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Full text of "[Culloden papers] More Culloden papers"

To 

HECTOR FORBES OF CULLODEN 

this work is (by kind permission) 

gratefully dedicated. 



To my Sister, 

MYRA K. G. WARRAND, 

this volume is affectionately dedicated, 

in remembrance of our happy childhood, 

at Ryefield, Bught and Culloden. 



r \\ ^ 

C L-0\\ b 



A\ORE 

CULLODEN PAPERS 



EDITED BY 

DUNCAN WARRAND, AVA., F.5.A. 



VOL. V. FEBRUARY 1746 TO DECEMBER 1747. 



499482 



INVERNESS : 
ROBERT CAHRUTHERS & SONS, 

1930. 



PREFACE. 



With the issue of this volume the Editor's task is ended, except for 
the somewhat remote possibility that "Still More Culloden Papers" may 
some day emerge from a more detailed arrangement of the residue and 
from other documents found, while this work was in progress. How 
nearly the whole collection once came to destruction has already been 
mentioned in the Foreword to Volume I., and the following correspond- 
ence throws additional light upon that subject. 

Copy Letter Messrs MacQueen and Macintosh, W.S., to H. Ft. Duff, 
Esquire, dated 30th April 1819. 

Mr Blackwood seems impressed with the belief that Messrs 
Cadell and Davies acquired an unconditional right to the docu- 
ments lodged by you with them; and that this right may be now 
exercised by making them up in a new publication, with any 
other papers of interest connected with Scotland. Mr B. in- 
tends to consult an eminent literary character of this place and 
to request him to make a fit selection for publication under the 
title of "Scotch Papers." 

Being informed as to the nature of the contract between you 
and Messrs Cadell and Davies, we did not offer any observa- 
tions on the scheme developed by Mr Blackwood which has for 
a separate object to give the public several documents received 
from you, but which Messrs G. and Davies did not insert in the 
Culloden Papers. 

If the designs entertained by Mr Blackwood meet with the 
approbation of yourself and Culloden, some valuable "additions 
might be made to the collection, and letters from Lord Lovat, 
of a very characteristic tenor, might be received from a friend of 
ours here, addressed to neighbouring lairds. You probably 
know that Lord Hardwicke has several of the President's letters, 
and other original documents of value. He will, however, take 
no interest in Mr B.'s scheme till we ascertain Culloden's and 
your sentiments. We are etc. 



viii. PREFACE. 

Mr Duff to Macqueen and Mclntosh dated Muirtown, 3rd May 1819. 

In answer to your letter just received the following are the pre- 
cise facts in question. In February 1812 I happened to dine at 
Culloden, and seeing before dinner a large parcel of letters, was 
told that they had been brought down by the gamekeeper for 
coifing [wadding for guns]. I at once said that it was downright 
murder to use such valuable papers so; and Culloden said I was 
welcome to all in the house, and next day sent a cart full of boxes 
and sacks. I had at least thirty years before heard Dochfour speak 
of such papers as being once at Culloden; and I had no doubt 
the papers sent were those alluded to. Tn August 1812 I went to 
London and agreed for the publication of 1000 copies; but it was 
part of the agreement, in writing still here, that all the originals 
should be returned by 1st April 1813, when the work was to be 
out. The work did not come out till April 1815. Messrs Cadell 
and Davies had right to a second edition on paying me 75 
sterling; but certainly not to use the papers otherwise. When 
I gave over the papers and some bound books, they were in 14 
portfolios arranged, and I had put one apart with the most curi- 
ous letters, that facsimiles might be taken; but I find that no use 
in the publication was made of Lord Dnndas's, Lord Peterboro's 
or the Marquis of Argyle's, tho' certainly very curious and I 
must judge they have been made subservient to some other pur- 
pose. I may add that I have even found the gentlemen I had to 
do with in London very unlike what I expected very uncivil 
and haughty etc. As I believe I am not known to be the Editor 
of this work, tho' I wrote the introduction, preface and notes, 
I have had no correspondence, and it is quite new to me the fact 
that Lord Hardwicke had any of the President's letters, tho' 
many must exist that were not at Culloden in copy; as except on 
particular public business I do not think the President kept 
copies of his letters. It is somewhat strange that Messrs Cadell 
and Davies find the papers now of value. It was their constant 
theme that they were not, and in fact they spoiled the publica- 
tion by curtailing at first and then making an addenda they 
altered my preface in that part to excuse this; tho' they had all 
the papers in due time and made the first print from an idea 



PREFACE. ix. 

(I could not get out of their heads) that the publication could 
hardly be short enough to answer its value. I am etc (signed) 
H. R. Duff. 

[P.S.] Whether more than 1000 copies were published I 
know not. Mr Blackwood's suggestion may come from London 
by way of having the benefit of further use of the papers without 
paying me 75. I assure you I made no profit by what they first 
paid me 525. Of this 130 went in purchases for Gulloden in- 
cluding a tea-urn of silver the rest did not more than pay my 
journey to London and two months detention there or more. 
The papers were fully gifted to me without any reserve. 

Messrs MacQueen and Macintosh to Mr Duff dated 5 May 1819. 

By this afternoon's delivery we had the honour of receiving your 
letter of the 3rd current and beg to express our acknowledgments 
for the trouble you have been pleased to take, in detailing the cir- 
cumstances under which you came to be possessed of the Cul- 
loden papers. We had not the slightest intention of questioning 
your right to these documents, but having ascertained Mr Black- 
wood's views, it seemed a duty incumbent on us to render you 
aware of them, in order that the papers might not be employed 
in any purpose adverse to your inclinations, and having a tend- 
ency to compromise the value of the documents and perhaps the 
dignity of the family in some degree, by mixing up its memoirs 
with very opposite materials. Mr Blackwood's plan is not so far 
advanced that we can talk of it with certainty, but seeing it in 
progress we could not remain indifferent to the interests to which 
we have referred. 

It appears clearly to us that under your contract with Cadell 
and Davies, Blackwood is not entitled to execute his present 
design. He may publish a second edition of the previous collec- 
tion, but it must be much in the same style and of the same 
materials. Their unhandsome conduct to you does not merit in- 
dulgence, and there would be no propriety in allowing them 
enlarge their gains (after doing you so much injustice) by a 
misapplication of the documents. 

As Gadell and Davies were bound to restore the papers to 
you in April 1813, we conceive that their right to a second 



*. PREFACE. 

edition cannot extend beyond the documents formerly published. 
In short we think that if considerable profit is to arise from a 
second publication, it ought to belong to you as a small recom- 
pense for the interesting and admirable introduction and other 
information, under the auspices of which you introduced the 
documents to the world. We are etc. 

It is perhaps only fair to Messrs Gadell and Davies to remark that 
Major Duff is said to have been of a somewhat irascible temperament, 
and the present editor possesses some volumes which once belonged to 
him bearing the suggestive title l 'Miseriae Legales." If there was indeed 
any discourtesy on the part of his publishers, the article from the pen of 
Sir Walter Scott, which appeared in the "Quarterly Review" for January 
1816, must in so critical an age have made some amends. It is hoped 
that the index now given to the original volume may help further to en- 
hance its value. 

For the present volume it has been necessary to draw additional 
material from the State Papers preserved in the Public Record Office, 
without which some of the letters would have been too obscure. 

The Editor's thanks are due once more to the Proprietors and Staff 
of the "Inverness Courier," and to all others who have in any way 
assisted him in the production of the volumes. 

"Everything belonging to the Highlands of Scotland." wrote Sir 
W T alter Scott, "has of late become peculiarly interesting." The lapse of 
more than a hundred years has served only to quicken that interest; and 
there is gradually arising a far greater understanding of the history of 
our country from the reading of original letters and documents rather 
than from the study of obsolete histories. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Preface ........................ vii. 

Introduction ........................ xiii. 

VIM. The '45 From February to April 1746. 

(1) The Retreat to Sutherland ............ 1 

(2) In Sutherland .................. 13 

(3) The Taking of Dornoch ............ 39 

(4) The Retreat to Skye ............... 47 

(5) A Note on the Chisholm (Part i.) ......... 52 

(6) In Skye ..................... 55 

(7) A Note cm the Chisholm (Part ii.) ...... 62 

(8) The President Returns ............ 64 

IX. From April 1746 to December 1747. 

(1) After Culloden: Miscellaneous Letters ...... 69 

(2) Concerning the Independent Companies ...... 87 

(3) The Lord President Returns to Edinburgh ... 93 

(4) Letters from and about the Highlands (June 

and July 1746) ............... 103 

(5) State of Inverness (August 1746 January 1747) 123 

(6) The Lord President in Londotn ......... 135 

(7) Miscellaneous (November 1746 to March 1747) ... 139 

(8) Mainly Concerning Lord Lovat ......... 160 

(9) Miscellaneous (April to September 1747) ... 177 
(10) The End ..................... 192 

Corrections to the Original "Culloden Papers" (1746 to 

the End ..................... ... 201 

Appendix I. Losses by the Tenants of the Lord President 

on his Estate of Culloden before and after the Battle... 205 

Appendix II Account for Medicines, etc., supplied by 
Alexander Munro, Surgeon Apothecary, from 1724 

to 1747 ........................ 223 

Appendix III. Index to the Original "Culloden Paper*" ... 245 

Index ... 281 



INTRODUCTION. 



"If the ship had happened to have arrived three weeks sooner, with 
the arms and money I think we should have had such a number of people 
assembled, as would have deterred the Rebels from coming this Road." 
So wrote Lord Loudoun a fortnight after his evacuation of Inverness 
(Page 3). His correspondent, Lord Stair, was one of the few great men 
then resident in London who had any real understanding of the situation. 
To him had been due the idea of the Independent Companies and any help 
which Highlanders loyal to the Government had up to that time received. 
It is impossible to suppose that after seven months the authorities con- 
tinued to misunderstand the repeated requests for supplies. They, like 
the Duke of Cumberland, trusted no one in the Highlands except "the 
Church of Scotland as they call it that is the Mess Johns" (Page 36); and 
they certainly had no comprehension of the patriarchal state of things 
still prevailing Burt's "Letters" were not then published. 

What is properly called the Highlands of Scotland is that large 
tract of mountainous ground to the Northward of the Forth and 
the Tay where the natives speak the Irish language. 



A Highland Clan is a set of men all bearing the same sir- 
name, and believing themselves to be related the one to the 
other, and to be descended from the same common Stock. In 
each Clan, there are several subaltern tribes, who own their de- 
pendance on their own immediate Chief; but all agree in owing 
allegiance to the Supreme Chief of the Clan or Kindred, and look 
upon it to be their duty to support him at all adventures. 

The power of this Chief has no foundation in the Laws of 
the Country. Some chiefs there are that have neither property 
nor jurisdiction, and the cutting off the present Chief does no 
more than make way for another. 



xiv. INTRODUCTION. 

Those Clans or Kindreds affect to herd for the most part to- 
gether, not choosing (if they can help it) to mix with other 
kindreds; tho' sometimes accidents oblige them to take up their 
habitations in the districts of other Clans; but still they retain 
their allegiance to their proper Chief. 

This description is from the pen of the Lord President ("Gulloden 
Papers" CCGXLIII) and no man of his day better understood the matter 
or realised the difficulties which must accompany such a system. It is 
not too much to say that even in the case of Lovat the brothers Forbes 
may, in 1715 and after, have been greatly influenced by the fact that a 
Mackenzie as chief of the Erasers was an impossibility. Lovat, tyrant 
though he may have been, was never unpopular with the rank and file 
of his clan. Moreover, though the Union had done something to bring the 
two nations together, England was still for all intents and purposes a 
foreign country. Even Duncan Forbes as early as 1716 had already shown, 
by initiating a subscription for the prisoners, whose principles he de- 
tested, that the laws of their country were the laws by which they ought 
to be tried. Again, there was the question of kinship, sometimes remote 
enough, and the sensitiveness of all Scotsmen to any hardship, real or 
supposed, which might have its origin south of the border. 

The Lord President's great grandfather had spent much of his youth 
at Beaufort (see Foreword to Volume I.), a fact which in Scotland would 
not be forgotten, and even Hugh Inglis, in spite of his loyalty to the Go- 
vernment, could find sympathy for a c ondemned Lovat (Page 175) . Inglis 
was an Inverness man and must surely have been aware of such episodes 
as the attempt on Culloden, the attack upon Phopachy and other such 
doings, which the President's sister probably had in mind when she 
wrote of "that monster of men Lovat." Her son, Doctor Duncan Fraserof 
Achnagairn, was in a position to acquire considerable knowledge about 
his chief and it may be presumed that he shared it with his uncle at 
Culloden. Whatever the President's opinion may have been thirty years 
earlier, it must surely be accepted that towards the close neither he nor 
MacLeod were in any way deceived by Lovat. Hoping against hope they 
had made desperate efforts, firstly to keep the Frasers out of the Rising 
by any means in their power, and secondly to save an aged kinsman from 
his folly. 

The strategic position of Lovat's country and the extraordinary power 
which he exercised over his clan made the Frasers a very formidable 



INTRODUCTION. 



xv. 



obstacle to any plans which Lord Loudoun could make. Their active 
support in the Forty-five would probably have kept Inverness in the 
hands of the Government, as it had by their asssitance been taken in the 
Fifteen. 

Much has been said about MacLeod in the last volume, since the 
publication of which the following letter has come to light, written eleven 
days earlier than that given therein on page 10. 

From MacLeod of MacLeod to the President dated from Beaufort 14th 
June 1745. 

My dear Lord 

I expected before this time to have wrote you from the High- 
lands, but soon after I parted with you I had a feaverish dis- 
order and cold lasted for some days but went off as I thought 
without my doing anie thing for it. I wis so well as go a fishing 
and wett myself, and so stout [foolhardy] as not to shift after; 
that threw me into a fine smart feaver, that has confined me 
these 12 days and made your nephew [Dr Duncan Fraser of 
Achnagairn] ride with uncommon speed from Brodie here. I'm 
now prittie well again and intend to go abroad to-day for the 
first, time. 

I saw Barrisdale as he parted with you he assured me that 
young Glengarie was not of Lord John Drummond's Regiment, 
that he spoke most violently against it on all occasions, and 
against giving anie assistance to recruit it, if such a thing should 
be attempted, and that he expected to meet him with his Father, 
Sir Alexander [Macdonald] etc at Glenelg. Since that I know 
nothing except that their was a common fellow from Moidart 
here 3 days ago buying meal. I caused enquire at him of his 
young Chief, he said he was not at that meeting but was expected 
daily in that country from the South. As Sir Hector MacLean 
is my near relation I cannot help being concerned for him, 
tho if whats said here be true, that he is either come with intent 
to recruit for that regiment or to carry on a treasonable corres- 
pondence, I do think he richly deserves the fate he's likely to 
meet with. 

Pray did you get anie St Domingo rappee I sent from London 
for you. I forgot to ask when I saw you. There was a stone pot 
full of it. 



xvi. INTRODUCTION. 

I dare say their would be a bundle of compliments for you 
did my landlord know I was writeing. 

I was glad to hear your journey set yon up and enabled you 
to begin the session in health. I hope your wonted care will 
carry you threw it in the same way. I ever am, My Dear Lord, 
Most faithfully yours 

Normand MacLeod. 

The Doctor has wrote you in favours of Hugh Fraser who 
was once secretary here and the only tolerable servant ever I 
saw about the family, lett me join my word for him as I realy 
think him a deserveing lad. Lovat will help him to men if he 
gets ane ensigncy and has recommended him to Guest. 

If MacLeod and Lovat were then discussing the possible arrival of 
the Prince (Volume IV, Page 9), the above letter is indeed remarkable, 
but that of 25th June (Idem, Page 10) would seem to show that such 
was not the case and that Murray of Broughton was himself deceived. 
It is impossible altogether to ignore the testimony of Andrew Mitchell 
as to the frank evidence of Murray at Lovat's trial (Page 165) and his 
reference to MacLeod's position (Page 167), but excepting the narration 
of the unhappy Scheviz (Page 170), there is still no evidence to prove that 
MacLeod did anything worse than to deceive Lovat, when that became a 
necessity to gain time pro bono publico and possibly for his own immediate 
safety. Whatever uncertainty, if any, there may have been, he did notable 
work for the Government throughout the Rising. He "has all along be- 
haved finely," Loudoun told Stair (Page 6), in his account of events fol- 
lowing the evacuation of Inverness. Details of that episode, of the loca- 
tion of the Independent Companies in Sutherland and of their retreat to 
Skye are given very fully in this volume. 

Under the circumstances narrated it does not appear that Lord 
Loudoun could have acted differently, and he and the Lord President at 
least deserved thanks for keeping the food supplies of Sutherland 
and Caithness from falling into the hands of their opponents, and for 
helping further to divide their already scattered forces. 

It was in some ways a curious situation. Neither Loudoun nor the 
President seems to have been really anxious to join forces with the Duke 
and the Duke was certainly not anxious to receive them, though at one 
time he had actually ordered them to cross the Moray Firth, but this was 



INTRODUCTION. 



xvn. 



frustrated by the enemy having seized the boats (Page 27). While re- 
inforcements of regulars might possibly have been of use in Sutherland, 
there may have been reasons such as Prestonpans and Falkirk for not 
sending them. 

Meanwhile by the order of Lord Cromartie, the Lord President's 
estate of Ferintosh in Ross-shire seemed likely to suffer and did suffer 
(Pages 12 and 47). This order is in striking contrast with that issued by 
Murray of Broughton for the protection of the House of Culloden 
(Page 1). 

The surprising of Dornoch on 20th March, when Loudoun was absent 
on the right of his line (Page 39), became possible owing to a dense fog, 
which prevented the warships from protecting his left. One of the main 
objects was to seize the President and MacLeod (Page 45), but they made 
good their escape and were able to retreat to Skye in some order with a 
considerable part of their forces. Here they were cut off from news of 
much of what was passing, depending for information on such friends 
as the Chisholm, whose real part in the Forty-five is clearly brought out 
(Pages 52 and 62). On the President's return after the Battle of Culloden 
the situation (not to mention actual losses as given in Appendix I.) was 
indeed miserable, reminiscent of Cumberland's ominous words, "but 
the Jacobite rebellious principle is so rooted in this nation's mind that 
this generation must be pretty well wore out before this country will be 
quiet" (Page 71). With the flight of their Prince all Jacobite hopes 
had vanished more completely than even the President himself at first 
realised, though his concern for his country was at once manifest. 

The accounts of the state of Inverness (Page 123) seem an echo of a 
hundred years earlier, and the only Highlander of distinction, in addition 
to the President, whose voice might have been heard in the settlement 
of affairs was, curiously enough, Sir Alexander MacDonald. He and 
Cumberland seem to have got on well together. At first there had been 
a desire for that Prince's immediate departure (Page 79) but later a very 
different opinion was formed (Page 110); and it is possible, had Sir Alex- 
ander lived, that more merciful counsels might have prevailed he was 
actually on his way to London at the time of his death (Page 140). 

The Lord President survived his friend but a year, his end being 
hastened by ceaseless toil on behalf of his country. It was perhaps best 
so, for as Ramsay wrote truly, "he died at a most critical juncture, when 
a new tide of opinions and manners was setting in strong." 



xviii. INTRODUCTION. 

The beginning of a new era in Scottish history was indeed at hand, 
which might gradually have developed on happier lines, had it not been 
precipitated by the hopeless loyalty of those who made the Forty-five a 
possibility. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 



VIII. THE '45 FROM FEBRUARY TO APRIL 1746. 



(1) THE RETREAT TO SUTHERLAND. 

On Tuesday, 18th February 1746, the day after the " Rout of Moy," 
Lord Loudoun decided that his position was under the circumstances no 
longer tenable. He therefore withdrew northward, and the President 
went with him. Ten days later an order was signed by John Murray 
of 13 rough ton "to protect and defend the House of Culloden and furni- 
ture " (" Culloden Papers," CCGXIV.), an act of grace that says much 
for the esteem in which its owner was held. " The man who sent you 
the message about the House of Culloden before you left it, and whose 
style begins with 13. is in a good way of forgiveness," wrote Sir Alex- 
ander MacDonald to the President, 21st June 1746, in a letter to follow. 
The " B." does not, as might be expected, stand for " Broughton " 
Murray was still at large but, curiously enough, is almost certainly 
intended for " Barisdale." The nature of the message is not disclosed. 
One of the most pressing reasons for not remaining at Inverness is given 
by the President in his letter to George Ross of 15th May 1746 (" Culloden 
Papers," CCCXVIIL). 

What distress 1 d us most in this Country, & was the reall cause 
why the Rebells came to a head after their flight from Stirling, 
was the want of arms & money ; which, God knows, had been 
long enough called for and expected : had these come in due 
time, we could have arm'd a force sufficient to have prevented 
their looking at us this side Drumuochten The men were pre- 
pared ; severall hundreds assembled in their own Countrys, & 
some hundreds actually on their march. But, unluckyly, the 
Ship that brought the few arms that were sent, & the sum of 
Money that came, did not arrive in our road sooner than the 



I MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

very day on which the Rebells made themselves Masters of the 
Barrack of Ruthven. It was then too late to fetch unarm'd 
men from distances ; it was even unsafe to land the Arms & 
the Money ; so we were forced to suffer them to remain on board, 
& to retreat with the force we had, to preserve them for the 
further annoyance of the enemy. 

Lord Loudoun's own account of the events which led to his retirement 
is fortunately preserved in (a copy of) his letter to Lord Stair, dated 
2nd March 1746. The original was sent to the Duke of Newcastle, who 
seems to have returned it after copies had been made for the Govern- 
ment and the Duke of Cumberland (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.). 

Prom the Earl of Stair to the Duke of Newcastle, dated at London, 10th 
March 1746. 

My Lord 

I send your Grace enclosed a letter I received this moment from 
the Earl of Loudoun ; your Grace sees the hurry the letter ha? 
been wrote in, but -t is absolutely necessary that your Grace 
should see the situation that things are in, in order to the taking 
of proper resolutions. 

I shall trouble your Grace but with one reflection of mine, 
which is, that to me it appears to be absolutely necessary that 
there should be a place d 1 armes on that side, not exposed to 
winds or tides, which appears to me can only be Cromarty Bay, 
which is on all sides land-locked. At present the whole north 
coast from Mont-rose to the Murray Fyrth lyes exposed to violent 
storms of wind either from the east or the west, which may 
drive away for a good many days the provisions and magazines 
the Duke brings for his army. It is easy to see in what situa- 
tion we should find ourselves if the enemy should prevent us 
in siezing Cromarty & make that there place d' armes, but I 
shall trouble your Graco no further at present. 

I am most perfectly and with the greatest respect, 
your Grace's most obedient humble servant, 

Stair. 

Your Grace will be pleased to return the letter when its read 
having not had time to take a copy. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 3 

Tlie enclosure follows, dated from Dornoch, 2nd March 1746, 11 at night. 

My Lord 

I have just now a Letter from Capn. Porter of the Speedwell, 
who brought down the Money to us here & convoyed the Ship 
with the 1000 Stand of Arms, to acquaint me, That in coming 
round Tarbatness this Day, his Pilot ran Him on a Rock, on 
which he lost his false keel, and to desire me to send for the 
money from him (which we have hitherto been obliged to leave 
on board him) as He must go immediately into a Dock to refit, 
which leaves me very little time to inform Your Lordship of 
my present situation with the Troops, and as I can only in this 
case write one Letter, I beg you will have the Goodness to make 
my apology to the Duke of Newcastle, and Argyll. 

If the ship had happened to have arrived three weeks sooner, 
with the Arms and Money ; I think we should have had such a 
number of People assembled, as would have deterred the Rebels 
from coming this Road ; but as It happened, She did not arrive 
till the 9th, the Day that the Rebels took the Barrack of Ruth- 
ven, within 24 miles of Inverness, which put it out of our power 
to assemble People, that were to come at a Distance, and those 
that were near, were so terrified, that They would not stir, when 
They found the Danger so near Them. I put the Strength only 
in the appearance, for I have no Reason to trust more to the 
promises of those Gentlemen, than when I writ last on that sub- 
ject, as Your Lordship will see by the sequel. 

And now to give Your Lordship as clear an account of what 
has happened, as the time will permit. On Saturday was Fort- 
night [15th February] the advance Guards of the Rebels came 
into Strath Nairn, within eight miles of me ; & next Day the 
young Pretender took up his Quarters at the House of Moy, seven 
miles from me. That evening at 8, I called my officers together, 
and told Them I had got an information, that They had 
Thoughts of attacking us that night ; and as I was 
afraid of Desertion, I qualified it, by telling Them, I 
did not believe it ; But that it was fit for us to be 
on our Guard ; and therefore ordered Them, with their 
Men, to repair to their Alarm Posts, at 11 at Night, There to 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

remain, till I marched them from thence myself. My Guards 
and out-parties consisted of 300 men, to whom I added two 
weak Companys, who had not been made up since the Affair of 
Inverury, in order to make a Chain round the Town, to prevent 
any Intelligence being sent, of what I was about. I left one 
Company in the Castle, along with the Garrison ; and by 12 I 
got the Remainder, consisting of about 1500 men, clear out of 
Town, without any one Man in the Town suspecting, that I 
was gone further than some Pallisades on the Barn Hill, and 
some Dikes below That, in order to lie all Night on our Arms. 
We march'd on three miles in great order, and Silence ; There 
was a near Road turns of, which I could not march with the 
Body, both because of the Badness of the Road, and because It 
lead me thro' a more inhabited Part of the Country, from whence 
I could not have prevented Intelligence going. 

There I detached an Officer and Thirty Men to prevent their 
having any Intelligence that Way, with orders to stop all the 
People from going that way, and to halt at a place appointed, 
till They heard me begin the attack, which I proposed to be at 
Day Break. We march'd on to the Heights above the water 
at Nairn, when to my infinite mortification, I saw and heard, 
about a mile on my Left, a running Fire, from the whole De- 
tachment. They saw, or imagined They saw, Four Men ; on 
which They had made this Fire. But the Consequence on the 
main Body was very bad, for It threw us into the greatest Con- 
fusion. I got my own Regiment, at the Head of which I was 
in the Front, saved from falling out of the road. All faced to 
where They saw the Fire, They were ten men deep, & all 
presented, and a good many droping Shots, one of which killed 
a Piper at my Foot, whilst I was forming Them. The rest 
fell all back out of th.3 Road to the Right, a considerable way, 
in the utmost Confusion ; and It was a great while before I 
could get them brought up and formed ; and the Panick still so 
great, That It was with the greatest Difficulty when the Party 
came in, which They did in two & threes, That I could, stand- 
ing before the muzzels of their pieces, prevent their Firing on 
Them. And when I came to count the Corps (if I may call 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 5 

Independt. Companies by that name) I found I had lost the 
Five Companies in the Rear, of whom, after all the Search I 
could make, I could hear nothing. After remaining an Hour 
on the Ground, &, finding that I had lost one Third of my men 
in a Body, besides those who had left the Companies, that re- 
mained with me ; and finding Then the whole Country was 
alarmed, I thought it improper for me especially in the Con- 
dition the Men were, to march on to attack a superior Force, 
who must be prepared to receive me, & concluded That the best 
Thing left for me to do was, to march back to Town, which I 
accordingly did. 

The loss of the Five Companies happened in this manner. 
One of the Mackenzies Companies, which was the Fifth from 
the Rear, went of entirely from their Officers. The Officer 
who led the Fourth, a very good man, but very short-sighted, 
who did not perceive They were running, in the Dark marched 
after Them, which carried two more Companies after Him, 
and before They perceived their Mistake, They were got quite 
away from us ; and tho' Capt. Munro [of Culcairn] was with 
Them, who is almost the only officer I have, He was not able 
to bring Them up again. The Fifth Company was Mr Ross's, 
who had the charge of some Boxes filled with Carteridges, as 
our Carteridge Boxes carry very few. His Company did not dis- 
perse, but They halted, in spite of all He could do, at such a 
distance, that I could not find Them in the Dark till on my 
March back to Inverness. 

I ought to have told Your Lordship my Scheme before I told 
you what happened in the Execution of it ; but the shortness of 
the Time, & the numberless People that have come to me, with 
Letters, since I begun, makes it come in this irregular Shape, 
which I hope you will pardon ; for I have very little assistance. 

I had very good Intelligence where the Rebels lay in the 
Country Houses, dispersed at the Distance of Five Miles, most 
of their principal People in one House next to me, where I really 
think I should have been without their Knowledge by Day- 
break, & a very small Guard with them. And if it had pleased 
God, that the accident had not happened in the March, I flatter 



MORE ClJLLODEN PAPERS. 

myself, that I should have had the Happiness at one Blow to 
have broke the neck of the present Rebellion ; But it is past, 
and I must look forward, and had I men, that I durst trust 
would follow me, I would strike another yet. It is a cruel 
situation to have Names of Numbers, that you dare not fight, 
But now I will go on with my Journal. 

That Night, when the Alarm was brought Them from the 
Firing, which was the First They had, They retired in great 
confusion Two miles, But, next Day, They advanced nearer 
me ; and I lost, by Desertion, near 200 Men that Day. I found 
myself much too weak to fight Them in the Field, & in the most 
defenceless Place in the world ; and Wednesday [17th Febru- 
ary] fixed for making the Attack. In this Situation, I brought 
the People together. I have all along consulted with, The 
President, Mackload, who has all along behaved finely, Col. 
Innes, & Capt. Monro. I stated my case to them ; and They 
all agreed, after what We had seen, That I was not able to 
keep the Place ; And I do assure your Lordship that It is mv 
real Opinion, if I had, That It would not have been a Battle 
of above Five Minutes ; and I should have lost the whole Troops 
under my Command ; and I am afraid, if They had been made 
Prisoners, Half of Them would have joined Them ; and I 
should have put into Their Hands about 1700 Arms, And tho' 
I expect but little from These People by Themselves at pre- 
sent, They will be of great use, when the Rebels are dispersed, 
and They, supported with Regular Troops, will hunt Them out, 
where the others cannot. 

When This was determin'd, I would have slipt the Rebels, 
if I could, & march'd to meet the Duke ; But this was impossible 
for many Reasons, which Time will not permit me to tell your 
Lordship. Then I resolved to cross the Ferry of Kessock, hard 
by the Town ; and if my Design had been known, as They had 
so many Friends in Town, I should have lost Part of my Rear, 
before I could have got over ; For which Reason, I made all tho 
Appearance of marching East to meet the Rebels ; so That 
neither the Troops, nor the Town's People had the least doubt 
of it, till I march'd off, and, as It was I past myself with the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 7 

Rear Guard, under the Fire of Three Pieces of Cannon; but 
lost nobody. But Then I saw again, how unfit It would have 
been for me to have staid. I lay that Night [18th February] 
along the sides of the Lake that runs up to Beuely, & fancied 
to have my Men pretty much dispersed, to put Them under 
Cover, I posted the Mackenzies at the upper End, as it was Their 
own Country & they were likelyest to bring us Intelligence ; 
They alarmed us in the Night, but It proved to be Nothing. 
Next Day [19th February] I march'd, & past part above the 
Conan near Bran, Part at a Ferry above Cromarty, 
and Part at Cromarty, There I found, by the best 
Accounts I could get, That They had march'd out with 3000 
of Their best Men after me, Mackdonalds, Camerons, Stuarts, 
&c. Here I found the Country very narrow ; And, if I happened 
to be beat, could save none of my People; which made me 
resolve to cross at Tain into Sutherland; where if your Lord- 
ship will look on the Map, I will explain my Situation, and 
here, I think, I shall be able to make a Stand, as I have secured 
the whole Boats. What you see like a large River, is what 
here They call a Kile [Kyle] & is a narrow Arm of the Sea, 
& runs up about 15 Miles above This, & is easily defended, if 
They don't bring a great many Boats from Murray, which is 
not very easy ; But to prevent That, I have 600 Men in This 
Neighbourhood' ; In ihe Neighbourhood of the Bona, another 
Ferry, I have 300 ; And Ten Miles above This, where the Shinn 
falls in, which River is 4 Miles long, and has Three Fords in it, 
I have 400 Mackleods, and 200 Sutherlands and 300 more Suther- 
lands I have got from His Lordship and armed, since I came 
here. Above That there is a Lake of 18 Miles long, whose Name 
in the Map is Cromarty (sic) spelt Sinn, but in the Country, 
goes by the Same Name as the River. At present the River is 
impassable everywhere, and They tell me, will probably be so 
These Three Weeks, as the Lake is quite full. Howe'er Your 
Lordship sees, I am pretty secure, as I am Master of all the 
Boats, And if the Duke approaches, of whom I know nothing 
certain, but have sent in a Man of War an Account of our Situ- 
ation ; And from hence if the Rebels march to meet Him, If 



8 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

He thinks proper, I can follow in their Rear, to make a Diver- 
sion ; or if His Royal Highness chuses to have me pass over 
to join Him, & sends me some more Boats, which I have men- 
tioned, I can either pass from hence, which is a long Passage, 
or march to Cromarty, & pass from thence. I have been so 
often interrupted, That It is now past 4 in the Morning ; And 
as the Letter must go, I have not Time to read it over. I wish 
your Lordship may understand it. I should have told you, 
That the Two Mackenzie Companies dispersed themselves at 
Beuely ; But I hear Lord Fortress [Seaforth] has collected 
Them again, with 200 more ; with whom He proposes to join 
me, as soon as He can. 

I am &c 

Loudoun. 

P.S. I march'd out on the Tuesday [18th February] from Inver- 
ness ; and I understand, the Castle, where I left Two of the 
Independent Companies [The Grants and the Rosses] sur- 
render'd on the Thursday [20th February]. I have heard so 
many Accounts of This, that I cannot tell you what is Truth. 
Fort-Augustus is besieged, but holds out. All this Intelligence 
comes through the Rebels, I laid a great Deal of Provisions in 
Fort-George, But the Arms, & what Ammunition could be 
spared, I put on Shipboard. 

The above letter, though written in haste, may perhaps be taken as the 
most accurate account extant, not only of the departure from Inver- 
ness, but of the "Rout of Moy," where, it appears, the immortal 
MacCrimmon was killed in the immediate vicinity of Lord Loudoun. 
This seems to show that his Chief was not far off, and that the Mac- 
Leods must have marched towards the front of the column. It will 
be observed also that Lord Loudoun lays the blame on his own men 
the detached party for first firing. If this is accurate, the reputation 
of the Blacksmith of Moy is somewhat discounted, it being difficult to 
say whether the confusion was caused by his tactics or by his opponents' 
mistake. In retiring northward, Lord Loudoun hoped to draw a con- 
siderable detachment from the Prince's army in pursuit, in which at 
least he was entirely successful, 



MORE CULLOPEN PAPERS. 9 

The movements of the President may best be followed from a docu- 
ment entitled " Account of debursements 1745 & 1746," being an 
" Account of cash laid out by John Hay for the Right Honourable Lord 
President." 

February Tuesday 18 To the horses at Inverness ... 056 

To a cloak bagg lock ... 016 

To MackDonald the Runner 

at Inverness 010 

To all the servants at Inver- 
ness 040 

To the Bill at Kessock ... 080 

To the Servants at Kessock and 

for the Horses 036 

There are no entries for the next two days, but on the 21st the follow- 
ing items appear : 

To a horse shoe at the Bridge of Alness 006 

To a pound of tobacco 016 

To mending his Lordship's boots 006 

From these fragments it would seem that the President was for the time 
separated from Lord Loudoun, who appears to have crossed over at 
Cromarty. The following letter to Seaforth is dated 21st February from 
Nagg [?Nigg] 

My Lord 

I had just now the honour of your Lops, of the 20th in Rela- 
tion to the assembling of your people on Saturday and the 
Desertion of Dachmalluachs and Hiltons Companies of which 
I suppose these Gentlemen will make me a particular report 
this day. As to the disappointment which your Lop. seems to 
think my leaving of Kessock was to your assembling your 
people I assure you we have lost no strength by that for in the 
situation I there was, I could neither have supported your Lop. 
nor defended myself, my men were quartered in a line eight 
miles long and exposed to continual alarm and attacks where 
they could make no defence, whereas here I have got them 
together and am more on hand to support any point where 
there shall be occasion, than I could have done from thence. 

A 



10 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

So now I have no doubt that if they are in earnest they will 
be with you on Saturday [22nd]. I am very sorry that the 
private men of your two companies have behaved so ill. I 
shall repeat not of them, but I must know every instance and 
I own it gives me pain to think what report I can make to the 
Duke when he arrives and sees them. 

The situation I happen to be in at present obliges me in 
the first place, to think of the General good of the Country, 
and in the second of serving the Particulars and I do assure 
your Lop, I shall be ready at all times to give the utmost 
support to your Lop, that lies in my power, and am with great 
esteem and regard 

My Lord 
Your Lordships Most obedient humble Servant 

Loudoun. 

On the same day he and the President were both at Balnagowan, whence 
he wrote to Lord Sutherland, asking him to have boats in readiness at 
the Meikle Ferry (Rev. C. D. Bentinck, " Dornoch Cathedral and 
Parish," p. 319). On the 22nd he wrote again, intimating the arrivall 
of the arms, and asking Lord Sutherland to have 300 men sent to receive 
them (Idem). 

The following joint letter was written also on 22nd February from 
Balnagowan, " 12 o'clock." There is no indication as to the person 
to whom it was addressed, but that it reached its destination is clear 
from the endorsement, " In H.R.II. the Duke's [Cumberland] letter of 
Feb. 28th 1745/6" (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.). 

Sir 

We are much obliged to you for your note dated the 17th. 
Having been under a necessity to leave Inverness to avoid the 
superior forces of the rebells, who had got some artillery; we have 
taken up the ground about this place, where we have it in our 
power, to meet them, if they do not come with a superior force, 
such as in prudence we ought not to stand ; and if they do to 
retire further, cross the firth that divides Ross from Sutherland, 
where we hope to be able to secure ourselves ; and in that event 
we imagine the drawing so many rebells after us, will leave the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 11 

remainder, at Inverness, too inconsiderable to resist the .Duko 
But if the rebells shall not think fit to follow us with a superior 
force, we shall remain where we are, till we are informed of 
the Duke's nearer approach, and in that event, if the weather 
favour, we may either cross over to the Murray side, to join the 
army, having secured boats for that purpose, or may advance 
towards Inverness by the heads of the firths or otherways, 
according to circumstances, or such commands as we ma/ 
receive from the Duke. Should we be obliged to retire to 
Sutherland which can only be if the rebells direct the best part 
of their force against us we doubt not that the Duke may think 
of reinforcing us, with some troops, to be sent by boats from 
Findhorn, Nairn, or other places on the Murray coast. If this 
come safe to your hands, we doubt not you will find means to 
put it safely in the Duke's, or in the hands of the officer com- 
manding the troops in chief, in his absence. 

Loudoun. Dun. Forbes 

Later that day (22nd February) intelligence was received which prompted 
Lord Loudoun to cross his men to the Sutherland side as soon as pos- 
sible. This was accomplished on Sunday, 23rd. 

From Seaforth to the President, dated from Strathconon, Saturday, 
22nd February " ten forenoon." 

My dear Lord, 

Tho' I am here in a kind of Retreat, I am greatly anxious to 
hear of your Lordship, and Lord Loudoun's Welfare. My cer- 
tain Intelligence this morning is, that the Castle of Inverness 
surrendered yesterday, at ten oClock the Garrison Prisoners of 
War. They offered to surrender the day before upon being- 
allowed to march with their arms to the Ship. A strong De- 
tachment from all the Clans there .under Lord Kilmarnock, 
crossed Beulie yesterday, their advanced Guard under Baris- 
dale, and Lentren at Adnacrack [?Ardnagrask] last night. I 
hear circular Letters are sent to all and sundrie in that Neigh- 
bourhood to convene and compear against ten oClock this clay, 
under pain of immediate Military Execution. I regret the Case 
the more that the Resolution entered into, to be execute this 



12 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

I 

day, has misgiven by the sudden Retreat, which has left these 

Gentlemen quite exposed. The more I think of the tumultous 
desertion from Davochmaluach and Hilton the greater my 
Vexation and Anger is, however I hope to live to resent it season- 
ably upon these Fellows, who were too easily imposed upon. 
Ferburn is here, who is resolved to share in my Fate through 
the Highlands. The Bearer has directions (his name Alexr 
Ross) of the proper way to go, and return safe. Ave et vale 

K. Mackenzie. 
Compliments to all with you. 

The following orders were issued by Lord Cromartie after his advance 
against Lord Loudoun. 

Headed : Copie Letter the E. of Crornertie to the Chamberlains 
of Ferintosh [Sunday] 23 Feby 1746. 

Gentleman, 

By Virtue of His Royal Highnesses Order to me you are hereby 
required, to furnish in money or provisions one thousand five 
hundred pounds Stirling, for his Highnesses use, and if this 
demand is not forthwith complyed with, I am to use all manner 
of Military Execution against the proprietor and possessors of 
the Estate of Ferrintosh, by burning your Houses distroying 
your Cattle &c. 
To Alexr & Rodk Mackenzies Chamberlains of Ferrintosh 

(sic Subscribitur) Cromertie. 

Copie Pass, the E. of Cromertie to John Mackenzie. 

By George Earl of Cromertie commanding His Royall Highness 
Charles Prince Regent's Army North of the River Bewley. 

Permitt the bearer John Mackenzie to pass and repass from 
hence to Sutherland, without let or molestation. Given at 
Dingwall this 24th Feby 1746. 

To all Officers Civile and Military whom it may concern 

(sic sub.) Cromertie. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 13 

By GEORGE Earl of Cromertie, Commander in Chief of His 
Royall Highness Charles Prince of Wales 1 s Army, North of 
the River Buley. 

These are requiring all Officers of His Royall Highnesses 
Army, and all others whome it concerns, to allow all & sundry 
the Heritors, Tenants, & Possessors of the Shire of Ross that are 
employ'd in carrying their farm Meal, to pass to & return from 
Inverness to their respective homes, without any molestation 
to theirselves, Servants, Horses, &ca ; hereby certifying that such 
as countervene these, or give them disturbance of any kind, 
shall be highly culpable, & punish'd accordingly. Given at 
Dingwell, this 7th of March 1746. 

Cromertie. 
The last is "Culloden Papers" CCCXV. 



(2) IN SUTHERLAND. 

Having transported his command over the Meikle Ferry, Lord 
Loudoun himself marched to Dornoch, where his own regiment was to 
be quartered. The President went to Overskibo, with whose owners, 
the Grays, he had a double connection through the Erasers of Achna- 
gairn and the Munros of Newmore. He had refused Lord Sutherland's 
invitation to Dunrobin on the grounds that he must remain near the 
troops for some time, in order to give the best directions he could. 
("Dornoch Cathedral and Parish," p. 300). 

From the accounts : 

26 February 6 Ibs. sugar at Overskibo 090 

To a barrel of ale to the servants in 

Sutherland 036 

To the carriage of aquavitae & other 

things from Ferintosh 056 

To his Lordship to be given to Mr Wil- 
liam Baillie's gardener 10 6 

On the day these entries were made, Lord Loudoun sent over 150 men 
to Tain, "who about noon made proclamation at the cross . . .," 



14 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

and returned (Idem, p. 321), and on the 27th, at "11 and i," he wrote 

to the President. 

My Lord 

I send you the enclosed for your perusal and approbation, 1 
really think we cannot begin our March too soon and you see I 
have left ycu full powers. I think we ought to cross part of 
our people this night, you have here the MacDonalds and Mac- 
kays and my People, I have sent for Horses to be ready to trans- 
port the Baggage, and whoever crosses first should get 40 Horses 
and Carriages ready by pressing, for they will get away if any 
other way is taken. Might not Culcairn cross some of his people 
this day, if he can quarter them you should send two Boats 
immediately with Soldiers on board for they can only go with 
the Tide. Let me find a Letter from you on my return which 
shall be as soon as possible. 

I ever am My dear Lord yours. Loudoun. 

The enclosure is unfortunately missing, but this letter, taken in conjunc- 
tion with Lord Loudoun's letter to Lord Sutherland of even date (Idem, 
p. 323) shows that there was to be a general muster with a view to re- 
crossing to Ross-shire. 
My Lord 

I met with Captain Gray hear last night, and showed him your 
lordship's letter, and he immediately dispatched an express to 
the four companies on the Shin with orders to march. . . . 
Loudoun. 

The three letters which follow are from the Officer Commanding the 
"Speedwell," and the third confirms the fact that Lord Loudoun and the 
President proposed at this date to return with their men to Balnagowan, 
but the idea was abandoned on finding that the enemy had not, as sup- 
posed, retired to Inverness. 

On His Majesty's Service, 

To The Right Honourable the Lord President 
Speedwell off Tarbet Point 

My Lord 26th Feb y 1745 / 6 

I received the honour of your Lordship's Letter of the 22nd 
Instant, and shall do everything that lies in my Power for the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 15 

Service. The wind is now inclinable to the Eastward, which 
is not a proper wind for me to cruize in Tarbet Bay. The Tide 
will not serve to day for Capt Inglish's [Hugh Inglis] Ship to go 
into Ferry Oons, and as, tis likely to be dirty weather he is of 
opinion with myself, that we should return to Cromarty, for 
your Lordship is sensible it is not time to run a risque. The 
moment the wind offers fair, we shall return, tho' if Lord Lou- 
doun has not men to receive the arms, I think it would be better, 
if Inglish did not go in att all, but of that his Lordship must be 
the best judge, I mean his being secure from any attempt of 
the Rebels. When your Lordship has occasion for the money 
you will be pleased to send a Person, with your order for it, 
who must give me a receipt without which I cannot deliver it. 
I only mention this that the Service might not be delayed, in 
case the order should be forgot. The Shark and Vulture Sloops 
sailed this morning, but as the Wind has shifted I believe they 
will be obliged to return. Another of His Majesties Sloops 
joined them this morning, If he has brought any material 
News I will communicate it to your Lordship. My Compli- 
ments to Lord Loudoun, I am with my best wishes for your 
Lordship's health and Speedy Conclusion of this unhappy affair 
Your most Humble Servant 

H. Porter. 

[To the Lord President] 

Speedwell 27th Feby 1746 in Cromarty Bay. 

My Lord 

I have this moment received your Lordship's Favour of this 
days date. I shall remain here with Inglish till I hear from 
you again. I have no news of the Duke, the Men of War did 
not put back yesterday, and she, who joyned Middleton was 
five leagues off, and it came on very thick weather which pre- 
vented me speaking with her, I guess at her errand by her 
keeping the Sea all night, I dont know if Captain Middleton 
wrote to your Lordship that he had an Information from the 
Admiralty of 1800 of Fitz James's Regiment of Horse and others 
that were embarking at Ostend, designed for some part of this 



16 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

i 

Coast, and his Orders were to look out for them. Mr [unde- 
cipherable] was with me this morning, who informed me that 
he was with Lord Cromarty on Tuesday last [25th], when an 
Aid de Champ, (as they call him) of the Pretenders came with 
a message from him, to let him know of Fitz James's Men 
being landed at Peterhead, he immediately draw'd on his Boots 
and went for Inverness. This Sloop I conjecture has fell in 
with them, and not being able to give them Battle, came to 
acquaint Middleton of it. I wish Inglish's Ship was secure 
for I'm afraid Adm. Byng will want ships to line the Coast. 
Middleton has stove best Part of the Boats, the rest remain 
here. I sent two to Ferry Oons. I hope they are arrived, 
however I believe we shall muster enough in case the Troops 
should have occasion to cross here. My best compliments waits 
upon Lord Loudoun. 

I am, 
Your Lordship's most Obedient Servant, 

H. Porter. 

This letter (Newcastle Papers) is to Thomas Corbett [Secretary to the 

Admiralty]. 

Speedwell, Lynn Road, 8 March 1745/6 

Sir 

I arrived with his Majesty's Sloop under my command at In- 
verness on the 9th of Feby. having under my Convoy the Hellen 
and Margarett laden with Arms and Amunition for the use of 
the Garrisson, which Arms and Amunition I was directed to 
deliver to the order of Duncan Forbes Esqre Ld. President of 
the Sessions as likewise five or Six Thousand Pounds, which I 
had on Board but the Earl of Loudoun & Ld. President on my 
arrivall represented to me that the Rebell's Army was in Mo- 
tion towards them & being greatly Superior to that of Ld Lou- 
doun, were of Opinion that neither Arms nor Money coud be 
secure in Inverness; for which reason they coudn't receive them 
on Shore & therefore desir'd that I might stay there untill such 
Time as they knew the Design of the rebells. 

On the 17th of February the Rebells were within four Miles 
of Inverness & that Night Ld. Loudoun took a resolution to cross 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 17 

the water the next morning at Kessock, which was accordingly 
putt in Execution by the assistance of a great Number of Boats 
we secur'd for that Service. The Rebells being informed of his 
Lordship's Design, marched immediately for Inverness, with three 
Pieces of Cannon one Six Pounder the others, three [pounders,] 
the Horses that drew them were upon a full Trott and they arrived 
with them opposite Kessock about Noon, when Ld. Loudoun & 
the rear of his Army were embarking, at the same Time the 
Rebells began to play them upon him but did no Execution 
The Rebells then march'd in, & took Possession of the Town. 

On the 21st the Castle surren'der'd but upon no other Terms 
than Prisoners at Discretion. 

On the 19th I reed, a Letter from Ld. Loudoun at Kessock 
acquainting me that he had had an Alarm that Morning, & that 
he had taken a resolution to cross the Water at Gromarty and 
desir'd that I woud attend him there with the Boats that I had 
secur'd together with the Ships that were in the Road of Inver- 
ness, which I accordingly did on the 22nd. The Same Day 1 
reed, a Joint Letter from the Lds., Loudoun, & President, at 
Balnagown in the Shire of Ross, informing me that the Rebells 
were marching towards them & that they were under a 
Necessity of crossing immediately to Sutherland, without taking 
time to receive either Money or Arms that was under my Care 
& therefore desired that I woud anchor or cruize upon the 
Coast of Sutherland, in order to supply them with both Money 
and Arms which they stood much in want of. On the 26 I 
sail'd from Cromarty for the Coast of Sutherland & it being 
very thick weather & blowing strong Easterly I retired the same 
Night to Gromarty, the next morning I reed, a Letter from Ld 
President desiring me to remain there as Ld. Loudoun propos'd 
to return to Balnagown with his Army, upon an Information 
that the Rebells had retreated to Inverness, but finding his In- 
formation not Good he returned to Sutherland. On the 1st 
Inst. I reed, another Joint Lettr. from the Lds. Loudoun, & 
President, desiring me to attend them with the Money and 
Arms upon the Coast of Sutherland. On the 2nd, I sail'd from 
Cromarty for that Coast and at 8 o'clock, that Morning my 



18 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Pilott ran the Sloop upon a Rock off Tarbett Point. . . . 
I immediately communicated the Accident that had happenn'd 
to the Sloop, as well as the Opinion of my Officers thereon, to 
the Lds. Loudoun, & President who, as they were Masters of 
such Passes in Sutherland that they coud defend themselves 
against 3 Times the Number of the Rebells, sent for the Money 
on Shore. The Ship with the Arms is in a little harbour in 
Sutherland called Ferry Oons, guarded by a party of Lord Lou- 
doun' s men. On the 4th in the morning I sail'd from Dunrobin 
Bay in order to proceed to Sheerness : in the After Noon I 
look'd into Peterhead, v r here I saw three small Vessells un- 
rigged & his Majesty's ship the Winchilsea at an anchor in the 
Road Off Buchanness the same afternoon I saw the Eltham & 
Shark Sloop at an Anchor. 



[I] likewise shew'd him [Commodore Smith] a letter I had 
reed, the Day before from the Lds Loudoun & President desiring 
another Sloop to their Assistance, at 8 o'clock I parted with the 
Commodore off Aberdeen, he standing in shore with the wind 
at N.W. & blowing hard 



The Last Account I had of the Rebells was on the 1st Inst. 
by a Person that was sent on Purpose to Findhorne for Intelli- 
gence who gave an Account that there were 1600 Rebells in the 
Town & the Neighbourhood. The Number of the whole is 
computed to be 9000. By the Great Deteachments I have seen in 
the Shire of Ross & the Adjacent Counties & the undoubted 
Intelligence I have had from Inverness of Ld. Seaforts men 
having deserted him & joyn'd the Rebells, as likewise 300 of 
the McKenzie's having deserted Lord Loudoun & joyn'd as well 
as the Deserters that left them at Stirling in my humble Opinion 
they cannott be less than 7000 strong Lord Cromarty is in the 
Shire of Ross raissing Contributions Lord George Murray in 
the Shire of Banf doing the same & sending all the Provisions 
in the Country to Inverness. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 19 

I herewith send you . . . two Joint Letters from the 
Lords Loudoun, & President, by which their Lordships will see 
the Necessity there was for my staying so long upon that Coast. 
I am 

Sir 

with Great Respect Your most Obedient Humble Servant. 

H. Porter 

P.S. Lord Loudoun is near 2000 Strong. 
Honble. Thos. Gorbett Efqr. 

By the President's accounts: 

February 28 To Inverchassly's Groom 2 (3 

,, To crossing Donald McDonald's 

horse at the Meikle Ferry ... 006 
,, To Mrs Gray of Overskibo's Ac- 

count for sheep meal etc ... 2 13 6 

On 2nd March, Lord Loudoun wrote to Lord Stair the letter already 
given, detailing his retreat from Inverness and arrival in Sutherland. 

By the Presidents accounts : 

March 3 To Inverchassly's servant that brought 

some fowls 020 

To a man that brought over Donald 

Mackenzie's horse 020 

To a cow bought for the table at Over- 

skibo 1 13 4 

The following letter, though somewhat out of place, may have reached 
the President in Sutherland. It is from David Erskine, Lord Dun, dated 
from Dun, 26th February 1746. The Duke of Cumberland had arrived 
at Aberdeen on the previous day. 

My dear Lord, 

After a long and troublesome surcease of correspondence, and of 
being separate from one another, in our being together in our 
ordinary way, not a small part of my trouble, I take the first 
opportunity of addressing your Lop, at the same time to open to 
you, some personal grievances, I labour under, that as you've 
the opportunity and think proper, you may use endeavours to- 
wards my reprieve 



20 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

When I had the honour of waiting of His Royall Highness 
the D. of Cumberland, as he passed through this Country, I was 
not a little surprised at the manner I was received by his High- 
ness telling me, that my conduct during the Rebellion was com- 
plained of to him, as not perfectly Loyal, and spoke of two in- 
stances, my having had some correspondence with Mr Carnegy, 
son of Ballnamoon, deputy Lieutenant of this Country under 
Lord Ogilvy appointed by the Pretenders Son, and with one Mr 
Ferrier, a Captain amongst the Rebels, who with a Party of 
them was quartered in my Neighbourhood. I was not a little 
confounded at this unexpected charge, to which I only replied 
that I gave defiance to my greatest enemies to make good the 
charge, or to fix on me the least disloyalty, on the contrary when 
the opportunity offered, I should have no difficulty to justify 
my conduct, and make appear that during the whole Rebellion, 
the part I had played was Loyal and Dutiful. As to the in- 
stances mentioned the fact is, that I no sooner heard of Mr 
Carnegy intending to accept of such a Commission, but I used 
my endeavours to both Father and Son, to dissuade from it, by 
opening to them the ruinous consequences would attend it, for 
other means of preventing it were not in my power, what I 
said convinced the Father, against whose will, the Son would 
needs accept. As to Mr Ferrier, since the Commensement of 
the Rebellion, I never saw his Face, but once at my House 
where he came with his party to press and levy men in my 
neighbourhood, telling me, that out of my interest he believed 
to have some, not being in a condition to master and lay hold 
of him, I went to him and said that if he attempted to force 
out of my interest a man, it should be myselfe, upon this I senl 
notice to some of my neighbours, that if they would join with 
me I was willing at the head of my Farmers, servants and 
others in my ground, in case Mr Ferrier should attempt to 
Levy Men as he threatened, to resist and deforce him, but none 
would join me, not from unwillingness but without having 
any hopes of prevailing, for at this time as we were unarmed, 
the Rebels were, and more numerous, Sometime thereafter 
the Hazard Sloop, came to the Harbour of Montrose and upon 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 21 

hearing that the Captain was willing to send a shore 30 or 40 
of his Men, with some Arms for use of those who would join 
them I wrote the Captain, and sent my Son aboard of his Sloop 
to see if anything was practicable to be done with the Captains 
assistance, with whom at the time, were some Gentlemen well 
effected who thought the proposal impracticable, and there- 
fore it was dropped, to make resistance being thus impracticable 
I thought then of leaving this Country, but then all passages 
either to South or North were blocked up. 

My dear Lord in such a situation what could I do that I've 
omitted, and that I gave the least countenance aid or assistance 
to any of the Rebels, I defy the Devil himself to charge me with, 
but with regard to myself I'm altogether easy, for if the Govern- 
ment wants me to be out of the Court of Session, I shall as 
willingly demitt my office there, as I did in the Court of Jus- 
ticiary but if it shall be thought or pretended that I have made 
myself unworthy of it, by my misconduct the time of the Rebel- 
lion, I'll stand my tryall to the last, after the most strict Enquiry. 
But my only concern at present is, about my poor Brother, his 
Situation : its our misfortune to live in a Country much divided, 
and where the different Parties as Circumstances favour them 
do persecute one another with malice, and when one is anoyed 
as my Brother has the misfortune to be, for no other cause I 
know of, than that he has continued himself in the office of our 
Collector of Supply, notwithstanding the frequent and uncom- 
mon attempts against him. In our Town of Montrose, there 
are some persons, both Ecclesiasticale and Civile, that in the 
present Juncture are very malicious, who without dou"5t perhaps 
on different motives, have made Informations against my Brother 
and me, that its no wonder that the D. has received bad impres- 
sions of us, and the Town by repeated landing of some French 
Ships with arms and men, which by the by could not be helped, 
the Town being then full of Rebels, this has rendered the Town 
very obnoxious to the Government, upon which about a score of 
the Inhabitants are made Prisoners, amongst them my Brother, 
and I know not how long he may be detained. As to the Issue 
of a tryall he and we are absolutely easy, but a long confine- 



22 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

ment to one of his Age of Seventy may prove fatal, besides his 
Wife and Family are inconsolable, which adds much to his 
trouble. For what he is charged with we neither know nor can 
conceive it, unless it be that he has had the Misfortune to have 
his youngest Son ane apprentice of a Merchant in Montrose, 
to have joined the Rebels, and to my certaine, upon the sus- 
picion of it, his Father used all means, within his power to have 
prevented with his authority, threats &c. but the Boy having 
fallen in Company with Lord Ogilvy, all proved in vain, and 
he the Boy said if he was locked up in his Father's Garret of 3 
storries he wd to the hazard of his wish jump over the Window. 
What more could a Parent do, My Brother had his other 3 sons 
in the Service of the Government, two of them dyed in it, the 
last drowned lately with the Fox man of War and the Eldest 
is at present a Captain in Generall Anstruther's Regiment, well 
known for his loyalty &c to many in the Army. In regard of 
my Brother's conduct in other Respects, he has been so lucky 
as to keep from the Rebels the Public Money of his Collection, 
tho' offered and threatened to continue their Collector refused 
with disdain, and having called from him the Cess Books of the 
Shire, he would by no means comply till they made him 
Prisoner two several times, detaining him some days at each, 
and that he gave the least assistance to the Rebels in any shape, 
he gives defiance to any to make appear. Its true while the 
French and Highlanders were masters of the Town and in great 
numbers, some had billets on his House particularly th.^ 
Deputy Lieutenant with whom he behoved to converse, since h* 
had no place of safety to fly to. 

I endeavoured t/o have waited of S[ir] E[verard] 
F[awkener], His Royal Highness Secretary, to have laid before 
him the Cases, but getting no opportunity, I put in the hands 
of one my letter to him to be delivered, which if he 
received and minds of it, will I hope joyne his endeavours to 
have my Brother released upon the Bail I mentioned in my 
letter to S[ir] E. that upon any sum to be named my brother 
shall make his appearance at any time, in any place, and before 
any court or person, shall be appointed to answer to any charge, 
shall be preferred against him. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 23 

My Dear Lord, what apology shall I make for this trouble 
and long letter, writ in such hast and hurry, that I doubt if it 
will read, I have presumed on your good disposition [of] which on 
former occasions, both my Brother and I have had the experi- 
ence. Without saying more on chat subject I conclude with 
subscribing with the utmost sincerity 

My dear Lord 

Your Lops most faithfull most humble 
and most obliged Servant 

D. Erskine 

Waes me for the breach in our Bench, since we left it. [Death 
of Lord Balm^.rinol. 

Returning to the accounts : 

March 4 To a Merchant for six handkerchiefs ... 056 
,, ,, To Robert Forbes Groom which he payed 

out at the Ferry 030 

,, ,, To a pack of playing cards 002 

,, ,, To 2 pounds of tobacco 2 10 

,, 5 To William Baillie's servant that brought 

some fowls 010 

,, 6 To my Lord Sutherland's servant that 

brought wheat bread ... ... 020 

,, 7 To Mr Baillie's servant that brought ale 

over the Ferry 020 

,, 8 To a pair of creels for carriage 016 

,, ,, To killing a cow that was got from Mr 

Baillie 010 

From the Rev. James Fraser, minister of Alness, to the President, dated 
8th March [1746]. 

My Lord 

I Know not what intelligence your Lordship gets from West 
Ross; but some have assured me that little is done or talked 
there, of any consequence, but they have it at the West. The 
Regt. of McGregors & Mackinnons, who have been all this week 
quartered on Sir Harry Munro's estate, kept together last night 



24 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

at his house, and this day marched west, to a review, as they 
gave out, on the hill of Dingwall, and said they would be back 
at Fowlis this night. However they brought several sick men 
along. One was in worse condition than the rest, beg'd to be 
left till they returned. But they cursed & devil'd him away 
with them, saying, who knows if ever we come here again, for 
all this Mclnnon went two days agoe for Inverness, and has 
not returned. Their Prince was gone East to Murray, but sent 
his orders to Inverness. An express came yesterday to Ld 
C[romart]ie, that gave occasion for dispatching suddenly various 
expresses. Young P[itcaln]y called yesterday at Fowlis; and 
when he went off, two chief officers, after shutting the chamber 
door, expostulated with Geo: Munro, Sir Harry's servant, about 
his sending intelligence, as they alleadged, and threatened if 
they heard more of that, that be should be used as a spy, and 
that house should be no longer habitable. Late at night their 
Major, Glencairnie's [?Macgregor of Glencarnaig] brother 
arrived, and was overheard to say that the Duke's army were 
come or to come this day to Elgin; that their own men, who 
were gone home, were all got back, and their numbers were 
compleat, to the ammount they expected; that as they were to 
use now some discipline against desertion two men were 
hanged yesterday at Inverness and as many were to be shott 
this day. He said, as with a design to be heard without reserve, 
that there was a landing of French in Argyleshire. Whether 
this is designed as a pretence to their own men & others for a 
motion towards Lochaber, a little time will tell. But they seem 
to be in a sort of crisis; but whether we, who are here on the 
confines, may not get a severe sweep, before they leave us 
wholly, I cannot tell. The boy who brought me the letter, 
to be just row mentioned, told that he heard at the West that 
the Dukes army were indeed arrived at Elgin. The letter was 
from the E[arl] of Gr[omart]ie, with his own hand, and the 
boy said he brought none other but one to [Mackenzie of] 
Inchc[oul]t[er]. I'm not able to guess to my own satisfaction, 
at the mystery of it. But whatever crime may be in it, I de- 
sign for reasons of my own, to send a man west on Monday with 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 25 

the trifle required. A copy of the letter & answer is here in- 
closed. In guessing the reasons of things, we sometimes dive 
deep for a thing that is only to be found at the surface. 

We heard, yesternight late, that 1000 more men were come 
to Dingwall but thats now contradicted, and the corps that has 
been this week at Dingwall are said not to be considerable. I 
would be willing to signify the intelligence that may be got 
here; but will need to bf> excused if sometimes it be trifling or 
uncertain: as I doubtt not but it will be discreetly used so far 
as concerns my own interest & safety. I am 

Mar. 8th [1746] 

Since writing whats above, a friend of mine who converses 
with rebels, tells me that 800 men were to come over from 
Ferintosh side to be reviewed at Dingwall but, for ought he 
understood that all their partys were to return to their quarters 
till further orders from their Prince. That B[arisda]le had 
raised no more McK[enzie]s in the Highds than 80 men, that 30 
were raised about Brahan; 30 on Highfields ground, 40 on Kil- 
coys, 40 on Belmaduthy's, 40 on Scatwells: so he was informed. 
Their prince is in Murray with the remainder of the French. 
They tell that 3000 are at sea, with several men of war, that two 
French ships landed money lately in the Highlds & have escaped. 
And as to foreign news, that the French have declared war 
against the Dutch, who require 6000 men from us; and that 
Brussels is taken. By his account the Dukes army may be 
now at Elgin. They say the Rebels have in all now 10,000 men, 
and that Ld C[romart]ie is to insist for the crown rent from 
all concerned. 

I'm presently told, since writing last line, that the same people 
have actually returned to Fowlis. My author saw the foremost 
of them. 

Follows the enclosure : 

Brahan 7 March 1746 
Sir 

I find that you have not yet paid up your proportion of the 
Crown rents of Ross for Cropt 1744, which amount to 3 shillings 
o 



26 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

4d, which you will send to me against Monday next. Otherwise 
I must send a party to take up your effects & quarter upon you 
till it is paid. I am, Sir, 

Your humble servant, 

sic subscrib. Cromertie 

Directed on the back : 

To the Revd Mr James Eraser Minr. of the Gospel at Alness. 

Answer : 

My Lord 

I wish greater differences, that the world is divided about, were 
well adjusted. As to the 3s 4d that I ow of Crown rent 1744, 
it were a pity that your Lordship should get occasion to be 
offended for so small a subject. Against Monday, the term 
mentioned in your Lordship's letter, I may probably send one to 
wait of your Lordship about it I am etc. 

The writer of the above letter was the youngest son of the Rev. John 
Eraser of Pitcalzean, sometime also minister of Alness 

In their retreat the Prince's troops used every possible means to obtain 
money, provisions and other necessaries. During the stay of the detach- 
ment at Tain, 60 stg. was exacted from the Burgh, and there were many 
instances of pillage and what can only be looked upon as revenge, such 
as Lord Cromartie's orders for the burning of the houses of Inverchasley 
and Geanzies (W. Macgill, "Old Ross-shire and Scotland," 615, 616, 623, 
1222). An order to Alexander Baillie of Dunain, dated 4th March 1746, 
required him 

upon pain of fire and sword to send to the castle of Inverness 
the number of eight horses with as many cartes before eight 
oClock tomorrow morning & signify their arrival to Capt. 
McLoghlan store keeper in the Castle (Fraser-Mackintosh MSS., 
Register House). 

On 7th March the Duke of Cumberland wrote to Lord Loudoun from 
Aberdeen that he was to be at Banff with his army on the 10th, on his 
way to Inverness, though in point of fact he eventually remained at 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 27 

Aberdeen till 8th April. In this letter he gave "no particular orders, 1 ' 
Lord Loudoun told Lord Sutherland (" Dornoch Cathedral and Parish/' 
p. 324). This, however, was not strictly true. The Duke did give 
orders (possibly with a qualification as to practicability), as appears by 
Lord Loudoun's answer, which is endorsed, "Copy of a letter from 
Lord Loudoun to H.R.H. the Duke Dornich March the 10th 1745/6 In 
H.R.H. the Dukes of March 19th 1746/6" (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.) 

May it please your Royal Highness, 

I had the honour last night at eleven o'clock, to receive your 
Royal Highness's commands by yours of tfie 7th ordering me to 
embark the Troops and join Y.R.H. at Banff, as soon as I can 
possibly after the 10th, & to bring all the arms along with me. 

Lord Lion has likewise acquainted your Royal Highness that 
I have in my Possession Boats sufficient to transport them. I 
received a Letter from his Lordship from on Board the Vulture 
that he had ordered over to me all the Pindann [Findhorn] 
Boats; but none of them are yet arrived, & I have great Reason 
to believe that all the Murray Boats are in the Possession of the 
Rebells. 

I send your Royal Highness a Return of the Boats I have. 
Those marked 30 Bolls are Horse Boats, flat bottom'd & not fit 
for the Sea, as the Passage is 25 Leagues. The others serve to 
transport men across the small Ferries, but for the present 
Embarkation, none of them can be used; but the five marked at 
Sixteen Bolls & one at fourteen, there are four or fire more in 
Sutherland, which I have sent for. I have likewise four Ships 
one loaded with Goals from Lieut. General Guest, for Inverness; 
one with Arms and Ammunition, & some Merchants goods; an 
other, with some Merchant Goods; & the fourth, light. Those 
Ships in the condition they are, can not carry at most, above 
300 Men. 

In this Situation, Y.R.H. will See it is impossible for me to 
transport the Troops till Boats are Sent me from the South Side 
of the Firth, & those will not come, unless there are two Men 
with Arms in each of them. 

I send Y.R.H. a Return of the Troops in this part of the 
Country; besides which, I have been joined by 310 Men in four 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Companies from the Earl of Sutherland, besides Sergeants, Cor- 
porals & Drums, which they are making up to 400. 

I have an order from Lord Sutherland for his men to march 
with me wherever I require them. But as they are mostly men 
who have Farms, I am afraid they will march very thin at this 
Season of the Year whenever they discover they are to cross the 
Firth, Lord Rea[y]'s will march, at least as strong; but I dare 
not mention this Scheme to them 'till I come to put them on 
Board. 

I have lost a great many men by Desertion, since the Sunday 
Night I marched out of Inverness to have attacked the Rebells, 
upwards of ninety of mv own Regiment, mostly of those taken 
at Preston and I am equally afraid, we shall have a further 
Desertion, when we are come to embark, but those that come 
along will be the best. 

I should be very glad to receive Y.R.H. orders along with 
the Boats about those five Companies that have joined me here, 
whether I am to bring along with me as many of them as I 
can; or leave them here to defend the Passes; or if I am to take 
their Arms from them, which will be no easy matter. I shall 
have everything in as great Readiness as possible, against the 
Boats arrive. But from hence to the upper Part of the Shin, 
the Troops are dispersed to the different Passes, at Sixteen Miles 
Distance. Lord Sutherland's People are the furthest from 
hence. 

I can give Y.R.H. no certain accounts of the Rebells, as all 
Intelligence to me came through a Country in their Possession 
where they are very cruel to all those they Suspect. But, I 
have Reason to believe all the Cannon they took at Inverness, 
are carried towards the Spay. 

I shall not trouble Y.R.H. with a Repetition of the Situa- 
tion of this Country as I know Lord President who is fully 
acquainted with it, has done it, I shall be ready at all times, 
with the greatest zeal, to execute whatever orders I have tfie 
Honour to receive from Y.R.H. May it etc 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 



A Return of the Boats in the possession of the Right Honble E of 
Loudoun on the Sutherland Coast. 



Names of Places where the 
Boats lye. 


Number of Boats. 


Number of Bolls those 
Boats can carry. 




t 2 Ferry Boats 


30 each 




5.. 


16 


At the Mickle Ferry 


1 . 


U 




1.. 


12 




1 7 


10 




2 


10 


At Bonar 


1 


30 








Total 


19 


122 









N. These Boats will carry four Men for every three Bolls. 



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MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

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32 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

Endorsed : Copy of a letter from the Rt. Honble Duncan Forbes, Lord 
President of the Session to H.R.H. dated Overskibo near Dornoch 
March 10th 1745/6. In H.R.H. the Dukes of March 19th 1745/6. 

Sir, 

Having seen your Royal Highness's directions to the E. of Lou- 
don of the 7th together with his answer, which describes truly 
the impossibility of transporting any considerable number of 
men from the Coast of Sutherland to Banff, untill such time as 
sufficient Boats or other Vessells are sent from the southern 
shore to fetch them, I take the liberty to lay before your R.H. by 
this messenger, the present condition of this neighbourhood as 
it appears to me, together with what may probably be the views 
of the Rebels, & the resolutions we had formed for obviating 
them. 

The Rebels scheme in marching Northwards was obviously 
to collect their shatter'd Forces to make themselves masters of 
every thing to the northward of Spey, before your R.H. could 
come up with them, to amass together all the Provisions they 
could come at, to fores into their service all those whom Pru- 
dence only restrained from joining them; and if they could not 
make a stand against your R.H. at Inverness or to the East- 
ward of it, to retire into the Highlands by Loch-Ness if they 
could find Provisions to subsist them, or to the Northward to- 
wards this Country & Caithness, where some provisions are to be 
found, & where because of a multitude of Inlets of the Sea, 
and Passes, a Regular Army would find it difficult to follow 
them, & they could spin out the Rebellion many weeks, waiting 
for the result of the Chapter of Accidents. 

This scheme they have so far executed, as to have made 
themselves Masters of Fort George, & Fort Augustus, & to Have 
prevailed with numbers of men who 'till their Arrival kept out 
of the Rebellion to join them, & they have employ'd themselves 
in amassing Provisions; in which service so many of those as 
have not marched towards your R.H. are still occupied. 

Upon their advancing to Inverness with some Artillery, & 
such numbers as it became imprudent to think of resisting at 
that place, Lord Loudoun evacuated the Town, and retir'd with- 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 33 

out losing a man, Tho' the Rebels were so near, fhat they 
brought up some small Field Pieces, in time enough to play 
upon the Boats that transported the Rear Guard cross the Ferry 
of Kessock; and finding it unsafe to lye in the open Country, 
scatter'd as men must be in this season (where there are no 
Towns) & thereby liable to surprise, by their Rapid Motions; 
He took up the Ground where He now Lyes to the northward 
of the Inlet of the sea that divides Ross from Sutherland; into 
this Inlet the River of Shin enters, which has a course of 4 or 5 
miles from Loch Shin, and that Loch again stretches about 30 
miles more, back into the Mountains; at the Banks of the River 
where there are Fords, his Lordship has made some Intrench- 
ments, and having broken or secured all the Small Boats, that 
could be made use of for the Ferrying over Men, He is now in 
a condition to defend his Posts along the water of Shin, should 
the Rebels with great Superiority of Numbers attempt to force 
them; and He is also in a capacity (by the help of those Small 
Boats) to detach small Parties to Ross-shire to resist the Insults 
of the Rebels, should they come in greater Numbers than He is 
able to deal with. 

Under the favour of this situation we have remained where 
we now are, since the 23rd of Febry, & the Rebels marched on 
our first coming here, r. considerable force towards us, yet upon 
knowing how we were posted, they relinquish'd their design, 
& have contented themselves since that time with Keeping a 
Post at Dingwall with numbers, which sometimes were said to 
be 400, sometimes 1400 & sometimes more; But the precise 
numbers we cannot with certainty tell; nor is it easy to discover 
them so as to profit of the intelligence; such is the Fluctuation 
amongst them, & so quickly do they march and countermarch. 

The Business of those there at present is, to amass all the 
Meal & Provisions they can come at: They have issued orders 
[to the] Eastern parts of the Shire of Ross to bring in to Inver- 
ness 4550 Polls of Meal under pain of military execution; But 
our neighbourhood has hitherto prevented complyances, & Lord 
Loudoun has issued intimation that He will consider such com- 
plyance as aiding and 'abetting the Rebels, & threatening to 

D 



34 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Demean such as shall comply, accordingly; which will have the 
Effect, to prevent the Furnishing them with meal, so long as his 
Lordship remains where He now is; unless they should send 
a superior Force to Fetch it, which will lessen the numbers, 
with which they might think of opposing your Royal Highness. 

