(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Cuba review"

xc 

a35 



mw 



V. 
















r 



■,^^ V 



^M-- 'V; 



!'f'.^ 



liitMJ 



, ear PiA.ic^n 'i»io lu cents ACopy 
Pkiblishd^^heNunsonSteamshipUne. 8Z-926eaverStreet,NewYorkQt^. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Write for this New Book 



CONTAINING ILLUSTRATIONS AND DESCRIPTION OF 



llMK-BELTQwyEYDBS 

ro i iUGAR. ESTATES 
AD HKFI\-FK1ES 




LlMK-llLT C&MPAMY 



' brc>ad\v,w;m-\ 



LINK-BELT CONVEYORS 
for Sugar Estates and Refineries 

Everyone interested in the efficient and 
economical handling of sugar cane, 
bagasse, etc., at Sugar Estates or 
in the conveying of barrels, bags, 
etc., at Refineries should have a copy. 

Sent postpaid upon request 

LINK-BELT COMPANY 

299 ^BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 




Copyright 1913 



ALL 

ABOUT 
CUBA"* 



IT COVERS THE ISLAND'S 

INDUSTRIES AND ACTIVITIES 

ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR POSTPAID 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




PATENTE PELAEZ 

Esta maza puede colocarse facilmente en cualquier trapiche, sea de dos 6 tres mazas. Machuca bien 
la cana desmenuzandola y extrayendole al mismo tiempo las dos terceras partes de su guarapo, aejanao 
la cana bien preparada para el segundo trapiche. Ejecuta todo el trabajo de una desmenuzaUora ae 
primera clase y sin mas gasto que cuando se opera con una maza lisa. Esta maza es de acero y se na 
sacado privilegio para ella en todas las partes del iiundo donde se cultiva la cana de azucar. t-uei 
envienos un dibujo de la maza superior que usan U ii asi que de su eje, y les cotizaremos preoios bajoi 
por una maza completa para desmenuzar la cana de ;ste trapiche. 

NEWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 149 Broadway, New York, E. U. A. 

PIERRE DROESHOUT, Agt., Apartade 861, Havana, Cuba. 



r^ A DOr^C PARA TODOs usos y de todos tamaiios, de los para cana con cuatro juedas y capa- 
V_-A.r\.r\.W»J cidad de l'/, toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toneladai 
Hacemos una especialidad de juegos de herrajes, incluyendo los juegos 
de ruedas, completamente armados, con todas las piezas de metal, y pianos 
completes para construir los carros i su destino de maderas del pats 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Address: 
Ramaliam 




Bombas de Marsh 

Del mas alto grado de eficacia para el 
servicio de Ingenios. 



; y* Garantizamos menor consumo de vapor 
que cualquier otro fabricante de bombas 
de accion directa. 

Pidase un catdlogo 

" va. io s„o .1. Mnrsh AMERICAN STEAM PUMP CO. 

BATTLH CREEK, MICH. 
Representantes generales para Cuba: yillamil 6- Miller \i>Vi Mercaderes. Havana 



DONT OVERLOOK THE 
ADVERTISING PAGES 



Thiy form not th* leiil Interaitlni portion of th* publl- 
ootlon. and thtri li lufflolent varloty of InvMtmtnt »ro«o- 
• Itloni ond voluibia merohtndlH ■nnouneamanti to moot 
iveryont'i n«*d. G*t In (orreipondcno* with CUBA 

THE CUBA REVIEW review .dvortlMn tor Ihi loodi you wont. 



l'leu»c luenllun THIi CI Hi J<i:Vli:w when writinu Io Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



A. F. 



CRAIG & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

PAISLEY 
ESCOCIA 

Fabricantes 
de toda clase 

de 

maquinaria 

para 

moler caiia 
de azucar 

DIRECCION TELEGRAFICA 
"CRAIG" PAISLEY 

Claves: A.B.C., S^EDICION; McNEIL'S MINING Y GENERAL 





Prensas de 

Filtrar 

para Ingenios 

SHRIVER 

FILTER PRESSES 

i\ -- W r i t e us for 

IV ^ Catalog, Prices 

*\\ ' and Information 

T. Shriver & Go< 

814 Hamilton St. 
Hcrrison, N. J. 

Represented in Loui- 
siana by E. A. SAM- 
MONS CO., Ltd., 
New Orleans, La. 



FOR MOLASSES USE 




MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



2630 Whitehall Building 
New York 



HAIVIOIND TyVINK 




BUILT BY 



STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

AGENTS IN Cuba: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 

26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, WARREN, Pa., U.S.A. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THL CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, Neiv York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Editors and Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 

$1.00 Per Year . . . . lo Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on ^'pplication 



Vol. XI 



MARCH, 1913 



No. 4 



Contents of This Number 



Amnesty Law Vetoed by President Gomez '. 7 

Brief Notes of General Interest ] 1 

Chess Champion Cappablanca's Methods 12 

Cane Growing Experiments in Barbadoes 17 

Commercial Notes I3 

Cuba's Trade in Colors 

New Cable Letter Rates 

Pitch Pine Market ' 

Ruling on Cuban Products 

Seven Months' Trade Figures 

Tampico Exports to Cuba 

Cuban Railroad Earnings 14^ 32 

Cuba Railroad— Havana Electric 

United Railways — Western Railways 

Cuban Central 

Cuban Telephone Company Earnings 32 

Cuba's Sources of Income in 1912 30 

Cuban Cane Sugar Output ._^^ ' 17 

Diplomats to be Protected 8 

Havana's Hospital Service 12 

Isle of Pines Wants Annexation 9 

Liberal Party Defeated , 8 

Mobile's Trade with Cuba 27 

Modern Sugar F^state, Central Delicias 28, 29, 30 

Newspaper Comment on Cuban Matters 10 

National Bank's New President 15 

Plantations of Cuba — 

Pinar del Rio and Havana Provinces 18 

Matanzas Province 19 

Santa Clara Province 20, 22 

Camaguey and Oriente Provinces 24 

President-EIect Meiiocal's Promises » 8 

Sugar Prices at New YnrU (English and Spanish) 34, 35, 36 

Sugar Estates. Notc-s of New Enterprises 38 

ILM'STRATIONS 

Honiato Road View, Oricntc Province Cover 

liulkhcad Across Santiago Harbor i'Vontispiece 

Chart of Sugar Prices, 1911 and 1912 26 

W, A. Merchant 15 

Sugar Central Delicias 28, 29 

Trust Company of Cuba's New Building . 15 



THE 
CUBA RLVILW 



"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1913, bv the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XI 



MARCH, 1913 



Number 4 



GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



THE AMNESTY BILL FINALLY VETOED DIPLOMATS TO BE PROTECTED 

ISLE OF PINES ANNEXATION PLANS 



A general amnesty law re- 
Amnesty Law centlj- passed the Cuban 
Obnoxious Senate and Secretary Knox 
at once asked Mr. Beau- 
pre for an explanation of what was in- 
tended by it. The answer came that it 
was only a plan to set free the negroes 
who started a revolution in the eastern 
end of the island last summer, and a few 
offenders of similar character. This 
seemed satisfactory, but the Cuban Con- 
gress went on and amended the bill before 
its final passage so as to include about 
3,000 criminals and to grant pardons in the 
future and gave a clean bill of health to 
everyone now connected with the Gomez 
administration. 

Secretary Bryan also sent a protest 
against the bill by telegraph on March 5th, 
the day he took the oath of office as 
Secretary of State. The protest was in 
vigorous language, and showed that this 
government would not tolerate the pro- 
posed liberation of hundreds of criminals 
without other reason than the desire of 
President Gomez and his supporters. 

What this government objected to par- 
ticularly was the provision of the bill that 
wofuld have permitted Gomez to grant 
pardons before trial to persons in the 
government service, and others whom the 
incoming President, General Mario Meno- 
cal is credited with an intention of prose- 
cuting for wholesale grafting and cor- 
ruption. 

The American legation sent another note 
to President Gomez from Secretary of 
State Bryan on March 8th, warning him 
against signing the amnesty bill. 

Despite these protests it was given out 
that President Gomez had signed the bill 
on March 7th. Its application, however, 
was immediately suspended and after a 



long conference on March 8th with mem- 
bers of his Cabinet, Congressmen and law- 
yers. President Gomez decided to veto the 
measure. 

Many radical Congressmen on March 
10th called on President Gomez and pro- 
tested against his vetoing the bill. 

On March 11th it was stated that Presi- 
dent Gomez had not vetoed the amnesty 
bill, but had returned it to Congress with- 
out his signature, accompanying it with a 
message recommending several changes. 
Among other things the President suggest- 
ed that the measure make clearer the pro- 
visions extending amnesty to prisoners who 
have injured American interests. 

On March 13th, however, it was defi- 
nitely announced that the bill had been 
vetoed. 

The President recommends the framing 
of a new bill which extends amnesty only 
to prisoners taken at the recent rising in 
Oriente and to other purely political of- 
fenders. 

The Cuban newspapers were divided in 
their opinion on tlie subject. Cuba, which 
has been slandering the members of the 
American Legation, praises Gomez for 
maintaining Cuban national dignity and 
sovereignty. La Lucha approves the Presi- 
dent's action and commented as follows : 

"Had President Gomez signed the bill 
the instant he received it from Congress 
and had not fooled about the question of 
delicacy the Bryan note would have ar- 
rived 'too late.' " 

I. a Prcsna, which says: "The amnesty 
bill is a travesty on justice. It will free 
vulgar and incorrigible criminals, as Presi- 
dent Gomez has been doing periodically. 
F.very one knows the selfish motives of 
President Gomez in piling up trouble for 
liis successor. General MenocrJ, who, when 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



he is inaugurated on May 20th, will receive 
a lighted bomb, whose explosion is apt to 
end the Cuban Republic." 

La Discusion, the organ of the conserva- 
tives, says : "In reality it is foolish to view 
with indifference, from the Cuban view- 
point, any possibility of coolness of rela- 
tions with the great northern republic. In 
treating of a law susceptible of change 
along lines indicated by the United States, 
the President's veto is reasonable." 

El Dia, another conservative newspaper, 
commented somewhat sarcastically about 
Mr. Bryan's professed friendship to Cuba, 
so often avowed, but ended by saying : 
"Cuba cannot, under any circumstances, al- 
low strained relations between the United 
States and Cuba." 



The Cuban Government 
To Protect has been requested by the 
Diplomats State Department at Wash- 
ington to use its best en- 
deavors to secure enactment by the Cuban 
Congress of pending bills removing the 
existing exemption of Legislators from lia- 
bility for the publication of libelous and 
defamatory statements. 

Those responsible for recent attacks 
through the newspaper Cuba, upon Ameri- 
can Minister Beaupre and Secretary Gib- 
son have successfully asserted the right of 
exemption under existing law, hence the 
request. 

The Cuban government was so slow in 
punishing the editors of the offending news- 
paper that Secretary Knox was forced to 
send a note to the Cuban government ex- 
pressing the surprise of the United States 
at the apathy of the Cuban government 
and the regret that it must insist that the 
guilty parties be speedily punished. 

Secretary Sanguily in a note on Febru- 
ary 21st to Minister Beaupre, deprecated 
the impatience of the American govern- 
ment and reiterated his previous promises 
of vigorous action. 

The Lower House of Congress will not 
allow their comrade, Oscar Soto, to be 
tried by the courts for the libelous articles 
he confesses he wrote against the Ameri- 
can Minister. While the House up to 
March 6th had not taken official action, 
it is understood that in a caucus of a ma- 
jority of the members it was decided that 
it would not be a proper policy to yield 
one of their number to the courts. 



At a meeting of the Na- 

Swearing to tional Council of Veter- 

Preserve Peace ans held a few weeks ago 

in Havana in honor of the 

anniversary of Baire, a significant incident 

occurred. During the services Col. Irribar- 

ren rose and made all present stand and 

take an oath to preserve the peace forever. 



The decision of the Cuban 

Liberal Party Supreme Court on the pe- 

Defeated tition of the Liberal party 

that the Cuban election law 

be declared unconstitutional and thereby 

annul the recent elections wherein General 

Mario Menocal was elected President was 

handed down March 5th. The case was 

decided against the Liberal party. The 

court held that the case had not been 

properly presented. 

Whether or not the Liberals will pre- 
pare their case again and present it with- 
out the faults pointed out in the decision 
of the court is problematical. 

The general opinion seems to be that the 
matter is settled and that no further pro- 
ceedings will be considered. 



Menocal's 
Promises 



Colonel Aurelio Hevia, 
President-elect the President-elect's cam- 
paign manager and his in- 
timate friend, is quoted by 
the Havana Post as to the 
views held by General Menocal on Cuba's 
government problems. Col. Hevia, while 
not speaking with authority, was positive 
that he interpreted faithfully the senti- 
ments of his chief. He asserted that de- 
spite the predictions of the defeated lib- 
erals, there will be no investigations in past 
matters, no delving into what others have 
done. The future and the problems which 
come with it will occupy all the new Presi- 
dent's attention. The new administration 
will not only appear honest, but will be so. 
Harmony among the allies of the Con- 
servative party in the last elections and 
in the party itself continues undisturbed. 
The many leading men among the National 
Liberals who threw the votes of their con- 
stituents in favor of General Menocal have 
become the latter's friends and will heartily 
support his administration. Colonel Hevia 
believes that these men combined with the 
Conservatives from more patriotic motives 
than the mere hope of securing offices. 



Senor Eugenio Freyre, 
New Consul for acting Cuban Consul at 
Newport News the port of Galveston, has 

left the city to take up the 
duties at his new post in Newport News, 
Va., to which he has been transferred by 
orders from Havana, Cuba. Senor Freyre 
is succeeded in Galveston by Senor Joaquin 
Zanza. 

Eugenio Freyre was one of the younger 
generation of Cubans, trained in the United 
States for government service. He was 
a graduate of St John's MiHtary School, 
of Spring Valley, N. Y., of the Genesee 
Wesleyan Seminary, of Lima, N. Y., and 
of the Potsdam Technological School, of 
Potsdam, N. Y. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



9 



The movement among the 

Hoping for American residents of the 

Annexation Isle of Pines for annexa- 
tion by the United States 
is becoming more pronounced since the re- 
cent visit of William Jennings Bryan to 
the island on February lOth last. 

Mayor ^larzo states that the residents of 
the Island have been in a ferment of agi- 
tation since, although Mr. Bryan diplomat- 
ically avoided speaking on the subject of 
the Island's sovereignty while on the Is- 
land. 

At a meeting of the pro-annexation resi- 
dents at the Santa Barbara estate on the 
Island, strong hope was expressed by the 
speakers that the Wilson administration 
would realize their long pent-up hopes of 
separation from Cuba. 

On March 9th announcement was made 
by Thomas J. Keenan, of Pittsburg, Pa., 
President of the American Association of 
the Isle of Pines, that a petition directed 
to President Wilson and the Senate, re- 
questing annexation of the Island, would 
be put in circulation in the United States 
and the Isle of Pines. 

The petition states that 6,000 Americans, 
who reside or have property in this Isle of 
Pines, wish to have action taken to make 
the Island a permanent possession of the 
United States. The Isle of Pines, the pe- 
tition says, has become a distinctively Am- 
erican colony, citizens of the United States 
owning more than 95 per cent of the land, 
and making up a majority of the popula- 
tion. 

All this agitation is condemned by the 
Cuban press generally. Public opinion in 
Cuba, says the New York Tribune, is prac- 
tically unanimous in favor of the retention 
of the Isle as an integral part of the re- 
public as it was under Spanish rule. 

The Secretary of State has asked the 
Secretary to the Government to stop the 
Isle of Pines meetings and compel Ameri- 
cans there to fly the Cuban flag when they 
display the Stars and Stripes. 



On February 27th Cuba established a 
quarantine against the Canary Islands as 
a result of a report received from the Con- 
sul at Tencriffe, notifying the government 
that five deaths from bubonic plague had 
occurred there. Cuban sanitary officials 
believe that Cuba and Porto Rico were 
infected la.st summer through vessels from 
the Canaries. 



Havana's City Council desires to provide 
a bureau of information in the city for 
visitors, similar to those in operation in 
the capitals of Europe and in Argentina. 
The benefits will not only reach tourists, 
but will help the business interests gener- 
tlly. 



Professor Pablo Desver- 
Taft's Last nine, of Havana Univer- 
ll'ord for Cuba sity, and former Secretary 
of the Treasury under the 
Wood administration ; Sub-Secretary of 
State Guillermo Patterson, and the Cuban 
Minister to the United States, Sr. Martin 
Rivero, represented Cuba at the inaugura- 
tion of President Wilson. 

A special mission of these delegates was 
to further commercial relations between 
the two countries. They are well supplied 
with data regarding Cuba and will show 
that the republic is in a position to grant 
to the commerce of the United States al- 
most as many benefits as she might re- 
ceive from any reciprocal arrangement 
which may be agreed upon. 

While in Washington the Cubans went 
to the White House to express the farewell 
greetings of President Gomez and the Cu- 
ban people to President Taft and their 
gratitude to the President for the part he 
had taken in the life of the Cuban nation 
during his provisional governorship. In 
reply the President said in part : 

"I am very much touched by this, be- 
cause of its unusual character — its excep- 
tional character — which gives it so much 
emphasis. I have had a profound interest 
in Cuba, and my rather short experience 
there— and yet an experience at a time 
when there was a trembling in the balance 
and we did not know what might happen — 
was a thirty days' responsibility that 
equaled any that I have had in my life, 
and fixes in my heart my interest in that 
beautiful island and her inhabitants and 
the fortunes that await her in the family 
of nations." 



Changes in the taxes lev- 
Tax Changes ied in Havana as made by 
the City Council, are as 
follows : 

Now. Formerly, 

Cafes ; . . $200.00 $150.00 

Bars 175.00 150.00 

Groceries and wine 

stores 100.00 60.00 

Drug stores 200.00 100.00 

Boarding houses . , 100.00 50.00 

Candv stores 50.00 40.00 

Grocery stores 30.00 20.00 

Lawyers 20.00 25.00 

Flower vendors 10,00 15.00 

Bootblacks 1.00 ,3.00 

Scene painters 10.00 16.50 

Cinematographs ... 50.00 

riivsicians 10.00 20.00 



Havana's reform Mayor, General Freyre 
de Andrade, is still reforming. The City 
Council having voted themselves salaries, 
Mayor .'\ndrade promptly exercised his pre- 
rogative and vetoed the resolution. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



COMMENT ON CUBAN AFFAIRS 



THE ATTACK ON THE AMERICAN MINISTER, INTERVENTION, ETC. 



The Jacksonville (Fla.) Times-Union 
comments editorially in the following fash- 
ion on the recent note of Secretary Knox 
demanding the prosecution of the Havana 
editor who in his publication, Cuba, grossly 
attacked the American Minister. 

All this is interesting as showing the 
ideas the Taft administration entertains as 
to the powers of the government over the 
press. We can't justly demand anything 
from Cuba that we would not do for Cuba 
or another foreign country. What if some 
newspaper in the United States _ should 
criticise the Ambassador of a foreign na- 
tion. Would President Taft promptly pro- 
ceed to punish the offending editor? U 
he couldn't get at him in any other way, 
would he order him deported? 

We do not remember any specific case 
of the criticism of a foreign Ambassador 
by an American newspaper. We remem- 
ber a good deal of fun that was made 
of one who used his ambassadorial powers 
to beat a taxicab driver out of a part of 
the fare he charged, and our old friend 
Wu Ting Fang was treated humorously 
by the press. No editors were punished 
by the President — none was transported. 

The newspapers of this country criticise 
Emperors, Kings, Presidents — and their 
criticisms are generally just. It is a pity 
that they are not always so. The laws 
furnish a certain amount of protection 
against newspaper attack, but Emperors, 
Kings and Presidents can hardly be ex- 
pected to take advantage of this protection. 
We see no reason, however, why M. Beau- 
pre shouldn't take advantage of it. He is 
not too big. 

Now are we to look on this demand 
made on Cuba as a command to Cuba to 
do a thing that if conditions were reversed 
we would not do for Cuba, and therefore 
an unjust demand, or must we assume that 
the Taft administration in its old age as- 
sumes a new attitude toward the press — 
that it proposes to punish newspapers that 
criticise high officials, law or no law. In 
either case the result is bad. It would be 
shameful if a nation of 100,000,000 people 
should demand that a nation of 2,000,000 
do what it would not do under similar cir- 
cumstances. The only effective argument 
would be that ratio of fifty to one in 
strength. It would be a mere matter of 
force, and we would hate to see force 
openly substituted for right. But it is still 
worse if this demand is honest, and may be 
taken as an indication of a policy of rigid 
censorship and control of the press. 



Intervention in Cuba is no such task as 
intervention in Mexico would be. It is not 
to be lightly undertaken, and Americans 
hope will not be again undertaken ; but it 
is none the less an ever-present possibility. 
It is impossible to affirm that the United 
States retains any considerable degree of 
affection for her insular Godchild. Ingrati- 
tude has cooled the altruistic ardor which 
prevailed at the close of the Spanish war. 
If there is another intervention it will be 
with some degree of anger mingled with 
the sorrow ; and for this reason it is to 
be dreaded by both nations. — Cleveland 
(Ohio) Plain Dealer. 



The Havana newspaper Cuba, which got 
into trouble recently because of slanders 
on the American Minister and the Secre- 
tary of the American Legation, says the 
gathering in Havana of ex-Presidents Cas- 
tro, of Venezuela ; Reyes, of Colombia, and 
Zelava, of Nicaragua, and also of many 
Mexican refugees, offers an auspicious oc- 
casion for Latin Americans to make con- 
certed plans to check American imperial- 
ism. 



La Opinion, the organ of the Zayistas, 
who are just now threatening to start a. 
revolution because their candidate, Senor 
Zayas, was defeated for the Presidency, 
says all Latin America admires and loves 
Castro because he has always been the 
stanchest and fiercest enemy of the United 
States, which was at one time dread, but 
is now a laughing stock because it has been 
so cowardly before Mexico. Castro, it says, 
is the Latin American, ideal of liberty and 
democracy. 

The Cuban people are not going to de- 
stroy themselves by engaging in revolution, 
recently said the Hon. Gonzalez de Que- 
sada, Cuban Minister to Germany. The re- 
cent election was conducted without riot 
or trouble. It is true that the defeated 
candidate for President, Vice President 
Zayas, and his supporters, are seeking to 
have the election set aside by the Supreme 
Court on the ground that it was uncon- 
stitutional, but after the court gives its 
decision there will be no appeals to arms. 
Zayas is a patriot who has worked hard 
for Cuba. He is fair-minded and loyal. 

"The American people are doing more 
than those of any other nation to develop 
Cuba. Next to the Americans, the English 
and Germans are helping in Cuba's devel- 
opment." 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INTERESTING NEWS NOTES REGARDING \AR10US MATTERS PERTAINING 

TO THE ISLAND 



A Cuban engineer of Cienfuegos, don 
Evariste Montalvo, wants permission from 
his government to use the Jabacoa river in 
the municipality of Rodas, Santa Clara pro- 
vince, to generate electric force for a light- 
ing plant and other industrial enterpcises. 
He also wants the concession given to 
Sr. Ignacio Lauza y Lastra, for a similar 
purpose in February, 1909. canceled on the 
ground that the conditions of the conces- 
sion have not been obeyed. 

The McVickar-Gaillard Realty Company 
recently leased in the Forty-two Broadway 
building in Xew York, space to the Havana 
Central Railroad Company, the Cuban and 
Pan-American Express, the United Rail- 
way of Havana, the Central Cuba Sugar, 
the ^^'ashington Sugar and the Western 
Railways of Havana. 

An asylum for the aged, established by 
a great benefactress in Cuba, ^Martha 
Abreu, was inaugurated in Santa Clara 
City on February 24th. 

The British Minister, Mr. Stephen Leech, 
recently applied to the Cuban State De- 
partment for an investigation of an attack 
which he asserts was made on January 18 
against James Allen, a British subject, 
living at La Gloria. Cuba, by a native who 
Allen states attacked him with a knife. 

The steamer Xuevitas, of the Herrera 
line, Havana, was on March 1st reported 
on the rocks and a total loss at the en- 
trance of the bay at Sagua de Tanamo on 
the north coast of Oriente province. 

The Xuevitas was a 1,020 ton steamer 
built in Glasgow in 1883. She was bought 
by Herrera & Co., of this city, in 1905, and 
given her present name, her former one 
being Stct Watert. 

To encourage the formation of music or- 
ganizations among the youth of Cuba, the 
Provincial Council of Santa Clara has do- 
nated $100.00 each to the Banda Infantilde 
Quemados de Guines and de Santo Domin- 
go and $200.00 to the Banda Infantil de 
Palmira. 

The City Council of Santa Clara has 
voted $400.00 as a subsidy payalilc in twelve 
parts toward the establishment in the city 
of an Academy of Painting. 

La Lucha, of Havana, says the sale of 
the Santo Domingo convent in that city is 
planned. 

During the month of January, Caibarien, 
in Sanfa Clara province, on the north ciast, 
sent Havana 10.307 pounds of fish. 



A statue of Luz Caballero was unveiled 
February 24th at the old Punta Park in 
Havana. 

The statue represented the philosopher 
and teacher sitting on a rock in contem- 
plation, and is made of bronze, the work 
of the French sculptor, M. Coucins. The 
base of the monument is of dark gray gran- 
ite, with bronze cornices and plates on each 
side, and was designed by Sr. Aurelio Me- 
lero, a Cuban artist. 

The Santiago Traction Company has 
double-tracked its line to Vista Alegre, a 
very beautiful suburb of the city. The 
building up of this section and the con- 
sequent increase of business made this im- 
provement necessary 

A diploma and a prize of one dollar is 
to be given children of the public schools 
in Cuba who report any one making a 
wrongful use of the national colors. 

The movement has been started by the 
Xational Association of School Teachers 
and is based on the knowledge of the lack 
of respect shown the flag by certain classes 
of people. 

The salaries of the municipal police in 
Matanzas are $30.00 per month for the in- 
fantry and $35.00 per month for the mount- 
ed squad. The force is agitating for an 
increase. 

Don Braulio Martinez has been given 
governmental authorization to establish an 
electric-light plant at Artemisa, Pinar del 
Rio province. 

Something like sixty tons of dynamite 
were recently found on Cayo Ratones in 
Santiago harbor. The government authori- 
ties' attention has been called to the matter 
and it is likely that the dangerous sub- 
stance will be taken elsewhere. 

The Cuban Minister to Spain, Sr. Justo 
Garcia Velez, returned recently to Havana 
in the hope of restoring his health, which 
has become impaired. Sr. Navarro Revert- 
er assumed the duties of the absent Min- 
ister. 

The old hotel in Santiago de Cuba, the 
Casa Granrla, which faces the Dolores Ca- 
thedral, will soon be demolished and a new 
hotel will be erected by the Cuba company. 
The site is on the plaza and adjacent to 
the handsome new building of the San Car- 
los Club, now ncaring completion. ' 

Cardenas capitalists are considering the 
establishment of a factory for the manu- 
facture of a vegetable food frr caltlc. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



GENERAL NOTES 



MATANZAS TELEPHONE PLANT 

The telephone plant of the city of Ma- 
tanzas has been offered for sale by the 
government in a decree signed by President 
Gomez. All the rights and interests in the 
plant have passed into the hands of the 
government through the expiration of the 
franchise under which it was operated by 
a local company. It will now be sold to 
the highest bidder subject to right of "tan- 
teo" enjoyed by the Cuban Telephone Com- 
pany. 

Under this right the telephone company 
has the privilege of equaling or of raising 
the figures of the highest bid, providing 
the company is not the highest bidder when 
the bids are opened. 



IMPROVED HOSPITAL SERVICE 

Havana will soon put into public service 
two automobile ambulances to cost $10,000. 
The necessary appropriation has been ap- 
proved by the municipal council. 

A new emergency hospital is planned for 
Luyan's, a suburb of the capital. 

La Lucha, a daily newspaper of Havana, 
find considerable fault with the ambulance 
service of the city, complaining that doc- 
tors use the ambulances for private uses. 
It says : 

"A spectacle that is commonly given in 
this city is to see persons who have been 
injured rushed to the nearest emergency 
hospital in a hired hack, altogether inap- 
propriate for such a purpose, or to see an- 
other injured person placed on any sort 
of a handy shelf and borne on the shoul- 
ders of his working companions." 

The city medical services will also be 
reorganized. The Council has resolved that 
the city should engage the services of 
twenty physicians to attend and give first 
aid, and ten other physicians to devote 
their time exclusively to the poor while 
a new plan of having charity inspectors 
visit the needy as it is done in other coun- 
tries, is to be put in force. 



CUBAN TOWNS GET WATER 

A new aqueduct which draws its source 
from Las Canteras springs near Calabazar, 
and which produces 3,600 litres of water 
per minute, will supply Santiago de las 
Vegas, Calabazar, Rincon and Rancho Boy- 
eros, all in Havana province, as well as 
the tobacco plantations and orange groves 
in the district. 

The aqueduct is owned by a private com- 
pany which was organized in 1910 under 
the name of the Alberro Canal Company, 



of which prominent Havana capitalists are 
interested and of which Dr. Fernando San- 
chez de Fuentes, Congressman-elect for 
Havana, is Secretary. The cost of the 
aqueduct has been up to the present $107,- 
000. A pumping station conveys the water 
to a reservoir located near by with a ca- 
pacity of three million gallons. From 
thence the water is sent through cast-iron 
pipes to the different towns and farms. 
There are special rates for workingmen's 
homes and no rental is charged when 
houses are unoccupied, despite the fact that 
the rates are per annum. 



THE CUBAN CHESS CHAMPION 
CAPPABLANCA 

There never has been a chess player be- 
fore Cappablanca who paid so much atten- 
tion to outdoor sports and one who actually 
made it a point to build up his body in all 
directions. He plays billiards, pool, base- 
ball, lawn tennis, etc., things which bene- 
fit his body and health to a great extent, 
thus being an all-round athlete. He, there- 
fore, when sitting down to a game of 
chess, never knows the word fatigue. His 
mental capabilities are always fully at his 
command, and that is one great secret of 
his success. On the other hand, he has 
two other great qualities. He does not 
smoke and he does not drink alcoholic 
mixtures in whatever shape. Janowski has 
said that non-smoking and non-drinking is 
almost equal to a pawn and move, meaning 
thereby that he could almost give pawn and 
move to any player in his class. Of course, 
that is a little exaggeration, but every point 
counts. As a rule Cappablanca is disposed 
to be very light-hearted. He can laugh 
like a young boy and can enjoy a joke at 
any time. Of course, he can also be very 
stern, but what is a man without tempera- 
ment? — Havana Post. 

The international chess tournament in 
Havana came to an end March 6th with 
Frank Marshall, the American champion, 
winning by one point over his rival, Jose 
Raul Cappablanca, the Cuban champion, 
thus reversing the tables as to what had 
happened in the late New York tourney. 

Marshall received $500.00, the first prize, 
and Cappablanca the second, which was 
$350.00. Marshall won 10% games, lost 
3%, and Cappablanca won 10, lost 4. 



The Manzanillo Water and Light Com- 
pany has asked for an extension of time 
of one year to complete the work of es- 
tablishing an electric plant in that city. 
The concession was granted in February, 
1912. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



13 



COMMERCIAL NOTES 



PITCH PINE MARKET CONDITIONS 

Exports of pine from all Gulf Ports to 
Cuba for 1910, 1911 and 1912 were: 

Lumber superficial feet 

1912 1911 1910 

107,607,030 115,252,529 127,600,610 

The outlook for Cuba is more favorable 
than in some time. Last year's shipment 
to that island was about eight million feet 
less than in 1911, and twenty million feet 
less than in 1910. 

Cuba shows especial encouragement, new 
inquiries being frequent and the order files 
increasing. This should be the best spring 
since 1910 for the Cuban trade. Cuban 
shipments for January was well above the 
average and chiefly made up of schooner 
cargoes. — Gulf Coast Record. 



TAMPICO EXPORTS TO CUBA 

The volume of the total export trade 
that passed through the port of Tampico, 
in Mexico, amounted in the fiscal year of 
1910-11 to $46,072,869. The amount taken 
by Cuba in this period was $29,034. 



RULING ON CUBAN PRODUCTS 

There will be no reduction permitted in 
that part of the duties on goods from Cuba 
caused by undervaluation, according to a 
ruling of the United States Treasury De- 
partment, announced January 9th. last. This 
ruling was made known in a letter to the 
Auditor of the Department from Assistant 
Secretary Curhs, which reads : 

"The Department is in receipt of your 
memorandum of November 12 last, inviting 
attention to the failure of the Collector of 
Customs at San Juan, Porto Rico, to make 
a reduction of 20 per cent of the additional 
duty accruing under sub-section 7 of section 
28 of the Tarifif Act of August 5, 1909, on 
products of Cuba. 

"Section 2 of the reciprocity treaty be- 
tween the United States and Cuba, pro- 
claimed by the President on December 17. 
1903, provides that the products of the soil 
and industry of Cuba shall be admitted at 
the reduction of 20 per cent of the rate of 
duty thereon. 

"There is no specific provision as to the 
additional duties imposed for undervalua- 
tion, but the Dci)artment is of the opinion 
that the reduction should lie applied only to 
the regular duties and that the additional 
duties accruing for undervaluation under 
said sub-section 7 are not subject to the 
allowance of 20 pcrcentum." 



NEW CABLE LETTER RATES 

Overnight cable letter service between 
New York and Cuba at five cents a word 
has been announced by the Western Union 
Telegraph Company, and went into effect 
March 1. This new service at reduced 
rates will tend, without doubt, to promote 
closer business relations between Cuba and 
the U^nited States and save several days 
in correspondence. 

A similar arrangement between the 
United States and England a year ago led 
to a large increase in trans-Atlantic cabled 
letter correspondence. 

The rate for this service between Havana 
and Xew York will be $1.00 per 20 words, 
or 5 cents per word, instead of 15 cents, the 
cost of the regular service. Rates to other 
points and Canada will be from 25 cents 
to $1.00 more than the rate to New York. 
The message must be written in plain Eng- 
lish or Spanish, no code words being al- 
lowed. The company agrees to deliver the 
letters within 24 hours after they are filed. 



SEVEN MONTHS TRADE FIGURES 

The following figures show the value of 
merchandise imported into Cuba and ex- 
ported from that country into the United 
States for the seven months ending Janu- 
ary 31st. 

These figures have been supplied by the 
Statistical Division of the Bureau of For- 
eign and Domestic Commerce, Department 
of Commerce and Labor. 

1913 1912 

Imports from Cuba. $62,941,222 $42,437,006 
Exports to Cuba... 41,939,782 37.325.973 



CUBA S TRADE IN COLORS 

During 1911 Cuba imported colors, dyes 
and varnishes to the value of $726,000, of 
which $435,548 was from the United States 
and $204,590 from the United Kingdom. 



CUBAN TOBACCO PURCHASES OF 
' OTHER COUNTRIES 

1912 1911 

Germany (bales) 80,401 11,145 

Canada (bales) 18,078 10,9.56 

Argentine (bales) 13,865 5,545 

Spain (bales) 7,327 2.624 

Chili (bales) 1,478 

h'rance (bales) 1,111 

Great P.ritain (bales) 7.30 

Netherlands (bales 395 

Belgium (bales) 423 

United States (bales) ... .271,404 268,820 



14 THECUBAREVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD, THE HAVANA ELECTRIC, ETC. 
The Cuba Railroad Company's Earnings. 



The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of January and for seven months ended 
January 31st, compares as follows : 

1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 

January gross $460,322 $368,471 $315,783 $256,793 $218,258 

Expenses 208,223 176,216 166,890 129,607 114,885 

January net $252,098 $192,354 $148,893 $127,186 $103,373 

Charges 66,791 65,125 59,625 36,667 33,086 

January surplus $185,307 $127,129 $89,268 $90,519 $70,287 

Seven months' gross... 2,409,274 1,951,136 1,577,719 1,276,059 1,065,868 

Net profits 1,075,202 876,567 669,095 474,290 426,007 

Fixed charges 467,263 425,875 279,625 251,877 277,359 

Seven months' surplus. $607,938 $450,692 $389,470 $222,413 $198,648 



Earnings of the United Railways of Havana 



Weekly receipts : 
Week ending February 1st. 
Week ending February 8th. 
Week ending February 15th. 
Week ending February 22d.. 



1913 


1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


£44,680 


£39,996 


£39,065 


£39,486 


£36,619 


47,158 


40,094 


39,650 


39,436 


35,638 


48,144 


40,951 


40,673 


42,252 


37,366 


50,385 


42,324 


42,897 


44,159 


37,532 



Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 

Weekly receipts: 1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 

Week ending February 2d.. $50,366 $47,184 $50,476 $39,976 $36,035 

Week ending February 9th.. 56,029 45,803 48,912 39,132 27,360 

Week ending February 16th. 52,241 45,994 47,048 38,984 36,991 

Week ending February 23d... 51,394 46,775 44,145 39,084 38,664 

From January 1st $417,267 $371,148 $360,812 $352,699 $338,550 



February Quotations for Cuban Securities 

[Quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co.] 

Bid. Asked. 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent bonds (Exterior) 101% 101% 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5 per cent bonds 95/2 96/2 

Havana City First Mortgage 6 per cent bonds 106 108 y2 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6 per cent bonds 102 105 

Cuba Railroad First Mortgage 5 per cent bonds 100 101 y2 

Cuba Railroad Preferred Stock 95 100 

Cuba Company 6 per cent debentures 97 100 

Havana Electric Railway Cons. Mortgage 5 per cent bonds 97 72 98 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. (common stock) 85 88 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. (preferred stock) 94 98 

Matanzas Market Place 8 per cenfbonds — participation certificates.. 100 105 

Cuban-American Sugar Co., 6 per cent Coll. trust gold bonds of 1918. . 94 V2 96 

Santiago Elec. Light and Traction Co. First Mortgage 6 per cent bonds 98 98 h 
All prices of bonds quoted on an "and interest" basis 



THE CUBA REVIEW' 



15 



CUBA'S BANKING INSTITUTIONS 



NATIONAL BANK S NEW PRESIDENT 

The American Minister, Mr. Arthur M. 
Beaupre, Congressman Martin W. Little- 
ton, of New York, Dr. Orestes Ferrara, 
speaker of the Cuban House, and man_v 
others, were speakers at the farewell ban- 
quet given on February ISth, under the 
auspices of the American Club, to Mr. Ed- 
mund Gustave \'aughan, the retiring Presi- 
dent of the Xational Bank of Cuba. The 
speakers paid high tribute to the distin- 
guished guest of the evening, who is held 
strongly in the affections of the American 
colony in Havana and Spanish and Cuban 
residents. 

The banquet was held in tlie main dining 
room of the beautiful Miramar at the foot 
of the Prado. 

^Ir. \'aughan assumed the presidency of 
the Xational Bank of Cuba in 1904. That 
institution's deposits then were $6,000,000 
and their loans amounted solely to $2,500,- 
000. He leaves the bank with deposits in- 
creased to $27,000,000, while $18,000,000 are 
out in loans. The cash movement in the 
bank last year averaged $3,959,000 per bank- 
ing day. 

"The bank is more of a Cuban institution 
now than it has ever been," said Mr. 
Vaughan recently. "Instead of the stock 
being held abroad by foreign banks it is 
rapidly getting into the hands of the people 
of this country, where it should be." 

Mr. Vaughan will tour the world and aft- 
erwards take up business life again in New 
York. He will also retain an active inter- 
est in the aflfairs of the bank. 

Mr. William A. Merchant, for many 
years \'ice President of the institution, was 
elected President of the National Bank of 
Cuba on February 19th, to take the place 
of Mr. Edmund G. Vaughan. 

The election was carried out with four- 
fifths of all the shareholders in the bank- 
ing institution represented, 40,000 of the 
50,000 shares voting. Dr. Jose Lopez Rod- 
riguez was elected Vice President to suc- 
ceed to the vacancy caused by the promo- 
tion of Mr. Merchant. Two other impor- 
tant changes were the election to the board 
of directors of Dr. Vidal Morales and Sr. 
Angel Barrios. 

Mr. Merchant was born in Alexandria, 
Va., in 1862. He is a graduate of St. 
John's Military Academy of that city. He 
began his business career as a telegraph 
operator on a railroad. He was soon pro- 
moted to the general offices of the company 
and passed eight years as a member of 
the executive staff. 

From the railroad Mr. Mfrchant went 
to R. G. Dun and was its manager for fif 
t»-<-n vfnrs. In Infer vcars lie was the com 




William A. Merchant, President National Bank 
of Cuba. 

pany's general manager for the West In- 
dies. He resigned this position eight years 
ago to accept the vice presidency of the 
bank. 



The Royal Bank of Canada has secured 
a prominent location in Sagua la Grande, 
Santa Clara province, on the corner of 
Marti and Calixto Garcia streets on which 
to erect a new building for a branch office. 



1^% 


H 'Bill R^^^^H' 
■ 9 ^'T'^ 


" " 1 




M Bi'ii^^Mr'i' li 



'I'lic new home of the Trust Company of Cuba, 

on ()hiK|)o .Strcf(, Havana. Opcnivl for husiness on 

K.hin.Hv 2.Sth last. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE CUBAN TOBACCO INDUSTRY 



TOBACCO COMPANY S STATEMENT EXPORTS TO THE UNITED 

STATES 



HAVANA TOBACCO CO. S YEAR 

The Havana Tobacco Company reports 
for the year ended December 31 last, and 
issued March 4, 1913, were as follows : 
Total income $50,822 ; operating expenses, 
including interest on bills payable $243,307 ; 
deficit $192,485 ; interest on gold bonds 
$375,000; deficit $567,485.- 

The company for earnings relies entirely 
upon the dividends of its holdings of stock 
of Henry Clay and Bock & Co., Ltd., 
Havana Cigar and Tobacco Properties, 
Ltd., Havana Commercial Company, H. de 
Cabanas y Carbajal and J. S. Murias y Ca. 

The combined earnings of the above 
companies, after deducting all expenses for 
management, depreciation, interest on deb- 
entures, etc., were $857,179, of which the 
proportion of Havana Tobacco Company, 
based on its holdings of their respective 
securities, was $680,001. Owing to the de- 
ficits that existed on the books of some 
of the companies prior to 1912, only a por- 
tion of the year's earnings is available for 
dividends. 

Included in the above statement are divi- 
dends from Havana Cigar & Tobacco Fac- 
tories, Ltd., aggregating $49,447. 

The balance sheet as of December 31 
last shows : Assets — Stocks in other com- 
panies $39,058,626 ; stocks in foreign com- 
panies $2,810,691 ; accounts receivable 
$15,004 ; preferred stock treasury $296,200 ; 
common stock treasury $209,059 ; cash 
$16,866 ; total $42,406,447. 

Liabilities — Common stock $30,000,000 ; 
preferred stock $5,000,000 ; 5 per cent bonds 
$7,500,000 ; accrued interest on bonds pay- 
able June 1, 1913, $31,250; accounts and 
bills payable $4,399,312; total $46,930,562; 
deficit $4,524,114. 

The retiring directors were re-elected. 



THE CUBAN TOBACCO CROP 

[Consul General James L. Rodgers, Havana, 
February 19th.] 

The present tobacco crop now being gath- 
ered in Cuba is pronounced to be one of the 
best in quality seen for several years. It 
is said to be of good development in most 
districts, of fine burning characteristics and 
of light texture, as well as good aroma. 
In the Province of Pinar del Rio, where 
the great majority of the good filler tobac- 
co is grown, the weather has on the whole 
been favorable, with the result that a good 
grade of staple filler will be produced and 
in ample quantity. However, in this dis- 



trict it is stated that the percentage of 
wrapper tobacco will be low, and that 
causes the growers of the wrapper in the 
Partido district to hope that their product, 
which is also of good quality, will be in 
great demand, and especially since the mar- 
ket has almost been swept clean of the 
1912 crop. 

There has been a deficiency of rain in 
both the Partido (Havana province) and 
the Remedios (Santa Clara province) dis- 
tricts, and while in the first named this is 
not so serious a matter owing to irriga- 
tion facilities, it may have a great effect 
uoon the latter, where the bulk of the 
cheaper filler grades is grown. An occa- 
sional rain during the next six weeks would 
relieve the condition and would mean that 
the present crop would be ample in quan- 
tity. The reverse, however, would cer- 
tainly jeopardize the outcome both in quan- 
tity and quality. 

The general expectation of. the growers 
is for good prices, and that hope seems jus- 
tified in view of the quality of the 1913 
crop and the known fact that but little of 
stock remains in Havana or other market 
centers. 



IMPORTS OF HAVANA LEAF AND CIGARS 

The following table shows the imports 
from Havana at the port of New York, 
during 1912, as classified by monthly re- 
turns : 

Tobacco. Cigars. 

Bales. Cases. 

January ., 14,251 1,900 

February 12,398 1,903 

March 15,162 2,443 

April 9,050 2,002 

May 10,919 2,255 

June 12,790 2,437 

July ,15,171 1,892 

August 29,019 2,803 

September 29,733 2,522 

October 27,941 2,942 

November 30,021 3,375 

December 21,119 2,634 

Total 227,574 31,204 

1911 importations 138,630 29,123 



The Dutch West Indies, in proportion to 
their population, make considerable impor- 
tations of cigars from Cuba, says Tobacco 
of New York. The imports in 1909 totalled 
227,500 cigars ; in 1910, 309,825 cigars, and 
in 1911, 59,860 cigars. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 



SUGAR AND TOBACCO NOTES 



CONSUL Rodger's report on the 1913 sugar output — barbadoes 

EXPERIMENTS IN CANE GROWING CIGAR CONSUMPTION 



CANE EXPERIMENTS AT BARBADOES 

"It may be mentioned incidentally that 
during- the last ten years several of the 
planters have endeavored to grow the Bour- 
bon sugar cane in Barbadoes, but in every 
instance, so far as I know, it has been at- 
tacked by the fungus Colletotrichum fal- 
catum. Recently, there were two plots of 
Bourbon sugar canes growing on one es- 
tate from plants obtained from Panama, 
and for a long time they were free from 
disease, but before they reached maturity 
this fungus was found to be present. 

Owing to the fact that sometimes there 
is a delay of more than one day after 
sugar canes are cut before they are sup- 
plied to the central sugar factories it has 
been considered advisable, owing to the 
number of these recently established, to 
ascertain the loss that accrues from the de- 
lay. With this object in view a quantity 
of B. 376 canes were cut, thoroughly mixed 
and made into sixty bundles of 105 lbs. 
each, and sent to the government labora- 
tory where each bundle was made exactly 
100 lbs. These bundles were then forward- 
ed to the Department of Agriculture and 
divided into three series of twenty bundles 
each, which were designated A, B and C. 
The A series were left exposed to the sun 
and air as tliey would be under ordinary 
plantation conditions. The B series were 
covered with the fallen dry leaves of the 
sugar cane. The C series were covered 
with dry leaves of the sugar cane and wat- 
ered once daily. Each day for some days a 
bundle of each series was crushed and the 
juice analyzed. The results will be given 
in full later in the report of the sugar-cane 
experiments, but it may be briefly men- 
tioned that for the first three days little 
change took place; after that time, how- 
ever, they rapidly deteriorated." — Report of 
John R. Bovell, Superintendent of Agricul- 
ture, Barbadoes. 



THE CUBAN SUGAR OUTPUT 

[Consul General James L. Rodgers, Havana, 
February 7th.] 

According to all present indications, the 
sugar output of 101,3 will be by far the 
greatest in the history of the industry in 
Cuba. The latest statement of production, 
which carried the figures to February 3, 
showed a total of r{97,0SS tons as the output 
of 100 mills, this result being 107,239 tons 
larger than to a similar date in 1912, when 
165 mills were grinding cane, ft is known 



also that several other mills will commence 
operation soon, and therefore, if the pres- 
ent rate of production continues and the 
weather is favorable in the spring months 
it is entirely possible that a total output 
of 2,200,000 tons will be reached. This 
would represent a gain over last year of 
about 11 per cent. 

However, it is apparent in many of the 
cane districts that much of the cane will 
remain uncut, this being due to scarcity of 
labor and to a surplus of the product. Fur- 
thermore, at the prevailing prices offered 
for Cuban sugars delivered in New York 
there is not much incentive for the mills 
that are not so well equipped to operate, 
and as a consequence many of the cane 
growers will not be able to sell their cane. 
An increase in the price of sugar seems to 
be expected by all, however, and that may 
relieve a situation which does not appeal 
favorably to a substantial percentage of the 
producers in Cuba. 

The weather has been very favorable for 
the cane, and were labor more plentiful it 
is assured that under a normal price for 
Cuban sugar the industry would be thriv- 
ing as never before. 



CONSUMPTION OF THREE PROVINCES 

Santa Clara province in 1912 consumed 
39,557,825 cigars and 4,723,971 packs of 
cigarettes. It occupies third place among 
the provinces of the Island for tobacco con- 
sumption and the second place as regards 
population. The figures show a large in- 
crease over those for 1911. 

Matanzas province consumed in 1912, 
13,886,450 cigars, against 11,847,825 in 1911. 

Pinar del Rio province inhabitants 
smoked 9,427,250 cigars in 1912 and 8,196,- 
675 in 1911. 

Camaguey province consumed less than 
anv other province, the figures being for 
1912, 3,941,950 cigars and in 1911, 4,291,275. 

Figures for the other provinces are not 
yet available. 

The population of these four provinces, 
according to the last census, was as fol- 
lows : 

Santa Clara 4.^.7,431 

Matanzas 239,812 

Pinar del Rio 240,372 

Camaguey 118,269 

The income of Matanzas province for 
the month of J'"ei)ru<'iry was as follows: 
Custom hou.se, $37,849; loan tax, $780.21. 



o 

»— 1 

a: 

Q 

< 

o 
u 

> 

o 
a: 

H 



CO 

Z 

o 

I— H 

H 

< 

a: 
< 
o 

D 

CD 
> 

h-H 

H 
U 

< 

O 



■B^s« 



1!25 



O.S 






ocs^ I 



So 0. 

O C 



5P3 = 



ea a 
.20 



' c 






1 











Jo, ■a 



8 ^ 



Cr3 £3o,'533 



5 ^3o 
. .2M 



% ^ ,* 



uO 



■cSga 



rt^ < 



5 gu ca 

3ggw 






O rt cs 

"33 



o c 



"3 •■Sg;; 



g g OS .S S ta ^ 



.2 '3 OS a ~ B o Sh 

g C a fL| 3 U N 
§3^ „m«S° 



< 
> 

< 



O 

u 

(—1 
> 
o 

O, 
H 



CD 

O 

>-^ 

H 

< 
H 

< 

a: 
< 
o 

D 

CD 

> 

H 
O 
< 

O 

OQ 

< 



5 M 



rou 



^S'^ 









32 

"3 o 



§■5 



3 -^J* ini I— ( 1— ( "O CQ 



as 



?3 a> 



ca 

§0. 



S2 



"CO 












eea 



C C « S C C C C 
tC ro O 72 03 CO »3 OJ 





























<a 
























c ^ 










s 






ea 


l<a° 

» CO 2 


gfl 
















s 












> > 




w 


WSi 








: ^a 


K3 


S 




3§« 


.» 










n 


-* 


Q(^l«q "CO . 






"c 


1 "^ 

■3 



■^ 


S 




OC 





^ 


^ 


■o 


<- 


00: 


ca 



nZ ^ 



-go 

3 S 



Si~3 b 3 ca 3^ ^ 
^35mo,m^c2 



as 

0<i! 






U^ ■a 

oj N g 

cai-l'a 
fe o C qJ 



3fe<" 



sa5 

o'3 N 



a ca I 



m o 3 
3'3-S'^ 



Sol 



' „•<! 01 oj ca 3 cao 

'='S§ -gcgo 

1 OgMoHo^ 





C3 
3 

2 


c 


c 






3 
C3 

"^ 




§ 





ea 

c 
ca 

•a 

ca 




t4 

3 

■a 






— O .S CS 

S.2.-g^2ftH 
3 ca 3*-i (- o 



53 5 



I 3 g ca 



• o c • 

as 2: 



'O C'! 



•fi " 3 ^ 

o-s E c c ci 
fcH 3 o ca ca la o 



c/^ 


1 


< 


;|^ t 


N 


,o£-^ 


2 





< 


1|M"^ 




1~£ 




Q 

D 
Z 

P 

z 

o 
u 



to 

< 
N 

< 
< 

o 

o 
z 

> 
o 



eg .2^SS 
c<! ^ g =^ . 
feg|feM|„ 



.c jjj ^ -ii .2 c 2 
c 'c c S 'c s 'c 

S3 eS rt c C3-5 «« 

t- a a 5 0-3 a 
fa y: »: < 7: o 7: 



i 5 C t' g c3 S 



"•a 






OS 



1 "cS"" 






„ ;g : o 



ij cuhjCLiOu^) 



< 

< 

u 



< 

en 

o 

u 
z 

> 

O 

a: 

X 
H 



en 

o 

I— H 

H 
< 
H 
Z, 

< 

Oh 

< 
o 

D 
en 

> 

H ! 
^ I 
< 



CQ 



ISBS^ 






S^Sl 



38,594 

18,500 
60,144 
13,047 

4,417 
16,962 
92,865 
118,019 
74,178 
13,853 

79,080 

70,299 

45,424 

31,800 
20,875 


Ob- 


110,000 

67,955 

7,642 



^inoocii-i 



-i-lOO cq CO 






'iS. aV. 



►igS 



£ d a g 8 

cu a; o'^ 
"■eg 






cS p. 



o^ o 5 

eg g-g c 



ca c B S 5 I 



5 S "S g c c 
.2 a ta-£ rt rt 

o •«: tz; o CO t/3 



55 



g § rt 



ao o c rt 
^ bo 60 o ;r7 

oils I i 

0.2.22 n < 
■"'oomH!; 







• eS 






.■3 


• C 






• a 


:.Q 






:ci 


:W 






. C3 


• o 






;J 


•■o 






: a 


■■a 






. 3 


> 












„. 


■m 




g 






rn 



o§ : 

3 
„«- 3 



'55 rt 



_2 S^^I-Sa^S " 
O ro-^OiOCug 



go 





<^ 








h- 1 


M 


N 






Ogti 


P5 5§a) 




Fi^ 




EHi- 


O 



o fe 



o m 



» '' SIS 3 "me o o 



tort^ 

a§u 



a 



•c ,2 o 



= 33 



■3 o 

•Sir 






a ImOs 



III 

T ^ 3 ^ 

:£ G c 



•s2o 



&0 3 M S _ 2 

S,go,OM3iH-S N 



Is 



bh tagj 



— 3 1 



i5og, 
153.3 1 
■S'-o'd* 






, OtS B 
32 .3 

1| a 



3 2t: 

o (5 



! S3 ri 
■CS E 



2S 



^ -S " '3 M 
5 3 C B C 3 

t. g B B t< > 

d.z; o o o o 

000000 






5 ?S S 2 . ca-D 3 

■^ ca rt ta : " 3 •- 

CQ s £ Q^ • g *i3 a 

oS. o.,„ •a « g 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



21 



FARQUHAR 




Verdaderamente es una realidad conocida de que nuestra repu- 
tacion esta acreditada por mas de treinta y cinco afios en Cuba con 
los Arados y otros Instrumentos de los que todos los Comerciantes y 
Hacendados y Colonos de la Isla podran justificarlo. 

La ilustracion de arriba ensena nuestro arado "LABRADOR" 
del tamano corriente el cual se conoce como el Mejor. Todos los 
Comerciantes de Cuba lo saben y esto hace que tengan constantemente 
un surtido en almacen. 

Tambien hacemos un tamano y medida corriente de Carretillas 
para Sacos y como tambien Carretillas para Almacen, Desgranadoras 
de Maiz, Rastras, etc. 

La AMERICAN TRADING COMPANY de la Habana 
y Nueva York son nuestros agentes de la Isla de Cuba para los 
ARADOS. 

Ademas fabricamos, Maquinas 
de Vapor y de Gasolina, Calde- 
ras, Maquinas de Traccion de 
Vapor y de Gasolina, Trillado- 
ras, Aserraderos, etc. 

Solicitanse los Catdlogos Ilustrados 




A. B. FARQUHAR & CO. 



COTTON EXCHANGE BLDG. 
NEW YORK, E. U. 

IHrcrcidn rdhlrgrdflra "I'l-lS' .W'lil.}'." Xrin York 



Pliaii mintion the CUBA REVIEW when wmiting to advktiiiii 



5000 • 








'-' 


"< 


*< * . 






in 


r"" 




in 


^ 


^ 






^ 




OOOOO 


^* 


fxT 


in 


o 


r/; 


o 


lOOl 


^'in 


on" 


r~"io 


o" 


lOlfJ 


M 




iC^ 


icio"o 


o 


o 
































•* 


X'-rJ^r-i,- 


r- 






■^f^ 






-■rf c 






oo t- 


















'"' 










r-H 
















*"" 






W^ 






















^ 


^ 






"' 


""■ 




■^ 




m 




oot- 


^ 




h- 




m 


r- 




in 


^ 


rH 


^ 


in 


o c:. 00 o 


^ 


o 


CO 


(M 


t^ 


cr. 


ino^ 


-ci 


00 


OlO 


C^] 


lOCO 


^ 




CD 


OD-^C- 


c^ 


-t^ 








































































NCO 


rp 




Ci<— ff^) 


M 


cocr 


lO 


>- 


CO 


lO 


r< 




o 




Tt" 


(M 






l-H 


w 


iij 


'-~' 




cococ 


O-rJl 


1—1 




UJ 


CO(M 


•<J< 




'.'J 


C^ -^(M 


L— 


00 


OOb-T 


P, 




looi-T 


to 


t-'c 




m 


r^ 


rH 


ni 






r-i 






aiocoin 


CO 


(71 


o 


oo 


1-1 


CO 


t— ^ t. 


ID CD 


lO 


■^CO 


oo 


in CO 


lf3 




CO 


CDCDtJI 


CO 


-— i 


























1-1 
















r- 




■* 


























*"* 










'"' 








'"' 


















































£i 



5COOCOCOOO t- j-li-iCCOUtiCOt 

:>COcCM<NlD CD tT" CJ t- CO 00 l-H t- 

St-TcO-^Oi CD CO caoocD-^aacocj 

COWOO CO CO CS l-H CD "tj^ CO O O 



MCS!3> CO 1— t lO -rf C 



b-mTtH>rf<T— lOCiCOO 



^OiCJWi-i »0 



l-H cot-ieot 



^CO-^COi-H .-^ 



CO CO 00-^ -*< con 



:iTtlCOi-HO 

q'coo wc 



O pCib-COO CO -^ -rt^ o CD CO c 
coco :oc 



go 

: ,-, Sea -2 °-'S 

. . «4 O . .3 



■ tjfj^'-'K c 



P30 



,1< 0,5 < 



BifeSfe-'oigTiOS fc 



I £ o 



O^ 2S _fe o 



•<= o s o fc 
S 9W 



a g 3 2 oc 



o 



5 ^£^>g p &^tfg|£o 



rt^^ S ce a °5 =4 



•cr-gc ".2 eg 



C C • C 



^ CCCCCCCCC C 



3 c S c3 g rt 



<5 eS 

to 

o 



9 ^ m''^ 






000 



..(u MO 






S MO) >-aS fe 3 
E rt 3 « o 3.2 E. 






£S£ 



0^ 3 +J w ^ 

3j3-g c^- . . . 
"* c 2 S =af^.^fc|*i 



fl & m rf & 
H J.? C £ CS 






s o ^ o . la 

.... § Q ^ r® 3 

003"^'-'?? 

g g . .— nS 

o 3.S KrtiS 3 

C ro o [a &■ <i I-; 



■3" 



to ' 

CO 53 H^ 3 Std oj'^ 
-< fe 3 o "^ . ^. 

gZ fc. (L C3 t g >-- tB -< 



a - 
So 

= ~ "O § 2 ; 



3 " o ts 

3 faM 



c ~ ■a g o £ 



idc^- 



' <B O 3 t. 

■a bfl m CD 55 



■S ° 
.2 s 



gu gOj-^EPsd 






I<1 



ca o ° g S I ! 



«s| 









btit-i o S m *4 

.SSn"C2-5gc33 

U.S «^ '^ ? =3 'S " 



: o .2 3 •; 
i c F " " ' 
3, 9 J 



o .S 3 
rt c 5 o !«.i5 " 5 



If ••?! 



o>5 S^ fi»?2^2^ 2 



^>.2 



<c; p 



-c«&| 






tS t»»'a 3^ ^' 

?|S55|5g 









.S2o| 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 





< 

m 
u 
< 

D 
< 


h^^^hI 






^^^^^^^1 




< 


^^^^^^^^^^ 




z 




I^^^^E^ 




f 




< 


'■ 




q: 


f ,, . _;..... ' : 




< 


^ . 


T— ^-^^^P 




I^IMl 




5 ^ 

m LiJ 


f^^^ 




Q U 

z 


BR''' 


" '' V^^l 


Q 
U 




''■fli 


Z 


;-^ ' 'i 




(9 
(0 


Uef^^' 




III 



1 ■HHpip^^- 


v]H,^^B 




1^1^^^^^^^^ 






' HP 














bidm 


i 


^P§ ; -7---- 


— s^sB 




^ 








1^ 




J 




1 




f 








M. 


I ~- 





UJ 





«5 ii ^ 

Cu U. CO 



It (« 

uu 



D 
O 

< 

< 

o 
o 
u 

I— t 

> 

o 

H 



CD 

O 

H 

< 
H 

< 

a 

D 

CD 

> 

H 
U 
< 

O 

< 



-.-- 






Q 


^s?,^ 










sm"2 























H 




""* 






^ 














S'ffl'-' 2 












0.2"^ 


.-H^ ,-lrHCa 


OJ 


__ „ 


b- 05 in CO o) lo 


r- 






b- 


fpl 




^ 






i-HrH i-ii-((M 


t- 


„„ 


(M CO lO -TtH .-I O 


.n 


Outpu 

in Bag 

1910 

Crop 


(M C3 CO t-H t- O 


5 


i-Hi-H i-li-Hca 


LO 


tput 
Bags 
09 
op 


oocoos G:)Oir:i 


"^ 




t- 


5.a-^- 


w^o SSS 


^ 


■-•i-H i-Hi-i 


UJ 
































oj 










■a 




^ 


• ■§ c 


S r„ 


a 

■o 

< 


■•s|« s 


e IS 


g,g^ &«W H 




,„ 2 a £.0 S 




g ■a g fc; ,3 




j3 










































c 












.2o 




C CCS 


CQ 


rt rt c« rt 




ig'S sss 


«<« 


^o 


■§-§a saa 




OO*^ "^"^"^ 






















. '.Oj^ 






^ • -^s 


u 




OoiSO'^ 


s 






-< 


• c 

c 




'CJ JK M > m - a 




& 






o 


'HtiW 






S6;d^|s?S5 










ca . 


















«3 










a : 


























: . 


ed 






























- -^ am 






t-i 


1 -^^.g 




6 



a 
& 

o 


.9 : 3 « 2 


>k 


'2 tMMo c i- 




•arto=at^o=« 








|asi2^^s 








'% h£5 "S 














^^ 

























A^ 


o 










& 














3 




|8 : 1- 




S d C rt cS 




3 ago SS 










j^ : 












, 






<M a 


























3 • 






0> (4 


2 ■ao„ g • 

3 g-sl Is 










^ «=§s fig 














t, 


■"^ 


i-s 


«« 





H 

o 

O 

\A 
U 

I— I 

> 

o 

PL. 

DC 
H 



CD 

O 
I— ( 

H 

< 

H 

Oh 

< 
o 

D 

CD 

> 

I— H 

H 
U 
< 

O 

OQ 
< 



o c 






C S 

.20 



50 oc 

fH'* G0C005 






K^Sh 



3 O ; 



i%-Z, O'g M, 



i ISM 



S = S 

O t-i C3 



:.S3« 









■'p^ .QU ocajtapLii 



> q 0) 
o rf 



rH Hfe -ijfcHOfcwfefei^i^ i^i^i-; 



aaa|a|g|§asia 



HA3es03a\C3iu03a} gt i 
i3p.33"3''3" " 



sss'li 



rf p ( 



-a g c-g 
S S ?S 5 « -2 ca 
" S w g oa ^ 7: 



ooo'G 



c K' '^ M m 

3 2'- 



g3 23 2! 

rt rf Jj (M C.J CQ 
•/3 U rt in ^ rt 



o C 



. • • ■ >.3 • 

i :| :5| : 

' ^ ©Sin 



^oS : 



^"5 



ea g gPH eaoi 3M5 ca g 
"^ m'Sm PnoQ^-giSaicKigSW gin 



"E 
S 3 



Jo 

3 
CO 



■a^ 






3 c I 
Cj-o I 



OS 



=*J C3 ri =^ S 2 ^ 

.2'i5"2Zga 
15 a ta c ^ gd 
ea S-S 3 ^ Sill 






1^ 



p.2fe^| 



§1^ 



= W M « ^ "S S 

a 3 . bo « bfl m 
iJim o 3 G 3 t, 

««.2ca<a5o^ 
ca ce c« oi'SO 



t^ can' 

01 ea oS oj ^ „ _ 



I ca 3 ^£1 



a-g 

ti o 



g-n 



J ^ 3 „ „ „ _ „ 



" ° e 

•oa-o 
(£32 



o ca o 

B'sa 

c3 c 



is 

eg 



cj p N rt c ^^ *S 



cj c3 N TO c wirj w; 



iQo 



■30 



=« e: o -g s 
lss'2-2„sgs^'§ 3a ml 



- •-• _- J^^ 2*3 o ^ 

o aSa5»55 
II III "^^ -.a 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



"PERFECTLY SATISFIED" 



ASK THE OWNERS OF 



SANBORN EVAPORATORS 




400,000 gallon SANBORN QUADRUPLK iil Central Consiielo, San Pedro do Maeoris, 

Santo Domingo 

Fewest Joints Highest Economy 

Easiest to Keep Clean 

Capable of Indefinite Enlargement 

Simple Efficient 

SANBORN EVAPORATOR CO. 

79 WALL STREET NEW YORK CITY 



CHART OF 
SUGAR PRICES 
AT NEW YORK 
OF CENTRIFUGAL 
SUGAR 96° TEST 
SHOWING THE 
EXTRAORDINARY 

ADVANCE 

IN THE 

PRICES 

DURING 

THE YEAR 

1911 AND THE 

MARKED RECESSION 

OF PRICES IN 1912. 

SOLID LINE . . . 1912 
DOTTED LINE . . 1911 




THE CUBA REVIE\^• 



MOBILE'S TRADE WITH CUBA IN 1911 

[Report of Leopoldo Dolz, Cuban Consul.] 



Imports from Cuba to Mobile were $309,200 in 1911 and $373,359 in 1910. 
Exports to Cuba totaled $9,356,956 in 1911 and $9,043,288 in 1910 and consisted in 1911 
of the following articles : 

Corn, 1,053,830 bags, valued at $650,077 

Wheat flour. 487,793 barrels 2,194,752 

Corn meal '. 215,317 

Sugar mill machinery 650,357 

Iron pipe, 13,562,947 pounds 166,194 

Other iron manufactures 77,179 

Hams and pork shoulders, 2,130,313 pounds 245,500 

Salt pork, 3.589,932 pounds 320,893 

Lard, etc., 25.820,822 pounds 2,497,563 

Rosin, 21.315 barrels 154,026 

Lubricating oil. 94,516 gallons 41,152 

Salt, 9.476 pounds 50,356 

Pine lumber, 66,120,000 superficial feet 1,163,232 

Furniture 71,391 

Other manufacturers of wood 37,341 

Miscellaneous 821,355 

Total $9,356,685 

In the fiscal j-ear ending June 30, 1912, Mobile exportations to Cuba totaled $4,656,152 
and the importations from Cuba $289,416. 

Cuba has occupied for some years, and especially since the reciprocity treaty became 
effective, the first place in importations from Mobile and these have gradually increased 
from year to year. Even 1911 shows an increase in spite of the revolutionary uprisings 
in the Island which, to a certain extent, paralyzed trade, especially the lumber imports. 
Mobile exports to Cuba are larger by $1,000,000 than those of New Orleans, Boston, 
Philadelphia and Baltimore combined. 



Summary of Active Plantations by Provinces — Output Figured in Bags 



English, Spanish. French, etc. American Cuban 

Ownership Ownership Ownership Total 

Province 1912 Est. 1913 1912 Est. 1913 1912 Est. 1913 1912 Est. 1913 

Havana 1,582,423 1,780,000 27,580 40,000 199,179 232,700 1,809,182 2,052,700 

Pinar del Rio... 37,012 25,000 84,558 112,000 201,846 236,000 323,416 373,000 

Mat,inzas 1,482,084 1,718,000 349,437 398,000 1,271,751 1,575.000 3,103.272 ,3,691,000 

Santa Clara ... 1.737.875 2,087,000 907,990 1,080,000 1,350,675 1,823,000 3,996,540 4,990,000 

Camaguey 85,834 100,000 703,744 1,065,000 117,896 175,000 907,474 1,340,000 

Oriente 607,236 814,000 2.705,782 2,408,790 371,777 515.000 3,684,795 3.737,790 

Totals 5.532.464 6,524.000 4,779,091 5,103,790 

Percentage.. 40 40 35 32 



3,513.124 4,556,700 13,824,679 16.184,490 
25 28 100 100 



Summary of Sugar Plantations by Provinces — Nationality of Owners 



English, French, Spanish, etc. Cuban American 

Ownership Ownership Ownership 

Havana 14 4 1 

Pinar del Rio 2 4 1 

Matanzas 24 18 6 

Santa Clara 2,2 26 12 

Camaguey 1 1 4 

Oriente 12 5 13 

Total 1913 85 58 Z7 

Total 1912 76 70 



Total 

19 
7 

48 

70 

6 

30 



?,7 



180 

183 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



A MODERN SUGAR FACTORY 



CENTRAL DELICIAS IN ORIENTE PROVINCE THE LAST WORD IN 

SUGAR MILL CONSTRUCTION 

The factory consists of one large building, the mill and boiler houses being in line, 
with the sugar house at right angles thereto; this part of the factory is seven stories 
high. The area covered is roughly 85,000 square feet. The buildings are all of steel 
construction and pneumatically riveted from top to bottom ; the columns are also of 
steel, having cast-iron bases on concrete foundations. The plant is designed for a daily 
(24 hours) capacity of 3,250 short tons of cane, work being carried on night and day, 
Sundays included. 

The cane arrives at the factory after passing over two sixty-ton weighing machines 
in railway cars of about twelve tons capacity, divided into two compartments holding 
six tons each. It is hoisted out of the cars by chain slings on a traveling yoke and 
dumped into the cane hoppers of the mill carriers by automatically tripping the slings, 
the latter being provided with trip links for the purpose. The hoists are driven by elec- 
tric motors controlled from an elevated platform, so placed as to give a clear view of 
the railway lines and the cane hoppers. The cane carriers are independently driven 
by steam engines controlled from the platform in front of the mill crushers. 

There are two sets of twelve-roller mills with crushers complete, having rollers 36 
inches diameter by 84 inches long, each set driven by two Corliss engines through double 
gearing. One engine drives the crusher, first, second and third mills, and the other 
drives the fourth mill. Each mill and crusher has its separate hydraulic accumulators 
which obtain their pressure water from a steam-driven pessure pump, but they are also 
provided with hand pumps in case of need. The mill rollers are fitted with hollow 
forged nickel steel shafts. The working of each set of mills is controlled by one man 
from the elevated platform running round the mills, through an arrangement acting on 
the governors of the engines, in such a way that any desired speed of crushing can be 
obtained and at the same time the mills can be stopped without the assistance of the 
engine drivers in a minimum of time. Each mill house has a twenty-tone traveling 
crane, carried on beams supported from the building columns, and covering the whole 




Sugar Central "Delicias," Oriente Province, Owned by the Cuban-American Sugar 
Company. Estimated Output for this Season's Crop is 300,000 Bags. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



29 




Central Delicias — Vacuum Pan Floor in Operation. 

installation for erection and repair purposes. Both a hot and a cold maceration water 
service is fitted and provided with meters for accurate working. In a convenient posi- 
tion in the mill house there is a large-gauge board for the pressure gauges of high, low, 
exhaust steam, and vacuum, as well as recording instruments for the same. The 
bagasse is conveyed to the furnaces by motor-driven conveyors, the boilers being lo- 
cated in a continuation of the mill houses. There are twenty multitubular boilers seven 
feet diameter by twenty feet long working at 125 pounds pressure, divided into two 
batteries of ten each and fitted with green bagasse furnaces of the step-grate pattern. 
The boilers are carried on steel columns outside the brick work, so that the furnace 
walls have no weight to carry. Two of the boilers are fitted with coal-burning furnaces 
for raising steam and are idle during the crop. The products of combustion are carried 
off by two steel self-supporting stacks on concrete foundations, ten feet diameter by 
one hundred and eighty feet high above floor level, the flues being lined with brick. 
Railway tracks are laid down in the boiler houses for the supply of fuel and the removal 
of ashes. The scraper carriers and the revolving furnace feeders are also driven by 
electric motors. 

The juice after leaving the mills is pumped up into the juice weighers (two for each 
set of mills), consisting of a pair of tanks, each on a registering weigh beam. The 
juice then goes to the liming tanks, the lime being admitted into the tanks during filling, 
each tank provided with a coil for compressed air for thoroughly mixing tlie juice. The 
defecation plant is of the open-tank type with the usual steam coil in the bottom. The 
juice is first heated by passing it through a battery of five steam-heated heaters, cither 
direct or exhaust steam being used. There is ample scum-tank and filter-press capacity. 
All the cloths from the latter are washed in rotary washers, driven through shafting by 
an electric motor. The filter-press mud is discharged into screw conveyors driven by an 
electric motor. The various juice and filter-press pressure pumps are steam driven. 

Two sets of standard quadruple efi^ects have been in.stallcd, each of 21.000 square feet 
of heating surface, with its separate counter-current jet condenser. The evaporator* 
and pans are connected by the same air line to the dry-air piunps, of which there are 
two of large size, both steam driven. In service only one is used, which easily maintains 
a steady vacuum of 27 inches. Five thirteen-fect pans have been put in, three calnndria 
and two coil pans, to work either exhaust or direct steam. Each pan has its motor- 
driven auxiliary dry-air pump for raising the vacuum to a .suitable lieiglit before cutting 
in the pan on the main air line to avoid heavy fluctuations of the vacuum, and its sepa- 
rate counter-current jet condenser, the hot weJls of which discharge into the main drain- 
age canal running through the factory. On tlie floor below the pans n^c located the 



30 THECUBAREVIEW 

crystallizers, of which there are twenty-four of the cyhndrical enclosed type, nine feet 
diameter by twenty-four feet long, with belt-driven stirring gear connected to four 
motors, each driving the shafting for six crystallizers. The connections from pans to 
crystallizers and from crystallizers to the centrifugal hoppers or mixers are of piping, 
as compressed air is used for discharging purposes. Suitable valves are fitted so that 
each pan can discharge into any one crystallizer, and any one crystallizer into the three 
centrifugal mixers. The centrifugals discharge the dried sugar on to belt or screw con- 
veyors (the latter for low sugars) which in turn deliver it to the elevators of the bag- 
filling hoppers, of which there are two on the ground floor provided with swinging spouts 
for filling the bags, each of which holds 325 pounds net. An electric travelling hoist 
spans the sugar floor for loading the bags on to the railway cars, which run into the 
building. All the conveyors, molasses pumps, elevators, etc., are driven from shafting 
coupled to electric motors.__ A large molasses storage tank on armored concrete columns 
has been constructed in the factory yard for filling the railway tank cars for shipment. 
All the necessary tanks for the evaporators, pans, and for hot and cold water are located 
high up in the sugar-house building. 

The loaded cane car sidings are located on one side of the factory; the cars pass 
through the end of the mill houses under the hoists, then round the end of the sugar 
house to the empty car sidings where the trains are made up and despatched to the 
fields. All the sidings are well lighted with arc lamps to enable work to be carried on 
night and day. The rolling stock consists of steel cars carried on four-wheeled bogies, 
with locomotives of large size and of sufficient power to haul trains of about 450 tons 
gross weight behind the tender. As the line is all single-track, it is divided up into 
sections controlled by flagmen acting under telephone orders from the traffic office. The 
railway system is an extensive one when it is remembered that for this factory alone 
over 3,000 tons of cane have to be brought in daily ; the railway also handles the cane 
and sugar traffic from two other neighboring estates belonging to the Cuban-American 
Sugar Company, and in addition there are general supplies to be brought in. The rail- 
way which is owned by the company deals with over a million tons of traffic in less than 
six months, which quantity gives an idea of the transport problems that have to be 
solved when dealing with large factories. 

The factory was designed, laid out and constructed by the company's own engineering 
stafif with local labor recruited on the spot, consisting mainly of Cubans, Spaniards and 
negroes from various West Indian islands. The work was carried out from start to 
finish in less than twelve months and when the factory was started up, it worked with 
complete success. All material, with the exception of sand, stone and red brick, was 
imported. 

Prior to the commencement of the factory a new deep-water port was built on an 
island in a large land-locked bay five miles away, on the north coast, connected to the 
mainland by a stone causeway nearly three-quarters of a mile long with large warehouses 
for the storage of sugar, quays electrically lighted (so that work can go on night and 
day if necessary) and electric hoists for the handling of the sugar bags in the ware- 
houses. Railway tracks run along the quays so that ships can be loaded direct off the 
cars or from the warehouses, while a molasses storage tank of about 11,000 tons capacity 
has been built close to its own deep-water quay to enable tank steamers to come alongside 
and take a full cargo. — International Sugar Journal. 



Cuba's Sources of Income during 1912 

Custom Houses, etc. Loan Tax. Lottery. 

January $2,715,969.72 $334,613.40 $444,387.49 

February 2,260,865.63 298,340.70 367,111.29 

March 2,697,048.08 312,579.84 363,500.72 

April 2,544,649.97 300,582.33 350,186.16 

May 2,481,535.32 305,128.17 273,667.12 

June 2,647,537.42 278,659.60 273,667.12 

July 2,265,729.25 346,475.34 260,241.60 

August 2,303,513.98 341,332.64 336,536.00 

September 2,322,787.36 325,435.75 276,869.00 

October 2,520,604.70 318,604.76 219,678.00 

November 3,021,597.60 332,114.26 197,224.00 

December 2,845,269.11 327,569.45 343,304.80 

Total, 1912 $30,636,108.14 $3,821,346.24 $3,777,748.18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



Do you want to 
accurately determine 



WHAT IS YOUR EXTRACTION? if 



so, use the 



RICHARDSON AUTOMATIC SUGAR JUICE SCALE 




Built on the equal length beam principle. 

Fitted with United States or Spanish solid 
weights. 

The World's Standard of Accuracy 

In many progressive ^lills it is found in- 
dispensable. — How about yours? 

This Machine has succeeded year after year 
in weighing juice with accuracy where all 
other methods have failed. 

It has thick COPPER tanks and BRONZE 
working parts and the entire construction 
is of the most substantial kind. Nothing to 
get out of order. 

RICHARDSON SCALE CO. 
10 Colfax Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

209 S. State St., Chicago. 
12 Park Row, New York. 

rwenty-fwe years' experience building spe- 
cial Automatic Scales for all kinds 
of liquids and solids. 




CORREAS IMPERMEABLES 
DE CUERO, MARCA ARCA 

FABRICADAS FOR LA 

9hiladelphia "pelting Company ^™^^^^\^^^^ 

* *JJJ!JJ.Uj l |. W!fM^^^li3gIT| ' ^4\j aM PENN., U. S. A. 

Oficina en Nueva York: 2 RECTOR STREET 

Las Mejores Correas de Transmision para Ingenios y toda clase 
de Maquinaria de Azucar. 

Las CORREAS "ARCA" no se estiran, son eficientes, duran 
mas tiempo y transmiten mas fuerza motriz que cualesquiera otras 
correas. 

Se estan usando en mas de sesenta ingenios en Cuba, y este 
afio se usaran en muchos mas ingenios. 

De venta y en existencia por 

JULIAN AGUILERA & CO., Almacenistas de Ferreteria 
MERCADERES 27 HABANA, CUBA 



I'lvase nienlion Till: C.l IS.\ Hi. VIEW ii'litn ivriltim In .\dvvrlisvvs 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



RAILWAY EARNINGS, GENERAL NOTES, ETC. 



MISSING BANKNOTES FOUND 

Ramon Llano, a Spaniard, arrested in St. 
Louis for attempting to pass two $10,000 
bills of the $200,000 stolen from the Na- 
tional Bank of Cuba, has made a full con- 
fession and implicates a merchant of Ha- 
vana. 

The Cuban government took the neces- 
sary steps to procure the extradition of 
Llano. 

The $200,000 were stolen from the Na- 
tional Bank of Cuba last October. The 
money, in twenty $10,000 bills, was given 
in an envelope to a trusted messenger of 
the bank to take to the postoffice for reg- 
istry. The envelope was addressed to the 
National Park Bank of New York, but the 
money was never received in New York. 



THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS, 
LIMITED 

Weekly Receipts : 



February 


1.. 


. . £19,491 


Increase 


£6,223 


February 


8. . 


19,005 


Increase 


4,985 


February 


15.. 


19,374 


Increase 


4,233 


February 


22.. 


19,321 


Increase 


4,498 


March 1. 




20,554 


Increase 


4,095 



THE WESTERN RAILWAYS OF HAVANA, 
LIMITED 

Weekly Receipts : 

February 1 £5,282 Increase £329 

February 8 5,035 Increase 452 

February 15. ..,.. . 5,440 Increase 474 

February 22 5,078 Increase 86 

March 1 4,867 Decrease 91 



According to the Voice of the People, 
published at Guantanamo, construction 
work has begun at Caunanera on the new 
railroad station. The old building will be 
torn down to make way for the new one. 



The business men of Encrucijada, in 
Santa Clara province, are petitioning for 
the establishment of a branch of the Na- 
tional Bank of Cuba in their city. A new 
branch of this bank was on February 28th 
established in Remedios, in the same pro- 
vince. Sr. Arturo Berrayarza is the man- 
ager of the new office. 



General Ernesto Asbert was officially in- 
stalled as Governor of Havana province on 
February 25th. Governor Asbert was re- 
elected last November. 



CUBAN TELEPHONE COMPANY 

Cuban Telephone Company earnings for 
January, 1913, were $65,891.85, with 11,889 
telephones in use. 

A case which was on trial in the New 
York Supreme Court on February 25th be- 
fore Justice Pendleton, is an action brought 
by Roland R. Conklin against the United 
Construction and Supply Company and 
Samuel M. Jarvis for an accounting. 

Messrs Conklin and Jarvis obtained a 
concession from the Cuban Government in 
1900 to construct and operate telephones 
through the island. They organized the 
Havana Telephone Company to operate in 
Havana, and the Cuban Telephone Com- 
pany for other lines. Then the United 
Construction and Supply Company was in- 
corporated as a holding concern. 

Messrs. Conklin and Jarvis later dis- 
agreed, and now Conklin demands an ac- 
counting. About $600,000 is said to be in- 
volved in the litigation. 



R. E. Holoday, the United States Con- 
sul at Santiago de Cuba has been trans- 
ferred to Cape Natal, Africa, a much more 
important post and pays $6,000 annually as 
against $4,000 in Santiago. Mr. Holoday 
was greatly liked in Santiago and his trans- 
fer is regretted. His successor is said to be 
a Mr. Fowler, of Oregon. 



The feeding of school children, a move- 
ment started in Havana several months 
ago by Dr. Carlos Garrido, began March 
10th. Subscriptions already received are 
an assurance that the movement will be a 
success. 

Mrs. Jose Miguel Gomez, wife of the 
President, and Mrs. Mario Menocal, wife 
of the President-elect, have both given 
their earnest support to the movement. 



Solis, the bandit, who has terrified the 
inhabitants of Camaguey province during 
the last four years, is becoming active 
again judging from complaints received by 
the government from American and Ger- 
man property owners. These assert that 
the bandit is sending out threatening letters 
for various amounts, which must be paid 
promptly or else they run a risk of assassi- 
nation. 



Forty-five cases of diphtheria in Camag- 
uey recently were traceable directly to the 
scarcity of water in the city. The Public 
Works Department claims that there is no 
money in the Treasury with which to buy 
a pump, which will cost $1,500. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



Condensor 



LYTTON VACUUM TRAPS 

Will trap 
any Vacuum 
that 
can be 
produced 




Injection 
Water 



Write for Bulletin No. 5 



Agent for Cuba : 

J. HERNANDEZ 
Inquisitor 5, Havana 



Lytton Vacuum Trap, 40 series, Draining 
Entrainer of Barometric Condenser 



Sales Office: LYTTON MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, 50 CHURCH STREET, NEW YORK 
Main Office and Works: FRANKLIN, VA.. U. S. A. 




*fc The BUDA COMPANY'S 
MOTOR CARS 

We manufacture Plantation and Rail- 
road Equipment including Hand Cars^ 
Push Cars, 
Jacks, 
Swi tches 
and Frogs 



30 Church Street, New York 




APARTAIKJ 13 



THOMAS F. TURULL 



TKLKI'ONO A-7751 
PRODUCTOS QUIMICOS Y ACIDOS PARA LAS 
INDUSTRIAS ESPECIALIDAD PARA INGENIOS 

Acids and Chemicals for all Manufacturing Industries 

CUBA 124 
HABANA CUBA 



I'tease mention THE Cl'HA lif-lVIKW ii'ln-n tvrilinq In Adverllxcrs 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR REVIEW 

Specially written for The Cuba Review by Willett & Gray, of New York 



Our last review for this magazine was dated February 13, 1913. 

At that date the quotation for 96 test centrifugals was 3.48c per pound. They had 
been sold at 2 l-16c c. and f. in January, hhit were then 2%c c. and f. These quotations 
of 2 l-16c c. and f. and 3.42c per pound duty paid, proved to be the- lowest of the present 
Cuba crop campaign, and the market has slowly and steadily improved until at this 
writing the quotations are 2 7-32c c. and f..and 3.5Sc per pound duty paid, showing an 
advance for the month of 10c per 100 pounds. 

While this is not a large rise, still it is important as coming at the height of th« 
sugar-making season. 

The weekly receipts do not show an excess over what they should be to complete the 
full crop expected. These receipts should reach monthly amounts as follows, say 
March, 430,000 tons ; April, 400,000 tons ; May, 310,000 tons ; June, 150,000 tons and after 
July 150,000 tons. 

The about 200,000 tons thus far made above last year to this time have been freely 
distributed and do not show much of an increase of stocks on hand, for the reason that 
the year began in the United States with stocks at a minimum for both visible and 
invisible, both of which have been replenished freely from the Cuba crop thus far. 

It is a notable feature also that in Europe stocks have not largely accumulated from 
the large beet crops, in fact the United Kingdom is suffering from an insufficiency of 
supplies and is calling upon Cuba for assistance. 

This is brought about partly by the disastrous outfurn of the Russian crop of beet 
sugar. Russia in previous prosperous years not only exported a limit of 200,000 tons to 
convention countries, with a large surplus over, but demanded from Brussels the privi- 
lege of exports of 50,000 tons more, say, 250,000 tons. 

The vagaries of weather conditions has changed this prospective exportation into a. 




The 




Crescent Thermometer 



The "Crescent" Thermometer has a well earned reputation for 
its perfect workmanship, lasting accuracy, and handsome appear- 
ance. It is a "Quality" instrument through and through, and 
what is more surprising it is no more expensive than others. 
You should have a copy of our handsome catalog fully illustrat- 
ing and describing more than seventy styles and types of 
"Crescent" Thermometers. It is well worth having and it's 
yours for the asking. 

Write for Catalog M. 27 

The Schaeffer & Budenberg M'f g. Co. 

CHICAGO BROOKLYN, N. Y. Pittsburgh 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



35 



PLANTATION CARS °' ^'' '''^^' ^'^^ 



THE PARTS FOR SAME 



r 




Uno de nuestros carros plataformas de acero recientemente construidos para la Cuban 
Central Railway. ^ v.i^<iu 



No. 902-C (Palabre de clave— ZOVOD) 

s plataformas de acero recientemente co 

Solicitense nuestros precios y especificaciones completas para carros nara cafia rt 
cualquier otro servicio, antes de decidir. ' 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direccion telegrallca: NALLIM, NEW YORK 
Produccion anual ademds de 100,000 carros 



probability of but 82,000 tons available for such exports, leaving the difference for export 
to be supplied by other beet countries, and cutting down the beet siugar supplies for the 
United Kingdom. 

This is the immediate cause of a small improvement in beet quotations from 9s 2'/4d to 
10s l%d where such an advance was not expected so early in the campaign. 

Altogether, the sugar situation at home and abroad gives promise of some steady 
improvement as the season advances. 

Regarding tariff prospects, the present situation is that the newly completed Commit- 
tee on Ways and Means are now considering the tariff schedule by schedule and will 
reach the sugar clause during the coming week, but it is not likely that the committee 
will change the free sugar bill as it passed the Flouse of Representatives at the last ses- 
sion of Congress, leaving to the Senate and the conference committee of both Houses 
the final rates of diuties to be enacted into law. 

No one expects the entire duty to bo taken off, but rather a reduction to about $1.00 
per 100 lbs. on foreign and 80c per 100 lbs. on Cubas 96 test. The date of application 
can hardly be sooner than October 1st and may be delayed until Jan. 1, 1914. The extra 
session of Congress is probably to be called for April 7th and it is likely to be August 
before the tariff bill is completed. It is quite possible, though by no means certain, that 
all the present Cuba crop will go into consumption at the present duty dates. 

Refined is slowly improving in price and demand, but is still selling without the usual 
adequate profits for refining, at the 4.30c to 4.35c basis, for graniulated. 

New York, March 13, 1913. 



AN ELECTRIC RAILWAY 

On February 9th, the Cienfuegos, Pal- 
mira and Cruces Electric Railway and 
Power Company, ran two electric cars from 
the Villucndas Park in Cienfuegos to Cao- 
nao, an outlying town, in twenty-three min- 
utes. The return trip was made in bet- 



ter time. The cars then made a few trips 
over the tracks in some of the principal 
streets of Cienfuegos, such as Santa Cruz, 
Arguelles and others. 

The opening of the public service to 
Caonao and through the city was approved 
by the Railroad Commission at its meet- 
ing on February 18th. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

REVISTA AZUCARERA 

• Escrita expresamente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York 



Nuestra ultima revista para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 13 de febrero de 1913, 
en cuyo periodo la cotizacion de los azucares Centrifugos polarizacion 96° era 3.48c la 
libra. En enero se vendieron a 2 l-16c costo y flete pero la cotizacion entonces era 2%c 
costo y flete. Estas cotizaciones de 2 l-16c costo y flete y 3.42c la libra derechos pagados 
resultaron ser los precios mas bajos de la zafra de Cuba en la presente campafia azuca- 
rera, y el mercado ha mejorado paulatinamente y con constancia hasta que al escribir 
esta resena las cotizaciones son 2 7-32c costo y flete y 3.58c la libra derechos pagados, que 
muestra un aumento durante el mes de 10c las 100 libras. 

Aunque esto no es un aumento considerable, sin embargo es importante por acontecer 
durante el apogeo de la estacion de la zafra de aziicar. 

Los recibos semanales no muestran un exceso sobre lo que debicran ser para completar 
de lleno la zafra esperada. Estos recibos deberian llegar a cantidades mensuales como 
sigue: digamos marzo 430,000 toneladas ; abril, 400,000; mayo, 310,000; junio, 150,000; y 
despues de julio, 150,000 toneladas. 

Las 200,000 toneladas de azucar recibidas poco mas 6 menos hasta ahora sobre las 
recibidas el aiio pasado a estas fechas han sido ampliamente distribuidas y no meustran 
gran aumento de existencias en manos, a causa de que el afio empezo en los Estados 
Unidos con existencias en su minimo habidas y por haber, las cuales han sido amplia- 
mente repuestas hasta ahora de la zafra de Ouba. 

Asimismo es una circunstancia notable el hecho de que en Europa las existencias no se 
han acumulado en gran manera con las grandes cosechas de azucar de remolacha; en 
efecto la Gran Bretana se esta resintiendo de la carencia de existencias y esta acudiendo 
a Cuba en busca de ayuda. 

Esto se debe en parte al giro desastroso de la cosecha de azucar de remolacha en 
Rusia. Rusia en ahos prosperos anteriores no solo exportaba a los paises de la con- 
vencion un limite de 200,000 toneladas, con un gran exceso remanente, sino que exigia de 
Bruselas el privilegio de exportar 50,000 toneladas mas, digamos 250,000 toneladas. 

Las anomalias del estado del ti.empo han cambiado esta exportacion anticipada en la 
probabilidad de solo 82,000 toneladas disponibles para tales exportaciones, dejando q*ue la 
diferencia en la exportacion sea suplida por otros paises productores de remolacha, y 
disminuyendo el suministro de azucar de remolacha para la Gran Bretana. 

Esta es la causa immediata de una pequeiia alza en las cotizaciones del azucar de 
remolacha de 9s 2^d a 10s l%d, cuando no se esperaba un alza tan pronto en la cam- 
pafia azucarera. 

