, and she d. Aug. 1, 1867. He m. 2d, 
Mch. 23, 1871, Mary Hawkins. His ch. were 235 George Rogers 8 b. 



308 History of Southampton. 

June 15, 1833, 236 Edward Oliver 8 b. Oct. 28, 1836. d. Apr. 4, 1857, 
237 Nancy Kogers 8 b. Apr. 1, 1839, d. July 30, 1858, 238 John 
Henry 8 b. Mch. 27, 1841, d. Nov. 13, 1881, 239 Juliette 8 b. Jan. 30, 
1844, d. July 27, 1844, 240 Emily 8 , twin with Juliette, and who 
m. July 22, 1871, Jonathan Warren of Brooklyn, who d. Sept. 9, 
1882, and she m. 2d, on Aug. 3, 1886, John E. Harrington of Dau- 
bury, Ct., and 241 Henrietta 8 b. Dec. 12, 1845, d. Feb. 12, 1851. 

235 George Kogers 8 , grad. of Yale, m. Aug. 18, 1868, Mary 
Catherine, d. of Norman and Prances Hale (Metcalf) Seymour of 
Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., N. Y., and had s. 242 George Seymour 9 
b. Aug. 20, 1869. 

204 Joseph 4 d. 1752, had w. Martha and ch. 243 Lydia 5 , 244 
Joseph 6 , 245 Zerubbabel 5 and 246 Seth. 6 

192 Jonathan 3 of Watermill (not "Water Mills) d. 1740, had w. 
Hannah and ch. 247 Jonathan 4 , 248 Josiah 4 , 249 David 4 , 250 Isaac 4 , 
who m. Jemima Stephens, and 251 Jeremiah. 4 

251 Jeremiah 4 d. 1775, had w. Deborah and ch. 252 Jeremiah 5 , 
253 Jonathan 6 , 254 Ezekiel 6 , 255 David 6 , 256 Eunice 5 , 257 Prudence 6 
and 258 Anna 5 , w. of Sayre. 

252 Jeremiah 6 had ch. 259 Caleb 6 of New Jersey, 260 Ezekiel 6 and 
261 William 6 of Hog Neck, near Sag Harbor. 

An Ezekiel believed to be 260 Ezekiel 6 b. 1753, d. 1825, m. Phebe 
Eogers, and had ch. 262 Ezekiel' b. 1781, 263 Thomas' b. ] 782, 264 
Parmenas' b. 1784, 265 Nathan' b. 1786, 266 Erancis' b. 1788 and 
267 Milicent' b. 1795. 

264 Parmenas' was a portrait painter and some of his ivory 
painted miniatures are very fine, but one at least is out of drawing. 

261 William 6 had ch. 268 Caleb', 269 Sylvester' b. 1809 and 270 
George.' 

268 Caleb' had ch. 271 James L. 8 and others, names unknown 
to me. 

269 Sylvester' had w. Nancy and s. 272 Jeremiah 8 b. 1838. 

196 Jonah 3 d. 1727, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 273 Jonah 4 , 274 
Ezra 4 , 275 Elizabeth 4 , 276 Mary 4 and 277 Samuel 4 b. 1708. 

273 Jonah 4 had w. Elizabeth (prob. Poster) and ch. 278 . 
Ebenezer 6 , 279' Eunice 5 b. 1735, d. July 17, 1793, w. of Wm. Hop- 
kins of Palmyra, N. Y, 280 Bethia 5 , w. of Timothy Poster, 281 
Mary 6 , w. of Stephen Beeves, and 282 Jonah. 5 



Genealogies. 309 

278 Ebenezer 6 m. Elizabeth, d. of Jedidiah Foster, and had ch. 
283 Ebenezer 6 , 284 Samuel 8 , 285 Austin 6 and 286 William 6 b. 1790. 

283 Ebenezer 6 had w. Hannah, d. of Elias White, b. 1785, and 
had oh. 287 Elias White 7 b. 1807, 288 James G. 7 b. 1809, 289 
Peter 7 , 290 Edward' b. 1812, 291 Helen 7 b. 1820 and 292 Jane 7 b. 
1822. 

287 Elias W. 7 m. 1st Ann Eeeves b. 1809 and had s. 293 Eugene 
E. 8 b. 1852. He m. 2d Mrs. Enstine (widow), who had by former 
husband two sons, one of whom d. a young man, and the other 
John Henry, who married and has ch. 

2'88 James G-. 7 m. Harriet, d. of Edward Eeeves, b. 1815, and had 
ch. 294= Elizabeth 8 , w. of Capt. Elias Howell White of Sebonac, b. 
1847, 295 Oscar L. 7 b. 1850, 296 Charles G. 8 b. 1852 and 297 George 
Eeeves 8 b. 1854. 

297 George Eeeves 8 m. Dec. 3, 1884, May Bonney, and has s. 298 
George Ealph 9 b. Oct. 25, 1885. 

285 Austin 6 moved away and had s. 299 George P. 7 

286 William 6 had w. Milicent b. 1814 and d. 300 Mary V. 7 b. 
1847, w. of George Howell Post, b. 1838. 

282 Jonah 6 had ch. 301 Isaac 5 , 302 Oily 6 , w. of Nathan Cooper, 
303 Eunice 6 w. of Elias Eeeves, 304 Jonah 5 , 306 Gilbert 5 and 307 
Euth 5 , w. of George White. 

277 Samuel 4 of Mecox, b. 1708, d. 1754, m. Experienoe Halsey, 
and had ch. 308 Samuel 5 b. 1740, 309 Benjamin 5 , 310 Jeremiah 5 b. 
1748 and 311 Walter 5 . 

308 Samuel 6 of Bridgehampton d. 1820, had w. Phebe and ch. 
312 William 6 b. 1771 and 313 Sylvanus. 6 

313 Sylvanus 6 of Sag Harbor, had ch. 314 Sylvanus 7 and 315 
Samuel. 7 

310 Jeremiah 5 of Persipany, N. J., d. 1846, had ch. 316 Burnet 6 , 
317 Jared 6 , 318 Abraham 5 , 319 Samuel 6 and 320 Mary. 6 

311 Walter 5 had ch. 321 Walter 6 and 322 Samuel. 6 

321 Walter 6 had s. 323 Matthew' of New York. 

322 Samuel 6 had ch. 324 Eev. Samuel N. 7 for some time principal 
ot a large select school at Sing Sing, N. Y. and 325 William. 7 

200£ Thomas 3 of Bridgehampton, d. 1726, had w. Sarah and 
ch. 326 Leah 4 , 327 Eachel 4 , 328 Joshua 4 , 329 Kesiah 4 , 330 Micah 4 , 
331 Sibyl 4 and 332 Eliphus. 4 



310 Histoky of Southampton. 

Of the ch. of 200£ Thomas 3 I find no trace. 328 Joshua 4 may- 
have gone to Cape May Co., N. J., as there was one of this name 
residing there in 1700. Quite a large number of Southampton 
people went to that county as well as to Elizabeth of that State 
about 1660-70. 

This finishes the record of the descendants of 5 Edward. 2 Of 
course it does not include all his descendants, but all that I have 
been able to gather. 

Descendants of 7 Richard 2 the third son of 1 Edward 1 the 
emigrant, of those who came with him to America. 

7 Richard 2 b. 1629, m. 1st Elizabeth, d. of Thomas Halsey, and 
2d, a d. of Joseph. Raynor. I do not know the order of the ages of 
his ch., but give them as nearly as I can guess from various infor- 
mation gathered from early documents. Nor do I know which to 
assign to his two wives, but presume they are mostly the children 
of his first wife. He had ch. 333 Richard 3 , 334 Josiah 3 b. 1675, 
335 Hezekiah 3 b.. 1677, 336 Edward 3 , 337 Obadiah 3 , 338 Christo- 
pher 3 , 339 Daniel 3 , 340 David 3 , 341 Edmund 3 , 342 Ruth 3 , w. of 
Jonas Bower, 343 Isaac 3 and 344 Sarah. 3 

333 Richard 3 d. 1740, and had w. Sarah (as by will proved June 
28, 1740) and ch. 345 Sarah*, w. of Martyn Rose, 346 Edward 4 b. 
1684, 347 Christopher 4 , 348 Arthur 4 , 349 Obadiah 4 , 350 Dorcas 4 , 
w. of Norris, and 351 Abigail 4 , w. of Pierson. 

*346 Edward 4 of Bridgehampton, b. 1684, d. Oct. 11, 1772, m. 

Abigail June 13, 1712, and hadch. 352 Hannah 5 b. Sept.8,1714, 

w. of Terbell, 353 Mehetabel 5 b. Oct. 4, 1716, w. of 

Ludlam, 354 Abigail 6 b. Sept. 15, 1718, w. of Prince, 355 

Sarah 6 b. Oct. 28, 1720, w. of White, 356 Deborah 6 b. Mch. 

27, 1723, w. of Pierson, 357 Ezekiel 6 and 358 Daniel 5 twins b. 

Mch. 21, 1725, 359 Gideon 6 b. Jan. 26, 1728, 360 Jemina 5 b. May 

2, 1732, w. of Stratton, and 361 Martha 5 b. Nov. 26, 1733, w. 

of Pierson. 

357 Ezekiel 5 d. 1802, had w. Lucy and ch. 362 Abigail 6 , 363 
Hannah 6 , 364 Stephen 6 and 365 Demas." 

364 Stephen 6 of B. H. had w. Zipporah b. 1764, and s. 366 Her 
vey' b. 1796. 

* In the first edition this Edward was incorrectly said to be son of Major John Howell, 
whose son Edward d. s. p. 



Genealogies. 311 

366 Hervey' had w. Sophia, b. 1795 and oh. 36? Ellen 8 b. 1823 
and 368 Edward 8 b. 1826. 

358 Daniel 6 had ch. 369 Edward 6 b. 1756, 370 Simon 6 and 371 
Price. 6 

369 Edward 6 d. 1834, had s. 372 Daniel.' 

372 Daniel' of Hadlyme, Cb., had ch. 373 G-eorge 8 and 374 Joseph 
E. s both of whom mar. and had ch. 

370 Simon 6 had s. 375 Daniel' of Sag Harbor. 

359 Gideon 5 resided near Morristown, N. J., d, Jan. 20, 1802, m. 
Apr. 2, 1753, Sarah Gordon, b. Mch. 25, 1732, d. Oct. 22, 1803, 

and had ch. 376 Sarah 6 b. Feb. 15, 1754, w. of Fairchild, 377 

Martha 6 b. June 20, 1756, w. of Bell, 378 Ezekiel 6 b. Mch. 27, 

1758; 379 Abigail 6 b. Jan. 19, 1761, d. Aug. 19, same year, 380 
Hannah 6 b. Jan. 20, 1763, twice married, d. Mch. 20, 1829, 381 
Daniel 6 b. Nov. 29, 1765 and 382 Gaius 6 b. May 25, 1770. 

378 Ezekiel 6 d. June 16, 1831, m. Feb. 16, 1786, Susanna Hill b. 
May 16, 1762, d. Nov. 27, 1851, aud had ch. 383 Eunice K.', 384 

Sarah F.', w. of Carpenter, 385 Hannah M.', w. of Todd, 

386 Edward', 387 Calvin', 388 Anna', w. of Ward, and 389 

Daniel.' 

386 Edward' had ch. 390 William L. 8 , 391 George W. 8 , 392 Susan 8 , 
w. of Peck, and 393 Charles E." 

391 George W. s has ch. 394 Edward 9 , 395 Charlotte K. 9 396 
Susan 9 and 397 Mary Lee. 9 

387 Calvin 7 had ch. 398 Matilda 8 , 399 Rodney 8 , 400 Joseph W. 8 , 
401 William H. 8 , 402 Nelson 8 , 403 Matilda 8 , 404 Augustus 8 , 405 
Mary 8 and 406 Frances K. 8 

401 William H." has ch. 407 Frank 9 and 408 Rodney. 9 

381 Daniel 6 d. July 6, 1790 had s. 409 Daniel G.' 

409 Daniel G.' had ch. 410 Arthur 8 , 411 Eunice 8 and 412 Wil- 
liam. 8 

382 Gaius 6 had ch. 413 Jacob', 414 Elias 7 , 415 Harriet 7 , 416 
Ohilion 7 and 416 Daniel.' 

335 Lieut. Hezekiah 3 b. 1677, d. Dec. 4, 1744, m.,lst Sept. 10, 
1702,Phebe d. of Thomas Halsey, who d. July 16, 1732, ae. 62, and he 

m. 2d Mary and hadch. by 1st w. 417 Phebe 4 b. Jan. 11, 1705, 

418 Experience 4 b. Aug. 28, 1706, 419 Hezekiah 4 b. May 6, 1709 
and 420 Jedidiah 4 b. June 28, 1713. 



312 History of Southampton. 

419 Hezekiah 4 m. Dec. 11, 1735 Susannah. 1709, d. of JobSayre, 
and had ch. 421 Phebe 5 b. Jane 1, 1737, 422 Jane 5 b. Apr. 20, 
1739, 423 Hezekiah 5 b. Sept. 13, 1741 and 424 Charles.* 

423 Hezekiah 5 moved to Blooming Grove, Orange Co., N. Y., 
m. Juliana, b. 1737, d . of Nathaniel Woodhull, and had ch. 425 Heze- 
kiah 6 b. Aug. 21, 1768, 426 Jane 6 m. Jan. 4, 1801, Judge Augustus 
Porter of Canandaigua, N. Y., and 427 Nathaniel 6 b. Jan. 1, 1770. 

425 Hezekiah 6 d. Jan. 20, 1855, m. Dec. 6, 1796 Frances Tuthill, 
b. Mch. 2, 1772, and d. Dec. 14, 1830, and had ch. 428 Juliana' b. 
Sept. 16, 1798, w. of Eobert Denison, 429 John W. 7 d. in infancy, 
430 Hezekiau 7 b. Nov. 10, 1801, d. June 29, 1875, 431 Nathaniel 7 
b. May 4, 1803, d. 1844, 432 Matthew Henry 7 b. Jan. 16, 1805, 433 

John Woodhull 7 b. Oct. 24, 1806.. 434 Mary 7 , w. of Brewster b. Feb. 

26, 1808, 435 Andrew 7 b. 1801, d. young, 436 Gabriel 7 b. Mch. 18, 
1812, 437 Simeon 7 and 438 Andrew 7 b. Mch. 27, 1816. 

432 Matthew H. 7 had w. Julia Brewster and ch. 439 Nathaniel 
Woodhull 8 , 440 Charles 8 , 440^ Sarah B. 8 and 440f Joana B. 8 

439 Nathaniel W. 8 m Apr. 22, 1858 Mary Halsey b. Dec. 9, 1832 
and has ch. 441 Joanna B. 9 b. June 6, 1861 and 442 Hezekiah 9 b. 
Nov. 28, 1864. 

440 Charles 8 had d. Edith. 

433 John W. 7 d. Jan. 12, 1870, m. Eliza N. Strong and had ch. 443 
Juliana 8 b. 1830, w. of Daniel E. Moffatt, 444 William Strong 8 b. 
1835, 445 Selah 8 b. 1840, 446 Fanny 8 b. 1842, w. of Charles Cooper 
and 447 Theodore. 8 

444 William S. 8 m. Jan. 1858, Mary J. Grigg. 

445 Selah 8 m. Mch. 6, 1865 Nannie E. Applegate, and has ch. 
448 Frederic B. 9 b. July 27, 1867, 449 Fanny E. 9 b. Mch. 25, 1869 
and 450 William W. 9 b. June 23, 1872. 

436 Gabriel 7 m. Mary, d. of John Jessup, b. Dec. 21, 1818, and 
had ch. 451 Edward Denton 8 b. Apr. 16, 1838, 452 John Jessup 8 b. 
Aug. 13, 1841 and 453 Jessie F. b. June 25, 1852. 

451 Edward D. 8 m. Isabella Bennett and had ch. Hannah and 
Mary. 

452 John Jessup 8 m. Sept. 24, 1866, Isabella M. b. Jan. 2, 1846, 
d. of James Cox, and has ch. 454 Mary Isabella 9 b. Sept. 6, 1867, 
455 Margaret Louise 9 b. Feb. 27, 1869, 456 Alice Maria 9 b. Feb. 4, 
1871, and d. 1876, 457 James Cox 9 b. Jan. 26, 1873 and 458 
George 9 b. Jan. 19, 1875, d. 1876. 



Genealogies. 313 

438 Andrew 7 m. Mary Seeley and had ch. 459 Timothy S. 8 and 
45 9£ Rebecca. 8 

427 Judge Nathaniel W. 6 , a man of note in Canandaigua, N. Y., 
b. in Blooming Grove, Orange Co., N. Y, Jan. 1, 1770, d. Oct. 15, 
1851, m. 1st Mch. 17,1798,Sally Chapin,b. June 4, 1778, who d. Apr. 
25, 1808. He m. 2d Mch. 10, 1809, Fanny Coleman b. at Amherst, 
Mass., Aug. 3, 1781, and she d. Feb. 9, 1842. He hadch. 460 Juliana 
Chapin' b. Aug. 29, 1803, m. Sept. 1828, Clement Wells, and d. 
Jan. 10, 1845, 461 Alexander Hamilton' b. Sept. 30, 1805, 462 
Thomas Morris' b. Aug. 7, 1807, d. Aug. 6, 1808, 463 Elizabeth' b. 
Apr. 21, 1810, m. Arnasa Jackson, Dec, 1831, d. Aug. 22, 1839, 464 
Thomas Morris' b. Dec. 7, 1811, 465 Sally Chapin' b. Nov. 16, 
1813, d. Jan. 4, 1814, 466 Sally Chapin' b. Mch. 9, 1815, m. Henry 
S. Mulligan, Sept. 5, 1839, 467 John Greig' b. Feb. 15, 1817, d. at 
New Haven, Ct, Mch. 16, 1835, 468 Nathaniel Woodhull' b. Jan. 
19, 1820 and 469 Augustus Porter' b. May 29, 1823. 

461 Alexander H.' of Cana-ndaigua, m. July 15, 1830, Emily 
Jackson, and had d. 470 Mary Olmsted 8 b. Sept. 9, 1831, m. Feb. 
9, 1860, William W. Worthington. 

464 Thomas M.' m. May 16, 1838, Louisa Young and had ch. 471 
Jane Elizabeth 8 b. Mch. 1, 1840, m. Apr. 3, 1862 John R. Hazard 
and 472 Sarah Gibson 8 b. June 20, 1842, m. Dec. 26, 1863, B. B. 
Foster. 

466 Sally Chapin d. Oct. 10, 1885 and Henry S. Mulligan d. 
May 15, 1855, had ch. 1st Lieut. James Strong b. July 6, 1840, 
wounded at Bull Rua Aug. 30, 1862, d. at Buffalo June 10, 1863; 
Lieut. Greig Howell b. Dec. 25, 1841, d. at Key West, Fla. of yel- 
low fever while in U. S. army Aug. 20, 1862 ; Charlotte b. Sept. 25, 
1844 ; Morris Howell b. Aug. 28, 1846, d. Aug. 7, 1847 ; Henry 
Strong b. Aug, 10, 1848 ; and Edward Howell b. Nov. 12, 1852. 

The 5th ch. above, Henry Strong Mulligan m. May, 1877, Eliza- 
beth Haddock and have ch. Charlotte b. Mch. 1, 1878, Mary 
Lathrop, b. Mch. 25, 1880, Elizabeth Haddock b. Aug. 17, 1883, 
and Sally Howell b. Mch. 14, 1885. 

468 Nathaniel W.' of Brooklyn, N. Y.,m. Fanny McCay and had 
ch. 473 Fanny 9 b. Sept. 15, 1849, 474 Nathaniel Woodhull 8 b. Apr. 
1, 1852 and 475 Mary 8 b. Sept. 28, 1853. 

469 Augustus P.' m. Caroline Reid and had ch. 476 Sarah Louise 8 
b. Mch. 8, 1855, 477 Thomas Morris 8 b. Oct. 10, 1857, 478 Katie 

40 



314 History of Southampton. 

D. 8 b. Apr. 21, 1860, 479 Augustus Porter 8 b. Feb. 1, 1863, d. July 
11, 1867 and 480 Fanny Colemau 9 b. Aug. 6, 1869. 

424 Charles 6 of Blooming Grove had ch. 481 Selah 6 , 482 Henry 6 , 
483 Charles 6 and 484 Edmund. 6 

482 Henry 6 had ch. 485 William 7 and 486 Andrew. 7 

484 Edmund 6 had ch. 487 Charles', 488 James 7 and 489 Joseph. 7 . 

420 Jedidiah 4 b. in Southampton June 28, 1713, d. in Blooming 

Grove, N. Y. 1795 and had ch. 490 Phebe 5 , w. of Humphrey, 

491 Elizabeth 5 , w. of Sayre, 492 Clarissa 5 , 49:5 Mary 5 , 494 

Hezekiah 5 , 495 Edward 5 , 496 Elias 6 , 497 William 5 of Salem, N. J., 
and 498 Dr. Ebenezer 5 of Salem, N. J. 

495 Edward 5 had ch. 499 Harriet 6 , 500 Austin 6 , 501 John C. 6 , 502 
Edward 6 , 503 Charlotte 6 , 504 Charles 6 , 505 George 6 and 506 Wil- 
liam. 6 

502 Edward 6 , an eminent citizen of Bath, Steuben Co., N. Y., had 
ch. 507 Frances M. 7 , w. of Underbill, 508 Daniel C. 7 , 509 Ed- 
ward 7 , 510 Ambrose S. 7 , 51.1 James F. 7 , 512 Charles 7 , 513 William 
L. 7 and 514 Bobert U. 7 

504 Charles 6 had ch. 515 Eliza 7 and 516 Mary. 7 

506 William 6 had ch. 517 Edward A 7 , 518 John A. 7 , 519 William 7 
and 520 James. 7 

339 Daniel 3 of Ewing, 1ST. J., b. in Southampton 1680, d. Apr. 
25, 1732, had ch. 521 David 4 b. 1705, 522 Phebe 4 b. Sept. 28, 1707, 
w. of John Scudder, 523 Elizabeth 4 b. Jan. 9, 1709, w. of William 
Pearson, 524 John 4 b. 1712, d. June 13, 1732, 525 Hannah 4 b. Feb. 
24, 1714, 526 Daniel 4 b. Feb. 24, 1716, 527 Mary 4 b. Feb. 6, 1718 
528 Abigail 4 b. 1720, d. Jan. 31, 1746, 529 Joshua 4 b. Oct. 11, 
1722 and 530 Hezekiah 4 b. Aug. 7, 1727. 

521 David 4 d. Oct. 24, 1775, m. Mary Baker and had ch. 531 
Daniel 5 b. 1739, d. Feb. 27, 1812 (m. Deborah, d. of Stephen Rose 
and left descendants*), 532 John 5 b. June 14, 1727, 533 David 5 d. 
1785, 534 Joseph 5 b. 1729, d. 1800, 535 Amos 5 and 536 Timothy 5 b. 
1743, d. 1804. 

532 John 5 m. Naomi Hart b. Sept. 5, 1736, and had ch. 537 
Ezekiel 6 b. Oct. 30, 1755, 538 Acher 6 (Archer ?) b. Oct. 19. 1758, 
539 Susanna 6 b. Aug. 28, 1760, 540 Noah 6 b. May 22, 1762, 541 
John 6 b. Feb. 5, 1765, 542 Huldah 6 b. May 28, 1768, 543 Eseck 6 b. 
Jan. 14,1771, 544 Mary 6 b. Aug. 28, 1773, d. 1832, 545 Joseph 6 b. Feb. 
18,1776 and 546 Abner 6 b. Dec. 8, 1778. 



Genealogies. 315 

545 Joseph 6 m. Mary Buckrnan and had ch. 547 Eseck', 548 
Elvira 7 , 549 John', 550 Mary 7 , 551 Adeline 7 , 552 Joseph 7 , 553 
Amanda 7 and 554 Lydia 7 , w. of Charles Moore of Trenton. 

See at the end for more. 

By an oversight I have given the descendents of 335 Hezekiah 3 and 
339 Daniel 3 a little out of order; those of 334 Josiah 3 should have 
preceded, aud those of 339 Daniel 3 should have followed those of 
337 Obadiah. But the numbering prevents any confusion. 

334 Josiah 3 b. 1675, d. 1752, had w. Mary b. 1681, d. 1766 (and 
there is some reason to think she was his second wife and that he 
first m. Phebe Johnes), and had ch. 555 Abner 4 b. June 22, 1699, 
556 Phebe 4 , 557 Elisha 4 b. 1704, 558 Mary 4 , 559 Josiah 4 b. 1709, 560 
Elias 4 and 561 Esther", w. of Post, who had s. Elias Post. 

555 Abner 4 d. 1755, m. Eunice Fithiaa of East Hampton, and 
had ch. 562 David 5 b. Feb. 10, 1740-41, 563 Phineas 5 b. Nov. 5, 
1742, 564 Eunice 5 b. Mch. 20, 1744, w. of Stephen Howell of Sag 
Harbor, 565 Mary 5 b. Jan. 15, 1746, 566 Thomas 5 , 567 Stephen 5 b. 
Aug. 12, 1749, d. s. p., and 568 MehetabeF b. May 24, 1751. 

563 Phineas 5 removed to New Jersey and had ch. 569 Sylvanus 6 , 
570 Hervey 6 , 571 Hiram 6 , 572 Aaron 6 , 573 Richard 6 , 574 Harriet 6 , 
2d w. of Abraham Cooper of Oxbow, N. Y., and 575 Susanna f , 1st 
w, of Abraham Cooper. 

573 Richard 6 had s. 576 Benjamin A. 7 of Flanders, Morris Co.. 
N. J. 

559 Josiah 4 d. Nov. 1, 1775, had w. Mary aud ch. 577 Josiah 5 b. 
1738 and 578 John. 5 

577 Capt. Josiah 5 d. 1808, m. 1st Mary Howell and had five ch.; 
he m. 2d w. Phebe Piersou b. 1746, d. 1808, and had by her four 
ch. His ch. were 579 William 6 b. Sept. 21, 1777, 580 Daniel 6 b. 
1776, d. s. p. 1798, 581 Elisha 6 b. 1779, 582 Hampton 6 , 583 Charity 6 , 
584 Mary 6 , w. of Oliver Post of Quogue, 585 Josiah Pierson 6 b. 
1784, 584 George 6 d. 1825 (w. Phebe Sayre) and 587 Phebe 6 , w. of 
Maltby Rose of Bridge Hampton. 

579 William 6 d. Jan. 10, 1848, m. Anna Brewster and had ch. 
588 William E. 7 b. Oct. 20, 1808, 589 Temperance 7 b. Oct. 27, 1811, 
w. of John Roe of Patchogue, 590 Walter 7 b. Oct. 13, 1813, 591 

*The record of the descendants of 339 Danieia is taken mostly from Cooley's Trenton, N. J., 
genealogies where will be found a much fuller record than here given, as I have taken only 
one branch. 



316 Histoky of Southampton. 

Henrietta 7 b. Dec. 29, 1815, w. of John Osborn, 592 Charles J. 7 b. 
June 20, 1818, 593 Phebe 7 b. June 16, 1826, and 594 Mary 7 b. Sept. 
19, 1829. 

588 "William E. 7 m. Loretta Brooks and had eh. 595 Edwin 8 , 596 
Charles 8 , 597 Anna 8 , 598 Catherine B. 8 , 599 Henrietta 8 and 600 
Amelia. 8 

590 Walter 7 of Bellport m. 1st Mary H. Wicks ; m. 2d Amy E. 
Wicks and m. 3d Prances A. Wicks, and had ch. 601 William 8 b. 
Sept. 13, 1837, 602 Florence 8 (a son) b. May 2, 1842, 603 Mary 8 b. 
Feb. 28, 1845, 604 Emmet 8 b. Oct. 6, 1853, 605 Charles J. 8 b. Oct. 
23, 1858, and 606 Anna 8 b. Not. 4, 1861. 

581 Elisha 6 d. 1838, had d. 607 Sarah 7 , w. of Erastus Foster of 
Quogue. 

582 Hampton 6 m. Elizabeth Post and had ch. 608 Daniel 7 , 609 
Josiah 7 , 610 Gilbert 7 , 611 Benjamin H. 7 of Brooklyn, 612 Hampton 
L. 7 and 613 Charles. 7 

608 Josiah 7 had s. 614 Josiah P. 8 

585 Josiah Pierson 6 of Quogue, m. Lydia Hubbard b. 1792 and 
had ch. 615 John H. 7 b. 1811 and 616 Hampton.' 

615 John H. 7 of Quogue had w. Nancy b. 1815 and ch. 617 
Bertha 8 b. 1838, w. of Edwin Halsey, 618 Mary 8 b. 1842, who has 
won an enviable fame as an author, 619 Lydia 8 b. 1844, w. of 
Mortimer Howell, 620 Josiah P. 8 b. 1845, 621 John 8 b. 1847, 622 
Caroline 8 b. 1849, 623 Nancy 8 b. 1851 and 624 William 8 b. 1855. 
(Dates of birth from census and, therefore, approximate only. ) 

616 Hampton 7 had s. 625 Hampton 8 and perhaps others. 

578 John 6 of Canoe Place, 1785, and later of Ketchabonac, had 
s. 626 Mitchell. 6 

626 Mitchell 6 had ch. 627 Charles 7 b. 1812 and 628 John. 7 

627 Charles 7 m. Elizabeth, d. of Shepherd Halsey, and had ch. 
629 John Fletcher 8 b. 1838, 630 Mortimer 8 b. 1838, 631 Gertrude 8 
b. 1840, w. of Dr. Jarvis of Moriches, and 632 Clara M. 8 b. 1846. 

629 John Fletcher 8 m. Maria J., d. of Capt. Mercator Cooper, 
and had ch. 633 Nathan Cooper 9 b. Oct. 7, 1869, and 634 Clara 
Bowley 8 b. Apr. 10, 1872. 

630 Mortimer 8 m. 619 Lydia Howell 8 and has ch. I. John Mitch- 
ell 9 b. Sept. 1, 1866, II. Hampton Pierson 9 b. Dec. 27, 1869, III. 
Lloyd Mortimer 9 b. Oct. 25, 1873, IV. Henry Jarvis 9 b. July 31, 
1876, and V. Gertrude Halsey 9 b. Aug. 6, 1878. 



Genealogies. 317 

628 John 7 had a d. 635 Betsey M. 8 , who m. John P. Youngs of 
Bridge Hampton. 

An Elias, whom I take to be 560 Elias 4 , wills in 1784 to ch. 636 

Elias 5 b. abt. 1746, 637 Mary 5 , w. of Hudson, 638 Hannah 6 , w. 

of Halsey, 639 Abigail 6 and 640 Ruth 5 . 

636 Blias 6 m. Abigail, d. of Stephen Rogers, and had ch. 641 
Maltby 6 bap. 1785, 642 StepheD R. 6 bap. 1787, 643 Huldah 8 , w. of 
Jared Haines, 644 Mulford 6 , 645 Phebe 6 , w. of Elias Hudson, and 
646 Eiias." 

646 Elias 6 m. Nancy, d. of Obadiah Rogers, and had ch. 647 
Obadiah' b. Oct. 16, 1804, 648 Eliza 7 b. Jan. 30, 1813, 649 George 7 
b. Sept. 23, 181 7, of Sag Harbor, who m. and d. on the passage 
home from California, and 650 Nancy. 7 

337 Obadiah 3 had ch. 651 James 4 , 652 Ryall 4 d. 1764, 653 Obadiah 4 
b. 1725 or 26, 654 Richard 4 b. 1727, d. s. p. 1793, 655 Abigail 4 , w. 
of Stephens, and 656 Sylvanus 4 b. 1737. 

653 Obadiah 4 d. Apr. 23, 1793, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 657 
Obadiah 5 , 658 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1785, 659 Daniel 5 bap. 1787 and 660 
Henry. 6 

657 Obadiah 6 had w. Hannah and ch. 661 Lewis 6 (who m. and 
has a family in the west), 662 Daniel 6 b. 1816, 663 Milicent 6 , w. of 
Capt. James Parker, and 664 Henry. 6 

662 Daniel 6 had w. Sarah M. and ch. 665 Prances R.' b. 1847, 
666 William 7 b. 1848, 667 Eliza 7 b. 1850 and 668 Sarah J.' b. 1853. 

656 Sylvanus 4 d. June 13, 1806, and had ch. 6(59 Deal 6 , who 
moved to Ovid, N. Y., 670 Lucinda 6 , w. of Samuel Jones, and 671 
Sylvanus 6 , d. s. p. 

This ends the record of the descendants of 7 Richard 2 Howell, so 
far as I have it. In Cooley's Trenton Genealogies will be found 
the record of the descendants of a Christopher whom I believe to 
be 338 Christopher 3 of this work. 

8 Arthur 2 b. 1633, d. Mch. 29, 1683, m. 1st Elizabeth, d. of Lyon 
Gardiner of East Hampton, in 1658. She d. and left one d. 672 

Elizabeth 3 , who m. Loper of E. H. He m. 2d Hannah, d. of 

Thurston Ray nor, and had other ch. 673 Arthur 3 b. 1661, d. s. p. 
Mch. 24, 1683, 674 Abiah 3 b. Oct. 22, 1666, 675 Martha 3 b. Sept. 
24, 1668, 676 Eleanor 3 b. Sept. 1, 1670, 677 Thomasoa 3 (a d.) b. 
May 22, 1672, 678 Elisha 3 b. Sept. 18, 1674, 679 Lemuel 3 b. July 



318 Histoet of Southampton. 

31, 1677, 680 Penelope 3 b. Deo. 19, 1679, 681 Hannah 3 b. Nov. 7, 
1684,, and perhaps 682 Henry. 3 Inventory of his estate amounted 
to £887 15s. 5d. 

8 Arthur 2 was interpreter of the Indians for the town. 

678 Elisha 3 d. July 10, 1750, had w. Damaris b. 1669, d. May 1, 
1757, and ch. 683 Arthur 4 , 684 Elisha 4 , 685 Lemuel 4 , 686 Jesse 4 d. 

s. p. w. Mary, 687 Philip 4 , 688 Abiah 4 , w. of Pierce, 689 

Charity 4 , w. of Halsey, 690 Martha 4 , w. of Smith, 691 

Sarah 4 , w. of : Price, 692 Phebe 4 , w. of Halsey, and 693 

Susanna 4 , w. of Halsey. 

683 Arthur 4 d. 1761 or 62, m. Susanna, d. of Theophilus Pierson, 
and had ch. 694 Arthur 6 , 695 Elias 5 , 696 Silas 5 , 697 Frederic 6 , 698 
Sarah 5 , 699 Martha 6 , 700 Phebe 5 , 701 Susauna 5 and 702 Louisa. 5 

684 Elisha d. 1777, had w. Mary and ch. 703 Matthew 6 , 704 
Philip 6 , 705 Lewis 6 , 706 Edmund 6 , 707 Jesse 6 , 708 Mary 6 , 709 Han- 
nah 6 and 710 Eunice. 6 

685 Lemuel 4 b. Sept. 13, 1718, d. 1782, m. 1st Dec. 11, 1746, 

Eunice who was b. Jan. 27, 1727, and d.j June 13, 1759. He 

m. 2d Eeb. 20, 1760, Abigail b. Feb. 21, 1725, and had ch. 711 

Charity 5 b. Nov. 26, 1747, w. of David Hedges, 712 Moses 5 b. Oct. 
18, 1750, 713 Solomon 6 b. June 20, 1753, d. Nov. of same year, 714 
Caleb 5 b. Jan. 30, 1761, and 715 Ruth 5 , w. of Pierson. 

714 Caleb 5 m. Abigail Oct. 24, 1786, and had ch. 716 RutM 

b. Sept. 26, 1787, d. 1829, 717 Lemuel 6 b. Aug. 30, 1790, d. 1819, 
718 Elisha 6 b. Sept. 30, 1793, d. 1805, and 719 Benjamin Franklin 6 
b. June 11, 1801. 

719 Benjamin F. 6 d. Oct. 5, 1855, m. Elizabeth Cooper Mch. 2, 
1824, and had ch. 720 Lemuel 7 b. Oct. 29, 1825, 721 Lucretia' b. 
Apr. 7, 1828, 722 Elizabeth 7 b. Sept. 1, 1830, and 723 Henry 7 b. 
Sept. 11, 1835. 

723 Henry 7 had w. Margaret and ch. 724 Henrietta 8 b. 1862 and 
perhaps others. 

679 Lemuel 3 b. July 31, 1677, d. Sept. 9, 1712, had w. Sarah 
and ch. 725 David 4 , d. young, 726 Henry 4 b. Nov. or Dec. 1712, 
and 727 Sarah. 4 

726 Henry 4 d. 1774, m. Phebe Halsey b. 1715, d. 1802, and had 
ch. 728 Henry 5 , 729 Levi 5 and 730 David. 5 

730 David 5 d. Dec. 29, 1839, m. Mehetabel Halsey b. 1754, d. 
Dec. 27, 1789, and had ch. 731 Mary 6 b. 1774 and d. 1860, w. of 



Genealogies. 319 

Nathan T. Cook, 732 Fanny 6 b. 1776, d. 1852, w. of Barzillai 
Halsey, 733 Elizabeth 6 b. 1776, w. of Rogers Halsey, 734 Henry 6 , 
735 Col. Levi 6 b. 1781, d. s. p. 1863, 736 David 6 of New York, 
d. s. p., and 737 Clarissa 6 , w. of Job Haines 

734 Henry 6 of Setauket m. Cynthia Halsey and had ch. 738 
Henry' and 739 James. 7 

The record of the descendants of 679 Lemuel 3 was given me by 
Addison M. Cook, Esq., of Bridge Hampton. But there may be 
an error in it as (if my abstract of the will of this Lemuel is cor- 
rect) he died leaving children, David, Lemuel and Sarah. If this 
is correct then Lemuel, the son of 679 Lemuel 3 , may have had ch., 
David and Henry, as given, above, and in that case 727 Sarah 4 should 
be omitted. The ages of the generations are such that either theory 
is possible. The line is correct anyhow. 

9 Edmund 2 , the youngest son of 1 Edward 1 was allowed by his 
eldest brother John the homestead and after occupying it till about 
1698 sold it and moved to Cape May County, New Jersey. He was 
b. about 1635, d. 1706 in New Jersey, and being called on the town 
record the son-in-law of Thomas Sayre in a deed in which he and 
Thomas Sayre each give one half of the land needed for a new 
street, now called Job's lane or Academy lane, must have married 
a d. of this Thomas Sayre. She died no great length of time after 
the marriage and appears to have left no ch. He m. Oct. 11, 1664, 
Sarah, d. of Joseph Judson of Statford, Conn., and had ch. 738 
Elizabeth 3 b. Oct. 10, 1669, 739 Sarah 3 d. Apr. 10, 1685 and 740 
Edmund. 3 

His w. Sarah d. Aug. 29, 1688. I have been unable to trace his 
descendants, if he had any in New Jersey. 

In Hatfield's History of Elizabeth, N. J., it is stated that the second 
w. of 5 Edward 2 , Mary was a twin sister of Hannah, daughters of Rich- 
ard Bryan of Milford, Ct. Hannah m. Rev. John Harriman, who 
preached in Southampton in the latter part of 1674, and was settled 
there Apr. 12, 1675, and remained till the early part of 1676. Mary 
when m. to Edward Howell was the widow of John Maltby of New 
Haven, and by him had ch. John and Mary Maltby. John Maltby 
the elder was lost at sea in 1676. His d. m. Rev. John Pordham 
son of Rev. Robert Fordham. Richard Bryan was the oldest son 
of Alexander Bryan the wealthiest man in Milford. 



320 Histoey of Southampton. 

Additional to the New Jersey branch. 535 Amos 8 had son 741 
Lot 6 b. about 1769. 

741 Lot 6 had ch. 742 Elizabeth', 743 Rebecca', 744 Sarah', 745 
Charles', 746 William B.'b. 1799, 747 Daniel', 748 Lot' and 749 Jane.' 

746 William B. 7 m. 1818, Jane Cameron and had ch. 750 Eliza 
Jane 8 b. 1820, w. of John Singleton, 751 Louisa 8 b. 1822, w. of 
William Walters (who have a d. Jennie b. 1858) and 752 Mary 8 w. 
of Jesse Howell, who have a d. Florence Howell. 

A Howell said to be from Long Island and may have been of 
this family, whose Christian name has not yet been ascertained, 
whom we will call 753, had ch. 754 Jacob 6 of Hardwich, N. J., 755 
John 6 of Wantage, Sussex Co., N. J., and 756 William 6 , who lived 
near Hardwich. 

755 John 6 had ch. 757 Ira', 758 William C, 759 Alpheus', 760 
Vincent', 761 John' and 762 Martha.' 

758 William C had s. 763 James E." of Newark, N. J. 

759 Alpheus' of Deckertown, N. J., had ch. 764 Charlotte E. 8 , 
765 John C. 8 , 766 Obadiah P. 8 b. 1846, of Port Jervis, N. Y., 767 
Martha E." and 768 Maretta. 8 

Howell Family of Southold. 

It is said by Rev. William Hallock, D. D., formerly secretary of 
the American Tract Society in New York that his ancestor Peter 
Hallock after settling in Southold went to England, married there 
a widow Howell, and returned with her and her son Richard, then 
a lad, to the colonies. 

This 1 Richard 1 d. Nov. 9, 1709, had w. Elizabeth, d. of William 
Hallock and had ch. 2 David 2 b. 1676, 3 Jonathan 5 , 4 Richard 2 b. 
1684, 5 Isaac 2 , 6 Jacob 2 , 7 John 2 , 8 Ruth 2 , 9 Elizabeth 2 and 10 
Dorothy. 2 Order of ages not known, but that of the sons probably 
as above. 

2 David 2 d. Aug. 18, 1756, m. 1st Abigail Conklin, 1717-8, m. 

2d Lydia Holdridge 1726, m. 3d Mary and had ch. 11 Daniel 3 , 

12 Aaron 3 , 13 Mary 3 , w. of Joseph Longbotham, 14 Israel 3 , 15 
James 3 and 16 Richard. 3 

4 Richard 2 d. 1769, had 1st w. Deborah, and 2d w. Prudence 
Griffing, and ch. 17 Richard 3 , 18 Deborah 3 , w. of — — Doddy, 19 

Sarah 3 , w. of William Penny, 20 Dorothy 3 , w. of Conklin, 21 

Hannah 3 , w. of Ketcham, and 22 Abigail. 8 



Genealogies. 321 

5 Isaac 2 d. 1757-9, had w. Phebe, and ch. 23 Daniel 3 , 24 Micah 3 , 
•35 Hannah. 3 , 26 Phebe 3 , w. of Nathan Corwin, 27 Rachel 8 and prob- 
ably 28 Isaac 3 killed 1746. 

6 Jacob 2 d. s. p. ] 732 had w. Margaret. 

, 7 John 2 d. 1734, had 1st w. Margaret and 2d w. Hannah, and ch. 
29 John 3 d. 1741, 30 Jonathan 3 , 31 Eunice 3 , 32 Jemima 3 and 33 
Esther. 3 

The above record is taken from the Index of Southold by Charles 
B. Moore, Esq., of New York. As Mr. Moore is a careful and in- 
defatigable worker in local history and genealogies this is 
to be relied on, and is certainly a good basis for subsequent geneal- 
ogists to make connection. 

The following genealogies are of families descended from the 
Southold Howells and the record was gathered as opportunity was af- 
forded. A John Howell b. about 1718 of Middle Island, a village 
about one mile from the old Yaphank station in the L. I. R. R. 
whom we will call 34 John 3 had ch. 35 Hannah 4 , 36 Jonathan 4 b. 
about 1756 and 37 John 4 b. 1760. 

36 Jonathan 4 had ch. 38 Davis 6 , 39 Norton 5 'and two daughters. 

37 John 4 had w. Martha and ch. 40 Charles 6 ,41 John 5 , 42 Emilia 5 , 
43 Charlotte 5 and 44 Mitchell. 5 

41 John 5 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 45 Benjamin 6 , 46 Franklin 6 , 
47 Elizabeth 6 , 48 Nathaniel 6 of Speonk, 49 Hampton 6 of Speonk, 50 
Mitchell 6 , 51 Charles M. 6 , 52 Electa 6 and 53 Maria. 6 

45 Benjamin 6 of Moriches had ch. 54 Benjamin Franklin 7 , 55 
George W.', 56 Thaddeus P.', 57- Emma C. 7 , 58 Judson P. 7 and 59 
Jesse P.' 

46 Franklin 7 of Moriches had d. 60 Ella. 8 

Another branch of this family are descended from David Howell 
of Indian Island, which is a small island in the Peconic bay and in 
the town of Riverhead, whom we shall call 61 David. 4 

61 David" had ch. 62 Ezra 6 , 63 Benjamin 5 , 64 George 5 , 65 David 5 
and 66 Noble. 5 

62 Ezra 5 moved to Orange Co., N. Y., and hadch. 67 John 6 , 68 
Coe 6 of Blooming Grove, same county, 69 Huntting 6 and 70 Thomas 6 , 
most of whom have families. 

63 Benjamin 6 had ch. 71 James 6 , 72 Daniel 6 , 73 John 6 , 74 Benja- 
min 6 , 75 George 6 , 76 Chauncey 6 , 77 Henry 6 , 78 Horace 6 and 79 
Preston. 6 

41 



322 Histoet of Southampton. 

73 John 6 had s. 80 John E.' of Goshen, N. Y. 

75 George 6 had s. 81 Dr. George' of Biverhead, who had s. SS' 
Levi 8 of the same place. 

^> 64 George 5 of Tompkins county, N. Y., had ch. 83 Benjamin 6 , 
84 George 6 and 85 Jeremiah. 6 

85 Jeremiah 6 had s. 86 Sidney B.' of Painted Post, N. Y., who 
has d. 87 Jenny. 8 

65 David 5 had son 88 David. 6 

88 David 6 of Monroe Co., N. Y., had ch. 89 Abner 7 , 90 George 7 ' 
and 91 Van Ess.' 

66 Noble 5 of Orange Co., N. Y., had ch. 92 Cad 6 , 93 Albert 6 , 94 
Coe 6 and 95 Peter. 6 

Huntting Family. 

This family is descended from elder John Huntting, who resided 
in the east of England, probably in the county of Norfolk. He 
had a brother who was a dissenting minister, preaching in that and 
the adjoining county of Suffolk as he found employment in those 
troublous times for dissenters. John Huntting came to this coun- 
try in August, 1638, and when the Kev. John Allen was ordained 
minister of the gospel in Dedham, Mass., John Huntting was at 
the same time ordained a ruling elder of the church. 

It has been thought by some that the family have no coat of 
arms. But in Bloomfield's History of Norfolk, vol. 5, page 460, is 
a record among other monuments in the village church of Trowse- 
with-Newton, of a coat of arms borne by the Hunton family, differ- 
ing from that of the Huntons of East Knoyle, county of "Wilts, just 
enough to make it highly probable that the two families are con- 
nected. As to the spelling of the name, that was a matter of 
indifference in those days. The wits of Charles II amused them- 
selves in signing their names in as varied forms as their ingenuity 
could devise. The name Sayre is spelled in three or four different 
ways in the same legal document of date in the 17th century. 
Huntting and Hunton are doubtless the same name. The arms of 
the East Knoyle family are : Argent, on a chevron per pale gules 
and azure, between three talbots (or hunting dogs) passant sable, as 
many stags heads cabossed or. Crest: A demi-talbot gules collared 
and eared or, holding between the paws a stag's head cabossed of 
the last. 



Genealogies. 323 

The arms on the Norfolk monument are : Sable, a chevron ermine 
between three talbots passant argent. This agrees perfectly with 
the arms as pictured and in possession of Mr. William Hedges of 
East Hampton, and which are, if I remember correctly, of quite 
ancient date. The presumption is that the Hunttings of Long 
Island and the Huntons of Trowse are the same family. The two 
inscriptions given by Bloomfield are as follows: 

"Hannah the dearly beloved wife of John Hun ton died 9 Dec. 
1707." 

" Hie jacet Johannes Hunton Generosus* ob. 28 Maij. A. D. 
1714. ae. 57." 

1 John 1 d. Apr. 12, 1682, freeman Mch. 13, 1639, at Dedham, 
Mass., and one of the founders of that town in 1638, and ruling 
elder in the church there, m. Esther Seaborn and had ch. 2 Mar- 
garet 2 b. in England and m. Mch. 24, 1646, Robert Ware, 3 John 2 
b. in England, 4 Samuel 2 b. July 22, 1640, 5 Nathaniel 2 b. Dec.15, 

1643, and d. in few days, 6 Mary 2 , w. of Buckner and 7 Esther 2 , 

who m. Dec. 26, 1649, Nathaniel Fisher. 

3 John 2 m. Elizabeth, d. of Thomas Payne of Dedham and had 
ch. 8 John 3 b. 1672, d. soon, 9 Thomas 3 b. 1674, d. 1676, 10 
Nathaniel 3 b. Nov. 15, 1675, 11 Esther 3 b. Nov. 19, 1677, 12 
Rebecca 3 b. Jan. 13, 1679, d. 1696, 13 Samuel 3 b. Mch. 14, 1681, d. 
1704, 14 Elizabeth 4 b. Feb. 2, 1683, 15 Ebenezer 3 b. Jan. 1, 1685, 
16 Stephen 3 b. May 14, 1688, and 17 Jonathan 3 b. Jan. 27, 1690. 

10 Rev. Nathaniel 3 d. Sept. 21, 1753, grad. of Harvard, from Sept. 
1696 to his death the faithful and laborious minister in East Hamp- 
ton, to whom for his careful church records all the people of that 
place owe a debt of gratitude, m. Mary Green of Boston, and had 
ch. 18 Nathaniel 4 b. Aug. 1702, 19 Edward 4 b. Feb. 1704, 20 Mary 4 
b. May, 1706, 21 John 4 b. Sept. 1707, 22 Samuel 4 b. Apr. 1710, 23 
Joseph 4 b. Mch. 1711, 24 Mary 4 b. Sept. 1713, w. of Joseph Coit of New 
London, 25 Jonathan 4 b. Oct. 1714 and 26 Elizabeth 4 b. Oct. 1718. 

18 Rev. Nathaniel 4 was liberally educated as a minister, but ill 
health compelled him to abandon the profession and he cultivated 
a farm in East Hampton. He d. Sept. 1770, m. Mary Hedges Sept. 
11, 1728, and had ch. 27 Nathaniel 5 b. Apr. 1730, 28 Joseph 6 b. 
Dec. 1731, 29 Mary 5 b. May, 1735, d. Aug. 30, 1738, 30 William 6 
b. June, 1738, and 31 Joseph 6 b. Aug. 1740. 

* Gentleman. 



324 Histoey of Southampton. 

27 Nathaniel 5 d. Sept. 1801, had ch. 32 John and 33 Abraham. 6 

32 John 6 had ch. 34 Nathaniel 7 b. 1792 and 35 Kev. James M. 7 of 
Jamaica. 

34 Nathaniel 7 had d. 36 Elizabeth b. 1823, w. of John Dayton. 

33 Deacon Abraham 6 m. Mary Mulford Aug. 1794 and had ch. 

37 Maria M. 7 b. Feb. 15, 1745, m. July 29, 1812, Joseph Osborn, 

38 John 7 , 39 James Madison 7 , 40 Israel Otis 7 b. 1816, 41 George M. 7 
and 42 Prances. 7 

39 James Madison 7 m. 2d w. Mary Dimon and had ch. 43 Ade- 
laide 8 , 44 Cecilia 8 and 45 Tunis D. 8 , the latter now in business in 
New York and only ch. of second wife. 

41 George 7 had w. Mai-y D. and cb. 46 Alexander S. 8 b. 1841 and 
47 Abbie J. 8 b. 1844, w. of John H. Hunt of Sag Harbor. 

30 "William 5 d July 6, 1816, m. Puah Osborn b. Dec. 29, 1747, 
d. Aug. 24, 1809, and had ch. 48 Jeremiah 6 b. 1772, 49 Rev. Jona- 
than 6 of Southold and 50 Mercy 6 , w. of Osborn. 

48 Jeremiah 6 d. June 19, 1845, had ch. 51 Jeremiah 7 b. 1812, 52 
David H. 7 b. 1815 and 53 William' b. 1818. 

51 Jeremiab 7 had w. Joana and ch. 52 William L. 8 b. 1841, 53 
Charles H. s b. 1844, 54 Jeremiah 8 b. 1846, 55 David H. 8 b. 1852, 
56 Samuel B. 8 b. 1856, 57 John 8 b. 1860 and 58 Mary E. 8 b. 1862. 

53 William 7 had w. Fanny L. and d. 54 Elizabeth b. 1861. 

31 Capt. Joseph' d. Aug. 1771, had ch. 55 Joseph 6 b. 1766, 56 
Mary 6 and 57 Elizabeth. 6 

55 Joseph 6 d. 1845, had ch. 58 John 7 b. 1801, 59 Ira' b. 1802, 60 
Joseph' b. 1805 and 61 Asa 7 b. 1808. 

58 John 7 had ch. 62 Whitby 8 , 63 Nelson 8 of Albany Co., N. Y., 
64 Newton 8 and 65 John 8 of Delaware Co., N. Y 

59 Ira' of Schoharie Co., N. Y., 66 Wesley 8 , 67 Clark 8 , 68 Miles 8 
and 69 Albert. 8 

60 Joseph' of Schoharie Co., N. Y., had ch. 70 Fletcher 8 and 71 
Ambrose. 8 

61 Asa 7 of Cayuga county, N. Y., had ch. 72 William M. 8 of 
Little Falls, 73 John W. 8 , 74 Seymour O. 8 , 75 Frank M." and 76 W. 
Irving. 8 

19 Dr. Edward 4 d. 1745, m. Mercy, d. of Isaac Mulford, and had 
ch. 77 Edward 6 , 78 Isaac M. 6 , 79 Mercy 6 , 80 Mebetabel 6 and 81 
Mary. 5 



Genealogies. 325 

21 John 4 m. Wid. Clemence Oonkling, d. of Samuel Parsons, 
and had ch. 82 Elizabeth 6 , w. of Burnett Miller, 83 Ruth 6 , w. of 
Jeremiah Miller, 84 Mary 6 , w. of David Osborn, 85 Clemence 6 , w. 
of Jacob Sherrill, 86 Lucretia 5 , w. of Ananias Miller, 87 Temper- 
ance 6 , w. of Eleazar Conkling, 88 Jerusha 6 , w. of Daniel Hedges, 
and 89 Esther W. 6 , w. of Thomas Chatfield. 

22 Samuel 4 , a merchant of Southampton, d. May 12, 1773, m. 
1st Mary G-ardiner, who d., and he m. 2d May 31, 1746, Zerviah 
Rhodes, who d. Nov. 12, 1780, and had ch. 90 Samuel 6 b. Feb. 2, 
1748, and d. s. p. at sea Jan. 10, 1776, 91 Mary 5 b. Oct. 17, 1749, 
d. Dec. 27, 1788, w. of James Post, 92 Abigail 6 b. Sept. 8, 1751, d. 
May 12, 1840, w. of Caleb Cooper, Esq., 93 Benjamin 6 b. Nov. 18, 
1753, 94 Zerviah 6 b. Jan. 5, 1757, w. of Major Zebulon Jessup, 95 
Joyce 5 b. Nov. 15, 1761, d. Dec. 20, 1805, w. of Daniel Sayre. 

93 Col. Benjamin 5 d. Aug. 17, 1807, m. Anna Ehodes Nov. 16, 
1784, d. Dec. 6, 1789, and be m. 2d Mehetabel Cooper Aug. 29, 
1793, d. Nov. 23, 1850, and had ch. 96 Samuel 6 b. Sept. 25, 1785, 
97 Anna 6 b. Eeb. 2, 1789, d. Sept. 4, 1796, 98 Benjamin 6 b. Oct. 21, 
1796, 99 Mary 6 b. Aug. 5, 1798, w. of Luther D. Cook, Esq., of Sag 
Harbor, 100 Edward 6 b. Aug. 21, 1800, 101 William 6 b. Oct. 23, 
1802, 102 Gilbert Cooper 6 b. Apr. 26, 1805, and 103 Henry 6 b. Dec. 
15, 1807. 

96 Samuel 6 m. but had no ch.; d. May 9, 1854. 

98 Benjamin 6 of Sag Harbor d. Feb. 1, 1867, had w. Mary R. and 
ch. 104 Margaret B. 7 b. 1831 and 105 Benjamin F.' b. 1841, who d. 
June, 1886. 

100 Deacon Edward 6 d. 1856, m. 1st Harriet, d. of Thomas Sayre, 
and had six ch. She d. and he m. Wid. Phebe A. Fordham and 
had one other ch. His ch. were 106 Samuel', 107 JamesR. 7 b. 1826, 
108 Henry Edward 7 b. 1828, 109 Sarah A.' b. 1832 (who m. 1st Rev. 
Charles B. Ball of Lee, Mass., and had one d. Harriet, and after 
his death m. Mr. Bartlett of the same town), 110 William Jay 7 b. 
1836, d. s. p., Ill Gilbert C. 7 b. May 10, 1839, and 112 Charles A. 7 
b. 1843, son of second w., who had also a d. Rowena by first hus- 
band, who m. Alfred Robinson. 

106 Rev. Samuel 7 , grad. of Amherst, m. Emma, d. of Daniel 
Halsey, and had s. 113 Samuel 8 , who d. a young man. Rev. 
Samuel for a few years was principal of the Southampton Academy 
and as a teacher was thorough, faithful and courteous ; then studied 



326 Histoby of Southampton. 

theology and was called as pastor to the Presbyterian Church in 
East Hampton, and died there much beloved by all his people. 
The writer, once a pupil of his, gladly bears this testimony to his 
eminent abilities and his high character. 

107 Capt. James E. T of Bridgehampton d. a few years ago, m. 
Martha, d. of Deacon John White, and had one d. 114 Martha J. 8 , 
w. of T. 0. "Worth. 

108 Capt. Henry E. 7 of Bridgehampton, m. Caroline H., d. of 
Matthew Hildrefch, and had ch. 115 Mary F. 8 b. 1862, d. 1886, 116 
Adelaide 8 b. 1864 and 117 Harriet. 8 

He was a member of the New York Legislature in the session of 
1886 and acquitted himself to the satisfaction of his constituents. 

Ill Gilbert C m. May 18, 1864, Annette, d. of B. Halsey and 
Fanny Foster, and had ch. 118 Edward 8 b. July 16, 1865, 119 
Fanny Sayre 8 b. Feb. 28, 1868, 120 "William Jay 8 b. Jan. 6, 1873, 
121 Henry 8 b. June 1, 1875, d. Sept. 16, 1875, and 122 James B. 8 b. 
Dec. 19, 1884. 

101 William 6 m. 1st Ann, d. of "William Foster, and 2d Cornelia, 
d. of Micaiah Herrick, and had by his first wife ch. 123 "William 
Foster', 124 Benjamin' b. 1834, 125 Hannah' b. 1837, 126 Nancy'' 
b. 1839, w. of John H. Ellsworth of McGregor, Iowa, and 127 
Edward P.' b. 1844. 

123 William F.' and 124 Benjamin' are both married and have 
ch. living in McGregor, 111. Benjamin was a soldier in the civil 
war, a member of an Iowa regiment. 

127 Edward P.' m. a d. of Zebulon Jessup and has ch. 

102 Gilbert C. 6 of Sag Harbor had w. Philena and ch. 128 Eliza- 
beth' b. 1831, 129 Mary A. 7 b. 1836, 130 Harriet A. 7 b. 1839, 131 
Gilbert C. 7 b. 1844 and 132 Eobert M.' b. 1849. 

103 General Henry 6 had w. Caroline and ch. 133 Cornelius' b. 
1835, 134 Samuel K.' b. 1839, 135 Henry H.' b. 1844 and 136 
Fedora 7 b. 1847. 

25 Jonathan 4 d. 1751, m. Esther, d. of Matthew Mulford, and had 
ch. 137 Jonathan 6 and 138 Matthew. 5 His will mentions that his 
ch. were then minors, but omits their names. 

4 Samuel 2 b. July 22, 1640, m. Dec. 24, 1662, Hannah Hawk- 
house, and had ch. in Dedham, 139 Samuel 3 b. Mch. 3, 1665, 140 
Samuel 3 again b. July 15, 1666, 141 Catherine 3 , 142 Anne 3 , 143 
Ebenezer 3 b. 1676, 144 Mercy 3 and 145 Hannah. 3 



Genealogies. 327 



Jagger Family. 
Jeremiah Jagger was the ancestor of the family of this name on 
Long Island. It has not been ascertained when he emigrated from 
England to this country, but he was one of the first settlers of 
Wethersfield, Ct., which was settled in 1634 by people from Water- 
town, Mass. He was in the Pequot war of 1637, and was one of 
the colony who went to settle a new town, which they called Stam- 
ford in 1640-41. He was master of trading vessels to the "West 
Indies, and died Aug. 14, 1658. His widow Elizabeth m. Robert 
Usher and had one d. Elizabeth. 

