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THE CUBA REVIEW 



Link-Belt Sile 



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Tlic J(\cii\ Drive for Sugar ^lill Machinery 

/^PERATE-iin hot. coll, damp or oily 
^^^ places with ut slip or loss, maintaining 
an efficiency of over 98 '/r- Drives on long 
or short centers. Wire rarges of speed 
ratios are available, making possible the 
most advantageous operating speeds. 

flexible as a Belt 

Positive as a Gear 

More 1 fficient Than Either 




i Look for the Name on the Washers; 
1 Look for the Liners in the Joints. 





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Write for Data Boolv Xo. 125, our 112- page price list It ^hows how to figure 
drives, and to tletermiiie costs. 



Link-Belt Company 



299 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 



71 BEAVER STREET 
NEW YORK 



Cable Address: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(All codes used) 

RAIL AND FASTENINGS 
FROGS AND SWITCHES 

CARS 
BOILERS, TANKS, PUMPS 



Direccion Cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(Usaiiios todas laa claves) 

RIELES Y ASEGURADORES 

RANAS Y CAMBIAVIAS 

VAGONES 

CALDERAS, TANQUES, BOMBAS 




Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
" Lion" Brass Trade M ark Labels and Seals attached . 

DJi^ripuv°e"at.iog Jafflcs Walkcf & Cofflpany, Ltd. 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

jose: l. vii^laamil 

Santa Clara 29, Havana, Cuba 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



/^ A DDi^O PARA TODOS USDS y de todos tamanos, de los para caiia con cuatro ruedas y cap^- 

^'»****"'^ cidad de 1 ^ toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 tonelad^Si 

Hacemos una especialidad de juegos de herrajes, inclnyendo los jiiegos 

de ruedas, completamente armados, con todas las piezas de metal, y pianos 

completes para construir los carros a su destino de mad eras del pais 





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RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Addrf.ss; 
Ramai.iam 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

^°8°l5-?r3l' SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. S^liTet 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 



SUGARS 



RAW AND 
REFINED 



82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal — the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensena uno de nueatros carros, todo de acero, para cafia. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capacidades varias y hemos fabricado un gran numero de carroa para cafi^ B^fa 
UBo en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y M6xico, que tienen jaules de acero o de madera y /eon- 
struidas para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cana. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direcci6n telegrdfica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B. CINTAS, Oficios 29-31. Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Offiea In TuUa, 
Oklahoma, Clinton Bids- 

2630 Whitehall BuUdlne 
NEW YORK 




STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Log Angeles Office 

414 Crosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

Agentt in Cuba: 

ZALDO A MARTINEZ 

26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



BUILT BY 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 



PEDRO PABLO DIAGO 



GUILLERMO CARRICABURU 



LOUIS V. plage: CO. 

... STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND SHIP BROKERS ... 

76 CUBA STREET, :: HAVANA, CUBA 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLACfi" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 



82 WALL STREET 
NEW YORK 



Published Weekly Subscription Price $3.00 a year 

WRITE TODAY FOR SAMPLE COPY 

Indispensable to tKe Man Interested in Sugar 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
S 15 
7 15 



P M 



P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
P M 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



PM 



AM 
10 V 
12 15 



PM 



AM 
6 55 
8 33 
10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
PM 



A M 
6 15 
8 15 



7 30 
11 22 
AM 



Fare 
Istcl. 
$2.04 
3.99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana .Ar 

At Artemiaa Lv. 

Ar Paso Real Lv 

At Herradura Lv. 

Ar Pinar del Rio .... Lv. 

Ar Guane Lv 



Fare 
3dcl. 
$1.10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 


AM 
7 49 
5 45 

AM 


AM 
11 09 
9 35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 


AM 
11 47 
9 45 


P M 
3 49 
1 45 


P M 
6 47 
4 45 


6 38 
3 00 

P M 










AM 


P M 



P M 
7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
3 00 
1 30 
P M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " | Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cts. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west of 
Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25%. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New' York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 



$1.00 Per Year 



Advertising Rates on Application 



10 Cents Single Copy 



Vol. XV 



DECEMBER, 1916 



No. 



Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — A Tree Morning Glory, Common in Cuba. 

Frontispiece — American Legation Building, Havana. 

Page 

Cigar Box Cedar Tree, illustrated, by C. H. Pearson 12, 13, 14, 15 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

Cotton Fabrics and Ready-Made Clothmg 29, 30 

Imports and Exports 30 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

Bank of Cuba in New York 29 

Cuba Cane Sugar Corporation 21 

Cuban- American Sugar Company 22, 23, 24, 25 

National Bank of Cuba 21 

New Incorporations •_ 21 

Nipe Bay Company 25, 26, 27, 28 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 21 

Cuban Government Matters: 

Army Horses " 

Cuban Citizenship 7 

Cuban Fruit Seeds 7 

Cuban Poetry 9 

Customs Collections 8 

Havana Horse Show - ■ 9 

Havana library 9 

International Health Commission 7 

Marianao 8 

Minister to Mexico 7 

New Department ^ 

Parcel Post Treaty 9 

Projected Railways 7 

Road Construction 8 

School Ship 9 

Stock Breeding Station 7 

Trade with Cuba ^ 

Publications Received 19 

Shipping Goods to Cuba, by Dean R. Wood 16, 17, 18, 19 

Sugar Industry: 

Havana Sugar School 34 

Mauritius Sugar. q," ' Vo qq 

Plantation White Sugar ^^i ^^< "So 

Sugar Crop Estimates 34 

Sugar Shipments 3o 

Sugar Review, English 35 

Sugar Review, Spanish 36 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads 20 21 

United States Legation in Cuba, illustrated 10, 11 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THL 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL A1U)UT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1916, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



DECEMBER, 1916 



Number 1 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



SUBSIDY FOR PROJECTED RAILWAY 

The President of Cuba signed a decree on 
November 16 granting the Compania del 
Ferrocarril del Norte de Vuelta Abajo a sub- 
sidy ot $G,000 per kilometer ($3,650 per mile) 
for the construction of a railway connecting 
the city of Pinar del Rio and the port of 
Esperanza on the north coast, with a con- 
necting branch to La Palma. It is reported 
that the company will begin work at once. 

The new railway will traverse a rich agri- 
cultural and mineral section, including the 
valley of Vinales, whose scenic beauty has 
alwaj^s been a source of admiration to trav- 
elers in western Cuba. Vinales, the port 
of Esperanza and La Palma, are now con- 
nected with the provincial capital city of 
Pinar del Rio by a splendid highway, over 
which an automobile-bus service is afforded 
twice daily. 

This railway will also traverse part of the 
lowlands of the celebrated Vuelta Abajo 
district and the "Lomas" or hill country, 
where the best tobacco of the world is grown. 



CUBAN FRUIT SEEDS 

Alberto F. Hevia, the Cuban consul in 
Marseilles, France, has reported to the state 
department the use of acids of seeds of agua- 
cate and mamey, two well known Cuban 
fruits, in the manufacture of toilet soap. 



MINISTER TO MEXICO 

Sr. Ramon Pio Ajuria has been designated 
Minister of Cuba to ^Ie.\ico. 



CUBAN CITIZENSHIP 

It is stated by the State Department that 
a great many immigrants have recently been 
granted Cuban citizenship, in one month 
the number amounting to 1,800. 



STOCK BREEDING STATION 

The authorities of Cienfuegos have offered 
to the Cuban Government a plot of land 
to be devoted to the establishment of a 
government stock breeding station, and the 
matter is now being considered by the 
Department of Agriculture. 



INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 

Dr. Juan Guiteras, head of the Cuban Pub- 
lic Health Service, reached New York Dec. 11 
in company with other members of the Inter- 
national Health Commission, headed bj' Major 
General Wm. C. Gorgas from South America 
after a two months trip up the Amazon and 
in Northern Brazil, where they studied yellow 
fever and other tropical diseases. The Com- 
missionstopped at the principal cities and towTis 
on the banks of the .Amazon and in Northern 
Brazil, examining the patients in the hospitals 
and making records of the diseases spread 
by the fever-breeding mosquito. 

Other members of the commission were Dr. 
Henry R. Carter of the United States Public 
Health Service, Dr. C. C. Lyster, Dr. Eugene 
R. WTiitmore, Dr. Wm. R. Wrightson, who 
will make their report to the Rockefeller 
Foundation. 



THE CUBA R E \' I E \V 



NEW DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Frank Menocal, Commissioner of Im- 
migration, is planning to construct a new 
department of ))aths connected with the 
Triscornia quarantine station, to cost approxi- 
mately ?4,000. 



ROAD CONSTRUCTION 

It is reported that land o«-ners and others 
residing in Oriente Province have started a 
subscription for the collection cf fimds to 
repair roads of that region, and to build por- 
tions of roads badly needed. 

Santa Clara is also planning for road re- 
pair in a similar manner. 



MARIANAO 



Public bids are to be asked for the con- 
struction of a residential park at ^Marianao 
Beach and also a park which is to be devoted 
to amusements. 



COUNTERFEIT MONEY 

It is reported in the press that the United 
States Secret Service has discovered that 
coimterfeit of American money is being made 
in Cuba, the coimterfeit money being sent 
to Vera Cruz, Mexico, where it is easily cir- 
culated on account of the lack of faith in 
Mexican paper money. 



CUSTOMS COLLECTIONS 

In the first half of the calendar year 1916 
the customs collections for the entire Republic 
were S17,119,S0S, an increase of ?4,6So,740 
over the same period in 1915. 



CANADIAN POTATOES 

Considerable shipments of potatoes from 
Canada to Cuba by way of Boston are re- 
ported and it is stated that the Cuban demand 
for Canadian seed potatoes will be about 
80,000 barrels. 



PANAMA CANAL 

The Panama Record states that the S. S. 
Jalisco arrived at Cristobal on October 21st 
and proceeded through the Canal bound to 
the West coast of South America. This 
steamer was the first ship flying the Cuban 
flag to go through the Panama Canal. 



HAVANA HOTELS 

.V recent article by Mrs. Mary Roberts 
Reinhart appeared in the Saturdmj Evening 
Post. This article is entitled ''The Pirates of 
the Caribbean," and is exceedingly flippant, 
to say the least, and a portion of the article is 
in questionable taste. This should not have 
been taken seriously, Init imfortunately the 
Cuban press and, we understand, many of the 
Cubans have taken the article literally and 
resent what they consider imwarranted impli- 
cations. The word "Pirates" is applied to the 
Havana hotel keepers. It is to be regretted 
that this frivolous article has been brought 
into undue prominence, but it is quite true 
that in the "Winter season there are not suffi- 
cient hotel accommondations in Havana to 
acconmaodate the large numbers of tourists 
that visit that city. Regardless of the prices 
for accommodations, American tourists have 
been greatly inconvenienced by the lack of 
sufficient hotels. The toiu-ist trade is verj' 
important to Havana and to Cuba generally, 
and if this traffic is to be properly taken care 
of in the future, adequate and reasonable 
hotel accommodations wiU have to be pro- 
vided. 

We note that the Havana Pod has an- 
nounced its intention of providing a bureau 
to be placed in charge of competent persons 
who will look after tourists and provide them 
with accommodations in private houses if it 
is impossible to secure rooms at the hotels. 



OUR UNPRECEDENTED TRADE WITH 
CUBA 

The foregoing figiu-es for the ten month 
period ending with October show an increase 
of 75.389^ in the export figures this year over 
last year, and a gain this year of 128.o09c over 
the same period in 1914. Also a gain in oiu- 
imports of 23.25'^ c for the period this year 
over last year. For the month of October 
alone the figures for this year show a gain of 
over 100':"^ in the imports from Cuba to the 
United States, and a gain of almost GO'^c in the 
export figiues to Cuba over the same month 
last year. 

These figures speak volumes for the very 
favorable trade which is now developing be- 
tween the United States and Cuba, and with 
the continuance of the present conditions for 
another twelve months it is not easy to fore- 
cast just what the ratio of increase will show 
for the next period. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA LIBRARY 

According to the Havana Pout, Dr. \'arora 
Suarez, Mayor-elect of Havana, is plar.r.irg 
to establLsh a puVjlic librar}', and Mr. Arter.d 
R. de Carricarte i.s mentioned for the position 
of Manager. It is designed to have this 
library operated in the same manper as the 
free public libraries of the United States. 
Lecture courses wilJ be established as well 
as branch libra/ics and the circulation, cf 
books vnW be encouraged. 



PARCELS POST TREATY 

It is rumored that the negotiations \\-ith 
the Spanish governm.ent for the signing of a 
treaty between Spain and Cuba prox-iding 
for parcels post arrangements have been 
suspended imtil the war in Europe ends. 
The treaty was opposed bj- tobacco manu- 
facturers in Spain. 



ARMY HORSES 



It is stated that the Cuban Governjnent is 
to establish a horse breeding station at Cam- 
aguey for the purpose of developing horses 
to be used for the Cuban army. The Prov- 
ince of Camaguej' has always been cele- 
brated for its lands for cattle grazing. 



HAVANA HORSE SHOW 

It is proposed to have a Horse Show 
sometime during February w-hich will take 
place at Oriente Park, Havana. A large sum 
of money will be proxided for prizes and 
incidental exper^ses. 



HAVANA 



The Department of Immigration reports 
that during the month of November, just 
passed, 12,552 passengers entered the port of 
Havana. 



CUSTOMS RECEIPTS. NOVEMBER 

The Customs Department of Havana 
states that the receipts of the port for the 
month of XovemJjer totalled $2,630,289.34. 



NEW TELEGRAPH STATION 

Director of Communications, Chas. Her- 
nandez, announced the opening of a new tele- 
graph station at Cascajal, Santa Clara. 



CAMAGUEY 

The Department of Agriculture has an- 
nounced that the n.ew^ Caspar Betancourt 
Cisr.eros school will be formallj- opened the 
latter part of Februar}'. Construction work 
is going on rapidly on the school building. 
One of the novelties of the school will be 
a\aarv. 



SPAIN CANCELS ORDER 

At the request of the Cuban State De- 
partment, the Spanish Government has 
cancelled a portion of a roj-al decree, which 
prohibited the exportation of cigarette 
paper. 

SCHOOL SHIP 

It is reported that the Cuban Government 
is trying to buj' the Italian bark Ninfa for 
use as a school ship. 

CUBAN POETRY 

A volume of poems of Xieves Xenes, the 
leading poetess of Cuba, has been pubEshed 
by a coirmaission of the Cuban Academia 
Xacional de Artes y Letras. 

HAVANA CENTRAL RAILWAY 

A general strike of the emploj-es of ttus 
railroad took place on December 16th, and 
this strike was not cojofined to the motormen 
and conductors, but the workers in the power 
plants abandoned their work and the Line 
was completely tied up. The Railroad 
Company also supplies electric current for 
power and lighting and the consumers of 
current were greatlj- inconvenienced. The 
trouble w'as fin.alh- adjusted after a duration 
of several da vs. 



According to the Havana Post the recent 
exposition in the Republic of Panama has 
resulted well for Cuban exhibitors, many 
orders having been received bj" Cuban 
merchants. 



TOBACCO SHIPMENT 

A shipment of 1,200,000 cigars and 420,000 
boxes of cigarettes is reported for December 
shipment from Havana to Chile via the 
Panama Canal. 



LA GLORIA 



La G'oria Fiir has been postponed to 
Feb. 27-28 & Mar. 1, 1917. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Patio of the American Legation Building, Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 11 



THE UNITED STATES LEGATION IN CUBA 



The United States Government has inn-chased the mansion nf)w ()<cu])ied Ijy tlie American 
Minister in the Cerro — the Cerro noted for handsome resid(>n(es witli trc ])i(al gardens, and 
picturesque surroundings of tropical growths and lofty royal paJnis. 

The Echarte Mlla, belonged to a prominent Cuban family, Alfonso, noted for their hos- 
pitality. Sr. Edelberto P'arres, who married a nic>ce, Fnriqucte Fcharte, was ai)pointed to rep- 
resent the Cuban Government at Venezuela, l)ut never took his post. 

The Legation occupies nearly a block. The main offices are on one side of the house, and 
the apartments, spacious drawings rooms with stuccoed ceilings, corridors with marble pave- 
ments are on the opposite side, while beyond are the gardens and grounds. The main entrance 
has steps leading to the wide piazza, with balustrades intertwined with stcphanotis climbing 
roses and other flowers, adding sweetness to the balmy breeze. Lofty royal palms tower above 
the building and the American flag floats overhead. 

The Ignited States Minister and Mrs. Gonzales have resided in this villa since their coming 
to Cuba and have entertained American and Cuban society and distinguished visiters from the 
United States with charming hospitalit3^ President and Mrs. Menocal were among their 
guests at a ball given by Minister and Mrs. Gonzales at the Legation two years ago. 

The United States Minister to Cuba, Mr. William Elliot Gonzales, is American bj' birth; 
his mother was a member of a distinguished South Carolina family, the Elliots, and his father, 
Gen. Aml^rosio J. Gonzales, was a Cuban general who fought under Gen. Narciso Lopez. Gen. 
Gonzales made his home in Columbus, South Carolina, and his two sons were born in the 
South. Until he came to Cuba, during the Spanish American war, as a captain in the South 
Carolina Volunteers, Mr. W^illiam Gonzales had never visited the home of his father. 

Since the advent of the Republic of Cuba, five American Ministers have served their govern- 
ment in Cuba. The first, Mr. Herbert Squires, and his family resided in Marianao at the 
Quinta Hidalgo; Mr. Edwin V. Morgan, his successor, also resided in Marianao. The third 
Minister appointed to Cuba, Mr. Henry Brinckerhoff Jackson, and Mrs. Jackson resided in a 
mansion opposite the Eelen Church that formerly belonged to the Cuban Marquis de Al- 
mendares, and was the scene of many social functions during the regime of Spain. ]\Ir. 
Arthur Beaupre and Mrs. Beaupre took a house on the Malecon, upon the arrival of Minister 
Beaupre in Havana. 

So far as we know, there is only one other Legation the property of the American Govern- 
ment, namsly, Bucharest, the capital of Roumania. Negotiations have been on foot to pur- 
chase other property for embassies and legations abroad, but so far, have not culminated in the 
purchase of foreign lands for that purpose. 



CHEAP SUGAR NOT IN SIGHT ^j^^^ -^ ^^.jl ,^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^j^^ ^^^ 

The peace negotiations will have to come sources of supply will be available. Li the 

to a head very soon to bring about a reduction face of such conditions it is regarded as 

in the price of sugar next Fall, according fortunate that Cuba is beginnin.& to harvest 

to F. C. Lowry of the Federal Sugar Refining what promises to be a record crop, amomiting 

Company. He believes that if the war to 3,400,000 tons, as against 3,006,000 

«nds in the next few months it may be possible tons last year. Other increases should make 

for Belgium., Fraace, Russia, Germany and the world's supply larger this season by 

Austria to increase their sowing of sugar 700,000 tons, 
beets .next April, which would mean an 
increase in the supply of raw sugar in the 

following October. During the war nearly University of Illinois Bulletin, November 

every country in the world, save Germany 20th. 1916, Urbana, ill. 

and countries in Asia, has purchased Ameri- This issue contains a description with illus- 

can refined sugar. If peace is deferred until trations of the new Ceramic Engineering 

too late for increased planting next Spring Building, dedicated Dec. 6 and 7th, 1916. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




A Cigar Box Cedar Tree, Showing Character of Barlv. 



CIGAR BOX CEDAR 



By C. H. Pearson 

Of the many important timber trees native to Cuba the cigar box or Spanish cedar is at 
present of greatest ccmmercial importance. The tree is known locally by the Spanish-speaking 
people as cedro, cedro macho, cedro de ramazon, cedro dulce and cedro hembra. In the trade it is 
known also as West Indian or tropical American cedar, because it is indigenous to all the 
islands of the West Indies and to the mainland from southern Mexico southward to Brazil. 
Owing to its extensive natural range of growth there seems to be a pronounced tendency in the 



THE CUB A R h \ I K W 



13 




A Cigar Box Cedar Tree Planted for Shade 
and Ornament. 



cedar to run into varieties, many of which assume the character of distinct species, and trees 
almost similar in appearance to the true cedar occur as tar south as Argentina. Perhaps no 
other tropical timber tree can thrive in such a great variety of soils as the cigar box cedar, but 
it is probably most abundant in the deep, moist and rich soil of southern Mexico, where it is, 
however, inferior, though larger than in Cuba and Jamaica. The best wood is said to be derived 
from trees grown on the upland situations in Cuba, Haiti and Trinidad. In Cuba, it reaches 
its greatest development in the rich valleys and fertile mountain slopes. 

The tree yielding this important wood attains a height ot from SO to 100 feet and a trunk 
diameter of from two to six or more feet. The trunks which are usually cylindrical above the 
enlarged root swelling are tree from branches for the first 30 or 40 feet. The tree has been de- 
scribed as yielding enormous dimensions, furnishing boards of such great width that a single 
one is sufficient to make a door or a table top. The logs frequently contain from 3,000 to 5,000 
board feet; the average run where 15 inch logs are included is about 700 board feet to the 
tree. Unfortunately, the trees develop large buttresses extending to the height of from six to 
ten feet from the ground. The best portion ot the trunk oi a tree felled for timber is generally 
left in the lorest, because those who fell the trees invariably cut them above the root swellings. 

When cigar box wood is first cut it is pale reddish brown color which upon exposure to 
light and air turns darker, often remotely resembling certain grades of cherry; other grades 
resemble true mahogany for which it is often substituted and used. The most desirable wood is 
obtained from trees grown on uplands. Such trees have a reddish brown wood that is fuiely 
mottled and figured. The majority of the iogs are cross-grained and show alternate lines of 
light and dark shades to mahogany. The wood from large burls, burr or sound knots are 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Cigar Box Cedar Tree Grown on Upland 
Soil. 



Logs of Cigar Box Cedui', Squared and 
Ready for Shipment to Marlvet. 



highly esteemed by all cabinet makers. These are usually beautifully figured with spots and 
mottles, curled and matted together. Very large burrs are sometimes procured from old trees 
in the virgin forests of Cuba. The wood from the buttresses is often elegantly figured and it 
seems remarkable that not mere cf it is used. 

This handsome fast-g; owing tree produces one of the finest timbers in the West Indies. 
Cigar box cedar is strong, moderately tough, durable, works well, splits with difficulty and is 
susceptible of a h igh polish which it retains indefinitely. The wood emits a distinct aromatic or 
cedary odcr, which is true also of some other species of this important group of timber trees. 
Cigar box cedar is said to be ^roof against the attack of white ants which are so destructive to 
woods in the tropics. There are, however, no authoritative records showing that it is entirely 
imnuuie to the ravages of these insects or to the teredo. All users of cedar, and writers on 
timber seem to agree that the wood is very durable in contact with the soil and resists the 
action of the weather. This quality of withstanding the action of the elements is due probably 
to the presence of an essential oil in the wood, which is known in the trade as cedrela oil. 

Speaking about cigar box cedar in the West Indies, Cook and Collins* state that this pre- 
cious wood of an agreeable odor is very lasting. It is heavier, more compact, and darker 
colored than mahogany, which the variety called cedro macho much resembles; the 
variety known as cedro hembra is much lighter, less compact and much lighter in 
color. The first-named variety is used for furniture, carpenter work and the interior 
of houses, and for the latter is preferred to mahogany, being softer and more easy to work, 
also having the advantage of never being attacked by insects. It is used also for win- 
dows, balconies, etc. The military authorities use if for boxes and powder vessels. This 
softer variety is the kind that is generally preferred in making cigar boxes. The more compact 
kind is used extensively as a mahogany substitute. 

It is not always easy to distinguish between the wood of cigar box cedar and true 
mahogany. They are closely related botanically and in many respects are quite similar. 
Those who have handled and worked both woods can usually tell them apart quite readily. 
The odor of the cedar is perhaps the most reliable characteristics, but there is a community 

♦Economic Plants of Pcrto Rico, Washington, 1903. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



15 




stump of Cigai Box Cedar, Showing the 
Amount of Waste. 

of other properties which ciui be relied upon in distinguishing it from mahogany. Cedar is 
coarser, lighter in color and weight, softer and is more easily worked. Moreover, the annual 
rings of growth are more prominent and the pores are considerably more conspicuous on a smooth 
transverse section. In smooth longitudinal sections of cedar may be observed dark colored 
cellular masses in the pores; in true mahogany these masses are usually white or nearly so. 

Cigar box cedar is highly esteemed for a good many purposes both locally and abroad. 
The bulk of the wood that goes to New York, Liverpool, London and Hamburg is utilized in 
making cigar boxes. There is hardly a limit to the number of uses to which cedar may be put. 
It possesses properties that fit it for the same purpose? as true mahogany and teak. 

The bulk of the cigar box csdar used in the United States is obtained in Cuba. According 
to the Commerce Reports the following quantities have been received from Cuba since 1911; 



Qhantity Value 

Year Board Ft. Dollars 

1911 13,811,000 788,214 

1912 9,783,000 545,197 

1913 12,815,000 723,837 

1914 9,866,000 591,716 

1915 8,036,000 468,934 

The amounts received from all sources from 1911 to 1915, inclusive, are as follows: 

Quantity Value 

Year Board Ft. Dollars 

1911 18,172,000 995,968 

1912 15,035,000 807,699 

1913 19,092,000 1,094,048 

1914 17,285,000 982,152 

1915 15,875,000 947,313 



16 THECUBAREVIEW 

SHIPPING GOODS TO CUBA AND OTHER LATIN 
AMERICAN COUNTRIES 



By Dean R. Wood 



Consular Invoices. — -Consular Invoices must be presented in the Custom House for goods 
shipped to Cuba and must be correctly made out. In addition to the Consular Invoice, certi- 
fied to before the Cuban Consul, at least two other copies of the invoice, exact copies of the 
Consular Invoice, should be sent to buyer or consignee, as in addition to the Consular Invoice 
one other copy must be presented in the Custom House, and the importer needs one copy for 
his own information, thus making two copies in addition to the Consular Invoice, or three 
copies in all. Only one Consular Invoice, signed by the Cuban Consul, is necessary. Consular 
Invoices for shipments of goods under $5.00 in value are not necessary,but if not presented goods 
will lose the benefit of the Reciprocity Treaty between Cuba and' the United States. For 
shipments, $5.00 or more in value. Consular Invoices must be presented in the Custom House. 
Invoices should always be made in Spanish. 

Bills of Lading. — Bills of Lading must also be presented in the Custom House, with the 
Consular Invoice and other copy of invoice. Bills of Lading must be countersigned by the 
Cuban Consul or a fine of $3.00 will be placed on the goods. Bills of Lading for short shipped 
goods must also be signed by the Cuban Consul or the goods will J)e fined. 

Net and Gross Weight. — Net and gross weight of package or box, must be given in the in- 
voice and the net weight of each article or class of goods, stated separately in a plain and 
distinct manner. Care should be taken to have these net weights correct, as most articles 
or goods, pay Custom House duties by weight. 

Goods not the Production of the United States.— ^Goods and merchandise not the production 
of the soil or industry of the United States should be placed on a separate Consular and com- 
mercial invoice, as only such goods as are the production of the United States are entitled to 
benefit of the Reciprocity Treaty between Cuba and the United States. Shipments of foreign 
goods under $5.00 in value Consular Invoices not required. All shipments of foreign goods, 
$5.00 or over in value, Consular Invoices must be presented. 

Porto Rican Goods and Articles the Production of Porto Rico.— Goods and merchandise 
productions of Porto Rico are entitled to benefit of the Reciprocity Treaty between Cuba and 
the United States and may be placed in invoice together with other goods and productions of 
the United States. State in invoice "productions of Porto Rico." 

Coffee Grown in Porto Rico. — Coffee grown and produced in Porto Rico is entitled to the 
benefit of the Reciprocity Treaty between Cuba and the United States. State in invoice 
"products of Porto Rico." 

Groceries. — In sending such goods and articles as groceries to Cuba, care should always be 
taken to put coffee, tea, etc., on a separate invoice, as these articles are not productions of the 
United States. Coffee and Tea have not been gronm in the United Stales up to the present time. 
Metals.— Give different kind of metal in Consular Invoice— brass, tin, copper, iron, cast 
iron, steel, aluminum, etc. Every kind of metal pays a different duty and under different 
paragraphs of the Custom House Tariff. Copper and bronze pay more than other metals. 
Aluminum pays a high duty and care should be taken to have net weights of articles manu- 
factured of aluminum correct. 

Cast Iron. — -When goods are manufactured of cast iron always state in invoice "cast iron/' 
as this kind of iron pays much less in the Custom House than steel or other kinds of iron. 

Prices. — Prices should not be included or bunched together, but price of every article or 
class of goods, given separately, as some goods pay duty by weight and some ad valorem. 

Fabrics.— Give number of pieces, yards, factory mark or reference, and net weights. Care 
should be taken to have net weights correct. If possible and convenient give number of threads 
in a square of 6 millimeters (M inch) and if these threads are plain or cross web. This 



THECUBAREVIEW 17 

information is not necessary, Init it is a help to theCustom House broker in making the Cus'om 
House Entry, as fabrics pay Custom House duty in Cul)a according to the number of thre;:ds 
in a square of millimiters or one fourth of an inch. Cross web fabrics pay a little more than 
plain web. It would also be advisable if possible, to state if fabrics contain dyed threads as 
in this case there is a Custom House surtax of 30% on the goods. If any other articles or goods 
other than fabrics are contained in theshijjments the net weight and price of these other goods 
must be given plainly and separately. In sending fabrics to Cuba, samples should always l)e 
sent apart from the goods, as in the Custom House in Cuba samples are always taken and send- 
ing the samples separately prevents goods from being mutilated. 

Mixed Fabrics. — Mixed fabncs, cotton mixed with silk, wool, or any other mixture, should 
be so stated in the invoice. The principal material should also be stated and proportion of the 
principal material. If proportion of principal is silk or wool then goods pay duty ad valorem 
and not In* threads as cotton goods. Also if goods contain one-fifth or more of silk, wool, or 
other material, goods pay duty ad valorem as silk or wool. 

Ready-Madc Clothing. — -Give material, cotton, wool, silk, etc., if composed of mixed ma- 
terial, and proportation of each. Do not state in invoice u^ool or silk, unless material is act- 
ually ivool or silk, as those goods pay more duty than cotton and other material. Ready made 
clothing imported into Cuba is generally made of cotton. If possible and convenient, give 
number of threads in a square of 6 millimiters or one-fourth of an inch, the same as for fabrics. 
Ready-made clothing cotton, in Cuba pays Custom House duty according to the fabric and 
an additional surtax of lOO^c on the making. Care should be taken to have net weights 
correct. Ready-made clothing is imported into Cuba in very large quantities. 

Package and Packing. — Do not invoice goods as placed in certain box or package and then 
place in some other box or package. Pack goods in package as per invoice. 

Weights. — The weights both gross and net, should be given in kilos. 

Storage Charges. — Five days only are allowed after vessel arrives in Cuba in which to 
present the Custom House papers including Consular Invoi e and Bill of Lading, and if not so 
presented heavy storage charges are placed on the goods. In some ports only three days are 
allowed. Send all papers immediately, including Consular Invoice and Bill of Lading. 

Matches. — Matches pay an internal revenue tax of two cents for every 200 matches. 
Advisable to give number of boxes and number of matches per box. 

Tobacco. — Tobacco pays an internal revenue tax. Care should be taken to give correct 
weights both net and gross. 

Exaggerated Values. — Do not give exaggerated values, as many articles of goods pay Cus- 
tom House duty ad valorem. 

Porcelain. — In the Ignited States the word ''porcelain," is applied rather indiscriminat- 
ingly to goods which are not actually porcelain, crockery, vitrified clay, etc. Some confusion 
has been caused in foreign Custom Houses on account of this. The real porcelain is this and 
transparent. Do not invoice as porcelain unless goods are actually porcelain. The foregoing 
applies particularly to insulators of vitrified clay which are often invoiced as porcelain. 

Iron Bed*. — Iron beds are imported into Cuba in very large quantities, coming almost 
entirely from the United States. Advisable to state in invoice if beds have adornments of 
brass or any other material, as when this is the case the goods pay duty under another para- 
graph of the Custom House Tariff. 

Machinery. — ^In shipping machinery' to Cuba the class of machme, number of machine, 
and year of construction should be given in the invoice. If the factory is located at an interior 
point a record should be kept at port of shipment of pieces or boxes short shipped. Failure 
to do this has resulted in a vast amount of confusion in foreign Custom Houses. 

Breaking the Official Tare. — WTien it may be desired to break the official taie on any box 
or package, this may be accomplished by placing in the box any other small article such as a 
package of tooth picks, nails, etc. The value and net weight of these other small articles should 
be given in the invoice. In sending to Cuba such goods as rain coats, iron beds, brass beds, 
saddles, leather gloves, harnesses and cartridges, the official tare should always be broken. 



18 THECUBAREVIEW 



Translations into Spanish.— Invoices must be translated into Spanish and presented in the 
Custom House in Cuba together with other papers. It is not absolutely necessary for an ex- 
porter in foreign country to make out the invoices in Spanish, but the importer in Cuba, or his 
Custom House broker, must make the translation and present the same in the Custom House. 
When the invoices are made in any other language than Spanish it is likely to cause some 
delay in the Custom House despatch. Exporters who wish to build up a prosperous ])usiness 
in Spanish-speaking countries can never make a success unless they are willing to send the 
invoices in Spanish. 

Advertising Matter Without Value. — Net weight must be given in the invoice and a state- 
ment may be made that articles have no commercial value. Estimated values must be given, 
and if this is not done, the goods will have to pay duty. Advertising matter without any 
commercial value, in small quantities, is generally admitted free of duty in Cuba. 

Articles and Goods Shipped by Other Parties.— When an exporter in the United States 
combines in his shipment goods purchased or shipped by other parties, prices and net weights, 
also gross weight must be given. 

,S7, oes. ^Shoes are imported into Cuba in very large quantities. Shoes in the Custom 
House in Cuba are divided in three classes as follows: 

Class No. 1. Men's shoes, sizes No. 5 or larger, which pay duty at the rate of 
$0.1365 per pair and an additional 9.1% ad valorem. 

Class No. 2. boys', young men's, ladies' and misses' shoes, which pay duty at 
the rate of $0.91 per pair and an additional 9.1% ad valorem. 

Class No. 3. children's shoes. No. 93^2 and smaller, which pay duty at the 
rate of $0,455 per pair and an additional 9.1% ad valorem. 

If any other articles other than shoes, laces, buttons, etc., are shipped in the same ship- 
ment with shoes, the net weight and value of these other articles must be given distinctly 
in invoice. In invoice give sizes of shoes. Some exTJorters mark on the outside of the box 
the number of pairs contained therein, which is a very good idea. As shoes are a kind of 
merchandise which often suffers loss en route, such goods should be carefully packed and the 
boxes wired. Ship shoes in packages or box as per invoice and do not invoice as placed in 
a certain box while the goods are actually placed in some other box. In the Custom House 
in Cuba for shipments of shoes, the shoes are counted pair by pair and the Custom House 
appraiser and the Custom House broker must both be satisfied that shipment is complete 
and nothing lacking. 

Documents Not Signed.— The shipping documents for ex-port shipments are often sent 
abroad without being properly signed and shipments have been held up in foreign Custom 
Houses on this account. Exporters in the United States should see that documents for export 
shipments are properly signed. 

Documents in Duplicate. — In most Custom Houses all documents must be presented in 
duplicate which should be remembered by exporters in the United States. This does not 
apply in general to Bills of Lading as in mostCastom Houses, but one copy of the Bill of Lading 
is required. 

White Metal, Britannic Metal and Nickel— In sending to foreign countries goods man- 
ufactured of white metal, britannic metal and nickel, do not invoice as manufactured ot such 
material unless actually the case. Some exporters invoice goods as white metal, etc., when 
goods are manufactured of steel plated. This applies particularly to nickel. Invoices are 
often received stating that goods are nickel when, as a matter of fact, the goods are nickel 
plated. 

Packing List.— The system used by some exporters, particularly of machinery, of giving 
weights in a packing list separate from the invoice, is not satisfactory. Often the packing 
list is lost or the owner of the goods fails to send the packing list to the Custom House broker 
who finds that he has no data whatever of weights. It is advisable and best to give weights 
in the invoice and, if desired, a packing list may also be sent, but give all necessary particulars 
and information in the invoice. 

/p^^gs^—Fines are often placed in foreign countries on goods particularly for mistakes 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



in the invoice. In Cuba if it be found that the actual weights of goods is more tlian /50% 
greater than the weight given in the invoice the goods are liable to confiscation. 

General Inslructions. — The correct making out of invoices and other shipping documents 
to Cuba and other countries, is not at all a difficult matter. All that is generally necessary- 
is to give gross and net weight of each box or package and net weight of each article or class 
of goods, and not bunch prices, but give prices separately. To such firms and merchants in 
the United States who are comparatively new at the export trade it may appear a difficult 
matter, but after a while it will be much easier. There are quite a number of firms in the United 
States who now enjoy a prosperous trade with Cuba and who at first made all kinds of mis- 
takes, but who are now sending their invoices and other shipping dociunents very correctly 
and nicelv made out. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

Tropical Agriculture. By Earley Vernon Wilcox, of 
the United States Department of Agriculture. 
8vo. Cloth. $2.50 net. D. Appleton and Com- 
pany, New York. 

This book is written from the standpoint 
of the general reader, business man and agri- 
cultural student. It deals with tropical 
agriculture in the commercial sense, the pro- 
duction of things to eat, wear, and use in 
technical industries. It presents in a brief 
form what everybody ought to know about 
the tropics. Particular attention is given to 
the nature, source, and commercial import- 
ance of tropical products. The volume con- 
tains an account of about 350 tropical pro- 
ducts of peculiar interest and commercial 
importance, and it presents also an intelli- 
gible picture of animal industry in the tropics, 
as well as of climate, soils, and economic 
conditions. 

The author, now an Administrative As- 
sistant in the States Relations Service, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, was for six years 
in charge of the Hawaii Experiment Station. 
Good general treatises on "Tropical Agri- 
culture" exist in foreign languages, and there 
are some large and expensive English works 
which give a comprehensive view of the sub- 
ject. American contributions are chiefly 
monographs on individual crops, such as 
bananas and rubber. Dr. Wilcox's book is 
the first American publication to cover the 
whole subject of the crops, cultural methods, 
and livestock of the tropics in an authorita- 
tive and popular style. 



The Inlernaiional Movement of Fertilizers 
and Chemical Products Useful to Agriculture." 

Under this title the International Institute 
of Agriculture in Rome has lately published 
its half-yearly review on producing, trade 
and consumption of chemical fertilizers, form- 
ing a portion of the September number of 



the Bulletin of Agricultural and Commercial 
Statistics. 

The 75 pages of this review include a con- 
siderable number of statistics, some official, 
some from other trustworthy sources. Phos- 
phatic, Tyotash and nitrogenous fertilizers are 
dealt with, as well as the principal chemical 
products ^isijul to agriculture. 



Aparatos Destiladores de Agua, published 
by Eimer & Amend, 205 Third Ave., New 
York City. 

This booklet gives a full description of the 
various types of apparatus for distilling water. 
It is universally recognized that distilled 
water is a very important factor in laboratory 
analyses and also for other industrial opera- 
tions, as weU as for domestic use. This appa- 
ratus is, therefore, very important in the mod- 
ern laboratory and in the modern industrial 
plants. In selecting a distilling apparatus, 
the following points should be carefully con- 
sidered. 

1st. — -The quality of the product. 

2nd. — The economy of operation. 

Sd.^The easiness with which it may be 
kept clean. 

4th. — -The cost of upkeep and simplicity 
of operation. 

5th. — The durability of the apparatus. 

The Barnstead distilling apparatus, of 
which this publication treats, is of such types 
as may be heated by coal, natiu-al gas, gaso- 
line or electricity, and the various sizes have 
the capacity of producing one gallon per hoiu- 
up to ten gallons per hour. 

Copies of this publication may be secured 
by application to Messrs. Eimer & Amend, 
New York City. 



HAVANA 

The Director of the Census Department 
has stated that the census of Havana on the 
31st of May, 1916, was 359,259. 



20 THECUBAREVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The earnings ot the Cuba Railroad for the month of October and for the four months 
ended October 31st compare as follows: 

1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

October gross $504,336 $391,108 $277,147 $347,562 $289,812 $257,681 

Expenses 358,438 249,153 161,285 197,393 171,293 154,601 

October net $145,898 $141,954 $115,862 $150,168 $118,518 $103,080 

Other income 933 

Net income 146,832 141,954 115,862 150,168 118,518 103,080 

Fixed charges 87,091 72,012 70,195 66,791 66,791 60,125 

October surplus $59,740 $69,942 $45,666 $83,377 $51,727 $42,955 

Fro7n July \st. 

Four months gross $2,156,599 $1,639,755 $1,317,855 $1,372,873 $1,257,574 $1,037,957 

Four months profits ... . 851,398 718,436 531,742 328,630 256,416 211,375 

Other income 3,480 

Fixed charges 348,623 288,306 280,962 267,166 266,888 240,500 

Four months .surplus. .. . $506,254 $430,129 $250,779 $328,630 $256,516 $211,375 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of October 10 Months to Oct. 31 

1916 1915 1914 1915 1914 

Gross earnings $532,358 $463,385 $464,438 $4,572,321 $1,477,642 

Operating expenses 197,205 188,820 197,301 1,872,659 2,102,600 



Net earnings 335,153 274,565 267,137 2,699,662 2,375,042 

Miscellaneous income 11,014 15,083 6,361 92,001 93,365 



Total net income 346,167 289,648 273,498 2,791,663 2,468,407 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges. 213,622 182,480 166,131 1,707,328 1,399,361 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipts: 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

October 28th . £30,423 £28,590 £17,792 £18,977 £17,300 £17,899 

November 4th 32,018 26,663 19,152 19,898 20,235 19,818 

November 11th 33,374 26,772 20,022 20,655 20,879 18,619 

November 18th 31,885 26,987 20,947 21,163 19,829 16,261 



EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



Weekly receipts: 

October 28th 

November 4th . . . 
November 11th. . . 
November 18th. . . 
November 25th . . . 



1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


£5,247 


£4,635 


£4,197 


£3,791 


4,945 


4,752 


4,646 


4,080 


5,333 


4,873 


4,975 


4,511 


5,353 


4,586 


4,673 




5,501 


4,625 


4.402 


4,903 



THECUBAREVIEW 21 

EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAY 

Weekly receipts: 1916 1915 1914 1913 

October 28th £9,518 £8,679 £5,614 £6,688 

November 4th • 8,961 7,809 6,106 6,872 

November 11th 7,977 7,876 6,502 7,038 

November 18th 7,641 7,932 7,032 7,376 

November 25th 7,995 9,396 8,073 7,451 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

As quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., New York. 

Bid. Asked. 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 923^ OBJ^^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 98^ 99J^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 963^ 9&% 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 434% Bonds of 1949 86 88 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 103 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 94 97 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 95 96 1^ 

Cuba Co. 6% Debenture Bonds 99J^ 1003^ 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 100 lOlM 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 94 95 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 1063^ 109 3^ 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 102 105 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 none 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 100 110 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock 150 200 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 102 102 3^ 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 65 70 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st Mtge. Bonds 92 95 

All prices of bonds quoted on an and interest basis. 



NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA NEW INCORPORATIONS 

The National Bank of Cuba has declared Central Sugar Corp'n, general sugar plan- 

a semi-annual dividend of 4 per cent, plus tation, refinery, tobacco, fruits, coffee, other 

an extra dividend of 1 per cent. The Bank products, 30,000 shares of $100 each, 80,000 

of Cuba in New York, which opened for shares of no par value, carry on business with 

basiness in May of this year, declared a di\-i- .$3,400,000 (tax paid, $5,500); F. J. Bomm, 

dend of 4 per cent., payable January 2. F. S. Connett, H. P. Dubois, 37 Wall St. 



CUBA CANE SUGAR CORPORATION 



Cane Sugar Inverting Co., Jersey City, 

At the annual meeting of the Cuba Cane manufacture inverted cane sugar, .$2,000; 

Sugar Corporation on Jan. 8 the b\ -laws will He/mar L. Meyer.s, Jersey City; H. L. 

be amended to decrease the number of di- Franck, Brooklyn; I. W. Parmenter, New 

rectors from twenty-four to twenty-two. York. 



22 THECUBAREVIEW 



THE CUBAN-AMERICAN SUGAR COMPANY 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30. 1916 

The production of raw sugar for the year was 268,310 tons (of 2,000 pounds) as compared 
with 236,401 tons for the year ending September 30, 1915. While the tonnage of cane ground 
was less then in the previous year, the production of raw sugar was the largest in the history 
of the Company; due to favorable weather conditions the percentage of sucrose in the cane was 
exceptionally high. 

The operations of the raw sugar mill at Gramercy, La., were suspended in the fall of 1915. 
It was found more advantageous to dispose of the cane elsewhere. 

The tonnage of cane ground and the year's output of raw and refined sugar for the last two 

years appears in the following table: 

1915-16 1914-15 

Cane ground 2,188,047 tons 2,218,168 tons 

Rmv Sugar Production . (flags 320 Lbs) {Bags 320 Lbs) 

Chaparra 623,040 525,088 

Delicias 436,889 315,872 

Tin-uaro 248,536 236,956 

Unidad 116,547 84,472 

Mercedita 76,521 93,617 

Constancia 175,407 196,055 

Gramercy, La -5,447 

Total 1,676,940 1,477,507 

or 268,310 tons or 236,401 tons 

Refined Sugar Production.: 

Cardenas Refinery, Cuba 24,996,597 lbs. 14,713, 144 lbs. 

Gramercy Refinery, La 117,513,196 lbs. 154,954,482 lbs. 

The net profit ot the Company for the fiscal year amounted to $8,235,112.39, after deduct- 
ing $729,338.68 for depreciation on Buildings, Machinery and Equipment. Ample provision 
has been made for doubtful Colonos' Accounts and for the year's proportion of the cost of 
original plantings. 

During the fiscal year $768,408.69 has been expended on the acquisition of additional lands 
in Cuba, consisting of virgin cane lands adjoining the extensive territory of Chaparra, and of 
the Asuncion Estate, adjacent to Mercedita. The latter purchase strengthens and completes 
Mercedita with a cane supply commensurate with this modern and efficient house. 

The total acreage now owned and leased by the Company is as follows: 

Acres In Cane Per Cent 



Owned 448,640 



Leased 



146,579 32 

16,713 7,815 47 

465,353 154,404 33 

These lands have been carefully acquired during a periotl of sixteen years. While, as 
shown, one-third is devoted to cane, a necessary part is devoted to pastures and other uses; 
there remain available for such further development as the company may elect to make in the 
future, over one hundred thousand acres of fertile soil, expecinlly suitable for cane. 

During the year improvements of the plants have involved the expenditure of $1,902,018.11 
on factory buildings, mills and machinery, dwellings and SL'hools, new warehouses, railroad 
extensions and equipment. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The detailed appraisal of the company's buildings, machinery and equipment referred to 

in the last annual report has been made, and these now stand at $17,800,140.80, based on normal 
and not on existing values of material and labor. After the deduction of .SI, 827,448. 13 made as a 
result of this appraisal, and 01 $.339,.5.59. 2 1 expended during the year on special replacements 
to maintain the factories in their most efficient state, the reserve to meet general depreciation, 
which is carefull}' provided for in every budget, is now .13,932,041.09, or about 22 per cent, of 
the book value of buildings and machinery. 

KeguJar quarterly dividends of 1% per cent, were paid on the preferred stock, and quart- 
erly dividends of 2J^'2 per cent, were paid on the common stock; an extra cash dividend of 10 
per cent, on the common stock and a distribution of conomon capital stock equivalent to 40 per 
cent, were declared to owners of common capital stock, both payable October 2, 1910. 

During the year .1307,000 of The Cuban-.\merican Sugar Company's Six Per Cent. Bonds 
were retired by the operation of the Sinking Fund Provisions, making a total of $1,2.51,000 of 
these bonds retired in this manner, leaving outstanding on September 30, 1910, .$8,749,000. 

The outlook for the apprt^aching campaign is satisfactory. The factories have been enlarged 
and strengthened, and the work of the mills will doubtless surpass all previous experience. The 
fields present an aspect of unusual promise, and the supply of cane, as well as the output of 
sugar, should exceed any former year's record. 

THE CUBAN-AMERICAN SUGAR COMPANY AND ITS SUBSIDIARY COM- 
PANIES CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET. SEPTEMBER 30, 1910. 

Capital Assets : ASSETS. 

Lands $8,572,497.40 

Buildings, machiner}', railroad tracks, rolling stock, etc. . . . 17,800,140.86 

$26,372,644.20 

Goodwill 3,929,340.28 

Securities in hands of trustees 2,000.00 

Work animals, live stock and equipment 951,440.84 

Current Assets and Growing Cane: 

Planted and growing cane $1,429,406.09 

Advances to Colonos and contractors (after deducting re- 
serve for bad and doubtful accounts) 1, 400,648. 6i) 

Inventory of raw materials, supplies and merchandise in 

stores 2,41.5,281.32 

Stock of raw and refined sugar 1,417,564.21 

Accounts and bills receivable (after deducting reserve for bad 

and doubtful accounts) . . . : 1,335,810.22 

Cash in banks, with fiscal agents and on hand 5,772,128.74 



Deferred Charges to Operations: 

Bond discount $83,990.00 

Unexpired insurance, ta.xes, etc 148,703.85 



13,770,899.27 



232,093.85 

$45,259,627.50 
LIABILITIES. 

Capital Stock: 

Common(authorized, $10,000,000) 71,356 shares of $100 each $7,135,600.00 
Seven per cent, cumulative preferred stock (authorized $10,- 

000,000) 78,938 shares of $100 each 7,893,800.00 

$15,029,400.00 

Stock distribution, payable Oct. 2, 1910, to holders of common capital stock. . 2,854,240.00 

Common stock of Colonial Sugars Company in hands of the public 2,000.00 

Collateral trust bonds outstanding, due April 1, 1918 8,749,000.00 

Real estate mortgages and censos (Cuban) 472,125.34 



24 THECUBAREVIEW 



Current liabilities: 

Bills payable $567,958.47 

Bankers loans 1,313,716.67 

Accounts payable 1,156,095.85 

Salaries and wages accrued 52,215.29 

Interest accrued 282,965.39 

Dividends declared, payable October 2, 1916 1,030,091.50 

4,403,013.17 

Sinking fund for redemption of bonds 257,522.87 

Reserve for depreciation 3,932,641.09 

Surplus per annexed statement 9,559,0.d5.03 

$45,259,627.50 

CONSOLIDATED PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT, 
For the Year Ended September 30, 1916. 

Raw and refined sugars produced, less commissions, etc $26,320,942.60 

Molasses produced 492,334.07 

Profit on stores, cattle, etc 530,851.34 

$27,344,128.01 

Less: 
Expenses of producing, manufacturing, selling, etc., of raw and refined sugars 17,718,657.32 



,625,470.69 



Deduct: 

Provisions for depreciation $729,338.68 

Discount on bonds 61,866.00 

Interest on l)onds 529,530.00 

Interest on bills payable, etc 69,623.62 

1,390,358.30 

Net profit for the year $8,235,112.39 

CONSOLIDATED SURPLUS ACCOUNT, 

For the- Year Ended September 30, 1916. 

As at October 1, 1915 .$6,28.5,790.14 

Add: 
*Collateral trust bonds cancelled through the 

sinking fund (see below) $367,000.00 

Profit for the year ending Sept. 30, 1916, per 

annexed account 8,235,112.39 



8,602,112.39 
$14,887,902.53 



Deduct : 
Dividends on 7 per cent, preferred stock: 
Paid Jan. 3, 1916 for three months to Jan. 1, 

1916—134% $138,141.50 

Paid April 1, 1916, for three months to April 

1, 1916—1^% 138,141.50 

Paid July 1, 1916, for three months to July 1, 

1916— 1M% 138,141.50 

Paid October 2, 1916, for three months to 

October 1, 1916-1 M% 138,141.50 



$552,566.00 



THE CUBA REVIEW 25 

Dividends on common stock: 

Paid January 3, 1918, for three months to Jan- 
uary 1, 1916—21^% $178,390.00 

Paid April 1, 1916, for three months to April 

1, 1916—23^% 178,390.00 

Paid July 1, 1916, for three months to July 1, 

1916—23^% 17S,:]90.0() 

Paid October 2, 191G, for three months to 

October 1, 1916— 2 J^% 178,390.00 

Paid October 2, 1916— special dividend— 10% 713,560.00 

— 1,427,120.00 

Common capital stock distribution payable 

Octol)er 2, 1918 2,854,240.00 

Sinking fund provisions for the cancellation of 

collateral trust bonds (see above) 494,921.50 

5,328,847.50 



Surplus at September 30, 1916 .$9,559,055.03 

* In October, 1916, bonds of the par value of $2.53,000 were retired out of the Sinking Fund for Redemption 
of Bonds, which are not included in the $367,000 shown obove. 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE NIPE BAY CO. 



By the act'on of the stockholders taken at the meeting held at Jersey City, N. J., on Dec. 
8, 1915, the fiscal year of the company was changed so that it would end on September 30, 
instead of June 30, and the report herewith submitted covers the period of fifteen months ended 
September 30, 1916: 

INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Net earnings from sale of sugar for the year(taxes deducted) were $2,687,966.78 

Miscellaneous earnings 34,568.31 

Total net earnings $2,722,535,09 

Interest charges: on debentures $218,450.00 

on mortgage bonds 218,750.00 437,200.00 

Balance net income ■ .$2,285,335.09 

Dividends 383,034.00 

Balance surplus for year $1,902,301.09 

Surplus brought forward from close of previous fiscal year 1,178,059.74 

Total surplus $3,080,360.83 

Direct charges to income account 871,298.49 

Balance surplus September 30, 1916 $2,209,062.34 

The net earnings due to the high prices for sugar which ruled during the period, are the 
best that the company has ever reported. 

The production during the period amounted to 146,262,400 pounds of sugar and 3,223,906 
gallons of molasses as compared to 120,247,960 pounds of sugar and 3,114,041 gallons of 
molasses for the previous fiscal year. This production was somewhat less than was anticipated 
earlier in the year, and was considerably affected by an excessive rainfall during the spring and 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



summer which prevented the regular cuttmg and hauhng of cane to tlie railroads, thus necessi- 
tating the closing of the mill at frequent intervals. As this condition has existed for the past 
two seasons it seems reasonable to hope that, under the law of averages, better results wiU be 
realized next year. 

The company's cultivations were purposely situated near a range of hills with a view to 
overcoming the shortage of water which is experienced at some of the neighboring plantations. 
The results obtained to date in ordinarily dry seasons have been good, but in order to insure a 
regular supply of cane for the mill every season, future planting will be so located that it will 
be available when the present fields are not workable. Additional planting contemplated for 
the commg year will, it is believed, afford sufficient cane for the future under all contingencies. 

The machinery necessary for the mstallation of the third unit in the company's mill 
originally contemplated, has been ordered a^nd should be working in time for the 1918 crop. 
Necessary improvements to the two units now in operation to bring them up to the same stand- 
ard of efficiency as the new third unit wll also be made so that by 1918 the company should 
be in a position to produce from 160,000.000 to 190,000.000 pounds of sugar each year. 

INVESTMENTS. 

During the period the company acquired from the United Fruit Company a one-half 
interest in the Revere Sugar Refinery, which company is at present constructing a new lefinery 
on land owned by it, situated at tidewatei, on the Mystic River in CharlestouTi, Mass. This 
refinery will have the most modern machinery that can be installed and wdll have capacity 
sufficient to handle the greater part of the sugar which mil be produced at both Pieston and 

Banes, Cuba. i j • • 

A charge was made against Income Account during the year to cover special depreciation 
on cultivations and plantation equipment in Cuba, in conformity to conservative inventories 
adopted by this company and the United Fruit Company and its subsidiaries. 

STOCK AND DEBT. 

Under the plan submitted to the stockholders on March 5, 1915, for the retirementof the 
preferred shares through an exchange for common shares, only 121 preferred shares remained 
outstanding on September .30, since when five additional .shares have been exchanged. 

On June 1, 1916, $200,000 6% debentuies were redeemed, leaving a balance outstand- 
ing of $2,766,000 which mature on June 1st, 1917. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF INCOME ACCOUNT FOR THE FISCAL YEARS 
ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 1916, AND JUNE 30, 1915. 

1916 1915 

Incovie Accowil 15 Months 12 Months Increase 

Net earnings ftaxes deducted) .$2,687,966.78 .$2,164,717.84 $523,248.94 

Miscellaneous income 34,568.31 9,264.99 25,303.32 

Total income $2,722,535.09 $2,173,982.83 .$.548,552.26 

Less : Interest charges 4 37,200.00 389,769.11 47,430.89 

Balance net income $2,285,335.09 $1,784,213.72 .$501,121.37 

Dividends declared • . 383,034.00 360,-508.00 22,,526.00 

Surplus for fiscal year $1,902,.301.09 $1,423,705.72 $478,595.37 

Surplus income at close of previous year 1,178,059.74 134,644.79 1,043,414.95 

Total surplus $3,080,360.83 $1,558,350.51 $1,-522,010.32 

Xess: Direct charges to profit and loss 871,298.49 380,290.77 491,007.72 

Balance surplus $2,209,062.34 $1,178,059.74 $1,031,002.60 



THECUBAREVIEW 27 

Comparative Statement of Cultivation and Lands Owned by the Company on September 30, 

191G, and June 30, 1915. 

Acreage 

Cultivations: 1916 1915 

Sugar cane 24,709 23,248 

Pasture 13,711 13,702 

Total acres cultivated lands 38,420 30,950 

Improved land other than cultivation 5,796 5,68S 

Unimproved land 83,573 85,151 

Total acres land owned 127,789 127,789 

Comparative Statement of Live Stock Owned by the Company on September 30, 1916, and 

June 30, 1915. 

Cattle: Description 1916 1915 

Cows 428 312 

Bulls 696 324 

Oxen 1,727 1,979 

Stecis 145 154 

Calves 327 196 

Heifers 124 120 

Total 3,447 3,085 

Horses and Mules: 

Stallions 30 29 

Mares 51 40 

Geldings 169 153 

Colts 21 41 

Mules 193 158 

Asses 1 1 

Total 465 422 

Comparative Statement of Railways and Equipment Owned by the Company on September 

30, 1916, and June 30, 1915. 

1916 1915 

Miles of road (gauge 4 feet 8}i inches) 87 .24 76 .93 

Equipment : 

Number of Baldwin locomotives 11 11 

Number of cars: 

(Mostly steel frames; capacity 40,000 poimds each, 
equipped with automatic couplers and air brakes) . . 

Cane 341 335 

Flat 56 42 

Gondola 10 7 

Tank 4 3 

Box 4 4 

Repair 1 1 

Pile driver 1 1 

Dump 4 — 

Miscellaneous 6 5 

427 398 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



COMPARATIVE BALANCE SHEET. SEPTEMBER 30. 1916. AND JUNE 30. 1915 



ASSETS: 

Cost of property 

Plantation equipment: 

Buildings 

Cultivations 

Livestock 

Tools and machinery . 

Railways 

Telephones 

Boats 

Wharves 

Merchandise 

Material 

Sugar mill 



1916 



1915 



Investments 

Current assets: 

Cash 

Accounts receivable 

Sugar and molasses stock.. 

Coupon, dividend and trus- 
tee accounts 

Advance pajTnents 



$785,516.32 

1,321,578.93 

207,517.00 

231,479.30 

1,676,945.83 

9,875.05 

13,255.46 

62,227.72 

200,886.68 

186,888.24 

1,400,000.00 



$2,076,416.95 
368,331.58 
151,457.60 



$4,396,006.00 

$891,387.27 
1,498,876.79 
177,654.00 
337,926.18 
1,384,740.00 
23,833.06 
23,395.06 
100,969.63 
142,984.54 
225,034.53 
6.096,170.53; 1,621,077.79 



$4,396,006.00 



Increase. 



LIABILITIES: 
Capital stock: 

Common 

Preferred 



340,339.51 



2,596,206.13 

1,581.00 
23.19 



$1,286,840.40 
192,421.22 
175,843.68 



$13,430,326.36 



Tunded debt: 

First mortgage 5% Sink- 
ing fund gold bonds, due 
May 1, 1925 

Ten Year 6% gold deben- 
tures, due June 1, 1917. 

Unclaimed dividends, unpaid 
coupons, and matured 
notes, not yet presented 
for payment 

Current Liabilities: 

Accoimts payable 

Drafts 

Dividends payable 

Interest accrued, not due. . . 
Income account 



$4,490,400.00 
12,100.00 



$3,500,000.00 
2,766,000.00 



6,427,878.85 



(/$105,870.95 
dl77,297.86 

29,863.00 
(il06,446.88 

292,205.83 

(il3,958.01 

dl0,139.60 

(B8,741.91 
57,902.14 

^38,146.29 
^221,077.79 4331,708.32 



141,250.00 



1,655,105.30 

2,185.00 
41,728.08 



$12,664,153.23 



$4,272,100.00 
$4,502,500.00 230,400.00 



$3,500,000.00 
6,266,000.00, 2,966,000.00 



$789,576.55 
175,910.36 
rf24,386.08 



$4,502,500.00 



$218,300.00 
(^218,300.00 



199,089.51 



941,100.83 

rf604.00 
rf41,704.89 



$766,173.13 



6,466,000.00 



4200,000.00 



$166,959.41 
64,316.45 
90,110.50 



3,141.00 



321,386.36 

128,236.66 
2,209,062.34 



$90,208.15 

10,780.68 

360,508.00 



$13,430,326.36 



4200,000.00 



12,100.00 



461,496.83 

43,996,66 
1,178,059.74 



$12,664,153.23 



$76,751.26 

53,535.77 

d270,397.50 



4,959.00 



(Z140,l 10.47 

84,240.00 
1,031,002.60 



$766,173.13 



d Decrease. 



THECUBAREVIEW 29 

REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE BANK OF CUBA IN NEW YORK 

at the close of business on the 29th day of November, IDlti. 

Resources 
Stock and bond investments, viz: 

Public securities, market value $152,505.55 

Loans and discounts secured by collateral 537,691.48 

Loans, discounts and bills purchased not secured by collateral 424,556.93 

Due from appioved reserve depositaiies, less amount of offsets 154,998.79 

Specie 80,000.00 

United States legal tender notes and notes of national banks 21,156.76 

Customers' liability on acceptances (see liabilties, per contra) 37,139.71 

Other Assets, viz: 

Fiu-niture and fixtures $1,729.25 

Accrued interest not entered on books at close of business on 

on above date 5,792.23 

— 7,521.48 

Total $1,415,570.70 

Liabilities 

Capital stock $100,000.00 

Surplus on market value: 

Surplus fund $50,000.00 

Undividend profits 15,008.63 

— 65,008.63 

Deposits not preferred: 

Deposits subject to check $846,932.40 

Time deposits, certificates and other deposits, the payment of 

which cannot legally be required within thirty days 303,185.87 

Demand certificates of deposit 15,232.44 

Cashier's checks outstanding, including similar checks of other 

officers 14,000.00 

Certified checks 31,276.47 

—— 1,210,627.18 
Acceptances of drafts payable at a future date or authorized by 

commercial letters of credit 37,139.71 

Accrued interest not entered on books at close of business on above 

date 2,795.18 

Total $1,415,570.70 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



COTTON FABRICS AND READY-MADE CLOTHING IN CUBA 

Cotton goods are imported into Cuba in very large quantities. In the last few years 
American manufacturers of cotton goods have made decided gains in the Cuban market although 
even yet the American exporter of cotton goods does not do as well as he ought in a market 
which is right at his door and where his goods receive preference in the Custom House. Ready- 
made cotton clothing imported into Cuba comes almost entirely from the United States and 
American ready-made clothing in Cuba is considered as the very best. The ready-made cloth- 
ing imported into Cuba does not consist entirely of common goods and working men's clothing, 
but considerable quantities of goods of a better grade are irnported, also ladies' clothing. Cham- 
bray, klaaki and drill shirts and trousers, denim overalls and similar goods are imported into 
Cuba in large quantities, coming mostly from the United States and the American exporter 
about controls the Cuban market as far as such goods are concerned. Ready-made clothing 



30 THECUBAREVIEW 

of silk and wool and mixtui-es of these goods are also imported. The foUo-ning table p^ives 
importations of cotton goods into Cuba for the fiscal year 1914-1915. 

IMPORTATION OF COTTON GOODS INTO CUBA, FISCAL YEAR 1914-1915. 

From the 

Articles. Total United States. 

Yarn and thread $338,116 $36,740 

Plain weave fabrics 4,233,932 1,847,698 

Crossed woven fabrics 2,053,067 820,369 

Knit goods 1,355,915 299,142 

Carpets 2,390 868 

Laces : 445,536 8,980 

Fancy goods 52,556 23,196 

Piques 24,128 10,567 

Ready-made clothing 527,083 390,326 

Velvet 138,823 50,730 

Tulles 69,225 12,293 

Other manufactures of cotton 345,651 74,866 

Total $9,586,422 $3,575,775 

Instructions for Shipping Ready-Made Clothing to Cuba. — Gross and net weight of box or 
package, must be given. In the Cuban Custom House cotton goods pay duty according to the 
number of threads in a space of six milometers or one-fourth of an inch. A surtax of 100% is 
placed on ready-made cotton clothing and siu-tax of 30% for colored threads on both ready- 
made clothing and fabrics. If the goods contain silk, wool, or any other material, a surtax is 
placed. If the mixture of silk, wool, or any other material, exceeds one-fifth of the threads then 
the fabric or goods, are considered as silk or wool and pay duty ad valorem. In sending ready- 
made cotton clothing to Cuba the shipper may, if he wishes, give number of threads in a space of 
six milimeters and if the goods are crossed or plain woven. This information is not absolutely 
necessary, but is a help to the Custom House and to the broker. 

Invoices. — -In the invoices for ready-made clothing to be sent to Cuba, the shipper should 
always give net weight separate of each class or lot of goods, and the reference mark or nmnber. 
Ready-made clothing almost always has a reference mark which is attached to the garment by 
a tag. The reason for this is that goods which may appear similar, when they are placed under 
the thread countei it is found that the number of threads is different and goods pay at 
different rates. When the net weights of different lots of ready-made clothing are bunched 
together, it means that every lot must be weighed in the Custom House, which causes a vast 
amount of delay in the Custom House despatch. 

Cardboard Boxes.— W\\ei\ ready-made cotton clothing is shipped to Cuba in cardboard 
boxes the net weight of these cardboard boxes should be given separately. This may result in 
considerable saving in duties to the buyer. 

Instructions for Shipping Cotton Fabrics to Cuba. — The insti-uctions for shipping readj^-made 
clothmg to Cuba apply also to fabrics except that for fabrics samples should always be sent. 
In the Cuban Custom House samples of cotton fabrics are always taken and sending samples 
avoids the piece of goods, being mutilated and facilitates the work in the Custom House. The 
trade in Cuba for American cotton goods is rapidly increasing and it is a market which is 
worthy of careful attention. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Total values of merchandise imported from and ex-ported to Cuba during October and the 
10 months ended October, 1916, compared with corresponding periods of the preceding year 
were made public by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of the Department of 
Commerce, as follows: 

Month of October 10 months ended October 

1916 1915 1916 1915 1914 

Imported from Cuba. . $16,608,357 $8,292,505 $218,193,437 $177,083,869 

Exported to Cuba ... . 15,888,169 9,980,041 128,985,646 73,128,406 $56,4.52,170 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



PLANTATION WHITE SUGAR 

^\There is no doubt, that one effect of the 
war will be to enormously stimulate the pro- 
duction of what is known as plantation white 
sugar, in contradistinction to the white sugar 
made by refineries. The want of power in 
British refineries, which can only cope with 
50 per cent of what is wanted in the form of 
white sugar by the British consumer, led, be- 
fore the War, to the introduction of German 
and Austrian white sugar to an enormous ex- 
tent. Thus in 1913 no less than 660,000 tons 
of white sugar came from these countries in 
one form or another. It cannot for one 
moment be thought that this sugar will come 
again into this comatry, if it comes at all, on 
the same terms as the produce of our own 
colonies, or even of neutral countries. The 
gap will therefore have to be filled either, as 
at present, with American refined and white 
plantation sugar from the Java factories, or 
else with preferentially treated sugar from 
our existing exporting colonies, or from 
colonies which, perfectly adpated for the 
manufacture of sugar, have not dared to in- 
itiate its production in the face of the cheap- 
ened-by-protection products of Austria and 
Germany. 

At the present time the main countries 
making white sugar direct from the cane are 
the Brazils, Louisiana, Java, and Mauritius. 
The Brazil product, which is used entirely for 
local purposes, is manufactured in such a 
manner, and is of such a character, that the 
process of manufacture employed hardly en- 
ters into the general question. For all prac- 
tical purposes, therefore, the three other 
countries, Louisiana, Java, and Mauritius, 
may be regarded as the present homes of 
plantation white sugar. 

The successful manufacture of plantation 
white sugar depends upon two factors — the 
clarification and the treatment of the masse- 
cuites. 

As regards clarification, the process em- 
ployed may be divided into two classes — ■ 
those dependent on "sulphitation," or the 
use of sulphurous acid to neutralize the lime, 
and those in which carbonic acid is used for 
this purpose, lime in white sugars, as well as 
ail other sugars, being the basis of clarifica- 
tion. 



In the typical sulphitation process the juice 
is treated, when cold with quantities of lime 
larger than would be used in the manufactiu'e 
of sugar for refining purposes, the excess of 
which is neutralized by the introduction of 
the gas formed by burning sulphm- in the air, 
the body formed being converted into sul- 
phiu'ous acid on contact with the juice. 
Sometimes the lime is added first, sometimes 
the sulphur gas; but in each case the resultant 
effect is neutralization, or nearly so, a slight 
acidity being sometimes left. The juice is 
now raised to boiling point, boiled vigorously, 
and subsided, the clear liquor going to the 
evaporator, and the mud, as usual, to the 
filter presses. 

There are several variants of the above 
process. It may be that the settling of the 
mud is facilitated by the addition of phosphor- 
ic acid, or phosphate of soda, to the juice, of 
the clear liquor is slightly acidified with 
phosphoric acid and cleaned in "ehminators." 
A common system also is to boil the sjTup, 
subside it, and sulphur slightly; while a 
modern method of sulphitation — the Bach 
process, which is highly spoken of — provides 
for the treatment of the juice in the first 
instance with only so much lime and sulphur, 
or lime alone, as would be required for ordin- 
ary clarification, the determining treatment 
being applied to the syrup, which is heavily 
limed, sulphured, boiled and filtered. This 
treatment causes the s\Tup to become easily 
filterable. The clear syrup is again slightly 
sulphured, so as to give it the necessary 
acidity for bright sugar. In Louisiana also, 
the clarified juice is generally filtered through 
bag filters, and in some cases continuous set- 
tling of the clarified juice is done. 

In the other class of clarification for white 
sugar, the carbonatation class, carbonic acid, 
as already mentioned, is the medium used for 
neutralizing the lime. In single carbonata- 
tion, the lime, in large quantity — as much as 
lioWi per cent, on the canes being used — is 
added to the cold juice, and after the tem- 
perature of the juice has been raised to be- 
tween 120 deg. F. and 130 deg. F., carbonic 
acid gas is forced into the juice until the juice 
is neutral. It is now boiled and filtered 
through filtering presses, the clear juice 
going to the evaporator. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



A modification of this process is one in 
which the clear liquor, after filtration, is made 
slightly acid by being ''sulphured," and it is 
claimed that by this process, which is called 
the "acid thin juice" process, a much brighter 
sugar results than with the ordinary car- 
bonation process. 

In the double carbonation, the process of 
carbonating is divided into two stages. The 
juice is heavily limed, as in the single car- 
bonatation process, and is then heated to 140 
deg. F., at which stage carbonic acid gas 
is added until a slight but definite alkalinity 
is left. It is then filtered through filter presses 
and the filtered juice is again treated with 
carbonic acid until the juice is neutral. The 
juice is now boiled and filtered. 

A modification of this process is that of 
Battelle, in which the juice is raised to the 
boil after the lime is added, in order to destroy 
the glucose. It is now carbonated to neutral- 
ity, and filtration effected. The clear juice 
is now slightly limed again, carbonated 
to neutral point, boiled, and filtered. The 
benefits claimed for this process are: firstly, 
that there is no danger of discoloration of the 
juice from partial glucose destruction during 
carbonatation; and, secondly, that the 
Steffen process can be used to obtain the 
sugar from the molasses, which are practically 
completely exhausted of sugar by this means, 
the Steffen process treats the molasses with 
dry lime, forming an insoluble saccharate of 
lime, which is filtered and used for clarifica- 
cation purposes, the sugar in the saccharate 
re-entering the juice in this way. 

In the De Haan modification of tfip double 
carbonatation process, the necessary alkaline 
reaction of the first carbonatation is obtained 
from the commencement by adding the lime 
and carbonic acid at the same time to a 
continuous flow of juice. The objectionable 
frothing is thus avoided. 

The above gives an outline of the various 
clarification processes in vogue in the 
present-day manufacture of white sugar direct 
from the cane juice. The other part of the 
manufacture which plays an important part 
in the white sugar manufacture is the method 
of treatment of the massecuites, and the great 
imderlj'ing principle is that of double curing. 
In this the massecuite is cured without the aid 
of water in one set of centrifugals, the sugar 
made into a magma with washings from the 
second curing, and cured again in a second set 



of centrifugals, in which the necessary wash- 
ing and steaming is done, the resultant white 
sugar going to a drier, while the washings go 
partly to form the magma mentioned above, 
with the balance back to either the syrup or 
the clarified juice. The drier prevents any 
likelihood of the sugar deteriorating in a 
moist climate. 

The great advantages of this system are 
that the molasses proper are kept separate 
from the washings and steamings, while at 
the same time the formation of the magma 
greatly facilitates the subsequent washing 
of the sugar. It may he mentioned that the 
molasses massecuites, which are invariably 
built on grain from syrup, are treated in the 
same manner. 

An important point in connection with the 
subject under review is that of the relative 
cost of the clarification processes. This, of 
course, must vary according to the local 
price of the chemicals employed and of 
labor. As a guide, the following figures, 
given by Dr. Prinsen Geerligs,* are of value 
as representing the Java conditions. In these 
the cost of the ordinary sulphitation and 
double carbonatation are compared. Taking 
1,000 tons of canes, the cost of chemicals and 
labor for the clarification departments are: 

Sulphitation Carbonatation 
Chemicals. .. £ 5 12 11 £31 17 

Wages 1 16 10 6 3 5 



Total 7 9 9 38 5 

Or if nine tons of canes are taken to the ton 
of sugar, the relative cost would be a little over 
1/8 per ton and 8/6 respectively, a difference 
of nearly 7 /-per ton against the carbonatation 
process. 

Another matter of the greatest importance 
is the effect of the process upon the extraction 
of sugar. In this connection Dr. Geerligs 
again gives information, also from Java. 
Taking the sulphitation yield as 100, he gives 
that of double carbonatation as 100.32 of 
De Haan's process 100.64, and of the Bach 
sulphitation process 100.96, a difference dis- 
tinctly in favour of the latter. 

There is one advantage in the sulphitation 

ystem which must not be overlooked, and 

hat is that at any moment a sulphitations 

plant can be turned on to the make of grey 

sugar if required in the ordinary manner. 

■ *"The Manufacture ofWhite Sugar," Norman Roger, 
2 St. Dunstan's Hill, E. C. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



In the foregoing nothing has been said as to 
the refining of raw sugar in a rawsugarfactory, 
meaning by refining, the treatment of the raw 
sugar by a distinct process from that by which 
it was made. Up to recently the only way 
of doing this has been to decolorize the melted 
sugar by means of animal charcoal. For 
a tropical sugar factory this is placed outside 
practical politics on account of the cost of 
freight of the animal charcoal, or char, as it is 
called. Even for high-class raw sugars, a ton 
of this is required for every ton of sugar, and 
the freight of this would form an imenter- 
tainable item in the cost of manufacture. 
The introduction into the sugar world, 
however, of Xorite, which belongs to the class 
of bodies called decolorising carbons, puts an 
altogether diffeient aspect on the case. This 
body, which is prepared by the carbonizing 
of wood, is in an extremely fine state of sub- 
division, and a small quantity, varj-ing from 
2 per cent, to 5 per cent., according to the 
color of the sugar treated is said to be 
sufficient for the purpose. It can also be 
manufactured on the spot, and the cost of 
freight thus saved. 

Were a Norite refining plant attached to a 
raw sugar factory, a raw sugar of a rather 
higher standard than the ordinary 16 D.S. 96° 
polarization would have to be made by the 
latter. The position in relation to directly 
produced plantation white sugar would be as 
follows : 

The manufacture of the raw sugar would 
mean less cost of chemicals and fuel, less wear 
and tear of machinery where the comparison 
is made with a sulphitation sugar, and, what 
is important, at least 1 per cent, more sugar 
extracted from the sugar in the juice. .\s 
against this, there would be cost of the Norite 
refining, with a rather higher cost for fuel 
than in a home refinery, but with no super- 
vision expenses. The sugar turned out 
should be of first class quality and constant 
in character, which plantation white sugar 
is not. 

Unfortunately, at the present moment there 
is no e\ddence on a working scale of what 
Norite vnW do by itself in the direction of 
decolorizing raw sugars. It is, it is true, used 
by some of the sugar-using trades in this 
counl^y, and as an adjunct to existing "char" 
plants in some refineries, but its adaptability 
to the entire work of a refinery has yet to be 
demonstrated. The complete adaptability 



of Norite for refining purposes is, therefore, 
still sub judice. Attempts have been made to 
adapt it to raw cane juice, but, as might be 
exi)ected when the amount of color to be 
dealt with and the considerable impurities 
of an organic character to be associated with 
are considered, up to now the working has 
not l^een a success. 

In conclusion, it must be borne in iinnd that 
the character of the juice to be dealt with is 
an important factor in the choice of a process. 
Some juice will yield leadily to a sulphitation 
process; others may recjuire the more strenu- 
ous double carbonatation pioces,s. But what- 
ever be the character of the juice, the economic 
production of white sugar for direct consimip- 
tion is ^vithin the reach of every cane sugar 
producing concern. For success, however, 
every department of the factory must be 
thoroughly well equipped. The clarification 
plant must be on a scale to deal with the worst 
class of juice it is required to handle — not with 
the average, as is usually the case in a raw 
sugar factory. The vacuum pan power must 
be ample, and there must be no question of 
hot boiling from faulty vacua or structural 
defects. The centrifugal plant, also, must 
be of full capacity, and, of course, the boiler 
power, so as to place out of the question any 
dragging or inefficient work for want of steam. 
And the work must be thoroughly supervised 
by a proper scientific staff. The treatment 
of the juices in clarification requiies constant 
skilled watching, and the boiling of the various 
massecuites equally skilled observation as to 
quotients. 

With the manufacture of ordinary raw 
sugars, a slight variation in color does not 
affect the price. With the manufacture of 
white sugar, it does not take much to bring 
about a depreciation of £2 per ton in pi ice. 
But the reward for thoroughness is high 
quality of sugar, big extraction from the canes, 
and a substantial balance in the bank. 
■ — -The West India Committee Circular. 



INCORPORATED. N. Y. 

Sugar Planters' Corp., sugar and other 
plantations, sugar centrals, factories, re- 
fineries, 7,500 shares, $100 each, 7,500 shares 
no par value, carry on business with .S787,500; 
D. Bailey, L. J. Francke, J. S. Fiske, 27 
WiUiam Street. 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




A Specimen of the Sugpr Cane Rai.^ed at " Palmurejo," Oriente, Cuba. — Courtesy Julian 

Cendoya. 



SUGAR CROP ESTIMATES The Havana Sugar School recently closed 

Messrs. Joaquin-Guma-Leandro A'ejer, of its session for 1916, and fourteen sugar engi- 

Havana, December 11, 1916: "^ers were graduated. 
"The new 1916-17 Cuba sugar crop is esti- 
mated at 3,572,571 tons." 

Mr. H. A. Hiinely, of Havana, estimates 

the Cuba crop at 3,466,000 tons. i^ugar estates in Cuba which sold for from 

Willett & Gray's Cuba crop estimate is $20,000 to $30,000 before the war, are now 

unchanged at 3,400,000 tons. selling at $125,000 and $150,000. 



THECUBAREVIEW 35 



THE SUGAR REVIEW 



Specially icrilten for the Cuba Review by Willelt & Gray, New York. 

Our last review for this magazine was dated November 6, 1916. 

At that date, Cuba Centrifugal sugar C()° test basis, was quoted 5%c. c <k f, and is now 
4%c. c & f, showing decline during the month of ^4('. per lb. for the cost and freight basis. 

On November Sth, SV^c.c &f was reached. At this point the market remained steady until 
November 14th,. when 3^c. decline was made to 5^c. c & f followed on the 23d by a decline to 
5.00c. c & f (having given ten days of nominal market). The tone of the market having changed 
to weakness, J^c. further decline came on the 24th, to 4%c. c & f and to 4%c. c & f on the 28th 
of November, since when the market remained steady until December 6th, when it improved 
Kec. to 4%c. c & i and closes quiet at this writing. 

The interest now changes from the spot market to the future. 

The beginning of the 1917 Cuba crop was announced on December 4th, by two centrals, 
the "Tinguaro" and the "Ciego de Avila," tollowed by a third on the 6th. It was also announced 
on the 6th that the grinding of the Porto Rico crop had begun. 

Thus far, estimates of the Cuba crop have not been given out by the Cuban experts, but 
an increase of 400,000 to 500,000 tons is generally looked for if weather conditions prove- 
favorable throughout the season. In this connection, it may be interesting to yoiir readers to 
note the average monthly prices cost and freight New York, obtained for the 1916 crop which 
can be used as a partial guide to the course of the market for the 1917 crop. In January, 1916, 
the lowest average of 1916 was made at 3.633c. c & f. We may note, however, that in October, 
1915, the average had been 3.104c. per lb. The February, 1916, average was 3.92c c &f.; March, 
4.597c.; April, 5.0S2c.; May, 5.42c.; June, 5.313c.; July, 5.293c.; August, 4.626c.; September, 
4.497c.; October, 5.269c.; November, 5.271c. A comparison of these prices with the closing bids 
on the New York Sugar Exchange at this date (December 7th) may have significance to planters 
and operators if able to apply them; January, 4.26c.; February, 4.01c.; March, 3.97c.; April, 
3.9ec.; May, 4.00c.; June, 4.03c.; July, 4.07c.; August, 4.09c.; September, 4.12c.; October, 
4.15c.; November, 4.18c. 

It is noticeable, that simultaneously with the beginning of grinding in Cuba, the real busi- 
ness of the new campaign began, after a few scattering sales, by the British Commission making 
purchases of 100-150,000 tons Cuba sugar tor January-April deliveries at 3.50c. to 3.60c. per 
lb. f .o.b., Cuba, and at the same time the American Sugar Refining Co. took an equal amomit at 
the basis of 4i/^c. c & f , New York, for similar shipments. 

Thus the new campaign is fully inaugurated at the basis of 3.50c. to 3.60c. f.o.b. Cuba and 
43/8C- c & f New York tor early deliveries. The refiners' purchases have been made to secure a 
certain amount of supplies, not easily obtained otherwise, for their anticipated trade at home 
and abroad early in the new year, yet it by no means follows that the price rise for the cam- 
paign will begin at those quotations, but rather in view of the crop starting without weather 
delays, and the production rapidly accumulating after the present month, there may prove to 
be a lower point from which the real campaign may start, say from 3%c. and 33^2C. c & f . 

Refined sugar has ruled at relatively higher prices than raws, but the local demand is ex- 
tremely limited and several refiners are closing their houses for balance of December, rather 
than buy raws at current quotations. 

Cane Fine Granulated is quoted today at 7.20c. less 2%. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

New York, December 7, 1916. 



SUGAR SHIPMENTS MAURITIUS_SUGAR 

It is reported in the press that Great Britian It is reported that the entire sugar crop of 

has purchased 3,675,000 sacks of Cuban Mauritius, about 180,000 tons, has been 

sugar and that the Government of Portugal purchased on behalf of the French Govern- 

has purchased 6,000 tons of Cuban sugar. ment. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 



Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por Willetl & Gray, de Nueva York. 

Nuestra ultima reseiia para esta publicaci6n eStaba fechada el 6 de noviembre de 1916. 

En aquella fecha, el aziicar Centrifugo de Cuba, polarizaci6n S6°, se cotizaba a 5Jiac. la 
libra costo y flete, y ahora se cotiza a 4"i6C. c. y f., mostrando una baja durante el mes de ^c. 
la libra bajo la base de costo y flete. 

El 9 de noviembre el precio llego d, 5J^c.c.yf.,d cuyo punto el mercado permanecio estable 
hasta el 14 de noviembre, en que tuvo lugar una baja a 5^c. c. y f., 6 sea una disminucion de 
3^c.,seguido el 23 por otrabajadS.OOc.c. yf. (habiendohabido diez dias deun mercado nominal). 
Habiendo cambiado el mercado a un tono mas flojo, el dia 24 bajo a 4J^c. c. y f., 6 sea otra 
disminucion de 3^c. y A 4%c. c. y f . el 28 de noviembre, permaneciendo estable el mercado desde 
entonces hasta el 6 de diciembre,en que subi6 jiec, 6 sea A 4%c. c.y f., cerrando con un mercado 
quieto al escribir esta resena. 

Lo interesante cambia ahora del mercado actual al mercado del futuro. 

El principio de la molienda de la zafra de Cuba de 1917 fue anunciado el 4 de diciembre 
por dos centrales, el "Tinguaro" y el "Ciego de x4.vila," seguido de un tercero el dia 6. Tambi^n 
se anuncio el dJa 6 que habia empezado la molienda de la zafra de Puerto Rico. 

Hasta ahora, los peritos de Cuba no han emitido cdlculos acerca de la zafra de Cuba, pero 
se espera generalmente un aumento de 400,000 d 500,000 toneladas si el tiempo llega a ser 
favorable durante toda la estacion. En este respecto, podra interesar a los lectores el fijarse en 
el promedio mensual de los precios costo y flete Nueva York, obtenidos por la cosecha de 1916, 
lo cual puede tomarse en parte como guia para el curso del mercado para la cosecha de 1917. 
En enero de 1916 se llego al promedio mas bajo durante el ailo 1916, 6 sea a 3.633c. c.yf. Sin 
embargo, podra observarse que enoctubre de 1915 el promedio habia sido 3.104c. la libra; el 
promedio en febrero de 1916 fuc 3.92c. c.yf.; en marzo, 4.597c.; en abril, 5.082c.; en mayo, 5.42c.; 
en junio, 5.313c.; en julio, 5.293c.; en agosto, 4.626c.; en septiembre, 4.497c.; en octubre, 
5.269c.; y en noviembre, 5.271c. Una comparaci6n de estos precios con las ultimas ofertas en 
la Bolsa de Azucar de Nueva York d, esta fecha (7 de diciembre) podrd tener significancia para 
los plantadores y corredores si saben aplicarlos, a saber; enero 4.26c.; febrero 4.01c.; marzo, 
3.97c.; abril, 3.99c.; mayo 4.00c.; junio 4.03c.; -julio, 4.07c.; agosto 4.09c.; septiembre 4.12c.; 
octubre 4.15c., y noviembre 4.1Sc. 

Es de notarse, que simultaneamente con el comienzo de la molienda en Cuba, empez6 el 
verdadero movimiento de la campaiia azucarera, despues de unas cuantas ventas irregulares, 
haciendo la Comision Britdnica compras de 100 a 150,000 toneladas de azucar de Cuba para 
entregas de enero a abril al precio de 3.50c. A, 3.60c. la libra libre il bordo Cuba, y al mismo 
tiempo la American Sugar Refining Company adquirio una cantidad igual bajo la basa de 4^/30. 
c. y f. New York para embarques tambien para esas fechas. 

Asi es que la nueva campaiia azucarera se ha inaugurado por completo bajo la base de 
3.50c. d 3.60c. libre a bordo Cuba y 43/8C. c. y f. Nueva York para tempranas entregas. Las 
compras de los refinadores han sido hechas para asegurar cierta cantidad de existencias, que 
no podrlan conseguirse facilmente de otro modo, para su anticipado comercio en el pais y en el 
extranjero a principios del nuevo ano, y sin embargo eso de ningiin modo quiere decir que el 
alza de precios para la nueva campaiia empezara a esas cotizaciones, sino que mas bien en vista 
de que la cosecha empieza sin demoras d causa del tiempo y se acumulen rdpidamente las exis- 
tencias despues del mes actual, podrd resultar que la verdadera campaiia empiece a un punto 
mds bajo, digamos desde 3%c. y S^c. c. y f. 

El azucar refinado ha regido d, precios relativamente mds altos que el azucar crudo, pero la 
demanda local es sumamente limitada y varios refinadores estan suspendiendo sus operaciones 
por el resto de diciembre antes que comprar azucares crudos a las cotizaciones corrientes. 

El azucar fino granulado de caiia se cotiza hoy d 7.20c. menos 2%. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

Nueva York, diciembre 7 de 1916. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— G4— 66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain , Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 



HAVANA— N. Celata y Ca. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 



LONDON — The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS— Heine et Cie. 




iPorque Compra Usted Agua 

Destilada Pagando lOCentavos 

el Galon? 

/^UANDO puede hacer agua mds pura por 
meno.s de un centavo el galon emple- 
ando uno de nuestros Alambiques de 
Laboratorio No. 70 para ga.s. 

Precio del Alambique de Laboratorio, No. 70 
$50. Un Alambique de cobre niquelado para 
Droguistas, de una capacidad de un galon 
la hora, cuesta solamente .S28.00, 6 de }4 
galon la hora, .S17.0(). 

Se envirara folleto con todos particulares 
al solicitarnoslo. 

EIMER & AMEND 



205-211 Third Avenue 

Establecida en 1851 



NEW YORK 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
P. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 

We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



RAILS 

James M. Motley, 71 Beaver St., New 
York City, offers 6,000 tons, first quality 
52 lb. relaying rails, together with complete 
angle bars, these available for prompt 
shipment. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when tinting to Advertisers 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



THE NEW JERSEY ASBESTOS CO. 




HOME OFFICE: 

WATER ST.. NEW YORK. N. Y. 

BRANCHES: 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Allentown 



Patent "V" Pilot Packings recom- 
mended for High Pressure Steam and 
Ammonia. 

Cable Address: "Gladiatrix," New York 



Bank of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST., NEW YORK 



RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptances. Your 
account is solicited. 



LINK-BELT COMPANY BLOWS IN NEW 
FURNACE 

The fifth furnace at the Belmont p'ant of 
the Luik-Belt Co , Indianapolis, was blown 
in the middle of December, adding materially 
to the capacity for producing malleable Link- 
Belt. Extensive buildin.g operations at the 
Belmont works have been completed, and 
the manufacturing activities reorganized to 
keep pace with the increasing demand for 
Link-Belt for all conveying, elevating and 
])ower transmission purposes. 



W. A, MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN - 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES 



President 
Vice-President 
Casliier 
Asst. Cashier 



LA MAYA VALLEY LAND AND IMPROVE- 
MENT COMPANY 

This Company announces that it has been 
decided to redeem the entire outstanding 
issue of the 10 years 7% gold debentures, 
redemption to be made on December 31st, 
1916. These bonds are to be redeemed at 
the rate of 105, and should be presented for 
redemption to the Columbia Trust Company 
of New York. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THECUBAREVIEW 39 

POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

GUANAJAY 

Fare, 55 Cents 

GUINES 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5 A. M. to 8 P. M. Last train 11.20 P. M. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P. M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) $0.05 

Guanabacoa (Ferry and Electric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanca and Cabanas Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 

Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

JAS. s. BOQUE, supt. MOBILE, ALA. 



ESTABLISHED 1852 ROHLIG & CO INQUIRIES REQUESTED 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

BREMEN BREMERHAVEN HAMBURG 

Knoohenhaueretr. 16-17 am Hafen 113 Alsterdamm 14-15 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PROVIDED ON APPLICATION 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton. Night Call. 411 Hamilton. , Cable Address: "Abiworka," New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy Forginits.Iron and Brass Castings, Copper Specialties, Diesel Motor Repairs, Cold Storage 
Installation, Oil Fuel Installation, Carpenter and Joiner work 

11-27 IMLAY STREET /Near Hamilton Ferry BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Afents for "KinKhorn" Multiplex Valve 



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40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $325,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Correapondanc* Solicitad from 
I n t • n d 1 n s I n ▼ • ■ t o r a 

OFFICERS 
Norman H. Davit - - . . . President 
Oswald A. Homsby - - - - Vice-President 

Claudio Q. Mendosa - • - Vice-President 
J. M. Hopgood ------ Treasurer 

Rogelio Carbajal ------ Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



P. 


RUIZ 


® 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA, CUBA 



MOTOR GUINCHE EL "COLONO" 

Un substitute moderno para los BUEYES 
de la antiguedad 



MAS ECONOMICO 

MAS SEGURO 

MAS RAPIDO 

CUESTA POCO 

Especialmente para los trasbordadores de 
Vild, Quinones, Castellon 

Pidanse precios y pormenores 
COMPANIA AGRICOLA, Monserrate 10, Habana 
6 EL COLONO WINCH CO., 106 Wall St., N. Y. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADO EN 1869 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Active Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar Sts. 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponsales en Espafia 6 Islaa Canarias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables. del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

& interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Amargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi- 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



DELAWARE CHARTERS 

Cuban-American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, build, erect, and operate tele- 
phone and telegraph stations, $2,500,000; 
W. J. Neilan, L. H. Gunter, George V. Reilly 
of New York. 



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THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 

P. M. P. M. 



10.30 











* 
A. 


17 
M. 











10.00 
A.M. 
12.00 
4.40 

9.00 
10.55 

5.28 



8.50 

10.20 

P.M. 

1.00 

10.00 
11.00 



P.M. 



No.l7 

P.M. 



5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 



No. 3 

P.M. 



3.10 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P.M. 

3.00 

3.30 



P.M. 



No. 7 No. 5 ^ 
A.M. A.M.I S 



10.01 7.40 
11.58 10.10 



4.40 
8.40 



6.45 
P. M. 



12.33 



3.38 
6.45 



6.40 
8.00 



10.30 
P.M. 



Havana 



Lv . . Central Station . . Ar. 

Ar. . . .Matanzas Lv. 

At ... . Cardenas Lv. 

Ar Sagua Lv. 

At ... . Caibarien Lv. 

Ar. . . Santa Clara. . . . Lv. 
At. . . Cienfuegos Lv. 



Ar. .SanctiSpiritus. . .Lv. 

Ar. .Ciegode Avila. . .Lv. 

Ar . . . .Camaguey. . . . Lv. 

Ar Antilla Lv. 

Ar. Santiago de Cuba. Lv. 



No. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8 No. 6 No.lO 

A.M. A.M. P. M. P. M. P.M. A.M. 



7.36 9.13 



5.31 
12.45 
P. M. 
8.00 
5.30 
A.M. 
12.10 



6.45 

5.00 

A.M. 



P.M. 
8.25 

7.35 

4.55 

A.M. 

7.40 

6.55 



A.M. 



2.06 



12.00 
9.12 



6.20 



1.55 
P.M. 
11.20 

2.30 
2.00 



P.M. 



6.39 



4.44 
1.05 



12.00 
8.20 



8.00 

A.M. 



9.05 6.20 



6.28 
4.25 



1.00 



9.15 

8.48 



6.15 
A.M. 



10.00 
P.M. 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



From Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienfuegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 



Drawing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 

THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



U. S. Cy. 
AntiUa $23.33 



Batabano . 

Bayamo 

Caibarien 

Camaguey 

Cardenas 

Ciego de Avila . 

Cienfuegos 

Colon 

Guantanamo . . . 
Holguin 



1.53 
20.66 
10.68 
15.49 

5.43 
12.72 

8.69 

5.56 
25.58 
21.20 



Isle of Pines 

Madruga , 

Manianillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

[ Remedios 

Sagua , 

San Antonio 

Sancti Spiritus 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba . 



U. S. Cy. 
$6.00 

3.01 
22.02 

3.20 

9.64 
10.43 

8.45 

.45 

11.19 

8.53 
24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or leas in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 

''WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres frona Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Svmday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL "WEEK=END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send thrM oenta in stamps for "Cuba — A Winter Paradise," a beau- ITnltofl Railwavc nf HavAtm 
tiful illusUated booklet desoribing interesting trips in Cuba to WOllCU IVOUWajTS Ul naTaiU 

FRANK ROBERTS, General Passenger Agent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacidn directa de todas los 
centros manufuclureros del mundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vaporcs Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Harcelona, Espana 
Independcncia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

yard.- 56-58 Beard Street. Erie Basin 

Telephones: 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Oflice: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Munro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c. 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to push the sales of 

American high class products. Would 

represent a first class firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEV, CUBA 



M. J. CABANA 



COMMISSI ON 
MERCHANT 



P. O. Box 3, Camaguejr 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a uom- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in east- 
ern Cuba. 



F. W. Hvoslef 



E. C. Day 



R. M. Miohelsen 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

SteamshlpApts&ShipBrokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CabU: "B«nMM«" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertitert 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



43 




S.S. MUNAMAR 

NEW YORK-EASTERN CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

Steamer 

MUNAIMAR 

MUNAMAR 

MUNA.MAR 

Svecial through rates quoted to Xurvilos passmgirs via the- SS. MUN^AMAR arul 
Antilla. 

FREIGHT ONLY 
Regular fortaightly sailings for Matanzas, Cai'denas, Sagua, Caibarien, Pto. Padre, 
Slanati, Banes, Gibara and Xuevitas. 



Xew York 


Antilla 


Antilla 


Xew York 


Leave 


Arrive 


Leave 


Arrive 


Jar. 20 


Jan. 24 


Jan. 27 


Jan. 31 


Feb. :! 


Feb. 7 


Feb. 10 


Feb. 14 


Feb. 17 


Feb. 21 


Feb. 24 


Feb. 28 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

SS. CRATHEUS — Havana, Cardenas, Caibarien Jan. 5 

SS MUXISLA — Havana, Matanzas, Sagua Jan. 12 

SS. BERTHA — ^Cienfuegos, Santiago Jan. 16 

SS. MUXPLACE — 'Havana, Cardenas, Caibarien Jan. 19 

SS. MUXISLA — Havana, Matanzas Jan. 26 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER January 20, for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rosario. 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER Jan. 4 and 18 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of cal 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE, Pres. 



LEWIS C. LILLIE, Sec. and Treas. 



Grand Prize awarded for Locomotives at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 

The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 




PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES 

Specifications Furnished on Application 
REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE WEST INDIES: 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Addresses: "BALDWIN. PHILADELPHIA." "LEEBALD. HAVANA" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



Vi 



The 



i 



CVBA REVIEW 




OQ AYear JANUARY 1917 10 Cents A Copy 
iblished bytheMunson Steamship Line, 8Z-92 Beaver Street, NewYork City. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Link-Belt 



For conveying, elevating and power transmission. Its 
worth proved by service. The many types produced 
by us set the standards of performance and durability 
in various industries. 




This Trade-Mark V 



-< on every link. 



Write for General Catalog No. 110, illustrating the entire Link-lielt line. 

Link-Belt Company 



299 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK CITY 



llHIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIllHlllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIN 


JAMES M. MOTLEY '' ^^l^%il^^^^ 


Cable Addrecs: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(All codes used) 

RAIL AND FASTENINGS 
FROGS AND SWITCHES 

CARS 
BOILERS, TANKS, PUMPS 


Direccion Cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(Usamos todas las claves) 

RIELES Y ASEGURADORES 

RANAS Y CAMBIAVIAS 

VAGONES 

CALDERAS, TANQUES, BOMBAS 




Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
' ' Lion ' ' Brass Trade M ark Labels and Seals attached . 



DeiJripdve"cataiog Jaiiies Walkcf & Compafly, Ltd. 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

jose: l. viclaamil 

Santa Clara 2Q, Havana, Cuba 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



/"■ A I?I?r^Q PARA Tonos usfis v dc toflos tamanos. de k>s jiara cana ccm ciiaim ruolas y capa- 

N-'ArvivUO ciJad de I'A toncladas a los cmi jucgos doblcs de ruc<las y cajiacidad de 30 toneladas 

Haccmos una cst^cciahdad dc juegos de hcrrajcs. tnclnycndo los juegoi 

dc ruedas, cumplctamcutc arinados, con todas las pxczas dc metal, y pianos 

cl>i^;U:'-s para constmir los carros d sn destino de inaczras del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Address: 
Ramamam 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

'''^s^ls-S' SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. S'lu'^et 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 



SUGARS 



RAW AND 
REFINED 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 

82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and ^Veekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trade, 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET AD^^CES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensena uno de nuestros carros, todo de acero, para cana. 

Tenemos otros tipo3 de capacidadea varias y hemos fabricado un gran numero de carros para cafia para 
uao en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaulc-s de acero o de madera y con- 
struidas para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cana. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E. U. A. 

Direccion telegrdfica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot. 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B CIXTAS, Oficios 29-31. Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Offic* in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma, Clinton Bldg. 

2630 Whitehall BuUdlng 
NEW YORK 




STEEL TANKS 



HAMOIND T^INK: 




COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Los Angeles Office 

414 Crosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

Agents in Cuba: 

ZALDO & MARTINEZ 

26 O'Reilly Street, Havana 



BUILT BY 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 



30% 

m&s de 




Mejor 
extrac- 



PATENTE PELAEZ 

Esta maza puede colocarse facilmente en cualquier trapiche, sea de dos 6 tres mazas. Machuca bien la 
oafia desmenuztodola y extray^ndole almismo tiempo las dos terceras partes de su guarapo, dejando la canabien 
preparada para el segundo trapiche. Ejecuta todo el trabajo de una desmenuzadora de primera clase y sin rnds 
gasto que cuando ae opera con una maza lisa. Esta maza es de acero y se ha sacado privilegio para ella en todas 
las partes del mundo donde se cultiva la oafia de azucar. Pues envienos un dibujo de la maza superior que usan 
U is asl que de su eje, y les cotizaremos precioa bajos por una maza completa para desmenuzar la cana de este 
trapiche. 

NEWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 149 Broadway, New York, E. U. A. 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
5 15 



PM 



P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
PM 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



PM 



AM 
10 1" 
12 15 



PM 



AM 
6 55 
8 33 
10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
PM 



A M 
6 15 
8 15 



7 30 
11 22 
AM 



Fare 
Istcl 
$2.04 
3.99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana .Ar. 

Ar Artemisa Lv. 

Ar Paso Real Lv. 

Ar Herradura Lv. 

Ar Pinar del Rio .... Lv. 

Ar Guane Lv 



Fare 
3dcl. 
$1. 10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 


A M 
7 49 
5 45 

AM 


AM 
11' 09 
9'35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 


AM 
11 47 
9 45 


P M 
3 49 
1 45 


P M 
6 47 
4 45 








6 38 
3 00 

P M 






AM 


P M 



P M 
7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
3 00 
1 30 
P M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " | Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cts. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

A RE on Bale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west o^ 
•^*- Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25%. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



$1.00 Per Year 



SUBSCRIPTION 



Advertising Rales on Application 



10 Cents Single Copy 



Vol. XV 



JANUARY, 1917 



No. 2 



Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — A Street in Casa Hlanca leading up hill, for pedestrians only. 
Frontispiece — Inclined Railwoy at the Mines of Mayari, Cuba. 
All .\round Cuba: 

Citrus Fruits 

Code of Neutrals 

Counterfeit Money. . 

Cubitas Valley Fair. 

Malanga 

New Electric Lines 

Tariff Changes 

Cattle liaising in Cuba, Illustrated, by Consul Henry M. Wolcott 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

Cuba Rai road Company 

Gasoline Motors 

Playing Cards 

Scales 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

A. H. Lamborn Company 

Cuba Cane Sugar Corporation 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 

Report of the Cuba Cane Sugar Corporation . 

Cuban Government Matters: 

Conscription . . 

Havana Colonial Debts 

Law Against Drugs. . . 

Minister from Bolivia. 

Naval School 

Naval School, Illustration. . 

North Carolina Suit 

Paraguay 

Road Congress 

Publications Received 

Regulations, Workmen's Compcnsaiion .Act, Translated by Charles Anguh 

Sugar Industry: 

American Beet Sugar Industry 

Central for Hayti 

Central Tinguaro 

Central Washington 

Chart — Raw Sugar Exports from Cuba, 191.5-10 

Chart Showing Relation Between Price of Sugar and Exports. 

Chilean Sugar 

Cuban Sugar Crop 

Hawaiian Sugar 

Hongkong Sugar Trade 

IMexican Laborers 

Patent 

Sugar Exports 

Sugar Mill Situation in Cuba 

Sugar Supnly of the L'nited Kingdoi;.. . . 

Sugar Review, EngUsh 

Sugar Review, Spanish 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Hailroads 



16,17,18,!!) 



2(3 
27 
27 
26 



21 

21 

21 

.22,23,24,25 



S 
7 
7 
8 
7 
10 



7 

8 

. . 28 

,13,14,1.5 



3.3 
31 
31 
31 
34 
32 
31 
29 
31 
29 
31 
31 
3.5 
30 
33 



20. 'n 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Inclined Railway at the Mines of Mayari, 



THL 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL AL.OUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



JANUARY, 1917 



Number 2 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



HAVANA COLONIAL DEBTS 

President Mcnocal h-is signed a decree 
suspending a resolution adopted l:)y the City 
Council of Havana on November 16 provid- 
ing for an Issue of municipal bonds to pay 
for debts amounting to $2,812,000, dating to 
the tim3 when Cuba was a Spanish colony. 

A similar resolution for a bond issue to 
mest claims for servicss alleged to have been 
rende.-ed under Spao'sh domination, was 
adopted by the Cou.aciJ last June. President 
)\Ienocal also annulled this decree, on the 
ground that it involved infrdctions of the 
laws of mU'iicipctlit'e.?. 

LAW AGAINST DRUGS 

The law which was pat into effect in Cuba 
recently prohibiting the sale of habit forming 
drugs, has had the effect of placing some diffi- 
culty in the way of operating a sugar m.ill. 
Ether, which is among the prohibited drugs, 
is needed for the manufacture of sugar, and 
the authorities are now considering some way 
to permit the use of ether by suga'- centrals 
and at the same time ])revent the drug from 
being sold to unauthorized parties, but the 
exact mode of procedure whereby the sugar 
centrals would be exem.pted has not yet been 
determined. 

QUARANTINE ENDED 

The Department of Sanitation stated on 
Dec. 13, that the quarantine against American 
ports for infantile paralysis was ended. 



NAVAL SCHOOL 

The new Cuban naval academy at^Mariel 
was opened on January 8 with appropriate 



ceremonies. 



PARAGUAY 

It is reported that the Government of Para- 
guay has decreed that Cuban Government 
representatives in Paraguay may denounce 
attempts to pass off as of Cuban origin manu- 
factured toljacco which lacks an official label. 
It is specified, however, that the label in 
question does not constitute a trade-mark and, 
therefore, the effect of such denunciation will 
be restricted to an official notice warning con- 
sumers of fraud. The decree specifies that the 
(\iban Government should recii:)rocate in a 
similar manner to establish protection for the 
products of Paraguay which may be exported 
to Cuba. It is stated that this is the first in- 
stance in which the Government of Paraguay 
has given recognition to a trade or merchan- 
dise mark. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL 
LAW 

This institute, which comprises five dele- 
gates from each of the national societies of the 
21 ^\merican states, has planned to have its 
next meeting in Havana, Cuba, and the ses- 
sions are to begin January 22. It is stated 
that the Cuban Government has approved 
a credit of $10,000 to defray ex-penses. 



THE CUBA'REVIEW 



ROAD CONGRESS 

Announcement is made that plans have 
been completed whereljy a National Congress 
of Roads will be held scm.e tim.e during 1917 
which will endeavor to organize a National 
Highway Com.mission whereby there will be 
built a national highway from one end of 
Cuba to the other. This schem.e is not a new 
one, and it is said that the plans have been in 
the hands cf the Secretary cf Public Works for 
scm.e time. The scheme would also include 
a central highroad across Cuba from North to 
South, and the plan would fuxthermore com- 
prehend the utilization of existing highways, 
so that upon completion of this work, Cuba 
would be practically covered with a netwoik 
of gocd roads, a state of affairs most desirable 
and profitable for the Cubans. 



MINISTER FROM BOLIVIA 



STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

According to a Washington despatch, the 
law suit against the State of North Carolina, 
which involved the sum of $2,000,000 worth 
of bonds, the suit being instituted by the 
Government of Caiba acting presumably for 
third parties, has been withch-awn by direc- 
tion cf President Menocal. 



CON.SCRIPTION 



It is runiored that a plan for the estab- 
lishment of compuslory military service in 
Cuba is being studied carefully by the Depart- 
ment of Gove nment and the geneial staff of 
the army. 



MILK. INSPECTION 

The National Board of Health of Cuba has 
issued a decree authorizing the organization 
of hygienic m.ilk inspection bureaus through- 
out the entire island. 

SPANISH GOVERNMENT 

It is reported that a request of the Board 
of Immigration of Spain to the Department of 
Im.migration of Cuba that each Spanish im- 
migrant be required to show a passport sig- 
nifying that he was not evading military ser- 
vice will not be granted. 

BARRACKS 

President Menocal has authorized the gen- 
eral staff of the army to build a barracks at 
Santiago de las Vegas providing the cost does 
not exceed $7,000. 




Sr Don Ignacio Calderon, Courtisi/ Bulletin 
cf the Fan- American U nion. 

We have been informed that Si. Den. Ig- 
niicia Calderon, the Bolivian Minister to the 
United States, has also been accredited to 
Cuba, and we understand that Sr. Calderon 
is leaving on the 14th of January via Key 
West to vi.^it Havana, for th? purpose of pre- 
senting his credentials. The Minister will be 
accompanied by Mrs. Calderon and their 
daughter, and it is further stated that Sr. 
Calderon plans to make a tour of Cuba before 
returning to the United States. Sr. Calderon 
has represented Bolivia in Washington since 
If 01, his length of service making him the 
Daan of th? Latin-American diplomatic 
corps. 



ECUAEXDR 



Dr. Rafael N. Elizalde, the new Minister of 
Ecuador to Cuba, presented his credentials to 
President Menocal on January 10. 



COMPENSATION LAW 

This law is about to go into effect in Cuba 
and in this issue is given an abstract of the 
rules and regulations for its enforcement. 
This law is one of the most important acts 
of the Cuban Congress ever enacted, and its 
effects will be far-reaching. Every manu- 
facturer, sugar central, or other employer 
of labor in Cuba will be subject to its pro- 
visions and will have to conform to its 
requirements. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



MALANCA 

According to the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture 
a new root crop, the dasheen, is l)eing grown 
by a nuip.ber of farmers of the south, and 
})ronu<es t ) l)ecom.e a valua>)le member of the 
grouj) of domestic vegetables, such as the 
the potato. 

The value of the dasheen, it is l)clieved, will 
be as a crop supplemental to, rather than a 
substitute for, the potato. 

In food value the dasheen is comparable 
to the potato, though it contains a smaller 
proportion of water and a greater proportion 
of protein, starch and sugar than the latter. 
The new vegetable may be prepared for the 
table as potatoes usually are, or may be made 
into flour and used in l)aking. 

The Cuban variety of the dasheen is known 
as IMalanga, and is largely used in Cuba and 
is, of course, capable of more extensive culti- 
vation. 

CITRUS FRUITS 

The Bureau of Chemistry of the United 
States Department of Agriculture has devoted 
much time to an investigation during the last 
year of the production of by-products of citrus 
fruits and has developed a method for the manu- 
facture of citrate of lime from lemons, while 
consideral)!e ])rogress has been made in the 
manufacture of citric acid from the same fruit. 
The manufacture ot lemon oil has been studied 
and progress reported in this direction. The 
study of tangerines has resulted in the green 
fruit as a valuable source of citric acid, and the 
oil as a commercial possibility. Orange vine- 
gar has been made and the prospects of this 
being a commercial success seem probable 
although the market is limited. 

COUNTERFEIT MONEY 

It is reported that much counterfeit of 
Cuban money is now in circulation, the silver 
dollar being the coin most frequently counter- 
feited. It is understood that the Cuban 
Governm^ent is making every effort to appre- 
hend the counterfeiters. 