Upon our retiring first to this Country, Ld. Fortrose retired 
into his Highland Estate of Kintail & Lochalsh, where accord- 
ing to our Information, he has got a considerable number of his 
kinsmen about him, to Defend that country against the Rebels, 
& Sr. Alexr. Macdonald who lay ready at the Kyles of Sky with 
400 of his kinsmen to come down & Join us, was prevented by 
the Rebels getting between him and us, & is we presume (for we 
have had no direct correspondence with him since that time) 
still in the same situation guarding the Island from their In- 
sults. 

Since our arrival in this Country, the E. of Sutherland has 
furnished 400 & Lord Reay 100 of their Tenants, & Lord Lou- 
doun has armed them, I believe they will be useful for de-- 
fending the Passes that lead into this Country, which is their 
own, But I question how far we can depend on their Imbark- 
ing, or marching very far out of it. 

I have ventured to state our case so far to your R.H., that 
you may Judge what is fittest, & the most conducive to the 
service to be Done; If it is your pleasure that we should cross 
over to the Southern shore upon sending us Boats that can 
carry us, we shall embark, But then the immediate conse- 
quence must be that the Rebels will get the Meal demanded 
from Ross-shire, together with what more this Country can 
afford; & whenever we are gone from hence should they think 
fit to retire before your R.H. without waiting to be broke, they 
may take up the Ground we are possessed of, & it would take 
some time to dislodge them from it. 

On the other hand if your R.H. shall judge it expedient to 
advance towards Inverness without us, upon receiving your 
commands, we can direct our march towards it also, & may 
advance so as to be within reach of being Joined by Lord Fort- 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 35 

rose & Sr. Alexr. Macdonald, unless they would weaken the 
Force with which they would oppose your R.H. by Directing 
a superior Force against us. 

I have no excuse fo^ my Presumption in laying these hasty 
Thoughts before your R.H. so incorrectly, But my zeal for 
His Majesty's service & the most ardent wishes for your success. 
I am, if your R.H. will pardon the Familiarity, with Affection 

Your most Faithful etc 
Overskibo near Dornoch 10th March 1745/6. 

Part of the Duke of Cumberland's letter to the Duke of Newcastle 
(enclosing the two foregoing) follows, from which it appears that either 
he did not appreciate or purposely ignored the usefulness of Lord Lou- 
don's force in Sutherland. It is dated from Aberdeen, 19th March 
1745/6 (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.). 

My Lord Duke of Newcastle 

I herewith enclose the copies of Lord Loudoun & the Presi- 
dent's letters to me with the return of the forces in his Majesty's 
pay now under Lord Loudoun's command, By these letters 
they plainly show an aversion to the imbarking and 
coming southward, which I shall readily dispense with, as my 
only view in bringing them South was, that they should not 
have to say that we refused making use of their assistance. 
But I think it much more for the honour of his Majesty's forces 
and of the nation, to finish this affair, without any further use 
of the Highlanders, than plundering and sending out parties. 
I propose therefore letting them know that I shall not expect 
their coming to join me till I get to Inverness. 

I am, your very affectionate friend 

William. 

It may be as well to insert here part of a letter from the Duke of Cum- 
berland to the Duke of Newcastle, dated from Aberdeen, 28th February 
1746, endorsed as private and received by express 5th March (Newcastle 
Papers). It serves to show the general and unfortunate view taken of 



38 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

the Highlands of Scotland in general, while the eagerness of some of the 
Ministers to injure the Episcopalians undoubtedly increased the Duke's 
suspicions, and added to the sufferings after Gulloden. 

My Lord Duke of Newcastle 



As to the affairs here they are just in the State that I have 
represented them in my publick letter; but I am sorry to say 
that all persons who have been intrusted with the power in this 
part of the Kingdom have turned their favour & trust to those 
that could bring in members with most ease & not to those 
that were most zeallously affected, for instance L Penmure & 
Mr: Maule are both brought into Parliament by the Jacobite 
interest & to favour their coming into Parliament all the marks 
of favour from the Crown are bestowed upon Jacobites & so 
it is all over Scotland as I hear. The only people to be trusted 
are the Church of Scotland as they call it that is the Mess 
Johns and here in the north they own that almost all the people 
are Jacobites & led away by the Episcopalls who have meeting 
houses all over this country. In the South the common people 
are as well affected as in any part of England. The honestest 
man I have met with here is L[ord] Leven [Lord] of the Session 
[and Lord High Commissioner] who is -of neither party but 
wishes to have things put upon the right foot & would be very 
able. The [Lord] Justice Clark [Andrew Fletcher, Lord Mil- 
ton] is as able and as wilUng a man as there exists but too much 
an Argyle man to be trusted with all that will be necessary 
after this affair, this I say to you & you allone for he is of vast 
use to me & does all I want with the greatest readiness imagin- 
able. I am sorry to say that the bottom here is bad & that the 
greatest part of this Kingdom are either openly or privately 
aiding the rebels & how it may be changed I dont know at least 
imediately I am your affectionate friend 

William 

One would have thought to find in the Duke of Newcastle's answer, dated 
6th March 1746, and also marked as private (Newcastle Papers), some 
suggestion by name of others in Scotland, notably the President, who 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 37 

were loyal to the Government, but such an opportunity was not taken. 
Scotland was truly unfortunate ?n its more immediate rulers during the 
Forty-Five. The portior omitted in this letter consists of compliments 
and mention of the Duke of Cumberland's good judgment after his 
short sojourn "in the disagreeable country." This from the Manager 
of Scots affairs. 

Sir 

. . . I am truly concerned for the state, yr. R.H. finds things 
in, in Scotland; where the Rebels are able to support a very 
numerous Army; and little or no Assistance is given to His 
Majestys Government. I have long fear'd the Consequences of 
that Conduct, which Y.R.H., now, so justly describes; and I am 
too well acquainted with the management of the King's Interest 
in the Country, to imagine that the interests of attainted Families 
(tho' at present in the Hands of unexceptionable persons) can 
ever be brought zealously to support the Government. The 
Church of Scotland have always been well affected to the Pro- 
testant Succession: The common People in the South, I dare 
say, are so also: But the divisions amongst the Friends of 
the Government have ran so high in Scotland, that Both Parties 
have, in their Turns, courted the assistance of the Jacobites; 
and that is the chief cause of the present misfortune. 

Yr. R.H.'s Character of Lord Leven, who is very little 
known to me, will make me endeavour to cultivate him, & bring 
him forward. The Behaviour of Lord Justice Clerk, I own, has 
pleased me better than any man's in Scotland. There is a 
Spirit, a sense & a Zeal for the Government, which cannot be 
put on; But He must be consider'd absolutely in the Light, Yr. 
R.H. represents him. 

The great object will be to pass such Laws, after the Re- 
bellion is over, as may effectually reduce the Power of the High- 
lands; and thereby disable France from playing this Game upon 
us whenever they please: and so keep this country in their 
constant Dependance. This, I think, is the great Point, which 
every servant of the King ought to have first in view. For 
this, those Laws, suggested by Y.R.H. may be very proper; and 



38 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Others, even of a higher nature, are, and must be, under con- 
sideration. But, towards succeeding in this, we must, if pos- 
sible, get some of the considerable Scotch Nobility to join with 
us; to prevent it's being call'd a national measure; & a national 
affront, & Injury. The Duke of Argyle will, I hope, co-operate 
with us; and I am not for making Others desperate, that shall 
be disposed to do so. But I find It is the general Opinion that 
none of these Regulations can be attempted in Parliament, til! 
the Rebellion is over; and That, under God, depends upon 

Y.R.H. . 

Forgive the zealous overflowings of Sir, 
Y.R.H. 's etc 

Holies Newcastle. 

Returning to the President's accounts : 

March 11 To my Lord Sutherland's servants that 

brought an ox 076 

To [Munro of] Auchanny's servant that 

brought a salmon 026 

To Mrs Baillie's servant that brought ale 010 
To a cow that the Guard killed without 

orders 210 

To MacDonald the runner when he went 

for wine 010 

,, 12 To salt ... 014 

,, 13 To a man from Captain MacDonald ... 010 

,, 17 To a servant that brought straw 020 

,, 17 To a boy who Brought some beef & tongue 010 
,, 19 To the Mistress of Overskibo in part pay- 
ment of her account 19 

,, ,, To her for a ston of butter & sixpence for 

carriage 1 10 6 

Meanwhile, on the receipt of information that the enemy was approach- 
ing Tain, Lord Loudoun requested (llth March) Lord Sutherland to 
have boats sent to the Meikle Ferry, and three days later asked for more, 
with a view to crossing troops over "I hope to make them very sick 
of their project on East Ross." He also warned Lord Seaforth (15th 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 39 

March) against any boats falling into the enemy's hands (" Dornoch 
Cathedral and Parish," pp. 324-326). It would seem from the following 
that Lord Loudoun must also have warned Hugh Inglis (as well as any 
others whose ships were within the Little Ferry) to put to sea. Inglis 
was in charge of the Government cash, and, though his ship was later 
captured, he managed to escape with all but 70 in copper (Idem, pp. 
328-329). 

To the Right Honble Lord Loudoun. 

My Lord. 

Our Ship is ready for sea, as I believe the rest of the ships in this 
Harbour are, and will in obedience to your Lordships Commands 
get over the Bar, as soon as Mud and Weather will permit. It 
blows hard at present from the South east, and as like to con- 
tinue as ever, while it ccntinues from this Art it's impossible to 
get out. 

J am My Lord, 

your most obedt Most obliged Servant 
Ferry Oons 17th March 1746. Hugh Inglis. 

(3) THE TAKING OF DORNOCH. 

There are several accounts of what befell on 20th March. The 
'Scots Magazine" gives the following: 

The rebels having collected a number of fishing boats at Find- 
horn and two other small places in the Murray frith put four 
men. on board each, and by the favour of a thick fog, which 
lasted eight days, coasted about Tarbet Ness to Tayne in Ross- 
shire, where a body of their men lay. There they embarked, 

to the number of 12 or 1500 , 

. . . and on the 20th of March, at eight in the morning, they 
crossed the ferry, and landed on the Sutherland side, about two 
miles west of Dornoch, where 200 of Loudoun's regiment were 
cantoned . . . Lord Loudoun had left Dornoch that morning 
about five o'clock, and gone westward to reconnoitre the 
different passes where the rest of his men were stationed, dread- 
ing nothing from that quarter, as he had carried all the boats 
over to the opposite shoire, and judged it impracticable to bring 
any from the Murray frith, three ships of war being stationed 
there. , . . . . . , 



40 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

From the Duke of Cumberland to the Duke of Newcastle, dated from 
Aberdeen, 26th March 1746 (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.). 

My Lord Duke of Newcastle 

His Majesty must have observed how negligently these High- 
landers who are with us do their duty, as well by the Surprise 
of the posts upon the hills as the last affair that happened at 
Keith. And I am sorry I have a further proof of this, which 
is of much more consequence. For by two letters which I send 
here enclosed, his Majesty will see that Lord Loudoun's people 
have suffered themselves to be surprised at Dornick from the 
Murray side by a few boats. All that I can say with certainty 
of the affair is, that Major Mackenzie has surrendered with that 
part of Lord Loudoun's regiment which was there, prisoners 
of war; and that it looks as if Lord Loudoun & the Lord Presi- 
dent's army would be entirely dispersed, I am much sorrier 
for the appearance of the affair than for the thing itself, as I own 
I have never expected much assistance from them 

William. 

The two enclosures are as follow, the second being an enclosure to the 
first. 

Anonymous "to the Hon. Maj. Cofield [William Caulfieldl or in his 
absence to any general officer that is with his Royal Highness 
Haste." The letter is dated 24th March, 5 o'clock in the morn- 
ing. 

Hon. Sir 

Herewith comes a letter to Lord Findlater giving ane account of 
the situation of affairs in Sutherland Friday last. The rebells, 
by means of the Murray boats, which they had carried over, and 
favoured with a fogg, passed the Broad ferry into Sutherland 
& seized all the boats Lord Loudoun had there as well as the four 
lying in the ferry, & made a small guard of Lord Loudoun's 
men, which is said to be Lord Loudoun's own regiment, 
prisoners. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 41 

They no sooner landed one body of their men & made them- 
selves masters of the boats than immediately they went off for 
another and as Lord Loudoun's men were much scattered guard- 
ing the passes on the upper part of the ferry, it was impossible 
to gather them together in time to oppose the rebells' second 
debarkation. The Earl of Loudoun himself and the Lord Presi- 
dent posted up towards the men, but whether they would judge 
it proper to make a stand or to retire, Collector Wedderburn, 
who is my informer, savs he cannot tell. 

He says there were only 300 of Lord Loudoun's regiment in 
Dornoch and but a few of these, who were on ane outguard 
taken, the rest having escaped, that the rebells entered Dunrobin 
& behaved, as he heard, very civilly, tho' my Lord Sutherland 
was gone and had atong with him Sir Harry Innes & some 
others & had taken a boat in order to join the Duke 

The letter ends with excuses from the writer for not coming in person. 

Prom James Anderson to "The Rt. Hon Earl of Findlater & Seafield, 
Aberdeen Haste Haste" The letter is dated from "Boindie," 23rd 
March 1746. 

My Lord 

Mr : Wedderburn collector of excise came here about an hour ago 
and brought the following intelligence, which I thought it my 
duty to communicate to your Lordship for the service of the 
Government. 

He says he came from Dunbeath yesterday early in the 
morning and that in the night between the 19th & 20th a pretty 
considerable party of the rebells, by the help of some boats from 
Murray and a thick fog which prevailed at that time landed upon 
the Sutherland side of the mickle ferry and surprised the guard 
of Lord Loudoun's regiment and took them prisoners some few 
only excepted who made their escape by flight. The gentle- 
man further adds that he was assured by undoubted authority 
that Lord Loudoun & the Lord President went up to the guards 
upon the passes of the Kyle & the river 'twixt Sutherland & Ross, 
but had no intelligence whether they had made any stand against 
the rebells or consulted their safety by flight. 
P 



42 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

He tells me also that the rebells the same day they landed 
in Sutherland made themselves masters of four merchant ships 
lying in the little ferry, one of which served his Majesty as a 
tender, & took possession likewise of the Earle of Sutherland's 
house, and he expected they would advance to Caithness the next 
day, where he apprehends there will be a considerable rising. 
Mr: Wedderburn says the situation was such that it was imprac- 
ticable for him to communicate the intelligence sooner. 

Your lordships most . . . humble servant, 

James Anderson. 

Lord Sutherland made his escape by boat, and was accompanied among 
others by the writer of the following document (State Papers, Scotland, 
P.R.O.). It is dated at Aberdeen, 29th March 1746, and contains, not 
only an account of events at Dornoch, but also of Lord Loudoun's opera- 
tions from the time he left Inverness. 

Account of Lord Loudoun's retreat. 

Upon the advance of the rebell army to Inverness Ld. 
Lowdoun, being well informed of the Superiority of their num- 
bers, and haveing lately before experienced how little depend- 
ance was to [be] laid upon sundry under his command, after 
putting two companys commanded by the Master of Ross and 
[Grant of] Rothymurchus junior into the Castle found it neces- 
sary to abandon the town about 10 forenoon the 18 of Feb. As 
we had seen the Enemy from the top of the Castle some hours 
before advancing slowly to attack us sundry of their advanced 
guards were gott into the east end of the Town by the time 
our Rear had gott over the Bridge, but it being commanded by 
the Castle and the Ness not fourdable, they could not gett over 
to attack us, but at same time very allartly drew down three 
Feild peices by the North side of the City and from the point 
near Oliver's old Fort, cannonaded us while we were passing 
the Kessock-ferry, which though it did no damage, yett haveing 
thrown sundry shott among & over us, it struck a most un- 
accomptable terror into the Highlanders, which appeared by 
many deserting us that night, and more soon after. The 19 we 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 43 

marched to Cromarty & the 20 were quartered near New-Tarbit 
& the adjacent places upon the north of Cromarty firth, and here 
the two Mackenzie companys, commanded by Dochmaluach, and 
Hilton, in one night officers and all deserted us to a man, and 
went home, here we lay untill Sunday the 23 that his Lordship 
being informed that a very large body of the Rebells, now 
joyned by all the Frazers haveing headed the Firths by Bewly 
& Dingwal, were advanceing to attack us, His Lordship then 
finding it necessary to rotrait into Sutherland, we were marched 
there and his Regiment consisting of about 220 Men were 
quartered in Dornoch and the adjacent Farms which was the 
Head Quarters. Here H was determined to make the last stand 
especialy as his Lordship was now joyned by about 6 or 700 of 
Ld. Sutherlands people, but as there was a long Line to defend 
nearly the breadth of that part of the island, it was necessary 
to canton the Men all along it at a considerable distance from 
one another. To the left in and about Dornoch, lay the Regi- 
ment, next to them 3 Companies of M'Kays, then 2 Companies 
of Macdonalds, then the Inverness Company, then the Monro 
Company then the 4 Companies of McLeouds, opposite to the 
three Fourds of the River Shin, which from the Lake of that 
name, falls into the Firth of Dornoch, these fourds his Lordship 
fortifyed, placed there his best men as this was the place in 
which we apprehended to be attact, all along Lough Shin lay 
sundry partys of the Sutherlands & a considerable body of them 
at the West end to defend the passes of the Mountains. The 
Rebells to the number of 2000 or 2500, came into the low parts 
of Ross-shire and made Tain their head-quarters. Here we lay 
opposite to one another untill Thursday the 20 of March, when 
about 9 in the morning in such a thick fogg as we could not see 
100 yards we were allaranied that a considerable body of the 
Rebells were landed about 2 miles to the westward of Dornoch. 
Ld. Lowdoun that morning by 6 o'clock, was gone up about 16 
miles to visit the quarters upon the River Shin as indeed all 
along his Lordship underwent a prodigious fatigue, saw every- 
thing done himself and constantly visited every quarter. 



44 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Upon the alarm being given, the major beat to arms & 
immediately gott together about 120 of the Regiment the rest 
being 3 miles distant guarding the Ships that had the money 
and Stores on board then laying in the little Firth of Ferry- 
Ouns 3 miles to the Northwards of Dornoch, with these he pro- 
ceeded towards the place of landing expecting to be joyned by 
the McKays to see if possible to beat them off. Upon our march 
we were informed that all at once they landed about 800 men, 
300 of which had immediately marched directly upwards to 
upper Skibo to seise the Lord President who with his own 
people about 60 in Number under his Son, was quartered there, 
the remainder had stayed to cover the passage of those that were 
to follow. We marched on and quickly found ourselves with- 
in half Muskett-Shott of at least 600 men, besides the 300 who 
were gone up above us whom we could not see. Here we could 
observe 18 Murray boats 8 or 10 of which were landing more 
men, & the rest under sail returning for others. As the McKay 
guard of 40 had upon ihe first landing returned without firing 
a Shott, so the major H seems thought fitt that we should retire 
without firing likeways. We retired to Dornoch which they 
perceiving marched about 500 men after us, here we had time 
to throw seme smal quantity of Ammunition into a Ditch & 
proceeded to gett, if possible over the ferry of Ferry-ouns, which 
as it goes about 6 Miles up the Country might have given them 
some stop & preserved us. But about a mile to the northwards 
of Dornoch, I don't know what panick saised them that they 
were for capitulating only informed sundry of the officers who 
had formerly been prisoners after Preston that they might escape 
if they could, as they apprehended they would not be included. 
They, Ld. Charles Gordon, the young Laird of McLeoud & the 
relator a Voluntier, thought it their duty to take the advantage 
of that little halt & escape over the Ferry, which the guard of 
60 of the Regiment had done before. The Master of the Store- 
ship [Hugh Inglis] was immediately advertised & had just time 
to gett the Military Chest on board a small boat and escaped to 
Sea. The Relator saw the above Officers and soaldiers make 
up the north side of the Ferry in great disorder and stayed upon 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 45 

the north-bank until the Rebells by their fire upon four Ships 
there laying (2 of whom were loaden with London-goods for In- 
verness & two more with all the spare Military-stores, & the 
most valuable effects of the people of Inverness, & places ad- 
jacent) had oblidged them to send their boats ashore one of which 
they had saized on their side & had them in full posession. The 
Relator knowing that a Messenger of the Duke of Cumberlands 
with dispatches from Ld. Loudoun was then at Dunrobin wait- 
ing to put to Sea & in all probability not then gone, made for 
that place in order to escape that way> and acquainting the Earl 
of Sutherland with what had happened, he finding his people 
at a distance, & his house indeed not tenable especialy as they 
had gott possession of 9 smal Cannon on board these Ships so near 
it, & a large quantity of Ammunition, judged it proper to aban- 
don it and make his escape. So that as quickly as possible 
his Lordship, Sir Harry Innes, Major McKay the Duke of Cum- 
berlands Messenger, & the relator, gott on board a smal Boat, 
& with some difficulty the wind being directly on Shoar gott to 
Sea were next day taken up by the Vulture Sloop of War upon 
the Murray coast, & some days after landed at Trap [?Troup] in 
Aberdeen-shire. 

Ld. Loudon, before his leaving Inverness had siized or dis- 
troyed all the Boats from Nairn, & as he marched along had done 
the same quite to Sutherland & had all those he had not dis- 
troyed in Dornoch firth, but the long continuance of East winds 
and Foggs had obliged the Sloops of war to leave the coast, and 
gave the Rebells ane opportunity unperceved to bring a large 
number of Boats from Murray and in the manner above to sur- 
prise us which was a providential circumstance which could not 
be forseen and indeed by all his Lordships care (which was very 
great) could not have been guarded against. 

There first attempt upon landing was to seize the person of 
the President & as they imagined of McLeoud Senior who had 
loadged with him some dayes before but was then gone, against 
these two their cheif Vengeance was leveled. The Relator be- 
lieves (although he cannot certainly say) that the Ld. President 
did escape, and that along with the McKays he might retreal 



46 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

into the Mountains of Strathnavern or into Lord Rea's Country, 
this he thinks most probable. As to the E. of Loudoun who at 
the landing of the Rebells was then about 16 miles to the West- 
ward along with 400 McLeouds (by much the best body of his 
Highlanders) its not at all to be doubted if he incline that 
measure that with them he may retreat westwards, into the 
Isle of Sky and its not improbable that 200 Mcdonalds may take 
the same rout, Although without much Ammunition, less pro- 
vision and no money, (as we have carried off his Military Chest) 
any considerable body cannot be long kept together. 

As to the present Number of the Rebells all that the Relator 
knows, Is that in Ross before their passage into Sutherland by 
the best information their Numbers were about 2500 not ex- 
ceeding 3000 although they called themselves 5000. That on 
the 21 by the information of Lady Brodie by a Boat from the 
Murray Coast that came on board the Vulture Sloop the Pre- 
tender was recovered of his Fever was gone back from Elgin to 
Inverness and had a considerable body about 2000 there about 
him that all along the Coast from Fochabers to Inverness they 
were thinly cantoned their numbers very uncertain and he can 
make no judgment what numbers were at Fort Augustus, which 
they have made their grand Maga/ino or what numbers have 
gone to hesidge Fort William, but he belives the last are not 
very numerous, although after the taking of Inverness, especialy 
of Frazers <fe McRenzies they gott a great addition. On the whole 
by the best information it? the practice of that great body of 
Theirs that when any Clan have gott Spoil enough worth going 
home with that they go off in a body there depositt it and return 
sometimes more numerous sometimes less, so that it would be 
impossible to their Muster-master general if they have such an 
Officer to tell there numbers at any Time perhaps within 1500. 

From the Cullan westwards & ah along the County of 
Murray, they have carried off all the Meal & Grain of any kind 
they can find save what is necessary for their own immediate 
subsistence & on the Dukes advance will burn all the forage. To 
the Relators knowledge they have done the same in the East 
parts of Ross without leaving the people so much seed as would 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 47 

sow the tenth part of their Lands. The Ld President's Estate 
of Ferntosh & the Monroes County of Fern-Donald, they have 
rendered a compleate desolation, and he himself on Munday the 
17 saw sundry houses on fire on the opposite side about 3 miles 
above Dornoch which we were next day informed was done by 
Ross of Pitcalny late Ensign in Ld. Loudouns Regiment but now 
a Collonel among the Rebells in order to force the Country Men 
to take up Arms. 

The surprising of Lord Loudoun's forces was a great achievement on the 
part of the Jacobite Army, but it did not in the end produce all the results 
which had been hoped. 

(4) THE RETREAT TO SKYE. 

Lord MacLeod, in his account of the affair of Dornoch ("The Earls 
of Cromartie," II., 397), states that the enemy 

so soon as they discovered our being landed retir'd. The county 
militia went to their respective homes, and the Earl of Suther- 
land cross'd over the Firth of Murray and went to the Duke of 
Cumberland's army. The Earl Of Loudoun and the President 
Forbes retir'd with Sir Alexander Macdonald and the Laird of 
Macleod and their men into the Isle of Sky. The greatest part 
of Loudoun's own regiment was made prisoners of war, to- 
gether with their Major, William Mackenzie. 

Lord MacLeod seems to have been mistaken in supposing that Sir Alex- 
ander MacDonald was in Sutherland. He was certainly not there on 
10th March, when the President wrote to the Duke of Cumberland, and 
there does not appear to be any evidence for his presence later, other than 
Lord MacLeod's statement. His two Independent Companies were, as 
previously narrated, in position between the Mackays and the Inverness 
Company, beyond which came the Munro Company, and then the four 
MacLeod Companies, "by much the best body of his [Lord Loudoun's] 
Highlanders," guarding the fords of the Shin. As Lord Loudoun him- 
self was on the west part of the line, the arrangements for the retreat 
from the east parts were probably concerted, hurriedly enough, by the 
President. It is certain that the MacLeod & MacDonald Companies, and 
presumably what was left of Loudoun's regiment, retreated to Skye, also 



48 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

the Munro Company, as appears by MacLeod's letter to the President 
of 26th April 1746, to be hereafter given. Presumably the Inverness 
Company also retreated to Skye, though there is no direct evidence of 
this. The Sutherland and Mackay Companies apparently dispersed for 
the time into their own country, but rendered considerable service after- 
wards, the capture of Lord Cromartie and Lord MacLeod being due to 
the enterprise of Ensign Mackay. The fate of the President does not 
seem to have been known to the neighbourhood, it being actually sup- 
posed that he had gone to Argyll ("Sutherland Book," II., 97). Having 
a guard of his own men under his son, he escaped capture, and his 
accounts show the route followed. 

March 21 To the Bill at Strathoickall 110 

They appear then to have turned down Glen Einig, the next item being: 
March 22 To the bill & to the maid at Lochbroom ... 17 6 

That day they reached "Lochow" [Loch Ewe.] 

March 23 To the Bill at Lochow for meal, the 

horses and aquavitae 110 

,, ,, To aquavitae to the Guard 4 

,, ,, To 4 hired horses from Lochow to 

Lochcarron 080 

,, ,, To meal at the minister's [Rev. Aeneas 

Sage] house for the Servants ... 016 

On the 24th and 25th the President was at Loch Carron. 

March 24 To my Lord Seaforth's servant at Loch- 
carron 076 

,, ,, To straw for the horses at the minister's 

house there 2 6 

,, ,, To a sheep fo r the servants at Lochcarron 034 
,, 25 To fire for the Guard at Lochcarron 002 
,, ,, To the servants & hyrers to go about Loch- 
broom and Lochow ... 10 
,, ,, To the Minister's daughter at Lochcarron 110 
,, ,, To the Minister's maid servant ... 026 
,, To the price of a sack for carrying meal ... 018 
,, To Tornick's [?Tournaig's] servant when 

his Lordship dined 020 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 49 

March 25. To cash for a cow to the Guard at Loch- 

carron, paid the minister 1 10 

On the 26th the President crossed over to Skye. 

March 26 To two hired horses from Lochcarron to 

Lochalsh 026 

,, ,, To corn to the horses at Lochalsh ... 010 

,, ,, To the Mistress of Auchtertire [?Mur- 

chison] for the horses 026 

,, ,, To her to be given to the servants a 

guinea 110 

,, ,, To the Boatman at Lochalsh for ferrying 

the horses . 026 

,, ,, To a guide from the Ferry of Lochalsh to 

Broadford 010 

,, 27 To the Mistress of Correchatachan ... 10 6 

,, ,, To the Groom for the horses ... ... 26 

,, ,, To shoeing the horses at Broadford ... 036 
,, To Donald MackDonald the Hyrer ... 010 
,, ,, To a guide from Broadford to "Kamloch- 

dell" for the servants 010 

,, ,, To sheaves of corn for the horses at 

"Kamlochdell" 016 

'Kamlochdell," as spelt by John Hay, who kept these accounts, was 
the President's destination, not, as generally supposed, on MacLeod's 
estate, but in Sleat. In letters, to be hereafter quoted, the spelling is 
"Kenlochnadale" and "Kinloch na daale," which shows that the place in- 
tended was near Loch na Dal. In his letter to the President of 26th April, 
MacLeod mentions that Culcairn remained there with the boats, and it 
thus appears that what remained of Lord Loudoun's force stayed in that 
neighbourhood till after the Battle o'f Gulloden, when it again emerged. 
The following letter shows that there were actually about 800 men still 
under arms. 

From Andrew Fletcher, Lord Milton, to the Duke of Newcastle, dated 
from Edinburgh, 5th April 1746 (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.) 

My Lord Duke 

I send your Grace enclosed a copy of a letter I received from 
the Duke 01 Athole containing the latest advices of the situa- 



50 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

tion of the King's affairs in Perthshire. As to which I need 
make no Observation, further, than to inform your Grace, that 
before the Hessians marched from Edinburgh, I haveing dis- 
covered, a murmurring among some of their inferiour officers 
upon account of no cartel! being settled, (which I supposed had 
been put into their heads, by some evill designing persons 
here), I did then immediately acquaint his Royall Highness of it. 

And now, upon observing that the Rebells, had volun- 
tarly abandoned, the seige, or rather blocade, of the Castle of 
Blair, when the garison was reduced, to great want of provi- 
sions, etc. And a report prevailing that the Rebells had on 
the 29th of March given up the Seige of Fort William, I took 
the liberty to suggest, to his Royall Highness, that these 
retreats, looked, as if they proceeded from generall orders, upon 
a resolution taken by the Rebells to call in all their out Partys 
and collect their whole strength into one body, in order to meet 
his Royall Highness the Duke of Cumberland; But whither, 
they will in that case, come to a fair engagement, or wait oppor- 
tunitys to catch advantages, and in the mean time endeavour to 
harrass the Dukes army, which is certainly in their Power, and 
for their interests, and what they have been practiseing, are 
matters easyer to state than determine; as the Rebells are in 
possession of the County of Murray and have carried off most 
of the provisions, though to appearance resolved to dispute 
the Duke's passing the River of Spey, yet if they should be 
drove from that Post, it seems more than Probable, that in their 
retreat they may destroy the Forrage etc. So that upon the 
march of our army it may be supposed, that they can rely on 
being furnished with nothing out of that County. 

I send your Grace also inclosed a Copy of a particular De- 
claration of war by the Camerons and Macdonalds against the 
Duke of Argyll E curious enough piece. 

I send also a short Journal of the Seige of Fort William 
till the 25 March. 

There was a report here, which was generally believed, that 
the Rebells had upon the 29th of March in the Morning, given 
up, and abandoned the Seige of Fort William; which, I am 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 61 

affraid was not well founded, and I suppose was occasioned by 
the Rebells drawing off their cannon from their first batterys, 
exposed to the Fort, and oblidged to raise new Batterys, for 
upon the 31st of March there were fireing of Cannon as formerly 
heard by those in the neighbourhood of Fortwilliam, But as 
that Fort has been supplyed with every thing necessary by Major 
Generall Campbell it is hoped the Rebells shall not be able to 
take it. 

By Express from the Isle of Skye, by the way of Inveraray, 
I hear that Lord Loudoun, Lord President and Mcleod with 
about 800 men, after a distressing and fatigueing March 
arrived there the 26th of March, in want of money, ammunition 
and provisions; Major Genii. Campbell is to do what he can 
to aid them, they are safe from the Ennemy, as there is a ship 
of war there to guard the Coast. The safest way they can get 
out of that Isle to join his Majesty's Forces, is by taking the 
Boats from Sky to Dunstafnage, which is two ordinary days 
sailing; & often performed in one day, if the wind is favourable. 
Dunstafnage is 22 miles rorth of Inverary, from thence to Stir- 
ling or Perth the way is known. 

I have the honour to be with the utmost Respect 

May it please your Grace 
Your most obedient and most humble Servant 

And, Fletcher 

P.S. Since writeing the above (as I wait to lay hold of the 
Express that brings the Letters from the Army) I have received 
an Express from Perth by which I am informed that upon the 
3rd Instant by 5 oclock in the morning the Earl of Grawfurd 
with a party of Dragoons arrived at Blair Castle and was fol- 
lowed by the Duke of Athole and both were made welcome by 
Sr. Andrew Agnew. That the Rebells were retired to Ruthven 
that on the 4th the Prince of Hesse sett out from Dunkeld for 
Blair with all the Cavalry & Hussars, and was followed by 1000 
foot. 

The enclosure, being "Lochiel & Keppoch's declaration of war against 
the Campbells of Argyllshire in a letter directed to Alexander Stuart, 



52 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

younger of Invernahyle & by him published in Argyllshire by letters 
20 March 1746," is printed in the "Scots Magazine" for 1746, p. 174. 

Returning to the President's accounts : 

March 31 To paid for straw and corn sheaves to the 

horses 5 8 

To acquavitae to the servants 030 

To washing of linens at Broadford ... 050 
April 1st To a pair of shoes for the Boy [Presum- 
ably Fergus Fergusson, see Foreward 

to Vol. I.] 018 

To the boy who went for Mr Gordon ... 010 

In addition to the foregoing, there is a sum of 9 entered as handed to 
the President at Overskibo; 2 2s to Captain Forbes at Loch Carron, and 
further sums to him of 1 15s and 7 4s up to 31st March. 



(5) A NOTE ON THE GHISHOLM (PART I.). 

Roderick Chisholm of Chisholm is stated to have been born in 1(397. 
If this is correct, he would have been eighteen years of age, when in spite 
of having signed the address of loyalty to George I., he led his clan to 
fight against him at Sheriffmuir. After his forfeiture, the estates ap- 
pear to have been purchased in 1724 by James Baillie on behalf of the 
family, a charter following in 1725 to Mackenzie of Allangrange, who in 
turn disponed them to Roderick's younger brother, Alexander Chisholm 
of Muckerach. Subsequently, Roderick's eldest son, as Alexander 
Chisholm, younger of Comer, had a grant of the estates in 1742, during 
his father's lifetime. Roderick himself had asked for a pardon in 1725, 
which was granted in 1727. The above details are taken from Mac- 
kenzie's History of the Chisholms," where, however (p. 65), it is 
erroneously stated that "Roderick took up arms again in 1745 . . ." 
In Fraser-Mackintosh's "Antiquarian Notes" (Edition, MaQdonald, p. 
185) it is also stated that "on the landing of Prince Charles, the attach- 
ment of Roderick to the Stuarts could not be restrained, and he, with 
his clan, took the field." In point of fact he did nothing of the kind. 
Apart from other evidence, a copy (apparently made in 1870) of a re- 
markable document shows very clearly how matters stood with him. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 63 

This copy is actually among the Fraser-Mackintosh papers in the 
Register House, and would appear to have been overlooked, as the word- 
ing of the second edition of "Antiquarian Notes" is the same as the 
original (1865) edition. 

The document is a copy of a "Memorial for Roderick Chisholm of 
Chisholm" in 1748. It narrates that by copies of the Act of Indemnity 
in June 1747, Roderick Chisholm of Comer in Strathglass was among 
the excepted, and people were of opinion that this referred to him, 
though his real designation was Ghisholm of Chisholm. The memori- 
alist was unable to think that the exception referred to him, though it 
possibly referred to his youngest son, who was also named Roderick, 
and was killed at Culloden. The document goes on to give statements 
which are certainly borne out by the available evidence. 

. . . It is equally notour that the Late Honble. Duncan 
Forbes of Culloden Lord President of the Session came from 
Edinburgh to Culloden his seat in Inverness-Shire very early in 
the said month of August 1745, and our Country generally, and 
truly, were of a belief that the suppressing of that Rebellion 
in its infancy, & the preventing the ruin of our Constitution & 
Country were the motives which hurried his Lordship North 
so Early. It is a fact equally certain & that can be vouched by 
the Lord President's holograph Letters in the Memorialists 
hands that upon his arrival, he called by Express for the 
Memorialist, That the Memorialist directly waited for him, 
That they Conferred, & that the president communicated his 
Sentiment, & pointed out what part he desired the Memorialist 
should act, as a person he thought of weight in the Country and 
in whom he could Confide & Trust. 

That the intercourse and Correspondence twixt the Presi- 
den & the Memorialist, & the Memorialist's Interviews with the 
President personally were constant uninterrupted & very fre- 
quent for the course of many months from the beginning of 
August till after the Battle of Falkirk which happened about 
17th of following January. 

References to the Chisholm in Volume IV. should be consulted, and, 
incidentally, Lovat's letter to the President of 24th August 1745 (" Cul- 



54 MORE CULLODEN PAPEHS. 

loden Papers," GGLVI.) is of interest. In respect of the movements of 
the Prince's army Lovat wrote 

Your friend the old Chisholm told this to Gulcairn this day, as 
he was coming to dine with me; and I had it from others . . . 
I spoke to two men that saw them [the Prince's army] pass by 
yesterday at the head of my country, and spoke to them; and 
your favourite that spoke to Gulcairn this day will send his men 
to join them, whether he go himself or not . . . 

After the Battle of Falkirk, when the rebels overran Scotland, the 
Ghisholm was placed in a difficult position, and it is stated in the 
memorial that he 

did apply [to] the Lord President for his advice & Direction as 
to what part the Memorialist should act for his safety, which 
his Lordship was pleased to give in a holograph Letter addressed 
to the Memorialist's Son [William Chisholm] a Phisician at 
Inverness dated 16 February 1746 the second day before the 
Rebells entered the town of Inverness, & that the Lord Presi- 
dent Lord Loudoun & the men under his command retired from 
it Northerly 

Then for some time communication between the Ghisholm and the 
President was interrupted, and owing to the distress caused by other 
clans, some of the inhabitants of the Chisholm's estate joined the Rebels. 
The Memorialist had then retired, and associated himself with Lord 
Seaforth in his country, and he was actively loyal to the Government at 
that time; in proof of which the memorial goes on to quote a letter from 
the Lord President, "and still in his [the memorialist's] hands." 

This letter was dated from "Kenlochnadale, 1st April 1746 wrote on a 
small slipp of paper sewed in a man's coat, from Sky after the Presi- 
dent & Lord Loudoun retreated there." 

As previously shown, this was the President's final halting place in 
Skye; and after his arrival, when he sought for news, it was to the 
Chisholm he turned. 

My dear Chisholm. 

Here I am where some time ago I little thought to be; what of 
all things in the World is most wanted is Intelligence, What is 
doing at Inverness & in your Neighbourhood, What I expect 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 55 

from your friendship is that you will give me as good Informa- 
tion as you can of the situation of things to the Eastward of you, 
& how the force of either side is Disposed : If you think it to 
delicate to write freely I wish you would send me some sensible 
man whom you may Intrust & whom I may credite, I will make 
no other excuse of this freedome But that you know I am yours 
most faithfully (Signed) Dun : Forbes. 

The memorialist does not give the answer sent to this letter, but states 
that he gave the best intelligence he could. 



(6) IN SKYE. 
Returning once more to the Accounts : 

April 2 To Donald MackCoiloig, for a pair of shoes 010 
,, 4 To the Laird of MackLeod's servant that 

brought wine etc 026 

,, ,, To the two Runners MackDonald and 

MackCoiloig 10 6 

,, ,, To Captain John Forbes 1 11 6 

,, ,, To his Lordship in silver 026 

5 To Captain Forbes 10 6 

,, ,, To his Lordship in silver 050 

,, 6 To the Groom boy to buy a shirt out of his 

wages 030 

7 To 6 pounds of Tobacco 060 

,, ,, To Aquavitae to the Servants 036 

,, ,, To Captain John Forbes for the Guard... 1 11 6 
,, ,, To his Lordship in silver to be given to Mr. 

Forbes Gauger his servant 050 

,, 11 To a man that brought Butter, a large 

cheese & a Black Cock 020 

,, ,, To his Lordship in silver 020 

12 To 4 creels of oysters ,., ... ,,, 034 



66 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Of the President's letters at this time no copies, if such were made, sur- 
vive. The following are two of the answers : 

From Archibald Campbell to the President, dated from Inverary, 4th 
April 1746. 

My Lord, 

With the utmost concern I perused your letter of the 29th 
March, all here sympathise with your Lop and your Partner's 
adversity. In the Situation the Earle of Loudoun was in, I do 
not see what other party he could have taken, He may have it 
in his Power to join some of the Kings Forces but I fancy he 
cannot find it an easy matter to join the Duke of Cumberland 
for some time. 

Major General [John] Campbell [afterwards 4th Duke of 
Argyll] who makes his Compliments has dispatched a Vessel 
with 762 Bolls 1 bushel, l^qrs of Meal for the Relief of the 
People under the Earle of Loudoun's command, and has sent 
you Ammunition over land, to be brought you by the Boat, that 
carryed your Messenger. 

The General intends a part of the Meal aboard the Vessel 
that is sailed from this Place, for the Supply of Dunstaffinish and 
Dowart Castle, but if the Earle of Loudoun shall judge it abso- 
lutely necessary for the Kings Services to make use of it there, 
he leaves him at Liberty. This he bid me this Morning say to 
your Lop. that he wished much to have the Earle of Loudoun 
and your Lop with any officers you have with you, to assist him 
to carry on his Majesty's Service in the West Parts. This he 
was to have said to yourself in a Letter, if he had not been very 
suddenly taken ill of a severe fitt of the Rheumatism last night, 
which makes him the more earnest to have the Earle of Lou- 
doun here, who he knows to be a very good officer. We have 
this morning accounts from the Country of the Rebels, that your 
Command retired to Lochbroom and a Party of the Rebels was 
in quest of you, and that three of your Ships were taken, with 
any Treasure His Lop had, ebb'd in a Creek near Dingwall. By 
the last Advices we had from the Army under His Royal High- 
ness, they were not marched from Aberdeen on the 26th March. 



MORE CtJLLODEN PAPERS. 57 

The Messenger that brought the Dispatches told us the Duke 
with the last Division was to move on the 27th. By some 
accounts we have from Perth, it is doubtful if they marched 
quite so soon. The first Division was advanced as far as Strath- 
bogie and Keith 

Lord George Murray with a Command of 2000 men came 
to Athole about a fortnight ago, invested Blair Castle, where we 
have a Garrison of 500 Regulars, fired briskly at first with some 
small Cannon, which had no effect, however he continued about 
the place in order to starve them, but the Castle wa& safe on the 
31st, and the Hessians were upon their march from Dunkeld 
that day to relieve it. 

Fort William has been besieged since the 20th March, it is 
well supplyed with everything that is necessary, and the People 
in so good spirits, it is believed that it will make a gallant de- 
fence, and the Rebels may either tyre of it or will not be able 
to force it till the D. of Cumberland can come to their Relief. 

I can with certainty inform your Lop that you can have no 
meal from Ireland. 

There have been large importations from Liverpool and 
Bristol to Clyde, where it is now sold at 15sh. the Boll in Great 
and 16sh. in retail. Tho' it is dear I believe you will find it 
the readiest market to resort to for the Relief of the Country 
you are in. I wish your Lop and all your Companions a happy 
turn of fortune and am with great regard 

My Lord your Lops most faithfull 
Humble servant 

Arch : Campbell. 

From Seaforth to the President, dated from Kintail, 12th April 1746. 

My Lord, 

Your Lordship's of the 10th with the account of Fort William 
&c, and that of the llth concerning my own Situation came both 
at the same time to hand. I have a grateful sense of your Lord- 
ship's warm and vigilant zeal for my Interest and Honour. Nor 
is the Design you mention the first of many Tryalls I had, from 
the Commencement of our Present Troubles to maintain both 
o 



68 MORE CULL013EN PAPERS. 

against the Secret Wishes and Intrigues of some, and the more 
ouvert attempts of others. Hitherto I thank God all are ren- 
dered abortive without great noise or trouble to such as should 
support the common Cause. And as long as I can quash attacks 
from many Quarters, I do not effect giving additional trouble, 
where I have been once and again left exposed to apparent 
Danger carried to and left at my Door. Nor would I be thought 
busie to claim the least meritt where the sincere, however weak 
endeavours of some must be neglected to aggrandise the mono- 
polised Services of others. Meantime I can assure your Lord- 
ship that it can be as confidently reported, that the Practices 
of all Emmissaries whatever have not had the least success with 
my People, tho' as they're situated I cannot yet insure them, by 
any support visible offered them, either from being forced into 
a Rebellion, or undergoing the most Cruel Treatment, from their 
Inveterate Neighbouring Enemies even after a Defeat and Re- 
treat. 

I continue Your Lordships 

K. Mackenzie. 

The two letters which follow were perhaps received as enclosures at a 
later date, but may be here inserted. 

Address: 

Au Lieutenant Colonel Forbes 

du Regiment de Dragons Gris, 
Breda 
La Hollande 

London March 4th 1746. 
Sir, 

We had a very short and easy passage. I just come from Cap- 
tain Wilkinson's, but did not find him so left word with one 
of his Clerks. The Horses are bought, and they wanted men 
so much that it was thought necessary, to hire men to take care 
of them if I had not come in good time. Major MacDougal 
has gone to Scotland. Blair and Bethel are in the Country, but 
I hear the Recruits are mostly ready. Wauchop is here but I 
have not seen him to-day. He is just begun to come abroad. 
My Lord Stair has been very ill for some days past, but now is 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 59 

on the mending hard. The Rebels have again united their 
scattered Forces and took possession of Inverness, which my 
Lord Loudoun was obliged to retire from with his Party into 
the Shire of Ross. The Duke with his whole Army was to be 
at Aberdeen on the first of this month. He will certainly attack 
them as soon as he gets up, so we hope soon to hear of the last 
blow to this Rebellion, if they continue in the resolution of wait- 
ing for him there as they now give out. My Lord Lovat has 
now declared openly in their favours, and dispersed a sort of 
Manifesto in the Highland language, which they say has had a 
great deal of effect on them. I have not been able to get a sight 
of one of them. Our Convoy of Transports had a very quick 
passage, but two of them were lost one with ammunition and 
one with forty one horses of the Guards, they say only four of 
the Men were drowned. There is as yet no talk of sending an 
Army to Flanders, and the Hessians who had received orders 
to embark for Flanders are now countermanded, and a part of 
them are already on their March to join the Duke. In short 
nothing of that sort can go forward till the affair of the Re- 
bellion is entirely over. Commodore Knowles has taken two 
Major Generals and three Brigadiers with a great number of 
officers on board a french Ship. I hear my Lord Rothes is 
to go over to Flanders, in which case my Lord Dunmore I sup- 
pose will c'ome back, according to his desire. The City of 
London is compleating the Foot Guard to 100 men a Company 
at its own expence. They give five pounds a man to inlist 
for six months, or till the Rebellion be entirely finished. Not- 
withstanding this great price they have got a set of the poorest 
fellows I ever saw, whom the old Men in derision call the five 
pounders. The Duke is in great favour with the People of England. 
Pinchbeck has made a Medal of him which they say is very like, 
of which he sells great numbers and makes a great deal ol 
money. You will scarcely believe that Naizon has got Lego- 
niers Regiment of Dragoons, and Kennedy a Regiment of Foot, 
after so many disappointments. They talk of the two others 
that are now vacant for my Lord Bury and Colonel Conway. 
They have got a Farce which they act now wherein Jenny Came- 



60 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

ron is introduced, when I have time I will go to see it. I dont 
know what part she Acts in it. The Marriage between Miss 
Tallakins and Jones of the Guards is now declared, and they 
have got a very pretty House where they live together in. I 
must remember to learn where Molly Kerr is gone for Lord 
Adam's satisfaction against I write again. I have not yet seen 
young Colonel Forbes. I am Sir 

your most obedt humble Servt 

David Scott. 
Address : 

Lieutenant Colonel Forbes, 
of The Grey Dragoons 
at Antwerp 
in Brabant. 



London April 1st 1746. 

Sir, 

I suspect from a Letter of Hamiltons that came to hand yester- 
day, that our Letters of late have not gone safe, for he complains 
that you have had no accounts from England, whereas I have 
wrote every week since I left you. The day fixed for our 
Embarkation was tomorrow, but it will not take place quite so 
soon, but I believe about the end of this week or the beginning 
of next we shall set out. I was sent down this morning to 
Gravesend to enquire into the condition of the transports, which 
are to carry us over. We have three ships for our Regimen! 
but of the worst kind. Your rascal [?Horns] Ship was worth 
all three of them and you knew it was none of the best, My 
Lord Rothes is to supply the place of Lord Dunmore, and com- 
mand us in chief, he is to have under him the illustrious Briga- 
dier Bligh. I believe these two Generals are not at all fond of 
the honour done them. Willy Leslie is putting in for Deputy 
Quarter Master General, with the Rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 
Fourteen transports fell down the River yesterday for Scotland 
with the following four Regiments, Mordaunt's, Hough ton's 
Handasydes, Skelton's, but as the wind has been southerly they 
could only get down the River. They are designed to rein- 
force, the prince of Hese, Framton's Regiment lyes ready to be 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 6l 

embarked for Cape Breton. They still talk of ten Battalions 
of Foot under Legonier for Flanders, but I have no idea the thing 
can happen till affairs are settled in the North. I believe every- 
thing is ready now that we want, except seven or eight horses, 
which the Captains will forgive us if we dont bring at all. We 
have made a push for being made some amends for selling our 
Baggage Horses at a low price, and being obliged to buy others 
dearer. This plea has the more weight as we did it by a per- 
emptory order from Lord Dunmore. I begin to wish we were 
with you, for I dont think it in the least improbable that you 
will stand a siege at Antwerp, before you are much older, and 
I should not be pleased not to be present at that performance. 
I fancy the first Westerly wind you may begin to look out sharp 
for us. The Promotion is not yet made, but the first day Lord 
Stair is able to go as far as St James, he is to desire the King 
to order out the Commissions. [Lord] Glasgow is about to 
give in a memorial to his Majesty, and designs to demand a 
private audience. I suppose he will be recompensed for the 
loss of his hand by a Company of Foot, which I believe he will 
think but a bad exchange. They talk here of a great Army 
being formed in the Pays Bas even 100,000 men, but I find it 
is not very clear, where it is to come from. For my part I 
believe the care of the Continent will be left to our nine Squad- 
rons. By our last accounts from Scotland the Duke remained 
still at Aberdeen, the Rebel Party sometimes appeared but were 
driven back. We dont know what they are doing about Fort 
William, which they had invested. Their scheme seems to 
be at present to amuse the Duke, by shewing Partys now and 
then to him, whilst they try to get South either by Perth or thro 
Argyllshire. I wonder how they venture to separate so much. 
They have set up what they call the Fiery Cross, which is to say 
that they will destroy and burn all those who dont join them. 
We are apprehensive for the President and Lord Loudoun. The 
Grants except those who joined the Duke have been forced to 
sign a neutrality in form with the Rebels, to give hostages, whose 
names you being a Highlander may possibly read. Dalrachney, 
Rothiemurchus, Gartenbeg, Tillygoram. I have waited for the 



62 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

Gazette till the post is on the point of going away. If I stay 
any longer I shall lose it, so you must be content with the little 
I give you. I am Sir your most obedient humble Servant 

David Scott 
Returning to the Accounts : 

April 14 To [MacLeod of] Waterstein's servants 

that brought a cow .. 026 

,, 15 To a smith for horse nails 010 

,, 18 To straw & hay for the horses 026 

,, ,, To my Lord Seaforth's servant 026 

,, 19 To the Baillie of Glenelg's servant for a 

roebuck 026 

,, ,, To Lord Seaforth's servant that brought a 

letter 020 

,,21 To Captain John Forbes for a cow to the 

Guard 1 11 6 

,, ,, To ditto for a pair of shoes 030 

,, ,, To washing at Kamlochdale 026 

,, ,, To [MacLeod of] Drynoch's servant that 

brought a lamb & fresh butter ... 020 

,,22 To Captain Colin MacKenzie's servants ... 040 

,, ,, To the servants washing at Kamlochdale... 020 

(7) A NOTE ON THE CHISHOLM (PART II.). 
The Chisholm, according to his memorial, was (as previously stated) 
at this time with Lord Seaforth, and he claimed to have been the first 
to let the President know of the Battle of Culloden (16th April). That 
he did so, the memorial says, was evident from a letter from Skye, 
dated 18th April, from the President, which letter was still in the 
memoralist's possession; that it thanked him for his good services, and 
[was] fully as expressive of his confidence in the memorialist as the 
former was, and which concluded as follows : 

I have no news to give you in return ... If you can learn 
with any certainty what course the Rebells have taken since the 
Action, what loss they have sustained or what Rout the Regular 
Troops are pursuing, it will be very obliging to let me know. I 
am Yours etc, (Signed) Dun : Forbes, 



MORE CULLODEN PAPEftS. 63 

As shown, there is an entry in the accounts for payment to Seaforth's 
servant, on the 18th, and it is expressly stated that a letter was 
delivered on or before the 19th. If one came from The Chisholm on the 
18th in this manner, the news of the battle travelled quickly. It is possible 
that the letter delivered on the 19th was also from The Chisholm, as the 
memorial states that he answered the President "timely & to purpose." 
The memorial then proceeds to give the following "just coppie" of the 
President's letter, dated from "Kenlochnadale," 22nd April 1746. 

Dear Sir, I am very much obliged to you for the Information 
with which you have favoured me, and at the same time con- 
cerned for the Danger in which the bearer acquaints me you 
think yourself to be from the malicious suggestions of some of 
your weak or wicked Neighbours; Were his Royal Highness or 
those about him as well acquainted with your Conduct as I am, 
or were it possible for me to be with him as soon as you wish, 
no unconveniency cou'd affect you from these falsehoods. But as 
that cannot possibly be I have chosen this way to secure you so 
farr as my giving a character of you can; and to make use of your 
assistance for the publi^ service. 

The Inqlosed are the first Letters that Earl Loudoun or I 
have Risqued to the Duke since we came into this Island & I 
have told him I have chosen you as the safest man by whom 
they could be put into his hands, and by whom we cou'd have 
his answer, you will Therefore the moment this comes to you 
whether by Night or by Day, Take horse and proceed straight 
to the Duke, & put the two Letters inclosed into his hands, 
& with the like care and Dispatch Transmitt his Commands to 
us. I will not aim at ane Excuse [for this] piece of Trouble 
of which you will easily see the End as well as the necessity I 
am My Dear Chisholm Faithfully Yours 

(Signed) Dun : Forbes. 

The Memorial continues that the moment The Chisholm received the 
despatches he went to Headquarters at Inverness, where he was intro- 
duced by the Hon. Colonel Campbell, and well received, and that he 
delivered his commands to His Royal Highness. Being unacquainted 
with the numerous military parties then situated between Inverness 
and his own country, he got a pass from His Royal Highness, dated 25th 



64 MOHE CULLODEN t>APEKS. 

April 1746, directing that he should receive all manner of assistance as 
needed; and while he (the memoralist) was in the shire of Inverness the 
highest command under the Duke frequently received him in their com- 
pany and in their camps. The memorial concludes that The Chisholm 
had made a genuine relation of his conduct, which could be supported 
by vouchers. 

Whatever trouble he had subsequently to face, the prevailing 
accounts of The Ghisholm are so far true that the President was instru- 
mental in creating a favourable atmosphere for him, in return for value 
received. 

(8) THE PRESIDENT RETURNS. 

Without waiting for an answer to the letter sent with The Chisholm, 
the President, as his accounts show, left Skye on the 23rd. John Hos- 
sack had written, 19th April ("Culloden Papers," DXXX.), urging this, 
and stating that there was no body of the rebels in the way, also that 
Captain Hugh Forbes had applied for and obtained a guard of 50 men 
with officers to protect the house and lands of Culloden. 

s. d. 
April 23 To Sir Alexander MacDonald for a cow 

to the Guard 179 

,, ,, To 5 setts of shoes to the horses to 

McLeod's smith 10 6 

,, ,, To [MacDonald of] Knocks servants for 

the horses & Sir Alexander's Groom 10 6 
,, ,, To the Landlady of [Kinloch na Dal] ... 110 

To a sack to hold meal 020 

To Donald Ross 110 

,, ,, To Mr Martin, Sir Alexander's Gentleman 110 

,, To Sir Alexander's Porter 020 

,, To a guide from [Kinloch na Dal] to Kyle- 

lachan 010 

,, ,, To a guide from Kylelachan to [?Edder- 

carron] 010 

,, ,, To corn and hay to the horses at Fernick 008 

24 To the bill at [?Eddercarron] 1 10 4 

To the horses and Hostler 090 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 65 

s. d. 

April 24 To the Bill at Kamloch Ganechan (sic) ... 136 

To the Horses there 010 

,, ,, To 4 hired horses from Lochcarron to ditto 090 

,, ,, To William Baillie for the Guard at Contin 110 

,, 25 To the Housekeeper at BraKan 110 

To the Porter 050 

,, To the Groom 050 

,, ,, To a man at Kessock for carrying back 

Gapt. Forbes Horse 020 

,, 26 To the Ferryboat of Kessock & a yole that 

came to the peer of Inverness ... 046 

,, ,, To 4 horses for carrying baggage to Gontin 10 
,, ,, To carrying baggage from Gontin to Gul- 

loden 020 

,, To a pair of gloves 026 

,, ,, To the two Hyrers in Town two days ... 010 
,, ,, To lyning and threed for his Lordships 

vestcoat 030 

To a blackball 010 

,, ,, To Donald Mackcoiloig's for 39 days ... 110 

,, To Donald MacDonald for 39 days ... 110 
,, ,, To Donald MacDonald for his horse from 

Lochcarron to [Kinloch na Dal] Being 

45 miles 15 

Under date 20th May 1746 appears an item "To the Mistress of Over- 
skibo's account discharged by Auchnagairn 6 12s," with 2s 6d "to her 
servant that came out of Sutherland for it." On 27th May there is an 
entry "To my Lady Talisker [MacLeod] by your Lordship's order per 
bill 21." 

The President did not at this time return to Gulloden. His letters 
are dated from Inverness, and the accounts also show that he was resident 
there. 

April 29 To Mr Dundass's Servant for one of the 

Coach Horses 058 

To the Barber for dressing .. 006 

To soleing his Lops Shoes 036 

To the Groom for the horse that came in 

B about Corn and hay 010 



66 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

s. d. 

May 1 To two bottles of Wine from the Tavern 050 
do To Mr Baillie of Ardmore's Servant that 

brought an ox 050 

do To Rapee Snuff 006 

2nd To 4 bottles of Wine from the Tavern ... 10 

3rd To 6 hankercherfs 060 

do To a white iron Canister to hold tobacco 022 
6 To an Express that went over to my Lord 

Seaforth 010 

do To Rapee Snuff 006 

8 To Codes Bought 006 

do To post Letters 024 

10 To Mackdonald the Runner for going to 

Culloden ... 010 

do To Mr Dundass Servant for one of the 

Coach-horses, to drink 056 

do To the post for carrying drops & a small 

bundle from Edinr 020 

12 To the Postage of Letters 010 

do To a Chapin of Shrubb at Inverness ... 030 

do To Eggs 003 

do To 4 Leamons 010 

16 To the Postage of Letters 008 

do To 6 bottles of Arrack 110 

do To 6 bottles of Rumm 18 

do To 3 dozen of Leamons 060 

do To a boy to carry a Salmon to Culloden 

from Inverness 006 

17 To a blew frock for myself at Inverness 180 
do To John Forbes Millar in Ferrintosh his 

son that brought wild fowls ... 026 
do To a man that brought letters from Sir 

Robert Gordon 010 

do To a postage for a letter ... 004 

19 To Rapee Snuff 9 oz. ... 1 1 

20 To a Ib. of Shagg Tobacco 014 

do To a pair of second hand boots to Fergus 

Fergusson the boy ... ,,, ... 026 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. tf 

May 20 To footing George Harleys boots (the s ' d> 

groom's boy) 030 

do To a pair of Stockings for Fergus Fer- 

gusson 014 

do To blew lyning for his Coat & Vestcoat 

which the Taylor forgot 010 

do To a black ribband for your Lop's Stock 004 
do To a suit of Livery Cloaths to Fergus Fer- 

gusson making included 1 18 6 

May 21 To the Barber for dressing your Lop's wig 

23 days at Inverness ... 020 

do To the runner for going to Duncan Forbes 

at Beawlie 010 

do To Postages of a letter .. 004 

do To 25 days at Inverness board wages ... 1 15 

"In my house at Gulloden,' wrote the President, 9th May, to his 
cousin, William Forbes, "the rebells "have done me no damage. I have 
lost neither spoon, fork nor knife, tho' I left everything to their mercy. 
My cattle, planting etc have not escaped so well. I am absolutely 
naked : soled shoes, darned stockings, ragged shirts, fragments of boots 
are my apparell. You will therefore provide linnen and shoes, the best 
can be got. After I come, I believe I must put up with Stonyhill for 
some time" (Hist. MSS., Com., Lang MSS. I. 452). 

The following items of losses incurred are from a document headed 
"Damages committed by the Rebells upon my Lord Presidents mains 
and domicils" The whole amounted to 571 5s lOd 

6i bolls meal given prisoners & Guard. 

12 bolls meal sent to Inverness. 

16 bolls meal used locally by the rebels. 

16 ,, oats 

1 hogshead port wine. 

18 dozen French claret 

4 dozen ,, white wine. 

3 ,, Old Sherry. 
i Madeira. 

4 ,, & 7 flasks "Barabar" Wine. 
16 ,, Scots gallon aquavitae. 



68 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

6 dozen "Bowlls" strong ale. 

Kitchen & pewter vessels carried away by the rebels. 

5 pair plaids & blankets ,, ,, ,, 

4 pair fine linen sheets. 

24 "napries." 

24 bolls oats sent to Inverness. 

74 bolls oats corn & straw given Rebells horses when quartered 

here. 

12 Bolls Barley do. 
14 labouring Oxen. 

4 feed ditto 

5 Cows with calf. 

2 young stots. 

3 Horses stolen by the Rebells. 

100 Barrells English Coal, spent & carried away. 
The frame of the iron Roller. 
The frame of the stone ditto. 

6 Bees Skips and other damages done in the garden. 
Damages done carts and other labouring utensils. 

32 firelocks taken by the Rebells. 
5 "Fusives" & a carbine. 

7 small swords. 

1 fine silver mounted cutlas. 

2 fine saddles. 
The garden chair. 

40 wedders slaughtered for the Pretender's use. 

75 ,, carried away by the Frasers, October 16th [1745]. 

6 table knives & forks ivory hilted. 

1 silver spoon. 

The President's tenants suffered also, as well from the Government 
troops as from the Prince's Army, See Appendix I. Moreover the 
Battle of Culloden by no means saw an end to damages committed, as 
the following illustrates. 

A coppie of my damages by the Troops the night of the batle of Culloden. 

Baillie Gilbert Gordon taken from him 800 stons hay at 6d, 80 
stons stra at 1, 20 stons pease stra at 2d, 4 bolls bear at 11/2J, 1 
boll white pease at XI. 



MORI-: CULLODEN CAPERS. 69 

The Town of Inverness was also involved in very considerable expenses, 
as appears by the accounts of the then Treasurer, Andrew Murray. 

"Repairs & conveniences made for the King's Army after their 
entering the Town the 16 April 1746 immediately after the Battle of 
Culloden." 

Rearing a Flesh Market for the Duke's Army at the Fort. 

Taking down the old Guard House at the Cross. 

Plastering & whitening the Town Hall. 

Sentry boxes. 

A large bench in the Guardroom. 

Town Clerk's Office fitted for the Officers' Guard Room, includ- 

mg iron for a grate & bricks to cure it of smoking. 
Repairs done in the Church, Tolbooth, Town House, when the 

troops gave access to them. 
Repairing glass work of Charity School, Library & Achnacloich's 

kiln used as hospitals by the Army. 
Men for keeping the streets clean by order of the Magistrate on 

a message from H.R.H. the Duke of Cumberland from 19th 

April to 23rd August 1746. 
Clerk MacBean's house also taken for a hospital. 
Plaids sent for to Badenoch to accommodate the troops. 
Fairfi eld's kiln fitted also for a hospital. 
In June 1747 the Bridge mended, shattered by the guns of the 

Fort & by the Forts being blown up. 



IX. FROM APRIL 1746 TO DECEMBER 1747. 

(1) AFTER CULLODEN: MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS. 

It has sometimes been supposed that the disaster at Dornoch and the 
retreat to Skye put an end both to Lord Loudoun and to the Independent 
Companies. No greater mistake could be made. So soon as circum- 
stances permitted, some of the Companies were ordered to Fort- Augustus; 
and the districts where they operated may be considered fortunate com- 
pared with those upon which some of the regular troops were quartered. 



?0 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

From Macleod to the President, dated from Glenelg, 26th April 1746. 

My Dear Lord 

Here we are and the storm of wind &o high that its impossible 
for me to bring our Provisions from the Ship, and as it rains hard 
in the Hills I fear a flood, however, we are to use all possible 
diligence to get to Fort -Augustus, but Monday is the soonest pos- 
sible for us to be there. Its almost certain the Pretender with 
very few people with him are in the Wilds of Lochaber, and 
that Barisdale, Lochgarry, Glenmoriston etc keep the hills with 
different small parties. If we meet any annoyance (which I do 
not expect) it must be from some of those in the passes I know 
you will do all the good you can, so I need say nothing on that 
head. We hear Sutherland has got a Regiment, on what foot- 
ing I do not know, but you will do for your friends as you see 
proper, only I beg when anie thing is to be done for those 
whose Service you, I know, esteem, for whom I flatter myself 
I am one, you give the preference to the Knight [Sir Alexander 
Macdonald,] for I would rather retyre to bread and milk, than 
that anything sh. be done for me, and he left unprovided. I 
am in very bad health, with the utmost attachment Intyrlie 
yours 

Normand Macleod. 

11 a'clock. I shall long much to hear from you, Cullcairn 
remains at Kinloch na daale with the boats, 50 of my men in this 
Barrack, and 50 more tc be added to them when they get arms, 
50 of Sir Alexr at the Kyles, to be reinforced in the same manner, 
or as directed from above, and a sharp look out over the whole 
Island to catch anie Rebels that may attempt to escape that way. 

Macleod had yet to learn that rewards to those who had remained 
loyal to the Government, or rather to those who had done everything in 
their power to serve it, were scarcely considered. Lord Sutherland in- 
deed fell actually into disfavour, Sir Alexander Macdonald, had he lived, 
might possibly have accomplished something for himself and others, but 
the Lord President's immediate intercession for his country made far too 
many enemies to leave any hope of even justice to himself. Throughout 
his march through Scotland the Duke of Cumberland, apart from any 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 71 

ideas of his own, had not fallen in with men like Forbes. There were 
those who could represent things as infinitely worse than they were. 
Even before the Battle of Culloden the Duke wrote, 4th April, of the 
strong- Jacobite sympathies of the whole country, of his own view that 
mild measures would be of no use and that "the whole of the laws of this 
ancient kingdom must be new modelled" (Newcastle Papers). 

Prom the Duke of Cumberland to the Duke of Newcastle, dated from 
Inverness, 30th April 1746. (Idem). 

My Lord 

I had the pleasure of yours. I am extremely obliged to you for all 
the fine things you are so kind as to say. I indeed do that justice 
to my friends that they feell my disagreable situation at the same 
time that it is found necessary that I should ingage and go 
through with the affair, which I now hope is almost over with 
regard to the Military operations, but the Jacobite rebellious prin- 
ciple is so rooted in this nation's mind that this generation must 
be pretty well wore out, before this country will be quiet. I 
hope the importance of the affair will make people put up with 
the inconvenience of a Summer Session which will be absolutely 
necessary for the almost totall change of this constitution. L. 
President has joined me and as yet we are vastly fond of one an- 
other but I fear it wont last as he is as arrant Highland mad as 
L. Stair, or Crauford, he wishes for lenity if it can be with safety 
which he thinks but I dont for they really think, that when once 
they are dispersed, it is of no more consequence then a London 
mob, and but yesterday a Sr. Will Gordon [of Park] wrote to one 
of the officers to complain that his house has been plundered 
whilst he was out following his duty (as he is pleased to call the 
rebellion), they are now dispersed all over this kingdom at their 
own homes, and nobody medles with them except I send the 
Millitary force after them. I have got the L. President to direct 
Sr E. Faulkener in the drawing up a proclamation which I shall 
take the liberty to publish in his Majesty's name requiring of all 
the civill Magistrates to exert themselves, in order that these dis- 
persed rebells may be brought to justice, but as one half of the 
Magistracy have been either ai'ders or abettors to this rebellion 



72 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

and the others dare not act through fear of offending their chiefs 
or of hanging their own cousin, I hope for little from them. I 
will if possible collect all the papers of hints that I have but they 
are so undigested and I have neither time myself nor law enough 
to form them into any order but the Chancellor when he gets them 
may very possibly find some good if some body else clears the 
rubish for him, as the different remarks are in originall hands I 

must beg that they be not produced or lost 

I am your affectionate friend 

William. 

Since this was finished I received your letter of the 25th 
.... I hear Ld. Justice Clerk has writ to you for an order to 
abollish the meeting houses in Edinborough. I am ashamed that 
he should desire an order to put the laws of this country in execu- 
tion and he would not have done it but that the Scottish clergy 
are in an uproar about it as I have demolished all Mass houses 
and Meeting houses as we marched allong. Hawley has asked 
leave to quit this command as he says he has neither temper nor 
cunning to live with them .... 

From Sir Alexander Macdonald to the President (an official letter). 

My Lord 

Late last night my Lord Loudoun received His Royal Highnesses 
the Duke's Letter, and your Lordships at Strathchloy [Glen- 
clunie.] He did not think it proper to return because of his want 
of money, and that many of our Men are without Firelocks to the 
number of about 350, of these two articles he has wrote to the 
Duke and begs you quicken the Answer. This day we marched 
clown through Glen Moriston to this Place, the Inhabitants were 
apprized of our Motions and the men betook them- 
selves to the Hills, with most of their Cattle, how- 
ever we have got a good many Cows, some Horses a num- 
ber of Goats and sheep, tomorrow we march into 
Urquhart, where Lord Loudon remains Until he hears from 
Inverness. Strathchlonie is within four Miles of the Entry into 
Glenmoriston and within eleven of Fort-Augustus, where we 
would have been at this present writing, but for the Letters 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. ft 

which came to Lord Loudoun last night. I write at the Earl's 
desire, who is just now writing to His Royal Highness 
I am 

My Lord 

your most obedient humble Servant 

Alexr Macdonald. 

From Livisie within a mile of Invermoriston 28th April [1746] 9 
at night. 

Your Lordship will run a fresh express to Lord Loudoun as the 
Bearer must be weary and will want to return home. 

From Macleod to the President, dated from Urquhart 29th April 1746, 7 
at night. 

My dear Lord, 

Here we are and thank God you was not of our party 
att Strath-Clunie, which has knocked me almost quite 
up, Lord Loudoun hopes for leave to come to Town 
for a day or two, whether Sir Alexander and I should 
both attend him there, or one of us remain you will 
judge, and let us know, because tho' there is no probability of 
ane Attack, or hardly a Possibility we would never forgive our- 
selves if such a thing happened, and one of us not present, be 
assisting in ordering Provision out for our People, Sir Alexr 
last night and I now, write for Loudoun as well as ourselves. 
I am your very sincere 

Normand Macleod. 

P. S. Remember what a number of the Men we have here 
want Arms, and how necessary it is for them to have them putt 
in their hands. The Crooked Laird with his possy are very fond 
of us, and he is to give us what flesh meat he can, meal he has 
none. 

The "Crooked Laird' 1 seems to refer to Ludovick Grant, younger of 
Grant, who had now "leapt with amazing agility off the fence on which 
he had so long sat" (Dr William Mackay, "Urquhart and Glenmoriston," 
which see passim). The conduct of the Grants during the Forty-five has 
been the subject of much literature. The two following documents refer 
i 



74 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

to the so-called armed neutrality signed by the Grants when threatened, 
as they said, with military execution by the Prince's army (when in re- 
treat) if they did not rise. Certain Grants were sent to Inverness as host- 
ages where they were found upon the arrived of the Government forces. 
Their position was illegal. 

Endorsed: Memorial for Rothiemurchus etc Unto the Lord President of 

the Session 1746. 
Memoriall. James Grant of Rothiemurchus, Robert Grant of Dellachaple, 

George Grant of Tulligorm, Duncan Grant of Achernach, and John 

Grant of Whythae. 
Unto the Right Honourable Duncan Forbes President of the College of 

Justice. 

Humblie Shewith, 

That the Laird of Grant, upon the first Concoction of this unhappy 
Rebellion, having sent to Inverness ane Independent Company 
of 100 men for the Service of the Government in conjunction with 
the other well affected Clans, to which the memorialists gave 
their hearty assent and concurrence, and he and his whole clan 
being in Arms all along, for the Protection of the Country and 
waiting to be employed by the Government rendered him and 
them so odious to the Rebells, that they resolved by the most 
vigorous means, to put a stop to these our Designs (since they had 
then the power in their hands) having taken the Town of Inver- 
ness and no assistance nearer us, for ought we then knew, than 
the Town of Perth. And accordingly one John Murray, who 
assumed to himself the Title of Secretary to the Pretender's Son, 
wrote a threatening Letter, addressed to the Laird of Grant, de- 
manding hostages and the delivery of our Arms, against the first 
day of March under pain of the Most severe Military execution, 
which so surprised us all that Mr Grant of Grant, resolved to go 
south with his Lady and the other Gentlemen who had taken pro- 
tection in his House and advised that all his People should go 
along with him, and leave their effects, wives and children to 
the mercy of those lawless and outrageous Banditty. But upon a 
General Consultation we and the other Gentlemen of the Country 
found that the Commons out of sympathy to their Wives, and 
fear of being rendered miserable, would not accede to this pro- 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 76 

posall, and therefore resolved to stay in the Country, in order, if 
possible to obtain Terms of Peace, for themselves and the People, 
till, by the Duke of Cumberland's approach, it was in their power 
to declare their sentiments more freely, besides they were afraid 
if the Gentlemen deserted the Country, that the Commons might 
be forced to join the Rebells, who could not Be supposed to have 
so much firmness of mind, as not to come in to any measures 
rather than be burnt and plundered, And to obtain such terms 
it was agreed to send Deputies to Inverness, (being ignorant of 
the Laws), to endeavour to ward off that blow till proper assist- 
ance came to their Relief. Accordingly the Memorialists having 
had then, some of them their Sons, and others their Friends, 
Prisoners in the Castle of Inverness, were judged the properest 
men to be sent down, and still, after they went, in order to show 
their unwillingness to agree to any of their proposalls, they shifted 
doing anything for ten or twelve days expecting the Duke's Ad- 
vance. Till at last the Rebells resolving not to be any longer 
trifled with, presented a Paper which they called a Parole, for 
our not bearing arms nor any of our dependants, against them, 
which they forced us to sign, by which we were so far from being 
willing to abide that how soon we heard of his Royall Highness 
approach, we wrote to the Country in the strongest terms to 
come up and join him, with which they complyed and came as 
soon as possible, And tho' they could not have the happiness to 
share in the Victory of that Glorious Day, that restored Peace to 
the Nation, yet are now in Urquhart where the Memorialists 
would be, if permitted, in order to execute such order as His High* 
ness will enjoin. 