1 Jeremiah 1 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 2 John 8 , 3 Jeremiah 2 and 
3 Jonathan. 2 The two latter remained in Stamford and 2 John 2 
came to Southampton where the first mention of him on the 
records is of a grant of land for a house lot in 1651, this lot now 
being the homestead of Capt. G-eorge G-. White. 

2 John 2 wills in 1698 to w. Hannah and ch. 4 John 3 d. s. p. 5 
Jeremiah 3 , 6 Benjamin 3 (infirm in body or mind or both) 7 Samuel 3 , 
8 Jonathan 3 b. 1678, 9 Elizabeth 3 , 10 Sarah 3 b. July 21, 1669, 11 
Susanna 3 and 12 Lydia. 3 The daughters some of them may have 
been older than John the oldest son, but I have given them in the 
order of the will. 

5 Jeremiah 3 d. 1744, had w. Hannah 4 , who d. before 1740, and 

ch. 13 John 4 , 14 Hannah 4 , w. of Halsey, 15 Jeremiah 4 b. 1690 

d. s. p. 1736, 16 Sarah 4 , w. of Hildreth, 17 Nathan 4 b. 1694, 

18 Patience 4 , w. of Howell and 19 William 4 b. 1704. 

13 John 4 had son 20 Nathaniel. 5 

20 Nathaniel 6 had ch. 21 Nathaniel 6 and 22 David. 6 

21 Nathaniel 6 had son 22 Nathaniel 7 b. 1801. 

22 David 6 had w. Jane and ch. 23 David' b. 1794, 24 Stephen', 
25 Franklin' b. 1807, 26 Hervey 7 b. 1809, d. s. p., 27 Daniel 7 b. 1813 
and 28 Eliza', w. of John Burnett. 

23 David' had w. Elizabeth and son 29 Herman 8 , who died a 
young man. 

25 Franklin 7 had ch. 30 David 8 b. 1840, 31 Sarah A. a b. 1842, 32 
Mary E. 8 b. 1845, 33 Lucy M. 8 b. 1847 and 34 John F. 8 b. 1852. 

17 Nathan 4 d. 1786 had ch. 35 Abigail 5 , w. of Bishop, 36 

Nathan 5 , 37 Elias 5 , 38 Jeremiah 5 and 39 Charity 6 , w. of Post. 



328 History of Southampton. 

36 Nathan 5 moved to a locality near Elizabeth, New Jersey, and 
had ch. 40 John s , 41 Jeremiah 6 b. 1762, 42 Nathan 6 and 43 Hannah 6 , 
w. of Moses Austin. 

40 John 6 had ch. 44 Stephen 7 b. Nov. 25, 1770, 45 Silas' of Ohio, 
46 Ellas' of Morristown, N. J., 47 Joseph', 48 Hannah', 49 Charity', 
50 Elizabeth' and 51 Phebe.' 

44 Stephen' had son 52 Ira 8 b. 1805. 

52 Ira 3 of Albany, N. Y., has ch. 53 Franklin A. 9 b. Nov. 26, 
1853, and 54 Henry C. 9 b. June 27, 1856. 

53 Franklin A. 9 m. July 2, 1876 Lillie M., d. of Jessie White, 
and has ch. 55 Ira F. 10 b. Aug. 3, 1877, and 56 Claude A. 10 b. Mch. 
30, 1882. 

54 Henry C. 9 m. Jan. 29, 1876, Mary B. White, and has ch. 57 
Henry C. 10 b. Aug. G, 1877, 58 Carrie 10 and 59 Lillie. 10 

46 Elias' of Morristown had ch. 60 William 8 and 61 Lewis 8 both 
of New York city. 

42 Nathan 6 had ch. 62 Daniel' and 63 David.' 

38 Jeremiah 5 had ch. 64 Jane 6 , w. of 22 David Jagger, 65 Jere- 
miah 6 and 66 Daniel 6 of Palmyra, Wayne Co., N. Y., who left de- 
scendants. 

19 William 4 had son 67 Jeremiah. 6 

67 Jeremiah 5 had w. Jane and ch. 68 Walter 6 , 69 Kufus 6 , 70 Jehiel 6 , 
71 Prudence 6 and 72 Clara', who m. and had d. Mary, w. of Wm. 
Townsend Jones of New York and Southampton. 

70 Jehiel 6 of New York had ch. 73 William', 74 Walter', 75 
Augustus' and 76 Charles.' 

74 Walter' had son 77 Eev. Thomas Augustus, bishop of the 
southern diocese of Ohio. 

7 Samuel 3 was probably the father of 78 Samuel 4 , who d. 1782. 

78 Samuel 4 had w. Mary and ch. 79 Samuel 5 b. 1726, 80 Josiah 5 , 

81 Joseph 5 , 82 James 5 b. 1740, 83 Eunice 5 , w. of Coe, 84 Me- 

hetabel 5 , w. of Goodale,85 Hannah 5 and 86 Phebe. 6 

82 James 5 d. Apr. 23, 1833, had w. Jane and son 87 Samuel 6 b. 
1775. 

87 Samuel 6 d. Mch. 10, 1845 had w. Deborah and ch. 88 Jane' w. 
of Sylvanus White, 89 Phebe', w. of Jeremiah Squires, 90 Mary 7 , 

w. of Capt. Austin Herrick, 91 Maria', w. of Terry, 92 Deborah 7 

and 93 Samuel Hampton.' 

93 Rev. Samuel Hampton 7 m. Elizabeth, d. of Jonathan Fithian, 



Genealogies. 329 

Esq., and had ch. 94 Eosa 8 , w. of Edwin E. Post, M. D., now of 
New burgh, N. Y., and 95 Elliot Fithian 8 , who d. Sept. 1883, in 
young manhood, whose talents and high character gave promise of 
a noble life. Eev. S. H. Jagger was born and married in South- 
ampton and ministered to Presbyterian church of Marlboro, Ulster 
Co., N. Y , with acceptation and usefulness for nearly a generation, 
when he was obliged to resign his charge on account of impaired 
health, and took up his residence in Newburgh. 

8 Jonathan 3 b. 1678, d. Mch. 1, 1761, had w. Bethia and ch. 96 
Matthew 4 , 97 Stephen 4 and 98 Ebenezer. 4 

97 Stephen 4 of Canoe Place b. Sept. 27, 1719, m. Jan. 24, 1751, 
Martha Pierson, who d. June 30, 1764, and had ch. 99 Martha 5 b. 
Mch. 4, 1752, d. Mch. 11, 1759, 100 Stephen 5 b. Apr. 29, 1754, 101 
Susanna 5 b. July 25, 1765, 102 Hannah 5 b. Jan. 4, 1758, 103 Abi- 
gail 6 b. Mch. 21, 1760 and 104 David 5 b. Jan. 19, 1762. 

100 Stephen 5 d. Apr. 10, 1796, m. Aug. 5, 1766, Miriam Wicks 
b. Feb. 23, 1736 and d. 1825, and had ch. 105 Enoch 6 , 106 Anna 6 , 
107 George W. 6 , 108 Elizabeth 6 , 108^ Cephas 6 and 109 Elizabeth. 6 

104 David 5 d. 1850, m. Abigail Albertson, b. Dec. 16, 1763, and 
d. May 11, 1834, and had ch. 110 Martha 6 b. Jan. 16, 1785, d. July 
12, 1818, 111 Stephen 6 b. Feb. 28, 1788, d. July 2, 1827, 112 
Charity 6 b. Apr. 22, 1790, d. Aug. 18, 1820, 113 William 6 of Eiver- 
head b. Oct. 15, 1792, 114 Abigail 6 b. Jan. 8, 1795, 115 David 6 b. 
July 10, 1798, and 116 John 6 b. Nov. 2, 1800. 

115 David 6 d. May 1, 1884, m. Maria Skidmore and had ch. 117 
Chauncey', 118 William 7 of Jericho, L. I., and 119 Mary.' 

116 John 6 of Great Neck, L. I., d. Jan. 14, 1882, m. Feb. 7, 
1828, Sarah E. Smith, and had ch. 120 Mary' and 121 Louise' 
who m. 

98 Ebenezer 4 of Southampton had ch. 122 Ebenezer 5 b. 1776, 123 
Susanna 5 and 124 Lewis. 5 

122 Ebenezer 5 d. 1849 had ch. 125 Harriet 6 b. 1810, 126 Milicent 6 , 
w. of Frederic Howell, a merchant of Southampton, 127 Lewis 6 b. 
1816, and 128 William 6 b. 1823. 

127 Lewis 6 has w. Sarah b. 1823 and ch. 129 Oscar L.' b. 1845, 
130 Lafayette E.' b. 1849, 131 Elmira H. 7 b. 1852, 132 Kate L.' b. 
1852, 133 Sarah L.' b. 1854, 134 Andrew H.' b. 1860 and 135 Henry 
C. 7 b. 1864. 
42 



.330 History of Southampton. 

128 William 6 has w. Abigail b. 1831 and ch. 136 James M. 7 b. 1853, 
137 Annette' b. 1854, 138 Florence E.' b. 1857 and 139 Hubert A.' b. 
1864. 

124 Lewis 6 had son 140 Albert 6 b. 1813. 

140 Albert 6 m. Maria Pelletreau and ch. 141 Walter L. 7 b. 1846, 
142 Anna M.' b. 1848, w. of Samuel Dimon, 143 Clara 7 b. 1854, w. 
of Edgar A. Hildreth, 144 Mary 7 b. 1856, w. of Henry H. Hildreth, 
145 Hattie 7 b. 1860 and 146 Charles A. 7 b. 1861. 

141 Walter L. 7 m. Nettie, d. of Stephen Burnett, and has ch. 147 
Aliene 8 , 148 Albert 8 and 149 Eloise. 8 

Burke's Gen. Armory mentions one family of the name of Jager 
as using a coat of arms. 

Jennings Family. 

John Jennings, the ancestor of this family in Southampton, is 
first mentioned residing in Hartford in 1639. He is first mentioned 
in Southampton on the list of inhabitants of 1657. In 1662 he 
bought of the homestead of John Oldfields, in Southampton (as 
North Sea was then called). The inventory of his estate amounted 
to £77 0s. 6d. 

1 John 1 d. between 1686 and 1698 and had ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Wil- 
liam 5 , 4 Johana 2 , 5 Sarah 2 and 6 Samuel. 2 

3 Lieut. William 2 d. 1746, had w. Mary and ch. 7 John 3 , 8 
Mary 3 , 9 William 3 , 10 Sylvanus 3 and 11 Thomas 3 b. 1701, d. 1768, 
and had w. Sibyl but no ch. 

7 John 3 d. 1759, had w. Elizabeth and eh. 12 John 4 , 13 Zebulon 4 , 

14 Anne 4 , w. of Brown, 15 Sarah 4 , w. of Brown, 16 

Naomi 4 , w. of Bugg, 17 Elizabeth 4 , 18 Phebe 4 , 19 Abigail 4 and 

20 Stephen. 4 

13 Zebulon 4 had s. 21 George. 5 

21 George 5 had ch. 22 Lewis 6 and 23 Julia 6 , w. of Dillon. 

9 William 3 had ch. 24 Sylvanus 4 , 25 Elias 4 and 26 Israel.' 

24 Sylvanus 4 had ch. 27 William 5 b. 1764, 28 Nicholas 5 b. 1766 
and 29 Sylvanus. 5 

27 William 6 d. Feb. 22, 1845, had w. Naomi and ch. 30 Paul 6 and 
31 Elizabeth 6 bap. 1786. 

30 Paul 6 had s. 32 Jared M 7 b. 1810. 

32 Jared M. 7 had w. Harriet b. 1807 and ch. 33 Phebe" b. 1833, 
w. of Nicholas Havens, 34 Catherine 8 b. 1837, 35 Edson 6 b. 1840, 36 
Gilbert W. 8 b. 1842 and 37 Julia 8 b. 1849. 



Genealogies. 331 

29 Sylvanus 6 had ch. 38 David 6 of Sag Harbor and 39 John. 6 
25 Elias 4 m. Dorothy Purple 1777 and had ch. 40 Anne 5 , 41 

Elias 5 b. 1780, 42 Webb 5 , who removed, and 43 Purple 5 , removed. 
41 Elias 5 d. June 14, 1849, had ch. 44 Wickham L. 6 b. 1808, 45 

Andrew 6 b. 1814, 46 Elias 6 b. 1822, 47 Albert 6 b. 1828 and 48 Mary 

A. 6 b. 1831. 

44 Wickham L. 6 of Mill Pond Head had w. Catherine b. 1808 
and ch. 49 Ellen W. 7 b. 1842, 50 Lawrence W.' b. 1845, 51 Kate R.' 
b. 1847, 52 Abigail E. 7 b. 1849, 53 Albert W.' b. 1850 and 54 Emma 
R." b. 1852. 

45 Capt. Andrew 6 of Bridge Hampton m. Ann Eliza, d. of 
Stephen Foster, and had ch. 55 Andrew P.' b. 1861, 56 Eliza C. 7 b. 
1863 and 57 Ernest' b. 1864. 

46 Elias 6 had w. Caroline b. 1820 and ch. 58 Addison 7 b. 1847 
and 59 Jane R.' b. 1854. 

47 Albert 6 had w. Eunice b. 1830 and ch. 60 Mary L. 7 b. 1858 
and 61 Alice H. 7 b. 1862. 

6 Samuel 2 d. 1760 and had ch. 62 James 3 , 63 Samuel 3 and 64 
Jesse. 3 

63 Samuel 3 d. about 1782, bad w. Rachel and ch. 65 Samuel 4 b. 
1747, 66 James 4 b. 1748, 67 Silas 4 , 68 Joshua*, 69 Caleb 4 of New 
Jersey, 70 Ananias 4 and 71 Phebe. 4 

65 Samuel 4 d. s. p. Jan. 15, 1827, had w. Mary, who d. 1834, 
ac. 77. 

66 James 4 d. Apr. 3, 1822, had w. Sarah and ch. 72 Julia 5 bap. 
1786 and 73 Daniel 5 b. 1796. 

73 Daniel 6 had w. Hannah b. 1798 and ch. 74 Mary 6 , 75 Nancy 6 
b. 1825, 76 Emma 6 b. 1829, 77 Louisa 6 b. 1835, 78 Augustus 6 b. 
1837 and 79 James Edwin 6 b. 1839. 

79 James Edwin 6 has w. Sarah C. b. 1840 and ch. 80 Lottie A. 7 
b. 1861, 81 Edwin M. 7 b. 1862 and 82 James A. 7 b. 1864. 

64 Jesse 3 d. 1772, had w. Sarah and ch. 83 Lemuel 4 , 84 Daniel 4 , 
85 Jasper 4 , 86 Simeon 4 and 87 Sarah. 4 

Families of this name are found in New Jersey with other Long 
Island families, and doubtless many removed there, but I have been 
unable to ascertain the connection. 

Burke's Gen. Armory mentions eighteen families of this name 
as using coat armor. 



332 Histoey of Southampton. 



Jessup Family. 

This family is thought by a writer in the New Eng. Hist, and 
Gen. Register, vol. 10, p. 358, to be of the family of Jessops of 
Bromehall, in Yorkshire. The name is variously spelled on the 
records in this country. If this is really the home of the Long 
Island family, their arms, granted July 13, 1575, would be : Barry 
of six argent and azure, on the first nine mullets gules, three, three 
and three. 

John Jessup, the ancestor of the Southampton family, is said by 
a descendant, Mr. John Jessup Howell, to have come to Massachu- 
setts in 1620, but I find no earlier trace of him than 1637, when he 
was in Hartford; then, before 1640, of Wethersfield, from which he 
was one of the first settlers of Stamford in 1640, and thence, as early 
as 1649, of Southampton. 

1 John 1 had ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Thomas 2 , 4 Hannah 2 , who m. Sept. 
11, 1678, Joseph Hildreth and 5 Mary. 2 

2 John 8 of Old Town m. June 16, 1669, and had ch. 6 Elizabeth 3 
b. Apr. 13, 1670, 7 John 3 b. Sept. 27, 1671, d. s. p., 8 Isaac 3 b. Oct. 
12, 1673, 9 Jeremiah 3 b. Mch. 4, 1678, 10 Henry 3 b. Mch. 12, 1681, 
11 Mary 3 b. Mch. 2, 1683, and 12 Hannah 3 b. Jan. 2, 1685. 

8 Isaac 3 d. 1753 or 54, had w . Abigail and ch. 13 John 4 b. Oct. 
25, 1698, 14 Nathaniel 4 , 15 Abigail 4 , 16 Lewis 4 and 17 Stephen. 4 

13 John 4 had w. Phebe b. Jan. 10, 1699, and ch. 18 Sarah 5 b. 
Jan. 6, 1725, 19 Abigail 6 b. Feb. 27, 1727, 20 Ann 6 b. Feb. 23, 
1730, 21 John 6 b. Apr. 20, 1734, 22 Nathan 6 b. Sept. 30, 1736, 23 
Hannah 6 b. Dec. 3, 1739, and 24 Stephen 5 b. Apr. 12, 1743. 

21 John 5 m. Mary Halsey and had ch. 25 Isaac 6 b. Mch. 11, 1757, 
26 Matthew 6 b. Feb. 25, 1759, 27 Mary 6 b. Apr. 2, 1761, 28 Martha* 
b. Nov. 21, 1763, 29 Phebe 6 , 30 Charity 6 b. Mch. 22, 1766, 31 
Susanna 6 b. Feb. 17, 1771, 32 Dency 6 b. Oct. 21, 1774, and 33 Syl- 
vanus 6 b., Feb. 14, 1779. 

26 Matthew 6 had 1st w. Keturah and ch. 34 Martha' b. 1790 and 
35 Cynthia.' Keturah d. and he m. 2d w. Mercy Schellinger and 
had s. 36 John S. 7 Mercy d. and he m. 3d w. Eunice Herrick and 
had ch. 37 Henry H.', 38 Ann', 39 Hannah', 40 Jane', 41 Edward' 
and 42 Fanning. ' 

36 John S.' of "West Hampton b. 1798, m. 1st Margaret, d. of 
Nathan Cooper, b. 1799, and had ch. 43 Franklin C. 8 b. 1823, 44 



Genealogies. 333 

Isaac M. 8 b. 1827, 45 Sarah M. 8 b. 1831, 46 Nathan C. 8 b. 1834, 
47 Mercator 8 b. 1837 and 48 John H. 8 b. 1842. 36 John S. m. 2d 
w. wid. Mary Eose nee "White. 

43 Franklin C. 8 m. Charlotte, d. of William French of South- 
ampton, b. 1832, and had ch. 49 Margaret 9 b. 1856 and d. young, 
50 Margaret 9 b. 1858, 51 Agnes F. 9 b. 1860, 52 Winfield 9 b. 1862 
and 53 Isabel 9 b. 1864. 

25 Isaac 6 m. Mary Albertson b. Sept. 27, 1757, and had ch. 54 
Abigail', 55 Charity 7 , 56 Ilia', 57 John' b. May 14, 1794 and 58 
William.' 

57 John' m. Hannah Budd b. July 20, 1795, and had ch. 59 
Mary 8 b. Dec. 28, 1817, w. of Gabriel Howell of Orange Co., N. Y., 
and 60 Jeannette 8 b. June 16, 1819. 

16 Lewis 4 d. 1759, had ch. 61 Silas 5 , 62 Ruth 5 , w. of Zachariah 
Rogers and 63 Abigail. 5 

10 Henry 3 d. 1736, had w. Bethia and ch. 64 Bethia 4 , w. of 
Joseph Post and 65 Thomas 4 b. Feb. 28, 1721. 

65 Deacon Thomas 4 d. May 20, 1809, had 1st w. Mehetabel b. 
1719, d. June 30, 1768, and' 2d w. Sibyl mar. 1770, b. 1714, d. 
June 5, 1804. He had ch. 66 Henry 5 b. June 25, 1743, 67 Thomas 5 
b. Mch. 21, 1745, 68 Mehetabel 5 b. May 18, 1747, 69 Jeremiah 6 b. 
Aug. 14, 1749, d. 1816, 70 Bethia 6 b. Sept. 12, 1751, 71 Zebulon 6 
b. Sept. 15, 1755, 72 Ebenezer 5 b. Mch. 28, 1759, d. Oct. 26, 1838, 
73 Daniel 6 b. July 27, 1761 and 74 Samuel 5 b. Sept. 4, 1763. 

66 Henry 5 of Quogue d. 1824, m. Jane, d. of Hugh Raynor, and 
had ch. 75 Mehetabel 6 b. July 23, 1770, 76 Sarah 6 b. Dec. 22, 1772, 
77 Lewis 6 b. Nov. 22, 1774, 78 Henry 6 b. Aug. 11, 1776, 79 Silas 6 b. 
Mch. 10, 1779, 80 Apollos 6 b. Sept. 13, 1782, 81 Ruth 6 b. July 30, 
1786 and 82 Ebenezer 6 b. Sept. 16, 1789. 

^ — 78 Henry 6 of Palmyra, N. Y., had s. 83 George G.' 

79 Silas 6 of Quogue d. 1841, m. Susan Raynor and had ch. 84 

Egbert 7 b. June 16, 1818, 85 William' b. Nov. 21, 1819, d. 1852, 

and 86 Mary' b. Feb. 2, 1821. 

84 Egbert' had w. Nancy W. b. 1822 and ch. 87 Susan M. 8 b. 

1846, 88 Fannie 8 b. 1851 and 89 Silas E. 8 b. 1856. 

67 Thomas 6 d. 1824, had son 90 Harvey 6 bap. 1787 and 91 
Bethia 6 , w. ot Oliver White. 

71 Major Zebulon 5 d. June 8, 1822, m. Dec. 6, 1780, Zerviah 

Joseph Pe S f- 



334 Histoet of Southampton. 

Huntting b. Jan. 5, 1757, d. May 25, 1835, and had ch. 92 Samuel 
Huntting 6 b. Dec. 31, 1781, 93 Abigail 6 b. Mch. 23, 1785, m. 
Josiah Poster, Aug. 7, 1805, 94 Mary 6 b. Apr. 11, 1787, m. Jan. 4, 
1810, Austin Howell and d. Dec. 25, 1819, 95 Harriet 6 b. Feb. 11, 
1790, w. of Capt. George Post, and d. Apr. 27, 1830, 96 Fanny 6 b. 
Feb. 17, 1792, m. Sylvanus S. Mulford, May, 1818, 97 Nancy 6 b. 
Oct. 31, 1793, d. 1796, 98 William H. 6 b. Jane 21, 1797 and 99 
Sylvester 6 b. Apr. 4, 1800. 

92 Samuel Huntting 6 d. Dec. 10, 1822, m. Dec. 4, 1802, Pamela, 
d. of David Mackie and had ch. 100 Elizabeth 7 , 2d w. of Capt. 
George Post and 101 Zebulon 7 b. 1817. 

101 Zebulon 7 had w. Frances b. 1820, and ch. 102 Mary F. 8 b. 
1849, 103 Zebulon H. 8 b. 1851, 104 Elizabeth H. 8 b. 1852, 105 
David M. 8 b. 1855, 106 Sibyl 8 b. 1857 and 107 Pamela 8 b. 1857. 

98 Judge William H. 6 grad. of Yale moved to Montrose, Pa., 
and became honored in church and state. He m. Amanda Harris 
July 4, 1820, and had ch. 108 Jane', 109 Mary', 110 Harriet 7 , 111 
William 7 , 112 Henry Harris 7 , 113 Samuel 7 , 114 Fanny 7 , 115 Annie 7 , 
116 George A. 7 and 117 Huntting. 7 

112 Rev. Henry Harris 7 , D. D., grad. of Yale, has been a mis- 
sionary in Turkey. He has ch. 118 William 8 and 119 Henry H. 8 , 
both grad. of college of New Jersey. 

74 Samuel 5 d. Sept. 4, 1763, removed to Orange Co., N. Y., had 
w. Eebecca Armstrong and ch. 120 Jane 6 b. Jan. 1, 1782, 121 Wil- 
liam 6 b. July 6, 1790, 122 Amzi 6 b. Nov. 12, 1791, 123 Mary 6 b. 
Dec. 19, 1793, 124 Daniel 6 b. July 1, 1795 and 125 Thomas 6 of 
Newburgh, N, Y., b. Jan. 23, 1810. 

124 Daniel 7 had 1st w. Sarah Luby and 2d w. Martha , and 

ch. 126 Anna 7 b. 1821, 127 Albert 7 b. Oct. 11, 1822, 128 Jane 7 b. 
Dec. 27, 1824, 129 William 7 of Illinois, b. Nov. 23, 1826, 130 Sarah 7 
b. Dec. 16, 1828, 131 Henry S. 7 b. Feb. 6, 1831, 132 Samuel 7 b. 
May 23, 1833, 133 Francis A. 7 b. Jan. 24, 1835, 134 Selah 7 b. Sept. 
8, 1837, 135 Thomas 7 b. Dec. 27, 1839, 136 Rev. Theodore F. 7 b. 
Oct. 10, 1841, and 137 George P. 7 b. Mch. 21, 1845. 

132 Rev. Samuel 7 of the Pres. Church had son 138 George P. 8 

3 Thomas" d. Sept. 12, 1684, m. Mary Williams Nov. 23, 1683, 
and had son 139 Thomas 3 b. Aug. 23, 1684, d. Dec. 8, 1684. 



Genealogies. 



335 




JOHNES AND JONES FAMILY. 

According to Mr. Edward E. Johnes of 
New York, Edward Johnes came to this 
county in 1630, sailing from Yarmouth, 
England, in 1629. In 1635 his father 
Eichard Johnes of Dinder in Somerset with 
his wife Alice, followed, and settled in 
Charlestown, Mass. Mr. E. E. Johnes be- 
■ lieves the family, from some evidence he 
has seen, to be a younger branch of the 
Johnes family of Dolancothy in Carmar- 
thenshire, and to have the following coat 
of arms, the crest of which was on silver, 

owned by Timothy Jones, D. D., one of the 

descendants of Edward, in the last century: * Azure, a lion ram- 
pant between three crosses form6e fiteh^e or, a chief of the last. 
Crest : A lion rampant or, supporting an anchor azure, fluke of 
the last. Motto : Vince malum bono. 

The first three generations uniformly spelled the name Johnes 
which form some of the descendants still retain, while others have 
dropped the third letter altogether. 

1 Edward 1 d. between 1653 and 1657, had w. Ann, who after his 
death m. July 1660, Thomas Halsey. He came to Southampton 
with a family in Feb. 1644-5, was there admitted a "freeman" in 
1647. He had ch. 2 Samuel 2 and 3 Edward 2 b. about 1650. 

2 Samuel 2 d. in 1695, had w. Sarah, who d. Oct. 3, 1692, and 
son 4 Samuel 3 b. 1673. 

4 Deacon Samuel 3 d. May 4, 1760, m. Esther, d. of Capt. Thomas 
Stephens, b. 1680 and d. Jan. 18, 1753. He had ch. 5 Samuel 4 , 6 
Stephen 4 b. 1700, 7 Elizabeth 4 , 8 Obadiah 4 b. Feb. 7, 1715, 9 Tim- 
othy 4 b. May 24, 1715and 10 William 4 b. 1719. 

5 Samuel 4 m. Hannah, d. of Christopher Foster, Oct. 20, 1715, 
and had ch. 11 Hannah 5 b. Dec. 16, 1716, 12 Esther 5 b. Jan. 12, 
1718, 13 Phebe 5 b. Sept. 19, 1721, 14 Foster 5 b. Oct. 13, 1723, 15 
Abigail 5 b. Sept. 19, 1725, d. Nov. 13, 1725, 16 Mary 5 b. Nov. 19, 

* After the plate had been prepared Mr. Edward R. Johnes of New York writes that he is. 
convinced the shield is charged with a lion passant instead of the lion rampant. 



336 Histoey of Southampton. 

1726, 17 Elizabeth 5 b. May 20, 1729, 18 Abigail 5 b. Feb. 13, 1731, 
and 19 Samuel 6 b. Jan. 1, 1733. 

19 Samuel 5 had ch. 20 Obadiah", 21 William 6 and 22 Samuel. 6 

20 Obadiah 6 had ch. 23 William 7 of New York, 24 Thomas 7 d. 
1813, ae. 66, and 25 Susanna. 7 

22 Samuel 6 m. Lucinda, d. of Sylvanus Howell, and had ch. 26 
Clement', 27 Miranda 7 , 28 Elmira 7 and 29 Emma. 7 

6 Stephen 4 of New Jersey was the ancestor of numerous families 
now living in the States of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Virginia and Maryland, not traced. 

8 Obadiah 4 d. Dec 18, 1790, m. 1st Apr. 23, 1741, Esther Fithian 
b. 1721, d. Jan. 20, 1759. He m. 2d Elizabeth Miller of E. H. and 
had ch. 30 Gardiner' and 31 Bethia 6 b. 1752, d. 1768. 

30 Gardiner 6 had s. 32 Nicholas. 6 

9 Eev. Timothy 4 , D. D., pastor of First Presbyterian Church, of 
Morristown, N. J., from Feb. 1743 until his death, grad. of Yale 
1737, d. Sept. 17, 1794, m. 1st Elizabeth, d. of Job Sayre, who was 
b. July 24, 1715, and d. 19 Sept, 1748, ae. 31. He m. 2d Nov. 15, 
1749, Keziah Ludlow, d. Nov. 2, 1794, ae. 79, and had ch. 32 Theo- 
dosia 5 , who m. Jan. 27, 1762, Jacob Ford, Jr., 33 Timothy 5 b. 27 
Sept. 1748, 34 Samuel Stevens 5 , 35 Anna 5 b. July 10, 1751, m. Aug. 
2, 1772, Joseph Lewis, d. Feb. 17, 1826, 36 William 6 b. May 19, 
1755, and 37 Armstrong. 5 

33 Timothy 5 , M. D., d. Oct. 13, 1818, had 1st w. Sarah, who d. 
Mch. 16, 1780, and 2d w. Abigail J., d. of John Blanchard, b. Nov. 
11, 1757, and mar. Jan. 13, 1785, and d. Sept. 2, 1842. He had 
ch. 38 Timothy 6 b. Jan. 13, 1773, d. Mch. 22, 1775, 39 Oliver 6 b. 
April 15, 1776, d. 24th of same month, 40 Maria 6 b. Oct. 29, 1777, 
d. 1845, 41 John Blanchard 6 b. Dec. 1, 1785, 42 Elizabeth Sophia 6 
b. June 14, 1787, d. Apr. 9, 1873, 43 Francis Childs 6 b. Mch. 19, 
1789, d. near Sunbury, Ohio, Jan. 11, 1830, 44 Joana Niter 5 b. May 
16, 1791, w. of Woodruff, and 45 George W." 

41 Elder John B. 6 , M. D., d. July 4, 1863, had w. Helen M. 
(who d. Sept. 25, 1851, ae. 56) and s. 46 Theodore 7 , M. D., d. Feb. 
14, 1844, ae. 28. (See end for addition.) 

45 George W. 6 d. May 5, 1882, m. June 7, 1837, Frances Nichols 
of Newburgh, N. Y., who d. July 24, 1870, ae. 64, had ch. 47 John 
Nicoll 7 b. Feb. 28, 1828, d. Feb. 14, 1844, and 48 Anna Wil- 
liams 7 bap. 1834, m. Aug. 19, 1868, to Theodore Little. 



Genealogies. 337 

34 Samuel S. 5 d. Apr. 5, 1768, m. Mch. 23, 1767, Sarah Wheeler, 
d. May 25, 1792, ae. 46, had d. 49 Phebe b. Dec. 26, 1767, m. May 
24, 1787, John Dorccy. 

36 William 8 d. Dee. 8, 1836, m. 1st Feb. 9, 1785, Anna Brewster; 
• 2d w. Esther, who d. July 24, 1789, ae. 21 ; he mar. 3d w. in 1794, 

Charlotte Pierson, who d. Dec. 20, 1845, ae. 71, and had ch. 50 
Charles Alexander 6 b. Mch. 30, 1796, 51 Joseph Lewis 6 b. 1797, d. 
s. p., 52 Elizabeth C. s b. Mch. 23, 1799, m. May 10, 1820, Zebulon 
W. Conkling, 53 Aaron Pierson 6 b. Mch. 23, 1801, 54 William 6 b. 
and d. in 1803, 55 Harriet 6 b. Mch. 24, 1804, d. Aug. 3, 1813, 56 
William 6 b. Sept. 30, 1806, 57 Charlotte O. 6 b. Nov. 8, 1809, 58 
Louisa J. 6 b. Apr. 22, 1812, w. of Eev. Mr. Kirkland, and 59 
Edward Eudolphus 6 b. Dec. 16, 1813. 

50 Charles A. 6 d. Dec. 7, 1832, m. Sarah Pettit, and had ch. 60 
Charles A. 7 d. s. p., 61 Joseph Lewis', G2 William P.', 63 Mary E. 7 
and 64 George M. 7 

62 William P. 7 m. Anna L. Gold and had s. 65 Edward R. 8 b. 
Sept. 8, 1852. 

65 Edward R. e of New York m. Mary Harris b. Sept. 11, 1858, 
and has s. 66 Edward G. 9 b. Jan. 15, 1884. 

53 Aaron P, 6 had w. Lydia and son 67 Goldsmith D. 7 

67 Goldsmith D. 7 had s. 68 Henry 8 , grad. of Yale 1878. 

59 Edward R. 6 m. Mary Bennett and had ch. 69 Edward', 70 
Charles' and 71 Mary B. 7 , w. of H. D. Knowlton. 

37 Armstrong 5 d. April 28, 1790, m. Jan. 13, 1782, Leah Sutton, 
d. Jan. 1809, ae. 62, and had ch. 72 John Sutton 6 b. Nov. 11, 1782, 
73 Catherine 6 b. June 14, 1784, d. July 20, 1807, and 74 Elizabeth 6 
b. Sept. 13, 1786, d, Jan. 15, 1806. 

72 John S. 6 had w. Elizabeth, d. Oct. 19, 1815, and ch. 75 
Catherine 7 b. Aug. 15, 1807, 76 Lewis A. 7 b. Feb. 12, 1809, and 77 
Mary 7 b. Sept. 4, 1811. 

Note —For the record of the descendants of the Eev. Timothy Johnes, D. D., a noted man 
of his time I am indebted both to Edward E. Johnes, Esq., of New York, and to the Eev. 
Mr Durant' pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Morristown, All of the descendants 
of this eminent clergyman, I believe, spell the name Johnes. 

10 William 4 b. 1719, d. Mch. 5, 1779, had w. Mary b. 1716 and ch. 
78 Hannah 6 b. 1741, 79 Phebe 6 b. 1744, 80 Elias 6 b. 1746, 81 Paul 6 
b. Nov. 5, 1748, and 82 Isabella 5 , w. of William Floyd. 

81 Lieut. Paul 6 d. Oct. 6, 1776, had ch. 83 Elias 6 b. 1773, 84 Wil- 
liam 6 b. 1774 and 85 Elizabeth. 6 
43 



338 Histoby of Southampton. 

3 Edward 2 b. about 1650, d. Aug. 26, 1726, removed to East Hamp- 
ton and bad cb. 86 Edward 3 .b. 1678, 87 Daniel 3 and 88 Edward. 3 

86 Edward 3 d. 1745 and bad cb. 89 Ezekiel 4 b. 1708 and prob. 90 
Elisba. 4 

89 Ezekiel 4 of Jericho, East Hampton, d. Jan. 5, 1790, m. Mary 
Shaw Jan. 31, 1734, and bad ch. 91 Ezekiel 5 b. 1736, 92 Edward 5 b. 
1738, 93 Elisha 5 b. 1741, 94 Mary 5 bap. 1743 and 95 Jeremiah 6 b. 1745. 

91 Ezekiel 5 d. Jan. 7, 1718, had w. Martha and ch. 96 Mary 6 bap. 
1760, 97 Talmage 6 bap. 1767 and 98 Ezekiel 6 bap. 1778. 

97 Talmage 6 d. 1850, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 99 Edward' b. 
1801 and 100 William' of Bridgehampton. 

99 Edward' of Jericho had w. Nancy S. and ch. 101 Lewis 8 (as I 
suppose him the son of Edward) b. 1823, 102 Edward H." b. 1829 
and 103 Erastus 8 , who m. Hannah Bennett but left no ch. 

101 Lewis 8 bad w. Anna T. and ch. 104 Sarah L. 9 b. 1851 and 
105 Anna L. 9 b. 1852. 

102 Edward H. 8 has w. Phebe O. b. 1834 and cb. names unknown 
to me. 

92 Edward 5 had ch. 106 Mehetabel 6 bap. 1762, 107 Elizabeth 6 bap. 
1770 and 108 Abigail bap. 1776. 

95 Jeremiah 6 d. July 2, 1803, had w. Lydia and ch. 109 Sylvanus 6 
b. 1787, 110 Mary 6 and 111 Jeremiah. 6 

109 Sylvanus 6 had w. Elizabeth and d. 112 Philena 7 b. 1810, w. 
of Capt. William Mulford. 

90 Elisha 4 m. June 29, 1746, Elizabeth Miller and had ch. 113 
Mary 5 bap. 1748, 114 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1750, 115 Ebenezer 6 bap. 1752 
and 116 Elisha 6 bap. 1760. 

87 Daniel 3 m. Sept. 21, 1721, Eachel Conkling and had ch. 117 
Daniel 4 and 118 Phebe 4 bap. 1713, 119 Mary 4 and 120 Elizabeth 4 
bap. 1722 and 121 Martha 4 bap. 1722. 

88 Edward 8 m. for 2d w. Phebe Gould Nov. 5, 1741, and had ch. 
122 Esther 4 bap. 1730, 123 Elisha 4 and 124 Abigail 4 bap. 1738 and 

125 Talmage 4 bap. 1742. 

41 John B. 6 , M. D., in addition to what was given above, had s. 

126 George W. 7 } who d. 1882, leaving w. Prances N., whom be m. in 
1827. 

46 Theodore 7 b. Feb. 14, 1816, had ch. 127 Fanny N. 8 , 128 John 
IV. 8 b. Feb. 28, 1828, d. 1844 and 129 Anna W. 8 , w. of Theodore 
Little. 



Genealogies. 339 



Ludlow Family. 
The name of this family was generally written Ludlam down to 
about the time of the revolutionary war. I cannot tell which form 
is correct, as I have been unable to ascertain the family connection 
in England. William Ludlam, the first of the name, is not on the 
list of townsmen in May, 1649, but his sons are on that of 1657. 
There is no trace of him in the New England records. He came 
from Matlock, a village in Derbyshire, Eng. 

1 William 1 d. 1665 in Southampton, had w. Clemence and ch. 2 
William 2 b. 1628, 3 Henry 8 , 4 Mary 2 , 5 Prances 2 , 6 Grace 2 , 7 Joseph 
and 8 Anthony 2 b. 1651, and, as by his will, sons-in-law, Caleb Car- 
withen (Corwithy or Corwith), Thomas Scudder and Samuel King. 

2 William 2 lived in Huntington at the time of his father's death. 
He d. in 1667 or 1668. 

7 Joseph 2 was a resident of Watermill (not Water Mills) 1665 ; of 
Oyster Bay, 1675, and later of Cape May county, New Jersey, or else 
perhaps a son Joseph — for a long list of whose descendants see 
Littell's Passaic Valley Genealogies. 

3 Henry 2 d. intestate Oct. 25, 1681, and had ch. 9 John 3 of 
Jamaica, 10 Henry 3 b. Jan. 8, 1669, and 11 William. 3 

10 Henry 3 d. 1737, had w. Eachel and ch. 12 William 4 , 13 
Henry 4 , 14 Jeremiah 4 , 15 David 4 , 16 Eachel 4 , 17 Jane 4 , 18 Mercy 4 , 19 
Deborah 4 and 20 Abigail." 

13 Henry 4 of Bridgehampton d. 1761, had ch. 21 Henry 5 , 22 
Silas 5 , 23 Stephen 5 , 24 Jeremiah 5 , 24| Eachel 5 , 25 Jemima 6 , 26 
Mary 6 and 27 Sarah. 6 

24 Jeremiah 5 had ch. 26 Isaac 6 , 27 Eachel 6 bap. Jan. 26, 1786, 
and 28 John 6 of Southampton b. 1793. 

26 Isaac 8 had ch. 29 Sylvanus' b. 1805, 30 Isaac' b. 1807 and 31 
Jeremiah' b. 1816. 

29 Sylvanus' had w. Abigail b. 1813 and ch. 32 James 8 b. 1834, 
33 Gordon 8 b. 1837, 34 Harriet 8 b. 1839, 35 Henry 8 b. 1842, 36 Abi- 
gail 8 b. 1849 and 37 Charles F. 8 b. 1858. 

32 James 8 has w. Sarah E. and d. 38 Edith 9 b. 1864. 

30 Capt. Isaac' had w. Phebe b. i808 and ch. 39 Phebe E. 8 b. 
1833, 40 Maria J. 8 b. 1836, 41 Frances P. 8 b. 1841, 42 Martha T. 8 b. 
1843, 43 Caroline Letitia 8 b. 1 848 and 44 Herbert 8 b. 1852. 



340 History of Southampton. 

31 Oapt. Jeremiah' m. Laura 0. G-elston and had ch. 45 Gelston 
C. 8 b. 1851, 46 Edward M. 8 b. 1855, 47 Laura Gelston 8 b. 1857, 48 
Kate W. 8 b. 1861 and 49 Jennie T. 8 b. 1864. 

28 John 6 of Southampton had w. Harriet and ch. 50 Luoinda 7 , 
51 Marietta', w. of Stephen Bennett, 52 Elizabeth 7 b. 1833 and 53 
Charles H. 7 b. 1836. 

11 William 3 d. 1732, had w. Sarah and oh. 54 William 4 , 55 Nehe- 
miah 4 , 56 Sarah 4 , 57 Phebe 4 and 58 Martha. 4 

8 Anthony 2 b. 1651, d. Mch. 17, 1682, had w. Sarah and ch. 59 
Anthony 3 b. 1671 and 60 Phebe 3 , w. of Jonah Rogers. 

59 Anthony 3 d. Dec. 21, 1723, had 1st w. Patience, who d. Oct. 
11, 1708, 2d w. Abigail and 3d w. Rebecca Shaw, mar. in E. H. 

Dec. 20, 1716. He had ch. 61 Anthony 4 , 62 Patience 4 , w. of 

Shaw, 63 Samuel 4 , 64 Phebe 4 , w. of Davis, 65 Sarah 4 w. of 

Baker, and 66 Temperance. 4 

61 Anthony 4 had w. Zerviah and ch. 67 Anthony 6 , 68 Samuel 5 , 
69 Mary 5 and 70 Ann. 5 

67 Anthony 5 d. 1809, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 71 Anthony 6 b. 

1781, 72 Elias 6 , 73 Mary 6 , w. of Rose, 74 Hannah 6 , w. of 

Halsey, 75 Zerviah 6 , w. of ■ Cook, 76 Elizabeth 6 , 77 Jerusha 6 , 78 

Puah 6 , 79 Abraham 6 and 80 Bilgah. 6 

71 Oapt. Anthony 6 d. Nov. 12, 1843, had w. Abigail b. Aug. 19, 1783, 
d. of Jesse Halsey, and ch. 81 Jesse 7 b. 1806, 82 Samuel 7 , 83 Lafay- 
ette 7 , 84 Charity 7 , 85 Abigail 7 , 86 Caroline', 87 Charles Anthony 7 b. 
1817, 88 Elizabeth', 89 Charlotte 7 and 90 Augustus 7 b. 1826. 

81 Jesse 7 had w. Harriet and ch. 91 Gabriel H. s b. 1834, 92 
Samuel 8 b. 1836, 93 Sarah E. 3 b. 1838, 94 Eugene A. 8 b. 1840, 95 
Maria H. 8 b. 1842, 96 Antoinette 8 b. 1846, 97 William 8 b. 1848 and 
98 Walter 8 b. 1851. 

82 Capt. Samuel 7 , while master of the ship Gov. Clinton of New 
York, was lost with all on board in the Japan sea about 1836. 

87 Charles Anthony' had ch. 99 Charles Anthony 8 b. 1848, 100 
Mary H.' b. 1850 and 101 Edward 8 b. 1854. 

72 Elias 6 had w. Sarah b. 1784 and ch. 102 Albert G.' b. 1816 
and 103 E. Jones' b. 1823. 

103 E. Jones' has w. Maria E. and ch. 104 Stanley' b. 1856, 105 
Ellen C.° b. 1860 and 106 Henry J." b. 1864. 

Burke's Gen. Armory mentions twenty-six families of the name 
of Ludlow as using coat armor. 



Genealogies. 341 



Lupton Family. 
This family has for some time disappeared from Southampton, 
though until recently, and perhaps still, there have been some of 
the name in Bridgehampton. Christopher Lupton came here in 
1654. In 1681 he (or his son Christopher) bought mill privileges 
of Samuel Clark in North Sea. The inventory of his estate at his 
death was £69 14s. Od. 

1 Christopher 1 wills in 1686 to w. Abigail, d. of Thurston Raynor, 
and ch. 2 John 2 ;, 3 Thomas 2 , 4 Christopher 2 , 5 Joseph 2 , 6 Lydia 2 , 7 
Mary 2 and 8 Deborah. 2 

2 John 8 d. 1716, m. Hannah, d. of Peregrine Stanbrough, and 
had ch. 9 John 8 , 10 Christopher 3 , 11 Josiah 3 , 12 David 3 , 13 Sarah 3 , 
14 Hannah 3 and 15 Mary 3 , w. of Culver. 

9 John 3 of Bridgehampton, d. 1755, had ch. 16 John 4 , 17 David 4 , 
18 Rachel 4 , 19 Abigail 4 and 20 Mary. 4 

One of these sons of 9 John 3 had ch. 21 John 5 b. 1780 and 22 
Mary 6 b. 1784, living in 1855 in B. H. 

12 David 3 of Mecox m. Oct. 11, 1744, Rebecca Conkling, Jr., of 
East Hampton. 

i Christopher* of B. H. m. Dec. 26, 1714, Abigail Dimon of 
E. H. 

5 Joseph 2 had ch. 23 Thomas 3 and 24 Hannah. 3 

23 Thomas 3 of S. H. had w. Mary and ch. 25 Hannah 4 b. 1744, 
26 Christopher 4 and 27 Thomas. 4 

26 Christopher 4 of Sebonac d. 1782 and had ch. 28 Sarah 6 , 29 
Mary 5 and 30 Phebe. 5 

Many of this family removed to New Jersey, where the name is 
yet common. 

Burke's Gen. Armory describes coats of arms used by two Eng- 
lish families of this name. 

McCoekbll Family. 
James McCorkell, of Scotch-Irish descent, b. in 1787, came to 
Southampton with his w. Lilian and had ch. 1 William, 2 Sarah, 3 
James, lost at sea, 4 Capt. Samuel b. 1830, who m. Mary, d. of 
Capt. Albert Rogers, and lives in Lloyd, Wisconsin, 5 Charles of 
Wisconsin,. 6 Andrew, 7 Margaret J. b. 1832, who d. in Schenectady, 



342 Histoky or Southampton. 

JST. Y., 8 Eobert, 9 Joseph b. 1835 and 10 Mary b. 1837. None of 
the name now live in the town. Andrew, Eobert and Joseph also 
live in Wisconsin. 

William m. Harriet Topping and also removed to Wisconsin. 

Capt. Samuel has d. Mary Cordelia b. 1869. 

Mackib Family. 

1 Dr. John Mackie 1 came to Southampton from Dundee, in Scot- 
land. He was b. in 1695 and died 1758. He had w. Mehetabel 
and ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Andrew 2 , who moved away, 4 Peter 2 , 5 George 2 
b. 1737, 6 David 2 b. 1738, 7 Sarah 2 and 8 Mehetabel. 2 

5 George 2 d. 1813, m. Jane, d. of Zebulon Howell, and bad ch. 9 
George 3 , d. s. p., 10 Sophia 3 , w. of Uriah Halsey, and 11 Elizabeth 3 , 
d. Feb. 11, 1796. 

6 David 2 d. 1819, had ch. 12 Peter 3 , d. s. p., 13 Susan 3 , 14 Han- 
nah 3 b. 1781, 15 William 3 b. 1791 and 16 Elizabeth 3 , w. of 

Allen. 

Mr. Allen had ch. John and William. 

John Allen m. Mary A., d. of Capt. Isaac Sayre, and had d. Ida, 
now deceased. 

William moved to the south, where he has aw. and family of 
Beveral children. 

Marshall Family. 

1 Joseph Marshall 1 came to Southampton subsequent to 1667. 
He d. Aug. 29, 1685 ; m. Mch. 18, 1674, Elizabeth Howell, and had 
ch. 2 Elizabeth 2 b. May 14, 1676, 3 Sarah 2 b. Oct. 30, 1678, 4 
Joseph 2 b. Oct. 3, 1680, and 5 Benjamin 2 b. Oct. 15, 1682. 

5 Benjamin 2 d. 1752, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 6 John 3 , 7 
Esther 3 , w. of Blachley, and 8 Joseph. 3 

8 Joseph 3 had s. 9 Gamaliel. 4 

9 Gamaliel 4 had ch. 10 Sylvanus 5 b. about 1800, 11 James 5 , d. s. 
p., and 12 Maria 5 , w. of Lewis Sanford. 

Mitchell Family. 

This family resided in Bridgehampton, though none of the name 

now live there. A Mr. Mitchell is said on the records to have sold 

some land in 1649 or 1650 to Joseph Hildreth. But the name is 

not on the tax list of 1683, and no further mention is found until in 



Genealogies. 343 

1686 John Mitchell of E. H. buys twenty acres in Mecox from Mary, 
wid. of Samuel Mills, late deceased. John belongs to none of the 
families of this name mentioned in Parmer's and Savage's works, 
unless he was a son of Matthew, who came to Oharlestown 1635 ; then 
to Hempstead with Rev. Mr. Denton, and then to Stamford, where 
he died. 

1 John 1 had s. 2 John 2 b. 1660. 

2 John 2 d. 1717, had 1st w. Sarah and 2d w. Phebe and s. 3 
John 3 b. 1684. 

3 John 3 d. 1762, m. Mehetabel Cook and had ch. 4 Phebe 4 , w. of 

Clark, 5 Mary 4 , w. of Moore, 6 John 4 b. 1719 and 7 

Stephen. 4 

6 John" d. 1774, had w. Mehetabel and ch. 8 Phebe 6 , w. of John 
Gelston, b. 1759, 9 Stephen 6 b. 1762, 10 James 6 b. 1765 and 11 
John. 6 

9 Stephen 6 had ch. 12 Nathaniel 6 and 13 John . 6 

12 Nathaniel 6 had ch. 14 Stephen' and 15 Edward 7 b. 1834. 

10 James 6 d. 1815, m. Lucy Oonkling b. 1766, d. 1836, and had 
ch. 16 Mary 6 b. 1790, 17 Samuel 6 b. 1792, 18 Phebe 6 b. 1795, w. of 
Judge Hugh Halsey, 19 Edward 6 b. 1799 and 20 Catherine 6 b. 1808, 
w. of Josiah H. Post. 

Burke's Gen. Armory describes coats of arms used by eighteen 
English families of this name. 

Paekee Family. 
One family of this name living in Bridgehampton is descended 
from 1 Jeremiah P., who came here from Wales. He had s. Jere- 
miah, who had ch. 2 Matilda, w. of E. Reed of Newburg, N. Y., 3 
Huldah, w. of Geo. Lugar of Mystic, Ct., 4 John of Virginia and 
5 Rodney of Bridgehampton (who has ch. James L., John, "Wil- 
liam H. b. 1836, Phebe, Elenora, Laura, Clarissa, Margaret, Emily 
and Sarah). 

Paesons Family. 
Among the settlers of East Hampton a year after the settlement, 
in 1650, appears the name of Samuel Parsons, then a young man 
about twenty years of age. No record yet discovered reveals his 
parentage or birthplace. A full genealogy of this family is not 
given here, but the line only leading to the Southampton branch. 



344 History of Soothampton. 

I Samuel 1 b. 1630, d. July 6, 1714, had w. Hannah d. Oct. 3, 
1728, ae. about 83, and ch. 2 John 2 d. 1715, 3 Lois 2 , 4 Esther 2 , 5 
Seth 2 b. 1665, 6 Sarah 2 , 7 Robert 8 and 8 Samuel 2 b. 1683. 

5 Seth 2 d. Sept. 19, 1725, had ch. 9 Hannah 3 bap. 1701, 10 Eliza- 
beth 3 bap. 1704, 11 John 3 bap. 1706, 12 Stephen 3 bap. 1709, 13 

Elizabeth 3 bap. 1712, w. of Woodruff, 14 Puah 3 bap. 1716, w. 

of Recompence Sherrill, and 15 Seth 3 , d. s. p. 1752. 

II John 3 d. 1793, m. 1st Wid. Martha Barnes, Oct. 25, 1729, and 
had ch. 16 Puah 4 bap. 1730, 17 Mary 4 bap. 1732, 18 Mercy 4 bap. 
1733 and 19 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1735. He m. 2d Wid. Phebe Chatfield, 
nee Mulford, and had other ch. 20 John 4 bap. 1741, 21 Seth 4 bap. 
1749, 22 Elnathan 4 bap. 1753 and 23 Stephen 4 bap. 1754. 

22 Elnathan 4 had ch. 24 Elnathan 5 bap. 1784, 25 Nathaniel 5 of 
Glens Falls, N. Y., 26 Charlotte 5 , 27 Solon 5 bap. 1789, 28 William 
D. 5 bap. 1794, 29 Charles 5 bap. 1798, 30 Phebe 5 and 31 Jonathan 5 
of New Brunswick, IS. J. 

24 Elnathan 5 removed to Glens Falls, N. Y., and had ch. 32 
Henry Martyn 6 and 33 Charles. 6 

32 Rev. Henry M. 6 d. about 1859, m. Maria, d. of James and 
Phebe (Rogers) Brown of Southampton, and had one son who died 
young. Rev. Henry M. was a man of unusual power in the pulpit; 
of a genial, sympathetic disposition, and one whom all who knew 
him loved. He was a native of Glens Falls and entered Williams 
College, where he remained till some time during his third year, 
when he was compelled by his health to abandon study and take a 
sea voyage. On his return he resumed his studies at home. Visit- 
ing his Uncle Charles in Southampton he was engaged to teach the 
academy in that place, which the writer was then attending. No 
man more than he won the love of his scholars. He subsequently 
studied for the ministry and was licensed to preach, and ordained 
as pastor of the Presbyterian church at Moriches by the Presbytery 
of Long Island. His ministry was brief but eminently successful 
in building up the church of his charge, till failing health com- 
pelled him to resign. 

29 Charles 5 removed from E. H. and m. Eleanor Harris of South- 
ampton and had ch. 34 Mary 6 , w. of Dr. Gildersleeve of Port Jeffer- 
son, L. L, and 35 Sarah Jane 6 , w. of Charles White of Southampton. 

Burke's Gen. Armory describes coats of arms used by eleven 
English families of this name. 



Genealogies. 



345 




Pelletreau Family. 

The ancestors of this family were Hugue- 
nots, who, upon the l-evocation of the edict of 
Nantes, fled from France and sought safety 
and religious freedom in a foreign clime. 
The first of the family in America were Jean 
Pelletreau and wife Magdalena and their 
nephews, Jean and Elie, the latter having 
two sons, Jean and Elie, which names were 
soon anglicized into John and Elias. These 
were direct descendants from an ancestor who 
was physician to Admiral Coligny, and, like 
his illustrious patron, perished in the mas T 
, sacre of St. Bartholomew, August 23, 1572. 

fflellelXesm, King Charles IX. granted him a coat of arms 
AwY.mm j u ly 17, 1571. The following is a transla- 
tion of the description or blazon . 

Azure : a column shortened, in pale or, encircled with a serpent 
proper, between two martlets of the second. Mantle and crest : 
(a helmet) as the shield. 

Jean 1st was naturalized in New York Sept. 22, 1687, and died 
in 1700. His wife Magdalena died in 1702 without children. Jean 
2d died in 1703 childless. He and his brother Elie were natural- 
ized July 10, 1696. The native place of this family was the village 
of Acres, in what is now the Department of Oharente Inferieure. 
They were all members of the French church in New York and 
in their wills left funds toward the support of its poor. Their 
names are found in connection with the troubles in that church, as 
in favor of Rev. Lewis Bow. (See Doc. Hist, of N. Y., vol. 3.) 

Elie Pelletreau died in 1730, leaving sons Elias, Paul, Francis, 
John and Benjamin and a daughter Magdalena. Elias died before 
his father and left dau. Mary and Elizabeth. Paul is supposed to 
have had a son Elias, who had ch. Elias, Samuel, Mary and John. 
From the first of these are descended the families now living in the 
city of Brooklyn. Benjamin was the youngest son and is not 
known to have left descendants. 
44 



346 Histoet of Southampton. 



/yoi 

Francis Pelletreau is said to have been an infant at the time when 
the family left Prance in 1686. He came to Southampton in 1717. 
He married Jane, wid. of Eichard Osborn, Sept. 26, 1721, and had 
ch. Mary b. Nov. 30, 1723, and Elias b. May 31, 1726. Jane d. 
Dec. 6, 1733, aged 38. His second wife was Mary King, wid. of 
Joseph King of Southold and dau. of Judge Thomas Chatfield of 
East Hampton. She was b. Sept. 9, 1731, and m. Francis Pelle- 
treau Sept. 4, 1734, and they had ch. Hugh and Hannah b. in 1735. 
Francis was a merchant and in 1728 he purchased the homestead 
of Samuel Woodruff, and this place remained in the possession of 
his descendants until 1866 and is now the residence of Mr. Josiah 
Foster. The old house remained standing till 1881 ; it was the last 
house on Long Island that retained the old-fashioned rhomboidal 
panes of glass set in lead, and from these it was known as " the 
house with diamond windows." In 1737 Francis Pelletreau went 
to London to undergo a surgical operation and died from its effects 
Sept. 26. His widow marriedf Judge Hugh Gelston, Feb. 23, 1738, 
and died Sept. 1, 1775. 

Mary, oldest daughter of Francis, died July 6, 1736. Hugh d. 
when a child. Hannah m. Edward, son of Rev. Sylvanus White, 
in 1757, and d. Mch. 1, 1810. 

Capt. Elias Pelletreau d. 1810, first m. Sarah, d. of Hugh Gelston, 
Dec. 29, 1748, and had five ch. Jane b. May 13, 1750, w. of Judge 
Pliny Hillyer of Simsbury, Ct., whose descendants are now living 



Genealogies. - 347 

in Westfield, Mass.; Francis b. May 15, 1752, d. Sept. 29, 1765 ; 
Hugh b. Nov. 25, 1762, d. July 30, 1771 ; John b. July 29, 1755, d. 
Aug. 26, 1822; Elias h Aug. 29, 1757, d. Oct. 10, 1831. 

Capt. Francis m. 2d w. Sarah, d. of Zebulon Oonkling of East 
Hampton. They had no ch. Sarah d. Apr. 14, 1784, ae. 53. 

The last named m. Hannah, d. of Col. Josiah Smith of Moriches, 
Aug. 7, 1782, and had ch. Francis b. May 16, 1784; Elias Smith b. 
May 18, 1789, d. Sept. 30, 1821 ; Maltby b. Mch. 23, 1791. Hannah, 
w. of Elias 2d, d. July 11, 1804, and he m. Milicent Post, Dec. 
21, 1804, and had son Paul, 'who d. in childhood. 

Col. Elias Smith Pelletreau m. Hannah, dau. of Oliver Smith of 
Moriches, and had son Jesse Woodhull, who died Nov. 8, 1876, ae. 
60, leaving ch. Mary, w. of John S. Havens of Moriches, Jessie and 
Legrand. 

Maltby m. Mary Joralemon of New York and left ch. William 
Upson, Maltby, Francis and Jane, w. of John P. Beauville. 

William U. m. Mary Short and left sons William Upson and 
Maltby K. , both living in New York city. 

Francis m. Mary Oonkling of Islip and left ch. Henry and Cor- 
nelia ; the latter m. Rev. Ralph Smith ; the former died childless. 

John, son of Elias 1st, m. Mai-y, dau. of Dr. William Smith, 
Apr. 9, 1785, and had six ch. William Smith b. June 8, 1786, d. 
Mch. 15, 1842 ; Nathaniel b. Sept. 18, 1787, d. Jan. 5, 1823 ; Sarah 
b. July 19, 1789, d. Apr. 15, 1839 ; Charles b. Dec. 9, 1791, d. Feb. 
24, 1863; Edwin b. Jan. 11, 1795, d. 1840; John b. Feb. 15, 1804, 
d. Dec. 2, 1817. 

Mary w. of John d. Dec. 2, 1817, aged 58. 

William Smith, son of John Pelletreau, m. Nancy, dau. of Da- 
vid Mackey, May 23, 1810, and had ch. Albert d. May 19, 1843, 
aged 32 ; George d. Dec. 21, 1832, aged 20 ; Jane, w. of Lyman 
Lewis of Westfield, Mass.; Gilbert d. in 1864; Alexander b. Mch. 
4, 1829, now in California ; Mary Gelston, w. of Capt. William 
Green, Prairie du Sac, Wis. ; Frances, w. of William I. Matthews of 
Washington, Pa. 