PORT OF HAVANA 

Statistics for the year 1916 show that dur- 
ing the year 89,631 passengers entered the 
port of Havana and 65,812 sailed from the 
port. 



REDUCTIONS ON MATERIALS FOR ASBESTOS 
FABRIC 

Certain ai)i)aratus and materials u.sed in the 
manufacture of asbest(,'s cloth are to be exempt 
from the surtax established by the decree of 
February 1, 1904, according to customs cir- 
cular dated October 20, 191(5. The articles 
entitled to the reduction are classified under 
tariff Nos. 40, 57, 226, and 231, the surtaxes, 
remited being 30% of the duty on articles 
dutiable vmder Nos. 40 and ,57, and 25% of the 
duty in the case of the other goods. Such 
apparatus and materials must be nnported 
by manufacturers for use in their own estab- 
lishments and a sworn declaration as to such 
intended use must be submitted. 



REDUCTION ON FABRICS FOR MATTRESSES 
ETC. 

A Cuban decree of October 20, 1916, ex- 
empts from the surtax of 20 per cent. im]>osed 
by the decree of February 1, 1904, cotton 
fabrics classified under Xos. 114, 115, 116 and 
117 of the C\iban customs tariff, provided 
such goods are imported by manufacturers of 
mattresses, pillows, and sweat pads, for use 
in their own establishments. In order to take 
advantage of these reductions, importers 
must make declaration imder oath that the 
goods ?.re to be used as above indicated. 



NEW ELECTRIC LINES 

Electric .itreet-car service was inaugurated 
in Matanzas and Cardenas on December 17. 
The Diari o de la Marina says that much en- 
thusiasm greeted the opening of the new car 
service, and it is believed that the tramwaj'S 
will assist greatly in the development of these 
cities. 



HAVANA 



The ship registry department of the cus- 
toms bureau shows that during the last six 
months of 1916, 1,008 vessels of various 
nationalities entered the port of Havana. 

Statistics of the customs department show 
that in the second six months of 1916, 47,258 
passengers with 81,675 pieces of baggage 
arrived in Havana. 



PATENT 



A patent for a process of preserving milk 
has been granted to Sr. Carlos !Muiioz. 



10 



THE CiU B A REVIEW 




T H E C U B A It E \' I E W 11 

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ENFORCEMENT 
OF THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT 
RECENTLY ENACTED IN CUBA 

Translated by Charlen Aiujuio of the New York Bar 

XOTK: The purpose of the translator has been to make the meaning of th(; Spanish 
text eloar to the English speaking reader rather than to translate it literally. 

In uccordiince with the Dowers conferred utjon me by Article 68 of the Const it ufi(jn, and 
Dursuant to the provisions of Article 52 of the law of Juno 12th of the current year enacted by 
tlic Honorable Congress of the Rcuublic and relating to the compensation of workmen for 
accidental injuries sustained in the course of their emploj-ment, and on motion of the Secretary 
of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor. I ai)i)rove, although teiiii)ora/ily, the following rules and 
regulations: 

Article First: Jiy "Emjjloyer" is meant the individual or company A\liich is the owner 
of the construction, business or industry in connection with which the work is being performed. 

If the construction, or any ])art thereof, is being done, or the industrj', or any j)art thereof 
is being conducted, /nirsuanttoa contract, the "Contractor" shall be deemed the employer. 

Article Second: By "Workmen" is meant every person who is either permanently or 
temporarily engaged in doing any work for a fixed remuneration, away from his own liome 
The foreman, W'hose wages do not exceed $3.00 per day and whose contract of employment is 
for at least thirtj- days, and the apprentices who work without any remuneration whatsoever 
shall be deemed to be workmen within the meaning of this law. 

Workmen who because of the requirements of the work or the duties which are entrusted 
to them are obliged to reside either by themselves or with their families in the place or on the 
premises where the industry or the business is ];eing cank d r n shall not be deemed to be work- 
ing in their own homes. 

Article Third: By virtue of the provisions of sub-division 1 1 cf Article 2 of the Law, the 
employees of mercantile establishments shall be deemed to be within the protection of the law-. 

Artilce Fourth: For the purjjose of fixing the remuneration which the workman does not 
receive in money, but in goods and in lodgings, or in any other form, said remrmeration shall 
be cf)mputed in accordance with the average value in the locality of the goods furnished, or of 
any other thing which may constitute svich remuneration. 

If the services of the workmen are contracted for on a jobbing basis, the remimeration 
should be fixed by determining the remuneration Avhich, as a general rule, is received by work- 
men of the same class as the victim of the accident for the same or similar kind of work. 

Article Fifth: Xotwithstanding the provisions cf sub-division 2 of Article 8 of the Law 
which ])rescribe that no compensation shall be paid pursuant to the provisions of this Law 
for injuries which do not result in incapacitating the workjnan or employee so that he cannot 
gain his usual daih' wage during a period not less than two weeks, in view of what is provided 
in Article 34 of the Law (following, as may be seen, .Article S thereof) regarding the obligation 
of the emploj-er to render first aid to the injured, medical and pharmaceutical assistance, and 
to pay the expenses of the funeral and interment, not exceeding, however, thirty dollars, it 
shall always be the duty of the employer to pay these expenses, whatever may have been the 
duration of the workman's incapacity for his work, it being noted that the requirement or 
condition regarding the two weeks' incapacity may only be availed of by the employer and not 
in anv manner may it be considered to extend to insurance companies. 

In regard to the medical and pharmaceutical assistance, it must be remembered that in 
case the victim of the accident availing himself of theright conferred upon him l)y Article 29 of 
the Law, wishes to designate the doctor and the druggist who are to assist him during the dura- 
tion of the cure, his wishes in the matter must be acceded to, provided that the doctor or 
druggist he designates shall reside in the locality where the injm-ed workjnan happens to be 

Article Sixth: The compensation to which the workmen are entitled and which should be 
paid by the employer and by insurance companies, must be given in the same form, place, coin, 
and at the times, in which thewageswere paid, unless, of course, the interested oarties should 
otherwise agree. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Article Seventh: The wroof to which A'-ficie 33 of the Law refers, that is to say, the proof 
of having insuied his workmen in some dulj^ authorized organization and that said company 
assures or guarantees to the insured the compensation which in that article is provided for, 
should be made by the employers or their representatives and by the heads of firms and 
industries, before the Municipal Judge of the place where the work is being performed and 
before the Judge of the First Instance of the said Municipal District. 

The captains, ship owners or consignees of ships who are employers within the meaning of 
this law. shall furnish said proof to the Municipal Judge of the district wherein is situated the 
port in which the said ship is registered and to the Judge of the First Instance wlio has super- 
vision of the said Municipal Judge. 

Article Eighth: The approval by the Government of the by-Laws of insurance companies 
which such companies are required to obtain before they can carry on this kind of business, 
shall be given by the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, and this same office shall 
be in charge of the inspection and supervision of .?aid companies in accordance with the powers 
conferred upon it by the Executive Law and especially by the Presidential Decree No. 1123 of 
the year 1909. 

Article NinOi: The insurance companies or associations desiring to devote themselves to 
this kind of insurance, described in the Workmen's Compensation Act, should provide security 
in the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), official currency, either in cash or in 
mortgage bonds of the state, which amount shall guarantee the immediate com])liance of the 
obligations of said companies as insurers. This security shall be entirely distinct from those 
which have previously been furnished or wnich ma}' hereafter be furnished by them in accord- 
ance with other laws of the Cuban state, and it shall be deposited in the office of the Secretary 
of the Treasury, through the office of the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor and 
it shall be at the disposal of the said Department of Agriculture, Comnierce and Labor, which 
department, whenever a Judge officially notifies it that he has ordered an insurance company 
to pay a certain sum, shall demand of said company that it make the said payment ordered by 
the Judge within a pericd of forty-eight hours, counted from the time of receiving the notifica- 
tion, and if such payment is not made said company shall communicate with the office of the 
Secretary of the Treasury, so that if the security- is in cash the amount asked for by the Judge 
shall be sent immediately and if the security is in bonds those necessary to produce the amount 
asked for by the Judge shall be sold. 

Article Tenth: Once the office of the Secretary of the Department of Agriculture, Com- 
merce and Labor has obtained the money asked for by the Judge, it shall proceed to send it 
without delay to the said Judge, and it shall make written demand on the same day and do 
whatever it deems convenient, so that the insurance company will accordirgly incresse its 
security, granting it a reasonable time in which to do so, and if said insurance company 
shouldneglect todoso with in the said pericd, the Department of Agriculture, Comimerce and 
Labor shall declare cancelled every contract entered into with that company, communicating 
this through the proper channels to all the judges of the First Instance of the Republic, 
so that they in turn may communicate it to the employers, who in accordance with the Registers 
of each court, appear to have contracted with the company whose authority has been revoked, 
informing them that from that moment the employers shall alone and directly l:»e respon- 
sible for the accidents occuring in the course of the work until they have contracted with 
another insurance company which has complied with the legal requirements. 

Article Eleventh: The same obligations and formalities prescribed in the preceding articles 
in regard to insurance companies now existing in Cuba, shall be understood to be applicable to 
companies hereafter organized for the purpose of insuring against accidents occurirg in the 
course of employment, and likewise to domestic comjpanies and to foreign companies. 

Article Tiveljth: The mutual companies Avhich may be organized for the purpose of ajipor- 
tioning among its members the amount of the losses suffered by any of said members and with 
out participation directly or indirectly in any surxjlus, shall be subject to the following regula- 
tions: 

First: That they must be organized by more than five employers, who must prove that they 
are such to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, by exhibiting 



THECUBAREVIEW 13 

to him the rcceijjt for the lant Indiistriiil Tax, jtltJiough it may ap])ear tliercfrom that it lias refer- 
ence to some kind of work or oecuj)ation not eovered by this Law. 

Second: That they must have eaused to he insured at least two Innuh'ed w<H-kmen amoiif^ 
those employed in the work or industries in which said employers are engaged. 

Third: That in the by-Laws of said associations provision is made for the joint respj)nsi- 
bility of all the members, which responsibility shall not be extinguished in any case until the 
total obligations have been i)aid or satisfied, either directly by the mem})ers or by the accept- 
ance of the said responsi})ility by an accident insurance company which is legally organized. 

Fourth: That they j)rovide security in the sum of ten thoiisand dollars in the foim i)re- 
scrilx-d in Ai-ticle Ninth. 

Arlicle Thirteenth: The Judges of the First Instance, jjursuant to Article 28 of the 

Law, shall give judgment imposing compensation which, as to the amount mentioned therein 

should be paid immediatelj^ although an appeal is taken from said judgment, shall proceed to 

collect the same by means of a special proceeding known as "Apremio etc." whenever the 

obligation to pay the compensation is imposed on the employer; and when said obligation is 

imposed u])on the insurance ccmipany, once the judgment is given and without waiting even 

until it is affirmed on ai)peal, they shall officially communicate with the Secretary f f Agri- 

cuture, C'oiDinerce and Lal)or and reaues-t of him that he remit the amoimt which according to 

the Jvidgment should be paid. 

NOTE: By Decree dated The 2Ist day of December, 1916, tha President of Cuba 
amended Article Thirteenth of the Regulations, so that said Article should now read as 
follows: 

Article Thirteenth: The Judges of the First Instance, pursuant to Article Twenty- 
eighth of the Law, shall proceed to collect the compensation by the special proceeding known as 
the "Apremio" when said obligation to pay the compensation is imposed upon the emoloyer; 
when said ol)ligation is imposed upon an insurance company, once the judgment is given and 
without waiting until the appeal is decided, they shall cite to appear before them, the represen- 
tative of the company who resides in the locality, so that within a period of thirty-six hours 
it (the company) shall pay into court the amount of the award. If no representative of the 
company can be found, the company shall be cited by means of a written notice, and if its 
place of business is unknown and it has no representative in the locality, it shall be cited 
by publication. After three days have passed without the money having been paid into 
court, the judges shall officially communicate with the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce 
and Labor and request that he remit the amount of the award. 

Arlicle Fourteenth: For the purpose of complying with this Law and pursuant to the 
powers which Article Forty thereof confers U])on the Executive to fix the conditions to which 
insurance comi)anies should conform, it is established: 

(rr) The accident insurance companies, as soon as they have entered into a contract of this 
kind, shall give written notice to the Municipal Judge of the locality in which the work or 
enterprise is being carried on, also to the Judge of the First Instance who is the sup'erior of said 
Municipal Judge, of the name and domicile of some person resident in that locality, to whom 
all notices must be given on behalf of the company in any proceeding in either of said courts, 
which, however, shall be without jirejudice to the company's right to a])pear in the proceeding 
in accordance with our Laws. When the com])anies have not complied with said provisions, the 
judges shall serve the notices, citations and summons by posting in the cotu't rooms of said 
courts and trilnmals. 

(6) The insurance companies which are engaged both in other kinds of insurance business 
and accident insurance, shall keep such other business entirely apart from their accident insur- 
ance business; 

(c) Said insurance companies, by the mere fact of having entered into a contract in Cuba, 
shall be imderstood to have expressly suljmitted themselves to the jurisdiction of our tribtmals 
and courts, and it shall be deemed that they iiave expressly accepted all our laws and regulations 
with reference to accidents arising in the course of employment; 

id) Likewise they shall permit the inspectors and agents of the office of the Secretar}' of 
Agriculture, Commerce and Labor to examine their certificates of incorporation, by-laws, and to 
investigate the manner in which the capital and reserve fund has been employed, to examine 



14 THECUBAREVIEW 

the terms and conditions of the poUcies, the insurance rates, the estimated reserves and life 
payments, the manner in which the contracts of insurance are entered into and the renewals 
thereof, their duration and manner of parformance, etc.; and said companies shall comply with 
the suggestions and modifications which are proposed to them by the Secretary of Agriculture, 
Commerce and Labor, providing they are in accordance with our Laws and regulations. 

(e) The Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, when he believes that insurance 
companies are not complying with the principal requirements of the Law and that failure to 
so comply may in time result in their not fulfilling the obligations they have assumed, shall de- 
mand through the representatives of the company in the capital, granting a reasonable time 
for compliance, that the company shall remedy the defects he has found, and if within the given 
period of time, the insurance comj^any fails to remedy the defects found, the Secretary of Agi-i- 
culture. Commerce and Labor shall proceed to cancel and revoke the right of said company to 
insure, and he shall communicate the same to all the Judges of the First Instance for the 
purposes of Article Tenth of these reg"alations ; 

(/) When the defects found are of such character that it is manifest the purpose was to 
avoid the compliance with the contracts entered into, the Secretary of Agriculure, Commerce 
and Labor shall immediately proceed to cancel and revoke the right of insm-ance, communi- 
cating the same to the Judges of the First Instance; 

(g) From the decisions of the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor relating to 
such matters, an appeal may l^e taken as provided by Law, l)ut when tiie Secretary of Agi-icul- 
ture, Commerce and Laljor deenas ])rojjer, and by means of a decree, he may compel compliance 
with his decision, notwithstanding the appeal taken therefrom; 

(h) The insurance companies shall submit in the month of January in each year to the 
Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, a detailed report of their operations relating to 
the Workmen's Com]3ensation Law; 

(i) The Secretar}' of Agricultiu-e, Commerce and Lal)or shall not gi-ant the necessary 
authorization to foreign insurance companies until they have notified him in writing that they 
are registered in the Mercantile Registry of the capital, (Havana) and that they have an agent 
or representative in the same with all the powers necessary to enable him to comply with the 
requirements of the Workmen's Compensation Law and with these Regulations, and with a 
permanent place of residence; 

(j) When the Secretary of Agricultiire, Commerce and Labor learns that this agent or 
representative has for any reason quit his office, he shall give notice addressed to the office 
which the company maintains in Havana, and if it does not maintain any such office he shall 
publish such notice in the Gazette, granting a reasonable and sho>-t time in which to appoint 
a new representative, and if such company should fail to do so within the said fixed period, the 
said Secretary shall cancel its contracts ol insurance in the manner already stated; 

(k) In addition to the guarantee referred to in Article Ninth the insurance companies 
shall be obliged to invest fifteen per cent of tiieir assets in real estate, situated within the 
ReDublic; 

Article Fifteenth: The employers or the heads of the industries or enterprises which, in 
accordance with .Aj-ticle Fiftieth of the Law, wish to directly assume the obligations imposed 
by the Workmen's Compensation Act, by obtaining previous authorization from the President 
of the Republic, shall do so through the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, upon 
giving evidence that they are within the limitations established l)y Article Fiftieth. 

To this end they shall present in the said proceeding before the Secretary of Agiiculture, 
Commerce and Labor, (and so that a note may be made thereof) the title deeds corresponding 
to the property which they propose to furnish in guarantee of the fulfillment of their obliga- 
tions; (and for the purpose of filing with the papers in the said proceedings) they shall present a 
certificate of the Register of Property that said property is registered in his name, and that 
there is no incumbrance of any kind whatsoever upon it, and they shall likewise present a 
certified copy from the office of the Register of Property, of the deed in w^iich the mortgage 
has been constituted in accordance with the provisions of Article Fiftieth of the Workmen's 
Compensation Law, Avhich deed or mortgage may have been accepted by any District Attorney 
of the Republic in the name of the Government, and without said person accepting said deed, 
incurring any liability whatsoever by reason of having accepted the same. 



T H E U U B A R E V I E W 15 



TheSecl-otaryof Afrrifulturc, ill view of said (locuniciits ami after ohta'iiiiiji; all the inf<iriiia- 
tion which ho dooms projior as roKards the sufficiency of i\ut KUaraiitoe, shall urocoed in a proper 
case to obtain from the President of the Republic th(> authorization referred to in said Article 
Fiftieth. 

Article Sixkctdh: Foreign hriiis and concerns shall also be under the obligation of having 
uitiiin the country a representative as required by Article Fiftieth of this Law, with the con- 
ditions and requirements therein stated, which they shall establish in the petition in which 
tihey request the said authorization. When the Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor 
learns that for any reason the said representative has quit his office, he shall proceed in the 
same manner as is indicated with reference to insurance comjianies. 

Arliclc Seventeenth: The notice; of meeting which Article Twenty-eighth of the Law pro- 
vides shall be given by the Judge of the First Instance to the parties or their representatives, so 
that they may reach an agreement, shall be understood to mean to the representatives in tli(! 
locality of the insurance company in the cases where the employer is not the insurer. 

Artlde Eighteenth : \\'hen it happens that the employer or the contractor of the Avork are 
themselves the insurers, the citation to appear before the judge shall be served at the residence 
of the employer if it should be situated in the same place as the court and, if not, at the reisdcnco 
of the head or person in charge of the work who may have his residence within the Judicial 
District, and if there should be no one to accept the said citation, after an order certifying to the 
fact has been ol)tained and signed by the clerk of the court in which the -proceedings are had, 
the same shall be l)i)sted in the court house. 

Article Nineteenth : When the injured workman, or his representatives duly authorized, shall 
inform the Court of the First Instance that his claims under the Workmen's Compensation 
Law have been fully satisfied, the Judge of the First Instance shall terminate the proceedings, 
no matter at what stage they may be, and shall have the papers duly filed. 

TRAXSITORV 
Article Twenti':th : In view of the temporary character of the present Rules and Regulations 
the Executive shall name a commission which shall confer with all the industrial and lal)oring 
classes of the country, which are affected by the Law of the 12th of June, of the current year 
and shall propose within a period of six months the modifications which it believes ought to be 
introduced in the Rules and Regulations previously established. 

Given in the President's Palace in Havana on the 12th day of December, 1916. 



CODE OF NEUTRALS CUBITAS VALLEY FAIR 

A code of rules of maritime neutrality which On account of the excessive rainfall, the 

should govern the relations between belliger- vegetab'e growers considered it advisable to 

ents and neutrals was submitted to the Ameri- postpone the Cubitas Valley Fair in order to 

can Institute of International Law in annual have a more complete line of vegetables for the 

ses.ion at Havana, Jan. 22. exhibition; con.«equentIy, the Fair Association 

The proposed regulations practically pro- has po.itponed the Fair dates to February 27 

vide for freedom of the seas in time of war. and 28 and March 1, 1917. This year 

Commercial blockades would be forbidden the La Gloria Fair A.ssociation departs from 

and mails inviolate; merchant ships without its usual custom by having other societies 

contraband, whether of belligerant or neutral meet in convention. The Cuban Xation;d 

registry, would be unmolested if they bore Horticultural Society ard the Cuba Fruit 

vi.seed papers; right of search at sea wouid be Exchange will meet at this time in conjuuc- 

abolished. The mandates would be enforced tion with the Fair Association, and there will 

by a neutral conference with authority to l)e representatives and ex-perts from the 

take "severe measures" against violators. various Citrus Fruit Colonies of the Island. 

The code was drafted by Dr. Alejandro Al- The Government will be represented also, 

varez, Secretary General of the institute, and It is hoped that out of this Congress there 

who formeny was juriconsult to the Chilean shall come a consolidation of all Citrus 

Foreign Office and counselor to the Chilean grow-ers for a more complete National 

legations abroad. It will be referred to the Exchange, 
national society of international law in each 
of the twenty-one American republics. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Cuban cattle along the Vianks of a river. 



CATTLE RAISING IN CUBA 



By Consul Henry M. Wolcott, Habana 



Many inquiries have been received at the Hal)ana consulate general from Americans who 
desire information as to the possibilities of success in the cattle-raising industry in this country. 
Therefore it is opporttme to submit the following report prepared liy an American who for 
14 years was directly engaged in this business under very favorable conditions in the eastern 
end of the island: 

At the close of the Spanish-American war, Cuba was practically without cattle, and im- 
portations commenced in 1899 from the United States, Mexico, South America, Porto Rico, 
and some from the smaller West Indies; mostly grown thin steers were brought from South 
America and female stock from other places. The thin steers weighing about 700 pounds upon 
arrival, would gain 300 pounds on the good pastures here in five months, and the net gain per 
head was about $10. The price of beef cattle from 1900 to 1904 was about 6 to 6^ cents per 
pound on the hoof; cows, $60; bull yearhngs, $25, etc. 

About 1905 the country was overstocked with cattle; exportation is impracticable because 
the supply is too small to properly fit out the refrigei-ator carriers for dressed meats, and the 
grass-fed live cattle lose too much in transit. The price began to fall in 1905, and at this period 
beef was selling from 3 to 33'2 cents a pound, cows $25, yearlings $8 to $12, etc. These condi- 
tions continued, and at times there was no demand until all kinds of female stock was being 
slaughtered daily, and in 1913 a scarcity was felt, and since then prices of all kinds of cattle 
have gradually risen until present sales are at 6M to 7 cents for beef, $55 for cows, $25 for bull 
yearlings, etc. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 




'JMlling the soil with oxen driven plough. 

Prices of Pasture Land — Cattle Pests. 

Prior to 1901 good pasture land was worth about $3 per acre; to-day the same quality 
will cost from $15 to $20 an acre. Good ranch land is scarce at present, but might be found 
in the Province of Camaguey and Oriente at the above prices. The other Provinces of the 
island are not rich in grazing lands. 

There are several native perennial grasses used for grazing, but Guinea and Para (or 
Parana) grass are the only ones of good value for pasture. If the usual rains occur, the gra^ 
grows and gives good feed every month in the year, but pastures must be fenced and allowed 
to recuperate a month or two from time to time in order not to kill them out in times of un- 
usual drought. The rainfall here is about 57 inches, and the dry season extends from Novem- 
ber to March, during which time the average rainfall is from one to three inches. 

CJood fenced pasture land can maintain 16 head of cattle on a caballeria of land (33 J^ acres) 
the year rovmd. 

Black leg is prevalent in Cuba in all cattle less than 30 months old. Anthrax is not un- 
known, and constant care must be given cattle, especially young stock, to cure screw worms 
caused by blow-flies depositing eggs in any slight open wound on an animal. The former is 
easily controlled by vaccination, the second is not serious, and the latter is a matter for constant 
care, but easily managed. 

Abundance of good river water is often found in pastures in Oriente Province, but parts 
of Camaguey depend on wells; this is a very important feature when bujang ranch land. 

The climate of Cxilja is subtropical, and although the sun is hot it is always tempered by 
the cool trade winds, and the thermometer never falls below 50 in the winter. 

The majority of cattle in Cuba to-day are of crosses Ijetween the imports given in the 
first part of this report and bulls originally from Africa and India; the cows will weigh about 
800 pounds, and good range three-year-old steers will average 925 pounds. Some good breeds 
have been imported from the United States and, in a small way, are improving the present 
cattle here. 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




:%3&»t^a?«!ijgB!^-l* 



A herd of heifers, representing some of the Im'~i l.icctis from the I'nited States, most ly 
Cuban-born yearlings, at Estacion. 

The present is a poor time to buy ranch land or cattle in Cuba, because both are at 
exceptionally high prices. 

In order to succeed in the cattle-raising industry here it is necessary for the owner to 
speak Spanish and to have had a year or two experience in the Imsiness in this country. Hired 
help can not be depended on to conduct the lousiness without the ])ersonal supervision of the 
owner. 

Ii)i ports of Meat into Cuba. 

The following table shows the quantities and values of the imports of salt, fresh, cannedi 
and jerked beef into Cuba during the fiscal years 1914 and 1915: 



Kind and Whence Imported 
Salt Eeef 

Tnited States 

Uruguay 



Total. 



Fresh Beef 



United States , 



Canned Eeef 

United States 

France 

United Kingdom 



1914 




1915 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Pounds 




Pounds 




89,941 


«6,4S9 


78,291 


$6,829 


2,468 


236 






92,409 


$6,725 


78,291 


$6,829 


66,999 


$7,60S 


112,010 


$10,299 


57,277 


$10,382 


35,899 


$5,640 


158 


36 






307 


54 







Total 



57,742 



$10,472 



35,899 



$5,640 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



Jerked Beef 

Iniled States 1,489,762 

.\rsentina 6,829,0i)7 

rruKuav 14,426,820 

Vene/.uela 62,780 

Total 22,808,429 



$174,664 

870,29.") 

1 ,690,034 

10,992 



136,411 

8,744,7()i) 

11,617,423 



$17,089 

r)4o,0o() 

l,r)7."),497 



$2,74(),48r) ir,,498,600 $2,137,642 




Miners at Work. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

BuUcliit of .Vims, \o\ I, Xo. 1.— This pub- 
lication was prepared liy Si'. Pabio Ortega, 
mining engineer, and the publication is a re- 
port of the recently created Bureau of mines 
which was organized as a bureau under the 
direction of the Secretary of Agriculture. The 
bulletin contains a great deal of information 
which hitherto has not been available be- 
cause it was in the archives of the Depart- 
ment in the form of various papers printed in 
Spanish, French and English. The publica- 
tion gives a complete statement of the condi- 
tion of the mining industry prior to 1885, and 
it gives also a complete statement of the legis- 
lation i)rior to 1883 affecting the mining in- 
dustry, and the information is also arranged 
to cover the mining industry up to December 



31, 1915. There is a valuable digest of the 
laws of Cuba, which have to do with mining 
and concessions for mining. The principal 
mines in operation at the present time are 
fully described and photographs arc given of 
the working of these mines. In the statistical 
section, statements are compiled which give 
the mining concessions by provinces, prior to 
1899, and also the same information from 
1899 to 1915, and the mines and concessions 
authorized in 1915 are given in a separate 
table. These tables give the name of the 
mine, the owner of the concession, the area of 
the property, the location and date of con- 
cession and also the class of ore mined. The 
volume also has a map of the province of 
Pinar del Rio showing the location of the con- 
ce,ssions for that province. 



20 THECUBAREVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD 

The earnings of the Cuba Railroad for the month of November and for the five m.onths 
ended November 30th compare as follows: 

1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

Noveniber gross $501,174 $387,173 $285,225 $342,357 $278,968 $251,023 

Expenses. 421,616 241,406 166,577 195,210 191,188 156,538 

November net $79,557 .?145,767 $118,648 $147,146 $87,780 $94,484 

Other incoro.e 673 

^Jet income 80,231 145,767 118,648 147,146 87,780 94,484 

Fixed charges $95,216 $78,262 $70,195 $66,791 $66,791 $60,125 



Surplus for month Dec. . $14,985 $67,505 $48,452 $80,355 $20,988 $34,359 
From July \sl — 

Five months' gross $2,657,773 $2,026,929 $1,603,080 $1,715,231 $1,536,542 $1,288,980 

Five montns' net 930,956 864,203 650,390 742,944 611,085 546,359 

Other incom.e 4,153 

Fixed charges 443,840 366,569 351,158 333,958 333,680 300,625 



Five months' surplus. .. . $491,269 $497,634 $299,232 $408,986 $277,404 $245,734 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of Novembc-. 11 months to Nov. 30th. 

1916 1915 1914 1916 1915 1914 

Gross earnings $517,627 $481,315 $461,788 $5,457,438 $5,053,635 $4,939,430 

Operating expenses 194,101 178,828 194,895 2,083,933 2,051,487 2,297,496 

Net earnings 323,526 302,487 266,893 3,373,505 3,002,148 2,641,934 

Miscellaneous income... 16,676 32,704 3,240 127,620 124,705 96,606 

Total net income 340,202 335,191 270,133 3,501,125 3,126,853 2,738,540 

Surplus after deducting 

fixed charges 203,384 227,442 157,864 2,030,107 1,934,769 1,557,226 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly receivis: 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

Week ending-Nov. 25th.. £35,160 £27,783 £21,244 £20,994 £21,543 £17,691 

Week ending Dec. 2d.... 33,889 27,045 22,206 23,081 23,195 20,416 

Week ending Dec. 9th.... 35,152 29,401 23,059 26,553 25,918 20,887 

Week ending Dec. 16th... 36,177 32,973 24,889 32,150 29,629 25,941 



EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

WeeMy receipts: 1916 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending Dec. 2d. £5,149 £4,886 £4,806 £5,033 

Week ending Dec. 9th. 4,690 4,842 5,030 5,140 

Week ending Dec. 16th 5,739 5,107 

Week ending Dec. 23d 3,582 4,857 4,567 4,920 



THECUB A REVIEW 21 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 




Weekly rereipts : 


191(j 


191.") 


1914 


1913 


Week ending Dec. 2(1 


£<M)73 


£9,7S9 


£6,464 


£6,786 


Week ending Dec. 9th 


S,788 


9,()2() 


6,028 


7,043 


Week ending Dec. U>th 


9,564 


10,247 


6,683 


8,139 


Week ending Dec. 23d 


9,647 


10,139 


6,997 


7,911 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

A$ quoted by Lawrence Turnure & Co., Ntte York. 

Bid. Asked. 

RepubUc of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 92 93H 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 4^^% Bonds of 1949 86^ 87^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 96^ 96i^ 

RepubUc of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 98^ 99 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 103 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 94 97 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 95 96^ 

Cuba Co. 6% Debenture Bonds 99^^ lOOJ^ 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 100 102 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 93 95 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 104 106 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 99 lOOH 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 none 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 104 110 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock 175 185 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. CoUateral Trust 6% Bonds 101 K 102 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 63 67 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st Mtge. Bonds 92 95 

All prices of bonds quoted on an and interest basis. 



CUBA CANE SUGAR CORPORATION THE A. H. LAMBORN CO. 

Stockholders of the Cuba Cane Sugar Corp. It is announced that on January' 1, 1917, 

were informed by the management at the Mr. William V. Wood, who has been actively 

annual meeting that production in the current identified with the sugar trade for the past 

season would probably approach 4,000,000 thirty years, joined this organization as a 

bags of raw sugar, compared with 3,100,000 stockholder and member of the metropolitan 

bags last season. The estimated output of the department. 

Stewart Sugar Company, recently bought Effective at the same time, the refined sugar 

was included in the total. Ijrokerage business of Messrs. B. W. Dj-er & 

The Board of Directors was reduced from Company was absorbed, Mr Dyer becoming 

twenty-foiu- to twenty-two members. It was a stockholder and an active member of the 

announced that shipping contracts at advan- organization. 

tageous rates had been made for 2,000,000 Messrs. Wood and Dyer have been elected 

bags of the current season's yield. directors of the corporation. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 
CUBA CANE SUGAR CORPORATION 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1916 

This company was incorporated on December 31, 1915. Its first fiscal period ended on 
September 30, 1916, comi)rising therefore, only nine months. The i)hintations acquired were 
all purchased as going concerns and the vendors accounted to the Corporation for all profits 
from December 1, 191.5 (the beginning of the crop year). The operations of the company for the 
nine months' period ending September 30, 1916, therefore cover a full grinding season. The 
1915-16 crop was necessarily made under the management of the various vendors as the prop- 
erties were taken over at different times during the grinding season, the last plantation not being 
taken over until April, 1916, although the profits from December 1, were turned over with the 
property. This fact must be taken into account in judging of the year's results. The earnings 
for the nine months ending September 30, 1916, were as follows: 
Operating Profit from December 1, 1915 -SI 4,729,087.59 

Less : 

Interest and Exchange $91,385.85 

Reserve for Taxes, Etc 290;000.00 

Dead Season Expenses at Plantation from completion of Grinding 

to September 30, 1916 918,689.17 

Reserve for Depreciation 1,250,000.00 

2,550,075.02 

Balance being Net Profit $12,179,012.57 

From December 1, 1915, to September 30, 1916, the company expended for renewals and 
repairs approximately $990,000, which have been deducted before arriving at the net earnings 
of the period. The expenditure of this smu placed the plants in as good wjrking conditions as 
when the grinding season started The item of $1,250,000 for depreciation charged to the earn- 
ings for the year is in addition to the sum of .$990,000 before mentioned. 

By far the greater part of the cane ground at the company's mills is raised !)>' tenant 
farmers (colonos), who, as is customary in Cuba, are entitled to their pay in raw sugar at a 
definite number of pounds of raw sugar per 100 pounds of cane delivered at the mill, or the 
equivalent in cash at current local quotations. It results from, these arrangements that only a 
part of the sugar made by the Company is its own property, the remaining portion belonging 
to the colonos. The colonos' sugar is generallysold either to or through the company, although 
a certain amount of the cane every season is settled for by the delivery of raw sugar in kind. 
The effect of these arrangements is to make the colono share in the benefit of high prices for 
sugar and to make him l)ear his proportion of the disadvantage resulting from low prices. It 
will be understood that the cost of the Company's cane is thus very much less when sugar 
prices are low then during .seasons when the prices of sugar are high. 

PROPERTY ACCOUNT 

The Company at the outset purchased 17 plantations in the Island oi Cuba, of which one 
small plantation (Asuncion) has since been resold. This plantation was originally purchased 
only because the owner of Conchita, who also owned Asuncion, declined to sell the former, with- 
out the latter. As Asuncion is located at a distance from all the other plantations of the 
Company, it was deemed advisable to resell it. 

To bring the operating efficienc> of all the j^'ants ir() to the standard we have set for our- 
selves and to increase their capacity where such increase was adiisal^le, considerable machin- 
ery has been purchased and installed. In order to round out the land holdings of certain of the 
plantations, purchases of 228 caballerias (7,600 acres) of land have been made. During the 
period under review, the Company also purchased the Stewart plantation and mill. The 
Stewart is a thoroughly modern mill, with a capacity of 550,000 bags, and is located in the 
Eastern end of Cuba, near the plantations Moron and Jagiieyal. This plantation was taken 



THECUBAREVIEW 23 

over at the end of the grinding season, the 1915-1() croj) remaining the proijerty of tlie vendors 
The above purchases and additions from April 30, 1916, aggi-egating $9,150,689.41, were paid 
for without the issue of any additional securities. 

Tlie Property Accoimt as of Septeml)er 30, 191(5, is made up as follows: 

Cost of Projjerties to April 30, 1916 $48,956,280.22 

Transfer Taxes, Notary Fees, FAc 164,010.46 

Purchase of Stewart Property 18,400,000.00 

Lands and Warehouses Purchased 330,955.20 

Betterments, Buildings, Machinery, FAc, Etc 419,734.21 

— 9,150,689.41 

Lc-is: $58,270,986.09 

Sale of Asuncion, Sale of Machinery, Etc 634,870.44 

$57,636,115.65 

All the Com]janv's properties were acquired free of liens and unencumbered, except in 
cases where such liens and encumbrances could not be cancel 'ed and, in those cases, the amount 
thereof was deducted from the purchase price and deposited bv this Companv with the 
Gu irantv Trust Companv of Xew York in a special account, as shown in the balance sheet. 

Tlie property of the Company now consists of 17 fully equipped .sugar mills, having a 
working capacity of approxunately 4,000,000 bags of sugar, as follows: 

ALAVA JOBO MARIA VICTORIA SAX IGXACIO 

COXCHITA JULIA MERCEDES SOCORRO 

FELIZ LEQUEITIO MOROX SOLEDAD 

JAGUEYAL LUGARENO PERSEVERAXCIA STEWART 

SAXTA GERTRUDIS 

LAXDS 

TJie Company owns in fee 10,577 caballerias of land, equal to 352,566 acres, and iiolds 
under lease, — most of these leases being for a long period — 5,830 caballerias of land, eoual to 
194,333 acres of additional land. Fiu-tnermore, the Companj^ has satisfactory contracts for 
the jnirchase of cane from the owners or lessees of large tracts of other lands tributary to its 
mills. The Company is thus assured of a supply of cane ample for the present and future re- 
quirements of its factories. 

GEXERAL EQUIPMEXT 

Besides the sugar mills and cane lands, the properties include machine shops, srores, 
workmen's houses, offices, residences of managers, superintendents, chenv'sts, etc.; also cane 
carts, oxen, and all other appurtenances proper for the operation of well equipped sugar estates. 

RAILROADS 

The Company owns and operates for the transportation of its products and supplies, 
737 kilometers (458 miles) of railway of wnich 434 kilometers are standard gauge and 303 kilo- 
meters are narrow guage, together with equipment consisting of 93 locomotives, of which 64 
are standard gauge and 29 narrow gauge, and 2,475 cane cars, of wJiich 1,470 are standard 
gauge and 1,005 are narrow gauge. 

ORGAXIZATIOX 

The Company is proceeding systematically to organize its various departments so that the 
best and most economical results may l^e attained in all branches of the Company's business. 

PRODUCTIOX 

During the clu-rent fiscal period the Company produced 3,174,168 bags of an average 
weight of 320 lbs. each, of raw sugar, equal to 452,035 tons of 2240 lbs. each. The production 
of Stewart is not included in the above, as that plantation was purchased after tlie completion 
of the crop. All of this sugar has been sold. Sugar unshipped at the close of the fiscal period 
on September 30 has been taken up in the accounts at net sales price. 

STEAMSHIP FREIGHTS 
The Company was fortunate, through the intervention of Czarnikow-Rionda Company, 
in securing tonnage for the last croj) at the low rate of 25c. per 100 ll)s. This proved of great 



24 THECUBAREVIEW 



advantage as freights went as high as GOc. per 100 ]l)s. (hiring the season, the average f(jr the 
year being 48c. 

For the coming season, tonnage for the Company's sugar has again ]:)een secured at very 
favorable rates through the same soiu-ce. 

PLANS FOR INCREASED PRODUCTION 

The Company is proceeding with plans to increase its output approximately as follows: 
1917—3,800,000 to 4,000,000 bags 
1918—4,400,000 to 4,600,000 " 
1919— 4,800,000 to 5,100,000 " 

The greater part of these increases are planned for the Eastern end of Culja, where 
land and the cost of cane are cheapest and where railroad freights are lower than in the West. 

The improvements which are being made in the factories should show some result in the 
coming crop of 1916-17, and still greater results in the crop of 1917-18 when most of this 
work will have been completed. Improvements in the production of cane probably- \\ill not 
show before the crop of 1918-19 because of the time it requires to mature the cane from the time 
of its planting. It is expected that marked improvements will result along the lines of better 
cultivation, with fertilization, where needed, and irrigation at points where irrigation can be 
economically introduced. 

PROSPECTS FOR NEXT SEASON. 

For the coming season the care is in good condition. The first of tha plantations started 
grinding on December 10. In many plantations, weather favoring the start, will be 
earlier than last year, notwithstanding the many difficulties exijerienced in the shipment of 
machinery purchased. C\iba has experienced unusually heavy rains during November. These 
rains, if not continued through December, will have a favorable effect. If continued too long 
their effect on the crop a«11 be adverse. 

The prospects for sugar prices for the coming season are favoraljle, as there are more 
countries in Europe and elsewhere that will this year be compelled to import sugar. 

ASSETS 

Properties and Plants $57,636,115.65 

Advance Payments — Machinery and Betterments 140,156.37 

$57,776,272.02 

Cultivations — Achninstration Cane 1,122,568.90 

Materials and Supplies 1,703,706.14 

Current Assets and Advances to Colonos: 

Advances to Colonos less Reserve for Doubtful Account $3,659,019.49 

Advances to Stores 26,208.98 

Centrifugal and Molasses Sugars: 

On hand at September 30, 1916, Valued at Net Sold Prices, 

less Shipping and Selling Expenses 3,421,414.71 

Accounts and Bills Receivable, less Reserve for Doubtful 

Accounts 760,793.36 

Cash 1,527,723.42 

Cash on deposit to meet Dividend due Oct. 1, 1916 875,000.00 

10,270,159.96 

Security for Rede?nption nf Liens emdCensos on Properties — 

Cash Deposited with Trust Company $1,669,482.13 

Bonds of Cia Central Mercedes Deposited 60,000.00 

1,729,482.13 

Deferred Charges : 

Insurance, Rents and Taxes paid in advance $267,624.60 

Items in Suspense 7,500.00 

— ■ 275,124.60 



$72,877,313.75 



THECUBAREVIEW 25 

LIABILITIES 

Declared Capital .S52,r)()(),U0O.0(> 

500,000 Shares T/c Cumulative Convertil)le Pniferred Stock 

par value, $100.00 each. 
.500,000 Shares Common Stock without uoiniual or j)ar value. 

Bills Payable $3,83G,229..")7 

Drafts Outstanding 405,000.00 

Accounts Payable and Accrued Charges , 2,140,094.73 

Dividend Xo. 3 (payable October 1, 1916) 875,000.00 

7,256,324.30 



Liens on Properties — Cash deposited, per contra $937,688.82 

Censos on Properties — Cash deposited, per contra 731,793.31 

Bonds of Cia Central Mercedes owned by Corporation and Out- 
standing as Guarantee, per contra 60,000.00 



Reserves: 

Taxes, Etc $290,000.00 

Dejireciation 1,250,000.00 



1,729,482.13 



1,540,000.00 



Surplus Account: 

Balance, as per Profit and Loss Account 9,851,507.32 



^2.877,313. 75 



PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT— SEPTEMBER 30, 1916. 

Operating Profit from December 1, 1915 $14,729,087.59 

Less : 

Interest and Exchange $91,385.85 

Reserve for Taxes, Etc 290,000.00 

Dead Season Expenses at Plantations from completion of Grind- 
ing to September 30th, 1916 918,689.17 

Reserve for Depreciation 1,250,000.00 

• 2,-550,075.02 



Balance being Net Profit $12,179,012.57 

Dedticl: 
Dividends declared on Cumulative Convertil^le Preferred Stock, 
payable : 

No. 1, April 1st, 1916—1%% $875,000.00 

No. 2, July 1st, 1916-1%% 875,000.00 

No. 3, October 1st, 1916—1%% 875,000.00 



$2,625,000.00 
Less : Accrued Dividends on Stock issued subsequent to January 

January 1, 1916 297,494.75 

2,327,505.25 



Balance carried to Surplus Account $9,851,507.32 

EXPORTS OF WATCHES FROM U. S. TO CUBA 

J'iscal year ended June 30 
1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 
Exported to Cuba $2,846 $1,852 $8,094 $2,844 $4,814 $6,289 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



CUBA R. R. CO. 

In an interview accorded a representative 
of The Cuba Review, Mr. Whigham, President 
of the Cuba Railroad Company, stated 
that the many problems of congested traffic 
were rapidly being solved, that the new 
equipment needed by the road was now in 
Cuba, the reballasting of the tracks was 
]iroceeding rapidly, and that, furthermore, 
the new terminal facilities, docks, ware- 
houses, etc., at Nuevitas, would be available 
in February. This new connection between 
Nuevitas and Camaguey would greatly 
relieve the congestion of the main line and 
at the various terminal points, notably, 
Antilla. Mr. Whigham said that for the 
six months, January to July, 1917, the 
gross traffic revenue would, without douljt, 
amount to $18,000 per mile. 

With reference to the recent appointment 
of Mr. C. R. Hudson as Vice-President and 
General Manager of the Cuba Railroad, 
with headquarters at Camaguey, Mr. Whig- 
ham emphasized the statement which was 
made l)y Mr. Hudson to the effect that the 
CuV>ans in charge of operating the Cuba 
Railroad were deserving of great comm.enda- 
tion in the way that matters were handled 
during the season 1915-16, and that also 
the Cuban railroad employes showed greater 
aptitude for handling traffic than did the 
Mexicans, for example. Mr. Hudson was 
also greatly impressed by the opportunities 
now ahead of the Cuba Railroad and thought 
that the difficidties presented by the un- 
precedented amount of freight to be moved 
were to be quickly and efficiently overcome. 



scalf:s 



"Decision No. 7158. — In the City of Havana, 
on August 4, 1916. at the regular meeting of 
the Junta de Protestas, the following decision 
was decreed. Whereas: Messrs. R. K. Carter 
& Co. protested against the appraisement 
made on page 66,311 of the Custom House 
of this port, of an importation of a scale 
for weighing sugar according to item 214 of the 
Tariff, it being claimed that part 215 B is the 
one that should be applied, as it was de^^tined 
to the "colonia" of Sr. R. Angulo, situated 
in Manati. The office of the Custom House 
Collector stated that he confirmed the ap- 
praisement as they considered that said bene- 



fits are, as determined by Law, for the In- 
genios and not for the "colonias de cana''. 
The said protest was sent to this Junta by the 
Collector of the Custom House with letter 
dated April 5 last. Whereas: When on ap- 
pointing the daj' for making the protest, Sr. 
Jose Fresneda appeared, and ratified the pro- 
test and showed that this scale should be in- 
cluded under part 215 B, inasmuch as what is 
granted to the owner of an estate, who is 
rich, should also be granted to the "colono'", 
who is not rich. Whereas: The protest was 
duly and forma Jy established. Considering: 
That according to the papers in the case, the 
merchandise whose tariff classification has 
occasioned this protest, consists of a scale for 
weighing cane to be installed at the "colonia" 
of Mr. R. Angulo, situated in Manati, Ter- 
mino Municipal de las Tunas, Provincia de 
Oriente. Considering: That item 215 B of the 
Tariff, a« modified by Decree No. 121, of 
January 27, 1908, comprises apparatus and 
machinery as well as integral parts of same, 
which having various applications in industry 
and agriculture are destined as auxiliaries for 
the manufacture of sugar, provided they are 
imported for or by the planters, who under 
the Ordinances prescribed by the Secretary of 
the Treasury, will give proof of the installa- 
tion of same. Considering: That in the pre- 
sent case it concerns a scale which is to be 
used on a cane plantation, for which it is 
necessary to recognize the right of its being 
classified under item 215 B, provided that in 
due time its installation is proven in accord- 
ance with the requirements demanded by the 
Secretary of the Treasury, inasmuch as ac- 
cording to the papers in the case it can be 
seen that the oath demanded by Cicrular Xo. 
128 of 1901 has been given. In view of the 
documents and the legal dispostions appli- 
cable to the case, we unanimously resolve to 
recogize the present protest as the classifica- 
tion of the scale in question corresponds to 
item 215 B; and to communicate this reso- 
lution to the Secretary of the Treasury, to 
the Custom House Collector of this port and 
to Messrs. R. K. Carter & Co. for the purposes 
of Decree No. 80 of January 25, 1909, and as 
soon as this resolution is entered to return the 
papers forwarded, making due note in the 
respective files." 

We have quoted this decision in full because 
it is interesting inasmuch as item No. 214 of 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



27 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



the C'uhau 'I'aritT cai-rics a st'i't"'":*' '"ite of 
2b^c acl valorem wliich, with the reci])rocity 
reduction to the United States, niake.s a net 
rate of 18.35%, whereas item No. 215B under 
the same concUtions makes the net rate of 
7M%) and this decision is o^ importance be- 
cause, while we understand it is not the first 
decision, it confirms strong y tie precedent 
that in the importation of sugar niacninery 
under the Cuban Tariff, the colono is l)eno- 
fited to the same extent as the sugar central, 
W'hich may import sugar machinery directly 
for its own use, whereas the use of the scale 
in question by the .colono has to do indirectly 
with the actual manufactUx-e of sugar. 



country, thus facilitating negotiations, as welt 
as creating a Ijctter impression and closer con- 
tact commercial!}'. — Conmd R. M. Barlkmaii,. 

CioiJiieqoK. 



GASOLINE MOTORS 

A verj- fair demand for gasoline motors ex- 
ists in the Cienfuegos district, but on accoimt 
of the excessive advance in the price of gaso- 
line there is a tendency to turn to the crude- 
oil engine. 

The following quotations have been ob- 
tained: 1?4 horsepower, $78; 1^4 horsepower, 
$55; 4K horsepower, $95; 4 horsepower. 
$180; 6 horsepower, $185, $215, and .$.375; 8 
horsepower, $285. 

Dealers also offer a complete i)lant for light- 
ing and industrial purposes (the heating fea- 
ture being superfluous for this climate), con- 
sisting of engine, motor, and storage battery, 
with a capacity for 10 lights, costing at fac- 
tory $150, placed on market here at $240. 
Others, of 20-1 ight capacity, with a factory 
cost of $200, sell here at $320. 
Service for Both Power and Light. 

In this district pretentious residences, war- 
ranting the installation of electric lights or 
farms where the development of power is de- 
sirable are very limited in number. Every 
important center of population, including the 
sugar plantations, has service for both ]>ower 
and light, although it is probable that much 
of the current is availaljle only during the 
"lighting" hours, from sunset to sunrise. In 
this city, however, it is stated that every- 
thing is in readiness for daily service except 
the running of the cable, the delivery of which 
has been delayed several months. 

The names of individuals and firms who 
may be interested in this subject are for- 
warded. It is suggested that corres])ondence 
be conducted in Spanish, the language of the 



CUBA'S TRADE IN PLAYING CARDS 

Cul)a's imports of playing cards in the 
fiscal twelvemonth ended Juuq 30, 1916, 
reached a higher figure than in any of the 
three preceding years, being 3,734 gioss, as 
against 2,S49 gross in 1914-15, 2,889 gioss 
in 1913-14, and 3,352 gross in 1912-13. Of 
these cards approximately ],000 gross came 
each year fiom the United States. 

Spain is the largest exporter of cards to 
Cuba, its exports amounting to 2,500 to 3,000 
gi'oss per annum. All cards exported from 
Spain have the Spanish faces and they are in 
general use all over the island, the American 
faces being used in clulis wheie poker is the 
piincipal game. There are three grades of 
Spanish playing cards imported into Cuba^ 
known as Sol, Loba, and Heraldo. Foimerly 
there was a large sale of the first of these, 
but since the imposition of an internal 
revenue tax of 5 cents on each pack, importa- 
tions have fallen off. They are of the very 
poorest quality, crudely lithographed on a 
cheap straw'board. At the present time the 
imports are about evenly divided between the 
Loba and the Heraldo, but the latter board 
is glowing in popularity. The prices per 
gross paid by the Haliana exporters for these 
cards at the factory in Spain are: Sol, $1.60; 
Loba, $5.50; Heialdo, $11.56. 

The Spanish cards are sold by traveling 
representatives of the Spanish factories who 
visit Cuba every two years. American cauls 
are sold by representatives who visit Habana 
annually. Merchants in the interior are 
supplied by the Habana jobbers. — Special 
Agent Robert S. Barrett. 



LOVEJOY, MATHERI8C HOUGH 

In view of the increasing business in Cuba^ 
this concern has decided to open an office in 
Havana, the temporary address of which will 
be 21 Obi.spo Street until the new Horter 
Building, corner of Obispo and Oficios Streets, 
is completed. Mr. Carlos F. Noyes, Certified 
Public Accountant, will be in charge of the 
Cuban office. 



•2S 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

The High Price of Sugar and Hoio to Reduce 
It, l5y Harold Hamel Smith, Editor Tropical 
Life, pal)'ished by Bale, Sons & Danielsson, 
Ltd., London, England. 

IMr. Smitii treats his case under the foUow- 
ins heads: 

The Case of India and tlie West Indies, 

A Competitor on India as a Cane-Sugar 
Producing Centre, 

Experts Discuss the Sugar Industry in 
India, 

When Will India Export Sugar to England, 

The Cuban Out]:)Ut and the Shrinkage in 
Sugar Supplies, 

Cane-Farming in the West Indies, 

The Java Out out, 

The Present and the Possible Output of 
Sugar within the Empire, exclusive of India, 

A Double Tribute to the Dietetic Value of 
Sugai, 

The Engineers and the Increased Output. 

H'j conclusions are briefly as follows: 

First: In order to reduce tlie p. ice of sugar 
it is necessarv to increase the production of 
cane sugar, and this, Mr. Smith believes, can 
be accomplished by better training of the 
laborers engaged in the cultivation of sugar 
cane. 

Second: Mr. Smith discusses the practi- 
cability of inci easing the production of tne 
land now under sugaj- cultivation by means of 
intensive Cultivation as opposed to extensive 
•cultivation, and it is emphasized that the 
sugar production of India, can be greatly en- 
larged, that is to say, the production of India 
is approximately 2,600,000 tons of sugar and 
gur, and in addition 500,000 tons of palm 
sugar, which is not sufficient to supply the 
domestic consumers in India, making it 
necessary to import some 800,000 tons per 
yea;, and Mr. Smith points out that with the 
proper method of cultivation, India could 
produce at least 5,000,000 tons of sugar. 



PHILIPPINE SUGAR 

The Bureau of Science of the Philippine 
Islands, which is constantly studying the 
sugar industry in the islands and assisting 
sugar producers to develop new methods with 
the object of increased output and higher 
quality, has issued a statement of preventable 
losses in sugar production, and a comparison 
of results between the present method and 
that ol employing a central factory. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

Handling Coal in the Victor Power Plant, 
Book No. 296, published bv the Link-Belt 
Co. 

Handling Coal and Ashes in the Power 
House of Wm. H. Grundy & Co. wi'.h Link- 
Belt Machinenj, Book Xo. 288, published bv 
the Link-Belt Co. 

Copies of these publications can be ob- 
tained on application to the Link-Belt Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Chicago or Indianapolis. 



THE INSULAR POSSESSIONS OF THE UNITED 
STATES— THE REPUBLIC OF CUBA 

Under this title, Harvey Fisk & Sons, 
Bankers and Govermnent Bond Dealers of 
New York, have published an one-hundred 
and twenty page pamphlet descriptive of the 
Island p;)ssessions of the United States, 
Hawaii, the Philippine Islands, and Porto 
Rico; and of the Republic of Cuba. 

The book contains chapters on the area 
and population, products and industries, 
banks, commerce, finances and bonded debts 
also historical notes. 

The book will be found valuable for refer- 
ence not only by investors but also by all per- 
sons who wish to ))e well informed about these 
island countries. 

There is more information about these 
countries packed between the covers of this 
book than can be found anywhere else in 
similar compass. 



Bulletin No. 183, Vol. XVIII, Cattle Feed- 
ing, published by Purdue University Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Lafayette, Ind. 

BuUetin No. 184, Vol. XVIII, Sheep 
Feeding, published by Purdue University 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Lafayette, 
Ind. 

Bulletin No. 196, Vol. XIX, Cost of 
Raising Leghorn Pullets, published by P*urdue 
University Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Lafayette, Ind. 

Bulletin No. 191, Vol. XIX, Cattle Feeding, 
published by Purdue University Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Lafayette, Ind. 

Bulletin No. 192, Vol. XIX, Sheep Feeding, 
published by Purdue University Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Lafayette, Ind. 

Bulletin No. 195, Vol. XIX, Temperature 
E.r.periments in Incubation, published by 
Purdue University Agricultural E.xperimeut 
Station, Lafayette, Ind. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



29 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



THE CUBAN SUGAR CROP FOR 1917 

[Consul Henry M. W'olcott, Hiivanii.] 

For the week ended January X, 1!)17, 112 
■Cuban sufjar centrals were grinding, as com- 
pared with 137 in the corresponding week of 
191<). Twenty-six nulls began operations 
during the past week. Tlie arrivals of sugars 
of the present crop total 71,259 tons, the fig- 
ures for the corres])onding date in 191() being 
148,942 tons. 

The early estimates of local experts for the 
present year's (1917) production were be- 
tween 400,000 and 600,000 tons in excess of 
last year's record crop of 3,000,000 tons. 
These estimates were usually given, however, 
on condition that the weather prove as favor- 
able as last year, which was abnormally good 
in that respect. 

The actual results of the grinding up to date 
are decidedlj' disappointing though there is 
little doubt that the tonnage of cane available 
for grinding is sufficiently in excess of last 
year's cro]) to warrant the optimistic estimates 
of local authorities. The final results will 
dej)end on weather conditions for the re- 
mainder of the season, the labor supply, ren- 
dement (sugar yield) of the cane, transporta- 
tion service and other factors at present 
tlifficult or impossible accurately to predict. 
Up to the jiresent, dry weather has been gen- 
erally prevalent, but there has been a notable 
absence of the cool temperatures usual in 
December and January. The consequence has 
been an average rendement below normal. 
Sb-ike Causes Delay — Yield May Fall Short of 

Estimates. 

The railroad strikes and other labor troul:)les 
which occurred throughtout the 'sland in 
December caused great difficulty in the move- 
ment of machinery -mports tor new mill 
equipment. The result has been vexatious 
delays in the installations of new machinery 
in many ot the mills and consequent tardy 
beginning of operations. While the railroad 
strikes have been settled, the supply of labor 
for the cane fields is far l)elow the demand and 
it seems likely that there will be a shortage of 
available labor during the entire campaign. 

Considering all these facts, and counting on 
normal weather conditions late in the season, 
it now seems that the volume of the 1917 crop 
will fall considerably shortof the first estimates, 
iiotwithstanding the enormous tonnage of 



available cane and the fact tiiat Ki additional 
mills will probably grind. Many well-in- 
foruKKl persons are now frankly predicting 
that the present crop will not much exceed 
that of 191.5-l(i. However, it seems that such 
a result could only be brought about by ex- 
ceedingly unfavorable weather conditions and 
other vital factors durinp- the balance of the 
season. 



HONGKONG SUGAR TRADE 

[Conaiil General George E. Anderson, Hon<jkong.] 

^^'hile the sugar trade generally is unusualh- 
prosperous the refining of sugar in Hongkong 
is not proceeding in as great a vohmie as was 
expected a short time ago, especially with ref- 
erence to the demand for sugar in Russia. The 
Russian Government has made arrangement 
for the importation of 300,000 tons of sugar, 
free of duty during the current year, through 
Vladivostok, but these imports have been 
much slower than was anticipated. Most of 
the trade apparently has gone to Japanese re- 
fineries and largely represents Formosan sugar 
production. 

The 1916-17 Formosan crop is unusually 
large and the Formosan mills have com- 
menced to grind nearly a month earlier than 
usual, apparently wirh a view of taking special 
advantage of the demand for sugar in Russia. 
The Hongkong refineries so far have sold to 
Russia only the amount of sugar contracted 
for at the beginning of the present movement. 
To date Hongkong has imported about 233,- 
500 short tons of raw .sugar, as compared with 
about 250,000 short tons during the like period 
a year ago. Of these imports the large re- 
fineries take about 200,000 tons and the bal- 
ance is brought in by Chinese middlemen for 
Chinese use. 

Sugar-crop conditions in the Far East as re- 
ported to the refineries here are very promis- 
ing as to size and general prospects. In the 
Philippines the outlook is for a larger pro- 
duction of high-grade sugar than ever before. 

In Java weather conditions are reported fav- 
orable for a much larger crop this season than 
was realized last year. Hongkong's imports of 
sugar during 1916 have come about 70 per 
cent from Java, 20 per cent from the Philip- 
pines, and 10 per cent from Formosa. 

It is of more than passing interest to note 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



that the Chinese Government has been con- 
ducting experiments for some time with a 
view to introducing sugar-beet culture in 
China. Experiments have been greatly inter- 
fered with Isy the difficulty of securing seed, 
which is said to have increased in price from 
$8 to $58 per bushel, with very little to be 
had at any price; but sugar men here are of 
the opinion that the day is not very far dis- 
tant when China will produce most if not all, 
of the sugar required for its people and thus re- 
lease a large amount of Java and Philippine 
sugar for use in other parts of the world. 



SUGAR-MILL MACHINERY SITUATION IN 
CUBA 

In 1914, in six leading sugar mills of Cuba, 
the average extraction was 91, the maximum 
93.5; in Hawaii the average was 95.46, the 
maximum over 98. The high results obtained 
in Hawaii since the installation of modern 
machinery have awakened Cuban planters to 
the possibilities that lie at their own doors, 
and they are using a large part of their war- 
time profits for the purchase of new equip- 
ment. 

For the time l^eing British, German, and 
French machinery is out of the market here, 
and the trade is practically in the hands of 
American firms. A Louisiana company that 
builds its own machinery and mill equipment, 
contracting for a factory complete, has done a 
$3,000,000 business the past year. The opera- 
tions here of a Missouri corporation that builds 
and sells mill crushing and grinding machinery 
only aggregated fully $2,000,000 for the 
twelve-month, and a Pennsylvania firm en- 
gaged in the same lines completed contracts 
that totaled $500,000. The year's business of 
two important contracting engineers, who do 
not manufacture machinery themselves, but 
buy their equipment in the United States, 



ran into the millions. An Hawaiian iron 
works that builds complete mill outfits has 
a staff of engineers now in Cuba drawing 
plans for new factories. 

Faulty Packing Threatens Success of American 
Exporters. 

British, German and French companies 
have had the bulk of this trade in the past. 
There is no doubt that American manufac- 
turing and engineering firms are getting the 
business now, but whether or not thej- will be 
able to hold it when their European competi- 
tors are again in the field is quite another 
question. They assuredly will lose much of 
it if greater attention is not given to the 
packing and marking of their Cuban ship- 
ments. 

Specific instances of faulty packing and 
crude delivery methods on the part of Ameri- 
can firms have been brought to my atten- 
tion during my stay in Cuba. Two centrals 
that had ordered machinery in the United 
States especially for this seasons's grinding did 
not receive it until after the season started; 
and when the cases did arrive, owing to 
wretched packing and marking there was 
a lamentable mix up of parts. A contract for 
furnishing certain truck cars complete re- 
sulted in receiving the bodies from a concern 
in New Jersey and the wheels from a firm in 
Indiana, weeks apart in delivery. In other 
instances machinery parts were sent to the 
wrong address. 

Poor American packing was supposed to 
have ended after all that has been said and 
written on the subject, but it is again crop- 
ping out in Cuba and at a most inopportune 
time. — -Special Agent F. J. Sheridan, Cama- 

guey. 

SUGAR BEETS 

France, crop, 1915, 1,909,900 metric tons. 
France, crop, 191(5, 1,148,070 metric tons. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Total values of merchandise imported from and exported to Cuba during November and 
the 11 months ended November, 1916, compared with corresponding periods of the preceding 
year have just been made public by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of 
the Department of Commerce, as fellows: 

Month of November 11 months ended November 

1916 1915 1916 1915 

Imports from Cuba . $16,426,736 $10,405,393 $234,620,173 $187,489,262 

Exports to Cuba.... $16,865,910 $10,694,766 $145,851,803 $83,823,172 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



PATENT 
A process of forming bri(iuettes f'-om bag- 
asse has been patented in the United Kingdom 
by H. W. Aitken. Formerly, attempts have 
been made to press wet l)agasse into bri- 
quettes, and it has always been found im- 
possible, without reducing the water content 
to alx)ut 6%. The briquettes otherwise formed 
re-expand and become disintegrated. By 
Mr. Aitken's process it has been found possi- 
ble to make the bagasse into briquettes 
without the necessity of preliminary drying 
and also without the use of a binding material. 



HAWAIIAN SUGAR 

According to an article in Commerce Re- 
ports, the invention of a new process for the 
recovery of sucrose from final molasses is re- 
ported. It is stated that this process would 
mean a gain of at least 33-^% in the commer- 
cial sugar crop of Hawaii. The new process 
takes trom the so-called final molasses approxi- 
mately Y2 of 8% of sugar that heretofore has 
been considered an absolute loss. It is claimed 
by the inventor, Mr. Williams, that the addi- 
tional cost for machinery would be slight, the 
process in effect obtaining results in one opera- 
tion instead of the three operations now neces- 
sary. The ])rinciple of the process is that it 
is not the glucose gums or ash, but the water 
in the molasses that has prevented hitherto 
the sucrose therein from crystalizing; there- 
fore, the first step in the process is to boil the 
molasses to a practically complete absence of 
Avater: secondly, the results are obtained in the 
new process by the use of a high speed centri- 
fugal, the centrifugal being run to a speed 
nearly twice that of the centrifugal under 
present conditions. 



MEXICAN LABORERS 

The President of Cuba has granted a con- 
cession to the Alto Cedro Sugar Co. for the 
importation of 300 laborers from Mexico. 
The executive decree, in the Diario de la 
Marina of December 26, states that this con- 
cession is in the nature of an experiment. 
Provision is made for a quarantine of six 
days and medical inspection of the Mexican 
laborers upon their arrival at a Cuban port. 



PROPOSED SUGAR CENTRAL FOR HAITI 

Plans are afoot for the establishment by 
the Northern Haiti Sugar Corporation of a 
sugar central in the plain near Cape Haitien. 
Local owners of some 4,000 carreaux (12,000 
acres) of suitable land have alreadj' sub- 
scribed to the project, and it is believed that 
the enterprise will succeed. 

In this connection it might be stated that 
Le Moniteur of September 16 contained the 
announcement of the signing of a contract 
for the erection of a central near Port au 
Prince. — Consul Lemuel W. Livingston, Cape 
Haitien. 



CHILEAN SUGAR REFINERIES 

The Diario Ihistrado states that negotia- 
tions are being carried on for the consolida- 
tion of the Refinerxa de Azucar de Vina del 
Mar and the Refineria de Azucar de Penco. 
This would practically monopolize the local 
industry. Chile's imports of raw sugar for 
refining amounted in 1914 to about 75,000 
tons, and in 1915 to about 67,000 tons. In 
these same years refined sugar was imported 
to the extent of 8,500 tons and 3,300 tons, 
respectively. The raw sugar comes chiefly 
from Peru. 



SUGAR PRICES 



Messrs. "\^'iilett & Gray, in their general 
review, express the opinion that sugar prices 
would probably range between 3J^c. and 
4^-^c. c & f for the year 1917. 



CENTRAL "TINGUARO" 

It is stated that the new central of the 
Cuban-.\merican Sugar Company, known as 
Central Tinguaro, at Perico, is now in suc- 
cessful operation. The Central Tinguaro is 
the largest cane mill ever constructed. 



CENTRAL WASHINGTON 

The Central W^ashington expects to grind 
over 200,000 bags in 1917. In 1916 the out- 
put was 180,000 bags, yield 12.45% sugar. 
Mill extraction 80.56% normal juice. MiUing 
plant, 1 Fulton crusher, 4 mills, 36"x84". 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



.50 


























AO 










A 
























/ 


^^®— 


"^ 






^_^ 


-^ 




^ -20 
ID 








y 






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g 5.00 

a. 








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40 






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tr— Average Momthy Price of Cuban 








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Raw Sugar at M.Y. c.n-f . basis 96° test. 








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§ 1.200 
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orrrHLY Exports of 5ue 
ROM Cuba to U.5 Port 


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Jam. Feb. Har. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug 5er Oct rtov. Dec. 

1916. 

DIAGRAM ILLUSTRATING 

RELATION BETWEEN MARKET PRICE OF RAW SUGAR AND 
CUBAN SUGAR EXPORTS TO U. S. PORTS DURING 1916 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



THE SUGAR SUPPLY OF THE UNITED 
KINGDOM 

The decision of tho (iovornnioiit to rostrict 
yet further the supph- oi sugar to tlio country 
has led the Royal ('oinnn'ssion on tho Sugar 
Supply to issue a Memorandum (('(/.H'.V.).ii), in 
which they ex])lain 1h(;ir desin; to distribute 
the available (juantity of sugar as fairly and 
equitably as is ])ossible. They point out that 
in 1915 purchasers of sugar drew their suj)- 
plies from three sources, viz: (1) the British 
refiners, (2) the Royal Commission itself, and 
(3) so-called "free-sugar," lieing sugar im- 
ported by license in fulfillment of existing 
contracts. This year there have been and con- 
tinue to be, to all intents and i)ui-poses, but 
two sources; namely, the first two above 
mentioned. 

The refiners have been instructed this year 
to issue their supply of sugar only to their 
customers of 1915, and to each the same pro- 
portion of the quantity available each week or 
each month, as that customer's total purchases 
during 1915 bore to the refiner's total sales for 
that year. Thus the Royal Conmiission en- 
deavours to secure that each custom.er will 
get his fair share. 

As regards the sugar dealt with directh' by 
the Royal Commission, the same principle is 
followed, all the direct buyers having been re- 
quired to make a return of all the sugar used 
and distributed by them in 1915, and on these 
returns the supplies now avilable are appor- 
tioned, pro rata to the various piu-chasers. 
Retailers are also expected to distrbute their 
supplies to their customers as fairly as possible. 

Finally, the Royal Commission take the 
opportunity to contradict an impression that 
seems to have got abroad that each buyer of 
sugar this year is entitled to claim 75% of the 
quantity of sugar he had in 1915. This is not 
so; the Royal Commission very naturally 
cannot say definitely what proportion of the 
1915 supplies will henceforward be available. 
It may approximate to 759c; it may l)e less. 
All that can be said by them is that every en- 
deavom- is being made to distribute whatever 
quantity there may be in the most equitable 
manner possible. — -The Internntional Sugar 
Journal. 



AMERICAN BEET-SUGAR INDUSTRY 

Riissia now occui)ies IIk; chief jjosition a> 
the source of sugar-beet seeds for the United 
States. liefon; the war a very large propor- 
tion of these seeds came from Germany. .\ 
greatly increased total of purchases is shrjwn 
by figures compiled for the nine months ended 
September :iO, 191(5, t)y the Bureau of Korcign 
and Domestic Commerce. Record-breaking 
imjjorts foreshadow great activity in the sugar- 
beet industry in this country-. 

For the nine months mentioned the imports 
of seed reached a total of 18,500,000 pounds, 
which is 1,000,000 i)ounds more than were 
imported during the complete calendar years 
1913 and 1914, and nearly double those for the 
full year 1912. 

In the fiscal year 1914 Germany supf)lied 
nearly 9,000,000 pounds out of a total of H),- 
250,000 povmds, the remainder coming chiefly 
from Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Holland. 
In the fiscal year 1916 Russia supplied 5,881,- 
946 pounds out of a total of 9,042,490 pounds 
Imports of beet seed into the United States 
for the calendar years 1911 to 1916 were as 
follows: 

Pounds J 

1911 11,025,.531 

1912 9,8.54,894 

1913 ]7,()44.721 

1914 17,."w7,062 

1915 4,029,022 

1916 (9 months) 18,474,995 

It is an interesting fact that exports of re- 
fined sugar in the first nine months of 1916 
totaled 1,388,650,984 pounds, or nearly 50 
per cent more than during the whole calendar 
year 1915, 3^2 times more than in 1914, and 
26 times more than in 1913. 



CENTRALS GRINDING 

On Dec. 26th there were 48 Central.^ 
grinding as compared with SO at correspond- 
ing date, 1915. 



COST OF SUGAR PRODUCTION 

A commission of the Department of Com- 
merce, Washington, has been recenth' making 
an investigation a.s to the cost of ])rodiicing 
sugar, and it is stated that the cost of extrac- 
tion is approximately the .same in Porto Rico 
and Hawaii, and it is furthermore estimated 
that the cost of producing sugar in Cuba is 
about Ic. per lb. less than in Porto Rico and 
Hawaii. 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



5.500.000 



5.000.000 



4.500,000 



4,000.000 



5,500.000 



3,000.000 



2^.000 



2.000.000 



JAn. Feb. Mar. Apr May. Jun. Jul Aug. 5er Oct riov. Dec. 



1.500,000 



J.0OO.OOC 



500,000 




750.000 



: 700.000 



^650,000 



-600.000 



550000 



^500.000 



■450.000 



-400.000 



350,000 



■300,000 



Z50,000 , 



200^000 



: 150,000 



-• 100.000 



50,000 



Jam. Feb. Har. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. 5ep. Oct. nov. Dec. 
Comparison of Haw Sugar Exports from Cuba to the United Kingdom and 
Europe during 1915 and 1916. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR F.XPORTS 

The value of supir exported from the 
United States in the calendar year 191(3 was 
in round terms SIOO.OOO.OOO, against S-13,- 
000,(KJO worth in Utlo, slS.OOO.OOO in 1914 
and less than .S2,000,0()() in I9i:i, the year im- 
mediately preceding the war. In ealiinfj; atten • 
tion to these figures, the foreign trade depart- 
ment of the National City Bank states that 
the United States had never been an exporter 
of sugar in any considerable quantity until 
the exigencies of the war rendered inaccessi- 
ble the sugar producing area from which 
Western Europe had l:)een accustomed to 
draw its supplies. Germany, Austria-Hun- 
gary and RiLssia, as the world's greatest 
producers of beet sugar, had met all the 
sugar requirements of the remainder of 
Europe, but when their supplies became 
no longer available by reason of war con- 
ditions, and those of France and Belgium 
were greatly reduced, the remainder of Europe 
necessarily turned to the cane sugar section of 
the world for its supply. Cuba, Java, the 
Hawaiian Islands, Porto Rico and the Philip- 
pines are the world's largest producers of cane 



sugar for exportation, (India is a large i>ro- 
(hicer, but has none for exportation), and as 
Java distributes most of its output to adjacent 
Asiatic countries and Cuba, Porto Rico and 
Hawaii send practically all of their sugar 
direct to the United States, our own market 
became the chief source from which Europe 
could draw sugar, especially in the refined 
form, since the cane producing islands of the 
world export most of their product in the raw 
state. As a consequence, the quantity of 
sugar exported from the United States 
jumped from 52,000,000 pounds in 1913 to 
390,000,000 pounds in 1914, 903,000,000 
povmds in 1915 and approximately^ 1,750,000,- 
000 pounds in 1916. 

The increase in total value of exports last 
year is partlj' due to the increase in the price. 



PHILIPPINE SUGAR CENTRAI^ 

According to Commerce Reports, the sugar 
planters of the Province of Negros had a meet- 
ing recently to consider the prospects of erect- 
ing .sugar centrals in this district. The plant- 
ers interested represented valualjie sugar 
raising land of about 10,000 acres. 



SUGAR REVIEW 



Specially urittenfor The Cuba Review by Willett & Gray, New York. 



Our last review for this magazine was dated December 7, 1916. 

At that date, Cuba Centrifugal sugar 9o° test basis, was quoted at 4 ll-16c. c. & f. (5.69c) 
and is now 4% c. & f. (5..39c.j, showing a decline of 0.30c. per lb., but in the interim, the 
market has been as low as 4 l-16c. c. & f. (5.0Sc) as recently as December 27. Since that 
date the market has turned upward until at this ^\Titing, it is difficult to buj' at below 4.50c. c. 
&f. (5.52c). 

It had been generally anticipated that the low point of the Cuba crop from which the 
steady- season rise would be made, would be rather below 3%c. c.&f. at which it started for 
futiu-es. This anticipation has been made void by reason of the late openmg of crop making 
and absence of earh* new crop receipts, to replace the demands made on old crop stocks by the 
needs of refiners. At this A\Titing, the local stocks are quite small and refiners are now depen- 
dent upon their actual importations from week to week and supplies from this source promise 
to be somewhat limited until well into February. 

The original Cuba crop estimate, as made by Messrs. Guma-Mejer of 3,572,571 tons will 
scarcely be reached from the present pro.spects, and we see no reason at present, to change our 
estimate from 3,400,000 tons. 

Our figures for the year 1916, are now complete, as given in our ''Weekly Statistical Sugar 
Trade Journal" issue of Januarj' 4, 1917. 

The consumption of sugar in the United States in 1916, was 3,658,607 tons, a decrease of 
142,924 tons from 1915, of which con.sumption, Cuba contributed 1,636,548 tons, against 
1,841,602 tons in 1915. Exports of refined sugar contributed to largely by Cuban raws. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

were 635,279 tons from Atlantic ports and $59,090 tons from New OrJeans. The average price 
cost and freight for Cnfm Centrifugals 96° test, was 4.767c. jier lb. against 3.626c. per lb. in 1915, 
and an average for 10 years of 2.977c. per lb. net cash. 

The prospects for 1917 cannot be well outlined at this writing, by reason of the several un- 
certainties, which now exist, such as the ending or the j^rolongation of the European war; the 
actual final outturn of the Cuba and other crops, by reason of the unknown weather, ocean 
freight and labor conditions during the existing campaign. 

The increased cost of production and the higher rates of freight than in 1915 will reduce the 
net profits of the Cuban planters somewhat, but should leave still a very handsome return to 
individual planters and corporations. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

Xcw York, .January 6, 1917. 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita especialmente vara la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York. 

Nuestra ultima resena para esta puljlicacion estaba fechada el 7 de diciemljre de 191(i. 

En esa fecha, el azucar Centrifugo de C\iba polarizacion 98° se cotizaba a 4 ll-16c. costo y 
flete (5.69c) y ahora se cotiza A 43--gc. c. y f. (5.39c.), lo cual muestra una baja de 0.30c. la libra, 
pero en el Interin el mercado ha llegado a bajar hasta A 4 l-16c. c. y f. (5.08c.) en fecha tan 
reciente como el 27 de diciembre. Desde esa fecha, el mercado ha experimentado un alza 
hasta que al escribir esta resena es dificil hacer compras de azucar por menos de 4.50c. c. y f 
(5.52c.). 

Se ha anticipado generalmente que el Ixijo punto de la zafra de Cuba, desde el cual tendria 
lugar el alza constante de la estaci6n, seria algo mas bajo de 3J^c. c. y f . d cuyo punto empez6 
I)ara entregas en el futuro. Esta anticipacion ha resultado ser nula con motivo de haber empezado 
tarde la zafra y a la falta de recibos tempranos de la nueva zafra para sustituir la demanda de 
existencias de la antigua cosecha segiin las necesidades de los refinadores. Al escribir esta 
resena, las existencias locales son algo escasas y los refinadores dependen ahora de sus efectivas 
importaciones de semana en semana, y el abasto de este origen indica ser algo limitado hasta 
}:)ien entrado el mes de febrero. 

El calculo primitive de la zafra de Cuba hecho por los Sres. Guma-Mejer, que ascendia a 
3,572,571 toneladas, escasamente llegara a esa cifra segiin los indicios al presente, y actualmente 
no vemos el motivo para cambiar nuestro calculo de 3,400,000 toneladas. 

Nuestras cifras para el ano 1916 estan ahora completas, segiin se manifiesta en nuestro 
"Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal," (Boletin Semanal de Estadistica del Comercio Azu- 
carero), emision del 4 de febrero de 1917. 

El consume de azucar en los Estados Unidos en 1916 fue de 3,658,607 toneladas, una dis- 
minucion de 142, 924 toneladas de la de 1915, en cuj^o consumo Cuba contribuyo con 1,666,548 
toneladas contra 1, 841,602 toneladas en 1915. Las exportaciones de azucar refinado, a que 
contribuyeron en gran parte los aziicares crudos de Cuba, fueron 635,279 toneladas de puertos 
del Atlantico y 59,090 toneladas de Nueva Orleans. El promedio en el prenio, costo y flete por 
los aziicares Centrifugos de Cuba polarizacion 96° fue de 4.767c. la libra contra 3.62Sc. la libra 
en 1915, con un termino medio en 10 aiios de 2.977c. la libra en dinero efeetivo neto. 

La perspectiva para 1917 no puede describirse verdaderamente al dar esta resezia, a causa 
de las diversas inseguridades que existen al presente, como por ejemplo el final 6 la prolonga- 
cion de la guerra europea; el giro final que puedan tener las zafras de Cuba y otras cosechas, 
con motivo de no saber cudl serd el estado del tiempo, n cuales senin las condiciones del 
flste mailtimo ni del trabajo durante la campaiia existente. 

El aumento en el costo de produccion y el aumento en los gastos de flete, maj^ores que en 
1915, reducira algo las ganancias netas de los plantadores cubanos, pero deberia dejar aiin muy 
buenas ganancias a los plantadores particulares y a las cirporaciones. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 
Nueva York, enero 6 de 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— 84— 66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi. 
dends and Interest, Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain , Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 



HAVANA— N. Gelats y Ca. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 



LONDON — The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS — Heine et Cie. 




^Porque Compra Usted Agua 

Destilada Pagando lOCentavos 

el Galon? 

/^UANDO puede hacer agua ui&s pura por 
menos de un centavo el galon emple- 
ando imo de nuestros Alambiques de 
Laboratorio No. 70 para gas. 

Frecio del Alambique de Laboratorio, No. 70 
$50. Un Alambique de cobre niquelado para 
Droguistas, de una capacidad de un galon 
la hora, cuesta solamente $28.00, 6 de }4 
gal6n la hora, $17.00. 

Se envirard, folleto con todos particulares 
al solicitarnoslo. 

EIMER & AMEND 

205-211 Third Avenue NEW YORK 

Establecida en 1851 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
P. O. BOX 1241 U, S. A. 



We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



BANK DIVIDENDS 

The National Bank of Cuba declared a semi- 
annual dividend of 4% plus an extra dividend 
of 1%. The Bank of Cuba in New York, 
which opened for business May 11, 1916, de- 
clared a dividend of 4%. 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



THE NEW JERSEY ASBESTOS CO. 




HOME OFFICE: 

1 WATER ST.. NEW YORK. N. Y. 

BRANCHES: 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, AUentown 



Patent "V" Pilot Packings recom- 
mended for High Pressure Steam and 
Ammonia. 

Cable Address: "Gladiatrix," New York 



Bank Of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST., NEW YORK 



Guillermo Carricaburu 



RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. ^ Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE - 
L. G. JONES - 



President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 



Pedro Pablo Diago 

LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 

76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLACfe" 

FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET .-. .-. NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 
Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 

Write Today For Sample. Copy 

Indispensable to the Man Inter- 
ested in Sugar 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THECUBA REVIEW 39 

POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

GUANAJAY 

Fare, 55 Cents 

GUINES 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



Train every hour daily froin CENTRAL STATION from 
5 A. M. to 8 P. M. Last train 11.20 P. M. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P. M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) $0.05 

Guanabacoa (Ferry and Electric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanca and Cabafias Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 

Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. Ail kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

A. KLINQ, Prop. MORIT F AI A 

JAS. S. BOGUE, Supt. IVH-FOll^E., /\L,/\. 



ESTABLISHED 1852 ROHLIG & CO. INQUIRIES REQUESTED 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

BREMEN BREMERHAVEN HAMBURG 

Knoohenhauerstr. 16-17 am Hafen 113 Alsterdamm 14-16 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PROVIDED ON APPLICATION 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton. Night Call, 411 Hamilton. Cable Address: "Abiworka," New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy Forgings, Iron and Brass Castings. Copper Specialties, Diesel Motor Repairs, Cold Storage 
Installation, Oil Fuel Installation, Carpenter and Joiner U ork 

18-20 SUMMIT STREET \ m^., h».v,:i* F.„„ BROOKLYN N Y 

11-27 IMLAY STREET 1^*" Hamdton Ferry BROOK.LYIN, IS. Y. 

AKents for "Kinrhorn" Multiplex Valve 



Please menlion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUB A 11 E \' 1 E W 



THE 

TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 

CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $325,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Corr««pondanc* Solicited from 
Intanding Inraatora 

OFFICERS 

Norman H. Da^'i■ ----- Preaident 
Ofwald A. Hornsby - - - - Vice-Preiident 
Claudio G. Mendoia . - - Vice-President 

J. M. Hopgood Treasurer 

Rogelio Carbajal Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



P. 


RUIZ 


*a 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


Slationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA. CUBA 



MOTOR GUINCHE EL "COLONO" 




Un substituto moderno para lo? BUEYES 
de la aiitiguedad 

MAS ECONOMICO 

^L\S SEGURO 

MA^ HAPIDO 

CUESTA POCO 

Especialmente para los trasbordadoros ilo 
Vila, Quinoucs, Castellon 

Pidanse prooios y porinonoros 
COMPANIA AGRICOLA, Monserrate 10, Habana 
6 EL COLONO WINCH CO., 106 Wall St., N. Y. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADO EN IStW 

Capit.il Paeado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236.000 

Activo Total 234,000.000 

Trescieiitas Treinta y Cinco Sucursnles 
New York, corner William and Cedar Sts. 
Londres. Bank Buildings. Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursi\les en Cuba 

t. \-ni-sponsalos on F.spafta 6 Islas C^maJias y IViloaros 
V on todas livs otras plazas b:\noablos dol Mundo 
\'a\ c\ Do^iavtamento do Ahorros so jidnnton dopositos 

a mtoros dosdo Cinco Pesos on adolouto 

So oxpidon Cartas de Cnxlito para viajoros en Libras 

Ksterlinas 6 Pesetas, vaKnloras estas sin desouento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiauo 02. Monte US. Muralla .">-', T.inoa 07, 

Vodado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Admin is tradores 
i; DK AHOZARENA F. .1. HEAITY 



ESTAIUISHKD 1814 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Ih'posil Vaults 

Manufacturers of Ihc Famous II. I'pmann 
Brand of Ci<)<jr.s- 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Taoon l.'iO-lOS Aiuargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



FsTM-.i.ism.n tSTt'i 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general bankins busi= 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Offici:: Aoiiar 108 

HAVANA 



CANE FIRES 
:Maiiy cano tiros havo alroaii\ boon ropovtcd 
in till' sugar jilaiitations. Many of the fives 
are b.>lievod to hive l>een of ineoiiiliu-y 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW xvhen writhig to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 No.l7 No. 3 No. 7 No. 5 

J'. M.V. M. P. M. P. M. A. M. A. M. S 



10 :iO 10.00 

A. M. 

. . 12.00 

.. 4.40 



9.00 
10.55 



7.17 
A. M. 



5.28 



8.50 

10.20 

P. M 

1.00 

;io.oo 

11.00 



P. M 



5.35 

8.13 
10. 16 
P. M. 



3. 10 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A. M 
3.10 

5.45 

P. M 

3.00 

3.30 



P. M 



Havana 



INo. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8 No. 6 No.lO 

A.M. A..M. P. M. P. M. P. M. A.M. 



10.01 7.40 



Lv. .Central Station. Ar. 7.3C 9.13 2.06 6.39, 9.05 6 



11.58 10.10 58 Ar. 



2.18 12.33 



4.40|. 
8.40 . 



109 Ar. 



179 Ar. 
230 Ar. 



. .Matanzas. 
. . Cardenas . 



I 3 38 
'6!45 6145 195 Ar 
P.M.I I 

6.40 241 Ar 



. . Sagua ... 
. Caibarien . . 



180 Ar . . . Santa Clara. 
. . Cienf uegos . 



.Lv. 
Lv. 



.Lv. 
.Lv. 



Lv. 
Lv. 



8.00 



10.30 
P.M. 



276 Ar 

340 Ar. 

I 
520 Ar. 
538 Ar. 



.SanctiSpiritus. 
.Ciegode Avila. 
. . .Cainaguey. . 



.... Antilla 

Santiago de Cuba. 



.Lv. 

.Lv. 

. Lv. 

.Lv. 
Lv. 



5.31 6 
12.45 5 
P. M. A. 

8.00 .. 

5.30 .. 
A.M. 
12.10 .. 



45 12. 
00 9. 
M. 



P.M. 
8.25 ... 

7.35 ... 

4.55 ... 
A. M. 
7.40 
6.55 ... 



00 4.44| 
12 1.05 



12.00 
8.20 



6.28 
4.25' 



6.20 



8.00 

A.M. 



55 
M. 

,20 

30 
,00 



A. M. 



P. M. 



1.00 



9.15 

8.48 



6.15 
A.M. 



20 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SUEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



From Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienfuegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 

THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



U. S. Cy. 
Antilla $23.33 



Batabano . 

Bayamo 

Caibarien. . . . 
Camaguey . . . 
Cardenas .... 
Ciego de Avili 
Cienfuegos. . . 

Colon 

Guantanamo. 
Holguin 



1.53 
20.66 
10.68 
15.49 

5.43 
12.72 

8.69 

5.56 
25.58 
21.20 



Isle of Pines , 

Madruga 

Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas , 

Remedies , 

Sagua 

San Antonio , 

Sancti Spiritus. . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba . 



U. S. Cy. 
$6.00 

3.01 
22.02 

3.20 

9.64 
10.43 

8.45 

.45 

11.19 

8.53 
24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
1 10 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 



''WEEK=END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL "WEEK=END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send three oenta in stamps for "Cuba — A Winter Paradise," a beau- ITnifA/1 Railuravc nf l-favann 
tiful illustrated booklet desoribing interesting trips in Cuba to »JI"ICU ivauways Ul liaraiia 
FRANK ROBERTS, General Passenger Agent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Imporlacion directa de todas los 
centros maniifactureros del miindo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espafui 
Independencia Street 17 21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



112 



Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard: 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Muiiro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N, Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 188 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 
No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to push the sale$ of 

American high class products. Would 

represent a first class firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



CO M M I88ION 
MERCHANT 



M. J. CABANA 

p. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merohandise either on a oom- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in east- 
ern Cuba. 



F. W. Hvoslef 



E. C. Day 



R. M. Miohelien 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

SteamshipAgents&ShipBrokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CahU: "Btnf»c»" 



Pleate mention THE CUBA REVIEW token ivriting to Advertitert 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



43 



' 




v.\ 












.. ...■* 




7 


«■ 


1 


r=r'- J^L,^ ' 






hH 




1 



S.S. MUNAMAR 

NEW YORK-EASTERN CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

New York Antilla Antilla New York 

Steamer Leave Arrive Leave Arrive 

MUXAM.YR Mch. 3 Mch. 7 Mch. 10 Mch. 14 

MUXAM.\R Mch. 17 Mch. 21 Mch. 24 Mch. 28 

MUNAMAR Mch. 31 Apr. 4 Apr. 7 Apr. 11 

Special through rates quoted to XuevilnH passengers via the SS. MUNAMAR and 
Antilla. 

FREIGHT ONLY 
Regular fortnightly sailings for Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua, Caibarien, Pto. Padre 
Manati, Banes, Gibara and Xuevitas. 

MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

SS. MUXPLACE — -Havana, Cardenas, Caibarien Feb 2 

SS. MUX'ISLA — -Havana, Matanzas, Sagua Feb. 9 

SS. BERTHA— Cienfuegos, Santiago Feb. 13 

SS. MUXPLACE — -Havana, Cardenas, Caibarien Feb. 16 

SS. MUXISLA— Havana, Matanzas Feb. 23 

MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER Febuary 22, for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rosario. 

BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER Feb. 1 and 15 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of call 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MORRI.*^ LH LIE, Pres. 



LFWIS C. LILLIE. Sec. and Treas. 



Grand Prize awarded for Locomotives at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 

The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 




PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES 

Specifications Furnished on Application 
REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE WEST INDIES: 

WALUCE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable AddresseB: "BALDWIN. PHILADELPHIA," "LEEBALD, HAVANA" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 










STC^Year VEBRU?|B\^fl917^ 10 CentsA Copy 
mklisbedibvthe flunson Steamship Line 8Z-9^'Bedver Street, New^y^Hl 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Steel Roller Link-Belt 




"TT" Class 

-HI" H- 




rpOR the positive transmission of po^er ;'t speeds iniri imdi :ic between ordinpry 
^ m- lleable-iran Link-Belt, rnd Link-Belt Silent Chain fur liigh speed service. 
"TT" Class-Link Belt was designed to furnish the greatest strength possible for the 
weight of material used. The Links are uniform, engaging pirts are made with sm?Ji, 
accurate clearances, and perfect fit on cut wheels is assured. "TT" Class Link-Belt 
is specially adapted to the operation cf bagasse carriers, screw c inveyors, sugs'r 
elev-itors, etc. WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 

This is the > < mark of quality. 

It appsars on every Link-Belt m.^nufactin-ed by us, and is your 
gurantee cf reliability in m teri 1, workm-'nship rnd operatirm. 



Link-Belt Company 



299 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



7llllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!ll!ll{||||l!IIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllll^ 


JAMES M. MOTLEY "^^^^^^J^^" 


Cable Address: JAMOTLEY, New York 


Direccion Cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York 


(All codes used) 


(Usamos todas las claves) 


RAIL AND FASTENINGS 


RIELES Y ASEGURADORES 


FROGS AND SWITCHES 


RANAS Y CAMBIAVIAS 


CARS 


VAGONES 


BOILERS, TANKS, PUMPS 


CALDERAS, TANQUES, BOMBAS 




Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
"Lion" Brass Trade Mark Labels and Seals attached. 

De^ripdve"Gataiog J 30168 Walkcf & CompaHy, Ltd. 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

JOSE L. VI1.LAAMIL 

Santa Clara 29, Havana, Cuba 



Write for our 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



r^AI?l?/^Q PAKA Touos usos y de todos taniafios, de los para caiia con cuauo ruedas y capa- 

ii-'AlvlN.WO cidad de I'A toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad dc 30 loiieladas 

Hacemos una especialidad de juegos de hcnajes, inclnyeiuto los juegos 

de ruedas, coinplclaiiieiile armados, con todas las piezas de metal, y pianos 

coiiiplrtus paid Liinstiiiir lus canos a su dcstuio de mac'iras del pais 





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RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Address: 
Raatai I \M 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

BoiSers Tested for Any Required Pressure 
Phone.Broad SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. S'Z7el 



1835-1836 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 

SUGARS 



RAW AND 
REFINED 



82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Jou.-nal— the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensena uno de nucstros carros, todo de acero, para cafia. 

Teuemoa otros tipos de capaeidades varias y liemos fabricado un gran mimero de carros para cafia para 
uso en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, Am6rica-CeLitral y Mexico, que tienen jaules de acero o de madera y con- 
etruidas para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cana. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E. U. A. 

Direcci6n telegrdfica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot. 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B CINTAS. Oficios 29-31. Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Off ic« in TuUa, 
Oklahoma, Clinton Bldg. 

2630 Whitehall BuUding 
NEW YORK 




HtVIMOIndta^nJ^ 




STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Los Angeles Office 

414 Grosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

AgenU in Cuba: 
ELLIS BROTHERS 

28 Sun Ifiuacio, Havana, Cuba 



BUILT BY 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 



SUGAR EXPORTS FROM BRAZIL 

The total exports and the shares of the United States and the United Kingdom during 1912- 
1915 were (in metric tons of 2,204.6 pounds). 



Total exports [ To United States 



Year. 



Tons. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 



Value. 



Tons. Value. 



To United King- 
dom. 



Tons. Value. 



19J2 , 4,772 $272,096 



5,367 j 314,507 ; 

31,860 1,895,916 , 6,203 | $.508,397 
59,074 I 3,607,452 21,929 | 1,131,742 



4,599 $244,099 

5,134 282,142 

24,136 1,325,854 

21,627 1,389,863 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P MP Mi 
5 152 55 
7 154 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
P M 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



P M 



P M 



AM 
10 1 
12 IE 



PM 



A M I A M 1 Fare 
6 55 6 15llstcl. 
8 33 8 15'$2.04 
10 03 3. 99 

10 18 , 4.32 

11 041 7 30 5.16 

12 32 11 22 6.79 
P M 1 A M 



i Fare lA Ml A M A M P MP MIP M 
Lv. Cen. Sta., Havana Ar. 3dcl.7 49 11 09 11 473 496 47 7 09 

Ar Artemisa Lv.!$1.105 45 9 35 9 451 454 45 5 35 

Kt. '. .Paso Real Lv.l 2. 12 ... . 8. 04 4 04 

Ar Herradura Lv.l 2.29i.... 7.47 3 47 

Ar .Pinardel Rio....Lv. 2.71.... 7.00 6 383 00 

Ar . .Guane Lv. 3.521.... 5.30 3 001 30 

AMIAM AM PMPMP M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros ll'^}'' 

Calabazar 10 " I Santiago de las Vegas .... iO 

Rincon 25 cts. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Laot train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west of 
Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25%. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



$1.00 Per Year 



SUBSCRIPTION 

Advertising Rales on Application 



10 Cents Single Copy 



Vol. XV 



FEBRUARY. 1917 



No. 3 



Contents of This Number 



Cover Page — A Giant Ceiba Tree and Country Seene. 
Frontispiece — Farm School, Camaguey. 

All Around Cuba: 

Ciego de Avila 10 

El Roque Canal 10 

Film Companies ■ . . . 10 

Moron 10 

Palm City 10 

Trinidad 10 

Camaguey Farm and School, illu.strated 12, 13, 14 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

Armour Packing Co 33 

Cienfuegos, Palmira & Cruces Belt Line Ry 32 

Cuban Tire & Rubber Co 32 

Electrical Goods 33 

Export Trade 34 

Lignum Vitae 34 

Royal Bank of Canada 32 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

Cuba Cane Sugar Corporation 

Oil Trust, Ltd 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities .... 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads 9, 



United Railways of Havana Report . 



20 
20 
20 
20 
.21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30; 31 



Cuban Government Matters: 

American Institute of International Law ,S 

Building Imnrovements 9 

Cienfuegos Street Improvement 7 

Granja "El Chico" 9 

Havana Traffic Rules 7 

Matanzas Railway 9 

Public Library 7 

San Lazaro Hospital 7 

El Cobre Mines, illustrated ^ . . ; .15, 16, 17 

Havana Private Watchmen ! IS 

Publications Received 18 

Santiago Dock Strike, illustrated 11, 12 

Sugar Industry: 

Central "Redencion" 3") 

Porto Rico Sugar 35 

Sugar Crop Estimate 35 

Tacajo 35 

Sugar Review, English 35, 36 

Sugar Review, Spanish 36 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THL 
CUBA RLVILW 



'ALL ABOUT CUBA" 



Copyright, 1017, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



FEBRUARY, 1917 



Number 3 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



CIENFUEGOS STREET IMPROVEMENT 

Contracts have been awarded to Sr. Rodri- 
guez at H'avana tor the improvement of 
streets in the city of Cienfuegos, and the work 
calls for the most improved macadam and 
asphalt highways used with Belgian blocks. 

The amount allowed for these street im- 
provements, more than $2,000,000 is to be 
protected by a lien on the revenues derived 
from the city water plant, which will be 
taken over by the contractors and operated 
for a period of years. 

The streets of Cienfuegos and a number of 
the other larger Cuban ci^^ies have been badly 
neglected in recent years and allowed to be- 
come almost impassable, but with the in- 
crease in the automobile traffic throughout 
Cuba and the many complaints from owners 
of cars, the Government is considering the 
matter of urging the munici])alities to take 
steps to keep their streets in order. 



HAVANA TRAFFIC RULES 

A commission ha.-^ Ijeen appointed to revise 
the present rules for regulating traffic in the 
City of Havana in order that the congestion of 
traffic that is so serious at times may be, if 
possible, prevented. The plans contemplate 
making certain streets available for one way 
traffic only and it js furthermore recommended 
that in certain parts of the city traffic police- 
men be assigned who will be able to speak 
English. 



SAN LAZARO HOSPITAL 

This buikling was partially destiw'ed by fire 
on January ICth, under the superintendence 
of the Havana Fire Department. The remain- 
ing portions of the building will be burned at 
a later date in order that there may be no 
danger of the fire spreading. The emplojinent 
of the firmen to set a building on fire rather 
than to extinguish a fire was somewhat un- 
usual. 



JAMAICA 



The Immigration Department of Cuba has 
been disturl)ed over the great number of- 
immigrants from Jamaica, and the Depart- 
ment has made a regulation whereljy Jamai- 
can immigrants will be required to furnish 
a certificate showing that their blood contains 
no traces of malaria. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

It is stated that Mayor Varona Suarez has 
authorized commissioners to 'nspect the 
l)U'lding known as the Fronton where "Jai 
A Lai" was formerly played, and the com- 
missioners will report on the suitabilitj^ of 
this building for the establishment there of a 
public library and museum. 



GENERAL SUAREZ 



Major General Manuel Suarez, who Avas 
the oldest living general of the Cuban revo- 
lutionary wars, died at Camagiiey on Jan. 2. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
INTERNATIONAL LAW 

The visit of the delegates to the recent con- 
gress of the American Institute of Inter- 
national Law in session at Havana was made 
very pleasant while they were the guests of 
the Cuban Government, and in iippreciation 
of the courtesies extended during their stay 
in Cuba , the President of the American Insti- 
tute, Jas. Brown Scott, gave a farewell ban- 
quet in honor of the Cuban Government. 
The American m_embers were the guests of 
the city of JVIatanzas and President Menocal 
generously arranged for the party to use his 
private car for the trip and d.iring their stay 
in the latter city. 

The Am.erican Institute of International 
Law was founded in Washington in 1912 for 
the purpose of propagating in America the 
principles of justice and law which should 
regulate the relations of these nations to each 
other. The congress in Havana resulted from 
an invitation of the Cuban Government and 
was under the auspices of the Cuban Society 
of International Law, affiliated with the 
American Institute. 

In the session of the Institute held last 
month in Havana ten recommendations, in- 
troduced by Dr. Brown Scott, were unani- 
mously approved. They wiU be known as 
the "Havana Recommendations" and are as 
follows : 

(1) The convoking of a third conference of 
The Hague and the invitation thereto of 
all the nations of the world. 

(2) That the peace conference of The Hague 
should meet in fixed periods of time and 
be a permanent body, which without 
imposing justice, should recommend it. 

(3) All arrangements between the states 
with respect to the convoking and pro- 
ceedings of conference to be made 
known, so that in this institution no 
nation should have preponderating in- 
fluence. 

(4) The naming of a committee to meet at 
regular intervals during the recess of 
the conferences and whose duty it would 
be to work to secure the ratification and 
adoption of treaties and declarations 
and attempt to obtain the strict observ- 
ance of such. 

(5) A universal agreement respecting the 
fundamental principles of international 
law expressed in the declaration of rights 
and duties of nations, adopted by the 
American Institute on January 6, 1916. 



(6) The creation of a permanent board of 
arbitration to study, discuss and inform 
on those questions, not susceptible to 
judicial solution, which would be sub- 
mitted to the board by the powers. 

(7) The employment of the good offices of 
mediation and of friendly arrangement 
of questions not capable of judicial solu- 
tion. 

(8) Arbitration for the solution of con- 
flicts not capable of being judicial^ 
solved and also for those which even 
being so, have assum.ed, because of delay 
or bad interpretation, such a political 
importance that the nations prefer to 
submit them to boards named by them- 
selves rather than to a permanent judi- 
cial court. 

(9) The negotiation of a treaty by which a 
judicial union of all nations is established, 
similar to the 1908 Postal L^nion, in 
which all civilized nations should take 
part, each pledging his good faith to sub- 
mit differences which involve questions 
of right and equity to a permanent court 
of this union, whose decisions would Le 
obligatory not only for the nations in 
litigation, but for all those forming a 
part of the union. 

(10) The formation of a pu1)lic opinion for 
the pacific arrangement in general, and 
particulary in favor of the nine foregoing 
proposals, so that if they were accepted 
they would be put into practice and made 
effective under the highest of sanctions, 
"a decorous respect for the opinions of 
humanity." 

MUSKETRY INSTRUCTOR 
Charles C. Willimas, who was musketry 
instructor to the Cuban army, died Jan. 27th, 
at Havana. 

Mr. Williams was a retired sergeant of the 
American army and was a champion marks- 
man and had been instructing the Cuban army 
in markmanship for about a year. 

HAVANA CITY FINANCES 
It is stated that at the first of January the 
condition of the city treasiu-y showed a bal- 
ance on hand of $19,337.45 and that the city's 
immediate obligations amounted to .floO,- 
627.70. The city officials are now consider- 
ing msans whereby this deficit may be met. 

HAVANA 

Customs statistics show that during the 
month of January, 12,544 passengers arrived 
in the port of Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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I-tfiuudclefl Statt' lJ(_|<ai I nient Building, Havana. 



GOVERNMENT BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS 
AT HAVANA 

The building used by the State Department 
in Havana is undergoing repairs and will be 
remodeled throughout to provide increased floor 
space for offices, and it wi-ll be equipped with 
a passenger elevator. It is understood to be 
tlie intention of the Government to adopt 
a distinctive type of architecture for all of 
its piil)lic buildings, and the building used by 
the Department of State and Justice will be 
the first of a group to undergo the necessary 
changes and -improvements to meet the pres- 
ent demands (as shown in the accompanjing 
photo). Work is also under way on the ad- 
joining building formerly used as the head- 
quarters of the Secret Police. 



the farm, owing to the severe losses and con- 
tagion spread to other breeds. However, this 
has been overcome to a large extent and it is 
now established that the Spanish "Prats" 
breed of chickens are best suited for Cuba, 
due to their suitableness to the Cuban climate 
and good returns as layers. 

President Menocal now uses "El Chico"as 
his summer residence and visits here fre- 
quently, and he seems ha])piest when he can 
devote a part of his time looking around the 
place keeping in close touch with his interests 
in connection with agricultural matters, stock 
breeding, etc. — 'his doing so is with the desire 
to help Cuba and her people. 



GRANJA "EL CHICO" 

This is the property of President Menocal 
and is located near Havana (as described fully 
in the April 1916, columns of the Review). 

Although considerable criticism has ap- 
peared in the pages of certain Havana news- 
papers in regard to this project, the writer has 
found that there is no ground for criticism 
and the chicken farm branch of the estate has 
proven to be a success and it receives the 
personal attention of the President. 

In the early stages of the experiment when 
numerous fancy chickens were nnported from 
the United States and other countries, a num- 
ber of the white leghorn variety were afflicted 
with the 'croup', which brought discourage- 
ment to some of the experts connected with 



MATANZAS STREET RAILWAY SYSTEM 

Tliis line was opened to the public for ser- 
vice in December 1916 and is proving a big 
financial SL'ccess The company is at present 
operating ten cars, of the latest storage battery 
t^-jje, over fourteen kiloaieters of track, reach- 
ing to different portions of the city; and plans 
are under way to very materially increase this 
track mileage and make it possible to travel 
to any part of the city on a five cent far. The 
street railway system with power house and 
other holdings represents an investment ol 
$270,000.00. 

ELECTRIC PLANTS 

Electric plants have been authorized at 
Varadero and Pedro Betancourt, and also im- 
provements OP the plant at Rodas. 



10 



I'HE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



IMPROVEMENTS AT TRINIDAD 

The Caba Railroad's recently constructed 
branch line connecting Placetas del Sur, on 
the main line, with Casilda, the seaport for 
Trinidad in Santa Clara province, will socn 
In- opened up for traffic, and this new line wall 
opsn Tip a rich agricultural and mineral coun- 
try and once rnor^ give the very old town of 
Trinidad direct communication with the in- 
terior poiats (,f CaV)a. The distance of this 
new extsnsion is 91 kilometers and, owing to 
the difficult engineering work encountered in 
locating a line through and across the canyon 
of the Agaliama river, considerable delay has 
b2en experienced. The new 1 ine extends over 
a portion of the old rnadbed which was for- 
merly used as a railroad and abandoned dur- 
ing the revolution. The town of Trinidad 
has a population estimated to be 12,000 in- 
habitants, and is located five kilometers from 
Casilda, the seaport, and has been one of the 
most inaccessible important points reached 
by travelers in Cuba. 

MORON 

The building occupied by the National Bank 
of Cuba at Moron is undergoing repairs, which, 
when completed , will make it the largest and 
one of the most handsome buildings in Moron. 

A new sugar mil' is l)eing erected in the 
vicinity of Moron along the line of the pro- 
jwsed North Coast Railroad by the Mendoza 
Cia. of Havana. The new mill Avill have an 
initial capacity of 100,000 bags to be in- 
creased when necessary and will be ready for 
grinding next years' crop. A large tract of 
land is being made ready for cane in this 
vicinity. 



EL ROQUE CANAL 

Steam shovel and dredging woi-k is again 
under way on the proposed El Roque canal 
and the work has advanced to a point across 
the tracks ct the United Railways near Jovel- 
lanos in Matanzas province. Sr. Rodriquez 
is handling the contract for this work and it 
is intended to drain the sA\-ami3 lands around 
Cardenas on the north coast through these 
canals or ditches and thereby secure much 
needed irrigation for interior points, and also 
restore much valuable land around Cardenas 
for commercial purposes. 



CI EGO DE AVILA 

The new building at Ciego de Avi'a lor the 
Royal Bank of Canada is rapid 'y nearing com- 
pjetion. It is of the same standard style of de- 
sign as other buildings erected by this com- 
pany throughout the island and will cost 
1180,000. The work of construction is in charge 
of Purdy & Henderson. 

MATANZAS 

The Vice-president of the Hershey Inter- 
urban Railway Company, which plans an 
electric line from Matanzas to Havana, has 
asked the railway commission for permission 
to buiki a line from Casa Blanca to Cojimar 
as a Yiavt of the project. 



FILM COMPANIES 

Several companies of film artists have been 
touring the island of Cuba during the past 
month making up film plays among the nat- 
ural scenic beauties and mountains of Eastern 
Cuba. 



PALM CITY 



We have been informed that Dr. Benedict 
Lust of New York City has acquired 1,500 
acres of land at Palm City, with the intention 
of forming a colony. The colonists will be 
encouraged in the culture of fruits, cocoanuts 
and alligator pears, and it is planned to 
establish a pure food cannery where various 
products of the colony will be put up. 



HOTEL PLAZA CAMAGUEY 

Owing to insufficient quarters the Hotel 
Plaza at Camaguey, under the management 
of Mr. I. Grossman, has arranged for addi- 
tions and betterments to the present building, 
w^hich include the erection of an additional 
story and changes in the present grountl floor 
plan and entrance. The contract for this 
work has been let to the Purdy & Henderson 
Company, Havana. 



THE TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

For the year ending Dec. 31, 1916, after 
paying the dividend at the rate of 8% per 
annum the c«mp:my placed $125,000 to the 
reserve fund and carried over $21,000 to 
profit and loss account. 



THE CCJBA REVIEW 



11 



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12 T H E C U B A R E V I E W 



SANTIAGO DOCK STRIKE 



The strike began January 3ci , when the stevedores and helpers stopped work on a steamer 
discharging at the Santiago wharves upon refusal of the sliipping agents to grant their demands 
for an increase in daily wages from $2.50 to .S4.00, and other dictatorial conditions as to how and 
when they should load and unload steamers. The shipping agents and representatives were 
agreeable to granting their demands fcr an increase in wages, but refused to recognize their 
Union and its intention to impose unreasonable conditions governing the handling cf a steamer 
on arrival at the docks ui Santiago. No agreement could be reached on this point and the 
strike continued quieth' until January fifteenth. In the m.eantin:e the situation had become 
serious in the city as regards food supplies, and on January 14th, at a conference of the mer- 
chants and shipping agents, it was decided to attempt to break the strike Jan. 15th, by get- 
ting all the volimteers possible at $10.C0 per day and using the clerks from the various stores 
and offices. This plan worked better than was expected and more than 300 young men reported 
for duty early on the morning of the 15th, including the President cf the Chamber of Com- 
merce and some of the city's mcst prominent business men, who removed their coats and went 
to work handling freight and dri\ing the carts to destination — and the only new disquieting 
development favorable to the cause of the strikers up to this time was a sjTnpathetic walk-out 
of all the cart and truck drivers — but this did not disturb the good work going on by the men 
acting as strike breakers, and they finished their first day's work without much interference 
owing to the excellent protection given by the Government rural guards, and a large quantity 
of much needed merchandise and perishable provisions were moved from the docks to the con- 
signees, and to all appearances the strike had failed. 

To an outsider's view the strike was conducted in a most orderly way and settled in the 
only possible manner. After the first da3''s efforts on the part of the shipping men to show 
the strikers that they meant business and the co-operation of the rural guards to preserve order 
and keep the freight moving from the docks, the strikers asked for a further conference and 
withdrew their unreasonable demands and were allowed to return to work. It is to be hoped 
that this satisfactory' settlement of the Santiago strike will have a beneficial effect on other 
labor troubles now brewing throughout the island. 