En conjunto, la situacion del azucar aqui y en el extranjero promete alguna mejoria 
constante a medida que avance la estacion. 

Respecto a la perspectiva del arancel, la situacion actual es que el Comite de Medios 
y Arbitrios recien organizado esta ahora considerando dicho arancel punto por punto, y 
llegara a la clausula del azucar durante la semana cntrante, pero no es probable que este 
Comite cambie el proyecto de ley sobre el azucar libre de derechos segun fue sancionado 
por la Camara de Representantes en la ultima sesion del Congreso, dejando al Senado 
y al Comite Conferencista de ambas Camaras el poner en ejecucion la final valuacion de 
los derechos. 

Nadie espera que se aboliran por complete todos los derechos, sino que mas bien se 
hara una rebaja de aproximadamentc $1.00 por 100 libras en los azucares del extranjero 
y 80c por 100 libras en los azucares de Cuba polarizacion 96°. La fecha en que empezara 
a aplicarse esta ley escasamente sera antes del primero de octubre, y hasta puede ser 
demorada hasta el primero de enero de 1914. La sesion extraordinaria del Congreso 
probablemente tendra lugar el 7 de abril, y es probable que leegue el mes de agotso 
antes de que se complete el asunto de la ley del Arancel. Es muy posible, aunque de 
ningun modo cosa cierta, que toda la zafra actual de Cuba pase al consumo a los precios 
existentes del Arancel. 

El azucar refinado esta aumentando en precio paulatinamente, asi como la demanda, 
pero se esta vendiendo aun sin dejar las acostumbradas utilidades por la elaboracion, bajo 
la base de 4.30c a 4.35c por el granulado. 

Nueva York, marzo 13, de 1913. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



CABLE ADDRESS: Turnure 



NEW YORK 
64-66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

BANKERS 

Dcyotits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and RemitUnce 
of Dividends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale 
of Letters of Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons, etc., for account of others. Drafts Payment* 
fcr Cable and Letters of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France Spain 
Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Central and South America. ' ' 



CORRESPONDENTS: 



EAVANA— N. Gelats y Ca. 
MEXICO Banco Central Mexicano. 



LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd 
PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



SUGAR TESTING APPARATUS 



FUNDADA EN 




POLARISCOPIO SOBRE "BOCKSTATIV" LA FORMA MAS MODERNA 
Con caja a prueba de polvo, parte de prisma, y engranaje prolongado. 



EIMER & AMEND, 205.211 Third Avenue, New YorkpSr//„aa/ 



Hace una especiali- 

dad de surtir 
Todos los Instru- 
mentos para la 
Prueba de Azucar 
y Habilitacion de 
Laboratorio. 
Unicos Agentes en 
los Estados Unidos 
y Canada para los 

STANDARD 

POLARISCOPIOS 

Su triple 6 doble 
campo de vision ha 
sido adoptado por 
el Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos co- 
mo norma. 

Toda la maquina- 
ria experimental y 
los aparatos descri- 
tos en {(Agricultural 
Analysis,)) del Prof. 
H. W. Wiley. Sp 
suministran con 
(ustos todos los in- 
formes pedidos. 

Pidanse Listas de 



SE VENDEN ^ Equipos de Ferrocarril para el uso de Centrales 

Locomotoras de todas clases, pesos y entrevias. 

Carros de Pasajeros, Carros Combinados de Pasaje= 
ros y de Equipajes, tambien de Pasajeros, de 
Equipajes y de Correo, se asi se desean. 

Carros de Plataforma, Carros Q6ndola con fondo 
piano, Carros (iondolo con fondo de tolva, 
Carros Cerrados de Carga, Carros de Refrigera= 
cion, Carros para Ganado, Carros de Tanque y 
Carros Especiales. Pidase nuestra ultima lista. 

Indiquese sus Exigencias 

26 CoRTLANDT St. THE MALES COMPANY New York City 



A Sure Cure 
For Slipping 
BELTS 



iJixon's Solid Belt UrcssiriK is a iiuick, sure 
and ea.sy cure for slipping liclts. 
Dixon's Traction Belt Dressing restores lost 
efficiency to glazed, dirty and otherwise neg- 

CROFT & PRENTISS ^°JVA^!v'fiA!'c&B^''* 



X 

o 

N 



fifds,' inriilion Till-: CI ll.\ KliVIHW ii'lien ivriliiig lo Advertisers 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEWS OF SUGAR ESTATES 



MILL AT JAGUEY GRANDE 

The establishment of a new mill at Jag- 
iiey Grande, Santa Clara province, on a 
co-operative plan on the part of the mer- 
chants and cane growers is projected. 

The site of the new mill is Hkely to be 
that of the old mill "Australia," which was 
demolished during the war, or on thirty- 
three acres of land which Sr. Desirerio 
Garcia, one of the promoters of the ven- 
ture offered to give free. 

In case the mill is built it will have a 
capacity of about 15,000,000 arrobas per 
crop, without causing any harm to the in- 
terests of the sugar mills Cuba and So- 
corro which at the present time cannot 
take care of the product of that section. — 
Im Lucha, Havana. 



ANOTHER SUGAR CENTRAL 

Another sugar mill is projected in the 
neighborhood of Piedrecitas, in Camaguey 
province, on the line of the Cuba railroad 
by a company composed of Americans and 
Cubans and known as the Piedrecitas Sugar 
Company. The management will be Cuban 
and the originator of the new enterprise 
is said to be Senor Oliverio Tomen, of 
Camaguey. It is hinted that the American 
capital will be furnished by sugar men from 
Louisiana. 

Another mill will be added to the Cen- 
tral at Jobabo, in Santa Clara province, 
doiiUbling its equipment. This estate is 
owned by the Cuba company and two other 
mills are projected by this same company. 
One at Tana, near the Jobabo estate, and 
one at Alto Cedro. 



CENTRAL NEAR CIEGO DE AVILA 

A sugar mill near Ciego de Avila, Ca- 
maguey province, is projected, and $345,000 
has been promised by Havana merchants, 
the Stewart Sugar Company and business 
men of Ciego, the latter contributing $45,- 
000. If necessary, whatever capital is lack- 
ing will be supplied by the men of the 
latter city. The location of the new estate 
is said to be on the lands of the El Recreo 
farm, owned by Sr. Vicente Irionde. The 
Spanish Herald, of Ciego, says the project 
will not fail for lack of money. 



The story in an Havana paper that the 
Cuban-American Sugar Company contem- 
plate the building of another sugar mill 
in Matanzas Provinve is without founda- 
tion. At the ofHces in New York it was 
emphatically stated that no such project 
was being or would be considered. 



A CENTRAL IN SANCTI-SPIRITUS 

It is stated that the negotiations for cer- 
tain lands in Sancti-Spiritus have been 
completed and that a great sugar mill will 
soon be built on the newly acquired ter- 
ritory. 

The old farm Las Guasimas, comprising 
about 40,000 acres, and long in the posses- 
sion of the ancient Iznaga-Lersundi family, 
has been bought by an American syndicate 
beaded by the Cresson-Morris Company of 
Philadelphia. The cost of the lands is 
mentioned at $1,500,000, but this is a mis- 
take. The real price was $600,000. The 
new company will be known as the Abarcas 
Sugar Company. 

The location of the new mill is East of 
the Zaza River, and on the south coast. A 
railroad will be b'uilt running to a wharf 
at which large steamers can load, there 
being sufficient depth of water. The work 
of clearing the land has begun and the 
construction of mill, wharf and railroad 
will begin within sixty days. The mill will 
be ready to grind on January 1, 1915, and 
will have a capacity of 250,000 bags. The 
whole contract is in the hands of the 
Cresson-Morris Company who will soon 
open an office in Havana, and they will 
be prepared to handle contracts for general 
plantation equipment. The deal was han- 
dled by Mr. A. M. Del Valle. 



Central Hormiguero, in Santa Clara pro- 
vince, expects 160,000 bags from this year's 
crop as against 110,000 last year. Since 
December — when the mill began grinding, 
the yield has been 60,000 bags, with but 
few interruptions, either on account of the 
weather or accidents to the machinery. The 
daily grind has been 140,000 arrobas. The 
extraction thus far has been 78 per cent, 
with the sugar content at 10.40 per cent. 
This estate, like many others, has material- 
ly increased its equipment. Its railway cov- 
ers 58 kilometers, narrow gauge, and six 
locomotives with 230 cane cars in constant 
use. The estate possesses, also, two mo- 
lasses tanks of 150,000 and 200,000 gallons 
respectively, and is constructing another 
with a capacity of 500,000 gallons. Five 
hundred men are employed. 



Pedro Fernandez de Castro, the owner 
of the sugar mills "Nuestra Senora del 
Carmen" and "Loteria," located at Jaruco, 
died in Havana February 2d at an advanced 
age and following a lingering illness. Sr. 
Fernandez de Castro for many years was 
Mayor of Guanabacoa and was interested 
in public affairs. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



39 



HAVANA 



CUBA 

National Bank of Cuba 

Government Depositary 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$6,250,000.00 



Head Office — Havana 

27 BRANCHES IN CUBA 

N tw York A genc\f 
1 WALL STREET 



COLLECTIONS 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL aa4 
SURPLUS 



$650,000 



TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 



EXAMINES TITLES 
NEGOTIATES LOANS 



COLLECTS RENTS 
ON MORTSACES 



Correipondence Solicited front 
Intendinf Inrettori 



OFFICERS 

Norman H. Davis President 

Oswald A. Hornsby - ■ . . Vice-President 
Claudio O. Mendoza • • - Vice-President 

J. M. Hopgood Treasurer 

Rogelio Carbajal Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

INCORPORATED 1869 

Fiscal Agent of the Government of the Republic of 
Cuba for the Payment of the Army of Liberation 

Paid=up Capital, 

and Reserve. .. .$25,000,000.00 
Total Assets $180,000,000.00 

Head Office MONTREAL 

New York Agency 
Corner William and Cedar Streets 

Branches in Antilla, Bayamo, Caibarien. 
Camaguey, Cardenas, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, 
Guantanamo; Havana: Obrapia 33, Galiano 92, 
Monte 118, Muralla 52; Manzanillo, Matanzas. 
Nueyitas, Puerto Padre, Sagua la Grande, Sancti 
Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba. 



Established IS44 



H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A QENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
C«rriiMad«Rtt at All Prladpa! Piatti af the lilan^ 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of th* Famous H. Vpmann 
Brand of Cigart 



FACTORY: 
PaM* it Taeaa 1 61- Its 



OFFICE: 
Aiaargyra l-( 



ESTABLISKIB 1176 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 

Transact a general banking business 
Correipondents at all the principal 
places of the world 

Saje Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 



Tlie Clerks' Cliih is tlie largest in Ha- 
sana. It lias over :i(),()00 niemhers who 
contriliute $l.r)0 every montli as dues, and 
tluy have what is declared to he the second 
l.irficst Ijall room in the world. 'i"hey own 
tlie handsome cliih luiildinjj;- at the corner 
'if tlic J'rado and Colon streets, and the 
meinhershii) included .Spaniards and Cu- 
hans. 



I'luuac men lion J HE CL It. i HEVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA 



The United Railways of Havana 

in conjunction with the Cuba Railroad, maintain a service of 
two trains daily between Havana and the growing Eastern 
city of CAMAQUEY, and one Express Train daily between 
Havana and SANTIAGO DE CUBA, the "Dream City of the 
West Indies." Buffet lunch is served on these trains. 

FOUR TRAINS DAILY 

in both directions between Havana and MATANZAS, which latter city because of its picturesque 
situation and tne charm of its principal attractions (Yumuri's famous valley and the wonderful 
caves of Bellamar) has long enjoyed distinction as the great "Mecca" of the tourists, and it 
continues to gain in populaiity. EXCELLENT TRAIN SERVICE is maintained to many other 
places of great interest to tourists, all of which are fully described in "Cuba — A Winter 
Paradise," a profusely illustrated 80-page booklet with six complete maps and 72 viewi illustrative 
of this wonderful island, sent postpaid on receipt of 3 cents in stamps. 

Frank Roberts, General Passenger Agent 
United Railways of Havana -------- 118, Prado, Havana, Cuba 






FRED WOLFE ^^i calzada de vives, Havana 

Cable, "Wolfe" 

Negociante en Todas Clases Dealer in all Classes of 
de Ganado Live Stock 

Especialmente en Mulos Especially in Mules 

Always on hand Large Stock of All Classes of Mules — All Mules Sold Are 
Guaranteed as Represented — Can Furnish Any Number Desired on Short Notice 



^ 



ISLAND OF CUBA OF 



THE LIVERPOOL & LONDON & GLOBE INSURANCE CO. 



LOSS OF INCOME 
FOLLOWING FIRE 



Tbis Company will issue Binders on risks in the Island of Cuba 
at tbeir New York office, 45 William Street. Tel., 3097 John. 

FIRE— FIRE AND BOILER FIRE, BOILER EXPLOSION 

EXPLOSION AND ENGINE BREAKDOWN 



Havana Office: 106 Cuba Street 



P. RUIZ ® BROS. 

ENGRAVERS 

FINE STATIONERY 

Obispo 22 P. O. Box 608 

HAVANA, CUBA 



WE OWN 



50,000 acres of land 
between Manati Bay 
and Puerta Mala- 
gueta. Perfect title and fully paid for. We 
want more people interested at Manati. Will 
give some one a snap on ten thousand acres 
outside of the platted portion. Easy terms. 
This is an unusual opportunity. Act quick. 

Manati Company of Cuba 

218 Palace Building Minneapolis, Minn. 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

Sugar Brokers 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Addreis, "Tide, New York" 



GILTNER BROS, Emineiice,Ky,U.S.A. 




Dealers and breeders of 
Kentucky Stallions, Mares 
and Jacks. 

Hereford, Shorthorn, Hol- 
stcin and Jersey bulls. 
Well broken mules in car 
lots for sugar planters. 
Export Trade a Specialty 

Prices named on animals 
delivered anywhere in the 
world. Write us your wants. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



BUCKEYE NURSERIES 

M. E. Gitlett, Prop. TAMPA, FLORIDA, U. S. A. 

ORANGE, LEMON AND GRAPE-FRUIT TREES 

LARGEST CITRUS NURSERY IN THE WORLD 
QUALITY VARIETY DELIVERY 

Price May Be Forgotlon—Qiiality NEVER 

We grow nothing but Standard Varieties which we can recommend to the trade as 
Money-Makers. 

Having had thirty-four years' experience, we thoroughly understand packing trees 
for long-distance shipments. 

We guarantee our trees to be True to Name, Free from White Fly and to arrive at 
destination in good condition. 

Consider the future and protect your RI T/^If FYP Nil TR ^P*!? IFQ 
investment by planting reliable trees from OVJ\-/I\.ti I Hi 1^ ^rV0IliA\li:<0 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

Engines, BoilersandMacHinery 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 
Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

St«mins^ip 'Wortc a Specialty 
A. KLING. Prop. MORfT IT Af A 



ESTABUSHED 1852 



INQUIRIES REQUESTED 



ROHLIG & CO. 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
BREMEN BREMERHAVEN HAMBURG 

K.NOCHENHAUERSTR 16/17 AM HaFEN 113 AlSTERDAMM 14/15 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PORVIDED ON APPLICATION 



WILLETT St GRAY, BroKer. and Agents 

FOREIGN AND ^S^XT^'^^ TV ^K> ^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

DOMESTIC )^^ ^1^1.:^.^-^ Aid 1^^ REFINED 

82 WALL STREET, NE^V YORK 

'ublishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED. 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton 
Night Call, 411 Hamilton 



Cable Address: 
"Abiworks," New York 



Atlantic 'Basin Iron Works 

Engineers and Boiler Makers 

Machinists, Plumbers, Tinsmiths, Pine I'ittcrs, HIacksmiths, Com)ersmiths, Pattern 
Makers, Sheet Iron Workers, Iron and Firass Castings. Steamship Repairs a Specialty. 



Corner Imlay and Summit Streets 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I'lea.ic mill I ion I III: CI'/IA l(i:\li:\V irlnii mrilinu In Adticrliscrs 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"P A S S O L" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, COR. STONE 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos De Bea & Co. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importaol6n direeti dt todii let 
••ntrot manufaoturcroi d«l munde 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward & 
Co., New York; Serra Steamship Company, 
Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos de A. 
Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espana Indepen- 
dencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL. WOOD. LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

or KVEKY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard; 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones: 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 



STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
PixKS, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimate! 
on all classes of contracting; work in Cuba, 



New York Office 

143 Liberty St. 



Harana Office 

Zulueta 36 D. 



John Munro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



MARIANO RODRIGUEZ MORA 

AGRIMENSOR (SURVEYOR) 

SANTA CLARA, Cuba 

DANIEL WEILL [s .. c ] 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

ESPECIALIDAD EN ROPA HeCHA DE TrABAJO 

Am in a position to push the sales of American 

high class products. Would represent a first 

class firm. 



Apartado 103 



Camagiiey, Cuba 



M. J. CABANA 



COMMISSION 
MERCHANT 
P. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a com- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in 
eastern Cuba. 

F. W. HvosLEF E. C. Day R. M. Michelsen 

Bennett, Hvoslef &. Co. 
Steamship Agents and Ship Brokers 
18 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

Cable: "Benvosco" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




SAILINGS 

NEW YORK— CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 

SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS NORTHBOUND SAILINGS 

(From New York) (From Nuevltas) 

S.S. Olinda - - April 2nd S.S. Curityba - April 4th 

S.S. Curityba - April 16th S.S, Olinda - - April 18th 

S.S. Olinda - - April 30th S.S. Curityba - May 2nd 

Nuevitas, Antilla, Nipe Bay, Puerto Padre and Gibara. 
FREIGHT ONLY 

S.S. CuBANA, April 9th; S.S. LURISTAN, April 23rd 
Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua and Caibarien 

MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A Steamer — -Matanzas-Caibarien ApRiL 1 ST 

S.S. Bertha — Havana " 4th 

S.S. Paloma — Santiago-Guantanamo " 9th 

A Steamer — Manzanillo - - - - - " 9th 

S.S. Karen — Havana - - - " 11th 

S.S. Bertha — Havana- - - " 18th 

S.S. SiGNE — Matanzas-Caibarien-Sagua-Cardenas - - - " 19th 

S.S. Karen — Havana ------ " 25th 

S.S. KlORA — Cienfuegos - - - - *' 30th 

MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Mobile, April 1st, for Montevideo and Buenos Ayres; April 
1 7th for Buenos Ayres and Rosario 

BALTIMORE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 
Sailings from Baltimore, April 1 0th and April 24th for Havana 

BALTIMORE— COLON SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 
A Steamer, April I9lh, F^altimore to Colon 



I'lrimc iiicnlion Tlll-l (A'li.\ KJCVIICW ii'Jifii ii>riliii(i lo Adverllsir.s 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904-1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed ia 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 galloni 
of cane juice per twenty-foul 
hours, and the other ta 
handle 325,000 gallons in tht 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built foi 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects arc 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE. Prerident. 



LEWIS C. LILLIE, Secretary and Treasurer. 



THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 



BReAO ANb 
NARROW SADflE 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 

LOCOMOTIVES 



• INai.E EXPANIION 
AND CO M PO U N B 




o^t^raTk"" PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES JIV,o"NToP*iE^5?c". 



SptcificatioHS Furnished on Application 



AMERICAN TRADING COMPANY, Lonja del Comercia No. 418, Havana, Cuba 

Cable Address: "Baldwin, Philadelphia" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 




CVBARfiVlEW 





vA m 






^'nT 



l.OOAYear JUNE 1913 lOCentsACopy 
Piiblished bytheMimsonSteamshipUne. 82-9ZBeaver$treet.NewYorkCity. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Portable Bag Filers 

Cut down handling cost and materially 
increase the efficiency of your entire 
force. Low in first cost and operating 
expense. Full particulars on request. 

Like all Link-Belt Machinery, our Portable Bag Filers 
are substantially constructed — built for hard con- 
tinuous service. They are compact and readily 
portable. Capacity 60 tons an hour. 

The Link-Belt Company is recognized as the 
pioneer in the art of conveying materials. 

Our various elevating and 
conveying devices to-day 
represent the highest de- 
velopment of their re- 
spective types. 

Write for further infor- 
mation 




^ 



(W>-* — SWIVEL HOLLE.RS 



LINK-BELT COMPANY 



299 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



YOUNGSTOWN CAR & MANUFACTURING CO. 

Fabricantes de Carros para Carga, Ingenios y Minas, etc. 




CABLE ADDRESS: 
JAMOTLEY, 

NEW YORK 

(all codes used) 



YOUNSSTOWN 



Gerente del 
Departamento 
de Exportacion 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 

71 BEAVER STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



Rieles y Aseguradores 

Ranas, Cambiavias y Soportes de 

Locomotoras 

Calderas 

Tubos para Calderas 

Caches para Pasajeros 



Ladrillos Refractarios 

Tanques de Madera y de Hierro 

Torres de Acero y de Madera 

Puentes de Acero 

Edificios de Acero 

Hierro Acanalado 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



/<- A r> n /^O PAEA TODOs usos y de todos Umafios, de los oara cana con cuatro J«eii*« ^ "P*. 
CARROS c'dSd d^ 1 ^ toneladas 4 lot con juegoi doblei Se rueda. y capacidad de 30 ton.lada. 

Hacimos una tspecialidad de juegos de herfjes, tncluvendo los juegos 
' derTedL^compUt,mente armados. con todaslaspiezas ie metal, yf a»" 

completos pari consiruir los carros i su desUno de maderas del pas 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Charch St., New York, N. Y. "^S^'u^Tm-^ 



DONT OVERLOOK THE 
ADVERTISING PAGES 

OF 

THE CUBA REVIEW 



They fwm let tbt least UtereitUi portion of th* *ykll- 
eatlea, aid there It tuffelent variety of lavtitmeRt *r«»e- 
iltleii and valuahle merehandUe aaROuaeemcRti tc moi 
everyent'i aeed. Get la eerreeteadenee with CUBA 

REVIEW advertltert fer the Hodt yeu wait. 




ALL 

ABOUT 

CUBA"* 



Copyright 1913 



IT COVERS THE ISLAND'S 

IN DUSTRIES AND ACTIVITIES 

ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR POSTPAID 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Prensas d* 

Filtrar 

para Insenios 

SHRIVER 

FILTER PRESSES 

Write us for 
Catalog, Pricei 
and Information 

T. Sbriver & Co. 

814 Hamilton St. 
Hcrrison, N. J. 

Represented in Loui- 

sianm by E. A. SAM- 

MONS CO., Ltd.. 

New Orleans, La. 



FOR MOLASSES USE 




STEEL TANKS 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



2630 Whitehall Building 
New York 



nA.ivioiNmrA.iNK: 



■WARREN, PEN N. 



BUILT BY 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

AGENTS IN CUBA: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 
26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, WARREN, Pa., U.S.A. 




Entrance to the Yumuri Valley, City of Matanzas. 



THL CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Editors and Publishers 

SUBSCRIPTION 

$1.00 Per Year - - lO Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 



Vol. XI JUNE, 1913 No. 7 
Contents of This Number 

PAGE 

American Merchants— Trade Hints 18, 19, 20 

Agricultural Notes — 

Avocados and Mangoes ;?Y 

Propogation Experiments — Illustration on page 31 

Cigars and Cigarettes—How Made in Havana (Illustrated) — 26 

Credits in Havana and Cienfuegos }X 

Electric Light Plants in Many Towns ^^ 

Financial Notes — ^ 

Havana Electric Railway Receipts J^ 

New Cuban Loan J^ 

National Bank's New Branch j^ 

Prices of Cuban Securities J'J 

Cuban Telephone Co. Earnings Jo 

Cardenas-American Sugar Comjiany Dividend jo 

Free Port Suggested for Santiago j^ 

Foreign Claims Settlement Urged J^ 

Havana's Customs Receipts 'o 

Isle of Pines— Some United States Newspai)er Comment •^i 

Large Contracts Declared Void 

(1) Santiago Electric Light Plant }j 

(2) Malecon Continuation '' 

Money Order Fees ^ '^ 

Mazorra Insane Asylum Investigation ^^ 

Maine Monument Ceremonies 

Mining Intelligence^ ., 

Asphalt Mines in Six Provinces |" 

New Iron Ore Deposits !^ 

Ore Properties of Two Companies i'l'Vo 1^ 

.Vew Administration Changes and Activities IL 1-^' '^ 

President Menocal's Helpers ■ 

President Menocal's Policies— An Interesting Interview ^' ']' 

Patent Medicines in Cuba , 

Railroads— ' 16 

Cuban Central Earnings '" 

Western Railroad Earnings j° 

New Train to Cienfuegos ^ 

North and South Coast Road -^ 

Placetas to Trinidad j • 

Cuba Railroad Receipts !^ 

Havana Electric Railway Receipts ''] 

T'nitcd Railway Receipts 

Stianish Articles - _ , , • . , , -o • i„.,<^ 

Comentarios Favorables de la Pensa de Inauguracion del Presidente ^^ 

Menocal ,^ 

Revista .Azncarera 2o 

Santiago de Cuba Harbor Jm(irovcments 

Shredded Cane Experiments Further Facts 

Sugar Matters- ,., 

New Centrals in Oricnte Province •J'^ 

Cuba's Labor Problem -'^ 

Burnt Cane Deterioration ^^ 

Sugar Review by Willett & Oray 35 

Tobacco KcceiptB and Exportations for Five Months ■ ••; ••■• <'" 

Cover Page Illustration is the Statue of General .AgramoTUe, recently erected m the 
City of Camaguey. 



THL 
CUBA RLVILW 



"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1913, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XI 



JUNE, 1913 



Number 7 



GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



PRESIDENT MENOCAL S STRONG CABINET BRIEF NOTES OF THE 

MEMBERS THE MAINE MONUMENT CEREMONIES 



Enrique Jose Varona, Vice- 

President President, was born in the 

Menocal's city of Camaguey in 1849, 

Helpers was graduated from the 

" University of Havana and 

is now professor of philosophy and ethics 

in that institution. He was Deputy to the 

Spanish Cortes from Camaguey Province 

shortly after the Ten Years War (1868-'78). 

Under General Wood's administration he 

was Secretary of Public Instruction. He is 

an author, a newspaper man and presfdent 

of the Conservative Party. 

General Emilio Nunez, the Secretary of 
Agriculture, is a practical tobacco grower. 
He is also a merchant and a man of 
wealth. He was governor of the province 
of Havana in the early days of the Cuban 
Republic. On taking his office he declared 
that one of the first things he purposed to 
do was to reorganize the government agri- 
cultural experimental station at Santiago 
de Las Vegas in Havana Province. 

Jose Ramon Villalon, Secretary of Pub- 
lic Works, was born in Santiago de Cuba, 
in 1864, and speaks English fluently, having 
graduated in 1889 from Lehigh Univer- 
.sity, where he obtained his degree of civil 
engineer. 

Cosme de la Torriente, Secretary of 
State, is the Vice-President of the Conser- 
vative Party. At the time of the second 
American intervention lie was Cuban Min- 
ister to Spain, a position he resigned. 

Cristobal de la Guardia, Secretary of 
Justice, is the only member of the cal)inet 
who has no war record. In is<!i8 he made 
an unsuccessful effort to organize a lal)or 
party. As a senator he marie a strong fight 
against the lottery, chicken fighting and 
Jai-alai. His election for tlie ()ortfolio of 
justice is considered an excellent one 



Col. EureHo Hevia, Secretary of the In- 
terior, was one of Gen. Galixto Garcia's 
expedition which embarked on the "Haw- 
kins" for Cuba and when that vessel sank 
off the Jersey coast he narrowly escaped 
with his life. During the first intervention 
he was assistant secretary of state. Since 
1906 he has practiced as a lawyer. 

Leopoldo Cancio, Secreatry of the 
Treasury, has been a cabinet minister sev- 
eral times. He assisted in the preparation 
of the reciprocity treaty witli the United 
States in 1903. 

While in the United States, prior to join- 
ing General Maceo, he built the first dy- 
namite gun ever used in the world and 
employed it in the operations in Cuba. He 
is a professor of mathematics in the Uni- 
versity of Havana and a member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers and 
the American Institute of Mining 'En- 
gineers. 

Ezequiel Garcia, the Secretary of Public 
Instruction, is professor of literature in 
the University of Havana. 

Enrique Nunez, Secretary of Public 
Health, was graduated from the University 
of Havana in 1886 and as a surgeon in 1893. 



In order to have Mexico get her United 
States mail some twenty times a month 
instead of ['we or six times as at present, 
Sr. Pedro luiriciuez, chief post-office in- 
spector of the Republic of Mexico, will 
recommend that all mail I)e sent via Ha- 
vana. He also wants all Mexican mail 
now being sent to New York and New 
Orleans be sent direct to Key West via 
Havana, as he is convinced that the most 
satisfactory service is being <)l)tained 
tliroiigh the Key West routing. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The National Maine Monu- 
The Maine ment, erected to commemo- 
Monument rate the martyrdom of the 
Unveiling officers and men of the bat- 
tleship "Maine," who went 
to their deaths when the warship sunk in 
Havana harbor on February 15, 1898, was 
unveiled May 30th in New York City with 
an impressive ceremony. 

The Maine dedication ceremonies stiarted 
May 29th with the arrival in the Hudson 
of the gunboat "Cuba," bearing the Cuban 
representatives for the unveiling. It was 
the first time that a warship flying the flag 
of Cuba visited New York, and when she 
arrived at her anchorage, under escort of 
the "Yankton," the "Wyoming" and the 
other flagships fired a national salute of 
twenty-one guns in her honor. The "Cuba" 
saluted the American flag as she passed 
Governors Island. 

The Cuban government had sent to New 
York its famous military band of eighty 
pieces and this band marched in the parade. 
This is the first time it has visited x\merica. 
The Cuban commissioners at the cere- 
mony were Manuel de la Vega Calderon, 
charge d'aff'aires at Washington ; Colonel 
Jose Marti, representing the army; Com- 
mander Quevedo, representing the navy; 
Consul General Mariano Rocafort, Luis 
More y del Solar, commander in chief of 
Cuba's artillery ; Felipe Pazos and Jvaquin 
Torrabas. 

In the course of an address at the un- 
veiling. Ex-President William Howard 
Taft had the following to say about Cuba : 
"Out of the Spanish war came the Re- 
public of Cuba. Prophecies of impending 
danger to it if a change of administration 
in the United States were to come had 
be?n freely made, but in the last year one 
President of the United States had peace- 
fully given over his office to his successor 
and the Cuban people had successfully met 
the test. 

"Cuba is our foster child. As she errs 
in the childhood and youth of her national 
life we must bear with her and aid her. 
Again and again it has been said, and 
without a thought of the new responsibili- 
ties and the new burdens we would have 
to assume and the plighted fate we would 
have to break, that if Cuba again stumbles 
and the United States is obliged to inter- 
vene to prevent a fratricidal war and great 
disaster, then we must end the republic 
and take over the island within our juris- 
diction and protection. This is said with- 
out regard for our parental relation to 
her, and our continuing duty to help her, 
and to be patient with faults that may be 
expected in her struggles to govern her- 
self." - 

The Governor of Maine next spoke, and 
following him Sr. Calderon, of the Cuban 
legation at Washington and one of the 




The great American people are lavishly entertain- 
ing the Cuban army which is visiting their country. 
El gran pueblo aniericano festeja con efusion al 
Ejercito Cubano que visita su nacion. 



representatives "^f the Cuban government 
at the unveiling ceremonies. Sr. Calderon 
also read a message from the president of 
the Cuban War Veterans to the American 
veterans of the war, and sprung a stir- 
prise on the assemblage when he presented 
to Gen. Wilson his government's check for 
$1,000 as Cuba's contribution to the Maine 
monument fund. 

The thanks of Cuba for the cordial re- 
ception given its representatives at the 
dedication of the Maine Memorial Monu- 
ment in New York City are conveyed in a ' 
dispatch received June 4th by the Secretary 
of State from Sr. Cosme de la Torriente, 
Secretary of State of Cuba. The message 
is as follows: 

"Permit me to convey to you the satis- 
faction felt by all the official and social 
elements of the republic at the brilliant 
and friendly reception of the representa- 
tives and forces of the army and navy of 
Cuba who attended the dedication of the 
Maine Monument in the City of New York. 

"As your telegram to the authorities of 
the State and City of New York, recom- , 
mending most solicitously the reception of' 
the Cuban commission, contributed without 
doubt to so cordial a demonstration, 1 beg 
you to accept the expression of the sincere 
gratitude of our President, government 
and people." 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE NEW PRESIDENT'S POLICIES 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS CUBa's GREATEST NEED IMMIGRATION PLANS 

FOREIGN CAPITAL IS SOUGHT 

"I believe Cuba's greatest needs are the primary schools, which my administration will 
promote wherever the population warrants, and we will improve the normal and trade 
schools next. Another great need is an increase in the present means of communication, 
the enlargement of established industries and the encouragement of new ones. 

"We also should cultivate the closest commercial relations with the United States, 
Cuba's natural principal market, and exert ourselves to make permanent the advantages 
both undoubtedly have received through the present reciprocity treaty. 

"For the moment I believe it will be better to maintain the treaty as it stands unless 
the United States makes sugar free, in which case the reciprocity agreement dies a 
natural death, thus enabling the European manufacturer to compete with us successfully, 
making inroads on our market and causing almost irreparable damage. 

"The fact should be impressed on the- minds of the American people that this damage 
ultimately affects them as well as us. For instance, in the event of war endangering 
other sources of supply were the treaty abrogated the United States must pay the Eu- 
ropean price for Cuban sugar or do without it. 

"Cuba now supplies three-quarters of all the sugar consumed in the United States. 
In all events I consider the revision of our present tariff one of Cuba's necessities. I 
intend to devote especial attention to foster immigration, which is most essential to tlie 
progress and permanent prosperity of our country. 

"I hope before the expiration of my term to have started an immigration current of 
sufficient volume to insure forever the settlement of many troubles originating in the 
present dearth of good immigrants. To this end will it be necessary to establish a 
modern, adequate system of colonization. 

"The sugar industry has suffered also from the lack of storage facilities. Our planters 
have been unable to hold back sugar for good prices. 

"I favor any measures tending to remedy these conditions, such, for instance, as the 
construction of warehouses for the storage of sugar in the chief ports or the establish- 
ment of banks to supply requisite funds to move a crop or anything to help the Cuban 
planter defend himself. I favor agricultural banks, the need for which is widely felt in 
our commerce and industry, and any enterprises of this kind will have the administra- 
tion's hearty moral support. 

"Heartiest encouragement will be extended to all foreign capital seeking investments 
in Cuba. The greater the amounts the warmer will be the greeting, especially when its 
purpose is to increase the manufacturing capacity of this country. 

"On assuming office I shall first lay out a general scheme with a view of meeting the 
urgent needs of each locality — meaning the building of highways and new railroads, the 
establishment of irrigation plants and aqueducts, and everything else necessary to make 
each community prosperous and satisfied. Means will be sought to reduce the high cost 
of living, chief among which looms the revision of our tariff." 

Queried regarding the Isle of Pines, General Menocal squared his slim shoulders and 
took on the resemblance to war-time pictures taken on the field of battle. He said : 

"I am most decidedly opposed to all diminuition of our national territory, in whatever 
form it might l)e attempted." — Interview in the Nczij York Herald. 

Under Cuba's land tax system unused and undeveloped land pays no taxes. One can 
hold free of taxes a million acres of fertile land provided no plough touches it and no 
effort be used to make it productive. The moment it is converted to productive purposes 
the tax assessor and tax collector get busy. On this matter the President expressed 
himself stronglv. 

"I am strongly committed to a radical reform of a land tax system which has been 
handed down to us from the Spanish conquerors of Cuba," he said. "The natural wealth 
of Cuba lies in her soil, and her people must have access to that soil. The fair taxation 
of unoccupied and undeveloped lands will force it into the market. 

"We need small farmers as well as great sugar and tobacco enterprises. No section 
on earth has an equal percentage of fertile soil, and it shall be my policy to urge the 
passage of such laws as will vastly increase the acreage under cultivation." 

The American investor in Cuba was also discussed and the President was equally 
emphatic in his opinion. He said: . 

"There seem.s to be a constant fear on the part of certain of your publicists that 
American investors are 'exploiting^ the tropical countries covered Iw your Monroe 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Doctrine. The American investors in Cuba and in Central and South America have 
always been most scrupulous in their obedience to the local laws and contracts. 

"Cuba and her tropical neighbors cannot be developed unless outside capital takes up 
a large share of the task. We need more ships, more railroads, more mills and more 
of all that American enterprise and capital has to offer, and we have no fear that we will 
be 'exploited' if those Americans who come in the future follow the high example set 
by those who have invested millions in sugar, fruit, tobacco and other products of our 
soil. Please say to the American people that we are eager to be 'exploited' by the same 
class of men who are now placing Cuba and Central America on the commercial and 
industrial maps of the world. "^Frederick Upham Adams in the New York Sun. 



Late News Notes 



President Wilson sent the following 
nomination to the Senate June 13th : Min- 
ister to Cuba, William E. Gonzales, of 
South Carolina, in p!ace of Arthur M. 
Beaupre. William E. Gonzalez is the editor 
of The Columbia State and the son of 
Ambrosio Jose Gonzales, a Cuban patriot. 



The Senate recently by unanimous con- 
sent approved the Sanchez Agramonte bill 
which provides that all bills which have 
been before Congress for consideration 



for more than two years should be con- 
sidered as abandoned and requires that 
they be formally presented again before 
action will be taken on them again. These 
pending bills number 1,582. 



The biggest conflagration ever known in 
the history of Cruces, Santa Clara Prov- 
ince, occurred on June 9th. Fourteen build- 
ings, including the Marti Theater and the 
Hotel Ambos Mundos, were destroyed, the 
tctal loss amounting to more than $250,000. 




The National Maine Monument unveiled May 30th in New York City. It is the work of Attilio 

Piccarilli, the sculptor, and H. Van Buren Magoniale, the architect. 

Momimento a las victimas del "Maine" que fite descubierto solenvnemente el dia 30 de Mayo en la 

ciudad de New York, obra del bran esciiltor italiano Attillio Peccirilli. 



THE CUBA REVIE W 



11 



NEW ADMINISTRATION CHANGES AND ACTIVITIES 



Dr. Pablo Desvernine y Galdos, Presi- 
dent of the Xational University of Cuba, 
was appointed Cuban Minister to the 
United States, succeeding Senor Antonio 
Martin-Rivero. who has been Minister to 
the United States since April 11, 1911. 
Dr. Desvernine is a lawyer and is a friend 
of President Alenocal. He was a member 
of the special mission sent to Washington 
to attend the inauguration of President 
Wilson. 

Prior to that he served as Secretary of 
the Treasury under General Wood and 
later as one of the members of the Ad- 
visory Board which framed the laws of 
Cuba during the ^lagoon administration. 
He has for years been instructor of civil 
law in the Havana University. Dr. Des- 
vernine will not leave for Washington un- 
til the latter part of this month. 

The resignations of the following min- 
isters have been accepted : Messrs. Aniceto 
Vallivia y Sisay. Tomas Collazo y Tejada, 
Mariano Aramburo y ]\Iachado and Justo 
Garcia Velez, formerly representing Cuba 
at Christiania, Paris, Chili and Madrid. 

Col. Justo Garcia Velez was later ap- 
pointed Supervisor of the Territorial Bank 
succeeding Francisco Lopez Leiva. 

The following Cuban diplomats retain 
their places under the new administration: 
Messrs. Carlos Garcia \^elez, Francisco 
Zayas y Alfonso. Juan de Dios Garcia 
Kohly, Benjamin Giberga y Gali, accredited 
respectively as Ministers Plenipotentiary 
to London, Brussels, Holland and Rio 
Janeiro. 

Dr. Gonzalo de Quesada remains as Cu- 
ban Minister to Germany. Sr. Marquez 
Sterling, now at the Mexican post, will, it 
is understood be kept there. 

General Carlos Rojas, of the Cuban 
army, has been appointed minister of Peru. 
He will relieve Colonel Aguirre. 

Mr. Mariano Rocafort, the Consul-Gen- 
eral at New York, will be transferred to 
Barcelona, taking the same official rank. 

President Menocal, at the suggestion of 
Secretary Villalon of the pui)lic works, has 
appointed Luis F. Perez, engineer for the 
province of Pinar del Rio. Perez was 
formally attached to the Chaparra sugar 
mil!, and is a classmate of the President. 

A recent bill introduced in Congress pro- 
vides for a life tenure of office of all 
judges. The argument of the bill is that 
the judiciary should be assured of tlieir 
office, and thus be in a perfectly untram- 
meled position, all tending to better service. 



President Menocal is asking Congress 
for a larger appropriation, about $12,000, 
for legations in England, United States, 
Argentine, Germany and Norway, holding 
that the amounts already allowed' were too 
small to properly maintain the dignity of 
these offices. In order that there may be 
no real additional expense to the state he 
suggests the abolishing of the following 
unimportant diplomatic offices : 

Sub-consuls at Rio Janeiro and Shang- 
hai, first chancellor to the consulate gen- 
eral at New York, first chancellor to Paris, 
consul, second class, at Gonaives, first chan- 
cellor at legation to Haiti, vice-consul at 
Rome, and expenses of Gonaives, Haiti, 
will be abolished. This will effect a saving 
of $11,600. 

Objection having been made to Secretary 
of Public Works Villalon to the retention 
in his office of ^Manuel Roca, paymaster, 
it being alleged that he was a Zayista or 
Liberal. Secretary Villalon replied that 
Roca was an honest man and he wants 
and would keep such men in office. 

The President has asked Congress to 
omit from the budget the item of $25,000 
which for the last four years has been al- 
lowed the chief executive for secret ex- 
penses and for which there is no account- 
ing required. The President said in a 
message on the matter : "Such expenses 
are unnecessary in a free and democratic 
country, inasmuch as the Republic has suf- 
ficient police to properly protect the state 
of disturbances, and holds that there is no 
Iietter way to reduce the high customs 
duties now prevailing than to reduce the 
government expenses, thereby removing 
the need of the high duties." 

The Cuban Post Office Department has 
reconnnended the negotiation of a parcel 
post treaty with the United States on con- 
dition that the latter permit the shipment 
of small packages of tobacco which has not 
heretofore been permitted under the Amer- 
ican regulations. 

The two contracts upon which bids had 
l)een asked and given were declared null 
and void May 30th by presidential decree. 
The first was the contract for the erection 
of an electric light and pumping plant at 
Santiago de Cuba, and the other was the 
contract for the building of the ATalecon 
from its present end to the .\lmcndares 
River. 

The Ciil'.an g^uernmcnt lias been notified 
<if the api)ointment of Sr. Raul Regis de 
Olivera as i'rnzilian minister to Cuba. Sr. 
Olvera succeeds Sr. Foutitoura Xavier. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



On May 23d President Menocal, on 
recommendation of the new Secretary of 
Sanitation, Dr. Enrique Nuiiez, signed a 
decree removing the six provincial sani- 
tary supervisors who were appointed about 
a month ago by President Gomez, and 
which was understood to be merely a ruse 
to give good berths to a group of ex- 
members of Congress , the law having 
been passed by the Liberals in Congress 
with just that end in view. President 
Menocal believes that the $48,000 per an- 
num required for the expenses of the new 
inspectors can be used for better purposes 
and suggested reconsideration of the law 
creating these new officers. He believes 
the employees in the Sanitary Department 
can do whatever inspection work is neces- 
sary without additional expense. 

Secretary of Sanitation Xuiiez has con- 
firmed Dr. Juan Guiteras, the eminent 
Cuban sanitarian, in his post of Director 
of Sanitation, also Dr. Jose A. Lopez del 
Valle as local health officer for the city of 
Havana. 

Secretary of the Interior Hevia favor- 
a decree to be issued by his department 
canceling all licenses to carry arms, and 
only to issue them in accordance with the 
law which takes them. This decree will 
do away with about 10,000 licenses to carry 
arms which have been issued during the 
past four years. 

Secretary of Sanitation Nunez found 
conditions at the Mazorra State Asylum 
for the Insane, situated a short distance 
from Havana, so bad that he terms them 
an "ignominy for Cuban society, for men 
and for physicians." He urged at a re- 
cent cabinet meeting in the name of "the 
honor of the Republic to ask Congress for 
the funds necessary to put the asylum in a 
condition required by civilization, science 
and humanity." 

The charges of conditions found at the 
asylum were so serious in the opinion of 
the President and the other members of 
the cabinet that it was decided to imme- 
diately name a committee of the Secretary 
of Sanitation, and the Secretary of the 
Interior to make a full report at once to 
submit same with all its details to the 
attention of Congress. 

Two Japanese waiters were recently de- 
tained at Triscornia, Havana, because they 
did not have identification papers. All 
Japanese are barred from Cuba unless they 
are merchants. 

Morro Castle's light at the entrance to 
Havana harbor will be made four or five 
times more powerful. Colonel Jane, the 
recently appointed captain of the port, 
plans to place two strong lights on opposite 
sides of the channel, as a help to incoming 
ships at night. 



Roberto L. Luaces, the Camaguey agri- 
cultural engineer, whom the American 
residents in Cuba, and especially the plant- 
ers and horticulturists urged for the po- 
sition of Secretary of Agriculture in Presi- 
dent Menocal's Cabinet, has been appointed 
head of the Division of Agriculture in the 
Department of ^Agriculture, Commerce and 
Labor. 

The office given to the young and com- 
petent Camagueyan was the one formerly 
held by Professor Jose Comallonga of Ha- 
vana University. He will be in charge of 
everything directly connected with agricul- 
ture, the experimental stations, the farmers' 
schools, distribution of seeds, granting of 
prizes to agriculturists, the inspection of 
all experimental work, the study of the 
extirpation of disease among cattle and 
plants and the organization of fairs, ex- 
positions and the high supervision of the 
cattle registry. It is one of the most im- 
portant offices in the department, and un- 
der Sr. Luaces' management will become 
of great value to the agricultural interests 
of the country. The office carries with it a 
sa'ary of $.3,600 a year. 

The representatives of England, France 
and Germany called on the Secretary of 
State on June 3d to learn the government's 
intentions regarding the claims of the sev- 
eral countries mentioned against Cuba for 
damages done by insurgents during the 
war against Spain, and to insist on an 
early settlement. The claims aggregate 
several million dollars. 

Cuba's contention is that it is not re- 
sponsible as at the time the damage oc- 
curred there was no Cuban government, 
and Spain held dominion over the island. 
It insists the claims be referred to a com- 
mission of arbitration. The Senate had 
previously accepted a committee report 
recommending that arbitration be resorted 
to in settling the claims. 

The claims have been pending ever since 
the war in 1898. The nations first took up 
the subject with General Wood, but he said 
that it was one for the Cuban government 
to solve when it came into power. Presi- 
dent Palma succeeded in keeping the 
powers quiescent during his administration. 
Then the Magoon administration took the 
same stand that General W^ood, viz. : that 
the powers should wait until the Cuban 
government was re-established. During the 
administration of President Gomez the 
powers presented a joint note of such 
strength that the subject could not be post- 
poned any longer, and President Gomez 
sent a message to Congress asking that the 
matter be taken up. 

The House tabled the Arbitration bill on 
June 22d owing to President Menocal's op- 
position. Apparently the bill places all re- 
sponsibility on him. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



13 



The Good Roads Association of Cuba, 
represented by Messrs. Alzugaray and Az- 
carate, had a lengthy conference recently 
with President Menocal. Senores Cancio 
and Villalon. Secretary of the Treasury 
and Public Works respectively. The com- 
mittee vigorously urged the construction 
of new roads throughout the six provinces, 
asserting that owing to the chaotic condi- 
tions of the Gomez administration, the 
sums annually appropriated were ineffect- 
ively used. They also urged the construc- 
tion of a central highway through the 
island, the absence of which in the light of 
the great advantages it would confer on 
the people was a national disgrace. 

A general overhauling of the Depart- 
ment of Public Works was also advised 
and that incompetent and indifferent em- 
ployees be dismissed. 

The strict observance of laws for the 
preservation of the roads was also urged. 

Governor Manuel Rodriguez of Oriente 
Province believes that for geographical and 
economical reasons the city of Santiago is 
certain to be a port that will be the popular 
stopping place for the ships of the world 
on their way to and from the Panama 
Canal. It is amply protected and is a deep 
and safe harbor. The approach to it is 
also free of reefs and ships can steam full 
speed right into the harbor itself and se- 
cure supplies of coal and provisions. 

The governor is also urging the govern- 
ment to make Santiago a free port. 

A free port is an area into which goods 
may be imported without payment of duty. 
then manufactured or remixed or repacked 
or handled in any way whatsoever and 
either re-exported free or made Hable for 
duty only when brought out of the free 
zone. 

The goods can be either stored or sent 
to foreign countries. Of course, if shipped 
to the interior they would have to pass 
through the custom house. Samples and 
stocks of goods on consignment might be 
held in the limits of the free port without 
payment of duty, and manufacturers for 
the export trade might there receive im- 
ported raw material duty free. 

General Gomez has not hesitated to 
criticise the administration of General 
Menocal, says the Havana Post. "His 
honeymoon," the ex-president said, "must 
already be very bitter. He must, even 
within this short time realize that many of 
his ideals about government are impossible 
to carry out." 

A life saving .station at Havana is asked 
for by Col. Jane, Captain of the Port. 
There are frequent severe storms with 
vessels in dire distress and up to the pres- 
ent time there has been no adequate relief 
system. 



President Menocal wants all municipal 
judges to be lawyers, even though they 
may have to serve the smallest courts in 
the island. It is believed that competent 
lawyers who will accept small offices in 
interior villages will not be easy to find, 
as the salaries are not over $150.00 per 
month. 

Captain Edmund J. Frederick, the well 
known American who fought with the Cu- 
bans during the revolution, handhng the 
dynamite gun which proved so effective on 
various occasions, has been appointed by 
Secretary of Public Works Villalon an in- 
spector in the department. The office car- 
ries a salary of $200 per month. 

According to the Director of Posts and 
Telegraphs there is no objection to the 
establishment of the treaty which has for 
a base the receiving and forwarding 
through Cuban telegraphic lines of mes- 
sages to be sent out from the wireless 
plant at Guantanamo to vessels on high 
seas, fixing the rate of four cents a word 
for forwarding the message through Cu- 
ban lines. 

The Department of the Interior has ap- 
proved and forwarded to the State Depart- 
ment a report of the Director of Posts 
and Telegraphs accepting on general terms 
the proposed telegraphic treaty offered by 
the United States government in connec- 
tion with the wireless station at the Xaval 
Station in Guantanamo. 

The report will now be submitted to the 
United States government and if the terms 
are acceptable it will lead to the estab- 
lishment of a treaty in the regular form. 

The President's cabinet has decided that 
in the future Cuban commissioners would 
not be sent to various places in the world 
to attend various kinds of congresses un- 
less it was clearly apparent that some good 
could be accomplished by such an expen- 
diture of money. Therefore a commission 
will not be sent to San Francisco to select 
a site for the Cuban building at the coming 
fair, but the nearest consular agent in Cali- 
fornia will be sent to choose a location. 

Secretary of Sanitation Xunez recently 
suspended a decree issued by the Gomez 
administration concerning the sale of pat- 
ent medicines in Cuba of foreign make. 
This law would have compelled them to 
print their formulae upon the labels. 

Foreign manufacturers naturally objected 
to this ruling which required them to re- 
veal trade secrets. Secretary Xunez will 
investigate the matter fully before applying 
the law. • 

Manuel Sccades has been confirmed as 
legal adviser to the Department of Gov- 
ernment. He occupied that place und'er 
the (Jomcz administration. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD, THE HAVANA ELECTRIC, ETC. 
The Cuba Railroad Company's Earnings. 



The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of April and for the ten months ended 
April 30th compares as follows : 

1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 

April gross $450,650 $396,723 $301,182 $278,954 $226,657 

Expenses ,231,602 181,575 151,267 148,311 121,773 

April net $219,047 $215,148 $149,915 $130,282 $104,884 

Charges 66,791 67,624 60,125 36,666 34,579 

April surplus $152,256 $147,523 $89,790 $93,615 $70,305 

Ten months' gross $3,785,812 $3,119,580 $2,529,189 $2,100,736 $1,766,920 

Net profits 1,757,485 1,493,429 1,133,538 881,647 769,676 

Fixed charges , 667,638 623,749 459,050 361,876 329,937 

Ten months' surplus.. .$1,089,845 $869,680 $674,488 $519,770 $439,639 



Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

Week ending May 11th $54,671 

Week ending May ISth 54,174 

Week ending May 25th 68,064 

Week ending June 1st 54,671 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


$51,082 


$46,201 


$40,134 


$39,557 


49,494 


45,111 


41,325 


39,140 


47,012 


44,709 


40,302 


38,124 


48,096 


46,349 


44,157 


41,557 



Earnings of the United Railways of Havana 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

Week ending May 3rd £48,055 

Week ending May 10th 45,993 

Week ending May 17th 41,623 

Week ending May 24th 34,480 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


i42,849 


i25,743 


£27,410 


£26,623 


39,662 


22,237 


22,254 


22,117 


36,875 


19,535 


,• 18,316 


18,066 


30,821 


18,468 


18,205 


15.868 



April Quotations for Cuban Securities 

(Quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., New York) 



BID 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent Bonds (Interior) 96 

Republic of Cuba Exterior 5 per cent Bonds 100 

Havana City First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 104 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 102 

Cuba Railroad First Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 100 

Cuba Railroad Preferred Stock 95 

Cuba Company 6 per cent Debentures 95 

Havana Electric Railway Consol. Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds.. 94 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Preferred Stock 92 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Common Stock 82 

Matanzas Market PI. 8 per cent Participation Certificates 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. 6 per cent Coll. Trust Gold Bonds of 1918.. 94 

Santiago Electric Light & Traction Co. First Mtge. 6 per cent Bonds.. 98 

All prices of bonds quoted on an "and interest" basis 



Vi 



ASKED 
971/2 
100% 
108 

106 
101 
100 

99 

95 

98 

88 
104 

95 

98% 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



15 



FINANCIAL AND RAILROAD MATTERS 



MANY NEW ROADS DISCUSSED MONEY ORDER FEES AND REGULATIONS 

NATIONAL BANK HAS 35 BRANCHES 



NORTH AND SOUTH COAST RAILROAD 
PROJECTED 

According to El Popular of Cardenas, a 
railroad from that city, which is on the 
north coast of Havana Province, to the 
Bay of Cochinos on the south coast is be- 
ing seriously advocated. 

The new road will indisputably serve a 
very rich region, especially in crossing the 
Zapata peninsula, which is rich in valuable 
woods. Without taking into consideration 
the necessary branches to the various fincas 
the line will be over 95 kilometers in length. 
A subsidy of $10,000 per kilometer is asked 
for. 



INAUGURATION WEEK RECEIPTS 

The receipts of the Havana Electric 
Railway Company during the week of 
festivities consequent upon the inaugura- 
tion of President ]Menocal compare with 
the same period in 1912, a normal week, 
as follows : 

1912 1913 

May 19th $5,642.35 $10,336.35 

May 20th 7,182.95 15,394.75 

May 21st 6,373.10 11,459.80 

May 22nd 6,720.65 8,770.80 

May 23rd 6,454.75 7,837.20 

May 24th 7,016.05 7,473.90 

May 25th 7,622.70 6,791.90 

Total $47,012.55 $68,064.70 



A NEW CUBAN LOAN 

It is believed that the new Cuban gov- 
ernment will speedily seek a loan in the 
United States, owing to the depleted con- 
dition of the treasury, if the American 
government will permit it. 

The contention has been that the United 
States is bound under the Piatt amendment 
to protect the finances of the country as 
well as to guard against revolutionary 
activities. 

Leading New York bankers report that 
Cuban loan preparations have not yet 
reached a stage to admit of practical dis- 
cussion and no details of any such pro- 
posed loan have yet come to the notice of 
prominent New York financial institutions. 
There is no doubt of the necessity for such 
a loan and one will in all probability 
shortly be applied for by the Cuban ad- 
ministration. 



CUBAN MONEY ORDER FEES 

For amounts not exceeding $2.50, 3 cents; 
over $2.50 and not exceeding $5.00, 5 cents ; 
over $10.00 and not exceeding $20.00, 10c. ; 
over $20.00 and not exceeding $30.00, 12c. ; 
over $30.00 and not exceeding $40.00, 15c. ; 
over $40.00 and not exceeding $50.00, 18c.; 
over $50.00 and not exceeding $60.00, 20c.; 
over $60.00 and not exceeding $75.00, 25c. ; 
over $75.00 and not exceeding $100.00, 30c. 

Payment is in American currency and 
$100.00 is the maximum amount for which 
a single money order may be issued. For 
a larger sum additional orders must be 
secured. 



TALK OF NEW RAILROADS 

A railroad is projected from Placetas to 
Trinidad, Santa Clara Province. Trinidad 
is one of the oldest towns in Cuba and 
one of the most picturesque. It is entirely 
cut off from railroads, however, and for 
that reason has lost much of its former 
importance. 

A railroad from Caibarien to Mayajigua 
in Santa Clara Province is about ready for 
service. The central "Narciso" is largely 
interested in the road which will permit 
direct transportation of its sugar to Cai- 
barien on the north coast. 

A railway line from the batey of the 
Socorro sugar mill in Matanzas Province 
to Playa Lisa in the Cienega de Zapata, is 
now being planed by Sr. Pepro Arenal, 
owner of the mill. The improvement is 
expected to cost about $300,000, says La 
Lucha of Havana. 



NATIONAL BANK OPENS BRANCHES 
The National Bank of Cuba announces 
the opening of four new branches in sugar 
districts in Cuba, at the following points: 
Encrucijada and Remedies, in Santa Clara 
province; Jovellanos, Matanzas province, 
and Guanajay, in Pinar del Rio province. 
It has also opened a new branch at 88 
Muralla, Havana, which makes five 
branches in the city. The total number of 
branches throughout the island is now 35. 



Sr. Ciro de la Vega is the new engineer 
of the city of Havana. He was formerly 
attached to the Havana Electric Railway, 
Gas and Power Company and has never 
held a public office. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



MINING, COMMERCIAL, RAILROADS AND FINANCIAL 



ASPHALT MINES IN PLENTY 

According to the statistics of the Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, asphalt mines through- 
out the island have been registered in the 
following towns : 

HAVANA PROVINCE 

Havana (4) ; Guanabaooa (5) ; Bejucal 
(5) ; Managua (1) ; Santa Maria del Ro- 
sario (1) ; Banta (16) ; Jaruco (4) ; San 
Jose de las Lajas (1). 

PINAR DEL RIO PROVINCE 

Cabaiias (7) ; Guanajay (11) ; Mariel 
(3) ; Esperanza (2). 

SANTA CLARA PROVINCE 

Raucho Veloz (1) ; Yaguajay (1) ; 

Sancti Spiritus (10) ; Camajuani (6) ; 

Jatibonico (1) ; Santa Clara (1) ; Que- 
mado de Guines (1). 

CAMAGUEY PROVINCE 

Marti (13) ; Maximo Gomez (9) ; Ciego 
de Avila (5) ; Moron (2). 

MATANZAS PROVINCE 

Cardenas (6) ; Matanzas (5) ; Colon (l). 

ORIENTE PROVINCE 

Holguin (1); Puerto Padre (2). 



CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS EARNINGS 



Weekly receipts : 

April 19th ... £19,659 Increase.. 

April 26th ... 19,606 Increase.. 

May 3rd 19,075 Increase.. 

May 10th 19,071 Increase.. 

May 17th 18,499 Increase.. 

May 24th 15,393 Increase.. 

May 31st 13,313 Increase.. 



NEW ORE FIELDS IN CUBA 

A New York syndicate is conducting an 
investigation of iron ore deposits in west- 
ern Cuba, says the Iron Trade Review. 
The ore is nodular and is higher in iron 
than the eastern Cuba deposits and con- 
tains no chrome and nickel. It is pro- 
posed to wash the ore, but it will not be 
necessary to nodulize it or otherwise treat 
it. A deposit of over 20,000,000 tons is 
reported. 

TWO companies' POSSESSIONS 

"The Bethlehem Company and the Penn- 
sylvania Steel Company each own about 
500,000,000 tons of iron ore in Cuba, easily 
mined." — Richard H. Edmonds, Editor 
Manufacturers' Record, Baltimore, Md. 



CUBAN TELEPHONE CO. EARNINGS 

The Cuban Telephone Company shows 
a good balance for May. The total re- 
ceipts were $73,550.75 as against $54,254.36 
for the same month in 1912. On the last 
day of May the telephone company had a 
total of 13,219 telephones in operation as 
against 9,430 during the same month last 
year. 



£1,436 
892 
218 
3,391 
4,341 
5,003 
3,979 



WESTERN RAILWAY EARNINGS 



May 


3rd ... 


. £6,830 


Increase. 


£1,475 


May 


10th .. 


. 6,938 


Increase. 


. 1,900 


May 


17th . . 


. 7,521 


Increase. 


. 1,563 


May 


24th .. 


. 7,551 


Increase. 


. 1,153 


May 


31st .. 


. . 7,064 


Increase. 


. 1,373 



THROUGH TRAIN TO CIENFUEGOS 

The new through train of the United 
Railways of Havana between Havana and 
Cienfuegos is now in service. It leaves the 
central station daily at 10.30 p. m., arriving 
at Cienfuegos at 6 a. m. the following 
morning. The train from Cienfuegos 
leaves daily at 10 p. m. The sleeping cars 
have been named "Damuji," "Mayabeque" 
and "Yumuri." 

The service began May 25th. The inter- 
mediate stations showing the route fol- 
lowed are after Havana, Guines, Union, 
Navajas, Guareiras, Esles, Rodas, Palmira 
and Cienfuegos. 



CARDENAS-AMERICAN SUGAR PFD. 

The Cardenas-American Sugar Co. has 
declared an initial quarterly dividend of 
1% per cent, payable July 1st, to stock- 
holders of record on June 30th, and a sec- 
ond quarterly dividend of 1% per cent, 
payable October 1st, to stock of record on 
September 30th, on its $1,250,000 outstand- 
ing 7 per cent cumulative preferred stock. 



Havana's customs receipts 

Custom house collections at Havana for 
the month of May compare as follows: 

1913 $1,872,087 

1912 1,654,466 

1911 1,651,649 

1910 1,410,790 

1909 1,343,434 

1908 1,370,889 

1907 1,573,055 



18 THECUBAREVIEW 



HINTS FOR AMERICAN MERCHANTS 



HARDWARE, STATIONERY, OFFICE SUPPLIES, MOTOR BOATS, ETC,, IN 
HAVANA INFORMATION ON CREDITS 

In the machinery and the hardware trades the situation in Havana is fairly well 
understood by American manufacturers, for buyers here have been big customers of 
ours for years. There are many launches of perhaps 30 feet in constant use in Havana 
harbor and it would follow that there ought to be a fine market for motors and motor 
boats, but it is not as yet. Some of the sporting and athletic clubs have imported 
motor boats, and some of the hardware or machinery houses sell marine motors, but 
there is no distinctive motor boat trade established and no dealers devoting their attention 
to this line. 

The paper trade of Cuba, like that in stationery and office supplies generally, is also 
thoroughly known and cultivated by manufacturer^ of the United States in all its 
branches from the "news" to strawboard, from envelopes to paper bags. There is, how- 
ever, what impresses me as an attractive opportunity^ in Havana for some enterprising 
manufacturer of folding boxes, especially such boxes •^as are used by our laundries for 
delivering shirts, and the cheaper, lighter weights of %he boxes utilized by tailors for 
suits. Nothing of the sort is used in Havana, or Cuba, to-day and the claim is that 
freights and heavy import duties bring costs out so high, as to forbid importations. But 
I can learn of no one that has made a practical experiment. Meanwhile tailors and other 
shopkeepers in Havana use wrapping paper and as little of 'it-as possible, and one of 
the prominent tailoring establishments even went so far as to have a delivery wagon 
built with a large number of drawers. On delivering -,ithe goods these drawers were 
taken out, carried to the door or into the house, emptied and returned to their places 
in the wagon, thus saving the cost of paper. | 

As in the case of motor boats, many automobiles have t|edn brought into Cuba directly 
by their owners or through commission agents who h^Cye sold from^,. catalogue. An 
anomalous state of affairs exists in the Havana automobilq trade. ; Any/ dealer or garage, 
several commission agents, seem to be willing to order aiid import from catalogue any 
kind of a machine for which a customer may express a preferente. Few of the dealers 
have any "agencies," at least any to which they seem very firmly or devotedly attached. 
It took me two hours one day to learn who is the Havana agent for one'of the very best 
European cars, a machine of world-wide reputation. Not one of .the- garages, where I 
inquired could tell me. Discovering the agent by chaince, I f ound ihim.to be' a well-known 
machinery dealer, who acknowledged he had only sold two cars in two years, had not ■ 
even a car of his own. Yet there are plenty of automobiles in Havana;: you will find ^ 
sixty or seventy-five waiting for hire on the stand in Central -Park, every ,i day ; or drive 
in late afternoon down the Prado and along Malecon will display hundreds. 

An enormous field undoubtedly exists for motor trucks in rthe sugar (estates — but the 
task set them is a severe one, one that like matrimony is not^: lightly to be entered upon. 
Many a great oxcart of the country has been stuck in the deep mud of ■ the _cane fields 
and abandoned, more than a few traction engines have been mired despite various forms 
of special equipment. However, the magnificent possibilities of the. business warrant 
its serious study — and the sugar people have both the inclination and .the means to buy. 
Much interest is also being shown in motor trucks for Havana. A number are already 
in use, and the past two or three months have seen the arrival' of demonstration samples 
from at least two American factories and one European. A word of advice must be 
offered as to motor trucks for business purposes in Havana; the streets m the old parts 
of the city, the principal business parts, above all the parts devoted to heavy wholesale 
business, are exceedingly narrow and scores of them are not navigable by the ordmary 
motor car which cannot negotiate the sharp street corners in the limited widths afiforded. 
Exceptional short wheel base seems therefore to be indicated, as the diagnosticians say. 
In athletic and sporting goods the Cuban capital is far and away the best customer 
we have in all Latin-America. Baseball is firmly established both as a professional game 
and as a sport ; tennis and golf are popular ; football, played by the college students, is 
gaining in favor in other circles ; basket ball calls for supplies in the shops. 

Havana, the capital of Cuba, is, in popwlation, about the size of the capital of the 
United States. But Havana is more than a political capital, it is the great commercial 
capital and center of the whole Republic as well. Here are numberless great rich 
wholesale importing houses whose agents reach the whole interior and even control a 
good share of the trade of the more independent coast towns. Front the rich tobacco 
fields of Pinar del Rio in the West to the great sugar plantations of the central province, 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



Santa Clara, and the rapidly developing wealth of Oriente, at the far eastern end of the 
island, there comes to Havana a flood of business which is handled by these wealthy 
old established merchants who, curiously enough, seem little known to American manu- 
facturers, or at least comparatively neglected by them. American drummers who visit 
Havana apparently give scant attention to these humdrum establishments in old din^y 
seemmgly lifeless streets, while the smaller if smarter establishments are given undue 
attention. 

The impression has become general among manufacturers in the United States that 
Cuban buyers invariably demand open credits, will tolerate no drafts and demand from 
three to six months' time. This is true to a limited extent onlv. Some Havana buyers 
still handle their American business through Xew York exporters, some have their own 
New York offices; some want open accounts, remitting immediatelv on receipt of goods 
or taking time, as may have been agreed upon ; some will accept anv sort of terms' that 
may be suggested — if they can get an extra 2 per cent. In other words, the Cuban 
market is not so very different from any other. — Mr. Hough in the American Exporter. 

The United States government has made a special study of foreign credits. The 
matter has been compiled by Archibald J. Wolfe, Commercial Agent of the Department 
of Commerce and Labor, and published a few months ago as Special Agents' Series 
No. 62. From this work the following consular reports on credits in Havana and Cien- 
fuegos are taken. 

The usual terms of credit offered in Havana by American manufacturers are 30 to 90 
days without interest, but in some cases draft with bill of lading attached is sent, the 
bill of lading being surrendered on acceptance of draft by the importer. There are a 
few concerns who require cash in New York before shipment is made. 

American exporters consider credit in Cuba much more of a risk than do the European 
exporters, and this is due in part to the difficulty of American houses in having their 
banks finance the transactions, while on the other hand the large majority of European 
shippers finance their own shipments, and the further fact that the European houses are 
willing to meet what might be termed the prejudices of the Latin-American trade, which 
the American houses are not always willing to do. 

The manufacturers of foreign nations other than American sell their goods prin- 
cipally on consignment and against open credit. The acceptance of a time draft is 
usually recorded before surrendering the bill of lading. As a rule, no guaranty of any 
kind is given. 

Usually no interest is charged by the foreign manufacturer, other than American, for 
the time over which credit extends. The rate of interest charged by local banks on loans 
to be used by importers for payment on goods in cases where credit is not extended 
runs from 8 to 10 per cent. 

As will be noted, there is considerable variation between the terms offered by European 
houses and those offered by American houses, although there is very little variation in 
this matter Ijctween European nations themselves, and practically no variation in terms 
among firms of the .same nation in similar lines of business. 

The larger and more responsible importers of Cuba demand and usually receive longer 
terms of credit from the foreign exporter, this being in some cases as long as 12 and 
18 months, and it is probably a fact that consideration of longer terms of credit over- 
balances considerations of price and quality in the mind of the importer. 

Almost invariably the Cuban merchant insists that at least credit be extended to him 
long enough to enable him to receive the goods in his warehouse and to pass them 
through the customs. 

In conclusion it may be stated that in order for the American exporter to get his full 
share of this trade he should closely meet European competition in the matter of credits. 
— United States Consul-General James L. Rodgcrs. 

The general terms of credit offered by representatives of American manufacturers in 
Cienfuegos are 90 days net; cash, 2 per cent. 

When credit is refused it is generally because of fear of the importer's responsibility. 
Confidential reports are generally obtained through private information by responsible 
local merchants. 

European manufacturers generally grant 5 and 6 per cent cash discount on current 
accounts. Whether or not the acceptance of a time draft is recorded before the surrender 
of the bill of lading corresponding to the shipment depends on the importer's standing 
with the shipper. No guaranty is required after credit has been granted. 

No interest is charged for the period over which credit extends: on the contrary, 
European houses offer a discount for cash before maturity. Local banks charge from 
8 to 10 per cent per annum, according to the standing of the mercliants, for money 
advanced. There is no variation in terms of credit granted by exporters of various 
nations or by houses of the same country. 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The larger and more responsible houses generally exact discount by paying cash in 
advance. In this particular, market price is the only consideration in deciding between 
competing lines. On the regular terms usually granted there is plenty of time for the 
merchants to receive goods, pass them through the customs, and arrange them in stock 
before making payment. 

Competition is very keen, and as each merchant seeks special individual concessions, 
uniform terms on part of American manufacturers could hardly be adhered to. However, 
on provisions and all perishable goods cash in advance or on delivery of the bill of lading, 
or its equivalent, are the only terms that lead to satisfactory results for the exporter. 

I have seen offers from German manufacturers to a reliable dry goods firm here 
granting 6 months' time without interest or commission, and one-half of 1 per cent 
monthly rebate for money paid in advance of maturity. An American concern offered 
the same firm 90 days net, 3 per cent 10 days, or 2 per cent 60 days, which thei latter 
considers good and a move in the right direction on the part of the American manufac- 
turer. The 2 per cent in 60 days feature especialty seems: to appeal to the local mer- 
chant, as it gives him sufficient time and a reasonable cash discount. 

Whenever American manufacturers and exporters realize that the capturing of this 
market can be more easily accomplished by meeting the European competitor's credit 
terms and uniform courtesy than by any other minor details, a long step toward securing 
the proper proportion of Cuba's import trade will have been taken. — United States Consul 
Max J. Baehr. 



IMPROVEMENTS AT SANTIAGO DE CUBA 

One of the many Southern harbors 
which are being improved, perhaps both in 
anticipation of the impetus to be given 
Latin-American commerce by the opening 
of the Panama Canal and on account of 
the growing local business interests, is that 
of Santiago de Cuba. As those who re- 
member the blockade by the ships under 
Admiral Sampson's command in 1898 will 
readily agree, the harbor itself is a safe 
one. But for Admiral Cervera's desire to 
make a record for doing something of 
some sort, his fleet apparently would have 
been safe there for an indefinite period. 

The work in progress at Santiago relates 
to wharfage. A bulkhead wall nine hrn- 
dred meters long has been built, together 
with a platform on the inshore side, over 
-the rock filling of twenty-five feet in width. 
From this bulkhead to the shore extensive 
flats have been filled, reclaiming about 
810,000 square meters. 

Santiago harbor entrance has a depth of 
twenty-eight and a half feet, and at the 
wharves, except the Juragua Iron Com- 
pany's which affords twenty-six feet, the 
depths are sixteen to eighteen feet. San- 
tiago at present affords no public wharf- 
age, no generally available cranage nor 
dry-dock facilities for large _ craft. But 
large ore cargoes are loaded in a modern 
manner at private wharves near Santiago, 
and when the new quay is available large 
steamers will be assured of accommoda- 
tion. 

Presumably no improvement on nature, 
unless it is a little deepening, will be at- 
tempted at the bottle-neck entrance to the 
bay which Hobson in 1898 corked up, and 
which is just as convenient for the in- 
sider's protection as for the outsider's 
bottling-up tactics. 

A full page illustration of this great im- 



provement, showing bulkhead, inner plat- 
form and flats, was printed in the March 
issue of The Cuba Review. 



MARSEILLE S TRADE WITH CUBA 

The last available figures are those for 
1911 found in the report of the Cuban Con- 
sul. Values given are in francs. 



Exports to Cuba. 



1911 
1,013,573 



1910 
1,002,500 



Tiles form the largest exports, the total 
in 1910 being 8,277,252 kilograms and in 
1911 12,580,963 kilograms. Cement follows 
with 2,122,006 kilograms in 1910 and 2,422,- 
980 in 1911. These two items form nearly 
seven-eighths of the total exports to the 
republic. The exports for the previous 
j^ears show considerable variation and are 
given as follows : 



1903. . 


. 4,884,309 Klgs. 


400,832.21 Fes 


1904. . 


. 12,825,245 " 


661,371.17 " 


1905. . 


. 14,593,122 " 


665,146.00 " 


1906.. 


. 20,225,877 " 


855,459.23 " 


1907. . 


. 17,578,024 " 


1,915,164.80 " 


1908. . 


. 16,541,266 " 


889,398.90 " 


1909. . 


. 6,860,763 " 


533,805.10 " 



From the low figures of 1909 there has 
been a pronounced rise in 1910 and 1911. 

Imports from Cuba the consul finds are 
of too insignificant a character to merit 
tabulation. Cuban tobacco, which of course 
is largely used in France, comes to Mar- 
seilles by way of New York and in Amer- 
ican ships and hence does not figure in 
the statistics of Cuban trade. Cuban 
cigarettes, the consul says, are not accept- 
able in France. Consumers prefer the yel- 
low tobacco and hence the Turkish, Egyp- 
tian, Russian and American cigarettes con- 
trol the mark'Ct. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



21 



THE ISLE OF PINES DISCUSSION 

COMMENT FROM UNITED STATES NEWSPAPERS — THE ISLAND'S 

ATTRACTIONS 



VALUABLE TO CUBA 

The island, or more correctly speaking, 
the two islands, because it is cut in twain 
by a marsh, is valuable to Cuba because 
of its live stock, mineral and agricultural 
productions and the industries which these 
have produced, but it is a small territory, 
somewhat less in area than the average 
Texas county, and would be worth less to 
this country than to Cuba. 

Shortly after the war with Spain the 
United States gave unofficial expression to 
the policy of acquiring the Isle of Pines 
as a coaling station, but no official action 
has been taken to secure it and in view 
of the fact that other countries might mis- 
construe the proceeding, even purchase of 
the territory with the free consent of the 
Cuban government would better be under- 
taken, if at all, with great caution. The 
chief argument in support of the annexa- 
tion proposition is that Americans consti- 
tute a_ majority of the population and own 
a majority of the property there. — San 
Antonio (Texas) Express. 



MR. root's position 

When Mr. Root was secretary of state 
the question of American possession was 
acute until a treaty was negotiated recog- 
nizmg the jurisdiction of Cuba. Before 
the war with Spain the Isle of Pines was 
governed from Havana as a part of the 
province of that name, and as a lawyer 
Mr. Root could not construe American title 
to the island from the Treaty of Paris. 
While it has been a hardship to the settlers 
to live under old Spanish laws and adjust 
themselves to local ordinances, it must be 
admitted that the Cuban officials have been 
polite, considerate and accommodating. — 
New York Sun. 



AMERICAN RULE WANTED 

To-day the Americans make up the large 
bulk of the white population in the I.sle of 
Pines. Naturally they arc desirous of sub- 
stituting American for Cuban rule, al- 
though they apparently have little or no 
fault to find with the latter and do not 
complain of suffering any serious injustice 
at the hands of the Cuban authorities. 

A petition is now being circulated in tiiis 
country addressed to President Wilson and 
asking for annexation. That many signa- 
tures will be .secured is altogether likely. 
Signing petitions is one of the easiest 



tilings that the average American can do 
But it IS yet to be demonstrated that an- 
nexation IS desirable. It would cost a con- 
siderable sum, for Cuba could not be ex- 
pected to relinquish possession unless paid 
a good price. The justification for the 
expenditure of such a sum is by no means 
clear. It would be fine for the Americans 
of the Isle of Pines, but whether it would 
also be fine for the Americans who have 
not voluntarily expatriated themselves is an- 
other question. — Cincinnati (Ohio) Times- 
Star. 



CHARMS OF THE ISLE OF PINES 

Each large tract is called a plantation, 
and in most cases still bears the name given 
to It by its native owners. The title to 
all the land is traced back to its original 
owner, a doughty warrior and sea-rover, 
Capt. Duarte, who won the favor of the 
Spanish King and received the island by 
royal grant. After his death the island, 
with the exception of a tract near the 
capital, was divided among his hears. The 
heirs grew in number, the tracts were sub- 
divided into smaller estates without much 
regard to definite boundaries. So that 
when the Americans purchased them and 
divided them into sections and forty acre 
tracts they fitted into each other like 
patches on a crazy quilt. 

The island drowses in an atmosphere of 
romance. It was in olden times long the 
headquarters of pirates who roamed the 
Spanish Main. Later it was a penal colony 
where political prisoners were sent, and 
also the headquarters of cargoes of slaves 
who were shipped here from Africa to be 
put into merchantable shape. Immense 
corrals were constructed to keep them 
irom escape. 

Nueva Gerona is the capital and still 
wears the a,spect of an ancient Spanish 
town. One could procure a lot in the city 
free provided he built a house in a certain 
fashion with the portico projecting over 
the sidewalk. That provision was made 
in the will of the man who owned the 
town. But after one had gone througli the 
red tape involved it was said the gratuitous 
grant was fairly expensive. 

Sante Fe. the other important settlement 
lias famous mineral .springs and boasts of 
an American newspaper and an American 
land company. 

The climate is all that could be desired 
^M .'"''inn"? °^ temperature ranging from 
r>0 to 100 degrees.— iV. )'. Evening Sun 



22 THECUBAREVIEW 

COMENTARIOS FAVORABLES DE LA PRENSA DE LOS 

ESTADOS UNIDOS 



EL MENSAJE DE INAUGURACION DEL PRESIDENTE MENOCAL DENOTA 
QUE ES UN HOMBRE SINCERO. PROMETE UN NUEVO REGIMEN PARA CUBA 

iLe cabra a Menocal la suerte de Palma? '-O sera hombre con brio suficiente para 
veneer los obstaculos que con seguridad tendra que arrostrar todo hombre que trate de 
establecer en Cuba una forma de gobierno eficiente y justa? Si Menocal fracasa, 'cual 
sera entonces el deber de los Estados Unidos respecto a la Isla? Habra que redurrir a 
otra intervencion, y si sucede eso, <■ tendra esa intervencion que ser permanente, como se 
amenazo la ultima vez que las tropas americanas se retiraron de Cuba? 

Los americanos no desean la intervencion en modo alguno. Todo lo que el pueblo 
cubano tiene que hacer es adherirse a su caudillo y someterse a su buen juicio. A menos 
que desgraciadamente su buen criterio haya sido juzgado en demasia, Menocal efectuara 
la salvacion de su patria si se le da una oportunidad. — Cleveland (O.) Plain Dealer. 

El nuevo Presidente promete un nuevo regimen para Cuba. Su tarea mas ardua sera 
el acabar con los revolucionarios y anexionistas de profesion. — Boston Record. 

Las personas allegadas al nuevo Presidente de Cuba dicen que al declarar su proposito 
de pedir la intervencion de los americanos al primer indicio de grave revolucion, lo dijo 
con intencion de hacerlo asi. — Springfield (Mass.) Republican. 

El general Mario Menocal ha sido elegido tercer Presidente de la Republica de Cuba, 
siendo el candidato de los conservadores. El partido que ha entrado en el poder esta 
representado, no solo por la personalidad del Presidente y al parecer por la de su Gabi- 
nete, sino por un elemento del pueblo cubano mas sensato, mas culto y mas prosper©. 
La inauguracion del general Menocal, en ese sentido, indica un cambio completo de poli- 
tica. — New York Nation. 

Los hombres a quienes se ha encomendado el regir los destinos de la joven nacion son 
estadistas series y competentes. 

El pueblo de los Estados Unidos deberia prestar su ayuda y simpatia al nuevo Gobierno 
nacional de Cuba, asi regocijarse al ver que la nacion en cuya creacion tanta parte ha 
tornado, ha entrado en una fase de su existencia. — Charleston (S. C.) Post. 

El general Menocal es el hombre de Estado que Cuba necesita especialmente en el 
periodo actual de su independencia. Es graduado de la Universidad de Cornell, y ha 
residido muchos afios en los Estados Unidos. El hecho de haber sido elegido como 
candidato sin afiliacion a partido determinado, muestra que es muy popular con sus com- 
patriotas, lo cual le da cierta invulnerabilidad q'ue no podria conseguir de ningiin otro 
modo. Ha proclamado un programa politico sin adherencia a partido determinado, con 
la esperanza de desarrollar en la Isla todos los elementos de un buen gobierno. — Provi- 
dence (R. I.) Journal. 

Los asuntos del pais segun los ha dejado en sus manos la Administracion saliente, 
seran para el un desconcierto financiero y un estado de cosas sin arreglar en todos los 
departamentos del gobierno. El Sr. Menocal es un hombre de larga y profunda ex- 
periencia en los negocios ; es un hombre de capacidad en todo el sentido de la palabra ; 
es hombre rico, y su honradez no admite la menor duda. 

Tendra que luchar desde el principio con un grupo de politicastros sin escrupulo de 
conciencia, que han medrado a costa de las vicisitudes del pais, y para quienes la "revolu- 
cion" es el medio familiar para conseguir el lucro. — New York Tim^es. 

En todo y por todo, Cuba parece haber escogido para la Presidencia un hombre ilustrado 
de ideas modernas, y todos los que desean el bien de esa hermosa y fertil Isla confian 
en que el Sr. Menocal desempenara su mision como es debido. Hay la probabilidad de 
que tendra lugar en Cuba un periodo notable de desarrollo y prosperidad, una vez que 
posee todos los elementos naturales para garantizar tan buena suerte, y solo requiere 
una administracion sincera y capaz para llevarlo a cabo. — Chicago (111.) Interocean. 

Sus palabras, al asumir la Presidencia, parecen indicar que no deja de apreciar como 
es debido el espiritu amistoso de los Estados Unidos durante la revolucion y desde en- 
tonces. En ese hecho, asi como en su manero de proceder hasta la fecha, se basa la 
esperanza de que el general Menocal es el hombre que Cuba ha necesitado durante largo 
tiempo para encauzarla en el camino de un gobierno soberano y prospero. En todo lo 
que haga con ese fin, se captara los mejores deseos del pueblo de los Estados Unidos. 
Columbus (O.) Despatch. 



THECUBAREVIEW 23 

Cuba esta situada a nuestras puertas. Ese probablemente es el motivo por el cual los 
americanos no se esfuerzan en comprender ni los problemas ni el caracter del pueblo 
cubano ; por eso es que se ha desarrollado ademas una tendencia en el Departamento de 
Estado de los Estados Unidos en "entrometerse" en Cuba por la mas ligera provocacion, 
o sin provocacion algtuna. Cuba, a pesar de la enmienda de Piatt, es sin embargo un 
pais extranjero, un pais independiente, con su gobierno soberano y que se sostiene de por 
si. Lo que a nosotros nos concierne principal y vitalmente es el sostenimiento de esa 
independencia y el que intervengan en la Isla las naciones extranjeras en peligro y 
detrimento de Cuba. El tratado de Paris no significa otra cosa ni mas ni menos; y 
especificadamente, no significa que hemos de ocuparnos ni aun de interesarnos en los 
detalles o sistema politico del gobierno local. Si en los asuntos internos de Cuba "se 
sale la olla al hervir, dejemos que se saiga." Nuestros molestias empiezan solamente 
cuando se escaldan los que no sean cubanos. Y estas son evidentemente las miras de 
Mr. Bryan. — Lotiisvillc (Ky.) Times. 

Durante varios anos el general Menocal ha sido el administrador de un immenso in- 
genio de azucar, asi es que debe estar al corriente en todo lo que se refiere a los intereses 
de la Isla. Debiera conoccr la actitud de los Estados Unidos, cosa tan esencial para un 
Presidente de Cuba; debiera estar al corriente de las miras de los duefios de ingenios y 
de la necesidad en Cuba de capital extranjero. Su experiencia como comandante militar 
y como jefe de policia son cosas que debieran hacer un imposible el que cualquier 
subordinado trate de embaucarle. — Rome (N. Y.) Sentinel. 

Los Estados Unidos deben hacer lo que este de su parte en dar su apoyo a este po- 
deroso representante del mejor elemento cubano si ha de dominar la situacion. Bajo la 
ultima administracion nuestro Gobierno se metio en una politica de mezclarse en Cuba 
respecto a sus asUntos interiores de una manera no de acuerdo con la verdadera acepcion 
de la enmienda de Piatt, cuya politica solo sirvio para slucitar entre el pueblo cubano 
una especie de resentimiento y hostilidad que perjudico la confianza del pueble por toda 
la Isla en la sinceridad de nuestra amistad. 

La enmienda de Piatt nunca fue sancionada para usarse como latigo que fustigara al 
gobierno de Cuba en lo que se refiere a la reg*ulaci6n de su politica interior y puramente 
domestica. — Boston (Mass.) Transcript. 

El Sun de Nueva York cree que la "intricada y dificil" tarea del Presidente Menocal 
sera la de que Cuba se salve por si misma, para lo cual dice en su editorial : 

"Bajo la administracion de Gomez los departamentos estaban en manos de politicos 
codiciosos. La aduana, los departamentos de rentas piiblicas y de obras publicas estaban 
contaminados por la corrupcion, y el nuevo Presidente hallara en el poder una legion 
de oficinistas incompetentes atricherados y alegando estar protegidos por la ley del ser- 
vicio civil que tan menospreciadamente han escarnecido. 

Al deshacerse de los oficinistas corruptos, el Presidente Menocal tendra que proceder 
con cautela a la vez que con resolucion. Los politicos adversarios no repararan en desacre- 
ditarle y f rustrar su proposito ; hasta seran capaces de derrumbar las bases que sostienen 
la repiiblica y forzar la intervencion, sabiendo que eso probablemente seria el fin de Cuba 
Libre. El nuevo Presidente ha escogido un Gabinete excelente, y la alianza del partido 
conservador con los asbertistas parece asegurar el apoyo de un Congreso amigable. Pero 
desde el momento que entre a ejercer sus funciones los politicos poco escrupulosos del 
partido liberal empezaran a tramar la ruina de su administracion. 

Si el Presidente Menocal puede tener a raya a una horda de politicos arrojados y 
convencer al cubano desafecto de que el Gobierno no le debe la existencia, se salvara 
la Kepublica." 

La flaqucza predominante en los asuntos internos de Cuba hasta ahora ha sido la falta 
de un gobierno recto y eficiente en sus departamentos administrativos, particularmente 
en los asuntos de la haciendo publica. 

La tarea que confronta al Presidente Menocal y a sVis asociados en el nuevo gobierno 
es vasta y dificil. Pero el ha puesto ya en evidencia la rcctitud y discernimiento que se 
necesita para hacer f rente a tales responsabilidades, y parece que posee la confianza de 
las personas pensadoras de la Isla.— Atlanta (Ga.) Journal. 

A pesar de las divergencias de partido que han prevalecido en la Isla de Cuba desde 
que obtuvo su independencia, y que han creado '"■bstaculos dificiles de veneer, Cuba hoy 
dia esta mucho mas adelantada que lo que era Cuba hace dicz 6 doce anos, pues el pueblo 
ha progreado maravillosamente bajo un sistema de gobierno repwblicano. La educacion 
de las masas va subyugando con rapidez la tendencia de aquella parte dc la poblacion que 
se oponia a toda clase de gobicrnf), y es de espcrarsc f|ue las insurreccioncs contra la 
autoridad del gobierno establecido son ahora cosas que pertcneccn al pasado. — Houston 
(Tex.) Post. 



24 



IHE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INTERESTING NEWS NOTES REGARDING VARIOUS MATTERS PERTAINING 

TO THE ISLAND 



The Payret Theatre in Havana occupies 
an area of 3,000 square meters. The 
edifice contains 75 private boxes, 524 or- 
chestra chairs, 158 other chairs on the 
main floor, 708 seats in the family circle 
and 692 others for wromen. In total the 
house can seat 2,553 persons and about 
4,000 when there are standees. 

Enrique Pineiro, Cuban Consul at Ma- 
laga, Spain, died a few weeks ago. 

Pages at the palace who will be under 
the direct order of the president's wife 
will wear a white uniform with white caps. 
The brass buttons on the uniform will 
bear the republic's coat-of-arms. 

Mr. Walter F. Smith, proprietor of the 
Hotel Plaza, Havana, has sold his interest, 
it is said, in the Malecon and Prado hotel 
and restaurant to a syndicate, which will 
take possession at once. The sale includes 
the Miramar gardens also. 

Senora Guardiola de Palma, widow of 
Cuba's first president, will return to Cuba 
to end her days in the land in which she 
shared her husband's eminence and sub- 
sequent obscurity. 

Pilot tolls in Havana are cheaper than 
in any harbor in the Western Hemisphere, 
says the Havana Post. They were classified 
by the Spanish government years ago, 
upon the 5,000 ton basis. The commission 
that did it apparently never dreamed there 
would ever be a ship larger than that to 
enter the harbor. 

Dr. Manuel Valdez Rodriguez, professor 
of the University of Havana, who is in the 
United States making a study of institu- 
tions of learning, has also been commis- 
sioned by the Cuban government to pay 
particular attention to the American ju- 
venile courts. 

A bill for a hospital in Victoria de las 
Tunas, Oriente Province, appropriates $18,- 
000 for its immediate construction. The 
sum of $7,593 was also appropriated for 
the annual maintenance of the hospital. 

A new lighthouse double the size of the 
present one, will be built at the Morro Cas- 
tle of Santiago de Cuba. 

The new tower will be twelve meters 
higher and the lamp, which is to be placed 
on the top, will serve as a beacon to ves- 
sels fifty miles away, an improvement con- 
sidered one of importance, due to the com- 
ing opening of the Panama Canal. 



Men clerks, who at present monopolize 
the counters in the dry goods shops in 
Cuba and who sell everything from a dress 
down to the interior wearing apparel of 
women, are to be replaced by girl clerks. 
This is the reform that Congressman Bar- 
tolome Sagaro of Oriente would Hke to 
have introduced. 

"My purpose is," said the congressman, 
"to open a new field by our poor girls ; to 
give them facilities to make an honest liv- 
ing and thus save them from falling in 
the gutter driven by misery in most of the 
cases." 

Money of the Republic of Bolivia is be- 
ing manufactured in Havana, on a large 
scale, according to information which has 
been transmitted to the Cuban State De- 
partment by the minister of Bolivia. 

The first nation to send its congratula- 
tions to the administration of President 
Menocal was China. In a long cablegram 
President Yuan Shi Kai extended the best 
wishes of China for his success. 

The San Francisco wharf in Havana, the 
first pier and warehouse constructed by 
the Port of Havana Docks Company, under 
the Scovil concession, was formally opened 
for traffic on March 5th, when the Morro 
Castle, arriving from New York, went to 
dock directly at the wharf, all its freight 
to be handled by the Ports of Havana 
Dock Company, passengers also landing at 
the dock. The new wharf was illustrated 
in the February issue of The Cuba Re- 
view. 

Domingo Rosillo, the Cuban aviator, on 
May 17th made the first flight ever accom- 
plished by a Cuban airman across the 
Florida Straits from shore to shore. He 
started from Key West at 5.45 and arrived 
at Havana at 8.10, making the passage of 
ninety miles in 2 hours and 25 minutes. 
Augustine Parla, another Cuban aviator, 
made a similar flight the next day landing 
at Mariel, near Havana. 