Nancy, w. of William S., d. Apr. 22, 1832, aged 44, and he m. 
Elizabeth, d. of Col. Isaac Welles of Westfield, Mass., June 26, 
1839, and had ch. Helen, now president of Pennsylvania Female 
College, Pittsburgh, Pa.; William Smith of Southampton and 
George of Virginia City, Nevada. 



348 History of Southampton. 



Nathaniel, son of John, m. Harriet Crittenden and had ch. 
Walter, Mary, w. of Daniel Jagger, and Maria, w. of Albert 
Jagger. 

PiEESOisr Family. 
Henry Pierson, the ancestor of the families of this name, now 
living in the town, came during the first or second year of the set- 
tlement. It is believed that he was the brother of Rev. Abraham 
Pierson, of whom an account has been given in the seventh 
chapter. His descendants are numerous, though but one family of 
this name resides in the village of Southampton at the present 
time. Like all, or nearly all, of the first settlers, Mr. Henry Pier- 
son was a Christian. In his own handwriting [and he was a fine 
penman and town clerk for many years] on the town records, 
penned doubtless in a devout frame of mind, is found the following: 

" Jehovah I upon thee call ! 
make thou haste to me, 
And hearken thou unto my voyce, 
When I do crye to thee." 

1 Henry 1 d. 1680, m. Mary, d. of John Cooper, and his widow m. 
Eev. Seth Fletcher of Elizabeth, N. J., who had preached for some 
time in Southampton. He had ch. 2 Joseph 2 , 3 Henry 2 b. 1652, 4 
Benjamin 2 , who removed to Elizabeth, N". J., and had descendants, 
5 Theodore 2 b. 1669 and 6 Sarah 2 b. Jan. 20, 1660. Inventory of 
his estate £1256 Is. 2d. 

2 Lieut. Joseph 2 d. Oct. 13, 1692, m. 1st Amy Barnes, Nov. 17, 
1675, and after her death Oct. 3, 1692, m. Joana, wid. of Thomas 



Genealogies. 349 

Cooper. He had ch. 7 Amy 3 b. Oct. 28, 1676, 8 Henry 8 b. Apr. 17, 
1678, 9 Mary 3 b. June 12, 1680, 10 Joseph 3 b. Aug. 6, 1682, 11 
Epbraim 3 b. Jan. 20, 1687 and 12 Samuel 3 b. Feb. 24, 1690. 

8 Henry 3 m. June 11, 1702 Abigail Ludlam and had ch. 13 
Henry 4 b. Feb. 1, 1704, 14 William 4 b. Apr. 1, 1706, 15 Azel 4 b. 
Sept. 13, 1708, 16 John 4 b. Dec. 10, 1710, 17 Eli 4 b. Dec. 30, 1712, 
18 Abigail 4 b. Feb. 28, 1714, 19 Amy 4 b. Oct. 11, 1716 and 20 
Samuel 4 b. Mch. 15, 1721. 

20 Samuel 4 had ch. 21 Timothy 6 and 22 Samuel. 5 

21 Timothy 6 had ch. 23 James 6 , 24 Charles 6 , 25 Eli 6 , 26 Timothy 6 
and 27 William. 6 

23 James B m. Sept. 22, 1788, Phebe Culver and had ch. 28 Wil- 
liam 7 of Cairo, Greene Co, N. Y., 29 James', 30 Henry', 31 Philetus' 
and 32 Milicent 7 , w. of William Wick. 

29 James' of Eiverhead had w. Achsa and ch. 33 Edward 8 and 
34 Alice. 8 

31 Philetus' b. 1801, m. Elizabeth, d. of Edward Reeves, b. 1802, 
and had ch. 35 James Henry 8 b. 1838, 36 Harriet E. 8 b. 1840, w. of 
Capt. Jetur E. Eogers and 37 MaryjL. 8 b. 1842, w. of David Burnett. 

24 Charles 6 m. Elizabeth Howell, 1793, and had ch. 38 Sophia', 
39 James', 40 Harriet' 41 Mary', 42 Charles', 43 Betsey', 44 Ann' 
and 45 William.' 

39 James' m. Mary Hineman and had ch. 46 Henry 8 and 47 
Jane. 8 , 

42 Charles', had ch. 48 Mary 8 and 49 Charles." 

10 Joseph 3 had ch. 50 Joseph 4 b. Feb. 3, 1707, 51 Sarah 4 b. Feb. 
13, 1709. 

15 Azel 3 moved to Cumberland Co., N. J., and left descendants 
who are given in Pierson's Pierson Genealogy. 

3 Col. Henry 8 b. 1652, d. Nov. 4, 1701, of Sagg, m. Susanna, d. 
of Major John Howell, and had ch. 52 John 3 b, Nov. 30, 1685, d. 
Jan. 15, 1704-5, 53 David 3 b. 1688, 54 Hannah 3 , 55 Sarah 3 , 56 
Theophilus 3 b. 1690, 57 Abraham 3 b. 1693, 58 Josiah 3 b. 1695 and 
59 Mary. b 

3 Col. Henry 2 was elected for several years with Col. Matthew 
Howell his brother-in-law to the colonial Assembly, and from 1693 
to 1695 inclusive was speaker of the house. 

53 David 3 d. 1767, m. 1st Esther Conklrag and 2d Elizabeth 
Conkling in 1712-3, and had s. 60 Lemuel 4 of Sagg, b. 1717. 



350 Histoet of Southampton. 

60 Lemuel 4 m. Martha Stratton of E. H., Apr. 9, 1741, and had 
ch. 61 Phebe 6 , 62 Lemuel 6 b. 1744, 63 Jemima 6 , 64 David 6 b. 1751 
and 65 Isaac b. 1758. 

63 Lemuel 6 d. Nov. 8, 1821, had 1st w. Sarah, who d. July 3, 
1771, ae. 25 and 2d w. Mary, and ch. 66 Henry 6 and 67 Franklin. 6 

64 Oapt. David 6 d. Feb. 15, 1829, had w. Susanna, and s. 68 
Jesse 6 b. 1780. 

68 Jesse 6 d. Jan. 27, 1840, had w. Elizabeth b. 1783 and ch. 69 
David' b. 1801, m. Susan Cone 1865, 70 George 7 , 71 Eobert' b. 
1812, 72 James' b. 1815, and 73 Marietta' b. 1819. 

65 Isaac 5 of Morristown, N. J., had ch. 74 Elisha 6 b. 1781, 75 
Eleazer 6 b. 1785 and 76 Maltby G-. 6 b. 1795. 

74 Elisha 6 had ch. 77 John', 78 Sidney', 79 Eliza', 80 Harriet' 

and 81 Hannah.' 

76 Maltby G. 6 had ch. 82 Isaac N. 7 , 83 Aaron', 84 Charles J. 6 , 85 

Henry W. 7 , 86 David L.', 87 Maltby G. 7 , 88 Allen H.', 89 William', 

90 Mary A.', 91 Hannah 7 , 92 Harriet', 93 Ellen C. 7 and 94 

Sarah L.' 
5 Theophilus 3 b. 1690, d. Sept. 1744, m. Sarah Topping and had 

ch. 95 Henry 4 , 96 Susanna 4 , w. of Arthur Howell, 97 Stephen 4 b. 

1729, 98 Keturah 4 and 99 Nathan. 4 
95 Henry 4 d. 1783 and had ch. 100 Shadrach 6 and 101 James. 5 
100 Shadrach 5 removed to interior of New York State and m. 

Eebecca, d. of Sylvester Pierson of N. J., and had ch. 102 Henry 6 , 

103 Moses 6 of Montgomery Co., N. Y., 104 James 6 , 105 Joseph 6 and 

106 Kufus. 6 

103 Moses 6 had ch. 107 Henry 7 , 108 David 7 and 109 Nelson. 7 

107 Henry 7 had ch. 110 Moses 8 and 111 William B. 8 

106 Rufus 6 m. Amy Kimball and had ch. 112 Eunice 7 , w. of H. 

G. Herrick, 113 Henry R. 7 , 114 A. Judson 7 , 115 Rebecca, 7 w. of 

A. J. Brazeldon, 116 Elsina', who after death of Rebecca m. the 

same, 117 Eustacia 7 , w. of H. J. Gordon, 118 Martha 7 , w. of Albert 

Parsons and 119 David A. 7 b. 1837. 

113 Henry R.' the Chancellor of the University of New York, 
grad. of Union Coll., LL. D., lives in Albany, N. Y., had w. Sarah H. 
Davis and ch. 120 Mary Ida 8 now deceased and 121 Henry R. 8 

114 A. Judson 7 of New York had ch. 122 Sarah 8 , w. of Dr. Frank 
Ratcliff, 123 William 8 and 124 Frances. 8 

119 David A. 7 of Albany m. Helen M. Barker and has ch. 125 



Genealogies. 351 

Laura 8 b. 3868, 126 Ella B. 8 b. 1870, 127 Percy L. 8 b. 1873 and 128 
Annie L. 8 b. 1876. 

101 James 6 had son 129 Sylvanus. 6 

97 Stephen 4 had ch. 130 Theophilus 6 and 131 Elias. 5 

130 Theophilus 5 had ch. 131 Elias 6 , 132 Charles 6 , 133 Jeremiah 6 , 
134 Paul 6 , 135 Harvey 6 and 136 Solon. 6 

132 Charles 6 had son 137 Henry. 7 

134 Paul 6 , had ch. 138 James P.' and 139 Charles P. 7 

131 Elias 5 had ch. 140 Jeremiah 6 and 141 Elias 6 bap. Jan. 29, 
1786 in S. H. 

99 Nathan 4 d. Feb. 5, 1810, had w. Abigail and ch. 142 Nathan 6 , 
143 Zechariah 5 b. 1750, 144 Jeremiah 6 and 145 Sarah. 5 

142 Nathan 6 of Richmond, Mass. had ch. 146 Nathan 6 and others. 
146 Nathan 6 had ch. 147 John D. 7 , 148 Bobbins 7 and 149 Sarah. 7 

143 Zechariah 5 d. Nov. 15, 1827, of Richmond, Mass., had ch. 
150 James 6 , 15i Silas 6 , 152 William 6 , 153 Myron 6 and others. 

150 James 6 had ch. 154 Franklin 7 , 155 Sarah 7 , 156 James H.' 
and 157 Nathan. 7 

151 Silas 6 had ch. 158 Zechariah' and 159 Charles. 7 

152 William 6 had ch. 160 Edwin D. 7 , 161 Levi R. 7 and 162 
Albert. 7 

153 Myron 6 had son 163 Douglas. 7 

6 Abraham 3 b. 1693, m. 1st Jan. 7, 1720, Elizabeth Conkling of 

E. H. and m. 2d Prudence b. 1702, d. 1776, and had ch. 164 

Matthew 4 b. 1744, 165 Silas 4 , 166 William 4 , 167 Elizabeth 4 , w. of 
Lemuel Pierson and 168 Zebnlon. 4 

164 Matthew 4 had ch. 169 Hiram 5 and 170 Silas 5 b. 1789. 

170 Silas 5 had w. Elizabeth b. 1797 and ch. 171 Lawrence 6 b. 1823, 
172 Caleb 6 b. 1834, 173 Charles 6 b. 1835 and 174 Caroline 6 b. 1838. 

168 Zebulon 4 had ch. 175 John 5 , 176 Abraham 5 and 177 D. Wil- 
liams. 6 

176 Abraham 6 had ch. 178 Huntting 8 , 179 Ruth 6 , 180 Isaac 6 and 
181 Eliphalet 6 . 

177 D. Williams 6 had ch. 182 Nathan 6 , 183 John" and 184 
Stephen. 6 

7 Josiah 3 b. 1695, d. 1782, had four wives and ch. 185 Silas 4 , 186 
Matthew 4 b. 1725, 187 Sylvanus 4 , twin with Matthew, 188 Paul 4 , 
189 Timothy 4 b. 1731, 190 Josiah 4 , 191 Joseph*, 192 Benjamin 4 and 
193 John. 4 



352 History of Southampton. 

185 Silas 4 had eh. 194 Silas 5 , 195 William 5 , 196 Martha 5 and 197 
Sarah. 5 

186 Matthew 4 d. Oct. 17, 1798, hadw. Phebe, who d. Feb. 23, 1782, 
ae. 52, and eh. 198 Henry 6 of Eichmond, Mass., 199 Lucretia 5 , w. 
of Caleb Eussell of Morristown, ~N. J., formerly of B. Hampton. 

198 Henry 5 had ch. 200 Sophia 6 , 201 Josiah 6 bap. 1784, 202 
Joseph 6 , 203 Elizabeth 6 and 204 Harriet. 6 

201 Josiah 6 had ch. 205 Mary H. T , 206 Henry M. 7 , 207 Sarah A.', 
208 Melissa 7 , 209 Abigail', 210 Phebe 7 and 211 Joseph. 7 

206 Henry M.' of Pittsfield, Mass., had ch. 212 Henry E. 8 , 213 
Hattie E. 8 , 214 Fanny F. s , 215 Joseph E. 8 , 216 "William E. 8 , 217 
Frank E. 8 and 218 Mary L. 8 

187 Sylvanus 4 had eh. 219 Sarah 5 , 220 Margaret 5 , 221 Eebecca 5 
and 222 Martha. 5 

188 Paul 4 had ch. 223 John 5 of New York, 224 Josiah 5 , 225 Ben- 
jamin 5 , 226 Alanson 6 , 226| David 5 , 226f Susan 5 , 227 Mary 5 and 228 
Sarah. 6 

192 Benjamin 4 of Ballston, N. Y., had ch. 229 Jeremiah 5 of 
Eamapo, N. J., 230 Gilbert 6 , 231 Caleb 6 , 232 Isaac 6 and 233 John. 5 

5 Theodore 2 b. 1669, d. May 7, 1726, had ch. 234 Job 3 b. 1697 
and 235 John. 3 

234 Job 3 d. Feb. 28, 1768, had w. Hannah and ch. 236 Lemuel 4 
b. 1723 and 237 David. 4 

236 Lemuel 4 m. Elizabeth, d. of Abraham Pierson, and had ch. 
238 Samuel 5 b. Jan. 1, 1753, and 239 William 6 b. 1762 and perhaps 
others. 

238 Samuel 5 d. Oct. 13, 1838, m. Dec. 17, 1778, Jerusha Conk- 
ling of E. H. and had ch. 240 Samuel Dayton 6 b. 1786, 241 Joana 6 , 
w. of Ebenezer White, 242 Job 6 b. Sept. 23, 1791, and 243 Esther. 6 

242 Job 6 d. 1860, had w. Mary and ch. 244 Sarah J. 7 , 245 
Samuel Dayton 7 b. 1819, 246 Job' b. 1824, 247 Mary B. 7 and 248 
John B. 7 of Troy, 1ST. Y. 

248 John B. 8 had d. 249 Mary L. 8 b. 1863, d. 1867. 

239 William 6 had ch. 250 Terrill 6 , 251 Alfred 6 b. 1793, 252 Tho. 
Jefferson 6 and 253 Hiram. 6 

237 David 4 had s. 254 David. 5 

235 John 3 had ch. 255 Daniel 4 , 256 Stephen 4 and 257 Jedidiah. 4 
255 Daniel 4 had ch. 258 Job 6 b. 1758 and 259 John 5 b. 1772 and 

perhaps others. 



Genealogies. 353 

258 Job s had ch. 260 James 8 , 261 Halsey 6 and 262 Alanson." 
260 James 6 had son 263 Nathan' of Northside. 

259 John 6 d. Aug. 11, 1853, had w. Hannah and ch. 264 
Nathaniel 6 , 265 John 6 and 265£ Daniel H. 6 

256 Stephen 4 had ch. 266 James 5 and 267 John. 5 

257 Jedidiah 4 had ch. 268 Caleb 5 b. 1764, 269 Daniel 5 , 270 
Gordon 5 b. 1787 and 271 Peleg. 5 

268 Caleb 5 had son 272 Theodore." 

270 Gordon 5 had w. Matsey b. 1789 and ch. 273 Theodore 6 b. 
1820, 274 David 6 b. 1825, 275 Elihu 6 b. 1832 and 276 Jerusha 6 b. 
1834. 

275 Elihu 6 m. Phebe, d. of B. Halsey Poster, and has d. 277 
Clara P.' b. Dec. 1862 or Jan. 1863. 

Burke's Gen. Armory describes coats of arms used by eight Eng- 
lish families of this name. 

Post Family. 

The name of Richard Post first appears on the records of South- 
ampton in May, 1643, when a home lot was granted to him by the 
proprietors. In 1681 he is recorded as giving land to his son John, 
and in 1687 he gave land to his son Joseph. In 1688 he gave his 
homestead in Littleworth to his son-in-law, Benjamin Poster, and 
his daughter Martha, the wife of Benjamin Poster, and the last two 
were to provide for the wants of himself and his wife so long as 
they lived. 

1 Richard 1 d. about 1689 and had w. Dorothy and ch. 2 John 2 , 3 
Thomas 8 , 4 Joseph 2 b. 1649 and 5 Martha. 2 

2 John" d. 1687, m. Nov. 3, 1670, Mary , and had ch. (as by 

his will) 6 Mary 3 , 7 John 3 b. 1674, 8 Jeremiah 3 , 9 Sarah 3 , 10 Doro- 
thy 3 , 11 Martha 3 , 12 Deborah 3 and 13 Richard. 3 

7 Capt. John 3 d. Mch. 3, 1741, had w. Mary and ch. (as by will) 
14 John 4 , 15 Joseph 4 b. 1704 and 16 Isaac 4 b. 1712. 

The residence of Capt. John Post was "by the great ditch," 
which was not far south from Goodale's lane. 

14 John 4 m. Abigail, d. of Joshua Halsey, and had ch. 17 James 5 
and 18 Abraham 6 (and I conjecture 19 John 5 , of whom hereafter). 

17 James 6 m. Mary Huntting, who d. Dec. 27, 1788, ae. 38, and 
had ch. 20 William 6 , 21 James" and 22 Caleb. 6 

20 William 6 m. Jane Cooper and had d. 23 Mary A. 7 
45 



354 History of Southampton. 

21 Gapt. James 6 m. Dec. 5, 1807, Hannah, d. of Obadiah Rogers, 
b. Aug. 7, 1787, and had ch. 24 Mary 7 b. Jan. 12, 1809, 25 William 
Eogers 7 b. Apr. 8, 1811, 26 Edwin 7 b. Dee. 12, 1815, 27 Jane 7 b. 
Nov. 18, 1818, w. of Eev. Hugh N. Wilson, D. D., 28 Phebe 7 b. 
June 11, 1822, 29 Julia Ann 7 b. Jan. 12, 1825, and 30 Henry 7 b. 

Apr. 19, 1828. 

25 William R. 7 m. 1st Charlotte P., d. of Oapt. James Parker, 
and had ch. 31 James Henry 8 b. 1839 and 32 Edward Rogers 8 b. 
1842. William R. m. 2d w. Mary, d. of Jonathan Pithian, Esq. 
He has been supervisor of the town many years and an accurate 
and careful man of business, foremost in every good work. His 
oldest son, James H., died in the service of his country during the 
civil war, May 18, 1862. 

32 Edward R. 8 , M. D., a grad. of the college of New Jersey, lives 
in Newburgh, N. Y., and m. Rosa, d. of Rev. S. Hampton and 
Elizabeth (Pithian) Jagger, and has ch. 33 Ada Rogers 9 b. Dec. 5, 
1866, 34 Prances 9 b. July 4, 1868, and 35 L. Hampton 9 b. Sept. 22, 
1874. 

26 Edwin 7 m. Susan, d. of Oapt. Edward Halsey, b. 1821, and had 
ch. 36 Harriet Rogers 8 b. 1845, 37 Henry 8 b. 1853 and 38 William 
J. 8 b. 1861. 

18 Abraham 5 had ch. 39 Oliver 6 b. 1778 and 40 Abraham. 8 

39 Oliver 6 of Quogae m. Mary, d. of Josiah Howell, and had ch. 
41 George O. 7 b. 1814 and 42 Josiah H. 7 

41 George O. 7 of Quogue had w. Harriet b. 1824 and ch. 43 
Josiah H. 8 b. 1845^44 William E. 8 b. 1848, 45 Mary 8 b. 1857 and 
46 Erasttis F. 8 b. 1860. 

42 Josiah H. 7 m. Catherine Mitchell and had son 47 George 
Edward. 8 b. 1832. 

40 Abraham 6 of Quogue had ch. 48 Elizabeth 7 , w. of Skid- 
more, 49 Mary', w. of Charles Rogers, 50 John H. 7 b. 1812 and 51 
William 7 of New York. • 

15 Joseph 4 b. 1704, d. Sept. 27, 1780, m. Bethia, d. of Henry 
Jessup, who d. Mch. 30, 1790, ae. 79, and had ch. 52 Stephen 5 , 53 
Joseph 6 , 54 Jeremiah 5 , 55 Nathan 6 b. May 14, 1748 and 56 Henry H. 5 

52 Stephen 5 m. a Howell and had ch. 57 Stephen 6 , 58 Keziah 6 b. 
1780, 59 Abital 6 , 60 George 6 and 61 Howell. 6 4 

57 Stephen 6 had w. Harmony and son 62 William 7 b. 1803. 



Genealogies. 355 

62 Oapt. "William' had ch. 63 Ann Eliza 8 b. 1834, w. of Eli P. 
Fordham, 64 Harriet 8 , w. of Henry A. Fordham, 65 Mary J. 8 b. 
1842 and 66 William 8 b. 1844. 

60 Oapt. George 6 was a man of large reading and an influential 
citizen in his day and generation. He m. 1st Harriet, d. of Major 
Zebulon Jessup, b. Feb. 11, 1790 and d. Apr. 27, 1830. He m. 2d 
Elizabeth, d. of Huntting Jessup, and had ch. 67 William Henry' 
b: Mch. 16, 1821, 68 Huntting Jessup 7 , 69 George' d. Sept. 15, 
1849, 70 Nathan' b. Apr. 1830, 71 Albert Jessup' b. 1833, 72 Sarah 
Elizabeth' b. 1835, w. of Capt. Hubert White, 73 Charles A.' b. 
1838, 74 Frederic' d. young, 75 Peter Mackie' b. 1843, 76 Mary 
Huntting' b. 1845 and 77 George' b. 1852. 

67 William H.' of Stockton, California, m. Oct. 31, 1848, Ann, d.. 
of deacon John White, b. Dec. 25, 1826, and had ch. 78 William 
Jessup 8 b. Aug. 8, 1856, d. Apr. 25, 1857, 79 Frank Henry 8 b. Oct. 
3, 1858 and 80 Frederic Jessup 8 b. Mch. 12, 1860. 

68 Huntting J.' of Palmyra, N. Y., m. Susan, d. of Daniel Ford- 
ham and had ch. 81 Harriet Jessup 8 , w. of Egbert Ellsworth, and 
others whose names I know not. 

70 Nathan m. in California, where he resides, in 1870, Fanny- 
Dayton. 

61 Howell 6 of Palmyra, N. Y., had s. 82 Samuel.' 

53 Joseph 5 had w. Sarah and d. 83 Philena 6 d. Mch. 19, 1780, ae- 
8 and perhaps others. 

54 Jeremiah 5 had w. Mehetabel, who d. Apr. 16, 1811, ae. 72, 
and s. 84 Samuel 6 b. 1766. 

84 Samuel 6 d. Apr. 10, 1846, had w. Cynthia, who d. May 28, 
1861, ae. 87, and d. 85 Elizabeth', w. of Albert Eeeves. 

55 Nathan 5 of Bridgehampton d. Oct. 3, 1803, had w. Mehet- 
abel, who d. May 31, 1832, ae. 84, and s. 86 Lodowick. 6 

86 Lodowick 6 had ch. 87 Eichard' of New Bedford, 88 Robert F. T 
b. 1806, 89 Elizabeth', w. of Sullivan Cork and 90 Caroline', w. of 
Gen. Henry Huntting of Sag Harbor. 

88 Robert F.' d. Dec. 10, 1849, had son 91 Nathan. 8 
16 Isaac 4 b. 1712, d. May 8, 1785, had son 92 Isaac. 5 

92 Isaac 5 lived on the homestead now occupied by William Jag- 
ger, d. about 1788, had w. Agnes and ch. 93 Isaac 6 b. Aug. 12, 
1784 and 94 David 8 b. 1786. 

93 Isaac 6 was taken when a boy to Montrose, Pa., by his mother who 



356 History of Southampton. 

had married 2d Bartlett Haines and moved there from Southampton. 
He d. Men. 23, 1855, m. Susanna Hinds and had ch. 95 William 
L.', 96 Albert L.', 97 Isaac L.', 98 George L. 7 d. 1871, and six 
daughters, names unknown to me. 

94 David 6 went to Montrose, 1801, d. Feb. 24, 1860, m. Minerva, 
d. of Samuel Scott, Jan. 1809, and had eleven ch., names unknown 
to me. 

19 John 5 had s. 99 Nathan 6 of Bellport, L. I. 

99 Nathan 6 had ch. 100 Nathan', 101 Hiram 7 and 102 John. 7 

Proud Family. 
John Proud started from England in May, 1817, in a packet 
ship on which were many passengers, among whom was George 
Bowden, before mentioned. On their voyage they met with hard 
winds and storms which continually drove them from their course. 
They were 110 days on their passage, and all on board were put 
on short rations. At length, suffering from want of food, ten of 
the passengers, among whom were Messrs. Proud and Bowden, 
requested the captain to set them ashore on the first land they 
made. This proved to be Montauk Point where they were landed, 
and the two above mentioned, remained and settled in Southampton. 
By their own testimony they met the kindest of friends in the 
people of Montauk and Amagansett, who relieved all their neces- 
sities, and sent them on their way rejoicing. John Proud m. Phebe 
Brown and had ch. Phebe, w. of William F. White, and Henry, 
who now resides in Bridgeport, Ot. 

Raystor Family. 

Thurston Baynor is recorded with the prefix Mr., which in early 
times meant more than it does now. He was a magistrate and a 
leading man in the early settlement. He came to this country in 
the Elizabeth from Ipswich, Bng., in April, 1634. He settled first 
in Watertown, Mass., then was one of the first settlers of Wethers- 
field, Conn., thence went to Stamford as one of its first settlers in 
1640-41 and thence to Southampton, where he was made freeman 
in 1649. In 1639 he was one of the Deputies in the government 
of Connecticut. 

1 Thurston 1 b. 1594, d. about 1667, had 1st w. Elizabeth b. 1598 
and 2d w. Martha and ch. 2 Thurston 3 b. 1621, 3 Joseph 2 b. 1623, 



Genealogies. 357 

4 Elizabeth 2 b. 1625, 5 Sarah 2 b. 1627, 6 Lydia 2 b. 1633, 7 Hannah', 
w. of Arthur Howell, and son or nephew, 8 Edward 2 about 1633. 

2 Thurston 2 d. 1667, had w. Martha and ch. 9 Joseph 3 , 10 Mary 3 , 
w. of Thomas Cooper, 11 Abigail 3 , w. of Christopher Lupton, 12 
Deborah 3 , w. of John Scott, 13 Jonathan 3 b. about 1650 and one 
other daughter, name unknown, w. of John Eose. 

13 Jonathan 8 m. June 2, 1680, Sarah Pierson and had s. 14 Jon- 
athan 4 b. Mch. 4, 1681. 

14 Jonathan 4 d. 1741, m. July 27, 1704, Irene Herrick and had 
ch. 15 Jonathan 6 and 16 David 6 twins b. Jan. 18, 1705, 17 Martha 6 , 
18 Adonijah 6 b. Aug. 24, 1708, 19 Elihu 5 b. Nov. 18, 1710, 20 Sarah 6 , 
21 Nathan 6 b. Eeb. 14, 1716-7, 22 William 6 b. Oct. 1, 1719, 23 
Henry 6 b. June 9, 1722 and 24 Hugh 6 , who had w. Sarah b. 1725 
and d. Mch. 26, 1806. 

18 Adonijah 6 had son 25 Adonijah. 6 

25 Adonijah 6 had ch. 26 Oliver 7 , 27 Catherine', w. of Wade 

and mother of Oliver Wade of Sag Harbor, 28 George' bap. Oct. 19, 
1788, 29 Sylvanus', 30 Abigail', 31 Kebecca', 32 William' and 33 
Charles.' 
~^*~%\ Nathan 6 d. 1772, removed to West Hampton, m. Jerusha 
Bowers, who was b. 1717 and d. 1809, and had ch. 34 Elihu 6 b. 
1752, 35 Ichabod 6 a soldier in the revolutionary war, 36 Nathan 9 , 
37 Elizabeth 6 , 38 Jerusha 6 , 39 Sarah 6 , 40 Phebe 6 , 41 Hetty 6 and 42 
Patty. 6 

34 Elihu 6 d. 1826, m. Elizabeth Albertson and had ch. 43 Jotham 7 
b. 1781, d. 1850, 44 Elizabeth' b. 1783, 45 Euth' b. 1785, 46 
Nathan 7 b. 1787, 47 John' b. 1789, 48 Charity' b. 1791, d. 1832, 
49 Nancy' b. 1793, 50 Abigail' b. 1796, 51 Herrick 7 b. 1798, d. 
1837 and 52 William 7 b. 1801, d. 1803. 

46 Nathan 7 removed to Philadelphia, d. 1824, m. Mary Hoffman, 
who was b. 1787 and d. 1828, and had ch. 53 Maria 8 b. 1815, d. 
1879, 54 Charles 8 b. 1816, 55 Elizabeth 8 b. 1818, d. 1826, 56 Cath- 
erine 8 b. 1821, d. 1846 and 57 George 8 b. 1823, d. 1824. 

54 Charles 8 m. Anna H. Dungan and had ch. 58 Kate 9 , w. of 
Anthony M. Gilbert (who has ch. Anna, Emily and Mary), 59 
Charles 9 b. 1853 d. 1854, 60 Charles 9 b. 1855 (who m. Annie Pot- 
ter), 61 Nathan H. 9 b. 1857, 62 Mary 9 b. and d. 1865, 63 William* 
b. 1866, 64 George 9 b. 1867, 65 John 9 b. and d. 1869, 66 Anna* 
b. 1870, 67 Hetty 9 b. 1873 and 68 Herrick 9 b. 1875. 



358 History of Southampton. 

The record of the' descendants of 46 Nathan' was furnished me 
by 61 Nathan H. Eaynor, M. D., of Philadelphia. 

47 John' had ch. 69 John M. 8 of Greenport and 70 Herrick J. 8 of 
West Hampton. 

3 Joseph 2 d. about 1682, had w. Mary and ch. 71 Thurston 3 , 72 

John 3 , 73 Isaac 3 , 74 Elizabeth 3 , w. of Lane, 75 Josiah 3 , 76 

Mary 3 and 77 Hannah. 8 

71 Thurston 3 removed to Cape May Co., New Jersey, m. Wid. 
Sarah Johnes in New Jersey, 1693, and had d. 78 Mary 4 , w. of 
Nicholas Haiens or Haines of Shrewsbury, and probably 79 Morris 4 , 
as such a one had laud previous to 1700 in Cape May Co. and is 
associated with 71 Thurston. 3 

73 Isaac 3 d. 1732 or 1733, had w. Mary and ch. 80 Hannah 4 and 
81 Phebe. 4 

Mary Raynor m. John Earle Nov. 1678, probably the d. of 3 
Joseph. 2 

Stephen Raynor had d. Ruth bap. May 6, 1787, in Southampton. 

It may seem improbable that there were two Thurston Raynors 
who had wives Martha and both d. 1667, but the evidence all points 
to that conclusion. 

Two English families of this name have coats of arms described 
iu Burke's Gen. Armory. 

Reeves Family. 
The Southold tradition has it that two brothers, Thomas and 
James Reeves, came to this country about 1660 and took up a resi- 
dence in Southold. About 1667 Thomas moved to Southampton. 
Moore, in his Southold Index, says James came from Wales. 

1 Thomas 1 d. Aug. 28, 1685, m. Rebecca Davis of Southampton 
and had ch. 2 John 2 b. July 15, 1673, 3 Rebecca 2 b. Mch. 1, 1676, 
4 Thomas 2 b. Oct. 3, 1679, 5 Hannah 2 b. Feb. 9, 1681, and 6 Abi- 
gail 2 b. Sept. 22, 1684. 

2 John 2 d. 1753, had w. Rachel and ch. 7 John 3 , 8 Nathan , 9 
Stephen 3 , 10 Abraham 3 , 11 James 3 , 12 Charles 3 and 13 Abigail 3 , w. 
of Cooper. 

9 Stephen 3 had ch. 14 John 4 and 15 David 4 b. Apr. 1741. 
14 John 4 had ch. 16 John 6 , 17 Thomas 6 , 18 Edward 5 b. 1774, 19 
Abraham 5 , 20 William 5 and 21 Jesse. 6 



Genealogies. 359 

17 Thomas' had ch. 22 James 6 and 22£ Ann", who m. 1st 

Enstine and had eh. Thomas and John Henry, and m. 2d Elias W. 
Howell. 

18 Edward 5 had ch: 23 Lemuel 8 b. 1800, 24 Henry 6 b. 1805, 25 
Albert 6 b. 1808, 26 Augustus 6 b. 1812 and 27 Harriet 6 b. 1815, w. 
of James G. Howell. 

23 Lemuel 6 of Sag Harbor had w. Hannah A., d. of Joel Jacobs, 
and ch. 28 Henry Augustus' b. 1833, grad. of Union College, edi- 
tor of the Republican Watchman, Greenport, L. I., 29 Mary C. 7 b. 
1839, 30 Charles 0.' b. 1842 and 31 Walter A. 7 b. 1846. 

24 Henry 6 m. Emily Cook b. 1815 and had ch. 32 Edward Cook 7 
b. 1838 and 33 Albert H.' b. 1845. 

32 Edward Cook 7 has w. Ada and son 34 Frederic S. 8 b. 1865. 

33 Albert 6 m. Elizabeth, d. of Samuel and Cynthia Post, and had 
ch. 35 Samuel Post 7 b. 1836 and 36 Elizabeth 7 b. 1839, w. of 
Lemuel "Wick. 

26 Augustus 6 has w. Mary S. and ch. 37 George W.' b. 1847 and 
38 Heber A 7 b. 1851.. 

15 David 4 m. Dec. 4, 1768, Hannah b. Jan. 14, 1747, and 

had ch. 39 Charlotte 5 b. Feb. 25, 1770, 40 Apollos 5 b. Sept. 2, 1771, 
and 41 David 5 b. Apr. 29, 1779. 

4 Thomas 2 had son 42 David 3 b. 1725. 

22 James 6 b. 1797, had w. Ann b. 1801 and ch., names unknown 
to me. 

Reeve Family. 
For a long time the descendants of James Reeves of Southold 
have spelled the name Reeve. Bethuel Reeve of Southold town 
bought land in North Sea in 1758 and resided there. He was of 
about the fourth generation in descent from James. 

1 Bethuel 4 d. 1782, had w. Mary and ch. 2 Joel 5 b. 1755, 3 Silas 5 , 
4 Daniel 6 , 5 Zebulon 6 , 6 Jeremiah 5 , 7 Keturah 6 and 8 Bethia. 5 

2 Joel 5 d. Dec. 14, 1831, had w. Anna and ch. 9 Bethuel 6 , 10 
Rumney 6 , 11 Wines 6 , 12 Jeremiah 6 and 13 Jetur. 6 

12 Jeremiah 6 had ch. 14 Jetur', 15 Barnabas 7 , 16 Jeremiah 7 , 
17 Frances 7 , 18 Bethuel', 19 Josephine', 20 Charlotte 7 and 21 
Charles. 7 



360 Histoet of Southampton. 



Rhodes Family. 

1 Capt. Henry Rhodes was born in Stonington, Ct., Apr. 25, 
1762. He came to Southampton, entered into mercantile business 
and married Sept. 14, 1789, Hannah Cooper b. Aug. 6, 1765, sis- 
ter of Mehetabel, second wife of Col. Benjamin Huntting, both 
being thought to be daughters of Abraham Cooper of Southampton. 
He died Jan. 7, 1848, and his w. Hannah d. May 22, 1836. 

They had ch. 2 Foster b. July 17, 1794, d. 1840, 3 Mary b. Oct. 
3, 1796, w. of William Parsons, 4 Eobert R. b. July 24, 1799, d. s. 
p., 5 Frances b. June 11, 1802, 6 Henry b. Feb. 11, 1805, and 7 
James b. Feb. 11, 1808, d. 1838. 

2 Foster had ch. 8 George R, 9 Robert R, 10 William, 11 John H. 
8 George R. m. Frances, daughter of 3 Mary and William Par- 
sons, above mentioned. 

6 Henry m. Emmeline, d. of Capt. Stephen and Sarah Sayre, and 
had ch. 12 Elizabeth, 13 Robert Sidney, who lives in Brooklyn and 

14 Hannah. 

7 James m. Sophia, also d. of Capt. Stephen Sayre and had ch. 

15 Henry and 16 Simon, both of whom reside in California. 

Rogers Family. 
William Rogers is mentioned as a resident from 1642, to, at 
least, March, 1645-6. In 1645 the Gen. Court make him a grant of 
land. In 1649 he is made freeman. He appears to have had a 
home in Hempstead, for a few years previous to 1649. From 1649 
to 1655 we find him an inhabitant of Southampton, and after this he 
disappears altogether. Nor can any will of his be found on record. 
Subsequent to 1655 Obadiah Rogers is mentioned as residing on the 
same homestead that William had occupied. In 1669 Widow Ann 
Rogers of Huntington makes a will, leaving ch. 2 Obadiah, 3 John, 
4 Samuel, 5 Mary, 6 Hannah and 7 Noah- of these 2 Obadiah is 
called the oldest and is spoken of as living in Southampton. Now 
it is probable that 1 William gave the Southampton homestead to 
Obadiah about 1655, and with his w. and younger ch. removed to 
Huntington where he might have resided several years. 3 John 
and 7 Noah removed to Branford, Ct., and in the earliest deeds 
there recorded in which they are grantees of land, they are mentioned 



Genealogies. 361 

as "late of Huntington, L. I." John left no issue. These 
two brothers received a large inheritance from their father as 
appears from the Branford records. 

1 William 1 had ch. 2 Obadiah 2 , 3 John 2 , 4 Samuel 5 , 5 Mary 3 , 6 
Hannah 2 and 7 Noah. 2 

2 Obadiah 2 d. 1689 or 1690, had w. Mary and ch. 8 Obadiah 3 b. 

1655, 9 Mary 3 , 10 Sarah 3 , w. of Hakelton, 11 Elizabeth 3 , w. - 

of William Eussell, 12 Patience 3 , 13 Jonah 3 and 14 Zachariah. 3 

8 Obadiah 3 d. May 5, 1729, m. 1st Dec. 20, 1683, Sarah, d. of 
Edward Howell, she d. Oct. 11, 1685, and he m. 2d Mary, wid. of 
Edmond Clark, and had ch. 15 Irene 4 b. 1684 or 85 and 16 Oba- 
diah 4 b. 1699. 

16 Capt. Obadiah 4 d. Oct. 31, 1783, m. Abigail, d. of William 
Herrick, b. 1702 and d. May 6, 1782, and had ch. 17 Stephen 5 b. 
May 6, 1722, 18 Mehetabel 6 b. Jan. 30, 1725, 19 James 6 b. Dec. 12, 
1729, 20 Milicent 6 b. June 5, 1732, w. of Cornelius Halsey of W. 
H., 21 Ruth 5 b. Sept. 8, 1734, w. of Thomas Cooper father of Caleb 
Cooper, 22 Mary 6 b. Sept. 27, 1736, w. of George Herrick, 23 Phebe 4 
b. Feb. 1, 1738-9, w. of Matthew Howell of Fourth Neck and 24 
Zephaniah 6 b. June 25, 1742 

17 Stephen 6 m. Feb. 23, 1744, 1st Phebe Jones, who died June 
11, 1760, and m. 2d June 30, 1761, Hannah, d. of Deacon John 
Sayre, and wid. of Matthew Howell, and had ch. 25 Obadiah 6 b. 
Feb. 10, 1745, 26 Abigail 6 b. Sept. 7, 1746, w. of Elias Howell, 27 
Gabriel 6 b. Mch. 25, 1748, d. s. p., 28 Cornelius 6 b. Nov. 14, 1750, 
d. young, 29 Silas 6 b. June 8, 1727, d. young, 30 Hannah 6 b. Jan. 

5, 1754, w. of Shipman of Ct., 31 Mary 6 b. Oct. 22, 1755, w. 

of David Eose, 32 Henry 6 b. 13, 1757, d. young, 33 Matthew 6 b. 
Dec. 10, 1762, 34 Phebe 6 b. Aug. 5, 1764, w. of Matthew Howell 
of Wickapogue, 35 Stephen 6 b. Oct. 25, 1765, d. s. p. and 36 Me- 
hetabel 6 b. Dec. 27, 1768, d. June 6, 1846, w. of Capt. Oliver 

Howell. 

25 Obadiah 6 d. 1817, m. Hannah, d. of Nehemiah Sayre and she 
d. June 2, 1822, and had ch. 37 Nancy 7 b. Mch. 19, 1781, m. Dec. 
11, 1800 Elias Howell of Chester, N. J., d. Aug. 5, 1824, 38 Han- 
nah 7 b. Aug. 7, 1787, w. of James Post and 39 Phebo twin with 
Hannah, m. Nov. 17, 1814, David Hull Brown of New Jersey and 
had ch. James R. b. Feb. 19, 1819, Harriet b. Feb. 12, 1823, w. of 
Stephen Harris, Maria b. Feb. 21, 1821, w. of Rev. Henry M. Par- 
46 



362 History of Southampton. 

sons, and after his death m. a Mr. Brainerd, David A. b. Feb. 13, 
1825, and William H. b. Aug. 16, 1827. 

33 Matthew 6 d. Sept. 15, 1844, m. July 3, 1797, Euth, d. of 
Abraham Sayre, b. Aug. 17, 1778, d. July 18, 1856, had ch. 40 
Mary' b. Aug. 26, 1806, m. Capt. Charles Howell Jan. 11, 1831, d. 
Aug. 1, 1867 and 41 Nancy' b. Mch. 24, 1808, d. Aug. 30, 1861, w. 
of Albert Poster. 

19 James 5 had ch. 42 Jeremiah 6 of Quogue, d. 1797, 43 Milicent 6 
and 44 Euth. 6 

24 Zephaniah 6 d. Oct. 29, 1796, m. Elizabeth, d. of Nehemiah 
Sayre b. Apr. 18, 1743, d. Apr. 1, 1814, and hadch.45 Herrick 6 , 46 
Susan 6 , w. of Eufus Sayre, 47 Huldah 6 , w. of Thomas Sayre, 48 
Abigail 6 , w. of Cephas Poster, 49 Mary 6 , w.of James Logan of New- 
burgh and 50 Hannah 6 , w. of Samuel Bishop. 

45 Herrick 6 m. 1st Hannah, d. of David Eose and had one son 51 
Jetur', who d. s. p. He m. 2d Phebe, d. of Abraham Sayre b. 
July 4, 1785, d. Jan. 1842, and had ch. 51 Albert' b. 1807 and 52 
Harriet', w. of Augustus B. Halsey of Watermill. 

51 Capt. Albert' d. July, 1854, m. 1st Mary, d. of Paul Halsey, 
who died leaving'no ch. He m. 2d her sister Cordelia Halsey and 
had ch. 53 Mary E. 8 b. Mch. 17, 1839, w. of Capt. Samuel McCorkell, 
54 Jetur E. 8 b. Mch. 14, 1841 and 55 Edwin H. 8 b. Oct. 1, 1843. 

54 Jetur E. 8 m. Feb. 7, 1866, Harriet E., d. of Capt. Philetus 
and Elizabeth (Eeeves) Pierson and had ch. 56 Bessie P. 9 b. Sept. 
20, 1871, 57 Mary H, 9 b. Jan. 2, 1876 and 58 Albert 9 b. Jan. 3, 1878. 

13 Jonah 3 of Bridgehampton had ch. 59 Joseph 4 , 60 Jonah 4 , 61 
William" and probably 62 David. 4 

59 Joseph 4 of Bridgehampton d. Feb. 1761, had ch. 63 Joseph 6 , 
64 John 6 b. 1731, 65 Zachariah 5 , 66 Elias 5 , 67 Nathaniel 6 , 68 Eunice 6 , 
69 Hannah 6 , 70 Elizabeth 5 , 71 Sarah 6 and 72 Euth. 5 

63 Joseph 6 d. 1798, had w. Sarah and ch. 73 Job 6 of Cayuga Lake 
region, 74 Jesse 6 , 75 Joseph 6 of Sag Harbor, 76 Jemima 6 , 77 Jerusha 6 
and 78 Eachel. 6 

74 Jesse 6 of Speonk had w. Amelia and ch. 75 Elizabeth', 76 
Oliver' b. 1788, 77 Jehiel', 78 Huldah', 79 Jeremiah' b. 1798, 80 
Jerusha', 81 John' b. 1802, 82 Maria', 83 Harriet' and 84 Jesse.' 

76 Oliver' m. Abigail Eogers b. 1798 and had ch. 85 Herman H. 8 , 
86 Herrick 8 , 87 Delia H. 8 , 88 Mary C. 8 , 89 Charles 8 b. 1829, 90 
Cephas 8 and 91 Sarah J. 8 b. 1833. 



Genealogies. 363 

77 Jehiel 7 m. Jerusha Oorwin and had ch. 92 Betsey A. 8 and 93 
Jemima J. 8 

7# Jeremiah' m. Hannah Raynor b. 1800 and had ch. 94 Ange- 
line 8 and 95 Henry M. 8 

81 Capt. John 7 m. Maria Smith b. 1816 and had ch. 96 Mary E. 8 
b. 1851 and 97 Gilbert 8 b. 1854. 

84 Jesse' m. Jemima Robinson and had ch. 98 Jemima 8 , 99 
Jerusha 8 , 100 Georgiana 8 and 101 Henry H. 8 

64 John 6 of B. H. d. May 26, 1798, had ch. 102 John Topping 11 
b. 1759 and 103 Josiah. 6 

102 John T. 6 d. Oct. 9, 1816, m. Sarah, d. of the Rev. James 
Brown of B. H. b. 1757, d. May 24, 1823, and had ch. 104 John 7 
105 Nathaniel 7 , 106 Mary 7 , w. of David Halsey and 107 Jeremiah 7 
b. 1797. 

104 John 7 of New York had ch. 108 Charles R. 8 of Ravenswood, 
L. I., and 109 Sarah 8 , w. of William Gardiner of Bayside, L. I. 

105 Nathaniel 7 had ch. 110 George 8 , 111 Dennison 8 , 112 Edmund 8 
and 113 Dr. James 8 of Sag Harbor. 

103 Josiah 6 had ch. 114 Euclid 7 of Sag Harbor, b. 1807, and 115 
Charles.' 

65 Zachariah 5 of Noyac m. Ruth, d. of Lewis Jessup, and had son 
116 Lewis. 5 

116 Lewis 6 of Northside m. Hannah, d. of Jesse Halsey, and had 
ch. 117 Jesse 7 , 118 Ruth 7 , 119 Lewis 7 , 120 Charity 7 and 121 Charles. 7 
67 Nathaniel 5 had ch. 122 Abraham 6 and 123 Selah. 6 

60 Jonah 4 had ch. 124 William 5 and 125 Joshua. 5 

125 Joshua 6 had son 126 Jonah. 6 

126 Jonah 6 had ch. 127 Jonah 7 and 128 Chapman 7 b. 1787. 

127 Jonah 7 had son 129 Jonah.' 

128 Chapman' of Sag Harbor had w. Esther and son 130 Ed ward 
C. 8 b. 1803. 

61 William 4 of Bridgehampton, d. 1775, had w. Rhoda and ch. 

131 Hannah 5 , w. of Halsey, 132 Mary 5 , w. of Halsey, 133 

William 6 b. 1744, 134 Jonathan 6 b. 1746, 135 Phebe 5 and 136 
Esther. 6 

133 Capt. William 5 d. Nov. 11, 1813, had w. Mary b. 1746, d. 
Apr. 28, 1808, and ch. 137 William 6 b. 1783, 138 Caleb 6 b. Mch. 7, 
1796, d. Feb. 3, 1842, and 139 Huntting. 6 



364 History of Southampton. 

137 William 6 d. 1840, had w. Susanna b. 1778, d. Sept. 16, 1844, 
and ch. 140 Jones' b. 1803, 141 Richard' b. 1805, 142 Hannah', w. 
of Albert Halsey, and 143 Louisa', w. of Daniel Halsey of 
Wickapogue. 

140 Oapt. Jones' d. 1886, had w. Hannah and son 144 William 8 
b. 1844. 

141 Richard' had w. Elizabeth and ch. 145 Orlando H. 8 b. 1835, 
146 Frances 8 b. 1837 and 147 Edwin 8 b. 1840. 

134 Judge Jonathan 6 d. Jan. 26, 1819, m. Mary, d. of David Cooper 
of B. H., b. 1742, d. Nov. 30, 1815, and had son 148 Benjamin 6 b. 
Nov. 29, 1769. 

148 Benjamin 6 d. Apr. 2, 1842, had w. Abigail b. 1769, d. Mch. 
30, 1822, and ch. 149 Benj. Franklin' b. 1803 and 150 Caleb.' 

149 Benj. Franklin' had w. Mary b. 1809 aud ch. 151 Melinor G. 8 
b. 1838, 152 Mary H. 8 b. 1840, 153 Agnes 8 b. 1842 and 154 Phebe 8 
b. 1844. 

150 Caleb' had w, Cordelia and ch. 155 Minerva 8 b. 1837, 156 
Benjamin F. 8 b. 1839 and 157 Charles M. 8 b. 1840. 

62 David 4 had s. 158 David. 5 
■ 158 David 5 had ch. 159 D. Hedges 6 and 160 Peleg 6 b. 1786. 

159 D. Hedges 6 had ch. 161 James', 162 Josiah H.' of Sagg, b. 
1815, and 163 David.' 

162 Josiah H. T had w. Elizabeth and ch. 164 Alfred 8 b. 1852, 165 
Ada 8 b. 1854, 166 Henry H. 8 b. 1857, 167 Edwin P. 8 b. 1860 and 
168 Albert H. 8 b. 1863. 

160 Peleg 6 had w. Ruth b. 1790 and ch. 169 Mary' b. 1822, 170 
Elizabeth' b. 1824, 171 Horatio' b. 1825, 172 John D.' b. 1827 and 
173 Ruth 7 b. 1833. 

14 Zachariah 3 of Bridgehampton had son 174 Stephen. 4 

174 Stephen 4 , b. in B. H., moved to Speonk while a young man, 
d. 1779, m. Martha, d. of Thomas Halsey, and had ch. 175 Vin- 
cent 5 , 176 Phebe 5 , 177 Martha 5 and 178 Stephen. 5 

175 Vincent 5 m. Abigail Petty and 2d Jerusha, d. of Joseph 
Rogers, and had ch. 179 Jesse 6 , 180 Caleb 6 , 181 Epenetus 6 , d. s. p., 
and 182 Thomas. 6 

179 Jesse 6 m. Mary, d. of Stephen Halsey of B. H., and had ch, 
183 Abigail' b. 1798, w. of Oliver Rogers, 184 Phebe', 185 Ruth' 
186 Stephen' of Sag Harbor, 187 Eliza', 188 Elmy', 189 Mary' and 
190 Anson' of Ohio. 



Genealogies. 365 

180 Caleb 6 of Buffalo, N. Y., had eh. 191 Vincent 7 and 192 
Blmy.' 

132 Thomas 6 of Sayville, L. I., had ch. 193 Jerusha 7 , 194 George 7 , 
195 Halsey', 196 Smith 7 , 197 Lyman 7 , 198 William 7 , 199 James 7 and 
200 Epenetus. 7 

178 Stephen 6 had w. Eachel and ch. 201 Stephen 6 , d. s. p., 202 
Charles 6 , 203 Apollos 6 , d. s. p., 204 Caleb 6 , d. s. p., 205 Cephas 6 , 
206 Albert 9 , who had a family, 207 Jerusha 6 . 208 Clarissa 6 , 209 
Martha 6 and 210 Sarah. 6 

.202 Charles 6 m. Lydia Tuthill and had ch. 211 Bmmeline 7 , 212 
TuthiU 7 b. 1809, 213 Luther 7 b. 1816, 214 Phebe 7 and 215 Nancy. 7 

212 TuthiU 7 m. 1st Nancy Sandford and 2d Mary Burnett, and 
had ch. 216 David T. 8 b. 1841, 217 Herman H. 8 b. 1843, 218 James 
L. 8 b. 1845, 219 John 8 b. 1849 and 220 Mary P. 8 b. 1853. 

213 Luther 7 of Islip had w. Esther and ch. 221 Julia 8 , 222 Wil- 
liam 8 b. 1839, 223 Charlotte 8 b. 1841, 224 Phebe 8 b. 1844, 225 Mary 
Ellen 8 b. 1848, 226 George 8 b. 1851 and 227 Cornelia 8 b. 1854. 

205 Cephas 6 m. Elizabeth Bishop and had ch. 228 John 7 , 229 
Matilda 7 , 230 William 7 and 231 Mary 7 , w. of Edwin Halsey. 

7 Noah 2 of Branford, Ct., had ch. 232 John 8 b. 1677, d. s. p., .233 
Josiah 3 b. 1679, 234 Hezekiah 3 , 235 Mary 3 b. 1675, 236 Elizabeth 3 , 
237 Anna 8 and 238 Noah. 3 

233 Josiah 3 had w. Lydia and ch. 239 Lydia 4 b. Feb. 28, 1714, 
240 Jonathan 4 b. Dec. 12, 1715, 241 Levi 4 b. Feb. 10, 1716-7, 242 
Thomas 4 and 243 Josiah. 4 

243 Josiah 4 m. Martha Frisbie and had ch. 244 Medad 5 and ten 
others, names not known. 

244 Rev. Medad 5 m. July 9, 1787, Rachel Baldwin, and had ch. 
245 Flora 6 b. July 25, 1790, 246 Louisa 6 b. Mch. 13, 1792, and 247 
Amzi 6 b. Dec. 17, 1793. 

247 Amzi 6 m. Sept. 22, 1814, Elizabeth Barnum, and had 
ch. 248 David B. 7 b. July 27, 1815, 249 Samuel F. 7 b. Apr. 30, 
1820, 250 Theodore D. 7 b. June 10, 1822, 251 Ann E. 7 b. Oct. 16, 
1826, 252 Emily L. 7 b. Mch. 6, 1831, and 253 Harriet 7 b. Aug. 24, 

1837. 

234 Hezekiah 3 of Huntington d. 1780 or 81, had w. Ruth and 
ch. 254 Alexander 4 , 255 Isaac 4 , 256 Melha 4 (son), 257 Hezekiah 4 , 258 
Ezekiel 4 . 259 Zophar 4 , 260 Obadiah 4 , 261 Phebe 4 and 262 Ruth 4 , w. 
of Sammis. 



366 History of Southampton-. 

259 Zophar 4 of Huntington d. 1780, had w. Deborah and ch. 263 
Zophar 5 , 264 Joel 6 , 265 Moses 6 and four d's, names unknown. 

260 Obadiah 4 of Huntington had oh. 266 Ruth 5 , 267 Zebulon 5 , 
268 Isaac 5 , 269 Piatt 5 and 270 Abel. 5 

238 Noah 3 had s. 271 Noah 4 , who had s. 272 Noah 5 , who had s. 
273 Noah 6 , who had s. 274 Noah', who had s. 275 Noah 8 of Corn- 
wall, Ot. This branch have always lived in Connecticut and of 
course there were many more ch. scattered through the six genera- 
tions, but I record all I know, on the authority of 250 Theodore D. 
Rogers 7 above mentioned. 

This finishes the record of the descendants of 1 William Rogers 1 
so far as I know it. 

James Rogers Family. 

Another family of Rogers have long been connected with the 
history of Southampton, two members of which will be long remem- 
bered : Deacon John Rogers, long an estimable officer in the Pres- 
byterian Church and an upright merchant, and Miss Harriet Jones 
Rogers, to whom the same v church is indebted for the gift of their 
fine organ, a lady respected for her exemplary character and good 
deeds. 

For most of the following genealogy I am indebted to Warren 
Rogers Dix, Esq., of New York. 

1 James 1 , b. in England 1615, settled in New London, Ct., and 
d. in 1688, had ch. 2 James 2 and six others, names unknown to me. 

2 Capt. James 2 of N. L. b. 1652, d. 1713, m. Nov. 5, 1674, Mary 
Jordan, and had ch. 3 James 3 b. 1675 and seven other ch., names 
unknown. 

3 Capt. James 3 moved to Norwalk, Ct., and d. there July 16, 
1733, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 4 James 4 b. about 1700, 5 Dr. Uriah 4 
b. 1710 and 6 Samuel. 4 

4 Capt. James 4 m. Mary Harris of New London, and d. in the 
West Indies, and had ch. 7 Uriah 5 b. Sept. 21, 1737, 8 Elizabeth 5 
b. Jan. 27, 1741, 9 Jeremiah 5 b. Apr. 27, 1743 in New London and 
six other ch., names unknown. 

7 Major Uriah 5 of Southampton d. 1814, m. Mary, d. of Abner 
Howell b. in Southampton June 15, 1746 and d. in Norwich, Ct. 
Oct. 23, 1816, and had ch. 10 John 6 b. 1778, 11 William 6 , 12 Mary 6 ,' 
13 Cynthia 6 , 14 Henry 6 bap. 1787 and 15 Dr. Howell. 6 



Genealogies. ! 367 

10 Deacon John 6 m. Mehetabel, d. of George and Jane (Howell) 
Mackie and had ch. 16 Robert', 17 Jesse', 18 William', 19 
Augustus', 20 Charles', 21 George M.', 22 James', 23 Prances', w. 
of ■ Snyder of New York and 24 Mary. 1 

21 George M.' m. Esther, d. of Hiram Sanford of Sagg, and had 
ch. Hannah 8 b. 1842, Hiram S. 8 b. 1844, James 8 b. 1846, Charles 8 
b. 1848 aud George 8 b. 1850. 

22 James' m. Adaline, d. of Aaron Green, and had d. Mary 8 , w. 
of David Burnett. 

11 William 6 had ch. 25 Mary' and 26 Elizabeth.' 

9 Capt. Jeremiah 5 d. at Clinton, now Hyde Park, N. Y., Aug. 
11, 1810, m. Mary, d. of Obadiah Johnes of Southampton, b. Mch. 
29, 1750 and d. at Hyde Park Nov. 1826. He resided in South- 
ampton and had ch. 27 Capt. Jeremiah 6 b. Jan. 15, 1772, d. in S. 
H., Oct. 2, 1797,28 Obadiah Jones 6 b. abt. 1775, 29 Warren 6 b. 
Dec. 20, 1777, at Killingworth, Ct., where the family had taken 
refuge while the island was under British occupation, 30 Edmund 6 , 
31 James 6 , 32 Harriet 6 , 33 Mary 6 , 34 Esther 6 and 35 Elizabeth." 

28 Obadiah Jones 6 m. Clara, d. of Micaiah Herrick and had d. 
36 Harriet Jones' of Southampton. 

29 Warren 6 m. 1st Sarah Ogden Piatt and 2d Aug. 29, 1821, 
Julia P. Gabriella, d. of Joseph Louis, count d' Anterroches, when 
she was wid. of Edward Griffith, b. Mch. 15, 1794, and had ch. 37 
Theodore', 38 Edward', 39 Julia F.' b. Nov. 19, 1828, 40 Sidney', 
41 Warren' and 42 Henry.' 

39 Julia P.' m. J. Augustus Dix of New York June 1, 1854, and 
had son Warren R. Dix b. Nov. 23, 1855, who m. Feb. 1, 1883 
Elizabeth Le Roy Clark. 

30 Edmund 6 had ch. 43 Rev. Ebenezer P.', D. D., 44 John', 45 
Sarah', 46 Julia' and 47 Harriet.' 

31 James 6 had ch. 48 Anna', 49 Abigail', 50 Josephine', 51 Mary' 
and 52 James. 7 

Rose Family. 
Deacon Stephen Rose of Bridgehampton was of opinion that 
the families of this name on the east end of Long Island are de- 
scended from a John Rose who he thought was old enough to be a 
brother of Robert Rose, to be soon mentioned. He thought he had 
seen a paper in the records of the town whereby land was assigned 



368 History of Southampton. 

to such a John. I believe he was mistaken. Robert Eose of 
Wethersfield in 1639 came in the Francis from Ipswich, co. of Suf- 
folk in 1634, aged 40, with w. Margery 40 and ch. John 15, Eobert 15, 
Elizabeth 13, Mary 11, Samuel 9, Sarah 7, Daniel 3 and Dorcas 1. 
He removed soon to Stratford and thence probably to Southampton 
in 1644, where he had a grant of land Mch. 6, 1644-5. His name is 
on the list of whaling squadrons in Mch. 1644-5, but no John is men- 
tioned so far as I can ascertain until 1657, when he is an inhabitant of 
North Sea. Eobert removed to East Hampton probably about the 
time of its settlement in 1648, and subsequently to Westchester Co., 
N. Y. His son Eobert removed to Branford with a few others 
about the same time when Rev. Mr. Pierson went there, and his 
third son Samuel went to Newark, New Jersey and left two daugh- 
ters. The youngest son Thomas born on Long Island inherited 
his father's homestead in East Hampton and finally sold it and 
removed. This leaves only John and Daniel to be accounted for. 
Of the latter I find no trace whatever. John, if I am correct, was 
the John of North Sea in 1656, and from whom are descended all 
of the name in Southampton. 