CAMAGUEY FARM SCHOOL 



The formal opening of the branch agricultural school located in Camaguey province near 
the city of Camaguey has been delayed owing to shortage of construction material and fit- 
tings for the various laboratories. The Adminstration and Class Room building, dormitories, 
creamery, wagon and tool houses, cattle barns and stock pens, chicken runs and bee yeards are 
all completed with the exception of minor fittings, and it is now expected to begin the enrollment 
of classes and start the teachiag of the various practical courses not later than IMarch 15th, 
this year. 

The Cuban Government, through the laws of its legislature in July ISOO, created six farm 
schools for the island to be distributed among the different provinces and dedicated to the teach- 
ing of practical agriculture, farm mechanics and stock husbandry, to young men and boys over 
fourteen years of age, the schools to afford equal opportunities to native and foreign hihabitants 
of Cuba. At the beginning each school was to have sufficient capacity for thirty students. (The 
C amaguey school will be one of the largest, most modern and complete schools on the island 
and will have ample facilities for sbrty students at the outset.) The State is to furnish board 
and lodging during the course of study, which will consume about two years for the following 
subjects. 

Arithmetic and Drawing Chemistry and Physics Natural History 

Agriculture Plant Culture Farm Bookkeeping. 

Sixty acres of land were acquired for the Camaguey school in December 1913, and an addi- 
tional sixty acres in June 1914, and with this last parcel of land a substantial brick building was 



IMI E CUBA R E V 1 ]•: W 



13 




I'nfinished Administration and Classroom Building 
Farm School, Camaguey. 



acquired, which is used today by the Director in charge, Dr. Luaces, as a residenee and office. 
It is interesting to note in connection with the new building constructioa work that special 
attentioa is being givevi to the sanitary and water service installations and no expense has beea 
spared to jierfect such an arrangement, and it is not unlikely that this will be made an educa- 
tional feature or ol)ject lesson in the dormitories and class rooms. 

The Director in charge, Dr. Luaces, first came to this farm in October 1914, having resigJied 
the position of Director General of Agriculture at Havana, which change he requested becdu.se 
of a desire to be more active and because of the opportunity afforded to be among the farmers, 
who are all his friends and seek his advice; and it is through Dr. Luaces's tireless efforts 
that the school at Camaguey was made a possibility, and he is very happy and pleased with 
the success attained so far, and when the school is finished and in operation the people of 
Cuba and Camaguey province in particular will be much indebted to him. The farm and 
school will 1)6 well equipped with chemical and physical laboratories, also with apparatus for 
meteorological work, specimens for the natural historj^ museum, fanning tools and a complete 
creamery outfit, also electric lighting and ice plant, incubators, etc. The Director has collected 
a good reference and working library for the professors, who will be eight in number, selected 
by competitive examination in their respective branches, and also for the students, and in this 
endeavor Dr. Luaces is receiving valuable aid from the U. S. Department of Agriculture and 
the experiment stations at Manila, Hawaii, Porto Rico, Texas, Florida, Cahfoniia and others. 
As a reference library on agricultural matters in Cuba today, the library at the Camaguey 
school is surpassed only by that of the collection of native woods numbering 17(3 varieties; 
and a good start has been made in the collection of native soils, sands, Umes, guanos, rocks and 
miiierals of the province. Valuable experiments are being conducted along the lines of 
introducing new forage crops such as Sudan, Rhodes, Natal, and other grasses, for the benefit 
of Camaguey province, which is principally the cattle section for Cuba. 

The farm, besides rendering cattle breeding service, also maintains a plant propogatuig 
department for the free distribution of plants for beautifying the parks, schools and roads in the 
province. The eggs produced by the fann chickens are sold at half rite to the fanners who 
must use them for breeding purposes only, and the young hogs, cattle, etc., are also sold to 
breeders, and this is all done in the hope of educating the farmers, improving the breed and 
increasing the chicken farm industry among the Cuban country people. The office distributes 
seeds, bulletins and periodicals which are received from the office of the Secretary of Agriculture 
at Havana, and any interesting pubUcations which are contributed by outsiders. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Interior. Court and Grounds, Farm School. C'ainaKUf 



' '""V'. --i<^*; ^^''' ii 




Cat t li' Sticds >V K II i< 



111 .Si'tidol, Cania)j,uc\ 



The farm and school enjoys ap iieal locution on the highroad fr^m C\:maguey to Santiago 
de Cuba, three miles from the city of Cam.ague>. Its soil contains a good percentage of black 
clay and a rich sandy loam.. The water supply is obtained from, an artesian well, and the farm 
will be well supplied with running water from the num.erous natural springs in the vicinity. 

The school banner will be composed from, the Irish colors, green and gold, both of wliich 
are appropriate to the county and farm. — the green of the grass and the gold of the citrus fruits— 
also the colors of the Director, Dr. Luaces, who is known am.ong the Anierican and other for- 
eigners of the province of Cam.aguey as the "Cuban-Irishman." 



T iiK c r ii A H i: V I !•: w 



15 



i-^ir 



'■'^''■'^Wp' 




The 



Remains of the Old Church which Contains 
"The \'irKin of Kl Coiirc." 



"EL COBRE" MINES 



These mines are said to be tiie oldest copper mines in trie Western Hemisphere, located 
in the m.ountains west of Santiao:o, and history says they were first developed in the year 1620, 
by the Spaniards, who abandoned theT>. to the Eng'is'i in 1837, and were worked until 1865, 
when they again reor-.ained idle until 1903, when the present American holding company started 
operations. They are t)est reached from Santiigo by boat across the bay to the mining rail- 
road station, from which point five trains operate each day to the town of El Cobre and the 
niines fifteen miles away. Along the rail route to the mines can ])e seen evidences of the old 
aV^andoned railroad and wrecked bridges used many years ago during the En.glish occupation 
and as t'le train nears El Cobre can be seen the old location of the mines with the building 
a})parently intact used l)y the English Comjjany and now abandoned. 

At first sight the town of El Cobre looks the tj^iical mining town and as if it had experienced 
the usual "mushroom" growth, but it must not be overlooked that this has been a busy and 
growing communitj^ during the past three years, owing to the unprecedented demand for all 
grades of copper, due to the European war. The place also strikes one as l)eing unbearably 
hot — -situated as it is in the canyon with mountains en all sides — l)ut the inhabitants explain 
that due to this location they get the i)leasant evening breezes which find a way through these 
canyons or cuts from the sea. 

The visitor to El Cobre for the first time is attracted by the most iniusual sight of an old 
church in ruins which can be seen on the summit ol one of the distant hills, and wonders how it 
-remains standing in r.u'ns, as it appears, and we ai-e told that it is tlie wreck of a very old Church 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




TlK' Tc.wiL <,l i-:! < -..li 




(•.(■iicral \'ic\v of Mnics and Plant, l-:i Cobre. 



which was erected by an order of Spanish priests and has fallen down due to the many exca- 
vations and mining operations throughout the hill underneath. This old chapel is known as 
the "Virgin of El Cobre" and contains an image of the "Virgin Mary" which has stood, un- 
scathed throughout the years. 

The mining camp proper consists of offices, power house, laboratory, shops, foundry and 
concentrators, and in the foundry there are facilities for making many large copper composi- 
tion castings from the concentrated ore taken from the mines. The plant is in charge of Mr. 
W. H. Emerson, General Manager, and he is assisted by a staff of .\mericans and Englislimen. 
Several hundred men are employed in the mines at present and the mining labor is entirely 
Spanish from the Gallego province of Spain, and these Gallegos will not work with Mexicans 
or Spaniards from other sections of Spain, or in fact any other foreign class of labor, on account 



T H E C U B A R E V I E A\' 



17 




Hills ShoAving Shafts and Aliuii-ig OperaUuu.- 




('■('iieral \'ie\v of Mines and Plan.t. 



of racial prejudice, and the company considers these Gallegos to be the best class of mining 
labor owing to their good habits and to the fact that they are contented, and they are employed 
in .preference to others. 

The Cuba Copper Company holds many claims for the ore deposits in the liills about El 
Cobre, and at present four of these locations are being actively worked. The operations are 
what is known as "shaft and tunnel" work and the greatest depth at which they are now taking 
out ore is six hundred feet below the surface ot the hills. Owing to the pressing demand for copper 
at the present time, they are working two shifts of men day and night, and are taking out hun- 
dreds of tons daily which run from six to eighteen per cent copper. The mines are equipped 
with elevators and at the bottom of each main shaft is a 'arge pump which is constant' j' pump- 
ing the water out of the mines. 

The rock-ore is brought to the surface in a skip and dumped into a chute from which it is 
fed into a crusher; from the cioisher the rock-ore is carried on a broad apron conveyor to the 
rolls, where it is pulverized. The pulverized ore is then delivered to a series of flotation cells, 
where it is mixed with compressed air, water and crude oil. After an agitating process this 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



mixture is passed from one cell to another, the valuable metal, or copper, being- carried in 
suspension. The ore now enters the concentrators after the foregoing washing and mixing 
processes, and that portion of the ore bearing fluid is passed over the concentrating tables and 
collected for shipment. The fluid which has been carr>-ing the foreg)ine- processes, and which 
sti'l retains much value is finally delivered to the precipitation beds, where it flows over 
heaps of scrap steel, iron, zinc, etc., and practically all of the remaining ccpper in solution is 
precipitated on the scrap ir )n and is cleaned up at regular intervals, yielding about 80*; f pure 
copper metal. This copper precipitates and the concentrates are bagged and shipped for final 
treatment at the smelters in the United States. 



HAVANA PRIVATE WATCHMEN. 

The watchman of yore, with lighted lantern 
in one hand and uplifted lance in the other, 
readyfor defense, has passed away. He hailed 
the passing hour i:i stentorian tones, from ten 
o'clock to break of day, and hourly announced 
the time and weather. He sometimes slept at 
his post or went on his beat, with eyes half 
closed and yawned with weariness. Generally 
these guardians of the public peace were 
Spaniards, appointed by the City. Nowa- 
days policemen are assigned to the duty of 
guardiar.s of the night, and each Legation has 
policemen on duty, a courtesy of the Cuban 
Govenunent. Policemen on day a.nd night 
rounds are jiow the guardians of the peace and 
protectors cf the city and suburban towns. 

However, private watchmen are sometimes 
employed in the subiu'bs. They are usually 
natives cf Spain, and wear a cap with a 
leather ba.'id to de;:ote their calling as well as 
their badge of office. They carry a stout 
cudgel and are accompanied by a watch-dog. 
These private watchmen are supposed to 
be on their beat from nine o'clock until day 
break, but in many cases, they are not visible 
except on the days they come to collect a dol- 
lar a month, their usual stipe.-id. 

There is a motion before the House to abol- 
ish this nightly service, as useless and unde- 
sirable. 

However, sometimes a shrill call by a 
whistle will summon aid either to help quell a 
fracas, or hold up a dark marauder, attempting 
to break into a house. Cuban dweUings are 
safeguarded with iron bars and strong, mas- 
sive doors, but some houses cf modern archi- 
tecture have light iron scroll work, instead of 
bars, and doers, easily broken open, and 
burglars break in while the inmates are asleep. 
A favorite method of these criminals is to 
waft a handkerchief saturated with choloform 
which stupifies the sleeper, and then the 
burglar has time to cirry off his booty, while 
the private watchman is taking his forty 
uinks. 



The j)olice force in Havana for traffic was 
established by Gen. Armando Eivas, ^who 
improved the conditions greatly while he was 
Chief of Police. There are now police, mounted 
policeme.n, and policemen on foot. Their 
uniforms are neat and natty and they wear 
helmets, and wield a club. They are kept on 
the alert, especially in the crowded narrow 
streets of the capital. It is estimated that 
six thousand automobiles and motoring 
cars traverse Havana daily. Since the Ford 
Agency has been established, automobiles can 
be hired for twenty cents a trip in town and 
for thirty five cents a trip in the Vedado. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

Chemical Conirol in Cane Sugar Factories, 
by H. C. Prinsen Geerligs, Ph.D., published 
by Norman Rodger, London, E. C, England. 
Price 10s. net. This volume presents the 
most modern methods that are in use for 
the sampling and analysing of the several 
products, and the calculating and recording 
of the results, in cane sugar factories in 
almost every cane-growing country of the 
world. There are slight d.eviations practised 
in different countries, but, on the whole, 
the processes here described are universally 
adopted in all coimtries where chemical 
control in the sugar-houses is in regular use. 

Standard Guide to Cuba, 1917, by Charles 
B. Reynolds, published by Foster & Reynolds 
Co., Havana and New York. Price 50c. 
American money. This book is a new and 
complete guide to the Island of Cuba, with 
maps, illustrations, routes of travel, history, 
and an English-Spanish phrase book. 

StandardCuide to Havana, 1917, by Charles 
B. Reynolds, published by Foster & Rey- 
nolds Co., Havana and New York. Price 
25c. A.merican money. This book is a com- 
plete handbook for visitors, with map, 
illustrations, history, and an English-Spanish 
manual of conversation. 



T H E C U B A R E V I E VV 19 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD 

Tho earnings of the CuIjh liiiilroad Company for the month of DcccmlH-r and six months 
ended December 31, 191(1, compare as follows: 

1916 1915 1914 191;] 1912 1911 

Deeemher gross $517,402 $513,369 $403,377 $458,343 $412,408 $293,684 

Expenses 465,280 265,990 186,850 219,360 200,390 155,732 



Deceml)ernet $52,122 $247,378 $216,527 $238,982 $212,018 $137,952 



Other income 9OI 

Xet income 53,024 

Fixed charges $95,133 $86,179 $70,195 $66,791 $66,791 $60,125 



Deeemher sur])] us $42,109 $161,199 $146,331 $172,191 $145,226 $77,827 

From Ju y 1: 

8Lx months' gross $3,175,176 $2,540,298 $2,006,458 $2,173,574 $1,948,951 $1,582,665 

Six months' net 983,078 1,111,582 866,918 981,927 823,103 684,312 

Other income 5,055 

Fixed charges . . . , 538,973 452,748 421,354 400,750 400,472 360,750 

8ix months' surplus $449,159 $658,834 $445,563 $581,177 $422,631 $323,562 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of December: 1916 1915 1914 

Gross earnings $530,270 $487,667 $457,284 

Operating expen.ses 212.438 186,031 203,530 

Net earnings 347,832 301,636 253,754 

Miscellaneous income 16,942 29,616 5,514 

Total net income 364,774 .331,252 259,268 

Surplus after deducting fixed cliarges 234,293 205,793 154,555 

12 months to December 31: 

Gross earnings $>, 017,703 $5,511,303 $5,30 3,714 

Operating expenses 2,293,370 2,237,518 2,501,023 

Net earnings 3,721,339 3,303,785 2,895,688 

Miscellaneous incom.e 144,531 154,.321 102,119 

Total net income 3,835,900 3,458, 10 > 2,997,807 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 2,314,401 2,140,532 1,711,780 

EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipts: 1916-1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 

Week ending Dec. 30th. . £40,885 - £40,742 £27,789 £36,732 £35,764 £32,516 

Week ending Jan. 6th.. 44,987 50,780 33,212 43,580 35,209 38,004 

Week ending Jan. 13th. . 52,145 .55,487 38,277 40,429 43,137 35,334 

Week ending Jan. 20th. . 54,824 .55,475 .39,993 47,0S4 43,795 40,623 

EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 

Week ending Jan. 6th £6,655 £5,759 £1,571 £.5,406 

Week ending Jan. 13th 6,461 6,504 4,831 4,826 

Week ending Jan. 20th 6,234 6,479 4,811 .5.173 

Week ending .Jan. 27th 6,122 6,629 4,434 5,305 

Week ending Fel). 3d 7,223 6,707 5,185 5,400 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

Week:y receipts: 1916-1917 1916 1915 1914 

Week ending Dec. SOth £10,858 £13,290 £6,211 £9,029 

Week ending Jan. 6th 16,106 15,896 9,438 12,291 

Week ending Jan. 13th 19,802 21,373 13,570 14,190 

Week ending Jan. 20th 2.5,,521 23,562 17,5.53 16,804 

Week ending Jan. 27th 2.5,975 26,1.34 18,.510 17,703 

Week ending Feb. 3d 26,108 25,712 17,892 14,167 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

As quoted by Lawrence Turnure dt Co., New York. 

Bid. Asked. 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 933 2 94H 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 43^% Bonds of 1949 86 87 

RepubUc of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 96}^ 96J4 

RepubUc of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 983^ 100 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 103 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 92 95 

Cuba Raih-oad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 93 3^ 95 

Cuba Co. 6% Debenture Bonds 993^ lOOJ^ 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 97 100 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 93 95 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 1053^ 107 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 99 101 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 none 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 102 109 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock / 160 175 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. CoUateral Trust 6% Bonds 101 3^2 101 M 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 58 63 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st Mtge. Bonds 92 95 

All prices of bonds quoted on an and interest basis. 



OIL TRUST 

The Oil Trust, Limited, was registered in 
March, 1910. In addition to its interest in 
oil properties in \arious parts of the world, it 
also has a holding in the Cuban Asphalt Com- 
pany. Up to the present it has not been plain 
sailing by any means; and although the report 
for the year to September 30, last, discloses a 
better financial position, the credit balance of 
£7,097 cannot be treated as a profit, and 
shareholders cannot look for any dividend un- 
til the company has recovered from the re- 
sults of unsatisfactory investments made at 
the outset of the Trust's career. During the 



year the holding in the Cuban Asphalt Com- 
pany has been increased by supplying further 
working capital to operate the properties, and 
from all accounts the money has been well 
spent. The railway connecting the property 
with the port of shipment has been put in 
running repair, and an output of asphalt is 
now being secured.— /^ro//i Westminster Gaz- 
ette, London. 



CUBA CANE SUGAR CORP. 

It is rumored inHavana that the Cuba Cane 
Co. will shortly add the sugar mill at Manati 
to its already enormous holdings in Cuba. 



THECUBAREVIEW 21 

THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA AND REGLA 
WAREHOUSES, LIMITED. 





1915-1916 




(/. 


£ s. 


d. 


11 


2,090,360 1 


5 


11 


1,129,237 17 


2 





£961,122 4 
54.02 per cent. 


3 



REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE, 1916. 

The result of the working of the Railwaj's for the year 1915-1916, as conij)ared with 
1914-1915, is as follows: 

1914-1915 
£ s. 

Receipts 1,692,361 18 

Expenses 894,465 9 

Balance £797,89o 9 

Ratio of expenses to receipts 52.85 per cent. 

To this balance of £961,122 4.s. 3d. there has to be added the profit on the working of the 
Regla Warehouses, the gain in exchange and Transfer and other Fees, and to l^e deducted the 
payment in respect of the Marianao Railway leased to this Company. These adjustments 
having been made there rem.ains a total of £971,173 lis. 3d. After payment of interest on 
Debentures and Debenture Stocks, dividend on Preference Stock, Interim Dividend (2 per cent, 
paid on the Ordinary Stock on INIay 15, 1916, Taxes (including Excess Profits Duty for 1914- 
1915), Stam.p Duties, and adding Interest and Dividends on Investments, the value of the 
coupons on the Bonds of the Havana Central Railroad Company exchanged for four per c^ent. 
Debentures and Debenture Stock of this Company, and the amount brought forward from last 
account, there remains an available balance of Net Revenue of £625,469 36'. 5d. 

This sum. of £625,469 3.s. 5d. is dealt with as follows: 

£ 

Transferred to Reserve Account 300,000 

Transferred to General Renewals Reserve 100,000 

Transferred to Insurance Account 5,000 

Transferred to Pension Account 10,000 

The Board recomnaends a final dividend of 3 % (less income tax at 3.s. Qd. in 

the £) — -making 5% for the year — -on the ordinary stock, absorbing 196,077 

Carrj-ing forward 14,392 



s. 


d. 
































3 


5 



£625,469 3 5 
The Reserve Account amounts to £1,000,000 Os. Od. 
The General Renewals Reserve am,oants to £322,157 15s. id. 
The Insurance Account amounts to £3r,000 Os. Od. 
The Pension Account amounts to £44,792 2s. 8d. 

RECEIPTS 

Passengers. — The receipts from Passenger Traffic (inckiding ^Marianao Electric Service) 
amounted to £569,404 against £447,059 last year, an increase of £122,345, or 27.37 per cent. 
The nmnber of passengers carried was 7,936,512 against 6,727,030, an increase of 1,209,482, or 
17.98 per cent. The average distance travelled per passenger (main Une only) was 33 miles 
and the average fare (main hne only) 3s. 10.98(/. against distance per passenger of 3." miles and 
an average fare of 4s. 3.4.0d. in the previous year. The average receipts per passenger ro.ile 
(main line only) were 1.44d. against 1.47 d. and the percentage of traffic to capacity hauled 
36.83 against 31.90 for the previous year. 

The actual number of main line passengers and corresponding earnings during the years 
1914-1915 and 1915-1916 were as follows: 

Year Passengers Receipts 

1914-15 1,856,163 £397,491 

1915-16 2,634,271 515,659 

Increase 778,108 or 41.927o £118,168 or 29.73% 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Year Passengers Receipts 

1914-15 4,870,867 £49,568 

1915-16 5,302,241 53,745 

Increase 431,374 or 8.86% £4,177 or 8.437o. 

Total Goods Traffic Receipts.— The total receipts from Goods traffic amounted to £1,237,882 
against £1,020,256 for tne previous year, an increase of £217,626 or 21.33 per cent, giving an 
average of 3s. 0.29d. per ton for an average haul of 29 miles,' and receipts per ton mile of Os 
1.24c?. against 2.s. 10.33f/. per ton for an average haul of 25 m.iles, and receipts per ton mile of 
Os. 1.36f/. in the previous year. The percentage of traffic to capacity per goods train amounted 
to 42.74 against 40.14 an increase of 2.60 or 6.48 per cent over the pre\ious year. 

Sugar Traffic— The traffic accruing from Sugar Cane and its products this >ear am.ounted 
to 27.04 per cent, of the gross receipts against 30.87 per cent, last year, and formed 45.73 per 
cent of the total goods and livestock traffic (excluding Com.pany's capit 1 account materials) 
against 51.28 per cent last year. The receipts from Sugar Cane and its products amounted 
to £565,191 against £522,473 last year an increase of £42,718, or 8.18 per cent. In the year 
under review we carried 988,064 tons of sugar, or 33.43 per cent, of the total production of the 
Island, which amounted to 2,955,454 tons up to August 26, 1916. Last year we carried 
889,248 tons of sugar, or 35.81 per cent, of the toal production of the Island, which was 2,483,- 
484 tons up to August 28, 1915. The estunated amount of cane required to produce the 
sugar carried by us am.ounted to 8,982,400 tons, of which we transported over our line 4,811,737 
tons or 53.57 per cent, against 4,489,635 or 50.49 per cent in the former crop, so that for 
every ton of sugar we carried 4.87 tons of cane against 5.049 last year. 

The average receipts per ton of cane, including private hauling, were 5.75(/. and O.oQd 
per ton m.ile against 6.43f/. per ton and 0.61f/. per ton mile last year. The average haul per 
ton was 10.24 miles against 10.51 last year. 

Total Tonnage.— The total number of tons, Public, Government, and Military Traffic) 
includmg live stock, was 8,174,771 tons and company's m.aterials, 291,696 tons— total, 8,466,467 
tons against last year under the same headings, 7,123,839 tons; com.pany's materials, 252,738 
tons — 7,376,577 tons lieing an increase of 1,089,890. 

EXPENDITURE 

The total expenditures incurred during the year in the working of the railways alone 
amounted to £1,129,238 or 54.02 per cent, of the gross receipts com.pared witn £894,466, or 
52.85 per cent, for the previous year. The increase in tne total expenditure is, tnerefore, 
£234,772, or 26.69 per cent. 

Coal— The cost of coal per locomotive mile on the main line has been 5.96d. against 5.23d. 
The am.ount of coal consum.ed per engine m.ile was 59.70 lbs. against 57.57 lbs. for the previous 
year. Per traffic ton m.ile it was 1 . 129 lbs. against 1 .272 lbs. last year. 

Traffic Expenses.— The total traffic expenses amounted to £268,488 against £242,108, or an 
increase of £26,380 tons. 



COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF WORKING, Year ended June 30, 1916. 

Passenger Traffic. 



June 30, 1915. 



June 30, 1916. 



Description 



Quantity 1 Amount I Quantity j Amount 
No. 1 £ No. I £ 



Passengers Main Line- 
First Class 

Third Class 

Employees Tickets. . . 

Total 

Passengers— Elec.Servici 

Total Passengers 

Passengers GuanabacoE 
& Ferry Boat Service 



184,278 

1,637,16 J 

33,9251 

1,856,163 
4,870,867 

6,727,030', 

1,026,227 



109,233' 237,8391 

284,792 2,359,801' 

3,460 36,631! 

397,491 2,634,271 

49,568 5,302,241 

447,059 7,936,512 

13,752 1,106,442, 



146,314 

365,403i 
3,942; 



515,659| 
53,74c, 



569,404 
14,317 



Increase. 


Decrease. 


Juantity [ Amount 
No. No. 


Quantity 
No. 


Amount 
£ 










53,561 

721,841 
2,700 


37,081 

80,611 

470 






778,108 
431,374 


118,168 
4,177 






1,209,482 


122.345 






80.215 


565 







Per Cent. 

Quantityl Amount 
No. £ 



29.07 33.95 

44.07 28.31 

7.98 13.73 



41.92 
8.86 

17.98 

7.82 



29.73 
8.43 



27.37 
4.11 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 



Goods and Live Slock Traffic. 





June 30 

Quantity 
Tons 

2,804,959 

1,684,676 

889,248 

217,666 

10,517 


, 1915. 

Amount 
£ 


June 30 

Quantity 1 
Tons j 


1916. 1 


Increase. 


Dean 


iase. 

Amount 
£ 

3,275 
1.719 

2,746 

367 
50 

115 
35 

'i69 
1,676 

4,621 


Per C 

Quantity 
Tons 

7.90 
5.97 
11.11 
39.91 
39.23 

9.13 
22.32 
40.18 
85.41 
27.61 
30.53 
15.49 
28.69 
13.23 

78.31 

33.93 

14.28 

36.64 

2.48 

306.40 

27.73 

110.37 

43.45 

77.03 

8.73 

5.16 

95.48 

13.79 


;ent. 




-Amount 

£ 1 


Quantity 
Tons 


Amount 
£ 

32,382 

14.016 

1.314 

42.718 

"27 
2,180 
3,251 

21.498 

13.031 
889 
7.288 
3.894 
1,967 
3,936 
690 
8,188 

93,649 
13,166 
9.915 


Quantity 
Tons 

7,274 
. . . . 
'89i 
377 

■ 1,136 

17,883 

. ... 

8.762 
20,972 


Amount 
£ 


Sugar Cane — Co'sHaulag ; 
Sugar Cane —Private 


88,567 

31,730 

379,818 

18,635 

3.723 


3,026,476 

1,785,261 

983,064 

334,539 

14,643 


85,292 

30,011 

412,200 

32,651 

5,037 


221,517 

100,585 

98,816 

86,873 

4.126 


3.70 
5.42 
8 53 




75.21 




35.29 






Total Sugar Cane & Prod . 


5,607,066 

32,590 

112 

7,765 

- 31,410 

2,918 

5,282 

1,314 

7,422 

74,887 

3,348 

125,188 

201,446 

68,749 

30,475 

111,184 

4,456 

50,004 

9,602 

156,626 

169,764 

232,011 

152,063 

7,085,682 

24,022 
154,989 
73,727 

252,733 

7,338,420 


522,473 

15,517 

75 

2,842 

12,098 

1,131 

1,858 

415 

720 

25,374 

541 

13,762 

29,311 

9,593 

1.735 

4,794 

1,359 

4,342 

814 

132,818 

105,695 

80,716 

18,691 


6,118,983 

25,316 

157 

14,397 

40,082 

2,027 

6.100 

937 

8,404 

133,533 

2,212 

107,305 

275,247 

70,453 

123,849 

142,014 

9,374 

71,732 

16,998 
170,235 
161,002 
453,543 
131,091 

51,446 


565,191 

12,771 

102 

5,022 

15,349 

764 

1,808 

300 

685 

46,872 

372 

12,086 

42,342 

10.482 

9,023 

8,688 

3,326 

8,278 

1,504 

141,006 

101,074 

174,365 

31,857 

9,915 


511.917 

■ 45 
6,632 
8,672 

"818 

"982 

58,646 

73,801 
1,704 

93,374 

30,830 
4,918 

21,728 
7,396 

13,669 

221,529 
51,446 


8.18 
17.70 


Coffee (Native) 


36.00 
76.71 


Fruit Fresh (Native) 


26.87 
32.45 




2.69 




27,71 


Fodder 


4.86 


Wood, Native (Not Fire- 


84.72 




31.24 


Firewood, Common 

Coal 


12.18 
44.46 




9.27 




420.06 


Stone 


81.23 


Tiles 


144.74 




90.65 


Manure, Common 

Merchandise & fist Class.. 
Produce of the 1 2d Class. 
Coun ry noi'j 3d Class., 
specified above] 4th Class. 
I. 5th Class. 


84 77 

6.16 

4.37 

116.02 

70.44 

.... 


Total Public Traffic 


986,674 
1,366 

1,366 
988,040 


8,136,494 

37,750 

178,793 

75,153 

231,696 

8,428,190 


1,233,182 
1.853 

1,853 
1,205,035 


1,050.812 

13.72g 

23,804 

1,426 

38.958 

1.089.770 


216.508 






14.83 


21.94 


Materials— Capital Acc't. 

Coal for Co.'s use 

Materials— Revenue Acc't 

Total 


487 

487 

216,995 

849 

631 


'i62 


'2i8 


57.15 

15.36 

1.93 

15.41 

14.85 

.79 
6.43 

.31 


35.65 
35.65 


Total of all Goods 


21.96 


Oxen, Cattle. Horses, &.v,. 


35,638 
2,519 


30,855 
1,361 

32,216 


35,920 
2,357 


31,704 
1.143 


282 


2.75 
16.02 






Total Live Stock 


38,157 
7,376,577 


38,277 


32,847 


120 


1.96 


Total Goods & T.ive Stock. 


1,020.256 


8,466.467 


1.237,882 


1.089,893 


217,626 






14.78 


21.33 



COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF WORKING, Year ended June 30, 1916. 
Mileage and General Results. 



Year Ended 
Description June 30, 1915 

Total Gross Receipts £1,692,362 

Working Expenditure £894,466 

Net Receipts £797,896 

Percentage of Expnd. to Gross Receipts... 52.85 

Average miles of Line open 681 

Average No. of Stations open Ill 

Receipts per mile of line £2,485 

Expenses per mile of line £1.313 

Net receipts per mile of line . . £1.172 

Steam train miles 2,499.725 

Electric train miles 560.60.5 

Receipts per train mile , lis. Id. 

Expenses per train mile,. , os. lOd. 

Net receipts per train mile \ 6s. 3d. 

Vehicle miles run (Steam Trains) | 25.476.127 

Vehicle miles run (Electric Trains) | 856,622 

Receipts per vehicle mile ' Is 

Expenses per vehicle mile [ Os 

Net receipts per vehicle mile Os 

Aver. No. of passengers per day, main line . . 
Aver. No. of passenger per train, main lirie . . . i 
Aver. No. of pass, per mile of line, main line . . I 



Year Ended 
June 30, 1916 



3d. 

Sd. 

7d. 

5,085 

53.8 

2,726 




PerCl'nt. 



23 . ,52 
26.25 
20.46 

2.21 



23.54 
26.28 
20.48 

8.36 
42.87 

7.52 
10.00 

4.76 
20.75 
18.08 

6.67 
12.50 

4i'.53 
24.35 

41.89 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF WORKING, Year ended June 30, 1916. 

C^n^inuei. 



Description. 



Average receipts per passenger 

Average miles per passenger 

Average receipts per passenger mile 

Average receipts per passenger train mile. . . 

Tons of goods and live stock per day. 

Tons of goods and live stock per train.. . . . . 

Tons of goods and live stock per mile of line. 
Average receipts per ton of goods and live stk . 
Average miles per ton of goods and live stk. 

Average receipts per ton mile 

Average receipts per goods train mile 

Train and Engine Mileage 

Total engine miles run 

Total engine miles run per engine in service. 
Total engine milesrunper engine of total stk. 

Total steam train miles run 

Totalsteam train milesrunper engine inserv. 
Total steam train miles run per engine of total 

stock 

Steam train miles per mile of line 

Average vehicles (of 4 axles) per train (steam) 

Passengers 

Goods and live stock 

Percentage of Traffic to Capacity. 

Passengers 

Goods and live stock 

^^1 Coal Consumption. 

Per train mile. 

Per engine mile 

Per vehicle mile 

Per ton mile of traffic 



Year Ended 
Jime 30', 191.5 



0.5. 

1.5s. 



3.40a. 

35 

1.47d. 

7.05d. 

19.517 

135 

10,461 

10.3.3fi. 

25 

1.36rf. 

3.25d. 



3,949,057 
23,196 
17,590 

2,499,725 
14,683 

11,135 
3,671 



4.23 
14.84 

31.90 
40.14 

90.65 
.57.57 
8.888 
1.272 



lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 



Year Ended 
June 30, 1916 



3s. 



Os. 
16s 



10.98rf. 

33 

1.44d. 

0.62d. 

22,335 

158 

12,004 

0.29<i. 

29 

1.24rf. 

4.54rf. 



Increase 



4,553,390 
24„547 
20,0.52 

2,708,648 
14,602 

11,928 
3,977 



4.69 
16.19 

36.83 
42.74 

100.04 
59.70 
8.801 
1.129 



lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 



Os. 



5.57(f. 

2,818 

23 

1,.543 

1.96d. 

4 

■ 1.294. 

604,333 
1,351 
2,462l 

208,9231 



793 
306: 



0.46 
1.35 



lbs. 
lbs. 



4.93 
2.60 



9.39 
2.13 



Decrease iPer Cent 



Os 



4.42d. 

2 

.03d. 



Os. .I2d\ 



81 



lbs 
lbs 



087; 
143 



8.60 

5.71 

2.04 

22.23 

14.44 

17.04 

14.75 

5.71 

16.00 

8.82 

7.25 

15.30 
5.82 

14.00 

8.36 

.55 

7.12 
8.34 

10.87 
9.10 

15.45 
6.48 

10.36 
3.70 

11.24 



ANNUAL RETURN OF ROLLING STOCK, June 30, 1916 



Description 



Aa at June 30 



1915 



1916 



Increase 



Net Increase 
Decrease or Decrease 



Enslnes 

Passenger Engines 

Goods Engines — ^Light 

Goods Engines — Heavy 

Electric Locomotives 

Shunting Engines 

Total Engines 

Passenger Stock 

Rail Motors 

Electric Motors 

Parlor Cars 

Sleeping Coaches 

1st Class Coaches 

3d Class Coaches , 

Mixed Coaches (1st and 3d) 

Total Passenger Coaches 

Baggage and Parcels Stock 

Baggage Vans 

Mixed Animal and Baggage Vans . . . 

Total Baggage and Parcels Vans 

Goods Stock 

Covered Wagons 

Flat and Low-sided Wagons 

Cattle Wagons 

Tank Wagons 

Horse Wagons 

Brake Vans 

Total Goods Stock 



49 
88 
66 

20 



43 

87 

72 

1 

18 



6(a) 
1 (o) 



223 



6(6) 
1(b) 



2(6) 



—6 
— 1 

+6 
+ 1 
—2 



3 
24 

1 

3 
46 
85 

9 



3 
24 

1 

3 
46 
82 

9 



168 



3(6) 



—3 



37 



35 
6 



2(6) 



1.609 


1,698 


3,909 


4,156 


71 


71 


47 


47 


19 


19 


140 


150 



100 (a) 
695 (a) 



10(a) 



11(6) 

448 (e) 



5,795 



6,141 



805 



459 



+89 
+247 



+ 10 



+346 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



ANNUAL RETURN OF ROLLING STOCK, June 30, 19m— Continued. 



Description. 



Service Stock 

Deposits Loco. Repair Shop — Cienaga . 

OflBeial Coach 

Coal Car deposits Regla 

Steam Shovel 

Traveling Cranes 

Breakdown Wagons 

Permanent Way Wagons, Dwelling, &c. 

Tank Wagons for Water — -2 Axles 

Tank Wagons for Water — 4 Axles 

Open Wagons for departmental use. . . . 

Weighbridge Testing Wagon 

Gasoline Cars 

Spare Locomotive Tenders 

Inspection Coach 



Total Service Wagons. 



Ferry Boats 

Water Carts, &c. 



As of June 30 
191.5 



12 
1 

4 
1 
7 
9 
152 
7 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 
1 



207 



191 G 



12 
1 

8 
1 

7 
8 
152 
7 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 
1 



210 



2 

12 



Increase 



4(a) 



1 (d) 
14(a) 



JNet Increeae 
Decrease or Decreass 



2(b) 
14(b) 



+4 
— 1 



16 



+ 3 



(a) Acquired by purchase. (b) Retired from service. „, ™ 

(c) 447 retired from ssrvice and 1 converted into Breakdown Wagon (d) Converted from Flat Wagon. 



No. 1. 



STATEMENTS OF ACCOUNTS, June 30, 1916. 
Capital Authorized and Issued, as at June 30, 1918. 



Ordinary Stock 

Ordinary Shares 

Deferred Ordinary Stock 

5% Cumultaive Pref . Stock and Shares 
5% "A" Irredeemable Deb. Stock. . . 
5% Consolidated Irred. Deb. Stock.. . 

5%' Irredeemable Debs. Stock (1906). 
4% Redeemable Debs, and Deb. Stk. . 
4}4% Redeemable Debs to Bearer. . . 



Capital 
Authorized 



Capital Issued 



£ 

6,859,970 

30 

600,000 

3, .500,000 

380,000 

1,425,900 

3,574,100 

1,323,100 
988,750 







£ S. 

6,535.870 

30 

494,756 12 

2,786,429 

380,000 
1,425,900 

3,004,669 

1,281,4.55 
988,750 



Capital liable 
to be issued 



£ 
24,131 



s. d. 




!£18,651,850 0:£16,897,859 18 9 



94,303 15 10 
7,227 10 



(3) 


119,100 


(4) 


5,898 


(5) 


7,216 11 



Balance 
(unissued) 



£ 
299,219 



10,939 11 
706,343 10 



427,957 
34,428 2 6 



£257,876 17 ll £1,478.887 4 2 



(1) Available for exchange of Shares in The Western Railway of Havana, Ltd. , and the Cuban Central Railways, 
* 7'>)°AvaWble^for\xchang^ of Havana Central Railroad Common Capital Stock still outstanding. 

(3) Available for the redemption of £119,100 Bonds of the old Company not yet converted mto Debenture 

*°*'(4) Available for payment of Ordinary Dividend No. 21, unclaimed at this date. 

(5) Available for exchange of Havana Central Railroad 5% First Mortgage Gold Bonds still outstanding. 



No. 2. 



CAPITAL ACCOUNT for the Year ended June 30, 1916. 



Expenditure 

£ s. 
To Capital Expend, as per 
Account to June 30,1915. 10,597,662 17 
Add. 
Expenditure during year 
1915-16 as per Abstract L 186,886 17 



CapitalExp.June .30,1916 10,784,549 15 2 
Bal carried to BalSht(5) 6,226,210 3 t 



£17,010.759 18 9 



Receipts 

Total received to 

June 30, 1915. 

£ s. d. 

By Capital 

Ordinary Stock 6,53.5,120 

Ordinary Shares 30 

Deferred Ordinary Stock. . . . 494,756 12 6 

5% Cumulative Pref. Stock. 2,786,429 

5% "A" Irred. Deb. Stock.. 380.000 

5%Cons. Irred. Deb. Stock. 1,425,900 

5%Irred.Deb. Stk. (1906). 2,988,193 
4% Redeemable Debentures 

and Debenture Stock 1,281,455 6 3 

4}^% Redeemable Deben- 
tures to Bearer 988,750 0^ 

Total 16,880,633 18 9 

5% Irredeemable Debenture 
Stock( 1£06), retained to 
be issued on surrender for 
conversion into this stock 
of the £112,900 Bonds of 
the old Company still 
outstanding 112,900 



Since received. 
£ s. d. 



Total. 
£ s. d. 



750 6,535,870 

30 

494,756 12 6 

2,786,429 

380,000 

1,425,900 

16,476 3,004,669 



1,281,455 6 3 
988,750 



17,226 16,897,859 18 9 



112,900 



£16.993.533 18 9 £17,226 £17.010.759 18 9 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



No. 3. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT for the Year ended June 30, 1916. 



Expenditure 


1 

< 

A 
B 
C 
D 

E 
F 
G 
H 

I 
J 
K 


Amount 




Per Cent, of 
Gross Receipts 




1914-15 




1915-16 




1914-15 


1915-16 


Maintenance Expenses 

Permanent Way and Works 


£ s. 

180,487 2 

76,451 9 

24,335 15 

44,612 9 

180,824 17 
7,738 16 

242,107 15 
34,595 12 
13,934 2 
58,678 17 
30,698 11 


d. 

8 
7 
8 
4 


9 
1 

11 
4 
4 


£ s. 

242,175 1 

99,699 8 

34,662 14 

81,580 12 

221,940 14 
8,634 15 

268,488 1 
42,988 17 
27,096 10 
62,842 5 
39,128 15 


d. 
4 
8 
3 
5 

11 
7 
4 
5 
1 
9 
6 


10.66 
4.52 
1.44 
2.64 

10.68 

.46 

14.31 

2.04 

.82 

3.47 

1.81 


11.58 
4.77 


Coachina, Stock 


1.66 
3.90 


Transport Expenses 

I.oconuitive Running 

Vehicle Running 


10.62 

.41 

12.84 




2.06 




1.30 




3.01 




1.87 








894,465 9 

4,000 
803,600 9 


11 



4 


1,129,237 17 

4,000 
971,173 11 


2 


3 


52.85 


54.02 


Annual I'aym.'nt in -espect of Lease of Marianao 

►-• Railway S\steni 

Balance carried to Net Revenue Account (No. 4) . 






£1,702,065 19 


3 


£2,104,411 8 


5 







Receipts 



Train Earnings 

Pass:-iigers 

Private Trains 

Parcels. Luggage and Mails 

Sugar Traffic 

General Goods 

Live Stock 

Special Accounts 

Ferry and Guanabacoa Service . . 

Public Telegrams 

Sundry Receipts 

Total Receipts — Railway 

Regla Warehouses — Balance 

Gain in Exchange 

Transfer and other Registration Fees 



1914-15 

£ s. 

447,059 1 

1,313 2 

70,307 6 

522,473 6 

465,566 16 

32,215 15 



13,7.52 4 ] 

584 10 4 

139,089 16 2 



1,692,361 18 11 

7,528 5 1 

1,884 8 3 

291 7 



1915-16 

£ s. d. 

569,403 n 6 

2,375 10 9 

107,816 18 11 

.565,191 4 

639,843 17 3 

32,846 10 5 

14,317 7 4 

5.37 12 10 

158,027 12 1 



2,090,360 1 5 

4,230 17 5 

9,435 1 

385 9 6 



£1.702,061 19 3 £2,104,411 8 5 



Per Cent, of 
Gross Receipts 

1914-151 1915-16 



16.42 
.08 

4.15 
30.87 
27.51 

1.90 

.81 

.04 

8.22 

100.00 



27.24 
.11 

5.16 
27.04 
30.61 

1.57 



-03 
7.56 



100.00 



No. 4. 



NET REVENUE ACCOUNT, as at June 30, 1916. 



To interest on Deb. Stocks and Bonds— 

On 5% "A" Irred. Debenture Stock 

On 5'''c Consolidated Irrea. Deb. Stock 

On o';^r Irred. Deb. Stock (lllOtt) and uncor.- 
verted 1890 Bonds of the Old Company. 

On 4'~r Redeemable Debentures and Deben- 
ture Stock, issued and liable to be issued... , 

O 1 4 H'^c Rsde mable Debentures to Beare.'. 
Dividend on .5'^7 Cumulative Preference Stock. 

Excess Profits Duty, 1914-1.5 

Interim Dividend of 2 7 (No. 23) on Ordinary. 

Stock paid May 15, 1916. 

.\nnual Payment as Composition for Stamp 

Duty on Preference Stock, Ordinary Stock 

and Deferred Ordinary Stock 

Other Stamp Duties 

Cuban Taxes— Balance 

ncome Tax 

Balance carried down 



n.OOO 
71,295 



156,168 14 6 



51, .546 17 6 

45,240 1 7 

139,321 9 

40,937 10 



131,200 12 4 



4,549 17 

284 2 3 

51,4G1 

2J,00U 

609,920 8 2 



£1,340,925 12 4 



By Balance f rom Revenue Account, as per 

Statement No. 3 ] 

By Interest and Dividends on Investments, i 
By Coupons due and accrued on Bonds of 
Havana C.n ral Railroad Cjmpany. . 



By Balance brought down, year ended June 
30, 1916 

By Bal. from vear ended 

June 30, 1015 £603.550 6 3 

Less — ■ 

Ordinary Div. No. 
22 (5' o) paid 
Nov. 12, lil5.32S,001 11 

Carried to Re- 
serve Account. 150,000 

Carried to Gen. 

Ren. Reserve.. 100,000 

Carried to Insur- 

5,000 



971,173 11 

252,484 








ance Account. . 
Carried to Pen- 
sion Account. . 




5,000 



588,001 11 



Carried to Balance Sheet (No. 5). 



87,268 9 
£1,340,925 12 4 



609.920 82 



15,.54S 15 3 



£625,469 3 5 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



27 



No. 5. 



BALANCE SHEET, as at June 30, 1916. 



£ s. d. 

To Capital .Acct. (as per Statement N(i. 2). . ^ 6,226,210 3 7 

To Premiums on Capital Ksued in |{eserve. . . . 36,i)07 1 6 

*To Sundry Creditors and ( 'ridit lialaiiees.... 729.180 1 

To Sundry DelienturcHoldens for Interest... 12.5..585 8 6 

To Sundry Ordinary and Prcf. Stocl<holders. 'f-< 

for Dividends." 74,298 17 3 

To Reserve Account 700,(100 

To General Renewals Reserve 222,1.^7 1 5 4 

To Insurance Account 30,000 

To Pension Account 34.7(;2 2 8 

To Loan against Security 214,461 19 

To Net Revenue Account Balance (a.s per 

Statement No. 4) 62,5,469 3 5 



*There is a contingent liability in respect 
of the guarantee of .£(100, 00(1 Five per cent. 
10 year bond.s of the American Cuban 
Estates Corporation. 



£9,019,068 11 10 



£ 8. d. 

By First Mortgage y{ i50-year gold bonds 
and Common Capital Stock of tlic Havana 
Central Railroad ( 'ompaiiy aciiuircd by an 
issue of tliisCompaiiy's 4' , Dehciilurcs and 
Deferred Ordinary Stock, at par. Held by 
Trustees for 4'; Debentures as Security). . 1,776.211 18 9 

By Discount on issue of Debentures 4,P43 15 

By Commissions on Sales of Debentures and 
Stock 149,100 II 

By Expenses of the Western Railway of Hav- 
ana, Ltd., Exchange Operation, in accord- 
ance with terms of Plan sul mitted to Ex- 
traordinary General Meeting held Nov. 22, 
1911 21,.3.S4 7 

By P>xpenses of Havana Central Exchange Op- 
eration in accordance with terms of Plan 
submitted to Extraordinary General Meet- 
ings held July 11 and 26, 1907 24,9.59 7 II 

By Expenses of Cuban Central Railways, Ltd., 
Exchange Operations, in accordance with 
terms of Plan submitted to Extraordinary 
GeneralMectingheldDec. 9, 1913 ._ 49,730 8 3 

By Investments at Cost, including £296,785 
88. id Deferred Ordinary Stock of this Com- 
pany held bv the Trustees for the o'l Irred. 
Debenture Stock (1906) 5,4S3,591 11 8 

By Stock of Stores and Materials in hand and 

"in transit 207,473 12 5 

Bv Sundry Debtors and Debit Balances 380,983 17 

By Moneys on Deposit with Bank '■l'^!;'^'^'! " ^ 

By Cash in Havana and London 377,425 111 

By Moneys on Loan 113,264 U 3 

£9,019,068 11 10 



B. 



COMPARATIVE ABSTRACTS OF EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 

Locomotive Maintenance. 



Superintenelence 

Salaries 

General Expenses 

Wages 

Materials 

Workshop Exp. (Proportion of) . 
Contributions for Special Works 

Total , 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



£ «. d. 

5,337 12 2 

498 10 1 



5,836 2 3 

35,743 2 11 

15,775 19 2 

10,613 16 10 

8,482 8 5 

£76,451 9 7 



% 



.35 
2.11 
.93 
.63 
.50 

4.52 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



£ s 

5,614 

495 



d 
2 1 
1 11 



£ s 

I 




d. 


% 


I 

6,109 
40,757 
27,073 
11,277 

8,482 


4 

2 

3 

10 

8 



2 
6 

7 
.5 


.29 

2.24 

1.29 

.54 

.41 


£99,699 


8 


8 


4.77 



C. 



Coaching Stock Maintenance. 





Year ended June 30, 1915. 


Year ended June 30, 1916. 




Superintendence 


£ s. d. £ s. d. 
1,711 1 11 
159 16 2 

-_ 1,870 18 1 

11,454 17 3 

6,095 7 

195 11 1 

4,719 2 3 


% 

.11 
.68 
.36 
.01 
.28 


£ s. d. £ s. rf.j 
1,760 3 i 
155 4 3 

1 915 1 6 


% 










Wages 


14,657 6 6 

13,192 3 2 

178 17 lOJ 

4,719 2 3 


.70 
.63 


Workshops Exp. (Proportion of). 
Contributions for Special Works. 


.01 
.23 


Total 


£24,335 15 8 


1.44 


£34,662 14 3i 


1.66 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



COMPARATIVE ABSTRACTS OF EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 

Permanent Way and Works Maintenance. 



Superintendence 

Salaries 

General Expenses 

Permanent Way 

Wages 

Materials 

General expenses 

Telegraph 

Wages 

Materials 

Bridges and Culverts 

Wages 

Materials 

Stations and Annexes, including 
Yards, Sidings and Tramways 

Wages 

Materials 

Workshops, Running Sheds 
Turntable, Water Stations, 
Wells and Stores Warehouses- 
Wages ■ . .. 

Materials 

Official and Permanent Way 
Houses and Buildings outside 
the ordinary service- — 

Wages • . 

Materials 

Fences, Gates, Level Crossing; 
and Roadways 

Wages 

Materials 

Tools and Equipment 

Wages 

Materials 

Contributions for Special Work 
Electric Transmission 

Total 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



£ s. d. 

12,165 16 3 

1,640 16 11 



2,769 
2,245 



16 


5 
5 


6,919 
5,115 


18 
10 


11 
5 


10,1.53 
5,620 


5 
2 


8 
8 



475 9 
499 IS 9 



350 
329 


5 
19 


3 
3 


557 
186 


16 
13 


3 

4 


176 
2,322 


6 
11 


2 
10 



13,806 13 2 

50,651 9 3 
42,923 8 
584 8 6 



5,014 16 10 



12,035 9 4 



15,753 8 4 



974 19 6 



680 4 6 



— 744 9 7 



2,498 18 

33,763 6 8 

1,055 18 4 



£180,487 2 8 



% 



.82 

2.99 

2..5'4 

.03 



.30 



.71 



.93 



.06 



.04 



.15 

1.99 

.06 



10.66 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



£ s. d. 

12,619 18 6 

1,805 7 1 



2,676 16 6 
2,141 1 



5,817 
3,862 


6 
5 


6 
1 


13,794 
8,758 


1 
7 


4 

1 



722 5 5 
625 12 7 



938 11 
761 3 



517 
301 


14 
12 


6 
5 


232 
2,957 



10 


3 
10 



14,425 5 7 



74.100 10 

73,722 6 

933 14 



4,817 16 7 



9,679 11 7 



22,552 8 5 



1,347 IS 



I 1,699 11 3 



819 6 11 



3,189 11 
33,763 6 
1,123 13 11 



£242,175 1 4 



% 



.69 

3.55 

3.53 

.04 



.23 



.46 



1.08 



.06 



.08 



.04 



.15 

1.62 

.05 



E. 



Locomotive Running Expenses. 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



Superintendence 

Salaries 

General Expenses 

Salaries and Wages 

Drivers and Firemen 

Running Shed Staff 

Coal 

Water 

Rates 

Pumping 

Salaries and Wages 

Coal 

General Materials 

Maintenance of Pumps, &c. 

Wages 

Materials . . 

Contributions for Spec. Wks 

Lubricants 

Oil 

Grease 

Materials of Gen. Consumption. . 
Tools and Equip. Maintenance . , 

Total 



£ s. d. 

3,613 5 5 

511 7 2 



52.72S 12 
12,132 3 10 



1,604 1 5 

2,622 4 10 

2,099 IS 5 

322 9 6 

1,53S 8 2 

1,422 2 3 

337 1 9 



1,086 15 1 
1,717 16 



4,124 12 7 



64,860 15 10 
90,951 19 3 



9,946 6 4 



2,804 11 1 

7,257 12 2 

878 19 



£180.824 17 



% 



3.83 
5.37 



.59 



10.68 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



£ s. d. 

4,126 11 5 

688 12 8 



62,501 12 10 
13,005 6 7 



1,949 19 4 

2,911 19 2 

2,669 18 8 

340 11 6 

1,923 13 9 

1,621 1 

337 1 9 



1,353 11 9 
1,977 6 



4,815 4 1 



75, .506 19 5 
119,376 1 11 



11,754 5 2 



3,330 17 

6,339 9 

817 17 



3.61 
5.71 



.56 



.16 
.31 
.04 



£221,940 14 111 10.62 



THE CUBA RE VI E W 



D. 



COMPARATIVE ABSTRACTS OF EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 

Goods Stock Maintenance. 



Superintendence 

Salaries 

General Expenses 

Wages 

Materials 

Workshops Exp. (Proportion of) 
Contributions for Special Works 



Year ended June 30, 101.' 



£ s. d. 

2,634 18 3 

246 1 9 



2,881 

17,647 9 

15,6.57 19 

1,121 6 



7,304 14 10 



£44,612 9 4 



.17 
1.04 
.93 
.07 
.43 



2.64 



£ .<!. d. 

2,936 9 

258 19 2 



3,195 
24,446 
45,412 

1.222 



8 2 
2 4 
2 
6 11 



7.304 14 10 
£81,.580 12 5 



29 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



% 



.15 

1.17 

2.17 

.06 

.35 

3.90 



Vehicle Running Expenses. 



Superintendence 

Salaries 

General Expenses 

Wages of Revisers and Greasers 
Lubricants- — • 

Oil ... 

Materials of Gen. Consumption. . 
Tools and Equip Maintenance. . . 

Total 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



E s. d. 

332 4 2 

47 4 



379 4 6 

5,963 16 7 

979 3 9 

370 5 4 

46 6 7 



£7,738 16 9 



% 



.02 
.35 



.07 
.02 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



£ s. d. 

346 13 7 

57 17 



404 10 7 

6,345 10 2 

1,269 12 2' 

568 11 

47 2 7 



£8,634 15 ?! 0.41 

1 



% 



.02 
.30 



.06 
-03 



G. 



Traffic Expenses. 



Superintendence 

Salaries 

General Expenses 

Stations 

Salaries and Wages 

Materials 

Books, Forms, Stationery. . 
Light'g Stations and Signals 
Food, Shoeing and Veter.. .. 
Of General Consumption . . . 

Elec. Lt.. Gas — Private Co. 's. 
Company's Elee. Lt. Plant 

Maintenance 

Working 

Liniforms 

Furniture and Equipment 

Maintenance 

Depreciation and Renewal 

Live Stock 

General Expenses 

Trains 

Wages, Guards and Brakemen 
Lighting Coaches Materials.. . 

Cleaning Coaches 

Wages 

Materials 

Tools and Equip. Maintenance 
Materials of Gen. Consump. .. 

Level Crossing Watchmen. . . . 
Adv. Timetables, Tickets, «Si;c. 
Traffic Compensation Paym'ts 

Terminal Expenses 

Total 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



£ s. d. 

19,163 2 11 

3,825 12 11 



4,545 12 4 

5,138 1 9 

1,672 16 4 

1,516 5 11 



215 1 2 
1,077 17 11 



2,613 12 11 
910 11 2 



67,686 12 o\ 



12,872 16 
3,824 9 



1,292 19 1 
39 5 9 

1,040 10 10 

258 6 4 
1,778 12 4 



31,808 18 11 
565 8 4 



3,524 4 1 
1,126 18 2 
2,278 4 11 



22,988 15 10, 1.36; 



4.00 



.76 
.23 



.08 



.06 



.03 



1,518 12 1 .09 

1,.543 14 10 .09 

741 12 2I .04 

87,217 13 7j 5.15 



£242,107 15 1 14.31 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



£ s. d. 

22,476 7 9 

4,225 1 11 



4,714 19 5 

4,675 7 8 

1,893 17 4 

1,629 11 5 



275 16 9 
1,184 1 7 



2,695 10 5 
995 14 6 



26,701 9 8 1.28 



78,229 1 10 3.74 



12,913 15 10 
4,115 19 



1,459 18 41 
37 4 lOi 



231 17 11 
2,192 19 2 



3,691 4 11 

2,076 15 9 

1,750 10 

1,824 4 

2.298 4 9 

2,828 10 

88,096 3 



£268,488 1 4 



.62 
.20 



.07 



1,019 18 10 .05 



.01 
.10 



38,476 4 10 1.84 
544 11 6; .03 



.18 
.10 
.08 

.09 

.11 

.13 

4.21 



12.84 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



H. 



COMPARATIVE ABSTRACTS OF EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 

Electric Train Working. 





Year ended June 30, 1915 




Year ended June 30, 1916 

£ s. d; 
10,625 12 9 
32,058 4 11 

304 19 9 

£42,988 17 5 






£ s. d. 

8,978 18 

25,376 3 7 

240 10 8 

£34,595 12 3 


% 

.55 

1.50 

.01 

2.04 


% 
.51 


Cost of Elec. Energy Pur 

General Expenses 

Total 


1.53 
.02 

2.06 











Ferry Boats. 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



Maintenance — 

Slips and Landing Stages... . 

Wages.. . 

Materials 

Ferry Boats — 

Wages 

^Materials 

Running Expenses . . 

Wages — 

Engineers and Firemen 

Masters and Seamen 

Slipmen 

Coal 

General Materials 

Toals & Equip. Maintenance 

Depreciation 

Total 



£ s. d. 



% 



200 17 7 
375 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



% 



1,276 13 1 
1,391 4 8 



2,667 17 9 



2,885 6 7 

2,997 15 4 

710 3 4 



2,524 10 

1,343 19 4 

229 2 2 



6,593 5 3 

4,097 2 4 
£13,934 2 11 



123 15 9 
162 2 



1,481 5 2 
1,366 8 6 



2,901 10 

3,009 14 10 

708 14 2 



285 17 9 



2,847 13 s 



2,832 18 6 

1,384 18 5 

221 4 10 





6,619 19 



4,439 1 9 
12,903 17 11 



.21 
.62 



£27,096 10 1 1.30 



J. 



COMPARATIVE ABSTRACTS OF EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 
General Charges. 



' 


Year ende 

£ s. d. 

3,500 

1,942 10 

708 8 2 

3,580 11 8 
2,158 10 2 


d June 30, 1915 
£ 8. d. 

11,890 

36,307 1 11 

1,800 6 3 

2,276 19 2 

380 6 

3,103 18 1 

1,556 13 6 

867 2 

496 17 9 


■ 

% 

i 
.70 

2.15 
.11 
.14 
.02 
.18 
.09 
.05 
.03 


Year ended June 30, 1916 

£ s. d. £ s. d. 
3,500 
1,9,42 10 

551 1 

4,018 16 7 
2,627 13 4 

12,640 

36.006 16 7 
3,465 6 9 

39,472 3 4 

1,819 13 11 

2,053 6 8 

425 4 10 

3,22^ 17 10 

1,512 15 5 

980 IS 

716 5 9 

£62,842 5 9 




London 


% 


Trustees' Fees 

Legal Exp. and Aud. Fees. . 

Salaries of Sec. and Clerks, 
Rent of Office and Office 
Expenses 

General Expenses 


61 


Cuba Administration — 


32,848 4 
3,458 17 


4 

7 




General Expenses 


1.89 
.09 




.10 




.02 


Insurance , 

Ground Rents 

Inspection of the Line 

Medical Expenses 


.15 
.07 
.05 
.03 


Total 


£58,678 17 4 


3.47 


3.01 











THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



K. 



Miscellaneous Expenses. 



Batabano Wharf 

Dredging at Bat aban6 

Mileage and Demurrage 

Rents 

Accident;;, Losses, Damages 

Omnibuses and Carts. . . , 

Rolling Stock Hire 

Miscellaneous Expenses paid 

through London Office 

Incidental Kxpenses 

Running Powers 

Total 



Year ended June 30, 1915. 



£ s. 


d. 


% 


1,553 9 


10 


.09 


1,508 17 





.09 


1,130 15 


10 


.07 


1,255 2 


10 


.07 


7,103 


9 


.42 


112 7 


o 


.01 


4,798 1 


9 


.28 


2,920 





.17 


5,937 15 


3 


.35 


4,379 


8 


.26 
1.81 


£30,698 11 


4 



Year ended June 30, 1916. 



£ 


9. 


d. 


% 


1,539 


3 


o 


.07 


1,329 


8 


o 


.06 


1.809 


18 


6 


.09 


1,255 


2 


11 


.06 


7,349 


9 


8 


.35 


112 


7 


n 




8,500 


4 


1 


.41 


5,560 








.27 


7,294 


7 


4 


.35 


4,379 





8 


.21 


£39.128 


15 


5 


1.87 


— 


— 


— 






CAPITAL EXPENDITURE- YEAR 1915-1916. 



Completed Works 

£ s. d. 

Rolling Stock 219,470 19 4 

Perman entWay. . . . ^ , 3,044 1511 

New Plant and Equipment ^ „ 2,890 6 6 

Land Purchases 11,025 10 2 

Stations, Buildings, etc 2,236 Oil 

Sundries . ,_ I34 9 

, . , 2.39,408 1 10 

.4'W — Works m Progress, as at June 30, 1916 188,864 15 3 

428,272 17 1 
Less — -Works in Progress, as at June 30, 1915 ■ 216,123 10 6 

212,149 6 7 
Less — Withdrawals from Service and other Capital Credits 25.262 8 11 



£186.886 17 8 



SUGAR PLANTERS CORPORATION 

A new financing corporation organized 
to operate in Cuba, has recently made public 
its plans. The company is to be known as 
the Sugar Planters' Corporation, and offices 
have been opened by the organization at 27 
William Street, Xew York. The directorate 
of the new organization is as follows: 

Manuel Ajuria, Senator of Havana, C\iba; 
De ^^'itt Baile}^ Vice-president and counsel 
of the compan}', Sir illiam Beardmore, 
Bart., of Glasgow, Scotland; Thomas Coch- 
ran, of J. P. Morgan & Co., Xew York; Dr. 
Orestes Ferrara, President of the Cuban 
House of Congress, Havana, Cuba; John S. 
Fiske, president of the company; Frederick 
E. Gunnison, Vice-president ol the Lawyers' 
Title & Trust Companj'; August Heckscher, 
capitalist; T. A.. Howell, of B. H. Howell, Son 
& Co., Xew York; Minor C. Keith, Vice- 
president of the United Fruit Company, Xew 
York, and C. J. Schmidlapp, Vice-president 
of the Chase National Bank. 



This organization is capitalized at •'?7.50,000 
of 7 per cert cumulative preferred stock and 
7,500 shares of common stock having no par 
value. This stock will not be offered for 
sale publicly, and it is understood in sugar 
circles that the stock has already been 
heaviu' oversubscribed . 

The compam- will not, according to the 
announcements circulated engage in sugar 
manufacturing, but will confine its activities 
to advancing loans to Cuban sugar planters 
and assist them in marketing their crops. 
The prospectus of the corporation states: 

"It is with the idea ot assisting smaller 
planters over periods of financial stress and 
of lending them expert help in marketing 
their crops that the Sugar Planters' Corpora- 
tion has been organized." 



HAWAIIAN SUGAR CROP 

The estimate of the Hawaiian Sugar Plant- 
ers Association for the 1917 sugar crop totals 
633,920 tons. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 




The new home of the Royal Bank of Canada at Antilla was finished and ready for occupancy 
in December last, and is now used as the branch headquarters of the bank at Antilla. The 
building is sm.all but attractive and enjoys an excellent central location on the hill site over- 
looking the bay of Nipe. The construction work was handled by tne firm of Purdy & Hender- 
son, Havana, who designed the building at a cost of $50,000, in accordance with tne standard 
type of architecture adopted by this company. The com.pany is now having constructed adja- 
cent to the new bank building an attractive hom.e for the resident manager. 



CUBAN TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY 

The Cuba Automobile Tire & Rubber Com- 
pany with offices at 116 Aguira, Havana, was 
recently organized under the Cuban laws with 
a paid capital stock to the amount of .$1,250,- 
000. This new company will be composed en- 
tirely of Cuban stockholders with Capt. C. W. 
Talbott, an American and former head of the 
Cuban Telephone Company, as it3 President 
and the following executive officers and 
board of directors: Mr. Carlos I. Parraga, 
Vice-Pres.,Mr. Jose E. More, Sec'y. and Treas., 
and Mr. Thomas C. Gould, Gen. Manager. 
The board of directors is composed of Dr. 
Orestes Ferrara, Messrs. Marimon and 
Godoy, Sr. Villo.ldo and Dr. Divino. 

The factory for the manufacture of all 
grades and styles of rubber goods will be 
located at Puentes Grandes, near Havana, and 
the building construction is nearing com- 
pletion and should be ready for operation not 
later than May 1. This end of the business 
will be in charge of a Mr. Gould, an expert in 
the manufacture of ruliber goods and at pres- 
ent located in Havana. 



The new company will manufacture all 
kinds of rubber goods, specializing in automo- 
bile tires and tubes tor the local Cuba markets. 
It is the intention to import the necessary raw 
material from the United States at the outset 
and until arrangements are perfcted ior draw- 
ing from the Central and South American 
sources of supply. 



CIENFUEGOS, PALMIRA & CRUCES BELT LINE 
RAILWAY 

Plans are under way for the construction of 
a belt line railway in the city of Cienfuegos 
and for a distance of five miles to Coano. It 
is also understood that it is the intention of 
the operating company to eventually extend 
this belt line to Paimira and thence to Cruces, 
both points on the main line of the Cuban 
Central Railways between Cienfuegos and 
Esperanza and a distance of approximately 
fifteen and thirty miles. Mr. Roy O. Miles, 
with offices in the city of Cienfuegos, is the 
chief engineer in charge of the construction 
work. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



CUBAN MARKET FOR ELECTRICAL GOODS 

Cuba imports about half a million doilars 
worth of electrical supplies a year, of which 
80 per cent comes from the United States. A 
report on this market ju?t issued by the 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
of the Department of Commerce, states that 
there has never been any serious competition 
in any electrical line except lamps. Before 
the war the Germans actually sold mere 
.'amps in Cuba than American mamifacturers 
did. 

In summing up the future of the market, 
special Agent Philip S. Smith, author of the 
report, states Ihat the field for motors and 
other small devices, such as portable tools, is 
limited primarily to the sugar mills or to 
c'ties where a day circuit is available. A.s the 
mines develop, houever, the demand for 
power will grow and this may eventually be- 
come an important market for the larger 
motors. There is a surprising number of 
small shops, any one of which is a prospective 
user of electric motors, and though the in- 
dividual shops are small, the aggregate power 
is considerable. 

In discussing the small market for electrical 
cooking utensils, the report explains that one 
reason for the small demand for chafing dishes 
and similar devices is the mode of life of people 
who keep servants, and this comprises all 
people who may be regarded as in comfortable 
circumstances. The cook is given a certain 
amount of money with which to purchase 
food for the family each day, and out of this 
she pays for fuel, ice, etc. If electric de- 
vices are used, the master of the house pays 
for the current and the allowance to the 
cook is decreased, which means that she loses 
the advantage of bargaining with the char- 
coal dealer. Against this she protests vigor- 
ously, as she counts on pocketing what is left 
at the end of the day. If the allowance is not 
decreased, fuel is likely to be paid for twice. 

The report, which is entitled "Electi'ical 
Goods in Cuba," Special Agents Series No. 
128, goes carefully into every feature of the 
trade in electrical goods in Cuba, and is de- 
signed to be of practical assistance to Ameri- 
can exporters. There are chapters on central 
stations, lighting, heating devices, power for 
sugar mills, future field for electricity, customs 
classification of electrical goods, packing, ad- 



vertising, etc. Tiiorc are 38 pages and the 
nominal selling price is 5 cents. C'opies may 
be jjiu'chascd from the Superintendent of 
Documents, Washington, or from the near- 
est district office of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce. 



HEYDRICH & MULLER 

Mr. Fernando Heydrich and Mr. Victor 
Mliller, have formed a partnership, succeeding 
the firm of Victor Mtiller S. eo C. and wiU 
operate under the name of Heydrich & Mtiller 
with its home office in the Calle Habdna, No. 
110 Habana, Cuba, and its New York Office 
at 13 Park Row, New York City. 



HAVANA 



The Armour Packing Company of Chicago 
have contracted for the erection of a half mil- 
lion dollar refrigerating and storage ware- 
house at Havana, to occujjy the block be- 
tween Dos Emparadios and Velaza streets 
near the waterfront. This building will be of 
steel construction throughout its five stories 
and provision will be made for the most im- 
proved cold storage plant facilities. The work 
of design and construction will be handled by 
the well known Havana firm of Purdy & Hen- 
derson. 

LA GLORIA 

Chamber of Commerce Departments 

Citrus Fruit Department. — ^P"or production, 
markets, packinghouses, managers, buyers, 
sales, etc. 

Roads and Transportation Department. — 
Good roads and water transportation, ship- 
ping facilities. 

Bureau of Information Department. — 'Em- 
braces statistics and data on land, groves, 
fruit, routes, traveling information for tour- 
ists, home seekers and investors. Bulletins, 
publications and market quotations. History 
of Cuba, land, soil and production. 

Cultural Department. — Spraying fertiliza- 
tion, diseases, remedies, nurserj" stock, plant- 
ing of trees and care of groves. 

Citrus Supply Department. — For boxes, 
straps, paper, etc. in car load lots at special 
prices. Saw mill, building material, and 
lumber yards. 

Toicn Improvemems arid Health Department. 
— Physician, hospital, health, streets, homes. 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



EXPORT TRADE 

To give more i)rompt and efficient service 
to their increasiag foreign clieutele, tfie fol- 
lowing Works have placed the management of 
their Export Department in the hands of Mr. 
James M. Motley, 71 Beaver Street, New 
York. 

Dmican Stewart & Co., Ltd., 

Pe:ansylvania Boiler Works, 

Weir Frog Co., 

The John H. McGowan Co., 

The Rahn-Larmon Co., 

Cleveland Pimch and Shear Works Co., 

Standard Water Systems Co., 

Standard Saw Mill Machinery Co. 

The products of these works comprise 
su-gar mills, boilers, tanks, engines, pumps, 
condensers, evaporators, effects, rails, switches, 
locomotives, cars — in fact, every class of 
equipment for the use of plantations, railroads, 
mines antl other industrial enterprises. No 
doul)t the foreign business of these firms will 
be largely extended under Mr. Motley's man- 
agement, whose extensive experience in the 
export field and familiarity with the require- 
ments of different industries admirably fits 
him for increasing the number of satisfied 
clients of these firms. 



CUBA'S SUPPLY OF LIGNUM-VITAE. 

[Consul Henry M. Wolcott, Habana.] 

Exporters of Cuban hardwoods, who from 
long experience are well qualified to express 
an opinion, state that probably not more than 
4,000 tons of lignum-vitae exist at accessible 
places in the island. It is doubtful if even one- 
third of this amount could be cut and ex- 
ported at a cost which would leave any profit 
even at the present high prices. Wood of this 
variety has not been exported from any dis- 
trict of Cuba other than the Oriente Province 
for a long period. The small supply that has 
been available was in good demand locally. 

An American at Cristo, Oriente, Cuba, who 
has been an exporter of native hardwoods, is 
believed to have accurate information regard- 
ing the supply. He states : 

Contrary to the general lieiief, the availaljle 
supply of lignum in Oriente is very limited 
and will soon beconae practica.ly exhausted on 
account of the fact that it takes many years 
to grow, and while many have been busy cut- 
ting for export, no provision whatever has 
been made to plant or even cut scientifically. 
Wood measuring less than 6 inches in diameter 



has no export value and land-owners, when 
clearing land for cane planting or to make pas- 
ture, destory all the sma'l trees as value.ess. 
Lignum-vitae contains a large percentage of 
rosir, so that the tree will often take fire andbe- 
destroyed before it reaches a mature size. In 
the Jiguania and Bayamo districts, along the 
Canto River, one may see thousands of stumps 
of lignum, all that remains of trees destroyed 
in that district when forests were burned to 
make pasture before the railroad tapped that 
Sisction, and now that there is a railroad for 
transportation there is no lignum for export. 
This is also true of places that the railroad will 
traverse in the near future — -the timber is be- 
ing destroyed to-day to make pasture. 

It is safe to say that the available supply of 
good merchantable lignum, 6 inches and up, 
in this Province 's considerablj- less than 3,000 
tons, and this eiiists on land owned or con- 
trolled b}' American capital, the owners of 
which do not care to sell their vahiable hard- 
woods, or on littie lots in practicable inac- 
ce&sil)'e places. 

Formerly there was a laige amount of lig- 
num along the southern coast of Oriente Pro- 
vince lietween Santiago de Cuba and Cape 
Maisi, liut to-day that has all been cut and 
only a few trees remain here and there, not 
sufficient in number or size to warrant cutting 
operations. 

Property owners in this Province have a 
tendency to greatly overestimate the amount 
of lignum and other hardwoods on their prop- 
erty. A. fairly accurate estimate could be ob- 
tained by "cruising" the few remaining prop- 
erties where there is lignum in any quantities. 
This wouid not be a very difficult job, as the 
wood grows only in four or five districts in this 
Province. The supply is certainly growin 
smaller daily. 

T'.jis report has l)een confirmed by an A.meri- 
can now living near Haliana who was form- 
erly for many year engaged in cutting and 
exporting lignum-vitae in Oriente Province. 
Persons interested in obtaining a supply of the 
wood might correspond with any of the local 
hardwood dealers. 

CANADIAN EXPORTS TO CUBA 
Dry Salted Codfish 
Fiscal year ended Mar. 31. 

19U $470,230 

1915 S.502,724 

1916 $622,763 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



35 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR CROP ESTIMATE 

Sr. Mariano CaKqucro of Havana, Cuba, 
estimates that the j^ugar croj) of the Island ot 
Cuba for the season of 1910-1917 will l)e 
3,373,000 tons. The difference Ijetween this 
estimate and other estimates which have been 
published is due, according to Sr. Casquero, 
to the scanty yield of the cane in some locali- 
ties, the great difficulties of trant-pcrting same 
to the Centrals and the scarcity of labor. 

TACAJO 

The new mill lieing constructed at Tacajo 
in Oriente Province is rapidly nearing com- 
pletion, notwithstanding many serious delays 
owing to labor troubles. A large part of the 
rolling stock for the new mill has already 
arrived and the two large locomotives were 
shipped from Philadeljjhia via Key West 
and the ferry on their own wheels. 



NEW SUGAR MILLS 

The work of constructing the new sugar 
mills at Cupey, Punta Alegre and Marcane 
is progressing rapidly, and the mills at Cupey 
and Punta Alegre are to be ready to start 
grinding early in March. 



CENTRAL REDENCION 
MM 
The old Central "Rodencion", located near 
JVIinas on the lineof the Ferrocarril Camaguey 
<t Nuevitas in Camaguey province, is at pres- 
ent undergoing extensive repairs and remodel- 
ing and is expected to Ije ready for griiiding 
part of this season's crop. 

PORTO RICO SUGAR 

Pecent sugar estimates are to the effect that 
l)eginning \\itii March the weekly prxluctim 
of sugar will be approximately 1?.5,OCO tons 
and that this rate of production will be con- 
tinued until June. It is expected that the total 
production for the season wall be between 500,- 
000 and 525,000 tons. 

SUGAR CROP OF PORTO RICO 

The records of the island's f-ugar prcduction 
from the cane crops of the past eight years are : 

Years Tons Years Tons 

1909 277,092 1913. . . . 398,003 

1910 346,785 1914. , . . 351,665 

1911 349,840 1915. . . . 346,490 

1912 371,075 1916 483,589 



SUGAR REVIEW 



Speciall'j ivrUt^n for the Cuba Rev.ew 'jy WUlett & Gr \y, New York. 

Our last review^ for this magazine was dated January 6, 1917. 

At that date, Cuba Centrifugal sugar 96° test basis, was quoted at 4^8C. cost and freight, 
per lb., and is now 33^c. c & f. showing decline of J^c. per lb. From January 6th, the market 
remained steady at 43/^c. till January 16th, at 4Mc. January 24th, 4.00c.; January 25th, 3J^c.; 
January 26th, 3 15-16c.; January 27th,3 J^c; February 2d, 3 13-16c.; to the close, when it is 
SJiC; cost and freight. The feature of the crop season thus far has been its backwardness 
and freedom from undue pressure to sell which has held the quotations thus far from going to 
some point as low as SHc c. & f. or 33^c. c. & f. as anticipated by the general public. Of course, 
there is still time and circumstances for some further decline Ijefore the regular steady rising 
market conditions become operative. 

Unusual and more or less imcertain events coming almost daily to influence the market 
conditions render any opinion of the future more or less obscure, and facts as they exist at the 
moment can only be given. 

For instance, the immediate demand for raw sugar is curtailed by labor strikes which have 
been going on for weeks at several refineries with no immediate end in sight. In the mean- 
time, this circumstance keeps the price of refined sugar so much higher than the parity of raws 
as to keep the dema?Kl on a strictly hand to mouth basis throughout the country. Should the 
price of refined be lowered to the usual parity it would likely bring in an increased demand be- 
yond the present limitations of refining without increasing the demand for raws. 

The United States having now broken with Germany, it will soon be known if the ocean 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

traffic of our country with European countries is to be greatly interrupted as now appears 
possible. Quite large engagements have been made with our refineries for export of refined 
sugar to which the above applies. 

There is a disposition to have sugar prices sustained as far as possible while awaiting new 
developments from Germany. 

In addition to the usual rates of freight and insurance some buyers are taking out war 
risk insurance. 

Porto Rico free duty sugar is finding buyers at 4.64c. per lb. delivered New York. Fine 
granulated is quoted i.t 6.75c. less 2% 6.615c. net cash. 

WILLETr & GRAY. 

New York, February 6, 1917. 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York. 



Nuestra liltima resena para esta pub]icaci6n estaba fechada el 6 de enero de 1917. 

En esa fecha, el aziicar centrlfugo de Cuba polarizacidn 96 se cotizaba A 45^c. costo y 
flete la libra, y ahora se cotiza A 3j^c. c. y f., mostrando una baja de J^c. la libra. Desde el 
6 de enero el mercado permanecio estable A 4%c. hasta el 16 de enero que bajo 6, 4J^c., t'l 
24 de enero d 4.00c. el 25 de enero A SVsc, el 26 de enero & 3 15-16c., el 27 de enero & S'/^c , 
el 2 de febrero d 3 13-16c., hasta cerrar el mercado, en que se cotiza A 3Kc- costo y fiete. El 
punto importante en la estacion del azucar ha sido hasta ahora su tendencia d 
retraerse y el verse libre de efectuar vcntas forzadas indebidamente, lo cual hasta ahora ha 
impedido que las cotizaciones llegaran A un punto tan bajo como S^^c. c. y f . 6 33 oc- c. y f. segiin 
anticipaba el publico en general. Por supuesto, aiin hay tiempo y se podran originar circun- 
stancias que motiven mayor baja antes de que las condi clones para un mercado regular hacia el 
alza constante lleguen A efectuarse. 

Los acontecimientos no usuales y n\As 6 menos inciertos que se presentan casi diariamente 
para influenciar el estado del mercado hacen que cualquier opinion que se de acerca del futuro 
sea mds 6 menos vaga, y solo pueden exponerse los hechos tal como existen por el momento. 

Por ejemplo, la demanda inmediata por el azucar crudo estA restringida por las huelgas 
de los obreros, cuyas huelgas ya se van prolongando por varias semanas en algunas refinerias, 
sin que haya indicios de tenninarse pronto. Entretanto esta circunstancia mantiene el azucar 
refinado a un precio mucho mds alto en proporcion A los aziicares crudos, que mantiene la 
demanda por todo el pals bajo la base de las necesidades mds apremiantes. Si el precio del 
azucar refinado bajase A la paridad usual , probablemente ocasionarfa un aumento en la demanda 
mds alld- de las actuales limitaciones del refinamiento del azucar sin avmientar la demanda por 
azijcares crudos. 

Habiendo ahora roto los Estados Unidos sus ralaciones diploniiiticas con Alemania, se 
sabrd pronto si el trafico maritimo de este pais con los paises europeos va A ser interrumpido en 
gran manera, como parece ahora posible. Se han hecho arreglos bastante considerables con 
nuestras refinerias para la exportaci6n de azucar refinado, A lo cual puede aplicarse lo que 
acabamos de decir. 

Hay predisposici6n A mantener los precios del azucar en cuanto sea posible mientras se 
aguardan nuevos acontecimientos de Alemania. 

Ademds de los tipos usuales de flete y seguro maritimo, algunos compradores estdn sacando 
p61izas de seguro contra riesgo de guerra. 

El azucar libre de derechos de Puerto Rico estd hallando compradores A 4.64c. la libra, A 
entregar en Nueva York. El azucar fino granulado se cotiza A 6.75c. menos 2%, 6.615c. precio 
neto. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 
Nueva York, febrero 6 de 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— S4— 86 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest, Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 



HAVANA— N. Gelats y Ca. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 



LONDON- 



-The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



GRAMERCY ELECTRIC STIRRER 



,^SS»*%>, 



Useful for many purposes besides 
stirring. 

The Universal Motor 1-10 11. P. can 
be operated on direct current or alter- 
nating current, is fully enclosed with 
aluminium cover and can be raised 
or lowered as desired. It is attached 
to the support by an adjustable 
extension clamp. The heavy iron 
support has a base 16 inches by 
25 inches. Underneath the base, a 
rheostat with ten steps is attached, 
the wires passing up from the rheostat 
to the motor through the hollow rod. 

Gramercy Electric Stirrer, With Support, As 
Illustrated, Net $20 



EIMER & AMEND 



HEADQUARTERS FOR EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY SUPPLIES 
205 THIRD AVENUE CORNER 18TH STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

OTTAWA, CANADA 




PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Fouiidi'U 1S51 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

p. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 

We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



R 



28-24 in. OAGE. 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 
ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft. 4 in. Capacity 10 Tons. 
Weight 7,500 lbs. 

FIRST-CLASS CONDITION 

Will Convert to .Steel Underframe Flat Cars. 
PROMPT SHIPMENT .-. LOW PRICE 
RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 

T i(klhr«ir_tfj 

I , WA LTER A. ZELNI CrtER SUPPLY COMPANY 

kkriruiikii 



325 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo. 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



THE NEW JERSEY ASBESTOS CO. 




HOME OFFICE: 

1 WATER ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 

BRANCHES: 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Allentown 



Patent "V" Pilot Packings recom 
mended for High Pressure Steam and 
Ammonia. 

Cable Address: "Gladiatrix," New York 



Bank Of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST., NEW YORK 



Pedro Pablo Diago 



Guillermo Carricaburu 



RESOURCES Nov. 29J916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially, interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 



76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLACe" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET .-. .-. NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 
Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 



W. A. MERCHANT 

J. T. MONAHAN - - ^ 


President 
Vice-President 


Write Today For Scuuplc Copy 


CHAS. F. PLARRE - - 


Cashier 


Indispensable to the Man Inter- 


L. G. JONES - - - 


Asst. Cashier 


ested in Sugar 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THECUBAREVIEW 39 



POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

GUANAJAY 

Fare, 55 Cents 

GUINES 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5 A. M. to 8 P. M. Last train 11.20 P. M. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P. M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Rcgla (Ferry) $0.05 

Guanaliacoa (Ferry and Electric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanra and Cahafia.s Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

.Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 

Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

A. KLING, Prop. MOBILE ALA 

JAS. S. BOQUE, Supt. IVIV^DILIL, J\L.I\. 



ESTABLISHED 1852 ROHLIG & CO. INQUIRIES REQUESTED 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

BREMEN BREMERHAVEN HAMBURG 

Knoohenhauerstr. 16-17 am Hafen 113 Aleterdamm 14-16 

GENERAL AGENTS OF MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, NEW YORK 

UNDERTAKING TRAFFIC ALL OVER THE WORLD AT LOWEST RATES 
THROUGH RATES TO AND FROM EVERY PLACE PROVIDED ON APPLICATION 



Telepiione, 33 Hamilton. Night Call. 411 Hamilton. Cable Address: "Abiworka," New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy Forgin([B,Iron and Brass Castmga, Copper Specialties, Diesel Motor Repairs, Cold Storage 
Installation, Oil Fuel Installation, Carpenter and Joiner Work 

l?i? f^Tv^'^ST'^^IF'" ) N- Harni.ton F.rry BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

Agents for "Kinrhorn" Multiples Val»« 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE 

TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Corraapondanca Solicited from 
Intanding Inraators 

OFFICERS 

Norman H. Davii ..... President 
Oiwald A. Hornsby - - - - Vice-Preiident 
Claudio Q. Mendoia - - - Vice-President 
J. M. Hopgood ---... Treasurer 
Rogelio Carbajal --...- Secretary 
W. M. Whitner . . Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



P. RUIZ ® BROS. 

Engravers — Fine Stationery 
Obispo 22 P. O. Box 608 

HAVANA, CUBA 



MOTOR GUINCHE EL "COLONO" 




Un substitute moderno para los BUEYES 
de la antiguedad 

MASECONOMICO 

MAS SEGURO 

MAS RAPIDD 

CUESTA POCO 

Especialmente para los trasbordadores de 
Vild, Quinones, Castellon 

Pidanse precios y pormenores 
COMPANIA AGRICOLA, Monserrate 10, Habana 
6 EL COLONO WINCH CO., 106 Wall St., N. Y. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADi) EN 1S69 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Active Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar Sts. 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponsales en Espafia 6 Islas Canarias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se adniiten depositos 

& interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linoa 67, 

Vedado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-1C8 Amargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi- 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 

P. M.,P. M. 


No.17 

P. M. 


No. 3 

P. M. 


No. 7 No. 5 js \ H=„=„» No. 2 N0.I8 No. 4 No. 8 No. 6 No.lO 

A.M. A.M. 2 Havana A. M. A. M. P. M. P. M.^P. M.jA. M. 


10.30 


10.00 

A.M. 
12.06 
4.40 

9.00 
10.55 

5.28 


5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 


3.10 

5.27 
7.30 


10.01 7.40 

11.58 10.10' 58 


Lv. .Central Station. .Ar. 
Ar . Matanza.s . Lv. 


7.36 9.13 2.06 

5.31 6.45 12.00 
12.45 5.00 9. 12 


6.39 

4.44 
1.05 

12.00 
8.20 

's'oo 

A.M. 


9.05 

6.28 
4.25 


6.20 






2. 18 12.33 109! Ar Cardenas Lv. 

4.40 179 Ar Sagua .Lv. 

8.40 230 A r Caibarien.. . Lv. 








P. M. 
8.00 
5.30 

A. M. 

12.10 

P. M. 
8.25 


A.M. 






* 


17 
M. 












* 


'7 




10.40 


3.38 

6.45 6.45 
P. M. 
: 6.40 

8.00 

10.30 

P.M. 


180 Ar. . . Santa Clara. . . . Lv. 
195 Ar. . . Cienfuegos Lv. 




6.20 


1.00 

9.15 

8.48 

6.15 
A.M. 


16' 66 


A. 


8.50 

10.20 

P.M. 

1.00 

10.00 
11.00 




A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P.M. 

3.00 

3.30 


P.M. 




276 
340 


Ar . .Ciego de Avila. . . Lv. 
Ar. . . .Camaguey. . . . Lv. 


7.35 

4.55 

A.M. 

7.40 




1.55 
P.M. 
11.20 

2.30 










538 Ar. Santiago de Cuba. Lv. 


6.55 


2.00 
















P. M. 




P.M. 




A.M.I 


P.M. 




1 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitau. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



From Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienfuegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 

ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



Antilla 


U. S. Cy. 

$23.33 

1.53 

20.66 

10.68 

15.49 

5.43 

12.72 


Isle of Pines 


U. S. Cy 
$6.00 


Batabano 

Bayamo 

Caibarien 

Camaguey 

Cardenas 


Madruga 

Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

Remedios 

Sagua 


3.01 

22.02 

3.20 

9.64 

10.43 

8.45 


Cienfuegos 

Colon 


8.69 

5.56 

25.58 

21.20 


.45 


Sancti Spiritus 

Santa Clara 


11.19 

8.53 


Holguin 


Santiago de Cuba 


24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 



(( 



WEEK=END" TICKETS 



FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL "WEEK=END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send three cents in stamps for "Cuba — A Winter Paradise," a beau- ITnifAfl Railurav* tJt I4a«r«ri* 
tiful illustrated booklet desoribing interesting trips in Cuba to Wniieu IVOUWayS OI nSVaiU 

FRANK ROBERTS, Goneral Passenger Agent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET. Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Imporlacion directa de todas los 
ceiitrus luainifuctiii cru^i del mundo 

Agents for the Munsnn Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; .lames E. NVaiil 
& Co., New York; Scrra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlantieos 
de A. Tolch & Co. de Barcelona, Espana 
Independcncia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUINIBER 
AND TIMBER 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Wall Street, New 



112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard: 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, .'{IG Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONIU' CONSmUCTlON 
Piers. Ukiuges, Raii-koads ami IJuii.di.ngs 



A'e are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of conlractiiig work in Cuba. 

New York OfTu-e: 

WOOLWORTH Run. KING. 2.''.:5 P.nOADWAY 

Havana Office: Zulukta 36 D. 



John Munro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2102 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to push the sale* of 

American high class products. Would 

represent a first class firm 



APARTADO 102 



CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



M.J. CABANA "LTrV^V^"^ 

p. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merohandise either on a uom- 
misaion basis or under agency airangements. Also 
furnishes all desired infortaaticn about lands in east- 
ern Cuba. 



F. W. Hvo«lef 



E. C. Day 



R. M. MiobelscD 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

Steamship Agents & Ship Brokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CahU: "B*nt«te«" 



PUa»e mention THE CUBA REVIEW when xjoriting to AdverUaert 



V H l^ CUBA REVIEW 



43 




S.S. MUNAMAR 

NEW YORK-EASTERN CUBA SERVICE 



PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

Xew York Antilla Antilla 

Leave Arrive Leave 

Mch. 3 Mch. Mch. 10 



Xew York 

Arrive 
Mch. 14 



Steamer 
xMUNAMAR 

Subsequent .sailings to Antilla PL;spended until farther notice on account of 
conditions in Eastern C"ul):i. 



FREIGHT ONLY 

Regular fortnightly sidings for Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagux, Caibarien, Pto. Padre, 
Manati, Banes, Gibara and Nuevitas. 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

SS. BERTHA Havana :\Iarch 2 

SS. WIEN Cardenas, Cailiarien March 2 

SS. MUNISLA Havana, Matanzas March 9 

STEAMER Cienfuegos March 13 

SS. MUNPLACE Havana, Cardenas, Caibarien March Ki 

STEAMER Havana, Matanzas, Sagua :\Iarch 23 

SS. ]\IUXISLA Havana, Cardenas, Caibarien ]^Iarch 30 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER Mir.-h 2), for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rosario. 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER March S and 22 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of call 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIE\^' 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904 = 1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

328 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



S. MOPPIS IJIJJH. Pres. 



LFWIS C LILLIE. Sec. and Treas. 



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P M 



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8 33 

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Fare 

3dcl. 

$1.10 

2.12 



A Ml A M AM P M P M!P M 
7 49 11 09 11 473 496 477 09 



AM 



9 35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 



9 451 45 4 45 5 35 
— 4 04 



AM 



P M 



6 38 3 00 
3 001 30 

P MP M 



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"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street. New York 



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Vol. XV MARCH. 1917 No. 4 

Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — Cuban Sugar Estate (Courtesy American Photo Co.) 
Frontispiece — Central "Florida." 

Cuban Government Matters: 

The Political Situation ' 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities '"* 

Hormi<;uero Sugar Estate, Illustrated 1 1- !-• ^'^ 

Manufacturing Sugar in Cuba, Illustrated ^' ^' 



Sugar Industry: 



15 



Chart Showing Market Price of Cuban Raw Sugar, r, years 

Sugar Estate Statistics of the Island of Cuba 10, IS, 20, 22, 24, 2(i, 2S, 30, 32 

Summary of Sugar Estates 

World's Sugar Production ' 

Sugar Review, English ' ' 

, „ . ^ . , • 36 

bugar Review, Spanish 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THL 
CUBA RLVILW 

'■ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



MARCH, 1917 



Number 4 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



THE POLITICAL SITUATION IN CUBA 
The following is a sequence of the events 
leading up to the Cuban revolt: 

President Mario G. Menocal, after serving 
one four-j-ear term, so.ight re-election as a 
candidate of the Conservative Party. Presi- 
dent Menocal was opposed by Dr. Alfredo 
Zayas, representative of the Liberal Party. 
The campaign was hotly contested. The 
election was held on November 1st and the 
first retiu-ns indicated the probaljility of 
the election of Dr. Zayas. The Conserva- 
tive Party refused to admit defeat and 
claimed to have carried the election. After 
some days of saspense, the matter of the 
contested election was referred to the Cen- 
tral Election Board in Havana, and eventually 
to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court 
affirmed most of the retiu-ns favorable to 
Dr. Zayas, but ordered that new elections 
should be held in certain districts, the most 
important of these new elections being in 
Santa Clara Province, the balloting to take 
place on February Uth. The methods 
of the Conservative Party during this period 
have been bitterly attacked by the Liberals, 
who have alleged corruption, coercion and 
illegal use of governmental influence. Earh' 
in February bands of armed men appeared 
in the Eastern Provmces. On February 
lOtb the Govermnent announced the dis- 
covery of a plot to kidnap the President, 
and many were arrested charged with being 
conspirators. On February r2th, the gar- 
rison at Santiago de Culja revolted and 
obtained po.ssession of the city. Aljout 
this time General Jose IMiguel Gomez, 
Ex-president of Cuba and a powerful factor 
of the Liberal Part}-, disappeared from Hav- 
ana. On Februarj^ 14th the new elections 
were held in Santa Clara Province, and the 



result was an overwhelming majority for 
the re-election of President Menocal. The 
Government of Cuba, in an official statem.ent, 
sought to minimize the im,portance of the 
insurgent movement, but at the same tim.e 
announced the purchase of 10,000 rifles 
and 5,000,000 rounds of am.munition, the 
purchase being made from the United 
States, and a call for volunteers was i.ssued. 
On March Sth the capture of General Gon ez 
took place as a re.sult of a battle between 
the Goverm^nent forces and the in.siu-gents 
near Placetas del Sur. General Gom.ez 
and a large number of other prisoners were 
brought to Havana, where they were im.- 
prisoned and will be tried in due course of 
law. 

It is extrem.eh' unfortunate for Cuba 
that these political disturbances took place 
at such a prosperous period in her history. 
It has already cost the Cuban people a large 
amount of money, as will be readily seen 
when the estimate of the Cuban sugar 
crop is examined. This will show a great 
loss of production and a consequent loss of 
wealth to the Cuban people. Fiu-therm.ore, 
there has been considerable damage done 
to the railroads in Eastern Cuba, which 
has made it impossible to operate trains, 
and it will take some time Vjefore this dam.age 
can be repaired and transportation again 
be resumed. Considerable dpmage to the 
cane fields and to the sugar centrals has 
been reported. 

It is greatly to be hoped that in the future 
the Cuban people will learn that the peace- 
ful developnient of the wonderfid resources 
of Cuba is the true province of their Govern- 
ment and that nothing can be gained by 
revolution, and such disputes as friction 
over elections should be decided by the 
constituted legal tribunals and not by force. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING SUGAR FROM 

CANE IN CUBA 



The cane is transported from the fields in carts and railway cars and on arrival at the mill 
is unloaded upon the cane-carrier by a hoist with a capacity to lift up to ten tons at one opera- 
tion. Chains or wire ropes are placed under the load of cane between transverse slats on the 
platform of the car or cart, the end attached to the support above, and the load is lifted bodily 
into the air, transported to a suitable hopper a1>ove the carrier and then dropped by the pull of 
a trigger. In some cases the cane is gradually discharged from the hopper upon the carrier by 
means of a revolving drum or traveling apron provided with strong hook-like teeth; in other 
cases the hopper is built at the bottom of a trough six or seven feet wide by about half as deep, 
and leading up at an angle to the crusher. In the bottom of this trough is the carrier— an 
endless apron of wooden or metal slats or plates; or in the later models of steep ascent a link- 
belt conveyor of great strength provided with strong steel teeth, 18 inches long, curving slightly 
forward to elevate the heavy, tangled mass of cane which falls upon it and the mass of cane, 
in a rough layer 12 inches or 18 inches deep, falls precipitously over the upper apex of the carrier 
into a hopper-like receptacle which feeds it into the preliminary crusher, consisting of two 
enormously strong steel rollers, provided with interlocking ridges to grip, which crush and tear 
the cane. Besides the hoist method of unloading cane, there is the basculador or tip-platform, 
which is arranged to tip either to one side or on end at an angle of about thirty degrees, causing 
the cane to slide from the car or cart into the hopper of the carrier. There is also an arrange- 
ment for forcing the cane out through one end of the car by means of power driven bumpers 
which are in use in some of the mills of Cuba. 

Cane contains about eighteen per cent of sugar, of which from ten to thirteen per cent is 
extracted in the process of manufacture. .'Vfter the cane has been macerated the juice flows 
through a finely perforated Ijrass straining plate into a small receiving tank, and is pumped into 
the lining tanks, where milk of lime is immediately added to neutralize acidity and to precipi- 
tate those impurities which form insoluble Silt. Then ensues the defecation process. The 
juice passes through heaters fitted with tubes, along which the liquid flows, and thence into the 
defecators, which are open vessels with steam coils in the bottom, serving to heat the juice 
slowly, after which the clear juice is decanted from the scum on the top and the "mud" at the 
bottom. The clear juice is subsequently drawn by vacuum attraction into the evaporators 
called "effects," where the boiling process properly begins. There may be double, triple, quad- 
ruple effects, or even d, greater number. In these eva])orators the juice is reduced to the extent 
of 75 per cent of its volume, and is then called "syrup." A further reduction of 50 per cent takes 
place in the vacuum pans, where the syrup becomes known as "massecuite." The concen- 
trated juice is run into immense vessels to cool and crystalize, and the mass of crystals formed 
is poured into fast-whirling machines called "centrifugals" in recognition of the force which 
whirls the molasses out of the crys+als and turns them a golden-yellow color in a few minutes 
rotation. The amount of molasses flung out of the crystals is about 30 per cent. This molasses 
is carried away through ])i]je lines and is pumped into large tanks wh?re it isstored for shipment. 
In times gone by little attention was paid to this factor in the business, it being allowed 1o run 
away, but the advent of what is now an importtnt and welcome enterprise in connection with 
the sugar irdustry, the Cuba Distilling Compan'' turned the despised and neglected molasses 
into something for which there is a steady sale, and which without any trouble or expense to 
the pi inters is, m many cases, equal m financial returns to a moderate dividend on the capitali- 
sation of the estate. The most up-to-date melhod of treating "massecuite" is to pour the con- 
tents of the vacuum or "strike-pan" mto a large receplacle, called a crystalizer, in wnich a 
revolving shaft with blades attached keeps +he m-^ss m motion for a certain number of hours 
before it goes to the centritugds. This process is based on the fact that while sugar crystals 
ivre in motion their volume increases to a greater extent and more rapidly than when at rest. 

From the centrifugals the sugar descends through a chute mto liags, containing usually 
320 or 325 pounds. The bags when filled are sewed, weighed and then shipped to the market 
awaiting raw sugar^ — -or perhaps stored pending a rise in the market-price of this necessary 
commodity. 



T II K C V B A H K \ I ]•: W 




llauliiiK Cane to the Cf)lonia Central !'"( 




10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 


















0^ 



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Interior View, Central Moron. 




',1 M^l 



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7 -r» *^ !-« • ^' 4l!^- V 






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General Interior View of Sugar Mill, Showing the Finished Product Ready to Ship. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 




Hormiguero INIill 



HORMIGUERO SUGAR ESTATE 



The Spanish word "Hormi^iaero," translated to English, means "Anthill," and it is any- 
thing hut the definition of one's impressions after a visit to this estate. 

To reach Hormiguero one takes the train on the Culjan Central Railway from Cienf uegos 
to the station HormJguero, a distance of eighteen miles, where change is m.ade to the plantation 
railroad, over which a small car drawn by an Ajnerican mule takes you to the sugar m.ill and 
estate only a short distance aw^ay. On this short trip to the plantation one gets the first im.- 
pression of the attention given to the care and upkeep of this magnificent estate, situated in one 
of the most picturesque parts of Santa Clara province. The right of way along this plantation 
railway is nned with Royal palms, which give the usual stately grace to their surroundings, 
while palmettos, orange trees and verdant banana plants give the usual pleasing tropical effect. 
When the mule car reaches its destination at the mill and residence of the owner, all the stories 
told in Cienfuegos of the beauties of this estate are instantly recalled and confirmed at first 
glance. The mansion and estate of the owner, Mr. E. L. Ponvert, is one of the m.ost magnifi- 
cent in Cuba, as shown in some of the accompanying photographs, and it is hard to believe and 
understand how they ever gave it the name of "Anthill." Mr. Ponvert and family are lovers of 
nature and the beautiful, and everything about the estate bears evidence of this fact— the 
beautiful gardens with all varieties of flowers, the aviary with hundreds of different kinds of 
birds and a small zoo containing monkeys, dogs and cats. The residence-mansion is so situated 
to the m.ill that the elder Mr. Ponvert can l)e com.fortably seated in the large portico enjoying 
all the beauties surrounding his home and at the same time observe most every operation in the 
large sugar mill only a stone's throw across the way. 

This mill is one of the oldest in Cuba. It was first started in 1839 and continued operations 
up to the war times of the sixties; it resumed operations in 1868 and has been grinding sugar 
continuously year after year up to the present time, and during all this time the ownership 
has rem.ainded in the Ponvert family. It is well managed and progressively conducted, and 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Ponvert Family Residence, Hormiguero. 




Church and Oardens, Hormiguero Estate 



one of the few large mills which has not been absorbed by the all-powerful syndicates which 
control so many of the great estates of the sugar island. The m.ill is provided with modern ma- 
chinery of the best type throughout and produces from 175,000 to 200,000 bags of sugar each 
year. Around the plantation is ample evidence of organization and thrift— the workingmen's 
homes are well kept and there is an appearance of prosperity all al)out. 

The ownership of this m.ill is entirely a family afTair, and this is the reason why Mr. 
Ponvert, Sr., has refused flattering offers to sell, especially of late, to the Cuba Cane 
Company and others who were exceedingly desirous of purchasing the estate, and it is 
understood he refused $5,000,000 for the property. The affairs of the estate are handled by a 
staff of experts headed by Mr. E. L. Ponvert, who is the owner and administrator, ably assisted 
by his son, E. L. Ponvert, Jr., who is the engineer in chief of the plantation. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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Tropical (lardens, Hormiguefo Estate. 



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Hormiguero Estate — -Deep, cool portico, protected from the sun. 

There are several large warehouses located on the property for the storage of sugar which 
is handled over the plantation railway to the main line of the Cuban Central for shipment 
to lighters at the loading port of Cienfuegos. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of Jamuirv 

1917 19i() 

Gross Earnings $547,487 $492,074 

Operating expenses 229,965 186,285 

Net earnings 317,522 305,789 

Miscellaneous income 6,368 9,794 

Total net income 323,890 315,583 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 192,012 200,192 

EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly reeeipis: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 1910 

Week ending Jan. 27th £59,082 £58,909 £45,105 £40,734 £44,680 £39,996 £39,065 £39,486 

Week ending Feb. .3d.. 60,889 61,584 49,519 41,2.57 47,158 40,094 39,650 39,436 

Week ending Feb. 10th 60,784 59,783 50,044 48,719 48,144 40,951 40,673 42,252^ 

Week ending Feb. 17th 54,800 59,331 50,747 49,659 50,385 42,324 42,897 44,159 

EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

Weekly Receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 

Week ending February lOth £30,006 £25,080 £19,847 £18,380 

Week ending February 17th 28,805 26,959 21,077 20,108 

EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

Weekly Receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 

Week ending February 10th £7,322 £6,700 £5,469 £5,550 

Week ending February 17th 6,404 6,202 6,055 5,252 

Week ending February 24th 6,785 6,956 5,481 5,119 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

A$ quoted by Lawrence Turnure d: Co., New York. 

Bid. 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 92 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 98 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 95 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan ^1^% Bonds of 1949 86 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 89 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 91 

Cuba Co. 6% Debenture Bonds 98 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 99 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 91 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 106 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 99 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 102 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock 180 

Cuban- American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 101 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 60 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st Mtge. (>% Bonds 90 

All prices of bonds quoted on an and interest basis. 



Asked. 

94H 

99 H 

96 

86M 
105 
103 

92 

93 
100 
101 

93 
108 
lOOJ^ 
none 
105 
190 
1011^ 

63 

94 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



15 




. 7 ^2,28^ ,, ^^4 .. 18 25 , ^ ,5^^6 1520^7^ ,^ ,^ ^^ . 5 £2223^ ,^ ,^^2 9 ^2330^ ^^,^4 1, ,825^ ^ ^^^ 

Jam Feb. Mar. Apr Nay Juh July Aug. Sep Oct nov Dec. 



DIAGRAM 

Showing Market Price of Cuban Raw Sugar at New York, c. A f. Basis, 96° Test.'j 

During the Last Five Years. 



The influence of the war upon the price of sugar may be seen at a glance by reference 
to the attached chart of sug^r prices during the past five years. Particular attention, 
however, is drawn to the wide fluctuations in the price of sugar during the past three 
years, since the opening of the war in 1914, from which it will be noted with interest that 
whereas the uncertain conditions resulting from the war have been reflected m the wide 
fluctuations in the price of sugar each year, it is nevertheless a fact that the average price 
of sugar has been on a little higher level each succeeding year. • ^ ■ .,. 

It will be particularly interesting to watch the fluctuations in price during the ye^r 
1917, in view of the large element of uncertainty which is still prevailing because of the 
European war and to which the Cuban insurrection has contributed to no small extent. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



NOTE 

In View of the extremel> unsettled 
conditions now existing in Cuba, aris- 
ing out of the insurrection, it is most 
difficalt to secure autlientic informa- 
tion concerning the status of (grinding 
throughout the Island, particularly 
in tlie eastern part, the means of com- 
munication Ijeing so interrupted as to 
make it impossible for the Cuba Review 
to publish an estimate of the 1917 crop 
that could be considered as dependable 
as our crop estin ates for previous 
years. 

We, therefore, have not made any 
alterations in the figures given to us 
by the var.ous plantation owners. W"e 
would state, however, that from such 
information as we have been able to 
secure, it is very probable that the 
total crop will be reduced to aVout 
254 million tons. 

The present indications are that for 
the provinces of Pinar de Rio, Havana, 
Matanzas and Sta. Clara, the figures 
in our tables should be reduced by 10%, 
due chiefly to weather conditions re- 
sulting in decreased sugar content of 
the cane. For the provinces of Cama- 
guey and Oriente, where labor and 
political disturbances have been most 
prevalent, the figures will prohably he 
reduced fully 50%. 

It seem.s proballe, therefore, as the 
Cuba Review goes to press, that the 
total crop may be as high as 2,750,000 
tons, with a possibility of further re- 
ductions, the extent of which will de- 
pend upon the length of tim.e which 
may elapse before the restoration of 
normal conditions. 



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THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensefia uno de nuestros carros, todo de acero, para cafla. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capacidades varias y hemes fabricado un gran numsro de carros para cafia para 
UBO en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y M6xico, que tienen jaules de acero o de madera y con- 
otruidas para loa distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cafia. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E. U. A. 

Direcci6n telegrdfica- NALLLM, New York Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot. 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B CINTAS, Oficios 29-31. Havana. 



ROMANAS BENNINGTON DE SUSPENSION 
Para Gviarapo y Miel 

P ? ■ i 




ROMANAS PARA TODO USO INDUSTRIAL Y MERCANTIL 
Bennington Scale Company, New York 



18 



CO cd O^ S-H 



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T HE C U B A R E V I E W 



19 



CARROS 
PARA 
CANA 

('(instruccionde primc- 
"d clase enteratnentc 
fie acero 6 en parte dv 
madera seKunse ilesea. 
Cualquier taniann; 

cualquier estil'). 
Tiposdede,scar},'ai-, pm 

el costado. 
Tipos dedescar^^ar, pill 

a cabeza. 
Tipos (lede.searKar, coi 

i^rua. 





Para mieles 
aceites 6 agua 



PLATAFORMAS 

Cualquier tamano 
Cualquier estilo 



CASILLAS 

Para azucara }' 
mercancias 



THE GREGG COMPANY, Ltd 

80 Wall Street, New York 

y 

Hackensack, New Jersey 



GREGG 

LA CA. GREGG DE CUBA 

OFICINA Y ALMACEN CALLE AGUIAR 118, HABANA 



WM. C. GREGG, Presidente BURR GREGG, Vice-Presidente 

W. G. WOODSIDE, Vocal LOUIS D. GREGG, Tesorero 

0. T. GREGG, Secretario 

Tcnemos ('.vidcncUi comph-la j/ara emlmrqur inmcdinto. 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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THE CUBA R E V I E W 



21 



KoppeL 




FIRELESS LOCOMOTIVES AND SUGAR CANE CARS 

Fireless, smokeless, sparkless locomotives for switching or shifting. 

Sugar cane cars all types and sizes. Also steel rails, portable track, 
switches, frogs, turntables, and complete installations of Plantation 
Railways. Write jur catalog and prices. 




PLANT: KOPPEL, PA. 



Cuban Office: Havana, Lonja del Comcrcio, 217 

San Domingo Office: Van Kampen, Schumacher & Co., San Pedro de Macoris 

Porto Rico Office: Fritze, Lundt & Co., Succa., Inc., San Juan 

Venezuela Office: Olavarrip y Royna, Caracas 

New York Office. 30 Churcn Street 




22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 




PREPARE 
NOW 



FOR YOUR 



REQUIREMENTS OF 




SUGAR BAG SEWING TWINE 



FOR THE COMING SEASON 

We recommend the use of our Special Twine prepared 
especially for use on sugar plantations and made of 
fibres which can be exported without restrictions. 




M. J. GRADY CO., Inc. 



110 READE STREET 
NEW YORK 



■. \ 



Reel of Sewing Twine 
WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 



Cable Address 
'GRADYARN, NEW YORK" 

We also have a full line of 

TWINES 
CORDAGE 
THREAD 
YARNS 



%/. 



A 



Manila Rope 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



FABRICAMOS 



PUNTILLAS 



ALAMBRE DE POaS 





Puntillas de alambre de todas clases 



Crampas para cerca RAILES LIGEROS 

Cerca Tijida de alambre 
"SOUTHERN" 



10 BARS 49 INCH HIGH 



Alambre liso galvanizado Alambre 
templado 

Barras de hierro dulce para toda clase 
de trabajos de herreria 

Barras de acero cuadradas, re- 
"iifj^cSoI?* torcidas en frio, para reforzar 

concrete 



LYMAN (Pattern) 
Alambre de Puas 




Garantizan-ios la superior calidad de todas nuestros productos^ 

GVJLF STATES STEEL COMPANY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA. ESTADOS UXIDOS DE AMERICA 



Para informes, precios, etc., dirigirse a nuestros agentes 
RODRIGUEZ Y HERMANO (P.O. Box 13), Santiago de Cuba, Cuba 



I'l (; I J li A \i K V I I-; w 




t_, vj 4-I i~, t-t f~t r^ -*-■ ^-^ ^j "^ 






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nElL\C\/QsS E.x-rE.\Mg>tOK 



.\Mo.\(i rsi-i(s, IN c\'\'.\. '»i 



SMITH BOILERS 



Alii. I III, I nl.LOW IXfJ: 



ALTO CEDUO SUGAR CO. 
fJEXTIiAL UNION 
CJEXTIIAL I':.SPERANZA 

fxjxsTAXCUA .si:g.\r go. 