A concession has been asked of the city 
council for a theatre in Caibarien, Santa 
Clara province, on the north coast, pro- 
viding the builder will pay no taxes for 
twenty years. 

M. M. Stewart of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church in Cuba, has been _ author- 
ized by the government to solemnize mar- 
riages. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



GENERAL NOTES 



THE MATANZAS CAVES 

A correspondent of the Chicago Post 
writes thus entertaininglj- of a visit to the 
wonderful caves of Bellamar situated just 
outside the city of Matanzas distant about 
2 hours run from Havana : 

"The afternoon voyage of discovery lies 
along the curving shore of Matanzas Bay 
where the stiff trade wind blows up re- 
freshing dust of spray from the combined 
breakers and bears inward a brisk smell 
of the sea. Southward, entering a rough 
ston\- country, one sees about the bristling 
fields of henequen or sisal hemp coloring 
with the deep green of swordlike leaves, 
the shoulders of receding hills. Into the 
midst of this plantation, 4,000 acres in ex- 
tent, the road turns, to halt at a little build- 
ing on the plateau, set back among bananas 
and pineapples. 

"Here is the entrance to the caves. But 
a few steps and one is rigid in wonder. 
Above, beneath and all about spreads the 
vast emptiness of a hall, draped majesti- 
cally with the flowing tapestry of giant 
stalagmites, here and there joining to form 
towering fluted columns. From this spa- 
cious chamber a passageway disappears 
into the very bowels of earth. Along this 
we are led, now stooping to avoid the sharp 
projections of the low ceiling, now stepping 
into another of an endless series of halls. 
Myriad formations, here the dainty frost 
work of crystalization. there the massive 
carving of pillars, make it like some vast 
cave of Ali Baba, disturbed in its secrecy 
only by the drip of water or the bloodbeat 
of one's own ears, audible in the silence. 

"Xo cave in the world, they say, is so 
wonderful in the perfection of its forma- 
tions. In extent it never has been deter- 
mined. Far within an underground stream 
rushes into darkness, where none has pene- 
trated. Explorers have worked for seven- 
teen hours continuously through the cav- 
erns without reaching their limits. To the 
present, however, thirty separate chambers 
have been found, connected by more than 
three miles of hallways, which are said to 
extend under the sea itself." 



Ramon Garcia Oses, a nephew of former 
President Gomez and director of the Cu- 
ban Agricultural Experiment Stf:tion at 
Santiago de las Vegas, Havana Province, 
committed suicide June 12th. The gov- 
ernment immediately ordered an investi- 
gat'on of the affairs of the station. Sr. 
Oses held a similar position under the 
Mexican government until his uncle I)e- 
came President of Cuba. 



MORE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANTS 

Permission has been asked of the gov- 
ernment to establish electric light plants at 
Madruga, San Nicolas. Catalina de Guines, 
Jaruco. Carabello, Bainoa, San Antonio 
and Rio Bhnco del \orte, all in Havana 
Province. 

Ramos Valderas has been given authori- 
zation by the Jovellanos municipality to 
establish an electric plant in that city 
situated in Matanzas Province. 

Manuel P. Cardenas is petitioning for 
permission to establish an electric plant in 
Aloron, Camaguey Province. 

Luis Torres has solicited government 
permission to establish an electric plant in 
Los Arabos. 

Messrs. Mon and Fernandez have re- 
ceived the necessary government authoriza- 
tion to install an electric plant at Isabela 
de Sagua, the north coast port of Sagua 
la Granda, Santa Clara Province. 

Sr. Rafael Rodriguez has received au- 
thorization to install an electric plant in 
Calimete. Light service will include also 
the towns of Manguito and Amarillas. All 
places mentioned are in Matanzas Province. 



MINOR NOTES 

The dates of Cuba's National holidays 
are January 1st, February 24th, May 20th. 
October 10th and December 7th and 25th. 

The city of Havana is soon to inaugu- 
rate the garbage crematory built by the 
Havana Terminal Company as one of the 
compensations allowed the state for the 
Arsenal- Villanueva station improvement. 

A Senate resolution was passed May 
24th by which neither the majority nor the 
minority can spring a surorise on the op- 
position. The resolution provides that at 
no session of the Senate shall there be dis- 
cussed any measure which has not been 
advertised in the "order of the da}^" at 
least twenty-four hours in advance of the 
session. 

A bill introduced in the House of Rep- 
resentatives May 24th abolishes cock fight- 
ing. The ground taken is that the sport 
is cruel and also tends to the demoraliza- 
tion of the laboring classes, especially in 
the rural districts. A bill for the abolition 
of the national lottery is also pending be- 
fore the House. 

.'Mbcrt James Hanachell has been ap- 
pointed Honorary Consul of Cuba in Bar- 
badoes. 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE MAKING OF CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 



The factories of Havana employ thou- 
sands of persons — one alone giving work 
to three thousand cigar makers. The rooms 
where these men work are especially in- 
teresting, for rolling a cigar properly re- 
quires no little skill, says the Nezv York 
Sun. In this room are men who as boys 
served a long apprenticeship to learn the 
rudiments and fundamentals of cigar mak- 
ing and who have steadily improved and 
gained in skill in making the same size 
and shape cigars all the time. A number 
of the workers have made the same type 
of cigar every working day for twenty 
years. Some of these men are really 
artists in their work. The cigar maker is 
given his filler and wrappers (the former 
weighed and the latter counted) and under 
his expert hands the material is made to 
assume one of the hundred shapes in which 
Havana cigars are put on the market. His 
only tool is a sharp cigar maker's knife, 
with which he trims the wrapper to_ meet 
his requirements, and he selects by his eye 
and his cultivated sense of touch just 
enough material to make the cigar exactly 
the proper length, and, more difficult still, 
the right amount to preserve the absolutely 
uniform thickness of the particular size 
on which he is working. Since the color 
and texture of wrapper leaves cannot be 
controlled by the grower to any appreciable 
extent, it is impossible to supply the mod- 
ern demand for light color wrappers — a 
demand based entirely upon the erroneous 
idea that the color of the wrapper is an 
index of the strength of the cigar. While 
it is true to a limited extent that the color 
of the wrapper afifects the strength, repre- 
senting as it does only a small part of the 
whole cigar, it is only reasonable to state 
that this factor is of minor importance, 
the real strength depending upon the class 
of tobacco used in the filler. If, for ex- 
ample, a cigar carrying the blend intended 
for the United States market, where heavy- 
bodied cigars are not in demand, should 
be given a dark wrapper the strength 
would not be noticeably affected, although 
so great is the power of suggestion that 
the cigar would not sell, consequently, as 
far as possible, the cigars shipped to the 
United States have light colored wrappers. 

The cigarette factories, too, are interest- 
ing from the fact that hundreds of girls 
make their living in the manufacture of 
millions of Cuban cigarettes consumed 
each year. These workers vary from chil- 
dren of twelve to women of fifty. Some 
of them are exceedingly pretty, although 
there are few who bear any resemblance 
to Carmen as she is pictured by our op- 
eratic stars. Others are slovenly and are 



incessant smokers. The tobacco used for 
cigarettes is stored on the top floor of the 
factory, and its odor is so strong that the 
visitor can only remain in the rooms there 
for a few moments. Several floors are 
given over to the different processes of 
cigarette making. The machine has prac- 
tically superseded hand labor, although 
certain branches of the trade still demand 
hand-made cigarettes. Nearly all the work 
in these factories is done by women, who 
roll, tip and pack the cigarettes. They 
usually come to work in their gayest 
clothes, especially during the carnival sea- 
son. The Queen of Havana's Carnival is 
always from these workers, being selected 
by popular vote of the cigarette girls of 
the city. 

The whole process of cigar and cigarette 
making from the growth of the tobacco 
until it comes out a finished product is in- 
teresting anywhere, but especially so in 
Cuba on account of its vastness and the 
great number of people employed in the 
industry. 

FIVE MONTHS TOBACCO RECEIPTS 

Receipts of tobacco at Havana from 
January 1st to May 2'2nd figure as follows : 

Bales 

Vuelta Abajo 24,055 

Semi Vueha 2,876 

Patido 1,511 

Matanzas 79 

Santa Clara 2,358 

Camaguey 2 

Santiago de Cuba 876 

Total 31,757 



FIVE MONTHS TOBACCO EXPORTATION 

The exportation of tobacco from January 
1st to May 15th compares as follows: 



1913 
Leaf Tobacco— Bales 123,497 

Cigars 65,762,853 

Cigarettes— Packs .. 7,775,814 
Cut Tobacco — Kilos. 107,059 



1912 

104,059 

67,722,234 

6,106,295 

169,609 



TOBACCO PRODUCTS WANTS FACTORY 

The Tobacco Products Corporation is 
reported to have been negotiating for the 
Hoyo de Monterey cigar factory at Ha- 
vana. It is asserted that an ofifer of 
$1,000,000 cash and $1,000,000 stock of the 
Tobacco Products Corporation was offered 
but was decHned. 




In a Havana Cigarette Factory— Machines for making American style cigarettes. It cuts the 
cigarette into size and piles them into a barrel. They are then taken to the packing room. 




Cicar selectine and packing department in Havana, where an expert selector separates tlie 
* ftrcnt blends and colors.'^ His light is toned down by curtains, as this work must 



dif- 



e done with great care. 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



MORE ABOUT SHREDDED CANE 



SUGGESTION TO HOLD THE DRY CANE FOR THE NON-REAPING SEASON 



THE NEW M MULLEN SUGAR PROCESS 

The experiments in connection with the 
new McMullen Sugai- process are being 
prosecuted with great vigor, and though 
the patent owners are keeping the matter 
very quiet, we are in position to state that 
10,000 tons of cane, shredded and dried 
in a way pecuHar to the new process, have 
been prepared on the Cuba plantations of 
the United Fruit Company, and shipped to 
arrive at Madison, Wisconsin, by the end 
of May. 

It will be recollected that in commenting 
on the previous experiments in our October 
issue of last year, we stated that the 
United Fruit Company had obligated 
themselves to an enormous extent in con- 
nection with the new process, having paid 
one and a half million dollars for one-half 
share of the patent rights, and further hav- 
ing undertaking to provide forty milHon 
dollars capital for establishing refineries 
in the United States to manufacture sugar 
by the new process. It is in connection 
with the latter provision, it is said, that the 
huge quantity of cane is now on its way 
to Madison, to enable experiments to be 
conducted on a scale more approximating 
to that that will have to be employed in 
actual manufacturing for commerce. Spe- 
cial machinery enabUng this to be done has 
been installed in a beet factory at Madison. 

The inventor of this new process, which 



— if all that is claimed for it is verified — 
will undoubtedly bring about an entire 
revolution in the sugar world, is a Cana- 
dian. Seen recently Mr. McMullen was 
even more optimistic, if that is possible, of 
the prospects of his process than he was 
when first he announced his discovery to 
the world. A full report of the process, 
given in an interview with the inventor, 
appeared in our last November issue. — 
Canadian W. India Mag., Mont, May, 1913. 
Commenting on the McMullen process, 
the West India Committee Circular says, 
that "under the present American customs 
tariff the sugar in the dried cane would 
go in duty free, which is, we take it, the 
raison d'etre of the process. Otherwise 
there is no reason why the paper stock 
should not be made on the estate as well, 
and the cost of drying the megass saved. 
When all the considerations and the process 
are boiled down, we get back to diffusion 
instead of milling. As we have before 
pointed out there is just a chance that it 
might pay to erect a smaller factory to 
work all the year round, instead of only in 
the crop season, drying the cane for the 
non-reaping season ; but this is very doubt- 
ful. The question of the use of megass for 
paper making has been so long before the 
cane sugar world without any definite view 
of profit from it, that doubts arise as to 
the pecuniary advantage of converting it 
into paper instead of fuel." 




Ruins of mill at Preston, Nipe Bay, used in the experiments for 
defibering cane. The mill was burnt down April 26th. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



29 




Cable 
Letters 
To Cuba 

5 Cents per Word 

New telegraph service at greatly 
reduced rates inaugurated by the 
Western Union to facilitate busi- 
ness corresponcence between the 
United States and Cuba 

CABLE LETTER RATES 

New York — Havana 

20 word message - - - $1.00 
Each additional word - 5 cents 

Cable letters for Cuba filed 

before midnight delivered 

during the next day 

Flash Cable Services at regular 
rates 

The Western Union Telegraph Co. 




Se hacen curvas y rectas, de 
enchufe de rosea y de reborde, de 
hierro y de metal de mezcla. 

Pidan el Boletin No. 7 

Aeentes 
J. E. HERNANDEZ, InquUidor 5, Havana. Cuba 
L. J. BARTHELEMY, San Juan. Puerto Rico 

Oficina general para la vcnta 

HUDSON TERMINAL, NEW YORK, U. S. A. 

Fabricada per la Lytton M'f's;. Corporation 

Franklin. Va.. U. S. A. 



f.rtr»^^ 




The BUDA COMPANYS' 
MOTOR CARS 

We manufacture Plantation and Rail- 
road Equipment including Hand Cars, 
Push Cars, 
Jacks, 
Switches 



and Frogs 

30 Church Street, New York 




HAWAIIAN CANNED PINEAPPLES 

The pack of canned pineapples for the 
present season in Hawaii is estimated at 
about 1,000.000 cases, valued at $.''..000,000. 
The Hawaiian pineapple has gained a repu- 
tation in American markets in the form of 
fresh fruit and in the can. The canned 



product has found ever a wider field and 
is being shipped to Europe and other for- 
eign countries. The large demand has 
stimulated further plantings, and new com- 
panies or those already in the business 
have acquired leases during the year on 
several thousand acres of land not here- 
tofore under cultivation. 



30 



THE CUBA R E V I E ^^' 



EXPERIMENTS WITH AVOCADOS AND MANGOES 



THE A\OCADO YIELDING TO NEW METHODS OF MULTIPLICATION 

GRAFTING OF MANGO SEEDLINGS SECURE GOOD RESULTS 



PROPAGATION TIME SHORTENED FOR 
AVOCADOS AND MANGOES 

Continuation of experiments in methods 
of propagating the avocado and mango has 
developed the fact that these fruits may be 
inarched or budded almost with as much 
facility- as is known to be the case with 
fruits of temperate climates. The difficul- 
ties which had hitherto made the propaga- 
tion of superior varieties of avocados and 
mangoes uncertain are rapidlj- disappearing. 

Avocado'- ma}' be budded when thej' are 
about nve-iixteenths of an inch in diameter 
and will be ready for planting in garden or 
orchard in about a 3"ear from the germina- 
tion of the seed. 

Another means of shortening the time 
reqmred in propagation has been the in- 
arching of very j-oung seedlings. For this 
purpose the seedlings are cared for in the 
usual way and when about five-sixteenths 
of an inch in diameter are transplanted to 
pots or boxes, placing the stem to one side 
rather than in the center so as to facilitate 
getting it into contact with the scion. A 
ven,- convenient substitute for a pot Has 
been suggested by Oliver. This consists 
of a burlap wrapping. Burlap is cut in 
strips of suitable size to hold the plants and 
on this is placed a mixture of soil, sand 
and sphagnum moss. The ball of soil sur- 
rounding the roots is placed upon this and 
the whole is wrapped and tied. The ad- 
vantages of this device are that it is light, 
compact and less clums}- than a pot and 
if necessary can be tied to a branch of the 
tree, thus eliminating the benches required 



to support pots. But even if the bench is 
used, as sometimes seems desirable, a great 
man}' more plants can be placed upon it in 
wrappings than in pots. 

The inarching process for these ver}' 
young seedlings is precisely the same as 
that for older plants and need not be 
further described here. It has been found 
advantageous to fertilize the seedlings 
about once in two weeks by the use of a 
small amount of fertilizer added to the 
water. In the case of avocados a union is 
effected in about six weeks. 

Thus the avocado, which a few years 
ago was thought to be difficult or almost 
impossible of a sexual propagation is yield- 
ing to many methods of multiplication. 

The grafting of ver}' young seedlings of 
the mango has been tested along the same 
lines as practiced with the avocado and 
with equally good results. The mangoes 
are better to be a little older than the avo- 
cado because they do not so quickly ac- 
quire the desired diameter of stem and 
because most of the shoots of the mango 
trees which are to be used as scions are of 
considerable size. It has also been found 
necessarv' to allow the mango inarches 
eight or nine weeks to unite, this being 
at least two weeks longer than the avocado 
requires. — Philippine Review. 



NEW DIRECTOR APPOINTED 

The President named Dr. Gaston Alfonso 
Cuadrado, the well known chemist, as di- 
rector of the agricultural station at San- 
tiago de las Vegas. 



JACKS & SADDLE HORSES 

We are the largest breeder* in Kentucky of Mam- 
moth jacks and saddler* and Percheron horses. We 
can fill your order for mules, pure bred hogs, cattle, 
sheep or poultry. Write for catalogs. 

H. T. BROWN & CO. 
Lexington, Ky. 



THEODORE E. FERRIS 

Formerlv Gary Smith & Ferris 
NAVAL ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER 
Hudson Teemikal Bldg., 30 Chuech Steeet 
'phone: 2786 coetlandt New York City 

Plans, Specifications and Superintendenct ; 
Steamships, Steamboats, Lighters, Tugboats, 
Barges, Yachts — steam and sail and Motor- 
boats of all classes 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing - - - Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 



Phone, Broad 
1835-1836 



SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. 



Night Phone 
4605 Sunset 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 




A, young seetlling mango inai-ched; B, young seedling avocado iii.in.in.-ii ; C, young 
seedling avocado budded. 




^Crescent" Thermometers 



^J MONG the many styles and types of "Crescent" 
J I Thermometers may be found a complete line for 

Sugar Refineries. 
For accuracy, workmanship and appearance, the "Crescent" 
Thermometer has won for itself an enviable reputation. It 
has back of it over sixty years of experience in Thermometer 
making which is your assurance of Quality and Precision. 
Our Catalog is unusually comprehensive and mighty in- 
structive. Send a postal for a copy today. 



iu!,i s,ay: Send Catalog M27 



The Schaeffer & Budenberg M'fg. Co. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



CHICAGO 
WASHINGTON 



ATLANTA 

I l.'.l I 



PITTSBURGH 
NKW ORLF.AN.S 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



NEW SUGAR CENTRALS IN ORIENTE 
PROVINCE 

La Independencia of Santiago states in 
a recent issue that three new sugar centrals 
are projected for Oriente Province. 

Sr. Federico Fernandez, a rich planter 
of the province, has closed a contract for 
the construction of a mill with a capacity 
of 100,000 bags of sugar. 

Sr. Fernandez had 32 caballerias (about 
1,067 acres) seeded to cane some time ago, 
which will be ready to cut at the next 
season, when it is expected the new mill 
will be ready to begin grinding the cane. 
The situation of the new central is near the 
line of the Cuba Railroad between Jiguani 
and Palma Soriano. 

The second central will be built by Luis 
de Hechavarria, a well known lawyer of 
Santiago, who for two years past has been 
negotiating with the heiri of Schumann & 
Co. over its construction. 

The situation of this central is near 
Moron, twenty miles from Santiago, and 
the owners expect to ship their sugar from 
that port. Sr. Hechavarria is a large 
owner of territory in this section of 
Oriente Province, much of which is already 
planted to cane, supplied during the pres- 
ent season to the centrals in the neighbor- 



hood, "Santa Ana" and "Union." The new 
mill expects 20,000 bags at first, 600,000 
the next season and after that its full out- 
put of 100,000 bags. 

Sr. Andres Duany will build the third 
mill, which will be a very small one on his 
farm known as the "Alto Cedro," which is 
doubtless near the well known town of 
that name. Much of Sr. Duany's caballe- 
rias are planted to cane and the estate like- 
wise possesses a fine irrigation plant. 

A new central is spoken of as projected 
for Mayajigua, Santa Clara Province on 
the finca Rosa Maria. 



CUBA S GREAT LABOR PROBLEM 

Greatest of all Cuba's problems in the 
new situation to be produced by the pres- 
ent reduction and early abolition of the 
tariff on sugar is the problem of how to 
procure the labor which will be needed 
m Cuba's inevitable stimulated sugar in- 
dustry. Already this year there is an in- 
sufficiency of labor (and of mills) to con- 
vert the unprecedented cane crop into 
sugar, great as has been the increase in 
mill capacity during the last two or three 
years. General Menocal has voiced his 
recognition of the fact that Cuba needs 
more capital, more mills, more ships, more 




Map of Oriente Province showine location of projected sugar mills.— See article above. 

Mapa le la Provincia Oriente mostrando el sitio de los ingenios de azucar ideados. 

Vease el articulo arriba. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



railroads, more everything — but whence is 
to come the labor to operate these? The 
problem is diilficult but not insoluble, and 
we shall await with interest the presenta- 
tion of the solution which we have no 
doubt General Menocal has already formu- 
lated in his mind. The difficulty is that 
the sugar industry will develop with a 
rapidity altogether disproportionate to the 
country's development along other lines, 
and for that reason there will be a dead 
season each year during which there will 
be a dearth of employment for the thou- 
sands that must be brought here to cut 
the cane during the grinding period. There 
is an obvious error on national economy in 
bringing from abroad an army of men to 
earn high wages which at the end of the 
grinding season they will take back to their 
homes abroad, draining the country of 
wealth which should remain here. General 
Menocal says that Cuba needs small farm- 
ers, and were there a few tens of thou- 
sands more of these to draw upon for 
cane cutters the problem would be solved. 
But the development of small farms will, 
we fear, be a slow process. The problem, 
how^ever, is so vital that its solution is 
certain. Necessity is the mother of in- 
vention. Capital and labor Cuba must 
have for her inevitable development. Cap- 
ital will come and it will attract labor, for 
capital has wonderful powers of attrac- 
tion, and is wonderfully resourceful. — 
Editorial in the Havana Telegraph. 



A COLLAPSIBLE BARREL 

A patent has recently been taken out for 
what is described as a reversible barrel. 
It consists of two equalized conical steel 
halves bolted together in the middle at a 
joint consisting of an elastic and chemical 
proof Dermatine ring lying in a groove. 
The principal advantage of this design is 
that, in returning empties, the halves can 
be nested one in another and so take up far 
less space. Steel barrels for holding 10 
cwt, of molasses and weighing themselves 
2 cwt. each are returned empty to Natal 
at a freight charge of 7s. 6d. each ; nested 
barrels of the same capacity would go for 
2s. 6d. Again, mineral oil barrels which 
would cost £l 17s. 6d. to return to the 
United States (the charge being by space), 
could be replaced by nesting barrels which 
traveling by weight would cost 5s. to return 
empty. There are other advantages claimed 
for this patent barrel, such as the ability 
to clean and coat the insides. All halves 
are interchangeable, any two will make a 
barrel, or single halves may be used with a 
cover plate. — International Sugar Journal. 



There are but two commercial bodies in 
Cuba. One in Havana and the other in 
Santiago. The former takes the title of 
Chamber of Commerce for the Island of 
Cuba and has representatives in the differ- 
ent provinces. The other is simply called 
the Santiago Chamber of Commerce. 



A. F. CRAIG & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

PAISLEY 
ESCOCIA 

Fabricantes 
de toda clase 

de 

maquinaria 

para 

moler caiia 




de 



azucar 



DIRECCION TELEGRAFICA 
"CRAIG" PAISLEY 



Claves: A.B.C., S^EDICION; McNEIL'S MINING Y GENERAL 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



PLANTATION CARS ""' ^'^^ *''"'^' ^^° 



THE PARTS FOR SAME 



- 


¥'"''' 


||||||iK ■■niimi Ta||BB|BB|B|H|H|L^ ~""t~ '^^^^^^fe^arasna..^ 


m~- 


» 


1 

•1 




; ■1^^^' -^ ^ • _ \ 


'"^ 


n 


wBKk^^IZZLMSM 


K 











No. 501-B (Palabra de clave ZOVVO) 

Uno de nuestros cari'os cubiertos recientemente construidos para la Cuban Central 
Railway. 

Solicitense nuestros precios y especiflcaciones conipletas para carros para caiia, o 
cualquler otro servicio, antes de decidir. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY CO., NEW YORK, E.U. A. 

Direccion telegrafica : Nallim, New York Produccion annual de mas de 100,000 carros 
Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B. CINTAS, Amargura No. 12, Havana 



THE SUGAR OUTPUT OF CUBA 

[Report of United States Consul General James L. Rodgers, Havana] 



Up to June 1, 1913, according to the unofficial but reliable figures issued weekly, the 
total production of sugar during the present campaign in Cuba had amounted to 2,066,845 
long tons, in comparison with 1,662,789 tons at a similar date in the campaign of 1912. 
The number of mills grinding on June 1, 1913, was 64, a slight decrease from the number 
at a similar date in the preceding year. 

The weather of the present time being normal, it would be certain that the majority of 
the mills still running would grind through the month of June were other conditions 
such as to warrant operation. But on account of the exceedingly low price and the tre- 
mendous stock of sugar which has accumulated at the shipping ports of the island, it is 
doubtful whether on July 1st many of these mills will be continuing work. It is entirely 
probable, however, that the total production for the year of 1913 will reach 2,200,000 tons. 

The stock of sugar at mills and Cuban ports on June 1st was estimated at 682,289 tons, 
and while this to some extent represents the natural accumulation, it is principally due to 
the price, which at present does not permit a profit to the large majority of the producers. 
Under old conditions such an accumulation of sugar would seriously test the financial 
resources of the sugar industry, but with the amplification of banking facilities in Cuba 
and with the loyal determination to sustain those worthy of credit, there has been no 
public demonstration of any financial stringency. In this respect the present conditions 
illustrate better than through any other way the change- which has occurred in private 
Cuban financial affairs within the last three years. This is for the distinct benefit of the 
people, of the sugar industry, and of the country as a whole. 

There is confident expectation that the price of Cuban sugars will in the very near 
future show a substantial increase, and therefore everyone who can afford to do so is 
holding, despite the inevitable loss in polarization of the product and of weight. 



T H E C U B A R E \' I E W 35 

SUGAR REVIEW 

specially written for The Cuba Review by Willett & Gray, of New York 



STOCKS LARGELY IN EXCESS CUBA S ASSURANCE OF A MARKET 

FOR ALL HER SUGAR 

Our last review for this magazine was dated ^lay 15, 1913. 

At that date the quotation for 96° test Cuba centrifugals was 3.33c per lb. There has 
been no other quotation during the month under review. Some effort at times was 
made to advance to 3.36c per lb., but after a few days holding the offerings returned to 
3.33c and business was resumed. 

Refiners always took all offerings at this basis for Cubas and at 3.30c per lb. for the 
free duty Porto Ricos. 

As a consequence of the free buying of refiners, their stocks in refineries and ware- 
houses are largely in excess of last year's holdings at the corresponding time. 

The parity of the Cuban prices, however, has been sufficiently below the European 
markets to encourage quite an increase of exports to foreign markets. These pur- 
chases for foreign exports amount already to 250,000 to 300,000 tons for Europe, 50,000 
tons for Canada and 22,000 tons for Vancouver, a total of about 350,000 tons diverted 
from the United States supplies, but still enough left of visible supplies to meet the 
wants of the United States up to the maturing of the domestic cane and beet crops, the 
latter of which promises to be the largest yet made. 

Cuba has certainly proved this season its capacity for increasing its sugar crops al- 
most indefinitely and at a lower basis of cost than any beet producing country if not 
lower than any cane producing country. 

The sugar schedule of the tariff bill is. however, likely to go through the Senate 
virtually unchanged with 25 per cent reduction from present rates of duty and 20 per cent 
advantage to Cuba, all for three years, and after years free duty sugar from all the 
world and no reciprocity for Cuba. 

There is no prospect whatever of any increase in the present reciprocity advantage to 
Cuba for the next three years, and it does seem somewhat extraordinary that the present 
administration deals so unthinkingly with the following years as to its relations to the 

Island. 

Of course, there is always present the suggestion that with free sugar voted now for 
the world after three years, something may happen in the interim to produce other legis- 
lation to meet conditions that may then exist. 

In the meantime as the bill will certainly stop the promotion of our domestic sugar 
industries, Cuba can go on increasing her production with full assurance of a market 
for it all either at home or abroad. 

European beet crops promise well under mostly favorable weather for field work and 
the growing beet roots. 

Quotations for beets during the month have fluctuated more than Cuban, but still not 
largely, say from 9s 3%d to 9s iV>d to 9s iVad to 9s 5}Ad to 9s 2 1/4 d to 9s 5% d at 
the close. ■ . 

The tariff bill will be reported to the Senate for final action during the present month 
and its discussion will continue through July and its going into operation may not be 
until October 1st but hardly later than that date. 

Both our domestic crops of sugar will come to market under the new rates of duty 
except the early production of California beet sugar. 

Our refined market has been extremely quiet and dull and the figures show quite a 
loss in consumption of sugar up to the present time. The whole country has acted as 
if the reduced tariff duties were coming in force at once and hence have carried stocks 
from hand to mouth only. Standard I'ine Granulated after selling down to 4.10c less 
2 per cent by some refiners has now recovered to 4.30c less 2 per cent by all refiners 
except Arbuckle Bros, at 4.20c less 2 per cent. 

The fruit season is now at hand, and buying in larger volume is noted which may 
lead to some improvement in both raw and refined quotations in the near future. 

New York, June ifi, 1913. 



36 THECUB A REVIEW 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita expresamente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York 

Nuestra ultima revista azucarera para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 15 de mayo 
de 1913, en cuya fecha la cotizacion del azucar centrifuge de Cuba polarizacion 96° era 
3.33c. por libra. Durante el mes bajo resefia no ha habido otra cotizacion, aunque a 
veces se hicieron esfuerzos por aumentar al precio a 3.36c. por libra, pero despues de 
unos cuantos dias las ofertas volvieron a 3.33c. y continuaron los negocios. 

Los refinadores aceptaron todas las ofertas bajo esta base para los azucares de Cuba y 
a 3.30c. la libra por los azucares de Puerto Rico libres de derechos. A consecuencia de 
estas compras por los refinadores, sus existencias en las refinerias. y en los almacenes 
son grandemente en exceso de lo que tenian el aiio pasado por la misma epoca. 

La paridad de los precios de los azucares de Cuba, sin embargo, ha sido suficiente- 
mente menor.que la de los mercados europeos para estimular bastante el aumento de la 
exportacion a los mercados extranjeros. Estas compras para la exportacion al extran- 
jero ascienden ya de 250,000 a 300,000 toneladas para Europa, 50,000 toneladas para el 
Canada y 22,000 toneladas para Vancouver, o sea un total de unas 350,000 toneladas 
desviadas de las existencias de los Estados Unidos, pero sin embargo dejando aiin 
existencias visibles para llenar las necesidades de los Estados Unidos hasta que llegue 
la cosecha del azucar de cafia y de remolacha del pais, esta ultima prometiendo ser la 
mas grande que se conoce. 

Cuba verdaderamente ha probado esta estacion su capacidad para aumentar su cosecha 
de azucar casi indefinidamente y bajo la base de un costo mucho menor que el de 
cualquier otro pais productor de remolacha, si no mas bajo que el de cualquier pais pro- 
ductor de caiia. 

A pesar de todo, la clausula del azucar en el proyecto de la tarifa es probable que sea 
aprobada por el Senado sin sufrir cambio alguno, con un 25 por ciento de rebaja de los 
derechos actuates y una ventaja de 20 por ciento para Cuba, todo durante tres afios, y 
despues de tres afios el azucar libre de derechos para todos los paises del mundo, sin 
reciprocidad para Cuba. 

No hay indicios en modo alguno de aumento en la actual ventaja de reciprocidad hacia 
Cuba durante los tres proximos afios, y parece algo extraordinario que el Gobierno actual 
se ocupe tan poco de los afios venideros respecto a sus relaciones con la Isla. Por 
supuesto, siempre cabe la idea de que al votarse ahora el azucar libre de derechos para 
el mundo entero despues de tres afios, algo puede suceder en el interin que conduzca a 
otra legislacion a allanar las condiciones que puedan existir entonces. 

Entretanto, como el proyecto de Ley con seguridad hara cesar el adelanto de nuestras 
industrias de azucares del pais, Cuba puede seguir aumentando su produccion con la 
completa seguridad de obtener mercado para todo su azucar, bien sea en el pais o en 
el extranjero. 

Las cosechas de remolacha europea prometen ser buenas bajo un tiempo de lo mas 
favorable para los trabajos del campo y el crecimiento de la raiz de remolacha. 

Las cotizaciones del azucar de remolacha durante el mes han fluctuado mas que las del 
azucar de Cuba, pero sin embargo no en gran manera, digamos de 9s. 3%d. a 9s. 4%d. 
a 9s. l%d. a 9s. 5%d. a 9s 2^d. a 9s. 5%d. al cerrar el mercado. 

El proyecto de ley sobre la tarifa sera presentado al Senado para su accion final du- 
rante el mes actual, y su discusion continuara durante julio, sin que se ponga en opera- 
cion probablemente hasta el primero de octubre, pero escasamente no mas tarde de esa 
fecha. 

Nuestras cosechas de azucar tanto de cafia como de remolacha llegaran al mercado 
bajo el gravamen de los nuevos derechos, excepto la temprana cosecha de azucar de 
remolacha de California. 

Nuestro mercado de azucar refinado ha estado extremadamente quieto y flojo, y el 
producto de las ventas muestra una perdida en el consumo de azucar hasta el presente. 
Todo el pais ha accionado como si los derechos mas bajos de la tarifa fueran a ponerse 
en vigor al instante, y por lo tanto se han provisto de existencias solamente para sus 
necesidades mas apremiantes. El azucar normal refinado, despues de venderse al bajo 
precio de 4.10c. menos 2 por ciento por algunos refinadores, ha reaccionado a 4.30c. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



menos 2 por ciento por algunos refinadores, excepto Arbuckle Bros., cuyo precio es 
4.20c. menos 3 por ciento. 

Ha Uegado la estacion de la fruta y se notan compras en gran cantidad, lo cual puede 
conducir a alguna mejoria en las cotizaciones del aziicar crudo y refinado dentro de poco. 

Xueva York, junio 16 de 1913. 



CABLE ADDRESS: Turnu«e 



NEW YORK 
64-66 Wall Strkbt 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

BANKERS 

Depoiits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance 
of Dividends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale 
of Letters of Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons, etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments 
fcy Cable and Letters of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, 
Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Central and South America. 



CORRESPONDENTS : 



HAVANA— N. Gelats y Ca. 
MEXICO Banco Central Mexicano. 



LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



SUGAR TESTING APPARATUS 



FUNDADA EN 1851 



ElMER & AMEND, 



Hace una especiali- 

dad de surtir 
Todos los Instru- 
mentos para la 
Prueba de Aziicar 
y HabilitaciSn de 
Laboratorio. 
Unicos Agentes en 
los Estados Unidos 
y Canada para los 

STANDARD 

POLARISCOPIOS 

Su triple 6 doble 
campo de vision ha 
sido adoptado por 
el Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos co- 
mo norma. 

Toda la maquina- 
ria experimental y 
los aparatos descri- 
tos en ((Agricultural 
Analysis,)) del Prof. 
H. W. Wiley. Se 
suministran c () n 
rustos todos los in- 
formes pedidos. 

Pidanse List as de 

205-211 Third Avenue, New York Predos llustradas. 




FOLARISCOPIO SOBRE "BOCKSTATIV ' LA FORMA MAS MODERNA 
Con caja a prueba de polvo, parte de prisma, y engranaje prolongado. 



SEEK MARKET IN UNITED STATES 

J. G. van Dusscldorp, member of a firm 
of sugar brokers at Vlaardingen, Holland, 
who was in New York recently, said that 
the probability of the tariff being removed 
from sugar has aroused the beet growers 
along the North Sea, and Mr. van Dussel- 
dorp has come over to investigate the pos- 
sibilities for obtaining contracts. 

M present, according to the visitor, the 
duty on sugar prevents Dutch exporters 
from sending their country's main product 
over here. A large market has been found 
in England, though, for exports tf) that 
country, a tax has to be paid the Dutch 



government. Mr. Dusseldorp says that 
refined sugar is now selling in Holland at 
2.2 cents a pound, brown sugar being much 
less. Hitherto the freight rate to the 
United States, joined with our protective 
tariff, has prevented the importation of 
Dutch sugar in large quantities, but with 
free trade in that commodity, sugar brokers 
in Holland believe they will be able to 
compete here with Cuban sugar. — New 
York Times. 



The new central "Moron" in Camaguey 
Province began grinding late in March. 
Although beginning late this modern estate 
expects a vield of 150,000 bags. 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



INFORMATION FOR SUGAR PLANTERS 



MOLASSES NOT A GOOD FERTILIZER FIRE INJURY TO CANE ANALYZED 

A SUGAR MERGER 



■ USE OF MOLASSES HARMFUL 

As the result of experiments on the sub- 
ject of the use of molasses in cane culti- 
vation, Mr. S. S. Peck concludes that mo- 
lasses applied to land which is receiving 
the usual fertilizer applications as prac- 
ticed in Hawaii does harm. It causes a 
part of the nitrogen applied as nitrate to 
revert back to less available or unavail- 
able forms of nitrogen, by checking the 
nitrification of sulphate of ammonia dress- 
ings, and by retarding the ammonification 
and nitrification of the nitrogen of organic 
fertilizers. This harmful efifect is stated 
to be entirely due to the organic constitu- 
ents of the molasses, the mineral matters 
having no influence. Dressing with car- 
bonate of lime does not correct the adverse 
action of the molasses. — West India Com- 
mittee Circular. 



DETERIORATION IN BURNT CANE 

The burning of sugar cane either by ac- 
cident or design has assumed large pro- 
portions in Cuba this year and has attracted 
general attention. In Australia there has 
been likewise considerable destruction of 
cane in this way and to such an extent 
that at the Australian Sugar Producers' 
Association conference recently there was 
considerable discussion. The injury to the 
cane by fire is thus summed up by the 
Australian Sugar Journal and copied in the 
Agricultural Nezvs : 

"Recent analyses have shown that losses 
from burning occur to the following ex- 
tent. In the? first place there is a loss in 
weight which is never less than 4 per cent 
and, on the average, probably as high as 6 
or 7 per cent. Accompanying this, there is 
an increase in the percentage of fibre 
which leads to corresponding difficulties as 
regards extraction. Moreover, the deterio- 
ration in the field is more rapid in the case 
of burnt canes than in the case of green 
canes cut an^' left in the same way. 
Furthermore, an average interval of three 
days between burning and milling causes a 
minimum average reduction in value of 20 
per cent. In one experiment, during ten 
days the following changes were found to 
have taken place : on the day of burning 
the analysis was : Brix., 24.19 ; sucrose, 
sucrose, 22.36 ; quotient of purity, 92.43 
glucose, 1.41 ; glucose ratio, 1.83 ; per cent 
sucrose in cane, 17.92. On the tenth day, 
analysis gave the following result : Brix., 



20.59 ; sucrose, 14.95 ; quotient of purity, 
72.61; glucose, 4.17; glucose ration, 37.89; 
per cent sucrose in cane, 10.07. 

"It is stated further that practical expe- 
rience supports the above figures, since on 
several estates it is taking from 10 to 12 
tons of burnt cane to make a ton of sugar, 
whereas of green cane only 7 tons are re- 
quired." 




An iron skeleton frame on the Toledo sugar estate, 

Havana Province, used to cool the condenser 

water from the mill. 



A LOUISIANA SUGAR MERGER 

Irf the March issue of the Gulf States 
Banker appeared the report of a tenta- 
tive plan for the formation of the Louisi- 
ana Cane Sugar Company, a $60,000,000 
holding company to be organized in case 
the tariff reduction on sugar should turn 
out to be a moderate one. The company 
would put all the sugar interests under a 
single i^D management, and cut down the 
number of factories in the State from 168 
to 50. 

Sol. Wexler, vice-president of the Whit- 
ney-Central Bank, prepared the prospectus 
asking an inventory of each factory. He 
further contemplates the organization of a 
subsidiary company with a capital of $1,- 
000,000 to be known as the Agricultural 
Credit Company, the object of which will 
be to furnish growers of cane entitled to 
credit with the necessary funds for the 
carrying on of their planting operations. 
These advances will be made at the lowest 
rate of interest and without any commis- 
sions or other charges. 



The Cuba Railroad will soon build a 
handsome station at Manzanillo, Oriente. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



30 



HAVANA 



CUBA 

National Bank of Cuba 

Government Depositary 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$6,250,000.00 



Head Office — Havana 

27 BRANCHES IN CUBA 

N tTV York Agency 
/ WALL STREET 



COLLECTIONS 



THE 

TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL «n4 
SURPLUS 



$650,000 



TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 



EXAMINES TITLES 
NEGOTIATES LOANS 



COLLECTS RENTS 
ON MORTaASES 



Carrcspondencc Salieited from 
Intcndiac InTtstort 



OFFICERS 

Norman H. Davis President 

Oiwald A. Hornsby - - - - Vice-PreBident 
Claudio G. Mendoza - - - Vice-President 

J. M. Hopgood Treasurer 

Rocelio Carbajal Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

INCORPORATED 1869 

Fiscal Agent of the Government of the Republic of 
Cuba for the Payment of the Army of Liberation 

Paid=up Capital, 

and Reserve. .. .$25,000,000.00 
Total Assets $180,000,000.00 

Head Office MONTREAL 

New York Agency 
Corner William and Cedar Streets 

Branches in Antilla, Bayamo, Caibarien. 
Camaguey, Cardenas, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, 
Guantanamo; Havana: Obrapia 33, Galiano 92, 
Monte 118, Muralla 52; Manzanillo, Matanzas, 
Nuevitas, Puerto Padre, Sagua la Grande, Sancti 
Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba. 



Established 1144 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKINS BUSINESS 
C«rr«ip*itf«iits at All PrIaslpal Plassi of Ike lilaad 

Safe Deposit Vaulit 

Manufacturers of th« Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigart 



FACTORY: 
Past* ds TaMi I6«-IS8 



OFFICE: 
Amargiira l-t 



ESTABLIIMKB lt7( 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking business 
Correspondents at all the principal 
places m f the world 

Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 



EX-SECRETARY S NEW OFFICE 

Former Secretary of State Manuel 
Sanguily, who was named to the Commis- 
sion of Statistics by President Gomez, and 
who resigned that office, has been ap- 
pointed by President Menocal to be In- 
spector General of the army with the rank 
of brigadier-general. 



Pleaie mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisert 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA 



The United Railways of Havana 

in conjunction with the Cuba Railroad, maintain a service of 
two trains daily between Havana and the growing Eastern 
city of CAMAQUEY, and one Express Train daily between 
Havana and SANTIAGO DE CUBA, the "Dream City of the 
West Indies." Buffet lunch is served on these trains. 

FOUR TRAINS DAILY 

in both directions between Harana and MATANZAS, which latter city because of its picturesque 
situation and ibe charm of its principal attractions (Yumuri's famous valley and the wonderful 
caTes of Bellamar) has long enjoyed distinction as the great "Mecca" of the tourists, and it 
continues to gain in popularity. EXCELLENT TRAIN SERVICE is maintained to many other 
places of great interest to tourists, all of which are fully described in "Cuba — A Winter 
Paradise," a profusely illustrated 80-page booklet with six complete maps and 72 views illustratiTC 
of this wonderful island, sent postpaid on receipt of 3 cents in stamps. 

Frank Roberts, General Passenger Agent 
United Railways of Havana -- - 118, Pkado, Havana, Cmx 



FRED WOLFE isi calzada de vives, havana 

Cable, "Wolfe" 

Negociante en Todas Clases Dealer in all Classes of 
de Ganado Live Stock 

Especialmente en Mulos Especially in Mules 

Always on hand Large Stock of All Classes of Mules — All Mules Sold Are 
Guaranteed as Represented — Can Furnish Any Number Desired on Short Notice 



^ 



P. RUIZ S BROS. 

engravers 

fine stationery 

Obispo 22 P. O. Box 608 

HAVANA, CUBA 



DYNAMITE FOR HARD SUBSOILS 

According to the Experiment Station 
Record experiments have been conducted 
in Hawaii to test the value of dynamite in 
opening up impervious subsoil which occurs 
in certain parts of that territory. A low 
velocity 25 per cent dynamite was used, 
the sticks being l-!4-inch in diameter by 8 
inches long, and placed to a depth of about 
2V2 feet, varying with the nature and con- 
dition of the soil. The results obtained 
were satisfactory, the subsoil was opened 
up, and the cost of the experiment was 
about 3c. per hole, thus making the cost of 
8 feet X 8 feet spacing (the usual distance) 
$20.40 per acre. In preparing the land for 
planting, the ordinary ploughing and cul- 
tivating operations have to be performed 
in addition. 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 
Sugar Brokers 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Addreii, "Tide, New Yerk" 



PITCH PINE MARKET CONDITIONS 

Cuban orders for pine lumber are fre- 
quent and liberal, this branch of the trade 
having been especially active for months 
past. More lumber is being shipped to 
Cuba than at any previous time, and there 
is every indication of continued brisk 
trade. Cuban freights continue upon a 
high level, which has not apparently ex- 
erted any disturbing influence upon the 
volume of purchases, and mill prices for 
Cuban lumber rule practically unchanged. 



It is declared that owing to the insist- 
ence of many of the citizens of Santiago, 
Mrs. Palma will make her permanent home 
in that city, where her distinguished hus- 
band was born and died. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

Engines, Boilers andMacKinery 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 
Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

A. KLING. Prop. MOBILpFI AI^A 



ESTABUSHED 1852 



ROHLIG & CO. 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
BREMERHAVEN 



INQUIRIES REQUESTED 



BREMEN BREMERHAVEN HAMBURG 

Knochenhauerstk 16/17 am Hafen 113 Alsterdamm 14/15 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PORVIDED ON APPLICATION 



Vil 

FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 

82 WAl^L, STRKET, NK^V YORK 

•ublishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal — the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED. 



St GRAY, BroRers and Agenta 

S^^ A^ ^JT-C^ JWr ^^ REFINED 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton 
Night Call, 411 Hamilton 



Cable Address: 
"Abiworks," New York 



Atlantic "Basin Iron Works 

Engineers and Boiler Makers 

Machinists, Plumbers, Tinsmiths, Pipe Fitters, Blacksmiths, Coppersmiths, Pattern 
Makers, Sheet Iron Workers, Iron ana Brass Castings. Steamship Repairs a Specialty. 



Corner Imlay and Summit Streets 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 




£^.J. Mm 




Playing Polo at F5anes, a town on the north coast of Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"P A S S L" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, COR. STONE 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos De Bea Sc Co. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
lmp*rtae!6n dIrteU dt todat l«i 
•introi manufaeturcrei d«l mund* 

Agenti for the Munion Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward & 
Co., New York; Serra Steamship Company, 
Lirerpool; Vapores Transatlinticos de A. 
Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espafia Indepen- 
dencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL. WOOD. LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

or XVXSY DI8CKIPTI0M 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard; 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones: 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTINQ ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
PiEKS, Bkidssi, Railioads and Buildinci 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimatei 
on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 
WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 
Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Mimro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Addkess: Kukomale, New Yokk 
Telephone, 2492 Soutb 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE&MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL [s .. c ] 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

ESPECIALIDAD EN ROPA HeCHA DE TrABAJO 

Am in a Jiosition to push the sales of American 

high class products. Would represent a first 

class firm. 

Apartado 102 Camagiiey, Cuba 



M. J. CABANA 



COMMISSION 
MERCHANT 
P. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a com- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in 
eastern Cuba. 

F. W. HvosLEF E. C. Day R. M. Michelsem 

Bennett, Hvoslef & Co. 

Steamship Agents and Ship Brokers 
18 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

Cable: "Benvoseo" 

The Mayor's latest plans include the 
creation of cheap restaurants where the 
price of a rneal will not be higher than 10 
cents, a 2 per cent interest pawn shop and 
free moving-picture plays for the poor in 
the open air. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



SAILINGS 



NEW YORK— CUBA SERVICE 



SOUTHBOUND 
(From New 

S.S. CURITYBA - - 

S.S. Olinda - - 



PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 

SAILINGS NORTHBOUND SAILINGS 

York) (From Nuevltas) 

July 16th S.S. Curityba - - July 4th 

July 30th S.S. Olinda - - July 18th 



Nuevitas, Antilla, Nipe Bay, Puerto Padre and Gibara 
FREIGHT ONLY 

S.S. CubANA, July 9th; S.S. LuRISTAN, July 23d 
Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua and Caibarien 



S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 
S.S. 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 
PalomA — Caibarien-Santiago-Guantanamo . . . 

Karen — Havana-Cardenas 

Bertha — Havana-Matanzas ------- 

SiGNE — Cienfuegos-Manzanillo 

Karen — Havana-Sagua 

Bertha — Havana-Matanzas 

Paloma — Caibarien-Santiago-Guantanamo - - - 



July 



1st 
4th 
I 1th 
12th 
18th 
25th 
29th 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Mobile, July 8th for Montevideo and Buenos Ayres; July 22nd 
for Buenos Ayres and Rosario 



BALTIMORE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Baltimore, July 3d, July 17th and July 31st 



BALTIMORE— COLON SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 
A Steamer, July 1 5th, Baltimore to Colon 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 



■^^^^P 


j^H^^^^^H^^^RETTi^^^ 


■|^H| 




■P**^' 


m|HH 




,.> 


dr^^fT^^HH^H 




^S^^ 

^^^^.^B 






B^t.'^ yHHHHBSSS 


H'll^tfl^^H 






l^nBH 




^^^^^^B^H 


i^^^^H 



Model of 1904-1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reycrsing the 
course of the Tapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on th« 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE, Preiident. 



LEWIS C. LILLIE, Secretary and Treasurer. 



THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 

LOCOMOTIVES 



BROAD ANB 
NARROW SADSE 



• INBLC EXPANBION 
AND CO M PO U N D 




n"" PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES JJV.?NToF*iE^5?c". 



Sptcifications Furnished on Application 



AMERICAN TRADING COMPANY, Lonja del Comercio No. 418, Havana, Cuba 

Cable Address: "Baldwin, Philadelphia" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



CVBA REVIEW • 








> ^fH 



Pkiblished bytheHunsonSteamitifb U ne. .82r9Z Beaver Street 



wvy.^te 



w. y 



k.<S' 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Portable Bag Filers 

Cut down handling cost and materially 
increase the efficiency of your entire 
force. Low in first cost and operating 
expense. Full particulars on request. 

Like all Link-Belt Machinery, our Portable Bag Filers 
are substantially constructed — built for hard con- 
tinuous service. They are compact and readily 
portable. Capacity 60 tons an hour. 

The Link-Belt Company is recognized as the 
pioneer in the art of conveying materials. 

Our various elevating and 
conveying devices to-day 
represent the highest de- 
velopment of their re- 
spective types. 

Write for further infer- 
mat ion 




(^^ SWIVEL ROLLLRS 



LINK- BELT COMPANY SIVy%\T,^? 




1' 



~rv 



5 G.F.C.Co. 




Garfield Fire Clay Co., Inc. 

FABRICANTES DE 

Ladrillos Ref ractarios de Prime- 
ra Calidad y de Todas Formas 



Gerente del 
Departamento 
de Exportacion 



CABLE ADDRESS: 
JAMOTLEY, 

NEW YORK 
(all CODES used) 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 

71 BEAVER ST., NEW YORK 

Rieles y Aseguradores 

Ranas, Cambiavias y Soportes de 

Locomotoras 

Calderas 

Tubos para Calderas 

Caches para Pasajeros 

Ladrillos Refractarios 

Tanques de Madera y de Hierro 

Torres de Acero y de Madera 

Puentes de Acero 

EdiUcios de Acero 

Hierro Acanalado 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



r* A D D r^C FA«A TODOi oioi J de todoi Umafiot, de loi omr» cafi« con cuatro juedai y c«pa 
V^ AKKL-'iJ cidtd de 1 J4 toneladas & loi con juegoa doblei de ruedai y capacidad de 30 toneladai 
Hactmos una etpecialidad d* jutgos de htrrajts, incluyendo los juegos 
de ruedtu. complettmente armados, con todas las pieeas de metal, y panot 
completes para construir los carros i su destino df madrra: del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Charch St., New York, N. Y. ""'^^ui^^T'- 



DON'T OVERLOOK THE ^*"* '•'■ ■•* **• '•"* '■*•'••*'■• •^'•' •* *" •■*"• 

A rkWFDTiQiMr p AT F^ ""•■' "■* "•'• " '""•'•■* ""•** •' •"••»■•■* •'••• 

AUVtilV 1 ISlfNv* i AOE.O »{»••% aatf valuakit ntrtkaadlM aaaeiiiMMtaU to ■••« 

^' tveryaat'i •u4. 6*t la MiretpaaritMM witk CUBA 

THE CUBA REVIE W HEVIEW aHvtrtlMrt lap tki iMrii y«y ■•■!. 




r.oPYBir.iiT 1913 



ALL 

ABOUT 

CUBA*' 



IT COVERS THE ISLAND'S 

IND USTRIES AND ACTIVITIES 

ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR POSTPAID 



Pteaee menlton THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertlsere 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Los Instrumentos Agricolas y Maquinas 

de FARQUHAR 

han merecido distincion en la Isla de Cuba por su buena cualidad durante muchisimos 
anos, porque estan hechos por niecanicos expertos, y estan hechos de un material 
cuidadosamente escojido en una fabrica moderna, donde las condiciones y las necesida- 
des de Cuba han recibido su atencion especial, y por esta razon estan atendidas 
cuidadosamente. 



Caidlogos d solicitud 

Direcci6n cablegrdflca : 
"Fenankle," New York 




Correspondencia en todoa 
los idiomas modernos 



Fabricamos Maquinas de Vapor y Calderas, Maquinas de Gasolina, Maquinas de Trac- 
cion de Vapor y de Gasolina, Trilladoras, Aserraderos, Malacates, Arados, Rastras, 
Cultivadoras, Desgranadoras de Maiz, Molinos para Maiz, Sembradoras de Granos, Sem- 
bradoras de Maiz y de Algodon, Excavadoras de Patatas, Carretillas para Almacen, 
etc. Tambien hacem.os Prensas hidrdulicas para Sidra, Vino, y Chapear. 

A. B. FARQUHAR & CO., Cotton Exchange Bldg., New York 




Prensas de 

Filtrar 

para Ingenios 

SHRIVER 

FILTER PRESSES 



Write ui for 
Catalog, Prices 
and Information 



T. Shriver & Co. 

814 Hamilton St. 
Hcrrison, N. J. 



FOR MOLASSES USE 




MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



2630 Whitehall Building 
New York 



H^IMOIND T yVlNK: 



WARR3EN..3PBN N. 



BUILT BY 



STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

AGENTS IN cunA: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 

26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, WARREN, Pa., U.S.A. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THL CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, Neiv York 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Editors and Publishers 

SUBSCRIPTION 
$1.00 Per Year -------- .--- lo Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 



Vol. XI 



AUGUST, 1913 
Contents of This Number 



No. 9 



The Cover Page Illustration shows the hulling mill, drying floor and home of a 
coffee planter in Oricnte Province. 

Canal across the Cienaga de Zapata (with map) -6. 27 

Cuban Railroad Statistics — 

Cuba Railroad Company Earnings 14 

Cuban Central Itailway Earnings 14 

Cuban Central Railway Extension 17 

Havana Electric Railways Earnings 14 

Railroad Freight Rates Revision 14 

United Railways Earnings 14 

Western Railway Earnings 14 

Custom House Collections 40 

Electric Light Plants— More Installr.ti -ns 13 

Financial Matters — ^.^ 

Cuba's Five Per Cent Bonds V. 15 

Cuban Railroad Dividend Prospects f6 

Cuba Company's Xew Issue 16 

Cuba Company's Shares Attractive 16 

Cuban Securities — July Quotations .•. 15 

Five Per Cent Gold Bonds Redeemed r...lS, 17 

National Bank Report 19 

Foreign Trade of Cuba- — - 

Cuba's Buying Increasing 21 

Distribution of Exports 20 

Distribution of Imports 22 

Exports of 1912 and Countries 20 

Trade of Leading Nations * 22 

Trade Outlook for 1913 22 

Isle of Pines, Comments on its Ownership 11 

Labor in Cuba, the (luajiro (Illustrated) 28 

Lumber Exports from Gulf Ports 27 

Medicinal Properties of the Pawpaw .-. 29 

MoniDC Doctrine and Cuba 10 

Nev. .\dfninistration Activities 9 

Port Improvement Company Concession Annulled .' 7, -S 

Police Force of Cuba 10 

Sar.tiago's Coming Exposition 13 

Sufear Industry — , 

Sugar Estate News 30 

Status of Tariff Discussion 33 

Willett & firay's Sugar Review (English) 34 

Willett & (iray's Sugar Review (Spanish) 35 

Tobacco Industry — 

CigJf'r Exports for .Six Months 24 

Cigar Tra<le Active 25 

High Priced Cigars ..; 24 

New .Size of ('igar 24 

Tobacco Irhjjorts 24 

Total Receijrts to July 17th .r.'-.ji^t... 24 

Tourist Traits in Santiago. Views of Richard Harding Davis :.f}!.:'. 3! 

M.\NY BEAUTIFUL ILLUSTRATIONS 



■--\ 



THE 
CUBA REVIEW 



"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1913, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XI 



AUGUST, 1913 



Number 9 



GOVERNMENT ' MATTERS 



en 



THE PORTS COMPANY CONCESSION ANNULLED — CUBA S FUTURE- 
HOPEFUL, SAYS PRESIDENT MENOCAL 



On August 4th, President 
A Great Menocal issued a decree an- 

Concession nulling the concession to the 
Annulled Ports Improvement Com- 
pany of Cuba, the most im- 
portant granted during the Gomez Ad- 
ministration, involving many millions. 

The annulment is based upon the alleged 
failure of the company to fulfill its contract 
and to organize according to the laws of 
the country. The company's officials say 
that the charges against it are not justified. 

On the advice of the attorneys of the 
Ports Company an appeal to the Supreme 
Court will be taken against President Me- 
nocal's decree. 

The attorneys hold that President Meno- 
cal's decree is unconstitutional and that the 
President is usurping the functions of the 
judiciary. The Supreme Court usually con- 
venes in December, but as the law requires 
a decision on appeals involving the ques- 
tion of con.stitutionality within thirty days 
after the appeal is filed the court will as- 
semble in October. Meanwhile harbor im- 
provement work is paralyzed and payments 
of tonnage dues are withheld from the 
company. 

The Ports Company intends to bring suit 
in the lower courts demanding damages and 
tonnage bills and that the concession 
granted to the company by the Cuban Con- 
gress under the Grjmez .Administration be 
held as an escrow pending a decision. This 
suit may last a year or two. 

The Ports Improvement Company of 
Cuba is largely compo.sed of American 
capitalists and holds concessions for dredg- 
ing harbors and carrying out other im- 
provements in Cuban ports, in return for 
which it is permitted to collect a surtax on 
the merchandise of incoming vessels. 

The Secretary of Public VVorks will take 



charge of the company's works in all Cu- 
ban ports. The Secretary of Justice will 
reserve the right to prosecute any persons 
guilty of ofifenses in connection with the 
concession granted to the company. Fur- 
ther action against the company awaits the 
convocation of the Supreme Court 

T. L. Huston, an American, says the Nezv 
York Times, is said to have been the chief 
backer of the Ports Improvement Company, 
and that concern, it is said, made a per- 
petual contract with the Dady-Huston Con- 
tracting Company to do all the work re- 
quired under the concession. Michael J. 
Dady, the Brooklyn politician and con- 
tractor, was a partner with Huston in the 
latter corporation. 

It is expected in Washington that the 
British government will make representa- 
tions soon in behalf of British investors 
who are holders of the bonds of the Cuban 
Ports Improvement Co. and who are facing 
great losses as a result of President Meno- 
cal's action. 

Officials of the government in Washing- 
ton were not inclined to discuss the action 
of President Menocal until full details had 
been received, but from what they already 
know they believe that he has taken the 
right course. The concession granted to 
the Ports Improvement Company was put 
through the Cuban Congress under the ad- 
ministration of President Gomez, whom 
Mcnf)cal succeeded. 

It is understood that President Menocal 
is proceeding in an apparently legal manner. 
He contends that the company, which was 
l)romotcd by Americans but in which many 
Cubans particii)ated, was not legally or- 
ganized, as was provided by the law grant- 
ing the concession. Consequently he can- 
cels the concession, but expresses the in- 
tention of his government to proceed ac- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



cording to provisions of law and to give 
the bondholders, some of whom are inno- 
cent, recourse to the courts of Cuba. 

Great profits were expected from the 
concession, which provided for the im- 
provement of various ports by the company 
in return for the revenue derived from port 
dues. One estimate of the profits was that 
$45,000,000 would be cleared in thirty years, 
the life of the concession, with' an actual 
expenditure of about $10,000,000. The latter 
sum was obtained by the flotation of a bond 
issue in London. 

Under the terms of the concession, the 
company is allowed to collect 70 cents for 
every ton of merchandise imported from 
the United States and 88 cents on that 
imported from all other countries. For 
this concession it agrees to carry out im- 
provements in the port of Havana and va- 
rious other ports of the island. These im- 
provements under the terms of the con- 
cession must be completed in six years and 
will cost several millions more than the 
total collected in that time from the tax 
on merchandise. The company figures 
that it will be eighteen years before it will 
begin to pay dividends on its investment. 
It admits that it will probably make $20,- 
000,000 from the concession, but that this 
profit will come eighteen or twenty years 
after the concession has been in force. 



Religious 

Meetings 
Prohibited 



Baptists in Havana have 
been forbidden by the Mayor 
to hold further open air 
evangelistic meetings in the 
streets. These have been 
held in the poorer quarters of the city 
where there was no church or other build- 
ing available. 

Superintendent AlcCall of the Baptist 
Mission in Cuba will appeal to the courts 
believing that the constitution gives_ them 
the right to hold religious services in the 
public thoroughfares. 

This is the first time that any objection 
has been found to such services since the 
times of the Spaniards, says the Post. 
From 1898 religious meetings have been 
held not only on Sunday nights but week 
nights throughout the city and never be- 
fore have the authorities taken action 
against them. 



The Cuban Senate con- 
The Shooting vened in special session on 
of July 25th and agreed to the 

General Riva request of the Supreme 
Court for permission to 
proceed with the trial of Senator Morales 
and Representative Arias, who are ac- 
cused of participating in the murder of 
General Riva, Chief of the National Police, 
who was shot down in the street in Havana. 
The Senate later took up the question 
of amending that part of the constitution 




LiKORio: Esta es la ley: "Todos los cubanos son 

iguales." Abajo la impunidad! El que la hace, 

que la pague. — El Veterano, Habana. 

No immunity for Congressmen. Liborio, as rep- 
resentative of the Cuban people, says: This is the 
law: All Cubans are equal. Down with immunity. 
He who breaks must pay. 



iwhich grants- immunity to congressmen 
guilty of crimes, a question which is arous- 
ing the deepest interest all over the island. 
It is the general opinion that this question 
is far greater importance than the bring- 
ing to trial of General Riva's murderers, 
because it must be settled whether or not 
the life of any one of the two million and 
odd citizens of Cuba should be left at the 
mercy of any of the one hundred and six- 
teen men composing the two houses of the 
national legislature. 

It is plainly stated that with the rights 
of immunity waived a notable proportion 
of the membership would at once become 
liable to arrest and prosecution in many 
instances on grave criminal charges. Out 
of a total of ninety-two representatives 
charges of one kind or another are re- 
ported to be pending against twenty-five. 
The proportion of accused in the Senate is 
not so high. In all these cases the con- 
sent of Congress to permit prosecution has 
been demanded and refused. 

No further action by Congress has yet 
been taken. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEW ADMINISTRATION ACTIVITIES 



PUBLIC WORKS 

A sum of $3,000 will be expended in re- 
pairs of the Gibara hospital, Oriente Prov- 
ince. 

The Secretarj- of Public Works has or- 
dered the continuance of the dredging work 
in the Zanja Canal at Nuevitas. 

Messrs. Fernando Alernelos and Co. of 
Sancti Spiritus have been informed by the 
Secretary of Public Works that their plan 
for an aqueduct at Ciego de Airla, Cama- 
guey Province, is now under examination, 
after which it will be sent to the Governor 
of the province. 



Sr. Antonio Altamira, formerly in the 
Cuban consul's office at New York, has 
been appointed Cuban consul at Newport 
News, Virginia. 

The Cuban government has established a 
quarantine against all ships arriving at Cu- 
ban ports from Uruguay. It is reported 
that the bubonic plague is very prevalent in 
the South American country. 

The immigration authorities recently ar- 
rested 88 Haitians who attempted to land 
in on the south coast of Oriente province 
from a schooner. The Haitians say they 
were sent to Cuba by an employment 
agency to work as dock hands. 



Sr. Jose T. Pimental has been super- 
ceded as_ Chancellor of the Cuban legation 
at Washington by Sr. Jose A. Acosta. 

Henry Jones, N. Partridge and G. D. 
Campbell, have been named honorary con- 
suls for Cuba at Sheffield, Great Britain, 
Fernandina, Fla., and Weymuth, Canada, 
who will serve at the cities named in 
their order. 

The governor of Oriente Province has 
suspended in part the 1913-14 budget of 
San Luis, which had been approved by the 
city council, because of its not complying 
with certain legal requirements. 

The President has created a new depart- 
ment called the "Infantile Hygienic Ser- 
vice." As its name indicates it will en- 
deavor to safeguard Cuba's children from 
unhealthful conditions and will be entirely 
under the jurisdiction of the sanitary de- 
partment. 

L. O. Boorem has been appointed Hon- 
orary Consul for Cuba at Kansas City, Mo. 

General Eugenio Sanchez Agramonte 
has been appointed Chief of the National 
Police. 

The new United States instructors in the 
Cuban army are Major Whittenmeyer and 
Captain Hyde. 




Kl, CUKRO DK Mf.NOCAI, 

L\bori'/- Al(jinia tec habia de lltf/ar el ilia de que se acabara en Cuba la r/iuipcria. 
Hasta el tio, que es hombre serio y formal quiere que sitene el cucro Menocall 

The "Note" hcl'l out by Uncle Sam in tlie above ))ietiire (Irom I.a I'olitica Comica) says in 

tourist Spanish: "Mcnocal. you're all right; crack the whip, I'll back you up." The coils in 

the lash of Mcnocal's whip spell "f.ey," the .Spanish word for Law." 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



GENERAL COMMENT ON CUBAN AFFAIRS 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE AND CUBA 

Writing of the Monroe Doctrine Fred- 
erick Upham Adams in the New York 
American says : 

"The theory that the Monroe Doctrine 
means a perpetual toleration of lawless- 
ness and brigandage nas been discarded 
so far as Cuba is concerned. The United 
States has "interfered" twice m its affairs, 
and there is not an intelligent Cuban who 
does not know that the perpetuation of his 
repubUc depends on the ability of its people 
to maintain and properly administer dem- 
ocratic institutions. The Gomez administra- 
tion is charged with having established 
the high record for graft and duphcity, 
but President Mario G. Menocal is a man 
of character and of marked constructive 
energy, and those who know him best pre- 
dict Vat he will place the Cuban Govern- 
ment on a much firmer foundation. 

Bear in mind, however, that Cuba is the 
sole nation for which the United States 
has intervened to protect it against itself. 
Cuba is no longer one of the "hands-off 
Monoe Doctrine republics. It is impossible 
to cite any rational reason why the United 
States should make an exception of Cuba. 
If it be just and moral and righteous to 
tolerate anarchy in Mexico the same rule 
of conduct should apply to Cuba. The latter 
has never witnessed the butchery of an 
elected executive by army officers who be- 
trayed the man and the government they 
had sworn to defend. 

The jingo press of Cuba and of all Latin 
America is now engaged in reviling and 
sneering at the United States because of 
the failure to apply in Mexico the same 
remedy as in Cuba. The charge is made 
that Uncle Sam is either afraid of Mexico 
or is too stingy to incur the expense of 
enforcing order there. 

Under the circumstances it is impossible 
to credit the Monroe doctrine for the sane 
and sensible policy which we have pursued 
with Cuba. The Cuban doctrine was one 
of action. It was a notice to Cuba and to 
the world that the United States would not 
tolerate anarchy in Cuba. It was a guar- 
antee that Cuba should not become another 
Haiti. It was the application or ^ common 
sense to an intolerable condition." 

El Mundo, an influential daily in Havana, 
has its Httle fling at the United States along 
the lines indicated by Mr. Adams. In a re- 
cent issue it said : "The formidable fleets 
that threaten Constantinople do not deter the 
Balkans any more than the Mexicans are 
deterred by the Yankee battleships in their 
harbors and the Yankee regiments Hned 
up along their frontier, which aim their 



guns but do not shoot. As for ourselves, 
we Cubans fear the Protector only when 
we see him in Camp Columbia. The Pro- 
tector is terrible when we have him among 
us but not when he thunders from Wash- 
ington. Balkanians, Mexicans or Cubans, 
we pay no attention to lectures, notes or 
admonitions, warnings, or chidings." 



THE CUBAN POLICE FORCE 

"Much of the rioting in Cuba which can 
be fanned by a skillful agitator into a form 
of "revolution" could be nipped in the bud 
if the police were not deterred from using 
force through the fear of assassination." 
This is the opinion of Major Frederick 
A. Wells, commanding the First Battalion 
of the Twenty-third Regiment, National 
Guard, of Brooklyn, who has recently re- 
turned from a visit to Havana, where he 
witnessed the funeral of the murdered 
Chief of Police Riva. 

Major Wells said further : "I happened 
to be in Havana the day of the funeral. 
I was told by Cuban friends not to miss 
seeing it as I would see the native tem- 
perament in the raw, 'without clothes on,' 
as one Cuban forcibly expressed it. 

"The Mayor of the city had requested 
that in order to show public appreciation 
of the virtues of the dead police chief, the 
general public should fall in line after the 
passage of the body and make up an im- 
promptu part of the funeral cortege. 

"This feature was the striking part of 
the funeral. When the body had passed 
the people fell in, but not in the way it 
would be done up North. Here the march- 
ers would form a line from curb to curb 
and try to march with at least a semblance 
' of order. But not so in Havana. There 
the people iust tumbled into the street, as 
it were. There were fullblooded negroes, 
young and old, poorly dresssed and in rags ; 
there were white men with frock coats and 
high hats rubbing elbows with men almost 
in tatters, and there were women of all 
ages and colors in the line. All pushed 
and jostled their way along, with no 
thought of order. Now and then would 
occur congestion of the population that 
would threaten to cause a riot. Then the 
police would seek to get some form of 
order, but their efforts were of little avail, 
for they went about it in the gentlest sort 
of way. Where the Brooklyn policeman 
would tap an obstreperous individual on 
the head with his club or jerk another into 
place by his collar, the Havana police 
would say, 'Please stand back,' or 'Don't 
crowd, please.' 

"I was surprised at this conduct and told 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 



a Cuban friend how the police of New 
York would do things. 

" 'Ah, that would never do here,' he re- 
plied with an expressive shrug of his 
shoulders. 'If a policeman should strike 
one of these people, he would be marked 
for assassination, and all the police know 
it, so that is why they are so kind. Up in 
New York I am told you sometimes have 
had what they call the Black Hand assas- 
sinations. Yes? Well, that is what they 
have down here, whenever a man is marked 
for assassination. We must make our po- 
lice correction fit the temperament of the 
people.' 

"The consequence was," Major Wells 
went on, "that the uproar of the struggling 
crowds was deafening sometimes as the 
police sought to keep back the throngs till 
the body had passed. When a policeman 
would gently push back a spectator, the 
latter would set up a roar of anger which 
would be taken up by all those near him." 

"Why, several times it seemed to me 
that the crowd was as near to a riot as 
that," and the Major snapped his fingers. 
"Any such scenes at a funeral in the North 
would be considered a public scandal, but 
down there it is regarded as a natural thing. 

"I understand now how this namby 
pamby attitude of the police breeds in the 
masses a disregard for law and makes them 
the easy prey for disgruntled politicians 
who may desire to start a revolution to 
help their political fortunes. A good firm 
hand on the part else to prevent these 
periodical outbreaks called revolutions." 
— Brooklyn Eagle. 



ISLE OF PINES AND NANTUCKET 

A few days ago a person who has had 
opportunities for quite wide observation 
remarked that he wished the United States 
could acquire the Isle of Pines. Of course, 
that sentiment was badly expressed, because 
the United States could acquire the Isle of 
Pines if it wished to do so. The Isle of 
Pines is a small island on the south coast 
of Cuba, near the east end, off the province 
of Pinar del Rio, and the people of the 
little island, mostly Americans, are very 
anxious that the island should be annexed 
to the United States, and they have been 
agitating the question more vigorously 
than usual, until the Washington authori- 
ties are weary of the thing and the officers 
of the Cuban government are disgusted. 
Commercially speaking, the people of the 
Isle of Pines make out a very good case 
for themselves, also, patriotically speaking, 
because they are Americans, but the fact 
that the Sui)reme Court of the United 
States has decided that the Isle of Pines 
belongs to Cuba prevents it from being ab- 
sorbed by any such thing as "snap" legisla- 
tion. We cannot understand why it re- 



quired a decision of the Supreme Court to 
settle the question as to the sovereignty 
over the Isle of Pines, inasmuch as it is a 
small island close to the Cuban coast. An 
important point is that Cuba does not wish 
to sell the island, and all jingoes should 
understand that even in the jingodom 
there can be no reason for annexing or 
taking the Isle of Pines by any such meth- 
ods as the Panama strip was taken in the 
Roosevelt administration. It would be just 
as logical for England to seriously con- 
sider or discuss the annexation of Nan- 
tucket. — New Egland Grocer and Trades- 
)nan, Boston, Mass. 



THE OWNERSHIP OF THE ISLE OF PINES 

The Americans in the Isle of Pines again 
ask us to negotiate for its acquisition, and 
we don't wonder that they do so. No great 
patriotism can be developed by belonging 
to Cuba. But this request is bitterly re- 
sented in Cuba, and the demand is made 
that the Cuban government should treat the 
petitioners as guilty of treason. We under- 
stand treason to mean the making of war 
against the established government, which 
they have not done. We cannot imagine 
that if people in Maine or Michigan should 
request that those States be annexed to 
Canada any one would call it treason. At 
worst it would be unpatriotic. — Independ- 
ent (N. Y.) 

But an issue was made of the circum- 
stance that a narrow salt water inlet sepa- 
rates the smaller island from the Cuban 
mainland. 

It is neither creditable to us, nor profit- 
able, to have the status of the lovely little 
island remain in doubt. If we have title to 
it, whv not assert it? But we know well 
enough that we have not, and, despite all 
efforts of real estate boomers, speculators 
and exploiters, this government should not 
hesitate to make it clear, once for all, that 
it belongs to Cuhz.—]V ashing ton (D. C.) 
Herald. 



The New York Tribune finds the shoot- 
ing of General Riva akin to the murder of 
Rosenthal in New York City, because in 
each case a gang of gamblers fostered by 
a corrupt political ring resorted to murder 
to prevent interference with their illicit 
pursuits. 

It calls attention also to the fact that a 
charge of "puritanism" will not lie against 
Havana as it does against New York, the 
former city being most tolerant and liberal, 
but it still has no less trouble than New 
York. 



Cuba has made more progress under our 
helpful co-operation in fifteen years, than 
that country made in a cycle of Spanish 
misrule. — Lcwston (Mc.) Journal. 



1^' 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



:(--(q,Uc 



CUBA'S FUTURE HOPEFUL 



In a letter to the Baltimore Sun, Presi- 
dent Menocal renews his earlier promises 
regarding his administration. He favors 
"the promotion of primary schools wher- 
ever the nucleus of population war- 
rants it, and the creation of normal col- 
leges to better prepare our young men 
and women for the noble task of teach- 
ing; the increase of our present means of 
communication, the enlargement of our 
established industries and the encourage- 
ment of new enterprises. He said fur- 
ther : 

We should also cultivate the closest 
commercial relations with the United 
States. Your country is the natural and 
principal market for all our products and 
we should exert ourselves to make per- 
manent the advantages that both countries 
have undoubtedly obtained through the 
present Reciprocity Treaty. 

I am most favorably disposed toward 
immigration. In my opinion, it is es- 
sential to the progress and permanent 
prosperity of our country, especially im- 
migration by families, and I intend to de- 
vote careful attention to this problem. 

The heartiest encouragement and sup- 
port will be given to all foreign capital 
that may desire investment in Cuba and, 



the greater the volume, the warmer the 
greeting, especially when the purpose is 
to increase the manufacturing capacity of 
the country. 

I hope that our promises may be as seri- 
ously taken bv your readers as they are by 
ourselves. All the energies of my Gov- 
ernment will be devoted to one end — -to 
put Cuba in the place that rightfully be- 
longs to it in the concert of nations. 

Construction and building work of all 
kinds is being done, new railroad 
lines laid down and every legitimate en- 
terprise heartily encouraged. The people 
generally are confident and look forward 
to better times. 

The future is hopeful. Chief among 
other things looms the opening of the 
Panama Canal to international commerce, 
for which event some of our bigger cities 
are already making preparations ; Cuba's 
geographical position gives her an unusual 
interest in this, the event of the age, whose 
ultimate effects on her neople and her 
commerce it is impossible now to foretell. 
In the light of what history teaches us, we 
can only prepare for the delicate task of 
guiding our country amonp^ the multitudin- 
ous, and often diametrically opposed, in- 
terests that surround us. 



Government Activities 



President Menocal on July 30th annuLed 
the concession which had been made by 
the Gomez administration to the Nipe Bay 
Company to import 1,000 Haitians in the 
work at its sugar mills. 

The opinion of the cabinet 

Other was that the new workers 

Concessions would prove undesirable and 

Annulled likely to become public 

charges, for what reasons is 

not stated. Spanish labor is favored for 

Cuba and this will be encouraged. 

' 'The other concession killed was one 

granting the right to cut all the wood in 

the keys and islands of Cuba on the north 

coast. 



'"' -. The Secretary of Agricul- 

■ ;^' Must ture has sent a letter to all 

^:'Use Real the Mayors in Cuba asking 
Money if the law of June 23, 1909, 
is being obeyed in their lo- 
cality and ordering a full report of all in- 
fractions. 

The ^aw mentioned prohibits the payment 
to. laborers of salaries or other obligations 
■iti chips or counters either of metal or 
paper instead of the real coin. 



MINOR GOVERNMENT NOTES 

Target practice with revolvers is urged 
for Havana's police on the ground that they 
were not sufficiently acquainted with their 
weapons to use them effectively. 

The government officials look upon the 
suggestion with favor and a shooting gal- 
lery will soon be established. 



The government is having trouble col- 
lecting the taxes and rents of the occupants 
of the workingmen's homes built about a 
year ago near Havana for the laboring 
classes. These homes: were given the ij|en 
for a small price and payr)i,ent by inS|t;al- 
ments was also permitted. An official col- 
lector has been apppin,ted to locjik ,aftei; the 
dflir^querits. . ','^, "Vji;, ',...,,,,,. ... 

President Menocal at the requets of the 
Secretary of the Interior has signed a de- 
cree prohibiting the use by persons outside 
of the army and the police forces of- the 
island of the .45 caliber Colt revolvers. A 
fine and the loss of the gun will follow 
violations of the decree. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



13 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INTERESTING NEWS NOTES REGARDING VARIOUS MATTERS PERTAINING 

TO THE ISLAND 



Kubelik and Melba are to be heard in 
Havana next winter, and will be the 
first time that the famous Bohemian vio- 
linist will be heard in Havana. Mme. 
Melba has already graced the stage of the 
Payret in the same citv. 

Long distance telephone communication 
has been established laetween Santiago and 
San Luis, and from the former city to 
Camaquey and Santa Clara. 

Eugenio Rejneri, the contractor for the 
new presidential palace in Havana, has 
promised the president it will be ready for 
occupancy December 1, 1914. 




The first woman lawyer in Cuba. 
Sencrita Eiperanza cle Quesada Villalon, doctor 
en derecho que ejerce en Santiago de Cuba; pri- 
mera "doctora" salida de nucstras universidades. 

The negro rebels accused of being in the 
Estenoz revolt will presently be tried in 
Santiago. Miss Villalon as States attorney 
will defend many of them. 

A new theatre is about ready at Santo 
Domingo, Santa Clara Province. The so- 
ciety "HI Liceo" is the owner. 

On July .'',1st the insane asylum at Ma- 
zorra, Havana Province, contained 2,462 in- 
mates. During the month there were 148 
new unfortunates admitted. The asylum 
at Mazorra is the only one in C'uba. 



THE SANTIAGO EXPOSITION 

The executive committee to prepare the 
budget and regiilations and to consider 
plans for a national exposition in 1915 
at Santiago de Cuba was named a few 
weeks ago. The gentlemen composing this 
commission which will begin active work 
immediately are as follows : 

Governor Rodriguez Fuentes, Mr. Ger- 
man Michaelson, President of the Chamber 
of Commerce, Mr. Emilio Bacardi repre- 
senting the industrial element in the city, 
Mr. Oswaldo Morales representing the 
sugar planters, Mr. Juan Real of the Pub- 
lic Works Department and Mr. Charles 
Sequera, Municipal Architect. 



MORE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANTS 

Messrs. Andres Delgado and Carlos Mi- 
yares have been granted authorization by 
the government to install electric light 
plants for Hght and power at Perico and 
Xueva Paz, with privilege to extend the 
service later to the adjoining towns of Pa- 
los and Vegas, all in Havana Province. 

A Celorio Alfonso has been granted per- 
mission to establish electric plants in the 
towns of Cabaignan and Guayos, Santa 
Clara province. 

^lessers. Everardo Ortiz, Dorando Vas- 
uez and Julian G. Gova have been author- 
ized to establish plants in Palacios, Pinar 
del Rio province, Cifuentes, Santa Clara 
province and Cumanayagua, also in Santa 
Clara province. 

E. P. Mahoney has been granted per- 
mission which he solicited several days ago, 
to install an electric plant at Nuevitas, 
Camaquey province, Cuba. 

Sotero Gonzalez has been granted per- 
mission to install an electric plant in Pal- 
mira, Santa Clara Province. 

M. Malbis will establish another at 
Abreus. same province. 

E. G. Winters anl Miguel Font will 
establish a plant at Moron, Camaguey 
Province. 



Miners in the mines at Daiquiri, Oriente 
Province, demand higher wages. Troops 
have been ordered to the scene to prevent 
trouble if the strikers interfere with the 
strike breakers. 

French possessions in the West Indies 
are so far south of the regular Panama 
route, that a commercial base there is not 
worth while, for shippers will rather coal 
in Cuba. — Nezv York Herald. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN RAILROAD MATTERS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD, THE HAVANA ELECTRIC, ETC. 
The Cuba Railroad Company's Earnings. 



The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of June and for the fiscal year ended 
June 30th compares as follows : 

1913 1913 1911 

June gross $399,100 $318,818 $262,954 

Expenses 179,772 187,149 141,213 

June net $219,327 $131,669 $121,740 

Charges 66,791 67,624 57,579 

June surplus $152,535 $64,044 $64,160 

Twelve months' gross. $4,632,039 $3,819,253 $3,059,649 

Net profits 2,215,502 l,818y»57 1,347,071 

Fixed charges 801,222 758,998 576,754 

Twelve months' surplus $1,414,279 $1,059,861 $797,316 



1910 
$226,198 
115,614 

$110,584 
36,667 

$73,917 

$2,559,336 

1,107,299 

435,210 



$672,089 



1909 

$196,704 
105,057 

$91,647 
34,774 

$56,873 

$2,157,165 

950,088 

399,290 

$550,799 



Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

July 6th $56,480 

Tuly 13th 54,931 

July 20th 54,710 

July 27th 53,809 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


$51,659 


$47,534 


$44,813 


$42,045 


48,533 


47,201 


43,642 


36,839 


49,422 


45,510 


43,118 


39,726 


49,908 


43,989 


44,540 


39,825 



Earnings of the United Railways of Havana 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

June 29th £20,035 

July 5th 19,741 

July 12th 19,703 

July 19th 19,343 

July 26th 20,528 

TRACK OBSTRUCTIONS 

Some curious statistics just issued by the 
Cuban Railroad commission and sent by 
the secretary of government to all the pro- 
vincial governors, chronicles the casualties 
caused during the last ten years by careless 
owners permitting the straying of their 
cattle on the railroad tracks of the various 
lines in the island. 

During this period 4,945 animals were 
killed, of which 3,856 were cows, the bal- 
ance consisting of horses and swine. 

According to Secretary of Public Works 
Jose R. Villalon, a call has been made on 
the representatives of all the railroad com- 
panies operating in the country for a meet- 
ing on October 1st to treat on the revision 
of the railroad freight rates. The revision 
it is thought will take six or seven months 
time to work into shape. 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


il7,374 


£15,577 


£16,370 


£14,422 


18,273 


17,088 


17,022 


14,585 


19,588 


16,919 


16,324 


14,365 


19,293 


16,321 


16,349 


13,971 


19,431 


14,597 


15,652 


13,915 



CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS, LTD. 

Weekly receipts : 

July 5th £6,803 Increase... £734 

July 12th 6,386 Increase . . . 338 

July 19th 6,702 Increase . . . 444 

July 26th 6,913 Increase ... 493 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA, LTD. 

Weekly receipts : 

July 5th £5,792 Increase... £771 

July 12th 5,709 Increase... 45 

July 19th 6,491 Increase... 879 

July 26th 6,113 Increase... 250 



Harry Usher, manager of the Cuban 
Central Railways, has been made manager 
of the Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway, 
in South America. 



THE CUBA REVIE W 



15 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



NATIONAL BANK REPORT 

The annual report of the Banco Xacional 
de Cuba (Xational Bank of Cuba) for the 
year ending June 30, 1913, is as follows. 
The values are in United States currency. 



Cash $6,337,525.23 

Due from Banks 

and Bankers.. 3,971,092.24 
Remittances in 

Transit 1,764,560.17 



$12,073,177.64 



Bonds and Stocks — 

Gov't Bonds. .$2,627,278.03 
City of Ha- 
vana Bonds. 747,269.42 
Other Bonds. 615,059.31 
Stocks 97,966.84 



4,087,573.60 



Loans, Disc'ts, Time Bills, etc. 18,461,975.29 

Bank Buildings 1,170,621.86 

Furniture and Fixtures 89,183.57 

Sundry Accounts 198,949.19 

Securities on Deposit 3,292,147.33 



Total $39,373,628.48 



LIABILITIES 



Capital $5,000,000.00 

Surplus 1,200,000.00 

*Undiv. Profits. 336,530.60 $6,5.30,530.60 



Deposits 2.-3,433,933.79 

Due to Banks and Bankers... 4,111,016.76 
Deposits (Securities ) 3,292,147.33 



Total $39,373,628.43 

♦Deduct $200,000.00 four per cent semi- 
annual dividend, payable July 1, 1913. 



CUBA S FIVE PER CENT BONDS 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent gold bonds 
of 1904, aggregating $1,020,000, recently 
drawn for redemption on September 1, 
1913, will be paid at the office of Speyer & 
Co. in New York on and after that date. 
This is the third annual drawing of bonds 
of this issue and makes a total of $3,060,000 
called for redemption of an original issue 
of $35,000,000. 

At the offices of J. P. Morgan & Co. the 
Havana report that the firm had pur- 
chased an additional $1,000,000 of Cuban 
six per cent notes was corroborated. These 
notes were issued, according to Havana, 
pending completion of negotiations for a 
long term loan of $15,000,000 or $20,000,000. 
Of that Messrs. Morgan & Co. know noth- 
ing. Some time ago the house purchased 
$1,500,000 of six per cent notes from the 
Cuban government, having an average ma- 
turity of about eighteen months. 

On July 23rd the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury of the Cuban government stated to Mr. 
Frank Stemhardt, who is the representa- 
tive in Cuba of Speyer & Company, that 
reports published that J. P. Morgan & Co. 
were to take care of the Cuban finances 
and were to float a $15,000,000 loan, were 
without foundation. 



According to a recent statement of Presi- 
dent Menocal if the finances of Cuba make 
another loan necessary it will not be sought 
abroad until local capitalists have had an 
opportunity to subscribe to it. 

The president also declared that he was 
opposed to increasing the standing debt of 
the country to any larger figures than it 
is at the present time. He said that he be- 
lieved that Cuba could get along, paying her 
debts and meeting the running expenses. 



July Prices for Cuban Securities 

CJuoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., New York) 



Bid Asked 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent Bonds (Interior) 95 96^/4 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent I>onds ( Exterior) 99% 100% 

Havana City First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 103 108 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 101 106 

Cuba R. R. First Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 98 100 

Cuba R. R. Preferred Stock 98 100 

Cuba Co. 6 per cent Debentures 95 100 

Havana Electric Ry. Consol. Mtge. 5 per cent Bonds 94 95 

Havana Electric Ry., Liglit & Power Co. Preferred Stock 90 94 

Havana Electric Ry., Light & Power Co. Common Stock 80 84 

Matanzas Market Place 8 per cent Bond Participation Certificates 100 104 

Cuban American S. Co. CrAl Trust per cent Gold Bonds of 1918 94 95 

Santiago Electric Light & Traction (Jo. First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 98 Vi 98 M> 
All prices of bondi quoted on an "and interest" basis 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



LONDON OPINION ON CUBAN INVESTMENTS 



CUBA COMPANY SHARES PROVE ATTRACTIVE INVESTMENT PROSPECTS 

OF CUBAN RAILWAYS 

THE CUBA company's NEW ISSUE 

[From the Investors' Review, London] 
An issue of $2,500,000 7 per cent, cumu- 
lative preferred stock in $100 shares has 
just been made by this company, of which 
5,468 shares were subscribed in New York 
and 19,532 were offered for sale here by 
Messrs. Robert Fleming & Co. at 104 per 
cent New York terms, or £21 7s. 6d. per 
share. According to the information su- 
plied by the president the company owns 
the whole of the common stock of the 
Cuba Railroad, about 300,000 acres of se- 
lected lands in Cuba, with sugar mills and 
plantations in the provinces of Camaguey 
and Oriente, and various town sites on 
the line of the railroad. The total author- 
ized amount of the preferred stock $8,- 

000,000, of which $4,000,000 is set aside 

for the redemption of 6 per cent, deben- 
tures, and $1,500,000 is held in reserve. Of 

the present issue $1,200,000 is to provide 

for the repayment of notes issued for the 

Jobabo mill, $700,000 for doubling that 

mill, and the balance for working capital. 

Surplus earnings of the Cuba Railroad 

have increased from $322,089 for the year 

ended June 30, 1910, to $509,862 for 1911- 

12, and in ivxay last it paid its first divi- 
dend on the common stock of 4 per cent, 

while for the year just ended the surplus 

is estimated at $750,000. The Cuba Co.'s 

own record is more erratic, a deficit of 

$24,721 in 1910-11 having been followed by 

a profit of $395,463 the following year, 

and one of 4J245,00O for the past 12 months. 

Apart from the common stock of the Rail- 
road Co., the value of the properties 

owned is estimated to be fully equal to 

the issued debentures and capital stock, 

amounting to $14,500,000, and the present 

issue therefore should be amply covered. 

It is redeemable as a whole after three 

years from date of latest issue at 115 

per cent and accrued interest at the com- 
pany's option on six months' notice. 



CUBA COMPANY SHARES ATTRACTIVE 

Regarding the new issue of the Cuba 
Company, London Opinion has the follow- 
ing to say : 

"The flood of new issues has ceased, but 
among the few which are appearing are one 
or two attractive ones. The 7 per cent 
Cumulative Preference Shares of the Cuba 
Company, list for which opened and closed 
yesterday, are rather attractive as the earn- 
ings of the Company, after payment of all 
prior charges, amount at present to about 



,000, whereas the amount required for 
the dividend on the preference shares now 
issued is only $175,000. The Cuba Company 
has a large and varied stake in that most 
prosperous island, for it possesses the en- 
tire Common Stock of the Cuba Railroad 
Company, about 300,000 acres of selected 
lands, numerous valuable town sites includ- 
ing the City of Antilla, and extensive sugar 
mills and plantations. At the issue price of 
104 per cent these shares yield about 6% 
per cent." 

CUBAN RAILWAY PROSPECTS 

[From the London Outlook] 

Several weeks must elapse before the di- 
rectors of the United of Havana and the 
Cuban Central, the two railways operating 
in Cuba in which the British investor is 
most interested, publish the results for the 
financial year which ended on the 30th of 
last month. But the market is already talk- 
ing about the dividends, and we propose to 
note carefully the dividend outlook. It 
may be said at once that the market es- 
timates that there will be an increase from 
4% to 5 per cent in the United of Havana 
dividend and an increase from 2 to 3 per- 
cent in that of the Cuban Central. 