Seventeen coats of arms of different families of this name are 
described in Burke's General Armory. 

Following my theory of the American origin of this family. 

1 Eobert 1 d. in 1665 in East Hampton had w. Margery and ch. 2 
John' b. 1619, 3 Eobert 2 b. 1619, 4 Elizabeth 5 b. 1621, 5 Mary 8 b. 
1623, 6 Samuel 2 b. 1625, 7 Sarah 2 b. 1627, 8 Daniel 2 b. 1631, 9 Dor- 
cas 2 b. 1632 andlO Thomas 2 b. say 1635. 

2 John 2 d. Apr. 17, 1697, had w. Abigail and ch. 11 David 8 , 12 
Thomas 3 , 13 James 3 , 14 Hannah 3 (not 18 yrs. of age Feb. 27, 1715-6 
when 2 John 2 made his will) 15 John 3 , 16 William 3 and 17 Martyn 3 . 
(David has half the landed estate, the other half to his wife and to 
Thomas on her decease.) 

11 David 3 d. 1716, had w. Hannah and ch. 18 Hannah", 19 David 4 
20 Daniel 4 and 21 Obadiah 4 (sons in Mch. 1716 all under 15 years 
of age). 

12 Thomas 3 of Watermill (not Water Mills) had son 22 Israel. 4 
15 John 3 had ch. 23 David 4 and 24 James 4 . 

23 David 4 had w. Esther and ch. 25 Esther 5 b. 1736, d. 1738, 
and 26 David. 6 

26 David 6 had son 27 David 6 b. 1753. 



Genealogies. 369 

27 Oapt. David 6 d. July 23, 1836, had 1st w. Mary Rogers, who 
d. 1800, ae. 44 and 2d w. Nancy Jessup, who d. Apr. 22, 1845, ae. 
66. He had ch. 28 Hannah 7 , 1st w. of Oapt. Herrick Eogers, 29 
Nancy', w. of Micaiah Herrick, 30 Emma 7 , w. of Capt. Edward 
White of Sebonac, 31 David Eogers 7 b. 1798, 32 Harriet 7 , w. of 
Silas Riggs, 33 John 7 b. 1802, d. s. p., July 16, 1854, 34 Mary 7 , w. 
of Jacob Drake and 35 Austin. 7 

31 David R 7 m. Mary A. White b. 1800 and hadch. 36 Jetur R. s 
b. 1823, 37 Emma 8 , w. of John Rickard and 38 David Harold 8 b. 
1840. 

36 Oapt. Jetur R. 8 m. Caroline, d. of John Benedict, and had d. 

39 Emma 9 b. 1856. 

38 D. Harold 8 in. 1st Mary, d. of Capt. Henry Halsey and hadd. 

40 Mary. 9 His w. d. and he m. 2d Eleanor, d. of Albert Hildreth, 
and had ch. 

17 Martyn 5 (the first interred in the cemetery at Watermill) had 
w. Sarah, d. of Richard Howell and ch. 41 Zaccheus 4 b. 1700, 42 
Stephen 4 , 43 Christopher 1 (who removed) 44 John 4 (who removed 
to Orange, N. J.), 45 Sibyl 4 (who removed with Stephen to Ewing, 
N. J.), 46 Esther 4 , 47 Sarah 4 and 48 Abraham. 4 (Order of births 
not known.) 

41 Zaccheus 4 d. Aug. 4, 1760, had w. Anna, who d. Aug. 17, 
1773, and ch. 49 Stephen 6 b. 1742, 50 Anna 5 , 51 Phebe 5 , 52 Puah 5 
and 53 Moses/ 

49 Stephen 5 d. July 1, 1806, had w. Chloe, who was b. 1744 and 
d. July 7, 1796, and had ch. 54 Jeremiah 6 , 55 Phebe 6 , w. of Timothy 
Holmes of Connecticut, 56 Zaccheus 6 , 57 Silas 6 of Connecticut 
and 58 Stephen 6 b. June 5, 1780. 

57 Silas 6 had ch. 59 George 7 , 60 Phebe 7 , 61 Emily' and 62 

Sophronia. 7 

58 Deacon Stephen 6 d. 1866, m. Feb. 10, 1805, 1st Phebe Haynes, 
who was b. May 5, 1780, and d. Aug. 14, 1817, he m. 2d Nov. 15, 
1818, Maria Pierson, who wasb. Nov. 21, 1788, andd. April 2, 1831, 
he in. 3d, Mch. 21, 1832, Nancy Haynes, b. Aug. 10, 1794. He 
had ch. 63 Stephen 7 b. June 17, 1806, 64 David 7 b. July 25, 1808, 
65 Ehphalet' b. July 26, 1810, 66 Chloe'' b. Mch. 20, 1813, 67 
Mehetabel 7 b. Aug. 24, 1815, 68 Phebe 7 b. Aug. 7, 1817, 69 Benja- 
min F. 7 b. Oct. 10, 1819, 70 Aaron W. 7 b. July 8, 1821, 71 Henry 

4-7 



370 History of Southampton. 

Martyn' b. Mch. 10, 1823, 72 John H.' b. Aug. 30, 1824, 73 Mary 
C b. Sept. 1, 1826, 74 Maria E.' b. Nov. 18, 1834, and 75 Helen 
B. 7 b. June 28, 1836. 

65 Eliphalet 7 lived in the West and had ch. 76 William 8 and 77 
Henry T. 8 

76 Eev. William 8 of Omaha City, Ks., has ch. 78 Sidney 9 , 79 
Howell 9 , 80 Frank 9 and 81 Eichard. 9 

77 Eev. Henry T. 8 of Lowell, Mass., has d. 82 Helen. 9 

71 Henry Martyn 7 m. Elizabeth, d. of Sullivan Cook, and had ch. 
83 Anna 8 b. 1852, w. of Addison Cook, 84 Charlotte P. 8 b. 1854, 
85 Henrietta 8 b. 1857, 86 Prank 8 b. 1858 and 87 Stephen 8 b. 1860. 

53 Moses 5 m. Hannah, d. of David Cooper, and had ch. 88 Jere- 
miah 6 , 89 Simon 6 , 90 Martyn 6 , 91 Luther 6 and 92 Hannah 8 , w. of 
Caleb Pordham of New York. 

89 Simon 6 had son 93 Harvey 7 b. 1816. 

93 Harvey 1 had w. Hannah b. 1821 and ch. 94 Sarah H. 8 b. 1842, 
95 Frederic H. 8 b. 1844, 96 Nancy 8 b. 1846 and 97 Charles 8 b. 1848. 

90 Martyn 6 had s. Lupton 7 of Sebonac. 

91 Luther 6 had w. Phebe and ch. 98 Hannah 7 b. 1834 and 99 
Laura 7 b. 1840. 

48 Abraham 4 had ch. 100 Abraham 5 , 101 Samuel 6 and 102 
Eufus. 5 

100 Abraham 5 had son 103 Maltby Gelston 6 b. 1791. 

103 Maltby G. 6 had w. Phebe b. 1788 and ch. 104 David P. 7 b. 
1813, 105 Elbert 7 b. 1825 and 106 Abraham 7 b. 1829. 

104 David P.' has w. Mary S. and ch. 107 Adeline C. 8 b. 1846 
and 108 Abraham 8 b. 1857. 

105 Elbert 7 m. Josephine, d. of Daniel and Louisa Halsey of 
Wickapogue, and has ch. 109 Maltby Gr. 8 b. 1856 and 110 Phebe L. 8 

101 Dr. Samuel 5 had son 111 Abraham T. 6 b. 1792. 

Ill Abraham T. 6 d. Apr. 14, 1857, had w. Eliza b. 1804 and ch. 
112 Samuel 7 , who d. a young man of much promise, 113 Matilda' 
b. 1825, 114 Maria E. 7 b. 1830, 115 Adelaide 7 b. 1835, 116 Caroline' 
b. 1838, 117 Evelyn 7 b. 1841 and 118 Nettie 7 b. 1844. 

Ill Abraham T. was a graduate of Yale College, a lawyer by pro- 
fession, and one unusually successful with a jury, and for several 
years a county judge. His brilliant talents made him a man of 
distinction among the highest in the land. 



Genealogies. 371 

102 Dr. Rufus 6 m. Phebe, d. of Thomas Sanfovd, and had s. 119' 
Edwin 6 b. 180?. 

119 Col. Edwin 6 had w Sarah E. b. 1812 and ch. 120 Eliza J.' b. 
1835, 121 Edwin S.' b. 1837 and 122 Kufus' b. 1841. 

42 Stephen 4 b. 1710, d. Aug. 16, 1775, removed to Ewing, N. J., 
m. Elizabeth, d. of Ebenezer Prout, who d. Jan. 30, 1779, and had 
ch. 123 Phebe 6 b. 1739, d. Jan. 9, 1772, w. of Amos Pender, 124 
Deborah 5 , w. of Daniel Howell of Ewing, 125 Ebenezer 6 b. 1744, 
126 Patience 6 b. 1746, d. Mch. 13, 1785, w. of Henry Baker of 
Hopewell, N. J., and 127 Elizabeth 6 b. 1748, d. 1811. 

125 Ebenezer 6 d. Apr. 20, 1831, had w. Eunice and ch. 128 
Stephen 6 b. Jan. 6, 1769, 129 Phebe 6 , w. of Jonas Addoms of New 
York, 130 Ebenezer P. 6 b. 1784 and 131 Samuel 6 b. 1786, d. s. p. 
July 19, 1810. 

128 Stephen 6 m. Elizabeth Wynkoop. 

130 Ebenezer P. 6 of Trenton m. Catherine, d. of Dr. Jonathan 
Forman, and had ch. 132 Elizabeth', w. of George Kissam, 133 
Jonathan F. 7 b. 1818, 134 Catherine 7 and 135 Samuel K. 7 

133 Jonathan F.' d. May 21, 1877, m. 1st Elizabeth, d. of Benja- 
min Hendrickson, and 2d Caroline, d. of William Paff. By his first 
wife he had ch. 136 Emma 8 , w. of W. H. Cooley, and 137 
Catherine. 8 By his second wife he had ch. 138 Ella 8 , 139 Mary L. 8 
and 140 Forman. 8 

135 Samuel K.' m. Matilda Hobensack and had s. 141 George K. 8 

Santokd Family. 
Long Island naturally looks to New England for its antecedents 
and, in some cases, for its progenitors. Searching the N. E. 
records for an earlier generation than Ezekiel Sandford, as the 
name was originally written, who, in 1678, received an appropri- 
ation of fifteen acres in Bridgehampton, we find no less than three 
English pioneers who each had a son Ezekiel. Thomas of Dor- 
chester, Mass., in 1634, had a son Ezekiel, who died in Fairfield, Ct., 
1683 ; Andrew of Hartford had son Ezekiel, who lived in Milford, 
Ct.; and Robert of Hartford had a son of the same name b. Mch. 
13, 1648. This Robert had also a son Zacharias, which name reap- 
pears in a son of Ezekiel, and adds another reason for assuming 
that the Southampton family descended from Robert of Hartford. 
In the former edition I said that I had found mention of a Thomas 



372 History of Southampton. 

Sandford in Southampton in 1676. I confess I cannot now find my 
original note of this mention, nor any evidence in the printed 
records of this Thomas, and, therefore, am inclined to adopt the 
line of descent as given below. 

Burke's General Armory mentions nineteen English families 
using coat armor, and one of the descendants of Ezekiel believed he 
had ascertained the arms of this family in England. The blazon 
is as follows : " Quarterly, first and fourth per chevron, sable and 
ermine ; in chief two boars' heads coup'ed close or ; second and 
third, per fesse indented azure and ermine. 

Crest: a falcon, with wings indorsed, preying on a partridge 
proper. 

Motto : Nee temere nee timide. 

1 Eobert 1 of Hartford, Ot., in 1645, d. in June, 1676, m. Ann, 
d. of Jeremy Adams, and she d. 1682. He had ch. 2 ZachariahV3 
Elizabeth 2 b. Feb. 19, 1646, 4 Ezekiel 2 b. Mch. 13, 1648, 5 Hannah 2 
and 6 Abigail. 2 ' 

2 Zachariah 2 of Hartford d. 1714, had w. Sarah and ch. 7 Sarah 8 
b. Nov. 15, 1681, 8 Zachariah 3 b. Apr. 26, 1686, d. s. p., 9 Ann 3 
and 10 Bebecca 3 , twins, b. Aug. 27, 1689, and 11 Abigail 3 b. Oct. 
11, 1692. 

4 Ezekiel 2 of Bridgehampton d. 1714, had w. Hannah and ch. 
12 Ezekiel 3 b. Apr. 9, 1681, 13 Thomas 3 b. Aug. 9, 1684, 14 Abi- 
gail 3 and 15 Zachariah. 3 

12 Ezekiel 3 of B. H. or "Watermill d. 1 755, had 1st w. Elizabeth 
b. 1681, d. Apr. 26, 1738, and 2d w. Dorcas and ch. 16 Ezekiel 4 , 17 

Sarah 4 , w. of Hedges, 18 Abigail 4 , w. of Sayre, 19 Phebe 4 , 

w. of Jessup, 20 (probably, though not named in his father's 

will) Sylvanus 4 b. 1743 and 21 David. 4 

16 Ezekiel 4 m. Wid. Phebe Higgins of Elizabeth, N. J., Nov. 1, 
1738, and had ch. 22 James 6 b. 1779, 23 Hiram 6 b. 1784 and 24 
Isaac 6 , the rich farmer of Illinois. 

22 James 5 had w. Sarah b. 1789 and ch. 25 Benjamin P. 6 b. 1821 
26 James Lawrence 6 b. 1823 and 27 John A. 6 

26 James Lawrence 6 of Bridgehampton had w. Nancy and ch. 
28 Helen A.' b. 1846, 29 Caroline E.' b. 1848, 30 James A.' b. 
1850, 31 Nathan L.' b. 1854, 32 John E. 7 b. 1858 and 33 Henry L ' 
b. 1863. 



Genealogies. 373 

23 Hiram 5 of Sagg d. Apr. 12, 1865 j had d. 34 Esther 6 b. 1817, 
w. of Henry Eogers. 

20 Sylvanus 4 d. Feb. 22, 1778, had son 35 Charles. 5 

21 David 4 had ch. 36 Lewis 6 and 37 Zachariah. 6 

13 Thomas 3 of B. H. d. 1761, had w. Sarah and ch. 38 Thomas 4 
b. 1701, d. Feb. 23, 1789, 39 Jonah 4 , 40 John 4 , 41 Susanna 4 and 42 
Silas. 4 

39 Jonah 4 d. 1771, had w. Sarah and ch. 43 Jonah 5 , 44 James 5 , 

45 Sarah 5 , w. of Topping, 46 Susanna 5 , 47 Ohloe 5 and 48 

Abigail. 5 

43 Jonah 6 d. 1785, had w. Martha and ch. 49 Sarah 6 , 50 James 
Montgomery 6 and 51 John Monmouth. 6 

40 John 4 d. 1785 had w. Esther and ch. 52 Josiah 5 , 53 Caleb 5 , 54 

John 5 , 55 Hezekiah 6 , 56 Keturah 8 , w. of Jennings, 57 Mehet- 

abel 5 , w. of Topping, 58 Esther 5 , 59 Eebecca 5 , 60 Jernsha 5 and 

61 Elizabeth. 6 

42 Silas 4 not living in 1759 had ch. 62 Silas 5 , 63 Zephaniah 6 , 64 
Sarah 5 and 65 Hannah. 5 

15 Zachariah 3 of B. H. d. 1771, had ch. 66 Henry 4 , 67 Stephen 4 , 
68 Joel 4 , 69 Daniel 4 , 70 Abraham 4 and 71 Elias. 4 

68 Joel 4 b. 1727, d. Feb. 25, 1797, had ch.72 James 6 , 73 Lemuel 5 
d. s. p., 74 Hugh 5 , 75 Jared 5 b. Feb. 19, 1774, 76 Oliver 5 , 77 Pru- 
dence 5 and 78 Armatel. 5 

72 Dr. James 5 of Huntington had son 79 Lewis, 5 of Milwaukee. 

75 Dr. Jared 6 d. Aug. 1817, m. 1801 Sarah B. Halsey and had 
ch. 80 Halsey 6 b. 1801, 81 Lewis Halsey 6 b. June 8, 1807, 82 
Edward 6 of New York, d. 1854 and 83 James S. 6 of New York. 

80 Halsey 6 was vice-chancellor of the State of New York. He 
m. Fanny Howell. 

81 Lewis Halsey 6 of Ovid, N. Y., d. 1852 had son 84 Lewis 7 of 
New York, d. 1852, 

69 Daniel 4 d. Nov. 8, 1807, had w. Phebe and ch. 85 Samuel 6 b. 
Nov. 26, 1762 and 86 Jason 5 b. 1778. 

85 Samuel 5 had w. Phebe, b. Apr. 2, 1765, and ch. 87 Sarah 6 b. 
Jan. 24, 1790, 88 Samuel 6 b. Aug. 3, 1791, 89 Hervey 6 b. Jan. 26, 
1795, 90 Jason 6 b. June 1, 1798, who removed to Palmyra, N. Y., 
91 Nathan 6 b. Jan. 24, 1800, and 92 Eliza" b. Dec. 1, 1806. 

88 Samuel 6 had ch. 93 Mehetabel', 1st w. of Albert Hildreth and 
94 Lewis' b. 1814. 



374 



Histoky of Southampton. 



94 Lewis' m. Maria Marshall and had ch. 95 Phebe A. 8 b. 1841, 
96 Sibyl M. 8 b. 1843 and 97 George L. e b. 1848. 

89 Hervey 6 went to sea and so disappeared forever. 

86 Jason 5 d. Sept. 16, 1859, had ch. 98 Sophia B. 6 b. 1809 and 
99 Daniel Hedges 6 b. 1811, who had w. Mary. 

71 Elias 4 had ch. 100 Beriah 5 , 101 Elias 5 , 102 Jonathan 5 and 103 
George. 5 

101 Elias 5 had son 104 Isaac. 6 

104 Isaac 6 had ch. 105 James Lawrence' of Southampton (who 
m. Justina, d. of Peter Fournier) and 106 Edward.' 

A Thomas Sanford of Bridgehampton of this family was the 
father of the eminent jurist, Nathan Sanford, formerly chancellor 
of the State of New York. This Thomas had other ch. Thomas 
and Phebe, w. of Rose. I have been unable to trace them. 




"iiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiraiiniii 



Sayre Family. 
Thomas Sayre was the founder of the family 
of this name in Southampton and one of the 
eight original "Undertakers" coming here in 
May or June 1640. He was a native of Bed- 
fordshire, England, as appears from the exam- 
jjp^ ination of his son Job before the Dutch Council 
in New York as before narrated. In 1638 he 
and his son Job had each 60 acres of land al- 
lotted to them in Lynn, Mass. The arms of 
this family are as handed down by family tra- 
dition: Gules, a chevron ermine between three 
sea gulls argent. 

Crest : A cubit arm erect proper holding a dragon's head erased 
argent. Motto: Saie and doe. Another form of the motto used 
by some of this name Dico facio seems to be a pun on a false deriva- 
tion of the name itself. Lower on surnames derives it either from 
assayer, a crown officer in the royal mint whose duty it was to assay 
gold aud silver for coinage, or from a patronymic Saher of Norman 
origin. The homestead drawn by Thomas Sayre in 1648 and the 
house he built in that year still standing have remained in posses- 
sion of the family to this day. 

1 Thomas 1 b. about 1590, d. 1670 had ch. 2 Francis 5 , 3 Daniel 8 , 4 
Joseph 9 and 5 Job. 8 




Genealogies. 375 

2 Francis 2 d. Jan. 20, 1698, lived at the north end, had w. Sarah 
and ch. 6 John 3 b. Jan. 6, 1665, 7 Francis 3 b. June 17, 1669, 8 
Jonathan 8 , 9 Damaris 3 , w. of Elisha Howell, 10 Thomas 3 b. 1677^ 
d. Dec. 10, 1715 (he had w. Patience), 11 Caleb 3 and 12 Ichabod. 3 

6 Deacon John 8 d. Apr. 29, 1724, had ch. 13 John 4 b. 1692, 14 
Thomas 4 of New Jersey b. July 1, 1696, 15 Damaris 4 b. May 9, 
1698, 16 Elizabeth 4 b. Mch. 23, 1701, 17 Jonathan 4 of New Jersey 
b. Jan. 18, 1705, 18 Sarah 4 b. Aug. 11, 1709 and 19 Hannah 4 b. 
Apr. 17, 1715. 

13 Deacon John 4 d. Mch. 12, 1767, m. Apr. 18, 1717, Hannah, 
who d. June 5, 1782, ae. 89, and had ch. 20 Prudence' b. Apr. 12, 
1718, 21 Abigail 6 b. Apr. 8, 1720, 22 John 5 b. Mch. 17, 1722, 23 
Luce 6 b. Aug. 17, 1723, 24 Eunice 6 b. Dec. 11, 1725, 25 Hannah 6 
b. Oct. 20, 1727, w. of Stephen Eogers, 26 Sarah 5 b. Sept. 3, 1729, 
27 Matthew 6 b. July 17, 1731, 28 Ann 5 b. June 1733 and 29 Ste- 
phen 6 b. June 12, 1736. 

22 John 6 had ch. 30 David 6 , 31 Sylvanus 6 and 32 Abraham. 6 

30 David 6 d. Mch. 9, 1825, m. June 28, 1779, Mary, d. of John 
Howell and had ch. 33 Jane' b. Mch. 14, 1781, 34 Howell' b. Sept. 
8, 1782, d. 1807, 35 Chester 1 b. Aug. 4, 1784, 36 Ozias 7 b. 1787, d. 
1800, 37 Oliver' b. Feb. 28, 1790, 38 Mary 7 b. Mch. 8, 1792, 39 
Desire 7 b. and d. 1794, 40 Joyce 7 b. Jane 6, 1794, d.' 1796, 41 Her- 
vey 7 b. June 16, 1798 and 42 Jeremiah 7 b. and d. 1800. 

37 Oliver 7 had ch. 43 David 8 b. 1822, 44 Edward 8 b. 1825 and 45 
a daughter. 

43 David 8 has w. Martha and ch. 46 Pamela 9 b. 1852, 47 Caro- 
line 9 b. 1855 and 48 Amelia 9 b. 1864. 

32 Abraham 8 had ch. 49 Foster 7 of Franklinville and 50 Solon 7 
bap. Aug. 7, 1785. 

27 Matthew 5 d. 1819, had ch. 51 Daniel 6 b. May 10, 1765, 52 
Francis 6 b. Sept. 28, 1766, 53 Eunice 6 b. Mch. 30, 1768, 54 John 6 
b. June 13, 1771 and removed, 55 Simon 6 b. July 8, 1774, 56 
Nathan 6 b. Apr. 12, 1776, and 57 Joel 6 b. Nov. 2, 1778. 

51 Daniel 6 of Cairo, New York, had ch. 58 Benjamin' and 59 
Matthew.' 



376 Histoby of Southampton. 

58 Benjamin' had ch. 60 Samuel 8 of Montrose, Pa., 61 Benj. 

Chapman 8 , 62 Daniel 8 of Montrose, 63 Lydia 8 , w. of Oomstock 

of Few York, and 64 Anna M. 8 , w. of Eichards of Philadelphia. 

54 Oapt. Matthew 7 had ch. 65 Simon 8 of Montrose, Pa., 66 
Daniel 8 d. s. p. and 67 Robert M. 8 d. s. p. 

52 Francis 6 had son 68 Thomas P.' b. Nov. 8, 1809. 

68 Capt. Thomas P. 7 m. Mary Lnpton of the town of Southold, 
b. Sept. 9, 1820, and had ch. 69 Matthew 8 b. Mch. 4, 1843, d. in 
the service of his country in the civil war, Feb. 11, 1863, 70 
Adelaide E. 8 b. Mch. 2, 1844, w. of Edward H. Foster, 71 Lucilla 8 
b. Apr. 25, 1846, 72 Julia F. 8 b. Sept. 12, 1849, 73 Edward Francis 8 
b. Oct. 5, 1853, 74 Phebe L. 8 b.,May 19, 1855, 75 Mary A. 8 b. Oct. 
26, 1858, d. Feb. 10, 1860, 76 Mary E. 8 b. Aug. 16, 1860, and 77 
Matthew H. 8 b. Jan. 12, 1864. 

56 Nathan 5 had son 78 John 7 of Franklinville. 

12 Ichabod 3 d. 1782, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 79 Ichabod 4 , 80 
Mary 4 , 81 Stephen 4 removed, 82 Elizabeth 4 , 83 Eunice 4 and 84 Joshua 4 . - 

79 Ichabod 4 had ch. 85 Ananias 6 , 86 Francis 6 b. 1771, 87 Martha 5 
and 88 Eunice. 5 

86 Francis 5 had w. Hannah and ch. 89 Francis 6 b. 1807 and 90 
James 6 b. 1812. 

89 Capt. Francis 6 on the hill m. Sarah A. Hedges and had ch. 91 
Frank' b. 1842, 92 Adeline 7 b. 1844, 93 Edward 7 b. 1848, 94 
Emmett 7 b. 1850 and 95 Nathan 7 b. 1854. 

90 James 6 had w. Sarepta and ch. 96 Harriet 7 b. 1842, 97 James' 
b. 1844, 98 Mary A' b. 1846, 99 Susanna 7 b. 1848, 100 William 7 b. 
1851 and 101 Nancy 7 b. 1853. 

84 Joshua 4 m/Elizabeth Cooper and had ch. 102 Sarah 5 , 103 
Joshua 5 , 104 Edith 5 , 105 Paul 5 b. Oct. 22, 1760, 106 Silas 5 , 107 
Caleb 5 , 108 Thomas 5 , 109 Eunice 5 , 110 William 5 , 111 Enoch 5 , 112 
Rufus 5 and 113 Ruth." 

103 Joshua 5 had ch. 114 Nathan 6 , 115 Thomas 6 and 116 William. 6 
105 Paul 5 m. Dec. 9, 1784, Mary Halsey, b. July 16, 1764, d. 
Mch. 19, 1850, and had ch. 117 Maria 6 b. Nov. 1, 1785, 118 Cor- 
delia 6 b. Apr. 21, 1787, d. May 21, 1875, 119 Eliza 6 b. Oct. 18, 
1788, 120 Nancy 6 b. June 2, 1792, 121 David H. 6 b. June 20, 1794, 
122 John 6 b. Sept. 27, 1796, 123 Edward 8 b. Aug. 14, 1798, 124 
Mary 6 b. Mch. 23, 1800, 125 Hannah 6 b. Dec. 24, 1801, and 126 
Ruth 6 b. July 20, 1803. 



Genealogies. 377 

123 Oapt. Edward 6 m. June 7, 1836, Mary J. Scott, and had ch. 
127 Edward Halsey' b. Nov. 21, 1839, 128 James S. 7 b. Nov. 17, 
1840, and d. in the service of his country in the civil war, Nov. 24, 
1862, 129 Henry' b. July 28, 1843, and 130 Rufus' b. Apr. 3, 1845. 

127 Rev. Edward H. T , grad. of Amherst College and Princeton 
Theolog. Seminary, m. July 17, 1862, Mary 0. Hulfish of Prince- 
ton, and had ch. 131 Lillys A. 8 b. Apr. 25, 1863, 132 Edward W." 
b. Mch. 30, 1865, 133 Henry S. 8 b. Aug. 8, 1867, d. 1871, 134 Mary 
R. 8 b. Aug. 7, 1873, 135 Emma 0. 8 b. Nov. 15, 1874, and 136 
Edith W. 8 b. Sept. 27, 1877. 

129 Henry' m. June 17, 1877, Annie McKune, and had ch. 137' 
Elmer W. 8 b. May 2, 1878, d. Apr. 12, 1880, and 138 Edward O. 8 
b. July 2, 1881. 

122 John 6 of St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., had ch. 139 Mary' and 140 
David. 7 

106 Silas 6 had ch. 141 Elizabeth 8 , 142 Clarissa 6 , 143 David 6 , 144 
Rev. "William N. 6 of Pine Plains, N. Y., 145 Silas 6 , 146 Edith 6 , 147 
James Hervey 6 and 148 Ann. 6 

107 Caleb 6 had ch. 149 Amanda 6 , 150 Augustus 6 , 151 Eliza 6 , 152 
David H. 6 , 153 Amie A. 6 and 154 Harriet. 6 

108 Thomas 6 m. Huldah, d. of Zephaniah Rogers, and had ch. 
155 James 6 , 156 Elizabeth 6 , 1st w. of Capt. George Howell, 157 
Rufus 6 , 158 Rogers 6 , 159 Abigail 6 , w. of Jonathan Pithian, Esq., and 
160 Harriet 6 , 1st w. of Deacon Edward Huntting. 

110 William 5 had son 161 William. 6 

111 Enoch 5 settled along the Hudson river and had ch. 162 
Prances M. 6 , 163 Cooper J. 6 and 164 Eliza. 6 

112 Rufus 5 m. Susan, d. of Zephaniah Rogers, and had ch. 165 
Panny", w. of Benj. Halsey Poster of Mill Pond Head, 166 Clarissa 6 , 
1st w. of William R. Howell of Moriches, 167 Susan 6 , w. of 246 
James Sayro 7 and 168 William 6 , d. s. p. 

This comprises the record of the descendants of 2 Prancis 2 , the 
oldest son of 1 Thomas. 1 

3 Daniel 2 of North End and afterward of Bridgehampton d. 

1707, m. 1st Hannah, d. of Christopher Foster, and 2d Sarah , 

and had ch. 169 Daniel 3 b. 1666, 170 Samuel 3 , d. before 1707, and 
left ch., 171 Joseph 3 , 172 Ephraim 3 , 173 Nathan 3 , 174 Hannah 3 , w. 
of Josiah Topping and 175 David. 3 
48 



378 Histoey of Southampton. . 

169 Capt. Daniel 3 of Sagg, d. May 11, 1748, had w. Sarah b. 
1667, d. May 15, 1733, and ch. 176 Daniel 4 , 177 Isaac 4 , 178 Han- 
nah 4 , w. of Smith, 179 Mary 4 , w. of Ludlam, 180 Ann 4 , 

w. of Moore, 181 Ethan 4 and 182 Silas." 

177 Isaac 4 d. 1726, had w. Elizabeth, who had child unborn when 
he made his will Dec. 14, 1725. 

181 Ethan 4 , not living in 1747, had ch. 183 Daniel 5 , 184 Sarah 5 , 
185 Elizabeth 5 , 186 Abigail 5 , 187 John 6 , 188 Nathaniel 5 and 189 
Noah. 5 

182 Silas 4 willed May 16, 1722, to w. Abigail and ch. 190 Silas 5 , 
191 Sarah 5 , 192 Ezekiel Sanford 5 , 193 Elizabeth 5 , 194 Abigail 5 , 195 
Hannah 5 and 196 David. 5 

See toward the last for descendants of 192 Ezekiel. 5 

4 Joseph 2 , according to Dr. Hatfield, removed to New Jersey in 
1667 and died there in 1695. 

5 Job 2 b. 1612, d. Apr. 1, 1694, had first wife Sarah, who d. Oct. 
29, 1684, and 2d w. Hannah, wid. of Arthur Howell, and ch. 197 
Job 3 b. Aug. 25, 1672, 198 Benjamin 3 b. Aug. 9, 1674, 199 James 8 
b. Sept. 12, 1676, 200 Elizabeth 3 b. Mch, 1, 1678, 201 Sarah 3 b. 

May 4, 1680, w. of Lyman, and 202 Abraham 3 b. July 5, 1683, 

d. s. p. 1712, and had w. Hannah. 

5 Job 2 was the one from whom Job's lane is named, from the tra- 
dition that he gave it from his homestead for that purpose ; but the 
records show that he gave land jointly with Edmund Howell, who 
owned to the south of him down to the present residence of Mrs. 
Amanda Hildreth. Doubtless Job proposed the plan. 

197 Job 3 d. Mch. 26, 1755, m. Susanna, d. of John Howell the 
2d, and had ch. 203 Nehemiah 4 , 204 James 4 b. Jan. 3, 1719-20, of 
Goshen, Orange Co., N. Y., 205 Joseph 4 , 206 Ezekiel 4 , d. s. p. 
1740, 207 Benjamin 4 , 208 Susanna 4 , 209 Elizabeth 4 , w. of Kev. 
Timothy Johnes, D. D., and 210 Abigail. 4 

203 Nehemiah 4 d. Aug. 5. 1784, m. Dec. 24, 1741, Bethia, d. of 
Abraham Cooper, and had ch. 211 Elizabeth 5 b. Apr. 18, 1743, w. 



Genealogies. 379 

of Zephaniah Eogers, 212 Abraham 5 b. Feb. 5, 1745, 213 James 5 b. 
July 3, 1748, 214 John 5 b. Jan. 5, 1752, d. s. p., 215 Hannah 5 b. 
Nov. 7, 1756, w. of Obadiah Eogers, and 216 Jane 6 b. Mch. 24, 
1759, w., of Obadiah Wright. ' 

212 Oapt. Abraham 5 d. Apr. 16, 1810, m. Mehetabel, d. of Abner 
Howell, and had ch. 217 Stephen 6 b. Feb. 27, 1770, 218 Merit 6 b. 
Sept. 20, 1771, 219 Eunice 6 b. Feb. 16, 1774, w. of Joseph Eeeves, 
and d. Mch. 8, 1857, 220 Agee 6 b. Mch. 6, 1776, and d. at sea, 221 
Euth 6 b. Aug. 17, 1778, m. July 3, 1797, Oapt. Matthew Eogers, 
aud d. July 18, 1855, 222 Nehemiah 6 b. Jan. 3, 1781, d. s. p., 223 
Beulah 6 b. Dec. 4, 1783, w. of Joseph Hildreth, 234 Phebe 6 b. July 
4, 1785, w. of Herrick Eogers, 235 William 6 b. Sept. 26, 1787, d. s. 
p. Sept. 18, 1849, 236 Susan 6 b. Aug. 10, 1790, w. of Eli Halsey, 
237 Jared 6 b. Mch. 25, 1793, and 238 Lewis 6 b. Aug. 14, 1796. 

217 Stephen 6 d. 1839 or 40, had w. Sarah, d. of Elias White, and 
ch. 239 Sophia', w. of James Ehodes (who had ch. Henry and 
Simon), 240 Sarah', w. of James Larry (who had ch. Margaret, 
Edwin, James aud Stephen), 241 Emeline 7 , w. of Henry Ehodes 
(who had ch. Elizabeth, Sidney and Hannah), 242 Mary*, w. of 
Edwin Isham of Illinois, and 243 William N 7 

243 Dr. William N. 7 was a graduate of Williams College and the 
N. Y. Academy of Medicine, and when the eastern stream of men 
to the gold fields of California was at its height, he went there to 
practice his profession. Notwithstanding his natural abilities, 
which were of a high order, and his skill acquired in study and 
hospital practice in New York, he was too modest a man to succeed 
in competition with the push and daring of inferior men. In dis- 
gust he threw what few medical works he had taken with him into 
San Francisco bay, abandoned his profession, and engaged in a 
crushing-quartz establishment, and lost his life by some untoward 
accident in the mill. He lived a pure and noble life and died 
lamented by all who knew him. 

218 Merit 6 m. Susan Wick and bad ch. 244 Eobert 7 , 245 John 7 , 
246 James 7 , 247 Agee 7 , 248 Mary 7 and 249 Elizabeth.' 

246 James 1 m. 167 Susan Sayre and had eh. 250 Ellen 8 b. 1839, 
w. of Charles Selden Halsey, 251 John W. a b. 1842, 252 Clara F. 8 
b. 1846 and 253 William 8 b. 1849. 

See at the end of this genealogy record of family of 247 Agee', 
received too late for insertion here. 



380 History of Southampton. 

198 Benjamin 3 b. Jan. 19, 1674, had ch. 254 Benjamin 4 , 255 
James 4 and 256 Capfc. David. 4 

254 Benjamin 4 of Bridgehampton d. 1790, m. July 3, 1740, and 
had ch. 257 Susanna 5 b. Apr. 16, 1741, w. of Edward Topping, 258 
Stephen 5 b. Jan. 14, 1742-3, 259 David 5 b. Apr. 20, or May 1, 
1747, 260 Benjamin 5 and 261 Elizabeth 5 , twins, b. June 1, 1750. 

259 David 5 d. Sept. 11, 1830, and had ch. 262 Stephen 6 b. Mch. 
9, 1772, 263 Gelston 6 b. Oct. 28, 1773, and d. Jan. 27, 1786, 264 
Elizabeth 6 b. June 10, 1775, d. Oct. 31, 1831, 265 Mary 6 b. Jan. 8, 
1778, 266 Phebe 6 b. Sept. 24, 1779, d. Dec. 4, 1783, 267 Jane 6 b. 
Dec. 6, 1781, 268 Francis 6 b. Jan. 5, 1784, 269 Maltby Gelston 6 h. 
May 5, 1786, d. s. p. Dec. 10, 1825, 270 Phebe 6 b. Aug. 2, 1787, 
271 David 6 b. Aug. 5, 1789, d. Sept. 29, 1792, and 272 Hugh 6 b. 
Apr. 15, 1791, d. Oct. 11, 1793. 

262 Stephen 6 d. July 2, 1822, m. Sophia Eysam, and had ch. 273 
Mary', 274 Fanny', 275 David M.' bap. 1808, 276 William 7 and 277 
Caroline.' 

275 David M. 7 had w. Eugenia L. and ch. 278 Stephen 8 b. 1833 
and 279 John. 8 

278 Stephen 8 has w. Elizabeth b. 1835, and ch. 280 Harvey 9 , 281 
John 9 , 282 Eugene 9 b. 1862, 283 a son b. 1865, 284 Frank 9 and 285 
Stella. 9 

268 Francis 6 of Catskill, N. Y., d. 1868, m. Feb. 15, 1810, Susan, 
d. of Oapt. George Taylor of Catskill, and she d. Oct. 5, 1861. He 
had ch. 286 Jane 7 , 287 Sophia', 288 James Maltby', 289 Samuel 
Penfield' and 290 Mary', w. of Charles B. Pinckney of Catskill. 

260 Benjamin 6 had ch. 291 Susanna 6 , 292 Sarah 6 , 293 Mary 6 , 294 
Charles 6 , 295 Uriah 6 b. 1790, 296 Nancy 8 , 297 Daniel 6 and 298 
John. 6 

294 Charles 6 of Sandgate, Vermont, had ch. 299 Sarah', 300 
Eebecca 7 , 301 James 7 , 302 Julia 7 and 303 Florida.' 

295 Uriah 6 d. 1882, had w. Nancy and ch. 304 Mary 7 , 305 John 
E. 7 b. 1822, 306 Horatio G. 7 b. 1825, 307 a d. who m. M. A. Gray, 
and 308 Louisa. 7 

306 Horatio G. 7 has w. Jerusha P. and ch. 309 Edward G. 8 b. 
1861 and 310 Grace E. 8 



Genealogies. 381 



Branch of Oapt. Isaac Satee. 

The furthest back I can go with certainty in this family is to a 
Joseph Sayre, whom we will distinguish as 311 Joseph, who may 
be of the fourth or fifth generation, from 1 Thomas. 1 He may be 
a son of 197 Job 3 or a grandson of 3 Daniel. 2 Supposing the 
former, then 311 Joseph 4 d. 1779, had w. Mary and ch: 312 Isaac 6 b. 
1757 and 313 Job 5 , who d. 1789. 

312 Isaac 6 had ch. 314 Jehiel 6 b. 1783, 315 Mary 6 b. 1784, 316 
Francis 6 , 317 Isaac 6 b. 1789 and 318 Hervey 6 b. 1797. 

314 Jehiel 6 had w. Mary b. 1791 and ch. 319 Halsey 7 , 320 William' 
b. 1821, 321 George 7 , 322 a daughter and 323 Julius A.' b. 1833. 

316 Francis 6 had son 324 William Henry.' 

317 Oapt. Isaac 6 d. Apr. 11, 1853, had w. Eliza and ch. 325 
Mary A.', w. of John Allen, 326 Frederic Spencer' b. 1831, 327 
Harriet' b. 1835, 328 Adelaide' b. 1838, 329 Louisa' b. 1841, 330 
Eugene O.' b. 1843 and 331 William Wallace' b. 1848. 

A Benjamin Sayre lived near Eahway, N. J., in the last century, 
was of the Long Island family, but I cannot say with certainty to 
what branch he belonged. His descendants are as follows : 

332 Benjamin 5 b. Feb. 3, 1743, had ch. 333 Daniel 6 , 334 Moses 6 b. 
May 3, 1769, and 335 Jedidiah. 6 

334 Moses 6 had ch. 336 James' b. in Milton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
June 25, 1799, 337 Warren', 338 William W.', 339 Charles' and 340 
John W.' 

336 James' had ch. 341 Charles H. 8 , 342 James L. 8 and 343 Theo- 
dore S. 8 b. in and resident of Utica, N. Y. 

341 Charles H. 8 had ch. 342 Carrie A. 9 , 343 Anna L. 9 , 344 
James 9 , 345 G-eorge S. 9 , 346 Lansing 9 , 347 Leonora 9 and 348 Amelia 
V. E. 9 

349 David 5 of Sag Harbor, supposed to have come from New 
Jersey, and whose ancestors I cannot trace, but presume he belongs 
to the Southampton family, had ch. 350 Silas 6 , 351 Nathan 6 , 352 
Thomas 6 , 353 Wickham 6 , who d. s. p., and 354 Hannah 6 , w. of 
Henry Havens and mother of Wickham Havens of Sag Harbor. 

350 Silas 6 had son 355 Charles of Texas, who d. s. p. 

351 Nathan 6 had ch. 356 Jeremiah' of Sag Harbor and 357 
Nathan' of the Sandwich Islands. 



382 History of Southampton. 

356 Jeremiah 7 had d. 358 Mary P. 8 

352 Thomas 6 had two daughters. 

A Joseph Sayre of Goshen, Orange Co., N. Y., wills in 1767 to 
w. Sarah and ch. James, John, Benjamin, Daniel, Stephen, Martha 
and Jonathan, the latter a minor at date of will. This is also 
doubtless a Long Island family. 

29 Stephen Sayre 5 was a graduate of the college of New Jersey at 
Princeton and said to be the handsomest man of his age. A mini- 
ature once in possession of an aunt of the writer would confirm this 
judgment. He went to London before the revolutionary war and 
was successful in founding a banking house in that city. Was 
made High Sheriff of London, and about the time of the opening 
of hostilities the ridiculous charge was made against him by Lord 
Eochford that he had engaged in a conspiracy to seize the person 
of the king as he went to the Parliament house and to take posses- 
sion of the Tower. He was imprisoned in the Tower a few days, 
and, being examined on a writ of habeas corpus, was dismissed as 
entirely innocent. He then instituted proceedings against Lord 
Eochford and the court awarded him one thousand pounds dam- 
ages. He was on terms of intimacy with the best society of 
London and highly respected. He returned to America after the 
war and settled near Bordentown, New Jersey, where he passed the 
rest of his life. The estate of Mr. Sayre afterward became the 
property and residence of Joseph Bonaparte, the ex-emperor of 
Spain. 

Eeceived too late for insertion in proper place. 

247 Agee 7 of Adrian, Mich., b. Oct. 26, 1804, at Southampton, 
moved to Michigan, m. 1st, July 3, 1834, Lucy Frary, b. in Kupert, 
Vt., Sept. 15, 1811; m. ad, Oct. 30, 1851, Submit Frary, b. in 
Eupert, Vt., Dec. 4, 1814, and had ch. 359 Helen Amelia 8 b. Apr. 
3, 1835, 360 Frances Cornelia 8 b. Jan. 8, 1837, 361 Adaline Eliza- 
beth 8 b. Jan. 16, 1839, 362 William Frary 8 b. June 12, 1841, 363 
Edgar Agee 8 b. July 16, 1843, 364 Emma Augusta 8 b. Dec. 30, 
1846, 365 Lucy Adella 8 b. Nov. 4, 1850, and 366 Frank Arthur 8 b. 
Mch. 10, 1854. 

363 Edgar A. 8 m. Oct. 19, 1869, Anna 0. Moore, b. at Erie, Pa., 
Aug. 29, 1849, and had ch. 367 Edgar Ealph 9 b. in Erie, Pa., July 
29, 1870, and 368 John Moore 9 b. June 29, 1873, d. Sept. 5, 1874. 

361 Adaline E. 8 m. Oct. 9, 1871, John W. Brittingham. 



Genealogies. 383 

364 Emma A. 8 m. Feb. 18, 1875, Edward D. Wheeler of Man- 
istee, Mich., b. in New Marlboro, Mass., May 8, 1843, and has son 
Harold Sayre Wheeler b. July 23, 1884. 

192 Ezekiel S. 6 m. Abigail Cooper and in 1794 removed to 
Ticonderoga, Essex Co., N. Y., and had ch. 369 Silas 6 b. Jan. 26, 
1778, 370 Stephen 6 b. Dec. 24, 1782, and 371 Maria 6 , w. of Silas 
Can Geld. 

369 Capt. Silas 6 of Ticonderoga d. Mch. 14, 1863, m. Affla Abell, 
b. in Sharon, Ct., Sept. 4, 1783, d. Apr. 19, 1849, and had ch. 372 
Theodore' b. Dec. 26, 1805, 373 Corydon' b. Aug. 8, 1807, 374 
Leander Russell' b. Apr. 17, 1809, 375 Ezekiel Sanford' b. Dec. 24, 
1811, 376 Milton Homer' b. June 18, 1819, d. June 20, 1837. 

372 Theodore' of Demopolis, Ala., d. Nov. 21, 1853, m. Oct. 10, 
1836, Harriet Hanners of Northampton, Mass., b. Apr. 3, 1809, d. 
May, 1874, and had ch. 377 George Hanners 8 b. Sept. 9, 1837, 378 
Theodore Hebard 8 b. Feb. 10, 1842, 379 M. Sanford 8 b. Apr. 14, 
1844, and 380 Prances Lee 8 b. Sept. 6, 1848, d. Sept. 20, 1869. 

373 Corydon' d. in Dexter, Mich., Apr. 1843, m. in 1828 Eoxaua 
Cooper, who d. 1834, and had ch. 381 Gordon A. 8 , of Mason, 
Mich., and 382 Helen E. 8 , who d. in Dexter. 

374 Leander R' of Middlebury, Vt., m. June 21, 1836, Ann 
Maria Trowbridge, b. in Middletown, Ct., Aug. 7, 1815, and has 
ch. 383 Edwin Milton 8 of Rochester, N. Y., b. in Hume, Allegany 
Co., N. Y., Oct. 20, 1837, 384 Sanford Leander 8 of New York b. 
Nov. 10, 1839, and 385 Charlotte Affia 8 b. Nov. 1, 1845, d. Nov. 26, 
1868, w. of Courtney S. Kitchel of Milwaukee, Wis. 

383 Edwin M. 8 m. Sept. 5, 1866, Emily Johnson Fenton, and has 
ch. 386 Mary Eliza 9 b. at Crown Point, Aug. 7, 1867, 387 John 
Brydon 9 b. Feb. 2, 1869, 388 Emily Fenton 9 b. Apr. 10, 1872, d. 
Dec. 5, 187:5, 3S9 Gertrude Helen 9 b. Jan. 18, 1875, d. Aug. 16, 
1875, 390 Ethel Maria 9 b. Apr. 5, 1880, and 391 Robert Edwin 9 b. 
Dec. 29, 1881, d. Sept. 2, 1882, the last four being born at Suther- 
land Falls, Vt. 

378 Theodore H. 8 of New York m. Mary Ellen Hartwell of 
Northampton, Mass., Nov. 13, 1867, and had ch. 392 Charles 
Hawkes 9 b. Sept. 9, 1868, 393 Frances Lee 9 b. Nov. 15, 1869, 394 
James L. H. 8 b. Oct. 5, 1872, 395 Theodore Burt 9 b. Dec. 18, 1874, 
396 Grace Hartwell 9 b. June 7, 1878, and 397 Eva 9 b. Oct. 15, 1882. 



384 History of Southampton. 

379 M. Sanford 8 m. Sept. 12, 1870, Winnifred Springfield, and 
had eh. 398 John Frances 9 b. July 12, 1871, and 399 George 
Eugene 9 b. Aug. 30, 1873. 

375 Ezekiel S. 7 of Demopolis, Ala., d. Nov. 1853, m. Oct. 1836 
Maria Allen of New Haven, Cfc., who d. Apr. 1843, and he m. 2d 
w. Ophelia G. Kimberley of New York. 

370 Stephen 6 of Ticonderoga m. Dec. 29, 1808, Phebe Hotchkiss, 
and had ch. 400 Cicero' b. Dec. 27, 1809, 401 David H. 7 b. Apr. 17, 
1813, 401| Alpheus Orlando 7 and 402 Eliza 7 b. Dec. 8, 1822, d. 
Nov. 3, 1857, w. of D. W. Braman of Wadhams Mills, N. Y., where 
370 Stephen 6 resided at the time of the birth of his last two ch. 

400 Oice.ro 7 of "Wadhams Mills m. Jan. 4, 1837, Julia Ann Clark, 
and had ch. 403 Stephen A. 8 b. July 29, 1838, d. Aug. 3 of the 
same year, 404 Stephen C. 8 b. Aug. 14, 1839, d. Aug. 28, 1867, 405 
Clayton 8 b. Sept. 12, 1841 (married Kate North and resides near 
Wadhams Mills), 406 Harmie I. 8 b. Aug. 17, 1843, w. of H. H. 
Longsdorf of Binghampton, N. Y., with one d. Edith S., 407 Hosea 
T. 8 b. June 29, 1845, d. Apr. 28, 1864, 408 Orlando A. 8 b. Aug. 25, 
1847, 409 George D. 8 b. May 31, 1849, d. Sept. 18, 1871, 410 Scott 
G. 8 b. Oct. 11, 1851, 411 Denton C. 8 b. Oct. 17, 1853, 412 Myron 8 b. 
June 1, 1856, 413 Mary B. 8 b. Oct. 12, 1858, d. Jan. 29, 1878, 414 
Charles 8 b. June 17, 1860, and 415 Harriet E.' 8 b. Sept. 25, 1862. 

401 David H. 7 of Wadhams Mills, N. Y., d. Feb. 1859. 

401* Alpheus O. 7 b. Nov. 13, 1820, d. Feb. 22, 1860, m. Mary 
Viall, Mch. 20, 1856, and had d. 416 Lillie 8 , w. of John Cross of 
Wadhams Mills. 

Scott Family. 
Capt. John Scott is first mentioned on the New England records 
as an inhabitant of Hartford. He was for a while afterward a resi- 
dent of Setauket, then called Ashford. In 1657 he was made free- 
man at Southampton by the General Court, in which year probably 
he came here after quite a checkered career, and on Dec. 9, 1658, 
he was granted a home lot of three acres and five other acres, pro- 
vided he remained three years. I do not know his former residence 
in England but have reason to believe it was not Scott's Hall of 
Kent county. 

1 John 1 had w. Deborah and son 2 Jekomiah 2 b. 1663. 

2 Jekomiah 2 d. 1749, was Justice of the Peace a number of years, 



Genealogies. 385 

had w. Mary and ch. 3 John? (on list of 1698 and probably a young 
child then), 4 Lazarus 3 (not on list of 1698, nor any other of these 
ch.) afterward of Greenwich, Conn., 5 Jekomiah 3 , 6 Jackson 3 , 7 
Thomas", 8 Deborah 3 , 9 Mary 3 , 10 Sarah 3 and 11 Anne 8 . The order 
is that given in will of 2 Jekomiah 2 dated 1749. 

6 Jackson 3 had ch. 12 Jackson 4 b. 1757, 13 Matthew 4 , 14 James 4 , 
15 John 4 (who removed to Orange Co., N. Y.) and 16 Samuel 4 , who 
d. s. p. 

12 Jackson 4 d. 1842, had w. Susanna and son 17 James 6 b. 1784. 
17 James 5 had w. Julia b. 1786 and son 18 Samuel J. s b. 1817, 

who has w. Loretta D. 

13 Matthew 4 had son 19 Lewis 6 b. 1801. 

19 Lewis 6 has w. Sophia b. 1801 and ch. 20 Walter b. 1823, 21 
Harriet 6 , w. of Ohauncey W. Norton (who have ch. Henry P. and 
Addie), 22 Henry 6 and 23 John 6 b. 183S. 

20 Walter 6 m. Oct. 31, 1864, Louisa, d. of Daniel Jennings, and 
had s. b. 1865. 

14 James 4 had ch. 24 Sarah 6 , w. of Oapt. Hervey Harris, and 25 
Mary 6 , w. of Oapt. Edward Sayre. 

Seymour Family. 

The first of this family in America was Eichard. Seymour, of 
Hartford, 1639, of Farmington from 1652 to the year of his death, 
in 1655. The arms of this family, according to the tradition of the 
English origin, are : Quarterly, first and fourth, or, on a pile gules, 
between six fleurs-de-lis azure three lions of England ; second and 
third gules, two wings conjoined in lure, the first downwards or. 
Crest: Out of a ducal coronet or, a phoenix of the last, issuing from 
flames proper. Supporters : Dexter, a unicorn argent, maned and 
tufted or, gorged with a ducal collar, per pale azure and or, to 
which is affixed a chain of the last ; sinister, a bull azure, dueally 
gorged, chained, hoofed and armed or. 

Motto : Foy pour devoir. 

1 Eichard 1 d. 1655, had w. Mary and ch. 2 Thomas', 3 Eichard', 
4 John 2 and 5 Zechariah. 5 

2 Thomas 2 of Norwalk, Ct., had ch. 6 Hannah 3 b. 1654, 7 Abi- 
gail 3 , 8 Abigail 3 , 9 Mary 8 , 10 Sarah, 11 Thomas 3 b. 1660, 12 Mercy 3 , 
13 Matthew 3 and 14 Eebecca. 3 

49 



386 Histoet of Southampton. 

3 Richard 2 had w. Hannah and ch. 15 Samuel 3 , 16 Ebenezer 3 , 17 
Jonathan 3 , 18 Hannah 3 and 19 Mercy 3 . 

4 John 2 of Hartford m. Mary Watson and had ch. 20 John 3 b. 
1666, 21 Thomas 3 b. 1669, 22 Mary 3 b. 1670, 23 Margaret 3 b. 1674, 
24 Kichard 3 b. 1676, 25 Jonathan 3 b. 1678, 26 Nathaniel 3 b. 1680 
and 27 Zechariah 3 b. 1684. 

20 John 3 had ch. 28 John 4 b. 1694, 29 Timothy 4 b. 1696, 30 
Daniel 4 b. 1698, 31 Elizabeth 4 , 32 Jonathan 4 b. 1703, 33 Nathaniel 4 
b. 1704, 34 Susanna 4 , 35 Margaret 4 , 36 Zebulon 4 b. 1709 and 37 
Moses 4 b. 1711. 

29 Timothy 4 m. Rachel Alleyn and had cb. 38 Timothy 6 b. 1728, 
39 Alleyn 5 , 40 Charles , 41 Eachel 5 and 42 Charles 5 again. 

38 Timothy 5 m. Lydia Kellogg and had ch. 43 Timothy 6 bap. 
1749, 44 Norman 6 b. 1740, 45 Truman 6 , 46 Ann 6 and 47 Rachel. 6 

43 Col. Timothy 6 m. Abigail Skinner and had ch. 48 Abigail 7 , 
49 Mabel 7 , 50 Timothy 7 b. 1779, 51 Harriet 7 , 52 Henry', 53 Orson 7 , 
54 Chester 7 and 55 James S. 7 

52 Henry 7 had son 56 Henry. 8 

44 Norman 6 of Rome, N, Y., m. 1st a McNeil and 2d Catherine 

and had ch. 57 Norman 1 , 58 Alexander 7 , 59 Ardon 7 , 60 Mary 7 , 

w. of Thomas Hastings, D. M. of New York and 61 Catherine 7 , w. 
of Miles P. Squier, D. D., of Geneva, N. Y. 

57 Norman 7 d. Dec. 1859, m. 1st and 2d Lydia Kelsey, 

and had ch. 62 Norman 8 , 63 Catherine 8 , 64 McNeil 8 and 65 Lydia 8 , 
w. of Wheeler Hinman. 

62 Norman 8 of Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., New York, m. 
Frances Hale Metcalf, and had ch. 66 Mary Catherine 9 b. Aug. 29, 
1844, w. of George Rogers Howell, the author of this work, now of 
Albany, N. Y., 67 Henry Hale 9 of Buffalo, N. Y, 68 Norman 
Alexander 9 of Mt. Morris, N. Y, and 69 Edward I. Chase 9 of Mt. 
Morris. 

68 Norman A. 9 m. Elizabeth, d. of Joseph Curtis of Rochester, 
and had ch. 70 Mary Prances 10 , 71 Elizabeth 10 and 72 Charlotte. 10 

64 McNeil 8 m. Elmira Burpee and had ch. 73 McNiel V. 9 and 
74 Isabel 9 , w. of Stringer. 

59 Ardon 7 had ch. 75 Sarah 8 , w. of Josiah P. Pitch of New York 
and 76 Mary. 8 

45 Truman 6 of Albany had ch. 77 William', 78 Timothy 7 , 79 Tru- 
man 7 , 80 Isaac 7 and 81 Julia. 7 



Genealogies. 387 

79 Truman' had son 82 Truman 8 b. Sept. 24, 1824, a Major- 
General in the IF. S. Army. 

37 Moses 4 b. 1711 had ch. 83 Moses?, b. 1742, 84 Samuel 5 , 85 
Aaron 5 , 86 Sarah 6 , 87 Eachel 5 , 88 Catherine 6 , 89 Dorothy 6 and 90 
Eunice. 5 

83 Major Moses 5 had w. Clarissa and ch. 91 Moses 6 b. 1774, 92 
Ozias 6 b. 1776, 93 Horatio 6 b. 1778, 94 Heriry 6 b. 1780, 95 Epaph- 
roditus 6 b. 1783 and 96 Mary. 6 

91 Moses 6 had son 97 Dr. George.' 

92 Ozias 6 had w. Sabrina and ch. 98 Origen S.' of Litchfield, Ct., 
b. 1804 and 99 John 7 of the same town. 

93 Judge Horatio 8 of Middlebury, Vt., d. Nov. 21, 1857, had ch. 
100 Ozias' of Middlebury, 101 Moses' of Wisconsin, 102 Horatio' 
of Buffalo, N. Y., 103 Mary', 104 Emma' H.' and 105 Henry.' 

94 Henry 6 had ch. 106 Mary', w. of E. B. Miller, 107 Horatio' 
of Utica, Governor of Now York, 108 Sophia', w. of E. P. Shinnard 
and 109 John P.' 

109 John E. 7 of Utica has son 110 Horatio 8 1S77-80 State Engi- 
neer of New York. 

84 Samuel 5 of Litchfield, Ct.,had ch. Ill James 6 , 112 Charles 6 , 
113 Harriet 6 and 114 Clarissa. 6 

Ill James 6 had son 115 William 7 of Lansing, Mich. 

85 Aaron 5 had ch. 116 Friend 6 of Boston, 117 Edward 6 , 118 
Moses 6 , 119 Israel 6 of Troy, N. Y, 120 Aaron 6 and 121 Norman. 6 

117 Edward 6 of New York had ch. 122 Edward' and 123 Friend.' 

120 Aaron 6 had son 124 Charles.' 

121 Norman 6 had ch. 125 William' and 126 Charles. 7 

Squires Family. 

This name is generally written Squires, but the forms of Squire, 
Squier and Squiers are not uncommon on the early records. The 
first of the name on Long Island was a John Squires, who lived 
quite early in East Hampton and married the daughter of William 
Edwards of that settlement. I assume that he was the father of 
George Squires, who was of the age to be in the second generation, 
and who lived in East Hampton, though I have seen no express 
mention of the fact. 

Burke's Gen. Armory mentions eight English families of this 
name as using coat armor. 



388 History of Southampton. 

1 John 1 m. Ann, d. of William Edwards and had son 2 George/ 

2 George 2 m. Jan. 29, 1701, Jane Edwards, and had ch. 3 John 3 
h. about 1703, 4 Recompence 3 bap. 1705 and 5 Thomas 3 bap. 1705, 
who m. May 26, 1726, Rachel Ludlam and removed to Elizabeth- 
town, N. J. 

3 John 3 d. Jan. 7, 1758, at. 55, had w. Phebe and ch. 6 John 4 
bap. 1715, 7 Ellis 4 bap. 1717, 8 Nathan 4 bap. 1719, 9 Henry 4 bap. 
1722, 10 Phebe 4 bap. 1724, 11 Mary 4 bap. 1729, 12 Zerviah 4 bap. 
1731, 13 Jeremiah 4 bap. 1733, 14 Stephen 4 bap. 1735, 15 Jonathan 4 
bap. 1738 and 16 John 4 again bap. 1739. 

7 Ellis 4 moved into the western part of Southampton and had ch. 
17 Seth 6 , 18 Ellis 6 and 19 Daniel. 5 

17 Seth 6 had ch. 20 Nicholas 6 b. 1794, 21 Alvin 6 b. 1806 and 22 
Seth 2 b. 1808. 

20 Nicholas 6 had w. Sarah and ch. 23 Abner E. 7 b. 1831, 24 Sarah 
A.' b. 1836 and 25 Edwin F.' b. 1840. 

21 Alvin 6 had w. Mary P. and ch. 26 Allen P.' b. 1832, 27 Van 
Buren'b. 1835, 28 William' b. 1838, 29 Theron M.' b. 1840, 30 
Edward' b, 1841, 31 Georgiana' b. 1843, 32 Louisa' b. 1851, 33 
Emma J.' b. 1853 and 34 Mary E.' b. 1854. 

22 Seth 6 had w. Harma and ch. 35 Harmietta' b. 1833, w. of Jo- 
seph Raynor Howell, 36 Seth' b. 1834, 37 Jairus M.' b. 1841, 38 
Ann A.' b. 1843, 39 Monroe 7 b. 1847 and 40 George O.' b. 1852. 

18 Ellis 5 had ch. 41 Barnabas 6 b. 1797, who had w. Naomi, 42 
Zachariah Rogers 6 b. 1799, 43 Jeremiah 6 b. 1802, 44 Jetur 6 b. 1807 
and 45 Warren. 6 

42 Zachariah Rogers 6 had w. Margaret and ch. 46 George P.' b. 
1845 and 47 James W.' b. 1846. 

43 Jeremiah 6 of Southampton m. Phebe, d. of Samuel Jagger, b. 
1804 and had ch. 48 Edwin' b. 1829, 49 Mary Sophronia 7 b. 1831, 
w. of Jetur White, 50 Lucilla 7 b. 1834 and 51 Hampton 7 b. 
1842. 

48 Edwin' m. Jemima and had ch. 52 George 8 b. 1860 and 

53 Addie L. s b. 1862. 

44 Jetur 6 had w. Lucy Ann and ch. 54 Jetur J.' b. 1834, 55 
Eleanor A. 7 b. 1841, 56 Leander' b. 1843, 57 Ida W.' b. 1846, 58 
Lucy E.' b. 1851, 59 Avis H.' b. 1853 and 60 Eugene? b. 1856. 

19 Daniel 5 had ch. 61 Ellis 6 and 62 Daniel. 6 

15 Jonathan 4 had ch. 63 Stafford, 5 64 Ellis', 65 John' b. abt. 



Genealogies. 389 

1783, 66 Stephen 6 , 67 Sylvanus 6 , 68 Henry 5 , 69 Mehetabel 5 , 70 
Mary 6 and 71 Phebe. 6 

64 Ellis 5 had son 72 Albert G. 6 b. 1810. 

72 Albert G. 6 had w. Sarah and ch. 73 Elenora' b. 1844, 74 
Sarah' b. 1845, 75 Albert E.' b. 1849, 76 Alice G. 7 b. 1851 and 77 
Charles Edward' b. 1853. 

65 John 6 had ch. 78 Phebe 6 , w. of Nathan Hildreth, 79 Sarabell 6 , 
w. of Payne, 80 Clarissa J. 6 b. 1819 and 81 Edwin 6 b. 1825. 

67 Sylvanus 6 had ch. 82 Stephen 6 b. 1819, 83 Margaret 6 b. 1823, 
84 John 6 , 85 Henry 6 , 86 William 6 , 87 Sylvanus 6 , 88 Eichard 6 , 89 
Stafford 6 , 90 Mary 6 and 91 Margaret A. 6 

87 Sylvanus 6 had son 92 William 7 b. 1830.' 

92 William 7 had ch. 93 Addie 8 b. 1861, and 94 Erne 8 b. 1863. 

68 Henry 5 had son 95 Samuel B. 6 of Mill Pond Head, b. 1830. 

4 Eecompence 3 m. Dec. 30, 1725, Elizabeth Parsons of E. H. r 
and had ch. 96 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1730, 97 Abraham 4 bap. 1733, 98 
Hannah 4 bap. 1736 and 99 John 4 bap. 1739. 

97 Abraham 4 d.' 1785, had w. Phebe and ch. 100 Hannah 6 , 101 
Sarah 6 , w. of Pince, 102 Lucinda 6 and 103 Abraham. 5 

Stanbrough Family. 
Josiah Stanbrough was an inhabitant of Lynn in 1637, in 
Southampton in 1644, as his name is on the whaling list of March 
7 of that year, and was made freeman in this town Sept. 7, 1647, 
having had the apparently customary trial of three years' residence 
before attaining the right to vote and hold office. In 1658 he had 
a residence in Sagg. The title of Mr. is attached to his name on 
the records. 

1 Josiah 1 d. in Sagg 1661, m. a 2d w. Alice, wid. of Thomas 
Wheeler, and had ch. 2 Peregrine 8 b. 1640, 3 Mary 2 , 4 Sarah 2 , 5 
Josiah 2 and four other young ch. in 1661, when he made his will — 
these four may have been the ch. of Mrs. Stanbrough by her first 
husband. 

2 Peregrine 2 d. Jan. 15, 1701-2, m. Dec. 15, 1664, Sarah, d. of 
Rev. Thomas James of East Hampton, and had ch. 6 John 3 b. Dec. 
11, 1665, 7 Ruth 3 b. June 4, 1668, 8 Olive 3 b. July 18, 1670, 9 
Mary 3 b. Oct. 14, 1672, w. of Jonathan Strickland, 10 Hannah 8 b. 
Jan. 28, 1674, w. of John Lupton, 11 Sarah 3 b. May 26, 1677, w. of 
James Hemck, 12 James 8 b. Oct. 28, 1679, m. Sarah Edwards, of 



390 History of Southampton. 

E. H., 13 Eunice 3 b. Nov. 8, 1682, 14 Elizabeth 3 b. Jan. 24, 1686, 

15 Ann 3 and 16 Martha 3 . 

6 John 3 had ch. 17 Josiah 4 , 18 John 4 , 19 Peregrine 4 , 20 Eleazer 4 , 
21 Abigail 4 , w. of Rhodes, 22 Martha 4 and 23 Mary. 4 

18 John 4 d. in or near Dec. 1753, and had ch. 24 James 5 , 25 
John 5 , 26 Sarah 5 , 27 Abigail 5 , 28 Hannah 5 , 29 Martha 5 and 30 
Mary. 5 

19 Peregrine 4 had ch. 31 David 5 and 32 Stephen. 5 

31 David 5 had ch. 33 Isaac 6 , 34 Talmage 6 and 35 David." 
35 David 6 of Scuttle Hole had w. Lucretia and ch. 36 Stephen 7 
and 37 James. 7 

20 Eleazer 4 of Sagg, b. 1709, had w. Mehetabel b. 1709 and ch. 
38 Eleazer 5 b. Oct. 23, 1733, 39 Zerviah 5 b. Oct. 23, 1735, 40 Lewis 5 
b. Aug. 6, 1739, 41 Eunice 5 b. May, 1746, and 42 Thomas 5 b. Nov. 
25, 1749. 

42 Thomas 5 of Moriches d. Nov. 12, 1801, had w. Catherine and 
ch. 43 Mary 6 b. May 5, 1772, 44 Mehetabel 6 * b. Oct. 5, 1774, 45 
Lewis 6 b. Aug. 28, 1 776, 46 James 6 b. Mchl 5, 1779, 47 Clarissa 6 b. 
May, 1782, 48 Catherine 6 b. May 21, 1784, 49 Sarah 6 b. Feb. 25, 
1787, 50 Thomas Gk 6 b. Eeb. 20, 1790, of Newburgh, N. Y., d. 
1862, 51 Harvey 6 b. Jan. 28, 1794, of Orange Co., N. Y., and 52 
Mehetabel 6 b. Mch. 2, 1796. 

46 James 6 of Moriches d. July 23, 1862, had w. Nancy and ch. 
53 James 7 , 54 Delia 7 and 55 Samuel 7 b. Aug. 10, 1821. 

55 Samuel 7 had 1st w. Beulah and 2d w. Amy and ch. 56 James 
H. 8 b. June 18, 1844, and 57 Edith 8 b. Sept.-30, 1857. 

5 Josiah 2 m. July 24, 1670, Admah Chatfield, and removed to 
Elizabeth, N. J., 1690. He had ch. 58 Recompence 3 b. Aug. 22, 
1672, 59 Frances 3 b. Apr. 4, 1675, 60 Josiah 3 b. June 22, 1677, 61 
Hannah 3 b. July 1, 1679, 62 Phebe 3 b. Sept. 17, 1681, 63 Zerviah 3 b. 
Oct. 1, 1683, and 64 Adonijah 3 b. Mch. 18, 1687. 

After the death of 5 Josiah 2 his family, as Hatfield states (Hist, 
of Elizabeth), removed to Rahway, in New Jersey. 

Stephen's Family. 

The town records mention that Thomas Stephens, when a lad of 

16 years of age, in 1663, had lost his parents and had some prop- 
erty left him and that he went to live with Ellis Cook, who then 
occupied as his homestead the present homestead of Capt. James M. 



Genealogies. 391 

Herrick. Thomas subsequently married a daughter of Ellis Cook 
and lived in "Water Mill. In 1670 he exchanged homesteads with 
Martha, wid. of Ellis Cook, and in 1807 another Thomas Stephens 
sold this place to Micaiah Herrick. As to his age there are three 
data — the one above given; his will says he died Nov. 26, 1700, and 
his tombstone says he died Nov. 26, 1701, aged 51. 

1 Capt. Thomas 1 b. about 1650 m. Oct. 20, 1675, Elizabeth Cook, 
and had ch. 2 Thomas 2 b. Jan. 28, 1677, 3 Hester 2 b. Feb. 28, 1679, 
4 Phebe 2 b. Jan. 2, 1682, 5 William 2 b. Apr. 4, 1684, and 6 Josiah 2 
b. June 29, 1688. 

2 Thomas 2 d. 1711, had w. Hannah and ch. 7 Thomas 3 b. 1699 
and 8 Henry. 3 

7 Capt. Thomas 3 of Quogue d. 1779, had 1st w. Ann and 2d w. 

Abigail and ch. 9 Thomas 4 , 10 Elizabeth 4 , w. of Squires, 11 

Edward 4 b. 1754, 12 Abraham 4 , 13 Abigail 4 , 14 Hannah 4 , w. of 

Squires, 15 Charles 4 , 16 Ann 4 , w. of Gould, 17 Susanna 4 , w. 

of Green, and 18 Phebe 4 , w. of Durling. 

9 Thomas 4 d. 1782, had w. Mehetabel and ch. 19 Thomas 5 , 20 
Matthias 6 , 21 Sylvanus 6 , 22 Ann 6 and 23 Mehetabel. 6 

19 Thomas 6 had ch. 24 Thomas 6 , killed at the battle of Pitts- 
burgh, 25 Hiram 6 , 26 James 6 and 27 Sears. 6 

11 Edward" d. 1833, had ch. 28 Edward 5 of Michigan, 29 Mah- 
lon 6 b. 1790, 30 Chillon 6 and 31 Halsey 6 b. 1802. 

29 Mahlon 6 had ch. 32 Charles 6 b. 1817 and 33 Mary 6 b. 1821. 

32 Charles 6 had w. Eebecca A. b. 1820, and ch. 34 Edward' b. 
1839, 35 -William' b. 1843, 36 Julia' b. 1845, 37 Hannah' b. 1847, 
38 Mahlon' b. 1848, 39 Elizabeth' b. 1851, 40 Alice P.' b. 1855, 41 
Charles' b. 1857, 42 John' b. 1863 and 43 Emeline' b. 1864. 

31 Halsey 6 had w. Elizabeth and ch. 44 William 6 , 45 Hiram 6 b. 
1836, 46 E.Forrest 6 b. 1844, 47 Elizabeth 6 b. 1846 and 48 Zech- 
ariah 6 b. 1849. 

15 Charles 4 had son 49 Abraham 6 b. 1805. 

49 Abraham 5 had w. Milicent and ch. 50 Sarah 6 b. 1830, 51 John 
M. 6 b. 1841, 52 Hubert F. 6 b. 1845, 53 Charles M. 6 b. 1847 and 54 
Hannah R. 6 b. 1849. 

8 Henry 3 of East Hampton m. May 15, 1706, Sarah Jones, and 
had ch. 55 Henry 4 bap. 1707 and 56 Philip 4 bap. 1709. 

6 Josiah 2 of E. Hampton had w. Ruth. 



392 History of Southampton. 

Burke mentions twelve English families of this name as having 
coats of arms. 

Talmage Family. 

Thomas Talmage lived in Southampton Co., England, and had 
a brother John, a husbandman, who lived in Newton Stacey, in the 
same county, and died apparently without children, as his nephews 
inherited his estate. Thomas had ch. Symon, who d. s. p., William 
of Boston, Mass., in 1G30, carpenter, Thomas of Boston, 1634, Eobert 
of New Haven and Jane, w. of Richard Walker, 

The arms of this family, on an old parchment in East Hampton, 
are : Oules, between three choughs or, a chevron azure bearing five 
mullets. Crest : On a wreath or and gules a chough of the first 
plucking fruit gules from a bough leaved vert of a branch issuing 
from the dexter side of wreath. 

Motto : Frangas nonflectes. 

1 Thomas 1 of Boston, 1634, of Lynn, 1637-39, had land granted 
in Southampton Oct. 1642, had ch. 2 Thomas 5 , 3 Eobert 2 and 
possibly others. 

2 Capt. Thomas 2 also had land granted in Southampton in Nov. 
1642. He had w. Elizabeth, named in his will, which was proved 
Sept. 29, 1691, and ch. 4 Thomas 3 , 5 Nathaniel 3 b. 1644, 6- John 3 b. 

1679, 7 Sarah 3 , w. of John Bee, 8 Mary 3 , w. of Hand, 9 

Shubael 3 b. 1656 or 7, 10 Onesimus 3 b. 1662, 11 Naomi 3 and 12 
Hannah. 3 

4 Thomas 3 had ch. 13 Mary 4 bap. 1707, 14 Temperance 4 bap. 

1710, 15 Abigail" bap. 1712 and 16 Thomas 4 bap. 1722. 

16 Thomas 4 m. 2d w. Elizabeth Wick, Sept. 20, 1753, and had 
ch. 17 Mary 5 bap. 1748, 18 Elizabeth 5 bap. 1754, 19 a (child bap. 
1759 and 20 a daughter bap. 1765. 

5 Nathaniel 3 d. Aug. 3, 1716, had ch. 21 Naomi 4 bap. 1701 and 
22 Thomas." 

6 John 3 d. Nov. 2, 1764, m. 1st, Dec. 25, 1702, Experience 
Miller, and 2d w. Ann and had ch. 23 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1703, 24 
Ennis 4 (a son and may be the youngest), 25 John 4 bap. 1707, 26 
Experience 4 bap. 1708, 27 Jeremiah 4 bap. 1710, 28 Nathaniel 4 bap. 

1711, 29 Josiah 4 bap. 1713, 30 Joseph 4 bap. 1715, 31 Daniel 4 bap. 
1716, 32 Rebecca 4 bap. 1718, 33 Abigail 4 bap. 1720, 34 Margery 4 bap. 
1722, 35 Martha 4 bap. 1723, 36 Enos 4 bap. 1725, 37 Hannah 4 bap. 



Genealogies. 1 393 

1727, 38 Martha 4 bap. 1729, 39 David 4 bap. 1730, 40 Anne 4 bap. 
1735 and 41 Eachel 4 bap. 1737, and others twenty-one in all. 
25 John 4 had son 42 John 6 bap. 1740. 

27 Jeremiah 4 had son 43 Jeremiah 5 bap. 1746. 

43 Jeremiah 6 had ch. 44 Phebe 6 bap. 1770, 45 Elizabeth 6 bap. 
1772, 46 a d. bap. 1773 and 47 Jeremiah 6 bap. 1776. 

28 Nathaniel 4 m. 1734 Mary Fithian and had ch. 48 Nathaniel 6 
bap. 1738, 49 David 6 bap. 1740, 50 Mary 6 bap. 1743, 51 Esther 6 bap. 
1745, 52 Lucretia 6 bap. 1752 and 53 a ch. bap. 1757. 

29 Josiah 4 had son 54 Josiah 6 bap. 1737. 

31 Daniel 4 had. ch. 55 Ehoda 5 bap. 1744, 56 Abraham 5 bap. 1747 
and probably 56£ Stephen. 5 

36 Enos 4 m. Nov. 23, 1752, Mary Hand and had ch. 57 a ch. bap. 
1757, 58 Sarah 6 bap. 1764, 59 Keziah 6 bap. 1764, 60 a son bap. 
1767, 61 a son bap. 1769, 62 a d. bap. 1770, 63 Hannah 6 bap. 1774, 
and 64 Jon. 5 bap. 1776. (The omission of names or their abbre- 
viated form as "Jon. " by Dr. Buel on the church record is unfor- 
tunate for the genealogist.) 

39 David 4 d. 1808, had w. Lydia Pike and ch. 65 Lois 5 bap. 1761, 
66 Henry 5 bap. 1763, 67 David 5 bap. 1765, 68 William 5 bap. 1768, 
69 Lydia 6 bap. 1773 and 70 John 5 bap. 1778. 

67 David 6 d.- 1822, m. 1st Mary Parsons b. 1765 and d. 1796: 
he m. 2d Phebe Edwards and had ch. 71 Baldwin Cook 6 bap. 1792, 
72 Mary 6 and 73 David 6 (twins) b. Aug. 27, 1799 (and 73 David 6 d. 
Sept. 1799), 74 Phebe 6 b. Dec. 16, 1800, and d. Aug. 1801, 75 
Phebe E. 6 b. Sept. 13, 1802, 76 Anne 6 b. Mch. 31, 1804, 77 David" 
b. Jan. 25, 1806, 78 Jonathan 6 b. Dec. 3, 1808, aud 79 Nathaniel 6 
b. Jan. 3, 1810. 

71 Baldwin C. 6 had ch. 80 Sineus' and 81 David. 

77 David 6 m. Mary Ann Miller, b. Oct. 30, 1811, and had ch. 82 
Nathaniel Miller 1 b. "Mch. 1, 1834, 83 David Egbert' b. Apr. 1, 
1836, 84 Henry Clay' b. Dec. 5, 1844 and 85 William Lionel' b. 
July 23, 1849. 

83 David E.' m. Isabel Miller b. Apr. 14, 1841, d. of Isaac Miller 
of E. H., and had ch. 86 William E. 8 b. Nov. 26, 1869 and 87 
Mary Elizabeth 8 b. Nov. 17, 1874. 

56£ Stephen. 6 A Stephen b. about 1744 was the son of a Daniel 
Talmage. As 31 Daniel 4 appears to be the only one of the name 
50 



394 Histokt of Southampton. 

then living, I conjecture he was the man. On this supposition, 
56£ Stephen 5 had ch. 88 Daniel 6 and 89 Stephen. 6 

88 Daniel 6 had ch. 90 Isaac 7 , 91 John 7 , 92 Mary 7 , w. of Charles 
Oorwith of Watermill, 93 Sanford 7 , 94 Susan 7 , 95 Phebe 7 and 96 
George. 7 

89 Stephen 6 had ch. 97 Emily 7 and 98 Eliza 7 , both in succession 
wives of Capt. Charles Goodall of Southampton. 

Had some of the living members of this family replied to letters 
of inquiry a fuller record would have been given. 

Tekbell Family. 
William Terbell or Tarbill, as the name was generally written in 
olden time, and still is by a branch of this family in Boston, first 
appears on record in 1694. He lived in Bridgehampton where 
some of his descendants still reside. He moved to Mecox in 
1696. 

1 William 1 m. Mary, d. of Jonas Bower, and had ch. 2 William 2 , 
3 Mary 2 , 4 Jonah 2 and 5 David. 2 

2 William 2 had son 6 John. 3 

4 Jonah 2 had son 7 Jonah 3 b. 1744. 

7 Jonah 3 d. 1823, had w. Puah and ch. 8 Jason M. 4 , 9 JubaPand 
10 William. 4 

8 Jason M. 4 had ch. 11 Hannah 5 , w. of Sylvanus Parsons of 
East Hampton and 12 Jason 6 b. 1848. 

12 Jason 5 had d. 13 Phebe M. 6 b. 1845, w. of Talmage of 

Brooklyn. 

9 Jubal 4 had son 14 Henry 5 of New York. 

10 William 4 had son 15 Charles 5 b. 1811. 

15 Charles 5 had w. Phebe S. and d. 16 Ellen 6 b. 1845. 

5 David 2 had son 17 David. 8 

The absence of information of this family in the public records 
occasions this brief mention. 

Topping Family. 
Thomas Topping, the first of this name in Southampton, accord- 
ing to family tradition, was a refugee from religous persecution in 
England. Savage says (Gen. Diet.), "Thomas Topping of Mil- 
ford, 1639, but earlier was of Wethersfield and Eepresentative in 
1639, joined the church of Milford with his w. Emma in 1640. 



Genealogies. 395 

Had s. Elnathan baptized Aug. 2, 1640, and James Feb. 12, 1643. 
A contract made Oct. 20, 1666, at Milford, for his marriage with 
Mary, widow of Timothy Baldwin, is by her referred to ten years 
later when she was disposing of her property, in conformity with 
said contract to her children. He had before 1678 made Lydia the 
widow of John Wilford his third wife, and for the residue of his 
days lived at Branford, where, Oct. 5, 1686, he gave by deed to his 
sons Elnathan and James at Southampton, all his lands in the lat- 
ter place; to d. Mary Quinney (or some such name), ten cows; to 
d. Martha Herrick £10, in addition to what she had already received, 
to be paid by the sons, who then had the keeping of the cows also. 
His widow in 1688 transacted business with those sons and died 
Nov., 1694." 

From the Southampton Becords it is clear that the Thomas Top- 
ping mentioned by Savage resided several years in Southampton, 
then removed to Branford, and there remained till his death. 

Capt. Thomas the first settler gave his son 5 Capt. Thomas his 
homestead at the south end. The latter dies in 1682, and in 1683 
Oapt. Thomas of Branford confirms the gift of the same to Thomas, 
oldest son of 5 Capt. Thomas. 

Burke gives the arms of an English family of Toppings, as fol- 
lows: Azure, ten lozenges, four, three, two, one argent — crest. 
Two lion's gambs, sable holding up a roundel vair. 

1 Thomas 1 d. 1688, had 1st w. Emma, 2d w. Mary, who d. June 
9, 1668, and 3d w. Lydia, who d. 1694, and ch. 2 Elnathan 2 b. 
1640, 3 James 2 b. 1642 or 3, 4 John 2 b. 1646, 5 Thomas 2 , 6 Mary 2 
and 7 Martha 2 , w. of James Herrick. 



^Pw'^L 



fry* 

2 Capt. Elnathan 2 of Sagg, d. 1705, had w. Mary and ch. 8 
Elnathan 3 b. Aug. 20, 1664, 9 Abigail 3 b. Jan. 17, 1667, 10 Mary 3 
b. Nov. 18, 1670, 11 Mehetabel 3 b. June 27, 1675, 12 Stephen 3 b. 
Sept. 24, 1679, and 13 Sylvanus 3 b. Mch. 8, 1682. 

8 Elnathan 3 d. Sept. 1751, had w. Mary and ch. as by will 14 
Elnathan 4 , 15 Job 4 , 16 Silas 4 , 17 Luther 4 , 18 Zephaniah 4 , 19 Mary 4 , 
20 Phebe 4 and 21 Jerusha. 4 



396 Histoby of Southampton. 

One of these sons of 8 Elnathan 3 had son 22 Job 5 b. 1760. 

22 Job 5 d. 1834, had w. Martha and ch. 23 Luther 6 , 24 James 6 
and 25 Ira. 6 

23 Luther 6 had ch. 26 Hiram 7 of Sag Harbor and 27 Edwin.' 

12 Capt. Stephen 3 d. 1746, m. 1st Hannah and 2d wid. 

Elizabeth or Elishabah Matthews of East Hampton Dee. 14, 1727, 
and had ch. (order of births not known) 28 Elnathan 4 , 29 Stephen 4 , 

30 Sylvanus 4 , 31 David 4 b. 1716, 32 Daniel 4 , 33 Mary 4 , w. of 

Pierson and 34 Hannah 4 , w. of Wood. 

29 Stephen 4 d. 1782, had w. Abigail and ch. 35 Stephen 5 , 36 

Henry" b. 1750, 37. Jeremiah 5 , 38 Charles 5 , 39 Hannah 5 , w. of 

Pierson, 40 Abigail 5 and 41 Paul. 6 

35 Stephen 5 had ch. 42 Stephen 6 and 43 Nathan. 6 

42 Stephen 6 had ch. 44 James M. 7 of Sagg, 45 Henry', 47 Theo- 
dore 7 and 47 Stephen 7 b. 1808. 

47 Stephen 7 had w. Catherine b. 1814 and ch. 48 Augustus 8 b. 
1833, 49 James 8 b. 1835, 50 Henry 8 b. 1838, 51 Martha 8 b. 1844, 52 
Thomas 8 b. 1849 and 53 Leander 8 b. 1851. 

36 Henry 5 d. 1812, had w. Mary and ch. 54 Henry 6 b. 1777, 55 
Paul 6 , 56 Josiah 6 , 57 Charles 6 and 58 Hervey. 6 

54 Henry 8 d. 1851, had w. Mehefcabel and ch. 59 Sophronia 7 , w. 
of David Burnett, and 60 Jane H. 7 , w. of Stephen D. "Wood. 

55 Paul 6 had d. 61 Laura 7 , w. of Hervey Hedges. 

57 Charles 6 had s. 62 Charles Henry. 7 

62 Charles H. 7 had w. Janette and ch. 63 William Henry" b. 
Aug. 8, 1855, 64 Charles Price 8 b. July 8, 1865, and 65 Jessie Ster- 
ling 8 b. Sept. 11, 1869. 

58 Hervey 6 had son 66 James H.' 

66 James H. 7 of Wainscott had ch. 67 Morgan 8 and 68 Harriet. 8 

37 Jeremiah 5 of Tuckahoe had son 69 Hervey 6 of Hill St., South- 
ampton. 

69 Hervey 6 had ch. 70 William L. 7 , 71 Edward 7 b. 1828 and 72 
Harriet 7 b. 1835, w. of William McCorkell. 

31 David 4 b. 1716, d. Dec. 16, 1796, had 1st w. Phebe and 2d w. 
Jane, and ch. 73 Matthew 5 b. 1753 and 74 David 5 b. 1748. 

73 Matthew 6 d. Sept. 5, 1837, had w. Jane and ch. 75 Abraham 9 , 
who removed, 76 Joseph Warren 6 of Brookhaven, 77 David 6 of 
Orange Co., N. Y., 78 Gardiner B. 6 b. 1801, 79 Eliphalet 6 of Ohio 
and 80 Nathaniel 6 b. 1791. 



Genealogies. 397 

78 Gardiner B. 6 had w- Mary and ch. 81 Mary E.' b. 1856 and 83 
Addison G. 7 b. 1861. 

80 Dr. Nathaniel 6 had w. Anna and ch. 83 Robert Emmet 1 , 84 
George Clarence 7 b. 1842 and 85 Mary Ellen 7 b. 1843, w. of Dr. 
John C. Herrick. 

83 Robert E. 7 is an attorney at law' in New York and graduate of 
Amherst College. He m. Mary, only d. of Capt. Selden Poster of Cobb. 

74 David 5 d. 1834, had w. Eebecca and s. 86 Rensselaer 6 b. 1796. 

86 Rensselaer 6 had w. Charity b. 1799 and s. 87 Sidney B.' of 
West Hampton b. 1829. 

87 Sidney B. 7 m. Helen A. Hawkins and has d. 88 Ida H. 8 b. 1863. 
32 Daniel 4 of B. H. d. 1787, had w. Elizabeth and ch. 89 Joseph 6 , 

90 Seth 6 , 91 Abijah 6 , 92 Daniel 6 , 93 William 6 , 94 Elizabeth 5 , w. of 

Howell, 95 Prudence 5 , w. of Jennings, 96 Martha 5 , w. 

of Hildreth, and 97 Ziporah 6 , w. of Cooper. 

13 Sylvanus 3 b. 1682, had ch. 98 Ethan 4 and 99 Sylvanus. 4 

98 Ethan 4 had ch. 100 Shadrach 6 , 101 Jesse 5 , 102 Charles 6 , 
removed, 103 James 6 and 104 Stephen 5 , who d. s. p. 

101 Jesse 5 had ch. 105 George S. 6 and 106 Charles 0." 

105 George S. s had ch. 107 George S. 7 and 108 James M. 7 

106 Charles C. 6 had s. 109 Charles C. 7 b. 1814. 

109 Charles C. 7 had w. Emma P. b. 1817 and ch. 110 Parmissa" 
b. 1840, 111 Charles 8 b. 18^44 and 112 Anna 8 b. 1848. 
103 James 5 had son 113 Stephen 6 of Sag Harbor. 

99 Sylvanus 4 had son 114 Sylvanus. 5 

3 James 5 d. 1694, had w. Abigail and s. 115 James 3 b. Nov. 1, 1670. 
115 James 8 had ch. 116 Hezekiah 4 and 117 Charles.* 

5 Capt. Thomas 2 d. 1681, m. Hannah, d. of John White, and had ch. 
118 Thomas 3 b. Feb. 11, 1660, 119 Rachel 3 b. Apr. 19, 1663, 120 Ann 3 
b. June 9, 1666, 121 Hester 3 b. Apr. 16, 1671, 122 Joseph 3 b. June 30, 
1674, 123 Daniel 3 b. Aug. 19, 1676, and 124 Edward 3 b. Feb. 9, 1678. 

The inventory of 5 Thomas' property amounted to £703 14s. 6d. 

4 John 2 d. 1686, had w. Deborah and ch. 125 Josiah 3 b. 1663, 126 
John 3 , 127 Zerubbabel 3 and 128 Ephraim. 3 Inventory £326 2s. 6d. 

125 Capt. Josiah 3 d. 1726, m. Hannah, d. of Daniel Sayre, and 
had ch. 129 Josiah 4 and 130 John 4 b. 1706. 

129 Deacon Josiah 4 d. 1747, had 1st w. Mehetabel and 2d w. Abigail 
and ch. 131 Thomas 6 , 132 Josiah 6 , 133 Abraham 6 , 134 Edward 6 , 135 
Mehetabel 5 , w. of Sanford, 136 Esther 5 and 137 Keturah. 5 



398 



History of Southampton. 



130 John 4 d. 1747, had w. Sarah and ch. 138 Hannah 5 , 139 
Nathan 5 b. about 1732, 140 Sarah 5 , 141 Phebe 5 , 142 Mary 6 and 143 
Abigail. 5 

When I published the first edition of this work, in 1866, it was 
believed by some in the family that a Deacon Thomas Topping 
(whom we now designate as 144 Thomas 4 ) was the father of 145 
Edward 5 and that 144 Thomas 4 was a grandson of 5 Thomas. 8 
Since that time I have seen nothing to prove or disprove that 
belief. But after all 145 Edward 5 may be really the son of 129 
Deacon Josiah 4 , and, therefore, 134 Edward 5 above. I am inclined 
to believe this, and, therefore, dropping the 145 Edward 5 , I will 
proceed on this assumption. 

134 Edward 5 had ch. 146 Stephen 6 b. 1764, 147 George 6 and 148 
Abraham. 6 

146 Stephen 6 d. 1840 and had ch. 149 Alanson' b. 1802, and 150 
Edward.' 

149 Capt. Alanson' had w. Elmira b. 1805 and ch. 151 Arabella 8 
b. 1837, 152 Emily 8 b. 1841 and 153 James E, 8 b. 1848. 

150 Capt. Edward' of Moriches m. Lydia Glasier and had ch. 154 
Lydia 8 , w. of Capt. James Worth of Southold, 155 Louisa 8 , w. of 
Henry Osborne of Moriches, 156 Edward 8 , 157 Caroline D. 8 , w. of 
Prof. Swift of Eochester, 158 Agnes 8 (married) and 159 Eugene. 8 

148 Abraham 6 had ch. 160 Elisha', 161 S. Howell' and 162 Jones.' 
An Abraham died 1758, leaving w. Sarah but no ch. born. 

Whitaker Family. 

The " Beauties of England," a large English 
work, speaks of the Bampton Manor in the 
village of Bampton, county of Oxford, as the 
seat of the Whitaker family. The grand- 
father of George W. Whitaker of Southamp- 
ton, Edward Whitaker, occupied this and here 
his children were born. Beginning with 
Edward, a county magistrate, the pedigree is 
as follows : 

1 Edward 1 had ch, 2 Frederick 2 , 3 Sarah 8 , 
w. of William Hanbury Jones, a famous con- 
veyancer of London, 4 Ann 8 , d. unmarried, 
and 5 Edward. 8 




Genealogies. 399 

2 Frederick 2 m. Susanna Humfrey of the Holt House, Woking- 
ham, Berks Co., and had son 6 Sir Frederick 3 , Attorney-General 
and some time Prime Minister in Auckland, New Zealand, 7 George 
W. 3 b. in Bampton 1817 and seven daughters, four of whom married 
clergymen of the church of England, one m. in London and one in 
Brbach on the Rhine and one d. unmarried. 

7 George W. 3 m. Mch. 4, 1841, Catherine, d. of James and Mary 
(McLean) Alcock of Staffordshire, and had ch. 8 Frederick 4 , who 
d. in Auckland 1872, 9 Susan 4 , w. of Rev. Dr. McDonald, 10 
Edith", w. 1st of Charles S. Sharp, and after his death m. Nov. 6, 
1886, Thomas F. Bisgood of Sag Harbor, 11 Arthur 4 , now of 
Arizona, 12 Edward Gascoigne 4 and 13 Alice M. 4 

Mr. George W. Whitaker came to America in 1850 and to South- 
ampton in 1860 and purchased the Long Springs place of the heirs 
of Samuel Jagger, where he now resides. 

12 Edward G. 4 m. Sarah Inness and is now Deputy Attorney- 
General of the State of New York, and resides in Albany, and had 
son 14 Inness 6 b. May 22, 1886. 

White Families. 
1. Descendants of John White. 

Two families of this name came to Southampton, the first, that 
of John White, about 1644. He was a resident of Lynn in 1630, 
freeman there in 1633, and made freeman in Southampton in 1647. 
The other family descended from the seventh pastor of the church, 
Rev. Sylvanus White, who was the son of Rev. Ebenezer White, of 
Bridgehampton. Both of these families, however, are said to have 
a common ancestor, Thomas White of Weymouth, Mass. He 
was Representative in Gen. Court in 1636 and 37. He died Aug. 
1679, leaving, according to Farmer, 1st Joseph of Mendon ; 2 
Samuel of Weymouth, b. 1642, admitted freeman 1666, Represen- 
tative 1679, and died without issue, 3d Thomas of Braintree, 4th 
Hannah, who m. John Baxter and 5th Ebenezer b. 1648, and died 
Aug. 24, 1703, and father of Rev. Sylvanus of Southampton. 
John, the first of this name in Southampton, is thought to be 
another son of Thomas of Weymouth, not being mentioned in his 
will, because he died in 1662 before his father. 

This is possible as Thomas of Weymouth was born in 1599. 



400 History of Southampton. 

There are 74 English families of this name mentioned by Burke 
as using coat armor. 

For the descendants of other children of Thomas of Weymouth 
see Thayer's Family Memorials. 

1 John 1 d. 1662, had w. Ann (who in 1653 m. Zerubbabel 
Phillips of Southampton) had ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Sarah 2 , 4 Hannah 2 , w. 
of Oapt. Thomas Topping, 5 James 2 , 6 Martha 2 , who m. June 12, 
1673, Capt. John Howell, 7 Abigail 2 , who m. Oct. 19, 1682, Oapt. 
Abraham Howell, 8 Esther 2 m. July 11, 1678, Samuel Clark and 9 
one other d. not named in his will. 

2 John 2 prob. d. about 1670, had w. Hannah and ch. 10 John 3 
and 11 Elizabeth. 3 

10 John 3 in 1689 appears to be living in Huntington, L. I., and 
later was a resident of Elizabeth, N. J. 

5 James 2 m. Nov. 24, 1675, Euth Stratton of E. H. ; he d. Aug. 
21, 1694, and had ch. 12 Ephraim 3 b. Dec. 29, 1677, 13 Sarah 3 , 14 
James 3 b. May 15, 1681, 15 Stephen 3 b. Oct. 13, 1684 and 16 
Charles. 3 

12 Capt. Ephraim 3 d. Jan. 2, 1752, m. Sarah, d. of William Her- 
rick, who d. Oct. 12, 1756, ae. 74, and had ch. 17 John 4 , 18 Wil- 
liam 4 , 19 Eber 4 , 20 Prudence 4 , w. of Gibbs, 21 Desire 4 , w. of 

John Howell, 22 Sibyl 4 , w. of r Parshall and 23 Mary 4 , w. of 

John Foster. 

17 John 4 had w. Jerusha and son 24 John. 6 

24 John 5 had ch. 25 Ephraim 6 , 26 George 8 , 27 Mary 6 , w. of 
Zebulon Cooper, 28 Jerusha 6 , w. of John Bishop and 29 John 6 b. 
1781. 

25 Ephraim 6 m. Dec. 23, 1787, Mary Reeves and hadch.30 John 
and 31 Nathan' b. 1790. 

30 John' had ch. 32 John F. 8 and 33 William. 8 

32 John F. 8 had son 34 Hervey L. 9 , who has w. Sarah J. 

33 Capt. William 8 b. 1826, m. Phebe, d. of John Proud and has 
ch. 35 William H. 9 b. 1855, 36 Edith 9 b. 1861 and 37 Amy 9 b. 
1863. 

31 Nathan' m. Mary, d. of John Bishop and had ch. 38 Susan 8 , 
w. of Joseph King, 39 Mary 8 b. 1824, w. of Albert Halsey, 40 
Albert 8 b. 1827, 41 Jetur 8 b. 1829, 42 Eleanor M. 8 b. 1829 and 43 
Harriet 8 b. 1835. 



Genealogies. 401 

40 Albert 5 of Pennsylvania m. Catherine J. Morgan and had ch. 
44 Robert M. 9 b. 1855, 45 Albert A. 9 b. 1860, 46 Anna M. 9 b. 1862 
and 47 Nathan R. 9 b. 1863. 

41 Jetur 8 m. Mary Sophronia, d. of Jeremiah Squires and has ch. 
48 Lucy E. 9 b. 1861, w. of Jesse T. Fowler and 49 Carrie B. 9 b- 
1864. 

26 George 6 m. Ruth b. 1773, d. of Jonah Howell and had ch. 50 
Mehetabel' b. 1806, 51 Stephen 7 and 52 George' b. 1820. 

51 Stephen 1 had ch. 53 William 8 and 54 Charles. 8 

52 Capt. George G.' m. Elizabeth, d. of Daniel and Mary Ford- 
ham, and had ch. 55 Elizabeth 8 b. 1852, w. of James A. Hildreth, 
56 F;-ank T. 8 b. 1856, 57 Gilbert N. 8 b. 1860 and 58 Annie H. 8 b. 
1862. 

29 Deacon John 6 d. Oct. 5, 1854, m. 1st Bertha Reeves and had 
ch. 59 Harriet', w. of Capt. Joseph Harris, 60 Charles' b. 1824, and 
61 Jane', w. of Lafayette Douglas of Sag Harbor. Bertha d. and 
he m. 2d w. Mehetabel, d. of Deacon Moses Culver b. 1787 and d. 
Aug. 6, 1845, and had ch. 62 Ann', w. of William Henry Post now 
of Stockton, Oal., and 63 Martha', w. of Capt. James M. Huntting, 
late of Bridgehampton. Deacon John m. 3d w. wid. Ann Four- 
nier, but had no other ch. 

60 Charles' m. 1st w. who d. and left no ch. He m. 2d Sarah 
Jane, d. of Charles Parsons and had ch. 64 Elwyn P. 8 b. Sept. 13, 
1851, 65 John H. 8 b. Oct. 31, 1854, 66 Laura J. 8 b. Nov. 15, 1855, 
m. Jan. 6, 1880, Selden H. Halsey, 67 William W. 8 b. Mch. 15, 
1858, and d. young, 68 William W. 8 again b. Jan. 29, 1860, 69 
Harriet N. 8 b. Feb. 21, 1867, and 70 Charles Parsons 8 b. Mch. 1, 
1870. 

60 Charles' m. 3d w. wid. Eliza Baldwin in the summer of 1886. 

65 John H. 8 m. May, 1880, Alicia Penny. 

68 William W. 8 m. Feb. 14, 1885, Ida Dayton. 

18 William 4 had ch. 71 William 6 and 72 Elias. 5 

71 William 5 had ch. 73 Oliver 6 , 74 David 6 b. 1771, 75 Jeremiah 6 , 
76 Sylvanus 6 b. 1781 and 77 Ruth 6 b. 1785. 

73 Oliver 6 m. Bethia Jessup and had son 78 Thomas Nicholas' b. 
1710, who m. Nancy R., d. of James White. 

74 David 6 had ch. 79 Eliza' b. 1807, 80 Emily' b. 1815 and 81 
Hannah', w. of Anthony Jolly. 

51 



402 Histoet of Southampton. 

75 Jeremiah 6 of Greene Co., N. Y., had ch. 82 Amanda', 83 
Henry', a Professor in the Union Theolog. Seminary in New York, 
84 Emma', 85 Eunice', 86 Matilda', 87 James', 88 Eev. Samuel' and 
89 William.' 

83 Prof. Henry' had ch. 90 Eev. Theodore P. 8 , 91 Henry 8 of New- 
York, and 92 Maria. 8 

76 Sylvanus 6 had ch. 93 Maria', 94 Eli 7 b. 1812 and 95 Harriet.' 
94 Capt. Eli' had w. Phebe and ch. 96 Sarah A. 8 b. 1845, 97 

Henry E. 8 b. 1850 and 98 Fanny L. 8 b. 1852. 

72 Elias 5 had ch. 99 Hannah 6 b. 1785, w. of Ebenezer Howell, 
100 Sarah 6 , w. of Capt. Stephen Sayre, and 101 Edward 6 b, 1789. 

101 Capt. Edward 6 of Sebonac, m. 1st Emma, d. of David Eose, 
2d her sister wid. Mary Drake, mother of Capt. David E. Drake by 
her first husband, and had ch. 102 William', d. s. p., 103 Jane' b. 
1823, 104 Emma' b. 1826, 105 Elias Howell' b. 1831 and 106 Hubert' 
b. 1833. 

105 Capt. Elias H.' m. Elizabeth, d. of James G. Howell. 

106 Capt. Hubert' m. Sarah E., d. of Capt. George Post and has 
son 107 George Post. 8 

14 James 3 had ch. 108 Ebenezer 4 b. 1711 and 109 Charles 4 b. 
1716, d. 1791, who had w. Sarah, but if ch. I know not. 

108 Ebenezer 4 d. Mch. 24, 1783, and had w. Mehetabel and son 
110 James 5 b. 1746. 

110 Major James 5 d. Feb. 28, 1807, and had ch. Ill Silas 6 b. 1776 
and 112 James 6 b. 1777. 

111 Silas 6 d. May 23, 1856, had w. Abigail and d. 113 Mary', w. 
of David Eogers Eose. 

112 James 6 d. Oct. 1. 1858, m. Phebe, d. of Peter Howell and 
had ch. 114 Peter Howell' b. 1805, 115 James' of New York, 116 
Mary', 117 Darius P.' b. 1815, 118 Nancy E.' b. 1818, w. of T. 
Nicholas White and 119 a d., wbo m. Melven Parsons of New Bal- 
timore, New York. 



2. Descendants of Ehenezer White. 

1 Ebenezer 1 b. 1648 (as before mentioned, the fifth son of Thomas 
White of Weymouth) d. Aug. 24, 1703, m. Hannah, d. of Nicholas 
Phillips and had ch. 2 Ebenezer 8 b. 1672, 3 Thomas 2 b. Aug. 19, 



Genealogies. 403 

1673, 4 Samuel 5 , 5 Joseph 5 , 6 Hannah 2 b. May 12, 1681, 7 Abigail 5 
b. Mch. 3, 1863, 8 Benjamin 5 b. Feb. 21, 1685, 9 Experience 5 b. 
July 1, 1686, and 10 Elizabeth 5 b. Nov. 9, 1688. 

2 Eev. Ebenezer 5 of Bridgehampton, grad. Harvard Coll. 1692, 
d. Feb. 4, 1756, had w. Hannah and ch. 11 Elnathan 3 b. 1695, 12 

Hannah 3 , w. of Eossiter, 13 James 3 , 14 Mary 3 , 15 Sylvanus 3 b. 

1704, 16 Phebe 3 and 17 Silas 3 b. 1710, d. 1742, and had w. Sarah, d. 
of Arthur Howell. 

11 Deacon Elnathan 3 d. June 5, 1773, and had s. 18 Ebenezer 4 b. 
1723. 

18 Ebenezer 4 d. Feb. 11, 1802, had ch. 18 Silas 5 b. 1748, 19 
Samuel 6 , 20 Henry 6 , M. D., d. s. p. in Goshen, 1ST. Y., 21 Elnathan 6 , 
d. s. p., 22 John 6 , 23 Rufus 6 and 24 Sarah 5 , w. of Elihu Howell. 

18 Silas 6 d. Aug. 2, 1815, had w. Mary and ch. 25 Silas 6 , 26 Ebe- 
nezer 6 b. 1782, 27 Mary 6 and 28 Rachel 6 , w. of Job H. Halsey. 

25 Deacon Silas 6 had ch. 28 Josiah' b. 1802, 29 Harriet', w. of 
Corwith, and 30 Clarissa 7 , w. of David Hedges. 

26 Ebenezer 6 d. 1855, had w. Mary and ch. 31 Eliza', 32 Alonzo' 

b. 1810, 33 Jerusha 7 , w. of Rose, 34 Silas 7 , 35 Joan 7 and 36 

Edward. 7 

32 Alonzo 7 had w. Esther b. 1820 and ch. 37 Phebe J. 8 b. 1841, 
38 Mary E. 8 b. 1843, 39 Jerusha C. 8 b. 1846 and 40 Esther F. 8 b. 
1853. 

19 Samuel 5 had ch. 41 Samuel 6 and 42 Milton. 6 

22 John 6 had ch. 43 Daniel Howell 6 , 44 Elnathan 6 b. 1798, 45 
Henry 6 , 46 Susan 6 , w. of Gordon Corwith, and 47 Charity 6 , w. of 
Sears. 

45 Henry 6 had w. Eliza and ch. 48 Abigail 7 , w. of Capt. George 
Hand of East Hampton, 49 George 1 b. 1829, 50 Benjamin 7 , 51 
Alfred 7 , 52 Sarah A. 7 b. 1836 and 53 John E. 7 b. 1838. 

23 Rufus 6 had ch. 54 David 6 , 55 Samuel 6 , 56 Henry 6 and 57 
George." 

15 Rev. Sylvanus 3 , grad. of Harvard Coll. 1722, d. Oct. 22, 1782, 
m. Phebe, d. of Hezekiah Howell, and had ch. 58 Sylvanus 4 , 59 
Edward 4 b. 1731, 60 Hezekiah 4 , 61 Daniel 4 , 62 Silas 4 , 63 Phebe 4 , w. of 
James Tilley of Hartford, Ct., d. Oct. 26, 1782, 64 Ebenezer 4 died 
in infancy, 65 Ebenezer 4 b. 1746 and 66 Henry 4 b. 1750. 

Mention has been made before of Rev. Sylvanus in the history of 
the church in Southampton. 



404: Histoby of Southampton. 

58 Sylvanus 4 m. Eunice Herrick of Southampton and removed to 
Orange Co., N. Y., and had ch. 67 Phebe 6 , 68 Sylvanus 6 , 69 Eunice 5 
and 70 Nathan H. 5 

70 Nathan H. 6 had s. 71 Albert S. 6 b. Oct. 24, 1803, grad. of 
Union Coll. 1822, IT. S. Senator from Indiana, etc., and d. in 
Stockwell, Ind., 1864. 

59 Edward 4 d. June, 1767, m. Hannah, d. of Francis Pelletreau 
of Southampton, removed to Orange county, N. Y., and had ch. 72 
Hannah 5 , 73 Edward 6 , 74 Mary" and 75 Phebe. 6 

60 Hezekiah 4 m. Abigail Sayre of Southampton, removed to 
Orange county and there died, leaving six children. 

61 Daniel 4 , M. D., settled in Westchester, of Westchester Co., N. 
Y., m. Euphemia Bartow of New Eochelle, d. 1781, and had ch. 76 
JPhebe 6 , 77 Bathsheba 6 , w. of Don Joseph Barnubeau, Spanish Con- 
sul General, 78 Matilda 6 , 79 Daniel 6 , 80 Euphemia 6 and 81 The- 
ophilus. 

62 Silas 4 removed to Orange Co., N. Y., m. Sarah Newson and 
had ch. 82 James T. 6 , 83 Silas 6 , 84 Levi 6 , 85 Harriet 6 and 86 
Eobert. 5 

84 Levi 6 m. Ellen Cox and had ch. 87 Adelia 6 , 88 Elvira 6 , 89 
Charles 6 , 90 George 6 , 91 Robert 6 , 92 Harriet 6 and 93 Elenora 6 , all of 
whom are married and have children. 

65 Ebenezer 4 , M. D., of Yorktown, Westchester Co., New York, 
m. Helena, d. of Theophilus Bartow of New Eochelle, d. in 1827, 
and his wife d. a few years after him. He had ch. 94 Catherine 6 , 
w. of Dr. Samuel Strang of Peekskill, 95 Bartow 6 b. 1776, 96 Ebe- 
nezer 6 b. 1780, 97 Henry 5 , M. D., b. 1781, d. s. p. 1865, 98 Lewis' 
b. 1782, 99 James 6 and 100 Theodosius. 6 

Dr. Ebenezer White's patriotism during the revolutionary war 
was rewarded by his election to the State Senate, as well as by the 
universal respect of his fellow-citizens. 

95 Bartow 5 , M. D., of Pishkill, N. Y., d. Dec. 10, 1862, m. Ann 
Schenck and had twelve ch., the names of those who survived him 
being 101 Helena 6 , 102 Catherine 6 , 103 Matilda 6 , 104 Evalina 6 , 105 
Louis B. 6 , 106 Anna 6 , 107 Harriet 6 , 108 Mary 6 , 109 Octavia 6 and 110 
Novenia. 6 

96 Ebenezer 5 , M. D., of Somers, N. Y, d. Mch. 20, 1865, in. 
Amy, d. of Samuel Green of Somers, and had ch. Ill Bartow F. 6 , 
112 Stephen G. 6 , d. s. p., 113 Helen A. 6 , w. of James Brett of 



Genealogies. 405 

Fishkill, 114 Lewis H. 6 , 115 Oliver 6 , 116 Phebe 6 , w. of Eobert Cal- 
houn, 117 John P. 6 , 118 Euphemia 6 and 119 Samuel. 6 

Ill Bartow P. 6 , M. D., of Greenwich, Ct., m. Ann Augusta, d. 
of Dr. Blisha Belcher, and had ch. 120 Stephen 7 , 121 Alethea 7 and 
122 Elisha. 7 

114 Lewis H. 6 , M. D., of Pishkill, m. Helena, d. of John 0. Van 
Wyck, and had ch. 123 Howell 7 and 124 Catherine. 7 

'115 Oliver 6 , M. D., d. a few years ago in New York, where he 
had been a most distinguished physician, Vice-President of the 
Academy of Medicine. Late in life he married, but left no chil- 
dren. He said to the writer in Southampton, that as he came in 
the cars from New York he wondered why his ancestors did not 
sooner leave such a sterile wilderness. But as we rode through the 
Hamptons, on a visit to Montauk Point, he remarked, as he saw the 
luxuriant Gelds all around him, that his only wonder then was that 
they ever left at all. 

117 John P. 6 , a merchant of New York, had w. Margaret, d. of 
David Bryson, and d. s. p. 

98 Lewis 6 d. 1836, m. Amelia Kaymond and had ch. 125 Fred- 
eric 6 , 126 Sarah 6 , 127 Mary 6 , 128 Ebenezer 6 , 129 Catherine 6 , 130 
Elizabeth 6 , 131 Constant 6 , 132 Stephen G. 6 , 133 Aurelia 6 , 134= Lewis 
A.* and 135 John B. 6 

9.9 James 6 m. Sarah Bedell and had ch. 136 "William B. 6 , 137 
Elizabeth 6 , 138 Mary 6 and 139 Alvira. 6 

100 Theodosius 6 m. Philena Wright and had ch. 140 Henry 6 , 141 
Emmeline 6 , 142 Josephus 6 and 143 Louisa. 6 

66 Henry 4 , M. D., of Southampton, d. Dec. 20, 1840, m. 1st 
Hannah Eells and 2d Ann Stephens and had ch. 144 Hannah E.% 
145 Sylvanus 6 and 146 Phebe. 5 

145 Sylvanus 6 m. Jane, d. of Samuel Jagger, and had ch. 147 
Henry K. 6 b. 1829 and 148 Theodore S. 6 b. 1839, both of whom 
married and had ch. 

Wick Family. 

John Wick, the first of this name in Southampton, a serge- 
maker, is first mentioned in 1693. He lived first in Southampton, 
then moved to Bridgehampton, where he died. 

1 John' b. 1661, d. Jan. 16, 1719, had w. Temperance and ch. 2 



406 Histoet of Southampton. 

Job 2 , 3 John 5 , 4 Henry 2 , 5 Daniel 2 , 6 James 2 , 7 Temperance 2 , 8 Ann 2 , 
9 Phebe 2 and 10 Edith. 2 

2 Job 2 d. 1761, had w. Anne and ch. 11 William 3 , 12 Lemuel 3 , 
13 Zebulon 3 b. Aug. 26, 1748, and 14 Henry 3 b. Oct. 23, 1707. 

10 William 3 had s. 15 Sylvanus." 

13 Zebulon 3 d. 1809, m. 1st, Aug. 5, 1789, Phebe Jagger, and per- 
haps had 2d w. Mary, and ch. 16 Lucretia 4 b. 1775, w. of Edward 
Reeves, 17 Lemuel 4 b. 1778, 18 Susanna 4 b. 1780, 19 Elizabeth 4 b. 
1783 and 20 William 4 b. 1793. 

20 William 4 m. Milicent Pierson and had ch. 21 Philetus 5 , 22 
Milicent", 23 Lemuel 5 and 24 William 6 

4 Henry 2 d. Dec. 21, 1780, m. Mary Cooper b. Apr. 4, 1718, and 
d. July 7, 1787, and had ch. 25 Henry 3 b. Mch. 9, 1737, d. Sept. 10, 
1781, 26 Mary 3 b. Aug. 13, 1739, d. Sept. 18, 1796, 27 James 3 b. 
Dec. 19, 1741, 28 Phebe 3 b. Nov. 9, 1746, and 29 Tempe 3 b. Oct. 30, 
1758, d. Apr. 22, 1822, w. of Oapt. William Tuttle. 

3 John 2 of Bridge Hampton had ch. 30 John 3 , 31 Elizabeth 3 , 32 
Temperance 3 , 33 Edward 3 , 34 Anne 3 and 35 Elisha. 1 

33 Edward 3 had ch. 36 Mary 4 and 37 Elizabeth 4 bap. in E. H. 
June, 1776. 

1 John 1 , yeoman, was sheriff of Suffolk county from Oct. 1699 to 
Oct. 1700 and from Dec. 20, 1701, to Oct. 1702, and a magistrate 
from 1702 till his death. Provision is made in his will that his son 
John may "be brought up to learning in a college," and he was a 
graduate of Yale College in 1722. 

The epitaph of 1 John 1 reads as follows : 

Here | was layed | the body of Mr. | John Wick Esq. | who dyed 
Janvary ( the 16th Anno 1719 | in the 59th year | of his age. 

The stone is in the center of a six or eight acre lot in Bridge- 
hampton. The tradition is that he gave direction to have his 
body laid here, but his friends disregarded it and attempted to dig 
a grave in the graveyard, but the ants (in January!) came out in 
such swarms and filled the grave as they dug, that they were com- 
pelled to abandon their purpose. Another tradition says that the 
heirs, not liking the disposition of the property made in his will, 
read a summons over his grave, calling him to appear in court and 
show cause why the will should not be broken. 

Burke mentions one English family of the name using coat 
armor. 



Genealogies. 407 



Willmak Family. 
Isaac Willman had " accommodations layed out" to him in 1645. 
When the site of the village was changed in 1648 from Old Town 
to the present one along Main street, he had a house-lot granted to 
him next south of Ellis Cook, provided he stayed three years. 

1 Isaac 1 had w. Mary and ch. 2 Isaac 2 b. Aug. 31, 1657, 3 Abra- 
ham 2 , 4 Matthew 2 , 5 John 2 , b. May 18, 1670, 6 Theophilus 2 and 7 
Benjamin. 5 

2 Isaac 2 m. Oct. 7, 1686, Mary Wines of Sonthold, and had ch. 8 
Mary 3 b. Dec. 9, 1689, and 9 Abraham. 3 

The family did not remain in the town probably much later than 
the year 1700, and there are none now of this name residing in 
Southampton. 

Woodruff Family. 

John Woodruff is first mentioned on the list of 1657. His will 
mentions John, his eldest son, living in Elizabeth, 2f. J., and John, 
his youngest son, living in Southampton. The latter was heir to 
John Gosmer, and probably married his daughter, and lived on the 
present homestead of Mr. Josiah Foster. I presume some of this 
name in New Jersey are descended from the John of Elizabeth. 
There are six English families of this name mentioned in Burke's 
General Armory as using coat armor. 

1 John 1 d. in May 1670, had w. Anne and ch. 2 John 2 , 3 John 2 , 

4 Elizabeth 2 , w. of Dayton of East Hampton, and 5 Anne 2 , w. 

of Bobert Woolley. 

2 John 2 of Elizabeth, 2J. J., m. Mercy or Mary Carle of East 
Hamptou, and had son 6 Timothy 3 , who on May 12, 1709, m. Mary 
Baker of East Hampton. 

3 John 2 of Southampton, d. 1703, m. Sarah, probably the daugh- 
ter of Mr John Gosmer, and had ch. 7 Samuel 3 , 8 Joseph 3 , who 
died 1750, 9 Benjamin 3 , 10 Nathaniel 3 , 11 Isaac 3 , 12 Jonathan 3 , 13 

Sarah 3 b. Jan. 4, 1660, w. of Davis, 14 Hannah 3 , ] 5 Abigail 3 , 

aud 16 Elizabeth 3 . (Order of mention in will.) 

9 Benjamin 3 of Bridgehampton, d. 1750, m. Sept. 12, 1704, 
Margaret Davis of E. H., and had ch. 17 Daniel 4 , 18 John 4 , 19 Da- 
vid 4 and 20 Timothy. 4 

17 Daniel 4 had ch. 21 Benjamin 5 ,, 22 John 5 , 23 Elias 5 and 24 Mary. 5 



408 History of Southampton. 

21 Benjamin 5 had ch. 25 Job 8 b. 1776, d. 1857, 26 Jesse 6 b. 1765, 
d. 1857 and 27 Elisha. 6 

27 Elisha 6 had son 28 Jesse.' 

19 David 4 had ch. 29 David 5 and 30 Joshua. 5 

29 David 6 had ch. 31 James 6 , 32 Sylvester 6 , who removed, and 33 
Halsey 6 , who removed. 

20 Timothy 4 had ch. 34 Silas 5 , 35 Lemuel 5 and 36 Daniel. 5 

34 Silas 5 had ch. 37 Elias of Plattsburg, N. Y., 38 Silas 6 , 39 Abi- 
gail 6 , 40 Joseph 6 of Orange Co., N. Y. 

38 Silas 6 had ch. 41 Elias 7 b. 1808, and 42 Mary 7 , w. of Abraham 
Halsey of "Watermill. 

41 Elias 7 had w. Emmeline and ch. 43 Abbie P. 8 b. 1838, 44 
Mary J. 8 b. 1840, w. of Henry Graham of Sag Harbor, 45 Eliza A. 8 
b. 1844, 46 Helen 8 b. 1850, w. of Isaac D. Stevens of Orange Co., 
N. Y., 47 Alice A. 8 , w. of Frederick S. Van Nort of Newburgh, 
N. Y., and 4S Silas 8 b. 1854. 

36 Daniel 5 had ch. 49 Daniel 6 and 50 Abigail. 6 

49 Daniel 6 had ch. 51 Herman 7 , 52 Samuel 7 and 53 Daniel.' 

52 Samuel 7 had son 54 Samuel. 8 

10 Nathaniel 3 , weaver of Southampton, d. 1726, m. Oct. 24, 1705, 
Abigail Leek of E. H. and had ch. 55 Nathaniel 4 , 56 Isaac 4 , 57 Abi- 
gail 4 , 58 Sarah 4 , 59 Ebenezer 4 , 60 Jonathan 4 , 61 Amy 4 , 62 Mary 4 and 
63 Stephen. 4 

A Samuel in 1738 speaks of " my uncles Benjamin and Nathaniel, 
and my brother Alexander Eordham." He may have been son of 
7 Samuel. 3 

Woolley Family. 
Eobert Woolley, the first of this name in Southampton, is first 
mentioned on the list of 1657, probably having come here a few 
years earlier. Savage says he was of Fairfield, Mass., 1649 to 1653 
and then removed. 

1 Robert 1 m. Ann, d. of John Woodruff and had ch. 2 John 2 , 3 
Joseph 2 , 4 Ann 2 , 5 Elizabeth 2 , 6 Hannah 2 , 7 Phebe 2 , 8 Mary 2 and 
probably 9 Robert. 2 

2 John 2 had ch. 10 William 3, 11 Charles 3 , 12 Benjamin 3 and 13 
John. 3 

10 William 3 had son 14 Silas 4 b. 1746. 



Genealogies. 40& 

14 Silas 4 d. 1806, had oh. 15 Deacon Elias 6 b. 1775, d. 1843, 16 
John 6 b. 1777, d. 1804, and 17 William 5 b. 1779. 

17 William 5 had w. Mary and ch. 18 John 6 , 19 William 6 , 20 
Austin 6 b. 1815, 21 Harriet 6 , w. of Noah D. Ellsworth, 22 Phebe 6 , 
b. 1823, 23 Mary Ann 6 and 24 Jane 6 b. 1826. 

18 John 6 had w. Emily and ch. 25 Mary L. T b. 1843 and 26 Wil- 
liam H. 7 b. 1847. 

12 Benjamin 3 had son 27 Benjamin. 4 

27 Benjamin 4 m. Martha d. of Nathan Herrick and had ch. 28 
Charles 5 of Kingston, N. Y., and 29 Nathan 5 of Watermill. 

29 Nathan 5 had son 30 Charles N. 6 , M. D., who m. Margaret d. 
of Jonathan Pithian, Esq., and settled in Newburgh, N. Y. 

13 John 3 of Southold d. 1752, had w. Abigail and ch. 31 John 4 
of Southampton and 32 Tancred 4 of Southold. 

A family in Marlboro, N. Y., is descended from Abraham S., son 
of a Charles, who is probably 11 Charles 3 above. 

Burke's Gen. Armory mentions one English family of this name 
as having coat armor. 

Wbight Family. 

1 Nymphas Wright of Middle Haddam, Conn., had w. Hannah 
and ch. 2 Nymphas 2 and 3 Levi Daniels. 2 

2 Nymphas 2 , a farmer of Bridgehampton, m. 1st Malsey Pierson 
and. 2d Sophia Halsey and had ch. 4 Hannah E. 3 , w. of Samuel 0. 
Hedges and 5 Morgan P. 3 

3 Levi D. 2 for many years a successful physician in Bridgehamp- 
ton, m. Mary A. Hurd of Middle Haddam and had ch. 6 Mary A. 3 , 
wife of Hon. James M. Halsey, 7 Nathan H. 3 , 8 Levi" died in 
infancy, 9 Levi 3 and 10 Prank W. 3 

7 Nathan H. 3 , M. D., m. Catherine d. of Bichard Cook and has 
ch. 11 Alice C. 4 and 12 Mary H. 4 

10 Prank W. 3 m. Mary Spencer of Haddam, Conn., and has ch. 
13 Levi D. 4 and 14 Frank W. 4 
52 



SUPPLEMENT. 



The Deming Family. 

John and Thomas Deming or Diamont first appear in the 
Weathersfield records in 1635-45. Savage says, in his Genealogical 
Dictionary of New England (vol. 2, p. 35), that Thomas was per- 
haps the brother of John. This agrees with a tradition of the family. 

Thomas Deming's yard in Weathersfield in 1648 is mentioned as 
the place where one of the first ships of the colony (the Tryall) was 
built. [See Memorial Hist, of Hartford Co., Conn., p. 481. J 
Thomas married in 1645, in Weathersfield, Mary Sheaffe. His son 
James was born in 1646. Thomas removed with his family to Far- 
mington, thence to Southampton, thence to Basth.ampton, where 
he continued to reside. His descendants (found throughout the. 
United States and elsewhere) constitute what is known as the 
Thomas Deming branch of the Deming family. A few families 
showing the Thomas Deming line are given below : 

1 Thomas 1 wills in 1682 to w. Mary (who died Aug. 21, 1706) 

and ch. 2 James 2 b. 1646, 3 Thomas 5 , 4 Sarah 2 , w. of Headly 

of N. J., 4£ Abigail 2 , 5 Hannah 2 , w. of Bird or Budd, 6 

Elizabeth 2 , w. of Miller, 7 Buth 2 , w. of Dayton, 8 John 2 , 

who died before 1682. 

2 James 2 d. Dec. 13, 1721, m. 1st Hannah, d. of Rev. Thomas 
James, about 1677, and she died Sept. 20, 1706. He m. 2d w. 
Elizabeth Davis, Sept. 18, 1707, and had ch. 9 Mary 3 , w. of 
Matthias Hopping, 10 Thomas 3 , 11 John 3 , 12 Hannah 3 m. Joseph 
Moore or More of Bridgehampton, Jan. 17, 1705-6, 13 Abigail 3 , w. 
of Lupton, and 14 Nathaniel. 3 

10 Thomas 3 m. Hannah Finney of Bristol, R. 1., January 14, 
1706-7, and had ch. 15 Jane 4 bap. Oct. 20, 1707, 16 Rebecca 4 bap. 
Mch. 1708-9, 17 Jeremiah 4 bap. Dec. 10, 1710, and 18 Jonathan 4 
bap. May 11, 1712. 

11 John 3 d. 1765, m. 1st, Deborah Hedges, Dec. 17, 1718. She 
d. Feb. 18, 1722, b. 1696. He m. 2d, Elizabeth Davis, Dec. 25, 



412 Histokt of Southampton. 

1722. He m. 3d, Rachel Dayton, Apr. 23, 1730, and had ch. 19 

Deborah 4 bap. 1724, w. of Miller, 20 Elizabeth 4 bap. 1726, 21 

John 4 bap. 1727, 22 Elizabeth 4 again (d. of his 3d w.) bap. 1731, 

w. of Hand, 23 Kachel 4 bap. 1734, 24 Abraham 4 and 25 Isaac 4 , 

twins, bap. 1735, and 26 Mary 4 bap. 1742.* 

21 John 4 removed to Southbury, Conn., d. Feb. 7, 1809, m. 
Anna (dan. of Samuel) Knowles, Sept. 14, 1758 (she d. Aug. 28, 
1809, aged 77), and had ch. 27 Anna 5 b. Aug. 12, 1759, d. 1843, 
was 2d w. of Elijah Booth, 28 Davis 5 , 29 Isaac 5 bap. Mch. 18, 1764, 
30 Betty 5 bap. Feb. 23, 1766, d. Oct. 12, 1826, 31 Lucretia 5 bap. Oct. 
25, 1767, d. June 19, 1858, 32 John 5 , 33 Mercy 5 b. 1775, d. Dec. 30, 
1858, 34 Moses. 5 

28 Davis 5 b. 1762, removed to Albany Co., thence to Onondaga 
Co., N. Y., d. 1839, m. Elizabeth Curtis of Stratford, Conn., Dec. 
19, 1798, and had ch. 35 Delia Ann 6 b. Sept. 26, 1790, m. 1st, 
Luke Hitch, 1814, 2d, Asa Coleman, 1834, 36 Enfus Romeo 6 , 37 
Electa 6 b. Nov. 28, 1793, d. Sept. 14, 1848, was w. of James Y. 
Hodges, 38 Cythera 6 b. Apr. 14, 1797, d. Sept. 4, 1848, 39 Sophia 6 
b. Nov. 20, 1798, d. Oct. 13, 1850, 39 Lucy 6 b. Nov. 5, 1800, was 
w. of Daniel Patten, 40 Stephen Plate 6 b. Apr. 15, 1803, m. Sarah 
Carpenter, Nov. 28, 1841, 41 Alexander Hamilton 6 b. Feb. 6, 1805, 
42 Eliza 6 b. Oct. 20, 1806, was 2d w. of James Hodges, 43 Rutha 6 
b. Oct. 31, 1808, d. Feb. 28, 1812, 44 Charlotte 6 b. Oct. 29, 1810, 
was w. of George Poulton. 

36 (Rev.) Rufus Romeo 6 b. Feb. 4, 1792, d. 1868, m. Feb. 21, 
1825, Julia Ann Porter (dau. of Dr. Norton Porter), and had eh. 
45 Henry Franklin 7 b. Dec. 25, 1825, m. Mary J. Bennett, 46 
Julius Rufus 7 b. May 17, 1827, m. Helen Laird, 47 Philander 7 b. 
Feb. 6, 1829, 48 Helen Elizabeth 7 b. Nov. 5, 1831, 49 Ann Eliza 7 b. 
Mch. 16, 1834, w. of Leonard G-oodspeed, 50 Edward Payson 7 b. 
Jan. 17, 1836, m. Eliza Ann Fitch, 51 Delia Maria 7 b. Feb. 11, 
1838, w. of Edward S. Turner, 52 Lucius Davis 7 b. Aug. 20, 1840, 
m. Minerva S. Blake, 53 Albert 7 b. Apr. 1845. 

Note. — A few of the descendants of Thomas Diamont remaining on Long Island spell the 
name Dimon, constituting the Dimon family. [See page 336.] 

The above was furnished by Philander Deming of Albany, the well-known contributor to 
the Atlantic Monthly. The record shows how members of the same family may forget their 
common origin, by adopting forms of the name so varied as Dimon and Deming. The name 
is said by Lower to be derived from Dumont and was the family name of a Frenchman who 
emigrated to England. 

* So far the genealogy is identical with that of the Dimon family before given, the surname 
only being changed. 



Genealogies. 413 



Hakd Family. 
After the genealogy of this family had been stereotyped, addi- 
tional information was given by members of the family, as follows: 

171 Aaron 6 m. at Kingsbury, N. Y., in 1795, Thamor, d. of Epe- 
netus and Anna Piatt, and had ch. 205 Samuel Piatt' b. July 10, 
1796, d. May 10, 1800, 206 Bayard Epenetus' b. Dec. 10, 1800, d. 
Oct. 4, 1838, 187 Isaac Piatt 7 (as before) b. Oct. 31, 1803, d. 1849, 
207 Sarah Ann' b. Oct. 9, 1807, d. Oct. 29, 1808, 186 Lemuel Piatt' 
(as before) b. Feb. 3, 1810, and 185 Aaron Hicks' b. Dec. 3, 1811. 

186 Lemuel P.' m. 1st, Apr. 2, 1834, Mary S., d. of Ool. Tis- 
dale Eddy; he m. 2d, Oct. 7, 1841, Euth A., sister of his first w., 
and had ch. 208 Tisdale Aarou 8 b. Jan. 1, 1838, a lawyer in Charles 
City, Iowa, 209 Lemuel Burton 8 b. July 11, 1840, d. Dec. 27, 1860, 
189 Henry Eddy 8 b. Aug. 14, 1842, at Schenectady, 188 Bayard 
Epenetus 8 b. Dec. 19, 1845, at same place, and 210 Mary Elizabeth 8 
b. in Chicago Nov. 25, 1848. 

188 Bayard E. 8 of Chicago, 111., m. Sept. 2, 1868, Anna E. 
Church, and has ch. 211 Edith Bell 9 b. Nov. 6, 1869, 212 Bertha 
E. 9 b. Dec. 3, 1870, and 213 Bayard E. 9 b. Sept. 24, 1874. 

206 Bayard E.' m. Apr. 24, 1824, Eliza B. King, at St. Simon's 
Island, and had ch. 214 Eliza C. s b. Feb. 12, 1826, m. 1848 to Et. 
Eev. C. T. Quintard, Bp. of Tennessee, 215 Sarah Ann 8 b. June 2, 
1828, d. May 7, 1837, 216 Bayard E. s b. Mch. 25, 1830, d. July 16, 
1859, 217 Julia Isabella 8 b. Jan. 14, 1832, w. of Dr. Anderson, 218 
Sophia Piatt 8 b. June 14, 1834, d. May 7, 1835, 219 Henry M. 8 b. 
Dec. 1, 1836, d. May 21, 1837, and 220 Ealph King 8 b. June 30, 
1838, d. Nov. 23, 1841. 

168 Jeremiah 6 m. in East Hampton a Miss Talmage, removed to 
Bath-on-Hudson about 1800 and had ch. 221 Almira' b. about 1802, 
222 Mary', 223 Elizabeth' and a son, 224 George' (?) living in 
Niagara Co., N. Y., in 1883. 

172 Israel Putnam 6 d. in Albany, had ch. 225 Amanda Melvina', 
w. of Peter C. Don of Albany, who had ch. Mary J. James, Sarah C. 
and Peter O, 226 Cornelia' and 227 a son, who in 1883 lived in 
Michigan. 

206 Bayard E.' m. Apr. 14, 1824, Eliza B. King of Darien, Ga., 
and had ch. 228 Eliza Catherine 8 , 229 Sarah A. 8 , 230 Julia I. 8 and 
three other children who died young. 



414 Histoky of Southampton. 

187 Isaac P. 7 m. Margaret Shaw of Albany and had ch. 230 
John 8 , 231 Sarah A. 8 (both of whom d. young), and 232 Ellen. 8 

185 Eev. Aaron Hicks 7 (called on p. 281, Eev. Hicks 7 ), a Presby- 
terian minister, settled successively at Elizabeth, N. J., Easton, Pa., 
and Palisades, N. Y., where he died, leaving a family. 

The record of the descendants of 5 Joseph 2 was furnished by 
Miss Olive R. Hand, of New Lebanon, N. Y. 

5 Joseph 2 of Guilford, Ct., b. 1638, d. Jan. 1724, m. 1664, Jane, 
d. of Benjamin and Jane Wright of Killingworth, Ct., and had 
ch. 233 Sarah 3 b. Mar. 2, 1665-6, d. 1751, 234 Jane 3 , b. Sept. 9, 
1668, d. Dec. 13, 1683, 235 Joseph 3 b. Apr. 2, 1671, 236 Benjamin 3 b. 
Feb. 8, 1673, 237 Stephen 3 b. Feb. 8, 1675-6, 238 Elizabeth 3 b. Mch. 
12, 1677-8, w. of Benjamin Wright, 239 Silence 3 b. Mch. 12, 1679- 
80, w. of Ephraim Wilcox, 240 Anne 3 b. July 10, 1683, w. of Jonathan 
Wright and 241 Jane 3 b. Apr. 25, 1686, w. of Cornelius Dowd. 

233 Sarah 3 m. Oct. 11, 1688, Samuel Mimger of Guilford, and 
after his death, Mch. 5, 1717, she m. Caleb Woodworth. 

235 Joseph 3 m. May 14, 1692, Hester Wilcox of Middletown, Ct., 
and had ch. 242 Janna 4 b. Feb. 17, 1693, and 243 Esther 4 b. Jan. 
10, 1695, w. of Wm. King; Hester d. Mch. 15, 1696, and he m. 2d 
Hannah b. Feb. 8, 1670, d. of Wm. and Grace Seward and had d. 244 
Huldah 4 b. Oct. 6, 1697, w. of Zachary Smith of Huntington, L. I. 

236 Benjamin 3 d. Aug. 10, 1744, m. July 10,1695, Mary, d. of 
John Wilcox of Middletown and had ch. 245 Nathaniel 4 b. Apr. 12, 
1696, 246 John 4 b. July 12, 1698, 247 Mary 4 b. June, 1700, d. Aug. 
1702, 248 Submit 4 b. Aug. 5, 1702, w. of Ebenezer Bartlett, 249 
Ebenezer 4 b. Sept. 5, 1705, 250 Benjamin 4 b. May 7, 1708 and 251 
Mary 4 b. Aug. 15, 1712. 

237 Stephen 3 d. in Guilford Aug. 14, 1755, m. Nov. 6, 1700, Sarah 
Wright and had ch. 252 Joseph 4 b. Nov. 8, 1701, d. Jan. 10, 1702, 
253 Joseph 4 b. Jan. 10, 1703, 254 Mary 4 b. Oct. 30, 1704, w. of 
Josiah Meigs and 255 Sarah 4 b. Sept. 9, 1706. His w. d. Sept. 18, 
1706, and he m. 2d Nov. 16, 1708, Sarah d. of Abraham Pierson of 
Killingworth and had ch. 256"Stephen 4 b. Juue 13, 1710, and 257 
Abigail 4 b. Oct. 20, 1712, w. of Daniel Bradley. 

242 Janna 4 b. Dec. 9, 1767, m. Feb. 14, 1723, Dorothy, d. of 
John Griswold, and had ch. 258 Joseph 5 b. Jan. 24, 1724, 259 
Esther 4 b. Sept. 5, 1725, 260 Janna 5 b. Feb. 4, 1728, 261 Daniel 5 b. 
1732 and 262 Timothy. 6 



Genealogies. 415 

246 John 4 d . in East Guilford Apr. 1739. Had w. Deborah and ch. 
263 Elizabeth 5 b. July 1, 1728, 264 John 5 b. Aug. 25, 1730, d. 1734, 265 
Deborah 5 b. Apr. 2, 1732, w. of John Porter, 266 Submit 6 b. Sept. 7, 
7135, w. of James Munger, and 267 John 6 b. Feb. 12, 1738, d. s. p. 

249 Ebenezer 4 m. May 31, 1725, Susannah, d. of Ebenezer French, 
both of Guilford, and had ch. 268 Temperance 6 b. July 17, 1726, w. 
of Joseph Kelsey, 269 Ichabod 6 b. Aug. 16, 1728, 270 Ebenezer 6 b. 
July 9, 1730, 271 Jemima 5 b. xMay 17, 1732, 272 Aarou 5 b. July 11, 
1734, 273 Ira 5 b. 1736, and 274 Timothy 5 b. June 8, 1739. 

250 Benjamin 4 of East Guilford, d. Dec. 7, 1748, m. Oct. 29, 
1730, Mary Penfield, and had ch. 275 Mary 6 b. Nov. 18, 1731, d. 
Nov. 1793, 276 Huldah 5 b. Aug. 21, 1734, w. of Peter Penfield and 
277 Abigail 5 b. Sept. 28, 1743, d. Dec. 23, 1775. 

253 Joseph 4 m. Aug. 31, 1731, Hannah, d. of Nathaniel Hollabird, 
and had ch. 278 Sarah 5 b. June 9, 1733, d. Oct. 28, 1733, 279 Sarah 5 
b. Sept. 6, 1734, d. Dec. 28, 1736, 280 Samuel 5 b. Feb. 5, 1736, 281 
Sarah 5 b. March 30, 1744, w. of Wm. Throop, 282 Joseph 6 b. Apr. 
15, 1749, and 283 Hannah 5 b. Dec. 28, 1753, w. of Jared Leet. 

256 Stephen 4 of Litchfield, later of Woodbury, Ot., m. Jan. 16, 
1734, Eachel, d. of Thomas Walston, and had ch. 284 Eeuben 5 b. 
Dec. 4, 1734, 285 Rachel 5 b. Sept. 22, 1736, 286 Timothy 5 b. Aug. 8, 
1738, d. May 20, 1740, 287 Stephen 5 b. June 6, 1740, 288 Timothy 5 
b. Aug. 28, 1745, 289 Elias 5 b. Oct. 10, 1747, and 290 Abigail 5 b. 
Oct. 15, 1749, d. 1751. 

258 Joseph 6 of East Guilford d. Oct. 29, 1774, m. July 14, 1756, 
Lucy Meigs, and had ch. 291 Lucy 6 b. Jan. 3, and d. Feb. 18, 1760, 
292 Janna 6 b. Sept. 28, 1761, 293 Edward 6 b. March 1, 1765, and 
294 John 6 b. July 20, 1768, d. Dec. 20, 1775. 

261 Capt. Daniel 5 d. Oct. 16, 1816, m. 1st Oct. 28, 1749, Sibe 
Smith, who d. Sept. 20, 1772. He mar. 2d Lizzie Lynde May 13, 
1774. He had ch. 295 Esther 6 b. Sept. 8, 1760, w. of Willis Mun- 
ger, 296 Daniel 6 b.. Apr. 24, 1762, 297 Sibe 6 b. Sept. 9, 1768, w. of 
Gen. Buell of Marietta, Ohio, 298 Mehetabel 6 b. Aug. 30, 1772, w. 
of Dr. Levi Ward, 299 William 6 b. Feb. 2, 1776, d. Oct. 3, 1781, 
300 Lizzie 6 b. March 7, 1778, d. Oct. 5, 1781, and 301 Anne 6 b. 
1780, d. Oct. 10, 1781. 

269 Ichabod 6 d. in Albany, N. Y., June, 1759, m. April 19, 1748, 
Hannah Garrv, and had ch. 302 Ichabod 6 b. June 16, 1749, and 303 
Anna 6 b. June 22, 1751, d. May 22, 1752. 



416 History of Southampton. 

270 Ebenezer 5 m. July 20, 1757, Mary Evarts, and had ch. 304 

Benjamin 6 b. March 22, 1759, d. 1789, 305 Jemima, w. of 

Wolfe and 306 Aaron. 6 

274 Timothy 6 of Albany m. May 18, 1761, Esther Bishop, and had 
ch. 307 Anna 6 b. Nov. 10, 1762, 308 Esther 6 b. June 12, 1765, and 
309 Submit 6 b. Mary 9, 1768. 

280 Samuel 5 m. Mary Slooper, aud had ch. 310 Mary 6 b. in Guil- 
ford Feb. 11, 1764, w. of Peter Wylie, 311 Samuel 6 b. in Fairfield, 
Ot., Dec. 14, 1765, 312 Hannah 6 b. May 19, 1767, w. of ffm. Cop- 
ley, 313 Lois 6 b. in Hancock, Mass. (as all the rest), Mar. 29, 1769, 
w. of Alexander Allen, 314 Edmund 6 b. Jan. 22, and d. Feb. 3, 
1772, 315 Lucretia 6 b. March 23, 1773, w. of Wm. Clark, 316 Ed- 
mund 6 b. March 14, 1775, 317 Hollabird 6 b. Dec. 28, 1777, 318 
Naomi 6 b. Nov. 28, 1779, 319 Joseph 6 b. Apr. 16, 1782, and 320 
Thomas 6 b. July 19, 1785. 

282 Joseph 5 m. May 8, 1771, Prudence Wright, and had ch. 321 
Benjamin 6 , 322 Luman 6 , 3i3 Josiah 6 , 324 Stephen 6 , 325 Prucia 6 , 326 
Sarah 6 , 327 Arminda 6 , 328 Elizabeth 6 and 329 Huldah. 6 

292 Janna 6 d. in East Guilford Aug. 2, 1794 or 1799, m. Joana 
Meigs and ch. 330 Joseph Winborn' d. 1813, and 331 Janna Meigs' 
b. 1795 d. Jan. 31, 1813. 

293 Edward 6 d. in E. Guilford June 2, 1812, m. Feb. 20, 1790, 
Huldah Hopson and had ch. 332 Lucy Meigs' b. Dec. 8, 1791, 333 
Emily' b. March 2, 1793, 334 John Hopson' b. Dec. 8, 1795, 335 
Ann Sophia' b. Mar. 23, 1798, 336 Edmund' b. Sept. 5, 1800, and 
337 Horatio', b. Aug. 9, 1802. 

296 Daniel 6 of E. Guilford, d. Jan. 15, 1821, m. Artemisia Meigs, 
and had ch. 338 William Meigs' b. Oct. 6, 1788, 339 Augustus F.' 
b. Nov. 30, 1790, d. 1822, 340 Chloe' b. Nov. 6, 1791, 341 John 
Meigs' b. May 17, 1793, d. 1824, 342 Siba' b. May 13, 1796, 343 
Eliza' b. Mar. 10, 1799, 344 Daniel' b. July 16, 1801, 345 Artemisia' 
b. Apr. 24, 1803, d. June, 1804, 346 Jehiel Meigs' b. Apr. 24, 1805, 
347 Artemisia' b. Sept. 15, 1807, 348 George E.' b. Aug. 16, 1809, 
and 349 John A. 7 b. Jan., 1812, d. 1834. 

311 Samuel 6 d. Apr. 10, 1846, m. Ohloo Wadhams and had ch. 
350 Eunice' b. Aug. 26, 1795, w. of Stephen Norton, 351 Ira' b. 
May 31, 1799, 352 Frederic' b. Aug. 21, 1802, d. June 13, 1803, and 
353 Horatio N.' b. Dec. 22, 1805. 



Genealogies. 417 

316 Edmund 6 d. May 3, 1829, m. Sarah Ely and had ch. 354 
Maria 7 b. Nov. 11, 1800, w. of Alex. Allen, 355 Philander' b. Jan. 
1, 1802, d. Jan. 19, 1837, 356 Heman E.' b. Dec 1, 1803, 357 
Augustus' b. Apr. 10, 1807, 358 Esther' b. Nov. 26, 1809, d. Oct. 1, 

■ 1810, 359 Edmund' b. Aug. 18, 1813, and 360 Frederic A.' b. Mch. 
20, 1820. 

317 Hollabird 6 d. 1860, m. Charlotte Bills and had ch. 361 Mary', 
w. of Ira Wicks, 362 Darwin', 363 Horatio', 364 Lueretia', w. of 
Prof. Babbit, 365 Joseph', 366 Samuel' and 367 Charlotte', w. of 
Lafayette Lyon of Boston. 

319 Joseph 6 d. Apr. 3, 1821, m. Thankful Halsey. No children. 

320 Thomas 6 m. Hannah Tayer and had son 368 William' b. Apr. 
8, 1808. 

321 Benjamin 6 had ch. 369 Benjamin', 370 Sarah', 371 Lueretia', 
w . of Whipple, 372 Stephen', 373 Amanda' and 374 Prudia.' 

351 Ira' d. Oct. 15, 1864, m. Apr. 4, 1824, Martha Rose, b. Feb- 
6, 1803, d. Feb. 11, 1872. He had ch. 375 Franklin 8 b. June 20, 
1825, 376 Frederic 8 b. July 7, 1826, 377 Hiram 8 b. Dec. 31, 1827, 
378 Chauncey 8 b. Apr. 18, 1829, 379 Chloe 8 b. Oct. 9, 1831, w. of 
Amasa Tifft, 380 Samuel 8 b. July 14, 1833, and 381 Herman 8 b. 
July 27, 1835. 

353 Horatio N.' d. Not. 10, 1862, m. Apr. 25, 1833, Hannah 
G-ardner (who d. Apr. 9, 1881), and had ch. 382 Louisa 8 b. Nov. 
25, 1837, w. of Judge E. S. Strait of Troy, N. Y., 383 Cornelia 8 b. 
Aug. 1, 1840, 384 Samuel N. 8 b. Mar. 4, 1842, 385 Horatio N. 8 b. 
Sept. 8, 1845, and 386 Albert 8 b. May 7, 1847. 

356 Heman E.' m. Lydia Wilson and had ch. 387 Wilson 8 b. 
Apr. 29, 1835, 388 Helena S. 8 b. July 7, 1840, d. young, and 389 
Rev. Frederic Augustus 8 b. Oct. 23, 1842, d. Oct. 4, 1880, grad. of 
Williams College 1867, ordained Dec. 10, 1873. 

357 Augustus' d. Feb. 28, 1878, m. Wid. Emmeline Cole and 
had d. 390 Sarah. 8 

359 Edmund' d. in Mich. Mar. 7, 1883, m. Harriet Pardner and 
had ch. 391 Horace 8 , 392 Heman 8 and 393 Helen 8 (twins), the latter 
■w. of Hendershot, 394 Howard 8 , 395 Nettie 8 and 396 a daughter. 

365 Joseph' d. Sept. 1886, had w. Caroline and ch. 397 Jesse 8 , 
398 a child and 399 Nettie. 8 

368 William' d. June 22, 1882, m. Rhoda Jolls and had ch. 400 Wil- 
liam 8 , 401 Harriet 8 , 402 Antoinette 8 , 403 Mary 9 and 404 Charlotte. 8 
53 



418 Histokt of Southampton. 

375 Franklin 8 m. Feb. 26, 1850, Lucy Jane Green, b. Feb. 28, 
1827, and d. Apr. 3, 1852. He m. 2d, Sept. 8, 1858, Mary Man- 
dania, d. of John Spaulding, Sheshequin, Pa., b. Aug. 7, 1836, and 
had ch. 405 Minnie A. 9 b. Dec. 15, 1863, and 406 Olive R. E. 9 b. 
Dec. 20, 1866. 

376 Frederic 8 d. May 29, 1871, m. May, 1853, Harriet Young of 
Williamstown, Mass., b. Sept. 12, 1826, and had ch. 407 Egbert 9 b. 
Aug. 2, 1854, 408 Albert 9 b. Feb. 9, 1856, d. Apr. 9, 1S56, and 409 
Martha 9 b. June 12, 1858, w. of "Warner Peake of Blencoe, Iowa. 

377 Hiram 8 m. Jan. 9, 1853, S. Jane Hallett of Genoa, N. Y., and 
had ch. 410 Eugenia 9 b. Dec. 1, 1853, w. of Alanson Peck of Genoa, 
1ST. Y, 411 Henry G. 9 b. Sept. 7, 1857, and 412 Mattie It. 9 b. June 
22, 1865. 

378 Chauncey 8 d. June 15, 1885, m. Mch. 4, 1855, Sophia J. 
Arnold, and had ch. 413 Ira S. 9 b. Nov. 16, 1857, d. Aug. 26, 1872, 
and 414 Elmer A. 9 b. Nov. 10, 1861. 

380 Samuel 8 d. Feb. 25, 1871, m. Dec, 30, 1863, Mary, d. of 
Bernard Lord of Nassau, N. Y., and had ch. 415 Laura G. 9 b. Dec. 
16, 1868, and 416 Samuel W. 9 b. Nov. 5, 1871, d. July 27, 1872. 

381 Herman 8 m. Apr. 24, 1866, Nettie Carmichael of Schodack, 
N. Y, and had son 417 Samuel W. 9 b. Mar. 19, 1881. 

384 Samuel N. 8 m. Dec. 25, 1861, Cornelia Elliott of Maiden, N. 
Y, and had ch. 418 S. Nelson 9 b. Dec. 16, 1862, 419 Mabel A. 9 b. 
Mar. 11, 1864, 420 Isadora C. 9 b. July 17, 1865, 421 Genevieve A. 9 
b. Apr. 20, 1867, 422 Albertine 9 b. May 2, 1872, 423 Mary F. 9 b. 
Apr. 12, 1876, 424 Eoyal 9 b. June 15, 1879, d. Aug. 27, 1880, and 
425 Vera 9 b. Mar. 18, 1881. 

385 Horatio N. 8 m. Feb. 4, 1869, Mary Waterbury of Hudson, N. 
Y, and had ch. 426 Albert E. 9 b. Mar. 21, 1870, d. Mar. 1, 1875, 
427 Horatio N. 9 b. Aug. 17, 1875, 428 Hannah M. 9 b. Sept. 1, 1878, 
429 Chauncey W. 9 b. Nov. 25, 1880, and 430 Romine 9 b. Nov. 21, 
1882, d. Aug. 3, 1883. 

386 Albert 8 m. Apr. 14, 1878, Mary E. Dickerman of Spencer- 
town, N. Y, and had ch. 431 Grace E. 9 b. July 25, 1881, 432 Abbie 
L. s b. Feb. 7, 1883, and 433 Albert D. 9 b. Apr. 25, 1884. 

407 Egbert 9 m. Dec. 22, 1886, Cynthia A. Ashley of New Lebanon. 

411 Henry G. 9 m. Sept. 3, 1878, Ida Sill of Genoa, N. Y, and 
has ch. 434 Mary C.'° b. June 4, 1879, 435 Samuel 10 b. Feb. 13, 1881, 
436 Herbert 10 b. Sept. 1883 and 437 Agnes 10 b. 1886. 



Genealogies. 419 

414 Elmer A. 9 m. Adelle M. Townsend b. Feb. 1, 1861, and has 
s. 438 Ira 10 b. Jan. 2ft, 1885. 

Thus ends the record of Miss Olive E. Hand. 

The following record of the descendants of 88 Nathan 8 Hand was 
given by Augustus F. Hand, M. D., of Morris, Illinois : 

88 Nathan 5 b. May 14, 1747, d. May 26, 1811, of Shoreham, Vt., 
m. Anne Barnes and had ch. 439 Samuel 6 b. Oct. 16, 1769, 440 

Isaac 6 b. June 19, 1772, 441 Nancy 6 b. July 16, 1774, w. of 

Clark, and d. 1810, 442 Prances 6 b. Mch. 15, 1777, w. of Her- 
bert of Brooklyn, and d. 1837, 443 Augustus 6 b. Sept. 24, 1782, 444 
Julia S. 6 b. June 20, 1786, w. of Erastus Barnum, and d. 1840, and 
445 Nathan 6 b. Apr. 22, 1789, d. July 4, 1812. 

439 Samuel 6 d. Sept. 15, 1845, m. Elizabeth, d. of Rev. Eichard 
Sill, and had ch. 446 Rev. Eichard L.\ 447 Augustus 0.', b. 
Sept. 4, 1805, 448 Nancy A.', w. of N. G. Chipman, M. D., 449 Susan 
A.'d. 1885, 450 Eliza A.' and 451 Harriet N.', w. of Doolittle. 

443 Augustus C* has been mentioned before as 201 Augustus.' 
He m. Marcia Northrup and had ch. Judge Samuel 8 of Albany b. 
1834, d. 1886, Clifford C. and Eichard L. of Elizabethtown, N. Y. f 
and two daughters. 

443 Augustus 6 d. May 9, 1851, m. wid. of Martin Post and had 
ch. 452 Augustus Frederic' b. July 11, 1816, 453 Oliver Hulburd 
b. Oct. 24, 1818, and 454 Sarah 7 b. Nov. 9, 1821, w. of Ezbon Fuller. 

452 Augustus Frederic', M. D., m. May 1. 1850, Sarah Eduella 
Clark, and had ch. 455 Eduella C. 8 b. Nov. 26, 1851, who m. Alfred 
E. Frost June 5, 1884, 456 Truman Augustus 8 , M. D., b. Nov. 29, 
1853, 457 Frederic Clark 8 b. Nov. 19, 1857, d. 1858, and 458 Oliver 
Hulburd 8 b. Jan. 7, 1859. 

453 Oliver H.' m. Elizabeth Perkins and had ch. 459 Elizabeth 8 , 
w. of Seneca Hazard, 460 Agnes 8 , w. of Aurelian Post, and 461 
Samuel Augustus. 8 

It may be added, to complete the record of 88 Nathan 5 , that he 
was the son of 74 Capt. Samuel 4 , who was son of 69 James 8 , who 
was son of 9 James 4 , who was son of 1 John. 1 



420 



Histoby of Southampton. 




Ehodes Family. 

The coat of arms of this family is : Argent, two 
quatrefoils, slipped, sable, a chief of the last. 

Crest: A wolf's head couped, sable, collared argent. 
This family is descended from the Eode or Kodes 
family, formerly of the manor of Eode in the hun- 
dred of Northwich, in the county of Cheshire, Eng- 
land, a pedigree of which may be found in Orme- 
rod's History of Cheshire, vol. 3, p. 53. The spelling 
of the name was changed in America about 1750 by 
adding a letter. 

The first of this family hitherto traced by the family 
is 1 Capt. Simon Ehodes 1 born in Newport, E. I., 
Jan. 24, 1716-7, though probably two or three 
generations preceded him in America. He m. Dec. 15, 1756, Anne 
Babcock of Stonington, Ct., to which place he removed. He had 
ch. 2 James 2 b. 1757, 3 Mary 2 b. 1758, who m. Eobert Eogers of 
Stonington in 1787, 4 Simon 2 b. 1760, 5 Henry 2 b. 1762, 6 Annie 2 b. 
1764, w. of Col. Benjamin Hunttingof Southampton, and 7 Abi- 
gail 2 b. 1768, w. of Job Green. 

5 Capt. Henry 2 m. Hannah b. Aug. 6, 1765, d. of Abraham 
Cooper, and had ch. 8 Anna 3 b. 1790, 9 Sarah 3 b. 1792, 10 Poster 3 b. 
1794, 11 Mary 3 b. 1796, 12 Eobert E. 3 b. 1799, 12 Frances 3 b. 1802, 
13 Henry 3 b. 1805 and 14 James 3 b. 1808. 

10 Foster 3 m. Ann Eeeves of Dartmouth, N. B., and had ch. 15 
Hannah C. 4 b. 1818, 16 John H. 4 b. 1820, 17 William P. 4 b. 1823, 
18 George E. 4 b. 1825 and 19 Eobert E. 4 b. 1828. 

16 John H. 4 m. Phebe E. Meserole of Brooklyn b. 1824, d. 1862, 
and had ch. 20 Foster M. 5 b. 1846, 21 Henry E. 5 b. 1848, 22 George 
F E b. 1850, 23 John D. s b. 1852, 24 Gertrude V. 5 b. 1854, who m. 
in 1885 William M. Gibson and had d. Gertrude M. b. 1886, 25 
Elizabeth E. 5 b. 1857, who m. Joseph B. Jones and had d. Edna E. 
b. 1880, d. 1884, 26 Mary B. 6 b. 1860 and 27 George W. 5 b. 1862. 

20 Foster M. 5 m. Anna Hatfield and had ch. 28 Sarah L 6 b. 1874 
and 29 Elizabeth 6 b. 1876. 

This genealogy was furnished by John H. Ehodes, Esq. 



Genealogies. 421 



Sayre Family. 

32 Abraham'' had, besides the ch. given iu the genealogy of this 
family, also a daughter, w. of Rev. Jonathan Huntting, and a son, 
50£ Herman 7 Daggett, who removed to Sag Harbor. 

50! Herman' m. Harriett Reeves and had ch. 417 Julia Reeves 8 , 
418 Henry Perkins 8 and 419 Jonathan Huntting. 8 

419 Jonathan H. 8 went to San Francisco to reside, m. Llewylla 
Helen, d. of U. S. Chaplain James 0. Rayner, and has ch. 420 
Huntting Rayner 9 and 421 Wickham Reeves. 9 



Shokt Notices. 

Fragmentary notes of men and families connected with the 
history of Southampton : 

1. Anning, John, tailor, buys land in Wickapogue in 1687 of 
Robert Norris, yeoman. He is on the rate list of 1683 with three 
polls and £88, but not on lists of 1694 or '96. 

2. Bacon, Abigail, housekeeper of Manasseh Kempton, 1734. 

3. Bancroft, Widow. Land was granted to her in 1644, but it is 
not probable she ever resided here. She had a s. Thomas, resident 
of Lynn, who had descendants. 

4. Barbur, Samuel. On rate list of 1694, £18, and on list of 
1698 with w. Mary and d. Mary. Lived in Bridge Hampton. 
Savage mentions a Samuel of Windsor, Ot., who was son of Thomas 
and had ch. Thomas, Samuel, John and Hannah. 

3. Barker, Samuel. Freeman 1656-59. In 1666 is mentioned 
as a weaver, living in North Sea. Had w. Naomi and probably was 
father of William, who, in 1688 and later, appears as a merchant, 
living between Thomas Topping on the north (now the residence of 
Albert and James H. Foster) and Edward Howell on the south. 
As late as 1698 Willliam has no family ; names his Uncle Matthew 
in his will. He was written as " Mr." Left large estate, as 
appears by inventory in office of Sec. of State of New York. He 
died Aug. 14, 1702, at Southampton. 

Wm. Barker, Gent, merchant, wills, Mch. 16, f?$£, to Abraham 
Howell, Gent., £50 current pay ; to John Wick, sergemaker of S. 



422 Histoey of Southampton. 

H., his housing and land he bought of John Jagger ; to John 
Wick's son Job his dwelling-house and land ; to Sibyl, d. of John 
Howell, dec'd, £20 current pay ; to Mary, wid. of John Howell, a 
ring worth £5 ; to Thos. Herrick, £5 ; to John Burt of N. Y., £10 ; 
to cousin Ann Leaget, £50 ; to Arthur Davice, £5 ; to the poor of 
S. H., £5; to Rev. Mr. Whiting, £5 sterling ; remainder of estate 
in houses and land, in N. Y. and Staten Is., to cousin, Mary Menty, 
d. of his uncle, Matthew Barker. Prov. Sept. 14, 1702, Albany. 

4. Barrett, Richard, planter, is mentioned as an inhabitant in 
1642 to 1659. Lived at the south end somewhere, probably in Toil- 
some lane. Was sometime magistrate. 

Barrows, Andrew, of Sagg, merchant, wills Mch. 3, 1782, to w. 
Sarah and ch. John, Hannah, Matthew, Edmund, Mary and Mar- 
garet Saterly. Proved Sept. 9, 1782. N. Y. S. 0. 

5. Bartholomew, Josiah, carpenter, in 1688 lived at the south end 
and perhaps in Toilsome lane. Not ou list of 1698. Here in 1683. 

Baxter, Thomas, of S. H., wills, Oct. 17, 1785, to ch. Benjamin, 
Zilpah Root, Ruth Ladd, wid., Reuben, Thomas and Stephen, and 
gr. s. Samuel Gage. Proved Jan. 24, 1786. 1ST. Y. S. 0. I think 
he must have lived in Sag Harbor. 

6. Beswick, John, probably a planter or farmer, mentioned in 
1671, when he owned land. Not on list of tax payers 1683. 

7. Bigelow, Samuel. Is mentioned in town records as having w. 
Mehetabel and ch. Abigail b. Feb. 10, 172f , Timothy b. Sept. 19, 
1724, Mary b. Sept. 18, 1826, Isaac b. June 15, 1730, and Samuel 
b. Jan. 12, 173}. Not on list of 1698, nor rate list of 1736. 

8. Blyeth, William. Probably a servant or laborer ; only found 
on list of 1698. 

9. Bond, Robert. Came from Lynn to Southampton, according 
to Hatfield. He further says of him that he was a man of influence 
and had 1st w. Hannah, sister of John Ogden and 2d w. Mary, wid. 
of Hugh Roberts of Newark and d. of Hugh Calkins. Had sons 
Joseph and Stephen and perhaps others. Died in Newark 1677. 
Prom Southampton records we find he was a blacksmith and had a 
grant of land here in 1643. He was one of the colonists to settle 
East Hampton in 1648 and in 1659 represents that town at Hart- 
ford. Prom East .Hampton he removed to New Jersey, 1664 or 5, 
as one of the settlers of Elizabeth, as above related, and resided 
some time in that town. 



Genealogies. 423 

10. Bostwick, Arthur, May 29, 1643, has a grant of land, and in 
1680 John, probably his son, is mentioned as a brickmaker in 
Mecox. Not on tax list of 1683. 

11. Bower, Jonas, first mentioned June 16, 1651, when a £50 lot 
is granted him, provided he work at his trade. He had eldest son 
Jonas and s. Isaac, who was born 1668 and d. Jan. 20, 1746, ae. 78, 
and d. Mary, w. of Wm. Terbell. 

Jonas Bower, Nov. 13, 1670, wills to w. Hannah and ch. Joseph, 
James, Jonathan and Jonah (or Jonas) (not of age) and Isaac. 
Proved June 6, 1671. N. Y. S. O. 

Isaac m. Ruth Howell (prob. d. of Richard) Apr. 12, 1686, and 
had ch. David, Daniel and Mehetabel. Jonas 1st was not living in 
1696. Jonas 2d removed to Southold, where he died 1709, leaving 
w. Ruth and ch. eldest son Daniel, Jonas (or, Jonah), Stephen, 
Ebenezer, Mehetabel, Hannah, Bzekiel, all under 21. 

Isaac Bower, yeoman, wills Jan. 13, 173f, to Cousin Stephen B., 
Cousin Jonah B., Cousin Mehetabel Halsey and Cousin Mary 
Woodruff. Proved Feb. 10, 1745. 

Boyer, Stephen, a merchant, wills, Feb. 3, 172f, to various 
parties in S. H. and to kinsman by name of Faviere. Proved Nov. 
19, 1730. He lived on the Charles Pelletreau place. 

12. Breed, Allen. Besides the signature of this planter to the 
agreement made before the settlement and mention in the Indian 
deed of Dec. 13, 1640, the sole reference found on record is to this 
effect : " Yt is ordered that Mr. Howe is to have his planteing Lott 
at the end of Allen Bread's planteing Lott and yt is to lye three 
Achres in length and so much in bredth as will make the Lott to 
containe three score and four Achres." He, however, returned 
during this year to Massachusetts. He was (Lewis) a resident of 
Lynn 1630. 

13. Briggs, Clement. Mentioned once as in a lawsuit about 
1660. David also is mentioned in same suit and is on tax list of 
1683, but not 1694 ; both probably sons of Clement of Mass. Eliza- 
beth, wid., May 10, 1652, has a grant of land from the town. She 
was prob. wid. of Clement B. who came to Plymouth in the Fortune 
1621 ; then removed to Dorchester, where he m. Joan Allen ; thence 
he removed to Weymouth, 1633, and had ch. Thomas b. June 14, 
1633, Jonathan b. June 14, 1635, John, David b. Aug. 23, 1640, 
and Clement b. Jan. 1, 1643. He had 2d w. Elizabeth. 



424 History of Southampton. 

Brown, Timothy (of B. H.), wills, Dec. 18, 1767, to ch. Daniel, 
Henry, Samuel (who was then under age), Susanah, Sarah, Mary, 
Hannah and Phebe. Proved Dec. 26, 1767. N. Y. S. 0. 

14. Browne, William, freeman in 1648 and died in latter part of 
1650. Had daughter Mary, w. of Richard Merwin or Marvin. 
Was a merchant. 

Bryan, Alexander, of Milford, Ct., had property in S. H. Let- 
ters of adm. given to his w. Sibylla Sept. 27, 1700 or 1701. N. Y. S. 0. 

15. Budd, John. In 1644 was a resident of Southold. In 1645, 
July 7, has additional land granted to him by the town of South- 
ampton, where he had removed, and in 1650 has a mill. 

16. Bush, Christopher. Was fined March 25, 16f£. 

17. Butler, Samuel, merchant, lived on the former residence of 
Josiah Foster and is first mentioned in 1698. Had w. Sarah and 
ch. Martha b. Jan. 18, 1687, Sarah b. Apr. 4, 1690, Amy (w. of 
Zebulon Howell) b. Sept. 15, 1692, Mary b. Apr. 5, 1694, Nathaniel 
b. Apr. 4, 1698, James b. May 18, 1700, Gideon b. Dec. 11, 1701, 
and Ann. In 1753 James was a resident of Branford. Samuel B. 
d. in 1706. 

18. Campbell, John, records birth of d. Sarah Dec. 11, 1687. 
He m. Sarah Hakelton (a wid.), d. of Obadiah Sogers, March 9, 
168$. In April, 1687, lived in East Hampton. 

19. Cory, John, has land granted 1644 ; not here 1649 ; removed 
to Southold; had w. Margaret and ch. John, Abraham, Isaac and 
Jacob. In 1700 there was a John Cory in Elizabeth, N. J., who d. 
1722, w. Priscilla. Isaac Cory was a tax payer in 1683, but re- 
moved to Southold, as appears from the list of 1698 in office of 
Secretary of State, Albany. 

A John Corey of Southold, Dec. 26, 1753, wills to w. Dorothy 
and ch. Abijah, John, Elizabeth Lawes, and Dorothea Dickenson, 
gr. ch. Bradick Cory and Mary Wiggins. Prov. Aug. 24, 1754. 

20. Davis, Eulk, has a grant of land Oct. 9, 1642. In 1655 he 
was a resident of East Hampton and in 1660 of Jamaica. He m. in 
E. H. (2d w. prob.) Mary, who m. 1, James Haines, 2d, Ralph Day- 
ton, and 3d, Fulk Davis, and had ch. 2 John 2 , 3 Samuel 2 of North 
Sea, 1657, of Jamaica, 1660, and 4 Benjamin 2 , and perhaps 
others. 

2 John 2 of North Sea, 1661, had prob. w. Elizabeth and ch. 5 
John 3 , 6 Mehetabel 3 , 7 Jonathan 3 , who in 1704 removed to Hope- 



Genealogies. 425 

well, Burlington Co., 1ST. J., 8 Zechariah 3 and perhaps 9 Abiel 3 
and 10 Eldad. 3 

8 Zechariah 8 had w. Lydia and ch. 11 John 4 , 12 Sarah 4 , 13 
Joseph 4 and perhaps others. 

4 Benjamin 5 of S. H. had w. Rebecca and son 14 Benjamin 3 of 
S. EL, who, in 1698, sold his property there and probably removed. 

In tax list of 1694 of S. H. there is a John with three sons taxed 
for £110, and another John (a mason) taxed for £36, and still a 
third John, Jr., taxed for £21. 

A John, a weaver, of New Haven, 1688, of E. H. 1694, m. 
Susanna Osborn, Nov. 3, 1703, and had ch. Elizabeth bap. 1706, 
John bap. 1723, who m. Catherine Talmage, and had ch. Catherine 
bap. 1746, Benjamin bap. 1754, Mary bap. 1763, Henry bap. 1770 
and Abigail bap. 1775. 

Joseph of Brookhaven wills, 1690-1, to ch. Joseph, Benjamin, 
Samuel, Daniel and Mary. 

John of E. H. b. 1676, d. Aug. 3, 1766. 

John, Sr., of E. H. d. Dec. 22, 1705. 

Thomas of E. H. b. 1686, d. Sept. 27, 1751. He m. Abigail Par- 
sons June 11, 1722. 

Roger Davis of E. H. b. 1674, d. Feb. 15, 1734. 

Elisha Davis m. Amy Pierson in E. H. May 7, 1739. 

It is said by Mr. Albert H. Davis of New York that a John 
Davis, not a son of Fulk Davis, settled in East Hampton quite 
early and had son John and other ch. If so, some of the above 
given names may be in his family. 

21. Earle, John, in 1681, lived between Huntting's corner and 
residence of the late Austin Herrick. In 1678, Nov., he married 
Mary Raynor and had d. Mindwell b. Aug. 16, 1683, and s. David 
b. Jan. 11, 1684, aud prob. d. Mary. In 1683 he is rated in East 
Hampton. Savage mentions a John E. who came to Boston 1656, 
ae. 17, and lived in Northampton 1656-71, and had ch. Noah, John 
and three daughters. 

22. Eason, Henry, Mr., has land granted in 1652 ; mentioned in 
lawsuit 1654 — not here in 1657. 

Elias, David, a merchant. Letters of administration to his 
father, Benjamin Elias, Nov. 16, 1725. N. Y. S. 0. 

23. Ellis, John, a glover in Mecox, and in 1683 sells his house — 
54 



426 History of Southampton. 

perhaps s. of John of Dedham, Mass., who had. s. John b. Apr. 
26, 1646. 

24. Else, John, apparently of Sagg, 1676, and on tax list of 1683, 
and d. or removed in that year ; perhaps son of Roger E. of Yar- 
mouth, Mass. 

25. Farrington, Edmund, came in the Hopeioell of London from 
Olney, Co. of Bucks, 1635, ae. 47, with w. Elizabeth, ae. 49, and 
four ch. He was b. 1588, d. 1671. Elizabeth, his w., was b. 1586, 
and ch. Sarah b. 1621, Martha b. 1623, John b. 1624, Elizabeth b. 
1627 and m. John Fuller 1646. Edmund, Thomas, John and 
Edward are found on the early papers, but no evidence of actual 
residence here, except perhaps Thomas and Edward, both of whom 
were on the list of 1645, but not on that of 1644. Edward was here 
apparently in 1657. In 1666 Edmund is mentioned by Thompson 
as a resident of Flushing. 

26. Field, Alexander Mr. Oct. 6, 1652, chosen freeman. Men- 
tioned Oct., 1655, on jury. Farnaer says he was of Salem, Mass. ; 
member of church 1648 ; freem. 1649, and is called a cordwainer. 
In 1640 he lived in Charlestown, aecording to Savage, and removed 
to Salem in 1642; married, in New Haven, Gillian, wid. of Rich. 
Mansfield, and died 1666. 

27. Flint, Benoui. In 1678 a resident of Sagg. June 10, 1675, 
m. 2d w. Mary, d. of Wm. Browne (but not of the William B. 
mentioned above siuce she mar. Richard Marvin), and had ch. 
Benjamin b. Feb. 2, 1679, and d. Apr. 7, 1685 ; John b. Sept. 10, 
1680; Sarah b. July 14, 1683, and d. June 14, 1685 ; and Mary b. 
Aug. 21, 1685, and probably Hannah as by list of 1698. The w. of 
Benoni F, of Sagg, d. Dec. 7, 1724, ae. 70 ; b. 1652. 

Flint, Ammy, of B. H., wills, May 6, 1771, to w. Priscilla and sons 
Nathan, Stephen, Silas and d. Mary Moore. Proved Mch. 29, 1776. 

Benoni Flint, of Sagg, wills, June 14, 1784, to w. Azubah and 
ch. Hamutal (a. d.), Edward, John M., Richard, Collin, Benjamin 
and William. Prov. Dec. 7, 1784. N. T. S. O. 

28. Gibbons, John, beltmaker, of Southampton ; mentioned 1720. 
(Secretary of State office.) 

29. Gilbord, Caleb. 1698, by list, has w. or d. Elizabeth, and 
ch. Bethia and Mary. In 1707 he sells his dwelling-house and home 
lot in the village to Richard Wood. 



Genealogies. 427 

Gibbs, Joseph, was a schoolmaster in Bridgehampton — i. e., 
Mecox about 1758. 

30. Goldsmith, Thomas, has land granted in 1651; a farmer. 
In 1654 he kept the ordinary. Removed to Killingworth, Ct., 
between 1682 and 1685. Is called a great-uncle of John Gold- 
smith, of Southold, in 1709. Thomas lived at the Southend, south 
of Wm. Barker, who lived south of the Toppings, who lived on 
present residence of Albert and James H. Poster. All these were 
north of Toilsome lane. 

Joseph Goldsmith, of Watermill, m. Catherine, d. of John 
Howell, and died Aug. 27, 1797. 

31. Goodwin, Thomas, is on list of 1683, but not on census of 
1698. In 1684 he buys a home lot of John Jennings on the hill, 
late the residence of Oapt. Mercator Cooper, deceased. One of this 
name sailed, in 1635, aged 30, from London to St. Christopher's. 

32. Goring, Henry, on rate lists of 1683 and 1695, but I know 
no more of him. Savage mentions a Henry, of Windsor, who had 
s. William b. 1679. 

33. Gosmer, John Mr., sometimes called Cosmore (which mis- 
leads Savage), probably father of Richard (on whose estate he 
administers in 1649, and Richard appears to have died unmarried), 
and probably had also a d., who was w. of John Woodruff. John 
Gosmer 1659 gives his " adopted son," John Woodruff, all his houses 
and lands. In 1665, then deceased, he is called the grandfather of 
John Woodruff, Jr. He lived on the late residence of Charles Pelle- 
treau, and also owned a house and lot opposite to this on the other 
side of the street, late the residence of Frederic Howell. He came 
here with the first company in 1640. Was a man of wealth and 
much influence, and magistrate for many years. His wife's name 
was Elizabeth. He came originally from Fordwich, Kent county, 
England. 

34. Gould, John, tailor. In 1686 he buys of Richard Post his 
IT. W. corner (former residence of Josiah Foster), and sells the same 
1692 to Walter Melvine, who sells the same to Samuel Butler 1697. 
He removed probably to Elizabeth, where, according to Hatfield, 
appears one of this name 1694. But in April, 1687, he lived (or 
one of that name) in East Hampton. 

Greenvill, John, of S. H., wills, Mch. 19, 1689-90, his property 



428 History of Southampton. 

to his w. Euth, d. of Peregrine Sfcanborough. He died soon after 
this. No children are mentioned in his will. 

35. Griffing, Hugh, blacksmith, here from Mch. 165^ to May, 
1652. 

36. Hakelton, William, d. Sept. 6, 1685 ; on tax list of 1683 ; w. 
Sarah d. of Obadiah Eogers, who m. 2d John Campbell. Apr. 1, 
1681, he has a grant of land on the hill, provided he remain. 

37. Hampton, James, called an old man 1673, first of Salem ; 
lived at Nbrthendon residence late of John Eogers, which residence 
he bought of Eichard Barnes 1652. Had w. Jane, and only ch. 
Mary, 1st the w. of James Mappem or Mapham, and m. second Benj. 
Horton, of Soutbold. Appears to have occupied Pope's lot — the 
one to the south of this, at one time. 

38. Hanke, Abram, on tax list of 1683. 

39. Harker, William ; one of the original undertakers, and men- 
tioned in the Indian deed of Dec. 13, 1640. Eemoved to Lynn, 
and there resided ; w. Elizabeth d. May 21, 1661. 

Havens, Constant, of B. H., yeoman, wills to w. Elizabeth and 
ch. Constant, Jonathan, Abigail, w. of Thos. Terry, Mary Tuttle, 
Lucretia Howell and Elizabeth Havens. Proved Jan. 8, 1761. 
N. Y. S. 0. 

Havens, Joseph, of B. H., wills, Oct. 12, 1771, to w. Jemima and 
ch. to be born of his wife then with child, his sisters Hannah 
Havens, Sarah, w. of Alexander King, brother Jonathan H., 
nephews Nicoll Havens and Jonathan Nicoll Havens. Codicil of 
of Apr. 29, 1775, states that his w. died in giving birth to a male 
child named Joseph. Will proved May 31, 1775. 

40. Heathcote, George, bought a residence of Obadiah Sale, which 
Caleb Heathcote, said to be a cousin of George, in 1712 sold to the 
town for a cemetery. William Eussell was the first owner of this 
property. George H. died in Southampton. 

In 1710, Nov. 14, George Heathcote writes his will as a merchant 
in Pennsylvania, and wills to cousin Caleb H., of N. Y., to two gr. 
ch., ch. of John Barker, of London, and his sister, deceased, and to 
sisters in Eng., Hannah Browne and Anne Lupton. 

41. Hilyard, Timothy, with w., d. or sister Margaret, on list of 
1698. In 1669 one of this name in Hampton, Mass., according to 
Savage. 



Genealogies. 429 

42. Houldsworth, Jonas, 1663, schoolmaster, afterward of Hunt- 
ington. In. 1698 in Southold. Taught in Southampton £35 per 
annum. 

43. Howe, Daniel and Jeremiah. Daniel, one of the most influ- 
ential pioneers of the settlement, master and owner of the vessel 
which brought the colonists from Lynn, and magistrate. Eesided 
here from the settlement until the settlement of East Hampton, of 
which, according to Hedges, he was one of the settlers in 1648. 
But he was in Southampton in Oct. 1649. Lewis and Newhall 
(Hist, of Lynn), say he was freeman there 1634, and Lieut, in the 
Ancient Artillery Company 1638. He had brother Edward and 
son Ephraim, and perhaps other ch. Jeremiah, Dec. 1, 1646, is 
mentioned, with a few others, who had not then paid their taxes 
due — perhaps because of removal. He was son of Edward, the 
bro. of Daniel, and came in the Truelove 1635, and removed to New 
Haven. 

44. Hubby, John, 1650, receives money for working in the sea- 
poose, and in 1651 in a lawsuit. May, 1652, he fails to appear in 
court,, having left the town. 

45. Hughes, Humphry, had son Humphry b. Oct. 2, 1669. In 
1669 a Humphry had w. Martha, and in list of 1698 are Humphry, 
Abner, Uriah, Jedediah and John, the four latter probably the sons 
or brothers of the 2d Humphry. None of this name are on the 
tax lists of 1695 or 1683. They lived east in Bridge Hampton or 
Sagg. A Humphry Hughes was of Cape May Co., New Jersey, 1696. 

Jacobs, Joseph, of S. H., merchant, wills, Sept. 12, 1774, to w. 
Eleanor and ch. Joseph, Joel, Oliver, Eleanor and Prudence (the 
last four under age). Proved Oct. 19, 1774. N. Y. S. 0. Joel 
continued the business of a country store, and lived in the house 
now owned by Edwin P. Halsey. 

46. Jacques, Eichard, sole mention is on the whaling list of 
1644. 

47. Kallum (or Kellam), Eobert, is on tax list of 1683. He has 
a lot in division of land in 1673, and remained quite a number of 
years in the town. 

48. Kelly, John, carpenter, April 10, 1651, has a lot of three acres 
granted to him. In Jan., 165£, occurred the suit for obtaining 
promise of marriage under pretense of ' his wife being dead — 



430 History of Southampton. 

i. e., dead in trespasses and sins — before alluded to. March, 165£, 
he was fined 5s. for lying, and did not remain long after this. 

49. Kempton, Manasseh. Savage says a Menasseh (who must 
have been father or gr. father of the one in Southampton) Kemp- 
ton was one of the earliest settlers of Plymouth, and probably came 
in the Ann 1623. He died Jan. 14, 166f, and his w. Julian d. 
Feb. 19, 166-f, se. 81. Eep. 9 yrs. The Manasseh, of Southampton, 
d. Nov. 28, 1737, se. 86. In 1 688 he bought Pope's lot of Ben. 
More, which is the open lot north of the residence of A. J. Post's. 
Manasseh died a bachelor. He was a farmer, and willed, Sept. 27, 
1734, to kinsman William K., of Plymouth, If. E. ; to kinsman 
Stephen Kempton, cordwainer, of S. H., and his d. Priscilla, and 
to Abigail Bacon, his housekeeper. Proved Jan. 13, 173$ N. 
Y. S. 0. 

50. Kirtland family. Philip came quite early to Lynn — proba- 
bly with part of his family. His two sons — Philip, se. 21, and 
Nathaniel, ae. 19 — came to Lynn in the Hopewell April, 1635. He 
had another son, John, b. about 1607, who was in B. H. 1658 and 
1659, and what other family I know not. Philip, junior, and his 
brother Nathaniel, were a short time residents here — coming with 
the first settlers. But Philip returned to Mass. in 1641, and 
Nathaniel removed before 1644. Philip, Jr., had ds. Mary, Sarah, 
Susanna and Hannah, and w. Alice, who m. 2d Evan Thomas. 

51. Larrison (or Lawrison), John, a mason, m. 1st Jemima Hal- 
sey May 23, 1683, and 2d Mary, wid. of David Howell, Dec. 20, 
1686. Had one d., Mary. In 1683 he is taxed for £254, and not 
living 1694. 

52. Laughton, John, 1665, has tnree acres N. of Mr. Russell's 
home lot. (See Heathcote for the location.) He probably died 
childless soon after 1679. In 1678 a brother Josiah is mentioned, 
who had then a son John of full age. Josiah had* also son Josiah. 
In 1715 Josiah sells the so. half of place formerly John Laughton's 
to Benjamin Haines. The name is spelled Lawton on commis- 
sion to collect the taxes. 

53. Lawrence, Zachary, on the list of 1683. 

54. Learning, Christopher, of Sagg, had w. Esther and s. Thomas, 
b. born about 1674, a cooper, and a son Aaron. In 1692 he and his 

*W. S. PeUetreau. 



Genealogies. 431 

sons moved to Dennisville, Cape May Co., N. J. A considerable 
account of this family, after their migration to Cape May Co., 2J. J. 
(whither the L. I. people went for carrying on the whaling busi- 
ness) may be found in Dr. Beesely's history of the settlement of 
this county, bound up with the Report of the Geological Survey of 
Cape May County by G. H. Cook. 

55. Lum (or Loom), John, had a home lot granted June 17, 
1651. He probably removed to Huntington, as such a one in 1660 
is mentioned as living there, " formerly of North Sea," and having, 
still a son Samuel in Southampton, who is said to be heir of Mark 
Meiggs, of Huntington. In 1654 John has a hundred in the Saga- 
bonack division. He had, also, probably another son, Matthew, 
who was a blacksmith, and in 1667 lived in the Southend some- 
where. A Samuel is on the list of 1683 and 1694, and on the list 
of 1698 we find a number of the name, and if his family, we might 
say w. Hannah and ch. Matthew, Samuel, Abigail and Hannah. 
He lived in the Mecox settlement. 

56. Maltby, John, formerly of Connecticut, a tax payer in 1694. 
He m. Susana Clark, and had ch. Sarah b. 1705, who d. unmarried 
1723, and Mary, w. of Hugh Gelston. John M. d. June 27, 1706, 
aged 33 years. The John mentioned was the son of John Maltby, 
of New Haven, who (according to Savage) was lost at sea 1676, 
leaving w. Mary and children Mary and John. His w. Mary was d. 
of Richard Bryant, of Milford, Conn., and was born 1654. She m. 
2d Edward Howell, who thus brought the children to Southampton, 
where John, at maturity, married Susana Clark, and Mary m. Rev. 
John Fordham. The John of Southampton must have had male 
heirs, as a family of this name in Hadlyme, Ct., claim descent 
from him. 

57. Mapham (or Mappem), John, according to Savage, was son 
of John, of Guilford, Ct., in 1639, who d. 1649. John, the younger, 
m. Mary, only d. of James Hampton, and succeeded to his estate, 
and had two ds., one of whom, Mary, m. Thomas Lupton. The 
other, Abigail, m. Charles Booth, of Southold. 1671 James Hamp- 
ton gives him land. He died between 1683 and 1686, in which year 
(1686) his wid. m. Ben]'. Horton, of Southold. 

58. Marvin (or Merwin), Robert. May 12, 1649, he has from the 
town a £100 lot granted to him " on three months' approbation had 
of him." This, by the way, establishes the fact that he was a far- 



432 History of Southampton. 

mer, as the town gave usually but a £50 lot to mechanics on their 
settlement. He, more than any other, occupied himself in destroy- 
ing wolves, as appears from the town records. Eichard is once men- 
tioned, but it is probably a clerical error for Eobert. He m. Mary, 
d. of William Browne, and in 1650 administers upon the estate of 
his father-in-law. Thompson mentions him as a resident of Hemp- 
stead in 1682, as also a John — perhaps a son. 

59. Mason, William, in 1682, buys eight acres on the hill (now 
homestead of Thomas Warren), and there lived, in 1684 and 1698. 
James, of East Hampton, 1687. *In 1696 a William M. had 150 
acres in Cape May Co., N. J. 

60. Meacham, Jeremiah. Savage says a Jeremiah, of Salem, 
Mass., a fuller, had w. Deborah and ch. Isaac, Jeremiah, Ehoda, 
Sarah, Hannah and Bethia. The s. Jeremiah probably is the one 
on the Southampton records as a resident in 1658, and also in 1660, 
when he is mentioned as on jury, or the elder Jeremiah might himself 
have moved as mentioned. Hedges gives him an early residence in 
East Hampton. 

61. Meiggs, Mark, with father Vincent and brother John, are 
residents of New Haven 1646-7. He resided in Southampton from 
1651 to 1658. He was granted a lot in B. H, but abandoned it 
before Dec. 1651. In Huntington 1672. He gives by will all his 
property, after decease of his wife Avis, to Samuel, s. of John Lum, 
of Southampton. In 1657 a Vincent Meiggs is resident of North 
Sea, and in 1653 he contracts to build a mill in E. Hampton. He 
died at Killingworth, Ot., Dec, 1658. 

62. Melvine, Walter, a cooper, and w. Mary, in 1697, sell to 
Samuel Butler what was formerly the homestead of Josiah Poster. 
He recorded ch. John, b. Jan. 3, 1685; Hannah, b. March 18, 
1688, and Martha, b. July 1, 1691. 

63. Mendall, John, June 8, 1659, one of a party who illegally 
took goods from a Dutch vessel Wrecked at Southampton. Nothing 
more can I find of him. 

64. Miller, John, 1655, charged with slander by Mark Meggs. 

65. Mills, Eichard, freeman 1650, schoolmaster and town clerk 
1651. In 1551, Apr. 11, the old meeting-house was given him by 
the town to enlarge his own house for keeping the ordinary. March 
7, 165£, he sells his homestead to John Cooper, Jr., removed and 
was schoolmaster in Middlebury, N. Y., 1660, and town clerk in 



Genealogies. 433 

Westchesber, 1661. In 1683 Samuel and Isaac pay taxes. Samuel M. 
d. 1685, leaving son Bichard, a minor. In 1694 only Isaac remains, 
and he lived in Bridgehampton, Sagg or Mecox, and had son Isaac 
in 1698 (as per list), and also probably s. Jonathan. Dr. Mills had 
son David, b. Dec. 9, 1693. 

66. Milner, George, appears as resident in 1653 and 1654. Lewis 
says Michael Milner came in the James of London 1635, as. 23, and 
removed to L. I. If so, perhaps he was father of this George. 

67. Mmthorn, Bichard, on list of 1698 — probably a servant or 
laborer. 

68. Moore (or More), John and Benjamin, etc. John has a lot 
granted Apr., 1641. March 15, 164|, he was censured by the court 
" for saying Daniel Howe did vsurpe the execution of the place of 
magistracy, hee then lyeing under church censure.'' Oct., 1644. 
"A little before this Southampton, through Edward Howell, John 
Gosmer and John Moore, petitioned to be received in the Jurisdic- 
tion of Connecticut."* In 1688 Benjamin sells Pope's lot to Manas- 
seh Kempton. In 1698 Joseph has, per list, w. Sarah and ch. 
Joseph. 

Joseph More, of S. H. (B. H.), Gent., wills, Mch. 21, 1723, to 
w. Sarah and ch. Elizabeth Sanford, Sarah Cook, Buth M., Abigail 
M., gr. s. Daniel More (not 21), and gr. sons Caleb and David More. 
Proved May 30, 1726. This name is spelled indifferently Moore 
and More. 

Bobert More, of B. H, yeoman, wills, Sept. 9, 1753, to w. Mary 
and ch. Henry and others not named, but all under age. Proved 
Oct. 26, 1753. N. Y. S. 0. 

Benjamin, Elizabeth, Sarah and Mary. 

69 Morehouse, John, of B. H., first appears on the list of 1683. 
He d. Oct. 10, 1701, leaving children John, Mary and Phebe. The 
second John (of B. H.) had w. Zerviah and willed Jan. 4, 1760, to 
d. Zerviah and gr. ch. John Morehouse, Nathan M., Isaac M., 
Phebe M. and Silvanus Stuart, Silas Stuart, Buth Stuart, Mehet- 
abel Stuart and Sarah Stuart and Zerviah Hand. Proved Dec. 25, 
1760. The second John had ch. John, Nathan and Gideon, whom 
he must have outlived. Gideon removed. The third John had ch. 
John, Nathan, Isaac, Phebe and Zerviah. 

* Trumbull's Hist, of Ct. 
55 



434 Histoet of Southampton. 

70. Mowbray, John, schoolmaster, engages to teach a school 
Apr. 28, 1694, "att twelve shillings In cash per schollar for the 
terme of six moneths comenceing from ye first day of May next, 
and ending ye first of November next Ensueing, and to teach them 
In these hours following, viz., from eight to eleven o'clock In the 
fforenoone and from one to five of the clocke ye afternoone." He 
removed to one of the western towns of L. I. On the list of 1698 
with Anning Mowbray. 

71. Needham, Edmund, on the list of "Undertakers" 1640 and 
in the Indian deed of Dec. 13, 1640, but did not remain long, since 
no land is recorded to him. He lived in Lynn, where he died in 
1677, leaving children, as recorded by Lewis and Newhall. 

72. Newell or Newhall, Thomas, mentioned only in the agree- 
ment of the settlers. Eesided in Lynn and died there. 

73. Newton, Benoni, died at Mecox March 4, 170-f, ae. 53. Had 
w. Joana, who d. May, 1710, ae. 56. Was a carpenter. Had ch. 
according to list of 1698, Benjamin, Isaac, Jonathan, John, Joana, 
Elizabeth and Phebe. 

Isaac Newton of B. H. wills Mch. 7, 170J, to bro. Ebenezer 
(under age), bros. Caleb and John, sisters Elizabeth and Martha. 
Proved May 16, 1712. N. Y. S. 0. 

Nicoll, Benjamin, of S. H. (prob. Sag Harbor) Letters of adm. 
to his w. Charity Aug. 6, 1724. 

74. Norris, Kobert. In 1678 had been for 11 years in service of 
Richard Howell. In 1683 Peter and Robert both tax payers. In 
1698, as by list, both lived east — in Sagg probably — and Robert 
had w. Hannah and ch. Robert; Oliver, Hannah, Mary and Sarah. 
Peter had w. or d. Sarah and ch. Hannah and Elizabeth. In 1683 
Oliver is taxed in East Hampton. 

75. Odell, Richard, Mr. On whaling list of 1644. July 7, 1645, 
the house lot of " Mr. Cole of Hartford " was given to him on con- 
dition of his remaining three years. Made freeman Oct. 8, 1647. 
Here as late as 1654, but soon after removed to New Jersey or New 
York. 

76. Ogden, John, Mr., freeman May 31, 1650. "Was the leader in 
the settlement at North Sea with five other families besides his own 
in Feb. 16ff. 1663 has son John and nephew John O. Here in 
1665, but in 1667 is said to be of Feversham. In Feb. 1663 he is 
said to be J. 0. of Feversham, and Elizabethtown was settled in 



Genealogies. 435 

Nov. 1664. Bub Feb. 1663 = Feb. 166|. So far our records. Hin- 
maa says he was at Stamford, Ot., in the latter part of 1641 or early 
in 1642. Had w. Jane, who, according to tradition, was sister of 
Robert Bond. Hatfield says he had brother Richard. In 1644 
those two brothers removed to Hempstead, L. L, of which John 
Ogden was one of the patentees. He went, says Dr. Hatfield, to 
Achter Kol or Elizabeth with his adult sons John, Jonathan, 
David, Joseph and Benjamin. Here as in his. other residences he 
was appointed to posts of honor and responsibility. Dr. H. gives 
further information, which is beyond the scope of these pages. 
Samuel 0. of Elizabeth m. Johana Sehellinger of E. Hampton, Sept- 
10, 1707. John 0. of same place m. Mary Osborn of E. Hampton, 
Oct. 8, 1722. 

77. Oldfields, John, June 17, 1651, has a £50 lot granted him 
provided he settle and pursue his trade as a tanner. In 1659 sells 
home lot between Thos. Halsey, Sen., and Thos. Cooper. In 1662 
sells his house and lot in "Northampton" or North Sea to John 
Jennings, cord winder. In 1664 resides in E. Hampton. In 1665 he 
was in Jamaica, L. I. A John 0. is named as one of the patentees 
in Gov. Dongan's patent of Jamaica 1686. 

78. Osman , no such name on the records early or late any- 
where. This is mentioned because others following Thompson 
who gives the name have been perplexed at finding no traces of such 
a person previous to the settlement of Southampton. 

79. Owen, George. On the list of 1683. 

80. Paine, William, in Feb. 165|, has a £100 lot in Sagabonack 
division. In April, 1654, he is mentioned as " of late deceased." 
He had w. Martha and lived probably in North Sea or North Side. 
In 1657 a Joseph Paine is mentioned. 

81. Painter, Richard, a tailor, in 1679, buys \\ acres on the hill 
of Cornelius Voncke; here in 1682, but not in 1683. He removed 
to Elizabethtown, N. J. 

82. Parker, John, a fuller, of Novae in 1696. The privileges of the 
stream at Novae were granted to him May 2, 1690, for a fulling mill. 

83. Parvine, Thomas, lived up Meeting-house lane probably, and 
had, as by list of 1698, w. or d. Rebecca and s. Thomas. 

84. Patton, Robert, died May 12, 1700 — a bachelor apparently. 
Wills his estate to various parties and £20 to a Wm. Patton in Scot- 
land. 



436 History of Southampton. 

85. Peirce, Jonathan, d. July 2, 1759, b. 1695 ; had w. Abiah and 
a s. Benjamin, who d. Aug. 1, 1747, ae. 19. 

86. Penny, John, mentioned 1729 as haying w. Juda and ch. 
Eobert and Christopher, who removed to South Carolina. John is 
on list of 1794 and in 1696 sells his homestead. 

87. Perkins, William, on the tax list of 1694. Ann of North Sea 
is on list of 1698, when probably William was dead. Taxed in 1683 
in Bast Hampton. 

88. Petty, John, on list of 1683. Edward on the tax list of 1694 
and in 1698 has by the list sons Elnathan and Edward. 

89. Phillips, Zerubbabel, m. Ann, wid. of John White, 1663 ; 
•constable and lieutenant. He died about 1686 and perhaps left son 

John P. 

90. Pope, Thomas, weaver, was one of the settlers of Stamford in 
1641 ; resident of Hempstead 1644-47 ; then came probably to South- 
ampton, though Parmer mentions a Thomas of Yarmouth in 1646 
who had sons Seth b. 1647, Thomas, 1651, and John b. 1652. He 
had w. Mary and son John. Received house lot from Southampton 
March 16|^, and there resided in 1670. He removed thence to 
Elizabeth, N. J., perhaps about 1670, and died there before 1677. 

91. Redfleld, James, Jan. 166|-, sues an Indian for a gun and gets 
it. One of this name in New London 1649 and 1662. 

92. Reed, Thomas, schoolmaster, has recorded ch. Sarah b. Aug. 
1, 1706, Ashur b. Sept. 8, 1711, Thomas b. Apr. 23, 1714, John b. 
Apr. 25, 1717, Sybil b. Jan. 24, 1720, Amy *b. Feb. 8, 1723, and 
David b. Aug. 10, 1725. He m. Sarah, d. of Isaac Cory, May 30, 
1704. 

93. Robinson, John, "late of Salem," May, 1652, has granted to 
him "ffarringtons land, the saide land being intended for a smith." 
Soon removed. 

Rolt, Henry, of B. H, weaver, wills, Jan. 2, 1770, to w. Phebe 
and his two sisters, Sarah Rolt and Jane Allen. Proved Oct. 9, 
1770. N. Y. S. 0. 

94. Rounsifull, Richard, with son Richard and Hannah and ■ 
Martha appear only on the list of 1698. They lived in Wickapogue. 

Rugg, Joseph, of S. H. (North Sea), presser of cloth, wills, Feb. 
1, 1781, to w. Deborah and ch. eldest d. Sarah, Mary, Agnes, Phile, 
Phebe and Jerusha. Proved July 3, 1782. N. Y. S. O. 

95. Rusco, William, of Hartford, 1639. Nathaniel had recorded 



Genealogies. 437 

ch. Johana b. Jan. 20, 1684, Mary b. Sept. 2, 1685, Nathaniel b. 
Sept. 6, 1686, and Ebenezer b. Oct. 10, 1688, aud Ammiruhama b. 

. List of 1698 adds Amijah E., lived east, perhaps in Sagg. 

Elizabeth, w. of Nathaniel R., d. Oct. 18, 1686. 

96. Eussell, William, on the list of 1657. Lived at the North end 
and died 1678. Had ch. Oliver b. May 7, 1671, and William. Oliver 
was a cooper and on list-of 1694, but not on that of 1696 or 8, as he 
removed abont that time to Cape May Co., N. J. William of S. H. 
Aug. 27, 1678, wills to w. Elizabeth aud ch. Oliver, William and 
others not named. He m. Elizabeth, d. of Obadiah Rogers. He 
was drowned 1681. Samuel of E. H, prob. son of William above, 
had ch. bap. Mary, Sept. 18, 1709 ; Martha, Aug. 26, 1711 ; Samuel, 
May 17, 1717 ; Samuel again, June 28, 1719. 

David R. had s. Jared bap. in E. H. May, 1778. 

John R. of B. H. buys land in E. H. 1760. 

Caleb R. of B. H. b. 1749, June 4, grad. at Princeton 1770, 
removed soon after this and studied law at New Brunswick — 
practiced in Morristown and had ch. Sylvester D. b. 1776 ; Jared S. 
b. 1778 ; Henry P. b. 1779 ; Charles b. 1783 ; Robert M. b. 1786, 
William b. 1789; and Algernon S. b. 1793. 

97. Sale, Obadiah, a cooper, had w. Rachel. In 1688 buys a house 
lot of Samuel Whitehead between the present residences of James H. 
Pierson and Albert Reeves, and in second purchase of the same 
buys the corner house lot now the residence of Albert Reeves. In 
1679 he sold his homestead (now the North end cemetery) to Geo. 
Heathcote. Hatfield thinks Obadiah was s. of Edward (b. 1611) of 
Salem, 1635, and had bro. Ephraim aud ch. Ephraim and Daniel 
and two others. He removed from Southampton to Boston and 
thence to Elizabeth, N. J. 

98. Sanders, John, on the list of 1683. Six of this name in 
Savage. 

99. Searing, Simon, June 17, 1651, had a £50 lot granted him. 
Thompson says he was in Hempstead 1647 and 1683. 

99£. Scott, Robert, merchant, of Boston, sues Jonas Wood H. 
Feb. 25, 165f. 

100. Shaw, Thomas, a cooper, 1682, of North Sea, had ch. 
Thomas (probably) and David, Francis and John, and in 1698, as 
by list in family, Mary, Susana and Jane. Edmund Shaw, March, 
165f, is censured for excess in drinking, and again, Dec. 15, 1658. 



438 History of Soothamfton. 

In 1687 Edmund and Richard inhabitants of East Hampton. 
Richard resided there as early as 1698, when he is mentioned with 
wife Elizabeth. 

101. Shepherd, John, died March 24, 168f. Sole record. 

102. Silvester, Capt., proprietor of Shelter Island, Oct. 30, 1655, 
sues Jonas Wood H. 

103. Simpkins, William ; on tax list of 1683. He had ch. Bar- 
bara b. Nov. 10, 1678, Sarah b. Nov. 12, 1680. His w. Mary d. 
Mch. 10, 1681. 

104. Smith, Richard, and Roger, etc. Richard, with title of 
Mr., is mentioned as being a resident here as early as 1643. Sept. 
17, 1656, he was banished from the town on account of " unrever- 
end carriage " toward the magistrates, and has a week to prepare. 
The banishment appears to have been effectually carried out, 
although he returned, as appears from the Boston records. Felt 
says he was a Quaker and was imprisoned in Boston for disorderly 
conduct in Sept. 1656, but soon released and sent back to his 
family on L. I. He came to Boston Sept. 2, 1656, from the Barba- 
does, to which he had been banished. In 1676 has w. Sarah and 
lives in "Smithfield" (probably Smithtown), L. I. In 1698 
Joseph, William and Thomas are on the list of North Sea men, 
perhaps ch. or gr. ch. of Richard. 

June 17, 1651, Bartholomew Smith has a home lot of £50 granted 
him provided he remain and pursue his trade. In 1660 Roger 
Smith is mentioned as in a law suit. 

"Phebe, relict of Nathaniel Smith, Esq., d. Aug. 26, 1775, ae. 
73," is supposed to be the mother of Dr. William Smith, who m. 
Ruth, d. of Zebulon Howell, Sen., and had ch. Dr. John, Phebe, 
Mary and another son, who removed to Philadelphia. Mary m. 
John Pelletreau and had ch. William S., Nathaniel, Charles, 
Edwin and John, as appears in the genealogy of the Pelletreau 
family. 

105. Standley, Onesiphorus ; on the tax list of 1683. 

106. Stanton, Thomas, was paid £4 for services as interpreter to 
Indians. A resident of Stonington, Ct., and came to Virginia 
1634, se. 20. Had s. Thomas b. 1639. 

107. Stolking or Stocking, George; on tax list of 1694, s. of 
Samuel of Middletown, Ct., who was s. of George of Cambridge and 
Hartford. 



Genealogies. 439 

108. Stratton, John, in 1644, has a grant of land. Not here in 
16-19, bat one of the settlers of East Hampton in that year. Rich- 
ard Stratton on the whale list 164f, and in 1683 mentioned as a 
resident of Bast Hampton. 

109. Strickland, Jonathan, with w. ord. Mary, on list of 1698. 
A Mr. Stickland or Sticklem (probably same name as Strickland), 
1650, said to be of Hempstead, and to have son-in-law, Jonas Wood. 

Sturmey, Charles, of North Sea, 1682, and d. Dec. 24, 1691, had 
w. Deborah. 

110. Swinfleld, Raphael ; sole mention is Dec. 1, 1646, when he 
failed to pay tax — probably had removed.- Not on the list of 1644. 

111. Symonds, Henry, Apr. 6, 1641, has land granted, but no 
evidence of any residence. According to Snow (Hist, of Boston), 
he was made freeman at that town 1643. Lechford says he was 
one of the church organized at Lynn, but did not go to Long 
Island with the others. 

112. Tainte, John, blacksmith; only mentioned in 1682. 

113. Tennison, John, carpenter; here in 1667 and '68, building 
the second church. In 1671 he had a lot granted him which is 
now either the west half of Daniel Jagger's home lot, or the home- 
stead of the late Agee Halsey, which in 1682 he sold to Major John 
Howell. 

114. Terry, Robert and Thomas. Thomas, aged 28, Robert, 25, 
and Richard, in 1635, came to America in the James from Eng- 
land. Thomas was one of the " undertakers," but did not remain 
long if he came at all. Robert was here probably from 1640 to 1646 
or thereabouts. He was of Flushing 1666. 

115. Thorpe, Thomas, in 1651 mentioned in a lawsuit. In 1655 
Thompson put him among the first settlers of Brookhaven. One 
of this name died in Ipswich, Mass., 1677. 

116. Tomson, Thomas. One of this name came in the Abigail 
in 1635, aged 18. He resided in Lynn, then in New London and 
■was here in 1642. Hedges says he was one of the settlers of East 
Hampton 1649. According to Hatfield he removed to Elizabeth, 
.N. J., and d. Sept. 1676, of good estate. Had ch. Moses, Aaron 
and Hnr. 

117. Travally, Thomas, w. Hannah 1683, on list with three polls 
and £229. Not on list of 1694, but wife is. Lived on road to 
Bridgehampton or in Old Town. 



440 Histoky of Southampton. 

Vail, Vayle or Veale, Thomas. Vail, Thomas, an inhabitant in 
1647 and remains nntil 1654, and perhaps later. He had w. Sarah. 
Was prob. a bro. of Jeremiah Veale or Vail, a blacksmith of Salem, 
Mass., who in 1651 was offered a hundred pound allotment if he 
would settle in Southampton and carry on his trade. Jeremiah had 
ch. bap. in Salem, Abigail, May 18, 1644; Sarah, Mch. 21, 164$; 
and Jeremiah, Dec. 30, 1649. (Essex Inst. Coll., vols. 5 and 6.) 

118. Vonck, Cornelius, a German, and "cordwainer," lived on 
present residence of Thomas Warren, which he bought of Ben 
Davis 1668. Sold what is the residence of Milicent Hendrickson 
to Richard Painter, 1679, from his home lot. Had w. Madeline, 
who, being wid., sold the homestead to Edward White, who, 1682, 
sells the same to William Mason. His ch. Alida, b. Aug. 27, 1668; 
Catherine b. Mch. 9, 16$$; John, Nov. 15, 1671; Mary, Jan. 27 
167f; Madeline, May 2, 1675; d. Ider b. April 17, 1677; d. Bar- 
bar Apr. 18, 1679 ; Henry, Jan. 7, 168$. 

119. Wade, Dr. Nathaniel, w. or d. Abigail and s. Simon, as per 
list of 1698, lived in Sagg. 

120. Walton, Henry. One of the original "undertakers," and 
mentioned in Indian deed of Dec. 13, 1640. But probably soon 
after removed. 

121. Ware, John, by list of 1698, lived at the Southend; perhaps 
up Toilsome lane, and had ch. Jacob and John and w. or d. 
Elizabeth. 

122. Warren or Waring, John, of Cold Spring, in town of Oyster 
Bay, has w. Elizabeth, d. of John White, and she appears to be an 
only child, and they have son John Warren, to whom they give all 
John White's property, which he possessed at his death and which 
they probably had held by will in trust. 

Waters, Anthony. Mch. 6, 1659, bought a house and lot of 
Samuel Dayton of North Sea, which had been his father's, Ralph 
Dayton's. He did not remain long in the town. 

123. Weeks, Thomas, on a jury Jan. 165f, of Stamford, Ct., 
1649. 

124. Welbee, George, an original "undertaker" and mentioned 
in Indian deed of Dec. 13, 1640, but probably soon after removed. 
Lynn 1638. 

125. Wells, William, first mention, March 164f, when he was 
censured for "unreverend speeches" to Daniel Howe, magistrate. 



Genealogies. 441 

Was a resident then and on the list of Dec. 1646, of those who 
failed to pay their taxes, probably because of removal elsewhere. 

1-36. Wheeler, Thomas, Sept. 1658, then deceased. Probably an 
inhabitant of East Hampton, and his wid. in. Mr. Josiah Stan- 
brough of Sagg. John was of Bast Hampton 1687. 

127. Whitehead, Samuel, cordwainer, of New Haven, 1643, 
Southampton 1688. Had d. Mary b. Feb. 14, 168-f ; s. Samuel b. ' 
Feb. 29, 168f Married 2d w. Joana Beebe, Oct. 24, 1689 ; mar. 1st 
w. Mary. Cooper, Sept. 12, 1682, and she d. Apr. 20, 1687. Not on 
list of 1683 or 1698. Probably removed to New Jersey, where the 
name prevails. 

128. Wickham, Joseph, tanner ; on list of 1698, with s. Joseph 
and w. or d. Sarah, and lived at Sagg. 

Wickham, Joseph, tanner, Aug. 1686, had a grant of land in 
Sagg provided he stay seven years and work at his trade, which he 
did. 

129. Wilkeson, Josias, of North Sea, where he had a house, 1657 
or 8. One of this name of Providence, R. I., early. 

130. Willman, Isaac, first mentioned 1649. Had w. Mary and 
ch. Isaac b. Aug. 31, 1657, Abraham, Matthew, John b. May 18, 
1670, Theophilus and Benjamin. Isaac 2d m. 1st, Mary Wines 

of Southold Oct. 7, 1686, and 2d, Susanah , and had ch. Mary 

b. Dec. 9, 1689, and Abraham, and probably (by list of 1698) 
James and perhaps also Susana, Hannah and Elizabeth. Theophi- 
lus W. of Conn. d. in E. H. Sept. 6, 1744, ae. 72 ; b. 1672. 

131. Willmot, Alexander, "joiner," of New Haven in 1697, 
bought a residence in Bridgehampton and had w. Mary and s. 
Walter b. 1709, who graduated at Yale 1734. Walter studied for 
the ministry and was ordained pastor at Jamaica, L. I., Apr. 12, 
1738. He died 1744. Married Freelove Townsend, d. of Jotham 
T. of Oyster Bay. Alexander W. had other ch. as by his will, viz.: 
Mary, Hannah, Hepsabah and Sarah, w. of Abraham Bradley. His 
will was proved Mch. 30, 1721. N. Y. S. O. 

132. Winthrop, Mr. [John], had a lot apportioned him, but 
probably never occupied ; in 1644 it was transferred to Mr. 
[Edward] Johnes. 

133. Wood, George, 1644, servant of Mr. Edward Howell. In 
1665 he was living in Huntington. Doc. Hist. 

134. Wood, Jonas. Two of this name appear on the early 
56 



442 Histoky of Southampton. 

records of Southampton, and in one case one of them is the princi- 
pal and and the other a juryman in a lawsuit. To distinguish 
them the former is called Jonas Wood H. [Halifax] and the latter 
Jones Wood 0. [Oram]. Jones Wood H. is the earliest on record 
and was made freeman Oct. 7, 1650. Hatfield says Jonas and 
Edward Wood were members of the church at Water town, Mass., 
in 1635, and with Jo. Strickland and others were dismissed May 29* 
1635. to plant a colony on the Connecticut river, to which they 
gave the name of Wethersfield. In 1640 Jonas, Jonas, Jr., Jere- 
miah, Edmund, removed from Wethersfield and with others (Hin- 
man, Puritans of N. E.) settled Eippo warns (Stamford, Ct.). Jonas 
and Edmond (or Edward, as HatGeld has it) are thought to have 
been brothers and the other two their sons. In the spring of 1644 
they joined the colony that crossed over to L. I. (Wood, Hist, of L. 
I.), and settled Hempstead, Jonas being one of the patentees. 
Jonas and Jonas, Jr., subsequently settled at Huntington, L. L, and 
were both living there in 1675. The Jonas of North Sea, Wood 
thinks, was son of Edward and cousin of Jonas, Jr., supposing the 
latter to be son of Jonas, Sr. To return to the Southampton notes. 
Jonas, July, 1650, draws land for his father-in-law, Mr. Strickland 
of Hempstead. 

Jonas Wood (Halifax) of Huntington, March 11, 16f#. In 1650 
one-half an acre from his home lot was laid out for a highway to 
the water. Jones Wood H., not on list of 1649 ; he had w. Eliza- 
beth and, 1652 and 3, lived in North Sea. Oct. 30, 1655, Jonas H. 
and Jonas O. mentioned. But the record is a tangle. 

In 1698 we find Richard and Jacob named — separately — possi- 
bly both young men or boys. In 1710 we find Eichard had w. 
Hannah, d. of Thos. Reeves, married Apr. 10, 1704, and had ch. 
Hannah b. Feb. 9, 170£, Phebe b. Oct. 28, 1709, James b. March 
13, 17H> Matthew b. March 6, 17|£, Theophilus b. May 11, 1718, 
Abraham b. Aug. 14, 1721, and Silas b. June 16, 1724. His will is 
of date Apr. 17, 1731, and gives to his son Silas his dwelling-house 
in the "North Sea bounds." James is not mentioned in his will, 
which was proved Aug. 26, 1734. 

Elnathan Wood m. a d. of Stephen Topping and had s. Silas, 
who had s. Stephen now living in Bridgehampton. Elnathan had 
also bro. Silas. 



Genealogies. 443 

Jonas (Halifax) of Huntington had w. Elizabeth and children, 
Jonas, Jeremiah, Timothy, John (not certain of the order of age, 
nor how many more). Timothy, 1709, of Jamaica, had w. Judith. 

Jonathan b. 1G58, in 1662 is indentured to John Smith of Hemp- 
stead — son of Jonathan and Anne of R. I. 

Edmond appears to be the father of Jonas (Halifax) ; according 
to Huntington Rec. Jeremiah had w. Elizabeth, and this Jeremiah 
was dead in 1659. Timothy was also dead in 1659. 

1688. Jonas of Huntington willed (will proved 1692) to heirs 
Jonas, John, Eliza and Phebe. 

1696. Samuel (of Huntington) is called son and heir of Jonas 
"Halifacks." 

1681. (Huntington, Rec.) Joseph (husbandman) m. Eunice 
Jarvies. 

1679. Joseph d. 1747, ae. 68. 

1677. Eliphalet, son of John, b. Eeb. 14, Huntington. 

1680. John, son of John, b. Apr. 6, Huntington. 
1680. Samuel, s. of Jeremiah, b. July 27, Hempstead. 
1684. Joseph of Hempstead, called s. of Jeremiah, 
1683. Jeremy, Sen. and Jun., householders, Hempstead. 
1683. Jonas, householder, Hempstead. 

1717. Joseph (Halifax) sells. 
1720. John, Jr., of Halifax. 

1740. Huntington, Jeremiah devised to oldest son Jonas and 
named son Jeremiah executor. 

1749. Jeremiah, father of Jonas and Jeremiah (as 

above) and lately deceased. 
1753. Jonas (weaver), w. Charity, sells land to bro. 
„ , . j Jeremiah, yeoman. 

°' 17 _„ John, ) bros., and sons of John, late de- 

Jotham, j ceased. 
1753. John (cordwainer) sells land. 
1746. John, blacksmith mentioned. 
There appear to have been three of the name of Jonas as co tem- 
poraries. 

Jacob W. was a resident of Mecox 1676. 

1692. Jonas and w. Lydia of Hempstead. 

1693. Huntington. Sam, Sen., and w. Deborah sell to son Jeseph 
W. Deed signed by Sam, Sr. and Jr., and Deborah. 



444 History of Southampton. 

1698. Hempstead Rec. Lydia W. of B. 2J. Jersey. 
1677. Joseph of Huntington, cooper. 

1705. Timothy, cordwainer, of Jamaica, has w. Hannah. 

1706. Jonathan of Jamaica has w. Mary. 
1708. Joseph of Huntington has w. Eebecca. 

1710. Jonas of Huntington has w. Elizabeth. 

1711. Justice John, John, Sen., Jeremiah and Timothy of Hunt- 
ington join in a deed. 

1718. Jonas of Jamaica, cordwainer. 

1718. Jonas of Jamaica, Gent. 

1719. Joseph of Huntington, weaver. 

1720. John at Plagpond Huntington, son of John, who had also 
son Eliphalet, and in 1721 John and Caleb are called brothers. 

1723. Joseph sells to his son Caleb. 

1727. Joseph of Oyster Bay (weaver) (formerly of Huntington) 
releases to Caleb and Amos the land his father now lives on. 

1724. John has a son Jonas. 
1730. Jeremiah has a son Jonas. 



Anniversaky of Settlement of Southampton. 445 

CELEBRATION OF THE 225TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
SETTLEMENT OF SOUTHAMPTON, DECEMBER 13, 
1865. 

This day was chosen as the anniversary of the day on which legal 
possession of their homes was obtained from the Indians, as may be 
seen from the date of the Indian deed given in the Appendix. The 
historical discourse was delivered by Rev. Geo. Rogers Howell, and 
the following ode written for the occasion, by Mrs. Maria J. R. 
Howell, daughter of Capt. Mercator Cooper, and wife of John 
Fletcher Howell, Esq., was finely rendered by a large choir. 

At a meeting in the evening, appropriate addresses were made by 
H. R. Stiles, M. D., and Mr. Alden J. Spooner, of Brooklyn, and 
the Rev. Messrs. W. B. Reeves, of Westhampton, and Epher Whita- 
ker, of Southold. 

Eise up, ye people, with anthems of praise, 
And loud to Jehovah your thanksgivings raise; 

Praise ye the might which hath built here an altar, 
And gathered a people from over the sea; 

Sing to the mercy whose love cannot falter, 
And praise ye Jehovah, the God of the free. 
Rise up, ye people, with anthems of praise, 
And loud to Jehovah your thanksgivings raise. 

Agos have rolled down the dark stream of time, 
Since our forefathers left their own native clime, 

Seeking a home on this ocean-girt Isle, 
Where, free from the weight of oppression's hard rod, 

Untrammeled by rank and unfettered by guile, 
Secure they might dwell, and in peace worship God. 
Rise up, ye people, with anthems of praise. 
And loud to Jehovah your thanksgivings raise. 

Here in their Island homes they have been blest, 
An oasis fair upon ocean's broad breast; 

The loved forms that builded the first cottage fires 
Long since have slumbered beneath the green sod; 

But the children, impressed with the same fond desires, 
Still bring to this altar their tribute to God. 

Rise up, ye people, with anthems of praise, 
And loud to Jehovah your thanksgivings raise. 



Appendix. 447 



APPENDIX 



*"THE DISPOSALS OF THE VESSELL." 

March 10, 1639. f 

"In consideracon that Edward Howell hath disbursed 15 lb and Edmond 
ffarington 10 lb, Josias Stanborough 5 lb, George Welbe 10 lb, Job Sayreolb, 
Edmond Needam 5 lb, Henry Walton 10 lb, & Thomas Sayre 5 lb. Itt is 
Agreede vpon that wee the forenamed vndertakers haue disposed of our sev- 
erall pts of our vessell to Daniel How. In Consideracon whereof hee is to 
Transports them soe much goods either to them, theire heirs, executors and 
Assignes, (If they shall Desire it) as theire severall somme or sommes of Mon- 
ney shall amounte vnto, & moreover to each of those psons Above named, or 
their Assignes, he shall transporte to each man A Person and a Tunne of goods 
ffree. But in case that any of the forenamed Persons shall not have occasion 
for the transportacon of- soe much goods as his monney shall Ammount vnto, 
that then the said Daniell is to make them payment of the remainder of the 
monney by the end of two yeares nest ensueing the date hereof, and likewise 
this vessell shall be for the vse of the Plantacon, and that the said Daniell 
shall not sell this vessel] without the consent of the maior pt of the Company. 
And that the Vessell shall be reddy at the Towne of Lynne to Transporte such 
goods as the Afforesaid vndertakers shall Appointe, That is to say three tymes 
in the yeare. ^furthermore if In case that any Persons shall not have occasion 
to Transporte any goods, that then the said Daniell is to pay them their somme 
or sommes of monney, together with Allowance for a Tunne of goods & A 
pson within the tearm of two yeares next ensueinge the date hereof, for the 
full performance hereof the said Daniell How has — [three or four lines muti- 
lated and illegible.] 

" ffurthermore whereas it is expressed formerly that the vessell shall come 
to our Intended Planntacon three tymes in the yeare, wee thought good to 
express the tymes, viz : the first Moneth, the fourth moneth and the eighth 
moneth. 

" ffurthermore for the rates of Persons goods and chattells that if there 
proue any difference between vs the vndertakers and the said Daniell How 
that then it shall be referred to two men whome they and he shall chuse. 

" ffurthermore for as much as Allen Bread, Thomas Halsey & William Har- 
ker, Are by the Consent of the Company come into and pty vndertakers with 
us, wee Edward Howell, Daniel How & Henry Walton have consigned three 
of our pts that is to each man a house lott, Planting lott and farme answerable 
to the rest of ye vndertakers for their disbursements of five pounds A man 
to-vs the above said vndertakers, that is to say whereas Mr. Howell had 3 lotts, 
he shall have hut two & Daniell How for three lots shall have but two & Henry 
Walton for 2 lotts shall have but one. 

" Edwakd Howell, 
' ' Daniell How, 
" Henby Walton." 

* From the town records. 1 1639^0. 



44:8 Histoey of Southampton. 

For as muck as wee Edward Howell, Edmond ffarrington, Edmond Needam, 
Daniell How, Josias Stanborougb, Thomas Sairs, Job Saires, George Welbe 
and Henry Walton & Thomas Halsey, Allen Bread, William Harker, have 
disbursed ffourscore pounds ffor the settinge fForward A Plantacon, and in re- 
gard wee have taken vpon vs to transporte at o r owne prop Costs and charges 
all such psons as shall goe at the first voyage whenD those of o r Company 
that are Chosen thereunto shall goe vpon Discovery and search, and to beginne 
and settle a Plantacon, and further more in regarde all such psons soe goeinge 
vpon o r accompt have in o r vessell the ffreedome of halfe A Tunne of goods a 
pson, it is thought meete that wee the fore, named vndertakers should not any 
tyme nor tymes hereafter be lyable to any rates, taxes or Impositions, nor be 
putt vpon any fenceings, buildinge of meetinge house, erecting ffortifications, 
buildinge of bridges, repairinge high wayes, nor otherwise charged for any 
Cause or reason whatsoever duringe the tyme of o r discontinuance in o r intended 
Plantacon, except yt in the fencinge in of Plantinge Lotts, every man shall 
{with his neighbore) fence or cause to be fenced by the first day of April wch 
shall be 1641. 

ffurthermore because delaying to lay out the boundes of Townes, and all 
such land within the saide boundes hath bene generally the ruin of Townes in 
this Country, therefore we the said vndertakers have thought goode to take 
vpon vs, the dispose of all lands within our said boundes soe yt yt wch wee 
lay out for A house Lott, shall at all tymes from tyme to tyme hereafter, con- 
tinue to be A house Lott, and but one Dwelling house shall be builded vpon 
it, and those Lottes yt wee lay out for plantenge Lotts, shall not at any tyme 
nor tymes hereafter, be made house lotts whereby more Inhabitants might be 
receaved into o r said Plantacon to the ouer chargeing of Commons and the 
Impoverishinge of the Towne, and yt allsne what is lay ed out for Commons shall 
Continue Common & noe man shall presume to Incroach vpon it soe much as 
A hands breadeth, and whatsoever wee lay out for farmes shall so remaine for 
after tyme, and ye dispose of all such landes so layed out shall also bee at all 
tymes and from tyme to tyme hereafter at the will & pleasure of vs the said 
vndertakers o r executors Administrators and Assigns. Namely the disposinge 
of the lande * * * shall be disposed * * * [nearly two lines gone]. 

Andallsoe whosoever sellethhis Accomodations in the Towne shall sell house 
Lott & plantinge Lott or Lotts & meddow Intirely and if hee sell his farme he 
shall not devide it butt sell it together, viz, his ffarme Intirely & his Accomo- 
dations in ye Towne Intirely. 

Moreover whosoever cometh in by vs shall hould himself Sattisfyed with 
foure Achres to an house Lott & twelve Achres to a plantinge Lott, & soe 
much meddow & vplande as may make his Accomodations ffifty Achres, ex- 
cept wee the said vndertakers shall see cause to Inlarge that proportion by A 
farme or otherwise. 

ffurthermore noe pson nor psons whatsoever shall challenge or claime any 
proper Interest in Seas, rivers, creekes or brookes, howBover boundeinge or 
passinge througe his grounde, but ffreedome of fishinge, fowlinge, & naviga- 
tion shall be Common to all within the bankes of the said waters whatsoever. 

And whosoever shall fell any tree or trees in high wayes, is either to grubb 
them up by the rootes or else to cutt them smooth vp euen by the grounde and 
putt the tree or trees out of all such highways 

And whosoever felleth any tree or trees in the common, shall either carry 
away the body or bodyes thereof with ye Aptenances, or else sett or lay it vp 
on heapes soe as the pasture for Cattell or passage for man or beast may not 
haue any Annoyance. 

Likewise noe pson nor psons wtever shall fell or lopp or carry away any 
Tree or trees, fire wood or otherwise vff or ffrom any Lott or Lotts wtsoeuer, 
for as is the lande, soe shall ye Aptnances bee, every mans owne peculiar 
ppriety. v 

Neither shall any pson or psons make or vse any highwayes paths or other- 



Appendix. 449 

wise over any persons house Lott plantinge Lott or medow, but shall vpon all 
occasions vse the Allowed waves layed out for yt end. 

(furthermore it is thought ineete that if the said vndertakers make any 
Composition with any pson or psons yt lay claim to them to make manyfest 
his or their right in any pt or pts or in all * * * of the place where God 
shall direct vs to beginne or intended Plantacon * * * [a line gone]. 

And it come tp passe yt wee the said vndertakers shall either in our owne 
names, or in the names of the Inhabitants In generall promise to pay or cause 
to be paid any somme or sommes of money, goods or Chattell, fines or rates or 
the like, as may hereafter be thought meete proportionably to what they 
Injoy, And that then every pson or psons Inhabitinge within the boundes of 
our Plantacon beinge owners of lande there, that they shall be contented and 
pleased to help to beare a share or shares, from tyme to tyme and at all tymes 
hereafter of all such payments as may be required of vs the forenamed 
vndertakers o r executors Administrators or Assignes and yt his or their Sub- 
scribeinge to these presents may be a sufficient Declaration vnder all such 
psons handes yt they doe approve of all the premises here specified. 

Lastly wee the said vndertakers testifye by these prsents in our Admittinge 
of Inhabitants to our Intended Plantacon tha* wee without any kinde of reser- 
uation leave men ffree to choose and determine all Causes and Controuerseys 
Arbitrary amonge themselues. And that whensoeuer it shall please the Lord 
& he shall see it good to adde to vs such men as shall be fitt matter for A 
church, that then wee will in that thinge lay ourselves downe before ye Con-, 
stitutes thereof either to bee or not to be receaved as members thereof accord- 
inge as they shall discerne the worke of god to be in our hearts. 

Edward Howell Yemarkeof 

John Edmund Needham Edmund X ffarrington 

Cooper Josiah Stanborough Thomas Say re 

Henr. Walton Darnell How 

Job Sayre 

the mark of George Welbee 

Allen X Bread Thomas Halsey. 



William Harker. 



Vndertakers. 



the marke of Phillip Kyrtland 

Thomas T Newell Nathaniel Kyrtland 

John ffarington Tbomas ffarrington 



the marke of 
Richard & Dyall 



Thom — Terry. 



These are to give notise that wee the Aforesaid Company of vndertakers doe 
ffully and ffreely give our Consent that John Cooper shall and is Admitted an 
vndertaker with the like full & Lymmitted power with ourselves in all Cases 
yt may Concerne our Plantacon. 

Edward Howell 
the mark of Edmond X ffarrington. 
Edmund Needham 
Thomas Halsey. 
the mark of Allen W. Bread. 
Daniell How. 
Henr. Walton. 



57 



450 Histoey of Southampton. 

A Declakation of the Company. 

Know all men whom these preseuts may concerne yt whereas it is 
expressed in on Artikle that the power of disposinge of Land & Admission of 
Inhabitants into our Plantacon shall at all tymes rernaine in the hands of vs 
the said vndertakers to vs and our heires forever, yt our true intent and 
meaneinge is that when our Plantacon is laid out by those Appointed accord- 
inge to oar Articles & that there shall be a church gathered and constituted 
accordinge to the minde of Christe, that then wee doe ffreely lay downe our 
power both of orderinge and disposeinge of the plantacon & receaveinge of 
Inhabitants or any other thiDge that may tende to the good & welfare of ye 
place at the ffeete of Christe and his Church, provided that they shall not doe 
any thing contrary to the true meaninge of the fformer Articles. 

ffurther more whereas it is expressed in A fformer Article yt the lande of 
vndertakers should at all tyines remains ffree from Affordeinge any helpe to 
builde meeting house or makeing of bridge or bridges or mendeinge of high 
wayes or the like dureing the tyme of their discontinuance ffrom the planta- 
con, it is thought meete that yt shall take place & stande in force but two 
yeares vnless there be some good reason given for it & then those shall have 
land only for the third yeare provided yt within the thirde yeare they come 
backe againe, [nearly two lines gone] * * ye 4th day of ye 4th 16 — 
In witness of these two Articles foregoinge wee have sett to our hands. 

Edward Howell, 
the marke of Edmond X ffarrington 
John Cooper Thomas Halsey 

Edmund Needham Daniell How 

Henr. Walton. Thomas Sayre. 

These are to give notis that wee the aforesayd vndertakers doe ffully and 
ffreely give our Consent that Mr. John Gosrneere shall and is admitted an 
vndertaker with the like full and Limetted power with ourselves in all Cases 
yt Conserne our plantatyon. 

Edward Howell the marke of Allen X Breade 

Edmund Needham. Thomas Sayre. 

Henr. Walton The marke of Edmund X ffarrington. 

John Cooper Thomas Halsey 

William Harker 



"INDIAN DEED OF DEC. 13, 1640." 

" This Indenture made the 13th day of December Anno Dom. 1640, between 
Pomatuck, Mandush, Mocomanto, Pathemanto, Wybennett, Wainmenowog, 
Heden, Watemexoted, Checkepuchat, the native Inhabitants and true owners 
of the eastern part of the Long Island on the one part, and Mr. John Gosmer 
Edward Howell, Daniell How, Edward Needham, Thomas Halsey, John Cooper^ 
Thomas Sayre, Edward ffarrington, Job Sayre, George Welbe, Allen Bread' 
William Harker, Henry Walton on the other part, witnesseth, that the sayd 
Indians for due Consideration of sixteen coats already received, and also three 
score bushells of Indian corn to be paid vpon lawfull demand the last of Sep- 
tember which shall be in the yeare 1641, and further in consideration that the 
above named English shall defend vs the sayd Indians from the unjust vio- 
lence of whatever Indians shall illegally assaile vs, doe absolutely and forever 
give and grant and by these presents doe acknowledge ourselves to have given 
& granted to the partyes above mencioned without any fraude, guile mentall 
Eeservation or equivocation to them their heirs and successors forever all the 
lands, woods, waters, water courses, easemts, profits & emoluments thence 
arising whatsoever, from the place commonly known by the name of the place 
where the Indians hayle over their canoes out of the North bay to the south 



Appendix. 451 

side of the Island, from thence to possess all the lands lying eastward betweene 
the foresaid boundes by water, to wit all the land pertaining to the parteyes- 
aforsaid, as also all the old ground formerly planted lying eastward from the 
first creek at ye westerraore end of Shinecock plaine. To have & to hold for- 
ever without any claime or challenge of the least title, interest, or propriety 
whatsoever of vs the sayd Indians or our heyres or successors or any others by 
our leave, appointment, license, counsel or authority whatsoever, all the land 
bounded as is abovesaid. In full testimonie of this our absolute bargaine con- 
tract and grant indented and in full and complete ratification and establish- 
ment of this our act and deed of passing over all our title & interest in the 
premises with all emoluments & profits thereto appertaining, or in any wise 
belonging, from sea or land within our Limits above specified without all guile 
wee have sett to our hands the day and yeare above sayd. 

" Memorand. Before the subscribing of this present writing it is agreed 
that ye Indians above named shall have liberty to breake up ground for their 
vse to the westward of the creek aforementioned on the west side of Shinne- 
cock plain. 

" Witnesses of the deliverie & subscribing of this writing. 

" Abraham Pierson, " Manatacut, his x mark, 

" Edward Stephenson, " Mandush, his x marke, 

" Iiobart Terry, '" Wybenet, his x mark, 

" Joseph Howe, " Howes, his x mark, 

" Thomas Whitehone, '• Setommecoke, his x mark, 

" Joseph Griffeths, " Mocomanto, his x mark, 
" William Howe, "these in the name of all the rest. 

" Recorded in ye office at New York Oct 3 1665, by Matthias Nicolls, Sec." 



INDIAN DEED OF QUOGUE PURCHASE. 

May 12, 1659. 

Bee it knowne unto all men that by this present writing that I Wiandance 
Sachem of Paumanacke or Long Island have upon deliberate consideration, and 
with my sonne Weeaycombone both of us together giuen and granted vnto 
Mr John Ogden and his heires forever, I say freely given a certaine tract of 
land beginning at the west end of Southampton bounds, which land is bounded 
easthwards with Southampton bounds and with a small piece of meadow 
which I gave to M r John Gosmer which he is to enjoy, Northward to the water 
of the bay and to the creeke of Accobaucke [Beaverdam stream] Westward 
to the place called peheconnacke, and Southerly to potunck, three miles land- 
ward in from the high water marke and creeke of accobaucke and so along to 
the west. But from this three miles bredth of land Southward all the land 
and meadow towards the south sea, the beach only excepted which is sold to 
John Cooper, I say all the land and meadow I have sold for a considerable 
price unto Mr John Ogden for himself his heirs executors and assigns for ever 
upon condition as followeth, first that Thomas Halsey and his associates shall 
have the privilege of the place of meadow called quawcanantucke the terme 
of years formerly granted to him or them. But the land lying betweene 
quawcanantucke and three miles northward he shall or may possess and im- 
prove at present but when the yearesof the aforesaid Thomas Halsey shall be 
expired then shall the aforesaid M r John Ogden or his assigns fully possess 
and improve all quacannantucke meadow with the rest aforesayd, and then 
shall pay or cause to be payd unto me Wiandance my heirs or assigns the 
summe of twenty five shillings a yeare as a yearly acknowledgement or rent 
for ever And it is also agreed that wee shall keep our priviledgos of Gsbing 
fowling hunting or gathering of beryes or any other thing for our vso and for 



452 History of Southampton. 

the full and firme confirmation hereof we have hoth partyes set too our hands 
marke and seals interchangeably the date and yeare above written. 
In presence of us 

David Gardiner. John Ogden 

Lion Gardiner. 

Note. — The consideration for the above purchase appears to be £400 paid 
to Wyandanch who for this sum became surety for the Shinnecock Indians 
who were thus fined apparently for burning some houses in Southampton. 



Ifov. 2, 1667. John Ogden of Elizabeth-town N. J. sells to Southampton 
100 acres of salt marsh or meadow lying on Peaconic bay, the same having 
been apparently included in the above purchase. 

DEED OP QUOGUE PURCHASE, 16/3 



From the following instruments it appears that the land embraced in the 
<juogue purchase was first sold to John Ogden by the chief of the Montauk 
tribe, Wyandanch, and from him passed into the hands of John Scott who 
sold it to the town. The creek or river called Apaucuck is now called indiffer- 
ently the Beaverdam or Apocock stream. 

This writing wituesseth an Agreement Between John Scott of Ashford [Se- 
taukett] on Long Island in New England, Esq., of the one part, And John 
Howell, Thirstan Raynor, Robert Fordham, Thomas Halsey Senior, Gent, 
Samuel Clark, Richard Post & John Jessup Yeoman of the other part, Wit- 
nesseth that the said John Scott for & in Consideration of Seventy pounds to 
be well and faithfully paid unto him his heirs Exec™ Admin 8 or Assigns in 
Chattels as they shall be Estimated by two persons Indifferetly Chosen accord- 
ing to the rate of beef & pork at price current, All those lands rivers 
waters, woods, underwoods, timber trees Marshes Marish Ground privileges 
Jurisdictions ways easements proprieties Emoluments whatsoever that he 
the said John Scott Bought or by any means acquired of Mr. John Ogden of 
Feversham [North Sea] lying and being bounded west on South side with 
a Creek or river Commonly known by the appellation of Apaucuck, And 
on the East with Niamuck [Canoe Place], and North with the South Side of 
the Neck lying between the first Creek called Iron Creek and from thence 
by the path from neck to neck to Peaconet about Eight Miles East and West, 
all which lands Meadows and privileges &c North of the said path between 
Peaconnet and the first Creek called the Iron or red Brook or Creek aforesaid 
which shall be and remain notwithstanding any pattent right Granted to the 
said parties above mentioned their heirs associates & Successors by Mr Farrett 
anno 1639 an absolute Estate in Fee Soccage without lett or Molestation to 
him the said John Scott his heirs and assigns forever South of the which path 
the said John Scott his heirs or assigns shall not feed nor Common any Cattle 
by Tertue of Interest in the Lands or Meadows bounded North of the path 
aforesaid, Nor the said John Howell &c not to be Trespassers for accidental 
Commonage untill the said land be fenced. To the true performance of the 
premises articles Clauses and Agreements the parties above mentioned have 
interchangeably set to their hands and seals this Second day of February 
Anno Dom. 1663 

John Scott. 

In presence of 

Thomas Backer, 
Thos James 
Chas Barnes 

Memorandum Mr John Ogden being present when the above deed was 
signed and sealed by John Scott Esq he the said Mr John Ogden doth by Sub- 
scribing own himself fully Satisfied in the said Conveyance and doth further 



Appendix. 453 

own that Wyandanch delivered unto him Quiet Seizin and possession of all 
the Lands above recited in part of pay of the four hundred pounds Shenecoek 
Indians Stood indebted and the said Wiandanch bound for the said Indians as 
will more at large appear in the said Wiandanch his obligation for himself 
Estate and the Estate of his Indians his and their heirs & assigns for ever. 

In presence of us John Osden. 

Tho. Backer. 
Tho. James. 

The Deposition of John Woodruff Jun r & Samuel Dayton this 2nd of Feb- 
ruary 1663 these Deponents say they were present when Wiacombowne deliv- 
ered unto Mr John Ogden quiet seizen and possession of all the Lands above 
recited with the premises mentioned and for the end mentioned in Mr Ogden 
his subscription above written. 

This taken before me the day & year above written. 

Thirston Raynor. 

1st. INDIAN DEED OF TOPPING'S PURCHASE, 1662. 

This writing, made the tenth of April, 1662, between Weany Sunk Squaw, 
Anabackus and Jackanapes, all of them resident at Shinnecock, near South- 
ampton, on Long Island, ou the one party, and Thomas Topping, of South- 
ampton, on the aforesaid Island, on the other party, witnesseth : That we, the 
said Weany, Anabackus and Jackanapes, have given and granted, and by these 
presents do give and grant, bargain, sell, assign and set over unto Thomas Top- 
ping aforesaid, his heirs and assigns for ever all our right, title and interest 
that we have, or ought to have, in a certain tract of land lying and being West- 
ward of the said Shinecock, and the lawful bounds of Southampton afore- 
said, that is to say, to begin at the Canoe Place otherwise Niamnck, and so 
to run westward to a place called and known by the name of Seatuck, and 
from thence to run northward across the said Island or neck of land unto a 
place called the head of the Bay, with all the meadow and pasture, arable 
land, easements, profits, benefits, emoluments, is or may be contained within 
the limits and bounds before mentioned, together with half the profits and 
benefits of the beach on the south side of the said Island in respect of fish, 
whale or whales that shall by God's providence be cast up from time to time, 
and at all times, with all the herbage or feed that shall be or grow thereon : 
To have and to hold all the forementioned demised premises, with all and sin- 
gular their appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise appertaining to 
him, the said Thomas Topping, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns 
for ever, without the lett, trouble, denial or molestation of us, the said Weany, 
Anabackus and Jackanapes, our heirs or assigns, or any other person or per- 
sons lawfully claiming from by or under us, our heirs, executors, adminis- 
trators or assigns for and in consideration of the four score fathom of Wam- 
pum, or other pay equivalent to be paid unto the said Weany, Anabackus and 
Jackanapes, together with those other Indians interested whose names are 
underwritten, at or before the first day of December next ensueing the date 
hereof by the said Thomas Topping or his assigns : unto the true and faith- 
ful performance of all the premises we have hereunto interchangeably set our 
hands. 

In presence of 

James Herrick 
John Topping 
Elnathan Topping. 

Thomas Topping Wataugum x 

Weany x her mark Tequobin x 

Anabackus x his mark Cobish x 

Jackanapes x his mark 
Note. — The modern orthography of the above indicates it is a copy of a 
copy. But so in the town records. 



454 History of Southampton. 

2nd. INDIAN DEED OP TOPPING'S PURCHASE, 1666. 

Know all men by these presents that whereas wee the vnderwriters whoe 
are of the Indians of Shenecock vnderstanding that some of our Indians here, 
namely, Weany, Anabackus, Jackanapes and some others have sold vntoCapt. 
Topping a tract of land westward from Southampton bounds, we doe hereby 
make protest against the said sale and doe affirme yt the said persons or Indians 
had noe right to make any such said sale, but that ye Interest & propriety vnto 
the said land belongeth totally or principally vnto vs or some of vs, And wee 
the true proprietors of the said lands do hereby Assigne and make over all our 
said Interest in the said tract of land lying from a place called Niamuck'or ye 
canoe place westward to a place called Seatuck and soe to run across ye Island 
(namely Long Island) vnto a place called the head of the bay or Peaconet on 
the North, wee say wee doe impart and Assigne all o r said Interest in ye faid 
lands (whereof Qnaqnanantuck is pt) vnto our ancient and loving ffriends the 
Townesmen of Southampton, to them & their successors for ever with this 
provise and consideration, that if Generale Nicolls whome wee acknowledge 
the honr ble & discreet Govern 1 of this Island doth vpon examination finde vs or 
pt of vs to bee true pprietors of ye said lands beforementioned, And that the 
said Southampton men doe receive and possess the same vpon our right or 
accompt that then they shall pay vnto vs as his said hon r shall determine, 
Witness our hands this 17th of September, 1666. 

The mark of O Mandush son. The mark of X Mandush his daughter 

The mark of ) Jonaquid The mark of S Weetetasen. 

The mark of | Goabes [Job's?] wife The mark of nn quaquashaw 
the relict of Mandush the Sa- The mark X of Punch 
chem. The mark of { Saugum unfitt. 

The marke | of Hoaquomes. The marke of : Tapuckhowbank. 

John Smith ■ ) his marke. 

HOGNECK DEED. 

Oct. 1665. The Shelter Island Indians haue this day confirmed the purchase 
of Hogg neck to Southampton men forever reserving liberty of hunting & 
fishing & fowling upon the same and have received sixe Indian coates vpon the 
confirmation thereof. In full satisfaction of all their claimes to Southampton 
men. 

before me 

Richard Nicolls. 
in ffort James. 

INDIAN DEED OF 1703. 

To all christian people to whom these presents shall come, Know yee that 
Pomguamo Chice * and Mahmanam Indian Sachems of ye plantation of In- 
dians commonly known by the name of Shinnecock and by and with ye con- 
sent of ye rest of their people for divers good causes thereunto moving as also 
for the sum of twenty pounds current money of ye province of New York to 
them in hand paid by ye Trustees of ye Commonalty of ye Town of South- 
ampton wherewith the said Pomguamo Chice and Mahmanam Indian Sachems 
above said acknowledge themselves satisfied contented and paid, hath given 
granted remised and released and forever quit claimed and by these presents 
themselves their people, their heirs and successors doth fully clearly and ab- 
solutely give grant remise release and forever quit claim unto the said Trustees 
namely Elnathan Topping, Joseph Fordham, Joseph Pierson, Abraham How- 
ell, Jekamiah Scott, Joseph Howell, Daniel Halsey, Thomas Stephens, Josiah 
Howell, Gersham Culver, John Maltby and Hezekiah Howell of ye Common- 
alty of ye town of Southampton their associates their heirs and successors 

* Chice means simply an old man. 



Appendix. 



455 



for ever in. ye full and peaceable possession and seizin for all such right estate 
title interest and demand whatsover as they ye people had or ought to have 
of in or to all that tract of land of the township of Southampton situate lying 
and being butted and bounded South with the main ocean, on the North by ye 
Bay and peconic great river which divides ye two branches of said Island and 
Easterly by a line running from a stake upon Wainscott plaine to the afore- 
said sea or main ocean, being the bounds between ye town of Easthampton 
and Southampton and Westerly from an Inlet out of ye sea or main ocean 
commonly known by cupsogue gut, into ye South bay running Northerly up 
Seatuck river to the marked bound tree of the said Township of Southampton 
standing npon ye west side of ye main branch of said Seatuck river and from 
said tree extending northerly to peconic great river aforesaid, together with 
all and singular the liberty privileges and advantages to the same belonging 
whatsoever ye said tract of land and township with all beaches points 
meadows Marshes Swamps rivers Brooks Coves ponds of water timber and 
Stone belonging or in any manner of wise appertaining unto ye said tract of 
land or township as above bounded and all that therein is contained or in any 
manner of ways comprehended, To have and to hold to them the said Trustees 
their associates their heirs and successors with theirs and every of their ap- 
purtenances to the only proper use benefit and behoof of each proprietor In- 
habitant of said township according to their respective appropriate rights, 
and ye undivided land to the proprietors according to their several rights and 
proportions in said township and to their heirs and assigns forever, so that 
neither they ye said Pomguama Chice and Mamanam their people nor any of 
their heirs and successors nor any other person or persons for them or any of 
them or in their or any of their name right or stead by any of them shall or 
will by any way or manner hereafter claim challenge or demand any estate 
right title or interest of in or unto the premises or any part or parcel thereof, 
but from all and every action, right title interest and demand of in or to ye 
premises or any part or parcel thereof they and every of them shall be utterly 
barred forever by these presents, and in full confirmation hereof they the said 
Pomguamo Chice and Mahman'an and many others of their people have here- 
unto set their hands and seals in Southampton aforesaid this sixteenth day of 
August Anno Domini 1703. 



Signed sealed and delivered in pres- 
ence of 

Stephen Bowyer 
Arthur Davis 
Benjamin Marshall 

ye said day 16th of August 1703 70 
Indians whose hand and seals are here- 
unto affixed appeared before me and 
acknowledged "this deed of release to 
be their free and voluntary act and 
deed. 

attest 
John Wheeler Justice 



Noadian x 
Wompi Dick x 
Cannady x 
Enoshott x 
Appoit s 

Will son of Conck 
Comhistuckm x 
Mosquomboim x 
Bedheded Will x 
Nogion x 



L S 




L S 




L S 


L S" 




L S 




L S 




L S 




L S 


L S 




L S 



h s] 


<t 


L S] 


'l si 


l s' 




L S 




L S 


'l s" 


L S 




L S 


'l s" 




L S 




L S 




L S ] 


L S* 




L S 




L S 




L S 




L S 


I, S* 


L S' 




L S 


L S 




L S 




L S 



Pomguamo x Chice 
Mahmanam x 
Wackwana x 
Tomon x 
Judas x 
Obadiah x 
Songotuck x 
Achigon x 
Wigan x 
Quotagoboye x 
Ben Quarn x 
Nahanas x 
Mamhatuce x 
Wolliutt x 
Toby * 
Titus x 
Nassausyck x 
John Man x 
Frank x 
Aquaqunt X 
Wombon x 
Angquano x 
Arthur x 
Quemitt x 



456 Histoky of Southampton. 

deed of james faeeett ape. 17, 1640. 

From the town, records. 
Know all men whom this p'sent writing may concerne that I James ffarret 
of Long Island Gen' Deputy to the right honr 111 the Earle of Starling Secretary 
for the kingdom of Scotland doe by these p'sents in the name and behalf of 
the said Earle and in mine owne name allsoe as his Deputy as it doth or may 
any way concerne myself, Give and grant free leave and liberty to Daniell 
How, Job Sayre. George Willby and William Harker* together with their asso- 
ciates to sitt downe upon Long Island afforesaide, there to possess improve and 
enioy eight miles square of land or soe much as shall containe the said quan- 
tity, not only upland but alsoe whatsoever meadow marish ground, harbo" 
Eiv" and creeks lye within the bounds or limitts of the said eight miles, The 
same and every pt thereof quietly and peaceably to enioy to them and theire 
heyres forever without any disturbance, lett or mollestation from the said 
earle or any by bis appoyntment or p r curement for him or any of his. And 
that they are to take their choise to sit down upon as best lyketh them and 
alsoe that they and their associates shall enioy as full and free liberty in all 
matters that doe or may concerne them or theires or that may conduce to ye 
good and comfort of them and theires both in church order and civill Governmt 
together with all other Easem' 8 conveniences and accommodations whatsoever 
which the said place doth or may afford, answerable to what other plantations 
enioy in Massachusetts Bay. But in as much as it hath pleased our Boyall 
King to Give and grant the patent of Long Island to the afforesaid Earle: In 
consideration thereof it is agreed uppon that the trade with ye Indians shall 
remaine to the said Earle of Starling to Dispose of from time to time and at 
all times as best liketli him. Onely ye aforesaid Daniell How and his co- 
partners shall have libertie to make choice of one man amongst them that shall 
freely trade with the Indians in theire behalf for any victualls within theire 
owne plantation, but not for wampum. And if any of the afforesaid p'sons or 
any for them shall secretly trade with the Indians for wampum whither directly 
or indirectly without leave or license from the said Earle or his Assignes the 
pson or psons soe offending shall pay for every fathom soe traded to the said 
Earle or his assignes the sum of twenty shillings: ffurther it is Agreed uppon 
that whatsoever shall bee thought meete by the r l WorP 1 John Winthrop Esq. 
Govern' of the Massachusetts Bay to bee given to the Earl of Starling in way 
of acknowledgement as the Patenttee of the place shall be duely and truely 
paid, {furthermore it is agreed upon that noe man shall by vertue of any gift 
or purchase lay any claime to any land lying within the compass of the eight 
miles before mentioned but onely the afforesaid Inhabitants shall make purchase 
(in theire owne names at theire owne leisure from any Indians that Inhabit or 
have lawf ull right to any of the aforesaid land) all or any pt thereof, and 
thereby assure it to themselves and theire heyres as theire Inhabitance for 
ever. In witness whereof wee have hereunto set our hands and seales the 17th 
day of Aprill, 1640. 

Memorandum. That the true meaning of Mr ffarret is that whereas hee 
hath formerly purchased sartaiu lands in Long Island for the Earle of Starling 
or himself, That hee doth by these presents fully release all claime and Inter- 
est in the land above mentioned or psons that shall sitt down upon it with all 
to Governmt whither in church orin commonwealth. All which is to be clearely 
and fully drawne up according to the trew meaning of this agreement when 
things shall be settled and concluded by the r' worP 1 John Winthrop above 
mentioned. 

James ffarkett [seal] 
Sealed and delivered in the presence of 

Theoph : Eaton 

John Davenport. 

* The grantees above named probably went on from Lynn to New Haven, and obtained this 
patent from Farrett in person. 



Appendix. 457 

Endorsed on the back side of the said writeing under Mr Winthrop his hand 
as followeth. 

I John Winthrop within named having seriously considered of that within 
this writeing is refered to my determination although I am very unwilling to 
take it upon mee and as unfit alsoe the rather being to seeke of any rule or 
aproved p'sident to guide mee herein yet being called hereunto: I shall ex- 
press what I conceive to bee Equall upon the considerations here insueing, viz. 
The land within granted being a meere wilderness and the natives of the 
place pretending some interest which ye planters must purchase, And they 
might have had land enough gratis (and as convenient) in ye Massachusetts or " 
other of the Collonies w' h libertie to trade with the Indians, (which they are 
here debarred from) And for that they had possessed and improved this place 
before any actuall claime made thereto by the r' honr ble the Earle of Starling, 
or had any notice of his Lopp» pattent, And whereas his Lopp (for considera- 
tion I suppose of the p r mises) requires nothing of them but in way of 
acknowledgement of his Interest, I doe here uppon conceive apd doe accord- 
ingly (soe farre as power is given mee) order and set down that the Inhabit- 
ants of the tract of land within mentioned or the plantation now called 
Southampton upon Long Island, and their successors for ever shall pay yearly 
to the said Earle of Starling his heyres or assignes upon the last day of Sep- 
tember at Southampton aforesaid four bushells of the best Indian corne there 
growing or the value of soe much in full satisfaction of all rents aud services 
(the 5th p l of Gold and Silver ore to the Kings Ma tiB » reserved allways 
excepted) In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand. Dated 20th 
(8)1640. 

John Winthkop. 

EXTRACT FROM DEED OF FARRETT JUNE 12 1640. 
From Docs, of Col. Hist, of JV. T., V. 3, p. 21. 

Know all men whom this present writing may concern that I, James Farret 
of Long Island Gent: Deputy to the Right Hou 1 " 16 the Earle of Stirling Secre- 
taire for the kingdom of Scotland do by these presents in the name and behalf 
of the said Earle of Stirling and in my own name as doth or may concerne 
myself give up all Rights, Titles, Claims and Demands of and from all Patent 
Right of all those lands lying and being bounded between Peaconeck and the 
eastermost point of long Island with the whole breadth of the said Island from 
sea to sea with all lands and premises contained within the said limits . 
uuto Edward Howell, Daniel How, Job Sayer and their associates .... 
by vertue of my letters of Attorney bearing date 1637 .... .In 

witness hereof I have hereunto set my hand and seale the 12th of June 1640 

James Fakkett. 

F ARRETS CONFIRMATION JUL! 7, 164Q. 
From the town records. 

Memorandum: It is agreed upon between James ffarret agent, and Edward 
Howell John Gosmer, Edmund Harrington, Daniel Howe, Thomas Halsey, 
Edmund Needham, Allen Breed, Thomas Sayre, Henry Walton, George 
Welby, William Harker and Job Sayre : that whereupon it is agreed upon in 
a covenant passed between us touching the extent of a plantacon in Long 
Island, that the aforesaid Mr Edward Howell and his copartners shall enjoy 
eight miles square of land or so much as the said eight miles shall containe, 
and that now lie in said bounds being layed out and agreed upon: It is to 
begin at a place westward from Shinnecock entitled the name of the place 
where the Indians drawe over their cannoes out of the north bay over to the 
south side of the island, and from there to run along that neck of land east- 



458 History of Southampton. 

■ward the whole breadth between the bays aforesaid to the easterly end of an 
Island or neck of land lying over against the Island commonly known by the 
name of Mr ffarrefs Island,* To enjoy all and every parte there of according 
as yt is expressed in our agreement elsewhere, with that Island or neck lying 
over against Mr ffarrefs Island formerly expressed. 

James Fakret. 

S^r [Wit™*- 

LORD STIRLING'S CONFIRMATION OF THE SALE OF SOUTHAMPTON, 

AUG. 20, 1640. 

Note.— This in the Col. Hist, of N. Y., v. 3, p. 22, is dated 1639, but the 
date of the year is manifestly an error. It shows that notice of the purchase 
and settlement had been made in June, else sufficient time for the transmis- 
sion of these facts across the Atlantic wonld not have been afforded. 

I William Earle of Sterline doe make knowne to all men to whom it doth or 
may concerne, that whereas James Farret Gent, my lawfull Agent upon Long 
Island &c in America hath disposed by sale of divers lands in my name and 
for my use upon the said Island and Islands adjacent within my pattent ac- 
cording to the power given him by myselfe Aprill 1637, unto Edward Howell .. 
Daniel Howe, and their heires and successours for ever as from Peaconnet to ye 
eastermost poynte of ye said Long Island : and unto John, Thomas, and Ed- 
ward Farington and successively to the longest liver of them and to his heires 
and assignes for ever : and unto Mathew Sunderland and his heires and assignes 
for ever : I say whatsoever bargaine contract and conclusion the above 
named parties (for themselves heires and assignes for ever) have made w lh M r 
Faret, according to the custome of New England, I the said W m Earle of 
Sterline ratine and hold of value in law : and doe upon the request of my said 
Agent James Faret by these presentes bind my selfe heires and assignes to doe 
any further act or thing whereby or wherewith ye titles of ye above named 
parties (vizt) Howell, How, Farringtones, Sunderland, and their heires and 
successo™ for ever, may be strengthened, w ch they have under the hand and 
seale of my foresaid Agent James Farret, of w oh I am by him fully satisfied : 
and that he hath in full satisfaction for the said lands for my use received a 
competent sum of money, in consideracon of w ch money, I doe acquit all right 
title interest and demand of and to ye s d lands and patent right for ever. 
Witness my hand and seale this twentieth day of August one thousand six 
hundred thirty-nine. 

signed Sterline. 
In presence of 

James Ramsey 

John Johnson 
Vera Copia. 

PATENT OF GOV. EDMUND ANDROS, 1676. 

Edmund Andross Esq Seigneur of Suzerainty Left and Governor Genii vnder 
Tiis Royall Highness James Duke of York and Albany &c, of all his Territory 
in America, to all to whom these presents shall come Sendeth Greeting 
Whereas there is a certaine towne in the East riding of Yorkshire vpon Long 
Island commonly called and known by the name of Southampton, situate, 
lying and being on the south side of the said Island, towards ye main sea, 
having a certain tract of land therevnto belonging, The Easward Bounds 
whereof extend to a certaine place or plaine called Wainscott where the landes 
are settled betwixt theire neighbers of the Town of Easthampton and them: 

*Now Shelter Island: See Thompson's L. I., V. I, p. 365. 



Appendix. 459 

their Southern bounds being the sea and soe runs Westward to a place called 
Seatuck, where a stake was sett as their farthest extent that way • Then cross- 
ing over the Island to the northward to Peaconic great river (not contradicting 
the Agreement made between there towne and the Town of Southold, after 
their tryall at the court of Assizes) and soe to run Eastward along the north 
bounds to the Eastermost poynt of Hogg neck over against Shelter Island, 
Including all the necks of land and Islands within the aforesaid described 
lands and limits: Now for a confirmation vnto the present ffreeholders Inhabi- 
tants of the said towne and precincts, Know yee that by virtue of his Majesties 
letters pattent and the Commission and authority vnto mee given by his Royal! 
Highness, I have ratified, confirmed and granted, And by these presents doe 
hereby ratify confirme and graut unto John Topping, Justice of the peace, 
Capt. John Howell, Thomas Halsey Senior, Joseph Rainer Constable, Edward 
Howell, John Jagger, John ffoster and ffrancis Sayre Overseers, Levt Joseph 
ffordharn, Henry Peirson, John Cooper, Ellis Cook, Samuel Clarke, Richard 
Post, and John Jennings as pattentees for and on ye behalfe of themselves 
and their associates, the ffreeholders and Inhabitants of the said Towne their 
heires successors and assigns all the aforementioned tract of land with the 
necks and Islands within the said bounds set forth and described as aforesaid, 
with all rivers lakes waters hawking hunting and fowling and all Heredita- 
ments therevnto belonging, To have and to hold all and singular their said lands 
hereditaments & premises with their and every of their Apurtenances and of 
every part and parcel thereof to the said pattentees and their Associates, their 
heirs, successors and assigns forever. 

The Tenure of the said land to be according to the custome of the Mannor 
of East Greenwich in the County of Kent in England, in free and common 
soccage and by fealty only, provided always notwithstanding that the extent 
of the bounds before recited no way prejudice or infringe the particular pro- 
priety of any person or persons who have right by patent or other lawf ull 
clayme to any part or parcell of the lands or tenements within the limitts 
aforesaid, only that all the lands and plantations within the said limitts or 
bounds shall have relation to the towne in Generall for the well government 
thereof, and if it shall so happen that any part or parcell of lands or tenements 
withine the limitts afore described bee not already purchased of the Indians it 
may be purchased as occasions [require] according to law. I do likewise con- 
firme and Grant unto the said patentees, their heirs successors and assigns all 
the privilidges and immunities belonging to a town within this government, 
and that the place of their present habitation and abode shall continue and 
retaine the name of Southampton by which name and stile it shall be distin- 
guished and knowne in all bargains and sales, deeds, records and writings, 
they the said pattentees and their associates their heirs successors and assigns 
making Improvement on the said lands and conforming themselves according 
to law and yielding and paying therefor yearly and every yeare as an acknowl- 
edgement or quitt rent one ffatt lamb vnto such officer or officers there in au- 
thority as shall be empowered to receive the same. 

Given under my hand and seale with the seale of the province in New 
Torke, the first day of November in the eight and twentieth year of his Majes- 
ties Reigne Annoque Domini one thousand six hundred seventy-six. 

E. Andros. 

Examined by me and recorded. 

Mathias Nicolls Seer. 



460 History of Southampton. 



PATENT OF GOV. DONGAN. 

THOMAS DONGAN Capt Generall Governor in Chiefe and Vice Admirall in 
and over the Province of Ne wyorke and Territoryes Depending thereon in Amer- 
ica &o. under his Majesty James the second By the grace of God King of Eng- 
land Scotland ffrance & Ireland Defender of tbe faith &c. To all whom this 
shall come sendeth Greeting Whereas the Right Honorable Edmund Andross 
Esquire Seigneur of Suzrainte Lievt. and Governr. Genii, under his Royall 
Highs James Duke of yorke and Albany &c : now his present Majesty of all 
his Territoryes in America did by a certaine writeing or Patent under the seale 
of the Province bearing date the first day of November One thousand six hun- 
dred and seventy sis grant Ratifye and continue unto John Toping, Justice of 
the peace Capt. John Howell Thomas Halsey Senior Joseph Eaynor Constable 
Edward Howell John Jagger John Foster and Francis Sayres Overseers Lievt. 
Joseph Fordham Henry Pierson John Cooper Ellice Cooke Samuell Clarke 
Richard Post and John Jenings as Patentees for and in behalfe of themselves 
and their Associates the freeholders and Jnhabitants of the Towne of South- 
ampton a certaine tract of Land lyeing and being scituate in the eouthside of 
Long Island in the Eastriding of Yorkshire towards the Maine sea the East- 
ward bounds where of extends to a certaine place or plaine called Wainscott 
where the bounds are settled betwixt their Neighbors of the Towne of East- 
hampton and them their southern bounds being the sea and so runns West- 
ward to a place called Seatuck where a stake was sett at their furthest extent 
that way then crossing over the Island to the northward to Peaconock great 
river not contradicting the agreement made betweene their towne and the towne 
of southold after their tryall at the Court of Assizes and so to runn Eastward 
alongst their north bounds to the Easternmost part of Hoggenoch over against 
shelter Island includeing all the necks of Land and Islands within the afore- 
said described bounds and limitts together with all Rivers Lakes "waters quar- 
ries Woodland plaines meadowes pastures marshes fishing hawking hunting 
and fowling and all other profitts Coinodityes and hereditaments to the said 
Towne tract of 'Land and premisses within the Limitts and bounds afore- 
menconed described belonging or in any wise appertaineing To haye and to 
hold all and singular the said Lands hereditaments and premisses with their 
and every of their appurtennces and of every part and paTcell thereof to the 
said Patentees and their associates ther heires Successors and Assignes forever 
according to the tenure & custome of the Manor of East Greenwich within the 
County of Kent in England in free and Comon Soccage and by fealty only 
Provided alwayes notwithstanding that the extent of the bounds beforerecited 
do noway es prejudice or infringe the particular proprietyes of any person or 
persons who have right by Patent or other lawfull claime to any part or par- 
cell of land or Tenements within the Limitts aforesaid only that all the Land 
and Plantacons within the said Limitts or bounds shall have relacon to the 
towne in Genii for the well government thereof And if it shall so happen 
that any part or parcell of the lands within the bounds and limitts aforede 
scribed be not already purchased of the Indyans it may be purchased (as occa- 
sion) according to law And moreover he the said Edmund Andross Lievt aDd 
Governr Genii as aforesaid did further grant and confirme unto the said Paten- 
tees and their Associates their heires Successors and Assignes all the privi- 
ledges and Imunityes belonging to a towne within this Government and that 
the place of theire present habitacon & abode shall continue and retaine the 
name of Southampton by which name & stile it shall be distinguished and 
knowne in all bargaines & sales Deeds Records and writeings they the said 
Patentees and their Associates their heires Successors and Assignes makeing 
improvement on the said land and confirmeing themselves according to law 
and yielding and paying therefore yearly & every yeare as an acknowledge- 
ment or Qnittrent on fat lamb unto such officer or officers as shall be impow- 
ered to receive the same as by said Patent Recorded in the Secretaryes Office 



Appendix. 461 

relacon being, thereunto had may more fully and at large appear And 
Whereas of Late some difference hath happened betweene the Inhabitants of 
said towne of Southampton and the Indyans adjacent to said towne concern- 
ing the bounds above specifyed and alsothat the clauses above expressed for 
constituting them a towne and giving them privileges and Jmunityes are not 
sufficient in the law to convey to them such privileges & Jmunityes as was 
designed to be given them And Whereas Major John Howell a freeholder 
and one of the Patentees of the aforesaid towne of Southampton by Order of 
the ffreeholders of the said towne hath made application unto me that I would 
confirm unto ye ffreeholders of said Towne in a more full & ample manner all 
the abovecited tracts and parcells of land within the limitts and bounds afore- 
said and finally determine the difference between the Indyans and the ffree- 
holders of the said towne of Southampton And also that I would Erect the 
said towne of Southampton within the Limitts and bounds aforesaid into one 
Towneship NOW KNOW YBE That I the said Thomas Dongan By virtue of 
the power and authority to me derived from his most Sacred Majesty aforesaid 
and in pursuance of the same have examined the matter in variance between 
the ffreeholders of the said Towne of Southampton and the Indyans and do 
finde that the ffreeholders of the Towne of Southampton aforesaid have law- 
fully purchased the lands within the Limitts and bounds aforesaid of the 
Indyans and have payd them therefore according to agreement so that all the 
Indyan right by virtue of said purchase is invested into the ffreeholders of the 
Towne of Southampton aforesaid and for and in consideracon of the Quittrent 
hereinafter reserved and other good and lawfull consideracons me thereunto 
moveing Have Granted Ratifyed Released and Confirmed and by these pres- 
ents do grant Ratifye Release and Continue unto Major John Howell Thomas 
Hallsey Senior Edward Howell John Jagger John Foster Francis Sayres Joseph 
ffordham Henry Pearson Samuell Clarke Job Sayers William Barker Isaac 
Halsey ffreeholders & Jnhabitants of Southampton heeriu after erected and 
made one body Corporate and Politique and willed and determined to be called 
by the name of the trustees of the ffreeholders and comonalty of the Towne 
of Southampton and their Successors all the afore recited tracts & necks of 
land within the bounds and limitts aforesaid together with all and singular 
the houses MESSUAGES Tenements buildings millnes millnedames fencings 
Jnclosures gardens orchards fields pastures woods underwoods trees timber 
Comon of pastue feedings meadowes marshes swamps plaines Rivers Rivolets 
waters lakes ponds Brookes streames beaches Quarris mines mineralls Creeks 
harbours highwayes and Easements fishing hawking hunting and fowling (sil- 
ver and gold mines Excepted) and all other franchizes profitts Comodityes and 
hereditaments whatsoever to the said tracts & neckes of land and premises 
belonging or in any wise appurtaineing or therewith all used occupyed accepted 
reputed or taken to belong or in any wayes to appertaine to all intents purposes 
and constructions whatsoever as also all and singular the rents arrearages of 
rents Issues and proStts of the said tract of land and premisses heretofore due 
and payable To have and to hold all the aforerecited tract and parcell of 
land and premises with their and every of their appurtennces unto the said 
Major John Howell Thomas Hallsey Senior Edward Howell John Jagger John 
Foster Francis Sayers Joseph Fordham Henry Pierson Samuell Clarke Job 
Sayers William Barker Isaac Halsey ffreeholders and comonalty of the towne 
of Southampton and their Successors forever to and for the severall and Re- 
spective uses following and to no other use intent and purpose whatsoever 
That is to say as for and concerning all and singular the severall respective 
parcells of Land and meadow part of the granted premises in any wayes taken 
up and appropriated before the day of the date hereof unto the several and 
respective present ffreeholders and Inhabitants of the said towne of South- 
ampton by virtue of the aforerecited deed or Patent to the only use benefite 
and behoofe of the said respective present freeholders and Inhabitants and to 
their severall and respective heires and Assignes forever And as for and con- 
cerning all and every such parcell or parcells tract or tracts of land Remainder 



462 History of Southampton. 

of the Granted premises not yet taken up or appropriated to any particular 
person or persons by virtue of the aforerecited deed or Patent to the use bene- 
fite and behoofe of such as have been purchasers thereof and their heires and 
assigns forever in proporcon to their several] aud respective purchases thereof 
made as tenants in Comon without any lett hindrance or molestation to be had 
or reserved upon pretence of joynt tenancy or survivorship any thing contained 
herein to the contrary in any ways notwithstanding TO BEE HOLDEN of his 
said Majesty his heires and Successors in ffree and Comon Soccage according to 
the Mannor of East Greenwich in the County of Kent within his Majestyes 
Realme of England YEILDING rendering and paying therefore yearly and 
everv yeare from henceforth unto our Sovereigne Lord the King his heires 
and Successors or to such Officer or Officers as shall be appointed to receive the 
same the sume of one lamb or the value thereof upon the five and twentieth 
day of march at Newyorke in full of all Rents or former reserved rents ser- 
vices acknowledgements and demands whatsoever AND further By virtue of 
the power and authority to me the said Thomas Dongan as aforesaid given and 
in pursuance of the same and for the reasons and consideracons above recited 
I have willed determined declared and granted And by these presents do will 
determine declare and grant that the said Inhabitants and ffreeholders the 
ffreemen of Southampton aforesaid Comonly called by the name of the ffree- 
holders and Inhabitants of the towne of Southampton or by whatever name 
or names they are called or named & their heires and Successors forever hence 
forward are aud shall be one body Corporate and Politique in Deed and name 
by the name of the trusteess of the ffreeholders & comonalty of the towne of 
Southampton and them by the name of the Trustees of the ffreeholders and 
comonalty of the towne of Southampton one body corporate and Politique in 
Deed and name I have really and fully for his said Majesty his heires and Suc- 
cessors erected made ordained constituted and declared by these presents and 
that by the same name they have succession forever And that they and their 
Successors by the name of the Trustees of the ffreeholders and comonalty of 
the towne of Southampton be and shall be forever in future times persons able 
and Capable in law to have perceive receive and possesse not only all and sin- 
gular the premises but other messuages lands Tenements Priviledges Jurisdic- 
tions franchizes and hereditaments of whatsoever kind or species they shall 
be to them and their Successors in ffee forever or for the term of a yeare or 
yeares or otherwise whatsoever manner it be and also goods Chattells and all 
other things of whatsoever name nature quality or species they shall be and 
also to give grant release aliene assigne and dispose off lands Tenements 
hereditaments and all and every other act and acts thing and things to do and 
Execute by the name aforesaid and that by the same name of the trustees of 
the ffreeholders and comonalty of the towne of Southampton to plead and be 
impleaded answer and be answered unto defend and be defended they are and 
may be Capable in whatsoever place and places and before whatsoever Judges 
and Justices or other persons or officialls of his said Majesty his heires and 
Successors in all & all manner of accons Plaints suites Complaints causes mat- 
ters and demands whatsoever of what kind quality and species the same be 
and shall be in manner and forme as any other of his majestyes Liedge people 
within this Province can or are able to have require receive possesse Enjoy re- 
taine give grant release aliene assigne and dispose plead & be impleaded an- 
swer and be answered unto defend and be defended do permitt or execute 
And for the better enabling the Trustees of the ffreeholders and comonalty of 
the towne of Southampton aforesaid in doing and Executing all and singular 
the premisses I have willed granted and determined and by these presents do 
will grant and determine that from henceforward and forever hereafter the 
said Trustess of the ffreeholders and Comonalty of the towne of Southampton 
doe and may have and use a Common seale which shall serve to Execute the 
causes and affairs whatsoever of them and their Successors And further I 
will and by these presents in behalfe of his said Majesty his heires and Suc- 
cessors that henceforward forevermore there be and shall be Trustees of the 



Appendix. 463 

ffreeholders and comonalty of the towne of Southampton aforesaid to be chosen 
and elected as in these presents hereafter is rnenconed who shall be and shall 
be called the Trustees of the ffreeholders and Comonalty of the towne of South- 
ampton and they and their Successors shall and may at all convenient times 
hereafter upou a publique sumons to be obteined at the request of any three of 
the Trustees aforesaid from any of his Majesty's Justices of the peace of the 
said towne or for default thereof from any of the Justices of the County of 
Suffolk for the time being- assemble and meet together in the towne house of 
the said towne or in such other publique place as shall be from time to time 
appointed to make such acts and orders in writing for the more orderly Doeing 
of the premisses as they the said Trustees of the ffreeholders and Comonalty 
of the towne of Southampton aforesaid and their Successors from time to time 
shall and may think CONVENIENT so allwayes as the said acts and orders 
be in no wayes repugnant to the laws of England and of this Province which 
now are or hereafter may be Established and that they be not in any wayes 
against the true intent and meaning of these presents AND also I willordaine 
and determine that all and singular the aforesaid acts and orders from time to 
time shall be made and ordered by the vote of the Major part of the said Trus- 
tees of the ffreeholders and Comonalty of the towne of Southampton afore- 
said or at least by the vote of the Major part of such of them as shall from 
time to time Assemble and meet together in manner as aforesaid so allwayes 
there be not fewer in number than seaven of the said Trustees present at such 
meetings so to be held as aforesaid and for the better execucon of this grant 
in this behalfe I have assigned nominated Created Constituted and made and 
by these presents do assigne nominate Create Constitute and make Major John 
Howell Thomas Halsey Senior Edward Howell John Jagger John Poster Francis 
Sayres Joseph Fordham Henry Pearson Samuell Clarke Job Savers William 
Barker Isaac Halsey to stand and be . the first modern Trustees of the ffree- 
holders and Comonalty of the Towne of Southampton to continue in the afore- 
said Office from and after the date of these presents until the time that others 
be elected and Chosen in their stead According to the manner and forme herein 
after expressed And moreover I do by these presents for and on the behalfe 
of his Most Sacred Maj esty aforesaid his heires and Successors appoint that the 
Trustess of the ffreeholders and Comonalty of the town of Southampton Con- 
stables and Assessors within the towne of Southampton aforesaid be yearly 
Chosen on the first twesday of April 1 forever Viz : twelve Trustees of the 
ffreeholders and Comonalty of the towne of Southampton two Constables and 
two Assessors in such publique place as the trustees for the time being shall 
appoint and direct and that the Trusteess Constables and assessors be Chosen 
by the Majority of voices of the ffreeholders and freemen of the towne of 
Southampton aforesaid AND Lastly I give and grant for and on behalfe of his 
said Majesty his heires and Successors by these presents to all and every person 
and persons and to whatsoever person subject to his said Majesty his heires 
and Successors free and lawfull power ability and authority that they or any 
of them any messuages Tenements Lands meadows feediugs pastures woods 
underwoods rents revercons services and other hereditaments whatsoever 
within the said County of Suffolke (which they hold of his Sayd Majesty his 
heires and Successors unto the aforesaid Trustees of the ffreeholders and 
Comonalty of the towne of Southampton and their Successors shall and may 
Give grant Bargaine sell and alienate to have hold and Enjoy unto the said 
Trustees of the ffreeholders and Comonalty of the Towne of Southampton 
and their Successors forever YEILDIN(* and paying therefor unto his said 
Majesty his heires and Successors on the said twenty fifth day of march yearly 
and every yeare forever the full and just sume of forty shillings Current 
monevof this Province at Newyorke Wherefore by virtue of the power and 
authority aforesaid I do will 'and Command for and on behalfe of his said 
Majesty his heires & Successors that the aforesaid ffreeholders and Comonalty 
of the towne of Southampton and their Successors have hold use and Enjoy 
And that they shall and may forever have hold use and Enjoy all the Liber- 



464 Histoey of Southampton. 

tyes authorityes Customes orders ordinances francliizes acquittances lands 
Tenements and hereditaments goods and Chattells aforesaid according to the 
tenure and effect of these presents without the lett or hinderance of any per- 
son or persons whatsoever IN TESTIMONY Whereof J have caused the seale 
of the said Province to be hereunto affixed and these presents to be entered in 
the Secretaryes Office Witness rny hand at Fort James the sixth day of Decem- 
ber — One thousand six hundred Eighty six & in the second yeare of his said 
Maiestyes Eeigne 

Thomas Dongan. 



LAWS ADOPTED BY THE FIRST SETTLERS. 

Note. As portions of the laws are now illegible the missing parts are supplied from the 
- ■*'■ copy of the Massachusetts laws, which were digested by John Cotton, and seem to have 
been copied by Edward Howell for the Southampton settlers. Those of Mass. are pub- 
" lished in the Mass. Hist. Soc, in the Hutchinson Papers, 1865, Vol. I, p. 183. 

"'•'■' An Abstract of the Lawes of Judgmnt as given Moses to the Commonwealth 

,.,, of Israel, soe farre foarth as they bee of Morall that is of perpetuall and 

uniuersall Equity. Among all Nations, Especially such where the Church and 

c. Common Wealth are Complanted together in holy CouenaDt and fellow shippe 
with God in Jesus Christ, being joyntly and vnanimously Consented vnto as 
ffundamentall by the Inhabitants of this Collony of Southampton. 

Op Trespasses. 

1. Yf a mans swine or any other Beast or a fire kindled by him break out 
into an other mans field of Come, he shall make full Restitution both of the 
damage don by them, and of the losse of tyme well others have had in Car- 
ryeing such swine or beasts vnto the owners or vnto the fold, (Exod. 12: 5, 6) 
But yf a man put his swine or Beast into another mans field Restitution is to 
bee made of the best of his owne though yt were much better than that which 
was destroyed or hurt. (Levi. 34: 18 Exod. 31: 34) 

3. Yf a man killeth another mans beast or digg or open a pit and leave yt 
vnconered and a beast fall into yt, he that killeth the beast and the owner of 
the pit shall make Restitution. (Exod. 21 : 35 & 36) 

3. Yf a man's beast killeth the beast of an other the owner of the beast shall 
make Restitution. (Exod. 21:28 & 29) 

4. Yf a mans Oxe or other beast gore or bite and kill a man or woman, 
whether child or of riper age, the beast shall be killed and noe benefit of the 
dead beast reserued to the owner, But if the oxe or other beast were wont to 
pushe or bite in former tymes and the owner hath been told of yt and hath not 
kept him in, then the oxe or beast shall be forfayted and killed and the owner 
allso put to death, or else fined to paye what the Judges and persons damne- 
fied shall laye vpon him. 

5. Yf a man deliuer goods to his neighbour to keepe and they be sayd to be 
lost or stolen from him, the keeper of the goods shall be put to his 
oath concerning his own innocency* which yf he take and noe evidence 
appeare to the contrary hee shall be quitt: But if hee bee founde false vnto 
his neighbour or vnfaithfull bee shall paye double vnto him. 

But if a man take hire for the goods committed vnto him and they be stolen 
the keeper shall make restitution, but yf the beast so kept for hire dye or be 
hurt or be driuen awaye noe man seing of yt, An Oath shall be taken of the 
keeper that yt was without his default and yt shall bee accepted. Ex. 22: 
11, 13. 

But yf the beast bee tome in peeces and a peice be brought for witness yt 
excuseth the keeper. Exod. 22: 13. 

* These words from the Mass. Code, as also other portions in italics. 



Appendix. 4G5 

Of Crimes, and First of sdch as Deserue Capitalx< Punishmt or Cut- 
ting off from a Mans People whether by Death or Banishmt. 

1. Of Blasphemy which is a curseing of God or wicked denieing of God by 
Atheisme or the like, to be punished with death. Lev. 24: 15. 

2. Idolitry to bee punished with death. Deut. 13: 1-11. 17: 3 & 4. 

3. Witchcraft which is fellowshippe by couent* with a familiar spirit to be 
punished wth death. Ex. 22: 18. Lev. 20: 27. 

4. Consulters with witches not to bee tollerated but eyther to bee cut off by 
death or Banishm't. Lev. 20: 6. 

5. Heresie which is the maintayneance of some wicked error ouerthrowing 
the foundation of Christian Religion with obstinacy, yf it be ioyned with 
endeavour to seduce others therevnto to be punished with death. Because 
such an Heretick noe lesse than an Idolater seeketh to thrust the soules of 
men from The Lord their God. Deut. 17: 10. 

6. Td worshipp God in a molten or grauen Image to be punished with death. 

7. Whosoever shall revile the Religion and worshippe of God and the-, 
Gouermt of the Church as yt is now established to be cut off by Banishmt. 

8. Willful periury whether before the judgment seate or in private con- 
ference to bee punished with death. Rashe periury whether itt bee in 
publick or priuate to be punished with Banishmt. Just is it that such a mans 
name should bee cut off from his people who pphaneth so grossely the name 
of God before his people. 

9. prophaneing the Lords daye in a carelesse or scornefull neglects or con- 
tempt thereof to bee punished wth death. Nu. 15: 30 & 36. 

10. To plot or practice the betrayeing of the Country or any principall forte 
therein, to the hand of any fforraigne State, Spannishe ffrench Dutch or the 
like, contrary to the Alleidgance wee pfesse & owe to or dread Soueraigne 
Lord King Charles his heires and Successors whilst hee is pleased to protects 
vs as his Loyall Subjects, shall bee punished wth death. 

ll.Vnreuerened and dishonorable Carriage to Magistrates to be punished 
with banishment for a tyme, tyll they acknowledg their ffault and pfesse 
Reformation. 

12. Rebellion or Sedition or Insurrection by takeing vp of armes against 
the prsent Gouermt established in the Country to bee punished with 
death. Num. 16: 1, 2, 3, 31, 32, 33. Rebellious Children, whether they 
continue in Riot or Drunkenesse, after due correction from their parents, or 
whether they curse or Smite their parents Are to bee put to death. Deut. 21: 
18. Lev. 20: 9. Ex. 21 : 15 & 17. 

13. Murder which is a willfull man Slaughter, not in a mans necessary and 
iust defence, nor casually Committed, but out of Hatred or Cruelty to bee 
punished bv death. . 

14. Adultery which is the denieing of the Marriage bed to bee punished with, 
death. . 

15. Defiling a woman Espoused, is a kinde of Adultery, and punished by 
death, of both partyes. But yf the woman be forced then by the death of the 
man only. 

16. Incest which is the defiUng of any that are neare of kmne within the 
degrees prohibited in Leviticus, to be punished with death: unnatural fdthmess 
to be punished with death, whether sodomy, which is carnal fellowship of mm 
with man, or of woman with woman: or buggery which is carnal fellowship of 
man or woman with beasts orfowles. 

17. Whoredome of a maid in her fathers house kept secret till after her mar- 
riage with another, to be punished with death. 

18. Manstealing to be punished with death. 

19. ffalse witness against life to be punished with d eath. 

* This " couent " is abbreviation of Covenant. 

59 



466 History of Southampton. 

Op Crimes lesse Hainous such as aee to bee Punished with some 
Corporall Punishment or Ffine. 



Bash & ppliane 
swearing and 
curseing, to 
bee punished 



1. With losse of honour or office yf hee bee a magistrate 
or officer. Meete yt is that their names should be dis- 
honored who dishonor God's name. 

2. With losse of ffreedome. 

3. With disability to give Testimony. 

4. by Corporall punishmt, eytherby stripes or by brand- 
ing them with an hott yron or boarei-ng them through the 
tongue as he hath boared and pierced God's name. 

2. Drunkenness as transformeing Gods Image into a Beast,, is to be pun- 
ished with the punishmt of a beast. A whippe for the horse and a rodde 
for the fooles backe. Prov. 26: 3. 

3. fforceing of a mayd or a Rape is not to be punished with death by Gods 
Lawes. 

1. With a ffine or penalltye to the ffather of the mavde. Deut. 22: 
28, 29. 

2. With the mariage of the mayde defiled (to wit) yf shee and her 
ffather consent. 

3. With Corporall punishment of stripes, for this wrong is a Real] 
slander and worse to make a whore then to saye one is an whore. 
Deut. 22: 17, 18. 

4 ffornication to f *' By marria g e of the mayde or giueing her a sufficient 
I dowry e. 
be rmnished ) ^" ^l** 1 str ipes though fewer from the equity of the 
" [ former case. 

Maymeing or wounding of a ffreeman whether free burgess or ffree Inhabitant 
to be punished with a fine. 



But 



Note.— A mistake was made by the printer in omitting one generation in 
the pedigree of the John Howell branch on page 302, and the proper correc- 
tion is here given. 

36 John 6 b. April 20, 1743, m. Mehetabel Jessup and had 
eh. 769 John 7 b. 1765, 770 Mehetabel, 7 771 Leucretia, 7 772 
Matilda, 7 773 Dorothy, 7 774 Elizabeth, 7 775 Prudence, 7 776 
Lois 7 bap. 1785, and 777 Charles. 7 

Note.— These high numbers are taken so as- not to interfere with those 
attached to the numbers of the family in the genealogy. 

769 John 7 b. 1765, d. 1834, m. Mary Saltmarsh in Greene 
county, N. Y., where he removed, and had ch as given in the 
genealogy on page 302, there attributed to his father, but with 
the correction of the upper figure designating the generation, so 
that they would be as follows: 769 John 7 b. 1765 had ch. 42 
John, 8 43 Horace, 8 44 Orson, 8 45 Frederick, 8 b. 1803, 46 
Philo, 8 47 Dr. Thomas, 8 and 48 William. 8 
The others will be correct by changing the figure designating- the generation. 



Errata. 467 



ERRATA. 



In table of contents, Deed of Quogue purchase, 1663 instead of 
1653. 

Page 141 : Sewanhacky. Thus spelled in some docnments, but 
better, perhaps, as in others, Seawanhaka. 

Page 264: 30 Andrew Halsey 7 is said, by Mr. J. L. Halsey, to 
have been born, in 1784. 

Page 266 : 149 Lemuel Halsey 5 had son, 522 Jesse 6 . 

Pages 266, 267 : 151 Caleb Halsey 6 , b. 1755, not 1765. 

Page 273 : For 473 Esther 4 read 473 Ethan. 4 
^ Page 276: 562. Rev. Lewis 7 , of Parmer Village, should be 562 
Rev. Lewis 8 , of Farmer Village ; and he was son of- 560 William, 7 and 
not his brother as given in the text. 

Page 280 : 131 Eleazar Hand 6 m. Catherine McGown, and not 
the sister of Josiah Dayton ; but the latter m. sister of Eleazer 
Hand. 

Many dates are taken from the census and from tombstones, and 
where the month and day of the month of the birth and death are 
not given, it mast always be understood the dates are approximate, 
and not absolute. 



10, line 31, instead of Protestant read Catholic. 
Pag?, r 56, upper name, column to right, instead of Hall read 
Howell. .. ■'.-•*.:, 

Pager332, 3d line from bottom, instead of 42 Fanning 7 read 42 



INDEX OF NAMES AND SUBJECTS. 



Academy 138 

Agawam 15 

-Agreement of settlers 447 

— Andros and a new patent 65 

Anning, John 421 

Anniversary celebration, 1865 445 

Arms and coat armor 202 

Arms carried to church 130, 137 

n Assembly at Hempstead, 1664 ... 58 

Atlanticville 160 

Babbit, John M 118 

Bacon, Abigail 421 

Bancroft, widow 421 

Barbur, Samuel 421 

Barker family. 421 

Barnes family 202 

Barrett, Richard 422 

Barrows, Andrew 422 

Bartholomew, Josiah 422 

Battle of L. 1 70 

Baxter, Thomas 422 

Bays, property of, in the town ... 28 

Beaverdam 162 

Beers, Daniel 122 

Bells.... 135 

Benevolence 92 

Beswick, John 422 

Bigelow family 422 

Births 198 

Bishop family 203 

Blessing (bark) visits L. 1 12 

Block Island 10 

Blyeth, Wm 422 

Bogart, David S 116 

Bond family 422 

Bostwick, Arthur. 423 

Boundaries 144 

Bower family 423 

Boyer, Stephen 136 

Breed, Allen 423 

Bridge Hampton, Pres. Church. . , 127 

Briggs family 423 

British pccupation 74 



Page. 

Brown, Timothy 424 

Browne, Wm 424 

Bryan, Alexander 424 

Bryant, Richard 431 

Budd, John 424 

Buel, Dr., on revolutionary war. . . 73 

Burnett family 206 

Burying grounds 186 

Bush, Christopher 424 

Butler family 209, 424 

California gold fever, 1849 83 

Campbell, John 424 

Canoe Place 159 

Cattle laws 192 

Cemeteries 186 

Census. See List of Inhabitants, 
etc. 

Character of the settlers 46 

Chatfield family 210 

Christmas memories 180 

Church edifices 127 

Church founded 47 

Church history of 97 

Church rates, etc 130, 137 

Civil war, 1861-64 85 

Clark family 211 

Cleveland, Wm. N 124 

Clock of the church 135 

Cochrane, Major 75 

Coffee .' 178 

Colonies 78 

Condit, Walter 124 

Connecticut, union with 51 

Cook family 212 

Cooper family 217 

Cooper, John, warns of Steenwyck 63 

Cooper, Mercator 219 

Corwith family 226 

Cory, John • 424 

Courts 87 

Courts, sentences of 94 

Cow Bay settlement 16 

Cuffee, Paul 125 



470 



Indkx. 



Page. 

Culver family 228 

Daggett, Herman 114 

Davis family 424 

Days of week 177 

Dayton family 229 

Deaths 200 

Deed, Farrett's, April 17, 1640... . 456 

Deed, Farrett's, June 12, 1640 457 

Deed, Farrett's, July 7, 1640 457 

Deed for Topping's purchase, 453, 454 

Deed for Quogue purchase 451 

Deed Indian, Dec. 13, 1640 450 

Deed Indian, 1703 450 

Deming family 411 

Deming. See Dimon. 

Dimpn family.. . . , 236, 411 

- Disposal! of the vessell 447 

Dix, John A. 161 

Drumming for church 94, 95 

Drunkenness 92 

Duke's laws 58 

Dutch interregum, 1673 59 

Earle, John. 425 

Bason, Henry 425 

' Bast Hampton colonized. 79 

-East Hampton representatives.. . . 57 

Eaton, Horace 81 

Edwards family 238 

Elders, ruling 98 

Elias, David -425 

Elizabethtown, N. J 79 

Ellis, John 425 

Ellsworth family 241 

Else, John...... 426 

- Epitaphs of Southend burying- 

ground ' 178 

Erskine, Lord. . . ; 75 

Fairs, (market) 179 

Faith in prayer • 178 

Fanning' family 241 

Farrington family 426 

Farrington, John 18 

Field, Alexander 426 

Fires, protection against 95 

Fithian family 242 

Flanders 163 

Fletcher, Seth • 105 

Flint family 426 

Food and drink of settlers 178 

Fordham family 245 

Fordham, Robert 101 

Foster family 247 

Foster, Benjamin, in Rev. war. . . 57 

Fournier family 256 

Fowler family 257 

Freemen 88 

Freemen and church membership, 47 
Gardiner, Lyon 169 



Page. 
Gardiner's Island settled, 1640., . . 16 

Gelston family 258 

Gelston, Samuel 108 

Genealogies ; . 201 - 

General Court defined 50 

Gibbons, John 426 

Gibbs, Joseph 427 

Gilbord, Caleb 426 

Gold buried 194 

Goldsmith family 427 

Goodall family 260 

Good Ground 160 

Goodwin, Thomas 427 

Goring, Henry 427 

Gosmer, John 427 

Gould, John 427 

Graham, E. A 226 

Great Plains 14'i 

Green family 261 

Greenvill, John 427 

Griffing, Hugh 428"" 

Hakelton, Wm 428 

Haines. See Haynes. 

Halsey family 262 

Halsey, Daniel, poems 195 . 

Halsey, Judge Hugh 276 

Halsey, Dr. Silas 276 

Hampton. James 428 

Hand family 277 

Hand family (supplement) 413 

Hand, David 76 

Hand, Joseph, of Guilford, Ct., 

genealogy 414 

Hand, Nathan, descendants 416 

Hanke, Abram 428 

Harker, William 428 

Harriman, John 102 

Harris family 282 

Havens family 428 

Haynes family 284 

Heathcote, Caleb and George .... 428 

Hedges family 287 

Hedges, Henry P 74 

Hempstead Assembly, 1664 58 -. 

Herrick family 293 

Herrick. Edward 124 

Herrick, Louisa P 296 

Hildreth family 2B7 

Hilyard, Timothy 428 

Hogneck deed 454 

Hogneck laid out 30 

Houldsworth, Jonas 429 

House lots, size of . . . .* 25 

Howe family 429 

Howell family 300 

Howell family of Southold ...... '. 320 

Howell, Edward 16 } 21 

Howell, Major John 29," 64*, 66 



Index. 



471 



Page. 

Howell, Maria J., poem 445 

Howell, Col. Matthew 302 

Howell, Judge Nathaniel W 313 

Howell, Parrnenas, artist 195 

Hubby, John 429 

Hudson, Henry 11 

Hughes, Humphrey 429 

Hunt, Col., of Sag Harbor 304 

Huntting family 322 

Huntting Rev. Samuel 325 

Indians 164 

Indian deed of 1703 454 

Indian local names 141 

Indians, murder by 188 

Indians, religious belief of 169 

Indians watched 90 

Its used, 1647, on records 179 

Jacobs family 429 

Jacques, Richard 429 

J agger family 327 

Jennings family 330 

Jerome, Horace 304 

Jessup family 332 

Job's Lane 378 

Johnes or Jones family... 335 

Johnson, Edward, on settlement 

of Long Island 22 

Kallum, Robert 429 

Kelly, John 429 

Kempton, Manassah 430 

Kennedy, David 124 

Ketchabonack 161 

Kirtland, Philip 18 

Kirtland family 430 

Lands allotted 91 

Larrison, John 430 

Latitude and longitude 144 

Laughton family 430 

Lawrence, Zachary 430 

Laws of the colony 47, 58, 87 

Learning family 430 

License laws of 1653 and 1655.. . . 93 
*•' List of freemen, 1649 31 

- List of proprietors, 1655 33 

- List of heads of families, 1657. . . 32 

- List of heads) of families, 1683.. . 44 

- List of heads of families, 1784.. . 112 

- List of all inhabitants, 1698 34 

r-List of men in whaling squadrons, 

1644 182 

List of meu in whaling squadrons, 

1653 183 

List of men in whaling squadrons, 

1657 183 

List of men in whaling squadrons, 

1667 184 

' List of North Sea men, 1668, 1687, 33 
Little Plains 141 



Page. 

Long Island, names of 141 

Long Island united to New York 

Colony 57 

Loom family 431 

Lovelace, Governor, reception of, 192 

Ludlow, family 339 

Lum family 431 

Lupton family 341 

Lying to be punished* 92 

McCorkell family 341 

Mackie family 342 

Magistrates and Representatives 

to Connecticut 56 

Main street laid out 25 

Maltby family 431 

Manners and customs 176 

Mapham, John 431 

Marriages 199 

Marshall family 342 

Marvin, Robert 431 

Mason, William 432 

Mather, Cotton, on settlement of, 15 

Meacham, Jeremiah 432 

Meacox laid out 30 

Meacox burying-ground 190 

Mechanics, bounty 432 

Meiggs family 43& 

Melvine, Walter 432 

Mendall, John 432 

Merwin, Robert 431 

Methodist Society 126 

Miller, John 432 

Mills, Richard 432 

Milner, George 433 

Minthorn, Richard 433 

Mitchell family 342 

Money vessel . 194 

Montrose, Pa 80 

Moore family 433 

More family 433 

Morehouse family 433 

Morgan, John J. A 123 

Mowbray, John 434 

Mulford, John 66 

Mulligan, Henry S 313 

Name of town, its origin 15 

Names, Christian, in 1698 43 - 

Names, local, Indian .... .... 141 

Names of first settlers 30 ■ 

Names of Long Island 140 • 

Needliam, Edmund 434 

Newell (or Newhall), Thomas.... 434 

Newton family 434 

New York Annex 84 

New York Colony, union with ... 57 

Nicoll, Benjamin 434 

Norris, Robert 434 

North End burying-ground 190 



472 



Index. 



North Sea, Leads of families of, 

1668 and 1687 33 

North Sea settled 29 

North Sea, the Plymouth Rock of 

Southampton 24 

Noyao 159 

Occum, Sampson 166 

Odell, Richard 434 

Ogden, John 29 

Ogden family 434 

Ogilby on settlement of 15 

Oldfields, John 435 

Onuck 162 

Osman 435 

Owen, George 435 

Ox pasture 143 

Paine, Blisha 110 

Paine, William 435 

Painter, Richard 435 

Palmyra, NT 80 

Parker family 343 

Parker, John 435 

Parsonage 1 30 

Parsons family 343 

Parsons, Henry M 343 

Parvine, Thomas 435 

Patent of Governor Andros 458 

Patent of Governor Dongan 460 

Patton, Robert 435 

Peirce, Jonathan 436 

Pelletreau family 345 

Penny, John 436 

Perkins, William 436 

Peters, Hugh 21 

Petty, John 436 

Phillips, Zerub 436 

Pierson family 348 

Pierson, Abraham ...21, 99 

Pierson, Col. Henry 349 

Pierson, Henry R 350 

Pompey, the slave 78 

Ponquogue 160 

Pope, Thomas 436 

Post family 353 

Post, William R 354 

Potunk 162 

— Presbyterian church 99 

Presbyterian church of Bridge 

Hampton 127 

Proprietor rights 26 

Proud family 356 

Purchase of lands 25 

Quiogue 161 

Quogue 160 

Quogue purchase 25 

Quogue purchase deed 451 

j Raynor family 356 

Rebellion of 1861-64 : 85 



Page. 

Redfield, James 436 

Reed, Thomas 436 

Reeve family 359 

Reeves family 358 

Residences, early 146 

Revolutionary war 68 

Rhodes family 360, 420 

Ride, extraordinary 179 

Robinson, John 436 

Rogers (James) family 366 

Rogers (William) family 360 

Rolt, Henry 436 

Rose family 367 

Rose, Abraham T 370 

Rounsif ull, Richard 436 

Rugg, Joseph 436 

Ruling Elders 99, 132 

Rusco, Wm 436 

Russell family 437 

Safety of the town 90 

Sagg 159 

Sagg burying-ground 190 • 

Sagg settled 30 

Sag Harbor churches 129 

Sale, Obadiah 437 

Sanders, John 437 

Sanford family 371 

Sayre family 374, 421 

Sayre, Job 18 

Sayre, Stephen 382 

Sayre, Wm. N 379 

School hours 434 

Schools, 137 

Scott family 384 

Scott, Robert 437 

Seabonac division, 1655 33 

Searing, Simon 437 

Seating people in church 134 

Seaweed claims 27 

Settlement, date of 20 

Settlement, the first location 25 

Settlement, terms of 16 

Settlers, their character 46 

Settlers, their antecedents 15 

Settlers, names of 30 " 

Seymour family 385 

Sharp practice 193 

Shaw family 437 

Shaw, Peter H 120 

Shepherd, John 438 

Shiland, Andrew 124 

Shinnecock, Lease of, to Indians, 173 

Shinnecock Indian chiefs 173 

Shinnecock Hills sold, 1861 175 

Silvester, Capt 438 

Simpkins, Wm 438 

Smith families 438 

Soldiers, 1686 33 



Index. 



473 



Page. 

Soldiers of the Revolution 70 

Southampton, Earl of 10, 15 

"Southampton, early importance of, 48 

-South End burying ground 187 

Southold attacked by Dutch 64 

-Southold purchased and settled.. . 55 

Speonk 163 

Squires family 387 

Squiretown 160 

Stanbrough family 389 

Standley, 438 

Stanton, Thos 438 

Stealing fruit , 94 

Stephens family 390 

Stirling, Lord, title to L. 1 14 

Stocking or Stolking 438 

Storms, noted 193 

Stratton, John 439 

Strickland, Jonathan 439 

Sturmey, Chas 439 

Sunday School established 121 

S winfield, Raphael 439 

Symonds, Henry 439 

Tainte, John 439 

Talmage family 392 

"Tax list, 1683, 44 

Taylor, Joseph 105 

Tea 178 

Temperance reform 121 

Tennison, John 439 

■ Tenure of common land 26 

Terbell family 394 

Terry, Robert and Thos 439 

Thanksgiving 92 

Thorpe, Richard 439 

Tomson, Thomas 439 

Topping family 394 

Topping, Edward, in Revolution- 
ary war 76 

Topping's purchase 25 

Topping's purchase, deeds. . . 453, 454 

'Town marks of L. I. towns 59 

Townsmen 88 

Training of soldiers 89 

Travally, Thos 439 

Tryon's (Gov.) oath of allegiance.. 72 
Two hundred and twenty-fifth an- 
niversary 445 

Undertakers, the original 30 

,Vail, Thomas and Jer 440 

Verazzano, J., dicoveries 9 



Page. 

Vonck, Cornelius 440 

Voting enforced , 92 

Wade, Dr. Nath 440 

Walton, Henry 440-- 

Ware, John 440 

Warren, John 440 

Washington and Lee . . 77 

Watermill 158 

Waters, Anthony 440 

Waters of the town, common prop. 

erty 28 

Waterville 163 

Weany, Sunk Squaw 169 

Welbye, George 18, 440 

Weeks, Thomas 440 

Wells, William 440 

West Hampton 162 - 

Whaling enterprise 180 

Wheeler, Thomas 440 

Whipping 90 

Whitaker family 398 

White, Ebenezer, descendants 402 

White; John, descendants 399 

White, Sylvanus 109 

Whitehead family 440. ~ 

Whiting, Joseph 107 

Wick family 405 

Wickapogue burying-ground 190 — 

Wickham, Joseph 440 

Wilkeson, Josias 440 

Williams, Joshua Ill 

Willman family 407, 440 

Willmot familv 440 

Wilson, Hugh'N 122 

Winthrop, John 440 

Winthrop's exploration of Long 

Island 12 

Winthrop on settlement of 22 

Winthrop, John, engagement at 

Southold 64 

Witchcraft 96 

Wolves 191 

Wood, George 440 

Wood, Jonas, family 440 

Woodruff family 407 

Woolley family 408 

Wright family 409 

Tear when begun 176 

Youngs, John 66 

Zeehond, Dutch frigate 63 



fflnis. 



60