GlilAX-AMEIl. SUGAR CO. 
CI'PE^' SUGAR CO. 
CZ.\ I{XIKO\V-iaOXD.\ CO. 
DEUK'IAS SUGAR CO. 
'IlilXIOAO SUGAR CO. 



FRAXK MrXlXXEV, Esq. 
FRAXCISCO SUGAR CO. 
\L\NATI SUGAR CO. 
MERCEDITA SUGAR CO. 
SAX VICEXTE SUGAR CO. 
SANCTI SPIRITUS E. L. & P. CO. 
TUIXUCC SUGAR CO. 
TIXGU'ARO SUGAR CO. 
MAI'OS SUGAR <"0. 



SAMUEL SMITH & SON CO 

PATERSON, NEW JERSEY, U.S.A. 



ESTABLISHED 1844 



Cable Address: "SAMSMITH" 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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&> 



THE CUBA REV IE W 



23 



Be Sure It Is Lion Packing 




'Lion" Auto Water Automatic 
Packing 

HERE'S WHY 




"Lion" Expanding Steam 
Packing 

HERE'S WHY 



It's too good to escape imitations. The "just as The good qualities of_ both fiber and metal packing 
good" plea will not make any impression on you if ' are combined in "Lion" Packing. You get the 
you have tried Lion Packing. The metal studs, , excellent durability of metal plus the flexabilityof 
which are found only in Lion Packing, doubles its fiber. It expands and contracts automatically with 



life and at the same time absolutely prevents scoring 
of the rod. 



There is a Thin Red Line running through 
Genuine "Lion" Packing. Look for it. 



varying pressure of steam and water. It never 
loses its "spring." 

A Brass Trade Mark Label and Seal is attached to 
Genuine "Lion" Packings. Look for it. 



JAMES WALKER & CO., Ltd., 27 Thames St., N. Y. 

J. i R. Wilson, Inc., San Francisco, Cal., Sole Western Agents. A. B. Johnson Co.. 134 Wesa Main St., Norfolk. Va. 

Economic Eagr. & S. Co., 4/' Cliiton Ave., N., Roohes;er, N. Y. ^,J. Reyner, Newport News, Va. 

0. C. Kecklsy, Transportation Bldg., Chicago. 111. 




Romanas Howe de suspension para guarapo con brazo 
de registro impresor para cualquier tipo de peso. Ameri- 
cano 6 Espaiial. dial? 

Las Romanas Howe para guarapo son universalmente 
conocidas y usadas por lo que omitimos aqui detalles. 

Pidanse precios a su Agente 6 a 

THE HOWE SCALE CO. OF NEW YORK 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



THE NEW JERSEY ASBESTOS CO. 



1 WATER ST., NEW YORK CITY 



SPECIALISTS IN 

ENGINE PACKINGS 
Patent"V"PilotSteam Packing 

recommended for high pressure 
and superheat steam. 

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fur high j)ressure steam. 




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ESTABLISHED 1894 



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MT. VERNON. ILLS., U. S. A. 




Fabricantes de Garros de Mercancias de todas clases, de acero 
y de madera; Garros para Gana; Ruedas de Garro, 
Piezas Fimdidas y Forjaduras 

Gapacidad para 10,000 Garros, 150,000 Ruedas y 20,000 
toneladas de Forjaduras al auo. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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THECUBAREVIEW 33 



THERE IS IN HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL 
OPERATION AT PRESTON (ORIENTE) 
CUBA, IN THE NIPE BAY FACTORY A 



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79 Wall Street, New York City 



34 THECUBAREVIEW 



SUMMARY OF ACTIVE PLANTATIONS BY PROVINCES 

OUTPUT FIGURED IN BAGS 

Provinces European Ownership American Ownership Cuban Ownership Totals 

1916 Est. 1917 1916 Est. 1917 1916 Est. 1917 1916 Est. 1917 

Havana 1,623,026 1,63.5,000 475,638 475,000 467,611 .570,000 2,566,275 2,680,000 

PinardelRio 23,500 30,000 114,324 128,000 163,7.59 215,000 301,583' 373,000 

Matanzas 1,170,917 1,618,000 2,-504,282 2,763,000 766,989 84.5,000 4,442,188 5,226,000 

Santa Clara 1,867,906 2,227,000 2,046,815 2,200,000 2,601,282 2,9.53,000 6,516,003 7,380,000 

Camaguey 1,947,688 2,295,000 394,317 870,000 2,341,905 3,165,000 

Orientl.'. 678,410 79.5,000 3,526,763 4,658,000 588,316 910,000 4,793,489 6,363,000 

Totals 5,363,759 6,305,000 10,615,510 12,519,000 4,982,174 6,363,000 20,961,443 25,187,000 

Total e-^timate 1917 crop modified, as per note page 16, about 19,250,000 bags. 
N.ATIOMALITY OF OWNERS 



Havana 

PinardelRio.... 

Matanzas 

Santa Clara 

Camaguey 

Oriente 

Total 1917. 
Total 1916. 



ipeanOvvnc 


srship 


Ams 


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ship 


Cuban O^vhership 


Totals. 


9 






4 






8 


21 


1 






3 






5 


9 


15 






15 






10 


40 


21 






16 






36 


73 









9 






12 


21 


11 






21 






10 


42 


57 
63 






68 
66 






81 
66 


206 
195 



THE WORLD'S SUGAR PRODUCTION 



The sugar prod iction of the world has increased amazingly in the last half century, bi.t the 
production has been no more amazing than the mcrease in consumption. 

In 1870 the production of cane sugar was 1,850,000 tons and of beet 900,000— a total of 
2,750,000 tons. 

In 1914 it was 9,8()5,016 tons of cane and 8,908,470 tons of beet— a total of 18,773,486 
tons. 

The crop of 1916-17 is estnnated at 11,394,510 tons of cane and 5,828,000 tons of beet— 
or a total of 17,222,510 tons. 

Such redviction as there has been m beet production has been mostly in Europe, where 
the Central nations depend on beet sugar. 

Such increase in cane production as are shown must l>e credited mostly to Latin- 
America — principally Cuba. 

Sugar, like cotton, seems to find more employment the more there is of it. Less than a 
century ago it was practically a luxury. Now it is recognized as one of the great sta Tes of 
food. The world would have a sad time without it. Man has discovered that in sugar there are 
energy, heat and power-producing qualities superior to those in many other forms of food. Ac- 
ceptance of this fact lead Great Britain early in the war to hasten to safeguard a supply of sugar. 
Contracts were entered into for large quantities of Cuban cane. These contracts were dupli- 
cated in 1916 and will be renewed in 1917, "unless the war ends before the nation's sugar needs 
become urgent. The British have drawn freely on Trinidad, Barbadoes, Jamaica and other 
British West Indian Isles and also upon British India (the crop of which approximates 2,500,000 
tons), but still Cireat Britain ha.? to buy from .\mer'c i. The total exports in 1916 to Europe 
were 694,000 tons. 

It is manifest that man's appetite for sugar grows with the years. In 1965 the per capita 
consumption of sugar in the United States was 18.17 lbs. per annum. In 1915 it was 86.00. 
We may think the Am.erican consumption great, but it is below that of Australia, which in 1915 
was 100 lbs. per capita per annum. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



35 



Stiulonts (if I lie iii(l,i-;t IV declare tliat 1t:e iiroadeniiiK u.sos of s'ligur ;irp only well under 
way and tluit l)el"<)re nian.N yi-ars tiie ])c'i- capita eonsunijjtion of other countries will appnjxi- 
mate that of the Ignited vStates. They contend that, comixircd witii other foods, it is one of the 
cheai)est and that it is K^inK to be a matter of production and not consun'.ption that will 
bother the world l)efore loiif;;. They say, too, tliat liie end of tiu' war will farnish a {greatly 
increased demand in lOarojVe, as the beet supjar indvistries of tiie Central Empires have not been 
well cutivated in the ])eri()d of hostilities, and the seed matter is likely to ])laKiie the l)eet farn)- 
ers. Sujrar st(K'ks have fallen to a ver\ low sta<>;e and will retiuire reijlenishinf.";. 

If the i)redietion of ti^.e stvidents that the i)r()l)lem of tlie future is K'>i"K f" '«' niorc in 
producing enoiigh sugar to n^.eet the demand rather than finding a good market for the an^.ount 
produced, it is gonig to be necessary to look for additional good territory for sugar raising. 

Of the cane districts of the world none compares with fvuha. 

Of the other West Indies islands, Porto Rico ranks next to (\i1)a, but Porto Rico's yield 
is little m.ore than one-eighth of that of Cuba. 

Tlie Hawaiian Islands ])roduce a little less than (iOO.OOO tons a year, or al)out IS'^ of 
what Cuba furnishes. Hawaii lias about reached the lim.it of its ]iossibilities. 

The croj) of Cuba today makes up practically one-tiiird of the caiu> cro]) of the world, and 
Cuba has not reached 'ts limit l)v anv mean-;. 



I I i • 








LoadinK C'aiie C'ar'ts mvaitiiis tlieir tui'ii at tlie !M ill 



THE SUGAR REVIEW 



Specially written for The Cuba Review by Willett & Gray, New York, N. Y. 

Our last review for this magazine was dated February 6, 1917. 

At that d.;te, Cuba Centrifugal sugar 96° test basis, was quoted at 'SJ'ic. per lb. cost and 
freight (4.89c. duty paid). The quotation of 3 13-16c. c. & f. (4.83c. duty pjidj made Feb. 2d 
h IS proven the lowest point of the present camp iign year tlius far. The month under review 
has been notable for the changes made from day to day as follows: Feb. 61 h, SJ/gC. c. & f. 
(4.89c.); Feb. 9th, 4c. c. & f. (5.02c.) ; Feb. 14th, 4^c. c. & f. (5.39c.); Feb. 19th, 4)^0. c. & f. 
(5.52c.); Feb.23d, 4 3-16c. c.& f. (5.20e.); Feb. 24th, 4p. c. & i (5.02c.); Feb. 27th, 41^0. c.&f. 
(5 27c.) , March 1st, 4^e. c. & t. (5.39c.) ; March 7th, 43/^r. c. & f . (5.27e.) 

Strike condilions at several refineries have continued throughout the month, but show 
somewhat of an improvement at this writing. For this re .son the melting of raw sugars has 
been curtailed and the production of refined has been very far below the requirements of the 
local trade for domestic consumption. This supply for home use has been further curtailed by 
largss sales for export made the latter part of 19x6, for shipmsnt during Janu iry, !March, 1 9 J 7, 
which have been filled bv refiners. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

The Ame^ic^^n Sugar Refining Co., since the strike, have devoted all their available working 
capacity to supplying the domestic trade, but their output, ovving to the strikes, has been 
much below their hill capacity. The jjresent signs point to a full output, however, during the 
coming month, which will warrant their becommg much larger buyers of raws for April and 
May deliveries. 

Whatever reaction may come at the moment, now that raws can be bought at 43^^c. c & f . 
(5.27c.), is more than likely to be followed by a rising course again, in view of the uncertain 
conditions of crops, and political agitation in the island of Cuba, which have already led to 
reductions in Cuba crop estimates to 3,000,000 tons. This estimated reduction does not mean 
an eventual shortage of supply for all needs of the United States and foreign countries, as our 
table of world supplies is still abundant for oil needs in view of the stringent regulations made 
to reduce consumption in European countries. 

There are prophesies being made that the Europ?an war will be fought to a close during 
the next six month. WILLETT & GRAY 

New York, March 7, 1917. 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, dt Nueva York. 



Nuestra ultima reseha para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 6 de febrero de 1917. 

En esa fecha, el azucar Centrifugo de Cuba, polarizacion de 96°, se cotizaba a 3 J^c. la 
iibra costo y flete (4.89c. derechos pagados). La cotizacion de 3 1.3-16c. c. y f. (4.83c. derechos 
pagados) que tavo lugar el 2 de febrero ha sido hasta ahora el panto mas bajo alcanzado en la 
actual campana azacarera del aho. El mes bajo resena ha sido notable por los cambios que 
han tenido lugar de dia, en dia, del modo siguiente: febrero 6, Z%c. c. y f. (4.89c.); febrero 9, 4c. 

c. y f. (5.02c.); febrero 14, 43^c. c. y f. (5.39c.); febrero 19, 4Mc. c. v f. (5.52c.); febrero 23, 
4 3-16c. c. y f. (5.20c); febrero 24, 4c. c. y f. (5.02c.); febrero 27, 4Mc. c. y f. (5.27c.); marzo 
1, 4^c. c. y f. (5.39c.; y marzo 7, 434c. c. y f. (5.27c.) 

Han continuado las huelgas durante el mes en algunas refinerlas, pero al escribir esta 
resena se nota alguna mejoria en la situacion. Con motivo de las hvielgas se ha reducido la 
elaboracion de los aziicares crudos, y la produccion de azucar refinado ha sido mucho menor de 
los requerimientos del comercio local para el consumo del pais. Este abasto para el uso en el 
pais se ha reducido aun mas por las grandes ventas para la exportacion hechas a liltimos del 
ano 1916, para embarque durante enero y marzo de 1917, y que han sido efectuadas por los 
refinadores. 

Desde que empezo la huelga la American Sugar Refining Company ha dedicado toda su 
capacidad trabajadora disponible para surtir el comercio del pais, pero su produccion, debido 

d, las heulgas, ha sido mucho menor de su capacidad por entero. Los indicios al presente, sin 
embargo, indican un campleto abasto durante el me? entrante, lo cjal asegura que sean com- 
pradores de mucho mas azucar crudo para entregas de abril y mayo. 

Culaquiera que sea la reaccion que pueda sobrevenir por el momento, ahora que los 
aziicares crudos pueden comprarse a 4i^c. c. y f. (5.27c.), es mas que probable que vuelva A 
ser seguido de un alza en los precios, en vista del estado tan incierto de las cosechas, asl como 
de la agitacion politica en la isla de Cab?, lo cual ya ha ocasionado reducciones en los calculos 
de la zafra de Cuba a 3,000,000 toneladas. Este calcalo en la reduccion de la zafra no quiere 
decir una merma eventual en las existencias para surtir todas las necesidades de los Estados 
Unidos y los palses extranjeros, pues segiin nuestros calculos, las existencias del mundo son aiin 
abundantes para cubrir todas las necesidades en vista de las medidas tan rigidas que se han 
tomado para reducir el consumo dei azucar en los palses europeos. 

Se pronostica que la guerra europea llegara a su fin durante los seis meses entrantes. 

WILLETT & GR.\Y 

Nueva York, marzo 7 de 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— S4— 6G Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 



HAVANA— N. GelaU y Ca. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 



LONIXJN — The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS — Heine et Cie. 



PYREX LABORATORY GLASSWARE 



<^. 



im 







Pyrex Glass — a new borosilicate glass possessing an extraordinarilv low expansun 
coefficient, 0.0000032, and great resistance to sudden temjierature changes. 

Chemical stability tests show Pyrex glass to be less soluble in water and acids and 
about equally soluble in alkalis, compared with the best resistance glass, either .\merican 
or foreign, hithertofore ofTered. The glass contains no metals of the magnesia-lime-zinc 
group and no heavy metals. 

The low e.vpansion coefficent makes it possible to make Pjtcx beakers and flasks w^th 
wall slightly thicVer than usual— t.iis greatly increases the durability of the vessels without 
diminishing the resistance to sudden heating and cooling. 

Descriptive Price List Upon Request 



EIMER & AMEND 



NEW YORK CITY 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



OTTAWA, CAN 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

P. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 



We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



R 



28-24 in. GAGE, 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 
ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft. 4 in. Capacity 10 Tons. 
Weight 7, .500 lbs. 

FIRST-CLASS CONDITION 

Will Convert to Steel Underframe Flat Cars 
PROMPT SHIPMENT .-. LOW PRICE 

RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 

VALTER A^ZELNICrtER SUPPLY COMPANY J^ 

i.i.iiioi%ii.niv 



325 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo. 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



Cane Handling Machinery, 

Hoisting & Excavating Machinery, 

Skandia Oil Engines 

H. S. JOHANNSEN 

50 CHURCH STREET - - NEW YORK 

EXPORTERS & IMPORTERS PURCHASING & SALES ENGINEERS 



C'alil;' Add' 



'Hcsiiii.ji), Now York." 



'lMi(iiu>, ('oit. 34(12 



Bank of Cuba in New York 

1 WALL ST., NEW YORK 

RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 ■ $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES - 



President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 



Pedro Pablo Diago Guillermo Carricaburu 

LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 



76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLACfi" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET .-. NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 
Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 

Write Today For Sample Copy 

Indispensable to the Man Inter- 
ested in Sugar 



Please msntion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THECUBAREVIEW 39 



POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

y^ w J » my jk f Jt VT' Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
(jU/\i^/\.J A I 5 A.M. to 8 P.M. Last train 11.20 P.M. 

Fare, 55 Cents 

g^ I T I RT T^ C Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 

Cj LJ 1 IN 111 O 5.50 A.M. to 7.50 P.M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) •' •• ■ ^0.05 

Guanabacoa (Ferry and Electric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanca and Cabafias Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 

Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

A. KLINQ, Prop. MORTI F ALA 

JAS. S. BOQUE, Supt. MUCILH, ALA. 



OILS, GREASES A. C. FABRICIUS 1 ACEITES, GRASAS 

and other ' ' O ^ °''°* "^ ' 

OIL PRODUCTS I 82-92 Beaver St. Productos de Aceite 

New York, N. Y. Marca -Zander" 

manufacturados de j los me- 
Cable— Fabriciusa Se Busca Agentes jores aceites de Pennsylvania 



of the famous "Zander" brand 
made of the best Pennsylvania 
Oil. 



Telephone. 33 Hamilton. Night Call. 411 Hamilton. Cable Address: "Abiworka." New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy ForginKi.Iron and Braas Castings, Copper Specialties, Diesel Motor Repairs, Cold Storage 
Installation. Oil Fuel Installation, Carpenter and Joiner Work 

18-20 SUMMIT STREET I ^j Hamilton F.rry BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

11-17 I MLAY STREET / N««r Hamilton r.rry 

Acents for "Kinthorn" Multiplex Valva 



FUase mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Correapondanc* Solicited from 
intandlns InTaatora 

OFFICERS 

Norman H. Davii . - . - . President 
Oswald A. Horniby - - - - Vice-President 

Claudio G. Mendoza - - - Vice-President 
J. M. Hopgood ------ Treasurer 

Rogelio Carba]al ------ Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



P. RUIZ 


® 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 


HAVANA, CUBA 




Ventilador y Soplador scoplado a 
Turbinas Lee "Corliss" especialmente para 
Hornos de Bagazo Verde 

LEE TURBINE CO., 106 Wall St. 

H. F. RUGGLES, 106 Wall St., N. Y. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADIJ EN 1SG9 

Capital Pagado $11 ,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Active Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar Sts. 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponaales en Espafia 6 Islas Canarias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

d interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
U. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Aniargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi= 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 

Safe Deposit Vaults 



Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. GONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when wnting to Advertiser 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 

P. M. P. M. 



No.l7 No. 3 No. 7 No. 5 js 

P. M. P. iM. A. M. A. M. S 



10.30 10.00 
A. iM. 
112.06 
4.40 



9.00 
10.55 







*. 

'i 

A. 


17 
M. 











5.28 



8.50 

10.20 

P. M. 

1.00 

10.00 
11.00 



P. M 



5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 



3.10 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A. M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P. M 

3.00 

3.30 



P. M. 



Havana 



INo. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8 
A.M. A.M. P. M. P. M. 



10.01 7.40 



Lv . . Central Station . . Ar. 



11.58 
2.18 



10.10 58 Ar. 
12.33 109 kv. 



. . .Matanzas. 
. . . Cardenas . 



.Lv. 
.Lv. 



4.40 
8.40 



179 Ar. 
230 At. 



6.45 

P. M. 



3.38 
6.45 



6.40 
8.00 



10.30 
P.M. 



180 Ar. 
195 .\r. 

241 Ar. 

276 Ar . 

340 .\r. 



. . Sagua 

. Caibarien . . . . 

. . Santa Clara. . . 
. . Cienf uegos . . . . 



.Lv. 
.Lv. 



Lv. 
Lv. 



.520 Ar. 
.538 Ar. 



.SanctiSpiritus. . 
.Ciegode Avila. . 
. . .Camaguey. . . . 



.... Antilla 

Santiago de Cuba. 



7.361 9.13i 2.06 



5.31 6.4512.00 
12.45 5.00 9.12 
P. M. A. M. 

8.00 

5.301 

A. M 



12.10 



P.M. 
8.25 



7.35 .. 

I 
4.55!.. 
A.M.: 
7.40 
6.55'., 



A.M. 



6.20 



6.39 



4.44 
1.05 



12.00 
8.20 



8.00 
A.M. 



No. 6 No. 10 
P.M. A..M. 



9.051 6.20 



6.28' 
4.25 



1.55 
P.M.; 
11.20; 

2.30 
2.00 



P.M.I 



1.00 



9.15 

8.48 



10.00 
P. M. 



6.15 
A.M. 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



FTom Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienf uegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 

THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



Antilla 

Batabano 

Bayamo 

Caibarien 

Camaguey 

Cardenas 

Ciego de Avila. 

Cienfuegos 

Colon 

Guantanamo . . , 
Holguin 



U. S. Cy. 
$23.33 

1.53 
20.66 
10.68 
15.49 

5.43 
12.72 

8.69 

5.56 
25.58 
21.20 



Isle of Pines 

Madruga 

Mansanillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

Remedios 

Sagua 

San Antonio 

Sancti Spiritus. . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba . 



U. S. Cy. 
$6.00 

3.01 
22.02 

3.20 

9.64 
10.43 

8.45 

.45 

11.19 

8.53 
24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over pri\'ilege ia allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 



"WEEK=END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL '^WEEK-END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send three oenta in stamps for "Cuba— A Winter Paradiae," a beau- ITnifpJ Railurav* ftf HavaiM 
tiful illustrated booklet describing interesting trips in Cuba to ^JHUea IVaUWayS OI nSVaiM 
FRANK ROBERTS, General Passenger Agent. Prado, 118, Havtma, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacion directa de todas los 
centros inanufaclureros del mundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espaiia 
Independencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS. CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard: 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Muiiro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Teleplione 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c. 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to puah the iale» of 

American high data producte. Would 

rtpretent a firtt close firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



M. J. CABANA 



CO M M I88IO N 
MERCHANT 



P. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merohandise either on a {loin- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in east- 
em Cuba. 



F. W. Hvoilsf 



E. C. Day 



R. M. MiobelMB 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

StsamshipAgents&ShipBrokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CahU: "£«nMM«" 



Pleaae menUon THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertiteri 



THE CUBA IM; \ I V. \\ 




S.S. MUNAMAR 

NEW YORK CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

New York Matanzas Matanzas New York 

Steamer Leave Arrive Leave Arrive 

MUNAMAR March 31 April 4 April 7 April 11 

MUNAMAR April 14 April IS April 21 April 2o 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Rpsular sailings for Mata7izas, Cardejias, .Sdgua, Caibarien, Antilla, Niiovitas, Pto 
Padre, Gibara, Maraati and Banes. 

MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

SS. MUNPLACE— //cmna, Matanzas, Cardeiui.s, Cirjifiicgns April fi 

A STEAMER— //o?Yrr?.a, Caiharien April 1 3 

SS. MI'NISLA— //a/Y//(Y7, Matanzas, Sagua April 20 

A STEAMER— //^/Y;//y^ Cardenas, Cailiarien April 27 

MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAINIER Ajml 2.5th, for Montevide.), Buenos Aires 

BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER ^I'"! o and 19 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of call 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW' 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

AVILMINGTON, DEL. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE, President 



Grand Prize awarded for Locomotives at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 

The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 




PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES 

Specifications Furnished on Application 
REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE WEST INDIES: 

WALUCE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Addresses: "BALDWIN. PHILADELPHIA," "LEEBALD, HAVANA" 



PUaae mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertiaert 



\^,)5 



THE 



CVBA REVIEW 



"^'f. .-f 




llfllfllPi x,,i^^J3 



''H?$ilr?tbf' 






'^'m 



l.OOAYear APRIL 1917 lOCentsACopy 
\iblishe(l by the Munson Steamship Line 8Z-92 Beaver Street, New%k City. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Link-Belt 
SilentChain ililif 

':,i,tiii!t>>"i"""- )j & 



.IW'" 



Y 



till, 

iniii 

^lllm 



THE IDEAL DRIVE FOR 
SUGAR MILL MACHINERY 

''OU CAN connect your engine or 

electric motor to lireshaft or individual ma- 
chine, and attain a transmission efficiency of 
over 9S%. The drive is positive, cannot slip, 
and operates equally well in hot, cold, damp ; 

or oily places. 

Link-Belt Silent Chain is 
"Flexible as a Belt— Positive as a Gear 
—More Efficient than Either." It 
operates on short or long 
centers, and affords wide -.-;--;=;'' 

ranges of speed ratios. 

Write for Data 

Book No. 125, which ex- 
plains all about Silent 
Chain Drives, showing 
how to figure them, and 
to determine prices. 



itiiin 
iiinii 
iltinii 




'&"/,:::■■■'':.■::■:'' 



^;;;^r 



iBBPf;;,';"".? A 




Link-Belt Company 



299 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 



71 BEAVER STREET 
NEW YORK 



Cable Address: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(All codes used) 

RAIL AND FASTENINGS 
FROGS AND SWITCHES 

CARS 
BOILERS, TANKS, PUMPS 



Direccion Cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(Usamos todas las claves) 

RIELES Y ASEGURADORES 

RANAS Y CAMBIAVIAS 

VAGONES 

CALDERAS, TANQUES, BOMBAS 




Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
"Lion" Brass Trade Mark Labels and Seals attached. 



SS^ripdve^cataiog Jamcs Walkcf & Company, Ltd. 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

JOSE L. VIJLLAAMIL 

Santa Clara 2Q, Havana, Cuba 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



r^ARROQ P'^'*'^ Tonos usos y de todos tamafios, de los para cana con cuatro ruedas y capa- 

^/\r*IvV-liJ cidad de 1 ^4 toneladas a los con jucgos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toneladas 

Hacemos una cspecialidad de juegos de lierrajcs, incluyendo los jiiegos 

de ruedas, completameiite armados, con todas las piezas de metal, y pianos 

cvmplctos para cunslnnr lus carros a sii dcstino dc mad?ras del pais 






RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Address: 
Ramamam 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

""'fs^ls-S' SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. S'Z7:t 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 

SUGARS 



RAW AND 
REFINED 



82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensena uno de nuestroa carros, todo de acero, para cana. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capaoidadea varias y hemes fabricado un gran numero de carros para cafia para 
U80 en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, Amferica-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaules de acero o de madera y con- 
struidas para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cana. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direcci6n telegrdfica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot. 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B. CINTAS, Oficios 29-31, Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Offic* in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma, Gallais Bldg. 

2728 Whitehall BuUdlng 
NEW YORK 




STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Los Angeles Office 

414 Grosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

Agent* in Cuba: 
ELLIS BROTHERS 

28 San Igaacio, Havana, Cuba 



BUILT BY 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Total values of merchandise imported from, and exported to, each of the principal countries 
during December and the 12 months ended December, 19 IG, compared with corresponding 
periods of the preceding year have been made public by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce of the Department of Commerce, as follows: 

Month of December. 12 months ended December 
1916 1915 1916 1915 

Imports from Cuba $9,108,597 $10,058,884 $243,728,770 $197,548,146 

Exports to Cuba $18,781,230 $11,926,832 $164,622,950 $95,750,004 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
5 15 



P M 



P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
P M 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



PM 



AM 
10 r 
12 15 



PM 



AM 
6 55 
8 33 

10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
P M 



A M 
6 15 
8 15 



7 30 
11 22 

AM 



Fare 
Istcl. 
$2.04 
3.99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana .Ar. 

Ar Artemisa Lv. 

Ar Paso Real Lv. 

Ar Herradura Lv. 

Ar Pinar del Rio .... Lv. 

Ar Guane Lv. 



Fare 
3dcl 
$1.10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 



AM 
7 49 
5 45 



AM 



AM 
11,09 
9 35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 



AM 
11 47 
9 45 



AM 



P M 
3 49 
1 45 



P M 
6 47 
4 45 



P M 



P M 
7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
6 38 3 00 
3 001 30 
P MiP M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " { Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cts. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

A RE on sale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west of 
■^*- Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25%. 



Please Mention THE CUBA REVIEW uhen Writing to Advertisers. 



THE CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 

$1.00 Per Year -------10 Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 

Vol. XV APRIL. 1917 No. 5 

Contents of This Number 



Cover Page — 'Entrance to a Farm in Oricntc, Cuba 
Frontispiepo — Scenes at Nuevitas. 



Page 



All Arnunfl Cuba: 

American Bourse 12 

Banes Water Supply 8 

Felton 12 

Medical Congress 12 

North Coast Railroad 12 

Nuevitas S 

Stock Raising in Cuba S 

Apiculture in Cuba 34 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

American Textiles 23 

Auger Bits 22 

Construction Work 23, 24 

Fruit Trade 22 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

American Sugar Refining Company Report 21, 22 

Guantanamo Sugar Company 20 

New Niquero Sugar Company 20 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 20 

Traffic Receips of Cuban Railroads 19,20 

Cuban Government Matters: 

Germany " 

Postal Service 7 

President's Message 7 



Estacion Central Agronomica, illustrated ' . . 13, 14, 1"), 10 

Port Improvements at Nuevitas, chart 1(1,11 

Publications Received 18 

Spineless Cactus, illustrated 17, IS 

Sugar Industry: 

British Sugar Trade in 1910 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 

Chart of Exports from Cuba 33 

Cuban Sugar Crop 28 

El Soledad Plantation, illustrated 25, 26, 27 

Preston 28 

St. Croix 28 

Standard Scale 27 

Sugar Consumption in the United States 27 

Sugar in England 28 

Sugar Production 34 

Sugar Review, English 35 

Sugar Review, Spanish 36 

Travelling in Cuba during the Insurrection 9, 10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Scenes at Nuevitas after the Occupation of the Insurgents — See article page 9 . 



THE, 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL A I '.OUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munaon Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



APRIL, 1917 



Number 5 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



GERMANY 

On Fritlay, April 6th, Presulent !Menocal 
sent a message to the Cuban Congress in which 
he advocated the passage of a resolution de- 
claring that a state of war existed between 
Cuba and Germany, and on Saturday, April 
7th, the Senate and House of Representatives 
declared that a state of war existed between 
Cuba and Germany. 

Immediate steps were taken to secvu'e the 
German ships in Cuban waters, and in Havana 
representatives of the Cuban Government 
took possession of the steamers, Adelheid, 
Bavaria, Kydonia, Olivant, and in Cien- 
fuegos, of the steamer Constantia. 

The army of Cuba consists of 10,000 well- 
drilled and well-equipped men and the na\'y' 
comprises a number of gunboats. 



PRESIDENT MENOCAL'S MESSAGE 

At the beginning of the new session of the 
Cuban Congress, April 2, President Menocal 
sent a message which outlined the general situ- 
ation of the country, annoimcing that the 
revolt had been crushed and also commending 
the attitude assumed by the United States in 
upholding the constituted government of 
Cuba. President INIenocal also paid tribut to 
the patriotic services of the army and of the 
navy. 

The presidential message is quite compre- 
hensive and it reviews the work of the various 
departments and also makes various recom- 
mendations. The president recommends the 



establishment at once of two hospitals, one at 
Santa Clara and one at Santiago de Cuba. 
The President further recommends the estab- 
lishment of a regimental field hospital in each 
military district. An increase in salary is 
recommended for the members of the Depart- 
ment of Sanitation, the skill and medical 
knowledge required for this work fully^war- 
ranting additional remuneration. 

The President commented on the remark- 
able state of prosperity which existed in Cuba 
immediately prior to the revolt, and he pre- 
dicted that after public order had been com- 
pletely restored, Cuba would be again rich 
and prosperous. 



POSTAL SERVICE ECUADOR AND CUBA 

Arrangements have been completed for a 
direct mail service between Ecuador and Cuba 
which will occupy 10 days instead of 25 days 
as heretofore. Formerly all mail matter des- 
tined for Cuba pa.ssed to the United States, 
and was then forwarded in United States mail 
pouches; whereas under the new service 
pouches will be marked via Colon for Habana 
direct. 



APPROPRIATION FOR SANITATION 

The Cuban Government has authorized an 
expenditure of $30,000 for sanitation in the 
city of Habana, and for repairs in the hospi- 
tals of Sagua and of Cardenas, in accordance 
with a decree in the Bolelin Oficial de la 
Secretaria de Hacienda. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



BANES WATER SUPPLY 

Tlie present sai)ply of water for the town 
of Banes and the siifrar mill is inadequate and 
not satisfactory, owing to the hardness of the 
water, and on this account the I'nited Fruit 
Company has arranged for an expenditure 
of approximately $100,000 to secure an 
additional supply of water and improve the 
present system.. 

The work of laying the pipe line has been 
started, and it is planned to lay a line of six 
inch pipe for a distance of three and one-half 
miles from the Jagueyez river in the hills 
near Banes, where a good supply of excellent 
water can be obtained, and build a pumping 
station and softening plant in the city of 
Banes, also a reservoir with a capacity of 
one million gallons. The route of the pipe 
line has been surveyed so as to permit the 
flow of water by its own gravity to the 
reservoir, from which point it is pumped to 
the mill and passes through the softening 
plant where it is softened by a lime treatment 
and is ready for use. 

The proposed pipe line will require the 
laying of tw^eive miles of a special flexible 
joint cast iron pipe of eight, six and four- 
inch sizes, and when completed in from three 
to six months, will give the Banes section an 
unlimited supply of excellent water. J ' j 



STOCK RAISING IN CUBA 

The high price of sugar that followed the 
outbreak of the European war influenced many 
Cuban planters to plant in sugar cane large 
tracts of grazing land. There are still left 
in the island, however, thousands of acres 
of land suitable for stock raising, and if 
sown with grasses and forage plants these 
lands, in the opinion of the Cuban Agricul- 
tural Department, quoted by the Camara de 
Comer cio in its Boletin Oficial, would yield 
returns quite as profitable as those devoted 
to sugar cane. 

Two pasture grasses were imported into 
* the countn,' some years ago, the Parana from 
Argentina, and the Guinea grass from the 
west coast of -Vfrica, and they have proved 
-well adapted to the climate and soil of Cuba. 
It is estimated that 100 acres in either of 
these grasses w'ill pasture from 50 to 70 head 
of cattle in a year. Alfalfa has been intro- 
duced into the island, and when the soil is 



inoculated with alfalfa bacteria, it thrives. 
The Province of Camaguey is noted for its 
fine pasture lands. Oriente and Las Vegas 
are also rich in grass lands, though in these 
Provinces, as in Habana and Mat anzas, good 
lands are held at very high prices. In Pinar 
del Rio there are grazing lands offered at $20 
to $40 an acre, which, under proper manage- 
ment, would yield a profit of 20 to 40 per cent 
on the investment. 

High-grade cattle have been imported into 
the island during recent years, and the native 
herds are being rapidly improved. The De- 
partment of Agriculture has registered a total 
of 4,000,000 cattle in the country. Cuba is 
said to be well adapted for raising horses and 
mules, and American breeds introduced in 
the island thrive as at home. The native 
Cuban horses are of Arabian stock, intro- 
duced during the Spanish conquest, and they 
are much valuedfor their great endurance. 



NUEVITAS 

The construction on the Xuevitas terminal 
has progressed finely during the last few weeks. 
\^'orkmen have started excavating for the 
foundation of one of the large steel molasses 
tanks at Pastiila. There will be four of these, 
each having a capacity of 750,000 gallons or 
3,000,000 gahons in all, and one of them will 
probably be ready for use this season. 

There will be eight warehouses erected, 
about 450 feet long and 100 feet wide. One 
of these is practically completed, and another 
more than haU done. 

One of the warehouses for incoming freight 
at the end of the main dock is well under way. 
There wih be two of these, each about 400 by 
60 feet, one on each side of the dock, with a 
track between. Above this dock a lorg break- 
water will be constructed to break the force 
of the waves which at times rur quite high. 
Considerable dredging will be done here to 
give sufficient water for large vessels to land 
at the dock. 

The last trestle just above the eld cattle 
dock is nearly finished, and when this is done, 
it will be possible to run trains direct trom 
Nuevitas to Pastiila, although there is a large 
amount of cutting and filling to be done be- 
fore the permanent line can be laid. Another 
locomotive and a piledriver have been brought 
out to hasten the vrork.^From The Cuban 
American. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The Cnba Ret'iew is inclchtod to a contri- 
butor, who requests that liis name be with- 
held, for the account that follows of a journey 
through the Eastern part of ("uha(hn-ing the 
recent jiolitical (listur])ances. The ilUistra- 
tions on i)age (i give a very striking impression 
of what occurroil in tlie town of Xucvitas. 

JOURNF.Y FROM HABANA TO GUANTANAMO 
MARCH. 1917 

Started by rail, as usually the entire journey 
is (lone by rail in twenty-four hours, ^i'rain 
stopped eight hours after leaving Habana 
because main line bridges were all down l)e- 
yond Santa Clara. Train made a detour ami 
finally landed us at Caibarien March 3(1. 

Next day secured a motor boat with which 
to continue the journey from Caibarien east- 
ward on the north coast. Railroad bridges 
and plantations near Caibarien were being 
biu-ned that day, as we could see. There we 
were urged to start at midnight, the owner 
of the little motor boat fearing that rebels 
would prohibit our starting next day. 

Motor broke down after one hour. iVIade 
repairs as possible and proceeded. Reached 
Punta Alegre, a new sugar mill, 38 miles from 
Caibarien, in 19 hours. Spent the night there, 
making further repairs with help of sugar fac- 
tory mechanics. 

Started again 5 a. m. next day. Covered 
about 80 miles, reaching a narrow passage be- 
tween islands by 5 p.m. Grounded — -water in 
the place being only 15 inches, while our motor 
boat drew 23 in. Another sloop grounded at 
same place and two small open cat-boats an- 
chored at sunset, fearing that they could 
not pass the narrow channel at night. 
Lucky for us there was a group of boats to- 
gether there. 

During that night, by full moonlight, 6 sail 
boats and 2 motor-boats full of rebels came 
through the channel, going westward toward 
Caibarien, probably fleeing from Camaguey, 
which the (Jovernment had just captured. 

Next morning deserted the motor boat, 
hired one of the little cat-boats, got through 
the passage and by 2 p. m. reached Punta 
Piloto, landing place of " La Gloria," an 
American fruit colony. Met a four-horse 
American Studebaker wagon bringing down a 
load of 5,000 oranges for shipment by cat-boat 
to Caibarien. Got driver to take us inland, 
but were stopped after four miles by Ameri- 
cans from "La Gloria," stating further pro- 



gress impossible, on account of a band of 250 
armed rebels blocking the road from "I^a 
Cdoria" to Camaguey City, our destination. 
Were driven back to the coast. Sjjent night 
in the kitchen of the orange shipper at Punta 
Piloto. 

Next morning secured another little boat 
and .sailed to a point two miles from Xucvitas, 
walking then to the cit}', where we found the 
rebels had devastated buildings and stores 
and destroyed railroad station, so that the 
place looked as if it were in Belgium today. 

March (jth, went on a mihtary train sis far 
as Minas Station, in the district of Camaguey. 
Were ordered off the train there. Spent the 
night at a large sugar mill near Minas. Un- 
derstand the two rear cars of the train, only, 
got through to Camague}'. the two first cars 
having been dynamited after we left the 
train. 

Saw about 9,000 acres of sugar cane fields 
completely destroyed by fire at this planta- 
tion near Minas. Next morning returned by 
military train to Nuevitas on the north coast. 
Hired a small motor boat and started at 
4 p. m. for Puerto Padre, the next large 
harbor toward the east. This time had to go 
right out to sea, but, finding it too rough, the 
captain of the little boat imdertook to take 
us through the reefs and succeeded in getting 
through by moonlight. Could go no further, 
therefore anchored from 9 p.m. till 6 a. m. in 
a smooth spot between the reefs — a most un- 
pleasant and dangerous night. 

At 6 o'clock next morning started for Puerto 
Padre and arrived there 5 p. m. On the way 
saw some canefields burning at Manati, a large 
sugar mill on the north coast. Passed the 
night in hotel Chaparra. 

Next morning, by courtesy of the Chaparra 
Sugar Company, were taken by their inspec- 
tion car to the east toward Santa Lucia Sugar 
Co. Arriving ■ there, found factory and of- 
fices deserted; owners and managers all fled 
before the rebels, who attacked and de- 
stroyed a good deal of their property on the 
7th. 

Next day Government troops came in to 
guard the property, and the factory and 
oflSce staffs returned to work as well as they 
could. 

At this point succeeded in engaging passage 
to Guantanamo by a sugar cargo boat. 
Reached Guantanamo 6 a.m. March 13th. 
Our steamer, proceeding as usual, was brought 
to a stop by three whistles from U. S. Battle- 



10 THECUBAREVIEW 



ship "Montana," and the flag signal to stop. rebels were particularly angry and violent 
The reason for this, as we soon found, was against American citizens, 
that the lower bay at Guantanamo, where the Next day, the 18th, hearing firing approach- 
American Naval Station is, was closed by ing- took refuge in U. S. Xaval Station at 
a huge submarine-catching net. Passage Caimanera, Guantanamo Bay, and with their 
through it was obtained for us after a half assistance procured passage on a transport 
hour, and we were escorted through by a as far as the City of Cienfuegos on the south 
motor launch from the battleship. Spent shore, where we were soon agam in safe and 
four davs in Guantanamo Valley, which was civilized surrou ndings. 



entirely under the control of the rebels, who MARIEL 

were running the Custom House, the city it has been planned to construct a new 

and railroads in complete freedom from hospital building at the quarantine camp at 

molestation. Mariel. It has been the custom for the 

However, on the 15th other rebel bands. Department of Sanitation to segregate 

coming from Santiago, destroyed bridges on passengers having contagious diseases arriving 

the Guantanamo & Western Line, and again in Havana and necessarily held in quarantine, 

we were unable to proceed inland for that It is proposed to construct two large buildings 

reason, without incurring imminent danger of for general cases and another small building 

death or capture, as these eastern Cuban for the treatment of extreme cases. 

PORT IMPROVEMENTS AT NUEVITAS 



That Nuevitas, the principal port of Camaguey province, is to become one of the principal 
shipping ports of the island is now practically assured. With the docks and warehouses now 
building, to cost approximately $1,000,000, and with the additional transportation facilities, 
there will be developed a great point for the shipping of products of the island, and for the 
receipt of freight and iiassenger traffic for Eastern Cuba. 

JSIuevitas will soon be an important railroad center. Since the Cuba Railroad has ac- 
quired the road from Camaguey to Nuevitas and the gauge standardized, there have been vast 
improvements in that line. Soon there will be another line to Nuevitas — the North Coast Rail- 
way, now in course of construction, opening up a country to development not heretofore 
touched, a country rich in possibilities which is attracting the 'attention of enterprising syndi- 
cates and developers, so that, within a very few years, a rich country will be opened which 
will so add to the wealth of Cuba, that past prosperity will be eclipsed and the future develop- 
ment of the country will only depend upon the amount of intelligent labor to be secured. 

It is a well-known fact that Camaguey province is to be greatly developed by the sugar 
people. Oriente province is now apparently the banner sugar province of the island, but in a 
very short time, according to prospects, the province of Camaguey will be one vast canefield, 
with mills dotting the country over and there will be work for all; prosperity will be more than 
ever apparent, and while Cuba is now the largest sugar-producing country of the world, it will 
soon be so far ahead of all others that there will be no comparison. 

Not only will the cane growing industry be greatly benefited by the dock improvements at 
Nuevitas, but the other classes of agriculturists, the farmers and the fruit and vegetable growers 
will be helped. The North Coast Railroad will tap a fruit and vegetable growing district al- 
ready rich in production, and this will be further developed when the proper kind of transporta- 
tion is oifered. The Cubitas Valley and all along the line of the North Coast Railway have all 
the greatest possibilities for development in the horticultural line, and with greater facilities 
for shipping there will naturally be greater incentive for development in this line. 

The industries of the island are now so great that Havana cannot handle all of the shipping, 
and the development of the port of Nuevitas will not cause business through the port of Havana 
to suffer a particle. Steamers to Havana are now filled to capacity. Wharves and warehouses 
are packed to the roofs. Railway lines leading out of Havana are behind in their freight hand- 
ling, and the customs authorities are far behind in their work of clearing goods, so that the estab- 
lishment of outside docks will be a relief and help to Havana and a means of faster development 
in Eastern Cuba and the island generally. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 



OUTLINE OF CUBA RAILROAD 

PORT IMPROVEMENTS 

AT NUEVITAS 

The two wharves are lo- 
cated at Punta I^astelillo, a 
point about five kilometers 
from the present Nuevitas 
station. The track has been 
laid and the roadbed com- 
pleted out to this point, with 
the exception of some shal- 
low filling and trestle work, 
and work has been started 
on the buildings located on 
the wharves and the sugar 
warehouses on the point. 

The new wharves are to be 
700 feet in length with two 
houses at the end of each 
wharf 282 feet long, for the 
storage of freight passing to 
and from the steamers, and 
at present the average depth 
of water alongside the 
wharves is 21 feet, but the 
plans call for further dredg- 
ing to secure the necessary 
depth of water to permit 
ships to turn. 




12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



FELTON 

r . t 

The original appropriation to cover pro- 
posed improvements in the'Bethlehem Steel 
plant at Felton was m.aterially reduced, 
but the revised plan provides for the ex- 
penditure of more than $1,000,000 in con- 
nection with improvements and betterm.ents 
on the plant and mjnes at this point, and it 
is understood that the greater portion of this 
appropriation wiU go towards enlarging the 
present Power Plant and installing a full set 
of Turbine alternators, which will more 
than double the capacity of the present 
generators; also new dock work which pro- 
vides for 500 feet of reinforced concrete 
dock and necessary dredging of the new 
location to thirty feet of water alongside the 
present loading and unloading docks. 



AMERICAN BOURSE 

It is proposed to open an American Bourse 
in Havana for the convenience of Cuban 
importers, and it is stated that a location has 
already been selected in the business section 
of Havana. The idea of this institution will 
be to provide a convenient meeting ]:)laee for 
Cuban merchants where they can inspect a 
great number of lines of guaranteed American 
merchandise, and full information and 
samples, etc., will be at their disposal. It is 
proposed that this Bourse be maintained by 
the manufacturers who display their samples 
and manufactures therein. It is not the 
purpose to show complete lines, but the idea 
is that the articles sold through the Bourse 
will repre.sent the highest of each respective 
class. This enterprise will be in charge of a 
representative who will be competent to 
handle export trade. 



HAVANA NEWSPAPER 

A new newspaper has made its appearance 
in Havana. It is called the Bolelin Oficial de 
los Mercados de la Habana, and will be 
devoted exclusively to financial matters. 



SHOEMAKERS 



The shoe manufacturers of Cuba have 
appealed to the Department of Agriculture 
asking that the shoes of the army and navy be 
ordered from them and not abroad. 



FERROCARRILES DEL NORTE 

The final survey has been completed 
for the route of this road between Moron 
and Nuevitas, and actual construction is 
now well under way. The roadbed is finished 
and the track laid from Moron to a point 
about fifty kilom.eters east (as indicated on 
the route ro.ap), where a siding has been 
diverted aliout twenty kilometers south and 
west to San Bernado, where it is understood 
a large m.odern sugar m.ill will be erected. 
The work is now being rapidly pushed to 
com.pletion and it is expected to be ready 
for traffic Ijetween Moron and Nuevitas, a 
distance of some 160 kilometers, early next 
year. 

The proposed route is through a new and 
undeveloped country and requires the con- 
struction of two large bridges over the 
Caunao and Maximo rivers, touching a point 
within three miles of the American citrus 
fruit colony, La Gloria. The plans are 
completed for terminals and wharves at the 
port of Nuevitas, which will be the principal 
shipping port for the new district opened up 
by this proposed railroad. 



MEDICAL CONGRESS 

Delegates of the Fifth Latin-American 
Medical Congress have decided to hold the 
next session of that congress in Havana. The 
date is not definitely decided, but will be in 
the latter part of 1917. Dr. Rafael Menocal 
has been chosen secretary of the congress. 



HAVANA 



The General Passenger offices of the United 
Railways, now located at 118 Prado, Havana, 
will be removed to the Central Station. 
The city ticket office will remain at the present 
location, 118 Prado, and this change wiJ only 
effect the General Passenger Agent, Mr. 
Frank Roberts, and his immediate staff, 
who will be in closer communication with 
the many matters concerning his department 
at the Central Station. 

PORT OF HAVANA DOCKS CO. 

It is reported that this concern, with a 
capital of .S8,500,000, has passed into the 
control of a syndicate headed by Sr. Jos6 
Mirimon, President of the Spanish Bank of 
Cuba. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



vs 




Entrance and Administration Building, Government Station, Santiago de las Vegas. 



ESTACION. CENTRAL AGRONOMICA 



GOVERNMENT EXPERIMENTAL STATION. SANTIAGO DE LAS VEGAS. CUBA 

This experimental station was founded in 1904 as a small farm, and has continued at its 
present location since that time, increasing in size and importance, until today it is one of the 
largest and most complete agricultural stations in the West Indies. 

The director in charge, Mr. J. T. Crawley, is an American, and he is assisted by a staff of 
Americans and young Cubans who have had their training at Cornell University and other 
Agricultural Schools in the United States. 

The location of this station is an excellent one, twenty miles from Havana in the western 
part of Havana province, and it is reached hourly by electric trains on the Western Railway of 
Havana. The farm is several hundred acres in extent and lies in a typical red soil tobacco 
country, which partly explains the wonderful results obtained here in the experiments with the 
tobacco plant. 

The institution is a well organized one, and the niuuerous departments are in charge of 
experts in their respective lines. The arrangement of the organization as to stations is as 
follows : 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY AGRICULTURE 

HORTICULTURE BOTANY 

VEGETABLE PATHOLOGY CHEMISTRY AND SOIL PHYSICS 

LIBRARIAN 

Experiments are carried on here in field work, irrigation, treatment of soils, grafting, stock- 
breeding, etc., and the full}' equipped laboratories add much to the scientific results obtained. 

The subject of irrigation has heretofore received but little attention in Cuba, in the first 
place because the crops have been so ample that irrigation was thought to be unnecessary, 
and in the second place the popular opinion seems to be that any system of artificially applying 
water to the usual crops would be so expensive as to be impracticable. The extended drouth 
of the past two years has been so severe, however, and such great damage has been done to 
almost every agricultural and financial interest of the Island, particularly to the sugar interests, 
that the subject is now receiving first consideration at this station. The station has no special 
irrigation engineer as yet, but it managed to give the subject much attention and now 
has a system of irrigation which is producing the desired results in cane and tobacco fields. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




INNER COURT — Grounds and Offices. Government Station. SantiaK'^ de las Vegas. 




Grove of Rubber Trees, Government Station, Santiago de las Vegas 



Recently ten plots of 150 sq. meters of cane were planted at the station for irrigation, and 
an equal area was planted to be grown without irrigation. It was late for planting cane and in 
the dry season. As a m.atter of fact the unirrigated cane did not germinate, whereas the irrigated 
cane germinated and grew well. The unirrigated cane was replanted and both fields were cut. 
The irrigated cane yielded at the rate of 95.826 arrobas per caballeria, whereas the tmirrigated 
yielded but 28.122. In other words, the irrigated yielded three times as much as the unirrigated. 
The soil conditions were the same in each instance. 

The following facts argue for irrigation in Cuba : 

The rainfall in Cuba is too small, even in the years of greatest pre- 
cipitation, for the full development of sugar cane. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



15 




'\r.i,,-,, ( ; I'l ,\vi iiii' unilcr ( ' I.ci'.-i'cImI h . ( Icj vci n nii'iil Staluni. S;m!iaK'> 'li' las X'cga;- 




rank A Power Plant, (!• 



Station, Santiago de las \" 



Every yeja- there is a continuous period of at least three months 
when cane needs more water than is suppHed by rainfall. 

The rainfall is very uncertain and irrigation is needed to insure 
against this irregularity. 

There is a considerable amount of surface water and a great deal of 
storm water, and there are no insuperable obstacles to their utilization. 
Underground water is found in most localities near the surface, and 
probably in sufficient quantity to be utilized. 

The present method of irrigating tobacco is both expensive and 
inefficient . 

When a good stream of water is available the tobacco can be cul- 
tivated and irrigated with one-third the labor now used, and to the bet- 
terment of the crop. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



The same good results have been secured at ths station ia studying the irrigation of 
tobacco as of cane, but in the case of tobacco heavy fertihzation is required in addition to 
irrigation. 

Several small plots of land have been devoted here to experiments with raising Burbank's ' 
Spineless Cactus and Rubber Trees and plants from Demerara and Para, but in the case of the 
Spineless Cactus the plot selected for these beds lays in a low stretch of ground which does 
not give sufficient drainage, and with the recent heavy rains, there has been too much water, 
which caused a rot to appear in the young slabs; and with the rubber plants or trees, just the 
reverse occurred and, due to the lack of a sufficiently humid climate, the trees seemed to be 
slowly withering, with the leaves discolored and dropping off, and the production of gum or 
rubber was of no consequence. These rubber plants were seven years old and under natural 
or normal conditions should be expected to produce good quantities of rubber, but they ap- 
peared to be badly neglected or not intended for this particular district of Cuba. 

The production of cotton has been tried at this station, but destructive insect pests and 
other difficulties have resulted in its abandonment as a crop. 

The grasses for pasturage seem to come second in importance to sugar cane and tobacco 
and they have succeded in introducing several new grasses on the heavy clay soils here that 
give every promise of success. 

The laboratories are most interesting and among other exhil)its there are 366 different 
kinds of woods, registered and described fully, which are extremely useful, not only for purposes 
of general construction, but for railway ties that never rot, handles for tools and implements, 
shipbuilding, carving and inlaying, and a thousand and one purposes for which hardwoods 
are always in demand. Interesting experiments are being conducted here in the importation 
of jute fibers from India for the manufacture of sugar bags. 

The gardens are complete with their hundreds of varieties of palms, which are more plenti- 
ful in Cuba than any other one tree, and not only does their peculiar graceful form add 
marked beauty to the landscape, but either fruit, bark, leaves or pith of this great family of 
indogens is here made to serve some good purpose in the life of the native. 




Spineless Cactus beds at Government Station, Santiago de las Vegas. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 




Spineless Cactus Grown on the Cendoya Farm near Santiago. 



BURBANK'S SPINELESS CACTUS IN SANTIAGO, CUBA 



So much has been written of late of the wonders and varieties of the Burbank Spineless 
Cactus plant, that it seems an important point has been omitted when one does not specify 
the "variety." We are told this makes all the difference in the world and this article will deal 
principally with what is known as the "late variety" grown on the experimental farm of IMr. 
Julian Cendoya at Santiago. 

]\Iany advantages are claimed for this late variety over the "early variety," and its food 
value as a nutritious forage, yielding in quantity, easy of culture and cheap to raise and handle, 
adapted to poor land as well as good, and producing an unfailing crop each year, makes it the 
most so-called precious forage crop known, and it should appeal to the stock raiser, the 
sugar planter and the farmer when considering the food supply. 

The Cendoya plantation is located on the Guantanamo & Western Railroad, midway be- 
tween Santiago and Guantanamo, and consists of 66 acres of this late variety planted only four 
months ago from a starting of 60,000 plants, and the results so far obtained have been satis- 
factory' when it is considered that they were laid out during the months of heayv' rains, many 
difficulties resulting therefrom on account of too much dampness which tends to rot the young 
plants. 

The experiment has not been carried far enough as yet to justify the making of any pre- 
dictions as to its success in Cuba, and the important question just now seems to be how and 
where to get the necessary slabs or leaves for propagation. These, for some years to come, will 
probably be too valubale for any other purpose than to plant new nurseries and fields. 

For comparison as to the possible returns from Spineless Cactus as a forage food, we are 
shown that alfalfa in the United States is worth $20 per ton. Melojo, or green corn fodder in 
Cuba is worth $25 per ton. These will grow only on the best soil. Five tons of alfalfa worth 
is sometimes cut from an acre of rich land if well irrigated. The minimum, 25 tons of 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 





Spineless Cactus Farm, Cendoj a. Santiago. 
An excellent specimen showing the original 
slab and the numerous sprouts which will 
be used as nursery stock. 

Spineless Cactus l-arni. <!'endoya, Santiago. 

Rows of voung plants showing the distance 

between slabs when planted. 

Spineless Cactus, grown on land worthless for any other food crop, at $10 per ton amoimts to 
$250 per acre, or $25,000 as the value of the.product of three waste caballerios or 100 acres, if it 
proves to be the food claimed and if the stock will continue to eat it. 

Only three years ago, every spineless cactus plant in the world was growing on a quarter 
of an acre of ground in the experimental nurseries of Luther Burbank, at Santa Rose, California. 
During the recent World's Fair in San Francisco, attention was called to the marvellous work 
accomplished by Burbank in plant life, and especially to the wonderous promise of his Spineless 
Cactus. This plant is now successfully grown in California, Florida and Cuba, and it is the 
intention of Cuban growers to use it locally and if necessary to ship it commercially as food to 
the Argentine and South American markets. 

Disinterested parties in Cuba say the stock will not eat the cactus as food, also that under 
certain conditions it will revert to the native spiney form, but it seems good logic to suppose that 
the Spineless is a distinct species which can be propagated indefinitely, especially from cuttings, 
and that it will no more revert to some other type than will corn or wheat. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

Bolelin de Minas, January, No. 2.— This 
publication is issued by the Department of 
Agriculture. This paper has a very full ac- 
count of the geological survey which was 
made in Cuba in 1901 by representatives of 
the Geological Survey of the United States, 
and it gives a great deal of information in re- 
gard to the geological situation of Cuba. 

A large portion of this issue of the magazine 
is devoted to information in regard to the 
copper mines of Cuba. 

This number also has two charts in colors 



which give much information in regard to the 
geological formation of the Island. 

Philadelphia Year Book, published by the 
Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. — -This 
gives an interesting description of industrial 
Phihidelphia in all its aspects. It describes 
the many industries and gives detailed in- 
formation about the hundreds of articles 
manufactured in the mills and factories of the 
city. Philadelphia has been called the 
world's greatest workshop and produces 
more varieties of manufactured goods than 
any other city in the world. 



THECUBAREVIEW 19 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of January and for seven months ended January 31, 1017> 
compares as follows: 

1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

January gross $761,118 $691,479 $544,891 $478,179 $460,322 $368,471 $315,783 

Expenses 552,682 292,281 227,479 240,722 208,223 176,216 166,890 

Net income $210,963 $405,296 $317,411 $237,456 $252,098 $192,254 $148,893 

Other income 2,527 6,097 

Net earnings $208,435 $399,198 $317,411 

Fixed charges 95,012 87,120 70,959 66,791 66,791 65,125 59,625 

January surplus $115,950 $318,175 $246,451 $170,665 $185,307 $127,129 $89,268 

From July 1st: 

Seven months' gross $3,936,295 $3,231,778 $2,551,349 $2,651,753 $2,409,274 $1,951,136 $1,577,719 

Seven months' net 1,191,514 1,510,781 1,184,329 1,219,384 1,075,202 876,567 669,095 

Other ncome 7,582 6,097 

Fixed charges 633,986 539,869 492,313 467,541 467,263 425,875 . 279,625 

Sui-plus $565,110 $977,009 $692,015 $751,842 $607,938 $450,692 $389,470 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month ojFehTuanj: 1917 1916 1915 

Gross earnings $504,325 $489,543 $444,404 

Operating expenses 210,852 177,766 175,928 

Net earnings 293,473 311,777 268,476 

Miscellaneous income 8,088 4,502 10,374 



Total net income 301,561 316,279 278,850 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 166.689 197,204 170,161 

2 months to February 2m: 19)7 1916 1915 

Gross earnings ?1,051,813 $981,617 $918,128 

Operating expenses 446,816 364,051 365,419 

Net earnings 610,997 617,566 552,709 

Miscellaneous income 14,456 14,297 15,463 



Total net income $625,453 $631,863 $568,172 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 358,701 397,396 350,995 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipS: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

Week ending Feb. 24th £56,593 £61,003 £50,108 £47,148 £49,056 £42,081 £42,987 

Week ending Mar. 3d 60,733 60,829 53,165 51,244 51,001 43,740 42,875 

Week ending Mar. 10th 61,623 59,977 52,308 51,055 50,093 41,216 42,765 

Week ending Mar. 17th 62,463 61,089 52,073 48,749 48,058 43,604 43,041 



EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 

Week ending March 3d £6,761 £6,818 £5,740 £5,414 

Week ending March 10th 8,505 7,066 5,703 5,487 

Week ending March 17th 8,276 6,989 5,704 5,273 

Week ending March 24th 8,247 6,741 5,223 5,280 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

Weekly Teceipts: 1917 1916 

Week ending February 24th £29,567 £26,992 

Week ending March 3d 30,553 27,369 

Week ending March 10th 30,671 26,658 

Week ending March 17th 34,639 26,365 

Week ending March 24th 30,928 28,415 



1915 


1914 


;23,339 


£19,557 


23,168 


20,818 


23,412 


20,104 


23,343 


22,103 


20,791 


21,721 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

A$ quoUd bv Lawrence Turnure A Co., New York. 

Bid. Asked. 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 90 93 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 4H% Bonds of 1949 85 K !^GH 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 94 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 98J/2 99^ 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 103 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 89 92 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 90 93 

Cuba Co. Q% Debenture Bonds 95 100 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 98 101 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 92 J^ 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 97J^ 98 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 1043^ 107 

Matanaas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 102 105 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock 205 206 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 10134 101 J^ 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 60 63 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. Ist Mtge. Bonds 92 95 

All prices of bonds quoted on an and interett 6am. 



HAVANA ELECTRIC RY.. LT. & PWR. CO. one-half per cent. (2M%) on the stock of the 

A semi-annual dividend of S3.00 per share Company for the quarter ended March 31, 

on the preferred stock and a dividend of $3.00 191", payable May 1st, 1917, to stockholders 

per share on the common stock will be paid of record at the close of business April 21, 

on May 15th, 1917, to stockholders of record 1917. The transfer books will not be closed. 

at the close of business on April 25th, 1917. — . . — 

Checks will be mailed. 

Stock transfer books will be closed from 

April 26th to May 17, 1917, both inclusive.^ The Board of Directors have declared an 

extra dividend of ten per cent. (10 '^) on the 



THE NEW NIQUERO^SUGAR COMPANY 



GUANTANAMO SUGAR COMPANY preferred and common capital stock of the 

The Board of Directors has declared a divi- company, payable April 18th, 1917, to stock- 

dend of one dollar and twenty-five cents holders of record at the close of business April 

($1.25) per share, or at the rate of two and 16th, 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



21 



THE AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING COMPANY 

AND ITS CONSTITUENT COMPANIES 



Condensed General Balance Sheet, December 31, 1916 

ASSETS 

Real estate and plants, including refineries, warehouses, cooperage, railroads, tank cars, wharves 
and stables, with their machinery and equipment, and timber and other lands owned in fee 
or through ownership of the entire capital stock of constituent companies, at cost less deprc- 
tion 

Investments, general 

Investments, insurance fund 

Investments, pension fund 

Merchandise and supplies, including raw and refined sugar, syrup, material in process of manu- 
facturing, boneblack, cooperage and other stock and supplies on hand 

Prepaid accounts, insurance, taxes, etc 

Loans 

Accounts receivable 

Accrued income, interest earned and dividends declared but not yet collected 

Cash on hand with trust companies, banks and short-term loans 

Capital Stock: LIABILITIES. 

Preferred $45,000,000.00 

Common 45,000,000.00 

Sundry Reserves : 

Forinsurance ' $9,000,00(1(1(1 

For pension fund l,250,0(lii (Ml 

For improvement of plants ' 1,367,.')1 i.S4 

For trade mark advertising 1,000,000.00 

For contingencies 857,753.03 

Accounts and loans payable 

Dividends declared payable January 2, 1917, and former dividends unclaimed 

Surplus: 

Balance December 31, 1915 $16,328,802.22 

Add Amount transferred in 1916 from profit and loss account 2,019,909.47 

Income and Profit and Loss Statement for the Year 1916 



Profit from operations 

Interest on loans and deposits . 

Income from investments 

Net profits from investments . . 



CREDITS: 



DEBITS: 

For depreciation, renewal or replacement of plant and equipment 

For appropriations to reserves as follows: 

Insurance fund $1,000,000.00 

Improvements of plants 1,000,000.00 

Trade Mark .\dvertising l.OOjO.OOO.OO 

Pension fund 250,000.00 

Contingencies 133,562,09 

For dividends declared during 1916 

Balance added to surplus 



$47,246,442.80 

23,972,0:50.34 

9,000,000.00 

1,250,000.00 

18,654,839.97 

1,527,643.32 

1,222,193.00 

3,833,259.72 

555,907.03 

22,717,453.53 

$129,979,775.80 



.190,000,000.00 



13,475, 267.S7 



6,555,963.24 
1,599,833.00 



18,348,711.69 
$129,979,775.80 



$9,756,379.42 

792j990.70 

2,905,737.10 

248,336.34 

$13,703,443.56 



$2.,000,OCO.CO 



3,383,562.09 
6,299,972.00 



Profit and Loss Statement 
Credits : 

Profit from operations 

Interest on loans and deposits 
Income from Investments. . . . 
Net profit from investments . . 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT YEARS 1913, 1914, 1915 AND 1916. 

1915 



1913 



$1,015,853.21 

894,204.30 

2,274,931.20 



1914 

$2,791,050,07 

934,330.45 

1,627,650.31 

786,359.13 



$11,683,534.09 
$2,019,909.47 



$2,991,465.39 

880,609,09 

2,312,646.21 



1916 

$9,756,379.42 

792,fe0.7O 

2,SCf,7c7.]0 

248,336.34 



Amount of appropriations for improvement of 
plants expended in new construction, and 
offset in depreciation on plant and equip- 
ment below 

Amount deducted from surp. of former years. . 



Debits: 

Depreciation, Renewal and Replacement. 

Sundry reserves 

Dividends declared 



$4,184,988.71 $6,139,389.96 $6,184,720.69 $13,703,443.56 



903,279.88 
3,196,195.47 



707,178.50 
1,198,630.56 



685,470.76 
701,992.24 



$8,284,464.06 $8,045,199.02 $7,572,183.69 $13,703,443.56 



$1,127,767.81 

856,731.25 

6,299,965.00 



$821,112.63 

924,114.39 

6,299,972.00 



$790,304.71 

481,906.98 

6,299,972.00 



Amount added to surplus of former years. . . . 



$8,284,464.06 $8,045,199.02 $7,572,183.69 



$2,000,000 
3,383,562.09 
6,299,972.00 

$11,683,.534.09 
2,019,909.47 

$13,703,443.56 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Balance Sheet 

Real estate and plants $40,S44,m.o(i 

Investments, general 2H, 41. '),(;,"):? '4U 

Investments, insurance fund S, 1)1)0, ()()(). (10 

Investments, pension fund 798,i).')."i.30 

Merchandise and supplies 17,71.3,730.82 

Prepaid accounts 28(i,000.,s;-! 

Loans 1,789,000,00 

Accounts receivable 3, Oil, 702. S4 

Accrued income 537,()()S S.'j 

Cash 17,587,854.81 

.5122,984,785.88 

Liabilities: 

Capital stock .1)0,000,000. 00 

Sundry reserves 10,321,377 2.i 

Accounts and loans payable 2,s3,s,4(i(),('>l 

Dividends declared and outstanding. . l,5'.).'i,.")17.00 

Surplus 18,229,425.02 

$122,984,785.88 



$4.S,477,03,s.20 
20,'.)r),s,070.i:i 

,S, 000. 001), 00 

SOO.OOD.OO 

15,431,099.02 

2.")4,S(;4.S1 

5,137,275.00 

4.350, lli7.r,l 

ISO, 123.55 

19,110,779.10 



S4S,7fi3,5ti0.47 

22,577,772,00 

■S, 000, 000, 00 

1,000,000,00 

16,963,384.52 

252,834.04 

3,803,274 90 

l.(io7,:'.',i,s ro 

ir,,s,si I i;7 

15,024,800.32 



847 



4(i,442,.S9 

23,972.0:^0 34 

9.000,000,00 

1,2.50,000,00 

18, 054, 839,97 

1,527,043.32 

1,222,193.00 

3,833,259.72 

.555,907.03 

22,717,453.53 



123,009,417.48 $122,061,875.01 $129,979,775.80 



$90,000,000.00 $40,000,000,00 

10,488,801.57 10,137,705.02 

:;.89I,S95,45 .3.999. ir,L>, 02 

1.59 1,920,(10 1.595.904,25 

17,030,794.40 10,328,.S02.22 



$■40,000,000.00 

13,475,207,87 
0,555. 903. 24 
1,. 599, 833. 00 

18,348,711.09 



!23,009,417.48 $122,031,875.01 $129,979,775.80 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



• MARKET FOR AUGER BITS IN CUBA 

The woodworking ini^liistry of Giiba is 
not developed to an important degree, 
although there are in the larger centers a 
considerable number of carpenter shops, 
small furniture repair and manufacturing 
shops, and wagon and carriage builders. In 
the municipality of Habana there are 16 
lumberyards that operate woodworking shops, 
more than 100 small carpenter shops, 17 
carriage and wagon construction and repair 
shops, 2 fairly large cabinetmaking and 
furniture manufacturing plants, and 18 or 
20 small cabinetmaking shops. 

Auger-BUs for Working Hardwood. 

There seems to be little doubt that an auger 
bit for working extremely hard woods would 
meet with approval here, if properly demon- 
strated to dealers and users by well-qualified 
Spanish-speaking salesmen who would per- 
sonally canvass the trade. A salesman repre- 
senting a general line of woodworking 
machinery, carpenters' tools or general hard- 
ware could carry samples of the auger bits 
referred to and demonstrate the practical 
application of the tool to the trade here. 
Such an effort would [probably meet with fair 
success. 

If, however, the manufacturers of these 
auger bits are not prepared to assume a sales 
campaign such as that indicated, it is possible 
that a resident manufacturer's agent in 
Habana would undertake to introduce and 
sell these tools. Some headway might also be 



made through correspondence and advertising 
matter in the Spanish language sent to prom- 
inent importers of hardware in the trade 
centers of this country. 

Terms of credit with well established 
hardware merchants in Habana are usually 
arranged without difficulty, especially on 
merchandise that is subject to a good demand. 
— Consul Henry M . Wolcolt, Habana. 

CUBA'S FRUIT TRADE 

Among the fruits grown in Cuba are the 
banana, pineapple, orange, lime, grape-fruit, 
avocado (aguacate) anon (custard apple), fig, 
guava, mamey and sapote. 

Exports — ^During the five years 1909-1913, 
was exported from Cuba an annual aver- 
age of 69,063,000 pounds of ]>inea])i)les, 
valued at $1,189,000; 82,223,000 pounds of 
bananas, valued at .$771,000; 6,195,000 
pounds of oranges, valued at $116,000; and 
84,223 pounds of limes valued at $1,521.00. 
Practically all of these fruits were shi])j)ed 
to the United States. 

Imports — The principal fruits and fruit 
products imported into Cuba during the 
five year period 1909-1913 and their average 
annual value, were: dried apples, $5,740.00, 
fresh apples, $59,000.00; canned fruit, $73,- 
000.00; grapes, $39,000.00; prunes, $15,- 
300.00; raisins, $27,300.00; olive oil, 
000.00; and wines, $1,574,000. 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS 

The Hammond Iron Works of Warren, Pa., 
announce that their Havana representatives 
in the future will be Messrs Ellis Bros., 28 
San Ignacio, Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



CUBAN MARKET FOR AMERICAN TEXTILES 

Althoujih the I'nitcd States buys four- 
fifths of Cuba's exports and sells more than 
half of all the goods Cuba Ijuys abroad, Anieri - 
can manufacturers supplied less than one- 
fourth of the cotton and wooJen textiles im- 
ported into the island during the normal 
years preceding the war, and this in spite of 
the fact that the tariff on cotton goods from 
the United States is 30 i)er cent less than that 
applied to similar goods from other countries. 
According to a new report issued by the 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
of the Department of Commerce, the United 
States is the logical source of supply for Cuban 
purchasers of textile- and should be able to 
obtain a much larger share of the business in 
the next few years. 

Until within a comparatively few years, 
says Special Agent W. A. Tucker, author of 
the report, .American manufacturers have i)aid 
relatively 1 ittle attention to the Cuban market, 
partly owing to the fact that prior to the en- 
actment of the reciprocity treaty there was 
little opportunity to build up a trade that 
was worth the effort involved. Since the es- 
tablishment of the Republic conditions have 
changed matei-ially, so that in 1914, Cuba 
ranked fourth as a purchaser of American 
cotton goods, its purchases being exceeded 
only bj' those of Canada, the Philippines, and 
China. 

The climate of Cuba is such that cotton 
goods are used for clothing by both sexes 
through the greater part of the year, and it is 
safe to say that a large proportion of the 
population is dressed in cotton, both winter 
and summer, as the winters are not cjld. 
The entire supply of cotton goods, both for 
wearing apparel and for household use must 
be imported, with the single exception of a 
relatively small quantity of terry towels 
manufactured on the island. 

During the fiscal year 1914, which was nor- 
mal, Cuba purchased abroad .$10,500,000 
worth of cotton goods, of which 34.13 per 
cent came from England, 21.47 per cent from 
the United States, 15.38 per cent from Spain, 
11.70 per cent from France, and 8.05 per cent 
from Germany. A number of other countries 
contributed smaller amounts. In 1915, the 
United States took the lead with 35.44 per 
cent, England's share fell off to 30.10 per 



cent, S])ain showed a slight increase to 15.75 
per cent, French sales decreased to 5.39 per 
cent, and (iermany's share was onlj' 3.34 per 
cent, the total imports amounting to $9,609,- 
968. It seems certain that so long as the ])res- 
ent abnormal conditions continue .American 
cotton will gain. 

The imports of woolen goods amoimt to 
only alx)ut 10 per cent of the imports of cot- 
ton goods, and by far the 1 argest share is sup- 
plied l)y England, France in normal times 
being second, Spain third, and the United 
States a poor fourth. Tiiere is an increasing 
demand for woolen fabrics, and although 
Cuba wil 1 never be a great consumer of these 
cloths it will require only a little effort to in- 
crease considerably the annual consumption. 
American manufacturers have not paid this 
market the attention it deserves, and in some 
cases when representatives were sent, they 
were not the right men for the «Tok. When 
properly represented American firms have no 
difficulty in selling goods. 

The new report is the first of a series on tex- 
tile markets in Latin America. It is entitled 
"Textiles in Cuba," Special Agents Series 
No 126. Most of the 56 pages are devoted to 
a careful analysis of the trade in the different 
kinds of cloth, technical and definite encu'gh 
to be of practical value to the manufacturer 
and exporter. There are also chapters on the 
general conditions governing the trade. 



IMPORTANT CONSTRUCTION WORK IN CUBA 

[Special Agent W. W. Swing, Hahana.\ 

Architects and contractors in Cuba report 
tnat business in their line is now active. Large 
fields in agriculture, industries, and comm_erce 
rem.ain to be developed. Several new sugar 
m-ills already are in course of construction and 
others are projected for grinding during the 
coming season. One of the important mills is 
thB Nueva Era in tne Province of Pinar del 
Rio, belonging to the Cia. Azucarera Hispano- 
Cubana, the president of which is Gen. Emilio 
Nunez, Halmna. The contract for the con- 
struction of this mill, it is reported, has not 
yet been awarded. 

Railway extension and new construction is 
being projected on a considerable scale. 
Among the works already authorized by the 
Cuban Government are a fine projected by 
the Cul)a Railroad Co., from Camamgae}- to 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



Santa Cruz del Stir on the soutli coast about 
80 kilometers (50 miles) ; another extension of 
about 90 kilometers from Placetas to Ciego 
de A\ila; an electric line from Habana to 
Matanzas, skirting the north coast, about 90 
kilom.eters, to be built by Mr. M. J. Hershey, 
Prado, 33 Habana ; and a considerable exten- 
sion of the Habana Central Railway line, an 
inter urban electric system with headquarters 
in the terminal station, Habann. (This com- 
pany has also been granted a concession by 
the Cuban Go\ernment to construct a new 
ferry slip in Halxma Harbor, to establish 
communication with the opposite side of the 
bay). A railway line of about 60 kilom.eters is 
projected from the port of Cienfuegos to 
San Lino, and a railroad of about 47 kilo- 
meters from the town of Pinar del Rio to the 
port of Esperanza, a concession for which has 
been granted to Mr. Jorge A. Belt, Calzada 
95, Vedado, Habana. The United Railway 
of Habana, whose offices are in the terminal 
station, also proposes to double-track its ex- 
isting line between Habana and Matanzas. 
Other projected works are a line of about 300 
kilometers from Caibarien to Nuevitas in 
which Jose Miguel Tarafa, of Habana, is 
interested, and a line from Bahia Honda to 
Cohsolacion del Norte in the Province of 
Pinar del Rio. 

Important Maintenance Work Expected. 

The heavy traffic movement of both sugar 
and general nierchandise is expected to oc- 
casion the necessity of important mainten- 
ance work on the lines of tne Cuba Railroad 
Co., whose headquarters are at Santa Clara, 
in the Province of that nam.e. The increase in 
the movem.ents of the ports also renders 
necessary extensions of wharves. In the port 
of Habana works are under consideration by 
the Port of Habana Docks Co. and the San 
Jose Wharf Co. amounting to $2,000,000. 

The tourist traffic and the increasing com- 
mercial importance of Habana require the 
construction of modern hotel buildings, and 
valuable sites already have been purchased. 
Mr. Regino Truffin, of Buena Vista, and Mr. 
Andres Gom.ez-Mena, Manzana de Gomez, 
Habana, are interested. 

The drainage of the extensive swamp on the 
south coast, known as Ceinaga de Zapata, 
surrounding the deep-water harbor known as 
the Bahia de Cochinos, is another important 
project authorized by the Cuban Government, 



and a, concession for this work has beeri 
granted to the Ceinaga Zapata Co. The New 
York representative of this company is Mr. R. 
G. Ward, Herald Square Hotel, New York. 
A new modern garage building, to cost about 
$200,000, is about to be constructed on the 
water front overlooking the sea, and the site 
has been purchased by Mr. Manuel Carreno, 
Zulueta, corner of Teniente Rey, Habana. 

Military Hospital — Construction of Hippo- 
drome. 

The Cuban Government proposes to build 
a military hospital at Cam.p Columbia, on the 
outskirts of Habana. A concession has been 
granted to Mr. Charles T. Henshall, Hotel 
Plaza, Habana, for the construction of a 
hippodrome and general amusement park 
within the city limits, and a movement is on 
foot to provide Habana with a large stadium 
in view of the effort ' to have the Olympic 
games held there in 1920. Mr Richard Grant, 
director of athletics in the University of 
Habana, has tne project in hand. 

A terminal railroad line is projected from 
Cardenas to Punto de Hicacos Peninsula of 
about 31 Idlometers to facilitate the com- 
merce of the port of Cardenas. This is the 
third port of the island, having exports of 3,- 
000,000 bags of sugar and about 200,000 tons 
of general im.ports. It is claimed this project 
mesns the hfe of Cardenas, which is affected 
at present by the local port charges maKing it 
expensive for shipping, when it should be one 
of the most economical ports of Cuba. It is 
nearer to snipping points in the United States 
than any other place on the island. Pedro M. 
Mederos, of Cardenas, has the concession and 
has made application for a subsidy from the 
Cuban Government. 



DELAWARE CHARTER 

Cuban Industrial Ore Co., cany on busi- 
ness of mining, $1,000,000; Herbert E. Latter, 
Norman P. Coffin, Clement M. Egner, local 
Wilmington (Del.) incorporators. 



ECUADOR 



The value of Ecuador's total imports from, 
and exportj to, Cuba during 1914 and 1915 
was as follows: 

Imports from Exports to 

1914 1915 1914 1915 

$3,514 $799 $41,397 $92,548 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



r 




^^.■.-..yA-., ■- -{ 



"Soledad" Mill and Plant. 



EL SOLEDAD PLANTATION AND MILL 



This plantation and central is owned and operated by INIr. E. F. Atkins of Boston, who was 
the founder of the estate nearly half a century ago, and it is today one of the best known sugar 
estates on the island of Cuba. The estate has been in operation for thirty-two years without 
interruption, and during most of that time Mr. Atkins has given the same his personal attention, 
making his residence on the plantation for several months each year. 

The sugar central, or mill, is located on the site of several old mills of the sm^aller type, of 
which there were originally eight on the present plantation of more than seven thousand 
acres of excellent cane land. The property is one of the show places of Cienfuegos, but owing 
to the distance from the city — twelve miles— and the present condition of the roads (it can be 
reached only by motor car) the trip is not a comfortable one, and on this account it does not 
hold the attraction for tourists from Cienfuegos that it once did. 

While the mill is not classed among the largest in Cuba— present capacity 140,000 bags of 
325 lbs. each— it is evident to an outsider after a visit through this "central, "'that it is a most 
eflBciently operated one, and from the standpoint of economy in operation, we are told, it could 
be used as an excellent object lesson for a great many of the larger mills in Cuba. Cleanliness 
appears to be the watchword in every part of the mill, and this excellent virtue, combined with 
the required discipline, makes for the efficiency noted. There are several novel features which 
indicate a spirit of progress about the mechanical operation of making sugar here which have 
not been adopted or have been abandoned in other mills, as the case may be, among which 
are noted a new style Link-Belt cane dump car which is operated by tilting sideways at the 
desired angle and the cane gradually slides from the car into the hopper of the earner, a big 
improvement over the old method of hoisting and dropping, and in this connection it is sur- 
prising to note the few miUs in Cuba today that have adopted this labor and tim.e-saving 
feature of handling the cane at the mill. In this mill, after the raw sugar leaves the centrifugals, 
it is forced to the top floor and blown into a conveyor from which it is dropped to the bagging 
floor. This is said to be an old idea to cool off the sugar before bagging it, and is not in general 
use in sugar mills in Cuba today. Soledad does not enjoy railroad facilities to a shipping port 
and it is necessarj' to transport the finished product of this mill in lighters down the Cajnao 
River to deep water at Cienfuegos. 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




New Office Building, Soledad. 




Home of Mr. Atlvins, Soledad. 



Among the additions and improvements noted at Soledad is an up-to-date l)aildins for 
the offices of the company and an additional new stracture to be used as quarters for the bache- 
lor officers. Individual cottages are provided by the company for the accomm.odation of 
married officers and their families. 

The residence and grounds occupied by Mr. Atkins and famjly during their stay at boledad 
are beautiful, and the gardens are among the finest in Cuba. There is an interesting old block 
house still standing on the plantation vvhich was used as a fortification during the stormy 
days of the Cuban rebellion in the nineties. 

Mr. Atkins has seen a great evolution in this important field of tropical agriculture and 
industry, not only in the methods of cultivation, but also in the progress of mechanical perfec- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



27 



tion and in the financial problems involved and in the question of handling the product thereof. 
In social phases of this industry as well, has he been n ost active and sj iiipathetic towards those 
identified with the incUistry as workmen, with particular reference to their housin>r proidem 
and to just and fair compensation. For this is he beloved, not only in his district of Cienfaegos, 
but all over Cuba where his true friendship for tlie island is well understood. He has con- 
ducted for many years at his own exj)ense and under the patronage of Harvard University a 
Tropical Experimental Garden near Soledad, where he has been very successful in the hybridi- 
zation of sugar cane, producing m^any new varieties of considerable con .m.erciai valae. For this 
work he has received the honorary degree of A.M. from Harvard University in the year 1903. 
These gardens have become well known throughout the world of agricultural circles and are 
frequently visited hy scientists from many lands, representing goverrunent and private interests, 
who have benefitted from the public-spirited initiative of Mr. AtKins. 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR CONSUMPTION IN UNITED STATES 
INCREASES 

The increase in consumjition of sugar in 
the United States has been greater than the 
increase in population, according to figures in 
Bulletin 47.3, recently prepared by the Bureau 
of Crop Estimates of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. The total consump- 
tion of sugar in this country for the decade 
ending with the fiscal year 1912-13 was 42.9 
per cent, greater than the consumption for 
the preceding decade, while the population 
for the same period increased only 21 per cent. 

The country is not only using more sugar, 
but it is ])roducing a larger portion of its total 
supply. During the decade ending with 
1912-13, as compared with the decade ending 
with 1902-03, the percentage of the total 
supplv^ produced at home increased 36.6 per 
cent., and the supply from noncontiguous 
possessions 64.4 per cent., while, on the other 
hand, the percentage imported from, foreign 
countries decreased 20.9 per cent. The total 
world production of both beet and cane sugar 
has nearly doubled during the last 20 years 
and increased from. 11,000,000 tons during 
the sugar year 1S93-94 to 20,000,000 tons in 
1912-13. 

Modern Equipment Provided for Cuban 
Factories. 

In Cuba the sugar factories have been 
improved by the use of modern equipment, 
with the result that although the number of 
factories slightly decreased, the output of 
sugar during the last 10 years has been more 
than doubled. During the last 20 years about 
9.5 per cent, of the sugar proauced in Cuba 
was exported, of which about 90 per cent, 
came to the United States. In Mexico the 



lowlands along the coast are well adapted to 
the growing of cane, and as many as 10 crops 
moy he harvested from one planting. Despite 
"unfavorable conditions, the production of 
sugar there during the five years 1903-04 to 
1907-08 increased 29.4 per cent, as compared 
with the preceding five years, and the output 
of sugar during the five years 1908-09 to 
1912-13 increased 33.8 per cent. In nearly all 
of the beet-growing countries of Eurojie the 
sugar factories have decreased in num.ber^ 
but by the use of im.proved methods the 
output of sugar has increased. 



STANDARD SCALE PROPOSED FOR SUGAR 
ANALYSIS 

More than 20 different scales have been 
employed in sugar analvsis, with the resulting; 
development of considerable misunderstand- 
ing in the industries. In cooperation with 
others who sought a rem.edy for this uncer- 
tainty, the United States Bureau of Standards 
has made a study of the problem, and a new 
scale, together with tables for its use giving 
equivalents in per cent sugar and specific 
gravity, was constructed. 

The Baume scales are arbitrary and are 
used considerably in the industries for deter- 
mining the density and per cent sugar in 
solutions. The great importance of these was 
shown by the action of the Association of 
Official Agricultural Chemists, which at its 
last meeting recommended that the Bureau 
of Standards prepare an official Baume scale 
for use in the sugar industries. Previous to 
that time the bureau had recognized the need 
of such a scale, and had conferred with several 
persons prominent in the field of sugar analy- 
sis. Visits to commercial plants in Baltimore 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



and Philadelphia furnished additional evi- 
dence that uniformity was needed. 

The new scale is to be used at 20° C. The 
standard temperature in sugar analysis is 
20° C. The advantages as well as the 
necessity of the new Bureau of Standards 
Baume scale are shown by the following: 
First, it is based upon the specific gravity 
values of Plato, which are considered the 
most reliable of any available; second, it is 
based on 20 C, the most convenient and 
widely accepted temperature for sugar work; 
third, it is based on the modulus 145, which 
has already been adopted by the Manufac- 
turing Chemists Association of the United 
States, by the Bureau of Standards, and by 
all American manufacturers of hydrometers. 
— Commerce Reports. 

SUGAR IN ENGLAND. 

According to an article in tlie Financial 
Mail of London, the political disturbance in 
Cuba has already made itself felt by increasing 
the sugar shortage in the United Kingdom. 
It seems to be thought that the shortage of 
the Cuban sugar crop has already made some 
difference in the supply going to the United 
Kingdom. It is stated, however, that the 
prospect of the sugar crop of Natal is en- 
couraging and that the cultivation of sugar 
is attracting much more attention in the 
colony of ^Mozambique, which is very well 
suited to the cultivation of sugar cane and has 
already attracted British capital. 

ST. CROIX 

The following figures show the amounts of 
■sugar exported from St. Croix during the 
past 16 years: 

Amount 
Year Tons. 

1900 12,9X5 

1901 9,244 

1902 13,014 

1903 17,080 

1904 11,481 

1905 13,637 

1906 6,182 

1907 10,998 

1908 11,483 

1909 3,955 

1910 10,836 

1911 10,496 

1912 9,865 

1913 5,968 

1914 5,206 

1915 4,015 



CUBAN SUGAR CROP 

Under present outlook, and with normal 
weather, 2,500,000 tons i.^ believed to be possi- 
ble maximum sugar crop. Fires interrupted 
railway traffic and labor disturbances have 
caused great decrease in output, estimate of 
which was too high in beginning, owing to 
character of cane in large sections. Maximum 
stated represents decrease from early estimate 
of about 800,000 tons. Little authoritative 
information is available as to amount of 
decrease attributable to revolution, but loss 
of 500,000 tons seems conservative estimate, 
— American Consul General, Havana. 



AMENDED ESTIMATE 

The American consul general at Habana, 
Cuba, states that the figures of the probable 
Cuban sugar crop transmitted March 28 may 
be increased by at least 10 per cent. 



PRESTON 



The United Fruit Company's mill at this 
point has just completed the installation of 
six large new settling tanks to replace twenty 
of the old style, also four complete Sanborn 
Evaporators with one LiUie additional, and 
new heaters, preparatory to the additional 
unit to be installed at this mill to be ready 
for next season's grinding. 



The United Fruit Company is having 
thousands of acres of land cleared and plowed 
in the vicinity of Nipe Bay along the new 
extension of their railroad from Preston, 
preparatory to planting in cane for next 
season's grinding. 



FORMOSA SUGAR 

When Formosa was taken over by the 
Japanese in 1895, the sugar production 
amounted to 75,000 tons per anniun. Lender 
the Japanese adminstration the annual pro- 
duction is now 350,000 tons. 

SUGAR CROP IN GUADELOUPE. 

Owing to the heavy demand in France for 
sugar the prospects are that the prices for 
this commodity will be high. The annual 
export of sugar from the colony averages 
about 40,000 tons. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



29 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR TRADE IN 1916 

Messrs. Wm. Connal & Co., Glasgow, in 
their review of the sugar trade for 19U), say: 
"The .Roj'al Commission on the Sugar Supply 
has contiinied to exercise entire control of the 
sugar market during the past year. It has 
successfully overcome ail difficulties of freight 
and exchange, and has succeeded in keeping 
the refineries of London, Liverpool and Green- 
ock in full employment. This of late has been 
no easy task, as supplies have been coming 
from Java and have been of uncertain arrival. 
On several occasions the deiay of a few hours 
on the passage would have throwai refiners 
out of work, but fortunately a timely arrival 
has generally relieved the situation. The Com- 
mission has likewise been enabled by the 
averaging of purchases judiciously made, to 
supply refiners wath raw sugar at an imchanged 
short price since February 28, notwith- 
standing the numerous and important fluctua- 
tions in the chief countries of production. 
The principal source of the raw sugar supply 
has been Cuba, where a record crop of 3,007,- 
000 tons has been reaped against 2,592,000 
tons the previous season, and so productive 
is this island that, under the stimulating in- 
fluence of a highly remunerative price the 
coming crop may with favorable weather, 
possibly exceed 3,500,000 tons. When it is 
considered that the average price of the last 
pre-war Culjan crop, basis 96 per cent, polari- 
sation, was about 8s to 9s per cwt. f. o. b., and 
that during the past year it has averaged 
about 18s. to 19s. per cwt. f. o. b. it will be 
seen how great the inducement has been for 
the Cuban planter to extend his cultivation, 
and how financially capable he is to equip his 
estates with plant of the newest and most im- 
proved description. It is thought not un- 
likely that Cuba may follow the lead of the 
Java planter, and adapt his plant to the manu- 
facture, in part, of white sugar suitable for 
direct grocery consumption. Java, next to 
Cuba, has contributed largely to the raw 
sugar supply. The present crop has been 
somewhat reduced by drought, but that now 
maturing gives promise of proving a record — 
namely, 1,560,000 tons, against 1,198,000 
tons in 1916. The Java crop is more inacces- 
sible than that of Cuba, as it is near to the 
Eastern markets, and in some seasons is 
largely drawn upon by India, Burmah and not 



infrequent I3' by China. The proi:ortion of 
white sugar now manufactured there, is of ex- 
cellent quality, and readily saleable for groc- 
ery purposes. The entire production of 
Mauritivis crystals, amounting to wen-nigh 
200,000 tons, was secured by the Commission, 
but inider an arrangement entered into with 
the French Government early in the year to 
make purchases on combined account, the 
cargoes of these sugars as they come forward, 
are being ordered to the French ports. Our 
own West India Crown colonies have proved 
disappointing, and, notwithstanding remuner- 
ative prices, they have showm little or no ex- 
pansion in their cultivation. It is well under- 
stood that they are capable of raising greatly 
increased crops — -that Jamaica, now produc- 
ing only 15,000 tons for export, could be made 
to yield 40,000 to 50,000 tons, and that British 
Guiana, with its present crop of 120,000 tons, 
possesses sufficient area for immense exten- 
sion. It would appear, however, that without 
guarantee of security against unfair competi« 
tion in the future, the requisite capital for 
such extensions cannot be obtained. 

It is further stated in the report that the 
consumption of sugar in the United Kingdom 
in 1913 was about 1,800,000 tons, of which 
940,000 were produced by our own refineries, 
and the remaining 860,000 were imported 
chiefly from Germany and Austria. The con- 
sumption for the past year has been reduced 
to about 1,400,000 tons, of which 850,000 have 
been from our own refineries, and 550,0000 
tons have been importations and stocks of 
white Java, American granulated, and Mauri- 
tius crystals. The market could readily have 
absorbed a much larger quantity of refined, 
and it is hoped that under the guidance of the 
new Controllers of Food and Shipping more 
liberal importations of refined may be ren- 
dered possible during 1917. 



SUGAR IN 1916. 



January. — At the commencement of the 
year a certain degree of hesitancy was shown, 
although the military position gave no hopes 
of a speedy termination of hostilities. A re- 
vision of the stocks in the United Kingdom 
disclosed the fact that the existing figure had 
been too high and that there were only 119,000 
tons available on January 1, compared with 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



465,000 tons twelve months previously, the 
total home consmnption tor the year ended 
December 31, 1915, having been 1,650,209 
tons compared with 1,683,834 tons in 1914. 
The arrivals from foreign countries durmg the 
ear.y part of the month were very small, and 
consisted largely ot American sugar, which had 
suffered badly on the voyage from fire and 
water. In producing countries the prospect of 
a large crop in Cuba seemed, already likely to 
be reached, judging by the numlier of fac- 
tories at work, and the feverish haste to secure 
the good prices obtainable. The pressure to 
sell, however. l)y holders brought about a 
sharp decline for 96% Cuban centrifugal, 
though so far as the American stocks were 
concerred they were at a low point, Isut so 
were the requirements of their refiners. It 
may here be remarked that the United States 
consumption for 1915 was 3,802,000 tons 
against 3,761,000 tons in 1914. The home de- 
mand continued unabated and as the im- 
ports of raw sugar and foreign refined con- 
tinued small, the Commission for Sugar 
Supply were compelled to raise their prices 
2s 6d per cwt. for granulated and crystals and 
this was followed by a similar advance in West 
Indian crystallized. 

In February, which in noi'mal times is the 
dullest sugar month of the year, the demand 
remainded good, with moderate supplies and 
higher rates, followed by a sharp reminder 
from the Royal Commission that imports 
would of necessity be fiu'ther reduced result- 
ing for a time in a strong tendency to antici- 
pate the effect of the above pi-onouncement . 
A large lousiness in low brown Eastern sugars, 
to be imported under license, had been done 
for some time and now became further ex- 
tended, while a speculative outburst in West 
Indian crystallised raised values from 7s to 
10s per cwt. Towards the close of the month, 
larger imports of raw occurred, to the reiief of 
the refiners who were very short of supplies. 
On the 2Sth a further advance of 2s per cwt. 
on certain kinds controlled by the Royal Com- 
mission was made, while at intervals further 
purchases of Cuban raws for Europe were re- 
ported. 

In March, the position of sugar stocks in- 
France caused the French Government to as- 
sume control and to prohibit the private im- 
portation of the article, while in the United 



Kingdom the Commission fixed the price of 
West Indiian raw to prevent further specula- 
tion. Diu'ing the month the arrivals of sugar 
of all kinds were larger tlian hitherto, but the 
operation cf making it ready for delivery was 
so tedious that at no time was any great 
quantity offered to the dealers. 

The following month of A pril contained the 
new Budget, in which the duty on sugar was 
advanced J^d per lb., necessitating an addi- 
tion of 4s 73^d to cubes, and 4s 73^d to 4s 
lOKd per cwt. to other refined. The new 
basis for West Indian crystallized was fixed at 
41s 7J^d for fair average quality with a vary- 
ing range of Is 6d per cwt. up or down accord- 
ing to quality. Towards the middle and end 
of the month the Commission was rejiorted to 
have made very large forward ])urchases of 
white cane, at advancing prices, to the extent 
of 450,000 tons. The tone of the foreign mar- 
kets at this period was firm ever5'A\rhere, the 
height of the Cuban crop having been reached 
and passed some little time previously, owing 
to a large falling off in the number of fac- 
tories at work at the close of April. This was 
reflected in the tone of the Ajnerican markets, 
which had risen 2s per cwt. diu'ing the month. 

In May however a consideralale part of the 
advance was lost, owing to the temporary sus- 
pension of purchases on behalf of the United 
Kingdom. 

Eariy in June the arrivals were heavier 
totalling in the first week of the month some 
61,000 tons of raw and refined (principally the 
former), compared with about 15,000 tons in 
the same period of 1915, but the stocks here 
were too moderate to admit of any hope of 
lower prices. Indeed early in the month a re- 
newal of purchases of American granulated 
on behalf of the United Kingdom and France 
at a .slight advance was reported, while the 
heme demand was fully capable of dealing with 
the moderate quantity distributed. An event 
of interest during this period was the arrival 
of 4,500 tons of Canadian granulated, and 
further large purchases of Cuban centrifugals 
for shipment here and to France at a further 
advance were reported the month closing as it 
had begun with the importation of large quan- 
tities of sugar. During the first six months 
there had been received in the United King- 
dom 566,713 tons of raw cane and 261 ,225 tons 
of refined sugar, which together showed a sur- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



plus of 117,712 tons when coinparcd with last 
year, while our stoc^ks, which stood at 119,000 
tons on January 1, were now 163,150 tons. 
These figures, however, included a large 
quantity of low brown cane sugar, which was 
largely in the hands of si)cculators, and which 
had to be held for some months before any 
profit accrued. Later in the year this sugar 
rose by leaps and bounds, and in the absence 
of other kinds was readily taken for grocery, 
and indeed every and any purpose that it 
could possibly be put to. Up to June 30, the 
home consumption amounted to 724,303 tons, 
a decline of 112,075 tons when compared with 
-January-June, 1915 — an important result, due 
not to any question of high prices, but entirely 
to the regulations attaching to the control. 

July. — -In the month of July the Royal 
Commission advanced the price of white Java 
for fair average quahty to 41s l^d.,and Maur- 
tius white crystals to 40s 73^d., and raw 
crystals, basis 92° net analysis, to 36s 3d, but 
left other sugars unchanged. Towards the 
middle of the month the purchase of 170,000 
tons of new crop Mauritius crystals by the 
Royal Commission was announced for later 
delivery, and it subsequently transpired that 
the whole of this sugar was destined for France. 
British i-efiners and dealers were now being 
well supplied with sugar owing to the arrival 
of some of the Java cargoes contracted for, 
while prospective wants were provided 
against by considerable purchases of Cuban 
raw, .^.merican granulated and white Java. 
Some relief to the large stock of low brown 
cane was experienced at this time by the re- 
shipment of a fair quantity to France. Little 
change in value in foreign markets occurred 
during the month, notwithstanding the occur- 
rence of a severe explosion in New York by 
which 40,000 tons of sugar were reported to 
have been destroyed. 

In August however, the American markets 
became distinctly easier for a time, but Java 
sugar on the contrary appreciated in value 
though not to any marked extent, the covu-se 
of these markets apparently contirumg to be 
mostly affected by the amount of support re- 
ceived from the United Kingdom, and not 
from any happenings to either the important 
Cuban or Java crops, the former of which 
broke all previous records. The production 



of the island anioiniti'd ('\ctituall\- to ;!,0()7,- 
915 tons with prospects of a furtlicr licavv in- 
crease in the succeeding season. 

lousiness in the month of September was 
somewhat restricted owing to a temporary 
shortage of the better kinds of grocery sugar, 
but considerable attention was directed to 
low brown cane, which was now being offered 
at relatively cheaper rates, and which offered 
opportunities for speculation. 

Early in Oclober, however, the Royal C!om- 
mission decided that future licenses for sugars 
of the above class would only l)e granted on 
condition that they were sold for brewing pur- 
poses. Considerable activity occurred during 
the month under review, the value of Cuban 
raw for prompt shipment advancing 3s per 
cwt.; but new crop, of which accounts were 
very favorable, remained quiet. Dealings in 
refining kinds from other parts of the world 
had been rendered almost imjjossible owing to 
lack of steamers, l)ut 3,000 tons of grainy 
Peruvian were about then reported to have 
been i)urchased. 

A few days later, in November, 2,000 tons of 
Brazilian sugar were also sold for the Ciyde 
and other outports; but as regards stocks actu- 
ally available, they had now been reduced to 
a lower figure than for two years ]3ast at this 
time, and consequently offerings by the Com- 
mission were small. The imminent commence- 
ment of the new Cuban crop had its effect on 
the American markets, and compared with 
prices a month back a fall of 3s per cwt. 
was recorded ior new crop raw sugar. 

The last month of the year opened quietly, 
but considerable purchases of new Cuban 
sugar were soon made for the L'nited Kingdom 
at steady prices, in addition to an important 
weight of Demerara for refining purposes. 
Towards the close large arrivals of raw and re- 
fined cane sugar took place, and the distribu- 
tion were on a larger scaie, but the difficulties 
in obtaining delivery were in no way im- 
proved, and many retailers were bare of 
stock of any kind at Christmas time. The 
imports of raw and refined to the United 
Kingdom for the year arrounted to 1,541,254 
tons, an increase of 36,212 tons compared with 
1915, while on the contrary the home con- 
smnption durinp the first 11 months of 1916 
showed the important reduction of 250,284 
tons. — The Produce Markets' Review. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



UNITED KINGDOM 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



IMPORTS. 



Unrefined Sugars: 

Russia 

Germany 



One Month Ending 
Dec. 31 



1915 
*Tons. 



1916 
*Tons. 



Twelve Months End- 
ing Dec. 31 . ^j 
1915 I 1916 " 
*Tons. ; *Tons. 



Netherlands 

Belgium 

France 

Austria-Hungary 

Java 

Philippine Islands 

Cuba 

Dutch Guiana 

Hayti and San Don ingo 

Mexico 

Peru 

Brazil 

Mauritius 

British India 

Straits Settlements 

British West Indies, British Guiana & 

British Honduras 

Other Countries 



369 

5,250 

24,474 

873 



43,621 

3,072 

2,500 

722 



3,281 

16 

17,818 



5,780 

5,537 

614 



Total raw sugars. 



Refined Sugars : 

Russia 

Germany 

Holland 

Belgium 

France 

Austria-Hungary 

Java 

United States ot America. 

Argentina 

Mauritius 

Other Countries 



Total refined sugars. 
Molasses 



Total imports. 



3,281 
2,764 



58,127 



5,170 



31 



600 

39,512 

200 

345 

2 



1,829 
20 



63,695 



23,288 
79 



3 
265 



45,860 
10,242 



23,636 
4,336 



114,229i 91,667 



293,596 

6,038 

359,746 

1,596 

280 

113 

31,440 

23,281 

111,081 

866! 



289,465. 

68,198 

553,565. 

2,470' 

4 

50,602 

8,751 

80,867 

50 



116,383 
32,453 



69,527 
2,979- 



976,875 1,126,479' 

I 

2,140 



92,870 



7a 

4,276. 



35 



S 



105,117 

188,746 

29,056 

80,704 

6,859 



94,278- 

267,681 

251 

27,931 

16,270 



505,527: 
144,773 1 



410,765 
121,599 



1,627,175, 1,658,843 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



EXPORTS. 



British Refined Sugars: 

Denmark 

Netherlands 

Portugal, Azores, and Madeira. 

Italy 

Canada 

Other Countries 



Tons. 



2 
900 



Foreign and Colonial Sugars: 

Refined and Candj- 

Unrefinc/l 

Various Mixed in lk)nd 

Molasees 



Total exports. 



902 

28 
70 



255 



1,255 



Tons. 



123 



Tons. Tons. % 

1 1 

13o 

19 1 1 

1 
16 



4,764 



i . 1 

4,472 



124 



4,936 

766 
1,327 



2,228 



164 1 



9,257 



* CaJtiulAfaed to lbs nearest too. 

jAn. Feb. [Iah. Apr. Hay. Jum Jul. Au6, 5ep Oct Hov Dec 



Comparison of 
Raw Sugar Exports 
from Cuba to the 
United Kingdom 
and Europe during 
1915. 1916 and 
1917 I to date). 



550aO0O."| 1 |-j 1 J 1 


































^7 






spoaoM— 










t 


. 


rooam 












1 








_j 








/ 








t 
















Z- 


• 


50QOOD 




/ 








I 








J 








!_ _^ 








t 








li 








1 1 


• 


SOOOOD 




T 








t/" 
















~i 








I -^ 








r 








r 




AOOlOOO 














/■ 






^^ 




SSQOOO 




z 






—i 


7.- 






t 


z 






T 


^J^ 






zjKXwnc f- 


ZZ. 






. J 


t 






81 


I 




ZSOflOO - 


3l "7 


t ^ 






S / 


t -U 




c 




*3J 








-cf-L 






) 


"^7 






l' — ?.- 


y 












ISOfiOD 


looftooc r '7 7 








^ J ^ 








J tj- 








t J t 






oosoo 


t ft 
















L t/ 






90.000 


\J~ J'- 








i^ 








l^ 








Jam rtB Mah 4pb M 


«» jun Jul Aut Sfo On n 


£N Dec 





4,475 

943 
3,256 



901 



9,575 



Estimate 


Outi:)iit 


270,000 


82,000 


300,000 


60,000 


165,000 


30,000 



34 THECUBAREVIEW 

SUGAR PRODUCTION 

The serious result of the revohition in the eastern part of Cuba is clearly reflected in the 
very much curtailed production of the following three Centrals, which have been obliged to 
shut down at this earlj date: 

Senado 

Jobabo 

Victoria 

735,000 172,000 

From the location of these Centrals there is every reason to believe that a wide area has 
been most seriously affected by the revolution. We are pleased to state, however, that from 
such information as we have received to date the other Centrals in the territory most 
affected by the political disturbance have not suffered such serious consequences, and while 
the result of these few Centrals cannot be considered as a criterion as to the proportionate 
decrease in the output of other Centrals in the eastern part of Cuba, we believe that these figures 
justify our remarks in a previous number of the Review that the output of the estates in this 
zone will be reduced to at least 50 per cent of their previous estimates. 

Other statistics received dm-ing the past month would also tend to confirm the figures 
published in the March number of the Revieiv showing a total crop not to exceed 2,750,000 
tons. 



APICULTURE IN CUBA 



Vice Consul H. M. Wolcott, Hahana. 

Previous to the war Germany took a large share of Cuban bee products. During the first 
year of the war there was a decided decrease ia the market values of honey and wax, and most 
producers turned to other lines of agricultural endeavor. However, with the present high cost 
of sugar and other food products, honey is in increased demcind, and it is possible that the indus- 
try will receive more attention in the future. 

Some few American colonists in Cuba have devoted themselves to the apiary industry with 
success, and particularly when it is conducted in connection with the citrus-fruit industry. But, 
ill general, apiculture has received little attention. While the climate of Cuba for the greater 
part of the year seems ideal for the success of this industry, there are adverse features to be 
considered, such as the .necessity for artificial feeding of bees i.n the dry seaso.n, excessive rains 
in the summer months, insect pests, and susceptibility of bees to disease in this climate. 
Countries Buying Cuban Bee Products — Beehives. 

The exports of bee products from Cuba during 1914 and 1915 were as follows. 

Countries. 

Belgium 

Canary Island 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands 

United Kingdom 

United States 

All other countries 



Wax. 




Honey. 




1914 


1915 


1914 


1915 


$4,523 




$103,014 




80 


$30 


5,886 


$3,097 






2;895 


17,140 


84,483 




155,119 




11,720 




53,964 


253,824 




17,873 


97 


1,150 


145,857 


220,722 


63,273 


89,020 


4,828 


1,605 


650 


332 



Total 251,491 240,230 384,898 364,563 

The imports of beehives in 1915 were valued at $6,515, all coming from the United States. 

Other beekeepers' apparatus imported amounted to $3,499, this total also being credited to the 

United States. 

Beehives and other utensils used in connection with apiculture enter Cuba free of duty. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 35 



THE SUGAR REVIEW 



Specially written for The Cuba Review by Willelt & (iray. New York, N. Y. 

Our last review for this magazine was dated March 7, 1917. 

At that date Cuba Centrifugal sugar 96° test basis was quoted at 434c. per lb. cost and 
freight and is now 5 l/32c. c. & f. 

During the interim the changes have been as follows : March 9th, 4 5 IGc; 10th, 43^c.; 
r2th, 4i^c.; 13th,4 7/16C.; 14th, 43^c.; 15th, 4 5/16c.; 16th, 4Mc.; 19th, 43^c.; 21st, 4 7/16c.; 
23d, 4 9/16c.; 24th, 4^c.; 27th, 4^0.; 29th, 47^c.; April 2d, 4 29/32c.; 3d, 4 29 '32c.; 4th 
4 ir^/Uw,.; 5th, 5 l/32c. 

From these quotations it will \)v noted that the market has been active with frefiuen^ 
change of prices and generally on the advance side resulting in a final improvement of about 
54c. per lb. Free tluty Porto Rico sugar also improved from 5.14c. to 5.89c. per lb., and owing 
to the recent declaration of war with Germany the freight rates have now to be increased quite 
largely — in some instances as much as 100%, owing to increase of war risk insurance. 

This results in Porto Rico prices being now asked at parity of Cuba Sugars. 

The advance in prices of all sugars has been largely in anticipation of war conditions which 
are now realized by act of Congress. The war influence is immediately felt in the speculative 
markets today by rapid advance in quotations on the Sugar Exchange for future months. 
For actual sugars the market is very strong with considerably higher pretention by sellers. In 
instances 5J4c. c. & f. is asked by Cuban houses with fair prospects of realization soon. 

Also a new feature m the sugar market to be contended with soon is the proposal of the 
Government to place an internal revenue tax of Ic. per lb. on all sugars going into consumption. 
If this is carried out, as it is likely to be, the one cent per lb. will be made to apply to all sugars, 
including Cubas, Porto Ricos, Hawaiian, Louisiana and domestic beet sugars as well as full 
duty sugars. 

The actual final effect of this action upon the price of Cuba sugars f . o. b. or c. & f . or duty 
jjaid cannot at this writing be forecast, but in the end the consumers will pay the cost as the tax 
will be appHed directly to the sugars which go into direct consumption which are mostly 
refined sugars and the revenue tax will be collected at the source which means at the refinerj' 
or beet sugar factory. 

The influence on Cuba and other raw sugars will work back-ward from the refiner who must 
govern his purchases of raws by the demand for refined at the enhanced prices made necessary 
by the tax. Regulation of food prices, includiag sugar, by Government control is also a pro- 
position likely to come into operation as the result of w^ar preparations. Certainly conditions 
relating to sugar and its probable future course of values can only be kno-ma as they come to 
pass and not be forecast with precision. At the moment the sugar market is strong and tending 
upward both actually and speculatively. 