Now as to the position. Let us take the 
United of Havana first. The company dur- 
ing the past year benefited largely from a 
record sugar crop, and through its sub- 
sidiary, the v/estern of Havana, from a fine 
tobacco crop. The latter part of the sys- 
tem has, of course, another wonderful crop 
now being carried. But as regards the last 
financial year, it was the splendid sugar 
season that was mainly responsible for its 
gross increase for the year of £306,000, 
though the general traffic is steadilv in- 
creasing. If the ratio of expenses to re- 
ceipts is much the same as last year the 
company should save from £90,000 to 
£100,000 in "net," and as 1 per cent, for 
the year on United of Havana ordinary 
represents rather less than £60,000, it is 
evident that fully 6 per cent, could be paid 
if the directors wished, and probably in 
the iDad old days of high dividends and 
improvident finance it would have been 
paid. But times have changed and the 
company is now very conservatively and 
prudently managed. Last year large sums 
were put into the road and no less than 
£125,000 was placed to reserves and re- 
newals. There seems to be little doubt 
that even larger special appropriations will 
be made this year, and shareholders may 
take it for granted that if the dividend is 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 



raised to 5 per cent the directors have 
every intention of at least maintaining it. 
And the only possible way to ensure this is 
by building up large reserves in good 
times, for nobody can say when a bad 
sugar crop may come again, and the 
United of Havana is still a "sugar" sys- 
tem. 

Now as to the Cuban Central. The 
gross increase published for the past year 
was £113,000, and with the ratio on the 
same basis as that for 1911-12 the net 
increase should be not far short of £50,000. 
One per cent on Cuban Central ordinary 
shares represents only £:,:00, so that here 
again the market evidently expects _ the 
bulk of the net increase to be specially 
appropriated. And the market is probably 
right, for the company is now, like its 
powerful and friendly neighbor, very pru- 
dently managed. The Cuban Central, even 
more than the United, is dependent on 
sugar for its revenue. Moreover, it is 
engaged in an important extention pro- 
gram, while there is just the possibility 
of competition in the future. Big reserves 
are therefore a necessity. It must not 
be forgotten, too, that it will have in- 
creased capital charges to meet this time. 

As regards the current year we hear 
that everything is going well. It is, of 
course, the slack season for the railways, 
but the rains have been abundant and 
the growing cane looks in splendid condi- 
tion, while the area under sugar has in- 
creased. 



THE PORTS COMPANY SHARES 

[From the Loudon Standard of July 29th] 

The $100 shares of the Cuban Ports 
Company have fallen to under 30, the ac- 
tual quotation being apparently about 27 
(the price is a wide one), as against 33 last 
week, while the Five Per Cent First Mort- 
gage 25-Year Gold bonds have dropped 1 
point, to 97. These movements, coming on 
top of the circular issued in the middle of 
this month denying the rumors previously 
current to the effect that the company's 
concessions might be interfered with by 
the government, have tended to revive un- 
easiness in London. Inquiries made in re- 
sponsible quarters elicited the information 
that no adverse news has been received tn 
account for the recent decline in the two 
capital issues, nor, so far as can ])e 
gathered, is there any reason to anticipate 
that fresh developments have taken i)lace. 
The market for both the bonds and the 
shares is a very narrow one, and compara- 
tively trifling transactions arc sufficient to 
bring about a rise or fall in prices. A first 
dividend of 1 per cent was declared on the 
$10,000,000 of (-ommon shares in .April last, 
and in si')me quarters it has been expected 
that a furthfT similar distrilmtion wouhl 



be announced at the end of July, but there 
is no indication at present of the directors' 
intentions in this connection, and the un- 
certainty arising out of this matter may 
possibly have led to realisations by share- 
holders. The port dues for the first half 
of 1913 amounted to $1,715,800, an in- 
crease of $76,800. 



A CUBAN CENTRAL EXTENSION 

[From the Investors' Chronicle, London] 

An interestino- new company registration 
is to be noted. The Cuban Central North- 
ern Extension Railway with capital £500,- 
000 in £10 shares, is an important develop- 
ment from the view-point of Cuban Central 
shareholders. A few months ago much was 
made of the fact that an American syn- 
dicate had obtained a concession for a rail- 
way connecting Nuevitas with Caibarien, 
which would have been partly competitive 
with Cuban Central. A protest, backed by 
Sir E. Grey, was made by the latter to the 
American authorities, and the project has 
now, apparently, fallen through. The Cu- 
ban Central's new subsidiary will acquire 
the section already built to Dolores, and 
the benefit of the work already done on 
the new section between Dolores and Ya- 
guajay, and will complete the work. Cu- 
ban Centrals, with a possible competitor 
converted into a friendly feeder, are now, 
at 4Vj, an attractive speculative purchase. 
They compare with 5^4 earlier this year, 
and although yielding only 4% per cent on 
the basis of last year's dividend, an in- 
creased distribution is in prospect, probably 
3 per cent, against 2 per cent. About 6 
percent is being earned. 



REPUBLIC OF CUBA S FIVE PER CENT 
GOLD BONDS REDEEMED 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent gold bonds 
of 1904, to the amount of $1,020,000, drawn 
for redemption on September 1, 1913, will 
be paid on and after that date at the office 
of Speyer & Co., New York. This is the 
third annual drawing of bonds of this 
issue and makes a total of $3,0()0,000 called 
for redemption to date out of an original 
issue of $35,000,000. 

The following bonds previously drawn 
for redemption have not yet been presented 
for payment : Series "A" for $1,000 each, 
drawn per September 1, 1912: 5.323, 5326, 
9733, 10893, 12,347, 20637, 21312, 23345, 26189, 
27524, 30910, 30915, .30936, 5324, 5327, 97.34, 
11364, 13351, 20679, 21814, 24165, 26190, 
:!0790, 30911, .30919, 30939, 5325, 9689, 10199. 
Interest on these bonds ceased September 
1, 1912. 

Series "F>" for $500 each, drawn per 
.Scptcmlx-r 1, 1911. Interest on this Iiond 
ceased September 1, 1911. 



THECUBAREVIEW 19 



NIPE BAY COMPANY ANNUAL REPORT 



HEA\Y OUTPUT OF SUGAR, BUT LOW PRICES FURNISH SMALL PROFIT 

INCOME ACCOUNT 

On July 31st the board of directors of the Xipe Bay Company submitted the following 
report of the company's business for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913. 

Total net earnings for the year after deducting $89,916,1!) expended for betterments 

and charged against operating expenses, were $374,017.13 

Interest on mortgage notes $191,412.00 

Interest on debentures 212,426.07 

Interest and discount 16,199.5.5 420,038.22 

Deficit $46,021.09 

Surplus brought forward from the close of the previous year 192,790.27 

Surplus $146,769.18 

Two dividends of 1 per cent each on preferred stock 40,000.00 

Balance, surplus $106,769.18 

The production of sugar by the company's mill at Preston was 118,330,812 pounds and of 
molasses 2,847,021 gallons, comparing with 81,386,568 pounds of sugar and 1,408,932 gal- 
lons of molasses in the period covered by the last previous report. Final figures for the 
current crop season could not be stated, as grinding operations were still in progress. On 
June 30th the balance of uncut cane available for the current crop was 4,749 acres, or 
twenty per cent of the total mature cane. 

Operating conditions were generally favoral)le, and the crop season will show a heavy 
output of sugar from the mill. On the other hand, the selling price of sugar has l)een 
exceptionallv low, so that prices realized have furnished a very small margin of profit. 

The properties are maintained in excellent physical condition. New cane fields have 
been planted to the extent of 884 acres. In connection with these new fields an irrigation 
svstem has been constructed for the purpose of testing out the beneficial results to be 
derived from producing cane with the aid of irrigation. It is anticipated that this system 
will insure the company against irregularity in tonnage due to drought and give a 
regular annual yield of cane in excess of that produced on plantations conducted by the 
ordinary methods of cultivation. The company has also improved its older cane fields 
by the re-planting of 500 acres. Six miles of railway were constructed, and otiier better- 
ment work carried on. 

The company has redeemed and canceled within the year $140,500 of its five-year 
6 per cent notes, leaving a I)alance outstanding of $3,060,500, and has also redeemed and 
canceled $200,000 of its (> per cent debentures, leaving an outstanding balance of 
$3,366,000. 

A statement of cultivated and uncultivated lands on June iiOth, as compared with 1912 
is also given in the report and is as follows : 

Acreage 

Cultivated lands: 19i:5 ''-'l^ 

Sugar cane *24,942 24,673 

Pasture ^2,287 12,559 

Total 37,229 37,232 

Other improved lands 4,381 4,381 

Unimproved lands SS.l^^ 86.179 

J,,i;i\ 90,560 90,560 

Total lands owned 127.789 127,792 

The live stock owned by the conii)any totalled 3, .-.79 head as oimparcd with l,():,2 in 1912. 
The plantation railroad cfiuipment compares as follows: 

' 19i:i 1912 

Miles of road, guage 4 feet H '/j inches T3.9(i (•)7,c,l 

Baldwin Locomotives of 43 tons each I ' '■' 

Number of cars ■^«' ^^S 

•Of these cultivated lands 1,151 acres are now under irrigation. 



20 THECUBAREVIEW 



LARGE INCREASE IN CUBA'S FOREIGN TRADE 



According to official statistics, the combined import and export trade of Cuba for 1912 
reached the total value of $298,880,569, or an increase of $62,477,193 over 1911. Of the 
total, $172,978,328 represented exports and $125,902,241 imports. Had it not been for the 
racial disturbances and the general elections, trade would have shown a still larger gain. 

The comparison of the business year 1912 with that of 1911 

„ , ^ . reflects primarily the great gain made by the sugar value ac- 

1 rade Lomparisons cruing from the largest output on record to that time. This 

gain over 1911 from sugar and its products was $44,526,914, 

thus accounting for all of the 1912 increase except $5,315,035, of which tobacco and its 

products made up $3,478,953, and minerals, principally iron ore, $881,620, leaving nearly 

$1,000,000 to be distributed among the other exports which ordinarily have a small place 

in the export trade. 

The following table shows the principal exports during 1912 and countries of desti- 
nation : 

Articles Total, 1912 U. S. Germany Spain France Unit. King. 

Animals, and products of : 

Animals $11,441 $10,331 $30 $250 

Hides and skins 1,938,217 637,327 1,128,493 $116,448 $32,000 

Other animal products.. 108,280 52,693 50,022 700 1,565 

Sugar and its products : 

Sugar, crude & refined.. 121,467,749 113,597,673 55 247 1,239,160 6,085,713 

Molasses 1,886,289 1,016,192 740 6 732,486 

Confectionery, etc 58,883 25,849 369 2,615 2,607 574 

Fruits, grains & vegetables : 

Fruits 2,184,420 2,178,700 210 997 1,236 



Grains and vegetables.. 609,033 529,417 1,088 3,619 68,080 2,610 
Marine products : 

Tortoise shell, etc 45,741 5,630 10,465 27,021 

Sponges 303,964 126,740 4,483 7,486 108,934 50,123 

Mineral products : 

Asphalt 86,303 86,303 

Iron, gold, copper ore.. 4,456,539 4,456,539 

Old metals 14,648 4,645 6,203 1,300 

Forest products : 

Vegetable fibers 135,364 84,054 38,482 112 1,870 

Timber 2,176,881 1,225,888 269,026 28,864 282,533 278,436 

Tobacco products : 

Tobacco leaf 21,690,181 16,242,072 3,146,877 240,733 80,405 41,89S 

Cigars, cigarettes 13,537,790 3,987,180 1,149,678 341,647 626,114 4,071,307 

Miscellaneous : 

Bee products 848,470 215,910 346,577 3,047 5,762 

Distilled products 524,906 26,681 8,781 7,752 210 136,380 

All other articles 341,600 215,259 30,449 12,895 7,289 865 

Total 172,426,699 144,725,083 6,192,028 649,227 2,566,519 11,438,154 

Reexports 550,739 460,850 7,144 9,096 8,216 8,182 

Money 890 890 

Grand total 172,978,328 145,185,933 6,199,172 659,213 2,574,735 11,446,336 

The exports to countries not given in the foregoing table were valued at $6,912,939, of 
which $5,300,060 represented tobacco and its products. 

Distribution of the J^e distribution of the exports to the United States and 

r- , other countries m 1911 and 1912 is given in the following 

Exports fnhip- 

^^°^^ • To United States To other countries 

1911 1912 1911 1912 

Products Percent Percent Percent Percent 

Animals and products 25.55 34.00 74.45 66.00 

Sugar and products 99.02 92.70 .98 7.30 

Fruits and vegetables 92.27 90.00 7.73 10.00 

Marine products 32.89 37.14 67.11 62.86 

Mineral products 99.94 99.80 .06 .20 

Forest products 54.29 56.51 45.71 43.49 

Tobacco products 63.71 57.14 36.29 42.86 

Miscellaneous 22.03 26.47 77.97 73.53. 



THECUBAREVIEW 21 

The predominance of sugar and tobacco in the export trade of Cuba is shown by the 
following table, giving the percentages of the exports for two years : 

Products I'JU 1912 Products 1911 1912 

Percent Percent Percent Percent 

Animals, and products of. 1.56 1.19 Mineral products 3.01 2.64 

Sugar and products 64.00 71.58 Forest products 1.74 1.34 

Fruits and vegetables.... 2.14 1.62 Tobacco products 25.95 20.43 

Marine products 25 .20 Miscellaneous 1.35 1.00 

Note. — Re-exportes and money are not included in the percentages. 

The increase in imports was the direct result of the prosper- 

Increased Purchases of ^"^ year, and, as is always the case in Cuba under such con- 

^ I ditions, represented an increased purchasing power for all 

the people. It is to be doubted if there is any other country 

in the world, whose import and export values run into large 

amounts, which can show such uniform sympathy with business conditions and which 

can display as little variance in the results applying to the subsidiary endeavors. 

Of the total increase of $12,635,244 in the imports during 1912, compared with 1911, 
$2,302,635 is credited to textiles, which means clothing and luxuries allied with domestic 
necessities, and $.j,345,673 to foodstuffs. The importation of $2,489,073 more in money 
helped swell the total gain, but there was also a gain in every classification except one — 
metals — where iron and steel fell off about $800,000 in value, and other metal imports 
gained, making the net loss $45i;375. The following table shows tie import trade, ac- 
cording to the classification established, as distributed to the United States and the other 
important supplying countries : 

Articles Total, 1912 U. S. Germany Spain France Unit. King. 

Stone, earth and ceramics : 

Earth and stone $1,436,692 $1,102,232 $38,351 $16,860 $75,079 $42,598 

Bitumens 1,197,181 1,187,776 883 4,706 3,410 

Glass and crystal 1,585,476 360,577 600,913 116,241 148,659 84,450 

Pottery, porcelain 909,752 269,864 137,805 132,274 114,914 147,519 

Metals, & manufactures of : 
Gold, silver, platinum... 377,015 87,779 85,005 6,788 49,035 15,944 

Iron and steel 6,564,400 5,012,297 383,566 47,107 168,448 741,061 

Copper 1,042,890 777,309 107,942 1,344 34,716 111,402 

Other metals 329,409 138,314 53,653 21,332 17,670 59,308 

Chemicals, drugs, etc. : 

Drugs 593,409 266,153 127,961 73,023 7,289 38,117 

Colors, dyes, etc 750,994 448,406 29,414 10,878 24,805 215,843 

Chemical products 4,032,255 2,611,431 103,257 59,297 755,140 374,011 

Oils, fats, greases 2,315,523 1,058,789 61,875 293,920 659,939 178,676 

Textiles, & manufactures of : 

Cotton, and man'frs of. 12,711,705 2,709,794 752,651 1,659,602 1,488,189 5,211,602 

Vegetable fibers 3,863,599 529,773 117,546 261,117 257,236 1,367,890 

Wool, bristles, hair 1,190,026 176,963 67,408 84,445 364,662 450,158 

Silk, & manufactures of 500,296 222,645 23,237 9,958 117,564 34,330 

Paper and paper goods : 

Paper and cardboard... 1,644,201 764,613 326,172 257,188 162,740 31,889 
Book and printed matter 439,547 190,539 50,591 79,136 33,310 14,185 

Wood, & manufactures of: 

Wood, and man'frs of.. 3,269,927 2,429,643 158,218 281,100 135,478 112,351 
Other vegetable matter. 269,635 7i2,099 17,494 18,591 21,936 97,539 

Animals, and products of : 

Animals 451,333 441,311 229 1,961 3,876 1,274 

Hides and skins 676,133 566,002 10,287 79,556 15,853 4,355 

" Manufactured animal 

products 5,019,259 3,708,344 47,656 1,133,519 59,926 34,204 

Machinery, instruments, etc. : 

Instruments 303,260 129,362 89,159 18,856 50,515 1,519 

Machinery 10,051,884 6,766,968 794,931 13,579 246,319 1,064,726 

Apparatus 3,037,479 2,425,972 90,222 55,799 248,947 130,891 

Foodstuffs : 

Meats 12,111,377 8,159,243 11,175 173,785 21,890 27,678 

Fish 1,647,660 111,299 8,»75 358,504 15,241 452,251 

Cereals 15,559,240 7,428,040 3,168,384 102,088 15,018 2,297,090 

Fruits 699,785 362,1 15 194 291,212 14,795 8,823 

Vegetables, etc 4.987,694 2,011,025 414,289 666,535 164,972 92,278 

Oils and beverages 3,599,820 376,493 55,894, 2,498,710 310,589 283,031 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Milk products 2,852,031 918,050 15,313 40,407 13,666 1,140,608 

Other foodstuffs 5,457,039 1,82-8,102 8,932 189,606 29,938 44,453 

All other articles 3,007,788 1,544,580 410,068 148,789 272,735 150,470 

Total 114,485,714 57,193,901 8,369,549 9,203,107 6,125,795 15,065,934 

Articles free of dutv 8,716,231 7,437,961 61,652 106,870 127,439 331,715 

Money ' 2,700,296 784,613 462,813 1,452,830 

Grand total 125,902,24165,416,475 8,431,201' 9,774,790 7,706,064 15,397,649 

The imports from countries not given in the foregoing table were valued at $19,176,062, 
of which $12,784,057 represented foodstuffs. Of this amount $9,477,135 came from 
countries of the Americas other than the United States, $1,533,007 from European coun- 
tries other than those given, and $1,773,915 from other countries. 

The following table shows the percentages of the distribu- 

/); tribution of the '•^°" °^ ^^^ imports into Cuba from the United States and 

^ , other countries during 1911 and 1912. American textile goods 

imports again show an increase in the imports, a trade in which the 

American manufacturer is slowly acquiring a footing: 

From U. S. From other countries 

1911 1912 1911 1912 

Products Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent 

Stone, earth and ceramics 54.93 57.00 45.07 43.00 

Metals, and manufactures of 69.56 72.30 30.44 27.70 

Chemicals and drugs 57.14 57.14 42.86 42.86 

Textiles, and manufactures of 18.75 30.00 81.25 80.00 

Paper and paper goods 44.56 45.24 55.44 54.76 

Wood, and manufactures of 71.38 71.43 28.62 28.57 

Animals and animal products 76.46 77.00 23.54 23.00 

Machinery, instruments, etc 73.64 70.00 26.36 30.00 

Foodstuffs 43.90 44.70 56.10 55.30 

Miscellaneous 53.33 50.00 46.67 50.00 

Articles free of duty 86.28 85.00 13.72 15.00 

To show the character of the Cuban import trade more clearly, and especially to point 
out the remarkable share foodstuffs represent of the total, the following table gives the 
percentages of the various import classifications to the whole value : 

1911 1912 

Articles Per cent Per cent 

Stone, earth and ceramics 3.95 4.09 

Metals, and manufactures of 7.75 6.60 

Chemicals and drugs 6.10 6.15 

Textiles, and manufactures of 14.15 14.50 

Paper and paper goods 1.70 1.75 

Wood, and manufactures of 2.75 2.81 

Animals and products 5.15 4.95 

Machinery, etc 11.41 10.72 

Foodstuffs 36,78 37.23 

Miscellaneous 2.66 2.40 

Articles free of duty 7.60 8.80 

T J 4 T A' Th.t position of the United States and other countries with 

1 rade oj L,eaaing regard to their trade with Cuba may be seen from the follow- 
Nations ing table of percentages for three years : 

Imports from — Exports to — 

Countries 1910 1911 1912 1910 1911 1912 

United States 50.58 53.10 51.90 85.95 86.77 83.94 

Germany 6.06 6.40 6.60 2.40 2.96 3.59 

Spain .' 8.05 8.10 7.76 .43 .37 .37' 

France 9.06 5.50 6.12 1.02 1.05 1.49 

United Kingdom 11.40 12.12 13.00 7.05 4.65 6.63 

Other countries 14.85 14.78 14.62 3.15 4.20 3.98 

Owing to the abnormally low price of sugar and other 

T T A ' IQ}^ conditions it is certain that the present year will not show 

Less I rade in /y/J ^^^^^^ results as 1912. The sugar crop will be nearly 400,000 

tons greater in volume, but its value, unless there is a great 

increase in price in the last six months of 1913, will not be as large by perhaps $20,000,000 

as for 1912. The importation values will not suffer as much, because on the strength of 

last year's results large purchases of machinery and supplies of all kinds were made. 

The imports for the first six months of 1913, as indicated by the customs statistics, have 

been large, but the purchases for the last half of the year will fall below. 




Bji 






24 



IHE CUBA REVIEW 



THE CUBAN TOBACCO INDUSTRY 



TOBACCO IMPORTS INTO CUBA 

An erroneous idea held by many tobac- 
conists, in addition to members of the 
general public, says the Tobacco Trades 
Review of London, is that tobacco of an 
inferior grade is often imported into Cuba 
and there manufactured into cigars, which 
are then foisted off as "genuine Havana." 
The facts are that, prior to the American 
occupation of the island, the importation 
of tobacco was prohibited ; since that 
time, whilst the importation of tobacco 
has not been entirely prohibited, an ex- 
cessive duty has been placed on the raw 
material, which has had exactly the same 
effect as the prohibition which previously 
existed. The duty is equal to five Ameri- 
can dollars per pound, and it is possible 
to purchase some of the best growths on 
the island for that sum alone. It is, there- 
fore, obvious that any attempt to import 
a cheaper grade of tobacco would be fore- 
doomed to failure, and that Havana ci- 
gars are made solely from the home-grown 
product. 

HIGH PRICED CIGARS 

The Havana correspondent of Tobacco, 
of New York, recently saw some beautiful 
sizes and colors of new cigars for the 
English market, and also some for Ger- 
many. Among the different cases attention 
was called to one huge cedar cabinet that 
measured over six feet and contained 10,000 
cigars, one half of them Coronas, and the 
other half Cetros, ranging in price from 
$200 and $250 a thousand. There were also 
boxes of the beautiful Cuban maple wood, 
containing 100 Corona cigars each, destined 
for the London market, and 7-inch fat ci- 
gars, called Salomones, destined for Ger- 
many, which the German students smoke, 
sitting around a table, half a dozen at a 
time, each of them having a kind of rubber 
attachment, while the cigar is placed in the 
center of the table. They are selling in 
Havana at $1,000 a 1,000. 



TOTAL RECEIPTS TO JULY 1 7tH 

The total tobacco receipts at Havana 
from January 1st to July 17th are as fol- 
lows : 

Bales 

Remedios 18,196 

Oriente 1,108 

Vuelta Abajo 99,053 

Semi Vuelta 11,668 

Partido 5,435 

Total 135,460 



EXPORTS OF CIGARS 

The exports of Cuban cigars from Ha- 
vana for the first six months of 1913 as 
compared with the same period in the previ- 
ous year total as follows : 

-1913 1912 

January 13,161,385 11,408,380 

February 14,431,875 12,494,267 

March 13,331,495 15,011,982 

April 18,431,837 12,794,245 

May 13,336,714 15,470,102 

June 12,906,444 11,778,538 

Total 85,599,750 78,957,514 

The leading world consumers of Cuba's 
cigars are the United States, England, Can- 
ada, Germany, France, Australia, Argentine, 
Spain and Chili. 

The exports to these countries for the 
six months ending June 30th compare as 
follows : 

1913 1912 

England 33,008,006 27,386,194 

United States 21,746,814 21,448,268 

Canada 6,658,864 5,502,252 

Germany 3,844,842 4,102,252 

France 7,778,957 7,507,82'5 

Australia 2,718,481 2,493,549 

Argentine • 1,969,063 2,904,823 

Spain 2,442,249 2,059,373 

Chili 2,062,712 1,759,861 

Total 82,230,788 75,164,879 

— La Lucha, Havana. 



A NEW CIGAR 

Por Larrafiaga, Fabrica de Tobacos, 
which is the new style of the present so- 
ciety, is getting ready a new size of a cigar 
which, they explicitly state, is only for 
those connoiseurs of imported cigars from 
Havana that are not led astray by the 
shining light colors and fine workmanship, 
but who want to smoke a cigar that is 
sweet, mild and has a pronounced high 
aroma. These cigars are made from leaf 
from a particular but extremely limited 
section of the Vuelta Abajo, therefore 
the output of this cigar will be limited. 
The name of this cigar will be Nacionales, 
and they will be packed in a special boite 
nature cedar box, holding 50 cigars. The 
box is an invention of Don Antonio Rivero. 
It is air tight, provided with a lock, and 
each of the four layers of cigars is sep- 
arated by a thin sheet of cedar wood, and, 
besides, it is protected from being tam- 
pered with by a ribbon that runs around 
the box with the gold seal of the Por 
Larrafiaga factory, which has to be cut 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



before the box can be opened. The cigar 
weighs 16 lbs. to the thousand, the whole- 
sale price will be around $275 per 1,000. 



TEN FIELDS FOR EXPERIMENTS 

Ten fields for the purposes of experi- 
ments in tobacco cultivation will soon be 
established by the government in the Vuelta 
Abajo, at Pinar del Rio, Guane, San Juan 
y Martinez, Artemisa, Viiiales, San Cristo- 
bal, San Luis and other places. $4,000 has 
been appropriated for this purpose. Sr. 
Francisco B. Cruz, Director of the Agricul- 
tural School in Havana Province, will be in 
charge of the work. 



CIGAR TRADE ACTIVE 

The cigar trade with the United States 
usually is at its lowest ebb during the two 
vacation months, but strange to say not- 
withstanding all the drawbacks existing in 
the United States at the present time, the 
unsettled condition of the tariff revision, 
the tightness of money and the lack of new 
enterprises, there is more call for some of 
our renowned brands than we dared to ex- 
pect so early in the season. Business 
with England is never particularly active 
at this season, but nevertheless that country 
is calling for more cigars than in former 
years. This is the season for Germany to 
order, at first sample shipments of the new 
crop cigars, and then after receipt and a 
satisfactory trial, she generally places the 
bulk of her orders for the year. The ship- 
ments of cigars for France are usually 
made during the months of December to 
May inclusive, while the Regie during the 
remaining six months of the year does not 
send any orders at all, but this year we 
have learned that it has already ordered 
750,000 cigars of one size from one con- 
cern, as a September shipment. Canada is 
keeping well to the front, and South Amer- 
ica and Australia are beginning to call for 
heavier shipments right along. The lesser 
countries are bound to take their customary 
quantities as they need them, so we think 
we are fully justified in describing the out- 
look as more hopeful for our cigar indus- 
try, particularly as the 1913 Vuelta Abajo 
crop is bound to be satisfactory to the 
smokers all over the world, owing to its 
mild but highly aromatic quality, as well 
as the perfect burn of the cigars. 

The leaf market has suddenly awakened 
from its lethargy, and has become active. 
Prices have ruled high, and in all probabil- 
ity will continue to stay so, if they do not 
go even higher later on. When a crop is 
good there is always an increased demand, 
as we are never sure of being able to count 
upon more than one or two really good 
crops in succession. F-'or this reason the 
manufacturers that have enough capital will 
try to buy more than a full year's supply. 



As the supply of wrappers might be run- 
ning short some big sales of Partido wrap- 
pers have taken place, one leaf dealer dis- 
posing of 1,000 bales, running from Re- 
sago la to Resago 7a. Only Remedios 
tobacco is not moving quickly in the local 
market, although in the countr\' the prices 
for farmers' vegas are advancing. There 
has been a great deal of speculation this 
year in the Santa Clara Province. Store- 
keepers, druggists and other people that 
had a little ready money went in and 
bought tobacco from the vegueros right 
from the start. They either resold it with 
a profit, when they could do so, or they 
went to work and packed the tobacco 
themselves. Some had no idea of what 
correct packing meant, and through ignor- 
ance they mixed the classes, or possibly a 
few may have resorted to false packing 
in the bargain. Such lots of tobacco will 
have to be sold at low prices later on. 

There are no more bundles of leaf in 
the hands of the vegueros, that are for 
sale, excepting some small lots here and 
there, which has either been held above the 
market or is poor tobacco. — Havana cor- 
respondence of Tobacco. Xew York. 




Rev. Charles W. Currier, I'll. D., recently nomi- 
nated Bishoj) of Matanzas. 

He was sent to Surinam, Dutch Guiana, 
South .America, and labored among the na- 
tives there. He came to the United States 
i:{ months later. In January, 1892, he paid 
his first visit to Baltimore and remained 
there some time. On September 3, 1900, 
the cardinal honored the priest by appoint- 
ing him pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
Washington. 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE CIENAGA DE ZAPATA CANAL* 



The following quaint story, taken from the columns of La Lucha of Havana, gives an 
interesting account of a new and great enterprise now under way. 

"I was surprised by the arrival in these peaceful forests of a company of not badly 
dressed workmen, peaceful and satisfied looking, carrying camps, valises, hammocks, 
surveying instruments and other field equipment. 

"I bowed to the two w^ho appeared to be the leaders, who informed me half in English 
and half in Spanish, what the reader will see who reads my story. 

"The technical superintendent of the little company was a Washington gentleman, 
Mr. E. L. Anderson, and his assistant ^Ir. S. P. Hunter, both under the direction of the 
well-known engineer Mr. S. J. Gess, absent at the time. 

"During the past month of December, they started from the Bahia de la Broa, dragging 
through narrow roads, through muddj^ places and clearing thickets, engaged during the 
day in work in the country and during the night under a tree where they slept in the 
open air. 

"And for what is all this toil? 

"To carry out the plans of the greatest work ever realized in Cuba since Columbus 
discovered the island, plans for a long canal which, beginning at the above mentioned 
bay, will extend to Cienfuegos. 

"The length of the canal will be no less than 200 miles, the width 35 meters and the 
depth 4 metres, at least. 

"The work has already reached 'San Bias' covering a space of 70 kilometers, and the 
company is confident of reaching the terminus before Christmas. 

"The facilities of the future company will be greater because the grounds for excava- 



See map below showing territory to be benefited by this great work. 



A._9' 



.^ 






-^JL£L^ 



<ff' 



of' 







TRwieSA KEI^ 



Map of Matanzas and Santa Clara Provinces, showing location of the canal. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



27 



tion are a meter and one-half below the level of the Caribbean Sea, on which the great 
swamp borders. 

"The construction of the canal will have two principal objects: the irrigation of the 
rich territory and the transportation of passengers and goods, which to-day follow a 
devious maritime channel for a distance of 40 leagues through keys and reefs on the 
south of the peninsular of Zapata. 

"The 'Zapata Land Company" is the name of the corporation, which, the informers say, 
has sufficient capital and enterprise to fmish the canal in two years and make it a branch 
of the greater Panama Canal. 

"The Cuban government will obtain the largest benefit from this enterprise, but the 
owners of the bordering lands welcome the new project which, naturally, will materially 
increase the value of their land. Cienfuegos and Batabano, the first on the south coast 
of Santa Clara Province and the other on the south coast of Havana Province, will be 
particularly benefited." — P. Quiros, Haciendo "San Bias," July 30th. 



Lumber Exports to Cuba 



PITCH PINE MARKET CONDITIONS 

The West Indies trade shows further 
slowing down and has changed for the 
worse ver}- materially since the beginning 
of July. Decline is most manifest in Cu- 
ban business, which was conspicuously 
active through earlier months of the year, 
a new record for volume of lumber export 
having been registered in the half year just 
closed. Only moderate inquiry is reported 
for Cuba at present, though substantial or- 
ders, taken earlier, are yet to be filled. — 
Gulf Coast Record, July' 19th. 



Although inquiry from Cuba has fallen 
off in marked degree, some business is of- 
fering, and a substantial quantity, hitherto 
placed, is yet to go forward. The month's 
out-go for Cuba has been a little under the 
average of the earlier season. — July 26th. 

July shipment to Cuba has fallen little 
below the standard of foregoing months. 
Cuban grades are in limited call and some- 
what off. No improvement is apparent. 
Cuban shipment was the smallest in many 
weeks, and confined to the port of ^Mobile. 
— August 2nd. 



.»*>«. 

r*^'^ 



"Crescent" Thermometers 



'I I MONG the many styles and types of "Crescent" 
JM Thermometers may be found a complete Ime for 

Sugar Refineries. 
For accuracy, workmanship and appearance, the "Crescent ' 
Thermometer has won for itself an enviable reputation. It 
has back of it over sixty years of experience in Thermometer 
making which is your assurance of Quality and Precision. 
Our Catalog is unusually comprehensive and mighty in- 
structive. Send a postal for a copy today. 



Just sap; Send Catalog M27 



The Schaeffer & Budenberg M'f g. Co. 



CHICAGO 
WASHINGTON 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

ATLANTA 
il.'tl ) 



PITTSBURGH 
NEW ORLEANS 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HANDICAPS OF THE CUBAN "GUAJIRO" 



HE CANNOT READ, AND IS NOT KEPT INFORMED RECEIVES NO HELP 

FROM HIS GOVERNMENT 

It is not true that the American farmer in Cuba is a harder worker than the Cuban 
farmer; on the contrary, the Cuban "guajiro" works more and harder than any other 
countryman of the world. 

The Americans who cultivate the lands of their colonies, who exhibit fine fruits and 
other products of the annual expositions, work very much at their ease. They do not 
labor during the heat of the day, they (use tents in the fields, they stay indoors when it 
rains and they sleep under mosquito bars. 

We do not blame them therefor. Such is the modern way of living. 

But it is not true that they work more or are more inclined to work than the Cuban 
farmer, who makes of himself a beast of burden, and becomes bent under the burden of 
his toil. What is true — and therein rests the whole secret of the phenomenon, — is that 
the American farmer is a man prepared for his task, so prepared by his national govern- 
ment, and the Cuban farmer is a man absolutely destitute of any preparation. 

In the United States, primary education is taught and trfuly taught in the rural dis- 
tricts, and there is not to be found a single farmer who does not know how to read and 
to count, who does not, in a word, possess the rudiments of a general education. Then, 
in the United States are published thousands and thousands of pamphlets, most of them 
for free distribution, treating, and treating well, upon agricultural problems, — methods 
of cultivation, the nature of plants and trees, etc., etc. 

And there are, moreover, in the United States, everywhere schools, institutes of every 
kind, and scientific establishments, really practical and really popiularized, placed at the 
easy and profitable disposition of the rural population. 

The American farmers, moreover, have perfectly organized the economic side of their 
business, the buying and selling and everything relating in the interests of the national 
production. And the Cuban Guajiro! How does he live? 

He does not know how to read or write or count, he has no notion of anything, nor 
does he hear anything talked of, the nation preserves him in the crude just as he came 
from the bosom of Mother Nature. He doesn't read because he doesn't know how, and 
he couldn't read if he did know how, for in this country there is nothing about agricul- 
ture of the least utility or profit published, in fact there is no agricultural matter pub- 
lished at all. If an agricultural experiment station is established, it promptly becomes a 
purely bureaucratic center, absolutely useless, though absorbing an enormous amount of 
money, without publishing a page. We have often visited these stations and they have made 
our heart sink, while, when we have come away from a private plantation and stopped 
at the government experiment station at Santiago de las Vegas, the contrast has been 
tremendous, the latter looking like a neglected barnyard. The government announces 
branch experiment stations, but the public knows in advance that they will be merely so 
many new bureaucratic sub-centers, founded solely to furnish jobs for political friends 
and henchmen, in wihich no one will be found to know anything about anything, and 
where nobody will try to teach anyone anything, and whither nobody will take the trouble 
to go in hope of learning anything. 

Nor has the guajiro here any to help him economically or any other way, being left to 
the mercy of the storekeeper, under whose gallows he lives and dies. 

Is it possible to expect under such conditions that the Cuban guajiro shall produce, 
labor, cultivate, select and improve, like the American farmer, and shall come and exhibit 
fancy fruits at the National Exposition? The miracle is that he is alive — that he doesn't 
bray, never having been educated to do anything else ! And it is a wonder that he is not 
exhibited naked and in a state of nature as the primitive "Homo Cubensis," survivor 
from the age of ignorance and hardship. — La Discusion, Havana, translation of the Ha- 
vana Telegraph. 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Tofving - - - Steamship Tomng a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

""'"Tsss^rs!? SOUTH ST, NEW YORK, U. S. A. f^^f i^Zt 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



29 



HORTICULTURAL MATTERS 



MEDICINAL PROPERTIES OF THE PAPAW 

The following interesting information is 
taken from the Tropical Agriculturist for 
February 1913. "The milky juice of the 
unripe fruit of the Papaw tree is admitted 
by highly medical authorities to be an ef- 
ficient vermifuge, and a similar property 
is possessed by the seeds, which have a 
pleasant flavor resembling that of cress. 
The juice is also a good cosmetic, which 
is used for the removal of freckles. But 
the most remarkable thing connected with 
the Papaw tree is the property possessed 
by the milky juice of the unripe fruit of 
separating the fibres of flesh and making 
it tender. The late L. A. Bernays, who 
was undoubtedly a reliable authority on 
the properties of plants and fruits, says, 
in his valuable work on 'The Cultural In- 
dustries of Queensland,' that this property 
is not confined to the juice of the fruit, 
but the very exhalations of the tree are 
said to possess it ; and of this fact the 
Brazilian butchers take advantage to make 
their toughest meat saleable. This is ac- 
. omplished by suspending the newly-killed 

"at in the tree, or by wrapping it in the 
1 ves. So powerful is this softening ac- 
tion of the juice that it must be used with 
caution, the meat will drop to pieces, which 
makes it more unpalatable than if left in 
its original condition of toughness. 

"Some interesting experiments were 
made some years ago upon this subject at 
the Royal Agricultural Museum, Berlin. 
A portion of the juice was dissolved in 
three times its weight of water, and this 
was placed with 15 lbs. of quite fresh, lean 
beef in one piece in distilled water, and 
boiled for five minutes. Below the boiling 



point, the meat fell into several pieces, and 
at the close of the experiment it had sep- 
arated into coarse shreds. The juice can 
be dried without losing its effect, but its 
efficiency in this respect does not appear 
to have been tested over a longer period 
than six months." — Agricultural Nczus. 




Cable 
Letters 
To Cuba 

5 Cents per Word 

New telegraph service at greatly 
reduced rates inaugurated by :lie 
Western Union to facilitate busi- 
ness corresponcence between the 
United States and Cuba 

CABLE LETTER RATES 
New York — Havana 

20 word message - - - $1.00 
Each additional word - 5 cents 

Cable letters for Cuba filed 

before midnight delivered 

during the next day 

Flash Cable Services at regular 

rates 
The Western Union Telegraph Co. 




The BUD A COMPANY'S 
MOTOR CARS 

We manufacture Plantation and Rail- 
road Equipment including Hand Cars, 
Push Cars, 
Jacks, 
Switches 
and Frogs 



30 Church Street, New York 




30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEWS OF SUGAR ESTATES 



CENTRAL ULACIA NEARLY READY 

Another sugar mill is being built two 
kilometers from Rodrigo Station in Santa 
Clara Province on the line of the Cuban 
Central Railways. The owners, the Ulacia 
Brothers, expect to begin grinding the next 
crop. 

The installation of the machinery is go- 
ing forward with such promptitude, that 
Sefior Jardeiia, the administrador, is con- 
fident that on December 15th the siren of 
the new mill will sound the termination of 
the installation work and that on January 
1, 1914, will grinding begin. 

The Ulacia Brothers have, until this year, 
managed the central "Santa Catalina," 
situated at Cruces. 



mills are near each other in Santa Clara 
Province. 



CENTRAL RAMONA RENOVATED 

Central "Ramona" has been very thor- 
oughly overhauled from the mill to the la- 
borers' quarters and put in splendid con- 
dition by the owner, Don Francisco Arre- 
chavaleta. The estate has been leased to 
the well-known wealthy resident Don Do- 
mingo Leon, proprietor of the centrals 
"Fidencia," situated at Placetas, and "San 
Pedro," situated near Sagua. All three 



NEW MILLS GETTING READY 

Reports from Camaguey of August 4th 
are to the effect that the machinery for the 
new sugar mill at Ciego de Avila was then 
at Antilla ready to be forwarded to the site 
of the new mill and that the work of com- 
pleting a branch railroad to connect with 
the Jucaro and Moron railroad had been 
completed. 

At Piedracitas in the same province, 
where a new mill will also be built, there 
is much activity. The company has ac- 
quired ties for its railroad lines and the 
carpenters are at work on the mill's houses, 
the machinery being already in transit. 
Contractors are also reported to be looking 
for cane, good prices being offered for de- 
livery next February when the mill is ex- 
pected to be ready to grind. 

Reports from Florida state that Sr. 
Cueto of Havana, representing the directors 
of a Cuban bank has been looking for the 
site for a mill in that district, the purchase 
of 125 caballerias of cane land being re- 
ported. 



Coloque una Trampa Perfecta al Vacio, 



Live 

STEAM 




de Lytton 



(Patente pendiente) 



Para su variado servicio en 
vez de hacer uso de la 
molesta bomba de agua 
dulce. 

Son compactas, ocupan sola- 
mente la mitad del espacio 
de una bomba y necesitan 
muy poca base. 



Hechas por la LYTTON MT'G. CORPORATION 



Oficinas para la venta 
Room 1177 HUDSON TERMINAL, NEW YORK 



Oficina Principal y Fabrica 
FRANKLIN, VIRGINIA, E.U.A. 



Agente para Cuba : Jose Hernandez, Inquisidor 5, Hahana 
Agente para Puerto Rico: J. L. Bartholemy, San Juan 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



rff^'!^ 



^\l 



^ *- 



M, Til, <?«^ lmsdsai^(0^ esfe!lrt/Q«i^ es lierm 
-^ CdnsaQrdd£l)uml(? [rmkariosbendocidd^ 




The Tourist at Santiago 



A.t their feet is a plaza tilled with jas- 
mine, oleander, roses, royal palms; across 
the street a cathedral four hundred years 
old, and facing it the palace on which was 
raised the first American flag to tiy over 
Cuba. Within the distance of a cab ride 
is San Juan Hill, Morro Castle, or the 
mountain of Bonaito, from the top ot 
which is a view of valley, harbor and 
ocean, among the most beautiful of any 
land And ten minutes' walk wou d take 
them where, against a wall, were shot the 
American filibusters of the Vtrgimus. 
The bronze tablet on the wall reads, \ou 
who pass, uncover the head. This spot is 
consecrated soil. It is blessed with the 
blood of patriots sacrificed to tyranny. 

But the tourists on the terrace of the 
hotel do not uncover the head ; they do not 
pass the spot ; they prefer to learn how a 
fellow-countryman in the hardware busi- 
ness in Spokane raised ten thousand dol- 
lars on a first mortgage. Why, to learn 
that, should one travel a thousand miles. 
Why leave home? 

They number from three to five hun- 
flrcd. and at once do they scatter toward 
San Juan Hill? They do not. They make 
a coml)ined charge upon the newspaper 
stand and buy picture postal cards thou- 



sands of picture postal cards. Within ten 
minutes after their arrival the entire ship s 
company is on the terrace or in the writ- 
ing-room feverishly directing to Aunt 
Emily or Uncle John picture post cards of 
places they have not yet seen, and which 
half of them never will see. They desire 
only that the folks at home shall know 
they are within twenty minutes' walk of 
the' battlefield of San Juan. But they do 
not take the walk. Instead, the women ot 
the party visit the local "emporiums and 
buy Panama hats, kodak films and tambou- 
rines decorated with scenes from bull- 
fights And the men remain on the veranda 
and fan themselves, and talk— not of what 
they have seen or of what, according to 
their itinerary, they are going to see — but 

of home. , c • u 

It will be many years before the bpanish 
Main or Cuba or the Windward Isles lose 
their local color. Always the Caribbean 
will hold its charm, its beauty, its historical 
interest. . . . After you have reached those 
happy isles and have visited the show- 
places the guide-books tell you to visit, do 
not sit in the patio of the hotel and read 
two weeks old newspapers from your home 
town (iet into the street and .see things. 
Richard Harding Davis in the Metropolitan. 



32 



T HE CUBA R E V I E;W 



THE NEW AMERICAN MINISTER 

William E. Gonzalez of Columbia, S. C, 
the new United States Minister to Cuba, 
presented his credentials to President Me- 
nocal on August 9th. A great crowd 
gathered to cheer for the new envoy, who 
is the son of one of Cuba's fighters for 
liberty. 

Minister Gonzalez, in the course of his 
speech, said he felt a profound interest in 
the future of Cuba, which was natural in 
one whose father, Ambrosio Jose Gonzalez, 
gave his life for Cuban liberty. President 
Menocal in replying said Minister Gonzalez 
was doubly of Cuban blood because his 
father was a native of the island and fur- 
thermore helped Narciso Lopez to raise the 
lone star flag, which is now the flag of the 
republic. 

La Luclia's impression of the new Ameri- 
can minister is thus expressed : 

"Mr. Gonzalez is a man of few words or 
speaks almost nothing. 

"His family will join him in November. 

"His brother Ambrose will direct the af- 
fairs of the State, Mr. Gonzalez' publica- 
tion in Columbia, S. C. His son Robert E. 
is its editor. 

"He stated his age as 47. His complexion 
IS florid and his physiognomy expresses 
great intelligence; his hair is gray. 

"He was dressed in a blue coat, with 
trousers of white flannel and wore a straw 
hat. 



"Mr. Gonzalez said he did not speak 
Spanish." 

NEW INDUSTRY IN CIENFUEGOS 

A new business, that of manufacturing 
mineral water, soda waters ajid fruit sirups, 
will shortly be established in Cienfuegos, a 
city on the south coast of Santa Clara 
Province having 30,000 inhabitants at the 
last census in 1907, although since then the 
city has grown greatly. 

Senor Pellon seems to be the moving 
spirit in the enterprise and associated with 
him is don Jose M. Conceyro, a chemist 
of the city. 

The necessary machinery has already 
been purchased. 



CUBAN TELEPHONE CO. EARNINGS 

July gave the Cuban Telephone Company 
307 more subscribers, a total to July 31st of 
13,751 as compared with 13,444 on June 30th. 

Receipts for July were .$76,998.51 and 
for the same month in 1912 $56,580. 

President Menocal has given assurances 
to Captain William M. Talbott, president 
of the Cuban Telephone Company, that he 
was completely satisfied with the way the 
company has fulfilled its obligations and 
told him there was absolutely no truth in 
any report that measures against the com- 
pany were contemplated. 



A. F. CRAIG & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

PAISLEY 
ESCOCIA 

Fabricantes 
de toda clase 

de 

maquinaria 

para ..,.;' 3,1, 

iholer cafia 
.nde aiziicar 

" DIRECCION TELEGRAFIGA 

\:-::...»iji T- "CRAIG" PAISLEY 

Claves: A.B.C., S^EDICION; McMlt/S MINING Y GENERAL 




THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



PLANTATION CARS °' ^'' '''^''' ^'^^ 



THE PARTS FOR SAME 




No. 1005-A (Palabra de clave XPTAS) 

El grabado ensena unc de nuestros carros para cana con jaula de acero. 

Fabricamos un gran numero de carros para cana para uso en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, 
America-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaulas de acero 6 de madera y construidas para 
Ids distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cana. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY CO., NEW YORK, E.U. A. 

Direccion telegraflca : Nallim. New York Produccion annual de mas de 100.000 carros 
Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B. CINTAS, Oficios 29-31 Havana 



The Tariff Discussion 



The discussion on the tariff bill up to 
August 13th left the sugar schedule still 
untouched. Democratic senators find cause 
in the death of Senator Johnston of Ala- 
bama for no little apprehension regarding 
the division of the Senate on the tariff bill. 
Before the death of the Alabama senator 
the Senate stood 51 Democrats, 44 Repub- 
licans and 1 Progressive. Then it would 
have been necessary for four Democrats to 
change to give vote with the opposition to 
defeat the bill, but the loss of one Demo- 
crat so changes the situation that a change 
of front by three Democratic Senators 
would effect the defeat of the measure, 
providing all the Republican Senators and 
Senator Poindcxter, the Progressive, should 
cast their l)allots in opposition to it. The 
understanding from the first has been that 
the Louisiana senators, both of whom are 
Democrats, would use their infinence and 
cast their votes against the bill so long as 
it contained a free sugar provision, how- 
ever remote. Therefore, with the opposi- 
tion maintaining its solid front, one more 
change would be sufficient to reverse the 
vote and defeat the bill. 
, There are, however, many coiitjngencies 
to be considered before leaping to the con- 
clusion that this will be the outcome of the 



contest. The first of these is the conceded 
difficulty of finding another Democratic 
convert to the opposition theory. Another 
is the possibility of gaining supporters for 
the bill on the Republican side. It is broadly 
liinted that Mr. Poindexter may decide in 
the end to give the measure his support, 
and it is almost as generally believed that 
comparatively few changes in the schedules 
might bring to its support such Republi- 
cans as LaFollette, Norris and Kenyon. 
On the other hand, it is probable that among 
the first changes demanded by even the 
most liberal Republican Senators would be 
the restoration of sugar to the dutiable list. 

Senator Newlands is known to be much 
averse, personally, to free sugar, but the 
Senate is still ignorant as to how he may 
vote in view of the edict of the Democratic 
caucus. 

No one pretends to see the end of the 
discussion. The sugar schedules, which it 
was expected would be taken up a few 
weeks ago, is still untouched. The debate 
on preceding i)ortions of the bill has been 
long ago drawn out, and when sugar was 
readied in the natural order, it was passed 
over because of the temporary indisposition 
of .Senator Ransdcll. — Willett & Ciray on 
August 12th. ■' ' ' ^ ■'•■'' 



34 THECUB A REVIEW 



SUGAR REN'IEW 

Specially \vritten tor Thk Cvba Review by Wii.i.ktt & Orav. of New York 



Our last review for this magazine was dated July 16, 1913. 

At tliat date the quotation for 96° test Cuba centrifugal sugar was 3.54c. per lb. and is 
now 3. 73c. per lb., the highest value obtained this year. 

A uTonth ago our market was 40c. per 100 lbs. below the parity of European beet sugar, 
but this difference has since been reduced to 29c. per 100 lbs. and there is a possibility 
of reducing it further before the close of the season. 

The advance from 3.54c. was steady, on purchases by the reliners to meet the largely 
increasing demand for their product which came from all parts of the country, indicating 
a big consumption and near the close some 500,000 bags Cuban and other raw sugars 
were sold basis of 2% c & f or 3.73c. landed for %* test. 

Included in the sales here were 25,00<1 tons Cubas. originally bought for shipment to 
Europe, but resold to America at a good proiit and replaced by purchases of beets for the 
English refiners, thus strengthening" the European markets. 

Refiners here will still need large supplies of raws before the close of the .<;eason and, 
with stocks not being excessive and decreasing constantly, the holders may be expected 
to demand some further advance, say to about 2'^'2C. c &^ f (3.S6c) or close to the parity 
of European beet quotations. 

In consequence of the resale of English-owned Cubas to America and the pro.<;pect of 
the Cuban crop outturning fully up to the recent estimates, it is now unlikely that it will 
be necessary to import here much, if any, full duty sugars, this year, but the balance 
of the Cuba crop will doubtless be wanted here at full prices. 

Standard fine Granulated is now at 4.70c. less 2 per cent for casli quoted by all refiners. 

The domestic Beet Granulated of new crop, for October delivery, is offered at 4.50c. 
less 2 per cent in a quiet way : the crop promises to be larger than the record crop of last 
year, and after October 1st it will be coming to market rapidly .and be an important 
factor, as it will undoubtedly be pressed for sale, supphnng the demand to an unusual 
extent, probably forcing the refiners to reduce their meltings greatly during October- 
December. 

The Louisiana cane crop is making good progress with prospects of a normal yield 
and, also will come on the market during October-December. 

The producers of these domestic crops will be anxious to take advantage of the present 
tariff' while it remains in force. 

European markets further declined after July 16th until Beet touched Ss 9%d f. o. b. 
Hamburg on July 22nd, after which date there was a steady recovery until to-day, when 
the quotation is 9s 4^'jd and now the paritv of 4.02c. for 96° test Centrifugals at New 
York. 

The Java crop, which began in May, has been estimated to outturn 1,500.000 tons, but 
has been suff'ering from drought and the estimate is just reduced to 1.450,000 tons; none 
of this crop has yet been shipped to Europe or .-Kmerica. as the eastern markets are 
taking it at relatively higher prices than those ruling in western markets. 

In Washington, Congress is still discussing the new tariff' bill, but has not yet reached 
sugar in the Senate, the prospects being that tlie bill will not finally be passed before 
October. 

As proposed by the Senate Committee, the bill provides for a reduction in sugar duty 
of 25 per cent on Alarch 1, 1914, and for free sugar on May 1, 1916. 

If the Senate approves of March 1. 1914, for date of effect of sugar schedule, it will 
have to be referred to the Conference Committee as the House voted to put it in effect 
the day after the bill passes, and it is possible that a compromise date will be finally agreed 
to. perhaps January 1, 1914. 

It must be remembered that the receipts of the Cuba crop during January and February- 
are usually enormous, amounting to 400,000 tons, and as these must be sold by the 
planters to obtain funds, a reduction in duty on March 1st would be discounted, so that 
the domestic sugar producers would not be much, if any better off, than if the new 
tariff is put in force January 1st. 

It is now noted that the wording of the Cuban reciprocity treaty is such as to ap- 
parently prohibit any reduction in present rates of dtuty on Cuban sugar, although it is 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



35 



evident that such was not intended and the question may not be raised f^'^lf '>; J'"^' ^' 
Congres is now at work on the new tariff bill, it would seem wise to make it P am that 
the in ention is for Cuban sugar to be admitted at a concession o 20 per c nt on the 
rates of duty provided in the bill, and not leave the question in the least doubt. 
New York, August 14, 1913. 

REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita cxpresamcnte para la Cuba Review por Wh-lett & Gray, dc Nucva York 

Xuestra ultima rese.a para esta pubhcacion ^sfal^ j^^^^ J^^^,^^ ^1^^ ^^it 
cuva fecha la cotizacion del azucar centnfugo de Cuba polarizacion 

un gran consumo, y proximo a cerrar el '.^^^'^^^ ;'.;','^5'''''" ^^ ., fiete o sea 3.73c. 
azucar de Cuba y otros azucares crudos bajo la base de 2 ,sc. costo > tiete, o 

"l^rido e'n°tT'ventas"a'qui habia 2.5.0.,0 toneladas de azucar de Cuba, compradas pri- 
de remolacha de Europa. . ^^..^ares de Cuba en un principio 

-^r- s^ ^^- ~i;» - r- ^1 t:^ x*i/:;^rx.;;^ 

octubre empezara a llegar rapidamente ai "j^'^Y.^i^n.nnda de una manera poco usual, 
octubre a diciembrc. . . . t ■:^,,^ ... va nrc^entando l)icn, con probabilidades 

ahora la l^;'""'' <^^,^* ■" ; ^,1,1 /„ ayo se'haUia calcula.lo rculiria l.r.oO.OOO ,o„ela- 

La coscchd de Java, que empe/. c y ,,i^„in cp -icaba de rcducir a 1,450,000 tone- 

das, per„ ha sido ='7'- »/°a. n " T m,>a ^ A ,"r a ntda Ic esla coseiha. p>,cs los 

'ntcadoT <>d 'SH:'r;r«.r';o;;a™r';da°iva,,, » ..ecio, ,„... aU„. .uc K. ,uc 

risen en los ■■'"■:»;l"* ''«' S'^tiendo en Washing.,,,, el |,r„yec... ,le la nueva Tarita 

hi Congreso ""»™'f '"''=" ,",/;„ ,,,, llc.„a,l„ aun al Se.ia.ln. y las ,.robaWli<la<les 

r"d:''"u"e ^"eho%tect Aranedrn." no ser^ ,ern,inad„ an.es ,.0 oc.n.re^ S,„,,n 



36 



T Fl K C U B A>1 REVIEW 



propuesto por el Comite del Senado, el proyecto de la Tarifa estipula la rebaja de un 
25 por ciento en los derechos del aziicar desde el primero de marzo de 1914, y el aziicar 
libre de derechos desde el primero de mayo de 1916. . .; 

Si el Senado aprueba el primero de marzo de 1914 como fecha en que ha de tener 
efecto la clausula del aziicar, tendra que ser sometido al Comite Conferencial, pues la 
Camara de Representantes voto para que se pusiera en efecto el dia despues que sea 
sancionado el proyecto Arancelario, y es probable que haya finalmente un acuerdo 
respecto a la fecha, que puede ser tal vez el primero de enero de 1914. 

Hay que tener en cuenta que los recibos de la cosecha de azucar de Cuba durante 
enero y febrero son generalmente enormes, ascendiendo a 400,000 toneladas, y como 
esto debe ser vendido por los plantadores para obtener fondos, habria que descontar una 
reduccion en los derechos en primero de marzo, asi es que los productores de azucar del 
pais no saldrian mas ventajosoS de lo que sucederia si la nueva tarifa se pusiese en vigor 
el primero de enero. 

Se observa ahora que la fraseologia del Tratado de Reciprocidad con Cuba es tal que 
al parecer prohibe cualquier reduccion en los derechos actuales sobre el azucar de Cuba, 
aunque es evidente que no se intento tal cosa y tal vez no se toque el asunto oficialmente, 
pero como el Congreso esta ahora ocupandose del proyecto de la nueva Tarifa, seria 
oportuno el explicar claramente que la intencion es que el azucar de Cuba sea admitida 
con una concesion de 20 por ciento sobre los derechos provistos en dicho proyecto de 
Tarifa, y no dejar el asunto pendiente de la menor duda. 

Nueva York, agosto 14 de 1913. 




The Papaw Fruit. See article on the valuable, medicinal properties 
of the papaw. It will be found on page 29. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



CABLE ADDRESS: Turnure 



NEW YORK 
64-66 Wai,l Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

BANKERS 

Depotits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance 
of Dividends and Interest Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase an " Sale 
of Letters of Exchange Collection of Drafts. Coupons, etc., for account of others. Drafts. Payments 
kj Cable and Letters of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England. France. Spain 
Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Central and South America. opain. 



CORRESPONDENTS ; 



HAVANA-N. Gelats y Ca. 
MEXICO Banco Central Mexicano. 



LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank Ltd 
PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



SUGAR TESTING APPARATUS 



KUNDADA EN 1851 




POLARISCOPIO SOBRE "BOCKSTATIV" LA FORMA MAS MODERNA 
Con caja a prueba de polvo, parte de prisma, y engranaje prolongado. 

EIMER & AMEND, 2OS-2II Third Avenue, New York 



liace una especiali- 

dad de surtir 
Todos los Instru- 
mentos para la 
Prueba de Azticar 
y Habilitacion de 
Laboratorio. 
Unicos Agentes en 
los Estados Unidos 
y Canada para los 

STANDARD 

POLARISCOPIOS 

Su triple 6 doble 
campo de vision ha 
sido adoptado por 
el Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos co- 
mo norma. 

Toda la maquina- 
ria experimental y 
los aparatos descri- 
tos en ((Agricultural 
Analysis,)) del Prof. 
H. \V. Wiley. Se 
suministran con 
gustos todos los in- 
formes pedidos. 

Pidanse Listas de 
Preciot Ilustradas. 



Publications Recently Received 



The Steam Consuiiiptioii of Locomotive 
Jlngincs from the Indicator Diagrams, by 
J. Paul Clayton, has been issued as Bulletin 
Xo. G.") of the Engineering Experiment Sta- 
tion of the University of Illinois. 

This Pailletin (Jevelops and illustrates 
the application of the logarithmic diagram 
to locomotive engines. It is shown that 
the steam consumption of locomotive en- 
gines can be determined from the indi- 
cator diagrams alone to within 4 per cent 
of the actual consumptin as measured in 
test plants. Copies may be obtained upon 
application to W. I'. .M. Goss, Director of 
the I'ngini-ering Exi)erimcnt Station. Uni- 
versity of Il'inois, Urbaiia, Illinois. 

Hc'iistal Dental, llalnina. Mayo de 19i:'.. 
Pu'ilicacion mcnsual dcdicado a la Ciencia, 
Arte y Literatura Dentales. 



Our Dumb Animals, Boston, Mass., 
June. 

La Llacienda, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Boletin Oficial de la Camara dc Comer- 
cio, Industria y Navegaciun de la Isla de 
Cuba, Abril .30 de 1913. 

Monthly Bulletin of Agricultural Intel- 
ligence and of Plant Diseases. Issued by 
the International Institute of Agriculture, 
Bureau of Agricultural Intelligence and 
Plant Diseases at Rome, Italy. 

La Instruccion Primaria. Revista Meii- 
sual, puI)licado por la Secretaria de In- 
struccion Publica y dellas Artes. Ilabana, 
Marzo y Abril de 1913. 

Sanidad y Beneficcncia, IIaI)ana. P>oletin 
Oficial de la Secretaria. I-'ncro de 1913. 

holctin del Archivo Nacional, ITabana. 
Publicacion bimestral. Marzo-Abril. 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR PRODUCTION FIGURES — CROP OF 1912-13 



The sugar production of the twenty cen- 
trals in the Sagua la Grande district for 
the present crop compares as follows. The 
increase of all the mills over that of the 
previous crop makes interesting reading. 

1912-13 1911-12 

Bags Bags 

Caridad 30,745 13,047 

Constancia 131,130 74,178 

Corazon de Jesus 30,948 13,853 

El Salvador 49,000 31,800 

Esperanza 33,000 20.875 

Lutgardita 75,222 45,669 

Luisa y Antonia 12,500 7,650 

Macagua 42,000 22,426 

Patricio 121,732 80,603 

Purio 86,160 64,705 

Ramona 31,000 10,920 

Resolucion 50,141 17,245 

Resulta 76,985 49,070 

San Francisco de Asis.. 47,120 18,572 

Sta. Lutgarda de Lopez. 81,500 44,070 

Sta. Lutgarda de Camba 38,253 15,178 

San Isidro 41,000 21,077 

Santa Teresa 163,696 95,235 

San Pedro 40,626 6,336 

Unidad 96,950 66,258 

Total 1,279,709 750,814 



The yearly sugar report for the year 
1913 of El Hacendado Mexicano contains 
the names and addresses with the indi- 
vidual production of each sugar factory in 
Mexico, Central America. South America, 
Porto Rico, Cuba, Trinidad, Hawaii, Java 
and Philippines. 



CUBA S SUGAR PROGRESS 

Sugar authorities predict that within three 
or four years Cuba will produce 3,000,000 
tons of sugar. In 1888 the crop was 560,000 
tons, and in 1912-13 it had advanced 2,250,- 
000 tons. The increase of 400 per cent has 
come since the Spanish regime, under which 
at its lowest in 1896 only 212,000 tons were 
produced. From 1897 to 1899 the crop 
averaged 300,000 tons. The old regime, in- 
capable of preserving public order and pro- 
tecting life and property, was not a field for 



investment of capital on an expanding scale. 
Meanwhile American insurance has made of 
that island the chief sugar producing unit in 
the cane-growing world. Spanish, Cuban, 
American and German planters vie with 
each other in developing Cuba's sugar pos- 
sibilities. — Wall Street Journal. 



SUGAR CROP CONDITION ON JULY 3 1 ST 

According to the figures issued Hy 
Messrs. Guma & Mejer, the well-known 
brokers of Havana, the condition of the 
sugar crop on July 31st compared as fol- 
lows. The quantities are given^iiTtons. 

1911 1912 1913 

Exports 1,283,351 1,475,808 1,851,102 

In existence 115,235 299;520- 364,692. 

Local consump.. 42,530 41,450 51,300 

Receipts to date.1,441,116 1,816,776 2,267,094 

The exports were distributed to the fol- 
lowing ports : 
Three ports 

north of 1911 1912 1913 

Cape Hatteras. 1,121,565 1,178,347 1,178,347 

New Orleans... 158,357 161,257 215,815 

Galveston 2,143 14,999 20,901 

Canada 3,143 8,998 

Vancouver 27,954 

Curacoa 28 

Europe 1,286 118,062 254,249 



REFUSE MOLASSES FOR MOBILE 

The information that Mobile is to be a 
distributing and importing point for refuse 
molasses from Cuba, which is used in the 
manufacture of horse and cattle feeds, if 
correct, should be a cheering note in the 
general upward trend the affairs of the 
city as a manufacturing and importing 
center have taken of late, says the Mobile 
Register. 

Central "Preston" on Nipe Bay to July 
30th, had produced 386,450 bags. 

Central "Boston" to July 31st had made 
336,696 bags. 

Up to the same day "Santa Lucia's" pro- 
duction was 171,232 bags. 



A Sure Cure 
For Slipping 
BELTS 



Dixon's Solid Belt Dressing is a quick, sure 
and easy cure for slipping belts. 
Dixon's Traction Belt Dressing restores lost 
efficiency to glazed, dirty and otherwise neg- 
lected belting. 



CROFT & PRENTISS 



Lonja Bldgr-t Room 424 
HAVANA, CUBA 



D 
I 

X 
O 

N 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



39 



HAVANA 



CUBA 

National Bank of Cuba 

Government Depositary 



CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$6,250,000.00 



Head Office — Havana 

27 BRANCHES IN CUBA 

New York Agency 
I WALL STREET 



COLLECTIONS 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



ru;'p\*u^"- $650,000 



TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES COLLECTS RENTS 

NESOTIATES LOANS ON MORTBASES 

Carrespondencc Sulicited from 
Intending InTCttori 



OFFICERS 

Norm*n H. Davis President 

Oswald A. Hornsby - • • - Vice-President 
Clmudio G. Mendoza - - - Vice-President 

F. M. Hopgood Treasurer 

RofeHo Carbajal Secretary 

W. U. Whitner - • Mjjr. Real Estate Dept. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

INCORPORATED 1869 

Fiscal Agent of the Government of the Republic of 
Cuba for the Payment of the Army of Liberatior 

Paid=up Capital, 

and Reserve. .. .$25,000,000.00 
Total Assets $180,000,000.00 

Head Office MONTREAL 

New York Agency 
Corner William and Cedar Streets 

Branches in Havana: Obrapia 33, Galiano 92, 
Monte 118, Muralla 52, Luyano 3 (Jesus del 
Monte) ; Antilla, Bayamo, Caibarien, Camaguey, 
Cardenas, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, Manzanillo, 
Matanzas, Nuevitas, Pinar del Rio, Puerto Padre, 
Sagua la Grande, Sancti Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba. 



Established 1S44 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A SENERAL BANKINS BUSINESS 
Csrrsspsiclsnti at All PrIaslpal Plaess of the Island 

Safe Deposit I' suits 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigart 



FACTORY: 
Pa>«* ds Taeaa 169-118 



OFFICE: 
Anariura 1*1 



Establismib 1176 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 

Transact a general banking business 
Correspondents at all the principal 
places af the v 



Id 



Sajt Deposit Vaults 

Office: Aguiar 108 



Arth»ur M. Beaiipre, late minister of the 
I'nited States to Cuba, left Cuba June 29th. 
lie expects to go to his former home in 
Illinois and after a short stay there will 
tDur ICurope. 

Sr. Manuel Esteva Ruiz is the recently 
apiiointefl Mexican consul to Havana. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when lurlllng to Advertlaere 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA 



The United Railways of Havana 

in conjunction with the Cuba Railroad, maintain a service of 
two trains daily between Havana and the growing Eastern 
city of CAMAGUEY, and one Express Train daily between 
Havana and SANTIAGO DE CUBA, the "Dream City of the 
West Indies." Buffet lunch is served on these trains. 

FOUR TRAINS DAILY 

in both directions between Harana and MATANZAS, which latter city because of its picturcique 
iituation and ine charm of its principal attractions (Yumun s famous valley and the wondertul 
caTCS of Bellaraar) has long enjoyed distinction as the great "Mecca" of the tourists. »nd it 
continues to gaTn in popularity. EXCELLENT TRAIN SERVICE is maintained to many other 
Ss of grfat intefest to tourists, all of which are fully described m "Cuba-A Winter 
Paradise " a profusely illustrated 80-page booklet with six complete maps and 72 riews illustraUTe 
©f this wonderful island, sent postpaid on receipt of 3 cents in stamps. 

Frank Roberts, General Passenger Agent 
United Railways of Havana -------- 118, Prado, Havana, Cuba 



FRED WOLFE i^i 



CALZADA DE VIVES, HAVANA 

Cable, "Wolfe" 

Negociante en Todas Clases Dealer in all Classes of 
de Ganado Live Stock 

Especialmente en Mulos Especially in Mules 

Always on hand Large Stock of All Classes of Mules-All Mules Sold Are 
Guaranteed as Represented— Can Furntsh Any Number Desired on Short Notice 



^ 



P. RUIZ a BROS. 

ENGRAVERS 

FINE STATIONERY 

Obispo 22 P. O. Box 608 

HAVANA, CUBA 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SDK 

Sugar Brokers 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St 

Cable Address, "Tide. New Y«rk" 



JACKS & SADDLE HORSES 

We are the largest breeders in Kentucky of Mam- 
moth jacks and saddlers and Percheron horses. We 
can fill your order for mules, pure bred hogs, cattle, 
sheep or poultry. Write for catalogs. 

H. T. BROWN & CO. 

Lexington, Ky. 



THEODORE E. FERRIS 

Formerly Gary Smith & Ferris 
NAVAL ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER 
Hudson Terminal Bldg., 30 Church Street 
'phone: 2786 coRTLANDT New York City 

Plans, Specifications and Superintendence : 
Steamships, Steamboats, Lighters, Tugboats, 
Barges, Yachts — steam and sail and Motor- 
boats of all classes 



Custom House Collections 



The receipts of the Havana custom house for July compare as follows: 

1913 $1,770,523 1909 1,509,947 

1913 1 r09,223 1908 1,313,839 

1911 1,574,059 1907 1,623,661 

1910 1,496,572 1906 1,534,538 



i'luase mention I'UE CUBA REVIEW when ufriling lo Aducrtisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



TWO GOOD SPANISH BOOKS 

From the press of Sir Isaac Pitman & 
Sons, Ltd., London and New York, we 
have received a copy of two little hand- 
books entitled "Spanish Business Letters" 
by E. AlcConnell, and "Spanisli Commer- 
cial Phrases," which are very moderately 
priced. The first named is a practical 
handbook (second series), consisting of 48 
pages containing examples of the most 
usual class of commercial correspondence. 
The book presupposes a knowledge of 
Spanish, no unnecessary space lieing taken 
up with the English translation, but there 
are numerous marginal notes in English 
explanatory of the more idiomatic words 
and phrases. The book of "Spanish Com- 
mercial Phrases," as its name indicates. 
gives examples of phrases applicable to 



general commercial correspondence, such 
as replies to inquiries, execution of orders, 
quotations, letters of credit, remittances, 
etc., etc., as well as phrases of particular 
anplication to various lines of manufacture. 
In this book the English equivalent is given 
below the Spanish. The book, wliich con- 
sists of 32 pages, also contains a list of 
Spanish ablireviations. To those desiring 
to acquaint themselves with idiomatic Span- 
ish commercial correspondence these books 
will be found helpful. 

Dr. Desvernine the Cuban minister to 
the United States may not return to Wash- 
ington. It is known that he accepted the 
post with great reluctance in the first place 
and that he is already extremely anxious 
to give it up and renew bis old law practice. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

Engines, Boilers a^dMacKinery 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 
Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

St*»flna^ip l^ork a Specialty 
A.. KLING, Prop. MORfl IT Af A 



INQUIRIES REQUESTED 



ROHLIG & CO. 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

BREMERMAVEN HAMBURG 

AM Hafen 113 Alsterdamu 14/15 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH R.ATES TO AND FROM E\'ERY PLACE PORX'IDED ON APPLTCATTON 



ESTABLISHED 1852 

BREMEN 

Knochenhauerstb 16/17 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 

82 W^ALL STREET. NEMT YORK 

'ublishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal^ the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED. 



St GRAY, BroKers and Agents 

»^^ "^J- VjC^tL MX. ^^ REFINED 



Telephone, 3J Hamilton 
Night Call, 411 Hamilton 



Cable Address: 
"Abiworks," New York 



Atlantic Basin Iron Works 

Engineers and Boiler Makers 

Machinists, Plumbers, Tinsmiths, Pine Fitters, Blacksmiths, Coppersmiths, Pattern 
Makers, Sheet Iron Workers, Iron anrl P.rass Castings. Steamship Repairs a Specialty. 



Corner imiay and Summit Streets 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I'lease mention THE CUliA KliVlliW when ivritiny to Advertisers 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"P A S S L" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, COR. STONE 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos De Bea Sl Co. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANT* 
lmfartaol6n dlrtota de tedai loi 
eantros manufaotunroi dil munds 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward & 
Co., New York; Serra Steamship Company, 
Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos de A 
Folch &. Co. de Barcelona, Espafia Indepen 
dencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL. WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF XVERY DE8CKIPTI0M 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard; 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones: 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
PiEKs, Bkid*e8, Raileoads and Buildimss 

We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 
on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 
WooLwoRTH Building, 233 Broadway 
Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Muiiro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Addkess: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 Soutk 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL u « c ] 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

ESPECIALIDAD EN ROPA HeCHA DE TrABAJO 

Am in a position to push the sales of American 

high class products. Would represent a first 

class firm. 

Apartado 102 Camagiiey, Cuba 



COMMISSION 
MERCHANT 



M. J. CABANA 

p. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a com- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in 
eastern Cuba. 

F. W. HvosLEF E. C. Day R. M. Michelsbm 

Bennett, Hvoslef & Co. 
Steamship Agents and Ship Brokers 
18 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

Cable: "Benvosco" 

REVENUES DURING JUNE 

June 1912 $3,199,774.14 
1910 3,374,812.79 
The income from the lottery since it was 
established totaled to June 30, $14,145,596. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 






MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



SAILINGS 

NEW YORK— CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 
SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS NORTHBOUND SAILINGS 



(From New York) 



S.S. CURITYBA 

S.S. Olinda 



Sept. 1 0th 
Sept. 24th 



(From NuevHaa) 

S.S. Olinda - - Sept. 12th 
S.S. CuRiTYBA - Sept. 26th 

Nuevitas, Antilla, Nipe Bay, Puerto Padre and Gibara 

FREIGHT ONLY 

S.S. CUBANA, September 3rd; S.S. LuRlSTAN, September 17th 
Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua and Caibarien 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

S.S. Karen — Havana-Matanzas SepT. 

Steamer — Cienfuegos-Manzanillo 

Steamer — Havana-Sagua 

S.S. Bertha — Havana-Matanzas 

S.S. SiGNE — Caibarien-Santiago-Guantanamo . . - - 
S.S. Karen — Havana-Cardenas 



5th 
6th 
12th 
19th 
23rd 
26th 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Mobile, Sept. 9th for Montevideo and Buenos Ayres; Sept. 23d 
for Buenos Ayres and Rosario 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

freight only 

Sailings from Baltimore, Sept. 11th, Sept. 25th 



I'lease mention THE CUliA UliVlEW when writing to AdvertUers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of:i 904- 1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factoriea in 
Formosa, belonging to th« 
Taiwan Seito Kabuskiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japmn. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 galloni 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other t« 
handle 325,000 gallons in ike 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formoaa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reyersing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on thf 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



8. MORRIS LILLIE. Preaident. 



LEWIS C. LILLIE, Secretary and Treaiurer. 



THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

Philadelphia, Pa.. U. S. A. 

LOCOMOTIVES 



BROAD AND 
NARROW GAUGE 



SINGLE EXPANSION 
AND COMPOUND 




FOR A L L GAUGES PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES ^o meet a L L con. 



OF TRACK 



DITIONS OF SERVICE 



SPtcifieatiens Furnished on Application 



Representative for the West Indies: 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Address: "Baldwin. Philadelphia" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



^/l\ 



The 




THE CUBA REVIEW 





Portable Bag Filers 



will pile your 
Boxes and Bags 
with Speed 
and Economy 



Here is a mechanical motor-driven piler 
of simple construction and low first cost 
— a most profitable investment for this 
work. Handles any size of box or bag. 

LINK-BELT COMPANY 

299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 





n^ 



-/v 



-J G.r.c.Co. 

N" 




Garfield Fire Clay Co., Inc. 

FABRICANTES DE 

Ladrillos Ref ractarios de Prime- 
ra C alidad y de Todas For mas 



Cerente del 
Departamento 
de Exportacion 



CABLE ADDRESS: 
JAMOTLEY, 

NEW YORK 

(all codes used) 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 

71 BEAVER ST., NEW YORK 

Rieles y Aseguradores 

Ranas, Cambiavias y Soportes de 

Locomotoras 

Calderas 

Tubos para Calderas 

Caches para Pasajeros 

Ladrillos Refractarios 

Tanques de Madera y de filer ro 

Torres de Acero y de Madera 

Puentes de Acero 

Edificios de Acero 

Hierro A canal ado 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



/^ A D D (^C PAiA TODOi usoi y de todoi Umafios, de loi para cafia con cuatro ruedai y caoa- 
^•^*-l^r^^>--'»J cidad de 1^ toneladas 4 loi con juegoi doblei ae ruedai y capacidad de 30 tonelaaai 
Hacemoi una especialidad de juegoi de herrmies, incluyendo lot juegos 
de ruedas, completamente armados, con todas las piezas de metal, y pianos 
completos para construir lot catros i su destino de maderas del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Ctiarch St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Addkess: 
Ramaliam 



DONT OVERLOOK THE 
ADVERTISING PAGES 



Ths/ Itrm aot tat leait Interettloi jMrtloa et tkt publl- 
oatlCB. and thir* li tumtipnt variety et UttitniaRt Rrtte- 
■ItUni and «aluable marakandlt* aaaouaaamaati ta aiaal 
•veryana'i need. Gat la aarreivaadaHta with CUBA 

THE CUBA REVIE ^V review ad«artlaara far the h«'i yau »aat. 



OF 




ALL 

ABOUT 

CUBA'* 



Copyright 1913 



IT COVERS THE ISLAND'S 

INDUSTRIES AND ACTIVITIES 

ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR POSTPAID 



Please mention THE CUBA RBVWW ivhen writing to AdverlUerg 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Los Instrumentos Agricolas y Maquinas 

de FARQUHAR 

han merecido distincion en la Isla de Cuba por su buena cualidad durante muchisimos 
alios, porque est^n hechos por mecanicos expertos, y est^n hechos de un material 
cuidadosamente escojido en una fabrica moderna, donde las condiciones y las necesida- 
des de Cuba han recibido su atencion especial, y per esta raz6n estdn atendidas 
cuidadosamente. 



Caidlogos d solicitud 

Direcci6n cablegr&flca : 
"Fenankle," New York 




C9rretp0n.den.cia en todoa 
los idiomas modernos 



Fabricamos Mdquinas de Vapor y Calderas, Mdquinas de Gasolina, Mdquinas de Trac- 
cion de Vapor y de Gasolina, Trilladoras, Aserraderos, Malacates, Arados, Rastras, 
Cultivadoras, Desgranadoras de Maiz, Molinos para Maiz, Sembradoras de Granos, Sem- 
bradoras de Maiz y de Algodon, Excavadoras de Patatas, Carretillas para Almacen, 
etc. Tambien hacemos Prensas hidrdulicas para Sidra, Vino, y Chapear. 

A. B. FARQUHAR & CO., Cotton Exchange Bldg., New York 




Prensaa d« 

Filtrar 

para Ingenios 

SHRIVER 

FILTER PRESSES 



Write ui for 
Catalog, Prices 
and Information 



T. Sbriver & Co. 

814 Hamilton St. 
Hcrriion, N. J. 



FOR MOLASSES USE 




MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



2630 Whitehall Building 
New York 



HAIMO^D TtVINK: 




BUILT BY 



STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

AGENTS IN CUBA: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 
26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, WARREN, Pa., U.S.A. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THL CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE , Editors and Publishers 

SUBSCRIPTION 
$1.00 Per Year - - - - - - - IQ Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 



Vol. XI 



SEPTEMBER, 1913 
Contents of This Nunmber 



No. 10 



The Cover Page Illuf.tration is of a Picturesque Street in Santiago. page 

Agricultural Matters 28, 29 

Comment on Cuban Matters, by: 

General Pino (Cuban) on Annexation 16 

New York World on the Administration 16 

Secretary of State Torriente (Cuban) on Sugar 8 

Mitchell Chappie (American) on Havana 16, 17 

Former U. S. Vice-President Fairbanks 17 

Vladimir Krymoft (Russian) on West Indies 17 

General Hernandez (Cuban) Praises Administration 17 

Commercial Matters: 

Coke Exports of Wales 25 

13uty Exemptions, on Harness, Steel Bars, etc 25 

Free Ports Projected 25 

Hamburg's Trade with Cuba 24, 25 

Trade Report of British Vice-Consul 24 

United Kingdom's Cotton Experts 24 

Financial Matters: 

August Prices for Cuban Securities 19 

Cuban- American Company Dividend 19 

F"oreign Claims Against Cuba 7 

New Loan Decided Upon 9 

Telephone Company Earnings 19 

Immigration for Six Months 8 

Isle of Pines News Items 30 

Lumber Exports to Cuba 33 

Mules and Horses Purchased by Government 8 

Mining Matters. Vast (Jre Deposits (Illustrated) 12, 13, 14 

Patent Medicine Regulations 8 

Ports Company Annulment — Views of English Newspapers 10. 11 

Railroad Matters: 

Cuba Railroad Earnings 18 

Cuban Central Railways Earnings 18 

Cuban Central Railway Condition 20, 21. 22 

Havana Electric Railway Earnings 18, 22 

Havana's Stage Line Earnings 22 

United Railways of Havana Earningo , 18 

Western Railway Earnings 18 

Sugar Industry: 

"Aguadita's" Extension Work 33 

Central "Catalina" Leased 35 

New Central in Oriente Province 32 

New Central "America" 32 

New Central near .Moron 32 

Opinion on Free Sugar. .Secretary of State Torriente 8 

Production of .Sugar Remedios District 37 

I'residenl Buys Sugar Mill H 

.Sugar Refinery Burns 38 

Willctt & (Jray's .Sugar Review (English) 34, 35 

Willelt & Gray's Sugar Review (Spanish) 36 

Sitanish Business Correspondence. Expert Advice 26 

Tannery Er.tablished in ('uba 41 

Tobacco Exports for Two Years and Value 23 

"Yankees" Attacked ami Defendcil by (Cubans 27 

MANY BEAUTIFUL ILLUSTU.N IIONS 



THL 
CUBA RLVILW 



'ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1913, by the Munson Steamship Line 



\'OLUME XI 



SEPTEMBER, 1913 



Number 10 



GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



THE POWERS AND CUBA PATENT MEDICINE REGULATIONS - 

VIEWS ON FREE SUGAR 



CUBA S 



A London despatch, dated 
Cuba's September 11th, to the Nezv 
Foreign York Evening Telegram, 
Claims says that the Cuban gov- 
ernment is about to present 
a note to the British, French and German 
governments simukaneously. The object is 
to obtain respite from the pressure which 
these governments are continuing to exert 
jointly to bring about the payment of al- 
leged damages suffered by British, French 
and German subjects during the Cuban 
revolution and the Spanish-American war. 

Should there be a disagreement between 
the Powers and Cuba over any particular 
claims Cuba will suggest that arbitration 
be resorted to, favoring tlie President of 
the United States as arbitrator. 

These claims are divisible into three 
classes. In the first class, for instance, 
fall claims for money and material fur- 
nished to Cuban revolutionary leaders, for 
much of which formal vouchers were given. 
It is understood that President Menocal 
and Secretary Torriente believe these 
should be paid without more delay than 
necessary to establish authenticity of the 
documents involved. 

The second class comprises claims which 
Cuba will insist she cannot consider in any 
circumstance, since to do so would violate 
her constitution. She will not consent to 
arbitration of these. Presumaljly she an- 
ticipates the support of the .American gov- 
ernment in this attitude. 

The third class lies Ijetween these two, 
claims concerning which there may be ar- 
bitrable differences of fjpinion. 

When the Treaty of Paris was signed the 
United States government assumed certain 
obligations, .'\mong them was the ol)liga- 



tion to settle with American citizens (and 
no others) for needless damage suffered by 
thern during Cuba's revolutions against 
Spain and for other damage through any 
failure of the Spanish government to exer- 
cise due diligence. Spain assumed analogous 
obligations with regard to her own subjects 
(and no other). It was agreed that for 
damage suffered in the legitimate course of 
those wars neither should pay. 

It is these latter claims which the Ger- 
man, French and British ministers have 
been trying to collect from the Cuban gov- 
ernment. 



When this crime was com- 

The Shooting mitted, Provincial Governor 
of Asbert, Representative Arias 

General Riva and Senator Morales were 
promptly arrested charged 
with the shooting and put into jail. 

The Neiv York Herald says in its account 
of the proceedings that Vidal Morales had 
little part in the affair and was released 
from custody on his own recognizance. The 
court could then go no further without 
consent of Congress. To settle the matter. 
Presient Menocal called an extra session 
of Congress for the purpose of modifying 
the criminal code, which, it had been dem- 
onstrated, prevented prosecution of mem- 
I)ers guilty of common law crimes even 
when Congress was not in session. 

When Congress met. Speaker Lanuza in- 
troduced a bill to modify the criminal code. 
The gist of it is that the courts may here- 
after proceed unless stopped by Congress. 
The Mouse took one look at the bill and 
the quorum faded awa.v, ;iiul none lias as- 
sembled since. 

'T'rr)l)alily." said .Speaker Lruiuza, "things 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



will drag along this way ^f ^^ J^^af .^h" 
Recent events have demonstrated that the 
courts may work up so much feelmg 
against an accused official that pubhc opm- 
ion will force the chambers to consent to a 
continuance of the case against him when 
Congress does meet. We are free to mfer 
that this is the reason the liberals are pre- 
venting a quorum." 

Dr L. A. Beltran, V. S., and 
Buying Capt. Vila of the Cuban 
Mules Army, have been m East bt. 
and Horses Louis and. Fort Worth, 
Texas, buying for the L-u- 
ban government 440 horses and 64 mules 
ThTs order is soon to be followed, says 
the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, by one 
twice as large. The horses are to be used 
as remounts for the Rural Guards, and are 
of a lar-er type than the Cubans generally 
buy The specifications call for horses 
from 15.1 to 15.3 hands high and the in- 
spection is quite as rigid as that made by 
buyers for the United States Army. _ 

Many of the horses offered are rejected 
on sight and others are turned back, after 
a more detailed inspection. The buymg is 
said by men interested in such contracts to 
indicate that the Cubans wish to mount 
their army on better animals than the un- 
der-sized pacing ponies ordinarily seen m 
that country. i • i- ^ 

The number of mules ordered indicates 
that a regular pack train is to be equipped, 
fifty pack animals and fourteen for saddle 
u^e The Cubans have bought several 
large orders of horses in East St. Louis, 
but never before have made such strict 
specifications as to size, soundness and 
quality. 

Under the new pharma- 
Patent ceutical rules just revived 
Medicine by President Menocal on 
Regulations September 3rd, foreign 
manufacturers will not need 
as was provided in the old rules, to be 
legally represented in Cuba by an agent, 
but they must explain on the labels of the 
medicine the name of the components to 
which it owes its value. Under the old 
rule it was provided that the component 
parts and the quantity of each ingredient 
should be given, but the manufacturers 
claimed this would be revealing their trade 
secrets and therefore unjust. The labels 
must also state the name of the manufac- 
turers. The sale of the medicines which 
imT^ede the procreation are to be barred ab- 
solutely from sale and a punishment of 
$50.00 for even advertising them is fixed 

Other provisions of the decree affect the 
question of the record which must be kept 
by the department of all drug stores which 



must be inscribed, all of these estabhsh- 
ments to be known in the future by the 
name of the druggist owner of the place. 



Seiior Torriente, Secretary 
Cuba's Views of State, in an exclusive in- 
on terview with a New York 

Free Sugar Herald representative on 
August 27th, said that Cuba 
is reminding Washington that under her 
treaty she enjoys a preferential and is re- 
questing that in tariff reforms the Ameri- 
can Congress respect her rights. The sub- 
ject was discussed at a Cabinet meeting 
on the same day. 

Cuba has no desire that the reciprocity 
treaty be terminated, believing both parties 
are finding it profitable. Cuba's special in- 
terest is sugar. 

"What will Cuba do when sugar is free?" 
was asked. 

Senor Torriente said : "We are now in- 
terested in protecting ourselves for the 
three years that must elapse before the 
duty on sugar will be removed. We cannot 
foresee our action when sugar will be free, 
for, frankly, opinion here is divided as to 
the effects on Cuba, some asserting they 
will be beneficial and others declaring to 
the contrary. Experience alone can deter- 
mine, but inasmuch as the removal of duty 
means the loss of privilege to us, we will 
request recompense in increased preferential 
on other products still dutiable or in some 
other form." 



The official figures of the 
Six Months Secretary of Sanitation re- 
Iiiiniigration cording the number of im- 
Figures migrants for the first six 
months of 1913, are as fol- 
lows : 

January 3,505 April 1,494 

February 2,222 May 1,378 

March 2,038 June 1,619 

The custom of carrying con- 
No cealed weapons in Cuba is 

Concealed well nigh universal and the 
Weapons President is seeking to abol- 
ish it by revoking all pistol 
licenses. This has been tried many times 
without lasting effect. Those regularly 
licensed constitute only a small proportion 
of the Cubans who habitually go armed, 
and would as soon think of leaving home 
without revolver and knife as without 
their hats. It is now proposed to pro- 
hibit the carrying of weapons under the 
severest penalties. 

Dr. Luis Mazon has been appointed first 
secretary of the Cuban legation in Vene- 
zuela. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEW ADMINISTRATION ACTIVITIES 



RECENT CENSUS FIGURES 

In the towns of Santa Clara Province a 
recent census gives the population as fol- 
lows : 

Abreus 6,024 

Cruces 11,503 

Calabazar 14,650 

Caibarien 12,235 

Camajuani 15,471 

Cienfuegos *81,462 

Cifuentes 6,003 

Corralillo 8,528 

Encrucijada 9,389 

Esperanza 21,958 

Palmira 10,009 

Placetas 20,043 

Quemado de Guines 13,005 

Rancho Veloz 9,025 

Ranchuelo 6,162 

Rodas 21,093 

Sagua la Grande 26,329 

Vueltas 18,854 

Sancti Spiritus 53,846 

Camarones 8,436 

Remedios 20,716 

San Juan de los Yeros 10,113 

Santa Clara *52,843 

Lajas 12,764 

Santo Domingo 23,371 

Trinidad 32,790 

Yaguajay 18,428 

Zulueta 7,238 

Total in the province 549,874 

More than one-fourth of the total popu- 
lation of the six provinces is found in this 
province. 

The last official census was made in 1907 
during the .\merican intervention. The 
population of Santa Clara was then 457,431. 
In five years accordinly there has been an 
increase of 92,743 inhaljitants. 

* Figures of 1012. 



SANTIAGO SWATERSUPPLYINADEQUATE 

Santiago de Cuba has been quite un- 
lucky as to her water supply for years. 
Three different aqueducts have been built 
by the .-\mcrican and Cuban governments, 
but none have been adequate and Santiago 
de Cuba every once in a while suffers from 
a water famine which moves the govern- 
ment to take some action. 

Engineers from the Public Works De- 
partment have been ordered to go to San- 
tiago to thoroughly study the difficulties 
and to devise a system which will supfjly 
the city's needs. 



CUBAN ENGINEERING CO. CONTRACT 

Reports that the contract with the Cuban 
Engineering Company would be annulled 
because of the company's plain failure to 
carry out the terms of the contract, have 
been denied by Secretarv of Public Works 
Villalon. 



KHAKI SUITS BARRED 

Country people have been recently im- 
posed upon many times by men who have 
gone to remote farms, dressed in khaki, and 
stated they were members of the rural 
guard, and secured accommodations. Then 
at an opportune time they would rob the 
place and disappear. 

To prevent this the government has for- 
bidden all those engaged in outdoor work, 
especially engineers and surveyors, to wear 
suits made of this material. The latter 
are objecting vigorously, claiming that their 
work requires clothing that will stand wear 
and tear and that khaki or corduroy is the 
only kind that gets these results. 



NEW $15,000,000 LOAN 

The Cuban government will float a loan 
of about $15,000,000 within the next few 
months. Preliminary authorization has 
been given by President Wilson and Mr. 
Bryan, the Secretary of State, says a Nczu 
York Herald Washington despatch of 
September lltli. 

Under the Piatt amendment the United 
States has general supervisory power over 
Cuban finances. 

The Cuban government, through Dr. 
Pablo Desvernine, its Minister here, sev- 
eral weeks ago made formal request for 
tlie authority of the United States to float 
a loan. When the Menocal administration 
was inaugurated it was confronted with a 
deficit. Although no puljlic statement has 
ever been issued, the deficit has been esti- 
mated at from $5,000,000 to $12,000,000. 