Upon the whole of which the Memorialists being examined 
by order of His Highness, we were ordered to repair to Edinburgh 
forthwith, and deliver ourselves to the Justice Clerk, there to 
await our Tryall.or Furder orders. Tho' it is well known and to 
your Lordship in particular, that we were never as much as sus- 
pected of Jacobitism, and at this time preserved our men and 
Arms, for the Government's Service, and never paid any Taxes 
or Imposition, no not the cess, which many in the neighbourhood 
have done, in obedience to the frequent Threats and Menaces of 
the Rebells, 



76 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

May it therefore please your Lop, to take the Premises 
under consideration and upon finding what is above repre- 
sented to be just, to use your good offices with His Royal 
Highness, if we are to be brought to Tryall, that he may 
admit us to Parole, to stay in the Country till the same comes 
on, to prevent charges, or other ways to dismiss us, which 
we are ready to acknowledge as the effect of your Endeavours 
and his Highnesses Glemencj 

Dun: Grant 
James Grant 
Robert Grant 
George Grant 
John Grant. 

Endorsed: Copy of a Letter delivered by [Grant of] Rothiemurchus. 

Dearest Friends, 

As we have your Principles by the Part you acted, and were 
willing to act *>nce tnis Unnatural and unhappy Rebellion began 
we need use no arguments to persuade you to what we and your- 
selves always, and now think right only as it was by Necessity, 
and by our want of knowledge, in such desperate Circumstances, 
as we were then in, threatened by a powerful, bloody, lawless 
Banditti, wh. we wore not able to resist, and to which we were 
more than any exposed, far from all help, we all agreed that in 
consideration of the threatening Letter, sent by Mr Murray, de- 
manding Hostages, and the delivery of our Arms, we should come 
here and obtain the best terms we could for you and your Country, 
our Critical Situation could allow of, in consequence of which 
resolution we came, and notwithstanding, we saw 2000 of the 
keenest for our destruction, here ready to devour, all that is most 
dear to us, and ourselves close confined, We stav'd off any 
agreement for 12 days expecting a Relief, till it was told us by 
the only persons that favoured us most, that our refusing to sign 
a paper they then brought ready drawn, would be constructed 
as Trim 1 ing and immeciiately we were to be used as Criminals and 
our Country men, Wives &c., exposed to Military Execution their 
Common Term, to which, to our regret and with the utmost 
reluctance, we yielded, upon our getting an Ample Protection, 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 77 

which you all saw, and in consequence of which we have been 
kept Prisoners and indifferently used, till our Glorious Deliverer 
the Duke of Cumberland, and his victorious Army, set us free, 
and has cleared a passage for you and us to act like our Ancestors, 
Men famous for Glorious Freedom and Revolution Principles. 
Let us therefore Dr Countrymen in the strongest manner our heart 
can indite, and in the name of God to exert yourselves to the ut- 
most of your powers, and with all expedition to assemble under 
your Chief's Banner, and repair here with such Arms as you can 
muster, to demonstrate what you really are, and that it was 
necessity and Force, that made us and you act so contrary to our 
real and innate Principles. As this will be your Honour and 
Safety, and the safety of us your distressed Friends, your hearty 
and ready compliance will much oblige. 

Gentlemen &c. 
Inverness 28th Aprill 1746. 

The above Copy delivered by Rothemurcus to Sir Everard 
Fawkener, and he declares the same to be a true Gopye. 

From Lord Reay to the President dated from Edinburgh 28th April 1740 
("Culloden Papers" CCCXVI) 

My Lord, 

I wish this may find your Lop & Earl Loudoun safely arrived at 
Inverness. I have been very anxious about you since you left 
Sutherland: meantime I judge it's agreable to you, that you was 
not disappointed in the confidence your Lop put in some of your 
Friends. You'l have heard of the threatning Letters I had from 
the Earl of Cromerty; which, as I could not follow my men thro' 
the Hills in case we had been attacked, obliged me to come up 
here. But I find the concert made at Tongue ere I left it has had 
the desired Success, and his Lop has time now to repent that he 
did not take your Lop's kind advice. As my People were con- 
stantly on their Watch till his Lop was made Prisoner, and that 
the Rebells in Caithness hindered our getting seed from thence as 
usuall, I'm much afraid of Ley Land on my estate; and should my 
Son's Company be called out till Bear seed is over, it may do 
much harm & make it difficult in my absence to get out the best 



78 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

men, which would be the reverse if seed-time was over. This 
I leave to your Lop. My Sons will obey your Commands as far 
as they can. Pray make my Compliments acceptable to the Earl 
of Loudoun. I am, with sincere Respect, 
My Lord, 

Your Lop's most obedient 

most affte humble Servant, 

Reay. 

[Ross of] Inverchasley, Mrs Wm Forbes, Mr Doule & I drunk 
yr Lordship's health in Luckie Clephars who pledged us most 
cheerfully. 

From William Raillie to the President, dated from Ardmore 3rd May 1746. 

My Lord, 

The Master of Ross's men are now here and will be att Tayne 
this night so that according to your Lordships desire I send for 
orders what they are next to do. They want Arms but the 
Rebells have left about a score of Guns at Tayne which I suppose 
they may get and we have near a score more of the Guns my Lord 
Loudon ordered us from Sutherland, the rest were returned when 
the Rebells came to the Country. If it was thought proper to 
order them search for Arms in Coigach and Lochbroom, I believe 
they would get more than to serve themselves, for such of the 
people there as were in the Rebellion and escaped, are now lurk- 
ing at home, as I believe all the fragments of these unhappy 
people are, for I do not hear that there are any considerable num- 
bers together in any Country whatever. I have the honour of 
being with the greatest regard. 

My Lord 

Your Lordships most obedient and most Faithfull 
obliged servant 

Will: Raillie. 

The Company of 'he Rosses with the Grant Company had been left 
by Lord Loudoun in the Castle of Inverness, when he retired to the north. 
Both companies surrendered under the order of Major Grant two days 
later, 20th February 1746, 



MORE CULLODfiN PAPERS. 79 

The following private letter from Sir Alexander Macdonald to the 
President is dated from Urquhart 4th May 1746. Though his mention of 
the Duke of Cumberland is sufficiently indiscreet, it does not appear that 
he had as yet fully grasped his intentions, and it would seem, in justice to 
Grant, younger of Grant, that he may also have expected a lenity which 
was conspicuous by its absence. The full story of the surrender and sub- 
sequent treatment of the Grants may be read in W. Mackay's "Urquhart 
and Glenmoriston." 

My dear Lord, 

This moment most of the Glenmoriston men came to deliver them- 
selves and their arms to the Laird of Grant to be put into the 
Duke's Mercy, the rest of the Glenmoriston men are to be here 
tomorrow morning. 1 thought proper to let your Lordship know 
this, as I know will use your utmost efforts for that lenity that 
will end the disturbances of this Country and quicken His Royal 
Highness's departure from the Highlands of Scotland in quest of 
more Laurels. The method of using these men will resolve the 
whole Highlands as to what they are to expect and what they 
are to do. I am my dear Lord, 

Yours unalterably 

Alexr Macdonald. 

Mr Grant who drinks your health sends compliments. 

The Duke of Cumberland was not likely to listen to anything the Pre- 
sident might say as to mercy. See his letter (previously given) to the 
Duke of Newcastle of 30th April. He wrote to him again on 29th June: 

I have nothing to say new from this country but that to my great 
astonishment I find them a more stubborn and villainous set of 
wretches than I imagined could exist. (Newcastle Papers). 

From 1 Eric Sutherland, titular Lord Duffus, to the President dated from 
Pulrossie 5th May 1746. The writer's father, Kenneth, third Lord 
Duffus, had been attainted for his share in the Rising of 1715. 

My Lord, 

I heartily congratulate your safe return to Inverness and beg 
pardon for giving you this trouble at a juncture when you must 
necessarily have so much business. I have seen my Lord a very ex- 



80 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

traordinary Scene since you left this Country, and have been sur- 
rounded with a set of people with whom it required my utmost 
prudence to conduct my conversation and behavour with safety. 
What still added to my perplexity and unlucky situation, was the 
suspition and jealousy of the ignorant people of this Country who 
1 know would f ake umbrage at my House being so resorted to and 
for which I bore no small burden. Further particulars would be 
too tedious to trouble your Lop with, at this time but when I can 
have the honour to see you I hope to meet with your approbation. 
What I beg of you at present is your advice whether it is proper 
for me to come to Inverness at this juncture, when people of all 
Hanks and Degrees are making their appearance. I have no pre- 
tentions of being introduced to his royal Highness but as a dutiful 
subject who has had no concern in the Public Disturbance, and by 
my Fathers transgression cannot even be introduced as a person 
or note or distinction. In these circumstances I humbly intreat 
your Lop's advice, and tho' you should judge my coming to Inver- 
ness unnecessary, yet I beg to know, when and where I may have 
the opportunity of waiting on your Lop, if only for half an hour 
which favour shall ever be acknowledged by 

My Lord 

Your Lops most obliged and obedient humble Servant 

Duffus. 

From John MacDonell of Glengarry to the President dated from Fon- 
Augustus 6th May 1746. 

My Lord 

I have the honour of writing your Lordship this, to acquaint you 
I have been as dilligent as possible in my power to prevail on my 
People of Glengarry to deliver up their Arms, and notwithstand- 
ing the industry and cunning craft of some people had so good 
success in this country that I have prevailed upon the Commoners 
all to surrender their Arms, who are willing henceforth to take 
the oath of Allegiance to the King and Government. I daresay if 
your Lordship advise me to it, I would prevail with most the 
nominall Subalterns to follow the example of the Commons. I 
do assure them and am ready to show them good example, and 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 81 

I doubt not to have equal good success in the countrys of Knoidart 
and Morar, but the time limited is short for Countries at a Dis- 
tance: The Country of Glengarry is ready upon call (I mean the 
Common), and any belonging me will not gladly acquiese, I shall 
be as much their Enemy as any. But my Lord I beg Pardon to 
use the Freedom, as to tell your Lordship the summons sent was 
not at all agreeable to the People, I mean the Place for Delivering 
their Arms. I earnestly entreat your Lop have it altered so that 
it may be in this Place they deliver their Arms, and your Lop 
be so good as to obtain His Royal Highness's protection, for my 
own Family, Servants, Cattle &c. I entirely depend upon your 
Lordships Friendship and Advice, which I faithfully promise 
shall be punctually followed and obeyed by me, I put my whole 
trust in your Lordship's Friendship. I wish to know if your 
Lordship comes this length if not that I may have the honour of 
waiting of your Lordship, so as to open my mind more fully wh. 
would be too tedious to write. It's generally reported here that 
two ships either French or Spanish have landed upon our West 
Coast, with money and arms, that the Pretender thinks of main- 
taining a flying partv for some time, the certainty of which I 
shall soon know and acquaint your Lordship per express. Your 
cousin my wife beggs I make offer of her must humble duty to 
your Lordship and I most earnestly beg the favour your Lordship 
be as good as send me a pass for James Stuart to draw Aquavita? 
from Ferrintosh, for the use of my family and that of my change 
Houses for the want of which I lose considerably and is very 
inconvenient for Passengers. I am with the greatest esteem and 
due regard My Lord 

Yours Lordships most faithfull 

obedient and most humble Servant 

John McDonell, of Glengarry. 

Glengarry's wife was a daughter of Gordon of Glenbucket and her 
mother was a Forbes, but the connection with the Culloden family might 
in its extreme remoteness have been easily overlooked. 

The next document appears to have been an enclosure to this letter. 
It is endorsed: Copy Advertisement Major General Campbell anent 
delivering up of Arms, 
I 



82 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

For Glengarry 

By Major General John Campbell. 

Whereas the Custom among the Highlanders in Scotland of hav- 
ing arms in their custody, of using and wearing the same has 
been discharged by Law as tending to disturb the Peace and 
quiet of that Part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, and 
Whereas the same vain and dangerous Custom has greatly con- 
tributed to the furtherance of the Present Rebellion. These are 
therefore requiring and Commanding the Inhabitants of the 
Countries and Parishes underwritten to deliver up their Arms 
to me or any person having my Order viz the Inhabitants of 
Glencoe, to the Commanding Officer at Castle Keilchurn, Those 
of Appin, Morevin, Kingerloch and Ardgour, to the Command- 
ing Officer at Islandstalker, those of Ardnurmurchan, Suinart, 
Moydart, Arisaig, Knoydart, Morir, Tirij, Coll, Rum, Egg, Cana, 
Uist, Barra, and Ellannamuich to the Commanding Officer at 
Mingary Castle. Those of the Parishes of Killmunivaig and 
Killmally in Lochaber to the Commanding Officer at Fort- 
William, and those of Mull and Ikolumkill to the Commanding 
Officer at Dowart Castle. Certifying to the respective Heritors 
or Land Lords there Tenants and Possessors were truly in the 
Rebellion, that the mosl vigorous execution of the Law shall be 
directed if their Arms are not voluntarily and universally, de- 
livered up at the Places above mentioned, in fifteen days after 
the Heritor is served with a Copy of this order, or that the same 
is published at the respective Parish Churches, and in order that 
the Heritors and others may be possessed of a proper Document 
of their Complyance with this Order, the Commanding Officers 
in the different Castles are directed to give Receipts for what 
arms they shall receive, and from whom. 
Given under my hand and seal at Inveraray the 23rd Aprill 1746. 
Sir Subscribitur John Campbell. 

Glengarry himself had not been "out." See "Culloden Papers" 
CCCCXLIII, from which it appears that he had actually contemplated a 
visit to Culloden. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 83 

From MacLeod to the President dated from Gortuleg 12 May 1746. 

My dear Lord 

Quite fatigued and vory much defeat here I am, as it was the 
only inhabited place I could find. Sir Alexr. [MacDonald] 
Stopt a while with me, but is gone on, and I follow him to- 
morrow morning, if I am not intyrlie knocked up. Poor [Thomas 
Fraser of] Gcrtuleg is told he still layes under suspicion, and that 
there are letters of his own found which give great umbrage. I 
know not what truth is in this, but I should be sorry he had done 
anything to forfeit hie. Protection, as I must remember how use- 
ful he was to the Generall Cause, and what Particular Services, 
of a very lasting Nature he did for you as well as for me, wh. I 
never can forget, and I know you do not. I really wish for more 
health to be able to work throw this Campaign. 

I am yours 

N. Macleod. 

From David Ross of Inverchasley to the President dated from Edinburgh 
12 May 1746. 

My Lord 

It gave me infinite Joy to hear Your Lordship keeps such good 
health, since the 20th March, and of your Lops, safe return to 
Culloden, Your Lop would hear of my coming to this Place with 
Lord Reay, and that I was singled out as the only Sacrifice in 
Ross, for my eldest Son who was here lately computes my loss 
one way or another to 1000 guineas. I shall apply for redress or 
be silent as your Lop will direct, and determine me, and as I 
know your Lop. is readie to write, I begg if your Lop. has any 
spare time, you may dress me two or three lines of advice, for 
I'll stay here till the return of this post is "due, and if I knew 
your Lop was to be soon here, I would waite though I have no 
kind of Business to have the pleasure of kissing your Lordships 
hand in Edinburgh. I understand [Munro of] Newmore pro- 
cured the Commissariat of Ross to [Ross of] Aldy. If the Crown 
Rents of Ross is not to be disposed of to a Peer as formerly and 
if they will be leveyed by a collector as in [Ross of] Kindeace's 
time, it would be more Goodness in your Lordship then I've a 



84 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

title to, if you got me named Collector. I was 10 Days with the 
Master of Ross at the Hawkhead, and it would seem by the 
nature of his parole, he must all along continue inactive against 
the Rebells, which may putt an end to his Company, tho 1 if he 
was called upon by his Royal Highness I believe he would sub- 
mit to his pleasure. As my son, your Lordship lieutenant is by 
this means idle, and may be so for some time, I submit to Your 
Lordship whether or not it would be to his interest if he could 
get into a Marching Regiment. Its my own opinion it would, 
and its my Choice, but I'll acquiese in your Lops, opinion and 
though it should be for his getting in to a Regiment I've no way 
to push him forward or exchange him, but one way, and that 
is assuredly by your Lordship. I'm half trembling for my pre- 
sumption and freedom, but I recover when I think with whom 
I use it, the Best Man (without flattery) on the face of the Earth, 
May God long preserve him, and with the greatest respect and 
esteem 

I ever am 

My Lord 

Your Lops, most oblidged most faithfull 
and Devoted readie Servant 

David Ross. 

From the Governors etc of Aberdeen to the Lord President, dated from 
Aberdeen, 12th May 1746. 

My Lord 

As we have the honour to be appointed, Governours of this City 
by H.R.H. the Duke of Cumberland, we could not omitt 
taking the first opportunity of congratulating your Lord- 
ship's agree iMe Meeting with H.R.H., after such a 
long and hazardous situation, in the Service of your 
King and Country, and in a special manner beg leave 
to express our unfeigned thankfulness for your late gener- 
ous good intentions of reliving this City under Rebel oppression, 
which has been fully communicate to us by one of our numbers. 
This distinguished mark of your favour we hope shall so influence 
our Conduct, as we shall never be taxed with ingratitude to such 
ane Honourable Patron. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 85 

Our late Provost [James Morisorfj gave you the trouble from 
time to time of acquainting your Lop. with the Situation of this 
Town as lie hade opportunity. Your Lop. knows the publick 
Revenues of our Town must suffer very much for want of due 
care and management, which cannot be done, without a legal 
Magistracy and Council, and its therefore hoped His Majesty 
will make provision for this and other burghs in like circum- 
stances, and as our Representative in Parliament has advised us 
that application has been made to his Majesty, by some of the 
Burrows, we have therefore been thinking of a proper method 
and do find there is some inconsistancy in making application 
either in name of the Old or New Councils, as there are objec- 
tions to the conduct of a few Members of both, during this 
wicked unnatural Rebellion. And therefore we as Governours 
have presumed to make the Application (Copy of which is here- 
with sent) craving his Majesty may be pleased to grant warrant, 
to the last Provost and four Baillies (being men well affected) to 
Elect a New Magistracy and Council as was done in the year 
1716, so as to root out all seeds of disaffection out of our Council. 
And we hope such a^ have she wen any marks of disaffection, 
will not be found worthy of that trust. 

As there was a Precedent for this in the Reign of his late 
Majesty (Copy of which we have also herewith sent) and that it 
was the basis of all succeeding Councils since that time, we hope 
there can be no objection to that method, whereas if it were 
deviat from, there might be a handle made, that the alteration 
proceeded from a conviction that the former method was 
erroneous. So we humbly apprehend it will be best to make the 
practise of our burgh uniform and thereby the former rule will 
be confirmed and established, besides we are fully persuaded, 
that this will be the most effectual method for settling peace and 
tranquillity in the burgh and rooting out everything that looks 
like disaffection of our Councils. 

As our Town has been always honoured with your Lop's 
protection, we thought it our duty to lay this, our Procedure 
before your Lop. both for your approbation and assistance. The 
Petition was sent last week to Mr Maule our member, to be 



S6 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

laid before the King We shall embrace every opportunity to 
testifie that we have the honour to be with greatest esteem and 
perfect truth 

My Lord 

Your Lordships most obedt and most faithful humble 

Servants 

Signed in name and at the desire of the Governours of the City 
of Aberdeen by 

James Morison, Preses. 

List of Governours [in addition to Provost Morison] 

Provost Cruickshank 

,, John Robertson 

,, Chalmers 

,, Alexander Robertson. 

Aberdeen 
Baillif Gordon 

,, Mouat 

,, Burnett 

Andrew Logie, D. of Gild 
Alexander Thomson, advocat 
Convener Auldjo 
[Captain Crosby was Commandant] 

From Andrew Logie, Dean of Gild, Aberdeen, to the President dated from 
Aberdeen 12 May 1746. 

Permit me to accompany the Publick Thanks, with my own 
Sincere Professions of Gratitude & esteem. The Address pre- 
sented to his Majesty, copy of which is transmitted to your Lord- 
ship, was the only form in our present condition in which we 
could send it. The conduct of some, of both the preceding 
Council, and of that chosen, the day when their procedure, was 
interrupted by the Rebells under Hamilton, has been such, as 
although it does not expose to persecution, unless a very par- 
ticular enquiry was to be made, yet may most justly exclude 
from Confidence and trust. 

His Royal Highness orders, respecting the unrigging our 
Ships, calling all Boats into proper Stations and guarding the 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 87 

Coasts are most punctually execute: Our Militia still continue 
to do regular Duty, and to apprehend all Rebells coming within 
their bounds, as was strictly enjoined 

Permitt me my Lord, with pleasure to remember your Lord- 
ships truely Patriot wish "A speedy settlement to our Country 
with as little Mischief to Scots-men as possible." And to add 
that your Lordships Family may always continue to be the Decus 
et Tutamen of their Country. I shall always in highest esteem 
remain 

My Lord 

Your Lordships Most obligd. & most Obedt. 
humble Servt. 

Andrew Logie. 



(2) CONCERNING THE INDEPENDENT COMPANIES. 

The unusual manner in which the Independent Companies had been 
brought together, the actual dates when they were first raised, the dates 
on which they were completed and the commissions of the officers de- 
livered, involved serious questions with regard to their pay. 

The following notes (undated) are in the President's handwriting. 

The Independent Companies have pay from the date of their 
arrivall at Inverness and they ought to be repayed as near as can 
be the reall expense of bringing them thither, to be allowed in 
their account, when it comes to be regularly made up. Now as 
some of them were brought together sooner and some later, and 
as they will come upon the establish nient probably of one date 
anterior to the actuall levying, the pay of which period may go 
to help the levying etc- if it is practicable by the rules of the 
Army is it not just that the whole saving of pay anterior to the 
actuall levying should be brought into one heap and divided 
equally between them otherways the captain that brought his 
company first together for the service will fare worst. 

On 13th May 1746 he wrote to John Scrope; to Henry Pelham and to 
George Ross, the army agent ("Culloden Papers" DXXXI; CCCXVII; 
and CCCXVIII). To the last he sent a certificate of the dates on which 



88 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

the officers' commissions had been delivered, their companies being com- 
plete, and gave the names of the officers. He also wrote on the same day 
to the Duke of Newcastle. 

Inverness, 13th May 1746. 
My Lord 

The Correspondence I had the honour to hold with your Grace, 
has been interrupted for a great while. The sudden retreat 
which Earl Loudoun c.nd I were obliged to make from this place 
the 18th of Febry. before the Superior force of the Rebells who 
assembled in our Neighbourhood after flying from His Royal 
Highness the Duke at Stirling, and the more sudden retreat which 
we were forced to make from the Post we had taken up on the 
Confines of Sutherland on the 20th March to avoid an unequal 
conflict, with a body of the same Rebells, who under the favour 
of a very extraordinary fog, which lasted two compleat Days, 
found means to collect Boats unespyed by his Majesty's Ships of 
War, and to land on the Coast, which we were to guard, unob- 
served by us; made it impossible to give your Grace any accounts 
of our proceedings, untill we had access to return to this Country 
by the total de-route of the Rebells, by his R.H., and as the Duke 
has undoubtedly acquainted his Majesty from time to time, with 
the accounts he had of us, but more particularly as a journall of 
our trifling adventures would deserve no attention after His Royal 
Highness's glorious Achievement, which by putting at once an 
end to the wicked Rebellion has justly engrossed the Regards of 
the King and of the Publick, I shall not trouble your Grace with 
any minute details of our proceedings, but shall content myself 
with giving you an account, of what has been done, in pro- 
secution of the Trust committed to me by his Majesty, of dispos- 
ing of Commissions for 20 Independent Companies, which bear 
date the [blank] Sept. last. After making one Reflection, that 
the too late arrival of the Sloop with arms and money, which I 
had long solicited, was the cause, why the Rebellion, gathered 
fresh strength in this Country, after the Rebells flight from 
Stirling, had these arms come in time enough to have been put 
into the hands of men., who were ready prepared to receive them, 
the Rebells durst hardly have shewn themselves op this side of 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 89 

the Mountains, but as those arms did not arrive in our Road 
till the very day, the Rebells made themselves Masters of the 
Barrack of Ruthven in Badenoch, within 26 miles of us, it was 
too late to assemble the men we had prepared, and in place of 
making use of the arms we were obliged to keep them as well 
as the money on Shipboard for security. 

When the blank Commissions for raising 20 Independent 
Companies came to my hand, I made the most discreet use of 
them I was able, whereof I from time to time acquainted the 
Marquis of Tweeddale. I delivered Commissions to 18 Companies 
of 100 private men each, but not till the Companies were com- 
plete, all those excepting one Company [Seaforth's Lewes Com- 
pany,] which by the Rigour of the Season and deep Snow in the 
Mountains, was hindered from joining us, were in conjunction 
with part of Loudoun's Regiment, the force that bridled this 
Neighbourhood, and prevented the accession of any considerable 
strength to the Rebells, from thence, until we were overpowered 
at Inverness. At that time Earl Loudoun left 2 of those com- 
panies in the Castle to strengthen the Garrison, 2 more were left 
with Lord Fortrose, who retired with them to his Highland 
Estate, to prevent the efforts of Earl Cromartie and the other 
Rebells, to force his kindred to join them in Arms. And when 
the Rebells, under the favour of the fog already mentioned, forced 
a Passage into Sutherland, finding that the whole of those Com- 
panies could not possibly be subsisted in the Mountains of that 
Country, we left four of them there, whose good Services in 
saving the Hazard Sloop, and discomfiting the Earl of Cromarty, 
your Grace has doubtless heard of, and with the rest, by forced 
Marches, through the North West Highlands, gained the Isle of 
Sky, where they were employed in preventing any accession of 
strength to the Rebells, untill His R.H.'s compleat Victory, ren- 
dered that care unnecessary and now they are by the Duke's 
order at the upper end of Loch Ness, under the Command of the 
Earl of Loudoun, and will it is to be hoped, as they are compleat, 
including the 2 Companys, that were made Prisoners at the 
Castle of Inverness be useful in following the Debris of the 
Rebells throw their Mountains, 



90 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

Regard to the Trust imposed on me by his Majesty, made 
me careful not to dispose of any of those Commissions, but as the 
exigency of the Service required. Your Grace will observe that 
I have given Commissions only to 18 Companys, tho 1 at different 
times, Several more Companys of Militia were raised, employed 
and for the time payd, so that Commissions for 2 Companys still 
remain blank in my hands. Of this I acquainted the Duke on 
my coming to this Place, and signified my readiness to put those 
Commissions in his hands, to be disposed of, if he judged it 
proper, but his Royal Highness thought it more fit, as there was 
no present occasion for them, to reserve them for His Majesty's 
disposition, and they are now in my Custody, ready to be re- 
turned to his Majesty, which will produce a saving, or to be dis- 
posed of as His Majesty shall be pleased to direct. 

The same accidents that prevented me corresponding with 
your Grace prevented also my returning Lists of the names of the 
Officers commissioned and of the dates of their commissions 
without which it seems, the Establishment of their Pay cannot 
properly be made, and this haa been the cause why a stop has been 
put to the issuing money, for that Account, so that they have in 
a great measure been subsisted on private Credit. To remove 
this difficulty I have transmitted to Mr George Ross agent for 
these Companies, a certificate of the names of the Officers and of 
the Dates of the delivery of their Commissions, signifying at the 
same time that the several Companys were compleat, before the 
Commissions were delivered, this I did after stating the case to 
H.R.H., whose opinion it was that the fact should be particularly 
reported, and that in forming the establishment, allowance 
would be made of Pay, for a reasonable time anterior to the 
actual Delivery of the Commissions, to indemnify the Officers, for 
the expense, which the levying of the Companies must have put 
them to. I am now speaking out of my Profession, and there- 
fore I doubt, not in stile, but as your Grace will guess at what I 
mean, I am confident you will give such directions, as are fit to 
be given on the Subject 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 91 

I have my Lord, for somewhat more than nine months, been 
moving in a very odd Sphere, for a man of my Profession. The 
Skill and Bravery of the Duke have at last delivered the Nation 
from its dangers and me from my Excentricity. I have at- 
tended his Royal Highness for some days, and have furnished 
him with all the rights I was Master of, so that he judges it un- 
necessary I should follow him any further. If his Majesty has 
any further need of my service in the Irregular way, I am ready, 
if not I shall return, without having had much rest to Edin- 
burgh, to my regular Drudgery. 

Before I take my leave I must suggest to your Grace, that at 
the beginning of our unhappy confusions, His Majesty's pleasure 
was signifyed to me by the Marquis of Tweedale, then Secre- 
tary of State, to supply myself with money for extraordinary ex- 
penses, by draughts on Mr Pelham or the Paymaster General, 
but that Expedient becoming impracticable by the almost total 
interruption of correspondence, and by other Accidents, I was 
obliged after expending so much of my own money as I could lay 
my hands on, to take up small sums here and there, where 
I could find them on my own Notes; at last Earl Loudoun was 
forced to pursue the same course, and we were both obliged to 
borrow from the small sums, that were sent down for the Sub- 
sistance of the Independent Gompanys, and to apply the Money 
to other necessary and contingent Services. These Accounts 
cannot possibly be made up till Earl Loudoun is disengaged from 
the immediate Service in which he is now engaged, but in the 
meantime I find myself dayly dunned for small sums, amount- 
ing in the whole to no great matter, which I was obliged to take 
up on my own Credile. These I should in [The rest of the 
letter is missing.] 

His letter to John Scrope ("Culloden Papers'' DXXXI) is naturally on 
more intimate lines, and touches upon his own position, whether he 
should be at "further trouble; or whether it is not more expedient to ly 
still and be quiet; leaving those of my country who know nothing of the 
matter, and who have chose to take no part of the risque, to direct as they 
shall think fit." 



92 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

The following list gives the names of the officers of the Independent 
Companies and the dates on which they were reckoned to be complete, 
that is the time of their arrival respectively at Inverness. 



Company. 
Munro 


Complete. 
23rd Oct. 1745 


Captain. 
George Munro of 
Culcairn 


Lieutenant. 
Adam Gordon, younger 
of Ardoch 


Ensign. 
Hugh Munro, younger 
of Achany 


Sutherland (I.) ... 


25th Oct. 1745 


Alexander Gunn [? of 

Badonloch] 


John Gordon 


Kenneth Sutherland 


Grant 


3rd Nov. 1745 


Patrick Grant, younger 
of Rothiemurchus 


William Grant [? younger 
of Dellachappel] 


James Grant 


Mackay (1.) 


4th Nov. 1745 


Hon. George Mackay ef 
Skibo 


John Mackay [? of Clash- 
neach] 


James Mackay [? of 
Skerray] 


Sutherland (11.) ... 


8th Nov. 1745 


Peter (Patrick) Suther- 
land (Kinminity) 


William Mackay, young- 
er of Pitfure 


John Mackay of 
Mudale 


Mscleod (1.) 


15th Nov. 1745 


John Macleod of 
Talisker 


Alexander Macleod, 
younger of Balmeanach 


John M'Askill, Rud- 
h'an Duuaiii 


(11.) ... 


it 


Normand Macleod of 
Waterstein 


Donald Macleod, Bernis- 
dale 


John Macleod, Osdal 


(HI.) ". 





Normand Macleod, 
younger of Bernera 
(Harris) 


John Campbell, Ensay 


John Macleod, 
yeunger, Gesto 


(IV.) ... 


> 


Donald Macdenald of 
Castleton 


William Macleod, 
Hammer 


Donald Macleod, Mill 


Inverness 


18th Nov. 1745 


Bailie William Mackin- 
tosh (Termit) 


Kenneth Mathison 


William Baillie 


Assynt Macleod ... 


28th Nov. 1745 


Hugh Macleod of 
Geanies 


George Munro 


Roderick Macleod 


Seaforth (1) 


10th Dec. 1745 


Alexander Mackenzie of 
Davochmaluach 


John Mathison 


Simon Murchison 


(11.) . 


M 


Colin Mackenzie of 
Hilton 


Alexander Campbell, 
Factor to Seaforth 


John Macrae 


Macdonald (I.) ... 


31st Dec. 1745 


James Macdonald of 
Airds 


Allan Macdonald of 
Knock 


James Macdonald 


(11.) ... 





John Macdonald of 

Kirkibost 


Allan Macdonald (Kings- 
burgh) 


Donald Macdonald 


Mackay (11 ) 


6th Jan. 1746 


Hugh Mackay, younger 
of Bighouse 


John Mackay [? of 
Clashneach] 


Angus Mackay 


Ross 
Seatorth(Dl.) ... 


8th Jan. 1746 
2nd Feb. 1746* 


William, Master of Ross 
Colin Mackenzie 


Charles Ross [? Brother to 
Ross of Shandwick] 

Donald Macaulay 


David Ross, younger 
of Inverchasley 

Kenneth Mackenzie 



* This was the Lewes Company, which never reached Inverness. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 93 

(3) THE LORD PRESIDENT RETURNS TO EDINBURGH- 

By his accounts the President seems to have left Inverness on 21 May. 

22 May To Donald Mackcloage for a pair of shoes 

to run with 030 

23 ,, To Captain John Forbes by your Lop's 

order 10 10 

,, ,, To a Man brought a letter from Baillie 

Fraser Inverness 006 

,, ,, To a man sent from Brodie House to Sir 

Robert Gordon's 020 

24 To the Butler at Brodie 110 

,, ,, To the Porter there 026 

,, ,, To the Servants & horses at Elgin 8 G 

,, ,, To the Serjeant of the Guard Focabers for 

half a boll oats 080 

25 ,, To the Butler at Castle Gordon 1 1 

,, ,, To the Porter ... 050 

,, ,, To Your Lordship to give the Groom ... 050 

,, ,, To the Servants at Focabers 036 

,, To the Bill at Cullen 1 12 6 

,, ,, To the two Cintenells .. 026 

26 ,, To the Bill at Banff 252 

,, ,, To the Minister's maids at Banff where 

your Lordship lay 050 

,, ,, To the Bill at Old Meldrum 145 

27 ,, To the Bill at Mr [?] Dyce in Aberdeen ... 2 10 
,, ,, To three bottles wine & 8 bottles ale at the 

Mill of Stonehaven 070 

,, ,, To the Bill at Bervie ... 136 

28 To the Bill at Montrose 2 12 2 

,, ,, To the Servants of the House 020 

,, ,, To the two Centinells at ditto 026 

,, ,, To the Ferrj at Ferryden 020 

,, To the Bill at Aberborthick ... 114 

,, ,, To the Ferry at Dundee 2 Boats 056 

29 May To the Bill at Couper 1 19 

,, ,, To the Bill at Kinghorn 139 




94 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

29 May To Donald Mackiloage for coming south 110 

,, To carry home three horses and himself ... 220 
,, ,, To the carrying of the luggage to the Boat 1 
,, To the yaull to carry your Lordship to the 

Boat 026 

,, ,, To the Boat for your Lordship 10 6 

,, ,, To Carriage for the Baggage from the Boat 006 

,, To crossing the horses 050 

4 June To 2 years wages to myself [John Hay] 
from 10 May 1744 to 10 May 1746 at 

eight pounds per annum 

,, ,, To 3 shirts to Fergus Ferguson the Boy ... 
,, ,, To a pair of shoes to him 

With regard to Fergus Ferguson, see Foreword to Vol. I. Since the 
publication of that account a memorandum has been found, which shows 
that he on 5 June 1788 (in the time of Arthur Forbes of Gulloden, the Pre- 
dent's grandson) "delivered the different keys as butler and resigned same 
to Daniel Young." He was thereafter in receipt of a pension, for the half 
year's payment of which he wrote to Gulloden on 23 August 1788 from 90 
Titchfield Street, London. A receipt signed by him on 28 November 1801 
shows that the pension was at the rate of 30 a year. 

From the Magistrates of Glasgow to the President, dated from Glasgow 
2 June 1746. 

My Lord 

Our Majestrates and City Council have informed me to offer their 
sincere congratulations to your Lop. on your return in peace and 
health to our Metropolis, and resuming the Exercise of your high 
office. We have known with pleasure, your Lop, the brightest 
ornament at the Bar, we have the happiness to behold your Lop 
at the head of our Law distributing justice to his Majesty's Sub- 
jects, with the most consummate knowledge, and penetration and 
with the greatest impartiality. Your Lop. has lately in a more 
critical and important scene, [Letter torn] and confirming your 
Countrymen in their duty and Loyalty to our most Gracious 
Sovereign, supporting the establishment and maintaining the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 95 

Constitution of Brittain, for all which unwearied Labours and 
great Services, Your Lop. will permitt me to render the humble 
acknowledgements of our Corporation. Mr [?] Crosse writes me 
he has taken the Liberty of putting into your Lop's hands a copy 
of our memorial. We have experienced your Lop regard and 
affection to our Community as well for our Industry as our In- 
variable attachment to our happy Government. We have no 
doubt of your Lops best office and powerful interest for procuring 
us relief in our present great distress. I shall ever be proud 
of being distinguished as 

My Lord 

Your Lops most faithfull 
and very Obedt hum. Servt 

And. Cochrano. 
Glas[gow]2nd. June i746. 

From the Earl of Dunmore to the President dated from London, 7th June 
1746. 

My Lord 

I had the honour of your Lordship's of the 31st May. I wish I 
could express how sensible I am of your generous friendship to me 
and my Family upon this unhappy occasion. I am sorry to find 
my Letter of the 15th was so long before it reached you. At that 
time my unfortunate Brother was at Sir Alexander Ramsay's 
House, without my knowing at that time there was any intention 
of removing so soon from thence. However I hope he is still at 
Inverness and that your Lordship's Application will have the 
desired effect, of preventing his Removal. 

But if that should fail (for which I should be extremely con- 
cerned) the next thing is, that I desire his Triall may be put off 
to the last, which favour I flatter myself H.R-H. will not refuse, 
nor even the first, If my brother is not gone from Inverness when 
you apply for his staying there. I am with the greatest truth and 
regard, My Lord 

Your Lordship's most obedient 
humble Servant 

Dunmore, 



96 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

From the Earl of Dunmore to the President dated from Hanover Square 
15th August 1746. 

My Lord. 

I send you a copy of a Letter I received from the Duke of New 
Castle. It surprises me a good deal to find the Cabinet Gouncill is 
unanimous in the prosecutions as mentioned in the Letter. I 
flattered myself I had made some impressions on some of the 
members and I never doubted but your Lordship's Friendship 
would entirely put an end to my Brothers Prosecution, and I still 
hope the best. For I think the Duke of Newcastle acquainting mo 
with the resolution taken in Councill upon the affair is intended 
to put me upon making use of the little time that is left in the 
best manner I can- 

I am your Lordships 

most obedient Humble Servant 

Dunmore 

For further correspondence concerning the Hon. William Murray see 
"Sulloden Papers" CGCXXI-CCGXXIII, CGGXXVIII, CCCXXIX, 
GCCXXXIII, CGGXXXIV. During the Duke of Cumberland's brief stay 
in Edinburgh (21-22 July) the President laid the case before him. Murray 
eventually received a pardon presumably in part at least due to the Presi- 
dent's efforts (Worn GCCXLI). 

It was considered probable that the President would journey to 
London during the course of the year and this possibility he intimated to 
Sir John Cope ("Gulloden Papers" CCCXXIV). 

Edr 21 June 1746. 
Dr Sr, 

I have had the Honour of yours of the 12th; & with it a great deal 
of pleasure, as it satisfys me that you are not as yet got into the 
fashion of suffering distance of time or place to interrupt friend- 
ship, or of joining in with the Cry of Fools, who will take upon 
them to censure, without knowing what they judge of. I have 
got at the end of a troublesome task, checkered with various in- 
cidents; & I am sensible I meet with many criticks; but as I am 
conscious I have done, according to the several exigencies, the 
best that appeared to me to be in my power, I remain quiet, and 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 97 

despise the Objectors, as I laugh at the Objections; which cannot 
possibly be judged of, but by such as know the situation in which 
I was; <fe these are very few. 

You have been truely informed about Lord Loudon and your 
humble Servt. We have never varied our style, because Truth 
is stubborn; it will not vary, and those who have a true respect 
for it dare not attempt to violate it. What impressions may have 
been given of your Conduct in the North, I, who was at a distance, 
cannot guess at; but it is to be hoped, that the Duke, who has had 
experience of the nature of Marches through the Highlands, and 
whose eyes must show him what sort of Ground the Corryarrick 
is, must have a more perfect knowledge of the difficulties you 
had to grapple with, than he had when he left London; & I should 
think that his Officers who were present at Falkirk would hardly 
venture to make observations on what happened at Preston; so 
that it's highly probable, the stile may change, if ever this matter 
comes to be the subject of consideration. The Duke is at present 
where he has been for sometime employed, at Fort Augustus, in 
receiving the arms and the submission of the Rebels; his patience, 
which surprises in such Years, is equal to his fire, & in all pro- 
bability will do very great service to the public. 

The young Pretender is, I think, still in the Country; and 
the probability is great, that he will not get out of it; the spirit 
of the Rebells is quite broke; and it requires no more than some 
skill to contrive Regulations with Judgement, which under a 
proper Execution would secure the future tranquillity of this 
Country. I wish our Resolutions with respect to the Continent 
may be directed by temper and discretion. With respect to these 
matters, as I have not sufficient Understanding, I have nothing 
left but to wish in general that things may be well. If I may 
trust my observations, I fear we have been rather too quick here- 
tofore. 

The remembrance you tell me Lord Harrington has of me, 
gives me great satisfaction; I value not the opinion of any man, 
but of him of whom I have a good one myself; and as I must 
have been senseless, not to have concurred with Mankind in the 
estimation of his Lordship's Merit, it must surely flatter me 
much that he is pleased at any time to think of me, or what I am 
about, with approbation, 



98 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

It is possible, that when our Term is over, I may think of 
seeing London once more, to wait of his Lordship, and to renew 
that acquaintance by which I have been so much honoured. 

This will be delivered you by George Ross, who has fre- 
quently acquainted me with your goodness to him on my 
Account, and how much I am indebted to your good-will. If 
he should have occasion hereafter for your Recommendation to 
my Lord Harrington, in a matter he has in view, you may safely 
say that he is honest, and that employing him will be a favour 
done to me. I am sure, Dr Sir John, I have wrote enough in 
this villainous Scrawl to plague you wt decyphering it; and there- 
fore that I can do nothing better than to have done, when I have 
assured you that I am, very faithfully, 

Your most obedt and most humble Servant, 

Duncan Forbes. 

On 12 June he had acquainted the Government with his own opinion 
of the means to be adopted for the restoration of peace in the Highlands 
and for the prevention of rebellion (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.) The 
following notes are in his handwriting (see also "Culloden Papers" 
CCCXLIII, GCGXXVI, CCGXXV). 

Some Considerations on the Present State of the Highlands of 
Scotland tending to shew what may be expected to happen, if 
France should think fit to risk a few Battalions with some Arms 
and money and a small quantity of Meal, to feed the Common 
Highlanders who are starving, to be landed on the Western 
Coast. 

It is next to a certainty, that as many of the Rebellious High- 
landers as are alive, and not in custody, will immediately join 
them which in 2 or 3 weeks most form a considerable body. The 
use of some French Battalions, in this Service is only to give 
credite to the attempt, for during the Winter, they can no more 
act amongst the Mountains than our Regular Troops can, and they 
may be Hutted near to where they land. 

The Rebellious Highlanders who may join them, can roam 
over the Highlands in the Winter, without feeling much incon- 
venience as they march without Baggage, their Plaid is their 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 90 

Tent, and they can carry as much meal as will support them many 
days. It is to be feared, that all those who were threatened or 
forced into the last Rebellion will be Volunteers in such a New 
Insurrection, as their case has not been much distinguished from 
that of others. 

The first operation of the Rebells assembled, will probably 
be, to range over the Highlands, and give the pretence of Force, 
to all such as in their hearts wish them well, to join with them, 
and in this operation they cannot be resisted by the Regular 
Troops, who cannot at this season march into, nor be subsisted 
in the Highlands. 

Tho' the Cattle in the Rebellious Countrys have been de- 
stroyed, which at first must occasion a scarcity of provisions to 
the French Troops, that may be landed, and even to the High- 
landers themselves, yet the stock of Cattle to the right and left 
of them, have been left intire. Argyllshire to the southward, 
Ross, Sutherland the Isle of Sky &c. to the Northward, have not 
been wasted as the inhabitants behaved themselves dutifully- But 
as that behaviour gav^e the highest offence to the Rebells, and as 
the arms by which that offence was given are now taken out of 
their hands, which disables them to defend themselves or their 
property, it is more than probable the Rebells will supply their 
wants, and execute their vengeance by the same Act of Plundering 
these Countrys adding threats of fire and sword if thereby they 
may hope to Prevail with any of the Inhabitants to join them. 

And if where they find any of the individuals disposed to 
serve them, they can afford to return their Cattle, or pay for them 
in French money, there is little doubt they may find a consider- 
able accession of strength. 

When they shall be thus strengthened and supplyed which 
may be in the Compass of a very few weeks, they will probably 
direct their march towards the Eastern Coast, where the Troops 
as they now lye Cantoned cannot resist them, and must be in 
Danger of being cut off in Detail. 

Should the Troops, that ly alongst the Coast 'take the party, 
of drawing to a head at Inverness Besides the Danger of having 
their Provisions cut off, and being overpowered by numbers in a 



100 MOftE CULLODEJN PAPERS. 

Defenceless Place, where there is no convenient cover for them, 
the Rebells might take a Fancy to direct their Course southwards, 
as they did last Autumn, and the probable consequences of such 
an event are obvious. And should the Troops to prevent these 
inconveniences, abandon the North and place themselves on the 
South side of the Forth, the possession which the Rebells must 
gain of so great a tract of Country would give their attempt too 
much Reputation, and might encourage numbers, who have not 
yet putt off the mask in both Nations to declare themselves, 
especially if France should cause a distraction of our Force, by 
any attempt on our Coasts. 

If it is reasonable to believe, if what has been suggested 
should happen, if France should, now, when the Duke and the 
Army are with us, risk so inconsiderable a Force, and expense 
as has been mentioned. 

Q. What may be expected to be the event, if the Army should 
be weakened by sending Troops beyond seas, and dis- 
heartened by sending away the Duke. 

Q. Supposing the scheme to be laid and agreed to, to send His 
R.H. with some Troops to Flanders, or supposing it so far 
executed the course of the Winter that both he and they were 
there, must it not be layed aside, and both he and the Troops 
recalled, upon such an attempt from France, with the suc- 
cess that must in all probability attend it. 

Q. Is it to be taken for granted that the Ministers of France, are 
so blind to their own interest, or so sparing of a few men 
and a little money, that they will fail to prevent his R.H. 
Operations, at the Head of a British Army in Flanders, at so 
small an expense, not to mention the many other advantages 
that would accrue to them, from the confusion we should be 
flung into, allow it to be but temporary. 

These notes (also in the handwriting of the President) are attached to 
a long list of prisoners, whose names are already known. 

Transplantation of Macgillvries, Macfies, MacNabbs, Kennedies, 

Mac Tavishes, &c, 

Q. Whether Practicable. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. loi 

Q. What can be done by act of Parliament 
Q. The Execution 

How can the individuals be found 
The effect upon the whole 
111 and well effected 

N.B. The list of such as have surrendered their arms to be con- 
sidered 

Moidart not theevish Knoidart so. but of late. 
Q. May not the end proposed be compassed in another manner. 

by Bargain. 

Q. If the disarming project take place may not the intercourse 
of Priests be prevented with Moydart, Knoidart, Morar, S. 
Uist, Bara, Glengarry, Strathglass, Glenlivet, Strathdearn &c. 
Q. May it not be made high treason for any subject of Brittain, 
to list in the French Service, or of the Service of the Pre- 
tender or of any of his sons. 

Q. May it not be made Lawfull to try such offence upon a 
summonds, at the M[arket] C[ross of Edinburgh] and 
P[ier] and S[hore of Leith] in, Scotland, and by an equivalent 
way in England &c. 

And to direct that upon Conviction, all Estate belonging 
to such offender shall forfeit to the Grown, with all rights 
that shall afterwards devolve upon him. 

Correspondence with such an offender after conviction to 
be Feloney, as also enticing or sending men abroad, to list in 
the French or Pretenders Service. 

Q. What Security can be expected from such to whom amnesty 
may be extended is taking the Oath any? 

Will it be right to clog the Pardon, with a condition of 
so small value. 

Q. Will it not be a condition that all Gentlemen claiming the 
Benefit of the Pardon, shall appear in some Court to be 
named, within a day limited to claim the advantage thereof. 
To have a certificate of their appearance &c. 
To have their names Registered. 



102 MORE CULLObEN PAPERS. 

May not this go to all Persons that are Infef t or appearand 
Heirs to such as were, and to all Sons and Brothers of such 
the Commons to be under no necessity of appearing. 

May not the term for appearing be six weeks for such 
as are within Scotland and three months for such as may be 
at the date of Pardon beyond Seas. 

May it not by Act of Parliament be declared that such 
of the Persons concerned in the Rebellion as shall not within 
those Terms appear, shall upon summons be liable to be pro- 
ceeded against in absense and to have judgement upon con- 
viction irrevocably pronounced against them. 

If an indemnity is to Pass in Parliament may not a Pro- 
vision be made, more ample than in the former Acts, for dis- 
charging actions against those who acted in support of the 
Government. 

N.B. As the Habeas Corpus Act stands suspended till the 20th 
November, and as it must take some days to renew that sus- 
pension, ought not some course be taken to discharge 
Prisoners in Scotland, against whom there is no sufficient in- 
formation, before that term and to commit more perfectly 
such against whom there is. 

Exceptions: Prisoners in the Castle. 

Genl. Exception: Popish Priests. , 

All Feus held of forfeiting Superiors to be held of the 
Crown. 

All Tenants at will to have leases. 

A day to be fixed for Exhibition of Claims on forfeited estates. 
Q. Macdonald of Morar 

The Estates of Kinloch Moidart, Barisdale, Lochgarie, Rasay, 
Lovat Strowan &c. Shian Glengyle &c. Ardprior, Glenmoris- 
ton Keppoch, Glencoe &c. 
Q. Loggy Almond 

[Memoranda: ] 
Transportation. 
Convicts Pardoned of Rank. 
[Macdonald of] Kingsborrow. 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 103 

S[ir] [H]ector Maclean. 

Mackintosh. 

Peter Sutherland. 

If the scheme do not begin next Summer when will it? 

Arms where lodged? 

Fortifications. Gitidel of Inverness. 

Price. 

Barrack of (Henelg. 

Lord Dunmore. 

No Ships on W. Coast for intelligence. 

Sherrif Clark. 

(4) LETTERS FROM AND ABOUT THE HIGHLANDS 
(JUNE AND JULY 1746). 

On 4th June Sir Alexander Macdonald wrote from Fort- Augustus to 
MacLeod of MacLeod, who was then at Inverness, telling him that he had 
given an account [subject not disclosed] to Sir Everard Fawkener, the 
Duke's Secretary, and that the Duke would see justice done; that the 
people of Badenoch and Lochaber had given up their arms and were not 
to be injured, Glengarry's men having suffered for not doing so; that 
Invergarry was being blown up; and that, some Kintail men having fired 
on the troops, four had been shot in consequence. The letter (original 
at Dunvegan) ends: "Our t.wo [Macdonald] companies are gone to tho 
Long Island where they will find the Prince if not gone off in an Irish 
meall ship which put in to South Uist." 

From MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness 7 June 1746. 

My dear Lord 

I begin to be impatient att not hearing from you as it will pritty 
much determine my Motions, Tho' I am far from being well yet 
and these three days of bad weather I've felt severely. The 
Knight remains with the Duke at F. Augustus, he went to and 
returned the same day from Fort William. Loudoun has been in 
Brae Lochaber, and Badenoch, and is now att Aviemore. The 
People there have delivered their arms so much to the Duke's 
satisfaction that they are to be no more molested. Lord George 
Sackville went to Glenelg, with a Party of 800 men, he came on a 



104 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Shealing of the Ghisholm in his way and carry 'd off a good many 
of his Cows and horse. Some Glenmoriston Rascals, as its said 
when he was near Kintail fired on his baggadge men, who fled 
and they laid hold of some part of it, he imagined it was People 
of that Country and finding some Arms in their Houses, he burnt 
what is called the Crow and carry'd away Cattle, Butter and 
Cheese &c. He has now gone the way of Knodart, Moy- 
dart, &c. and with this weather he must have a sad time of it. 
The Chisholm has left me today. I expect him [Fraser of] 
Struie and [Fraser of] Dumballoch with all the Strathglass Arms, 
and the Frasers of that Neighbourhood next week. Poor Tarn 
More [Fraser of Gortuleg] is not yet out of jeopardy. 

I've just got a Letter from Will: Baillie, he saw [Grant of] 
Shewgly, his son, and the Parson [Rev. John Grant] att 
Cromartie, he says they talk of very strong and good Materials 
against the Author of their Distress and seem heartily inclined 
to use them, which I own I do not wonder att. I suppose some of 
our People here, have wrote you of the Death of William 
Macintosh, who had some Fishery Post of your procuring for 
him. 

I am intyrlie yours 

Normand Macleod. 

From MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness 11 June 17'i6. 

My dear Lord 

I had your note, and must have been stupid indeed not to have 
acquainted you, if any alteration happened in the destination of 
the Lady, but its just in the way you left it. The Lady has the 
freedom of the Town. Loudoun is here, these two days on 
furlow. The Duke is well enough pleased with the delivery of 
Arms in Brae Lochaber, Badenoch and Macintosh's Country, and 
I believe no more harm will be done to that quarter, Macdonald 
is so very close I know little of what's doing at Fort Augustus, 
They now talk of moving very soon South, but Loudoun says he 
does not perceive that every thing or anything is ready for it. 
As to their Operations, some mistakes I believe have happened, 
made by the Officers out on command, which unluckily have 
always been of the severe side. You'll know unlucky Lovat is 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 105 

taken on the West Coast. I know not whether he is sent to the 
Clyde, or to be landed at Fort William The rainy weather or 
some cause or other (but its neither eating or drinking) has hurt 
me, and I'm a good deal more uneasie these four or five days 
with my limbs than I was. I want but the least hint from you 
to draw me nearer Clarky 

I am Intyrlie yours Normand Macleod. 

A copy of the Duke of Cumberland's Commission to James Fraser of 
Castleleathers to administer the Lovat estates so far as concerned the 
Beaufort portion is "Culloden Papers" CCCXXXI. 

The "Lady" was Anne, Lady of Mackintosh, whose letter follows. 
Her father, John Farquharson of Invercould, wrote later his thanks to 
the President for his efforts on her behalf ("Culloden Papers" DXXXIII). 

Inverness Joun 14th 1746. 

My Lord 

It gave me a great del of pleasure to hear McLeod say that your 
Lop was in good Health, and had gott safe to Edenburgh. I 
would have wrot before now, but thought it needless to give 
your Lordship any trouble while I had so littel to say, That it 
woud be agreeable to your Lordship to know that I had gott the 
liberty of the Town, to Walke and see my friends, I did not 
doubt & woud certainly have acquainted you the moment it 
hapned but I was sure it woud soon reach you from other Hands. 

I have now to tell your Lordship that as Marquis Tale- 
bairden is taking (sic), I have certain Intelligence that his letters 
& Papers are taken also, of what consequence that may be to your 
Friend I know no one can judge better than your Lordship, but 
shall say no more on this subject, tho I imagine your Lordship 
would expect that I should not lose the firste opportunity of 
acquainting you of this Incident I cannot promise to entertain 
your lordship with news, Matters still proceed as when you left 
us, only the Highlanders are dayly giveing their arms, a few of 
our Clan that were engadged have several days ago surendered 
themselves to Ld. L[oudoun] I shall now conclude with [wish- 
ing] your Lordship may do me the justice to believe, that no one 
is with more real esteem 
H Your Lops Humble Servant A Mclntostl> 



106 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

From MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness 14 June 1746. 

My dear Lord, 

Tho I write this to let you know, there's such a person in being, 
muoh out of order and very impatient to be elsewhere, in hopes 
of finding a cure. I have hardly anie thing worth while to say to 
you for I know little of the Destination of the Troops or when the 
Duke moves. Loudoun was here four or five days by way of 
clearing accounts and very busy with his Tale, but I must own 
I was very jealous, I do not know how you may feel yourself. 
I believe he is to be posted all alongst betwixt Fort Augustus 
and Fort William. He bids me mention a mistake he thinks you 
made in a report, given in of the Independent Gompanys, which 
he wishes may be rectified The Paper is thus titled. List of 
Officers of the Independent Companys, raised in the North, 
specyfying the date of delivering them their Commissions. Their 
Gompanys being then compleat. Now the dates you give to their 
being Gompleat, is the days they came into Inverness. Now as 
to my four Companys they were 20 days compleat, and together 
before they gott to Inverness. And Sir Alexander Macdonald's 
two were much longer so, as they remained a long time at the 
Kyle, and no doubt some of the others that came from a distance, 
must have been some time compleat, before their arrival in this 
Town. 

Yours, 

Normand Macleod. 

Lovat is to be this day att Fort Augustus. 

From MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness 15 June 1746. 

My dear Lord 

As I find ane express going to Edinr. I just wrote this note to 
acquaint you that Goll Macdonell Barisdale with 60 men came to 
Bernera, Friday and delivered their arms there, and he himself 
went to Fort Augustus. Its probable he has got terms on promis- 
ing to do services, which he is surely able to do. 
Your distressed 

Normand Macleod. 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 107 

MacLeod's detractors might possibly find satisfaction in the word 
"distressed" but, as his letters at this time show, he was very unwell and 
unable to take any active part in passing events. This might account for 
the use of the word; though Barisdale was almost certainly cognisant of 
what had passed at Beaufort in October 1745 (see Vol. IV.) Other refer- 
ences, however, by MacLeod to him do not show any particular anxiety. 
Andrew Lang describes Barisdale as an "infamous coward liar and 
traitor" but prints his "Narrative" in full, from which it appears that his 
protection was sent by the Duke of Cumberland through Sir Alexander 
MacDonald. One of the Jacobite charges against him was that he warned 
the Lord President and Lord Loudoun of the Prince's approach to Inver- 
ness, advising them to retire ("Companions of Pickle" pp. 87, 118, 122). 

Prom MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness 18 June 1746. 

My dear Lord 

I have yours of the 12th, I own it gives me a good deal of Pain 
to think Bills &c should be going on for regulating this Part of 
the Kingdom without your being advised about them, as I think 
you know more of the Highlands in General, and what would be 
proper for healing the present breach and bring security and 
usefulness from them for the future, than all the People now att 
London put together, and I shall think it good luck indeed, if 
some blundering mischief does not happen. 

I find George Ross has call for all the commissions of the 
Independents, to alter the dates, of their Commissions, according 
to your note of their being compleat, which I believe will make 
it the more necessary for you to advert, to what I wrote in my 
last, and testifie it, if it is a mistake. For your string of queries 
I shall answer them as well as I can. Its thought the Pretender 
is not gone, and that he will probablie be soon taken, and most 
of the Chiefs that remain, as its known where they lurk. Coll 
[Macdonald of] Barisdale, Friday surrendered the Arms of 60 
men at Bernera, and he was dismissed, since which he has mett 
Loudoun and [Sir Alexander] McDonald near Fort Augustus, 
what passed be sure I know not, but 6 men a company of the 
whole Army are ordered out on detachments, I know not if any 
of the Independents (who are soon to be but 70s) are to be with 



108 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

them, there was none of them with L[ord] G[eorge] Sackville, 
and he went quite wrong and no part of their orders by that were 
execute. Sir Alexander has been close with the Duke, and is very 
often called for, and spoke to by himself, consequentlie looked 
on as a great favourite, and its likely, for he wont write a Scrap 
to anie of his old Cronies. 

The information that came from Harris while you was here, 
and which you opened when I was at Fort Augustus, proved ex- 
actly true. Lovat is att Fort Augustus, close confined, that is 
nobody admitted to him, its said by some he is to be brought 
here, and by others that he is to be sent strait to Edinburgh, in 
his litter. I never could learn why Glengarry's House was 
burnt, though I have asked the Knight [Sir Alexander Mac- 
Donald] ten times. Some say it was on finding arms and rebell 
goods concealed, but what is believed is that he engaged under 
that Penalty to bring in his People to deliver up their arms, 
against a day certain, and failed. He was the other day at Fort 
Augustus with about 80 of them. Will. Murray with all other 
Prisoners have gone by sea for Newcastle, long ago, which I 
took for granted you knew. Lord McLeod, [Grant of] Shewglie 
&c. &c. went all at one time 

People here are extremely well pleased with Gfeneral] 
Blackney, and I think with reason. He seems to be oblidging 
and wishing as far as he has power, to do good natured things. 
I intended to consult Glarky [Dr John Clerk] att Edinr. I shall 
not move quite so soon now as I intended, as you hint a desire 
to the contrary. Tho to tell you the truth, I know not what use 
I can be of, abed here. I am however rather better than when I 
wrote last, whatsoever way I feel myself, I will still be in the 

same manner unalterablie yours 

Normand Macleod. 

Loudoun is at Shire More, in Badenoch but moves soon to the 
West Highlands. 

The unfortunate Glengarry, in addition to his other troubles, was 
himself imprisoned on the finding of incriminating correspondence. 
Andrew Lang on the authority of "MS. in Laing Collection, Edinburgh 
University Library" states ("Pickle the Spy" p. 149) that Glengarry had 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 109 

in January 1745 disponed his lands to his son, but the following copy of 
a letter (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.) seems to show that any such 
arrangement must have been elastic. 

The person to whom the letter was addressed is not disclosed. 

Edinr. Castle, Novr. 14th 1746. 
Dr Sir, 

As I am duly sensible of your Friendship towards me and my 
poor family I hope you'l forgive me for making both my inclina- 
tion and present situation known to you. Since ever I came to 
this place I have often considered of the situation of the country 
and in particular of my own and I am very sensible of the mis- 
fortunes the late wicked and unnatural Rebellion brought on this 
Kingdom of which I have my own share tho 1 I can say with a 
good conscience that I had not the least accession to it notwith- 
standing I now suffer in it as if I had been concerned, and this I 
owe to some of my nearest Relations who to serve their own pur- 
poses thought fit to inform against me. This treatment from my 
friends and that I plainly forsee that I am not in safety to live 
amongst such people being fully perswaded that my life would be 
in danger was I to live amongst them has made me resolve to 
dispose of my Estate to any person that will give me a reasonable 
price for it. Wherefore I think it a duty incumbent on me to 
make the first offer of it to His Majesty so that I beg the favour 
of you to apply to My Lord Justice Clerk and acquaint his Lord- 
ship of this my resolution and to assure him that I am willing 
upon reasonable terms to dispose of my Estate to His Majesty, 
and failing that to any of His Majesty's Loyal Friends that His 
Lordship shall think of. I am sincerely with Esteem 

Dr Sir 
Your most obliged humble Servant 

(Signed) John Mcdonnell of Glengarry. 

This letter duly reached the Lord Justice Clerk (Andrew Fletcher, 
Lord Milton) who wrote to the Duke of Newcastle 15th November (State 
Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.) discussing the desirability of taking the offer 
so as to get as much land as possible into the hands of the Crown, as 
against the difficulty of making a purchase from a person imprisoned 



110 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

on a charge of high treason. He had in the meantime, while waiting for 
instructions made an indefinite reply to the letter, to "the gentleman who 
brought it." 

From Sir Alexander MacDonald and Macleod to the President dated from 

Inverness 21 June 1746. 

My dear Lord, 

Ever since I took leave of you here, I have inhabited Fort 
Augustus as agreeable a Se~jour as any in the world, was there 
as much Goodness in proportion to their Rank in the other Officers 
as their Commander is possest of, when I say this I hint only at 
some of not the first Rank, who were a little severe, as they could 
not distinguish Persons &c. I am afraid He of Sky Cattle will 
sell ill this year, as Droves are sent South by the Commanders of 
Partys, that were employed in distressing the Rebells. As I have 
only come a jant here to see the Laird and am just to return to 
the Head Quarters, you can expect no detail, till either the Laird 
or I, have the pleasure to chat with you. The man who sent you 
the Message about the House of Gulloden before you left it, and 
whose stile begins with B [Barisdale] is in good way of Forgive- 
ness. Lord Loudoun kisses your hand, and says you have forgot 
your Northern Friends, he writes by next Post. 
I am, as ever 

My dear Lord 

Yours 

Alexr. Macdonald. 

[In MacLeod's handwriting] 

I am much worse than I was and confined to my Bed by my 
limbs only, but I will come to you soon and let Clarky try his 
hand on me. I've wrote you twice of the dates given the Com- 
missions already, and now send you the S y of Wars Queries 
on that head, putt on a Petition presented by G. Ross, for a months 
pay to indemnify the Companys, for raising and subsisting the 
men before they got to Inverness. Now as to Sir Alexanders two, 
he subsisted them at the Kyles after they were raised, the first, 
John McDonalds 7 weeks and James's above five, and this att 
your own desire, and Sir Alexander says you wrote him that you 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. Ill 

had acquainted the S y of State, that these two Companys were 
stationed there. It is very necessary you write to Sir E. Falconer 
about Gortuleg, and putt him in mind of what you said, with re- 
gard to him and that very soon. 

Adieu. 
[Enclosure] 
Endorsed: 

Observations on Mr Ross's Memorial relating to 18 Independent 
Gompanys and Querys relating thereto. June 6th, 1746. 

The Commissions were delivered according to Lord Presidents 
Letter, when the Companys were compleat and according to the 
Dates in his annexed List, the Commission first delivered was on 
October 23rd, the last of the 18, on Febry 2nd. And it is pro- 
posed that the establishment of the whole should commence and 
the pay of the whole be issued from August 24th 1745, by which 
means they who compleated last would be the greatest Gainers. 
Whereas considering the Rank in the Army gained by these 
Officers, and the Nature of Dependencys in those parts, whence it 
may easily be supposed that no Enlisting money was given, con- 
sidering too that when Lord Loudoun retreated many of those 
Companys returned to their own Habitations, I cannot imagine it 
proper to give them any pay before the dates of their respective 
Commissions. 

Q. If the Duke has not reduced these to Seventys,? yet this 
memorial desires Pay for them as Hundreds till June 24. 

Q. The musters of the Companys? and how any payments to 
them are to be boocked to, in the Paymasters Account. 

Q. How many and what Companys remained? How many 
and which dispersed when Lord Loudoun and Lord President 
retired from Inverness? 

Q. Whether returns were made from time to time of the 
Strength of the Companys, and to whom? 

From MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness 22nd June 1746. 

My dear Lord, 

This evening I have yours of the 19th and take this chance occa- 
sion to write two or three lines. Loudoun says as to the dates of 



112 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

the Independent Commissions, lie meant, that blame was due 
both of you. But as you've wrote I fancy no harm will happen. 
He says he has been so tossed about he never had time to write, 
and often knew nothing of the Post, had little to write, 
tho if you were to meet he would have a thousand things to say, 
All the Companys are with him att Ruthven, except the four 
MacLeods and two McDonalds who are gone to Sky, and the 
Lewis Company that has ever remained there. The Militias 
there are discharged and elsewhere also, except the Argyleshire 
men. I hope and believe Collonell Inness will be safe, the Tryal 
was over yesterday but we do not know the Sentence. All the 
News from that, is great expectation of laying hold of the Pre- 
tender soon, and if^there is not some truth in a Clatter, we have 
that four French ships (they dont mention their Force) is come 
for him, and that he is gott into one of these, He must be found, 
as it is past doubt, that he with Collonell Sulivan, one other Irish 
Officer and a few Servants, were very lately lurking in the Long 
Isle, and its likely Lochiel and John Murray will be found, as 
they cannot easily gett out of the way. You see me soon 

Yours 

N. M. 
P.S. MacDonald went this evening to Fort Augustus. 

From Brodie of Brodie (Lord Lyon) to the President dated from London 
1st July 1746 ("Culloden Papers" CCCXXVII) 

My dear Lord, 

The latter end of last week, I was obliged to go to the Country; 
else had then acquainted your Lop that I show'd your letter 
where I thought it proper; & at last the D. of Newcastle took it 
from me, to show to the Chancellor; and I am told, they do not 
propose to bring in any Bills relative to Scotland this Session, 
except the Meeting-house bill, and that for discharging the High- 
land dress; which, I am just now told, would be brought into our 
house by the Attorney General in a day or two. For my own 
part, I am yet, in my private opinion, for the bill; not being 
convinced against it; but as I understood that your Lo'p & my 
friend McLeod were against it, I have objected to it, and asked 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 113 

the Duke of 11 - what Crimes had the Campbells, Suther- 
lands, McLeods, Munro's McKays, &c. been guilty of, that they 
should be punished by the legislature whilst they were in arms 
for the Government? which did puzle; & was answered, the Whig 
Clans might be excepted; which I said would not do; the thing 
must be general, or could have no effect. Meantime, I should 
be glad to be convinced, & armed with proper objections. As to 
the Meeting-house bill my Lords Tweeddale, Winchelsea, & 
Sandys, have shown great zeal; & at first insisted on all those for- 
feiting their employments who have been twice at a Meeting- 
house since Sept. 1745. But that is over-ruled; only they have this 
day agreed to incapacitate for the future all persons in Scotland 
from holding employments that resort to the nonjuring Meeting- 
houses; and to incapacitate Peers from voting in Elections that 
have been twice at a nonjuring Meeting-house since Sept. 1745. 
And in short no such person can vote in the choosing of a magis- 
tracy at Edinr & other places, whereby they think they can secure 
a Whig magistracy. 

I have mentioned your Lop's great expenses in this and the 
last Rebellion; and I find the Duke of Newcastle, chooses to see 
you here, before any further Scotch laws are made, of which you 
will be more properly acquainted. 

My Lord Stair, who opposes the Dress Bill, bids me make 
you his Compliments; and the Duke of Newcastle assures me, 
that, notwithstanding his differing with you as to Mercy, that 
you are a great favourite of the Duke's. 
I have the honour to be, 
My Lord, 

Your's most faithfully, 

Alexr Brodie. 

From the President to Brodie of Brodie, dated from Edinburgh 8th July 
1746 ("Culloden Papers" CCCXXXII) 

My very good Lord Lyon, 

I am obliged to you for yours of the 1st inst. I think our 
Ministers do well in not precipitating the projected Bills, which 
I understand are intended for preventions of any future Rebel- 
o 



114 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

lion, until the projects are well weighed, & so adjusted as to have 
the Effect without doing any considerable Mischief. I am not 
satisfied that what I have heard spoken of, relating to the Ward- 
holdings and jurisdictions could be of any great Service. The 
Meeting-house Bill bids fair to put an end to a practice, illegal in 
itself, which had been attended with bad Consequences. The 
most important Medicine for the Evil under which the Nation 
has so long suffered, & from which it has lately been in so great 
Danger, is the Disarming Bill; which I am told is ordered to be 
brought in. If this Bill is properly framed, & the due Execution 
of it judiciously provided for, it may be of infinite service; as it 
must in time make the Inhabitants of the Mountains as in- 
offensive & as little dangerous to the State, as their Neighbours 
in the Low Country; and I hope the Undertakers of this Bill know 
the Condition, the Temper, & the Manners of the Highlanders, 
together with the Defects of the former provisions, & the Ways 
of supplying them, well enough to enable them to make the 
Scheme now projected complete. 

With respect to the Bill for altering the Highland dress, 
which, if I understand any thing, is no more than a chip in 
porridge, which, without disarming, signifies not one halfpenny; 
and, an effectual Disarming supposed, is of no Sort of Incon- 
venience to the neighbouring Country or to the Government; I 
do not wonder that you, & a great many wise men where you 
are, who know nothing at all of the Matter, should incline to it. 
The Garb is certainly very loose, & fits Men inured to it, to go 
through great fatigues, to make very quick Marches, to bear out 
against the Inclemency of the Weather, to wade through Rivers, 
& shelter in Huts, Woods, & Rocks upon Occasion; which Men 
dress'd in the Low Country Garb could not possibly endure. 
But then it is to be considered, that as the Highlands are circun> 
stanced at present, it is, at least it seems to me to be, an utter 
Impossibility, without the advantage of this Dress, for the In- 
habitants to tend their Cattle, & to go through the other parts of 
their Business, without which they could not subsist; not to 
speak of paying Rents to their Landlords. Now, because too 
many of the Highlanders have offended, to punish all the rest who 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 115 

have not, and who I will venture to say are the greatest Number, 
in so severe a manner, seems to me unreasonable; especially as, 
in my poor Apprehension, it is unnecessary, on the supposal 
the disarming project be properly secured; and I must confess, 
that the Salvo which you speak of, of not suffering the Regula- 
tion to extend to the well-affected Clans, is not to my taste; 
because, tho' it would save them from Hardships, yet the mak- 
ing so remarkable a Distinction would be, as I take it, to list 
all those on whom the Bill should operate for the Pretender; 
which ought to be avoided if possible. It is for these reasons, 
which my Occupations make it impossible for me to explain at 
length, that I wish this Clause might be dropp'd; the rather that 
if any Reasons of State, which I cannot judge of, because I have 
not been acquainted with them, make it necessary, a Bill to that 
purpose might be contrived, with much less harm to innocent 
persons than probably the framers of this project have thoughts 
of. 

I cannot possibly take time to say any more than that. 

I am, etc. 

With reference to MacLeod's letter of 21st June and enclosure, the 
President on 12th July wrote as follows: 

Endorsed: Copy Lo. President to Mr [Henry] Fox, Secretary of 
War. 

Edinburgh 12th July 1746. 
Sir, 

The Letter you did me the honour to write to me of the 3rd inst, 
has been delivered to me and I with pleasure lay hold of the 
opportunity you give me of renewing former acquaintance, even 
by this way of Correspondence, tho' I must confess I little 
dreamed the subject of it should be proper to the War Office, 
not that I ever doubted your talents would raise you to that, and 
to higher employments, but it could never enter into my head, 
that my stars would be so whimsical, as to lead me out of my 
profession, into one, so foreign to it, and that should make it 
necessary for me to correspond with a Secretary of War, in his 
office. Since that however has been my fate, I am very glad 
to see, that office filled by a man whose Accuracy and attention 



116 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

promises great advantage to the Country in preventing unneces- 
sary expences, at a season when frugality is so essentially neces- 
sary for the Nation, and whose Indulgence for a stranger to the 
Trade, will make him listen with patience to what I may offer, 
in support of my opinion however ignorantly expressed. 

The question to be resolved is whether the establishment 
for the 18 Companys, raised by me, is or is not to have a date 
anterior to the Delivery of the Commissions upon their Com- 
pany's being compleat to the Officers, in consideration of Levy 
money, or what is the same thing the expense the Officers were 
put to in bringing their men together equiping them, and en- 
tertaining them, until they shewed at Inverness compleat. You 
seem to think that no consideration is due, and I on the other 
hand, am at present of opinion, that some, without determining 
what, is due, and I am confident you will weigh the motives 
which induce me to be of that opinion, without suspecting that 
I have anything in view further than justice and regard to his 
Majesty's Service should there be any occasions for Levies of this 
kind hereafter which God forbid. 

That I may not be too tedious I refer to my Letter of the 12th 
June, to George Ross, which you have seen, and shall begin 
with acquainting you that so soon as the Blank Commissions 
came to my hand, I acquainted the Gentlemen that were to raise 
so many Companys, as I then had occasion for, that they were to 
pick up and have in readiness, the men that were to compose 
their companys against the time that I should call for them, 
which was done accordingly. Now tho' I could not order the 
Companys to march to Inverness, until I was supplied with some 
money and arms, to supply and employ them, It is manifest 
their officers must have been at considerable expense, to enter- 
tain and Encourage them to be ready on a call, and in fact 
several of those Companys, particularly those that came from 
the He of Sky, were kept together for some weeks, before they 
came to Inverness to have their Commissions delivered to them, 
and, as this was the Case, I believe you will with me, think it 
hard if the officers have no allowance anterior to the delivery of 
their Commissions. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 117 

As this was the case of several of those Companys it was the 
case of all, that these officers to enable them to take the Field, 
were obliged to furnish them with such little pieces of Dress, 
and Highland Accoutrements, as they wanted, to make them 
appear in some sort uniform, and as these expenses must have 
come out of the officers Pockets, it seems reasonable they should 
have some satisfaction. 

You observe very properly that the Dependence which High- 
landers have on their Chiefs might facilitate the filling up these 
Companys without Levy Money, and it is undoubtedly so, for 
without that, no Levy Money however high, could when the Re- 
bellion had got to such a height, that all Communication with 
the Southern part of the Island was cut off, have brought together 
so many hundred men, on so short notice. But then, as those, 
who were employed in these Companys were picked men, in 
all senses the fittest for Service, it is obvious that many of them 
might be made willing by Deuceurs of some kind or another. 

And tho' in most cases the inclination of the Chiefs facilitated 
the Levys, yet in some particularly in that of McLeod of Genzies, 
skill and industry as well as expense were necessary. 

McDonald of Barrisdale whom you may have heard of, hav- 
ing some Estate in Assint Marched thither to levy a Company 
for the Pretender, Finding the People unwilling to Rebell, he 
began to use force and they fled to the Mountains of the Neigh- 
bouring Country. Hearing of this I sent Mr McLeod of Geanzies 
who had interest with them, to encourage them to keep together 
and to resist the violence offered, in this he succeeded, and the 
Company which Barrisdale intended for the Pretender, was 
hoisted out of his hands, and employed very profitably for his 
Majesty's Service. In this case you would I believe think it hard 
to give captain McLeod of Geanzies no consideration for all the 
Expenses of Levying this Company. I mention this particular 
to show you, that the making no allowance would in some cases 
be attended with complaint. This case it is true is pretty par- 
ticular, but in every one if it were proper to enter into a Detail 
of circumstances I could shew that the officers have been 
more or less out of pocket. As to what you mention, 



118 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

concerning the Noblemens Regiments raised in Eng- 
land and the Campbells that were brought together 
in Scotland the allowances made to the first I am 
utterly a stranger to, .... It is very probable these Noble- 
men have made no demand on the Grown, for the large expense 
it must have cost them, but I doubt, whether that is a precedent, 
that the officers of the Gompanys, whose wealth is not very con- 
siderable, ought to follow. The Campbells were called out on 
the Foot of Militia, without any Regular Commissions from the 
Grown, were subsisted during their Service, and then dismissed, 
In the same manner that E. Loudoun and I, when the Service re- 
quired it, called out, armed and subsisted, at different times, 
several Hundreds of Earl Sutherland, Lord Reay, Sir Alexander 
Macdonald and McLeod's men, besides the Independent Com- 
panys, and discharged them without any further payment, when 
the occasion for such service ceased. But that will not apply 
to the case of men, that have been listed and dressed for the 
King's Service. 

Those Sir are part of the considerations that move me to 
think that Justice requires some satisfaction should be made to 
the officers, for expense incurred by them anterior to the de- 
livering to them, their commissions. As I am entirely ignorant 
of the Rules and Practice of the Army on such matters, I stated 
the case to His Royal Highness the Duke at Inverness, before I 
made out the certificate relating to those commissions, and it was 
his opinion I should certify the special matter, that is the dates 
of Delivering the Commissions, expressing at the same time his 
sentiments, that the Companys would according to custom, be 
put on the establishment, at some reasonable period, earlier than 
the date of showing their Gompanys compleat, what that Period 
should be, I shall not take upon me to say, but as the Services of 
these Officers was, if I may be permitted to judge, very season- 
able, they ought not to meet with any discouragement. I am 
very sure very few of them have had many Comfortable night's 
lodgings, since their commissions was delivered to them, I can 
scarcely say they had any before I left them and their ease has 
not been greater since. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 119 

The Duke was also pleased to approve of my raising those 
Companys at Hundreds, whilst the Service required such 
numbers, and it was his intention to reduce them to seventys so 
soon the higher numbers could be dispensed with, that reduc- 
tion took place some time in June, I believe about midsummer, 
but of this doubtless you will have the regular signification. 

I am sorry to find that the Lords of the Treasury, imagine 
that his Royal Highness subsisted those Companys, and in that 
opinion have been too sparing in putting money to account, of 
their subsistance, into the hands of their Agent, which may oc- 
casion considerable inconveniencys. But I should hope, that you 
knowing what is certainly true, that the Duke has issued no sub- 
sistance to them hitherto, that inconvenience will be obviated 
for the future. 

I doubt I have given you by a great deal too much work to 
read this very wretched scrawl of mine, I am thoroughly con- 
vinced your Scruples proceed from a principle of Justice and 
Frugality, which I heartily wish every officer in Stations such 
as you possess, were filled with, and I hope you will do me the 
Justice to believe, that no mean or partial view influences the 
opinion which I freely delivered to you. As I have had the 
honour to have received a Letter from Mr Pelham, on the same 
subject, I shall take the Liberty to refer him to what I write to 
you, and I therefore beg the favour that you will be so good as 
to shew him this. I doubt not I am trespassing on the Rules of 
Good Breeding by making a request so familiar, but you will be 
so good as to pardon a man of my Profession for Errors of that 
kind. I shall detain you no longer, then till I have assured you, 
that I am with perfect esteem 

Sir Your most obedient and most humble servant 

D. F. 

From the President to the Duke of Newcastle dated from Edinburgh 
19 June 1746. 

My Lord, 

My Brethren the Judges of the Court of Session, have directed 
me to lay before your Grace, a circumstance that gives them no 
small concern, it is that four of their numbers are now so indis- 



120 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

posed that the Court has not at present the benefite of their 
Attendance, nor can they hope to have it for some time, which 
considering the vacancy that happened by the Death of the late 
Lord Balmerino, reduces their number to ten, of these, nine 
must necessarily be present together, in the Court of Session to 
constitute a Quorum, without which the Court can do no 
judicial Act, and one must attend in what is called the Outer 
House, for the Dispatch of Business there. Thus if any of the 
Ten, should by sickness or any unforeseen accident, be disabled 
to attend, the whole Course of Justice in this part of the Nation, 
so far as depends upon the Court of Session, must be at a stand, an 
incident that has not happened, so far as we know within the 
Memorey of Man. To prevent such an interruption I am desired 
by the Court, to represent to your Grace the Expediency of mov- 
ing his Majesty, to name as soon as conveniently may be, a Judge, 
to supply the place of the late Lord Balmerino, which would 
obviate the inconveniency dreaded, and leave no Room for com- 
plaint, should the accidental ill state of health, of any more of 
the Judges, prevent the Course of Justice. I am persuaded your 
Grace will approve of the Liberty the Court takes, of giving this 
hint which is for his Majesty's Service, as well as for that of the 
Country, and that you will look upon me, as you have always 
done, to be Your Graces most obedt and most 

humble servant 

To tliis the Duke replied 3rd July ("Culloden Papers" GCCXXX) in- 
timating the appointment of Robert Craigie, the Lord Advocate, to the 
vacancy, and at the same time congratulating the President upon his 
efforts in suppressing the Rising. 

His Royal Highness the Duke has upon all occasions done ample 
justice to the active and unwearied zeal your Lordship has shown 
for promoting His Majesty's Service and for defeating and dis=- 
appointing the views and designs of the Rebels. I have already, 
by the King's order, expressed to His Royal Highness His 
Majesty's entire satisfaction in your Lordship's conduct; and it 
is with great pleasure I take this opportunity of assuring you, 
that the King has the truest sense of the great and useful services 
your Lordship has performed in this critical conjuncture. 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 121 

A fortnight later the President wrote to Andrew Mitchell that he had 
done his duty but that he was 

under very great concern for this unhappy country, which is like 
to suffer, for crimes it is not guilty of, and seems in its distress 
to have no eye to pity it, nor hand ready to interpose for its relief. 

If necessary, in spite of the danger of obtruded advice, he would 
come south. ("Historical Papers," Spalding Club, i, 328). 

That he was not insensible to attacks which had been made upon 
him appears by the following. 

My dear Lord. 

I shewed the letter which I had the honour to receive from you 
of the 12th instant to my Uncle [John Scrope, Secretary to the 
Treasury,] who was extremely surprised at the contents of it, 
not being conscious to himself that he has given any occasion 
for what is therein suggested. He had a Letter from your 
Lordship from Inverness, and he did not sleep till he had pro- 
cured an order for the money you desired, tho' Mr Pelhain 
had not then received your Letter to him. As to the other 
things which were contained in the letter, you being come 
from Inverness, he did not think there was any occasion of 
writing any thing by the post, not knowing whether it would 
be prudent to express himself so freely as you would have ex- 
pected. Besides he was informed that you was coming to Town 
and he thought these things were fitter to be talked of by the 
fireside. He directs me to assure you that there is no friend 
of his, but what approves of your resolution and bravery and 
if anybody that he knows has any other thoughts they would 
not he is sure venture to say so to him. I beg to assure your 
Lordship that I am with perfect regard and esteem 

My Lord 

Your Lops most faithful and 
Obed humble servant 

Hen. Fane. 

The following (" Culloden Papers,' 1 GCCXXXVI.) from Sir Alex- 
ander Macdonald to the President, dated from Fort-Augustus, 29th 



122 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

July 1746, concerns Flora Macdonald and Alexander Macdonald of 
Kingsburgh. Other relative correspondence is in " Culloden Papers," 
CCCXXXV., GCGXXXVII., GGCXLII. 

My Lord, 

As my campaigning is now at an end, and begun under your 
inspection, you might reasonably expect from me some Ac- 
count of that part of it which has passed since we parted ; but 
your Lordship will forgive me, as I am no good Historian, and 
take it in scraps as I have the pleasure to chat with you some- 
times when we meet. One thing I will venture to give you a 
minute detail of ; the misfortune of Kingsborrow, now sent a 
prisoner to Edinr. When the young Pretender made his un- 
happy visit to Skye, from South Uist, in a small boat, he landed 
near my house, in woman's clothes, by way of being maid- 
servant to one Florence Macdonald, a Girl of Clanranald's 
family, now a prisoner with General Campbell. Miss Mac- 
donald went and made a visit to Lady Margaret, dined with her, 
and put her into the utmost distress by telling her of the Cargo 
that she had brought from Uist. She called on Kingsborrow, 
who was at Mugstot accidentally, and they had a very confused 
consultation together; and it was agreed to hurry him off the 
Country as fast as possible. The method Kingsborrow took 
was, to meet him about two miles from my house, in the way 
to his own. He (the Pretender) accosted him with telling him 
that his life was now in his hands, which he might dispose of ; 
that he was in the utmost distress, having had no meat or sleep 
for two days and two nights, sitting on a Rock beat upon by 
the rains; and when they ceased, ate up by flys; conjured him 
to shew compassion but for one night, and he should be gone. 
This moving speech prevailed, and the visible distress, for he 
was maigre ill coloured, and overrun with the scab ; so they 
went to Kingsborrow' s house, where he lay that night ; and he 
furnished him a horse to carry him seven miles next day 
to Portree. There he found, accidentally, a small Rasay boat, 
into which he put foot and disappeared all at once. A few 
days after, Genl. Campbell came to my house, which Captain 
Ferguson had already searched. Kingsborrow \vas called upon 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 123 

to assist in tracing the Pretender, which he undertook to do as 
far as he could, and told the General, that he had seen him, 
but in such misery that he could not lay hands on him ; and 
the General promised not to discover what he had done. 
Kingsborrow was active to the General's satisfaction ; but the 
Bird was flown, and had got to the main land. The Women 
about Kingsborrow's house, being examined, discovered the 
Pretender had been there. When I went to wait of General 
Campbell, he told me he could not be answerable not to secure 
him, on the evidence of the women ; but that he should have 
his choice either to remain a prisoner with him, or go with me 
to the Duke, and that he would write to His Royal Highness 
in his favours. Kingsborrow chose to come to this place, and 
got the General's letter, which he read to us and sealed. On 
arriving here, the Duke ordered Sir Everard Fawkener to ex- 
amine him ; and since, he has been confined, and now sent to 
Edinr. I used my little Rhetoric with the Duke .; but he stopt 
my mouth, by saying, that this man had neglected the greatest 
piece of Service that could have been done ; and if he was to be 
pardoned, you have too much good sense to think this the 
proper time; as it would encourage others to follow his example. 
I need not tell your Lordship how much I am concerned for 
the man's misfortune ; nor need I beg your assistance in a thing 
I have so much at heart as the Safety of this man, because I 
have always found you friendly in every thing tnat concerned 
me. I am with the usual attachment, 

My Dear Lord, Yours, 

Alexr. Macdonald. 

Along with this is a scrawl from my wife, who does not know 
that her name has been mentioned. 



(5) STATE OF INVERNESS (AUGUST 1746-JANUARY 1747). 
From John Hossack to the President, dated from Inverness, 9th August 

1746. 
My Lord, 

If any humanity remains, if any regard to the principles, which 
make his majesty beloved by his subjects, your Lordships solici- 



124 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

tude for the publick, will be greatly entertained bv the Friends 
of Liberty. Your Lordship smothered the Rebellion and pro- 
cured Glory to the Duke of Cumberland, its suitable to your 
Lordships Benevolence to have several sharers in your eminent 
services as you have reformed many persons of distinction, they 
are now taught by experience, and when they may dare to 
speak may confess their holdings are due to your Lordship. 

Your Lordship must look for innumerable solicitations, one 
I forward enclosed from Colonel Wedderburn. Many 
persons were led blindly into the Rebellion, through infatuation, 
who could not even then excuse their conduct. Sir John Wed- 
derburn I believe is one, his numerous family will excite pity. 

Yesterday two Regiments have quartered themselves in the 
Town, we are all accounted Rebells, we have no persons to 
complain to, nor do we expect redress. Lord Albemarle's 
movement from Fort Augustus is putt off, Bread and forage is 
again demanded from this. Old Glengarry, and old Clan- 
ranald, are brought to Fort Augustus and detained. Baris- 
dale was last Sunday overnight there, Lord Albemarle saw him 
twice, thereafter Glengarry was taken up. Sir Alexander Mac- 
donald went yesterday from here for Sky. I have wrote the 
gentlemen who assisted your Lop. with their money the time of 
the Rebellion of your readiness to pay them. Some of them 
can want payment and perhaps choose it till Mertinmass but 
whats most convenient for your Lop. would be to me a direc- 
tion if I knew it. [Campbell of] Delnies sent me your Lops, 
bills discharged : if Mr. Thos. Brody has been paid his letter of 
receipt to Delnies should have been sent me. John Rigg will 
follow the direction given him. I believe Alexr. Brody will 
take or forbear payment: its probable David Falconer will ex- 
pect payment here because he was advertised your Lop. has 
paid Geo. Dunbar 80. William Fraser will not I believe 
choose to be paid but at a term. Mr. Robt. Dunbar and Mr 
Patrick Grant do not desire to be paid. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 125 

May your Lop. assist with Councills that will to conviction 
over ballance all opposition. You have the prayers of all good 
men. My Lord 

Your Lops, most faithful Servant 

John Hossack. 

Endorsed : " Relating to the Ruines of the House at the Kirk by the 
Military," and addressed to Mr Thomas Stewart [factor] at Cul- 
loden. 

Sir, 

I can give you little satisfaction with respect to the House you 
write of. The Military Gentlemen require that of the Magi- 
strates which they can neither grant nor refuse, all is done by 
their superior power. I viewed that House some time ago and 
observed the Guard, which is daily changed had be#un to do 
considerable damage. They have now done all that could be 
done, except to allow the Roof to stand upon it, which cannot be 
long. They have taken away all the timber, Lintels, from 
windows, Doors and Chimneys, and window casements, they 
have raised and taken away all the deal floors, they have taken 
away all the joists, and they have taken away the 
Balks of the roof. The Sidewall in which were 
the Doors and windows, by the taking away the 
Lintels and iron stanchions must fall, and the roof 
of course, so that you have no more than Rubbish. But 
unless you order the accesses to be closed up with dry stones, thf; 
whole timber of the roof will be soon carryed away, and they 
have removed themselves to another Guard House. My Lord 
President is not the only person who has met with auch useage. 
Indeed I can give you no advice tho' some time or another these 
damages may be enquired after. In the meantime, there ought 
to be an examination upon oath, taken of the condition the House 
was in when the Guard entered, and of the condition to which 
its now reduced, that so the damage may appear I am 

Sir 
Your Most humble Servant 

John Hossack, 
Inverness 26th September 1746, 



126 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Draft, endorsed: From Tho Magistrates of Inverness to the Lord Justice 
Clerk. 

Inverness Novr. HkG. 
My Lord 

When the Important affairs which your Lordship has in Charge, 
do not abate your particular regard, We are thankful to God 
for the Instrument and pray for the support of your Lordship. 

We have a sensible feeling, of the dangers to which the Con- 
stitution, our Religion, Rights and Liberties were exposed by 
this late unnatural Rebellion and the Deliverance so near us, 
gave us greater cause of thankfulness for the Instruments that 
God hade employed than more distant parts could be touched 
with. We have not yet felt the immediate effects of our deliver- 
ance, but as we look upon our Grievances to be of short duration, 
we were not willing to complain, 

We were thankful to your Lordship for giving us an oppor- 
tunity to acquit ourselves, of the undue Chairge against us, for 
our being contemptuous of His Majesty's Troops and of that 
power and authority which became us to exercise as Magistrates. 
But the case will appear to your Lordship in another Light when 
we tell you that we have not since the Battle of Gulloden, been 
allowed but a restrained Exercise of the Power of Magistrates. 
With respect to the quartering the Troops they have with their 
Quarter Masters quartered themselves. They have made the 
after Chainge in the Quartering and the many Grievances must 
have been made by the inhabitants, the Magistrates could not 
redress them and they received as little from Officers. 

We have not the Command of a Prison, Tolbooth, Court- 
house or Town House. The Town Hall is taken for the Main 
Guard, the Town Clerk's Office, for the officers of the Guard, 
and the Guildery Room above it for Orderly Serjeants and we are 
reduced to a Spinning School in that House for Publick Meetings 
and Town and County Courts. A Guard House which hade 
neen used for the Military Troops ana the night watches of the 
Burgers before the memorey of men now living was pulled down 
and demolished by order. 

They required Coal & Candle for their several Guards, which 
for some time we resisted because it was not due from us, but 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 121 

apprehending the Refusal might effect the inhabitants in their 
Private Interests, we submitted, taking an Aid from Mr Cheap, 
from what fund, or from what cause we do not pretend to Judge. 
They have required 15 Sentinel Boxes, which have been made 
for them. These are parts of the burden brought upon the 
Towns small Revenue which it cannot support. Some of the 
Best Houses have been used as Hospitals for the sick, the wains- 
cotting and partitions pulled down and distroyed, all the con- 
venient stabling in Town, taken and employed, which deprives 
many of their means of Living. The commissaries for bread 
and forage took possession of the great Floors and Lofts, depriv- 
ing many of the exercise of their Traffic, and without the cer- 
tain hopes of redress for them. My Lord, this short summary 
we lay before your Lordship, not as Grievances for Redress, but 
to shew how little cause there was of complaint against us, 
We forbear to trouble your Lordship with the grievances of some 
private Families who as we could give them no redress, went 
without it. 

An instance has been quoted to your Lordship, of Mr Rose. 
An officer and his lady were quartered upon him, not by us, 
they got possession but not in a way which was agreeable to 
him. For the officer and his Lady hade their Passage through 
Mr Rose's bedroom and as the House did not afford them suffi- 
cient accommodation, they took a lodging and Mr Rose pro- 
vided them with Bed and Bed room furniture. We can not My 
Lord recollect an instance of any of our people's leaving the 
Town except Evan Baillie of Aberiachan, who took, and occu- 
pies both House and Farm,- in the neighbourhood. The House 
he rented in Town must be his till Whitsunday, and the same 
quartering which was upon him, remains in his House with 
necessary accomodation. 

We have been often told that we were all Rebells, which we 
know was given to excuse many a complaint, and therefore gave 
us no concern because we were not known to the gentlemen. 
Your Lordship is known to the disposition of the administra- 
tion of this Town, for many years, the persons that were in it 
were abhorrors of Jacobites and Popery, and Arbitary Govern- 



128 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

ment and have blessed God for a Glorious Revolution, and which 
we now do. Nothing in our Power to give your Lordship satis- 
faction, Nothing which your Lordship will be pleased to point to 
us as our Duty will be omitted, So far as it can be executed 
by us. 

The "Mr Cheap" of the above letter was probably George Cheap, 
who wrote to John Mackintosh, merchant, Inverness, 11 June 1747, 
requesting him to get an inventory and valuation of Government stores 
at Inverness and to inform General Blakeney that he (Cheap) had been 
appointed to survey and value all the Government stores in Scotland, 
selling what was not fit for the army. On the same day John Mac- 
kenzie of Delvine wrote to the same John Mackintosh, introducing "My 
good friend Mr Cheap General Guest's correspondent" (Fraser-Mackin- 
tosh MSS., Register House). 

From the Magistrates of Inverness to tho President dated from Inverness 
9 January 1747. 

My Lord, 

There is not any thing that can give concern or uneasiness to 
your Lordship but will be grievous to us, nor that we wou'd 
not endeavour to remove, more especially if it was chargeable 
to ourselves. Misunderstanding betwixt the Troops and us 
may have been justly represented to your Lordship and shou'd 
have proceeded from us, But so tender have we been of giving 
Cause of uneasiness or complaining of any irregular conduct 
in the Troops that we have bore all patiently believing that as 
this is the only town in Great Britian that does not share in 
the Priviledges of our Happy constitution we might soon be on 
a footing with other dutiful Subjects. We have not hitherto 
heard of any particular complaint (besides that which we are 
to mention) led against us but the Common Ephithet which 
many of the Military People give to the Inhabitants, when they 
are at all checked in excesses, of their being Rebels which serves 
them in great stead. 

My Lord Justice Clerk did us the honour lately to acquaint 
us, that he had heard of misunderstandings particularly in the 
Quartering here which we supose proceeded from the informa- 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 129 

tion which had been given to the Earl of Albermarle and since 
our answer to his Lordship's Letter we have not heard thereof. 
We are at a loss how to answer your Lop's Expectation because 
we know not one particular required of us by the Troops here 
that was not comply'd with. They had not indeed any par- 
ticulars to ask of us as they saved the trouble to themselves, 
Coal and candle we submitted to for the time in the manner 
we acquainted the Lord Justice Clerk, Fifteen Gentinel boxes 
were made for them, They have quartered themselves officers, 
soldiers, servants, wives, horses and dogs. Their officers do 
all feed together in messes in Private Houses which requires all 
the conveniences of the Houses, Kitchen, Furniture, etc. They 
have taken for their main-guard our Town Hall, Town Clerks 
Office and Guildry Room and pulled down the old Guard house 
in the Market Place. We have no Tolbooth Court House or 
Prison. The soldiers generally the greatest rogues in the 
British Army. They have taken away all the Portable timber 
that cou'd be found, gates and doors from Enclosures and Gar- 
dens, from all the old houses, even a door from the Church 
and dug lintals and joists out of the Stone Walls, Broke down 
the Sepulchers of the Dead, they have carried off Plows and 
Plow-Irons out of the Corn-fields, Roots and Herbage from the 
Common Gardens, Broke down Enclosures and Fences, Corns 
from Cornyards, a shop immediately opposite to the Main guard 
pillaged of Sundry valuable Merchandise by soldiers lodged 
about it, several articles were found in their custody and with 
others they sold them to : And tho the Causes of Punishment are 
little known to us yet we see Two Three Five whipped every 
other day nay Seventeen at once. What we Express generally 
is for Information to your Lop. Besides all this our Town is 
reduced to the greatest misery for lack of fire and meal. No 
Inhabitant dare presume to buy a Cart of Peats in the Market, 
Meal comcing to Market is carried off ere it reach the Meal 
House and even that which is brought there is so crowded with 
Soldiers that an Inhabitant cant get a Grain unless ther's 
quantity enough to .answer their Immediate Demands which 
rarely happens. Many good families are oblig'd to send to 



130 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

the Country and when they have got a Servant's burden must 
come into Town by By-ways. General Blackney in concert with 
us proposed to remedy this inconveniency but has not had 
Effect, The Soldiers stroll thro the Fields in the Country day 
and night and under pretext of searching for illicide goods search 
all the Loads that come into Town, even some officers do with 
their swords pearce the straw Loads in the Market Place. Nor 
do we hear that this strolling and night ambuling has been dis- 
couraged. On the contrarie some soldiers who were twixt Ten 
and Eleven O'clock at night found lurking at the Carse were by 
Merchants who landed there from the Country brought to the 
Main Guard, but instead of Thanks Capt. Dunlope the Officer 
of the Guard answered that he woud support the Soldiers who 
had not one word to say in Excuse for themselves, and accord- 
ingly next Morning General Blackney sent to the Provost to re- 
quire him to imprison those Merchants, which was comply'd 
with to prevent other Usage, And after thirty-six hours Confine- 
ment and upon their taking guilt to themselves, Genrl Blackney 
consented to their Liberation but with the threatening that if 
any Inhabitants did meddle with Soldiers he woud give it in 
Orders that the Soldiers shoud Run them thorow. 

As to the affair of John Anderson a farmer of the Towns 
Customs (which has given Uneasiness to your Lop.), We think 
the Military Gentlemen were not called to interfier in the pro- 
ceedings of the Magistrats in a Judicial Manner with their In- 
habitants, Expediency and prudence as well as Justice made 
it Necessary for the Magistrates to regard the complaint of 
Lachlan Mclntosh which had made a Noise over the Country, 
otherwise we could not expect to save our Inhabitants from 
starving for Want of bread, for no Countrymen woud expose 
their Meal to the Highway leading to the Town nor coud he 
Expect even Sixpense for the Peck in the Rude manner in which 
he must be used while he is dispensing of it. 

The Present Case my Lord is That Lachlan Mclntosh in 
Gallcantra an Honest and Useful Man who had brought some 
Suply of Meal to the Town did send Three Horses and two Ser- 
vants with Eight bolls of Meal to the House of Hugh Rose on the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 131 

High Road below the House of Castle hill there to ly till he 
brought as much more, when himself or His wife woud attend 
the Sale of it, One of the Witnesses in the Process Alexr 
Young did occasionally see Lachlan Mclntosh, who .told him 
he was to send Meal to the Town and that he had just then sent 
a part of it to Hugh Roses House to wait for the other parcele 
which he wanted to have at Hand, This Young told he'ed get a 
good price and woud apprise his Neighbours, which he accord- 
ingly did, and amongst others Alexr McKenzie, one of the 
Farmers of the Towns Customs, who directly informed his 
Partner John Anderson and they [persuaded] that Lachlan 
Mclntosh was intended to deprive them of the Towns Custom, 
Were resolved to be avenged on him, and the said Anderson in 
his Drunkeness brought Young his Informer with him to the 
Mainguard to acquaint the Officer of Meals Lying below Castle- 
hill to be convey'd to the Rebells, and thereafter the said And- 
erson went to bed. When the officer of the Guard had repre- 
sented and had got orders they sent to Anderson's House to 
bring him to be their guide, the Messenger got access to 
Anderson's House tho Late but as Drink had rendered him 
unable he said he woud not attend them before Morning and 
accordingly he and his Partner attended the Party to the House 
of Hugh Rose. The Party first searched Rose' House then 
requir'd the key of the Barn which he directly opened to them 
and where in One End Nothing was but the Eight bolls of Meal 
and three sheaves of Oats saved for a Stall'd cow, lying on the 
tops of the Baggs, the Party carried off the Meal and it was 
ordered into Custody here but no Enquiry was made about it 
nor of forty-one bolls taken from the People of Killiehuiman 
[Fort-Augustus.] Upon the Hearing whereof Lachlan Mclntosh 
carne to Town took assistance to have a Petition writt addressed 
to General Blackney setting forth his case and craving his meal 
might be restored or a Price paid him for it, which petition he 
delivered to the Genl but did not receive a Satisfactory answer; 
As L. Mclntosh who deals partly on Credite coud not long ly out 
of his money and being acquainted that Anderson had given a 
Malicious information he was advised to give in his complaint 



132 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

and claim before the Magistrals and as they could not deny a 
Hearing, the said L. Mclntosh supported his complaint as apears 
by the Process, first by Anderson's subscribed acknowledgment 
next by Young's deposition who was Anderson's Informer, from 
the Tenor of which it appears the Information proceeded from 
ill-will, and also from the deposition of Wm Cranston to whom 
the complainer had declar'd the same purpose and all supported 
by the Deposition of the Complainer. 

We have taken Declarations in further Evidence that the 
Gomplainer had petitioned Genrl Blackney and that the Meal 
was not concealed in the place where it lay, which is all that 
appear'd to us necessary to give your Lordship satisfaction, and 
we doubt not but your Lop will believe that the proceedings in 
the Court were fair and Candid which many witnesses can 
attest if they are required, and besides the Justice that was due 
to the Gomplr it was necessary to apprise the Country that the 
Magistrates woud not Wink at the Injuries which their Inhabit- 
ants might attempt to do to the Country. We believe Anderson's 
chief motive arose from his Interest which he believed was in- 
tended to be hurt and the miserable situation of the Town made 
it apparently necessary to proceed as has been done. 

From the whole of this tedious narration your Lordship will 
see what we and the Inhabitants do bear without Complaint and 
thereby how Injurious the Military Gentlemen are in their Com- 
plaints, A Goppy of the process was some time agone given to 
Genii Blackney and now a coppy of the Declarations which we 
transmit to your Lordship. 

We believe Genii Blackney might be easier dealt with had 
he not Persons about him that put matters in a false Light, par- 
ticularly Captain Dunlope a Scots man who pretends to know 
our Laws but takes them up at the Wrong End, if Military Law 
was considered by him he woud create Less trouble. We have 
served Genl Blackney with a Goppy of this Letter because it is 
intended for Information and not Complaint. 

Your Lordship cant miss to know that the Town under its 
Late incumbrances had been pillaged of their bed plaids and 
Blankets which made it necessary for us to have applyd the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. i& 

Justices of the Peace for their order on some parts of the County 
to bring in certain numbers of Plaids for the Use of the Troops, 
it was comply'd pretty well with except Strathspey (in the 
County) which had absolutely refused, upon which we apply 'd to 
Genl Blackney for a small party to suport the Peace Constables, 
the Genl refused, Lately one of the Quartermasters desired the 
Magistrates to provide Blanketting for 300 Recruits that were 
soon expected upon which the Justices order on Strathspey was 
renewed and a Peace officer sent therewith but to no effect, 
whereupon one of the Magistrates in that Emergency upply'd 
Genl Blackney again but he then also refused and answered that 
we ought to Provide. 

We are most Dutifully 

My Lord 

Your Lordship's most Faithful, most Obed. and most 
Humble Servants 
Jo Fraser 

Will Mclntosh Will Mackintosh 
James Fraser Robert Rose 

From John Hossack to the President dated from Inverness 10th January 
1747. 

My Lord, 

Our Magistrates are thankful to God for their access to your 
Lordship & your constant wafchfullness over the poor country, 
their backwardness to complain, and their dread from the sus- 
pension of common right, may have contributed much to the 
arbitrary proceedings of the Military people here, But especially 
the weakness of the Commander, led intirely by the advice of the 
most unrulie sett for most part of officers, that ever were in one 
society. Our Magistrates have no familiarity with the General, 
if any do go to him upon occasional matters they stand for the 
minutes they are speaking & part. And if any private person do 
go with a grievance, he's assured, I can do nothing till I receive 
E Albemarle's direction, sometimes, I know you to be a Rebell, 
The poor prisoners, some of whom innocent are not allowed to 
receive Charity, but in a concealed way, no access to any, but 
when a Captain of the Guard, of a moderate disposition happens 



134 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

to be on duty. [Eraser of] Castleleathers compt and reckoning 
for his intromission with the Lord Lo\at's labourings goes on 
before the Sheriff, his commission recorded in the minutes of 
the Court is the same as the coppie enclosed and a coppie of the 
Magistrals letter to the Lord Justice Clerk as they corrected it. 
Thomas Stewart is not so bad at all as he had been but is better 
and worse. Doctor Fraser is at Gordonstown where the children 
are in the smallpox, he sent for Doctor Clerk's letter as he could 
not so soon leave that place. 

I pray your Lordship would take care of that health which 
all good men pray may be continued. 

I am, My Lord, 
Your Lordship's most faithfull Servant 

John Hossack. 

The tone of these letters is necessarily restrained; the actual hard- 
ships endured were probably greater than the words convey. But for 
the atrocities committed by the Government and by its troops, the Forty- 
five might well have sunk to its proper level in history; even the Presi- 
dent's sister, Mrs Fraser of Achnagairn, who certainly had no Jacobite 
leanings could write (17 May 1746) to her friend, the Rev. David Ross, 
minister of Tarbet 

For instance the president his people are quite beggared by 
plundering them by the Troops, and my daughter has not a room 
in her own house but a very small garet, nor has the honest man 
the provost one place to bow his knee in save one room to make 
ready his victuals and lie in. Provost Hosack was kicked and im- 
prisoned in the church amongst the vilest rascality they had 
there; so was James Murray. In a word time would fail me to 
write of all the hardships the most firm are trysted with, and 
how long this kind of thing may continue is what none knows. 
All these mischiefs is not to be laid to th Duke's charge but to 
vile informers which they are daily plagued with. This country 
is so ruined first by that monster of men Lovat and next by the 
military and lastly by the Sutherlands the cruelties exercised on 
all that either were taken prisoners or gave themselves up is such 
as has made all the poor people in this; country fly, so that most of 
the country is leay. I sent down a young lad to stay a while at 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 135 

Tarbet whose innocency I can pretty well know to. He was 
Lovat's grieve at Tomich, and compelled to go with others as 
really forced, but took the very first opportunity to leave them 
as still having an aversion to the cause and their way. My con- 
cern for him arises from a persuasion that he is well inclined. 

I thought if your sister could afford him lodging 

for a few weeks it could not hurt her and it will oblige me, nor 
can I allow myself to believe that you, Dear Sir, would jelous 
my countenancing such as be without my having satisfying 
grounds for my doing it. If I were so minded there are objects 
not a few in this country but they do not, yea they dare not 
come near me more than they would come to their greatest 

enemy (Transactions of the Gaelic Society of 

Inverness Vol. XXVI.) 

A year later (April 1747) such words as these were common enough 
in ordinary correspondence "About this season of the year I creep silently 
out of the town in quest of health and spirits like a wounded rebell out of 
the field of Culloden" (Eraser-Mackintosh MSS. Register House). 

In spite of the epithet, "monster of men," applied to Lovat Lord 
Hardwicke wrote to the Duke of Newcastle, 4th September 1746, (New- 
castle Papers) that there were difficulties in getting a bill of indictment 
against him in Inverness-shire, where, although he was unpopular 
people would be in sympathy with him over a treason charge. 

(6) THE LORD PRESIDENT IN LONDON. 

The scarcity of family documents at this period makes it difficult to 
follow the President's own movements. That he was in London before 
26th August 1746 appears from a letter ("Newcastle Papers") of that date, 

wherein the writer states that he had not "yet seen the Pre 1 he being 

busy one day that I call'd and in the country the next." He was cer- 
tainly present as a witness at the examination of Sir John Cope on 1st 
September and following days ("Report of the Proceedings etc"- 
London 1749). 

It is generally supposed that he was received at Court and that 
Majesty turned his back on realising that Forbes was a greater patriot 
than a courtier. Certain it is, however, that he made every effort on 



136 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

behalf of his country and was consulted on more than one occasion. 

Writing on 1st September Lord Hardwicke told the Duke of Newcastle 

that 

The several points of public Business, which Your Grace 
enumerates are all material, but cannot all be immediately de- 
termined. That of the method of proceeding against Lord 
Lovat should indeed soon be so, because, if anything is to be done 
in Scotland, it ought immediately to be set on foot. It may also 
be necessary to have any Conference you intend with my Lord 
President of the Session pretty soon, because I suppose his stay 
here will not be much longer. However, as I purpose to stay 
in Town till towards the end of the next week, I shall have a 
full opportunity of receiving Your Grace's commands. (New- 
castle Papers). 

The following suggests that the President was not always in posses- 
sion of relative information. It is dated "Monday Forenoon" and ad- 
dressed to Andrew Stone, Private Secretary to the Duke of Newcastle. 

Sir 

As I am unwilling to take up your time by calling upon you I 
beg to know whether you have had any light, from Sir Everard 
Fawkener or any others, as to the names and numbers of the 
gentlemen who were concerned in the Rebellion, and who are 
not attainted or in custody. If I knew where I might meet you 
for five minutes, so as not to give interruption to Business, I 
should gladly call upon you. 

I am Sir 
Your most obedient humble servant 

Dun. Forbes. 

From Henry Pelham (correspondent not given) dated from Green- 
wich "8 o'clock in the morning, Monday." The letter is endorsed as 
September 29th [1746] (Newcastle Papers) 

Dear Sir 

You see by the date of my letter that I am an early man 
here and return letters as soon as I have read 'em. 

As Lord Chancellor does not come to town till this evening I 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 137 

conclude I shall not be wanted till to-morrow. I will certainly 
be in London by 8 o'clock to-morrow morning, and dine with 
my Brother [The Duke of Newcastle] afterwards, if he thinks 
proper. I suppose we shall meet to-morrow evening, if we do I 
desire you will send me word to my house that I may put off 
my long-winded friend Duncan [Forbes] till the next day for att 
present he stands appointed to come to me to-morrow in the 
evening at seven. 

I am Dear Sr 

ever yrs 

H. Pelham. 

The Lord Chancellor would appear to have paid more attention to 
the President's proposals than did the brothers Pelham. 

From Lord Hardwicke to the Duke of Newcastle dated from Powis 
House 23rd October 1746 "at night" (Newcastle Papers). 

My dear Lord 

d^^M 

*! 

Give me leave to mention one word to your Grace abt. our Friend 
Duncan's Proposal of a Declaration of a general Pardon, with 
Exceptions and limitations. I cannot yet say that I have form'd 
any opinion upon the Measure in general; but it comes into my 
mind that King James the 2d published a Proclamation or De- 
claration of that nature after Monmouth's Rebellion. This I 
am sure of, that the History says a General Pardon was pub- 
lished, and I cannot find any Act of Parliament for that purpose, 
or any Title of such an Act in the statute-book. It there was 
such a proclamation or Declaration, it will be found in the 
Council-books, and I wish Your Grace could order it to be looked 
out in a private manner, because it might possibly furnish some 
hints. I would myself cause it to be searched for, but that I 
cannot so well do it, without giving a handle to observations and 
Constructions. 

I am, my Dear Lord, 
Ever Yours 

Hardwicke. 



138 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

On 5th December the Lord Chancellor again wrote to the Duke of 
Newcastle, sending a copy of the projected bill concerning forfeitures in 
Scotland, which he asked might be passed on to the Lord Advocate, add- 
ing a postscript "Your Grace will have the goodness to remember not to 
mention my Lord President's name." The Lord Advocate was then 
William Grant, afterwards Lord Prestongrange. 

The President seems to have left London a few days later as appears 
by MacLeod's letter to him of 16th December, which follows later. 
From Andrew Mitchell to the President dated from London 26th Decem- 
ber 1746 (Part of "Gulloden Papers" GGGXL) 

My dear Lord, 

I had the honour of your's of the 16th, which gave me sincere 
pleasure; as 1 cou'd not avoid having u great anxiety about you, 
for attempting so long a journey in an untryed machine, and at 
so rude a Season of the Year: but I thank heaven, that you are 
got safe home, and have had spirits to bear the severe shock 
which the loss of so valuable a friend as Sir A. Macdonald must 
justly occasion. 

As to the affairs of Scotland, I am convinced that no Man in 
the Administration has had one serious thought about them since 
you left this place; one only excepted, whose labours 'for the 
good of his Country are incessant; but as he chuses to work in 
the dark, I can give no account of his progress, only that I fear he 
will be successfull. 

You have done an injury to Hercules [John Forbes, younger 
of Culloden] without intending it. Your motives of action are, 
to Ministers of State, incomprehensible. Take this for an Ex- 
ample, and be convinced: A Gentleman that I can trust, but who 
is unknown to your Lop, told me, he happened to be by when 
your Son was spoke of to Mr Pelham; and somebody said, he 
deserved a mark of the King's favour. Mr P. said, if you had a 
son, sure you must know him best; and, had he been fit for 
any thing, wou'd certainly have mentioned him, as he (Mr P.) 
and you were upon so good a footing. This is hard & unjust to 
poor Hercules, who will never be a discredit to any family; and 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 139 

it is a pity that the father's virtue should be imputed to the Son 
for folly. I, therefore, take the liberty to propose, that you 
should write a letter to Mr Pelham, to be delivered by Hercules, 
& to serve as an Introduction. I will go along with him, or any 
other of your friends that you please to name; and I need not 
add, that you will take no notice of the fact above mentioned. 

Another thing is likewise fit that you shou'd know, because 
the Parties concerned imagine you have done them ill offices. 
My neighbour Sir J. Gordon, soon after you was gone, hinted 
to me, as if some expressions of yours concerning the E. of Grom- 
arty had retarded the favours he expected from the Grown. I 
said, that was impossible, because I knew your opinion was 
that the mercy shou'd be compleat; and that I was well assured, 
that you had signified so much to the Ministers. He told me, 
I was mistaken; that his Authority was too good to be doubted, 
and alluded to something that had passed between the P. of 
Wales and your Lordship. As he spoke with an air of mystery, 
I seemed not ^understand him, but insisted that he was the 
dupe of his own jealousy and anxiety, &.c. I find likewise, that 
all the nonsense and stuff that G[eorge] R[oss] has talked is 
very unjustly imputed to your Lordship; and I make no doubt, a 
certain Brother of yours [Lord Milton] has had hints of this; 
which at the same time will serve (if he succeeds) to magnify 
the talents, interest, and industry of my neighbour. 

Amidst your greater occupations, I should not have troubled 
[you] with these little matters; but that I cannot bear that you, 
or yours, should suffer unjustly. 

I ever am, with great truth and affection, 

My dear Lord, 
Your most obliged humble Servt. 

And. Mitchell. 

i 

(7) MISCELLANEOUS (NOVEMBER 1746 TO MARCH 1747). 

Sir Alexander MacDonald died 23rd November 1746. Six days later 
Martin MacDonald wrote from Armadale to "Mr [John] Mackintosh att 

Inverness" (Fraser-Mackintosh MSS, Register House) 



140 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

I am to writ you the mealancoly news of Sir Alexr McDonald 
Death . . . you will send for ... the Taylor youl give 
him orders to make a short coat of frisd scarlet cloth faced with 
black cuffs and black west [coat] conformed to the coat and let 
him despatch it all night and day and to send it with the Bearer 
and to place to Sir Alexr accompt till 111 see you again which 
will be very soon God willing. 

From Allan MacDonald, younger of Kingsburgh to the President, dated 
from Mugstot 27th November 1746. 

My Lord. 

This sorrowful letter brings your Lordship the melancholy 
news of the Death of Sir Alexander MacDonald of MacDonald. 
He died at Bernera in Glenelg on his way to London on the 
Twenty third of this month about eleven oClock forenoon. 
Your Lordship lost a firm Friend, and alas we have lost our 
happiness on earth. I was going along with him south where 
if it was possible he was to get me into the army again. I have 
now greater reason to leave my Country not knowing on whom 
to depend here. Soon as I hear of your Lordship coming to 
Scotland I'll have the honour of waiting on you. I came in 
from Slate yesterday to wait of Lady Margaret, whom I met on 
the Road. I cannot express her sorrow on this occasion. 
I am 

My Lord 

Your Lordships most humble 
and most afflicted Servant 

Allan MacDonald. 

MacDonald of Castleton writing to the President, 5th December, 
("Culloden Papers" CCGXXXVII) gives his opinion that Sir Alexander 
"was a downright honest man, true to his friend, and firm to his word. 
By his death we of his clan lost a father, and the King a good subject." 
In this letter he made request for the President's good offices in an en- 
deavour to obtain the release of Alexander MacDonald of Kingsburgh, 
who was still in prison for his association with Flora MacDonald. 
Kingsburgh had for twentyeight years been principal manager of his 
chief's affairs and his presence at this crisis was urgently required. It 



MORE) CULLODEN PAPERS. i4l 

would have been a gracious act on the part of the Grown to have liber- 
ated Kingsburgh forthwith, as some reward for Sir Alexander's services, 
but in the face of what was believed the authorities were in a difficult 
position. Lord Hardwicke Writing to the Duke of Newcastle, 20th 
December 1746, was of opinion that the Highlanders had plenty of money 
and arms, that they expected French assistance in the spring and that 
the officers of the Independent Companies were ready to join the 
Jacobites, especially those of the late Sir Alexander MacDonald (New- 
castle Papers). MacLeod of MacLeod and the President both desired 
Kingsburgh's release ("Culloden Papers" CGGXXXIX, GGGXLII). 

From MacLeod to the President dated from London 16 December 1746. 

My Dear Lord 

I hope this will find you well in Edinburgh drudging on att 
your laborious Task. I find the Secretary att War has prepared 
ane account which I suppose he transmitts this night to you with 
a view of what each Captain of ane Independent Company re- 
ceives on the jjjuposal of one muster or on the suposal of two, 
and that his opinion is one muster is sufficient and that will pro- 
bablie prevail for Mr Pelham does not remember anie Promise 
of giving two absolutely but concurring in doing what's thought 
proper. Att the same time they say, if any person would make 
the proper distinction of their Services and Circumstances in 
levying their Companies, these they would make an additional 
allowance to, that I can easily see is not a proper task for you 
and what I am sure I would not desire, or think you ought to 
do. But why my Lord Loudoun (who is daily looked for here) 
may not do it, I can't tell, and he is the only other that can I 
think properlie do it. Not to run through the whole eighteen I 
will only mention the two Macdonald Companies to you, who 
are dated in your List the 31st December, now I know and so do 
you, that they were compleat and assembled in the first days of 
November, and were regularly subsisted by Sir Alexander in 
Sky and desired to remain there till that Date that you and Sir 
Alexander called for them and the four Macleods were all to- 
gether and subsisted by me before the 20th October. Now that 
money must be refunded or we lose it. For I need not tell you, 
that we cant or wont return on the Captains for it, and this in- 



142 MORE CULLODEN CAPERS. 

convenience I saw and mentioned to you, when you told me of 
the method you had taken in giving in the Dates of these Com- 
panies Commissions. But by what they say I think that will 
still be rectified by Loudoun's giving in a distinct Account of 
these Transactions as they happened. I have no news to give 
you. Several mails are due and we expect to hear of a ruffle 
in Provence and good accounts of his R.H.'s the Dukes negotia- 
tions in Holland. We are to part with our privilege of Franking 
and so are all the offices, by which its supposed the post office 
will gain 63,000 a year. I'm sure I shall gain the Saving .10 
or 12 a year for Newspapers and save some Trouble I'm not 
fond of. My mind continues as it ought to do, much distressed 
for our irreparable loss, in one of the best of men and most dear 
Friend. I ever am yours 

Normand Macleod. 
Sir Arthur [Forbes] went to Bath Sunday. 

From Brodie of Brodie (Lord Lyon) to the Duke of Newcastle, dated 
from Brodie House 27th December 1746 (Newcastle Papers). 

My Lord 

I beg Leave to acquaint Your Grace that Sir William Gordon of 
Park who made his Escape cross the Murray Firth from Murray 
to Sutherland some months ago Is still Lurking by the name of 
Mr Grant in the County of Sutherland or Caithness, and That 
when He went Into Sutherland He had The Earl of Sutherlands 
Permission so to do and assurance of Protection. 

All This I know to be True, But If it is known even by my 
Friend the Earl of Sutherland That I am Your Grace's Informer, 
It will prove of fatal Consequences to me. 

I have the Honour to be with great Respect and Esteem, 

My Lord Duke 

Your Grace's most faithful 

and most obedij&nt sert. 

Alexr Brodie. 

In spite of the above somewhat despicable information, Sir William 
Gordon escaped to France. (A. & H. Tayler, "Jacobites of Aberdeenshire 
and Banff shire in the Fortyflve," where this letter is also given). 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. U3 

From MacLeod to John Forbes, younger of Culloden, "Lieutenant of 
Lord Hartford's Regiment of Horse [Royal Horse Guards, Blue] 
at Amersham" dated from London in December 1746. 

My dear John. 

Last night I got a letter from the Good-man dated att Stonyhill, 
he got there this day se 'enight the 13th in pritty good health, but 
much afflicted with worthy Sir Alexers death. The account of 
it met him at Durham. For news all we know by the Mails 
that came yesterday is that the Austrians and Piedmontese are 
making progress in Provence, some say they go to Aix and some 
to Toulon. There has been ane insurrection in Genoa, in 
which a good many Austrian officers were killed. And it was 
talked that the King said yesterday att the Levee that they 
brought it on themselves. Old Lovat behaved with spirit at the 
Bar of the House of Lords Thursday, his Tryal its thought cant 
come on till Febry. I will step down for a day and see you and 
Hugh. Let me^know how long you abide there and how both 
of you are. Yours 

Normand Macleod. 

The President had written 1 December 1746 to the Government, in- 
timating Lovat' s request that he should have access to his property, and 
a letter from the Government to the Lord Advocate dated 20 December 
ordered The receiving of his rents as if he were innocent (S.P. Scotland, 
P.R.O.). MacLeod was with Lovat on 18th December as he told the 
President in a letter of that date ("Culloden Papers" CCCXXXVIII) 

I saw unhappy Lovat today. Except for the feebleness of his 
limbs, his looks are good. He asked me several questions, and 
particularlie about you, said he was resigned and ready to meet 
his fate, since it was God's will, asked after his children etc 

Macleod writes naturally and there is no allusion to the past. 

From Andrew Stone (for the Duke of Newcastle) to the President dated 
from Whitehall, 3rd January 1746/7. 

My Lord 

My Lord Duke of Newcastle being prevented by a great hurry of 
business, from writing himself, to your Lordship as he fully 



144 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

intended, by this Conveyance, I have his Graces Directions to 
make his Complements and excuses to you, and to beg that you 
will allow me to remind you, in His Name, of the Return to be 
made (If I mistake not), by the Lords of Session to the Order of 
the House of Lords, made towards the Conclusion of the Last 
Session of Parliament, concerning the Regulations proposed to 
be made in Scotland. My Lord Chancellor (as his Grace under- 
stands) had some Conversation with your Lordship on this sub- 
ject, a little before you left London, and that you then gave him 
hopes, that the Return wd. be made soon after Christmas. My 
Lord Duke begs that it may, if it can possibly be done, be sent 
by the Time The House of Lords is to meet after the Recess, 
(which I think will be on Tuesday the 13th Inst.), His Grace 
having Reason to believe that from something that was flung 
out in the House before the Adjournment that if the Return is 
not made by that Time, it may give Occasion to some disagree- 
able Motion. As your Lordship will receive this at farthest on 
Tuesday morning, My Lord Duke hopes you may be able to let 
him know before the 13th, at what time the Return will be 
made. 

I was very sorry I had not an opportunity to pay my Respects 
to your Lordship before you set out for Edinburgh. You will 
give me leave to assure you of my most sincere wishes for your 
Health and Happiness during the course of many years and of 
my being with the truest Respect 

My Lord 

Your Lordships 

Most Obedient & most humble Servant 

Andrew Stone. 

P.S. I have at last the satisfaction of acquainting your 
Lordship that Messrs. Rattray & Lauder are at full Liberty. 
His R.H. The Duke returned yesterday from the Hague, having 
settled everything relating to the ensuing Campaign to His en- 
tire Satisfaction. The Operations in Provence seem to go on 
successfully, tho' we hear no very late accounts from thence, 
that can be at all depended upon. There is nothing new from 
the State of Genoa, but the Confirmation of the taking of Savone, 



I 

MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 145 

Wtih reference to Stone's postscript, John Rattray and John Lauder 
were the two surgeons who had been captured "vi et armis," as told in 
a previous letter, and made to attend the wounded of the Prince's Army. 
The following is headed: 

Representation of George Lauder Surgeon in Edinburgh. 
The Day before the Battle of Preston I was taken Prisoner 
from Edinburgh by the Rebels to take care of the Wounded in 
case of Action, and have been detained by them for the same 
purpose ever since. 

The Officers who were made prisoners at that Battle have 
often told me, they reckoned it a great happiness to the Army, 
that I and Mr Rattray (who was in the same Situation with me) 
were there as a great Many of the Wounded both Officers and 
Soldiers must have inevitably perished, without immediate as- 
sistance, and there was not a Surgeon but us to be found. 

Amongst the many taken care of by me the following gentle- 
men were not only dressed in the field but taken care of during 
the whole cours.of their cures, viz: 

Gapt. Poyntz who had one very dangerous wound in his 
hand and five in his head, 

Major Griffith had a large wound in his head, 

Lieutenant Disney had his hand cutt of with a Sword and 
a shot in his shoulder, and must have dyed with loss of Blood in 
a very short time without assistance. 

Lieutenant Hewitson had two dangerous wounds in his 
Head, one thro' both Tables of his Skull and a very bad one in 
his Arm. 

Lieutenant Swinie had a large wound on his Face. 

Mr. Bishop son to Captain Bishop who was killed in the 
Action had fourteen wounds, some of them exceedingly danger- 
ous, and must have died without extraordinary Care. I not only 
dressed him and operated on him, furnishing both external and 
internal Medecines, as I did to the others, but even found him 
Lodgings, Nurses and Money for his Subsistance, he being an 
Orphan destitute of Friends and Money. Besides the above 
named I gave advice and the first dressings and operations to 
many more, who were afterwards taken care of by other Sur- 
geons t 



146 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Mr Rattray likeways took care of many amongst whom were 
Captain Sandilands who had Sixteen Wounds. 

Mr [perhaps Birnie] who had six wounds and would have 
died with Loss of Blood without instant help. 

Mr Rattray and I, that day likeways operated upon and 
dressed almost three hundred private Men, two hundred and 
eighty of which were taken into the Charity Work-house, where 
they were taken care of by Mr Wood and I, who are the Sur- 
geons belonging to that House, but my charge of them was 
greatest as I performed the whole operations and furnished the 
Medecines but of my own Shop gratis. These facts can be at- 
tested by the Gentlemen themselves, and by Hugh Hunter 
Surgeon to my Lord Loudoun's Regiment who I desired some 
time to assist me with the Private Men, as also by Francis Drum- 
mond the Surgeon to Colonel Lascelle's Regiment, who came 
some times to the Work House to enquire of me concerning the 
Men of Colonel Lascelles Regiment. Myself and six Apprentices 
and Students, continued dayly six or eight hours aday with the 
said Dressings. Colonel Halket will likeways attest that three 
Days after the Action he came to me, [expressed] the sense he 
had of the obligation he lay under to me for the care I had taken 
of the Men, and told me that he understood that there was three 
or four of his men, about seven Miles in the Country who needed 
their Legs, or Arms to be cut off, but as the Surgeon to their 
Regiment was only a Young man, he did not in- 
cline that the Thing should be done by his sole Advice, 
or even that he should be the operator. He therefore desired 
me to visit them, and to perform the operations if I judged them 
proper. I went and saw them, thought the operations unneces- 
sary and brought the men to Edinburgh, where they were taken 
care of. 

Besides taking care of the wounded I likeways at my own 
expense, carryed out to the Prisoners at Colonel Gardiners 
House, two Dozen of Wine, eight large loaves of bread, and a 
good quantity of Cheese. After the Battle of Falkirk I took care 
of Captain Fitzgerald of Colonel Munro's Regiment, who had 
two wounds in his head and in a bad state of health otherwise, 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 147 

both he and Captain Halley must certainly be sensible too, that 
it was by my representation of the bad consequences, it would 
be to their healths, if they were carried alongst with the other 
Prisoners, that the one was left at Aberdeen and the other at St. 
Ninians. I not only dressed wounds of all the wounded men 
and Militia prisoners at Stirling (which was the Place I was 
ordered to reside at) but likeways gave them money towards 
their substance, this can be attested by Mr Simpson,. Minister 
of the Gospel at Falla, who was a Prisoner. I believe both he 
and Mr Maitland will likeways attest the pains I was att to get 
a place for a Hospital to them where I might have them better 
taken of, both as to the Dyet and other ways; but the hurry and 
confusion the Rebells were continually in at that time pre- 
vented their doing anything of that sort,, to either their own 
People or Prisoners. From their Abandoning Stirling till now 
I was not of the smallest use to either side, having neither In- 

^^^ 

struments, Bandages, Dressings, or Medicines they having been 
left in Athole in the hurry of their Flight from Stirling, and 
brought again to Inverness by Lord George Murray a few Days 
before the Battle of Gulloden. The Lord Presidents Chamber- 
lain and other Servants can bear Witness to the use I designed 
them for that day. 

Anonymous to the President dated Saturday 10th January [1747] 

My dear Lord 

I cannot Bragg much of my transactions of this week, I fear 
[MacDonald of] K[ingsburgh] will not be given to the Mac- 
donald Family and I was talked to about his Tryal but not in a 
Possitive or Peremtorie way. I showed your letter for Mr Fox 
to Mr Pelham who read it, but I doubt not withstanding what 
you wrote and I attempted to say, the Companies will gett no 
more than half a Muster of 30 days, how they'll divide it I can't 
tell, but I know that if the four McLeods have no more they'll 
lose about 100 a companie. and the 2 Macdonalds considerable 
more. No doubt you've been told what a Buss is made here 
about the resolutions you and your Bretheren made in the case 
of Hamilton. Their is 3 mails come in I know not more than 



i48 MORE CULLODEN 

you'll find in the News Paper. If the Gazette is out in time you 
shall have it, Savonna is taken, Genoa in its further situation in 
the hand of the R E bells as they are called, and they deny the 
story of the check we met with in Provence, att the Opera to-- 
night Lord Cobham said a Courier was come in with accounts 
of ane Action there,, but did not say how it went the whole 
story may be Apochyphal for ought I know. 
Mitchell Sir Harry Munro Rattray and I drink your health 
Adieu 

From MacLeod to the President dated from London 13 January 1747 
("Gulloden Papers" CGGXLIV, reprinted with an additional para- 
graph concerning the Independent Companies). 

My dear Lord, 

This day Lord Lovat was brought to the Bar of the house of 
Peers, to give in Answers to the Articles of Impeachment ex- 
hibit against him; which he did; his answers were a denial, 
but seemed to be well drawn up, and properly worded. He 
then presented two petitions to the Lords: the first set furth, 
that the Factor apointed on his Estate had not complied with 
the Orders of the House; nor had Capfn Ferguson restored his 
strong box with his money, tho' ordered so to do by a Warrant 
from the D. of Newcastle by His Majesty's Command; saying 
he was in the same Condition as before, destitute of money to 
support himself, or to provide for his defence; prayed for relief, 
&c. 

The Chancellor spoke first, and shewed with great elo- 
quence the fittness of all that had been done in Scotland to 
suppress the most unnatural and unprovoked Rebellion that 
ever was raised; shewed its conformity to the Laws of England, 
the laws of Nations, and of Common Sense; mentioned pre- 
cedents of things done in the Irish Rebellion, after the Revolu- 
tion and cited opinions of some English Lawyers. The D. of 

Newcastle made a very proper encomium on what the C r 

had said, and told the steps that had been taken, by order of 
his Majesty, with regard to the money Ferguson had, and with 
regard to his Estate; and read a part of the Advocate's letter, 



MORE CULLODEN t'APEftg. 

shewing he had comply'd with the first Order from the Crown, 
as well as with that from the house of Peers: he then said, as to 
the money Ferguson had, he had been ordered to deliver it up; 
but on his representing that he looked on it as fair prize, belong- 
ing to himself and the Seamen with him, it would be hard to 
rob him of it, till it was known whether it was so or not; which 
could not be certainly ascertained, till the event of Lord Lovat's 
Trial; so that matter was to rest there. In the end, he moved 
for rejecting the Petition. Lord Granville spoke next, agreed 

entirely with the C r's exposition of the Law, and said he 

would even go further, and cited a very learned and eminent 
Lawyer of our Country, Mr Craigie, who had lately, in the Case 
of Hamilton, wrote a very fine paper on that Subject; and made 
an encomium on him in much finer words than I can pretend to 
remember; but said, that they were to support their own order 
and dignity, and do justice, without shewing favour or resent- 
ment. That the Prisoner had made a legal Demand, and that 
it must have a legal answer; and that the Petition could not be 
rejected, but on the supposal of falshood in the Allegation. On 
which, the D. of Newcastle said, it was on that Supposal he 
moved it, and referred to the Advocate's letter. The D. of 
Argyle then said, that the debate might have been much 
shortened, as it was only allegation, and no proof offered to 
support it; which the house ought not to notice; said, that some- 
thing more was couched in the petition than appeared openly, 
and meant, if possible, to throw dust in their eyes; that if it was 
real want of Support to defend himself that the petitioner knew 
well little or nothing could be got out of his Estate, or any other 
Highland one, for that purpose, by the unhappy situation those 
parts had been in for some time past. So it carried, to reject 
that Petition; on which the prisoner desired to be brought to the 
Bar; and told the Lords he had heard that it had been thrown out 
[because] he had no proof of tha Allegations in his petition: he 
said, he came prepared with full and legal proof, and had an 
instrument or protest in his hand, taken against the Factor, for 
not complying with the Orders of the house; but that paper was 
refused. He said some strong things with regard to his unhappy 



160 M6HE CULLODEN 

situation, and read some strong epithets with regard to Fergu- 
son and the Factor, and seemed to be very much moved on the 
order for his withdrawing the second time. There was a very 
full house; and his Royal Highness the Duke attended, as did 
all the members of our house in Town, you may be sure. His 
second petition was, desiring leave for his Agent, Willm 
Fraser, to have access to him; which was granted with the pro- 
viso of an Officer of the Tower being present; which proviso was 
proposed by the Duke of Argyle, and agreed to. I was with Mr 
Fox today about the companies and I believe its determined 
they have no more than half a muster or 30 days allowance with 
the off reckonings, but because of the peculiaritie of the four 
McLeod companies and two Macdonald ones who had such a 
distance to march and were so long subsisted in the lies by order 
before they could come to Inverness after they were compleat, 
thirtie days more will be allowed them, on your mentioning 
these facts either in a letter to Mr Fox or to me which I must 
show them. I have not been very well and much out of spirits 
this while which I attribute mostly to want of exercise, so I've 
none to blame but myself. Sandy Forbes I'm told is to have 
leave to retyre which his long, and faithful service justly entitle 
him to. Its said the Duke is to cross the seas at the end of this 
month or the beginning of next. 

Several of your acquaintance enquire frequently for you. 

I ever am yours, 

N. M. L. 
If you are to write about these six companies, do not delay it. 

From William Dalrymple dated from Cranstone 15 February 1746/7. 

My Lord 

I should have executed my Promise to you before now if I had 
not been taken so ill that I have not been able to hold the pen in 
my hand for some days past. I congratulate yr Lop by-the-by 
on your being able to come abroad which was no small pleasure 
to me to hear. 

What I have been able to do towards the fulfilling of my 
promise I have herewith sent, the rest I must leave to a further 
day. Upon reading it over I begin to think that if I had had 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 151 

time to cool I should have dressed some passages of it in milder 
language. But then yr Lop must have had a Sample~~of my Art 
rather than of my Ingenuity, as it stands at present you have my 
whole soul open to yr View without disguise and tho it should 
be rude I'd rather display it to you as it is than put on the 
Mask. 

The state of the Linen Manufacture of Ireland as well as 
Scotland is fairly set furth in these Sheets. But as I cannot 
help contradiction even with my Betters when Truth and the 
good of my County is the prize I must premise to yr Lop. that 
you must expect to have most of your Maxims if not all debated. 
This being the 'Case and that I have not vanity enough to hope 
to convince or to gain Belief from my own Weight alone I pro- 
pose the following Arbitration in such points as we may differ 
about, viz I appeal for the truth of every fact that I have already 
advanced or shall hereafter advance, the minutest fact not ex- 
cepted, to persons disinterested in the dispute, from these I have 
reason to seclude all persons holding offices from the Trustees 
and such likewise as may be in Expectation. It is to those only 
that I appeal who will neither gain nor lose by the Decision but 
in common like myself from the general calamity or Welfare 
of their Country. As to what regards the Glasgow trade I appeal 
to such men as the Laird of Dougalstone, Robt Tuke, Lawrence 
Colquhoun, and Wm Cranfurd, Jun; than whom there is not 
Men of greater knowledge nor stricter probity. As to what re- 
gards the trade of London I appeal to Claud Jonestone, to George 
Auchterlony, to John Currie and Jonestone and Fothringhame, 
the rest of the linen factors having neither fortunes, trade nor 
knowledge. As to what regards the Linen trade in Ireland, I 
appeal to Adair and Jackson, to Smith and Seeker, to Jonathan 
Gurnell and to Joseph Ellis the richest IrisTi factors in London. 
If any of these gentlemen give a single fact against me of any 
Consequence I shall be willing to forfeit your Lop's Friendship 
and the esteem of all honest men and if you have a mind to do me 
or yourself Justice in this dispute you will take some pains to 
find out whether I am the honest fellow I pretend to be or the 
rogue that wants to impose upon you, 



162 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Besides what is now sent when I have time and health I 
propose to continue what I have begun and to lay before yr Lop. 
the several sorts of foreign Linen, which of them ought to be 
imitated and which not, the way to imitate them and give you 
good reasons for all I shall advance. In treating of these matters 
I shall show yr Lop. that tho we have a low priced Manufacture 
of Linen in Scotland yet we have no Manufacture at all of coarse 
Linen (which is a distinction yr Lop. may never perhaps have 
adverted to) and that it is impossible for us to attain to it with- 
out pains in the first place being taken by the Trustees to alter 
the method of Spinning in use and the Machine with which 
they spin. The Hempen Manufacture I shall likewise discuss 
and the necessity of encouraging proper Machines for the soften- 
ing thereof. In treating of these things I am very far from 
assuming to myself any superior Talents above by Neighbours. 
I know my own Depths and how unfit I am for the enterprise 
I have begun. Yet at the same time as I have trod a path take 
it altogether that no man living either did before or since I can- 
not give myself up for a mere Cypher, and allow that I saw 
nothing that I heard nothing and that I remember nothing during 
that whole journey. What smatterings therefore I have picked 
up since I am now fairly begun I will communicate to your 
Lops, if you approve of it and as it will be the only System I 
may say without vanity that you have hitherto had that will 
stand the Test, I hope to make yr Lop. before I have done with 
you, what you most ardently wish and what you rave of I dare 
swear in yr very slumbers, the best Countryman in Scotland. 
I am with the greatest Esteem My Lord 

Yr Lops most obedt humble Servt 

Will: Dalrymple. 

The two following letters mention the Heritable Jurisdictions bill 
for which see W. L. Mathieson "Scotland and the Union" p. 372 et seq. 

From Andrew Mitchell to the President dated from London 21 February 

1747. 

My dear Lord. 

As Sir Arthur [Forbes] and Mr Macleod promised to write to 
your Lop. by the Tuesday and Thursday post, J delayed 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 153 

writing to you till I should be able to accompany my letter with 
a copy of the Bill lately brought into the house of Lords, which 
was printed only yesterday. 

What is intended by the Bill, and how far it agrees with, 
or differs from, the Report of Lords of Session, will best appear 
from the Bill itself which I transmit to you under two franks, 
Macleods. 

My Lord Chancellor after moving that the reports might be 
read, made great compliments to the Lords of Session, but added 
that the remedy proposed by them was not adequate to the evil, 
and therefore he said he should take the liberty to make some 
remarks on the Report and to propose to their Lops a Bill etc. 
He said the Report concerning- the impossibility of determining 
who had rights to Heritable jurisdictions! was to him a convinc- 
ing argument of the necessity of taking away these Jurisdictions. 
Then he endeavoured to show from the words of the report that 
the Judges of the Court of Session were of opinion 

Imo That the Kings Justice could not be administered with- 
out taking away the Heritable Jurisdictions etc. and 2do the,/ 
were of opinion that these jurisdictions might be abolished pro- 
vided compensation was made to the Proprietors. The argu- 
ment chiefly used to prove that this was not contrary to the 
Articles of Union, was that the parliament of Scotland had power 
to have taken them away, which power was now transferred to 
the parliament of Great Britain, that in all unions the parties 
were not to be strictly tied to the words of the pacta conventa, 
when the advantages were apparent and mutual, and he in- 
stanced the fatal effects of a strict and rigid interpretation, in the 
case of Lithuania and Poland. He said that the Parlt. of Scot- 
land were so sensible of the danger of these Jurisdictions that 
they had by degrees indulged the Privy Council with a power 
of chequing and curbing them, which power was never defined 
by law, that when the Privy Council was taken away these 
Jurisdictions should likewise have been abolished, here he 
quoted a passage from Sir G. Mackenzie, concerning the power 
the P. Council had over the Clans and other great men. What 
remarks he made on the report will appear from what he has 



154 MORE CULLODtfN PAPERS. 

adopted or rejected in the bill. Then he said he would acquaint 
the house 1st with what were not his reasons for bringing the 
bill,, and 2ndly what were his reasons. He did not bring in this 
bill on account of the late rebellion, that indeed was the occasion 
but not the cause etc. 2ndly it was no diffidence of the nation 
for he knew there were many loyal, brave and faithful subjects 
that deserved to be encouraged, 3rdly. neither was it from any 
doubts that he had of the noble persons who were proprietors of 
these Jurisdictions, for many of them were well-known to him, 
and he knew that some who had the greatest powers of that sort, 
woud from their great affection to their country and to the R. 
family, not only not oppose but frankly concur arid give their 
assistance in promoting the bill. He said that whatever might 
be the past reason of granting these extensive Jurisdictions to 
subjects, he was always of opinion that it was bad policy to dis- 
annex them from the Grown, that it was weakening the tyes 
between the K. and his subjects, and exposing the peace of the 
country to the caprice of private men, that it was not sufficient 
to take from them the Jurisdiction in capital matters and cases 
of Dememb ration, for that was rarely executed, it was the ordin- 
ary course of Justice and the regular administration of it, that 
served to keep up the regard and respect due to the sovereign 
from his subjects in the most remote corners etc. etc. 

There was no debate nor speaking, the bill was ordered to 
be printed on a motion from the D. of Newcastle and I hear it 
will first be brought into the House of Commons before it be 
again read in the Lord's House, where I make no doubt it will 
meet with great opposition. 

I hope you Lop. will have leisure thoroughly to consider 
this affair, and as something will be probably done in Parlia- 
ment you will give your assistance to render it as beneficial, or 
at least as little hurtful to the Country as possible. 

I thought to have answered yours of the 12th but shall delay 
that till next post as it is now very late. 

Yours affectly. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 155 

**** *V 

From Andrew Mitchell to the President dated from London. 26 Feby 

1747. 

My dear Lord, 

In mine by the post of last Saturday, I gave your Lop. as full an 
account, as my memory could suggest, of my Lord Chancellor's 
speech, and I can at present call to mind but one thing material 
which I believe I did not mention, in speaking of the Union, 
he took notice-, how disireable it was, that the laws of the two 
countries should not widely differ from each other, he added, 
that he was unwilling to load this bill, but that he had en- 
deavoured to make an inchoation. For this purpose, it was pro- 
posed in the bill to give the Judges in the Circuit the power of 
determining finally small causes that should come before them 
from the Sheriff's Court,, and that in England great advantage 
was found in the Judges of the Circuit determining civil causes 
and he expressed great resentment against the authors of some 
seditious pamphlets that tend to excite jealousy and animosity 
between the two nations, and said they were punishable by law 
and that if any more of that sort was published he thought it 
would deserve their Lop's notice etc., 

I have troubled your Lop with so minute a detail, as it 
may enable you to guess how far this reformation is intended 
to be carried, and what are the views of some of the 
reformers. The speech met with great applause, and 
I find the subject of it generally relished. The people 
of this country certainly imagine, that when herit- 
able Jurisdictions are once abolished, they have nothing 
to fear from Scotland. As this is the case, and you 
know it is not easy to convince the English nation that they are 
mistaken, I believe a bill of this sort will pass, though I am in- 
formed there will be several alterations before it comes into the 
House of Commons; it is to be wished that those who are best 
able would suggest what may fitly be substituted in the place 
of the Jurisdictions, and were that once properly adjusted, I 
think no man in Scotland but the Proprietors of the Jurisdic- 
tions can have reason to complain. It is needless for me to 
point out to your Lop. some clauses of the Bill that are justly 



156 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

found fault with, they will occur to yourself, and I hope you 
will be the instrument of having them amended. It would be 
still more impertinent to tell you the various opinions of our 
own countrymen, some are against it, others violently for it, 
both equally absurd and without understanding anything of the 
matter, the more moderate think, that as an alteration in that 
part our Constitution will certainly be made, they wish that it 
was done as much for the advantage of the Country as may be, 
which can only be brought about by the assistance of the ablest 
and honestest men of the law of our Country, to point out what 
is fit to be done, and the best manner of doing it, for I firmly 
believe that the people of this Country do not mean to do any- 
thing to our disadvantage, but they are ignorant and diffident 
of all information. 

In answer to your Lop. of the 12th I have seen my Lord 
Granard since, and he will send a probate of the will, a power 
of attorny, and the receipt of Mr Graham to be delivered up. 
The Duke of Montrose has wrote to the Executors of the late 
Mr Graham, to desire that they will immediately search for the 
bond and deliver it up. As to the interest on the two bonds 
the Duke's factors know nothing, as they were paid here by His 
Grace. Lord George [Graham] some years ago borrowed 1,000 
of his brother for which he gave bond bearing interest at 3 per 
cent, and by a state, which I have seen, of the accounts between 
the brothers,, at Whitsunday next there will be due only a bal- 
lance of a few pounds by way of Interest. By what I can learn 
from the D. of Montrose he woud chuse to have everything 
cleared at or before Whitsunday, but he fears he shall not be 
able to raise the whole sum wanted, and therefore if it was 
agreeable to the Executive he woud pay 1,000 or 1,500 at 
that time and give his bond for the remainder, which will be 
about 3,000 or 3,500 with interest at 5 per cent, which bond 
he thinks he shall be able to clear by Martinmas next, as he has 
already given notice to have an heritable debt paid which is due 
to him in Scotland. I mention these particulars only by way of 
hint to your Lop., as a suggestion of that sort will come most 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 157 

properly from your Lop. and the Executrix will be very safe 
with the Duke's bond, and this will make his Grace easy as he 
is much a man of order and method. 

My concern for you gave me more alarm than I find there 
was occasion for, but it gives me more uneasiness that you shoud 
have any other sufferings but what are incident to human 
nature, from which if my prayers coud avail, I would have you 
exempted. I mentioned to you in a former that I believed 
a certain person had been at pains to give bad and false impres- 
sions of you, to a brother of yours, I am sorry to find by what I 
hear of that Gentleman's behaviour that my suspicion has proved 
too true. I hear that Gentleman sent to the person who had thus 
misrepresented you, a long paper in which all the alterations 
and emendations made by the new bill are contained and those 
of a certain party say, that my Lord Chancellor not only formed 
the bill, but also made his speech from that paper, all this I have 
from good authority, but my friendship with you has rendered 
me suspected, for I have not yet been able to obtain a sight of 
the paper. 

Soon after I had your first letter the Interloquitor in Capt. 
Hamilton's Case came to be the subject of every conversation, 
but with so good a foundation I found no difficulty to satisfy 
everybody that I had occasion to talk with, both of the Justice 
of the Interloquitor, and of the falsity of the report concerning 
the two propositions said to be found by the Lords of Session. 
So soon as I saw the representation transmitted by the E. of 
Albemarle I sent purposely to several of the ministers and 
showed them your Letter, they acknowledged that it was per- 
fectly agreeable to the Interloquitor, but said they had been de- 
ceived by a false misrepresentation, and that they did not know 
whom to trust. As several of your friends promised to write 
when this affair happened, I did not, the reason was, I had some 
tenderness for a man with whom I had once some degree of 
friendship, and was therefore unwilling to be the first informer, 
but if he was the author of the paper I saw, all my tenderness is 
gone for ever, 



158 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Your Lop. needs be no ways concerned about any reports or 
even rash words spoke against you, they will serve only to add 
lustre to your Character, when the truth shall be known; and 
the rule you have ever followed, of doing your duty, will be a 
lasting protection and comfort to you ... I fancy you have 
been misinformed about the C[hancello]r disapproving of the 
Return, he said indeed that the remedy proposed in it was not 
adequate nor sufficient. All your friends speak of you with 
sincere warmth and affection, and it will not be easy for the Gates 
of hell to prevail against you Lady Schaub charged me with 
many compliments to you I had mentioned to you an injustice 
you had done to Hercules [John Forbes, younger of Cul- 
loden] and hinted how it might be repaired. I wish you woud 
think of it, and send a letter only of Introduction to him to Mr 
Pelham. Poor Lytelton is in great affliction for the loss of his 
wife yours 

A.M. 

The mention of Lord George Graham in the above letter is in connec- 
tion with his will, by which he bequeathed his possessions to Lady Mary 
Forbes, the Earl of Granard's daughter. 

In Andrew Lang's "Companions of Pickle," (Chap. IX) will be found 
the narrative of Colonel John MacDonnell concerning a certain sum of 
money landed on the west coast of Ross-shire for the Prince's use. The 
following letter (State Papers, Scotland, P.R.O.) should be read in con- 
junction therewith. It is headed: Copy letter from Ding wall dated 
Tuesday 10th March, 1747. 

Saturday last Alexr. McKenzie of Lentron and John 
McKenzie of Torridon, two Rebel officers of Lord Cromertie's 
Regt. came to this place with a party of men to the number of 
16 or 17, armed with Guns Swords and pistols and forcibly car- 
ried away Murdoch McKenzie another of the officers of Lord 
Cromertie's Regt. and march'd with him to the hill above Ding- 
wall where they were joined by some more of their Gang 
and where they have gon since is yet uncertain. It is said that 
the reason for apprehending Murdoch is that he might deliver 
up to these Gentlemen officers some money which he had in his 



MORE cuLLODfiti PAPERS. 159 

custody That was landed in Coigach a Port in Lord Gromertys 
Estate in the Highlands. This ship came to the Highlands some- 
time after the Battle of Culloden and delivered to Major William 
McKenzie Brother to the Laird of Culoy [Kilcoy] and to Colin 
McKenzie alias Roy Brother to Dundonald and to the above 
Murdoch McKenzie a Portmanteau containing 3000 sterl. and 
Upwards. The Kings troops being then in the Country, The 3 
officers divided the money for their own private use But it is 
now given out that theres an order from the Pretender Requiring 
these Gentlemen to Deliver up the money to the Gentlemen who 
still adhere to his Interest in this Country to subsist themselves 
and their adherents, who are still so audacious as to keep together 
a small body of armed men and do openly frequent their own 
houses and other publick places, what greater contempt of 
Government than to pretend to come by legal authority from the 
pretender to a Royal Burgh within 6 or 7 mile [sic] of the 
Garrison of Inverness. Their presuming in this manner to go 
unmolested portends Destruction to their neighbours who are 
weel affected in so much that part of the Best Highland Posses- 
sion belonging to Sir H. Munro [of Foulis] and his uncles Estates 
will be unpossessed all this term as no tennent in such circum- 
stances will agree to possess 1 them. 

This letter was sent by the Duke of Newcastle (through Generel 
Huske) to Major General Blakeney on 27th March 1747. The Duke stated 
that it had been delivered to him by Sir Harry Munro and that 

the Behaviour of these Rebels, being unmolested by his Majesty's 
Troops, did prevent the Tenants in those parts from taking of 
Farms whereby the well affected Highlands were almost un- 
possessed. His Majesty was extremely surprised at these Ac- 
counts, and I am to signify to you His Pleasure, that you should 
forthwith enquire into the severall Tracts contained in the in- 
closed letter and send some of his Majesty's Forces into those 
Parts ... to secure all little Parties of the Rebels . . . 
and give all possible protection to the People . . . particu- 
larly to the Tenants belonging to Lord Fortress and Sr. Harry 
Monro or any other of His Majesty's faithfull subjects, who may 
want to be protected from the Rebels. 



160 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

General Huske's letter on the subject dated from Edinburgh 31st 
March 1747 is as follows. 

Sir 

Yours of the 27th I am favoured with, and have in obedience to 
His Grace the Duke of Newcastle's commands forwarded His 
letter to M. Genii. Blakeney to Inverness. I think it looks a little 
extraordinary if the information from Dingwall should be sent 
to His Grace without acquainting 1 Genii. Blakeney of their com- 
plaints. I wish it may not be Lord Fortress own people that 
have committed the outrages complained of, as most of His 
people was in the Rebellion headed by Lord Cromarty; none of 
the King's Troops is in that part of the Country as His R.H. the 
Duke did not think it necessary. . 



Lord Stair was so bad for these two days past that his death was 
expected every hour, is now something easier, but I believe it's 
impossible he can get over it. 

I beg you will assure His Grace of my most humble respects, 
and am 

Sr 
Your friend and most humble 

Servant John Huske 

(8) MAINLY CONCERNING LORD LOVAT. 

Simon, Lord Lovat, was condemned to death 18th March 1747. Ac- 
counts of the trial are too well known to require repetition, but the follow- 
ing letter gives one more version of part of the proceedings. 

From Andrew Mitchell to the President dated from London 12th and 14th 
March 1747 

My dear Lord 

As I wrote your Lordship an account [not found] of the evidence 
against Lord Lovat on the 10th I shall now endeavour to give 
you a view of Secretary Murray's examination as far as my 
memory can serve, persuaded that you will have a more perfect 
one from some that took notes at the tryal. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. l6i 

In the month of February 1742, he was first made acquainted 
with the transactions that were going on among the Jacobites in 
Scotland by the Earl of Traquair who showed him some letters 
dated at Paris from Drummond of Buchwaldie concerning these 
affairs; afterwards he had a meeting with the said Drummond, 
Lord Perth and Lord Traquair, at which they told him that in 
1739 Drummond had been sent over to Paris with an association 
signed by Lord Traquair, his brother, Lochiel, D. of Perth, Lord 
John Drummond, the elder, Sir James Campbell of Auchinbreck 
and Lord Lovat, that he had had several conferences with Card. 
Fleury and some other of the French Ministers, that the Cardinal 
had assured Drummond that the King of France would support 
the interests of the Pretender and endeavour to establish him 
by an invasion, on Scotland and England at the same time, but 
that the Cardinal thought that a body of Swedish troops woud 
be more acceptable to the Scots because of their religion, than if 
any French troops were sent into Scotland and that itj was pro- 
posed that somebody should be sent from Scotland to accompany 
the person to be sent from France to Sweden to negotiate these 
troops; this commission was offered to Murray but he declined 
it; soon after a memorial was drawn up containing the names of 
such persons as woud favour an invasion, and a computation of 
the numbers that might be raised to support it in Scotland, and 
Buchwaldie set out for Paris in order to show this memorial to 
the French Ministers. That at different times in the year 1742 
Lord Traquair showed him letters from Buchwaldie, containing 
accounts of his progress and success at the Court of France, that 
some of these letters not being consistent with others, it was 
thought proper by Lord Traquair,, Lochiel and the D. of Perth 
to send somebody to Paris to enquire into the state of their 
affairs, that Murray accordingly went thither in December 1742; 
that at Paris he was introduced to Lord Semple by Buchwaldie, 
and afterwards had an audience of Cardinal Tencin with whom 
nothing material passed, that afterwards he took lodgings at 
Versailes and was introduced by Semple to Monsieur Amelot, 
the secretary of state for foreign affairs, with whom he had 
several conferences, that Mr Amelot assured him of his master's 



162 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

intentions to support the interest of the Pretender in Britain, 
so soon as an occasion should offer; he told him at the same 
time that Card. Fleury had intended an invasion from Flanders 
the year before, but that the design was prevented by an order 
from Court to Marechal Maillebois to march towards Hanover, 
that the French ministry were still hearty in the P. cause and 
that the King had ordered him to assure him that he had the 
Pretender's interest as much at heart as his own, but that it was 
necessary to know what assistance might be expected from Eng- 
land and Scotland among the Pretender's friends. Buchwaldie 
and he came soon after this to London (in the month of March 
1743) for that purpose; and in the beginning of April Murray 
met with the D. of Perth at York, who did not approve of the 
negotiations at Paris: about tha beginning of April he saw Lord 
Traquair at Edinburgh, and gave him an account of what had 
passed at Paris, and of Drummond's bussiness in Eng- 
land, that soon after Lord Traquair set out for 
London, and remained in England till autumn 1743, 
that on his return, he told Murray that he had had 
several meetings with Lord Barrymore, Sir Watkin Williams 
and Sir John Hynd Cotton, that they appeared shy, particularly 
Cotton did not care to talk on the subject and refused absolutely 
to sign and seal. That the Earl told him that one, Buttler, was 
sent into England under pretence of buying horses, but really to 
sound the intentions of the Party in England in conjunction with 
Drummond, that they both went away satisfied, and Drummond 
went to Rome to shew the memorial above mentioned, and to 
give an account of the negotiations in England. That in the end 
of summer or beginning of autumn 1743 Drummond returned to 
Paris with fresh instructions from Rome, that he wrote to Lord 
Traquair who shewed him the letters; that the scheme proposed 
then to be executed was, that 3000 French shoud be sent from 
Dunkirk to Scotland, under the command of the Earl Marshall, 
that 1500 of them were to land at Inverness, and the other 1500 
in the West of Scotland, who were to be commanded by Sir 
James Campbell of Auchinbreck, and that 10,000 regular troops 
were about the same time to land as near London as possible. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 163 

under the command of the Marachal de Saxe, that Drummond 
after he had given an account of this plan in one of his letters, 
added by way of postscript that he did not know how the troops 
under Earl Marshall coud get to Scotland; this and other such 
hints occasioned a diffidence in the managers in Scotland, so that 
Lord Traquair etc desired Murray to answer Drummond's etter, 
which he did, and they receiving no satisfaction, it was resolved 
to send Murray in the spring to Paris. That he set out in April 
or May 1744 and passed through London, he then went to the 
army in Flanders and afterwards into Holland and from thence 
to Paris, that at Paris he was introduced to the young Pretender 
at the house of Aeneas Macdonald, a banquier, that he afterwards 
had a private audience of the young Pretender, in which he told 
him that Semple and Drummond were deceiving him, that not 
above 4500 coud possibly be raised in Scotland, that the country 
was not well inclined to him, that the numbers they had set 
down in the memorial were not to be depended upon, that things 
were not then ripe for a rising; he therefore endeavoured to dis- 
wade him from an invasion, that the young P. 
seemed resolved to risque it, and said that if 
the French K did not attempt something soon in his 
favour, he would venture coming amongst them with a 
single servant only. That he had much reasoning to the same 
purpose with Mr Sheridan who promised to endeavour to the 
utmost of his power to disuade from the attempt. I do not re- 
member whether Murray returned to Britain in the end of 1744 
or about March 1745. He had no notice of the young P: resolu- 
tion of coming that year till about the middle of June 1745, 
which he received in a letter, telling him that he woud be there 
in July, in which the signals to be made on the western coast 
were marked; he communicated this to Lord Traquair, the D. of 
Perth, Lochiel, and copies were taken and sent to their friends 
along that coast. The young Pretender had been landed some 
weeks before he had notice of it and then only by an anonymous 
letter desiring him to repair to the house of Lord John Drum- 
mond, the elder, which he understood and immediately com- 
plied with. 



164 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

In the month of August after he had joined his master he 
received a message from Lord Lovat, pressing the delivery of cer- 
tain patents and commissions, which he mentioned to the young 
Pretender, who directed him to make the best excuse be coud, 
and to tell Lord Lovat that the patent and commission were 
signed, but had been left with other baggage about 10 miles 
behind them, on their hearing that Sir J. Cope was marching 
into that country, but he does not remember whether he wrote 
to Lord Lovat or only sent excuses by his Lordship's messenger. 
That at Edinburgh after the battle of Prestonpans he received 
a letter from Lovat with one to the young Pretender, full of 
assurances etc etc and there was a hint in the letter, referring 
him to the bearer of the letter; who had instructions to insist for 
the patent and commission, that Kelly upon this had orders to 
write out a patent or commission, he does not know which, but 
saw him writing it, nor does he know if it was delivered. 

That after the Battle of Culloden Lovat met with 10 or 12 
chiefs of the rebels at - - and by accident, for they did not ex- 
pect him. That Lochiel was much pleased that they could have 
Lovat's advice, that then it was agreed to raise 3500 men for the 
protection and defence of the country, i.e. against the King's 
troops, that Lovat thought that number sufficient, and as large 
as could be subsisted, that his proportion was 400 who were to 
be under the Master of Lovat's orders, that he, Lord Lovat, 
ordered his secretary to write to the Master in Murray's name, 
but Murray did not see the letter, that Murray's clerk paid 70 to 
Lord Lovat's servant as pay for 400 for 10 days, that this was paid 
in the same room where the chiefs met, but he does not know 
whether Lovat saw it paid, tho' he was in the room. 

That about 10 days after this he heard that only 500 of the 
above number of 3500 had been gathered, that soon after he left 
that country, and never saw the prisoner till now. That about 
that time 45,000 louis d'or had been landed on the west coast out 
of which he paid the money for the new levies. 

Being asked whether he had ever distributed any letters from 
the young P. which were sent him undirected, he said he had 
brought three or four with him from Paris, and that he received 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 165 

others afterwards, but did not remember the number, that each 
of these letters had a credential annexed that he delivered one 
of these letters to Macleod, and sent another to Sir A. Macdonald, 
but does not know whether he received it, that one went to the 
Duke of Perth and he sent several to Lochiel. 

14th March. Before reading over this account I am sensible 
it is extremely defective, though I was well placed and extremely 
attentive at the tryal, but as it is, accept of it for your amuse- 
ment. 

Mr Murray's behaviour really surprised me, he spoke at first 
a little too fast, but he possessed himself the whole time, and 
was not disconcerted by the interruptions and rubs he met with, 
and there appeared an accuracy, distinctness, and consistency in 
the whole of his evidence which nothing but truth and a good 
understanding can produce. 

He made no use of any papers to refresh his memory and the 
examination including the interruptions lasted about two hours. 

When he had named the three English gentlemen above 
mentioned, he was interrupted by Lord Talbot in a ruff manner; 
he happened to say that he had "been directed,"" on this Lord 
Gholmondeley said he ought to declare by whom he had been 
directed. Sir Wm. Yonge said he had had no directions from 
the managers for that they had examined him only with regard 
to Lord Lovat, and that What he had now said was entirely 
new to them. Murray being again asked by whom he had been 
directed said that after the managers had been with him, a 
person came to him, who had officiated as their secretary, to 
know if he had recollected any thing material since he had seen 
the managers and that that person desired him to give an account 
of the rise etc of the rebellion when he came before the house of 
Lords, and indeed the question Mr Noel put to him lead him 
naturally to do it. The Lord H. Steward desired him to go on 
without giving offence. 

My Lord Talbot with more warmth than knowledge asked 
several questions, viz whether he was a voluntary witness; he 
desired the term to be explained, and then said that he never had 
any promise of a pardon, but if he had had a pardon he must and 



166 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

woud have answered as he had done though in an other situation 
he should have been sorry to appear as a witness against Lord 
Lovat etc. Being asked whether he surrendered, he said he did, 
for he could have killed two Dragoons having arms in his pos- 
session and the door shut, but he chose to surrender, tho' he 
owned he did not then intend to have surrendered. Upon this 
Lord Talbot said that he neither doubted the gentleman's courage 
nor humanity etc. It is needless to trouble you with the squabble 
between the managers and the noble Lord before the questions 
were put. 

Then Hugh Fraser of Dongallan was called, who swore that 
Lovat had engaged him to accept of a company, that he knew of 
and directed the clan to rise, that he sent the firey cross about to 
raise the clan, that Lord Lovat had forced his son, that he be- 
lieved the clan would not have followed the son without my 
Lord's directions, that the Prince's health was drunk at his table 
etc. 

Two stewards of my Lords were afterwards examined, they 
were very tender of their Lord, but they confessed his drinking of 
healths, ordering of bell tents and other warlike stores to be made 
and sent his clan after they had marched to Perth to join the pre- 
tender, his receiving and entertaining the officers that com- 
manded his men etc etc. 

Another witness confirmed several particulars already men- 
tioned, but told that he saw the Master burn his white cockade 
and that he believed him very unwilling to engage. 

Then a blacksmith was called who was so stupid that the 
managers were ashamed to examine him after he had been 
sworn, which pleased Lovat greatly. 

The house adjourned to Friday, and it was said there woud 
be a motion on Thursday in the house of Commons concerning 
the naming of members etc but they have not yet made any. 

Imperfect as the above account is, what follows will be still 
more so, as I have it only by hearsay, not being able to attend 
the tryal. 

On Friday an other Fraser who had been his secretary and 
was wounded was examined and his evidence was very strong, 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 167 

as to the forcing his son, raising his clan, corresponding with 
Murray, the P. sec., Lochiel etc. 

Two servants of Murray's confirmed the fact of Lovat's 
meeting with the clans after the Battle of Culloden, and agreeing 
to the raising his men etc. 

Sir E. Fawkner gave an account of what passed between 
Lovat and him which no doubt you have heard from Sir E. My 
Lord being asked whether he had any question to put to Sir E. 
answered no, that he was that gentleman's humble servant, and 
wished him joy of his young wife. 

I need give you no account of the written evidence that was 
produced as I imagine you may have seen it at Inverness or 
London, a letter was read of Lovats to Secretary Murray, one to 
the young Pretender, and one to Lochiel in which he complains 
highly of Macleod's deserting and deceiving of him, and sets 
forth at lenth the horrid imprecations with which Macleod had 
loaded himself (when Lovat saw him last) if h& did not join with 
the Erasers in the Rebellion. I am sorry our friend was in the 
house, when this letter was read, it occasions much reflexion 
and abuse, and as the proper conduct on such an occasion, is 
extremely delicate, pray give him your advice. 

Sir John Strange is to sum up next Monday, and I suppose 
Murray will again be called to prove the letter etc. The solicitor 
is reserved for the reply after Lovat has made his defence. 

Yesterday I am honoured with yours of the 7th of which I 
shall make the best use, at present no body thinks or talks of any 
thing but the tryal. The clause about the Baron Courts bids 
fair to make the whole bill miscarry, the compensation though 
ever so moderate will ammount to an immense sum and no body 
will be pleased or think himself paid. I shall write soon. Be- 
lieve me ever yours 

A. Mitchell. 

Macleod was placed in an awkward position. The last time he had 
seen Lovat he had for the moment deliberately deceived him with a view 
to gaining time also perhaps because he was in Beaufort. 

The President was one of the few who knew the truth. At the trial 
Lovat proposed to call MacLeod as a witness, and leave was given; but, 



16$ MORE CULLODEN 

having been told that questions could be put to the witness by the other 
side as well, he saw fit to withdraw from this idea: (see D. N. Mackay, 
"Trial of Lord Lovat," pp. 338 and 247). MacLeod's evidence must have 
been fatal. 

Writing 9 April 1747 William Grant told the President 

This day your old acquaintance Lovat, whose real character and 
history I believe nobody knew better than your Lordship made 
his exit with great constancy and decency as I am told. (Hist. 
MSS. Com. Laing MSS. vol. II. p. 392). 

On the same date Sir Arthur Forbes wrote 

Its astonishing with what resolution and sang-froid Lovat dyed 
today .... Tho MacLeod could write you many more 
things (at least as I suppose), he desires to be excused till Satur- 
day, ("Gulloden Papers" GGGXLV). 

Whatever MacLeod may have said on this subject has not sur- 
vived. He had written in very ordinary fashion two days previously, 7 
April, to the President from London. 

My dear Lord 

You've been so silent of late that I imagine either some of my 
letters have miscaryed or that some parts of them you do not like 
to answer. I write this att Sr Arthur's desire to beg you speak 
to some of the commissioners of the Customs to re examine 
Rannie the King's cooper at Leith's conduct during the time of 
the late Rebellion. Mr Scroop says its what they may do, and I 
believe they are wrote to about it. If [undecipherable] has been 
spoke to to take the command in Scotland I wish he would, as I 
dare say he would do the service well and be agreeable to the 
country. 

We expect great news soon from Flanders as the DuKe is by 
this time in the field. Midly's [Medley] success in takeing and 
dispersing the French transports going to Genoa gave high spirits 
att Court. I ever am Yours 

Normand MacL'eod. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 169 

On llth April Brodie of Brodie, Lord Lyon, wrote to the President 
from London. The letter is printed in "Culloden Papers" (CGCXLVI) 
but a long paragraph has been omitted and also the endorsement 
(which refers to it) "The Lyon's letter acknowledging his ingratitude to 
My Father." It is here reprinted in full. 

My good Lord, 

As Sir Arthur and McLeod write to you so frequently the occur- 
rences here, I need no't trouble you with a repetition of them; 
especially as, since Tuesday last, there has nothing remarkable 
happened, except Lovat's dying with courage and decency, for- 
giving all Mankind. He, I am told, blamed your Lordship & 
McLeod for somewhat; but I have no't heard the particular. I 
hear, he blamed Gortuleg, to whose care he trusted some of the 
papers produced against him; and said, that Gortuleg was a Pupil 
or a Spy of your Lop and McLeod. Sir Lud. Grant tells me, he 
regrated ever having differed with his Family; and that his pro- 
vocation agt Sir James Grant was, that your Lop told him, 
Sir James had solicited to take away his Company from him. 
Meantime this trouble is chiefly to acknowledge with great 
gratitude your favours in recommending me to your friends of 
the Town of Inverness, which I am sure will effectually secure 
my seat in Parliament, without owning any obligation to any 
body else. My Lord, I do assure you upon my honour that when 
I reflect upon my former ingratitude to your Lordship it is the 
most disagreeable idea that can possibly present itself to my 
view and makes me detest myself. So all I shall therefore say 
on the subject so unpleasing to me is that I hope by more years 
and experience I am taught not to be so easily bit again, and 
therefore I do think I may be able to promise upon my future 
gratitude, when so thoroly convinced of former ingratitude. 
And so I hope I may sincerely declare that I have the honour to 
be with sincere respect and regard 

My good Lord 

Your Lordship's most faithlul most 
obedient and most obliged humble servant 

Alexr Brodie, 
W 



170 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

Brodie duly represented the Inverness Burghs from 1747 till his death. 
The importance, however, of the above letter lies in its reference to Lovat 
and MacLeod, which may serve as an introduction to the following from 
a copy now among the Eraser-Mackintosh MSS. in the Register House. 
The document from which the copy was made was itself a copy, being 
headed "A copy of a letter from S of M n to his Friend att 
Edinburgh." The writer was Robert Scheviz, sometime of Muirtown, 
and the letter is dated from Inverness 2 May 1748. Scheviz was one of 
the witnesses against Lord Lovat no proof whatever has been found for 
the assertions he makes. When Lovat was asked whether he had any 
questions to ask that witness he replied "My Lords, he has said so many 
false and wicked things that I do not know what questions to ask him or 
where to begin." (D. N. Mackay, "Trial of Lord Lovat"). 

Sir, 

I was very unwilling to write you on a subject so much to the dis- 
like of some people and which may offend iff made known to 
them yett for your satisfaction and if possible to clear my own 
character once unsullied I Laid aside my Scruples and in these 
few Lines endeavour to regain the good opinion of my Country- 
men and Friends and in the old Scots Phrase Lay the 
Saddle on fHe right Horss as I find now to my sade Experience 
that my being Witness against the Late L[or]T) L[ova]t has gone 
pretty far to Ruin my Reputation as well as my Interest I must 
in justice to my Selfe and to my Posterity Lett the world know 
the reson which Induced me to become an Evidence and that the 
facts may be understood and the Candid Reader with Impartial- 
ity Judge I must begin this short history of my Life as far back 
as the year 1741. In that year the L[or]D L[ova]t at the Desire 
of some of his Political Parliamentary friends resolved to have 
the L[air]D of McL [MacLeod] in Parliament and tho Sir 
J[ame]s G[ran]t was L[or]D L[ovt]t Brother in Law and then 
sitting member for the county of Inverness and made the Interest 
and Countenance of the M[inist]ry and the Disposal of several 
Commissions in the Army such was L[or]D L[ova]ts power and 
address that he got Sir J[ame]s Turned out and McL[eo]d 
Elected in his place. I was then a voter in that County and much 
inclined to support Sir J[ame]s G[rant]s Interest however by 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. m 

the interest L[or]D L[ova]t hade in me the advance of a little 
money by himself and his Doers and the Pompous promise from 
the L[air]D of McL[eo]D att this Election this introduced Great 
intimacies and Friendship betwixt me and the new member and 
he having been frequently at the L[or]D L[ova]ts howss I was 
made one of the party known in some Degree to the Political 
Transactions of the noble L[or]D and his guest. I had Likewise 
seen and read a good deal of the correspondence betwixt my 
L[or]D and the new member prior to Augt. 1745. I hade also 
share of my L[or]Ds confidence and received from him some 
marks of friendship which ended with my not complying with 
his Will in the affairs transacted in the country in the 1745, after 
the battle of Gulloden I had frequent conferences with the 
L[or]D L[y]on and another Gentleman of Distinction and then 
without reserve I told what 1 knew of my L[or]D L[ova]ts ac- 
cession to the Late Rebellion. I had then no thought of being 
made a witness to Destroy the man to whom I owed many obli- 
gations. I was so unfortunate to be too open Particularly to the 
L]or[d L[yo]n who in conjunction with m[c]L[eo]D Discovered 
all my conversation and what they themselves know of my 
L[or]D L[ova]ts intrigues to those employed in the Governments 
service I was then attacked from all corners to give Evidence 
against my L[or]D L[ova]t Particularly by the L[or[D L]yo]n 
and M[ac]L]eo]D they told me it would be the greatest service 
done to the family of L[ova[t to have the old man beheaded 
which would save the son, this was the constant language and 
even inforced by some of those whom I loo.ked upon to be friends 
to that unhappy family this induced me to make an open breast 
and not only agreed to be a witness against my L[or]D but I be- 
came a Sollicetor advising Severalls to Join with me to be Evi- 
dence for the Grown. I gave notice of several persons proper to 
be brought Evidence against the unfortunate L[or]D att the 
same time I was put upon my guard not to give up in the list 
two or three persons because if they were brought to the bar they 
behooved consistant with truth to mention m[ac]L[eo]d and 
make him accessory to L[or]D L[ova]ts treasonable practices in 
many strange instances and iff I hade been my Selfe Examened 



172 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

upon that point I could have discovered more of that Gentlemans 
Intrigues than could have hangd him and twenty Lairds but as 
I apprehend he had made up his peace with the m[inist]ry no 
questions was asked concerning him when the witnesses were 
brought to Inverness and Examined by Kil[ravoc]k who then be- 
came a violent enemy to L[or]d L[ova]t as appeared by his con- 
duct in accepting an office which must remain for ever a Blot in 
his Scutcheon and great is the pity considering his family and 
the unsullied character of his heir and Successur I say when 
these witnesses were Examined I was very assistant in making 
up the proper Questions to be put to them, some of the witnesses 
were sent to prison for not complying others were threatened 
and even there houses burnt and their cattle Driven away for 
not attending Kil[ravoc]ks Court, these things having alarmed 
some Gentlemen in the Government they sent a fresh Agent from 
Edinburgh to Inverness who they thought hade more law and 
less violence in his temper than the managers of the new Court 
att Inverness and he prevailed on Severals to sett out from 
Inverness to London to be Evidence against the L[or]d L[ova]t. 
I was then preparing for my Journey but having neither the 
Language of England nor countenance Enough to appear befor 
such a Solemn Court to Give a long History of transactions for 
some years past I waited of a Revd m[iniste]r of the G[ospe]l 
who very generously sett down from my own notes all I hade to 
say in clear and Distinct order and to him I was so much obliged 
for my regular conduct att the bar, on my arrival att London I 
communicate to my L[or]d L[yo]n what I was to say of which 
he approved and after being examined by the Sollr for the Crown 
I and the other Witnesses were confined to a mess[enge]rs Howss 
till the day of the tryall and what Happened at the tryall it 
is needless to inform you as you are too well acquainted with 
itt already, there was one circumstance however that happened 
in course of my Examination which gives me great pain. I was 
asked by a noble Lord iff I held any Lands of the L[or]d L[ova]t 
by tack or other ways, iff I was owing him any money or rent, 
to which I answered in the negative particularly with Respect 
to a tak or Rent, the fact is I had a Sett from L[or]d L[ova]t of 



MORE CULLODEN PAPEHS. 173 

some Lands near the Kirk of Kilmorak and give my bill to my 
L[or]ds Chamberlain for the Rent of these Lands and which I 
believe stands in his hands still unpaid, this fact I am obliged 
to explain to prevent the calumny thrown out against me as iff 
I had willfully perjured my self I never would have answered 
In the negative had I understood the meaning of the noble Lords 
question but as I was neither master of the English Language 
nor understood the English Lord that asked the Question I un- 
luckily answered in the negative. After L[or]d L[ova]ts Sen- 
tence and Execution I had frequent meetings with the Instru- 
ments of my Disgrace they made me still believe I was to have a 
nominall Post for Life but behold the cheat, one of these Persons 
I have reason to believe Received a Large Sume of money to be 
given to me of which he has thought fitt not to communicate a 
penny to me to this Hour. I was forced for want of money to 
Remain with a Broken Leg in a privat hole att Londo.i to avoid 
the force of Dilligence from a Gentleman who was once my 
friend and I believe had no other Quarral att me than my be- 
koming Evidence agt his friend, Remaining in this unhappy 
Situation I Received notice from the L[air]d of M[ac]Ld to 
repair furthwith to Scotland to attend his Election att Inverness 
that on my arrival att Edinburgh my charges would be paid me 
and something more for discharging my pressing debts. I sett 
out from London with my Brother in Law the [?] young L[air]d 
of D[unballo]ch in a post chaise and on our arrival att Edin- 
burgh the L[air]d of m[c]ld [MacLeod's] doer attended us and 
from him we received orders conserning our further journey to 
Inverness where I was to receive Everything to my mind, butt 
soon after our arrival there we found Major G[ran]t who had 
opposed Mcid [MacLeod] give up his pretensions to the Elec- 
tion because the F[rase]rs who had the Ballance of Power in 
there hands declared for M[ac]L[eo]d not from any real affec- 
tion for him butt for another consideration which I wish may 
answer there expectations. For this Situation I was so far from 
meeting with the kindly Reception I expected from the people 
of that Place that every Body there Except a few Lookd upon 
me with an Evil Eye and my very old intimate friends Denyd 



174 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

my embraces. I immediately Repaired to [Thomas Fraser of] 
D[unballo]chs houss in my way to my own houss but to my 
surprise the houss was Surrounded by some hundreds of women 
and men in womans Gloaths threatening to pull down the houss 
unless I was delivered up to their fury and nothing could have 
prevented my falling a sacrifice to there wrath but a Detachment 
of the Army from Inverness who came just in time to my relief 
and they conducted me safe to Inverness, no sooner had I arrived 
there than I was attacked by the Law Artillery Mornings and 
Captions were my daily companions and nothing prevented my 
being put in Prison but the Interposition of one or two of my 
friends, I was promised Great assistance from M[ac]L[eo]d my 
debts were to be paid my family suported but how soon his 
turn was over all his promises vanished and I will make no 
other Remarks on his Conduct than to think with others that his 
Conduct of late years has Rendered him Rather the object of 
pity than the object of there Resentment, lie, is neglected by his 
friends Despised and Rediculd by all Partys and in that unlucky 
situation I Leave him, but to return to my own case I am now 
in a Town where I dare not appear on the Street without the 
Risque of my life I dare not venture to my own Country without 
the imminent Hazzard of my own Life I am now forced to part 
with my little interest in that Country att a price far below the 
value and tho the Suspension of Dilligence Lately procured for 
me may prevent my person being thrown into goal yet my Lib- 
erty is for ever confined, all these misfortunes are brought upon 
me by my appearing Witness at L[or]D L[ova]ts Trial, happy 
were it for me had I followed the advice of a Gentleman att 
London who easily for saw the misery which was to follow my 
Conduct but unlucky for me I neglected that advice and followed 
the advice of men of Dissimulation and Treachery who I now see 
but too late have laid aside all sence of honour and Good prin- 
cipals and Sacrificed these and my Interest to there own wicked 
ends I am now obligd to avoid greater mischief to retire to the 
utmost corner of the [possibly Earl of Sutherland's] Territorys 
and there remain if my Enemy shall allow me during the Re- 
maining part of my Life reflecting with horror and Dettestatibn 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 175 

of my own Late Conduct incessantly Praying forgiveness to the 
two Gentlemen so oft repeated in this Letter who were the cause 
of my misfortunes as much as there own Eternal Disgrace. I 
have att Large Sett down by way of Memoirs the Transactions 
of the times from the 1736 to the 1747 and these I will communi- 
cate to you in proper time wherein you will see the naked truth 
and at the same time Discbverys made of Persons and circum- 
stances that will surprise you, Some of the friends of the family 
of L[ova]t are become my persecutors I wish they would Ex- 
amine into the Conduct of some of there own clan partly known 
by there actions and some still behind the Courtain who were in 
the Secrets of there Chief and trusted by him and there malice 
against me ought att Least to Divide and they share of itt, these 
Gentlemen last mentioned I painted in there true colours in my 
memoirs. I have thus given you a Short Detail in way of abridg- 
ment of my memoirs for your satisfaction and others who may 
have an inclination or time to Examine into my Conduct and I 
hope sometime after this to furnish you with a Larger Subject 
more to your taste than this can be and I ever am 

Your obligd and most faithfull & most 
obedient Servt 

(Signed) R[obert] S[cheviz] 

That Lovat's fate found sympathy in many quarters is amply proved. 
Even Hugh Inglis, a staunch supporter of the Government, could write 
from London 9 April 1747, to his friend, Gilbert Gordon, 

Poor Lovat suffers this day. Severalls of bur countrymen have 
behaved like villains at the tryall. 

Two days later, 11 April, he penned the well-known letter, addressed 
to the same correspondent at Inverness. 

My Dr Sir 

I wrote you by last post & now as then, can give you but poor in- 
couragement with regard to our fishing. Never poor people were 
so unlucky as to the sale, still large quantities arriving daily. 
Rob, Rodger is not yet come up, what has happened in his ad- 



176 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

ventures is still a mystery to me, Tho' there will be no dificulty 
in recovering the Insur. I houp. Poor Lord Lovat was beheaded 
a few hours after writing my last. He behaved like ane old true 
Duelnach, quite undaunted even to the last. Made several witty 
speeches, which seems quite agreeable to the bulk of the people. 
His corpse is to be brought down by the Pleadger, I have been 
looking out for another sloop, but none to be had worth buying. 
I expect to be loaded this insueing week, and if our old good 
luck continues, I houp to be with you soon. My best wishes to 
good Mrs Gordon, and all true Friends 

I am Dr. Sir 
Yours for ever 

Hugh Inglis. 

This letter for long furnished evidence that Lovat's body actually had 
been removed from the Tower and brought to Kirkhill, but this assertion 
has since been disproved. 

From Lord Hardwicke to the Duke of Newcastle, dated from Powis 
House, 12th April 1747, "at night." (Newcastle Papers) 

My Dear Lord 

Your Grace will pardon me for taking the liberty to acquaint you 
with what I have heard relating to a Story, which runs about 
Town of leave having been given to carry Lord Lovat's body to 
be buried at Castle-downie. Lord Findlater tells me it may pro- 
bably endanger the public Peace in that part of the Country. 
Highland Funerals are allways attended with vast numbers of 
People, often tumultuous and riotous; and on this occasion, it is 
said Industry has been used beforehand to make it so. This in- 
formation may make it not improper at least to enquire into the 
circumstances. 



* i 

Ever Yours 

Hardwicke. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 177 

(9) MISCELLANEOUS, APRIL TO SEPTEMBER 1747 

The Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, which was passed in 1747, was not 
the work of the Court of Session, which had declined to comply with an 
order from the House of Lords to this effect. Suggestions, however, had 
been made and the President had occupied himself with the matter. 
The following holograph letter, perhaps to Lord Hardwicke, is dated 
from Stoneyhill 28 April 1747. 

My Lord 

This morning I had the very obliging letter which your Lop did 
me the honour to write to me from Twickenham of the 23rd with 
a very needless excuse for your not having sooner answered a 
Letter of mine of an old date, and wittfa defence still more un- 
necessary of yourself, against misrepresentations, which you 
suspect, may have been made of your conduct, in relation to the 
Bill now pending. With respect to the last, the just esteem I 
have for your Lop, is too well known to High and Low in the 
Country, to permit any misrepresentations of your conduct, to 
find their way to me, and if they did the familiar acquaintance 
with which your Lop, has for many years honoured me with, 
and the perfect knowledge I have of your motives and manner of 
acting, in everything that relates to the good Of the Publick, 
would secure my mind against being touched by any such False 
Representations, should any Fool be hardy enough to fling them 
out. The sphere in which my good stars have confined me to 
Act, has been always narrow, and therefore few of my little 
transactions, have fallen within the publick ken, but if your Lop 
was as well acquainted with the Principals that guide me, as 
I am with these that determine you, I sh. not tho' I have the 
honour to have some Detractors of note, fear that their misrepre- 
sentations would stick with your Lop, on the contrary I am satis- 
fied when I leave this World, you would say you ITad lost a 
Friend. As to the first, when Recess from the Business of the 
Court to which I belong, gave me Leisure to trouble your Lop, 
wih a very long Letter, about the Jurisdiction Bill, I know I was 
writing to a man who had not a minute to bestow on Ceremony 
hardly two to bestow on the common exigencies of life. J 



178 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

trusted that your Lop would from the Principle that guides you, 
not only take it in good Part, but consider it so far as suggested 
anything for the Publick Service. But I had no notion that your 
Lop was to sit down to make a regular answer, and I see with 
some satisfaction, that some Parts of the Bill to which I had 
objections are altered, the others in Respect to which my Re- 
flexions have not made such Impressions, are not. As to the 
main scope of the Bill, your Lop knows perfectly well my senti- 
ments. I feel your Lop's motives, and think the end desirable 
nor have I ever anywhere held a different Language. The only 
article ever I doubted of on this head, was, the expediency. I 
proposed my doubts to those concerned in taking the Resolution, 
as my duty required. But as they are much better judges, than 
I am, of what is or is not fit to be done, there I left it, and have 
never signified a different opinion. What your Lop suggests, as 
matter fit to produce laughter, were to be explained in conversa- 
tion, I guess at, and I must confess I have heard of some things, 
that made me laugh in my sleeve, as the saying is, in this 
Country, and I should have been surprised at them, if anything 
that comes from that quarter could surprise me. 

As to the project, which I consider but as accessory 
to the main design of the Bill nf trying small Civil 
Causes at the Circuits, I exposed my sentiments to 
your Lop heretofore. The scheme then devised, of 
bringing those Causes to be tryed in the Form of 
suspensions has been changed, but then it has been most cer- 
tainly changed for a worse. Appeals, at the Discretion of the 
litigious, will produce, much, and what is worse irreparable 
mischief, to the Lower Class of Mankind. But I have wrote so 
much on this subject to our Lord Advocate, whose complaisance 
against his own opinion I blame, but who, I hope, will be so 
just to your Lop, and to this poor Country as to impart the ad- 
vices he has received. But I flatter myself this part of the Bill 
will be dropped in the Committee. If that should not be the 
case, I look upon the thing to be of so much consequence, that I 
can venture to conjure your Lop. by those interests which you 
have most at heart, Your own Fame, and the concerns of the 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 179 

Helpless, to consider it well before it pass the House of Lords. 
If my Lord Advocate has omitted to siiew your Lop, what I wrote 
to him, I can send you copys. The Liberty which I have already 
used, is full Proof, that I believe you look upon me, as being 
what I most certainly am, your Lops 

Most Faithfull and most obedient 
humble Servant 

From the President [to Henry Felham] dated from Stoneyhill, llth May 
1747. 

Dear Sir 

When I tell you that I feel myself hurt, by a Resolution you 
can alter, you will not wonder that I apply to you. Upon the 
death of the late Surveyor General of the Customs at the Port of 
Inverness, I recommended a very honest man to succeed him. 
Mr Brodie, the Lord Lyon recommended another, and the Com- 
petition between us was I presume the reason, that the office was 
kept vacant since last May. I am now informed it is to be sunk, 
as unnecessary and as having been created many years ago only 
to oblige my Brother. If this suggestion has been the cause of 
Dropping the Office, I am not without hopes that the resolution 
may be altered, because it is undoubtedly false. The Officer first 
appointed was indeed named by Sir R. W[alpole] to oblige my 
Brother, and the Private History of that Transaction was merry 
enough. But as to the office its self, I had laboured for years to 
have it granted, as the only possible means, of restraining the 
unbounded smuggling, which destroyed the Revenue, as well as 
the large Country which lies on both sides of the Murray Firth, 
and I take upon me to say that in the hands of an honest man, it 
must be of very Great Service, whereas without it, or some more 
expensive Guard the Prevention of Smuggling is impossible. 
What 1 write on this subject (Pardon my Vanity) is the more to 
be considered, that I have contributed more to the support of the 
Revenue, than any. Perhaps more than all my Countrymen put 
together, and I hope you know me, so well as to believe, that I 
Scorn to say what is not true, in a serious matter. 



180 MORfi CULLODEN PAPERS. 

If what I have taken the liberty to suggest, makes that im- 
pression upon you which I flatter myself it may, as to the utility 
of the Office, I believe you will meet with no difficulty from Mr 
Brodie as to the Nomination of the Officer, having reasons to 
think he will concur with my Request. 

The Information I have had from Publick Report that Earl 
Loudoun's Highland Regiment is to be sent abroad, gives me 
some uneasiness, as it leaves the communication, between the 
attainted Rebells, abroad and their Friends in the Highlands, 
open, to all intents and purposes. But I am hopeful as that 
danger must have been foreseen, measures may have been taken 
to prevent it. I wish effectual ones may. 

All I have further to say is to ask your Pardon for my Pre- 
sumption, and to assure you that I am with a very warm sense 
of your Friendship 

Dear Sir, 

Your most faithful and 
most obedient humble Servant 

As Brodie of Brodie, Lord Lyon, was then nursing the Inverness 
Burghs his concurrence with the Lord President in the matter of the 
above mentioned appointment is easily accounted for. See his letter of 
9th June 1747, which follows. 

Andrew (afterwards Sir Andrew) Mitchell, (through his wife) of 
Thainston, a great friend and admirer of the President, had already 
written, 6th April 1747, to him on the subject of entering parliament 
("Gulloden Papers" DXXXII). In this he was successful, representing 
Aberdeenshire from 1747 to 1754 and afterwards the Elgin Burghs. He 
is best known from his association with Frederick the Great at Berlin, 
at which Court he was Ambassador from 1765 till his death there in 1771. 
The following is dated from London 22nd May 1747. 

My dear Lord 

As I wrote to you last night by post, I give you this trouble by 
an express which goes directed to Mr Tho: Fairholm. The 
reason of it is fairly this, upon a notice I had from Scotland of an 
intention to dissolve the Parliament at the end of this Session, I 
have made enquiry here, and I find that that matter has actually 



CULLODEN PAPERS, is! 

been in deliberation and may possibly take effect, But as this is 
not certain I must desire the favour of you not to mention it to 
anybody) and therefore there is no time to be lost with regard 
to settling matters in the country. Sir Arthur [Forbes] is still 
of opinion that if Lord Braco could be secured all will be well, 
but how to bring this about I must leave to your Lop. and him, 
who I know have my concerns sincerely at Heart. The great 
difficulty appears to me to be the breaking of this affair properly 
to the County, and for fear of giving any offence, the best ex- 
pedient that occurs to me is, that Sir Arthur may show the en- 
closed letter which is calculated chiefly for Lord Braco, I have 
sent it under your Lordship's cover that you may if you approve 
of it, forward it to him with proper direction, and if you do not, 
I desire you will destroy the letter and tell me what I should do, 
or advise Sir Arthur directly what he ought to do, for you know 
whatever is your opinion will be mine. 

I have had much trouble and long waiting before I could 
procure a proper opportunity to explain my affair to the D. of 
Newcastle, but I had no sooner done it, than he gave me the 
strongest assurances of assistance and support, I have since been 
with Mr Pelham, and he has concurred as heartily as his 
brother, and gave me leave to acquaint my friends. From both 
I have the most solemn promises that it shall not be mentioned 
to any person whatever, but with my leave, and that it shall be 
declared in any manner that I shall direct. Mr Pelham told me 
that he had never given his approbation of Sir Archd. Grants 
offering himself a Candidate for the County, and gave for his 
reason that Sir Arthur was a man of Character and your rela- 
tion. The manner that both the Qentlemen mentioned Jhave 
behaved pleases me much, they have exacted no promises, and 
therefore bound me more strongly, and when I objected that this 
affair if the circumstances were known, might not only hurt me 
but my friends interest in the County, they assured me that no 
use should in any event be made of the secret that I have trusted 
them with. Upon the whole I thought it better fairly and 
openly to tell the fact as it was, than to dissemble or conceal 
any circumstance, and I think I have reason to believe that I 



182 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

have succeeded better, than if I had taken the contrary method, 
and at all events I shall hurt my friend less. The fair and open 
path has hitherto been my Delight, and I will not depart from it. 
The D. of A[rgyllJ neither knows nor suspects anything of the 
matter, and I hope before I declare to have my battery so strong 
that he will not attack it. 

The Debate of yesterday was very extra-ordinary, neither side 
entered much into the question, but the D. of A[rgyll] made the 
most exotic speech I ever heard, had I not been informed before 
that he was to speak for the bill I should have thought from his 
facts and reasonings that he intended to vote ag't it. He 
began by telling the house that the people of Scotland were 
against the bill, he then gave a detail to show that the laws of 
Scotland were very imperfect, that before the union there were 
perpetual feuds and civil wars among the Nobility, that there 
was no treason law till after the union everything being deemed 
treason that the administration and privy council were pleased 
to construe to be so, yet that the Jurisdictions and powers of the 
nobility had been useful in preserving the Constitution ag't the 
attempts of the Crown, he expatiated much on the iniquity of 
the Privy Council, and the great abuses introduced by the 
manner of managing the Parliament of Scotland, which he said 
was not according to the modern manner of having a majority 
and he told the house that he had advised his predecessor to 
resign these great powers into the hands of the Crown, he de- 
clared that the taking them away was in no sense agt. the 
Articles of the Union, he exhorted the Ministry to do more, and 
to make laws not from the Scots Statute book, but desired to 
be governed by Acts of the British parliament, he added that by 
this Scotland would become rich and its inhabitants become in- 
dustrious, and gave for instance an Estate that he possessed in 
one of the Western Islands which he had improved from 500 
per Annum to 2,500 per Annum. He bestowed great en- 
comiums on the law of England, and praised the Chancellor 
copiously, and concluded warmly for the Bill. I forgot to tell 
you that he gave by the bye a very inaccurate and tedious ac- 
count of the introduction of feudal tenures into Scotland. Upon 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 183 

the whole the speech seemed calculated to show what might be 
said against the bill, and of consequence to enhance the merit 
of voting for it, and the dreadful description he made of Scot- 
tish policy and government, set in contrast to the wise policy 
and just laws of England, must give a high idea of the candour 
and capacity of the Speaker to an English audience, who gener- 
ally think every other nation their inferiors. My Lord 
Tweeddale spoke well for the bill but declared against that 
clause of it which gives power to the circuit to try civil causes. 
The Earl of Morton spoke in a very manly manner agt. the bill, 
and declared that he thought it would not answer the end, he 
praised his old friend Sir Robert, and lashed both sides with 
great impartiality. Only 16 voted agt. the commitment of the 
bill. 

We have no news from abroad, three more ships of the fleet 
dispersed by Anson are taken and brought in. 

If your Lop. has leisure to give me your advice with regard 
to the steps to be taken here, and in what light it should be men- 
tioned to the D. of A. you may if you think it necessary send 
it to Mr Fairholm with directions to be forwarded by express, 
and I have told him to direct the packet for a merchant in the 
City. 

There has lately been a jumble in the administration, your 
friend Chesterfield gave some disgust by his ingenuous actinsr, 
but matters are now again adjusted. there are some reports that 
Lord Harrington will be made general of the Marines in lieu 
of Ireland as the D. of Dorset wants to go there Craufurd has 
got the Grays and Lord Tirawley the Covert, of Minorca. As I 
wrote last night to Sir Arthur I think it needless to repeat what 
I then said, only as I told him in a concise manner and in a sort 
of cypher of the encouragement I had met with perhaps your 
mentioning that you are satisfied on that point may be of use, 
everything else I leave to yourself and hope you will forgive this 
trouble from 

Your affectionate 

'Andrew Mitchell, 



184 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

P.S. Our friend Lytilton has behaved in all this affair as I 
expected. I send you along with his compliments a pamphlet 
he had lately published. I think the argument ingenious, and 
the writing very elegant, but shall be glad to know your thoughts 
of it. 

The first Lord Lyttelton published several works. A note to the 
above letter in a different handwriting indicates that it may have been 
his work on the Conversion of St Paul. See also "Culloden Papers" 
CCCXLIX. 

From MacLeod to the Lord President dated from London, 23rd May 

1747. 

My dear Lord. 

I had yours of the llth with that to Mr Pelham and yesterday I 
had ane hours conversation with him, he is to write you himself, 
but seems resolved not to revive John Baillies place for the pre- 
sent as there was so many different aplications for it and none of 
the aplyers seemed willing to yield to the other and he did not 
incline to disoblidge anie of them and that the office might be 
dispensed wt as not extreamlie necessarie. As to what you've 
said of Loudouns Highland Regiment as I formerlie told you 
the King has ordered the 30 (paper torn) of adition to five Com- 
panies and five ensigns and by what I can learn that is all that 
is to be done for the present. The ensigns are not I believe yet 
named. There is ane allowance to rase a Dutch Regiment of two 
Battalions 1600 men: of wh. Ld. Drumlenrigg is Colonell Jo 
Stewart Lt. Collonell and Jo. Younge Major, and I believe its 
understood they may list common men Tho they were in the 
rebellion. The Jurisdiction bill was debated in the house of 
Peers Thursday. Tweedale was violentlie for it, but is for leav- 
ing out the clause wh. gives the Lords of Circuit power to judge 
in civil cases, the Duke of Argyle spoke near two hours, The 
judges of these things say il was a very fine, a very learned and 
a vary artfull Thing, he gave much good advice to those who 
were or should hereafter bo our Ministers, he objected to the time 
of bringing in this Bill (but now it was too far gone to stop) he 
showed it would not answer the ends for wh. it was intended 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 185 

but might joined with other things be a proper mean, he entered 
into a long detail of our Constitution and History as also of that 
of England, he showed that these Jurisdictions were at the time 
of granting them and long after the great ground work of our 
liberties and the strong Bulwark against Prerogative, now the 
Case was altered in England and Parliament was the fence of our 
liberties and it was proper they should be so in Scotland also, 
and concluded for the Bill wtout saying he would or would not 
be for amending anie part of it in the Committee. Moray lost his 
maiden head and really spoke well against it, by wh Sutherland 
had nigh lost fourty Guineas, for Moray beated 20 Guineas that 
he would speak and 20 that Sutherlanl would not speak, the 
money went to his heart and up he gott, said he had severall of 
these Jurisdictions wh. his family had gott for their Services to 
the Crown that he had no mind to part with them and therefore 
he was against committing the Bill. Moreton spoke against it, 
so did Beaufort and Westmorland. The D. of Montrose was 
dubious but divided for the Bill, for the Bill Chesterfield Berkley 
of Straton and Findlater, Baccleugh was the only Scots man 
joined the three speakers against ffie Bill and they had 12 
Englishes with them four. I saw Mr Scroop yesterday after 
being with Mr Pelham, and he told me he apprehended, the 
matter would turn out in that way, and that a man that chooses 
drawing the [undecipherable] with you now and then, was at 
the bottom of it, and I do apprehend he is right and ever 

am yours 

N. M. L. 

Its said the C .t Council are to come to resolutions relative 
to the Master of Lovat and severall others Mounday. 

From the Lord President to the Lord Advocate dated from Stonyhill 29 
May 1747. 

My Lord. 

A Jaunt which my health obliged me to take for a few days in 
the Country, from which I returned only two days agoe, pre- 
vented my receiving and consequently my returning thanks 
sooner, for yours of the 12th, wch gives ane accott of the Juxis- 
v 



186 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

diction bill as it past in the Committee; Reasoning on that subjict 
is now late, and therefore I shall say little more, on it, then that 
I am under no small concern, for the Consequences of these parts 
of it to which I objected: The option wch the Suspender has, to 
resort to the Court of Session, does not cure my apprehensions, 
because tho a Suitor really aggrieved, may prefer that methode 
yet a Litigeous willfull Suitor, who means only to distress his 
adversary, and to gratify his own humour, never will, and if 
such a Suitor appeall capriciously, as he may, from the just sen- 
tence of a Baron, in such tryffles as are competent before the 
Court In most cases the appeall interposed, will be equal to an 
absolvitor, for lack of means to prosecute; and the small jurisdic- 
tion reserved to the Baron will thus be entirely defeated, as weel 
as the poorer claimants before the other Inferior Courts, must be 
dissapointed, after he has recovered a just Judgment, if he has 
not the wherewithall to follow out his rightfull demand, or judges 
it not prudent to lay out 20 or 30 shillings for the recovery of 5 or 
6. The Limitation of the endurance, of this part of the bill, is 
surely some relief, the effect whereof it is not very likely I shall 
see; But if the operation of this bill shall be, as I very much fear 
it will, a stay of recovery of all petty debts, for a term of ten 
years, where the debiter is litigeous, I doubt that term will be 
thought rather too long: I am confident my Lord Chancellor, does 
not see this matter in the light in wch. I doe; else he never would 
have given his consent to it, But either I have been unlucky 
enough not to explain mysel, or suggestions must have been 
made to his Lop. by other persons, to whose judgement he 
trusted, that obviate the difficulty mentioned by me, But which 
suggestions I could not remove because they were not communi- 
cated to me. His Lop. has I am certain, acted with a very safe 
conscience and from his candour I am hopefull, that if experi- 
ence shall justify my apprehensions of this part of the Bill, it will 
not be permitted to leave out the ten years, at present allotted for 
it. 

I am glad my Lord to be assured by yourself, that the charge 
I brought agt you of too great complaisance, was unjust, because 
nothing can be more dangerous, to tjiis country, then that turn in 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 18*7 

a man of your Lordp's character and abilitys, when the Law or 
Constitution of it is the Question; what made me suspect it was, 
that as you and I agreed in opinion, as to the absurdity of this 
provision, in the bill, and as your Lopp. was on the spott, able to 
confute and expose any false suggestion that might be offered in 
support of it, I could hardly conceive how the present could goe 
through if the proper arguments had been made use of agt. it. 
But if your Lopp has done all that you could doe. there surely lys 
noe more blame at your door than there does at mine. 

As to the Shirreffs power of sitting in Civil Causes, at any 
time during either of the vaccations, I confess I am not satisfied 
with it, noe more than what I am wt. what your Lordp. suggests 
as to the motive to it, vizt that Shirreffs to be appointed may be 
at the same time, practising advocats af Edinr. But as any ob- 
servations, which I have to make on this, or on what else is new 
in the bill, must come too late, and as I am intyrely a stranger to 
what is intended, with respect to these Shireffs, I had best stope 
short, and end the trouble I now give you by subscribing my 
Selfe etc. 

From Brodie of Brodie to the President, dated from London 9th June 

1747. 

My Good Lord 

I have looked over all your Letters since I came to Town and 
don't find the name of Mr Hossock in any one of them but your 
last and therefore when I begged your Lop to explain yourself I 
meant only to prevent mistakes and not to give any offence which 
if I have done I am sorry for with all my Heart, Meantime as to 
my Sentiments of having not the least difference with your Lop 
as to yielding the Promise of that contested Employment, I refer 
you to what Mr Pelham has said and Mr McLeod in their Letters 
to you on this subject. 

My Lord Notwithstanding your Lop tells me you are very 
glad my Election is fixed, I must still entreat for your Lop assist- 
ance to make it so. 

It is true that Mr Pelham has undertaken for [Lord] Fortrose that 
he will be for any person that he pleased and it is as true that Mr 



188 MORIS CIJLLODEN PAPERS. 

Pelham has wrote to him in very pressing Terms. But as he is 
averse to me, he has been trying Kilravock since he went home, 
and proposed to Kilravock to set up himself which bait has taken 
with the Baron a little in so much that he does not absolutely 
agree to the Duke of Argyll's request in my Favours, states the 
case and concludes with an appearance of his readiness to obey 
his Grace's commands. He writes to me at the same time and 
encloses my Letter to the Duke for his perusal wherein he says 
"Inverness is the leading Burrow and if the President had 
"so pleased, he might in the conversation you had at Edinh of 
"which you wrote to me have plainly told you that you was to 
"have or was not to have that Town which I thought to be abso- 
lutely at his disposal." 

He afterwards says 

"The President is not sure, or if he is, the Bussmess may be done 
"by you and him without any other." 

My Lord The occasion of my now troubling your Lop is to 
beg of you to have your Directions to the Town of Inverness 
ready for me by the time I come to Edinh as I shall not stay above 
a day there, and shall be there probably when you are throng in 
the Session that is in the middle of the week, that is McLeod and 
I are to set out on Saturday the 13th and propose being at Edinh 
on Thursday the 18th. 

I would also be obliged to your Lop if you would signify to 
Kilravock your inclinations for me that he may believe that your 
Lop is in earnest for me. 

Mr Campbell is in great earnest that my election for this Dis- 
trict may be without opposition, Because by the Dissolution of 
the Parliat his new votes are cut out, and so I think I may be able 
to carry Nairn County against him, But as he's agreeable to the 
administration that we should all be in Friendship with one an- 
other and assist one another, in our respective districts allotted for 
us, so I shall be very sorry if I shall be obliged for self-defence 
to give any disturbance. 

My Lord before I conclude I must tell you that I am informed 
that your friend George Ross has had some scheme in view for 
the Tow r n of Inverness and for some Friend nay I have been told 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. isd 

of a friend of his in the city who was to give a 1000 to pur- 
chase another Town to join Inverness, it being taken for granted 
by some people that P[rovost] Hossock will not agree to my being 
the man without my procuring him that contested employment 
which is not in my Power to do. 

For myself I do not believe there is anything in these idle 
reports, but if there is your Lop can easily knock it in the Head, 
and if I have your Letter of Recommendation to the Town of 
Inverness I doubt not of having it with or without P. Hossock's 
consent. 

Once more I beg your Lop pardon for all this Trouble which 
I hope your wonted Goodness will pardon from 

My Good Lord 

your most faithful obliged 

and obedt humble sert 

Alexr: Brodie. 

From Lady Margaret Macdonald to the President dated from Mugstot 15 
June 1747. 

My Lord, 

Your former goodness to many of Sir Alexander's friends, has 
made some of them at present put it upon me to mention them 
to your Lop. the Prospect of the Regiment to be soone raised for 
the Dutch Service has made some of our young people hope that 
it may be in your Lorsp's power to have them preferred to a 
Gommission. In this view my Lord, I take the liberty to mention 
Lieut. Allan Macdonald, who I believe your Lop. may remember 
in Gapt John McDonald's Company, I wou'd yet bring him more 
particularly to your remembrance by mentioning him by the 
title of Kingsborrow's Son, I confess that it is at this time an 
inconvenient Epethet, tho I hope with your Lop: it won't prove 
a stumbling block in the Road of his fortune. 

Capt: McDonald of Castletown, and Ensign Donald 
McDonald have already been obliged to McLeod's friendship, 
their unexpected good luck in being so soon provided for, ought 
surely to satisfy me, but as I know the particular Regard Sir 
Alexr had for the young Gentleman, who throws himself under 



i90 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

your Lop's Protection, and that I shall still believe your Lorsp. 
retains the same kind disspositions towards all his friends, or 
rather more, as they have nothing now to depend on, but the 
value then of your Lop's Judgment must always sit upon the 
memory of so worthy a man as your Late friend who I know on 
all occasions confided so entirely in your Lop. that I can't but 
looke on my self and the family he has Left, as being with much 
Sincerity and Gratitude, 
My Lord, 

you Lops 

Ever obdt Servt 

Margt Macdonald. 

From Sir Harry Munro of Foulis probably to Andrew Stone, Secretary to 
the Duke of Newcastle, dated from Foulis Castle 2nd July 1747 
(Newcastle Papers). 

Sir, 

Permit me to give you this trouble, the occasion of my writing 
will I hope apologise for me. Dureing the short time I was in 
Edinburgh, I visited frequently my young Friend, the unfortun- 
ate Son of the late Lord Lovat, I found him in such a temper of 
mind as became one under such circumstances, conscious of the 
crime he committed, and extreamly sensible of the good offices 
shown him by His Grace the D. of Newcastle, att the same time 
his health being impaired by a long and close confinement, not a 
little anxious to know what was to become of him. I am per- 
suaded that few by this time are unacquainted with the compas- 
sionate disposition of His Grace the D. of Newcastle, and others of 
His Majesty's most honorable privy Gouncell toward this un- 
happy youth. 

My Friend Sr. Lud. Grant acquaints me that he has wrote 
to you on the subject I now do, I beg to joyn my request, that the 
Duke be put in mind to move His Majesty that some resolution 
may be taken, to grant Mr Fraser his pardon, or if that be 
thought unproper to order his enlargement, Sir Ludovick Grant 
and myself being bail to present him when required. 

I am with regard, 

Sir, 
your obedient and most obliged 

Humble Servant, Harry Munro. 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 191 

From MacLeod of MacLeod to the President dated from Inverness, 25th 
July 1747. 

My Dear Lord 

I've yours of the 21st this morning, your philosophy is good 
but as you resolve to be present here, I hope and think we shall 
have no cause to put it in practice on the Present Ocasion, I hope 
if you are to use my Chaise horses it will be mentioned by the 
Moundays Post or the one that comes in here this day Se'enight 
will do, no alteration has hapened here since I wrote last I find 
John Maule is greatly in earnest to support me and has wrote 
twice to his Friend the D. of Argyll on that head. This moment 
I've a letter from Sr Arthur [Forbes] who has been at Inveralachy, 
and nothing will make him oppose me but a positive request from 
the M[aste]r of L[ova]t and he is resolved to attend here, as 
[Andrew] Mitchell is quite snugg. 

I am ever yours 

N. Macleod. 

The fact that MacLeod who had sat in Parliament for Inverness-shire 
from 1741 to 1747, was again elected does not point to unpopularity 
among the lairds who had votes, however powerful the Ministerial 
"wire-pulling." 

From the Earl of Morton to the Duke of Newcastle, dated from Dalmahoy 
27th September 1747. (Newcastle Papers). 

My Lord 

I'm told that the President Duncan Forbes's son is soliciting to 
have the Government of Inverness Castle which it seems is now 
vacant; his father's services are well known to your Grace and 
everybody else, I'm sure I may say he did more to curb the Re- 
bellion than any one Scotchman perhaps I should not be far 
wrong if I said than all scotch-men put together: but his delicacy 
is such in what concerns himself or his family that possibly he 
may not apply in behalf of his son. However as the son has 
begun his solicitations at his own hand, I will venture to say that 
if he succeeds it will be an encouragement to many of the King's 



192 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

best friends in this part of the world and Perhaps a discourage- 
ment if 'tis otherwise dispos'd of. I have the honour to be with 
the highest esteem 

My Lord 

Your Grace's 
Most obedient and 

most Humble Servant 

Morton. 

If John Forbes, younger of Culloden, were making such application 
it does not appear from the family papers, which would seem for the 
most part to have been mislaid or destroyed for the latter part of the 
year 1747. 

(10) THE END. 

About the beginning of November 1747 the Lord President became 
very ill. The following letter (from a copy made in 1837) appears to have 
been written to his son at that time. 

Dear John 

I am very sorry for you, the great charges and expenses I have 
been at in supporting his Majesty in the Rebellion have far ex- 
ceeded beyond the sum I thought it would have cost when I saw 
you last. I would advise you to go to London where I believe I 
may have some Friends yet. Mr Scroop, Mr Littleton and 
Mitchell are kind hearted and affectionate men, and they will tell 
the King that his faithfull servant Duncan Forbes has left you a 
very poor man. Farewell May the God "of Heaven and Earth 

bless you. 

Duncan Forbes. 

On 1st December he sent for William Forbes his cousin, an advocate, 
(of the Pittencrieff family) who later wrote to John Forbes, the Presi- 
dent's son, an account of what passed at that time. ("Culloden Papers" 
CGCL, here reprinted). 

Edinr, 17th March 1748. 
Dr Sir, 

I received your's; and in answer to that part of it, by which you 
want to know how your Father, on his Death Bed, expresst him- 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 193 

self with regard to the losses, dammages, & expences which your 
Uncle the late Culloden, and his Lordship, sustain'd by the two 
late Rebellions in Annis 1715 <& 1745; you'll please mind, that I 
told you, the second day after his Lordship's interment, that he 
had, upon the first day of December last, sent for me, and en- 
jbyn'd me, how soon you came to Scotland, to communicate to 
you several particulars which he then told me; and all which 
particulars, immediately after I parted with his Lop, I took 
down into wryteing, in way of memorandum; which memo- 
randum I read over to you. But, as his Lordship told the same 
things to Mr Forbes, Writer to the Signet, which he says he also 
took down in wryteing, and that you was so lucky as to come in 
time to hear the same things from his Lop's own mouth, a very 
short time before he dyed, you must certainly know the whole 
as well as I do. However, to satisfy you, I do sincerely declare, 
upon the word of an honest man, that amongst the many expres- 
sions and instructions he told me to be communicated to you, 
the following was one: 

" You will also tell my Son John, that his Uncle had been 
'* a great looser, as he himself was, by their outlays during the 
" Rebellion 1715. That his Lordship was a vast looser by the 
" Rebellion 1745; for that his factor Thorn. Stewart had expended 
" about three years rent of his Estate of Culloden on it, and putt 
" him in debt otherwise considerably; which he never discovered 
*' untill he returned from London, nor until the death of Stewart, 
" that he himself had thrown out and spent great sums of Mbnev 
" otherwise, whilst the late Rebellion subsisted; which he had 
" not adverted to, nor demanded Payment of, and for which he 
" thought himself highly blameable." 

What is above, is exactly the meaning & substance of what 
his Lop exprest upon this Article; and I shall not be positive, if 
he did not express it in the same words. I hope to see you 
before you leave this place; and if I shou'd not, I wish you a 
^PPy journey; and that you may believe that I am, most sin- 
cerely, 

Dr Sir, 

Your affectionate Cousin, 

and most obedient faithfull Servt, 

Will. Forbes, 



194 MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 

On 3rd December 1747 John Hay, the President's steward, wrote to 
Mrs Ross of Kindeace (Grizel Forbes, the President's sister) the follow- 
ing (copy among the Eraser-Mackintosh MSS). 

Madam, 

I received yours & am sorry to acquaint you that my dear 
Lord & Master has been very ill since I wrote you last, 
and continues so still. God grant by next I may give you better 
comfort. We expect the young Squire from London every day. 

>....,, 
I am writing this in my Lord's Chamber while he is now slum- 
bering If my life could borrow his it would be 

good for Scotland. All that I shall add is that I ever am Your 
Ladyship's affecte humble servant 

John Hay. 

John Forbes arrived in Edinburgh on Sunday 6th December and the 
Lord President died on Thursday 10th December 1747. 

From John Hay to Mrs Ross of Kindeace, dated from Edinburgh 10th 
December 1747. (Copy among Eraser-Mackintosh MSS). 

Madam, 

The ever to be lamented, my dear Master Lord President died this 
morning at eight of the clock and is to be interred in David 
Forbes tomb & in his dear Brother's grave; I have not words to 
express the grief that is among all the people here on account of 
his death & as for myself I believe I shall soon follow him. 
The young Squire arrived here Sunday last. I can write no 
more for grief but ever am the Family of Culloden's & your 

affecte Servant 

John Hay. 

From John Forbes, now of Culloden, to his aunt, Mrs Ross of Kindeace, 
dated from Edinburgh, 10th December 1747. (Copy among Fraser- 
Mackintosh MSS). 

My Dear Aunt 

Melancholy are the accounts which this will bring you, no less 
than the death of your worthy Brother and my Father which 
happened this morning at 8 o'clock after an indisposition of about 
five weeks, 



MORE GULLODEN PAPERS. 195 

That fatherly care with which he always cherished this poor 
Country, his love of justice & his benevolence to mankind are 
the occasion for the general grief which prevails for the loss of a 
life so truly valuable how much more then must those be 
affected who were more closely connected with him by ties of 
blood. I need not suggest this to you who are a fellow sufferer 
with myself & will therefore the more easily figure the distress of 
Your affectionate Nephew & humble Servant 

John Forbes. 

See also J. Hill Burton "Lives of Lord Lovat and Duncan Forbes 1 ' 
p. 386 where is quoted a memorandum of the last interview John Forbes 
had with his father. 

From William Grant, Lord Advocate, to the Duke of Newcastle, dated 
from Edinburgh 10th December 1747 (Newcastle Papers). 

My Lord 

I think it my duty for one, tho' your Grace, I doubt not, will 
have otherwise notice of it to mention to you, that this morn- 
ing the Lord President Forbes of the Court of Session dy'd, and 
to condole with your Grace and all the King's true friends, as I 
do most heartily, on the loss that his Majesty and this country 
have met with, of a person in that eminent station who was of 
unquestionable affection and zeal for his Majesty and his family 
and who, I expected would have been of great use at this junc- 
ture for promoting and executing the system now happily begun, 
for discouraging and by degrees extinguishing or suppressing 
the spirit of dissaffection in this country. 

I am ever with great respect, my Lord 

Your Grace's most humble and 
most obedt. Servant 

William Grant. 

The Lord President was buried on Sunday 13th December 1747 in 
the Greyfriar's Churchyard, Edinburgh, in the grave where rested the 
remains of his brother, John Forbes of Culloden. The family accounts 
show among other similar items 

Jan. 1748 To James Norries accompt for my Lord's 

scutcheon 8 9 8 

To Francis Brodie Wright his accompt for my 

Lord's funeralls . 21 2 



196 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

His funeral was splendid, being watched by the Magis- 
trates of Edinburgh, the Faculty of Advocates, and the Writers 
to the Signet, in their formalities his brethren declining the 
compliment, lest it should be made a precedent, they therefore 

attended the corpse with the relations of the family 

As he was one of the first of the Scottish lawyers who sacrificed 
at the shrine of the English graces, so he was unquestionably the 
purest and most enlightened. Nor can a young lawyer, begin- 
ning his course with every advantage, form himself upon a more 
faultless model. (Ramsay, "Scotland and Scotsmen in the 
Eighteenth Century"). 

Among the many letters which were surely received by John Forbes 
of Culloden at this time none perhaps was more typical of the universal 
regret than the following from the Master of Lovat, dated from Glas- 
gow, 26th December 1747. 

Sir 

My concern for the loss you have lately sustained will not allow 
me to be silent tho' it renders me the most unfit person in the 
world to offer any consolation. If so just a sorrow can admit 
of any you must find some in seeing all around you share so sin- 
cerely in it. But none does so more, or with greater reason than 
I do. My obligations to your Father were many. His interest 
and honest advice assisted me at times when true friends are 
most needed, but seldom found, nay while he lived I could 
hardly say I wanted a father. Thus, Sir, in whatever relation 
of life I consider myself I must be greatly affected. I love my 
country too well not to have the most sensible feeling for the 
loss it has made, and even as one of mankind I must grieve to 
see the world deprived of so great a head and so good a heart. 

You will, Sir, excuse my seeming to need rather than to 
bestow any comfort. I must own it and that I think it in vain 
to attempt to stifle so well founded a grief till reason and time 
have applied their slow remedys. Give me leave, Sir, to assure 
you that I shall alwis show by my actions and when these are 
not in my power by my good wishes towards you the gratefull re- 
membrance I have of the favours bestowed on me by your Father. 
I have the honour to be, Sir. 

Your most obedt faithfull Servant 

Simon Fraser. 



MORE GtJLLODEH PAPERS. 19? 

Part of a letter from John Forbes of Culloden to William Forbes dated 
apparently in April 1748. 

I feell so much your warm and anxious affection towards me, that 
I thought it best for me to delay answering your letters untill 
I had looked more about me and seen and conversed with my 
Fathers friends. When I came first to London tHe Vacation in 
Parliament occasioned some in whom I chiefly trust to be in the 
country. I have now seen most of them; and this morning by 
Mr Lyttleton's [afterwards Lord Lyttleton] particular desire I 
waited upon him at his house in town, brakefasted with him and 
had a conversation with him allone of about an hour where in 
gratitude I own I felt the Father and the friend. He feels so 
generously for me, that he has left me nothing to feell for myself. 
He carried me immediately and introduced me to Mr Pelham. 
I cannot help adding that in the conversation Lyttleton had with 
me he desired me to be intirely free with him and conceal 
nothing from him of my situation and circumstances, which I did 
very sincerely. He now knows as much of them as you and I do 
and I am convinced it will not be his fault if they are not soon 
repaired and something done for me 

Possibly something may have been done then and there, but at all 
events on 17 September 1754 a warrant was issued from Kensington 
(P.R.O, Treasury Out Letter Book (various) 71/253) for the payment of a 
yearly pension unto "Our Trusty and well beloved John Forbes Esq 11 of 
400 a year to date from 5 July 1753 "making the first payment there- 
from of so much as will become due on the 16th of October 1754 next and 
so on quarterly" at pleasure, on the Scots establishment. 

The following is from the Newcastle Papers and there is a holo- 
graph copy among the collections?" 

From John Forbes of Culloden to the Duke of Newcastle dated from 
Culloden House 2 November 1754. 

My Lord 

I have just received His Majesty's Warrant for a Pension of 
400 pr Annum upon the Establishment in Scotland for which 
mark of His Majesty's Goodness & favour to me, I can make 



198 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS. 

no return, but by steadfastly persisting in the ways and prin- 
ciples of my late Father. Permit me upon this occasion most 
humbly to return your Grace my thanks for your Goodness in 
recommending me to his Majesty, and to beg the continuance of 
your Grace's Protection which I shall endeavour by my Conduct 
to deserve. I have the honour to be with the greatest Respect 

Your Grace's 

most obliged & most humble 
Servant 

John Forbes. 

In 1766 by warrant dated from St James, 8 May, he had a grant of 
600 a year (to date from 30 November 1765) for life "from the Revenue 
Duty on Customs <5f Four and a half per cent in specie at Barbadoes in the 
Leeward Islands." 




CORRECTIONS TO THE ORIGINAL 
"CULLODEN PAPERS" 

(FEBRUARY 1746 TO DECEMBER 1747), 



201 



CORRECTIONS TO THE ORIGINAL "CULLODEN 

PAPERS." 



(CCCXIV. TO CCCLXV. AND ADDENDA DXXX. TO DXXXIII.; 



CGGXV. Not found. 

GGGXVI. Add postscript. "Invarchasley, Mr Wm. Forbes, Mr Doull 
& I drunk yr Lordship's health in Luckie Glephans, who pledged 
us most chearfully." 

CGGXVII. CCCXVIIL Not found. 
GCCXXII. CGGXXIIL Not found. 

CGGXXVII. 'The italics on page 286 are in error. The words have 
been underlined at a later date. 

CCCXXXVI. Not found. 

CGCXXXVIII. For "Hornwa" read "Stornwa" (Stornoway.) 

CCCXL. Not found. 

CCCXLIIL Page 299, line 11. From the words "The Want of Roads" 
to end is missing. 

CCCXLIV. is reprinted in the text (page 148) with an additional para- 
graph. 

CCCXLV, Not found. 

CCGXLVI. is reprinted in the text (page 169) with an addition. 

GGGLXI. Line 16 of second paragraph, for "found" read "formed." 
Line 7 of page 314, for "supported" read "suspected." 

DXXXL Not found. 

DXXXIII. The initial of the Christian name is "J" (John.) 



APPENDIX No. 



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APPENDIX I. Continue 


NATURE or DAMAGE 


1 peck meal & 6 pence taken violently 
meat and drink to a trooper ... 


corn and straw to his horse per receip 
2 bolls and 1 firlot oats sent to the Ca 


25 stones straw sent to Inverness 


10 stones straw sent to the Castle 


another trooper, per receipt ... 
2 horses sent to Fort-Augustus 
4 horses sent to Lochend 
3 horses do., & 1 horse at another tim 
2 horses to carry meal for the Lochen 
dishes and other things taken away . 
straw taken away violently when tl 
the hill & about my house 
a waggon of straw carried to the cam 
1 peck oats to 2 troopers before the b 
1 firlot oatmeal 


head linens & other things taken awa 
forces the Battle day 


lint taken away ... ... . 
3 hens & a piece pork & 1 peck meal I 


a new shirt 
resting by the horsemen & washing 4 


a pewter trencher melted by them . 
)f the soldiers that went away with 
meat & drink ... 


a horse taken by the Frasers ... . 
50 men, 2 days & 2 nights 






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IX I. Co 

NATURE OF DAI 


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APPENDIX I 


NATURE 


5 'S * ^ J 1 "< ! 

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lllllii 1 


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-HI !! 111! s.J ! 
till iuliit ll' 


Lord Jiilcho s Troops . . 
bolls victual oats 
6 stones straw sent to 
firlots oats sent to dit 






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oooooooo 
E-iHEHHHHEHEH 


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IP DAMAGE 


|:|:1:|:|1:^:1::::|: 

1 1 3 1 1 ! 1 1 ! ' - 

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APPENDIX 


P 

E- 

3 


Illl 1 ' f I f j f 1 ! l 41^ 

UMil'J!jijiiHli 
ilJIililslllliSflllil 


3 total of goods tal 
(particulars have m 
;al loss by Rebels 
, , , by Governme 
>ruary. To 2 ewes : 
fields ... 


[ill 5. Tolewetaki 
J boll large white os 






OOOO O O OO O OOOOOOO 

g HE -i H EH EHH H HHEHHEnHH 


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AMOUNT 
(Government) 


-rj 00 O O O f OOOOOO 

l-H 

ert OOOO I-H OOOO 




AMOUNT 
(Jacobite) 


^rt OOO^*^* CDOW 00 t* 00 Tj< 

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e^OOOO OOO OOOO 












HH -i_j 
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APPENDIX I. Co 


1 

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s . ft 5 . "S - J --S- 
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iii & * : siii ni i = Hii 3 |i -|| 

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HEnEH <1 <1 HEnH P^H HH EHHHH <5 HEHH 




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TOTAl (J) 


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a, oo o ,-. 
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1 AMOUNT 
(Government) 


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"-* I-( I-H 

nj t-U5CN(N 00-^FHOWCO 

I-I I-H 

<^ CNOOO 1C O O O -H O 




AMOUNT 
(Jacobite) 


r^ Tt< ^^ ^^ ^^ f* ^^ CO ^5 ^5 ^? O C^ ^^ CO CO 

co P _,l ( '~ H ''* t "' OO 
trft^ OOOOOOOOOOOO OO 








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APPEND! 




o '^g*^' .,*')) 
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igpttO-P C^^<bO^^ H 3 9 9 ^"'3^ x* QO^J 
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_gj <4!p4 > soe4'HNjm j<ac3<s | ^^ 

OO OOO&<c8o3OOOOOa)OOO cSOOO O OO 




OCCUPATION AND RESIDENCE 


43 

03 

3 : : : : : 

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TOTAL (G) 


tJ O <N W 

CO 00 * M* 
Or] - 

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TOTAL (J) 


* a 

2 5 

Crt 




AMOUNT 
(Government) 


* 
50 ^ w 2 

2 co o 




AMOUNT 
(Jacobite) 


Tj ^ oo o^O 1 * coo oo ooocoecMeocor^-Ht^ 

B ^ O5 TjtCOt-i-l (NO CO OOC<l^<N<N 1 *i-<i-H^O 
<rtO rH(M OOOO OO O OOOOOOOOOO 






: | : : : : : : : : : : : : : fc : | :::::::::: 
IP 1 1 

** 09 







: | : : M : : : : | : : : , | | ,:;::::,,: 

J fe r S 1 S *8 

v- -*a . O 

: a : j : : : : : : : : : . & *> :::::::::: 


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- I 1 1 : I 1 : : = i M * J I : >- *' t > ' s > J I : I 


[ XldNHJc 


NATURE 


gg |.| &| ! : ^o| 5 

1^1 1 1 1 Ji2 "5^= g ' 

U . , <M B '9 .i> *. i ,^<-t>, 

Hi r;i i^ lii III list 

o-SoS Ss-^ ^gcsS o i ^^3^9'~ ( *.c^ < ^ < 1 S^ 

n i i i 1^1 . ^ & g fliialall-^lsseoo 

di^^ *^a ^-s^^ rf^i^-iilja ^S^^: 


3 




ggss fll 1111 S^lsgl iljia^io i 

S-^ 2 1 Hi 2-S^* -S2-^^ A ! 

cS<N rj3 SiOCO 2 - *t- cq B 1 * ' cSfi<Nl35<|(NiS<8a3 

^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^3^^^ g ^^^^^^^^^ 




OCCUPATION AND RESIDENCE 


: g 

1 11 3 ''J 

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EH ^ H ^H 




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H 
A 

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5 


NATURK 


dyet to 2 men 
ash taken from my ser 
pig & a peck oatmeal 
stones straw ... 


pecks corn 
dyet to 2 men & a guii 
horse sent to Fort-Au 
horse sent to the Loch 
horses to Inverness w 
wedders 


11 7th, To 2 pair white 
gheep taken away 
hens ... 
arn 
bolster and some liner 


pril To a shilling tak 
ewe killed by them . 

pecks oatmeal 
hens & an ell linen 
ells linen ... . 

117th. To2bedplai( 


tartan plaid ... 
yards linen 
pair new shoes 
ti apron 
ew gloves 






V *V 


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E < M S>> <S 


^ c3 10 CO t> '^ 


o3 GO c3 o3 fn 






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H O O O O O 

EH H EH H EH 






. 






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218 





TOTAL (G) 


2 22 

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TOTAL ( J) 




3 00 

* 

t+J 00 O 




AMOUNT 

(Government) 


fH co oo o ^ 03 CQ c^ 
rt o oo oooooo 




AMOUNT 
(Jacobite) 


HW 

r^ CO ^ CO 1C Oi O GO C^ CO 00 

nn t~ a> G* <-< o <-< to I-H eq co o <* 

II l-H PH 1 < 

t^ OOO-HO 






. . . . . v . . . 


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:::::: :: : ::$::: :-^::: 


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APPENDIX I. 


NATURE OF DAMJ 


::: :::::>>: :: : ::^::: : ^::: 

c8 ^T fe * 

i 2 1 -I' 

p "d : *S: ::fl: :: : . ^ : : ', :" T>l :Sg 
g 8 S " te : * 1 : -^^^ : 2 * J 3 

B H Ct r* 2 V P** _ JSi S 

>% Q !n*Ti ^flSccg OD 

1^1 , li 1 ii'l . i]1j>-i 

n SH : !aj ^i 1 ,iin = riisi 

^l-p P|| 1 &% Is 1 tsil2s o^i^^i 

5 a ^"S-S 2fl "^ ^i:^*^^ Ti'z: a<0 3^ 

i^CL,^ ^bC&, tn -Q'd^ a C <>>rCHMo3 cfli0 42 M 

ooo oooboooo OHO o Sooooo ooo oo 
HHH HHEHWHHH <JH H SHHHHH HHH HH 




OCCUPATION AND RESIDENCE 


' 1 ' 1 

rS -2 

1 1 
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tS O M H 




& 


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219 



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APPENDIX II. 



APPENDIX II. 



ACCOUNT FOB, MEDICINES, ETC., SUPPLIED BY ALEXANDER MUNEO, 
SURGEON- APOTHECARY, FROM 1724 TO 1747. 

Accot The Right Honble my Lord President To Alexander Monro, 
Surgeon Apothecary. 

1724 s. d. 

Janry 5. Imps, for your Son a Box Ointment 004 

Item some Red Precipitate ... 008 

10 Item Herbs for emolient fomentation 009 

Item a Glass camphorated Spirit ... ... ... 010 

13 Item a small Glass Detergent Tincture 005 

15 Item the same for your Son ... ... ... ... 005 

26 Item a vomit for Mrs Wilson 006 

28 Item a half mutchkine Sacred Tincture 026 

Febr. 28 Item for your Servant a dose purging Pills 008 

March 7 Item a blister for the Head to Mrs Wilson 004 

Item a dose Sacred Tincture ... ... ... ... 014 

12 Item the same 014 

Item some Camomile flowers ... ... ... 006 

Item some Jumper Berries 008 

April 2 Item a Vomit for your Son 010 

June 18 Item an Anodyn Plaister for yrself 10 

21 Item the same 10 

24 Item a pot Universal Balsam 008 

26 Item for Yr. Servant a Pectoral Bolus 10 

July 2 Item for Yrself a purging Electuary 036 

5 Item to Wm Comry a purging ptisan ... ... 1 6 

7 Item for Yourself a Vomit 010 

Item a pot White Ointment 014 

10 Item a Glass Lime Water 009 

13 Item the same 009 

16 Item the same with addition ... ... ... 015 

Item the same in double quantity 018 

21 Item a glass camporate spirit for a Servant ... 020 

Augt. 1 Item the same 020 

8 Item the same 020 

17 Item the same . ,., .,, ,,, 020 



224 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

s. d. 



Sept. 


25 


Item a blister for Comry's Mother 





1 


4 






Item a healing Plaister 





1 


4 


Deo. 


10 


Item to Comries Wife 3 Pectoral Bolus's 





1 


6 




12 


Item to Mrs Wilson a Burgundy Pitch Plaister 








8 




18 


Item for your Son a Vomit 





1 







30 


Item to Comry a Vomit 





1 





1725 












Janry 


29 


Item the Vomit 





1 

















1 






Item Pectoral Bolus's ... 





1 


8 


Febry 


8 


Item for himself 2 dose Purging Pills 





3 







11 


Item a Cordial Mixture 





3 







14 


Item a Vomit 





1 







20 


Item to the servants Wife a Cordial Julap 





2 






Sum here is 2 14 1 

1725. s. d. 

Account Etc brought over 2 14 1 

Febry 22 Item a vomit 010 

Item to Mrs Wilson a Vomit 010 

March 4 Item to Comry a Vomit 010 

5 Item Three Pectoral Bolus's 026 

6 Item two of the same 018 

7 Item a Blister 014 

8 Item a healing Plaister 004 

Item a Cordial Bolus ... ... ... ... ... 012 

9 Item the healing Plaister 004 

10 Item the same ... ... ... ... ... ... 004 

11 Item a Large Cordial Julap ... ... ... ... 040 

April 18 Item to Mr. Murdoch a Vomit 010 

June 15 Item for himself a dose Salt of Tin 006 

Item a Glass Syrup of Poppies 008 

16 Item a Pot Stomachic Electuary 042 

Item Eight Wafers 008 

Item the Salt of Tin as before 006 

17 Item the same 006 

18 Item the same 006 

19 Item the same 006 

Item sixteen wafers ... ... ... ... ... 014 

Item to Hew a Box Detergent ointment 10 

20 Item the salt of Tin 006 

21 Item the Electuary 042 



APPENDIX II. 225 

s. d. 

June 21 Item the Salt of Tin 006 

22 Item ditto 006 

Item a glass Syrup of Poppies 010 

23 Item the Salt of Tin 006 

24 Item ditto 006 

25 Item a Vomit 010 

Item Gum Pills six doses 030 

Item two doses laxative Pills ... ... ... ... 026 

Item a small Glass Cordial Drops 014 

27 Item the laxative Pills 026 

Item 16 Wafers 014 

29 Item the Pills 026 

July 2 Item the Pills 026 

Item the Electuary 042 

4 Item 10 Wafers 10 

7 Item 5 doses of the Pills 063 

Item 4 Doses of the Gum Pills 020 

17 Item the Electuary 042 

Item 4 doses Gum Pills 020 

Item 8 Wafers 008 

20 Item a dose Gum Pills 006 



Sum here 6 4 10 



1725. s. d. 

Account etc brought forward 6410 

July 21 Item 6 Doses Laxative Pills 076 

Item 6 Doses Gum Pills 030 

25 Item 3 Mutchkines Stomachic Tincture 076 

Item some steel Carvy ... ... ... ... 010 

30 Item the Gum Pills as before 030 

Augt. 3 Item the Stomachic Tincture 076 

9 Item the Gum Pills 030 

12 Item a Glass Syrup of Poppies 014 

14 Item the Stomachic Tincture 076 

Item the Salt of Tin two doses 010 

17 Item the Laxative Pills 076 

Item the Salt of Tin 006 

18 Item the same eight doses 040 

19 Item the Electuary 076 

Item eight wafers 008 

24 Item a glass Camphorated Spirits 014 



226 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

s. d. 
Augt. 25 Item to Comries Wife a Historic Plaister 1 3 

Sept. 



31 


Item a Vomit 





1 





1 


Item for himself a Vomit 





1 







Item a Cordial Draught 





1 


4 









2 







Item some Venice Treacle 








4 




Item a Stomach Cataplasm 





2 


6 









3 







Item a Dose Physic 





1 


8 


2 


Item 4 Wafers ... 








4 




Item the Physic as before 





1 


8 




Item an ounce Best Rhubarb 





5 







Item the Clyster 





2 







Item the same with Addition 





2 


6 












8 




Item a Dose Sacred Tincture 





1 


8 




Item the Clyster 





2 







Item the Purging Pills 





1 


8 


3 


Item two Clysters ... ... ... 





4 







Item some Spearmint Water 





1 







Item a Dose Matthews Pills 








8 




Item the Sacred Tincture two Doses 





3 


4 




Item some Tincture of Julap 





1 







Item an Anodyn Julap 





3 





4 







1 







Item 4 Wafers ... 








4 




Item a Glass Anodyn Epithem 





3 


3 




Item a Bottle Almond Milk 





1 


6 


5 


Item the same ... 





1 


6 




Item the Cordial Powder 





1 





6 


Item a nervous Bolus ... 





1 


4 




Item 2 Plaisters for the Soles 





1 


8 




Item a Cooling Cataplasm 





1 






Sum here 12 5 10 



s. d. 
Account etc brought forward ... ... ... ... 12 5 10 

Sept. 6 Item the Almond Milk 016 

Item some shavings of Hartshorn 012 

Item a Glass Syrup of Limons ... ... ... 006 

7 Item the Almond Milk 016 



APPENDIX II. 227 

s. d. 

Sept. 7 Item a dose Tincture of Rhubarb ... 018 

8 Item to Comries Wife a Glass Cordial Spirit ... 012 

Item the Bolus 014 

Item a Wafer 001 

9 Item the Shavings of Hartshorn 1 2 

Item the Syrup of Limons 006 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

Item the Bolus 014 

Item a Wafer 001 

10 Item a Glass Camphorated Spirit 006 

Item 4 dose Tincture of Rhubarb ... 050 

11 Item the Bolus 014 

Item a Wafer 001 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

12 Item the Epithems 033 

Item ditto 033 

Item the Shavings of Hartshorn 012 

Item the Syrup of Limons 006 

Item the Bolus ... 014 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

13 Item a Dose Nervous Pills 016 

Item the Epithem 033 

14 Item 24 Doses Alexepharmic Powders 060 

Item 5 Mutchkines Alexepharmic Tincture 10 

Item some Alexepharmic Drops 016 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

15 Item the same 016 

16 Item the Pills 014 

17 Item the Almond Milk 016 

Item the Pills 014 

Item some Antimony for his Horse 008 

Item | Pound Finugree Seed 010 

18 Item for himself the Pills 014 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

19 Item the Pills 014 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

20 Item the same 016 

Item the Pills 014 

Item the Epithem 033 

21 Item Dose Anodyne Pills ... .'. 016 

Item a small Glass Anodyne Spirit 036 

22 Item a Mutchkine Tincture of Rhubarb 040 

23 Item the Anodyne Pills ... 016 



228 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

s. d. 

Sept. 23 Item the Almond Milk 016 

24 Item the Pills 016 

Item the Glass Spirit 036 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

25 Item the Pills 016 

Sum here 17 1 7 



1725. s. d. 

Account etc brought over 17 1 7 

Sept. 26 Item the Emulsion 016 

Item the Pills 014 

27 Item the same ... ... ... ... ... ... 014 

Item the Emulsion 016 

28 Item the same 016 

Item the Pills with Addition 019 

29 Item ditto .1 9 

Item the Emulsion 016 

30 Item ditto 016 

Item the Pills 019 

Oct. 1 Item ditto 019 

Item the Emulsion 016 

Item some Cephalic Materials ... ... ... 005 

2 Item the Emulsion 016 

Item the Pills 019 

Item the Materials 2 Papers 10 

3 Item the Pills 019 

Item the Almond Milk 016 

Item the Materials 10 

4 Item the Emulsion 016 

Item the Pills 010 

Item the Materials 10 

5 Item ditto 19 

Item the Pills 016 

Item the Emulsion 016 

6 Item ditto 1 6 

Item the Pills 019 

Item the Materials 10 

7 Item ditto 10 

Item the Pills 019 

Item the Emulsion 016 

8 Item ditto 016 



APPENDIX II. 229 



Oct. 



1725. 
Oct. 










s. d. 


8 


Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Materials 





10 


9 


Item ditto 





10 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Emulsion 





1 6 


10 


Item ditto 





1 6 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Materials 





10 


11 


Item ditto 





10 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Emulsion 





1 6 


12 


Item ditto 





1 6 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Materials 





10 


13 


Item ditto 





10 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Emulsion 





1 6 




Sum here 


20 


9 8 










s. d. 




Account brought over 


20 


9 8 


14 


Item the Emulsion 





1 6 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Materials 





10 


15 


Item ditto 





10 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Almond Milk 





1 6 


16 


Item ditto 





1 6 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Tincture of Rhubarb 





4 




Item the Materials 





10 


17 


Item ditto 





10 




Item the Emulsion 





1 6 




Item the Pills 





1 9 


18 


Item ditto 





1 9 




Item the Emulsion 





1 6 




Item the Materials 





10 


19 


Item ditto 


... 


10 




Item the Pills 





1 9 




Item the Emulsion 





1 6 


20 


Item the same ... ,.. , f . 





1 6 



230 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 



Oct. 



Novr. 



1725. 

Novr. 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



25 



26 



27 



30 



Deer. 





s. d. 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Materials 


10 


Item to his Horse some Flowers of Sulphur 


002 


Item for himself the Gum Pills 


010 


Item the Emulsion 


016 


Item the Materials 


10 


Item ditto 


10 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Emulsion 


016 


Item ditto 


016 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Materials 


10 


Item ditto 


10 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Emulsion 


016 


Item ditto 


016 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Materials 


10 


Item ditto 


10 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Emulsion 


016 


Item the Pills 5 Doses 


089 


Item the Materials 8 Papers 


076 


Item to 2 Doses Pills 


036 


Item 4 Papers of the Materials 


034 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item the Materials 


10 


Sum here 


... 24 12 10 




(sic) 




s. d. 


Account etc brought over 


... 24 12 10 


Item the Materials 


10 


Item the Pills 


019 


Item ditto 


019 


Item the Materials 


10 


Item a Mutchkine Tincture of Rhubarb 


050 


Item a small Glass Cordial Spirit 


040 


Item 20 Doses of the Pills 


1 15 


Item 40 Papers of the Materials 


1 13 4 


Item the Emulsion 


016 


Item a Purging Ptisan ,,, ,,, ,., 


018 



APPDNDIX II. 231 



1726. 

June 


23 Item Stomachic Elixir a Small Glass 
28 Item for Comry a Vomit 







8. 

1 
1 


d. 




Julv 


30 Item for himself 6 Papers Valerian 






2 
2 








Item the Elixir ... ... ... ... ... ... 





1 


o 


Augt. 


23 Item the same in large quantities 
5 Item some Liquorice Root 






1 




6 
4 




9 Item a Glass Spirit of Hartshorn 
14 Item a Box Stomachic Pills ... ... ... 







4 


6 

2 


Sept. 
Oct. 


19 Item a Glass Spirit of Hartshorn 
Item a Large Glass Stomachic Tincture 
7 Item a Clyster for Comry 's Wife 
Item to himself a | Mutchkine of the Elixir 
11 Item to Comry's daughter a glass Pectoral Mixture 
31 Item to himself a paper of the Materials 
Item some Valerian 











1 
2 
2 
4 
2 





9 


6 
1 
4 


NOVT. 


1 Item the Elixir 





4 







3 Item the Paper Valerian ... ... ... ... 








4 




8 Item 8 Papers ditto ... ... 





ft 


8 




Item 3 Papers Sage 








3 




Item some Diachylon Plaister spread 
15 Item 10 Doses Pills 







5 


3 





18 Item 2 Papers Sage 








2 


Deer. 


26 Item the Pills as last with addition 
29 Item a Glass Spirit of Hartshorn 
30 Item a Composition for the Horn [corn] 
17 Item to the Servant a Pint Emollient Fomentation 
Item a Purging Clyster... ... ... ... ... 









5 

3 

2 
1 


6 
6 



8 




18 Item a Pectoral Bolus ... 








10 




Item a Glass disentient Spirit 
22 Item a Glass Elixir for himself 
24 Item to the Servant Mutchkine Camphorate Spirit 
27 Item to himself 30 Papers Valerian 









2 

1 
10 



6 
6 
6 

4 


1727. 

Janry 


Item the Laxative Pills as last 
Item some Diachylon Plaister 
Item the Stomachic Elixir | Mutchkine 
29 Item some Diachylon Plaister 

1 Item a bottle emolient fomentation 
2 Item for his son a glass of camphorated Spirit 
12 Item to Comry's Niece a Vomit 












11 


4 


1 
1 





10 

10 

6 


8 




Sum here 


31 


5 

(eio) 


6 



232 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 



1727. 









8. 


d. 






Account etc brought over 


... 31 


5 


6 


July 


25 


Item for himself a Glass of the Elixir 





2 





Augt. 


2 


Item to Mr Murdoch a Glass Spirit of Hartshorn 








3 




19 


Item to himself a | Mutchkine of Elixir 





4 





Sept. 


1 


Item the same 





4 





Oct. 


27 


Item a small Glass ditto 








6 


Novr. 


5 


Item the Laxative Pills 





5 


6 






Item a Glass of the Elixir 





3 





Deer. 


2 


Item the same in large Quantity 





4 







19 


Item for Mrs. Wilson some Aromatic Powder 





1 


6 




22 


Item to himself the laxative Pills 3ple Quantity 





16 


6 






Item the Elixir a Mutchkine 





8 







23 


Item some Diachylon Plaister 








10 


1728. 












March 


7 


Item to his Son a Bottle Emulsion 





1 


6 




8 


Item a Vomit 





1 







12 


Item to Mrs Wilson a Burgundy Pitch Plaister 








8 


June 


18 


Item to himself some Diachylon Plaister 








5 






Item to Thomas Paterson 6 Dose Physic ... 





7 







19 


Item to himself Diachylon Plaister 








10 






Item a large Pot Basilicon Ointment 





1 


4 




20 


Item the Plaister 








10 




26 


Item to Thomas an Anodyne Bolus 








5 






Item a Purging Bolus 








4 




27 


Item the Anodyne Bolus 








5 






Item ditto 








5 






Item a Glass Astringent Julap 





3 


6 




28 


Item the Bolus as last 








5 






Item the Purging Bolus 








4 




29 


Item ditto 2 Doses 








10 




30 


Item a Glass Elixir for himself 





2 









Item for Thomas the Julap 





3 


6 






Item the Anodyne Bolus 








5 






Item the Purging Bolus 








4 


July 


1 


Item ditto 








4 






Item the Anodyne Bolus 








5 






Item the Julap 





3 


6 




2 


Item ditto 





3 


6 






Item the 2 Bolus's 








5 






Item ditto 








5 






Item the Julap 





3 


6 




3 


Item the Bolus's 








8 






Item the Julap 





3 


6 



APPENDIX II. 233 

s. d. 

July 4 Item a Purging Ptisan 018 

5 Item a small Glass of Buckthorn 003 

6 Item the Ptisan with addition 0110 

9 Item ditto 1 10 

10 Item an Anodyne Draught 10 

Item to himself 8 Papers Materials 048 

Sum here 36 9 5 



s. d. 

Account etc brought over 36 9 5 

July 11 Item to Mr. Thomas the Servant the Haustus ... 10 

17 Item to himself | Mutchkine of Elixir 040 

20 Item the Materials 048 

27 Item the Laxative Pills 106 

Item 6 Papers of the Materials ... ... ... ... 050 

Augt. 3 Item 8 Papers ditto 078 

Item a Mutchkine of the Elixir 080 

9 Item 20 Doses Pills Guilded 10 

Novr. 15 Item 6 Papers of the Materials 050 

Item 6 ditto of Sage 010 

16 Item some Diachylon Plaister ... ... ... ... 006 

22 Item a Glass of the Elixir 026 

Deer. 12 Item for Mr. Ross a small glass Spirits 002 

27 Item to himself 18 Papers for Tea 048 

Item a Glass of the Elixir 020 

1729. 

Janry. 8 Item the Pills 106 

Item a Mutchkine of the Elixir 080 

Item some Diachylon 013 

Item ditto upon Black Silk 020 

June 10 Item to Mr. Hew some Powder of Bark 020 

Item a Vomit 010 

Item some Diachylon ... ... ... ... ... 028 

Item a Large Glass Camphorate Spirit 028 

11 Item to himself some Plaister 005 

Item the Elixir as last ... 080 

19 Item 2 Doses of Materials 012 

20 Item to his Son some Diachylon 003 

23 Item for a Servant a Bottle Emolt. Fomentation ... 010 
26 Item some Valerian for himself ... ... ... 010 

Item some Sage ,, 003 



234 




MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

















s. 


d. 


July 


9 


Item some Diachylon 





2 


8 




18 


Item the Laxative Pills 


1 





6 




29 


Item the Elixir in double Quantity 





16 







31 


Item the Laxative Pills with addition 


1 


5 





Sept. 


4 


Item to George Ross some disentient Plaister 








8 


NOVT. 


20 


Item to himself some Valerian 








3 






Item a Paper of Sage 








1 




22 


Item ditto ... 








1 






Item the Valerian 








3 






Item for George Ross a Drying Wash 





1 


6 






Item some Plaister 








5 


Deer. 


12 


Item to himself a Mutchkine and \ of Elixir 





12 







26 


Item Laxative Pills 240 Doses Gilded 


4 








1730. 












Janry 


7 


Item to Mr Baillie a Dose Salts 








6 






Item X Doses Cooling Salts 





2 


6 




11 


Item to Mrs. Wilson a Vomit ... 





1 









Sum here 


... 51 


1 


6 






Account brought over 


51 


1 


6 


1730. 












Janry 


12 


Item to Mrs Wilson some Aromatic Powder 





1 


6 


May 


28 


Item to Mr. Baillie a Vomit 





1 









Item a Wafer 








1 


June 


1 


Item a Dose Sacred Tincture 





1 


4 




12 


Item a Glass Elixir for Himself 





2 









Item Gum Pills 12 Doses 





10 









Item laxative Pills 50 Doses 


4 










14 


Item to Mr. Baillie a Vomit 





1 









Item some Camomile Flowers 








6 




17 


Item some Diachylon Plaister 








3 




23 


Item a Vomit 





1 









Item 4 Papers Camomile Flowers 





2 







25 


Item to himself the Materials for Tea 





1 


4 






Item a Mutchkine and \ of the Elixir 





12 







27 


Item 14 Papers for Tea 





4 


8 


July 


6 


Item ditto 12 Papers 





4 







13 


Item 4 ditto 





1 


4 




14 


Item one ditto 








4 




18 


Item 8 of the same 





2 


8 




22 


Item 14 ditto 





4 


8 




29 


Item ditto ,.. ,,. ,,, ,,, ,,. 





4 


8 



APPENDIX II. 235 












s. 


d. 


July 


31 


Item 6 Papers ditto 





2 





Augt. 


5 


Item a Large Glass of the Elixir 





6 









Item 4 Papers of the Materials 





1 


4 






Item to Mrs. Wilson a Large Glass Anodyne Spirits ... 





2 


6 


October 


24 


Item 6 Papers Sage for himself 








6 




29 


Item some Stomachic powder for a Servant 








10 


Novr. 


8 


Item a large Glass of the Elixir for himself 





5 









Item some Diachylon Plaister 








10 






Item some Sage 








4 




11 


Item the Gum Pills 





15 









Item the Laxative Pills 


1 


5 









Item the Elixir 





8 









Item some Valerian 





1 





Deer. 


18 


Item a disentient Spirit for a Servant 





1 


2 






Item ditto 





1 


2 




22 


Item some Diachylon to himself 








5 




23 


Item some Valerian 








6 


1731. 












Janry 


6 


Item the Laxative Pills 50 Doses 


4 












Item a Mutchkine of the Elixir 





8 





June 


20 


Item a small Glass ditto 





1 









Item for a Servant a Dose Purging Pills 





1 


6 




30 


Item a Mutchkine of the Elixir 





12 





July 


8 


Item some Emolt. Materials for Fomentation 








8 






Item a pot Mercurial Ointment ... 








6 






Item the Materials 








8 




12 


Item a Mercurial Bolus 








4 






Item some Adhesive Plaister "... 








4 






Sum here 


66 


13 


5 


1731 




' 





s. 


d. 






Account brought forward 


66 


13 


6 


July 


13 


Item some Pved Precipitate of Mercurey 








2 






Item a Pot Althea Ointment 





1 


6 






Item the Bolus 








4 




14 


Item ditto 








4 




16 


Item a dose Purging Pills 





1 


6 




18 


Item ditto 





1 


6 




21 


Item a Purging Bolus 





1 


6 






Item 3 Wafers 








3 






Item some Diachylon Plaister 








5 



236 



MOKE CULLODEN PAPERS 



July 



Augt. 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
31 
3 
6 
10 



1732. 

March 
June 
July 
Augt. 
Deer. 



25 
31 
24 
5 
15 



1733. 

Febry 23 

March 1 

July 8 

Novr. 7 



Item the last Bolus 

Item 2 Mercurial Bolus's 

Item ditto 

Item ditto 

Item ditto 

Item ditto with addition 
Item a Purging Ptisan 

Item a Purging Bolus 

Item a Dose Physic 

Item ditto 

Item some Diachylon Plaister 

Item to himself some Valerian 

Item the Laxative Pills 

Item to his Servant some Basilicon Ointment 

Item some Red Precipitate of Mercury 

Item some Diachylon Plaister 



Item some Stomachic Powder for Mrs Wilson 
Item to himself a Glass of Elixir 
Item ditto a Mutchkine 

Item the Pills 

Item a Choppin of Elixir 



Item to Mrs Wilson materials for a Fomentation 

Item ditto 

Item to himself the Laxative Pills 
Item to his Groom a Dose Physic 



1734. 

Janry 3 Item to himself the Pills in 3ple quantity 

April 30 Item Gold Leaves 12 in number 

July 4 Item a Servant a Glass Anodyne Spirits 

12 Item a Glass Spirit of Hartshorn 

24 Item the Anodyne Spirit 

27 Item ditto 

Augt 23 Item ditto 

Sept 26 Item Pectoral Materials for 3 Mutchkines Water 

29 Item a large Glass Disentient Spirit 

Deer 4 Item a Large Disenssing Plaister 

7 Item a Dose Purging Pills 

10 Item ditto ... 






s. 


d. 





1 


6 








8 








8 








8 








8 








9 





1 


4 





1 


6 





1 


6 





1 


6 








5 





1 





4 











1 








1 


6 





1 


8 





4 


6 





2 








8 





4 











16 








1 








1 





1 


15 








2 


8 


4 











2 








2 








1 








2 








2 








2 








3 








4 








1 


3 





1 


4 





1 


4 



I 

APPENDIX II. 237 

s. d. 
1735. 

June 18 Item to George Ross a Glass Anodyne Spirits ... 023 
21 Item the same . ... 2 3 



Sum here 84 13 10 



s. d. 

Account etc brought forward 84 13 10 

28 Item to the Cook a Pot Purgative electuary ... 039 

24 Item to Mr Ross the Anodyne Spirit 023 

Item to himself some Valerian ... ... ... 003 

Item a paper of Sage 001 

July 1 Item the Valerian in large Quantity ... ... ... 010 

5 Item the Pills as last in less Quantity 340 

10 Item for Mr. Ross some Flower of Brimstone ... 002 

11 Item for himself some Valerian 003 

Item for Mr. Ross a Purgative Electuary 1 8 

Item some Anodyne Ointment 008 

17 Item some Flower of Brimstone 008 

19 Item the Electuary for the Cook 039 

Item 12 Doses Pectoral Pills 040 

Augt. 8 Item a Dose Physic to the Groom ... ... ... 014 

9 Item Materials for Fomentation 10 

Novr. 7 Item some Diachylon Spread ... 005 

1736. 

Janry 5 Item to the Housekeeper a vomit 010 

6 Item a purging Bolus 013 

7 Item a Pectoral Draught 009 

9 Item the Bolus 013 

10 Item a Paregoric Haustus 009 

12 Item a Vomit 010 

14 Item a Glass Pectoral Elixir 026 

Febr 3 Item the same 026 

6 Item 12 Doses Pectoral Pills 040 

12 Item some Pectoral Elixir 013 

20 Item the Pills 040 

22 Item the Elixir 013 

March 6 Item the Pills in double Quantity ... 080 

Item a Glass Pectoral Mixture 030 

14 Item the same 030 

July 31 Item the Laxative Pills for himself 400 



238 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 














s. 


d. 


Novr. 


4 


Item 


for Mr. John a Glyster 





2 









Item 


a Vomit 





1 









Item 


a Bag and Pipe ... 








8 




5 


Item 


a bottle Emulsion 





1 


6 






Item 


the same 





1 


6 




12 


Item 


a large Gargarism 





2 





Deer. 


25 


Item 


to Mr. Ross a Vomit 





1 







31 


Item 


to John Hay a large Pectoral Electuary 





4 









Item 


a Vomit 





1 





1737. 














Febr 


21 


Item 


the Electuary 





4 





March 


9 


Item 


Mr. Macintosh a Stomachic Decoction 





2 


6 






Item 


a Pectoral Mixture 





3 









Item 


a Blister 





1 


4 




10 


Item 


the Decoction 





2 


6 






Item 


the Mixture 





3 






Sum here 



96 5 5 



March 


10 


Account brought forward 
Item some healing Plaister 



.., 96 



s. 
5 

1 


d. 
5 
3 


Item Blister behind the Ear 








10 






Item 


ditto for the side 





1 


4 






Item 


some Liquorice Root 








4 




11 


Item 


a Glyster ... 





2 









Item 


a Bag and Pipe 








8 






Item 


an Evening Draught 








10 




12 


Item 


ditto 








10 






Item 


the Pectoral Mixture 





3 





Augt 


2 


Item 


to himself the Pills usual Guilded 


4 












Item 


a pound Valerian Root 





4 





Novr. 


3 


Item 


to Mr. Hay a Glass Eye Water 





1 


4 




10 


Item 


to Mr. Ross a Vomit 





1 





1738. 














Janry 


19 


Item 


to himself the Laxative Pills as last ... 


4 








Febr 


4 


Item 


a Vomit 





1 







5 


Item 


a Bolus 








8 






Item 


ditto 








8 




6 


Item 


a Glass Pectoral Mixture 





3 


6 




8 


Item 


ditto 





3 


6 




11 


Item 


ditto 





3 


6 



I 

APPENDIX II. 239 

s. d. 
Febr 



March 



June 
July 



13 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


15 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


17 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


21 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


23 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


26 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


28 


Item ditto 





3 


G 


4 


Item ditto 





3 


G 


8 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


11 


Item to the Maid a large Glass anodyne Spirit 





4 


6 


12 


Item to himself the Mixture 





8 


6 


17 


Item to the Servant an Anodyne Plaister ... 





1 


2 


2 


Item to himself some Diachylon Plaister 





1 


8 


4 


Item to Mr John a Diaphoratic Bolus 








10 




Item a Wafer 








1 


6 


Item some Flowers of Brimstone 








4 


7 


Item a Pectoral Mixture 





3 


6 


10 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


13 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


15 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


18 


Item a Purging Ptisan for a Servant 





1 


4 




Item to Mr. John the Mixture 





3 


6 


21 


Item a Vomit 





1 





27 


Item the Mixture 





3 


6 


29 


Item ditto 





3 


G 


30 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


18 


Item ditto 





3 


G 



Aug. 

Sum here is . 109 13 1 



1738. s. d. 

Account etc brought forward 109 13 1 

Sept. 12 Item to the Cook a Vomit 

Item a Dose Sacred Tincture ... 

14 Item some Styptic Powder 

Item some Styptic Tincture ... 

Item an Astringent Mixture 

Item a Styptic Mixture 
Item an Astringent Electuary 

15 Item a Glass Astringent Mixture 

Item some Styptic Spirit , ,,. 




240 



MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 












s. 


d. 


Oct. 


31 


Item Mr. John a Vomit 





1 









Item a Bottle Emulsion 





1 


6 


Novr 


28 


Item digestive Ointment for the Groom 








4 


1739 












May 


30 


Item to himself some Locatil lus Balsam 








4 


June 


2 


Item the same in less quantity 








3 


July 


3 


Item to Mr. Innes a Dose Sacred Tincture ... 





2 







7 


Item to 12 Doses of the Powder of Bark 





4 







12 


The Stomachic Materials for 3 bottles Wine 





6 









Item 6 Doses of the Bark 





2 







20 


Item the Materials 





6 









Item the Powders 





2 









Item some eye Ointment 








8 


Aug. 


30 


Item Mr. Ross a Glass Wade's Balsam 





1 


8 


Oct. 


2 


Item to himself the Pills with Aloes ... 


1 


15 







23 


Item ditto 


1 


15 





Novr. 


14 


Item to the Servant a Box Ointment 








6 


Deer. 


12 


Item a Dose Physic 





1 


4 


1740. 












Janry 


24 


Item to himself the Pills as last 16 Doses 





5 





Febry 


1 


Item to the Coachman an Anodyne Ointment 





1 


8 




2 


Item an Anodyne Plaister 





1 


2 




5 


Item some Camomile Flowers 





1 





March 


20 


Item the Pills for himself 


1 


15 





April 


3 


Item to Mr. Hay a Box healing Ointment ... 








3 




4 


Item a Glass dissentient Spirit 





2 





July 


17 


Item to a Servant Materials for a Fomentation 





1 









Item some Mercurial Ointment 








6 






Item a Dose Purging Powder. 





1 


3 




28 


Item ditto 





1 


3 




31 


Item a Dose Mercurial Pills 








6 


Sept. 


1 


Item to himself the Pill without Aloes 


3 


4 





Novr. 


8 


Item some Diachylon upon silk 








5 




15 


Item 12 Doses Rhubarb Pills 





12 





Deer. 


5 


Item ditto 





12 





1741. 












Janry 


13 


Item ditto 





12 





June 


9 


Item to the Servant some Mercurial Ointment 








4 


Oct. 


22 


Item to himself the Pills with Aloes in large quantity 


2 


1C 






Sum here 



125 9 4 



APPENDIX II. 



241 



1741. 



16 
17 


Account, etc., brought forward 
Item to himself a large Cordial Mixture 
Item a Stomachic Bolus ... ... ... 



... 125 






s. 
9 
3 
1 


d. 
4 

6 





Item 2 Wafers 








9 




Item a Pectoral Mixture 





3 


li 


18 







1 





19 


Item ditto 





1 





20 


Item ditto with a \Vafcr 





1 


1 


21 


Item the Pectoral Mixture 





3 


6 












1 


23 


Item the Pectoral Mixture 





3 


6 


96 


Item ditto 





3 


6 


28 







3 


6 


30 


Item the Bolus with a Wafer ... 





1 


1 


31 


Item ditto 





1 


1 




Item the Pectoral Mixture 





3 


6 



Dec. 


16 


Item 




17 


Item 






Item 






Item 




18 


Item 




19 


Item 




20 


Item 




21 


Item 






Item 




23 


Item 




26 


Item 




28 


Item 




30 


Item 




31 


Item 






Item 


1742. 






Janry 


2 


Item 




4 


Item 




7 


Item 




9 


Item 




12 


Item 




17 


Item 




22 


Item 




24 


Item 




30 


Item 


March 


20 


Item 




23 


Item 


August 


3 


Item 






Item 


Nov. 


5 


Item 




20 


Item 




23 


Item 




25 


Item 






Item 






Item 




26 


Item 




27 


Item 






Item 


Deer. 


10 


Item 



a Servant a dose Purging Pills 
to himself the Pectoral Mixture 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

to the Cook some Camomile Flowers ... 

a Purging Ptisan 

to the Servant materials for a Ptisan . . . 

to another a Dose Rhubarb 

to the Cook a Vomit 

to his Lordship 2 Bolus's with addition 

a Squill Mixture 

the Groom some antipsoric Ointment . . . 

the Purging Pills 

to the Footman ditto 

to his Lordship 6 Doses Pectoral Pills 

to Mr. Steel an Anodyne Ointment 

to the Maid a dose Rhubarb 

to the Housekeeper 12 Doses Laxative Pills 



010 
030 
036 
036 
036 
036 
036 
036 
036 
009 
1 3 
10 
008 
1 
1 1 
030 
008 
014 
014 
030 
1 
008 
040 



242 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 



1743. 
Janry 



June 
Novr. 



1743. 

Nov. 



1744. 
Janry 
Febry 
April 



June 
Sept. 

1745. 
Janry 

Febry 
March 
April 
June 



July 
Augt 



Oct. 





8. d. 


5 Item to his Lordship the Bolus 


1 1 


Item 2 Wafers 


002 


8 Item a Glass Disentient Spirit 


028 


15 Item ditto 


028 


30 Item the Pills guilded as last ... 


2 16 


4 Item to the Groom a Vomit ... 


1 


5 Item a Pectoral Mixture 


036 


11 Item ditto 


036 


Sum here 


133 6 




s. d. 


Account etc brought over 


133 6 


11 Item to the Footman a large anodyne ointment ... 


054 


19 Item to the Groom a Pectoral Mixture 


033 


22 Item to the Footman a Vomit 


1 


23 Item to the Servant ditto 


1 


22 Item to the Cook a Dose Salts 


10 


20 Item some Althea Ointment 


004 


12 Item to the Servant a Purging Bolus 


1 3 


Item a Gargarism 


10 


19 Item to the Housekeeper some Camomile ... 


009 


12 Item for his Lordship a large Pectoral Lochoch 


040 


1 Item for the Footman's Child a Vomit 


008 


4 Item some pectoral oxymel 


004 


4 Item to the Cook a Vomit 


1 


24 Item to Mr. Ross two Vomits 


020 


8 Item for the Postilion a dose Physic ... 


1 3 


18 Item to the Cat a Vomit 


002 


18 Item his Lordship's Pills with Aloes Guilded 


280 


4 Item for the servant some Ointment 


006 


8 Item to the Housekeeper a Vomit 


1 


20 Item to the Servant Pectoral Pills 16 doses 


054 


27 Item ditto 12 doses 


040 


2 Item ditto as first 


054 


6 Item to the servants wife some digestive ointment 


008 


7 Item some healing ointment 


008 


12 Item some Green Balsam 


020 


10 Item my Lords Pills as last 


280 



APPENDIX II. 243 



1746. 






. 


8. 


d. 


May 


8 


Item a Mutchkine of the Elixir 





8 





June 


1 


Item for the Postilion some camphorate Spirit 





1 


4 


, 


5 


Item a Dose of Physic 





1 


3 




6 


Item some ointment 








4 




12 


Item the camphorate Spirit of Wine 





1 


4 




19 


Item ditto ... 





1 


4 


1747. 












Febry 


4 


Item for my Lord a Castor Bolus 





1 









Item 2 wafers 








2 




5 


Item a large Squill Mixture 





3 







7 


Item a Pectoral Solution 





3 


3 




8 


Item the Squill Mixture 





3 







14 


Item for the Servant a Vomit... 





1 





June 


12 


Item for the maid a Blister behind the Ear 








3 






Item some healing Plaister 








10 




29 


Item a Vomit 





1 





Nov. 


4 


Item to the Servant a Glass of Anodyne Spirits 








4 




5 


Item for his Lordship a Vomit 





1 









Item 3 doses of White Vitriol 





1 









Item some Camomile Flowers 








3 




7 


Item the Squill Mixture 





3 






Sum here ... . 141 12 8 



1747. s. d. 

Account etc brought over 141 12 8 

Novr. 8 Item the Squill Mixture 030 

12 Item some Volatile Spirits 010 

13 Item the Squill Mixture 030 

15 Item the same 030 

18 Item the same 030 

21 Item the same 030 

30 Item a bottle bitter Infusion ... ... ... 020 

Dec. 1 Item an emolient Glyster 016 

Item a Bag and Pipe 008 

4 Item the Glyster 016 

11 Item a Cerecloath for his Body 5 11 1| 

Item Embowelling 

To attendance during the currency of the Accompt 31 10 

Sum total is 179 15 5$ 



244 MORE CULLODEN PAPERS 

Edinburgh 17 March 1748. 

Pay to Alexr Monro Chimrgeon in Edinburgh six months after 
date hereof the above sum of One hundred and Seventy nine pounds 
fifteen shillings and five pence and half penny and place the same to 
the account of (Signed) John Forbes. 

To 

William Forbes writer to the Signet, 

Edinburgh 25th August 1748 

Received a Bond for the above Sum by Mr Forbes of Culloden to me 

(Signed) Alexr. Monro. 



APPENDIX III. 

INDEX TO THE ORIGINAL "CULLODEN 
PAPERS" 



APPENDIX 



Index to the Original " Culloden Papers." 

(This Index should be read, in conjunction with the 
corrections to the Original "Culloden Papers," 
which appear at the end of each of the five 
volumes of "More Cul'loden Papers.") 

Aberchalder (1745), 212, 216. 

Aberdeen, Earl of (1690), 323. 

Aberdeen, town (1745),- 221, 222, 385, 393, 394, 397, 
399, 402, 406, 420, 422, 423, 452, 459- 
462, passim. 

Aberdeenshire (1745), 247, 248, 461. 

Aberkarny ( Aberoairny) , (1745), 370. 

Abertarf (1745J, 212, 215. 

Achnacarry (1/45), 374. 

Adair, Mr (1747), 304. 

Aedie, Mr (1740), 161. 

Aikman, William (1731), 121. 

Aird, the (1745), 246, 260, 427; (1746), 473. 

Airlie (Early), Lord (1745), 400. 

Airth skirmish (1746), 266. 

Alexander, Sir William, of Menstrie (1626), letter to 
Bailies of Inverness, 2. 

Alves, , of Edinburgh (1745), 262. 

Alves, Thomas, treasurer, of Inverness (1716), 67. 

Amelia, Princess (1737), 139. 

Aroram, Earl of (1745), 203. 

Anderson, Mr (1717), 71; (1736), 135. 

Anderson, Mr, servant to Ld. Sutherland (1745), 432. 
James (1716), 66. 

Angus (1745), 220. 

Armandale, Earl of (1690), 325-329 passim. 

Anne, Czarina (1740), 164. 

Anne, Queen (1702), 29; (1714), 31. 

Anstes, Mr (1737), 139. 

Arderseer, see Campbell of Ardersier. 

Artgyleshire (1691), 17; (1745), 424. 

Argyleshire regiment (1746), 270, 271, 272. 

Argyll, Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquis, iii., iv. and 
footnote; (1626), 2; (1649), 5-6; (1650), 
7 footnote. 

Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of (1685), de- 
claration on attempted reibeHioii, 11-12. 
,, Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of, letter to D. 
Forbes, 3rd of Culloden (1700), 28. Re- 
ference :- (1690), 13, 26, 320; (1692), 22. 
,, Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of, formerly E. 
of Hay, letter to D. Forbes, Ld. President 
(1746), 469; References :( 1745), xxxiii., 
210, 370, 377, 378, 382-384 passim, 413; 
(1746) 269, 469, 470; (1747), 302, 476. 
See also Hay, Earl of. 

,, John Campbell, 2nd Duke of, letters to D. 
Forbes, Ld. President (1716), 53; (1723), 
76, 78; (1737), 138; (1738), 145, 149; to 
J. Forbes, 4th of Cuilloden (1715), 40; 
to Col. W. Grant (1716), 59; References: 
ix., x. and footnote, xxii. footnote; (1722), 



248 INDEX TO THE 



xiv.; (1730), xviii; (1714), 32, 33, 34; 
(1715), 37; (1716), 41, 48, 52, 54, 55, 
64, 65, 67; (1717) 70, 71; (1721), 74; 
(1722), xiv.; (1723), 76, 77; (1725), 88; 
(1726), 355; (1727), 101; (1729), 106; 
(1730), xviii; (1733), 130; (1737), 136; 
(1738), 150; (1742), 172, 173, 179. 

Argyll's regiment (1692), 20. 

Arisaig (1745), 371, 373, 385. 

Armour, John (1725), 87, 89, 343-350 passim. 

Armstrong, Dr John, letters to J. Forbes, 6th of Cul- 
loden (1748), 307 } (n.d.) 315; to Rev. 
P. Murdoch (1748), 306; Ref erences : 
xx.; (1764), 312. 

Arnistou, Robert Duudas (the younger), Lord. 
Solicitor-General, letters to the Lord Presi- 
dent (1745), 263, 453. References: 
(1725), 90; (1730), 114; (1741), 171; 
(1742), 174-177 passim, 179, 180, 184 .186, 
187; (1744), 363, 365; (1745), 454-455; 
(1746), 266. 

Aros, Mull (1690), 13. 

Aroint (1745), 247, 421, 424, 428, 434, 438-441 passim, 
447, 461. 

Athoil, John (Murray) 1st Marquess (1690), 323, 

328 
John, 1st Duke of (1716), 65. 

James, 2nd Duke of (1743), 364; (1745), 220, 

371, 372,, 373, 378, 379, 383, 384, 393. 
,, titular Duke of (1745), see Tullibardine, 
William Marquess of. 

Athoil district (1745), 377, 378, 395, 398, 462. 

Auchterblair (1745), 430. 

Avoch (1745), 425. 

Ayr (1725), 82. 

Badenoch (1691), 17; (1716), 42, 44,47; (1729), 110; 
(1745), 249, 375, 378, 395, 398, 403, 408, 
449, 450. 

Baillie, Mr, Town Clerk of Inverness (1730), 118. 
Evan (1745), 410. 
Evan of Abriachan (1785), 103 note, 289 

note. 

John (1729), 110. 

Robert, bailie of Inverness (1649), 6. 
Rev. Robert, letters to J. Forbes, 4th of Cul- 
loden (1716), 43, 44; to D. Forbes, 5th of 
Culloden (1716), 47, 56; to unknown cor- 
respondent (1716), 51. References: 
(1714), 337; (1715), 37, 38; (1716), 52, 
66; (1717), 72; (1721),, 75. 
,, Sanders (1732), 128. 

,, Williaaii, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of Cullodeu 
(1745), 434; References: (1731), 122; 
(1745), 422, 439, 441, 442, 445, 446, 450. 
Ensign Win. (1746), 277. 
,, of Dunain,, family of, iii. footnote. 
Balcarres, Colin, 3rd Earl of, (1690), 323. 
Balmerino, John Elphinstone, 4th Lord, letter to D. 

Forbes, 5th of Culloden (1727), 101. 
., James Elphinstone, 5th Lord (Lord 
Coupar), (1727), 101; (1730), 113; 
(1746), 273, 287, 469. 
,, See also Elphinstone. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN CAPERS. 1 ' 249 



Banff (1745), 222, 381, 394, 456, 462. 

Banffshire (1745), 247, 407, 408, 452, 453, 455, 457, 

461. 
Barber, Bailie (1716), 43. 

Mistress (1716), 51. 
Lucy (1727), 102. 

Barclay, Sir George (1690), 13; (1691), 18-19. 
Baaisdatle, see Macdonald, Coll, of Barisdale. 
Barra (1745), 203, 462. 
Barrell's regiment (1746), 271. 
Bartlet, Mr (1745), 456. ' 
Bath, Lord, see Pitlteney, William. 
Baxter, Mr (1748), 310. 
Beaufort, Duke of (1745), 229. 

Simon Fraser of, see Lovat, Simon Fraser, 

Lord. 

Bedford, Duke of (1745), 223. 
Belfast (1690), 22. 
Belhaven, Lord, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of Culloden 

(1716), 66; (1721), 73. 
Bellenden, William, Lord (1665). 10. 
Benalder mountain, xxxv. 
Berwick, James Stuart-Fitz-james, titular Duke of 

(1745), 244. 

town (1745), 223, 224, 226, 413, 416, 417. 
Bisset, Commissary (1745), 398. 
Blacker, Mr (1745), 226. 
Blair, Mr (1737), 139. 
Blair, Atholl (1691), 17; (1716), 46; (1745), 218, 220, 

371, 378, 379, 383, 384, 393, 397, 398, 412. 
Blakeney (Bleakney), Major General (1745), 209, 398, 

429, 454; (1746), 270. 
B'lakeney's regiment (1745) , 223, 226. 
Bland's Dragoons (1745), 263. 
Bolton, Duke of (1745), 223. 
Barium (1716), 46, 47, 51; (1731), 123. 
Bouilloiie, Louis de, letter to Young Pretender 

(1745), 205. 
Bonirgay, Brigadier de (1731), 119. 

Bowles, (1732), 124; (1737), 137. 

Boyle, Peter (1746), 273. 

Braemar (1691), 17; (1745), 398, 450. 

Brahan (1716), 43, 51^ (1745), 247, 425, 428, 436, 461. 

Brampton, Carlisle (1745), 254. 

Bray, Lady (1653), 9. 

Breadalbane, Sir John Campbell, 1st Earl (1691), 18- 

19; (1690), 239; (1692), 22. 
Sir John Campbell, 2nd Earl (1745), 

378. 

district (1745), 377. 

Brechin (1741), 358-359; (1745), 393, 396. 
Brent, Mr (1721), 73. 
Brodie, Laird of (1690), 321, 333. 

Mr (1733), 131. 
,, Mrs (1735), 134. 

Alexander, of Brodie, Lord Lyon, letters to D. 
Forbes (1746), 285; (1747), 303; Refer- 
ences : ( 1721), 74; (1733), 130, 131; 
(1735), 134; (1743), 363; (1745), 222, 370, 
371, 372, 410, 416, 467; (1746), 288. 
,, Alexander, of Letlian (1714), 337. 
,, George, of B'rodde (1714), 34. 
,, George, preacher (1714), 337. 
,, James, of Brodie (1714)., 337. 
James, of White Hills (1714), 337. 



250 INDEX TO THE 



Brodie. John, Councillor of Inverness (1714), 337. 

John, of Windie Hills (1714), 337. 
,, Thomas, of Pitgavenie (1714), 337. 

William (1732), 126. 
Broghill, Lord, reply to petition of D. Fortes 

(1653), 9. 
Bucihan, David Erskine, Earl of (formerly Ld. Oar- 

dross), (1690), 319, 321; (1714), 34. 
,., John (1700), 27. 

Major General Thomas, truoe with William 
III. (1691), 18-19; References: (1689), 
vii.; (1690), 13; (1692), 19. 

Bunchrew estate, v & footnote, viii. footnote, xvii., xx. 
(1727), 102; (1730), xxi. ; (1745), 233; 
(1746), xxxvi.-xxxvii. ; (1764), 313. 
Buntine, Capt (1690), 15. 
Burnet, Sir Thomas (1690), 323. 
Bute, Earl of (1714), 34. 

Caber and Caberfey, see Seaforth, Earl of. 
Cadogan, General William, Earl of (1716), 41, 42, 46, 

51 passim, 56, 64; (1717), 72. 
Caithness, Lord, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of Culloden 

(1725), 88. 

Caithness county (1745), 392, 401, 433. 
Calder, Laird of, see Campbell, Sir Hugh of Calder 

(Cawdor) . 

Rev. James (1714), 337. 
',, Sir Thomas (1716), 43. 
Calder Bridge (1746), 264. 
Calderwood, Sir Win., see Polton, Lord. 
Caledonian Canal (1716), 51, and footnote. 
Callendar House (1746), 270. 
Cameron, Lady of Lochiel (1745), 212. 
of Dawnie (1745), 439. 
Donald, of Lochiel (1746), 207, 211.214 
passim, 216, 371,372, 374-376 passim, 386; 
(1746), 269. 

Sir Ewen, of Lochiel (1690), 13. 
,, John, of Lochiel (1716), 47, 48. 
Clan (1716), 42, 341; (1730), 118, 119: 

(1745), 211, 263, 385, 389. 
Campbell, Colonel (1746), 265. 
Com. (1723), 76. 
General (1746), 291, 292, 469. 
Mr (1726), 354. 
Provost (1716), 48. 
of Ardersier, Lady of (1653), 9. 
of Ardkinglass (1690), 26; (1692), 22. 
Capt. of Carrick (1745), 200. 
of Glendaruel (1714), 34. 
of Skipnes (1721), 73. 
Lieut. Alexander (1746), 277. 
Sir Archibald, of dunes (1714), 337. 
Colin, of Blythswood (1725), 92. 

, of Delnes (1714), 337. 

Daniel, of Shawfield (1725), 79, 80-85 

passim, 87, 92;, 345, 348, 349. 
H. (1745), 254. 
Sir Hugh, of Calder (Cawdor) (1697), 24; 

(1716), 44. 

Col. James (1729), 111. 
Genera] Sir James (1745), 200,201, 202-203. 
Sir James, of Auchinbreck (1745), 230. 
Lieut. John (1746), 276. 



OBIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPEE8." 251 



Campbell, Patrick, see Monzie,Lord. 

Capt. Robert, of Glenlyon (1692), 20. 
Sanders (1745), 424. 

,, See also Argyll and Breadalbane, Earls of. 
Campbell's regiment (1725), 82. 

Campo Florida, Prince Di, letter to Young Pretender 
(1745), 206. 




460. 
Cannichael, Lord, afterwards E. of Hyndford, see 

Hyndford, Earl of. 
Carnagie, Sir James (1745), 225. 
Carnburrow, Carnburge (Cairniburgh), (1690), 13; 

(1692), 21. 

Camwath, Earl of (1715), 37. 
Caroline, Queen (1729), 106; (1737), 139. 

Carseland, (1690), 15. 

Carteret, John, 2nd Lord, afterwards Earl Granville 
(1727), 356; (1738), 141; (1742), 176; 
(1746), 294, 295; (1747), 302. 
Cartright, Mr (1717). 343. 
Castle Dounie (1745),' 428, 438, 461. 
Castle Kilohurn (1691), 17. 
Castle Leod (1716), 43. 
Cathcart, Charles, 8th Lord (1731), 119; (1740), 161; 

(1745), 203. 

,, James (1716), 56. 
Caulfield, William (1742), 360; (1745), 367. 
Chambers, Eegent (1745), 466. 
Chandos, Duke of (1731), xviii. 
Chanonry (Chauery, Ohannerie), (1714), 34; (1716), 

43. 

Charles I., i-iii, footnote; (1626), 1, 4, 5. 
Charles II., iv-v, 14; (1650), 6-7. 
Charles Edward, Prince, instructions for march 
into England (1745), 226; protection 
order for Culloden House (1746), 
273: References: (1744), 364; (1745), 
xxxiii-xxxv, 203-206 passim, 208, 209, 211, 
212, 214, 220, 221, 230, 233-234, 244, 263, 370- 
371, 375, 381, 385, 386, 387; (1746), 281, 291, 
292, 473. 
Charteris, Col. Francis, xvii. footnote, xviii. (1691), 

19; (1730), 113, 115. 
Chesterfield, Earl of (1745), 198. 
Chisholm, The (Roddick) (1716), 41; (1731), 119; 

(1745), 212, 380. 
William (1745), 383. 

Chishohns of Strathglass (1730-1), 118, 119. 
Clanchattan (1626), 1, 4; (1745), 230, 246, 250, 431, 

440, 450; (1746), 473. 
Olanranald, MacdonaJd of, Lady of (1726), 355. 

Ranald (OJd Clanranald), (1717), 71; 

(1745),, 217. 371, 386. 
,, Ranald (Young Olanranald,) (1745), 

204, 207. 
,, Macdo-rialds of (1745), 372, 373, 385, 

388, 391. 

See also Maodonald, Ranald, of Benbecula 
Clark, Mr (1746), 293. 
Clark (Clerk), George (1729), 104; (1737), 136 

Dr John, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of Culloden 
(1731), 120, 121; References :( 1733), 130: 
(1738), 145; (1745), 252; (1747), 302. 



252 INDEX TO THB 



Clayton, General (1742), 184, 18&, 187, 360: (1744), 

365. 

Clayton's Regiment (1725), 82. 
Clerk, Baron (1745), 225. 
Clifton skirmish (1745), 263. 
Club, The, 325, 326, 328. 

Cluny, Evan Macpherson of, letter to Sir John 
Cope (1745), 374; letter to D. Forbes, 
5th of Culloden (1745), 373, 375. 
References: (1745), 217, 249, 250, 378, 
379, 382, 383, 389, 391, 403, 408, 412, 413, 
429, 449, 450. 
,, Janet Macpherson of, letter to D. Forbes and 

reply (1745), 217, 391. 
Cobham, Lord (1743), 197; (1745), 198. 
Cobham's Dragoons (1746), 265, 270, 468. 
Coohran, Sir John (1700), 27. 
Cockburn, Mr (1716), 45. 

,, Adam, Lord Ormiston (1690), 321, 333; 

(1717), 72. 
,, Sir Alexander (1745), 203. 

James (1723), 77; (1738), 149, 150. 
Coigaoh (1745), 421, 428, 440, 441. 
Colbert, Col., see Cuthbert. 
Colquhoun, of Luss, see Grant, Imdovick. 
Conon, River (1716), 43. 
Contin (1745), 447. 

Cope, Sir John,, letters to D. Forbes, Lord President 
(1744), 369; (1745), 220, 370, 383, 389, 399, 
400; (1746), 277; to Loudoun's regiment 
(1745), 207; References: (1745), xxxiid. and 
footnote, 204, 209, 213-221 passim, 224-226 
passim, 249, 371, 373, 374, 377, 379, 381-385 
passim, 387, 388, 390, 392-395 passim, 397-399 
passim, 401-403 passim, 412, 413; (1746), 266, 
267, 278 note, 281. 
Cornbury, Lord, letter to Lord President (1738), 147. 

Reference, xxix footnote. 

Corrie-arrach (Corry^rig), (1745), 216, 221, 281, 379, 
382, 383, 388-390 passim, 395, 399, 
400, 408. 

Corse, William, letter to D. Forbes (1746), 269. Re- 
ference: (1746), 469. 
Corsindae, family of Forbes of, iii. 
Corss, John (1740), 164, 165. 
Cotterill, Major (1745), 201. 
Coul (1716), 43. 

Coupar, Lord, see Balmerino, 5th Lord. 
Coupar Angus (1745), 220, 221. 
Court of Session, xxv.-xxix. and footnote, 151-154; 

(1714)., 35. 

Cowper, Mr (1728), 104. 
Craggs (James), (1721), 73. 

Craigie, Robert, Lord Advocate, letter to Lord Lovat 
(1745), 209. References: (1738), 147; 
(1742), 174, 184-187 passim; (1745), 204, 
210, 403; (1746), 287; (1747), 302. 
Craigie, Thomas (1745), 210. 
Craigy, Mr (1733), 131. 

Crawford, John Lindsay, 20th Earl of (1745), 202. 
,, William Lindsay, 18th Earl of (1690), 

319 333 

Grieff (1729), 111; (1745), 221, 370, 384. 
Cromartie, George Mackeiizie, 1st Earl of, see Tarbat, 
Viscount. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 253 



Cromartie, George Mackenzie, 3rd Earl of, letters to 
Lord President (1745), 232, 415; pass 
and protection (1746), 273. Refer- 
ences : (1745), 235, 242, 243, 246, 247, 
250, 380, 408, 411, 414, 421, 428, 434, 447, 
451; (1746), 273-274, 283, 295, 473. 
,, John Mackenzie, 2nd Earl (1715), 37; 

(1716). 43. 

Cromarty district (1696), 334; (1716), 43, 51. 
Cromwell, Oliver, pass to J. Forbes, 2nd of Culloclcn 
(1651), 8. References: xxxix. (1650), 7, 
iv. footnote. 

Cullen (1745), 394, 397,462. 
Culloden, battle of (1746), xxxvi. footnote; 473. 
Culloden estate (1625), li.-iii. footnote; (1685), viii. 
footnote; (1690), vii.; (1730), xx.-xxi.; 
(1734), xxii. footnote, xxiii. and footnote; 
(1745), 244; (1746), xxxvi .-xxxvii, 273, 474. 
Culloden House, attacks on (1715), xii., 51; (1745), 
xxxv., xxxvi., 230, 232-233, 237, 246, 253, 
424, 425, 426. 

Cumberland, William, Duke of, commission to Fraseir 
of Castle Leathers (1746), 288. Refer- 
ences : U745), 201, 263, 458; (1746), 
xxxiv. and footnote, xxxvi. footnote, 272, 
275, 280, 281, 286, 287, 290, 292, 468, 
473. 474. 

Cuming, Alexander, of Logie (1714), 337. 
Cunningham, Mr (1731), 120, 121. 

Irish officer (1746), 268. 

Cunninghame v. Chalmers, lawsuit (1740), 158. 
Cuthbert, Col. (1745), 466. 

of Castlehill (1716), 65, 66; (1717), 70; 

(1739), 151; (1745), 466. 
,, Al. Bailie of Inverness (1649), 6. 

George of Castlehill (1714), 337. 
John, yr . of CastMiiH (1714), 336, 337. 
William (1717), 71. 

Dalnacardich (1729), 111; (1745), 219. 

Dalrimple, Mr (1716), 53. 

Dalrymple, Sir David, Lord Advocate, letter to D. 
Forbes, 5th of Culloden (1716), 45; 
letter on Fraserdale escheat (1716), 58. 
References: (1716), xiii., 41, 42, 48, 
50, 58. 

,, Hew, the younger, afterwards Lord Drum- 
more, see Lord Drumonore. 

Sir Hew, the elder, President of Court of 
Session, memorial to George I. (1714), 
35; letter to D. Forbes, Ld. Advocate 
(1727), 101; (1732), 126. Refer- 
ences :( 1699), 27; (1730), 113; 
(1733), 130; (1737), xxiv., xxix. foot- 
note, 136. 

Sir John, Master of Stair (1690), 318, 
320-324 passim, 326, 333; (1692), 
19, 21. 

Dalwhinny (1745), xxxiii. footnote, 217, 382, 383, 399. 

D'Anvers, Mr (1745), 387. 

Dawson, William (1714), 337. 

Delafaye, Charles, letters to D. Forbes (1725), 83, 86 

93, 350, 352, 353; (1726), 354; (1727), 102 
( 1732) , 123. References : ( 1725) , 83, 84 

94, 351; (1726), 97, 



254 INDEX TO THE 



Deloraine, Earl of (1714), 34; (1731), 118-119. 
Deloraine's regiment (1725), 82; (1731), 119. 
Derby (1745), 261, 263, 458, 463. 
Deskford, Lord, letter to Lord President (1745), 430. 

References: (1745), 422, 423, 431. 
Devonshire, Duke of (1745), 198. 
Dingwall (1716), 43. 
Doohfour (1731), 123. 

Dodswell, (1732), 124, 125. 

Dornoch (1745), 425. 
Dorset, Duke of (1745), 198. 
Douglas, Mr (1745),, 199. 
Douglas, town (1745), 263. 
Douglass, Robert (1745), 203. 
Dove, Captain (1745), 460. 
Dow, Alister 1,1716), 41. 
Downs, Captain (1719), 73. 
Dreghorn, Lord, 262 footnote. 

Drummond, Mr (1716), 53; (1717), 71; (1746), 294. 
,, Messrs D. & W., letter to J. Forbes, 4th 

of Cultoden (1716), 68. 
George (1716), 58; (1717), 70, 72; 
(1721), 73; (1723), 76, 77, 78; (1745), 
224, 225; (1746), 266, 470. 
John, letter to Lord President (1738), 141. 
John, see Melfort, E. of. 
Lord John (1745), 454, 460, 462; (1746), 

269. 

Thomas, of Riccartoune (1690), 322, 328. 
see also Perth, D. of. 
Drummore, Hew Dalrymple, Lord (1730), 113; (1745), 

225 

Drumochter (1729), 110; (1745), 377, 378, 379. 
Duart (1692), 21. 
Duart Castle (1690), 13. 
Duff, Anne, see Mackintosh, Anne. 
William (1732), 126. 

, of Dipple (Deple), (1716), 68. 

Dumbarton (1725), 81, 83. 

Dumfries (1745), 263. 

Dun, Dr (1676), 10. 

Dun, David Erskine, Lord (1730), 113. 

Dunachton (1745), 439. 

Dunbar, of Hempriggs, v. 

Alexander of Bishop Mill (1714), 337. 

of Moy (1714), 337. 

Anna, see Forbes, Anna. 

Archibald of Thunderton (1716), 66. 

David of Dunphaill (1714), 337. 

George (1740), 155. 

J., bailie of Inverness (1649), 6. 

James, bailie of Inverness (1716), 44. 

51, 52, 67. 

James of Cleves (1714), 337. 
Jonathan, of Tulliglen (1714), 337. 
,, Ludovick, of Grange (1714), 337. 
,, Ludovick, yr., of Moy (1714), 337. 
Dunbar, town (1745), 224. 

Dunoanson, Major Robert, letter to Capt. R. Camp- 
bell (1692), 20. Reference: (1692), 20. 
Dundas, Robert, the younger, see Arniston, Lord. 
Dundee, John Graham, Viscount (1689), 323. 
Dundee (1745), 220, 454. 
Dunkeld (1745), 220; (1746), 298, 



ORIGINAL "CUI*LODEN PAPERS." 255 



Dunmoire, John Murray, Earl of, letters to Lord Pre- 
sident (1746), 279, 289, 296. References: 
(1746), 280, 281, 286, 290. 

Dunollich (1690), 13. 

Dunrobin (1745), 409. 

Dunstaffnage (1691), 13, 17. 

Dunvegan (1745), 428. 

Durand, Colonel (1745), 254. 

Earle, Tom (1717), 72. 
Edgcunnbe, R. (1715), 340. 

Edinburgh (1700), 27; (1715), 37; (1725), 90; (1736), 
xxiii., xxiv.; (1745), 218, 224, 227, 230, 262, 
263, 413, 416; (1746), 266, 269, 270, 
469-470. 

Edlin, (1741), 171. 

Edmestone (Edmonstone), family, iii. footnote. 
Elchies, Patrick Grant, Lord (1741), 358; (1745), 230; 

(1746), 272. 
Elgin (1626), 4; (1716), 65; (1725), 353; (1745), 452, 

455, 456, 457, 461, 462. 
,, magistrates of (1745), 407. 
Elphinstone, Arthur, afterwards 6th Lord Balmerino 

(1727), 101. 

,, see also Balmerino. 

Ephington, Robert, bailie of Inverness (1714), 337. 
Erchless in Strathglass (1691), 17. 
Erskine, Colonel (1745), 201. 
Lord (1727), 99, 101. 

(Airskin), Charles, afterwards Ld. Tinwald., 
Solicitor Gen. (1714), 34; (1725), 85, 86. 
David, Lord Dun, see Dun. 
James, Lord Grange, see Grange. 
Tom (1731), 119. 



Esk 



River (1745), 263. 



Essick (1745), 231. 
Ewing, John (1742), 175. 

Falconer, James (1725), 346. 

Falkirk (1745>, 454. 

Falkirk, battle of (1746), xxxiii. footnote, xxxiv., 265, 

267, 268, 270-272, 471, 473. 
Falla (1745), 225. 

Fane, Henry, letters to Lord President (1737), 138, 
139; (1741), 168; (1742), 184. Reference: 
(1746), 281. 

Farquhar, Francy (1727), 102. 
Farquharspn, Anne, see Mackintosh, Anne. 

,, J., of Invercauld, letter to Lord Presi- 

dent (1747), 478. 
Fawkner, Sir Everafd, letter to Lord President (1746), 

287. References: (1746), 279, 281, 286, 

288, 289-290, 292. 
Fearne, David (1690), 322. 
Fenwick, Mrs (1737), 135-136. 

Ferguson, Captain (1746), 292; (1747), 301, 302. 

Lieut (1745), 387. 

Ferintosh estate, v. & footnote; (1691), vii., xxiii. 
footnote; (1715), 37; (1732), 129; (1742), 
173 footnote, 174; (1745), 433, 435; 
(1784), xliii.-xliv. 
Fielding, Captain (1738), 149. 

Findlater & Seafield, James, 3rd Earl, letters to D. 
Forbes, 3rd of Culloden (1699), 26; 
(1701), 28; (1702), 29. 



266 INDEX TO THfc 



Fiudlater & Seafield, James, 5th Earl, letter to Lord 
President (1745), 393. References: 
(1745), 263, 397, 452. 

Finlaa-ig Castle (1691), 17. 

Finky, John (1714), 337. 

Fits-James, Lord (1745), 244. 

FJeeming, Mr (1729), 108. 

Fletcher, Andrew,, see Milton, Lord. 

Fochabers (1716), 47, 50; (1745), 456, 462. 

Fontenoy, battle of (1745), 200-203. 

Forbes, Captain (1690), 25. 

Col. of Maitland's Regt. (1700), 27. 
Lord, ii. 

of Echt (1745), 466. 

Capt. Alexander (1739), 150 ; (1745), 201. 
Anne (Dunbar), v. 
Arthur (1730-31), 118-119. 
Sir Arthur, letter to Ld. President (1747), 
302. References : xliii. (1745), 222; 
(1747), 475, 476. 
Sir David, of Newhall, vii. & footnote, xvii. ; 

(1739), 151. 

Duncan, 1st of Culloden, petitions on behalf 
of Inverness (1626), 1, 4; petition on Josses 
in Montrose's campaign (1653), 8-9. Re- 
ferences: (1572-1654), i.-iv.; (1626), 2, 
3; (1646), 5-6; (1651), 7. 
Duncan, 3rd of Culloden, plan for peace of the 
Highlands (1691), 14-18; sketch of state of 
things in 1696, 317-333 ; letter to Lt.-Col. 
J. Forbes (1700), 27. Ref erences : v-vii ; 
(1676), 1Q, 11; (1690), 12, 25, 319, 321, 322, 
326-329 passim; (1691), 330, 331; (1692), 
21; (1695), 22; (1697), 23, 24; (1698). 24; 
(1699), 26; (1700), 28; (1701), 28; (1702), 
29. 

Duncan, 5th of Culloden, Lord President, let- 
ters to Provost of Aberdeen (1745), 385, 
396; to anonymous correspondent (1746), 
268; to John, D. of Argyll (1721), 74; 
(1723), 76, 77; (1738), 150; to D. of' Athol 
(1745), 378; to W. Baillie (1745), 422, 439; 
to C.O. at Berwick (1745), 417; to Brodie 
of Brodie, Lord Lyon (1743), 363; (1746), 
288; to Gen. Clayton (1742), 360; to Cluny 
(1745), 379, 382; to Lady Cluny (1745), 217; 
to Sir J. Cope (1745), 371, 373, 377,, 381, 
383, 384. 388, 390, 397, 402, 403 (1746), 
281; to E. of Croniartie (1745), 235, 411, 
414; to Sir D. Dalrymple (1716), 41, 42; 
to C. Delafaye (1725), 84, 94, 351; (1726), 
97; to Ld. Deskford (1745), 431; to E. of 
Dunmore (1746), 290; to magistrates of 
Elgin (1745), 407; to Sir E. Fawkner 
(1746), 279; to E. of Findlater & Seafield 
(1745), 397, 452; to Capt. A. Forbes 
(1739), 150; to J. Forbes, 4th of Culloden 
(1714), 34; (1716), 50, 67, 69; (1721), 75; 
(1728), 357; (1729), 104; to J. Forbes, his 
son (1742), 182; to Ld. Fortrose, see Sea- 
forth below; mem. to D. Fraser for Loyat 
(1745), 240; to Fraser of Achnagaarn 
(1726), 98; to Fraser of Gortuleg (1745), 
451 ; to magistrates of Glasgow (1725), 79; 
to Glengarry (1745), 405; to D. of Gordon 



O&IGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 257 

(1745), 370, 452, 457; to Major G. Grant 
(1745), 388; to Lud. Grant (1745), 422, 
433, 443; to W. Grant (1740), 156; to Rev. 
W. H. (n.d.), 313; to Ld. Hardwicka 
(1739), 151; (1740), 155, 158; (1745), 199; 
to Lord Harrington (1745), 395; to Gen. 
Hawtey (1746), 472; to E. of Hay (1716), 
58; to Col. Innes (1716), 58; to Marquess 
of Lothian (1745), 199; to Ld. Lovat 
(1745), 213, 214, 216, 221, 228, 229, 230, 
231, 235. 237, 242, 245, 259; to Sir A. 
Macdonald (1745), 376, 428; to Macleod of 
Genzies (1745), 440; to Macleod (1745), 
427, 438, 455, 457, 459 ; to Macpherson of 
Cluny, see Cluny above ; to J. Macphenson 
(1745), 379; to A. Mitchell (1742), 180; 
(1745), 249, 465; to J. Morison (1745), 423, 
460; to P. Murdoch (1732), 127; to D. of 
Newcastle (1727), 355; (1729), 107, 110; 
(1746), 470; to H. Pelham (1744), 196 
(1745), 203; (1746), 274; to Mr Poyntz 
(1746), 296; to D. of Queensberry (1740), 
160; to Ld. Reay (1745), 396; to Ross of 
Inverchasly (1745), 406, 441, 446 ; to Ross of 
Pitcalniev (1745), 430, 446; to George Ross 
(1745), 449, 450; (1746), 275, 280, 286; to 
M. Ross, yr., of Pitcalnie (1745), 442; to 
Ross clan (1745), 445; to J, Scrope (1725), 
80; (1730), 114; (1732), 124; (1733), 132 
(1735), 135; (1738), 145; (1745), 448 
(1746), 474; to E. of Seafield, see FuxBater 
above; to E. of Seaforth (Ld. Fortrose), 
(1745), 213, 390, 421, 435, 444, 459; to Mrs 
Sleigh (1735), 134; to E. of Stair (1745), 
380, 449, 464; to E. of Sutherland (1745), 
401, 406, 425, 432; (1746), 467; to Mr Tal- 
bot (c. 1733), 358; to M. of Tweeddale 
(1742), 176, 179, 183, 185, 188; (1744), 365, 
366, 368; (1745), 204, 245, 404, 407, 416 
419, 420, 460; to Ge.n. Wade (1729), 109 
(1745), 450; to Sir R. Walpole (1716), 61 
(1729), 111; (1730), 116; to Sir W. Yonge 
(1744), 195; account of conduct of Glas- 
gow magistrates (1725), 86; memorial on 
revenue and tea-drinking (1742), 188-195; 
mem. on attainders (1746), 282; mem on 
suppression of the rebellion (1746), 284- 
note on state of Highlands (1746), 297 Re- 
ferences : ( 1685-1 747), via.-xliii. & foot- 
notes; (1714), 29, 33; (1715), 37, 38, 39, 
18, 338; (1716), 41, 42, 45, 46-49 passim 
5^-56 passim,, 59, 66-68 passim, 72, 73, 76 ; 
(1717), 70-72 passim, 342; (1721), 73 
(1723), 76, 78; (1725), 83, 86, 88, 89, 93 
94, 96, 97, 350, 352, 353; (1726), 98, 354 
355; (1727), 99, 101, 102, 356; (1728) 103 
1729 , 105-107 passim, 109, 111; (1730) 
112, 117, 118; (1731)/118,'l20 i2 , 122; 
(1732), 123, 125, 126, 129; (1733), 130, 131 
357; (1735), 133; (1736), 135; (1737) 135 
137-139 passim; (1738), 139-140, 141 144 
145, 147, 149; (1739), 153; (1740), 155, 157^ 
162 passim; (1741), 167-169 passim 171 
358; (1742), 172-175 passim, 17^ S, ffi 
182, 184, 186, 359; (1744), 196, 364, 365! 



258 INDEX TO TH* 

368, 369; (1745), 197, 198, 200-203 passim, 
207, 208, 211, 214, 216, 218-220 passim, 223- 
227 passim, 229, 232, 236, 238, 24Q, 243, 251- 
253 passim, 257, 258, 261, 263, 370, 373, 375, 
383, 385, 389, 391-393 passim, 398-401 
passim, 408-412 passim, 414, 415, 418, 419, 
423, 424, 426, 430-434 passim, 440, 442, 444, 
447, 453, 455, 458, 467; (1746), 264-267 
passim, 269, 272, 273, 277, 279, 285-287 
passim, 289-294 passim, 296, 468-470 passim 
473; (1747), 301-305 passim, 475, 478; 
anonymous letters to (1714), 29; (1716), 
54, 59; (1727), 99; (1742), 179. 
Forbes, Duncan, son of John, 6th of Culloden, xxii. 

(1764), 312. 

,, Duncan George of Culloden, xliv. 
Oapt. Hugh, letter to Ld. President (1745), 
201. References: (1742), 182; (1745), 
255, 468; (1746), 474. 

,, James, Lord of La Faye (1650), iv. footnote. 
,, Janet (Corsindae), iii. 
,, Jean, xliii. 
,, Jean (Gordon), (1715), xii. footnote, 38, 39; 

(1717), 71. 

,, John, 2nd of Culloden, petition to Gen. Lil- 
burne (1653), 8-9; petition for Inverness 
and answer (1655), 9. References: 
iv.-v.; (1651), 7, 8, 9; (1658), 10; (1664), 
10; (1676),, 10. 
Lieut. Col. John (1690-1692), vii. & footnote; 

(1700), 27; (1739), 151. 

,, Lieut. John, Scots Greys, letter to H. Forbes 
(1745), 201; to Ld. President (1746), 468. 
References: (1744), 195, 196. 
,, John, 4th of Culloden, letters to D. Forbes, 
5th of Culloden (1714), 33; (1715), 37, 38, 
78, 338; (1716), 47, 52, 53; (1717), 71, 72, 
342; to J. Forbes, 6th of Culloden (1732), 
126; to his wife (1715), 39. References: 
vii., viii., 305-6, 410; (1704), 335; (1714), 
32, 34, 337; (1715), xii., 36, 39; (1716), 
40, 43, 44, 46, 49, 50, 55, 65-69 
passim, 341; (1719), 73; (1721), 74, 75; 
(1728), 357; (1729), 104, 105, 111; (1730), 
xx.-xxi., xxiii., 113, 117; (1731), 118, 119, 
122, 123; (1732), 128, 129; (1733), 129-130, 
131, 132, 133; (1737), 136. 

,, John, 6th of Oulloden., letter to Alexander 
Rose (1764), 312. References : -xi. foot- 
note, xx,, xxii. & footnote, xxxviii. 
& footnote; (1730), 112; (1732), 127-128; 
(1738), 140-141, 142-143, 148-150 passim; 
(1742), 182; (1745), 200, 203. 464; (1746), 
278, 295; (1747), 304; (1748), 305, 307, 308, 
309, 310; (1754), 310; (1757), 311; (n.d.), 
314, 315. 

Mary (Innes), vii. 
Mary (Rose), x.-xi. & footnote. 
Peter (1727), 102; (1729), 105. 
Sarah (Stratton), xliii. footnote. 
William, of Pittencrieff, advocate, letter to 
J. Forbes, 6th of Culloden (1748), 305. 
References: (1739), 151; (1745), 465; 
(1746), 269; (1747), xxxviii. footnote: 
(1764), 312. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 259 



Forbes, William, brother of Capt. Alex. Forbes (1739), 

150. 

William, writer to the Sigyiet (1748), 305. 
Forres (1716), 51. 

Fort - Augustus (Kiliohuiman, Killiewnmnan) , 
(1719), 73; (1728), 103; (1729), 109, 
110; (1745), 216, 218, 246, 247, 260, 
374, 377, 378, 385, 395 b 399, 419, 420, 
451, 452, 460, 461; (1746), 281, 286. 
ForUJeorge (1745), 245, 388, 417, 419, 42Q, 449. 
Fort-WilHaan (1690), 21 footnote; (1716), 51; (1729), 
109; (1742), 362; (1745), 370, 371-375, 
passim, 377, 384, 386, 451, 455. 
Forth Raver (1745), 218. 
Fortrose, Lord, see Seaforth, 6th Earl of 
Fox, H., letter to Ld. President (1747), 303. 
Fraser, Dr (1738), 149; (1745), 212. 

Lady, of Achnagairn (1745), 234-235. 

of Belladrum (1714), 33. 

of Castle Leathers (1730), 117. 

of Culbokie (Kilbo-kie), (1745), 211, 212, 213, 

233, 241. 

of Dunballoch (1714), 33; (1717), 70. 
of Foyers, iii. footnote; (1714), 33; (1715), 

38, 338; (1717), 70. 
of Kinaries (1714), 33. 
of Reelick (1714), 33; (1729), 105. 
of Struie (Strae), (1716), 43. 
of Urchart (Erchet), (1731), 123. 
Rev. Alexander (1714), 337. 
Alexander, Lovat's 2nd son (1745), 221. 
Alexander, of Culduthel (1745), 212. 
Alexander, of Phopachy (1716), 41. 
Alexander, Lord Strichen, see Strichen, Lord. 
Bell (1764), 313. 

Charles,, of Inverallochy (1745), 222, 409, 410. 
Charles, yr. of Inverallochy (1746), 473. 
Donald, chaplain (1745), 240, 242. 
Duncan, of Achnagairn (1745), 228, 234. 
James, bailie (1745), 234, 235, 242, 449. 
James, of Achnagairn (1714), 33; (1726), 98; 

(1745), 242. , 

James, of Castle Leathers (1746), 288. 
James, of Foyers (1745), 211, 213, 23Q, 232, 

James of Strichen (Streachen), (1714), 33. 

Sandie (1716), 49. 

Simon, see Lovat, Lord, and Lovat, 
Master of. 

Rev. Thomas (1714), 337. 

Thomas, of Gortuleg, letter to Ld. President 
(1745), 216; to Lovat (1745), 387. Re- 
ferences: (1745), 211, 212, 213, 215, 231, 
233-238 passim, 241, 244, 252, 261, 409 
451; (1747), 303. 

William, agent for Lovat (1747), 302 

William, bailie (1716), 67. 

William, yr. erf Dulcraig (1731), 123. 

William, Fraserdale's chamberlain (1716), 46 

William, of Struie (1745), 233 
Fraser clan (1714), 33; (1745), xxxv., 246, 249 256 

v i , IP' 260 > 431 ' 432 > 451 > 46 ; 462. 
Frederick, Prince of Wales, see Wales, Frederick 

Prince of. 
Frend, Pr (1731), 120, 



60 INDEX TO THE 



Gardiner, Colonel (1745), 225. 

Gardiner's Dragoons (1745), 223, 225; (1746), 270. 

Garva (1745), 391. 

Garvieanore (1745), 216. 

General Assembly, Commission of (1650), 6-7. 

George I. (1714), 34, 335; (1716), 55-56. 

George II., xxxiv. footnote (1727), 102; (1737), 136, 

139; (1744), 367; (1745), 197, 253; 

(1746), 264. See also Wales, George, 



Gilfchrist, James (1745), 432-433. 

Glamis (1745), 269. 

Glasgow (1690), 15; (1725), xvii. (1745), 263, 264, 

414, 454; (1746), 269, 270, 273, 469. 
Glasgow magistrates, accounts of malt-tax riots 
(1725), 91; address to the King on. malt 
riots (1725), 90; petition to Lords Justice 
General (1725), 89; replies to examination 
(1725), 343-350. See also Glasgow riots. 
Glasgow regiment (1746), 269, 270, 272, 273. 
Glasgow riots (1725), 79-93, 98 note, 343-354. 
"Glasgow," vessel (1745), 245, 421. 
Glenbucket> see Gordon, John, of Glenbucket. 
Glencairn, Lord (1746), 267. 
Glencarne's [Lord Glencairn's] regiment (1690), 

18, 26. 

Glencoe (1745), 212, 217. 

Glencoe, massacre of (1692), vii. footnote, 19-21, 22. 
Glenelg (1732,, 128, 129; (1745), 203, 208, 373; 

(1746), 292, 296. 
Glenfinnon (Gleninven), (1745), 208, 211, 373, 374, 

375, 378. 
Glengarry, Macdonell of, see Macdonell, Alex., Angus, 

John. 
Glengarry district (1690), 13; (1716), 51; (1728), 103; 

(1745), 374; (1746), 275, 285. 
Glenmoriston (1731), 123; (1745V. 212, 217. 
Glenorchy (1745), 233. 
Glenshiel, battle ctf (1719), xiv., 73. 
Godolphin, Earl of, 36. 
Gordon, , (1742), 359, 360. 

,, >, wounded at Glenshiel (1719), 73. 

Mr, brother-in-law to Arniston (1742), 174. 

Mr (1746), 293. 

General, of Achintoull (1727), 355; (1729), 

108. 

of Ardoch (1745), 409. 
Lieut. Adam (1746), 276. 
,, Ada.ni, of Killfedder (1714), 338. 
,, Alexander, 2nd Duke of, see Huntly, Mar- 

quess of. 
Alexander of Ardoch (1714), 338; (1716). 

56; (1722), xiv. footnote. 
,, Alexander, of Wnehper (1714) 338 
,, Lord Charles (1745), 466. 
,, Cosmo, George, 3rd Duke of, letter to Ld 

P . dent (1745), 455. References: 
^744), 3 67 368 . (1745) 24? 3? 

374, 376, 378, 380, 383, 400, 452, 455-457 
passim; (1746), 293. 
,, Harry (1745) 255, 427, 465. 

Ie nf ne 3u?m&}, ft? 1 "*" of <1730 >' 

James, of St Christopher (1745) 426 427 
Lieut. John (1746), 276. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 261 



Gordon, Sir John, of Embo (1714), 338; (1726), 98-99. 
John, of Garthie (1714), 338. 

John, of Glenbucket (1729), 109; (1745), 222, 
371, 374, 380, 381, 386, 398, 400, 402, 403, 
407-410 passim, 413. 

,, Sir John, of Invergordon, letter to Lord Pre- 
sident (1745), 408. References: (1745), 
411, 419, 421; (1746), 295. 

,, Lord Lewis, letter to Macleod (1745), 466. 
References : 247, 442, 443, 451, 456, 460. 
Peter (1745), 374. 
,, Sir Robert, of Gordonstown, xii. footnote; 

(1721), 74. 
SirWilliain (1715), 39; (1716), 55; (1742), 

174, 175. 

,, Sir William, of Dalpholly (1714), 338. 
Gordon Castle (1729), 109, 110. 
Gower, Lord (1745), 198. 
Grafton, Duke of (1737), 138. 
Graham, James (1725), 90. 

,, ., see also Montrose. 
Grahame, Lt.-ol. (1690), 13. 
Granard, Lord (1676), 10. 

Grange, Sir James Erskine, Lord, Justice Clerk (1716), 
42, 48, 52, 53, 56; (1730), 113; (1732), 129; 
(1737), 136. 
Grant, (1695), 22. 
(1714), 33. 

Brigadier (1714), 33; (1715), 37; (1716), 41, 
46, 49, 53, 55, 59; (1717), 70, 71; 
(1730), 117. 

Colonel (1716), 53; (1731), 123. 
,, Governor,, of Inverness (1745), 424 
Laird of (1690), 321, 333. 
Mr (1745), 261. 
,, Mr, barrack master (1745), 400 
of Dalrachney (1731), 123; (1733), 130. 
,, of Glenmoriston (1745), 212, 388. 
,, of Rothiemurchus (1745), 422, 433, 442 443 
Alexander, M.P. (1714), 337. 



Major George (1745), 388. 

Ensign James (1746), 276. 

James of Sheugly (1745),, 427. 

Sir James of Grant (1732), 128; (1733), 131, 

132, 133; (1745), 21Q, 256, 376, 378, 380 

389, 422; (1747), 303. 
John (1728), 103. 
Ludovick, yr. of Grant, and of Luss, letters to 

Ld. President (1745), 431, 442. Refer- 

ences .-(1729), 106; (1733), 130; (1745), 

2 ' 430 ' 431) 433 ' 439j 443; 



Capt. Patrick' (1746), 276 

William (1729) a 109, 112. 

William (of Edinburgh), letter to Ld Presi- 
d ent ,Q741), 358. Reference: (1740), 156 

Colonel William (1716), 59 

Lieut. William (1746), 276. 
Grant clan (1745), 246, 247, 372 
Grant's regiment (1690), 18; (1716) 44 
Granville, Earl, see Carteret, Lord 
Gray, Thomas (n.d.), 314, 315, 



262 INDEX TO THB 



Guest, General Joseph (1725), 343, 350; (1744), 364; 

(1745), 387, 399, 453, 454. 
Gun, Capt. Alexander (1745), 425; (1746), 276. 



H, Rev. W. (n.d.), 313. 

Racket, Colonel (1745), 225. 

Hailes, Mr (1716), 55. 

Haining (Henning), John Pringle, Lord (1730), 113. 

HaltUme, Patrick, of Gleneagles (1714), 34. 

Peter (17J7), 72; (1721), 75; (1737), 136. 
Halifax, Lord (1745), 223. 
Halket, Co-lone! (1745), 383. 

Hall, Sir John, Provost of Edinburgh (1690), 320. 
Halley, Edmund (1731), 120. 
Hamilton, , debtor (1721), 73. 
Capt. (1746), 294. 
G. (1746), 279. 
J. (1745), 222. 

,, James, 5th Duke of (1740), 158. 
,, Lieut.-Col. James, letter to Maj. Duncan- 
son (1692), 20. References: (1692), 
19, 20. 

John (1733), 131. 
W., letter to Ld. President (1733), 357. 

Reference: (1733), 358. 
,, Sir William (1690), 318, 320-322 passim; 

327 333 
,, William, 3rd Duke of (1690), 318-321 

passim, 323-325 passim, 327, 333. 
Hamilton town (1725), 82. 
Hamilton's dragoons (1745), 223, 224; (1746), 

270, 272. 

Handgrove,, Colonel (1731), 119. 
Harcourt, Lord (1717), 342. 

Hardwicke, Earl of, Ld. Chancellor, letters to Ld. 
President (1738), 139; (1739), 153; 
(1740), 157, 158; (1741), 169. Refer- 
ences: (1733), 357; (1736), xxiv. ; 
(1737), xxv., xxx.; (1738), 141; (1739), 
151; (1740), 155; (1744), 196; (1745), 
198, 199; (1746), 286; (1747), 301. 
Harley, Robert, see Oxford, Earl of. 
Harrington, Ea,rl of, (1737), 138, 139; (1744), 369; 
(1745), 198, 395; (1746), 264, 278, 282, 
286, 296. 

Hawley, General, letter to Ld. President (1746), 265. 
References: (1745), 264; (1746), xxxiii. 
and footnote, 264-267 passim, 270, 271, 468, 
471, 472. 

Hay, Lord (1714), 33. 
Heighington, Captain. (1719), 73. 
Henderson, James (1725), 344. 

Thomas (1650), 7; (1676), 10-11. 
Herbert, Lord (1745), 223. 
"Hercules," see Forbes, John, 6th of CuHoden. 
Hickson, spy (1745), 226. 
Highbridge (1745), 373. 

Hill, Sir John, letter to D. Forbes, 3rd of CuHoden 
(1690), 25; (1692), 21; (1695), 22; (1697), 
5?jJS J Forbes - 2nd of Culloden (1676), 10; 
(1690), 12; to Col. Hamilton (1692), 20. R&. 
ferences: (1692), vii. footnote, 17, 19, 21 
footnote. 

Hill's regiment (1690), 8. 
Holloway, Mr (n.d.), 313-314. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPEBS." 263 



Home, Mr Henry, afterwards Lord Kames, letter to 

D. Forbes, 5th of Culloden (1732), 125. 
(Hume) Earl of (1745),, 225; (1746), 266, 267, 

268, 269. 

,, Sir Patrick, see Hume, Sir Patrick. 
Hope, Archibald, yr. of Rankeiler (1732), 124. 
Hossack, John, letters to D. Forbes, 5th of Culloden 
(1716), 46, 49, 52; (1719), 73; (1746), 473. 
References: (1721), 74; (1747), xxxviii. 
footnote. 

"Hotmd," sloop (1745), 460, 462, 464, 465. 
Howard, G. (1746), 278. 
Hume, Joseph (1732), 123, 125. 

,, Sir Patrick, afterwards Ld. Polwarth, after- 
wards E. off Marchmont, see March- 
mont, E. of. 
Hunter, R. (1725), 344. 
Huntly, Alexander Gordon, Marquess (1715), 39; 

(1716), 43, 342. 
Huske, General John (1745), xxxiii. footnote, 222, 

223, 224, 453; (1746), 267, 270, 271. 
Hyndford, John, 1st Earl of, formerly Ld. Carmichael 

(1699), 27; (1701), 28. 
John, 3rd Earl of (1740), 164. 

Idle I., Chief Baron, letter to Ld. President (1744), 

196. References: (1741), 169, 171. 
Hay, Earl of, afterwards 3rd Duke of Argyll, letter 
to Lovat (1716), 44. References : ix. ; (1714), 
32, 33; (1715), 37; (1716), xiii. 48, 49, 55, 56, 
58, 66; (1717), 70, 71; (1725), 83, 95, 96, 97, 
98; (1726), 355; (1729), 106, 111; (1733), 130, 
131, 132; (1737), 136, 138; (1738), xxxi. 
(1739), 152; (1740), 159. See also Argyll, 
Archibald, 3rd Duke. 
Inglis, Hugh (1745), 420, 458. 
Innes, Lt.-Col. (1716), 58. 
of Innes (1651), 7. 
of Innes, family of, vii. footnote. 
Sir Henry, of Innes (1714), 337; (1745), 456. 
John (1745), 450. 
Mary, see Forbes, Mary. 
Inverary (1729), 109; (1745), 462. 
Inveraw's company (1745), 371, 377. 
Inverbi-ecky (1745), 425. 
Invergarry (1691), 17; (1692), 19,, 21; (1716), 47, 

50, 56. 

Inverlaiden (1745), 430. 

Inverlochy (1690), 17; (1716), 42, 50; (1745), 415. 
Inverness, xx. footnote; (1626), 1-5; (1690), 13, 17; 
(1692), 21; (1714), 335; (1715) ,'xii. and 
footnote, 57; (1716), 39-40, 41-42, 44-45, 
47, 48, 50, 51, 341, 342; (1721), 74 and 
footnote, 75; (1722-1737), xiv. ; (1742), 
362; (1745), xxxv., xxxvi., 244, 246, 248, 
370, 376, 378, 389, 390, 397, 403, 415, 425 
440, 444, 461, 463, 470-471, 472; (1746), 
xxxvi. footnote. 

Inverness county (1655), 9; (1733), 130, 132. 
Inverness, magistrates of, address to Parliament 
(1649), 6; letter to H. Rose, J. Forbes and 
D. Fonbas (1715), 39; act appointing D. 
Forbes advocate (1716), 67. Refer- 
ences: (1716), 41-42; (1721), 74. 
Irwin, Lord (1745), 223. 



264 INDEX TO THE 



Isla (1602), 22. 

Island Donan (Onan), (1692), 21. 

Island Stalker (1690), 13. 

Jackell, Sir Joseph (1717), 342. 
James VI., i.-iii. footnote. 
James VII., v.-vi. footnote, 15. 

James. Francis Stuart (Old Chevalier), declaration 
(1714), 30. References: (1701), 28; 
(1714), 29, 30; (1715), xi.-xii. ; (1729), 107- 
111; (1742), 361; (1744), 366. 
Jameson, (1716), 51. 
Johnston, Miss (1748), 310. 

,, James, bailie of Glasgow (1725), 87, 89, 

343-350 passim. 

,, James. Secretary (1692), 21, 22. 
Ld. William (1716), 42. 

Kames, Lord, see Home, Mr Harry. 
Keith, General (1757), 312. 
Keith, town (1745), 456, 462. 
Kelly, Colonel (1745), 386. 
Kenmure's regiment (1690), 18. 
Kennedy, the Misses (1738), 141. 

John (1716), 47. 
Thomas (1714), 34. 

Keppoch, Macdonell of, see Macdonell of Keppoch. 
Keppoch district (1690), 17. 
Ker, A. (1650), 7. 

Ker's dragoons (1745), 263; (1746), 270. 
Kessock (1745), 423, 425. 
Kilcowy (Kilcoy), (1716), 43. 
Kilichuiman, see Fort- Augustus. 
Kilmahew (1723), 77. 

Kilmarnock, William, Earl of (1746), 265, 473. 
Kilravock (Kilraik) , see Rose, Hugh, of Kilravock. 
Kincleven, Lord (1626), 2. 
King, Sir Peter (1716), 67. 
Kingston, Duke of (1745), 223. 
Kinlochaben (1690), 13. 
Kintail (1745), 247, 424, 428,, 439. 
Kintore, Lord (1716), 66. 
Kintyre (1745), 414. 
Kirkmtilloch (1746), 469. 
Knoidart (1717), 71; (1745),, 207, 208. 

Lagan (1716), 47. 

Laggan Achedroum (1745), 212. 

Lagganvane (1745), 216. 

Lant, baron (1726), 354; (1741), 169. 

Lauder, Sir John, of Fountainhall (1721), 75. 

Lauderdale, John, Duke of (1680), 333. 

,, James, 7th Earl of (1745), 244; 

(1747), 476. 

Leith (1745),, 401, 402, 406; (1746), 265. 
Lesmahago ('1745), 263. 
Leven, George Melville, E. of (1690), 322 
Lichfield (1745), 254. 
Ligonier, Sir John (1744), 369; (1745), 254; (1746), 

2iio. 

Ligonier 's foot regiment (1746), 271. 
Ligonier's horse (1745), 263. 
Lilburne, Col. Robert, pass to D. Forbes, 1st of Cul- 

loden (1651), 8. Reference: (1653), 8-9. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 265 



Lindsay, Provost (1731), 119. 
,, John (1748), 306. 

,, Patrick, Bp. of Ross, letter to D. Forbes, 1st 
of Culloden (1626), 3; to Inverness Coun- 
cil (1626), 2. 
,, Tain (1745), 225. 
,, See also Crawford, Earl ctf. 
Linlithgow (1745), 412, 454; (1746),, 265, 267, 268, 

270, 272. 
Livingstone, Sir Thomas, letter to Col. Hamilton 

(1692), 19. Reference: (1692), 19. 
LochLochy (1745), 389. 
Lochaber (1690), 15; (1691), 17; (1729), 109; 

(1746), 285. 

Lochbroom (1745), 247, 428, 434, 441, 447. 
Loclibury (1690), 13. 
Lochgarry, chief of, see Macdoiiell, Donald, of Loch- 

garry 

(1729), 111.; (1745), 389. 
Lockhart, Sir George, 35. 
Logan, Mr, of Dunbar (1731), 120, 121. 

,, Robert (1714), 337. 
Lorn (1729), 109. 

Lome, Lord of, see Argyll, 1st Marquess of. 
Lothian, William Ker, 2nd Marquess of, (1715), 38. 
,, William Ker, 3rd Marquess of, Lord Clerk 
Register (1731), 118; (1740), 156, 157, 158; 
(1745), 199. 
Loudoun, Hugh, 3rd Earl of (1727), 101. 

,, John, 4th Earl of, letter to Gen. Hawley 
(1746), 472; letters to Lovat (1745), 255, 
256, 257, 436; to Marshal Wade (1745), 
450. References: (1745), xxxv., 

xxxyi., 225-227 passim, 229, 230, 244-246 
passim, 248-251 passim, 253, 259, 260, 
389, 404, 415, 421, 430, 431, 443, 449, 
451-453 paasim, 455-457 passim, 460, 461. 
(1746), 264, 274, 275, 277, 471. 

Lcrudoun's regiment (1745), 207, 224, 377,, 378, 390, 
403, 405, 417, 419, 420, 421, 438 
(1746), 270. 

Looighborough v!745), 263, 453. 
Lounds, Mr (1716) ( 58. 
Lovat, Amelia, Dowager Lady (1695), 437 footnote: 

(1697), 23-24 and footnote. 
Margaret (Grant), Lady (1716), 59; (1727), 

105. 

,, Simon Fraser, Lord, letter tc? R. Baillie (1716) 
52, 66; toRobt. Craigie (1745), 210; to D. 
Forbes, 3rd of Culloden (1697), 23; to D 
Forbes, 5th of Culloden (1716), 41 48 
55; (1717), 70, 71; (1726), 354 \ 
(1727) 101; (1745), '211, 214, 227 
229, 232, 236, 238, 240, 243, 251 
258, 409; to J. Forbes, 4th of Culloden 
(1714), 32; (1716), 49, 65, 69; (1721), 74, 
75; (1729), 105; (1730), 113, 117; (1731) 
18, 119 122 123; (1732), 129; (1733), 129^ 
131 ; to E. of Loudoun (1745), 260 ; petition 
for release (1714), 336-338; grant of Fraser- 
dale estate (1715), 339-340; memorial con- 
cerning Fraserdale escheat (1716). 57. Re. 
ferences: xii. footnote; (1695), 437, foot- 
note; (1697), 23-24 and footnote; (1700),, 28; 
(1714), 34; (1715), 341, 342; (1716), 42, 



266 INDEX TO THfi 



43, 44, 46, 50, 52, 53, 59; (1717), 72; 
(1745), xxxv.-xxxvi. and footnotes, 208, 
209, 213-216 passim, 221, 228-231 passim, 
235, 237, 240, 242, 245, 246, 255-257, 259, 
372, 373, 376-378 passim, 380, 382, 387, 
388, 390, 410, 424, 426, 427, 436-437 and 
footnote, 438-440 passim, 451-453 passim, 
455, 457, 461; (1746), 288, 293-295 passim; 
(1747), 301-303 and footnote, 477. 

Lovat, Simon Eraser, Master of (1745),, 210, 221, 222, 
228, 231, 233, 234-238 passim, 240-246 
passim, 250, 255, 256, 258-260 passim, 427, 
428, 439. 

"Ludlow Castle," vessel (1745), 248. 

Luke, Henry (1725), 346, 347. 

Lyon, Lord, see Brodie, Alexander of Brodie. 

Lyttelton, Sir George, afterwards Lord, letter to Lord 
President (1747), 304. References: 
(1748), 309, 310. 

McAlister, Thomas (PWiffiam), (1745), 387. 

MacAskill, Ensign John (1746), 276. 

McBean, Mr (1731), 122. 

Macbeanclan (1745), 246, 439. 

MacdeSifield, Lord, 152. 

Macculloch of Glestulich (1745), 434. 

Macdonald of Aughtera (1692), 19. 

of Clanranald, see Clanranald. 

of Gellaway (1716), 47. 

of Glencoe, see Glencoe, massacre of. 

of Glendarroch (1717), 71. 

of Kinloch Moidart (1745), 246, 263, 386, 

438. 
Alexander, of Kingsburgh (1746), 290-292, 

293, 294, 296, 297. 

,, Sir Alexander, of Sleat, letters to Ld. Pre- 
sident (1745), 207, 414; (1746), 291. 
References: (1740), 154; (1745), xxxiii., 
204, 208, 246, 247, 371, 375, 376, 378, 
380-382 pa&sim, 391, 403, 426-428 passim, 
465; (1746), 291-294 passim, 296-297. 
Lieut. Allan (1746), 277. 
Coll of Barisdale (1745), 236, 247, 421, 424, 
425, 427, 428, 438-441 passim, 461; 
(1746),, 283. 

Capt. Donald (1746), 277. 
,, Ensign Donald (1746), 277. 

Sir Donald (1715), 78; (1716), 51. 
,, Donald, of Castle town, letter to Ld. Presi- 
dent (1746), 292. 

Florence (Flora), (1746), 290, 291. 
Capt. James (1746), 277. 
Ensign James (1746), 277. 
Capt. John (1746), 277. 

,, Lady Margaret, letter to Ld. Milton (1740), 
154; to Ld. President (1746), 290. Re- 
ferences : (1746), 291, 292-293, 296. 
,, Ranald, of Benbecula (1726), 354. 
Macdonald clan (1745), 211, 256, 263, 341, 372, 373, 

385, 432, 441, 462, 464. 
,, See also Macdonell. 
MacdoneU of Keppoeh (1745), 217. 373, 386; 

(1746), 473. 

,, Alexander, of Glengarry (1690), 13; (1692), 
19; (1716), 41, 47-50 passim, 55, 56, 65; 
(1717), 71. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPEBS." 267 



Macdouell, Col. Angus of Glengarry (1745), 246, 427, 

438, 439. 

Donald of Lochgarry (i745), 383, 398. 
John of Glengarry (1745), 207, 211, 217, 
371-373 passim, 383, 384, 386, 388, 
404, 405. 
Macdonells of Glengarry (1745), 372, 373, 374, 

376, 388. 

, See also Macdonald. 
McEan of Glencoe (1692), 19. 
Maofarlane, John (1716), 48, 53, 56, 71. 
Maogilvray elan (1745), 246. 
Maoglashan, Peter (1745), 398. 
M'lan, see McEan. 

Mackattlay, Lieut. Donald (1746), 277. 
MacKay, Captain (1746), 272. 

General, vii. (1690), 15. 

Major (1745), 401, 432. 

of Bighouse (1745), 444. 

Ensign Angus (1746), 277. 

Capt. George, son of Ld. Reay (1745), 411, 

424, 444; (1746), 276. 
George, Lord Reay, see Reay, Lord. 
George, sheriff of Nairn (1714), 337. 
Capt. Hugh (1746), 277. 
Hugh, yr. of Bighouse (1745), 411. 
Ensign James (1746), 276. 
Ensign John (1746), 276. 
Lieut. John (2), (1746), 276, 277. 
Mackcrae, Ensign John (1746), 277. 
Mackenzie, Major (1745), 412, 413. 

Ardloch's brother (1745), 434. 

of Inch Coulter (1716), 43. 

of Kilcoy (Kilcowie), (1729), 106. 

Kilcoy's brother (1745), 447. 

of Lentran (1745), 447. 

of Pluscarden (Pluscarty), (1658), 10. 

Capt. Alexander (1746), 277. 

Col. Alexander (1714), 33, 34; (1715), 78. 

Sir Alexander of Coul (1745), 434. 

Alexander of Fairburn (1745), 421, 428, 

429, 435, 439, 440, 444. 
Alexander of Fraserdale, and faonily 
(1714), 33, 34; (1715), 78, 79, 339-340; 
(1716), 41, 47, 49, 50, 56-58 passim, 65, 
66; (1717), 70, 72; (1730), 117, 118; 
(1731), 120; (1732), 129; (1733), 131; 
(n.d.), 410. 

Oapt. Colin (1746), 277. 
Capt. Colin of Hilltown (1746), 277. 
Sir George (1690), 323. 
Sir James, Lord Royston, see Royston, 

Lord. 

Sir John, of Coul (1716), 43, 341. 
John, of Delvine family (1746), 294. 
John, of Torridon (1745), 447. 
Ensign Kenneth (1746), 277. 
Roderick of Prestonhall, see Prestonhall, 

Lord. 

Roderick, of Redcastle (1745), 434, 447. 
See also Seaforth, and Cromartie, Earls of. 
Mackenzie clan (1745), 212, 242, 246, 247, 250, 251; 

(1746) 283. 

Mackintosh, Brigadier, of Borlum (1716) 52 
Capt (1740), 155. 



268 INDEX TO THE 



Mackintosh, Laird of (1653), 9. 

Aeneas, of Mackintosh (1745), 378, 380, 

388, 389, 390, 426, 427, 438-439. 
Alexander of Termit (1716), 44. 
Anne (Duff), (1716), 341, 342. 
Anne (Farquharson) , (1747), 478. 
',, James (1716), 67. 

L. letter to Mrs Forbes of Culloden 

(1715), 38. 

,, Laohlan, of Mackintosh, memorial con- 
cerning rebellion (1716), 341. Refer- 
ences: (1715), 79. 
Capt. William (1745), 455, 461; 

(1746), 277. 

,, William, of Mackintosh (1625), iii. 
Mackintosh clan (1745), 208. 
Macky, Captain (1745), 402. 
Maclaurin, Mrs (1747), 476. 

,, Prof. Colin, letter to Ld. President (1745), 
261. References: (1742), 181; (1745), 
224, 311. 

MacLean of Coll (1745), 207. 
MacLean clan (1745), 424. 
McLeane, (1690), 13. 

Charles (1715), 40; (1716), 67. 
MacLeod, Lieut. Alexander (1746), 276. 

Alexander of Bakneanach (1745), 438, 439. 

Ensign Donald (1746), 277. 

Lieut. Donald (1746), 276. 

Capt. Hugh (1746), 277. 

Hugh of Genzies (Geames), (1745), 236, 

440, 461. 
,, Capt. John (1746), 276. 
Ensign John (2), (1746), 276. 
,, John, Lord, son of E. off Cromartie (1745), 
242, 408, 409, 411, 414, 415, 428, 434, 441, 
447; (1746), 473. 
,, John of Tallisker (1745), 207, 426. 

Rev. Neil (1746), 293, 294. 
,, Normand (1740), 154. 
,, Normand, of Bernera (1746), 276. 
,, Normand, of Macleod, letters to Ld. Presi- 
dent (1745), 203, 208, 426; (1746), 293, 
294; (1747), 301; to J. Forbes, 4th of 
Culloden (1732), 128. References: 
(1730), 117; (1731), 120; (1732), 129; 
(1733), 130, 131; (1745), xxxiii., 207, 
221, 227, 228, 234, 246, 247, 250, 371, 375, 
378, 380-382 passim, 388, 391, 403, 410, 
418, 424, 427, 429, 438, 444, 451, 453, 455, 
457, 459, 460.462 passim, 466; (1746), 
286, 296, 297, 469; (1747), 302, 303. 
,, Capt. Normand of Waterstein (1746), 276. 
Ensign Roderick (1746), 277. 
,, Sandy (1745), 426. 

Lieut. William. (1746), 277. 
MacNeal, (1716), 56. 
Macpharlan, see Macfarlane. 
Macpherson, of Breackachy (1745), 374, 375. 
,, of Cluny, see Cluny. 

John (1745), 379. 

Macpherson clan (1745), 208, 263, 384. 
Mahan (Mohaun), Lord, see Stanhope, James, Earl 
Maitland of Petrichie (1745), 466. 
Malton, Lord (1745), 223, 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 269 

Mansfield, Earl of, see Murray, William. 

Mar, Earl of (1715), 39, 57. 

March, Earl of, later 4th D. of Queensberry 

(1740), 160. 

Marchmont, Patrick Hume, Earl of, letter to D. 
Forbes, 3rd of Culloden; (1698), 24. 
References: (1690), 12, 13; 319, 321, 
323-333 passim; (1692), 21; (1695), 22; 
(1697), 24; (1714), 34; (n.d.), 166. 
MarischaJ, George Keith, 10th Earl (1745), 222, 

435, 462. 

Marlborough, Duke of (1716), 41, 53, 54,; (1717), 72. 
Martin, Admiral (1745), 418. 

,, Andrew (1738), 141. 
Mathie, Mr (1745), 225. 
Mathison, John (1746), 277. 

Lieut . Kenneth ( 1 746 ) , 277 . 
Mdfort, John, Drummond, Earl of (1690). 323. 
Melvil, (1748), 306, 308. 

Melville, George, Earl of, Sec. of State, pass to D. 
Forbes, 3rd of Culoden (1690), 12. Re- 
ferences :( 1690), vii., 319, 321-326 passim, 
328, 329, 331-333 passim. 
,, George, E. of Leven, see Leven, Earl of. 
Menigay (1745), 379. 
Menzies, Dr (1745), 212. 
Meriot, Mr (1739), 151. 
Methuon, Mr (1716), 68; (1727), 356. 
M ernes, Maj. Duncan (1691), 19. 
Middleton, John, letter to Marquess of Argyll 

(1646), 5. 

Midleton, George (1742). 182. 
"Milford" vesseJ (1745), 454. 
Millar, Mrs (1748), 306, 310. 

,, Andrew, letter to J. Forbes, 6th of OuModen 
(1748), 309. References: (1742), 177; 
(1748), 306, 308. 
,, Miss Peggy (1748), 306. 
Miller, Captain (1746), 473. 

,, Charles, Provost of Glasgow (1725), 80-84 
passim, 86-87, 88, 89, 91, 93, 343-350 passim. 
Milton, Lady (1729), 111. 

., Andrew Fletcher, Lord, Justice Clerk (1730), 
113; (1738)., 147; (1740), 154; (1741),. 171 
(1744), 364; (1745), 453; (1746), 266, 269' 
469. 

Mingery, Ardnamurchan (1690), 13 
Minto.Sir G. Elliot, Lord (1730), 113. 
Mitchell, Sir Andrew, tetters to Ld. President (1742) 
181; (1745), 197, 198, 219, 226, 253, 261; 
(1746), 294, 426; (1747), 475; to Rev. R 
Murdoch (1748), 306 (1757), 312. Refer 
enoes: 477 note; (1738), 141; (1742) 177 
180; (1745), 249; 465;' (1747), x^viii! 
footnote; (1748), 308, 309, 310; (1754), 
olU, oil. 

,, James , bailie (1725), 87, 89, 343-350. 
Mockomire (1745), 212 
Moidart (1745), 462. 
Monck, Genera] George, protection tb J. Forbes 

!-c ' in 5 letter to A " dit i- Gen. Thomson 
(16nS), 10. 

Monro, Capt. (1715), 37. 

Mr, postmaster (1717), 71. 
Sir Alexander (1698), 24, 25. 



270 INDEX TO THE 



Monro, Oapt. George (1746), 276. 
Lieut. George (1746), 277. 
Ensign Hugh (1746), 276. 
Monroe, Sir George (1676), 10. 

,, see also Munro. 
Montagu, Duke of (1745), 223. 
Montague, Colonel (1719), 73. 
Monteith (1745), 400. 
Montgomerie, Sir James, of Skelmorlie (1690), 319- 

.329 passim; (1691), 330, 332, 333. 
Sir John (1690), 321. 

Montrose, James Graham, Marquess of, 8. 

,, James Graham*, 2nd Duke of (1714), 34. 

William Graham, 3rd Duke of (1742), 178. 
Montrose town (1745), 244, 439, 454; (1746), 265, 472. 
Monzie (Mnny), Patrick Campbell, Lord (1730), 113; 

(1738), 147. 

Moor, Capt. (1719), 73. 
Moray, Col. (1717), 71. 

Alexander, 18th Earl of (1676), 11. 
,, James, 16th Earl (1626),, 1-5. 
James, 21st Earl (1743), 363; (1745), 244. 
Moray district (1733), 130, 132; (1745), 247. 
Morchison, Ensign Simon (1746), 277. 
Mordauiit, Brigadier (1746), 278. 
More, Tarn (1745), 215. 
Morgan of Tradegan (1745), 229. 

Morison, James, provost of Aberdeen, letters to Ld. 
President (1745), 393, 419. References: 
(1745), 385, 396, 423, 460. 
Morton, Earl of, letter to Ld. President (1742), 172, 

174. Reference: (1742), 174. 
Moy (1716), 47. 
Muir, Willie (1745), 377. 
Mull (1690), 13, 17; (1729), 109. 
Mulloy, Terence, letter on fight at Ft. William (1745), 

386. 
Munro, Col. (1733), 133. 

Commissioner (1690), 322; (1695), 22. 
,, Mr (1716), 66. 
of Obsdale (1746), 267. 
,, Alexander, of Kilchoan (1714), 338. 
,, Andrew of Wester Town (1714), 338. 
Capt. David (1715), 338. 
,, Earquhar, of Wanar'd (1714), 338. 
George of Culoairn (1714), 338; (1745), 212, 
222, 381, 404, 425, 445, 446, 450,, 455, 456, 
459, 46ft, 462. 
,, George of Culrain (1714), 338; (1715), 36; 

(1719), 73. 

,, George of Newinore (1714), 338. 
,, Sir Harry of Foulis, letter to Ld. President 

(1746), 267. 

,, Hector of Novar (1714), 388. 
, , Hu gh of Ardul Li e ( 1 7 14 ) , 338 . 
Hugh of Killcairne (1714), 338. 
,, Hitgh of Teaninich (1714), ,338. 
Col. John, letter to Ld. President (1745), 200. 
,, John (1735), 135. 
,, John, yr. of Novar (1714),, 338 
,, Capt. Robert (1715), 36. 

Sir Robert of Foulis, letter to J. Forbes, 4th 
? 1 f ^ 1 C , l ! 1Ioden < 1715 >. 36- References: 

(1715) ' 78; (1745) - m > 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 2?1 

Munro dan (1745), 245, 249, 380, 404. 

,, see also Monro. 

Murdoch, Rev. Patrick, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of 
Cullodeu (1730), 112; to J. Forbes, 6th of 
Cnllodeu (1738), 140, 142; 148; 
(1746), 278; (1748), 307, 308, 310; (1754), 
310; (1757), 311; to? Andrew Mitchell 
(1742), 177. References : xxii. (1732), 
127; (1748), 306, 308; (1757), 312; (1764), 
312. 
Murray, Mr (1715),, 37. 

Lord George (1745), 220, 263, 402, 403, 436, 

(1746), xxxvii. 
,, James (1717), 72. 
,., John (of Broughton), (1746), 273. 
,, William, afterwards E. of Mansfield, letter 
to Ld. President (1738), 144; (1740), 159, 
162; (1741), 167, 169, 171, 173. Refer- 
ence : xxv. footnote. 
,, William (E. of Dunmore's brother), (1746), 

279-280, 286, 290, 296. 

,, see also Atholl, Dukes of; Dunmoro, E. of. 
Murray's regiment (1746), 270. 

Nairn, county (1733),, 130, 132. 

Newcastle, Duke of, letters to D. Forbes, 5th of Cul- 
loden (1725), 94, 97; (1726), 98; (1729), 
107; (1740), 162; (1746), 264; (1746), 
287; to M. Ridley (1745), 222. Refer, 
ences: (1725), 82, 83, 95, 97, 353; (1726), 
354; (1727), 102, 355, 357; (1729), 107, 
109, 110; (1732), 123, 125; (1745), 223 
(1746), 276, 280, 286, 469, 470; (1747), 
301, 302. 

Newcastle, town (1745), 222, 248, 458. 

Newhall, Sir Walter Pringle, Lord (1717), 70, 71: 
(1730), 113. 

Newton, Sir Isaac (1731), 120, 121 

Ndmmo, James (1716), 54; (1717), 71. 

Niven, (1730)1, 116. 

Obrain, Mr (1745), 206. 
Obryan, (1717), 72.. 
Ochiltree, Lord (1626), 2. 
Ogi'lvie, Lord (1745), 221, 413, 436 

David (1725), 86. 
,, Sir James (1690), 327. 
Oglethorpe, General James,, letter to Ld. President 

(1740), 155. 

Old Meldrum (1745), 462. 
Onslow, Arthur, Speaker, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of 

Culloden (1736), 135. 
Orfordi, Earls of, see Walpole 
O'Sulevan, Capt. (1745), 386. 
Oswald, prisoner (1716), 42. 
Ouchterlony (1716), 46. 
Oxford, Robert Harley, Earl of (1717), 72, 342-343. 

Pack, Major (1725), 88. 

Paisley (1725), 82. 

Paterson, Alexander (1714), 337 

Paton, Frank (1738), 148-149. 

P'axton, prisoner (1742), 181 

Pelham Henry (1744), 195, 196; (1745), 203, 209 



272 INDEX TO THS 



Pembroke, Earl of (1737), 138. 

Perth. James Drummondt, 1st titular Duke of (1690), 

323. 
,, Jainosi Drummond, 3rd titular Duke of (1745), 

208, 220, 221, 263, 264, 436; (1746), 269. 
Perth, town (1715), 39; (1745), 220, 221, 230, 246, 
370, 377, 384, 396, 397, 400, 406, 454, 463, 
472; (1746), 269, 469. 
Peterborough, Earl of (1730), 116. 
Piterkin, Alexander (1714), 337. 
Pitman, Captain (1745),, 248. 
Pitsligo, Lord (1745), 230. 
Pitt, William, the elder (1745), 198. 
Poison, David, of Kinmylies (1717), 70. 
Polton, Sir Win. Calderwood, Lord (1730), 113. 
Polwarth, Lord, see Marchinont, Earl of. 
Ponsonby, General (1745), 201. 
Port-Glasgow (1725), 87. 
Porteous, Captain (1736), xxiii. 
Porthnocky (1745), 394. 

Portland, Earl of (1690), 12; (1692), 22, 325, 331. 
Poter, C. (1723), 76. 
Poyntz, Mr (1746), 296. 
Preston, Lanes (1745), 458. 
Preston Pans, battle of (1745), 224-225, 226-227. 
Prestcmhall, Roderick Mackenzie, Lord (1714), 33; 

(1733), 130. 

Price, Capt. (1742), 359, 360. 
Primrose, Mr (1716), 52. 
Pringle, John, see Haining, Lord. 
Robert (1716), 55. 
,, Sir Walter, see Newhall, Lord. 
Pulteney, William, later E. of Bath (1717), 72; 
(1729), 104; (1742), 173, 174, 176; (1746), 
294, 295. 
Purvis, Mrs (1716), 66. 

Queensberry, Duchess of (1740), 160, 

Charles, 3rd Duke of (1740), 160; 

(1745), 225; (1746), 273. 
James, 2nd Duke of (1701), 334; 

(1702), 29. 

William, 1st Duke of (1690), 323, 328. 

,, see also March, Earl of. 

Queensrerry (1746), 269, 270. 

Rae, Sir David, of Eskgrave,, vii. footnote. 
Ramsay, bailie of Glasgow (1725), 88,, 349. 

,, Allan, xvii. 
Rates, Badenoch (1745), 440. 
Rattray, John (1746), 272, 273. 

Rawlinson, Thomas, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of Cul- 
loden (1728), 103. Reference : 289 note. 
Reayi, George Mackay 3rd Lord, letters to- Ld. Presi- 
dent (1745), 392, 411, 424, 444; (1746), 273. 
References: (1745), xxxiii. 246, 249. 380, 396. 
Redcastle (1727), 101. 
Revelrigg, Lady (1716), 50. 

Ricartoun, see Drummond, Thomas, of Riccartoune 
Rich, Sir Robert (1731), 119 
Rich's Dragoons (1731), 119. 

Richmond, Duke of (1737), 138; (1740), 162; 
(1745), 198. 



ORIGIN AL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 273 



Ridley. Maithew, Mayor of Newcastle, letter to Ld. 
President (1745), 223, 458. References: 
(1745), 222, 226; (1746), 266, 469, 470. 
Ridpath, Mr (1716). 65. 
Robertson, Bailie (1716), 49. 

,, Alexander, letter to Ld, President (1745), 

412. 
Tom (1715), 78, 79; (1721), 74. 

William, of Craogmill (1714), 338. 
Robinson, Strouen (1745), 400. 

T. (1716), 44, 68. 
Rodney, Capt. (1745), 248. 
Rogers, Alderman (1745), 287. 

Capt. (1745), 399. 
Rollock, (1716), 43. 
Rose, Lieutenant (1745), 387. 

,, Mrs, of Kilravock, xi. footnote. 
of Clava (1739), 151. 
,, Alexander (1764), 312. 
Hugh, of Clava (1714), 337. 
,, Hugh, of Kilravock, x. ; (1702), 29; (1714), 337, 
338; (1715), xii. footnote, 37, 39, 78, 341; 
(1716), 43, 49, 55; (1717), 70. 
Hugh, yr. of Kilravock (1714), 33, 337, 341; 

(1729), 106. 

John, of Blackballs (1714), 337. 
John, of Bradlies (1714), 337. 
,, Mary, see Forbes, Mary. 
,, R., bailie of Inverness (1649), 6. 
,, see also Ross. 
Ross,, Capt. (1690), 26. 
Colonel (1716), 49. 
General (1729), 104. 
Lord (1690), 321, 322, 325-329 passim. 
,, Master of (1737), 136, see also William, below. 
,, of Balnagown, family of (1745), 438. 448. 
,, of Calrossie (1745), 434. 
,, of Kindeace, family of, vii. footnote. 
,, Alexander, of Pitcalnie (1745), 430, 434, 

439, 446. 

Arthur (1745), 448. 
Arthur, of Torroy (1714), 338. 
Lieut. Charles (1746), 277. 
Charles, of Balnagown (1745), 200, 203, 247. 
David (1745), 448. 
Ensign David (Shandewick's brother), (1745), 

406; (1746), 277. 

David, of Inverchasley (1745), 406, 441, 446, 450 
David, of Kindeace (1714), 338. 
Donald (1745), 442, 446. 
Duncan (1745), 448. 

,, George, letter to Macleod (1745), 418. Re- 
ferences : (173S), 140, 144; (1740), 164; 
(1741), 171; (1742), 359; (1745), 248, 405 



Hugh, of Tolly (1714), 338. 

John, of Achnacloioh (1714), 338 

Malcolm, of Pitcalnie (1714), 338. 

Malcolm, yr. of Pitcalnie (1745), 434, 438-440, 

442, 445, 446, 450. 
Robert (1745), 448. 
Simon (1745), 448. 
Thomas (1745), 448. 
Thomas, of Aldy (1714), 338; (1745), 442, 446. 



274 INDEX TO THE 



Ross, William, Master of Boss (1745), 406, 425, 435, 

441, 442, 445, 446, 450, 462; (1746), 277. 
,, William, of Breataugaill (1714), 338. 
,, William, of Easter Fearn (1714), 338. 
Ross clan, letter to Ld. President (1745), 447. Re- 
ferences :( 1745), 445, 450. 
Ross, Bishop of,, see Lindsay, Patrick. 
Ross county and Chaplainry (1696-1701), 334; (1714), 

34; (1716), 44; (1733), 133. 
Roswal, see Oswald. 
Roxburgh, Duke of (1716), 54; (1717), 72; (1721), 

74; (1725), 94, 95. 
Roy, John (1714), 337. 
Royal Bank of Scotland (1738), 145-147. 
Royal Scots regt. (1745), 373-374, 376, 383, 385. 
Royston, Sir James Mackenzie, Lord (1714), 33; 

(1730), 113; (1731), 120. 
Ruddiman, Thomas, letter to Ld. President (1737), 

137. Reference: (1731), 120. 
Ruthven (1690), 17; (1692), 21; (1716), 44; (1729), 

111; (1745), 216, 384, 390; (1746), 275. 
Rutland, Duke of (1745), 223. 

Saoheverell, Dr Henry (1714), 34. 

St. Glair (Sinclair), James, letter to Ld. President 

(1737), 135. 

St. Glair's (Sinclair's) company, see Royal Scots. 
St. George's Dragoons (1745), 223. 
St. Quentin, Sir William (1715), 340; (1716), 48. 
"Saltash," sloop (1745), 247, 248, 415, 428, 429, 449, 

450, 470. 

Saltoun, Lord (1692), 21; (1694), 437 footnote. 
Sandys, Lord (1742), 184; (1746), 286. 
Sargent, Mr (1748), 306, 308. 
Scatwell (1716), 43. 
Schwerin, Marshal (1757), 312. 
Sconsar, I. of Skye (1745), 381. 
Scott, bailie of Inverness (1716), 51. 
,, Captain (1745), 384. 
Sir William (1690), 328. 

Scrope, John, of Wormsloy, letter to Attorney General 
(1730), 113; to D. Forbes, 5th of ' Culloden 
(1725), 83, 96; (1726), 355; (1730), 117; 
(1737), 137; (1742), 174. References: 
(1725), 80; (1727), 99; (1730), 114, 116; 
(1732), 124; (1733), 132; (1735), 135; (1737), 
139; (1738), 145; (1741), 168, 171; (1742), 
184, 195, 196; (1745), 448; (1746), 276, 281; 
474; (1747), xxxviii. footnote. 
Seafield, Earl of, see Findlater and Seafield. 
Seaforth, Kenneth Mackenzie, 4th Earl of (1697), 23. 
,, Kenneth, titular 6th Earl (Lord Fortrose), 
letters to Ld. President ( 1745), 423,, 424, 
433, 440, 447, 458. References : (1745) , 
213, 246, 247, 37a, 376-378 passim, 380, 
382, 388, 390, 421, 425, 428, 435, 436, 439, 
444, 452. 459, 462; (1746), 283. 
,, William, 5th Earl, letter to D. Forbes, 5th 
of Gulloden (1728), 103. References: 
(1715), 39; (1716). 44, 50, 342; (1719), 
73; (1729), 106; (1730), 115, 116. 117. 
Searsich (1745), 379. 
Selkirk, Earl of (1740), 158. 
Shaw, John (1745), 426. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS." 275 

Sheridan [Thomas] (1745), 203. 
Skelmorlie, see Montgomerie, Sir James. 
Skye, I. of (1690), 13; (1716), 51; (1732), 129; (1740), 
154; (1745), 370, 373, 384, 424, 429; (1746), 
xxxvi., 291. 
Sleigh, Mrs Isabella, letter to D. Forbes, 5th of Cul- 

loden, and reply (1735). 133-134. 
Smith, Mr (1717), 72; (1740),, 162. 
,, Charles (1745), 261. 

,, William, memorial on Records (1740), 165. 
Solenthal, Mr (1737), 138. 
Somerset, Duke of (1717), 72; (1737), 139. 
Southesk, Lady (1729), 108. 
Southwell, Mr (1716), 55. 
"Speedwell," vessel (1746), 473. 
Spey River (1745), 389, 390, 395, 456, 457. 
Speyside (1745), 375. 
Spotswood, Col. A. (1725), 343, 350. 
Squadron, the (1714), 34; (1715),, 37; (1716), 54, 64, 

70, 72, 75; (1727), 100; (1746), 266, 469. 
Stair, James Dalrymple, Viscount (1690), 320-326 

passim, 329, 330, 332. 

,, John, Master of, later John 1st Earl, see Dal- 
rymple, Sir John. 

,, John, 2nd Earl of, letters to Ld. President 
(1745), 252; (1747), 303; memo, or rebel- 
lion in Scotland (1745), 217. References: 
xxxvii.; (1745), 219, 221, 380, 392, 410, 415, 
449, 464; (1746), 286, 468. 
,, Lord, regiment (1725), 82. 
Stanhope, Lt.-Col. (1746), 271. 

James (later Earl Stanhope), (1716), 45, 54, 

56, 58; (1717) 72. 

Philip, 2nd Earl (1727), 356; (1746), 296. 
Stark, John (1725), 87-89 passim, 343-350 passim. 
Steel, John (1746), 279; (1747), xxxviii. footnote; 

(1748), 307, 308, 310. 
Steuart, see Stewart . 
Steven, W. (1702), 333. 
Stewart, Capt. (1745), 388. 
of Ardsheal (1745), 217. 
,, of Innernity (1729), 108. 
,, Archibald, Provost of Edinburgh (1745), 261, 

262; (1746), 270. 
Sir Francis (1626), 2. 
,, Sir George (1731), 120. 

,, Sir James, Ld. Advocate, letter to D. Forbes, 
5th of Culloden (1716), 68. Refer- 
ences: (1699), 27; (1716), 66. 
,, John Roy (1745), 398. 
Tom (1745), 424. 
,, Thomas, factor to J. Forbes, 305, 306 
William (1714), 33, 34; (1715), 37, 78; 

(1716),, 43. 
Stewarts of Appin (1745), 217. 

,, see also Stuart. 
Stirling, John (1725), 87, 89, 343-350 passim. 

town (1690), 15; (1745), 370, 375, 377, 383, 
384, 454; (1746), 265, 267, 269,, 270, 468, 472. 
Stoneyhill estate, xvii. and footnote 
Stornoway (Stornwa), (1732), 129; (1746), 338. 
Straff ord, Lord (1721), 73. 
Strahan, Mr (1716), 66. 

family, iii. footnote. 



276 INDEX TO THE 



Stralachan (1745), 212. 
Stranraer (1690), 318. 
Strathbogie (1745). 380, 456, 462. 
Strathern (1729), 110; (1745), 431; (1746), 473. 
Stratherrick (1731), 123; (1745), 211, 212, 215, 216, 
222, 246. 257, 260, 387, 410, 427, 428, 461. 
Strathglass, see Chisholms of Strattoglass. 
Strathnaver, Lord (1714), 338. 
Strathspey (1716), 47; (1745), 431, 443. 
Stratton, Sarah, see Forbes, Sarah. 
Stricheix, Alexander Fraser, Lord (1730), 113; (1740), 

166; (1745), 222, 410. 
,, , see also Fraser, James. 
Stuart, Commissary (1716), 43. 
Mr (1716), 47, 56. 
Sir James (1658), 10. 
Lady James (1658), 10. 
John (1716), 51. 
Rev. William (1714), 337. 
see also Stewart. 
Stuart Pretenders, see Charles Edward, and James 

Francis. 

Suinard (1745), 377. 
Sunderland, Earl of (1721), 73. 
Sussex, Viscount, see Stanhope, James. 
Sutherland, James, of GreenhalJ (1714), 337. 
,, James, of Kinsterie (1714), 337. 

John, 15th Earl of, letter to J. Forbes, 4th 

of Culloden (1704), 335. References: 
(1714), 34, 338; (1715), 40, 42; (1716), 
53, 342. 

John, of Clyne (1714), 338. 
Ensign Kenneth (1746), 276. 
Capt. Peter (1745), 402; (1746), 276. 

William, 16th Earl of, letter to Ld. Presi- 
dent (1745), 401, 432, 467. Refer- 
ences : (1745), xxxiii., 245, 246, 249, 
380, 392, 396, 401, 406, 425, 432, 444; 
(1746), 467, 473. 
Sutherland county (1745), 435. 
Swarston Bridge (1745), 458. 
Swettenham, Captain (1745), 384, 386, 387. 
Swimmer, Mr (1740), 162. 
Symmer, Mr, letter to Rev. P. Murdoch (1757), 312. 

Tailzior, Ewen (1650), 6. 
Tain (1745), 425, 450. 

Taftot, Charles, Lord, 308; (1733), 357, 358. 
Tarbat, Viscount (1663-1701), 333-335; (1690), 323. 
Thompson, Auditor General (1658), 10. 
Thomson, Capt. (1745), 387. 
Mr (1745), 456. 

,, James, letters to J. Forbes, 6th of Cullodeu 
(n.d.), 314, 315. References: xviii., 
xxii. and footnote; (1748), 306-309, 811; 
(1738), 143, 149. 
,, James, bailie of Inverness (1716), 67. 

Tilson, Mr (1742), 184. 

Tiree (Teree) I. (1737), 138; (1738), 145. 

Titley, Mr (1737), 138. 

Tolquhoiin, family, ii., iii. 

Tomnahurich (1717), 71. 

Torwood (1746), 270. 



ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPEKB." 277 



Townshend. Viscount (1716), 44, 49, 54, 66, 68; 

(1725), 94, 353; (1727), 102, 356. 
Trelawney. Edward, letter to Ld. President (1740), 

161. 

Trigge, Mr (1745), 425., 
Trdnifure (1745), 213, 214, 388. 
Tullibardine, John Murray, Marquess of (1697), 23; 

(1700), 28. 

William, Marquess of (1715), 39; 

(1745), 203, 208, 220, 371, 381, 387, 
400, 412. 

Tullidanside (1731), 123. 
Tulloch,, of Tannochy (1716), 43. 

David (1745), 222. 

,, Thomas, of Taunochy (1714), 337. 
Tulloch district (1716), 43. 

TVeeddale, Charles Hay, 3rd Marquess (1714), 34. 
,, John, 4th Marquess of, letters to D. Forbes, 
5th of Culloden (1742), 175, 177, 182, 184, 
186; (1744), 364, 365, 368; (1745), 208, 
219, 385, 415. References :( 1741), 
171; (1742), 174, 176, 179, 180, 
181, 183, 185, 188; (1744), 365, 366, 368; 
(1745), 204, 245, 398, 449, 404, 407, 416, 
419, 420, 449, 453, 460, 465,, 474; (1746), 
264, 266, 276, 286. 

Uist, I. (1745), 203, 388, 391. 

Urquhart, of Burdsyards, family, vii. footnote. 

Robert (1714), 337. 

Robert, of Burdsyards (1702), 29; (1714), 

QQ7 

Thomas (1714), 337. 

Urquhart district (1745), 212, 247, 255. 256, 372, 427, 
428, 431-433 passim, 439. 

Vernon, Admiral (1740), 161. 

Mr (1738), xxii., 141; (1742), 178. 

Wade, General, letters to D. Forbes, 5th of Culloden 
(1727), 356; (1729), 109, 111; (1742), 359. Re- 
ferences :( 1725), xvii, 82, 83, 94, 343, 350; 
(1729), 105, 108; (1730), 116; (1744), 369; 
(1745), 222, 223, 227, 229, 254, 261, 264, 415 
422, 429, 450, 454, 458. 
Wales, Princess of (1737), 137, 138. 

Frederick, Prince of (1737), 138, 139. 

,, George, Prince of (George II.), (1716), 53, 55, 

56. See also Georgell. 
Waller, Mr (1742), 174; (1745), 198. 
Walpole, Horace, Earl of Orford, xix (1727), 356. 
Sir Robert, later E. of Orford, letter to D. 
Forbes, 5th of Culloden (1725), 96. Re- 
ferences: xix. ; (1715), 38, 340; (1716), 
46, 54, 61, 66; (1717), 72; (1723), 76, 78 
1725), 96; (1727), 99, 356; (1728), 104 
1729) 104 111; (1730), 115, 116 117 
(1731), 120; (1732), 124, 125; (1733) 
133; (1737), 136-138 passim, 142, 145 
(1738), xxxi; (1741 >, 170; (1742), 172 
174, 175; (1744), 369. 
Ward, Capt. (1690), 13. 
Warrender, (1754), 311; (n.d.), 315. 
Wentworth, General (1745), 223. 



278 INDEX ro THE ORIGINAL "CULLODEN PAPERS.' 



Wharton, Duke of (1717), 72. 
Whiteford, Colonel (1745), 399. 
Whitney, Mrs (1745), 263. 
Wick (1715), 36. 
Wightman Mr (1737), 138. 

,, General Joseph (1716),, 41, 43-48 passim, 

50, 51. 
,, General Robert, letters to Ld. President 

(1745). 224, 226; (1746), 266, 469. 
Willes, Lord Chief Justice (1740), 162. 
William III., orders for massacre of Glencoe (1692), 

19 ; order to liberate E. of Seaforth (1697), 23. 

References : (1689), 239; (1690), 14-15, 16, 

317-319 passim, 323, 325-326, 327-331 passim ; 

(1692), 22; (1700), 28; (1702), 29. 
Wilmington, Earl of (1742), 174, 184. 
Winchelsea, Earl of (1746), 286. 
Windliam, Sir William (1729), 104. 
Winton House (1715),, 59. 
Wishart, Mr (1737), 138. 
Wynne, Sir Watkin Williams (1745), 198, 229. 

Yonge, Sir William (1744), 195. 
York, Archbishop of (1745), 262. 



INDEX TO VOL. V. 



INDEX TO VOL V. 



Aberborthick (Arbroath), (1746), 93. 
Aberdeen, , Provost (1746), 86. 
Aberdeen, town (1746), Cumberland at,, 19, 26-27, 56- 
57, 59, 61 ; disloyalty of members of 
Council, 85, 86 ; petition for powers to 
elect new magistrates, 85 ; D. Forbes 
at, 93. 

,, governors of (1746),, letter to D. Forbes, 
84 ; appointments by D. of Cumberland, 
list, 84, 86. 

Aberdeenshire (1747), Mitchell, M.P. for, 180; elec- 
tion negotiations, 181-182, 183. 

Accounts for journeys of D. Forbes (1746), 9, 
13 19, 23, 38, 48-49, 52, 55, 62, 64-65, 93- 
94, 195. 

Adair and Jackson, Messrs (1747),, 151. 
Agnew, Sir Andrew (1746), at Blair, 51. 
Albemarle, William Anne van Keppel, 2nd Karl of 
(1746), at Ft. Augustus, 124. Refer- 
ences : ( 1746),, 129; (1747), 133, 157. 
Allanfeam (1746), 205, 215-216. 
Alness, Bridge of, (1746), 9. 
Alterlies (1746), 208, 213, 217. 
Amelot, M. (1742), promises of aid to Pretender, 161- 

162. 
Anderson, James (1746),, letter to E. of Findlater, 41. 

John (1746), 130, 131, 132. 
Anstruther's Regiment (1746), 22. 
Appdn district (1746), 82. 
Ardgour district (1746), 82. 
Ardnagrask (1746), 11. 
Ardnaonurchan district (1746), 82. 
Argyleshire (1746), loyalty and danger from rebels, 99. 
Argyleshire regiment (1746) S 112. 
Argyll, Archibald, 3rd Duke of, (1746), Camerons and 
Macdonakls declare war upon, 50, 51-52; 
(1747), speeches on Lovat's petitions, 149, 
150; and Aberdeenshire election, 182, 183; 
speeech on the Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, 
182-183, 184-185 ; and Inverness election, 188 
References: (1746), 3, 38; (1747), 191 
Aii&aig (1746), 82. 
Assint (1745), Macleod Independent Comp. from, 92; 

(1746), recruiting by both parties, 117. 
Atholl, James Murray, 2nd Duke of (1746), rein- 
forces Blair garrison,, 51. Reference- 

(1746), 49. 

Auchterlony, George (1747), 151. 
Auldjo, , Convener of Aberdeen (1746) 86 
Aviemore (1746), 103. 

Baillie, Mr (1729-30), 234. 
,, of Dofchfour, viii. 
Mrs (1746), 38. 

,, Alexander of Dunain (1746), threatened by 
rebels, 26, 



282 INDEX 



Baillie, Evan of Abriachan (1746), property in Inver- 
ness, 127. 

,, Jaines (1724), deals with Chisholm estates, 52. 
,, John, Surveyor General of Customs at Inver- 
ness (1747), 184. 
William (1746), 13, 23, 65. 

William. ensi(gn in Independent Comp. (1745), 

92 

,, William, of Ardmore (1746), tetter to D. 
Forbes, 78 ; report on Glen-Urquhart 
Grants, 104. Reference :( 1746), 66. 
Balfreish (1746), 206. 
Ballimore of Culloden (1746). 205. 
Balloch (1746), losses at, during rebellon, 205-206, 

208-209, 216-217. 
Balmerino, James Elphinstone. 5th Lord (1746), 

23 120 

Balmerino' s regiment (1746), 212, 215. 
Balnaglag (1746), 211-212. 
Balna,gown (1746), Loudaun and D. Forbes at, 10, 

14, 17. 
Banff (1746), D. Forbes at, 93. References :( 1746), 

18, 26, 32. 

Barbadoes (1766), grant on customs to J. Forbes, 198. 
Barra (1746), orders for the surrender of arms, 82. 

Reference : ( 1746) , 101 . 
Barryiinore, Ld. (1743), attitude to Jacobite proposals, 

162. 

Beaufort, Charles 4th, Duke of, (1747), opposes Herit- 
able Jurisdictions Bill, 185. 
Beaufort, xiv. 

Beauly (1746), Loudoun's troops at, 7, 8; rebels at, 11. 

Berkeley, John Baron Berkeley, of Stratton (1747), 

votes for Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, 185. 

Bernera (1746), Barisdale at, 106, 107; death of Sir 

A. Macdonald at, 140. 
Bervie (1746), 93. 
Bethel,, , (1746), 58. 

Birnie, Mr (1745), wounded at Preston Pans, 146. 
Bishop, Oapt. (1745), killed at Preston Pans,, 145. 
,, Mr (1745), wounded at Preston Pans, 145. 
Black, Duncan (1746), 205. 

John (1746), 205. 
Blackwood, Mr (1819). 
Blair, , (1746), 58. 

Blair, castle of , (1746), siege and relief, 50, 51, 57. 
Blakeney, General (1746), Macleod's account of, 108; 
petition to, in Inverness, 131, 132; 
(1746-7), military rule in Inverness, 130, 
132, 133; advised by offioers, 132, 133; re- 
fusal to assist Inverness magistrates, 133; 
(1747). instructions to, for tracking rebels, 
159, 160. Reference: (1746), 128. 
Bligh, Brigadier (1746), 60. 
Bonar (Bona), (1746), Loudoun's troops at, 7; boats 

at, 29. 

Braco, Lord (1747), in Aberdeenshire election, 181. 
Brahan (Bran), (1746), Loudoun's troops at, 7; 
numbers joining rebels at, 25; D. Forbes 
at, 65. 

Broad Ferry, see Mickle Ferry. 
Broadford (1746), 49, 52. 
Brodio. Francis (1747), 195, 



1NDBX 283 



Brodie, Lady of (1746), 46. 

Alexander (1746), 124. 

Alexander), of Brodie, Lord Lyon, letters: 
to D. Forbes (1746), 112; (1747), 169, 187; 
to D. of Newcastle (1746), 142; from D. 
Fofbes (1746), 113; (1746), views on High- 
land Dross Bill, 112-113; informs against 
Sir W. Gordon, 142; alleged evidence 
against Lovat, 171; (1747), acknowledges 
ingratitude to D. Forbes ; 169 ; relations 
with Scheviz, witness against Lovat, 171, 
172, 173-174 ; recommends Surveyor at In- 
verness, 179, 180, 187 ; Inverness burghs 
elections, candidature, 169, 170, 180, 187- 
189. Reference: (1746), 27. 

Brodie House (1746), 93. 

Brody, Thomas (1746), 124. 

Buccleuch, Francis, 2nd Duke of, (1747), votes 
against Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, 185. 

Burnett, Bailie, of Aberdeen (1746), 86. 

Bury, Lord (1746), 59. 

Buttler (1743), Jacobite mission, 162. 

Cadell and Davies, Messrs (1819), publishers of the 

Original Culloden Papers, vii.,, viii., ix., x. 
Caithness (1746), rising expected, 42. References: 

32, 77. 

Cameron, Donald, of Lochiel, relations with Jacobites, 
161; (1745),, letters sent to, froon Pre- 
tender, 165 ; in correspondence with 
Lovat, 167 ; notified of Pretender's land- 
ing, 163; (1746), declaration of war on 
Camptbells, 50, 51-52; prospects of his 
capture, 112; welcomes Lovat after Cul- 
loden, 164. 
,, Jenny (1746), 59-60. 

clan (1746), 7, 50. 
Campbell, Mr (1747), and Inverness election. 188. 

Col. (1746), 63. 
of Delnies (1746), 124. 
,, Alexander, factor to Seafortl*, lieutenant in 

Independent Company (1745), 92. 
,, Archibald (1746), letter to D. Forbes, 56. 
,, Archibald, Duke of Argyll, see Argyll. 
,, Sir James of Auchinbreck (1739), relations 

with Jac-O'bites, 161; (1743), 162. 
,, Major Gen. John (later 4th D. of Argyll), 
(1746), provisions Loudoun's troopp in 
Skye, 51, 56; notice on surrender of 
arms, 81-82; search for Pretender in 
Skye and arrests, 122-123; requests ser- 
vices of E. of Loudoun, 56. 
John, of Ensay (1745), 92. 
clan (1746), 51, 118. 
Cana (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 
Carnegy, Mr (1746), appointment from Pretender, 

20. 

Castle Dounie (1747), 176. 
Castle Gordon (1746), 93. 

Castle Kilchurn (1746), surrender of arms at, 82. 
Caulfield, Major William (1746), letter from 
anonymous writer, 40. 



284 INDBX 



Chalmers, Provost of Aberdeen (1746). 86. 
Chapleton (1746), 210-211. 

Charles Edward, Prince (Yoning Pretender), (1739- 
1742), French aid promised to, 161-162; 
(1744), advised against landing., 163; 
(1745), landing, 163; answer to Lovat'e re- 
quest for patents 164; (1746), at Moy, 3; 
French landings to support, reports pro- 
spects, etc., 24, 25, 81, 98-99, 100, 141; in 
Moray, 24, 25 ; recovery from fever, 46 ; hid- 
ing in Lochaber, 70 ; reported plans after Cul- 
loden, 81 ; in Uist, 103, 122 ; adventures in 
Skye, 122-123 ; prospects of capture, 97, 107, 
112; helped 'by Flora Macdonald and Kings- 
burgh, 122-123; (1747), funds landed, their 
disposal, 158-159; adherents still in arms, 159. 
Cheap, George, surveyor of stores (1746), 127, 128. 
Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of (1747), 
vote for Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, 185. 
Reference: (1747), 183. 
Chishokn, Alexander, yr. of Comer (1742), Chishokn 

estates granted to, 52. 
,, Alexander, of Muckerach, acquires Chis- 

hohn estates, 52. 

,, Roderick, the elder of Chishokn (The 
Chisholm), letters from D. Forbes 
(1746), 54, 62, 63; Memorial on his posi- 
tion (1748), 53, 54; Career up to 1745, 
52; (1745-1746), attitude to rebellion, 
52-55; co-operation with D. Forbes, xvii., 
53, 54-55; (1746), association with 1x1. 
Seaforth, 54, 62 ; informs D. Forbes of 
battle of Culloden, 62; mission from D. 
Forbes to D. of Cumberland,, 63 ; obtains 
pass from D. of Cumberland, 63-64; sur- 
render of arms, 104 ; lands plundered by 
Ld. Sackville, 104. 

Roderick, yr. of Chisholm (1746), 53. 
,, Roderick, of Comer in Strathglass (1747), 

53 

William (1746), 54. 
,, clan (1746), recruits to Pretender, 54. 
Cholmondeley, George, 3rd Earl (1747), 165. 
Church of Scotland (1746), loyalty, xiii., 36; 37. 
Clanranald, Ranald Macdonald of (the elder), (1746), 

prisoner at Ft. Augustus, 124. 
Clark, Alexander, in Balloch (1746), 205-206. 

Alexander, in Mickle Cullernie (1746), 206, 207. 
Hugh (1746), 206. 
Janet (1746), 206. 

Dr John (1746), 105, 108, 110; (1747), 134. 
John, in Cullernie (1746), 206-207. 
Margaret (1746), 207-208. 
Thomas, in Alterlies (1746), 208. 
Thomas, in Balloch (1746), 208-209. 
William (1746), 209-210. 
Clephan, Luckie (1746), 78. 
Cobham, Lord (1747), 148. 

Coigach (1747), money landed at, 159. Refer- 
ence: (1746), 78. 
Coll (1746), 82. 

Colquhoun, Lawrence (1747), 151. 
Comry, William (1724-27), 223-231 passim. 
Conon River (1746), 7. 



INDEX 286 



Contin (1746), 65. 
Conway, Colonel (1746), 59. 

Cope, Sir John, letter from D. Foiibes (1746), 96; 

(1745), defeat, D. Forbes' view, 97; (1746), his 

examination, 135. Reference:: (1745), 164. 

Corbett Thomas, Sec. to Admiralty (1746), letter to 

H. Porter, 16. 
Correchatachan (1746), 49. 
Corryarrick (Coirie-arrach), (1746),, 97. 
Cotton, Sir John Hynd (1743), attitude to Jacobite 

proposals, 162. 
Coupar (1746), 93. 

Court of Session (1746), question of number of judges, 
120; (1747), report on pacification of the 
Highlands, Hardwieke's criticisms, etc., 144, 
153-154, 158 ; attitude to Heritable Jurisdic- 
dictions Bill, 177. 

Craigie, Robert, Lord Advocate, letter from D. 
Forbes (1747), 185; (1746), appointed judge, 
120; (1747), praised by Granville, 149; con- 
duct in regard to Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, 
178-179, 186-87. 
Cranston, William (1746), 132. 
Crauford, William, jr. (1747), linen trade, 151. 
Crawford, John Lindsay, 20th Earl of (1746), rein- 
forces Blair, 51 ; Cumberland's opinion of, 
71; (1747), military appointment, 183. 
Cromartie, George Mackenzie, 3rd E. of, letters and 
documents: to Rev. J. Fraser, and reply 
(1746),, 24, 25-26; pass to John Mackenzie 
(1746), 12; demand for supplies from 
Ferintosh (1746), 12; pass to meal carriers, 
Inverness (1746), 13; (1746), damage to 
Ferintosh estate, xvii. ; recruiting for Pre- 
tender in Ross, 18; demands crown rents, 
25-26 ; orders burning of houses, 26 ; cap- 
ture, 48, 77; threats to Lord Reay, 77; 
attempts to seduce Mackenzies, 89, 160; 
alleged influence of D. Forbes against his 
pardon, 139; (1747), his (regiment, 158. 
References:: (1746),, 16, 24. 

Cromarty (1746), Loudoun's troops at, 7, 9, 43; ves- 
sels with arms at, 17. 

Cramarty Bay (1746), proposed base for army, 2. 
Crosby, Captain, Commandant at Aberdeen (1746), 86. 
Crosse, Mr (1746), 95. 

Cruickshank, Provost, of Aberdeen (1746), 86. 
Culchuinach (1746), losses at, during rebellion, 211, 

213, 214, 216. 
Cullen (1746), 93. 
Cullernie (1746), losses at, during rebellion, 206-209, 

211, 215., 218-219. 
Culloden, battle (1746), 62. 

Culloden estate (1746), protection order from Murray 
of Brouightoii, 1 ; guard granted, 64 ; dam- 
age and] thefts committed toy rebels, 67-68 ; 
damage by Government troops, 68 ; state- 
ment of losses by tenants at time of battle, 
205-219. Reference: (1746) > 110. 
Culloden Papers ( 1812-1815) > their first publication, 

viii. 

Cumberland, Frederick William, Duke of, letters: 
to Ld. Lccudoun (1746), 26; to D. of 



286 INDEX 



Newcastle (1746), 35, 36, 40, 71, 79; 
from D. Forbes (1746), 32; from Ld. 
Loudoun (1746), 27; from D. of New- 
castle (1746), 37. (1746), charges 
against Ld. Dun, 20; at Elgin, 24, 25; at 
Aberdeen, 19, 26-27, 56-57, 59, 61 ; views 
on use of independent companies, and 
their pay, 35, 40, 118-119; estimate of 
affairs and persons, March 1746, 36; 
portrait-medal by Pinchbeck, 59 ; popu- 
larity, 59 ; igrants pass to Cnisholm, 63- 
64 ; at Inverness, 63, 69 ; harsh views on 
Jacobites, xiii., 70-72, 79 - } attitude to D. 
Forbes and Loudoun, xvi.-xvii., 71, 113, 
120; destroys meeting houses, 72; Sir A. 
Macdonald's opinion of, 79 ; appoints go- 
vernors of Aberdeen, 84 ; views on com- 
missions and pay of Independent Coonps., 
90; D. Forbes' opinion of, 91, 97; at 
Fort Augustus, 97, 108,, 110; protection 
granted to Barisdale, 107 ; favour shown 
to Sir A. Macdonald, 108, 110; refusal 
to release Macdonald of Kingsburgjh, 123 ; 
(1746-1747), campaign on Continent, 
142, 144, 168; (1747), at Lovat's trial, 
150. References: (1746), 2, 6, 7-8, 10, 
11, 50, 63 ; 77, 96, 100. 
Currie, John (1747), linen trade, 151. 



Dalrymple, William (1747), letter to D. Forbes,, 150. 
Di-ngwall (1746), Jacobite review at, 24, 25; Jacobites 
at, 33; ships captured, 56. Reference: 
(1747), 158-160. 

Disarming BiM (1746), D. Forbes' views upon, 114. 
Disney, Lieut. (1745), wounded at Preston Pans, J45. 
DornocL (1746), Ld. Loudoun at, 13, 41, 43; taking 
by rebels and effects, xvii., 39-41, 43-45, 69; 
London's troops at, 43; houses burnt by 
rebels, 47. 
Dornoch Firth (1746), crossing by Loudoun's 

troops, 17. 

Dorset, Duke of (1747), 183. 
Dougalstone, Laird of (1747), 151. 
Doule, Mr (1746), 78. 
Drumlenrigg, Lord (1747), 184. 

Drummond;, of Bucfcwaldie (1739-43), missions in 

Jacobite interest, 161-162; (1743), false 

representations of Jacobite prospects, 

163. 

,, Francis, surgeon in Lascelles' Regt. (1745), 

146. 

Lord John, the elder (1739), signs agree- 
ment to support Pretender, 161; (1745), 
meeting of Pretender and chiefs at his 
house, 163. 

,, Thomas (1746), 207. 

Drummond's (Lord John's) regiment (1745), xv. 
Drumochter (1746), 1. 

Duart Castle (1746), surrender of arms at, 82. Re- 
ference :( 1746), 5<3. 

Duff, Major H. R. (1819), Editor of the "Culloden 
Papers," vii.-x. 



INDEX 287 



Duffus, Eric Sutherland, 4th (titular) Lord, (1746), 

letter to D. Forbes, 79. 
,, Kenneth, 3rd Lord (1715), 79. 
Dun, David Erskine, Lord (1746), letter to D. Forbes 

19; charged with disloyalty, 20-21. 
Dunbar, George (1746), 124. 

Robert (1746), 124. 
Dunbeath (1746), 41. 
Dundiass, Mr (1746>, 65, 66. 
Dundee (1746), 93. 
Dunkeld (1746), 51. 
Dunkirk (1743), 162. 
Dunlop, Captain (1746), at Inverness, 130; reports to 

Gen. Blakeney, 132. 

Dunmore, John Murray, 2nd Earl of (1746), letters 
to D. Forbes, 95, 96. Reference: 
(1746), 59, 60, 61. 

Dunrobin (1746), rebels at, 41. References: 13, 45. 
Dunrobin Bay (1746), 18. 
DunstafFnage* (1746), 51, 56. 

Dutch regiment (1747), proposed raising, 184, 189. 
Dyce, Mr (1746), 93. 



Eddercanron (1746), 64. 

Edinburgh (1746), meeting house at, 72. 

Egg (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 

Elcho, Lord (1746), 211. 

Elgin (1746), Cumiberland at, 24, 25; D. Forbes at, 

93; Mitchell. M.P. for, 180. 
Ellanamuich (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 
Ellis, Joseph (1747), 151. 
"Eltha/m," vessel (1746), 18. 
Erskine, Alexander, brother of Lord Dun (1746), 

arrest of, 21-22. 
,, David, Lord Dun, see Dun, Lord. 

Fairholm, Thomas (1747), 180, 193. 
Falo<rner, David (1746), 124. 
Falkirk, battle (1746), 53, 64,, 146. 
Fane, Henry (1746), letter to D. Forbes, 121. 
Farquharson, John of Inveroauld (1746), 105. 
Fawkener, Sir Everard (1747), evidence at Lovat's 
trial, 167. References :( 1746), 22 71, 77, 
103, 111, 123, 136. 

Ferguson, Captain (1746), search for Pretender, 122; 
(1747), retains Lovat's money, 148-150. 
,, Fergus (1746-1801), service in Forbes 
family and pension, 94. References: 
(1746), 52, 66, 67. 

Ferintoah estate (1746), supplies demanded by E. of 
Cromartie, xvii<, 12; wasted! by rebels, 47. 
References: (1746), 25, 81. ' 
Fern-Donald (1746), wasted by rebels, 47 
Fernich (1746), 64. 
Ferrier, , Captain in rebel army (1746,) levies men 

for Pretender, 20. 
Ferry Oons (1746), Capt. Inglis' ship at, 15, 16, 18- 

store ships captured by rebels at, 44 45 
Ferryden (1746), 93. 

Findhoirn, River (1746), rebels at, 18; base for rebels' 
boats, 39, References: (1746), 11. 



288 INDEX 



Findlater and Seafield, James, Earl of, (1746), letter 
from James Anderson, 41; (1747), opposes 
Lorat's burial in Scotland, 176 ; votes for 
Heritable Jurisdictions Bill, 185. 

Fitzgerald, Captain, of Munro's Regiment (1746), 
wounded at Falkirk, 146-147. 

Fitz-James's Begiment of Horse (1746), 15-16. 

Flandens (1746-47), conduct of war in, 59, 60, 61. 

Fletcher, Andrew, see Milton, Lord. 

Fleury,, Cardinal (1739), promises to Pretender, 161; 
(1742), -plans for invasion of Flanders, 162. 

Fochabers (1746), 46, 93. 

Forbes, Mr (1746), 55. 

,, Col. (1746), letters from David Scott, 58, 60. 
Alexander (1747), 150. 
,, Arthur,, 7th of Culloden, 94. 
,, Sir Arthur of Craigievar (1747), letter to D. 
Forbes, 168; Aberdeenshire election, 181, 
183; Inverness-shire election, 191. Re- 
ferences: (1746), 142; (1747), 152, 168. 
,, David, 194. 

,, Duncan, in Beauly (1746), 67. 
,, Duncan, 5th of Cullloden, Lord President; 
letters to : anonymous correspondent 
(1746), 10; Brodie of Brodie (1746), 113; 
the Chisholm (1746), 54, 62, 63; Sir J. 
Cope (1746), 96; R. Craigie, Ld. Advocate 
(1747), 185; D. of Cumberland (1746), 32; 
J. Forbes, his son (1747), 192; Win. Forbes 
(1746), 67; H. Fox (1746), 115; E. of 
Hardwicke (1747), 177; A. Mitchell 
(1746), 121; D. of Newcastle (1746), 88, 
119; H. Pelham (1747), 179; G. Ross 
(1746), 1; J. Scrope (1746), 91; A. Stone 
(1746), 136; account of Highland clans, 
xiii.-xiv. ; memo, on state of Highlands 
(1746), 98-103. Letters from : Aberdeen 
magistrates (1746), 84; anonymous (1747), 
147; W. Baillie (1746), 78; Brodie of 
Brodie (1746), 112; (1747), 169, 187; 
Archibald Campbell (1746), 56; Wm. Dal- 
rymple (1747), 150; Ld. Dun (1746), 19; 
Ld. Dunmore (1746), 95, 96; Henry Fane 
(1746), 121; Sir A. Forbes (1747), 168; 
Rev. J. Fraser (1746), 23; Glasgow magi- 
strates (1746), 94; Wmi. Grant (1747), 
168; John Hossack (1746), 123; (1747), 
133; Inverness magistrates! (1747), 128; A. 
Logie (1746), 86; E. of Loudoun (1746), 
14; Ld. Lovat (1746), 53-54; Macdonald 
of Castleton (1746), 140; Allan Macdonald 
(1746), 140; Sir A. Macdonald of Sleat 
(1746), \ 72, ,79, 110, 122-123; Lady M. 
Macdonald (1747), 189; Macdonell of Glen- 
garry (1746), 80; Anne Mackintosh (1746), 
105;'Macleod (1745), xv. ; (1746), 70, 73, 
83, 103, 104, 106, 107, 110, 111, 141, 143, 
148; (1747), 168, 184, 191; A. Mitchell 
(1747), 138, 152, 155, 160, 180; D. of 
Newcastle (1746), 120; Capt. Porter 
(1746), 14, 15; Ld. Reay (1746), 77; Ross 
of Inverchasley (1746), 83; Seaforth 
(1746), 11, 57; A. Stone (1747), 143; Ld. 



INDEX 289 



Duff us (1746), 79; (1715-1745), losses in- 
curred in rebellions, 113, 124, 1 ( J2-193 ; 
attitude to Lovat, xiv; (1716), work for 
prisoners, xiv; (1724-1748), account for 
medicines from A. Munro, 223-244; 
(1745), goes north to combat rebellion, 53; 
(1745-1746), relations with the Chisholm, 
53i, 54-55, 63; disposal of blank commis- 
sions, 88-90; (1746), retreat with Ld. 
Loudoun, 1, 9-11 ; in Sutheland, 13, 14, 15- 
18, 19, 27-28, 38, 52; attempt to cap- 
ture at Overskibo, 44, 45 ; at defeat of Dor- 
noch, 41 ; retreat to Skye, xvii., 47-49, 51, 
55 ; return from Skye, 64, 65 ; at Inverness, 
65-67 ; ingratitude of government to, 70 ; 
desire for lenity, Cumberland's opinion, 71, 
113; drafts proclamation against rebels, 
71-72; memorial to, from Clan Grant, 74; 
attends on D. of Cumberland, 91 ; journey 
to Edinburgh, 93-94; departure from In- 
verneiss, 93; efforts for Hon. Win. Murray, 
95-96 ; attitude to critics, 96-97 ; views on 
Cope's Jailure, 97 ; estimate of Cumberland, 
91, 97; suggestions for pacification of High- 
lands, 100-103 ; dealings with rebels, sug- 
gestions, 101-102, 137, 139; Ind. Camps., 
106, 107, 115-119, 141-142; opposed to High- 
land Dress Bill, 112, 114-115; Newcastle's 
wish to consult him, 113; Cumberland's 
application, 113, 120; views on Meeting 
House Bill, 114; disarming of Highlands 
approved, 114; requests appointment of 
another judge, 120; thanked by King, 120; 
attacks upon, Scrope's view of, 121 ; destruc- 
tion ofl his house in Inverness, 125 ; recep- 
tion by George II., 135; at Sir J. Cope's 
examination, 135; in London, 135-138; 
PeJiham's reference to, 137 ; his son and 
Pelha.m, 138-139, 158, 197 ; charges of work- 
ing against Cromartie, 139; (1746-47), 
intrigues against, 139, 157; Lovat's rents, 
143 ; at Stonyhilll, 143 ;' consulted by Hard- 
wicke and Newcastle, 144; Inverness elec- 
tion, 169, 170, 188-189; iblaaned by Lovat, 
169; relations with Brodie of Brodie, 169, 
170, 179, 180, 187 ; view on Heritable Juris- 
dictions Bill, 177-179, 1S5-18 7 ; views on 
surveyorship of customs at Inverness, 179, 
180, 184, 187 ; influence on rebellion, E. of 
Morton's view, 191; illness, 192, 194; death, 
194-195; burial, 194, 195-196; appreciation 
of 195, 196. 

Forbes, Duncan George, 8th of Culloden (1812), viii. ; 
(1815), ix.; (1819), vii. 

,, Grizel, see Ross, Grizel, of Kindeace 

,, Captain John (1746), 52, 55, 62, 65, 93. 

,, John, 4th of Culloden (1715, 1745), losses in 
rebellions, 193; (1734), burial place, 194, 
195. Reference : 179. 

,, John, 6th of Culloden. Letters to: Wm. 
Forbes (1748), 197; D. of Newcastle (1754), 
197; Mrs Ross of Kindeace (1747), 194. 
Letters from : D. Forbes (1747), 192; 



290 



Macleod (1746), 143; Wui. Forbes (1748), 
192: Master of Lovat (1747), 196; (1746), 
at Overskibo, 44; introduction to Pelham, 
138-139, 158, 197; injustice to, 158; (1747), 
application for governorship of Inverness 
Castle, 191-192 ; message from his father, 
193; at father's death-bed, 194-195; (1748), 
order to pay acount of A. Munro, 244 ; 
(1754), pension granted to, 197; (1766), 
grant on customs at Barbadoes, 198. Re- 
ferences :( 1724-38), 223-240 passim. 
Forbes, John, miller in Ferintosh (1746), 66. 

,, Capt. Hugh (1746), obtains guard for Cul- 
loden House, 64. Reference: (1746), 143. 
Lady Mary (1747), 158. 
,, Robert (1746), 23 . 
,, Win. (1746), letter from D. Forbes, 67. 
,, Wm. of Pittencrieff, advocate (1748), letter to 
J. Forbes, 6th of Culloden, 192 ; letter from 
J. Forbes, 197. 
,, William, writer to the Signet (1747), 193; 

(1748), 244. 

Mrs William (1746), 78. 

Fort Augustus (1746), siege by rebels, 8; capture, 32; 
magazine of rebel army, 46 ; Independ- 
ent companies at, 69, 70, 72 ; Cumber- 
land at, 97, 103, 110; Sir A. Macdonald 
at, 103, 110, 112; surrender of arms at, 
106, 108; Lovat imprisoned at, 106, 
108 ; Barisdale at, 107 ; meal seized by 
soldiers, 131. References :( 1746), 
72, 104, 124. 

Fort George (1746), capture by rebels, 32. Refer- 
ence: (1746), 8. 

Fort William (1746), siege,, 46, 50-51, 57, 61; sur- 
render of arms at, 82. Reference : 
(1746), 103, 106. 

Fortrose, Lord, see Seafprth, Earl of. 
Fox, Henry,, Sec. for War (1746), letter from D. 
Forbes, 115; (1747), application to, for pay 
for Independent Conips., 147, 150. 
" Fox," man-of-war (1746), 22. 
Foulis (1746), rebels at, 23-25. 
Framton's Regiment (1746), 60. 

France, support of Pretender (1742-3), negotiations 
and promises in Paris, 161-162, 163; (1743), 
proposed landings in United Kingdom, 162; 
difficulties, 163; (1746), reported landings in 
Scotland, 24, 25 ; 81; liklihood of Highland 
support of an invasion, 98-99 ; advantages 
offered by invasion of Scotland, 100. 
Fraser, secretary to Lovat (1747), evidence at trial, 

166-167. 

,, Bailie (1746), 93. 

,, of Achnagairn, family connections, 13. Re- 
ference: (1746), 65. 
Mrs, of Achnagairn (1746), letter to Rev. D. 

Ross, xiv., 134. 
,, of Struie (1746), surrender of arms, 104. 

Dr Duncan of Achnagairn (1745), xv., xvi. ; 

(1746). xLv. : (1747), 134. 
,, Duncan, in Brecknish (1746), 208. 
Hugh (1745), xvi. 



INDEX 291 



Fraser, Hugh of Dongallan (1747),, evidence at Lovat's 
trial, 166. 

,, Eev. James of Alness (J746), letter to D. 
Forbes, 23 ; letter from E. of Crotmartie and 
reply, 24, 25-26. 

,, James, in Chapelton (1746), 210-211. 

,, James, of Castle Leathers (1746),, factor for 
Lovat's estates, 105, 134; (1747), Lovat's 
complaint against, 148, 149, 150. 

,, James, in Culchuinach (1746), 211. 

,, James, magistrate of Inverness (1747), 133. 

John, in Cullernie (1746), 211. 

,, John, magistrate of Inverness (1747), 133. 

,, Rev. John of Pitcalzean (1746), 26. 

,, John, in Wester Urquhill (1746), 211. 

,, Simon, in Balnaglag (1746), 211-212. 

,, Simon, Ld. Lovat and Simon, Master of Lovat, 
see under Lovat. 

,, Thomas, of Dunballoch (1746), 104, 173, 174. 

,, Thomas, of Gortuleg (1746), loyalty during 
rebellion, 83 ; under suspicion, 83, 104 ; 
(1747), Lovat's charges against, 169. Re- 
ference: (1746), 111. 

William (1746), 124. 

William, agent for Lovat (1747),, 150. 

,, clan (1746), join rebels, 4-% 46; (1747), influ- 
ence in Inverness election, 173 ; importance 
in determining result of rebellion, xiv.-xv. 
Frasers of Strathglass (1746), surrender of arms, 104. 



Gardiner, Colonel (1745), 146. 

George II. (1746), reception of D. Forbes, 135. 

Glasgow, John Boyle, Earl of (1746). 61. 

(1747), 151. 
,, magistrates (1746), letter of congratulation 

to D. Forbes, 94. 
Glass, John (1746), 214. 
Glen Einig (1746), 48. 
Glenclunie, see Strathclunie. 
Glencoe district (1746), 82. 
Glenelig (1746), harried by Sackville, 103; (1745), xv. 

Bailie of (1746), 62. 
Glengarry, Laird of, see Macdonell) of Glengarry. 

,, district (1746), 101. 
Glenlivet (1746), 101. 
Glennioriston (1746), Loudoun's troops in, 72-73. 

,, men, see under Grant clan. 

Gordon, Mr (1746), 52. 

,, Bailie of Aberdeen (1746), 86. 
,, Adam, yr. of Ardoch (1745), 92. 
,, Lord Charles (1746), capt. in London's regi- 
ment, 30; escape at Dornoch, 44. 
,, Gilbert (1747), letters from Hugh Inglis. 175. 
Mrs Gilbert (1747), 176. 
,, John, of Glenbucket (1746), 81. 
,, John, lieutenant in Independent Comp. 

(1745), 92. 
,, Sir John (1746), intrigues against D. Forbes, 

139 157 

Sir Robert '(1746) , 66, 93. 

,, Sir William, of Park (1746), complaint 
against Royal troops, 71 ; escape, 142. 



292 INDEX 

Graham, Mr (1747), 156. 

Lord George (1747), 156.158. 
Granard, George Forbes, 3rd Earl (1747), 156. 
Grant, Mr ? alias of Sdr William Gordon, q.v. 

,, Major (1746), surrenders Inverness Castle, 78; 
(1747), retires from Inverness-shire election, 
173. 

,, of Dalrachney (1746), alleged hostage with 
rebels, 61. 

,, of Gartenbeg (1746), hostage with rebels, 61. 

,, of Glenmoriston (1746), 70. 

,, Alexander (1746), 212. 

,, Sir Archibald (1747),, candidate for Aberdeen 
county election, 181. 

,, Duncan of Achernach (1746), hostage with 
rebels, memorial to D. Forbes, 74-76. 

,, George of Tulligorm (1746), hostage with 
rebels, 61 ; memorial to D. Forbes, 74-76. 

,, James, Ensign (1745), 92. 

,, Sir James, of Grant (1741), defeat in Inver- 
ness election, Lovat's influence, 170; (1747), 
Lovat's charges against, 169. 

,, James, of Rothiemurchus (1746), hostage with 
rebels, 61 ; memorial to D. Forbes, 74-76 ; 
letter to Olan Grant on forced neutrality, 
76. 

,, James, of Sheugly (1746), sent prisoner to 
Newcastle, 108. Reference: (1746), 104. 

,, Grant, Rev. John (1746), 104. 

,, John, of Whythae (1746), hostage with rebels, 
memorial to D. Forbes^ 74-76. 

,, Lodovick, yr. of Grant (1746), aid to Lou- 
doun's troops, 73; conduct during rebellion, 
74; intercedes for Master of Lovat, 190. 
Reference: (1746), 79, 169. 

,, Patrick (1746), 124. 

,, Patrick, yr. of Rothiemurchus (1745), captain 
in Independent Comp., 92; (1746), in gar- 
rison at Inverness, 42, 78. 

,, Robert of Delllachaple (1746), hostage with 
rebels, memorial to D. Forbes, 74-76. 

,, William (1747), letter to D. Forbes, 168; 
opinion of D. Forbes, 195. 

,, William, Lord Prestongrange, see Preston- 
grange. 

,, William, yr. of Dellachaple (1745), 92. 

,, clan (1746), forced pledge of neutrality, 61, 
73-77; memorial to D. Forbes, 74-76; Glen- 
moriston men surrender, 79. 

,, Independent Company (174), surrender at In- 
verness, 8, 78 ; in garrison at Inverness 
Castle, 42 ; in Urquhart, 75 ; officers and date 
of completion, 92. 

Granville, Earl (1747), speech on Lovat's petition, 149. 
Gray, Captain (1746), 14. 

,, Mrs of Overskiibo (1746), 19, 38. 
,, family of Overckibo, 13. 
Griffith, Major (1745), 145. 

Guest, General (1745), xvi. ; (1746), 27; (1747), 128. 
Gun, Alexander of Badenoch (1745-6),. 31, 92. 
Gurnell, Jonathan (1747), 151. 



INDEX 293 



Halket, Colonel (1745), 146. 
Halley, Capt. (1746), 147 A 
Hamilton,, (1746), 60. 

Captain (1747),, 147, 149, 157. 
,, John (1745), at Aberdeen, 86. 
Handasyde's Regiment (1746), 60. 
Hardwicka, Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of, Letters: To 
D. of Newcastle (1746), 136, 137, 138, 
141 j (1747), 176; from D. Forbes (1747), 
177; (1746),, on Lovat's indictment, 135; 
(1746), views on Jacobite prospects in 
Scotland, 141; (1747), speech on Lovat's 
petition, 148 ; consultation with D. 
Forbes,, 144 ; speech on Heritable Jurisdic- 
tions Bill, 153-154, 155; views on reports 
of Court of Session, 153, 158; attitude to 
Heritable Jurisdiction Bill, 186. 
,, Philip Yorke, 3rd Earl (1819). 
Harley, George (1746), 67. 

Harrington, William Stanhope, 1st Earl (1746), praise 
of D. Forbes, 97 ; (1747), appointment as 
general of Marines, 183. Reference: 
(1746), 98. 

Hartford's (Hertford) Regiment* (1746), 143. 
Harriet, James (1746), 208. 
Haiwkhead (1746), 84. 
Hawley, General (1746), request to resign command, 

72. 

Bay, John, letters to Mrs Ross of Kindeace (1747), 
194; (1746), accounts of payments for D. 
Forbes, 9, 13, 19, 23, 38, 48-49, 52, 55, 62, 
64-65, 93-94. References : ( 1736-40), 230-240 
passim. 

"Hazard," sloop (1746), 20-21, 89. 
"Helen" vessel (1746), 16. 

Hercules, nickname of J. Forbes, 6th of Culloden q.v. 
Hessei, Prince of (1746), 51, 60. 

Hessian troops (1746), complaints concerning cartel 1, 
50 ; march to relieve Blair 57 ; join Cumber 
land, 59. 

Hewitson, Lieut. (1745), 145. 
Highfield, Mackenzie of (1746), followers recruited by 

Barisdala, 25. 

Hilton of Alterlies (1746), 212-213 
Hood, Donald (1746), 212-213. 

,, John (1746), 213. 
Home, William ((1746), 216. 

Hosisack, John, letters : To D. Forbes (1746), 123; 
(1747), 133; T. Stewart, factor at Culloden 
(1746), 125; (1746), urges D. Forbes to 
return from Skye, 64; ill-treatment by Royal 
troops 134; (1747), opposition to Brodie'at 
Inverness election, 189. Reference: (1747), 
187. 

Hough-ton's Regiment (1746), sent to Scotland, 60. 
Hunter, Hugh, surgeon (1745), 146. 
Huske. General John (1747), 159, 160. 

Ikolmkill (1746), surrender of arms,, 82. 

Independent Companies (1745-6), their pay, 87, 90; 
blank commissions, disposal by Lord 
President, 88-90; officers' names, 92; 



294 INDEX 



difficulties of raising, 117; (1746), lack 
of equipment, 1, 72, 73, 78; at rout of 
Moy and alter, 5-6, 8; desertions from. 
5-6, 8, 9-10, 12, 18, 28, 42-43; retreat 
from Inverness, 6-7 ; arms and money 
for, 15-18 ; proposed embarkation from 
Sutherland, 28, 34, 35; weekly return, 
March 1746, 31 ; Cumberland's view of, 
35, 40; surprised at Dornoch, 39-41, 
43-45, 69 ; positions in Sutherland, 7, 33, 
43, 47; retreat to Skye, 47, 49, 51, 89; 
provisioning difficulties in Skye, 51, 56, 
57; employment after Skye, 69-70, 
72-73_; quartered at Ft. Augustus, 69, 
70, 72 ; inarch through Glenmoriston, 
72-73 ; delay in arming and result, 88-89 ; 
summary of history, 88-90 ; disposal after 
retreat from Inverness, 89 ; re-as- 
sembling after Skye, 89 ; financial diffi- 
culties, 91 ; dates of completion, 92, 106, 
107, 110-112, 141-142; claim for pay, 
110-112, 116-119; partial dispersal, 111; 
strength at different times, 11, 119; 
assembly at Ruthven, 1 12 ; raising and 
equipment expenses, 116-119, 141 ; com- 
parison with similar English irregulars, 
118; supplementary levies, 118; Cumber- 
land's views on pay, 118-119; allowance 
to captains for levy, etc., 90, 141 ; alleged 
Jacobite officers, 141 ; grants for service 
before commissioning, 147, 150. 

Inglis, Captain Hugh, of "Pledger" Letters : To Gil- 
bert Gordon (1747),, 175; to Ld. Loudoun 
(1746), 39; (1746), delivery of arms for Inde- 
pendent Companies, 15-16 ; in charge of Govern- 
ment cash, 16, 17, 39 ; escape with military 
funds froan Dornoch, 44; (1747), comment on 
Lovat's trial, xiv., 175. 
Innes, Colonel (1746), 6, 112. 
Sir Harry (1746), 41, 45. 
John (1746), 213. 
Inveralachy (1747)*, 191. 
Invergarry house (1746), destruction, 103. 
Inverness (1741), election, Lovat's influence, 169, 170; 
(1743),, French invasion planned, 162; 
(1746), evacuation by Ld. Loudoun, 1, 6-7, 
10-11, 32, 42, 59, 88; surrender of castle, 
8, 11, 17, 59, 78; insecurity of, 16; 
exactions 'by rebels, 24, 26; numbers of 
rebels at, 46; Cumberland at, 63, 69; D. 
Forbes at, 65-67 ; expenses for troops after 
Culloden, 69; state after CuHoden, xvii. ; 
Grant clan, hostages at, 61, 75, 76; troops 
quartered upon, 124; destruction of D. 
Forbes' house, 125 ; military rule, exactions, 
etc., 126-127, 128-130, 132-133, 134; General 
Blakeney at, 130, 132; (1747), Surveyor of 
Customs, proposed abolition, 179, 180, 184, 
187 ; election,, candidature of Brodie of 
Brodie, 187-189. 

Inverness Independent Company (1746), in Suther- 
land, 43, 47 ; retreat to Skye, 48 ; date of 
completion and officers, 92, 



INDEX 295 



Inverness magistrates. Letters: To D. Forbes 
(1747), 128; to Ld. Milton (1746)* 1^5 
(1746), defence against charges of dis- 
loyalty, 126. 127-128; non-support by mili- 
tary/authorities, 130, 131-132, 133; (1747), 
Macleod, M.P. for, 173-191. 

Ireland (1747), linen trade, 151. 

Island Stalker (1746),, 82. 



Jones, , of the Guards (1746), marrage, 60. 

Jonestone, Claud (1747), 151. 

Jonestone and Fotheringhame, Messrs (1747), 151. 



Kamloch Oanechan (1746), 65. 

Kamlochdell, see Kinloch na daale. 

Keith (1746), 57. 

Kelly, (1745), 164. 

Kennedy, Col. (1746),, 59. 

Kennedies (1746), 100-101. 

Kerr, Molly (1746), 60. 

Kessock (1746) London's troops at, 6, 17, 33, 42; D. 

Forbes at,, 9, 65. Reference : (1746), 9. 
Killiehuiman, see Ft. Augustus. 
Kilmarnock, William, 4th Earl of (1746), 11. 
Kilmarnock's regiment (1746), 206. 
Killmally (1746), surrender of arms, 82, 
Killmunivaig (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 
Kilmorak, Kirk of (1747), 173. 

Kdngerloch distract (1746), surrender of arms at, 82. 
Khughorn (1746), 93. 
Kinloch Moidart (1746), 102. 
Kinloch na daale (1746), Independent Companies at, 

49; D. Forbes at, 62, 64, 65. Reference: 

(1746), 70. 

Kintail (1746), 34, 103, 104. 
Kirkhill (1747),, 176. 

Knoidart (1746), surrender of arms, 82. Refer- 
ence: (1746), 81, 101, 104. 
Knowles, Commodore (1746), 59. 
Kylelachan (1746,,) 64. 



Lang, Andrew, 107, 108. 

Lascelles' Retgiment (1745), 146. 

Lauder, George, surgeon (1745), forced attendance on 

rebels, 145-147; (1747), release, 144. 
Leanach (1746), 214, 217-218. 
Legonier, see Ligonier. 
Leslie, Willy (1746), 60. 
Leven and Melville, Alexander Leslie, Earl of, (1746), 

praised by Cumberland, 36, 37. 
Lewis company, see Seaforth. 
Ligonier, Sir John (1746), 61. 
Ligonier's Dragoons (1746), 59. 
Little Cullernie, see Cullernie. 
Livisie, Glenmoriston (1746), 73. 
Loch Ewe (1746), 48. 
Loch Ness (1746), 32, 89. 
Lochaber (1746), PVetender at, 70; surrender of arms 

at, 103, 104. Reference: (1746), 24. 
Lochalsh (1746), 34, 49. 



296 



Lochbrooiu (1746), 48, 56, 78. 

Lochcarron (1746), 48, 49, 52, 65. 

Logie, Andrew, Dean of Gild, Aberdeen (1746), letter 

to D. Forbes, 86. 
Long Island (1746), 103. 

Loudoun, John, 4th Earl of. Letters to: Anony- 
mous correspondent (1746), 10; D. of Cum- 
berland (1746), 27; D. Forbes (1746), 14; 
E. of Seaforth (1746), 9; E. of Stair 
(1746), 3; E. of Sutherland (1746), 14. 
Letters from : D. of Cumberland (1746), 
26; Hugh Inglis (1746), 39; (1745-46), his 
campaign, xvi.-xvii. ; (1746), retreat to 
Sutherland, 1-13, 32, 42-43, 59, 88; at rout 
of Moy, 3-6, 8 ; route from Inverness into 
Sutherland, 6-7 ; disposition of troops in 
Sutherland, 7, 33, 43, 47; plans to join 
Cumberland, 7-8; transport of troops, diffi- 
culties of boats, 10, 27, 28, 32, 34, 38, 45; 
request for boats to E. of Sutherland, 10, 
38; at Dornoch, 13, 41, 43; movements in 
Sutherland, 13, 14, 17, 27-28, 38; delivery 
of arms to, plans and difficulties., 15-18 ; 
request for another war vessel, 18; number 
of troops in Sutherland, 19 ; threats to those 
aiding rebels, 33-34 ; absence during attack 
on Dornoch, xvii., 39,, 43; visit to posts on 
L. Shin, 39, 43; destruction of boats, etc., 
45 ; plans after Dornoch , 46 ; retreat to 
Skye, 47, 49, 51, 89; position in Skye, 51, 
56, 57 ; services asked by General Campbell, 
56; request for equipment, 72, 73; re- 
assembles Independent Comps., 89, 112; 
debts incur lied, 91 ; surrender of arms to, 
103, 108; concerned with pay of Com- 
panies, 106, 111-112, 141, 142. Refer- 
ences: (1746), 35, 41, 63, 69, 73, 97, 104, 
110. 
Loudoum's Regiment (1745), 89, 146; (1746), 28, 30, 

40, 41, 47; (1747), 180, 184. 

Lovat, Simon, Lord Fraser of, letter to D. Forbes 
(1746), 53; (1715-45), attitude of Forbes 
brothers to him, reasons, xiv. ; (1739), 
relations with Pretender, 161, 164; 
(1741), influence in Inverness elec- 
tion, 170; (1741-45, 1747), relations 
with Scheviz, 170, 171 ; (1745), farces son 
into rebellion, 166, 167; (1746), raises clan 
59, 166; capture, 104-105; imprisonment at 
Ft. Augustus, 106, 108 ; how regarded in In- 
verness-shire, 135; visited in prison by Mac- 
leod, 143 ; indictment, 143 ; concession as to 
rents, 143; supports rebellion after Culloden, 
164, 167; (1747), estates administered by 
Fraser of Castle Leathers, 134 ; impeachment 
in Hse. of Lords, 148 ; petitions concerning his 
property, 148-150; (1747), trial, ? 60-1 67, 
172-173; treasonable letters, 167; relations 
with Macleod, xvi., 167-168, 169; oxecution, 

168, 169* 176; sympathy for his fate, xiv., 
175, 176; place of burial, 176. Refer- 
ences: (1745), vii., xvi.; (1746), 134, 136, 

169, 172. 



INDEX 297 



Lovat, Simon, Fraser, Master of, letter to J. Forbes, 
6th of Culloden (1747), IfcG ; (1745), forced 
into rebellion, 166, 167; (1747;, appeal fcr 
his release, 190; part in In verne->, -shire 
election, 191; gratitude 10 D. Forbes, l'.>6. 
Reference: (1747), 134, 185. 

Lyttelton, Sir George, afterwards Lord (1747), death 
of his wife, 158; j,ampiilet, by, 1F4 : (1748), 
kindness to J. Forbes, 6lh of Culloden. ,197. 
Reference: (1747), 142. 



Macanlsy, Donald (1746), 92. 
M'A skill, John (1745), 92. 
MacBean. . in Inverness (1746), 69. 
Alexander (1746), 213. 
Ann (Glass), (1746), 214. 
,, Anne, in Culchuinach (1746), 214. 
Mac(k)Coiloig (Mackcloage), Donald, runner (1746), 

55, 65, 93, 94. 

MacCrimmon, Piper (1746), death, 4, 8. 
Macculloch, Margaret (1746), 213. 
Macdonald, runner (1746), 9, 38, 55, 65, 66. 
Captain (1746), 38. 
of Clanranald, see Clanranald. 
of Knock (1746), 64. 
of Morar (1746), 102. 
Aeneas (1744), 163. 

Alexander, of Kingsburgh (1746), con- 
cerned in escape of Pretender and im- 
prisoned, 122-123 ; endeavours for his 
release;, 140-141, 147. 

Sir Alexander, of Sleat, letters : To D. 
Forbes (1746), 1, 72, 79, 110, 122; to 
Macleod (1746), 103; (1745), letter 
sent to, by Pretender, 165; (1746), at 
Gortuleg, 83; at Fort Augustus, 103. 
110, 112; intimacy with Cumberland, 
xvii., 108, 110; appeals for Macdonald 
of Kingsburgh, 123; death, 138, 
139-140, 143; character, 140, 142. Re- 
ferences : (1745), xv.; (1746), 34, 35, 
47, 64, 70, 73, 104, 107, 108, 124; 
(1747), 189. 

Allan, yr. of Kingsiburigh, letter to D. 
Forbes (1746), 140; (1745), lieutenant 
in Independent) Comp., 92; (1747), 
seeks commission in Dutch regiment, 
189 

Allan, 'of Knocfc (1745), 92. 
Coll, of Barisdale (1745;, report on young 
Glengarry, xv. ; (1746),, prospects of 
pardon, 1, 110; in pursuit of Lord Lou- 
don, 11 ; Mackenzies recruited by, 
numbers, 25 ; surrender, 106,107 ; Mac- 
leod \s attitude to, 107 ; meets London 
and Sir A. Macdonald, 107; protection 
from D. of Cumberland, 107 ; alleged 
treachery to Jacobites, 107 ; recruiting 
for Pretender in Assint, 117 ; interview 
with Ld. Albomarle, 124. Reference: 
(1746), 70. 
Donald (1746), 19. 



298 INDEX 



Maodonald, Donald, ensign in Independent Camp. 

(1745), 92; (1747), 189. 
Donald, hirer (1746),, 49. 
Donald, of Castleton, letter to D. Forbes 
(1746), 140; (1745-46), captain in Inde- 
pendent Comp., 31, 92; (1747),, 189. 
,, Florence (Flora), (1746), aid to Pretender 

and arrest, 122. 
,, James (1745), ensign in Independent 

Comp., 92. 

,, James, of Airds (1745-6), Captain in In- 
dependent Comp., 31, 92, 110. 
,, James, in Leanaoh (174,6)), 214. 
,, John, of Kirkibost (1745-46), captain in 

Independent Comp., 31, 92, 110. 
Lilias (1746), 214. 

,, Lady Margaret, letter to D. Forbes 

(1747), 189; (1746), involved in escape 

of Pretender, 122 ; husband's death, 

140. 

,, Martin (1746), letter to John Mackintosh, 

139-140. 
,, Ranald, see Clanranald. 

clan (1746), 7, 50. 

Macdonald Independent Companies (1745), officers, 
92; (1745-6), completion and maintenance, 
92, 106, 110, 116, 141; (1746), in Suther- 
land, 14, 43, 46, 47; in Skye, 47, 70, 112; 
in pursuit of Pretender, 103 ; supplement- 
ary levies, 118; alleged Jacobitism of 
officers, 141; (1747), subsistance before 
completion, 147, 150. 
Macdonell, Mrs, of Glengarry (1746), 81. 

,, Alexander, of Glengarry ("Young Glen- 
garry"), (1745), attitude to rising, xy. 
,, Alexander, of Keppoch (1746), declaration 

of war on Campbells, 50, 51. 
Donald, of Lochgarry (1746), 70. 

Col. John (1747), 158. 

,, John, of Glengarry, letters: To anon. 
(1746), 109; to D. Forbes (1746), 80, 
(1745-6), attitude to rebellion, 82; 
(1746), surrender of arms, 80-81; de- 
struction of his house, 108 ; imprisoned 
as suspect, 108 ; estate, proposed sale to 
Crown, 108-110; prisoner at Fort 
Augustus, 124. 

Maodonells of Glengarry (1746), submission, 80, 81; 
punished for not surrendering arms, 
103, 108. 

MaeDougal, Major (1746), 58. 

Macfies (1746), question of transplantation, 100-101. 
Macgillivray clan (1746), question of transplantation, 

100-101. 

Macgregor, , brother to Glencarnaig (1746), 24. 
Miu-gregm-s, regiment of (1746), 23. 
M;;c! nto.sh, see Mackintosh. 
Mi. Ivor, James (1746), 214. 
Mackay, Ensign (1746), captures E. of Cromartie and 

Ld. Ma-cleod, 48. 
Major (1746), 45. 

,, Alexander, son of Lord Reay (1746), in 
Loudoun's regiment, 30, 



INDEX 299 



Mackay, Ensign, Angus (1746), 92. 

Hon. George, of Skibo (1745-6), 31, 92, 
Hugh, yr. of Bighouse (1746), 31, 92. 
James, of Skerray (1745), 92. 
John, of Clasneaoh (1745-6), 92. 
John,, of Mudale (1745), 92. 
William, yr. of Pifcfure (1745), 92. 
Mackay Independent Comp. (1745), date of 
completion and officers, 92; (1746), with 
Loudoun, 14, 28, 34; in Sutherland, 4.% 47; 
retreat at Dornoch, 44; temporary disper- 
sa.l, 48; supplementary levies raised by 
Loudoun, 118. 

Mackenzie, of Allangrange (1725), 52. 
of Belmaduthy (1746), 25. 
of Inchcoulter (1746), 24. 
of Kilcoy (1746), 25. 
of Scatwoll (1746), 25. 
Alexander, customs official at Inverness 

(1746), 131. 

,, Alexander, chamberlain of Ferintosh 

(1746), order from E. of Cromartie, 12. 
Alexander, of Davochmaluach (1745), 
captain in Independent Company, 92 ; 
^1*46), his company deserts at Beauly, 
8, 9, 12, 43. 
,, Alexander, of Fairburn (1746), 12. 

Alexander, of Lentran (1746), 11; 

(1747), 158. 
Anne (1746), 214. 
,, Co-lin (1746), captain in Independent 

Comp., 62, 92. 

,, Colin, of Hilton (1745), captain in Inde- 

pendent Comp., 92; (1746), desertion of 
his company at Beauly, 8, 9, 12, 43. 
,, Colin, alias Roy, brother to Dundonald 

< s i?47), in charge of Pretender's funds, 
159. 

Dcmald (1746), 19. 
,, Donald, of Little Leanach (1746), 214. 

Sir G. (1747), 153. 

,, John, tenant at Culloden (1746), 215. 
,, John (1746), pass from E. of Cromartio, 

\-4. 

John, of Delvine (1747), 128. 
,, John, of Torridon (1747), 158. 

,, Kenneth (1746), 92. 

,, Margaret (1746), 215. 

Murdoch (1747), 158, 159. 

,, Roderick, chamberlain of Ferintosh 

(1746), order from E. of Cromartie, 12. 
,, Major William (1746), capture at Dor- 

noch, 44, 47. Reference: (1746), 30 
,, William (Kilcoy's brother)., (1747), in 

charge of Jacobite money, 159. 
Mackenzie elan (1746), attittide to rebellion, 25, 46, 

58, 89, 160. 

Mackenzie Independent Company, ,see Seaforth In- 
dependent Company. 
Mackinnon, , (1746), 24. 
Mackinnons, regiment of (1746),, 23. 
Mackintosh, Aeneas, of Mackintosh (1746) 30 
Alexander (1746), 215. 



300 



Mackintosh, Anna (1746), 215. 

., Anne (Farquharson), of Mackintosh 

(1746), letter to D. Forbes, 105; cap- 
tivity at Inverness, 104, 105. 
Donald (174,6), 215. 

John (1746), letter from Martin Mac- 
donald, 139-140; (1747), deals with 
government stores at Inverness, 128. 
Lachlan, of Gallcantra (1746), 130-132. 
William (1746), 104. 

Bailie William, of Terrnit (1745-6), 31, 92. 
William (1747), 133. 

Mackintosh clan (1746),, surrender of arms, 104& 105. 
MacLean, Sir Hector (1745), intrigues for Pretender, 

xv. 

Macleod, , captain in Independent Comp. (1746), 31. 
of Drynoch (1746), 62. 
Lady of Tallisker (1746), 65. 
Alexander, yr. of Balmeanach (1745), 92. 
Donald, of Bernisdale (174), 92. 
Donald, of Mill (1745), 92. 
Hugh, of Genaies (Geanies), (1745-6), cap- 
tain in Independent Comp., 31, 92; 
(1746), house burnt 'by rebels, 26; raises 
company in Assint, 117. 
John, Lord (1746), account of affair at Dor- 
noch, 47 ; capture, 48 ; sent prisoner to 
Newcastle, 108. 

John, yr. of Gesto (1745), 92. 
John, yr. of Macleod (1746), captain in 
Loudoun's Regt., 30; escape at Dor- 
noch, 44. 

John, of QsdaJe (1745), 92. 
John, of Tallisker (1745-6), 31, 92. 
Normand, yr. of Bernera (1745-6), 31, 92. 
Normand, of Macleod. Letters to: D. 
Forbes (1745), xv. ; (1746), 70, 73, 83, 103, 
104, 106, 107, 110, 111, 141, 143, 148; 
(1747), 168, 184, 191 ; J. Forbes, 6th of Cul- 
loden (1746) , 143. Letter from Sir A. Mac- 
donald (1746), 103; (1741), M.P. for In- 
verness, Lovafs influence, 170; (1741- 
5), alleged intimacy with Scheviz, 171; 
(1745), attitude to rebellion, xvi. ; re- 
ceives letter from Pretender, 165 ; his 
deception of Lovat, xvi., 167; informs 
against Lovat, 171; (1745-47), his rela- 
tions with Lovat, xiv., xvi.; (1746), at 
rout of Moy, 6 ; attempted capture by 
rebels, 45; retreat to Skye, xvii., 47, 
51; illness, 103, 106, 108, 110; attitude 
to Barisdale, 107; opposed to Highland 
Dress Bill, 112; visits Lovat in prison, 
143; (1747), blamed by Lovat, 169; 
called as witness against Lovat, 167 ; 
Scheviz's charges of treason, 171-172; re- 
lations with Schoviz over Lovat' s trial, 
171, 173, 174; M.P. for Inverness-shire, 
191. Rol'orouces : (1746), 110; (1747), 
152, 187, 188, 189. 
Normand, of Waterstein (1745-6), 31, 92; 

(1746), 62. 
Roderick (1745), 92. 
William, of Hammir (1745), 92. 



INDEX 301 



Maoleod Independent Companies (1745-6), completion 
and maintenance before commissioning, 
92, 106, 116, 141; (1746), in Loudoun's 
retreat^ 7 ; at rout of Moy, 8 ; in Suther- 
land, 43, 46, 47 ; retreat to Skye, 47 ; re- 
turn from Skye, 70 ; departure for Skye 
after Culloden, 112 ; supplementary levies 
raised by Loudoun, 118; (1747), losses oil 
period before commissioning, 147 ; special 
concession as to expenses, 150. 
MacLoghlan, Captain, store keeper at Inverness 

(1746), 26. 

McNab, Archibald, yr. of McNab (1746), 30. 
McNahs (1746), question erf transplantation, 100-101. 
Macpherson, William (1746), 215. 
MacQueen & Macintosh, Massrs (1819), correspond- 
ence with H. R. Duff, vii.-x. 
Macrae,, John (1745), 92. 
MacTavish (1746), question of transplantation, 

100-101. 

Maillebos, Marshall (1742), 162. 
Maitland, Mr (1746), 147. 
"Margaret," vessel (1746), 16. 
Marten, Mr (1746). 64. 

Marischal, George Keith, 10th Earl (1743), 162, 163. 
Mathison, John (1745), 92. 

,, Kenneth (1745), 92. 
Maule, John, M.P. for Aberdeen (1746), 36, 85; 

(1747), 191. 

Mickle Cullernie, see Cullernie. 
Mickle Ferry (1746), 10, 13, 19, 29, 38. 
Middleton, Captain (1746), 15, 16. 
Miller, James (1746), 215. 

Milton, Andrew Fletcher, Lord, letters to Duke of 
Newcastle (1746), 49, 109; letter from In- 
verness magistrates (1746), 126; (1746), 
Cumberland's & Newcastle's opinions of, 36, 
37 ; requests authority to close meeting- 
houses, 72; on proposed sale of Glengarry's 
estates, 109-110; on Inverness grievances, 
128; (1746-7), prejudiced against D. Forbes, 
139, 157. Reference: (1746), 75. 
Minga-ry Castle (1746), 82. 

Mitchell, Sir Andrew, of Thainston, letters to D. 
Forbes (1746), 138; (1747), 152, 155, 160, 
180; letter from D. Forbes (1746), 121; 
Career, 180; (1747), Parliamentary candi- 
date for Aberdeenshire, 180-182, 183. Re- 
ferences: (1747), xvi., 148, 191, 192. 
Moidart (1745), xv. ; (1746), 82, 101, 104. 
Monro, see Munro. 
Montrose, William Graham, Duke of (1747) ; 156-157, 

185. 

Montrose, town (1746), "Hazard" sloop at, 20; re- 
putation for disloyalty, 21 ; French troops 
landed at, 21 ; D. Forbes at, 93. 
Morar (Morir), (1746), surrender of arms 82. 

Reference: (1746), 81, 101. 
Moray, James Stuart, Earl of (1747), bet and speech 

on Heritable Jurisdiction Bill, 185. 
Moray district (1746), 7, 24, 25, 45, 46, 50. 
Moray Firth (1746), xvi., 39. 
Mordaunt's Regiment (1746), 60. 



302 INDEX 



Morevin district (1746), surrender of arms,, 82. 
Morisou, James, Provost of Aberdeen (1746), 85, 86. 
Morton, James Douglas, loth Earl of (1747), letter 
to D. of Newcastle, 191 ; speech on Heritable 
Jurisdiction Bill, 183, 185 ; appreciation of 
D. Forbes, 191. 

Mouat, Bailie, of Aberdeen (1746), 86. 
Moy, rout of, (1746), 1; 3-6, 8. 
Moy, blacksmith of, (1746), 8. 
Mull (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 
Munro, of Auchanny (1746), 38. 
,, of Newmore, 13, 83. 
,, Alexander, apothecary (1724-48), account for 

medicines, 223-244. 
Donald (1746), 215-216. 
,, Elizabeth (1746), 216. 
,, George (1745), lieut. in Independent Coinp., 

92. 

,, George, servant to Sir H. Munro (1746), 24. 
,, George of Culcairn (1745-6), captain in Inde- 
pendent Camp., 31, 92; at rout of Moy, 5, 
6; in Skye, 49, 70. References: (1746), 
14, 54. 

,, Sir Harry,, of Foulis, letter to A. Stone 
(1747), 190; (1746), captain in Loudoun's 
Regiment, 30; (1747), intercedes for 
Master of Lovat, 190. Reference: 
(1747), 148, 159. 

,, Hugh, yr. of Achanny (1745), 92. 
,, James (1746), 216. 

John (1746), 216. 
William (1746), 217. 

Munro Independent Company (1745), officers and date 
of completion, 92; (1746), in Sutherland, 
43, 47 ; retreat to Skye, 48. 
Munro's Regiment (1746), 146. 
Murchisoa, Mrs, of Auohtertire (1746), 49. 

,, Simon (1745), 92. 
Murdoch, Mr (1724), 224; (1727), 232. 
Murray, Lord George (1746), 18, 57, 14)7. 
James (1746), 134. 
James, in Balloch (1746), 216-217. 
,, John, of Broughton (1746), protection for 
Culloden House, 1; (1742), missions to 
Paris and London, 161-162; (1744), meets 
Pretender in Paris, 163 ; receives notice 
of Pretender's plans, 163; delivers letters 
from Pretender, 165; (1746), demands 
hostages from the Grants, 74, 76 ; pro- 
spects of his capture, 112 ; surrender, 166 ; 
(1747), evidence at Lovat's trial, xvi., 
160-166. 167. 

,, Hon. William (1746), intercession of D. 
Forbes for,, 95-96; sent prisoner to New- 
castle, 108. 
,, see also Atholl, Duke of; Dunmore, Earl of; 

Tullibardine, Marquis of. 
Murray district, see Moray. 
Mylne,' Alexander (1746), 207. 

Nairn (1746), 11, 45. 
Nairn county (1747), 188. 
Naizon, , (1746), 59. 



INDEX 303 



New Tarbat (1746), 43. See also Tarbat. 

Newcastle, Thomas Pelham Holies, 4th Duke of, let- 
ters to: D. of Cumberland (1746), 37; D. 
Forbes (1746), 120; Gen. Huske (1747), 
159. Letters from : Brodie of Brodie 
(1746), 142; D. of Cumberland (1746), 
35, 36, 40, 71, 79; Andrew Fletcher 
(1746), 49, 109; D. Forbes (1746), 88, 119; 
J. Forbes, 6th of Culloden (1754), 197; 
Wm. Grant, Ld. Advocate (1747), 195; 
E. of Hardwicke (1746), 136, 137, 138, 
141; (1747), 176; Gen Huske (1747), 160; 
E. of Morton (1747), 191; E. of Stair 
(1746), 2; (1746), his view or Ld. Milton, 
37 ; views on treatment of Highlands, 37- 
38 ; correspondence with E. of Dunmore, 
96 ; speeches on Lovat's affairs, 148 ; sup- 
ports A. Mitchell's candidature for Parlia- 
ment, 181 ; appeal to, for Master of Lovat, 
190. References: (1746), 3, 109, 112, 
113, 120, 135; (1747), 143, 144, 148, 154, 
159. 

Newton (1746), boats at, 29. 

N<dble, Thomas (1746), 217. 

Noel, Mr (1747), 165. 

Norries, James (1747), 195. 



Ogilvie, Isobel (Munro), (1746), 217. 

Ogilvy, Lord (174,6), 20, 22. 

Old Meldrum (1746), 93. 

Overskibo (1746), 13, 19, 38, 44, 45, 52. 

Overskibo, mistress of (1746), 65. 

Panmure, Lord (1746)., 36. 
Paterscm, Thomas (1746), 232. 

Pelhaon, Henry, letter to anonymous correspondent 
(1746), 136; letter from D. Forbes (1747), 
179; (1746), relations with J. Forbes, 6th of 
Culloden, 138-139, 158, 197 ; and pay of In- 
dependent Companies, 141; (1747), supports 
A. Mitchell in Aberdeen election,, 181 ; sup- 
ports Brodie in Inverness election, 187-188 
Reference: (1746), 87, 91, 119; (1747) 147 
184, 185, 187. 

Perth, James Driimmond, 3rd titular Duke of (1742), 
dealings with Murray of B'roughton, 161 ; 
(1745), notified of Pretender's landing, 163; 
receives letters from Pretender, 165 
Peterhead (1746),, 16, 18. 

Pinchbeck (1746), his medal of D. of Cumberland, 59 
"Pledger," vessel (1746), 176. 

Porter, Capt. H., letters to: T. Corbett (1746), 16- 
D. Forbes (1746), 14, 15; (1746), reporte 
accident to "Speedwell," 3; delivers arms 
for Independent Companies, 15-18 
Portree (1746), 122. 
Poyntz, Captain (1745), 145. 
Preston Pans, battle of (1745), 145 146 
Prestongrange, Wm. Grant, Lord, Lord Advocate 
(1747), letter to D. of Newcastle, 195 
References : 138, 143. 



304 INDEX 



Ramsay, Sir Alexander (1746), 95. 
Kannie, cooper at Loith (1747), 168. 
Rattray, John, surgeon (1745), forced attendance on 
rebels, 145 ; eases treated by, after Preston 
Pans, 146; (1747), release, 144. Refer- 
ence: (1747), 148. 

Reay, George Mackay, 3rd Lord (1746), letter to D. 
Forbes, 77 ; men supplied to E. of Loudoun, 34 ; 
threatened by E. of Cromartie, 77. Refer- 
ence: (1746), 83. 
Rigg, John (1746), 124. 
Robertson, Alexander, Provost (1746), 86. 

John, Provost (1746), 86. 
Rodger, Rob (1747), 175. 
Rose, Mr, Inverness (1746), 127. 
,, Elizabeth (1746), 217-218. 
,, Hugh, in Inverness (1746), 130, 131. 
,, Hugh, of Kilravock (1747), examination of wit- 
nesses against Lovat, 172 ; proposed candida- 
ture at Inverness election, 188. 
Robert (1747), 133. 

William, in Leanach (1746), 218. 
William, grieve to D. Forbes (1746), 218. 
Ross, of Aldy (1746), 83. 
of Kindeace (1746), 83. 

Alexander (1746), 12. 

,, Charles, brother of Shandwick (1746), 92. 
,, Rev. David (1746), letter from Mrs Eraser of 

Achnagairn, 134. 

,, David, of Inverchasley (1746), letter to D. 
Forbes, 83 ; house burnt by rebels, 26 ; losses 
in rebellion, 83. Reference :( 1746), 19, 
78, 83, 84. 

,, David, yr. of Inverchasley (1746), 84, 92. 
Donald (1746), 64. 

,, George (1746), letter from D. Forbes, 1; deals 
with pay of Independent Companies, 90, 107, 
110, 111 ; intrigues in Inverness election, 
188. References : (1728-45) , 233-242 passim ; 
(1746), 87, 98, 116, 139. 

,, Griaal (Forces), of Kindeace (1747), letters 
from John Hay, 194 ; letter from J. Forbes, 
6th of Culloden, 194. 

,, Malcolm, yr. of Pitcalnie (1746), 24, 47. 
,, William, Master of (1746), at Rout of Moy, 5. 

References : 42, 78, 84, 92. 

Ross Independent Company (1746), at rout of Moy, 5; 
surrender at Inverness, 8, 78; lack of arms, 
78 ; assembly at Tain, 78 ; in garrison at In- 
verness Castle, 42; dates of completion and 
officers, 92. 

Ross-shire (1746), 13, 18, 25-26, 33, 46, 83, 99. 
Rothes, John Leslie, 10th Earl of (1746), 59, 60. 
Royal Blues, see Hartford's Regiment. 
Rum (1746), 82. 

Ruthven (1746), rebels at, 2, 3, 51, 89; Independent 
Companies at, 112. 

Sackville, Lord George (1746), 103-104, 108. 

Sage, Rev. Aeneas (1746), 48. 

Sandilands, Captain (1745), 146. 

Sandys, Lord (1746), favours Meeting House Bill, 113. 

Saxe, Marechal de (1743), 163. 



INDEX 305 



Schaub, Lady (1747), 158. 

Scheviz, Robert, of Mudrtown, letter on Lovat'e trial 
(1747), 170; (1741-45), intimacy with Mac- 
leod and Lovat, 171 ; (1747), Lpvat's opinion 
of, 170; (1747), charges against Macleod, 
xvd., 171-172, 173-174; evidence against 
Lovat, 171-172 ; denial of holding land from 
Lovat, 172-17,3 ; misfortunes through evi- 
dence at Lovat's trial, 174 ; goes into hiding, 
174 ; unpopularity in Inverness, 173-174 ; 
mobbed at Dunballoch, 174. 
Scott, David (1746), letters to Col. Forbes, Scots 

Greys, 58, 60. 
Sir Walter (1816), x. 

Scrope, John, of Wormsley (1746), letter from D. 
Forbes, 91. Reference: (1746), 87; 

(1747), 121, 168, 185, 192. 
Seafield, Earl of, see Findlater and Seafield. 
Seafcrth, Kenneth Mackenzie, 6th Earl of (Lord Fort- 
rose), letter to D. Forbes (1746), 11, 57; 
letter from E. of Loudoun (1746), 9; 
(1746), rallies Independent Companies, 8, 
9 ; defends Kintail, 34 ; association with the 
Chisholm, 54,, 62; followers in rebellion, 89, 
160; (1747), tenants to be protected from 
rebels, 159; Inverness election, 187-188. 
References: (1746), 34-35, 38, 62, 89. 
Seaforth's Independent Companies (1745), Lewis com- 
pany detained by weather, 89, 92, 112 ; 
(1745-6), dates of completion, names of 
officers, 92; (1746), in retreat from Inver- 
ness, 7 , desertions, 5, 8, 9-10, 12, 18, 43. 
Sempill, Francis, titular Lord (1742-4), Jacobite in- 
trigues in Paris, 161, 163. 
"Shark," sloop (1746), 15, 18. 
Shin, River and Loch (1746), 7, 33, 43. 
Sheridan, Mr (1744), 163. 
Shire More (1746), 108. 
Simpson, Rev., of Falla (1746), 147. 
Skelton's Regiment (174,6), 60. 
Skye, Isle of, xvii., 34, 46, 47-49, 51, 55, 56, 57, 99, 

110 122 123 

Smith, Commodore (1746), 18. 
Smith and Seeker, Messrs (1747), 151. 
"Speedwell," vessel (1746), accident to, 17-18; de- 
livery of arms by, 15-18. Reference: 
(1746), 14. 

Spey, River (1746), 50. 

Stair, John Dalrymple., 2nd Earl of, letter to D. of 
Newcastle" (1746), 2; letter from E. of 
Loudoun (1746), 2, 3; (1746), attitude to loyal 
Highlanders, xiii. ; Cumberland's opinion of, 
71 ; opposed to Highland Dress Bill, 113 ; 
(1746-47), illness, 58, 160. Reference: 
(1746), 61. 

Steel, John (1742), 24*1. 

Stewart, John, brother of E. of Moray (1746), cap- 
tain in Loudoun's Regiment, 30; (1747), 
Lieut. Col. in new Dutch Regiment, 184. 
,, Thomas, factor at Culloden (1746), letter 
from John Hossack ; 125 ; (1747) , illness, 
134 ; expenditure in rebellion, 193. 
,, see also Stuart. 



306 



Stirling (1746), 18, 88, 147. 

Stone, Andrew, letter to D. Forbes (1747), 143; letter 
from D. Forbes (1746), 136; Sir H. Munro 
(1747), 190. 
Stonehaven (1746), 93. 

Stoneyhill estate (1746), D. Forbes at 143. Refer- 
ence: (1746), 67. 
Strange, Sir John (174,7), 167. 
Strathbagie (1746), 57. 

Strathclunie (Strathchkmie), (1746), 72, 73. 
Strathdearn (1746), 101. 

Strathglass (1746), surrender of arms, 104. Refer- 
ence: -(1746), 101. 
Strath Nairn (1746), 3. 
Strathoickall (1746), 48. 
Strathspey (1746), 133. 

Stuart, Alexander, yr. of Invernahyle (1746), 51-52. 
James (1746), 81. 
,, clan (174-6), 7. 
,, see aso Stewart. 
Suinart (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 
Sulivan, Colonel (1746), 112. 

Sutherland, Eric, titular Lord Duffus, see Duffus. 
,, John of Forss (1746), 30. 

,, Kenneth (1745), 92. 

Peter (Patrick) of Kinminity (1745-6), 

31 92 

,, William, 'l 7th Earl of (1746), letter fro<m 
E. of London, 14 ; asked for boats and 
men, 10, 38 ; invitation to D. Forbes, 
13 ; help to Loudonin, 28, 34 ; joins D. of 
Cumberland, 41, 42,, 45, 47; house cap- 
tured, 42; regiment granted to, 70; 
(1747), bet and speech on Heritable 
Jurisdictions Bill, 185. Reference: 
(1746), 23, 27, 38, 142. 
clan (1747), 134,. 

,, Independent Companies (1745), date of 
completion, names of officers, 92; 
(1746), in E. of Loudwin's retreat, 7; 
numbers with Loudoun, 27-28, 34, 43; 
defence of River and Loch Shin, 43; 
temporary dispersal, 48 ; supplementary 
levies raised 118. 

,, county (1746), Loudoun's retreat to, xvi., 

1-13, 43 ; disposition of troops in, 7, 33, 
43, 47 ; movements of Loudoun and D. 
Forbes in, 13, 14, 17, 27-28, 38; Inde- 
pendent Companies and rebels in, 88, 
89. References : 99, 142. 
Swedish troops (1739), 161. 
Swinie, Lieut. (1745), 145. 

Tain (1746), proclamation by Loudoun's troops at, 13; 

exactions by rebels, 26; rebels at, 38, 39, 43. 

Reference: (1746), 7, 78. 
Talbot, Lord (1747), at Lovat's trial, 165-166 
Tallakins, Miss (1746), 60. 
Tarbat (1746). 134, 135. See also New Tarbat. 

Bay (1746), 15. 
Tarbatness (1746), 3, 17-18. 
Tenoin, Cardinal (1742), 161. 
Thomson, Alexander, advocate (1746), 86. 



INDEX 307 



Tirawley, Lord (1747), 183. 
Tiree (Tirij), (1746), surrender of arms, 82. 
Tolmie, Andrew (1746), 218-219. 
Tomkh (1746), 135. 
Tongue (1746), 77. 
Tournaig (Tornich), (1746), 48. 

Traquair, E. of (1739), signs agreement to support 
Pretender, 161; (1742),, Jacobite intrigues 
with Murray oi Broughton, etc., 161; 
(1743), Jacobite mission to England, 162; 
(1745), notified of Prince's landing, 163. 
References: (1743), 162; (1744), 163. 
Traquair's brother (1739), 161. 
Troup (1746), 45. 
Tuke, Robert (1747), 151. 
Tullibardine, William Murray, Marquess of (1746), 

capture, 105. 

Tweeddale, John, 4th Marquess (1746), suggestions for 
financing the Independent Companies, 
91 ; favours meeting House Bill, 113 ; 
(1747), speech on Heritable Jurisdictions 
Bill, 183, 184. Reference: (1746), 89. 

Uist (1746), orders for surrendering arms in, 82; Pre- 
tender in, 122. Reference: (1746), 101, 103. 
Urquhart (1746), Loudoun's troops in, 72, 73. Refer- 
ence :( 174.6), 75. 

"Vulture," sloop (1746), 15, 27, 45, 56. 

Wales, Prince of (1746), 139. 

Walpole, Sir Robert, 179, 183. 

Wauchope, , (1746), 58. 

Wedderburn, Mr, collector of excise (1746), account 

of affairs, at Dornoch, 41, 42. 
Wester Urquhill (1746), 211. 
Westmorland, John Fane, 13th Earl of (1747), opposes 

Heritable Jurisdiction Bill, 185. 
Wilkinson, Captain (1746), 58. 
Williams, Sir Watkins (1743) , 162. 
Wilson, Mrs (1724-32), 223-236 passim. 
Winchelsea, David, 8th Earl of (1746), 113. 
"Winchelsea," vessel (1746), 18. 
Wood, Mr, surgeon (1745), 146. 

Yonger, Sir William (1747), at Lovat's trial*, 165. 
York (1743), Jacobite meeting, 162. 
Young, Alexander (1746), 131, 132. 

Daniel (1788), 94. 
Younge, John (1747), 184. 



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