If speculation is carried to an unusual extent it is our opinion that the Government will 
step in and regulate prices in the United States as is now being done in the warring nations 
abroad. WILLETT & GRAY. 

New York, April 9, 1917. 



SUGAR POSSIBILITIES IN PANAMA 

[Consul General Alban G. Snyder, Panama City.] 

Panama is said to have good timberland, es- 
pecially in the Bayano River section, which 
has received the most attention in the past. 
The best sugar lands, it is believed, are in the 
Provinces of Los Santos and Veraguas. 

Leading sugar producers in this country 
state that labor in the sugar section, Los San- 
tos and Veraguas, is all native, and the daily 
wage is 60 cents. Cane has to be planted 
about every seven years. Malaria prevai's in It is estimated that the consumption of 

the lowlands. Transportation facilities are sugar in Spain amounts to approximately 
poor. 10,000 metric tons per month. 



The Star and Herald of this city publishes an 
interview with Dr. Edwin Dexter, of the 
National Institute oi Panama, in wh'ch he 
expresses the belief that the cultivation of 
sugar cane could be greatly extended in 
Panama and that the great future of the 
Republic lies in that product. 



SPAIN 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 



Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York. 

Nuestra ultima reseila para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 7 de marzo de 1917. 

En esa fecha el aziicar centrifugo de Cuba polarizacion 96° se cotizaba d 4-3^c. la libra 
costo y flete, y ahora se cotiza a 5-1 /32c. costo y flete. 

En el interin los cambios ban sido como sigue: marzo 9, 4-5/16c.; el 10, 4-^c.; el 12, 4Kc.; 
el 13, 4-7/16C.; el 14, 4-3^c.; el 15, 4-5/16c.; el 16, 4-1^0.; el 19, 4-^c.; el 21, 4-7/16c.; el 23, 
4-9/16C.; el24 4-5^c.; el 27, 444c.; el29, 4-Kc.; el 2 de abril, 4-29/32c.; el 3, 4-29/32c.; el 4, 
4-15/16C.; yel5, 5-1 /32c. 

Por estas cotizaciones se notara que el mercado ha sido activo, con frecuentes cambios en 
los precios y generalmente hacia el alza, resultando en un amnento final de unos ^^c. la libra. 
El aziicar de Puerto Rico libre de derechos tambien subio de 5.14c. d 5.89c. la libra, y debido d 
lareciente declaracion de guerra con Alemania los precios de flete hantenido que ser aumentados 
ahora en gran manera, en algunos casos hasta un 100 por ciento, a causa del aimiento en el 
seguro de riesgo de guerra. 

Esto da por resultado el que los precios que se piden ahora por el aziicar de Puerto Rico 
esten a la par con los del aziicar de Cuba. 

El aumento en los precios de todos los aziicares ha sido en gran manera en anticipaci6n 
del estado de guerra, realizado ahora por decreto del Congreso. La influencia de la guerra se 
deja sentir inmediatamente hoy dia en los mercados especuladores por el aumento rdpido de 
las cotizaciones en la Bolsa de Aziicar para los meses venideros. Respecto a los aziicares de 
actualidad, el mercado es muy fuerte con indicios de precios mucho mas altos de parte de los 
vendedores. En algunos casos plantadores cubanos piden 5-Mc. costo y flete, con bastantes 
probabilidades de que Uegue A realizarse pronto. 

Asimismo un nuevo caracteristico con que habra que contar pronto en el mercado de aziicar 
es la proposicion del Gobierno en imponer derechos de consumo de Ic. la libra en todos los 
aziicares que se destinen para el consumo. Si esta medida se lleva a cabo, como, probable- 
mente lo sera, el recargo de un centavo por libra se aplicara a todos los aziicares, incluyendo 
los de Cuba, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Luisiana y los aziicares de remolacha del pais asi como los 
aziicares que pagan derechos. 

El efecto final que verdaderamente ejercera esta medida sobre el precio de los azucares de 
Cuba bajo la clausula de libre a bordo, costo y flete 6 derechos pagados no puedo preverse al 
escribir esta reseila, pero al fin y al cabo los consumidores pagaran el costo, pues dichos 
derechos seran aplicados directamente a los aziicares que se destinen directamente para el 
consumo, que son en su mayor parte los aziicares refinados, y el impuesto sera colectado e n las 
refinerias 6 fabricas de aziicar de remolacha. 

La influencia en los azucares de Cuba y otros azucares crudos se ef ectuard primeram ente 
desde el refinador, el cual tendra que regularizar sus compras de aziicar crudo segiin la demanda 
por aziicar refinado d los precios mds altos a causa del impuesto. La regulacion de los precios 
de viveres, incluyendo el aziicar, por medio del dominio del Gobierno, es tambien una propo- 
sicion que probablemente se pondra en operacion como resultado de las preparaciones de guerra. 
Seguramente el estado de cosas en lo que se refiere al aziicar y a su probable curso de precios en 
elfutuxosolo se puede saber a medida que acontezca y no puede pronosticarse con precision. 
Por el momento el mercado de aziicar es fuerte y con tendencia al alza, tanto realmente como 
en sentido especulativo. 

Si la especulacion se lleva d un extremo no usual, nuestra opinion es que el Gobierno inter- 
vendrd y regularizara los precios en los Estados Unidos, como se esta haciendo ahora en los 
palses en guerra en el extranjero. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

Nueva York, abril 9 de 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



Cable Address "Turnute" 



New York— 64— 66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

HAVANA N. Gelats y Ca. LONDON — The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial d« Puerto Rico PARIS — Hein* et Cie. 



PYREX LABORATORY GLASSWARE 







Pvrex Glass — -a new borosilicate glass possessing an extraordinarily low expansion 
coefficient, 0.0000032, and great resistance to sudden temperature changes. 

Chemical stability tests show Pyrex glass to be less soluble in water and acids and 
about equally soluble in alkalis, compared with the best resistance glass, either American 
or foreign, hithertofore offered. The glass contains no metals of the magnesia-lime-zinc 
group and no heavy metals. 

The low ex]Dansion coeffic'ent makes it possible to make Pyrex beakers and flasks with 
wall slightly thicker than usual— tnis greatly increases the dm-ability of the vessels without 
diminishing the resistance to sudden heating and cooling. 

Descriptive Price List Upon Request 

EIMER & AMEND 



NEW YORK CITY 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



OTTAWA, CAN. 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

P, O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 

We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



28-24 in. CxAGE, 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 

ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft. 4 in. Capacity 10 Tons. 

Weight 7,500 lbs. 

FIRST-CLASS CONDITION 

Will Convert to Steel Underframe Flat Cars 

PROMPT SHIPMENT .'. LOW PRICE 

RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 




325 Locust St., 



Louis, Mo. 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



THE NEW JERSEY ASBESTOS CO. 




HOME OFFICE: 

1 WATER ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 

BRANCHES: 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Allentown 



Patent "V" Pilot Packings recom_ 
mended for High Pressure Steam and 
Ammonia. 

Cable Address: "Gladiatrix," New York 



Bank of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST., NEW YORK 



RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES ■ 



President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 



Pedro Pablo Diago Guillermo Carricaburu. 

LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 



76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLACfi" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET .-. .-. NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 
Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 

Write Today For Sample Copy 

Indispensable to the Man Inter- 
ested in Sugar 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



THECUBAREVIEW 39 



POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

g-^ ¥ T A IVT A f A ^^ Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
VjlU/\iM/VJ A. I 5 A. M. to 8 p. M. Last train 11.20 P.M. 

Fare, 55 Cents 

GW T W ^T r* O Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 

VJ 1 IN Hi O 5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P. M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $L50. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) $0.05 

Guanabacoa (Ferry and Electric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanca and Cabaflas Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 

Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

A. KLING, Prop. IV/iriRlI V Al A 

JAS. S. BOQUE, Supt. IVlUDll-ll, ALA. 



OILS, GREASES 

and other 

^OILfPRODUCTS^ 

of tile famous "Zander" brand 
made of the best Pennsylvania 
Oil. 



A. C. FABRICIUS aceites, grasas 

y otros 

Productos de Aceite 

Marca "Zander" 
manufacturados de los me- 
jores aceites de Pennsylvania 



82-92 Beaver St. 
New York, N. Y. 

Cable — Fabriciusa Se Busca Agentes 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton. Night Call. 411 Hamilton. Cable Address: "Abiworka," New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy Forgings, Iron and Brass Castings, Copper Specialties, Diesel Motor Repairs, Cold Storage 
Installation, Oil Fuel Installation, Carpenter and Joiner Work 

"12? Fm^'^^'sTREEt'^ )N..r Hamilton Ferry BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

Agents for "Kinghorn" Multiplex Valve 

Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 











THE 

TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 






CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Corr««pon<i«nc« Solicited from 
Intending InTaators 






OFFICERS 
;^orman H. Davis .... - President 

Oswald A. Hornsby - - - - Vice-President 

Claudio Q. Mendoia . - - Vice-President 
L M. Hopgood ...-.- Treasurer 
Elogelio Carbajal ------ Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept 





P. 


RUIZ 


a 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA, CUBA 




Ventilador y Soplador scoplado a 
Turbinas Lee "Corliss" especialmente para 
Homos de Bagazo Verde 

LEE TURBINE CO., 106 Wall St. 

H. F. RUGGLES, lOG Wall St., N. Y. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADO EN 1SG9 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Activo Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner Williairi and Cedar Sts. 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponsales en Espana 6 Islas Canarias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

A interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Amargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi= 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. GONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when vyriting to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 No.l7 No. 3 No. 7 No. 5 ^ 

P. M. P. M. P. M. P. M. A. M. A. M. S 




7.17 
A. M. 



5.28 



8.50 

10.20 

P.M. 

1.00 

10.00 
11.00 



IP. M 



5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 



3.10 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P.M. 

3.00 

3.30 



P. M 



Havana 



INo. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8 No. 6 No. 10 

A. M. A. .M, P. .M. P. M. P. M. A. .M. 



10.01 7.40 



Lv . . Central Station . . Ar. 



11.58 10.10 58 Ar. 



2.18 12.33 



4.40! 

8.40 



6.45 
P.M. 



3.38 
6.45 

6.40 

8.00 

10.30 
P.M. 



109 Ar . 

179 -Ar. 
230 Ar. 

180 .\r. 
195:.Ar. 

241 Ar. 

276 1 Ar. 

I 
340 Ar . 

520 Ar. 
538 Ar. 



. . .Matanzas. . 
. . . Cardenas . . 

. . . . Sagua . . . . 
. . . Caibarien . . 

, Santa Clara. 
. Cienf uegos . 



.Lv. 
. Lv. 



.Lv. 
.Lv. 



Lv. 

. Lv. 



.SanctiSpiritus. . 
.Ciegode Avila. . 
. . .Camaguey. . . 



. . . . Antilla. .... 
Santiago de Cuba. 



Lv. 



7.36 9.13^ 2.06 6.39 9.05 6 



5.31| 6 
12.45i 5 
P. M. A. 

8.00 . 

5.30 . 
A.M. 
12.10 . 



45 12. 
00 

M, 



P.M. 

8.25 

7.35 

4.55 

A.M. 

7.40 

6.55 



A.M. 



6.20 



4.44 
1.05 



12.00 
8.20 



8.00 
A.M. 



6.28 
4.25 



1.00 



9.15 

8.48 



6.15 
A.M. 



20 



00 
M. 



P.M. 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



From Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienf uegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 

ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 

PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



U. S. Cy. 
Antilla $23.33 



Batabano . 

Bayamo 

Caibarien 

Camaguey 

Cardenas 

Ciego de Avila . 

Cienfuegos 

Colon 

Guantanamo. . , 
Holguin 



1.53 
20.66 
10.68 
15.49 

5.43 
12.72 

8.69 

5.56 
25.58 
21.20 



Isle of Pines 

Madruga 

ManianiUo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

Remedies 

Sagua 

San Antonio 

Sancti Spiritus. . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba . 



U. S Cy. 
$6.00 

3.01 
22.02 

3.20 

9.64 
10.43 

8.45 

.45 

11.19 

8.53 
24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 

"WEEK=END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL *^WEEK=END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send three cents in stamps for "Cuba — A Winter Paradise," a beau- ITnifAfl Railurav* nf Hnvuna 
tiful illustrated booklet describing interesting trips in Cuba to WIIIICU ivauwajrs Ul itaTaiia 

FRANK ROBERTS, General Passenser Acent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacion directa de todas los 
centros maiiufactiireros del mundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espaiia 
Independencia Street 17/2L 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 



Yard . 



Near South Street 
56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 



Telephones : 
Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Munro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N, Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2192 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers. Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c. 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to push ths sales of 

American high class products. Would 

represent a first class firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



CO M M I88IO N 
MERCHANT 



M. J. CABANA 

p. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a uom- 
mission basis or under agenoy arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired iniormaticn about lands in east- 
em Cuba. 



F. W. Hvoslef 



E. C. Day 



R. M. Miohelsen 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

SteamshipAgents&Ship Brokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Cahh: "£«nf««««" 



Pleau mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertiaer$ 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



43 




S.S. MUNAMAR 



NEW YORK CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 



Steamer 
MUNAMAR... 
MUNAMAR... 


New Yo 

Leave 
May 12 
May 26 


rk Autilla 
Airire 
May 16 
May 30 

FREIGHT 


Nuovitas 

Ai'rive 
May 18 
June 1 
ONLY 


Nuevitas New York 

Leave Arrive 

May 20 May 24 

June 3 June 7 


Regular 


sailings for 
Padre, 


]\Iatanzas, Car 
Cibara, ]\Ia:iat 


ienas, Sagua, 
1 and Eanes. 


Caibarien, Fto. 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

MUNISLA. ^ Havana, Cardenas Mav 1 

MITNPLACE Havana, Matanzas, Caibarien May 8 

MUNISLA Havana, Sagua May 15 

ABSALON Santiago, Cienfuegos Mav 16 

OLINDA Havana, Matanzas May 22 

MUNISLA Havana, Cardenas May 29 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER May 20, for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rcsario. 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAISIER May 10 and 24 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of cal 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan, 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

-WILMINGTON. DEL. 

S. MORRIS LILLIE, President 



Grand Prize awarded for Locomotives at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 

The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 




PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES 

Specifications Furnished on Application 
REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE WEST INDIES: 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable AddroBses: "BALDWIN, PHILADELPHIA," "LEEBALD, HAVANA" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisert 




1.00 A Year MAY 1917 

Published by the Munson Steamship Line 8Z"92 Beal 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Link-Belt Cane Car Dumps 

FOR QUICK UNLOADING FROM CARS TO CANE HOPPER OR CONVEYOR 




LINK-BELT C'AXE CAR DUMPS discharge cars without 
switchback. One man handles the dumping mechanism, and one of the switchmen 
clamps the cars in place. Link-Belt Cane Car Dumps are made of metal through- 
out, ruggedly built, and g'.ve reliable, continuous servics. A hydraulic plunger furnishes 
power for dumping. Submit your requirements to us for estimate. 



Link-Belt Company 



299 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 



71 BEAVER STREET 
NEW YORK 



Cable Address: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(All codes used) 

RAIL AND FASTENINGS 
FROGS AND SWITCHES 

CARS 
BOILERS, TANKS, PUMPS 



Direccion Cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York 

(Usamos todas las claves) 

RIELES Y ASEGURADORES 

RANAS Y CAMBIAVIAS 

VAGONES 

CALDERAS, TANQUES, BOMBAS 




Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
" Lion " Brass Trade M ark Labels and Seals attached . 

D^?ip°Ivr^a,aiog Jafflcs Walkcf & Company, Ltd. 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

JOSE L. VICUAAMIL 

Santa Clara 2Q, Havana, Cuba 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



^ A I^Ul^C PARA TODOs usos y de todos tamanos, de los para cafia con cuatro ruedas y capa- 

v^AIxrvvyiD cidad de 1 >^ toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toneladas 

Hacemos una especialidad de juegos de herrajes, incluyendo los juegos 

de ruedas, complelamente armados, con todas las piecas de metal, y pianos 

cumplclus para cvnslnur los carros d su destino de maderas del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cable Addrf.ss: 
Ramai.iam 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 



Phone, Broad 
1835-1836 



Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. 



Night Phone 
4605 Sunset 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 

SUGARS 



RAW AND 
REFINED 



82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trade. 
TELEGRAPHIC iNIARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensefia uno de nuestros carros, todo de acero, para cafia. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capacidades varias y hemos fabricado un gran numero de carros para cafia para 
U80 en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaulos de acero o de madera y con- 
struidas para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga tie la cafia. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direcci6n telegrdfica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B CINT AS. Oficios 29-31. Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Offie* in Tulsa. 
Oklahoma, Callais Bldg. 

2728 Whitehall BuUdins 
NEW YORK 




HAIVIOIND T AINK 




STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Lo« Angeles Office 

414 Grosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

Agtntt in Cuba: 
ELLIS BROTHERS 

San Ignacio, Havana, Cuba 



BUILT BY 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 




30% 

mlis de 



PATENTE PELAEZ 

Esta maza puede colocarse faoilmente en cualquier trapiche, sea de dos 6 tres mazas. Machuca bien U 
oafia desmenuzdndola y extray6ndole almismo tiempo las dos terceras partes de su guarapo, dejando la cafia bien 
preparada para el segundo trapiche. Ejecuta todo el trabajo de una aesmenuzadora de primera clase y sin m4s 
gasto que cuando se opera con una maza lisa. Esta maza es de acero y se ha sacado privilegio para ella en todas 
las partes del mundo donde se cultiva la cafia de aziicar. Pues envienos un dibujo de la maza superior que usan 
U is asi que de su eje, y les cotizaremoa precios bajos por una maza completa para desmenuzar la cafia de este 
trapiche. 

NEWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 149 Broadway, New York, E. U. A. 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
5 15 
7 15 


P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
PM 


P M 
2 15 

4 15 


AM 
10 r 
12 15 


AM 
6 55 
8 33 

10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
PM 


A M 
6 15 
8 15 


Fare 

Istcl. 

.12.04 
3.99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 
















7 30 
11 22 

AM 








P M 


PM 


PM 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana .Ar 

Ar Artemisa Lv 

.^r Paso Real Lv 

Ar Herradura Lv 

Ar Pinar del Rio .... Lv. 

Ar Guane Lv 



Fare 
3d el. 
$1.10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 


AM 
7 49 
5 45 

AM 


AM 
11 09 
9 35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 


AM 
11 47 
9 45 


P M 
3 49 
1 45 


P M 
6 47 
4 45 








6 38 
3 00 
PM 






AM 


PM 



P M 
7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
3 00 
1 30 
P M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " | Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cts. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

A RE on sale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west of 
'^*- Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25%. 



Please Mention THE CUBA REVIEW uhen Writing to Advertisers. 



THE CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 
An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 

$1.00 Per Year _--___- 10 Cents Single Copy 

Adverlising Rates on Applicalion 

Vol. XV MAY. 1917 No. 6 
Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — A Stream in Eastern Cuba. 

Frontispiece — Felton, Xipe Bay. 

Page. 

.\11 .\round Cuba: 

Bridge, Mayari River, illustration 1- 

Church, Sagua I^a Cirande, illustration 1'^ 

Copper Mining 12 

Dock Workers Id 

Petroleum 10 

Sea Captains 10 

Van Home Estate, illustrated 11 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

Cuban Market for Shoes 17 

Textile Fibre Plants 17 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co 20 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban S 'curities 20 

Report of the Banco Xacional de Cuba 23, 24, 2.") 

R-^-port of the Havana Electric Railwav, Light & Power Co 21, 22, 23 

R'-port of the Royal Bank of Canada 25, 20. 27 

Santa Cecilia Sugar Co 20 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads 19 

C\ib;in Covernment Matters: 

Amnesty Law R 

Captain O'Brien .S 

Cuban Tariff ^ i) 

Elections 7 

Export Trade (I 

I'jxportation of Gold S 

Food Commission 7 

Government Land 7 

Havana Schools 9 

National Debt 8 

Postage Stamps 9 

Guayaha Falls, Illustrated 13, 14, l.i, 10, 17 

Sugar Industry: 

Centrals Finished Grinding 3.") 

Chart, Shipments of Sugar to Europe 34 

Chart, United States Import and Export Trade with Latin America 33 

Punta Alegre Mill, illustrated 2S, 29, 30, 31 

Six Years of Trade with Cuba 32 

Sugar Review, English 35, 30 

Sugar Review, Spanish 30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




•I 



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fe 



; ' ^m 



ri 






^ 




THL 



fi* w 



CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



MAY, 1917 



Number 6 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



FOOD COMMISSION 

In view of the high cost of food in Guba, 
President Menocal has appointed a commis- 
sion consisting of the Secretary of Agricul- 
ture, the Secretary of Justice, the Mayor of 
Havana, a representative of the Camara de 
Comercio and the Secretary of the Sociedad 
Economica de Amigos del Pais. 

It is the purpose of this commission to 
carrj' on a campaign of education whereby 
Cuban agriculturists will pay more attention 
to the cultivation of crops other than sugar 
and tobacco. It is well known that the soil 
of Cuba is suited to the cultivation of ar- 
ticles necessary for food, but it has been the 
custom of the Cuban farmer to devote his 
attention almost exclusively to the cultiva- 
tion of sugar cane and tobacco, consequently, 
Cuba imports vast quantities of foodstuffs 
which might be raised in Cuba. The second 
object of the commission is to effect prompt 
and practical relief to the poor Cubans by 
means of an appropriation of $200,000 which 
is to be used for the purchase of the neces- 
sary articles, the purchases to be made 
through Cuban foreign representatives and 
Consuls. It is proposed that articles pur- 
chased be brought to Havana and from there 
distributed throughout the island as may be 
needed and sold to the consumer at the prices 
fixed by the commission. This scheme, if 
successful, will be in effect a national co- 
operative agency and will result in the 
prompt distribution of foodstuffs at a low 
cost to the ultimate consumer. 



ELECTIONS 

The final results of the elections'were an- 
nounced on April 12, and it is shown that the 
Liberal party won in the Province of Havana 
with 32 electoral votes and in the Province 
of Camaguey with 12 electoral votes. This 
makes the total electoral votes of the Liberals 
44. The Conservative party won in Ma- 
tanzas with 1.5 electoral votes, in Santa Clara 
with 28, in Pinar del Rio with 15 and in 
Oriente with 2S, making a total of 86 elec- 
toral votes for the Conservative party. ^This 
insures the reelection of President IMenocal 
for another four-year term, and it is to be 
hoped that these four years will bring political 
tranquility and material prosperity for Cuba. 



GOVERNMENT LAND 

A bill introduced in the Senate in 1913 
providing for a division of Government 
owTied land now idle for stock raising or 
farming is to be again presented, and an 
effort will be made to get the bill passed. 

The plan is to give from one to five ca- 
ballerias of land to any Cuban citizen who has 
a good record, and can show that he knows 
how to farm or raise stock, and who has a 
family. He would be obliged to construct 
a house on the property within the first 
eight months, either raise stock or cultivate 
the land, and would pay no taxes for the first 
three years. He would be subject to oc- 
casional visits of inspection of experts of 
the Department of Agriculture and could not 
sell the land or transfer it to a third person. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



NATIONAL DEBT 

The Ciibaa iiationr.l debt is at present 
$68,S08,000, and in her national UfeCuba has 
paid $11,500,000 upon her debts by amortiza- 
tion of debts as the bonds came (kie. 

This debt is composed of the following 
financial operations: 

Six per cent, revclutionary bonds issued 
by Estrada Palma for 13,000,000, som.e 18,000 
still to be paid. 

Six per cent, loan of .135,000,000 with 
Speyer & Co. of New York, for payment of 
salaries of Liberating /-rm_y, under Estrada 
Palma's Presidency, irade in 1904 and ex- 
pires in 1944. Taxes on slcohol and tobacco 
to pay bonds. About $6,000,000 paid. 

Four and a half per cent, loan of $16,500,000 
by Gen. Jose Miguel Gom.ez with Speyer & 
Co., for paving and sewerage work in H.avana, 
amortization to begin in 1919, bonds expire 
in 1949. Ten per cent, of customs duties 
go to pay this loan. 

Interior debt of 5 per cent. flOO bonds 
to complete payment of Liberating Army; 
$11,000,000 emitted, and some $600,000 
aro.ortization made. 

Loan of 1914 of President Menocal with 
J. P. Morgan & Co., under Law of Economic 
Defense, of $10,000,000 at 5 per cent. Ex- 
pire in 1949, and 15 per cent, of custom.s 
duties go to payment. Amortization begins 
in 1920. 

Treasury bonds, some $5,000,000 emitted, 
under present Government and sam.e law. 
Some $3,000,000 amortization of bonds made. 

This makes a total of $11,500,000 paid and 
$68,908,000 \et to be paid. 



CUBAN EXPORT PROHIBITION ON GOLD 

President Menocal issued a decree April 21 
forbidding the exportation of either American 
gold or silver, or Cuban gold or silver. For- 
eign money not in Cuba will only be per- 
mitted exportation through the ports of 
Havana, Santiago de Cuba and Cienfuegos. 
Such exportations must be carefully exam- 
ined by custom.s inspectors. 

It is the duty of the Government, says 
the decree, to guard the stability of the 
current coinage and prevent a recurrence of 
the conditions which caused the establish- 
.m.ent of the present Cuban monetary system. 



AMMESTY LAW 

As a i-esult of the offer of the Cuban Gov- 
ernment to treat liberally those insurgents 
who give adequate assurance of their loyalty 
to the existing Government, the Secretary 
of Justice has issued a decree which will 
result in releasing from prison all persons who 
were imprisoned for the sole crime of se- 
dition and rebellion, and who subsequently 
voluntarily gave themselves up to the Gov- 
ernment. This action has resulted in the 
release of a,bout 1,000 persons. 

CAPT. JOHN O'BRIEN 

On the 20th of April, Capt. John O'Brien, 
otherwise known as Dynamite Johnny or 
Capt. Unafraid, was tendered a reception 
at the Hotel McAlpin, New York, on behalf 
of the Cuban Government on the occasion 
of the Captain's 80th anniversary of his 
birth. The Cuban Consul, Dr. Leopoldo 
Dolz, and a large party of Capt. O'Brien's 
friends, were present, and the following 
cablegrain was sent by President Mario G. 
Menocal : 

The present circumstances make it 
doubl>' pleasant for me to extend my 
congratulations and sincere good wishes 
on the occasion of your SOth birthday, 
as the course of events has proved that 
Cuba has not forgotten the magnani- 
mous aid rendered by you and your 
countrymen during our struggle for in- 
dependence. The conflict in which once 
again Cuba and the United States stand 
side by side is, in my judgement, but a 
prolongation of our fight for liberty on 
an immensely larger scale. May you 
live to celebrate many more happy birth- 
days and to witness the triumphal vin- 
dication of the ideals to the defense of 
which you have dedicated your life. 



CUBA RAILROAD 

The Cuban Ciovernment has decided to 
advance $1,000,000 to the Cuba Bailrjad for 
repairs needed on that line as a result of 
bridges, trestles, etc., being destroyed by the in- 
surgents. The money will later be deducted 
from the sum which the Government must 
pay the railway either for troop transporta- 
tions or for indemnities. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



HAVANA SCHOOLS 

The r>nort of Dr. Jose M. Carl)()iiell, chief 
of the Service of .School Hygiene, states that 
the school rooms in Havana are too few in 
number and defici.^nt in hjgienic (jiialities, 
and in eciuipment for teaching. 

Only four schools were approved by the 
report. The others are lacking in ventilation, 
capacity, light, isolation and other demands 
of modern school hygiene. 

There are 21,489 children enrolled in Havana 
schools, and for an average daily attendance of 
14,700 children, there are onlj 76 schools with 
379 class room-s in all. 



CUBAN TARIFF 



With a view to encouraging the domestic 
shoe industr}', the Cuban Governm.ent, by a 
decree promulgated December 1, 1916, 
exempted the following articles from the sur- 
taxes established by the decree of Februarj- 1, 
1904, provided the goods are imported by 
shoe manufactureres for use in their own 
establishments and that a sworn declaration 
to that effect is presented: 

Ornaments for shoes and bows of all kinds ; 
celluloid for covering heels; fabrics for lining, 
insoles and toes; pasteboard in sheets; yarn 
and thread of all kinds; varnishes, polishes, 
waxes and pastes; tanning materials; emery 
and sandpaper. 

The following articles are exempt from sur- 
tax if intended for use in the shoemaking 
industry, whether or not imported by man- 
ufacturers of shoes for use in their own 
e.stablishments: 

Shoemakers' lasts and tools; nails, tacks, 
eyelets, buttons, wire, loops, and laces of 
all kinds for boots and shoes; tanned skins 
of all kinds (except chamois skin for cleaning 
metal articles and sole leathers) ; split sole 
leather for insoles and special sole leather for 
leggings; counters of all kinds; fiber and 
leather board for heels and insoles; canvas, 
elastic webbing and other fabrics specially 
prepared for boots and shoes. — Customs 
Circular No. 24, 1916. 



GOVERNMENT BUILDING 

It is announced that the new building of 
the department of Government will be opened 
on Mav 20. 




NEW ISSUE CUBAN POSTAGE STAMPS 

The accompanj'ing photograph is a repro- 
duction of a new issue of the Cuban 2c post- 
age stamps which were put in circulation re- 
cently. It is expected that new issues of other 
denominations will follow, the 3c, oc and 8c 
stamps appearing about May 10th, and the 
Ic, 10c, 20c, 50c and $1.00 stamps, about 
June 1. On the new 2c stamp there is a photo- 
graph of General Maximo Gomez, and on the 
issues that follow the subJ3cts will be other 
generals of the wars of Cuban Independence, 
as has been the custom in the past. 



GOOD ROADS 



The necessity of the construction of good 
roads throughout the Island of Cuba, es- 
pecially in the Eastern provinces, is again 
being agitated. The Cuban Government is 
hampered by lack of funds for this work, and 
it is hoped that sufficient credit will be given 
in order that this work may be vigorously 
prosecuted. 

CUBA'S TRADE WITH THE UNITED STATES 

The predominating part which the United 
States plays in the commerce of Cubg, is 
shown by the fact that in 1913 — a normal year 
— we exported to, and imported from, Cuba 
more commodities than all the other countries 
combined. In that year Cuba exported to 
the United States $132,581,549 out of total 
exports of $165,208,265; and imported from 
the United States $71,743,872 out of total 
im.ports of $135,810,590. And for the fiscal 
year 1916 Cuba's total trade with the United 
States exceeded $300,000,000, made up as 
follows: Exports to United States approx- 
imately $257,000,000 and imports from the 
United States approximately $90,000,000; 
an increase of more than 35*; ^ in the exports 
and more than 20% in imports for the period. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



DOCK WORKERS 

The dock workers of Havana have obtained 
their demands without striking. At a con- 
ference between the delegates of the unions, 
representatives of the companies and Sub- 
Secretary Montalvo as mediator, the men 
received all they demanded, save the question 
of higher pay, which is to be left to the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury . 

The men received the eight-hour day, with 
working hours from 7 to 11 A. M. and 1 
to 5 P. M. for day work, and 7 to 11 P. M. 
and 12 to 4 for night work. 

The dock workers' demands have been 
pending since February, when their threat- 
ened strike was patriotically withdrawn, when 
the revolution broke out, in order not to em- 
barrass the Government. 



SEA CAPTAINS 



A bill was passed by Congress, which pro- 
hibited Cuban merchant ships or ships flying 
the Cuban flag from being commanded either 
by foreigners or by Cubans who had been 
naturalized. 

President Menocal vetoed the bill ow^ng to 
the present state of war and the scarcity of 
sailors of Cuban national ty. 



SANTIAGO 



It is reported that when the rebels evacu- 
ated Santiago de Cuba they carried with 
them $187,000 from the provincial treasury 
and $140,000 deposited as sureties on mining 
denouncements. 



HAVANA COURTS 

President Menocal has sent a message to 
the Senate calling attention to the fact that 
the bill passed creating three new courts in 
Havana, one of instruction, the correctional, 
and one municipal, will require an additional 
appropriation to be effective. 



PETROLEUM 

Prospecting for oil has received great at- 
tention in Cuba recently and a great number 
of oil claims have been requested from the 
Government. The press of late has devoted 
much space to sensational reports of dis- 
coveries of oil in Cuba. Up to the present the 
actual results have shown that at Bacuranao. 
some 15 miles west of Habana, the Union Oil 
Co. has two wells, whose capacity produces 
about 25 bbls. of oil per day. 



ORIENTE 



A commission of Congressmen from Oriente 
province visited President Menocal recently 
to ask him for public works and improvements 
for Oriente. 



NICARAGUA 



A representative of Nicaragua believes that 
its production of tobacco could be greatly 
increased and has sent a request to Cuba that 
expert tobacco planters be sent to Nicaragua 
to engage in the cultivation of tobacco. 



GERMAN MINISTER 

Friedrich von Verdy du Vernois, German 
Minister to Cuba, sailed May 1 for New York 
via Key West. The Minister received his 
passports several weeks ago, but time was 
granted to him to arrange legation affairs. 



VEDADO TENNIS CLUB 

The board of directors of the ^'edado 
Tennis Club has placed their clubhouse, 
grounds and yachts at the disposal of Presi- 
dent Menocal for whatever use the Go\ern- 
ment can make of them in the war with 
Germany . 



HAVANA 



Statistics of the captain of the port's office 
show that 5,546 j^assengers arrived in Havana 
during the month of April, while 6,964 sailed 
during the same period. 



SHARK SKIN 



Cuban waters are infested with sharks, and 
it is reported that the Cubans have been ex- 
perimenting with a view to making use of 
shark hides for leather suitable for footwear. 
A shipment of 10,000 hides to New York for 
this purpose has been reported. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



11 




(liiiiiiids ami ]<csL(li'n(.-o, Van Home Estate, Cauiagi 




Entrance to Van Home Estate. Camaguey 



VAN HORNE ESTATE 



This property was acquired by the 1 ite Sr. \\'m.\'an Biorne to be used as his residence while 
in the city of Camaguey. Improvements were under way to remodel the residence and beautify 
the grounds and gardens, but he never Hved to see the completion of this work_,and occupy the 
premises. 

The residence is a magnificent example of an okl Castilhan castle used by Spanish aristo- 
crats in the old days, and is finished throughout with native mahogany and hardwoods. From 
he cupola above the top floor an excellent view of the surrounding country and city of Cama- 
guey can be had. The gardens and grounds comprise a plot of fifty acres. 

Negotiations are at present under way between the Van Home heirs and the city of 
Camaguey to permit the use of the estate as an orphan asylum for Cuba's homeless children, and 
it is understood that the Van Home family wish to pre.sent the estate to the city of Cama- 
guey as a charitable gift. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 




The bridge over the Mayari river, constructed by the United Fruit Company last 
season, has recently undergone extensive repairs demanded by the Cuban Government, 
including the lengthening of draws sufficiently to permit the passage of certain Go\ernment 
mail boats, and the 500 foot bridge is now used for cane traffic originating in the newly 
acquired holdings of this company from the Dumois interests and located on the eastern 
border of Xipe Bay. 



COPPER MINING DEVELOPMENTS IN CUBA 



Owing to the apparent extensive undeveloped mineral rei^ources of Cuba, minirg experts 
have been induced to come to Cuba in the recent past, and the rei-ult cf their investigations and 
reports have been no favorable that it i:! not the least exaggeration to say that a small mining 
boom is on the way, which may assume large and imp nrtant proportions before long. The easy 
old Spanish methods by which mining clairrs in Cuba are denounced, giving anyone the right 
to stake a claim wherever he believes there may be a mineral deposit even though it chances to 
be on the property of another person, has resulted in an immense number of claims being estab- 
lished all over the island, and almost everybody one meets nowadays has an interest in a mine or 
a claim. The majority of these, of course, will never amount to anythmg, but among a few of 
the more prominent are the copper mines now under development at Fomento, Santa Clara pro- 
vince, and near Bayamo in Oriente province. The former is a Cuban organization known as 
the Compania Minera y de Fomento with offices in the Lonja building, and was recently organ- 
ised to develop properties near Fomento in Santa Clara province. The President of the com- 
pany is Mr. W. W. Lawton, and the majority stockholders are prominent Cubans. The hold- 
ings of this company are said to be the m.ost rich in copper and zinc ore yet found in Cuba, 
which were originally discovered and opened up by Mr. "\\'m. C. Watkins, an .American, who 
had to find financial support to develop his claims in Cuba. So far the two best workings of the 
five mines under way on this property are th'fe Los Cerros and Josephine mines which are 
yielding 8% copper and 30% zinc at the present time. 

Another copper m.ining development which is attracting considerable attention at this 
tim.e in Cuba is the 'Serafina' mines of the Compania Mineral Del-Datil, located near Bayamo 
in Oriente province, but no official report as to the percentage of ore has as yet been made 
jjublic. 



THE CUBA R E \' I r W 



13 




One side of the falls and one of the numerous 
streams passing over in the dry season. This 
view shows only one-half of the drop from the top 
to the bottom, giving a good idea of the heighth. 



THE GUAYABA FALLS 



Little is heard of these falls and few travelers have found the time and inc'ination to pay 
them a visit, owing to their location in a remote and well-nigh inaccessible part of the Mayari 
mountains in Eastern Cuba. SiflH£iHl!'li^ll 

They are situated on the property of the Bethlehem Steel Company on the eastern side of 
the Mayari mountains overlooking Nipe Bay and the Gulf, and the distance from Felton on 
Nipe Bay is sixteen miles to Woodfred, which is at the summit of the incline railways and where 
this company is removing millions of tons of iron ore yearly, and from Woodfred to the fall is 
approximately six miles over mountain trails across a wild uninhabited country, said to _con- 
tain enough undeveloped iron ore to supply the world for years. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Pines and Hardwoods Along the Mountain Trail to the Fall 



The trip to the falls is far from being a comfortable one, and the only means of getting near 
them at present is by ore-train from Felton to the foothills, thence transferring to the incline 
railways, and the last leg of the trip must be made on the back of a Culjan pony via the trail 
route; this list feature of the ourney is full of interest and excitem.ent, and if the bridges over 
the mountain streams are washed away, as was the case when the writer visited the falls, it is 
necessary to walk or wade and lead the pony a good part of the distance. 

All along the trail from \^'oodf^ed can be seen the red iron ore yet to be mined, and these 
hills are estimated to contain five hundred million tons of ore, which is being removed at the rate 
of one million tons yearly, leaving a supply to last for five hundred years at the present yearly 
output. One can't help imagining when riding over these fields of untouched ore why the native 
Cuban did not take possession and mine the ore, but the answer one gets to this query is that 
the Cuban expected to find the iron in finished bars, rods, etc., ready to be used, and he cou d 
not see the possibility otherwise of securing iron from the soil. For the first few miles the 
pine and hardwood trees have been cut down, with few exceptions, to supply timber for 
building the many frame l)uildings at Felton and Woodfred; also, can be seen nimierous tapped 
and withering trunks of pine trees, the result of drawing off the turpentine for commercial use. 
A striking and pecuharly noticeable thing along the trail was the unusual growth of large trees 
on the mountain side, the tall pines invariably growing on the hills and the hardwoods in the 
valleys. These same hardwood trees have been the means of a number of employees of the 
Iron Company furnishing their homes complete with excellent pieces of valuable furniture. 

The officials of the former Spanish-American Iron Company are credited with being the 
first visitors to the falls from the States some five years ago, and Mr. C. F. Rand, at that time 
President of the company, constructed foot bridges across the trail from Woodfred to the falls. 
He also marked and kept the trail cleared and erected a handsome pagoda and obseravtion plat- 
form opposite the falls from the native bamboo and other woods, all done to show his apprecia- 
tion of this natural wonder. 

The best time to view these falls and see them at their best is during the rainy season, or 
during the tropical summer months, when the enormous rainfall floods the many small mountain 
streams and passes over the falls. However, during this season it is next to impossible to 
travel across the mountains and get within miles of the falls to enable one to get a near glimpse 
of the falling water, which is said to be, at this period, one solid fall of water five hundred feet in 
diameter in the shape of a concave and 500 feet drop at the highest point. The noise of the 
falling water can be heard several miles away. 



T H E C U B A R !•: \' I l] W 



15 








. ■< 



Ara.'/ui 1 l'M:iit. .Mu;.-iii-| Mwnilaiii>. ()rii-iiti' riM.ii 




Bottom of Falls, Ouayaha Fall.- 



Our first glimpse of the actual water falling was a little disappointing, after hearing Jn 
advance of our visit such glowing reports of the wonderful sight, but as already explained the 
time of our visit was not during the rainy season, and the fall of water passing over at this time 
(early January) was hardly great enough to make a good clear picture, although it s difficult to 
get a photo of the falls at anytime that does them justice because of the impossibihty to get below 
and look up. The observation platform is just opposite, on a line with the top of the falls. The 
magnificence of the view from this point as regards future possibilities is bej-ond description. 
Do-mi the side pour numerous small waterfalls, some of which even now are of great beauty. 
Directly opposite the point is one whose thin, misty stream drops from the top of the inner 



1() 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Guayaba Falls. 



canyon clear to the bottom, whish distance we believe to be fully the five hundred feet claimed. 
Nature has carved out of the rock formation at the bottom a great basin, into which the 
water crashes down mid small clouds of spray and flows rapidly out of the narrow end of 
the canyon. One can imagine no more inspiring sight after hours of climbing over precipitious 
moimtain trails and hearing the roar of falling waters in the distance, than to come suddenly in 
view a waterfall like thi^ d iring the torrential rainy periods. The setting is there the year 
roimd, though it sometimes lacks the necessary water to make it as famous as other falls not 
so high. The Guayaba River, also the Mayari and numerous smaller streams pursue their 
tortuous way through this wild region of Eastern Cuba and supply the water which goes over 
these beautiful falls, ai-d from which the large sugar mill at Preston, the property of the United 
Fruit Company, gets its water supply. The view looking through the canyon towards Nipe 
Bay is beautiful, and recalls im.pressions of the great "Niagara Gorge," and visions that these 
same falls of Guayaba have been in the distant past, or will be in the future, as great as the falls 
of Niagara in our own country. Away in the distance on a clear day can be seen the baeutiful 
blue waters of the Eay cf .■ ipe, and along its shores the thriving busy life of m.aking sugar at 
Preston and Banes, fifteen n iles away. 



Every visitor to Eastern Cuba, will in the not distant fdttnc, include this trip to the falls 
in his itinerary when better communications are established. While the falls may never 
equal the magnitude of Niagara, they are today higher and the surrounding scenery is of 
unusual natural beaut v. To quote from a visitor's record in the log book kept at the hotel at 
^^ oodfred, his impressions, after a visit to the falls in the rainy season, when they were at their 
best, "The water seems to suddenly leave the plateau lands and leaps five hundred feet in a 
sheer droj) to the valley below." A\ho will deny that some day this neglected water-power will 
be developed and harnessed to be used as hydro-electric power for the already big industries 
located on the shores of Nipe Bay, and make this section of Eastern Cuba one of the great 
industrial centers of the West Indiqp? 



TEXTILE FIBRE PLANTS 

The cultivation of textile fibre plants is 
attracting miuih attention in Cuba at pres- 
ent. Sisal hemp, or henequen, has long been 
cultivated in the island, but none of the fibre 
is at present exported, as the total produc- 
tion is used up by the local rope and cordage 
factories, and this latter industry has in- 
creased to such an extent as to render neces- 
sary the importation of raw material from 
Mexico. The unsettled conditions in xMexico 
have given an impulse to the cultivation of 
henequen, and projects are under considera- 
tion for the planting of large tracts of land 
with this plant. Large areas are under 
cultivation at the present time, which are 
being added to yearly by the RafHoer- 
Erbsloh Co., near Matanzas, for their large 
rope plant located there. The fact that 
henequen grows on rocky and barren soil, 
unfit for the cultivation of the staple agri- 
cultund products of sugar and tobacco, or 
the minor products such as corn, sweet 
potatoes, yams, tomatoes, etc., is an im- 
portant factor in this industry. 

Experiments are at present being made for 
the cultivation of another textile plant in 
Cuba known as "Malva Blanca." This plant 
grows wild nearly all over the island, but 
especially in the richer and well watered 
lands, and was until lately looked upon as a 
weed or shrub of no value, and difficult to 
extirpate when once it obtained a foothold. 
The bark of the wild Malva Blanca yields an 
excellent fibre somewhat similar to the 
Dacca Jute of India, and it is expected that 
by a selection of the seed and scientific 
methods in the cultivation of the plant and 
extraction of the fibre, the quality of the latter 
will be improved and the cost of production 
reduced. If this new enterprise is successful 
the jute of India may have found a formidable 
rival, the importance of which, as far as 
relates to the Cuban market alone, mav be 



realized when one considers that a .3,000,000 
ton sugar crop requires about 21,000,000 jute 
bags, all of which have to be imported for the 
present requirements. 



CUBA IS THE GREATEST MARKET FOR 
AMERICAN SHOES 

Cul)a is at present the best m_arket in the 
whole world for American footwear, says a 
report on the subject just published by the 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
of the Departmeiit of Commerce. Although 
the climate is tropical very few even of the 
poorest natives go without footwear of some 
kind, and the per capita consumption of 
shoes is therefore very heavy. Over 80 per 
cent of the business is done by American 
firms, as there is no competition from, local 
manufacturers and not any of great import- 
ance from Europe. 

In spite of America's strong position in the 
market, however, the author of the report, 
Special Agent, Herman G. Brock, asserts that 
there are many ways in which our hold on the 
market can be strengthened, as there are a 
number of features in the Cuban trade not 
well understood by the American manufac- 
turer. These the report discusses at con- 
siderable length. Particular attention is paid 
to the requirements of the market and the 
merchandising methods and commercial re- 
quirements and practices. 

There are 46 pages in this report, which is 
entitled "Markets for Boots and Shoes in 
Cuba," Special Agents Saries No. 133. 



PINEAPPLES 



It is estimated that this year's crop of 
Cuban pineapples will be about 100,000 crates 
less than 1916, the total this year being about 
700,000 to 750,000 crates. The shortage is 
attributed to increased area devoted to the 
cultivation of sugar cane. 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THECUBAREVIEW 19 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The report of the Cuba liaih'oad for the month of February and for eii^ht months endeJ February 28th com" 
pares as follows: 

1917 191t) 191.') 1914 1913 1912 1911 

February Ki-os^- $39.5,030 $721,363 $.522,.586 $488,121 $46.5,147 $367,375 $31.5,921 

Expenses. . 362,698 298,287 234,742 239,121 235,673 183,097 166,647 

February net $32,931 $423,075 $287,843 $249,000 $229,473 $183,468 $149,273 

Other Income 945 

Net income 33,877 423,075 287,843 

Charges 94,7.58 88,241 72,308 66,791 66,791 65,125 59,625 

Surplus for month ...December 60,880 334,833 215,535 182,208 162,681 118,343 89,648 

Eight months gross 4,.331,925 3,953,142 3,073,936 3,1.39,875 2,874,421 2,318,512 1,893,640 

Net earnings 1,224,445 1,933,8.56 1,472,173 1,468,384 1,-304,675 1,060,035 818,.369 

Other income 8,528 6,097 

Fixed charges 728,744 628,111 564,622 534,333 .534,0.55 491,000 .3.39,2.50 

Eight months surplus $.504,230 $1,311,843 $907,551 $934,051 $770,620 $569,035 $479,119 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekh/ Receipts: 1917 

March ending March 24th £65,.529 

Week ending March 31st 66,579 

Week ending April 7th .59,571 

Week ending April 14th 56,142 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

Weekly Receipts: 1917 1916 

Week ending March 31st £31,365 £29,171 

Week end'ng April 7th 30,782 27,861 

Week ending April 14th 26,.525 27,737 

Week ending April 21st 28,041 24,643 



1916 


1915 


1914 


1913 


1912 


1911 


£65,134 


£48,399 


£.52,260 


£46,120 


£44,788 


£.37,916 


60,792 


49,685 


51,754 


50,221 


40,393 


31,604 


58,810 


46,042 


39,836 


50,4.54 


39,276 


31,683 


57,904 


55,668 


35,023 


48,337 


43,440 


28,400 



1915 


1914 


£19,248 


£21,-588 


19,129 


1.5,742 


22,004 


16,6.56 


23,509 


28,402 



1917 


1916 


1915 


1914 


£8,902 


£6,479 


£5,609 


£.5,7H 


8,589 


7,005 


5,738 


5,047 


9,.3.32 


7,036 


6,277 


6,61.5 


9,007 


6,318 


6,739 


6,458 



EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

Weekly Receipts: 

Week ending Mtrch 31st 

Week end'ng April 7th 

Week ending April 14th 

Week ending April 21st 

EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of March: 1917 1916 1915 

Gross earnings $.545,397 $470,616 $472,185 

Operating expenses 237,386 196,706 195,880 

Net earnings $308,011 $273,910 $276,305 

Miscellaneous income 21,295 19,200 7,906 

Total net income $329,306 $293,110 $284,211 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 193,248 162,601 175,606 

3 months to March 31: 

Gross earnings $1,597,210 $1,452,233 $1,390,314 

Operating expenses 678,202 560,7.57 561,299 

Net earnings $919,008 $891,476 $829,015 

Miscellaneous income 35,751 33,497 23,369 

Total net income $954,7.59 $924,973 $8.52,384 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 551,949 5.59,996 526,601 



20 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



THE PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

A* quottd by Lawrenct Turnur* it Co., Ntv York, 

Bid. 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 90H 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 97 J^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 93 

RepubUc of Cuba Exterior Loan 4}^% Bonds of 1949 84 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 89 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 90 

Cuba Co. 6% Debenture Bonds 95 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 98 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 90 J^ 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 105 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 100 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 102 i^i 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock 190 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 100^^ 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 61 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st Mtge. 6% Bonds 92 

All prices of bonds quoted on an and interest hasii. 



Asked. 

94 

99 M 
951^ 
86 

105 
103 

92 

93 
100 
101 

93 
1U8H 

none 

105 

195 

100 J^ 
63 
95 



HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY, LIGHT AND 
POWER CO. 

Notice has been given of a special meeting 
of the stockholders to be held on May 17, 
1917, at Jersey City, N. J. The meeting will 
take action on the resolution passed by the 
board of directors declaring that it is ad- 
visable to increase the capital stock of the 
Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power 
Company from $30,000,000, divided into 
300,000 shares of the par value of $100 each, 
of which $15,000,000 is preferred stock and 
$15,000,000 is common stock, to $36,000,000, 
divided into 360,000 shares of the par value 
of $100 each, this increase of 60,000 shares 
to be preferred stock, having the same 
preferences, qualifications and restrictions as 
the preferred stock set forth in the original 
certificate of incorporation; second, to fix 
the price, terms and conditions upon which 
this increase of capital stock is to be offered 
to the stockholders for subscription; third, to 
authorize the underwriting of the subscrip- 
tion and sale at par of the entire increase of 
preferred capital stock; fourth, to transact 



any further business that may come before 
the meeting. 

On the same date, but at a later hour, the 
annual meeting of the stockholders will take 
place for the purpose of electing the directors, 
each to serve for three years. 



SANTA CECILIA SUGAR COMPANY 

The Readjustment Committee, at the 
request of the holders of the first mortgage 
6% gold bonds, preferred capital stock and 
common capital stock, have prepared a plan 
for the readjustment of the securities and 
affairs of the company, and the holders of 
such securities are requested to deposit their 
holdings with the Colum.bia Trust Company, 
the depositary of the Readjustment Com- 
mittee. Bonds must be deposited in ne- 
gotiable form with August 1, 1917, and 
subsequent coupons attached, and certificates 
for preferred or common stock must be duly 
indorsed for transfer with necessary stamps 
attached. The plan provides that no se- 
curities may be deposited after May 15, 
1917, unless specially permitted by the Re- 
adjustment Committee. 



HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY, LIGHT & POWER 

COMPANY 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

DECEMBER 31. 1916 

The gross earnings for tl.e years 1913, 1914, 1915 and 191() were as follows: 

1913 1014 1915 lOlf) 

$5,417,0.-)4.27 $5,3!)f),713.7S $.5,r)41,:i02.72 $0,017,708.59 

A condensed statement of the results of operation: 

1910 1915 1914 \9\:i 

Ornss oirnines $0,017,70*.59 $5,541,302.72 $-,3 '0,713.78 $5,417,054.27 

Operation expenses andtaxes; .::.■:.■ ;:.:... 2.443.885.33 2.337,506.05 2,-95,321.59 2,612,952.80 

Net inpome " $3,573,823.26 $3,203,790.07 $2,p01,392.19 $2,804,101.41 

Miscellaneousincome.. ....::;■.:: ......... 144.501.49 147,874.95 102,119.18 H0,087.0() 

Gross income $3,718,384.75 $3,351,671.02 $2,903,511.37 $2,944,189.01 

FirstVharges ..■.■■. .' .' .' 1,297,093.23 1,115.413.99 1.0-)4, 131.97 1,090,085.82 

Net profit from operation* miscellaneous mcome. $2,421,291.52 $2,236,257.63 $1.MJ9,371.40 $1.S48,103.19 
Balance at credit of profit and loss account, Jan. 1. 

1910 l,70;t,950.00 

$1.131,24S.12 — of which anioimt the following disbursements 

were made: 

Dividends paid during the year (6% on the preferred and common shares) $1,790,901.18 

Provisions for sinking fund in r-speet to English bonds of the Compania de Gas y Electricidad de la 

Habana, and Consolidated mortgage bonds of the Havana Electric Railway Company 111,761.83 

Reserve for deprecia' ion IS'ncQ oo 

Reserve for bad and doubtful debts and other adjustments 123,U»3.3d 

Profit and loss account — balance transferred to 1917 2,024,501.78 

Total $4,131,248.12 

To comply with the tax laws of Cuba, separate accounts are kept of the various depart- 
ments of the company and the following is a summary of the operation thereof during 1916: 

Operating Ex- 
Departments Gross Earnings penscs and taxes Percent. Net Earnings Percent, 
from Operation (not including of Gross from of Gross 
First Charges) Earnings Operation Earnings 
Electric Railway .... $3,122,362.81 $1,346,260.36 43.12 $1,776,102.45 56.88 

Electric Light ■ 2.099,059.86 552.235.87 26.31 1.540.823.99 73.69 

Gas ,575.290.35 344.927.00 59.95 230,363.35 40.05 

Stage Lin-s V.'. 219,333.77 198,874 31 flO. 67 20.459.38 9. 33 

Electric Omnibuses (1 month). 1.661.80 1.587.71 95.54 74.09 4.40 

$'1,017,708.59 $2,143,885.33 40.61 $3,573,823.26 59.39 

The average force employed during the year was 3,017, of whom 35% have been in the 
service of the company or its predecessor for ten years and more and 25% for at least five 
years. 

The improvement in public lighting continues and over seven hundred incandescent 
lamps of from CO to 1,000 candle power were installed during 1916 and whenever practicable 
suspended from fancy brackets attached to the railway poles. The increase in electrical output 
was 15.31% and the increase in net earnings on account of electric lighting 13.68^ c. The 
number of electric meters in service Tecember 31, 1916, was 3,285 in excess of that of the pre- 
ceding year. 

Twenty-one electric autcn chiles for pessenger and for other company purposes were 
purchased and partly placed in service. A suitable garage is under construction and will be 
completed early in 1917 for storing, charging and repairing purposes. 

The new track constructed during the year aggregates 2.47 miles and the reconstructed 
track 2.66 miles. 

The gas distributing system was extended by 2.22 miles of new main and 802 new ser- 
vices were connected.. 

The sales of gas appliances during 1916 amounted to $105,453.71. The output of gas 
increased 15.2% over 1915, the net earnings increased 23.6% and the operating expenses de- 
creased 3.92%. The net increase in meters during the year was 1551. The stoves and ranges 
installed at the end of 1916 total 5325, water heaters, 827 and industrial apparatus 633. 



22 THECUBAREVIEW 



The total number of passengers carried on the cars during the year (59,698,790) shows 
an increase of 9.93%, compared with 1915, and the rolling stock of the company was increased 
by the construction of 14 new passenger cars. 

The consolidated power plant has operated reliably and economically. The total net 
output was nearly 47,000,000 K.W.H:., in the production of which 42,894 tons of coal were 
consumed, or 2,048 pounds per K.W.H. 

The high cost of feed, combined with the decreased earnings, made the result of the 
year's operation of the stage lines unfavorable, showing a decrease of $45,937.74, or 17.3% 
less, as compared with 1915. 

The Employees' Mutual Benefit Society has continued in sound and prosperous condition 
and over .$11,000 has been expended in assistance to members during illness. 

BALANCE SHEET. DECEMBER 31. 1916 

ASSETS 

Properties, plants and equipment, including banliers' charges and other ex- 
p?nditures in connection with the organization of the company, discount and 
expenses on general mortgage bonds and interest, discount and expenses on 
two-year gold notes during construction ^55 3^7 597 Y5 

Investments (At cost) ' 'iifi'-jBT ciQ 

Current Assets: 

Cash in banks and on hand $1 412 153 24 

Accounts receivable, after providing for bad and doubtful debts ........ . . . . '857i443 06 

Stock of materials, merchandise and supplies on hand 867* 119 46 

Materials in transit - 49 ',526 68 

Deferred Assets: ' ■ -■ 

Insurance paid in advance, deferred charge, etc IO7 064 04 

LIABILITIES li^:^^^:T^^ 

Capital Stock: 

Authorized and Issued: 

Common: 

150,000 shares, par value, $100 each, fully paid and non-assessable $15,000,000 00 

Less: Held in treasury: 

515.69 shares, par value, $100 each 51 ,569.00 

Ro/ f> 1 *■ -D f J ■ '' $14,948,431.00 

6% Cumulative Preferred: 

150,000 shares, par value $100 each, fully paid and non-assessable $15,000,000.00 

Less: Held in treasury: 

1.73 shares, par value $100 each 173 qq 



— 14,999,827.00 

_ J J r. u. $29,948,258.00 

r unded Debt: 

Consolidated mortgage 5% gold bonds of Havana Electric Ry. Co., dated Feb. 1, 

1902, due February 1, 1952 " $9,188,111 09 

Less in treasury '.'.'.'..'.'.' '50o',429'.9S 

iS8 6^7 6^1 1 1 
6% General Consolidated obligations of Compania de Gas y Electricidad de la 

Habana, redeemable at the option of the company 6,000,000.00 

Fifty-year 6% mortgage bonds of Compania de Gas y Electricidad de la Habana. 

1904 3,998,000.00 

Thirty-seven-year 5% English mortgage bonds of Compania de Gas y Electrici- 
dad de la Habana, 1906 (£128,800) 622,533.33 

General mortgage 5% sinking fund gold bonds, dated Sept. 1, 1914, due Sep .1, 

1954 $5,698,000.00 

Less: 

Deposited with Government of Cuba $52,000.00 

In treasury 343,000.00 395,000.00 5.303,000.00 24,611,214.44 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts payable ". $166,428.87 

Dividends and interest due but unpaid ', 70 994.13 



Deferred Liabilities: 

Accrued interest on bonds $365 877.76 

Consumers' Deposits 262,914.25 

Other deposits 9l'l69.48 

Sundry accruals for taxes, etc IOG'sOS.SS 

Capital Stock of Havana Electric Railway Company, outstanding: to be 

exchanged for capital stock of Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co $17,585.00 

Capital Stock of Compania de Gas y Electricidad de la Habana, outstand- 
ing: to be exchanged for capital stock of Havana Electric Railway, Light & 

Power Company ' ' 2,547.74 



237,423.00 



826,270.07 



$20,132.74 



jLess; Capital Stock of the Havana Electric Railway. Light & Power Co., 

held in reserve in respect of above 20,132.74 

Special Reserve 522 288 19 



Corporate Surplus: 

Profit ;iii(l loss ri'count — Credit balance as per statement attaehed hereto $2,024, "jOI. 78 

Ucscrvc for redemption of consolidated mortgage a% gold bonds of Havana 

Electric Railway Company 273,000.00 

Reserve for redemption of thirty-seven-year 5% English mortgage bonds of 

Compania de Gas y Electricidad de la Habana 102,460.67 

Sinking fund rossrve, Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mtgc. Bonds. . 106,697.66 

Reserve for depreciation 7o,000,00 2,581,606.11 

SIS, 727,1 10.81 

CONDENSED PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

DECEMBER 31. 1916 

Railway i.iKlit & Power 

Department. Department. Total. 

Gross earnings from operation . . $3,343,:ioS..S.S $2,674,3.')0.21 SO, 017,708.59 

Oixraliiii; expensfs . 1,. 503,457.34 792,912.91 2,296,370.25 

$1,839,901.04 $1,881,437.30 $3,721,338.34 
Deduct: 

Taxes, U. S. A $21,927.00 $9,999.90 $31,926.96 

Taxes, Cuba 18,000.00 94,250.00 112,250.00 

Trigo annuities 3,338.12 3,338.12 

Interest on funded debt 555,935.87 741.157.36 1,297,093.23 

$599,200.99 $845,407.32 $1,444,608.31 



$1,240,700.05 $1,036,029.98 $2,276,730.03 

Add Miscellaneous Income: 

Interest on depo.sits $47,003 81 

K':'"'^ : „ ; 25,941.37 

Other miSL'ellaneous mcome 71,556.31 

$144,561.49 



Net profit for the year ,. $2,421,291.52 

Balance at credit of profit and loss account, January 1, 1916 1,709,956.60 

^ , $4,131,248.12 

Deduct: 

Provision for sinking fund in respect to English bonds of the Compania de 
Gas y Electricidad de la Habana and consolidated mortgage bonds of the 

Havana Electric Railway Company $1 U, 761. S3 

Reserve for depreciation 75,000.00 

Reserve for bad and doubtful debts and other adjustments 123,083.33 309,845.16 



Dividends Paid: 

On preferred shares. May 13, 1910, on $14,999,857 at 3^0 . . $449,995.71 

On preferred shares, Nov. 15, 1910, on $14,999,857 at 39c • 449,995.71 $S99,991.42 



$3,821,402.96 



On common shares, May 13, 1916, on $14,948,496 at 3% • • $448,454.88 

Oncommonshares, Nov. 15, 1916, on $14,948,496 at 3%.. 448,454.88 896,909.76 1,796,901.18 

Balance carried to balance sheet $2,024 501.78 



BANCO NACIONAL DE CUBA 

(National Bank of Cuba) 
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— DECEMBER 30. 1916 

CUnited States Currency) 

ASSETS 
CASH: 

In Vaults $12,433,940.69 

In Transit 41 ,820.76 

Coinage (Xational Currency) oOO.OO 

Due from Banks and Bankers 4,478,808.94 

Remittances in Transit 3,325,332.55 $20,280,402.94 

BOXDS AND STOCKS: 

Government Bonds $3,035,857.47 

City of Havana Bonds 655,769.42 

Other Bonds 572,129.31 

Stocks 118,402.28 4,382,158.48 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Loans, Discounts, Time Bills, etc 37,467,629.46 

Bank Buildings and Real Estate 1,497.425.19 

Sundr> Accounts 10 591.28 

Securities on deposit 6,483,490.9/ 

Total $70,121,698.32 

liaeilitip:.s 

Capital $5,000,000.00 

Surplus 2,800,000.00 

♦Undivided Profits 551,275.42 

.$8,351,275.42 

Deposits 54,843.011.86 

Due to Banks end Bankers ; 403,920.07 

Pension fund for Employees 40,000.00 

Deposits (Securities) 6,4S3,490.97 

Total $70,121,698.32 

♦Deduct $250,000 for the semi-annual Dividends of i% plus a special dividend of 1% 
(making a total of 5% semi-annual) payable January 1, 1917. 

A year of unprecedented prosperity was enjoyed by Cuba in 1916, the sugar crop having 
been the largest and most profitable in the history of the island and tobacco exports were also 
larger than the previous year and better prices realized. 

The largely increased sugar cane plantings and the construction of ten new mills in 915 
enabled Cuba to produce a crop of 3,003,624 tons, or over 400,000 tons greater than the previous 
largest crop, which was harvested in 1914. The average price of sugar in Cuba during the year 
1916 was 4.425 cents per pound, as against 3.2246 the previous year and the amount realized 
from the crop was about $300,000,000. 

During the year 1916 sixteen new sugar mills were built which will grind during the i^resent 
season. Weather conditions on the whole were favorable to the crop, although excessive rains 
were reported in many sections. To this fact and injury to the cane by a wind storm in Novem- 
ber which nearly reached the intensity of a hurricane, is attributed the reduction in yield of 
sugar, of which many mill owners complain. 

The December estimates of crop statisticians for the present season of about 3,500,000 
tons are being reduced owing to the following circum_stances : the decreased yield of sugar from 
the cane, the delay in grinding due to rains in early December and failure to receive new ma- 
chinery in time, the deficiint service of the railroads and the scarcity of labor. The prevailing 
opinion is that the crop, with normal weather conditions during the grinding season will be 
about 3,200,000 tons. 

While the prices of sugar opened higher this season than last and have so continued up to 
this writing, it is believed that the average for the total crop will not be as high as last year un- 
less Europe increases its purchases. Last year European countries imported from Cuba and 
the United States about 1,300,000 tons of raw and refined sugar, whereas, thus far they have 
purchased less than 500,000 tons this season. 

The profits of the cane growers (colonos) will probably be smaller than during the two 
previous years owing to the largely increr.sed scale of wages and other difficulties under which 
the crop is being harvested. 

Port receipts up to February 3rd have been 469,089 tons as against 641,616 tons up to 
February 5th last year. 

There was considerable improvement in the tobacco situation during the year 1916. The 
quality of Vuelta Abajo and Partidos crops was good and that of Remedios fair. While the 
crop was smaller prices were ro.uch higher and the new year finds the planter in better financial 
condition than for the several years past. Stocks are practically exhausted and it is thought 
prices will rule higher than last year. The growing crop of Vuelta Abajo has improve J with 
recent rains and it is thought quality will be fair to good, but the crop will be smaller than 
last year. The Partidos crop will probably be a little smaller than last year, but of good quality. 



THECUBAREVIEW 25 



It is :i little early to make predictions relative to the Keinedios erop; its (iiumtity and (luality 
will depend iii)on the weather duriiifi the mouth of Fel)ruary. The aereage is s:<ici to bo larger 
than last year, but the probabilities are that this erop will not be larger than the last if as large. 
The oroj) of 1910 amounted to 361,099 bales as compared with 433,2()7. Exports for 191t) were 
352,220 bales, being an increase of 11,519 over the previous year. 

Considerable attention has been given to copper mining in the tobacco province of Pinar 
(!el Hio during the past year. Many mining claims have been denounced and a considerable 
amount of work was performed, but shipments of copper ore have been confined to two or three 
mines. Th(> declared value of copper ore .shipped from Pinar del Hio during the year 191(1 was 
about $4,ri()0,()()0, of which amount 90' ^ or more was from two mines. 

Deposits on December 30, 191(5, were $54,843,01 1.8() as against $3(;,145,4()o.5"/ on the same 
date of the previous j'ear, representing an increase of $1S,()97,(305.29, or 51.73^ i- 

The number of individual deposit accounts on December 30, 1916, was 59,397 as compared 
with 53,077 the previous year, being an increase in number of 6,320 accounts, equal to 11.90%- 

Deposits in the Savings Department on December 30, 1916, amounted to $15,144,361.63 as 
: gainst $8,582, 769. SS on the same date of the previous year, being an increase of $6,561,591.75 
or 76.45 "^o- The number of accounts was 30,504, as against 24,836 on the same date of the 
previous year, an increase of 5,668 accounts, or 22.82%. 

Amounts handled by the Collection Department in 1916 aggregated $358,000,000 as com- 
I)ared with $327,000,000 in the previous year, representing an increase of $31,000,000 or 9.48%. 

The turnover in the Exchange Department during the past year amounted to .$471,000,00 
as against $371,000,000 in the previous year, or an increase of $100,000,000 equal to 26.95%. 

The cash movement at the head office for the year 1916 amounted to $3,130,000,000 
against $2,146,000,000, being an increase of $984,000,000, or 45.85%. 

Loans on December 30, 1916, were $37,467,629.46 as compared with .$22,724,471.53 on the 
same date of the previous year, representing an increase in amount of $14,743,157.93, equal to 
64.88%. The number of loans on the last day of 1916 was 5,924 as against 5,111 in 1915, being 
an increase in number of 813 or 15.90%. 

The regular 8% dividend for the year was paid and also an extra dividend of 2' ^ which 
was warranted by ihe earrings. The surplus of the bank was increased $800,000, making a 
total surplus of $2,800,000. Ample provision was made for bad and doubtful accounts and 
$551,275.42 were left in undivided profits prior to payment of dividend. 

During the year a new Havana branch was opened on Belascoain Street and six other 
branches in the interior as follows: Pains in Havana Province, Pedro Betancourt in the Province 
of Matanzas, Cabaiguan in Santa Clara Province, Florida and :Moron in the Province of Cama- 
juey and San Luis in Oriente Province. 

A considerable addition was made to the head office building for the occupancy of important 
tenants and a new bank building was erected at Placetas, making in all 12 branch bank build- 
ings owned by the institution. Not a single office in the building of the head office has been 
vacant during the year. 

It is with great satisfaction that shareholders are advised of the increased holdings of 
shares of the bank during the past fifteen months by active officers and employees of the insti- 
tution, the number of such shareholders now being 115. 

During the year $20,000 were added to the employees pension fund, making a total of 
$40,000 set aside for said fund. 



THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 



DIRECTORS' REPORT 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED NOVE:vIBER 30, 1916 

Profit and Loss Account 

Balance of Profit and Loss account, November 30, 191.5 $676,472.16 

Profits for the year, after deducting charges of management and all other expecs s, 
accrued interest on deposi s, full provision for all bad ard doubtful debts atd 

rebate of interest on unmatured bills 2,111,307.65 

$2,787,779.81 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Appropriated as follows: — • 

Dividends Nos. 114, 115, 116 and 117, at 12 per cent per annum $1,417,207.02 

Transferred to Officers Pension Fund 100,000.00 

Written off Bank Premises Account 2.50,000.00 

War Tax on Bank Note Circulation 118,226.51 

•Contribution to Patriotic Fund 50,000.00 

Balance of Profit and Loss carried forward 852,346.28 

GENERAL STATEMENT, NOVExMBER 30, 1910. 



$2,787,779.81 



Liabilities 
To the Public: 

Deposits not bearing interest 

Deposits bearing int., including int- 
_ erest accrued to date of statement. 

'^ 

- Total deposits ._ 

Not? a of the bank in circulation. . . . 
Bal. due to other banks in Canada. . 
Balanc"S due to banks and banking 
correspondentsin the United King- 
dom and foreign countrif s 

Bills payable 

Acceptances under letters of credit. . 



To the Shareholders: 

Capital stock paid in 

Reserve fund 

Balance of profits carried forward . . . 

Dividend No. 117 (at 12% per an- 
num), payable Dec. 1, 1916 

Dividends unclaimed 



$53,365,396.12 

140,862,199.46 

$200,227,595.58 

18,178,228.49 

1,464,467.85 



6,683,108.63 
478,392.16 
452,677.26 

$227,484,469.97 

$12,000,000.00 

12,560,000.00 

852,346.28 

359,840.71 
4,770.25 

$253,261,427.21 



Assets 

Current coin 

Dominion notes 

Deposit in the Central gold reserves. 

Deposit with the minister for the pro- 
poses of the circulation fund 

Note.? of othsr banks 

Cheques on other banks 

Balances due by other banks in Can. . 

Balances due by banks and banking 
correspondents elsewhere than in 

Canada 

Dominion and Provincial Govern- 
ment securities, not exceeding mar- 
ket value 

Canadian Municipal securities and 
British, Foreign and Colonial Pub- 
lic securities other than Canadian, 
not exceeding market value 

Railway and other bonds, debentures 
and stocks, not exceeding market 
value 

Call loans in Canada, on bonds, de- 
bentures and stocks 

Call and short (not exceeding thirty 
days) loans elsewhere than in 
Canada 



Other current loans and discounts in 
Canada (less rebate of interest) .... 

Other current loans and discounts 
elsewhere than in Canada (less re- 
bate of interest) 

Overdue debts (estimated loss pro- 
vided for) 

Real estate other than bank premises. 

Bank premises, at not more than cost, 
less amounts written off 

Liabilities of customers under letters 
of credit, as per contra 

Other assets not included in the fore- 
going 



$16,072,763.38 
14,249,110.25 
6,500,000.00 

595,340.00 

3,857,573.80 

11,805,508.55 

1,199.79 



5,092,067.54 
1,029,374.10 

14,012,089.69 

15,464,604.22 
11,076,005.90 

21,372,026.45 
$121,127,663.67 

86,936,631.39 

37,928,027.25 

466,640.93 
1,095,473.24 

5,138,398.14 

452,677.26 

115,915.33 

$253,261,427.21 



CUBA 

The sugar crop for 1915-16 amounted to 3,005,000 long tons, against 2,575,000 for 1914-15. 
It is estimated that producers obtained an average price of $4 per 100 lbs., f .o.b. Cuba — about 
double the average price for several years prior to the war. Experts estimate the probable 
1916-17 crop at 3,500,000 tons, almost 1,000,000 tons more than the crop of two years ago. 
Sixteen new mills were erected during the past year, making 201 to grind during the present 
•season. On account of unseasonable weather, the mills are considerably later than usual in 
starting to grind, and the cane is giving unfavorable returns as compared with last year. 
These facts, together with a scarcity of labor and transportation difficulties, may result in a 
lower production than estimated. Sugar freights during the last crop averaged 30c. to 60c. per 
100 lbs., and present indications are that they will be higher during the coming season. There 
is more or less imcertainty regarding prices, but the outlook is nevertheless very favorable. An 
incident worthy of mention in the sugar trade during the year was the formation of the Cuba 
Cane Sugar Corporation, which acquired seventeen mills with an anticipated output of 550,000 
tons during the present crop. 

The production of tobacco was somewhat under that of the preceding year, and less than 
half a normal crop. Prices have risen steadily, and the value of the past crop is estimated at 
something over $30,000 000, as compared with about .$20,000,000 in 1915. On the whole, con- 
ditions for the coming crop are favorable to an increased yield of good quality. 

The cattle industry has been very profitable on account of the greater demand for working 
cattle, together with high prices for beef and hides. These factors have led to a depletion of the 
breeding stock, which may affect the industry seriously if not arrested. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



27 



Coffee and cacao are rapidly beconiing iiiiportant croi)s. Production and prices during 
the past year were satisfactory. 

There was considerable development in the mining inchistry during 1916, particularly in 
iron, manganese and copper. 

A notable feature of the trade of Cuba is the large balance of trade in her favor, viz., .SISO,- 
000,000. For 1914-15, it was $92,000,000, and for 1913-14, §.38,000,000. 

Imports for 191.5-1(3 were $172,000,000, and exports $302,000,000. 



AMERICAN BEET SUGAR CO 

Gross earnings of the .\merican Beet Sugar 
Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
totaled $14,971,116, compared with $10,479,- 
293 the previous year After making de- 
duct ons for depreciation, ecc, there is a bal- 
ance of $4,254,747, which is equivalent to 
$28.36 a share on 150,000 s ares of common 
stock, compared \A-ith $14.30 earned the pre- 
\'ious year. President Duval's report places 
the average cost of sugar sold, nc'uding 
freight and other selling expenses, at $4.21 a 
bag of 100 pounds, as against $3.95 last year. 



MONEY ORDERS 

The Cuban Government has paid the 
United States $95,000 as the balance due the 
United States in the money order service up 
to February 28, 1917. In 1916 Cuba issued 
143,884 money orders on American post 
offices, amounting to $1,311,548.85. 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY CO. 

This company has just finished a well for 
the Hormiguero Central Corporation at 
Hormiguero, Cuba. The well is 204 feet deep, 
j-ields 70 gallons of water per minute within 
suction distance and 80 gallons of water per 
minute with the pump cylinder down in the 
well 80 feet. This is a very fine well and the 
depth is very moderate. 



BRAZIL 



The directors of the Rio de Janeiro Trans- 
port Co., recently founded in New York wdth 
a capital of £1,000,000, have informed the 
Brazilian Ministers of Commerce and Ma- 
rine of the forthcoming initiation of their 
service with large and rapid cargo boats, 
which will assure a regular connection be- 
tween the United States and Brazilian ports. 
The commercial exchange between the two 
countries will be further assured by the West 
Indies Steamship Co., which, on the one 
part, will carr>' on a regular service between 
Cuba and the United States, and on the other 
between Cuba and Brazil, the River Plate 
ports and the Pacific, making the return jour- 



ney via the Panama Canal. — Financial N'ewSf 
London. 



DELAWARE CHARTERS 

Cuba Development Co., deal in and with 
stocks, bonds, etc., $1,000,000; Herbert E. 
Latter, C. L. Rimlinger, Clement M. Egner,. 
local Wilmington, Del., incorporators. 

Cuba Motor Company, manufacture, buy^ 
sel] and deal in and with automobiles, etc., 
$10,000; L. B. PhilHps, J. B. Bailey, local 
Dover incorporators. 

West Porto Rico Sugar Co., acquire sugar 
plantations and to erect and maintain sugar 
factories, $3,000,000; Carlos Cabrea, Julian 
B. Shope, Bartolmi Surda, New York. 

Cuban Colono Co., plant, grow and cultivate 
sugar cane and operate sugar plantations^ 
$7,800; M. V. Haywood, C. L. Rimlinger, 
Clement M. Egner, local Wilmington, Del., 
incorporators. 

NEW YORK CHARTERS 

The Cuban Confectionery and Trading Co., 
Inc., merchandise importers, exporters, $80,- 
000; H. B. J. Craig, L. L. De. La Barra, T. 
W. Osterheld, 120 Broadway. 

The Cuban Amiesite Co., Inc., patented 
pa\'ing products, patented cement, shares no 
par value, begin with $500; W. C. Zeller, 
G. Link, Jr., E. C. Draper, 17 Batterj^ Place. 

HAVANA CUSTOM HOUSE RECEIPTS 

1916 1917 

January $2,280,601.09 $2,873,993.06 

February 1,863,434.44 2,260,266.97 

March 2,285,048.74 2,356,160.54 

Totals $6,429,084.27 $7,490,420.57 

HAVANA 

Mayor Varona Suarez, in a report to the 
City Council, states that in the past fiscal 
year the City of Havana received $4,619,- 
626.27 and spent $5,682,106.45, a difference 
of $1,062,480.18 as the deficit for the past 
year. 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 




Punta Alegre Mill and Buildings. 



THE "PUNTA ALEGRE" MILL 



The opening of this new central took place recently ind was attended with much ceremony 
by a rei>resentative list of Boston financiers as well gs CLben dignitaries. 

This new mill is situated some forty miles ecst of Cr ibarien on the north capst. The factory 
and batey site is beautifully placed at the waters' edge, and from the stamlpoint of the shipping 
facilities afforded, the location is ideal. The heavy freight charges which the mills in the 
interior of the isknd have to besr sre elininated since the sugrr made will be shipped from the 
company's docks and in its lighters to shipside at Cayo Frances at a very low cost. 

The mill, erected by the West India Management and Consultation Com.pany, and em- 
bodying all that sugar engineering experience of the past thirty years has proved to be best, is 
undoubtedly what a sugar mill should be as a mechanical proposition. No expense has been 
spared to obtain this end. The result is a m.echanical triumph. 

The mill is one of the two that have installed the double crusher process. This method 
prepares the cane more thorough.ly than the single crusher, and makes possible a m.uch larger 
tonnage with a better extraction of sugar. The entire plant, with the exception of the crushing 
machinery, is driven by electricity. This has been found to be more efficient than steam, in 
that it allows each unit to be controlled more easily than under the old steam process. In this 
mill the grouping of the different units so that each process follows along the line of least resist- 
ance was the subject of very careful study, with the result that the plant can be worked at a 
minimum expense. 

Future expansions have also beenprovided for in such a way that they maybe effected with- 
out disturbing in any particular the existing arrangements. The plantation from which the 
company draws its supply of cane for the Punta San Juan (or Punta Alegre) mill consists of 
35,000 acres of hea\\ black loam sugar land, drained by a system of .small ditches which 
flow into a large ditch more than fifteen kilometers long. 



r H I. CUBA R E VI K W 



29 




Interior View, Punta Alegre Mil 




Vacuum Pans and Evaporator Effects. Punta Alegre Mill. 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




'Casa Vivienda" — Officers' Living Quarters, Punta Alcgre Alil 







Loaded Caii'3 Cars and Roadbed at the Alill, Piinta Alegre Mil 



The cane is brought from the plantation to the mill over a standard gauge, rock-ballasted 
railroad of some forty kilorr.eters, with no grsde exceeding one-quarter of one per cent. The 
steel cars used for transporting the cane are of the latest model with a capacity of thirty tons 
each. The road has been built under the most discouraging conditions, but the determination 
of the engineers triumphed, and the road is now one that will bear comoarison with the best in 
the island. In addition to the main lines, there is a system of portable track roads which act 
as feeders bringing the cane from the more distant fields. This ramification of portable track 
roads will make it possible to haul the cane during periods of rainy weather when it otherwise 
would be impossible to pursue the field work. 



THE CUBA R E \M E \\- 



31 




Punta Saa Juan Dock on Buenavista Bay, Puiita Alegre Sugar Mill 



The entire property is provided with fresh running water by means of an aqueduct 23 
kilometers in length. The water comes from the Chambas River, which traverses the southern 
end of the property and is filtered and sterilized before it is pumped into large storage reservoirs. 

The Batey is the outcome of careful planning, so that the hygienic conditions of the place 
should be of the best. The quarters for the bachelors are commodious and comfortable, while 
the married men are provided with houses that are ideal for the purpose. Besides, there is a 
considerable supply of small houses for married laborers. 

The officers of the Punta Alegre Sugar Co. are: President, Edwin F. Atkins, Boston, Mass.; 
Vice-Presidents, Chas. B. Wiggin, Boston, Mass., and Elie L. Ponvert, Hormiguero, Cuba.; 
Treasurer, Robert W. Atkins, Boston, Mass.; Secretary, John E. Thayer, Jr., Boston, Mass. 

The directors are: Galen L. Stone, E. V. R. Thayer, Frederick R. Ayer, Jr., Chas. B. 
Wiggin, E. B. Dane, Richard F. Hoyt, Ralph Hornblower, all of Boston, and Geo. H. Frazier, 
Philadelphia, Pa. and W. de S. IVIaud, Havana. 

To the energy of these men and to their belief in the future of Cuba, is due the conception 
of this enterprise; to the skill, pluck and determination of the men under them, is due the ac- 
complishment; and the organization which will make for success in the future is the result of 
much painstaking thought and unflagging effort on the part of the active managers of the 
Punta Alegre Sugar Company. 



BEET SUGAR IN SIBERIA 

A committee of the Society of Siberian 
Engineers proposes to experiment with the 
cultivation of sugar-beet seed in Siberia with 
a view to ascertaining if it is possible to 
develop this industry. It is planned to make 
the experiments cover a period of three years, 
and a specialist has been engaged to look 
after the ex-periments on the plantations. 



CUBAN CIGARS 

According to El Tohaco, Cuba, during the 
year of 1916, manufactured 390,126,959 
cigars. They were produced as follows: 
Havana, 222,772,259; Pinar del Rio, 12,561,- 
575; Matanzas, 21,983,475; Santa Clara, 
56,954,075; Camaguey, 8,088,200, and Ori- 
ente, 67,767,375. This production was larger 
than any in recent years. 



32 THECUBAREVIEW 



SIX YEARS OF TRADE WITH CUBA 



United States Imports from Cuba 

1911 1912 1913 1914 

Value Value Value Value 

Bananas $772,313 $961,948 

Cattle, hides and skins $379,636 $627,544 425,336 1,526,788 

Copper ore 620,522 729,525 741,917 2,123,174 

Iron ore 4,864,186 2,288,102 

Sugarcane 76,226,966 106,414,904 93,850,298 115,517,902 

Tobacco— leaf 91,593 186,305 207,826 196,399 

Tobacco— all other 15,818,867 15,767,120 14,523,310 14,509,847 



1915 


1916 


Value 


Value 


$987,573 


$995,020 


2,731,235 


2,981,749 


3,810,352 


5,769,593 


2,450,163 


2,195,409 


165,134,662 


202,799,472 


145,113 


213,573 


11,784,912 


12,109,375 



Total imports for each year.. $106,098,026 $137,890,C04 $125,093,740 $146,844,576 $197,548,146 $243,728,770 

United States Exports to Cuba 

1911 

Value 

Agricul.imple., and parts of. . $254,411 

Automobile tires 

Books, maps, etc 259,888 

Boards, joints, etc 2,288,005 

Boots and shoes 3,297,704 

Bacon 556,588 

Com 1,402,792 

Cars— passenger and freight. . . 1,603,821 

Cotton cloth 1,657,757 

Coal— bituminous 2,776,619 

Furniture 752,867 

Hams and shoulders — cured . . 638,311 

Iron & steel pipes and fittings.. 1,237,047 

Iron and steel sheets and plates. 

Iron and steel, structural 802,685 

Leather— glazed kid 47,878 

Lard 3,974,656 

Lard compounds & substitutes. 1,542,264 

Locomotives — steam 291,918 

Oil-cottonseed 182,008 

Oil— crude 374,298 

Oil— illuminating 54,439 

Oil— lubricating and heavy . . 395,454 

Pork— pickled 806,512 

Printing paper 129,265 

Rosin 

Sewing machines 338,017 

Typewriter machines 101,721 

Tin plates, terneplates, etc 119,681 

Wheat flour 3,981,049 

Wagons 

Wire 560,931 



1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


Value 


Value 


Value 


Value 


Value 


$272,795 


$247,105 


$222,867 


$377,098 
356,903 


$688,124 
805,471 


306,505 


241,381 


246,613 


290,520 


328,994 


2,037,048 


2,939,581 


1,686,786 


2,080,936 


3,892,038 


3,483,566 


3,857,378 


3,585,082 


4,583,426 


6,759,377 


673,949 


1,136,067 


1,781,212 


1,494,633 


2,176,286 


1,815,979 


1,660,500 


1,868,314 


2,207,548 


2,739.846 


1,245,521 


2,420,049 


1,289,430 


1,232,431 


4,275,893 


1.867,837 


1,661,357 


1,860,626 


3,301,862 


5,.326.830 


3,061,934 


3.473,626 


3,011,776 


3,274,890 


3,762,319 


857,728 


908,228 


651,797 


688,677 


1,087,061 


766,698 


944,985 


963,514 


1,509,604 


1,995,678 


902,940 


1,059,062 


813,601 


1,031,569 


2,255,369 




712,455 


456,636 


739,473 


1,902,579 


619,889 


735,910 


517,103 


966,844 


2,474,289 


53,252 


70,140 


59,544 


.^0,895 


86,222 


3,478,059 


5,573,753 


5,182,098 


5,473,621 


7,431,869 


2,398,597 


1,490,911 


1,348,715 


1,265,974 


1,362,043 


266,302 


734,122 


437,680 


588,908 


1,660,193 


255,637 


340,478 


470,518 


530,080 


844,896 


237,008 


343,672 


482,504 


606,437 


1,171,031 


101,923 


155,191 


17,893 


25,808 


144,768 


548,289 


567,915 


500,043 


389,323 


973,661 


820,447 


883,968 


329,601 


636,095 


1,049,576 


209,177 


216,272 


268,700 


320,333 


431,729 

185,796 


373,340 


440,614 


277,786 


306,370 


436,468 


111,601 


107,406 


92,027 


145,714 


216,579 


162,619 


204,596 


126,901 


217,309 


413,445 


4,330,747 


4,094,182 


4,326,135 


6,075,953 


7,306,918 




37,611 


41,481 


21,718 


46,153 


415,117 


470,822 


395,272 


519,817 


1,119,154 



Total exports for each year $62,280,509 $65,228,061 $73,238,834 $67,877,382 $95,750,004 $164,622,950 



In coiiiiection with the statistics of the United States trade with Cuba, it i.s interesting to 
note the charts shown on the opposite page, which are reproduced from a chart issued by 
the Pan-American Union. The upper chart shows the exports from the United States to Latin 
America for 1916, totaling §497,155,369, of which the exports to Cuba amounted to $164,622,- 
950. The chart in the lower part of the page shows the United States imports from Latin 
America for 1916, totaling $823,578,723, of which the imports from Cuba amounted to $243,- 
728,770. These charts empha.«ize the importance of the trade with Cuba. 



m 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 





34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 





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It may be seen from the 
accompanying diagram that 
shipments of Cuban raw sugar 
to Europe have increased in 
volume during the last two 
months and are now onh" 
60,000 tons less than last year 
at this time. 

During the same period 
Europe has taken in refined 
sugar from the United States 
only 40% of what was 
shipped last year. With this 
large decrease in shipments 
of refined sugars, it seems 
reasonable to presume that 
the European demand for 
Cuban raw sugar will show 
no abatement during the bal- 
ance of the year. 

jAn Feb Har Apr May Juti, Jul Au6 5ep. Oct nov Dec 

DIAGRAM 
Showing Exports of Cuban Raw Sugar to Europe during 1915, 1916 and 1917 

(to May 1st) 



SUGAR CULTIVATION IN NATAL 

In 1915, 140,000 acres were devoted to 
sugar cane growing and 46,000 acres addition- 
al are now being prepared for cane; 184,000 
acres, after inspection, were declared suitable 
for the cultivation of sugar cane, and it is 
rumored that a sjTadicate of sugar growers 
proposes to purchase some 110,000 acres of 
sugar cane land. 

In Xatal there are about 30 sugar centrals, 
all of which are equipped with British ma- 
chinery. 



PANAMA 

The National Assembly of Panama has 
approved a contract made by the Executive 
with the Amalgamated Sugar Co. of Utah 
for the sale to that company of 8,000 hectares 
(hectare equals 2.47 acres) of unoccupied 
Government land west of the River Chiriqui 
Viejo, to be planted to sugar cane within two 
years. The price of land was $2.50 per 
hectare, subject to the execution of the terms 
of the contract. 



THECUBAREVIEW 35 



CENTRALS REPORTED AS FINISHED GRINDING 

MAY 7, 1917 



Bags Per Cent 

Central Est. Actual Short Over Short Over 

KWANA 

Occidente 25,000 16,542 8,4.58 347c 

MATANZ.\S 

Armenia 8.5,000 77,300 7,700 9% 

Elena 15,000 19,000 4,000 27% 

Feliz 135,000. 142,000 7,000 5% 

G Mena 365,000 325,000 40,000 119c 

Triunfo 20,000 30,000 10,000 50% 

SAGUA 

Maria .\ntonio 50,000 40,300 9,700 19% 

CAIBARIEN 

Vitoria 165,000 30,000 13.5,000 82% 

CIEXFUEGOS 

Dos Hermanos fAcea) 28,000 28,000 

NTJEVITAS 

Senado 270,000 64,000 206,000 76% 

ANTILLA & NIPE BAY 

Alto Cedro 90,000 (?J Abandoned 

Cupey 110,000 30,000 80,000 73% 

Elia 115,000 2.3,000 92,000 80% 

jobabo'' 300,000 60,000 240,000 80% 

SANTA CRUZ 

Francisco 350,000 195,000 155,000 44% 



2,123,000 1,080,142 
1,080,142 

1,042,858 bags short, or about 150,000 tons. 

Estates reported finished 15 

Per cent of estimated crop reported 8.7% 

Average shortage 49% 



SUGAR REVIEW 



Specially vritfen for the Cuba Retiew by Wilktt & Gray, Xeo York. 

Our last re%-iew for this magazine was dated April 9th, 1917. 

At that date Cuba centrifugal sugar 96° test basis was quoted at 5-1 /32e. cost and freight 
and at this MTiting is 53^c. c. & f. 

During the interim the changes were as follows: April 10, 5140.; 11th, 5-5/16c.; 12th, 
o3/^c.; 13th, 5-7/ 16c.; 19th, SMc; 23rd, SJ^c; 24th, 5-3 'IGc; 25, o^c; 26th, 5-3/16c.; 
May 1st, 5Mc.; c. & f. unchanged to date. 

From these quotations it is to be noted that fluctuations were He. dovm to 3, 16c. up from 
the 5Mc. level, at which the month began and closed. 

Sugar must now be classed among other food products subject to regulations to be fixed 
by the Ciovernment. Thus far the Government has made no special regulations, but much 
talk relating thereto is being heard from "\^'ashington. 

No doubt the action of refiners in limiting the distribution of refined sugar to the countrj' 
to the actual requirements of consiunption has done much to keep prices from advancing as 
thev might have done, temporarily at least, under a strong speculative demand from all sources. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

The Government no doubt takes notice of this disposition on the part of refiners to dis- 
courage undue speculation in sugar and for this reason is Ukely to take no spec'al action in 
hmiting trade and prices for sugar, unless these circumstances change to active speculation 
on the Sugar Exchange, of which there are no signs at present. 

It is to be noted specially' that recent reduced estimates of the outturn of the Cuba crop 
are being replaced by a return to higher former e timates. We have seen no special reasons 
for changing our OA\ai estimate of o,000,000 tons which seems likely to be confirmed by results. 

There is now but little expectation of an internal revenue tax l>eing placed on sugar, or 
any change in the rate of duty on same. The only Government action, if any, may be that in a 
control of prices for food products, some mention may be m.ade of sugar, but this has for the 
time being no influence upon prices. 

There appears at this writing to be a waiting market, without special indication of either 
an upward or downward important movement, the tone and tendency if anything, being to 
steadiness with a slight upward trend. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

New York, May 7th, 1917 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 

Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por WiUett & Gray, de Nueva York. 

Nuestra ultima reseha para esta publcacion estaba fechada el 9 de abr^l de 1917, en cuya 
fecha el aziicar centrifugo de Cuba polarizacion 96° se cotizaba a 5-1 /32c. costo y flete, y 
ahora se cotiza d 53^c. costo y flete. 

Durante ese plazo los cambios fueron como sigue: abril 10, 5}ic.; el 11, 5-5/16c.; el 12, 
dVsc; el 13, 5-7/16c.; el 19, SMc; el 23, SVsC.; el 24, 5-3/16c.; el 25, 5Kc.; el 26, 5-3/16c.; el 
1 de mayo, 5J^c. costo y flete, sin cambio hasta la fecha. 

De e.stas cotizaciones se observara que las fluctuaciones fueron 3^c. hacia la l:)aja a 3/16c., 
hacia el alza del nivel de 534c., a cuyo precio empezo y termino el mes. 

El azucar debe ahora ser comprendido entre los demas prodiictos alimenticios sujetos a 
las regulaciones fijadas por el Gobierno. Kasta ahora el Gobierno no ha planteado regnlaciones 
especiales, pero se oyen muchos rumores procedentes de Washington acerca de ese asunto. 

Indudablemente el proceder de los refinadores en limitar la distribucion del azucar re- 
finado para el pais a los actuales requerimientos del consumo ha influenciado mucho a que 
dejaran de subir los precios, coroo hubiera sucedido, a lo m.enos provisionalmente, bajo una 
grande demanda por todas partes. 

El Gobierno indudablemente se apercibe de esta disposicon por parte de 'os refinadores 
para desanimar la indebida especulacion en el azucar y por este m.ot'vo es probable que no tome 
medidas especiales para limitar el com.ercio y los precios del azucar, a menos que estas circuns- 
tancias se cambien en activa especulacion en la Bolsa de Azucar, de lo cual no hay indicios al 
presente. 

Ha de notarse especiahnente que los recientes calculos de reduccion de la zafra de Cuba 
vuelven a ser sustituidos por los anteriores calculos de mayor cuantia. No hemos visto motivos 
especiales para cambiar nuestro calculo de 3,000,000 toneladas, cuyo ca'culo parece ser 
probable sea confirmado por los resultados. 

Hay ahora poca probabilidad de que se imponga un derecho de impuesto al azucar, ni 
que haya cambo alguno en los derechos arancelarios do este articulo. La unica medida que 
podrd, tomar el Gobierno, si lo hace, sera que al regularizar los precios de los productos ali- 
menticios, podra hacerse alguna mencion del azucar, pero eso por ahora no tendril influencia en 
los precios. 

A escribir esta reseiia parece haljer un mercado en espera, sin indicio especial de movi- 
miento importante hacia el alza ni hacia la baja, el tono y la tendencia, si es de esperarse, 
algo, sendo mas bien hacia un mercado estable con ligera tenencia al alza 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

Nueva York, mayo 7 de 1917. 



THE CUBA R E V I E W 



37 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— 64— 66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi 

dends and Interest Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 

Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 

of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spait , Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 

and Central and South America 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

HAVANA— M. GelaU y Ca. LONDON 

PUERTO RICO -Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 



-The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



GRAMERCY ELECTRIC STIRRER 

Useful for many purposes besides 
stirring. 

The Universal :Motor 1-10 LLP. can 
be operated on direct current or alter- 
nating current, is fully enclosed with 
aluminium cover and can be raised 
or lowered as desired. It is attached 
to the support by an adjustable 
extension clamp. The heavy iron 
support has a base 16 inches by 
25 inches. Underneath the base, a 
rheostat with ten steps is attached, 
the wires passing up from the rheostat 
to the motor through the hollow rod. 

Gramercy Electric Stirrer with Support, as 
Illustrated, net - - $20.00 

ElMER & AMEND 

HEADQUARTERS FOR EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY SUPPLIES 

205 THIRD AVENUE, CORNER 18TH STREET, NEV/ YORK, N. Y. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. I- Oun-lf 1 is.l. OTTAWA, CANADA 




ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

P. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 



We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



CARS 



104.8^ GAGE FL\TS— Length 10 ft, Cin. 

Ciparity 20,000 lbs. 

28-24 in. GAGE. 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 

ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft 4 in. Capacity 10 Tons. 

Weight 7,500 lbs. 

Fl RST - CLASS CONDITION 

Will Convert to Steel Underframe Flat Cars. 

PROMPT SHIPMENT .-. LOW PRICE 

RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 

LRA.ZELniCrtER SUPPL ' 

ii.TTr(#i 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



COCOA 

Fiscal year ended June 30 
1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 

U. S. imports of crude 

cocoa from Cuba $75,0oo $147,244 

U. S. reexports of cocoa to 

Cuba 8,150 3,614 

U. S. imports of cocoa 

products from Cuba... 4,625 4,856 

U. S. exports of cocoa and 

chocolate manufactur- 

tures to Cuba 29,735 51,085 



1916 
,836 $326,642 $517,938 $411,502 
4,202 4,676 2,103 3,744 

7,382 8,899 9,837 9,978 



57,589 48,379 41,591 64,667 



Bank of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST., NEW YORK 



RESOURCES Nov. 29. 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking busine.5s transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES - 



President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 



Pedro Pablo Diago Guillermo Carricaburu 

LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 



76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLAC£" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET .-. .'. NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 
Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 

Write Today For Sarnple Copy 

Indispensable to the Man Inter- 
ested in Sugar 



Pte2se rmntioa THE CUBA REVIEW when wnlinj to Advertisers 



THECUBAREVIEVV 39 



POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

/^ Y T A TVT A f A \Z T^'®'" every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
\j|J/\[>|/\J/\ 1 5 A.M. to 8 P.M. Last train 11.20 P. M. 

Fare, 55 Cents 

Gw T w m T J-* ^ Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 

LJ 1 IN III iD 5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P.M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGL.4, GUANAB.\COA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) $0.05 

Guanabacoa (Ferry and Fleet ric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanca and Oaljiinas Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10..30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. ^F 



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HAVANA 






CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Correapondenc* Solicited from 
Intandlng Invastora 






OFFICERS 
^Jorman H. Davii - - . . . Preiident 
Oiwald A. Hornsby - - - - Vioe-Preiident 
Claudio G. Mendoia - - - Vice-PreBident 

J. M. Hopgood Treaeurei 

Rogelio Carbajal Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - - Mgr. Real Estate Dept 





P. 


RUIZ 


a 


BROS. 


Engro 


vers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA, CUBA 




BOMBA VIKING 

PARA TODOS LI QUI DOS 

Especialmente miel y leche de cal; todos tamanos 
para tuberla de 1, 4 pulgada hasta 8 pulgadas. 

VIKING PUMP CO., 108 Wall St., N. Y. 
HORACE F. RUGGLES, M.E. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADO EN 18G9 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Activo Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar Sts. 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponsales en Espafia 6 Islas Canaiias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

d interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, iMonte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Of icina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Amargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi= 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. GONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when vmting to Advertisers 



THE CDBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 







CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 








No. 9 No. 1 

P.M. P. M. 


No.l7 

P. M. 


No. 3 

P. M. 


No. 7 No. 5 .2 I H-„«„» 
A.M. A.M. 2' Havana 


No. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8iNo. 6 No.lO 

A.M. A.M. P. M.jP. M.|P. M.jA.M. 


10.30 


10.00 

A. M. 

12.06 

4.40 

9.00 
10.55 

5.28 


5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 


3.10 

5.27 
7.30 


10.01 7.40 

11.5810.10 
2.18 12.33 

4.40 

8.40 

3.38 

6.45 6.45 
P. M. 
6.40 


Lv. . Central Station . .Ar. 

58 Ar. . . .Matanzas. .... Lv. 
109 Ar . . . . Cardenas Lv. 

179 Ar Sagua .Lv. 

230 Ar Caibarien Lv. 

180. Ar. . . Santa Clara. . . . Lv. 


7.36 

5.31 
12.45 
P. M. 

8.00 


9.13| 2.06 

6.45 12.00 
5.001 9.12 

A.M. 


6.39 

4.44 
1.05 

12.00 
8.20 

'8^66 
A.M. 


9.05 

6.28 
4.25 


6.20 


* 




10.40 


5 30 


j 




* 


i. 17 


A.M. 
12.10 




6.20 


1.00 


io!oo 


A.M. 


8.50 

10.20 

P. M. 

1.00 

in nn 






241 Ar. SanfitiSnirittia Lv. 


P.M. 
8.25 

7.35 

4.55 
A.M. 
7.40 






!p. M. 

9.15i 






A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P.M. 

3.00 

3.30 


8.00 276 Ar..CiegodeAvila. . .Lv. 

10.30 340 Ar Camaguey. . . . Lv. 

P.M. 

520 Ar Antilla Lv. 




1.55 
P. M. 
11.20 

2 30 




1 
8.48! 

6.15 

A.M.I 


'ii.oo 


538 .'^r. Santiago de Cuba. Lv. 


6.55 ! 2.00 






;P. M. 




P. M. 




A.M. P.M. 


1 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



From Havana to Berth Compartment 

Cienfuegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14 00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$1000 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 

THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 





U. S. Cy. 




U S Cy 




$23.33 


Isle of Pines 


$6.00 


Batabano 


1.53 


Madruga 


3.01 


Bayamo 


20.60 


Manianillo 


22.02 


Caibarien 


10.68 


Matanzaa 


3.20 


Camaguey 


15.49 


Placetas 


9.64 


Cardenas 


5.43 


Remedios 


10.43 


Ciego de Av-ila 


12.72 


Sagua 


8.45 




8 69 


.45 




5.56 




11.19 




25.58 


Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba 


8.53 


Holguin 


21.20 


24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-ovor privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 

''WEEK=END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL "WEEK=END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send three oents in stamps for "Cuba — A Winter Paradise," a beau- 1TnifA<l Railuravc nf l-Iavans 
tiful illustrated booklet describing interesting trips in Cuba to ^JUllCU IVaUWdjrs MX Iiavaiia 
FRANK ROBERTS, Gsneral Passenger Agent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 
PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET. Cor. Stone 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacidn directa de todas los 
cenlros inaniifaclureros del inundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espaila 
Independencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard: 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Munro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2192 South 



Teleptione 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Excliange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers. 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s en c 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to push Iht iaU§ of 

American high class products. Would 

rtpresent a first class firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 

MI PARANA COMMISSION 
. .1. V^/\D/\l"N/\ MERCHANT 

P. O. Box 3, Camaguey 

Handles all lines of merchandise either on a uom- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in east- 
em Cuba. 



F. W. Hvoslef 



E. C. Day 



R. M. Miobalsen 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

SteamshlpAgents&SliipBrokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CabU: "B«nff««««" 



Pleate tnetUion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to AdverHters 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



43 




S.S. MUNAMAR 



NEW YORK CUBA SERVICE 



S learner 
iMUxXAMAR . . . 
MUNAMAR... 


PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

New York Antilla Nuevitas 

Leave Arrive Arrive 
June 16 Juno 20 June 22 
June 30 July 4 July 


Nuevitas 

Leave 
June 24 

July 8 


New York 

Arrive 

June 28 

July 12 






FREIGHT 


ONLY 






Regular 


sailings for 
Padre, 


Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua, C 
Gibara, Manati and Banes. 


aibarie?!, Ft 


n. 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

MUNISLA Havana, Matanzas June 5 

KAREN Havana, Sagua )une 12 

A STEAMER Caibarien, Cienfuegos, Santiago June 13 

MUNISLA Havana, Matanzas, June 19 

KAREN Havana, Cardenas June 2(5 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER June 20, for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rosario. 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER June 7 and 21 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of call 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushiki 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects arc 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 



-WILMINGTON, DEL. 



S. MORRIS LILLIE, President 



Grand Prize awarded for Locomotives at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 

The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 




PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES 

Specifications Furnished on Application 
REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE WEST INDIES: 

WALUCE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Addresses: "BALDWIN. PHILADELPHIA," "LEEBALD, HAVANA" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertiser! 




The 



REVIEW 



1^^ 



■i^j 



yfl-AJt 









J U N E 

bblisliediyihe n«nson.Sf«flfeln'|>lint 'i 




THE CUBA REVIEW 



< Trade Mark 



Look for This ^> 

On Every Link and Chain You Buy 

It is your guarantee of Reliability. Each 
link is made of the very best materials, 
subjected to rigid tests, and careful in- 
spection before shipment. 




Write for Catalog and full particulars 

Link-Belt Company 

299 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 



71 BEAVER STREET 
NEW YORK 

Gerente del Departamento de Veritas en el Extranjero de 
THE WEIR FROG COMPANY CLEVELAND PUNCH AND SHEAR WORKS CO. 



DUNCAN, STEWART & CO., LTD. 
STANDARD WATER SYSTEMS CO. 
STANDARD SAW MILL MACHINERY CO. 



PENNSYLVANIA BOILER WORKS 
THE JOHN H. McGOWAN CO. 
THE RAHN-LARMON CO. 

Los produc'tos de pstas Fabiifiis abarc-Ui: 

Locomotoras Livianas 
Gruas sobre Ruedas 
Garros: Para Cafia 
Para Carga 
Para Obras de 
Construccion 
Carriles y accesorios 
Via Portatil 
Ranas y Chuchos 
Puentes de Acero 
Edificios de .\cero 
Maquinas de Izar 
Aserraderos 
Calderas 

Maquinas a Vaoor 
Maquinas a Petroleo 
Maquinas a Gasolina 
Bombas 
Tanques 
Tornos 

Prensag para Ruedas 
Maquinas para Taladrar 

Metales 
Acepilladoras para Met- 
ales 
Punzones y Cizallas para 

Metales 
Ejes, Poleas y Accesorios 
Trapiches, Desmenuzadoras y toda clase de Maquinaria para Ingenios de Aziicar 
Calentadores de Agua para Calderas Alambiques para Agua Evaporadores de Serpentines 

Maquinaria Frigorifica 
A solicitud sc remitcn catalogos y prcsupuestos. 
Direccion cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York (Se usan todas las clavcs.) 




THE CUBA REVIEW 



/^ A DO^C PARA TODOs USDS y de todos tamanos, de los para cafla con cuatro ruedas y capa- 

V^'^****^'^ cidad de I'/t toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toneladas 

Hacemos una especialidad de juegos de herrajes, incluyendo los juegos 

de ruedas, completamente armadas, con todas las piezas de metal, y pianos 

completos para construir los carros d su destine de maderas del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



CAnr.F. Addrkss: 

RA>rAI,IAM 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 

^^Is-te'^ SOUTH ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. S'Z7.l 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 



SUGARS 



RAW AND 
REFINED 



82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trad«. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 





msmm^ 


mmmm^ 


1 


B 


: 


rrr 


CE 


"cr 






" 




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MS 








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T' ^- • cemV— '' 


R«L --^' ^- 


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..T'^Inj 


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-> ^-Tn^^— 


Shb^ I 




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"r^'""^"' " 


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pBBrv 
















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El grabado ensefia uno de nuestros carroa, todo de acero, para cafia. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capacidades varias y hemos fabricado un gran aumero de carros para cafia para 
use en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y M6xico, que tienen jaulrs de acero o de madera y con- 
atruidaa para los distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cafia. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direcci6n telegrAfica: NALLIM, New York Produccidn annual de mds de 100,000 carrot. 

Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B CINTAS. Ofjcioa 29-31. Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Off ic« In TuUa. 
Oklahoma, Gallais Bldg. 

2728 Whitehall BuUdlnc 
NEW YORK 




H AIMOIND T yVINK 



WARREN. PEN N. 



BUILT BY 



STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Los Angeles Office 

414 Grosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

Agtntt in Cuba: 
ELLIS BROTHERS 

28 San Ignacio, Havana, Cuba 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 




Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
"Lion" BrassTrade Mark Labels and Seals attached. 

Di^ripVa"ata.og Jafflcs WalRcf & Company, Ltd. 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

JOSE L. VIl^I^AAMIL 

Santa Clara 29, Havana, Cuba 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
5 15 
7 15 



P M 



P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
P M 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



P M 



AM 
10 1 
12 If 



PM 



AM 
6 55 
8 33 
10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
PM 



A M 
6 15 
8 15 



7 30 
11 22 
AM 



Fare 
Istcl. 
$2.04 
3 99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana . Ar 

Ar Artemisa Lv. 

kr Paso Real Lv 

Ar Herradura Lv, 

Ar Pinar del Rio Lv 

Ar Guane Lv 



Fare 
3dcl. 
$1.10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 



AM 
7 49 
5 45 



A M 



AM 
11 09 
9 35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 



AM 
11 47 
9 45 



AM 



P M 
3 49 
1 45 



P M 



P M 
6 47 
4 45 



6 38 
3 00 

P M 



P M 



7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
3 00 
1 30 
P M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " | Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cts. 



Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



M. to 9.15 P.M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Ha\ ana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west o' 
Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25% 



Flease Mmtim THE CUBA REVIEW when Writing lo Advertisers. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street. New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 

$1.00 Per Year -----__ lo Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rales on Applicalion 



Vol. XV JUNE, 1917 No. 7 

Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — The Gorge, Yuimui Valley. 
Frontispiece — President MaiioG. Menoeal. 

All Around Cuba: 

Cienfuegos ^ I 

Havana Correspondence j I 

Nuevitas Warehouse, illustrations ] •' 

Train S jrvic ; jj" 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

Matanzas Fertilizer Works, illustrated 2G, 27, 28 29 

Oil Wells, illustrated ......".'...".'. "29 30 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

International Portland Cement Corp 25 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Sscurities 21 

Report of the American Beet Sugar Co 2-4 25 

Report of the Cuban Telephone Co ........ .22, 23,' 24 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads . .~ '. . . ' 20 

Cuban Government Matters: 

Bond Issue 7 

Cuban Fruits v; 

Cuban Gunboats jo 

Cuban r.,oan v; 

Cuban Mili'ia .^ ............ . 10 

Department of Agriculture S 

Food Control Board S 

Immigration 9 

InausuraMon 7 

Naval Srhool 10 

till Machinery ' <) 

Postal S Tvice ' ' ' \{\ 

Railroail ( 'commission S 

Tra<le Mark Registration '.1 

United States and Cuba 10 

Sugar Industry: 

Centrals Finished Grinding 32 33 . 

Chart, Average Price of Cuban Raw Sugar ........... ' 34 

Cuban Government Estimate 31 

San Agustine Estate 33 

Sugar Tax 35 

Sugar Review, English 35 3(5 

Sugar Review, Spanish 3C, 

Suggestions to the Home Seeker, illustrated 13, 14, \r,, 10, 17, 18 19 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




President Mario G. Menocal, Inaugurated May 20, 1917, for His Second Term. 



THL 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



JUNE, 1917 



Number 7 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 




Ganeral Emilio Xufr-z, Vice-President of Cuba. 
INAUGURATION 

On the 20th of May, General Mario Gar- 
cia Menocal took the oath of office to the 
Presidency of Cuba for another term of four 
years. The ceremony took place in the Presi- 
dential Palace at noon and was a very simple 
one. 

General Emilio Xuiiez assumed the office 
of Vice-President of the Repubhc of Cuba. 