President Menocal directed the ' Secre- 
tary of the Treasury to prepare a state- 
ment showing the actual financial condition' 
of the government. This was laid before 
the State Department. Mr. Bryan decided 
that the loan was necessary and was within 
the ability of the Cuban government to. 
repay. The terms of the loan are now 
being drawn up ly the Cuban government 



The agricultural school of Havana may 
be shortly transferred to the experiment 
station at Santiago de las Vegas. 



10 T H E C U B A R E \' I E W" 

THE PORTS COMPANY ANNULMENT 



ENGLISH 1N\EST0RS \"ERY MUCH DISTURBED OVER THE MATTER 

OPINIONS OF THE LONDON PRESS 

The Daily Express comments as follows : 

"The Cuban government, it will be remembered, recently took the remarkable step _ot 
appointing an otEcial appraiser to value the company's concession prior to its expropria- 
tion. The authorities allege that the sum expended by the company on the development 
of its property is less than originally stipulated, and that in these circumstances the 
agreement must be canceled. This action has naturally created the suspicion that the 
government is trvnng by any means in its power to secure control of the port." 

It says further: "Everybody would be prepared to suspend judgment during the presen- 
tation of its case,, and to listen to it when presented, but it will be a hopeless day for 
Cuba in the world's markets if she should start upon a policy of confiscation without the 
very fullest justification. And it must not be forgotten that there have been other in- 
stances recently of an impleasant nature. The bill recently introduced into the Senate, 
and not proceeded with at the time owing to the dissolution, simply provided for annulling 
the concession and repaying to the Ports Company the cash value of work actually 
performed ! The assertion seems to be that the monopoly was obtained by corruption, 
and a complete investigation was demanded. If this is the assertion, what of the position 
of innocent bondholders and shareholders, induced the more readily to support the con- 
cern by the attitude of the government in the matter of receipts? There is an ugly and 
dirt\' appearance about the business which requires much explanation, and we still hope 
that the Cuban government is not going to blacken its hands irretrievably in this un- 
pleasant business."' 

The Pall Mall Gasette calls the annulment "a confiscation policy" and says : "We need 
hardly say that the government will eventualh' have to make out a strong case if it is 
to do anything in the way of confiscating concessions already granted." 

"The concession was originally granted by a Ministrv- belonging to the opponents of 
the existing government, and, therefore, is regarded as coming from a tainted source. 
But the legaUtj- and regularity" of the concession have at least twice before been contested 
and proved in the Cuban courts. In these circumstances, it would seem improbable that 
the company can be deprived of their rights as a bona-fide matter of law,'' says the 
Financier and Bullionist. 

The Pall Mall Gazette in a later issue declared : "It seems an amazing thing that, after 
revenues have been collected and dues appropriated under the concession by the govern- 
ment, the latter should now turn round and repudiate the bargains of its predecessors in 
office. But it is also necessary to know why Cuban Ports interests on this side have 
pooh-poohed the rumors about government action, especially in connection with the 
recently-introduced bill, seeing that there was evidently strong foundation for the rumors 
of hostility. We hope that this is not indicative of earlier business methods in connection 
with the concession. * * * The Cuban government is not one to be entrusted directly 
or indirectly with British capital." 

"The raising of contentious issues at this early period suggests that the authorities in 
Cuba are anxious to regain possession of the port, but they can scarcely do this without 
giving the company substantial compensation." is the opinion of the Financial Times. 
This journal also beUeves "that, in the event of the Cuban government proceeding to 
extremes, assistance will be derived from the L^nited States authorities in securing fair 
play for the company." 

The London Standard expects "an official statement to be issued by the Ports Company 
shortly, but in the meantime it is stated that all steps are being taken to protect the 
interests of the stock and bond holders." 

The Stock Exchange Gazette takes the same view. It says : "The company is 'under 
the jurisdiction of the United States. An appeal will, if necessary, be made in due 
course by the board to the authorities at Washington, and if the property is to be ex- 
propriated, it will be necessan.- to call upon President Wilson to see that fair compensa- 
tion is given to the company. Even so. however, the position will be unsatisfactory, 
for the concession was granted for a period of thirt\- years, of which less than two have 
so far elapsed. A large amount of capital expenditure has been undertaken which has 
not yet become remunerative, and is scarcely likely to be taken at its par value for 
purposes of an official appraisement. The probabilitj- is, therefore, that the company will 
lose hea-vily by the transfer of it-« assets ;.t this juncture ; in fact, the whole of the "share 



T H E C U B A R E V I E A\' 11 

capital would probably be lost. The bondholders' position is, however, more hopeful, 
it being impossible to conceive that the most drastic valuation will bring out a figure 
insufficient to cover the greater part of this class of capital." 

The Jnzestors' Rez'iezi' talks plainly on the matter as may be seen in the following 
quotation from its columns : 

■'We begin to see a little more clearly what is involved in this Cuban Ports dispute, 
and fear it cannot be gainsaid that the concession under which the bonds were issued 
here was obtained by fraud or something too near it for comfort. Three natives of Cuba 
and two foreigners carried the thing through on grab-all lines, and when a change of 
government came in the island the new Ministry immediateh- proceeded to act in what 
they considered to be the interests of traders and the inhabitants of the island at large. 
They brought in a bill to cancel the concession. Some time ago, it may be recollected, 
Mr. Govett published a most interesting and optimistic report with regard to the value 
of the lands to be reclaimed in the course of executing the port works. Against these 
prospective assets of high value the promoters or the organisers of the Ports Company 
issued to themselves and have been trading off here $10,000,000 of share capital. No 
actual asset is represented by that share capital, and none of the expenditure on the 
works is provided from it. The English bondholders are finding all the money, and we 
cannot gather that they are in danger whatever happens : indeed, the government professes 
its willingness to refund all the money thus far spent on the works. The outlook for 
the shareholders, however, is much less comforting we regret to say. but hopes are 
indulged in that the dispute may end in a compromise, and it would assuredly be unwise 
on the part of the Cuban government to punish innocent holders in Europe for crimes in 
which they had no participation. Probably, however, there is still a great mass of the 
wind share capital unsold, and it might be onh- justice were the amount of it to be 
ascertained and canceled. In that event innocent shareholders here might be willing to 
submit to cash assessment, if .not too severe, in exchange for the retention of an interest 
in the valuable property to be created when the works are completed. It is a disagreeable 
episode altogether, and a good deal of indignation has been expressed over what looks 
like the hole-and-corner manner in which the government has acted. It may not be to 
blame, but it looks as if it had given too little thought to foreign interests." 

"Any purchaser of a decent line of the Debentures would have to pay a very different 
price to that obtained by forced sellers of a few thousand dollars' worth within the last 
few days. I would advise holders of the five per cent bonds not to throw them away, 
since confiscation is out of the question. Some 6^4 million dollars have been expended 
by the company in hard cash, and the interest should be fairly secure, even in the event 
of the threatened 20 per cent reduction of the dues. The Cuban government is not at all 
likely to treat unfairly a concern doing valuable service, and to expose itself to interna- 
tional complications." says the Financier and Bullionist, London. August 16th. 

The Rialto finds "the matter not a pleasant one, for Cuba has only recently given 
another instance of bad faith. And it is passing strange that the government should 
have been collecting port dues and handing over any proceeds to the company if it 
considered the concession corrupt and invalid." 

Secretary of State Torriente thinks the government's position impregnable. The Port 
Company's appeal against the presidential decree, which denied its legal existence, alleging 
violations of the commercial code, declares the decree violates the constitution, denies the 
alleged violations of the code and quotes evidence purporting to prove the government 
has recognized the company. Commenting on this appeal Senor Torriente reiterated his 
belief that the government's position is impregnable. 

-Asked on August 27th whether compromise was possible he declared it was not. but 
that criminal action to put guilty persons in jail was possible. 

Clement J. Suarez. writing to the London Times from Belgium, denies that President 
Menocal has broken faith with investors, neither has he abrogated or canceled the law 
of February, 1911, granting the concession. He says further: 

"President Menocal declares in the decree that there is no identity between the persons 
contemplated b}- law and those forming the jiresent administrative board of control 
which the decree declares (1) has not complied with the statute law of Cuba: (2) is 
guilty of felony and misdemeanor: (3) has conspired with others corruptly to mislead 
European investors by issuing false statements: (4) has been guilty of treaS'On against 
the State of Cuba by attempting to bribe officials of the United States government 
dealing with foreign affairs : ( 5 ) has fraudulently expended the public taxes of Cuba in 
corrupting newspapers published in the island : and is. finally, an association incapable, 
in its present unreformed condition, of receiving the tonnage tax, the collections of 
which are held in suspense pending judicial decision. The decree gives no fewer than 
22 names of persons involved in these dishonorable transactions. 



12 THECUBAREVIEW 



MINING MATTERS 



THE VAST ORE DEPOSITS OF CUBA 500,000,000 TONS AVAILABLE 

FURTHER AREAS RICH IN ORE 

The discovery that Eastern Cuba is over-laid with a deposit of iron, accessible for 
mining w-ihout tunneling or shafting, which aggregates fully 500,000,000 tons or more, 
means that a new source of supply is available for the American iron and steel industry 
that is of the greatest importance. Less than ten years ago was this deposit investigated. 
In 1904 samples of ore were taken from a small area that were found to contain over 
50 per cent of iron. This was followed by a more exhaustive study of what is known 
as the Mayari district, by pits 300 feet apart, with borings made with a 2-inch carpenter's 
auger in the bottom of each pit. At hrst, each foot of pit the borings were analyzed 
separately; but the ore proved of such uniform quality that samples were then taken of 
each 6 feet, by borings only, and the distance between these was increased to 1,000, 
1,500 and 1,750 feet. 

The only iron ranges in this country that can be contrasted with the Cuban deposits 
m extent are the Superior, which in their earlier history supplied 75 per cent of the ore 
consumed by American furnaces. 

The ore in its natural state contains a very large percentage of water, which increases 
to some extent with the depth below the surface. Near the surface it is red in color, 
with somewhat granular structure. The color gradually changes with depth, finally reach- 
ing a bright yellow. The consistency also changes toward the bottom to a clay-like, 
sticky mass. The relative proportion of red and yellow ore is quite variable; in some 
places the yellow reaches close to the surface, while in o,thers the red extends almost 
to the underlying serpentine. 

In the Mayari division of the Spanish-American Iron Company, the ore lies on an 
irregular plateau, about 15 miles long and 5 miles wide at . the widest point, entirely 
covered with pine trees and brush, which grow directly on the ore. The elevation at 
the northern extremity, which is approached by the railroad, is about 1,700 feet above 
sea-level. At the southern end the general elevation is about 2,000 feet. Ore is removed 
by means of scraper-bucket excavators and steam-shovels, these machines loading into 
special standard-gage, side-dump steel cars of 100,000 pounds capacity. 

The Spanish-American Iron Company is also operating hard-ore mines of the Daiquiri 
group, on the south coast of Cuba, about fifteen miles east of Santiago. The main ore 
property at Daiquiri, once considered as three separate mines, San Antonio, Lola and 
Magdalena, has now developed into a practically continuous body of ore. The ore in 
the Lola mine can easily be distinguished from the waste by its darker color. The 
waste-banks are on the right and the ore-lowering inclines on the left. Both the ore and 
the over-burden are removed from a series of benches. Fourteen steam-shovels are 
employed for stripping, the largest of which is a 90-ton Marion carrying a 4-yard dipper. 
All are served by locomotives and trains of side-dump cars for removing the rock to 
waste-banks on the back side of the hill. 

On account of the rock being mixed more or less with the ore, it is necessary to load 
all of the ore by hand into small cars, which are run to lowering-inclines. These inclines 
carry the ore in skip-cars to the main-line railroad, which runs from the foot of Lola 
hill to La Playa, the shipping-port at the coast, four miles from the mines. 

A hoisting-incline is provided for raising coal, machinery and general supplies from 
the main-line railroad to any level of the mine. A modern air-compressor plant is lo- 
cated along the railroad near the San Antonio mine, and a pipe-system is arranged to 
furnish compressed air for tunnel-exploration and for general service to any part of the 
mine. Steam-drills are used in the principal blasting-work. Ore is also brought from 
the Berraco and Sigua groups of mines, located to the east of Daiquiri, over a narrow- 
gage railroad joining the standard-gage main-line about two miles below Daiquiri 
mines. All of the ore is crushed before shipment in a Gates crusher-plant to sizes suit- 
able for use in the blast furnaces. 

The contour of the ground at the point where excavations were begun, in the Mayari 
district, though appearing to be quite regular, is not ideal for steam-shovel operation. 
The depth of ore is not uniform, in many places the underlying rock projecting far up 
into the ore, even to the surface. The general slope of the ground, even in the most 
nearly level places, is quite irregular. Therefore, it is difficult to find many places 
where it is possible to operate a steam-shovel for an extended period in a cut of eco- 
nomical depth without including a considerable portion of the rock with the ore ex- 



THE CUBA REVIEW^ 



Vi 



cavated. For this reason the scraper-bucket excavators are more satisfactory as well 
as more economical for excavation, although their capacity is considerably less than that 
of the large-size shovel used. Three of these excavators are now at work, together with 
one 90-ton Bucyrus steam-shovel. The excavators operate 1.25-cubic yards Page buckets, 
although a larger capacity of bucket is contemplated. The bucket swings through a 
radius of 60 feet, and without difficulty removes all the ore for a width of about 100 feet 
down to the rock bottom, the projecting rock and stumps being discarded. Each ma- 
chine-crew consists of one operator, one fireman, and three pitmen. As the machine 
works up hill or down hill continually, and the track follows the same grade, cars can 
be dropped down by gravity to be loaded as needed, with a minimum aomunt of loco- 
motive service. 

The nodulizing plant, located on the east side of the raw-ore yard, consists of twelve 
rotar\- kilns, 10 feet in diameter, and 125 feet long, set at an inclination of % inch per 
foot, and 20 feet apart. The kilns are of the type commonly used in the manufacture of 
cement. The diameter, however, is unusually large in order to overcome trouble from 
"ringing-up" in the hot zone, which often causes serious delays in the operation of kilns 
of smaller diameter. Each kiln is carried by two steel tires rigidly fastened to the shell. 
The cut-steel driving-gear attached to the shell close to the tire near the cold end is 
152.78 inches in diameter, and 4 inches in pitch. Each kiln is driven by a 35 horse-power 
variable-speed motor. A 7.5-ton over-head electric traveling-crane, carrying a man- 
trolley with 3 cubic yards grab-bucket, is provided for removing the nodules from the 
trough of the nodulizing plant and loading them into oO-ton electric transfer-cars on 
the track passing alongside of the trough. 

The construction at the water-front is somewhat unusual. Close to the front leg 
of the bridge, and parallel to its runway, is a trestle extending over one side of a trough. 
A transfer-car brings the nodules from the nodulizing-plant, and discharges from one 
side into this trough, in position to be readily loaded into the vessel, or to be moved 
back to storage under the main span of the bridge by the grab-buckets. The bottom of 
the trough is one foot above high tide. Its outer wall is formed by planking spiked to 
a row of piles. All of this construction, being above the water-line, is not subject to 
damage by the teredo navalis. From the outside of the trough-wall the bottom drops 
of? at an angle of 45 degrees to 28 feet deep at the fender-line, which is approximately 
under the hinge of the boom of the bridge. 

Considerable dredging was necessary in order to provide a suitable harbor. A basin 
1,500 feet long, 200 feet wide at each end, and 400 feet wide at the widest point, was 




General view of nodiiliziiiK plant at I-clton. Twelve kilns arc in operation. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



dredged to a depth of 28 feet. The approach-channel, 2,500 feet long'- and 200 feet width, 
was dredged to the same depth. Felton, on Cagimaya Bay, a well-protected branch on 
the south side of Nipe Bay, close to its entrance, has proved a very safe and satisfactory 
harbor. 

Each year more investigations are made of the deposits beyond the mines opened, and 
the results confirm the statement that this and the Mayari beds contain fully 500,000,000 
tons with an extensive area still unexplored. The tonnage available for steel making 
may be 600,000,000 or more, as only a half million tons or more of ore are mixed 
annually. — Henry Hale, in the Scientiftc American, New York. 

The Mining and Engineering World recently printed abstracts of discussions before 
the American Institute of Mining Engineers in February, 1912, on the valuation of iron 
mines for taxation. In the course of the proceedings comparisons were made of the 
Cuban ore vC^ith that of the Lake Superior mines, and Mr. E. E. White of Ishpeming, 
Mich., prepared a table of costs of nodulized Cuban ore, which is as follows : 



COST OF CUBAN ORE AT PITTSBURGH 



Cts. per Unit 



Mining, 27 cts. per ton, 40 cts. nodulized 0.76 

NoduHzing, $1 per ton 1.89 

1,200 miles sea-haul at 0.05'22 = 62.6 cts. per ton 1.19 

25 miles land-haul in Cuba at 0.336 = 8 cts. per ton 0.15 

328 miles land-haul to Pittsburgh at 0.336 = $1.10 per ton 2.09 

Loading and unloading boats, 10 cts. per ton 0.19 

Terminal costs in Cuba, 18 cts. per ton 0.34 

Terminal costs in U. S., 15 cts. per ton 0.28 

Royalty, 5 cts. per ton 0.095 

Taxes, 5 cts. per ton 0.095 



Premium for Bessemer quality, 48 cts. per ton. 7.080 

Premium for phosphorus, 0.025 per cent, 25 cts. per ton. 

Total premium, 73 cts. per ton 1.38 



Total cost per unit to compare with cost of average Lake Superior ore at 5.57 5.70 
Duty, 12 cts. per ton 0.23 



5.93 




Steam drag at Felton mining properties owned by the Spanish-American Iron Company. 



THE CUBA R E \M E W 



15 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INTERESTING NEWS NOTES REGARDING VARIOUS MATTERS PERTAINING 

TO THE ISLAND 



Jennings S. Cox. one of the best known 
Americans in Cuba, died in New York re- 
cently. For the past eighteen years he had 
been general manager of the Spanish- 
American Iron Company and the Pennsyl- 
vania Steel Company's mines in Oriente 
Province. He was a graduate of the school 
of mines of the Columbian University, 
class of '87. 

According to the official register there are 
1,321 lawyers practising their profession in 
the republic. 

Citizens of Cabaiguan, Santa Clara Prov- 
ince, have begun to hold meetings to segre- 
gate the borough from the municipality of 
Sancti Spiritus to become a free and inde- 
pendent municipality. 

The Inglaterra Hotel, the Seisdedos bank- 
ing house and a jewelry store in Guan- 
tanamo were destroyed by fire on August 
18th. The loss will probably be $200,000. 

The Terry Theatre in Cienfuegos, re- 
ported to be in the market, will not be sold. 
On the contrary, the present owner, dona 
Teresina Porticos, widow of D. Thomas 
Terry. wiP make considerable repairs to 
the building and put in fine condition for 
the show business for which it was con- 
structed. 

Serious charges have been made by a 
member of the provincial council of Pinar 
del Rio. against Governor ^Manuel Sobrado. 
The most serious accusation is of misap- 
propriating state funds. A special investi- 
gation judge has been appointed by the 
Supreme Court to look into the matter. 

The new edifice of the Spanish Club in 
Puerto Padre is nearly ready and will be 
inaugurated with appropriate ceremonies on 
October 12th, that date being the tenth 
anniversary of the foundation of the so- 
ciety. 

The Mimng and Engineering World says 
that oil has been discovered in the prov- 
ince of Matanzas. The well was drilled 
near Legunilla and 100 bbls. per day are 
beinK secured by pumping. The discovery 
of oil in this quantity is an encouragement 
and will result in a number of test wells 
being sunk in Matanzas. 

According to the Correo de Oriente, 
published at Ifolguin, a new gold mine has 
been found in that section and that the vein 
is a rich one. The same authority records 
the discovery of a coal deposit. 



Havana's council will try and control the 
price of condensed milk which a member 
declares has been too high. An attempt will 
be made to purchase a supply and establish- 
ing stores for the sale of the product. 

There were rumors that Ex-President 
Gomez had cut short his European tour 
and was returning to Cuba, even the date 
of his arrival at New York being given. 
The story proved to be a canard. General 
Gomez will not return until next December. 

The appearance of the buggy, which is 
peculiarly an American institution, about 
the town of La Gloria in such numbers of 
late is a good sign. It is an evidence of 
prosperity and is better in every way than 
saddle and pack-horses. 

It means dissatisfaction with the birdle- 
path stage of development — in which all 
Spanish American countries stagnate — and 
a desire for roads fit for vehicle traffic, 
which will later develop into a demand for 
good roads, the appearance of which is a 
sure sign of a progressive agricultural com- 
munity. — La Gloria Cuban American. 

Some machinery for the electric plant at 
Isabela de Sagua, Santa Clara Province, 
has already been received. The balance 
will arrive very soon. Sr. Carlos Galvani 
is the owner of the new enterprise. 

Mr. Everardo has been granted a permit 
to install an electric plant at the town of 
Agramonte, which is to be used for lighting 
the town. 

The Cuban consul at New Orleans has 
informed his government that the horse 
and mule disease known as "authrax" has 
assumed alarming proportions in Louisiana 
and has invaded Alabama and Mississippi. 

At the instance of the Secretary of Sani- 
tation, Dr. Nunez, one of the best surgeons 
of the island. President Menocal has re- 
cently signed a decree by which sanato- 
riums are created for the benefit of chil- 
dren afflicted with tuberculosis and provid- 
ing for their free medical assistance. 

\ very wise law has lieen enacted pro- 
viding for the retirement with pay of those 
engaged in the military service as a reward 
and in recognition of the services rendered 
to the cf)untry. 

It is stated that Mayor General Jose de 
I". Monteagudo, who was in the United 
States all sunnner on sick leave, will return 
to TIa\;ina ;tt llic end of the present month. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



GENERAL COMMENT ON CUBAN AFFAIRS 



SPOILSMEN ARRAYED AGAINST THE 
PRESIDENT 

Many in close touch with the ins and 
outs of Cuban conditions, political and com- 
mercial, believe the republic faces the most 
serious problem since the American flag 
was lowered from the national palace, says 
the New York World's Havana corre- 
spondence of September 1st. It finds that 
Cuba at present faces conditions that 
might be subdivided into four parts. 

1. A chaotic political condition, and the 
attempt of professional politicians and 
those who crave power to overthrow the 
influence of and discredit the Menocal ad- 
ministration. 

2. The action of Congress in refusing to 
accede to the wishes of the President and 
temper the "immunity clause" of the con- 
stitution so that its members would not be 
entirely immune from civil courts. 

3. The recent Presidential decree that 
dissolved the Ports Company of Cuba and 
annulled millions of invested foreign capital, 
which may serve to cheapen the commercial 
integrity of the republic with foreign in- 
vestors. 

4. The recently enacted military retiring 
law, by which nearly one hundred army 
officers have been retired and which po- 
litical factions have seized upon for cam- 
paign material to stir up discontent in the 
army. 

Cuban politics are thorough disorganized. 
The Liberal Party is shattered and the 
"patriotic conjunction," composed of Con- 
servatives and Asbert Liberals, and which 
elected President Menocal, is likewise dis- 
rupted. This division was brought on by 
the President's honesty. "Instead of listen- 
ing to party clamor Menocal set about run- 
ning his office in a business way. Where a 
man of opposite faith was efficient he was 
retained in office," and this conduct, as may 
be imagined, caused a loud and far reach- 
ing howl of objections from the politicians 
who want all the government jobs. 

The refusal of Congress to temper the 
"immunity clause," which allows members 
to slay and pillage without fear of civil 
courts, was a slap at the President. This 
wrangle grew out of the killing of Gen. 
Armando de J. Riva, Chief of the National 
Police. The accused men are in jail, but 
persistent rumor says enough evidence of 
a certain sort will be produced to clear 
them. 

The law retiring army officers has given 
those opposing the administration a chance 



to stir up strife, and politicians have seized 
upon it as a weapon to question Menocal's 
executive ability. 

The World writer predicts that "Menocal 
will either make a magnificent success or a 
rank failure. There is no middle-of-the- 
road way for him." 



ANNEXATION FAVORED BY CUBANS 

General Pino, a member of the Cuban 
Congress for the province of Pinar del Rio, 
in an interview with a representative of the 
Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, spoke very 
freely concerning his country's relations 
with the United States. He said : 

"If the question was put to a vote, the 
people of Cuba would in all probability 
express a willingness and even a desire to 
become a State of the American Union, 
but intervention at the hands of the Ameri- 
can people is not desired and will never be. 

"If we were to become a State of this 
Union and elect our own Legislature and 
Governor and other State officers our people 
would be entirely satisfied. But we would 
be opposed to a government like that which 
Porto Rico now has. We would not want 
a Governor appointed by Washington in 
whose selection our people would have no 
part." 

He said also that "in all sections of the 
island one may see a contented people en- 
gaged in the various lines of human en- 
deavor, confident that their times of armed 
conflict are past and that every one is guar- 
anteed life and liberty. The courts in the 
island at this time are far superior to any- 
thing Cuban people have heretofore known." 

General Pino has extensive tobacco fields 
in Pinar del Rio and is devoting almost his 
entire time and attention to their cultivation. 



AMERICAN PRIDE PUNCTURED 

he Prado or "Broadway" of Havana, 
now paved with cement and thronged with 
hurrying automobiles, elegant equippages 
and gay throngs, and illuminated by electric 
lights, becomes a veritable fairyland on 
balmy evenings. The band is playing, and 
listening Americans innocently sit down in 
some vacant seats, when along comes an 
attendant to collect a fee of 5 cents. The 
American resents it, and immediately hires 
an automobile at $5 an hour rather than 
pay the pittance for a seat which he feels 
ought to be free. After all, it is the spirit 
of things to which the American takes ex- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 



ception. At the hotel are American papers, 
magazines and other home reminders wel- 
come to the average American. 

Perhaps this surplus of American jour- 
nalism leads him to address cab drivers and 
policemen in his own tongue, expecting 
them to speak English — but they don't. The 
Cuban insists upon speaking Spanish, and 
for the first time many an American has his 
national pride punctured as he realizes 
that there are other people on earth besides 
his fellow citizens. — ^litchell Chappie in 
National Ma gas inc. 



HOW TROUBLE WAS STIRRED UP 

(From Salem (Mass.) News) 

Former Vice-President of the United 
States Fairbanks, an extremely conserva- 
tive man, recently said that "trouble was 
stirred up in Cuba after the first govern- 
ment in the island had been established, 
'by speculators, by the owners of public 
utilities and of great sugar and tobacco 
plantations,' who desired annexation as a 
means of enhancing the value of their 
property." 

He said further : "Men who wanted to 
fatten on government contracts, or who 
were eager for military distinction, or who 
wanted Cuba annexed because of the 
chance to exploit her railroads, sugar and 
tobacco plantations and other sources of 
wealth, were eager for war ; they felt that 
out of it would come the annexation of 
Cuba to the United States, and as Ameri- 
can territory the value of its resources 
would be largely increased. The yellow 
press played its selfish and nefarious part; 
it was moved by no consideration of either 
patriotism or national honor." 

The testimony of the former vice presi- 
dent accords exactly with the statements 
made by Hon. William H. Moody, then 
congressman from this district, as to the 
pressure brought to bear on members of 
Congress by the war lobby, by men am- 
bitious for promotion by contractors and 
makers of ships and guns and ammunition. 



ALL TO BE AMERICAN TERRITORY 

Editor X'ladimir Krymoff of the Novoe 
Vreuiya, the leading newspaper in Russia, 
has spent four weeks in tropical countries 
of America, and in that time has visited 
Cuba, Jamaica and the Central American 
republics in the interest of his publication 
to study conditions in these countries and 
their attitude toward the United States. 

While in Xevv York he gave the press 
his opinions on the matters. He said : 

"I have been particularly interested in 
trying to determine whether those coun- 
tries are going to be Americanized or not. 
I have interviewed many persons of note 



in the various republics, and they express 
the hope that such a thing will not come 
to pass. From what I have seen and heard 
I am of the opinion that at least all the 
countries of Central America and the Ca- 
ribbean will eventually become American 
territory. 

"I saw American officials in Panama and 
I saw American officials in the West In- 
dies. Cuba is supposed to be an independ- 
ent republic, but to me it seems quite 
American. I spoke English everywhere. I 
saw mail boxes bearing the legend 'U. S. 
Mail.' I found I could buy there every- 
thing American. I saw sugar that had 
been grown in Cuba, sent to the United 
States to be refined, and then brought back 
home to be sold. 

"In Santiago I could not pay my bills 
in Cuban money. I had to pay them with 
American monev." 



LOUISIANA S SUGAR PLANTATIONS 

These will soon be broken up into small 
vegetable and fruit farms, says the New 
Orleans Picayune. 

"The question of a contemplated cut in 
the import on foreign sugars, with an ulti- 
mate aim of placing such on the free list 
entirely three years hence, has naturally 
disturbed the planter quite as much as the 
actual loss of the crop. 

"The question of just what crops can be 
substituted has been discussed only in the 
abstract ; in the concrete it is a difficult one 
to answer. Stock raising may be said to be 
one of the most attractive : corn growing 
has proved successful, but both of these 
operations can be carried on on lands worth 
only a fraction of the value now placed by 
the tax assessor on those devoted to sugar. 
Other crops have been advocated and have 
been planted for years, the three "P's" for 
instance — peas, pecans and peanuts. The 
three "S's" may also be cited — strawberries, 
string beans and spinach — while the rais- 
ing of citrous fruits has proved a success, 
but hardly north of the New Orleans 
parallel. 



PRAISES THE ADMINISTRATION OF 
PRESIDENT MENOCAL 

General Ensebio Hernandes spoke re- 
cently on invitation at a Liberal Party 
meeting near Havana. His hearers ex- 
pected criticism and denunciation of the 
.Menocal administration, but the si)eakcr, 
himself a "Liberal," disa|)pointed them by 
praising the administration called for 
cheers for its work and said the Conser- 
vatives had in three months done more 
good for tlie country than the Liberals did 
in the four years tliey were in power. 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN RAILROAD MATTERS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD, THE HAVANA ELECTRIC, ETC. 
The Cuba Railroad Company's Earnings. 

The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of July and for the fiscal year ended 
July 31st compares as follows : 

1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 

July gross $324,186 $334,393 $262,665 $233,440 $162,429 

Expenses 188,673 185,782 143,313 115,007 113,411 

July net $135,513 $148,610 $119,351 $118,432 $49,017 

Charges 66,791 66,375 60,125 36,667 34,995 

July surplus $68,721 $82,235 $59,226 $81,765 $14,021 

Gross earnings, July 1st $324,186 $334,393 $262,665 $233,440 $162,429 

Net profits 135.513 148,610 119,351 118,432 49,017 

Fixed charges 66,791 66,375 60,125 36,666 34,995 

Month's surplus $68,721 $82,235 $59,226 $81,765 $14,021 



Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 



Weekly receipts : 
Week ending August 3rd... 
Week ending August 10th. . 
Week ending August 17th.. 
Week ending August 24th . . 



1913 


1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


$55,558 


$51,358 


$48,021 


$45,289 


$41,309 


56,067 


52,856 


44,056 


43,167 


40,583 


56,108 


51,421 


47,093 


43,225 


39,458 


52,546 


46,743 


45,326 


42,547 


35,680 



Earnings of the United Railways of Havana 



Weekly receipts : 
Week ending August 3nd... 
Week ending August 9th . . . 
Week ending August 16th.. 
Week ending August 23rd.. 



1913 


1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


£20,438 


£19,197 


£15,555 


£16,587 


£14,517 


21,003 


20,984 


15,761 


16,168 


14,200 


20,738 . 


19,455 


15,599 


16,076 


14,725 


19,750 


19,214 


15,870 


15,852 


14,473 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA, LTD. 



CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS, LTD. 



Weekly receipts : 






Week 


ly receipts : 






August 2nd. .. £6,002 


Increase. . 


£1,538 


August 


2nd. . . £6,145 


Increase. . 


£360 


August 9th... 6,303 


Increase. . 


1,512 


August 


9th... 6,848 


Increase . . 


1,082 


August 16th.. 5,929 


Increase. . 


1,498 


August 


16th.. 6,642 


Increase. . 


1,730 


August 23rd.. 5,791 


Increase. . 


1,471 


August 


23rd.. 7,821 


Increase. . 


3,488 


August 30th.. 5,445 


Increase. . 


174 


August 


30th . . 6,908 


Increase. . 


4,427 



Orders have been placed in the United 
States by the Cuban Central Railway for 
three superheater ten wheel locomotives, 
three superheater consolidation locomo- 
tives and two smaller engines. 

Robert Orr, general manager of the 
United Railways of Havana, purposes to 
extend the wharf of his company at Talla- 
piedra. Plans for the improvement have 
already been filed with the government. 



ENGLISH CAPITAL IN CUBA 

According to the Havana Avtsador Co- 
mercial, English capital invested in Cuban 
railways and the mileage of these roads is 
as follows. The figures are for 1912. 

Mileage 1,690 

Capital invested £26,950,867 

Net income £1,323,827 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 

AUGUST PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

(Quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., New York) 

Bid Asked 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent Bonds (Interior) 95 97 

Republic of Cuba Exterior 5 per cent Bonds 99% 100 1/4 

Havana City First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 103 108 

Havana Citv Second Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 100 104 

Cuba R. R. First Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 100 102 

Cuba R. R. Preferred Stock 95 100 

Cuba Co. 6 per cent Debentures 96 100 

Cuba Co. 7 per cent Cumulative Preferred Stock 100 104 

Havana Electric Ry. Co. Consol. Mtge. 5 per cent Bonds 93^2 94% 

Havana Electric Ry. Light & Power Co. Pfd. Stock 91 96 

Havana Electric Ry. Light & Power Co. Com. Stock 81 86 

Matanzas Market Place 8 per cent Bond Participation Certificates 100 104 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Coll. Tr. 6 per cent Gold Bonds of 1918... 93^-2 95 

Santiago Electric Light & Traction Co. First ]\Iortgage 6 per cent Bonds 98 Vt 98^/^ 
.•Ml prices of bonds quoted on an "and interest" basis 



NOT TO ANNUL TELEPHONE CON- 
CESSION 

President ]\Ienocal issued a statement 
August 12th saying that on account of ru- 
mors that the Cuban government intended 
to follow the action against the Ports Im- 
provement Company by similar attacks on 
American companies, especially the tele- 
phone company, he desired to explain that 
the government has no such intention. On 
the contrary, the President added, the Cu- 
ban government intended to continue to 
extend to such companies all the protection 
to which they were rightfully entitled, but 
reserved the right to exact a strict fulfill- 



ment of all obligations to which com- 
panies were committed under the terms of 
their concessions. 

During August the Cuban Telephone 
Company's subscribers had increased to 
14,552 as compared with 13,751 on July 31st. 

The earnings for August totalled $80,947.04 
as against $76,998.51 for July. Work has 
begun on the local station at Placetas del 
Xorte, Santa Clara Province. 

The Cuban-American Sugar Co. has de- 
clared a regular quarterly dividend of 1% 
per cent on the preferred stock, payable 
October 1st to stockholders of record Sep- 
teml)er 15th. 



«. . 




! 














^^^^ 


^^^^ 


i4.*ii. 


'fil^i*^ 


M|^ • Jm' tf 




■MH^k.. .It ^1 


■'t^- J 


P 


^^ 


¥j 


US^ 


^i^HBPVPd 




P^^^Vf^^ 


U|^|**___T_ 


1 


1 


p 


1 




i 




1 


H 


^y 












MMg^^'' 


'--iM 


lll|flfl|^^H 


■ 


■1 


r 


m 




ii 


m 


IH 






wtM 


m 


k-^ 


■■-■''■ 


>i.M. 




^^H^. 


,*■/ ■ . 


^^^^^Hl 



of I'fllon and planl. 



liiiK ailiclc nn paKr \~.) 



20 THECUBAREVIEW 



CONDITION OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS. LTD. 



ALMOST ENTIRELY DEPENDENT ON SUGAR, BUT THE POSITION OF THE 

COMPANY IS STRONG 

A noteworthy feature of the last few years has been the greater diversity of traffic 
over the Cuban Central Railway, for although some SO per cent of the total freight traffic 
still consists of sugar, sugar-cane and molasses, the Company now has a fair general 
traffic, which is steadily growing in importance, and has also a good and steadily increas- 
ing passenger business. The nature of the freight traffic will be appreciated from the 
summary appended : 

FREIGHT TRAFFIC CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

1911-13 1910-11 1909-10 1908-09 1907-08 1906-07 

Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons 

Sugar cane 1,799,372 1,284,203 1,562,456 1,311,799 849,534 1,474,654 

Sugar . . ." 307,581 304,935 329,758 289,459 189,956 296,630 

Molasses 66,821 75,064 79,958 84,147 50,790 63,274 

Timber and firewood 75,342 82,359 69,331 51,579 50,645 54,623 

Building Materials 86,932 93,561 77,363 51,319 59,167 61,781 

Tobacco 18,909 13,295 18,434 25,402 8,797 8,570 

Machinery 7,573 9,060 5,554 4,669 5,503 4,830 

Rum 7,215 6,079 6,533 6,063 7,671 5,401 

Maize 3,716 3,213 2,618 2,793 2,796 2,045 

Fruit and vegetables 5,405 3,119 2,557 4,601 2,436 1,168 

General goods, etc 232,122 215,160 195,778 169,354 175,158 174,683 

Total goods traffic 2,610,988 2,090,048 2,350,340 2,001,185 1,402,453 2,147,659 

Receipts i350,554 £318,913 £328,371 £308,805 £234,169 £294,176 

The income from passengers and from baggage, parcels, etc., also shows a marked 

increase during the last decade. The figures follow : 

Total Total 

Passengers Receipts Passengers Receipts 

1911-12 494,043 148,348 1906-07 805,378 129,251 

1910-11 851,902 140,198 1905-06 797,360 113,297 

1909-10 809,210 135,515 1904-05 703,062 93,851 

1908-09 763,713 122,387 1903-04 531,183 75,590 

1907-08 773,785 121,469 1902-03 498,127 65,232 

The position of the Company is, therefore, relatively strong, and, although the Cuban 
sugar industry may be said to be on the crest of a wave of prosperity, the immediate 
outlook appears to be promising, and the future of the Company, especially having regard 
to the new mileage recently constructed and brought into use, is certainly hopeful. Suf- 
ficient time has not yet elapsed to enable the new extensions to be fully remunerative, but, 
as they tap a fertile cane disrict, a considerable growth in traffic may be expected as 
development proceeds. The all-rail route from Havana, which has so far produced 
satisfactory results, is, moreover, likely to further add to the Company's prosperity. It 
looks, therefore, as though the corner had been turned, and that shareholders are about 
to receive a more adequate return upon their capital, which up to now has certainly not 
been of a brilliant character. The average annual distribution since the Company com- 
menced operations in 1899 has been at the rate of under 1 per cent per annum, and the 
highest dividend yet paid has been only 2 per cent, which was paid in 1911-12 and the 
two preceding years. 

The London Statist, a recognized financial authority, recently drew attention to the 
speculative possibilities of the company's £10 ordinary shares at the prevailing price of 
about £4%, although the quotation has risen recently to £4%. 

The near approach of the publication of the annual report has revived market talk of 
a probable increase in the dividend, and the general expectation appears to be that 4 
per cent will be distributed on account of the past twelvemonth, against 2 per cent for 
1911-13 and the two preceding years. The position of the Company is interesting, and 
from the data available it is clear that the present hopeful dividend anticipations are by 
no means exaggerated. Last year, it will be recollected, the Company earned a profit 
for the Ordinary of over £43,000, a sum equal to a dividend of nearly 5 per cent on the 
shares. Only 2 per cent was, however, distributed, and the whole of the surplus, amount- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ing to about £26,000, was set aside to reserve and renewals. Very much better results 
have been secured in the past twelve months, and the directors may be in a position not 
only to raise the dividend to 4 per cent, but to allocate a substantially larger sum to 
the reserve funds than in 1911-12. The increase in traffic receipts, according to the 
weekly returns, was as much as ill4,000, or nearly 23 per cent, and the total of the 
gross earnings, including sundry receipts, has thus been raised to the record figure of 
£614,000. What proportion of this growth in earnings will be added to net revenue ac- 
count remains to be seen. In the last two or three years a policy of improvement has 
been in evidence, and a good deal of money (both capital and revenue) has been spent on 
rene.wals anti betterments in order to secure greater economy of operation. These outlays 
are already bearing fruit, and, whilst the cost of maintenance is likely to remain relatively 
heavy for a time, a reduction in transportation expenses is to be looked for, and a further 
decline in the ratio of the total expenses to receipts may be anticipated. If we assume 
that one-half last year's expansion in earnings has been absorbed by increased expenditure 
(which means an addition of as much as £57,000 to the cost of working), the ratio of 
expenses to receipts would be lowered from 58.78 to 57.16 per cent, a not unreasonable 
assumption, having regard to the improved physical condition of the property. The net 
earnings may thus show an improvement of £57,000, or 27.6 per cent. On the other 
hand, interest charges will require something like £20,000 more than in 1911-12, owing to 
the issue last year of an additional £350,000 Five Per Cent Debenture stock, and on 
balance the gain in profit may be about £37,000. This is sufficient to provide an extra 
4 per cent on the share capital, and the total estimated profit for the year, amounting to 
£80,000, may thus be equal to a dividend of something like 9 per cent. As it requires only 
£36,000 to pay 4 per cent on the Ordinary, it is evident that such a distribution could be 
made without any departure from the usual conservative policy of the board, and that. 
in addition, a much larger sum could be devoted to reserve and other purposes than in 
previous years. 

In the following table are given the estimated figures in respect to the past twelve 
months as outlined above, and for comparative purposes the actual earnings and profits 
for the three preceding years : 

INCOME PTATE.MEXT CUB.\.\ CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

1912-13* 1911-12 1910-11 1909-10 

Gross earnings £614,000 £499,982 £460,086 £465,310 

Expenses 351,000 293,900 281,288 282,686 

Ratio (57.16) (58.78) (61.14) (60.75) 

Net earnings 263,000 206,082 178,798 182,624 

Miscellaneous 2,000 1,670 1,834 2,639 

Net income 265,000 207,752 180,632 185,263 

Rent-charges 9,000 9,304 9,927 10,516 

4 V- per cent Debentures 48,000 47,740 45,955 44,000 

6 per cent 2nd Debentures 1,742 12,000 12,000 

5 per cent Debenture Stock 45,000 23,015 

Taxes and miscellaneous 17,000 16,406 14,774 12,877 

Total charges 119,000 99,207 82,656 79,393 

Net profit 145,000 109,545 97,976 105,870 

5 VL' per cent Pref. dividend 66,000 66,000 66,000 66,000 

Profit for Ordinary 80,000 43,545 31,976 39,870 

Ordinary dividend 36,000 18,000 18,000 18,000 

Rate per cent (4p. c.) (2p. c.) (2p. c.) (2 p. c.) 

Surplus 44,000 25,545 13,976 21,870 

Special renewals, etc 24,000 21,000 9,000 10,000 

Reserve 20,000 5,000 5,000 10,000 

Total funds 44,000 26,000 14,000 20,000 

Balance Dr. 455 Dr. 24 Cr. 1,870 

Brought forward 10,000 10,963 10,987 9,117 

Carried forward 10,000 ]0,.508 10,963 10,987 

* Estimated. 

The London Stock lixcliange Gazette reminds its readers that "the system is mainly 
dependent upon sugar for its revenue, and the fact that its sources of income are so 
restricted renders its fortunes liable to very sharp ups and downs. At present it is on 
the cre.st of a wave of prosperity, and this may possibly continue for some time, but 
eventually, of course, some reaction is inevitable." 

The I'inancial Times says the annual report due in October "can I'.-irdly fail to be of an 
unusrally satisfactory character because of its earnings." 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The main results of working for the last dozen years or so, together with the dividends 
paid on the Company's Ordinary capital, are set out beneath : 

CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAY 

Dividend 
Miles Gross Net Net on 

Year Open Earnings Expenses Ratio Earnings Profit Ordinary 

Percent Percent 

1912-13* 337 £614,000 £351,000 57.16 £263,000 £145,000 4 

1911-12 260 499,982 293,900 58.7S 206,082 109,545 2 

1910-11 255 460,083 281,288 61.14 178,798 97,976 2 . 

1909-10 241 465,310 282,686 60.75 182,624 105,870 S 

1908-09 241 434,357 249,523 57.45 184,834 103,388 Nil 

1907-08 241 359,948 214,666 59.61 145,282 89,955 Nil 

] 906-07 241 429,310 247,616 57.63 181,694 104,445 2 

1905-06 241 406,000 226,000 ,55.71 180,000 100,436 Nil 

1904-05 219 345,000 193,000 55.95 152,000 81,551 2 

1903-04 216 281,170 170,000 60.60 111,000 54,040 Nil 

1902-03 216 254,000 154,000 60.62 100,000 48,881 Nil 

1901-02 216 271,000 153,000 56.40 118,000 56,157 Nil 

1900-01 214 248,000 131,000 52.64 117,000 67,995 1 

1899-1900 214 196,000 111,000 56.81 85,000 41,279 Nil 

* Estimated. 

It should, of course, be appreciated that the dividends paid in no sense represent the 
profits earned. In the last seven years, for instance, the balance available for the Ordi- 
nary has averaged over £37,000 a year, a sum equal to an average annual dividend of 4% 
per cent. Including 1912-13, the results for which are as yet problematical, the average 
dividend earned has been something like 5 per cent on the shares. By distributing profits 
so sparingly the directors have, of course, been able to greatly add to the Company's 
financial strength. The total reserve funds now amount to about £140,000, of which 
£50,000 constitutes a general reserve and £69,000 renewal and casualty fund. The Com- 
pany is, therefore, in a better position than ever previously to raise the dividend to a 
4 per cent basis, and having regard to past results, which include both good and bad 
years, such a rate might conceivably be maintained even when relatively bad times come 
again, as they may in a country so largely dependent on crop conditions. — London Statist. 

An excellent wind-up of its financial year to the end of June last is shown in the Cuba 
Railroad Company's statement of earnings and expenses, says the London Financial 
News. With a gross increase of $80,282 for the month, the working expenses were de- 
creased by $7,376, and as the fixed charges were slightly smaller, the surplus for the 
period was raised by $88,491. For the past twelve months the gross earnings rose to the 
extent of $812,787, the net profits by $396,642, and the fixed charges by $42,224, the 
surplus thus showing an imorovement of $354,418. The working expenses include $96,000 
for extraordinary replacements. 



EARNINGS OF RAILWAYS AND STAGE 
LINES 

In the report of the Havana Electric 
Railway, Light and Power Co., for the 
year ending December 31, 1912, the gross 
receipts of the Havana Electric Railway 
from the beginning of the operation of the 
road in 1901 are given and these follow : 



1901 $611,131 

1902 871,697 

1903 1.084,508 

1904 1,235.945 

1905 1.477,064 

1906 1,570,302 



1907 $1,810,888 

1908 1.937,797 

1909 2.106.761 

1910 2.272,603 

1911 2,588.050 

1912 2,754,139 



From the stage Unes of the company, 
which tap the suburbs of the city, the re- 
ceipts since their beginning in April, 1903, 
aggregate as follows : 



1903 $228,785 

1904 279,343 

1905 329,500 

1906 348,801 

1907 332,234 



1908 $339,009 

1909 381,886 

1910 384,376 

1911 403,451 

1912 390,002 



The net income and operating ratio for 
1911 and 1912 compare as follows: 

1912 1911 

Net income $1,443,038 $1,376,363 

Operating ratio.. 47.59 46.82 



WANT RAILWAY EXTENDED 

- The municipal government has asked 
Congress and the President to take the 
steps necessary for extension of the West- 
^-n Railroad line extension to Arroyos de 
Mantua. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 



THE CUBAN TOBACCO INDUSTRY 

TWO YEARS TOBACCO EXPORTATIONS 

An interesting report, recently issued by the Tobacco Manufacturers' Union of Havana, 
gives a history of the organization's existence and in addition some valuable statistics 
regarding the production, exportation and consumption of tobacco for a period of some 
years. The most recent exportation figures, those for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1913, and comparisons with the fiscal year of 1911-12 are herewith given: 

Quantities Value (U. S. Currency) 

1912-13 1912-13 1911-12 1911-12 

Cigars 185.623,708 177,544.826 $13,058,199 $12,271,842 

Cigarettes (packs) 18.303,822 15,080.416 554,757 447.259 

Leaf tobacco (bales) 406.205 290,368 21,293,361 17,061,488 

Cut tobacco (kilos) 283,588 372,156 285,930 347,200 

The exportations from January 1st to August 15th compare as follows: 

1913 1912 1911 

Leaf tobacco ( bales ) 181,489 192,872 194,416 

Cigars 109,385,826 99,792,527 110,607,074 

Cigarettes ( packs ) 12,455,540 9,833,393 8,924,079 

Cut tobacco (kilos) 172,811 244,208 155,663 

For the 1912-13 exports, the average value per bale of leaf tobacco was $52.42; for 
each 1.000 cigars. $70.34 ; for each! 1,000 packs of cigarettes, $30.30, and for each kilo of 
cut tobacco, $1.00. 




United States .\Iinistr:r William K. fionzalez leaving the presidential palace after jticsciitiiii,' his ciedeii: 

tials to President Menocal. 

El tninisiro tic los I-statlos Unidos Mr. IVitliam li. (ionzalcz acomfaiiddo del Sr. Giiillcrmo Patterson y 

el comandanic Julio Sannuily salieiidtr dc Palacia dcspucs dc liahcr I'rcsciitado sits crcdcncialcs al. 

Presidente de la Rcpt'ihlica.- I.a Bohemia. 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



BRITISH vice-consul's REPORT 

The following information is from the 
report by the British Vice-Consul at Ha- 
vana (Mr. H. D. R. Cowan) on the trade 
of Cuba in 1911-12, which will shortly be 
issued: 

Machinery to the value of £2,000,000 was 
imported during the financial year ended 
30th June, 1912, that is, to the value of 
some £750,000 more than in the preceding 
year. Of this the United Kingdom only 
secured about £204,000, a decrease of £42,- 
000 in comparison with the previous year. 
Very considerable sums, however, have 
been expended on new sugar machinery 
during the past autumn and the figures 
for the present year should show a con- 
siderable increase. 

It may be noted that a larger develop- 
ment is going on in the sugar industry 
than at any previous time. There are ru- 
mors of many new mills to be built 
throughout the island. In this connection 
it may also be mentioned that steam 
ploughs are coming much more exten- 
sively into use in the canefields than has 
hitherto been the case. 

In a recent trip through the island the 
Vice-Consul found that sentiment was 
quite strongly in favor of British sugar 
machinery, which bears a reputation for 
durability possessed by no other. 

It would seem as if the sugar industry 
in Cuba has no limits of extension except 
as imposed by the size of the island, as a 
very large proportion of the soil is suit- 
able for cane culture. A very serious ob- 
stacle to progress, however, is the short- 
age of labor which is now beginning to 
make itself felt, indeed it is probable that 
a large amount of cane will remain uncut 
this year for this reason. Once this ob- 
stacle is overcome, and it is the subject 
of very serious consideration on the part 
of the government, there would seem to be 
a long era of prosperity before the indus- 
try. It may be added that Cuba already 
produces more than one-fifth of the total 
output of cane sugar of the world. 



UNITED KINGDOM S COTTON EXPORTS 

The total value of cotton goods imported 
into Cuba in the year 1911-12 was £2,434,508, 
of which £957,758 came from the United 
Kingdom. These figures show an increase 
of £200,000 in the imports from the United 
Kingdom, but they represent a slight fall- 
ing-oflf in the percentage of the total. — 
Report of British Vice-Consul Mr. H. D. 
R. Cowan. (See the Vice-Consul's report 
above on general trade.) 



IMPORTS TO CUBA AND EXPORTS FROM 
CUBA THROUGH HAMBURG 

The imports and exports during the last 
five years from Cuba into Hamburg are 
given by the Cuban consul at that port in 
his last official report and are as follows. 
The values are in marks. 

Imports Exports 

1907 12,368,600 26,765,490 

190S 16,003,850 21,514,330 

1909 13,367,310 24,656,610 

1910 12,991,920 28,092,920 

1911 12,066,930 30,856,030 

Tobacco leaf, cigars, salted hides and 
wax made up over three-fourths of the to- 
tal imports. 





ja»^^^^P 


t^^W 














I^^^S 








BBk^'g^^^^l 








^fl 


■HP' 


^w' 


WKeSHr^rl^ 


HHH 








fliiiiniHIH 








H|H|| 






^^Sm 


^H 






Wmmmr' ^UL 


"'3^^ ^^ 








k' 


Sfinf '^ &Hg| 






Wk ^^^^^ 




' 


f^^^^ jJi^aHl 


^^^^ 


I^^H 


^ 


\ f W^^^ 


It 


^^^Mv-^ "■* -^K^H 


¥i' • 


' ^ x^^lSaBBi 


rafc -^ ^^ L' ^^ 




^Rbs^^ 1 


X^M 


^^ 






^~ >%i' 








,- 






,.^.. 



The Brazilian Minister to Cuba (on the right) 

Sr. Raul Regis de Oliveira. 

El ministro del Brasil Sr. Raul Regis de Oliveira 

cl salir de Palccio despues de present ar sus cre- 

denciales. — Fot. de Vigil. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



Of the exports the same ratio included 
the following leading articles : 

Rice 9,704,000 

Malt 1,378,910 

Kidney beans 1,827,490 

Condensed milk 2,169,070 

\\'oolen goods 1,570,010 

Stockings 1,867,100 

Paper 1,279,920 

Glassware 1,048,970 

Iron manufactures 1,566,310 

Machinery 1,320,780 

Locomotives 83,330 

Total 23,815,890 

Other articles exported consisted of cof- 
fee, cinnamon, beer, sardines, paints, pot- 
ash, medical instruments, wire, silk manu- 
facturers, clothing, hats, underwear, porce- 
lains, iron pipes, incandescent lamps, pianos 
and piano players, typewriters and adding 
machines, phonographs, watches and jewel- 
rj-, perfumes, etc. 



BELTS, HARNESS AND SADDLERY 
EXEMPTIONS 

In compliance with a petition presented 
by manufacturers of belts, harness and 
saddlery, the government of Cuba, by a 
decree of May 9, 1913, has exempted certain 
supplies used in the manufacture of the 
above articles from the payment of the 
surtaxes provided by the decree of February 
1, 1904. 

These surtaxes applied to sole leather, 
patent leather, hides and skins, canvass, 
cotton tape, thread, buckles, clasps, eyelets, 
brads, rivets, patent hooks, rings, harness, 
chains and cords, and ranged from 15 per 
cent to 30 per cent of the duty. 

Their exemption from the surtax will 
result in a corresponding change in the 
rates of duty imposed on such articles 
whether imported from the United States 
or from other countries. In order to be 
admitted at the reduced rates of duty the 
articles must be imported direct by the 
manufacturers of belts, harness or saddlery 
for use in their establishments, and a sworn 
declaration to that effect must be presented. 

CSee page 77 of Tariff Series Xo. 27, is- 
sued by the United States government.) 



DUTY EXEMPTION ON STEEL BARS 

The Cuban Gaceta Oficial for the 21st of 
May contains a presidential decree exempt- 
ing from the customs surtax of 30 per 
cent, which was imposed by the decree of 
February 1, 1904, steel bars of all kinds, 
including rods, when imported by Cuban 
manufacturers for the manufacture of 
rivets, screws, nuts, rivet plates, spikes, 
bolts and nails. The usual swofin declara- 



tion regarding the use to which such steel 
bars are to be put is required. 

The rate of duty fixed for such bars un- 
der No. 36 B. of the Cuban tariff is 90 
cents per 100 kilogs. gross weight. 



savannah's new CUBAN CONSUL 

Through the effects of the Chamber of 
Commerce of Savannah Arthur J. Howard 
of Howard and Company, brokers, has been 
appomted official representative of the Re- 
public of Cuba at that port. His appoint- 
ment becomes effective August 1st. 

The need of an authorized representative 
of the Cuban government in Savannah has 
ong been felt. Savannah manufacturers 
have repeatedly complained about the in- 
convenience they have experienced in clear- 
ing vessels for Cuban ports. Since the 
death more than a year ago of Consul 
Moynello Cuba has not been regularly rep- 
resented in Savannah, and as a result a 
great deal of inconvenience has been ^elt 
by the shippers 

CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS ACCEPTED 

A measure which will be greatly wel- 
comed by tax payers in Havana is the 
decree issued September 7th by Havana's 
Mayor authorizing the payment of all city 
taxes with certified checks to the order of 
the city treasurer. Payment may also be 
made by means of postal monev orders 
receipts for which the city will return 



TO CREATE FREE PORTS 

The Cuban government propose to create 
free ports at Santiago and Cienfuegos for 
the entry of goods free of duty, which are 
intended to be re-exported either in the 
condition in which they were landed, or 
after having been re-packed or subjected 
to industrial processes. 



LOCAL TELEPHONE FOR HOLGUIN 

A local teleplione system will soon be in 
operation in Holguin, Oriente Province. 
The following prices will govern : 

Private houses $2.00 per month 

Lawyers, doctors, dentists, 

^^'^ 2.50 per month 

Stores, etc -.oo per month 



Matanzas exports for July, 1913, aggre- 
gated in value $1,826,392, of which' $1,776,- 
128 was in sugar. 

The coke exports of Cardiff, Wales, to 
Cuba in 1912 amounted to 1S95 long tons.-- 
U. S. Consular Report. 



26 THECUBAREVIEW 

CORRESPONDENCE WITH SPANISH PEOPLE 

By Commercial Agent Gereard Harris 



SOME VALUABLE SUGGESTIONS REGARDING BUSINESS LETTER WRITING 

A first-class business house in the United States is mindful of the value of good 
impressions. The stationery is of the very best quality; the letters are carefully type- 
written, carefully composed, and altogether, according to accepted standards, artistic and 
perfect examples of the art. Why, then, should business houses be so careless in their 
correspondence with foreign concerns who set even greater store by externals and small 
points than we do? 

In order of objection is the literal Spanish version of some business letter. The 
epistle is drafted in English and the Spanish clerk given instructions to put it, word 
for word, in Spanish. The result is a creation fearful and wonderf(ul to behold in the 
estimation of the recipient. The Spanish form of correspondence is considerably 
different from the terse, almost curt, form of the United States. There is more of 
salutation, of thoughtfulness, and less of blunt expression ; more of the personal note, 
so to speak, and finally a conclusion that would seem florid to the American business 
man. The absence of these evidences of good business breeding (according to the 
standard of the man to whom it is addressed) is a puzzle to the average Spanish-speaking 
business man. He does not know whether to become ofifended at the implied lack of 
respect and kindly interest in him, or to be merely amused at the exhibition of ignorance 
on the part of the American. In either event it is not the frame of mind the writer 
would have his effort produce, nor is such a state of mind conducive to the best results. 

So small a matter as the signature may be the cause for umbrage. If Smith & Brown 
send out a letter signed "per Jones," or "per M," or anybody else than the principals, 
the recipient concludes that Smith & Brown do not estimate him or his business very 
highly, or else they would not allow a mere clerk to carry on the correspondence and 
sign the letters addressed to him. He thinks that a person of at least equal dignity with 
him as head of the firm should sign the letter. 

The address is also a matter that sometimes is unfortunate in its effect. An American 
firm would not care if its letters were simply addressed "Smith & Brown, Washington, 
D. C," or "John M. Smith, Washington, D. C." Yet the failure to put the titles of 
"Sefior" or "Senors" or "Don" where it is proper and where the person addressed is 
entitled to it, is likely to a certain extent to prejudice the recipient against the missive 
and its source. 

These are small matters, it is true, but they are matters that custom and education 
and long use have made proper in the Latin-American countries. Conformance of them 
is easy and is very likely to produce good results. 

These are the principal objections to correspondence with American houses, together 
with the allegation that the Americans are not so prompt about answering their corre- 
spondence as they should be. To eliminate these apparently trivial objections means a 
hisrher regard for the firms doing so and the facilitation of business. 



SPANISH SHOULD BE TAUGHT advantage. But even more than this, there 
The United States has some foreign pos- is a vast business field, as our various cham- 
sessions. Both Porto Rico and the Philip- bers of commerce are just findmg out in 
pines are Spanish speaking. Cuba, with this South American country. But if it is 
which we have had much to do, speaks the to be occupied, it must be by men who 
same language. Mexico, and all the Central speak Spanish and are familiar with the 
Am.erican republics, with which our future customs of these lands which are still so 
is likely to be more closely connected, use largely Spanish. Some of our business 
the same language. And practically the houses have long recognized this. Occa- 
whole of South America is Spanish speak- sionally one may see an advertisement for 
ing. a stenographer who can speak and write 
John Lind cannot speak Spanish ; we need Spanish, oi for a salesman with the same 
men for all sorts of foreign posts who can. qualification. But we are just at the begin- 
There is a splendid chance for teachers, for ning of this new and vast business oppor- 
engineers and scientists of all sorts in these tunity. Who should enter into it if not 
Spanish-speaking countries which are just the young people? And how can they un- 
beginning their development. And the man less they learn the language required? — 
who speaks Spanish has naturally a great Newburg Port (Mass.) Nezvs. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



AGAINST THE YANKEE 



A BOOK BY A CUBAN APPARENTLY WRITTEN TO AROUSE HOSTILE 
FEELING MAYOR ANDRADE's STINGING REBUKE 

A recent book entitled "Against the Yankee" and written b\" Julio J. Gandarilla, a 
young Cuban, has been published in Havana. A copy was sent for such commendation 
as the work might deserve to Havana's Mayor. General Freyre de Andrade. The latter 
reviewed it to some purpose in a letter to the author. The Mayor's feelings towards this 
country and the author's were energetically expressed. In part the Mayor's reply is as 
follows : 

'T am not against the Yankees. I am with the Yankees. I am one of their warm 
friends and one of those who will not forget the favors we owe them. 

'"The new generation, the one which did not suffer in behalf of the war : the one 
which did not take part in the struggle foi^ independence and for which it did not make 
any sacrifices, may despise the Y'ankee and make themselves the echo of the void boast- 
ing of those who were their enemies when they gave their lives for our liberty: but 
those of us who were in the camps of the revolution, those of us who could appreciate 
the strength of the reccncentrados and are convinced that to the Yankee intervention, 
to the Y'ankee blood, we owe our liberty, the end of our struggle and sufferings, must 
always be in favor of the Y'ankees. consider them our friends and admire their loyalty 
in their relations with Cuba. 

"It is true that during an unfortunate time, for the Y'ankee and for us. a man of no 
conscience, a bad ruler and representative of the Y'ankee. came to Cuba, ruined its 
treasury, corrupted its customs, demoralized its government and delivered our country 
to men who ought not to have ruled over us : but if they incurred mistakes, we have 
also committed our faults, as well as our people did by chosing those men and creating 
this sad state of affairs. 

'"But they have reformed and in the United States, as well as in Cuba, those who acted 
so are looked at with hatred. We should not hold the Y'ankees responsible for what 
one man did : he is despised to-day by his own countrymen. 

"I will not make any propaganda m its favor, as it appears to me a foolish attempt, 
an unpatriotic act. It makes us to appear as ungrateful, as disloyal friends towards 
those from whom we have received benefits. It would bring inevitable grief for our 
country, as our powerful neighbor on seeing the immorality of o*ar character, our forget- 
fulness. would consider us unworthy of our independence and of the favors we have 
received. Although they would not take away from us our independence, they would 
at least leave us exposed to the powerful enemies of Cuba who are only looking for a 
chance to make claims for damages they suffered dTiring the war. 

"I am convinced we have nothing to fear from the Y'ankee ; that we will yet receive 
favors from that great nation of practical men who are at the same time full of roman- 
ticism, just principles and of liberal and progressive ideas, as no other people have ever 
been. Instead of being their enemies, and bringing troubles to their government, we 
must be their allies, their friends and be always ready to give for them our lives as they 
did once for us. 

"These sentiments which I have always expressed publicly are my sincere belief. I am 
sure I will die with them, and no other sentiment will ever have echo in me if its directed 
against the very nation which I will consider the noblest until it attempts to destroy our 
independence. This will never happen unless there are fools who. with their insults, 
foolishness and un familiarity with the reality of facts pretend to offend those of its 
subjects who live in this land in which only praise ought to be given and gratitude shown." 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK. Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Toiving - - - Steamship Toiving a Specialty 

floilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

""Tsjs^rs^J SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U. S. A. S§^' l\Z', 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



AGRICULTURAL MATTERS 



TO ENCOURAGE FARMERS 

A society under the name of "Fomento 
Pecuario" was recently organized by mer- 
chants and manufacturers in Havana. 

The purposes of the society, as explained 
by Sr. Coro, its president, will be to aid 
animal industry in all its forms, especially 
mule raising, as long as that class of ani- 
mals are imported from abroad ; to protect 
the industry of bee raising, and of interest- 
ing farmers in the cultivation of corn so 
that this grain could be supplied at home 
instead of being imported, representing 
not only a great saving, but a new source 
of wealth for the country. 



dreamer who fishes and chases the elusive 
possum while the grass and weeds play 
havoc with his groves and other crops, and 
the interest on the mortgage is piling up, 
has a small chance in the race with prog- 
ress. He needs educating. — Isle of Pines 
Appeal. 



COFFEE AND CACAO 

In Oriente Province a fine coffee crop is 
anticipated. All the owners of the plan- 
tations are beginning the harvest unusually 
early and are unanimous in their prediction 
of an abundant yield. 

Custom house figures of Matanzas show 
importations of coffee to aggregate 6,051,686 
pounds with a value of $827,011 in the 
period from 1908 to 1913. In the same 
time cacao importations were 21,435 pounds, 
having a value of $6,197. 



INVITING FAILURE 

Someone has said : "It is usually a dead 
heat in the race between the fool who 
farms and the farmer who fools." We 
have all met, in our time, both the above 
gentlemen, and have invariably noticed that 
their general complaint was nothing doing 
or doing nothing. In other words the 




Cable 
Letters 
To Cuba 

5 Cents per Word 

New telegraph service at greatly 
reduced rates inaugurated by the 
Western Union to facilitate busi- 
ness corresponcence between the 
United States and Cuba 

CABLE LETTER RATES 
New York — Havana 

20 word message - - - $1.00 
Each additional word - 5 cents 

Cable letters for Cuba filed 

before midnight delivered 

during the next day 

Flash Cable Services at regular 
rates 

The Western Union Telegraph Co. 




CARROS DE MOTOR 

DE LA 

COMPANIA BUDA 

Fabricamos equipos para Ferrocarriles 
e Ingenios, que incluyen Carritos de Ma- 
no, Carreti- 
llas, Gatos, 
Cambiavias 
y Ranas 



30 Church Street, New York 




T H E C U B A R E V I E W 29 

PRACTICAL CACAO PLANTING SUGGESTIONS 

By W. M. Malins-Smith, in the IVest India Circular, London. 



In planting from bamboo pots, the method of placing pot as well as plant in the hole 
cannot be highly recommended, for the pot does not rot quickly enough, and the roots of 
the supply are cramped for too long a period. The bamboo pot can be split at the hole 
and the plant easily removed with the earth adhering firmly to the roots if the precaution 
is taken of freely watering the nursery a few hours before planting out. 

A cacao field in Grenada is generally weeded once in three or four months ; three months 
for the more open spaces and fields where young cacao is growing; and at longer intervals 
for the bearing well-shaded fields. Weeds are not allowed, however, to remain around 
young plants for so long, and a system of hand-weeding a space of about eighteen inches 
radius around the plant about six weeks after each weeding is generally practiced. If the 
weeds came up very fast before the next weeding, the plants are hand-weeded again a 
few days before the general weeding of the field, so that the weeders may have no excuse 
for carelessly damaging the young plants. The hand-weeding is a most important work, 
for weeds art the greatest enemy to young cacao, especially vines and grasses. 

Light forkitig around the young plant once a year and a wider area each time will 
tend to keep the soil in good tilth; will tend to make the plant root more deeply; and 
will serve as a mulch during the dry season, especially if it is done im'mediately this 
season begins. It is best, however, and pays best to fork the whole field, as the catch 
crops will also benefit and they will give better crops to help pay the cost of establishing 
the cacao. 

All weedings, dead leaves, straw and old banana stems should be "bedded" or buried 
near the surface at least once a year, or better still as often as the field is weeded. This 
adds considerably to the maintenance of a good tilth and to the fertility of the soil. It 
has been fully realized in Grenada that the more the soil is tilled while the cacao is young, 
the better will be the field of bearing cacao in the future. 

As most of the cacao soil in Grenada is comparatively heavy, and as this is the stage 
when the soil should be worked up into good tilth, an application of lime at the rate of 
one ton to one ton and a half per acre, or one and a half to two hogsheads, would be 
beneficial and have a quickening effect on all the plants in the field. The lime not only 
breaks up the heavy portions of the soil, but it also neutralizes any sourness that may be 
in it, and renders available a large amount of unavailable plant food in the soil. 

The field should be drained thoro'Ughly before planting or as soon as possible after. 
There is nothing, not even bush, that retards the growth of young cacao so much as 
undrained water in the soil. The thorough draining of a field of young cacao, even with- 
out forking and manuring, makes a wonderful difference in its appearance. 

As regards shade it has been conclusively proved in Grenada that the soil and not the 
cacao tree must be shaded. Young cacao plants up to bearing stage cannot shade the soil, 
therefore temporary shade must be provided so that the soil be thoroughly shaded and 
at the same time the young plants also in a lesser degree. To encompass these ends it is 
wise to have two kinds of catch crops planted between the young cacao ; one being tall- 
growing and the other short, one that will shade both plant and soil, and one that will 
shade the soil only. The banana (Musa sapientum) is the best tall growing shade, 
and should always be planted, for its shade is permanent throughout the whole period 
of the growth of the young cacao. Tannias (Colocasia escitlenta) and sweet potato 
(Ipo)nea batata) make excellent short growing shade for the soil. 

A cacao tree up to the age of eighteen mouths consists of a straight upright stem with 
leaves growing out horizontally. About that age it forms at its summit three or more 
branches which do not spread horizontally but at a more or less upward angle, three of 
which only should be allowed to develop and the others removed. 

Xext appear one or more suckers immediately below the point from which the tree has 
branched. These are nothing more or less than an e.xtra stem for adding to the height 
of the tree; and if allowed to remain the sucker will repeat the formation of the lower 
stem and branches. As it is not desirable that the tree should attain too great a height, 
the sucker is removed as soon as it appears; and the tree is able to devote all its energies 
in developing the three primary branches. 

After a time, secondary branches are formerl and of these the superal)un(lant ones are 
removed, so that the others may develop better. And so the process continues with the 
tertiary branches until the tree has arrived at full development. The developing process 
continues till long after the tree begins to produce fruit. A well cared for cacao tree 
will continue to develop till it is twelve years old ; whereas it may bear fruit at three or 
four years. 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ISLE OF PINES INTERESTS 



FRUIT AND VEGETABLE EXPORTS 

(From the Isle of Pines Appeal) 

During the six months from January 1st 
to June 30, 1913, the total shipment of 
fruit and vegetables from the Isle of Pines, 
according to the consular agent, was 85,884 
crates, and from July 1st to August 21st 
1,870 crates. 

These shipments were distributed as fol- 
lows : 

Crates 

Oranges 6,455 

Grapefruit 13,184 

Vegetables 54,708 

Lemons and limes 276 

Pineapples 11,261 



NUEVA GERONA THE BETTER PORT 

The chief of the national navy has or- 
dered the coast guard boats, Alfredo and 
Matanzas, from Batabano to Nueva Gerona, 
Isle of Pines, until further notice. He 
says this is done because the port of Ba- 
tabano offers no securities for the ships in 
case a cyclone should happen along that 
way. 



The repairing and repainting of the cus- 
tom house and government dock at Gerona, 
Isle of Pines, will soon be under way by 
the Public Works Department. A new coal 
pocket will also be lauilt. When this im- 
provement is completed the wharf and 
warehouses at Jucaro will receive attention. 

Nueva Gerona will soon have an electric 
plant. 



STONE CRUSHING PLANT 

A stone crushing plant will soon be estab- 
lished in Nueva Gerona at the base of the 
mountain west of the town, and will be 
equipped to furnish at a reasonable cost 
pulverized limestone for agricultural pur- 
poses as well as crushed stone for all com- 
mercial purposes. — Isle of Pines News. 



A public school will soon be established 
at Galeta Grande, Isle of Pines. The re- 
quest to the Cuban government was made 
by the English minister. The superintend- 
ent of schools has been instructed to look 
into the matter. He is known to be favor- 
ably disposed to the project. 



The Difference Between 

Good and Inferior Sugar 

has a great deal to do with the method of refining. If right temperatures are not 
maintained in processes demanding a certain temperature an inferior product results. 
Then why not make sure that right temperatures are maintained — eliminate uncer- 
tainties, by installing a 

"Columbia" 

Recording Thermometer 

You will then receive each morning a chart — a written 

record — showing in detail the exact temperature 

maintained in the process for every minute, day 

and night, during its operation. Supervise your 

plant intelligently if your aim is "maximum 

output with minimum expense." Install a 

"Columbia" NOW. 

Write for Catalog M-28 

The Schaeffer & 

Budenberg Mfg. Co. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



THE NAVAL FIGHT AT SANTIAGO 



A SPANISH ACCOUNT OF THE SCENES PRECEDING THE BATTLE 



The scenes preceding the great naval 
fight at Santiago de Cuba, and the man- 
ner in which the Spanish ships steamed 
out to sea to meet what proved their doom, 
are described in Coiitcinporary Cuba, of 
Havana in extracts from a book soon to 
be pubHshed in Madrid by Senor Alfonso 
Hernandez Cata, an eye-witness of the 
doings that then took place. Senor Cata 
says : 

"The piers were alive with people. Now 
and again from the file of ships, some- 
times swinging obliquely at their anchor- 
age but never changing their relative in- 
tervals, would shoot out a boat bearing 
marines to the shore. When they landed, 
the crowd would open up to let them pass 
and a respectful murmur would follow 
them. The officers wore blue uniforms, 
brilliant with gold lacing. They repre- 
sented the common hope of all, and per- 
haps for this very reason, at times, feeling 
the eyes of the crowd fixed upon them, 
they would bow their heads as though op- 
pressed with the weight of so many hopes. 
For the populace Spain's power seemed in- 
corporated in those six dark craft, which 
had steamed in so triumphantly one morn- 
ing, glancing in the sunbeams, flags and 
pennants fluttering in the breeze, amid 
plaudits of joy, their very salutes com- 
municating a dash of heroic enthusiasm 
to the throng gazing at them from the 
shore. In the evenings, among the groups 
discussing the latest rumors on the Plaza 
de Armas, some expert would vanquish 
the pessimism of the timid by reading ex- 
tracts from a Madrid newspaper, in which 
by a comparison of the fleets of the con- 
tending powers, it was demonstrated to 
what extent fate and foresight combined 
favored Spain in tonnage, guns and skill. 
. . . The mere names of the warships 
evoked an atmosphere of patriotism and 
power: Infanta Maria Teresa, Cristobal 
Colon, Almirante Oqnenda, Viscaya, Furor, 
Pluton. And here they were in this in- 
significant port, revealed to the world's 



notice by a hazard of war, like six bristling 
claws arming one of the Spanish Lion's 
formidable paws outstretched from afar 
to guard the prey above which the Eagle 
was circling. 

One morning the marines who had been 
disembarked to reinforce the contingent in 
the trenches were recalled to their ships. 
They marched down toward the piers, 
formed in a column of four files, flanked 
by their officers at regular intervals. The 
rhythmic beat of the steps sounding in the 
ill-paved streets, announced their coming 
from afar, and the people turned out to 
see them pass. They marched with long 
strides, unhesitatingly, no smile on their 
faces, but with an expression testifying 
as much of heroism as of unconcern. An 
old man watching them from a window 
said to a woman at his side : 'They are go- 
ing to their death.' . . . 

"From the esplanade behind the piers but 
few witnessed the departure of the fleet. 
It took place in the early morning. From 
the funnels of the warships arose dense 
clouds of smoke which combined in the air 
to form a kind of pall that hovered above 
them. When they got under way a pro- 
found silence reigned ; the minds of all 
seemed oppressed by the same anxious 
thought. The sun, causing the water to 
glow like a funeral pyre, lighted up the gay 
colors of the flags and pennants. As the 
flagship entered the first bend of the chan- 
nel a 'viva' ran"- out through the air. It was 
a single sonorous, enthusiastic outburst, 
succeeded by dead silence. Not a wave 
ruffled the water, not a breeze stirred the 
air, not a cloud dimmed the sky. One after 
the other the warships passed out of sight, 
leaving the bay deserted. . . Only the 
distant and continuous booming of cannon 
gave the certainty that at this moment a 
supreme combat was taking place, with all 
its horrors of destruction and death, be- 
hind the serene hills gilded by the sun's 
rays." What happened afterward is a mat- 
ter of histiiry. 



AMERICAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS 

Reports reaching Santiago that the Holy 
See would name Bishop William Jones of 
Porto Rico to succeed the late Monsignor 
Barnada as head of the metropolitan see of 
Cuba, have caused much agitation, which, 
however, is not directed against the person 
of the American prelate, but that Cuban 
Catholics prefer to have a Culian arch- 
bishop rather than a foreigner. 



Recently the Holy See when creating the 
new dioceses of Matanzas and Camaguey, 
named an American as Bishop of Matanzas, 
and there was a general protest, despite the 
fact that it was a bishopric of new creation 
and which had never been filled by a Cuban 
Ijcforc and which is difi'erent from the case 
of the metropolitan see of Cuba which had 
been filled by a Cul)an prelate until the 
death of Archbishop Barnada. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEWS OF SUGAR ESTATES 



THE CENTRAL BORJITA 

M. Paul Boulanger, an engineer, recently 
left Cuba for France to complete the nego- 
tiations for the construction of a sugar 
central in Oriente Province. 

Sr. Boulanger, according to report, has 
contracted for all the machinery and build- 
ings required for the new estate, which is 
known as the "Borjita" and will be built 
at Dos Caminos, near San Luis, the latter 
the junction of the Cuba Railroad and the 
Guantanamo and Western. 

The names of some of the men interested 
in the new enterprise are given as don 
Luis de Hechevarria, a well-known lawyer, 
and the banking house of Schumann & Co., 
both of the city of Santiago. 

The capacity of the new central will be 
80,000 bags, figuring on 100 days of opera- 
tion. The estate comprises 400 caballerias 
of most excellent soil, with plenty of 
streams available for irrigation, and easy 
access to railroads. The machinery will be 
installed by Sr. Boulanger and will be 
bought in France, England and Belgium. 
The mill expects to begin grinding in De- 
cember of next year. The work of con- 
structing the plantation railway is under 
way. 

The administrador of the new estate will 
be Sr. Lorenzo Fresnada, now traffic chief 
of the "Delicias" and "Chaparra" sugar 
estates. 



CHAPARRA AND DELICIAS ESTATES 

The two great sugar centrals "Chaparra" 
and "Delicias" in Oriente Province were 
still grinding late in August. Up to the 
19th "Chaparra" has ground 3,343,440 
arrobas of cane, producing 461,323 bags of 
sugar of 325 pounds each. Of this quantity 
364,153 had been exported and 3,218 sold in 
Cuba. The production of molasses to the 
same date was 3,613,105 gallons. 

For the same period of the preceding 
year Chaparra had produced 432,242 bags 
of sugar. 

The record of "Delicias" to August 19th 
was 31,902,318 arrobas of cane ground, 
295,274 bags of sugar of 325 pounds, and 
2,411,399 gallons of molasses. The output 
averaged 1,000 to 1,500 bags of sugar daily, 
and 2,000 to 2,500 at Chaparra polarization 
SO. 

The central "Chaparra" ended its season 
on September 4th at noon with 479,662 bags 
to its credit. Central "Delicias" at that date 
was still grinding. 

On September 4th throughout the island 
'but three sugar centrals were grinding: 



"Delicias," "Preston" and "Santa Lucia," 
all in Oriente Province. Central "Boston" 
made 387,000 bags. 



ANOTHER ESTATE FOR ORIENTE 

It is reported that Federico Fernandez 
will build the new sugar mill "America" in 
the village of Maffo, near Baire, Oriente 
Province. It is expected it will be in work- 
ing condition for the next grinding season. 
It will probably have a capacity of from 
30,000 to 40,000 bags and will be finished 
in time to grind the next crop. 



NEW CENTRAL TALKED OF FOR 
SANTA CLARA PROVINCE 

At a breakfast recently given at Moron 
in honor of Sr. Fausto Menocal, manager 
of the Moron Sugar Central, by the leading 
citizens of the plaza, it was intimated that 
another sugar mill would be erected at 
Moron at the completion of the railroad 
from Caibarien to Nuevitas now in course 
of construction. 



Valvula FIJA de 

Reduccion 

de Lytton 




Coloque en 
sus Tachos 
una Valvula 
de Reduc- 
cion que 
sea segura 
y data 
el servicio 
requerido. 



Agente 

L. J. BARTHELEMY, San Juan, Porto Rico 

Oficina general para la venta: 
HUDSON TERNIMAL, NEW YORK, U.S.A. 

Fabricado por la Lytton M'f'g. Corp., 
Franklin, Va., E. U. A. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



aguedita's new extension 

The work of extending the railroad line, 
which will unite the "Aguedita" estate with 
the Chilena farm, will shortly be under 
way. The new extension will greatly in- 
crease the cane "zone" of the central. 



3S 



A road from Puerto Padre to the "De- 
licias" sugar central is in course of con- 
struction. 

Mr. Sage has been appointed temporary 
director of the "Guantanamo Sugar Com- 
pany" interests. 



PRESIDENT BUYS A SUGAR ESTATE 

Representatives of President Menocal 
have signed papers with Sr. Emilio Do- 
minguez for the purchase of the old Ele- 
jalde mill at Guira de Helena, Havana 
Province, which was destroyed during the 
war. The price said to have been paid is 
a large one. 

General Menocal is said to be ready to 
purchase more lands in the district and then 
he will proceed to rebuild the old factory 
and start again making sugar in this pros- 
perous sugar district. 



Lumber Exports to Cuba 



PITCH PINE MARKET CONDITIONS 

(From the Gulf Coast Record) 

The week's movement to Cuba was about 
the smallest recorded this year. — August 
16th. 

Cuban inquiry shows no improvement 
over former weeks. The week's clearance 
included about two and a half million feet 
for Cuba. — August 2,3rd. 

Summer shipment of lumber to Cuba has 
held up in considerable volume, and has 
exceeded that of the same business a year 
ago. Most of the orders were taken some 
time earlier, however, and only moderate 



additions are reported since June. Present 
inquiry is light, but not entirely absent, 
with reasonable prospect of recovery late 
in the year, always a period of renewed in- 
terest in this trade. Except for apprehen- 
sion among sugar planters of the results 
when the new American tariff becomes 
effective, business and administrative con- 
ditions in Cuba are encouraging. — August 
30th. 

There is no improvement observable in 
the amount of business offering for Cuba, 
but new inquiries are not entirely lacking. 
Shipments are of larger extent than usual. 



A. F. CRAIG & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

PAISLEY 
ESCOCIA 

Fabricantes 
de toda clase 

de 

maquinaria 

para 

moler cana 
de azucar 

DIRECCION TELEGRAFICA 
"CRAIG" PAISLEY 

Claves: A.B.C., S^EDICION; McNElL'S MINING Y GENERAL 




34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



PLANTATION CARS ""' ^^^ '^''^'^^ ^^° 



THE PARTS FOR SAME 




No. 1005-A (Palabra de clave ZPTAS) 

El grabado enseiia uno de nuestros carros para cafla con jaula de acero. 

Fabricamos un gran numero de carros para caiia para use en Cuba, Puerto-Rleo, 
America-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaulas de acero 6 de madera y construidas para 
los distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la caiia. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direccion telegraflca: Nallim, New York Produccion annual de mas de 100,000 carros 
Representante para Cuba : OSCAR B. CINTAS, Oficios 29-31 Havana 



SUGAR REVIEW 

Specially written for The Cuba Review by Willett & Gray, of New York 



Our last review for this magazine was dated August 14, 1913. 

At that date the quotation for 96° test Cuba centrifugals was 3.73c. per lb. and is now 
3.76c. per lb. after having sold at 3.S0c. per lb., the highest quotation of the year. 

On the cost and freight basis 2 13/32c. per lb. (3.80c.) has been the highest paid, with 
present sellers at 2 7/16c. per lb. c & f (3.76c.). It is doubtful if any higher level is 
reached this season and if not then this will prove to be the only year in which sugar 
quotations at this season have not risen to the parity of European markets or the so- 
called World's Market as fixed at Hamburg. 

The reason for this exception is owing to the fact of the abnormally large crop of 
Cuba which renders the United States quite independent of Europe for supplies this year. 

There are still some 20,000 tons of Cuba Centrifugals in the United Kingdom which 
can be imported here if required later on but which are likely not to be wanted before 
the early domestic beet crop comes to market in October/December. After the new 
year the next Cuba crop will become the feature of the new campaign and with the 
present outlook in the sugar world the price of that crop will be reduced to as low a 
limit as was the present crop at any time. 

Refined sugar reached its high price at 4.80c. per lb. recently, which quotation is still 
the list price of all refiners excepting the Federal Sugar Refining Co.. which takes orders 
at 4.60c. less 2 per cent for prompt shipment while others take orders at 4.70c. less 2 
per cent. 

Cane refiners have the market for their product to themselves for another month, 
after which their business will meet large competition from the domestic beet factories. 
These are now soliciting business at 4.60c. basis for deliveries in October as soon as 
manufacture begins. 

Beet crop reports from Europe are mostly favorable and beet quotations continue to 
move very steadily with only slight fluctuations about the cost of production, the present 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



35 



prices being 'Js 6d (4.Uoc. at New York) for September, 9s S^/id (3.97c.) for October, 
which means new crop and 9s 6d (4.05c.) for futures of May delivery. 

The Java crop by our recent cable of last week is estimated at 1,450,000 tons against 
1,331,180 tons last year. None of the Java crop is thus far exported for the United 
States, which is another quite unusual thing at this season. 

The domestic cane sugar crop of Louisiana is estimated at about 300,000 tons to come 
on the market October to January. This crop will almost entirely disappear as a factor in 
sugar supplies during the coming three years, being virtually voted out of existence 
with the coming of free duty sugar after May 1, 1916. 

The tariff bill passed the Senate as printed in our paper of April 10, 1913, the new 
rates of duty taking effect March 1, 1914 and free duty May 1, 1916. 

The No. 16 Dutch Standard color test is eliminated on the passage of the bill allowing 
raw sugar of above No. 16 D. S. to come into the United States at the rates of duties 
per degree of polariscopic test as specified in the present law. 

After March 1, 1914, the differential on refined will be eliminated also allowing refined 
sugar to come in at the polariscopic duty rates for raws without the extra duty assessed 
now because it is refined. 

These tariff changes are likely to produce a somewhat important effect on the sugar 
trade in the United States as well as upon the sugar markets of the world, which 
changes cannot at this writing be clearly foreseen, but must be developed after March, 
1914, by the actual working of the new measure upon the trade generally. 

At the close the market is very quiet in the absence of buyers from the market for 
some time past. Sellers offer very freely centrifugals for shipment at 2 7/16 per lb. 
c & f and simply wait for buyers to appear. 

New York, Septemlier 1."), 1913. 



Sugar Estate and Crop News 



Sugar exports and stock in existence on 
August 31st, compares as follows from the 
figures supplied by Messrs Guma and Mejer 
of Havana. The quantities are given in tons. 

1911 1912 1913 

Exports 1,381,713 1,645,326 2,080,885 

In existence 28,070 163,410 204,461 

The distriljution of the export sugar was 
as follows : 

Three ports 

north of 1911 1912 1913 

Cape Hatteras. 1,194,303 1,313,081 1,504,682 

.\ew Orleans... 178,267 191,235 258,300 

Galveston 7,8.-,7 17,944 24,830 

Canada 4,914 8,998 

V^ancouver 27,9.")4 

Curacoa -^ 

Europe 1,286 118,002 256,093 

SUGAR CROP AND RAILROADS 

The sugar crop will reach 2,418,000 tons^ 
easily beating last year's record of 1,89."),000 
tons, and, as more land has been put un- 
der cultivation, only favorable weather is 
required to ensure an even larger yield in 
1914. .\'o vvfjnder the carriers have done 
well, and the financial outlook is decidedly 
encouraging, scarcity of laltor and corre- 
spondingly liigh wages being the only flies 
in the ointment. The United of the Ha- 
vana system had a minute traffic increase 



of £19 last week, and the afiliated Western 
a decrease of il9, but Havanas have im- 
proved, in sympathy with other stocks in 
this section, and I shall not be surprised to 
see them in the nineties before the accounts 
for the past twelvemonth make their ap- 
pearance in October. Cuban Centrals 
have made a move, the quotation on 
Atagust 15th of 5 3-32 for the Ordinary 
l)eing the highest for many a long day, 
and Imyers of the £lO share at tliat figure 
are not likely to have cause for repent- 
ance. — Financier and BitUionist of London. 



CENTRAL "SANTA CATALINA" LEASED 

The final papers have been signed at 
Cienfuegos for the leasing of the large 
sugar central "Santa Catalina," located at 
Cruces, which, until recently, was leased 
by Messrs. Ulacia, rich proprietors of tlie 
province of Santa Clara. Said central has 
been transferred into the hands of Messrs. 
Richard Diaz, Donato .Artime and Car- 
dona & Company, and with their recog- 
nized ability, it will only be a short time 
l)efore tlie production of this plantation 
will be materially increased. 

The new company which has leased the 
central "Santa Catalina" will introduce 
very great improvements. 

The work of renovation and cleaning 
will begin shortly, and a great many la- 
linrers will find employment at this central 
up to Xhv next Iiarvest. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Es'crita expresamente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York 



Nuestra ultima resena para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 14 de agosto ppdo., en 
cuyo periodo la cotizacion del aziicar centrifuge de Cuba polarizacion 96° era 3.73c. 
la libra, y es ahora 3.76c. la libra, despues de haberse vendido a 3.80c. la libra, la mas 
alta cotizacion del aiio. 

El precio mas alto q'ue se ha pagado bajo la base de costo y flete ha sido 2 13/32c. 
(3.80c.), con actuales vendedores a 2 7/16c. la libra costo y flete (3.76c.). Es dudoso el 
que llegue a mayor precio esta estacion, y si no es asi entonces este sera el linico aiio 
en el cual las cotizaciones de azucar en esta estacion no hayan alcanzado la paridad de 
los mercados europeos o lo que se llama las cotizaciones en los mercados del mundo 
segun se fijan en Hamburgo. 

El motive de esta excepcion es dibido al hecho de la grande cosecha anormal de Cuba, 
lo cual hace que los Estados Unidos no tenga que depender este aho de Europa para 
proveerse de existencias. 

Quedan aun unas 20,000 toneladas de azucar centrifuge de Cuba en la Gran Bretaha, que 
pueden importarse aqui si se necesitan mas tarde, pero la probabilidad el el que no se ne- 
cesiten antes de que la cosecha de azucar de remolacha del pais llegue al mercado durante 
octubre a diciembre. Despues del aiio nuevo la proxima cosecha de Cuba sera el factor 
importante de la nueva campaiia azucarera, y segun los indicios al presente respecto a 
los azucares del mundo el precio de dicha cosecha se red/ucira a un limite tan bajo 
como lo ha sido la cosecha actual en tiempo alguno. 

El azucar refinado llego recientemente a su mas alto precio de 4.80c. la libra, cuya 
cotizacion es aun el precio listado por todos los refinadores exceptuando la Federal 
Sugar Refining Company, que acepta pedidos a 4.60c. menos 2% para pronto embarque, 
mientras que otros refinadores aceptan pedidos a 4.70c. menos 2%. 

Los refinadores de azucar de caiia estan en posesion del mercado para su producto 
durante otro mes, despues de lo cual su negocio hallara mucha competencia de las 
fabricas del azucar de remolacha del pais. Ahora estan solicitando transaciones bajo 
la base de 4.60c. para entregas en octubre, tan pronto como empiece la elaboracion. 

Segun se nos informo por el cable la semana pasada, la cosecha de Java esta cal- 
culada en 1,450,000 toneladas contra 1,331,180 toneladas el aiio pasado. Hasta ahora 
no se ha exportado a los Estados Unidos nada de la cosecha de Java, lo dual es cosa 
bastante rara en esta estacion. 

La cosecha de azucar de cafia de la Luisiana esta calculada en unas 300,000, par£^ 
llegar al mercado de octubre a enero. Esta cosecha casi dejara de ser un factor de 
importancia en las existencias de azucar durante los tres anos venideros, eliminandose 
por complete con la llegada de los azucares libres de derechos despues del primero de 
mayo de 1916. 

La Ley Arancelaria fue sancionada por el Senado segiin resenamos el 10 de abril de 
1913, empezando a tener efecto los nuevos derechos el primero de marzo de 1914 y libre 
de derechos el primero de mayo de. 1916. 

Con la aprobacion de la nueva Ley Arancelaria queda eliminada la clausula de polari- 
zacion No. 16 del Tipo Holandes, permitiendo que el azucar crudo sobre el No. 16 de 
dicho Tipo entre en los Estados Unidos con derechos segun el grado de polarizacion, 
como se especifica en el arancel actual. 

Despues del primero de marzo de 1914 quedara tambien eliminado el diferencial en 
los azucares refinados, permitiendo que el azucar refinado entre en este pais con los 
derechos de polarizacion de los azucares crudos, sin los derechos adicionales impuestos 
bora a los azucares refinados. 

Estos cambios arancelarios es probable que causen algun efecto importante en la 
industria azucarera de los Estados Unidos, asi como en los mercados azucareros del 
mundo, cuyos cambios no pueden preverse claramente al publicar esta reseiia, sino 
que tienen que revelarse despues de marzo de 1914 por la ejecucion efectiva de la nueva 
medida por el comercio en general. 

El mercado esta en calma al cerrar. Los vendedores ofrecen azucares centrifuges pa- 
ra embarque a 2 7/16c. la libra costo y flete. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



CABLE ADDRESS: Tvrnure 



NEW YORK 
64-66 WiU-L Strkit 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

BANKERS 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance 
of Dividends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale 
of Letters of Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons, etc., for account of others. Drafts Payments 
ky Cable and Letters of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France SDain 
Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Central and South America. ' . pa , 



CORRESPONDENTS: 



HAVANA— N. Gelats y Ca. 
MEXICO Banco Central Mexicano. 



LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank I rn 
PARIS-Heine et Cie. ' ^"- 



SUGAR TESTING APPARATlTs 



FUNDADA EN 1851 




POLARISCOPIO SOBRE "BOCKSIATIV" la forma MAS MODERNA 
Con cKJa a prii.ha de polvo, parte de prisma, y t-iigranaje prolongado. 

EIMER & AMEND, 2OS-211 Third Avenue, New York 



llace uiia especiali- 

dad de surtir 
7 odos los Instru- 
mentos para la 
Frueba de Azucar 
y Habilitacidn de 
Laboratorio. 
Unicos Agentes en 
los Estados Unidos 
y Canada para los 

STANDARD 

POLARISCOPIOS 

Su triple 6 doble 
campo de vision ha 
sido adoptado por 
el Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos co- 
mo norma. 

Toda la maquina- 
ria experimental y 
los aparatos descrj- 
tos en ((Agricultural 
Analysis,)) del Prof. 
H. W. Wiley. Se 
suministran con 
fustos todos los in- 
lormes pedidos. 

Pidanse Listas de 
Preciot Ilustradas. 



SUGAR PRODUCTION IN THE REMEDIOS 
DISTRICT 

The production of sugar of the 13 cen- 
trals in the district of Remedios, Santa 
Clara Province, during 1912-13 compares 
with the previous year as follows : 

T.)12-13 1911-12 

Bags Bags 

Vitoria 133,070 106,414 

Reforma 123.647 89,rj69 

Zaza 127,7.56 S3,786 

Xarcisa 118,172 117,608 

San A'-.::tin 106,038 89,055 

Fe 1 00,550 75,061 

Adela 91,481 79,709 

San Jose S6,643 42,2r)3 

Altamira 77,434 38,538 

Rosalia 41 ,639 26,567 

San Pablo 43.S86 21.454 

Fidencia 10,954 59,791 

Julia 9,750 7.130 

Total 1.071,020 836,985 



SUGAR ASSOCIATION FORMED 

A national sugar association has recently 
been organized in Havana for the purpose 
of bringing together all who are connected 
with the sugar industry of Cuba. The fol- 
lowing officers were elected : 

Honorary Presidents — General Mario G. 
Menocal, president of the republic: General 
Emilio Nunez, secretary of agriculture ; Dr. 
Jose A. Simpson. 

President — Dr. Jose A. Freyrc de An- 
drade. 

Vice-President — First, Dr. Jose Co- 
mallonga ; Second, Dr. Francisco Henares ; 
Third, Miguel Morera. 

Secretary — Javier Resines. 

Vice-Secretary — Gtiillermo Freyre de An- 
drade. 

Treasurer — Dr. Carlos J. Valdes. 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR CONSUMPTION INCREASING 

A bulletin issued by the United States 
Department of Commerce gives a pre- 
liminary report of the statistics of sugar 
production and sugar imports during the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1913. These 
figures show a marked increase both in 
domestic production and in imports from 
Cuba, indicating that the consumption of 
sugar in the United States is advancing 
very rapidly, says the Philadelphia (Pa.) 
Item. 

During the year according to the report 
the quantity of sugar sent to the United 
States by Cuba was in excess of four 
billion pounds while the output of the in- 
sular possessions and of the continental 
portion of the country also was approxi- 
mately four billion pounds. On this sub- 
ject the report says: 

"These figures, which show that the 
sugar imported in 1913 exceeded that of 
any other year, suggest that the sugar con- 
sumption of the United States in 1913 will 
be larger than ever before and will, for 
the first time, exceed S billion pounds. The 
quantity brought from foreign countries is 
above 4% billion pounds, and from Hawaii 
and Porto Rico nearly 2 billion, while the 



domestic production now approximates 2 
billion pounds, the figures for 1912 being, 
of beet sugar about 1,200 million pounds, 
and of cane sugar, 724 million pounds. 
Speaking in very round terms, it may be 
said that foreign countries supply approxi- 
mately one-half of the sugar consumed in 
the United States, our own islands about 
onefourth, and our own fields about one- 
fourth. Cuba supplies nine-tenths of that 
from abroad ; Hawaii, about one-half of 
that from our islands ; and beets, nearly 
twothirds of that produced at home. 

"Sugar from Cuba makes its highest 
record in 1913, 4,311,744,043 pounds against 
3,509,657,597 pounds in the former high- 
record year, 1910." 



SUGAR GROWERS ORGANIZE 

Sugar cane growers of the Guantanamo 
Valley recently organized a protective asso- 
ciation. Their intentions are to make the 
organization a national one. 



SUGAR REFINERY DESTROYED 

The H. R. Estrada sugar refinery at 
Cardenas was destroyed by fire on August 
30th. The insurance was $200,000. 




PATENTE PELAEZ 

Esta maza puede colocarse facilmente en cualquier trapiche, sea de dos 6 tres mazas. Machuca bicn 
la cana desmenuzandola y extrayendole al mismo tiempo las dos terceras partes de su guarapo, dejando 
la cana bien preparada para el segundo trapiche. Ejecuta todo el trabajo de una desmenuzadora de 
primera clase y sin mas gasto que cuando se opera con una maza lisa. Esta maza es de acero y se ha 
sacado privilegio para ella en todas las partes del mundo donde se cultiva la cana de aziicar. Puei 
envienos un dibujo de la maza superior que usan U is asi que de su eje, y les cotizaremos precios bajos 
por una maza completa para desmenuzar la cana de este trapiche. 

NEWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 149 Broadway, New York, E. U. A. 

PIERRE DROESHOUT, Agt., Apartade 861, Havana, Cuba. 



This 

Axle Grease 

Saves Money 



Dixon's Axle Grease lasts from three to five times 
longer than any other because of the durability of its 
basic ingredient, flake graphite. Saves over two-thirds 
of time in application. Will not drip in warmest 
weather. Always cleanly. Does not catch dirt or dust. 
Compare it with others and know how much less it 
costs. 

CROFT & PRENTISS ^-JT^Al'crBl'' 



D 

I 

X 

O 

N 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



39 



HAVANA 



CUBA 

National Bank of Cuba 

Government Depositary 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$6,250,000.00 



Head Office — Havana 

27 BRANCHES IN CUBA 

N en> York A gene}) 
I WALL STREET 



COLLECTIONS 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL An« 
•URPLUt 



$650,000 



TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES COLLECT! RENT! 

NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTOAIES 

Carrcspondenrt.- F 'licited fron 
Intending inTtstori 



OFFICERS 

Norman H. Davis President 

Oswald A. Hornsby - - - - Vice-President 
Claudio O. Mendoza - - - Vice-President 

J. M. Hopgood Treasurer 

Rogelio Carbajal Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

INCORPORATED 1869 

Fiscal Agent of the Government of the Republic o' 
Cuba for the Payment of the Army of llberatim 

Paid=up Capital, 

and Reserve. .. .$25,000,000.00 
Total Assets $180,000,000.00 

Head Office MONTREAL 

New York Agency 
Corner William and Cedar Streets 

r.ranches in Havana: Obrapia 33, Galiano 92 
Monte US, Muralla 52, Luyano 3 (Tesus del 
Monte); Antilla, Bayamo, Caibarien, Camaguey, 
C ardenas, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos. Manzanillo, 
Matanzas ^uevitas, Pinar del Rio, Puerto Padre. 
Sagua la Grande, Sancti Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba. 



ESTAILISHID 1144 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKIN6 BUSINESS 
C«rr«ap*ad«ntt at All PrIaclMl Plasti of the liland 

Safe Deposit Vaulit 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 



FACTORY: 
Pa««* de Taeea 168-1*3 



OFFICE: 
Anariura I -I 



N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 

Transact a general banking bu»ine*» 
CorrcipondenU at all the principal 
places of the world 

Safe Deposit faults 
Office: Aguiar 108 



NEW ENTERPRISE AT PUNTA BRAVA 

At this town, situated ni-ar Havana, Sr. 
Alberto Canet lias fstahlishcd a modern 
coffee roaster. He will be enabled to 
supply the demand for coffee from the 
|)0()rer classes at a considerable reduction 
from the price they have been paying. 



Pleate mention TBB CUBA REVIEW when writtng to Aduertiaert 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA 



The United Railways of Havana 

in conjunction with the Cuba Railroad, maintain a service of 
two trains daily between Havana and the growing Eastern 
city of CAMAQUEY, and one Express Train daily between 
Havana and SANTIAGO DE CUBA, the "Dream City of the 
West Indies." Buffet lunch is served on these trains. 

FOUR TRAINS DAILY 

in both directions between Hayana and MATANZAS, which latter city because of its picturetque 
■ituation and the charm of its principal attractions (^'umun's famous valley and the wonderful 
caTCS of Bellamar) has long enjoyed distinction as ':e great "Mecca" of the tourists, and it 
continues to gain in popularity. EXCELLENT TRA . N' SERVICE is maintained to many other 
places of treat interest to tourists, all of which ?re fully described in Cuba— A Winter 
Paradise," a profusely illustrated 80-page booklet with six complete maps and 72 Tiews illustratiye 
of thii wonderful island, sent postpaid on receipt of 3 cents in stamps. 

Frank Roberts, General Passenger Agent 
United Railways of Havana -------- 118, Prado, Havana, Cxjba 



FRED WOLFE i" 



CALZADA DE VIVES, HAVANA 

Cable, "Wolfe" 

Negociante en Todas Clases Dealer in all Classes of 
de Ganado Live Stock 

E«pecialmente en Mulos Especially in Mules 

Aluiays on hand Large Stock of All Classes of Mules— All Mules Sold Are 
Guaranteed as Represented— Can Furnish Any Number Desired on Short Notice 



^ 



P. RUIZ a BROS. 

ENGRAVERS 

FINE STATIONERY 

Obispo 22 P. O. Box 608 

HAVANA, CUBA 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

Sugar Brokers 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable AddreiB, "Tide, New Y«rk" 



KENTUCKY JACK AND 
PERCHERON FARMS 

(Successors to the Cook Farms and the Cloverdale 

Jack and Percheron Farm) 
We have the best herd of big bone Kentucky Mam- 
moth jacks in the country and a splendid lot of 
Percheron stallions and mares. Also a few nice 
saddlers and drivers. We will make special prices 
to those who buy this fall. Catalog ready Nov. 1st. 
Write or visit our farms 

J. F. COOK & H. T. BROWN, Proprietors 
Lexington, Ky. 



THEODORE E. FERRIS 

Formerly Gary Smith & Ferris 

NAVAL ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER 

Hudson Terminal Bldg., 30 Church Street 



'phone: 2786 cortlandt 



New York City 



Plans, Specifications and Superintendence : 
Steamships, Steamboats, Lighters, Tugboats, 
Barges, Yachts — steam and sail and Motor- 
boats of all classes 



A NEW CHIEF ENGINEER 

C. H. Sanderson, who for a number of 
years has been one of the engineers on 
switchboard and power station design for 
the Westinghouse Electric and Manufac- 
turing Company at East Pittsburg, has ac- 



Power Company, at Havana. Mr. Sander- 
son is a graduate of Ohio State University, 
and has been connected with the Electric 
Company for the last 13 years. 

Construction work on the extension of 
the Havana Central to Artemisa is pro- 



cepted the position of chief engineer for gressing rapidly and will soon be com- 
the Havana Electric Railway, Light and pleted. 

Please mention THE CVRA REVIFAV when irriling tn Adnerll.trrt 



THECUBAREVIEW 41 

Havana's burial customs just returned from Cuba, has been exhibit- 
ing a sample of white tanned Spanish sole- 

The dead poor are treated with scant leather suitable for heels or soles of ladies' 

consideration in Havana, for the custom ^j^^ men's shoes 

up to the present seems to have been of ^his leather has attracted a good deal of 

interring the bodies of those very poor ^t^^ntion, being pronounced by experts as 

without either coffin or shroud, into a ^^^ ^^^^-^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ y ^^at has been 

ditch with other corpses. ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^ 

The city council is working a reform in , r .u- i .u i • u • i •*. 

this matter and has asked the Bishop of "?f ^e of this leather, which is snow-white 

Havana to provide separate graves for each ^^^ through, obviates the necessity of paint 

unfortunate. The council will provide '-'^ stains. ^ 
coffins. In the event of the Bishop proving 

obdurate to the request the council pur- FIRE IN SAGUA 

poses to place a tax on the cemetery from ^, , , ■ t c ^■ 

which it has been always exempt. The telephone concession of Santiago 

passed to the possession of the state on 

*" August 14th, when the twenty years of the 

NEW TANNERY IN CUBA concession expired^ The concession was 

granted in 1893 to Sr. Luis Berenguer. Ihe 

The representative of the Superintendent government will likely now lease it out to 

and Foreman of Boston, Mass., who has the best bidder. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

Engines, Boilers andMacKinery 

Jklanufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 
Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

St«aans^ip IXTork » Specialty 

A. KLING. Prop. MOBILEl ALA. 



ESTABUSHED 1852 ROHLIG & CO. INQUIRIES REQUESTED 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

BREMEN BREMBRHAVEN HAMBURG 

Knochenhauerstr 16/17 am Hafen 113 Alsterdamm 14/lS 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERT.AKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PORVIDED ON APPLICATION 



WILLETT St GRAY, BroRer. and Agent. 

FOREIGN AND ^^^T^^^ TK 1K> ^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

DOMESTIC V^'t^tjr.^r^.JclC:^^^ REFINED 

82 WALL STREET. NEIV YORK 

'ublishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal — the recognized authority of the trad*. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED. 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton ,,..9*'''? ^Mr^"\r , 

Night Call, 411 Hamilton "Abiworks, New York 

Atlantic 'Basin Iron Works 

Engineers and Boiler Makers 

Machinists, Plumbers, Tinsmiths, Pine Fitters, Blacksmiths, Coppersmiths, Pattern 
Makers, Sheet Iron Workers, Iron ann Rrass Castings. Steamship Repairs a Specialty. 

Corner Imlay and Summit Streets Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Please mention THE CUHA UhVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



48 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"P A S S L" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, COR. STONE 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos De Bea Sl Co. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Impertaelin dirteta de tedti lot 
••ntroa manufaotunrai dtl munda 

Agenti for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E, Ward & 
Co., New York; Serra Steamship Company, 
Liverpool; Vapores Transatlinticos de A. 
Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espafia Indepen- 
dencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL. WOOD. LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF KVERY DESCKIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard; 58-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones: 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
FiEKs, Bkidces, Railsoads and Bi;ildin«i 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 
on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 
WooLwoRTH Building, 233 Broadway 
Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Mimro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cablk Address: Eunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 Soutk 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL [s .. d 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

ESPECIALIDAD EN ROPA HeCHA DE TrABAJO 

Am in a position to push the sales of American 

high class products. Would represent a first 

class firm. 

Apartado 102 Camaguey, Cuba 



M. J. CABANA 



COMMISSION 
MERCHANT 
P. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a com- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in 
eastern Cuba. 

F. W. Hvosi-EF E. C. Day R. M. Michelsem 

Bennett, Hvoslef & Co. 

Steamship Agents and Ship Brokers 
(8 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Cable: "Benvosco" 

Mr. Henry C. Saunders, as attorney for 
William Carleton, wants to register 46 hec- 
tares of land containing gold and other 
metals, situated in the municipality of Hol- 
guin, Guajabales ward, farm of Sr. Manuel 
de Fuentes. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




SAILINGS 



NEW YORK— CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 

SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS NORTHBOUND SAILINGS 

(From New York) (From Nuevltas) 

S.S. CuRiTYBA - - Oct. 8th S.S. Olinda - - Oct. I 0th 
S.S. Olinda - - Oct. 22nd S.S. Curityba - - Oct. 24th 

Nuevitas, Antilla, Nipe Bay, Puerto Padre and Gibara 
FREIGHT ONLY 

S.S. LURISTAN, Oct. 1st; S.S. PalOMA, Oct. 15th; a Steamer Oct. 29th 
Matanzas. Cardenas, Sagua and Caibarien 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Regular sailings Mobile to Havana, Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua, Caibarien, 
Santiago, Guantanamo, Cienfuegos and Manzanillo 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Mobile, Oct. 7th for Montevideo and Buenos Ayres; Oct. 21st 
for Buenos Ayres and Rosario 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 
Sailings from Baltimore. Oct. 9th, Oct. 23rd 



Hlease mention THE CUBA HliVIEW when writing to Advertisers 






THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of:i 904. 1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to tk« 
Taiwan Seito Kabuskiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 galloni 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other ts 
handle 325,000 gallons in th« 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for serrice in Formoia. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reyersing the 
course of the yapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillis 
and which has proyen of 
great yalue for solutions de 
positing incrustations on tb* 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



I. MORRIS LILLIE, PrcsMant. 



LEWIS C, LILLIE, Secretary and Treasurer. 



THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 



BROAD AND 
NARROW GAUGE 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 

LOCOMOTIVES 



SINGLE EXPANSION 
AND COMPOUND 




''irA^V'r' PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES Vnro^'Io^'-s^HVl^E 

SPtnfitmtions Furnished on AppUcattcn 

Representative for the West Indies: 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

C9bU Address: "Baldtvin. Philadelphia" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



^ 



i^ 



•^ ''1», 



n^ 



■.\' 



'^-^ 




'\k; 






V 



^><i«l 




1.00 AYear^CTWBER 1913 lOCenMCopy 
Piiblbhed brtheHunsonSteamshipUne. (^'SZBeaverStreet.NewYorkQty. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



LINK BELT CRANES 

Equipped with Grab Bucket, Electric Lifting Magnet or Hook Block 
The most efficient cranes on the market to-day 




Distinctive Features 

Steel Gears Throughout 

Bronze Bushings Throughout 

One Point Adjustment on 
Clutches 

Few Parts — Every One 
Accessable 

Large Roomy Platform for 
Operator — Everything 
Handy 



.t^ .-a ^ 



Catalog on Request 
Correspondence solicited. We invite a thorough investigation 

LINK-BELT COMPANY ^IV^gR^^^f/v 



YOUNGSTOWN CAR & MANUFACTURING CO. 



Fahricantes de Carros para 




:, Ingenios y Minas, etc. 



CABLE ADDRESS: 
JAMOTLEY, 

NEW YCRK 

(all codes used) 



rOUNGSTOWN 



Cerente del 
Departamento 
de Exportacion 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 

81 BEAVER STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Ladrillos Refractarios 

Tanques de Madera y de Hierro 

Torres de Acero y de Madera 

Puentes de Acero 

Bdificios de Acero 

Hierro Acanalado 



I^ieles y Aseguradores 

Ranas, Cambiavias y Sopor tes de 

Loco motor as 

Calderas 

Tubos para Calderas 

Coches para Pasajeros 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



r^ARRO^ PAKA TODOi oioi y de todoi Umafioi, de lot parm cmfta cen cuatro ruedai y capa- 
^''^'^^^^^^ cidad de IH toneladaa 4 loi con juegoi doblei de riiedai y capacidad de 30 toneUdai 
Hactmos una rtpecialidad dt futgot dt htrrmjtt, incluytndo lot juigot 
d* ruedat, completmmtnte armados, con todat las pittas dt metal, y flanot 
eompletos para construir los cartas 4 su dtstino de maderas drl t<mii 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Gbarcb St., New York, N. Y. 



Cablk Addius: 
Raualiam 



DONT OVERLOOK THE 
ADVERTISING PAGES 



OP 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Tk«y lera att tk* Itait lattrtitlai pertUa ef tk« pakH- 
eatlaa, aad tk«r« li liaiUat varltty at linitatat pf*pa> 
iltlaai aatf valvakU ■•rtkaatflM aaaaaaNatatt te MMt 
•««ry*M'i aMtf. a«t li MiTHHaitBM witk eu^A 

REVIEW a««*rtlMn far tkt iMtfi yaa mat. 




ALL 

ABOUT 
CUBA" 



COPYIIOHT 1913 



IT COVERS THE ISLAND'S 

INDUSTRIES AND ACTIVITIES 

ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR POSTPAID 



PlamMt mtntlon THE CUBA REriBW whan wrUtng to AdverUser$ 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Los Instrumentos Agricolas y Maquinas 

de FARQUHAR 

han merecido distincion en la Isla de Cuba por su buena cualidad durante muchisimos 
aflos, porque estan hechos por mecanicos expertos, y estan hechos de un material 
cuidadosamente escojido en una fabrica moderna, donde las condiciones y las necesida- 
des de Cuba han recibido su atencion especial, y por esta razOn estan atendidas 
cuidadosamente. 



Catdlogos d solicltud 

Direcci6n cablegr&fica : 
"FeNankle," New York 




Correspondencia en todoa 
los idiomas modernos 



Fabricamos Maquinas de Vapor y Calderas, Mdquinas de Gasolina, Mdquinas de Trac- 
cion de Vapor y de Gasolina, Trilladoras, Aserraderos, Malacates, Arados, Rastras, 
Cultivadoras, Desgranadoras de Maiz, Molinos para Maiz, Sembradoras de Granos, Sem- 
bradoras de Maiz y de Algodon, Excavadoras de Patatas, Carretillas para Almacen, 
etc. Tambien hacemos Prensas hidrdulicas para Sidra, Vino, y Chapear. 

A. B. FARQUHAR & CO., Cotton Exchange Bldg., New York 




Prensas d« 

Filtrar 

para Ingenios 

SHRIVER 

FILTER PRESSES 

Write ui for 
Catalog, Pricei 
und Information 

T. Stiriver & Go. 

814 Hamilton St. 
Hcrrison, N. J. 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



2630 Whitehall Building 
New York 




STEEL TANKS 



BUILT BY 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 



AGEKTs IN Cuba: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 

26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, WARREN, Pa., U.S. A. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THL CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, Neiv York 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Editors and Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 
- - - - - - - - - - - 10 Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 



$1.00 Per Year 



Vol. XI 



OCTOBER, 1913 



No. 11 



Contents of This Number 



The Cover Page Illustration is a View of the Picturesque Canimar River. (Courtesy 
of the United Railways of Havana.) 

Cuban Ports Company Matter 9 

Comment on Cuban Matters from All Sources .........."!'!!^...'..7lb, 11 

Financial News: 

Cuban Treasury Report 26 

Cuban Securities. Prevailing Prices 26 

Cuban Telephone Earnings 25 

Earnings Santiago Electric Light Co '. !!''"!!''"" 25 

Speyers and the New Loan 25 

Government Activities: 

A National Highway Projected S 

Agricultural Fair 9 

Immigration to Cuba 9 

Office Patronage Views of President Menocal 7 

The New Loan 9 

Isle of Pines News 29 

Industrial Enterprises: 

Alpargata Factory in Regla 12 

Brick Factory in Cienfuegos 12 

Cuban Ore Properties in American Hands 12 

Charcoal Burners' Work and Pay 13 

Electric Light and Power Plants 12 

Gas .Stove Exposition 12 

Lumber Notes from the Gulf Coast 30 

Ko(|ue Canal Work Progressing 20 

liailroad News: 

Earnings of the Cuba Railroad 22 

Earnings of the Cuban Central 19 

Earnings of the Havana Electric 22 

Earnings of the United Railway 22 

Earnings of the Western Railway 19 

Guantanamo and Western Annual Report 23 

Sea Ferry to Havana 25 

Shoe Trade of Cuba: 

Manufacturing Plants 1 4 

Popular Styles 13 

Purchases and Credits 1 6 

Packing Directions 17 

Sugar Industry: 

Report of a Sugar Estate 38, 39 

Sugar Estate News 31 

Sugar Review (English) by Willett & Gray 32, 33, 34 

Sugar Review (Spanish) by Willett & Gray 35, 36 

Trade News: 

August's Trade Increases 17 

Canarla and the Cuban Market 17 

Customs Receipts (^Jreat Increase 18 

New Customs Regulations 18 

One Year of Commerce 17 

Trade Mark Ruling 1 7 

United Kingdom atul Cuba 18 

Tobacco Industry: 

August Exports from Havana _ 27 

Crop News 27 

Exports to England 27 

Spurious Cuban Cigars 27 



THL 
CUBA REVIEW 



"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1913, by the Munson Steamship Line 



LIBRARY 
INCVV YORK I 
6UTA>«C.*L 



Volume XI 



OCTOBER, 1913 



Number 11 



GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



PRESIDENT S OPINION ON OFFICE PATRONAGE NEW LOAN MAY BE 

FOR $30,000,000 IMMIGRATION VERY LARGE 



President ?iIenocal recently 

President's gave out a statement to an 

J'iezi's on evening paper of Havana, 

Patronage which sharply emphasizes 

his views on the question of 

patronage. He says : 

"I am not bothered by the job seekers. 
To aspire to a public position is a legiti- 
mate sentiment. Conservatives, or better 
say, Conjunctionists. Liberals, Veterans. 
office holders, all have their aspirations; all 
feeling that they liave a perfect right to 
what they pretend. For my part, I try to 
please them all in the proper measure and 
according to their merits and the circum- 
stances of the case, demanding at the same 
time their strict compliance with their duty. 
There are limits to this patronage ciuestion 
and these limits are those which have been 
traced beforehand by the law and the limi- 
tation of the l)udget appronriations. We 
are going to the limit in this matter, but 
not one inch further. We did not wage 
that formidable electoral campaign, nor 
did the Conjunctionists form a union and 
neither did we receive the support of the 
country from the east to the west in order 
that we might proceed arbitrarily or cai)ri- 
ciously in that matter. I look upon the 
patronage question from a point of view 
which we may call a national reality. I try 
to heed the clamors of the Conjunctionists 
and even those who militate in the opposi- 
tion whenever their demands shall be rea- 
«onable and that they be served in the 
right proportion according to their apti- 
tudes; because I am tlie President of all 
the Cubans, and that without l)reaking 
away from the doctrines, i)rinciples, and 
moral compromises of the party — as long 
as I never contracted any material ones 
and also of the law, I aspire that all citi- 



zens shall be served within a measure of 
equity and that justice shall be adminis- 
tered." 



For a 
N^ational 
Highway 



The administration has un- 
der advisement the building 
of a national liighway con- 
necting Oriente and Pinar 
del Rio provinces with Ha- 
vana. Engineers of the department of pub- 
lic works are now making estimates and 
Congress will be asked to make an ade- 
quate appropriation if the president ap- 
proves of the plans. 

There are roads connecting Ha\ana with 
Pinar del Rio, RIatanzas and Cardenas, but 
none east of the latter city, connecting 
with Oriente. 



The chief of the navy de- 

Tiinber partment has ordered the 

Dcspnilation commanders of gunboats to 

closely guard the coasts to 
stop the fraudulent exploitation of forests 
in the numerous keys along the coasts 
wliich are rich in timber. The order is 
due to information received by the secre- 
tary of agriculture al)out the exploitation 
which is carried on in those zones in spite 
uf the president having enacted recently 
tliree decrees annulling concessions for 
the exploitation of forests in the maritime 
zones of the northern coast, from the prov- 
ince of Pinar del Rio to Caibarien, and on 
the southern coast of Santa Clara. 



■ \ recent project to erect a 2r)-story busi- 
ness l)tiilding on the site of the Campo 
Marti in Havana is objected to by the 
.Vational 15oard of lleallh because of its 
encroachment on a pul)lic park. 



8 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The now loan will be used 
May be a to pay off the outstanding 

$30,000,000 current indebtedness left by 
Loan the preceding administra- 

tion and push needed public 
works to completion. 

The government recently submitted to 
the Washington government a very satis- 
factory statement in regard to the treas- 
ury's condition. 

President Menocal purposes to spend 
$7,000,000 for completing the Havana 
sewers, $3,000,000 for paying off old debts 
of the Public Works Department, and 
$2,000,000 to meet other pending obliga- 
tions. The remainder will be used to ex- 
tend, pave and repair Havana's streets. 

The economical management of the Me- 
nocal administration is rapidly increasing 
the financial strength of the country. 

It is thought probable that Congress will 
increase the amount of the loan to $30,- 
000,000 in order to carry out other pro- 
jected public works. It is understood that 
the Cuban minister to Washington has re- 
ceived assurances from Secretary Bryan 
that he has no objections to a loan of $20,- 
000.000. 

Regarding this loan the London Morning 
Post made the following comment : 

"It seems indeed most improbable that 
the Cuban government will receive much 
encouragement from any responsible Lon- 
don house at the present moment. British 
lenders may well wait to see how the gov- 
ernment intends to deal with the claims of 
the bondholders of the Cuban Ports Com- 
pany before they entrust fresh funds to the 
Cuban authorities." 



The Department of Health 
Chinese and Charities has approved 
Women a report of the immigration 
Barred office which will deny the 
admission to this country 
to a large number of Chinese women who 
allege that they are wives of merchants re- 
siding in this country. Cuba permits Chi- 
nese merchants to enter the country, but 
bars all others, the law saying nothing of 
merchants and their wives unless they 
show the marriage certificate. 

Chinese laborers and coolies are barred 
from Cuba, but the immigration laws permit 
merchants to come into the country as long 
as they are identified. Dr. Guiteras, the 
director of health in Cuba, says it has be- 
come a regular trade for some agents to in- 
troduce venders of produce and fried foods 
as merchants. 

Dr. Guiteras wants strict measures 
adopted to restrict the invasion which he 
thinks is highly prejudicial to the country 
owing to the diseases that these elements 
spread and the harm they cause the la- 
lioring element of the country. 



The work of the agents of 
Immigrants the Department of Agricul- 
for Cuba ture abroad toward procur- 
ing laborers with which to 
take care of the sugar crop, which is the 
country's annual problem, seems to be 
bearing fruit, the steamship companies an- 
nouncing that during the month of October 
they expect to bring more than 8,990 la- 
borers, which is the record for a single 
month. 

The passage of the married men who by 
coming with their families denote that they 
will stay here permanently, is being paid 
by the Department of Agriculture. These 
families have been assured permanent 
work and homes at different sugar planta- 
tions. 

Many sugar planters have already noti- 
fied the authorities that thev are willing to 
take these immigrants and emplov them on 
their estates to the extent of fifty and one 
hundred families. 



The secretary of agricul- 
ture has been asked by meat 
dealers to encourage the 
importation of foreign cat- 
tle to save the country from 
the disastrous effects of the inevitable high 
prices due to the scarcity of cattle. 



May 
Import 
Cattle 



Major Andrew S. Rowan, 
Cuban U. S. A., retired, nation- 
Site ally known as "the man who 

Dedicated carried the message to Gar- 
cia," took part at San 
Francisco on September 25th in the dedica- 
tion of the site on which the republic of 
Cuba will erect a pavilion for the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition in 1915. 

The Cuban commissioner Sr. Jose Por- 
tuondo y Tamayo spoke feelingly of the 
part this nation played in winning inde- 
pendence for the island republic. 



The Cuban government will 
Agricultural hold a fair or exposition in 
Fair Havana from January 28th 

Coming to February 24th. Among 
other features foreign firms 
will be invited to show horses, cattle, 
pigs, chickens, etc., and from these ex- 
hibits the government will buy valuable 
specimens, expending from $40,000 to $50,- 
000, such animals to be used at the farm 
schools. 



Dr. Enrique Jose Varona, vice-president 
of the republic and president of the Con- 
servative Party, resigned his place as head 
of the party on September 15th. Wrangling 
inside Conservative ranks over the division 
of the spoils is the cause. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE CUBAN PORTS COMPANY 



One of the most important decisions of the Supreme Court in relation to the Cuban 
Ports Company concession annuhnent is that rendered October 8th. 

It was the second appeal made by the company. The court holds that President 
Menocal was right in his contention that the present company cannot be considered as 
holder of the original concession, as it was not organized in accordance with the law. 

The court's Jirst decision. October 3rd, held President ^Menocal's action in annulling 
the company's concession was not unconstitutional. The second appeal was against the 
presidential decree cancelling the concession. 

The hopes of the Cuban Ports Company now rest upon a civil suit, in which it expects 
to have no difficulty in showing that it was organized according to the laws, which is the 
principal point involved. On October 1st, Eugene Klapp, president of the Cuban Ports 
Company, formally notified the Cuban government of his intention of filing such suit. 

The government on September 2~th began another suit against the Ports Company with 
the object of dissolving its contract with the government on the ground that it was 
■'prejudicial to the public interest." 

This suit takes advantage of an old Spanish law governing public works, which allows 
the State to bring suit for the cancelation of any contract which is thought harmful to its 
own interests. 

Some of the biggest engineering and contracting firms in New York City stand to lose 
large sums of money through President jNIenocal's revocation of the Ports Company 
concession sustained by the Supreme Court at Havana on October 8th. 

These firms include MacArthur Brothers of 11 Pine Street, who, in association with 
Walker, Sons & Co. of London, formed the MacArthur-Perks Company, Ltd., which 
undertook a large part of the work; Michael J. Dady. the old-time Brooklyn politician 
and contractor, and the Snare & Triest Company. Still another part went to the Bowers 
Southern Dredging Company of Galveston. 

These sub-contractors proceeded to move into the Cuban harbors extensive plants for 
dredging, including steam shovels, the most improved dredges, etc. The value of these 
plants is put by them at $2,000,000. Under the CubanI laws 75 per cent of the men em- 
ployed were citizens of the island, but the skilled workmen were nearly all Americans, 
and' they numbered between 2,000 and 3,000. 

John R. MacArthur of MacArthur Brothers, R. P. Clark, president of the Bowers 
Southern Dredging Company; Michael J. Dady, Frederick Snare of Snare & Triest, 
and Mr. Trumbo called later on Secretary of State Bryan in reference to their interests. 
In their talk with Mr. Bryan the sub-contractors took the view that the United States 
government, through the adoption of the Piatt amendment, had put itself in a different 
relation toward Cuba than it bears to any other of the Spanish-American republics. That 
relation, they argued, involved an obligation on the part of the United States to safe- 
guard the property rights of all foreigners, which in this case would include the English 
bondholders and the American contractors, to say nothing of the original concessionaries. 

According to the Xctu York Times despatch they were advised that the policy of the 
State Department would remain unchanged, and that this government could not see any 
way in which it could intervene. 

In reply to recent inquiries by the British minister at Havana as to what tlie intentions 
of the government were towards the lx)nd and stock holders, of whom many were be- 
lieved to be British subjects who had made bona fide investments in the company by 
purchases in the open markets, Sr. de la Torriente, the secretary of state, replied that 
both bond and stock holders would have to bring an action against the Ports Company 
and the Trust Company of Cuba in the Criminal Courts, that the government would do 
the same, and would do all in their power to assist those bond and stock holders. He 
added, further, that those against whom criminal proceedings were taken were liable as 
regards all of their property of whatever nature. 

This last remark, says the I.oudoii /icoitoniist, hints at an endeavor "to put into con- 
tribution the personal estates in Culja of those responsible for the promotion of the 
company. .An action in the Cultan Courts is a (Hlficult undertaking, and there will be 
little chance of success unless bond and share holders are able to co-operate. For the 
moment what is required is a nuicii more complete disclosure of the facts, and above all 
a full answer from the company to the facts and arguments of President Menocal. Their 
continuous silence would be regarded in most (|uarters as damaging evidence against 
them. Whether an action in the English Courts is advisaljle the Itondholders themselves 
must decide, but they must not delay, or the assistance which at present is being held out 
to them will 1)C of no value." 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



GENERAL COMMENT ON CUBAN AFFAIRS 



The Rev. C. W. Frazer is the Episcopal 
minister at the Cape Cruz sugar planta- 
tion in the Province of Oriente. He has 
lived for ten years among the Cubans, 
speaks very interestingly of them and 
their customs. 

"The Cubans differ from Americans very 
radically, just as all Latins differ from 
Anglo-Saxons," he said recently to a re- 
porter of the Savannah (Ga.) Press. "They 
have their own individual traits very dis- 
tinctly marked, and Americans who come 
there on business and other enterprises can- 
not hope to change them over to suit their 
own ideas. The main trouble with all 
Americans who come to Cuba is that they 
forget that they are in a foreign country, 
and endeavor to make the Cubans, who are 
Hving according to their own customs and 
habits and manners of many years, change 
about and conform to American ideals. 
Which is a manifestly absurd thing to try 

"The Latin differ essentially from the 
Anglo-Saxon in that they hate to come 
directly to the point about anything. We 
like to come straight to the point — they 
like to go in the most round-about way. 
They hold it to be a sign of weakness m 
a man for him to tell the truth right away. 
They think he is a fool and an idiot to 
come right out and state the direct facts 
in a case. This is to them a sign of a lack 
of mentahty and of weakness of which a 
man ought not to be guilty. However it 
a Cuban lies to you and drives a hard bar- 
crain with you he will come around after- 
wards and laugh at you and joke with you 
about it. If an Anglo-Saxon hes, though. 
he will try to conceal it the rest of his Ute. 



than all other interests combined. Since 
Cuba became an independent nation, 
American capital has acquired control of 
fully 50 per cent of the sugar plantations, 
and the Americans are extending their 
holdings. There is very little American 
money invested in public utilities, and few 
Americans are in municipal business afifairs. 
"Opinion regarding free sugar is divided. 
There are those who favor it, but there are 
others, and I am among them, who believe 
that free sugar will not help Cuba. We 
have a preferential duty of 25 per cent, and 
with free sugar to all countries, Cuba will 
not be able to take advantage of the pref- 
erential." — Dionisio Velasco, a business 
man of Havana, in the Washington (D. C.) 
Post. 



The old Spanish regime, incapable of pre- 
serving public order and protecting hfe 
?.nd property, was not a field for invest- 
ment of capital on an expanding scale, 
says the New York Telegraph. Meanwhile 
American investments have made of that 
island the chief sugar producing unit in 
the cane growing world. Spanish, Cuban, 
American and German planters vie with 
each other in developing Cuba's sugar pos- 
sibilities. The savanna lands insure enor- 
mous expansion and rapidly increasing 
output. 

"H the capitalists of Cuba have per- 
mitted the English to control the railways 
and the Spanish to become the merchant- 
men of Cuba, they have certainly not al- 
lowed the foreigners to surpass theni in ul- 
timate predominance of interests in the 
■elands, for the sugar industry is far greater 



In the September issue of the Canadian 
Magazine, Mr. C. Lintern Sibley tells the 
story of "Van Home and his Cuban Rail- 
way." It is interesting to notice that Sir 
William paid full heed to the Cuban's 
punctilious regard for manners when he 
was manipulating his island road. 

"When he got his railway builders to- 
gether, he laid down two imperative rules, 
which were as follows : 

Rule 1. — When you meet a Cuban, never 
allow him to be the first to off with his hat. 

Rule 2. — When a Cuban bows to you, 
always bow twice in response." 



F. R. Johnson, manager of the export de- 
partment of the Standard Sanitary Manu- 
facturing Company of Pittsburgh, recently 
returned from a trip of six months, during 
which he covered Cuba and other southern 
countries. 

In Cuba the last crop of sugar, though 
a bumper, sold for very low prices, conse- 
quently the people in the country are re- 
stricted for funds, and the wholesalers are 
trying to collect and expanding credits as 
little as possible until they can get their 
money in. Cuba is a good buyer, he asserts. 

They now have express trains with sleep- 
ers on many of the roads, where formerly 
accommodations were rather limited. There 
are also many good hotels in the island 
to-day. 

Altogether Cuba is a fine country, Mr. 
Johnson finds, both for business and com- 
fort. 



Cubans are peculiar. They condemn, 
they praise, they accuse, but when you ask 
for evidence, legal proofs, it is not forth- 
coming. It is enough for them that they 
say so — that somebody else said so — that 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 



people would not say so unless it was so ! 
They — like the Mexicans, like all the Latins 
who have been directed, ruled, twisted and 
tossed about by Spanish and American 
contact — are like little children : impulsive, 
quick to belief of wrong or of right accord- 
ing to the statement made, but never of 
the caution before accepting statement that 
would go into any thorough investigation. 
— Tozi'ii Topics. 

ENTHUSIASTIC OVER CUBA's FERTILITY 

James Linn Rodgers, United States con- 
sul general at Havana, and calling Colum- 
bus his voting home, was a visitor in New 
York recently after a conference with 
executive departments at Washington. Not 
so very many years back Linn Rodgers was 
mighty well known in Ohio as private sec- 
retary to Governor Bushnell, and a remark- 
ably popular one. Prior to his official 
honors J. Linn was inclined to journalism, 
but after the statehouse experience yearned 
more for the privilege of building up the 
commercial interests of the nation, and was 
sent to Shanghai, China, as consul-general 
by President Roosevelt. This was done at 
a time when the Roosevelt relations with 
Ohio Republicans were less strained than 
now, and the new consul was ably backed 
by big Ohio men in Congress, although his 
appointment was almost personal with the 
president. The Rodgers way of doing things 
in a region of unrest was much approved at 
Washington, and when Havana needed the 
same sort of consular administration there 
was promotion of Rodgers to the Cuban 



port, and his record has been a remarkable 
one in the face of difficult problems and all 
else that vexes the spirit in Latin-American 
countries. Consul Rodgers is remarkably 
enthusiastic about Cuba and its resources, 
insisting that our citizens don't realize how 
fertile and rich the island is and what it 
could be made to produce with the Amer- 
ican way of doing things. — Cincinnati 
(Ohio) Engineer. 



GOODS OF UNITED STATES MANUFAC- 
TURE POPULAR IN CUBA 

American manufactures have taken 
profitable advantage of the fact that their 
products find a ready and continually in- 
creasing market in Cuba. This is the 
natural result of existing conditions, such 
as the reciprocity treaty and Cuba's prox- 
imity to the United States and the fact 
that as there are practically no factories 
operated in Cuba, nearly all manufactured 
articles must be purchased abroad. Amer- 
ican goods stand high in the opinion of the 
Cuban people ; in fact, if a Cuban is as- 
sured that an article which he desires to 
buy was manufactured in the United 
States he will give it preference to the same 
kind of an article manufactured in other 
countries. — Bath (X. Y. ) Plain Dealer. 



Cuba, like jNIexico, lacks a just land tax. 
Such a tax in Cuba will open large areas 
of uncultivated land to farming enterprises, 
and will remove one great source of dis- 
content, savs the .Vcrc ]^ork Times. 




James L. Rodxtrs, tlie United .Statis consul-gcncial in Havana, He took office July 1, 1907. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES 



CUBAN ORE PROPERTIES IN AMERICAN 
HANDS 

The Southern Steel Co., capitaHzed at 
$30,000,000, is reported to have completed 
arrangements ensuring the construction of 
an extensive plant on the river front near 
Mobile. It has purchased 8,000 acres, 50 of 
which virill be occupied by buildings and 
machinery representing an investment of 
$5,000,000, the daily output to be 1,000 tons 
of steel rails and other products. 

The company is being organized by C. V. 
Mead of Denver, president of the Inter- 
Locking Rail & Structural Steel Co. of that 
city and Chicago ; J. F. Barnhill of Chi- 
cago, engineer of the Inter-Locking cor- 
poration and inventor of the interlocking 
steel rail ; L. C. Davis of Chicago, consult- 
ing engineer of the company; A. G. Wood, 
a New York engineer; Rupert Fry of Mil- 
waukee, president of the Old Line Life 
Insurance Co., and other capitalists. 

An official statement from Mr. Barnhill 
to the Manufacturers' Record of Baltimore 
states that the parties have acquired an im- 
mense tract of land on the island of Cuba, 
containing vast deposits of high-grade iron 
ore. This tract of land embraces an area 
of over 500,000 acres. This tract of land 
is heavily wooded with the finest grade of 
mahogany, lignum-vitae and other hard- 
wood common to the island. The land is 
advantageously situated with a sea front- 
age with a land-locked harbor. 

Having secured this ore deposit, the par- 
■^ies have been seeking a suitable location 
on the gulf coast, convenient to coal flux- 
ing, transportation and the like. 



NEW ELECTRIC LIGHT AND ICE PLANT 

A limited company has been formed in 
Santa Isabel de las Lajas, Santa Clara 
Province, with a capital of $25,000 to estab- 
lish an electric light plant. The bonds is- 
sued draw 8 per cent annual interest and 
the common stock will also receive a 
dividend. 

The bonds have all been bought by the 
business men of the neighborhood. A re- 
frigerating and ice plant will be installed in 
the building soon to be constructed for the 
necessary machinery for producing the 
light. 

The new company has made a contract 
with the city council to supply a public 
light service for ten years at an annual 
cost of $3,600. 

Ramon Ruiz Cabrera has asked for a per- 
mit to install an electric plant at Manacas, 
Santa Clara Province. 



AN ALPARGATA FACTORY IN REGLA 

The enterprise is conducted along mod- 
ern lines with up to date equipment. Very 
little hand work is done, machinery taking 
its place, contrary to the custom in foreign 
countries where hand work is the largest 
factor. Don Victor Vidaurrazaja, a Cuban 
and the owner, has invented a good part 
of the operating machinery. The output 
consequently compares advantageously with 
the foreign made goods both in quality and 
in price. 

The owner is something of a philan- 
thropist and having in mind the many poor 
families in the town sends out work which 
may be finished by hand at home. The 
force of the factory is 100 workmen. At 
home the women can earn seventy cents to 
one dollar per day. 

Alpargatas are shoes or slippers made of 
canvass with rope soles. They are univer- 
sally worn by the poorer workmen and re- 
tail at a low price, about 30 cents per pair. 



A NEW BRICK FACTORY 

La Lucha's correspondent writes that 
certain elements in Cienfuegos are annoy- 
ing the American Mr. Allen who is build- 
ing a brick factory in the city, inciting the 
laborers not to carry any materials for his 
very important and new enterprise. 

They demand that Mr. Allen should not 
be allowed to remove the sand from the 
river Arimao, which he requires in his 
work and which is his exclusive privilege, 
so decided by the former Secretary of the 
Treasury, Mr. Gutierrez Quiros, in accord- 
ance with the Spanish Mine Law in force 
in Cuba and Mr. Juan del Campo, the then 
mayor of Cienfuegos. 

Mr. Allen with his stone and construc- 
tion materials business represents an in- 
dustry of great benefit to the city as it 
affords work to a large number of laborers 
in Arriete, in Ciego Montero and Cien- 
fuegos. 



GAS STOVES INTRODUCED 

The Havana Electric Light and Power 
Company will establish in a prominent cor- 
ner of the Prado a permanent exposition 
showing the advantages of cooking by gas. 
The present cooking system of hotels and 
private kitchen is carried on with charcoal 
as a fuel and small tiled stoves. The com- 
pany plans a reduction in the price of gas 
which will encourage a wider use of the 
ranges. All the known cooking appliance 
familiar to northern users of gas will be 
exhibited and explained. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



13 




Method of piling wood preparatory to covering and firing in manufacturing charcoal in Cuba. 



CHARCOAL burners' WORK AND PAY 

Generally two to four men are employed 
stacking up the large sticks of wood, in 
large cone shaped piles (see illustration). 

These heaps of timber, mostly dry hard 
woods, red mangrove and other woods 
formed on the low lands, are then cov- 
ered with dry grass and weeds and over 
this again is shoveled spade after spade of 
sand till the whole is well covered. The 
fire is lighted from the top down and takes 
about a week to burn up the pile properly. 
While burning it must be constantly 
watched, for if the fire breaks out or air 
holes appear, the whole thing would go up 
in smoke. 

One pile is usually being made up while 
one is burning, or giving up its charcoal, 
which is gradually scraped away from the 
lower edges as it burns, by a long wooden 
toothed rake and placed in large sacks 
holding about 200 lbs. 

These are then stacked away in the long 
narrow barges or "Chalanas" and slip 
away to the port which in this case was 
Batabano, Havana Province. 

The manufacturer gets $:i for sixteen 
big bags of this charcoal. The men receive 
$28 Cabout $24.04 American money) per 
month Spanish silver and their board. 

Their board consi.sts of "tasajo" or 
jerked beef, "i)acalao" or dried codfish, 
potatoes and beans supplemented some- 
times by eggs and fresh cabbage anfl in 



some cases water cress, which grows well 
in the dry seasons, round all the springs. 
The company pays a rent of $100 a 
month for the privilege of cutting and 
burning charcoal and make thousands of 
dollars a year at this industry, to supply 
the fuel most commonly used in Cuba. — 
Progressive Cuba. 



NEW SANTIAGO HOTEL 

The construction of the new "Casa 
Granda" in Santiago by the Cuba Com- 
pany is progressing rapidly, work being 
pushed day and night, Sundays and feast 
days. 

The new hotel will be without doubt the 
best in the city, as only steel and cement 
are used in its construction. It will be 
five stories in height. 



Steamers are now running direct from 
Boston to Havana, and shoe manufacturers 
handling trade in Cuba are able to ship 
direct instead of sending their goods to 
New York. There are a number of firms 
in Boston which arc doing a goocj' business 
with tlie Cubans. 



Jatibonico in Camaguey Province,' where 
the large sugar estate of the Cuba Com- 
pany is situated, will soon boast of an 
electric light and power plant. 



14 THECUBAREVIEW 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS' OPPORTUNITIES IN CUBA 



HOW TRADE CAN BE DOUBLED LEATHERS AND STYLES MOST IN 

FAVOR PACKING DIRECTIONS 

The total shoe trade of Cuba amounts to over $4,000,000 annuallj', and is constantly 
growing. Importations of footwear into the island according to the latest published 
Cuban statistics gained a little more than 100 per cent during the 5-year period 1903 to 
1907, inclusive, during which period the control of the market passed from the hands of 
the Spanish to those of the American shoe manufacturer. 

There are only three factories in Cuba usinf^ machinery in manufacturing shoes, all of 
which are in the city of Havana. Each o'f / ese is a comparatively small plant, having 
a necessarily limited output. The factory of Antonio Cabrisas is equipped with American 
shoe-making machinery with the exception of three antique heeling machines of French 
manufacture. Power is furnished by a 25-horsepower gas engine. Sr. Cabrisas manu- 
factures principally a McKay sewn shoe in men's, women's and children's and a few 
nailed goods. He gives employment to 150 hands, and the full capacity of the factory 
is 150 dozen pairs of shoes per week. The shoe produced is a good imitation of an 
American-made McKay shoe, although, perhaps, lacking certain points of iinish charac- 
teristic of the American product. On the whole, however, this shoe is well made and of 
good appearance and, considering the difference between the comparatively untrained 
Cuban operative and the skilled American workman, deserves creditable mention, says 
Arthur B. Butman of the Department of Commerce and Labor. 

The piece-work system as employed in an American factory is not used in this factory, 
the 'employees being paid by day-wage schedule as follows: A foreman receives $15 per 
week Spanish silver; boy and girl employees, $2 per week Spanish silver; other employees 
in all the various departments, $2 per day Spanish silver, on an average, which amounts 
to about $1.75 per day United States currency. All the lasting is done by hand, there 
being no lasting machinery installed in this or the other factories mentioned. 

The lasts, upper leathers and findings of all kinds which enter into the manufacture of 
the shoe exclusive of the sole, are imported from the United States with the exception 
of some duck lining, which comes from England, and elastic goring used in the congress 
show, which is imported from England and Italy. The olutput of the factory in question 
is sold to the retail Cuban stores at $18, $28, $38l and $421 Spanish gold per dozen pairs. 
A 15 per cent discount is allowed. 

The R. S. Gutmann plant is in a modernly constructed 
ci pi f ' C h building. All operations are conducted on one floor and the 
anoe l lanis in ^^uoa equipment throughout is of modern American shoe-making 
machinery, mostly in duplicate. Power is furnished by a 
25-horsepower alcohol engine of German origin. About 100 dozen pairs per week of the 
cheaper grade of McKay sewn shoes, in men's, women's and children's, comprise the 
output of the factory. Eighty-five persons are employed, including both sexes and 
children, and practically the same scale of wages prevails here as in the Cabrisas factory. 
In the factory of Soler & Bulnes I found the entire equipment of the shoe machinery 
to be American, with two exceptions — one a heeling machine, the other an edge-setting 
machine, both German. An old-fashioned water wheel furnishes a 25-horsepower motive 
power for this factory. Soler & Bulnes manufacture a Goodyear welt shoe only and 
turn out a very good product on American lines. They employ 95 hands, and the ca- 
pacity of the factory is about 125 dozen pairs per week. Native-tanned sole leather is 
principally used in these factories, comparatively little sole leather being imported into 
Cuba. 

^"^ The French system of measurements is employed in each 

'■U, 7 J p.' factory. I found in all three establishments good imitations 

o^p/es ana I rices gf practically all the styles of American-made shoes now 

being sent to Cuba, namely: Lace and button, both high and 

low cuts, for men, ladies, misses and children, in black and colored vici ; men's and 

boys' calf balmorals, also many congress shoes for men, a style which, I am told, is 

growing in favor here. In addition, they h'uild a low balmoral and a low button for 

misses and children, known as "Napoleons." These are made from grain leather, and 

were formerly imported from the United States, until the advance in prices in the 

States prohibited further importations. There is practically no sale for "Napoleons" in 

Cuba at a price above $1;50 Spanish silver, and they may be bought here, of Cuban 

manufacture, at the following wholesale prices per dozen pairs Spanish gold, 10 per 

cent off : 



THE CUBA REVIE \V 



15 



Black, sizes 7 to 1 — $13.50 to $1-1. 

Cdlored, sizes 7 to 1 — $14 to $14.50. 

Black, misses', $1S to $18.50. 

Colored, misses', $18.50 to $19. 

Generally speaking, men's and boys' Cuban-made shoes sell, wholesale prices, as follows, 
Spanish gold, 10 per cent off : 

Men's shoes, $2.40 to $2.85 per pair. 

Boys' shoes, $1.90 to $2.10 per pair. 

Retailers usually make a gross profit of 20 to 25 per cent. 

Men's shoes of Spanish manufacture are generally built on 
Features of the Spanish ^. typically Spanish last, the "Mandrilleno," straight, with 
CI high instep and full ankle. They are made usually by hand 

in two styles, one with very high arch, having a ten-eights to 
eleven-eighths heel ; the other with low arch and four-eighths 
to five-eights heel. Men's Spanish goods are wholly in hand-sewn welts, with the ex- 
ception of a shoe manufactured by Gornes Hijos, Fiol Hermanos, Ciudadela, whose 
product is a Goodyear welt. This Goodyear shoe is made principally on a full swing 
last, with narrow toe, medium arch and ten-eighths to eleven-eighths small heel. Leathers 
used in the manufacture are a champagne kid, a black kid and a tan kid, all of American 
tannage, French and German patent leathers, and a very Hght willow calf tanned near 
Barcelona. In styles bals, bluchers, congress and button and blucher oxfords are fur- 
nished. The sole leather used is all of Spanish tannage, very white and extremely solid, 
and has excellent wearing qualities. I am told, however, that on the whole this Spanish 
shoe gives but medium satisfaction. The wholesale prices of men's shoes (in Spain) 
range from $36 to $56 per dozen pairs, Spanish silver, and retail in Cuba at $4.30 Spanish 
silver per pair for those costing $36 per dozen pairs, and at $5.50 per pair same currency 
for those costing $56 per dozen pairs. All Spanish-made shoes, both men's and women's 
are classed as medium fine to fine. 

In women's goods I find the Spanish shoe made on French last, having a narrow 
forepart, much drawn out, medium toe and high instep, with usually a medium high 
French heel. In some instances the leather-covered Cuban heel is used. These shoes 
are all hand-made throughout, and hand turned ; they are much lighted in weight than 
the American ladies' shoe, but lack the good fitting qualities characteristic of the 
American product. The lasting of the Spanish-made shoe is apt to be deficient, usually 
having been pulled over but once and left on the last only a short time. Thus fashioned 
it is impossible for the shoe to keep its shape after a little wear. The wholesale prices 
of women's shoes of Spanish make laid down in Havana range from $18 to $51 of 
Spanish gold per dozen pairs. Included in these prices are shoes made from the cheapest 
sheepskin to the finest vici and patent kids. 

The cheaper grade of shoe is made from a chrome-tanned sheepskin and black cabretta, 
the sheepskin being tanned in Spain and the cabretta in France and! the United States. 
The fine grade of Spanish shoes are made from an extra quality of black and champagne 
kid of American tannage, and patent kids from Germany. A certain quantitv of cheap 
hand-sewn and pegged shoes are imported from Barcelona. 

Men's shoes of American mamufacture are in good demand 

Popular Svles of Amer- '" Cuba. They are desired on an American last, with narrow 

oi toe, full swing, close edges, high heel (ten eighths to eleven- 

ican anoes eighths), and with a medium sole. The styles in favor are 

bluchers, balmorals, buttons and blucher oxfords, as well as 

sailor ties and pumps. The leathers best liked are vici, black and tan, tan Russia, l^lack 

velour and patent vici; sizes range from 4 to 11, and widths D and E are the more 

largely sold. The characteristic American shapes for men are constantlv erovving in 

popularity. 

The native Cuban prefers the oxford blucher or Initton, or other low-cut shoe, while 
the Spaniards living on the island more generally favor the high-cut shoe, balmorals, 
blucher and button. I am informed that workmanship and general appearance are ap- 
preciated first of all by the Cuban trade, but the quality must be kept up.. Cuba's climate 
is very hard on leather. Dealers tell me that very few shoes arc ever repaired, and this 
accounts in part for the great consumption of footwear on the island. The average man, 
after wearing the soles off a pair of shoes throws them away, though the uppers may 
still be in good condition. The American shoe is light and preferred l)y the large ma- 
jority (the United States now holds about 85 per cent of the total trade of Cul^a) for 
both its good wearing qualities and the great variety of shapes and styles which our 
manufacturers produce. The Cuban foot is usually small in size, men's slioes ranging 
from 4 to 9, with few exceptions, the largest sizes imported finding sale among the 
colored population. In the high cuts, for both men and women, duck linings shokild be 
used, while in oxfords and other low-cut styles leather linings are wanted. A Cuban 



16 THECUBAREVIEW 

is naturally coquettish about his feet, being a great admirer of the fancy shoes. Colored 
tops, gray, green and tan ooze are largely used, with the recent ascendency in favor of 
green ooze. Fancy buttons are in great demand. Silk laces and a very good quality of 
mercerized cotton lace are wanted. All laces should be very wide, especially on the 
oxfords, and all low cuts should be furnished with large eyelets. The popularity of the 
American-made man's shoe in this market is evidenced by the statement, authentically- 
furnished the writer, that a Massachusetts manufacturer, whose product is largely ad- 
vertised, sold over 75,000 pairs of men's shoes in the Cuban republic during the year 1908. 

To supply the female trade in Cuba there is a large de- 
Li^ht Tan Shoes "land for a medium-priced shoe with very light soles, clcse 
Ti/ . 1 edges, medium-pointed toe, high arch and high heel. In the 

yy antea better grades the French Louis XV heel is preferred, 16- 

eighths to 20-eighths over all measurements, although many 
leather-covered wooden Cuban heels, 14-eighths to IS-eighths, are sold. The favored 
leathers are black and tan vici, while in the cheaper grades there is considerable sale of 
Cabretta in black, tan and white. This Cabretta is well liked, owing to the soft, pliable 
appearance of the leather. Shoes made from the same, costing in the United States 
from $12 to $30 per dozen pairs wholesale, are retailing here for $2 to $4.50 per piir. 
In tan kids the Cubans not only prefer but demand a medium light color. They very 
much object to the dark chocolate color sent out by many manufacturers in the United 
States. I was told that if some of our tanners would make more of a soecialty of 
medium light shades, and if our manufacturers would use the same in making shoes for 
this market, it would greatly help the sale of the American shoes. A tan shoe is sold 
the year around in this climate, since tan footwear is considered much cooler than black. 
Women's black vici kid shoes are nearly always desired with patent leather tips. Re- 
cently, however, shoes without tips have been put on the market and are finding a fair 
sale, but where a tip is ordered it should be invariably furnished. In manufacturing 
women's shoes for Cuba a last with high instep and full ball should be used. There has 
always been a good demand in the Cuban market for a champagne kid ladies' shoe of 
fine grade, and during the winter months a certain quantity of patent-leather goods are 
wanted. The larger percentage of trade, however, for the entire year is in tan and 
black vici. Comparatively few high cuts in women's shoes are sold, the preference 
being in blucher oxfords, sailor ties, colonials and pumps. 

The above styles should be furnished in McKay and turned shoes, as the Goodyear 
welts in women's shoes do not find favor with the trade here to any appreciable extent 
Fancy leather tops on the low cuts are more or less in vogue, and large eyelets and 
wide laces are wanted as in the case of men's shoes. Women's sizes range from 13% 
to 6, and for supplying the colored trade 6%, 7 and 7i/4 ; widths D-E and E-E should 
be furnished, as narrow widths are not marketable. 

These goods as found in Cuba are largely of American 

Misses' Children s and manufacture. Styles are bals, blucher oxfords, sailor ties. 

, ' . » CL Gibsons, etc. Sizes range from 1 to 6, having no heel, 5 to 8 

injants onoes ^j^j^ outside or spring heel, and 8% to 11 with o:utside low 

heels; in misses', ll¥2 to 2, with outside low heels. These 

shoes are made in black and tan kid and cabretta. They are procured in the United 

States at wholesale prices ranging from $4.80 to $9 per dozen pairs, and are retailed in 

Cuba for $1 to $2 per pair. 

Regarding children's shoes, it is suggested that if the American manufacturer would 
carry a stock for immediate delivery he would be able to do twice the business here that 
he now does by making them up on order. 

The American shoe is usually bought by the leading jobbers 

How Purchased directly from the manufacturers in the United States. Some 

P 7. buy their stocks from manufacturers' agents on the island, 

K^reaits while retailers often purchase through commission merchants 

in New York. Shoes for other points in Cuba than Havana 

are bought largely of Havana jobbers; also from manufacturers' agents. The retail shoe 

business is in the hands of the Spaniard, and almost without exception his credit may be 

considered as very good. 

There are few failures among the retail dealers, and while some may be a "little 
slow" at times, their payments are practically sure. The larger number pay on 60 days 
from day of shipment ; many, however, are looking for the cash discount on the 30 days, 
and since about 30 days are required to obtain the goods from the manufacturer in the 
United States and have the same passed through the Cuban custom-house, taking ad- 
vantage of the discount and paying in 30 days practically means paying on receipt of 
goods. 

The open-credit system prevails. Very few goods are being shipped here against draft. 
One business man in Havana sold last year over $500,000 worth of shoes of American 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 



manufacture, and his losses were less than $750, a portion of which he still expects to 
collect. If his experience is to be taken as a criterion, Cuban credits may certainly be 
considered as good. 
Freight rates on shoes from Xew York to Havana are 14 cents per cubic foot. 

Shoes sent to Cuba should be packed in large, well-built 

Pnrhina Piir^rtinr, cascs. Thrcc-f ourths-inch lumber should be used, the ends 

1 acriing LJirecuons reinforced, and iron-strapped. An all-around strap should be 

used without exception, since the steamship companies will 

not be responsible for theft in any instance if merely corner straps are employed. It is 

desired that shoes destined for Cuba be packed in large cases. Men's shoes should 

average 200 pairs to the case: women's 400 to 500 pairs; misses" and children's, 500 to 

1,000 pairs; and infants' and babies', 1.000 to 2,000 pairs. Great care should be taken that 

all weights be accurately marked on the cases, since cases are entered by weight, and all 

thefts are made good, according to the shortage in weight. 



AUGUST TRADE INCREASES 

The August importations of Matanzas 
are valued at $89,328.70 as against $57,958.96 
for 1912 and $64,.361.S1 for 1911. 

The value of the exportations to the 
United States are as follows : 

1913 1912 1911 

$2,469,450 $3,077,012 $607,843 

The sugar exports to England for the 
month totalled $6,335.12. Aquardiente was 
exported to Uruguay to the amount of 
$2,850.00; $12,750.00 "in 1911 and none in 
1913. 



NEW TRADE MARK RULING 

The ruling established under the Royal 
Decree of the year 1884 which regulates 
the granting of trademarks and brands in 
this countrj' under which no product is 
allowed to have more than one brand, 
however different its qualitj^ may be, has 
been annulled as obsolete by a decree signed 
September 27th by Secretary of Agricul- 
ture, Commerce and Labor Xuiiez. 

The decree is based on the provisions of 
Military Order Xo. 511 of 1900, which per- 
mits that different brands be authorized 
when the owners should present certificates 
of changes made in the product ; also on 
the Trademark Convention of Paris which 
upholds the principles of liberty as to the 
brands and trarlemarks and further on the 
ground that Ijy rulings of tlie department, 
cigar manufacturers are permitted to put 
out whatever brand or name to their cigars 
that they may wish to receive protection as 
to the name by merely registering and pay- 
ing the fees provided for the purpose. 

Under the new ruling a manufacturer of 
soap, for instance, may have as many trade- 
marks and brands as he wishes for the 
same product, as long as the same should 
not conflict with otiiers previously granted 
and upon paying the regular fees. 



SHIPMENTS TO EUROPEAN PORTS 

Mr. P. D. de Pool, forwarding agent, of 
Havana, has furnished the Isle of Pines 
Fruit Growers' exchange with the follow- 
ing information relative to the fruit ship- 
ping facilities between Havana and Eu- 
ropean ports. He writes as follows : 

French Line. — Steamers sail the 15th of 
every month. The rate on pines is 50 
francs, plus 5 per cent per cubic meter 
(which equals about nine pineapple crates) 
to St. X'azaire, the first port of call. Rate 
of freight to Paris is 60 francs, plus 5 per 
cent primage. Time of voyage from 11 to 
14 days. 

German Line. — Steamers sail the 5th and 
18th of each month. Freight rates as fol- 
lows ; one case, three c. f., 80c. per crate. 
Same rate to Havre and Plymouth, on 
pines. Grapefruit, etc., 70 shillings to 
Hamburg or Havre and 90 shillings to 
Paris per 1,000 kilos. Time required for 
transit to Plymouth, 15 to 16 days ; to Ham- 
burg, IS to 20 days; to Havre, 16 to 18 
days. — Isle of Pines News. 



CANADA AND THE CUBAN MARKET 

The island of Cuba is a splendid market 
for Canadian exports of almost all kinds, 
says Mr. A. T. Quillez, acting trade com- 
missioner for Canada at Havana. 

While the Cul)an tariff is to some extent 
discriminatory in favor of the United 
States, chicfiy in regard to manufactured 
articles, Mr. Quillez nevertheless believes 
that there is a market in Cuba for Cana- 
dian commodities of nearly all classes rep- 
resented in tlic present Canadian export 
list, particularly, perhaps, flour, canned 
vegetables, potatoes, fish and manufactures. 
Mr. Quillez is a Cuban by birth. 



British capital invested in Cuban securi- 
ties to the amount of $4,903,000 during the 
first half of 19].;. 



Havana's customs receipts for four 
months past compare as follows: 



May 1 to .August 31 



1912 1913 

$6,512,722 $7,339,485 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FURTHER TRADE NEWS 



UNITED KINGDOM AND CUBA 

More than half of Cuba's imports from 
the United Kingdom are made up of cotton 
and cotton goods, rice and machinery. The 
total value of cotton goods imported in the 
year 1911-12 was £2,434,508, of which £957,- 
753 came from the United Kingdom. These 
figures show an increase of £200,000 in the 
imports from the United Kingdom ; but, 
as they represent a slight filling off in the 
percentage of the total, there should still 
be large openings for British exporters 
which are not taken advantage of. 

Machinery to the value of £2,000,000 was 
imported — that is, to the value of some 
£750,000 more than in the preceding year. 
Of this the United Kingdom only secured 
about £204,000, a decrease of £42,000 in 
comparison with the previous year. Very 
considerable sums, however, have been ex- 
pended on new sugar machinery during the 
past autumn, and the figures for the next 
year should show a considerable increase. 

British goods and trading principles are 
held in the highest repute, and there can 
be no doubt that trade will be largely aug- 
mented when the British merchant realizes 
that Cuba offers a field for his enterprise, 
and is more ready to send representatives 
to the country. — Financial A^czvs, London. 



CUSTOM HOUSE RECEIPTS 

Havana's customs collections for August 
compare as follows : 

1913 $1,866,322 

1912 1,028,150 

1911 1,597,533 

1910 1,414,351 

1909 1,516,254 

1908 ], 292,894 



NEW CUSTOMS REGULATIONS 

Hereafter Havana merchants who over- 
pay customs duties will have the excess 
refunded at once. Under the former re- 
gime it was customary for them to take 
legal action to collect the overcharges. On 
the other hand when they underpaid the 
duties they were liable to heavy penalties 
and immediate payment. 



The Cuban government is arranging for 
a national exhibit at the great Panama- 
Pacific exposition at San Francisco in 1915. 

General Enrique Loynaz del Castillo has 
been appointed as representative of the Cu- 
ban nation at the fair. 




I.iborio, the Cuban workingman, points with pride 
to the table showing the great increase in customs 
receipts. See ligures below. — From La Lucha. 
La Renta de Aduanas — Liborio: En cuatro meses 
y dlas credo la recaudacion. i Que dird de esto 
lilcncia? lY que dird Tiburon? — La Lucha. 



INCREASE IN CUSTOMS RECEIPTS 

The first five months of the new ad- 
ministration shows an extraordinary and 
flattering gain in the customs receipts of 
Havana. The total increase for the period 
named is $1,220,853. The official figures 
follow : 

1913 1912 

May $1,878,088 $1,654,466 

June 1,830,492 1,623,893 

July 1,770,524 1,609,224 

August 1.866,382 1,628,151 

September 1,957,918 1,560,817 

Total ' $9,297,404 $8,076,551 

This large increase was somewhat un- 
expected especially in a season when im- 
portations dwindle. With the increase of 
business the winter months bring, the fiscal 
year's increase may reach nearly $3,000,000. 



Exports from the United States to Cuba 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1913, 
is stated by the Department of Commerce 
to be $70,600,000. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



CUBA'S COMMERCE WITH THE WORLD 




7 ; ;^ 

(S) 
8' 

The above circles made up by tlic Cuban Treasury Department show the volume of busi- 
ness of the world with Cuba during the calendar year of 1911. 

Imports Exports 

No. 1. United States $r>9,9G2,409 $106,660,610 

No. 2. Other countries of America 9,159,359 3,641,696 

No. 3. Spain 9,046,551 459,703 

No. 4. Germany 7,234,657 3,641,555 

No. 5. France 6,202,738 1,307,517 

No. 6. United Kingdom 13,099,000 5,697,314 

No. 7. Other countries of Europe 5,352,137 809,075 

No. 8. All other countries 2,398,863 726,1 76 



Total.... 






$113,055,774 


$122,943,652 


THE CUBAN CENTRAL 


RAILWAYS, 


LTD. 


WESTERN RAILWAY OF 


HAVANA, LTD. 


Weekly receipts : 






Weekly receipts : 




September 6th . . .£6,58!) 


Increase. 


.£945 


September 0th. . .£5.727 


Decrease. ..£143 


September J3tli.. 0.54s 


Increase. 


. . 324 


SeiJtemlicr 13th.. 5,590 


Increase. . . 61 


Septemljcr 20tli. . 0.074 


Ik-crease. 


. . 123 


September 2()th . . .•.,:'.() 1 


Decrease. . . 242 


September 27th.. 0.171 


Increase. 


. . 3:!9 


September ;i7tb.. l.'.Mo 


hicrcase. . . 177 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INTERESTING NEWS NOTES REGARDING VARIOUS MATTERS PERTAINING 

TO THE ISLAND 



NEW LIGHT HOUSE 

A light house of the sixth order will soon 
be erected at Manati, north goast of 
Oriente Province. 

Other light houses projected on Cuba's 
coast are four in number. They were in- 
cluded in the works to be done by the Cu- 
ban Ports Company, but these works be- 
sides all others are now suspended by the 
annulment of the company's concession. 
The new light houses were to be placed at 
the following points: (l) Buena Vista 
Key, 1st class light; (2) Cayo Breton 
(S.E. of Cienfuegos), 1st class light; (3) 
Cayo Pepe (Isle of Pines), 2nd class light; 
(4) Cayo Moa (on the N. E. coast), 2nd 
class light. It is reported that it would be 
impracticable to alter the San Antonio light 
by putting it higher up. 



ICE COMPANY CHARGES 

The ice company in Guantanamo has 
served notice to its patrons that the fol- 
lowing prices will govern for stated quan- 
tities of ice to be delivered as required : 
150 pounds, $1.35, in 5 pound quantities ; 
300 pounds, $2.70, in 10 pound quantities ; 
750 pounds, $5.75, in 25 pound quantities ; 
1,500 pounds, $10.80, in 50 pound quantities. 

The company issues coupons which must 
be used under these contracts. 



THE ROQUE CANAL 

President Menocal has recently made a 
tour of inspection of this great work in 
Matanzas Province and found the enter- 
prise going on satisfactorily. 

The contractors have already cut through 
twelve kilometers of rock toward the 
north, which represents about 20 per cent 
of the work, the canal to be fifty kilo- 
meters long. In this work there are em- 
ployed three large rock cutters and four 
dredges which pump the mud out to a 
distance of two hundred meters on each 
side of the canal which is twelve meters in 
width. 

The effect of the work is already being 
reaped in the Roque valley where already 
more than 30 caballerias have been re- 
claimed and are now devoted to cane plant- 
ing. When the work is finished the famous 
Majaguila and Guayabeque swamos which 
have a surface of more than 800 caballerias 
wiU be reclaimed. 



THE PHYSIOGRAPHY OF THE 
CARIBBEAN 

An exceedingly interesting article on the 
"Geology of the Panama Isthmus and the 
Caribbean Archipelago,'' appeared in En- 
giiieering of the 22nd ult. In this it is 
pointed out that had the geographical fea- 
tures of the Caribbean remained as they 
were at a time geologically not far distant, 
to be exact at the beginning of the Tertiary 
period, there would be no occasion for the 
construction of the Panama Canal, for at 
that time the Caribbean Sea was connected 
with the Pacific Ocean and the Isthmus of 
Panama did not exist. This fact is in- 
dicated by the presence of identical fossils, 
belonging to the early Tertiary period, on 
both sides of the Isthmus. 

On the site of what are now the Antilles, 
therefore, was, in every probability, the 
isthmus which united North and South 
America. 

The subsidence which brought about the 
present physiographic condition of the An- 
tilles was a gradual one. The distribution 
of the flora and fauna shows that the first 
result was the formation of a large island 
occupying the site of Cuba, Jamaica, Hayti 
and Porto Rico. One of the evidences of 
this is the distribution of a group of birds, 
which are called in Jamaica "Green todies." 
The genus consists of only four species, 
restricted to these four islands. The fact 
that the tody is confined to these four 
islands and that none are found elsewhere, 
shows that at one time these islands were 
included in one island, and the additional 
fact that each of the four islands possesses 
its own separate species evolved from the 
common form, proves that separation took 
place later on. Sea soundings, taken in the 
locality, confirm this view. — West India 
Committee Circular. 



An explosion followed by fire in Sagua 
la Grande on August 30th destroyed the 
warehouse of Messrs. Mufiis & Co., hard- 
ware merchants. No explanation is given 
as to the cause of the explosion. The losses 
foot up to $80,000. 

President Menocal will prosecute one 
Demetrio Perez, a Spaniard, for calumny. 
The latter, who is secretary of the Glass 
Makers' Union, wantonly attacked and 
aspersed Cuba's President during a meet- 
ing, and was immediately arrested. 



CURIOUS POPULATION STATISTICS 

The municipality of San Jose de los 
Ramos, Matanzas Province, comprises 
three wards, and the 1913 population is 
given as follows. In 1912 the population 
was 8,008. 

San Jose de los Ramos 3,300 

Caiiagua. formerly Las Ciegas.. 1,137 
Banaguises 3,416 

Total 7,853 

Of these 7,853 inhabitants, 4,569 are white 
and 3,284 colored. 

There are 6,552 native Cubans and SO 
naturalized. 1,027 Spaniards, 1 English, 
1 French, 20 Turks, 1 Argentineo and 170 
Chinese. 

There are 4 doctors and 2 druggists in 
this town, 917 artizans and other workmen, 
and 11 Cuban army men, 2,210 are engaged 
in domestic occupations, 2,986 are without 
any calling. There are 15 professors, 231 
property owners and 190 merchants ; 2861 
can read, 2832 can write. Of those who 
can read 29 cannot write. Of those that 
can read 1,758 are whites and 1,103 are 
colored. Of those who can write 1,748 are 
white and 1,084 colored. There remains 
then 4,992 illiterate in this municipality or 
nearly 63 per cent of its population, 2,811 
white and 2,181 colored. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



21 



MAYOR FACILITATES BUSINESS TRANS- 
ACTION 

Havana's Mayor General Freyre de An- 
drade is constantly busy in improving the 
public service by expediting the business 
in the several departments. 

His latest ruling provides that all ap- 
plications for record of new taxpayers 
when the sale of a commercial house or 
store is made should be approved the same 
day that the application is received, when 
the deed of sale accompanies the appli- 
cation. 

He also rules that applications for the 
removal of a store from one locality to an- 
other must also be approved on presenta- 
tion of application when tlie cliange has 
been approved by the health authorities. 



BASEBALL IN CUBA 

Captain Jake Dauliert, of the I5rooklyn 
Superbas, and ten other meml)crs of the 
team will play in ("ul)a this autumn. 

The date for departing for Cuba has not 
been set, as Daubert is trying to arrange a 
number of games in Florida with hotel 
teams. The idea is to work down through 
Florida to Key West, and take the boat for 
the short run from ney West to Havana, 
later in the season. 



FENDERS ON CUBAN AUTOMOBILES 

"Cuba has taken the lead in a new field 
lor the preservation of life," remarked J 
A. btotesbury, representative of an Amer- 
ican exporting house of New York re- 
cently "The Cuban Congress has passed 
a bill reqmnng ail automobiles to be 
equipped with fenders. These fenders are 
designed not only to protect life, but to 
atford protection for the machines, and 
many automobiles have been saved from 
wreck since the fenders came into use I 
have not seen any of these fenders in this 
country, though, curiouslv enough, the in- 
vention, I am told, is that of an American 
1 here are many 'bumpers' used on ma- 
chines in this country, but the style of fen- 
der which the Cuban authorities insist shall 
be used on machines in that countrv i« 
different from the ordinary bumper they 
are somewhat like pneumatic tires that pro- 
ject from the front of the automobiles, and 
ward off an ohjectr—JJ-ashiugfou Post 



SALE OF EXPLOSIVES 

Government rules and regulations for 
handling ex-plosives in Havana establish- 
ments prohibit more than 25 pounds for re- 
tail purposes at a time. 

Merchants handling and importers of ex- 
plosives have complained to the government 
regarding these regulations which were put 
m force since the terrible catastrophe in 
Cienfuegos when a stock of explosives ac- 
cidentally Ignited, caused manv deaths 

Ihe merchants find the new rules onerous 
and want them changed. 



CUBAN millionaire's DEATH 

Jose R Barrios, millionaire coal mer- 
chant of Havana and New York, who out- 
fitted native troops in the Cuban revolution 
that preceded the Spanish-American Wa" 
died suddenly in New York on Septembe; 
27th Dea h had overtaken him in a street 
car through heart failure. He was 63 years 
old and leaves two daughters and a son. 

nf .Jl°f V?'' ^^° ^^ ^^^ ^" exporter 
of coal to Cuba and was an importer of 
Cuban products. During the ten years- 
war for Cuban independence he took an 
active part and at the conclusion of hos- 
tilities he declined a public office that was 
offered to him for his services and re- 
turned here where he had been in business 
twenty years. 

GUANTANAMO and the BAHAMAS 

Havana and Guantanamo are now in 
touch with the Bahamas by wireless, a 
station having been opened at x\assau 
which has a 400 mile radius. " ' 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN RAILROAD MATTERS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD, THE HAVANA ELECTRIC, ETC, 
Yearly Earnings of the Cuba Railroad 



The gross and net earnings of the Cuba Railroad for the twelve months ended June 30, 
1913, constitute a record. The main comparisons of the past three years are : 

Year ended June 30th 1913 1912 1911 

Gross earnings $4,632,039 $3,819,253 $3,059,649 

Expenses 2,416,537 2,000,394 1,685,578 

Net earnings 2,215,502 1,818,859 1,374,071 

Interest, charges, etc 801,222 758,998 576,755 

1,414,280 1,059,861 797,316 

Pref. div 600,000 550,000 450,000 

6 per cent 5% per cent 4% per cent 

Divisible 814,280 ■ 509,862 347,316 

400,000 .... 

Rate 4 per cent nil nil 

414,280 509,862 347,316 



Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 



Weekly receipts: 1913 

Week ending September 7th $54,537 

Week ending September 14th 56,655 

Week ending September 21st. 53,379 

Week ending September 28th 51,519 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


$53,100 


$49,325 


$45,124 


$41,739 


51,213 


46,410 


41,240 


36,461 


48,693 


45,799 


41,451 


37,628 


49,054 


45,366 


40,154 


38,293 



Earnings of the United Railway of Havana 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

Week ending August 30th il8,921 

Week ending September 6th 19,996 

Week ending September 13th 19,680 

Week ending September 20th 18,889 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


£19,122 


£15,548 


£16,333 


£14,473 


20,147 


17,695 


17,073 


15,549 


19,630 


16,114 


15,850 


13,961 


18,677 


15,881 


16,229 


13,125 



WESTERN RAILROAD DIVIDEND 

The Western of Havana announces a 
dividend of 7 per cent, the same as for the 
preceding year, and the appropriations are 
also the same — £10,000 to reserve, £5,000 to 
insurance fund, and £16,703 forward. West- 
ern of Havana £10 shares, standing at 12%, 
yield £5 12s per cent on the 7 per cent 
basis. 



Havana's mayor approves the project, but 
wants the condition made that if the city 
council or some other concessionaire de- 
cides to build a better railroad, that Mr. 
Barlow shall consent to the removal of his 
road for a reasonable indemnity. 



ELEVATED ROAD SCHEME 

Joseph E. Barlow, of Havana, has asked 
the city council to grant him a concession 
for the erection of an elevated railway from 
Havana to Buena Vista, Camp Columbia 
and other nearby places. 



CUBAN CENTRAL S NEW MANAGER 

The board of directors of the Cuban 
Central Railways of Santa Clara have ap- 
pointed Mr. George Morson, acting general 
manager of the United Railways of Ha- 
vana, to succeed Mr. Harry Usher, as gen- 
eral manager of that road. 

Mr. Morson takes possession of his office 
in December. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 



THE GUANTANAMO AND WESTERN RAILROAD 

ANNUAL REPORT OF OPERATIONS EARNINGS, EXPENSES AND INCOME 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1912-13 

The report on the operations of The Guantanamo & Western Railroad Company for 
the hscal year ended June 30, 1913, with statement of earnings and the treasurer's general 
balance sheet, was issued on September 26th. 

Capital expenditures during' the year, for other than rolHng stock, amounted to 
?79,S7S.59, prmcipally for new station buildings, section houses, coal deposits water 
tanks and sidings at San Justo. 

There have been no extensions of the main line during the year, the mileage in opera- 
tion bemg 75, although some extensions of switches and sideings were made, some new 
ballasting done and considerable drainage work completed. 

One new locomotive and some rolling stock were acquired at a cost of $33,100 of 
which $25,000 was paid with car trust bonds. 

The steel bridges were cleaned and painted and the timbers in wooden bridges and of 
ties over the entire line renewed with best quality of native hardwoods. These renewals 
increased materially the cost for maintenance of way and structures, which was nearly 
$25,000 more than the previous year. 

A succession of unusually heavy rains during the months of October, November and 
December seriously interfered with traffic, caused large expenses for repairs and replace- 
ments and delayed for a month the grinding season of the sugar mills. 

For the total sugar season 351,178 bags were carried as against 326,632 in 1912 and 
261,107 in 1911. 

A table of revenue and expenses follows: 

1913 1912 1911 

Total revenue from transportation $440,774.14 $382,342.16 $323,107.74 

Maintenance, transportation and general expenses... 377,874.43 328,269.12 291,907.16 

Xet transportation earnings $62,899.71 $54,073.04 $31,200.58 

The report states that the condition of the property is good and being continually im- 
proved. Some additions to freight equipment will be required for the current year. Ex- 
tensive renewals of culverts, bridges and ties will be continued, and additional facilities 
are being provided for more economically handling a steadily increasing traffic. 

The general balance sheet of June 30, 1913. follows : 

.■\SSETS 

Road and ccpiipment $6,728,378.97 

Deferred charges 11,254.71) 

Material and supplies, per inventory 78,260.60 

Cash and cash items 37,258.17 

Bills receivable 17,400.00 

Accounts receivable 73,037.88 

Income account 33,000.75 

$6,978,591.13 
r.i.AniMTiES 

Capital stock — Preferred 1st $2,750,000.00 

Capital Stock — Preferred 2nd 250,000.00 

Capital Stock — Common 2,750,000.00 $.",750,()()().(i() 

First mortgage bonds 6 per cent 600, 000. oo 

Car trust bonds 6 per cent. Series 1 $160,000.00* 

Car trust bonrls 6 per cent. Series 2 25,000.00 lS,-,,0()0.0() 

Two-year redeemable notes .'iOO.OOO.OO 

Bills payable S9,] 19.00 

Interest accrnerl on fundcrl and tloating debt 11,158.87 

Employees hos[)ital fund 3,882.44 

Mail service for Cuban government 17,181.36 

-Accounts jtayable 22,249.46 

♦$25,000 paid in July, I9i:;. $6,978,501.13 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN RAILROAD NEWS 



THE UNITED RAILWAYS DIVIDEND 

The United of the Havana is soundly 
managed under the present regime, and is 
enjoying great prosperity. The coming 
dividend results are awaited with interest. 
But it is now possible also to look at the 
chances of the next sugar crop, since so 
much in Cuba depends upon sugar. The 
new cane was requiring more rain a few 
weeks ago, but it was still green and the 
extra rains came. The prospect now seems 
to be that the record crop of the past year 
may be repeated next season if all goes 
well. But nobody looks for any further 
increase, although the area under sugar is 
said to be greater. The hurricane period 
has now to be faced, and it is a far cry to 
the December cutting of the cane. But the 
prospects are bright, and the dividend 
showing should be quite satisfactory, al- 
though the directors may be relied upon to 
act conservatively. — London Observer. 



FIVE PER CENT DIVIDENDS 

The council of the United Railways of 
Havana submitted to the general assembly 
of stockholders in London on October 22d 
the declaration of a 5 per cent dividend on 
the common stock. It also decided to trans- 
fer to the reserve fund £125,000, to the 
reserve fund for repairs i50,000 ; to the in- 
surance fund, £5,000 ; pension fund, £20,000 ; 
to cancel the balance of the £15,000 fund 
for extraordinary work and to carry to a 
new account £l6,330 10s 7d. On the 5 per 
cent dividend basis United of Havana 
stock at 89% cum dividend yields £5 lis 6d 
per cent. 

NEW BRIDGE UNDER CONSTRUCTION 

The Guantanamo and Western Rail- 
road is building a steel bridge 260 feet 
long over the Guaso River near Cuatro 
Caminos. The company is constructing in 
its own workshops two passenger cars of 
native woods. 



OTHER GUANTANAMO RAILROAD NEWS 

The Guantanamo and Western Railroad 
Company has started construction of a 
large new sugar warehouse at the port ter- 
minal of Boquerou. 

Mr. H. B. Snider, for several years gen- 
eral superintendent of the Cuba (Van 
Horn) Railroad, has been appointed gen- 
eral manager of the Guantanamo & West- 
ern Railroad. He is a man of large rail- 
"oid experience. 



CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY PROSPECTS 

Low prices were realized for the last 
Cuban sugar crop, but the prospects for 
the coming harvest are considered bright, 
and the Cuba Railroad Company expects 
to derive still greater benefits during the 
current year. A large addition is to be 
made to the rolling stock to deal with the 
extra tonnage, and a rolling-stock trust 
has been formed. Other industries are 
said to be developing healthily, and refer- 
ence is made to the constant expansion in 
passenger traffic. After providing for the 
4 per cent dividend paid on the common 
stock last May, there was a surplus of 
$3,396,840 at the end of the fiscal year in 
June. Since 1905 the gross earnings have 
increased by 350 per cent, and net receipts 
by 649 per cent. In the interval working 
expenses have been continually reduced 
without impairing the efficiency of the 
property, the proportion for the past year 
being 52.17 per cent, compared with 71.28 
per cent in 1905. — London Daily News. 

The annual report which has now come 
to hand shows that 8% per cent was ac- 
tually earned on the $10,000,000 of common 
capital, so that the board was fully jus- 
tified in making the distribution in question. 
For the past twelve months the gross earn- 
ings amounted to $4,632,000, an increase of 
$812,800, or 21.3 per cent, while the net 
earnings totalled $2,215,500, an improve- 
ment of $396,600, or 21.8 per cent. The 
directors report that an agreement has been 
arrived at with the Cuba Company upon all 
matters relating to the construction of the 
railway, and the balance of the Cuba Rail- 
road Company's common shares, namely 
$3,874,000, has, therefore, been delivered to 
the Cuba Company. The outlook for the 
current year is very hopeful, in view of the 
probability of an excellent sugar crop, while 
the extensive program of renewals which has 
been in progress for some time on the rail- 
way should enable the system to be worked 
much more economically in future than 
hitherto. It seems probable, therefore, that 
during 1913-14 the directors will be able to 
make a larger return on the common shares 
than was forthcoming during the period 
under review. That issue is not dealt in 
over here, but the $4,000,000 of 5 per cent 
fifty-year improvement an equipment gold 
bonds are quoted in London and stand at 
98. There are also $12,030,000 of first 
mortgage 5 per cent fifty-year gold bonds, 
which are changing hands at 105, and also 
$10,000,000 of 6 per cent non-cumulative 
preferred shares which stand at 103. — Stock 
Exchange Gazette, London. 

Detailed earnings are on page 22. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



RAILROAD NOTES 



SEA FERRY TO HAVANA 

The Florida East Coast Railroad an- 
nounces that it will establish a car-ferry 
service between Key West and Havana so 
that railroad cars will go through, directly, 
between the Cuban city and northern 
points. At present the cars stop at Key 
West. For the new service, two seagoing 
ferry boats of 411-foot length and 60-foot 
beam will be constructed. The cars will be 
transported between Havana and Key West 
on these boats. The service will be the first 
sea ferry in the world, the railroad officials 
declare. 



SUGAR CARRYING ROADS PROSPER 

The passage of the American tariff bill 
through the Senate, putting sugar on the 
free list, should be an important factor for 
Cuba, and ought to stimulate trade in that 
island, especially as another large sugar 
crop is promised. United Havanas and 
Cuban Centrals have both advanced in con- 
sequence ; an increase from 4 to 5 per cent 
is expected on the former, while the figures 
of the latter tend to show that 4 per cent 
may be paid, as against 2 per cent a year 
ago. — Loudon JP'orld. 



TIME EXTENSION GRANTED 

The Puerto Principe and Xuevitas Rail- 
road has been granted by presidential de- 
cree an extension of six months to begin 
the work of building a pier and warehouse 
on the inlet of Mayanabo ne.xt to the port 
of Xuevitas. 



SANTIAGO AND HAVANA SERVICE 

The through line from Havana to San- 
tiago will now be via Marti and Bayamo 
instead of by way of Alto Cedro. The new 
route shortens the journey materially. 



ROADS TO BE ELECTRIFIED 

A plan to electrify all the passenger lines 
leaving Havana to Rincon, which is the 
distributing point of both the United Rail- 
ways and the Western Railway, will be put 
into operation as soon as possible. 

The Havana Terminal Company has al- 
ready placed orders for several new stor- 
age battery cars which will be used in 
establishing lines connecting with Arte- 
misa, Guira de Melena, Bejucal, San An- 
tonio de los Banos and other places in 
Havana Province. 



RAILROAD TRACK ADVANCING 

On August 23rd, the Atlantic Fruit Com- 
pany had built about six miles of the rail- 
road which will connect Sagua with Cayo 
Mambi. The road will be finished by 
October. 