BONDS AUTHORIZED 

President Menocal has signed a decree auth- 
orizing issuance of $30,000,000 of Governm.ent 
bonds for a war loan, in line with, his recom,- 
m.endation to Congress last month. His recom- 
mendation has been before Congress, but be- 
cause of the delay occasioned by a divergence 
of opinion and in view of the urgent necessity 
of funds for war purposes, the President took 
matters into his own hands, utilizing the 
authority granted to him. in the joint resolu- 
tion adopted by Congress last month to avail 
himself of all the material resources of the 
nation. 

The bonds will be issued in three sections', 
the first in the fiscal year beginning July 1 and 
the second and third in the two succeeding 
fiscal years. They will bear interest of not 
m.ore than 6 per cent, and their amortization 
will begin at the conclusion of the war. 

The decree also provides for several revenue 
m.eas\ires. Among them is a normal tax of 
10 cents on each bag of sugar weighing 325 
pounds or more and. an extraordinary war 
tax of 10 cents when the price of sugar, f . o. b. 
Havana, is 3 cents a pound or m.ore. Sugar 
companies operating in Cuba also will be taxed 
6 per cent of net profits, which are to be de- 
termined by adding the tax by weight to the 
cost of production. 

Mining and insurance companies also will 
be taxed, the former 6 per cent, of net profits 
and the latter 4J^^ per cent of premiums. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 

The Commission which was appointed by 
the Cuban Government some time ago to 
study the question of the nationaUzation of the 
Cuban railways has, it is reported, finished its 
work, and its report should prove of great in- 
terest. 

The Cuban railroads have been criticised 
on account of the service and also on account 
of the freight rates, which are claimed to be 
excessive. The Cuban public, realizing that 
the railroads are largely owned by foreign 
capital, is prone to believe that the rates are 
based, on the proposition that the traffic should 
bear all that is possible, rather than on the 
proposition that the best interests of the 
Ciiljan i)ublic should be served by low but fair 
freight rates. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Upon General Nunez's assuming the office of 
Vice-President of Cuba, the position of Secre- 
tary of Agriculture was left vacant. Until a 
new secretary is appointed, the office will be 
administered by Secretary of the Treasury, 
Sr. Cancio. 



FOOD CONTROL BOARD 

By a decree of the president, this board has 
been reorganized and consists of the President 
of Cuba, the Secretary of Agriculture, the 
Mayor of Havana, the Secretary of the 
Economic Society of Friends of the Country, 
and four ro.ero.bers of the Chamber of Com- 
m.erce in Havana. 



CUBAN FRUITS 



The Cuban Department of Agriculture has 
issued an order forbidding the im.portation to 
Cuba of a number of fruits and plants, for the 
purpose of avoiding the possibility of import- 
ing diseases now imknown here. 

Among the fruits Ijari-ed are the Mexican 
and the Central American alligator pear and 
seeds, and pineapples and slips from Jam.aica, 
banana plants from Japan, the Philippines, 
East Indies and the adjacent country. 

Cotton plants from Mexico, or unm.anufac- 
tured cotton from Mexico or Central America 
is forbidden on account of the boll weevil. 



AMERICANS IN CUBA 

The Cuban Government has put its ;irmy 
rifle ranges at the disposal of Americans 
anxious to prepare for service. Col. Witter- 
meyer, military attache of the Am.erican Lega- 
tion, announced a plan whereby all Americans 
in Havana between 21 and 30 years of age 
should confer with him and undertake the 
arms practice under American army rules. 



CUBAN LOAN 



By Presidential decree issued May 26th, 
it was determined to issue bonds for $30,000,- 
000, under the authority granted by the 
Cuban Congress in the resolution of April 
5th. The bonds issued will be nine year 
bearer bonds and bear a maximum interest 
of 6%. The bonds are to date from January 
1st, 1918. 

It is proposed to have a stamp tax con- 
nected with the raising of the money for this 
loan and the tax is to be imposed on: 

1. All stock exchange operations. 

2. A graduated stamp tax for all private 
receipts and receipts before a notary. 

3. All commercial invoices, excerpts. 

4. All contract leases. 

5. All surety bonds. 

6. Various documents connected with the 
purchase or transfer of property. 

7. A stamp on each page of the credit 
books of merchants. 

8. A stamp on each page of banJs accounts. 

9. Bonds or funds deposited with guaran- 
tee for electrical service companies. 

10. Letters of exchange, notes and various 
documents. 

11. Documents of indebtedness to the 
Govermnent shall be stamped when paid. 

12. Birth, marriage and death certificates. 

13. Certificates of mercantile property 
and naval registers. 

14. Family counsel books. 

15. Hunting licenses or permits to carry 
arms. 

16. Automobile licenses. 

17. Permits for wagons and other vehicles. 
New stamps have been ordered for use in 

accordance with this law, and the law is to 
be effective July 1st. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



IMMIGRATION IN 191G 

The Do])artmeiit of Itiiinigratiou has issucxl 
an interesting l^ooklet of statistics of iinnuKra- 
tion and passenger service to Cuba during the 
year 1916. There were a total of 55,121 un- 
migrants arriving during the year, as com- 
pared to ;32,795 in the previous year of 1915. 
During the year also 111,582 passengers came 
to Cuba tlu'ough the various ports of the island 
and 71,599 left the island, as compared to 
79,233 arriving in 1915, and 65,433 leaving. 
The following table shows the number of 
immigrants who came to Cuba from the 
various countrie;?: 

Country. No. of Imnrijrants 

Spain 37,615 

Jamaica 7,133 

Haiti 4,992 

Porto Rico 1,277 

United States 1,209 

Germany 55 

South America 336 

Lesser Antilles (not listed) 27 

Arabia 20 

A astro-Hungary 15 

Belgium 10 

Bulgaria 5 

Canada 19 

Centra America 109 

Korea 7 

China 6 

Demnark 99 

Dominica 129 

Egypt 5 

Scotland 5 

Philippines 3 

Finland... 2 

France 169 

Greece 34 

Holland. 30 

East Indies. 40 

England 326 

Italy 164 

Japan 262 

Mexico 662 

Norway 10 

Poland 1 

Portugal 27 

Roumania 1 

Russia 29 

Serbia 7 

Syria 59 

Sweden 9 



Switzerland 11 

Turkey 68 

(Listed without a country) 2 

Of the entire 55,121 inimigrants arriving, 
47,354 were men and 7,767 were women, and 
the entire nunil)er of immigrants brought to 
Cuba $958,302. The list of occupations of 
these immigrants is also interesting. The 
largest number were laborers, totaling 40,769, 
and the next largest number were merchants, 
totaling, 2,472. 

In distinction to the immigrants who 
came to work and remain, for a tune at least, 
in the country, there were some 32,000 more 
passengers arriving last year than in the pre- 
ceding year. Passengers leaving the island 
during the year numbered 71,599. The largest 
number left for the United States, 42,278, 
showing that only 1,653 fewer persons left 
for the United States than came from it, and 
the next largest number left for Spain, 20,081, 
whereas 45,884 came to Cuba from Spain. 
Of the entire 111,582 passengers coming to 
Cuba, 90,127 came through the port of 
Havana . 



MODIFICATION OF PROCEDURE FOR TRADE- 
MARK REGISTRATION. 

Two decrees of February 14, 1917, and 
February 28. 1917, respectively, make 
certain changes in the procedure to be fol- 
lowed in the registration of trade -marks in 
Cuba. As provided by these decrees, appli- 
cations for the registration of trade-marks 
must first be published in the Gaceta Oficial 
for three daj s and thereafter a more complete 
description must be published in the monthly 
Boletin Oficial of the Department of Agri- 
culture, Commerce and Labor. Opposition 
to the granting of registration for a mark 
may now be brought within 60 days after 
publication in the Boletin Oficial, instead of 
within 30 days, as was previously the case. 



OIL MACHINERY 

It is proposed to admit all machinery con- 
nected with the oil drilling business without 
duty, for the purpose of encouraging the dev^el- 
opment of the Cuban oil industry, and it is ex- 
pected that a bill will shortly be introduced 
in the Cuban Congress putting oil machinery 
on the free list. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



UNITED STATES AND CUBA 

rnder date of A^ay 16th, the United States 
Government issued a proclam.ation to the 
Cuban people in wl)ich it was stated that all 
disturbances which interfered with the pro- 
duction of sugar in Cuba will be considered 
hostile acts, and that unless all those under 
arms against the Government of Cuba return 
imm.ediately to their allegiance, it may be 
necessary for the United States to regard them 
as enemies and deal Avith them, accordingly. 



LIBERTY LOAN 



Banking interests in Cuba have announced 
that they are prepared to aid the United 
States Govermnent in selling United States 
bonds. The Banco Nacional de Cuba is pre- 
pared to receive subscriptions and forward 
them, to the United States Treasury without 
charge to the subscribers. It is thought that 
Cuban investors will purchase m.any of these 
bonds. 



CUBAN MILITIA 

The last of May President Menocal issued 
a decreee reducing the Cuban militia from 
25,000 to 12,000 men, the order to go into 
effect at once. 



SPAIN ACTS FOR CUBA 

The Cuban minister in Berlin has turned 
over the Cuban legation's affairs there to the 
Spanish minister, who will act for Cuban inter- 
ests in Germany. 



NEW WIRELESS STATION AT HAVANA 

The Cuban Government is erecting a new 
wireless station at Casa Elanca, near the Tris- 
cornia quarantine camp, which will be tho- 
roughly up to date and considerably more pow- 
erful than the present one at Morro Castle, 
Havana. 

HAVANA 

The contractor for the Malecon extension 
has asked the Government to indemnify hun 
to the extent of $10,000 for damages resulting 
for the stopping of the work along that 
thoroughfare. 



POSTAL SERVICE 

The law passed some time ago increasing 
the salaries of the post office employes has, 
after soro.e delay, become effective, and the 
postal employes are now enjoying increased 
compensation. 



RAILWAY SERVICE 

The Railway Commission has recom.mended 
that a 50% reduction in freight rates be ni.ade 
for fruits and vegetables, which is hoped will 
result in lower prices for the consum.ers of 
these comm.odities. 



CUBAN GUNBOATS 

The Cuban gunboats Patria and Baire are 
expected to be ordered to the United States 
for needed repairs and to undergo certain 
changes which will enable them to carry 
heavier guns. 



CUBAN ARTILLERY 

It is proposed to send Cuban artillery sol- 
diers to Key West, Fla., Avhere they will re- 
ceive instruction in gunnery from. United 
States officers. 



NAVAL SCHOOL 

It is reported that the government has de- 
cided to close the naval school at IMariel for 
the time being in order to use all of the officers 
and cadets there in active service of the 
Cuban navy. 



CUBA'S HISTORIAN REMOVED 

Dr. Alfredo Zayas, former vice-president 
and recently candidate for the presidency on 
the Liberal ticket, has been removed as his- 
torian of Cuba by President Menocal. 



HAVANA CUSTOM HOUSE RECEIPTS 

Havana papers report sam.e as being $2,- 
139,839.65, being the largest April receipts on 
record. 



SAN LAZARO HOSPITAL 

The work of removing this old building has 
been completed, but as yet the erection of the 
new hotel which was to be built on this site 
has not been commenced. 



THE CUBA R E V I L W 



11 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



HAVANA CORRESPONDENCE 

Ilavuna, June llth, 1917. 

The Cuban Government, some time Hince, 
officially announced that the Revolution which 
broke out last February was ended, altliouKh 
there are still a few small bands operating in 
the eastern provinces. The latest devt'lop- 
ment in this coimection is the annouiic<'nient 
that the militia will be mustered out on .June 
15th, as their services are now no loiij^cr re- 
quired. 

It is announced that the trial by military 
court martial of the Cuban army offic(>rs who 
participated in the recent revolution will be- 
gin .June loth, and there are over thirty ( 'uban 
officers to be tried. 

On account of the revolutionists burning 
so many railroad bridges and destroying rail- 
road tracks, communication between Havana 
and Santiago has been either by direct steamer 
or by rail to Cienfuegos, thence by steamer. 
The railroad companies have worked as ra[)id- 
ly as po.ssible repairing damages and com- 
munication between Havana, and Santiago is 
again open by making two short transfc^rs. 

President Menocal has sent a letter to (.'on- 
gress asking to be authorized to establish a 
sslective draft system in Cuba similar to that 
efTective in the United States, the ages to be 
within 21 and 30. He calls attention to the 
fact that voluntary enlistment is very de- 
ficient, and in view of Cuba having entf^red 
the great war, it becomes necessary that she 
prepare herself to this end. 

The high cost of living continues to receive 
the attention of the Government in an en- 
deavor to reduce same. The bakers insisted 
that they could not bake bread and sell it at 
the rate of r2c. per lb., as decreed by the 
Government, then!ff)r(; with an idea to h(!lp- 
ing them out the f Jovernmrmt has purchased 
a large quantity of flour in the L'nited States, 
some of which has already arrived and, it is 
stated, will be sold to the bakers at cost. 

The suburban development of Havana con- 
tinues without any apparent let-up, notwith- 
standing the greatly increased cost of buiirling, 
due not only to the high cost of material, both 
local and imported, but al.so in view of the 
eight-hfjur law and larger wages which have to 
be paid the workmen. 

With a view to developiri'.^ l,iiitj lying bi-- 
tween the .\lrn-;ndares River ami the bathing 



beach at Marianao, a company has been 
formed of which the Havana millionaire mer- 
chant, Jose Lopez Rodriguez, is the principal 
factor, which has secured a concession from 
the (Jovertunent to build a dravsbridgc across 
the vlmendares River, thus continuing to 
flic bathing beach the sea drive which, leading 
out of Havana, now ends at the liiver. 

Some time ago a concession was granted by 
the ('uban CJovernment to lay a telephone 
cable between Havana and Key ^\'est, the idea 
of the promoters being that by iiu-ans of same 
the Cuban Telephone Co., which is the only 
telephone company operating in Cuba, would 
be connected with the liell Telephont! Co. and 
thereby make it possible to commtmicate di- 
rectly between the principal cities of Cuba and 
the United States. 

Nothing definit(! has yet becsn done in this 
direction, but t\w (!uban Telephone Co., in 
their annual rejxjrt recently published, state 
it is their intention to arrange for this conncic- 
tion, and they also expect to make arrange- 
ments so that similar cables will be laid be- 
tween the eastern end of Cuba and Haiti, and 
al.so from Santo Domingo to Puerto Rico, thus 
enabling t(;lephoiic conununication to be had 
with these; two islands. 



CIENFUEGOS 



The U. S. State ])ey)artm(!nt announces th*; 
appointiuent of (Charles S. Wiujins, formerly 
consul at Nunimberg, to be consul at Cien- 
fiiegos, ('uba. 



SAN n AGO AND HAVANA 

Under date of ,]mw 2nd, it i.s anTiouncc<l 
that rail comvnuni(!ation lias been ag;iin 
establi-shed between Havana and Santiago 
for passenger service only. This nccessitateH 
the passengers making two transfers and it 
is not jet possible to handle freiglit. Th(! 
work of re{)airirig tlu; bridges is being rajjidly 
done, and it is hopr-d that the line will .soon 
be in a position to luuidle fr.-ight. 



FOURTH OF JULY 

The .Americ.m residents in Havana have 
j)l,inried to have a patriotic celebration on tlu; 
1th of July, to b(! held at the National 
TlK^atcr. An elaborat(! program has been 
pi mn'd and t!ie entire jiroccM^fls of tlu; enter- 
tiimiiciit, arc to be devoted to I Ik; Red ('ross. 



l:"! 



T H E-yiC UBA REVIEW 








Views of the Sugar Warehouse at K uevitas, Destroyed by the Insurgents 
During the Recent Occupation 



THE CUBA I{ F-: V I i: \v 



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American Colonists' Home. 



SUGGESTIONS TO THE HOMESEEKER 



(D^paiimeut of Agricu'iun, Commerce and labor, Havcnta.) 

Mistakes in the selection of the locaUty, chosen as the place in which to make ones home 
in a foreign country may easily render years of labor fruitless even if they do not end in absolute 
disaster. It is to avoid these errors as far as possible that the following suggestions are tendered : 

Healthfulness of the locaUty, of course, is paramount to everything else, especiaUj- where 
a man has assumed the responsibility of tt:king liis family with hum. Proximity to some local 
market and facHities for transportation of products to m.ark.ets outside of the country must also 
be seriously considered. Next in importance probably com.es the natural fertility and physical 
condition of the soil which it is proposed to cultivate. 

^^'here possible it is decidedly advisable to visit the coiuitry first with sufficient time and 
means to go carefully over the ground and not make a choice of location too hurriedly. As- 
certain the line of industry to which you are best adapted, or which gives the greatest promise 
of success and select land with reference to your requirements. 

Do not attempt to enter any field unless reasonably sure of having a sufficient amount of 
funds to see you through the first two years without counting upon returns that may ulti- 
mately com.e from, your investment. No m.atter what is selected as the chief course of revenue 
it is well to have in addition a few side lines that may give quick returns on the capital invested 
and thus keep ''the pot boiling" untU the enterprise is fairly underway. 

In purchasing land do not depend entirely on your own judgm.ent,or the appearance of the 
soil, but consult, if possible, some native in whose judgment and intelligence you have absolute 
confidence. Pay out no m.oney under any cii'cumstances for the purchase of land until con- 
vinced that you have found what you want and that the titles to the property are good. 

Unless you are investing your money in some of the larger industries such as sugar, hene- 
quen, cattle raising or tobacco, it is well to secure a location convenient to some large city where 
you can depend on a local m.arket for your products throughout the j-ear. If desirable colonies 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



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Castor Beans 



THE CUB A R E V I !•: W 



15 




Planting Orange Trees. 



can be foiiiK] in which to locate, there are frequently advantages from association with neigh- 
bors who speak your language and w^ho have interests in comm.on. On the other hand be ab- 
solutely sure that the location of the colony does not bar its menp.bers from a reasonable chance 
of success. 

Most any one with a fair knowledge of agriculture and willing to work can make a living 
in Cuba, since many of the chief elements of expenses in the United States may be dispensed 
with in this latitude. First of all the fuel bill for heating purposes during winter is entirely 
eliminated, since even in the coldest days the rays of the sun will render one comfortable while 
at rest, and very little exercise will keep one warm, where the thermometer seldom, falls below 
60 degrees. Fuel for cooking in the country, as a rule, may be found in the nearby forests and 
charcoal can always be purchased at reasonable prices. The heavy warm, clothing necessary to 
protect one against cold in the north, may be entirely dispensed with, which eliminates another 
expense. 

Garden vegetables and poultry will not only go far towards furnishing food for the family, 
but may always be exchanged in the nearby towns for those articles that cannot be readily 
l)roduced, on the farm. 

Lands sold through colonization companies are frequently held at a much higher value 
than the same lands could be bought outside of the company; but, on the other hand, the 
co-operation of neighbors engaged in the same or similar industry is often very helpful and 
m.ore than compensates for the difference in the price of the land. 

Unfortunately, the selection of the lands occupied by many of our American and Canadian 
colonies in this Republic, was made by individuals who ferm.it ted the low prices asked to ob- 
scure that fatal defect of unwise location, thus placing the colony from the first, at a great dis- 
advantage in its struggle for success. 

In spite of those disadvantages which result from an unfortunate location, \\ here colonists 
are cut off from decent transportation facilities, one of these colonies at least has managed to 
exist, and in a way prosper, although everything but climate and. soil was against it from the 
first. Other colonies have been located, by reckless speculators, on the poorest kind of soil, 



16 



T HECUBA REVIEW 




Cultivating an Orange Grove. 



on which nothhig can be grown without the use of an excessive amount of fertihzer, unless 
it be Burbank's spineless cactus. 

In the early days of the first Intervention, real estate dealers succeeded in buying lands in 
large tracts at prices varying from 90c. to S1.25 per acre that the natives would not consider 
for agricultural purposes at any price— lands not only lacking in fertility, but without any 
reference whatever to transportation either for the present or the future. These large tracts 
of almost worthless sand were divided up into sm,all farms of from five to fifty acres each and 
sold at prices ranging all the way from $25 to $75 per acre and are held at those prices to-day. 

Through the reckless use of fertilizer, and the expenditure of considerable amounts in care 
and cultivation, attractive citrus fruit groves have been brought to maturity in some of the 
colonies. Photographs of these served for advertising purposes, and through the mediimi of 
tons of beautifully illustrated literature, spread broadcast in the United States and Canada, 
many settlers were induced to come to Cuba in the early days of the Eepublic, who were sorely 
disappointed, since they found no way in which these farm.s could be m.ade to support a fam.ily 
dependent on them for a decent living. 

To those of the poor sandy lands of the extreme west of "Vuelta Abajo" and in the Isle of 
Pines, a saviour seems to have been found in the Burbank spineless cactus. This marvelously 
prolific and persistent plant of the desert, not only thrives where other forage refuses to gjow, 
but it will yield from, twenty-five to fifty tons of fresh succulent food for cattle, horses, hogs, 
sheep, goats and chickens throughout the entire year. It defies drouth and needs no fertilizer. 
No land, if well drained, is too poor for spineless cactus. Thus it seems that the comparatively 
steril soils on which othei- useful plants refuse to grow without the use of quantities of exi^ensive 
fertilizer, ro.ay yet be made to produce a crop almost priceless to the stockman, the poultry 
raiser and the small farmer. With spineless cactus planted in these soils, lands otherwise 
agriculturally worthless, m.ay be made to yield a profit of from $100 to $200 per acre. 

There are still, however, thousands of acres of land in Cuba that can be purchased, divided 
up into small farms and sold at reasonable prices, and under fairly intelligent m,anagement 
success on these farms can be almost assured. 

Small stock raising— hogs, sheep, goats, poultry— and vegetable growing where irrigation 



T H E C [■ n A li K V 1 L \V 





Orange Groves, 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Pineapples. 



is possible, give the greatest promise of quick returns and continued profits to the honi.e-seeker 
of any industry that can be found in Cuba today. 

In the mountainous districts the cultivation of coffee and citrus fruit can be carried on 
jointly. These form not ohly an agreeable occupation, but a very sure source of income, after 
the first four years required to bring these plants into bearing. An apiary too, for those who 
like the care of bees, is a very desirable adjunct, since these little insects work the entire year 
round, and both honey and wax are important articles of export. 

In the country a pahn thatched bungalow, with the assistance of the natives, can be quickly 
constructed at a very sro.all cost. Such a house, with the exercise of a little taste on the part 
of the owner, will make a very comfortable residence in Cuba, and if carefully built, will endure 
eight or ten years. Wherever loose stone and sand are conveniently at hand, with the use of 
a little cem.ent, a far more substantial structure, and often a very artistic one, can be erected at 
a small expense. 

Families of m,oderate means to whom agricultiu-al enterprises, or living in the country may 
not appeal, may find opportunities in Havana through which a few thousand dollars, invested 
in reliable agricultural industries, controlled and operated on a large scale by reliable parties, 
may give returns quite as satisfactory as those derived from actual labor in the fields. 

Such interests as sugar, spineless cactus, stock raising, henequen growing, etc., are some- 
times carried on through cooperation, and if intelligently managed, will pay larger dividends 
to the stockholders with less risk of failure, than can be secured where the individual with 
small capital, attempts to establish and carry on the business himself. Before investing, how- 
ever, in any enterprise of this nature, the greatest care should be taken to ascertain the standing 
and responsibility of the company that may invite investment. 

The Government of Cuba has no lands for either sale, preemption or gift. The few tracts 
of governro.ent land which remained during the first days of the Repuljlic were awarded 
soldiers of the War of Independence. 

Many excellent ro.ountain lands are held in large tracts of from 10,000 to 50,000 acres by 
non-resident owners who, paying little or no taxes whatever, have held on to them., refusing to 
sell in small lots and thus greatly hindering the development of the country. Som.e of these, to- 
day, can be purchased at prices varying from $5 to $10 per acre, and if located within a reason- 
able distance of the sea coast, or good harbors, are really worth m.any times that am.ount. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 











>'::£^-:,^ 



(irapefruit Clruvc 



These lands, although located in the mountains, are usually well watered, and covered 
with soil that is adapted to the growing of coffee, cacao, citrus fruits, mangoes, grapes, and in 
fact, any fruit known to the tropical world. They will also support most of our forage crops 
and hence can be used advantageously as small stock farms and goat ranches. 

Conclusiot^. 

Cuba is more than anxious to have people of the better class visit her shores in search of 
permanent homes, and will do all that is possible to facilitate homeseekers in selecting locations 
that may give the best promise of success. Custom duties are not collected on household 
effects that have seen use in other countries, ttnd most of ovir railroad companies offer tran.«por- 
tation free to families who will establish permanent homes along their lines. 

Unless poor health necessitates a change in climate do not think of coming to Cuba with 
the idea of securing a clerical position since these and the trades command only about one 
half the salary paid in the United States, and remember that a knowledge of the Spanish lan- 
guage i essential in securing any position salaried in this country. 

Remember also that this Bureau is ready at all times to assist and advise homeseekers 
in every way possible and without expense of any kind. 




20 THECUBAREVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The report of the Cuba Raih'oad Company for the month of March and for nine months ended March 31, 1917, 
compares as follows: 

1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

March gross ... $230,107 $799,779 $588,628 $585,739 $460,740 $404,344 $.334,366 

Expenses 252,2.55 342,975 242,183 256,063 226,979 186,098 169,112 

March net Def. 22,148 456,804 346,440 319,675 233,761 218,245 165,253 

Other income 836 11 

Net income D.-f. 21,311 456,815 

Charges 94,758 87,554 72,308 71,.575 66,791 65,125 59 675 

March surplus Def.imfilO 369 261 274,132 2i8,100 166,939 1.53,120 105,578 

Nine months' gross '4,562,033 4,752,921 3,662,564 3,72.5,614 3,335,162 2,722,856 2,228,006 

Net profits 1,202,297 2,390,661 1,818,613 1,788,060 1,538,436 1,278,281 983,622 

Other income 9,.365 6,108 

Fixed charges 823,502 715,665 6.36,9-30 605,908 600,847 556,125 398,925 

Nine months' surplus 388,160 1,681,105 1,181.683 1,182.1.52 937,589 722,156 584,697 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weeklij receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

Week endin-^ April 28th £67,622 £55,387 £56,388 £42,614 £48,055 £42,849 £25,743 

Week ending May 5th 67,987 54,156 55,837 40,006 45,993 39,662 22,237 

Week ending May 12th.. . 64,624 51,362 53,689 34,605 41,623 36,875 19,535 

Week endincr Mav 19t.h 57,651 43,237 45,.353 27,367 34,480 30,821 18,468 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

WeeEy receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending Arril 28th £29,045 £23,633 £23,817 £17,368 £19,075 

Week ending May 5th 33,438 25,694 ,22,221 15,959 19,071 

Week ending Mav 12th 30,740 21,612 22,.381 1-3,822 18,499 

Week ending May 19th 28,149 17,475 19,289 10,815 15,393 



EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

WeMu receivts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending (pril 28th £9,0.50 £7,419 £7,012 £6,333 £6,830 

Week ending May 5th 11,039 8,544 7,512 6,203 6,930 

Week ending May 12th 11,319 7,272 7,515 6,456 7,521 

Week ending May 19th 9,789 7,133 7,173 5,743 7,551 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month cf April: 1917 1916 1915 

Gross earnincrs $.534,613 $466,554 $434,159 

Operating expenses.:.:: 230,195 187,623 188,160 

Net earnings $304,418 $278,931 $245,999 

Miscellaneous income 11,875 13,178 11,304 

Total net income $316,293 $292,109 $257,303 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 179,970 161,644 149,247 

Four mcnihs to April 30. 

Gross earnings $2,131,823 $1,918,787 $1,824,473 

Operating expense's. .: ■ . . ■ 908,398 748,380 749,459 

Net earnings $1,223,425 $1,170,407 $1,075,014 

Misceliareous inccme 47,626 46,675 34,673 

Total net income $1,271,051 $1,217,082 $1,109,687 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 731,919 721,640 675,848 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



21 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



THE PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 



As t,uoti<l III/ Liiirtiici & Turn lire d 



Yo 



Bid. Askcf. 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 90H Q.i}/^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 9Si :s 99 j 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 9232 94 i 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 4}/^% Bonds of 1949 85 86 j 

Havana City First Mortgage C% Bonds 102 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 104 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 80 85 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 89 91 

Cuba Co. 6% Debenture Bonds 91 95 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 90 96 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 92 943^. 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Preferred Stock 102 105 

Havana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. Common Stock 98 100 

Matanzas Market Place S% Bond Participation Certificates 100 none- 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 103 105 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Common Stock 192 197 

Cuban-.Ajnerican Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 100 100^; 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 59 62. 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st Mtge. 6' ^ Bonds 92 95 

All ]>ric?s of bonds quoted on an and interest basis. 



SANTA CECILIA SUGAR COMPANY 

In regard to the readjustment plan which 
this company has undertaken, the time to 
deposit these securities has been extended to 
June 8, 1917. The plan, as originally under- 
taken, will not become operative unless suf- 
ficient securities are deposited before June 8. 



THE CUBAN-AMERICAN SUGAR CO. 

A quarterh' dividend of two and one half 
per cent {2}^%) was declared on the outstand- 
ing common capital stock. 

A quarterly dividend of one and three- 
quarters per cent {!%%) was declared on the 
outstanding preferred capital stock, payable 
July 2, 1917, to stockholders of record, June 
15, 1917. 



CUBA CANE SUGAR CORPORATION 

A quarterly dividend of $1.75 per share 
has been declared upon the preferred 
stock of this corporation for the quarter 
endmg June 30, 1917, payable July 2, 1917, 
to stockholders of record at the close of 
business June 15, 1917. 



INDEMNITY. 

The Camaguey Sugar Company has present- 
ed to the special judge of Camaguey Pro\'ince 
claims for indemnities totaling $382,000 as 
the sum of the damage done to their proper- 
ties by the rebel bands of IManuel Fern^dez, 
Anastasio Abreu, J. "SI. Esquivel, F. Bermudez 
and Porfirio Amador. 

Cane fields were burned to the value of 
$379,604.76, and the remainder is for the 
value of the horses and materials of the com- 
pany which the rebels made away with. 



GUANTANAMO 



The Bureau of Yards and Docks, Washing- 
ton, D. C, has awarded the general contract 
for the construction of the Fuel Oil Storage 
Plant at the Xaval Station, Guantanamo, 
Cuba, at a contract price of $320,000, to the 
Stewart Engineering Corporation. 



PORVENIR SUGAR CO. 

The Porvenir Sugar Company Cuba, has 
ordered one Mogul type locomotive from the 
Baldwm Locomotive Works. 



22 THECUBAREVIEW 



REPORT (ABRIDGED) OF CUBAN TELEPHONE CO. 

The last annual reijort dated April 12 1916, covered in part the operations of the com- 
pany up to March 31, 1916, with statements of assets and liabilities and revenue account to 
December 31, 1915. The present report covers, as to figures, exclusively the operations of 
the company for the year enciing December 31, 1916, and statements of assets and liabilities, 
revenue account and statistical information are submitted accordingly. 

The net income for 1916 was $438,305.15 as against .$349,454.92 for 1915, a gain of 
$88,850.23. 

During the year the sum of $392,236.94 was applied out of revenue to current niaintenance 
and depreciation, showing an increase of $89,45/. 60 over 1915. 

The amount set aside for depreciation alone, during the year, was $234,262.00 , or $57,- 
443.64 more than in 1915. This incease is principally due to a charge of $46,516.86 to prop- 
erly adjust the value of material, equipment, tools, etc., which were carefully inventoried in 
December last. 

All accumulated dividends on the preferred shares were paid on September 15, 1916, and 
regular quarterly dividends of 1K% on these shares have been declared and paid on the 15th 
day of October, 1916, and January 15, 1917. The board has also declared and paid on October 
15, 1916, and January 15, 1917, dividends of 1 1^2% on the common shares 

The net earnings for 1917 should show a material increase over 1916 as the gross income is 
increasing from month to month and rigid economy in operation, consistent with good service, 
is being practiced. Without deducting the special depreciation on material, equipment, etc., 
the earnings, after deducting the 6% dividend for the preferred shares, were equivalent to a 
little over 6 6/10% on the common stock, on which 3% was paid from the earnings of 1916. 
Subject to the continuance of satisfactory business conditions, there is every reason to expect 
in 1917 net earnings, after preferred dividend, equal to 8% on the common stock. 

Plans are being prepared for three standard types of buildings which it is proposed to 
build in the various towns where there are local plants and the company is now occupying 
leased buildings. About twenty of these buildings, which will cost from three to five thousand 
dollars, could be advantageously built within the next two to three years. 

The sale and delivery of $2,500,000 Collateral Trust Convertible 5% bonds was com- 
pleted and from the proceeds of this issue all outstanding obligations of the company have been 
paid, notably the loan of $1,000,000 from Messrs. Drexel and Company, of Philadelphia. 

The authorized capital stock of the company, was, as previously approved, increased to 
$16,000,000, to wit, $2,000,000 in preferred shares and $14,000,000 common shares. The pres- 
ent outstanding and issued shares remain the same as at Dec. 31, 1915, to wit: $2,000,000 
preferred shares and $5,000,000 common shares. 

The following increases in plant value are of particular interest: Havana local plant, $280,- 
197.68; other local plants, $121,523.93; real estate and buildings, $12,867.38. 

The number of exchanges operated by the company on December 31, 1916, was 36, of which 
eight were automatic, and a total of 230 cities and towns were connected to the system. 

On December 31, 1916, there were 23,652 telephones in operation throughout ttie com- 
pany's system as against 19,876 on December 31, 1915, an increase of 3,776 telephones during 
1916. Undoubtedly an equal increase could be secured in 1917, but as it is very necessary to 
rearrange and reconstruct our cable and wire distribution systems in Havana and some of the 
other cities, which are now up to capacity, it is quite possible that we will have a smaller in- 
crease in 1917 and a large increase in 1918. 

Since the last report the following Sugar Centrals have been connected with our system, 
viz., Socorro, Algodones, Occidente, Triunvirato and Lhnones, making a total of 65 mills thus 
far connected. 

An active campaign has been started to add as many more of the sugar mills as are within 
reasonable distance of our lines and stations. Due, however, to the present high cost of all 
material, the construction of several lines has been deferred, but it is expected that a number 
of new mills will be connected during this year. 

The board has been actively co-operating with other interests towards the placing of a 



THE CUBA REVIEW 23 

submarine tolophonp (•al)lo from lfav:uia to Key Wost, and, later on, from tlio oastcrn end of 
Cti])a to Haiti, wliich will in turn connoct with land lines across Haiti and Santo Domingo, and 
again with a submarine telephone ral)le from Santo Domingo to Porto Rieo, to be ronneoted 
with the telephone system of Porto Kico. 

The Havana-Key West cable is naturally of prime importance and of particular interest 
to the i)eople of Cuba and the United States, as it is expected to be able to connect practically 
any point in Cuba with any place in the United States and Canada. Tliis service will be in- 
vahiable to business activities l)etween the United States and Cul)a, and tbc early cf)mi)]ciioii 
of this project will be hastened in every possible way. 

The connection l)y telephone ])etween Cuba, Haiti, Santo Domingo and Porto Rico is not 
so urgently needed as with the United States, l)Ut such connection will be quite profitable to 
this company, as all calls from Porto Rico, Santo Domingo and Haiti will be made over some 
500 miles of long distance lines of the Cuban Telephone Company, wliich will collect a reason- 
able and fair toJl for this service. Furthermore, we can justly expect that, by reason of such tele- 
phone connection with the adjoining islands, the present relatively unimportant business re- 
lations })etween Cul)a, Santo Domingo and Porto Ri(;o, will receive a decided impetus 

CUBAN TELEPHONE COMPANY. 
Coii'lenietl General Baltnce Sheet, December 31, 1916. 
ASSETS. 

Plants, Properties and Conces.sion $13, 03.'>, 199.49 

Investments in vSecurities of Havana Subway Company 7.57,016.87 

Advances to Havana Subway Company 316,794.4.'5 

Advances on account Merchandise Purchases 23, .522. 19 

Current Assets: 

Cash on hand and in banks $913,49,5.51 

Accounts Receivable 68,082.01 981,.577..52 

SuDplies, Office Furniture, etc 308,139.58 

Deferred Debit Items: 

Discount on Bonds Sold 1,215,408.84 

Insurance Prepaid 2,648.64 

Total Assets $16,640,307.58 

LIABILITIES. 

Common Stock $5,000,000.00 

Preferred Stock 2,000,000.00 

First Mortgage 5% Convertible Bonds, Issued $7,665,000.00 

Less: Bonds deposited as collateral for Collateral Trust Bonds in Treasury .... 2,652,430.66 

Outstanding $5,012,569.34 5,012,.569.34 

Convertible Collateral Trust 5% Bonds 2,-500,000.00 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable $16,412.79 

Coupons Outstanding 178,728.50 

Dividends Outstanding 108,164.50 

Taxes Payable 58,043.57 

Subscribers' Deposits 65,793.00 

427,142.36 

Reserves : 

Depreciation on Plant and Supplies 796,014.05 

Surplus, December 31, 1916 904, .581. 83 

Total Liabilities $16,640,307.58 

Condensed Statement of Income and Profit ani Loss for the Year Endini Deremher 'Mst, 1916. 

Gross Operating Revenue $1,492, .570. 77 

Less Cancellations, Reductions, etc 43,110.25 

Net Operating Revenue $1,449,460 52 

Deduct: 

Operating Expenses and Taxes $521,099.33 

Depreciation on Plant, Equipment, Supplies, etc 234,262.00 755,361.33 

Net Operating Income $694,099.19 

Non-operating Income: 

Intirest on Ssourities Owned, etc., and Profit on Outside Contracts 142,189.78 

Gross Income $836,288.97 

Less: 

Intsrest on Bonds Loans and .\ccounts 397.983.82 

Net Income for Year $438,305.15 

Suolus December 31st 1915 895,649.42 

Profit and Loss Adjustments, Prior Periods 64,188.15 

Total $1,398,142.72 



2-t 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Deduct: »o- - 

Proportion of Defaried Debits chargeable to Year $35 <47.32 

ri-ofit and Loss Adjustments. PYior Periods 7,813.57 

Pref 3rred Di\-idends, Prior Periods 180,000.00 

Pr^farred Dividends Year 1916 120,000.00 

Common Dividends in 1916 150,000.00 493,560.89 

Sarpli:sD.-c?mb?r31, 191(5 S90 ,581.83 

Comparative Statement of Income and Expensfs for Three Years from 1914 to 1916. 

Expenses: 

1914 1915 1916 

Gross Income $1,203,022 $1,375,902 $1,634,760 

ExT)GIlS6S' 

Operation 539,682 599,103 669,898 

Depreciation 168,793 176,813 234,262 

Interest on Bonds 250,531 250,531 292.295 

Total Expenses $959,006 $1,026,447 $1,196,455 

Per cent, of Gross Income 79.7% 74.6% 73.2% 

Net Income $244,016 $349,455 $438,305 

Pe • cent, of Gross Income 20.3% 25.47o 26.8% 

Subject to Intsrest on Bonds $663,340 $701,635 $849,147 

2 2/3 2 8/10 2 9 10 

times times times 

the bond the bond the bond 

interest interest interest 

Number of telephones at end of year 17,819 19,876 23,652 

Average number of telephones for year 16,808 18,847 21,764 

income per telephone per year $71.57 $73.00 $75.11 

Oaeration per telephone per year $32.11 $31.79 $30.78 

Dspreciation per telephone per year 10.04 9.38 10.76 

Bond intjrest per telephone per year 1J.91 13.29 13.43 

Total Expenses $57.06 $54.46 $54.97 

Net Income per telephone per year $14.51 $18.54 $20.14 

Statistical Information to December 31st, 1916. 

Central Offices 36 

Subdivided as follows: 

Automatic local S 

Manual local , 22 

Manual long distance ' 6 

Total telephones connected to system 23,652 

Composed of: 

Automatic 20,610 

Magneto - 3,042 

Gain in telephones for Calendar Year, 1916 3,776 

Cities and towns connected 230 

Minimum specified in concession 95 

Meters underground cable installed 120,314 

Meters aerial cable installed 214,302 

Meters of circuits contained in cables 86,274,269 

As follows: 

Havana District, approximately 72,000,000 

Other offices, approximately 14,000,000 

Average daily local connections. 257,000 

Kilometers of long distance pole lines 2,589 

Minimum specified in concession 1,860 

Kilometers of No. 8, No. 10 and No. 12 copper circuits 17,517 

Kilometers of phantom circuits in use 850 

Average daily long distance connections 2,000 

Grand total of local and long distance calls for year 94,000,000 

Poles used in system 95,14.5 

Sugar mills connected to system __65 

Total number of emnloyees "■!'' 

Dist'ibuted as follows: 

Permanent 630 

Temporary 117 



AMERICAN BEET SUGAR COMPANY 



ANNUAL REPORT 1916-17 



The folloAving is from the annual report of the company, dated April 28, 1917: 
Income statement shows receipts of 15,333,224.07; expenses, $9,208,547.20, leaving earn- 
ings of $6,126,676.87. Dividends on the preferred and common stock are deducted to the 
amount of $3,300,000, showing a balance of $2,826,676.87, out of wliich amount various appro- 
priations for additions and depreciation of factories and land, amounting to $1,571,929.65 are 
taken, leaving surplus of $1,254,747.22 for the fiscal year. 



THECUBAREVIEW 25 

The following comparative percentages of factory cost i;er 100 pouncLs of sugar for fiscal 
years ended March 31, 1917, and March 31, 1916, will be of interest. 

. 1916-17 ' 1916-15 . 

Kerns. Cost. Per Cent Cost. Per Cent 

Paid to farmers for beets $4,516,899.13 62.56 $3,439,943.92 62.86 

Transporting beets to factory 361,619.25 5 . 01 283,567.49 5 . 18 

Agricultural sxiperintendence 375,035.12 5.20 208,042.61 3.80 

Labor operating factories 598,098.05 8 . 29 401,402.47 7 . 34 

Factory repairs 301,065.15 4 . 17 291,375.54 5.32 

Fuel. . " 298,280.30 4. 13 256,866.05 4.69 

Lime rock 166,027.65 2.30 121,703.42 2.22 

Sugar bags 295,686.28 4.09 175,797.32 3.21 

Miscellaneous operating supplies 239,175.76 3 . 31 152,000.72 2 . 78 

Factory and office supervision 268,402.73 3 . 72 225,951.45 4 . 13 

Stock in process from previous campaign. 128,527.16 1.78 93,322.17 1.71 

Total gross cost $7,548,816.58 104 . 56 $5,649,963.16 103 . 24 

Deduct: 
Value of stock in process, wet pul]) and 

molasses residue $329,159.17 4 . 56 $177,246.67 3 . 24 

Net factory cost.o| sugar produced .$7,219,657.41 100.00 $5,472,716.49 100.00 



INTERNATIONAL PORTLAND CEMENT CORPORATION 



APRIL 30 BALANCE SHEET 

Assets: Liabiliiies: 

Stock of .\rgentine Co $2,156,500 Preferred stock 2,5C0,00a 

Stock of Cuban Co 17,620 Common stock 1,017,620- 

General expense 7,530 Accounts payable 26,015 

*Accounts receivable 460,164 

Cash in banks 901,820 



Total 3,543,635 Total 3,543,635 

*Represents amoimt due from the Compania Argentina de Cemento Portland for supplies- 
and machinery purchased in New York. 

The companj^ has acquired the entire capital stock of the Compania Argentina de Cemento- 
Portland. Substantial progress has been made in the construction work. Contracts have 
been made for the purchase of machiner>'''and supplies, both in this country and in the Argentine, 
the contracts respecting shipments from this coimtrj^ bemg verj- favorable. It Is connnon 
knowledge that many difficulties are developing in the way of procuring construction materials,, 
transportation, both by land and water, and in obtaining labor, nevertheless it L«5 hoped that 
the plant will be substantklly completed by the end of the year and possibly in operation by 
that time. 

In a circular addressed to the stockholders of Cuban Portland Cement Co., Sept. 19, 1916, 
it was stated that up to July 1, 1917, the company would issue in exchange for each share of 
Cuban stock then outstanding one share of the conmion capital stock of the International 
Company. 1762 shares of such capital stock have been received and a like amount of the com- 
mon capital stock has been issued therefor. 

The Cuban Portland Cement Co. owns a valuable cement deposit in Cuba, of approxunately 
1144 acres, on which it is erecting, and is nearing completion, a plant having a capacity for 
manufacturing 600,000 barrels of cement per anniun. 



26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 




G3ri3ral Vi3v\r, Armour F3rtiliz?r Works, Matanzas, Cuba. 

MATANZAS FERTILIZER WORKS 



The Armour Company of Chicago has invested one-half million dollars in the construc- 
tion of a large modern plant on the outskirts of the city of Matanzas for the manufacture of 
commercial fertilizers for use in Cuba. This is one of the most complete of their recently 
constructed plants and is one of the thirty-six operated by this company throughout the world. 
It is proposed to manufacture all kinds of fertilizer and phosphoric acid for sugar refining. The 
buildings and equipment in this plant represent an investment of $500,000, and consist of 
offices, laboratories, power house, acid furnaces and tanks, mixing plant, docks, water reser- 
voirs, etc. 

The plant includes a large and most up-to-date building for the manufacture of sulphuric 
acid, where sulphur and nitrate of soda are burned with oyxgen to make sulphuric acid. This 
building contains four large chambers of forty tons daily capacity, each chamber is equipped 
with numerous thermometers to record the necessary hourly temperature taken by the experts 
in charge, and we are told that this operation requires close attention to prevent loss of the 
sulphuric acid after a specific heat is reached which must be maintained. The next most 
interesting operation here in the manufacture of chemical fertilizers is in the large acidulating 
or mixing plant, where the sulphuric acid is mixed with phosphate rock, which is imported from 
Florida, to secure the acid phosphate or fertilizer. Tankage, ammonia and blood fertilizer is 
also received here which is mixed with the acid phosphate to make the highest grade fertilizer 
on the market. The building used for the acidulating or mixing plant is an enormous structure 
used for the storage of the finished product and necessitates a special type of construction pro- 
viding for bulging or slanting walls to offset the outward pressure caused by the chemical re- 
action of the acids and fertilizers. In connection with the sulphuricacid and acidulating 
plants is an up-to-date chemical laboratory, where tests are hourly made of the M-id and 
finished product. This plant will have a yearly output of 80,000 tons, or sufficient fertilizer 
products for eighty per cent of Cuba's sugar and tobacco lands. 

A new cement wharf is being constructed to replace a former dock which was partly 
washed away and destroyed. The location of the plant is some four miles from 



THE CUBA R J: V I E W 



27 




Docks BL'ing Constructed at lli._ AniK.ur l-Cit i li/.t r riant, Matan^ae 




Central View Showing l^uwer iMant mi IviRht and Water Si 

Fertilizer Works, Matanzas. 



'i'tmk, Armour 



the city of IVIatanzas and is situated on a beautiful point at the entrance of the bay, 
near the Cuba Distilhng properties and Dubrccq wharf, and is connected with the city by the 
Matanzas Terminal Branch railways. The company has erected comfortable homes for the 
officers and employees connected with the plant near the water's edge and an excellent beach on 
the waterfront affords good sea bathing the year round. 

It is of interest to recall with the e&ttblishn ent cf this rrct'ein pknt in Cuba by the Armour 
Company that the fertilizer situation today in Cuba, as well as elsewhere, must be considered 
from an entirely different standpoint frcm. that which obtained a few years ago. Then all fer- 
tilizing materials were available, and one had only to choose between them, but now many 



■28 



T H E ; C U B A|[R E V I E W 




Sulphuric Acid Plant, Armour Fertilizer Works, Matanzas. 






Acidulating or :Mixin!^: liuildinr, Ariimur I-'ertilizcr AVcu'ks, Matanzas, 



materials have been practically withdrawn from sale and many of those which are still in the 
market are held at such high prices as to be out of consideration. Under these circumstances the 
question arises as to whether there is a method of farming yet to be found that will tend to 
make the lack of fertilizer least felt. 

Since the war, potash fields of Ciermany which supply the world have been entirely cut 
off and the United States Government has made strenuous efforts to discover potash deposits, 
or some source of supply that would relieve the anxieties of the farmer. A number of fac- 
tories have been established for the purpose of extracting potash from the large supplies of 
kelp found on the western coast. While partial success has accompanied some of these efforts, 



TUl. CUB A R I. V I h W 



29 



yet the fact remains tliat thore is now in the western hemisphere but a tithe of the potash nor- 
mally needed, and tliat this scarcity is apt to be felt as loiif? as the war lasts. The i)resent 
price and scarcity of potash in the market is such that it is impracticable to secure fertilizers 
with any but a very small percentage of this substance, and even in cases where the fertilizer 
contains a small amount, it is valued at so high a price that it is very doubtful if the effect on 
crops will pay for its use. The nitrogen situation is better, but it is not all that could be 
desired. The principal supply of the nitrogen contained in the fertilizers used in Cuba comes 
from sulphate of ammonia and slaughter house products, such as tankage, bone-meal and blood. 
Almost all of the sulphate of ammonia used in agriculture lias luitil recently {;ome from Knghmd, 
but the exigencies of the war, ex' essive freight and insurance rates have, to a large extent, cut off 
this supply, and the production in the United States has not kept up with the demand. The 
excessive prices put iipon sulphate of ammonia and nitrate of soda for munition making have 
caused a large demand for the animal ammoniates, causing in turn a scarcity of all these 
articles and exorbitant prices. It is costing now more to treat phosphate rock with sulphuric 
acid in order to render the phosphoric acid available, since the sulphuric acid is in demand also 
in the war industries. 

With these facts as to the fertilizer situation before one, the establishment of this large 
plant by the Armour Company at Matanzas seems most timely, and it is to be hoped that 
the farmers of Cuba, particularly those of the western provinces where the land is old and next 
to impossible to grow crops without fertilizer, will awaken to the possibilities afforded and the 
advantages to be derived from this new and welcome industry in their country. 



OIL WELLS 

A recent visit made to the oil wells at 
Bacuranao, a few miles East of Havana, re- 
sulted in the following information in regard 
to the situation there: 



The Union Cil Co. pumps on an average 
about 50 bbls. each day. This, however, 
does not represent continuous pumping, as 
the supply of these wells is not in a condi- 
tion for the pumps to be working all of the 




■General View of the Union Oil Co. Mine at Bacuranao. 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Board of Directors of the Union Oil Co. Mine at Bacuranao. 



tiiue. The Cuban Petroleum Co. has a tank 
of about 2,000 bbls. capacity, where the 
petroleum is stored until it is sent to tbe 
refinery, which is located at Belot in Havana. 
This refinery is operated by the West India Oil 
Refining Co. 

The petroleum pumped by the Union Oil 
Co. is said to contain 22% gasoline, some para- 
fin and other valuable substances. The 
Union Oil Co. operates four wells and is 
pumping approximately 35 bbls. daily from 
well No. 4 and 15 bbls. daily from well No. 5. 
Well No. 6 has been driven about 1,000 ft. 
with 6 inch pipe. A large tank of 50,000 gals, 
capacity has been built, as well as some other 
smaller tanks. Piping is laid from the large 
tank to the railroad station ac Minas, about 
two miles distant, where there is another 
tank of 50,000 gals, capacity. This company 
has already shipped 1,000 bbls., 700 of which 
went to Matanzas for refining and the balance 
to Regla and other places where the oil is used 
for fuel purposes. There are some 1,500 
bbls. of oil ready for shipment, awaiting their 
removal to tank cars. As soon as the railway 
can handle this shipment, the West India Oil 



Co. has agreed to buy all that can be delivered. 
The Union Oil Co. uses some 10 bbls. daily to 
operate boilers and pumps, and has a pump- 
ing capacity from their tank at the wells to 
their tank at Minas of 60 bbls. per hour. 

The consensus of opinion seems to be that 
the working of these oil fields will result in the 
production of a large quantity of crude petro- 
leum. 



COTTON WASTE IN CUBA 

There is a dem.and in Cuba for cotton waste 
for machine wiping. The principal users of 
this material are the railroads and the sugar 
m.ills. The railroads, it is stated, buy all their 
supply direct through their purch;M-ing agents 
in New York City, and while many of the sugar 
mills buy from supply houses in Habana, still 
a considerable quantity is furnished by deal- 
ers in this city, the names of the principals of 
which are submitted. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

Mr. Horace F. Ruggles, M.E., has changed 
his address and in the future his New York 
office will be at 108 Wall St. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



GOVERNMENT ESTIMATE 

This year's Cul)aii sugar crop will he ap- 
proxiuuitoly 2,800,000 tons, accorti.ing U) an 
official statement issued l)y the Cul)an Clov- 
erunieiit in Havana, designed to inform all 
concerned with the statistics of i)rodu(!t ion on 
the island for the present season. Con^pared 
with last year's record crop, the tonnage this 
year shows a decrease of only five per cent. 
This showing, in view of the present high 
prices of sugar, and the proved certainty that 
they cannot be much re(hiced in the immedi- 
ate future, indicate that the earnings of the 
various Cuban sugar conii)anies will be large 
again this year, and that production will be 
far greater than was recently forecast, though 
less than originally estimated by six hundred 
thousand tons. With the settlem.ent of recent 
labor difhculties in Havana, a fortunate 
delay in the beginning of the rainy season 
and the complete collapse of the recent up- 
rising, all indications are now for the expedi- 
tious handhng and m.arketing of the output, 
with fortunate results to the producers and 
to the trade generally, Cuba having realized 
her responsibilities as the world's chief 
sugar producer in the present critical time, 
due to the European war. 

The Cuban Covernment statement was is- 
sued by Senor Eusebio 8. Azpiazii, private 
secretary to President Menocal of Cuba, and 
was transmitted by cable to the RepubUc of 
Cuba News Bureau in New York. Secretary 
Azpiazu's statement is as follows: 

"The original estimates of sugar statisti- 
cians for the crop of 1916-1917 averaged some- 
what over .3,400,000 tons. This, in my judg- 
ment, was too high an estimate, even had there 
been no internal disorders, and on March 20, 
bearing this in mind, as well as the attempt 
at revolt then at its height, I estimated the 
present crop at 2,850,000 tons. Now, with 
the crop nearing the end and in view of tele- 
graphic advices received from all districts in 
Camaguey and Oriente, I have revised my 
previous calculations in my estimate, this 
year's crop cannot exceed 2,850,000 tons as 
previously estimated and will more probably 
be nearer 2,800,000 tons. The four western 
provinces in Cuba have manufactiu-ed to date 
1,775,000 tons, and in Camaguey there have 
been manufactured 260,000 tons, in Oriente 



the output to date is 450,000 t(}ns. Even 
with good weather prevailing for the rest of 
the season the four western provinces are not 
likely to manufacture more than 50,000 to 
75,000 tons, in addition, Camaguey 50,000 
and Oriente 2.50,000, making the total i)ossi})le 
cro]) not to exceed 2,850,000 tons as esti- 
mated in March. 

"This revised estimate, therefore, shows tliat 
notwithstanding the late start and the at- 
tempted rebellion, the present crop will have 
fallen short of the original too optimistic es- 
timates by less than twenty per cent., and 
only five per cent, behind last year's record 
output. The stocks on hand in the Island of 
Culja today are approximately twenty per 
cent, less than last years." 

This statement of Secretary Azpiazu, the 
Republic of Cuba New Bureau pointed out, 
was reached only after exhaustive inquiries 
by the Cuban Government, prosecuted by 
official agencies, and therefore can set at rest 
the alarmist reports which indicated that the 
profits of the principal sugar companies would 
be more or less curtailed. That the ret^erve 
stocks on hand are less than last years, indi- 
cates, too, the News Bureau added, that the 
present price levels due to the improved eco- 
nomic conditions, must necessarily be main- 
tained. With the weather continuing favor- 
able, as it has in the past three months and 
more, the marketing of the crop will proceed 
with the utmost facility. 



FORMOSA 



It is officially estimated that the crude- 
sugar output of the several producing com- 
panies of Taiwan (Formosa) for the season 
ending in May, 1917, will be: Taiwan Sugar 
Manufacturing Co., 190,190,000 pounds; 
Yensuiko Co., 113,050,000; Dai Nippon Co., 
81,130,000; Teikoku Co., 66,500,000; Meiji 
Co., 109,030,000; Toyo Co., 130,310,000; 
Niitaka Co., 62,510,000; Rin Hon Gen Co., 
35,910,000; Tainan Co., 8,645,000; Shinko 
Co., 11,305,000; Taito Co., 5,985,000— total, 
814,625,000 pounds. 

Last year's production amounted to 463,- 
261,864 pounds. About 90 per cent, of 
Taiwan's sugar is exported to Japan and there 
refined. — Consul M. D. Kirjassoff, Taiwan. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



1917 SUGAR CROP 



Central Est. 

HAVANA 

Guira de Melena .55,000 

La Julia 210,000 

Loterla 20,000 

Mercedita (Pascual) 205,000 

Nombre de Dios 30,000 

Occidente 2.5,000 

Portugalete 65,000 

Providencia 190,000 

San Augustin 100,000 

MATANZAS 

Armenia 85,000 

Carolina 85,000 

Conchita 320,000 

Cuba 200,000 

Elena 1,5,000 

Felfz 135,000 

Flora 115,000 

Gomez Mena 365,000 

Jesus Maria 90,000 

Jobo 105,000 

Josefita *90,000 

Limones *135,000 

Nueva Paz 125,000 

Porvenir *25,000 

San Cavetano *50,000 

San Ignacio 110,000 

Santa Rita 90,000 

Santo Domingo 90,000 

Saratoga 50,000 

Socorro 360,000 

Triunfo 20,000 

Triunvirato *45,000 

CARDENAS 

Alava *300,000 

Covadonga 180,000 

Dolores 65,000 

Dos Rosas 60,000 

Dulce Nombre 65,000 

Esperanza 70,000 

Guipuzcoa *145,000 

Luisa y Antonio 7,000 

Mercedes 275,000 

Porfuerza 80,000 

Progreso 150,000 

Reglita *100,000 

Santa Gertrudis 220,000 

San Vincente *90,000 

Soledad *150,000 

Tinguaro 2.50,000 

Violeta 110,000 

Washington 1.50,000 

SAGUA 

Caridad 30,000 

Constancia 140,000 

Corazon de Jesus 75,000 

Maria Antonio 50,000 

Resolucion 65,000 

Resulta 115,000 

San Francisco de Asis 40,000 

San Isadro 60,000 

Santa Teresa 175,000 

Ulacia 120,000 

Unidad 100,000 





Ba 


«s 


Per Cent 


Actual 


Short 


Over 


Short 


Over 


44,666 


10,.334 




19 




220,000 




10,000 




5 


25,000 




5,000 




25 


190,000 


15,000 




7 




30,000 










16.542 


8,458 




34 




78,000 




13,000 




20 


196,000 




6,000 




3 


94,000 


6,000 




6 




77,300 


7,700 




9 




84,000 


1,000 




1 




289,141 


30,859 




10 




178,000 


22,000 




11 




19,000 




4,000 




27 


140,000 




5,000 




4 


100,000 


15,000 




13 




300,000 


65,000 




18 




82,000 


8,000 




9 




80,000 


25,000 




24 





101,000 



74,997 
75,300 
80,500 
42,500 
2.57,000 
30,000 



197,000 



24,000 



35,003 

14,700 

9,500 

7,500 

103,000 



10,000 



23,000 



19 



16 
11 
15 
29 



10 



263,500 




13,500 




120,000 




10,000 




169,160 




19.160 




21,350 


8,650 




29 


146,000 




6,000 




74,000 


1,000 




1 


40,300 


9,700 




19 


.56,000 


9,000 




14 


106,000 


9,000 




8 


44,000 




4,000 




47,000 


13,000 




21 


169,.500 


5,500 




31 


106,000 


14,000 




12 


106,000 




6,000 





50 



160,000 


20,000 




11 




66,000 




1,000 




2 


47,000 


13,000 




22 




51,458 


13,.542 




21 




77,000 




7,000 




10 


6,824 


176 




3 




223,160 


51,840 




19 




70,000 


10,000 




12 




135,000 


15,000 




10 





5 

9 
11 



10 



THECUBAREVIEW 33 



Bags Per Cent 

Central Est. Actual Sho Over Short Over 

CAIBARJEN 

Rosalia 60,000 59,880 20 

Rosa Maria 45,000 27,000 18,000 40 

SanJos6 125,000 130,000 5,000 4 

San Pablo 42,000 40,000 2,000 5 

Zaza 125,000 115,000 10,000 8 

CIENFUEGOS 

Andreita 200,000 188,000 12,000 6 

Cieneguita 100,000 72,000 20,000 26 

Constancia * 

Dos Hermanas (Fowler) 105.000 109,700 4,700 4- 

Dos Hermanos (Acea) 28,000 28,000 

Juragua *68,000 

Lequeitio 170,000 175,000 5,000 3 

Manuelita 120,000 109,000 11,000 10 

Maria Victoria 125,000 120.758 4,242 3 

ParqueAlto 90,000 75,500 14,500 16 

Pastora 7.5,000 71,000 4,000 5. 

Perseverancia 190,000 181,000 9,000 S 

Portugalete 115,000 109,000 6,000 5 

San Agustin *150,000 

San Francisco *100,000 

Santa Maria 115,000 103,045 11.155 10 

Santa Rosa 150.000 138,000 12,000 8 

Santisima Trinidad 68,000 .50,000 18,000 26 

Santa Catalina 125,000 117,820 7,180 6 

Senado 270,000 64,000 206,000 76 

ANTILLA AND NIPE BAY 

AltoCedro 90,000 100 

Cupev 110,000 30,000 80,000 73 

Elia.' 115,000 23,000 92,000 80 

Jatibonico 250,000 155,200 94,800 38 

Jobabo 300,000 81,000 219,000 73 

RioCauto 100,000 84,000 16,000 16 

Tuinucu 180,000 185,707 5,707 S 

SANTA CRUZ DEL SUR 

Francisco 350,000 195,000 155,000 44 

MANZANILLO 

Dos Amigos 70,000 71,000 1,000 1 

Madrazo (Tranquillidad) 50,000 23,160 26,840 54 

Salvador 60,000 59,000 1,000 2 

Total 9,940,000 8,398,768 

8,398,768 

1,542,232 bags short, or about 227,000 tons. 

Estates reported finished 96 

Per cent of estimated crop reported 28.3% 

Average shortage 15.5% 

* Finished. 



SAN AGUSTI N E ESTATE wooden frame and were fuU of massecuite. On. 

On May 26, a fire which started in the falling down, they smashed centrifugals and 

boiler house of the San Agustine estate in tumbled against steel columns of quadruple 

Cienfuegos completely destroyed this central, effect, tearing do^\^l the quadruple effect, 

including 30,000 bags of sugar. All of the condenser, filter presses and everything in 

machinery except the mills and engines and their path. The fire started at half-past five 

three boilers was completely destroyed. A and the house burned all night. The sugar 

large quadruple effect, one vacuum pan, all burned for three days. The sugar was in- 

crystallizers, filter presses and tanks crumbled siu-ed at $420,000, but the machinery de- 

to the ground, also a large barometric con- stroyed is valued at $500,000. The sugar 

denser. The crystallizers were mounted on a house was not insured. 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




'"^^'^%M62S^'"*^l6 62Z23^^=^^"5'OI7Z4'^«2229^,^,g^ 



2 3'^°»7W2128^'"«^2 3fea30 



JAM Feb. Mar. Apr May Jum joly Aug. 5ep Oct Mov Dec 



Crop Year. 

1915-1916. 
1914-1915. 
1913-1914. 
1912-1913. 
1911-1912. 



Cuban Crop 
Outturn. 
Tons. 
3,007,915 
2,592,667 
2,597,732 
2,428,.537 
],S95,184 













Average Price 






Average Price 












of Cuban Raw 






of Cuban Raw 












Sugar — 96 degr. 






Sugar — 96 degr. 






Cuban Crop 




centrif., C. & F. 






c-ntiif., C. & F. 


Crop 


Year 




Outturn. 

Tons. 




Basis at New 
York. 






Bisis at New 
York. 


1910- 


-1911. 




1,483,451 


1916.. 


. .4.767 cents per lb. 


1911. . 


..3.090 cents per lb. 


1909- 


1910. 




1,804,349 


1915.. 


. . 3.620 cents per lb. 


1910. . 


..2 


S2> cents per lb. 


1908- 


1909. 




1,513,582 


1914.. 


. .2.745 cents per lb. 


1903 . . 


.2 


646 cents per lb. 


1907- 


1908. 




961,958 


1913.. 


. .2.150 cents per lb. 


1908. . 


. .2 


713 cents per lb. 


1906- 


1907. 




1,427,673 


1912.. 


. .2.804 cents per lb 


1907.. 


. . 2 


396 cents per In. 


ay's 


iVeekly 


Stjt 


isticjl Sugar 


^Trade Journal. 









THE CUBA REVIEW 



35 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR TAX 
The Cuban Covfrnincnt, folloAvinp; its ac- 
tion in pn)\iding for a .small tax on raw snjiar, 
has issued an official ox])lanatory statement to 
reassure, not only the consumer, but those who 
are interested at present in the prospective 
earnings of the various Cuban sugiir-produc- 
ing companies, as to the nef^ligible effect of the 
tax both on the retail price of sugar as a 
household commodity, and. on the profits of 
the Cul^an sugar producers. Tlie statem.ent, 
which was in the form of a Havana cablegram 
from. E. S. Azpiaza, secretary to President 
Menocal, to the Eepublic of Cuba News 
Bureau, in New York, says: "The new sugar 
tax of twenty cents a bag and six per cent, on 
the net profits of the sugar com.panies is ex- 
ceedingly moderate considering that a bag of 
raw sugar at present prices is worth $15. This 
leaves a net profit to the producer of around 
$9 a bag. The measiu^e works this way : Sup- 
pose a sugar m.ill m.akes 1,000,000 liags of 
sugar, earning a net profit of $9,000,000, the 
taxes would be .|1200,000 of this amount at 
twenty cents a bag. The cost of production 
plus the bag tax would be about $6,200,000, 



leaving a net profit of $8,800,000 on which 
is com])uted the six per cent tax, in this case 
amounting to aroimd .$.520,000." 

Official cabled advices received by the News 
Bureau from Havana indicate that the pro- 
duction of the various centrals in Cuba for the 
present season will be only five per cent, less 
than last year's record crop. Few of the im- 
portant producers have suffered to any ap- 
precial)le extent from the recently-collapsed 
uprising, and the im])osition of the bag tax 
and the slight excess profit tax should not 
affect their earnings to any extent worth con- 
sideration. In fact, all the estimates of the 
earnings of the various companies, as well as 
their tonnage production, which have eman- 
ated from unofficial sources in the past ten 
weeks, have been mider, instead of over, the 
actual figures. This has been well reflected 
by conditions in the stock market, where 
Cuban sugar stocks, in the face of reactions 
in other industrial issues, have exhibited un- 
usual strength, their quotations steadily in- 
creasing toward figures which the revised of- 
ficial Cuban Government statistics indicate 
are the correct price levels. 



THE SUGAR REVIEW 



SpecMiy written for The Cuba Review bv Willeti db Oray, New York. N . Y . 

Our last review for this magazine was dated May 7th, 1917. 

At that date Cuba centrifugal sugar of 96° test basis was quoted at 53'ic. cost and freight 
and is now 4^c. per lb., showing decline for the month under review of ^gc. per lb. 

The cost and freight quotation from, day to day varied as to the date of sliipments. The 
regular duty paid quotation changed as follows: May 8th, 6.145c.; 10th, 6.21c.; l-lth, 6.08c.; 
15th, 6.02c.; 22d, 5.96c.; June 1, 5.89c. 

At this writing there is a moderate demand from refiners at 4J^c. c. & f. (5.89c. duty paid) 
for prompt shipment Cubas. 

Porto Ricos have been more freely offered than Cubas with last sales at 5.77c. per lb. 
against Cubas at 5.89c. duty paid. Condtions of supplies and demand have improved some- 
what during the month from the outside point of view, some Cuban crop experts advancing 
their latest estimates to quite near our unchanged estimate of 3,000,000 tons, which we see no 
good reason to change even to the 2,900,000 tons which lately put out from Cuba. 

Cuban buyers of contract futures on the Sugar Exchange have been prominent factors in 
sustaining prices which might be lower now except for such support. 

The Tariff Committee at Washington have decided to place an excise tax on all sugar 
going into consumption of 3'2C. per lb. This action is confirmed by the Houses of Congress, as 
is most likely, will have the effect of a raise of duties on Cuba sugar from Ic. per lb. to 13/2C. 
per lb. Connected with this tction is a movement to stop the payment of drawbacks on 
sugar exported which would raise the price of refined for export about Ic. per lb. 

Inasmuch as Ainerican granulated and Java whites and West India crystals all sell at the 
same price in London, say about 9.0Cc. per lb. including duty, there would have to be a read- 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 

justment of buying which would throw the buying of the 600,000 tons of refined in the United 
States back into Java and Cuba for increased amount of raw sugar. 

Cuba akeady sells one-fourth of her crop to Europe, if an added direct demand should 
come from Europe for one-fifth more of her crop the result would be that the Cuba crop to the 
extent of 9-20ths or nearly one-half would go outside of the United States making Cuba vir- 
tually the fixer of prices for the world. In the end it will probably result in no change being 
made in tlie drawback, and hence no such disturbances as will result from such adverse legisla- 
tion. 

Refined sugar has shown some disposition to turn toward less demand and lower quota- 
tions are general at 7.50c. less 2% at the close. 

New York, June 8th, 1917. WILLETT & GRAY. 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 



Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Gray, de Nueva York. 

Nuestra ultima resena para esta publicacion estaba fechada el 7 de mayo de 1917, en cuya 
fecha el aziicar centrifugo polorizacion 96° se cotizaba d, S^c la libra costo y flete, y ahora se 
cotiza a 4%c. la libra costo y flete, mostrando una baja de %c. la libra durante el mes bajo 
resena. 

La cotizacion de costo y flete de dia en dia vari6 segiin la fecha de los embarques. La 
cotizaci6n regular del azucar con derechos pagados cambi6 del modo siguiente: el 8 de mayo, 
6.145c.; el 10, 6.21c.; el 14, 6.0Sc.; el 15, 6.02c.; el 22, 5.98c.; y el 1 de junio, 5.89c. 

Al escribir esta resena hay una moderada demanda de los refinadores A 4^c. costo y flete 
(5.89c. derechos pagados) para pronto embarque de aziicar de Cuba. 

Los azucares de Puerto Rico han tenido mayor oferta que los de Cuba con las ultimas 
ventas a 5.77c. la libra, contra los de Cuba A 5.89c. derechos pagados. Las condiciones del 
abasto y la demanda han mejorado algo durante el mes bajo el punto de vista exterio'-, algimos 
peritos en la zafra de Cuija aumentando sus ultimos calculos A muy cerca de lo que era nuestro 
incambiable ciilculo de 3,000,000 toneladas, el cual no vemos suficiente motivo para cambiar 
ni aun a las 2,900,000 toneladas que ultimaniente se esperaban de Cuba. 

Los compradores de azucares de Cuba para contratos en el future en las Bolsa de Aziicar 
han influido mucho en sostener los precios, los cuales serian ahora mds bajos & no ser por dicho 
apoyo. 

El Comite sobre la Tarifa en Washington ha decidido imponer un impuesto de He. por 
libra en todo el azucar que se destine al consumo. Esta medida, si fuera sancionada por las 
Cdmaras del Congreso, como es muy probable, tendrd por efecto el aumento en los derechos 
del aziicar de Cuba de Ic. la libra A 1 >2C. la libra. En conexi6n con esta medida, se trata de 
suspender el pago de reintegro en los azucares exportados, lo cual amnentaria el precio del 
azucar refinado para la exportaci6n cosa de Ic. la libra. 

Una vez que el azucar granulado de los Estados Unidos, el azucar refinado de Java y el 
cristalizado de la India Occidental se venden al mismo precio en Londres, digamos d unos 9.06c. 
la libra incluyendo los derechos, tendria que haber un nuevo ajuste para las compras, lo cual 
haria que la compra de 600,000 toneladas de azucar refinado en los Estados Unidos recaeria 
sobre Java y Cuba para el aumento en la cantidad de aziicar crudo. 

Cuba vende ya d Eiuropa una cuarta parte de su zafra, y si Uegara ademds de Europa una 
demanda directa para una quinta parte mas de su zafra, el resultado serla que la zafra de 
Cuba en cantidad de 9/20 partes, 6 casi una mitad, iria fuera de los Estados Unidos, haciendo 
que Cuba fuera verdaderamente la que fijara los precios del azucar en todas partes del mundo. 
Probablemente resultard que despu6s de todo no tenga lugar cambio alguno en la clausula de 
reintegro, y de ahi el que no resulten disturbios con motivo de tan adversa legislaci6n. 

El azucar refinado ha mostrado alguna disposici6n hacia menor demanda, y se hacen cotiza- 
ciones mds baja.5 en general a 7.50c. menos 2% al cerrar el mercado. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

Nueva York, junio 8 de 1917. 



TH E CUBA REVIEW 



37 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— S4— S6 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest, Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain , Me.xico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 

and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 



HAVANA— N. GelaU y Ca. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico 



LONDON — The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS — Heine et Cie. 



PYREX LABORATORY GLASSWARE 






Pyrex Glass — -a new borosilicate glass possessing an extraordinarily low expansion 
coefficient, 0.0000032, and great resistance to sudden temperature changes. 

Chemical stability tests show Pyrex glass to be Jess soluble in water and acids and 
about equally soluble in alkalis, compared with the best resistance glass, either American 
or foreign, hithertofore offered. The glass contains no metals of the magnesia-lime-zinc 
group and no heavy metals. 

The low exiDansion coeffic'ent makes it possible to make Pyrex beakers and flasks with 
wall slightly thicl':er tiian usual — -tiiis greatly increases the durability of the vessels without 
diminishing the resistance to sudden heating and cooling. 

Descriptive Price List Upon Request 

EIMER & AMEND 



NEW YORK CITY 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



OTTAWA, CAN. 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
P. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 



We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



CAR S 



10-4.8H GAGE FL.\TS— Length 10 ft. 6in. 

Capacity 20,000 lbs. 

28-24 in. GAGE. 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 

ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft. 4 in. Capacity 10 Tons. 
Weight 7,500 lbs. 

Fl RST - CLASS CONDITION 

Will Convert to Steel Underframe Flat Cars. 
PROMPT SHIPMENT .'. LOW PRICE 

RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 




38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 

82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Total values of merchandise imported from and exported to Cuba during January and the 
seven months ended January, 1917, compared with corresponding periods of the preceding 
year have been made public by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce, as follows: 



Imports from Cuba. 
Exports to Cuba 



Month of January 

1917 1916 

$14,249,995 $13,056,501 

15,338,515 10,064,202 



7 mos. ended January 
1917 1916 

$108,822,722 $90,878,025 
110,188,766 67,491,012 



Bank of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST. NEW YORK 



RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handhng 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES > 



President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Asst. Casiiier 



Pedro Pablo Diago Guillermo Carricaburu 

LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 



76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLAC£" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

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THECUBAREVIEW 39 



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POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

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Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 

SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, A\D CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) $0.05 

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Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
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thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
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HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

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SUGAR CANDY AND CONFECTIONERY 

Fiscal yei.r ended June 30. 

1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 

U.S. imports from Cuba.. $729 $l,lti4 $1,08G $1,247 $1,867 $1,266 

U.S. exports to Cuba... 62,336 65,179 76,014 83,206 95,256 175,646 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton. Night Call, 411 Hamilton. Cable Address: "Abiwork*," New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in aii Branches 

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40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Correspondanc* Solicitad from 
I n t • n d 1 n K Inrcatora 

OFFICERS 
Norman H. Davii .... - Preaident 

Oiwald A. Hormby ... - Vioe-Preiident 
Claudio Q. Mendoza - - - Vice-President 
J. M. Hopgood -....- Treasurer 

Rogelio Carbajal ------ Secretary 

W. M. Whitner - . Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



P. 


RUIZ 


® 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA, CUBA 




BOMBA VIKING 

PARA TODOS LI QUI DOS 

Especialmente miel y leche de cal; todos tamanos 
para tuberia de 1/4 pulgada hasta 8 pulgadas. 

VIKING PUMP CO., 108 Wall St., N. Y. 
HORACE F. RUGGLES, M.E. 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADO EN 1SG9 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Activo Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar St«. 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Coriesponsales en Espana 6 lalas Canaiias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables del Mundo 
En el Departainento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

d interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Amargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi- 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. GONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 W^all St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writinc to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 No.l7 No. 3 No. 7 No. 5 ^ 

P. M. P. M. P. M. P. M A. M. A. M. 2 



10.30 











♦ . 

'7 

A. 


17 
M. 











10.00 
A.M. 
12.06 

4.40 
» - 

9.00 
10.55 

5.28 



8.50 

10.20 

P. M. 

1.00 

10.00 
11.00 



P.M. 



8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 
P.M. 
3.00 
3.30 



P.M. 



10.01 7.40 



11.58 
2.18 



4.40 
8.40 



6.45 
P. M. 



10.10 
12.33 



3.38 
6.45 



6.40 
8.00 



10.30 
P.M. 



Lv . . Central Station . . Ar 



.Matanzas, 
. Cardenas , 



Ar Sagua Lv 

Ar . . . . Caibarien Lv 



. Santa Clara. . . . Lv. 
. Cienfucgos Lv. 



Ar. .SanctiSpiritus. 
At . .Ciego de Avila. 
Ar. . . .Camaguey. . 
Ar Antilla. 



.Lv. 

.Lv. 
. Lv. 
.Lv. 



538 Ar. Santiago de Cuba. Lv. 



No. 2 N0.I8 No. 4iNo. 8 No. 6IN0.IO 

A.M. A.M. P. MP. M. P. M. A.M. 



7.36 9.13 

5.311 6.45 
12.45 5.00 
P. M. A.M. 

8.00 

5.30 

A.M. 
12.10 



2.06 



12.00 
9.12 



P. M. 
8.25 

7.35 

4.55 

A.M. 

7.40 

6.55 



6.20 



1.55 
P. M. 
11.20 

2.30 
2.00 . 



6.39 
44 



05 



A. M.i 



P. M. 



9.05 



6.28 
4.25 



1.00 



9.15 

8.48 



6.15 
A.M. 



6.20 



00 
M. 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

From Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienfuegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 

ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



Antilla 


U. S. Cy. 

$23.33 

1.53 

20.66 

10.68 


Isle of Pines 


U. S Cy 
$6 00 


Batabano 

Bayamo 


Madruga 

Manianillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

Remedies 

Sagua 


3.01 

22.02 

3 20 


Camaguey 

Cardenas 


15.49 

5.43 

12.72 


9.64 

10.43 

8 45 


Cienfuegos 


8.69 

5 56 


.45 


Colon 


Sancti Spiritus 


11 19 


Guantanamo 


25.58 


8 53 


Ilolguin 


21.20 


Santiago de Cuba 


24.11 



Passengers holding full tirkets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 



(( 



WEEK-END" TICKETS 



FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL "WEEK-END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Send thiM cents in stamps for "Cuba — A Winter Paradise," a beau- ITnifA/l DalKiravrs nt I4an«>%* 
tiful Illustrated booklet describing interesting trips in Cuba to »-'nilCU IXaUWayS Ol navana 
FRANK ROBERTS, General Paasanger A«ent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET. Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacidn directa de todas los 
centros manufactureros del mundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espana 
Independencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 

Yard: 56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 

Telephones : 

Office, 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Mimro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers* Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 18ft 
Maritime Exohange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c. 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a position to push (h« $al»t of 

American high clan product§. Would 

rtpreient a firtt elat$ firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



M. J. CABANA 



COM M I88IO N 
MERCHANT 



P. O. Box 3, Camasuey 

Handles all linea of merchandise either on a oom- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
(urnishea all desired information about lands in east- 
ern Cuba. 



F. W. Hvoslef 



E. C. Day 



R. M. Michslaea 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

SteamshipAgents&ShipBrokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CaM«: "l>«nt«SM" 



Plea$e meniion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to AdvertiserM 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



43 




S.S. MUNAMAR 



NEW YORK-CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

New York Antilla Xuevitas Nuevitas New York 

Steamer Leave Arrive Arrive Leave Arrive 

MUNAMAR.... July 14 July IS Julv 20 July 22 Jaly 26 

MUNAMAR July 28 Aug. 1 \n^. :] Aug. o Aug. 9 

FREIGHT ONLY 

Regular sailings for Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua, Caibarien, Pto. 
Padre, Gibara, Manati and Banes. 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

SS. MUNISLA Havana, Matanzas Julv :^ 

SS. VERATYR Havana, Sagua July 10 

A STEAMER Caibarien, Cienfuegos, Santiago July 11 

SS. MUNISLA Havana, Matanzas, July 17 

SS. \:ER ATYR Havana, Cardenas July 24 

SS. MUNISLA Havana, Matanzas Julv 31 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER Juh 20, for Monte\-ideo, Buenos Aires and Rosario. 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER July 5 and 19 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of cal 

without previous notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushild 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan. 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

-WILMINGTON, DEL. 

S. MORRIS LILLIE, President 



The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 

TWO BALDWIN ENGINES are offered for IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

subject to prior sale 

One is of the Mogul (2-6-0) type, and the other of the Consolidation 
(2-8-0) type. Specifications are briefly a? follows: 

Mogul Type: — -Gauge, 3' 6"; cylinders, 17" x 22"; 
Driving-wheels, diam., 48"; Boiler pressure, 160 lbs.; Fuel, 
soft coal or wood; Weight on driving-wheels, 72,000 lbs.; 
total engine, 83,000 lbs.; total engine and tender, 150,000 
lbs.; Tank capacity, 3,000 gallons water, 6 tons coal. Com- 
plete equipment, including air brakes and steel tired engine 
truck and tender wheels. 

Consolidation Type: — Gauge, 3' 6"; cylinders. 16" x 
20": Driving-wheels, diam., 43"; Boiler pressure, 160 lbs.; 
Fuel, wood; Weight on driving-wheels, 70,000 lbs.; total 
engine, 80,000 lbs.; total engine and tender, 135,000 lbs.; 
Tank capacity, 2,500 gallons water, 2}4 cords wood. Com- 
plete equipment, including air brakes and steel tired engine 
truck and tender -wheels. 

The Locomotives are suitable for Plantation Service. 
Prices will be quoted on application. 

WALLACE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Addresses: "BALDWIN, PHILADELPHIA,"i"LEEBALD, HAVANA" 



Please mmtion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Adverti*er» 




.00 A Year JULV 1917 lOCentsACopy 



t I l« I II k i A« 



■ I 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



LINK -BELT 

Elevators and Conveyors 

For Bagasse, Sugar, etc. 

THROUGH long years of reliable service, Link-Belt 
Machinery has become a recognized standard for the 
handling of sugar cane, bagasse, etc., from the field to 
the finished product. 

Our engineers are specialists in designing sugar handling 
machinery. Let them work out your problems. We make 
no charge for advice, layouts or estimates. 

Link-Belt Machinery includes : Elevators and Conveyors 
for every service, Juice Strainers, Bagasse Carriers and 
Feeders, Field Transfers for Sugar Cane, Car Dumpers, Roller 
Chains, Link-Belt Sprocket Wheels, Transmission Machinery, 
etc., etc. 

Link-Belt Company 



299 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK CITY 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 



71 BEAVER STREET 
NEW YORK 



Gerente del Departamento de Veritas en el Extranjero de 



THE WEIR FROG COMPANY 
PENNSYLVANIA BOILER WORKS 
THE JOHN H. McGOWAN CO. 
THE RAHN-LARMON CO. 



CLEVELAND PUNCH AND SHEAR WORKS CO. 
DUNCAN, STEWART & CO., LTD. 
STANDARD WATER SYSTEMS CO. 
STANDARD SAW MILL MACHINERY CO. 



Los productos de estas Fdbricas abaroan: 




Bombas 

Tanques 

Tornos 

Prensas para Ruedas 



Mdquinas para Taladrar Metales 
Acepilladoras para Metales 
Punzones y Cizallas para Metales 
Ejes, Poleasy Acccsorios 



Locomotoras Livianas 

Gruas sobre Ruedas 

Garros: Para Cafia 
Para Carga 
Para Obras de 

CoDstruccion 

Carriles v accesorios 

Via Portatil 

Ranas y Chuchos 

Pueiites de Acero 

Edificios de Acero 

Maquinas de Izar 

Aserraderos 

Calderas 

Mdquinas d Vapor 

M dquinas a Petroleo 

Mdquinas ii Gasolina 
Calentadores de Agua para Calderas 
Alaml)ii|U'S para Atpia 
Evaporadorcs de Serpentines 
Miiquinaria Frigorifica 



Trapiches, Desmenuzadoras y toda clase de Maquinaria para Ingenios de Aziicar 
A solicitud se remiten catdlogos y presupuestos. 
Direcoion cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York (Se usan todas las claves.) 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



i^ADDOC PARA TODOS usos y de todos tamaiios, de los para caiia con cuatro ruedas y capa- 

V/AIV-K.w«J cidad de X'/z toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toncladai 

liacetnos una especxalidad de juegos de herrajes, incltiyendo los juegos 

de ruedas, completamente armados, con todas las piczas de metal, y pianos 

completos para constrinr los carros d sii dcstino de inac'sras del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cahi.f. Address: 

RA MALI AM 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 
Ph. ne. Hannover g2 BEAVER ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. 



Xight PhoiK! 
110.5 Bay Ridge 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 

SUGARS 



RAW ANQ 
REFINED 



82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trad*. 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 



ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensena uno de nueatros carros, todo de acero, para cafia. 

Tenemos otros tipos de capacidades varias y hemes fabricado un gran numero de carroa para cafia para 
USD en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaulea de acero o de madera y con- 
Btruidas para los distintos tipos de carga y desoarga de la cafia. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direcc.i6n telegr^fica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidn annual de md$ de 100,000 carro$. 
Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B. CINTAS, Oficioa 29-31, Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE 



MATERIAL 
FABRICATED 



Om««inTuUa, 
Oklahoma, Gallais Bldf. 

2728 Whitehall BuUdinc 
NEW YORK 




HATVIOIVD TyVINK 



- WARR EN, PEN N. 



BUILT BY 



STEEL TANKS 



COMPLETE 
OR ERECTED 

Los Angeles Office 

414 Crosse Building 

Spring & Sixth 

AgtnU in Cuba: 
ELLIS BROTHERS 

28 San Ignacio, Havana, Cuba 



HAMMOND IRON WORKS, Warren, Pa., U.S.A. 




Write for our 
Descriptive Catalog 



Insist upon 
Walker's **LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
"Lion" Brass Trade Mark Labels and Seals attached. 

James Walker & Company, Ltd. 



27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

JOSE L. VICLAAMIL 

Santa Clara 2Q, Havana, Cuba 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 



TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
5 15 



P M 



P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
P M 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



PM 



AM 

10 r 

12 15 



PM 



AM 
6 55 
8 33 

10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
PM 



AM 
6 15 
8 15 



7 30 
11 22 
AM 



Fare 
Istcl. 
$2.04 
3.99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana . Ar. 

Ar Artemisa Lv 

Ar Paso Real Lv 

Ar Herradura Lv 

Ar Pinar del Rio .... Lv. 

Ar Guane Lv 



Fare 
3dcl. 
■SI. 10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 



AM 
7 49 
5 45 



AM 



AM 
11 09 
9 35 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 



AM 
11 47 
9 45 



P M 
3 49 
1 45 



AM 



P M 



P M 
6 47 
4 45 



6 38 
3 00 

P MP M 



P M 
7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
3 00 
1 30 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 cts. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " | Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cU. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

A RE on sale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west of 
**• Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25%. 



Fleqsp Mention THE CUBA REVIEW xvhen Writing to Advertisers. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine. 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



$1.00 Per Year 



SUBSCRIPTION 



Advertising Rates on Application 



10 Cents Single Copy 



Vol. XV JULY, 1917 No. 8 

Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — The Two Sentinels. Paue 

Frontispiece — Garden, Central Stewart. 

All .\iouiid Cuba: 

Captain .John O'Rrifn Ht 

Cuban Ports Company 11 

Dr. Lanuza 11 

Havana Correspondence it, Id 

Independence Day 1" 

Red Cross 11 

Citrus and Other Fruits, Illustrated 12, l.S, 14, 1.5, Hi 

Cul)an Commercial Matters: 

.\merican Paper • 31 

Cane Transportation in Porto Rico 30, 31 

Chewing Guni 32 

Containers 32 

Cul)an Financial Matters: 

International Brewing Company Report 21, 22, 2.3 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 23 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads 20, 21 

Ciil)aii (iovernnient Matters: 

Capital Punishment 5 

Cuba and the War ' 

Governnient Plants 5 

Inimigration Restrictions ' 

International Farm Congress 7 

I iiternational Health Commission 8 

Lottery | 

Supreme Court ° 

Publications Received i7 ' le iq 

Public Works and Improvements, Illustrated i /, lo, i» 

Sugar Review — English • 

Spanish 

The Sugar Industry: 2-, 

Argentina „•„ 

Cuba Soil if. 

Eastern Bolivia 3^ 

Formosan Sugar ^„ 

Hongkong Sugar Trade 2? 

India Sugar Crop ' <, . 

Molasses as Cattle Feed 5| 

Porto Rico Sugar Z^ 

Santo Domingo Estate 07 

Rio .Janeiro 24 

Sugar Beets 2^ 

Sugar Refinery for Mukden go 

Sugar in Sao Paulo .j^ 

Sugar Impurities 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THE 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL AP.OUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1017, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



JULY, 1917 



Number 8. 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



CUBA'S PARTICIPATION IN THE GREAT WAR 

The "ever faithful isle" is an old Spanish 
name for Cuba which is being enthusiastically 
revived. By ranging herself side by side with 
the United States in the great struggle for 
world wide democracy, Cuba has demonstrated 
her unswerving devotion to the country which 
gave her freedom. 

Though the Island republic has a standing 
army of only 11,000 men, her unorganized mili- 
tary strength is estimated at 450,000. Her 
greatest service in the war will be to see that 
the numerous bays and gulfs which indent her 
2,500 miles of coastline are not used as hidden 
bases by Germany. 

Both copper and manganese, extremely 
valuable in the manufacture of munitions, are 
mined in considerable cfuantities in the eastern 
provinces, particularly in the neighborhood 
of Santiago. Four thousand iron miners fur- 
nish the United States with an a\'.=rage of 
50,000 tons of ore each month. With Cuba 
an ally instead of a neutral, United States ves- 
sels will have the use of the Havana and other 
harbors, when necessary. By the treaty of 
1903, we acquired coaling stations at Guanta- 
namo and Bahia Honda. 

INTERNATIONAL FARM CONGRESS 

The Cuban government has been invited 
by the government of the United States to 
participate in the International Farm Con- 
gress, which will be held at Peoria, 111., in 1918. 



IMMIGRATION RESTRICTIONS 

As a result of a message sent to Congress by 
President Menocal, calling attention to the 
fact that the country lacks the nece.ssary 
number of farm laborers because the usual 
immigration of Spanish laborers is greatly 
diminished at present by opportunities 
opened to them in the United States and other 
countries, where wages are high and work is 
plentiful, a bill has been .submitted to the 
Cuban Congress recommending that all re- 
strictions on immigration should be with- 
drawn, excepting those enforced by the D<>- 
partment of Sanitation, and that prohibiting 
minors under fourteen years of age entering 
the country without being accompanied by, 
or having in Cuba, some relatives. 



SAGUA RAILROAD CONCESSIONS 

President .Menocal, at the suggestion of the 
Secretary of Public Works, has signed a de- 
cree approving the sale of the Sagua Railroad 
concession, which was granted on December 
19, 1856, for the use of the port of Isabela de 
Sagua, to the Cuban Central Railroad, Ltd. 
The concession also included the land on 
which the Sagua Railroad's station, ware- 
house and shops are located. The Sagua Rail- 
road Company has been granted a new con- 
cession to build three warehouses at the 
Sagua docks, according to plans submitted on 
September 15, 1915. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



CUBAN COINAGE 

It is reported that the Secretary of theTreas- 
ury will order in the near future the manufac- 
ture of six million dollars' worth of silver 
coins, which is the balance of the order 
placed with the United States mint at Phila- 
delphia. 

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH COMMISSION 

The Cuban Government and the Rocke- 
feller Foundation of the United States through 
the International Health Commission, are 
co-operating in a campaign against yellow 
fever in other countries. President Menocal 
has granted a leave of absence to Dr. Juan 
Guiteras, Director of Sanitation of Cuba, so 
that he may, under the auspices of the Com- 
mission, begin a campaign to stamp out the 
disease. As most of the members of the In- 
ternational Health Commission are officers 
of the United States Army Medical Corps, the 
Cuban Government considers it a signal honor 
that Dr. Guiteras should have been appointed 
to perform so important a task. Research 
will begin soon on the Island of .Martinique 
and in Maracaibo. Director Taylor of Las 
Animas Hospital, Havana, is co-operating 
with Dr. Guiteras. 



CUBAN LOTTERY 

The resignation of Colonel Federico Men- 
dizabal, director of the lottery of Cuba, has 
been accepted by President Menocal, and 
General Armando Sanchez Agramonte, who 
was the Chief of Police of Havana, is to be the 
new director. Colonel Julio Sapguily has been 
appointed Chief of Police of Havana. 

By official decree, there will be several 
changes in the lotterj^ drawings, beginning 
July 1. The number of tickets in each draw- 
ing will be only 24,000, and the big prizes will 
be reduced to three, one for $100,000, o le for 
$30,000 and one for $10,000. 



CUBAN MILITIA 

The 25,000 militiamen mustered into the 
service when Cuba was threatened with a 
revolution recently have been ordered mus- 
tered out by the CJieneral Staff of the Cuban 
Army. 



SUPREME COURT 

President Menocal has decreed the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Jose Antolin del Cueto y Pazos as 
Chief Justice of the Cuban Supreme Court, 
which position was made vacant by the retire- 
ment of C'hief Justice Jose Antonio Pichardo 
y Marques to the pension list. Dr. Cueto has 
been a lawyer for forty-five years and pro- 
fessor in colleges and universities since 1882. 
In the case of the State vs. Cuban Ports 
Company, Dr. Cueto acted as legal adviser 
of the President and lawver for the State. 



CAPITAL PUNISHMENT 

The Cuban Senate by a vote of 17 to 1, has 
approved a bill abolishing the death penalty 
in Cuba. The measure has been sent to the 
lower house, and it is expected that it will be 
passed there without delay. It is believed that 
the bill was introduced at this time to save from 
possible execution a number of the army of- 
ficers charged with sedition and rebellion, now 
on trial at Cabana fortress. 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING AND SHOE PLANTS 

The results of the plant that the govern- 
ment recently installed at San Ambrosio to 
manufacture all necessary uniforms for officers 
and soldiers in the army has been so satisfac- 
tory that it is proposed now to install at the 
same place a printing office and a shoe factory. 
The machinery for the printing office has al- 
ready been ordered and will arrive in the near 
future and the shoe factory will be estab- 
lished later. 



SECRETARY OF JUSTICE 

It is reported that President .Menocal has 
accepted the resignation of Sr. Christobal de 
la Guardia, the Cuban Secretary of Justice. 
Dr. P. Desvernine, the Secretary of States, 
will assume the duties of the Secretary of Jus- 
tice until President .Menocal names his new 
cabinet. 



ISABELA DE SAGUA 

The Cuban Central Railway has sub- 
mitted to the Department of Public Works ex- 
tensive plans for great docks and wharves to 
be constructed at Isabela de Sagua. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



HAVANA CORRESPONDENCE 

H:iv:iiKi, .Inly (5, 1917. 

In our last report \vc referred to the rapid 
suburban development of Havana. The same 
thing holds true as regards the business dis- 
trict of the town, there being a mwnber of 
new buildings in course of construction and 
others planned. 

One of the largest, now building, is the new 
store of the Frank G Robins Co., dealers in 
office furniture, typewriters and office ac- 
cessories, at Habana and Obispo streets, the 
building being about half completed, and that 
portion now being occupied. The firm of J. Z. 
Horter, large dealers in agricultural imi)le- 
ments, etc., has nearly completed their war(>- 
house and office building at Obisjjoand Officios 
streets. It is reported that the Royal Bank 
of Canada has sold its present Havana bank 
building to the Havana "liolsa" or Stock Ex- 
change, and that the bank will shortly start 
erection of a much larger building at Obrapia 
and Aguiar streets, across from their present 
location. We also understand the Santa Cata- 
lina Convent, occupying an entire block on 
0'.Reilly street, has been sold, and it is the 
intention to erect a large commercial building 
upon the site. Among industrial concerns, the 
plant of the Cuba Tire & Rubber Co. at Puen- 
tes Grandes is rapidly nearing completion, we 
having made mention of this company in a 
previous report. Also a large warehouse and 
office building is being built for Armour A: Co. 
on Desamparados street, near the San Jose 
warehouses, which will be finished about the 
end of the year. 

Conditions in the Eastern provinces, 
caused by the revolution last winter, have 
practically become normal again. The rail- 
roads have effected repairs to the bridges and 
tracks which were destoyred by the rebels, 
and freight and pas.senger traffic is now being 
operated to all points without interruption. 
Everything taken together, business in general 
in Cuba may be considered as good, and sugar 
quotations are climbing higher. 

The trial by court martial of the Cuban 
army officers implicated in the revolution, 
which began on June loth, is still in session. 
The prosecuting attornej' has asked the death 
penalty for a number of the leaders and long 
terms of imprisonment for others, while some 
will be acquitted. As the Liberal congress- 
men have been unable to pass a bill granting 
amnesty to the participants of this revolution, 
they are now endeavoring to pass a bill abol- 
ishing capital punishment. 



Havana has, since our last report, experi- 
enced another strike; which took effect on 
.lune 19; this time on the part of the cartmen. 
This was caused by their di.s.satisfact ion with 
the manner in which shipments destined to in- 
terior points, were accejjted from them by the 
railroad company. After the strike had been 
in effect a few days, the Government placed 
jKjlicemen on the carts and also furnished a 
large number of trucks belonging to the 
Government and the municipality, thus 
breaking the strike, after which the cartmen 
went back to their work. 

The i)ineai)ple shipi)ing season, usually at 
its height during the months of May and 
June, is now over for the present croj), the 
movement amounting to approximately 950 - 
000 crates. Generally about half the entire 
movement goes via steamer to New York, 
but this year, the stevedores strike, which pre- 
vented the exportation of pineapples while it 
lasted, worked a great hardship on the steam- 
ship lines. The Cuban All Rail Route, how- 
ever, were able to carry their northbound 
shipments without interruption, due to the 
fact that they brought down empty American 
cars to be loaded with pineapples northbound 
in addition to the loaded cars which were 
returned them after being discharged here. 
Therefore, the ferry carried by far the largest 
quantity shipped by any one line. 

More interest than ever has lately been 
taken in the development of the growing oil 
industry in Cuba, and new companies are 
being formed. The Union Oil Co. retains its 
lead in the matter of actual production, and 
this has been greatly increased by the "shoot- 
ing" of one of their welLs. Practically their 
entire output, we understand, is sold to the 
West India Oil Refining Co. here, but they 
are unable to secure from the railroad a suf- 
ficient mmiber of tank cars to handle their 
shipments promptly. On the other hand, 
there is a bill pending in Congress to remove 
the duty on crude oil, but it is yet too early to 
say whether same will be passed and be ome 
a law or not. 

As Cuba has declared herself on the side 
of the Allies, it has become possible for Ameri- 
cans living on the Island to organize for the 
purpose of aiding their home country. All 
Americans living in Havana liable to conscrip- 
tive military service have been given an oppor- 
tunity to register at the United States Con- 
sulate-General here, and those who desire to 
avail themselves of the opportunity are re- 
ceiving military training and target practice 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



under the instruction of Cuban army officers, 
as arranged for by Lieutenant-Colonel Wit- 
temeyer, the American military attache sta- 
tioned here. 

The Havana Chapter of the American Red 
Cross has recently been established, and a 
considerable sum of money was raised through 



securing members to this association and con- 
tributions towards its work. Also an enter- 
tainment, which was a great success, was 
given in one of the Havana threatres on 
July 4th as a benefit to the .American Red 
Cross. 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



INDEPENDENCE DAY IN CUBA 

A notable patriotic celebration of American 
Independence Day was held in the Campoa- 
inor Theatre, Havana, on the Fourth of July, 
and the entire proceeds were for the benefit of 
the American Red Cross. 

In previous years the observane of the 
Fourth of July in Cuba has been restricted to 
members of the American colony, but this year, 
due to Cuba's alliance with the United States 
in the Avar against Germany, the event par- 
took of unusual importance. The festival was 
attended by President Menocal of Cuba, Hon. 
William E. Gonzalez, United States Minister 
to Cuba, officers of the United States Navy 
and many other Cubans and American promi- 
nent in public life. The main feature of the 
program were music by the Municipal Band, 
the electric display of the mingled coats-of- 
arms of the United States and Cuba, a series 
of tableaus depicting the work of the Red 
Cross on European battlefields, the un- 
furling from the stage of the flags of the En- 
tente Allies, and the singing of patriotic 
songs of both republics. 

The entertainment was attended by more 
than 3,000 persons and was a great success. 



PENSIONS 



In order to make up the deficit in the miu;ii i- 
pal budget of the City of Havana for the 
next fiscal year, the city council proposes to 
cancel all pensions and subsidies now existing. 
About 189,000 will be saved in this manner. 
There are many students in foreign countries 
whose education is paid for by the city of 
Havana and they will be left without re- 
sources to follow their studies. 



MARIEL 



The Department of Sanitation has named 
Dr. Francisco J. Velez as health chief of the 
station of Mariel. 



CAPT. JOHN O'BRIEN. 

Capt. John O'Brien, known to soldiers and 
sailors throughout the world as "Dynamite 
Johnny," died at the age of 80 in New York 
City, on June 21. The funeral was held in 
New York on June 26 and among the mourn- 
ers were officials of the Cuban Government, 
delegations from the Masonic fraternity, 
Spanish-American war veterans and members 
of the New York anil New Jersey Pilot Asso- 
ciation. The solid bronze coffin, given by 
the Cuban Government, was covered with the 
Stars and Stripes. A large wreath of red car- 
nations and white lillies, bearing the inscrip- 
tion "La Republica de Cuba," was sent in the 
name of President .Menocal of Cuba. The 
obituary rites of the Free .Masons were con- 
ducted by Excelsior Lodge. 

Capt. O'Brien was born in 1837 in the old 
drydock section of New York. In his boy- 
hood days he showed great love of adventure 
and at the age of 13 he ran away from home. 
During the Civil War, Capt. O'Brien shipped 
as mate and sailing master of the Deer, a 
schooner which carried munitions of war to 
the Confederates. In 1871 he joined the Hell 
Gate Pilot's Association, and it was during 
his days as pilot that he earned the name of 
"Daredevil Johnny."' Capt. O'Brien was 
famous as a filibuster. His first filibustering 
expedition was in 1885, when he delivered 
arms and ammunition to the revolutionists of 
Colombia. Three years later, during the 
Cuban insurrection, he made his most famous 
filibustering trip to Cuba, and it was at this 
time that he earned the title of "Dynamite 
Johnny." Capt. O'Brien commanded the 
schooner RambUr, with a cargo of 60 tons of 
dynamite from New York for Cuba. In the 
days before the explosive had been denatured, 
it could not be handled Avith impunity. A 
fearful storm overtook the Bambler and the 
cargo of dynamite jarred loose and began to 
roll with the vessel. The Captain was the 



T 11 ]•: C U B A R i: V I I', w 



11 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



only })ers(m on liicml the sliip wlm knew of 
what the carKo c jnsistcd, and realizinsj; the 
peril that he and the shijj's crew were in. he 
went below and siiiiile-handcd, secured tlie 
sliding boxes of dyn:uuite. The lininlilci 
reached Colon twelve d;iys after leaving \e\v 
York. 

Other revolutii)n< in which C'a))t. O'Brien 
served in transportin"; aninmnition and re- 
cruits were the war in Haiti in 18Si) and the 
10 years war in Cul)a. He is said to have 
commanded a submarine for the Japanese 
during the Russo-Japanese war. Of late 
years he had been the official pilot in Havana. 
He came to New York from Cuba in the 
Winter of 1916. 

DR. JOSE GONZALEZ LANUZA 

Dr. Juse Gonzale', Lanuza, Cuban i)atriot 
and attorney, died at this home in Havana on 
June 26th. Dr. Lanuza was a member of the 
Cuban House of Representatives and former 
Chief of the Conservative Party. During the 
revolution, he served his country well, gaining 
the rank of General and Attorney General. At 
the end of the revolution, he began the practice 
of law in the citj' of Havana, and with his 
partner, Dr. Desvernine, now Secretary of 
State, built uj) one of the largest law prac- 
tices in Cuba, known as the firm of Gonzalez 
Lanuza <fe Desvernine. 

The funeral wa.s held in Havana on June 
28 and was an imposing one. It was attend- 
ed by the Vice-President, members of the 
Cabinet, many senators, representatives, and 
men prominent in public and civil life. 



MATANZAS 



A bill was recently introduced in the Cuban 
Congress which provides for the paving of 
Matanzas. It is reported that the streets in 
that city are in a bad condition, and it is ex- 
pected that the needed rei)airs will be prompt- 
Iv authorized. 



CARDENAS ELECTRIC PLANT 

It is reported that the Cardenas electric 
plant has been sold to the Cardenas Electrical 
Company for the sum of $590,000. This 
Company is a new organization and Sr. Laur- 
eano Fall Gutierrez has been ai)pointed Presi- 
dent and Sr. Juan Castro, General .Manager. 



CUBAN PORTS COMPANY BONDS 

President Menoeal re(!ently sent a message 
to the Cuban Congress urging the passage of a 
law authorizing an indemnity for the pur- 
chasers of the bonds of the Cuban Ports Com- 
pany. These l)on Is were i.ssued imder a con- 
cession granted by the (lomez administration, 
for sanitation work in Cuban i)orts. President 
Menoeal vetoed the act as illegal on as.suming 
office. The bonds were sold for the most jiart 
in the United States and Great Britain, and 
the American and British governments are 
repor;ed to have urged indemnification of the 
purcha.sers. The President's message said 
settlement of this affair woul 1 avoid interna- 
tional friction and contribute much to rapid 
flotation of Cuba's .S30,000,00l) bon 1 i.ssue for 
war purposes. 

AMERICAN RED CROSS 

The National Headquarters of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross has authorized the organiza- 
tion of a chajiter in the city of Havana. The 
object of this chapter will be to obtain as 
many members for the American Red Cross 
as possible. June 18th to June 2.3th is the 
time set aside to accomplish this end, and it 
is hoped that many will join in hel])ing the 
Hav^ana chapter to gain its full share of mem- 
ber.^hi]). 



RESEARCH WORK 

The Division of Research of the Depart- 
ment of Comm.erce at \^'ashington. among 
other studies, has m.ade a special investiga- 
tion of the ini.ports of iron and steel in Cuba 
and the countries of origin, for the fiscal years 
of 1915 and 191»). 



FIBER CEMENT TILES 

By a presidential resolution of Januaiy 26, 
1917, the classification of plain roofing tiles of 
fiber cement imported into Cuba is changed 
from Tariff No. 2A, which specifies slabs, 
plates and steps of artifical stone, to No.lS, 
which includes unglazed roofing tiles of clay 
for building puri)oses. Under the new classi- 
fication such tiles imported from the United 
States will be .subject to a duty of $1.20 per 
100 square feet, as compared with the former 
rate of $0.50 per 100 kilos (.$0,226 per 100 
poundsj . 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CITRUS AND OTHER FRUITS 

Many varieties of citrus fruits are indigenous to Cuba. The great, beautiful, glossy leafed 
trees of the sour and of the bitter orange, are found growing wild in almost every forest of the 
Island. The lime, also, is found in more or less abundance, scattered over rocky hillsides, its 
beautiful, smooth lemon-like fruit going to waste for lack of transportation to markets. Al- 
most ever>-^vhere in Cuba are found a few orange trees, whose fruit is gathered for home con- 
sumption, but only with the coming of Americans has the growing of citrus fruit been under- 
taken as a commercial industry. 




Tangerines, Three Years Old. 



Homeseekers from Florida found the native oranges of the Island, all of which are called 
"Chinas" or Chinese oranges to distinguish them from the wild oranges of the woods, to be of 
peculiar sweetness, and superior quality to those grown either in Florida or California. The rich 
soils, requiring comparatively little fertilizer, were very promising, and with the beginning of 
the First Intervention, large tracts were planted by American colonies in every province of 
Cuba. Some of these, as in the Bahia Honda district, fifty miles west of Havana, cover hundreds 
of acres within one single enclosure. 

It has been found that the earliest possible varieties of oranges, together with the latest 
grown, command always good prices in the American markets; more than all, that these, es- 
pecially the Valencias and Washington Navels, will stand shipment to Eurojic and other dis- 
tant markets. 

Within a radius of fifty miles of the city of Havana, many beautiful groves are today in 
bearing, whose crops are sold advantageously in the markets of the capital, to which they are 
transported in large vans and automobile trucks. This fruit brings in the local market from 
$6 to $15 per thousand, and yields a very satisfactory return to those who planted groves a 
few years ago. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



13 



• > 







Lemon Trees. 

The cultivation of grape fruit, not only in Cuba but in that section of Havana Province 
known as the Isle of Pines, has been very successful as far as the production of a high grade fruit 
is concerned. The trees are prolific and the crop never fails. Unfortunately, grape fruit shipped 
from Cuba to the United Stated has not always found a profitable market, and there have been 
seasons when the crop became an absolute loss, since the demand abroad was not .sufficient to 
pay for transportation to northern markets. As the taste for grape fruit grows, it is possibl 
That this occasional glutting of the market may become a thing of the past, but at the present 
time many of the groves of grape fruit in Cuba are being budded with oranges, this is true also 
of the lemon trees. 

There are over 20,000 acres today in this Republic on which citrus fruit is grown. The total 
value of the estates is estimated at about fifteen million dollars, but with each jear it becomes 
more apparent that the ara of profitable citrus fruit culture will be limited to a radias within 
not more than 100 miles from some port whence frequent and regular shipments can be made 
to the United States. This is an essential feature in the citrus fruit industry. Its disregard 
means failure. 

PINEAPPLES 

Pineapples have been grown in Cuba for export since the beginning of the First Interven- 
tion, and to some extent even before. In point of money value, the industry ranks next to that 
of the citrus fruit. Although up to the present time most of the pineapples intended for export 
are grown within fifty miles of the city of Havana, over a million crates are annually shipped 
to the United States. 

Pineapples may be grown on any rich soil in Cuba and are considered one of our staple 
crops. The slips, or offshoots from the parent plant, are set out in long ridges some four feet 
apart with intervening spaces averaging a foot. These produce fruit in one j'ear from planting 
and from each original stalk an average of six suckers may be taken for planting in other beds, 
so that with a very small start the acreage may be easilj' increasod five or six fold each year. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




r^laniey Culoiacio 



About 8,000 plants are considered sufficient for an acre of ground; the cost of same when pur- 
chased averages about $30 per acre, while the preparation of the land for pineapple culture will 
amount to somewhat more. The returns, under favorable cirumstances, will vary from $75 to 
$100. The average net profit from pineapples grown near Artemisa and Campo Florido is said 
to be about $50 per acre. The high price of sugar, since the beginning of the European war, 
however, has caused much of the former pineapple acreage to be converted into cane fields. 

The profit derived from pineapple culture, as in all fruits or vegetables of a perishable 
nature, depends very largely upon the shipping facilities of the locality selected. Pineapples 
cannot long be held on the wharf waiting for either trains or steamers. 

In this connection it may be mentioned that the daily ferry line, recently established be- 
tween Key West and Havana has been very beneficial to shippers. On? grower informed this 
Bureau that his profits had increased forty per cent as a direct result of the opportunity to load 
freight cars on his fields, whence they could be shipped to any city in the United States without 
Ijrcaking bulk. 

The red Si)anish, owing to it excellent shipping qualities, is preferred to all others for export, 
although many other varieties such as the "pina blanca" or sugar loaf , which will not stand 
shipment abroad, are used for local consumption and bring an average price of ten cents retail 
throughout the vear. 

MANGOS 

One of the most abundant and delicious fruits in Cuba, is the niango, which is found 
growing wild in the forests, especially in the hills of Bahia Honda, as well as in almost every 
yard or meadow of the Island. Both tree and fruit resemble the peach in some respects, although 
the mango grows much larger, frequently attaining a height of 50 or CO ft., furnishing grateful 
shade for stock. The leaves are long, dark green, and glossy. The fruit is slightly pear-shaped. 



r II !•: CUBA RE V 1 1: w 




Affuacate; 




KgK ]>l;ui!. 

smooth of skin, and beautifully colored in varying; tints of yellow, n>d, and russet-hrown. It is 
very juicy and resembles somewhat a ripe clingstone peach. 

Owing to its delicacy but few have been shipped to foreign markets, although with sufficient 
care in packing, it is quite probable that exportation would prove successful. The fruit comes 
into bearing during the month of April and continues into September. 

The mango at the present time is being greatly improved through grafting choice varieties 
brought from India and different parts of the world onto the native Cuban stock. The Mulgoba 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Date Bananas. 



round in shape, of delicious flavor and without the objectional shred of the native fruit, sells in 
the local markets of Havana, together with the Chinese, at from 25.^. to 50c. each. 

VEGETABLE GROWING 

With the advent of the American colonies in 1900, truck gardening sprang rapidly into 
prominence, until today, it forms quite an important part of the small-farmer's revenue. Most 
of the well-known vegetables of the United States are grown here, not only for the local markets, 
but for shipment abroad. They are usually planted at the close of the rainy season in October 
or November and are brought to maturity in time to reach the North during the winter and 
early spring, when high prices prevail. 

Those vegetables from which the best results have been obtained are sweet peppers, lima 
beans, okra, white squash, tomatoes, egg-plants, string beans and early potatoes. 

The above mentioned vegetables may be grown in the rich soils of any part of the Island, 
but are seldom profitable when not cultivated close to railroads, or within a radius of 100 miles 
of Havana, whence steamship lines have daily sailings to ports in the United States. Profits 
depend on location, soil, water supply, intelligent cultivation and success in reaching markets 
in which there is a demand for the product. 

W^ith irrigation, which insures absolute control of the crop, these profits may run an3rwhere 
from $100 to $400 or even $500 per acre; the latter figure of course being an exception which 
occurs only when all the many conditions necessary to vegetable growing happen to be favor- 
able. 

GRAPES 

In spite of the fact that the grape is indigenous to Cuba, prohibitory laws on the part of 
Spain during the regime of that monarchy forbade the culture of grapes outside of the Peninsula, 
and vine culture in this Island had no opportunity to thrive. And yet the few that are planted 
in gardens and on hillsides, have produced as fine fruit as can be found in any part of either 
Europe or America. There is no reason why many of the high mountainous districts of this 
country should not be converted into immense vineyards. 

With the influx of Americans and Canary Islanders familiar with grape culture, it is quite 
probable that the industry will soon assume an important place among horticultural products. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



17 




Arroyo Arenas Bridge. 



PROPOSED PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAY 
IMPROVEMENTS 



The Department of Public Works spends yearly an average sum of about $8,000,000 in new- 
works, not including the expenses of administration in the general budget. Large expenditures 
were made by the Bureau of Water Supply, Sewers and Municipal Engineering from 1911 to 
1914 in carrying out the Havana sewer and paving contract, an undertaking that was finished 
in 1915. This work, with the important additions authorized subsequent to letting the contract, 
cost about .$17,000,000. 

A great many works have been planned for the near future by the Bureau of Highways 
and will be begun when funds are authorized by Congress. Among them the most important 
is a general plan of highways connecting all the important cities in Cuba and formed mainly 
by three highways, one along the central part of the island, one connecting cities on the north 
coast, and the other along the south coast. As a great many of these cities are already con- 
nected, only sections of the highways will have to be built in order to complete the system. 
The plans provide for the connection of the three main highways by roads running across the 
island, and in many cases such connections have already been made. 

The length of the highways to be built to complete this general plan is about 3,700 kilo- 
meters (2,300 miles), and the work will cost about $44,000,000. 

The work of the important Bureau of Water Supply, Sewers, and Municipal Engineering 
will be increased more and more every year. Large appropriations have been asked from Con- 
gress in order to complete and extend the work on sewers and pavements in Havana to new 
sections of the city, to complete and enlarge the aqueducts of Santiago, Pinar del Rio and 
Camaguey, and for many other public improvements. The necessary appropriations for carry- 
ing on these works have been made regularly, and it is expected that they will be concluded in 
due course. 



18 



T IJ ]■; CUBA U E VIEW 




Road from MataTizas to th{» Pfllaniar Caves 




Road from Matanzas to Madruga 



THE CUBA R E \- I E W 



19 




Road from Havarui to Santiago de las Vegas- 

and Bridge 



-Basin of the Albear Canal 



Three large jobs are being finished by this bureau at present with the appropriations al- 
ready granted. These are the aqueduct of Hanta Clara, at a cost of $7.50,000; the paving of the 
city of Cienfuegos, at a cost of about $2,000,000; and the Poque Drainage Canal, at a cost of 
$5,000,000. Of these works, the aqueduct of Santa Clara is about fifty per cent finished; the 
paving of Cienfuegos has just been commenced under a contract by which the aqueduct has 
been given to the contractors for a period of thirty nine years in payment; and the El Roque 
Canal is about seventy per cent finished, and has already cost about $3,500,000. 

An aqueduct is also being built for the town of Guines, in the Province o{ Habana, at a 
cast of $2.50,000, and thirty psr cant of the work is now finishsd. Another aqu3duct is being 
built for the town of San Luis, in the Province of Oriente, at a cost of $10.3,000, and thirty 
per cent of this work also is already completed. Some other minor works that will cost about 
: 653,000 are contemplated, and of this total Congress has already appropriated $300,000. 
.Mimicipalities and private corporations are also doing considerable work of this nature, es- 
pecially in the construction of aqueducts. 

A general plan has been adopted for extending the lighting of the shores of the island, sub- 
ject to appropriations from Congress, including the construction of thirteen new lighthouses at 
a cost of about $1,495,000. The 39 lighthouses in Cuba at present have a total value of $2,- 
010,000. 

Pending a resolution regarding the contract for dredging all {)()rts of the i-^land, the (tov- 
ernment has in contemplation works of improvement the cost of which will amount to about 
^ 27,),()()(). 

Several projects are about to be carried out in Havana antl in cities and towns in the in- 
terior of the islarcl by the Department of Public Works. These will include work on the National 
Capitol, the Presidential Palace, a model prison, the university buildings, monuments in 
Havana, and hospitals, courthouses, etc., in several Provinces. 

In a decree published in September, 1916, the President of the Republic apportioned the 
sum of .¥3.58,000 for improvements in the jxistal, telegraph, and telephone service, including the 
installation of generators to replace the chemical batteries at present in use, structural modifi- 
cations in the central station, underground electrical conduits, and the construction of new 
telegraph and telephone lines. 



20 THE CUBA REVIEW 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of April and for ten months ended April 
30th, compare as follows: 

1917 191G 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

at <it i2? €; <t *Jt ^ 

3& •& •IP -IP 'IP 'IP 'JP 

April gross 520,584 777,659 545,701 544,871 450,659 393,723 301,182 

Expenses 319,037 317,388 227,481 260,174 231,602 181,575 151,267 



April net 201,546 460,271 318,219 284.697 219,047 215,148 149,915 

Other income 836 

Net income 202,383 460,271 

Charges 94,758 87,554 72,308 71,566 66,791 67,624 60,125 



April surpli^ 107,624 372,716 245,911 213,130 152,256 147,523 89,790 

Ten months' gross... . 5,082,617 5,530,581 4,208,266 4,270,486 3,785,812 3,119,580 2,529,189 

Net profits 1,403,844 2,850,932 2,136,833 2,072,757 1,757,484 1,493,429 1,133,538 

Other income 10,201 6,108 

Fixed charges 918,261 803,219 709,238 677,474 667,638 623,749 459,050 



Ten months' surplus . 495,784 2,053,821 1,427,594 1,395,282 1,089,845 869,680 674,488 



The report of the Cuba Raihoad for the month of May and for eleven months 
ended May 31, 1917, compares as follows: 

1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

$<f <!l <£ <6 ft •? 

.p 45 if •II "IP •!!> 

May gross 562,968 681 003 540,877 462,000 447,127 380,854 267 506 

Expenses 413,830 332,317 207,919 240 788 208,436 187,093 148,714 



May net 149,138 348,685 332,957 221,212 238,690 193,761 113,792 

Other income 994 

Net income 150,132 348,685 332,957 

Charges 94,352 87,554 72,308 71,566 66,791 67,624 60,125 

May surplus 55,780 261,131 260,649 149,646 171,898 126,136 58,667 



Eleven months' gross. 5,645,586 6,211,584 4,749,143 4,732,487 4,232,939 3,500,434 2,796,695 

Net profits 1,552,982 3,199,617 2,469,791 2,293,970 1,996,174 1,687,190 1,252,330 

Other income 11.195 6,108 

Fixed charges 1,012,613 890,773 781,547 749,041 734,430 691,373 519,175 



Eleven mos. surplus. . 551,565 2,314,953 1,688,244 1,544,928 1,261,744 995,816 733,155 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Wkekly receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

£ ££££££ 

Week ending May 26th. .. . 52,717 38,578 41,564 21,973 30,513 28,090 17,076 

Week ending June 2d 45,078 34,756 34,326 20,975 26,898 22,522 17,372 

Week ending June 9th 36,003 32,822 29,356 21,070 22,237 18,370 15,255 

Week ending June 16th. .. . 34,581 29,829 24,596 20,788 20,985 19,158 16,107 



T H E C U B A R K V 1 K W 21 

EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

19i:i 1914 HM.J l!)l(i 1917 

Weckli/rcnipis: Z £ £ £ £ 

Week ending iM ay 2()tli 9,935 7,287 7,141 5,389 7,064 

Week ending .June 2d 11, KK) 0,552 5,824 5,473 5,767 

Week ending June 9th 8,273 7,278 7,100 4,865 5,797 

Week ending June 16th 7,393 6,166 5,941 5 030 5,81 1 

EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

1917 191(1 1915 1914 1913 

Weekitj receipts. £ £ £ £ £ 

Week ending May 26th 24,282 15,182 17,689 9,524 13,313 

Week ending June 2d 22,538 12,857 16,063 8,378 10,282 

Week ending June 9th 17,167 12,110 11,653 8,849 8.356 

Week ending June 16 15,380 11,532 8,579 7 478 6,954 



EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

1917 11916 1915 

M ON III oj May. $ $ $ 

Cross earnings 564,237 498,275 478,732 

Operating expenses 252,894 185,634 193,138 

Net earnings 311,343 312,641 285,594 

JMiscellaneous income 6,361 9,136 4,937 

Total net income 317,704 321,777 290,531 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 183,217 191,271 177,798 

Five Months to May 31. 

Gross earnings 2,696,060 2,417,062 2,303,205 

Operating expenses 1,161,292 934,014 942,597 

Net earnings 1,534,768 1,483,048 1,360,608 

Miscellaneous income 53,987 55,810 39,610 

Total net income 1,588,755 1,538,858 1,400,218 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 915,136 912,911 853,646 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



INTERNATIONAL BREWING COMPANY 

(STOCK COMPANY! 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, LAID BEFORE THE STOCK- 
HOLDERS GENERAL MEETING CALLED. ON THE 23rd OF APRIL, 1917 



INTERNATIONAL BREWING COMPANY {Stock Company) 
To the Slockholders: Havana, Ciiha. 

The Board of Directors fulfils with pleasure the duty of giving account to the Stock- 
holders General meeting of the business and standing of the company during the period 
comprised from the 1st of April to this day, the 31st of December of 1916, to which the accom- 
panying balance sheet refers, and which comprises only the said nine months, as the previous 
one was passed on the 31st of March of this same year. 

As can be seen by said balance sheet, the raw materials and merchandise in existence 
amount to $193,530.21; the cash in hand to $81,757.06, and the drafts and bonds to collect to 



22 THECUBAREVIEW 



$62,753.49, which amounts to a total of $;i38,0-K).7t), whifh, adled to the $392,906.28 of re- 
ceivables assets on the account sales amount to $730,947.04, that is, an increase of $81,456.99 
in relation to same entries apportioned in the previous report; likewise the value of live stock, 
wagons, utensils, etc., having increased from the previous report, which was $112,694.21, to 
$164,002.23. 

The continuation of imjirovements and enlargements of our Brewery and Ice Factory, 
started during the period comprised by the previous report referred to, and other necessary 
improvements including the materials and malt in existence to-day, represent an investment of 
$323,164.64 during the nine months, of which $91,173.83 belong to the improvements on the 
grounds, enlargements of the factory building, improvements in the restaurant, small houses 
for the chemicals, canteen, and the construction of new shops, sanitary service, coal houses, 
stables and houses for the storage of hay and barrels; $114,092.28 to machinery, comprising 
therein the buying and installation of new beer tanks, the new ice plant, the system for the 
purifying of water, three boilers and new pieces of machinery; $4,835.42 to the buying of motor 
trucks and to the making of new wagons for the ice and beer; $9,382.65 to the acquisition of 
live stock and harnesses; to-day we have one hundred and forty mules instead of sixty mules 
~we had formerly, and we have to increase that number because the growing increase in the 
product to be transported requires it; and the rest up to the $323,164.64 to kegs, new refriger- 
ators, furniture and utensils, including the malt and materials in hand mentioned above. And 
lastly, in addition to having increased considerably the sale of our product, exceeding our own 
calculations, we have taken in, in the nine months referred to in this report, $204,362.42 more 
than in the same months of the previous year. 

All this will prove to the stockholders that the eagerness shown by this Board of Directors 
toward the development and prospei"ity of the Company has given the results expected. 

Our brewery and ice factory, with the improvements and enlargements accomplished there- 
in, and those we will undertake in order to have it completed next year, can be considered as a 
model in its class; even to-day, by its installation, it causes that impression to those that visit 
this plant, and its product is entirely accepted by the public, as shown by the necessity of 
making some of the enlargements in order to be able to increase the production to attend to the 
demand of the market. 

Now in regard to the liabilities of the company: its consolidated debt amounts to $1,500,- 
000 for the issue of bonds of the First Series in force to-day, having in the company's treasury, 
the rest up to $2,000,000, that is to say, $500,000; we expect that with those bonds and the pro- 
duction of next year we will be able to pay all the other debts of the balance's liabilities, the 
major part of which has been incurred on account of the enlargements and improvements 
made in the factory and by taking care of those that have to be made. 

The balance referred to in this report has been approved, after having been minutely 
analyzed and verified by the examination of all the accoimts and its vouchers, by .Messrs. 
Deloitte, Plender, tJriffiths & Co., of London, accountants of reputation, who perform that 
kind of work for large concerns throughout the world, amongst them in Havana, for the United 
Railways of Havana and the Havana Electric Railway Light & Power Company, by which we 
can be sure that said balance means the true condition of the company. 

We think that the stockholders will be satisfied with the success obtained so far in the 
enterprise, this Board of Directors trusting that it shall be much better in the future, and that 
very soon we will be able to declare dividends on the shares regularly. 

Habana, December 31, 1916. 

General Balance taken on the Slst day oj Deee)nher oj 1916. 

ASSETS 

Properties $2,432,682.41 

Live stock, wagons, utensils, etc 164,002.23 

Cash in hand 81,757.06 

Drafts and collectable bonds 62,753.49 

Raw materials and merchandise in < xistence 193,530.21 

Divers debtors 392,906.28 

Securities advanced 7,455.53 



T li E CUB A 11 !•: \ I !•: w 



-'3 



Deposits 

Invest int lit s in otlu-r coniijaniei 



(•).<).")i.or. 
•20l.:{») 



'r«t;il s;:i:U2.2:i9.63 

LIABILITIES 

Ca])ir;il s 1 ,•_>.-)().()()().()() 

r,.(»()0 shares prefcircd slock at *!()() each oOO.OOO.OO 

7,r)()() sliares coiimiori stock at SlOO each 750,000.00 



Mortgage Ijouds 7';; interest 

4.000 bonds first series at §500 each, rcdcciiiaijje in 1055. 2.000.000.00 
Le.ss: In tlie company's treasiny and not issued 

1,000 Bonds first series at $500 500,000.00 

Divers creditors 

Bills payable 

Bonds payal)le 

Acciunulated interest on bonds 

Deposits as guarantee 

Keserve for the security of bills 

Surplus 



131,135.20 
75,753.43 

152,275.00 

52,500.00 

3,00(i.22 

55,005. (50 

122,564.18 



otal «3,342,239.63 



THE PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 



.Is ,,„„lnl /,// Liur, 



& r, 



Xrir )■„,/:. 



Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% bonds 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944. . . 
Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949. . . 
Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 43^% Bonds of 1949. 



Bid 
92 
98 
92^ 

85 M 



Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 100 

Cuba Railroad Co Preferred Stock 84 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 89 

Cuba Company 6% Debenture Bonds 92 

Cuba Co. 79c Cumulative Preferred Stock 87 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 92 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co., Preferred Stock 104 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co., Common Stock 99 

Matanzas .Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Co., Preferred Stock 100 

Cuban-American Sugar Common Stock 185 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 100 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 59 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st mtge. Q% bonds 90 



A.sked 

94 

99 

93,1^ 

8614 
105 
104 

87 

91 

96 

93 

94 
107 
102 
none 
104 
190 
lOOV^ 

02 

95 



CAMAGUEY 

A bill has been introduced into Congress 
asking for the authorization of the simi of $2,- 
950,000 for improvements and rerairs in the 
roads and water systemof thecityof Camaguey . 
It is proposed to include a proportional appro- 
priation in the national budget for six con- 
secutive years, beginning with the fiscal year 
1917-191S. 



IMPORTED FOODSTUFFS 

By a presidential decree of April 19, 1917, 
the e.vportation from Cuba of all imported 
food ])ro(hicts is prohibited tinless the express 
autliorization of the Coverimient has l)een 
secured in each case. The Treasury Depart- 
ment and the Department of Agriculture, 
Commerce and Labor are intrusted with the 
enforcement of the prohibition. 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



MOLASSES AS CATTLE FEED 

While the farmers of the United States are 
beginning to reahze the value of beet pulp and 
beet tops as a cattle feed, they have almost 
overlooked the value of another important 
by-product of beet and cane sugar manufac- 
ture, namely molasses. It has been estimated 
that sufficient molasses is produced by the 
beet sugar factories alone to supply the mo- 
lasses portion of a balanced ration for almost 
500,000 head of cattle. 

The molasses produced by the cane sugar 
refinery is not the same as that produced by 
the beet sugar factory. Molasses from cane 
contains glucose, while beet molasses is free 
from that sugar, but retains a large percentage 
of salts and other impurities. Cane molasses, 
therefore, enjoys a wide range of usefulness 
for human consumption, while beet molasses is 
especially adapted for use in cattle feeling. 

While there are great variations in the com- 
position of molasses, there have been no in- 
stances recorded where any toxic effects have 
followed molasses feeding. It is true, how- 
ever, that diarrhoea is apt to follow exces- 
sive use, due to the organic salts it contains. 
As this condition might arise in ahnost any 
case where there is an excess of one kind of 
feed, it cannot te justly laid to the use of 
molasses. In view of this the farmer who feeds 
molasses should keep the molasses percentage 
of the ration within limits of a reasonable 
standard, just as he should do with every 
other substance entering into the composi- 
tion. 

Molassic salts are mainly carbonate of 
potassium or sodium and chlorides. They 
contain also lime, sulphuric acid and a small 
percentage of phosphate. The presence of 
these salts, far from being objectionable, is 
rather an advantage. 

The nourishing value of molasses is attri- 
buted to the percentage of its extractive ele- 
ments, which, when compared with its caloric 
power, is very high, and demands an almost 
insignificant amount of physiological work. 
In this particular, sugar has a higher food 
value than other hydrocarbons. Being solu- 
ble in water it does not necessarily demand the 
action of gastric juices or the expenditure of 
latent forces of tlie organism for its assimila- 
tion. It hds also been pointed out that sugar, 



being diffusible, soon passes by osmosis 
through the intestinal tubes, while other non- 
nitrogenous extractive elements, such as 
starch, pentosanes, etc., must undergo many 
modifications lasting for a considerable time 
before assimilation is possible. The osmotic 
action of a sugar solution is very rapid, so 
much so that it is claimed that its complete 
oxygenation is impossible. The blood not 
being forced to supply oxygen necessary for 
its transformation, there results a stored up 
energy for subsequent tissue and fat forma- 
tion. This fact alone gives sugar an advan- 
tage over all other carbohydrates for fat for- 
mation, and hence its value for cattle feeding, 
either as it is found in molasses or in other 
forms that the farmers may have at their dis- 
posal. 

It has been found that molasses added to 
forage is an excellent, healthy and economi- 
cal substance, producing both flesh and fat. — 
J. A. Brock in Facts About Sugar. 



AMERICAN SUGAR-BEET SEED 

Sugar-beet seed of good quality and in 
large quantities must be produced in the 
United States if the highest development of 
the beet-sugar industry in this country is to 
be reached, say plant specialists of the 
United States Department of Agriculture. 
The domestic beet-sugar industry, in which 
more than $100,000,000 is now invested, was 
almost wholly dependent, until the outbreak 
of the war, on a seed supply from Europe. 
Some seed was imported with great difficulty 
for the 1916 planting, but several sugar fac- 
tories remained idle because of the insufficient 
supply. No grave difficulties, it is believed, 
stand in the way of the domestic production 
of high-quality seed sufficient to meet the 
needs of this country. 

The studies of the plant specialists lead 
them to believe that the quality of beet seed 
and of the crops which such seed produce can 
be improved greatly by selection and plant 
breeding, and that as a result the cost of 
production of seed in this country can be 
reduced. They take the view that the first 
step in the development of a permanent 
beet-seed industry here lies in the development 
of true types with reference to both seed 
beets and seed production. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



25 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR REFINERY FOR MUKDEN. MAN- 
CHURIA 

A Japanese sugar refinery is to be estab- 
lished at Mukden. While sugar cane is not 
adapted to the climate of Manchuria and 
there are no sugar beets grown in this region, 
an effort will be made to induce the Chinese 
to grow the latter, and forward contracts 
will be made by the refinery to insure a 
suflicient quantity of beets for sugar manu- 
facture on a large scale. The Manchuria 
Daily News of January 25 quotes Mr. Hashi- 
moto, of the South Manchuria Sugar Refining 
Co., as follows: 

Work on the factory will be started in April 
and we hope to complete it in September and 
to begin manufacture of sugar in October. 
The principal part of the machinery is to be 
ordered from the railway workshops, Sha- 
hokou, and the minor portion from the 
Osaka Iron Works. Their installation will 
be set about as the building work progresses, 
so that it may be completed simultaneously 
with the completion of the construction work. 

Cultivation of Beet to he Fostered. 

As regards the cultivation of beet, two 
plans are on the tapis. One is to buy land 
and raise beet on our own account. The 
other is to enter into contracts with the 
Chinese peasants to undertake the task. In 
the present circumstances the former plan 
is thought rather unwieldly, and it is more 
likely that the latter scheme will be adopted. 
In this respect the arrangements now in 
force for a like factory at Hulan, North 
Manchuria, are to be taken into considera- 
tion in framing the contracts with the peas- 
ants. As to the encouragement of the cul- 
tivation of beet, a good word from the 
landowners and people of local influence 
would serve to much good. We have some 
experience in Formosa on this point and 
stand in a position to profit thereby. 

As regards seed beet, a German species is 
held as the best. However, it being impos- 
sible to import it from Germany direct, we 
intend to procure German species from 
Southern Europe. As the Manchurian peas- 
ants must be strangers to beet, we expect 
that some difficulty will be encountered in 
breaking them into the knack of its culti- 
vation. However, such difficulty will be 
met with only in the first year. The refining 
of sugar may be taken up about January 
next year. For raw material either Japanese 
or Formosan sugar may be imported, as the 
price may suit us better. 

Some years ago a sugar refinery was 
plarmed in northern Manchuria. A con- 
siderable amount of Chinese capital was 



raised for the purpose, and German ma- 
chinery was purchased and installed. Fi- 
nancial and other difl^cultics, however, were 
encountered, and the operations proved 
unsuccessful. — Consul-General Baker, Muhhn . 



SUGAR NEEDS IN ARGENTINA 

Following the acceptance by the Argentine 
Government of the bids for the special im- 
portation of sugar, the bidder for the largest 
amount failed to produce the required 
security and this necessitated another call 
for bids. The bids received in response to 
the second call represented a total of 22,000 
tons of sugar, instead of the 60,000 tons de- 
sired, and the definite bids resulting from the 
two calls amounted to only 37,000 tons, or 
about half of the Government's original esti- 
mate of the country's needs. The conditions 
of the second call, as published in the Boletin 
Oficial, were similar to those of the first call, 
the reduced duties for the special importation 
of sugar being retained at 2}^ Argentine cents 
gold per kilo for the refined, and J^ cent 
for the raw sugar, without the bonus, and 
with the limitation of 4.10 paper pesos per 
10 kilos as the maximum wholesale price of 
the sugar in Argentina. Argentine gold peso 
equals 96.5 cents; paper peso equals 42.4 
cents; kilo equals 2.2046 pounds. 

The Revista de Economia y Finanzas be- 
lieves that the failure to secure acceptable 
bids for the importat'on of 75,000 tons of 
sugar is evidence that not so large an amount 
will be needed before the new crop of cane 
makes domestic sugar available, somet'me in 
May. The sugar produced in Argentina last 
year was about half the normal consumption, 
but as practically no sugar was exported in 
1916, and as certain stocks were held over 
the previous year, it is not improbable that 
the bids received under this last call will pro- 
vide a sufficient quantity until the domestic 
sugar can be put on the market. 



BRITISH INDIA 



The total estimate of the yield of raw sugar 
for 1917 was placed at 2,626,000 tons. On this 
basis, the average yield per acre would be 
2,437 lbs., as compared Avith an average of 
2,468 lbs. for 1916. 



-26 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR IN EASTERN BOLIVIA 

Sugar cane grows luxuriantly in eastern 
Bolivia, attaining a great height, and the crop 
is seldom injured by frost. The cultivation is 
conducted in the most primitive manner. The 
land is cleared and the undergrowth burned, 
the tree trunks that cannot be made into 
firewood being left to rot in the ground. The 
planting is done by jaljl)ing oblique holes with 
a long sharpened stake, about 3 feet apart, 
and inserting a piece of cane. The cane soon 
sprouts, after which the ground has to be 
cleared of weeds. The weeding must be re- 
peated until the cane is tall enough to smother 
tlie weeds. The gro\md is never plowed or 
irrigated, the cultivation consists simply of 
destroying the weeds, which is all done by 
hand labor with a small native pushing hoe. 

In about 10 months the cane is ripe and 
ready for cutting. Two or three weeks after 
cutting the cane leaves are dry enough to burn, 
when fire is applied and the whole field burned 
off. The cane roots soon sprout again, and 
the same weeding operations have to be gone 
through as in the previous year. This pro- 
cess is continued year after year until the 
field has to be replanted. This replanting is re- 
peated three or four times, when the ground 
become exhausted and the field is then aban- 
doned and the planter changes to new 
ground. 

Sugar is made by Ijoiling the cane juice in a 
copper cauldron until it becomes of the proper 
consistenc}', when it is transferred to earthen- 
ware crocks with a hole at the bottom for the 
molasses to drain from. The refining is done 
by the claying process. The m,olasses is 
made into alcohol. 

Wooden Mills in Use. 

Many planters still use the antiquated 
wooden sugar mills, and most of the iron mills 
in use are operated by anim.al power. Owing 
to the immense cost of transportation in east- 
ern Bolivia, even a comparatively small steam 
mill requires considerable capital to buy, im- 
port, and install, besides having to wait at 
least a year from the date of ordering imtil it 
is set up and in working order. Another rea- 
son for using the old mills is that the native 
planter has no love for machinery, and is, in 
-consequence, ignorant respecting it, and either 



cannot or will not learn anything about a 
steam engine. There are only 15 steam power 
sugar mills in all eastern Bolivia. The animal 
power mills are generally worked by means of 
oxen. 

During the year 1914 Bolivia imiwrted 
8,500 tons of sugar, valued at £200,000 
(roughly, $1,000,000), for consumption in the 
western Departments. Even under the pres- 
ent disadvantages of transportation all this 
sugar could have been produced in the Depart- 
ment of Santa Cruz.^Bonid of Trade JouriinJ. 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED 
PROVINCES 

The cultivation of the sugar-cane in tliis 
part of India presents very diiTerent problems 
to those encountered in the West Indies. 
In India, sugar-cane occupies the land only 
about one-half the time that it does in the 
West Indies, and after the crop is established 
it has to carry through a period of drought 
that is by no means conducive to high 
yields. Very often dry weather and the 
attack of white ants seriously interfere with 
germination, and this is often one of the 
causes of the low tonnage per acre. Provided 
irrigation can be carried on during the hot 
or dry period, the climatic conditions in the 
United Provinces are otherwise favorable 
in a general way for excellent growth. 

The reason for the small return of sugar 
seems to lie more in the preparation of the 
sugar than in the composition of the cane or 
the milling. The ])rincipal loss occurs during 
boiling owing to the fact that no care is taken 
to avoid acidity. 

The great diffic\ilty that has to be faced 
in making any attempt to organize cane grow- 
ing on the central factory basis is that the 
fields of cane are so small and scattered. 
Moreover, the cultivator cannot afford to 
devote all his attention to sugar-cane, he 
has to grow food crops, and this of necessity 
means a limited amount of production. 

Considering the fact that most of the 
sugar-cane soUs have been continuously 
cropped for himdreds of generations without 
adequate manuring, it is surprising that 
growers are able to obtain the j'ields they do 
under the circumstances.— .4(7rirM'/)/ra/ News, 
Barbados. 



T HE CUBA R E V I E W 



27 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



THE SUGAR MARKET AT RIO DE JANEIRO 

A retrospective view of the suj^ar market of 
Kio de Janiero chiriiip; 191() sliows that in this 
article as in many others, l^ra/il has profited 
by conditions brought about l)y Ihc lluropcaii 
war. 

While the foreign markets did not order 
as heavily, perha])s, as some i)eo])le had 
expected, relativel}' large quantities of Braz- 
ilian sugars were placed abroad and a 
considerable amount of money was made 
by growers here in exporting. The market 
prices within the coimtry remained low and 
therefore favorable for export transactions. 

Ex]3orters are looking forward to in- 
creased shipments during 1917, although it 
would seem that this will l)e governed largely 
])y the conditions of the domestic markets, as, 
so far as maj- be judged, the actual produc- 
tion of the country has not been perceptibly 
intensified nor increased. 

Lack of Proper StatisHcs. 

In this connection the Associacao Commer- 
cial (Board of Trade) of Rio de Janeiro has 
once more pointed out that the lack of care- 
ful national crop statistics, and of statistics of 
domestic manufacturer and production gen- 
erally, makes it almost impossible in Brazil to- 
day to show any foresight, or to take any 
active measures to control and direct a mar- 
ket, or to make it profit by any exceptionallj^ 
good foreign conditions that may arise. The 
only statistics that the Republic appears to 
have of this sort are those of the consimio tax 
(internal-revenue tax on manufacture, pro- 
duction and consiunption) and these figures 
are not shown in their entirety bj^ pubUcation. 

The attempt made in November, 1916, to 
direct exports toward Argentina was a failure 
because of the low prices prevailing in that 
market. This, however, did not discourage 
the growers and those of northern Brazil and 
of Campos renaained firm in their ])olicy of 
careful releasings, so as to keep the market on 
their side and export as niuch as possible to 
Europe. 

Russia Expected to he an Important Market. 

It is expected that during 1917 Russia will 
prove to be a valuable market. It is expected 
that in 1917 that country may require 1,400, •■ 



000 tons, or 23,S00,000 l)ags, as bags of sugar 
figure in Brazil. 

During 1916 the total entries of sugars into 
Rio de Janeiro amounted to 1,. 542,(194 bags, 
of 'which 1,488,701) bags were either con- 
sumed locally or shipped abroad, leaving in 
warehouse on December 31, 1916, 371,9SZ 
bags. Sergipe, Maceio, Pernambuco, Santa 
Catharina, Campos, Bahia, Espirito .Santo 
Parahyba, Xatal and Minas Geraes were the 
chief remitting points to Rio de Janeiro. — 
Consul General Alfred 1. Moreau Coltsrhalk^ 
Rio de Janeiro. 



INDIA'S SUGAR YIELD 

The Inilian Department of Statistics has 
issued its final general memorandum on the 
sugar cane crop of 1916-17, basing its cal- 
culations upon reports received from Prov- 
inces that contain 99 per cent, of the area 
under cane in British India. As given in the 
Indian (Government) Trade Journal, the 
total area is estimated at 2,414,000 acres, as 
against 2,391,000 acres, the revised figure of 
last year, showing an increase of 1 per cent. 
The total yield of raw sugar (gur) is estimated 
at 2,626,000 long tons, as against 2,634,000 
tons, the revised figure of last year, or a 
decrease of 0.3 per cent. 

In addition to the areas embraced in these 
totals, sugar is grown on a small scale in 
certain other tracts in British India, and the 
average area of such tracts for the last five 
years has been some 23,000 acres. An addi- 
tion of approximately 1 per cent., or 2.5,000 
tons, should therefore be made to the total 
estimatetl yield on this account. 

Of the total area under sugar cane in 
British India, the United Provinces are 
credited with 53.2 per cent.; the Punjab 
with 15.3 per cent.; Bihar and Orissa, 11 
per cent.; Bengal, 9.4 per cent.; Madras, 3.8 
per cent.; Bombay and Sind, 2.7 per cent.; 
Assam, 1.5 per cent.; Xorthwest Frontier 
Province, 1.3 per cent., and the Central 
Provinces and Berar, 0.9 per cent. 



GUADALOUPE 



The latest estimate placed on the sugar crop 
of 1916-1917 states that it will be approxi- 
mately 45,000 short tons, which is larger than 
last j^ear. 



28 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



HONGKONG SUGAR TRADE 

For the first time in many years, if not in 
the history of the trade, Hongkong's output 
of refined sugar went principally to Europe dur- 
ing the past year. The unlimited demand for 
sugar in that market was met by an unusually 
short demand in China, due to several causes. 
About two-thirds of the entire output of the 
refineries went to Europe and an unusually 
large portion of the high-grade raw sugar 
went in that direction. However, the sugar 
trade of Hongkong and its relation to that of 
China and the Far East was rather unsatisfac- 
tory during 1916. Present prospects are that 
the current year will be better, and also that 
the improved situation will work largely to 
the benefit of the Philippines. 

Imports during the past year were far below 
norm.al, being placed by local dealers at only 
about 324,000 short tons, as compared with 
al)out 670,000 tons in 1915 and similar amounts 
in normal years. Of these imports 234,000 tons 
were from Java, 79,260 tons from the Philip- 
pines and 6,740 tons were from the lower 
Chinese coast and about 4,030 tons were from 
Formosa. The refineries exported about 80,- 
'000 short tons of refined sugar, of which about 
85 per cent was Java sugar, the rest Ijeing 
Philippine. Of the 80,000 tons of refined 
sugar exported, Europe took about 55,000 
tons, the United States about 525 tons, and 
Chinese and various ports the balance. 

Of the raw sugar exported, about 30 per 
cent went to Japanese factories, while the rest 
went to Chinese and European ports direct. 
Much of the decrease in the trade is ascribed 
to political conditions in China and the im- 
possibility of distributing sugar even where the 
people had the money to buy it. High freight 
rates also were a factor, but it is recognized 
also that Japanese refineries have cut into 
the Hongkong trade, both in China and else- 
where, very materially. At the close of the 
year there was on hand a stock of about 25,000 
tons. Hongkong importers are of the opinion 
that because of a lack of freight service from 
the Philippines to the United States and 
Europe, while Java is comparatively well 
served, the import of Philippine raw sugar into 
Hongkong the current year will be much 
larger than usual. — Consul General Geoige E. 
Anderson, Hongkong. 



PORTO RICO SUGAR 

Up to March 4 there had been shipped from 
the new sugar crop 106,283 tons of sugar, or 
somewhat more than 20 per cent, of the 
estimated crop for the year, which has been 
placed at slightly in excess of 500,000 tons 
of 2,000 pounds each. 

Since the beginning of the grinding season 
weather conditions have been favorable for 
grinding, but continued dry weather has 
somewhat retarded growing cane. Recovery 
of sugar from the cane has been considered 
generally satisfactory, but the tormage of 
cane to the acre has been about 20 per cent, 
short of general estimates, due to poor grow- 
ing conditions during most of last year. 
Despite the shortage in cane, however, it 
is expected that, due to a greater recovery 
of sugar from the cane, the total production 
will come up to estimates made at the first 
of the crop. 

There have been comparatively few agri- 
cultural strikes during the sugar season so 
far, although several centrals in the eistem 
section of the island have been closed down 
for varying periods. Wages have been higher 
than in previous years, and in many in- 
stances centrals have promised bonuses at 
the end of the crop in the event they had no 
strikes during the working season. The 
general demand for $1 a day for an eight 
hour day has not been generally granted, al- 
though in many instances the wages are con- 
siderably higher than that. 

The grinding season will run into July. — 
Harwood Hull, San Juan. 



DENMARK'S BEET SUGAR PRODUCTION. 

The returns from the Statistical Bureau of 
Denmark, just published, indicate that the 
production of sugar from beets for the cal- 
endar year 1916 amounted to 112,800 tons, 
compared with 125,200 tons in 1915. The 
area sown to sugar-producing beets was nor- 
nal, but the yield of sugar was less. 

The consumption of sugar has been steadily 
increasing, expecially since 1909. The use of 
sugar per inhabitant in 1916 is put at 103 
pounds as against only 88 pounds in 1914. 
This estimate takes in the industrial and pri- 
vate use of the article.— Co«su( General E. D. 
Wi7is'ow, Copenhagen. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



29 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



SUGAR IN SAO PAULO 

The cultivation of sugar pane is one of the 
oldest industries in tlie State of Sao Paulo, 
and 50 years ago the exportation of cane 
sugar was of greater importance than that of 
cofTci-, while in 1825 it represented 50 per 
cent of the exportation of the State. 

In recent j^ears, the industrj' has again 
come into importance through the in- 
creased local demand and the advantage 
sugar produced in the State has over that im- 
ported from other parts of the Republic in the 
way of lower charges and freedom from certain 
imposts levied by the exporting States. 
Furthermore, improved methods in the sugar 
mills have contributed much to the rehabilita- 
tion of the industry, the mills in the cities of 
Piracicabu, Capivary, Lorena, Santa Rosa, 
and Santa Barbara being of the m.ost modern 
type. 

Impurln of Sugar Through Satilos. 

In spite of the increased output of sugar 
in the State, it is still necessary to import con- 
siderable quantities from other parts of the 
Republic. In 1914 there was a to.al of 164,- 
015,092 pounds im.ported from other states, 
and in 1915, 139,723,784 pounds. 

The part of the State where sugar cane is 
most cultivated is that which is nearest Rio 
de Janeiro, in the arm lying between the 
State of Minas Geraes and the sea, the crop 
being the most profitable one that can be 
Taised in that territory. It has been found, 
however, that a locality in the northern part of 
the State in the parishes of Ribeirao Preto 
and Sao Simao is best adapted to its culture, 
but owing to the fact that the land in this 
region produces larger returns when planted to 
coflFee, the sugar industry naturally receives 
little attention, although as m.uch as 35 tons 
per acre has been produced there. 

Co.sl of Production. 

The average production per acre in the 
regions where it is most cultivated averages 
about 15 tons. The average cost of pro- 
ducing sugar cane is about $2.50 per ton, 
although it is reported to be as low as $1 per 
ton in one locaUty and as high as $3 in of ers. 
Field hands working in sugar can receive 
about 75 cents per daj' and the workers in the 
mills receive about §1.25 per day. The sac- 



charine content fluctuates between 9° and U° 
B. The percentage of saccharose varies from 
10 to 18 per cent, according to locality and the 
weather. The production of rum per 100 gal- 
Ions of molasses varies from 32 to 40 gallons. 

Output of the Sugar Mills. 

There are 15 large mills in the State that 
have a capitalization of $4,000,000 and a pro- 
ductive capacity of about 600,000 sacks of 
132 pounds each, or 39,600 short tons per 
year. The production has never reached this 
figure, however, the output for the five years 
beginning with the 1910-11 season having 
been as follows, in short tons: 1910-] 1, 26,306; 
1911-12, 28,401; 1912-13, 27,365; 1913-141 
26,806, and 1914-15, 35,659 tons. 

The statistics for the 1915-16 crop are not 
yet available, but the production is officially 
estimated at 37,620 tons. The principal fac- 
tories belong to a French company. 

In addition to these factories there are some 
3,000 small mills operated by planters. These 
mills produce only unrefined kettle sugar and 
rum, and no statistics as to their output are 
available, but inasmuch as this raw sugar en- 
ters quite extensively into strictly local com- 
merce the amount produced probably equals 
that of the large mills. 

The large mills also produce considerable 
quantities of alcohol and rum, the amounts in 
1914-15 having been 1,076,997 gallons of alco- 
hol and 61,136 gallons of rum. The produc- 
tion of both articles for the entire State in 1914- 
15, including both the factories and the small 
mills, was 30,056,898 gallons. — Consul General 
Charles L . Hoover, Sao Paulo. 



CUBA'S SOIL 



The International Sugar Journal oi London, 
in the April number, comments forcefully on 
the present method of cane cultivation in 
Cuba. According to this authority the 
wisdom of the methods adopted in Cuba 
of working the virg'n soil to more or less 
exhaustion does not allow any regard to the 
needs of a future generation of tillers. Cuba's 
vast forest lands are rapidly being depleted 
and planted to cane; therefore, after a lapse 
of time the Cuba cane planters will face a 
serious problem, those of the Western part of 
Cuba first, because the Eastern end of Cuba 
still possesses vast tracts of forest land. 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CANE TRANSPORTATION IN PORTO RICO 



The conditions showni in the accompanying ilhistrations-will. in a measxire, account for the 
fact, in eight years, Porto Rico has ahiiost doubled its export of sugar, the figures for 1909 
showing 244,257 long tons exported, while for 1917 the estimated figures up to Mareh 81 are 
412,000 long tons. 

The figures given indicate not only a big increase in acreage l)ut also improved methods of 
handling the cane. 

These scenes were photographed at Central Constancia, Toa Baja, P. R. This plantation 
is the property of the well known Compania Azucarera del Toa, San Juan. Under the presi- 
dency of Don Rafael Palacios Apellaniz, this company is kno^vn as one of the best managed 
sugar concerns in Uncle Sam's island domain. 




Fig. i shows a heavy Koppel locomotive of 110 H. P. hauling a train of seventy-five sugar 
cane cars of 114 ton capacity each. These cars are of specially heavy construction and have 
been in service for a considerable period with highly satisfactory results. Although these cars 
are rated at 13^ tons capacity, their construction permits a much heavier load. 




Fig. 2 shows some Koppel side dunip cars used for road construction in the \icinity of 
Central Constancia. In this work the motive power is furnished by oxen since the intermittent 
operation of the cars would not justifj- the expenses of a locomotive for this work alone. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



31 



ThcHe dump oars in cHpiicities of IS, 20, 27 or 36 cubic feet are extensively used in connec- 
tion with Koppel Portable Track for road construction work, transporting building material, 
fuel, etc., and are generally employed to run on Ko])i)('I jjortablc track, a pile of which appears 
just back of and between the two dump cars. 

There is a r.ii)idly increasing demand for industrial railways and various t>7)es of cane and 
dump cars in Porto ]lico and many inquiries have been made (•(niccriiing locomotives earn 
track, etc., for the comiag season. 

This active demand for modern cane handling c(iui])m('nt, the construction of new planta- 
tion roads and the imi)rovemeut of the old roads, when considered in connection with the present 
condition of world sugar demand, point to an unprecedented period of profitable activity in 
Porto Rican sugar circles. 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS 

Till Danish We.^t Indies, by Waldemar 
AVestergaard, jjublished by the .Macmillan 
Co., New York. Price, $2..5(). 

This book furnishes in r.nidable form such 
information as Americans will wish to pos- 
sess concerning the Danish West Indies. The 
author discusses the administration of the 
Danish West India & Guinea Co. from 1671- 
1754 and then traces the history of the islands 
from 1754, from which date they were gov- 
erned directly by Denmark, to 1917, when they 
became the property of the United States 
through purchase. Throughout, economic 
matters are emphasized, though the more 
picturesque incidents are also included, such 
as the exploits of the buccaneers and pirates, 
even those of Ividd. 

There are very interesting descriptions of 
the i)roduction of sugar and the crude 
methods of refining in use in early times. 
The writer explains carefully the workings of 
the sugar industry and traces its decline as a 
result of the exhaustion of the soil, the devel- 
opment of the beet sugar process, and the 
labor shortage caused by the abolition of the 
slave trade. The author then shows how in 
recent years, more efficient and advanced 
methods have brought tip the production of 
sugar to where it was before its decline. The 
fact that this has been done from a smaller 
area of cultivation shows that the industry 
is to assimie a more important part. 

The work is based on extended research in 
Danish archives and will be of interest to, and 
valued by, the casual reader as well as the 
student. 



Walter A. Zelnieker Supply Comi)aiiy 
m St. Louis, announce the recent appoint- 
ment of Mr. Karl W. Bock as manager. 

Mr. Bock has been, for the last ten years, 
secretary of, and assistant to, the vice- 
I resident of the Union Pacific Coal Com- 
pany and subsidiary coal companies, lo- 
cated at Omaha, Nebraska. 



The Walter A. Zelnieker Supply Co. an- 
nounce that they have secured the services 
of Mr. M,\ H. Dayton as city salesman. 

.Mr. Dayton was formerly with the Rail- 
road Supply Co., Chicago, m., as secretary 
and jurchasing agent; also their eastern rep- 
resentative for five years. He came to St. 
L'ouis seven years ago representing the same 
firm and that of the Chicago Signal & Supply 
Co., and the Elyria Iron & Steel Co., manu- 
facturers of signal and track maintenance 
materials. 

TheWalter A. Zelnieker Supply Company 
and affiliated companies are now represented 
in the Birmingham district by Mr. Thomas 
A. Hamilton, who for the past fourteen years 
has been connected with Crane Company, 
prior to which he was superintendent of the 
East St. Louis Plant of the Zelnieker Car 
Works. .Mr. Hamilton will have charge of 
both buyin-r and selling in the southeastern 
territory. 

Mr. Hamilton's office will be at 1018 Wood- 
ward Building, Birmingham, Alabama. 



Pre>ident Menocal has signed a decree plac- 
ing a credit of .'$20,000 at the disposal of the 
Department of Public Works for the con- 
struction of a road from Zulueta to Placetas. 



NEW YORK CHARTER 

Honduras and Buffalo Corp., Buffalo, 
realty and cultivation of same in Honduras, 
operate lumber mills, manufacturing, sugar 
cane, &c., $10,000; H. Yates, E. B. Stevens, 
J. F. Smith, Buffalo. 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



CUBA BUYS AMERICAN PAPER 
Cuba imported $3,300,000 worth of paper 
in 1916 and American maufacturers fur- 
nished over 70 per cent of that total, accord- 
ing to a bulletin issued by the Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce. This 
trade has been growing rapidly in recent 
months and from all indication has not yet 
reached its limit. 

A large share of the new business and of 
the business formerly going to Germany has 
come to the United States, but unless un- 
usual care is taken there will be a tendency 
to return to old sources of supply when the 
war is over. Special Agent Robert S. Barrett, 
author of the report, believes that prepara- 
tion for the future is quite as important as 
getting orders today. 

Spain and Norway are the next most im- 
portant sources of supply after the United 
States, but Spain is not really a competitor, 
as its exports to Cuba consist principally of 
handmade writing paper and cigarette paper 
with which American manufacturers are ap- 
parently unable to compete. Norway is an 
active competitor in news, print and wrapping 
paper and the exports from that country are 
likely to increase as soon as normal shipping 
conditions are restored. The trade that Ger- 
many formerly had, consisting largely of 
coated book paper, envelopes, wrapping paper, 
cardboard, and lithographic goods, amounting 
to $250,000 a year, has gone principally to the 
United States, although in lithographic 
goods England has increaed its sales $25,000, 
since Germany disappeared from the market. 



CONTAINERS 
The only provision in the Cuban tariff law 
whereby free admission can be secured for 
receptacles to be used as containers for the ex- 
portation of national products is that con- 
tained in item 323 of the customs tariff. Ac- 
cording to this item, receptacles exported from 
Cuba with fruits, sugar, molasses, honey, 
spirituous liquors, alcohol, coconut oil, and 
cordage oil are exempt from duty upon proof 
of identity when reimported empty. It is 
stated by Cuban officials that this applies 
only to containers such as acid drums, which 
can be so marked as to be readily identified 
upon subsequent reimportation. No ex- 
emption is allowed for labels of any kind. 
The practice in this matter has become firmly 



established, and it is understood that no re- 
ductions, exemptions or concessions will be 
granted. It is expected that there will be es- 
tablished industries able to satisfy the de- 
mand for tin cans, and there are already suf- 
ficient facilities for the printing of labels of 
all kinds. 

WALTER A. ZELNICKER SUPPLY COMPANY 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
the Walter A. Zelnicker Supply Co., St. 
Louis, held April 19th, Mr. A. R. Topping 
was elected Secretary of the Company. Mr. 
Topping has been associated with this Com- 
pany for the past eleven years. 

The Walter A. Zelmicker Supply Company, 
St. Louis, and allied companies have secured 
the services of Mr. Charles H. Trapp, who is 
to act as confidential secretary to Mr. Zel- 
nicker, the president. Mr. Trapp was for- 
merly associated with James Stewart and 
Company in St. Louis, Denver and Idaho, 
and lately with Mr. Terrell Croft, Consulting 
Electrical Engineer, St. Louis. 

The Weaker A. Zelnicker Supply Co. has 
issued a Bulletin for May, No. 215, which 
gives a list of rails, cars and other iron and 
steel products Avhich they have in stock. 
Copies of this may be obtained on application 
to the Walter A. Zelnicker Supply Co., St. 
Louis, Mo. 

RIVERA, MARTINEZ Y TORRE, S. EN C. 

Messrs. Juan F. Rivera, Rafael Martinez 
and Manuel de la Torre have formed a cor- 
poration known as Rivera, Martinez y Torre 
S. en C, Obrapia No. 23, Havana, to engage 
in the business of the purchase and sale of 
sugar. 

AMERICAN CHEWING GUM 

The following table shows the value of 
American chewing gum exported to Cuba for 
the fiscal years ending June 30, 1912, 1913^ 
1914, 1915, 1916, and for the 9 months ending 
March 31, 1917: 

Fiscal years ending June 30 

1912 $3,234 

1913 3,661 

1914 3,441 

1915 18,766 

1916 ».979 

9 months ending Mar. 31, 1917.. . 17,213 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

Rmda de In Sociednd Cuhana de Irigcnicrofi, 
jniblisliod at Havana, Cuba. The May mnn- 
])er of tliis publication contains a full descrip- 
tion of tlic proposed national capitol, to be 
erected on the site of the present Presidential 
palace. The illustrations of this article 
include the elevation of the front of the 
buildingr, principal entrance, and ground plan 
of the building. It is estimated that the cost 
of the construction alone of this l:)uilding will 
amount to $2,160,1.52.29. This does not 
include the proposed improvements of the 
grounds, wliich will amoimt to 1100.000. 



Brazil Today and Tomorrow, by L. E. Elliott, 
Literary Editor of the Pan American Maga- 
zine, published by the Macmillan Co., 
New York. Price, $2.25. 
The author of this book first discusses 
pre.sent social conditions in Brazil, explain- 
ing who the Brazilian is, what political and 
social events have moulded him and what he 
has done to develop his territory. Finance, 
the monetary conditions of the coimtry, the 
problem of exchange, the source of income, 
the various means of transit and the indus- 
tries are then considered in succeeding chap- 
ters. Altogether the work is a complete and 
extensive survey of Brazil today, and a strik- 
ing forecast of the country's future, written 
by one who has spent many years in South 
America and whose knowledge is based on 
personal study of conditions and tendencies 
there. 



LINK-BELT CO. 

This company has issued a hanger printed 
in colors, on which is reproduced a portion of 
President Wilson's proclamation which is of 
particular interest to manufacturers at the 
present time. The Link-Belt Company will 
be pleased to send a copy of this to anj'one 
who will write to the Chicago office. 

Traveling Water Screens for Condenser In- 
takes, Book No. 305, published by the Link- 
Belt Co., Chicago, 111. This booklet con- 
tains a paper by Henry J. Edsall which gives 
much information on the proper methods of 
obtaining water for condensers, and the neces- 
sity for using proper screens. The article is 
well illustrated with half-tones and diagrams. 

Blue Diamond Coal Company's Tipple, pub- 
hshed by the Link-Belt Co., Chicago, III. 
This booklet contains illustrations and de- 
scriptions of the plant at Cardiff, Ky. 



The Ideal Drive for Grain Elevators, Book No- 
309, published by the Link-Belt Co., Chicago, 
III. This hook contains full descriptions of the 
Link-Belt Silent Chain Drive, with various 
types of installations. 

ImrcasliKj Profile by Sanng Expenses in 
the HnmUing and Storing of Coal and Ashes, 
Book No. 304, i)ublished by the Link-Belt 
Co., Chicago, 111. This is a full descriptive 
paper })y Henry J. Edsall, with illustrations 
and diagrams. 

Some Modern Coal Tipples, Book No. 303, 
pul)lished by the Link-Belt Co., Chicago, 111. 
This paper, by Henry J. Edsall, M.E., is illus- 
trated fully and exjjlains the essentials of a 
well constructed tipple. 

Link-Belt Wagon and Truck Loaders, Book 
No. 270, issued by the Link-Belt Co., Chicago, 
111. This book is handsomely illustrated 
and contains much infonnation in regard to 
machinery specially built for handling coal,, 
coke, stone, sand, fertilizer and similar loose 
materials from storage. 

The Ideal Drive for Cement Mill Equipment, 
Book No. 253, issued by the Link-Belt Co. 
This booklet is descriptive of the Link-Belt 
Silent Chain Drive as applied to the operation 
of cement machinerj\ 

Link-Belt Silent Chain, Book No. 125, 
issued by the Link-Belt Co. This book is de- 
voted to a description of the Link-Belt Silent 
Chain as a medium for the transmission of 
power. The company furthermore calls at- 
tention to the fact that the Engineering De- 
partment is always at the service of clients 
and is prepared to give further infonnation in 
regard to this apparatus. 

Link-Belt and Sprocket Wheels for Satumills, 
Book No. 260, issued by the Link-Belt Co. 
This books describes those classes of Link- 
Belt most commonly used in Saw Mills, and 
presents only a few of the many varieties that 
they are prepared to supply. 

The Ideal Drive Jor Textile Machinery, Book 
No. 258, published by the Link-Belt Co., 
Chicago, 111. This book describes and illus- 
trates the Link-Belt Silent Chain Drive, which 
has proven very successful in the Textile In- 
dustry. 



Copies of any of the above publication may 
be obtained on application to the Link-Belt 
Co., Chicago, Philadelphia, Indianapolis. 



34 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



FORMOSAN SUGAR 

Present indications are that the large sugar 
crop in Formosa, which is reported by all 
authorities as the largest in the history of the 
Island and actually in excess of the opti- 
mistic estimates made several months ago, 
will affect the entire sugar business in F^ong- 
kong for the current season. The Formosan 
•crop is placed by sugar authorities at about 
6,600,000 piculs, or about 440,000 short tons. 
On this large crop, Japan draws for much of 
its domestic supply, and the excess is sold 
abroad. In this case it is sold largely to Cen- 
tral and North China, and these territories 
have been peculiarly the field for Hongkong 
sugar refineries for many years. The result is 
that Japanese refineries and sugar exporters 
with their advantage in cheap freights and 
short hauls are shutting the Hongkong con- 
cerns out of the Chinese market. So far 
the China market, for the Hongkong refineries, 
is practically dead. 

The situation is not promising for the con- 
sumption of the large Philippine sugar crop 
in the East, but the general course of sugar 
production seems to indicate that there will 
be a considerable supply available in the Orient 
for distribution elsewhere, if freight accommo- 
dations can be had at a reasonable rate. 
Freight accommodations are working to the 
advantage of Java sugar, so far as the United 
States is concerned, while they work to the ad- 
vantage of Formosan and Japanese producers 
in the trade in China. The Philippines and 
its big crop suffer disadvantage either way. 

Imports oj Raw Sugar. 

So far this season, the Hongkong re- 
fineries have imported about 900,000 piculs, or 
about 60,000 short tons, of raw sugar, which 
is considerably below the usual purchases. 
Of these imports, subtantially one-half have 
come from Java and the remainder from the 
Philippines and Formosa in about equal 
amounts. Formosa sugar has been coming 
into this market in greater quantities than 
«ver. Imports of sugar by Chinese dealers 
from all sources have been much below nor- 
mal, but of these imports those from Formosa 
have been larger than usual. All sugar 
authorities in the Far East, however, report 
slight movement in the trade compared with 
what the large crops demand. So far as 
China is concerned, the present range of prices 



is too high for normal consumption. It is 
probable that a considerable outlet for the 
surplus stocks will be found in European 
countries. — Com nl GeneralGeorge E. A nder.-^on, 
Hongkong. 



IMPURITIES IN RAW SUGAR 

The International Sugar Journal for June, 
1917, contains an interesting and unusual 
article concerning raw sugar as imported into 
Great Britain, in which the statement is 
made that the question was raised as to the 
advisability of placing certain semi-refined 
Java and Cuban sugars on the market for 
direct consumption. The Food Controllers' 
Department replied that owing to the large 
amount of impurities contained in sugar of 
this class it was unfit for consumption in its 
raw state. The Department further claimed 
that the impurities found consisted of sand, 
clay, specimens of the sugar louse, and iron, 
which latter element made it unfit for the pre- 
serving of fruits. The Journal then asserts 
that these claims have caused considerable 
sm-prise to the sugar world in general, inas- 
much as these foreign constituents have been 
found only in certain low grades, such as 
Ilo-Ilo, which in normal times are never put 
into consumption. Formerly, such charges 
might have been wholly substantiated, but in 
recent times, such improvements have been 
made in the process of refining, that one must 
refuse to believe that the average run of 
Cuban centrifugals is unsuitable for use as a 
grocery sugar. If these charges are upheld 
in the majority of cases, which would not 
seem to be the fact, judging from the experi- 
ence of the trade, the high standard of pro- 
duction must have been lowered to a con- 
siderable extent. 



NEW SUGAR ESTATE IN SANTO DqMINGO 
A company capitalized at $200,000 and in- 
corporated under the laws of the State of New 
York was recently organized for the purpose 
of opening up and developing a new sugar es- 
tate in the Dominican Republic. It has pur- 
chased about 80,000 acres of virgin land in 
the Barahona district, embracing territory on 
both sides of the Yaque River of the south 
near its outlet. 

While the character of the region is desert, 
the soil is considered very productive and 
pe -uliarly adapted to the cultivation of sugar 



THE C U n A K E \ 1 E W 35 



cane. Tho jjiofitahlc dovolopiiiont of this Yaquc Kivor, which is the only available 
enterprise will depend largely, however, \ipon source from which the nccesssary water can 
the successful installation of a system of irri- be secured. It is planned to utilize the 
gation, elaborate plans for which are now "Laguna Kincon," which is situated a short 
under contemplation. A force of engineers is distance west of the river, as a reservoir, and 
on the grotmd engaged inmaking the necessary it is estimated that the work necessary to in- 
preliminary surveys, and it is expected that as stall this system and prepare the estate for 
soon as their work has been sufliciently ad- the purpose tho company has in mind wil 
vanced a formal ai)plication will be made to involve an outlay of $I,();)b,0:)9 to $1, .500,001) 
the Covermiieiit for i)er.i ission to tap the —Consul ClmKi, I S. Eihniuh, SntdoDnminqi, 



SUGAR REVIEW 



!-inci'ill!i written for The Cuba Renew hi/ Willelt tt (irty, Xew York, .V. Y. 

Our last review for this magazine was dated June 8, 1917. 

At that date Cuba centrifugal sugar of 96° test basis was quoted at 4%c. per lb. cost and 
freight and is now 5 He. showing net advance of %c. per lb. during the time under review. 
Sugar from store and August shipments from Cuba sold up to 53^c. c. & f. on June 2«th. 

The changes in the quotations were as follows: June 8th, 4J^c.; 20th, 4 15 16c.; 
25th, 5c.; 26th, 5i^c.; 27th, SJ^c; 28th, 53^c.; 29th, 53^c. The 5J^c. c. <K: f. spot quotatiori 
remains nominally unchange 1 although the tone and tendency of the market th(> past few 
days has been towards an easier condition. 

The Finance Committee of the U. S. Senate has reported the revenue bill to the Senate 
where it is now being considered for final action there before the Bill goes back to the House of 
Representatives for confirmation or conference. As reported to the Senate the Bill calls for the 
rescinding of the present drawback of Ic. per lb. allowed on all sugar exports and imposes an 
excise or internal revenue tax of l^c. per lb. on all raw and refined sugar delivered for con.sump- 
tion. The Bill is not quite clear as to whether the }4c. per lb. is to be added also to sugars ex- 
ported but we think not 

Our regular con.sumption figures for the first 6 months of 1917, show very favorably giviag 
2,366,542 tons consumption, against 2,i;37,733 tons for corresponding 6 months of 1916, an 
increase of 10.7%. Full details of the six months business in sugar are given in our Statistical 
Sugar Trade Journal of July 5, 1917, a very valuable compendium, worthy of special study but 
too long to include herewith. 

The British Commission have continued buying sugar both in Cuba for raws and in the 
United States at advancing limits, in fact their marking up their bids in Cuba from about 
4.40c. to 5c. f. o. b. was the cause of the rise which our American refiners have had to pay 
recently for supplies 

At length, however, the absence of demand in Java for the big crop of l,800,0tK) tons 
no%\- maturing, owing to the difficulties in the way of transportation, has caused a large 
decline in their market values with pressure to sell by leading operators in Java. Such 
sugar offered for s le here had to be declined because of tonnage conditions, but latest reports 
indicate that the British Sugar Commission have been buying sugars from Java to an extent 
of about 150,000 tons. Such purchasing in Java will tend to relieve the pressure of buying in 
Cuba and the U. S. and no doubt give Europe more full supplies from October onward. Pur- 
chases in Java made now can hardly reach Europe in September, in any sufficient quantity to 
influence the values of the nearby months shipments from Cuba to a considerable extent. 

However at SJ-^c. c. & f. for Cuba contracts, the market seems to have reached a high point 
to call a halt, if not a partial reaction. 

Befined sugar has been in good demand at irregular prices. Just now the quotations for 
granulated are: Arbuckle 7%c.; Federal and Warner 8c.; American and Howell T^c., all less 
2 % for Cash. Our consumption figures for the six months show that the country in general has 
ample stocks of sugar and indicate a quiet spell in the buying of refined for home consumption 
un il about September. WILLETT & CRAY. 

Xew York, July 9, 1917. 



36 THECUBAREVIEW 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 



Escrita especialmente para la Cuba Review por Willett & Grau, de Ntieva York. 

Nuestra ultima resena para esta publicaci6n estaba fechada el 8 de junio de 1917. 

En esa fecha el azucar Centrifugo de Cuba polarizaci6n 98° se cotizaba A 4J^c. la libra 
■costo y flete, y ahora se cotiza A 53^c., mostrando un aumento neto de ^c. la libra durante 
«1 mes bajo resena. El azucar en almacen y de embarques de agosto de Cuba se vendi6 hasta 
^ 53^c. costo y flete el 29 de junio. 

Los cambios en las cotizaciones fueron como sigue: junioS, 43^c.; el 20, 4 15/16c.; el 25, 
5c.; le 26, 5>8C.; el 27, 534c.; el 28, 5^c.; y el 29, 5,l^c. La cotizacion de 5Hc. costo y flete 
entrega inmediata permanece nominalmente sin cambio, aunque el tono y tendencia del mer- 
cado durante estos liltimos dias ha sido hacia un estado mils moderado. 

El Comite Financiero del Senado de los Estados Unidos ha presentado al Senado el proy- 
ecto de ley de impuestos, en cuya, Cd.mara se estd, ahora debatiendo para un acuerdo final 
antes de que dicho proyecto de ley vuelva A transmitirse d la Cdmara de Representantes para 
su confirmacion 6 conferencia. Segun se ha presentado al Senado, el proyecto de ley exige 
se rescinda la rebaja actual de Ic. por libra en todas las exportaciones de azucar, e impone una 
contribuci6n 6 impuesto interno de J/^c. por libra en todos los azucares crudos y refinados en- 
tregados para el consumo. £1 proyecto de ley no especifica claramente si el }.^c. por libra ha de 
agregarse tambien d los azucares exportados, pero creemos que no. 

Nuesto calculo regular respecto al consumo de azucar durante los primeros 6 meses de 
1917 es en sentido muy favorable, mostrando un consumo de 2,366,542 tonelad js, contra 2,137,- 
733 toneladas por los 6 meses correspondientes de 1916, 6 sea un aumento de 10.7 por ciento. 
En nuestro Trade Journal sobre estadisticas del azucar del 5 de julio de 1917 se dan detalles 
completes sobre el negocio del azucar durante dichos seis meses, un compendio muy valioso 
que merece un estudio especial, pero que es demasiado largo para incluirlo aqui. 

La Comision Britanica ha continuado comprando azucares crudos tanto en Cuba como 
en los Estados Unidos a precios de alza limitados, y en efecto, el hacer sus ofertas en Cuba 
desde unos 4.40c. a 5c. libre a bordo fue causa del alza que nuestros refinadores Americanos 
han tenido que pagar recientenmente por las existencias. 

Sin embargo, por fin la falta de demanda-por azucar de Java por la grande cosecha de 1,800,- 
000 toneladas ahora, en estado de madurez,debido d las dificultades en los medios de tranporte, 
ha ocasionado una gran baja en los valores de su mercado, con instancia a efectuar ventas d e 
parte de los principales corredores de Java. Dicho azucar ofrecido aqui a la venta tuvo que ser 
rehusado a causa de las condiciones de tonelaje, pero los uliimos informes indican que la Comisi6n 
Britanica del Azucar ha estado comprando azucares de Java en cantidad de unas 150,000 tone- 
ladas. Tales compras en Java contribuird d aminorar la necesidad de hacer compras en 
Cuba y en los Estados Unidos, e indudablemente proporcionard a Europa mayores existencias 
desde octubre en adelante. Las compras hechas ahora en Java escasamente Uegaran d Europa 
en septiembre en cantidad suficiente para influenciar mucho los jorecios de los embarques de 
Cuba durante los proximos meses. 

Sin embargo, d 5l^c. costo y flete por los contratos de azucar de Cuba, el mercado parece 
haber Uegado d un punto muy alto lo suficiente para quedarse ahi ya que no para que tenga 
lugar alguna reacci6n. 

El azucar refinado ha tenido buena demanda d precios irregulares. .Mismamente ahora 
las cotizaciones por el azucar granulado son: Arbuckle, 7^c.; Federal y Warner, Sc; American 
y Howell, 73^c.; todos menos 2% pago al contado. Nuestra estadistica respecto al consumo 
durante los seis meses muestra que el pais en general tiene amplias existencias de azucar e 
indica un periodo de calma en las compras de azucar refinado para el consumo domcstico hasta 
septiembre proximamente. 

WILLETT & GRAY. 

Nueva York, julio 9, de 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York— 64— 66 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letters 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

HAVANA— N. Celata y Ca. 

PUERTO RICO — Banco Comercial da Puerto Rico 



LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 
PARIS — Heine et Cie. 



GRAMERCY ELECTRIC STIRRER 

Useful for many purposes besides 
stirring. 

The Universal Motor 1-10 H. P. can 
be operated on direct current or alter- 
nating current , is fully enclosed with 
aluminium cover and can be raised 
or lowered as desired. It is attached 
to the support by an adjustable 
extension clamp. The heavy iron 
support has a base 16 inches by 
25 inches. Underneath the base, a 
rheostat with ten steps is attached, 
the wires passing up from the rheostat 
to the motor through the hollow rod. 

Gramercy Electric Stirrer with Support, as 
Illustrated, net - - $20.00 

EIMER & AMEND 

HEADQUARTERS FOR EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY SUPPLIES 
205 THIRD AVENUE, CORNER 18TH STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. Founded is,!. OTTAWA. CANADA 





ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
P. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 



We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



CAR S 



10-4.81^ GAGE FLATS— Length 10 ft. 6in 

Capacity 20,000 lbs. 

28-24 in. GAGE, 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 

ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft. 4 in. Capacity 10 Tons- 
Weight 7,500 lbs. 
FIRST-CLASS CONDITION 
Will Convert to Steel Underframe Flat Cars 
PROMPT SHIPMENT .-. LOW PRICE 

RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 




38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 




30% 

m&s de 
cana 



PATENTE PELAEZ 

Esta maza puede colocarse facilmente en oualquier trapiche, sea de dos 6 tres maEas. Machuca bien la 
oafia desmenuzdndola y extrayfindole almismo tiempo las dos terceras partes de su guarapo, dejando la cafta bien 
preparada para el segundo trapiche. Ejecuta todo el trabajo de una desmenuzadora de primera clase y sin md» 
gasto que ouando se opera con una maza lisa. Esta maza es de acero y se ha sacado privilegio para ella en todae 
las partes del mundo donde se cultiva la cana de azticar. Pues envienos un dibujo de la maza superior que usan 
U is asl que de su eje, y les cotizaremos precioa bajos por una maza completa para desmenuzar la cafia de este 
trapiche. 

NEWELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 149 Broadway, New York, E. U. A. 



Bank of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST, NEW YORK 



Pedro Pablo Diago 



Guillermo Carricaburu 



RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handling 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES - 



President 
Vice-President 
CasKiier 
Asst. Cashier 



LOUIS V. PLACE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND S H IP BROKERS 

76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLAC6" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET .-. NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 

Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 

Write Today For Sam-ple Copy 

Indispensable to the Man Inter- 
ested in Sugar 



Pleaae menlion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Adnerlisers 



THECUBA REVIEW 39 



POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

GUANAJAY 

Fare, 55 Cents 

GUINES 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5 A. M. to 8 P. M. Last train 11.20 P. M. 



Train every hour daily fronn CENTRAL STATION from 
5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P. M. Last Train 11.10 P. M. 



SUBURBAN SERVICE TO REGLA, GUANABACOA, AND CASA BLANCA 
(CABANAS FORTRESS) FROM LUZ FERRY, HAVANA, TO 

Regla (Ferry) $0.05 

Guanabacoa (Ferry and Electric Railway) 10 

Casa Blanca and Cabafias Fortress (Ferry) 05 

Ferry Service to Regla and car service to Guanabacoa every 15 minutes, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 midnight, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Casa Blanca, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kinds. Architectural Iron and Brass 

Castings. Light and Heavy Forgings. All kinds of Machinery Supplies. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

A. KLING, Prop. MORIT F AI A 

JAS. S. BOQUE, Supt. IVlV-TDll-IL, /\luJ\. 



THE AMERICAN PHOTO CO 

PHOTOGRAPHY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

Construcfon, Minint; and Sugar-Mill Work a specialty. We are the larf;e^t, best 
equipped and most experienced house in Cuba Sampler and estimates submitte 1 
upon request. Let us help you make your advertisements convincing. 

HAVANA OerSPO 70 CUBA 



Telephone, 33 Hamilton. Night Call. 411 Hamilton. Cable Address: "Abiworka," New York. 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy Forgings, Iron and Brass Castings, Copper Specialties, Diesel Motor Repairs, Cold Storage 
Installation, Oil Fuel Initallatlon, Carpenter and Joiner work 

i;i? frnTYlrllir'' ]^'" """"*<>" ^'"^ Brooklyn, n. y. 

Aganta for "Kinchorn" Multiplex Valra 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 











THE 

TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 






CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

I n t • n d 1 n ( Inv«*tor« 






OFFICERS 
Gorman H. Davii - - - . . President 
Oiwald A. Horniby - - - - Vioe-President 

Claudio Q. Mendoia ... Vioe-President 
F. M. Hopgood ------ Treaaurer 

Rogelio Carbajal ------ Secretary 

W. M. Whitner • - Mgr. Real Eatate Dept 





P. RUIZ 


•a 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 


HAVANA, CUBA 




CARRITO DE LINEA 

Para Pasajeros, Equipajes, Carga y Materiales y 
Herramientos de Reparaciones. Fuerte y 
Muy Otil. Dos Tamanos. 

HORACE F. RUGGLES, M.E., Fabricante 

108 Wall Street, New York 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADU EN 1S09 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserve 13,236,000 

Activo Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar St». 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponsales en Espafia 6 lalas Caiiajias y Baleares 
y en todas las otras plazas bancables del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

& interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeros en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederas estas sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Oficina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of th« Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Amargura 1-S 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi- 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. CONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when unitinc to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 No.l7 No. 3 No. 7 No. 5 « 

P. M. P. M. P. M. P. M. A. M. .\. M. S 



10.30 



5.28 



8.50 

n 
10. 

p. 
1. 



p. M 



5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
p. M. 



3.10 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P. M. 

3.00 

3.30 



P. M 



10.01 
11.58 



7.40 
10.10 



58 
2.18 12.33 109 



4.40 
8.40 



6.45 
P. M. 



3.38 
6.45 



6.40 
8.00 



10.30 340 
,P. M. 
,520 

538 



Havana 



Lv. .Central Station. .Ar. 



Ar. . . Matanzas. .... Lv. 
Ar . . . . Cardenas ..... Lv. 



Ar Sagua . . . 

Ar. . . .Caibarien. 



.Lv. 
.Lv. 



Ar. . . Santa Clara. . . . Lv. 
At. . . Cionf ucgos Lv. 



Ar. .SanctiSpiritus. . .Lv. 

Ar. .Ciegode Avila. . .Lv. 

Ar. . . .Camaguey. . . . Lv 

Ar Antilla Lv 

Ar. Santiago de Cuba. Lv, 



No. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8 No. 6 No.lO 

A. M. A. M. P. M.P. M. P. M. A. M. 



7.36 

5.31 
12.45 
P. M. 
8.00 
5.30 
A.M. 
12.10 



9.13 2.06 6.39 

6.45 12.00: 4.44 

5.00 9.12 1.05 

A.M 

12.00 
8.20 



P.M. 
8.25 

7.35 

4.55 

A.M. 

7.40 

6.55 



A.M. 



6.20 



1.55 
P.M. 
11.20 

2.30 
2.00 



8.00 
A.M. 



P.M. 



9.05 



6.28 
4.25 



6.20 



00 ; 



10.00 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



From Havana to Berth Compartment. 

Cienf uegos $3.00 .... 

Santa Clara 3.00 $8.00 

Camaguey 3.50 10.00 

Antilla 5.00 14.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 14.00 

ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 

PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 



Dra wing- 
Room. 
$10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
18.00 
18.00 



THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 



U. S. Cy. 
Antilla $23.33 



Batabano . 

Bayamo 

Caibarien 

Camaguey 

Cardenas 

Ciego de Avila . 

Cienf uegos 

Colon 

Guantanamo . . . 
Holguin 



1.53 
20.66 
10.68 
15.49 

5.43 
12.72 

8.69 

5.56 
25.58 
21.20 



Isle of Pines 

Madruga 

Manianillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

Remedios 

Sagua 

San Antonio 

Sancti Spiritus. . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba . 



U. S Cy. 
$6.00 

3.01 
22.02 

3.20 

9.64 
10.43 

8.45 

.45 

11.19 

8.53 
24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or leas in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Cama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. 

SPECIAL "WEEK-END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 

on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

Bend thrwoent. in atampe.for';CuU-A Winter P8radise.'^aWu- United RallwayS of HaVaiUl 



tiful illustrated booklet describing interesting trips 

FRANK ROBERTS, General PassanKer A««nt. 



Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET, Cor. Stone 
NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacidn directa de todas los 
centros manufactureros del mundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
de A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espafia 
Independencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 

Near South Street 
56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 
Telephones: 



Yard: 
Office, 1905 John 



Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
Piers, Bridges, Railroads and Buildings 



We are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

on all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York OfHce: 

WooLWORTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Muiiro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers' Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c. 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a po$\lion to push tkt talei of 

American high clais products. Would 

ripretent a first class firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



M. J. CABANA 



CO M M I88I ON 
MERCHANT 



P. O. Box 3, CamaKuey 

Handles all linea of merohandiae either on a oom- 
mission basis or under agency arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in east- 
ern Cuba. 



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11 04 

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7 30 
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Vol. XV AUGUST. 1917 No. 9 
Contents of This Number 

f ■|)Vor Page — Banana Tree 
Frontispiece — Colon Park. 
All Around Cuba: 

Baiagua Sugar Co 12 

Bird House and Gardens, Cienfuegos, illustrations 14 

Central Aniistad, illustration 13 

Central J.,uisa Condesa 12 

Central Railway Yards, Cienfuegos, illustration \^ 

Cuba Railroad Yards at Nuevitas, illustration 12 

Cuban Central Railway Station, Cienfuegos, illustration lo 

Laurel Tree, illustration 13 

Market for Imitation Leather 12 

Memorial Tablet , 12 

New Hospital Building at Cienfuegos, illustration 10 

Nipe Bay Co 12 

Commerce of the United States 22, 23 

Cuba, by Consul General James L. Rodgers, Havana 17, 18, 10 

Cuban Commercial Matters: 

American Construction Materials for Cuba 34 

Statistics of Yellow Pine Lumber 34 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

Cuba Submarine Telegraph Co o 21 

Guaranty Trust Co 21 

National Surety Co 21 

Prevailing Prices for Cuban Securities 21 

Traffic Receipts of Cuban Railroads 20 

Cuban Government Matters: 

British Investors 10 

Col. Collazo S 

Col. Jose Marti, portrait 10 

Constitution Suspended <" 

Cuban Army 8, 10 

Cuban Ports Co 7 

Cuban Navy 10 

Cuban Rebels 7 

Gen. Maximo Gomez and Family, portrait 

German Ships 8 

Gustave Garcia Menocal 10 

Government Loan 7 

Maximo Gomez Statue !• 

New Portfolio 

Treaty with Spain 10 

Mr. Elias Ponvert 1 '> 

Growth in Cuba's Foreign Trade 2-i 

Havana Correspondence 11 

Publications Received 34, 35 

Savannah Sugar Refining Co 1 <) 

Sugar Industry: 

Chart — Exports of Cuban Raw Sugar to Europe 32 

Chart — Price of Cuban Raw Sugar 30 

Cost of American Cane-Sugar Compared with Cuban 20 

European Shipments 33 

Final Report on Beet Sugar, 1916 31 

Indian Sugar Industry 33 

Netherlands Sugar 31 

Residence — Stewart Sugar Estate, illustration 2.5 

Sugar at Six Cents 31 

Sugar Crop of the Hawaiian Islands 38 

Sugar Industry of Cuba, by Consul CJeneral Henry H. Morgan, illustrated 25, 20, 27, 28 

Sugar Review, English 35, 30 

Sugar Review, Spanish 30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Colon Park, Where the Statue of General Maximo Gomez is to be Erected. 



THL 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL AP.OUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



AUGUST, 1917 



Number 9 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



CONSTITUTION SUSPENDED 

President Menocal recently saspended 
the constitutional guarantees and called an 
extra session of Congress. The decree sus- 
pending the guarantees gives as a reason the 
state of war existing between Cuba and 
Germany, but it is believed in political circles 
that the real reason was the differences which 
have arisen between the President and Con- 
gress. 



CUBAN PORTS COMPANY 

President Menocal has appointed the men 
into whose hands he will entrust the finding 
of a solution of the dispute between Cuba 
and the holders of the bonds of the defunct 
Cuban Ports Co. Jose .4ntonio del Cueto, 
the chief magistrate of the Supreme Court, 
was appointed chairman, while other com- 
missioners are Dr. Eicardo Dolz, the speaker 
of the Senate, and Br. Leopoldo Cancio, the 
Secretary of the Treasury. 

The decree of the President follows the 
law recently passed by Congress authorizing 
the President to take steps as he deemed fit 
to reach a settlement with the persons who 
hold the bonds of the Cuban Ports Co. 

The Port Docks Company, known as the 
"dragado," was formed during the Gomez 
administration to clean and dredge the ports 
of the island. The company was to receive 
a certain percentage of revenues paid to the 
government on merchandise entering Cuba. 
Its bonds were sold principally in the United 
States and England. 



When President Menocal entered office 
he cancelled the conce.ssion. It is under- 
stood the American and British govern- 
ments protested against his action, on behalf 
of purchasers of the company's bonds. 



GOVERNMENT LOAN 

President Menocal sent a message to Con- 
gress vetoing the .130,000,000 measure passed 
by both Foases. The reason for vetoing 
the measure is said to be that it did not in- 
clude the stamp tax clause recommended 
by him. 



CUBA'S MONEY 

The Treasury Department, in a statement, 
announces the distribution of Cuba's treas- 
ury funds on June 30th, as follows: In the 
treasury, Cuban currency, .?l,110,ol0.00; 
in the treasury, American currency, .$1,581,- 
314.82; in the National Bank of Cuba, $880,- 
792.45, and in the Poyal Bank of Canada, 
$43.45. The various items make a grand 
total of $3,572,660.72. 



CUBAN REBELS SPARED 

President Menocal has issued a decree 
commuting to life imprisonment the death 
.sentences passed by a military tribunal on 
Colonel Quinones, Captain Izquierda and 
Lieutenants Calzadilla and Roldos, who were 
convicted of sedition and rebellion jn.^con- 
nection with the recent uprising. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Captain Geo. Reno of the Cuban Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, has arrived in the United 
States in order to have a conference with 
Mr. Herbert C. Hoover in regard to the food 
situation in Cuba. 

There are many problems which confront 
Cuba imder present conditions. 

Captain Reno fully realizes the importance 
of Cuba's producing other crops besides 
sugar and tobacco in order that, by means 
of the diversity of crops and more attention 
to cattle raising, the Cuban people will not be 
compelled to im]Dort such large quantities of 
foodstuffs as is done imder present conditions. 



CUBAN ARMY 

Colonel .Miguel Varona has been appointed 
Chief of the General Staff of the Cuban Army. 

It has been determined by Presidential 
decree that the pay of the members of the 
regular army and militia, during the period 
of insurrection in Cuba is to be doubhd. This 
increase will cover the period from February 
10th to June 20th. 



COLONEL COLLAZO 

Colonel Rosendo Collazo of the Cuban 
Army, who has been in conference at Wash- 
ington with officers of the United States 
Army General Staff, has left for a tour of the 
country, to inspect the various national army 
ctntonments, and to report, on his return 
to Havana, on the workings of the selective 
draft in the United States, to President Men- 
ocal of Cuba. 

Colonel Collazo effected the captiu-e last 
March, during the Cuban uprising, of former 
President Jose Miguel Gomez with his staff, 
thus putting a stop to the activities of the 
rebels on the island. He is known in Cuba 
as a tactical expert and a student of military 
affairs. 

In his tour of the United States, Colonel 
Collazo expects to visit the Plattsburg camp, 
two large national training grounds in the 
State of New York, one in Indiana, and one 
in South Carolina, and to visit as well various 
arsenals and depots where army equipment 
is produced and stored, so that when the time 
arrives in Cuba, everything will be in readi- 
ness for procedure along the most efficient 
and vigorous lines. 



GERMAN SHIPS 

The Cuban government has turned over 
to the United States the five German mer- 
chant ships siezed in Cuban ports when Cuba 
declared war on Germany. The ships will 
be made ready for repair and operation. 



REGULATIONS FOR PHYSICIANS 

The Secretary of Sanitation approved the 
resolution adopted by the National Council 
of Sanitation to the effect that all doctors 
who are engaged, or will hereafter engage, 
in professional practice in Cuba, under dip- 
lomas obtained in other countries, must 
present themselves to the authorities of the 
National University for such examination 
as these may deem desirable, to have their 
titles considered valid. 



NATIONAL MEDICAL CONGRESS 

President Menocal has approved the bill 
granting an appropriation of $6,000 to assist 
in meeting the expenses of the forthcoming 
Fourth National Cuban Medical Congress. 



SCHOOLS 



President Menocal has signed the bill 
recently voted by Congress providing for the 
estabUshment of 900 new schools in the 
RepubUc, to be distributed throughout the 
six provinces. 



CONSULS AND DIPLOMATS 

All members of the Cuban diplomatic and 
consular service abroad are to receive salary 
increases of 30 per cent, by a statute passed 
by Congress and which General .Menocal 
approved. 



TEACHERS PENSIONS 

At the meeting of the Teachers' Association 
of Havana, the question of obtaining a law 
whereby teachers woidd be pensioned at the 
end of their service was again discussed, and 
it was thought that the matter would again 
be presented to the Cuban Congress. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 




Cieneral Alaxiiuo Ouiiit'z ami 1-aniilv 



MAXIMO GOMEZ STATUE 

The Cuban Congress, in .May, 1916, 
passed a law appropriating $200,000, to be 
devoted to the erection of a bronze equestiian 
statue of the celebrated General Maximo 
Gomez. A Commission! was ai)pointed to 
have charge of the matter and Colonel Villa- 
Ion is the President of the Commission. 

The Commission has announced a com- 
petition, open to Cuban and foreign sculptors, 
who are requested to submit their designs 
for this monument. The Commission has 
issued a book which specifies the rules under 
which designs are to be submitted by sculp- 
tors. These designs must be submitted be- 
fore March 31, 1918. 

Three prizes will be awarded for the best 
designs submitted: 

First prize -510,000 

Second prize 5,000 

Third prize 2,000 

The Commission has determined that the 
site of the statue will be in the center of the 
Parque de Colon. 



The book which the Committee has issued 
is very beautifully printed and contains a 
biography of General Gomez, many photo- 
graphs of the General, and also gives much 
information which would be of value to the 
sculptors in making their designs. 



NEW PORTFOLIO 

The bill passed by Congress, creating the 
portfoho of War and Xavy in the cabinet, 
has been signed. 

WAGE INCREASE MEASURE 

The House of Representatives received 
back from the President, with his veto, the 
bill passed by Congress in thel ast session, 
increasing the wages of all workmen engaged 
on public works to a minimum of SI. .50 a day_ 



SANITATION 



President .Menocal has appointed six 
supervisors of sanitation, one for each of the 
provinces: Pinar del Rio, Havana, Matanzas, 
Santa Clara, Camaguey and Oriente. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 




Col. Jose Marti, who has been appointed 
Secretary in the recently created portfolio 
of the War and Navy. 

CUBAN NAVY 

It is reported that the Cuban Navy wiU 
be augmented by the addition of new boats, 
and furthermore the Navy's personnel will 
be reorganized. 



BRITISH INVESTORS 
According to financial articles appearing in 
the newspapers published in Great Britain, 
great interest is taken in the possibility of 
the settlement of the bonds of the Cuban 
Ports Company. British investors purchased 
a large amount of these securities, beUeving 
that they were absolutely guaranteed by the 
Government of Cuba and, therefore, forming 
a safe and desirable investment. When Presi- 
dent Menocal succeeded President Gomez, the 
legality of the concession granted the Cuban 
Ports Company was brought into quesdon, 
and after a long legal contest, it was decided 
that the concession granted by the Cuban 
Government to the Cuban Ports Company 
was unconstitutional, and this decision seri- 
ously affected the holders of the securities of 
the Cuban Ports Company. British investors 
were naturally very uneasy as to the final 



result of their investment. The recent action 
of the Cuban Congress in authorizing Presi- 
dent Menocal to settle the claims of the hold- 
ers of the securities of the Cuban Ports Com- 
pany has had the effect of encoiuaging the 
British and other holders of these securities. 



GUSTAVO GARCIA MENOCAL 
Gustavo Garcia Menocal, brother of Presi- 
dent Mario G. Menocal and Representative 
in Congress from the Provinces of Matanzas, 
died at his home near Havana July 18. He 
bore the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the 
Cuban war of independence. 



CIENFUEGOS 
Acting Mayor Florencio Guerra of Cien- 
fuegos was assassinated July 30 as he was 
about to enter his home on the outskirts of 
that city. 



TREATY WITH SPAIN 
For a long time past, a new treaty has been 
pending between Spain and Cuba, and many 
negotiations have taken place, but no agree- 
ment has been reached. The only treaty 
at present in existence between Cuba and 
Spain is not suffi.ciently comprehensive in 
its provisions to properly regulate commer- 
cial intercourse between the two countries. 
Every year a large number of Spanish emi- 
grants come to Cuba. These emigrants are 
employed principally on the sugar estates, 
and the manner in which this emigration 
traffi.c is handled has never been satisfactory 
to either Spain, Cuba or the emigrants, and 
it is thought that if this new treaty is made, 
these vexed questions will be adjusted to the 
satisfaction of all concerned. 



LA GLORIA 
The Chamber of Commerce of La Gloria 
has presented a claim for |"50,000, which 
amount rer resents damages that were caused 
to the residents of La Gloria on account of 
the recent insurrection. 



CUBAN ARMY 
President Menocal has issued a decree rais- 
ing the pay of the officers and commanders of 
the Cuban Army as follows: First sergeant, 
$600 per year; second sergeant, $540 per year; 
third sergeant, $300 per year; corporals, .$300 
per year, and enlisted men, $276 per year. 



T H E C U B A 11 E V I E W U 



HAVANA CORRESPONDENCE 



The Avisa(l(rr Conurnal reports thiit for tlie fiscal year ended June :{(), 1917, tliere were 
2,374 vessels arrmnf^ at the port of Tfavana. This is the largest annual nuinl)er reported. The 
previous largest number w;us for the year ended June 30, 191G, amounting to 2,101. 

Prior to the Cireat War the rice imported here from the Orient was generally transhipped 
at Furopean jrorts, but on account of war conditions, until recently this rice came in cargo lots 
direct from India in British steamers. During the past month two Japanese steamers have 
arrived from India via the Panama (.'anal with exclusive rice cargoes, and we understand more 
are to follow. We might add that, with the exception of a few Japanese steamers which have 
arrived here this year with coal from American ports, the Japanese flag, we believe, has never 
been seen in this port on any class of vessel. 

The matter of Havana's water supply is one that is receiving a great deal of attention at the 
present time. Some authorities insist that the Vento Springs, which supply the City, are more 
than ample for its requirements, while others claim it will be necessary to secure an additional 
supply from other nearby sources. The fact remains that there has been considerable complaint 
lately over shortage of water in different parts of the city and a commission is to be appointed 
to study this question with a view to remedying the shortage. 

^^■hile there are no particular new developments regarding oil wells here, there have been a 
number of new companies organized since our last advices and a great deal of enthusiasm exists 
as to future prospects. 

The sugar crop is very promising and sugar has now reached record prices with good pros- 
pects of going still higher. There is no particular news to report regarding tobacco business. 

The Austrian steamer "Virginia," the only one interned in this Island, was sold to an 
American steamship company and put under the American flag on July 26th. She is at present 
undergoing repairs, and when they have been completed, she will sail, we imderstand, for an 
American port. 

According to a decree signed by President Menocal on July 14, when crude oil or residum 
of petroleum is imported into Cuba to be used as fuel, or for the operation of mining machinery, 
or by the Government for sanitary purposes, or by the Government for road uses of all kinds, 
the duty will be only one-tenth of a cent per gallon plus a port improvement tax of 10c. for each 
168 gallons. The duties heretofore in effect will again apply as soon as the native production 
is sufficient to supply two-thirds of the oil required for the uses mentioned above. We under- 
stand that one of the principal reasons for passing this law was so that sugar mills and 
the mining industry might use crude oil as fuel in case of a shortage of imported coal. 

We have made previous mention of mihtary court martials of the officers taking part in 
the late revolution, and would now state that the death sentences of the officers who were 
doomed to be shot at Cabanas were commuted to Ufe imprisonment, all the officers being dis- 
honorably discharged from the Army. 

Negotiations have been in progress for the consohdation of the principal chocolate and 
cracker factories in Havana, including "La Estrella," "La Constancia," Mestre & Martinica, 
ViUar, Gutierrez & Sanchez and the Cuban Biscuit Co. The new company will be known as 
the National .Mfg. Co., with a capital of $2,500,000, the Banco Espanol being largely interested 
in the formation of the new company. 

Hotel keepers and retail merchants here are endeavoring to get some change in present 
regulations which require travelers leaving the L". S. to secure passports, believing that same 
would have a very bad effect on the tourist travel next Winter. 

Havana, Aug. 6th, 1917. 



GUATEMALA 



The total quantity and value of the exports from Guatemala to Cuba during 1916 were as 
follows: 

Kilos Value 

692 .S6,618 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



ALL AROUND CUBA 



MEMORIAL TABLET 

A memorial tablet to Fnrique Hernandez 
Miyares, Oriente poet, was dedicated Aug. 
5, at Santiago de Cuba., the city in which he 
made his home. Literary, educational and 
other institutions were represented at the 
ceremonies. 

The tablet, which is a handsome marble 
one, was placed in the former home of the 
poet, at 9 Marina street. 



MATANZAS 



It is rumored that the Matanzas street 
car lines are to be sold to an American Com- 
pany, the identity of which is not disclosed. 
The company which founded, and has oper- 
ated, the lines to date, represents Cuban and 
Spanish capital. 



NIPE BAY COMPANY 



The Nipe Pay Company has been autho- 
rized to construct a stone esplanade on the 
shores of Kipe Bay. 



CAMAGUEY 



The Mayor of Camaguey has directed a 
petition to General Menocal for the granting 
of a $25,000 credit for urgent municipal 
needs. 



MARKET FOR IMITATION LEATHER 

There is comparatively little of a market in 
Cuba for imitations of leather, principally 
because there is practically no manufactin-ing 
of articles in which it could be used. There is, 
however, considerable importation of ]iro- 
ducts in which imitation leather is used. In 
normal times, much of this comes from Ger- 
many, but at present, the importation is 
nearly all from the United States. 

There are no statistics showing the im- 
portation of imitation leather. It is not 
probable that any market of importance 
could be developed because there is little in- 
centive for manufacturing articles from it. 
— Consul General James L. Rodgers, Habuna. 



BARAGUA SUGAR COMPANY 

The Uepartment of Public \^"orks has 
granted permission to the Baragua Sugar 
Company, of Camaguey, to construct a ship 
canal from Boca Grande to the Company's 
lands in Camaguey province. 



CENTRAL LUISA CONDESA 

A recent fire in this sugar mill, situated in 
Limonar, Matanzas, resulted in the destruc- 
tion of a sugar warehouse and its contents. 




Cuba Railroad»Yards at Nuevitas, Looking in the Direction of tiie Extension of New- 
Track to Wharf. 



T HE c u B A r{ !•; \' I [•: w 



13 




An excellent siM'tinifu nf tin- 'Laurer' tree gruwinK in Cuba. This particular tree 
is one of a number growing on the old Durnois tract, now the property of the United Fruit 
Company, at Saetia, along the shores, at the entrance to Nipe Bay in Eastern Cuba. The 
"Laurel" tree reaches a ripe old age in Cuba and is invaluable as a shade and protection 
from the tropical midday sun. 




Central Amistad. 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 





Scenes of Bird House and Gardens on the Beautiful "Quinta de Castano" (Country 

Seat of Castano) located at Punta Gorda near the Entrance to Cienfuegos Bay. 

The Property is One of the Show Places of the City of Cienfuegos. 



T III-: c V n A i{ I-: \- i i: w 




New Cuban Central Railway Station Building at Cicnfucgop. 




New Central RailwaylYards at Cienfuegos. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




New Hospital Building at Cienfuegoi- 



MR. ELIAS PONVERT 

Mr. Elias Ponvert, President of the Hor- 
migiiero Central, died at Magnolia, Mass., 
early in August. Mr. Ponvert was in the 
seventy-eighth year of his age and was one ot 
the most prominent sugar planters in Cuba. 
Mr. Ponvert had resided with his family on the 
Hormiguero sugar estate, Cienfuegos, Cuba, 
since 1878, spending all of his time there for 
fourteen years. In 1892 he came to the United 
States and traveled extensively. He also spent 
much time in visiting places of interest in 
Europe. 

The Hormiguero estate in Cuba has been 
developed until it is now one of the largest in 
production and most successful of all the 
sugar estates in the Island of Cuba. During 
the Cuban insurrection of 1895 and 1898, the 
Hormiguero estate was one of the few sugar 
estates which was operating, and this estate 
was able to produce a full crop of sugar during 
every year of the Cuban insurrection. 

Mr. Elie L. Ponvert, son of the late Mr. 
Ponvert, will succeed him as president and 
manager of the large and influential estate. 
He is well qualified to undertake the adminis- 
tration of this great property, after thirty 
years of training and experience as superin- 
tendent of the Hormiguero sugar factory and 
assistant to the late Elias Ponvert. 



SAVANNAH SUGAR REFINING CO. 

The plant of the Savannah Sugar Refining 
Company commenced operations July 2. 
This factory has been under construction for 
nearly a year. 

The corporation's refinery, which is located 
at Port Wentworth on the Savannah river, 
where the Savannah & Atlanta Railway has 
an extensive terminal and warehouse prop- 
erty, will have a capacity of 150,000 tons of 
refined sugar annually, or about 1,000,000 
pounds a day. 

Among the directors of the corporation, 
in addition to B. A. Oxnard, the president, are 
Henry T. Oxnard and Robert Oxnard, both 
vice presidents of the American Beet Sugar 
Company; James Imbrie of William .Morris, 
Imbrie & Co., Xew York; .Mills B. Lane, 
president of the Citizens and Southern Bank 
of Savannah and John H. Hunter, president 
of the Savannah & Northwestern Railway. 



COTTON PIECE GOODS 

Exports of cotton piece goods frona the 
United Kingdom to Cuba during the first 
nine months of 1916 and for the like period of 
1915 and 1914 are thus officially given: 

January-September Vards 

1914 31,597,100 

1915 37,080,800 

1916 37,171,100 



THE CUBA REVIEW 17 



CUBA 

liu Consul General James L. Ro'lgerx, llahuni. 

The commercial and industrial condition in Cuba during 191G was marked by the pros- 
perity brought about by the great sugar output, which sold at the highest average price in the 
history o" the Kepublic. 'J he imports showed large gains, as did also the exports with the 
exception of fruits and vegetables. These decreased somewhat through the tendency to plant 
and market sugar cane rather than anything else, and also because of an unusutiUy dry winter. 

Liijwrts of machinery and apparatus, nearly all of which are used in the sugar industry, 
almost doubled in value. There was also a great increase in the value of imported foodstutTs, 
as a natural result of the plenitude of money. Crains are shown, in greater or less degree, in all 
items of imports, and again it was demonstrated how thoroughly committed Cuba is to buying 
its necessities instead of trying to produce them. 

Percentages oj Trade with Various Countries. 
The following table shows the percentage of the United States and other principal coun- 
tries in the import and export trade of Cuba during the years 1914, 1915, and 1916. The 
diminution of the United States' share in the exports of the last two years is accounted for 
entirely by the fact that England and France got large quantities of sugar from Cuba: 

Imports from Exports to 

Countries: 1914 1915 1916 1914 1915 191G 

% % % % % % 

United States 58.23 67.35 72.00 83.14 82.65 75.40 

Germany 4.22 .55 .01 1.35 .01 

Spain.." 8.37 6.95 7.00 .93 .04 .09 

France 4.00 3.32 3.00 1.36 .05 4.04 

Great Britain 10.40 9.93 9.50 9.12 14.00 16.45 

Other countries 14.79 11.90 8.49 3.40 3.25 4.02 

Princi'pal Imports and Countries oj Origin. 
The following table shows the total imports into Cuba for 1915 and 191G, giving the 
amounts from the United States, Spain, France, and the United Kingdom in 1916: 

1916 

Total United United Other 

Articles. 1915 Total. States. Spain. France. Kingdom. Countriea. 

Stone, earth and ceramics: 

Earth and stone $1,347,291 $2,134,525 ?1,862,520 $15,196 $48,150 $10,4.56 $198,071 

Bitumens 1,636,984 2,804,310 2,794,491 9,749 70 

Glass and crystal 1,345,708 1,836,830 1,346,818 264,803 97,698 46,.569 80,411 

Pottery and porcelain 843,514 1,127,046 435,312 188,592 67,152 324,486 110,979 

Metals and manufactures of: 

Gold, silver and platinum. . . 311,126 480,007 296,965 87,612 61, .557 29,474 4,399 

Iron and steel 6,081,320 13,036,638 12,418,991 48,512 66,452 476,315 24,273 

Copper 809,429 1,.309,944 1,192,963 45,497 24,092 38,764 8,604 

Other metals 283,224 417,806 338,828 18,186 11,148 48,408 1,236 

Chemicals, drugs, etc.: 

Drugs 557,500 655,943 .384,323 133,099 2,239 10,725 125,557 

ColorsVdves, etc 896.736 1,260,379 1,056,252 29,736 7,817 163,840 2,734 

Chemical" products 5,831,185 8,248,171 6,760,211 109,462 726,894 428,863 210,756 

Oils, fats, greases 2,820,219 3,887,186 2,581,896 386,151 697,565 175,662 45,890 

Textiles and manufactures of: 

Cotton and manufactures of 11.185,948 16.162,979 7.207.478 2,927,194 617,012 4,311,898 1,097,018 

Vegetable fibers 6,383,520 9,242,562 1,996,899 437,698 116,667 2,986,314 3,704.984 

Wool bristles, hair 955,656 2,216,037 1,266,645 213,061 116,182 565.787 54,353 

Silk and manufactures of.... 689,337 990,496 559,347 27.364 144,533 69,226 190,024 

Paper and paper goods: _ „. 

Paper and cardboard 1,979,846 3,542,5,30 3,0W,.360 .344,616 44,071 31,940 117,.335 

Books and printed matter.. 300,744 327,940 114,277 107,419 17,065 70,262 18.917 

Wood and manufactures of: 

Wood, and products of 3.424,084 5,9.34,425 5.298.580 303.842 89,457 113,176 129,313 

Other vegetable matter 256,.399 496,635 112,317 43,363 34,295 265,354 41,306 

Animals, and products of: ^ _„„„., 

Animals 269,472 544,378 464,651 560 7,400 71,767 

Hide's ami Vkins " ... 923,820 1,232,866 1,097,;«0 100,631 10,362 7,519 17,024 

Manufactured products 6,168,095 8,373,336 7,062,908 1,180,263 23,955 15,.580 90,630 

Machinery, instruments, etc.: 

Instruments • . . 297,387 373,970 302,702 30,4Oi 19,763 425 20,.509 

Machinery ' 14,325,397 26,740,650 25,900,197 60,738 93,737 493,308 189,.335 

Apparatus.'.' ! ' 4,251,-399 10,.399,873 10,050,077 17,.381 124,251 19,649 188,515 

Foodstuffs: 

Meats 11,749,262 18,427,137 13,578,977 241,131 25,122 4,483 4,577,424 

Fish ^ 2,772,213 3,245,807 1,220,039 490,995 12,774 63,243 1,458,756 

Cereals 19,173,881 26,151,554 14,828,432 247,200 4..332 7.346,-326 3,725,264 



18 THECUBAREVIEW 

Fruits 1,077,556 1,247,812 807,244 404,283 4,027 547 31,711 

Vegetables, etc 6,660,544 10,362,443 6,852,288 1,279,880 34,331 173,996 2,021,948 

Oils and beverages 4,408,918 5,857,160 1,196,438 3,806,975 344,602 :508,739 200,406 

Milk products 3,470,026 3,792,258 2,975,9.-2 80,044 9,929 148,229 578,1.34 

Other foodstuffs 4,618,097 5,455,310 2,500,889 219,682 23,125 33,953 2,677,661 

Miscellaneous 4,367,920 6,829,456 3,198,371 352,568 2,182,473 223,354 868,158 

Articles free of duty 8,410,865 10,815,286 9,954,6(2 164,634 28,046 206,639 461,305 

Currency 14,563,631 32,316,594 32,316,594 

Total 155,448,233 248,278,279 185,337,194 14,408,772 5,930,905 19,230,658 23,344,977 

Share of the United States and Other Countries in Imports. 
The percentages of the imports by classes from the United States and those from other 
countries during 1915 and 1916 follow: 

From From 

United States. Other Countries 

Products 1915 1916 1915 1916 

/c /C iC ,0 

Stone, earth and ceramics 75.66 81.50 24.34 18.50 

Metals, and manufactures of 87.00 93.51 13.00 6.49 

Chemicals, drugs, etc 60.90 76.80 3i.l0 23.20 

Textiles, and manufactures of 36.08 38.56 73.92 61.44 

Paper and card board 65.78 80.58 .34.32 19.42 

Wood, andmanufactur sof 77.90 84.13 22.10 15.87 

Animal products 80.07 85.00 19.93 15.00 

Machinery, etc 92.60 96.66 7.40 3.34 

Foodstuffs SS.OO 58.90 45.00 41.10 

Miscellaneous'. 48.00 46.86 .52.00 .53.14 

Articles free of duty 79.00 92.13 21.00 7.87 

Cuba's Export Trade. 
In the following table are shown the values of the principal articles of export in 1914 and 

1915 and the amounts going to different countries in 1916: 

1916 

Total United United Other 

Articles. 1915 Total. States. Spain. France. Kingdom. Countries. 

Animals, ard products of: 

Animals $7,715 $12,808 $12,108 $700 

Hides and skins 3,038,429 3,224,826 3,222,551 2,275 

Other animal products 76,653 127,104 124,604 $2,500 

Suear and products: 

Suear—CTude and refined... 193,476,972 266,743,554 201,933,416$2,075,705 10,564,778 48,021,710 4,147,945 

Molasses 2,691,358 4,250,177 3,773,316 476,861 

Confectionery, etc 69,435 88,252 40,448 2,194 4,532 298 40,780 

Fruits, grains, vegetables: 

Fruits 2,771,274 2,600,704 2,600,.581 123 

Grains and vegetables 897,606 564,124 498,416 19,059 46,101 548 

^^Tortofse°S!etc 3,675 31,799 530 5,.540 25,729 

Sponges 204,116 224,367 149,986 10,869 30,543 23,077 9,892 

Mineral products: 

Asphalt 11-247 12,486 12,486 

Iron coper and other ores.. 4,097,659 11,167,147 11,167,147 

Old metals 147,749 219,346 219,346 

Forest products: 

\'eeetable fibers 53,281 212,523 193,133 107 19,283 

Timber and woods 834,901 721,271 633,951 51,643 700 34,977 

'^°TnbaccpTeaT ^' 15,232,231 16,156,004 12,536,808 280,245 173,763 31,070 3,134,118 

Cigars and cigarettes 9,181,547 9,731,509 3,929,761 406,691 391,713 2,704,274 2,299,070 

"^^Rpp nroducts 604,793 701,839 410,704 2,692 25,160 26,835 236,448 

distilled products 1,283,230 3,623,742 111,774 149,716 1,718,531 1,458,224 185,497 

Ali other articles 791,673 305,866 192,440 7,472 173 10 105,771 

Total 235,477,544 320,719,448 241,763,506 1,006,516 12,963,334 52,768,788 10,217,304 

Tjppxnorts 750,921 1,070,262 874,627 18,495 7,522 7,.343 162,075 

Currency.'.'.".'.' 18,063,298 34,781,640 7,452,285 27,263,115 60,000 6,240 

Grand total 254,291,763 356,571,360 250,090,418 30,288,126 13,030,856 52,776,331 10,385,619 

Proportion oj Shipments to Jnited States and Other Countries. 

The percentages of the principal items of export to the United States: 

To 

Unit 
Articles. 



Animal products 

Sugar and prod,ucts . . . 
Fruits and vegetables. 

Marine products 

Mineral products 

Forest products 

Tobacco products 

All other articles 



United States. 


1915 


1916 


% 


% 


99.50 


99.97 


84.47 


77.00 


99.75 


98.03 


60.00 


60.00 


99.48 


100.00 


89.00 


88.64 


63.26 


63.55 


39.53 


15.46 



Other ' 
1915 


To 

Countries 
1916 


0.50 

15. 53 

.25 

40.00 




,'C 

0.03 
23.00 

1.97 
40.00 


11.00 
36.74 
60.47 




il!36 
36.45 
84.54 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



19 



Declared Expcrrls to the United Slates. 

Tlie table below gives the quantities and vaUies of the exports invoiced at all th ; .\ia ;ri(3 iii 
consulates and agencies in Cuba for the United States during 1915 and 1916: 

.\ It ides: 

Aniniali- number 

Asphalt bags 

Bananas bunches 

Beeswax pounds 

Cigars, etc do 

Cocoa do 

Cocoanuts number 

Fruits and vegetables crates 

Hides and bones bundles 

Honey barrels 

Lumber and wood feet 

Metal fscrapl pounds 

Molasses gallons 

Ores: 

Copper tons 

Iron do 

Manganese do 

Pineapples crates 

Sponges bales 

Sugar bags a 

Tobacco pounds 

All other articles 

Total 

a A bag contains 325 pounds of sugar. 

The exports from the Habana consular district (including the consulate general at Habana 
and the agencies at Matanzas, Cardenas, and Xueva Gerona) for the United States follow: 



Quantity. 


Value. 


47S 


$9,074 


:5,05() 


8,879 


1.024,570 


717,401 


7:i:i.sr,2 


215,743 


7'.)S,<.U(I 


3,736,420 


3,'.i5t,:nr, 


553,997 


1,207,110 


16,771 


4S!I,(I17 


613,182 


)r,,:u'.t 


750,74ti 


3,7.S3 


63,598 


7,691,558 


513,349 


4,258,781 


458,724 


56,309,322 


2,194,478 


58,488 


1,794,344 


796,830 


2,378,635 


5,144 


87,297 




1,674,249 


5,545 


348,228 


13,363,777 


147,413,928 


23,159,588 


18,549,205 




247,925 








182,346,773 



Quantity. 


Value. 


280 


$2,781 


3 (XK) 


S,S79 


1,205,055 


521,! 174 


627,528 


96,237 


753,892 


3,618,868 


662,220 


99,094 


272,000 


12,924 


321,177 


554,538 


33,006 


978.972 


1 1 ,434 


90,685 


8,846,075 


427.6.'-)0 


4,912.000 


711,271 


104,065,961 


4.,545.246 


121,722 


6,076,833 


746,131 


2,(i03.89(i 


52,972 


558.i;J3 




1,4,89,936 


7,862 


353,790 


11,738,636 


171,244,9.36 


23,824,210 


15,661, .332 




334 314 








209,995,289 



.\rticles. 
From Habana. 

Animals number 

Beeswax pounds 

Cigars and cigarettes do 

Copper ore tons 

Fruits and vegetables crates 

H ides and bones bundles 

Honey barrels 

Lumber and wood feet 

Metal, scrap pounds 

Molasses gallons 

Pineapples crates 

Sponges bales 

Sugar bags 

Tobacco pounds 

All other articles 

Total 

From Matanzas. 

Animals number 

Hides, bones, etc number 

Molasses gallons 

Sugar bags 

All other articles 

Total 

Prom Cardenas. 

Asphalt barrels 

Sugar bags 

All other articles 



Total. 



From Xueva Gerona. 

Fruits and vegetables crates 

All other articles 



Total 

Total Haljana district. 



Quantity. 


Value. 


478 


$9,074 


495,992 


138.877 


798,940 


3.736,420 


30.000 


790,000 


289.947 


275,451 


15,294 


252.351 


1,783 


11.009 


190,000 


10.434 


4,002,394 


424.824 


20,549,270 


821.970 




1.074,249 


5.431 


342.153 


1.549,682 


15.496,820 


23.143,202 


18,514.561 


180,403 






42,708,596 


6i 


829 


19,499.500 


485,000 


2.487,050 


28,342,390 




11,223 




28,839.442 


366 


531 


1,783,073 


19,636,5.36 




1,731 




19,638.798 


200,000 


199,202 




274 




199,476 




91,386,312 



Quantity. 


A'alue. 


125 


$2.2.50 


377,043 


117.768 


753,892 


3.618,868 


61,000 


4. .575,000 


268,934 


174,807 


25,473 


4.36,804 


2,566 


76,980 


200,000 


36,000 


4,829,247 


695,425 


35,400,000 


1,770.000 




1,483,105 


7,862 


353,790 


1,415,772 


18,404,936 


23,812,146 


15,627,894 




205,100 




47,578,727 


35 


331 


561 


12,.547 


36,650.000 


1,466.000 


2,661,010 


36.2.55,815 




13.104 




37.747,797 


i.769,30i 


24,426,586 




4,.366 




24,430,946 


250,000 


259,043 




264 




259,307 




110,016,777 



The value of returned American goods was $406,151 for all of Cuba, as compared with 
8423,534 in 1915. 

Exports to Porto Rico from the Habana district in 1916 amounted to $35,390, against 
$29,813 in 1915. Motion-picture films and preserves were the principal items in both years.- 
No shipments to the Philippines or Hawaii were reported. 



20 THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The report of the Cuba Railroad for the month of June and for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1917, compares 

as follows: 

1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

June gross $815,772 $604,112 $457,570 $432,183 $399,100 $318,818 $262,954 

Expenses 446,610 286,703 199,822 255,232 179,772 187,149 141,213 

Net earnings 369,162 317,408 257,748 176,951 219,237 131,669 121,740 

Other income 1,190 524 

Net income 370,353 317,932 257,748 

Charges 94,268 87,470 72,308 70,375 66,791 67,624 57,579 

June surplus 276,084 230,461 185,440 106,576 152,535 64,044 64,160 

Twelve months' gross 6,461,359 6,815,696 5,206,714 5,164,670 4,632,039 3,819,253 3,059,649 

Net profits 1,922,145 3,517,026 2,727,539 2,470,921 2,215,502 1,818,857 1,347,071 

Other income 12,385 6,632 

Fixed charges 1,106,881 978,244 853,855 819,416 801,222 758,998 576,754 

Twelve months' surplus 827,649 2,545,414 1,873,684 1,651,505 1,414,279 1,059,861 797,316 

EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weeklu receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 

Week ending June 23d £35,498 £30,020 £23,919 £20,107 £20,035 £17,374 £15,577 

Week ending June 30 40,948 31 ,257 23,839 19,010 19,741 18,273 17,088 

Week ending July 7th 36,829 29,550 23,725 20,489 19,703 19,588 16,919 

Week ending July 14th 35,686 30,160 23,802 20,922 19,343 19,293 16.321 

EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipts: 1917 191 ■ 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending June 30th £9,751 £5,212 £4,694 £5,373 £5,792 

Week ending July 7th 7,169 5,148 5,054 5,813 5,709 

Week ending July 14th 7,276 5,992 5,238 5,419 6,491 

Week endhg July 21st 6,547 5,988 5,276 6,244 6,113 

EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

Weekly receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending June 23d £14,210 £12,987 £8,124 £8,551 £6,817 

Week ending Jime 30th 16,190 8,544 3,728 3,550 4,581 

Week ending July 7th 13,997 9,012 7,005 6,690 6,386 

Week ending July 14th 13,974 9,446 8,041 6,801 6,702 

EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of June- 1917 1916 1915 

Gross earnings $554,982 $476,935 $448,170 

Operating expenses: 243,262 185,506 182,664 

Net earnings ^^^'™ ^^^'^"^ '^^^'^^^ 

Miscellaneous income 21,672 10,852 9,897 

Total net income 333,392 302,281 275,403 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 213,972 166,863 165,998 

GroiZtl^J: '''"''''' $3,251,042 $2,893,997 $2,751,375 

Operating expenses: :::::::::::::::::::':::: 1,404,554 1,119,520 1,125,261 

Net earnings 1,846,488 1,774,477 1,626,114 

Misceiianeousincome::: :;:::::::::: 75.659 66,662 49,507 

Total ret income 1-922,147 1,841,139 1,675,621 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 1,129,108 1,079,774 1,019,644 



THE C U li A I{ ]•: V 1 1-. W 



21 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



THE PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

As quiit(j I liij Lawrcitcr Turiiiirc & Co , Xew York. 

Bid Asked 

Republic of ( 'viba Interior Loan 5% bonds 93 95 

Republic of Cuba Kxterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 99^ 99^ 

Republic of Cuba Fxterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 9o 96 

Republic of Cuba Kxterior Loan 4}/2% Bonds of 1949 8(5 none 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 103 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 102 105 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock 85 90 

Cuba Railroad Co. First JNFortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 85 90 

Cuba Company 6% Debenture Bonds 90 95 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 93 100 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 94 90 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co., Preferred Stock 104 J^ 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co ., Common Stock 993^ 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 none 

Cuban-American Sugar Co., Preferred Stock 104 lO.S 

Cuban-.-Vmerican Sugar Co. Common Stock ISO 195 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 100^8 100% 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 58 62 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st mtge. 6% bonds 90 95 



THE CUBA RAILROAD 

The Cuba Railroad has announced the 
resignation of Sr. Francisco Rosado, formerly 
General Traffic Agent of the RaUroad. Sr. 
Mariano Cibran has been appointed to suc- 
ceed Sr. Rosado. 



CUBA SUBMARINE TELEGRAPH 

The accounts of the Cuba Submarine Tele- 
graph Company reveal a satisfactory increase 
in earnings, gross and net. The former have 
risen from £45,300 in 1915 to £51,700 in 1916, 
and the latter from £16,200 to £33,700. The 
improvement enables the directors to raise 
the dividend from 5 per cent, to which figure 
it was lowered two years ago from 6 per cent 
to 7 per cent., of which 2 per cent, is reckoned 
as bonus. A sum of £14,000 is transferred to 
reserve, to which no appropriation was made 
last year, and while no further allocation is 
made to the pension fund, to which £2,500, 
was added last year, the carry-forward is 
maintained at £7,600. The reserve fund, 
which stood a year ago at £100,000, has been 
charged with £24,000 on account of the depre- 



ciation of investments and allowing for the 
addition now made to it out of last year's 
revenue, it now amounts to £90,000. The 
book value of the investments is £91,800. — 
Financier and BuUionist, London. 



NATIONAL SURETY COMPANY 

The National Surety Company of Xew 
York has been qualified to do business in 
the Republic of Cuba, and has opened a 
branch office under the management of Mr. 
Heaton M. Waring, who also has supervision 
over IMexcio, ^'irgin Islands, Santo Domingo 
and Hayti. 

Temporary offices have been opened in 
Teniente Rey Xo. 11 (Altos), which will soon 
be moved to the new office building on Man- 
zana de Gomez, now approaching completion. 



GUARANTY TRUST COMPANY 

Sosthenes Behn has been appointed repre- 
sentative of the Guaranty Trust Company 
of New York for the Island of Cuba, with 
offices at Havana. Mr. Behn is also president 
of the Cuban Telephone Company. 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES 



WITH THE FOUR MOST IMPORTANT NATIONS OF LATIN AMERICA 
DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE YEARS 1914-1915 



The following tables show at a glance the relative importance of our trade with Cuba, 
the imports from Cuba for the first six months of the years 1914 and 1915 exceeding the com- 
bined imports from Argentina, Brazil and Chile by approximately four million dollars. 

For the same period the combined exports from the United States to Argentina, Brazil 
and Chile exceeded the exports to Cuba alone by less than three million dollars. 

The total trade of the United States with Cuba for the first half of the years 1914 and 1915 

exceeded the combined trade of the United States with these three principal countries of 
South America. 

Argentina. 

■ — - — ■ Imports.- ■ E.rports. 

1914 1915 1914 1915 

January $5,803,646 $7,163,422 $2,932,836 $1,707,222 

February 5,453,672 8,346,841 2,849,513 1,638,712 

March, " 5,587,868 11,731,548 2,441,936 4,097,581 

April 6,062,917 9,441,931 3,012,596 3,693,501 

May 5,167,961 5,047,898 2,828,399 5,423,898 

June 3,793,469 7,639,905 2,324,289 5,250,300 

Total $31,869,533 $49,371,645 $16,389,569 $21,811,214 

Bradl. 

January $8,201,645 $10,012,954 $2,195,013 $1,801,002 

February 8,357,827 9,735,607 1,854,763 2,174,426 

March. " 11,776,566 8,721,932 2,085,987 2,394,382 

April 9,136,559 11,698,528 2,123,408 2,864,282 

May 7,643,798 6,176,708 2,486,436 2,386,606 

June 5,656,900 8,605,678 1,734,508 3,213,078 

Total $50,773,301 $54,951,407 $12,480,115 $14,833,776 

Chile. 

January $1,955,390 $1,157,728 $1,063,113 $8813,146 

February 1,508,028 2,258,174 1,364,154 781 ,595 

March. ." 2,009,264 2,315,252 1,254,058 714,212 

April 2,263,947 3,952,920 1,411,879 1,298,545 

May 2,516,151 2,265,722 2,186,998 1,128,126 

June 

Total $10,252,780 $11,949,796 $7,280,202 $4,811,624 

Cuba. 

January $8,391,307 $7,745,634 $5,079,899 $5,645,957 

Februar. 9,225,406 13,191,900 4,846,911 5,608,746 

March. .' 15,035,443 25,561,908 5,186,445 6,554,230 

April 16,585,826 26,054,740 5,004,572 6,464,622 

May 14,636,355 25,036,046 5,263,881 7, 114,372 

June 16,989,960 22,137,394 5,288,486 6,935,267 

Total $80,864,297 $119,727,622 $30,670,194 $38,323,194 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 



Argentina $49, :>7 1,(11.') 

Brazil 54,951,407 

Chile 11,949,790 



$116,272,848 



CuIki $119,727,622 

The Three Nations 1 16,272,848 



Difference in favor. 



$3,454,774 



CUBA'S TKADE WITH THE UXrrjlD STA^rES YOU THE YEAR 1:XD1XC; .JLXi; 30, 
1916, AS COMPARED WITH 'l^in*; TJiADE WITH ARGEXTIXA, liRAZlL, 
AND Cirn.E, FOR THi: SAME PERIOD. 



Cuba. 



Imporls. 
$127,198,578 



Exports. 
$228,977,567 



Argentina. 
$66,378,366 $112,512,420 



Brazil. 



Imports. 
$40,572,197 



$24,239,826 



Chile. 



Exports. 
$132,663,984 



$64,154,859 



GROWTH IN CUBA'S FOREIGN TRADE BY YEARS 



I'cay.s Imports. 

1899-1900 $76,870,000 

1900-1901 66,255,000 

1901-1902 66,063,000 

1902-1903 62,620,000 

1903-1904 74,492,000 

1904-1905 92,957,000 

1905-1900 106,505,000 

1906-1907 97,334,000 

1907-1908 98,829,000 

1908-1909 86,791,000 

1909-1910 103,446,000 

1910-1911 108,098,000 

1911-1912 120,229,000 

1912-1913 135,810,000 

1913-1914 134,008,000 

1914-1915 128,132,000 

191.5-1916 201,024,000 



E.rports. 

$49, .399, 000 

64,218,000 

54,247,000 

78,-383,000 

94,.399,000 

101,166,000 

107,266,000 

114,813,000 

112,122,000 

117,564,000 

144,039,000 

129,179,000 

146,787,000 

165,208,000 

170,797,000 

219,447,000 

336,801,000 



Balance 
in Jauor oj 

Exports. 

$27,471,000 

2,037,000 

11,816,000 

15,763,000 

19,907,000 

8,209,000 

761,000 

17,479,003 

13,293,000 

30,773,000 

40,.593,000 

21,081,000 

26,.5.58,000 

29,.398,000 

36,789,000 

91,315,000 

a35,777,000 



EXPORTS OF GRAIN FROM ARGENTINA 
TO CUBA 

The following statistics were compiled at 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce from the official Argentine statistics. 
The quantities are stated in metric tons of 
2,204.6 pounds. 

1913 1914 1915 



Tons 

Oats 602 

Corn 19,357 

Wheat flour 11 



Tons Tons. 



272 

9,477 

63 



9,3.56 



CUBAS TRADE WITH ARGENTINA FOR 1912 
AND FOR 1916 

1912 1916 

Imports 1,10.5,.380 pesos 1,.323,019 pesos 

Argentine peso is worth 96.48 cents. 



ARGENTINA 



The following table shows Argentina's im- 
ports from Cuba during the first three months 
of 1916 as compared, with the ccrrespcr.ding 
period of the preceding year, the values being 
given in Argentine gold pescs. 

January-March, 1915 222,150 

January- March, 1916 230,391 



24 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THE CUBA R K V I E \\ 



25 




Residence, Stewart Sugar Estate. 



SUGAR INDUSTRY OF CUBA 



By Consul General Henry H. Moraan, Habani. 

The total number of sugar mills in Cuba during the year 1916-17 was 201. Of this number 
8 are in the Province of Pinar del Rio 21, in the Province of Habana, 40 in the Province of 
.Matanzas, 71 in the Province of Santa (Jlara, 19 in the Province of Camaguey, and 42 in the 
Province of Oriente. Cf the total, 68 are owned and operated by citizens of the United States. 

The 1916-17 crop w^ill jaeld about 2,800,000 tons. The production of sugar in the island 
of Cuba has increased diu-ing the past seven years, as follows: 1911, 1,480,217 tons; 1912, 
1,893,687 tons; 1913, 2,429,240 tons; 1914, 2,596,567 tons; and 1916, 3,006,625 tons. 

The 1917 crop was estimated at 3,500,000 tons, but not more than 2,800,000 tons will be 
produced under favorable weather and other concUtions, the decrease being due to the de- 
struction of cane by the revolutionists and the inability of the mills to grind while disturbances 
lasted. The estimate for 1917 of 3,500,000 tons would have been exceeded but for the dis- 
turbances. The losses of cane by fire from August, 1916, to May, 1917, according to the 
Kabana estimate, were 374,283 tons. 

Apjrroximaie Production of Mills — Acreage Under Cnllivaiion. 
The above estimate is far below the actual loss, for it is well known that the actual 
destruction amounted to upward of 500,000 tons of sugar. The approximate possible produc- 
tion of sugar in the different Provinces at present and the number of mills in operation in 
each are shown in the following table: 



Provinces 


Number 
of mills. 


Approxi- 
mate pro- 
duction. 


Provinces. 


Number 
1 of mills. 


Approxi- J 
mate pro- 
duction 




7 
21 
40 
70 


Tons. 

58,500 

395,000 

705,300 

1,0:59,000 


Camaguey 

Oriente 

1 Total 


.... 20 
43 


Tons. 
471,000 




902,000 








.... 201 




Santa Clara 


3,571,400 



23 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Gardens and Residence, Central Gertrudi 



The approximate number of acres under cultivation in the different Provinces follows: 
Pinar del Pdo, 22,777; Habana, 153,835; .Matanzas, 270,400; Santa Clara, 404,000; Camaguey, 
183,000; and Oriente, 350,800; making a total of 1,384,812 acres. 

The average yield per acre under favorable conditions is about 21^ tons. 

Efject of High Prices on Sugar Grinding. 
The high price of sugar at present permits the mill to grind at a profit, cane j-ielding only 
8 per cent, of sucrose, allowing for a loss in grinding of 2 per cent. The percentage reaches 
as high as 20 per cent, imder exceptionally favorable conditions, usually in February-March, 
but is generally 12 to 13 per cent. At this time of the year (.May-June) it is between 11 and 
13 per cent. It is stated that sugar can be obtained from cane containing not more than 7 per 
cent, of sucrose without loss, and the production could therefore be considerably increased 
if this class of cane was crushed, but as there is no profit at this percentage the cane is not cut 
but is allowed to remain in the field for the next year's grinding. 

Losses Due to Dislurbances. 
The destruction of cane caused by disturbances in the Oriente district from Alto Cedro to 
Santiago and from Bayamo to Caimanera makes it certain that next season's crop in this 
territory will not exceed that of 1917, because not more than 10 per cent, of the cane fields 
destroyed by fire have been cleaned, and the new crop on this area will be from 15 to 25 per 
cent less than it otherwise would have been. While the seed in most cases has not been de- 
stroyed the ratoon shows evidence of being several months behind in its growth, and the cane 
that would have come to maturity in December cannot be harvested until April or .May,- 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




Central IMercedita. 



and then the yield will be 15 to 25 per cent less than it would have been had the burned eane 
been cut away and the fields cleaned. 

The writer visited the sugar plantations of Alameida, Frmita, Fsperanza, Santa .Maria, 
La Union, and others of minor note in this section of the Province, passed through many 
thousand acres of cane that had been destroyed by fire and found that no attempt had been 
made to clear away the old cane. The effect of this, too, will be a large increase in the cost 
of cutting the cane next year, as the old stalks still in the ground will have to be cut as well 
as the new cane. 

A visit was also made to all the sugar cane-growing territory in the Province of (^riente 
east of the points between Santiago de Cuba, and the writer had a conference with practically 
every sugar-cane planter of importance in the territory. In the district between Antilla and 
Santiago de Cuba great destruction of property has been caused by disturbances. "With but one 
exception, every railway station between these two points has been destroyed, a large number 
of bridges have been wrecked, and most of the shops along the line have been burned. .All 
the railway bridges have now been repaired or reconstructed except the one between San Luis 
and Auza, and this will soon be repaired, leaving a clear roadbed from Habana to Santiago 
de Cuba. In the section of Oriente Province referred to, the rainy season has now .set in, and 
there will be practically no grinding until Decemb3r next, nor will it be possible to repair the 
damages in the burnt area. 

Mare Favorable Conditions in Other Sections. 
While there were many thousand acres of cane burned between Alto Cedro and Antilla 
the planters in this section had, to a large extent, cleared away all the burnt section, and the 
ratoon was standing well in the field. The spring rains that commence in this section about 
the middle of I\'ay usually end toward the close of June, so that many of the mills in this 
section will now start grinding and continue until September. A few of the mills in this dis- 
trict, notably the Preston :Mill at Xipe i?ay, Tuinucu, and Baragua, will produce about the 
amount of sugar estimated, but the remainder of the mills will all be between 60 and 70 per 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE SUGAR INDUSTRY 



cent below the estimate. The prospect for a larger crop in this section of the island for next 
year, however, is excellent, and the planters say that under favorable conditions there will be 
a far greater yield than the estimated 1917 crop. 

In the northern part of the district at Chaparra and Delicias, where the largest sugar mills 
in the world are located, having a capacity of over 1,300,000 bags of sugar (about 186,000 
tons' a year, the rebels burned and destroyed about 8,000,000 arrobas (100,000 tons) of cane, 
bringing down the estimated production from 178,571 tons of sugar to about 157,143 tons, 
which, the manager informs the writer, will be the final figures when the mills cease to grind 
in .August next. All the burnt fields belonging to these plantations that are owned by the 
Cuban American Co. ha\e been cleaned, and it is estimated that, with favorable conditions, 
the yield of next year's crop will be con.siderably in excess of the estimated 1917 crop. 

In the Camaguey and Santa Clara Provinces, which were visited, the destruction caused 
by disturbances was far greater than that caused in the Province of Oriente. Every railway 
bridge of the Cuba Railway Co., between Camaguey and Antilla, was destroyed or damaged, 
as well as every bridge between AntUla and Guantanamo, and nearly all the railway stations. 
Practically one-half of the cane crop was destroyed. The cane fields in the neighborhood of 
Jobabo were devastated. 

The 14 mills that have now stopped grinding for the season show a production of 162,539 
tons, as against an estimated production of 319,300 tons, a difference of 156,761 tons, or 49.09 
per cent, all due to the destruction caused by the revolutionists. 

Notwithstanding the destuction, Cuba wUl be in a position to produce over 3,500,000 
tons of sugar in 1918, as there are a number of large mills now in course of construction which 
will be ready to grind in December next, and there are many thoasand acres of new fields 
planted. The output, however, will depend upon general conditions, improvement of the 
transportation facilities and labor conditions. 

Transportation Dijjicidties — Labor Shortage. 

The transportation facilities of Cuba have always been inadequate. With the exception 
of the Chaparra and Delicias mills, which have their own railway and seaboard facilities, 
and the Preston mill on Nipe Bay, all the mills in Cuba are dependent upon the Cuba Rail- 
way Co. for the transport of their sugar to a seaport, and are also dependent upon it for their 
supplies. Complaint has been made regarding the lack of transportation facilities, which 
have tied up thousands of tons of sugar in warehouses, on which mill owners are unable to 
get any advances from the banks. 

The most serious problem that confronts the sugar cane growers in Cuba at present is 
the scarcity of labor, and unless some action is taken to remedy this defect they will be seriously 
hampered in their operations in cultivating the fields and in gathering the next season's crop 
The revolution caused many thousands of Spaniards, Haitians, and others to leave the country, 
and it is feared they wUl not return. 

It is estimated that 50,000 extra hands will be required by Cuba for the cultivation of 
the cane fields and for cutting and grinding next season's crop. The cane cutters are now 
receiving $1 to .$1.30 per 100 arrobas (2,500 pounds) for cutting cane. The workers on the 
fields and the cart drivers receive $2 to $3 per day. 

Possibilities of Greater Yield. 
The soil of the Provinces of Oriente and Camaguey is very fertile and it is capable, with 
intensive cultivation, of producing a much greater yield. A large percentage of the land now 
under cultivation is practically virgin soil. Three crops of corn can be raised each year. 
Cane once planted reproduces itself each year for 20 to 25 years, and the only fertilization 
the soil requires is the cut leaves from the cane which is left in the fields at harvest time. 
The country also contains thousands of acres of grazing lands, and vegetables of all descrip- 
tions grow continuously. 



THl!. CUBA REVIKW 



29 



COST OF AMERICAN CANE SUGAR 
COMPARED WITH CUBAN 

The cost of producing cano susar in the 
United States and i)oss(>ssi(jns is compared 
with that in Cuba in a report entitled "The 
Cane Sugar Industry,'' issued June 30, 1.917, 
by the Bureau of Foreign and Doniertic 
Commerce, of the Department of Commerce. 
Forty-nine per cent, of the total sugar con- 
sumed in the United States is produced in 
seven of our western States, two of our 
Southern States, and our insular pos-sessions. 
The remaining fifty-one per cent, comes from 
Cuba and other foreign countries. The 
Bureau's report is the first thorough study 
of actual conditions in the competing sugar 
regions that has ever been published. 

According to the Government investiga- 
tors, the average cost of producing cane 
sugar in Hawaii during the normal crop year 
1913-1914 was $44.59 f. o. b. factory. In 
Porto Fico it was $52.29, in Louisiana $79.50, 
and in Cuba $28.92. The average marketing 
cost per ton from factory to dehvery in the 
United States was, for Hawaii $9.34, for 
Porto Eico, $4.27 and for Cuba $5.46. 

Per poimd of sugar delivered in the United 
States, the average cost of the Hawaiian 
product was 2.697 cents, of the Porto Rican 
2.328 cents, of Louisiana sugar 3.975 cents, 
and for the Cuban 1.719 cents, not counting 
the duty. With the duty added the cost of 
Cuban sugar deUvered in the L'nited States 
was 2.7238 cents. For 96 per cent, of all 
the beet .sugar produced in the United States 
during the same crop year the average cost 
f. o. b. factory was 3.74 cents a pound. 

In Hawaii the average cane production 
per acre harvested for mill was 43.92 tons, 
in Porto Eico 20.45 tons, in Louisiana 18.29 
tons, and in Cuba 21.32 tons. For every 
acre of cane, Hawaii produced an average of 
10,992 pounds of sugar, Porto Rico 4,539 
poimds, and Cuba 4,912 pounds. Louisiana's 
highest average production during the crop 
years 1909-10, 1910-11 and 1911-12 was 
2,616 pounds of sugar per acre. 

The most scientific and intensive system 
of cultivation is practiced in Hawaii, in 
striking contrast with the exiensive system 
in vogue in Cuba. The cane-cutting, loading 
and transportation methods contrast very 
favorably with those of Cuba; the rushing 
of the cane by fluming from the harvest 
field to the factory and the bringing of the 
railwav track and car upon the heels of the 



cane cutters in all jtarts of the fields in Hawaii 
are very modem developments when com- 
pared with the laborious and preci.sc adjast- 
ment of each stalk in the ox-cart, and the 
slow hauling of the cane by o.\ teams to the 
railroad, to be reloaded and hauled to the 
mill in Cuba. In the extraction of juice 
from the cane in Hawaiian factories and in 
other milling and scientific processes the 
r(>sults attained are the best of all cane- 
sugar countries. Eecaase of the fact that 
Hawaii represents the best efforts of the 
I'nited States and its insular possessions, 
the Bureau's report makes extended compari- 
sons between the conditions and results in 
Hawaii and those of its principal competitor 
and the main source of our foreign sugar 
supply, the island of Cuba. 

Although the exhaustive report (it con- 
tains 462 pages) is given over largely to a 
discussion of the cost of producing sugar, 
there are included some interesting statistics 
of the world's production of cane and beet 
sugar since the Brassels Convention of 1903, 
the destination of cane and beet sugar ex- 
ported from each country, and the source 
of the sugar imports of each country together 
with the annual and per capita consumption. 
It also gives the average, the highest and the 
lowest prices per pound at New York for 
each month and each year from 1904 to 1916 
of 96 centrifugal raw and fine granulated 
sugars, together with the differences between 
the wholesale prices of raw and refined sugar 
and the differences between the wholesale 
and retail prices of refined sugar. 

The report is the last that will be issued 
by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce on the cost of production in this 
country as compared with that in other 
countries, as the division that did this work, 
known as the Cost of Production Division, 
has been taken over by the Tariff Board, 
where the expert knowledge of the members 
of the staff will be used in making investiga- 
tions of production costs for the guidance of 
the Board in suggesting changes in tariff 
schedules. The full title of the bulletin is 
"The Cane Sugar Industry; Agricultiu-al 
Manufacturing and Marketing Costs in 
Hawaii, Porto Rico, Louisiana and Cuba," 
Miscellaneous Series No. 53. 



LABORATORY 

The new laboratory of the Department of 
Agriculture at Havana was opened early in 
August. 



30 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




jAPi. FEa Mar. Apr May juh. July Aug. Sep Oct Mov. Dec. 

LiDiagram Showing Market Price of Cuban Raw Sugar at New York, c. and f. Basir- 06- Test- 



THECUBAREVIEW 31 



SUGAR AT SIX CENTS 

AX lust, three years after the ()Utl)reak of tlii! war, the priee of sun.ar has cx- 
ceecle(] the lon^ anticipated figure of six eents i)er pound. If is interestinti to reeall that 
at the outl)reak of the war the price of sugar jumped from 2% to 514 cf^nia inside; (jf a week, 
and at this time it was predicted that sugar would go as high as 9 cents or 10 cents, and some 
speculators went so far as to buy sugar at a price approximately 6 cents in anticipation of taking 
immediate and large profits. 

The i-eason for the present high price of sugar might be attributable to the statistical 
situation wliich shows that there is not sufficient sugar to meet the demand, but on the other 
hand, during the past three years there have been many occasions when those interested in 
the niamifacture and sale of sugar have felt that the demand was far in excess of the world 
production, and justly predicted a rapid increase in the price of sugar, and at such times it 
would naturally be expected that the price would exceed G cents. This, however, did not take 
place and, therefore, it is perfectly natural that we should look to some other caasc for a satis- 
factory explanation of the present rise, and with this idea in mind it is interesting to note 
that the demand which we are now experiencing for raw sugar is attributable to the anxiety 
on the part of the buyers of raw sugar to fill their orders for refined, which temporarily has 
caused some pressure on the market. 

It is to be expected that the market price for raw sugar will fluctuate, depending upon 
ihe outside influences brought to bear on this market, but in view of the fact that the balance 
■of the supiily of Cuban sugar is held in strong hands, there is every reason to believe that 
the price will be maintained on a comparatively high level, although it may suffer slight re- 
action from time to time. 



FINAL REPORT ON BEET SUGAR. 1916 

Final returns from practically all operating factories give the 1916 production of beet 
sugar in the United States as 852,074 short tons. Unfavorable growing conditions reduced 
the expected yield, and in some regions thousands of tons of unharvested beets were frozen in 
the ground. 

State, and year of beet harvest Sugar made Area harvested Beets worked 

1916 Short Ions Acres Short tons 

California 274,.539 144,803 1,125,595 

Colorado 2.52,147 188,567 1,933,.595 

Idaho 4.5,874 42,134 331,478 

Michigan 69,341 99,619 502,705 

Ohio 18,234 24,767 137,696 

Utah 90,277 68,211 708,237 

■Other States 108,462 100,911 843,071 



United States 858,874 669,012 5,582,373 



1915 874,220 611,301 6,150,293 

1914 [[[[ 722,054 483,400 5,288,500 

1913 733,401 580,00u 5,659,462 

— The Monthly Crop Report. 



NETHERLANDS SUGAR 



According to official statistics, which cover the whole of the Netherlands, the imports an 1 
•exports of sugar for the years 1914, 1915 and 1916, were as follows: 

Imports. - — Exports. 

Kind 1914 191.5 1916 1914 1915 1916 

Metric Metric Metric Metric Metric Metric 

Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons. 

Jlaw beet -iugar 202..323 19,312 2,263 116,808 67,081 37,694 

Raw cane *u|ar 9 146 2,047 22,718 2,596 580 22.339 

Another ..........:....: 43:.589 9,853 25,788 172,274 103,186 32,281 

Totals 255,058 31.212 50,769 291,678 170,847 92,314 



32 



THE CUBA REVIEW 





?i'5nnnnf 


jAn. Feb. Mar. Apr. Nay. Jun. Jul. Aug. 5ep. Oct. Mov Drr 






















' 
























































.. 


'750.000 


5.000.00C 














y 












i /'"' 1 ' 














J ^ 






_: 700.000 














tt 


















f^ 








4.500.00C 


— 










tt 


















~i+ ~l 






H650.00O 














4^ 




















H- 




















7 






-600.000 


4.000,00C 












y^ 






































u 




















t 






— ■ 550,000 












1 


J 








ssooooo 










i 


t 


















'I 








-500.000 












It 
1 1\ 




















if 






















»/ 










3000000 










4^ 




















1 _ 




















i _ 




















T 








■400.000 












1 










z.5oaooo 
















/' 












li 




y'^ 




-550000 












/ / 


/ 


/ 
















f / 


I 


















f / 


: ^^^ 








2.000.000 










/ p 


^^ 






-300.000 










/ / 


_ >^ 








(T) 












/ / 


/ 








i 








— I 


^T 


_^ 






-250.000 • 






6 


1 




/ 






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1.500,000 






«« 


i/ 


nr^ 


r 






o 








>? 


1/ 


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f 






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/ 


/ 


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-200,000 










/ 
f 




t >V 
















i 


. 1 1 I./I 










innonof 






/ 


/ 


,— ^ 








- 150,000 








/ 


/ 


t 


















1 


f 














/ 


1 


J 


/ 














/ 


J 


f 


/L 








- 100.000 


^c\r\cv\t\ 




1 


/ 


















1 

-t- 


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1— 


/,. 


/ 










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a/ 
















i 


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Jam. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. 5ep. Oct. Hov. Dec. 



DIAGRAAI 
Showing Exports of Cuban Raw Sugar to Europe during 1915,51916Jand]1917 (to Aug. 1st.) 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



33 



EUROPEAN SHIPMENTS 



The continuity of shipments of raw sugar from Cuba transatlantic have entirely vindicated 
t he opinion expressed in the May issue of the Cuba Rrrricw to the effect that indications 
at that time were that shipments of raw sugar in 1917 would exceed those in 1916. I'p to the 
present time there has been shipped from Cuba to Europe and England approximately 40,000 
tons more than during a similar period last year. 

On the other hand, shipments of refined sugars from the United States have dccrea.sed, 
and up to date are only 60 per cent, of what they were a j-ear ago. Shipments of raw sugars 
from Cuba and refined from the United States in the aggregate are less this year than during a 
corresponding period of last year. It is, therefore, natural to expect that the total shipments of 
sugars transatlantic, including raw and refined, will be less in 1917 than actually took place in 
1916, inasmuch as it is highly improbable that these large differences will be made up in view 
of the available supply of raw sugar and the constantly increasing demand in the home market 
for refined. In the meantime old crop sugars are in storehouse in Java on the eve of harvest- 
ing a large new crop, but these sugars are not readily available to this market or to the Euro- 
pean market by reason of the great shortage of steam tonnage for transportation. 



THE INDIAN SUGAR INDUSTRY 



Contrary' to public expectation, the area under sugar cane in India is slightly less than at 
the corresponding date last year, the latest estimates being 2,354,000 acres in 1916 as against 
2,508,000 acres in 1915. The figures, according to the Provinces which yield collectively 99 
per cent of the total crop, are as under: 

Increase + 

Provinces. 1916-17 1915-16 or 

Acres. Acres. Decrease — • 

United Provinces 1,220,000 1,390,000 —170,000 

Punjab 358,000 354,000 + 4,000 

Bihar and Orissa 270,000 268,000 + 2,000 

Bengal 223,000 234,000 — 11,000 

Madras 99,000 85,000 + 14,000 

Bombay and Sind (including Native States).. 95,000 89,000 + 6,000 

Assam 35,000 36,000 — 1,000 

North-West Frontier Province 32,000 32,000 

Central Provinces and Berar 22,000 20,000 + 2,000 

Total 2,354,000 2,508,000 —154,000 

The bulk of the sugar is produced by primitive methods, and the average return does not 
exceed a ton of sugar per acre- a glaring contrast to the yields in other parts of the world. 
There is no reason why the sugar output of India should not be doubled without a single addi- 
tional acre being put in cultivation, by the adoption of modern methods of cane-sugar produc- 
tion.— T/jc Wist India Committee Circular. 



CENTRAL ALGODONES 

Central "Algodones," one of the new mills 
in Camaguey Province, has recently placed 
an order with the Baldwin Locomotive ^^'orks 
for two latest tj-pe sugar road locomotives 
for this plantation. 



SUGAR IN VERA CRUZ 

Owing to the fact that none of the estates in 
^'era Cruz is being operated to full capacity, 
the demand for sugar there has exceeded 
the supply, resulting in a price two or three 
times that of normal times. 



:U 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



STATISTICS OF YELLOW PINE LUMBER 

IMPORTED INTO CUBA DURING 1916 

Compiled by Ramon Cardona, Habana. 

PORT. Feet. 

Habana 77,951,077 

Sagua la Grande 17,612,127 

Caibarien 16,043,132 

Cardenas 13,684,292 

Antilla 13,031,922 

Santiago de Cuba 11,289,587 

jMatanzas 9,256,998 

Cienfuegos 8,505,709 

:Manzanillo 6,835,895 

Guantdnamo 3,711 ,862 

Puerto Padre 3,502,944 

Nuevitas 2,011,707 

Jucaro 1,521,753 

:Manati 1,371,779 

Gibara 1,168,648 

Banes 882,405 

Casilda 666,000 

Vita 583,000 

Niquero 440,000 

Grand Total 189,598,629 



AMERICAN_CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 
FOR CUBA 

Cuba's prosperity has resulted in extensive 
plans for new sugar mills, new railways, and 
many other phases of engineering activity, 
all of which will mean new orders for Ameri- 
can construction material and machinery, 
according to an official survey of the situation 
recently completed by Special Agent W. W. 
Ewing, of the Biu-eau of Foreign and Domes- 
tic Commerce, Department of Commerce. 

A number of new sugar mills are projected 
for this season, and railway construction and 
extension is being planned on a large scale. 
The heavy traffic movement of both sugar 
and general merchandise will make necessary 
a great development of the wharf facilities, 
and the need for greater warehouse space 
and other port improvements is apparent. 
.Modern hotel buildings are already being 
planned and sites acquired in order to meet 
the demands of the tourist traffic. .Many 
other indications of engineering activity are 
to be seen in all parts of the island. The 
United States is in the best position to supply 



the materials needed for all such improve- 
ments. 

Mr. Ewing's report is entitled "Markets 
for Construction .Materials and Machinery 
in Cuba," Special Agents Series No. 139. 
It deals with present building activities and 
with the demand for general construction 
material , flooring materials, roofing mater- 
ials, materials for interior finish, and con- 
struction machinery and tools. There is 
also a chapter on commercial practices and 
requirements and several pages of statistical 
tables. 



PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED 

Link Belt Roller Chain.— Book Xo. 326, 
published by the Link Belt Co. 

This booklet Avas printed for distribution 
at the Fremont Tractor Demonstration in 
August, 1917, and gives many interesting 
facts in regard to the manufacture and use 
of roller chains. The chain is described in 
detail with illustrations and the book also 
contains illustrations of tractors which are 
equipped with Link-Belt roller chains. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 35 



ASome FacLs ahuat Holler Chain Drire.s. — the JiitcriKilional In.stitutc of AKri<'ulture, 

Book No. 361, published by the Link-Belt Rome, Italy. 

Co. Thi.s book contains an article written Tliis j)M})licati()n consist'^ of a booklet of 

by A. Lee Henson, fully describing the appli- more than scvcntN- pa^cs and includes a 

cation of the diain drive to tlie Smith Motor consi(leral)le number of statistics, some 

Truck. official and some from f)ther triLstworthy 



Copies of these books may be obtained 
by application to the Link-Belt Co. in Phila- 
delphia, Chicago or Indianapolis. 



sources, on phosphatic, pota-sh and nitro- 
genous fertilizers, as well as the principal 
chemical products li.sted in agriculture. The 
Ijook treats of the world's i)roduction of these 
The Inter national Movement of Fertilizers articles in the international trade and the 

and Chemical Products Useful to Agriculture. wholesale price.s for the period under con- 

— Book No. 6, ^.'arch, 1917, published by sideration. 



SUGAR REVIEW 



Specidlly written for T)in Cuba Review by Willett A Gray, New York, -V. Y . 

Our last review for this magazine was dated July 9, 1917. 

At that date Cuba Centrifugal sugar of 96'' test basis was quoted at 5'/2C. c.& f. New ^'ork. 
and is now 6J4c. c. & f. 

^^ ith but two exceptions the changes have all been upward during the months under review, 
fluctuations having occurred as follows: July 9, 5 5/ 16c. c. & f.; July 11, o^^c; 12th, 5}^c.; 
17th, 5 19/32C.; ISth, 55^c.; 20th, 5 9/16c.; 24th, 55^c; 25th, S^c; 27th, 5 15/16c.; 30th, 
6c.; August 2d, 63/8C.; 3d, 63^c. c. & f. 

Porto Rico sugars have advanced during the month from 6.23c. to 7.21c., having been under 
the same influence as the Cuban sugar market, which is affected by the large purchases of 
Cuba sugar for shipment to Europe, as well as to this country. 

The unsold available supply in Cuba is run down to about 2.50,000 tons, and included in 
this amount is a considerable amount of sugar that is yet to be made, and for this reason C'ubau 
sellers have been reluctant to offer sugars until they are able to ascertain exactly how the crop 
will outturn. The above figure must be divided up between the United States refiners, Cana- 
dian refiners, the British and French Governments, and is it easy to learn the strength of the 
situation. 

As far as the sugar supply of the entire world is concerned there is plenty of sugar even 
under a decreased production of European beet sugar, and the increased production of cane 
sugar throughout the world, which has been stimulated by the prevailing high war prices. 
The only trouble is that the sugar that is available is in the wrong part of the world; that is, 
in Java and the Philippines, available supply of the former Island being from 600,000 to 1,000,- 
000 tons, and the latter about 70,000 tons. However, the sugar is not in the part of the world 
where the demand exists — Europe and America — and the problem of transporting sugar from 
eastern producing countries to western consuming countries is a very serious one, especially 
under the present existing state of ocean tonnage with which everyone is familiar. 

Relief from the high prices prevailing will not be in sight, until the new United States 
beet crop, the Louisiana cane crop, and the Cuban and other West Indian cane crops come to 
market, beginning from October to December this year. 

Refined sugar has been very difficult to buy, all refiners limiting sales and .some being en- 
tirely withdrawn from the market. Quotations for granulated, duty paid, have been advancing 
from 7Kc. to 8.40c. and 8.75c less 2%, which advance, of course, has been necessitated by 
the corresponding increase in raw sugar prices. 

The Cuba crop has continued to catch up upon that of last year, visible production to Aug. 
4th, being 2,862,619 tons or only 69,365 tons less than corresponding figure last year, which is 
2,931,984 tons. Last year the crop was shghtly over 3,000,000 tons, and this year's crop will 



36 THE CUBA REVIEW 

about equal it. In catching up in the shortage, comparison with last year can be more readily 
seen when it is remembered that the shortage in April of this year was over 300,000 tons. We 
estimate that 14 centrals are now working in the Island of Cuba against five last year and six 
in 1915. WILLETT & GRAY. 

New York, August 7, 1917. 



REVISTA AZUCARERA 



Bscrita espeeialmente para la Cuba RetitiB par WilUU A Gray, de Naeva York. 

Nuestra ultima resena para esta pubUcaci6n estaba fechada el 9 de juUo de 1917. 

Fn esa fecha el aziicar centrifugo de Cuba polarizacion 98° se cotizaba d 5f^c. costo y 
flete en Nueva York, y ahora se cotiza A GJ^c. costo y flete. 

Excepto en dos casos, los cambios han sido todos hacia el alza dinante el mes bajo reseiia, 
teniendo lugar las fluctuaciones del modo siguiente: julio 9, 5 5/16c. c. y f.; julio 11, 5^c.; 
ell2, SJoc; ell7, 5 19/32C.; el 18, 5^c.; el 20, 5 9/l6c.; el 24, S^c.f el 25, 5Mc.; el 27, 

5 15/l6c.; el 30, 6c.; el 2 de agosto, 63^c.; y el 3 de agosto 63^c. costo y flete. 

Los azucares de Puerto Rico han subido en precio durante el mes desde 6.23c. a 7.21c., 
habiendo estado bajo la misma influencia que el mercado de aziicar de Cuba, el cual es dsu vez 
afectado por las grandes compras de azucar de Cuba para embarcar a Europa, asi como para 
este pais. 

Las existencias sin vender y disponibles en Cuba se han reducido a unas 250,000 tone- 
ladas, e inclusa en esta cantidad hay considerable cantidad de azucar todavia por elaborar, y 
por este niotivo los vendedores de Cuba no se deciden a ofrecer azucares hasta poder averi- 
guar exactamente lo que rendira la zafra. La cantidad antes expresada tiene que ser repartida 
entre los refinadores de los Estados Unidos, los refinadores del Canada y los Gobiernos de 
Francia y la Gran Bretana, asi es que es fdcil averiguar la firmaza de la situaci6n. 

En cuanto d lo que se refiere & las existencias de azucar del mundo entero, hay abundancia 
de azucar aun a pesar de la disminucion de dicho producto en el azucar de remolacha 
de Europa, y el aiunento de produccion de azucar de caiia por todo el mundo, el cual ha sido 
estimulado por los altos precios prevalecientes d causa de la guerra. El unico inconveniente 
es que el aziuar disponible se halla en una parte del mundo no muy accesible, esto es en Java 
y en las Fihpinas, las existencias disponibles en el primer punto siendo de 600,000 a 1,000,000 
toneladas, y las de las Filipinas unas 70,000 toneladas. Sin embargo, el azucar no se halla en 
aquella parte del mundo donde existe la demanda — Europa y America — -y el prob- 
lema de transportar el azucar desde los paises productores del oriente d los paises consumidores 
del occidente es cosa muy seria, especialmente bajo el estado que existe al presente acerca del 
tonelaje maritimo, de que todo el mundo es conocedor. 

La baja en los altos precios prevalecientes no tendrd, lugar hasta que Ueguen al mercado la 
cosecha de azucar de remolache de los Estados Unidos, la cosecha de azucar de cana de la 
Luisiana y la cosecha de azucar de cana de Cuba y de otras cosechas de las Antillas, que em- 
pezara desde octubre d. diciembre de este ano. 

Ha sido muy dificil la compra de azucar refinado, todos los refinadores limitando sus ventas 
y algunos retirdndose entermente del mercado. Las cotizaciones del azucar granulado, derechos 
pagados, han subido de 73^c. d 8.40c. y 8.75c. menos 2%, cuya alza, por supuesto, ha sido 
necesaria por el correspondiente aumento en los precios del azucar crudo. 

La zafra de Cuba ha continuado d la altura de la del ano pasado, la produccion visible el 4 
de agosto siendo de 2,862,619 toneladas, 6 sea solamente 69,365 toneladas menos que en la cor- 
respondiente fecha el aiio pasado, que era de 2,931,984 toneladas. El aiio pasado la zafra 
fuc de un poco mas de 3,000,0000 toneladas, y la zafra de este ano casi la igualara. Al dis- 
minuir la merma, la comparacion con la zafra del aiio pasado puede verse mas facilmente 
teniendo en cuenta que la merma en abril de este ano era de mas de 300,000 toneladas. Cal- 
culamos que hay ahora 14 centrales funcionando en la Isla de Cuba, contra 5 el ano pasado y 

6 en 1915. WILLETT & GRAY. 

Nueva ^'ork, agosto 7 de 1917. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



37 



Cable Address "Turnure" 



New York--Sl— 36 Wall Street 



LAWRENCE TURNURE & CO. 

Deposits and Accounts Current. Deposits of Securities, we taking charge of Collection and Remittance of Divi- 
dends and Interest. Purchase and Sale of Public and Industrial Securities. Purchase and Sale of Letters of 
Exchange. Collection of Drafts, Coupons., Etc., for account of others. Drafts, Payments by Cable and Letter* 
of Credit on Havana and other cities of Cuba; also on England, France, Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo 
and Central and South America. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

HAVANA— N. C«lata y Ca. LONDON— The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd. 

PUERTO RICO^-Banco Comercial de Puerto Rico PARIS— Heine et Cie. 



PYREX LABORATORY GLASSWARE 







Pyrex Glass — -a new borosilicate glass possessing an extraordinarily low ex])aiisijii 
coefficient, 0.0000032, and great resistance to sudden temperature changes. 

Chemical stability tests show Pyrex glass to be less soluble in water and acids and 
about equally soluble in alkalis, compared with the best resistance glass, either American 
or foreign, hithertofore offered. The glass contains no metals of the magnesia-lime-zinc 
group and no heavy metals. 

The low ex]Dansion coeffic'ent makes it possible to make PjTex beakers and flasks with 
wall slightl}' thicl-er ttian usual— tais greatly increases the durability of the vessels without 
diminishing tlic resistance to sudden heating and cooling. 

Descriptive Price List Upon Request 



EIMER & AMEND 



NEW YORK CITY 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



OTTAWA, CAN. 



ARTESIAN WELL & SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
p. O. BOX 1241 U. S. A. 

We Drill Wells for Water Supplies. 
Write us for proposition for one for 
your plantation. Have a full equip- 
ment of tools and machinery in Cuba 
at this time. 



CAR S 



10-4. 8^ GAGE FL.\TS— Ungth 10 ft. 6in. 

Capacity 20,000 lbs. 

28-24 in. GAGE. 8 WHEEL 

Hopper Bottom Gondola 

ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

Length 19 ft. 4 in. Capacity 10 Tone 

Weight 7,500 lbs. 

Fi RST - CLASS CONDITION 

Will Convert to Steel Underframe Flat Cars 

PROMPT SHIPMENT .-. LOW PRICE 

RAILS, LOCOMOTIVES, CARS 

OF ALL KINDS 

JkUnUTTA 

:^WALTER A ZELMICrtER SUPPLY COM" 



38 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



SUGAR FACTORIES 

Construction & Equipment Corporation 

Designers and Constructors of Ingenios 
and Refineries 



NEW YORK CITY 
82 Beaver Street 



HAVANA 
Lonja Building 



SUGAR CROP OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

Statements from the Sugar Factors Co. 
(Ltd.), which handles and ships the output 
of the major number of sugar corporations 
in the Hawaiian Islands, indicate that the 
value of the 1917 crop, based on an estimated 
output of 643,620 tons, at the current market 
price of sugar will be $79,165,600. The 
value of the 1916 crop was $68,000,000. 

Prior to last year the cost of production 
of Hawaiian sugar, per short ton, was being 
cut down through steady development in 
efficiency. Now, however, very largely on 



account of the heavy bonuses paid to laborers, 
the cost shows a marked increase. During 
the last period more than $4,000,000 was paid 
to laborers on the bonus plan. This is based 
on the price of sugar. As the planter profits, 
so do the laboreres. 

The increased use of commercial fertilizers 
has been evident on the sugar plantations 
during the past five years. The quantity 
of commercial fertilizers used in 1917 will 
total approximately 85,000 tons. Five years 
ago, in 1913, the amount was 62,213 tons.— 
A. P. Taylor, Honolulu. 



Bank of Cuba in New York 



1 WALL ST. NEW YORK 



RESOURCES Nov. 29, 1916 - $1,415,570.70 

General banking business transacted 
with special facilities for handhng 
Cuban items through the National 
Bank of Cuba and its 40 branches. 
We are especially interested in dis- 
counting Cuban acceptance. Your 
account is solicited. 



W. A. MERCHANT 
J. T. MONAHAN 
CHAS. F. PLARRE 
L. G. JONES - 



President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Asst. Cashier 



Pedro Pablo Diago Guillermo Carricaburu 

LOUIS V. PLACiE CO. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
AND SHIP BROKERS 



76 Cuba Street, Havana, Cuba 
CABLE ADDRESS: "PLAC£" 



FACTS ABOUT SUGAR 

82 WALL STREET NEW YORK 

Published Weekly 
Subscription Price :: $3.00 a year 

Write Today For Sample Copy 

Indispensable to the Man Inter- 
ested in Sugar 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertisers 



T II K (; U H A IlIO V 1 E W 39 



POPULAR TROLLEY TRIPS 

Via the HAVANA CENTRAL RAILROAD to 

GUANAJAY 

Fare, 55 Cents 

GUINES 

Fare, 80 Cents Round Trip, $1.50. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION fror 
5 A. M. to 8 P. M. Lost train 11.20 P. M. 



Train every hour daily from CENTRAL STATION from 
5.50 A. M. to 7.50 P. M. Laet Train 11.10 P. M. 



SLBLRBAN SEIIVK K TO RECJLA, CilJANABAC OA, AND (ASA BI.ANCA 
(CABANAS FORTKKSSj FROM UJZ FKRRY, HAVANA, TO 

RcKla (Forryj *0.0r) 

(jiianahacoa (Ferry arirl Kloctric Railway) 10 

Gasa Blaiica and (Jabafia.s FortresH (Forry) 05 

P'erry Service to Regla and car sorvice to Guanahacoa every l.'i rniniiteH, from 
5 A. M. to 10.30 P. M., every 30 minutes thereafter, up to 12 rnidniKht, and hourly 
thence to 5.00 A. M. To Gasa Blanoa, every 30 minutes from 5.30 A. M. to 11.00 
P. M. 



HOME INDUSTRY IRON WORKS 

ENGINES, BOILERS and MACHINERY 

Manufacturing and Repairing of all kindi. Architectural Iron and Braia 

Caitlngi. Light and Heavy Forglngs. All kfndi of Machinery SupplUa. 

Steamship Work a Specialty 

A. KLINQ, Prop. MORII E ALA 

JAS. S. BOQUE, Supt. iVlWDlLE-, /\L./\. 



THE AMERICAN PHOTO CO 

PHOTOGRAPHY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

('on.struction, Mininj; and Su(;ar-Mill Work a .specialty. Wo art; th*; lar(,'e;t, bent 
equippcfl and mont fcxpericncwl hou.se in Cuba Samp!e< and estimates .suhmitte'l 
upon request. Let u.s help you make your afiverti.sementH convincini^. 

HAVANA OBISPO 70 CUBA 



Telephone 3.'} Hamilton. Niaiit Call, 41 1 Harrjilton. CJablu A<J'lr<:««: "AMwork*," New York 

ATLANTIC BASIN IRON WORKS 

Engineers, Boiler Makers & Manufacturers. Steamship Repairs in all Branches 

Heavy Forging*, Iron and Iira*i Cajtingi, Copper Hf<«cialtie«. Di«»el Motor Ileoairi, Cold Htoraie 
Inatallation, Oil Fuel Iriataliatlon, Carpenter and Joiner Work 

!?:" fMLAY^TREE" ]^'" "•'"•'»«"' ^erry BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

Agent* for "KInghorn" Multiplex Valve 



Please merdion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertiaert 



40 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



THE 



TRUST COMPANY OF CUBA 

HAVANA 



CAPITAL $500,000 

SURPLUS $450,000 

TRANSACTS A 

GENERAL TRUST AND 
BANKING BUSINESS 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

EXAMINES TITLES, COLLECTS RENTS 
NEGOTIATES LOANS ON MORTGAGES 

Corr«apond*nc« Sollcit*d from 
I n t • n d I n g InTsstors 

OFFICERS 

Normftn H. Davis ..... President 

Oswald A. Homsby - - . - Vice-President 
Claudio Q. Mendoia ... Vice-President 
J. M. Hopgood ---.-. Treasxirer 
Rogelio Carbajal ...... Secretary 

W. M. Whitner • - Mgr. Real Estate Dept. 



P. 


RUIZ 


® 


BROS. 


Engravers — 


Fine 


stationery 


Obispo 22 


P. 


0. Box 608 




HAVANA, CUBA 




CARRITO DE LINEA 

Para Pasajeros, Equipajes, Carga y Materiales y 
Herramientos de Reparaciones. Fuerte y 
Muy Util. Dos Tamanos. 

HORACE F. RUGGLES, M.E., Fabricante 

108 Wall Street, New York 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

FUNDADO EN 1869 

Capital Pagado $11,800,000 

Fondo de Reserva 13,236,000 

Active Total 234,000,000 

Trescientas Treinta y Cinco Sucursales 
New York, corner William and Cedar St». 
Londres, Bank Buildings, Prince St. 
Veinte y Tres Sucursales en Cuba 

Corresponsales en Espafia 6 Islas Canafiaa y Baleares 
y en todaa las otras plazas bancablea del Mundo 
En el Departamento de Ahorros se admiten depositos 

& interes desde Cinco Pesos en adelente 

Se expiden Cartas de Credito para viajeroa en Libras 

Esterlinas 6 Pesetas, valederaa estaa sin descuento 

alguno 

Sucursales en la Habana 

Galiano 92, Monte 118, Muralla 52, Linea 67, 

Vedado 
Of icina Principal - - - OBRAPIA 33 
Administradores 
R. DE AROZARENA F. J. BEATTY 



Established 1844 

H. UPMANN & CO. 

BANKERS 

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS 
Correspondents at All Principal Places of the Island 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

Manufacturers of the Famous H. Upmann 
Brand of Cigars 

FACTORY: OFFICE: 

Paseo de Tacon 159-168 Amargura 1-3 

HAVANA 



Established 1876 

N. GELATS & COMPANY 

BANKERS 



Transact a general banking busi- 
ness — Correspondents at all the 
principal places of the world 



Safe Deposit Vaults 
Office: Aguiar 108 

HAVANA 



JAMES S. GONNELL & SON 

SUGAR BROKERS 

Established 1836, at 105 Wall St. 

Cable Address, "Tide, New York" 



Please mention THE CUBA REVIEW when writinc to Advertisers 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



41 



UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

CONDENSED TIME TABLE OF DAILY THROUGH TRAINS 



No. 9 No. 1 No.l7 No. 3 No. 7 No. 5 

P. M. P. M. P. M. P. M. A. M. A. M. 



10.30 



10.00 

A.M. 

12.06 

4.40 

9.00 
10.55 

5.28 



8.50 

1 

10.20 
P. M 

1.00 

10.00 
11.00 



IP. M 



5.35 

8.13 
10.16 
P. M. 



3.10 



5.27 
7.30 



10.40 



A.M. 
3.10 

5.45 

P. M 

3.00 

3.30 



P. M. 



Havana 



No. 2 No.18 No. 4 No. 8 No. 6 No.lO 

A. M. A. M. P. M. P. M. P. M. A. M. 



10.01 7.40 
11.58 10. loi 58 



2.18 



4.40 
8.40 



6.45 
P.M. 



12.33 



3.38 
6.45 



6.40 
8.00 



10.30 
P.M. 



109 

179 
230 

180 
195 
I 
241 

276 

340 



Lv. . Central Station . .Ar. 



520 
... 538 



. . .Matanzaa. 
. . Cardenas . 



.Lv. 
,Lv. 



. . Sagua 

. Caibarien 

. . Santa Clara. . . 
, Cienf uegos 



.SanctiSpiritus. . 
.Ciegode Avila. . 
. . .Camaguey. . . 



.... Antilla 

Santiago de Cuba 



Lv. 

Lv. 

Lv. 

Lv 
Lv 



7.36 9.13 2.06 



5.31 6 
12.45 5 
P. M. A. 

8.00 .. 

5.30 .. 
A.M., 
12.10|.. 



45 12 
00 9 
M. 



P.M. I 
8.25 



7.35 .. 

4.55 .. 
A.M. 
7.40 
6.55 . 



6.20 



6.39 



4.44 
1.05 



12.00 
8.20 



8.00 
A.M. 



55 . . , 
M. 
.20 ... 



30 

00 ... . 



9.05 6.20 



6.28 
4.25 



1.00 

ilO.OO 

P. M. 
9.15 

8.48| 

6.15 

A.M. 



A.M.! 



P.M. 



Sleeping cars on trains 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 and 10. 
* Via Enlace Capitan. 

SLEEPING CAR RATES — UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

From Havana to Berth 

Cienfuegos $3.00 

Santa Clara 3.00 

Camaguey 3-50 

Antilla 5.00 

Santiago de Cuba 5.00 

ONE-WAY FIRST-CLASS FARES FROM HAVANA TO 
PRINCIPAL POINTS REACHED VIA 

THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

U. S. Cy. 
Antilla $23.33 





Drawing- 


Compartment. 


Room. 




$10.00 


$8.00 


10.00 


10.00 


12.00 


14.00 


18.00 


14.00 


18.00 



Batabano 

Bayamo 

Caibarien 

Camaguey 

Cardenas 

Ciego de Avila. 

Cienfuegos 

Colon 

Guantanamo . . . 
Holguin 



1.53 
20.66 
10.68 
15.49 

5.43 
12.72 

8.69 

5.56 
25.58 
21.20 



Isle of Pines 

Madruga 

Manianillo 

Matanzas 

Placetas 

Remedios , 

Sagua 

San Antonio 

Sancti Spiritus. . . . 

Santa Clara 

Santiago de Cuba . 



U. S Cy. 
$6.00 

3.01 
22.02 

3.20 

9.64 
10.43 

8.45 

.45 

11.19 

8.53 
24.11 



Passengers holding full tickets are entitled to free transportation of baggage when the same weighs 
110 pounds or less in first-class and 66 pounds or less in third class. 

Fifteen days' stop-over privilege is allowed holders of first-class through tickets, Havana to Uama- 
guey, Antilla, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo. 



(( 



WEEK-END" TICKETS 



FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all stations of the United Railways (except Rincon and 
such as are located at less than twenty kilometres from Havana) and vice versa, 
valid going on Saturdays and returning on any ordinary train the following Sunday or 
Monday at the very low cost of one-way fare plus 25%. ^^ 

SPECIAL *^WEEK-END" TICKETS 
HAVANA TO CIENFUEGOS AND VICE VERSA 

FIRST-CLASS, $11.00 THIRD-CLASS, $5.50 

Valid going on Saturdays and returning on Sundays and Mondays 
on the direct trains via Enlace Capitan only 

8endthrMoent«in8tamp»for"CuU— A Winter Paradiae."abeau- IJnifpH RailwaTS of HaVAna 
tiful Illustrated booklet desoribing interesting trips m Cuba to V'lUlcu ixauTrajo 

FRANK ROBERTS, General PassenKar Acent. Prado, 118, Havana, Cuba. 



42 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



S. F. HADDAD 

DRUGGIST 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

"PASSOL" SPECIALTIES 

89 BROAD STREET. Cor. Stone 

NEW YORK 



Bottled at the Brewery 




For Sale at all Dealers 
and on the Munson Line 



Sobrinos de Bea y Ca S. en. C. 

■ANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Importacidn directa de todas los 
centros manufactureros del mundo 

Agents for the Munson Steamship Line, 
New York and Mobile; James E. Ward 
& Co., New York; Serra Steamship Com- 
pany, Liverpool; Vapores Transatlanticos 
d« A. Folch & Co. de Barcelona, Espana 
Independencia Street 17/21. 

MATANZAS, CUBA 



JOHN w. McDonald 

COAL, WOOD, LUMBER 
AND TIMBER 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

112 Wall Street, New York 



Yardi 



Near South Street 
56-58 Beard Street, Erie Basin 



Telephones : 
Office. 1905 John Yard, 316 Hamilton 



THE SNARE AND TRIEST COMPANY 

CONTRACTINQ ENGINEERS 

STEEL AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION 
PiBKS, BRiDass, Railroads and Buildings 



Wt are prepared to furnish plans and estimates 

OD all classes of contracting work in Cuba. 

New York Office: 

WooLwoRTH Building, 233 Broadway 

Havana Office: Zulueta 36 D. 



John Muiiro& Son 

Steamship and 
Engineers* Supplies 

722 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cable Address: Kunomale, New York 
Telephone, 2492 South 



Telephone 
215 Hamilton 



Box 186 
Maritime Exchange 



YULE & MUNRO 

SHIPWRIGHTS 

Caulkers, Spar Makers, 

Boat Builders, Etc. 

No. 9 SUMMIT STREET 
Near Atlantic Dock BROOKLYN 



DANIEL WEILL s. en c. 

COMERCIANTE EN GENERAL 

Especialidad en Ropa Hecha de Trabajo 

Am in a po$ilion to puth tht lalt* of 

American high elai$ produett. Would 

r«pr«««n( a firtt ela»i firm 

APARTADO 102 CAMAGUEY, CUBA 



M. J. CABANA 



CO M M I 881 O N 
MERCHANT 



P. O. Bos 3, Camaguay 

Handles all linei of merohandise either on • oom- 
miasion basis or under agenoy arrangements. Also 
furnishes all desired information about lands in east- 
em Cuba. 



F. W. HvoiUf 



E. C. Day 



R. M. MiohalMB 



BENNETT, HVOSLEF & CO. 

SteamshipAgents&ShipBrokers 

18 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CahU: "B«n—$e»" 



Pleate mention THE CUBA REVIEW when wnting to Advertitera 



THE CUBA II E V 1 E \\ 



4b 



K^- 




^ 



S.S. MUNAMAR 



S.S. "MrXAM\H" 
8.S. "MrXAMAirV 



NEW YORK-CUBA SERVICE 

PASSENGER AND FREIGHT 

XiirYarh- AiiHUd .\ u(ril'ts Nuei'i'Ms Xew York 

Leive Arrive Arrive Le'iv Arrive 

Sept. S Sept. 12 Sept. 14 Sept. 16 Sept. 20 

Sept. 22 Sci)t. 2t) Sept. 28 Sept. 30 Oct. 4 

FREIGHT ONLY 



Regular sailings for Matanzas, Cardenas, Sagua, Caibarien, Pto. 
Padre, Gibara, ]\Ia?iati and Banes. 



MOBILE— CUBA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER— Havana, Sagua Sept. 7 

SS. -'ORKILD"— Caibarien, Santiago, Ci?nui9go.s Sept. 1 1 

SS. "TUSCAN"'— Havana. Matanzas Sept. 14 

SS. "MUXISLA"— Havana, Cardenas Sept. 21 

A STEAMER— Havana, Matanzas Sept. 2S 



MOBILE— SOUTH AMERICA SERVICE 



A STEAMER . 



FREIGHT ONLY 

. .Sept. 20 for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rosirio 



BALTIMORE— HAVANA SERVICE 

FREIGHT ONLY 

A STEAMER September 13 and 27 

The line reserves the right to cancel or alter the sailing dates of its vessels or to change its ports of 

fall without iircviou.-; notice. 

MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Lillie Multiple Evaporators 




Model of 1904=1905 
(Patented) 

"One of three Lillie quad- 
ruple effects installed in 
1907, in sugar factories in 
Formosa, belonging to the 
Taiwan Seito Kabushild 
Kwaisha, of Tokio, Japan, 
Two more quadruple effects, 
one to handle 550,000 gallons 
of cane juice per twenty-four 
hours, and the other to 
handle 325,000 gallons in the 
same period, are now (July 
1st, 1909) being built for 
the same Japanese Company, 
also for service in Formosa. 
These quadruple effects are 
arranged for reversing the 
course of the vapors and 
heat at will, a mode of op- 
eration peculiar to the Lillie 
and which has proven of 
great value for solutions de- 
positing incrustations on the 
evaporating tubes." 



The Sugar Apparatus Manufacturing Co. 

-WILMINGTON, DEL. 

S. MORRIS LILLIE, Presideiit 



The BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A. 




PLANTATION LOCOMOTIVES 

SpedficaHons Furnished on Application 



Representative for the West Indies 



W\LUCE R. LEE, NATIONAL BANK OF CUBA, HAVANA, CUBA 

Cable Addresses: "BALDWIN, PHILADELPHIA," "LEEBALD, HAVANA" 



PU^e m4rUion THE CUBA REVIEW when writing to Advertiaer* 



The 




1.00 A Year SEPTEMBER 191T 10 Cents A Copy 
Published bythe Munson Steamship Line 8Z-92 Beaver Street, NewYorkCity. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



LINK -BELT 

Elevators and Conveyors 

For Bagasse, Sugar, etc. 

THROUGH long years of reliable service, Link-Belt 
Machinery has become a recognized standard for the 
handling of sugar cane, bagasse, etc., from the field to 
the finished product. 

Our engineers are specialists in designing sugar handling 
machinery. Let them work out your problems. We make 
no charge for advice, layouts or estimates. 

Link-Belt Machinery includes : Elevators and Conveyors 
for every service. Juice Strainers, Bagasse Carriers and 
Feeders, Field Transfers for Sugar Cane, Car Dumpers, Roller 
Chains, Link-Belt Sprocket Wheels, Transmission Machinery, 
etc., etc. 

Link-Belt Company 

299 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



JAMES M. MOTLEY 



71 BEAVER STREET 
NEW YORK 



Gerente del Departamento de Veritas en el Extranjero de 



THE WEIR FROG COMPANY 
PENNSYLVANIA BOILER WORKS 
THE JOHN H. McGOWAN CO. 
THE RAHN-LARMON CO. 



CLEVELAND PUNCH AND SHEAR WORKS CO. 
DUNCAN, STEWART & CO., LTD. 
STANDARD WATER SYSTEMS CO. 
STANDARD SAW MILL MACHINERY CO. 



Los productos de estas Fdbrioas abaroan: 



Locomotoras Livianas 

Gruas sobre Ruedas 

Garros: Para Gafia 
Para Garga 
Para Obras de 
Gonatruocion 

Carriles y accesorios 

Via Portdtil 

Ranas y Ghuchos 

Puentea de Acero 

Edificios de Acero 

Maquinas de Izar 

Aserraderos 

Galderas 

Mdquinas d Vapor 

Mdquinas & Petroleo 

MAquinas d Gasolina 

Bombas 

Tanques 

Tornos 

Prensas para Ruedas 



r 


m^ 


'"■'.'^^"'i 
P 




HkJRhP^^^^ 




%^ 


^m 





Mdquinas para Taladrar 

Metales 

Acepilladoras para Met- 
ales 

Punzones y Gizallas para 
Metales 

Ejes, Poleas y Accesorios 

Calentadores de Agua 
para Galderas 

Alambiques para Agua 

Evaporadores'de Serpen- 
tines 
Mdquinaria Frigorifica 

Trapiches, Dcsmrnuza- 
doras y toda clase de 
Mdquinaria para Inge- 
nios de Aziicar 



A solicitud se remiten catdlogos y presupuestos. 
Direcci6n cablegrafica: JAMOTLEY, New York (Se usan todas las clavee. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



/^ARROQ PARA TODOS usos y dc todos tamanos, de los para cana con cuatro ruedas y capa 

^A*»>l»>V-IO cidad de 1 Yi toneladas a los con juegos dobles de ruedas y capacidad de 30 toneladas 

Hacemos una especialidad de juegos de herrajes, tncluyendo los juegos 

de ruedas, cumplctamciUe armadas, con todas las piecas dc inclal, y pianos 

completes para construir los cartas d su destuto de vtac'tras del pais 




RAMAPO IRON WORKS, 30 Church St., New York, N. Y. 



Cablf. Address: 
Ramai I\M 



HOLBROOK TOWING LINE 

W. S. HOLBROOK, Prop. 

Sea Harbor and General Towing. Steamship Towing a Specialty 

Boilers Tested for Any Required Pressure 



Ph nf, H'l-.over 

787-788 



82 BEAVER ST., NEW YORK, U.S.A. 



Xight Phone 
1105 Bay Ridg" 



WILLETT & GRAY, Brokers and Agents 



SUGARS 



RAW ANQ 
REFINED 



FOREIGN AND 
DOMESTIC 

82 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 

Publishers of Daily and Weekly Statistical Sugar Trade Journal— the recognized authority of the trad* 
TELEGRAPHIC MARKET ADVICES FURNISHED 



PLANTATION CARS OF ALL KINDS 

ALSO THE PARTS FOR SAME 




El grabado ensefia uno de nuestros carros, todo de acero, para cafla. 

Tenemos ctros tipos de capacidadea varias y hemos fabricado un gran numero de carros para cafia para 
U80 en Cuba, Puerto-Rico, America-Central y Mexico, que tienen jaules de acero o de madera y con- 
etruidas para loa distintos tipos de carga y descarga de la cafia. 

AMERICAN CAR & FOUNDRY EXPORT CO., NEW YORK, E.U.A. 

Direcci6n telegrdfica: NALLIM, New York. Produccidri annual de mds de 100,000 carroi. 
Representante para Cuba: OSCAR B CINTAS. Oficios 29-31. Havana. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



FOR MOLASSES USE STEEL TANKS 

BUILT BY 

HAMMOND IRON WORKS 

WARREN, PA., U.S.A. 

Wo furnish 

MATERIAL FABRICATED 
OR ERECTED COMPLETE 

Tulsa Office: - - 314 Kennedy Building 

New York Office: - 2728 Whitehall Bldg. 

Agents for Cuba: 

WONHAM, BATES & GOODE 

Havana, Cuba 





Insist upon 
Walker's "LION" Packing 

Avoid imitations, insist upon getting Walker's Me- 
tallic "Lion" Packing. Look for "The Thin Red 
Line" which runs through all the Genuine and the 
"Lion" BrassTrade Mark Labels and Seals attached. 



SSJriidve'Sataiog Jatties Walkcr & Company, Ltd, 

27 THAMES STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

, Sole Agent for Cuba 

JOSE L. VICLAAMIL 

Santa Clara 29, Havana, Cuba 



WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

TRAIN SERVICE DAILY 



P M 
S 15 



P M 



P M 
2 55 
4 33 
6 03 

6 18 

7 04 

8 32 
P M 



P M 
2 15 
4 15 



P M 



AM 

10 r 

12 15 



PM 



AM 
6 55 
8 33 
10 03 

10 18 

11 04 

12 32 
PM 



AM 
6 15 
8 15 



7 30 
11 22 
AM 



Fare 
Istcl. 
$2.04 
3.99 
4.32 
5.16 
6.79 



Lv. . . Cen. Sta., Havana . Ar 

Ar Artemisa Lv 

Ar Paso Real Lv 

Ar Herradura Lv. 

Ar Pinar del Rio Lv. 

Ar Guane Lv 



Fare 
3dcl 
$1.10 
2.12 
2.29 
2.71 
3.52 



A M 
7 49 
5 45 



AM 



AM 
11 09 
9 36 
8.04 
7.47 
7.00 
5.30 
AM 



AM 
11 47 
9 45 



AM 



P MlP M 
3 496 47 
1 454 45 



P M 



6 38 
3 00 

P M 



P M 
7 09 
5 35 
4 04 
3 47 
3 00 
1 30 
P M 



IDEAL 

TROLLEY 

TRIPS 



FAST DAILY ELECTRIC SERVICE FROM HAVANA TO 

Arroyo Naranjo 10 ct>. I Rancho Boyeros 15 cts. 

Calabazar 10 " | Santiago de las Vegas .... 20 " 

Rincon 25 cts. 

Leaving Central Station every hour from 5.15 A. M. to 9.15 P. M. 
Last train 11.15 P. M. 



"WEEK-END" TICKETS 

FIRST AND THIRD-CLASS 

ARE on sale from Havana to all points on the Western Railway of Havana west of 
Rincon, and vice versa. These tickets are valid going on Saturdays and return- 
ing on any ordinary train the following Sunday or Monday, and are sold at the very 
low rate of one way fare plus 25% 



Please Mention THE CUBA REVIEW uhen Writing to Advertisers. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

An Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 82-92 Beaver Street, New York 



MUNSON STEAMSHIP LINE, Publishers 



SUBSCRIPTION 

$1.00 Per Year -------10 Cents Single Copy 

Advertising Rates on Application 



Vol. XV SEPTEMBER, 1917 No. 10 
Contents of This Number 

Cover Page — Macco Street, ('aniagufy. 

Frontispiece — Fort El Caney, Santiago. Page 

Australian Pine, illustrated, by C. H. Pearson 22, 23, 2-1 

("ul)an Commercial Matters: 

XJuban i:^lectric Power Co IS 

Duty on Crude Petroleum j'j 

Duty on J< ire Apparatus \u 

Imports and Exports j 'j 

Cuban Financial Matters: 

(.'uban Central rtailroad 21 

rre vailing frices lor CuDan Securities 21 

Santiago i^lectric l.ight & traction tJo 21 

Tratbc Kcceipts of CuDan Kailroads 20 

Cuban Government Matters: 

Active VV ar Plans ot Cuba <j 

Uiego de .-ivila <j 

Uusionis tteceipts 6 

Dr. Luis Azcarate, portrait V 

German Steamers 7 

ivlap Stamps a 

•Niinister to Holland !«; 

New Book 2.5 

New Prison 21 

Jr'asspon Kegulations 10 

Pinar del Kio Kailroad 10 

Secretary ol Agriculture S 

Secretary of Government 10 

Secretary of Sanitation 10 

Spain 8 

Sugar Control ;» 

Suspension of Cuban Export Duties ,S 

Havana Correspondence 11 

Stock Raising, illustrated 12, 13, 14, lo, Iti, 17, Ks 

Sugar Industry: 

Chart, Exports of Cuban Raw Sugar to Europe 31 

Ctiart, Price of Cuban Raw fSugar at .New i ork 30 

Dominican Kepublic 33 

A Glimpse at Sugar 32, 33 

Glycerine from Sugar 2.3 

Hawaiian Sugar .Mill 2.5 

Hongkong Sugar 2'J 

Impurities in Raw Sugar 2i) 

Invert Sugar 27 

Price of CuDan Sugar at New York 27 

Russian Sugar Refining Industry 34 

Sugar Bags 2.5 

Sugar Futures 27 

Sugar in Porto Rico 33 

Sugar t^roduction 28 

Sugar Supply of the United Kingdom 28, 29 

Trinidad Sugar Cultivation 33 

Wasteful Cane Cultivation 27 

Sugar Review, English 34, 35 

Sugar Review, Spanish 35, 30 

Trade Publications 2.5 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




THL 
CUBA RLVILW 

"ALL ABOUT CUBA" 

Copyright, 1917, by the Munson Steamship Line 



Volume XV 



SEPTEMBER, 1917 



Number 10 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 







Dr. Luis Azcarate, 
Recently Appointed Secretary of Justice. 

GERM.\N STEAMERS 

On August 21, at the Presidential Palace, 
in the presence of Gen. Marti, Secretary of 
"War and Xav}', and WilUam E. Gonzales, 
United States .Minister to Cuba, President 
Menocal signed a decree transferring to the 
United States Government four large German 
steamships, the Bavaria, Olivant, Adelheid 






and Constantia, of an aggregate tonnage of 
approximately 20,000 tons, which were seized 
as })rizes of war by the Cuban Government 
on the day this coimtry declared war against 
Germany. 

.Minister Gonzales is quoted as stating: 
"President Menocal decUned to consider 
offers to purchase or lease, whether made by 
Governments, navigation companies, or in- 
dividuals. He regards these prizes of war, 
not as agencies for commercial profits, but to 
be used, as he states in his decree, for the 
common benefit in aiding to bring the war 
against the Government of Germany to a 
prompt and victorious end. President 
.Menocal would not sell them, but he has 
given them to the United States. It is just 
another illustration of Cuba's generous spirit 
and of her earnest ijurjjose to co-operate with 
her allies to the full extent of her power." 

Secretary Lansing has instructed the Ameri- 
can Minister at Havana to express to Presi- 
dent .Menocal the sincere appreciation of the 
United States Government and of the people 
of the United States of "the friendly and dis- 
interested action of the Cuban Government" 
in transferring to this country the steamships 
Bavaiid, Olivant, Adelheid, and Constnnlin, to 
be utiUzcd in the successful prosecution of the 
war against Germany. 



RED CROSS 



Colonel Miguel Varona, chief of the_ general 
staff of the Cuban army, has been designated 
President of the Cuban Red Cross. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



SPAIN 

The Spanish Ciovernment has appointed 
a commission to collect data concerning all 
official attempts made in the past to cultivate 
tobacco in Spain, and has requested Spanish 
agriculturists to report to the Ministry of the 
Treasury full details concerning such land as 
they wish to devote to tobacco growing. 
Information is sought as to any features which 
landowners believe to be favorable for tobacco 
raising in their particular localities. 

As soon as the statistics are available, the 
commission will determine the areas to be 
devoted to the cultivation of tobacco in Spain, 
designating as well certain tracts for exper- 
iments. 

[Tobacco at present is a monopoly in 
Spain, the Government receiving a fixed 
amount from a private concern which is 
given control of the trade]. — Consul General 
Carl Bailey Hurst, Barcelona. 



SUSPENSION CF CUBAN EXFCRT CLTIES 

The American Minister at Habana has 
furnished the following report, dated Aug- 
ust 21 : 

"I was yesterday informed by President 
Menocal that a decree suspending the export 
tax on iron ore and copper had been issued by 
him, and that next winter when Congress 
meets these taxes will be repealed. I have 
heard no objection to the standing of 6 per 
cent, tax on profits." 

[The export duties referred to were em- 
bodied in a provision of the recent law au- 
thorizing a Government loan of .1f30,000,000. 



SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE 

Er. Fugenio Sanchez Agramonte entered 
upon his duties on August 24th. 

The ceremonies of installation were simple, 
being attended only by a few government 
officials and members of the department. 



NEW TELEPHONIC CHIEF IS NAMED FOR 
HAVANA. 

On August 17, president Menocal desig- 
nated Sr. Linares Buardeno Chief of the 
Telegraphic Service of Havana. Chief 
Buardeno had served as a subordinate 
offi.cial of the department for several years. 



CUSTOMS RECEIPTS 

Detailed statistics of customs receipts and 
expenditures for the calendar year, 1916, re- 
cently compiled and analyzed by treasury de- 
partment experts, showed a marked increase 
of customs income, from $36,646,545.38 in 
1915 to $27,750,220.94 for 1916, a gain of 
18,896,362.44, or not far from a third. The 
Havana customs house in particular sur- 
passed all its former records. 

Next to Havana, the customs houses that 
led were, in the order stated, Santiago de 
Cuba, Cienfueges and Matanzas, the figures 
for each, for 1916, being: 

Havana $26,745,271.36 

Santiago de Cuba 2,402,094.30 

Cienfuegos 1,719,341.78 

.Matanzas 1,021,826.44 

The foregoing cities were the only ones with 
receipts above the one-million-dollar mark. 

The statistics compiled by the government 
include, in customs house receipts, besides 
tariff duties, such miscellaneous receipts as 
are taken in through the customs house, such 
as fines, etc. Customs house administration 
and other expenses were $1,328,860.41 for 
1915, and $1,422,833.82 for 1916. 



CUBAN INVENTOR 

The first official tests of the apparatus 
invented by Rafael Arazoza, a Cuban inventor, 
for raising sunken objects from the bottom 
of the sea, was held off Cojimar, recently. 
A bar of lead weighing 92 pounds was lowered 
into the sea and raised to the surface by the 
apparatus. 



MAP STAMPS. 



The new issues of Cuban stamps, which have 
been in circulation for some time, bearing, 
in the two-cent denomination, the picture of 
Maximo Gomez, will be the only authorized 
stamps in circulation after September 1st. 
The stamps of the earlier issue, which have a 
map of Cuba on their face will no longer be 
good for postage. 

MINISTER TO HOLLAND 

Dr. Kohly, Cuban IVIinister to Holland, has 
tendered his resignation to the State Depart- 
ment. 



THE CUB A R K \ I E \V 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



ACTIVE WAR PLANS OF CUBA 

AN'ith rnitod States troops shortly to begin 
a course of winter trainiiifr in Cuba, and with 
the whole ishviul acclaitninfi; President Men- 
ocal's generous attitude in turning over to the 
Federal Shipping Board in Washington, all 
the German ships which Cuba seized last 
April, the eyes of the western world are being 
turned more and more toward "the pearl of 
the Antilles," and to the work that Cuba is 
doing as an active ally of the United States 
in the present war. Some of the lesser activ- 
ities of the Cuban military and naval forties 
have, up to this time, escaped notice, although 
each is important and all combined give a 
striking illustration of the loyalty and energy 
of Cuba in her active aUiance with the United 
States. 

Col. .\Tanuel Coronado, member of the 
Cuban Senate and editor of the newspaper 
la Discuiiint, has organized an aviation unit 
which will be offered to France, with complete 
equipment, in the near future. It is probable 
from the enthusiasm shown by its ninety-odd 
members, that the "Escadrille Cubaine," 
as the flying unit will be called, will be the 
first body of fighting men from Cuba to serve 
on French soil. Col. Coronado's original 
plans called for a body of twenty-five trained 
aviators to comprise the escadrille, but 
already nearly 100 youths, who are repre- 
sentative of the best families of Cuba, have 
volimteered to take the prescribed aviation 
course and individually to bear the expense 
of their airplanes and equipment. Senator 
Coronado has just returned from Mew York, 
where he conferred with officials of the Aero 
Club of America and airplane manufacturers 
over the details of the escadrille's organization. 
Many of the volunteers for the escadrille are 
graduates of French universities. 

"I believe that the escadrille will be the 
most practical, and at the same time, the 
most appropriate, way of showing Cuba's 
sympathy with the cause of the Alhes," said 
Col. Coronado. The Colonel has asked the 
Navy Department in Washington for an 
arrangement by which the Cuban aviators 
may undergo their preliminary training at the 
Navy aviation school at Pensacola, Fla. 

While, for obvious reasons, the details of 
many of the co-operative war measures of 
Cuba and the United States are not per- 



mis.sable for publicaticm, substantial pro- 
gress has been announced officially here in 
the co-ordinative work of the Cuban and 
United States army and navy general staffs. 

Three warrant officc^rs have just arrived on 
the United States gimboat Tallapoosa from 
the Cruantanamo Naval Station to join the 
other Ignited States instructors and to give 
courses in gunnery technique to the non- 
commissioned officers of the Cuban Navy. 
Special attention is to be devoted to target 
practice. The crew of the cruiser Cuba, larg- 
est vessel of the island navy, will be the first 
to receive instruction. The ordnance of the 
Cuba was recently replaced with United 
States guns in an American port. 

Conferences have just been concluded 
between Captain Anderson, commanding 
the American naval forces in Cuban waters; 
Gen. Edmund Wittenmyer, mihtary attache 
assigned to the American legation here, who 
went to New York as an aide to General Bell ; 
Commander Carlton R. Kear, instructor 
at the Cuban Naval Academy, representing 
the United States; and President .Menocal, 
Secretary of War and .Marine, Jose .Marti, and 
Chief of Staff, Oscar Fernandez Quevado, 
of the Cuba Navy. The effect of these 
interchanges has been to complete all military 
and naval arrangements between the two 
countries for their action this winter. 

Cuban military commissioners have jast an- 
nounced the promotions of 288 officers in 
the Cuban army, in keeping with the enlarge- 
ment of the island's active mihtary force 
for possible duty later in Europe. 



SUGAR CONTROL. 

George .M. Rolph, general manager of the 
Calif ornia-Haw^aiian Sugar Refining Com- 
pany, has been appointed by Food Adminis- 
trator Herbert C. Hoover, as executive head 
of the Government bureau that will control 
the distribution and fix the price of sugar. 



CIEGO DE AVILA 

It is reported that the sum of .$70,009 has 
been appropriated by the Cuban Congress 
for the purpose of constructing a new modern 
hospital at Ciego de Avila. It is expected 
that ground will be broken for the building 
in the near future. 



10 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT MATTERS 



PASSPORT REGULATIONS. 

Considerable concern is being shown by the 
commercial and financial interests of Cuba 
over the present stringent passport regulations 
now in effect between the United States and 
Cuba. Cuba at present, in so far as the State 
Eepartment in Washington is concerned, is 
in the same status as any European country 
in the matter of passport requirements. 
"While these regulations to date have caused 
only the usual amount of delay to travellers 
between the United States and Cuba, and 
have not constituted any serious annoyance 
to those who come under their regulations, 
nevertheless it is reahzed in Cuba that when 
the tourist season begins, two months hence, 
either the regulations must be modified, or 
Cuba will suiTer during the coming winter a 
considerable and serious financial loss. In- 
formal representations have already been 
made to the State Department in \A'ashington 
looking toward the abridgment or the aboli- 
tion altogether of the present passport require- 
ments. It is understood also that the State 
Eepartment of Cuba will shortly present a 
communication to Washington on the subject. 
What the conservative element among the 
objectors beheves is a kind of discrimination, 
is seen in the fact that no passports whatever 
are required in Canada, while the travellers 
from the United States to Cuba are required 
to provide themselves with proof of United 
States birth or wuth naturaUzation papers; 
with letters from employers or associates 
certifying that they are going to Cuba on 
necessary commercial business; with three 
photographs of the applicant, one of which 
must be signed, and the certification of a 
responsible business man of the community 
in which he makes apphcation, who must 
accompany the applicant and swear corrobor- 
ation to his assertions. 

\\ hile only two or three days are required 
to complete the formalities, it is realized that 
under present travelling conditions, with 
Cuba ofiering more natural winter attractions 
to the United States tourist than any other 
country in the world at the present time, the 
influx of sight-seers and prospective investors 
in Cuba dxiring the coming winter will be 
larger than ever before. At H!avana alone, 
during the past winter, thousands of tourists 
from the Enited States arrived despite the 



slight disturbance caused by the recent 
uprising. What the result wUl be in the 
1917-1918 season with tranquility existing 
and the great material development of the 
country during the past year, can readily be 
imagined. 

One circumstance, which may or may not 
be a factor in the present muddle, is the 
belief in Washington that Cuba is more or 
less of a rendezvous for pro-German sympa- 
thizers and possible German espionage. Since 
the suspension of constitutional guarantees 
by President Menocal, which action was 
taken by the authority of the Cuban Congress, 
the President has taken into his own hands 
the extermination of any such activities in 
Cuba, and it is understood that the admin- 
istration here is now in a position to assure 
the United States Government that Cuba 
is as impossible a base for German spy activ- 
ities as is Canada. 

It is believed entirely probable that these 
requirements will be greatly modified or 
eUminated altogether within a sufficient time 
before the tourist season begins. 



SECRETARY OF GOVERNMENT 
Dr. Juan ?vIontalvo, the new Secretary of 
Government, assumed the duty of his cffice 
August 9th. 



SECRETARY OF SANITATION 
Secretary Mendez Capote, recently ap- 
pointed head of the Department of Sanitation 
by President Menocal, took possession of the 
department on August 16. 

The ceremonies of the installation were 
witnessed by many distinguished persons. 

The appointment of Dr. Mendez Capote 
has created a universally favorable impres- 
sion throughout the island, it being considered 
one of the strongest cabinet appointments 
that the president has made. 



PINAR DEL RIO RAILROAD 

The Cuban Senate has passed a bill pro- 
viding for the establishment of a railroad 
between Bahia Honda and Guane, in Pinar 
del Rio, and granting an appropriation of 
$3,600,000 for the purpose. The appropria- 
tion is at the rate of $12,000 a kilometre. 
The House is expected to pass the bill without 
opposition. 



THE CUB A R E V I K W 11 



HAVANA CORRESPONDENCE 



Three of the four (icrinaii sliips interned in this port, namely the Hav iri'i, Olivuit and 
Adelheid, have been given by the Cuban CJovcrnment to the United States Government and 
are being manned with Government crews to take the ships to the United States. 'I" he remain- 
ing steamer, the Kydonin, has been put under the Cuban flag and we understand will l)e used 
as a transport. 

The new war .staiiij) tax law went into effect on Sept. 1st throui^hout the island, ('on- 
siderable opposition was brought to bear by various interests against some provisions of the .law, 
with the result that the stamp on checks was abolished. The law is not altogether clear and 
difficulty has been experienced in the application of the same. 

There is nothing new to report regarding the oil well industry. Xo new wells are being 
sunk and work continues, although slowly, on the old wells. 

The Cuban sugar producers are somewhat at sea at present on account of the question 
of price fixing by the United States Government. Some appear to think the price now quoted 
of 7.25c. per pound, which is that fixed for American beet sugar, would prove remunerative 
to the Cuban planter, claiming that this price would mean about 4.59c. f. o. b. Cuban ports, 
and point out that the average price in Cuba for the past two years has been 4.53c. On the 
other hand, the question of labor in the cane fields may prove this coming crop to be a more 
serious one than ever before on account of the shortage of hands, and high wages will have to 
be paid to secure same. Heretofore, the principal laborers have been Spaniards who came to 
Cuba to work during the grinding season and then returned home, but the Spanish Government 
has now prohibited emigration of her citizens subject to miUtary service, and this will naturally 
considerably reduce this source of supply. One proposition under consideration is to permit 
the importation of Chinese laborers under certain restrictions to be decided upon. 

A new Cuban coastwise shipping company has recently been organized called the "Compania 
Nacional de Navegacion," of which General Rafael Fernandez de Castro is the president. At 
the present they are operating only the steamer Winona, but expect shortly to place others 
in the service. 

A new company called United States and Cuban Allied Works and Engineering Co., 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware, is being organized in Havana. Capital, 
$2,000,000 preferred and $3,000,000 common stock. Organized for the purpose of "operating 
dry docks, ship building plant, sugar mills, and various other enterprises." 

Officers will be: President, Frank Steinhart, President and General Manager of the Hav- 
ana Electric Railway, Light and Power Co. ; Vice-President (not yet decided upon) ; Treasurer, 
Armando Godoy, Vice-President of the Banco Espanol de la Isla de Cuba; Secretary, Claudio 
Mendoza, capitalist. 

Board of Directors will be: Messrs. Steinhart and Godoy mentioned above, Antonia San 
Miguel, owner of newspaper i a Luch^; H. Upmann, President of the Bank of H. Upmann 
& Co.; Emeterio Zorilla, Assistant to President, Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co.; 
Adolfo B. Horn, President, Krajewski-Pesant Corporation; Jose Marimon, President of the 
Banco Espanol de la Isla de Cuba; Julian Alonso, General Manager of the Empresa 
Naviera de Cuba, and Dionisio Velasco, capitalist and large real estate owner. 

The new company will take over the plant of Krajewski-Pesant Corporation, consisting of 
foundry, machine shops and dry docks, and also some adjoining property. They will lengthen 
the present Krajewski-Pesant dry dock to handle ships as large as the \\'ard Line steamers 
Saratoga and Havana, and also make other additions to the dry dock. 

They plan to put up their shipbuilding plant and get same in operation in the shortest 
possible time. 

They also expect to take over and operate other interests located on the Havana water 
front, details regarding which are not yet available. 



DELAWARE CHARTER $3,500,000, W. F. O'Keefe, G. G. Steigler, 

Cuban Products Corp. construct, lease, E. E. Wright, local Wilmington, Del., incor- 
maintain and operate lines for railroads, &c., porators. 



12 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



STOCK RAISING 



Essential conditions to success in stock raising, in any country, are nutritious grasses, 
good drinking water, a climate devoid of extremes in temperature, with a steady market at 
least fairly accessible. These the Republic of Cuba commands in abundance. 

There still remain hundreds of thousands of acres of well watered, well drained lands, 
that possess all of the above mentioned conditions. Much of the territory formerly devoted 
to grazing, has been recently planted in sugar cane, owing to the high price of sugar that fol- 
lowed the war in Europe. In spite of this, however, there are still large tracts in each of the 
six Provinces of the Island, that are not only available for stock raising but would, if sown 
with our best grasses and forage plants, produce, under proper management, returns per 
acre quite as satisfactory as those derived from sugar cane. 

Two grasses, excellent for either milk or fattening purposes, were imported into this 
country many years ago. The Parana, brought from the Argentine is best suited to our 
lower and comparatively level lands. Guinea grass, brought from the west coast of Africa, 
is excellently adapted to the mountain sides and does well even on the crests of the latter, 
up to an altitude of two thousand feet. 

One hundred acres in either one of these grasses, under favorable conditions, will keep 
from 50 to 70 head of cattle in good condition throughout the year. We have several varieties 
of native grass that spring up in the valleys, or wherever the undergrowth is removed from 
forest lands, but they are greatly inferior to either Parana, Guinea or Bermuda. 

There is every reason to believe that alfalfa will prove as well adapted to Cuba as it is 
to some parts of the United States, although up to the present time, but few experiments 
have been made with it. On President Menocal's farm, some eight miles from Havana, 
may be seen a splendid stand of this grass, from which several crops have been cut during 
the past year. Inocculation of the soil with alfalfa bacteria seems to be the only thing re- 
quired to make this excellent forage plant thrive in Cuba. Our experimental station at 
Santiago de las Vegas has succeeded, also, in introducing several new grasses on the heavy 
clay soils of that neighborhood that give every promise of success. 




Dairy Farm, INIatanzas. 



T HE C (I B A R V \ I I'. W 



13 




In all stock raising propositions, plenty of fresh water is absolutely essential. Rivers 
or running streams are most desirable acquisitions to any stock ranch. Wherever there are 
no streams water can usually be found by sinking wells to a depth varying from 20 to 200 feet. 
In the foot hills and mountainous districts, never failing springs are met in abundance. 

The Province of Camaguey has always been noted for its fine "potreros" or meadows 
since a large part of that middle belt is comparatively free from forests and is devoted to stock 
raising. Oriente on the east, and Las V'illas on the west, abound in splendid grass lands, 
although the recent demand for sugar cane has somewhat reduced the acreage. 




Pastoral Scene, Santiago de las Vegas 



14 



THE CUBA REVIEW 




A Cuban Range. 



In both Havana and Matanzas Provinces, good lands command a price that renders 
them rather prohibitive for stock raising purposes. But in Pinar del Rio there are still ex- 
tensive tracts, both in the level sections and in the foot hills, which furnish ideal grazing lands, 
and if not absorbed in the near future by the cane planters, this western province will become 
eventually one of the most successful stock raising districts in the Republic. These lands 
can be secured at the present tune, in large tracts, at prices varying from $20 to $40 per acre, 
but if properly administered will easily yield an annual net return of from 20% to 40% on 
the investment. 

At the beginning of the war of Independence in 1905, over three million head of native 
cattle were registered in the Island. The four years continual struggle between Spain and the 
people of Cuba, however, almost completely exterminated them. At the beginning of the 
First Intervention cattle were rushed into Cuba from all nearby countries, including Texas, 
Florida, Venezuela and Mexico. During the past few years, however, quite a number of 
high grade animals have been introduced for breeding purposes and are rapidly improving 
the present herds. Approximately 4,000,000 head of cattle are today registered in the De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

Cuba is quite as well adapted for raising horses and mules successfully, as any part of 
the Iliited States. This is owing, not only to the abundance of food found throughout the 
year, but to the fact that we have neither sleet snow, or cold, wet rains that sometimes chill 
and retard the growth of young colts. 

During the first Government of Intervention, a large number of American horses were 
brought to Cuba by the Army of Occupation, but in spite of the abrupt change of climate 
and conditions, American cavalry officers stated that never before had they found a place 
where their mounts seemed to thrive so well, and to remain so free from disease. The native 
Cuban horses are of Arabian stock, introduced here by the first Spanish conquerors who 
brought them from the Old World. They are hardy, gentle, easily kept, and of marvelous 
endurance, especially those bred in the mountainous districts. When crossed with good 



THE CUBA R E V I E W 



15 




Heiffers, Cuban-boiri Yearlings. 




m 






Cuban Pigs. 



16 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



Kentucky, Missouri or Montana stallions, they produce really excellent service animals, 
especially for the saddle. About three quarters of a million are registered in the Department 
of Agriculture. 

The breeding of mules too, for which there is always a demand in Cuba, will undoubtedly 
prove a very profitable enterprise in the near future. With the investment of the necessary 
capital, assisted by intelligent management, not only can Cuba furnish the local market for 
beef cattle, horses and mules, but with her many advantages for successful stock raising, 
there is no reaspjiwhy she shpul4npt supply a large quota to Jamaica, Bahama and adjacent 
islands, and perhaps to the United States. 

Cuba, at the present time, is importing approximately ten million dollars worth 
of pork and pork i roducts annually, notwithstanding the fact that this Island, 
owing to exceptional conditions for raising hogs economically, should not only ^upply 
the lo-al demand, but can and will, ultimately ex-port pork products to all of the nearby 
countries bordering on the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. 




A Cuban Bui 



The royal palm, \\hich covers many of the hillsides and slopes of our long mountain chains, 
running parallel with the coast, produces a small nut called "palmiche"' that furnishes a never 
failing food which helps the stock-grower in raising hogs. 

I . The "palmiche," picked up by the animals at the base of the palms, if in sufficient quan- 
tity will keep these animals in fairly good condition throughout the year. Shoats, intended 
for market, as soon as weaned, should be turned into a field planted with sugar cane, sweet 
potatoes, peanuts, yuca, corn, cow peas, "calabaza" or any of those food crops of which hogs 
are fond and that produce flesh rapidly. 

The population of the Republic is two and a half millions, increasmg at the rate of about 
seventy-five thousand per year. The demand for fresh pork in Havana is constant at from 
8M cents to 9 cents per pound, gold, on the hoof. Hams, at wholesale, sell at 26 cents per 
pound, and other pork products in proportion. 

Hogs breed twice a year in Cuba, and our climate, free from extreme of heat or cold, 
enables probably a larger percentage of the young to be brought to maturity, with less care 



THE CUB A R E'.V I EjW 



17 




Goats. Baracoa. 



and less risk, than in any section of the United States. Science, today, has rendered it poss- 
ible to eliminate the danger from contagious diseases to pork, hence it is that the raising 
of small stock, especially hogs, under the supervision of intelligent management, will prove 
to be one of the most remunerative industries of this Republic. 

Palmiche-fed pork is considered a greater delicacy than turkey or chicken. The native 
or domestic hog of the Island is, as might be expected, a common or scrub product, that, 
while healthy and prohfic, puts on flesh slowly, and is fitted only for fresh pork. This pork, 
however, with its nutty flavor of the "palmiche," is excellent eating, and when cooked, retails 
during the holidays at from 50 cents to 75 cents per pound. 

SHEEP.. 

Owing to our genial climate, sheep, lacking the necessity for wool with which to retain 
warmth, very naturally lose it within a comparatively few years. Mutton, however, always 
commands a good price in the local markets, hence it is that the raising of sheep for food, 
especially by those small farmers who are close to large markets, will always yield a satis- 
factory return. 

Up to the present time, discrimination has been used in introducing those breeds of 
sheep that are best suited for the production of mutton. That which we have is usually tender, 
and of excellent flavor, and if our small farmers would take the trouble to import good rams 
from desirable breeds in the United States, the raising of mutton, even if as a side issue, would 
add greatly to the revenue of farms located near large consuming centers. 

GOATS. 

The Republic of Mexico for many years has derived a very large revenue from the sale 
of goat skins, most of which were purchased by the New England shoe factories, while the 
by-products in the form of salted and sun dried meat, fat and other materials, always command 
a market. Recent wars of devastation have practically annihilated all of the great herds 



18 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



of goats in Mexico. During the past three or four years they have been furnishing food to 
the roving bands of different contestants in that unfortunate country. 

If men interested in the industry would take pains to look into this matter, the advantages 
which Cuba offers would be manifest. The hills and mountain sides of this Republic are 
clothed to their summits with underbrush, whose tender shoots furnish excellent food for 
animals that browse, and yet the raising of goats has never been considered here commercially. 

Under the management of men who are familiar with the raising of goats for their hides, 
and above mentioned by-products, there is no reason why this industry should not assume 
importance in Cuba, especially since these animals are invaluable for cleaning out under- 
growth, economically and effectively. 




Cuban Cattle 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



CUBAN ELECTRIC-POWER CO. 

All the interests of the Cienfuegos Electric 
& Power Co. have been taken over by the 
Cienfuegos, Palmira & Cruces Electric Rail- 
way & Power Co. The purchasing company 
(until about a year and a half ago practically 
the property of an American) was organized 
under a charter of the State of .Maine and is 
now said to be owned and controlled by 
H. Upmann & Co., Habana, Dr. Julio de la 
Torre, acting for Dr. Orestes Ferrara, also of 
Habana, and Cardona & Co., of Cienfuegos. 
The Cienfuegos Electric & Power Co. was 
reorganized by local Spanish capitalists about 



five years ago, secured the street lighting con- 
tract, and has been making preparations for 
supplying electric current throughout the day 
as well as night, but to date this new service 
has not been started. No further details are 
obtainable at present. 

It has also been learned that a contract has 
been signed by the above-mentioned railway 
company with the Carlota mine, Cumana- 
jagua, transportation of product being the 
object. This contract will necessitate imme- 
diate inauguration of construction of the pro- 
spective branch between Caonao and .Mani- 
caragua, with switches to the mine. — Vice- 
Consul George B. Starbuck, Cienfuegos. 



T H E CUB A R E \' 1 K W 



19 



CUBAN COMMERCIAL MATTERS 



REDUCTION IN DUTY ON CRUDE PETRO- 
LEUM AND RESIDUES. 

A law of July 14, 1917, reduces the customs 
duty on crude petroleum and i)etroleum rcsi- 
sidues imported into Cuba to 0.1 cent per 
gallon. This special rate, however, is 
applied only to crude oil and residues 
for use as fuel or in concentrating or 
other mining operations and to that im- 
ported by public authorities for sanitary 
purposes or for use on the streets. All other 
petroleum products are subject to the regular 
duty which, in the case of fuel oil imported 
from the United States, is $0.56 per 100 kilos. 
Furthermore, there is a provision that the 
regular duties shall again be imposed on these 
products whenever the domestic production 
is sufficient to supply two-thirds of the de- 
mand for the purposes indicated above. 



of June 22, 1917. A similar exemption is 
granted for pieces of marble, brass, and other 
materials for ase in erecting public monu- 
ments. Heretofore special exemptions have 
been granted from time; to time for th(! ira- 
portati(m of fire extinguishing equipment for 
public use, but there was no general exemp- 
tion. 



NEW YORK CHARTER 

Cuban Medal Film Co., Inc., Manhattan, 
motion-picture business, S.50,000; W. L. Dau- 
enhauer, F. H. Knocke, M. Zeno, 1476 Broad- 
way. 



FREE ADMISSION OF CERTAIN FIRE 
APPARATUS 

The privilege of importing pumps, hose, 
and other fire extinguishing apparatus and 
supplies free of duty is granted to the prov- 
inces and municipalities of Cuba by the law 



DELAWARE CHARTERS 

Havana Docks Corp., to acquire and carry 
on a general building of wharves, docks, &c., 
$5,000,000; C. L. Rimlinger, .M. M. Clancy, 
C. M. Egner, local Wilmington, Del., incor- 
porators. 

Cuban Products Corp., coastruct, lease, 
maintain and operate lines for railroads, &c., 
$2,500,000, VV. F. O'Keefe, G. G. Steigler, 
E. E. Wright, local Wilmington, Del., incor- 
porators. 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

The total value of merchandise imported from and exported to Cuba during the months 
of February, .March, April, May and June, 1917, compared with the corresponding periods 
of the preceding year have been made public by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce as follows: 

Month of February 8 mos. ended February 

1917 1916 1917 1916 

Imports from Cuba $23,333,684 $20,881,464 $130,156,406 $111,759,489 

Exports to Cuba 13,897,031 10,654,942 124,085,827 78,145,954 

Month of March 9 months ended March 

1917 1916 1917 1916 

Imports from Cuba $33,137,108 $25,884,793 $163,293,514 $137,644,282 

Exports to Cuba 11,644,632 12,026,138 135,773,389 90,172,092 

Month of April 10 months ended April 

1917 1916 1917 1916 

Imports from Cuba $30,454,942 $27,477,120 $193,748,456 $165,121,402 

Exports to Cuba 12,058,183 2,321,491 147,831,572 102,493,583 

Month of May 11 months ended May 

1917 1916 1917 1916 

Imports from Cuba $33,537,512 $30,478,087 $227,285,968 $195,599,489 

Exports to Cuba 14,175,303 12,743,007 162,006,875 115,236,590 

Month of June 12 months ended June 

1917 1916 1917 1916 

Imports from Cuba $23,109,442 $33,378,078 $253,395,410 $228,977,567 

Exports to Cuba 16,876,373 11,981,988 178,883,248 127,198,578 



20 THECUB A REVIEW 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



TRAFFIC RECEIPTS OF CUBAN RAILROADS 



EARNINGS OF THE CUBA RAILROAD COMPANY 

The report of the Cuba Raih-oad for the month of July, and for one month ended July 31, 
1917, compares as follows: 

1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 

July gross $743,774 $571,491 $420,089 $382,543 $324,186 $334,393 

Exijenses 514,756 313,186 210,008 220,961 188,673 185,782 

July net $229,018 $258,304 $210,081 $161,582 $135,513 $148,610 

Other income 1,137 817 

Net income 230,155 259,121 210,081 . . . 

Charges 94,124 87,348 72,269 70,375 66,791 66,375 

July surplus $136,030 $171,773 $137,812 $91,207 $68,721 $82,235 

One month's gross 743,774 571,491 420,089 382,543 324,186 334,393 

Net profits 229,018 258,304 210,081 161,582 135,513 148,610 

Other income 1,137 817 ...... 

Fixed charges 94,124 87,348 72,269 70,375 66,791 66,375 

Surplus $136,030 $171,773 $137,812 $91,207 $68,721 $82,235 



EARNINGS OF THE UNITED RAILWAYS OF HAVANA 

Weekly receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 

Week ending July 21st . . £35,194 £29,800 £24,372 £18,929 £20,528 £19,431 

Week ending July 28th.. 35,134 29,025 24,216 18,897 20,438 19,197 

Week ending Aug. 4th. . . 34,578 28,831 24,954 20,261 21,003 20,984 

Week ending Aug. nth.. 38,862 28,565 22,992 19,131 20,738 19,455 



EARNINGS OF THE WESTERN RAILWAY OF HAVANA 

Weeklii receipts: 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending July 28th £6,426 £6,238 £5,436 £6,469 £6,002 

W^eek ending Aug. 4th 6,802 5,758 5,274 6,202 6,303 

Week ending Aug. 1 1th 7,293 6,298 4,936 5,424 5,929 

EARNINGS OF THE CUBAN CENTRAL RAILWAYS 

Weekly receipts: 1907 1916 1915 1914 1913 

Week ending July 21st £12,639 £10,090 £8,634 £6,940 £6,913 

Week ending July 28th 12,738 9,182 6,679 6,770 6,145 

Week ending Aug. 4th 12,546 9,440 6,632 6,745 6,848 

Week ending Aug. 11th 12,618 8,835 7,006 6,353 6,642 

EARNINGS OF THE HAVANA ELECTRIC RAILWAY LIGHT & POWER CO. 

Month of July 1917 1916 1915 

Grosf earnings " $575,442 $492,520 $448,505 

§^?:Si expenses: ! : : .;.•.■.•.•.•.• 25^218 192,999 184,328 

Net earmngs 324 224 299 521 284,1^7 

Miscellaneous mcome iO,Dzo ia,y-±o __ 

Total net income $339,749 $313,466 $275,914 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 204,879 169,545 168,581 

Grt'earng" '' ^''' '''' $3,826,484 $3,386,516 $3,199,879 

OperXg Scpenses.-.V. ■.■.:■.:::•. 1-655 J73 1,3^2^519 1,3^9^590 

Net earnings $2,170,711 $2,073,997 $1,890,290 

Miscellaneous income.'. •.::::;:::: __9M83 __8_0^07 __61^244 

Total net income $2,261,894 $2,154,604 $1,951,534 

Surplus after deducting fixed charges 1,333,986 1,249,319 1,188,225 



THE CUBA R E V I E W 



21 



CUBAN FINANCIAL MATTERS 



THE PREVAILING PRICES FOR CUBAN SECURITIES 

As quotc'i 1)1/ Lawrence Turnure & Cu., \ew York. 

Bid Asked 

Republic of Cuba Interior Loan 5% Bonds 93^ 953^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1944 99 J^ 99^ 

Republic of Cuba ]<'xterior Loan 5% Bonds of 1949 951^ 963^ 

Republic of Cuba Exterior Loan 4}4% Bonds of 1949 803^ 88 

Havana City First Mortgage 6% Bonds 101 105 

Havana City Second Mortgage 6% Bonds 100 104 

Cuba Railroad Co. Preferred Stock none 85 

Cuba Railroad Co. First Mortgage 5% Bonds of 1952 none 85 

Cuba Company 6% Debenture Bonds 84 83 

Cuba Co. 7% Cumulative Preferred Stock 83 87 

Havana Electric Railway Co. Consolidated Mortgage 5% Bonds 93 J-^ 95 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co., Preferred Stock 101 106 

Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power Co., Common Stock 97 102 

Matanzas Market Place 8% Bond Participation Certificates 100 none 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Preferred Stock 100 105 

Cuban- American Sugar Co. Common Stock 170 185 

Cuban-American Sugar Co. Collateral Trust 6% Bonds 100 1003^ 

Guantanamo Sugar Company Stock 56 53 

Santiago Electric Light and Traction Co. 1st ]Mtge. 6% Bond? 90 95 



CUBAN CENTRAL RAILROAD 

A subsidy of sixty thoasand dollars for the 
Cuban Central Railroad Co., Ltd., is proposed 
in order to construct a branch line joining the 
town of Calabazar de Sagua with .Mata and 
Encrucijada. The town of Calabazar de 
Sagua and its siu"roundings are rich in soil 
and important in business. It has no high- 
ways to connect with neighboring towns, and 
all its commerce depends on the branch line 
from Sagua to Caibarien. 



THE CUBAN-AMERICAN SUGAR CO. 

A quarterly dividend of two and ona-half 
per cent. (214%) was declared Aug. 15 on the 
outstanding common capital stock; also an 
extra dividend of 10 par cant. (10%) on the 
outstanding common capital stock of the 
company; also a quarterly dividend of one 
and three-quarters par cent. {!%%) was 
dsclared on the outstanding preferred capital 
stock payable October 1, 1917, to stockholders 
of record Septembsr 12, 1917. 



EARNINGS OF THE SANTIAGO ELECTRIC LIGHT AND TRACTION CO. 

FOR JULY, 1917 

Gross earnings 

Working expenses 

Gross profit 

Taxes, interest accrued on bonds and unpaid debts 

Xet profit 

Dividend on real estate shares 

Surplus $10,914.16 $5,471.29 



1916 

$44,823,15 

23,058.30 


1917 

$51,390.19 

33,055.00 


$21,764.85 
$12,082.47 


$18,335.19 
$12,863.90 


$9,682.38 
1,231.78 


$5,471.29 



22 



THE CUBA REVIEW 





YouiiK Australian Pines Five Yeafs Old 
Planted as Roadside Trees in Southern Florida. 



AUSTRALIAN PINE 



Australian pine, casuarina, ironwood, beefwood, he oak, she oak and swamp oak are some 
of the mosc familiar names given to a tree botanically referred to as Casuariua equisdifolia. 
In tropical Am.erica where this tree is planted extensively, both for shade and. for ornament, 
it is generally known as Australian pine. It is not a pine at all, but belongs to an entirely 
different family of plants from that of the pines. In fact, it is not a coniferous tree, but is 
closely related to the willow and poplar, as it is classified with the am.entaceous trees of which 
the willow is the type. 



THE CUBA REVIEW 



23 




Australian Pines Planted for Syiade and Ornament. 

The name oak is pretty generally applied to this tree, because of the fancied resemblance 
in the color and broad pith rays of the wood to that of true oak. In the English trade the wood 
is known as Botanj' oak, because the original shipments of the wood of certain species of 
Casuarina came from points on Botany Bay in Australia. The name becfwood is more appli- 
cable, and is very generally used, because the heartwood resembles dried beef in color. The 
wood is very hard and durable, and for this reason is often called ironwood, which name it 
shares with a number of entirely difTerent trees from, all parts of the world. The use of this 
name will give rise to endless confusion am^ong those who are not familiar with the tree, an