ELECTRIC CARS FOR CIENFUEGOS 

Toward the latter part of last month, 
electric cars to the station of the United 
Railways in Cienfuegos were in public ser- 
vice. There are transfer privileges to cars 
circulating in other parts of the city. 



Financial Notes 



CUBAN TELEPHONE CO. EARNINGS 

The earnings and increase in the number 
of subscribers during the month of August 
compares as follows : 

1913 1912 

Earnings $80,947.04 $.57,732.04 

Subscribers U,r>52 10,082 

Work on the installation of a station at 
Placetas del Xorte is well under way. Tele- 
phone connoctiftn I)etween Havana and 
Santiago and between Santiago and Cama- 
guey and other cities in the province is 
now established. The rate between San- 
tiago and Havana is 3.00 for the first three 
minutes and I.-'jO for every two minutes 
additional. 

The aggregate gross income of this com- 
pany for the first eight months is $011, 40k. 



SPEYERS MAY NOT HANDLE LOAN 

Xotwithstanding the fact that Speyer 
Brothers of Xew York have under a Gomez 
decree the refusal on future loans by Cuba, 
it is learned that President Menocal asserts 
that President Gomez had no authority to 
issue such a decree, and he purposes to 
give the loan to the bankers offering the 
most favorable terms. 



EARNINGS OF THE SANTIAGO ELECTRIC 
LIGHT AND TRACTION CO. 

1913 1912 

September gross $3S,08.'» $30,122 

Sci)tcmber net 10,945 10,335 

I'irst 9 months gross... 340,535 299,763 

l'"irst 9 months net l.'.3,()42 125,451 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 



REPORTS OF VARIOUS COMPANIES THE GOVERNMENT NEW LOAN MAY 

BE $30,000,000 CUBAN TREASURY CONDITION 

Cuban Treasury Report 



The condition of the Cuban treasury on 
August 31st is officially stated to be as 
follows : 

INCOME 

Cash on hand July 31, 1913 $1,147,281 

Receipts for August : 

Customs receipts 2,401,762 

Consular receipts 62,873 

Posts and telegraphs 93,972 

Internal revenue 87,352 

Income from public (state) 

property 23,198 

Miscellaneous revenue 101,502 

National lottery 269,778 

Loan taxes 334,991 

Miscellaneous accounts : 

Mojiey orders 64,809 

Unpaid checks 9 

Honorary consulate fees 49 

Semi-public works performed 

for acct. of private persons 19,365 

Epidemics 2,869 

Deposit for harbor works 119,104 

Workingmen's homes 4,789 

Water supply of Cienfuegos. . . 18,148 

Tobacco guarantee stamps 2,620 

Bubonic plague 345 

Cash reimbursements 257,896 

In hands of collectors for ac- 
counting 27,579 

Total $3,893,019 

Crand total $5,040,301 



EXPENDITURES 

Disbursements, budget 1913-1914. $3,237,514 

1912-1913. 244,673 

1911-1912. 530 

1910-1911. 497 

laws 1909 72,866 

1910 36,398 

1911 1,500 

1912-1913. 6,400 

Third part of income from na- 
tional lottery 30,019 

Three million dollar loan 47,650 

National loan tax 110,384 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 

Private works $3,716 

Outstanding checks 3,136 

Expense of immigrants 6,026 

Water supply of Cienfuegos 3,351 

Ten per cent custom house collec- 
tions for the redemption and 

interest of $1,500,000 loan 103,416 

Tobacco guarantee stamp 378 

Paving and sewerageing works of 

Havana 354,050 

Total $4,276,296 

Cash in hand 736,425 

In hands of collectors 27,579 

Total $764,004 

Grand total $5,040,301 

Available to paymasters for cur- 
rent and extraordinary dis- 
bursements $3,012,272 



Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 

(Quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., New York) 

BID 

Republic of Cuba 5 per cent Bonds (Interior) 94% 

Republic of Cuba Exterior 5 per cent Bonds 100% 

Havana City First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 102% 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 100 

Cuba Railroad First Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 99 

Cuba Railroad Preferred Stock 95 

Cuba Company 6 per cent Debentures 96 

Cuba Co. 7 per cent Cumulative Preferred Stock 100 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consol. Mtge. 5 per cent Bonds 92% 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co. Preferred Stock 93 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co. Common Stock 82 

Matanzas Market Place 8 per cent Bonds Participation Certificates 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Coll. Tr. 6 per cent Gold Bonds of 1918.. 93 
Santiago Electric Light & Traction Co. First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 98% 

All prices of bonds quoted on an "and interest" basis 



ASKED' 

95% 
102 
106%- 
102 
101 
100 

99 
104 

93%- 

96 

85 , 
103 

95 

98% 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY 



STATISTICS OF EXPORTS AND IMPORTS MEXICO S TRADE SPURIOUS 

CUBAN CIGARS IN LONDON 

AUGUST, 1913, EXPORTS AND \'ALUES to be fully ten cents a pound higher than 

Quantities 1913 191'^ ^^^^ former, but this year we have again the 

^ " anomaly that Remedios commands even a 

Leaf tobacco (bales). 22,619 42,965 better figure than Vuelta Aba''o. 

Cigars 14,679,147 18,036,467 The manufacturers say that the demand 

Cigarettes (packs)... 1,530,732 1,448,304 for clear Havana tobacco in outrunning the 

Cut tobacco (kilos) . 20,683 16,832 supply made it often necessary to use the 

Yalues 1913 1912 1^^^ from a new crop before it had been 

Leaf tobacco $1,316,204 $2,039,528 §>^^" sufficient time to become properly 

Cigars 1019,287 1.228,554 ^"'"^d" ^' ^ consequence the cigars hat 

Cigarettes 43 733 58,531 ^^'^re "lade were not as mild and sweet as 

-- ° , , nn'Arx -,'~\-o was desirHDle, and smokers were beginning 

Cut tobacco 20,o49 17,9d8 ,,• r^i-i, ^ u 

to tire of this heavy tobacco. 

T- . , a>o onn r.~o <tooo( -r-i Now thc Cuban crop in 1912 was prolific 

1 otal $2,399,7(3 $3,334,.d<1 -.i, r nru^^ i-u 

^ ' ' ^ ' < !,-[ tobacco of an unusually light type, which 

did not require to be stored as long as 

CUBAN EXPORTS TO ENGLAND "^ual before it was properly cured and sea- 
soned. As a consequence cigars made from 

[Reportof the British Vice-consul Cowan at Havana] the 1912 tobacco have been of more pleas- 

„T,, ^ ^ , , r ^, ^ , ing quality, and more satisfactory to the 
.u T^^- total value of the tobacco sent to ^^g^e of the discriminating smoker than 
the United Kingdom m 1912 was iSOO,600, ^^^.^ ^^^ Havana cigars made in other re- 
ef which amount £< 91,300 represents cigars. ^^^^ years 

The crop of 1912 was a very good one in -phe improved qualitv in the cigars has 

quality, and the fact that the quantity fell ^^^^^^^ ^ j j increased consumption. 

short of the estimate enabled the growers p^^. example. Great Britain alone imported 

to obtain good prices. The total export ^^^^■^ ^-^^ million more cigars from Ha- 

was greater than in either of the two pre- ^.^^^ j,^ ^j^e first six months of 1913 than in 

ceding years. The crop of 1913, which is ^^^ corresponding period in 1912. 

already harvested, will be a large one of j^ j^ ^.^^ generally admitted that the 

very good quality, although there are rarely ^^^^^^^ tobacco crop for the current year is 

two good tobacco crops in succession The ^^.^^ ^^^^^^ ^,^^^„ that of 1912, it must 

weather has been more favorable than in j i^allv follow, therefore, that the finer 

the past two years, and there has been no nuality'of the cigars made from this vear's 

eye ones or prolonged rams to necessitate tobacco will still further help the business 

replanting. The Pinar del Rio tobacco has ^^ ^^^ manufacturers during the final 

provided exceptionally good filler tobacco. ,„onths of this year and the early months 

though there has been a shortage of wrap- ^f un4.— Tobacco of Nczv York. 
per leaf. But it is expected that this shortage 

will be corrected by a good crop in Havana "^ " 

and Santa Clara provinces. A law was SPURIOUS CUBAN CIGARS 
passed last year compelling all manuiactur- 

ers to put a national guarantee stamp on all "If the truth were known it would prob- 

boxes of cigars intended for export. Gen- ably be found tliat a good many cigars sold 

uine Cuban cigars may, therefore, now be in London as Cu))an have never come from 

recognized by this stamp, which is printed that part of the world at all," says the 

in green and bears the words 'Repul)lica de Dublin Express. "To meet this difficulty a 

Cuba, Sello de garantia nacional de pro- law. it appears, has been passed in Cuba 

cedeneia. Para tabacos torcidos y picadura,' compelling all manufacturers to put a na- 

and is so placed that it is broken when the tional guarantee stamp on all boxes of 

box is opened." cigars intended for ex])ort. Genuine Cuban 

"■ cigars may therefore now be recognized by 

TOBACCO CROP NEWS |'"^ ^^amp. which is printed in green and 

l)ears the words Rei)ublica de C ul)a Sello 

The early strong rlemand for Remedios de Garantia Nacional de Procedeneia, Para 

leaf is surprising, but it seems that most Tabacos Torcidos y Picadura,' and is so 

of the American seed and Havana cigar ])laccd that it is broken when the box is 

manufacturers give the preference to Re- opened. It is to be feared that even this 

medios leaf over thc heavy bodied Vuelta will not wholly accomplish the purpose 

Abajo tobacco. The latter Ijy rights ought aimed at. 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CITY OF NEWSPAPERS 

Havana, city of the Gulf of Mexico, has 
some three hundred thousand inhabitants, 
of which one-third can neither read or 
write, and of the remaining two-thirds, 
one-third does not read. In this city are 
p'ubHshed one hundred and seventy-three 
periodicals. 

In comparison, in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, a city that has five hundred thou- 
sand inhabitants, all of whom know how 
to read, are published two morning papers, 
two afternoon papers and two at night.— 
Ricardo Dolz in La Nota del Dia. 



A LIVESTOCK EXPOSITION PLANNED 

President Menocal wants an appropria- 
tion of $100,000 for a Cuban agricultural 
and livestock exposition with premiums 
which will attract the best American cattle- 
breeders, after which Cuba will purchase 
the prize winners for the island's experi- 
mental farms with the purpose of better- 
ing Cuba's livestock. 



SALESMAN WANTED 

To sell a line of mechanical rubber goods on 
commission. One familiar with the sugar 
trade preferred. Address THE CUBA RE- 
VIEW, NEW YORK CITY. 




Cable 
Letters 
To Cuba 

5 Cents per Word 

New telegraph service at greatly 
reduced rates inaugurated by the 
Western Union to facilitate busi- 
ness corresponcence between the 
United States and Cuba 

CABLE LETTER RATES 
New York — Havana 

20 word message - - - $1.00 
Each additional word - 5 cents 

Cable letters for Cuba filed 

before midnight delivered 

during the next dag 

Flash Cable Services at regular 
rates 

The Western Union Telegraph Co. 




The BUDA COMPANY'S 
MOTOR CARS 

We manufacture Plantation and Rail- 
road Equipment including Hand Cars, 
Switches 
Jacks, 
Push Cars, 
and Frogs 



30 Church Street, New York 




HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop, 

Sea Harbor and General Torving - - - Steamship Tomng a Specialty 
Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

^'"''^hf^lfe SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U. S. A. » I.Te? 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



M 



ISLE OF PINES NOTES 



Mrs. H. J. Parent, a Worcester woman, 
who has been a resident of the Isle of Pines 
15 months, stated that the residents of the 
island are anxious to have Congress take 
action on the oresent plans of having the 
island set off as a state bj- itself in order 
that the United States may give it the kind 
of assistance that the American people now- 
living on the island desire it to have. 

Mrs. Parent lives on what is known as 
the McKinley colony, and owns a farm of 
10 acres. 

"Isle of Pines has very poor facilities 
for the shipping of its fruit and this is one 
of the reasons why the people of the island 
want the United States to annex the island 
so that it will become a state and then we 
will get better shipping facilities than what 
we have to-day. 

"Under the present arrangements for the 
shipping of fruit, the raisers are obliged to 
cart the fruit 23 miles to the boat and with 
the handling over and over of the fruit it 
takes but a short time for it to spoil and 
we lose a lot of money. We are in hopes 
of getting a boat to come in direct to where 
the fruit is raised and then we can load 
on the produce without being obliged to 
cart it so far and then handle it over and 
over again. 

"Land is selling as high as $7.5 an acre 
to-day and has been advancing ever since 
we came to the island to live. This is 
caused on account of the demand for the 
land by the .American people who have 
come to the Isle of Pines to cultivate the 
land and make a living. 

"Before the land becomes productive it 
has to be sweetened with lime and fertiliz- 
ers as it is known as sour land when it is 
first tilled. Our own tract of land is sandy. 
There are some parts of the land that the 
sand is as white as snow and in this white 
sand the grape fruit grows. 

"Provisions arc very high on the island 
while help is cheap. All of the water is 
filled with magnesia but it does not injure 
it for drinking purposes. 

"Xone of the houses are built with cel- 
lars. Our house contains six rooms and a 
barn made of logs. Ponies and mules are 
used a great deal for transportation pur- 
poses. There are two large saw mills on 
the island and they are kept busy all of the 
time sawing the wood and getting it ready 
for the carpenters to erect new homes. 

"This island is noted for a place for the 
cure of rheumatism and hay fever." — 
Worcester (Mass.) Telefjram. 

Ramon Rivero has Ijeen appointed col- 
lector of customs of the port of Los Indies, 
Isle of Pines. 



PINEAPPLE GROWERS NOT MAKING 
MONEY 

The treasurer and general manager of 
the Isle of Pines Fruit Company, whose 
plantations are at Westport, Isle of Pines, 
gave much information concerning the ad- 
vantages and disadvantages Isle of Pines 
growers encounter during the course of a 
crop. 

He said that on account of difficulties, 
principally in transportation, his company 
will have to go into the canning business 
at home in order to handle their immense 
crop of pineapples. That is the only way 
for the growers on that island to make any 
reasonable profit on their plantations, he 
holding that none of the pineapple growers 
were making anything off their crops. They 
might make money at some times of the 
year, but he believed that in other times, 
while the great bulk of the crop was ready 
for shipment they lost more than they had 
made during their prosperous times. The 
writer showed how many hands the fruit 
passed through before it could be placed 
in the retailer's hands in Boston, which 
footed up to no less than seventeen hand- 
lings. Each one of these handlings costs 
the grower a part of the final sale until 
there is very little to pay for the crate and 
leave anything for the grower. 

Another suggestion this writer makes is 
that the privilege of through bills of lading 
be granted from the Isle of Pines to Xew 
York. Wholesale shippers of goods get the 
through bill of lading from New York to 
Xueva Gerona, and the Isle of Pines people 
want the same privilege, to save brokerage 
in Havana. — La Lucha, Havana. 



GRAPEFRUIT IN ENGLAND 

As a general thing tlie European fruit 
dealer appears tu think that trial shipments 
at the proper seasons might lie favorably 
tried, but at most they are not very en- 
thusiastic. Of grapefruit they are especially 
charry. With the exception of London, 
the capitals and larger cities, the fruit is 
unknown and a campaign of education 
must first be started. Small shipments to 
reputable Iiouses ought to be tried first, 
and there is no doubt but that the demand 
would increase. — Isle of Pines Nezvs. 



We have always believed that lemons 
would prove a paying crop in the Isle of 
Pines, says the .Ippcal, and iiave advised 
against the cuttintr down of lemon trees 
and buflding to something else. They have 
never been given a fair trial here. The 
l)roper varieties were not jjlanted. 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



PITCH PINE MARKET CONDITIONS 



The week was a very small one for West 
Indian shipment, only about one million 
feet going to Cuba. — September 20th. 

Quiet rules in the Cuban market, inquiries 
for the future being scarce, while the ac- 
cumulations of old orders are nearly 
cleared away. No indication of recovery 
is observable, though it may be noted that 
Cuban business usually lags at this season, 
to return in more or less degree about 
November. 

Cuban shipment of the week was about 
1,600,000 feet. — September 27th. 

When active buying declined several 
months ago, a fairly long list of orders 
were on the books, and these have main- 
tained the outgo at respectable figures, but 
most of them now have been shipped out, 
and few have been accepted to take their 
place. With high freights as generally 
prevailing during the hurricane season 
Cuba does not buy freely, and recovery 
generally comes with the easier freight 
costs of November and later. Such re- 
covery may be experienced this year, but 
the present promise is not for extensive 
development. 

The week of October 4th showed dull- 
ness most apparent in inquiry for Cuba.' 
The islands accounting for the week was 
less than one and a half million feet. 



CUBAN HARDWOODS IN ENGLAND 

Recent arrivals were 1,988 Logs Cuba 
mahogany of usual good quality and sizes, 
with several well-figured logs, being the 
first portion of the cargo just landed from 
Santa Cruz, and a parcel of 91 logs Cuba 
mahogany, all of which are figured, some 
finely, and many are plum logs. This latter 
parcel is a distinctly attractive one, and 
is bound to realize high prices. Following 
these there are for sale 253 logs of Cuban 
cedar, of good texture and of small to 
large sizes, and an exceptionally fine parcel 
Timber, of London. 



THE WORLD S ORANGE EXPORTS • 

The number of pounds of oranges 
shipped in 1911 from the principal foreign 
producing countries was given as follows : 
Spain, 869,725,553 ; Italy, 282,945 ; Jafifa 
(Palestine) 60,890,130; Japan, 14,158,559; 
Porto Rico, 25,076,880; Cuba, 3,609,817. 
California has furnished about 40 per cent 
of the total orange supply of the world. 
The American orange industry is located 
in California, Florida, Louisiana, Texas 
and Arizona, and the total annual produc- 
tion is estimated at 20,000,000 boxes. 



A. F. CRAIG & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

PAISLEY 
ESCOCIA 

Fabricantes 
de toda clase 

de 

maquinaria 

para 

moler caiia 
de azucar 

DIRECCION TELEGRAFICA 
"CRAIG" PAISLEY 

Claves: A.B.C., S^EDICION; McNEIUS MINING Y GENERAL 




THE CUBA R E \M E W 



31 



NEWS OF SUGAR ESTATES 



OUTPUT OF THREE CENTRALS 

The ligures of the arrobas of cane 
ground and the yield of sugar of three 
large sugar estates are as follows : 

Cane ground Sugar 
Arrobas Bags 

Central Jatibonico 29,962,255 262,365 

Jagiieyal 26,617,903 212,054 

Stewart 42,800,000 330,000 

These same centrals produced the fol- 
lowing quantities of molasses of the sec- 
ond grade : 

Jatibonico 2.131,455 gallons 

Jagiieyal 1,496,835 gallons 

Stewart 5,628.290 gallons 



CENTRAL "CIEGO DE AVILA 

The new central at Ciego de Avila will 
be ready to grind the next crop. The con- 
struction of a sugar warehouse with a ca- 
pacity of 25.000 bags of sugar is assured 
in the near future. Two new shareholders, 
Messrs. Munoz & Co. and Vilaplana & 
Bouza, have subscribed $5,000 and $3,00t) 
respectively toward the enterprise. 



PRESTON S FINE YIELD 

Charles G. Maher of Donaldsonville, La., 
chief sugar maker of the Xipe Bay Com- 
pany's big factory at Preston, Cuba, reports 
that the Preston plant wound up a success- 
ful season September 6th, after having been 
in operation since January 1st. Alore than 
600,000 tons of cane passed through the 
rollers, from which 428,000 bags of sugar 
were made. 



NEW ORLEANS FIRM GETS CONTRACT 

The contract for the erection and fur- 
nishing of macliinery for a sugar mill in 
Cuba, one of the largest contracts for con- 
struction work let recently, was awarded to 
Dibert, Bancroft & Ross, of New Orleans. 
The mill, which will cost appro.ximately 
$1/X)0,000 when completed, will be one of 
the most modern sugar mills in Cuba. The 
mill is in Piedra Citas, and will have a 
daily capacity of 1,500 tons. 



NEW OWNER FOR CONFLUENTE 

M. II. Lewis, President of the Santa 
Cecilia Sugar Company, has taken over the 
Confluente sugar estate at Guantanamo and 
C. B. Goodrich has been appointed admin- 
istrator. Additional machinery is being in- 
stalled in the factory to materially increas.- 
its efficiency and capacity. 



Central "Soledad" will construct a rail- 
road line, narrow guage from the batey 
situated near the town of Jovellanos, Ma- 
tanzas Province, to the dismantled central 
"Pelayo" at San Antonio, three leagues dis- 
tant from Cardenas. Sr. Fernandez Mari- 
bona, proprietor of central '"Saledad," has 
already contracted to build storehouses at 
Pelayo for the storage of sugar. The new 
line will be ready for service before the 
end of the year. The extension of this 
line to the "Oxamendi" farm is projected. 



LAMPARAS 
ELfiGTRICAS 
|lS de Proyeccion 

'.^^. Marca 



Cuatrd 

Veces iiiis 

Serviciables 

que 

Cualquiera 

otra Limpara \ 

Portatil 



Equipadu 
con baterfas 
TUNGSTEN 
ycon ^ 

bombillas 
MAZDA 



UNA LUZ 



Todo el Mundo' 





Pidaiisf ciitiildKos "CR" y piccios al Rcprc- 
scnlaiite general para la Isla 

SR. L. A. RLCHACA, ACIUIAR OL'. 1IA15ANA 



Scientifically Trained Sugar=Estate 
Manager 

Kxpericiiced white sugar maker. .Seventeen years 
of financial succer.K in Java and Mauritius. Last 
three years commercial training in the macliinery 
branch. Would take position as General Manager 
or consider Kstate Management, .\ildress: H. T., 
c/o Cul;a Review, New York City. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



PLANTATION CARS ""' ^"^ '^''^^^ ^^° 



THE PARTS FOR SAME 




No. 902-K (Palabra de clave ZOVZU) 

El grabado enseiia uno de nuestros carros para cana con jaula de madera. Se puede 
convertir en cari'o plataforma por medio de remover los costados y extremos. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capacidades varias y hemos fabricado un gran numero de 
carros para cana para uso en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y Mexico, que tienen 
jaulas de acero o de madera y construidas para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga 
de la cana. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E. U. A. 

Direccion telegraflca: CAREX, New- York, E. U. A. 

Produccion annual de mas de 100,000 carros 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR R. CINTAS Oficios 29-31, Havana 



SUGAR REVIEW 



NO IMPROVEMENT LOOKED FOR RATES OF DUTY NOW IN FORCE 

DISCOUNT INTERFERES WITH FOREIGN TREATIES 

Our last review for this magazine was dated September 15, 1913. 

At that date the quotation for 96° test Cuba Centrifugals was 3.76c. per lb. and is 
now 3.42c. per lb. duty paid. 

On the cost and freight basis it was then 2 13/32c. per lb. (3.76c. duty paid) and is 
now 2 1/16C. per lb. c & f (3.42c. per lb. duty paid). 

As anticipated in our last review, 2 7/16c. per lb. c & f and 3.80c. per lb. duty paid 
have proved to be the high level of the fall season. 

Without coming nearer at 3.80c. than 26c. per 100 lbs. to the European parity, the 
market has rather rapidly declined during the month under review to 3.42c. per lb. which 
is 68c. per 100 lbs. below European parity. Such a course to the market during the late 
months of the year has been unknown in any previous year, when the usual coiirse of our 
market has been to rise to the parity of Europe before making its decline in anticipation 
of the new crops of Cuba and the domestic cane and beet crops. 

The abundance of the local supplies, the desire to turn the domestic crops into cash 
before reduced duties come into operation, both of which cause unusual competition 
between the cane and beet interests, are mainly responsible for these changed conditions 
at this early period. 

It seems useless to anticipate any improvement from present conditions for some 
months to come, or until operations under the new tariff are the basis of the market. 

The new tariff is completed and signed by the President, and is now the law of the 
land. In operation to-day it applies as follows : 1st. The Dutch Standard No. 16 being 
now eliminated raws of 96 deg. test from Cuba pay 1.348)c. per lb. duty; 97 deg. test 
1.376c. per lb. duty; 98 deg. test 1.404c. per lb. duty; 99deg. test 1.432c. duty; 100 deg. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



test 1.46c. per lb. duty. These are the rates that will be paid on raw sugar from Cuba 
until March 1, 1914, and are 20 per cent less than the rates on sugar from other countries. 
Refined sugar will continue to pay 1.90c. per lb. duty from full duty countries and 1.52c. 
per lb. from Cuba. 

From March 1, 1914, to May 1, 1916, the rates of duty will be as in the following table: 



From 
Cuba 



Polaris- From Non- 
cope privileged 
Test Countries 


From 
Cuba 


75* 71c 


.568c 


76 736 


.5888 


77 762 


.6096 


78 788 


.6304 


79 814 


.6512 


SO 84 


.6720 


81 866 


.6928 


82 892 


.7136 


83 918 


.7314 


84 944 


.7552 


85 97 


.776 


86 996 


.7968 


87 1.022 


.8176 


88 1.048 


.8384 


* And under. 





i'olaris- 
cope 
Test 


From non- 
privileged 
Countires 


89.... 


1.074c 


90.... 


1.10 


91 


1.126 


92 


1.152 


93 


1.178 


94.... 


1.204 


95 


1.23 


96 


1.256 


97 


1.282 


98 


1.308 


99 


1.334 


100 


1.36 


96.10 . . 


....1.2586 


96.15... 


1.2599 



.8592c 
.88 
.9008 
.9216 
.9424 
.9632 
.9840 
1.0048 
1.0256 
1.0464 
1.0672 
1.088 
1.00688 
1.00792 



(These rates possibly subject to 5 per cent discount under provision J, Subsection 7, 
which provision, however, is expected to be repealed promptly. — W. & G., Oct. 8, 1913.) 

After May 1, 1916, there will be no duty assessed on sugar coming from any part of 
the world. 

There is a clause in the tariff bill which allows 5 per cent discount from the current 
rates of duties at time of arrival on all sugar coming into the United States on American 
vessels, provided that the clause does not interfere with our treaty obligations to other 
countries. 

It is found on investigation by the State Department that the clause does interfere to 
a very great extent with the treaties, and if allowed to be operated it would virtually 
reduce the duties on nearly all sugar (as well as other merchandise) the full 5 per cent. 
Hence its immediate operation is held in abeyance while waiting for the government to 
find a way out of the difficulty, either by a repeal of the clause or byl an adjustment of 
treaties so that American vessels alone shall benefit by the clause. It is claimed by the 
Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee of the House of Representatives that the 
President has the power of keeping the clause ineffective during this uncertain interval 
of investigation and adjustment. Importers, however, are acting on their opinion that 
the clause is now in force though not so recognized, and are paying the duties assessed 
without the 5 per cent reduction under special protest which will enable them to recover 
the 5 per cent later on. Several cargoes of sugar from Cuba have already arrived 
which are entitled to the reduction if the importers are right in their position. If the 
final result should be a repeal of the clause, it may appear that sugars arriving in Amer- 
ican or treaty country vessels during the period from the signing of the bill until the 
repeal of the clause are entitled to the discount of 5 per cent in duties. 

The important treaty countries producing sugar, said to be entitled to the discount are 
named as those of Austria, Argentina, Belgium, Denmark, Italy, Japan, Netherlands 
(Java), Prussia, Spain, Sweden and Norway as well as Great Britain. 

The following countries have no such "favored nation" treaties with us : Brazil, San 
Domingo, J-'rance, German I'Lmpire, Mexico, Peru and Russia. 

The course of the European markets has been the opposite to ours. 

The crop reports have been favorable and not been such as to warrant in general opin- 
ion tlie advance made, a considerable part of which is no doubt due to the opinion of 
others outside of the sugar trade wlio have evidently formed one of those syndicate 
cliques which so frequently influence prices on the European sugar exchanges. They 
are said to have bought largely of both the May and August deliveries. 

The possibilities of a market in the United .States for unrefined white sugar are much 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



discussed. We doubt if Cuban planters should change their manufacture to meet a 
demand from sugar consumers which we do not believe will ever materialize to an im- 
portant extent against the general use of refined sugar in this country. 

Th domestic refined beet crop is now on the market and all refined prices have rapidly 
declined from the high point of 1913 of 4.80c. per lb. less 2 per cent at! our last writing 
to the present quotations of 4.25c. less 2 per cent for cane granulated and 4.15c. less 2 per 
cent for the domestic beet granulated at the East and 4.05c. less 2 per cent at the West on 
New York basis. 

At below 4.00c. per lb. net cash with freight deducted the values at factories leaves a 
much less profit than usual. 

The immediate future of the market tends to further small decline in both raws and 
refined until a point is reached more settled than just now. 

New York, October 15, 1913. 



Iron Mines of Cuba 



3,000.000.000 TONS OF ORE 

Charles F. Rand, president of the Span- 
ish-American Iron Company, testified on 
October 10th in the hearing of the United 
States government's suit against the United 
States Steel Corporation. Mr. Rand has 
been head of the Spanish-American Com- 
pany for twenty years, and had also been 
connected with the Ponupo Manganese 
Company. 

"When did shipments begin from the 
Cuban south coast?" asked David Reed, 
representing the corporation. 

"In 1S95," replied the witness. 

"When did shipments commence from the 
north coast?" 

"In 1909, by the Spanish-American Com- 
pany. 

"When was it discovered there?" 

"In 190ii. The lands were taken over by 
us." 

"What are your reserves at Santiago?" 

"About 3,500,000 tons." 

It was brought out, on cross-examina- 
tion, that only one-half of the drying kilns 
of the company were used. About 1,300,000 
tons of ore had been shipped to the United 



States, the witness said, the majority of 
this being used by the Pennsylvania Steel 
and the Maryland Steel Companies. To 
outside persons, he said, 50,000 tons had 
been sold. 

Mr. Rand estimated the iron ore reserve 
in Cuba as 3,221,000,000 tons, distributed 
as follows : 

Mayori District, Spanish-American Iron 
Company, 600,000 tonnage ; Lenori Bay 
District, Guantanamo Exploration Com- 
pany, 69,000,000 tonnage ; various indi- 
viduals (estimated), 3,000 tonnage; total, 
84,000,000 tonnage; Moa-Taco District, 
Spanish-American Iron Company, 800,000,- 
000 tonnage ; Bethlehem Iron Mines Com- 
pany, 370,000,000; Buena Vista Iron Com- 
pany, 300,000,000 ; Guantanamo Explora- 
tion Company, 141,000,000; Eastern Steel 
Company, 50,000,000; Pilot Mining Com- 
pany (United States Steel Corporation), 
210,000,000 ; various companies and indi- 
viduals, 300,000,000. 

Camaguey District — Bethlehem Iron 
JMines Company, 3,500,000 tonnage; Juruga 
Iron Company, 2,500,000. Total, 6,000,000 
tons. 



Notes from Advertisers 



SECURES RESULTS FROM ADVERTISING 

The Buda Company state that they have 
sold many of their gasoline railroad cars to 
the sugar plantations in Cuba and wish to 
say that those who have not received their 
handsomely illustrated catalogue No. 191, 
will receive a copy upon request. 

The cars are especially designed for 
plantation use and are a necessity for plan- 
tation managers. Names of sugar estates 
which have purchased the cars will be sup- 
plied willingly at the ofiice of the company. 
From their advertisement in The Cuba 
Review they have received many inquiries 
and have made sales. 



AN IMPORTANT CONSOLIDATION 

The Cook Farms and the Cloverdale 
Jack and Percheron Farm of Lexington, 
Kentucky, have consolidated and will be 
known hereafter as the Kentucky Jack and 
Percheron Farms. J. F. Cook and H. T. 
Brown are the proprietors. They have 
recently bought the Union Stock Yards on 
West Fourth Street where they will have 
their sale barn. They will have in stock 
this season 200 heads of Mammoth jacks 
and Percheron horses. The _ catalog will 
be ready Nov. 1st and they will be glad to 
have all intending buyers of jacks and 
Percheron horses to visit their farms. 



THECUBAREVIEW 35 

REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita expresamente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York 



Nuestra ultima resena para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 15 de septiembre ppdo., 
en cuyo periodo la cotizacion dc los azucares centrifugos de Cuba polarizacion 96° era 
3.76c. la libra, y es ahora 3.42c. la libra derechos pagados. 

Bajo la base de costo y flete era entonces 2 13/32c. la libra (3.76c. derechos pagados), 
y es ahora 2 l/16c. la liljra c. y. f. (3.42c. la libra derechos pagados). 

Como se anticipo en nuestra ultima revista, la cotizacion de 3 7/16c. la libra c. y. f. y 
3.80c. la libra derechos pagados han probado ser el precio mas alto durante la estacion 
de otono. 

Sin aproximarse la cotizacion de 3.S0c. a mas de 26c. por 100 lbs. en la paridad de 
los mercados europeos, el mercado mas bien ha bajado rapidamente durante el mes 
bajo resefia a 3.42c. por libra, lo cual es 68c. por 100 lbs. por bajo de la paridad de los 
mercados europeos. El curso que ha seguido el mercado durante los liltimos meses del 
ano ha sido cosa desconocida en anos anteriores, en que el curso usual de nuestro 
rnercado ha sido el subir a la paridad de los mercados europeos antes de inclinarse a 
la baja en anticipacion de las nuevas zafras de Cuba y las cosechas del aziicar de caiia 
y de remolacha del pais. 

La abundancia de existencias locales y el deseo de convertir en efectivo el producto 
de las cosechas del pais antes de que se ponga en vigor la reljaja en los derechos del 
aziicar, cuyas causas ocasionan una competencia no acostunibrada cntre las partes in- 
teresadas en los azucares de cana y de remolacha, es la causa principal a que se deben 
estos cambios tan anticipados. 

Parece ser inutil el anticipar mejoria alguna en la situacion actual durante los proximos 
meses, o hasta que las operaciones bajo la nueva tarifa sean las bases del mercado. 

La nueva tarifa se ha completado y ha sidrt firmada por el Presidente, y es ahora 
la ley ciue rige. Su operacion hoy dia se aplica como sigue : Primero. Habiendose elimi- 
nado el Tipo Holandes No. 16, los azucares crudos de Cu1)a polarizacion 96° pagaran 
derechos de 1.348c. por libra; polarizacion 97° 1.376c. por lilira ; polarizacion 98° 1.404c. 
por libra; polarizacion 99° 1.432c. por libra; polarizacion 100° 1.46c. por libra. Estos 
son los derechos que se pagaran por el azucar crudo de Cuba hasta el 1°' de niarzo 
de 1914, y son 20 por ciento menos que los derechos sobre el azucar de otros paises. 

El azucar refinado continuara pagando derechos de 1.90c. por libra procedente de 
los paises que paguen derechos por completo, y ].5;2c. por libra procedente de Culia. 

Desde el 1° de marzo de 1914 al 1° de mayo de 1916 los derechos seriin coiro s:- in- 
dica en la siguiente tabla : 

Dereclios dc la nitcva Tarifa solve cl arji'icar Crudo y Refinado, en I'igor 
el 1° de marzo dc 1914. 



Grado de 
Polari- 
zacion 


De Paises 

no pri- 
vilegiados 


De 

Cuba 


75* 


... .71c 


.568c 


76 . . . 


. . . .736 


..")8SS 


77 


... .762 


.6096 


78 


. . . .788 


.6301 


79 


. . . .814 


.6.-, 1 2 


80 


... .84 


.(i720 


81 


. . . .866 


.6928 


82 


. . . .892 


.7136 


83 


. . . .918 


.7314 


84 


. . . .944 


.7r,.-,2 


85 


. . . .97 


.776 


80 


. . . .996 


.7968 


87 


. . 1 .022 


.8176 


88 


...1.048 


.8384 



Grado de 
Polari- 
zacion 


De Paises 

no pri- 
vilegiados 


De 

Cuba 


89 


1.074c 


.S592C 


90 


....1.10 


.88 


91 


1.126 


.'.lOOS 


92 


....1.152 


.9216 


93 


1.1 78 


.9424 


94 


1.204 


.96:'.2 


9,") 


1 '*'! 


MS 10 


96.... 


1.256 


1.00 IS 


!)7 


1.282 


1.0256 


9S . . . 


1.308 


1.0161 


99 


. .l.:{34 


1.0672 


100 


1 .36 


1.088 


96.10 . . 


... 1 .2586 


1.00688 


96.1.'). . . 


1.2599 


1.00792 



* Y de menor grado. 

( Hstos derechos cstaraii probablcmcnte siijctns a 5 jjor rifiito de dosciK'iito segiin 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 



clausula J, Subseccion 7, cuya clausula, sin embargo, es de esperarse sera abrogada 
muy pronto. — W. & G., oct. 8, 1S13.) 

y despues del 1° de mayo de 1916 no se impondran derechos a los aziicares procedentes 
de cualquier parte del mundo. 

Hay una clausula en la Tarifa que concede un 5 por ciento de descuento en los 
derechos actuales a la llegada de todo el aziicar que venga a los Estados Unidos en 
buques americanos, con tal que dicha clausula no afecte a las obligaciones de nuestros 
tratados con otros paises. 

Segun investigacion por el Departamento de Estado, resulta que dicha clausula afecta 
en gran manera a dichos tratados, y que si se Ueva a cabo reducira verdaderamente los 
derechos de casi todos los aziicares (asi como de otras mercancias) en un 5 por ciento. 
De aqui el que su inmediata operacion quede suspendida mientras se espera a qua el 
Gobierno obvie esta dificultad, ya sea abrogando dicha clausula o por medio de un 
arreglo en los tratados de manera que solamente los buques americanos se beneficien 
por dicha clausula. El presidente del Comite de Medios y Arbitrios de la Camara de 
Representantes alega que el Presidente de los Estados Unidos puede hacer que dicha 
clausula no tenga efecto durante este incierto intervalo de investigacion y arreglo. 
Sin embargo, los importadores son de opinion de que la clausula esta hoy en vigor aunque 
no esta reconocida, y estan pagando los derechos impuestos sin la rebaja del 5 por ciento 
bajo protesta especial, lo cual les facilitara el recobrar el 5 por ciento mas tarde. Han 
llegado ya varios cargamentos de azucar de Cuba que tienen derecho a esa rebaja si 
los importadores tienen razon en su demanda. Si el resultado final fuese la abrogacion 
de esa clausula, entonces los indicios son de que los azucares que lleguen en buques 
americanos o en buques de paises con los cuales existen tratados y durante el periodo 
desde que se haya firmado la nueva tarifa hasta que se abrogue la clausula tienen 
derecho al descuento de 5 por ciento en las importaciones. 

Los paises importantes productores de azucar con los cuales,' hay tratados y que se 
dice tienen derecho al descuento son Austria, Argentina, Belgica, Dinamarca, Italia, 
Japon, Paises Bajos (Java), Prusia, Espafia, Suecia y Noruega, asi como la Gran 
Bretana. 

Los siguientes paises no tienen tratados de "nacion f avorecida" con este pais : Brasil, 
Santo Domingo, Francia, el Imperio Aleman, Mexico, el Peru y Rusia. 

El curso de los mercados europeos ha sido lo contrario del nuestro. 

El azucar de remolacha en nuestra ultima reseria se cotizaba a 9s. 6d. (4.05c. en 
Nueva York) y subio a 9s. 7 l/2d. para el mes de septiembre. Para el mes de octubre 
el 15 de septiembre era 9s. 2 l/4d. y subio a 9s. 4 1/2'd., a 9s. 3 3/4d., a 9s. 5 l/4d., a 
9s. 9 3/4d. en la fecha actual. 

Los informes respecto a las cosechas han sido favorables y segun la opinion general 
no han sido tales que merecieran el alza ocasionada, debida en gran parte indudable- 
mente a la opinion de personas no ligadas directamente con el comercio de azucar, 
y que evidentemente han formado una de esas camarillas monopolistas que con tanta 
frecuencia influyen en los precios en las bolsas de azucar de Europa. Se dice que 
hicieron grandes compras de azucar para entregas en mayo y agosto. 

Se discuten mucho las probabilidades de conseguir mercado en los Estados Unidos 
para el azucar blanca sin refinar. Dudamos que los plantadores de Cuba cambien su 
manufactura para llenar la demanda de los consumidores de azucar, que no creemos 
llegaral nunca a ser de importancia contra el uso general del azucar refinado en este 
pais. 

La cosecha de azucar refinada de remolacha del pais esta ahora en el mercado y 
todos los precios del azucar refinada han bajado rapidamente del alto precio de 4.80c. 
la libra menos 3 por ciento, de que dimos cuenta en nuestra ultima reseria a las pre- 
sentes cotizaciones de 4.25c. menos 2 por ciento por el azucar granulada de cana, y 4.15c. 
menos 2 por ciento por el azucar de remolacha granulada del pais en la parte Oriental, 
yy 4.05. menos 2 por ciento en el leste, bajo la base de Nueva York. 

A un precio menor de 4.00c. por libra al contado y neto deduciendo el flete, el valor 
en las fabricas deja una ganancia mucho menor de la acostumbrada. 

El futuro inmediato del mercado tiene tendencia a una pequena baja tanto en el 
azucar crudo como en el refinado, hasta que se Uegue a un punto mas estable de lo 
que hay ahora. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



CABLE ADDRESS: Turhuik 



NEW YORK 
64-66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

BANKERS 

Deporits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance 
of Dividends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale 
of Letters of Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons, etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments 
fcy Cable and Letters of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, 
Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

HAVANA— N. Gelats y Ca. LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 

PUERTO RICO— Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico PARIS— Heine et Cii. 



SUGAR TESTING APPARATUS 



FUNDADA EN 1851 




FOLARISCOPIO SOBRE "BOCKSTATIV" LA FORMA MAS MODERNA 
Con caja a prueba de polvo, parte de prisma, y engranaje prolong*do. 



llace una especiali- 

dad de surtir 
Todos los Instru- 
mentos para la 
Prueba de Azucar 
y Habilitacidn de 
Laboratorio. 
Unicos Agentes en 
los Estados Unidos 
y Canada para los 

STANDARD 

POLARISCOPIOS 

Su triple 6 doble 
campo de vision ha 
sido adoptado per 
el Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos co- 
mo norma. 

Toda la maquina- 
ria experimental y 
los aparatos descri- 
tos en ((Agricultural 
Analysis,)) del Prof. 
H. W. Wiley. Se 
suministran con 
fustos todos los in- 
lormes pedidos. 

Pidanse Listat de 



EIMER & AMEND, 205-211 Third Avenue, New York pr^J^rfiuslradas, 



A WELL KNOWN ENGINEER DIES 

Jennings S. Cox, Jr., died in Xew York 
City Sunday, August 31st, at the age of 
47 years, of a complication of troubles due 
directly to heart disease. He was a widely 
known mining and metallurgical engineer, 
and for the last 18 years had been general 
manager of the Spanish- American Iron 
Company mines and other mining proper- 
ties of the Pennsylvania Steel Company in 
Cuba. He graduated from the School of 
Mines of Columbia University in 1887, re- 
ceiving the degree of metallurgical en- 
gineer. His first work was on the Harlem 
River Ship Canal, after which he was con- 
nected with the Carnegie Steel Company 
at Homestead, Pa., for a short time. He 
then took charge of John D. Rockefeller's 
Monte Cristo mine in Washington and 
from there went to Ironwood, .Mich., 
where he came in contact with Charles F. 
Rand and thus became connected witli the 
Spanish-.American Iron Company of which 
Mr. Rand is president. He was largely 



identified with the extensive developments 
of the mining districts on the north shore 
of Cuba, being very active in the explora- 
tions of the Mayari ore deposits. He was 
also one of the owners of the Ponupo 
Manganese Company. Mr. Cox's home 
was in Santiago, Cuba. 



DEATH OF RAMON O. WILLIAMS 

Ramon O. Williams, ex-United States 
consul to Havana, died October 2nd at his 
home in Brooklyn aged 86 years. He was 
a friend of General Grant, and during 
Grant's administration he was appointed 
consul, remaining in that position con- 
tinuously until President Cleveland's sec- 
ond term, when he retired from active life. 
Mr. Williams was a member of the Royal 
Geographical Society of London, and Trin- 
ity Historical Society of Dallas, Texas. 
His wife, who was Miss .Angela Garcia, his 
daughter Mrs. W. J. Disbrow, and three 
sons, Ramon V., George A., and Rol;crt 
A., survive him. 



38 THECUBAREVIEW 



REPORT OF A SUGAR PLANTATION 

A RECORD CROP LOWER COSTS OF PRODUCTION ATTAINED 

WEATHER FAVORS GROWING CANE 

The annual report of the Santa Cecilia Sugar Company, Oriente Province, issued 
October 2nd, shows that the gross revenue for the year was $531,251.53. Operating- 
charges of all kinds, including repairs and depreciation, aggregated $449,512.54, leaving 
net earnings of $81,738.99. Interest on funded and other debt amounted to $67,265.02, 
leaving a net balance carried to surplus of $14,473.97. Some production statistics follow : 

1913 1912 1911 1910 

Cane ground, Spanish tons of 2,500 lbs. . . 94,492 80,975 50,263 71,718 

Sugar output, bags of 325. lbs 77,841 62,383 43,190 63,732 

Percentage of sugar to cane 10.73 10.03 11.17 11.52 

Average New York polarization, degrees 95.66 95.28 95.35 95.34 

Average price realized, c. & f.. New York $2.07 $2.91 $2.41 $2.81 

Molasses output, gallons 498,733 446,984 310,462 361,597 

Gross revenue $531,251.53 $639,315.11 $407,134.10 $583,326.97 

Op'erating expenses and other charges.. 386,973.51 406,271.99 283,234.88 358,658.99 

Repairs, replacements and depreciation. 62,539.03 91,979.78 77,364.10 101,913.86 

Interest on funded and all other debt.. 67,265.02 67,393.57 106,192.96 106,007.76 

Additions and betterments 38,867.81 29,913.17 60,264.04 128,737.40 

Unusually late and heavy rains delayed the ripening of the cane so that, while the field 
production was heavier, the juice was as poor as the year before, the increased percentage 
in the yield of sugar as shown in the table above being due entirely to better work in the 
factory. The sugar market was bad throughout the season, the prices realized being 
the lowest in the history of the company. On the other hand, the crop was a record one, 
the amount of cane ground and sugar made being larger and the cost of production 
lower than ever before. 

The property has been well maintained and the efficiency of the factory further im- 
proved. Repairs and replacements, while less in amount than in preceding years, were 
ample and complete. Capital expenditures of $38,867.81 were principally for betterment 
of factory and additional railroad and other equipment. 

The rainfall and weather generally have thus far been favorable to the growing crop. 
The proposed reduction in tariff on sugar is expected to have a beneficial effect upon the 
Cuban industr}?-, although it may not be visible in the results of the current year. 

The balance sheet on June 30th is herewith given : 

ASSETS 

Real estate and improvements: 10, 650 acres (at purchase price and attending 
expenses, including $1,500,000.00 common stock issued at par as part of 
purchase price) improved with 3,457 acres of cane, with roads, bridges, 
fireguards and ditches ; and 1, 395 acres of made pastures, with fences, 

corrals and water supply $2,450,859.95 

Field equipment : Carts, harness and implements 10,370.33 

Manufacturing plant: Factory buildings, machinery and yards; and electric 
plant: water tower and dam.; machine and shop equipment; laboratory 

and fire apparatus, etc 514,869.28 

Managers' and employees' residences ; laborers' quarters, office, stores, ware- 
house, stables, etc 101,779.00 

Railroad and equipment ; 16.9 kilometers narrow-gauge track and sidings 

(mostly 40-lb. rail) with rolling stock 80,095.63 

Oxen, mules, horses, etc 29,513.00 

Administration office and residences 8,949.28 

Store and warehojuse stocks, material and cultivation accounts 48,712.96 

Accounts receivable 27,013.92 

Cash : in banks and on hand 91,947.21 



Capital stock : liabilities $3,364,110.56 

Common authorized and issued $1,500,000.00 

Preferred authorized $1,000,000.00 

Preferred, in treasury $6,200.00 

Preferred, unissued 278,700.00 284,900.00 715,100.00 



THECUBAREVIEW 3<) 

20-year first mortgage coupon G's bonds, interest payable 

February and August, authorized $1,500,000.00 

In treasury 753,000.00 747,000.00 

Refunding notes: 5-year coupon G's interest payable February and August. 20,880.00 

Bills payable 261,163.99 

Accounts payable 49,502.30 

Accrued interest on funded and other debt 23,693.34- 

Surplus 46,770.93 

$3,364,110.56 
The officers are : AI. H. Lewis, president ; C. H. Buswell, vice-president ; Robert 
L. Dean, secretary and treasurer. 



TRAMPAS LYTTON 

Importante para losduenosdelngeniosdeAzucar 

Para obtener todo el efecto del vapor que generen 
las calderas de la finca, especialmente en los 

TACHOS AL VACio 

estos deben estar perfectamente desaguados del agua 
de condensacion. El 

TRAMPAS "LYTTON" 

presta el mas satisfactorio servicio en ese respecto. 
Escritorio para la venta: 
OnCINA PRINCIPAL PARA LA VENTA: 1159 HUDSON TERMINAL. NEW YORK 
Fabricado por la LYTTON MANUFACTURING CORPORATION, FRANKLIN. VIRGINIA. E. U. A. 




HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

Eng^ines, Boilers andMacHinery 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brasi 
Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

^A,?.V.'Bo<?uc!*Stt»t. MOBILE, ALrA* 



ESTABLISHED 1852 



INQUIRIES REQUESTED 



ROHLIG & CO. 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
BREMEN BREMERHAVEN HAMBURG 

Knochenhauebstk 16/17 am Hafen 113 Alstekdamu 14/lS 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PORVIDED ON APPLICATION 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton 
Night Call, 411 Hamilton 



Cable Address: 
•Abiworks," New York 



Atlantic "Basin Iron Works 

Engineers and Boiler Makers 

Machinists, Plumbers, Tinsmiths, Pine Fitters, Blacksmiths, Coppersmiths, Pattern 
Makers, Sheet Iron Workers, Iron ann Brass Castings. Steamship Repairs a Specialty. 



Corner Itnlay and Summit Streets 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I'leaie mtntion THE CVliA HLVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA 



r 

t 



The United Railways of Havana 

in conjunction with the Cuba Railroad, maintain a service of 
two trains daily between Havana and the growing Eastern 
city of CAMAGUEY, and one Express Train daily between 
Havana and SANTIAGO DE CUBA, the "Dream City of the 
West Indies." Buffet lunch is served on these trains. 

FOUR TRAINS DAILY 

in. both directions between Harana and MATANZAS, which latter city becauie of its picturesque 
situation and the charm of its principal attractions (Yumuri's famous valley and the wonderful 
caves of Bellamar) has long enjoyed distinction as the great "Mecca" of the tourists, and it 
continues to gain in popularity. EXCELLENT TRAIN SERVICE is maintained to many other 

f laces of great interest to tourists, all of which are fully described in "Cuba — A Winter 
'aradise," ■ profusely illustrated 80-page booklet with six complete maps and 72 views illustrative 
•f this wonderful island, sent postpaid on receipt of 3 cents in stamps. 

Frank Roberts, General Passenger Agent 
United Railways of Havana -- 118, Prado, Havana, Cuba 



V 

» 









FRED WOLFE i^i calzada de vives, Havana 

Cable, "Wolfe" 

Negociante en Todas Clases Dealer in all Classes of 
de Ganado Live Stock 

Eapecialmente en Mulos Especially in Mules 

Almayt on hand Large Stock of All Classes of Mules— All Mules Sold Are 
Cumranteed as Represented— Can Furnish Any Number Desired on Short Notice 



n 



P. RUIZ ® BROS. 

engravers 

fine stationery 

Obispo 22 P. O. Box 608 

HAVANA, CUBA 



KENTUCKY JACK AND 
PERCHERON FARMS 

We are the largest breeders 
of Mammoth jacks and Per- 
cheron horses in America. 
We have some splendid sad- 
dle horses for sugar planters. 
Thoroughbred cattle, sheep 
and hogs. We can please 
you in pure bred live stock. 
IVrite for prices or catalog. 

COOK & BROWN, Proprietors 
Fayette Co., Lexington, Ky., U. S. A. 




JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

Sugar Brokers 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address. "Tide, New Yerk" 



THEODORE E. FERRIS 

Formerly Cary Smith & Ferris 

naval architect and engineer 

Hudson Terminal Bldg., 30 Church Street 
'phone: 2786 cortlandt New York City 

Plans, Specifications and Superintendence; 
Steamships, Steamboats, Lighters, Tugboats, 
Barges, Yachts — steam and sail and Motor- 
boats of all classes 



A Dixon 
Pencil for 
Every Use 



Dixon's American Graphite Lead Pencils 
are made in all colors, sizes, shapes and de- 
grees of hardness. They are the pencils 
for the people of Cuba and for all lines 
of business. Ask 

HARVEY & HARVEY S^i'^A^N^?"^ ^°uB^i 



D 
I 

X 
O 

N 



I'lrasf mentton THE CUBA REVIEW when ii-riling to Aitverdarrt 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



HAVANA 



CUBA 

National Bank of Cuba 

Government Depositary 



CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$6,250,000.00 



Head Office — Havana 

27 BRANCHES IN CUBA 

New York Agency 
1 WALL STREET 



COLLECTIONS 



THE 

TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL an« 
SURPLUS 



$650,000 



TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 



EXAMINES TITLES 
NEflOTIATES LOANS 



COLLECTS RENTS 
ON MORTSAStS 



CarrespoBdencc Selicited from 
Intending InTCttort 



OFFICERS 

Normmn H. Davii President 

Oswald A. Hornsby - - - - Vice-President 
Claudio G. Mendoz* - - - Vice-President 

J. M. Hopgood Treasurer 

Kogelio C«rbajal SecreUry 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

INCORPORATED 1869 

Fiscal Agent of the Government of the Republic^ of 
Cuba for the Payment of the Army of Liberation 

Paid-up Capital, 

and Reserve. .. .$25,000,000.00 

Total Assets $180,000,000.00 

Head Office MONTREAL 

New York Agency 
Corner William and Cedar Streets 

Branches in Havana: Obrapia 33, Galiano 92, 
Monte 118, Muralla 52, Luyano 3 (Jesus del 
Monte) ; Antilla, Bayamo, Caibarien, Camaguey, 
Cardenas, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, Manzanillo, 
Matanzas, Nuevitas, Pinar del Rio, Puerto Padre, 
Sagua la Grande, Sancti Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba. 



ESTABLISHBD 1144 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKINI BUSINKBS 
Csrrsipsadsnts at All Prlaslpal PlaMS •! lb* lilaad 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of th* Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigar* 



FACTORY: 
PaiM *• Tas«a llt-IU 



OPFISE: 
AHiarmra l-S 



ESTABLIIKB* lt76 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general bankbg business 
CorretpondenU at all the principal 
places •f the world 

Safe Deposit Vault* 
Office: Aguiar 108 



NEW STATION PROJECTED 

Next month will sec the la-binning of 
coiistruction work on a new railroad sta- 
tion at I'.atahano, Havana Province. The 
new l.uihling will I)c first class in every 
particular and the materials to be used are 
iron, mamposteria and hard native wood. 



Pleatt mentton THE CUBA REVIEW when wrtttn§ to Advtrtistrs 



a 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"P A S S L" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, COR. STONE 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos De Bea Sl Co. 

BANKERS AND COMMItBION MERCHANTS 
ImpartMlin dirteta d« todii lei 
••ntr«i manufaoturtrci d«l mund* 

Afcnta for the Munion Steamsliip Line, 
New York and Mobile; Jamea E. Ward ft 
Co., New York; Serra Steamship Company, 
Lirerpool; Vaporea Transatlinticoa de A. 
Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espafia Indepen- 
dencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL. WOOD. LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

or IVIRY DIBCKIPTIOIf 

112 Wall Street. New York 

Near South Street 

Yard; 68-58 Btard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 



STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 

FlEKI, BkiDSXS. RaILKOADI AMD BuiLDINM 



We are prepared to furniah plana and eatimatci 
on all claasea of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 
WooLwoRTH Building, 233 Broadway 
Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Muiiro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cablk Addxxii: Kun«icalk, New Yokk 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 116 
Maritime Exchansc 



YULE&MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL [s ek c ] 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

ESPECIALIDAD EN ROPA HeCHA DE TrABAJO 

Am in a position to push the sales of American 

high class products. Would represent a first 

class firm. 

Apartado 103 Camagiiey, Cuba 



M. J. CABANA 



COMMISSION 
MERCHANT 
P. O. Box 3, Cauaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a com- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in 
eastern Cuba. 

F. W. HvosLEF E. C. Day R. M. Michelsex 

Bennett, Hvoslef Sc Co. 
Steamship Agents and Ship Brokers 
18 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

Cable: "Benuoseo" 

BOARDS OF TRADE IN CUBA 

These are situated in Camaguey, Carde- 
nas, Cienfuegos, Guantanamo, Havana, 
Manzanillo, Matanzas, Sagua la Grande, 
Santa Clara and Santiago de Cuba. 



Pleaat mention THB CUBA RBVIBW when writing to Advertiaen 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



■■t.^.»-^.t~ 






MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



SAILINGS 



NEW YORK— CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 

SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS NORTHBOUND SAILINGS 

(From New York) (From Suevitas) 

S.S. CuRiTYBA - - Nov. 5th S.S. Olinda - - Nov. 7th 

S.S. Olinda - - Now 19th S.S. Curityba - - Nov. 21st 

Nuevitas, Antilla, Nipe Bay, Puerto Padre and Gibara 
FREIGHT ONLY 

S.S. Paloma, - - Now 12th S.S. Luristan - - Nov. 26th 

Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua and Caibarien 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Regular sailings Mobile to Havana, Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua, Caibarien, 
Santiago, Guantanamo, Cienfuegos and Manzanillo 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Mobile, Nov. 1 I th for Montevideo and Buenos Ayres, Nov. 25th 
for Buenos Ayres and Rosario 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Sailings from Baltimore. Nov. 6lh, Nov. 20th 



Pleaie mention THE CI'IIA Ui:VU:\\ irlu-it mriling to Advrrlhrrs 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE, Pres. 



LEWIS C. LILLIE, Sec. and Treas. 



THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 



BROAD AND 
NARROW GAUGE 



LOCOMOTIVES 



SINGLE EXPANSION 
AND COMPOUND 




"o*traTk'' plantation locomotives oVtio 



EET ALL CON- 
ONS OF SERVICE 



Specifications Furnished on Application 
Representative for the West Indies: 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Address: "BALDWIN, PHILADELPHIA" 



Pletu* mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 






The 



CVBA 




W/ 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



LINK BELT CRANES 

Equipped with Grab Bucket, Electric Lifting Magnet or Hook Block 
The most efficient cranes on the market to-day 

Distinctive Features 

Steel Gears Throughout 

Bronze Bushings Throughout 

One Point Adjustment on 
Clutches 

Few Parts — Every One 
Accessable 

Large Roomy Platform for 
Operator — Everything 
Handy 

Catalog on Request 

Correspondence solicited. We invite a thorough investigation 

LINK-BELT COMPANY SlV?S^J^^iV^.' 




WEIR FROG COMPANY 

Fabricantes de Ranas, Cambiavas y Estantes, Cruzamientos, 
Via Portatil y Toda Clase de Obra Especial 
:-: :-: para Ferrocarriles :-: :-: 



~% 




WM 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 

Cerente del Departamento de Exportacion 

71 BEAVER STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



Direccion Telegraflca: JAMOTLEY, NEW YORK 
(SE USAN TODAS LAS CLAVES) 



Lista Parcial de los Productos de mis Talleres: 



I^ieles y Aseguradores 
Ranas, Cambiavias y 

Estantes 
Locomotoras 
Calderas 

Tubos para Calderas 
Caches para Pasajeros 
Ladrillos Refractarios 
Tanques de Madera y 

de Hierro 
Puentes de Acero 



Torres de Acero y de 

Madera 
Edificios de Acero 
Hierro Acanalado 




Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




PATENTE PELAEZ 

Esta maza puede colocarse facilmente en cualquier trapiche, sea de dos 6 tres mazas. Machuca bien 
U cana desmenuzandola y extrayendole al mismo tiempo las dos terceras partes de su guarapo, dejando 
la cana bien preparada para el segundo trapiche. Ejecuta todo el trabajo de una desmenuzadora de 
primera clase y sin mas gasto que cuando se opera con una maza lisa. Esta maza es de acero y se ha 
«acado privilegio para ella en todas las partes del tnundo donde se cultiva la cana de azucar. Puei 
envienos un dibujo de la maza superior que usan U is asi que de su eje, y les cotizaremos precios bajoi 
por una maza completa para desmenuzar la cana de este trapiche. 

NEWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 149 Broadway, New York, E. U. A. 

riF.RRE DROESHOUT, Agt., Apartade 861, Havana, Cuba. 



GARROS 



PARA TODOS usos y de todos tamaiios, de los para cafia con cuatro ruedas y capa- 
cidad de 1 ^ toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toneladas 
Haccmos una cspccialiJad dc juegos dc licrrajcs, incluycndo los juegos 
de ruedas, completamentc armados, con todas las piecas de metal, y pianos 
completos para construir los carros a su dcstino dc maderas del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Churcli St., New York, N. Y. 



CAni.E Address: 

R A MALI AM 




ALL 

ABOUT 



COHYRIGHT 1913 



IT COVERS THE ISLAND'S 

INIMJSTRIBS AND ACTIVITIES 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR POSTPAID 



PUate mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertlsert 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Los Instrumentos Agricolas y Maquinas 

de FARQUHAR 

han merecido distincion en la Isla de Cuba por su buena cualidad durante muchisimos 
anos, porque estan hechos por mecanicos expertos, y estan hechos de un material 
cuidadosamente escojido en una fabrica moderna, donde las condiciones y las necesida- 
des de Cuba han recibido su atencion especial, y por esta razon estdn atendidas 
cuidadosamente. 



CaiAlogos d solicitud 

Direcci6n cablegr&flca: 
"Fenankle," New York 




Correspondencia en todos 
los idiomas modernos 



Fabricamos Maquinas de Vapor y Calderas, Maquinas de Gasolina, Mdquinas de Trac- 
cion de Vapor y de Gasolina, Trilladoras, Aserraderos, Malacates, Arados, Rastras, 
Cultivadoras, Desgranadoras de Maiz, Molinos para Maiz, Sembradoras de Granos, Sem- 
bradoras de Maiz y de Algodon, Excavadoras de Patatas, Carretillas para Almacen, 
etc. Tambien hacemos Prensas hidrdulicas para Sidra, Vino, y Chapear. 

A. B. FARQUHAR & CO., Cotton Exchange Bldg., New York 




Prensas de 

Filtrar 

para Ingenios 

SHRIVER 

FILTER PRESSES 

Write us for 
Catalog, Prices 
and Information 

T. Shriver & CO. 

814 Hamilton St. 
Harrison, N. J. 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



2630 Whitehall Building 
New. York 




STEEL TANKS 



BUILT BY 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 



AGENTS IN CUBA: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 
26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, WARREN, Pa., U.S.A. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THL CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Editors and Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 
$1.00 Per Year -------- .---lo Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 



Vol. XI 



NOVEMBER, 1913 



No. 12 



Contents of This Number 

The Cover Page shows tlie iiicturesqiie section between Havana ami Matanzas near 
Jaruco. (Courtesy of the United Railway.) 

Agricultural Matters 26, 27 

Baseball in Cuba - • 

Chess Tournament in Havana -'1 

Commercial Matters: 

Cuba's Trade in 1913 IS 

Contractors Investigated 1 1^ 

Cuba's Cotton Goods Imports 1 'J 

Havana Customs Receipts 1^ 

Matanzas Custom Receipts 1^ 

Uruguay's Exports to Cuba 19 

Financial News: 

Cuban Telephone Company Earnings 15 

Cuban Securities Prices 23 

Fruit Company Dividend 23 

Republic of Cuba's 5's 1-t 

Santiago Electric Light Company Earnings 2i 

Government Matters: 

President's Message 7 

Present Political Divisions 7 

Political Harmony Restored :. 7 

Ports Company Matters S 

Treaty Amendment Wanted S 

Government Activities: 

Panama Laborers for Cuba 9 

Patent Medicine Regulations H' 

Reduced Duties on Steel IIouoco 9 

Regulating Fertilizers '' 

General Comment on Cuban Matters 1 1 

Lumber Imports of Cuba 1'^ 

Meat Prices 20 

Motor Cars and Auto Trucks in Demand 21 

New Enterprises for Cuba: 

Electric Plants Established :. 12 

New Automobile Lines 12 

New Line to India 13 

Plant for Manufacturing Rope 1 ' 

Real Estate Company 1 3 

X'ineyard in Santiago ' 3 

Power Plant for Havana 21 

Railroad News: 

Cuban Central Extensions I -t 

Cuban Central Northern Extension Railway 1 ^ 

Cuba Railroad's Progress 17 

Earnings of the Cuba Railroad !■< 

Earnings of the United Railways 1-1 

Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 1;} 

Havana's Elevated Railroad 17 

Railroad Tariff Revision ....r. 1 '> 

United Railway's Report 1 ^> 

WeKtcrn Railway's Report 1 7 

Sugar Industry 2.S 

Sugar ('rop 29 

Sugar Review— Willctt & Gray 33 to 37 

Santiago Water Supply 22 

Tobacco Industry Matter* : ;...24, 25 



THL 
CUBA RLVILW 



•ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1913, by the Munson Steamship Line 



^^OLUME XI 



NOVEMBER, 1913 



Number 12 



GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



PRESIDENTS MESSAGE 
COMPANY MATTERS - 



■ PRESENT POLITICAL DIVISIONS PORTS 

NEW PATENT MEDICINE REGULATIONS 



LIBRARY 
N> W YORK 
"• ' ANICAl. 



One of the most extensive 
The documents ever addressed 

President's to a Cuban Congress was 
Message President Menocal's annual 
message on November 4th. 
It gave a complete and detailed report of 
the work and needs of every department, 
and a summary of th€ acts of the admin- 
istration. 

Regarding the foreign claims which were 
left in abeyance during the summer, the 
President states that they are now being 
discussed through diplomatic channels with 
the possibility of a favorable settlement. 

The State Department is at present 
working' on the question of establishing a 
parcel post treaty with each of the gov- 
ernments of Costa Rica, England, Belgium 
and Venezuela; commercial treaties are 
being discussed with the Netherlands and 
Chili. 

Consular incomes were $218,.js;!.r)0, an 
increase of $24,1.'!.").22 over those of tlic 
year previous. 

He urges a reform of the judiciary sys- 
tem anfl calls attention to the fact that lay 
members are appointed to posts as muni- 
cipal judges with great detriment to the 
cause of justice evidenced by the many 
complaints received. Me suggests that 
salaries be provided for these offices and 
lawyers appointed to fill them. 

>Ioney for increasing the postal service 
and the repair of the government telegraph 
lines is urgently demanded. The telegraph 
lines have not been repaired during the past 
five years. 

He recommends the increase of the rural 
guard with larger |)Osts in almost every 
Ijrotection to the country dweller. 

The tariffs are assailed as being obsolete 
town and district in the island to ensure 



and not in accord with the necessities of 
present conditions. He also wants some- 
thing done to reduce the cost of living. 

A trade balance of $32,870,443 is shown 
to l)e in favor of Cuba after a comparison 
of the imports and exports of the country 
for the last fiscal year. 



Haniioiiy 
Secured 



In October and early No- 
vember the Cuban Congress, 
incited by Lil)eral leaders, 
refused to convene in extra 
session to consider President -Menocal's 
message urging a new foreign loan of $15,- 
000,000. In this crisis the head of the re- 
public issued an appeal to the Cuban people, 
wherein he intimated the possil)ility of be- 
ing driven to employ extraordinary meas- 
ures if Congress continued causing the 
grave confusion in public affairs. The ap- 
peal had its effect, for on .November 0th 
the Liberal Senators, in a private caucus, 
decided to attend all the sessions and to 
permit the majority to decide all national 
questions. 

The House Liberals having made the 
same agreement, tlie government will obtain 
authority to negotiate its ])roposc(I loan. 



The ])olitical parties in 
I 'resent Cuba are now divided into 
Political four quasi organizations — 
Divisions the remnants of tlie Con- 
servatives, under the leader- 
ship of Vice-President Dr. l^nrique Jose 
Varona, the party of the President ; the 
.Asbertistas, led by Provincial (Governor 
.Alberto Asliert, now in jail awaiting trial 
for the killing of (k-neral Armando de J. 
Riva. late chief of the national jiolice ; the 
Zayistas, under Dr. .Alfredo Zayas, ex-Vice- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



President of Cuba; the Miguelistas, the 
supporters of ex-President Jose Miguel 
Gomez, who is now touring Europe. The 
last three are segments of the Liberal 
Party, which went down in defeat last fall, 
supporting the candidacy of Dr. Zayas 
against General Menocal. A segment of 
the party broke away from the Liberals, 
and led by Governor Asbert formed with 
the Conservatives the patriotic conjunction 
that elected Menocal. 



Ports 
Company 
Accused 



The commission which 
President Menocal appoint- 
ed to investigate the crim- 
inal responsibility of the 
Cuban Ports Company 
made a partial report to the President on 
November 11th, setting forth that the 
company and various officials of the 
Gomez regime had been guilty of several 
crimes, including "the falsification of an 
official document, the falsification of a 
public document, and the usurpation of 
authority." 

It is probable that a special Magistrate 
will be appointed soon to study the evi- 
dence that the commission collected, and if 
indictments are recommended, the matter 
will be referred to a higher court. 

The tonnage fees paid to the Ports Com- 
pany for the eighteen months prior to the 
annulment action of the concession by 
President Menocal is stated by the Treas- 
ury Department to be as follows : 

According to the statement there were 
imported from the United States during 
the year 1912-13, 1,044,566,141 kilos of 
merchandise which netted the company 
$731,425 ; . other merchandise from the 
United States and other countries amounted 
to 571,777,642 kilos or $502,542 in fees. 

During the same period there were also 
imported 1,350,306,859 kilos of coal which 
paid tonnage fees to the Port Company of 
$135,030. The total for the year was 2,966,- 
650,642 kilos and a total tonnage fees of 
$1,368,997. 

During the six months (January 1st to 
June 30, 1913) there were imported 1,611,- 
955,736 kilos of merchandise, the Port 
Company having received for its share or 
tonnage fees the sum of $714,996. 

The custom houses through which this 
merchandise was imported were Banes, 
Baracoa,, Batabano, Habana, Los Indies, 
Jaruco, Manzanillo, Puerto Padre, Sagua, 
Santiago de Cuba, Trinidad, Tunas de 
Zaza. 

Three post offices have been recently 
established. One at Sumidero, Pinar del 
Rio Province, another at Central America 
in Oriente Province and one at Maban, 
Santa Clara Province. New telegraph offices 
are also being established. 



Treaty 

Amendment 

Desired 



Col. Cosmo de la Torriente, 
Cuban Secretary of State, 
and Dr. Pablo Desvernine, 
Minister to the United 
States, are in Washington 
on a special mission to obtain the consent of 
the United States to such alterations of the 
reciprocity treaty between the countries as 
will enable Cuba to make up the financial 
deficit created by the free listing of sugar 
ty the Underwood tariff. President Meno- 
cal desires the United States to agree to a 
change of the agreement on tobacco that 
will give Cuba greater benefit. 



Cuba's income from all 

Cuba's sources except the National 

Income Lottery, for the first three 

months of the fiscal year 

1913-14 total as follows : 

July $2,631,374 

August 2,740,050 

September 3,071,351 

Total $8,442,775 



Under a new government 

Restricting ruling all Chinese merchants 

Chinese or students attempting to 

get into Cuba will be re- 
quired to put up a personal guarantee or 
one from reputable persons and a bond of 
$500 that they are as they represent them- 
selves to be, something that has not been 
required heretofore. The intended appli- 
cant for admission must also bring his pa- 
JDers properly authenticated by the Cuban 
consuls in China and a photograph of him- 
self. 



Regulation 
for 

Explosives 



New government rulings 
provide that merchants may 
have private magazines for 
the storage of powder, lo- 
cated at isolated places no 
nearer than 400 meters to any house, where 
they may store up to 100 pounds of powder, 
without license or permit to remove same. 
These magazines, however, shall not be al- 
lowed to be used for the storage of dyna- 
mite or other high explosives which must 
be kept at the government places. 

The order will also provide that mer- 
chants may import chlorate of potash with- 
out permit as long as it is not kept or im- 
ported with other substances such as oil, etc. 



The work for the construction of the 
Caibarien-Remedios aqueduct in Santa 
Clara Province, which is being constructed 
on the Bartolome River from where the 
supply of water will be taken, has com- 
menced. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES 



PANAMA LABORERS FOR CUBA 

President Menocal has directed the Cu- 
ban charge d'affaires at Panama to make 
every effort to bring the Spanish laborers, 
many thousands in number, who will be 
idle when the canal is tinished, to the island 
republic. 

The Spanish workman on the canal, says 
the Boston Herald, represents the finest 
type of laborer employed. He is active and 
industrious, and belies the general concep- 
tion of the Spaniard's lack of physique. 
These men come almost exclusively from 
the province of Galicia, and are known as 
"Gallegos." 

The action of President Alenocal is sig- 
nificant of an intelligent and wide-awake 
Cuban administration. 



INSTRUCTION MATTERS 

The secretary of sanitation has appointed 
two surgeon dentists for the dental inspec- 
tion of all the children in the schools. 



TO BUY SCHOOL DESKS 

The Cuban Department of Public In- 
struction will soon buy about 6,000 school 
desks for which bids are being prepared. 
The school desks have not been renovated 
since 1899, when the schools in Cuba were 
placed under government control. 

Congress will shortly be asked to con- 
struct public school houses throughout the 
island. 



CUBA S POPULATION 

Official figures from a census taken in 
June 1912, divides the inhabitants of the 
island into the following classes : 

"V\' hite Cubans 1,2.35,829 

Black Cubans 334,695 

Cuban mestizos (Half Breeds).. 274,272 
White foreigners 203,637 

Total 2,048,433 



CUBAN CONSUL AT CHICAGO 

Headfjuarters for the Cuban consulate in 
Chicago were recently opened. T. P-strada 
Paima, the new consul, succeeds Crescensia 
de Varona. 



The Puerto-Principe and Xuevitas Rail- 
road has been given a six months exten- 
sion of time to complete a wharf and 
warehouse in the inlet of Mayanabo, Nue- 
vitas liay. 



WIDER APPLICATION OF REDUCED 
RATES 

In accordance with the terms of a decree 
of the 27th of January, 1908, iron and steel 
houses, complete and knocked down, with 
or without parts of glass or crystal or other 
fireproof material, when imported for use 
in connection with the manufacture of 
sugar and brandy, are classed under para- 
graph {b) of Xo. 215 of the Cuban Cus- 
toms Tariff and are subject to import duty 
at the reduced rate of 10 per cent ad 
ralorern. 

The Cuban Gacefa Oficial for the 13th 
of August contained a Circular of the Min- 
istry of Finance providing that the reduced 
rate of duty quoted may be applied to such 
houses even when all the parts are not im- 
ported at the same time, on condition that 
the interested parties furnish beforehand 
a drawing of the buildings, showing the 
separate parts, and that they deposit, with 
each importation, a sum equal to the dif- 
ference between the reduced rates and 
those applicable under the tariff, this de- 
posit to be returned when the houses are 
completely erected. 

The special rates on sugar machinery 
granted to sugar plantations by No. 215 of 
the Cuban customs tariff were extended to 
sugar refineries on July 31, 1913. To ob- 
tain these special rates refiners of sugar 
are required to observe the same formal- 
ities as are exacted of planters. 



AS TO FERTILIZERS 

Merchants in Cuba engaged in the sale of 
raw materials for the manufacture of fer- 
tilizers must now show and post at their 
warehouses a certificate of the analysis 
made of their products sold by them under 
a penalty of a fine ranging from $25 to $50. 

It appears that there are many alleged 
fertilizers sold in Cuba which are consid- 
ered injurious to agriculture. 

President Menocal has signed the decree 
calling for this regulation. 

A new decree is being discussed to in- 
clude all the fertilizers and raw materials 
which are imported and sold throughout 
the republic. Order 214 of the first inter- 
vention and those of the decrees distended 
recently by President Menocal only ."efer 
to frrtilizers for tobacco. 



Sr. Jose Arcchabala has petitioned the 
government for permission to construct a 
wharf on the harbor front of Cardenas. 
Cardenas is a thriving city on the North 
Coast. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEW PATENT MEDICINE REGULATIONS 



THEIR RIGID CHARACTER FINE AND CONFISCATION FOR NON-OBSER- 
VANCE SIX MONTHS TIME GIVEN 



The Cuban Department of Health has re- 
cently promulgated comprehensive regula- 
tions governing sanitation and the prepara- 
tion and sale of pharmaceutical compounds. 
The rigid character of these . regulations, 
as contained in the decree of April 23, 1913, 
called forth a request from the National 
Pharmaceutical Association that more time 
be given for compliance with then new 
requirements. This protest resulted in the 
issuing of a supplementary decree, under 
date of August 22, 1913, modifying certain 
clauses in the original decree. Nonobserv- 
ance of the requirements is punishable by 
fine and confiscation of the product. An 
abstract of the regulations relating to pat- 
ent medicines is given below : 

Art. 40. The term "patent medicine" in- 
dicates any medicine offered for sale in a 
uniform container, with printed wrapper 
and label. 

Patent medicines and serum, vaccine, and 
similar preparations may be sold only in 
wholesale or retail drug stores and in the 
laboratories where prepared. 

Art. 43. When a patent medicine con- 
tains any of the following substances or 
their derivatives, the name and quantity of 
such substance must be shown on the label : 
Morphine, opium, cocaine, heroin, eucaine 
(alpha or beta), chloroform, cannabis in- 
dica, chloral hydrate, acetanihde, strych- 
nine, and such others as may be designated 
by the Bureau of Health (Direccion de 
Sanidad). 

Art. 44. Any false or misleading state- 
ment as to the composition of a patent 
medicine, or as to the kinds and amounts 
of substances contained therein, is abso- 
lutely prohibited. The Bureau of Health 
may, at any time, order the analysis of any 
patent medicine. 

Art. 45. The sale of patent medicines 
with anonymous label, or with false indi- 
cation as to manufacturer or factory of 
origin, is prohibited. 

Art. 46. Foreign patent medicines must 
be registered with the Bureau of Healthby 
agents or importers, and their circulation 
in the country shall be permitted only upon 
fulfillment of the following conditions: 
(a) The labels must name the constituents 
to which the patented article owes its medi- 
cinal properties; (b) tl labels must also 
state the name of the n a uf acturing_ drug- 
gist or company in the coiintry of origin. 

Art. 47. No patent medi'ine shall be put 
.on sale before its registration with the 
Bureau of Health. A certificate of regis- 



tration will be issued by the said bureau 
within three days from date of application. 
The advertisement or sale of a. medicine 
intended to prevent conception is prohibited. 
Art. 48. Branches or agencies of foreign 
laboratories established in Cuba which 
manufacture or put up patent medicines 
shall be in charge of a pharmacist, quali- 
fied according to article 1, of the law of 
February 29, 1912, and the products of such 
laboratories shall bear the name of the 
pharmaceutical director and the location of 
the plant. 

Art. 52. No serum, vaccine, toxine, or 
similar preparation, domestic or foreign, 
for human or veterinary use, shall be sold 
or distributed unless authorized by the 
Bureau of Health. 

The Bureau of Health may, at any time, 
order investigations and experimental tests, 
and any of the above preparations not con- 
forming to requirements shall be confis- 
cated. 

Art. 56. The products mentioned in 
article 52 shall be sold in their original 
packages, with a label showing the name of 
the laboratory and its management, date of 
preparation, serial number, and, except in 
the case of articles not affected by time or 
climate, period of efficacy. They must be 
accompanied by instructions for use, show- 
ing the standard strength, method of pres- 
ervation, and curative, preventive, or diag- 
nostic properties. 

Art. 58. The sale of foreign products, 
shall conform to the above requirements. 
Agents or representatives of foreign manu- 
facturers must apply for authority to sell 
their goods, and must present a legalized 
consular certificate showing that their 
manufacturing laboratories operate legally 
in the country of origin. 

Art. 60. The sale is prohibited of any 
serum, vaccine, toxine, or similar prepara- 
tion whose period of efficacy has expired. 

Art. 76. Execution is suspended for two 
years from the date of this decree [Aug. 22, 
1913] of the regulation contained in section 
(o) of article 46, and of that contained in 
article 52 relating to serum, vaccine, toxine, 
and similar preparations. 

A period of six months is allowed for 
reports to be made to the Bureau of Health 
on all patent medicines on sale and not 
registered previous to the date of this de- 
cree. 

Cuba is a large buyer of all kinds of 
patent medicines. '■ Imports in 1910 were 
$223,000 and in 1911, $251,000. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 



GENERAL COMMENT ON CUBAN AFFAIRS 



PROFITABLE INV'ESTMENTS TIME IS NOW 

(Loudon Chamber of Commerce Journal) 

The Hon. Correspondent in Havana of 
the London Chamber of Commerce, in dis- 
cussing the development of Cuba, calls at- 
tention to the great natural wealth of the 
island and the large number of lucrative 
businesses that can be successfully opened 
up there, and points out that the time has 
arrived to profitably invest in Cuba the 
surplus capital now lying idle in the banks 
of Europe. Cuba, on the opening of the 
Panama Canal, will undoubtedly occupy a 
very important position. The sugar crop 
just completed will, without exaggeration, 
exceed 2,100,000 tons. 

There are stored at the ports of ship- 
ment more than 700,000 tons, valued at 
i8,500,000, all this money being kept from 
circulation, the effect of which is very no- 
ticeable in all business transactions. The 
tobacco crop "collected" is not only im- 
portant but of a superior quality, and, if 
the Cuban government can arrange the 
treaties necessary to secure a reduction in 
duties from the countries to which it is 
shipped, it is sure that the production will 
increase, not only in quantity but also in 
quality. The companies established in Cuba 
are generally paying good dividends to 
their shareholders, and others are being 
established, or are only waiting for part of 
the capital to be subscribed in Europe, 
which will shortly play an important part 
in the commercial develoimient of the 
island. One is a companv to run motor-bus 
services in Havana, which services will, it 
is hoped, meet a long-felt want and are 
necessary to cope with the increased pas- 
senger traffic and the opening up of the 
suburbs of the city. There is a petition 
before Congress to open the ports of San- 
tiago and Cienfuegos, on the south coast 
of Cuba, as free ports, so that goods can 
be imported and deposited in these ports 
and re-exported to any part of the Amer- 
ican Continent. If this should come about 
it will increase very considerably the busi- 
ness that will be done on the opening of 
the Panama Canal. Engli.sh manufacturers 
would do well to carefully consider these 
important developments, and be prepared 
to take advantage of them and of the open- 
ings for business that already exist and will 
arise in the near future. 



foreign manufacturers continue to get con- 
siderable of the business, notwithstanding 
the preferential duties on machinery of 
American manufacture under the recip- 
rocal agreement with Cuba. 

One reason given by the United States 
Consul at Santiago is that the American 
banking facilities do not extend manufac- 
turers such favorable terms on loans nec- 
essary for them to compete by extending 
long credits to foreign buyers. 

Santiago last year shipped to the United 
States 1,429,753 tons of iron ore, valued at 
$3,872,078. 



A BRITISH OPINION OF CUBA S SUGAR 
FUTURE 

It would seem as if the sugar industry in 
Cuba has almost no limits of extension ex- 
cept as imposed by the size of the island, 
as a very large proportion of the soil is 
suitable for cane culture. But a very se- 
rious obstacle to progress is now begin- 
ning to make itself felt in the shortage of 
labor ; indeed this year it is probable that a 
large amount of cane will remain uncut for 
this reason. Once this obstacle is over- 
come — and it is the subject of very serious 
consideration on the part of the govern- 
ment, — there would seem to be an endless 
era of prosperity before the industry, in 
spite of the fact that Cuba already pro- 
duces more than one-fifth of the total cane 
sugar of the world. It is too early yet to 
estimate the probable effect of the proposed 
new American tariff on the Cuban sugar 
industry, and great difference of opinion 
exists among the Cuban growers them- 
selves. But the general opinion is, perhaps, 
rather to the effect that free sugar will be 
lienelicial. — Report of British Vice-Consul 
at Havana. 



AMERICAN AND FOREIGN MACHINERY 

While American manufacturers have sup- 
plied a large part of the machinery used in 
the construction of the sugar mills erected 
in Cuba, in the Santiago consular district, 



AN HONORABLE AND STRONG MAN 

".Mario Mcnocal has been deemed an 
lionorable and strong man. He is a grad- 
uate of Cornell University, and has the re- 
si)ect of those who know him in this coun- 
try. There arc unfortunately signs that 
his political following may not be sufficient 
to overcome the plotting of his political 
enemies. It may even be that he is too 
good a man to deal with an opposition 
none too scrupulous. It may not be easy 
to influence political events in Cuba solely 
through an apjjcal wliich rests upon the ad- 
vantage of the country, for the power of 
place and spoils has Iieen manifest there 
Ijack over the years in much demoraliza- 
tion." — Spriuf) field (Mass.) Republican. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NEW ENTERPRISES FOR CUBA 



NEW ELECTRIC PLANTS 

The President has authorized Don Fer- 
nando Parral, Don Carlos Miyares and 
Don Juho Jimenez to estabUsh electric 
plants in Agramonte and San Cristobal, 
with extension to Candelaria and Santa 
Cruz de los Finos and also in Maximo 
Gomez. 

Senor B. Ossorio has also been author- 
ized to establish a hydro-electric plant in 
Pinar del Rio. 

A new electric plant at Caibaiguan, Santa 
(;iara Province, has a "Diesel" motor of 
10 h. p. and a dynamo of a capacity of 
torty kilowats, sufficient for two thousand 
incandescent lamps of sixteen candle-power. 
There is also a tank for water with a 
capacity of eight thousand litres and a 
subterranean tank for petroleum with a 
capacity of fifteen thousand gallons. 

Messrs. Vicente Mora, Antonio Fernan- 
dez, Jose and Wilfredo Maso and Francisco 
Diego Madrago have been authorized to 
establish electric plants in Regla, Placetas 
and Manzanillo. The first named is in 
Havana Province, the second in Santa 
Clara Province and the third in Oriente. 

Juan R. Castellanos and Leopoldo Valdes 
Figueroa have been authoribed to establish 
a plant in Jaguey Grande, Matanzas Prov- 
ince. 

Angel Labrador has been authorized to 
materially enlarge his plant in Bolondron, 
same province. 

Messrs. Everado Ortiz and Francisco 
Ferrer have been authorized by the gov- 
ernment to establish electric plants at 
Guane, Pinar del Rio Province ; Jiguari. 
Province of Oriente, and at Madruga, 
Province of Havana. 



The President of the republic signed a 
decree on October 29th last permitting the 
free importation of all machinery, ap- 
paratus and accessories, also all the mate- 
rial required for the erection of a factory 
which will be built for the manufacture of 
bottles in Havana under the "Owens" 
patent, also for the manufacture of ice. 
The fact that this is the only enterprise of 
its kind in the island, determined the gov- 
ernment to assist it in every way. 



CANNING MACHINERY SHIPPED 

Carrying a full cargo of general mer- 
chandise, the schooner J. Edwin Kirwan, 
in command of Capt. S. B. Lennon, cleared 
at Baltimore for the Isle of Pines. To the 
knowledge of habitues around tlie custom- 
house this is the first cargo ever shipped 



to that destination. Much of the cargo is 
made up with canning machinery, which, 
it is said, is to be used in the construction 
of a factory for the canning of pineapples 
next season. 



TO MANUFACTURE ROPE 

A rope walk is projected for Cardenas, 
which it is expected will shortly be in 
operation. 

An organization has been effected for 
the new enterprise and the necessary cap- 
ital has already been subscribed for the 
preliminary expenses. The balance will be 
forthcoming as required. The total amount 
is $75,000, of which $50,000 will be used for 
buildings and machinery and $25,000 for 
the purchase of hemp. 

The industry is not the manufacture of 
bags, but of fibre, spinning-tackle and cord 
for sewing bags, and which is called "hilo- 
carreta," the enormous consumption of 
which in Cuba mav be calculated when it 
is realized that there are sewed annually, 
for the purpose of closing them, some 
twenty million bags. 

The profit of the business is evident 
from the simple fact that there are to-day 
in Cataluiia several factories in a pros- 
perous condition devoted to the manufac- 
ture of this cord, which have to import, as 
Cuba will do, the raw material from Italy. 
The difference in freight is not an obstacle 
because the import duties in Cuba com- 
pensate for that cost and leave a good 
margin. 



AUTOMOBILE LINES PROJECTED 

An automobile service is projected in 
Havana Province, between Cojimar and 
Casa Blanca and between Guanabacoa and 
the towns of Campo Florido and Cojimar. 

The chief of the Public Works Depart- 
ment has reported favorably on the project. 

The fare will be ten cents from Guana- 
bacoa to Cojimar, 15 cents between Cojimar 
and Casa Blanco and 30 cents for the 
round trip between Campo Florida and 
Guanabacoa. 

Further lines projected for which mu- 
nicipal permission is asked by Sr. Manuel 
Llovio, is one between Havana and San 
Jose de las Lajas, and another by Sr. Diego 
Perez between La Vibora and San Antonio 
de los Banos. Messrs. Luis Carmona and 
Benito de la Vega want to establish a line 
between Havana and Alquizar. 



A company will erect two modern blast 
furnaces in New York harbor with a view 
to utilizing Cuban ore. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



13 



NEW ENTERPRISES 



FRUIT GROWERS ORGANIZE 

The Cuban Growers' and Shippers' Asso- 
ciation was definitely organized in Havana 
on October 2Sth. W. P. Ladd, of Santiago 
de las Vegas, was elected president ; L. M. 
Elder, of Guayabal, vice president; and Mr. 
Xeville. secretary. 

The formation of the association is for 
the purpose of furnishing facilities to the 
crrowers of Cuba, who are members, for 
shipping their fruit to the United States 
and obtaining the best markets there. It is 
purposed to conduct it along lines that have 
been successful with similar companies or 
associations in Florida and California. 



NEW LINE TO INDIA 

Messrs Marimon, Bosch & Co. of San- 
tiago will establish a steamship line be- 
tween Santiago and Calcutta. 

The James Xourse Co., Ltd., of London 
will send one of their steamers direct to 
Santiago to be placed in this service. 



A VINEYARD IN SANTIAGO 

El Nacionolista of Guantanamo states 
that near Santiago there is a flourishing 
vineyard owned by Sr. Francisco Abad. It 
was recently visited by Sr. Emilio Nunez, 
Secretary of Agriculture, accompanied by 
the chief of the chemical laboratory of 
Oriente Province who were highly pleased 
with the appearance of the vines and char- 
acter of the soil. It is said the first wine 
made in Cuba was made recently on this 
plantation. 

It is understood that a company will be 
formed with a capital of $50,000 to exploit 
the new industrv. 



A NEW COMPANY 

The Cuban-American Corporation Co. of 
Brooklyn, capital $3,000,000, to purchase 
and deal in real estate especially in the 
island of Culia, was chartered in Dover, 
Delaware, on Xovemljer 5th. Xo names of 
directors are given in the announcement. 




Caves of Giiyabal, nrar Ciiaiiajay, II,iv;mri Prtivince. 
Cucvas lie Cuyahal. 



14 THECUBAREVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD CO., THE HAVANA ELECTRIC, ETC. 
Earnings of the Cuba Railroad 



The earnings of the Cuba Railroad for the months of September and for the three 
months ended September 30th compare as follows : 

1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 

September gross $310,251 $324,060 $259,823 $190,880 $158,898 

Expenses 191,876 189,197 140,816 119,033 102,503 

September net $148,375 $134,862 $119,006 $71,847 $56,394 

Fixed charges 66,791 67,347 60,125 36,666 35,228 

September surplus .... $81,583 $67,515 $58,881 $35,180 $21,166 

From July 1st — 

Three months' gross... $1,025,311 $967,761 $780,275 $631,190 $484,536 

Three months' net 445,628 404,786 348,794 274,770 156,506 

Fixed charges 200,374 200,097 180,375 110,000 105,220 

Surplus $245,253 $204,688 $168,419 $164,770 $51,286 



Earnings of the United Railways of Havana 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

October 4th il9,377 

October 11th 19,954 

October 18th 19,775 

October 25th 19,919 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


£19,194 


£16,861 


£15,826 


£14,244 


19,344 


16,738 


11,724 


12,963 


19,094 


16,054 


13,717 


13,298 


18,941 


17,147 


16,588 


13,840 



Earnings of the Havana Electric Railway 



Weekly receipts : 1913 

October 12th $56,861 

October 19th 54,575 

Oct«jber 26th 52,578 

November 2nd ^^.,. 45,19§ 



1912 


1911 


1910 


1909 


$51,088 


$48,359 


$33,710 


$37,760 


50,137 


46,006 


36,810 


38,229 


48,172 


42,296 


39,744 


39,251 


45,498 


49,705 


43,576 


45,022 



EXTENSIONS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL may be expected, especially as heavy re- 
newal charges are now coming to an end. 

Nearly 69 miles of new roads were 

opened by this company in the past year. "" 

Those constructed into cane lands have WESTERN -RAILWAY DIVIDEND 

been the means of mcreasmg the area un- »yi.-^ii^v | 

der cultivation in the zone in which the The Western Railway of Havana has de- 
company operated. Their rail-head, which clared a dividend of 7 per cent on its stock 
had reached Arimayo, is now being con- corresponding to the earnings of the fiscal 
tinued on to Cumanayagua, where they are year of 1912-13. 
advised there would be a very considerable 
amount of cane to be transported next sea- 
son. Some of the mill-owners on the line REPUBLIC OF CUBa's 5s. 
are increasing the output of their factories, 

and a new mill which has been built ad- Holders of Republic of Cuba 5% bonds 
jacent to the company's main line at Rod- of 1905, internal debt, are notilied by 
rigo should be working next crop and Speyer & Co. that they may deposit their 
should provide them with a considerable bonds with them for the purpose of pro- 
additional traffic. viding new coupons, numbers 17 to 4S, both 

Many extensions of the Cuban Central inclusive. Blanks for this p.irpose, which 
Railway have been effected, and when these must accompany each deposi^:, v/ill be fur- 
become productive, increased dividends nished on application. 



T H E C U B A R E V I E W 15 



CUBAN CENTRAL NORTHERN EXTENSION RAILWAY 



WORK ON THE NEW RAILROAD FROM CAIBARIEN TO NUEVITAS 

CUBAN central's EFFORTS TO SECURE A CONCESSION 

At the 14th general meeting of the Cuban Central Railways, Ltd., held in London on 
October 30th, the chairman Sir W. Lawrence Young Bart, gave the following account 
of a very interesting matter, namely the history of the concession given the North Coast 
Railway and their own prior attempts to sedure a similar concession for the same purpose 
to build a railroad from Caibarien to Nuevitas, both ports on the north coast of Cuba. 

Sir W. Young's address is as follows : 

"I mentioned to you at our general meeting last year, with the object of still extending 
the scope of our operations we applied to the Cuban government for a concession of 
$5,000 per kilometer for a proposed railway from Caibarien to Nuevitas — a port on the 
north coast of Cuba. The government of Cuba had put this concession up for public 
tender, and you will recollect that I told you that a local company, called the North 
Coast Railway Company, was awarded the concession in spite of the fact that they asked 
$6,000 per kilometer subvention for construction. We had carefully studied the route to 
Nuevitas via the north of what are called the Bamburanao Hills and also an alternative 
route to the south of those hills via Zulueta. All reports seemed to show that the 
better route was the northern one and also the easier to construct, but at the same time 
the government called for the southern route, and we therefore put in our tender for 
this route and also an alternative route from Caibarien via Zulueta free of subsidy. All 
our plans and profiles for both routes had been submitted to the Railway Commission, 
who approved same and accepted our guarantee. On October 5, 1912. the President signed 
a decree granting to the North Coast Railway Company the concession 1 mentioned. 
Senor Torriente. our lawyer at that time, was of the opinion that this decision was illegal, 
and, that being the case, the Foreign Office was approached on the matter, formal proFest 
being made by the British ^Minister in Havana against the injustice which had been in- 
flicted upon this company. I went to Washington, and, with the support of the British 
Embassy, a strong protest was made to the government there. The Foreign Office has 
given us every possible help, and in the House of Commons on April 14, 1913, the sec- 
retary of foreign affairs stated that the attitude of His Majesty's government towards 
the concession granted to the North Coast Railway Company was that it was considered 
by them to be ultra vires, and they had on two separate occasions addressed urgent repre- 
sentations to the Cuban government against the con-ession and in favor of the tender of 
the Cuban Central Railways. 

"Up to just lately the North Coast Railway Company has not been able to raise any 
capital, but I understand that possibly they may be able to do something in the future. 

''With a view to this and to protect our interests we have formed a company of our 
own with the object of proceeding as quickly as we can by the northern route as far as 
Maron. which we think will be a remunerative piece of line and also of great value 
strategically. We on our account have already built some 15 kilometers to Dolores, and 
we have the earthworks finished as far as Yaguajay, and from there onwards we propose 
to go to Moron. Later on, if circumstances are favorable, we shall proceed slowly towards 
our goal. We have also appropriated land at Nuevitas for our necessary terminals. The 
new company to which I have just now referred has been registered under the title of 
the Cuban Central Northern Extension Railway, with which it is proposed that the 
company should enter into an agreement, which was later authorized. The company has 
been registered with a capital of £500,000 in 50,000 shares of ilO each, all of one class." 



CUBAN TELEPHONE COMPANY service with Havana. Most of the Icad- 

ing towns in Oriente Province arc now in 

The October earnmgs compare as fol- telephone connection with Santiago and the 

'o^'s: same holds true in Camaguey Province. 

1913 1912 Cibara, Puerto Padre. Santa Lucia and 

$83,823.46 $60,413.32 Banes are in touch with Hnlguin and the 

Tu u -1 i ri i. 1 n-i i 1 rest nf tlie island. 
I he subscribers to Octolier 31st numlier 

l.'J.aiO. 

During the torrential rains of early No- A iu-\v railroad station is l)cing l)uilt by 

vember in the province of Pinar del Rio, tlu- Cul)a Railroad at I'.ayamo, Oriente 

the wires were jtut to a severe test but in Province, a station on the new through line 

no case was there any interruptifin to the from Havana to Santiago by way of Marti. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN RAILROAD MATTERS 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA REPORT 

The United Railways of Havana system 
enjoyed remarkable prosperity last year due 
to a big sugar crop, which ensured abundant 
freight earnings and stimulated all classes 
of business. Sugar constitutes its most 
important source of revenue, and in the 
, year to June 30th last it yielded almost 
£500,000 out of a gross income of il, 626,000, 
while it was responsible for no less than 
£71,900 of the gain of £212,000 in the com- 
pany's total receipts. Passenger receipts 
rose by £51,500 and from freight earnings 
£16,200 additional were derived. The past 
year's results compare favorably with those 
of the previous twelve months as will be 
seen from the following table : 

Year ended June 30th 
1911-12 1912-13 

Receipts £1,114,792 £1,626,674 

Expenses 774,247 887,057 

Profits 640,545 739,617 

Net revenue ■ 643,851 744,193 

Interest & dividends. 244,081 260,465 

Total net income.... 887,932 1,004,658 
Debenture interest, 

Preference dividend, 

etc 484,052 498,209 

Surplus 403,880 506,449 

Brought in 12,701 17,881 

Available 416,581 524,330 

General reserve 75,000 125,000 

Renewals reserve.... 50,000 50,000 

Pensions 20,000 

Insurance 10,000 5,000 

Extraordinary expen- 
diture 15,000 

Ordinary dividend... *263,700 1293,000 

Forward 17,881 16,330 

* 4:^2 per cent. t5 per cent. 

Passenger receipts, as already stated, im- 
proved by £51,500, of which £43,800 was de- 
rived from the main line and £7,600 from 
the Marianao section. The latter gain is 
equal to 24.35 per cent, and a steady in- 
crease of the traffic on this branch in the 
current year is indicated. 

The heaviest increase on the expendi- 
ture side was one of £66,600 in traffic 
charges, which was due to an outlay of 
£72,300 in respect of terminal station ex- 
penses, an item which appears in the ac- 
counts for the first time. As to the con- 
dition and prospects of the property, the 
general manager reports that locomotives 
have been well maintained, and, with the 
assistance of the twelve new engines on 
order, no difficulty in handling business 



promptly is anticipated. The average con- 
dition of the company's rolling stock shows 
a great improvement. 



RAILROAD TARIFF REVISION 

Under the Railroad Law of Cuba, rail- 
road tariffs are subject to revision by the 
Railroad Commission at intervals of not 
less than two years. The commission has 
called upon the various companies of the 
island to submit their views regarding a 
modification of the existing tarififs. The 
general manager of the Cuban Central at a 
recent meeting had advised the directors 
that these had been presented. They were 
informed, however, that the President of 
the republic would in no way permit any 
arbitary action on the part of the Railroad 
Commission, and that he desired to en- 
courage railway development in Cuba. 

Railroads in Cuba will hereafter undergo 
government inspection as often as in the 
opinion of the authorities such action shall 
be necessary. President Menocal has so 
ordered. 



The Havana Electric Railway, Light & 
Power Co. has declared a semi-annual div- 
idend of $3.00 per share of the Preferred 
Stock and a dividend of $2. .30 per share on 
the Common Stock, which was paid on 
November 15, 1913, to stockholders of rec- 
ord at the close of business on October 
25, 1913. 

The damage caused by straying animals 
to the rolling stock of Cuban railroads 
during the last ten years was as follows : 

Locomotives derailed 55 

Passenger coaches derailed. ... 51 

Cane cars derailed 103 

Number of persons killed 27 




Building of the branch bank of the Royal Bank 
of Canada in Santiago de Cuba. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 



THE CUBA RAILROAD S PROGRESS 

Working operations were commenced in 

1903. and since then, notwithstanding re- 
curring periods of political and commer- 
cial unsettlement. the progress made by the 
companj- has been decidedly favorable. 
For the incomplete year to the end of June, 

1904. the gross earnings amounted to $524,- 
042. while the working expenses exceeded 
that sum bj- $42,077. For each of the past 
nine years the broad results have been as 
follows : 

Year to Gross Xet Working- 
June 30 receipts earnings ratio % 

190.5 $1.029,258 $295,623 71.28 

1906 1.619,082 562,526 65.26 

1907 1,953,309 658,354 66.30 

1908 2,039.468 721.288 64.63 

1909 2,157,165 950,089 55.95 

1910 2,559,336 1,107,299 56.73 

1911 3.059.650 1.374.071 55.06 

1912 3.819,253 1,818,860 52.37 

1913 4,632,040 2,215,502 52.17 

Xinet}' timber bridges of an aggregate 
length of 3,811 feet were permanently re- 
placed during the year, and the masonry or 
concrete piers or culverts are ready for the 
superstructure or filling of lOS other 
bridges, aggregating 3,735 feet in length. 
Important sugar-mill developments are tak- 
ing place in the company's zone, and the 
directors are very optimistic not only as 
regards the new crop but in connection 
with the progress of other industries on 
the system, and the big expansion in pas- 
senger traffic. — Financial Times. 



AN ELEVATED ROAD UNNECESSARY 

There seems to be growing objection to 
the scheme of an elevated railroad for 
Havana. 

Havana already has extensive trolley 
and railway communications with • the 
suburbs and towns in the neighborhood ; 
there are trolley car lines which take the 
passengers to all the confines of Jesus del 
Monte and La Viljora ; the Havana Central 
Railroad offers communication with all the 
important towns in Havana Province; the 
.Marianao Railroad takes i^assengers from 
Concha .Station to .Marianao and the beach 
and further to Hoyo Colorado: there is 
trolley connection with Vedado to Carmela 
and the hill section of Principe and Car- 
melo ; trolley communication to Cerro ; 
trolley cars to Principe which is now being 
extended to reach .Marianao passing over 
the new .Mmendares bridge ; the Insular 
Railroad which takes j)assengers from 
V'cdaflo to Marianao and the new line 
which is being cftnstructed by the United 
Railways r>f Havana to establish its Concha 
terminus at Galiano and Zanja streets. 



There are accordingly sufficient means 
of communication already in existence 
which furnish passengers good and proper 
means of reaching the suburbs of Havana. 

^Ir. Orr of the United Railways of Ha- 
vana jtates that in the contract made be- 
tween his company and the government 
whereby the government relinquished its 
concession from Galiano street to the Villa- 
nueva station it was agreed that there 
should be established no railroad, nor 
street car line on a level with the ground, 
subterranean or elevated. This was agreed 
on between the government and his com- 
pan}^ in a contract signed before a notary 
public on December 23, 1910. 



WESTERN RAILWAY S REPORT 

Xinety-eight per cent of the shareholders 
of this road have accepted the offer of the 
United Railways to exchange their shares 
for the stock of that company and the 
Western Railway of Havana therefore no 
longer excites the interest it formerly did. 
This once independent system continues to 
be prosperous, even if it fails to make any 
appreciable progress. How its results for 
the past year compare with those of 1911-12 
will be seen from the following table : 

Year ended June 30th 
1912 1913 

Receipts £256,654 £281.264 

Expenses 143,224 166,219 

Profits 113,430 115,045 

Total net revenue 124,466 126,944 

Brought in 16,441 16,328 

Availalde 140,907 143.273 

Debenture interest, etc. 32,579 34,569 

Surplus 108,328 108,703 

Reserve 10,000 10,000 

Insurance 5,()0() 5,000 

Ordinary dividend... *77,000 *77,000 

Forward 16,32s 16,703 

* 7 per cent. 

Receipts, it will be noted, increased by 
£24,600, but as no less than £23,000 of that 
gain was absorbed by extra expenses, net 
earnings were only £1,600 to the good. 
Had the company remained independent, 
it would, therefore, have been unal)le to 
raise its dividend, whereas, thanks to the 
higher distribution made by the United 
Railways, the return accruing to holders 
of Western of Havana shares who assented 
to the scheme is 7% i)er cent, as compared 
with the 7 per cent they had regularly re- 
ceived for a numl)er of years. 

Tlie receipts and exi)enses for 1911 were 
£259,151 and £140,810 respectively. 



18 THECUBAREVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



OFFICIAL FIGURES OF CUBA S TRADE DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 
1913 AND FISCAL YEARS WITH COMPARISONS 

Cuba's Imports and Exports 



Imports First six months First six months 

1912 1913 

United States $30,622,751 $36,698,235 

Other countries of America 5,302,751 4,983,438 

Germany 3,888,835 4,972,138 

Spain 4,559,824 4,660,098 

France ' 3,034,517 3,362,062 

United Kingdom 7,472,112 8,172,198 

Other countries of Europe 2,873,110 3,653,468 

All other countries 1,459,516 1,846,274 



Total $59,212,924 $68,347,911 

Exports First six months First six months 

1912 1913 

United States $91,477,235 $78,872,761 

Other countries of America 2,440,911 3,227,044 

Germany 1,682,500 1,980,993 

Spain 216,979 249,608 

France 2,141,098 1,392,139 

United Kingdom 8,382,856 12,599,542 

Other countries of Europe 476,435 772,783 

All other countries 390,427 343,518 



Total $107,208,441 $99,438,378 



Trade of Fiscal Years Compared 



1911-12 1912-13 

United States $122,969,463 $132,581,459 

Other countries of America 4,371,622 6,066,577 

Germany 3,689,522 6,497,665 

Spain 480,161 690,952 

France 2,509,488 1,825,766 

United Kingdom 11,066,954 15,663,033 

Other countries of Europe 915,560 1,170,170 

All other countries 784,525 711,764 



Total $146,787,295 $165,207,375 



NOTICE TO THE EXPORT TRADE An investigation of the ac- 

To counts of the Messrs. Mc- 
The Southern Car Co., of High Point, Investigate Givney & Rokeby Company 
N. C, manufacturers of steel and wood Contractors who have the contract for 
passenger coaches and electric railway cars, the sewering and paving of 
has placed their export department under Havana, was ordered by Secretary of Pub- 
the management of James M. Motley, 71 lie Works Villalon, when the company filed 
Beaver Street, N. Y. City, to whom all in- a claim for $292,000 which was due them, 
quiries covering requirements for such Secretary Villalon said that the account- 
equipment should be addressed. Mr. Motley ing department showed that there was no 
is also the export department manager of such amount due the contractors and that 
the Glover Machine Works, Marietta, Ga. ; he would have experts from the Treastiry 
-Youngstown Car & Manfg. Co., Youngs- Department look over the books. He will 
town, O. ; Weir Frog Company, Cincinnati, also soon appoint a technical commission 
O. ; American Casting Co., Birmingham, Ala. ; to make a full report on the quality of the 
and the Garfield Fire Clay Co., Robinson, Pa. work done. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



FURTHER TRADE NEWS 



MATANZAS CUSTOMS RECEIPTS 

^latanzas customs receipts for the first 
four months of the present fiscal year are 
as follows : 

July $86,529.11 

August 84,401.75 

September 63,941.81 

October 101,382.82 



SANTIAGO S CUSTOMS COLLECTIONS 

The first four months of 1913 show cus- 
toms collections as follows : 

July $146,115.33 

August 154,126.44 

September 167,029.45 

October 141,455.38 



KEY WEST S TRADE INCREASING 

The export business through the port of 
Key West to Cuba has increased steadily 
and the current year will show the largest 
export business in the history of the city. 
It has grown rapidly since the completion 
of the Florida East Coast Railway and 
shipments from the North and East now 
reach Key West much sooner than former- 
ly. The run from Key West to Havana is 
only six hours. 

Cuba's cotton goods imports 

More than half of Cuba's imports from 
the United Kingdom are made up of cotton 
and cotton goods, rice and machinery. The 
total value of cotton gcods imported in the 
year 1911-12 was £2,434,508, of which £957,- 
758 came from the United Kingdom. These 
figures show an increase of £200,000 in the 
imports from the United Kingdom. — Re- 
port of Mr. D. Cowan, British Vice-Consul 
at Havana. 



HAVANA S CUSTOMS COLLECTIONS 

October's custom house collections 
Havana compare as follows : 

1913 $1,941,320 

1912 1,739,174 

1911 1,647,752 

1910 1,308,242 

1909 1,452,828 

1908 1,469,084 

1907 1,669,234 



at 



CARDENAS CUSTOM HOUSE COL- 
LECTIONS 

The three months of July, August and 
September showed collections at the Car- 
denas custom house as follows : 

1913 1912 

July $42,151.53 $37,435.69 

August 37,543.45 36,467.88 

September 61,503.03 36,441.93 



URUGUAY S EXPORTS TO CUBA 

Cuba's imports from Uruguay in 1912 
totalled $2,466,708, an increase of $535,269 
over 1911; $1,573,982 over 1910; $846,072 
over 1909 and $995,885 over 1908. 

The imports consisted mainly of the fol- 
lowing products : 

• Tasajo $2,435,739 

Garlic 24,568 

Onions 4,252 

Imports of Tasajo increased by $560,139 
and onions $3,038 as compared with 1911. 
The decrease in imports of garlic aggre- 
gated $16,965. 

Prices did not change much with the ex- 
ception of Tasajo, which rose to a price 
hitherto unknown in the salted meat in- 
dustry. Last December quotations were 
$21.15 per 100 kilograms. 



Lumber Imports 



PITCH PINE MARKET CONDITIONS 

Cuba's record of purchases for the year 
1913 will be a large one, the early months 
of 1913 having been remarkably brisk in 
this trade, but present interest is limited, 
and exi.sting stocks somewhat heavy. 

The week's Cuban shipment was about 
two million feet, all by sailing vessels. — 
October 18th. 

The Cuban yards are reasonably well pro- 
vided for forthcoming calls upon them, and 
show little disposition to stock further. 



Lower costs and freights should influence 
early winter business favorably, but no pro- 
notmced activity is looked for in the im- 
mediate future. 

Cultan shipment of the week was the 
largest in some time, rcacliing nearly three 
million feet. — October 25th. 

Recent shipment to Cuba has been 
rather above estimates, and the year's total 
will be a surprisingly large one, though 
chiefly attributable to the activity prevailing 
in its earlier months. — .Vovembcr 1st. 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INTERESTING NEWS NOTES REGARDING VARIOUS MATTERS PERTAINING 

TO THE ISLAND 



MEAT PRICES AND DEMANDS 

Prices of meat in Havana are always 
higher than in cities of the Eastern prov- 
inces, yet the cattlemen cannot ship on 
account of the excessive rates charged for 
transportation, reports the United States 
consul at Santiago. Steers 900 pounds 
gross cost about $4 per head for trans- 
portation in train loads and $4.50 in car 
loads from Santiago to Havana, a distance 
of 540 miles, and proportionately to inter- 
mediate points. That there is likely to be 
some loss by death and shrinkage is cer- 
tain. Buyers estimate that $1.25 per 100 
pounds is the correct difference in parity 
between Havana and Santiago. That is to 
say steers of 1,000 pounds net must sell 
in Havana at $52.50 per head for Santiago 
ranchmen to sell at $40. Cuban steers dress 
about 52 to 55 per cent, according to weight 
and age. 

Havana, the princioal market for cattle 
in the island, demands young fat steers 
weighing about 850 to 900 pounds on the 
hoof and dressing about 50 per cent. The 
reason is that in Havana there are about 
1,600 butcher shops, some of which do not 
sell over SO pounds daily, and the smaller 
the steer the better it cuts up into parts. 

The Cuban will not eat refrigerated meat, 
so the butchers cannot hold over their meat 
from day to day. If buyers suspect that 
meat for sale has been chilled 24 hours it 
is sufficient to condemn the meat. During 
the tourist season, from January until 
April, Havana imports some American 
refrigerated meat to supply hotels. The 
daily consumption in Havana is about 370 
steers, or one for every 1,000 inhabitants, a 
little less than one-half pound of meat per 
capita daily. . 

An attempt was made to import Cuban 
refrigerating meat into New York, but 
failed. 

ENGINEER POLLOCK's EXPERIENCES 

Clarence D. Pollock, a charter member 
of the Brooklyn Engineers Club. No. 117 
Remsen Street, and a past presidentof the 
organization, was until recently chief en- 
gineer in charge of the paving of the streets 
of Havana for the past two years, gave an 
interesting recital of his experiences ^m 
Havana at a meeting of the club on No- 
vember 7th last. 

Over 1,000,000 square yards of new 
pavements have been laid in Havana, and 
all of the pavements are guaranteed for 



five years. All of the asphalt used for this 
work comes from Venezuela, is shipped to 
New Jerse}^ where it is refined, and thence 
shipped to Havana in barrels. In response 
to a question as to labor conditions, Mr. 
Pollock stated that unskilled labor is paid 
12 cents per hour, working ten hours per 
day, and turns out an amount of work 
equal to about what an Itahan laborer 
would do in eight hours in the States. 
These laborers, the speaker said, were, as 
a rule, ''wooden-headed — they can't think 
for themselves." 

Commenting on the weather in Cuba, the 
speaker said the temoerature averaged 65 
degrees in the winter and 88 degrees in 
summer, and that only the tourists wore 
Panama hats, the natives and residents 
there considered them too warm. Mr. 
Pollock gave an interesting description of 
the largest cigar factory in Havana, em- 
ploying 1,100 hands, all on piecework, and 
stated that in each room in the factory a 
"reader" is employed by the workers, who 
sits and reads the Spanish newspapers to 
the hands while they are at work. This 
reader does nothing else all day but read 
to the employees, and for this each worker 
chips in a little out of his weekly pay 
toward his compensation. 

In an efifort to purify Havana harbor, 
which is very foul, Mr. Pollock said that 
the sewage is now carried across the city, 
under the bay and discharged into the Gulf 
Stream, "which carries it over 'toward 
England." — Brooklyn Citizen. 



HAVANA WANTS CHESS GAMES 

Jose R. Capablanca, chess champion of 
Cuba, who recently received a commission 
from the Cuban government as chancellor 
of the, Cuban consulate at St. Petersburg, 
has announced that he has been authorized 
by Mayor Andrade of Havana to invite ten 
of the leading masters of the world to play 
in an international tournament at Havana 
beginning February 1, 1914. The Havana 
city council has recommended the expend- 
iture of $10,000 for the tournament. 

The list of players includes Rubenstein, 
Schlechter, Tarrasch, Spielmann, Niemzo- 
witsch, Teichmann, Marshall, Duras, Ja- 
nowski, Alechine, Bernstein, Maroczy, At- 
kins and Vidmar. From this hst ten will 
be given places in the tournament. 

There are many first class chess players 
in Havana. The last tournament early in 
1913 excited great interest. 



THE CUBA R E V I E W 



21 



BASEBALL IN CUBA 

\lthousih professional baseball in Cuba 
is reallv'"only about two years old. three 
baseball clubs are now fully established in 
the city of Havana and tremendous inter- 
est in the game has developed. 

"Of course the national language ot 
baseball is American slang," said Senor 
Elev Martinez, president of the Almendares 
Club of Havana, in a recent interview, 
"and we use the same terms in describing 
points of the game. A fly is a fly, and a 
strike a strike. However, our people have 
not all caught on to the pronunciation of 
some of the words in vogue, and you might 
not recognize a "hit.' The umpire calls 
'one ball' and not 'uno bola.' When there 
is a dispute over a decision, there is apt to 
be a medlev of languages. In the games 
with the American teams we have one 
American umpire, and the other is a Cu- 

"There are several Cuban players who 
have been doing well in this country on the 
big league teams. For instance there is 
Marsans, of the Cincinnatis, who is the 
manager of Almendares. We call him the 
'Cuban Tv Cobb' and are very proud of 
him He" ranks second in stealing bases 
among the big professionals Then there 
are two Cubans on the Washington team, 
Calvo and Acosta, who play ball at home 
in the winter." 

MOTOR CARS AND AUTO TRUCKS 

The Canadian Acting Trade Commis- 
sioner at Havana states, in a recent report 
to his government, that many motor cars 
have been brought into Cuba directly hy 
their owners, or through commission 
agents who have sold from catalogs. Deal- 
ers and commission agents seem to be 
willing to order from the cataloo- and im- 
port any kind of machine for which a cus- 
tomer may express a preference, though 
few dealers have any proper agencies, in 
spite of this slack state of affairs, however, 
there are manv motor cars in Havana. 

There is undoubtedly a large held tor 
trade in inotor lorries or trucks on the 
sugar estates of Cuba, but at present difh- 
culties would be encountered because of the 
deep mud of the cane fields. Much inter- 
est is also being shown in motor lorries at 
Havana: a numl)er are already in use and 
latterly several sami)le lorries for demon- 
stration purposes have arrived from the 
United States and iuiropc. As many of 
the streets in the city are very narrow, an 
cxcci)tionally short wheel base is necessary 
in order tr^ negotiate the sharp street cor- 
ners successfully. 

'ihc new wharf of the Cuban Company 
ill .Mau/.anillo has been officially accepted. 



NEW POWER PLANT AT HAVANA 

The Havana Electric Railway & Power 
Co. has now under construction a 40,000 
h. p. plant in the harbor of Havana. At 
present there are three power plants in the 
citv of Havana ; one being for the railway, 
the second an independent power plant and 
the third a gas and electric plant. These 
three plants have recently been consoh- 
dated bv American interests and now a new- 
plant is" lieing constructed to take care of 
the power required for all such work m 
Havana. At the completion of the plant 
under construction the other plants will be 
dismantled. 

Four reinforced concrete chimneys have 
been contracted for with a Chicago firm. 

For this plant all coal is imported from 
the United States at a considerable expense 
necessitating an economical boiler mstalla- 
tion Each of the four chimneys will be 
•'75 feet high with a 14-foot inside diameter 
at the top; the foundations are a mat 40 
by 40 feet and 6 feet thick, reinforced both 
parallel to the sides and diagonally, and 
rest on wood piling. 

American cement is being used througn- 
out this work, and precautions are being 
taken to prevent any retards in the set ot 
the cement due to the unusual element m 
the water. While there is a cement mi m 
Havana, the chimney contractor, as well as 
other contractors on the island doing large 
work prefers American cement. 1 he cost 
of the native and the American cement are 
practically the same, being approximately 
?2 >^5 per barrel. 



RELIGIOUS MATTERS 

Rev Albion W. Knight, missionary 
bishop to Cuba, has resigned his ottice and 
will be the Vice-Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity of the South at Sweanee, Tenn. 

The Pope has nominated Archbishop 
Nouel of Santo Domingo apostolic delegate 
to Cuba and Porto Rico. Archbishop Nouel 
was for a short time president of the re- 
public of Santo Domingo after the down- 
fail of the Victoria regime. 

Tlic Protestant Episcopal House of 
I'.ishops in session in New York on Octo- 
lier 24th nominated the Rev. William C. 
P.rown for the ])lace of bishop of Cuba. 
The nomination was approved by the house 
of deputies. . 

Bishop P.rown is an archdeacon stationed 
now in F.razil. Me is proficient in Spanish. 



President Menocal desires a congres- 
.sional discussion of the general reorganiza- 
tion of Cul)a's army, wliich, it is under- 
stood, will be radical if tlie a(hninislrati<)n s 
wishes are observed. 



22 



T H E C U B A REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



SANTIAGO S WATER SUPPLY 

The old aqueduct, situated north east of 
Santiago, constructed in 1849, consists of 
two tanks of 300,000 gallons capacity, pipes 
of 11^/4 inches in diameter and 6,000 meters 
long, and a small tank of tubble, called the 
"Melilla" tank. 

The new aqueduct, situated north of the 
city, constructed during the administration 
of President Palma, is composed of a 
reservoir of cement, two smaller filtering 
reservoirs, two tanks of cement and an- 
other of steel with a capacity of 2,500,000 
and 60,000 gallons respectively, pipes of 20 
inches in diameter and 5,600 meters long. 

The wells of San Juan are situated East 
of the city. These number 40, are 12 inches 
in diameter and about 12 feet deep. The 
water is drawn by air power, and pumped 
to the new reservoir tanks. 

Afterwards a reservoir of wood was con- 
structed over the San Juan river to con- 
serve the supply in case of accident to the 
pumping station. 

The supply of water in the San Juan 
valley is unknown and there has been no 
scientific efi^orts made to determine the 
quantity available, on which to base a 
calculation for the future needs of the 
city. Neither is anything definite known 
or has an effort been made to ascertain the 
origin of the San Juan valley water supply. 



Much sand strata is encountered and the 
belief is general that the wells draw their 
supply from the river only. 

The quality of the water from the wells 
is good for drinking purposes but not so 
good for industrial uses because of the 
minerals in the water. If this supply does 
not prove adequate the city may be forced 
to go to the Sierie Morena Mountains 
where rivers would yield 450,000,000 gal- 
lons. If the waters from this source was 
not all that could be desired filters could 
be employed. 



GOMEZ SEEKS ANOTHER NOMINATION 

In an interview recently with ex-Presi- 
dent Jose Miguel Gomez while in Spain, 
Sr. A. Villar Ponte, correspondent of the 
Diario de la Marina of Havana, states that 
General Gomez accorded full and frank 
recognition of President Menocal's many 
fine qualities as man and as president and 
that he was capable of doing great things 
for Cuba. Regarding his renomination 
General Gomez without hesitation or cir- 
cumlocution said that he was still young 
and his work as president had been fruit- 
ful, he would on the expiration of Presi- 
dent Menocal's term seek a renomination 
in the regular course of events at the 
hands of his old adherents. 




Ex-President General Gomez and his family in the gardens at Sevilla, Spain. 
El General Gomes con su familia descansando en los nucvos jardines de la Htierta del Pietiro en Sevilla. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 



THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 

The Royal Bank of Canada first entered 
the West Indian field seriously after the 
close of the Spanish-American war, when 
following a visit to Cuba in 1S9S, by ]\Ir. 
E. L. Pease, the present general manager, 
a branch was opened at Havana in 1899. 
Due to the energy of the joint managers 
appointed, among whom were Mr. W. F. 
Brock, the present manager of the chief 
branch in Toronto, and a few months later, 
Mr. F. J. Sherman, now one of the assist- 
ant-general managers, the bank was able to 
take full advantage of the opportunities 
opened up by the gigantic changes the re- 
sults of the war brought about. The pur- 
chase in 1903 of the Banco de Oriente gave 
the Royal a branch at Santiago de Cuba. 
The following year the assets of the Banco 
del Commercio of Havana were purchased. 

It now has twenty branches in various 
cities of the island. 

The Royal Bank is to-day Canada's third 
largest bank and is increasing so rapidly 
that it may soon occupy an even more 
notable position. It has more branches in 
foreign countries than all other Canadian 
banks put together, these totalling no less 
than forty in all. 

Mr. E. L. Pease is sole general manager 
and vice-president also. Mr. C. E. Neill 
and Mr. F. J. Sherman, who resided for 
many years in Cuba, are the assistant-gen- 
eral managers, while Mr. W. B. Torrance 
is the superintendent of branches. — Canada 
West India Magazine. 



FRICES OF SUGAR STOCKS 

THE AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING CO. 



ANOTHER BRANCH OPENED 

The building of the .Vational Bank of 
Cuba branch in Manzanillo, Oriente Prov- 
ince, was dedicated .\ugust ISth. 





Common 


Pref 


;rred 




High. Low. 


High. 


Low. 


For year 1912. . 


133 i/o 1131/2 


124 


115 Vo 


1913 








]\Ionth of Aug. 


IIIV2 109 78 


115% 


1141/8 


Month of Sept. 


114% 109 


115 ys 


114 Vs 


-Montli of Oct.. 


110 107 


115% 


113 


Week ending 








Nov. 6 


108% 108 14 


113 


113 


AMERICAN BEET SUGAR CO. 






Common 


Pref 


erred 




High. Low. 


High. 


Low. 


For year 1912. . 


77 46 1/2 


101^/4 


90 


1913 








Month of Aug. 


28 78 25% 


70 


70 


Month of Sept. 


30 24 V2 






Month of Oct.. 


25% 19 Ys 


65 


65 


Week ending 








Nov. 6 


23 22 V-i 


65 


65 



EARNINGS OF THE SANTIAGO ELECTRIC 
LIGHT AND TRACTION COMPANY 



1913 

October gross $38,451 

October net 16,731 

First 10 months gross.. 378,986 
First 10 months net 169,773 



1912 
$35,036 

13,641 
334,799 
139,092 



FRUIT COMPANY DIVIDEND 

The Isle of Pines Co-Operative Fruit Co. 
of Boston, operating pineapple and grape- 
fruit plantations on the Isle of Pines, de- 
clared and paid on October 24th its first 
dividend, amounting to 5 per cent, upon 
its profit sharing certificates in division 1, 
series "A" plantation. 



Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 

(Quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., New York) 

. Rin 

Republic of Cuba Interior 5 per cent Bonds 91 __ 

Repul)lic of Cuba Exterior 5 per cent Bonds 09 /i 

Havana City 'Fir.st Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 10^^ 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6 per cent I'.onds 1("> 

Cuba Railroad l-"irst Mortgage 5 per cent lionds 9>i 

Cuba Railroad I'referrcd Str)ck -'^ 

Cuba Co. 6 per cent Debentures •'•'' 

Havana Electric Ky. Consol. Mortgage 5 per cent i5onds 92/2 

Havana I'.kctric Ry. Light & Power Co. Pfd. Stock 88 

Havana l-:]cctric Ry. Light & Power Co. Com. Stock 76 

Matanzas .Market Place 8 per cent Bonds Participation Certificates 100 

Cuba American S. Co. Coll. Trust per cent (iold Bonds of 1918 93 

Santiago Electric Light & Traction Co. First Mtge. 6 per cent Bonds... 98 Vi 

All prices of bonds quoted on an "and interest" basis 



ASKED 

93 
100 Vl 

108 
1112 
101 
1(10 
1(10 
93 1/1 

91 

SO 

1 0:5 

96 
981/2 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE CUBAN TOBACCO INDUSTRY 



BANNER YEAR FOR TOBACCO TROUBLES OF THE CIGAR MANUFAC- 
TURER EXPORTS TO ENGLAND 



TOBACCO EXPORTS 

The total value of the tobacco sent to 
the United Kingdom from Cuba during 
1912 was £800,635, of which amount £791,- 
286 represents cigars. 



DECREASE IN TOBACCO PLANTING 

The weekly El Guircno of Giiira de He- 
lena, Havana Province, laments the fact 
that in the present year there are a number 
of tobacco plantations for sale. An excess 
of production is the reason, in the opinion 
of La Lucha, for the failure experienced 
in the tobacco business. 

Our contemporary adds that there were 
years in which the tobacco crop of the is- 
land of Cuba did not go below 550,000 
bales. At present perhaps it will not reach 
450,000. 

At the time of such abundant production 
it was divided among Vueltabaja and Semi- 
vuelta, 300,000 bales; Vueltarriba, 175,000; 
and Partido, 75,000. 

To-day these figures have changed ; the 
Eastern and Western parts together will 
produce 350,000 bales, and on the other 
hand, Partido will certainly reach the 
amount of 100,000. 

In Vueltabajo and Vueltarriba the sale 
by weight was adopted. In Partido it goes 
by quality. Because the production in the 
places first named abounds in filling and 
that of Partido in wrapper. 

This being so, there is no rule of propor- 
tion as regards the respective crops. For 
one leaf of wrapper six or eight of filling 
are required. The amount of tobacco gath- 
ered in the Western and Eastern parts, 
with 75,000 bales in Partido, amply fill the 
requirements of manufacture. 

For this reason El Giiireno thinks that 
the planters of those districts if they used 
to sow 100,000 plants without being able to 
attend to them properly, should plant only 
50,000, giving them the required attention, 
this being based on the fact that one man 
ought not, or better said, cannot take care 
of at most more than about 12,000 or 14,000 
plants. 

Experience shows the truth of this. It 
has been proven that by not planting much 
tobacco the results are better. It is perfer- 
able to have 500 "matules" of real wrapper 
than 4,000 filling; 550 of wrapper at 3 pesos 
amount to 3,500, while 4,000 of filling at 25 
centavos, amount to 1,000 pesos. 

Unfortunately, the crop just finishing 



has been, with very rare exceptions, nega- 
tive in the extreme. The damage sufifered 
is bound to result in forcing, although 
against the wish of the planter, a decrease 
in the planting. — La Lucha, October 18th. 



BANNER YEAR FOR TOBACCO 

The opinion is expressed in the Cigar 
and Tobacco JVorld that the Cuban tobacco 
crop is as good this year as it has been for 
many years, that it will not be long before 
prices go higher again, and that the year 
will be remembered as one of the banner 
years for good smoking and tasting to- 
bacco. The tobacco was grown at its 
proper season and under favorable con- 
diticns, and is a good, aromatic, light to- 
bacco, with great combustibility ; it is a 
tobacco, too, that may be worked or may 
be kept for a year or two, and will improve 
all the time. This will not be realized till 
about January, or until the cold weather 
sets in, when the tobacco cures even better. 



CIGAR MANUFACTURER S TROUBLES 

Rainy days and humidity do much to 
handicap the Havana cigar maker. When 
the factories have not enough dry fillers 
they must shut down. 

Dark, rainy clouds besides give so little 
light in the afternoon that cigar selectors 
stop work, as they are unable to distin- 
guish the colors well. As even the old 
cigars, which are perfectly dry, will ab- 
sorb the humidity in the atmosphere and 
become pliable again, packing cigars in 
boxes is also a dangerous operation, and 
none of our experienced cigar manufac- 
turers will run the risk of doing that kind 
of work when the humidity is excessive. 
Under these circumstances cigar exports 
at such a time are small. 

Cuban Consul R. M. Ybor of Tampa 
protests against the proposed design for 
the government guarantee stamp to be 
vised upon cigars made under the manu- 
factured in bond plan, as it contains an 
objectionable phrase: "Made by Spanish 
hand labor." 

This phrase he considers unfair, for in 
Tampa two-thirds of the cigar makers em- 
ployed are Cubans, Americans and Italians. 
To employ a stamp bearing such a phrase 
might lead to trouble between the manu- 
facturers and the cigar makers, because it 
would form a basis for agitation by un- 
scrupulous persons. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY 

SMOKERS TO BE PROTECTED - GOVERNMENT REGULATION FOR MAKING 
CIGARS IN BOND FLOOD LOSSES 

paragraphs of the tariff, act of October 3, 
1913. 

"In order to comply with the requiremen. 
that duty shall be paid on the tobacco 
used, in its condition as imported, collectors 
will require the weighing and exammation 
and proper records to be kept of all to- 
bacco taken directly into the bonded manu- 
facturing warehouses from the import 
vessel. In the case of tobacco transferred 
from bonded warehouse into a bonded 
manufacturing warehouse, from which to 
make cigars, the records of the examma- 
tion and weights at the time of the importa- 
tion and entry of such tobacco will be used 
in arriving at the correct amount of duties 
due on the tobacco. 

"The collector will require, before the 
removal of the cigars from the bonded 
premises under a withdrawal for consump- 
tion, that internal revenue stamps shall be 
affixed to the boxes containing the cigars 
and that the boxes shall be stamped to in- 
dicate the character of the cigars, the origin 
of the tobacco from which made, and the 
place of manufacture." 



UNITED STATES PROTECTS SMOKERS 

Those who like genuine Havana cigars 
will be pleased to know that a Senate 
amendment to the United States tariff bill 
has become a law : 

It will permit the manufacturer manu- 
facturing in bond under the supervision of 
the government to produce cigars made ot 
imported Havana tobacco, and as the boxes 
containing such cigars will bear a govern- 
ment stamp it will thus afford absolute and 
irrefutable guarantee of the genuine Ha- 
vana origin of the cigars. 

The amendment reads as toUows: 

"Provided that cigars manufactured in 
whole of tobaccos imported from one 
country, made and manufactured in such 
bonded manufacturing warehouses, may be 
withdrawn for home consumption on the 
payment of the duties chargeable on such 
tobacco in its condition as imported, under 
such regulations as the secretary of the 
treasury mav prescribe, and the payment ot 
the internal revenue accruing on such 
cigars, and the boxes or packages contain- 
ing such cigars shall be stamped to 
indicate their character, origin of tobacco 
from which made and place of manufac- 

*"lts author is Edward C. Berriman of the 
firm of Berriman Brothers, large manufac- 
turers of Havana cigars. Tampa, hla. 

The regulations under which manufac- 
turers of clear Havana cigars may take ad- 
vantage of the special section of the new 
tariff law and manufacture their goods in 
bond, and thus bear a government guar- 
antee stamp certifying that they are made 
exclusively from importe<l Cuban tol,acco 
read as follows : 

"Only tobacco imported from one coun- 
try may l)e taken into premises bonded tor 
the manufacture of cigars, for use m mak- 
ing cigars. Cigars manufactured from 
such tobacco may be withdrawn for con- 
sumption in the United States upon the 
filing of an entry in the form provided by 
Article 257 of the customs regulations ot 
Vm for the withdrawal of merchandise 
from bond for consumption, such orm o 
entry to be modified to correspond to tlit 

'''^•The entry must specify in detail the 
duality of tobacco from which the cigars 
were made, and duty shall be paid on the 
tobacco used, in its condition as -"Parted 
at the rates provided in the appropriate 



Enormous losses from floods were re- 
ported on November 1st everywhere in the 
Pinar del Rio Province where the choicest 
tobacco of Cuba is grown. Most of the 
seed beds were wiped out and this means 
a delay of at least two months in the to- 
bacco crop. It is also said that a late crop 
is seldom as good as an early one. 



The repulilic of Columbia has informed 
the Cul)an government, through its repre- 
sentative, that it has voted a law increas- 
ing the duty on imported Cuban tol)acco 
fifty cents per kilo. A great amount of 
Cul)an tobacco is exported to Columbia 
and this increase in the duty whicli covers 
all kinds of tobacco > is, n.ituraUy, of mucli 
importance. 

The Union of Manufacturers of Cigars 
and Cigarettes in Havana named a com- 
mittee to call uiion the Secretary of State 
in order to persuade him to use his in- 
fluence to have the 5 per cent reduction in 
tlie duty on the shipments of cigars in 
American I)ntt(.ms figured on the gross 
amount, and not after the 20 per cent al- 
lowance, according to our reciprocity. It 
the Secretary of the Treasury in the United 
States shouhl rule otherwise, the :, iier cent 
vvouhl in rcahty be cut down to 4 jier cent. 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



AGRICULTURAL INFORMATION 



EGG-LAYING COMPETITION AND RESULTS GRAPEFRUIT IN ENGLAND 



EGG-LAYING COMPETITIONS IN THE 
RHINELAND 

The Chamber of Agriculture for the 
Rhineland has during the last three years 
conducted egg-laying competitions for poul- 
try lasting ten months in each year, from 
November to August, at its special grounds. 
The results of the first two years work 
are given in the present report. The first 
year 210 one-year-old hens were tested and 
in the second year 210 two-year-old hens; 
with few exceptions in both competitions 
the same birds were used. Each of the 
six breeds examined were represented by 
seven families, each consisting of five 
members. 

The comparison between the total yield 
of the one-year-old birds and that of the 
two-year-olds is considerably in favor of 
the former. During the ten months that 
the competition lasted the one-year-old 
hens laid 125 eggs, the two-year-olds 102.4 
eggs. The eggs laid in winter by the latter 
were only 34.71 per cent of those laid by 
the former. 

The following are the scores of the va- 
rious breeds : 

Average number of eggs laid 
1-year-old 2-year-old 
Breed hens hens 

Black Rhenish 104.7 124.1 

White Wyandotte.. 130.7 99.3 

Black Minorca 126.5 99.6 

Partridge Italian.. 121.0 103.7 

Buff Orpington 119.8 92.1 

White Orpington.. 111.3 95.5 

The small breeds have thus proved more 
productive than the medium-sized ; never- 
theless the difference was not so marked 
among the one-year-olds as among the 
others. As for their behavior during the 
various periods of the competitions the 
small and medium breeds gave one-third of 
the total yield during the first five months. 
The maximum number of eggs laid by the 
small breeds was in May for the one-year- 
olds and in April for the two-year-olds, 
while that of the medium-sized breeds was 
in both cases one month earlier. — R. Bosch, 
in Landwirtschaftliche Zeitschrift fur die 
Rheinprovins. 



THE AGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS 

As they are yet young, much, in regard to 
their scope and usefulness, cannot be said 
at present; still, the school at Santa Clara, 
which is now in its second year, is doing 
good work entirely due to the energy of 
its director, Doctor Antonio Ponce de 




Hon. Robert L. Luaces,-- director of agriculture 
in Cuba. 



Leon, and the Professors Messrs. Montero 
and Lorenzo, who have shown that they 
are full hearted in their work and are get- 
ting results in crops and attracting students. 
The latter, it appears, have entered into the 
spirit of their professors so much that dur- 
ing vacation time they are constantly mak- 
ing visits to the school and, being there, 
taking off their coats and putting in some 
good school work, so writes Mr. Robert 
Luaces, director of agriculture in Cuba. 



Reports are to the effect that the ravages 
of the cocoanut tree disease in the termino 
of Sagua are pronounced and the cause of 
much anxiety. Many of the land owners 
have cut down the trees in the hope of 
stamping out the evil. Remedies recom- 
mended have proved ineffective and in 
desperation the municipal council has voted 
a sum of money to be given to anyone in- 
venting one that will be successful. 



The President has signed a decree, in 
which the sum of $12,000 is asked to buy 
lands at Camaguey for the purpose of 
building an agricultural college. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



27 



AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL NOTES 



COMMERCIAL YIELD OF OIL IN COPRA 

There seems to be no doubt that the 
average commercial yield of oil in copra 
is 63 per cent in the experience of German 
crushers. This yield leaves a cake with a 
content of 6V2 to 7 per cent of oil, and at 
times the cake contains even as much as 
11 per cent. 

Fresh cocoanut kernels contain from 30 
to 40 per cent of fat, sun-dried copra con- 
tains as much as 50 per cent and kiln-dried 
copra considerably more — sometimes as 
much as 74 per cent. Lewkowitsch states 
that the mean content of fat in copra ob- 
tained from 21 analyses was 68.3 per cent. 
In these tests the maximum percentage was 
attained in copra from the Pacific Islands 
and was 74.72 per cent. Malabar and Cey- 
lon copra came next with 71 per cent, while 
Manila copra yielded in some instances 67 
and 68 per cent, and had a low record of 
64.7 per cent. 

The above figures from Lewkowitsch re- 
fer to total oil content. The Hamburg 
crushers expect to obtain an average of 63 
per cent of oil. In a single pressing of the 
raw material the variations are said by a 
well-known machinery manufacturer to be 
from 60 to 66 per cent. Both hydraulic and 
continuous-process presses are in use in 
Hamburg and both types of presses are 
manufactured in this country. Both types 
of presses have their special advantages, 
the continuous-process press being particu- 
larly useful in dealing with soft kernels, 
while the hydraulic presses are more par- 
ticularly available when the material at hand 
is hard and tough. 



IMPROVING THE AGUACATE 

Orchardists in southern Florida are be- 
ginning to plant out aguacate seedlings with 
the idea of saving those which stand the 
fruiting test, giving them names just as 
seedling oranges, pomelos and apples are 
named and thereafter propagated by bud- 
dage ; most of the Florida as well as the 
California avocados are budded nowadays, 
i. e., they are named varieties, on a par with 
the named citrus fruits. 

One feature of avocado growing not to 
be neglected is the selection of varieties 
that will fruit during the dry season. This 
would avoid possible loss of fruit through 
injury by wind and rain. 

Another thing which will tend to make 
the avocado one of the few really important 
fruits of the future is the very high nu- 
tritive value of the pulp; this contains 
from ]', to 18 per cent of readily digcstil)le 
oil besides a fair percentage of starch and 



sugar. In fact, the avocado is one of the 
few fruits which would serve as an emer- 
gency ration without any other food for a 
considerable time. The comparatively high 
price of the fruit on the retail market, de- 
pending largely upon the supply, of course, 
is almost entirely responsible for the slow 
progress of this fruit toward world-wide 
popularity. 

A very distinct type of aguacate with 
thick, hard skin, and found in Guatemala, 
which promises to surpass in shipping 
qualities the better known forms, is rec- 
ommended by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 




"N'irgen" banana, an unidentified wild species in 
tlie Pliilippines, having tlie fruits covered with 

husks. 

SOME COCOANUTS 

-Mr. O. W. Barrett, chief of the Division 
of Horticulture at Manilla, gives some 
figures of the world's cocoanut yields. He 
says : 

"If all the cocoanut trees of the world 
gave forty nuts apiece we would have the 
tremendous crop of ten billion nuts per 
year, or well over 300 nuts per second. 
These, if laid end to end, would form a 
line reaching around the earth ninety 
times, which would make a broad belt 
some 20 metres or 6.") ft. wide over land 
and sea." Mr. Barrett estimates that the 
I'Iiilii)i)incs have .'iO.OOO.ODO trees bearing 
and otherwise, against 60,000,000 in Ceylon. 



28 



THE CUBA R E \' I 1/ W 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



DR. DESVERNINE S SUGAR VIEWS 

According to Dr. Desvernine, who is the 
Cuban Minister to Washington, Cuban 
sugar planters under the provisions of the 
Underwood tariff can capture the trade of 
the United States if his country will make 
special effort to meet the new conditions. 
He addressed the Havana Board of Trade 
on November 7th last and told them that 
Cuban manufacturers must reduce the cost 
of production to a minimum. If that is 
done, he thinks it will be impossible for 
any country to produce sugar more cheaply, 
Cuba having the advantage of a low sea 
freight rate to New York, which is less 
than the railroad rates from the interior of 
the United States to the coast, and also 
less than the maritime freight rates from 
Java, Europe, and South America. 

The suppression of the Dutch standard, 
he said, gives Cuban sugar producers more 
freedom, inasmuch as their stock is not 
limited to a color which only refiners could 
purchase. Cuban planters can make white 
sugar of 98 and 99 degrees or more purity 
for direct consumers, so that it need not 
pass through the refiners' hands before 
reaching the purchasers. 

But before enjoying these advantages, 
the Minister says, it will be necessary for 
Cuban producers to organize along the 
lines followed by the California fruit 
growers, so as to have no difficulty in plac- 
ing their sugar. The chief trouble of the 
Cuban growers in the past has been their 
inability to hold their sugar for the proper 
prices, this inability enabling New York- 
buyers to obtain it at extremely low 
figures. He thinks Cuba should sell her 
sugar at the world's parity, thereby pre- 
venting American buyers from purchasing 
the Cuban supply every year for $30,000,000 
or $40,000,000 less than if they had bought 
in London or Hamburg. 

He estimates that upward of 300,000 tons 
of Cuban sugar were exported to England 
and Canada last season, while many large 
contracts are pending for future delivery 
in January and February. 

Forty-two thousand bags were sold to 
Japan alone. 

NO INTENSIVE CULTIVATION FOR CUBA 

"The present condition of the British 
West Indian sugar industry is critical. The 
average production of the weight of cane 
to the acre of land cultivated is low, con- 
sidering that an advanced system of cul- 
tivation is applied. The quantity of re- 
coverable sugar present in the cane is from 
year to year very unsatisfactory. The 



quality of the extracted juice is generally 
poor, and shows a retrogressive tendency. 
The losses caused by insect and fungoid 
pests attacking this crop are very increas- 
ing. The Bourbon cane has in many lo- 
calities entirely deteriorated, and the new 
seedling varieties which were introduced to 
take its place, not only do not quite fill the 
vacancy but have in their turn to be re- 
placed by other seedlings because of their 
rapid deterioration." 

So writes J. J. A. Carlee in the West 
India Committee Circular of August 26th 
and the remedy for these discouraging con- 
ditions is the establishment of nurseries on 
sugar estates, of which "there is not one 
in the West Indies," although in universal 
use in Java, and more exactly described by 
]\Ir. Carlee as "recuperating grounds for 
the cane grown on the estates." In this 
way a sound foundation is laid not only for 
the crop of the next year, but for coming 
years. 

If all cane cuttings used come from these 
nurseries a continuous supply of sure dis- 
ease resistant plants is secured, and a better 
type of cane is sure to follow. 

There are no such nurseries in Cuba and 
the writer says : "We have heard it sug- 
gested, and a certain profound truth under- 
lies this suggestion : How is it, if there be 
this urgent necessity for cane nurseries, 
that Cuba, the greatest producer of cane 
sugar, manages to do entirely without 
them ? 

"The reply is that in Cuba intensive cul- 
tivation of the sugar cane cannot be prac- 
tised. This is due to the lack of labor, 
which disadvantage in that island is met 
by an abundance of fertile land, so that 
extensive cultivation can there be a success. 
The cane is treated as a weed and is left 
to take care of itself, and the average yield 
of cane per acre is therefore very low. So 
axiomatic is the statement that the sugar 
cane if left to struggle for itself is hardier, 
as compared with that which has been at- 
tended to with all the available resources 
of modern agriculture that, given an ac- 
count of a general and very low prbduction 
of cane to the unit of area cultivated in any 
tropical country, it will be perfectly safe to 
infer the comparative freedom., of, that cane 
from organic deterioration and also from 
serious pests and diseases, and given a 
statement of a very high production of 
cane, to the unit of area cultivated in any 
tropical country, it will be safe to infer 
that this high production can only be se- 
cured at the expense of the hardiness of 
the cane, and that it will not be maintained. 



THE CUBA R E \' 1 E W 



■iU 



SUGAR CROP OF 1912-13 



TliC following are the ligures of the 1912-13 sugar harvest of Cuba as conii)ilc(l l))- Mr. 
H. A. Himely and Messrs. Guma & Alejer. There were 174 centrals grinding and the 
yield in bags and tons aggregate as follows : 

Centrals 



Antilla and Xipe Bay 6 

Banes 1 

Cienfuegos -^ 

Cardenas 21 

Caibarien 1- 

Gibara ' 

Guantanamo 10 

Havana -0 

Jucaro •' 

Matanzas • '^O 

Manzanillo 10 

Xuevitas 2 

Puerto Padre 

Sagua 

Santa Cruz del Sur 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Zaza 

Total centrals 1' 

Total 2,429,240 Tons 

A ton equals 2.240 lbs. A bag equals :!20 lbs. 

M. Himelv's crop estimate made December (>, 1912 2,328, S14 1 ons 

[Messrs. Guma & Mejer's crop estimate made December 9, 1912 2,2Sl,So7 ions 

PREVIOUS CROPS (HIMELY'S FIGURES) 

1<)10-11 1,480,217 tons 1909-10 1.804,349 tons 



3 
21 



Bags 
Mr. Himely 

1,102,530 
387,678 

2,512,829 

2,363,098 

1,076,681 
256,000 
.-j80,168 

1,333,831 
619,072 

3,018,170 
751,895 
258,155 
802,116 

1,391,579 

257,140 

187,030 

82,207 

24,504 

,004.683 



1^ 



Bags 
Mess. Guma & Mejer 

1,062,361 
387,678 

2,507,752 

2,361,238 

1,076,681 
256,255 
579,854 

1,413,671 
619,060 

2,941,724 
752,261 
258,758 
802,116 

1,389,291 

257,140 

227,209 

82,207 

24,504 

16,999,760 
2,428,537 Tons 



1911-12 1,893,687 tons 




CARROS DE MOTOR 



DE LA 



COMPANIA BUDA 

e Ingenios, que incluyen Carritos de Ma- 

Fabricamos equipos para Ferrocarriles 

no, Carreti- 

llas, Gatos, 

Cambiavias 

y Ranas 



30 Church Street, New York 




HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK. r'rop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing - - - Slcamship Toivins a Specially 

Hnilen Tested for Anu Hequiretl ITessiire 

Phone Broad SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U. S. A. ^Z'' ^:::Z 



1835-1836 



I'leo.sc mcniion irlC ClllA KI-VIICW ii'hrn wrilinu t<> .\<l<'erliscrs 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



A MODERN SUGAR FACTCRY 




View of the Jobabo sugar mill, at Jobabo, Oriente Province. It is owned by the Cuba Company. 
Mr. L. M. A. Evans is the superintendent. 



THE JOBABO MILL 

The output for the Jobabo Mill for the 
last crop was 136,000 bags. 

The installation of a new mill is prac- 
tically complete, and the estimated output 
for the coming year will be 250,000 bags, 
and Mr. Evans will remain superintendent. 

There having been rumors that a super- 
intendent would be appointed to succeed 
Mr. Skaife, who recently died, an enquiry 
at the Cuba Company office in New York 
elicited the information that Mr. Wm. W. 
Craib had been appointed executive agent 
in Cuba of the Cuba Company with refer- 
ence to its sugar mill properties. 

Sir William Van Home (the president) 
states in the annual report that the capacity 
of the Jobabo sugar mill of the Cuba Com- 
pany is being doubled for the coming har- 
vest, and three large independent sugar 
mills are under construction along the rail- 
way. 

The acreage of this great estate is over 
3,400 caballerias, over 113,000 acres. There 
are 35 squares of 8 caballerias each under 
cultivation and the estate also gets its cane 
from Tana, a short distance up the road. 

The estate employs no colonos, planting 
and harvesting its own cane. In season 
there are 1,200 men employed including 
cane cutters. 

The company has taken a part of the 
batey and established a town and named it 
■Jobabo after the mill. 

The plantation and mill work is under 
the direction of Mr. L. M. A. Evans, 
superintendent. . r-- 




L. M. A. Evans, superintendent 
sugar mill. 



f the Jobabo 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



NEW MACHINERY INSTALLED 

Man\- sugar estates in Matanzas Prov- 
ince are getting read}' to introduce 'tnuch 
new machinery in their mills. 

The "Porvenir" will install three brick 
furnaces for the burning of bagasse, some 
hoisting machinerj' and other apparatus for 
the better operation of sugar production. 

Central "San Cayetano" will also install 
new machinery and has constructed new 
furnaces. It is said that the Central "Trin- 
noivato" will not grind this year, for what 
reason is not stated. The estate's cane will 
be ground by Centrals "Limones," "Con- 
desa" and "San Cayetano." 



Rio Cauto Sugar Co. was incorporated 
in A11)any on October 29th with a capital of 
$1,100,000. The following are the directors : 
Jerome S. Sullivan, August ]\Iiller of 
Brooklyn, X. Y., and Wm. Wagner of New 
York City. 

The deal for the construction of the new 
mill has been made with a Xew Orleans 
firm who have contracted practically for 
all the machinery required. A large force 
of engineers are already on the way to the 
new mill location and work will l)e pushed. 
The contract calls for completion early in 
Fcbruarv next vear. 




A HINT FOR CUBAN PLANTERS 

The Louisiana Planter for July 19, 1913, 
calls attention to the possibility of central 
sugar factories co-operating with muni- 
cipal authorities for supplying towns with 
light and power and, perhaps, with water. 
If this could be carried into effect, it is 
believed it would reduce the cost of sugar 
manufacture. 



CENTRAL CONSTANCIA 

This mill will begin grinding on the 15th 
of December next. The Damuji Sugar 
Company owners expect a yield of 80,000 
or 85,000 bags. On this river are also the 
"Manuelita". "Dos Hermanos" and "Caro- 
lina" sugar Estates. 



LAMPARAS 
ELECTRICAS 
de Proyeccion 

"^^^ Marca 



Cuatro 3 

Veces mds 

Serviciables 

que 

Cualquiera 

otra Ldmpara 

Portatil 



Equipadas 

con baterlas ^ 

TUNGSTEN 

y con f'i 

bombillas 

MAZDA ' 



A LUZ 



1 




Jbt^^aMo Desvernine, Cuban Minister at 
Washington. 



I'idiinsc ijtli'ilogos "CR" y precios al Repre- 
sciitantc general para la Isia 

SR. L. A. BUCHACA, AGUIAR 92, HABANA 



DON'T OVERLOOK THE 
ADVERTISING PAGES 
or 
THE CUBA REVIEW 



Tlii'ii form iKil llic least iiilvri'sliiiii jiorlion (if 
III!' piil'lirdliiin, diirl llicrc is sufficient I'lirictu 
of iiUH'stniciit [)ri)[)(>silii)ns (mil ixillKihlc mcr- 
rlKiiidixc (iiinotiiirciiii'nls U> ii'cel ei'criirinc's 
need. Cef in correspondenrv willi C.I'IIA 
REVIEW advertisers for the goods yon iixinl. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Paw-Paw tree in Cuba showing the fruit, which are of a large size. 



T H E C U B A R E V I E W 33 

SUGAR REVIEW 

Specially Written for The Cuba Review by Willett & Gray, of New York 



CUBA A POSITIVE COMPETITOR OF JAVA FOR THE TRADE OF JAPAN 1 

SUGAR STOCKS DECREASE 

Our last review for this magazine was dated October lo, 1913. 

At that date the quotation for 96° test Cuba centrifugal sugars was 3.42c. per pound 
"duty paid and is now 3.64c. per pound. 

On the cost and freight basis it was then 2 l/16c. per pound and is now 2 9/32c. c & f. 

It will be noted that the quotations have increased somewhat during the month as the 
visible supplies from Cuba diminished. On October 15th the total stocks of the U. S. 
Atlantic Ports and New Orleans and stocks in the entire island of Cuba together were 
273.936 tons and are now 168,638 tons, showing a decline of 105,298 tons for the month. 

The advance noted has brought the diflference in parity between centrifugals and Eu- 
ropean beet sugar from 68c. then to 41c. per 100 pounds now. 

The visible suppplies from local points is still sufficient for the remainder of the season 
to prevent a further rise to the full parity of Europe though supplies may be drawn upon 
sufficiently to reduce this differential somewhat further, but there is little prospect of the 
parity becoming equalized before new crop Cubas are available. 

The fact is that the improvement in prices d'uring the period under review which was 
not anticipated in our last, has been owing to a change of policy by the domestic beet 
sugar factories in withdrawing their refined product from the far eastern markets, 
thereby increasing largely the distribution of cane refined in these sections, and calling for 
increased suppplies of raws I)y our cane refiners. 

This fortunate circumstance has turned to the special advantage of the Cuban sellers 
as seen in the improvement of values under necessary requirements. 

European markets under new beet crop conditions have worked in the opposite direction 
from our market as will be seen from the fluct.uations in beet sugar since October 15th 
at 9s 9%d to 9s TVod on the 21st, to 9s 11 %d on the 23d, to 9s iVjd on the 31st. No- 
vember opened at 9s 6%d declining to 9s 6d at this writing. 

The Louisiana cane crop is now coming to market under sales contracts for delivery 
of 400,000 bags or more at New Orleans up to December 15th, at 3.31c. per pound, basis 
96° test. Some later sales have been made at rather higher prices, say at 3.36c. per pound 
f. o. b. New Orleans. Some 16,000 bags of Louisiana sugars are on the way to Atlantic 
Ports U. S. and other shipments north will follow at a cost of .15 to .20c. added to the 
f. o. b. New Orleans price. 

The higher market in the United States for raws has led to resales of Cuba sugar 
bought originally for shipment to the United Kingdom. 

Xo sugar of the present Java crop has been shippped to the United Kingdom or the 
United States, all being taken for Japan, China and India at higher values than obtain- 
able elsewhere. 

A new and important innovation to the Cuba sugar trade was the sale recently made 
of some 42,000 bags centrifugals for shipment from Cuba to Japan at an understood price 
of 2.0SC. per lb. f. o. b. Cuba, with freight rate estimated at .33c. per lb. via Suez Canal, 
is causing unusual interest throughout the sugar world. It may be that the shipment will 
go through the Panama Canal if the canal is open for business at that time, but the rate of 
freight would not vary materially. The importance of the sale lies in the fact that it is 
the first time in history that Cuba and Japan have been united in direct sugar business 
interests, and the possibilities which are opened thereby as to the reconstruction of the 
sugar business of the world by the use of the Panama Canal in the immediate future. It 
will afford Cuba a trade outlet of great value enabling that country to increase her crops 
inrlefinitely with the opening of the Panama Canal. 

The sale brings Culia to the foreground as a positive competitor of Java for the trade 
of Japan. 

P»y our Java cable the market value r>f Javas for shi])ment is 1 1 shillings per cwt., 2.40c. 
per lb. free on board, and the freight to Japan is the equivalent of .11c. per II)., togetiier 
2.r,]c. per lb. against 2.41c. per lb. from Cuba. 



34 THECUBAREVIEW 

Insurance, the only other expense, is naturally a little higher from Cuba to make a cost, 
freight and insurance quotation. 

A correspondent reports that "the heavy consumption tax on sugar in Japan has tended 
to keep sugar values at a high level and naturally kept under any increase of consumption 
as compared with a few years ago. 

"The consumption of sugar in Japan still remains at 12% pounds per person or per 
capita. 

"I do not mean that the amount used has not increased at all ; there is an increase 
from less than 297,600 tons to more than 310,000i tons in a few years, but the Japanese 
population has increased more rapidly than the consumption, hence the continued per 
capita of 12% pounds without increase, owing to the increased values." 

"The demand for Brown sugar has decreased, while especially Centrifugals and Gra- 
nulated has increased, showing progress in our living standards." 

,, Refined sugar is being replaced by Centrifugals since the increase of taxation in 
1907, and Centrifugals are also replacing the superior grades of Browns from Formosa, 
which pay the same tax as Centrifugals." 

The writer gives an insight into the sugar trade of Japan not heretofore generally 
understood, and gives an indication that from the low point of 12% lbs. per capita con- 
sumption, an important rise is probable in this progressive nation, and what is of as 
much importance is that any increase is to be filled with Centrifugal sugars under the 
present tariff advantage to this grade. Here then opens up large possibilities for the 
island of Cuba, which has already cut quite largely into the trade of the United King- 
dom with the island of Java. With the several recent outlets opened for the sale of Cuba 
sugars outside of the United States, it is a question if the value of the Cuban product 
can be kept in 1914 as much below the parity of world values in Europe as it was in 
1913, say %c to %c per lb. 

Certainly our United States legislation on sugar, and the opening of new markets to 
the Cuba crop, based on the lowest cost of production in the Sugar World makes for 
Cuba a wonderful outlook in the future for a steady and profitable increase in yearly 
crop production. 

It is finally decided by the Attorney General of the United States that thf; 5 per cent 
advantage in duties on sugar by American vessels is null and void by reason of its 
interference with many commercial treaties, so that eventually the clause may be re- 
pealed by Congress. In the meantime duties will continue to be paid under protest on a 
bare possibility of future recovery of the 5 per cent. 

We add herewith our latest estimate of the World's coming Production and Con- 
sumption : 

The new cane and beet sugar crops of the World give promise of a normal increased 
total yield, estimated to outturn possibly 790,981 tons more than those of last season. 
In the 1912-13 campaign the production was, Cane — 9,185,755 tons ; E/uropean Beets 
8,320,000 tons and American Beet 624,064 tons; total of 18,129,819 tons while for the new 
season 1913-14 estimates are Cane 9,865,800 tons ; European Beets 8,415,000 tons and 
American Beet 640,000 tons; total of 18,920,800 tons. 

Half of the increased production is in Eastern countries, where it will be absorbed, 
except possibly it may admit of exports of part of the next Java crop to Europe. The 
increase in Louisiana and Hawaii will be consumed in the United States. Cuba promises 
about the same production as last season. 

The only increase in Europe is in Russia where most of it is wanted to fill depleted 
stocks, leaving only a moderate quantity, probably, for export. Our latest cable also 
indicates a slight increase in Germany. 

Invisible stocks in principal countries are still less than the normal (since the great 
deficiency in production of two years ago) and the actual consumption throughout 
the World is largely increasing, indicating that not more than the usual stocks will re- 
main at the end of this campaign to carry over to the next season. 

Finally the remaining small stock in Cuba should be wanted by our refiners at full up 
prices. 

At our last writing cane granulated was quoted at 4.25c. less 2 percent but since that 
date quotations have advanced to the 4.35c. basis, although at the close all refiners are 
quoting on the basis of 4.30c. less 2 percent. 

New York, November 14, 1913. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



:5-) 



PLANTATION CARS ""' ^'^'^ •^'"^^ ^^° 



THE PARTS FOR SAME 




No. 1100-F (Palabra de clave ZPUBT) 

Este Vagon-Cisterna es particularniente conveniente para transporte de melaza. 

Construimos vagones-cisterna para transporte de aceites y en general casi todos los 
liquidos con capacidades desde 4000 hasta 12,500 galones y con trucks de una capacidad 
de carga de 30, 40 6 50 toneladas. 

Nuestras talleres para la construccion de vagones-cisterna son las mas grandes del 
mundo y ban sido establecidas desde hace 35 anos. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E. U. A. 

Direccion telegraflca: CAREX, New- York, E. U. A. 

Produccion annual de mas de 100,000 carros 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B. CINTAS Oficios 29-31, Havana 



A. F. CRAIG & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

PAISLEY 
ESCOCIA 

Fabricantes 
de toda clase 

de 

maquinaria 

para 

moler cana 
de azucar 

DIRECCION TELEGRAFICA 
"CRAIG" PAISLEY 

Claves: A.B.C, S^EDICION; McNEIL'S MINING Y GENERAL 




Please mention Tllli CIJUA lihVlhW when writing to Advertisers 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita expresamente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York 



Nuestra ultima resena para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 14 de octubre de 1913^ 
en cuya fecha la cotizacion de los azucares centrifiigos de Cuba, polarizacion 96°, era 
3.42c. la libra derechos pagados, siendo ahora 3.64c. la libra. Bajo la base de costo 
y flete era entonces 2 1/I6c. la libra y ahora es 2 9/32c. c. y f. 

Se observara que las cotizaciones ban aumentado algo durante el mes a medida que 
disminuian las existencias visibles de Cuba. El 15 de octubre las existencias totales en 
los puertos del Atlantico en los Estados Unidos y en Nueva Orleans y las existencias- 
en toda la Isla de Cuba eran 273,936 toneladas, siendo ahora 168,638 toneladas, o sea 
una baja de 105,298 toneladas durante el mes. 

El aumento en las cotizaciones ha ocasionado la diferencia en la paridad entre los 
azucares centrifugos y el aziicar de remolacha de Europa de 68c. que era entonces a 41c. 
las 100 libras ahora. 

Las existencias visibles de puntos locales son aiin suficientes para el resto de la esta- 
cion para impedir mayor alza a la completa paridad de Europa, aunque podra hacerse 
uso de las existencias de tal modo que se reduzca dicho diferencial algo mas, pero hay 
poca probabilidad de que la paridad se ponga al igual antes de que este disponible la 
nueva zafra de azucares de Cuba. 

El hecho es que el alza en los precios durante el periodo bajo reseiia, lo cual no se 
anticipo en nuestra ultima revista, ha sido debida a un cambio de accion por parte de 
las fabricas del aziicar de remolacha del pais en retirar sus prod'uctos refinados de los 
mercados lejanos del este, aumentando por tanto en gran manera la distribucion del 
azucar de cafia refinado en dichas localidades, y por la demanda de nuestros refinadores 
de azucar de cana por mayores existencias de azucares crudos. Esta afortunada cir- 
cunstancia ha resultado en ventaja especial de los vendedores de azucares de Cuba, coma 
puede verse por la mejoria en los precios bajo los necesarios requerimientos. 

Los mercados europeos bajo las condiciones de la nueva cosecha de la remolacha han 
accionado en sentido opuesto a nuestro mercado, como podra verse por las fluctiiaciones 
en el azucar de remolacha, que desde el 15 de octubre eran 9s. 9 %d. a 9s. 7 V^d. el 21^ 
a 9s. 11 lid. el 23, a 9s. 7 %d. el 31. Noviembre empezo a 9s. 6 %d., declinando a 9s. 
6d. a esta sazon. 

Las noticias semanales que recibimos por cable dan informes favorables acerca de la 
recoleccion de las cosechas de remolacha de Europa. El 27 de octubre las fabricas emi- 
tieron su calculo acerca de las cosechas de remolacha de Europa, el cual comparamos 
con el calculo de F. O. Licht en la siguiente tabla : 

Calculo de las Calculo de Licht 

Fabricas 1913-14 Octubre 17, 1913-14 

Toneladas Toneladas 

Alemania 2,479,000 2,650,000 

Austria 1,699,000 1,825,000 

Francia 738,000 775,000 

Belgica 232,000 240,000 

Holanda 231,000 270,000 

Total, paises de la Convencion 5,379,000 5,760,000 

Rusia 1,739,000 1,875,000 

Otros paises 850,000 780,000 

Total toda Europa 7,968,000 8,415,000 

A la publicacion de esta revista no hay indicios de que haya necesidad de reducir los 
calculos acerca de la remolacha, sino mas bien puenden aumentar. 

La cosecha del azucar de cafia de la Luisiana esta llegando ahora al mercado bajo 
contratas de venta para la entrega de 400,000 sacos o mas en Nueva Orleans de aqui al 
15 de diciembre, a 3.31c. la libra, bajo la base de polarizacion 96°. Se han efectuado ven- 
tas mas tardias a precios algo mas altos, como por ejemplo a 3.36c. la libra puesto a 
bordo Nueva Orleans. Hay en camino unos 16,000 sacos de azucar de Luisiana con 
destino a puertos del Atlantico en los Estados Unidos, y seguiran otros embarques 



THE CUBA R E V 1 E \V 



r.-;nbo norte a un costo de .15 a .20c. agregado al precio de los cargamentos libre a 
bordo Xutva Orleans. 

Los prccios mas altos del mercado en los Estados Unidos por los azucares crudos l;an 
ccasicnado reventas de azucar de Cuba destinada primitivamente para embarcar a la 
Gran Rretaila. 

Xo se ha emharcado azucar alguna a la Gran Bretana ni a los Estados Unidos proce- 
dente de la actual cosecha de Java, habiendo sido tomada toda ella para el Japon, China 
y la India a precios mas altos de los que pueden obtenerse en ninguna otra parte. 

Una innovacion in.portante para el con-.ercio de azucares de Cuba ha sido la compra 
de un cargamento de la nueva zafra de centrifugas de Cuba para embarcar al Japon en 
febrero al precio convenido de 2.(]Sc. la libra puesto a bordo Cuba, a un costo de flete 
calculado en .3c. la libra via el Canal de Suez, cuya realizacion esta causando un in- 
teres mas de lo regular en todo el mundo az'ucarero. Puede suceder que el cargamento 
vaya per el Canal de Panama si este canal esta abierto al trafico en esa fecha, pero a/n 
asi el costo de flete no variaria materialmente. La importancia de dicha venta consiste 
en que por primera vez en la historia Cuba y el Japon han estado unidos en lo que se 
refiere directamente a los negocios del azucar, y las posibilidades que a causa de eso se 
presentan para la reconstruccion de los negocios del azucar del mundo haciendo uso del 
Canal de Panama en un futuro no muy lejano. Eso proporcionara a Cul)a una salida 
para su producto, lo cual le facilitara el aumentar sus zafras indefinidamente. 



CABLE ADDRESS: Turnure 



NEW YORK 
64-66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

BANKERS 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and 
Remittance of Dividends and Intel est. Purchase and Sale of Puhlic and Industrial Securities. 
Piiichase and Sale of Lettei: <r l-:xclianf.'e. Collet ti<:n v{ Drafts, Coupons, etc., for account of 
others. Drafts, Pavnients hv Cahle and Letters of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; 
also on England, France, Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

HAVAN.\— X. Gf.lats y Ca. LONDON— Tni; London Joint Stock Rank, Ltd. 

PLF/^TO RICO— Banco Comf.rcial de Puerto Rico PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



SUGAR TESTING APPARATUS 



FUNDADA EN 1851 




POt.AKlSf 

EIMER 



■OPIO SOUNK "!•.()( KS/I .\-| 1\'" 1,.\ lOl'.MA MAS \U)DKUNA 
:i :'t i.ni< Ij.i ilc |i'ilvri, parte de [irisma, y ciiKriiiiaje proloiiKadd. 

& AMEND, ZO-S-Zll Third Avenue, New York 



I lace una especiali- 

dad de surtir 
Tndos los Iiistrit- 
mciilo.i f> a r a la 
Pritcba dc Asucar 
y Hahilitdcidn de 
Lahoralorio. 
Uiiicos Agentes en 
los Estados Ihiidos 
y Canada para los 

STANDARD 

POI.AKISCOPIOS 
Su triple 6 di)1)le 
campo de vision lia 
sido adoptado por 
el (iobierno de los 
Iv'itadiir. Unidos co- 
mo norma. 

'I'oda la ma(|nina- 
ria experimental y 
Icis aparalos de'.rri: 
tos en (< ARricultnral 
Analysis,!) del Prof. 
11. W. Wiley. Se 
snministran c o n 

Klist IS todns los in- 
formes pedidos. 

Pidansc I.istas df 
Prccios Ilustradas. 



I-Iri c incniion THE CUBA REVIEW when ii'iiliii,, l« Advertisers 



38 THECUBAREVIEW 

Dicha venta hace sobresalir a Cuba como un verdadero competidor de Java para el 
comercio del Japon. 

Un corresponsal escribe : "El consumo de aziicar en el Japon permanece aun a 12 % 
libras por persona o por cabeza. No quiero decir que la cantidad usada no ha aumen- 
tado en modo alguno, pero la poblacion en el Japon ha aumentado mas rapidamente que 
el consumo de azucar, y de aqui el que continue el promedio de 12 V2 libras por cabeza 
sin aumento, debido al aumento en los precios. 

"El azucar refinado se esta reemplazando por el azucar centrifuge desde el aumento 
de derechos en 1907, y las centrifugas estan esirr-i-no reemplazando a las clases supe- 
riores de azucares terciados de Formosa, que pagan los mismos derechos que las centri- 
fugas." 

Esta carta da a comprender que desde el bajo consumo de 12 V2 libras por cabeza es 
probable tenga lugar un aumento importante en dicha nacion progresiva, y lo que es de 
igual importancia es que cualquier aumento que tenga lugar en el consumo se llevara a 
cabo con azucares centrifugas bajo la ventaja que ofrece la tarifa actual en el azucar 
de esa clase. Aqui se le presentaran entonces grandes probabilidades a la Isla de Cuba, 
que ya ha intervenido en gran manera en el comercio de la Gran Bretaiia con la Isla 
de Java. Con las varias vias recientes que se ban abierto para la venta de azucares de 
Cuba aparte de los Estados Unidos, la cuestion es si el valor del producto de Cuba 
puede conservarse en 1914 a una cifra por bajo de la paridad de los precios del azucar 
del mundo en Europa como lo estuvo en 1913, es decir, de %c. a %c. por libra. 

Seguramente la legislacion de los Estados Unidos sobre el azucar, y la apertura de 
nuevos mercados para la zafra de Cuba, basado en el mas bajo costo de produccion en 
el mundo azucarero, ofrece a Cuba una brillante perspectiva en el futuro para un estable 
y beneficioso aumente en la produccion anual de sus zafras. 

Ha sido finalmente decidido por el Procurador General de los Estados Unidos que la 
ventaja del 5 por ciento en los derechos del azucar embarcada en buques americanos es 
clausula nula y sin validez a causa de intervenir en muchos tratados comerciales, asi es 
que eventualmente esa clausula sera abrogada por el Congreso. Entretanto se seguiran 
pagando derechos bajo protesta, en la escasa probabilidad de recobrar en el futuro dicho 
5 por ciento. 

Damos aq'ui nuestro ultimo calculo sobre la proxima produccion y consumo de 
azucar en el mundo : 

Las nuevas cosechas del azucar de cafia y de remolacha del mundo prometen un rendi- 
miento normal aumentado, y que se calcula ascendera probablemente a 790,981 toneladas 
mas que la estacion pasada. En la campana azucarera de 1912-13 la produccion fue de : 
Cafia, 9,185,755 toneladas ; Remolacha europea, 8,320,000 toneladas, y Remolacha ameri- 
cana, 624,064 toneladas, un total de 18,129,819 toneladas ; mientras que para la nueva 
estacion de 1913-14 los calculos son : Cana, 9,865,800 toneladas ; Remolacha europea, 
8,415,000 toneladas, y Remolacha americana, 640,000 toneladas, un total de 18,920,800 
toneladas. 

La mitad del aumento de produccion esta en los paises orientales, donde sera absor- 
bida, excepto que probablemente permitira se hagan exportaciones de parte de la nueva 
cosecha de Java a Europa. El aumento en la Luisiana y en Hawaii sera consumido en los 
Estados Unidos. Cuba promete proximamente la misma produccion que la estacion 
pasp.da. 

El unico aumento en Europa es en Rusia, donde se necesita la mayor parte para 
llenar la merma de existencias, quedando solamente una moderada cantidad probable- 
mente para la exportacion. Las ultimas noticias que hemos recibido por cable indican 
tambien un ligero aumento en Alemania. 

-Las existencias invisibles en los paises principales son aun menos de lo normal (desde 
el gran deficit en la produccion de hace dos ahos) y el consumo actual en todo el mundo 
va grandealente en aumento, lo cual indica que al finalizar esta campana azucarera no 
quedafan mas de las existencias usuales para pasar a la proxima estacion.^^^ 

Finalmente las pequehas existencias que queden en Cuba seran ri'e'^^tadas por 
nuestros refinadores a buenos precios. '" 

En nuestra anterior revista el azucar granulado se cotizaba a 4.25c. menos 2 por ciento, 
pero desde entonces las cotizaciones ban subido a la base de 4.35c., aunque al cerrar el 
mercado todos los refinadores estan coti^ando bajo la base de 4.30c. menos 2 por ciento. 

Nueva York, noviembre 14 de 1913. ^ p; 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



39 



THE PROSPECTIVE CROP 

United States Consul James L. Rodgers 
at Havana reports under date of October 
31st that "a week of general rains through- 
out Cuba has changed somewhat the esti- 
mates of the 1914 sugar crop. Up to a 
week ago there had been insufficient rains 
in manj- sections, which, combined with the 
eflfects of lack of cultivation of the cane in 
some districts, owing to restricted financial 
ability primarily, induced the conclusion 
that the output of 1914 would be con- 
siderably less than in 1913. But the rains 
which have come at so important a period 
in the cane crop will undoubtedly help a 
great deal." 

There is no doubt now that with the 
prospects for the cane and the fine con- 
dition of the larger and more modern 
mills, there can be a close approach if the 
weather is as favorable as in 1913. 

Willett & Gray's advance estimate of the 
1913-14 Cuban sugar crop is 2,400,000 tons. 



Public 
Official 
Missing 



The Cuban secret service 

forces are looking for 

Rafael Carrera, formerly 

secretary of public works, 

who was indicted in the 

Supreme Court on November 5th. He is 

believed to have escaped from the island by 

way of Santiago and gone to New York. 

He was under a bond of $10,000. 



TRAMPAS 

PARA 

TACHOS 

AL 

VACIO 




AoF-NTiis: 
MILLER BROS.,TenienteRey 14, Havara, Cuba 
L. J. BARTHELEMY, San Juan, Porto Rico 

Oficina para la Venta: 
HUDSON TERMINAL, NEW YORK, U. S. A. 

l"aljric';id() poi' la Lytton Mfg. Corporation 
Franklin, Va. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 
(Hastings. Light and Heavy Forgings. -\1I kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

JAS. s. BOGUE," Supt. MOBILE, ALA. 



ESTABLISHED 18.')2 



ROHLIG & CO. 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
BREMERhAVEN 



INQUIIUKS IU:OLi:STFI) 



BREMEN BREMERtiAVEN HAMBURG 

Kno.iii NHAi i.itsTH. l(i 17 am IIaikn 11.5 Ai.sti:hi.\m m II I.) 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

undfutakinc thafi-k: all ovfr thf wohld at lowfst h.\ti:s 

THROrflll HATRS to AM) FIU)M FVF.HY I'LAC.F PHOVIDK I) ON APPLICAIION 



Telephone, It.'! Hamilton 
Night Call, 111 llariiilton 



(;ahl(! Addres.s: 
"Ahiworks," New York 



Atlantic 'Basin Iron Works 

Engineers and Boiler Makers 

Marhl/iisls, I'liinilx r>, Tiiisni il lis, I'iix- lillers, lilackMuillis, Coppeisiiiillis, I'aKeiil 
Makiis, Slicil linij Wrirkiis, Iron and I'.rass Castings. Sleaiiisliip Itcpaiis a Sp<'eialty. 



Corner Imlav and Summit Streets 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I'leuse mention Till: CVIi.\ HIA'IICW lulivi, ii'iiliim I') Adnrrlisvi-s 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA 



The United Railways of Havana 

in conjunction with the Cuba Railroad, maintain a service of 
two trains daily between Havana and the growing Eastern 
city of CAMAGUEY, and one Express Train daily between 
Havana and SANTIAGO DE CUBA, the "Dream City of the 
West Indies." Buffet lunch is served on these trains. 

FOUR TRAINS DAILY 

in both directions between Havana and MATANZAS, ^\hich latter city because of its pic- 
turesque situation and the charm of its principal attractions (Yumuri's famous valley and 
the wonderful caves of Bellamar) has long enjoyed distinction as the great "Mecca" of the 
tourists, and it continues to gain in popularity. Excellent Train Service is maintained to 
many other places of great interest to tourists, all of which are fully described in "Cuba — 
A Winter Paradise," a profusely illustrated 80-page booklet with six complete maps and 72 
views illustrative of this wonderful island, sent postpaid on receipt of 3 cents in stamps. 

FRANK ROBERTS, General Passenger Agent 

UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA = = 118 PRADO, HAVANA, CUBA 



151 CALZADA DE VIVES, HAVANA 

Cable, "Wolfe" 



FRED WOLFE 

Negociante en Todas Clases Dealer in all Classes of 

de Ganado Live Stock 

Especialmente en Mulos Especially in Mules 

Always on hand Large Stock of All Classes of Mules— All Mules Sold Are 
Guaranteed as Represented— Can Furnish Any Number Desired on Short Notice 




P. 


RUIZ 


® 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA, CUBA 



JAMES S= COIELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall SL 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



KENTUCKY JACK AND 
PERCHERON FARMS 

We are the largest breeders 
of Mammoth jacks and Per- 
cheron horses in America. 
We have some splendid sad- 
dle horses for sugar planters. 
Thoroughbred cattle, sheep 
and hogs. We can please 
you in pure bred live stock. 



"SMiSia'* Write for prices or catalog. 



COOK & BROWN, Proprietors 
Fayette Co., Lexington, Ky., U. S. A. 




THEODORE E. FERRIS 

Formerly Gary Smith & Ferris 

NAVAL ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER 
Hudson Terminal Bldg., 30 Church Street 
'fhone: 2786 cortlandt New York City 

Plans, Specifications and Superintendence; 
Steamships, Steamboats, Lighters, Tugboats, 
Barges, Yachts — steam and sail and Motor- 
boats of all classes 



An Ideal 

Paint For All 

Metal Surfaces croft & prentiss ^°HT^ife.^t;T/' n 



Silica and Graphite, the pigments contained in Dixon's 
Silica-Graphite Paint, are inert and practically inde- 
structable. Combined with pure boiled linseed oil as 
the vehicle, these pigments make Dixon's Paint of 
unequalled durability. It is an ideal protection for 
tanks, fences and all other steel and iron work about 
the centrals and plantations 



D 

I 

X 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



HAVANA 



CUBA 

National Bank of Cuba 

Government Depositary 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

$6,250,000.00 

Head Office — Havana 

27 BRANCHES IN CUBA 
IS'ew York Agency 

1 WALL STREET 



COLLECTIONS 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL and 
SURPLUS 



$650,000 



TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES COLLECTS UI:NTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Correspondence Solicited from 
Intending Investors 



OIITf;F,RS 
Norman II. Davis - - - - President 
Oswald A. Ilornsljy - - Vice-President 
(Jiindio G. Mendo/ii - - N'ice-I'resident 
J. M. lIopKood ----- Treasurer 
Mogelio (.arbajal ----- Secretary 
W. M. Whilner - Mki. Itcal Estate IJept. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

INCORPORATED 1869 

Fiscal Agent of the Government of the Republic of 
Cuba for the Payment of the Army of Liberation 

Paid=up Capital, 

and Reserve. .. .$25,000,000.00 
Total Assets $180,000,000.00 

Head Office MONTREAL 

New York Agency 
Corner William and Cedar Streets 

Branches in Havana: Obrapia 33, Galiano 92, 
Monte 118, Muralla 52, Luyano 3 (Jesus del 
Monte) ; Antilla, Bayamo, Caibarien, Camaguey, 
Cardenas, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, Manzanillo, 
Matanzas, Nuevitas, Pinar del Rio, Puerto Padre, 
Sagua la Grande, Sancti Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba. 



EsTAiii.isHKn 1814 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Miiniifacturcrs of Ihe Fatuous II. Upmunu 
Uruud of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Pasco dc Tacon l.-)9-168 Aniargura 1-3 



I'STAIM.ISIII.I) ISTCl 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 

Transact a general banking busi= 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Omtce: Agiiar 108 



NEW HOSPITAL BUILDING 

The constriiction of the new civil hospital 
in CJtiantanamo has begun and also the 
road from the city to Jamaica is I)eing 
built. The latter improvement is one long 
and earnestly desired and its necessity has 
never been disputed. 



I'Ica.u: inriiiion Till. CUliA REVIEW When writing ip Advertisers 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, Cor. Stone 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos De Bea & Co. 

BANKERS AMD COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Importacion directa de todas los 
CLitLios manufacliireros del miiiido 

Agents for the Munscu Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espafia 
Independencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

yard: 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting A\ork in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Munro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE&MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL [s. en c i 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 
Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

.4m in a position to push the sales of 

American high class products. Would 

represent a first class firm. 



APART ADO 102 



CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



MT PARANA COMMISSION 
, J. \^J\DJ\.iyj\ MERCHANT 

P. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a 
commission basis or under agency arrange- 
ments. Also furnishes all desired information 
about lands in eastern Cuba. 

F. W. Hvoslef E. C. Day R. M. Michelsen 

Bennett, Hvoslef & Co. 
Steamship Agents and Ship Brokers 

18 BROADWAY - NEW YORK 



Cable: "Benuosco" 



Cuban tobacco farmers have, it is said, 
inherited the belief from the time of Co- 
lumbus and it came then from the In- 
dians, that plants to be hardy to give sat- 
isfaction must be raised in the mountains. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



SAILINGS 



NEW YORK— CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 

SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS 
(From New York) 

S.S. CuRiTYBA - - Dec. 3rd 
S.S. Olinda - - Dec. 1 7th 
S.S. CuRiTYBA - - Dec. 31st 

Nuevitas, Antilla, Nipe Bay, Puerto Padre and Gibara 



NORTHBOUND 


SAILINGS 




(From Nvevitaf) 




S.S. 


Olinda 


- Dec. 


5th 


S.S. 


Clrityba ~ 


- Dec. 


I 9th 


S.S. 


Olinda 


- Jan. 


2nd 



J S.S. Paloma 



FREIGHT ONLY 

- - Dec. 10th S.S. Luristan - 
Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua and Caibarien 



Dec. 24th 



j S.S 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Havana-Sagua Dec. 

Havana-Matanzas 

- Caibarien-Santiago-Guantanamo - - - 

Havana-Cardenas - 

Havana-Matanzas ------- 

A Steamer — Cienfuegos-Manzanillo 



S.S. 
S.S. 



Karen 
Bertha 
S.S. Signe 
S.S. Karen 
Bertha 



5th 
12th 
16th 
19th 
26th 
27th 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 
Sailings from Baltimore, Dec. 4th, Dec. 18th 



Regular Sailings from Mobile, for Montevideo, Buenos Ayres and Rosario ? 






..•.^.•^^.a.^.a.^a.^'.*.^.*.^.*.^.*.^.*.^.*.^.*.. 



I'lt'tisa iiictili'in '/'III-: C.CHA KICVIKW wliin ii'iiliiifi to Ailverliseis 



—•••—4 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in svigar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE, Pres. 



LEWIS C. LILLIE, Sec. and Treas. 



THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 



BROAD AND 
NARROW GAUGE 



LOCOMOTIVES 



SINGLE EXPANSION 
AND COMPOUND 




0PTRAc"f'' PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES JmoNroF service 

Specifications Furnished on Application 
Representative for the West Indies: 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Adprf.ss: "BALDWIN, PHILADELPHIA" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers