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Full text of "Cultural directory II : Federal funds and services for the arts and humanities"

Cultural 

Directory 

II 

FEDERAL FUNDS 
AND SERVICES 
FOR THE ARTS AND 
HUMANITIES 








lllllllllllllllllllllllllll I 





Milium 




I i 




Federal Council The Federal Council on the Arts and the 

on the Arts Humanities was established by Congress in 

and the Humanities 1965 by the legislation that created the Arts 

and Humanities Endowments. The Federal 
Council includes the heads of federal 
agencies that have culturally related 
programs, and two congressional 
representatives. The purpose of the Federal 
Council is to promote coordination among 
federal programs in the arts and the 
humanities and to provide a forum for the 
exchange of ideas. 

Chairman 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Chairman 

National Endowment for the Humanities 

Commissioner 

U.S. Office of Education 

Secretary 
Smithsonian Institution 

Director 

National Science Foundation 

Librarian of Congress 
Library of Congress 

Director 

National Gallery of Art 

Chairman 

Commission of Fine Arts 

Archivist of the United States 
National Archives and Records Service 

Commissioner, Public Buildings Service 
General Services Administration 

Director 

International Communication Agency 

Director, National Park Service 
Department of the Interior 

Secretary of the Senate 
Executive Secretary of the Senate 
Commission on Arts and Antiquities 

Member 

U.S. House of Representatives 

Secretary 

Department of Commerce 

Secretary 

Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 

Secretary 

Department of Transportation 

Administrator 

General Services Administration 

Chairman 

The National Museum Services Board 

Director 

Institute of Museum Services 



Cultural 
Directory II 

FEDERAL FUNDS 
AND SERVICES 
FOR THE ARTS AND 
HUMANITIES 



FEDERAL COUNCIL ON THE ARTS 
AND THE HUMANITIES 



Linda C. Coe 
Rebecca Denney 
Anne Rogers 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS 
1980 



Support from the National Endowment for the 
Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, 
and the Office of Education made this 
publication possible The findings and 
conclusions, however, do not necessarily 
represent the views of the Federal Council, the 
Endowments, or the Office of Education 



Cultural Directory II 

Federa 1 Funds and Services for the Arts and 

Humanities 

©1980 Smithsonian Institution 

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication 
Data 

Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities 
Cultural directory II. 







Includes index 

1 . Federal aid to the arts — United States — 

Directories I Coe, Linda, 1945- II Denney. 

Rebecca, joint author III Rogers, Anne, 1951 - 
joint author IV Title. 

NX735.F42 1980 700' 79 79-20413 
ISBN 0-87474-323-0 



Printed in the United States of America 

Additional copies may be obtained at $7 75 from 
Smithsonian Institution Press 
1111 North Capitol Street 
Washington, D C 20560 



Contents 

Joan Mondale Foreword 

Peter Kyros Acknowledgments 
Linda C. Coe How to Use This Book 

Applying for Government Assistance 

Funds and Services 

List of Programs by Agency 
Descriptions, nos 1-270 

Appendices A-J 

Regional Offices 

Index 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/culturaldirectorOOfede 




11.11 IJUHJU. 




THE VICE PRESIDENTS HOUSE 
WASHINGTON. DC. 20501 



Dear Friends : 

In studying federal support of cultural 
activities , I thought I needed to look no further 
than the National Endowment for the Arts, the 
National Endowment for the Humanities, and those 
magnificent museums on the Mall in Washington. 
How wrong I was! I discovered that our federal 
government assists cultural activities in hundreds 
of ways. This Cultural Directory can be your 
shortcut to the same discovery. 

You will find described in these pages 
programs of the Appalachian Regional Commission, 
the International Communication Agency, the 
Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Labor, 
Transportation — even the Defense Department -- 
and many, many others. It is not their job 'to 
support culture; but they recognize that cultural 
resources can help them get their jobs done. 

We on the Federal Council on the Arts and 
the Humanities hope that this Cultural Directory 
will be useful to all of you who care about 
America's cultural life. 



Sincerely, 



Honorary Chairperson 
Federal Council on the 
Arts and the Humanities 



Acknowledgments 

This volume is a completely revised edition of a book 
published nearly five years ago by the Federal Council on 
the Arts and the Humanities, in cooperation with the 
American Council for the Arts (formerly Associated 
Councils of the Arts). It is a sign of the maturation of 
federal cultural resources that Cultural Directory II is much 
expanded and covers humanities as well as arts 
assistance. 

The Federal Council, under the leadership of Joseph 
Duffey, Chairman of the National Endowment for the 
Humanities, was extremely fortunate to have engaged the 
services of Linda Coe to direct the research and writing of 
this book. She authored the earlier edition as well and 
brought to this project not only her experience, but a keen 
sensitivity to the nuances of evolving government cultural 
programs and the needs of the American cultural 
community. Rebecca Denney and Anne Rogers carried 
out their research and writing with zeal and perseverance, 
tracking down hundreds of leads to federal resources. 
They have produced clear and succinct descriptions of 
the many kinds of support federal programs can provide 
for cultural endeavors. The editor, Barbara Ryan, the staff 
of Editorial Associates, and typist Susanne Sellars helped 
turn reams of paper into coherent manuscript. 

The staff of Cultural Directory II could not have done its 
job, however, without the cooperation of employees in 
dozens of federal agencies who furnished the information 
about their programs. We are most grateful for their 
assistance. 

Three Federal Council member agencies joined in 
underwriting the year-long research and drafting that went 
into this book, the National Endowment for the Arts, 
National Endowment for the Humanities, and U.S. Office of 
Education These agencies gave administrative as well as 
financial support. The Humanities Endowment also 
provided those most precious of Washington 
commodities — office space and telephones. A fourth 
Federal Council member granted the good offices of its 
highly regarded publishing arm, the Smithsonian Institution 
Press. 

We hope that readers, both inside and outside of 
government, will find Cultural Directory II informative and 
easy to use. We welcome readers' comments and 
suggestions for future editions. 

Peter Kyros 

Deputy Chairman 

Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities 

June 1979 



How to Use This Book 



Cultural Directory II is an updated edition of the original 
guide published in 1975. The Directory has been 
expanded to include descriptions of federal government 
support for the humanities as well as the arts. More than 
300 federal programs, activities, and resources described 
in this book offer various types of assistance to 
individuals, institutions, and organizations. Some give 
financial aid in the form of grants, loans, contracts, or 
stipends; others offer employment opportunities; still 
others provide services such as information, technical 
assistance, managerial counseling, traveling exhibits, 
reference collections and services, statistical data, and 
training opportunities. 

Scope of the Book 

Many of the programs described are directly oriented 
toward assisting cultural activities, such as programs of 
the National Endowment for the Arts and the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. Other programs, however, 
can provide assistance to cultural projects only under 
certain conditions. For example, the Department of 
Commerce's Economic Development Administration might 
support the restoration of a historic site or the construction 
of a cultural heritage museum only if certain economic 
criteria were met. As you will see from the examples given 
in the text, many programs seemingly unrelated to the arts 
and humanities are in fact potential sources of assistance 
for cultural activities. 

The Directory includes federal programs that support the 
study of any of the humanities disciplines; resource 
collections or facilities essential to humanistic pursuits; 
communication of the humanities to a wider constituency; 
and the study of any issue, problem, or discipline from the 
perspective of humanistic thought. The humanities are 
defined to include the following disciplines: archeology, 
comparative religion, history, jurisprudence, language 
(modern and classical), linguistics, literature, philosophy, 
and aspects of the social sciences, as well as the history, 
theory, and criticism of the arts. 

The arts programs described include those that support 
the creation, exhibition, or purchase of artworks, and 
training in, or study or performance of, the arts. The arts 
are defined to include all aspects of the visual and 
performing arts, including both traditional and 
contemporary art forms; architecture and design; crafts 
and folk art; photography and filmmaking; and radio and 
television. 

The constituency served by federal arts and humanities 
programs is largely a shared one, with different needs 
being met by different agencies. Libraries, museums, 
educational institutions, the mass media, and cultural 
service organizations as well as individuals may benefit 
from these programs. 

Organization of the Book 

The main body of the Directory describes the programs, 
activities, or resources of 38 federal and quasi-federal 
agencies and organizations. Entries are listed 
alphabetically by agency and are numbered sequentially. 



Cross references and the index cite these numbers rather 
than page numbers. When several entries are grouped 
under a particular administrative division, they appear at 
the end of the agency's section in alphabetical order. 

The index is the key to using this book most effectively; it 
is intended to direct you through the labyrinth of federal 
programs to the most relevant and promising kinds of 
assistance available. Subjects are classified according to 
art form or discipline, such as "dance," "historic 
preservation," "linguistics," and "literature," and also by 
type of user, such as "libraries," "museums," "Native 
Americans," and "teachers." A note at the beginning of 
the index contains hints on its use and a list of 
government acronyms. 

Program Information 

This guide does not attempt to provide definitive 
information on every program entry, but rather seeks to 
alert you to the availability of potential sources of federal 
assistance for cultural activities. Because government 
programs change frequently, you should always contact 
the federal agency administering a particular program for 
current information and detailed application guidelines. 

The following informational items are given (where data 
are available) for all entries: 

What/For Whom: Brief identification of type of assistance 
offered, whether funds or services, and identification of 
the individuals or organizations eligible to receive the 
assistance. 

Description: The purpose and scope of a program as 
well as details on eligibility requirements and on type of 
financial or nonmonetary assistance. 

Example: Specific examples of how a program has 
assisted cultural activities. To the extent possible, the 
most recent data on number of applicants, awards made, 
and amount of money appropriated by Congress for a 
program have been included. Dates given for funding 
statistics are for the government fiscal year (which begins 
on October 1 of the preceding year) unless otherwise 
indicated. 

Comment: Any additional considerations such as the 
legislative future of the program, or the agency's past 
funding priorities. 

Contact for Information: The office(s) to which inquiries 
should be directed. Most large federal agencies have 
regional, state, or local offices (listed in the telephone 
directory under "United States Government"), which 
should be contacted before contacting the Washington 
office for further information on programs Selected state 
and regional offices are listed in the appendices 

All of the programs and resources described in this guide 
have the potential for assisting arts or humanities 
activities. The challenge to you, the reader, is to be 
creative in exploring how to utilize this potential. 

Linda C. Coe 

Director, Cultural Directory Project 



Applying for Government Assistance 



Readers inexperienced in applying for assistance from 
federal agencies may find the following suggestions 
helpful. It should be remembered that these are general 
suggestions which may not apply in every case. Always 
check with the agency sponsoring a particular grant 
program for specific guidelines and requirements. 

Sources of Information on Government Programs 

The first step in obtaining a grant from the government is 
to find out what potential assistance programs exist. 

A most useful and informative source is the Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance (see no. 232), a 
"comprehensive listing and description of federal 
programs and activities which provide assistance or 
benefits to the American public." Published each summer 
by the Office of Management and Budget and updated 
each winter, the Catalog may be purchased from the 
Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, 
Washington, DC 20402, or from a Federal Bookstore, 
located in federal office buildings in most major cities (see 
Appendix G). The Office of Management and Budget also 
maintains FAPRS, a computerized information retrieval 
system keyed to the Catalog, which is accessible through 
county extension agents and state and local government 
agencies. FAPRS provides information to the public about 
potential sources of government assistance for a wide 
range of activities, including cultural and educational 
projects (see no. 232). 

The Monthly Catalog of U.S. Government Publications 
(available on a subscription basis) and Selected US. 
Government Publications, a free biweekly list, contain 
comprehensive listings of popular or newly issued 
publications available from the Government Printing 
Office. Other informative government periodicals include 
the Federal Register (see no. 167) and the Commerce 
Business Daily (see no. 25). These and other government 
publications are available through most major public 
libraries and all federal depository libraries nationwide 
(see no. 172), or may be purchased at Federal Bookstores 
(see Appendix G). 

Federal Information Centers (see no. 158), operating in 38 
major metropolitan areas with additional cities connected 
by toll-free telephone lines, provide information on various 
aspects of the federal government including funding 
programs and services. You may visit, phone, or write 
these centers, which are listed in Appendix F. For 
information on current or planned grant programs for 
which announcements and guidelines have not yet been 
published, contact the particular federal agency's Public 
Affairs, Public Information, or Legislative Affairs Office. 

What You Should Know Before Applying for a Grant 

It frequently takes government agencies from six months 
to a year to notify applicants of grant award decisions. 
Consequently, potential applicants must plan far ahead in 
terms of proposal development and long-range budget 
projections. 

Each agency has and will provide its own regulations or 



guidelines specifying who may apply for a grant and how. 
Guidelines list specific and important details such as 
eligibility requirements, application deadlines (the dates 
by which applications must be submitted to be eligible for 
consideration), requirements regarding official authorizing 
signatures and a list of materials to be submitted with an 
application. Interested applicants should study eligibility 
requirements carefully to determine whether they are 
eligible to apply for assistance and should pay particular 
attention to rules on an applicant organization's tax status. 

In addition, an agency will often supply general 
information that indicates its focus or preferences in 
funding proposals. A list of previous grant recipients 
(including names, addresses, and brief descriptions of 
projects) is often available from agencies. An agency's 
annual report may also indicate the agency's focus in 
programming. Studying the legislation that created a 
program may add to your understanding of an agency's 
funding priorities. A free copy of a particular law may be 
obtained by contacting your congressional representative 
or by writing the Senate or House Documents Office, U.S. 
Capitol, Washington, DC 20510 (include title and public 
law number if possible). 

Usually it is a good idea to discuss your project ideas with 
an agency staff member before writing your proposal. 
Most agencies will tell you in general terms what they will 
an r i will not fund and will suggest how you might modify 
your (jioposal to meet their guidelines. It is usually 
preferable to contact the local, regional, or area office of 
an agency before contacting the Washington 
headquarters office; often these local or regional offices 
make funding decisions and are familiar with specific 
funding priorities you should know about. The addresses 
of selected federal, regional, and state offices are listed in 
appendices at the end of the book 

Elements of a Well-Written Proposal 

Most federal agencies require applicants to use a printed 
application form when submitting proposals Application 
form instructions should be followed precisely — failure to 
do so often results in the agency's ignoring a proposal or 
taking longer to process it. 

The title of your proposal should be short, precise, and 
easily understandable; proposal language should be clear 
and concise. It is often helpful to have someone not 
involved with the project read the proposal in draft form 
before you submit it. Usually it is best not to include any 
supplementary information unless it is specifically 
requested in the instructions or guidelines. When 
requested, such information should be kept to a minimum 
for processing efficiency. Above all, a proposal should be 
legible; a typewritten or neatly printed application is 
preferable. 

A well-written proposal should tell readers what a project's 
directors will do, why they are qualified to do it, and how 
they will go about doing it. A proposal should outline the 
qualifications of project staff. It helps to present evidence 
that one has a track record of success or that "informed" 



persons, ideally persons known and respected by the 
grant-giving agency, think you can do the job well. 

A proposal must include a detailed budget showing all 
project expenditures broken down into appropriate 
categories, such as salaries, office supplies, and travel 
expenses. An applicant should read the program's 
guidelines carefully to see which expenses are allowable 
and which are not. Clarify the meaning of terms such as 
in-kind or indirect costs with the agency or an accountant 
before filling out the application. The achievement of 
proposed program objectives will depend, in large part, 
on a sound, realistic budget. In all cases, follow the 
guidelines provided by the agency. 

Responsibilities of Grantees to the Government 

To be eligible for government funds, occasionally an 
applicant must be able to "match" the grant in some way, 
that is, put up a certain percentage of funds, often from 
nonfederal sources or in-kind contributions, to match the 
federal grant. Sometimes this requirement demands 
broader participation than just that of the federal 
government in support of a project. Always check on any 
matching or in-kind contributions an agency may require. 

When the government gives taxpayers' money to a 
project, it expects some explanation as to how the funds 
were used and what was accomplished with the support 
of grant funds. Generally, federal agencies require 
grantees to submit periodic descriptive and fiscal reports 
during the course of grant activity and, upon completion 
of the project, final reports showing how funds were spent 
and the accomplishments of the grant. Government 
agencies usually request that an acknowledgment of their 
financial assistance be made on, for example, published 
material, announcements, exhibits, and films. Most 
important, read carefully all material provided by the 
funding agency, including the grant letter, and follow 
instructions rigorously. 

What to Do If an Application Is Rejected 

Some, though not all, federal programs have an appeals 
process for applicants whose requests for funding have 
been denied. The process differs even within divisions of 
federal departments and is often quite complex. Most 
federal agencies will be glad to discuss reasons for 
rejection and ways to improve chances of future funding. 
The reasons for rejection may have nothing to do with the 
intrinsic quality or merit of the proposal but pertain to 
other considerations — that federal funding is limited or that 
a proposed project is outside an agency's purview. 
Competition for most federal grants is very keen, and 
there is no harm in reapplying for a grant. In fact, 
perseverance is the name of the game. 

Linda C. Coe 



Funds 
and 




List of Programs 
by Agency 



ACTION 

1/ Older American Volunteer Programs 

Foster Grandparent Program 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program 
Senior Companion Program 

2/ Peace Corps 

3/ Technical Assistance and Information 
Former Volunteer Project 
National Center for Service-Learning 

Advisory Commission on 
Intergovernmental Relations 

4/ Intergovernmental Research 

Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation 

5/ Historic Preservation Activities 
6/ International Centre Committee 

Appalachian Regional Commission 

7/ Commission Funds 
Project Grants 
Supplemental Grants 

Architect of the Capitol 

8/ Art and Reference Library 

Community Services Administration 

9/ Community Action Assistance 
Community Action Grants 
Senior Opportunities and Services (SOS) 
Summer Youth Recreation Program 
10/ Economic Development 

Corporation for Public Broadcasting 

11/ Information and Services 

Clearinghouse on Public Participation 
Office of Communication Research 
Office of Educational Activities 
Office of Engineering Research 
12/ Radio Activities 

Radio Community Service Grants 
Radio Expansion Grant Project 
Radio Services 



13/ Television Activities 

Television Community Service Grants 
Television Programming Assistance 
Television Services 
14/ Training and Development 
In-Service Training Grants 
Minority Training Grants 
Women's Training Grants 

Department of Agriculture 

15/ Agricultural History Program Area 

16/ Cooperative Research 

17/ Craft Development Program 

18/ Farmers Home Administration Loan Programs 

Business and Industrial Development Loans 

Community Facility Loans 

Youth Project Loans 
19/ Forest Service History Program 
20/ Forest Service Interpretive Program 
21/ Forest Service Youth Conservation Corps 
22/ National Agricultural Library 
23/ Photography Division 
24/ State Cooperative Extension Service 

Community Resource Development 

4-H Youth Program 

Home Economics 

Department of Commerce 

25/ Introduction 

26/ Bureau of the Census Services 

27/ Industry and Trade Administration Data 

28/ National Bureau of Standards Services 

29/ Office of Minority Business Enterprise 

30/ Public Telecommunications Facilities Program 

Planning Grants 

Equipment Grants 
31/ Regional Commissions 

Demonstration Grants 

Supplemental Grants 

Technical Assistance Grants 
32/ United States Travel Service 

Economic Development Administration 
33/ Business Development Loans 
34/ Planning Assistance 
35/ Public Works Program 

Grants for Public Works and Development Facilities 

Public Works Impact Program 

Supplemental Grants 
36/ Special Economic Development/Adjustment 

Assistance 
37/ Technical Assistance Grants 



National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
38/ Coastal Program Grants 

Planning Grants 

Administrative Grants 
39/ Estuarine and Marine Sanctuaries 
40/ Sea Grants 



Department of Defense 

41/ Art Collections/Traveling Exhibits 

42/ Art Programs 

43/ Bands and Choruses 

44/ Fellowships and Visiting Professorships 

45/ Museums: Exhibits/Loans 

46/ Professional Entertainment Program 

47/ Recreation Programs 

48/ Research Facilities/Internships 

49/ Surplus Personal Property Sales 



Department of Energy 



50/ Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program 
51/ Education, Business, and Labor Affairs 

Faculty Development Projects in Energy Education 

Public Energy Education 

Used Equipment Grants 
52/ Energy Cdnservation Program (Title III) 

Preliminary Energy Audits 

Energy Audits 

Technical Assistance 

Energy Conservation Measures 
53/ Energy Extension Service 
54/ Historian's Office 
55/ Information Sources 

Citizens' Workshops 

Exhibits Branch 

National Energy Information Center 

Speakers Bureau 

Technical Information Center 
56/ Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program 



Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare 

57/ Introduction 

58/ Administration on Aging 

59/ Architectural and Transportation Barriers 

Compliance Board 
60/ HEW Fellows Program 

61/ National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 
62/ Rehabilitation Services Administration Special 

Projects 
63/ Social Services Programs (Title XX) 



64/ Surplus Real Property Transfers 



65/ 
66/ 



67/ 
68/ 



69 



70/ 



71/ 



72/ 



73/ 

74/ 
75/ 
76/ 
77/ 



78/ 



79/ 



80/ 
81/ 
82/ 



Education Division 

Introduction 

American Indian Education 

Grants to Local Educational Agencies (Part A) 

Grants to Nonlocal Educational Agencies (Part A) 

Special Programs and Projects (Part B) 

Adult Indian Education (Part C) 

Arts Education Program 

Bilingual Education Programs 

Basic Program 

Support Services 

Training Program 

Bureau of Education for the Handicapped Programs 

Division of Assistance to States 

Division of Innovation and Development 

Division of Media Services 

Division of Personnel Preparation 

Career Education Incentive Programs 

State Allotment Program 

Model Program 

Postsecondary Demonstration Program 

Citizen Education for Cultural Understanding 

Program 

Community Education Program 

Grants to Local Education Agencies 

Grants to Other Organizations 

State Grants 

Training Grants 

Community Service and Continuing Education 

Program 

Cooperative Education Program 

Educational Information Centers 

Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) 

Elementary and Secondary Education 

Programs (Title IV) 

Instructional Materials and School Library 

Resources (Part B) 
Improvement in Local Educational Practice (Part C) 
Emergency School Aid Act Programs (ESAA) 
Basic Program 

Educational Television and Radio 
Magnet Schools 
Nonprofit Organizations 
Special Arts Projects 
Environmental Education Program 
General Projects 
Minigrants 

Ethnic Heritage Studies Program 
Foreign Curriculum Consultants Program 
Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs 
Fellowships Program 
Research Program 



83 



84 



85 



86/ 
87/ 
88/ 
89/ 



90 



91/ 



92/ 
93/ 



94/ 
95/ 
96/ 
97/ 



98 



99/ 
100/ 
101/ 
102/ 



Fulbright-Hays Research Abroad Programs 

Doctoral Dissertation Program 

Faculty Research Program 

Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary 

Education 

Gifted and Talented Program 

State Programs 

Discretionary Programs 

Graduate and Professional Opportunities Program 

Group Projects Abroad Program 

Institute of Museum Services 

International Studies Programs 

Graduate and Undergraduate Programs 

International Studies Centers 

Services 

Library Grants for Higher Education 

College Library Resources 

Library Research and Demonstration 

Library Training 

Strengthening Major Research Libraries 

Library Services and Construction Programs 

Title I: Services 

Title II: Construction 

Title III: Interlibrary Cooperation 

Title IV: Older Readers Services 

National Center for Education Statistics 

National Committee-Arts for the Handicapped 

Model Site Program 

Special Projects 

Training 

Very Special Arts Festivals 

National Diffusion Network 

National Institute of Education 

Public Service Education Program 

Strengthening Developing Institutions (Title III) 

Cooperative Arrangement Grants 

National Teaching Fellowships 

Professors Emeritus Grants 

Student Financial Aid Programs 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants 

Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grants 

Campus Work-Study 

National Direct Student Loan 

Guaranteed Student Loan 

Teacher Centers 

Teacher Corps 

Vocational Education Programs 

Women's Educational Equity Act Program 



Department of Housing and 
Urban Development 

103/ Introduction 

104/ Livable Cities 

105/ National Solar Heating and Cooling Information 

Center 
106/ Urban Research Grants 

Community Planning and Development 
107/ Community Development Block Grants 
108/ Comprehensive Planning Assistance ("701") 
109/ National Awards for Urban Environmental Design 
110/ Rehabilitation Loans ("312") 
111/ Urban Development Action Grants 

Federal Housing Administration 
112/ Arts and Design in Public Housing 

Insured Housing Program 
Public Housing Modernization Program 
113/ Historic Preservation Loans 

Department of the Interior 

114/ Introduction 

115/ Environmental Education Programs 

116/ History Programs 

117/ Indian Arts and Crafts Board 

Advisory Services 

Museums 

Publications and Films 

Workshops 
118/ Libraries 

119/ Reclamation Public Services 
120/ U.S. Fish and Wildlife Cultural Activities 

"Duck Stamp" Design Contest 

Wildlife Art and Decoy Contests 

Wildlife Photography Contest 



121/ 
122/ 



123/ 



Bureau of Indian Affairs 

Cultural Studies 

Economic Development Loans 

Loan Guaranty and Insurance Fund 
Revolving Loan Fund 
Education Programs 

Johnson-O'Malley Assistance 
Haskell Indian Junior College 
Higher Education Assistance 
Institute of American Indian Arts 



Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service 
124/ Grants-in-Aid for Historic Preservation 
125/ HABS/HAER 

Recording Projects 



Exhibits 

Rehabilitation Action Projects 
126/ Historic Sites Programs 

National Register Program 

National Historic Landmarks Program 
127/ Historic Sites Surveys 

Executive Order 1 1593 Program 

Archeological Investigations and Salvage Program 
128/ Interagency Archeological Services 

Advisory Services 

Antiquities Program 

Internship Program 
129/ Surplus Real Property Transfers 
130/ Tax Incentives and Credits 
131/ Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program 

National Park Service 
132/ Cultural Programs in National Parks 

Artists-in-Residence Program 

Craft Demonstrations and Sales 

Living History Programs 

Office of Cooperative Activities 

Performing Arts 

Volunteers-in-Parks 
133/ Interpretive Design Center 
134/ National Capital Parks 

Art Barn . 

Artists in Action 

Carter Barron Amphitheatre 

Downtown Parks 

Ford's Theatre 

Glen Echo 

Sylvan Theatre 
135/ Wolf Trap/Filene Center 

Enrichment Program 

The Wolf Trap Company 
136/ World Heritage List 

Department of Justice 

137/ Law Enforcement Action Grants 
138/ Prison Recreation Programs 

V _____ 

Department of Labor 

139/ Introduction 

140/ Bureau of Labor Statistics 

141/ CETA: Introduction 

142/ CETA: Title II, Comprehensive Employment and 

Training Services 

Parts B and C 

Part D 
143/ CETA: Title III, Special Federal Programs 

Part A 

Part C 



144 



145/ 

146 
147 
148 



CETA: Titles IV and VIII, Youth Programs 

Title IV, Youth Programs 

Title VIII, Young Adult Conservation Corps 

CETA: Title VI, Countercyclical Public Service 

Employment Programs 

CETA: Title VII, Private Sector Opportunities 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration 

Senior Community Service Employment Program 



Department of State 

149/ Art in Embassies Program 



Department of Transportation 

150/ Design, Art, and Architecture in 
Transportation Program 

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) 

Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 

Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) 

U.S. Coast Guard 

Special Review for Historic Sites 



151 



Department of the Treasury 

152/ General Revenue Sharing 
153/ IRS Tax Services 

Environmental Protection Agency 

154/ President's Environmental Youth Awards 
155/ Public Awareness Materials 
156/ Youth Education Seminars 

General Services Administration 

157/ Introduction 

158/ Federal Information Centers 

Federal Property Resources Service 
159/ Surplus Personal Property Donations 
160/ Surplus Personal Property Sales 
161/ Surplus Real Property Sales 

National Archives and Records Service 
162/ Archival Reference Services 

Central Reference Division 
Microfilm Research Room 
Office of Educational Programs 
Publications 
163/ Audiovisual Archives 
Motion Picture Branch 
Sound Recording Branch 
Still Picture Branch 



164/ Center for Cartographic and Architectural Archives 
165/ National Audiovisual Center 
166/ National Historical Publications and Records 
Commission 

Fellowships in Historical Editing 

Publications Program 

Records Program 
167/ Office of the Federal Register 
168/ Regional Facilities 

Federal Records Centers 

Presidential Libraries 

Public Buildings Service 
169/ Art-in-Architecture Program 
170/ Living Buildings Program 
171/ Professional Services 

Government Printing Office 

172/ Government Publications 
Depository Libraries 
Sales Program 

International Communication Agency 

173/ Advisor on the Arts 

174/ Cultural Presentations Program 

175/ East-West Center 

176/ Fulbright-Hays Exchanges 

Graduate Study Abroad 

Teaching Abroad/Seminars for Teachers Abroad 

University Lecturing/Advanced Research 

177/ Publication Services 

178/ Speaking Tours Abroad 

Library of Congress 

179/ Introduction 
180/ American Folklife Center 
181/ Archive of Folk Song 
182/ Area Studies 

African and Middle Eastern Division 

Asian Division 

European Division 

Hispanic Division 
183/ The Center for the Book 
184/ Children's Literature Center 
185/ Law Library 
186/ National Library Service for the Blind and 

Physically Handicapped 
187/ Performing Arts Library 
188/ Processing Services 

Cataloging Distribution Service 

Cataloging in Publication Division 

Exchange and Gift Division 



National Serials Data Program 

Overseas Operations Division 
189/ Public Services 

Copyright Office 

Educational Liaison Office 

Exhibits Office 

Literary and Music Programs 

Preservation Office 
190/ Reference Services 

General Reading Rooms Division 

Loan Division 

National Referral Center 

Photoduplication Service 

Science and Technology Division 

Serial and Government Publications Division 
191/ Special Collections 

Geography and Map Division 

Manuscript Division 

Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded 
Sound Division 

The Music Division 

Print and Photographs Division 

Rare Book and Special Collections Division 



National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration 

192/ Technology Utilization 

National Endowment for the Arts 

193/ Introduction 
194/ Artists-in-Schools Program 
195/ Challenge Grant Program 
196/ Dance Program 

Choreographers Fellowships 
Grants for Companies 
Dance/Film/Video 
Dance Touring Program 
Long-Term Dance Engagements 
Sponsors of Local Companies 
General Services to the Field 

197/ Design Arts Program 
Fellowships 

Design Communication 
Design Demonstration 
Desrgn Exploration/Research 
General Services to the Field 
Design Excellence Project 

198/ Expansion Arts 

Instruction and Training 
Community Cultural Centers 
Arts Exposure Programs 
Neighborhood Arts Consortia 



199/ 



200/ 
201/ 



202/ 



203/ 



204/ 



205/ 
206/ 



207 



Summer Projects 

City Arts 

Regional Tour-Events 

State Arts Agencies-Expansion Arts 

Services to Neighborhood Arts Organizations 

Comprehensive Technical Assistance Program 

Folk Arts Program 

Folk Arts Projects 

Apprenticeships 

International Activities 

Literature Program 

Fellowships for Creative Writers 

Residencies for Writers 

Assistance to Literary Magazines 

Assistance to Small Presses 

Distribution and Promotion 

General Services to the Field 

Media Arts: Film/Radio/Television 

American Film Institute Independent Filmmaker 

Program 
American Film Institute/Arts Endowment Film 

Archival Program 
Production 

Regional Development 
Services to the Field 
Short Film Showcase 
The Independent Documentary Fund for 

Public Television * 
Museum Program 
Cooperative Programs 
Museum Purchase Plan 
Permanent Collections 
Preservation 
Special Exhibitions 
Support Services 
Training and Development 
Wider Availability of Museums 
Arts and Artifacts Indemnification 
Music Program 
Composers 
Jazz 

Orchestras 
Chorai 

Chamber Music 
New Music Performance 
National Endowment Fellows 

Office for Partnership 

Basic State Operating Grants 
State and National Priorities 
Regional Grants 
Governmental Support Services 
Opera-Musical Theater Program 
New American Works 
Professional Companies 



Regional Touring 

Services to the Art 

Special Opera-Musical Theater Projects 
208/ Special Constituencies Office 
209/ Special Projects 
210/ Theater Program 

Large Professional Theater Companies 

Professional Theater Companies with Short Seasons 

Small Professional Companies 

Professional Theater Touring 

Professional Theater Training 

Professional Theater for Youth 

Services to the Field/Theater Resources 

State Arts Agencies — Theater Projects 
211/ Treasury Fund 
212/ Visual Arts Program 

Fellowship Programs 

Art in Public Places 

Artists, Critics, Photographers, and Craftsmen 
in Residence 

Artists Spaces/Photography Workshops and Spaces 

Building Arts 

Crafts Programs 

Photography Assistance Programs 

Services to the Field 



National Endowment for the Humanities 

213/ Introduction 

214/ Challenge Grants 

215/ Gifts-and-Matching Grants 

216/ Division of Education Programs 

Elementary and Secondary Education Grants 

Higher Education Institutional Grants 

Higher Education Projects Grants 
217/ Division of Fellowships 

NEH Fellowships 

Fellowships and Stipends for the Professions 

Summer Seminars for College Teachers 

Summer Stipends 

Fellowship Support to Centers for Advanced Study 
218/ Division of Public Programs 

Media Program 

Museums and Historical Organizations Program 

Public Library Program 
219/ Division of Research Programs 

General Research Program 

Conferences 

Publications Program 

Research Collections 

Research Materials 
220/ Division of Special Programs 

Program Development 

Science, Technology, and Human Values 



Special Projects 
Youth Programs 
221/ Division of State Programs 



National Science Foundation 

222/ Introduction 

223/ Office of Science and Society 

Ethics and Values in Science and Technology 

Public Understanding of Science 

Science for Citizens 
224/ Science Education Programs 

Science Education Resources Improvement 

Scientific Personnel Improvement 

Science Education Development and Research 
225/ Scientific Research Programs 

Anthropology Program 

History and Philosophy of Science Program 

Linguistics Program 

National Trust for Historic Preservation 

226/ Introduction 
227/ Education Funds 

Cosponsored Conference Grants 

Internships 

Preservation Education Fund 
228/ Education Services 

Audiovisual Materials 

Career Information 

Conferences and Meetings 

International Cooperation 

Reference and Research Services 
229/ Historic Preservation Funds 

Consultant Service Grants 

Endangered Properties Program 

National Preservation Revolving Fund 
230/ Historic Preservation Services 

Advisory Services 

Asset Real Property Program 

Landmarks and Preservation Law 

Media Services 

Preservation Press 

Special Events 
231/ Maritime Preservation Program 

Office of Management and Budget 

232/ Federal Assistance Information 

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance 
Federal Assistance Programs Retrieval 
System (FAPRS) 



Office of Personnel Management 

233/ Federal Cooperative Education Programs 

234/ Federal Employment 

235/ Federal Summer Employment 

236/ Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) Grant 

Program 
237/ Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) Mobility 

Program 
238/ Presidential Management Intern Program 
239/ Technical Assistance and Training 

President's Commission on White House 
Fellowships 

240/ White House Fellowships 

Small Business Administration 

241/ Management Training for Arts Businesses 

242/ SCORE and ACE 

243/ Small Business Loan Programs 

Business Loans 
Development Company Loans 
Economic Opportunity Loans 

Smithsonian Institution 

244/ Introduction 

245/ Archives and Museums 

246/ Elementary and Secondary Education Programs 

247/ Exhibits: Loans/Rentals 

Museum Loans 

SITES 
248/ Folklife Program 
249/ Foreign Currency Program 
250/ Higher Education Programs 

American Studies Program 

Open Study Program 
251/ Kennedy Center Programs 

Education Programs 

Performing Arts Library 

Performing Arts Programs 

Public Services 
252/ Museum Training Programs 
253/ National Museum Act Programs 

Professional Assistance 

Seminar/Workshop Program 

Special Studies and Research 

Stipends to Individuals for Conservation Studies 

Stipend Support for Graduate/Professional 
Education and Training 

Stipend Support for Museum Internships 

Travel for Museum Professionals 



254/ Performing Arts Programs 

African Diaspora Program 

Children's Theater 

Performing Arts Series 

Recording Program 

Touring Performance Service 
255/ Public Services 

Exchange of Publications 

Membership Programs 

Photographs of Collections 

Radio Smithsonian 

Special Events and Facilities for Handicapped 
Persons 
256/ Research Fellowships 

Postdoctoral Fellowships 

Predoctoral Fellowships 

Visiting Research Student Program 
257/ Tribal History Research Assistance 
258/ Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 

National Gallery of Art 
259/ Introduction 
260/ Fellowships 
261/ Public Services 

Concerts 

Extension Services 

Lectures 

National Lending Service 

Photographic Services 
262/ Research Facilities 

Art Reference Library 

Photographic Archives 

Slide Library 
263/ Student Summer Employment 

Tennessee Valley Authority 

264/ Community Assistance Programs 

Cultural Awareness 
Operation Townlift 
265/ Recreation Technical Assistance 

^ 

United States Postal Service 

266/ Postage Stamp Art 

United States Senate 

267/ Senate Commission on Art and Antiquities 
268/ Senate Historical Office 

Veterans Administration 

269/ Educational and Vocational Benefits 
270/ Fine Arts Commissions 



ACTION 



1/ Older American Volunteer 
Programs 

What/For Whom 

Opportunities for men and women 60 years of age and 
older to serve as volunteers in schools, hospitals, libraries, 
museums, and other institutions as well as in private 
homes. Grants to public and private nonprofit community 
-service organizations to operate local programs. 

Description 

Low-income senior citizens provide care and 
companionship to handicapped children through the 
Foster Grandparent Program, and to adults, especially the 
elderly, through the Senior Companion Program. Older 
Americans use theic skills and experience in community 
service to all age groups through the Retired Senior 
Volunteer Program (RSVP). 



Foster Grandparent Program 

This program offers low-income people the opportunity to 
provide companionship and guidance to emotionally, 
physically, or mentally handicapped children in residential 
facilities, hospitals, correctional institutions, schools, and 
day care centers Their tasks may include feeding and 
dressing children, reading stories, playing games, doing 
arts and crafts projects, and helping with speech and 
physical therapy. Volunteers receive orientation and 
in-service training and are supervised by child-care teams 
at their assigned locations. Foster Grandparents work 20 
hours a week. They receive modest tax-free stipends 
transportation allowances, insurance, and hot meals while 
in service, and an annual physical examination. 

Example: In 1979, there were 199 projects using 16.640 
Foster Grandparents supported by an appropriation of 
$34.9 million. In Ypsilanti, Mich., the art of oral history is 
being revived by two Foster Grandfathers who are tracing 
their histories and recounting events of the Great 
Depression for a high school class of youth offenders. 
In Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico, "grandparents and 
"grandchildren" devote a major part of each day to 
woodworking, pottery making, and music. 



to such public and private nonprofit organizations as 
schools, courts, day care centers, libraries, museums, 
hospitals, nursing homes, and economic development 
agencies. There are no eligibility requirements for 
volunteers based on income, education, or experience. 
Expenses such as transportation and insurance are 
covered by the RSVP grant funds. 

Example: In 1979. there were about 250.000 RSVP 
volunteers serving on 682 projects supported by an 
appropriation of $20.1 million. Many volunteers serve in 
museums teaching arts and crafts and restoring exhibits. 
In Birmingham. Ala., volunteers serve in school enrichment 
programs as tutors and library assistants, teaching living 
history, and assisting children in laboratories and special 
projects In Washington. DC. volunteers serve as tour 
guides and receptionists at the Smithsonian Institution and 
as guides at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. 
Volunteers in Des Moines, Iowa, give demonstrations to 
children s groups at the Living History Farm In Colby, 
Kans.. volunteers teach crocheting, knitting, and quilting in 
public schools. To further art appreciation among young 
people, a volunteer in Kent. Ohio, arranges visits by area 
students to the State University Art Gallery. 



Senior Companion Program 

Senior Companions are volunteers from low-income 
groups who give individualized care and assistance to 
adults, especially to frail, elderly persons who live at home 
or in institutions The program is directed toward 
maintaining independent living conditions for these 
people. Tasks vary widely from simple health care, 
socializing, or initiating arts or crafts projects to informing 
and advising clients about appropriate community 
services. Volunteers receive orientation and in-service 
training. They work 20 hours a week and receive modest 
tax-free stipends, transportation allowances, insurance, 
and hot meals while in service, and an annual physical 
examination. 

Example: An appropriation of $7 million for the Senior 
Companion Program supported 60 projects in 1979 using 
3.300 volunteers. In Albuquerque. N.Mex.. elderly Zuni 
Pueblo Indians receiving meals under Title III of the Older 
Americans Act are entertained by Zuni Senior 
Companions performing tribal dances as part of the 
socialization program. Part of a special training program 
for Senior Companions in Oklahoma City, Okla.. is a 
course on aging as it is treated in various forms of 
literature. The course is entitled "Images of the Aging 
in Literature." 



Retired Senior Volunteer Program 

The Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) awards 
project grants on a cost-shared basis to develop and 
operate locally organized senior volunteer programs 
Senior citizens volunteer their services on a regular basis 



Contact for Information 



ACTION state offices (usually in state capitols) 
or ACTION regional offices or Older Americans 
Volunteer Programs. ACTION. 806 Connecticut Avenue. 
NW. Washington, DC 20525 



ACTION 



2/3 



2/ Peace Corps 



What/For Whom 



Opportunities for volunteer service in developing countries 
for United States citizens, 18 years of age and older, with 
or without college degrees. They must be committed to 
spending two years helping people abroad meet their 
basic needs for health care, food, shelter, and education 



Description 



The goals of the Peace Corps as originally set by 
Congress in 1961 are to help promote world peace and 
friendship; to help developing nations to meet their needs 
for skilled men and women; and to help promote mutual 
understanding between the people of the United States 
and those of developing countries Most Peace Corps 
volunteers are over the age of 21 and have skills in such 
fields as agriculture, conservation, education, forestry, 
health, public administration, and small business 
development. Volunteers without specific skills receive 
intensive technical training. Many volunteers have helped 
set up arts and crafts marketing cooperatives. All 
volunteers receive language and cultural training, usually 
in the country to which they have been assigned Cultural 
studies include the history, customs, and the social and 
political system of the host country. Volunteers receive a 
monthly living allowance plus a readjustment allowance of 
$125 a month payable at the completion of service. 

The Peace Corps Partnership Program encourages U.S. 
groups to raise money to support locally initiated 
self-development projects in communities serviced by 
Peace Corps volunteers. The community must contribute 
at least 25 percent of the project's cost and donate 
necessary land, labor, and raw materials. The United 
States and overseas "Partners" exchange progress 
reports, correspondence and essays, pictures, crafts, 
small artifacts, or utensils reflecting their culture. Average 
one-time grants are $1,200, with a range of from $300 to 
$5,000. 

Another program focuses on Women in Development 
(WID). A 1978 amendment to the Peace Corps Act 
recognizes that "women in developing countries play a 
significant role in economic production" and seeks to 
foster Peace Corps programs that give particular attention 
to women's participation in the total development effort. 
Such programs often include training women to develop 
businesses or cooperatives for marketing traditional arts 
and crafts, or training women in new crafts that would be 
marketable in their countries. 



Example 



In the 1978 calendar year, nearly 6,500 Peace Corps 
volunteers served in 64 countries in Latin America, Africa, 
Asia, and the Pacific. A volunteer with a business degree 
helped organize a cooperative for the production and sale 



of handicrafts in Bogota, Colombia. An anthropologist has 
spent four years in Call, Colombia, investigating 
archeological sites and publishing results of research as 
part of a national effort to preserve the country's historical 
heritage A married couple teaching English in Tunisia 
spent a summer on an archeological dig in Carthage. A 
volunteer in Quito, Ecuador, has extended his tour to three 
years to teach music and find a local replacement to carry 
on his work An architect is working as a special assistant 
to the director of urban planning in the Khenifra Province 
of Morocco. As part of the Peace Corps Partnership 
Program, in which there were roughly 400 U.S. partners, 
high school students in Chanute, Kans., raised $2,120 to 
help build a school in Nicaragua. A graduate of sociology 
and history has been assigned to the National Council of 
Women of Kenya. Another volunteer is teaching spinning 
and weaving to women in Nanyuki. Kenya, hoping to 
stimulate a small textile industry which could make the 
women economically independent. 

Contact for Information 

Peace Corps. ACTION, Washington, DC 20525 



3/ Technical Assistance and 
Information 

What/For Whom 

Information or technical assistance for community service 
groups and local volunteer groups in developing countries 
and low-income areas of the United States, education 
institutions, and former Peace Corps and VISTA 
volunteers. 

Description 

Former Volunteer Project 

The Former Volunteer Project is a public awareness 
program offering information on sources of technical 
assistance furnished by former Peace Corps and VISTA 
volunteers to nonprofit community service groups. It 
publishes a bimonthly newsletter, Reconnection, informing 
35,000 former volunteers about projects that could use 
their assistance. Such projects could involve setting up 
crafts cooperatives, building schools, developing 
curriculum materials, or designing solar energy appliances 
for low-income communities. A recent issue of 
Reconnection invited former volunteers interested in 
scientific exploration to contact EARTHWATCH, a 
clearinghouse seeking volunteers to accompany scientists 
on research expeditions around the globe. The Project 
helps former Peace Corps and VISTA volunteers to inform 
the public about their inservice experiences through 
speakers' bureaus. 



ACTION 



National Center for Service-Learning (NCSL) 

The National Center for Service-Learning was formerly the 
National Student Volunteer Program. It provides technical 
assistance materials, training sessions, and onsite 
consultations to college and high school student volunteer 
programs throughout the United States. Approximately 
485,000 college and high school students serve as 
part-time volunteers in community-service programs, and 
many receive academic credit for their work. 

NCSL publishes the Synergist, a journal describing actual 
or planned service programs. Past issues have 



highlighted a student-produced puppet show which tours 
schools and other institutions in the Southwest; the 
"Workshop of the Damned," a student-run drama program 
for prison inmates; an architecture program to aid 
handicapped people; and an art therapy program run by 
Pratt Institute volunteers. For further information contact 
NCSL at the Office of Education Programs at the address 
listed below. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), ACTION, Washington, DC 20525 



Advisory 
Commission on 
Intergovernmental 
Relations 



4/ Intergovernmental Research 



What/For Whom 



Information for the general public, of special interest to 
historians and political scientists. Technical assistance to 
state legislatures and executive and legislative branches 
of the federal government. Fellowships and senior 
residencies for researchers and policy makers. 



Description 



The Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations 
(ACIR) was established by Congress in 1959 to study the 
local, state, and federal levels of government; analyze 
emerging intergovernmental problems; and devise ways to 
ease tensions and resolve conflicts among them. The 
Commission consists of 23 governmental representatives 
and three private citizens. The Commission staff conducts 
the research that serves as a basis for findings and policy 



recommendations; translates Commission proposals for 
action into draft legislation for implementation at local, 
state, or federal levels; and serves as a source of 
authoritative information on intergovernmental matters. 
Government structures and functions and taxation and 
finance are examined. Recent studies have focused on 
the state and federal aid systems, interstate tax 
competition, citizen participation, and federal 
antirecession aid to state and local governments. 

At least one volume of findings and recommendations is 
published at the conclusion of each study. Single copies 
may be obtained from the address given below. A 
quarterly publication, Intergovernmental Perspective, and 
a periodic publication, Information Bulletin, report on 
intergovernmental issues. Technical assistance is provided 
to federal executive and legislative branches on proposed 
legislation in the intergovernmental area. State legislatures 
and executive branch representatives may work with staff 
to tailor draft legislation to the needs and laws of their 
state. 

Several fellowships and senior residencies are offered 
each year. College graduates, preferably with an 
advanced degree or work experience, are offered 
fellowship appointments of up to one year with an annual 
salary of $15,920. Persons with a strong policy 
background, usually a Ph.D. with considerable 
intergovernmental policy experience, may apply for 
one-year appointments as senior residents. The salary will 
range from $25,000, depending on qualifications. 

Contact for Information 

Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 
1111 20th Street, NW, Suite 2000, Washington, 
DC 20575 



5/6 



Advisory Council 
on Historic 
Preservation 



historic, architectural, or cultural significance that could be 
adapted for federal office space. 

Public information is also an important function of the 
Council. Regular publications include information on 
important legislation, new federal programs, Council cases 
involving the protection of resources and other items of 
interest. The Council issues publications on selected 
preservation topics such as Adaptive Use: A Survey of 
Construction Costs, Federal Programs for Neighborhood 
Conservation, and Issues in Archaeology. 



5/ Historic Preservation Activities 



What/For Whom 

Information and advisory services to federal, state, and 
local agencies, and to the general public. Contracts are 
occasionally entered into with private firms. 



Description 

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation was 
established as part of the National Park Service by Title II 
of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and 
made an independent agency in 1976. The Council is 
responsible for advising the President and Congress on 
matters relating to historic preservation. It also initiates 
studies of special preservation problems; makes 
recommendations on legislation affecting preservation; 
coordinates preservation efforts of federal, state, and local 
agencies; and comments on federal and federally assisted 
or licensed undertakings that affect historic properties 
eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic 
Places (see no. 126). 

All federal agencies are required to consult with the 
Council whenever proposed actions could inadvertently 
damage or destroy any historic or cultural properties. At 
an agency's request, the Council will review draft 
environmental impact statements or project plans and 
comment on the adequacy of provisions for property 
protection. Preservation groups, state officials, and federal 
agencies regularly seek participation of the Council in 
helping to settle legal disputes involving federal 
preservation law. (See also no. 230, National Trust for 
Historic Preservation.) 

Preservation efforts by federal agencies are encouraged 
by a number of statutes. For example, Executive Order 
1 1593 (see no. 127) stipulates that federal agencies 
consult with the Council to institute procedures that 
preserve and enhance federally owned sites. The Council 
is also directed to advise the Secretary of the Interior on 
the protection of important historical and natural areas 
from the adverse effects of surface mining and to advise 
the Secretary of Transportation on re-use of historic 
railroad stations. In accordance with the Public Buildings 
Cooperative Use Act of 1976, the Council works with the 
General Services Administration to identify buildings of 



Example 



Among the studies contracted for by the Council during 
1978 were several that compared the labor intensity of 
restoration and rehabilitation with that of new construction. 
These studies showed how historic preservation activities 
have contributed to the revitalization of urban 
neighborhoods and commercial areas, including 
Alexandria Historic District, Alexandria, Va.; Pioneer 
Square Historic District, Seattle, Wash.; Savannah Historic 
District, Savannah, Ga.; and the Strand Historic District, 
Galveston, Tex. Two publications have resulted from these 
studies: Contributions of Historic Preservation to Urban 
Revitalization and Assessing the Energy Conservation 
Benefits of Historic Preservation: Methods and Examples. 

The Council commented on nearly 2,500 federal or 
federally assisted or licensed undertakings that could 
have affected historic programs eligible for listing in the 
National Register of Historic Places. For example, an 
agreement was reached between the Council, the 
Connecticut Department of Transportation, and the Army 
Corps of Engineers on an interchange design for the 
Merritt Parkway, a limited access highway. The Parkway is 
eligible for inclusion on the National Register and is 
notable for its individually designed bridges and extensive 
landscapes. 



Contact for Information 



Executive Director, Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, 1522 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005 



6/ International Centre Committee 



What For Whom 

Information and technical assistance to preservation and 
conservation professionals, and others concerned with the 
preservation and restoration of cultural property. 



Description 

The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation 
and the Restoration of Cultural Property (headquartered in 
Rome, Italy) was founded by UNESCO in 1959. The 



Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 



6 



International Centre is an independent, intergovernmental 
organization concerned with the scientific and technical 
problems of the conservation, preservation, and 
restoration of historic structures and museum objects 
Funded by contributions from its 61 member nations, the 
International Centre sponsors research, technical 
assistance programs, publications, international meetings, 
and training in such fields as architectural conservation, 
conservation of mural paintings, and heating and lighting 
in museums. 

Responsibility for coordinating U.S. membership in the 
International Centre rests with the Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation (see no. 5). To assist it in carrying out 
its duties, the Council created an International Centre 
Committee composed of 29 representatives of federal 
agencies and national public and private institutions 
whose programs and interests are similar to those of the 
Centre. The Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, the 



Director of the Heritage Conservation and Recreation 
Service, and the Chairperson of the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation alternate as the Committee's chair. 

The International Centre Committee identifies special 
preservation problems in the United States, arranges for 
International Centre assistance in resolving them, 
publicizes Centre training courses, reviews credentials of 
American applicants, recommends instructors to assist 
with its educational program, convenes meetings of 
experts, and suggests national criteria and standards for 
preservation and restoration. 



Contact for Information 

Executive Director, International Centre Committee, 
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 1522 K Street, 
NW, Washington, DC 20005 



Appalachian 

Regional 

Commission 



7/ Commission Funds 



What/For Whom 

Matching project grants and supplementary grants to 
Appalachian states, their subdivisions and 
instrumentalities, and private nonprofit agencies. 

Description 

The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) is a 
federal-state governmental agency concerned with the 
cultural, economic, physical, and social development of 
the 13-state Appalachian region. 

Project Grants 

ARC offers grants for research, planning, construction, 
and demonstration projects to aid the social and 
economic development of the region. The Commission 
was authorized by the Regional Development Act of 1975 
to provide "housing, public services, transportation, and 
other community facilities in a way congenial to the 
traditions and beauty of the region" (Section 102). Priority 
is given to projects of significance and application to the 
entire region. The Act authorized "the development and 
stimulation of indigenous arts and crafts" (Section 302), 
although a limitation of $2.5 million per year was placed 
on such expenditures. Projects with recurring costs or 
general operating expenses are ineligible for support. A 
25 percent match is generally required. 

Supplemental Grants 

Grants are available to fulfill the matching-funds 
requirements of basic federal grants programs authorized 



on or before December 31, 1982, for eligible applicants 
who cannot meet the match because of their economic 
situation. In addition, special basic grants may be 
awarded to supplement other federal funds. Such grants 
are awarded for projects of high priority in a state's 
Appalachian development plan. 



Example 

The 1977 appropriation to the Commission was 
$6,709,308 for project grants. Of that amount, North 
Carolina received $1.5 million to build a folk arts center in 
Asheville on the Blue Ridge Parkway, and Bedford Village 
in Pennsylvania received $625,000 to help reconstruct the 
village and establish a crafts program. The 1978 
appropriation was $7,201,214 for project grants. In that 
year the Carolina Regional Theater was funded to tour 
Appalachia Sounding, a play about the pride and 
independence of the mountain people, throughout the 
13-state Appalachian region. 

The 1978 appropriation was $41,399,786 for supplemental 
grants. Of that amount, Mississippi received $30,000 to 
aid in the construction of an addition to the Houston 
Carnegie Library; New York received $150,000 for the 
construction of the Corning Public Library; and South 
Carolina received $200,000 for the construction of a 
studio/classroom building at the Greenville County 
Museum School of Art. 



Comment 

An ARC Arts Advisory Board, established in 1979, plans 
to submit cultural policy recommendations to the 
Commission in October, 1979. It is anticipated that these 
recommendations will result in a technical assistance 
program to aid cultural organizations and individuals in 
fund raising, marketing, and promotional activities. 



Contact for Information 

Appalachian regional state office (contact governor's 
office for address) or Appalachian Regional 
Commission, 1666 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington, 
DC 20235 



8 



Architect of the 
Capitol 



8/ Art and Reference Library 



What/For Whom 



Information about the U.S. Capitol available free upon 
request to students and researchers. 



Description 



The Architect of the Capitol is charged with the planning, 
design, and construction of certain buildings designated 
by Congress. The Architect's office also directs and 
supervises alterations of buildings, including the Capitol, 
the Library of Congress, the Senate and House Office 
Buildings, and the Supreme Court Building. The Art and 
Reference Library maintained by the Architect of the 
Capitol contains construction and maintenance records for 
all the aforementioned buildings; information on works of 
art in the Capitol; and historic photographs (reproductions 
available). 



Contact for Information 



Architect of the Capitol, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, 
DC 20515 



9/10 



Community 

Services 

Administration 



9/ Community Action Assistance 



What/For Whom 



Technical assistance in setting up community service 
programs serving low-income communities and 
individuals. Grants are made to Community Action 
Agencies, which in turn fund public or private nonprofit 
community organizations or individuals involved with 
antipoverty programs. 



Description 



The Community Services Administration (CSA) is the 
primary federal agency charged with reducing poverty in 
rural and urban areas of the United States. It administers 
three programs supporting community action projects 
which may include cultural components as long as the 
primary focus is on solving the problems of poverty. 

Community Action Grants 

The CSA awards grants to public and private nonprofit 
organizations that it has designated as Community Action 
Agencies. These agencies use the grants to administer 
local programs addressing basic community needs in 
areas of health, housing, energy, manpower, and 
education. These agencies are coordinated through 10 
CSA regional offices. The development of cultural centers 
or of arts, crafts, educational, and recreational activities 
aimed primarily at increasing the self-reliance of the 
participants may be included in such programs. The 
agencies also provide advisory and technical services in 
setting up cooperatives. 

Example: In 1978 CSA received an appropriation of $369 
million. Through Community Action Grants, CSA has 
supported many diverse projects with cultural 
components. In Chicago a grant was made to Urban 
Gateways for a 44-school educational enrichment program 
in the inner city. In Columbus, Ohio, a CSA-supported 
Cultural Arts Center offers programs in art, dance, drama, 
and music to 1,500 low-income area residents. In Los 
Angeles CSA aided a program model called Young 
Saints, which was designed to ascertain the effectiveness 
of the performing arts and telecommunication skills as 
tools for combating the root causes of poverty. In New 
York City, a $300,000 grant was awarded to New Cinema 



Artists to introduce children to repertory theater. Technical 
assistance from CSA enabled Campus Crafts, an 
economic development project in Annville, Ky., to market 
handloomed crafts, providing 14 jobs for low-income 
people who would otherwise be unemployed. 

Senior Opportunities and Services (SOS) 

Community Action Agencies assist persons 60 years or 
older from low-income groups. These agencies primarily 
provide basic services in health and nutrition, home 
weatherproofing, transportation, and referral to other 
federal and state agencies for specific types of 
assistance. In addition, senior citizen groups are assisted 
in publishing newsletters, sponsoring forums and 
seminars, acquiring space for education and recreational 
activities, and setting up such enterprises as crafts 
cooperatives. 

Example: The Senior Opportunities and Services 
program had a 1978 appropriation of $10.5 million. A 
grant was made to set up a Senior Opportunity Center in 
Moca, Puerto Rico, where the craft of Spanish 
lace-making was revived; participants have been able to 
supplement their incomes by teaching or selling their 
handicrafts. 

Summer Youth Recreation Program 

Community Action Agencies, in close cooperation with 
CETA prime sponsors, provide recreational opportunities 
during the summer to economically disadvantaged 
children. Activities include organized sports and games, 
arts and crafts, informational tours and cultural field trips, 
instruction in creative arts and dance, and other special 
events. 

Example: The Summer Youth Recreation Program had a 
1978 budget of $17 million. Of this amount, $6 million was 
allocated to sponsor a nationwide program using CETA 
workers to organize field trips for youths from low-income 
groups to historic national parks and monuments. 



Contact for Information 

Local Community Action Agency or CSA regional 
offices or Office of Community Action, Community 
Services Administration, 1200 19th Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20506 



10/ Economic Development 



What/For Whom 



Grants to Community Development Corporations and 
research organizations interested in stimulating the 



Community Services Administration 



10 



economy in areas of increasing poverty; grants and loans 
for new businesses or nonprofit development activities. 

Description 

The Office of Economic Development makes grants to 
about 40 nonprofit Community Development Corporations 
(CDCs). These corporations invest in profit-making 
business ventures designed to stimulate the economy in 
areas of increasing poverty. Such ventures may include 
the financing of crafts marketing cooperatives, arts retail 
outlets, or cultural centers. Using CSA venture capital as 
well as bank loans and investment funds from foundations 
and other private sources, CDCs initiate and support new 
profit-oriented businesses as well as nonprofit 
development activities. A 10 percent local match is 
required. 

In addition to awarding CDC grants, the office funds 
grantees to conduct research for, and provide legal and 
technical assistance to, the CDCs. No match is required 
for these support grants. 



Example 



From 1971 to 1978 CSA awarded more than $1 1 million to 
a Community Development Corporation, The East Los 
Angeles Community Union, in California. Using these 
funds as well as support from CETA (see no. 141) and 
other local funds, the Union established and maintains the 
Goez Gallery and the Goez Institute of Murals to help 
preserve and encourage Hispanic art. The Goez Gallery 
has become a focal point for display and sale of Chicano 
artists' paintings and sculptures. To date, more than 700 
murals depicting Hispanic experience have been painted 
in the East Los Angeles area. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Economic Development, Community Services 
Administration, 1200 19th Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20506 



11 



Corporation 
for Public 
Broadcasting 



1 1 / Information and Services 



What/For Whom 

Seminars, conferences, research reports, and publications 
for public noncommercial radio and television stations, 
independent producers, professionals, and the general 
public. 



Description 



The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is a private 
nonprofit corporation created by federal legislation to 
provide leadership in the development of a national public 
telecommunications system which will make 
noncommercial educational and cultural radio and 
television services available to all the citizens of the 
United States. Most of the Corporation's income is 
federally derived. 



Clearinghouse on Public Participation 

Established late in 1978, the Clearinghouse on Public 
Participation serves as a national information exchange for 
public radio and television broadcasters. It gathers and 
disseminates information on existing techniques for 
promoting local participation in station activities and policy 
making. Descriptions of model advisory boards, methods 
of holding open meetings, and case studies of public 
participation programs are among the kinds of material 
the Clearinghouse disseminates. For further information, 
contact the Office of Public Affairs. 



Office of Communication Research 

In conjunction with other departments in the Corporation, 
the Office of Communication Research undertakes 
research to establish programming priorities for radio and 
television. The Office also serves as a clearinghouse for 
radio and television programming and audience research, 
the results of which are made available to the public 
broadcasting community and the general public. National 
surveys to assess user patterns and public awareness of 
public radio and television have been conducted. In 
addition to "quantitative" measures of program impact, the 



Office has initiated several "qualitative" research projects 
to measure the effect of programming in terms of 
audience appeal and educational benefits. Recently, in a 
comprehensive evaluation the Office assessed the "Over 
Easy" television program's effectiveness in communicating 
information about social services and attitudes toward 
aging to older viewers. 



Office of Educational Activities 

The Office of Educational Activities plans and sponsors 
data collection, research, and analysis; demonstration 
activities; and informational programs for educators and 
the public about noncommercial radio and television's 
instructional services and educational potential. Printed 
materials that adapt general audience programming for 
educational uses have been created to accompany the 
"Nova" programs, "Studio See," the Shakespeare plays, 
and the Panama Canal radio debates. A nationwide 
survey of television's instructional uses in elementary and 
secondary schools was conducted, and the results 
analyzed in a 1978 series of reports. A similar study of 
television's role in higher education is planned for 1980. To 
improve the quality of children's educational television, the 
Office compiles research on how children learn and how 
particular television techniques affect learning. A special 
initiative to involve institutions of higher education and 
public broadcasting stations in cooperative continuing 
education ventures is also underway. 



Office of Engineering Research 

The Office of Engineering Research informs public 
broadcasters of technological developments in 
communications. A multiple-channel satellite 
interconnection system has been created to transmit 
programming to public radio and television stations. To 
illustrate the potential of alternative delivery systems to 
other stations, demonstrations of systems such as cable 
television, Instructional Television-Fixed Services (ITFS), 
Multipoint Distributing Service (MDS), satellite delivery, low 
power transmitters, SCA subcarriers, and video cassettes 
have been financed at several stations. Alternative 
systems may offer means to reach populations not 
adequately served by conventional technology, such as 
rural residents and urban ethnic or social communities. 
The Office is attempting to find more efficient ways to use 
AM and FM bands. Research on the Teletex system, which 
transmits printed text over the television broadcast system 
simultaneously with regular programming, is a major new 
involvement. 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate Office), Corporation for Public Broadcasting, 
1111 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036 



Corporation for Public Broadcasting 



12/13 



1 2/ Radio Activities 



What/For Whom 



Grants to CPB-qualified radio stations, public 
noncommercial radio stations, educational institutions, and 
other organizations proposing to start new noncommercial 
stations. 



Radio Services 

Technical assistance is offered to help stations develop 
nonfederal sources of funding through development, fund 
raising, public awareness, and community participation 
activities. Regular technical assistance services are 
supplemented by an annual development workshop and a 
newsletter, I.E. Development. The annual public radio 
conference reviews a variety of topics such as 
programming, production, and satellite transmission. 



Description 



The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is a private 
nonprofit corporation created by federal legislation to 
provide leadership in the development of a national public 
telecommunications system. The Corporation provides 
financial assistance to radio stations for community 
service expansion through two main categories of grants, 
described below. 



Radio Community Service Grants 

Awards are made to CPB-qualified public radio stations to 
expand the quality and scope of community services. 
Funds support such station-related costs as personnel, 
program services, programming, and equipment. During 
1979, approximately 195 stations received basic grants of 
$26,550, and an additional incentive grant based on the 
station's nonfederal financial support. A brochure, Po//cy 
for Public Radio Station Assistance, outlines the criteria 
and procedures for CPB qualification. 



Radio Expansion Grant Project 

Established in 1979, the project consists of two 
competitive grants programs whose purpose is to improve 
quality and encourage growth in the public radio system. 
Proposals are evaluated primarily on the applicant's ability 
to extend public radio service to new audiences. 

Qualification Assistance • Grants are made for 
planning and operational costs to existing stations and to 
organizations proposing to start new noncommercial 
stations that are not CPB-qualified. Stations must plan to 
meet the minimum CPB-qualification criteria at the 
conclusion of the grant. Proposals are evaluated 
according to such criteria as community involvement, 
facilities, financial base, and population and radio 
coverage of the service area. Planning awards do not 
exceed $2,000 a month. Operational grants range from 
$25,000 up to $100,000. 

Station Improvement • Grants are made to 
CPB-qualified radio stations to upgrade services. 
Proposals are evaluated according to such criteria as 
market size; proposed service improvements; and 
long-range budget projections. Awards of up to $1 million 
are distributed over a five-year period. For the duration of 
the planning period, up to $2,000 a month is available. 



Comment 



The Corporation does not currently provide support for the 
development of radio programming. A reorganization is 
under way that will change the grant procedures for the 
underwriting of television programming by the 
Corporation. There is a possibility that radio programming 
will be similarly affected. 

At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, the Board 
of Directors of the Corporation had recently authorized the 
reorganization to create a separate "program fund" 
headed by a director and supported by an advisory 
board. The proposed program fund will remove from the 
Corporation Board of Directors the responsibility for 
directly authorizing the underwriting or purchase of 
television programs. 

At the present time, inquiries for radio programming funds 
are referred to the National Public Radio (NPR), a private 
nonprofit corporation funded primarily by CPB. In addition 
to providing information about funding sources, NPR 
serves as the nationwide system for production, 
acquisition, and distribution of programming for the 
nation's public radio system. (Inquiries should be 
addressed to: National Public Radio, 2025 M Street, NW, 
Washington. DC 20036.) 



Contact for Information 



Radio Activities Department, Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting, 1111 16th Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20036 



13/ Television Activities 



What/For Whom 

Contracts with CPB-qualified public television stations and 
independent producers for the production of programs for 
public television; grants to local public television 
licensees. 



Corporation for Public Broadcasting 



13/14 



Description 



The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is a private 
nonprofit corporation created by federal legislation to 
provide leadership in the development of a national public 
telecommunications system. The Corporation provides 
grants for television programming and community 
services. CPB contracts annually with the Public 
Broadcasting Service (PBS) to maintain the national 
program service which distributes public television 
programming to stations around the country. 



Television Community Service Grants 

Grants are awarded annually to local public television 
licensees for the purposes of improving community 
services, hiring and training personnel, and generating 
local support. The grants are unrestricted, however, and 
may be used for any purpose to sustain and enhance 
public television in local communities Under present 
legislation, 50 percent of the federal appropriation to the 
Corporation is allocated to television community service 
grants. In 1979 the allocation for television community 
service grants was $60.1 million. Grants were awarded to 
164 licensees in 1979, averaging $371,429. The grants 
are comprised of a basic grant and a uniform grant 
totalling $120,200 and an incentive grant based on the 
station's nonfederal financial support. 



Television Programming Assistance 

Public television stations and independent producers may 
apply for funds for program and series development. In 
1979, $16.3 million was allocated for various phases of 
program development: research and development, pilots, 
production, specials, acquisitions, and completions. 

Example: Programs currently in the research and 
development or pilot stages include "Bubba," produced 
by WGBH-TV Boston, a dramatic series focusing on the 
growing-up years of a black teen-ager in Chicago in the 
early 1960s; and "History of the American Theatre,'' which 
is being produced at KCET-TV Los Angeles. 
CPB-supported series that are currently in production 
include "Western Exposure," a collection of films on 
contemporary issues, produced by independent 
filmmakers under the aegis of the Bay Area Video 
Coalition in San Francisco; "Edith Wharton," a 
dramatization of the life and works of the American writer 
by Cinelite, Inc., in Santa Monica, Calif.; and "Wisdom of 
the First Americans," a series examining the cultures and 
customs of Native Americans, produced by KBYU-TV at 
Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. CPB has also 
supported a large number of specials, acquisitions, and 
completions, including the KQED-TV San Francisco 
production of "Asian Insights," and a 25th anniversary 
restaging of the American ballet "Frankie and Johnny," 
performed by the Northwestern University Symphony and 
Ballet and produced by WTTW-TV in Chicago 



Television Services 

To support program development activities, the Television 
Activities Department holds seminars and workshops to 
provide advanced technical instruction and exchanges of 
experience among professionals. Regional Program 
Managers' Seminars are held annually to promote 
discussion among CPB staff and public television program 
managers on topics of current interest to the public 
television system The Arden House Public Television 
Seminars include station production personnel as well as 
independent producers. An annual international public 
television conference (INPUT) is held in cooperation with 
other North American and European public television 
organizations. 



Comment 

A reorganization is under way that will change the grant 
procedures for the underwriting of television programming 
by the Corporation. There is a possibility that radio 
programming will be similarly affected. 

At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, the Board 
of Directors of the Corporation had recently authorized the 
reorganization to create a separate "program fund" 
headed by a director and supported by an advisory 
board The proposed program fund will remove from the 
Corporation Board of Directors the responsibility for 
directly authorizing the underwriting or purchase of 
television programs. 

Contact for Information 

Television Activities Department. Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting. 1111 16th Street. NW. Washington, 
DC 20036 



14/ Training and Development 



What For Whom 



Grants to CPB-qualified radio and television stations to 
train broadcast professionals and technicians, especially 
women and persons from minority groups. 



Description 



The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is a private 
nonprofit corporation created by federal legislation to 
provide leadership in the development of a national public 
telecommunications system. CPB's Office of Training and 
Development assists individuals employed or being 
trained in professional and technical fields at public 
television and radio stations This Office supports the 
employment of women and minorities in station operation 



Corporation for Public Broadcasting 



14 



areas where they are underrepresented. Conferences on 
career opportunities for female and minority broadcast 
professionals are sponsored on an occasional basis 
throughout the year. 



In-Service Training Grants 

All individuals currently employed, full- or part-time, at 
CPB-qualified radio and television stations, are eligible for 
grants for short-term, intensive professional training. 
Awards range from $500 to $2,500 and cover up to half of 
all costs of salary, travel, and training expenses. 
Professionals arrange for courses or internships through 
their own stations and then apply for funding from the 
Corporation. On average, 140 people participate annually 
in professional development activities at stations and 
training sessions around the country. Examples have been 
professional training in instructional design, public affairs, 
radio journalism, and new video techniques; seminars on 
collective bargaining, managerial techniques, 
grantsmanship, and affirmative action; and internships on 
children's programming and public affairs. 



Minority Training Grants 

Grants are provided to CPB-qualified radio and televison 
stations to train ethnic minority individuals in professional 
and technical areas of important station operations now 
employing a low percentage of ethnic minorities. 



Management, production, and programming training has 
been supported in art direction, audio engineering, 
development, graphic design, instructional services, 
program management, and writing. A detailed training 
plan for each candidate must be outlined Stations may 
apply for assistance either before or after the 
candidate-trainee is selected. A minimum of 50 percent 
match is required of grantees; Community Service Grant 
monies (see nos. 12-13) may be used for the match. 
About 50 grants are made annually, ranging from $8,000 
to $30,000 for one to two years of salary, training, and 
benefits. Candidates are selected by radio and television 
stations, not by the Corporation, and therefore interested 
professionals and technicians should contact local 
stations, which in turn may apply to the Corporation for a 
grant 

Women's Training Grants 

Assistance is intended to promote employment and 
training of women in important professional and technical 
station operation areas now employing a low percentage 
of women. Procedures are essentially identical to those of 
the Minority Training Grants program described above. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Training and Development, Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting, 1111 16th Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20036 



15/16 



Department 
of Agriculture 



15/ Agricultural History 
Program Area 

What/For Whom 

Reference services for the general public, limited by 
available staff time; collections open to the public for 
scholarly research. 

DescriptJon 

The Agricultural History Program Area preserves 
information on the history of American agriculture. The 
Program sponsors symposia, conducts research, and 
maintains a bibliography that includes more than a quarter 
million references to books and articles on agricultural life 
and history. An extensive documentary file on federal 
agricultural programs is available for scholarly research 
upon request. The Program sponsors short-term (three- to 
four-month), nonrenewable internships for students to work 
on projects of interest to the Program, using all available 
archival resources in Washington, DC. — the National 
Archives, the Smithsonian, the Library of Congress, 
among others. Salary is commensurate with experience 
and educational level. The Program publishes lists of 
references on specific subjects such as The History of 
Agriculture in the Mountain States (1972) and The History 
of Black Americans in Agriculture, 1618-1974 (1975). 
Agricultural History News Notes, a monthly newsletter, 
contains information about research activities, new 
publications, and meetings of interest to agricultural 
historians. 

Contact for Information 

Agricultural History Program Area, Economics, Statistics, 
and Cooperatives Service, Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, DC 20250 



16/ Cooperative Research 



What/For Whom 

Formula grants to state agricultural experiment stations, 
the 1890 land-grant universities, and other designated 
state institutions. Funds may be used to plan and conduct 
research in cooperation with other agencies, institutions, 
and individuals. 



Description 



The Science Education Administration Cooperative 
Research staff administers federal grant funds for 
research in agriculture, agricultural marketing, rural 
development, and forestry. Research is primarily in 
agricultural science although studies are also sponsored 
that examine rural life and economy from a sociological 
perspective, or that analyze the role of the arts (local 
crafts, for example) in rural development. Federal funds 
combined with state appropriations or industry and 
foundation grants support research in state agricultural 
experiment stations, schools of forestry, land-grant 
universities, and the Department of Agriculture. The funds 
administered by Cooperative Research are appropriated 
under the authority of several laws and the purposes for 
which they may be used differ. 

For example, rural development research, authorized by 
Title V of the Rural Development Act of 1972, consists of 
studies in any field intended to further rural development. 
Among the research purposes established by the Hatch 
Extension Station Act of 1955, as amended, are the 
promotion of "prosperous rural life," and the efficient 
production and marketing of farm products, including 
crafts. Grants are distributed to eligible institutions 
according to formulas established by the authorizing acts. 
Emphasis is placed on local initiative and responsibility for 
selecting priorities and maintaining research. The grantee 
institution may use funds to support research in 
cooperation with other agencies, institutions, or 
individuals. 

Information on state and federal agriculture and forestry 
research projects is summarized in the Current Research 
Information System (CRIS). The Cooperative Extension 
Service (see no. 24) helps individuals to apply this 
information to their own circumstances. The National 
Agricultural Library (see no. 22) is another source of 
information on research in agriculture and forestry. 



Example 



The following projects indicate the range of research 
undertaken from 1973 to 1980. Colorado State University 
in Fort Collins sponsored the recording and transcription 
of more than 100 interviews with Colorado leaders for the 
archives of the State Historical Society, the research and 
publication of a history of German emigrants from Russia 
to Colorado and their contributions to the state, and a 
program that brought students and faculty into rural 
communities to assist residents concerned with preserving 
old buildings and historic sites. Louisiana State University 
at Baton Rouge sponsored a study of the history and 
themes of fairs and festivals in Louisiana and their relation 
to community life and the local economy. The University of 
Alaska in Fairbanks sponsored a study of three rural 
Native American communities, examining their 
demography, environment, and social history in the face 
of rapid economic development and cultural change. A 
researcher at the University of Kentucky in Lexington 
studied the economic efficiency of alternative systems for 



Department of Agriculture 



16/17/18 



production and marketing of wood handicrafts indigenous 
to local communities. 

The University of Vermont in Burlington investigated the 
delivery of educational services to rural craftspersons, 
including the services of such institutions and agencies as 
the Community College of Vermont, the Small Business 
Administration, and the Vermont Council on the Arts. The 
University of Wisconsin at Madison worked with the State 
Historical Society to survey rural areas for historical and 
cultural resources and to develop plans for an outdoor 
ethnic museum portraying Wisconsin architecture, 
customs, ethnic characteristics, and lifestyles. The 
university also developed a system for evaluating the 
cultural, historical, and scenic resources of Wisconsin's 
coastline communities, for use in land planning programs. 

Contact for Information 

State agricultural experiment stations or state 
land-grant universities or Cooperative Research Staff, 
Science Education Administration, Department of 
Agriculture, 14th and Independence Avenue, SW, 
Washington, DC 20250 



craft cooperative are described in the brochure 
Cooperative Approach to Crafts. The Cooperative 
Approach to Crafts for Senior Citizens is also available. 



Example 

In 1978, advice about data analysis and organization 
technigues was given to North Coast Opportunities, Inc., 
for its survey of craft marketing possibilities in Humboldt 
and Mendicino counties in California. A feasibility study 
was done for the Pennsylvania Craft Cooperative 
Marketing Association in western Pennsylvania to help the 
association organize for retail and wholesale marketing of 
pottery, wood, enamels, jewelry, leather, and other crafts. 



Contact for Information 

Local county Extension Service agent or Crafts 
Specialist, Cooperative Development Division, Economics, 
Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250 



1 7/ Craft Development Program 



18/ Farmers Home Administration 
Loan Programs 



What/For Whom 



What/For Whom 



Technical assistance for local and state governmental 
bodies, members of existing crafts associations or 
cooperatives, and residents interested in forming 
associations or cooperatives. No direct assistance to 
individuals. 



Description 



The Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service 
administers the Craft Development Program, which 
provides educational and technical assistance to 
craftspersons and cooperatives to improve their economic 
capabilities by developing business and management 
skills. Although the Program's orientation is primarily rural, 
associations with urban membership make use of its 
resources; both contemporary and traditional folk craft 
programs are assisted. Advice is provided to groups 
terming local or regional craft associations, and 
workshops are offered dealing with marketing, 
bookkeeping, and business procedures. The Craft 
Development Program also conducts research to identify 
craft associations in the United States and evaluate the 
impact of crafts in a particular region. 

The Program distributes publications, educational 
materials, and technical information on management, 
taxes, and marketing, and describes federal funding and 
technical assistance sources for craft businesses. Basic 
guidelines for successful planning and organization of a 



Loans and loan guarantees for individuals; public, private, 
or cooperative profit or nonprofit organizations; and Indian 
tribes. 



Description 



The Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) administers 
more than 20 categories of loans for agricultural and 
community purposes, such as housing, soil and water 
conservation, economic development, health, and safety. 
Cultural programs and projects may receive assistance 
when their objectives coincide with those of a loan 
program. Loans are negotiated by the FmHA county 
offices, whose staffs assist in the preparation of 
applications and provide advice on organizational, 
financial, and management matters. 



Business and Industrial Development Loans 

Loan guarantees to assist income-producing business, 
industrial development, and employment in rural areas are 
available. Possible uses of funds include business and 
industrial construction; conversion, acguisition, and 
modernization; purchase and development of land, 
easements, eguipment, facilities, machinery, and supplies; 
and working capital. Projects must be located in rural 
areas, preferably in open country or towns with a 
population under 25,000. 



Department of Agriculture 



18/19 



Example: A business and industry loan of $10,000 was 
made to Arcadian Crafts in Madawaska, Me., a 
French-speaking area of the state, for a women's crafts 
cooperative. 



Contact for Information 



FmHA county office or FmHA state office or Farmers 
Home Administration. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington. DC 20250 



Community Facility Loans 

Loans are made to cover costs of constructing, enlarging, 
or improving community facilities that provide essential 
services to rural residents. Although these facilities may 
include "community, social, cultural, and recreational 
benefits," such as museums, libraries, community 
buildings, and art centers, most community facility loans 
have been made for fire, safety, or public health 
purposes. All FmHA offices will assist applicants in 
preparing their applications for review and in making first 
determinations regarding engineering feasibility, economic 
soundness, financing, and management matters in 
connection with the proposed improvements. Normally, 
commercial financing is obtained for construction, and 
FmHA funds are used later to pay off the interim financing. 

Example: In 1978, the College of the Atlantic in Bar 
Harbor, Me., obtained a $100,000 loan to double its floor 
space by renovating an 1893 French Chateau style home 
listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The 
college, which emphasizes the humanities and design, 
also received assistance from the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation (see no. 226), the National 
Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grants Program 
(see no. 214), and local banks. A community facility loan 
of $900,000 was negotiated with the Georgia Mountain 
Fair, Inc., in 1979 for a building to house annual music 
festivals and fairs featuring craft exhibits, sales, and 
clogging competitions in northern Georgia. 



Youth Project Loans 

Loans may be made to young rural residents to establish 
and operate income producing enterprises of modest size. 
Each project must be connected with an organized and 
supervised program, such as a school or 4-H group. The 
project must be planned and operated under the 
guidance of the organization's advisor, must give 
indication that it will produce sufficient income to repay 
the loan, and must provide the youth with practical 
business and educational experience. Nearly any kind of 
income-producing project, including repair shops, art and 
craft sales, can be financed. Loans may be used to buy, 
rent, or repair needed tools, equipment, or supplies, or to 
pay operating expenses for the project. A schedule for 
loan repayment, tailored to the type of project, is worked 
out with the FmHA county supervisor. Although most of 
these loans have been made for farm related projects, 
FmHA encourages applications for such nonfarm 
enterprises as woodworking, jewelry making, and leather 
crafting to broaden and diversify the program's scope. 



19/ Forest Service History Program 



What/For Whom 



Reference collections of National Forest and forest and 
range experiment stations open to the public; limited 
reference services; occasional research contracts. 



Description 



The reference collections of the Forest Service include 
materials documenting its administrative history, the 
history of conservation, and biographies and memoirs of 
Forest Service personnel. Many of these materials relate 
the foresters' occupational lore and describe their 
interaction with local communities. The collections contain 
results of Forest Service research on subjects such as 
natural resource management and the preservation of 
cultural resources in the National Forest System. A sizable 
inventory of artifacts and artworks reflects changing 
methods of forest and range management. A collection of 
several hundred thousand photographs — accessible 
through a computerized index and covering a broad 
range of subjects related to forest life and work — is 
housed at the National Archives (see no. 163). This 
collection includes a visual record of Appalachian folklife 
in the 1930s. A newletter, History Line, provides 
information of interest to historians, folklorists, 
anthropologists, and others interested in forestry. 

The History Section and Forest Service regional offices 
occasionally enter into research contracts with colleges, 
research firms, other organizations, and individuals. For 
example, in 1978 a contract to prepare a history of the 
impact of federal land acquisition and management 
activities on the people and culture of the Southern 
Appalachians was let to a research firm in McLean, Va. 
That same year the regional office arranged with the 
University of California at Santa Barbara to prepare an oral 
history and cultural resources inventory of the Los Padres 
National Forest. The Alaska Historical Commission is 
currently updating and publishing a manuscript history of 
the Forest Service in Alaska through an arrangement with 
its regional office. 



Contact for Information 



Forest Service field or regional offices or History 
Section. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, 
Washington. DC 20013 



Department of Agriculture 



20/21 



20/ Forest Service Interpretive 
Program 



21/ Forest Service Youth 
Conservation Corps 



What/For Whom 



Interpretive programs providing performing arts 
opportunities; craft sales outlets for artists, craftspersons. 



What/For Whom 



Grants and subgrants to, and contracts with, state, 
county, municipal, and other local governments; public 
agencies; and nonprofit organizations. 



Description 



The Forest Service attempts to improve public 
understanding of environmental issues and natural 
resources through a variety of programs. At the visitors' 
centers and information stations of the National Forests, 
the Forest Service often provides explanations of folk 
crafts or cultural traditions representative of the region. 
Local artists or craftspersons present demonstrations or 
provide material for displays appropriate to the interpretive 
theme of the area. Many National Forests and National 
Recreation Areas administered by the Forest Service also 
have campgrounds that include amphitheaters. 
Occasionally, local performing groups are permitted to 
use these facilities, usually as part of regularly scheduled 
campfire programs. Programs involving fees or 
contributions require a paid permit, with some proceeds 
reverting to the federal government. Individuals or groups 
interested in participating in interpretive programs should 
contact local Forest Service administrators, who have 
discretion over programming. At Blanchard Springs 
Caverns in the Ozark National Forest in Arkansas, local 
folk musicians present programs at the evening campfire 
in the outdoor amphitheater. The visitors' center at the 
Caverns maintains an exhibit on local folk music and 
crafts. The Cherokee National Forest in Tennessee has 
used folk singers and other artists and craftspersons in its 
summer campfire programs. 

Works by local artists and craftspersons are purchased for 
resale or sold on consignment at Forest Service facilities 
by concessionaires, who operate private businesses 
under special use permits, and by local nonprofit 
interpretive associations, which sell natural history 
supplies, books, and photographs. Samples of crafts, 
artworks, and photographs are occasionally purchased for 
use in exhibits or for programs at visitors' centers. The 
Jefferson National Forest in Virginia provides a building for 
craft sales through the local Community Action Agency, 
which also sells wood materials to local craftspersons, 
and works with the Crafts Committee of the Mount Rogers 
Citizens Development Corporation to stimulate local 
crafts production. 



Contact for Information 

Forest Service field or regional offices or Director, 
Recreation Management, Forest Service, Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, DC 20013 



Description 



The Forest Service sponsors labor-intensive conservation 
projects at Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) sites around 
the country to accomplish work for which the Forest 
Service is responsible. Young men and women, ages 15 
through 18, are employed to work in residential and 
nonresidential settings during the summer months. Each 
project employs a minimum of 10 young people, although 
the optimum enrollment is considered 30 to 40. Each YCC 
site must provide an environmental education program 
related to participants' work assignments on the natural 
environment and heritage. "Heritage'' refers to the human 
history of an area, to archeological excavations, and to 
historic structures, their restoration and interpretation. 

A nonprofit organization may contract with any 
YCC-funded public land owner — a federal agency or a 
state, county, or municipal government — to operate a 
project on either federal or nonfederal land. Administration 
of YCC projects on federal lands is divided equally 
between the Department of Agriculture/Forest Service and 
the Department of the Interior. Each independently 
manages 35 percent of the program's annual 
appropriation. The remaining 30 percent is jointly 
administered by the two Departments through grants to 
states for projects on nonfederal public land such as state 
forests and parks. States may subgrant to jurisdictions 
that own such lands — counties and municipalities, for 
example — to run these projects. Nonprofit organizations 
interested in contracting should contact the owner of the 
site in question or the state YCC program agent (see 
below). 



Example 



For three consecutive years from 1977 to 1979, YCC has 
received a $60 million appropriation. Although most YCC 
projects protect and manage natural resources (timber, 
water, wildlife) or maintain recreation areas and trails, a 
few have restored and interpreted sites of cultural and 
historical significance. For example, the Loch Sa Ranger 
Station near Cooksia, Idaho, built in 1926, was restored to 
its orginal condition by workers from the YCC, the Job 
Corps, and Senior Community Service Employment 
Program, and placed in the National Register of Historic 
Places in 1978. The Pioneer Marine School of the South 
Street Seaport Museum in New York City employs YCC 
members on board its 1885 coastal sailing schooner, the 



Department of Agriculture 



21/22/23 



Pioneer, for educational sailing trips on Long Island Sound 
and for minor restoration work at the museum. During the 
summer of 1978, a YCC group at Grey Towers, a national 
historic landmark in Pennsylvania operated by the Forest 
Service, restored and inventoried gravesites dating from 
the early 1800s, and wrote a report about the persons 
interred there. Archeological digs on St. Croix and St. 
Thomas in the Virgin Islands were conducted by YCC 
participants under the supervision of archeologists during 
the summer of 1978. 



Conta ct for Information 

State YCC program agent (a list is available from the 
Washington, DC. office) or Youth Conservation Corps. 
Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
DC 20013 



Planned 1979 issues wtll focus on energy and labor as 
these relate to agriculture. Agricultural Literature: Proud 
Heritage — Future Promise contains the proceedings of a 
conference held on agricultural literature and includes 
papers entitled: "Oral History as Agricultural Literature," 
"A Folklorist, Not a Farmer: A Commentary," and 
"Agriculture with Hoof and Horn: An Analysis of the 
Historical Literature of the Cattle Industry." 



Contact for Information 

National Agricultural Library, Technical Information 
Systems. Science and Education Administration, 
Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705 



22/ National Agricultural Library 



23/ Photography Division 



What/For Whom 



Library facilities for the public; materials in the library 
collection available through interlibrary loan or 
photoreproduction; reference services available in the 
reading rooms, by mail, or by telephone. 



What/For Whom 



Reproductions of photographs, slide sets, and filmstrips at 
nominal cost for the public. Photo researchers may visit 
the Photography Division Library in Washington, D.C. 



Description 



The National Agricultural Library, located in Beltsville, Md., 
with additional reading rooms in Washington, D.C, is 
the national center for information on agriculture and 
related subjects. Its collections include material in 
over 50 languages. Books, periodicals, manuscripts, 
original imprint monographs, materials in nonprint forms, a 
collection of farm journals, historic papers such as 
personal memoirs and diaries, and special subject 
collections covering such areas as rural society and 
agricultural economics and law, constitute primary source 
material on the history of agricultural life in Western 
Europe and the United States. The Social Science 
Reading Room and Law Library maintain reference 
materials in their respective disciplines. AGRICOLA, a 
computerized index, catalogues data bases referencing 
agricultural information. Through commercial on-line 
services, access is provided to more than 90 other data 
bases in such fields as psychology, medicine, and 
jurisprudence. The National Agricultural Library: A Guide 
to Services is available from the office listed below. 

The Associates of the National Agricultural Library, 
established in 1972, is a private membership organization 
that sponsors symposia and workshops and publishes 
Associates NAL Today, a quarterly journal. The 
January/June 1978 journal highlights the contributions of 
North American Indian peoples to agriculture and offers a 
selected bibliography and guide to research sources. 



Description 



The Photography Division holds an extensive collection of 
photographs (both black and white and color), maps, 
charts, filmstrips, and slide sets, obtained through 
authorized work of the Department of Agriculture, 
available for study in its Library or through mail order 
reproductions. Subjects include apple harvesting, barns, 
conservation fairs and expositions, farm life, handicrafts, 
Indians, industry in rural areas, tobacco auctions, 
waterways, and windmills and are indexed in the Guide to 
USD A Photos and Color Filmstrips and Slide Sets of the 
USDA. available from the office listed below. The 
collection includes some historic photographs from the 
early 1900s, but most of these are held at the National 
Archives (see no. 163) and the Library of Congress (see 
no. 191), which house the Farm Security Administration 
collection of the 1930s. Materials are not copyrighted and 
can be reproduced in whole or in part, with or without 
credit, as long as Department endorsement of commercial 
products is not implied. 



Contact for Information 



Photography Division. Office of Governmental and Public 
Affairs, Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
DC 20250 



Department of Agriculture 



24 



24/ State Cooperative Extension 
Service 

What/For Whom 

Educational and technical assistance for tne general 
public. Community resource agents are assigned by state 
land-grant universities in response to community requests. 

Description 

Through the Cooperative Extension Service, the 
Department of Agriculture works with state land-grant 
universities and county and local governments to finance 
and plan educational and technical assistance programs 
designed to meet local community development needs. 
Although each state system differs, in general, local 
extension agents work with a committee of county 
residents to ensure that programs are geared to local 
needs and interests. Agents also help communities gain 
access to professional, technical, governmental, and 
private resources such as the research expertise of 
land-grant universities or the Office of Management and 
Budget's information retrieval system for federal 
assistance programs, FAPRS (see no. 232). Extension 
specialists, faculty members at state land-grant 
universities, assist county and area agents through their 
expertise in specific fields such as home economics or 
the visual arts. For example, the State Cooperative 
Extension Service affiliated with the University of 
Wisconsin coordinates programs of creative writing, 
music, theater, the visual arts, 4-H Clubs, and regional art 
workshops in rural Wisconsin. Extension Service programs 
with the greatest potential for supporting cultural activities 
are described below. 



Community Resource Development 

Extension community development agents help 
citizens and public officials to identify and meet the 
educational, organizational, and technical needs of their 
communities. Together they analyze community needs, 
study possible solutions, establish goals, identify 
resources, and mobilize action. 

Example: Since the late 1950s, area development agents 
in Arkansas have been involved in the development of that 
state's folklife programs as a way of improving tourism in 
the region. The Extension Service has assisted in the 
development of the Ozark Folk Center at Mountainview, 
the Ozark Foothills Craft Guild, the Arkansas Traveller Folk 
Theatre, and in the organization of the annual Arkansas 
Folk Festival and courses on Ozark folklore at Arkansas 
College. The Extension Service at Kansas State University 
in Manhattan has helped residents of communities with 
historic properties locate sources of assistance such as 
the state historic preservation office. In 1979 the 
community resource development and home economics 
staff at the University of Vermont in Burlington sponsored 



a course for craftspersons on business management. 
Sessions covered such topics as accounting, advertising, 
insurance, legal matters, pricing and marketing, 
and taxes. 

4-H Youth Program 

4-H is the nation's largest coeducational youth program. 
It is active both in urban and rural areas, involving 
more than 5 million young people in 1977, and 
emphasizes personal development through increased 
knowledge of the members' heritage and that of their state 
and county. Two of the seven program areas in the 4-H 
"Leisure Education Curriculum" are "cultural heritage" and 
"expressive arts" programs. Project activities reflect local 
preferences and address local needs, frequently including 
arts and crafts projects based on skills indigenous to a 
particular area, such as the folk music and dancing of 
various nationalities or the preparation of ethnic foods. 
Local and county fairs provide opportunities for 4-H 
members to participate in exhibits concerned with their 
cultural heritage. Materials have been developed to assist 
4-H'ers in learning, recording, preserving, and reviving the 
cultural heritage of their communities. Many 4-H groups 
have helped restore local historical sites. 

Example: In Albuquerque, N. Mex., the Extension Service 
coordinates an annual arts and crafts fair at which young 
Native Americans exhibit and sell craftswork such as 
jewelry, needlecraft, weaving, and woodwork. Both 4-H 
members and others participafe. In 1979, the 4-H program 
of the Extension Service in New York sponsored courses 
in genealogy. Participants traced family and community 
history through interviews and through documentation 
of material culture (e.g., barn styles, tools, and clothing). 
Participants studied indigenous crafts such as quilting, 
and skills such as the uses of natural dyes, herbs, and 
edible wild plants. The Arts Extension staff at the 
University of Wisconsin in Madison has compiled 
guidelines for an urban youth program in the cultural arts, 
a creative dance program, and a 4-H history and heritage 
program. 

Home Economics 

Extension home economists conduct educational 
programs that provide learning opportunities in family and 
community living. In some states, cultural programs are 
coordinated with extension service home economists by 
the state cultural arts chairperson of the National 
Extension Homemakers Council, a private volunteer 
organization. In other states, a cultural arts specialist is 
designated to coordinate activities at the state level. 
Information is disseminated through publications, 
meetings, classes, and learning centers. Recent programs 
have included courses in creative arts, crafts, and art 
appreciation, programs related to cultural heritage and 
historic preservation; presentation of plays and concerts, 
often featuring original work; and sponsorship of art 
and music scholarships. 



Department off Agriculture 



24 



Example: In 1976, extension home economists in North 
Carolina, in cooperation with the North Carolina Arts 
Council, compiled the North Carolina Cultural Directory, a 
guide to more than 800 cultural resources within the state, 
including art galleries, fairs and festivals, heritage centers, 
and museums. An Arkansas woodcarver trained at an 
extension workshop in 1977 has joined a craft guild and 
earns income from her new skill. In North Dakota, heirloom 
quilts have been identified in each county and slide/tape 
programs describing their historical significance have 
been created. In Virginia, extension home economists 



assisted at seminars on starting and managing small 
businesses, including income-producing crafts such as 
chair-caning, quilting, and sewing. 

Contact for Information 

Local county Extension Service agent or the state 
Extension Service director at the state land-grant 
university or Director of Information, Science and 
Education Administration, Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, DC 20250 



25/26 



Department 
of Commerce 



25/ Introduction 



publication and make it available to the public. For 
subscriptions write to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. 

Contact for Information 

Special Assistant to the Secretary for Cultural Resources, 
Office of the Deputy Under Secretary, Department of 
Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, 
Washington, DC 20230 



The Commerce Department's overall objectives are 
balanced national growth and economic development 
through programs promoting industry, trade, and tourism. 
For development purposes, the Department considers the 
arts, humanities, and historic preservation as part of a 
cultural service industry. Although direct involvement in 
cultural programming is not within the Department's 
purview, Commerce is concerned with the physical needs 
of cultural programming, the industry's international trade 
opportunities, and, in particular, the economic 
development potential of cultural resources for the 
community at large. 

Both profit and nonprofit cultural organizations are eligible 
for Commerce programs providing direct grants or such 
services as information, technology, and technical 
assistance. Commerce's Economic Development 
Administration (EDA), for example, administers several 
grants programs that support the planning and 
construction of buildings, including cultural facilities, 
where such projects contribute to an area's economic 
revitalization (see nos. 33-37). The National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) 
supports the development of public broadcasting through 
planning and equipment grants (see no. 30). Information 
about these grants and services can be obtained through 
the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary in Washington or 
from its network of 10 Secretarial Representatives in the 
field. All Commerce regional offices also provide 
information and assistance at the local level and are the 
first step in the review process for any grant. 

The Commerce Library in Washington, DC, contains 
extensive reference materials in the fields of economics 
and business, recent census data, foreign serials and 
books, periodicals, and the maritime collection. The 
Library conducts Business Information Seminars, and 
offers reference, research, and bibliographic services. The 
Library is open to anyone presenting proper credentials 
and a letter of purpose addressed to the Library Director. 

A major daily publication of the Department is Commerce 
Business Daily, which lists federal procurement invitations, 
contract awards, subcontracting leads, sales of surplus 
government property, and business opportunities abroad. 
Information on procurements and awards for art and 
photography services as well as architectural, 
engineering, or historic preservation services is included 
Most Chamber of Commerce offices subscribe to this 



26/ Bureau of the Census Services 



What/For Whom 

Census data and interpretive services for researchers and 
the general public. 

Description 

The Census Bureau compiles comprehensive economic 
census data at five-year intervals (in years ending with "2" 
and "7 "). The Bureau's Census of Service Industries 
contains data on such culturally related industries as 
dance groups and artists; music organizations, groups, 
and artists; theater, radio, and, television producers; 
managers and agents; architectural services; museums; 
educators and educational institutions; journalists, authors, 
editors, and reporters; librarians, archivists and curators; 
social scientists; and teachers. Data include location, 
receipts, expenses, number of employees, and other 
basic information on these industries. This census is 
available separately by state (entitled "Geographic Area 
Statistics" SC77-A-1 to 52) and for the United States as a 
whole (SC77-A-53). A Miscellaneous Subjects Report 
(SC77-S-9), to be released in 1980, will contain data on 
selected performing arts industries showing major sources 
of receipts, costs of operations, paid admissions, and 
performances. More detailed statistics and special 
tabulations contained on tapes may be furnished on a 
cost-reimbursable basis. Contact the Business Division at 
the address below. 

The Bureau collects data for its population and housing 
censuses that include age, race, sex, occupation, income, 
education, and housing, as shown by geographic 
area — neighborhood, city, state, and region. Such data 
could be helpful to those interested in analyzing the 
socioeconomic characteristics of cultural audiences for 
fund raising, determining site location for new facilities, 
and pinpointing areas where people with particular 
cultural interests might be found. Bureau specialists are 
available to answer inquiries and provide consultation on 
data products and services by telephone, through 
correspondence, and in person. Contact Data User 
Services Division at the address listed below. 



Department off Commerce 



27/28/29 



Contact for Information 



Bureau of the Census, Federal Building No. 3, 
Washington, DC 20233 



28/ National Bureau of Standards 
Services 

What/For Whom 

Technical assistance, publications, and consumer 
information for the general public. 



27/ Industry and Trade 
Administration Data 

What/For Whom 

information, publications, and analysis of industries, 
including arts industries, for government agencies, 
businesses, and the general public. 

Description 

The Industry and Trade Administration (ITA) monitors more 
than 400 manufacturing, wholesale, retail, and service 
industries, including publishing, recording, and filmmaking 
industries and their suppliers. ITA assembles statistics, 
monitors and interprets trends, and maintains 
communications with key trade associations and firms 
within the industries. ITA analysts maintain expertise in 
new products and technology, international developments, 
forecasts of trends, employment, supply, consumption, 
and markets and use this information to formulate policy 
and legislation. ITA deals with various arts-related industry 
issues such as recording rights royalties, international 
trade in artifacts, and industrial design. 

ITA publishes the Directory of Industry Assignments by 
Analyst, which lists the analysts to contact for information 
on specific industries. In addition, it publishes the annual 
U.S. Industrial Outlook, which summarizes data and trends 
in major industries. Industry-related information and 
analyses are provided to government agencies, 
businesses, and the general public on request from 
the address listed below. 

All data pertaining to an industry's output, services, or 
growth forecasts are recorded using the Standard 
Industrial Code (SIC), which uses two-digit numbers for 
major groups and three- and four-digit numbers for 
subgroups. Most culturally related industries are found at 
the four-digit level: for example, "music and record stores" 
(SIC 5733) is under group 57, "Furniture, home 
furnishings, and equipment stores." To receive 
publications or assistance in locating data on a specific 
group, contact the address listed below. 

Contact for Information 

Bureau of Domestic Business Development, Industry and 
Trade Administration, Department of Commerce, 
Washington, DC 20230 



Description 



The National Bureau of Standards (NBS) is the nation's 
physical science and measurement laboratory. It provides 
the basis for the standards by which people and nations 
develop and market products, assess the quality of their 
environment, and work out health and safety guidelines. 
The Bureau is responsible for hundreds of projects 
dealing with such pressing national issues as energy 
conservation and research, building use and rehabilitation, 
fire prevention and protection, materials research, and 
computer utilization. Consideration of these issues is 
becoming increasingly vital to the continued existence 
and operation of all cultural institutions as well as to the 
field of historic preservation. The NBS Center for Building 
Technology supports the building technology programs of 
federal, state, and local governments by assisting design 
professionals, building officials, and the research 
community develop improved design criteria. It conducts 
research aimed at conserving building materials and 
energy and develops methods to evaluate new types of 
building materials. Technical assistance and publications 
are available on many of these subjects. Among the 
Center's many recent publications are The Costs of 
Recycling Buildings and Energy Use in Building 
Operations. Lists and indexes of all recent reports are 
published by the Center in Building Technology 
Publications. 



Contact for Information 



Technical Information and Publications Division, National 
Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce, 
Gaithersburg, MD 20760 



29/ Office of Minority Business 
Enterprise 



What/For Whom 



Business advisory services provided by business 
assistance centers to profit-making business enterprises 
owned or controlled by one or more minority groups. 



Description 

The primary mandate of the Office of Minority Business 
Enterprise (OMBE) is to accelerate the expansion and 



Department off Commerce 



29/30 



development of minority-owned firms. Arts-related 
enterprises, ranging from recording and publishing 
ventures to crafts cooperatives, owned or controlled by 
persons from minority groups and run for profit, may 
qualify for assistance. Minorities are defined as blacks, 
Hispanics, Orientals, and Native Americans (Indians, 
Eskimos, and Aleuts). OMBE funds more than 300 local 
business assistance centers which provide a wide range 
of business management and technical assistance 
services to minority entrepreneurs. OMBE does not make 
loans or loan guarantees, although its centers can assist 
in identifying and arranging financing from a variety of 
sources. In addition, the centers have specialists in 
marketing, procurement, management, and loan 
application preparation. Some financing is available for 
experimental and demonstration projects. Information 
about locally based assistance centers funded by OMBE 
can be obtained from OMBE field offices. 



Description 



The Public Telecommunications Financing Act of 1978 
transferred the Public Telecommunications Facilities 
Program, formerly the Educational Broadcasting Facilities 
Program, from the Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare to the Department of Commerce. The Act 
significantly expanded the program's activities and 
responsibilities in the development of public broadcasting. 
The program awards both planning and construction 
grants, with emphasis on equitable geographical 
distribution. Since its creation in 1962, the program has 
awarded grants to help activate 167 public television 
stations and 80 public radio stations; 606 grants have 
been made to improve and expand existing 
noncommercial broadcasting stations. Persons interested 
in further support for radio and television should review 
the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (see nos. 11-14). 



Example 



OMBE has funded an organization in Los Angeles, Calif., 
which is advising the Goez Art Studio and Gallery on 
procuring contracts for the murals it does on commission; 
among the Studio's clients have been the State of 
California (state offices and post offices) and the 
Smithsonian Institution. In San Francisco, an 
OMBE-funded organization is providing the Dell Flamingo 
Dance Studio in the Mission District with assistance in 
marketing and advertising techniques and advice on 
securing financial backing from the public and private 
sectors. A San Francisco entrepreneur is being assisted in 
syndicating tapes of minority music to minority radio 
stations, public broadcasting companies, and business 
corporations. In Chicago, an OMBE-funded organization is 
providing management and technical assistance to the 
Joseph Holmes Dance Theater. The nonprofit subsidiary 
of this group teaches dance, but the group's for-profit 
dance troupe qualifies it for OMBE assistance in training 
in business and management techniques. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Minority Business Enterprise, Department of 
Commerce, Washington, DC 20230 



Planning Grants 

Grants are made to nonprofit organizations for 
planning facilities necessary to provide a wide range 
of educational, informational, and cultural 
telecommunications services. Plans may be for new 
facilities or for expanding services of existing facilities. 



Equipment Grants 

Matching grants of up to 75 percent of the total eligible 
project costs are made for the construction of apparatus 
required to deliver noncommercial telecommunications 
services and to strengthen the capabilities of existing 
public radio and television stations. Eligible costs 
may include installation of apparatus and preoperational 
expenses. Grants may not be used for construction or 
renovation of buildings necessary to house major project 
apparatus, or for land, operational expenses, or indirect 
costs. Applicants for equipment grants must submit a 
five-year plan indicating services to be rendered, 
necessary apparatus, and projected cost. Grantees are 
required to keep a complete and itemized inventory of all 
public telecommunications facilities under their control. 



Example 



30/ Public Telecommunications 
Facilities Program 

What/For Whom 

Planning and equipment grants to public radio and 
television broadcasting stations; noncommercial 
telecommunications entities or consortia; and nonprofit 
foundations, corporations, institutions, associations, or 
state and local government agencies organized primarily 
for educational or cultural purposes. 



In 1978, there were 124 grants totaling $18.7 million. 
Twelve grants, three for television and nine for radio, 
established new public broadcasting stations: A $600,000 
grant was awarded to Northern Minnesota Public 
Television, Inc., Bemidji, to activate a public television 
station in the sparsely settled rural area of northern 
Minnesota which will bring educational television for 
the first time to more than 25 percent of Minnesota's 
Indian population; Texas Consumer Education and 
Communications Development Committee, Inc., received a 
$600,000 grant to establish a new public television station 
in Harlingen, Tex., which will serve the bilingual and 
bicultural needs of its Spanish-speaking population. 



Department of Commerce 



30/31 



Contact for Information 



Director, Public Telecommunications Facilities Program, 
1325 G Street, NW, Room 298, Washington, DC 20005 



31/ Regional Commissions 



What/For Whom 



Grants to federal agencies, local and state governments 
within a designated development region, Indian tribes, 
other organizations; contracts with private individuals or 
organizations. 

Description 

Eight Regional Commissions (called Title V Regional 
Commissions after their enabling legislation) develop 
long-range, comprehensive interstate development plans, 
coordinate federal and state development activities, and 
promote increased private investment in development 
regions designated by the Secretary of Commerce. The 
basic concern of the Regional Commissions is regional 
development; proposals for using crafts and arts projects 
to stimulate a region's development may be considered. 
Each Commission is supported by the federal government 
and states belonging to that region. Commission members 
include a federal cochairperson appointed by the 
President and the governors of the states involved. 

The eight Regional Commissions represent the Coastal 
Plains Region (parts of Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, and Virginia), Four Corners Region 
(Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah), New 
England Region (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont), Old West Region 
(Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and 
Wyoming), Ozarks Region (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, 
Missouri, and Oklahoma), Pacific Northwest Region 
(Idaho, Oregon, and Washington), Southwest Border 
Region (parts of Arizona, California, New Mexico, and 
Texas), and Upper Great Lakes Region (parts of 
Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin). Each Regional 
Commission maintains its headquarters in the region and 
offices in Washington, D.C., as well. 

The Regional Commissions offer three kinds of assistance. 

Demonstration Grants 

Commissions may choose to fund several categories of 
assistance for demonstration projects in energy, 
education, health and nutrition, transportation, and arts 
and crafts. Projects in the latter category, according to the 
Commissions' authorizing legislation, Title V of the Public 
Works and Economic Development Act, should promote 
"the development and stimulation of indigenous arts and 
crafts of the region." Eligible applicants include local and 
state governments, Indian tribes, public or private 
nonprofit or tax-supported organizations, or individuals. 



Supplemental Grants 

Supplemental Grants help local and state governments 
meet local share requirements of federal grant-in-aid 
programs. Supplemental Grants may provide all or any 
portion of the federal contribution if a federal agency has 
certified that a proposed project can be funded but that 
insufficient federal funds are available. Supplemental 
Grants may be used for the construction or equipping of 
facilities and the acquisition of land. 

Technical Assistance Grants 

The Commissions are authorized to evaluate regional 
needs and potential for growth. Such assistance includes 
planning, investigations, studies, demonstration projects, 
and training programs. Grants are made to federal 
agencies, state and local governments; contracts are 
entered into with private individuals and organizations. 

Example 

Regional Commissions have sponsored crafts 
development and arts programs to help plan and promote 
economic development, especially of the tourist industry, 
within a region. The Coastal Plains Regional Commission 
provided $39,000 in 1979 to the West Florida Craft Guild, 
located in an economically depressed area of the 
Panhandle. The Guild's purpose is to help residents earn 
a supplementary income by producing and marketing 
such crafts as ironwork, pottery, sculpture, and weaving. 
In 1977, the Commission paid $78,000 to supplement a 
HUD-sponsored effort to convert an old railroad depot and 
warehouse in Beaufort County into the North Carolina Arts 
Center as part of the community's downtown renewal 
effort. The Four Corners Regional Commission awarded 
$4,150 to the White Pine Council of Arts and Humanities in 
Nevada in 1977 to purchase equipment needed for its 
pottery industry. The Commission has also supported 
archeological work in Native American ruins on the 
Mountain Ute Reservation. The New England Regional 
Commission made a $100,000 grant in 1975 to the 
Roxbury Action Group in Massachusetts for renovation of 
the Marcus Garvey House. 

The Old West Regional Commission awarded $10,000 in 
1979 to the Plains Indian Arts and Crafts Exhibition to 
enable Native Americans to produce and market arts and 
crafts. A $3,000 grant was made to the South Dakota 
Department of Game, Fish, and Parks to help produce the 
1979 Fort Sisseton Historical Festival, which promoted the 
historical and economic significance of the region. The 
Ozarks Regional Commission conducted a study in 1979 
examining the impact of arts on Louisiana's economy, 
especially its tourist industry. An inventory was conducted 
in 1977 to ascertain the economic significance and level 
of native arts and crafts production and the need for 
assistance in marketing and skills development. The 
Pacific Northwest Regional Commission awarded $25,000 
to the Klamath County Museum in Oregon to provide 
information about the historic Baldwin Hotel, listed in the 



Department of Commerce 



31/32/33 



National Register of Historic Sites (see no. 126). A grant of 
nearly $190,000 was awarded to develop a 
comprehensive arts plan for the State of Washington. The 
Upper Great Lakes Regional Commission has assisted in 
the development of the Iron Range Interpretive Center in 
Minnesota, which depicts the history and ethnic diversity 
of the miners. The Commission also provided $61,000 to 
the Neesh-La Indian Development Corporation to assist 
the Winnebago Wisconsin Dells Cultural Center. 

Comment 

The Regional Commissions' authorizing legislation, Title V 
of the Public Works and Economic Development Act of 
1965 as amended, expires in 1979. Bills proposing the 
Act's reauthorization, under consideration by the Congress 
during the spring of 1979, propose expansion of the 
Commissions into a nationwide system. 

Contact for Information 

Federal cochairperson of appropriate Regional 
Commission (see Appendix A) or Office of the Special 
Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce for Regional 
Development, Department of Commerce, Washington, 
DC 20230 



Example 



The 1978 allocation for USTS was $500,000, a major part 
of which was spent on advertisements abroad. The 
maximum allowable expenditure for any one advertising 
campaign was $10,000. This amount was spent in Canada 
to promote attendance at "Memphis in May," a festival of 
performing arts and arts and crafts from Tennessee. 



Contact for Information 



State Travel Director or Assistant Secretary for Tourism, 
United States Travel Service, Department of Commerce, 
Washington, DC 20230 



33/ Business Development Loans 

Economic Development Administration 



What/For Whom 



Loans and loan guarantees to individuals, partnerships, 
and profit-making organizations in areas designated 
as eligiblefor assistance. 



Description 



32/ United States Travel Service 



What/For Whom 

Technical assistance in public relations and advertising 
to nonprofit organizations developing programs that 
promote foreign tourism to the United States. 



Description 

The United States Travel Service (USTS) is responsible for 
promoting foreign tourism to the United States. It provides 
technical assistance in public relations and advertising 
and works closely with Commerce's Regional 
Commissions (see no. 31) as well as with states and cities 
to coordinate and develop projects and programs that 
will encourage foreign tourism. 

USTS publishes the annual Festival U.S.A., which lists the 
top 10 upcoming cultural events and activities in each 
state. For an event to be listed, complete information must 
be sent to the State Travel Director, who makes the 
selection. The State Travel Director can usually be located 
through the State Chamber of Commerce. 

To acquaint foreign journalists with the United States, 
USTS conducts tours which include museums, performing 
arts events, and festivals demonstrating unique 
regional cultures. 



The Economic Development Administration (EDA) makes 
direct loans and guarantees private bank loans to 
encourage existing industries to expand and new firms 
to locate and create jobs in areas of high unemployment. 
Direct loans may reach 65 percent of the cost of fixed 
assets (land acquisition, plant construction, and 
machinery and equipment) and 85 percent of working 
capital needs. EDA may guarantee 90 percent of the 
unpaid balance of private bank loans for fixed assets and 
working capital. This assistance may be used for projects 
to preserve historic buildings and to revitalize historic 
tourist areas which offer the potential for creating 
permanent year-round jobs. 



Example 



The 1978 appropriation for this program was $122 million. 
A $3 7 million loan was made to new owners for the 
restoration of the historic Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in 
Philadelphia. A guarantee of a $10 million loan was made 
to reopen the historic Peabody Hotel in Memphis, and the 
guarantee of another $6 million loan was approved to 
restore the Seelbach Hotel in Louisville, Ky., as a tourist 
center. 



Contact for Information 



EDA regional offices or Secretarial Representative (see 
Appendix A) or Office of the Assistant Secretary of 
Commerce for Economic Development, Department of 
Commerce, Washington, DC 20230 



Department of Commerce 



34/35 



34/ Planning Assistance 

Economic Development Administration 



Description 



What/For Whom 



Grants to planning organizations representing cities, 
metropolitan area councils of governments, towns, 
counties, and Indian tribes EDA designates as eligible for 
redevelopment assistance. Planning organizations must 
show that they are broadly representative of an area's 
social, economic, and political groups. 



Description 



The Economic Development Administration (EDA) makes 
planning grants of up to 75 percent of project costs to 
help economic development organizations make plans for 
long-range growth that will ensure effective use of 
resources in creating full-time permanent jobs for the 
unemployed. Grants may be made for planning cultural 
activities, tourist attractions such as folk festivals, 
restoration of historic sites, or expansion of arts and crafts 
production, as long as the activities can be shown to 
stimulate an area's economic growth. Funds may also 
support activities for long-range economic growth among 
multicounty economic development districts. Grants can 
fund staff salaries, administrative expenses, and 
consultant fees. Indian tribes may be eligible for 100 
percent of project costs. 



Example 



This program's 1978 appropriation was $25.5 million. 
Louisville, Ky., received $191,000 to plan a municipal 
museum. Detroit, Mich., received a $300,000 grant 
to prepare the city's economic development plans, which 
included the construction of a performing arts center. The 
North Carolina School of Arts received $100,000 to 
prepare a feasibility study for converting a theater into a 
cultural center for university and other programming in 
order to stimulate revitalization of Winston-Salem's 
downtown commercial area. 



Contact for Information 



EDA regional offices or Secretarial Representative (see 
Appendix A) or Assistant Secretary of Commerce for 
Economic Development, Department of Commerce, 
Washington, DC 20230 



The Economic Development Administration (EDA) makes 
grants and loans to plan and build public facilities needed 
to encourage long-term economic growth in 
EDA-designated areas where unemployment is high or 
family income lags behind the national average. Grants 
may be used to acquire and develop land, and to acquire, 
construct, rehabilitate, or improve public service facilities. 
"Public facilities'' include not only water and sewer 
systems, access roads, and vocational schools, but also 
public tourism facilities such as cultural and recreational 
centers, historic preservation sites, and museums. To be 
funded, such facilities must be an integral part of a 
comprehensive tourism complex being developed by a 
state agency or a qualified nonprofit organization involved 
in tourism. 

This program is one of the major sources of federal 
support for "bricks and mortar" projects. Proposals for 
cultural projects — which will be competing with 
applications for projects to support heavy industry, for 
example — must demonstrate a positive impact on the 
long-term job development of a community. To increase 
the cultural components of projects funded by EDA, 
cultural organizations should stay in close contact with 
state and local planning and development agencies. The 
three grant and loan programs are described below. 

Grants for Public Works and Development Facilities 

This is the basic Public Works grant program. It 
encourages long-term economic growth through the 
construction of needed public facilities. Project grants 
cover from 50 to 80 percent of the total project costs. 
Grant rates are established according to the severity of 
the area's economic problems and on the long-term jobs 
to be created by the project. Indian tribes may receive 
100 percent of project costs. 

Example: Of a total 1978 appropriation of $189.5 million, 
culturally related Public Works grants included $407,000 
to the Spanish-speaking Unity Council of Alameda County, 
Calif., to construct a community resource center to 
preserve folk customs; $3.7 million to preserve historic 
buildings in the redevelopment of the Boston Navy Yard; 
$25,000 to the city of Rome, N.Y., to reconstruct a historic 
village along the Erie Canal; and $5 million to construct a 
sports/cultural center in Charleston, W. Va. 



35/ Public Works Program 

Economic Development Administration 



What/For Whom 



Grants and loans for state and local governments, 
recognized Indian tribes, and public or private nonprofit 
organizations for projects in EDA-designated areas; block 
grants to states. 



Public Works Impact Program 

This program provides grants to construct needed public 
facilities that will provide immediate jobs for unemployed 
construction workers in designated project areas. 

Grants cover 80 percent of project costs. Indian tribes 
and development corporations lacking the necessary 
borrowing capability may recieve 100 percent of project 
costs. 

Example: EDA must spend at least 15 percent but no 
more than 35 percent of its annual appropriations for 



Department off Commerce 



353637 



Public Works on the Impact Program. In 1978, grants 
included $600,000 for the renovation of the Walt Whitman 
Poetry Center in Camden, N.J.; $282,000 for the 
construction of a learning center for the University of New 
Mexico at Taos; and $175,000 to refurbish a riverboat for 
use as a theater and museum in Marietta, Ohio. 



Supplemental Grants 

Under Section 304 of the Public Works and Economic 
Development Act, EDA is authorized to administer an 
annual block grant program apportioning funds to 
individual states based upon the public works funding 
provided by EDA to the states the previous year. Funds 
can be used for statewide projects or to assist local 
communities in meeting matching grants requirements for 
public works, planning and technical assistance projects, 
or as loans for private industry. States must provide 
25 percent of the grant in matching funds. 



Example 



The 1978 appropriation for this program was $93.3 million. 
Grants totaling almost $6.75 million were made to improve 
and expand the historic wholesale food and flower market 
of Los Angeles. Paterson, N.J., received a $7,727,450 
grant to revitalize the Great Falls National Historic District 
and link it to the central business district. Philadelphia 
received a $12,465,000 grant to rejuvenate the American 
Industrial Corridor, a historic inner city industrial area. 



Contact for Information 



EDA regional offices (see Appendix A) or the Office of 
the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic 
Development, Department of Commerce, Washington, 
DC 20230 



Contact for Information 



EDA regional offices or Secretarial Representative (see 
Appendix A) or Office of the Assistant Secretary of 
Commerce for Economic Development, Department of 
Commerce, Washington, DC 20230 



36/ Special Economic Development/ 
Adjustment Assistance 

Economic Development Administration 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to states, cities, counties, or 
EDA-designated districts suffering from economic 
dislocation or deterioration. 



Description 



The Special Economic Development/Adjustment 
Assistance program is designed to help EDA-designated 
areas suffering from long-term deterioration or 
experiencing or anticipating a sudden and severe 
economic dislocation resulting from the closing of a 
Defense installation, manufacturing plant, or other major 
employer. Periodically revised lists of designated areas 
and districts and maximum grant rates may be obtained 
from the offices listed below. Information on a specific 
area may be obtained from the county courthouse. 

Direct grants are made for the planning and 
implementation of overall economic development 
strategies, which could include the development of 
cultural centers or historic preservation of property. 
Usually, a minimum nonfederal match of 25 percent, 
in the form of funds or services, is required. 



37/ Technical Assistance Grants 

Economic Development Administration 

What/For Whom 

Technical assistance grants to individuals or groups 

representing localities suffering from impediments 

to economic progress. Unlike other EDA programs, there 

jr 

are no specific eligibility requirements. 

Description 

The Economic Development Administration (EDA) 
provides technical assistance grants to individuals or 
groups working to solve problems of high unemployment, 
low family income, and general economic development 
in EDA-designated areas or other areas of substantial 
need. Eligible costs include those for hiring consultants 
and personnel, and planning and administering an 
economic recovery program. Tourism, arts and crafts, 
and other cultural projects will be considered for 
assistance only if the proposed project shows substantial 
economic impact. Usually grants may not exceed 75 
percent of project costs. 



Example 

The 1978 appropriation for this program was $24.1 million. 
Technical assistance grants included $100,000 for a 
handcrafts demonstration program in Vermont and 
$14,000 for the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in 
Maine to conduct a seminar and prepare a business 
advice manual. Grants were also made for feasibility 
studies, including $60,000 for a performing arts center at 
Santa Ana, Calif., and $40,000 for a sports museum in the 
southern Allegheny Mountains area of Pennsylvania. A 
$35,000 grant was awarded to the Indian Pueblos Cultural 



Department of Commerce 



37 38 39 



Center, Inc., of New Mexico to extend assistance in 
management training to individual tribes seeking to 
preserve traditional Pueblo crafts techniques. In New York 
City, a $5,000 grant was used to research and produce a 
resource booklet entitled Protection of Cultural Properties 
During Energy Emergencies and Energy Conservation and 
His toric Pres erva tion . 

Co ntact for Information 

EDA regional offices or Secretarial Representative (see 
Appendix A) or Assistant Secretary of Commerce for 
Economic Development, Department of Commerce, 
Washington, DC 20230 



Example 



38/ Coastal Program Grants 

National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration 

What/For Whom 

Matching grants to states or to agencies appointed by 
state governors. 



In 1978, a 10.4 acre multiuse park called Lighthouse 
Landing, on the shores of Lake Michigan in Evanston, III., 
received an $1 1,000 CZM Planning Grant. The plan called 
for restoration and preservation of the historic lighthouse, 
fog house, and keeper's house, and the renovation of a 
historic mansion to be used as a museum and arts center. 
When the plan was approved in 1979, a $20,500 
Administrative Grant was awarded to administer the 
implementation of the plan. Some of these funds were 
used to restore the original Jens Jensen landscaping, to 
reconstruct the old council ring and grotto, and to draw 
up architectural plans for the lighthouse restoration. Other 
grantees in 1978 included Norwalk, Conn., for planning 
the development of its historic seaport; Calais, Me., for 
redevelopment of the city's waterfront to increase access 
and improve the esthetic environment; and Gulfport, Miss., 
for planning the development of the Harbor Square South 
area to meet the city's economic, cultural, esthetic, 
recreational, and community service goals. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Coastal Zone Management, Department of 
Commerce, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20235 



Description 



The Office of Coastal Zone Management (OCZM) 
coordinates activities to develop, protect, and preserve 
U.S. coastal areas. Its enabling legislation states that 
coastal zone management programs should give "full 
consideration to ecological, cultural, historic, and esthetic 
values as well as to needs for economic development." 
OCZM administers two grant programs. 

Planning Grants 

The governor or any appointed state agency of a coastal 
zone state may apply for a CZM planning grant. Funds 
cover the fees and salaries of consultants and other 
personnel employed to design an overall plan to protect, 
preserve, and develop the state's coastal zone. Such 
plans may include investigating the feasibility of 
renovating historic properties for use as recreation and 
cultural centers, and studies of the cultural heritage of 
inhabitants of coastal areas in order to forecast the results 
and impact of planned CZM activities. 

Administrative Grants 

A coastal state may apply for an administrative grant 
to implement a management plan that has been approved 
by the Secretary of Commerce. The maximum allowable 
administrative grant for one year is $3 million. Funds 
are used for administration and consultation, for 
architectural plans, and occasionally for small restoration 
projects. Funds may not be used for purchasing property 
or for "bricks and mortar" projects. 



39/ Estuarine and Marine 

Sanctuaries 

National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration 

What/For Whom 

Research and study opportunities in estuarine and marine 
sanctuaries for historians, archeologists, and other 
qualified researchers, as well as marine scientists. Tours 
for the general public. 

Description 

Coastal areas of demonstrated conservation, recreational, 
ecological, or esthetic value may be selected for 
preservation and restoration as estuarine or marine 
sanctuaries. They are used as field laboratories and 
research centers for the study of the natural and human 
processes occurring within the sanctuary. Opportunities 
for qualified groups or individuals include preservation of 
historic property, archeological and scientific research 
and illustration, and studies of the cultures of inhabitants 
of the sanctuaries. In addition, educational and 
recreational tours are often available for the public. For 
information about opportunities in specific sanctuaries, 
contact the office listed below. 



Department of Commerce 



39/40 



Example 



Description 



In 1978, the Elkhorn Slough acquired by the state of 
California as an estuarine sanctuary was the site of a 
major archeological dig carried out by the California State 
Historical Society to uncover ancient Indian sites. The 
Waimanu Valley in Hawaii, once the site of a thriving 
community, has been designated as an estuarine 
sanctuary, and extensive historic and archeological 
research is being carried out there. Off Cape Hatteras in 
North Carolina, the waters surrounding the sunken U.S.S. 
Monitor have been designated a marine sanctuary for 
the purpose of encouraging research and preservation of 
the historic ship. 



The National Sea Grant Program is a federal-state- 
university partnership designed to integrate research, 
education, and public service to help preserve and 
develop marine resources and technology. Such 
resources may include property of historic or recreational 
value or the cultural heritage of a coastal community. 
Universities and qualified organizations or their individual 
members are eligible for Sea Grant support. Grants, 
primarily administered by universities, may cover up to 
two-thirds of project costs; a one-third nonfederal match is 
required 



Contact for Information 



Example 



Office of Coastal Zone Management, Department of 
Commerce, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20235 



40/ Sea Grants 

National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration 



In 1978, the National Sea Grants Program awarded 
$10,000 to the University of Michigan to assess the 
development potential of Michigan's Great Lakes 
Underwater Park/Historical Preserve. The program also 
awarded $15,197 to the University of Wisconsin for a 
two-year study of the relationship between a coastal 
environment and the historical and cultural development of 
its population — specifically, the Afro-American population 
in the Sea Islands, S.C. The investigators are examining 
the relationship between adaptation to the Sea Islands 
environment and the persistence of unique cultural 
patterns among generations of Afro-American inhabitants. 



What/For Whom 



Matching project grants to universities or any qualified 
organizations or their individual members interested in 
marine development and technology. 



Contact for Information 



National Sea Grants Program, 3300 Whitehaven Street, 
NW, Washington. DC 20235 



41/42 



Department of 
Defense 



41/ Art Collections/Traveling 
Exhibits 

What/For Whom 

Armed Forces traveling exhibits for public and private 
organizations interested in exhibiting military art to the 
public, including educational institutions, public libraries, 
and museums. 

Description 

Army • The U.S. Army Center of Military History 
maintains and administers the 13,500-piece U.S. Army Art 
Collection, valued at approximately $4 million. The total 
collection includes the American Collection, artworks 
produced by military and civilian artists from World War II 
to the present (see no. 42); the Life Collection, 1,056 
pieces of art presented to the Department of Defense by 
Time, Inc., in 1960; and the German War Art Collection, 
confiscated World War II art produced by German military 
artists. Approximately 34 traveling exhibits, including many 
works done in Viet Nam, are available for temporary loan 
(usually for not longer than six months) to interested 
public and private organizations for public display. The 
exhibits are commercially shipped from and returned to 
the Center's Washington location at the borrower's 
expense. In addition, the borrower must furnish a surety 
bond indemnifying the government against theft, loss, 
damage, or destruction of the borrowed items. 

Navy • The Navy Combat Art Collection contains 
approximately 5,000 works, some of which are on 
continuous display at the Navy Combat Art Gallery in 
Washington, D.C. The Collection includes works produced 
by artists participating in the Navy Art Program (see 
no. 42). The Navy Combat Art Center has a program that 
permits communities or groups to exhibit selected art 
shows from the Combat Art Collection. Due to present 
budget restrictions, the sponsor is requested to pay the 
cost of shipping the art to the community and of returning 
it to Washington, D.C. The cost depends on the size of the 
show. The round-trip shipping cost for 30 original 
paintings is approximately $200. In the case of Combat 
Art Exhibits, at least 90 days' advance notice and a 
statement that 24-hour security will be provided are 
required. 

Air Force • The Air Force Art Collection contains 
approximately 4,500 works of art produced by 
professional civilian artists participating in the Air Force 



Art Program (see no. 42). The Collection is administered 
and maintained by the Office of Information, Office of the 
Secretary of the Air Force, Headquarters, United States Air 
Force, Washington, DC 20330. Parts of the Collection are 
on temporary loan to public and private organizations 
through special exhibitions arranged by the Art and 
Museum Branch, Community Relations Division, Office of 
Information, Pentagon, Washington, DC 20330. Costs of 
transportation are the responsibility of the exhibitor. 
Rotating exhibitions of Air Force art are on permanent 
view at the Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo.; 
Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.; the Air Force 
Museum, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio; the 
Arnold Corridor of the Pentagon; and the National Air and 
Space Museum, Washington, D.C. 

Marine Corps • The Marine Corps Art Collection 
contains more than 5,000 works, many of them produced 
by military and civilian artists participating in the Marine 
Corps Art Program (see no. 42). Selected shows from the 
collection are circulated throughout the United States in 
exhibits sponsored by the Marine Corps and by 
independent groups. Requests for exhibits should be 
submitted to the Marine office listed below. 

Contact for Information 

Army: Army Art Activity, U.S. Army Center of Military 
History, Room G2-W18, DARCOM Bldg., 5001 Eisenhower 
Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22333 

Navy: Navy Combat Art Gallery, Building 67, Navy Yard, 
Washington, DC 20374 

Air Force: U.S. Air Force Art Collection, Pentagon, 
Washington, DC 20330 

(Traveling Exhibits), U.S. Air Force Orientation Group, 
Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 

Marines: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters, 
U.S. Marine Corps (Code HDM), Washington, DC 20380 



42/ Art Programs 



What/For Whom 



Opportunities for military and civilian artists to paint 
military scenes and operations. Artists are not paid for 
their work but are reimbursed for certain expenses such 
as travel and art supplies. 



Description 



Army Artist Program • Using volunteer military and 
civilian artists, this program provides worldwide pictorial 
documentation of Army activities. Artists are selected 
by the Center of Military History and are permitted 
maximum freedom of expression. Interested military 
personnel who have completed basic training may apply 



Department of Defense 



42/43 



through the arts and crafts director of their local post. 
Soldier artists, on temporary duty assignments of 90 to 
130 days, work in two- to five-person teams and return to 
home stations at the end of their tours. Professional 
artists who are civilians are invited to visit specified areas 
of Army interest for a maximum period of 30 days to 
observe, photograph, and sketch military operations in 
order to produce paintings after returning home. Civilian 
artists may donate as many pieces of art as they wish to 
the Army Art Collection (see no. 41). 

Navy Combat Art Program • Civilian and, 
occasionally, Navy artists document Navy life in paintings, 
drawings, and photographs which become part of the 
Navy Combat Art Collection (see no. 41). Artists are 
chosen by NACAL, a committee composed of members of 
the Salmagundi Club in New York City and by the Chief of 
Naval Information. Usually artists are sent out for 3 to 10 
days to photograph and make rough sketches of the 
subject, returning home to finish their works. In 1978, nine 
civilian artists were used in this program; enlisted Navy 
artists have not been used since 1970. 

Air Force Art Program • Professional civilian artists 
volunteer to document worldwide activities of the Air Force 
in paintings which become part of the Air Force Art 
Collection (see no. 41). Artists are usually selected by 
three Air Force chairpersons, one each from three 
unrelated societies of illustrators located in New York, Los 
Angeles, and San Francisco. Participating artists are free 
to choose the subject matter for documentation. Artists are 
usually placed on tour at Air Force bases for periods of 3 
to 10 days to take photographs and make sketches on 
which finished paintings are based. During 1978, 148 
artists participated in the program. 

Marine Corps Art Program • Professional 
artists — active duty, retired, and reserve Marines, as well 
as civilians — document the activities of the Corps. Artists 
are selected by the Commandant of the Marine Corps. 
Since the beginning of the program in 1965, more than 80 
artists have contributed their works to the Marine Corps 
Art Collection (see no. 41). At present about four Marine 
Corps Reserve artists are called to active duty for a period 
of two to three weeks each year to cover major Marine 
Corps events. 



Contact for Information 

Army: Army Art Activity, U.S. Army Center of Military 
History, Room G2-W18, DARCOM Building, 5001 
Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22333 

Navy: Navy Combat Art Gallery, Building 67, Navy Yard, 
Washington, DC 20374 

Air Force: Secretary of the Air Force, Office of Information, 
Community Relations Division, Art and Museum Branch, 
Pentagon, Washington, DC 20330 

Marines: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters, 
U.S. Marine Corps (Code HDM), Washington, DC 20380 



43/ Bands and Choruses 



What/For Whom 

Career opportunities for musicians, instrumentalists, and 
vocalists, 17 years or older, with Armed Forces bands and 
choruses. 



Description 

Each of the Armed Forces offers career opportunities for 
musicians. Service bands include concert bands, jazz 
ensembles, and a symphony orchestra. Each service has 
a premier band headquartered in Washington, D.C., as 
well as many other bands located at service installations 
throughout the United States and overseas. Choruses 
accompany Air Force, Army, and Navy premier bands on 
concert tours. 

Applicants must pass a private audition, a physical 
examination, and the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude 
Battery. Interested vocalists should inquire about chorus 
opportunities and positions as pop vocalists. Placement 
with a band is based on the need for a particular 
instrument and the results of competitive auditions. 
Placement possibilities should be checked in advance; 
depending on the service, the enlistment contract may or 
may not ensure placement with a band. Three years is the 
minimum enlistment period for the Army, four years for 
the other services. Band and chorus personnel may be 
eligible for accelerated promotions based on civilian- 
acquired skills. They receive full military benefits, including 
subsidized opportunities to pursue a music education. 

Army, Navy, and Marine musicians not assigned to 
premier bands must complete the basic course of 
instruction offered by the School of Music in Norfolk, Va. 
Intermediate and advanced music courses are also 
available. Government-owned instruments and all 
instructional materials are provided for the student. 

Occasionally there are openings for especially talented 
civilian professionals to audition for premier bands or to 
provide such musical support activities as music 
arrangements and compositions, public relations, 
advertising and promotion, audio support, and recording. 

Each music information office can provide a booklet 
specifying the number, kinds, and locations of musical 
units, and policie v s concerning reimbursement of 
travel expenses. 

Civilians interested in obtaining the services of an Armed 
Forces band for a civic function should contact the 
nearest military installation service recruiter. Usually the 
host community must absorb transportation and lodging 
expenses if the event is held outside the local area. 

Example 

In 1978, the Premier Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine 
Bands, and the Army Field Band gave more than 8,000 
performances, involving more than 1 ,000 performers, 



Department of Defense 



43/44/45 



throughout the United States. In recent years, many 
service bands have expanded their repertories to include 
jazz, soul, rock, and country-western, as well as martial 
music. 

Contact for Information 



Army: Chief, Army Bands Office, Headquarters, 
Department of Army (DAAG-MSB), Washington, 
DC 20314 

Navy: Music Branch, Bureau of Naval Personnel (Pers 
724), Department of the Navy, Washington, DC 20370 

Air Force: Secretary of the Air Force, Office of Information, 
Community Relations Division, Bands Branch, Pentagon, 
Washington, DC 20330 

Marines: Director, United States Marine Band, Marine 
Barracks, Eighth and I Streets, SE, Washington, 
DC 20390 



44/ Fellowships and Visiting 
Professorships 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships for doctoral and postdoctoral research in 
military or aerospace history; visiting professorships at 
three Army higher education institutions. 



the following topics, among others: "The Art of Warfare in 
America and Europe, 1854-1871"; "History of U.S. 
Influence on Smaller Nations' Armed Forces"; "The 
Influence of f he American Military upon U.S. Foreign 
Policy, 1964-1974"; and "U.S. Army Officers and the 
Intellectual Mastery of the Reality of War, 1846-1940." 

Air Force • The Office of Air Force History offers 
two Dissertation Year Fellowships annually (although three 
were awarded in 1978) for doctoral candidates working on 
dissertations in the field of U.S. aerospace history. 
Applicants compete nationally for the $4,000 fellowships. 
The final application date for the following academic year 
is in early February. The Office also has a program of 
summer employment for two students of aerospace 
history. Although the program has been authorized 
annually, there have been years when no allocations were 
made. Contact the office listed below for further 
information. 

Contact for Information 

Army: Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, 
Attn: DAMH-HSR, Washington, DC 20314 or U.S. 
Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, 
PA 17013 

Air Force: Office of Air Force History, Headquarters, U.S. 
Air Force, CVAH(S), Boiling AFB, Washington, DC 20332 



45/ Museums: Exhibits/Loans 



Description 



Army • The U.S. Army Center of Military History in 
Washington, D.C., awards two Dissertation Year 
Fellowships annually. Applicants compete nationally for 
the two $4,000 fellowships, and grantees are selected by 
the Army's Historical Advisory Committee. Applicants must 
be candidates for the doctoral degree in history who are 
writing dissertations in the field of military history. 
December 31 is the final date for application for the 
following academic year. The Center also solicits 
nominations for visiting professorships at the U.S. Military 
Academy at West Point, N.Y., and at the General Staff 
College at Fort Leavenworth, Kans. For more information, 
contact the institutions directly or write to the Center at the 
address listed below. 

The U.S. Army Military History Institute in Pennsylvania 
awards an average of six Advanced Research Fellowships 
annually. Postdoctoral researchers and scholars or 
professional writers compete for these fellowships, which 
average $500 each. Research must be undertaken at the 
Institute. The Institute also solicits nominations for one 
visiting professorship in military history at the Army War 
College annually. 

Example: In 1978, the U.S. Army Military History Institute 
awarded Advanced Research Fellowships for research on 



What/For Whom 

Museum exhibitions for the general public. Traveling 
exhibits often available without charge to organizations 
able to protect and exhibit them properly. Special 
collections and historical materials for researchers by 
permission. Loans or donations of artifacts to public and 
private nonprofit organizations as well as state and local 
governments. 

Description 

Each service maintains museum collections illustrating its 
own military history through displays of artifacts, weapons, 
uniforms, dioramas, explanatory materials, military art, and 
posters. Orientation lectures, special tours, and traveling 
exhibits can often be arranged. In addition, each service 
has a limited number of obsolete and/or historic items 
designated as surplus, such as combat materiel, books, 
manuscripts, and vessels. These items may be lent or 
donated, at no expense to the government, for 
ceremonial, historical, educational, or display purposes 
only. 

Army • The U.S. Army Center of Military History in 
Washington, DC, oversees the 65 Army museums 
throughout the United States and overseas. The largest 



Department of Defense 



45/46 



facility is the West Point Museum located at the U.S. 
Military Academy, West Point, NY. Loans and donations 
of Army artifacts may be arranged through the Center. 
Allocation priorities are: 1) Army museums; 2) museums 
of the other armed services; 3) Smithsonian Institution; 4) 
museums of other federal agencies; 5) state, municipal, 
and university museums; and 6) veterans organizations, 
private nonprofit museums, and other public bodies. In 
1978, a number of Civil War cannon balls excavated from 
the Allegheny Arsenal were donated by the Army to the 
Western Pennsylvania Historical Society. 

Navy • The Director of Naval History is in charge of 
the eight museums maintained by the Navy, the largest of 
which is the Navy Memorial Museum in the Washington 
Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. The Director of Naval History 
is also responsible for the U.S.S. Constitution, "Old 
Ironsides," on public display in the former Boston Naval 
Shipyard. Surplus historic shipboard equipment may be 
obtained on indefinite loan from the Curator for the Navy. 
Such items as ship bells are often lent to churches, town 
halls, and schools, and anchors, chains, and cannons are 
displayed in parks. Obsolete or condemned vessels are 
available through the Naval Sea Systems Command 
(address below). In 1977, the U.S.S. Little Rock and the 
U.S.S. Sullivan were transferred to the Buffalo Urban 
Renewal Agency to be used as naval museums. 

Air Force • The largest museum maintained by the 
Air Force is the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air 
Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, which focuses on the 
military aspects of aviation history and the growth of 
aerospace power. Approximately 130 aircraft, missiles, 
and other related exhibits are on display. The Museum's 
responsibility is to supervise the loan of Air Force historic 
properties to support qualified museums portraying Air 
Force history. More than 500 historic planes, as well as 
other combat materiel, are on loan throughout the world. 
For ceremonial purposes, the Museum lent some fabric 
and chips of wood from the Wright brothers' Kittyhawk to 
Neil Armstrong to be carried in the Apollo for the first lunar 
landing. They were then lent to the Washington Air Force 
Recruiting Office for a touring exhibition. 

Marines • The Marine Corps maintains two major 
museums: The Marine Corps Museum, located at the 
Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C, and the Marine 
Corps Aviation Museum, located at Quantico, Va. In 
addition, exhibits are maintained at a Command Museum 
at Parris Island, S.C, and at the Navy/Marine Corps 
Museum, Treasure Island, San Francisco, Calif. 



Contact for Information 

Army: Commander, U.S. Army Center of Military History, 
Attn: DAMH-HSP, Washington, DC 20314 

Navy: Director of Naval History, Building 220, Navy Yard, 
Washington, DC 20374 or (for loans of historic 
objects) Curator for the Department of the Navy, Building 
220, Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374 or (for 
donations of vessels) Commander, Naval Sea Systems 



Command (NAVSEA OOD), Department of the Navy, 
Washington, DC 20360 

Air Force: Office of Information, The Air Force Museum, 
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 

Marines: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters, 
U.S. Marine Corps (Code HDM), Washington, DC 20380 



46/ Professional Entertainment 
Program 

What/For Whom 

Performing opportunities for professional entertainers, 
performing arts groups, and college groups with no more 
than 10 members who apply through their drama and 
music departments. 

Description 

The Department of Defense provides a continuing 
program of live entertainment for overseas personnel. 
Groups of professional and amateur entertainers (in the 
performing units listed below) tour isolated and remote 
military locations overseas. 

Professional units: The United Services Organization 
(USO) assembles and pays the salaries of small groups of 
professional entertainers. 

Commercially sponsored units: The Department pays 
travel costs and a small daily living allowance to 
entertainers, who receive a salary from civilian agencies. 

Gratuitous units: The Department pays travel costs and 
living allowances to entertainers, including college groups, 
who serve without salary. 

The Department of Defense supplements USO-provided 
entertainment. Interested groups may offer their services 
directly to the Adjutant General's office listed below. 
Entertainers are not salaried but the Department does 
furnish administrative support (for example, visa and 
inoculation costs), round-trip transportation, and a daily 
living allowance while touring. While a unit is on tour, a 
delay of up to two weeks of personal travel time may be 
authorized for individuals under certain conditions 
Preference is shown to small groups that include at least 
one woman. Programs should generally be light and 
tasteful. Soul, rock, jazz, country and western, and folk 
groups have been especially popular; programs limited to 
classical music or only choral work are generally not 
accepted 

Contact for Information 

The Adjutant General Center, Attn: DAAG-MSE, 
Department of the Army, Washington, DC 20314 
or Director of USO Shows, 1 146 19th Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20036 



Department of Defense 



47 



47/ Recreation Programs 



What/For Whom 



Crafts and performing arts workships, performances, and 
other recreational services for military personnel, their 
dependents, and civilian personnel. Technical publications 
available to the public. Music and drama scholarships for 
active military personnel. Cultural facilities available to 
civilians at the commanding officer's discretion. 



Description 



Army Morale Support Activities • The Army's 
Morale Support Activities Office maintains nearly 700 arts 
and crafts centers on Army installations around the world. 
The Office hires civilian arts and crafts specialists to give 
instruction in such fields as painting and drawing, 
graphics, photography, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry 
making, weaving, and woodworking. Minimum fees may 
be charged for instruction and use of equipment. Facilities 
may be available to civilians at the Commander's 
discretion. 

Annual "Arts and Crafts Week" activities take place on all 
Army installations. Civilian and Army artists and 
craftspersons demonstrate and exhibit their work on or 
near Army installations. All-Army Fine Arts, Crafts, and 
Photography Contests periodically invite civilian artists and 
craftspersons to participate as judges and consultants. 
Touring exhibitions of prize-winning works from the 
All-Army Art Contests are shown at Army installations 
worldwide and in nearby civilian communities, museums, 
and colleges. 

The Army has done extensive research on developing 
cultural centers and has published technical pamphlets on 
such topics as setting up workshops and exhibits, 
designing facilities, using crafts equipment, and 
techniques in specific areas of arts and crafts. All 
information is available to the general public on request. 

In addition to arts and crafts centers, the Office also 
programs performing arts activities. Most installations have 
established choruses and glee clubs, stage bands, and 
theater groups, as well as instruction in music and drama. 
Live commercial entertainment is also provided. 

Through agreements with state colleges and universities, 
the Army provides scholarships in music and drama to 
active military personnel. Because formal agreements 
have not been reached with institutions from all states, the 
program is currently administered informally. Interested 
individuals should contact the office listed below to find 
out whether their resident states participate in this 
program. 



Navy Special Services Program • The Navy craft 
program offers courses in ceramics, jewelry, painting, 
leathercrafts, woodworking, and photography, with 
professional instructors hired from local metropolitan 
areas. Most special interest groups, such as camera 
clubs, musical groups, and glee clubs, are furnished a 
meeting place and receive limited support from the 
Recreation Fund. Many activities are conducted in 
conjunction with similar community cultural programs. 
Responsibility for Special Services programming rests with 
,the commanding officers of ships and shore installations. 



Air Force Recreation Program • Arts-related 
programs in Air Force communities are conducted in arts 
and crafts, recreation, and youth centers, and include 
classes and workshops in such fields as painting, 
photography, pottery, batik, macrame, jewelry, piano, 
guitar, modern jazz, ballet, and folk dance. Many little 
theater groups, rock concerts, folk festivals, competitions, 
exhibits, lectures, demonstrations, and ethnic festival 
activities are organized or produced by Air Force 
personnel. 



Marine Corps Special Services Program • A variety 
of arts-related activities are provided for Marine Corps 
personnel and their dependents. Decisions on the 
programming of arts and crafts activities are made at the 
local command level and reflect the particular interests of 
the installation. Many Marine Corps installations have fully 
equipped arts and crafts hobby shops. Supplies are sold 
at minimum cost. Woodworking, ceramics, and 
photography workshops have been the most popular 
activities in recent years. If interest in a particular area is 
keen, professional instructors may be hired, or personnel 
may form a private organization to share their common 
interests, such as a drama or painting club. Marines also 
compete in local and interservice talent contests. Activities 
are supported using both appropriated and 
nonappropriated funds. 



Contact for Information 

Army: Morale Support Activities Office on any Army 
installation, or Community and Skills Development 
Activities, Office of the Adjutant General, Attn: 
DAAG-MSA, Washington, DC 20314 

Navy: Department of the Navy, Bureau of Naval Personnel, 
Special Services (Pers 721), Washington, DC 20370 



Air Force: Directorate of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation, 
AFMPC/MPCSOC, Randolph Air Force Base, TX 78148 

Marines: Head, Recreation Section, Commandant of the 
Marine Corps, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps (Code 
MSMS-12), Washington, DC 20380 



Department off Defense 



48/49 



48/ Research Facilities/Internships 



What/For Whom 



General libraries for active military personnel and their 
dependents, retired military personnel, and civilian 
personnel on military installations. Military historical 
research collections open to qualified researchers. 



Description 



Each branch of the military services maintains libraries on 
installations at home and abroad. Collections contain 
works of fiction and nonaction, educational materials, and 
technical information. Overseas libraries conduct 
programs designed to acquaint the military community 
with the culture and history of the host country. 

In addition, each service maintains extensive military 
history collections open to researchers. Special 
permission is needed to inspect classified material. 
(For a description of military history fellowships and 
professorships, see no. 44.) The main historical offices are 
described below. 

Office of the Secretary of Defense • A staff of three 
historians preserves documents pertaining to the Office 
and prepares classified histories for use by the Secretary. 
A separate Historical Division preserves the records of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff and prepares classified histories for 
their use. 

Army . Most commands and subunits of the Army 
have resident historians who preserve records and 
prepare annual historical reviews. These are coordinated 
under the supervision of the Chief of Military History at the 
Center of Military History in Washington, DC. The Center 
oversees and supervises all matters pertaining to Army 
history, including historic property and Army museums. It 
also serves as a research facility for public and private 
organizations and individuals interested in military history. 
The Center's U.S. Army Military History Institute in 
Pennsylvania houses extensive collections of artifacts, 
maps, recordings, photographs, and printed materials 
relating to Army history, and conducts symposia and an 
oral history program. 

In 1976 the Institute initiated a Student Internship 
Program. Up to seven internships in each of three 
semesters (fall, winter, spring) have been awarded 
annually. No stipends are available, but students receive a 
formal grade as well as academic credit for their work. 
Internships may be in the Archives, the Audio-Visual 
Collection, the Bibliographic Program, the Book 
Cataloging Division, the Government Documents 
Collection, the Museum, the Photographic Archives, or the 
Reference Section of the Institute. 

Navy • The Naval Historical Center in Washington, 
DC, maintains research and curatorial facilities available 
to the general public as well as to Naval personnel and 
historians. In addition, the Center publishes the research 
produced by its own historians and curators. The Navy 



welcomes applications from students interested in 
internships at the Center. Internships are specially 
designed to suit the needs of both the student and the 
Center. Although no funds are available, the sponsoring 
academic institutions may make agreements with 
individuals concerning residence and academic credit. 

Air Force • The major commands and many 
subunits of the Air Force maintain historical offices which 
preserve records and prepare annual histories and other 
required special studies. The Office of Air Force History in 
Washington, DC, supervises these units in all matters 
pertaining to Air Force history, including publications, oral 
history projects, and documentary films. In addition, it 
operates the Albert F. Simpson Historical Research Center 
in Alabama, which is the main repository for Air Force 
historical records. 

Marine Corps • The Marine Corps Historical Center 
in Washington, DC, maintains a library and archives and 
collections of papers, all of which are open to researchers 
and to the general public. 

Contact for Information 

Office of the Secretary of Defense, Historical Staff, 
Washington, DC 20301 

Army: U.S. Army Center of Military History, Attn: 
DAMH-HSR, Washington, DC 20314 or U.S. Army 
Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013 

Navy: Director of Naval History, Department of the Navy, 
Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374 

Air Force: Office of Air Force History, Headquarters, U.S. 
Air Force, CVAH(S), Boiling AFB, Washington, DC 20332 

Marines: Marine Corps Historical Center, Headquarters, 
U.S. Marine Corps (Code HDM), Washington, DC 20380 



49/ Surplus Personal Property Sales 



What/For Whom 

Surplus military personal property for sale to any member 
of the general public, 18 years or older, not employed by, 
or related to an employee of, the Defense Property 
Disposal Program- 
Description 

When military personal property is declared "surplus," the 
Department of Defense offers it for sale to the general 
public. ("Surplus" personal property from civil agencies is 
sold by the General Services Administration, see no. 160.) 
Personal property includes such items as motor vehicles, 
furniture, lumber, maintenance and repair shop 
equipment, musical instruments, phonographs, radios, 
office machines and supplies, photographic equipment, ail 
types of precious metals, textiles, and woodworking and 
metalworking machinery. 



Department of Defense 



49 



To encourage participation not only by individuals but also 
by business concerns of all sizes, property is usually 
offered in quantities, with retail sales, auctions, and sealed 
bids among the various sales methods. Sales are 
conducted throughout the country by Defense Property 
Disposal Regions. By contacting the office below, 
individuals and organizations may have their names and 
property interests placed on the bidders' list; they will be 



notified of sales held in their areas. Sale notices also 
appear in Commerce Business Daily, published by the 
Department of Commerce (see no. 25). 

Contact for Information 

Department of Defense Surplus Sales, Post Office Box 
1370, Battle Creek, Ml 49016 



50/51 



Department of 
Energy 



50/ 



Appropriate Technology Small 
Grants Program 



What/For Whom 



Grants to and cooperative agreements with individuals, 
local nonprofit organizations and institutions, small 
businesses, Indian tribes, and local and state agencies. 



Description 



Financial assistance is provided to develop and 
demonstrate small-scale, energy-related technologies. 
These are called "appropriate technology" projects 
because they meet local energy needs and use local 
materials, labor, and renewable energy sources. Such 
projects must be simple, efficient, and environmentally 
sound 

The program is administered through regional Department 
of Energy (DOE) offices. In each region a program 
announcement describing the funding cycle and 
guidelines is prepared and published in the Commerce 
Business Daily (see no. 25), newspapers, and trade and 
technical publications and circulated to interested groups 
and individuals. No more than $50,000 will be awarded to 
any grantee over a two-year period. 

Projects are funded under three categories. Concept 
Development Awards of up to $10,000 are made to 
develop an idea or to investigate areas ranging from new 
energy sources to new applications of existing procedures 
and systems. Development Awards of up to $50,000 are 
made for the systematic and practical development of a 
concept into a useful technology. Demonstration Awards 
of up to $50,000 are made to test a technology under 
operating conditions to show that commercial application 
is technically, economically, and environmentally feasible. 



workshop to teach the art of adobe making, an energy 
saving form of construction. 

Contact for Information 

Program Managers in Department of Energy regional 
offices or Appropriate Technology Small Grants 
Program, Office of Conservation and Solar Applications, 
Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 



51/ Education, Business, and Labor 
Affairs 

What/For Whom 

Grants to colleges and universities, public interest and 
community service groups, labor unions, and other 
organized groups with nationwide individual memberships. 
Donations of used energy-related equipment are made to 
colleges, universities, museums, and other nonprofit 
postsecondary educational institutions. 

Description 

The Office of Education, Business, and Labor Affairs in the 
Department of Energy (DOE) provides financial assistance 
to help the educational community address energy issues. 
Projects educate the public, students, and teachers about 
energy production and conservation; train professionals 
for energy research and development careers; or provide 
materials and equipment to support the latter purposes. 
Although the approach to energy education is primarily 
scientific and technological, ethical, historical, political, 
and social implications of energy issues have been 
considered by participants in DOE-sponsored projects. 
The Office has cosponsored or cofunded several projects 
with the National Endowment for the Humanities, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies and 
organizations. 

An annotated bibliography of available education 
materials is issued. Most materials are distributed by the 
Technical Information Center (see no. 55). Approximately 
40 titles are currently available. 



Example 



In 1979, the appropriation was $8 million. It was 
anticipated that although 12,000 proposals would be 
received, only 300 to 400 could be funded. The President 
requested $8.5 million for the program in 1980, but there 
is a possibility Congress will raise this to $23.5 million. 
Projects funded under the 1977 pilot program include an 
award of $10,000 to the Verde Valley Solar Energy 
Association in Arizona to weatherize the community library 
and install solar heating, and an award of $24,400 to 
Equinox-Solar Consulting in Chino Valley, Ariz., for a 



Faculty Development Projects in Energy Education 

Grants are made to colleges and universities to sponsor 
workshops for elementary, secondary, and college 
teachers. The content and the audience for the workshops 
vary, but each examines such topics as teaching 
methodology, energy resources, alternative technologies, 
and economic, environmental, political, or social 
implications of energy development. The workshops for 
high school and college teachers are of one to three 
weeks duration during the summer and may offer 
follow-up sessions during the academic year. One-day 



Department of Energy 



51/52 



workshops are offered for elementary school teachers 
during the school year. In order to participate, teachers 
apply to the sponsor of a workshop, not to DOE. A 
brochure listing workshops for the following summer is 
issued annually. 

Example: Grants totaling $1.1 million were made to 
institutions of higher education to host 63 workshops 
attended by more than 2,000 teachers in the summer of 
1979; more than 300 proposals for workshops were 
submitted. Examples of workshops conducted are 
"Energy Choices and Social Change in Arizona" at 
Arizona State University in Tempe, "Energy and 
Society — Past to Future" at Eisenhower College in Seneca 
Falls, NY., and "Energy Economics for Public School 
Teachers" at West Virginia University in Morgantown, 
W.Va. 



Public Energy Education 

Grants are made to public interest, community service, 
labor union, and other organized groups with nationwide 
individual memberships to conduct programs of public 
energy education. Projects explore energy-related 
economic and environmental issues as well as practical 
measures to conserve energy in the home. Proposals are 
accepted primarily from groups with previous experience 
in staging education programs. Ideally projects should 
reach large numbers of people and should have multiple 
cosponsors or funding sources. 

Four grants were made in 1978, including an award to the 
National Council of Churches to produce a pilot energy 
education project and written materials on ethical and 
humanistic dimensions of energy production and use. 
Public discussions of these topics were planned in 
cooperation with churches throughout the United States. 



Used Equipment Grants 

Used energy-related equipment is donated to two- and 
four-year colleges, universities, museums, and other 
nonprofit postsecondary educational institutions for 
energy-oriented programs in the life, physical, and 
environmental sciences. Items available are usually large, 
heavy equipment, suitable for nuclear science and 
engineering laboratories. Representatives of eligible 
institutions may review lists of equipment located at DOE 
installations; contact the nearest DOE field office for 
further information. 



52/ Energy Conservation Program 
(Title III) 



What/For Whom 



Formula grants to states. Grants to schools, including two- 
and four-year colleges and universities, hospitals, public 
care institutions, and local governments, including Indian 
tribal governments, and libraries owned by or serving the 
residents of a local jurisdiction that derive 40 percent of 
their budgets from local tax revenues. 



Description 



Contact for Information 



Office of Education, Business, and Labor Affairs, 
Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 



Title III of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 
1978 (PL. 95-619) authorizes grants to promote energy 
conservation in public buildings. Funds are allocated 
among the states according to two different formulas 
based on population, climate, and fuel costs. Buildings 
that house resources for the arts, humanities, and historic 
preservation, such as libraries, arts centers, and 
museums, may be eligible for assistance if covered by an 
application from an eligible institution. Based on the 
results of the preliminary energy audits and energy audits 
(see below), each state formulates and obtains 
Department of Energy (DOE) approval of a plan for the 
operation of the technical assistance and energy 
conservation grant programs. For preliminary energy 
audits and energy audits, Congress appropriated $20 
million for schools and hospitals and $7.5 million for local 
governments and public care institutions in 1978. For 
technical assistance and energy conservation grants to 
schools and hospitals, Congress appropriated $180 
million, and for technical assistance to local governments 
and public care institutions, $17.5 million. 

Preliminary Energy Audits 

States receive grants to conduct preliminary energy audits 
of schools, colleges, universities, libraries, hospitals, and 
buildings owned by local governments and public care 
institutions. A state may also channel its funds to these 
institutions to allow them to conduct their own audits. A 
preliminary audit determines the energy consumption 
characteristics of a building, including its size, type, rate 
of consumption, major energy-using systems, and energy 
conservation steps taken. Fifty percent matching usually is 
required. Information gathered through preliminary audits 
will establish a data base upon which the state plan for 
subsequent phases of the Title III program can be 
developed. 

Energy Audits 

Grants are made to states to sponsor energy audits of 
selected eligible institutions based on preliminary audits 
conducted by or funded by the state. Each state 
establishes criteria for determining which institutions 
should receive priority for assistance. The energy audit, 



Department off Energy 



52/53/54 



conducted by a state-approved auditor, is a brief, onsite 
survey and analysis of a building and its energy use 
patterns that identifies ways to conserve energy through 
operating and maintenance changes and assesses the 
need for energy conservation, such as solar or other 
renewable resource measures. Fifty percent matching 
usually is required. 



Technical Assistance 

Grants are made to schools, colleges, universities, 
libraries, hospitals, local governments, public care 
institutions, and authorized coordinating agencies 
representing such institutions to perform technical 
assistance in a building owned by the grantee, for which 
an energy audit or the equivalent has been conducted. A 
technical assistance program is conducted by a qualified 
analyst who considers all possible energy conservation 
measures for the building. The detailed engineering 
analysis estimates the expense and the savings in energy 
and costs likely to result from the modification of 
maintenance and operating procedures or from 
introducing new energy conservation measures, such as 
the acquisition or installation of a solar or renewable 
energy source. The state energy agency reviews and 
ranks applications and forwards them to DOE for 
approval of up to 50 percent of project costs. 



Energy Conservation Measures 

Grants are made to schools, colleges, universities, 
hospitals, and authorized coordinating agencies 
representing such institutions for energy conservation and 
solar or other renewable resource measures. The 
applicant must have completed an energy audit and 
technical assistance program or their equivalent for the 
building for which financial assistance is requested. 
Grants are used to design, acquire, and install measures 
to reduce energy consumption or to introduce solar or 
other renewable energy resources. 



Description 



Through this new program, the Department of Energy 
(DOE) awards grants to states and territories for energy 
extension services that will help consumers learn about 
and adopt energy-efficient practices and technologies. 
Each state plans services in response to local needs; the 
DOE provides guidance and technical assistance only, not 
direction, to the states. The Extension Service is primarily 
intended to benefit small-scale energy consumers 
— homeowners, small businesses, public institutions — and 
groups that influence energy consumption, such as 
architects and builders. Assistance is provided directly to 
the consumer through building audits, special training, 
workshops, and hotlines. 



Example 



Ten states were awarded approximately $1 .4 million each 
for 1978 and 1979 to plan and implement pilot energy 
extension services. The remaining states received $45,000 
to follow the pilot programs. A state office, state university 
system, or combination of both administered the pildt 
programs. Existing delivery systems were used whenever 
possible; for example, a majority of the states worked 
through the Department of Agriculture's Cooperative 
Extension Service (see no. 24). States were permitted 
great flexibility in selecting target audiences and services. 
The pilot program in Connecticut offered workshops to 
those responsible for church and museum buildings as 
part of its effort to stimulate energy conservation in 
municipal buildings. In Wisconsin, Extension Service staff 
convinced the Milwaukee government to finance energy 
conservation measures in a public library, now a center 
for energy-related educational programs and conservation 
services throughout the state. 



Comment 



The program extends only through September 30, 1979; 
however, prospects appear good for its reauthorization 
and funding sufficient for extension services in all states. 



Contact for Information 



State energy office or Institutional Buildings Grants 
Programs Division, Office of Conservation and Solar 
Applications, Department of Energy, Washington, 
DC 20585 



Contact for Information 



Energy Extension Service, Department of Energy, 20 
Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20585 



54/ Historian's Office 



53/ Energy Extension Service 



What/For Whom 



Information and technical assistance for organizations and 
individuals. 



What/For Whom 



Historical studies of federal energy policy, published in 
professional journals and in book fcrm. The public may 
use the archives with assistance from the staff when time 
permits. Occasionally, researchers are contracted by the 
Office or serve on the staff as visiting scholars to conduct 
energy-related historical research. 



Department of Energy 



54/55 



Description 



Studies of federal energy policy and the agencies 
responsible for its development are sponsored. Many 
specialized history fields — social history, women's history, 
environmental, urban, or diplomatic history — may have 
relevance to studies of energy policy. The staff has 
produced a two-volume history of the Atomic Energy 
Commission, a history of the nuclear navy, papers for 
presentation at professional meetings, and articles for 
publication in journals. Archives are open to the public for 
research purposes. A newsletter, Energy History Report, is 
planned for publication four times yearly. 

Through the Visiting Scholar Program, two academic 
researchers each year receive 12-month 
Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) assignments (see 
no. 237) to the Office. During 1979, a faculty member from 
Michigan State University in East Lansing undertook a 
history of household energy consumption in the United 
States, and a researcher from Brown University in 
Providence, R.I., wrote a history of solar energy 
development. Two outside contractors were retained for 
research projects by the Office during the same year. 



Exhibits Branch 

Exhibits explaining in nontechnical terms DOE programs, 
energy, environment, and conservation are made available 
without charge to sponsoring organizations Exhibits cover 
a wide range of energy topics and vary in size and 
mobility; large sophisticated units are designed for 
extended showings in science museums; others are 
assembled for professional conventions, shopping 
centers, libraries, fairs, or other large public places. 
Requests for exhibits should be made well in advance. 
For information on the program, contact Museum Division, 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak 
Ridge, TN 37830. 



National Energy Information Center 

The Center responds to requests from the general public 
for energy-related data and information, distributes 
statistical and analytical publications, and refers inquiries 
to other sources of assistance if necessary. Inquiries 
should be addressed to the National Energy Information 
Center, Department of Energy, 1726 M Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20461. 



Contact for Information 



Historian's Office, Executive Secretariat, Department of 
Energy, Washington, DC 20585 



55/ Information Sources 



Speakers Bureau 

Speakers are available from the DOE in Washington, DC, 
regional offices, and field offices to discuss energy issues 
at local, regional, and national forums. Speakers cannot 
accept honoraria, travel, or other expenses from the 
sponsoring organization. For further information, contact 
the Speakers Bureau, Office of Public Affairs, at the 
address below. 



What/For Whom 



Information and publications for the public Exhibits and 
motion pictures lent without charge to educational, civic, 
and other organizations for noncommercial showing. 



Description 



The Department of Energy (DOE) disseminates scientific, 
technical, and practical information relating to energy 
through a number of different programs. 



Citizens' Workshops 

Operated for DOE by educational and research 
institutions, such as museums and colleges, these 
workshops are designed to acquaint the public with the 
complexities of the energy-environment situation and 
provide an opportunity for discussion of related issues. 
Any organization may sponsor a workshop, ranging from 
one to three hours in length for 25 or more participants. 
Occasionally sponsors pay the costs of the DOE 
workshop leader's transportation and expenses. For 
further information, contact the Office of Public Affairs at 
the address below. 



Technical Information Center 

The Center responds to public requests for publications 
and information on energy production, use. and 
conservation from students, teachers, and nontechnical 
persons at all educational levels Staff refer inquiries to 
appropriate publications, libraries, and other information 
sources. Specialized information packets are prepared for 
use by classes, professional groups, and training 
programs. 

The Center also maintains a motion picture film library and 
free loan service. The Energy Films Catalog describes the 
collection of 92 motion pictures and explains borrowing 
procedures. Among these films are Energy — The 
American Experience, which illustrates the development of 
different forms of energy over the past 200 years. For 
further information, contact the Technical Information 
Center, Department of Energy, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, 
TN 37830 or Motion Picture Officer, Office of Public 
Affairs, at the address below. 



Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Department of Energy, 
Washington, DC 20585 



Department of Energy 



56 



/ Solar Heating and Cooling 
Demonstration Program 

What/For Whom 

Contracts with public or private agencies or organizations. 

Description 

The Department of Energy (DOE) awards funds for 
demonstrations of solar heating and cooling systems for 
residential and commercial buildings. Commercial projects 
have included a wide variety of building types, such as 
community centers, factories, fire stations, libraries, 
offices, and schools. Projects have tested both passive 
solar technology, which transfers energy by such natural 
means as convection, conduction, evaporation, and 
radiation, and active solar technology, which uses 
compressors, fans, pumps, and other equipment. 

Two useful guides to commercial projects may be 
purchased from the National Technical Information 
Service, Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, 
Springfield, VA 22161 . The Solar Heating and Cooling 
Demonstration Project Summaries briefly describes 
projects and their solar systems and equipment. The 
National Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial 
Demonstration Program Key Personnel Directory lists 
names and addresses of those responsible for each 
project: owners, architects, solar designers, and others. 
The National Solar Heating and Cooling Information Center 
provides additional information (see no. 105). 

Example 

DOE sponsored more than 190 commercial 
demonstrations in three funding cycles prior to 1979. The 



Department of Housing and Urban Development, which 
manages the residential part of the program, selected 
more than 11,500 dwellings during its first four cycles. 
Cultural facilities were selected for commercial 
demonstrations in several communities. For example, 
Orange County in California received $117,215 to install a 
solar heating and cooling system in the El Toro Branch 
Library. An award of $126,351 was made to San Luis, 
Colo., to install solar collectors on an adobe building 
intended to serve the city as a museum, shopping, and 
office complex. The Kansas Science and Arts Foundation 
received $160,341 to install a solar heating system for the 
Kansas Cosmosphere and Discovery Center, a museum in 
Hutchinson Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass., 
received $355,027 to install a solar energy system for a 
building that houses arts practice halls. An award of 
$113,000 was made to install a passive solar system in 
the Nambe Indian Pueblo, a tribal community center in 
Santa Fe, N.Mex. 



Comment 

The legislation that authorizes this program, the Solar 
Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974, expires 
in 1979 Whether new legislation will be introduced in 
Congress to create a new or expanded solar 
demonstration authority is as yet unknown. 



Contact for Information 



Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program, 
Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Solar 
Application, Department of Energy, Washington, 
DC 20585 or National Solar Heating and Coo.ing 
Information Center, P.O. Box 1607, Rockville, MD 20850 



57/58 



Department of 
Health, Education, 
and Welfare 



57/ Introduction 



The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) 
is the cabinet-level agency concerned with improving 
health, education, human services, and income security in 
the United States. Cultural institutions and projects whose 
purposes address one of these broad goals have 
received assistance from HEW. 

Major subagencies within HEW include: the Education 
Division, the Office of Human Development Services, the 
Public Health Service, and the Social Security 
Administration. The Education Division (see nos. 65-102) 
administers programs that directly support the arts and 
humanities, such as the Arts Education Program (see no. 
67) and the Institute of Museum Services (see no. 88), as 
well as programs with the potential of assisting cultural 
activities. The Office of Human Development Services (see 
nos. 58, 59, 62, 63) administers social and rehabilitation 
programs designed to deal with the problems of specific 
socioeconomic groups including the elderly, Native 
Americans, children of low-income families, and persons 
with mental or physical handicaps. 

The Public Health Service supports health-related 
planning, research, and training through six operating 
agencies. One of these, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and 
Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA), is responsible 
for the prevention, control, and treatment of alcohol 
and drug abuse and mental and emotional illness. 
Community-based treatment centers may offer programs 
in arts, crafts, or cultural heritage as part of therapeutic 
services. Scientific research related to mental health 
has been supported in such areas as anthropology, 
ethnography, sociology, social psychology, and 
sociolinguistics. 

Four private nonprofit educational institutions receive a 
substantial portion of their operating expenses from HEW 
appropriations. The American Printing House for the Blind, 
located in Louisville, Ky., distributes braille books, talking 
books, and other educational materials without cost to 
educational institutions for visually impaired students in 
elementary and secondary schools. Gallaudet College 
provides undergraduate, graduate, and continuing 
education in the liberal arts and sciences for 
hearing-impaired students. The College also administers 
two national demonstration schools, Kendall 
Demonstration Elementary School and Model Secondary 



School for the Deaf, which are located on the Gallaudet 
College campus in Washington, D.C. The National 
Technical Institute for the Deaf is the national college for 
deaf students, located in Rochester, NY., offering courses 
in graphic arts, photography, and visual communications 
technologies. Howard University, committed to the 
education of black and minority students, offers academic 
and professional programs in many fields, including fine 
arts, liberal arts, architecture and planning, law, and 
religion. Research institutes in the arts and the humanities, 
urban affairs, and educational policy are among those 
administered by the University. 

Many offices within HEW provide information to the public. 
For example, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) enforces 
laws banning federal financial assistance to programs or 
institutions that discriminate on the basis of race, color, 
national origin, sex, age, or physical and mental handicap. 
OCR carries on a technical assistance program to help 
recipients of HEW assistance comply voluntarily with the 
Section 504 regulations of the Rehabilitation Act (see no. 
208), and through its publications, and responses to 
individual inquiries, helps disabled persons and others 
understand Section 504 policy and regulations. The Office 
for Handicapped Individuals (OHI) responds to inquiries 
from disabled individuals and their resource organizations 
and makes referrals to other information sources. OHI 
publications include: a newsletter, Programs Serving the 
Handicapped; a resource guide, Recreation and Leisure 
for Handicapped Individuals; and Federal Assistance for 
Programs Serving the Handicapped, to be updated in 
1979. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Public Affairs, Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare, 200 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, 
DC 20201 



58/ Administration on Aging 



What/For Whom __ 

Formula grants to state agencies on aging which in turn 
make grants to local area agencies on aging. Public and 
private profit and nonprofit agencies and organizations 
may receive grants from or contract with state and area 
agencies for specific projects. 

Description 



The Administration on Aging (AOA) administers a program 
of formula grants to states to support planning and 
delivery of nutritional and social services to older persons, 
and several programs of discretionary grants to public 
and private nonprofit agencies and organizations for 
research, training, and model projects. Cultural programs 
in which older persons participate have been sponsored 



Department off Health, Education, and Welfare 



58 59 60 



through the formula grant program; recreation and 
education are considered components of social services. 
Arts and humanities programs are more likely to receive 
support if offered in such settings as senior centers, 
housing projects, public libraries, homes for the aged, 
retirement centers, and educational or cultural institutions. 

State plans are submitted to the Commissioner of AOA 
and local area plans to the state every three years. These 
plans determine what activities will be funded during the 
planning period. Each area agency is required to award at 
least half of its social services funds for access, in-home, 
and legal services. Special attention is directed to the 
needs of disadvantaged older persons. 

State agencies on aging allocate funds to more than 500 
area agencies to plan social services for the elderly at the 
local level. Since both the state and area agencies are 
prohibited by law from actually delivering services, they 
enter into granting or contractual arrangements with public 
or private profit or nonprofit agencies and organizations. 

Example 

During 1979, state and area agencies obligated $197 
million for planning and services. Cultural programs were 
among the services sponsored. For example, in Baltimore 
County, Md., the Commission on Arts and Sciences and 
the Commission on Aging have pooled resources to 
sponsor an artists-in-residence program at sites 
throughout the county. The Iowa Arts Council provides 
matching grants to community groups that wish to 
establish arts and aging programs Ten area agencies on 
aging have provided matching funds to establish such 
programs. The Rhode Island Division on Aging and the 
State Arts Council have jointly funded a statewide arts 
program for the elderly, including special performances 
and artists-in-residence. 



ensure compliance with federal law that requires all 
buildings and facilities owned, occupied, or financed by 
the federal government to be accessible to disabled 
persons. The Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare is the chairing agency of the Board, composed of 
representatives from nine federal agencies. Persons with a 
complaint about an inaccessible building should write to 
the Board. A brochure entitled Access America: The 
Architectural Barriers Act and You describes the 
enforcement rules and complaint process. An additional 
responsibility of the Board is to study alternative 
approaches to architectural, transportation, and attitudinal 
barriers and determine measures to be taken by nonprofit 
and governmental agencies to alter these barriers. Finally, 
the Board develops and distributes public information 
materials. A Resource Guide to Literature on a Barrier 
Free Environment contains 1 ,500 entries on research 
studies, surveys, and standards 

Comment 

The Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1978 expanded the 
1973 law to give the Board authority to provide technical 
assistance to agencies and individuals affected by 
regulations set forth to remove architectural, 
transportation, and communications barriers. Congress 
has not approved funding for the technical assistance 
authority to date. (See nos. 57 and 208 for sources of 
information on making buildings and activities more 
accessible to disabled persons.) 

Contact for Information 

Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance 
Board, 330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC 20201 



Contact for Information 



Area or state agencies on aging or Administration on 
Aging, Office of Human Development Services, 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
Washington, DC 20201 



/ Architectural and 
Transportation 
Barriers Compliance Board 

What/For Whom 

Information, investigation of complaints about inaccessible 
buildings, and enforcement, for the general public. 

Description 

The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance 
Board was created by Congress in 1973 primarily to 



60/ HEW Fellows Program 



What/For Whom 



Twelve-month appointments at the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare (HEW) for U.S. citizens with a 
record of community service and social concern, 
appropriate education, and specialized administrative 
experience. 



Description 



The HEW Fellows Program identifies and encourages men 
and women whose experience in education, management, 
administration, or community matters indicates their 
potential to become leaders in government or other areas 
of national service. Qualified individuals compete for 
one-year assignments in key departmental positions in 
Washington, DC, and in HEW regional offices. Salaries 
for Fellows are based on each individual's academic 
background, experience, and prior earnings. The purpose 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



60/61/62 



of the program is to develop the management and 
policy-making talents of the Fellows, to introduce their 
perspectives into the federal government, and to promote 
public understanding of government. Fellows resume their 
previous employment at the end of their assignment. 
Approximately 20 appointments are made each year. An 
educational program of lectures, seminars, and 
consultations with participants from similar programs, 
including White House and Congressional Fellows, is 
designed for each class of HEW Fellows. 

Contact for Information 



warranted, a NIOSH representative will inspect the place 
of employment and collect and analyze samples. A full 
report including recommendations is sent to the employer, 
the representative of employees, and to the Department of 
Labor. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Division of Technical Services, 
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 4676 
Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 



The Director, HEW Fellows Program, 330 Independence 
Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20201 



61/ National Institute for 

Occupational Safety and Health 

What/For Whom 



Information and technical assistance for the general 
public. 

Description 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 
(NIOSH) is responsible for recommending occupational 
safety and health standards, conducting related research, 
and providing technical assistance and information about 
occupational health hazards to the public. Artists and 
craftspersons frequently are exposed to toxic chemicals 
and substances: benzene and lead in painting and 
silk-screening; mercury and potassium in photography; 
silica dust in pottery; asbestos fibers in stone carving; 
hazardous vapors in print-making and furniture-stripping; 
and cadmium in jewelry making. Health hazards in the 
performing arts and children's arts materials have also 
been identified. Two sources within the agency offer direct 
assistance to workers, including artists and craftspersons. 

The Clearinghouse for Occupational Safety and Health 
Information responds to specific inquiries for information 
concerning occupational safety and health. Pamphlets, 
excerpts from journals, and computer searches of the 
comprehensive NIOSH data base are available, 
depending on the limitations of staff time. For example, a 
request to the Clearinghouse for information on the 
potential hazards of arts and crafts produced a packet of 
materials on various occupational health hazards. 

Any employer or authorized representative of employees 
may request that NIOSH determine whether exposure to 
substances found in a work place could be toxic to 
employees. The written request for an investigation is 
submitted to the Hazard Evaluations and Technical 
Assistance Branch or the Clearinghouse (see above) at 
the address below. If staff decide an investigation is 



62/ Rehabilitation Services 

Administration Special Projects 

What/For Whom 

Grants to and contracts with state vocational rehabilitation 
agencies, and nonprofit organizations or institutions. 

Description 

This program provides funds to state vocational 
rehabilitation agencies and related nonprofit organizations 
to expand and improve rehabilitation services and 
projects for physically, mentally, or emotionally disabled 
individuals. Projects that prepare handicapped persons 
for gainful employment or train individuals for new career 
opportunities or independent living may be considered for 
funding. Although neither arts nor humanities programs for 
disabled persons are specifically authorized by the 
legislation (the Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, 
and Developmental Disabilities Amendments of 1978), 
social and recreational activities are eligible for support, 
and may include a cultural component. Eligible costs 
include those for restorative and training services, facilities 
improvement, and technical assistance. 

Example 



In 1978, slightly over $7 million was appropriated for the 
program. Fifty projects have received support since 1976. 
Funding was provided to the North Carolina Museum of 
Art for a permanent gallery specially designed so that 
blind persons can "see" works of art through the sense of 
touch. The design of the gallery allows the blind visitor to 
be completely self-sufficient. 

Contact for Information 



State vocational rehabilitation offices or HEW regional 
offices (see Appendix B) or Rehabilitation Services 
Administration, Office of Human Development Services, 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
Washington, DC 20201 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



63/64 



63/ Social Services Programs 
(Title XX) 



What/For Whom 

Formula grants to states; state agencies provide funds to 
local counterpart public agencies and contract with public 
and private nonprofit agencies and organizations. 



Contact for Information 



State Title XX agencies (addresses and telephones 
available from the following Washington, D.C., 
address) or Social Services Programs, Administration 
for Public Services, Office of Human Development 
Services, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
Washington, DC 20201 



64/ Surplus Real Property Transfers 



Description 



Under Title XX of the Social Security Act, the federal 
government allocates funds to states to administer public 
social service programs. The goals of the Act are to help 
people become self-sufficient and economically self- 
supporting; to strengthen family life and protect children 
and vulnerable adults from abuse, neglect, and 
exploitation; to prevent inappropriate institutionalization by 
making home and community services available; and to 
arrange for placement in an institution when appropriate. 
Primary responsibility rests with the individual state for 
deciding what services to offer, where, and to whom. The 
Secretary of HEW cannot withhold federal funds in 
disagreement with the state's interpretation or definition of 
such services. 

Among the many social services offered by the various 
states are day care for children and adults, education and 
training, employment services, recreation, and services for 
disabled persons, alcohol and drug abusers, and others. 
Cultural programs could be sponsored for recreational 
purposes with Title XX funds. Crafts production could be 
encouraged as a source of income and personal 
fulfillment for the economically deprived. 

The federal government pays 75 percent of most program 
costs; funds must be provided to match the federal 
contribution from state and local appropriations and 
donations from individuals, organizations, and foundations. 
In 1979, $2.9 billion was available for allocation among the 
states based on population. For most services, eligibility is 
limited to persons whose income is 1 15 percent of, or 
below, the state median, although more restrictive 
eligibility standards exist in some states. 

By law, citizens, private nonprofit groups, and groups 
representing recipients can review and comment annually 
on the state's social services plan for the coming year. 
States are required to publish a proposed comprehensive 
plan, describing services, specific populations to be 
served, estimated costs, and proposed uses of public and 
private agencies and volunteers. The public has at least 
45 days to review the plan and submit comments, which 
the state agency is to consider in formulating the final 
plan. The degree to which individuals can affect the Title 
XX planning process depends upon their knowledge of 
the state plan, political expertise, and the competition for 
funds among providers and recipients of social services. 



What/For Whom 



Real property sold or leased at discounts of up to 100 
percent to state and local governmental agencies, 
tax-supported institutions, and nonprofit tax-exempt 
educational and health institutions, such as colleges, 
universities, public libraries, museums, vocational schools, 
elementary and secondary schools. 



Description 



Federal real property no longer needed by federal 
agencies may be sold or leased as surplus real property 
for educational or health purposes at discounts of up to 
100 percent, depending on the public benefits anticipated 
from the transfer. Real property 'includes buildings, 
fixtures, and equipment as well as the land upon which 
these are situated. 

Application for the transfer of surplus real property for 
public park, recreation, or historic monument use is made 
through the Department of the interior (see no. 129). Sales 
of surplus real property are arranged through the General 
Services Administration (see no. 161). A pamphlet entitled 
How to Acquire Federal Surplus Real Property for Health 
and Educational Purposes is available from the addresses 
below. 



Example 



In some cases, educational facilities on property acquired 
through a transfer from HEW have become permanent 
cultural resource* for their communities. The former Army 
Reserve Center at Buffalo, in Millersport, NY., was 
conveyed to the town of Amherst, NY., in 1972 for use as 
a museum. Exhibits of historical materials are 
complemented by regular educational programs for local 
school districts; a display of Iroquois artifacts was recently 
lent to the museum. The museum also provides instructors 
and loan kits for use in grades K-12, and instructional 
courses and materials for college- and postgraduate-level 
credit courses in "Museum Theory and Practice" offered 
by the State University at Buffalo. 

In June 1974, the former U.S. Post Office in Hopkinsville, 
Ky., was conveyed to the city of Hopkinsville; renamed the 
Pennyroyal Museum, the facility houses cultural and 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



64/65 



historical artifacts, offers classes in local history, and 
provides classroom space for community college courses. 
The former Commandant's House at the Naval Ammunition 
Depot, in Hingham, Mass., was deeded to the South 
Shore Conservatory of Music in 1974. The acquisition 
permitted the conservatory to expand its offerings to 
students from preschool to adult levels. In addition to 
music, the conservatory offers courses in ballet, modern 
dance, and music appreciation; free concerts; exhibitions; 
guest appearances by well-known artists; and educational 
workshops. 

Comment 

The General Services Administration has proposed that all 
surplus federal real property be subject to a "perpetual 
use" restriction, that property conveyed to a health-care or 
educational institution may revert to the United States if 
ever used for other than health or educational purposes. 
Existing regulations stipulate that after 30 years, the 
institution will have a clear title to the property. 

Contact for Information 

Real Estate Planning and Management Branch, HEW 
regional offices (see Appendix B) or Division of Realty, 
Office of Facilities Engineering, Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC 20201 



65/ Introduction 

Education Division 



The Education Division was created in 1972 to coordinate 
the educational programs and activities of the Department 
of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW). The Division's 
purpose is to direct federal attention to educational needs 
of national significance. Local school districts and state 
governments still maintain primary responsibility for public 
education in the United States. Federal financial 
assistance is frequently targeted for disadvantaged 
groups; low-income or physically disabled students; 
special curricular areas such as basic skills or 
international studies; and shortages of educational 
personnel and instructional materials. More than two-thirds 
of the Division's budget is allocated for postsecondary 
student financial aid and for elementary and secondary 
education programs operated through local and state 
education agencies. Although relatively few of the 
Division's programs assist arts or humanities education 
directly, many sponsor projects such as career education 
or teacher training which introduce students and teachers 
to cultural institutions and fields of study. 

The Division consists of the National Institute of Education 
(see nos. 95, 76), the Office of Education (see nos. 
66-102), and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for 



Education, which oversees the Federal Interagency 
Committee on Education (FICE), the Fund for the 
Improvement of Postsecondary Education (see no. 84), 
the Institute of Museum Services (see no. 88), and the 
National Center for Education Statistics (see no. 92). FICE 
exercises leadership, provides coordination, and advises 
heads of agencies in all areas of federal educational 
activity; approximately 30 agencies and Cabinet 
departments are represented on the Committee, which 
meets monthly. The Subcommittee on Arts and Education 
explores ways in which the arts can assist in achieving 
educational objectives of agency programs. 

The Office of Education (OE) is the largest of the 
subagencies, administering in 1979 more than 120 
funding programs with a budget of more than $12.5 
billion OE is organized into seven bureaus, several 
programs within the Commissioner's immediate office, and 
10 regional offices (see Appendix B). The bureaus are as 
follows: Bureau of Education for the Handicapped; Bureau 
of Elementary and Secondary Education; Bureau of 
Occupational and Adult Education; Bureau of 
Postsecondary Education; Bureau of School Improvement; 
Bureau of Student Financial Assistance; and the Office of 
Indian Education. The regional offices provide technical 
assistance and information about federal policies and 
programs and help educators use federal resources to 
plan educational programs. Staff advise grant seekers on 
federal funding, priorities, and application procedures. 

Guidelines describing program purpose, eligible 
applicants, and program costs are published in the 
Federal Register (see no. 172) and can be ordered from 
staff of those programs that offer grants or fellowships. 
Most of these programs operate on annual funding cycles 
with single deadlines for proposals each fiscal year. 
Contracts usually are announced in the Commerce 
Business Daily (see no. 25). The legislative authorizations 
for most of the Education Division programs, the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as 
amended, and the Higher Education Act of 1965, as 
amended, are renewed every few years, creating new 
programs and amending or terminating old ones. The 
timing of funding cycles and the appropriation levels 
approved by Congress vary from year to year. Thus, 
potential applicants should contact the program of interest 
directly for the most current information. 

Although private elementary and secondary schools are 
ineligible for direct federal assistance, many programs 
permit, and others require, that federally funded projects 
serve students in private as well as in public schools. For 
example, private school students may participate in Arts 
Education or Ethnic Heritage Studies projects; they must 
receive equitable services under Title IV of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act (see no. 77). Questions 
about federal laws authorizing services for private school 
students should be addressed to the Office of Nonpublic 
Education Services, Office of Education. Washington, 
DC 20202. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



65/66 



The Office of Public Affairs is a source of general 
information about the agency. It maintains a mailing list of 
persons wishing to receive press releases, which 
announce new programs, regulations, and grants 
awarded. The Office publishes the periodical American 
Education 1 times a year and the annual Guide to OE 
Programs, a magazine reprint that summarizes all the 
agency's programs. These publications can be ordered 
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government 
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. 

Comment 

At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, legislation 
to create a Department of Education at the Cabinet level 
was under consideration in Congress. If the proposal 
becomes law, the Education Division will be removed from 
HEW and merged with education programs from several 
federal agencies, including some of the science education 
programs of the National Science Foundation (see nos. 
223, 224). Although such changes could affect the 
administration of programs within the Education Division, 
their impact on the purposes, funding procedures, and 
eligibility requirements of individual programs will be 
slight, since these are legally determined by each 
program's authorizing legislation. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Public Affairs, Office of Education, Washington, 
DC 20202 



66/ American Indian Education 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to Indian tribes, organizations, and institutions; 
federally supported Indian schools; local, nonlocal, and 
state education agencies; and individuals. 

Description 

The Office of Indian Education administers the Indian 
Education Act, Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965, as amended The Act's purpose is 
to meet the special educational and related cultural needs 
of Indian students. Instruction in native languages and 
cultural heritage is an important aspect of these programs. 
Grants are authorized under Parts A, B, and C of the Act 



operating, and testing programs to meet the special 
educational and related cultural needs of Indian children. 
Example: A grant of $104,955 in 1978 to Tucson Unified 
School District in Arizona provided a program of cultural 
awareness activities, including Indian speakers, films, field 
trips to museums and cultural events in the local Indian 
community, and an Indian week, featuring craft 
demonstrations, dancing exhibitions, and folklore. 



Grants to Nonlocal Educational Agencies (Part A) 

Discretionary grants are made to Indian-controlled schools 
located on or near reservations to meet the special 
educational and related cultural needs of Indian students. 
Example: Grants ranged from $60,000 to $258,000 in 
1978. A grant of $93,500 was awarded to Chinle Valley 
School in Arizona to develop a bilingual curriculum for 
mentally retarded Navajo children. 



Special Programs and Projects (Part B) 

Grants are made to support planning, pilot, and 
demonstration projects; exemplary and innovative 
education projects; educational services not otherwise 
available; educational personnel development programs; 
and an Indian Fellowships Program. The discretionary 
grants are awarded on a competitive basis to Indian 
tribes, organizations, and institutions, and to state and 
local education agencies. Fellowships are awarded to 
individuals. Example: Awards ranged from $56,000 to 
$446,300 in 1978. The average fellowship award was 
$5,000. A grant of $192,216 was awarded to Rocky Boy 
Elementary School District in Montana for a bilingual/ 
bicultural program to preserve the history, culture, and 
customs of the Chippewa-Cree Tribes and to create new 
reading materials in the Cree language. 



Adult Indian Education (Part C) 

Grants are awarded to support planning, pilot, and 
demonstration projects; educational services; and surveys. 
These discretionary grants are awarded on a competitive 
basis to Indian tribes, institutions, and organizations, and 
to local and state educational agencies. Example: Awards 
ranged from $54 v 400 to $300,000 in 1978. A grant of 
$71,710 was awarded to the Narragansett Tribe of Rhode 
Island to provide adult basic education, General 
Equivalency Diplomas, and Narragansett culture and 
language. The educational and cultural activities are 
according to Narragansett tradition and are conducted in 
the longhouse. 



Grants to Local Educational Agencies (Part A) 

Formula grants are made to local education agencies 
including tribal schools for planning, developing, 



Contact for Information 



Office of Indian Education, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



67/68 



67/ Arts Education Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Contracts with and grants to state and local education 
agencies and other nonprofit agencies, organizations, and 
institutions. 

Description 

As stated in Title III of the 1978 amendments to the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act: 

"A) the arts should be an essential and vital component of 
every student's education; 

B) the arts provide students with useful insights to all 
other areas of learning; and 

C) a Federal program is necessary to foster and maintain 
the interrelationship of arts and education." 

The major objective of the new Arts Education Program 
regulations is to address arts education needs on a 
community, district, or statewide level utilizing all available 
cultural and educational resources within the broadened 
target area. Through 1978, the Program provided small 
"seed'' grants ($10,000 or less) to many state and local 
education agencies. For example, with the 1978 
appropriation of $750,000, 79 such grants were awarded. 
By contrast, the new regulations stipulate larger awards to 
fewer projects with a 50 percent local match required. The 
1980 appropriation of $1.25 million will be used to fund 
under 20 projects. The amendments have broadened 
applicant eligibility to include not only state and local 
education agencies but also nonprofit public and private 
agencies, organizations, and institutions such as libraries, 
museums, theaters, and universities. Projects must be 
designed to provide all students in project schools with 
opportunities to acquire skill in several media, including at 
least dance, music, theater, and the visual arts, and 
programs should integrate these arts into standard school 
curricula rather than treat them as elective courses or 
after-school activities. 

The 1979 regulations require that applicants use 
community arts resources in developing and conducting 
programs, that state and local education agencies 
strengthen their ties with community arts resources, and 
that new initiatives be encouraged from nonschool arts 
resources. It is suggested that professional artists be used 
to train teachers and administrators. Funds may be used 
for such activities as leadership training and staff 
development, community awareness programs, technical 
assistance, curriculum development, planning, project 
evaluation, and documentation. Grants will be awarded to 
projects meeting the arts education needs of states; urban 
areas or large cities; and rural or small communities. 

The Office of Education funds the Alliance for Arts 
Education (AAE), which, in turn, supports the 50-state 
Alliance for Arts Education network. Located in the 



Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, 
DC, the Alliance has initiated and participated in many 
activities designed to increase cooperation between 
national and state agencies and organizations to improve 
programs in arts education. All 50 states have established 
State Alliance Committees that work cooperatively with 
education agencies and arts organizations. AAE and the 
State Committees disseminate materials describing their 
work as well as state program status reports, and they 
make available guides and films developed in cooperation 
with national professional arts education organizations. 
Regional conferences are held to plan and exchange 
information, and consultant services are made available to 
states on request. For a description of demonstrations, 
performances, and showcase presentations cosponsored 
by AAE, see no. 251. 

Contact for Information 

Arts Education Program, Office of Education, Washington, 
DC 20202 or Alliance for Arts Education, John F. 
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, 
DC 20566 



68/ Bilingual Education Programs 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Grants to state and local education agencies, institutions 
of higher education, and private nonprofit organizations. 



Description 



The purpose of bilingual education programs is to provide 
instruction in the English language and the native 
languages of children of "limited English proficiency" in 
elementary and secondary schools. Limited proficiency is 
defined as the inability to speak, read, write, or 
understand the English language well enough to progress 
through the educational system. Every program must 
demonstrate appreciation for the cultural heritage of 
children from all backgrounds. 

Basic Program 

Grants are made to local education agencies, alone or 
jointly with an institution of higher education, to plan, 
establish, operate, or improve programs of bilingual 
education; to provide supplementary community 
educational activities such as adult or preschool 
education; to provide training for personnel conducting 
basic programs; and to arrange for technical assistance. 
Applicants must set forth plans to use area cultural and 
educational resources, which may include educational 
radio and television, institutions of higher education, 
museums, and musical and artistic organizations. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



68/69 



Example: In 1978, 565 grants totaling $94.6 million were 
made for basic programs that covered 64 languages. 
Several school districts have incorporated extensive 
cultural activities into their programs. Five hundred 
students in 13 schools participate in the Boston Public 
Schools Theatre Arts Project, which supplements the 
bilingual education program for six language populations 
Students learn acting techniques, discuss careers in the 
theater with actors and technicians, and produce and 
perform plays. Frankiin Northeast Supervisory Union in 
Richford, Vt., has engaged local craftspeople, a Maine 
theater group, and a French-Canadian dance troupe to 
teach students of this French-speaking population about 
their culture. John Jay High School in New York offers a 
program in graphic arts which employs cultural symbols of 
the Hispanic and Haitian populations. 

The San Antonio Independent School District in Texas has 
introduced bilingual education into speech and drama 
courses for high school students. Students designed, 
wrote, and produced programs in Spanish and English to 
be broadcast over closed-circuit television for the school 
and the community. The Skye City Community Schools 
project in New Mexico engages children in singing, 
dancing, and plays to increase their understanding of their 
culture, the Acomas Tribe of the Pueblo Group. The 
Terrebonne Parish School Board project in Louisiana 
employs dramatic skits, puppetry, songs, and local crafts 
instruction to teach children about their French Acadian 
culture, while offering practice in spoken language. 



programs are sponsored: the first supports personnel 
training programs and stipends for students enrolled in 
postsecondary bilingual education programs; the second 
provides fellowships to graduate students preparing to 
train others to become bilingual education teachers. In 
1979, 149 awards totaling $16 million were made. 

Comment 

The description above incorporates some of the changes, 
effective in 1980, legislated by Title VII of the Education 
Amendments of 1978. At the time the Cultural Directory 
went to press, final regulations for the program had not 
been published. These will clarify its structure and 
operation. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Bilingual Education, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



69/ Bureau of Education for the 
Handicapped Programs 

Education Division 



Support Services 

Grants are made to state and local education agencies 
and institutions of higher education to operate bilingual 
education centers for training and curriculum development 
in languages of the region. All basic programs are served 
by one of these centers. Training resource centers help 
bilingual education teachers and personnel undertake 
student evaluation and develop community liaisons and 
parental involvement. Materials development centers 
prepare curriculum and testing materials for the 
classroom, and teacher training materials for colleges and 
universities. Dissemination centers evaluate, publish, and 
distribute materials produced by development centers to 
school districts. 

Example: In 1979, 20 training resource centers, 19 
materials development centers, and 3 dissemination 
centers received a total of $18 million. The training center 
at Temple University in Philadelphia assists, in a nine-state 
area, local projects that operate in 14 languages — Arabic, 
Cherokee, Pennsylvania Dutch, Portuguese, Spanish, 
Tagalog, and Yiddish among them. The materials 
development center at Brown University in Providence, 
R.I., develops materials in Portuguese for the New 
England area. 

Training Program 

Grants are made to institutions of higher education and 
state and local education agencies. Two types of 



What/For Whom 



Grants to and contracts with state and local education 
agencies, higher education institutions, schools, vocational 
and technical institutes, public or private nonproiu 
agencies, organizations, and institutions. A free loan 
service of captioned films and other materials for 
hearing-impaired persons is available. 



Description 



The Bureau of Education for the Handicapped (BEH) 
administers more than 15 separate programs of 
assistance to improve the quality and delivery of 
educational services to handicapped children. Potential 
applicants should contact the Bureau for specific 
guidelines, forms, and eligibility requirements for each 
program. Although only a few Bureau-sponsored projects 
have emphasized the arts, their potential role in the 
education of disabled children is recognized. In 1975, the 
Bureau's authorizing legislation was amended by the 
Education of All Handicapped Children Act (Public Law 
94-142). The Report of the Senate hearings on this Act 
reflected strong congressional commitment to the arts as 
a resource for handicapped children, to the extent of 
"[urging] that local educational agencies include the arts 
in programs for the handicapped funded under this Act." 
Of the Bureau's 1979 appropriation, totaling $976.6 million 
($837.5 million for assistance to states), only a small 
percentage was awarded for cultural projects. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



69 



The Bureau's programs are administered under four 
divisions. 

Division of Assistance to States 

The Division monitors formula grants made to state 
education agencies to help them provide a free 
"appropriate" public education to all handicapped 
children, including necessary facilities, personnel, and 
■services. Each state submits to the Bureau an annual plan 
for statewide personnel training and local education 
programs that may incorporate cultural components. Local 
education agencies apply for funds to the state agency 
according to the plan, procedures, and priorities the state 
has established. According to a 1978 survey conducted 
by the National Center for Education Statistics (see no. 
92), 26 states have used BEH funds for arts projects. 

Division of Innovation and Development 

Several discretionary grants programs are administered 
by the Division. The Field Initiated Studies and Student 
Research Programs sponsor applied research, surveys, 
and demonstrations designed to generate knowledge and 
translate it into practical techniques and materials for 
disabled children's education. Model Programs for School 
Age Handicapped Children supports the development 
and demonstration of new or improved educational 
approaches; the Early Education Program supports model 
demonstration projects for preschool and early childhood 
education. 

Example: Several culturally related grants were given in 
1978. Central Midwestern Regional Educational Laboratory 
(CEMREL) in St. Louis, Mo., was awarded $70,180 for 
each of three years to develop a systematic method of 
adapting student arts materials for disabled students. A 
grant of $82,000 to Living Stage Improvisational Theatre 
Demonstration Program for Handicapped Children, 
created by Arena Stage of Washington, DC, provides 
theater workshops for children aged three to eight to 
encourage them to express feelings and creativity through 
music, dance, singing, acting, creative movement, and 
role modeling. The National Committee-Arts for the 
Handicapped (see no. 93), in Washington, DC, received 
$148,067 for a three-year effort to develop, field test, and 
disseminate the results of an arts-related curriculum model 
designed to enhance the cognitive growth and esthetic 
awareness of handicapped children. 

A research grant of $74,716 to the Smithsonian Institution 
supported a three-year effort to survey programs offered 
by museums to disabled students and produced detailed 
guidelines for museum educators to establish such 
programs. A research grant of $60,747 was made for the 
first year of a three-year project at the University of 
Kansas, Lawrence, to develop instructional packages and 
curriculum guidelines to help music teachers acquire the 
skills to provide music instruction to mildly handicapped 
children. The University of Kentucky Research Foundation 
in Lexington, Ky., was awarded a total of $1 16,681 for 



1978 through 1980 to develop an innovative program for 
teaching Appalachian folk crafts to handicapped children 
and youth. 



Division of Media Services 

Grants and contracts are made to support research, 
development, production, distribution, and training in the 
use of educational media and technology for handicapped 
persons, their families, employers, and others. The 
Division also supports the Captioned Films Library, a free 
loan service of films and other instructional materials for 
the educational, cultural, and vocational enrichment of 
hearing-impaired children and adults. Loans are available 
only to organizations or groups representing hearing- 
impaired persons. 

Example: Awards made in 1978 include one of $30,382 to 
Cara Smith, Inc., in Rockville, Md., for "Singing Signs," 
models of singing in sign language. Skye Pictures, Inc., 
in Richmond, Va., received $60,456 to employ model 
programs and materials to train museum staff and 
volunteers. Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, 
N.J., received $46,538 to develop and test "a new kinetic 
mode of presenting expressive and literary printed English 
to prelingually deaf adolescents and young adults." 



Division of Personnel Preparation 

Grants support preservice and inservice training of special 
educators and support personnel, including regular 
teachers, physical educators, recreation specialists, 
administrators, paraprofessionals, and volunteers. 
Undergraduate, graduate, and summer traineeships, 
special study institutes, and special projects are also 
sponsored. The Senate Report on Public Law 94-142 
remarked on the training of personnel: "It has been 
brought to the committee's attention that the arts can be 
used effectively as a teaching tool for handicapped 
children . . . increased attention should be given to training 
personnel in arts activities." 

Example: Illinois State University in Normal was awarded 
$35,000 in 1978 for a series of inservice training 
workshops to prepare arts teachers to teach disabled 
children, to train special education teachers to use the 
arts to promote learning in other academic areas, and to 
help both groups incorporate the arts into a total esthetic 
education program. A grant of $37,000 to the Texas 
Women's University Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on 
the Arts for the Handicapped sponsored an inservice 
education program for regular educators, teacher trainers, 
and volunteers, blending special education with visual art, 
music, dance, drama, and other art forms. 



Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program or Division), Bureau of Education for 
the Handicapped, Office of Education, Washington, 
DC 20202 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



70/71 



70/ Career Education Incentive 
Programs 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Formula grants to states; grants to and contracts with 
state and local education agencies, institutions of higher 
education, and public and private nonprofit agencies. 

Description 

The Career Education Incentive Act of 1977 established 
new programs to support educational projects that 
emphasize career awareness, exploration, decision 
making, and planning. Occupations in the arts and 
humanities are among the vocations that may be explored 
in these projects. Biased and stereotypical practices 
based on race, sex, age, economic status, and handicaps 
must be eliminated. The former Career Education 
Program, conducted by the Office of Education for four 
years, and the sponsor of 423 grants for career education 
demonstration projects, expired in the summer of 1978 



American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, 
Inc., in New York City received $75,000 to prepare a film, 
a study guide for teachers, student materials, and a 
training workshop to help teachers of foreign languages 
weave career education concepts into their curricula. With 
a $150,000 grant, the Children's Art Carnival in New York 
City provided workshops in the visual arts and writing and 
arranged apprenticeships for young people in culturally 
related careers. The Cultural Education Collaborative in 
Boston, Mass., received a contract of $125,000 for a 
model program demonstrating school system involvement 
with 17 Boston area cultural institutions, through visits, 
courses, and internships designed to acquaint students 
with the diversity of occupations within the cultural 
community. An $84,932 award to the National Council of 
Teachers of English based in Urbana, III., supported an 
effort to assess and improve its membership's knowledge 
and skills in career education. 

Contact for Information 

Career Education Program, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



State Allotment Program 

The majority of each state's allotment must be 
redistributed to local education agencies for a variety of 
comprehensive activities, such as career guidance, 
placement, and follow-up services; career education in the 
classroom; work experiences; training education 
personnel, parents, and community leaders; purchasing 
instructional materials; and cooperation with community 
groups. Based on its population, each state may request 
an allotment of at least $125,000 per year. 

Model Program 

Grants sponsor elementary- and secondary-level projects 
that demonstrate effective methods of career education 
that eliminate discrimination, bias, and stereotyping; 
encourage community and parent collaboration; and 
accommodate handicapped students in regular 
classrooms. 

Postsecondary Demonstration Program 

Grants or contracts are made for projects of national 
significance that promote career education in educational 
programs, guidance, counseling, placement, and 
follow-up services at a postsecondary level. 

Example 

Approximately $18,700,000 was appropriated in 1979 for 
state allotments and $1,000,000 for the Model Program. 
Several demonstration projects sponsored under the 
former Career Education Program illustrate ways in which 
cultural institutions may encourage career education. The 



71/ Citizen Education for Cultural 
Understanding Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to public or private nonprofit agencies or 
organizations, including institutions of higher education, 
local or state education agencies, professional 
associations, education consortia, and teacher 
organizations. Contracts are made with profit-making 
organizations. 

Description 

The purpose of this program is to stimulate locally 
designed educational projects to increase understanding 
in the United States about the cultures, actions, and 
policies of other nations and to encourage citizen 
awareness of th v e domestic and international ramifications 
of major policies of the United States and other nations. 
Funds may be used for three general purposes: to train 
educational personnel, to compile information and 
resources about international education, and to 
disseminate both information and resources. Proposals 
must evidence cooperation with appropriate segments of 
the local community. 

The program received an appropriation of $2 million in 
1979 Although a project may be concerned with any level 
of education — including adult, continuing, and community 
education — priority will be given to school-based 
programs in 1979, the initial year of funding. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



71/72 



Contact for Information 



Citizen Education for Cultural Understanding Program, 
Division of International Education, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Grants to Other Organizations 

Grants and contracts are awarded to public agencies and 
nonprofit organizations to promote efficient and 
coordinated delivery of community services. Applicants 
must have an agreement to work with a local education 
agency. 



72/ Community Education Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

•Grants to local and state education agencies, institutions 
of higher education; grants to and contracts with public 
agencies and nonprofit private organizations. 



State Grants 

A state education agency may apply for a population- 
based allotment of funds by submitting a plan for 
community education that includes assurances that all 
age groups and special populations will be served and 
that community institutions, groups, and parents will be 
involved on an advisory basis. Eighty percent of the state 
allotment must be distributed among local education 
agencies for community education programs. 



Description 



Financial assistance is given to help community schools 
collaborate with public and nonprofit agencies to provide 
comprehensive cultural, educational, health care, 
recreational, and related services to the local community 
Every community education program is based at a 
community center — such as an elementary or secondary 
school, community or junior college — operated by a local 
education agency in conjunction with other community 
groups. Each program should serve all age groups within 
the community, identify and document community needs, 
identify and use community resources outside the school, 
and actively involve on an advisory basis groups and 
persons served by the program. 

A few of the many types of programs that could be 
supported are services for mentally or physically disabled 
persons; training programs for community education 
personnel; high school curricula organized around such 
specialized interests as the arts; collaborative efforts 
among secondary schools, museums, cultural centers, 
and institutions of higher education; and leisure education. 
Typically, grants are used to pay the administrative and 
coordinating costs of programs. State or local grantees 
may use the fair value of their community education 
programs to meet matching requirements of certain other 
federal programs specifically identified in the legislation — 
for example, the Administration on Aging programs (see 
no. 58), the Community Service and Continuing Education 
program (see no. 73), and the science education 
programs of the National Science Foundation (see no. 
224). 

Four major categories of financial assistance, described 
below, are authorized. 

Grants to Local Education Agencies 

Grants are made to local education agencies to plan, 
establish, expand, and operate community education 
programs. Matching funds of 10 to 20 percent are 
required. 



Training Grants 

Grants are made to institutions of higher education to 
provide full- and part-time training for community 
education personnel, both preservice and inservice. 



Example 

Community Education received a $3.1 million 
appropriation in 1979. Approximately $3.5 million was 
awarded to 92 grantees in 1977. Many recipient programs 
sponsored arts and cultural enrichment as one aspect of 
community education services. A grant of $30,000 to the 
Bowling Green-Warren County Community Education 
Board in Kentucky helped the board offer, in 19 area 
schools and community centers, a broad range of 
educational, recreational, and social service activities. 
Among these were children's arts, crafts, and drama; 
mime; modern dance; photography; pottery; and 
woodworking. The Claiborne County Board of Education in 
Tazewell, Tenn., received $26,490 for a project that 
included a National Gallery of Art extension program, an 
art exhibit, and productions by a touring theater company 
and children's theater. The Madison Local School District 
in Madison. Ohio, was awarded $46,285 for a community 
program in education, fine arts, health, heritage, and 
recreation. 



Comment 

The description above incorporates changes, effective in 
1980, legislated by Title VIII of the Education Amendments 
of 1978. At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, 
final regulations for the program had not been published. 
These may clarify its structure and operation. 



Contact for Information 

Community Education Program, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Department off Health, Education, and Welfare 



73/74 



73/ Community Service and 

Continuing Education Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Formula grants to states, which make awards to 
institutions of higher education; discretionary grants 
directly to institutions of higher education from the Office 
of Education. Technical assistance to state agencies and 
institutions of higher education. 

Description 

Grants are made to support resource materials sharing, 
community service programs, and continuing education in 
colleges and universities. Projects address such 
community concerns as employment, government, health, 
land use, poverty, and transportation. A community 
service program is a college or university service, 
educational research, or extension program aimed at 
solving a community problem. Continuing education is 
postsecondary instruction designed to meet the 
educational needs and interests of adults. Resource 
materials sharing permits more efficient use of educational 
materials, communications technology, and local facilities. 
Ten percent of this program's annual appropriation is 
reserved for grants to colleges and universities from the 
Office of Education for demonstration efforts. Under the 
separate technical assistance authority, a national 
information network is being designed, case studies 
prepared, and training conducted for state agency and 
institutional personnel. 

Ninety percent of this program's annual appropriation is 
awarded to states on a population-based formula. By law, 
all institutions of higher education in each state must have 
an opportunity to participate in creating the state's plan 
that establishes priorities for spending these funds. A 
designated state agency reviews and funds proposals 
from postsecondary institutions. One-third of the state 
program costs must be met from nonfederal sources. A 
list of designated state agencies may be obtained from 
the address below. 

Example 

The program's 1979 appropriation was $16 million. During 
1978, several states sponsored projects that emphasized 
the arts and humanities in continuing education. (At least 
one-third of each award consisted of state matching 
funds.) An award of $25,210 to Idaho State University in 
Pocatello supported the modification of a semitrailer for 
use as a traveling exhibit, taking representative samples 
from the Museum of Natural History to rural areas of 
Idaho. The University of Alaska in Fairbanks received 
$27,722 to sponsor a festival of the arts of Alaskan native 
cultures: traditional storytelling, singing, dancing, painting, 
engraving, basketweaving, and scrimshaw. The University 



of Iowa in Iowa City through a consortium of 23 institutions 
was granted $94,719 for "Elderhostel," a program of 
continuing education for adults over 60. Elderhostel 
sponsored visits to concerts, exhibits, museums, and 
theaters. (The states of North Carolina, Ohio, and 
Pennsylvania also used funds to sponsor Elderhostel 
projects.) A grant of $45,094 to the University of 
Washington in Seattle sponsored documentary film 
presentations at community meetings intended to increase 
public awareness of the value and need for public funding 
and citizen participation in the arts. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Community Service and Continuing Education, 
Bureau of Higher and Continuing Education, Office of 
Education, Washington, DC 20202 



74/ Cooperative Education Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Project grants to universities, two- and four-year colleges, 
consortia, and occasionally nonprofit organizations. 

Description 

The Cooperative Education Program makes most of its 
grants to educational institutions to plan or administer a 
campus cooperative education program; a few have been 
made to train administrators for these programs and for 
research into, or demonstration of, methods of improving 
cooperative education. 

Cooperative education programs allow students to 
alternate periods of academic study with periods of 
off-campus employment related to their educational or 
career development. Students earn money to help pay the 
costs of attending college while participating in a work 
program integrated with formal study planned with close 
cooperation between educator and employer. Programs 
may benefit any student, whether enrolled full or part time, 
regardless of economic or ethnic background, academic 
course of study, or career plans. As an academic 
program, however, Cooperative Education demands that 
each student maintain a certain grade point average. It is 
thus distinguished from the federal Work/Study program, 
which requires no minimum academic standards and is 
strictly a financial aid program (see no. 98). 

An institution may receive federal funds to administer a 
Cooperative Education Program for five years. Staff, 
consultant, travel, and other administrative costs are 
eligible uses of grant funds; student stipends and salaries 
are not. A grantee may receive an annual maximum 
funding of $175,000. The average award for administration 
is $50,000. Of grants made in 1978, amounting to nearly 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



74/75/76/77 



$15 million, 249 were for the administration of a campus 
Cooperative Education Program, 16 awards were for 
training, and 6 for research. 

Contact for Information 



Description 



Cooperative Education Program, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



75/ Educational Information 
Centers 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 



Information for the public. 



Description 



Many states maintain Educational Information Centers to 
provide educational information, guidance, counseling, 
and referral services to the public Any state that submits 
an acceptable state plan to the Office of Education 
receives an award to cover up to two-thirds of the costs of 
planning, establishing, and operating such centers 
Centers provide information about postsecondary 
education programs, financial assistance, job placement, 
competency-based learning opportunities, and guidance 
and counseling services, among other services. A list of 
state agencies, their directors, addresses, and telephone 
numbers can be obtained from the office below. 

Comment 

The legislative authorization for this program, Title IV of the 
Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, expires at the 
close of 1980. Revisions to the Act could change the 
program or eliminate it. 

Contact for Information 

Educational Information Centers, Division of Training and 
Facilities, Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



ERIC is a computerized information system that stores 
citations of education-related documents, such as 
research reports, speeches, and periodicals. Sixteen ERIC 
clearinghouses select and index literature in such specific 
areas of education as early childhood, handicapped and 
gifted children, higher education, languages and 
linguistics, rural education, urban education, science, 
mathematics, and social studies. The ERIC Clearinghouse 
on Handicapped and Gifted Children, for example, 
abstracts general studies on creativity. The Clearinghouse 
on Information Resources indexes materials on library 
operations and professional education and on technology 
adaptable to education, including audiovisuals and cable 
television. 

Although no clearinghouse yet exists for the arts and 
humanities per se. many related fields, such as 
architecture, arts education, film, theater, music, writing, 
crafts, cultural enrichment, dance, humanities instruction, 
archeology, and folklore, are indexed. 

Libraries of major educational institutions as well as state 
departments of education subscribe to ERIC publications, 
and more than 600 maintain collections of ERIC 
microfiche: their locations are listed in the Directory of 
ERIC Microfiche Collections. ERIC publishes citations of 
educational documents in a monthly journal of abstracts, 
Resources in Education, indexed semiannually, available 
by subscription from the Government Printing Office, 
Washington, DC 20402. The monthly Current Index to 
Journals of Education indexes and annotates articles in 
more than 700 periodicals and is available by subscription 
from Oryx Press. 3930 Camelback Road. Phoenix, AZ 
85018 Information on ERIC publications may be 
requested from the office listed below. Copies of ERIC 
documents may be obtained in either microfiche or paper 
copy from the ERIC Document Reproduction Service, P.O. 
Box 190, Arlington, VA 22210. 

Contact for Information 

Educational Resources Information Center. National 
Institute of Education. Washington, DC 20208 



76/ Educational Resources 
Information Center (ERIC) 

Education Division 



77/ Elementary and Secondary 
Education Programs (Title IV) 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Research reports, periodicals, and educational reference 
documents for researchers, teachers, libraries, and the 
public. 



What For Whom 



Formula grants to state education agencies, which award 
subgrants to local education agencies. These agencies 
are required by law to ensure that private as well as 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



77 



public school students benefit from the use of these 
funds. 



Description 

Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
1965, as amended, establishes three separate categories 
of financial assistance at elementary and secondary 
school levels. Part B supports the acquisition of 
instructional equipment and materials; Part C, locally 
initiated educational projects; and Part D, counseling, 
guidance, and testing services. Parts B and C have been 
substantial sources of funding for education in the arts 
and humanities. The legislation that amended the Act in 
1978 revised eligible activities and funding procedures. A 
state seeking funds under Title IV must submit a plan 
every three years describing programs for Parts B, C, and 
D to the Commissioner of Education for approval. If the 
plan is approved, the state education agency is awarded 
grants, and it in turn subgrants for the approved programs 
to local education agencies on the basis of their written 
applications. To receive Title IV funds, the state must 
establish a state advisory council broadly representative 
of cultural and educational resources to advise on 
preparation and administration of the plan 

Instructional Materials and School Library 
Resources (Part B) 

Assistance is provided to help local education agencies 
acquire educational materials, instructional equipment, 
and library resources. Instructional equipment must be 
directly related to teaching or learning an academic 
subject — arts, English, history, humanities, industrial arts, 
and so forth. Band instruments, furniture, and gym 
equipment are ineligible purchases. Library resources 
include books, maps, musical scores, pictorial or graphic 
works, sound recordings, videotapes, and similar 
materials. For further information, contact the School 
Media Resources Branch at the address given below. 

Improvement in Local Educational Practice (Part C) 

This category supports locally initiated projects and 
activities designed to improve educational practices 
Eligible uses of Part C funds include programs for children 
with special needs, such as educationally deprived, gifted 
and talented, or disabled children; improvement of school 
management; professional development for education 
personnel; and programs that use other community 
resources, such as as businesses, cultural organizations, 
government agencies, labor unions, and museums. 
Questions may be referred to the Division of State 
Educational Assistance Programs at the address given 
below. 

Example 

Funds appropriated under Title IV in 1979 for distribution 
to the states totaled $162 million for Part B. Using $1,581, 



Bishop Union High School in California installed cabinets 
to display American Indian artifacts and contemporary art 
in the media center of the school library. The center 
serves as a repository for videotaped recollections of the 
early 1900s by local Paiute and Shoshone tribal members 
and for materials recorded by students describing local 
legends. In 1978, the state of Indiana circulated 64 art 
reproductions among nine schools for arts education 
programs at a cost of $3,600. St. Clare School in Ohio 
used $1,496 to purchase new record players for music 
education 

Virtually every state reported to the Office of Education 
that it had used Title IV-C funds to sponsor cultural 
projects within local schools in 1979 Approximately 
$146 4 million was allocated among the states for Part C. 
The Sunnyside School District in Arizona received $46,000 
to teach the history of the Sonoran desert region using 
photography and library resources. The New Castle 
County School District in Delaware spent $27,000 to train 
elementary classroom teachers in a music laboratory. 
Dade County Public Schools in Florida were awarded 
$195,223 to develop materials on the arts for visually, 
orthopedically, and hearing-impaired students. Muskogee 
County Schools in Georgia used $106,000 to offer career 
orientation and contact with professionals in the arts for 
high school students. Marshall Town School District in 
Iowa received $17,048 for a "comparison of western and 
non-western cultures through music" and $2,000 to bring 
dancers sponsored by the Iowa Arts Council into the 
schools. Dallas Community School District in Iowa used 
$350 for a project allowing first grade students to write 
and illustrate their own books. With $2,688 in funding, 
Wolfe County, Ky., offered an Appalachian music class to 
further an appreciation of local music. 

Cape Elizabeth, Me., sponsored an elementary-cchool 
weaving program with $1,500. The DeCordova Museum in 
Lincoln, Mass., spent $28,380 for a program that 
integrates art with social studies. St. Paul Public Schools 
in Minnesota, with $22,500, sponsored a dance education 
project that involves the child, the dancer, the classroom 
teacher, and the community in a curriculum that 
emphasizes the basic skills of body movement and 
communication. Fairmont School in Montana received 
$7,500 for a project that takes an anthropological 
approach to architecture, dance, drama, literature, and 
visual arts of different cultures. Grandfield Schools in 
Oklahoma received $16,200 to sponsor "reading 
improvement and motivation through the arts." Wayne 
County in Pennsylvania used $1 1,000 to bring arts 
experiences into its rural schools. Orange Windsor 
Supervisory Union in Vermont received $6,740 to create 
an elementary arts program focused on the visual skills 
and nature as a design model. Henrico County in Virginia 
sponsored a "Humanities Center" with $39,000 to 
encourage student interest in contemporary writing and 
drama. Botetourt County received $56,700 to develop a 
television series about the arts of the Virginia mountain 
areas. 



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77/78 



Comment 



Under the new Title V-B, formerly part of Title IV-C of the 
Elementary and Secondary Act, formula grants are made 
to states to strengthen the management capability and 
leadership resources of state education agencies. In 
several states, these funds have supported staff positions 
such as arts advisor, consultant, and curriculum specialist. 
Title V-B is used to provide technical assistance to local 
education agencies, to develop curricular materials, and 
to conduct workshops and conferences, among other 
purposes. 

Contact for Information 



ESEA Title IV Coordinator, State Education Agency 
(names and addresses available from the Washington 
office) or (Appropriate Branch or Division), Office of 
Education, Washington, DC 20202 



78/ Emergency School Aid Act 
Programs (ESAA) 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to and contracts with local and state education 
agencies and public and private nonprofit organizations. 

Description 

The Emergency School Aid Act (ESAA) seeks to prevent, 
reduce, or eliminate the isolation of minority groups and 
discrimination among students and faculty in elementary 
and secondary schools. The introduction of cultural 
heritage programs and arts education into the curriculum 
has been found to help children overcome the 
disadvantages of isolation and discrimination while 
improving the quality of education for all children. New 
awards in 1978 ranged in size from $80,000 to $800,000. 



Basic Program 

Local education agencies are awarded grants and 
contracts for one to five years. Project design and 
operation must involve teachers, parents, and other 
community representatives. Funds are used to hire and 
train staff, alter school facilities, or introduce new curricula 
and practices, including study of the language and 
cultural heritage of minority groups. In 1978, the 
appropriation for this category was nearly $138 million. 
According to a survey conducted by the National Center 
for Education Statistics (see no. 92), 18 states have used 
ESAA funds for arts projects. 



Educational Television and Radio 

Educational Television and Radio supports the 
development and production of integrated children's 
television and radio programs of cognitive and affective 
educational value. Grants and contracts are made to 
public and private nonprofit organizations with 
demonstrated expertise in television or radio programming 
and with minority group employees in responsible 
development, production, and administrative positions. 
Programs are of artistic or educational significance, 
suitable for transmission by commercial and public 
stations, free of charge. A mailing list is maintained for 
persons wishing to be notified when proposals for 
productions are being solicited. 

Example: Since 1972, 27 series have been produced 
with ESAA funds. The 1979 appropriation was nearly $6.5 
million. Series recently sponsored include "Forest Spirits," 
a presentation on the culture, history, and traditions of the 
Oneida and Menominee Indians of Wisconsin; "South by 
Northwest," a dramatic series about the roles played by 
blacks in settling the Pacific Northwest; and "Infinity 
Factory," which uses ethnic and cultural settings, music, 
and animation to help children learn mathematics and its 
applications to art, technology, and everyday life. 



Magnet Schools 

Grants are made to local education agencies to plan and 
conduct programs in magnet schools, centers that offer a 
special curriculum capable of attracting substantial 
numbers of students of different racial backgrounds. 

Example: The 1979 appropriation was $25 million. 
Approximately 26 awards were made under this category 
in 1978. The Indianapolis Public Schools in Indiana 
received $227,100 to provide coursework in creative 
writing, music, theater, and the visual arts and to offer 
students contact with professional artists. An award of 
$233,712 to the St. Louis Public Schools in Missouri 
supported both a visual and performing arts center and a 
high school that offered specialized instruction to recruit 
dropout students in drama, vocal training, musical 
instruments, and plastic and visual arts. In Teaneck, N.J., 
a $591,322 grant supported artists-in-residence programs 
and evening courses in creative and performing arts for 
community, students, and staff. The Seattle Public School 
System received two awards of $159,529 and $143,865 
for a visual and performing arts school and a general arts 
school which coordinated community arts resources, a 
specialized staff, and a dance company in residence. 



Nonprofit Organizations 

Public or private nonprofit organizations may receive 
assistance for programs designed to help local education 
agencies reduce minority group isolation (see Basic 
Program above). A total of $17.2 million was appropriated 
for this program in 1979. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



78/79 



Special Arts Projects 

Since 1974, the Commissioner of Education has made 
funds available for these projects. Grants are made 
to state arts councils and state education agencies 
to administer statewide arts programs. Eligible 
school districts work with a state grantee to obtain 
services. Projects must provide opportunities for 
interracial and intercultural communication and 
understanding. Professional artists of diverse racial and 
ethnic background and artistic skills in crafts, dance, film, 
music, poetry, theater, and visual arts are employed in 
school projects. Only one grant of up to $100,000 is 
made per state. 

Example: Seventeen awards, totaling approximately $1.7 
million, were made in 1979. In 1978, the state arts council 
in Arkansas operated artists-in-residence and visiting 
artists programs in seven rural school districts. These 
employed a craftsperson, a folklorist, a jewelry-maker, a 
photographer, a sculptor, a visual artist, and a weaver. 
The artists worked with students and with their teachers in 
special workshops. The Massachusetts Council on the 
Arts and Humanities coordinated the participation of 
artists, cultural institutions, and touring dance and theater 
groups in a Boston public schools program. The 
Oklahoma Arts and Humanities Council established an 
artist-in-residence program in music, poetry, theater, and 
the visual arts for three rural school districts. Comanche 
singers and dancers worked with young Native American 
children on ritual performances of religious and cultural 
significance. The Virginia Commission for the Arts 
employed visiting and in-residence artists, including an 
actor, jazz pianist, and water colorist, to work in Charles 
City, Richmond, and Roanoke. 

Comment 

The description above incorporates changes, effective in 
1980, legislated by Title VI of the Education Amendments 
of 1978. At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, 
final regulations for the program had not been published. 
These may clarify its structure and operation. 



agencies, organizations, and institutions, including 
libraries and museums. 



Description 

Environmental education is defined as an interdisciplinary, 
problem-oriented approach to the cultural, economic, 
physical, policy, and social implications of environmental 
concerns. Projects aim at educating the public about 
environmental quality and ecological balance. Projects 
consider the environmental effects of conservation, 
economics, pollution, population, resource allocation and 
depletion, technology, transportation, and urban and rural 
planning. Although projects may draw upon traditional 
methods of environmental education — conservation, 
environmental science, nature study — these approaches 
must be synthesized with ideas and materials from other 
areas, such as the arts and humanities, social sciences, 
and technology. Two categories of financial assistance, 
described below, are offered. 



General Projects 

Support is provided for research, demonstration, and pilot 
activities to develop curricula; to disseminate information; 
to support elementary, secondary, and community 
education programs; and to train education personnel, 
public service, government, business, labor, and industrial 
leaders and employees. Grants average $50,000 and 
usually require cost sharing. 

Minigrants 

Awards of $10,000 or less are made to conduct courses, 
workshops, seminars, symposia, and conferences, 
especially for adults and community groups. Projects are 
designed to help communities understand the causes, 
effects, issues, and options surrounding a local 
environmental problem. Although any public or nonprofit 
private organization may apply, preference is given to 
local citizen groups and volunteer organizations active in 
the environmental field. 



Contact for Information 



Equal Educational Opportunity Programs, Office of 
Education, Washington, DC 20202 



79/ Environmental Education 
Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to institutions of higher education, local or state 
education agencies, and other public and nonprofit 



Example 



With an appropriation of $3.5 million, 58 projects were 
undertaken in 1978. Vision, Inc., a nonprofit planning 
organization in Cambridge, Mass., received a $51,900 
award in 1977 to prepare the "Street Smart Program," a 
package of audiovisual materials designed to introduce 
children to the urban environment. The package contains 
art, drama, and social studies activities that draw on arts, 
career, and environmental education to help children 
understand environmental ideas and issues. A grant of 
$31,862 was awarded in 1978 to the Capital Children's 
Museum in Washington, DC , for its "Resource Material 
Development: Environmental Education in the Urban 
Context," a program to integrate arts, sciences, 
humanities, and technology in an exploration of the arts 
and sciences through all the senses. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



79/80/81 



Comment 



Since the Environmental Education Act was amended by 
the Education Amendments of 1978, changes in the 
emphases or operations of the program may occur in 
1980. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Environmental Education, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



awarded $45,000 for "Training in Ethnic Literature for 
Teachers." The Ketchikan Indian Corporation was given 
$44,000 for "Native American Curriculum Development 
Materials on Southeast Alaska." The Korean Community 
Service Center in San Francisco, Calif., received $46,000 
for "Korean Curriculum Development for the San 
Francisco Bay Area." The National Congress of 
Neighborhood Women in Brooklyn, NY., received $47,996 
for "Curriculum Development — Women as Community 
Leaders." The University of Toledo College of Education in 
Ohio received $44,961 for "Curriculum Development and 
Training — Teacher Preparation for Hungarian, Greek, and 
Polish Studies." 



80/ Ethnic Heritage Studies 
Program 

Education Division 



Contact for Information 



Ethnic Heritage Studies Program, Division of International 
Education, Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



What/For Whom 



Project grants to public and private nonprofit education 
agencies, institutions, and organizations. Eligible 
organizations include ethnic, community, and professional 
associations, Indian tribes, state and local education 
agencies, and institutions of higher education. 



Description 



Grants support one-year projects designed to enable 
students at an elementary, secondary, or postsecondary 
level "to learn more about the nature of their own heritage 
and to study the contributions of the cultural heritages of 
other ethnic groups of the Nation." Projects may be 
proposed in the following areas: the development of 
curriculum materials for the study of ethnic groups and 
their contributions to the American heritage in fields such 
as arts, drama, economy, geography, history, language, 
literature, music, society, or general culture; the training of 
teachers to use the curriculum materials; and the 
dissemination of the materials. Every project should show 
evidence of the endorsement and active participation of 
relevant ethnic, educational, and community organizations. 
Ethnic and community associations, historical societies, 
museums, art galleries, and research facilities are 
examples of organizations experienced in ethnic studies 
It is considered essential that the project have an impact 
on more than one ethnic group. Detailed guidelines are 
available from the office listed below. Regular project 
grants average $36,000 and may not exceed $60,000 A 
few "minigrants," ranging from $10,000 to $15,000, are 
also made. 



Example 



Fifty-six grants totaling $2.3 million were made in 1978; 
approximately 413 applications had been reviewed. 
Bacone College in Muskogee, Okla., received $14,000 for 
"Greek American Curriculum Development." The Indiana 
Department of Public Instruction in Indianapolis was 



81/ Foreign Curriculum Consultants 
Program 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Grants to state and local education agencies, institutions 
of higher education, and private nonprofit educational 
organizations. 



Description 



One of the Fulbnght-Hays categories (see nos. 83, 87, 
176), this program provides support to bring educators 
from other countries to the United States for an academic 
year to assist in planning and developing curriculum in 
modern foreign languages and area studies programs. 
Foreign area studies may be defined as the study of 
foreign countries and geographical areas, their languages, 
politics, cultures, and artistic life; cultural and physical 
anthropology; ethnology; linguistics; sociology; music, 
including ethnomusicology; and the arts. Requests for 
consultants from Western European countries are 
approved only for area studies curriculum development on 
modern political, economic, or social topics. Consultants 
may provide a variety of services: review educational 
materials and library holdings; prepare new instructional 
materials and study units; conduct demonstration classes 
and workshops for teachers; teach classroom courses (not 
more than one per semester); and participate in 
community functions and adult education programs. 
Grantee institutions are required to contribute to a 
consultant's living and domestic travel expenses. For the 
1978-1979 academic year, 15 awards averaging $12,600 
were made to bring educators to the United States from 
Latin America, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Japan. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



81 82 83 



Contact for Information 



Foreign Curriculum Consultants Program, Division of 
International Education, Office of Education, Washington, 
DC 20202 



82/ 



Foreign Language and Area 
Studies Programs 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Fellowship quotas awarded to institutions of higher 
education which in turn offer fellowships to graduate 
students. Research grants are made to institutions of 
higher education, local and state education agencies, 
other educational and professional organizations, and 
individuals. 



Description 



Title VI of the National Defense Education Act of 1958 
authorizes financial assistance to institutions of higher 
education to establish international studies centers and 
programs (see no. 89), and to support research and 
graduate student fellowships in the area of foreign 
language and area studies (see no. 81 for definition). 

Fellowships Program 

Academic year fellowships are offered to graduate 
students in foreign language and area studies. Fellowship 
quotas are awarded to selected higher education 
institutions. Individuals should apply directly to these 
institutions. Students may contact the Division of 
International Education at the address given below for a 
list of institutional award recipients. Approved programs 
may be multidisciplinary in approach and include such 
fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, 
linguistics, literature, philosophy, political science, and 
sociology; or professional studies such as education, 
business, and law. Language study in the geographic 
area of specialization is required. Students applying for 
fellowships must be preparing either to teach or to work 
for public or private organizations contributing to foreign 
relations or international understanding in the United 
States. 

Research Program 

Awards are made for surveys and studies to determine 
the need for increased or improved instruction in modern 
foreign language study and area and international studies; 
to conduct research on more effective methods of 
teaching these languages and fields; and to develop 
specialized materials for training students and teachers. 
An annotated bibliography, List #8, Foreign Language 



Area, and Other International Studies, summarizes the 
research and instructional materials developed under the 
auspices of this program since 1976. 

Example 

In 1978, almost $4.6 million was awarded to 46 
universities to offer 828 fellowships. Nineteen new grants 
and 13 supplemental awards for research were made with 
an allocation of approximately $1 million. Alliance College 
in Cambridge Springs, Pa., received $20,387 in 
supplemental funds for "Development of a Proficiency 
Test in the Polish Language and Culture." Michigan State 
University in East Lansing received $42,103 for "Improving 
the Quality of African Audiovisual Material in K-12 and 
University Courses: An Outreach Project." An award of 
$29,285 for "Films Completion Project: Contemporary 
Tibetan Buddhism" was made to the University of 
Wisconsin at Madison. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Division of International Education, 
Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



83/ Fulbright-Hays Research Abroad 
Programs 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 



Fellowships for doctoral dissertations to candidates who 
apply through their institutions of higher education. 
Research grants to faculty members through their 
institutions of higher education. 

Description 

The Fulbright-Hays Programs, authorized by the Mutual 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, are 
intended "to increase mutual understanding between the 
people of the United States and the people of other 
countries." Grants are made to U.S. citizens and foreign 
nationals for a variety of educational exchange activities 
(see also nos. 81, 87, and International Communication 
Agency, no. 176). Support is given for exchange activities 
in all academic fields, including foreign area studies (see 
no. 81 for definition). 

Doctoral Dissertation Program 

Advanced graduate students receive support for 6 to 12 
months for doctoral dissertation research overseas in 
world affairs, modern foreign languages, and area studies. 
Preference is given to research areas that are critical to 
the national interest, for which adequate instruction is not 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



83/84 



widely available in the United States, and for which there 
exists a shortage of trained personnel. Awards are not 
made for research projects focusing on Western Europe 
or for projects in countries in which the United States does 
not have diplomatic representation. Candidates must be 
enrolled in a doctoral program in foreign language or area 
studies in the United States or its territories and plan to 
teach in the United States at the postsecondary level. 
Applicants apply directly to their graduate dean, who will 
forward applications to the Office of Education. 



Faculty Research Program 

Awards are made for 3 to 12 months of research that will 
contribute to institutional efforts to strengthen programs in 
foreign language and area studies. Awards are not made 
for research projects focusing on Western Europe or 
projects in countries in which the United States does not 
have diplomatic representation. Grants enable faculty 
members to remain current in their fields of specialization 
and to develop and improve curricula and materials. 
Candidates must be experienced in foreign languages 
and in area studies, and anticipate long-term employment 
with an institution of higher education. Application is made 
to the candidate's institution, which forwards applications 
to the Office of Education. 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate Program), Division of International Education, 
Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



Example 



Doctoral dissertation stipends of just under $12,000 were 
awarded to 127 individuals in 1978; more than 459 
applications were reviewed. Examples of these 
dissertation grants are $12,876 to Cornell University in 
Ithaca, N.Y., for "Paramasastra: A Linguistic, Cultural and 
Historical Study of Traditional Javanese Linguistic Theory"; 
$12,105 to Harvard University for "Shirazi Silver-Engravers 
and Their Work: A Study of Art and Society"; $10,436 to 
Indiana University in Bloomington for "Bambara-Bozo 
Puppetry of the Segou Region, Mali: An Analysis of Art in 
Performance"; $3,694 to the University of California at 
Berkeley for "Prokofiev's Operas and Their Russian 
Literary Sources"; $14,089 to the University of Chicago for 
"Domestic Architectural Imagery and Its Significance in 
Contemporary Egypt"; and $1 1 ,563 to the University of 
Pittsburgh for "Hinduism in a Dynamic Urban Setting: The 
Example of Calcutta." 

Faculty Research awards averaging $10,500 were made 
to 57 of the 109 faculty applying for funds in 1978. 
Awards were made of $18,213 to the University of 
California, Santa Cruz, for "Folk Dance Music and 
Community Life in Greece"; $12,029 to the University of 
Colorado at Boulder for "Traditions and Preservation of 
Wooden Arts in South Asia"; $16,262 to the University of 
Kansas in Lawrence for "Sociolinguistic Variation in 
Brazilian Commands"; and $7,596 to the University of 
Pittsburgh for "Aiyanar: The Rise and Significance of a 
God in South India." 



84/ Fund for the Improvement of 
Postsecondary Education 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to postsecondary education institutions including 
colleges and universities; profit and nonprofit private, 
trade, technical, and business schools; education 
organizations and institutions, such as student and faculty 
associations, trustees, and state agencies; and providers 
of educational services at museums, libraries, and 
workplaces. 

Description 

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary 
Education provides assistance to education institutions 
and agencies for reform, innovation, and improvement of 
postsecondary education. Through the Fund's 
Comprehensive Program, proposals are invited that 
address any of the Fund's broad purposes. Since 
proposals are not restricted to narrow categories, the 
applicant must demonstrate initiative in proposal 
conception and design and responsibility for conveying a 
project's significance and feasibility. All proposals are 
considered in light of their responsiveness to problems of 
a structural nature, their impact on learners, and their 
cost-effectiveness. 

Several general areas for improvement are identified: 
exclusion of working adults, minorities, handicapped 
persons, and others from educational opportunities; failure 
of mass education institutions to meet student needs 
effectively; inadequate understanding of what are quality 
educational programs, personnel, and instruction; 
disparity between skills, knowledge, and attitudes taught 
by institutions and those needed by individuals to be 
effective and productive members of society; need to 
reduce costs and increase productivity; insufficient 
integration of industry, trade, and technical schools, 
libraries, museums, and other providers of educational 
services in the postsecondary educational system; 
inadequate information and advice to people choosing 
educational institutions; and institutional rigidity. 

Occasionally, the Fund invites applications on specific 
topics. For example, in 1979, two competitions were 
announced: "Adapting Improvements: Better Strategies for 
Educating Adults" and "Examining the Varieties of Liberal 
Education." 



Department off Health, Education, and Welfare 



84/85 



Example 



The Fund received an appropriation of $13 million in 1979. 
From approximately 1,800 applications received, 175 
projects were supported in 1978-1979, about equally 
divided between newly funded and renewal projects. 
Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa., with an 
award of $49,000, undertook to identify the fundamental 
techniques of philosophic reasoning and to disseminate 
materials designed to teach analytic reasoning skills. The 
College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Me., with a $23,635 
grant, refined a model curriculum in environmental design 
that integrates energy with economic, environmental, and 
esthetic considerations and prepares students to combine 
marketable trade skills with a scholarly understanding of 
the built environment. Illinois State University in Normal 
received $25,000 to field test course modules that focus 
on social issues from commonsensical, journalistic, and 
sociological perspectives. With a grant of $52,693, the 
Modern Language Association in New York City planned 
the dissemination of pedagogical and curricular materials 
developed in model courses on regional women's 
literature. The Museums Collaborative in New York City 
was awarded $1 10,428 to expand its Cultural Voucher 
Program, which provides money vouchers to community 
organizations for distribution to individuals who may 
purchase services of their choice from authorized cultural 
institutions. The School of Music at Northwestern 
University in Evanston, III., was awarded $60,287 to 
institute a competency-based graduate curriculum 
incorporating faculty development, curriculum redesign, 
and a network of apprenticeships and clinical experiences 
in surrounding communities. An intensive program of 
speech, writing, and theater courses for students deficient 
in standard English was supported at the University of 
Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg with a $50,000 grant. 



Contact for Information 



Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Education, 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
Washington, DC 20202 



85/ Gifted and Talented Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to and contracts with public and private agencies 
and organizations, including local and state education 
agencies and institutions of higher education. 

Description 

The Gifted and Talented Program awards financial 
assistance to plan, develop, operate, or improve 



education for gifted and talented chidlren. The term 
"gifted and talented" refers to children at preschool, 
elementary, or secondary levels with the potential to 
perform extraordinarily well in intellectual, creative, 
academic, or leadership activities, or in the performing 
and visual arts. From 1976 through 1979, all awards were 
made on a discretionary basis. The Education 
Amendments of 1978 require that 75 percent of the 
program's funds be allocated to states on a formula basis 
and 25 percent be reserved for discretionary awards. 

State Programs 

State education agencies receive grants for programs 
addressed to the educational needs of gifted and talented 
children, including inservice training of their teachers. At 
least 90 percent of these funds must be redistributed on a 
competitive basis to local education agencies; at least half 
of those funds must support projects that identify and 
educate disadvantaged children from low-income areas. 

Discretionary Programs 

Grants are made for training education personnel, model 
projects, state planning, research and evaluation, and 
dissemination of information. 



Example 

The program's 1979 appropriation was nearly $3.8 million. 
Competition for discretionary awards has been extremely 
strong. From 1976 through 1979, between 300 and 400 
applications were received and 15 to 25 approved each 
year. Projects sponsored have included leadership 
training, model projects, and curriculum development in 
the arts and the humanities. In 1978, the Center for 
Theater Techniques in Education in Stratford, Conn., 
received $41,650 to identify gifted junior high students in 
an urban school system and provide them with theater 
arts and other creative experiences. The state education 
agency in Honolulu, Hawaii, received $65,000 to identify 
students in grades four through six with outstanding 
abilities in the language arts and the visual and 
performing arts and to provide for their educational needs. 
The project also examined the benefits to students from 
instruction by local professional artists and the possibility 
of an interdisciplinary approach to education in the fine 
arts and languages. The New Orleans Public Schools in 
Louisiana received $20,000 to provide an intensive arts 
program for about 180 elementary and junior high school 
students identified as gifted in the visual or performing 
arts. 



Comment 

The description above incorporates changes contained in 
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1978. At the time 
the Cultural Directory went to press, final regulations for 
the program had not been published. These may clarify its 
structure and operation. 



Department off Health, Education, and Welfare 



858687 



Contact for Information 



Office of Gifted and Talented, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



86/ Graduate and Professional 
Opportunities Program 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Grants and fellowship allocations to institutions of higher 
education. Students must apply to their institution for a 
fellowship, not to the Office of Education. 



than $485,000 went to 26 institutions as grants. Fellowship 
allocations ranged from $15,000 to $1 17,000, grants from 
$10,000 to $31,600. Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., 
received $23,400 for fellowships in law. Cornell University 
in Ithaca, NY., was awarded $93,600 for engineering, city 
planning, and applied biology. Tuskegee Institute in 
Alabama received $31,200 for fellowships in architecture. 
The University of Arizona in Tucson was awarded $62,400 
for fellowships and a $26,500 grant for anthropology, 
education administration, and electrical engineering. Yale 
University in New Haven, Conn., received $62,400 for 
fellowships in American Studies, political science, 
economics, and history. 

Contact for Information 

Graduate and Professional Opportunities Program, Office 
of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



Description 



Colleges and universities receive support for programs of 
graduate or professional study that serve women, 
minorities, or other groups that traditionally have been 
underrepresented among graduate and professional 
degree recipients. "Graduate study" leads to a doctorate 
or other degree needed for an academic or professional 
career. "Professional study" leads to an advanced degree 
that qualifies students for a professional career. Specific 
fields of study are not identified; thus the burden is on the 
applicant college or university to document that it offers a 
high quality program for which there is a demonstrated 
national need and in which there is a distinct shortage of 
persons from underrepresented groups. 

Either an institutional grant or an allocation of fellowships, 
or both, may be requested. In 1978, institutional grants 
were made only in conjunction with fellowship allocations, 
emphasizing the recruitment and retention of students. 
Institutional grants average $15,000 to $30,000 for a 
year's support, and renewals are made on a competitive 
basis. Funds may be used to improve graduate, 
professional and, occasionally, undergraduate education 
through faculty development, program expansion, 
acquisition of instructional equipment and materials, 
strengthening of administration, and cooperative 
arrangements with other schools. Cost sharing is required. 
Colleges or universities may request fellowship allocations 
for as many as five academic areas in priority order. If any 
of the areas selected are approved by the Office of 
Education, the institution then recommends students. 
Fellowships are renewable for three years. 



Example 



The Graduate and Professional Opportunities Program 
received an appropriation of $8 million for awards during 
the 1979-1980 academic year. Approximately $3.2 million 
was awarded to 55 colleges and universities for the 
1978-1979 academic year. More than $2.7 million 
provided fellowship assistance to 354 students, and more 



87/ Group Projects Abroad Program 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Grants to institutions of higher education, state education 
agencies, and nonprofit education organizations. 



Description 



This program, one of the Fulbright-Hays categories (see 
nos. 81, 83, 176) supports group projects to help grantees 
improve their programs in modern foreign languages, area 
studies (see no. 81 for definition), world affairs, and 
intercultural education. Awards are not made for projects 
focusing primarily on Western Europe or for projects in 
countries with which the United States does not have 
diplomatic relations. Several types of projects are funded, 
including summer seminars for faculty and students to 
integrate international studies into the general curriculum; 
summer and academic year intensive language study for 
students; group research or study for six weeks to 12 
months by faculty and advanced students selected by 
their institutions for special training; and curriculum 
development projects in which teams of faculty and 
graduate students spend six weeks to a year acquiring 
and developing resource materials for language and area 
studies curricula. 

Also funded are summer seminars for elementary and 
secondary school teachers and curriculum supervisors to 
study the cultural origins of ethnic groups in the United 
States and intercultural understanding in order to plan and 
conduct ethnic heritage programs in the United States. 



Example 



Thirty-eight grants in 1978 enabled more than 800 
teachers, professors, and students to participate in group 



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projects abroad. Examples include $50,000 to Grambling 
State College in Louisiana for a "Curriculum Development 
Seminar in Indian Art," $50,000 to the Phelps-Stokes Fund 
for "West African Ethnic Heritage Studies Seminar," and 
$40,000 to the University of Florida at Gainesville for a 
"Community College Faculty Summer Field Seminar in 
Brazil." 

Contact for Information 

Group Projects Abroad Program, Division of International 
Education, Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



88/ Institute of Museum Services 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants requiring a 50 percent match to museums, 
including art, history, historic building, natural history, 
science and technology museums; aquariums and 
zoological parks; botanical gardens and arboretums; and 
planetariums. Public or private nonprofit agencies 
responsible for the operation of a museum, such as a 
municipality or college, may apply. 



operation despite severe financial setbacks as a result of 
the increase in fuel prices. The Museum of Science and 
History, Little Rock, Ark., was awarded an operating grant 
of $25,000 to hire two professional staff members, a 
curator of historical collections, and an exhibits specialist. 
Operating support of $21,500 to the Ohio Historical 
Society in Columbus helped the society respond to 
growing demands for public services by employing 
additional staff to expand the reference services and 
enlarge the education department. 

Comment 

Ninety-five percent of the Institute's 1978 monies were 
disbursed for general operating support. The Institute of 
Museum Services is the only federal source of assistance 
for museum operating expenses. Other agencies, such as 
the Arts and Humanities Endowments (see nos. 193-221), 
provide project support. The Institute probably will 
continue to concentrate its resources on operating needs 
rather than special projects. Considerable congressional 
support for the Institute is demonstrated by the doubling 
of its first-cycle appropriation to a level of $7.4 million in 
1979. 

Contact for Information 

Institute of Museum Services, 200 Independence Avenue, 
SW, Washington, DC 20201 



Description 



The Institute of Museum Services offers assistance 
through general operating and special project grants to 
relieve the financial burdens of museums. At least 75 
percent of the Institute's annual appropriation must be 
awarded as general operating grants for administrative, 
staff, physical plant, and other expenses. Museums may 
receive support for improvements in educational 
programs, conservation, exhibition, administration, and 
related operating costs or to maintain present efforts; 
objects for collections may not be purchased with these 
funds. Evaluation of applications is based on the quality 
and soundness of the museum's collections, exhibitions, 
education programs, community involvement, and overall 
operations. Special project grants support model 
approaches to problems shared by many museums: staff 
training, development of conservation methods, services 
to special constituencies, cooperative technical 
assistance, and exhibition exchanges with other 
institutions, for example. 



Example 



The Institute received 859 applications and awarded 256 
grants with its 1978 appropriation of $3.7 million. Special 
projects numbered 13. Awards ranged from $483 to 
$25,000, averaging $14,450. An operating grant of 
$24,985 enabled the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium 
in St. Johnsbury, Vt., to maintain its current level of 



89/ International Studies Programs 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Grants to institutions of higher education. Information and 
technical assistance for the academic community and the 
general public. 



Description 



Title VI of the National Defense Education Act of 1958 
authorizes financial assistance to institutions of higher 
education to establish international studies centers and 
programs, and to support research and graduate student 
fellowships (see no. 82) in the area of foreign language 
and area studies (see no. 81 for definition). 

Graduate and Undergraduate Programs 

Grants are made for up to two years to establish or 
improve instructional programs in international studies at 
the graduate or undergraduate level. Programs are 
comparative or interdisciplinary in scope, offer instruction 
in at least two world areas, and take place on United 
States campuses. Graduate international studies program 
assistance provides for the development of contemporary 



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problem- or topic-oriented international studies programs. 
Undergraduate international studies program grants 
support the introduction of an international dimension into 
the undergraduate general education program, particularly 
in the first two years of study. 



International Studies Centers 

Awards are made to establish and operate centers 
offering undergraduate and/or graduate instruction in 
foreign languages and area and international studies. Two 
types of centers are supported. One concentrates on a 
particular region and offers instruction in two or more of 
the principal languages and other fields fundamental to an 
-understanding of that region. The other type focuses on 
general international studies in such fields as law, 
diplomacy, and economics; on interregional studies; or on 
comparative approaches to worldwide concerns, such as 
food production and hunger, energy, and the environment. 
Both types of centers offer language training and 
incorporate, where relevant, professional training in such 
fields as business, education, journalism, and urban 
planning. "Outreach" services are offered to other 
colleges and universities, schools, local and state 
education agencies, and other organizations and 
individuals interested in the center's resources. 



Services 

The Division of International Education provides a variety 
of staff services in the field of international education. 

The Information Clearinghouse responds to inquiries about 
student exchanges, study abroad opportunities, 
employment abroad, and financial assistance for foreign 
students — concerns that fall outside other Office of 
Education programs and services. Brochures, pamphlets, 
and other reference materials about the Division of 
International Education and international education 
activities in general are prepared and distributed. 
Publications include Programs and Services of the 
Division of International Education, American Students and 
Teachers Abroad, Foreign Students in the United States, 
and Sfudy in Japan. 

Professional resource support is provided to improve 
understanding of educational systems and programs 
abroad. The Comparative Education staff prepares and 
publishes studies on educational systems of other 
countries and offers technical and consultative assistance. 



Example 

Graduate and Undergraduate International Studies awards 
generally do not exceed $45,000 per year for a single 
institution and $70,000 for consortia. Thirteen graduate 
and 25 undergraduate programs operated during 1978. 
Examples of graduate programs are "Language and 
International Trade" at Eastern Michigan University in 
Ypsilanti, Mich., awarded $41,500; "International Political 
Economy and Development" at Fordham University in the 



Bronx, N.Y., awarded $42,000 for its second year; and 
"International Studies and Business" at Rice University in 
Houston, Tex., also awarded $42,000 for its second year. 
Comparative urban studies, policy analysis, rural 
development, and technological growth are topics 
examined by grantees in earlier years. 

Among undergraduate-level grantees were Bethel College 
in North Newton, Kans., with a grant of $23,900 for its first 
year of "Rural Development in Emerging Countries"; 
Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., with a $40,000 grant for 
the second year of "International Performing Arts"; and 
Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis., with an award of 
$22,500 for "Language-Social Science Cooperation in 
International Studies." 

Eighty International Studies Centers, 15 specializing in 
undergraduate work, received awards ranging from 
$32,000 to $180,000 in 1978, the final year of a three-year 
funding cycle. Some of the fields of study offered at 
different centers are anthropology, archeology, 
architecture, art, art history, dance, fine arts, folklore, 
geography, history, international relations, law, linguistics, 
literature, music, philosophy, photography and cinema, 
political science, religion, sociology, theater, and urban 
planning. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Division of International Education, 
Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



90/ Library Grants for Higher 
Education 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to institutions of higher education and to public or 
private nonprofit organizations with libraries meeting 
certain specifications. 

Description 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, created 
several discretionary grant categories of assistance to 
colleges, universities, and certain nonprofit agencies for 
the acquisition of library resources, research and 
demonstration efforts, training programs, and to 
strengthen research collections. 

College Library Resources 

Grants support the acquisition of library resources, 
including law library material, such as books, periodicals, 
documents, magnetic tapes, phonograph records, 
audiovisual materials, and necessary binding costs. Three 



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types of grants can be awarded: basic grants up to 
$5,000 for each eligible institution, supplemental grants up 
to $20 per student, and special purpose grants that 
require matching of every three federal dollars with one 
institutional dollar. Since 1976, only basic grants have 
been awarded. Of more than 2,500 awards in 1979, 
averaging approximately $3,900 each, about 25 went to 
museums, historical associations, and film institutes, the 
remainder to colleges and universities. To qualify for 
assistance, nonprofit agencies must have a written formal 
agreement with an institution of higher education certifying 
that 50 percent of the organization's library services are 
provided to the institution's students. 

Example: Among nonprofit grantees in 1979 were the 
American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass.; 
American Film Institute in Washington, D.C.; Central New 
York Library in Syracuse; Cleveland Museum of Art in 
Ohio; Duquesne University Tamburitzans, Inc. (a dance 
school), in Pittsburgh, Pa.; Nevada Historical Society in 
Reno; Newberry Library in Chicago, III.; Society for the 
Preservation of New England Antiquities in Boston; 
Winterthur Museum in Delaware; and YIVO Institute for 
Jewish Research in New York City. 

Library Research and Demonstration 

Awards are made for research and demonstration projects 
designed to improve library training and practices and to 
develop new techniques, systems, and equipment for 
processing, storing, distributing, and disseminating 
information. Currently, priority is placed on studies and 
demonstrations to improve service, particularly to groups 
with special needs; institutional cooperation; library 
methodology; and library education. Grants vary from 
$10,000 to $250,000, averaging $70,000-$85,000. 

Example: Seventeen awards were made with the 1978 
appropriation of $1 million. A survey of public library 
services, resources, and facilities for visually impaired and 
physically handicapped persons was carried out by 
Florida State University in Tallahassee with a $45,392 
grant to identify needed improvements. Temple University 
in Philadelphia, Pa., received $58,387 to make small press 
publications more accessible. 



in Pennsylvania; "Ethnic Genealogy for Libraries" at Fisk 
University in Nashville, Tenn.; and "Marketing for the 
Library as a Nonprofit Institution" at SUNY Buffalo. 

Strengthening Major Research Libraries 

Assistance is provided to major research libraries to 
maintain and strengthen their research collections and 
make them more accessible to other libraries and 
scholars. Funds may be used to acquire books and other 
materials, establish cooperative lending systems, index 
and abstract, and hire staff, among other purposes. A 
major research library is defined as a public or private 
nonprofit institution whose library collections are available 
to qualified users and make a significant contribution to 
higher education and research. The collections must be 
broadly based and of recognized national or international 
significance for scholarly research, contain unique 
material, and be in substantial demand by researchers. 

Example: The program's appropriation in 1979 was $6 
million. Twenty research libraries received $5 million in 
grants during 1978, the program's first year of operation. 
The Art Institute of Chicago's award of $163,200 was used 
to acquire limited art editions, foreign publications, and 
photography microfilms and to restore the Daniel Burnham 
Plan of Chicago. The University of Illinois at Urbana 
acquired materials to strengthen the Slavic Reference 
Center and Italian Cavagna collection with an award of 
$70,216. The University of Texas at Austin was awarded 
$250,000 to acquire, catalogue, and enter into a national 
data base 8,500 volumes of Latin American materials. 

Comment 

The legislative authorization for these four programs, Title 
II of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, 
expires at the close of 1980. The new amendments to the 
Act could revise or even eliminate individual grants 
programs. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Division of Library Programs, 
Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



Library Training 

Grants are made for short- or long-term courses of library 
training or study, to establish fellowships or traineeships 
with stipends, and to establish or expand programs of 
library and information science. Students apply to an 
institution participating in the program for a fellowship or 
to the director of a training institute, not to the Office of 
Education. Stipends vary with the student's level of 
training and previous work experience. 

Example: In 1978, the program's $2 million appropriation 
funded 188 fellowships at 33 institutions and 25 training 
institutes in which more than 1,200 students participated. 
Examples of courses offered in 1978-1979 include 
"Library Services to the Aged" at the Edinboro Foundation 



91/ Library Services and 
Construction Programs 

Education Division 



What/For Whom 



Formula grants to state library administrative agencies to 
plan, provide, and coordinate library services within each 
state. Local public libraries apply to state library agencies 
for grants. 



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Description 



The Library Services and Construction Act authorizes 
grants to states for public library services under four titles: 
Services, Construction, Interlibrary Cooperation, and Older 
Readers Services. To receive allotments under these titles, 
each state is required to submit long-range and annual 
program plans. A library that wants to explore funding 
under a state formula grant should contact the 
administering state agency to find out its state's criteria for 
projects, the procedures for application, and whether the 
library's proposal is applicable under the state's plan 

Title I: Services 

States receive assistance to develop and operate public 
library services, especially in areas with inadequate 
service; to reach underserved populations, such as 
disadvantaged, handicapped, and aged persons; to 
strengthen metropolitan libraries to serve as national and 
regional resource centers; and to improve state library 
administration. More than $62 million was appropriated for 
this title in 1979. 

Title II: Construction 

This title has not been funded since 1973. Assistance is 
authorized to provide public libraries where there is 
inadequate service; to purchase land and initial 
equipment (excluding books); to pay architectural fees; to 
construct new buildings; to renovate, alter, or acquire 
existing buildings; and to remodel libraries to conserve 
energy or to remove architectural barriers. 

Title III: Interlibrary Cooperation 

Funds may be used to develop and implement 
cooperative coordination of the resources of public, 
academic, school, and special libraries, and information 
centers at the local, regional, state, or interstate level. This 
title received an appropriation of $5 million in 1979. 



National Endowment for the Humanities to train Native 
Americans to convert these primary materials into booklets 
for school-age and adult readers. Oral and local history 
projects also were undertaken by the Carnegie Public 
Library in Las Vegas, N.Mex., and the Jaquith Memorial 
Library in Marshfield, Vt. 

A study by the Mountain-Valley Library System in 
Sacramento, Calif., led to the creation of the Sierra 
Libraries Information Consortium, a vehicle for cooperative 
ventures among the libraries of the isolated California and 
Nevada counties in the northern Sierra Mountains. The 
Leon County Public Library in Tallahassee, Fla., held 
workshops on video production and created its own 
programs for local radio, television, and cable broadcasts 
on public affairs, local arts, oral history, local events, 
entertainment, and children's programs. The Liliha 
Community Library in Honolulu, Hawaii, offers afternoon 
and weekend programs in a low-income neighborhood 
directed to the cultural needs and interests of children. 
Among its activities have been storytelling, creative 
writing, construction of sets and props, music lessons, 
photography, and silk screening. The Green Gold Library 
System of Shreveport, La., in cooperation with the 
Shreveport Symphony, and partially funded by the state 
arts council, organized free chamber music concerts and 
an annual opera for senior citizens. The Franklin Lakes 
Public Library in New Jersey has extended its services to 
preschool children and their families through parent-child 
workshops in art, music, games, sensory experiments, 
and stories, and by maintaining a community social 
services resource file. 

Contact for Information 

Appropriate state library or state education 
agency or State and Public Library Services Branch, 
Division of Library Programs, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Title IV: Older Readers Services 

This title has never been funded. Assistance is authorized 
to states to provide library services for the elderly. 

Example 

To disseminate information about public library programs 
funded under these titles, the Office of Libraries and 
Learning Resources in the Office of Education and the 
Chief Officers of State Library Agencies in late 1977 
cosponsored the publication Library Programs Worth 
Knowing About, which describes 62 innovative projects. 
For example, the public library in Grand Rapids, Mich., 
sponsored "The Grand River Valley — Native American 
Oral History Program," taped interviews with elders of the 
local Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomie covering tribal 
history, customs and traditions, ways of life, language, 
songs, and legends. Additional funds were granted by the 



92/ National Center for Education 
Statistics 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Statistical data and publications for federal agencies, 
educators, educational researchers, policy makers, 
administrators, students, public or private institutions, and 
the general public. 

Description 

The National Center for Education Statistics is responsible 
for collecting statistics on education in the United States 
and for preparing and publishing analyses of these 
statistics. Surveys offer data about institutional, student, 



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and staff characteristics; courses and programs offered; 
finances; and participation by disabled persons or those 
of various ethnic, language, or racial heritages. In 
addition, the Center maintains data bases and provides 
computer access to data. 

Among regularly conducted surveys of educational 
institutions are the annual Higher Education General 
Information Survey and the Vocational Education Surveys. 
Many library surveys were conducted in the 1970s, 
including College and University Library Survey, 1979; 
Library Manpower Survey, 1979; and the Private School 
Library Media Centers, 1979. The first survey of museums 
and related institutions in 1978 was designed to establish 
a universe of such institutions to provide aggregate data 
on services and size. A second survey will examine in 
detail areas such as attendance, collections, educational 
programs, expenditures, personnel, and physical facilities. 

Results of a survey conducted in December 1978 
indicated state education agencies' commitment to arts 
education at the elementary and secondary levels. Policy 
statements supporting arts in education have been 
adopted by 31 states. Eleven federal programs not 
specifically aimed at arts education — Emergency School 
Aid (see no. 78) and Education of the Handicapped (see 
no. 69), for example — have been used by states to 
support arts projects. 

Since 1970, the Center and the Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting (see no. 11) have jointly sponsored data 
collection and dissemination efforts related to educational 
public broadcasting and technology applications. In 1977, 
the two organizations announced the completion of the 
School Television Utilization Study, an analysis of the use 
of television for instructional purposes in elementary and 
secondary schools. 

Publications that provide analyses of survey data to the 
public are frequently issued. These may be ordered either 
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government 
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402; or from the 
Statistical Information Office at the address below. 

Contact for Information 

National Center for Education Statistics, 400 Maryland 
Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202 



assistance, and information for individuals concerned with 
providing arts programs for disabled children and youth. 



93/ National Committee— Arts 
for the Handicapped 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to state and local arts agencies, recreational 
organizations, educational and other institutions, and 
agencies serving disabled persons. Training, technical 



Description 



The National Committee-Arts for the Handicapped 
(NCAH) is a nonprofit private group affiliated with the John 
F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. It serves as the 
national coordinating agency for the development and 
implementation of arts programs for handicapped children 
and youth. In 1979 the Committee received $1 million from 
the Arts Education Program (see no. 67) of the Office of 
Education (OE). It has also received assistance from the 
Bureau of Education for the Handicapped (see no. 69) in 
OE, the Alliance for Arts Education, and the Joseph P. 
Kennedy, Jr., Foundation. The Committee provides 
opportunities for handicapped children to learn through 
the arts by sponsoring model programs, training 
personnel, conducting research, disseminating curriculum 
and instructional methods, and promoting national 
awareness of the arts' significance for handicapped 
individuals. The Committee maintains a publications, film, 
and media library which provides information about any 
aspect of arts for disabled persons. Current projects and 
principles of arts education programming for disabled 
children are described in Humanism and the Arts in 
Special Education, prepared by the University of New 
Mexico and the Committee. Arts for the Handicapped 
Child ... Why? is a collection of case studies by therapists, 
parents, artists, and others recording the positive effects 
of arts experiences. A list of publications and a brochure 
explaining the Committee's activities are available from the 
address below. Assistance is offered under several 
categories described below. 



Model Site Program 

Model arts programs are accredited by the Committee to 
serve as national demonstration centers which provide 
technical assistance and workshops for arts educators, 
special education instructors, administrators, parents, 
and cultural leaders. No funds are provided to model 
sites; however, ^accreditation implies Committee 
endorsement of the program. Model sites must offer 
drama, dance/movement, visual arts, and music. 
Fifteen model sites operated during 1979. 

Example: The San Fernando Valley Arts Council in 
Northridge, Calif., in cooperation with the Los Angeles 
Unified School District, developed an arts resource center 
and conducted staff development for teachers. Camp 
Sunshine in Rockford, III., which is based in the local 
public library, is directed by a small professional staff, 
volunteers, and artists from the Rockford Arts Council. The 
camp provides arts sessions for children and their 
parents, works with local agencies serving the 
handicapped, and sponsors workshops in several states. 



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Special Projects 

Grants of up to $10,000 are made for the development of 
unique and innovative curriculum materials, research 
projects, inservice and preservice teacher training 
programs, and significant arts-related projects. About 30 
awards are made annually. 

Example: In 1979, a grant was made to the Arts in 
Special Education Project of Harrisburg, Pa., which 
planned to develop a statewide model for effective 
delivery of arts education to teachers of handicapped 
children ages 3 to 21; the Vermont Council on the Arts 
received a grant to provide information and training to 
statewide public and private nonprofit arts agencies 
seeking to implement the Section 504 regulations (see 
nos. 57 and 208). 

Training 

The Committee provides training and technical assistance 
to teachers, artists, and administrators in educational, 
recreational, museum, library, and art center settings 
through the Model Sites and regional workshops for Very 
Special Arts Festivals (see below). It has also sponsored 
leadership training for state directors of special education, 
arts educators, and university personnel. 

Very Special Arts Festivals 

Small grants of $500 to $5,000 are awarded by the 
Committee to agencies sponsoring festivals for the 
purpose of enlisting additional support from state and 
local arts and education agencies and other service 
groups. Matching funds are not required of grantees. 
However, evidence of organizational commitment is 
necessary, such as contributions of time or services. 
Through workshops, demonstrations, exhibits, and 
performances in the creative arts, disabled school-age 
children show their artistic skills and demonstrate the 
impact of the arts in promoting responsiveness and 
learning achievement. The Committee provides grantees 
with technical assistance, promotional materials, regional 
training sessions, and travel expenses. Other persons may 
participate in the training sessions for a fee. About 50 
festivals are organized annually. 

Contact for Information 

National Committee-Arts for the Handicapped, 1701 K 
Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006 



94/ National Diffusion Network 

Education Division 



Description 



The National Diffusion Network helps local school districts 
adopt educational programs developed and proved 
effective in other districts. Between 1974 and 1978, more 
than 200 programs were found suitable for national 
replication by the Office of Education's Joint Dissemination 
Review Panel. Of these, many programs, spanning all 
grade levels and many subjects, have received funding to 
encourage their nationwide dissemination. 

Financial assistance is provided for two purposes. Funds 
awarded to public and private nonprofit organizations and 
individuals enable the staff of approved programs to help 
educators in other communities adopt a program. Training 
sessions, curriculum materials, and technical assistance 
are financed. Awards are also made to "state facilitators," 
usually local or state education officials, who match local 
schools with exemplary programs and help coordinate 
exchanges of information, staff training, and planning. 

An annual reference book, Educational Programs That 
Work, contains descriptions of all programs approved by 
the review panel and the names and addresses of state 
facilitators. Anyone may examine the catalogue in the 
state facilitator's office or order a copy for a small fee from 
Order Department, Far West Laboratory, 1855 Folsom 
Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 



Example 



In 1979, $5.25 million was awarded to 55 state facilitators. 
Another $6.25 million was awarded to 120 developers of 
exemplary programs. Of these, only a few programs 
incorporate arts or humanities education into the 
curriculum in important ways. The Institute for Political and 
Legal Education in Sewell, N.J., has designed and tested 
social studies units to provide secondary students with 
knowledge and practical experience in political, 
governmental, and legal processes. The New York City 
Board of Education's "Learning to Read through the Arts" 
program is intended to improve reading skills in grades 
four to six through remedial workshops designed both to 
stimulate interest in the arts and to correct reading 
weaknesses. The project coordinates the resources of 
major museums, specially trained professional artists, and 
reading and art teachers. The Southwest Iowa Learning 
Resources Center in Red Oak has sponsored a course of 
study in the mass media for high school students to 
improve their understanding and performance in such 
areas as film, radio, and television production and their 
hardware, interpretation, and esthetics. 



What/For Whom 



Grants and contracts with local and state education 
officials, local education agencies, and other public and 
private nonprofit organizations and individuals. 



Contact for Information 



National Diffusion Network, Division of Educational 
Replication, Office of Education, Washington, DC 20202 



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95/ National Institute of Education 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to and contracts with individuals and public and 
private, profit and nonprofit organizations, institutions, and 
agencies. 

Description 

The National Institute of Education (NIE) awards grants 
and contracts for research and development projects in 
the field of education. These projects may include both 
basic and applied research and planning surveys, 
investigations, experiments, evaluations, and 
developmental activities directly related to such research. 
The primary missions of the Institute are to promote 
equality of educational opportunity and to improve 
educational practices, partly in order to reduce the degree 
to which ethnic background, race, sex, and social class 
influence educational attainment. 

Most of the Institute's funds are awarded through 
competitions based on Requests for Proposals 
(announced in Commerce Business Daily, see no. 25) or 
grant program announcements issued for specific 
research topics. Unsolicited proposals relevant to the 
Institute's missions but not addressed to specific grant or 
contract solicitations are also funded. Guidelines for 
unsolicited proposals and grant program announcements 
are available from the Institute at the address given below. 
Proposals are generally encouraged in the behavioral and 
social sciences — including anthropology, linguistics, 
psychology, and sociology — employing diverse 
methodologies, such as ethnographic description and 
historical analysis. 

Three program areas within the Institute administer 
sponsored projects. The Teaching and Learning Program 
focuses on the process of human learning and 
development: teaching and instruction in formal settings; 
reading and language; education outside of schools, in 
homes, workplaces, libraries, and museums, for example; 
and testing research results. Research on esthetic 
development and arts instruction is eligible under this 
program. The Dissemination and Improvement of Practice 
Program sponsors efforts to disseminate in useful form the 
results of educational research to teachers and 
administrators. The Educational Policy and Organization 
Program is concerned with improving the institutional and 
social environments in which education occurs. These 
include classrooms, schools, and school districts at 
federal, state, and local levels, and within the judicial 
system. 

The Educational Research Library, operated by NIE, has a 
complete collection of ERIC microfiche, legal references, a 
150,000-volume book collection, 1,200 periodicals and 
newspapers, and rare books, and is open to the public. 
Short-term loans of materials may be made to other 



libraries but not to individuals. Reading and study areas 
are accessible to researchers. 



Example 

The 1979 appropriation for the Institute was $97 million. 
Project grants and contracts range from $1,500 to $1.5 
million, averaging about $100,000 for grants and $150,000 
for contracts. From 1974 through 1978, NIE contributed 
$300,000 to Harvard University's basic research on 
creativity, perception, and cognitive development. In 1978 
it awarded $740,000 to the Central Midwestern Regional 
Educational Laboratory (CEMREL) for research in esthetic 
education and for the development of training and 
supportive services for teachers in elementary schools. 
CEMREL also sponsors the Aspen esthetic education 
conferences— national forums for researchers, 
practitioners, and policy makers — and is analyzing art, 
music, and creative writing data collected by the National 
Student Educational Progress Survey. Further, NIE gave 
$84,000 to a researcher at Harvard University for a study 
of the use and development of visual and verbal 
metaphor. 

Contact for Information 

Publications Management and Administrative Services 
Division, National Institute of Education, Washington, 
DC 20208 



96/ Public Service Education 
Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants and fellowship allocations to institutions of higher 
education. Students do not apply to the Office of 
Education for fellowships; they are nominated by their 
institutions. 

Description 

The Program's purpose is to support graduate and 
professional public service education, that is, preparation 
for leadership and management careers in government or 
in nonprofit community service agencies. Public service 
may be interpreted to include not only occupations 
addressed to the social and economic needs of a 
community but also those concerned with cultural welfare. 
Opportunities for program development, personnel 
exchanges, field work, and supervised practicum and 
internship experiences are considered important aspects 
of public service education programs. 

Two types of assistance are provided: grants to improve 
postbaccalaureate public service education programs and 



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awards of fellowships to support graduate students in 
such programs. Proposals for institutional grants usually 
must demonstrate a strong relationship between the 
proposed project and the training program for which 
fellowships are requested. A college or university that is 
awarded an allocation of fellowships recommends eligible 
students to the Office of Education. 

Example 

Nearly $4 million was awarded for the 1978-1979 
academic year: 74 colleges and universities received $1.3 
million in institutional grants and 97 institutions received 
$2.6 million to award 332 fellowships to graduate 
students. Since the Program's first year in 1975, only a 
small percentage of students has sought management 
positions in cultural institutions or groups. One became 
the manager of a municipal orchestra; another, an 
administrator on the design staff of a museum. 

Contact for Information 

Public Service Education Program, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



97/ Strengthening Developing 
Institutions (Title III) 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to public and private institutions of higher 
education that have been designated by the Office of 
Education as "developing institutions." 

Description 

The Higher Education Act of 1965 created the 
Strengthening Developing Institutions Program (known as 
Title III) to channel financial assistance to "developing" 
institutions of higher education. To be classified as a 
"developing institution," a college must document that its 
student body has a high percentage of economically 
deprived students, financial or other circumstances 
threaten its survival, constructive steps have been taken to 
strengthen fiscal status and program quality, and the 
potential exists for a distinctive and substantial 
contribution to the higher education resources of the 
United States. Funds assist these institutions in improving 
their academic quality, administrative capacity, student 
services, and fiscal stability. An institution must request 
and receive designation as a developing institution from 
the Office of Education in order to be eligible for a Title III 
grant, but designation does not guarantee funding. 

Designated institutions may apply for three types of Title 
III assistance, described below. 



Cooperative Arrangement Grants 

With this type of assistance, the developing institution 
makes arrangements for other colleges or universities, 
agencies, organizations, or business entities to help carry 
out its Title III activities over a period of one to five years. 

National Teaching Fellowships 

Awards are made for one or two years through a 
developing institution to junior faculty or graduate students 
from another college or university to teach full time at the 
developing institution. 

Professors Emeritus Grants 

Funds permit the developing institution to hire a professor 
retired from active service at another institution to teach or 
conduct research for up to two years. 

Example 

An appropriation of $120 million was enacted for 1979. As 
one aspect of comprehensive institutional development, 
some Title III grantees have concentrated on the arts or 
humanities curriculum. The College of the Mainland in 
Texas City, Tex., was awarded $800,000 for both 
administrative and instructional improvement, the latter 
effort including redirection of a fine arts program. In 1978, 
Gadsden State Junior College in Gadsden, Ala., received 
$710,000 for six coordinated efforts, among them the 
implementation of a competency-based curriculum in the 
humanities, communications, and social and natural 
sciences. Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga., received $1 
million for seven distinct activities, including expansion of 
its international and Afro-American studies programs. 
Rockhurst College in Kansas City, Mo., was awarded $1.3 
million for 12 coordinated activities, one of which, the 
Integrated Humanities Sequence, planned an 
interdisciplinary approach to the humanities. The 
University of Southern Colorado in Pueblo received 
$440,000 for 1 1 coordinated programs, one of which was 
a program planned to integrate ethnic studies into the 
general education program, and to develop workshops, 
art works, and a Multicultural Curriculum Center. Xavier 
University of Louisiana in New Orleans was awarded $2 
million for a comprehensive project with a guidance and 
enrichment component that includes programs in art, 
dance, literature, film, and drama to complement 
classroom assignments. 

Comment 

Since the authorization for this program, Title III of the 
Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, expires in 
1980, new legislation is required. Revisions of the 
program's structure and purpose are therefore possible. 

Contact for Information 

Strengthening Developing Institutions Program, Division of 
Institutional Development, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



98/99 



98/ Student Financial Aid Programs 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants, loans, and employment opportunities for students 
enrolled at least on a half-time basis at eligible 
postsecondary institutions (colleges, universities, 
vocational schools, technical schools, and hospital 
schools of nursing). Students must be United States 
citizens, nationals, or permanent residents. 

Description 

The Office of Education offers five programs to help 
students finance their education and training after high 
school. Assistance can be used for educational purposes 
only, such as tuition, fees, room, board, books, supplies, 
and other expenses. With the exception of the Guaranteed 
Student Loan Program, students must demonstrate need 
to qualify for assistance. Undergraduates may apply for all 
five programs, graduate students only for work-study and 
loan assistance. A booklet, A Student's Guide to Five 
Federal Financial Aid Programs, available at no cost from 
the address below, highlights the important facts about 
assistance and application procedures. Nearly $4 billion 
was appropriated for student financial aid in 1979. 



the past. Students apply for employment through their 
institutional financial aid office. 

National Direct Student Loan (NDSL) 

Loans to meet educational expenses range in size from 
$2,500 to $10,000 depending on the level of study. 
Repayment begins nine months after the student leaves 
school and is scheduled over 10 years at 3 percent 
interest. 

Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) 

This program permits a student to borrow directly from a 
bank, credit union, savings and loan association, or other 
lender. Undergraduates may borrow at 7 percent interest 
a maximum of $2,500 a year, graduates $5,000 a year. 
Repayments normally begin between 9 and 12 months 
after the student leaves school and are repayable over 10 
years. 

Contact for Information 

Financial aid office at the student's institution 
or regional office of student financial assistance, 
HEW regional office (see Appendix B) or Bureau 
of Student Financial Assistance, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Basic Educational Opportunity Grants (BEOG) 

Basic grants for the 1978-1979 academic year ranged 
from $50 to $1,600, depending on the student's 
financial need, which is computed on the basis of a 
congressionally approved formula. In 1978, students from 
families with incomes up to $25,000 were made eligible. 
Eligibility and the amount of aid are determined by the 
Office of Education; the student's institution cannot make 
any adjustments in the award. 



99/ Teacher Centers 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 



Grants to local education agencies and institutions of 
higher education. 



Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grants 
(SEOG) 

These grants are made to students of exceptional financial 
need who otherwise would not be able to continue their 
education. Grants range from $200 to $1,500 a year and 
must be at least equally matched by the student's school. 
Students apply for aid through the financial aid officer at 
their school, who determines which students are eligible 
for how much assistance. 

Campus Work-Study 

This program provides employment of up to 40 hours a 
week for students who need to earn part of their 
educational expenses. Salaries, based on the minimum 
wage, are related to the type of work and proficiency 
required. Jobs are arranged on or off campus with a 
public or private nonprofit agency. Many cultural 
institutions have participated in work-study programs in 



Description 



Teacher Centers supported under this program provide 
elementary and secondary school teachers with training 
and curriculum development activities addressed to their 
professional needs and the educational needs of their 
students. Grants for one to three years of assistance are 
made to local education agencies to plan, establish, or 
operate centers, and to institutions of higher education to 
operate centers. A policy board representative of 
elementary and secondary classroom teachers from the 
area to be served supervises the project. Each center's 
board is independent in determining policy and activities, 
and may choose to focus on a specific curriculum such as 
the arts, energy, international studies, or special 
education. Applications are submitted to state 
departments of education, which forward approved 
projects to the Office of Education. No more than 10 
percent of the monies available for grants in any fiscal 
year can be awarded to institutions of higher education. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



99/100/101 



Example 



Example 



The program's 1978 appropriation was nearly $8.3 million. 
State departments of education received 537 applications; 
of the 486 forwarded to the Office of Education, 61 were 
approved. Approximately 60 continuations and 25 new 
projects were sponsored with the 1979 appropriation of 
$12.6 million. The first Teacher Center grants were made 
in the fall of 1978. At least two projects plan arts 
experiences as part of comprehensive inservice training 
programs for teachers. Columbia City Schools in 
Mississippi received an award in 1979 for a project to 
help teachers integrate visual and performing arts 
activities into the regular curriculum. The Teacher Center 
based in Albemarle, N.C., funded in 1978. offers 
instruction in the arts through a puppetry workshop, a 
library with arts and crafts materials, and assistance from 
local artists. 



Contact for Information 



Teacher Centers Program, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



Teacher Corps received a $37.5 million appropriation in 
both 1978 and 1979. During 1978, 81 projects were 
initiated. Hunter College in New York City received a 
$150,000 award for a project in East Harlem designed to 
help teachers integrate arts and humanities resources into 
the regular curriculum. Workshops on photography, 
poetry, and literature were planned for the summer of 
1979, with follow-up in the classroom during the academic 
year. College faculty in architecture, history, music, urban 
affairs, and other disciplines will help teachers broaden 
the existing curriculum with materials and perspectives 
drawn from these fields. 



Contact for Information 



Teacher Corps, Office of Education, Washington, 
DC 20202 



1 00 Teachers Corps 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 



Grants to institutions of higher education, local and state 
education agencies, and correctional facilities. 



Description 



The purpose of Teacher Corps is to give teachers 
opportunities fcr professional development, to improve 
educational opportunities for children in low-income 
communities, and to strengthen college and university 
teacher preparation programs. Any area of the curriculum 
or of teacher expertise, including the arts and humanities, 
may be a target for improvement. Every project is the 
result of collaborative planning, administration, and 
evaluation by at least one institution of higher education, a 
local education agency, and an elected community 
council representative of local parents and residents. 
Teacher Corps Youth Advocacy Projects train educational 
personnel who provide remedial, basic, and secondary 
level education to young offenders or delinquents; 
correctional facilities help carry out these projects. 

Teachers, prospective teachers (interns), and other 
educational personnel are trained in the local community. 
Projects must produce positive curricular, administrative, 
or other changes in each project school. 

Five years is the maximum duration of assistance; from 
$150,000 to $300,000 is the maximum award depending 
on the year of the project. 



101 /Vocational Education Programs 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Formula grants to state education agencies which provide 
funds to local education agencies and enter into contracts 
with private profit or nonprofit vocational training 
institutions or other institutions capable of carrying out 
vocational programs. Discretionary grants to and contracts 
with two- and four-year institutions of higher education; 
local and state education agencies; Indian tribal 
organizations; other agencies; and public and private, 
nonprofit and profit organizations, institutions, and 
individuals. 

Description 

The Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education in the 
Office of Education administers federal assistance for 
vocational education: formula grants to states for 
instruction and supportive services, and discretionary 
grants for research and training. Vocational education 
programs prepare individuals for employment in careers 
that do not require a baccalaureate or advanced degree. 
Occupational instruction may be funded in many fields, 
including architectural technology, graphic arts, 
photography, radio and television production, theatrical 
production, and woodworking. States use formula grant 
funds for many purposes such as vocational instruction 
and placement services for students, research, teacher 
training, curriculum development, and special programs 
for academically, economically, or physically 
disadvantaged individuals. 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 101/102 



Example 



The appropriation for vocational education formula and 
discretionary grants in 1979 was more than $681 million. 
The state of Massachusetts supported radio and television 
production programs in the cities of Boston and Lowell to 
provide students with prevocational guidance and 
technical training in broadcasting. In New York State, 
students have received training in the technological 
aspects of theater production, lighting, set design, and 
sound systems. 



Contact for Information 



State department of education or Bureau of 
Occupational and Adult Education, Office of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202 



102 Women's Educational Equity 
Act Program 

Education Division 

What/For Whom 

Grants to and contracts with public agencies, private 
nonprofit organizations, and individuals. 

Description 

The Women's Educational Equity Act Program awards 
grants and contracts to develop model programs, 
materials, and other projects to promote equity for women 
in education. "Educational equity for women" is defined as 
the elimination of discrimination on the basis of sex and 
sex-role stereotyping in educational programs, and the 
responsiveness of educational institutions, administrators, 
instructors, and other personnel to the special educational 
needs created by inequitable practices. 

An extremely broad range of activities at all levels of 
education, from preschool to adult, qualifies for 
assistance: curricula, textbooks, and other educational 
materials development and distribution; educational 
personnel training; research and demonstration; guidance 
and counseling; educational activities for adult women; 
and programs in vocational, career, physical education, 
and educational administration. To be sponsored, projects 
must have the potential of a substantial nationwide impact 
by developing materials or model programs that can be 
adapted by others in similar settings. The primary goal 
must not be the provision of services directed to local 
needs or interests. Emphasis is placed on the importance 
of developing diverse approaches that reflect the needs 
and concerns of women of different age, ethnic, racial, 
regional, socioeconomic, and residential groups. Two 
categories of support are offered: general grants that 



usually range in size from $35,000 to $175,000 and small 
grants for $25,000 or less. 

Workshops on how to write proposals have been held 
annually for two years; in 1980 materials developed for 
use in these workshops will be available for sale by the 
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing 
Office, Washington, DC 20402. 

Example 

Of 101 applications for small grants submitted in 1978, 20 
were funded. Of 397 applications for general and 
continuation support, 50 grants were made. The Berkeley 
Stage Company in Berkeley, Calif., was awarded 
$1 15,241 for two years to create and test junior high 
school curriculum materials on setting educational and 
career goals; half-hour films of scenes from three plays 
depicting young women faced with critical life decisions 
and a three-program series for public television were 
planned. A researcher in Menlo Park, Calif., was awarded 
$14,900 to create a handbook, bibliography, and 
workshops for educational television producers to 
encourage the elimination of sex-role stereotyping from 
children's television. The Creative Resources Institute in 
New York City received a $97,875 grant to develop and 
test a project in Freeport, Long Island, an ethnically and 
economically diverse community, to encourage preschool 
children to explore sexist attitudes and behaviors through 
dance, puppetry, drama, music, and the visual arts. 
Benedict College in Columbia! S.C., received $193,913 for 
a two-year study of the contributions of black women in 
the arts, commerce and business, education, law, the 
media, and other areas during the past 200 years in a 
31 -state section of the United States. The results will be 
distributed to professional organizations in history, English, 
and other humanities fields, national television networks, 
and other interested groups. 

Comment 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1978 
amended the Women's Educational Equity Act to provide 
that the first $15 million in appropriations be awarded for 
demonstration projects with national impact. As of 1980. 
all funds beyond $15 million must be awarded to establish 
and operate programs of local significance to provide 
equal opportunities for both sexes, including projects to 
meet Title IX requirements. However, since the 1979 
appropriation was $9 million and the President's budget 
request for 1980 is $10 million, triggering of this new 
provision in the near future is unlikely. 



Contact for Information 

Women's Educational Equity Act Program, Women's 
Program Staff. Office of Education, Washington, 
DC 20202 



103/104 



Department of 
Housing and 
Urban 
Development 



1 03 Introduction 



The Department of Housing and Urban Development 
(HUD) is the principal federal agency responsible for 
meeting housing needs and for improving and developing 
the nation's communities. HUD's major assistance 
programs include mortgage insurance, rental subsidies, 
and loans or grants to rehabilitate, preserve, and revitalize 
urban centers suffering physical decay. Revitalization is at 
the heart of HUD's efforts to stimulate the housing industry 
to provide not only housing but also a suitable living 
environment, thus contributing to the stabilization and 
improvement of neighborhoods. HUD recognizes the role 
that arts and design can play in revitalization as reflected 
in the proposed Livable Cities Program (see no. 104). Two 
major programs with potential for assisting cultural 
organizations are Community Development Block Grants 
(see no. 107) and Urban Development Action Grants (see 
no. 111). In addition, functional arts and design projects 
are permitted as eligible costs in most HUD programs 
(see no. 112). Their inclusion in projects is at the 
discretion of communities receiving HUD assistance. To 
increase the cultural components of projects funded by 
HUD, cultural organizations and individual artists should 
stay in close contact with local government planning and 
development agencies. 

The Program Information Center in Washington, DC, 
provides information on all HUD programs, refers inquiries 
to the appropriate office, responds to requests on general 
sources of assistance, and distributes HUD publications. 
A wide variety of publications on housing, urban affairs, 
architecture, land use, community development, and 
related topics, including 50,000 Comprehensive Planning 
Reports (see no. 108), is available for consultation 
purposes from HUD's Central Office Library. HUD 
maintains 10 Regional Office libraries (see Appendix C) 
with area collections and a published card catalogue of 
Central Library holdings. 



104 Livable Cities 



What/For Whom 



Contracts with or grants to nonprofit, public, or private 
organizations or institutions, including units of state and 
local government, museums, cultural centers, and 
neighborhood arts groups. 



Description 



The Livable Cities Program was authorized in 1978. If 
funding is appropriated for this program, it will be 
administered by HUD in cooperation with the National 
Endowment for the Arts (see no. 193). Its purpose is to 
assist communities, neighborhoods, states, and nonprofit 
organizations in utilizing and developing artistic, cultural, 
design, or historic resources contributing to neighborhood 
revitalization. The program is designed particularly to 
expand artistic and cultural opportunities for low- and 
moderate-income people; to stimulate neighborhood 
revitalization; and, to the extent possible, to stimulate 
community and economic development. This program 
seeks to fund activities such as the design of minor 
rehabilitation of buildings that will be used as community 
cultural centers; programming for cultural centers; street 
festivals; collaboration between arts groups and 
community development groups; hiring a program director 
for a center; or urban design activities. 

Grants and contracts will be awarded to nonprofit groups 
for a wide range of projects in areas such as architecture, 
the visual and performing arts, interior design, 
photography, crafts, and urban design. The Arts 
Endowment is assisting in developing program criteria 
and guidelines, and is providing recommendations for 
persons to serve on panels which will judge the merit of 
proposals. Preference is to be given to projects initiated at 
the local level with broad community support — from 
neighborhood residents, local businesses, state and local 
governments, and persons with expertise in the relevant 
artistic fields. The cost of acquisition and construction of 
buildings is not included in the program. Final selection of 
awards rests with the Secretary of the Department. 



Comment 



Authorization for the Livable Cities Program was set at $5 
million each year for 1979 and 1980. At the time the 
Cultural Directory went to press no appropriation had 
been made for this program. 



Contact for Information 



HUD regional offices (see Appendix C) or Department 
of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, 
DC 20410 



Contact for Information 



Office of Neighborhoods, Voluntary Associations and 
Consumer Protection, Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Washington, DC 20410 



Department of Housing and Urban Development 



105/106/107 



105 National Solar Heating and 
Cooling Information Center 



Description 



What/For Whom 



Information for architects, designers, planners, educators, 
and the general public. 



Description 



The National Solar Heating and Cooling Information 
Center, established by the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD) in cooperation with the 
Department of Energy (see nos. 50-56), aims at making 
the public aware of the feasibility of solar energy 
applications and at encouraging the use of solar 
technology in homes and commercial buildings, such as 
community centers, libraries, and museums. Written and 
telephone inquiries are welcome. 

A variety of services and resources are provided. For 
example, a computerized file of solar professionals lists 
names, addresses, and fields of expertise of architects, 
designers, and other professionals. Technical questions 
about solar heating and cooling systems, equipment, and 
climatic factors are handled free of charge by the staff. A 
computerized file is maintained of proposed and actual 
laws and regulations affecting solar energy nationwide at 
all levels of government. Information is also available on 
local, state, and federal financial incentives, such as tax 
assessment relief and grant programs The Center has 
information on solar educational resources, including 
courses, conferences, seminars, speakers, exhibits, films, 
and solar models. A "Reading List for Solar Energy" offers 
ordering information and descriptive summaries for such 
titles as the Handbook of Homemade Power, Solar 
Architecture, and Informal Directory of the Organizations 
and People Involved in the Solar Heating of Buildings. 



Contact for Information 



National Solar Heating and Cooling Information Center, 
P.O. Box 1607, Rockville, MD 20850 



106 Urban Research Grants 



What/For Whom 

Project grants to and research contracts with public and 
private profit and nonprofit organizations, such as 
scientific and academic institutions or state and local 
governmental bodies with the capacity for research in the 
areas described below. 



Funds are used primarily for HUD-developed research 
projects, testing, demonstrations, and pilot programs 
related to national housing needs, evaluation of existing 
housing and community development programs, 
environmental improvement, and improved management 
and planning capabilities in state and local governments. 
The program seeks to encourage technological and 
managerial research, to demonstrate new systems and 
methods applicable to other elements of government and 
private enterprise, and to improve knowledge of housing 
and community processes. Most funds are directed 
toward housing and community development research, a 
large share of which is congressionally mandated work. 
Only a small proportion has been used for arts-related 
research. 

Project grants and research contracts are awarded on a 
highly competitive basis. Applications to be placed on 
HUD's composite bidders list may be obtained from the 
Office of Procurement and Contracts. Unsolicited 
proposals must be cost shared; guidelines for their 
submittal are available from HUD's Office of Policy 
Development and Research at the address listed below. 



Example 



HUD is surveying 400 business leaders in cities across 
the country to determine their experiences with and 
attitudes toward partnerships with government for urban 
development. A part of the survey will assess business 
leaders' receptivity to the more active federal 
encouragement of business investments in local arts and 
cultural activities and the extent to which firms contribute 
now toward the arts and cultural activities within their 
metropolitan areas. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and 
Research, Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Washington, DC 20410 



107 Community Development Block 
Grants 

Community Planning and Development 



What/For Whom 



Block grants, for up to 100 percent of project costs, and 
guaranteed loans to cities, urban counties, and other units 
of local government or locally designated public agencies. 
Community groups should contact the mayor, local 
community development offices, or the city Department of 
Economic Development concerning the possible inclusion 
of their projects in the community's development program. 



Department of Housing and Urban Development 



107/108 



Description 



Example 



Block grants and loan guarantees are made for such 
community development activities as construction, 
preservation, and restoration projects, and the provision of 
certain needed public services. The program's primary 
objectives are to improve housing and community 
development in local communities and to revitalize 
deteriorating areas so that neighborhoods can be 
preserved while economic opportunities are expanded, 
principally for persons of low and moderate incomes. 
Under this program, local government officials decide how 
funds may be spent. At least two public hearings must be 
held by local officials to gain citizens' views on community 
development prior to submission of application to HUD. 
Block grant applications should be submitted directly to 
the Department Field Offices for approval 

There are numerous eligible activities, among them the 
planning, acquisition, construction, and renovation of 
public facilities such as neighborhood or senior centers; 
properties of historic, esthetic, or architectural value; and 
parks, playgrounds, and other recreational facilities. 
Cultural and art centers, museums, and libraries are 
eligible to receive assistance only if they are 
"neighborhood facilities" — defined as facilities, for either 
one or multiple purposes, designed to provide health, 
social, recreational, or similar community services 
primarily for residents of the neighborhood service area. 
Schools or other educational institutions are ineligible for 
assistance. 

Also eligible are activities connected with the planning 
and implementation of historic preservation of buildings 
that are listed in, or are eligible for inclusion in, the 
National Register of Historic Places (see no. 126), or that 
have been designated as a state or local landmark, or that 
are located in a historic district. 

Public services to improve the block grant community's 
employment, economic development, or educational and 
recreational services and facilities can be eligible if they 
are supportive of physical development efforts. For 
example, community arts programs tied in closely with 
neighborhood revitalization efforts could be judged to be 
an eligible activity. 

Special projects involving planning and implementing the 
removal from community buildings of material and 
architectural barriers to the mobility and accessibility of 
elderly and handicapped persons are also eligible. 

Administrative costs for up to 10 percent of project costs 
are covered. Administration of urban environmental design 
planning is an eligible administrative cost to improve the 
management and long-range planning capabilities of 
block grant communities. This allows for interdisciplinary 
staffing to implement Community Development programs 
through the hiring of market analysts, social scientists, 
urban planners and designers, architectural engineers, 
and other design professionals. Interested persons or 
groups, including cultural organizations, may petition the 
local government to make use of this provision if it has not 
already done so. 



Authorizations for Community Development Block Grants 
were $3.6 billion for 1978 and $3.75 billion in 1979. 
Culturally related activities funded by grants in 1978 
included construction of a new roof for the Fox Theater 
Building in Atlanta, Ga.; restoration by the Maine Historical 
Society of the Portland Longfellow House to serve as a 
museum; a competition administered by the Cambridge 
Arts Council for artists to create murals, outdoor 
sculptures, and other permanent artworks to enhance the 
quality of neighborhoods in Cambridge, Mass.; restoration 
and landscaping of a historic area along the Strand River 
in Galveston, Tex.; and renovation and restoration of the 
Pabst Theatre in Milwaukee, Wis. 



Contact for Information 



HUD area or regional offices (see Appendix C) or 
Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and 
Development, Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Washington, DC 20410 



1 08 Comprehensive Planning 
Assistance ("701") 

Community Planning and Development 



What/For Whom 



Project grants to states, councils of governments, regional 
planning commissions, and recognized Indian tribal 
groups or bodies. Grants to nonmetropolitan regional 
organizations, municipalities with populations under 
50,000, and counties are processed through respective 
state governments. Although large cities and urban 
counties are eligible, the grants are intended for smaller 
jurisdictions. 



Description 



The Comprehensive Planning Assistance program 
(popularly known as "701" after its enabling legislation) 
makes grants to upgrade state and local government 
capacity to undertake a broad range of planning and 
management activities. As a minimum, the "701" program 
requires an ongoing planning process which must include 
land-use and housing elements. Eligible activities include 
feasibility studies for cultural and recreational facilities; 
studies of the impact of such facilities on the surrounding 
environment; urban design activities; evaluation and 
identification of historically and architecturally significant 
properties with potential for re-use; preparation of 
programs or legislation for historic preservation; 
development and improvement of management capability 
to implement planning; and development of 
policy-planning management capacity. 



Department of Housing and Urban Development 



108/109/110 



The "701" grantees are required to undertake land-use 
and housing planning. Land-use planning primarily deals 
with problems of growth, the need for public facilities and 
services, and environmental concerns such as the 
preservation of historic sites and structures. Housing 
planning considers the needs of all persons, problems of 
discrimination, and the preservation of existing housing 
and neighborhoods. Grants are made on a matching 
basis of two-thirds federal, one-third local funds. 

Example 

The 1978 and 1979 appropriations for the "701" program 
were $57 million and $53 million respectively Recently 
funded projects include two publications, A Future from 
the Past: The Case for Conservation and Reuse of Old 
Buildings in Industrial Communities and Built to Last: A 
Handbook for Recycling Old Buildings. Also funded were 
a regional survey of cultural resources in the Genesee 
Finger Lakes Region of New York, and plans for an arts 
and crafts center for the Wichita-Caddu-Delaware Tribes 
in Anadarko. Okla. Over 50,000 surveys and plans are 
available to the public from the HUD Central Library in 
Washington, DC. 

Contact for Information 

HUD area or regional offices (see Appendix C) or 
Office of Community Planning and Program Coordination, 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
Washington, DC 20410 



109 National Awards for Urban 
Environmental Design 

Community Planning and Development 

What/For Whom 

Awards to design professionals, builders and developers, 
local governments, public agencies, and community 
groups participating in HUD-assisted plans and projects. 

Description 

HUD's Biennial Awards for Design Excellence recognize 
superior design and planning in HUD-assisted programs 
and projects. Certificates or plaques are awarded in the 
categories of Project Design, Urban Design Concepts, 
and Management Approaches (innovative uses of the 
design process as a management tool) Juries are 
composed of professionals in the environmental design 
fields of architecture, planning, and landscape 
architecture; engineering; the social sciences: public 
management; and local government. Entries are judged 
on design quality in relation to the built and natural 
environment, community benefits, and the physical, social. 



and economic development of the area. How people 
organize to solve problems is given considerable 
emphasis. 

Example 

In 1976 awards were made for the cooperative efforts of 
state and local government agencies to save and restore 
the Federalist-period buildings in the historic Market 
Square of Newburyport, Mass.; the design of a multiuse 
public complex and extensive pedestrian access system 
over a major thoroughfare in Cincinnati, Ohio; and the 
restoration of an architecturally and historically significant 
nineteenth-century public building in the Central Market of 
Lancaster, Pa. No awards were made in 1978. The 
program will be resumed in 1980. 

Contact for Information 

Urban Design Program Officer, Department of Housing 
and Urban Development, Washington, DC 20410 



110 Rehabilitation Loans ("312") 

Community Planning and Development 



What/For Whom 



Loans to property owners for property rehabilitation. Funds 
are made available to property owners through a city 
government, a local public agency (such as a renewal 
agency), a housing authority, or other local departments of 
government. 



Description 



The Department of Housing and Urban Development 
(HUD) makes loans, popularly known as "312" loans, to 
property owners and certain long-term commercial tenants 
for the repair and improvement of single, multifamily, and 
commercial properties. In general, loans may not exceed 
the actual cost of rehabilitation or $27,000 per dwelling 
unit, or $100,000 for nonresidential loans, whichever is 
less. Loans for lower income families may bear an interest 
rate of 3 percent for terms not exceeding 20 years. 

Owners of properties in a Community Development Block 
Grant area (see no. 107). a federally recognized urban 
renewal area, or a federally assisted code enforcement 
area qualify for Rehabilitation Loans These loans can be 
used for institutional purposes by public and private 
cultural institutions, and neighborhood or community 
groups, provided they meet standard eligibility 
requirements Applicants should apply to the city agency 
responsible for "312" loans in their locality to determine 
their eligibility. Loans are generally used in conjunction 
with other forms of rehabilitation assistance for 
neighborhood improvement. 



Department of Housing and Urban Development 



110/111/112 



Example 



Comment 



In 1978 the appropriation for Rehabilitation Loans was $80 
million. In 1979 it was $230 million. Ten homes within the 
historic Logan Circle area of Washington, DC, received 
more than $600,000 in loans. A total of $500,000 in loans 
was used to rehabilitate several buildings, 200 to 300 
years old, in the historic downtown area of Newburyport. 
Mass. 

Contact for Information 

HUD area or regional offices (see Appendix C) 



A proposed project is considered for Action Grant funding 
only when the applicant provides firm evidence of prior 
private sector commitment to the project. HUD funds only 
projects that generate substantially more in private 
commitments than in Action Grant money. 



Contact for Information 



HUD area or regional offices (see Appendix C) 
or Office of Urban Development Action Grants, 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
Washington, DC 20410 



1 1 1 Urban Development Action 
Grants 

Community Planning and Development 

What/For Whom 

Grants to cities, urban counties, and small communities 
that meet at least three of HUD's seven criteria for 
physical and economic distress. Grants to arts 
organizations, historical societies, and other nonprofit 
groups whose proposals tie in with the economic 
revitalization plans of the qualifying city are processed 
through the local government agency. 

Description 

Action Grants are used to stimulate private sector funding, 
and to promote the revitalization of localities by stimulating 
their stagnating economies and reclaiming deteriorated 
neighborhoods. Projects include such activities as land 
clearance, site improvement, and the rehabilitation, 
restoration, preservation, and construction of public, 
commercial, industrial, and residential structures. Action 
Grants may also be used for equity funding, loans, loan 
guarantees, and other financial arrangements for joint 
public-private development. Cultural facilities that 
contribute to urban economic revitalization or 
neighborhood reclamation may be eligible for support 
under this program. 

Example 

The Action Grant Program was begun in 1978. 
Appropriations of $400 million a year were received in 
1978 and in 1979. Of the $400 million authorized for 1980. 
$100 million has been set aside for small communities. 
Funded projects include restoration of the historic 
Seelbach Hotel in Louisville, Ky.; construction of a 
pedestrian mall and renovation of a historic building in 
Troy, N.Y.; the building of walkways between the Alamo, 
the river, and the central business district of San Antonio, 
Tex.; and revitalization of a central business district, 
including rehabilitation of a historic railroad station, in 
Ogden, Utah. 



1 1 2 Arts and Design in Public 
Housing 

Federal Housing Administration 



What/For Whom 



Commissions to and subcontracts with artists, designers, 
and planners through planning and development 
organizations operating under HUD grants and loans. 



Description 



Cultural projects and activities that improve the 
environment of HUD-financed public housing are eligible 
for support at the discretion of local planning and 
development organizations operating under HUD grants or 
loans. Cultural groups, artists, and designers should work 
closely with these organizations to ensure that artworks 
and cultural activities are incorporated into the final plans. 

Insured Housing Program 

Artists may be commissioned to create artworks for 
multifamily housing projects whose mortgages are insured 
by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). Artworks 
may include sculpture, decorative mosaics, and murals. 
These works are considered a part of the real estate and 
must be in spaces visually accessible to all occupants. 
The total cost of artworks in any one project may not 
exceed 1 percent of the FHA-estimated cost of the 
structure. 

Public Housing Modernization Program 

A limited portion of funds allocated for the modernization 
of locally owned, federally assisted, low-rent housing 
projects may be used for functional art. "Functional art" 
includes objects or artifacts that are both esthetically 
pleasing and utilitarian, such as fountains that also serve 
as wading pools, artistically designed playground 
equipment, and decorative trash receptacles. Artists, 
designers, and planners are encouraged to submit their 



Department of Housing and Urban Development 



112/113 



proposals to local housing authorities. Public housing 
agencies are encouraged to seek tenant participation in 
this aspect of the modernization effort. 

Example 

In Phoenix, Ariz., the 1 percent set aside for insured 
housing was used to provide murals in community 
facilities. In Minneapolis, Minn , an FM station which 
serves several public housing areas received a 
modernization grant to purchase an antenna transmitter. In 
Omaha, Neb., modernization funds were used for the 
design and construction of a child care and recreation 
center which also houses a multiuse theater. 

Contact for Information 

Nearest HUD area or regional office (see Appendix 
C) or local Public Housing Agency or insuring 
office or Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, Washington, DC 20410 



1 1 3 Historic Preservation Loans 

Federal Housing Administration 



Description 



Individual historic residential properties or properties 
located within historic districts are eligible for Historic 
Preservation Loans from local lending institutions insured 
by the Federal Housing Administration, provided such 
properties meet the criteria of the National Register of 
Historic Places (see no. 126). Eligible residential property 
must have the capability of housing one or more families 
after rehabilitation, preservation, or restoration. The 
building's incidental nonresidential use may not exceed 20 
percent of the total usable floor area. 

Up to $15,000 per dwelling unit, not to exceed $45,000 
per structure, may be borrowed with up to 15 years for 
repayment. Historic Preservation Loans are made at the 
current market interest rate, not to exceed 12 percent. 
There is no loan application fee. 

All loan applicants will be given the leaflet Guidelines for 
Rehabilitating Old Buildings to assist them in improving 
their residential structure while preserving its historic 
character. Before a Historic Preservation Loan can be 
made, the State Historic Preservation Officer must review 
all proposed improvements to ensure that they do not 
conflict with guidelines. 



What/For Whom 



Insured Historic Preservation Loans to community 
residents and organizations, public and private 
institutions, and state and local governments. 



Contact for Information 



HUD area or regional office (see Appendix C) 
loan company 



or FHA 



114/115 



Department of 
the Interior 



Description 



1 1 4 Introduction 



The Department of the Interior is the principal 
conservation agency for nationally-owned public lands 
and natural resources. Its primary mandate is to preserve 
the historical and cultural environment of the United States 
and its territories for the enlightenment and enjoyment of 
future generations. This responsibility includes protecting, 
preserving, and encouraging prudent public use of natural 
and cultural resources, and providing interpretive 
programs and recreational opportunities in national parks 
and other public lands. The Department also has a major 
responsibility for Indian reservations and for people living 
in Island Territories under United States administration. 
The major divisions of the Department involved in cultural 
activity are the Bureau of Indian Affairs (see nos. 
121-123), the new Heritage Conservation and Recreation 
Service (HCRS) offering grants and advisory and technical 
services for historic preservation (see nos. 124-131), and 
the National Park Service (see nos. 132-136). All divisions 
are responsible for cultural resource management in 
response to the 1971 Executive Order 1 1593 (see no. 
127), and Department-wide policies and programs are 
being developed for interpretation and environmental 
education (see no. 115). Most divisions maintain history 
offices and libraries with research materials available to 
the general public (see nos. 116, 118). 

National Park programs offer many opportunities for 
employment in interpretive programs and crafts and 
performing arts. HCRS requires the services of historians, 
archeologists, anthropologists, and architects, and the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs employs educators as well as 
anthropologists, genealogists, and historians. All survey 
data and anthropological studies are available to 
researchers and the general public. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Public Affairs, Department of the Interior, 
Washington, DC 20240 



1 1 5 Environmental Education 
Programs 

What/For Whom 

Environmental education materials and programs for 
teachers, students, and the general public. 



In 1979, the Department of the Interior initiated a 
Department-wide effort to coordinate environmental 
education programs and to determine overall policy and 
goals. The Department seeks to advance the principles of 
sound ecosystems management through the development 
of environmental education programs, and to make 
available its resources and technical expertise to 
educational institutions and organizations. The protection 
and support of cultural resources within ecosystems will 
be an integral part of these programs. 

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has developed 
comprehensive environmental education materials for use 
in schools and on BLM sites. One of BLM's publications, 
All Around You, An Environmental Study Guide, was 
written for elementary and secondary students by six 
young scientists, sociologists, and educators on contract 
to the Bureau. It approaches environmental study through 
classroom disciplines including experimental science, the 
visual and performing arts, and history. The Guide 
includes an extensive bibliography organized by 
educational level. It may be purchased for $1.50 from the 
Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, 
Washington, DC 20402. For information about other BLM 
educational materials, contact the. Bureau of Land 
Management, Department of the Interior, Washington, 
DC 20240. 

The National Park Service runs environmental workshops 
and classes, and develops curriculum materials for 
teachers. It also develops student programs dealing 
primarily with ecosystems in specific parks that are part 
of the park's interpretive program. "Man and His 
Environment" is such a program developed for the Mesa 
Verde National Park. The extensive ruins of the prehistoric 
Anasazi Pueblo Indian culture are the focal point of the 
park's historical interpretive program. Findings from a 
recent reexamination of these ruins have been used to 
develop a site-specific environmental education program 
for young people. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has developed an 
educational program for grades 4-12 which encompasses 
the social, cultural, and biological environments. 
Curriculum materials cover such subjects as public use 
of public land, a "Social History Cemetery Study," 
environmental career profiles, and wildlife photography. A 
package of materials entitled We Can Help, developed by 
the Service, is published and marketed by the Jenny 
Publishing Company, 57 Queen Avenue South, 
Minneapolis, MN 55405. In 1978 the Service developed 
the Native American Environmental Education Program, 
which it coordinates jointly with the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs. This program focuses on environmental and 
wildlife issues as they relate to specific cultures of Native 
American tribes. In 1979, educational packages were 
developed for seven tribes in Wyoming and Montana. For 
further information, write to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Region VI, P.O. Box 25186, Denver Federal 
Center, Denver, CO 80225. 



Department of the Interior 



115/116/117 



Contact for Information 



Office of Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and 
Parks, Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20240 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate History Office), Department of the Interior, 
Washington. DC 20240 



1 1 6 History Programs 



1 1 7 Indian Arts and Crafts Board 



What/For Whom 



What/For Whom 



Manuscripts, photographs, surveys, and other historic 
data for researchers; contracts with historians; grants to 
earth science historians. 



Description 



The Bureaus within the Department of the Interior keep 
historical records and chronologies of all Bureau 
proceedings. The Department also administers a variety of 
grants and service programs with specific emphasis on 
historical research and heritage conservation. The majority 
of these programs fall within the Heritage Conservation 
and Recreation Service and are described in detail in 
separate entries (see nos. 124-131). Other programs are 
described below. 

Historians at the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are 
responsible for research into the highly complex problems 
of identifying beneficiaries of Indian claims awards. In 
order to qualify for federal programs that assist Indians, 
groups must be acknowledged as bona fide tribes by the 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs. 
Decisions are based on a number of complex criteria. 
The BIA history office has organized the Federal 
Acknowledgement Project, using historians, 
anthropologists, and genealogists to research the claims. 
In some cases, local professionals are contracted to assist 
in the project. All records will be published and made 
available to researchers and the general public. For 
further information, contact the Federal Acknowledgement 
Project, Bureau of Indian Affairs, at the address listed 
below. 

National Park Service (NPS) historians have produced 
several hundred reports dealing with historic events and 
structures on the more than 200 historic and archeological 
sites that the Service administers. These reports are 
available to researchers; they are kept in libraries at the 
sites as well as at the Denver Service Center, the main 
research center for NPS; the Interior Department Library in 
Washington, DC; and the Library of Congress. NPS also 
contracts with local historians to do special projects. In 
1978, a historian completed a book called Mountain 
Home, a history and handbook on mountaineering. 
Another historian wrote Kiva, Cross, and Crown, a volume 
on the Spanish colonization of New Mexico. For further 
information, contact the Director of the National Park 
Service at the address listed below. 



Advisory services, technical assistance, publications, 
films, and workshops for Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut artists, 
craftspersons, and organizations; state and local 
governments; and nonprofit organizations working directly 
with Native American groups. Information and museum 
exhibits for the general public. 



Description 



The Indian Arts and Crafts Board, an independent federal 
agency, promotes and encourages the development of 
both traditional and innovative Native American arts and 
handcrafts, performing arts, films, and literature, and the 
preservation of oral traditions through advisory services, 
workshops, publications, and films. The Board administers 
three Native American museums and provides information 
about potential sources of funding. No direct financial 
assistance is available. 

Advisory Services 

The Board advises directors of Native American cultural 
centers as well as individual artists, craftspersons, and 
groups of Native Americans interested in developing their 
own production and marketing operations. It also refers 
complaints about imitation Native American arts and crafts 
that are represented as genuine to appropriate federal or 
local authorities. The Board serves as an advisory body to 
the Institute of American Indian Arts operated by the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs in Santa Fe, N. Mex. (see no. 
123). Example: The Board is helping the Owens Valley 
Paiute-Shoshone Indians in California to develop a cultural 
center, in addition to assisting the Hopi Arts and Crafts 
Silvercraft Cooperative Guild in Arizona and the Qualla 
Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc., of Cherokee, N.C. 

Museums 

The Board operates a coordinated system of three 
regional museums with collections of historic, traditional, 
and contemporary American Indian arts, crafts, and 
artifacts. These museums present exhibitions of 
contemporary work and tours in cooperation with state 
arts agencies and other museums. The three museums 
are: the Museum of the Plains Indian and Crafts Center, 
Browning. Mont.; the Southern Plains Indian Museum and 
Crafts Center, Anadarko, Okla.; and the Sioux Indian 
Museum and Crafts Center, Rapid City, S.Dak. For 
information about exhibitions, contact the Board at the 
address listed below. 



Department of the Interior 



117/118/119 



Publications and Films 

The Board publishes a fact sheet entitled "General 
Information About the Activities of the Indian Arts and 
Crafts Board" that indicates the kinds of assistance 
available from the Board. The Source Directory lists arts 
and crafts marketing organizations, operated by Native 
Americans, throughout the United States. Two slide kits on 
Indian and Eskimo arts and crafts and contemporary 
Sioux painting and a 20-minute film on Native American 
Art are available through the National Audiovisual Center 
(see no. 165). 

Workshops 

The Board plans and conducts workshops to improve 
the skills of craftspeople. Various state and private 
organizations provide funding and instructors for these 
purposes. Example: The Board recently assisted in the 
planning of a traditional wood-carving workshop for the 
Houma Indians in Louisiana 

Contact for Information 

Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior, 
Room 4004, Washington, DC 20240 



1 1 8 Libraries 



What/For Whom 



Extensive research and reference materials for 
researchers and scholars; some libraries open to the 
public. 



Description 



The Interior Department maintains an extensive network of 
libraries and information centers throughout the United 
States. The Natural Resources Library in Washington, 
D.C., is the focal point of this network and functions as a 
clearinghouse and referral center for information resources 
within and outside the Department. The Library is in the 
process of building a bibliographic data bank to make all 
field library holdings accessible to scientists, researchers, 
educators, and the general public. A listing of all Interior 
libraries and collections, entitled Libraries and Information 
Services Directory, is available from the office listed 
below. 

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) oversees more than 100 
libraries in schools and colleges Holdings include books, 
periodicals, and audiovisual materials on tribal history, 
Native American education, and career opportunities. 
Many libraries have artifact collections as well as historic 
publications. There is an interlibrary loan service. As part 
of a major effort to improve libraries and media centers in 
the Indian school system a White House Pre-Conference 



on Indian Library and Information Services On or Near 
Reservations was held in October 1978. The National 
Conference is scheduled for November 1979. 

The National Park Service maintains libraries in its National 
Parks and monuments. These 210 libraries contain historic 
documents, books, artifacts, photographs, and 
memorabilia relating to their specific sites. Services 
generally include interlibrary loans and onsite reference. 
Libraries are open to researchers by permission. 

The U.S. Geological Survey maintains 17 libraries around 
the country, two of which have extensive holdings of 
cultural significance to researchers. The Denver library 
has a large collection of survey photographs which are 
excellent primary sources for historical data, particularly of 
Indians and Indian villages of the West. Collections of 
national and worldwide geological surveys are open for 
reference use. The National Center Library in Reston, Va., 
is the largest earth sciences library in the world. It serves 
as a depository for all Geological Survey open file reports, 
many of which are firsthand explorers' accounts of historic 
events occurring during expeditions in Indian lands in the 
West Although there are no catalogues of photographs or 
reports, a project to duplicate materials and make them 
more durable and accessible to researchers is under way. 
Recently the Library developed an exhibit to highlight 
photographs as a principal source of information about 
the West It will be toured by the Smithsonian Institution 
Traveling Exhibit Service (see no. 247). Researchers may 
request free information about maps, charts, aerial and 
space photography, and geodetic control from the 
National Cartographic Information Center in Reston, Va., a 
centralized facility that collects, evaluates, classifies, 
catalogues, and disseminates cartographic data on the 
United States. For further information contact the U.S. 
Geological Survey Library at: STOP 914. Box 25046, 
Denver Federal Center. Denver, CO 80225 or National 
Center, Mail Stop 950. Reston, VA 22092. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Library and Information Services, Department of 
the Interior, Washington, DC 20240 



1 19 Reclamation Public Services 



What/For Whom 

Visitor centers, tours, exhibits, and recreational facilities 
for the general public Loans of artworks to banks, civic 
organizations, and other public groups. Educational films 
for schools and special interest groups. 



Description 

The Bureau of Reclamation aims at stimulating the 
economies of 1 7 contiguous western states and Hawaii 



Department of the Interior 



1 1 9/1 20 



through the development and maintenance of dams, 
reservoirs, and lakes for irrigation and recreation. As 
required by law (see no. 127), all cultural resources 
affected by such development projects must be identified 
and preserved. Many reclamation projects have 
established museums, visitor centers, tours, artistic 
exhibits, and movies to make such resources available to 
the general public. Cultural groups gather at project sites 
for environmental education workshops, oral history 
readings and recordings, concerts, and similar activities. 
For maps of the 268 reclamation projects and recreation 
areas, write to the address below. 

From 1968 to 1973, the Bureau commissioned major 
American artists to paint or draw their impressions of 
reclamation projects. The resulting 64 scenic paintings 
now constitute a traveling exhibit available to banks, civic 
organizations, and other public groups. Contributing 
artists include Lamar Dodd, Xavier Gonzalez, Peter Hurd, 
and Norman Rockwell. Arrangements to show the exhibit 
may be made by writing to the Reclamation Art 
Coordinator, Public Affairs Office, at the address below. 
The Bureau offers informational and educational films 
about reclamation projects to schools and special 
interests groups. Films are lent free of charge except for 
insurance and postage fees. Contact the Bureau of 
Reclamation Film Library, Box 25007, Denver, CO 80225. 



Contact for Information 

Bureau of Reclamation, Department of the Interior, 
Washington, DC 20240 



120 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Cultural 
Activities 



settlements. Most programs are run by wildlife refuge 
personnel. However, seasonal permanent employment is 
available for educators, historians, or other professionals 
with special skills that may be required by specific refuge 
programs. Interested individuals may contact the nearest 
regional office or Interior's Personnel Office in Washington, 
DC, at the address below. Those interested in summer 
employment opportunities should contact the Register of 
Summer Employees in the Office of Personnel 
Management (see no. 235). For a list of refuges, write to 
the Division of Wildlife Refuge Management at the address 
below. 



"Duck Stamp" Design Contest 

The Fish and Wildlife Service conducts an annual contest 
to select a new design for the Migratory Bird Hunting 
Stamp, the "duck stamp.'' Everyone over 16 years of age 
who hunts migratory waterfowl is required to have one of 
these stamps, which are issued annually. Competition is 
open to all artists, who are given wide latitude in the 
choice of medium — pen and ink, oil, watercolor, etching, 
or pencil. Design may be in black-and-white or full color, 
but it must be 7 inches wide and 5 inches high. The 
winner, chosen by a panel of art and waterfowl authorities, 
receives no compensation except an album containing a 
sheet of the stamps. The winning design is produced by 
the Bureau of Engraving and Printing of the Treasury 
Department. Detailed contest rjjles are available from 
Public Affairs, Office of Audiovisual, at the address below. 



Wildlife Art and Decoy Contests 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Refuges sponsor local contests in 
the fields of wildlife art and photography, as well as in 
working and decorative decoy wood carving. 
Wood-carving contests are generally held separately from 
other arts contests. Winning entries are auctioned 
immediately after judging. For a list of refuges, write to the 
Division of Wildlife Refuge Management at the address 
below. 



What/For Whom 



Art exhibits, guided tours, and historic displays in wildlife 
refuges or visitor centers for the general public 
Opportunities for artists to exhibit their works. Contests for 
wildlife illustrators, photographers, and wood carvers. 



Description 



The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sponsors a variety of 
cultural activities in wildlife refuges or their visitor centers. 
Local artists display their wildlife artworks in visitor centers 
on a rotating basis. Visitor centers sponsor guided tours 
and, during special events such as National Wildlife Week, 
conduct special displays and demonstrations. Many visitor 
centers run programs to acquaint visitors with physical 
and cultural aspects of Native American and early white 



Wildlife Photography Contest 

Any employee oi the Fish and Wildlife Service may enter 
regional wildlife photography contests. Winning 
photographs are sent from the regions to Washington, 
DC, where they are entered in national competition. The 
photographs become part of the Service photo library and 
may be used, upon request, in publications which credit 
both the Service and the photographer. For further 
information, contact the regional office or the Office of 
Audiovisual at the address below 



Contact for Information 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, 
Washington, DC 20240 



Department of the Interior 



121/122/123 



121 /Cultural Studies 

Bureau of Indian Affairs 

What/For Whom 



Contracts with federally recognized tribes; collections 
open to qualified scholars, with priority given to 
developers of Indian community cultural programs; 
bibliography and reference services to qualified 
researchers. 



Description 



The Cultural Studies Center, which is located at the 
"Institute of American Indian Arts (see no. 123), Santa Fe, 
N. Mex., performs research, develops and disseminates 
resource materials relating to Native American cultural 
studies, and provides reference information on related 
research being done elsewhere. In addition, the Center 
provides limited funding through contracts to federally 
recognized tribes for the development of cultural 
curriculum materials such as oral history/tribal history texts 
or collections of tribal literature and folklore. It also 
provides assistance in Indian language program 
development. 



Example 



In 1979, the Center funded a joint program with the 
Library of Congress American Folklife Center (see no. 
180) to restore, retranscribe, and make available to 
historians and researchers extensive collections of Indian 
music and oral history recorded on wax cylinders. The 
Center coordinates international cultural program activities 
with the Interamerican Indian Institute in Mexico, and 
provides advice to tribes developing community cultural 
centers. The Center maintains a Research Collection 
which includes an extensive bibliography of 60,000 entries 
identifying publications dealing with Native American 
culture; a representative selection of photographs from the 
Smithsonian Institution archives relating to Native 
Americans; collections of Native American music and 
literature; a collection of Mexican Indian pictorial materials 
and codices; and a comprehensive index to oral history 
collections. 



Contact for Information 



Research and Cultural Studies Development Section, 
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Institute of American Indian Arts, 
Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 



tribes eligible for services from the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs (BIA). 

Description 

The Loan Guaranty and Insurance Fund and the Revolving 
Loan Fund were established by the Indian Financing Act 
of 1974 to promote economic development for Native 
Americans. Loans may be made to any enterprise 
organized for profit, including arts and crafts businesses. 
Loans are also available for education that will directly 
contribute to the economic development of the borrower. 

Loan Guaranty and Insurance Fund 

This Fund may either guarantee or insure loans to Native 
American individuals or organizations. Such loans are 
made at interest rates comparable to those charged by 
financial institutions for similar loans. The Secretary may 
also pay an interest subsidy on guaranteed and insured 
loans. This subsidy reduces the borrower's interest rate to 
that on BIA direct loans. This program provides access to 
private money sources that would otherwise be 
unavailable. 

Revolving Loan Fund 

This program makes direct loans to Native American 
individuals and organizations. Organizations receiving 
loans may in turn make loans to other organizations that 
need not be Indian-owned, but that must be located on or 
near a reservation on which the recipient organization has 
an economic impact. No more than 50 percent of a loan 
may be used for reloaning. Loans will be made only when 
there is a reasonable prospect of repayment and only to 
applicants on or near the reservation who are unable to 
obtain financing from other sources on reasonable terms. 

Example 

In 1978 Jonathan Taylor, Inc., an arts and handcrafts 
business in Cherokee, N.C., received a guaranteed loan 
of $1 15,000. A $650,000 loan was made to Indian Pueblo 
Marketing, Inc., a handmade Indian jewelry business in 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. In 1978 approximately $3.5 million 
remained in the Revolving Loan Fund. 

Contact for Information 

Nearest BIA area office 



122 Economic Development Loans 

Bureau of Indian Affairs 

What/For Whom 

Guaranteed or insured loans and direct loans to individual 
Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts, and to organizations or 



1 23 Education Programs 

Bureau of Indian Affairs 

What/For Whom 

Direct payments for specified uses to tribal organizations 
operating public or private schools for Native American 



Department of the Interior 



123/124 



children. Grants to Native American undergraduate or 
graduate students. Postsecondary instruction tor eligible 
Native American students (of one-fourth or more Indian 
blood). 

Description 

Johnson-O'Malley Assistance 

The Office of Indian Education Programs administers the 
Johnson-O'Malley Act, which provides direct payments to 
federally recognized public and private elementary and 
secondary tribal schools for programs which meet the 
special educational needs of Native American students. 
Such programs may include cultural components intended 
to strengthen the students' sense of their Native American 
heritage. 

Haskell Indian Junior College 

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) administers Haskell 
Indian Junior College in Lawrence, Kans., a 
comprehensive junior college offering both liberal arts and 
vocational or technical training to students who are at 
least one-quarter Indian from all parts of the United States. 
In 1977, courses offered by the Native American Cultural 
Division of the college included instruction in four Indian 
languages, the history of North American Indian tribes, 
and modular courses on Northern and Southern Plains 
singing, Northwest Coast carving, Navajo weaving, and 
tribal law. The Art Department teaches Native American 
arts and crafts focusing on traditional techniques in 
painting, jewelry making, and weaving. 

Higher Education Assistance 

Under the authority of the Snyder Act of 1921, BIA awards 
grants to students with demonstrated need who are at 
least one-quarter Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut, and who have 
been accepted by an accredited college or university. 
Funds are intended for students working toward a college 
or graduate degree, and they may be used for tuition and 
other required fees, textbooks, and living expenses. There 
are no restrictions on choice of major study area and 
many students have been graduated in the fields of arts 
and humanities. The 1979 appropriation for this grant 
program was $26 million, and 20,000 students received 
assistance. The maximum grant was $1,500. 

Institute of American Indian Arts 

BIA administers the Institute of American Indian Arts in 
Santa Fe, N. Mex., which offers training in both the 
traditional and creative arts to junior college students who 
are at least one-quarter Indian from all parts of the United 
States. The curriculum includes arts instruction in such 
traditional craft techniques as featherwork, weaving, 
porcupine quilling, costume design, and embroidery, and 
humanities instruction in Native American folklore and art 
history, cultural studies, Indian biology, and linguistics, 



with an emphasis on teaching students how to put their 
language into written form. The campus museum offers 
courses in museum studies, maintains collections of 
traditional and contemporary arts and crafts, and 
circulates traveling exhibits to tribal communities. Several 
powwows, where traditional dances and music are 
performed, are held throughout the year. 

Contact for Information 

Division of Education Assistance, Office of Indian 
Education Programs, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20245 



1 24/Grants-in-Aid for Historic 

Preservation 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 

What/For Whom 

Matching grants to states and to the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation. These in turn may transfer grant 
funds to individuals, public and private organizations, and 
nonfederal units of government.' Grants must be equally 
matched by the state or by other public or private 
contributions. 

Description 

The Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service makes 
grants to states and to the National Trust for Historic 
Preservation (see no. 226) to carry out state or regional 
historic preservation programs. Grant funds may be used 
to conduct surveys and prepare plans for the preservation 
of historic properties, and to acquire and develop 
properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places 
(see no. 126). Grant funds may also be used to establish 
"revolving funds" that operate as follows: (1) survey and 
planning grant funds are used by a state to plan a 
revolving fund; (2) acquisition and development grant 
funds are then used to implement the plan and to acquire 
and develop the properties; (3) after completion of 
development project work and establishment of protective 
covenants, the properties are sold and the proceeds 
made available for new projects. Thus, federal funds may 
be effectively transferred to the private sector where they 
are readily available for use in saving other endangered 
properties. 

Any nonfederal group or individual owning a property 
listed in the National Register may apply to the State 
Historic Preservation Officer, who is appointed by the 
governor, for 50 percent matching grants. Funds may be 
used for acquisition, protection, stabilization, preservation, 
rehabilitation, restoration, or reconstruction of eligible 



Department of the Interior 



124/125 



properties. All project work must conform to the Secretary 
of the Interior's Standards for Historic Preservation 
Projects as described in leaflets mailed to applicants. 
Grant fund recipients must agree to maintain the property 
for a specified number of years and to ensure that a 
public benefit is derived from the expenditure of federal 
funds. Applicants should contact the State Historic 
Preservation Officer for guidance on eligible costs, 
application procedures, and grant-in-aid assistance 
requirements. 

Nonfederal governmental units, groups, and individuals 
may apply for survey and planning grants to identify 
historic properties, prepare nominations to the National 
Register, and develop plans to assist in the preservation 
of historic properties. 

Example 

The Historic Preservation Fund appropriation for 1979 was 
$60 million; 1,400 projects were funded. The estimated 
appropriation for 1980 is $45 million. Acquisition and 
development projects have included the Prescott Public 
Library in Yavapai, Ariz., for $57,000; the Somerville Hotel 
in Los Angeles, Calif., for $100,000; the Gross Point 
Lighthouse in Evanston, III., for $18,894; the Framingham 
Railroad Station in Framingham, Mass., for $55,000; and 
the St. Croix Archeological Site in the Virgin Islands, for 
$2,383. An $82,550 statewide restoration project in 
Vermont has permitted the continuing use of 30 covered 
bridges. 

Contact for Information 

State Historic Preservation Officer or HCRS regional 
offices (see Appendix D) or Grants Administration 
Division, Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, 
Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20243 



125/HABS/HAER 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 

What/For Whom 

Documentation of historic properties: loans and sales of 
archival records and exhibits; and free catalogues for the 
general public. Summer employment opportunities for 
archeologists, architects, engineers, historians, and 
planners. 

Description 

The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) program 
identifies and documents historically or architecturally 
significant buildings. The Historic American Engineering 
Record (HAER) program performs a similar function for 



engineering and industrial sites. This documentation, 
indicating that a property is worthy of preservation, is 
often the criterion for nomination of the property to the 
National Register for Historic Places (see no. 126). In the 
case of HAER, sites may be documented as examples of 
engineering technique or achievement. These may be 
individual structures such as dams, bridges, or canals, or 
they may be groups of structures which, taken together, 
represent an engineering or industrial system of major 
consequence, such as the buildings along a railroad. 
Priority for documentation is given to properties that are 
threatened by demolition or substantial alteration (see no. 
127). 

Documentation consists of the preparation of precise 
measured drawings, photographs, and written reports 
which are deposited in national HABS or HAER archives in 
the Library of Congress (see no. 191). All records are 
made available to the public for scholarly study or for use 
in planning, restoration, and adaptive use studies. Copies 
of records may be ordered from the Photoduplications 
Service of the Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540. Before placing an order, one should ask for a 
cost estimate. Catalogues of HABS projects are available 
from HABS at the address below. HAER inventories are 
available at the same address. 



Recording Projects 

HABS and HAER regularly conduct inventories of 
properties in cooperation with state or regional groups or 
State Historic Preservation Officers. These inventories are 
broad in scope and do not involve detailed studies of 
properties; rather they are intended to identify and 
catalogue properties so that historic preservation plans 
can be made. In addition, both programs run summer 
recording projects in which a few properties are carefully 
documented. Records of these projects are held in the 
Library of Congress archives. Both HABS and HAER hire 
teams of undergraduate and graduate students and 
professionals in the fields of architecture, engineering, 
history, and archeology to work on these projects. 
Cosponsoring groups contribute at least 50 percent of 
project costs. Members of teams are paid at regular 
government service rates according to experience. 
Approximately 25 percent of applicants, the majority of 
whom are students, are accepted for these team projects. 
Those interested in summer recording jobs should submit 
resumes, drafting samples, records of work experience, 
and other pertinent information to either HABS or HAER at 
the address below. 

Example: Up to 1979, HABS had recorded more than 
17,000 buildings. In 1978, with an appropriation of 
$482,000, 17 teams consisting of 90 students and 
professionals documented historic structures in Santa 
Clara County, Calif ; residences and community buildings 
in Baton Rouge and Smithtown, La.; rural structures in 
cooperation with the Army Corps of Engineers in Missouri 
and Tennessee: an early nineteenth-century Shaker 
community in Enfield, N.H.; and the eighteenth-century 



Department off the Interior 



125/126 



Westover Plantation in Charles City County, Va., in 
cooperation with the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, the 
Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission, and the Virginia 
Endowment for the Humanities and Public Policy. 

HAER, with a 1978 appropriation of $301,000, conducted 
16 projects using 75 students and professionals. HAER 
teams documented sugar plantations in Hawaii and 
Louisiana, a hydroelectric plant in Michigan, a woolen mill 
in Missouri, the IRT subway line in New York City, a blast 
furnace in the New York Adirondacks, and the Fairmount 
Waterworks in Philadelphia, Pa. 

Exhibits 

HABS has a number of small exhibits which may be lent 
to qualified nonprofit groups. For information on the 
content of these exhibits, contact HABS at the address 
below. In addition, three HABS exhibits are toured through 
the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service 
(SITES, see no. 247). The exhibits feature Shaker 
buildings, Chicago architecture, and railroad stations and 
depots. Example: A 1979 exhibit of William Byrd's 
Westover is on view in the Public Records Office in 
Williamsburg, Va. 

Rehabilitation Action Projects 

As part of a summer demonstration program, HAER and 
HABS teams of planners, historians, and architects are 
studying underutilized historic structures and 
neighborhoods to determine the best plans for 
rehabilitation and re-use. In 1979, the third summer for 
this project, five or six studies will be conducted. For 
employment information, contact HAER and HABS at the 
address below. 



Contact for Information 

HABS or HAER, Heritage Conservation and Recreation 
Service, Department of the Interior, 440 G Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20243 



Description 



National Register Program 

The National Register for Historic Places is the official list 
of properties that have been judged by the Secretary of 
the Interior to be of local, regional, or national historic 
significance and thus worthy of protection and 
preservation To be eligible for inclusion in the Register, 
properties must have historical, archeological, 
architectural, or cultural significance. Properties are 
nominated to the Register by governor-appointed State 
Historic Preservation Officers who oversee statewide 
historic surveys and prepare state preservation plans. 
Listed properties are protected from destruction or 
impairment by any federally funded or licensed 
undertakings until such actions are reviewed by the 
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (see no. 5). In 
addition, they are eligible for several federal historic 
preservation grants and loans (see nos. 107, 113, 124, 
229, and 230). Listed commercial properties are eligible 
for tax benefits or incentives under the Tax Reform Act of 
1976 (see no. 130). Persons interested in having a 
property nominated should bring it to the attention of the 
State Historic Preservation Officer, whose address may be 
obtained from the office listed below. Heads of federal 
agencies are responsible for nominations of sites within 
their jurisdictions. Historic properties within the National 
Park System and National Historic Landmarks (see below) 
are automatically listed in the Register. 

National Historic Landmarks Program 

Public or private properties, including districts, sites, 
buildings, or other structures or objects of nat'onal historic 
significance, are eligible for designation as National 
Historic Landmarks. Properties judged to be of national 
significance in National Register nominations are brought 
by the Historic Sites Survey Division of the Heritage 
Conservation and Recreation Service (HCRS) to a review 
committee of outside experts for evaluation. Their 
recommendations are made to the Secretary of the 
Interior, who designates landmarks under the authority of 
the Historic Sites Act of 1935. 



Example 



126 Historic Sites Programs 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 

What/For Whom 

Protection and preservation of properties designated as 
National Historic Landmarks or listed in the National 
Register for Historic Places. Eligibility for federal historic 
preservation grants and loans and tax benefits for listed 
properties. 



By March 1979, nearly 19,000 sites had been listed in the 
Register Recent additions have included the Fox-Oakland 
Theater in Oakland, Calif.; the Hinson Mounds, an 
archeological site in Florida; the Hyde Park-Kenwood 
Historic District in New York; and Radio City Music Hall in 
New York City Additions to the National Register are 
published in the Federal Register on the first Tuesday of 
each month In 1979, the supplement to the Bicentennial 
edition of the Register was published in hard cover; it 
includes sites listed through 1976. Due to the increasing 
number of listed sites, this supplement is expected to be 
the last such publication. Plans for new state-by-state or 
regional publications are under consideration. 



Department of the Interior 



1 26/1 27 



In 1978, the Secretary of the Interior designated 87 
National Historic Landmarks, primarily in the areas of 
"Commerce and Industry," "Architecture," "Engineering," 
and "Original Inhabitants." A special study for Alaska 
resulted in the designation of 17 new Alaskan landmarks. 

Contact for Information 



HCRS regional offices (see Appendix D) or National 
Historic Landmarks Program or National Register for 
Historic Places. Heritage Conservation and Recreation 
Service, Department of the Interior, 440 G Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20243 



management of cultural resources within their jurisdictions. 
Most programs require the expertise of archeologists. 
historical architects or architectural historians, 
anthropologists, historians, or experts in historic 
preservation. Agencies contract for services directly or, in 
some cases, transfer funds to the Interagency 
Archeological Services (IAS) field offices of the Heritage 
Conservation and Recreation Service (see no. 128). 

For consultation on specific requirements and special 
problems of compliance with Executive Order 11593, 
federal, state, or local agencies should contact Chief, 
Interagency Archeological Services, Washington, DC, at 
the address given below. 



127 Historic Sites Surveys 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 

What/For Whom 

Contracts with experts in archeology, architecture, 
anthropology, history, preservation techniques, or other 
fields for projects involving identification and preservation 
of prehistoric and historic sites and structures; 
archeological consultative services to federal agencies 
that have compliance responsibilities under the Executive 
Order 11593. 



Archeological Investigations and Salvage Program 

Through this program, contracts and cooperative 
agreements are made with federal, state, and local 
agencies, with qualified scientific and educational 
institutions, and with private corporations for the purpose 
of carrying out data recovery investigations in federal or 
federally related construction projects. Contracts are 
competitively awarded in response to government 
requests for proposals. Those interested in archeological 
survey and data recovery on federal lands should contact 
the nearest IAS field office for information on employment 
opportunities. Contract solicitations are listed in the 
Commerce Business Daily (see no. 25). This program is 
funded by annual appropriations through the transfer of 
funds from other federal agencies. 



Description 



Example 



Executive Order 11593 Program 

In 1971, to further the purposes of several federal laws 
governing the protection of cultural resources on federal 
properties, the President of the United States issued 
Executive Order 11593 requiring that: 

"The Federal Government shall provide leadership in 
preserving, restoring and maintaining the historic and 
cultural environment of the Nation. Agencies of the 
executive branch of the Government shall (1) administer 
the cultural properties under their control in a spirit of 
stewardship and trusteeship for future generations, (2) 
initiate measures necessary to direct their policies, plans 
and programs in such a way that federally owned sites, 
structures, and objects of historical, architectural or 
archeological significance are preserved, restored and 
maintained for the inspiration and benefit of the people, 
and (3), in consultation with the Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation [see no. 5], institute procedures to 
assure that Federal plans and programs contribute to the 
preservation and enhancement of nonfederally owned 
sites, structures and objects of historical, architectural or 
archeological significance." 

To comply with the order, affected federal agencies have 
developed specific programs or policies for the 



Since 1975, Interagency Archeological Services has 
contracted for studies that serve as models for 
archeological survey and recovery techniques, or for 
stimulating new approaches to the management of 
resources on federal lands. The studies were designed to 
treat areas of concern to federal and state agencies. Two 
such studies are the Archeological Survey: Methods and 
Uses and Cultural Resources Evaluation in the Northern 
Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf. 

In 1979, the Army Corps of Engineers transferred funds to 
IAS to contract for an inventory of archeological resources 
in the Richard B. Russell Reservoir Project area in 
Georgia, prior to planning for expansion of the reservoir. 
The Bureau of Land Management transferred funds to IAS 
to hire experts from universities and private contracting 
firms to survey sample areas of federal land near Denver, 
Colo., in order to assess the character and extent of the 
archeological and historic resources on those lands. 



Contact for information 

Interagency Archeological Services, Heritage 
Conservation and Recreation Service, Department of 
the Interior, Washington. DC 20243. 



Department of the Interior 



128/129 



128 Interagency Archeological 

Services 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 

What/For Whom 

Advisory services for governmental agencies and 
archeologists; permits and contracts with qualified 
agencies and institutions involved in archeological survey 
and data recovery; internships for graduate students and 
established professional archeologists. 

Description 

The Interagency Archeological Services (IAS) Division 
directs and coordinates the nationwide program for the 
recovery and preservation of significant archeological and 
historic remains that are threatened by federal 
construction projects. The Division conducts innovative 
studies, offers advisory services and internships, issues 
permits, and negotiates contracts with experts to carry out 
its work under authority of Executive Order 1 1593 (see no. 
127). 

Advisory Services 

The Division conducts studies and offers seminars and 
symposia on archeological techniques and management. 
The results of these programs are published. Consultant 
services in interpreting archeological requirements of 
Executive Order 1 1593 and related laws are available for 
federal, state, and local agencies. 



Internship Program 

The Division offers internships to at least eight graduate 
students and four professionals in the fields of archeology 
and historic preservation. Internships are for a maximum 
of one year Interns work with one of the three field offices 
(listed below) or with the Washington, DC, office. 
Graduate interns in the field offices help develop 
scopes-of-work for proposed projects and monitor project 
progress. Senior interns generally work on specialized 
projects. Interns in the Washington, DC, office work on 
policy matters, publications, and contracts. Internship 
stipends for master's degree candidates are at the Office 
of Personnel Management GS-5 level, and for Ph.D. 
candidates, at the GS-7 level. Senior interns generally 
receive the same salary paid by their colleges or 
universities. Because each IAS office develops its own 
projects and staff needs, and selects its own interns, 
applicants should submit resumes and Standard Form 171 
to the office(s) of their choice. 

Contact for Information 

Chief, Interagency Archeological Services, Heritage 
Conservation and Recreation Service, Department of the 
Interior, Washington, DC 20243 or IAS Field Offices: 

Chief, Interagency Archeological Services — Atlanta 
1895 Phoenix Boulevard, Atlanta, GA 30349 

Chief, Interagency Archeological Services — Denver 
1978 South Garrison, Suite 107, Denver, CO 80227 

Chief, Interagency Archeological Services — San Francisco 
450 Golden Gate Avenue, Box 36065, San Francisco, 
CA 94102 



Antiquities Program 

Under the 1906 Federal Antiquities Act, any educational or 
scientific institution possessing professional expertise and 
adequate curatorial facilities may apply to the 
Departmental Consulting Archeologist for a permit to 
survey, test, or excavate archeological and 
paleontological sites on all lands owned or controlled by 
the federal government, except those lands under the 
jurisdiction of the Department of Agriculture. No funds are 
provided by the federal government and all projects costs 
are borne by the permit holder. 

Example: The Museum of Paleontology at the University 
of Michigan received a permit to conduct a research 
project in the northern Big Horn Basin of Wyoming The 
research, conducted from 1975 to 1978, documented 
evolutionary change in mammalian fossils across the 
Paleocene-Eocene boundary. In 1978, the University of 
Washington was issued a permit to conduct an 
archeological survey in Oregon The results of the survey 
will further anthropological knowledge of human 
adaptation processes in relation to prehistoric and 
environmental change. 



1 29 Surplus Real Property Transfers 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 



What/For Whom 



Real property transferred free of charge to state and local 
government agencies. State and local government 
agencies may lease with restrictions surplus federal 
properties to private organizations and individuals. 



Description 



Surplus real properties no longer needed by federal 
agencies may be transferred for public park, recreation, 
and historic monument use at discounts up to 100 percent 
to state and local governments. Real property consists of 
land or land with buildings or other improvements, and 
may be part of a surplus government installation. 
Properties transferred under this program may be leased 
with restrictions by state or local governments to private 



Department off the Interior 



129/130/131 



entrepreneurs. However, property must be used for the 
purpose for which it was transferred or revert to federal 
ownership. 

Maintenance and restoration of historic and architectural 
character are required of receivers of historic real 
property. Adaptive re-use with revenue-producing 
enterprises may provide financing for preservation costs. 

Application for the transfer of surplus real property for 
educational or health purposes is made through the 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (see no. 
64). Sales of surplus real property are arranged through 
the General Services Administration (see no 161) A 
pamphlet entitled Disposal of Surplus Real Property is 
available from the addresses below. 



Example 

During 1979, the city of Grand Rapids, Mich., was 
engaged in restoration of a former federal building 
transferred several years earlier. The Grand Rapids Art 
Museum plans to lease the building from the city and 
modernize the interior for use as an art gallery. The Old 
Federal Court Building in St. Paul, Minn., was transferred 
in 1972 to the city government for restoration and leasing 
to commercial and nonprofit enterprises. Tenants during 
1979 have included the Ramsay County Historical Society, 
St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, a community arts program, 
and the Shubert Club, which sponsors classical recitals, 
music education, and music therapy. In 1977 the Old 
Federal Office Building in Nashville, Tenn., was transferred 
to the city and county governments for restoration as a 
historic site and is undergoing renovation as office and 
commercial space. 



Contact for Information 

Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service regional 
offices (see Appendix D) or Division of Technical 
Preservation Services (for historic property) or Division of 
Federal Lands Planning (for public park and recreation 
lands), Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, 
Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20243 



Description 



Section 2124 of the Tax Reform Act of 1976 encourages 
rehabilitation of historic income-producing properties 
(including residential rental properties) and discourages 
their demolition. Such properties must be listed in the 
National Register of Historic Places (see no. 126) or 
included within a Registered Historic District and certified 
by the Secretary of the Interior as contributing to the 
historic significance of the district. The law allows the 
owner of a certified property to take accelerated 
depreciation on the cost of substantial rehabilitation (Sec. 
167 (o) Internal Revenue Code) or to amortize the amount 
expended over five years (Sec. 191 IRC). Conversely, 
owners may no longer take accelerated depreciation on 
new structures that replace certified historic properties, 
nor may they deduct demolition costs of the certified 
properties (Sees. 167 (n) and 280 (b) IRC). 

Many states and localities have adopted new tax policies 
to complement this law. Owners should contact the Office 
of Archeology and Historic Preservation at the address 
listed below for information on certification and guidelines 
on implementation of the Act. They should contact state 
and municipal government offices for information on 
similar local tax benefits or incentives. Since the law was 
enacted, over 900 rehabilitation projects in 41 states, 
involving an investment of more than $390 million, have 
qualified for the incentives. Nearly half of these projects 
would not have been undertaken had the incentives not 
been available. 

The Revenue Act of 1978 provides for a 10 percent tax 
credit for rehabilitation of commercial structures at least 
20 years old. Rehabilitation work on certified historic 
structures must be certified by the Heritage Conservation 
and Recreation Service (HCRS). The tax credit may be 
used with the accelerated depreciation provision of the 
1976 Act, but not with the five-year amortization of 
rehabilitation expenses described above. 



Contact for Information 



HCRS regional offices (see Appendix D) or Heritage 
Conservation and Recreation Service, Department of the 
Interior, 440 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20243 



1 30 Tax Incentives and Credits 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 



131 /Urban Park and Recreation 

Recovery Program 

Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 



What/For Whom 



Tax incentives for owners of income-producing historic 
property to encourage preservation or rehabilitation of the 
property; tax credit for rehabilitation of older commercial 
properties. 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to state and local governments which in 
turn award grants to special units of local government, 
nonprofit organizations, or park authorities. 



Department of the Interior 



131/132 



Description 



In 1978, a new five-year program for the recovery of urban 
recreation facilities and the development of innovative 
recreation programs was authorized. This program is to 
be administered by the Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service (HCRS). Local governments submit 
proposals to HCRS for matching grants to plan and 
implement programs that will contribute to revitalization of 
recreational facilities in economically and physically 
decaying urban neighborhoods. For implementation of the 
proposed plans, funds may be transferred to special local 
units of government (such as park or school districts) or to 
nonprofit organizations. Three percent of the total funds 
may be used for planning grants, whereas at least 87 
percent must be used for bricks-and-mortar projects. 

In a recent statement, HCRS recognized the "central role 
of the arts and cultural programs in developing urban 
recreational programs." It is expected that this role will 
provide a major focus for innovative projects. Such 
projects might include re-use of abandoned buildings as 
community centers, multiple use of public buildings for 
cultural activities, development of mobile facilities to 
provide handicapped or elderly persons with access to 
recreational and cultural programs, or providing arts and 
crafts materials and other recreational equipment for 
demonstration projects. 

Priority is given to projects that have demonstrated 
community support and can become self-sustaining; that 
benefit minority and low- and moderate-income 
neighborhoods; that are cost-effective and energy- 
efficient; and that complement other federal or local 
community development plans. Funds may not be used 
to acquire or maintain properties, or to construct sports 
arenas or other centers whose use will be primarily 
commercial. Grants require a 30 percent local match and 
are usually made available on a cost-reimbursable basis. 
The requested appropriation for 1979 is $37.5 million; for 
1980 it is $150 million. Authorizations are set at $150 
million a year for 1981 and 1982, and at $125 million for 
1983. 

A planning manual for urban recreation and other 
information is available from the address given below. The 
1978 HCRS National Urban Recreation Study, including 
the report, Art and Culture: A New Priority in Urban 
Recreation, is available for $3.50 from the Superintendent 
of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402. 



Contact for Information 



HCRS regional offices (see Appendix D) or Urban 
Programs, Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, 
Department of the Interior, 440 G Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20243 



132 Cultural Programs in 
National Parks 

National Park Service 

What/For Whom 

Opportunities for private national associations and local 
cultural organizations to enter into cooperative agreements 
with the National Park Service (NPS). Employment 
opportunities and residencies for craftspeople, musicians, 
artists, and performing arts groups in National Parks 
programs. 

Description 

The Division of Interpretation and Visitors Services directs 
and coordinates programs interpreting the natural and 
cultural heritage of the National Parks. Programs are run 
at the discretion of park directors. Since NPS has no 
funding capability, costs of programs, including 
employment of artists, are handled by local groups or 
agencies cooperating with NPS. Regional offices and 
about 300 park areas are authorized to enter into 
cooperative agreements with local private organizations or 
individuals to run park programs. 

Artists-in-Residence Program 

More than 24 National Parks have provided living 
quarters, work space, and logistical support for painters, 
writers, sculptors, potters, and theater groups. Salaries, if 
any, are paid by local cooperating agencies. During 
residency, artists offer programs for the public, training for 
the park staff, onsite exhibits or performances of their 
work, and in some instances they produce materials for 
the park's permanent collection. Example: At Peters Valley 
in northwest New Jersey, within the boundaries of 
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, a 
Craftsmen-in-Residence program, funded by local private 
and public sources, enables skilled craftspeople to live 
in the village year round, producing, demonstrating, 
teaching, and selling their work. Young people interested 
in crafts work under the guidance of resident professional 
potters, a wood sculptor, weavers, and other artisans. 

Craft Demonstrations and Sales 

The NPS seeks to improve the quality of crafts sold 
under concession agreements in park facilities. 
Artists-m-residence and local craftspeople may obtain 
permission from a park to demonstrate and sell their 
crafts. Example: Shoshone Indians from the Wind River 
Reservation demonstrate their crafts in regular programs 
at the American Indian Museum in the Grand Teton 
National Park Craftspeople at Peters Valley exhibit, 
demonstrate, and sell their crafts at the annual Craft Fair 
in late July. Any craftspeople interested in selling their 
crafts through NPS concessions should contact the Office 
of Cooperative Activities at the address given below. 



Department of the Interior 



132/133 



Living History Programs 

NPS sponsors approximately 75 Living History Programs 
around the country to help park visitors learn about the 
history and folkways of regions in which parks are located 
Living History Programs often include live demonstrations 
of indigenous folk crafts or re-creations of traditional 
farming or forestry techniques. Lists of selected living 
historical farms are available from the Division of 
Interpretation and Visitor Services at the address listed 
below. Example: The Valley Forge National Park has 
incorporated a drama into its Living History Programs with 
the presentation of the Pursuit of Happiness, a play based 
on historical sources at Valley Forge given by the Franklin 
Roberts Associates. 



Office of Cooperative Activities 

The Office of Cooperative Activities in Washington, DC, 
works with national organizations to develop nationwide 
programs for National Parks. NPS and the National 
Council for Traditional Arts (NCTA) cosponsor several folk 
programs each year in such parks as Chamizal National 
Memorial in Texas, the Golden Gate National Recreation 
Area in California, the Tumacacori Mission in Arizona, and 
Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts in Virginia. 
Research to locate local music, dance, and other folk arts 
is provided by NCTA to fit the needs of individual parks. 
The Office also acts as a central source of information and 
advice for groups interested in a cooperative arrangement 
with NPS, suggesting parks with suitable facilities for the 
proposed activity and helping to coordinate the necessary 
support system. Contact the Office at the address given 
below for further information. 



Performing Arts 

Approximately 125 areas of the National Park System use 
performing arts activities as part of the overall interpretive 
and visitor services programs. These activities include 
theater, music, and dance performances. Individual parks 
contract for performers. Example: At Cabrillo National 
Monument in California a week-long dance, music, and 
arts and crafts festival featuring Portuguese and Mexican 
cultures is held annually. A program at the Chamizal 
National Memorial offers a continuing series of events 
dedicated to preserve the 29 major cultural groups of 
Texas. The series includes the Siglo De Oro Drama 
Festival, Native American dances and ceremonies, and a 
Fiesta of the Arts. 



Volunteers-in-Parks 

This program utilizes a variety of volunteer talents to help 
supplement programs in the National Park System. Those 
interested in volunteering for park programs should write 
to their NPS regional office. Example: Volunteer artists at 
Cape Hatteras National Seashore work with visitors in 
interpreting the seashore through painting, weaving, and 
pottery programs and demonstrations. 



Contact for Information 



National Park Service regional offices (see Appendix 
D) or (Appropriate Office), National Park Service, 
Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20240 



133 Interpretive Design Center 

National Park Service 



What/For Whom 



Audiovisual programs, motion pictures, and publications 
tor National Parks and the general public. 



Description 



The National Park Service Interpretive Design Center in 
Harpers Ferry, W. Va., produces audiovisual programs, 
films, and publications for use in the National Parks and 
for the general public. The Center is also responsible for 
the design of all museum exhibits throughout the National 
Park System 

The Center has produced approximately 200 films or 
sound slide shows interpreting the natural or cultural 
history of National Park areas. These materials, which are 
used as part of the interpretive materials in the parks, may 
be rented or purchased for noncommercial use by the 
general public from the National Audiovisual Center (see 
no. 165). Available films include Independence, depicting 
the historical events surrounding the signing of the 
Declaration of Independence: Land of the Bighorn, a 
history of the Bighorn Canyon of Wyoming-Montana and 
the Indians who lived there; and Stone Forest, a history of 
a forest showing how wood becomes petrified. A 
catalogue of films is available from the National 
Audiovisual Center or from the Harpers Ferry Association, 
Post Office Box 147, at the address listed below. 

The Center is responsible for designing and publishing 
brochures, catalogues, posters, and other descriptive 
materials for the entire National Park System. Two 
particularly helpful publications are Index, a guide 
including an alphabetical listing of National Parks and 
affiliated areas, as well as a descriptive listing by state; 
and Access, a handbook of accessibility for handicapped 
visitors to the National Park System, including a 
site-by-site analysis as well as general information. These 
publications are available through the Superintendent of 
Documents. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402. 



Contact for Information 

National Park Service Interpretive Design Center, Harpers 
Ferry, WV 25425 



Department of the Interior 



1 34/1 35 



134 National Capital Parks 

National Park Service 

What/For Whom 

Opportunities for exhibition of artworks and for 
employment of artists, performers, and craftspeople in 
the metropolitan Washington, DC, area. 



events, primarily plays and musicals, for family 
entertainment. Recent productions have included 
Godspell, Give 'em Hell Harry, and Don't Bother Me, I 
Can't Cope. Regular talks on the history of the Theatre are 
available for scheduled groups. During the summer, 
hourly "Informances," short skits by drama students 
depicting historic events in the Theatre, are open free to 
the public. A museum in the basement of the Theatre 
exhibits Lincoln memorabilia. 



Description 



National Capital Parks (NCP) of the National Park Service 
maintains numerous parks and indoor and outdoor 
theaters in the Washington, DC, area. Its Branch of 
Community Services sponsors year-round cultural, 
educational, and recreational events in the parks, using 
the services of local performing arts groups paid by the 
National Park Service. 

Art Barn 

Cosponsored by the National Park Service and the Art 
Barn Association, the Barn, located in Rock Creek Park, 
serves as a permanent exhibit hall for professional artists 
and craftspeople. Group shows may be arranged by six 
or more artists submitting an application to the Art Barn 
Association, which handles scheduling. Shows last one 
month and works may be offered for sale. For information 
contact National Capital Parks West at the address below. 

Artists in Action 

The sidewalks along the reflecting pool at the Mall in 
Washington, DC, become the setting every Sunday 
afternoon for Washington area artists at work. This 
program is open to artists wishing to display their work to 
the public or to work on it in public. For information 
contact the Branch of Community Services at the address 
below. 



Carter Barron Amphitheatre 

From June 15 through Labor Day, Carter Barron is 
operated by National Capital Parks through contractors for 
commercial attractions There are also evening concerts 
presented by NCP For information contact the Branch of 
Community Services at the address below. 



Glen Echo 

Glen Echo in Washington, DC, provides workshops for 
children and adults to study drama, dance, and crafts 
such as candlemaking, stained glass, weaving, pottery, 
ceramics, photo silkscreening, and woodworking. There is 
also a permanent children's theater and a summer puppet 
theater. 

Sylvan Theatre 

Located at the Washington Monument, Sylvan Theatre is 
an outdoor amphitheater maintained by National Capital 
Parks Its free summer performances include plays, folk 
music, and dance events. Local groups are auditioned by 
the Branch of Community Services at the address below. 

Wolf Trap/Filene Center (see no. 135) 

Contact for Information 

National Capital Parks, National Park Service, 1 100 Ohio 
Drive, SW, Washington, DC 20242 



1 35 Wolf Trap/Filene Center 

National Park Service 

What/For Whom 

Performing arts and special events for the general public. 
Free enrichment programs for community groups. 
Fellowships to opera singers beginning their professional 
careers. 



Downtown Parks 

Free noon-hour entertainment is provided during the 
summer in downtown parks by NCP. Local amateur and 
professional performers are encouraged to participate and 
should contact the Performing Arts Coordinator of NCP at 
the address below for information on auditions. 



Ford's Theatre 

The historically restored Ford's Theatre is managed by 
NCP The Fords Theatre Society schedules commercial 



Description 



Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts in Vienna, 
Va., established by Act of Congress in 1966, is the first 
National Park dedicated to the performing arts. The 
117-acre park and its theater, Filene Center, are 
maintained by the National Capital Parks division of the 
National Park Service. The Wolf Trap Foundation, a private 
nonprofit corporation, is responsible for all creative 
programming at the Filene Center, which includes 
concerts, operas, ballets, and other special events. The 
Wolf Trap season runs from mid-June to early September. 



Department off the Interior 



1 35/1 36 



Enrichment Program 

The National Park Service sponsors several programs 
designed to enrich the cultural consciousness of the 
community using Wolf Trap's facilities. Organized groups 
of children, senior citizens, Spanish-speaking persons, 
and others may participate in Wolf Trap's "Theatre in the 
Woods" productions of Virginia folk tales, or observe 
National Park Service employees acting in "Performing 
Arts in Action," a program to introduce people to the 
performing arts. Enrichment workshops are held for 
groups prior to their attendance at Wolf Trap 
performances. On Sunday afternoons free service band 
concerts are held in a meadow at Wolf Trap. Groups 
interested in participating in the Enrichment Program 
should contact the Coordinator, Enrichment Program 
(address given below), to make a reservation. 

The Wolf Trap Company 

The Wolf Trap Company was established by the Wolf Trap 
Foundation with funds contributed by private sources. It 
offers 16 summer apprenticeships to opera singers at the 
beginning of their careers. Apprentices, selected in highly 
competitive annual auditions, are awarded $1,600 for their 
eight-week residencies. The Company pays music, 
make-up, and transportation costs, in addition to providing 
free room and board. While in residence, apprentices 
receive coaching in movement, stagecraft, and repertoire 
from leading professionals, perform selected arias, and 
perform in at least one full opera production. In 1979, 
there were 663 auditions, and the 16 men and 
women chosen ranged in age from 24 to 32. For 
information about auditions, contact the Wolf Trap 
Foundation, Company Auditions, 1624 Trap Road, Vienna, 
VA 22180. 

Contact for Information 

Director, Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts, 
1551 Trap Road, Vienna, VA 22180 



international community. Protection and preservation of 
listed sites. 



Description 

The World Heritage List is a UNESCO Project aimed at 
providing nominating states with complementary financial 
support for the preservation of properties identified as 
described above. As of November 1978, the 1972 Paris 
Convention concerning the protection of the world cultural 
and natural heritage had been ratified by 46 nations 
whose convention membership makes them eligible to 
nominate sites. Their dues are used to help protect and 
preserve those sites which are ultimately listed. The 
Department of the Interior, in cooperation with the Council 
on Environmental Quality and under the foreign policy 
guidance of the Secretary of State, conducts searches 
and nominates areas or properties within the United 
States. The National Park Service administers and invites 
comments on nominations. Cultural sites eligible for 
inclusion on the List may include monuments such as 
architectural works, immovable sculptures and paintings, 
archeological structures and sites, cave dwellings and 
inscriptions, or architecturally significant groups of 
buildings, which are of outstanding universal value from 
the point of view of history, art, or science. 



Example 

By 1979, the World Heritage fund contained $500,000, 
with another $500,000 committed. Only properties in 
immediate danger were eligible for funding. The first 
nominations to the List were made in 1978. The United 
States included the Mesa Verde as a cultural site 
exemplifying archeological techniques in uncovering the 
extensive remains of a 1000-year old culture. U.S. cultural 
sites nominated in 1979 were Independence Hall National 
Historical Park, and the Edison Laboratory in West 
Orange, N.J. Suggestions for nominations may be 
submitted by anyone at any time by contacting the 
address below. 



1 36 World Heritage List 

National Park Service 

What/For Whom 



Nomination to the World Heritage List for areas or 
properties of natural or cultural significance to the 



Contact for Information 



U.S. Delegate to the World Heritage Committee, Division 
of International Park Affairs, National Park Service, 
Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20240 



137/138 



Department of 
Justice 



In November 1978, $226,748 was awarded to Jazzmobile, 
Inc., in New York City for the Jazzmobile Young Citizens of 
Harlem Arts Program. The Program's objective is to divert 
young people from crime by channeling their energies into 
the areas of music, dance, and the visual arts. 
Professional artist-instructors are hired to work with the 
young people, aged 8-14 years. 



137 Law Enforcement Action Grants 



What/For Whom 

Block grants to state planning agencies which in turn 
award matching grants to public agencies, institutions of 
higher education, and private nonprofit organizations 

Description 

The Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA) 
awards block grants to official state planning agencies for 
the support of activities to prevent and reduce crime. 
These agencies in turn award grants to qualified 
organizations for the development of techniques, systems, 
and equipment for crime control. A 10 percent nonfederal 
match is usually required. Public groups, institutions of 
higher education, and private nonprofit organizations are 
those primarily considered for funding. Although relatively 
few LEAA grants are awarded to arts-related projects, 
proposals that use the arts as a tool to accomplish the 
program's overall goals could also be considered. Such 
projects often employ artists as instructors. For a list of 
state planning agencies, contact the office listed below. 

Example 

LEAA awarded the American Correctional Association 
$1,000,000 in 1977 and $800,000 in 1978 for Project 
CULTURE (Creative Use of Leisure Time Under Restrictive 
Environments). The Project awards contracts to state and 
local correctional and arts institutions to develop prison 
arts programs. The purpose is to improve inmates' 
self-worth, to ease the tensions of restrictive environments, 
and to increase financial support of programs at the local 
level. During the two-year period, the Project received 84 
proposals and awarded 21 contracts. Funds are used to 
administer programs, to hire instructors in the visual arts, 
crafts, drama, music, and creative writing, and provide 
necessary supplies and materials. Artists interested in 
employment with Project CULTURE or persons interested 
in obtaining Arts in Corrections, the Project's handbook on 
setting up prison art programs, should contact the 
American Correctional Association, 4321 Hartwick Road, 
Suite 319, College Park, MD 20740. 



Contact for Information 



Assistant Administrator. Office of Criminal Justice 
Programs, Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, 
Department of Justice. Washington. DC 20531 



138 Prison Recreation Programs 



What/For Whom 



Full- or part-time employment for. or contracts with, artists, 
craftspersons, and performing arts groups, for work in 
prison recreation programs. 



Description 



in 



Wardens (directors) of the 36 federal prisons are expected 
to implement the educationar goals, program definitions, 
and guidelines of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, and may 
also develop educational programs within their individual 
budgets. Federal guidelines note that prison recreation 
programs frequently include art, music, drama, special 
cultural events, and hobbycrafts. They recomrnond that 
addition to a recreation coordinator, prisons should 
employ one full-time staff member with expertise in 
hobbycrafts, and at least three part-time (contract) 
personnel in music, leathercraft, and art. They also 
recommend that each institution organize at least three 
stage productions annually — for example, talent shows, 
drama productions, and musical performances. At least 
once a month, each institution should also provide 
in-house entertainment using outside groups. Artists and 
art groups interested in working in federal prisons should 
contact the w v arden of the prison in their area. A list of all 
federal prisons, as well as a copy of the federal 
educational policy statement, is available. 



Contact for Information 



Local federal prison warden or Administrator, Education 
Branch, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Washington, 
DC 20537 



139/140/141 



Department of 




t • 



1 39 I ntroduct ion 



The Department of Labor (DOL) is responsible for the 
welfare of the wage earners of the United States, their 
working conditions, and opportunities for profitable 
employment. To carry out this mission, the Department 
sponsors job training and employment programs (see nos. 
141-146, and 148); monitors employment, wage, and other 
statistical measurements (see no. 140); and administers 
laws guaranteeing workers' rights, including the right to 
safe and healthful working conditions (see no. 147) The 
Department's major job training and employment effort, 
the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), 
has in the past provided substantial support for training, 
education, and public service employment in arts- and 
humanities-related occupations. 

Several offices provide information about the Department 
and its labor concerns. The Office of Information, 
Publications, and Reports is a central reference point for 
the entire Department. The DOL Library welcomes 
inquiries and permits its collection of 500,000 volumes to 
be examined on the premises or borrowed through 
interlibrary loan. The Historical Office researches labor 
history and current labor events, publishes articles, 
responds to inquiries from the public, and occasionally 
sponsors summer internships. The Women's Bureau 
gathers data, conducts research, and sponsors model 
programs to study and improve the status of women 
workers. Although it does not counsel individuals, it can 
provide information about agencies and organizations 
serving women, employment trends, laws affecting 
women's employment, and training opportunities. The 
Women's Bureau also compiled A Guide to Seeking Funds 
from CETA. 



and national professional staff are available for 
consultation on the use of Bureau data, usually at no 
charge. 

Description 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics gathers data on 
employment, the labor force, productivity, wages, 
consumer expenditures, labor-management relations, and 
occupational safety and health. Researchers in the social 
sciences and persons interested in statistical profiles of 
cultural institutions and occupations may find pertinent 
data in these studies. Annual surveys of employers in 
almost all industries, including art galleries, colleges and 
universities, libraries, and museums, yield occupational 
safety and health data. Statistics on employed persons 
that detail the age. sex, race, marital status, family 
relationship, full- and part-time employment status, 
occupation, industry, and class of workers are collected 
and published monthly. Other research has examined job 
satisfaction, worker absenteeism, and the changing 
patterns of working hours. 

Examples of Bureau publications are the Monthly Labor 
Review, a research journal in economics and the social 
sciences; the Handbook of Labor Statistics, an annual 
volume of the major statistical data produced; the 
Occupational Outlook Handbook, a biennially published 
description of employment in several hundred occupations 
and industries, such as design, printing and publishing, 
communications, the performing arts, and entertainment; 
U.S. Working Women: A Databook; and What Every 
Employer Needs to Know about OSHA Recordkeeping. 
Two brochures, How to Get Information from the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics and Major Programs: Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, summarize Bureau activities and are available 
from the regional and national offices. 

Contact for information 

Department of Labor regional offices (see Appendix E) 
or Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, 
Washington, DC 20212 



Contact for Information 



Office of Information, Publications, and Reports, 
Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210 



1 40 Bureau of Labor Statistics 



What/For Whom 

Statistical data through publications and other information 
services for researchers and the general public. Regional 



141 /CETA: Introduction 



What/For Whom 



Grants to prime sponsors — states, counties. Indian tribes, 
or units of local government in localities with populations 
of more than 100.000 — which are responsible for 
administering employment programs suited to local needs. 
Local public or private community-based nonprofit 
organizations and private businesses may apply to prime 
sponsors to administer specific programs. Funds are also 
reserved for governors for statewide programs and for 
discretionary grants from the Department of Labor in 
Washington. DC. 



Department of Labor 



141/142 



Description 



The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), 
revised by the amendments of 1978 (Public Law 95-524), 
is designed to provide job training and employment 
opportunities for economically disadvantaged, 
unemployed, or underemployed persons through a 
decentralized system of local, state, and federal 
programs. Most of the Act's provisions are authorized 
through 1982. The 1978 amendments to the CETA 
program structure reaffirm the Act's original purpose: to 
sponsor training, education, and public service 
employment programs that will lead to long-term, 
unsubsidized employment for low-income persons out of 
work. 

Only those cultural organizations able to address this 
emphasis and ensure that their proposed projects will 
serve the intended constituency and purposes of CETA 
benefit from CETA grants. The goal of a cultural project 
should be to find or create long-term employment 
opportunities for its CETA workers with other 
organizations, not to focus on its own staffing 
requirements. CETA assistance can cover salaries for only 
a brief time. Within any five-year period, no one can be 
salaried under public service employment (Titles II and VI, 
see nos. 142, 145) for longer than 18 months or in any 
CETA program, including training, for longer than two and 
a half years. Public service employment is intended for the 
most severely disadvantaged in terms of length of 
unemployment and prospects for finding employment. It is 
essential, therefore, that organizations seeking CETA 
assistance propose to accomplish their purposes within 
the period of the CETA contract or obtain new sources of 
revenue Further, employees must be provided with 
experience and training adequate to secure permanent 
nonsubsidized employment at the contract's expiration. 

The prime sponsor, the critical link in the chain of CETA 
funding, has considerable authority and flexibility in the 
local interpretation of CETA regulations. Based on 
population, unemployment, and low-income statistics, 
CETA funds are allocated by the Department of Labor to 
more than 450 prime sponsors. Prime sponsors may 
select public or private nonprofit organizations or private 
businesses to administer specific employment or training 
programs. 

Each prime sponsor establishes a planning council, 
composed of community representatives of labor, 
business, veterans' groups, organizations for handicapped 
persons, and education and training institutions. It 
recommends projects to the prime sponsor based on its 
evaluation of local employment and training needs. 
Cultural groups should be appropriately represented on 
the planning council to ensure them a role in determining 
long-range planning for local employment and training 
programs. Final policy decisions remain the prime 
sponsor's, however, although appeals can be made to 
regional Employment and Training Administration offices 

Representation on the state employment and training 
council, appointed by the governor, also should be 



pursued. The council reviews the plans and operations of 
all prime sponsors and recommends improvements in 
employment and training services throughout the state. 
Membership offers an opportunity to introduce ideas at 
the state level and to monitor prime sponsor activity. 

Prior to designing a proposal, an organization should 
thoroughly acquaint itself with the funding cycle and 
long-range plans of the local prime sponsor and its 
planning council. Prime sponsors are required to make 
their comprehensive employment and training plan 
available to the public. A review of this plan will educate 
the applicant about the prime sponsor's major directions 
and indicate how a cultural project might stand in the 
overall plan. An applicant presents a case for funding or 
argues an appeal based on provisions in CETA law and 
regulations. Copies of these documents are available 
through local congressional offices and regional 
Employment and Training Administration offices. 

Although only the local prime sponsor can supply specific 
eligibility requirements for each program, the Department 
of Labor does publish numerous pamphlets explaining 
CETA programs, A Guide to Seeking Funds from CETA 
and Program Fact Sheet: Youth Employment and 
Demonstration Projects Act, for example, and CETA Arts, 
a compilation of CETA-funded arts projects. 

Categories of assistance are grouped under different titles 
of the Act: Title II, employment and training, and public 
service employment programs (see no. 142): Title III, 
special federal programs, including employment and 
training for severely disadvantaged populations, and 
research (see no. 143): Title IV, programs for young 
people (see no. 144): Title VI, public service employment 
(see no. 145): Title VII, private sector employment (see no. 
146): and Title VIII, conservation projects for young 
persons (see no. 144). 

Contact for Information 

Local prime sponsor (names and addresses available 
from one of the following offices) or state governor's 
manpower services office or the chief elected city or 
county official or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor regional offices 
(see Appendix E) or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



142 CETA: Title II, Comprehensive 
Employment and Training 
Services 

What/For Whom 

Grants to prime sponsors (see no 141). 



Department of Labor 



142/143 



Description 



Under Title II, grants are allocated on a formula basis to 
prime sponsors for training, upgrading, retraining, 
education, and public service employment for 
economically disadvantaged persons. This title combines 
the former Title I, comprehensive manpower services, and 
Title II, public employment programs, of the CETA Act of 
1973. 

Parrs B and C 

Comprehensive employment and training services include 
education and skills training, on-the-job training, training 
leading to self-employment in a small business, short-term 
work experience leading to unsubsidized employment, job 
placement, supportive services such as child care or 
transportation, occupational upgrading, and retraining 
programs. Participants are either unemployed, 
underemployed, or in school. 

Part D 

Transitional public service employment programs place 
unemployed persons in entry-level positions designed to 
lead to unsubsidized employment in such public service 
fields as beautification, conservation, education, 
recreation, rural development, human betterment, and 
community improvement. 



Example 



The Artist-in-the-City Program, sponsored by the Seattle 
Arts Commission in Washington under Titles II and VI, 
placed artists in residencies of six months to a year with 
nonprofit, service-oriented organizations. For example, one 
artist offered a course at a local school on the techniques 
and history of Northwest Coast Indian art; another artist 
created animated public service announcements and a 
film for a local organization illustrating the problems with 
which handicapped persons must deal. Creating 
permanent positions for artists in a variety of nonprofit 
organizations is the primary long-term purpose of these 
residencies. 

Using Part B funds, the North Carolina Arts Council in 
Raleigh began, in 1979, a new program that will employ 
eight master and eight apprentice artists for six months. 
The program provides young, beginning artists with 
training; community service activity; and legal, tax, and 
other business information necessary for their professional 
survival. Another 16 artists will be employed for a second 
six months. Areas funded will include choreography, 
conducting, crafts, dance, directing, jazz, literature, and 
the visual arts. 

The Arts Council of Rochester in New York was awarded 
nearly $1.2 million in Part D funds to administer 108 jobs 
with 21 local arts groups. One-third of the positions were 
for practicing artists, the remainder for personnel whose 
responsibilities are to support the artists in their work or to 
expand community arts interest. These included archivists, 



development people, educators, instructors, librarians, 
and writers. 

Contact for Information 

Local prime sponsor (names and addresses available 
from one of the following offices) or state governor's 
manpower services office or the chief elected city or 
county official or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor regional offices 
(see Appendix E) or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



143 CETA: Title III, Special Federal 
Programs 

What/For Whom 

Grants to prime sponsors (see no. 141). Grants and 
contracts to public agencies and private organizations, 
including institutions of higher education. 

Description 

Under Title III, financial assistance is provided for 
employment and training programs for severely 
disadvantaged populations, and for research and 
evaluation projects. 

Part A 

Employment and training programs are sponsored to meet 
the needs of persons facing particular disadvantages in 
the labor market: Native Americans, migrant and seasonal 
farm workers, veterans, displaced homemakers, offenders, 
persons of limited English-language proficiency, 
handicapped persons, youths, single parents, and 
middle-aged and older workers. The programs may also 
address critical skills shortages or improve linkages 
between government employment and training agencies, 
business, labor, and community-based organizations. 

PartC 

Grants to and contracts with public agencies and private 
organizations, including institutions of higher education, 
are made to support employment and training research 
based on the knowledge and methods of the behavioral 
and social sciences. Experimental, developmental, 
demonstration, and pilot projects are sponsored to 
improve techniques and methods for dealing with 
employment and training problems. 

Example 



In 1979 the Papago Indian Nation and the University of 
Arizona's Radio-Television-Film Bureau cooperated on a 



Department of Labor 



143/144 



training project that is preparing four members of the 
Nation to become managers of a Papago reservation 
radio station that they will create. Working with Station 
KUAT in Tucson, Arizona, the Papagos are undergoing a 
four-year communications arts program telescoped into 
one year, plus on-the-job training. The Labor Institute for 
Human Enrichment in Washington, DC, received funding 
early in 1979 for a three-part program directed at the 
unemployment problems of performing artists. The project 
will work with labor and management to establish federal 
standards for apprenticeships in arts occupations, to 
develop arts jobs in the private sector, and to create 
union-based career counseling services for performers 

Contact for Information 

Local prime sponsor (names and addresses available 
from one of the following offices) or state governor's 
manpower services office or the chief elected city or 
county official or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor regional offices 
(see Appendix E) or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



144/CETA: Titles IV and VIII, Youth 
Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants primarily to prime sponsors (see no. 141). 



Description 



The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) 
sponsors programs designed to address the special 
problems of the young and unemployed under Titles IV 
and VIM. 

Title IV, Youth Programs 

Financial assistance is provided for a broad range of 
employment and training programs for eligible young 
people to improve their employment prospects and to 
experiment with alternative methods for so doing. Funds 
are allocated on a formula basis, primarily to prime 
sponsors, and on a discretionary basis for demonstration 
projects testing new approaches Young people interested 
in participating in any of these programs should contact 
their local prime sponsor or local Job Service/Employment 
Service office. 

Youth Incentive Entitlement Pilot Projects . This 
experimental program guarantees employment to 
participating 16- to 19-year-old economically 
disadvantaged youth who are in school or plan to return to 
school. Career counseling, academic tutoring, and other 



services may be offered. Seventeen prime sponsors have 
been selected to administer demonstration projects. 

Youth Community Conservation and Improvement 
Projects • Economically disadvantaged youth, ages 16 to 
19, employed on community planned projects, produce 
tangible benefits to the community, while receiving work 
experience and skills training Community-based 
organizations such as YMCAs or other private nonprofit 
agencies organize projects. 

Youth Employment and Training Programs • The 
same activities allowed under Title II (see no. 142) are 
authorized to enhance the job prospects and career 
preparation of low-income youth, ages 14 to 21, with the 
severest problems entering the labor market. Employment 
opportunities, training, and supportive services are 
sponsored to attack structural unemployment. Gaining 
practical experience on the job is an essential part of 
training, and related education is provided through close 
liaison with local education agencies 

Job Corps . Intensive vocational training, 
education, work experience, counseling, health, and other 
services in residential and nonresidential programs are 
offered to the most disadvantaged youth, ages 16 to 21. 
Job Corps centers are operated by local, state, or federal 
agencies or private organizations. 

Summer Youth Program . Economically 
disadvantaged youth, ages 14 to 21, are employed during 
the summer in order to provide a work experience that 
meets financial need and offers vocational exploration 
Workers have served in community projects as 
clerk-typists, maintenance helpers, museum aides, and 
recreation leaders. 

Title VIII, Young Adult Conservation Corps 

Operated under a tripartite agreement among the 
Departments of Labor, Agriculture, and Interior, the Young 
Adult Conservation Corps engages out-of-school, 
unemployed persons of any racial or economic 
background, ages 16 to 23, for a year of service. The 
young people perform useful conservation work, including 
development, rehabilitation, and maintenance of recreation 
facilities; clerical tasks; and other support services. Funds 
are also allocated to states by the Departments of 
Agriculture and Labor for local and state conservation 
projects on nonfederal public lands. Grants to conduct 
these projects may be made to units of local government 
or any public or private nonprofit organization 

Example 

The Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock received funds to 
sponsor a musical production to tour Arkansas state parks 
during the summer of 1979. Auditions were held 
throughout the state, to select about 20 performers, all 
economically disadvantaged young people, ages 14 to 
21. The Arts Expansion Program in Baltimore. Md . a joint 
project of the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and 
Culture and the Office of Manpower Resources, provides 



Department of Labor 



144/145 



training in the arts to about 320 young people during the 
summer and 135 people year-round. By subcontracting 
with local colleges and art institutions, the program can 
provide enrollees with intensive learning experiences in a 
variety of arts including mural painting, dance, music, 
musical theater, drama, Native American arts and crafts, 
and creative writing. Emphasis is placed on professional 
and college-level training in studio situations. 

The Cleveland Area Arts Council's "CETA and the Arts" 
project creates summer educational and employment 
opportunities in the arts for young people using CETA Title 
II and Title IV funding. Activities are held at neighborhood 
facilities in creative writing, dance, ethnic arts, music, 
public design, theater, and the visual arts. Students work 
in small groups with professional artists, preparing exhibits 
and performances. Each summer since 1975 a group of 
young people in Lane County, Ore., has written and 
produced a book on some aspect of county life. In 1978, 
after receiving training in oral history techniques, students 
interviewed older residents about local folklore and 
traditions, transcribed these materials, organized them, 
and wrote a text. They also planned the layout, took and 
developed photographs, and assisted in the production of 
the book, which was published in the fall. The restoration 
project at Grey Towers, a national historic landmark in 
Pennsylvania operated by the Forest Service, has made 
extensive use of Young Adult Conservation Corps 
programs. In addition to landscaping and building 
rehabilitation, enrollees have been trained to participate in 
the site's interpretive program. 

Contact for Information 

Local prime sponsor (names and addresses available 
from one of the following offices) or state governor's 
manpower serivces office or the chief elected city or 
county official or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor regional offices 
(see Appendix E) or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



145 CETA: Title VI, Countercyclical 
Public Service Employment 
Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to prime sponsors (see no. 141). 



Description 



Under Title VI, during periods when the national rate of 
unemployment exceeds 4 percent, funds are allocated to 
prime sponsors for temporary public service employment. 



Local prime sponsors determine participant eligibility 
based on federal regulations. Public service fields include 
beautification, conservation, education, recreation, rural 
development, human betterment, and community 
improvement. Cultural groups have provided transitional 
employment to artists, educators, librarians, researchers, 
support staff, writers, and others under this Title. 



Example 

The State Historical Commission in Montgomery, Ala., 
continued excavations at Fort Toulouse, a fort dating from 
1751, with archeological assistants salaried under CETA 
Title VI during 1979. The Indiana Creative Resource 
Corporation in Bloomington began two new efforts to 
create models for crafts marketing and production early in 
1979 The feasibility of establishing a local crafts 
marketing cooperative will be studied, using printed, 
leather, and sewn fabrics produced in-house. Along with 
the local Community Action program (see no. 9) the 
Corporation will experiment with the introduction of a 
cottage crafts industry. The Community Action program 
will locate people who will work at home reproducing an 
artist's designs for such items as leather wallets for 
payment on a piecework basis. 

The Cumberland County CETA office in Portland, Me., has 
funded a great variety of cultural projects. For example, it 
sponsored the Portland Children's Museum exhibit entitled 
"Cultures of Maine," which illustrates more than 200 years 
of state history The Governor Baxter School for the Deaf 
has a clown-mime in residence who teaches mime to the 
students. The Ram Island Dance Company began a 
performance center to teach young people in the local 
community. The Cambridge Arts Council in Massachusetts 
sponsored the "Call to Arts" annual competition, an 
invitation for proposals from artists which resulted in about 
35 commissions in 1978 for a variety of works, including 
musical performances, murals, and community workshops. 
The Arts Council also hired an oral historian to interview 
older residents of Cambridge about their recollections of 
the community, to be published in book form. In addition, 
the Cambridge Artist Facilitator program employs four 
artists to work full time with the community on local 
projects on a year-round basis The Merrimack Valley 
Textile Museum in North Andover, Mass., hired an 
assistant to the director of educational services to conduct 
classroom demonstrations, tours, and coordination of 
efforts to make the economic and social history of textiles 
part of local school curriculum. 

The Lane Regional Arts Council in Eugene, Ore., received 
new Title VI funds early in 1979 for a proposal that would 
create short-term employment opportunities for artists. 
Three persons will research the economic impact of the 
arts in the county. A coordinator for a summer parks 
project that will employ non-CETA artists was hired. Six 
artists will work in the community, in the schools, and on a 
children's art festival. The Virginia Foundation for the 
Humanities and Public Policy in Charlottesville, a state 
committee of the National Endowment for the Humanities 



Department of Labor 



145/146/147/148 



(see no. 221), received one-year funding to conduct a 
thorough evaluation of its programs since 1974. The study 
will produce an evaluation guide for individual project 
directors and begin preliminary work on a resource center 
to house the printed and media materials produced by 
funded projects. 

Contact for Information 

Local prime sponsor (names and addresses available 
from one of the following offices) or state governor's 
manpower services office or the chief elected city or 
county official or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor regional offices 
(see Appendix E) or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



146/CETA: Title VII, Private Sector 
Opportunities 



What/For Whom 



Grants to prime sponsors (see no. 141). 



Description 



Under Title VII, a new program allocates grants by formula 
to prime sponsors for demonstration projects that test 
different approaches to increasing both the involvement of 
the business community with CETA employment and 
training activities and the opportunities for private sector 
employment of economically disadvantaged persons who 
are unemployed or underemployed. Prime sponsors must 
create private industry councils, consisting of local 
business, labor leaders, and community-based 
organizations, which cooperate with the prime sponsor in 
planning programs under this Title. 

As of early 1979, Congress had not appropriated any 
funds for this new Title; however, programs designed to 
expand employment in the private sector in arts and 
humanities occupations are a possibility. For example, an 
artist could be placed with a graphic design firm, an actor 
in a commercial theater, and a writer, director, or 
technician with a commercial radio station. 



Contact for Information 






Local prime sponsor (names and addresses available 
from one of the following offices) or state governor's 
manpower services office or the chief elected city or 
county official or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor regional offices 
(see Appendix E) or Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



147 Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration 

What/For Whom 

Information and technical assistance for artists, 
craftspersons, small businesses, and the general public. 

Description 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration 
(OSHA) offers assistance to any member of the public 
with questions concerning the health hazards of a 
particular occupation Commercial artists, craftspersons, 
and performing artists unsure of the safety of their work 
sites or the hazards of materials with which they work may 
ask OSHA to answer general questions about working 
conditions. Requests for detailed research and technical 
data should be directed to the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health (see no. 61). OSHA also 
issues the OSHA Handbook for Small Businesses, which 
describes available services. 

In addition, a consultation service on occupational safety 
and health is provided to employers in all states through 
agreements with OSHA state offices and cooperating 
private consultants. Owners of businesses and crafts 
workshops may request a free assessment of the work 
site's safety and-advice on hazard removal. Requests from 
small businesses, or those with a specific problem, 
receive first consideration. Self-employed individuals are 
not eligible for this service. The consultant will not issue 
citations, propose penalties, or ordinarily provide 
information aoout the work place to OSHA's federal 
inspection staff. OSHA area and regional offices refer 
requests for consultation service to the appropriate source 
in each state. 

Contact for Information 

OSHA, Department of Labor regional offices (see 
Appendix E) or Director, Office of Consultation 
Programs, OSHA, Department of Labor, NDOL Building, 
200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210 



148 Senior Community Service 
Employment Program 



What/For Whom 



Subsidized workers performing community services for 
local public and private nonprofit organizations; grants 
covering up to 90 percent of project costs for state 
agencies and private nonprofit organizations. In some 
cases, state and national nonprofit organization grantees 
redistribute program funds to local sponsors, usually 
public or private nonprofit agencies or organizations. 



Department of Labor 



148 



Description 



Under Title V of the Older Americans Act, the Senior 
Community Service Employment Program subsidizes 
part-time community service employment for low-income 
persons 55 years or older. "Community service" includes 
social, health, welfare, educational, library, recreational, 
and similar services; conservation and restoration; 
economic development; and other services that contribute 
to the general welfare of the community. The Program is 
intended to benefit participating communities by providing 
a subsidized work force to help upgrade existing services 
or establish new services that local resources cannot 
support. Low-income older persons receive wages, 
counseling, medical examinations, limited job training, and 
sometimes placement in the regular labor market. 

Sponsoring organizations at the local level decide how the 
subsidized workers will be used. The Department of Labor 
has selected eight national grantees to administer the 
program: Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayores, 
Green Thumb, Inc., National Center on Black Aged, 
National Council of Senior Citizens, National Council on 
the Aging, National Retired Teachers Association/ 
American Association of Retired Persons (NRTA/AARP), 
National Urban League, and the Department of 
Agriculture/Forest Service. Most state and territorial 
governments also operate programs. In some cases, state 
and national grantees distribute program funds to local 
sponsors, usually public or private nonprofit agencies or 
organizations. Local sponsors either provide jobs 
themselves or place employees in selected public or 
private nonprofit organizations, such as museums and 
libraries. Addresses and telephone numbers of national 
grantees and state offices are available from the 
Washington, D.C., contact listed below. 

Example 

The Program's appropriation in 1978 was $200.9 million. 
Projects operated by the sponsoring organizations vary in 



purpose and structure and many include cultural 
institutions and activities. The Agrirama historical area in 
Tifton, Ga., is a restored rural farming community of the 
1800s where older residents of the area serve as 
interpretive guides and demonstrate the crafts of quilting, 
basket weaving, and blacksmithing. The National Center 
on Black Aged develops job assignments that foster 
indigenous culture and skills in rural communities. 
For example, the North Delta Museum in Friar's Point, 
Miss., houses donations from area residents of Native 
American artifacts and relics of the Civil War and both 
World Wars An older woman familiar with the area's 
history was appointed as a curator to begin classifying the 
collections to make them available to visitors. In 
Greenwood, Miss., the field staff of the Center is helping a 
group of local craftswomen organize and market their 
crafts — quilts, wood sculpture, and sewn and knitted 
garments. The NRTA/AARP works through local nonprofit 
sponsors at more than 100 sites; for example, the 
Oklahoma Theatre Center trains older workers while 
employing them in the costumes and reservations 
departments. 



Comment 

The Senior Community Service Employment Program was 
reauthorized by the Older Americans Act Amendments of 
1978. At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, final 
regulations for the Program had not been published. 



Contact for Information 



Local or national sponsoring organization or Senior 
Community Service Employment Program, Office of 
National Programs, Employment and Training 
Administration, Department of Labor, Washington, 
DC 20213 



149 



Department of 
State 



borrowed from museums, galleries, private and 
corporation collections, and artists for a minimum of two 
years. All costs for insurance and transportation during the 
loan period are paid by the Department of State. There 
are no commissions or purchases. Artworks must be 
original and of recognized quality. 



149 Art in Embassies Program 



What/For Whom 



Exhibitions of original artworks in embassies for artists of 
recognized talent. 



Description 



The Art in Embassies Program provides artworks by 
American artists for exhibit in U.S. ambassadors' official 
residences. Artworks, including paintings in all media, 
drawings, graphics, sculpture, and hangings, are 



Example 



Organizations and individuals who have recently 
participated in the Program include The Cleveland 
Museum, The Houston Museum, IBM Collection, The 
Metropolitan Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, 
and the National Gallery of Art, and artists Anni Albers, 
Richard Anuszkiewicz, John Chumley, Louise Fishman, 
Adolph Gottlieb, Betty Parsons, Peter Plagens, Saul 
Steinberg, and Carlos Villa. 



Contact for Information 



Art in Embassies Program (A/ART), Room B-258. 
Department of State, Washington, DC 20520 



150 



Department of 
Transportation 



1 50 Design, Art, and Architecture in 
Transportation Program 



What/For Whom 



Commissions for and contracts with architects, artists, 
designers, and planners occasionally made by local and 
state public agencies operating under Department of 
Transportation grants and loans. 



Description 



The Design, Art, and Architecture in Transportation 
Program serves as a central point of contact for 
designers, artists, and cultural groups concerned with 
integrating esthetic quality into transportation systems. The 
effort to bring about improved design, art, and 
architecture consists of initiatives planned throughout the 
Department of Transportation (DOT) to implement the 
Secretary's policy statement of September 1977: "to 
encourage good design, art, and architecture in 
transportation facilities and services. Funding for 
appropriate works of art in public spaces shall be 
provided for Departmental facilities and encouraged in 
transportation systems receiving grants under our 
programs." 

It is essential that artists, designers, and cultural groups 
work closely with local and state public agencies 
administering DOT grants and loans to ensure that design 
and artworks of high quality are incorporated into final 
project plans. DOT is composed of "operating 
administrations," each responsible for a specific mode of 
transportation: aviation, highways, railroads, urban mass 
transit, and shipping on rivers and coastal waterways 
Each administration is implementing the Department's 
design quality initiative by issuing guidelines appropriate 
to projects operating under its grants, loans, or permits. 

A few general statements can be made. Throughout the 
Department, design and esthetic quality are encouraged 
as fundamental components of project development and 
will often be fully eligible project expenses. Costs of 
original works of art are eligible under some DOT 
programs. Environmental impact statements for projects 
must now consider design, art, and architectural elements 
where deemed relevant. Drafts of environmental impact 
statements must be circulated early in the planning 
process to arts councils and other members of the design 
and art communities. Lastly, some recipients of DOT 
financial assistance will be required to conform to 



architect/engineer selection procedures that consider 
design qualifications. 

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 

Grants are made to public agencies to plan, construct, 
and repair airports, including landscaping and terminal 
facilities. Sponsors are encouraged to integrate design, 
art, and architecture in the early stages of planning. 
Individuals interested in a particular project should contact 
the regional FAA office or local airport authority. Example: 
FAA grant funds were committed to the acquisition of 
artworks for the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport 
Terminal in 1978. 

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) 

Grants are awarded to state highway agencies for 
planning and construction of highways, including 
landscaping and safety rest areas. Esthetics are 
considered an integral aspect of highway design and 
landscaping. Original works of art may be displayed in 
highway rights of way and rest areas, but only installation, 
not purchase, can be paid for with federal funds. 
Example: Sculptures donated by civic and arts 
organizations have been installed at rest areas along 
highway I-80 in Nebraska and at 17 sites in Vermont. 

Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 

The Federal Railroad Administration is funding substantial 
track and station improvements through the Northeast 
Corridor Improvement project. Three-fourths of one 
percent of station renovation costs in 15 cities has been 
allocated for the Station Arts program to secure original 
artworks, such as murals, bas-reliefs, free-standing 
sculpture, fountains, and paintings. Local station arts 
committees were established in each city to identify 
suitable categories of art and artists able to execute the 
proposed works. The selection of artists for commissions 
is scheduled for completion by fall 1979. There are no 
plans to expand the program to other locations. Under the 
Intermodal Rail Passenger Terminal Program, $3.6 million 
was appropriated for planning, preservation, and 
demonstration grants to renovate and re-use historically 
and architecturally significant railroad stations that provide 
intercity rail service. Civic, cultural, and commercial 
activities could be part of the re-use plan. Of the $3.6 
million appropriated, $2 million has been committed to 
projects around the country: the distribution of the 
remainder will not be determined until Congress decides 
on revisions to the Amtrak route structure. Example: Plans 
are moving forward to incorporate works of art in the 
station restoration programs for Wilmington Station in 
Delaware and Pennsylvania Station in Baltimore. 

Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) 

Grants and loans are made to local and state public 
transportation agencies to assist in financing the 
acquisition, construction, reconstruction, and improvement 



Department of Transportation 



150/151 



of mass transit facilities and equipment. Grants and 
contracts are also awarded for research and 
demonstration projects. On a case by case review, special 
design features, artworks, and graphics may be eligible 
for UMTA funding as part of any overall plan for transit 
improvement. Although emphasis has been placed on 
functional art (signs, vehicle designs, and architectural 
designs) projects may also include fine art (sculpture, 
mosaics, and murals) to enhance transit areas. Bus, rapid 
transit, and railroad terminals of historic significance may 
also be eligible for funds for renovation provided the 
facilities will be used for mass transportation purposes. 
The participation of local arts councils, business firms, 
community groups, and individuals is considered essential 
to successful mass transit arts and design programs. 
Interested persons should contact their local mass 
transportation authority. 

Example: In 1978, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation 
Authority (MBTA) was awarded a $45,000 grant to 
contract with the Cambridge Arts Council to develop 
procedures for the incorporation of artworks in the design 
and construction of four new Cambridge subway stations. 
The project may serve as a prototype for incorporating the 
arts into transportation systems throughout the country. 
Two projects, the Downtown Providence Auto-Restricted 
Zone in Rhode Island and the renovation of Hartford's 
Union Station in Connecticut, are intended to demonstrate 
the role of design and art in restoring historic districts and 
buildings for use as contemporary transportation centers. 



U.S. Coast Guard 

Plans are under way to authorize a fixed percentage of 
project funds for design and purchase of artworks for 
future Coast Guard facilities. Functional design for shore 
facilities is emphasized in a series of design guides. 
Interested persons should contact their Coast Guard 
district office or the Design Branch, U.S. Coast Guard 
Headquarters, Washington, DC 20590. Example: The 
Coast Guard Station in Alexandria, Va., will have a small 
exhibit area to display artworks by Coast Guard staff. 



Contact for Information 

Design, Art, and Architecture in Transportation Program, 
Office of Environment and Safety, Department of 
Transportation, Washington, DC 20590 



151 /Special Review for Historic 
Sites 

What/For Whom 

Historic site review for persons and organizations 
interested in preserving historic properties that will be 
affected by federally assisted transportation projects. 

Description 

The Department of Transportation (DOT) Act of 1966 
protects historic sites of local, state, or national 
significance by prohibiting DOT approval of any project 
that uses or endangers historic property — unless there are 
no feasible and prudent alternatives and all possible 
planning has been made to minimize harm to the area. A 
proposal for a project that might affect historic property 
must be submitted to the Secretary of Transportation with 
an explanation of why such lands were chosen, the effects 
of such a project, the alternatives considered, and the 
measures to be taken to minimize harm. Opportunities for 
public comment are provided. The special review as 
required by section 4(f) of the DOT Act applies to all DOT 
activities (highways, aviation, urban mass transit, railroads, 
rivers, harbors, and coastal waters) 

Properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places 
(see no. 126) are automatically entitled to protection. 
Properties not listed in the National Register may also be 
eligible for special review if jurisdictional authorities, local 
or state landmarks commissions, determine that they are 
of significance. 

Example 



Highway monies made possible a large-scale industrial 
archeological excavation near Passaic Falls in Paterson, 
N.J. The remains of an early locomotive works and other 
artifacts of "The Society of Useful Manufactures," founded 
by Alexander Hamilton, were discovered while excavating 
for the installation of the large drainage pipe required for 
State Route 20. Near Richmond National Battlefield Park, 
Va., the highway alignment was shifted 800 feet to protect 
historic Meadow Farm, an eighteenth-century Virginia 
colonial frame house considered eligible for the National 
Register and subsequently listed in it. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Environment and Safety, Department of 
Transportation, Washington, DC 20590 



152/153 



Department of 
the Treasury 

1 52 General Revenue Sharing 

What/For Whom 

Direct payments to state governments and units of local 
government, including Indian tribes. Recipients of revenue 
sharing funds may in turn allocate funds to public and 
private organizations, such as art agencies, historical 
societies, libraries, and museums. 

Description 

Under the revenue sharing program, state and local 
governments receive U.S. Treasury funds. Monies are 
allocated according to a formula based on population, tax 
effort, and per capita income. One-third of the total 
amount earmarked for each state goes to the state 
government; two-thirds goes to local jurisdictions within 
the state. State or local governments that receive revenue 
sharing money may use those funds to match a federal 
grant. 

The program was established by Title I of the State and 
Local Fiscal Assistance Act of 1972. Amending legislation 
in 1976 extended its operation through the end of fiscal 
year 1980 and removed certain restrictions. Governments 
may now allocate their funds for any purpose that is legal 
under state and local law. Programs sponsored by 
historical societies, libraries, and museums could be 
selected for support by a recipient government 

General revenue sharing allows citizens to work with their 
local or state governments in the selection of programs 
and activities that are to be funded. Governments are 
required to hold two public hearings with public notice 
prior to the adoption of their budgets, so that citizens can 
comment on the use of revenue sharing funds and their 
relationship to the entire budget. 

Example 

In 1979, nearly $6.9 billion was allocated to state and 
local governments. These jurisdictions reported to the 
Bureau of the Census that their expenditures were 
primarily for such purposes as fire and police protection, 
education, and highways. In 1976 and 1977 a small 
percentage of these expenditures were for libraries, parks, 
and recreation, including funds for cultural institutions and 
projects. It is frequently difficult to distinguish revenue 
sharing monies from the other funds used by local and 
state governments to support libraries, museums, arts 
groups, and other cultural activities. However, the 
following examples illustrate possible uses of revenue 
sharing funds for cultural purposes. 



The Stillwater Arts and Humanities Council in Oklahoma 
received two $10,000 awards from the city in the 
mid-1970s to assist in the purchase of the Sheerar 
Cultural and Heritage Center, which houses a museum, 
auditorium, and the Council's offices. An additional $3,500 
award was made to the Council in 1978 for work on the 
Center. For five years beginning in 1974, the Alameda 
County Neighborhood Arts Program has received between 
$20,000 and $50,000 in revenue sharing funds annually 
from the county to pay the general operating costs of the 
community arts program. The North Carolina Arts Council 
sponsors a challenge grant program through which local 
governments match funds from the arts council on a 
one-to-one basis to provide support to local arts groups. 
In 1979, the following North Carolina jurisdictions used 
revenue sharing funds to cover all or part of the matching 
requirement: Ayden, Davidson, Hyde City, and Macon 
County. 

The South Coast Repertory Theatre in Costa Mesa, Calif. 
received $250,000 from the city and another $250,000 
from the county in 1976 to construct a theater complex. 
The county provided another $10,000 in 1979 to support 
the theater's educational touring program in the local 
school district. The Washington State Arts Commission, in 
cooperation with the King County Arts Commission and 
Seattle Arts Commission, channels revenue sharing funds 
to arts organizations with regional impact. This relatively 
stable source of funding has engendered additional 
financial commitments to the arts from private sources and 
local tax revenue, and has enabled arts groups to draw 
up five-year development plans. Participants in the effort 
include the ACT Theatre, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Seattle 
Art Museum, and Seattle Symphony. 

Comment 

Application procedures vary from place to place. Cultural 
groups and institutions interested in receiving revenue 
sharing funds should have close working relationships 
with local governing bodies such as the mayor or city 
manager's office, or the city council. 

Contact for Information 

Local or state governing bodies or Director, Office of 
Revenue Sharing, Department of the Treasury, 
Washington, DC 20226 



153 IRS Tax Services 



What/For Whom 



Information and assistance for the public. 



Description 



The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is responsible for 
helping individual taxpayers and organizations understand 



Department off the Treasury 



153 



their federal tax obligations It issues many free 
publications, referenced in the Catalog and Quick Index to 
Taxpayer Information Publications, that explain different 
tax procedures, benefits, and responsibilities For 
example, the pamphlet How to Apply for and Retain 
Exempt Status for Your Organization describes exemption 
rules and procedures that are to be followed by 
organizations established and operated for charitable, 
religious, educational, scientific, literary, and other 
purposes. Other pamphlets cover the sale of musical or 
literary compositions, the donation of artistic works, and 
tax procedures for fellowship-holders in the United States 
or abroad. Publications are available from local IRS offices. 



The Internal Revenue Service maintains toll-free telephone 
lines in all 50 states. Questions in writing may be 
addressed to the IRS District Director in each state. 
Although IRS staff will answer questions about tax 
obligations, the taxpayer alone is responsible for the 
accuracy of the return and tax payment. 



Contact for Information 

IRS toll-free telephone line or IRS District Director in 
appropriate state or Internal Revenue Service, 
Washington, DC 20221 



>. 



1 54/1 55 



Environmental 

Protection 

Agency 



of Mississippi. The students wrote articles, conducted 
interviews, drew illustrations, and did library research. 

Numerous awards have been made to winners of poster 
and journalism contests throughout the nation. 

Contact for Information 

PEYA, Office of Public Awareness, A-107, Environmental 
Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW, Washington, 
DC 20460 



1 54 President's Environmental 
Youth Awards 



1 55 Public Awareness Materials 



What/For Whom 



Awards in the form of patches or certificates for young 
people up to 18 years old, for achievements in 
environmental protection. 



What/For Whom 



Description 



The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established 
the President's Environmental Youth Awards program to 
stimulate environmental awareness in young people by 
recognizing their community involvement and 
achievements. Projects range from clean-up campaigns to 
chemical analyses of water and air pollutants. In addition, 
many culturally related projects receive awards. These 
projects may include studies of the effects of conservation 
measures on lifestyles; identification, preservation, and 
adaptation of local historical properties; news releases 
and articles for school and local newspapers; and poems, 
posters, paintings, and plays depicting local or national 
environmental concerns. Groups as well as individual 
youths are eligible for awards. All projects must have an 
adult sponsor who organizes an "awards panel." The 
panel determines the basis for the award, names the 
recipients, and is responsible for presentation. In 1978, 
more than 100,000 awards in the form of patches or 
certificates were made. Contact the office listed below for 
applications. 



Example 



An award was presented to high school students of Fall 
River, Mass. With the help of the local historical society 
and the water department, they had made a thorough 
study of the history of an important local pond. On the 
basis of the results of historical research and extensive 
chemical and physical tests that the students performed 
themselves, a complete picture emerged of how the pond 
and its surroundings had changed. 

A group of high school students from Biloxi, Miss., won an 
award for their extensive participation in the publication of 
the 350-page Sea Grant's Guide to the Marine Resources 



Loans of films, photographs, and fine arts works to 
researchers, educators, and the general public 



Description 



The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) films covering 
a broad range of environmental subjects are available 
either on free loan or for a nominal fee. Films include 
historical surveys of the environmental effects of human 
lifestyles, the social and cultural impact of industrialization, 
and economic and political problems arising from 
environmental issues, as well as scientific information. For 
a list of available films, contact the office below for "Films 
from EPA." 

Between 1971 and 1972, EPA commissioned more than 
40 artworks on environmental subjects. These works may 
be lent to museums and other responsible parties or they 
may be photographed for reproduction for educational 
uses, research, or display. Participating artists included 
Lamar Dodd, Peter Hurd, Billy Marrow Jackson, Mitchell 
Jamieson, and Lowell Nesbitt. 

EPA maintains an automated and computerized color 
photo file called the DOCUMERICA Image System, which 
contains 16000 photos. Images are released for 
informational and educational uses. Original 
transparencies are not released. Because the system can 
serve only one picture researcher at a time, preference is 
given to those working on assignments in the public 
interest. User time is determined by the demands on the 
system. Complete microfiche files of DOCUMERICA's 
images are maintained at regional EPA offices. 
Reproducibles are available from an EPA contractor: 
Berkey K & L Custom Services, Inc., 222 East 44th Street, 
New York, NY 10017. 



Contact for Information 

Office of Public Awareness, Environmental Protection 
Agency, Washington, DC 20460 



Environmental Protection Agency 



156 



156 Youth Education Seminars 

What/For Whom 

Grants to universities or individuals working through 
universities on environmental problems. 

Description 

In 1978-79 the Office of Public Awareness initiated a 
demonstration project using university facilities for 
seminars aimed at educating the public, particularly 
students, in current local environmental problems and 
possible solutions. Direct grants are made to universities 
to conduct research and hire professional staff to manage 
the seminars. EPA supplies field experts and technical 
services. The seminars include a wide variety of activities, 
many of which are culturally related. Universities or 
individuals interested in addressing a local environmental 
issue in this way should contact the office listed below. 

Example 

In 1978, EPA awarded $300,000 to the University of 
Wisconsin for research on nonpoint source pollution 



(surface run-off). Part of this grant was used to set up a 
seminar, run by university staff and EPA field experts, to 
serve a cross-cultural group including teachers, librarians, 
writers, artists, scientists, and technicians. As a result, this 
group composed an Activities Guide Book for elementary 
students which is being printed and distributed to schools 
throughout the nation. It contains a wide variety of student 
activities relating to pollution, including projects in poetry, 
story writing, and arts and crafts, as well as scientific 
projects. A similar book is being produced for high school 
students. 

In 1979, EPA awarded $2,550 to Catholic University in 
Washington, D.C., to run a seminar for 30 participants in 
the development of comprehensive curriculum guidelines 
for elementary and secondary teachers of environmental 
studies. 



Contact for Information 

Youth Constituent Specialist, Office of Public Awareness, 
A-107, Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, 
SW, Washington, DC 20460 



157/158/159 



General Services 
Administration 



Description 



157 Introduction 



The General Services Administration (GSA) provides for 
the federal government a system for the management of 
ifs property and records, including construction and 
operation of buildings, procurement and distribution of 
supplies, utilization and disposal of property (see nos. 
159-161), and other responsibilities. The National Archives 
and Records Service is responsible for the preservation, 
use, and disposition of the records of the United States 
government (see nos. 162-168). The Public Buildings 
Service is responsible for the design, construction, 
operation, and maintenance of about 10,000 federally 
owned and leased buildings throughout the country (see 
nos. 169-171). Fundamental revisions of GSA construction 
and space management policies were required by the 
Public Buildings Cooperative Use Act of 1976, and 
reinforced by a Presidential Executive Order of August 
1978: Historic preservation and public use of federal 
buildings are to be considered primary concerns in the 
selection, planning, and use of federal buildings. 

Archives and other historical materials are available for 
research purposes at the National Archives Building in 
Washington, DC., and at Presidential Libraries and 
Federal Records Centers across the country. The GSA 
Library in Washington, DC, offers reference works in 
architecture, building materials and crafts, environmental 
education and engineering, historic preservation, land 
use, real estate, and more limited holdings in American 
history, the arts, careers, interior design, and landscape 
architecture. Research assistance is provided by the 
reference and legal librarians to visiting researchers; 
telephone and mail inquiries are also answered. 
Interlibrary loans are arranged with public and academic 
libraries. 



Operating in 38 major metropolitan areas, with 40 other 
cities connected by toll-free telephone lines, Federal 
Information Centers (FICs) act as clearinghouses for 
information about the federal government. Anyone with a 
question about the government, or about which 
government office to contact for information, may phone, 
write, or visit an FIC office. The FIC will supply the 
information or refer the questioner to the appropriate 
person or agency. Centers also have numerous 
government publications which are available to visitors. 
Many Centers have bilingual specialists to assist 
non-English-speaking persons. The Centers can often help 
answer questions about state and local governments as 
well. FICs are listed alphabetically under "Federal 
Information Centers" in the United States Government 
pages of telephone books. 



Contact for Information 



Federal Information Centers in major cities (see Appendix 
F) or Federal Information Center Coordinating Staff, 
General Services Administration, Washington, DC 20405 



159 Surplus Personal 
Property Donations 

Federal Property Resources Service 



What/For Whom 



Personal property donations to public agencies and 
Native American groups involved in such activities as 
conservation, economic development, education, and park 
and recreational programs; and to nonprofit educational or 
public health institutions, such as schools, colleges, 
universities, libraries, museums, educational radio and 
television stations, and child care centers. Federal 
agencies may also lend excess personal property to 
authorized project grantees for the duration of a grant 
period for specified purposes. For sales of personal 
property, see nos. 49 and 160 



Contact for Information 



Description 



Director of Public Affairs, General Services Administration, 
Washington, DC 20405 



158 Federal Information Centers 



What/For Whom 

Information about federal government programs for the 
general public. 



Personal property (machines, tools, furnishings) of federal 
agencies may be reported to the General Services 
Administration (GSA) as being in excess of the needs of 
the agency. In this case the property is offered to other 
federal agencies for their use. If there is no federal need 
for the property, it is declared surplus. The GSA may 
donate these items to public agencies and nonprofit 
educational and public health institutions. Hand and 
machine tools, office machines and supplies, furniture, 
hardware, motor vehicles, airplanes, and construction 
equipment are among the items available under this 
program. Within each state and territory, a surplus 



General Services Administration 



159/160/161/162 



property agency has been established. This agency 
determines eligibility; advises applicants on eligibility 
requirements, donation procedures, and conditions and 
restrictions on acquired property; and distributes surplus 
personal property. A free pamphlet, Federal Surplus 
Personal Property Donation Programs, describes this 
program 

Types and quantities of available surplus personal 
property vary considerably from time to time. The GSA 
notifies state agency representatives about available 
property. These representatives visit federal installations to 
select property. Therefore, eligible applicants should be in 
close contact with their state agency and visit the agency 
regularly to inspect and select property, or make their 
needs for property known. 

Contact for Information 

State agency for surplus property or Personal Property 
Division, Federal Property Resources Service, GSA 
regional offices or Donation Division, Federal Property 
Resources Service, General Services Administration, 
Washington, DC 20406 



Contact for Information 



160 Surplus Personal Property Sales 

Federal Property Resources Service 



What/For Whom 



Personal property sold on a competitive-bid basis to the 
general public. State and local governments, including 
tax-supported agencies, may purchase property by 
negotiation before it is advertised for competitive-bid sale. 



Description 



Surplus personal property of federal agencies that has not 
been donated to public agencies or eligible institutions 
(see no. 159) is offered for sale, on a competitive-bid 
basis, by the General Services Administration (GSA) 
regional offices. (The Department of Defense handles its 
own sales; see no. 49.) Personal property includes hand 
and machine tools, office machines and supplies, 
furniture, hardware, motor vehicles, airplanes, and 
construction equipment. The condition of the property 
offered for sale ranges from good to poor. Sales are 
publicized through newspapers, magazines, radio, 
television, direct mail, and the Commerce Business Daily 
(see no. 25). Prospective purchasers should contact the 
appropriate GSA regional office, describe the types of 
property desired, and ask to be placed on the mailing list 
for that region. As property becomes available, catalogues 
and other announcements are distributed to prospects on 
the mailing list. A pamphlet entitled Buying Government 
Surplus Personal Property is available at no charge. 



Personal Property Division, Federal Property Resources 
Service, GSA regional offices or Federal Property 
Resources Service, General Services Administration, 
Washington, DC 20406 



161 /Surplus Real Property Sales 

Federal Property Resources Service 



What/For Whom 



Real property sold on a competitive-bid basis to the 
general public. 



Description 



Surplus real property of federal agencies that has not 
been transferred to public agencies or to eligible 
institutions (see no. 64 and no. 129) is offered for sale, on 
a competitive-bid basis, by General Services 
Administration (GSA) regional offices. Real property may 
consist of land or land with buildings or other 
improvements. Scheduled sales are publicized through 
advertisements in newspapers, magazines, radio, 
television, direct mail, and the Commerce Business Daily 
(see no. 25). Prospective purchasers should contact the 
appropriate GSA regional office, describe the location and 
type of property desired, and ask to be placed on the 
mailing list maintained for that region. When such property 
becomes available, the office notifies prospects on the 
mailing list. The pamphlet Disposal of Surplus Heal 
Property is available at no charge. 



Contact for Information 



Division of Real Property, GSA regional offices or Office 
of Real Property, Federal Property Resources Service, 
General Services Administration, Washington, DC 20406 



162 Archival Reference Services 

National Archives and Records Service 

What/For Whom 

Collections and research rooms in Washington, D.C., and 
at the regional branches open to scholars, students, and 
the general public. Reference services provided by 
research consultants. Documents available through 
interlibrary loan and by purchase of microfilm or other 
reproductions Exhibit loans, courses, publications, and 
special tours available. 



General Services Administration 



162/163 



Description 



The federal government's permanently valuable records 
are kept in the National Archives, Washington, DC. 
Documents and related holdings that date from colonial 
times to the present constitute primary source materials on 
all aspects of U.S. history. The National Archives holds 
some 3 billion documents, including 5 million maps and 
charts, approximately 5 million still pictures, 100,000 reels 
of film, and 80,000 sound recordings. General inquiries 
are answered by research consultants in the Central 
Reference Division (see below). Detailed inquiries are 
referred to the appropriate division of the National 
Archives, such as the Audiovisual Archives (see no. 163) 
and the Center for Cartographic and Architectural 
Archives (see no. 164). 

Central Reference Division 

The National Archives Library contains 180,000 volumes, 
including government publications, covering American 
history and archival science. Holdings are organized 
according to agency of origin. Although there is no 
general card catalogue, there are inventories for each 
agency group. A list of record groups of the National 
Archives and Records Service is available from the office 
listed below. The Library permits onsite use of the 
collections. Records are available for study in research 
rooms, and microfilm, photographs, and other kinds of 
copies may be purchased. 

Microfilm Research Room 

Archivists prefer that researchers use the many materials 
and records that are on microfilm, so that further 
deterioration of originals may be prevented. The booklet 
National Archives Microfilm Publications assists 
researchers in locating materials. More than 2,100 
microfilm publications, arranged by agency of origin, 
provide basic documentation for research in the fields of 
American, European, Far Eastern, African, and Latin 
American history as well as in local history, genealogy, 
economics, public administration, political science, law, 
and ethnology. Sample titles are Records of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Federal 
Population Censuses (1790-1900). Catalogues of microfilm 
publications on subjects of special interest are in 
preparation. Two catalogues currently available are about 
holdings related to Native American and black studies. 
Pension, military service, and census records on microfilm 
contain names, dates, places, and relationships needed 
for genealogical research. 

Office of Educational Programs 

A variety of public programs is offered including 
publications, academic instruction, exhibits, and lectures. 
Publications include finding-aids for researchers; 
microfilms of frequently used records, such as 
genealogical material; and publications about the 
Archives' holdings, including the quarterly Prologue: The 



Journal of the National Archives. The Associates of the 
National Archives (a docent and public membership 
program) issues a free monthly calendar, a quarterly 
News Notes for scholarly journals, and slide shows and 
films about the National Archives' activities and holdings. 

The Office of Educational Programs has undertaken 
various training programs, including short-term workshops, 
lectures, and symposia in Washington, DC, to train 
undergraduates and graduates in the use of archives. A 
foreign archivists training program, conferences, and 
symposia are also organized by the Office. More than 40 
secondary school teaching units created by the Office, 
each containing facsimiles of original documents and 
accompanying teachers' guides, may be obtained from 
SIRS, Inc., Box 2507, Boca Raton, FL 33432. For a fee, 
the exhibits program, instituted in 1978, lends traveling 
exhibits to institutions able to meet stringent requirements. 
It also sells facsimile exhibits. Early in 1979, "Taking the 
Measure of the Land," a collection of 78 maps from 
1769-1974, was on loan to the Chicago Historical Society. 
At the same time, the exhibit "Holocaust: The 
Documentary Evidence" was made available for sale. 

Publications 

Among numerous publications available are facsimiles of 
historic documents; inventories of the records of 
government agencies; guides to foreign records captured 
in war; and handbooks in archival science, information 
retrieval, and records management. National Archives 
Microfilm Publications and the Select List of Publications 
of the National Archives and Records Service may be 
obtained, free of charge, by writing the Publications Sales 
Branch at the address listed below. Among references in 
the Select List are: Genealogical Records in the National 
Archives, Nineteenth-Century Puerto Rican Immigration 
and Slave Data, Photographs of the American City, 
Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Commission of 
Fine Arts, and Public Land Records of the Federal 
Government, 1800-1950. Positive copies of microfilm may 
be purchased. The Guide to the National Archives of the 
United States may be purchased from the Superintendent 
of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402. 

Contact for Information 

National Archives of the United States, Washington, 
DC 20408 



1 63 Audiovisua I Archives 

National Archives and Records Service 

What/For Whom 

Collections open to scholars, students, and the general 
public, with reference services provided by research 
consultants. 



General Services Administration 



163/164 



Description 



The collections, which include still pictures, motion 
pictures, and sound recordings documenting the activities 
of federal agencies, illustrate the social, economic, 
cultural, political, and diplomatic history of America. The 
materials are grouped according to agency of origin, and 
published guides are available for each unit. There are 
specialized indexes for categories such as black history 
or Native Americans. Research rooms are available for 
study purposes. Although materials cannot be rented or 
lent, researchers may make their own reproductions or 
may purchase copies subject to copyright restrictions. 
Generally, the resources of the National Archives are in 
the public domain and may be incorporated into films, 
books, or recordings. 

Motion Picture Branch 

Collections of 100,000 reels of edited and unedited motion 
pictures dating from 1894 are maintained. Three-fourths of 
these films have been transferred from federal agencies; 
the rest have been privately donated. For example, three 
films made by the Smithsonian Bureau of American 
Ethnology in the 1930s deal with the compilation of a 
dictionary of the Great Plains Indians' intertribal sign 
language. The films depict the theory, history, and 
practice of the sign language. Bureau films from the same 
years illustrate the preparation of Smithsonian 
archeological exhibits and diggings in Central America 
and the southwestern United States. The Harmon 
Foundation Collection of Films focuses on minority life and 
culture in the United States, Africa, Asia, and other 
developing regions. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development footage includes films on urban and 
community planning, housing discrimination, and urban 
poverty. Films of the Office of Inter-American Affairs 
produced during World War II deal with Latin American 
culture and archeological artifacts. The National Archives 
Gift Collection, dating from 1896, encompasses 
newsreels, documentaries, television footage, and feature 
films produced by government and private sources. The 
films document many facets of U.S. history, sociology, 
ethnic cultures, education, and international relations. 



such series as "Americans All — Immigrants All." Bureau of 
Ethnology holdings include 132 cylinder recordings, made 
by Mary C. Wheelright in 1920, of Navajo and Pueblo 
languages and songs. 

Still Picture Branch 

More than 5 million items are maintained in the collections, 
including artworks, posters, maps, and photographs, 
dating from the seventeenth century to the present. 
Among the specific collections are the Works Progress 
Administration (WPA) photographic records of the federal 
music, art, theater, and writers' projects of the 1930s; 
WPA photographs of industrial conditions in areas of 
unemployment; Commission of Fine Arts photographs and 
slides on American public buildings and the art and 
architecture of Europe, Egypt, Mexico, and Central 
America; Bureau of Indian Affairs photographs of Native 
American living conditions, customs, dress, dances, and 
industry dating from the 1860s; Women's Bureau 
photographs from 1892 to 1945 documenting the women's 
rights struggle and women workers in the professions, 
industry, and agriculture; World War II U.S. Occupation 
Headquarters photographs of war-damaged European 
monuments; Bureau of Ships photographs of naval events; 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics photographs of black 
farmers in the American South, 1906-1941; and 
photographs documenting the early American West 
showing wagon caravans, riverboats, blacksmithing, and 
gold mining operations. 

Contact for Information 

Audiovisual Archives, National Archives of the United 
States, Washington, DC 20408 



1 64 Center for Cartographic and 
Architectural Archives 

National Archives and Records Service 



Sound Recording Branch 

Collections of 80,000 sound recordings from 65 federal 
agencies are maintained. These recordings, dating from 
the early 1900s, include press conferences, panel 
discussions, interviews, speeches, court and conference 
proceedings, and news broadcasts. There is an extensive 
collection of captured World War II speeches, ceremonies, 
and miscellaneous German recordings, as well as the 
Nuremberg International Military Tribunal war crimes 
proceedings. Works Progress Administration recordings 
include dramatic radio broadcasts from the 1930s; 
performances by symphony orchestras and opera 
companies; and traditional black folk songs, blues, and 
spirituals. Among Office of Education records are selected 
radio broadcasts produced from 1934 to 1953, including 



What/For Whom 



Collections bpen to scholars, students, and the general 
public, with reference services provided by research 
consultants. 



Description 



The Center for Cartographic and Architectural Archives 
maintains collections of more than 1.6 million maps and 
about 2.3 million aerial photographs produced by federal 
agencies. The collections constitute valuable research 
material in such fields as geography, urban studies, and 
ethnic history. Selected maps and aerial photographs may 
be examined in the Cartographic and Architectural 
Archives research room, where reproductions are 



General Services Administration 



164 165 166 



furnished on a fee basis, and catalogues, lists, and other 
finding-aids for the collections are maintained. These are 
organized according to agency of origin, type of record, 
or by subject area, such as urban studies and Native 
Americans. Some finding-aids are available for purchase. 

Holdings include the Central Map File of the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs, with materials pertaining to Indian treaties, 
removal policy, settlements, and land use. Surveys and 
settlement records compiled by the Bureau of Land 
Management and its predecessors concern public domain 
lands, private land claims, and transportation 
rights-of-way. Among the records of the Census Bureau 
and Bureau of Agricultural Economics are manuscripts on 
immigration and population growth, and enumeration 
district maps prepared since the late nineteenth century 
which detail population data for counties, cities, towns, 
unincorporated settlements and, frequently, farm 
dwellings. Additional records related to urban 
development are plans of American and foreign cities 
dating from the late eighteenth century to the present as 
well as special-purpose maps that would be helpful to 
those researching urban development. 

Contact for Information 

Center for Cartographic and Architectural Archives, 
National Archives of the United States, Washington, 
DC 20408 



source Catalogues of available materials are issued 
regularly, as are listings organized by subject, media 
format, and sponsoring federal agency. 

Contact for Information 

National Audiovisual Center, General Services 
Administration, Reference Section, Washington, 
DC 20409 



166 National Historical Publications 
and Records Commission 

National Archives and Records Service 

What/For Whom 

Project grants to educational and other nonprofit 
institutions, such as universities, colleges, libraries, 
historical societies, museums, university presses, archives, 
and state and local government agencies. The 
Commission encourages matching-grant proposals, which 
would generate new monies from nonfederal sources, 
such as foundations, businesses, or state or local 
appropriations, to match a Commission grant. The 
Commission also awards fellowships to scholars. 



Description 



165 National Audiovisual Center 

National Archives and Records Service 

What/For Whom 

Sales and rentals of federally produced audiovisual 
materials to the general public; referrals to film loan 
programs. 

Description 

The National Audiovisual Center's collection of audiovisual 
materials covers a wide range of topics including aging, 
anthropology, art education, graphic arts, marine history, 
music, philosophy, photography, religion, urbanization, 
and woodworking. Through its distribution programs, 
federally produced audiovisual materials are made 
available for public use. User guides, such as teacher 
manuals and student workbooks, accompany some 
audiovisual materials specifically designed for training or 
instructional purposes. The Center sells such materials as 
motion pictures, video formats, slide sets, audio tapes, 
and multimedia kits. Only 16-mm motion pictures are 
available for rental. Regional federal agency offices and 
commercial distributors frequently provide free loans of 
16-mm motion pictures; the Center is aware of these 
federal loan programs and refers inquiries to the nearest 



The National Historical Publications and Records 
Commission supports projects to collect, preserve, and 
describe documents and records of American history, and 
to make them more accessible to the public. Applicants 
should also investigate the possibility of a grant from the 
Division of Research Programs, National Endowment for 
the Humanities (see no. 219). A statement is available 
from either agency explaining the ways in which their 
programs complement each other. At least half the costs 
of projects sponsored by the Commission usually are 
contributed by the grantee institution through payment of 
direct or indirect costs. 

Fellowships in Historical Editing 

A limited number of fellowships, four or five annually, are 
awarded by the Commission, with funds granted by 
private foundations. Fellowship applicants should hold a 
doctoral degree in American history or civilization, or 
demonstrate equivalent qualifications through writings. 
Fellows receive a year of training in advanced editing 
of documentary sources through work on a 
Commission-approved editing project in American history. 

Publications Program 

Grants support efforts to make important documentary 
source materials in United States history more widely 
available through compilation, editing, and publication 



General Services Administration 



166/167/168 



(letterpress or microfilm) in comprehensive or selective 
editions. Documents should have historical value and 
national significance beyond local and state interests. 
Assistance is usually given for efforts extending beyond 
one year. Applications should be made only after 
extensive consultation with Commission staff. From gift 
funds, special small grants occasionally are awarded to 
institutions whose graduate or undergraduate history 
departments are unable to meet the expense of 
photocopying documents for students in editing or 
methodology courses. 

Example: Publication projects were allocated $2.2 million 
in 1978. In 1978, the Commission made a new grant of 
$19,900 to Suffolk Community College in Garden City, 
New York, for a microform edition of the papers of 
nineteenth-century Cabinet officer and diplomat Richard 
Rush. The Commission also awarded $43,700 to the 
University of California at Los Angeles to continue work on 
a book edition of the papers of Marcus Garvey. From gift 
funds a $297 grant was made to the University of 
Southern Mississippi in 1977 for the collection of source 
materials for undergraduate student historical editing 
projects. 



Records Program 

Grants are awarded for projects dealing with records 
generated in every facet of American life. Materials of 
concern in the public sector have included historical 
records of state, county, municipal, and other 
governmental units. In the private sector, projects have 
dealt with manuscripts, personal papers, and family or 
corporate archives, as well as special collections related 
to particular fields of study, including the arts, business, 
education, ethnic and minority groups, immigration, labor, 
politics, the professions, religion, science, urban affairs, 
and women. Projects not related directly to a body of 
records, but intended to promote cooperative efforts 
among organizations or to advance professional skills of 
practitioners, have also been supported. 

Example: The Records Program was allocated $1.3 
million in 1978. Of approximately 250 applications 
considered, 83 were funded: the average award was 
$23,000. In 1978, the Immigrant City Archives in 
Lawrence, Mass., received a $6,000 matching grant for a 
survey and processing of records of local ethnic 
communities. The New York Public Library's Performing 
Arts Center was awarded $18,000 for the arrangement 
and description of six manuscript collections in the field of 
American dance. A $56,300 grant went to the City of 
Portland, Ore., for the preservation and processing of city 
archival records and for the establishment of an 
automated archival information retrieval system. The San 
Francisco Maritime Museum in California was awarded 
$19,500 for selective preparation of safety film negatives 
from nitrate-based negatives in the museum's major 
collection documenting West Coast maritime history. 
Western Carolina University's Mountain Heritage Center in 



Culowhee, N.C., was granted $25,500 for the survey and 
processing of collections relating to southwestern North 
Carolina. 



Contact for Information 

National Historical Publications and Records Commission, 
National Archives Building, Washington, DC 20408 



1 67 Of f ice off the Federal Register 

National Archives and Records Service 



What/For Whom 



Publications for sale to the general public. 



Description 



The Office of the Federal Register issues publications to 
help the general public find out about the programs of 
federal agencies Especially helpful publications include 
the Federal Register (available on a subscription basis), 
published five days a week, which contains federal 
regulations as well as Presidential Proclamations and 
Executive Orders: and the United States Government 
Organization Manual, the official handbook of the federal 
government which describes the purposes and programs 
of most government agencies and lists their 
administrators, as well as selected boards, commissions, 
committees, quasi-official agencies, and certain 
international organizations. Many government publications, 
including the Federal Register, are available to the public 
in Federal Depository Libraries (see no. 172), and can be 
ordered by subscription from Superintendent of 
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402. 



Contact for Information 



Office of the Federal Register, National Archives of the 
United States, Washington, DC 20408 



168 Regional Facilities 

National Archives and Records Service 

What/For Whom 

Collections open to scholars, students, and the general 
public at regional facilities around the country, with 
reference services provided by research consultants. 



General Services Administration 



168/169/170 



Description 



Federal Records Centers 

Fifteen regional centers store U.S. government records 
that are primarily of local or regional interest. Eleven of the 
records centers are designated regional branches of the 
National Archives and are open to scholars, students, and 
the general public. Research rooms, a basic reference 
library, microfilm reading equipment, and document 
reproduction facilities are available at the archives 
branches. Copies of microfilm publications are deposited 
in the regional branches where they are available for 
study in the research rooms or may be borrowed on 
interinstitutional loan. A listing of the regional branches is 
available from the office listed below. 

Presidential Libraries 

Six libraries preserve the papers and related historical 
materials of former Presidents Hoover, Franklin D. 
Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. A 
seventh library is under construction in Ann Arbor, Mich., 
to house the presidential papers of Gerald R. Ford. The 
libraries are open to qualified researchers; exhibit areas 
are open to the public. Brochures on the libraries are 
available. 

Contact for Information 

National Archives of the United States, Washington, 
DC 20408 



1 69 Art-ln- Architecture Program 

Public Buildings Service 



What/For Whom 



Commissions, ranging rom $200 to $250,000, to American 
artists and craftspersons. 



Description 



The Art-in-Architecture Program commissions artists to 
produce works of art to be incorporated into the 
architectural design of new federal buildings. Artworks 
include, but are not limited to, sculpture, tapestries, 
earthworks, architecturally scaled crafts, photographs, and 
murals in a variety of media. One-half of 1 percent of a 
building's estimated construction cost is reserved for the 
design, fabrication, and installation of the artwork as 
proposed by the project architect. Artworks are also 
commissioned for buildings undergoing repair and 
architectural alterations as well as for federal buildings for 
which artworks were originally planned but never 
acquired. 



Artists are nominated through a cooperative procedure 
between the General Services Administration (GSA), 
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), and the project 
architect. The architect is encouraged to submit an 
art-in-architecture proposal specifying the nature and 
location of the artwork in view of the overall design 
concept. Once the construction contract is awarded, NEA, 
upon GSA's request, appoints a panel of art professionals 
who meet at the project site with the architect and 
representatives of GSA and NEA (see no. 212). Together 
they review visual materials submitted and nominate three 
to five artists for each proposed artwork. NEA forwards the 
nominations to the Administrator of GSA, who makes the 
final selection. A fixed-price contract is then negotiated 
between GSA and the artist. 

Interested artists should send resumes and 35-mm slides 
of their work to the contact given below. 

Example 

Recently supported projects have included a 68-foot-long 
exterior neon wall work by Stephen Antonakos in Dayton, 
Ohio; four 1 2-foot-square figurative murals by Jack Beal in 
Washington, D.C.; a 90-foot-long interior sculpture in wood 
by Louise Nevelson in Philadelphia, Pa.; a 16-foot-long 
exterior tableau in bronze by George Segal in Buffalo, 
N.Y.; a water scupture in mosaic by Ned Smyth in the U.S. 
Virgin Islands; and a 30-foot-long fiber sculpture by 
Lenore Tawney in Santa Rosa, Calif. 

Comment 

The Art-in-Architecture Program was created in the 1960s 
to carry out a new policy of reserving a small percentage 
of the construction cost of each new federal building for 
artworks. Because the program has never had legislative 
authorization, its policies, funding level, and very 
existence have depended upon the interest of the 
incumbent President and GSA Administrator. Legislation 
was introduced into the 96th Congress to authorize the 
Program and establish basic procedures for its operation. 

Contact for Information 

Director, Art-in-Architecture Program, Public Buildings 
Service, General Services Administration, Washington, 
DC 20405 



1 70 Living Buildings Program 

Public Buildings Service 



What/For Whom 



Federal government buildings and grounds available 
outside normal working hours for cultural, educational, or 
recreational uses by any individual or organization. 



General Services Administration 



170/171 



Sponsor is charged only for costs beyond regular 
maintenance and services. Events must be nonpartisan 
and nonsectanan. 



Description 

The Living Buildings Program provides space to the 
public in federal government buildings located throughout 
the United States for a wide range of cultural, educational, 
and recreational activities. Auditoriums, lobbies, 
cafeterias, courtyards, and plazas are made available at 
no charge for lunchtime or afterhours use. If additional 
heat, air conditioning, maintenance, or guard service is 
needed, a fee to cover these costs is charged to the 
sponsoring group. Activities could include dance, musical, 
and theatrical performances; community meetings and 
forums; art, photography, and folklore exhibits; crafts 
demonstrations; films; ethnic festivals; and classes. 



Example 



The following programs were held during 1978: arts and 
crafts exhibits and demonstrations in the Mobile, Ala., 
Federal Building; Hawaii Arts Council exhibits and senior 
citizens meetings in the Honolulu Federal Building- 
Courthouse; "Festival 78," a five-day visual and 
performing arts festival in the Gerald R. Ford Building in 
Grand Rapids, Mich.; the Kansas City Ballet Company's 
performances on the stage of the Kansas City, Missouri, 
Federal Building; community activities and frequent tours 
to see the 32 small art objects commissioned by the 
Art-in-Architecture Program (see no. 169) in the Alfred P. 
Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Contact for Information 



Local federal buildings manager or Building 
Management, GSA regional offices (see Appendix 
F) or Living Buildings Program, Public Buildings 
Service, General Services Administration, Washington, 
DC 20405 



1 71 /Professional Services 

Public Buildings Service 

What/For Whom 

Contracts awarded to qualified design professionals, 
including architects, engineers, landscape architects, 
interior planning and design consultants, and 
conservators Usually an architectural or engineering firm, 
not the individual professional, is the prime contractor. 

Description 



The Public Buildings Service of the General Services 
Administration (GSA) is responsible for supervising the 
design, restoration, and construction of federally owned 
and leased buildings throughout the country. New building 
projects valued at $1 billion and renovations of $80 million 
were under construction in 1978. Design professionals 
interested in GSA contracting should file a Standard Form 
254, "Architect-Engineer and Related Services 
Questionnaire," with the GSA regional office and update 
it every year. The usual procedure is for the professional 
to associate with the architectural or engineering firm that 
is negotiating for employment as the prime contractor. 
(Only a few projects would be of such a specialized 
nature as not to require an architect-engineer.) For work 
providing professional fees in excess of $10,000, projects 
are announced in the Commerce Business Daily (see no. 
25). Smaller projects are announced through local 
newspapers, notices are sent to local professional 
societies, and announcements are posted at the 
appropriate GSA regional office. To respond to a 
particular project announcement, submission of a 
"Standard Form 255" to the regional office usually is 
required. This form supplements Form 254 by detailing the 
qualifications of the prime contractor and subcontractors 
to perform the specific project. (Artists and craftspersons 
should refer to the Art-in-Architecture program, no. 169.) 

Contact for Information 

Director, Construction Management Division, GSA regional 
offices (see Appendix F) or Assistant Commissioner for 
Construction Management, Public Buildings Service, 
General Services Administration, Washington, DC 20405. 



172 



Government 
Printing Office 



1 72 Government Publications 



What/For Whom 

Government publications for reference use in depository 
libraries or for purchase by the general public 



Description 

Thousands of government publications on many topics are 
prepared and released annually. To make these materials 
widely accessible within the United States and abroad, the 
government distributes publications through a system of 
about 1 ,300 depository libraries which are open to the 
public. Publications are also sold through the Government 
Printing Office (GPO) Sales Program. 

Depository Libraries 

Selected government publications, including many that 
are out of print, are provided without charge to eligible 
depository libraries. These libraries may choose to receive 
all available publications or may designate particular 
areas of interest. Many state, college, university, law 
school, and large city libraries are part of the Federal 
Depository Library System. Government Depository 
Libraries, a descriptive pamphlet that lists currently 
designated libraries, is available without charge. 
Information can be obtained from the nearest depository 
library, or by contacting the Chief, Library Division, Library 
and Statutory Distribution Service, Stop SLL, at the 
address given below. 

Sales Program 

Publications issued by federal departments and agencies 
are distributed either free of charge by the issuing agency 



or for purchase through the Sales Program of the 
Government Printing Office. Any of the GPO's nearly 
25,000 titles may be purchased at nominal cost at 26 
GPO bookstores located in major cities; mail orders 
through the Washington office require several weeks to 
process. Besides individual titles, more than 400 
periodicals and basic manuals with regular supplements 
are for sale on a subscription basis. Among these 
subscription items are Commerce Business Daily, a daily 
synopsis of proposed federal contract awards, 
procurements, and surplus property for sale; and the 
Federal Register, also issued daily, which announces 
Executive Orders and important federal rules and 
regulations affecting, among other things, grant eligibility 
and other aspects of federal assistance programs. 

Information about government publications and 
subscriptions is offered in a free brochure, Consumers 
Guide to Federal Publications The Monthly Catalog of 
U.S Government Publications lists all publications printed 
in a given month and is available by subscription. All of 
the following items are free: "Subject Bibliographies," 
which index each publication under appropriate subject 
headings such as anthropology, archeology, literature, 
music, and poetry; Selected U.S. Government 
Publications, issued 1 1 times per year, which describes 
titles of popular interest; and Government Periodicals and 
Subscription Services, which is revised quarterly. A 
microform catalogue of all titles for sale may be 
purchased from the Superintendent of Documents at the 
address given below. 

Government publications are in the public domain and 
may usually be reprinted or quoted without restriction. 
Authorized consent must be obtained for the use of 
copyrighted material, however. Any questions regarding 
reproduction in whole or in part should be directed to the 
originating federal department or agency Publications 
information should be obtained from the Superintendent of 
Documents at the address below 



Contact for Information 

Government Printing Office regional bookstores (see 
Appendix G) or (Appropriate Office), Government 
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402 



173/174/175 



International 

Communication 

Agency 



1 73/ Advisor on the Arts 



What/For Whom 



Advice and assistance on international arts affairs and art 
exchanges primarily for federal agencies and international 
institutions. 



Description 



The Advisor on the Arts is the principal liaison between 
the International Communication Agency (ICA) and other 
governmental and private organizations interested in 
international arts affairs and exchanges. The Advisor's 
office functions as a resource center and clearinghouse 
for information on international arts guestions, assists 
American institutions conducting international arts 
projects; and advises the ICA on such international 
exchange programs as international arts festivals and 
exhibitions. The office administers no funded programs. 



Contact for Information 



Advisor on the Arts, International Communication Agency, 
ECA, 1717 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20547 



Exchange Agreement Partial funding is available for 
extending private tours to other areas rarely visited by 
American performers. At least one such extension will be 
funded annually to each of these areas: East Asia, Near 
East, Eastern Europe, South America, and Africa. 
Technical assistance from U.S. embassies in obtaining 
bookings is available to other groups not funded by this 
program 

Performers interested in extending planned tours should 
send tentative itineraries, indicating open dates, to the 
office listed below. They will be sent a fact sheet to be 
completed and returned along with a tape or record (if a 
music group) or a schedule of public performances in 
the United States (if a dance or drama company). 
Performances are evaluated by artistic panels from the 
National Endowment for the Arts. 



Example 

The 1978 appropriation was $1,099,655. Approximately 30 
groups or individuals (about 10 percent of those who 
applied) received funds for extended tours. Groups 
funded to tour the Soviet Union included the New England 
Conservatory Ragtime Jazz Ensemble, the New York Pro 
Arte Chamber Orchestra, and the Paul Taylor Dance 
Company. In other areas of the world, assistance included 
an extension of an Eastman Wind Ensemble private tour of 
Japan to Hong Kong, Indonesia, the Philippines, 
Singapore, Malaysia, and Korea; an extended European 
tour of the Pilobolus Dance Theatre to Turkey, 
Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, and Sri Lanka; and an 
extended European tour of Clark Terry and the Jolly 
Giants to Egypt, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India. 



Contact for Information 

Cultural Presentations Division, International 
Communication Agency, 1776 Pennsylvania Avenue. 
Washington, DC 20547 



1 74 Cultural Presentations Program 



What/For Whom 



Funds for American performing artists to tour the Soviet 
Union or to extend privately financed tours to other areas 
rarely visited by American artists. 



Description 



The Cultural Presentations Program, formerly part of the 
Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural 
Affairs, assists qualified American performing arts groups 
and individuals on tour abroad At least three tours of 
major American performing arts groups to the Soviet 
Union are fully funded annually under the U.S. -USSR. 



1 75 East- West Center 



What/For Whom 



Scholarships, fellowships, doctoral internships, and other 
awards to scholars, professionals, and graduate students 
from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, 
economics, history, philosophy, and literature. 



Description 



The East-West Center, officially known as the Center for 
Cultural and Technical Interchange between East and 
West, is a national educational institution established in 
Hawaii by the US. Congress in 1960 Its purpose is to 



International Communication Agency 



1 75/1 76 



promote better relations and understanding between the 
United States and the nations of Asia and the Pacific 
through cooperative study, training, and research. The 
Center is administered by a public, nonprofit corporation 
with an international board of governors consisting of 
distinguished scholars, business leaders, and public 
officials. The Center's staff is multidisciplinary and 
multinational. 

Each year more than 1,500 persons from many nations 
and cultures participate in Center programs. Participants 
include visiting scholars and researchers; leaders and 
professionals from the academic, governmental, and 
business communities; and graduate degree students, 
most of whom are enrolled at the University of Hawaii. For 
each participant from the United States, two participants 
are sought from Asian and Pacific areas. 

Center programs are conducted through five institutes. 
The programs deal with problems of communication, 
culture and learning, environment and policy, population, 
and resource systems. A limited number of "open" grants 
are available to degree scholars and research fellows 
whose academic interests are not encompassed by 
programs at the institutes. The U.S. Congress provides 
basic funding for Center programs. Because of the 
cooperative nature of Center programs, Asian and Pacific 
governments, regional agencies, private enterprises, and 
foundations also provide financial support and 
cost-sharing grants. 

Example 

In 1979 the appropriation to the Center was $13.5 million. 
The Center's East-West Culture Learning Institute began a 
five-year study of "methods for analyzing cultural 
misunderstanding," which deals with problems in 
conducting cross-cultural and cross-national research and 
with how people can be prepared for cross-cultural 
experiences. 

Contact for Information 

East-West Center, 1777 East-West Road, Honolulu, 
HI 96848 



1 76/Fulbright-Hays Exchanges 



What/For Whom 



Full grants or travel grants for students, faculty, and 
research scholars. 



Description 



The Fulbright-Hays Program, formerly administered by the 
Department of State, is intended "to increase mutual 
understanding between the people of the United States 



and the people of other countries." The International 
Communication Agency (ICA) administers the program 
with the help of binational educational commissions and 
foundations in participating countries, U.S. embassies and 
consulates in other countries, and three major cooperating 
agencies in the United States — the Office of Education, 
the Council for International Exchange of Scholars, and 
the Institute of International Education. Grants (popularly 
known as Fulbright grants) are made to U.S. citizens and 
foreign nationals for educational exchange activities in all 
academic fields, including anthropology, fine arts, studies 
of geographic areas, history, linguistics, philosophy, and 
sociology. The Agency awards Fulbright grants in three 
categories, outlined below. (For other categories, see no. 
83 under the Office of Education.) 

Graduate Study Abroad 

Full grants or travel grants are awarded for one academic 
year to students and young professionals engaged in 
graduate study or predoctoral research while living in a 
foreign country. Applicants must be U.S. citizens in good 
health and must have held a bachelor's degree or its 
equivalent before the beginning date of the grant. A 
working knowledge of the language of the host country is 
required. Similar assistance is available for foreign 
nationals to study in the United States. In 1977, there 
were 489 Graduate Study grant awards. For further 
information contact: Fulbright Program Advisor on campus 
or Institute of International Education, 809 United Nations 
Plaza, New York, NY 10017. 

Teaching Abroad/Seminars for Teachers Abroad 

Project grants are made to cover travel and living 
expenses of elementary and secondary school teachers, 
college instructors, and assistant professors, for teaching 
in foreign schools for one academic year. Similar 
assistance is available for foreign teachers to teach in the 
United States. Travel grants are also awarded to teachers 
to attend summer seminars abroad. An applicant must be 
a U.S. citizen with a bachelor's degree and two to five 
years of teaching experience, depending on the exchange 
or seminar applied for. For the U.S. -U.K. exchange 
program, ICA assists only with travel and housing 
arrangements. Teachers' salaries are continued by their 
schools. In 1977, there were 352 teaching exchange grant 
awards. For further information contact: International 
Studies Branch, Division of International Education, Office 
of Education, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, Washington, DC 20202. 

University Lecturing/ Advanced Research 

Grants are awarded to university professors to serve as 
visiting professors or lecturers in institutions of higher 
education in foreign countries. Grants are also awarded to 
research scholars to undertake postdoctoral research at 
overseas universities, colleges, and certain centers and 
institutions. The length of the grant period varies from 2 to 



International Communication Agency 



176/177/178 



12 months. Grantees must be U.S. citizens at the time of 
application. For lecturing positions, college or university 
teaching experience is required at the level for which 
application is made. For research grants, a doctoral 
degree or, in some fields, recognition of professional 
standing as demonstrated by faculty rank, publications, 
compositions, exhibition record, concerts, or other 
achievements is required. In 1977, there were 544 grant 
awards to university lecturers, and 190 to research 
scholars. For further information contact: Council for 
International Exchange of Scholars, Suite 300, 1 1 Dupont 
Circle, Washington, DC 20036. 

Contact for Information 

See individual entries above. 



1 78 Speaking Tours Abroad 



1 77 Publication Services 



What/For Whom 

Translation, copyright, and marketing assistance for 
American publishers. 



Description 

The Office of Cultural Centers and Resources, formerly 
part of the U.S. Information Agency, performs several 
book promotion services. Lists of available books in a 
variety of languages are circulated to appropriate libraries. 
Through the book donations program, American 
publishers donate books for distribution abroad. The 
Office also assists American publishers in setting up book 
exhibits and in distributing books, particularly in 
developing countries. Such exposure often results in 
foreign publishers purchasing publication rights to 
American works. The Office assists foreign publishers in 
developing overseas translated editions of selected 
American books, in establishing American publishing 
contacts, and in negotiating copyright clearances. 



What/For Whom 



Grants to extend tours of speakers traveling abroad. 



Description 



The Arts and Humanities staff of the International 
Communication Agency awards grants to qualified 
speakers on private tour abroad. Preference is given to 
speakers touring in Africa and Latin America. The Division 
maintains a list of traveling speakers and their itineraries. 
This list is matched with annual program objectives of 
embassies or other local organizations. In most cases, at 
the request of an embassy, grants are made to speakers 
already on tour, to cover the cost of additional travel. Per 
diem costs and modest honoraria will also be provided. In 
rare cases, all travel costs will be covered. Speakers 
should send appropriate personal information, a synopsis 
of the talk, and an itinerary indicating open dates to the 
office listed below. 



Example 



In the first half of fiscal year 1979, more than 50 speakers 
received partial or full funding: a college president was 
fully funded to participate in educational conferences in 
Pretoria, South Africa, and Lusaka, Zambia; a college 
professor was sent to Bogota, Buenos Aires, and Santiago 
to lecture on contemporary American literature; a 
well-known novelist traveled to Japan, and another 
novelist went to Tel Aviv, Athens, and Belgrade, to lecture 
on American literature. 



Contact for Information 



Arts and Humanities Staff PGM/DA, International 
Communication Agency, 1750 Pennsylvania Avenue, 
Washington, DC 20547 



Contact for Information 



Office of Cultural Centers and Resources, International 
Communication Agency, 1717 H Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20547 



179/180 



Library of 
Congress 



Description 



1 79 Introduction 



The Library of Congress is the national library of the 
United States, serving Congress and all branches of the 
federal government as well as the general public. The 
Library's extensive collection of more than 74 million items 
includes books, periodicals, and pamphlets on every 
subject in many different languages; manuscripts; 
historical personal papers; rare books; prints and 
photographs; motion pictures and recordings; and maps 
The Information Office offers information about the 
Library's collections, services, and history to the public. 
Free guided tours and a slide show presentation on 
"America's Library" are given hourly on weekdays. Special 
tours for school and other groups may be arranged by 
contacting the Tour Coordinator of the Information Office. 

Admission to the research facilities of the Library is free. 
No introduction or credentials are required for persons 
over high school age who wish to read in the general 
reading rooms. Limited reference service is offered to 
correspondents who have exhausted local, state, and 
regional resources. 

Publications include the Library of Congress Publications 
in Print, issued annually, the monthly Calendar of Events, 
and pamphlets describing the services and collections of 
the Library. These are available free of charge from the 
Library's Central Services Division. Literary and folksong 
recordings, facsimiles of items in the collections, 
bibliographies, and other items are for sale by the Library 
or the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government 
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. 

Contact for Information 

Information Office, Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



1 80 American Folk life Center 



The American Folklife Center was created by Congress in 
1976 with the passage of the American Folklife 
Preservation Act (Public Law 94-201). Housed in the 
Library of Congress, the Center is directed to "preserve 
and present American folklife" through programs of 
research documentation, archival preservation, live 
presentations, exhibitions, publications, training, and other 
activities involving the many folk cultural traditions of the 
United States. "American folklife" is defined to mean the 
traditional expressive culture shared by the various 
familial, ethnic, occupational, religious, and regional 
groups in the United States. Expressive culture includes a 
wide range of creative and symbolic forms such as 
architecture, art, belief, custom, dance, drama, 
handicrafts, language, literature, music, pageantry, play, 
ritual, and technical skills. "Folk" expressions are those 
that are learned orally, by imitation, or in performance 
rather than by formal educational methods or institutional 
direction. 



The Center's board of trustees is composed of individuals 
from federal agencies and the private sector who are 
widely recognized for their interest and involvement in 
American folk traditions. The Center does not have 
grant-making authority and therefore cannot give direct 
financial aid to folklife projects (see no. 199). The Center's 
legislative mandate falls into three broad areas: 
(1) leadership for the field — that is, the identification, 
stimulation, and coordination of folk cultural activities for 
the nation in general, for the federal government, and for 
the Library of Congress; (2) assistance to the field in the 
form of research and reference expertise, help in locating 
and presenting local folk cultural resources, and other 
technical assistance; and (3) model projects in the field, 
ranging from research and publications to live 
presentations and exhibits. A brochure and a quarterly 
newsletter, Folklife Center News, describes the Folklife 
Center's mission and current endeavors. 



In 1977 the Center sponsored the research and 
publication of Folklife and the Federal Government: 
Activities, Resources, Funds and Services, a guide to 
federal sources of assistance for persons interested in 
folklife Copies are available from the Superintendent of 
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402, for $2.75. 



What/For Whom 



Technical assistance to the public in the form of 
consultant, research, and reference help on specific 
problems and projects; loans of professional documentary 
equipment; field documentation of selected folk cultural 
traditions; production of publications; and contracts with 
individuals and organizations. 



Example 



During 1978 and 1979, the Folklife Center, in cooperation 
with the Smithsonian Institution, conducted a study of 
Basque and rural ranch life in northern Nevada, as well as 
a survey of ethnic radio programs, the results of which are 
expected to be published in late 1979. A project 
documenting folklife along a section of the Blue Ridge 



Library of Congress 



180/181/182 



Parkway in Virginia and North Carolina was undertaken in 
cooperation with the National Park Service. 

Contact for Information 

American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, 
Washington, DC 20540 



181 /Archive off Folk Song 



What/For Whom 



Reading and listening room open to researchers, 
students, and the general public; appointments usually 
necessary for listening. Staff answers requests for 
materials unavailable to researchers locally. Specialized 
bibliographies and directories, duplicate tapes of archive 
holdings, photocopies of manuscripts, and referrals to 
specialists in various fields are available. 



the Collections of Recorded Folk Music and Folklore in the 
Library of Congress; and Folk Recordings, a list of the 80 
long-playing recordings of representative folk songs and 
tales issued by the Library. Photocopies of the out-of-print 
Checklist of Recorded Songs in the English Language in 
the Archive of American Folk Song to July, 1940 may be 
purchased from the Photoduplication Service (see no. 
190), and are also available in public and university 
libraries throughout the country. Commercial 78- and 
33-rpm recordings on subjects related to folklore are 
available through the Library's Motion Picture, 
Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Section (see no. 191). 

A limited number of intern/traineeships are available which 
provide opportunities for students of folk culture or library 
science to become familiar with the collection and to 
develop professional archival and bibliographic skills in 
folklore and ethnomusicology. 

Contact for Information 

Archive of Folk Song, American Folklife Center, Library of 
Congress, Washington, DC 20540 



Description 



Established within the Music Division of the Library of 
Congress in 1928, the Archive of Folk Song has been 
affiliated with the American Folklife Center since 1978 (see 
no. 180). The Archive maintains and administers an 
extensive collection of folk music and lore in published 
and unpublished forms. It is the national repository for 
folk-related manuscripts, recordings, and raw materials. 
The archive holdings include more than 30,000 field 
recordings — cylinders, discs, wires, and tapes — 
containing more than 200,000 items of folk music, folk 
songs, folk tales, oral history, and other types of folklore; 
and over 225,000 sheets of manuscript material, including 
180,000 pages amassed by the WPA Federal Writers' 
Project on folklore, ethnic studies, and ex-slave narratives. 
The collections emphasize the cultures of the United 
States and represent all states and regions of the country. 
Approximately 20 percent of the recorded collection, 
however, is from abroad, and an additional 20 percent 
from the United States is in languages other than English. 
The collections include recordings of the music and 
folklore of the early settlers and colonists, of Native 
American Indian tribes, of American black, Jewish, Polish, 
French, Mexican, and other ethnic groups. Listening 
rooms are open to the public but appointments are usually 
necessary. The reading room contains more than 3,500 
books and periodicals, and a sizable collection of 
magazines, newsletters, unpublished theses, dissertations, 
and field notes. 

Catalogues of major portions of the archive's holdings, 
both manuscripts and recordings, are available. 
Pamphlets distributed by the Archive include The Archive 
of Folk Song in the Library of Congress; An Inventory of 
the Bibliographies and Other Reference Aids Prepared by 
the Archive of Folk Song, Library of Congress: A Guide to 



182 Area Studies 



What/For Whom 



Library facilities and reading rooms for researchers of 
college age and above. As staff time permits, 
bibliographic and reference services are provided in 
person or by correspondence. 



Description 



African and Middle Eastern Division 

The Division maintains and develops collections relating to 
70 nations in Africa and the Middle East. It is organized 
into three sections, African, Hebraic, and Near East, each 
of which provides research assistance for specific files in 
its own section as well as for materials in the general 
collections of the Library of Congress. The African Section 
offers collections of pamphlets, current issues of major 
periodicals, and a wide range of bibliographic aids 
concerning sub-Saharan Africa. The Hebraic Section, with 
more than 115,000 volumes in Hebrew, Yiddish, and 
cognate languages, is a source of information on such 
subjects as the Bible, cultures and languages of the 
ancient Middle East, and of Jews and Judaism throughout 
the world. The Near East Section has 150,000 volumes in 
Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Armenian, and other languages 
covering, among other topics, languages and linguistics, 
history, and politics. 

Both the Hebraic and Near East Sections maintain union 
catalogues; the African Section has developed a card 



Library off Congress 



182/183/184 



index to African periodical literature. Supported by grants 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the 
Dir'iyyah Institute, the Near East Section is developing a 
Near East National Union List, a computerized catalogue 
in the Roman alphabet locating Arabic-, Persian-, and 
Turkish-language monographs and serials found in 
American libraries. 

Asian Division 

The Asian Division, previously the Orientalia Division, has 
custody of a collection of books, periodicals, newspapers, 
and microforms in the languages of South, Southeast, and 
East Asia through three units: the Southern Asia Section, 
the Japanese Section, and the Chinese and Korean 
Section. The Asian Reading Room's staff are area 
specialists and reference librarians. Tney provide 
assistance in the languages, literature, and culture of the 
Division's holdings as well as in the Western-language 
literature on Asia that is housed in the general collections 
of the Library, and they will respond to individual queries. 
Published bibliographies and reports also assist readers. 
Recent bibliographies include Chinese-English and 
English-Chinese Dictionaries in the Library of Congress, 
and Chinese Periodicals in the Library of Congress. The 
Asian Division also maintains union catalogues of 
Chinese-, Japanese-, and Korean-language books and 
serials held by American libraries. 

European Division 

The European Division, originally established as the Slavic 
and Central European Division, provides reference 
assistance on European cultural, political, social, and 
economic life. The European Reading Room, staffed by 
reference librarians, has materials pertaining to 18 
European countries and regions. The collection contains 
approximately 10,000 volumes, about 8,000 unbound 
Slavic- and Baltic-language serials, 125 newspapers, and 
35,000 East European publications, dating from about 
1880 to 1940, that are chiefly in Russian. These are 
accessible to the public in the European Reading Room. 
The Division's area specialists provide in-depth reference 
assistance, engage in bibliographic research, and 
maintain professional contact with the governmental and 
academic communities. The Division cooperates with the 
American Association for the Advancement of Slavic 
Studies in the compilation of its annual American 
Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies. 



humanities and social sciences, the Handbook of Latin 
American Studies, which includes sections on folklore, 
ethnohistory, music, anthropology, and sociology. It also 
maintains the Archives of Hispanic Literature on Tape, a 
collection of recordings of Hispanic poets and writers 
reading their own materials. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Division), Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



1 83 The Center for the Book 



What/For Whom 

Cosponsorship of seminars, exhibits, research, and 
publications with organizations and individuals. 

Description 

The Center for the Book was envisioned to be a catalyst in 
the book world, working with other organizations to 
stimulate interest in books, encourage reading, explore 
the role of the printed word, and encourage research 
about books and reading. Topics of interest to the Center 
include the history of books and printing; the publishing, 
design, and production of books; the distribution, access, 
and use of books and printed materials; the international 
distribution of books; authorship and writing; reading; 
literacy; the educational and cultural role of the book; the 
role and influence of the institutions of the book world; and 
the future of the book, particularly as it relates to new 
technologies and other media. Seminars and exhibits, 
research, publication, and audiovisual programs are 
planned; proposals for such efforts are welcomed. 

In 1978 the Center held a seminar on 'Television, the 
Book, and the Classroom" (cosponsored with the Office of 
Education), a program on "The Book in Mexico" 
(cosponsored with the Library of Congress Hispanic 
Division), and a conference on American reading habits 
(cosponsored with the Book Industry Study Group, Inc.). 

Contact for Information 

The Center for the Book, Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



Hispanic Division 

The Hispanic Division is a center for the study of the 
cultures of Latin America, Portugal, Spain, and other 
countries, including those areas of the United States 
influenced by Hispanic culture. Reference assistance in 
the Hispanic Society Room is available to scholars, and 
the Division produces guides, bibliographies, and other 
reference materials. Annually the Division prepares an 
annotated bibliography of Latin American materials in the 



1 84 Children's Literature Center 



What/For Whom 

Reference services, with inquiries handled in person, by 
telephone, or through written correspondence, for 
researchers and the general public. 



Library off Congress 



184 185 186 



Description 



The primary purpose of the Children's Literature Center 
(formerly the Children's Book Section) is to provide 
reference and bibliographic services to children's 
librarians, teachers, scholars, writers, illustrators, 
publishers, and others interested in children's literature. 
Children's literature is understood to be that published for 
those up to 14 years of age: picture books, fiction, 
nonfiction, folklore, and poetry. The Library holds 200,000 
children's books in its collections (including works in more 
than 60 foreign languages) and 18,000 in the Rare Book 
and Special Collections Division. 

The Center publishes bibliographies and plans symposia 
and lectures. An annotated list of outstanding books from 
the prior year for preschool to high-school-age children is 
issued annually. Working with The Center for the Book in 
the Library of Congress, the Children's Literature Center 
invites authors of children's books to lecture. It 
collaborated in the planning of a two-day symposium in 
1979 on "The Audience for Children's Books: A 
Transatlantic Perspective," in recognition of the 
International Year of the Child. 



Contact for Information 



Children's Literature Center, Library of Congress, 
Washington, DC 20540 



1 85 La w Library 



What/For Whom 



Reference and research services for the United States 
Congress, judicial and executive branches of federal 
government, law libraries, legal scholars and practitioners, 
and the general public. As staff time permits, 
bibliographic and reference services are provided in 
person, by correspondence, and by telephone. Service to 
the general public is limited by the Law Library's primary 
responsibility to serve Congress. 



Description 



More than 1,600,000 volumes, including the world's 
largest and most comprehensive collection of 
comparative, foreign, and international law, are contained 
in the Law Library. The collections are organized 
jurisdictionally by country and language and cover all 
legal systems, both ancient and contemporary. The five 
divisions of the Law Library are American-British Law, 
European Law, Hispanic Law, Far Eastern Law, and Near 
Eastern and African Law. Each division is responsible for 
the development, maintenance, and circulation of its 
collection, including foreign and rare law books, as well as 
for reference and research services involving its use. 



Many reports, translations, and bibliographies prepared 
by the legal specialists in response to congressional 
requests are of broad interest. A major research project 
carried out under interagency agreement between the 
Library of Congress and the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health resulted in a report 
comparing the laws and regulations related to coal mining 
in 22 nations. 

The Law Library maintains two major reference facilities 
and three foreign law/rare book reading areas for general 
use. Patrons of these facilities benefit from the assistance 
of legal specialists and support staff and have access to 
all materials in the law collection. The Law Library 
catalogue lists all legal material, whether maintained in the 
Law Library or in the general collections of the Library of 
Congress. The microtext room maintains 12,000 reels of 
microfilm; 210,000 microfiche; and reading, copying, and 
printing equipment. The Anglo-American Law Reading 
Room references U.S. Supreme Court and Courts of 
Appeal records and briefs, sets of federal and state 
statutory and administrative materials, court reports, 
digests, law reviews, treatises, and other secondary 
sources and finding aids. 

The Law Library prepares and publishes bibliographic 
aids to legal research. Important among these are ' 
annotated guides to the law and legal literature of foreign 
countries and subject indexes to 60 of the 270 official 
gazettes received in the Law Library. 

Limited reference and research services are available to 
those who are unable to corrie in person to the Law 
Library. Inquiries handled by the Law Library have 
concerned such varied topics as East European 
emigration; immigration and travel regulations; probation 
of a will in Jamaica; diplomatic protection of citizens 
residing abroad; and work permit issuance to persons 
with criminal records. Materials in the law collections that 
are not available locally or regionally may be obtained by 
interlibrary loan through a municipal, county, state, 
college, university, or bar association library. Many of the 
items that cannot be provided through interlibrary loan 
may be photocopied. 

Contact for Information 

Law Library, Library of Congress, Washington, DC 20540 



1 86/ National Library Service for 
the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped 



What/For Whom 



Free loans of braille and recorded reading materials to 
visually or physically impaired residents of the United 
States and citizens abroad 



Library of Congress 



186 187 188 



Description 



1 88 Processing Services 



The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped provides a free service of braille and 
recorded reading materials to persons who are unable to 
read standard print because of visual or physical 
impairment. Books and magazines in braille and on 
recorded disc and cassette (talking books), braille music 
scores and instructional materials, and playback 
equipment and accessories are available. Direct service is 
provided to readers through a national network of 160 
regional and subregional libraries. The National Library 
Service provides descriptive literature, application forms, 
and addresses of libraries participating in the program 
Nearly 600,000 readers are currently served from a 
collection of more than 21,000 book titles and 30,000 
music scores and texts. Approximately 1,600 new titles 
are produced annually for distribution through network 
libraries. 



Co ntact for Information 

National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped, Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



What/For Whom 



Cataloguing services and bibliographic information on 
new books, periodicals, and foreign publications for 
libraries, publishers, researchers, booksellers, and others. 
Exchanges and donations of surplus Library materials to 
libraries, institutions of higher education, schools, book 
dealers, and others 



Description 



Cataloging Distribution Service 

This office prints and distributes cataloguing and 
bibliographic data in the form of printed cards, book 
catalogues, machine-readable tapes, bibliographies, and 
other technical publications to libraries, learned societies, 
educational institutions, and other interested parties. Also 
offered is the MARC Search Service, a free search by 
subject heading, or other point of access, in the Library of 
Congress catalogue. The distribution service is the first 
source for most of the cataloguing information in the 
United States. Institutions can avoid cataloguing costs by 
using the established Library of Congress system. 



1 87 Performing Arts Library 



What/For Whom 



Reference collection open to artists, scholars, and the 
general public. 



Description 



A joint project of the Library of Congress and the John F. 
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (see no. 251), the 
Performing Arts Library houses collections on music, 
theater, dance, and film. It provides research and referral 
services for the collections at the Center and at the 
Library of Congress. Included in the permanent collection 
are 4,000 volumes, 300 periodical titles, and more than 
2,000 recordings of music, drama, prose, and poetry. 
Tapes of sound recordings and videotapes in the Library 
of Congress collections are available to the public, as are 
the bibliographic data bases of the Library of Congress, 
through a video display computer link-up. Specialized 
bibliographic and research assistance is provided for the 
Kennedy Center staff, artists, and scholars'. The Library 
offers exhibits of performing arts materials. 



Contact for Information 



Performing Arts Library, John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts, Washington, DC 20556 



Cataloging in Publication Division 

The Division arranges for the assignment of Library of 
Congress catalogue card numbers to new books free of 
charge prior to their publication. The system permits the 
printing of cataloguing data on the copyright page, 
reduces library processing costs, and affords earlier 
distribution of bibliographic data to libraries and other 
potential purchasers. Most United States publishers 
participate in the system (Serials, self-published works, 
and most government documents are currently excluded.) 
Preassignment of card numbers can also be arranged for 
individual publications not part of the system if the Library 
plans to catalogue them. 

Exchange and Gift Division 

This division is responsible for accepting gifts and 
distributing to other organizations items surplus to the 
Library's needs, including books, prints and photographs, 
sound recordings, and films. Donations of surplus Library 
materials are made to domestic tax-supported or nonprofit 
private or public organizations (libraries, museums, and 
schools). Federal agencies contribute about 75 percent of 
the material available for distribution Because of the 
volume of material received, the Division staff are unable 
to organize or maintain listings of items on hand. 
Designated representatives of organizations eligible for 
donations are welcome to select from the holdings in the 
Washington office. Some congressional representatives 
will delegate a staff member to search for materials 
requested by constituents. In addition, a formal exchange 



Library of Congress 



188/189 



program exists based on reciprocal arrangements 
between the Library and government organizations and 
selected scholarly institutions able to contribute unique 
items for the Library's collection. 

National Serials Data Program 

This program is the United States component of the 
International Serials Data System (ISDS), which assigns 
and registers an International Standard Serial Number 
(ISSN) and key title for serials (periodicals, annual reports, 
and numbered series) published in the United States. The 
ISSN, an eight-digit number, identifies a serial. Publishers 
and libraries may contact the Division to request an 
ISSN/key title assignment. 

Overseas Operations Division 

This division maintains a network of field offices in Asia, 
Africa, and South America whose purpose is to acquire 
current material for the Library and a number of academic 
research libraries. The network also produces accessions 
lists for seven countries and three regions in Third World 
areas. Each list serves as a bibliography for its 
geographical area, making current foreign-language 
materials accessible to libraries and researchers. 



pertaining to a copyright, such as assignments of 
copyright ownership, wills, and security interests. Records 
of copyright claims registrations are filed in the Copyright 
Office. Anyone may search the Card Catalog in the Office 
once a bibliographer from the Reference Search Section 
has explained how to use the Catalog. A search of the 
files and a written report of findings may be obtained for a 
fee. A comprehensive collection of research material on 
copyright is available in the Copyright Office Library, 
where a reference librarian is available to provide 
assistance. Information circulars, application forms, and 
some catalogues and studies on specific copyright issues 
are available free of charge; priced publications also may 
be ordered Telephone and visitor inquiries are welcome. 
For further information, contact the Copyright Office, 
Library of Congress, Washington, DC 20559. 

Educational Liaison Office 

Programs within the Library of Congress are arranged by 
the Educational Liaison Office for professional and 
international visitors with specific interests. All tours and 
appointments are based on the visitors' particular needs 
and interests, and can range from an hour-long visit in a 
specialized division of the Library to several days of 
intensive orientation in a particular department. 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate Division), Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



189 Public Services 



What/For Whom 



Educational tours and programs designed to meet the 
special interests of professional, international, school, and 
other groups. Information about copyright law, regulations, 
registration procedures, and the status of particular works 
for researchers, performers, educators, owners of works, 
and the general public. Loans of exhibitions to museums, 
libraries, and other qualified institutions in the United 
States and Canada. Technical assistance and information 
concerning the preservation and conservation of library 
materials for public libraries and archives, institutions of 
higher education, and individuals. 



Description 



Copyright Office 

The Copyright Office examines copyright claims for 
literary, artistic, and musical works; registers those claims 
that meet the legal requirements; and catalogues all 
registrations. It also records and catalogues all documents 



Exhibits Office 

Through a traveling exhibition service, exhibits are lent to 
qualified institutions in the United States and Canada. A 
fee covering rental expenses and insurance is charged, 
and the borrower pays the charges for shipping to the 
next exhibitor. Adequate display space and security are 
required, and the exhibit must be used for educational 
purposes. The Library provides publicity materials, 
including press releases and photographs. Exhibitions 
usually are offered for four-week periods. Other materials 
from the Library's collections include books, pamphlets, 
newspapers, broadsides, prints, engravings, maps, music 
scores, and manuscripts These materials are available for 
loan to recognized institutions that have well-established 
exhibition programs and a full-time professional staff 
proficient in handling the requested materials. Loans are 
subject to certain restrictions, and each request is judged 
on its own merits. 

Example: The 1979-1980 traveling exhibitions on loan 
included "Women Look at Women," a collection of the 
works of some of the best-known photographers of this 
century; "Color and the Graphic Arts"; "Papermaking: Art 
and Craft"; and "To Build a Better Mouse: Fifty Years of 
Animation." 



Literary and Music Programs 

The Library of Congress coordinates an annual series of 
free literary and music programs presented to the public 
at the Library's Coolidge Auditorium in Washington, DC. 
Literary programs feature critics, novelists, poets, and 
professional actors in presentations of American and 



Library of Congress 



189/190 



foreign literature. Performances of contemporary and 
classical chamber music and lectures by distinguished 
musicologists are highlights of the music program series. 
Recordings of many literary presentations are available for 
research in the Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and 
Recorded Sound Division of the Library (see no. 191), or 
for distribution to noncommercial radio stations through 
the Scheduled Tape Division of National Public Radio (see 
no. 12). The 1977-1978 season featured performances by 
the Juilliard String Quartet, readings by Andrei 
Voznesensky and Ann Stanford; lectures by Eleanor 
Cameron and H. Wiley Hitchcock; four plays first 
performed as part of the WPA Theatre Project of the 
1930s; and a special program of Chinese poetry and 
music. For information concerning the Literary or Music 
Programs, inquiries should be addressed to the 
Manuscript or Music Divisions (see no. 191). 

Preservation Office 

The Preservation Office provides reference and 
consultation services concerning the preservation, 
restoration, and protection of library materials. Brief, 
technical inquiries are answered without charge. Printed 
materials dealing with preservation matters are available, 
such as Procedures for Salvage of Water-Damaged 
Library Materials and Selected References in the 
Literature of Conservation. When exceptional disasters 
involving important collections occur, the Preservation 
Office provides onsite assistance for emergency salvage 
efforts. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Division), Library of Congress. Washington. 
DC 20540 



1 90 Reference Services 



What/For Whom 



Library facilities and reading rooms for researchers of 
college age and above. As staff time permits, 
bibliographic and reference services are provided in 
person, by correspondence, and by telephone to 
researchers who have exhausted local resources. The 
Collections Management Division assigns a limited 
number of study desks and reserve shelves to full-time 
researchers working on long-term projects. 



Description 



specialized divisions described below. The staff serve the 
general public through the facilities of the Main Reading 
Room and the Thomas Jefferson Reading Room North and 
through correspondence. The Division also publishes 
bibliographies. The Computer Catalogue Center, located 
in the Main Reading Room, provides access to a number 
of library data bases. Specialized reference services are 
provided in the Local History and Genealogy Reading 
Room Services are free to researchers and students over 
high school age, although credentials are required for the 
use of certain materials. Priority is given to inquiries about 
the Library's special materials or unique resources. If 
unable to accommodate a request for information, the 
Library can supply the names of private researchers who 
work on a fee basis. 

Loan Division 

Under the system of interlibrary loan, the Library lends 
unusual materials not readily accessible elsewhere for 
serious research. (Local, state, and regional libraries are 
expected to be the primary source of research material.) 
Academic (including junior college and media centers) as 
well as public libraries and special libraries may use this 
service. Ordinarily, materials are not provided for 
undergraduate study. Libraries can obtain materials 
unavailable through interlibrary loan by ordering 
reproductions from the Photoduplication Service (see 
below). 

National Referral Center 

The Center assists those with questions in all fields of 
human knowledge — including anthropology, the arts, 
ethnology, folklore, linguistics, and sociology — by referring 
them to organizations or individuals who can answer their 
questions The Center provides data on information 
resources in government, industry, and in the academic 
and professional worlds, including federal and state 
agencies, professional societies, university research 
bureaus and institutes, museum specimen collections, 
individual experts, and technical libraries. More than 
13,000 entries are indexed in the Center's computerized 
files, which visitors to the Library may search in person by 
using public computer terminals. The entries summarize 
each organization's special interests and the types of 
information services it will provide. The Center itself is 
not equipped to answer specific questions or provide 
bibliographic assistance. The Directory of Information 
Resources in the Social Sciences and other resource lists 
are occasionally compiled for information on specific 
topics The service is free and available to anyone upon 
telephone or written request. Telephone inquiries are 
encouraged to permit discussion of complex questions. 
Organizations that have expertise in specialized fields are 
invited to register as information resources. 



General Reading Rooms Division 

The Division provides reference and bibliographic 
services on the book collections that are not part of the 



Photoduplication Service 

Photocopies of manuscripts, prints, photographs, maps, 
and book materials in the Library of Congress collections 



Library of Congress 



190/191 



not subject to copyright and other restrictions may be 
purchased from the Photoduplication Service at moderate 
cost. Self-service photocopying machines are located in 
most reading rooms. 

Science and Technology Division 

The Division has primary responsibility within the Library 
for recommending acquisitions and for providing 
reference and bibliographic services in the broad areas of 
science and technology. The Science Reading Room 
contains major abstracting and indexing journals in the 
biomedical, earth, engineering, and physical sciences 
along with a reference book collection, including 
encyclopedias and handbooks, in the basic sciences. In 
addition to the services of the National Referral Center 
described above, the Division publishes an informal series 
of reference guides under the title LC Science Tracer 
Bullet and has issued a number of bibliographies. 

Serial and Government Publications Division 

An extensive collection of newspapers, periodicals, and 
government documents is available in the Newspaper and 
Current Periodical Reading Room, where reference staff 
provide assistance in their use. Materials date back to the 
late-seventeenth century and include foreign and 
domestic holdings, as well as special collections such as 
comic books, current underground newspapers, and pulp 
fiction. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Division), Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



191 /Special Collections 



What/For Whom 



Library facilities and reading rooms for researchers of 
college age and above. As staff time permits, reference 
and bibliographic services are provided in person or by 
correspondence. 



Description 



Geography and Map Division 

The Library's collection of more than 3.5 million print and 
manuscript maps and 40,000 atlases may be consulted in 
the Geography and Map Division's reading room, where 
reference volumes and current editions of cartographic 
and geographic serials may also be used. A. staff of 
specialists is available to assist in the use of the 
collections, which emphasize the United States and other 



areas of the American continents. Historical holdings 
include atlases dating from the earliest printed editions of 
Ptolemy's Geography (1482) and some 700,000 fire 
insurance maps documenting American urban settlement 
and growth over the past century. The Division maintains 
the Bibliography of Cartography, card and book 
catalogues, and bibliographies and checklists that 
describe various cartographic groups. 

Manuscript Division 

The Manuscript Division houses more than 35 million 
manuscripts and personal papers, primarily concerning 
American civilization from colonial times to the present. 
Collections include material for research in military, 
diplomatic, political, literary, judicial, intellectual, and 
social history. Recent additions to holdings have been in 
Afro-American history; history of science and invention; 
and history of psychology. Personal papers of 23 
Presidents, government officials, notable American 
families, organizations, writers, scientists, journalists, 
artists, and architects are among those housed in the 
Division. Photoduplication services and interlibrary loans 
of microform are available (see no. 190). Reference 
services are provided in person by reference librarians in 
the Manuscript Reading Room or by correspondence. The 
Division also administers an annual series of literary 
programs and a consultantship in poetry, through which 
distinguished poets are invited to participate in the literary 
programs and oversee the Library's recording program 
with contemporary poets reading their own works. 

Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded 
Sound Division 

The Division maintains an international archival collection 
of more than 252,000 motion picture reels, including films 
made from early paper prints deposited for copyright; 
900,000 sound recordings on disc, tape, wire, and 
cylinder, including radio programs from 1924 to the 
present; and television programs on film and tape, dating 
from 1948. Holdings include films noted for their high 
artistic quality and of sociological and historical 
importance. Feature films for entertainment are included 
as well as television documentary and educational films. 
The Division also maintains historic collections of motion 
pictures from major studios and the American Film 
Institute Collection (see no. 251), emphasizing films 
produced between 1912 and 1942. Items are not available 
on interlibrary loan, but serious researchers may study 
holdings free of charge in the Motion Picture Viewing 
Room if reservations are scheduled in advance. Since the 
holdings are indexed by title, not by subject, researchers 
must know specifically what they are looking for. Copies of 
materials in the collections may be ordered subject to 
copyright and other restrictions. The new American 
Television and Radio Archives, created by the Copyright 
Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-553) to preserve recorded 
television and radio programs, will not be accessible to 
researchers before 1980. 



Library of Congress 



191 



The Music Division 

The Music Division has custody of the Library's music 
collection, which includes printed and manuscript music, 
books on music, periodicals, and other materials. Book 
holdings cover music history, biography, esthetics, 
philosophy, psychology, organology, and many other 
fields. Pedagogical literature on file includes methods and 
studies for all instruments and voice; music education 
manuals; and textbooks on harmony, counterpoint, form 
and analysis, orchestration, and conducting. Manuscript 
sources include letters and autograph scores by 
composers and musicians, beginning with the era of J S 
Bach. Strengths of the collections are in serious and 
popular American music; the flute; opera scores and 
libretti; Johannes Brahms; the second Vienna School; and 
early music printing. Researchers will find reference 
assistance in the Music Reading Room, or through 
correspondence with Division staff. Limited materials are 
available through interlibrary loan. Microfilm reproductions 
and facsimiles of rare resources are available. The Music 
Division also administers an annual series of music 
programs (see no. 189) and makes commissions to 
composers of established reputation for the creation of 
new works. 

Print and Photographs Division 

The Division has custody of approximately 10 million 
pictorial items, such as fine and historical prints, slides, 
photographs and negatives, drawings, posters, and 
pictorial documentation of American history and culture. 
The prints, drawings, and photographs are indexed by 
collection. A few collections are indexed by subject and 
include such entries as folk art, folklore, and Indians. The 
Prints and Photographs Reading Room houses reference 
books, card catalogues, and viewers. A list of free-lance 
picture researchers in the Washington, DC, area is 
available upon request. 

Among special holdings of the Division are Erwin E S. 
Smith's photos of cowboys and the Western range; the 



Fine Print Collection, including the Joseph and Elizabeth 
R. Pennell Collection of Whistleriana and nineteenth- and 
twentieth-century prints by artists from various countries; 
the Farm Security Administration collection documenting 
the social, cultural, and economic history of the United 
States during the 1930s and early 1940s; paper cuts by 
Chinese artists; and the Cabinet of American Illustration 
collection of preparatory drawings for illustrations in 
American books and magazines from the 1860s through 
the 1930s. 



Rare Book and Special Collections Division 

More than 500,000 items are contained in the Division, 
including books, pamphlets, periodicals, broadsides, title 
pages, and a select number of prints, photographs, sheet 
music, manuscripts, and memorabilia associated with 
certain special collections. Two major strengths are 
Americana and pre-1500 imprints. Among more than 50 
special collections are the personal libraries of Susan B. 
Anthony, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Harry Houdini, Thomas 
Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Woodrow Wilson; 
subject collections on children's books, Abraham Lincoln, 
magic, gastronomy, and women's suffrage; author 
collections of the works of Sigmund Freud, Henry James, 
Rudyard Kipling, and Walt Whitman; and generic 
collections of Bibles, theater playbills, and dime novels. 
Notable illustrated books and other rarities are 
represented, particularly in the Lessing J. Rosenwald 
Collection The Rare Book Reading Room houses the 
Division's central card catalogue and special files 
indexing the collections. The holdings are not available 
through interlibrary loan. 



Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Division), Library of Congress, Washington, 
DC 20540 



192 



National 

Aeronautics and 
Space 
Administration 



192 Technology Utilization 



What/For Whom 



Technical assistance, publications, technical information- 
retrieval services, and computer documentation available 
free or on a fee-paying basis to state and local 
governments, industry, professionals, and the general 
public. 



Description 



The National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA) is an independent agency for nondefense 
aeronautical and space activities in the United States. 
Although primary emphasis is on science and technology 
research and development, the agency also engages in 
programs to promote the general public's understanding 
of aerospace technology and its applications. 

Technology, innovations, and inventions derived from 
government-sponsored aerospace research may be 
applied to technical problems, product development, and 
cost-reduction needs in virtually all sectors of the 
economy, including the cultural sector. Identification of the 
potential application can come from NASA or from the 
field. Innovations and improvements in the space program 



are brought to the attention of the public through the 
quarterly journal NASA Tech Briefs, the semiannual NASA 
Patent Abstracts Bibliography, and other publications. 
Information-retrieval services and technical assistance are 
provided to industrial and civil users by a nationwide 
network of Industrial Applications Centers. In cases where 
a technology could have broad and significant 
nonaerospace applications, NASA may participate with 
other public agencies in financing its adaptation or 
development. 

Example 

In 1975, a technique that equalized cable tensions, 
developed for handling large space-launch vehicles, was 
used in the construction of a movable ceiling for a theater 
at the University of Akron in Ohio. An industrial firm in 
California bought from NASA a vibration analysis 
technology developed in helicopter rotor research, and 
applied it to the design of acoustical chambers for guitars. 
NASA has been experimenting for about six years with 
photographic-image-enhancement techniques for making 
illegible documents legible. Late in 1978, NASA and the 
American Philosophical Society agreed to cooperate in a 
year-long effort, with a consortia of libraries, to select 
foreign and domestic documents representing different 
legibility problems as subjects for further experimentation. 
In the late 1970s, NASA and the National Park Service 
coordinated pilot projects in Chaco Canyon, Ariz., and 
Bandelier, N. Mex., which used scanner-equipped 
airplanes and NASA computerized image-enhancement 
techniques to locate buried ruins of pre-Columbian Indian 
sites. (Similar surveys have been accomplished using 
satellite images of the earth's surface.) 

Contact for Information 

Technology Utilization Officer at the nearest NASA field 
center or Director, Technology Transfer, NASA 
Scientific and Technical Information Facility, P.O. Box 
8756, Baltimore-Washington International Airport, 
MD 21240 



V 



193 



National 
Endowment 
for the Arts 



1 93 Introduction 

The National Endowment for the Arts is an independent 
federal agency which supports the arts through grants 
and information and technical services for individuals, 
nonprofit tax-exempt organizations, and state and regional 
arts agencies. According to a June 1978 statement issued 
by the Endowment, its goal is "the fostering of 
professional excellence of the arts in America, to nurture 
and sustain them, and equally to help create a climate in 
which they may flourish so they may be experienced and 
enjoyed by the widest possible public." 

The Arts Endowment and its sister agency, the National 
Endowment for the Humanities, are components of the 
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities, 
established by Congress in 1965 within the executive 
branch of the government. The National Foundation also 
includes the Federal Council on the Arts and the 
Humanities, which promotes coordination between the two 
Endowments' programs and those of other federal 
agencies that support the arts and the humanities. The 
National Council on the Arts, a Presidentially appointed 
body, advises the Arts Endowment on policies, programs, 
procedures, and grant applications. The Council is 
composed of the Chairperson of the Arts Endowment and 
26 private citizens who are widely recognized for their 
broad knowledge, expertise, or interest in the arts and 
who are appointed by the President for six-year terms. 
The Council meets not less than four times during each 
calendar year. 

The Endowment provides funds and services to 
individuals of exceptional talent, and to nonprofit, 
tax-exempt organizations and agencies representing the 
highest quality in such fields as dance, design arts, folk 
arts, literature, media arts, museums, music, opera and 
musical theater, theater, and the visual arts (see nos. 
194-212). The Endowment generally does not support 
activities leading to an academic degree, or construction 
or restoration costs (except under the Challenge Grant 
Program, see no. 195). For projects primarily concerned 
with the study of the history, theory, practice, and criticism 
of the arts, support is available from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities (see no. 213). Arts 
education projects receive support primarily from the 
Office of Education (see no. 67). 



Program funds are awarded either as nonmatching 
fellowships to individuals or as grants to public and 
private, nonprofit organizations, which must be matched 
dollar-for-dollar by nonfederal funds. The Treasury Fund 
method of funding is used for many large grants (see no. 
21 1). Challenge grants must be matched by at least three 
dollars in new or increased donations and are designed to 
stimulate nonfederal funding sources (see no. 195). 

Applications for Endowment funds are reviewed by 
rotating panels of recognized experts in the particular 
fields and by the National Council on the Arts before final 
action is taken by the Chairperson of the Endowment. 
Applicants are notified by letter about whether their 
proposals have been approved or rejected. The 
processing of a request may take eight months or more. 

Each program issues Guidelines, revised and updated 
each year, describing program details and application 
procedures and deadlines. In addition, every two years 
the Endowment issues a Guide To Programs which gives 
brief descriptions of all of the Endowment's programs and 
activities. The Cultural Post, issued bimonthly by the 
Endowment, describes program changes and other 
activities and events at the Endowment. The Post also 
reports general news and events of interest to the arts 
world. Subscriptions are available from the Superintendent 
of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 
DC 20402. 

The Endowment's Research Division conducts ongoing 
data reviews of arts organizations, artists, audiences and 
consumers of arts and cultural services in order to 
measure changes and develop long-range forecasting 
mechanisms for the arts field. It is expected that an 
annual national data review will be functioning by 1981. 
Division reports include: Where Artists Live; Economic 
Impact of Arts and Cultural Institutions: A Model for 
Assessment and a Case Study in Baltimore; Audience 
Studies of the Performing Arts and Museums: A Critical 
Review; and Self-Employment, Migration, and Household 
and Family Characteristics of Artists. An Audience Survey 
Manual is in progress, and a new edition of Employment 
and Unemployment of Artists is planned for 1981 . Reports 
are available from the Publishing Center for Cultural 
Resources, 152 West 42d Street, New York, NY 10036. 

The Arts Library/Information Center at the Endowment is a 
working collection of resources on all aspects of the arts 
in contemporary America — their promotion, financing, 
organization, management, development, and 
preservation. Holdings include 5,000 catalogued 
documents, 300 periodical titles, and 10 drawers of 
vertical file material. Although the collection is maintained 
primarily for Endowment staff, visitors are welcome to use 
most materials on site or to borrow them through 
interlibrary loan. 



Contact for Information 

Information Office, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



National Endowment for the Arts 



194 195 196 



194 Artists-in-Schools Program 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to state arts agencies, which in turn make 
grants to schools and other sponsoring organizations. 



Description 



The Artists-in-Schools, administered by the Endowment's 
Office for Partnership (see no. 206), is a nationwide 
state-based program that places professional artists in 
educational settings to work and demonstrate artistic 
disciplines. State arts agencies apply for matching grants 
which they in turn use to fund schools and other 
sponsoring agencies that place artists in residencies. The 
program offers technical assistance to schools, school 
districts, and communities for establishing, implementing, 
and evaluating artists' residencies. Residencies are open 
to architects and environmental artists, craftspersons, 
dancers, folk artists, filmmakers and videomakers, 
musicians, painters, photographers, poets, printmakers, 
sculptors, theater artists, and writers. Artists should submit 
inquiries to their state's arts agency (see Appendix H). 
The 1979 appropriation for this program was $4.4 million. 



Contact for Information 



State arts agency (see Appendix H) or 
Artists-in-Schools Program, Office for Partnership, National 
Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



Arts Endowment funding programs. Each year, the 
program issues Guidelines detailing eligibility 
requirements, application procedures, and deadlines. 

Challenge Grant funds may be used to stabilize an 
organization by establishing or augmenting cash reserves 
or endowment funds. The funds may also be used to pay 
off accumulated debts if there is a specific plan to prevent 
accumulation in the future. Other eligible uses include 
meeting increased operating costs, assisting one-time 
projects designed to strengthen the organization and 
generate continued financial support, and making capital 
improvements. Relatively few grants are awarded for 
capital improvements, and a higher local match is 
required. 

Matching requirements for Challenge Grants are at least 
three nonfederal local dollars for each federal dollar, and 
at least four to one for capital improvement. Since the 
purpose of Challenge Grants is to broaden and strengthen 
the base of continuing nonfederal support, allowable 
matching funds include new or increased contributions 
over and above those contributed during the year prior to 
the grant period; proceeds from certain types of benefits, 
testamentary gifts; donations from irrevocable trusts; and 
real property given for immediate sale. Donations must be 
given with the intent of continuity. Earned income, in-kind 
services, tangible property, and investment income may 
not be used toward a match. The grant period may be 
from one to three" years. For the 1979 Challenge Grant 
round, 326 applications were* received, and 102 grants 
were made totaling approximately $30 million. 



195 Challenge Grant Program 



Contact for information 



Challenge Grants Program, National Endowment for the 
Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



What/For Whom 



Challenge grants to well-established cultural organizations 
and consortia. Each federal dollar must be matched by $3 
in new or increased donations. 



1 96 Dance Program 



Description 



The Challenge Grant Program was established in 1976 to 
assist cultural organizations in increasing the level, and 
broadening the base, of continuing nonfederal support. 
Matching grants ranging from $30,000 to $1,500,000 are 
awarded to cultural institutions or consortia that have 
demonstrated a commitment to esthetic quality and have 
programs of recognized significance to the community, 
state, region, or nation. The Program attaches great 
importance to an organization's five-year, long-range 
plans and to its fund-raising preparations. Institutions 
should have well-developed plans before applying for a 
Challenge Grant. In addition, the Endowment suggests 
that organizations consult with state arts agencies in 
developing their applications. It is expected that most 
recipients of Challenge Grants will be grantees of other 



What/For Whom 



Grants, some v nonmatching, to individual dancers, mimes, 
and choreographers, dance companies, mime companies, 
dance service organizations, and state arts agencies or 
other sponsoring organizations. 



Description 



The Dance Program awards grants to individuals and 
organizations in the field of dance, and funds both 
traditional and innovative projects. Each year, the Dance 
Program issues Guidelines containing detailed application 
instructions and deadlines for the programs listed below. 
In most categories, grants are generally substantially less 
than the stated maximum. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



196/197 



Choreographers Fellowships 

Nonmatching grants are awarded in two categories to 
professional choreographers for the purpose of providing 
time and money for artistic growth. Eligible costs include 
continuing current work, new or experimental work, 
choreographic opportunities for dancers with professional 
companies, and creating new dances or setting existing 
dances for a choreographer's own company or another 
company. One category assists developing and 
experienced choreographers of demonstrated merit. The 
usual grant is $2,500; the maximum is $5,000. The second 
category, with maximum grants of $10,000, offers a very 
limited number of grants to choreographers of national 
stature. 

Grants for Companies 

Beginning in 1980, dance companies may apply for 
assistance in any of the areas described below. The 
deadline for applications is the same for all of these 
categories. 

Choreography • Grants ($150,000 maximum, with a 
few nonmatching grants of up to $25,000) are made to 
dance companies to assist them in expanding their 
repertoires. Eligible costs include commissions for 
choreographers, restaging of important works, and all 
direct costs of mounting the production before the 
premiere performance. In 1979 there were 236 
applications and 64 grant awards totaling $1.15 million. 

Artistic Personnel • Grants ($10,000 maximum) are 
made to dance companies to cover the salary of a new 
one-year position for full- or part-time artistic personnel, 
other than dancers (see Rehearsal Support below). This is 
a new 1980 category. 

Rehearsal Support . Grants (maximum $50,000) 
are made to dance companies to pay salaries of dancers 
and rehearsal personnel at union scale for up to eight 
weeks or 200 hours of rehearsal time per individual. Funds 
may be used for preparation for the performance season 
or, in rare cases, for creative rehearsal periods. 

Professional Companies in Residence • Grants 
($50,000 maximum, with some nonmatching grants not to 
exceed $15,000) assist dance companies in achieving 
greater financial stability and greater visibility in their 
home cities and communities. Grants may cover costs of 
both home performance seasons and regular tours in 
surrounding communities. 

Management and Administration . Grants ($10,000 
maximum, a few nonmatching) are made to help dance 
companies obtain professional management or to improve 
existing management structures. In 1979, there were 114 
applications and 35 grant awards totaling $213,255. 



projects primarily involving dance. In 1979, there were 103 
applications and 21 grant awards totaling $276,230. (See 
no. 202 for other film or video programs.) 

Dance Touring Program 

Grants of up to one-third of a dance company's minimum 
stated fee are awarded to state arts agencies or other 
sponsoring organizations for a minimum 
two-and-one-half-days' engagement in a community 
outside the company's city of residence. For the three 
largest companies, grants go both to the sponsors and to 
the companies. Separate Guidelines are available for 
these programs. During the 1979-1980 season, 80 dance 
companies received assistance to tour in 50 states and 
jurisdictions. 

Long-Term Dance Engagements 

Matching grants ($50,000 maximum) assist sponsors who 
engage dance companies for tours of two or more weeks. 

Sponsors of Local Companies 

This is a 1980 pilot program offering grants to sponsors of 
dance companies based in the sponsor's own city or 
community. This program is intended to complement the 
touring programs described above. 

General Services to the Field 

Grants ($50,000 maximum, with a nonmatching portion not 
to exceed $15,000) to organizations and individuals who 
provide services to dance companies, dancers, and 
choreographers. Projects that do not fit under the other 
funding categories may also be assisted. Services include 
management and technical assistance programs, 
provision of performance space, and community or 
regional promotion of dance. In 1979, there were 93 
applications and 46 grant awards totaling $752,150. 

Contact for Information 

Dance Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



1 97 Design Arts Program 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships to individuals. Matching grants to nonprofit, 
tax-exempt design and service organizations. 



Dance/Film/Video 

Grants ($50,000 maximum, with a nonmatching portion not 
to exceed $10,000) are made to dance companies, other 
organizations, and individuals using film or video in 



Description 



The Design Arts Program promotes excellence in the 
fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban 
design and planning, and fashion, graphic, industrial, and 



National Endowment for the Arts 



197/198 



interior design. Formerly called Architecture, Planning, and 
Design, this program was completely restructured for 
1980 funding. Guidelines, describing new categories, 
application procedures, and deadlines, will be available in 
September 1980 from the address listed below. 

Fellowships 

The Design Arts Program awards nonmatching fellowships 
to citizens or permanent U.S. residents in the following 
categories: 

Design Student Project Fellowships • Grants 
($9,600 maximum) are made to institutions of higher 
education with graduate programs in design arts. Grants 
are used to award fellowships of $800 to students in their 
final year of a professional, master's, or Ph.D. program to 
cover extra costs of thesis projects. 

Entering Professional Designer Project 
Fellowships • Awards ($5,000 maximum) are made to 
individuals entering the professional design field to 
provide time to develop or increase expertise. Funds are 
not to be used for professional education or foreign travel. 

Individual Project Fellowships . Awards ($10,000 
maximum) are made to professional designers and 
persons from other creative fields to carry out a specific 
design, research, or educational project. Students or 
teachers may receive a grant while studying or teaching. 

Senior-Level Sabbatical Fellowships • Awards 
($10,000 maximum) are made to accomplished 
professional designers to provide unencumbered time to 
explore new areas or new approaches to design which 
will lead to professional growth. 

Design Communication 

Matching grants ($50,000 maximum) are awarded to 
organizations for projects that inform the public about 
design issues and ideas. Eligible activities include 
conferences, workshops, seminars, and development of 
publications or archival or documentary materials. 
Proposals should clearly state goals, identify specific 
audiences, and indicate how information will be 
disseminated. 



Research and Design Assistance" category will be 
supported here. 

Community Design Assistance Program is a 1980 pilot 
program under Design Demonstration which awards a 
limited number of matching grants ($20,000 maximum) for 
established programs administered by design schools that 
provide services requested by community organizations. 
Funds may cover travel, supplies, production of design 
materials, workshops, and seminars. 

Design Exploration/Research 

Matching grants ($40,000 maximum) are awarded to 
organizations to conduct experimental and innovative 
research on design. Priority is given to projects that 
address, define, or resolve new or recurring design 
problems. Research projects should help to clarify the 
esthetic, utilitarian, economic, and social consequences of 
design. 

A new subcategory of funding is anticipated under this 
category in cooperation with the Department of Energy. 
The focus will be on energy-conscious design — improving 
the quality of design in the planning of energy-efficient 
cities and towns. For further information on this new 
program, contact the address listed below. 

General Services to the Field 

The Design Arts Program awards grants in varying 
amounts to organizations that offer significant technical 
assistance and advisory services to the design field. 
Special design-related projects that do not fit other 
funding categories are also eligible, as are state arts 
agencies and regional arts organizations for their design 
arts programs or projects. Before applying, organizations 
must submit a letter of inquiry to the Design Arts Program. 

Design Excellence Project 

This is a 1980 project to encourage both citizens and 
governments to recognize the role of design in making the 
environment more beautiful, more efficient, and less 
costly. Guidelines for this project were incomplete at the 
time this book was published. 



Design Demonstration 

Matching grants ($30,000 maximum) are awarded to 
organizations to support specific planning and design 
activities and services of local, regional, or national 
significance. Priority is given to demonstrations that are 
likely to have practical results. Eligible activities may 
include demonstrating the role of design in the earliest 
stages of neighborhood planning and management, 
relating design to national issues such as conservation, or 
showing the value of good design in meeting individual 
and public needs. The Endowment is particularly 
interested in projects relating the design needs of the 
visual and performing arts to the livability of a community. 
Projects formerly eligible under the "Cultural Facilities 



Contact for Information 



Design Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



1 98 Expansion Arts 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to community-based arts organizations 
with established professional direction and to state and 



National Endowment for the Arts 



198 



regional arts agencies. Technical assistance for 
neighborhood arts programs. 

Description 

The Expansion Arts Program awards a variety of grants to 
increase the involvement of Americans in the arts and to 
encourage artistic expression in diverse cultural groups. It 
supports neighborhood and community-based arts 
organizations in cities, towns, and rural areas, particularly 
in low- and moderate-income communities. Each year the 
program issues Guidelines containing detailed application 
instructions and deadlines for the categories of programs 
listed below. Only one application may be made by an 
organization to this program in any fiscal year; therefore, 
the category should be chosen carefully. 

Instruction and Training 

Matching grants (ranging from $5,000 to $30,000; 
averaging $10,000) are made to community-based arts 
organizations that offer professionally led workshops and 
classes on a regular basis. Artistic achievement, quality of 
professional staff, financial stability, and community 
participation are the major considerations in grant awards. 
In 1979, there were 302 applications; 232 grants were 
awarded. 

Community Cultural Centers 

Matching grants (ranging from $10,000 to $70,000; usually 
less than $25,000) are made to major community cultural 
centers serving as regional or national programming 
models. Such centers must offer training in at least two art 
forms and opportunities to trainees for performance or 
exhibition. Uniqueness and broad appeal, as well as 
artistic merit, are considered in reviewing applications. In 
1979, there were 45 applications; 28 grants were 
awarded. 



share financial development, administration, technical, and 
promotional resources. Each member must make its own 
artistic and program decisions. The consortium's history 
and potential as a national model are major considerations 
in the grant awards. In 1979, there were six applications; 
four grants were awarded. 

Summer Projects 

Matching grants ($15,000 maximum; usually less than 
$6,000) are made to assist outstanding professionally 
directed and community-based arts projects that take 
place exclusively during the summer and that provide 
training, including active participation, in one or more art 
forms. In 1979, there were 138 applications; 81 grants 
were awarded. 

City Arts 

City Arts is a pilot program designed to generate 
municipal public and private support for neighborhood 
arts groups. Matching grants for up to three years are 
made to city organizations, which in turn offer matching 
subgrants and substantial technical assistance to 
neighborhood arts programs. In 1979, there were 13 
applications; 12 grants were made, totaling approximately 
$630,000. 

Regional Tour-Events 

Matching grants (ranging from $5,000 to $15,000; 
averaging $7,500) are made to organizations that have 
sponsored for at least two years festivals using 
community-based arts groups from the region. Festivals 
should be at least three days' duration. Festivals should 
encourage local support for community arts groups, help 
raise money from new sources, help develop new 
audiences, and introduce arts groups to one another. In 
1979, there were 34 applications; 22 grants were 
awarded. 



Arts Exposure Programs 

Matching grants ($30,000 maximum; $10,000 average) are 
made to professionally directed and community-based 
organizations seeking to enable inner-city and low-income 
young and elderly people and other groups to attend 
major cultural events that they would not otherwise be 
able to see. Assistance is also given to organizations 
active in programs of crosscultural exchange between the 
old and the young, between the affluent and the 
nonaffluent, and between races. Eligible programs must 
be in existence at least two years before the application 
deadline date. In 1979, there were 304 applications; 169 
grants were made. 

Neighborhood Arts Consortia 

Matching grants up to $50,000 for not more than three 
consecutive years are made to neighborhood arts 
consortia for administrative services. Eligible consortia 
must consist of at least three arts groups. Members may 



State Arts Agencies-Expansion Arts 

Matching grants ranging from $5,000 to $20,000 are made 
to assist state and regional arts agencies in strengthening 
their community-based arts programs. In 1979, there were 
27 applications; 13 grants were awarded. 

Services to Neighborhood Arts Organizations 

Matching grants ($50,000 maximum; usually $12,000 to 
$15,000) are made to assist service organizations that aid 
a variety of community arts groups through equipment 
loans, publicity, sponsorship of activities, and assistance 
in dealing with real estate, legal, fund-raising, accounting, 
and like matters. In 1979, there were 45 applications; 28 
grants were awarded. 

Comprehensive Technical Assistance Program 

This program provides short-term consultants to 
community arts programs to help solve specific 



National Endowment for the Arts 



198/199/200 



administrative problems such as fund raising, 
bookkeeping, interpretation of guidelines or regulations, 
resource and audience development, or community liaison 
projects. This program does not make grants. 
Organizations interested in obtaining such technical 
assistance should write an explanatory letter to the 
address listed below. 

Contact for Information 

Expansion Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



1 99 Folk Arts Program 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to nonprofit, tax-exempt community and 
cultural organizations, Native American tribes, media 
centers, educational institutions, and state and local arts 
agencies. Nonmatching grants for apprenticeships to 
experienced folk artists. 



Description 



The Folk Arts Program encourages community- or 
family-based arts that have endured through several 
generations. The program welcomes innovative proposals 
that will foster cultural renewal within a community through 
the use of its folk arts resources. Folk arts include dance, 
handcrafts, music, narrative, oratory, poetry, ritual, and 
song. The major criteria used in selecting grantees will be 
authenticity of the folk art and excellence of work. 

Matching grants ($50,000 maximum; usually between 
$5,000 and $25,000) are awarded to organizations 
sponsoring folk arts activities that have broad community 
support and a high degree of technical and cultural 
expertise. Preference will be given to small, sharply 
focused, one-time projects. Nonmatching grants are 
available for apprenticeships (see below). Craftspersons, 
painters, and sculptors who are primarily creative artists, 
and those working in crafts that are considered "fine arts" 
are funded under the Visual Arts Program (see no. 212). 
Each year the program issues Guidelines containing 
detailed instructions and deadlines for the Folk Arts 
projects described below. 



few film and video grants are awarded each year. Grants 
for producing phonograph records are limited to projects 
documenting rare or previously undocumented music. All 
documentation projects must include costs for depositing 
collected materials in locally accessible archives. The 
program does not support purchase of cameras, tape 
recorders, or other major equipment. Occasionally these 
items may be borrowed from the American Folklife Center 
(see no. 180). In 1978, there were 51 applications for 
documentation grants; 23 grants were awarded averaging 
$17,860. 

Presentation of Traditional Arts and Artists . Most of 
this program's funds are used for fees of traditional artists 
who are presented by sponsoring organizations in local or 
regional festivals, community celebrations, exhibits, 
workshops, schools, or residencies. Funds may also be 
used for start-up costs of festivals, celebrations, and 
dances, and for information and printed programs 
intended to attract a general audience. Priority will be 
given to projects honoring local senior artists. In 1978, of 
88 applications for presentation, 46 grants were awarded 
averaging $13,827. 

Services to the Field • Grants are generally 
awarded to organizations for small, sharply focused 
projects which may include conferences, statewide folk 
arts coordination, and survey or investigative projects. 
Funds may cover fees of folklorists, anthropologists, 
ethnomusicologists, and linguists. Funding is ordinarily 
limited to two consecutive years. In 1978 there were 20 
applications; 13 grants were awarded averaging $15,000. 

Apprenticeships 

Nonmatching grants (usually $1,000) are made to 
experienced folk artists who wish to study withir. their own 
tradition as an apprentice to a master craftsperson. It is 
expected that most of the money will be used for the 
master's fees. Other eligible costs may include travel and 
supplies. In 1979, of 30 applications for apprenticeships, 
18 grants were awarded. 

Contact for Information 

Folk Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



Folk Arts Projects 

Projects funded by this program fall into the following 
basic categories: 

Documentation of Traditional Arts • Funded 
organizations use grants to pay the fees of sound 
technicians, filmmakers, and photographers; to cover 
costs of recording tapes, videotapes, and film-; and to pay 
the fees of traditional artists being documented. Only a 



200 International Activities 



What/For Whom 

Advisory and consultation activities with a range of 
national and international cultural agencies, particularly 
with the International Communication Agency (ICA). 
Exchange fellowships to the United Kingdom and Japan 
for mid-career American creative and performing artists. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



200/201 



Description 



Under an agreement signed with the International 
Communication Agency (see no. 174), the Endowment 
participates in international cultural exchanges by drawing 
on the expertise of its program panels for 
recommendations of American artists and arts 
organizations to work abroad under ICA sponsorship. 

Since 1976, the Endowment has also conducted individual 
artists exchanges with Great Britain and Japan. It is 
responsible for the preliminary selection of American 
artists and for professional assistance to Japanese and 
British artists. Other international activities are being 
planned. 

Exchange Fellowships for residencies in Japan and Great 
Britain are awarded to American creative and performing 
artists in mid-career who demonstrate potential for 
professional prominence. Five fellows go to Great Britain, 
five to Japan, and an equal number from each nation 
come to the United States. Priority is given to candidates 
who have a specific purpose in going to the chosen 
country and who have not recently resided there. 
Fellowships ($1,600 per month plus round-trip 
transportation) are awarded for periods of six to nine 
months. Each year, fellowships to both Japan and the 
United Kingdom are announced in the following program 
Guidelines: Dance (see no. 196), Design Arts (see no. 
197), Folk Arts (see no. 199), Media Arts: Film/Radio/ 
Television (see no. 202), Music (see no. 204), Theater (see 
no. 210), and Visual Arts (see no. 212). United Kingdom 
candidates may also apply under the Literature Program 
(see no. 201). Applicants should contact the individual 
programs for application procedures and deadlines. 



Fellowships for Creative Writers 

This program enables published writers of exceptional 
talent to set aside time for writing, research, and travel, 
and generally to advance their careers. Guidelines for 
nonmatching fellowships will be available in the summer of 
1980 

Residencies for Writers 

Matching grants ($5,000 maximum) are awarded to 
organizations, including state arts agencies, colleges, 
universities, libraries, theaters, museums, art centers, 
prisons, hospitals, and professional or community 
organizations of writers and teachers, to offer residencies 
to published creative writers, or to writers of stage, film, 
television, or radio works that have been produced. Funds 
are used for writer's fees and travel, and per diem 
expenses. Preference is given to programs providing new 
extended residencies outside large urban centers. 

Assistance to Literary Magazines 

Matching grants are made to noncommercial literary 
magazines in two categories, described below. 

Special Assistance Grants . Matching grants 
($5,000 maximum) to magazines for specific projects 
including special publications, payments to authors and 
other contributors, and efforts to increase readership and 
improve design, format, and production of the magazine. 

Development Grants . Matching grants of $15,000 
or $30,000 for a three-year period to a few magazines of 
outstanding quality to help secure continuing nonfederal 
support and to implement long-range plans. 



Contact for Information 



International Program Officer, National Endowment for the 
Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



201 /Literature Program 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships and residencies for published creative writers. 
Matching grants to nonprofit literary magazines; small 
presses; book centers; and distribution, service, and other 
literary organizations. 



Description 



The Literature Program assists the individual creative 
writer, encourages greater audiences for contemporary 
literature, and helps support professional literary 
organizations. Each year, the program issues Guidelines 
detailing application procedures and deadlines for the 
categories described below. 



Assistance to Small Presses 

Matching grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 are 
awarded to small presses or to state arts agencies on 
their behalf for specific projects in publishing and 
distributing volumes of poetry, fiction, plays, and other 
creative prose. College or university presses are ineligible 
in this category. 

Distribution and Promotion 

Matching grants are made to nonprofit distribution 
organizations or book centers for projects in four 
categories, described below. 

Audience Development • Grants ($10,000 
maximum) are used to fund regional small-press book 
fairs and traveling or permanent exhibits of contemporary 
literary works 

Review, Media, and Promotion • Project grants are 
made for promoting and developing audiences for 
contemporary literary works. Organizations should contact 
the program before applying. 

Distribution . Grants ranging from $1,000 to 
$30,000 may be used to distribute works of contemporary 



National Endowment for the Arts 



201/202 



literary value, to secure local and private sources of 
income, to increase community and audience involvement, 
and to maintain valuable literary works that would 
otherwise be lost. 

Production and Design . Grants are awarded to a 
few regional centers to upgrade the quality of 
noncommercial contemporary literary publications. 
Organizations should contact the program before applying 
for a grant. 

General Sen/ices to the Field 

A limited number of grants are awarded to literary service 
organizations or for unique projects not covered by other 
categories in the Literature Program. Applicants must 
consult with the program before formally applying. 

Contact for Information 

Literature Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



202 Media Arts: Film/Radio/ 
Television 



What/For Whom 

Direct matching grants to individual media artists; 
matching grants to nonprofit, tax-exempt media 
organizations, which may in turn award grants to 
individuals. 



Description 



The Media Arts: Film/RadioATelevision Program funds 
individual media artists directly or indirectly through 
organizations such as the American Film Institute. It also 
supports media arts centers, exhibition centers, facilities, 
archives, and service organizations. Media arts include 
documentary, narrative, and experimental works, and 
electronic creations, animated film, and sound art. In 
addition, the program fosters bringing other arts — dance, 
theater, and visual arts — to a wide public by supporting 
radio and television broadcasts of major series. Each 
year, the program issues Guidelines containing detailed 
application instructions and deadlines for the programs 
described below. 

American Film Institute Independent 
Filmmaker Program 

Grants are made to the American Film Institute to fund 
filmmakers working in animated, documentary, 
experimental, and narrative film. In 1979, approximately 40 
grants were awarded; the maximum award was $10,000. 
For further information, contact the American Film Institute, 
501 Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90210. 



American Film Institute/ Arts Endowment Film 
Archival Program 

This joint program awards matching grants up to $50,000 
to organizations with established archival film collections 
to help locate, preserve, and catalogue films of artistic or 
cultural value. Contact the American Film Institute, The 
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 
Washington, DC 20566. 

Production 

Matching grants are made to individual professionals 
($15,000 maximum) and organizations ($50,000 maximum) 
to support outstanding film, video, and radio productions 
that emphasize these media as art forms. Resulting 
productions should be shown or broadcast to a wide 
audience. In 1979, there were approximately 75 grant 
awards, most for less than $30,000. 

Regional Development 

Matching grants are awarded in three categories to make 
the arts of film, video, and radio more widely appreciated 
and available at the regional level. 

Aid to Film/Video Exhibition • Matching grants 
($15,000 maximum) are awarded to sponsoring 
organizations to exhibit, on a continuing basis, high quality 
film and video art that may not be available to the public 
through regular commercial channels. Eligible 
organizations must have completed at least one year of 
programming. One goal of the program is to open new 
markets for such works. Funds may cover the costs of 
visits of film and video artists to discuss their works with 
other artists and with the public. In 1979, there were 59 
applications and 36 awards, most for less than $10,000. 

In-Residence/Workshop Program • Matching grants 
ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 are awarded to nonprofit, 
tax-exempt organizations to enable them to invite 
nationally recognized film and video artists, radio 
producers, and critics for residencies of varying lengths. 
Visitors may be invited to give a single lecture or 
workshop or a series, or to create a new work while in 
residence. In 1979, there were 58 applications and 29 
grant awards totaling $164,500. 

Media Arts Centers . Matching grants ($50,000 
maximum) are made to nonprofit media arts centers to 
expand the regional impact of their programs. To qualify, 
a center must have had an operating budget of $100,000 
or more for at least one year prior to the proposed grant 
period, and meet specific criteria described in guidelines. 
In 1979, there were 26 applications and 17 grant awards 
averaging $30,000. 

Services to the Field 

Matching grants ($25,000 maximum) are awarded to 
organizations offering services to filmmakers, 
videomakers, and radio producers. Eligible activities 
include the distribution of media works, including 



National Endowment for the Arts 



202/203 



circulating exhibits; the provision of facilities and working 
space for independent media artists; conferences and 
seminars; research; and newsletters or journals. 
Occasionally, nonmatching grants up to $10,000 are 
made to individuals. In 1979, there were 164 applications 
and 89 grant awards in widely ranging amounts. 

Short Film Showcase 

The Media Arts Program makes a grant to the Foundation 
for Independent Video and Film to distribute selected 
short films by independent filmmakers to commercial 
movie theaters throughout the United States. Selected 
filmmakers receive honoraria. For information and 
application forms, contact the Foundation at 99 Prince 
Street, New York, NY 10012. In 1979, there were 236 
applications; 10 honoraria of $2,500 each were awarded. 

The Independent Documentary Fund for 
Public Television 

The Arts Endowment and the Ford Foundation jointly fund 
this program, administered by the Television Laboratory at 
WNET, to award grants to independent film and video 
documentarians. It is intended that completed 
documentaries will be broadcast by public television. In 
1979, 885 applications were received; 12 grants were 
awarded totaling $398,746. For information, contact the 
Television Laboratory, WNET, 356 West 58 Street, New 
York, NY 10019, Attention: Independent Documentary 
Fund for Public Television. 

Video Artists Fellowships (see no. 212) 

Contact for Information 

Media Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



aesthetic in purpose with professional staff, which 
owns or utilizes tangible objects, cares for them, and 
exhibits them to the public on some regular schedule." 
AAM accreditation is not required to be eligible. The 
significance of a museum project is the major criterion in 
the evaluation of applications. Each year the Museum 
Program issues Guidelines containing detailed application 
instructions and deadlines for the program categories 
listed below. In general, to be eligible, organizations must 
have been in operation two years prior to submitting an 
application. 



Cooperative Programs 

Matching grants ($50,000 maximum for up to one year) 
are made to encourage and assist cooperative endeavors 
between museums, groups of museums, or museums and 
state or regional arts agencies and organizations. Projects 
could include supporting the planning and implementation 
costs of extended loans of collections from one museum 
to another, sharing museum staff and expertise among 
several institutions, or providing staff to arts organizations 
cooperating with museums to plan and develop activities 
beneficial to museums. In 1979, 34 applications were 
received of which 24 were funded. The average grant was 
$20,000. 

Museum Purchase Plan 

Matching grants are made to eligible museums for the 
purchase of works by living American artists. Previous 
recipients of these grants are eligible, provided a final 
report on the earlier grant was submitted to the Museum 
Program Types of work that may be purchased include 
crafts, costume and fashion design, folk arts, graphic and 
film prints by independent filmmakers, industrial design, 
paintings, photographs, and sculptures. In 1977, 73 
applications were received; 54 were funded. 



203 Museum Program 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to museums, organizations providing 
museum services, state arts agencies, and regional 
groups. Nonmatching fellowships for museum 
professionals. Indemnification of cultural exhibits involved 
in international exchange. 



Description 



The Museum Program assists a broad range of museums 
and museum-related organizations and carries out 
projects of artistic and cultural significance. The Arts 
Endowment generally uses the definition of museums 
developed by the American Association of Museums 
(AAM): "a nonprofit institution essentially educational or 



Permanent Collections 

Two types of grants are available to assist museums with 
their permanent collections. 

Catalogue Assistance • Matching grants ($75,000 
maximum for one-year projects) are made to assist 
museums in the cataloguing of permanent collections of 
esthetic and cultural significance. Eligible costs include 
documentation, research, publication of catalogues and, 
in a few pilot cases, computerization of catalogues. In 
1979, 133 applications were received; 69 grants were 
awarded. The average grant was $17,400 

Utilization of Museum Collections • Matching grants 
($75,000 maximum for projects lasting up to two years) 
are made for installation of permanent museum collections 
and museum galleries. Such collections include works 
formerly held in storage or recently acquired as well as 
those currently on view. In 1978, 84 applications were 
received; 36 grants were made. The average grant was 
$31,000. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



203 



Preservation 

Two types of grants are available to museums for 
preserving collections of esthetic and cultural significance. 

Conservation • Matching grants for one year are 
available for planning conservation programs and 
conducting feasibility studies of training programs and 
conservation centers ($10,000 maximum); conservation 
projects; master-apprentice internships ($10,000 
maximum); short-term workshops ($10,000 maximum); 
existing training centers ($150,000 maximum); new 
training centers ($100,000 maximum); and the formation or 
expansion of regional conservation laboratories from 
which a number of museums can obtain services they 
could not afford singly ($30,000 maximum for existing 
laboratories; $50,000 for new laboratories). In 1978, of 130 
applications, 71 grants were made totaling $1,275,190. 

Renovation (Climate Control, Security, and 
Storage) • One-to-one matching grants are made to 
museums for professional consultations on problems and 
solutions in areas of security, storage, and climate control. 
Surveys must include renovation plans and cost estimates. 
Grants up to 25 percent of project costs are made to 
implement renovation plans. In 1978, 59 applications were 
made; 28 projects were funded. 



Special Exhibitions 

Matching grants ($100,000 maximum) are made to eligible 
institutions for planning and organizing special exhibits. 
Eligible costs include services of outside specialists, 
catalogues, shipping, and insurance. Matching grants 
($20,000 maximum) are made to participating institutions 
for installation of special exhibitions. Rental costs may be 
included if the exhibition was not initially funded by the 
Arts Endowment. In 1978, 295 applications were made; 
145 were funded. Most grants were under $20,000. 



Support Services 

Services to the Field . Matching grants ($30,000 
maximum) are made to museum service organizations for 
museum-related services such as research, publications 
(other than periodicals), workshops, and seminars. In 
1979, 16 applications were received; 8 grants were 
awarded. The average grant was $17,000. 

Visiting Specialists . Matching grants ($15,000 
maximum) are made to eligible institutions for temporary 
consultation services for specific projects of esthetic and 
cultural significance. Services may include development of 
improved education and public service programs, 
coordinated graphics programs, and improved methods of 
museum operations; establishment of library systems; 
improved use of nonprint media; plans for membership 
drives and other fund-raising activities; establishment of a 
library; or research on the permanent collection. In 1979, 
there were 29 applications; 23 grants were awarded. 



Training and Development 

Grants and fellowships are awarded to museums or 
museum professionals for training and improving the 
professional qualifications of museum staff. 

Fellowships for Museum Professionals • 
Nonmatching fellowships ($20,000 maximum; most are 
considerably less) are awarded to professional museum 
staff members of exceptional talent to take leaves of 
absence for periods ranging from one month to a year to 
study, travel, write, or engage in community projects. In 
1979, there were 29 applications; 14 grants were 
awarded. 

Museum Training • Matching grants ($60,000 
maximum) are made to museums and universities to 
support museum internships, apprenticeships, and a few 
graduate or undergraduate programs. Priority is given to 
proposals that specifically include training for personnel 
from minority groups. In 1979, there were 42 applications; 
25 grants were awarded. The average grant was $23,000. 

Wider Availability of Museums 

Matching grants ($30,000 maximum) are made to 
museums to provide educational opportunities that 
complement the goals of the museum. Grants are 
available in two areas, and applicants are encouraged to 
submit more than one proposal. 

Interpretation and Extension . Funds are used to 
increase participation in a museum's educational activities 
by incorporating other successful museum programs, 
including successful experimental programs, into regular 
education programs, or by developing programs for 
existing mobile or satellite museums. 

Museums and Schools . Funds are used to 
develop cooperative programs between museums and 
their surrounding school districts. 

In 1980, the program intends to assist innovative pilot 
projects using nonprint media (film, radio, television, and 
video) to extend the museum experience. 

Arts and Artifacts Indemnification 

The Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Act (Public Law 94-158) 
authorizes the Federal Council on the Arts and the 
Humanities (see no. 193) to make indemnity agreements 
with individuals, nonprofit agencies, institutions, and 
governments for eligible items either borrowed from 
abroad for exhibit in the United States or for exhibit 
abroad as part of an exchange with a foreign country. The 
Federal Council has delegated responsibility to the Arts 
Endowment to administer these agreements. Eligible 
exhibit items include artworks, other artifacts or objects, 
rare documents, books and other printed materials, 
photographs, films, and videotapes. Items must have 
educational, cultural, historical, or scientific value, and the 
exhibition must be certified by the Secretary of State as 
being in the national interest. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



203/204 



The Act provides for a $15,000 deductible and a ceiling of 
$50 million for a single exhibition. The total dollar amount 
for indemnity agreements which can be in effect at any 
one time may not exceed $250 million. The Act's 
regulations and application forms may be obtained from 
the address listed below. 

Contact for Information 



Museum Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



204 Music Program 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships to composers and their collaborators and to 
jazz performers. Matching grants to nonprofit ensembles, 
choruses, orchestras, and presenting and service 
organizations. 

Description 



The Music Program awards grants to individuals and 
organizations to improve and sustain performance quality, 
increase audience appreciation, make performances more 
widely available, and advance professional development 
and careers. Separate Guidelines are published each year 
describing application procedures and deadlines for each 
of the following categories. 

Composers 

Fellowship programs support composers and 
collaborations between composers and librettists, 
choreographers, or filmmakers. A limited number of small 
grants are made to centers, including electronic music 
studios, computer centers, and other innovative facilities 
that have a record of providing new music resources at a 
regional level to composers and to the general public. A 
few matching grants are made to organizations for 
projects serving as national or regional models of 
assistance to composers. In 1979 there were 698 
applications to the Composers Program (formerly the 
Composer/Librettist Fellowships); 161 grants were 
awarded. The American Music Center (250 West 57th 
Street, Room 626, New York, NY 10019) contains scores, 
librettos, recordings, biographical information, and 
documents relating to works written by recipients of 
Composers Program Fellowships. These materials are 
available for study. Contact the Center for a catalogue of 
materials in the collection. 



Jazz 

This category awards nonmatching fellowships ($15,000 
maximum) to established jazz composers and performers 



to compose, arrange, rehearse, or perform. Smaller 
fellowships ($5,000 maximum) are awarded to young 
artists to study with established artists. Matching grants 
($25,000 maximum) are awarded to organizations to 
present concerts, educational programs, workshops and 
clinics, residencies, festivals, or tours. Additional matching 
grants are made to individuals, groups, or organizations 
offering services to the jazz field In 1979, there were 445 
applications to the Jazz Program; 204 grants were made 
for an approximate total of $1 ,060,000. 

Orchestras 

This category assists symphony and chamber orchestras. 
Orchestras must be of high quality, must have been in 
existence at least three years, and must have performed 
at least five different subscription programs during each of 
the last two years. Matching grants ($30,000 to $255,000 
for orchestras employing full-time musicians for at least 26 
weeks a year; $10,000 to $45,000 for orchestras 
employing both full-time and part-time musicians; and 
$2,000 to $20,000 for orchestras engaging some 
professional musicians as a core orchestra) are used for a 
wide variety of projects to improve performance and 
management of the orchestra, broaden the repertoire to 
include new music, reach diverse audiences, collaborate 
with other performing-arts organizations, or develop 
special programs. If funds are available, the program will 
support a number of Music Resources Projects, which are 
innovative and exemplary projects of significant value to 
the field of music. The program also supports a small 
number of organizations offering services to the orchestra 
field. In 1979, there were 148 applications; 125 grants 
were made, totaling approximately $8.6 million. 

Choral 

This category, a pilot until 1980, awards matching grants 
($1,000 to $20,000) to choruses that have professional, 
salaried conductors, at least 12 singers, annual auditions, 
and have performed at least four different concerts in 
each of the last two years. Grants are awarded to support 
professional choruses; other independent and orchestra 
choruses; college, university, and conservatory choruses; 
and service organizations. 

Chamber Music 

This category, a pilot until 1980, awards matching grants 
($1,000 to $25,000) to chamber music ensembles or 
presenting organizations. Funds may be used for a wide 
variety of activities including securing rehearsal time, 
expanding repertoire, touring, or presenting programs for 
specialized audiences, sharing resources with other 
organizations; providing coaching classes or workshops 
for less experienced ensembles; or devising new ways to 
increase earned and contributed income. A limited 
number of organizations providing services of national or 
regional significance to the chamber music field may 
receive funding in this category. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



204/205/206 



New Music Performance 

This category, a pilot until 1980, awards matching grants 
($1 ,000 to $25,000) to new music ensembles or 
presenting organizations. Eligible activities include 
collaborating with television or radio stations to present 
new music and to further public understanding of new 
music as well as activities listed under "Chamber Music" 
above. 



206 Off ice for Partnership 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to state arts agencies or regional groups 
of state arts agencies, which in turn make grants and 
provide services to artists and public and private nonprofit 
organizations. 



Description 



Contact for Information 



Music Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



205 National Endowment Fellows 



What/For Whom 

Nonmatching grants to sponsoring organizations to permit 
individuals interested in arts management to serve as 
fellows at the Arts Endowment. 



Description 

National Endowment Fellows (formerly Work-Experience 
Interns) work for 13 weeks in Arts Endowment programs 
and offices. This program seeks to acquaint arts 
administrators with the relationship between government 
and the arts, with the policies and operations of the Arts 
Endowment, and with the national arts picture. Fellows are 
generally selected on the basis of prior professional and 
academic experience. They spend two-thirds of their time 
working as members of the professional staff, processing 
grant applications, helping prepare for, and attending, 
panel review sessions, carrying out research in policy and 
grants and other projects as directed. The remainder of 
the time is spent attending approximately 45 guest 
speaker seminars, field trips, panel meetings, and 
National Council on the Arts meetings. There are three 
fellowship sessions each year. Between 16 and 18 fellows 
are selected for each session. 

Nominations for one or two candidates are submitted by 
sponsoring organizations, and nonmatching grants are 
awarded to the sponsors, which disburse the money to 
the fellows. Grants consist of a $2,660 fellowship stipend 
and round-trip travel costs. 



Contact for Information 

Arts Endowment Fellows, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



The Arts Endowment's Office for Partnership was 
established in 1979. The main objective of the partnership 
programs is to encourage state arts agencies to play a 
central advisory role in formulating arts policy, in 
developing a national, state, regional, and local arts 
support system; in identifying national and state priorities; 
and in assessing the impact of federal and state support 
for the arts. The Office administers the Endowment's 
financial support of the arts through state arts agencies, 
and it directs the Artists-in-Schools Program (see no. 194). 
Other funds are available to state and regional arts 
agencies through specific Endowment programs. 

The Office for Partnership administers grants in several 
categories to assist state arts agencies and regional arts 
organizations in implementing their arts plans. 

Basic State Operating Grants 

Through this program, the Endowment assists state arts 
agencies in their arts support function by awarding 
matching grants on an equal basis to all states ($275,000 
to each state arts agency in 1979) with the proviso that 
the State Arts Plan be approved by the Chairperson of the 
Endowment. The state agency then awards grants to 
public and private, nonprofit arts organizations that 
address the goals of the state plan, that meet high 
standards of excellence and cultural significance, and that 
seek to broaden accessibility to the arts and develop 
resources at the community level. It is expected that by 
1981 the office will be using a multiyear program design 
which will necessitate long-range state plans. 

State and National Priorities 

In addition to the basic grants, project funds ($4 million in 
1979) are available to state arts agencies for state or 
national priority ^projects. Such projects include activities 
of small arts groups, support for individual artists, 
developing new and minority audiences, planning, and 
research. Funds are made available to states on the basis 
of both need (determined by population) and effort 
(determined by the state's per capita appropriation to the 
state arts agency). 

Regional Grants 

Matching grants are available to regional groups of state 
arts agencies ($40,000 for each member state) to carry 
out multistate cooperative programs that have been 
approved by the Chairperson of the Endowment. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



206/207 



Governmental Support Services 

Approximately 5 percent of the fiscal year budget for the 
Partnership Program is available for service functions to 
the arts field. The program supports technical assistance 
and other services of national associations, planning and 
management training projects, national and regional 
meetings, consultations, evaluations, and establishment of 
regional representatives. 



Comment 

Although community arts agencies are eligible for funds in 
many Endowment categories, no single program 
addresses them specifically. At the time the Cultural 
Directory went to press, the Endowment was developing 
policy with regard to community arts agencies. 



Contact for Information 

Office for Partnership, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



207 Opera-Musical Theater Program 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to professional opera and musical theater 
producing companies, state and regional arts agencies, 
and organizations offering services to the field. 



Description 



The Opera-Musical Theater Program, created in 1978, 
assists all forms of professional music theater, from 
experimental and ethnic musical theater to classic musical 
comedy, operetta, and grand opera. Each year, the 
program issues Guidelines containing detailed application 
instructions and deadlines for the programs described 
below. 



New American Works 

Matching grants are made to professional companies to 
encourage the creation and production of contemporary 
American opera-musical theater works. Three types of 
projects are eligible for funding. 

Creation • The applicant company may receive up 
to $15,000, match it with at least an equal amount, and 
provide the combined amount to creative artists such as 
composers, librettists, choreographers, and designers to 
complete or adapt a new work. 



Development . Grants ($30,000 maximum) may be 
awarded to develop new or seldom-produced works 
through laboratory or workshop production. 

Rehearsal and Original Production • Grants 
($100,000 maximum) are made for rehearsal and original 
production of new works, including costs of copying and 
orchestration. 



Professional Companies 

Matching grants ranging from $2,500 to $225,000 (but 
rarely exceeding 10 percent of a company's budget for 
musical theater activities) are made to established 
companies that produce professional opera and musical 
theater. Companies must have operating budgets of at 
least $50,000. Grants are available for artistic 
development activities, administrative improvements, and 
community services. 

Regional Touring 

This 1980 pilot program offers matching grants ($50,000 
maximum) to touring companies and state or regional arts 
agencies to cover up to one-third of the actual costs of 
regional touring projects. Funded companies must be 
incorporated specifically to tour, and they must be original 
producers. Tours should be designed to last at least two 
weeks and no more than six weeks, and they must cover 
two or more states. The company should present at least 
two opera or musical theater works while on tour. Priority 
will be given to projects that bring works to areas that do 
not generally have them. 

Services to the Art 

Matching grants are made to service organizations 
offering assistance to the opera-musical field nationwide. 
Funds may be used to offer management and 
informational services to opera and musical theater 
constituents, to offer technical assistance and consulting 
services to developing professional companies, and to 
provide staff and maintenance for national offices and 
programs. 

Special Opera-Musical Theater Projects 

If 1980 funding is available, a few matching grants will be 
made to organizations for outstanding innovative projects 
that will enhance the future of opera and musical theater 
in the United States. Grants to organizations in this 
category may be renewed for no more than three years, 
with the nonfederal match increasing annually. 
Nonmatching grants to individuals may also be made. 

Contact for Information 

Opera-Musical Theater Program, National Endowment for 
the Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



National Endowment for the Arts 



208/209/210 



208 Special Constituencies Office 



What/For Whom 



Information and technical assistance for cultural 
organizations and the general public. Matching grants to 
cultural and service organizations for model projects. 



Description 



The main goal of the Office for Special Constituencies is 
to make the arts accessible to handicapped persons, 
older Americans, prisoners, veterans, and institutionalized 
populations. The Office does this by promoting barrier 
removal and special facilities construction in cultural 
buildings and also by encouraging creative and 
responsive programming. The regulations of Section 504 
of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act mandate equal opportunity 
for qualified handicapped persons in programs and 
activities of all recipients of federal financial assistance. 
The dual function of the Office is to represent the interests 
of special constituencies in Endowment programs and to 
assist grantees in finding creative and efficient methods 
for including special constituencies in regular arts 
programs. The Office addresses this function in specific 
areas. 

Grants • For 1979, the National Council on the Arts 
set aside $200,000 to be used to solicit proposals from 
arts organizations to research and implement new ways of 
making their programs accessible. Ten Endowment 
programs are participating in the model demonstration 
projects. The projects will be documented and published 
as part of the Office's technical assistance materials. The 
Office anticipates $300,000 for 1980 model projects for 
special constituencies. 

Publications . The Office makes available to state 
arts agencies, Endowment grantees, and any individuals 
requesting them, a broad range of technical assistance 
material containing practical information on planning and 
implementing programs. Materials from the National Arts 
and Handicapped Information Service, such as "Technical 
Assistance," "Funding Sources," and publications dealing 
with various aspects of arts accessibility are available. In 
addition, the Office maintains an extensive library of 
materials on arts programs for special constituencies. 

Seminars and Presentations • In five regional 
seminars on Section 504, the Endowment's regional 
representatives and representatives from the state arts 
agencies (see Appendix H) were trained in how to comply 
with the 504 regulations. They are offering related 
presentations to arts organizations in their regions. Other 
presentations and slide shows are available for 
conferences of cultural and service organizations. 

Hot Line • The Office is prepared to give telephone 
assistance to state arts agencies and individual inquiries. 
The number is (202) 634-4284. 

Center for Arts and the Aging • The Endowment 
supports the National Council on the Aging's operation of 



a resource center providing technical assistance to 
cultural organizations interested in programs involving 
older Americans. For information contact, Center for Arts 
and the Aging, National Council on the Aging, 1828 L 
Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036. 

Organizations or individuals needing assistance with 504 
compliance specifically related to historic properties 
should contact The Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation (see no. 5), The Office of Preservation 
Services at the National Trust for Historic Preservation 
(see no. 230), or The Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service in the Department of the Interior (see 
no. 128). 

Contact for Information 

Office for Special Constituencies, National Endowment for 
the Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



209 Special Projects 



What/For Whom 



Grants for artists' colonies, arts presenting organizations, 
service organizations, and creative projects involving two 
or more disciplines. 



Description 



At the time the Cultural Directory was going to press, the 
Special Projects Program was undergoing extensive 
revision and specific program guidelines were not 
available. In general, the program will continue to support 
multidisciplinary projects, including experimental and 
innovative undertakings that are ineligible for funding 
under other Endowment programs. 



Contact for Information 



Special Projects Program, National Endowment for the 
Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



210 Theater Program 



What/For Whom 



Matching grants to professional theaters, state arts 
agencies, regional arts organizations, and theater service 
organizations. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



210/211 



Description 



The Theater Program awards grants primarily to nonprofit 
professional theaters that present both traditional and 
innovative dramatic works and have been in continuous 
operation for at least two years. The Program is equally 
concerned with strengthening existing institutions, 
disseminating theater productions of the highest quality, 
and fostering creativity in the field. All grants require a 50 
percent match, preferably from contributed funds. Each 
year, the program issues Guidelines containing detailed 
application instructions and deadlines for the categories 
described below. 

Large Professional Theater Companies 

Matching grants are awarded to organizations with an 
annual operating budget of at least $250,000 and a 
performing season of at least five months. Grants assist 
artistic development, including increased staffing or 
playwright-in-residence programs as well as production 
support; improvement of administration; and community 
services. In 1979, of 80 applications, 72 grants, ranging 
from $2,500 to $174,000, were awarded. 

Professional Theater Companies with 
Short Seasons 

Matching grants ranging from $1 ,500 to $20,000 are made 
to professional theaters with short seasons and annual 
operating budgets of at least $100,000. Activities assisted 
are the same as those for the category "Large 
Professional Theater Companies." In 1979, of 32 
applications, 12 grants averaging $5,000 were awarded. 

Small Professional Companies 

Matching grants (most ranging between $1,500 to 
$10,000) are made to small theaters that produce at least 
50 performances a year in the United States and 
concentrate on the development of artists and the 
presentation of new works. Eligible costs may include 
salaries of actors and other professional staff, playwrights' 
stipends and expenses, audience development, and 
development of new funding sources. In 1979, 202 
applications were submitted; grants were awarded to 93 
small theater companies. 

Professional Theater Touring 

This pilot program awards matching grants (maximum 
$50,000) to state arts agencies, regional arts 
organizations, and other networks or consortia that wish to 
sponsor tours of professional theater companies. Theaters 
involved must be current grantees of the Theater Program. 
The Program's purpose is to bring high-quality theater to 
areas where it has not been available. Tours must last 
from two to six weeks, and half-week or full-week 
residencies are particularly encouraged. During the pilot 
period, applications are accepted only from organizations 
that have consulted with the Arts Endowment in advance 
about the proposed project. In 1979, of 27 applications, 
26 grants were made in widely ranging amounts. 



Professional Theater Training 

Grants are made to organizations for training projects that 
benefit the field as a whole, not just a single institution. 
Eligible projects may include the development of 
communication and cooperation among training 
institutions and professional theaters, development of new 
master teachers, and search for new sources for 
scholarship aid. In 1979, one application was submitted 
and one training grant was awarded. 

Professional Theater for Youth 

Matching grants ranging from $2,500 to $20,000 are 
awarded to professional groups or separate companies 
within large theaters that produce dramatic material for 
audiences aged 5 through 14. Applicants must have an 
annual operating budget of at least $50,000. In 1979, of 
64 applications, there were 25 awards averaging $5,000. 

Services to the Field/Theater Resources 

Matching grants are made to organizations providing 
nationwide services to the theater field for special 
activities not eligible under other funding categories. 
Grants include informational, management, technical, and 
consulting services, or specialized services such as 
audition and casting programs for both professional 
theaters and artists. Grant amounts are determined by the 
nature of the project and the availability of funds. In 1979, 
of 22 applications, 12 were made in widely ranging 
amounts. 

State Arts Agencies-Theater Projects 

Matching grants are made to state arts agencies, either 
individually or in regional groups, to enable them to 
expand theater resources to benefit the broadest possible 
community and to develop professional theater in areas 
where it is not currently available. Only applicants that are 
not eligible under any of the above categories may apply. 
In 1979, one state arts agency applied and one grant was 
made in this category. 

Contact for Information 

Theater Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



21 1 /Treasury Fund 



What/For Whom 



Funds to public or private nonprofit, tax-exempt 
organizations that have been notifed of the Endowment's 
intention to award them a program grant and that have 
secured a pledge for a donation from a source outside the 
federal government. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



211/212 



Description 



The Endowment's Treasury Fund consists of 
congressionally appropriated funds that may be used only 
to match gifts to the Endowment from sources outside the 
federal government. This unique provision in the 
Endowment's legislation is designed to encourage and 
stimulate nongovernmental sources of funds for the arts. 

To receive money from the Treasury Fund, an applicant 
must qualify for a grant under the guidelines of a 
particular Endowment program. Funds are not available 
for projects or amounts different from those specified in 
the regular program guidelines. Applicants must also 
secure a pledge from an outside donor to make a gift to 
the Endowment. This contribution frees an equal amount 
from the Treasury Fund to be given to the grantee. The 
doubled amount must then be matched by the grantee. 
Thus, for every $1 donated to the Endowment, another $1 
is released from the Treasury. The grantee then matches 
this $2 with an additional $2. The result is that each 
federal dollar must be matched by three nonfederal 
dollars. 

The Endowment may accept gifts or bequests of money or 
property. Generally, these are tax deductible. To simplify 
procedures, donors do not have to send their gifts directly 
to the Endowment. Following approval of the grant, the 
grantee may receive the donation directly and report 
payment to the Endowment. 

Detailed information on how a Treasury Fund grant is 
arranged is available from the office listed below. 
Applicants wishing to use the Treasury Fund method 
should contact the appropriate Endowment program 
before applying for the grant. 

Contact for Information 

Office of the General Counsel, National Endowment for the 
Arts, Washington, DC 20506 



Fellowship Programs 

Fellowships ($10,000 maximum, with a limited number of 
$3,000 awards for emerging artists) are awarded to 
professional visual artists, craftspersons, and 
photographers to set aside time and to purchase 
materials, and generally to advance their careers as they 
see fit. Students are ineligible. Fellowships ($5,000 
maximum) are also awarded to visual arts critics for 
specific projects. Smaller fellowships ($1,000 maximum) 
are awarded to critics for travel to expand their knowledge 
of the current art scene outside their own region. Art 
historians should apply for funding to the National 
Endowment for the Humanities (see nos. 213-221). The 
1979 statistics indicate the extremely competitive nature of 
this program. Of 4,063 visual artists applying, 160 
received fellowships totaling $1,047,000; of 1,368 
craftspersons applying, 48 received fellowships totaling 
$424,000; of 1,844 photographers, 57 received fellowships 
totaling $430,000; and of 61 critics, 20 received 
fellowships totaling $72,000. 



Art in Public Places 

Matching grants (maximum $50,000 for commissioned 
artworks and $25,000 for purchases) are made to cities, 
towns, other state and local governmental units, state and 
local arts agencies, universities, and other nonprofit 
tax-exempt organizations to commission or purchase the 
best contemporary art for installation in public places, 
other than museums. This program is designed to provide 
new challenges and opportunities for American artists of 
exceptional talent and achievement. The work may be in 
any medium and the artist should participate in the choice 
and planning of the site. All applicants must notify the 
Visual Arts Program, by letter, of their intention to apply for 
a grant. In 1979, there were 96 applications and 29 grant 
awards totaling $720,902. 



21 2 Visual Arts Program 



What/For Whom 



Nonmatching fellowships to individual artists and critics; 
matching grants to nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations 
and state and local governments. 



Description 



The Visual Arts Program assists visual artists of 
exceptional talent, individually and through nonprofit, 
tax-exempt organizations. Eligible artists are professionals 
working in painting, sculpture, printmaking, and drawing; 
video, conceptual, or performing arts; crafts; or 
photography. Each year, the Visual Arts Program, issues 
Guidelines containing detailed application instructions and 
deadlines for the programs listed below. 



Nonmatching planning grants ($2,000 maximum) are 
awarded to visual artists of exceptional talent to 
investigate new materials and techniques for art in public 
places and to plan and design projects for specific public 
sites. Innovative design is encouraged and a wide variety 
of sites is eligible. Students are ineligible. In 1979, there 
were 84 applications and 1 1 grant awards totaling 
$22,000. 



Artists, Critics, Photographers, and Craftsmen in 
Residence 

Matching grants ($2,000 maximum) are made to art 
schools, museums, university art departments, and other 
arts organizations, including state and local arts agencies, 
to invite artists, critics, photographers, and craftspersons 
of national reputation for short-term residencies to work 
with students and faculty. Funds may be used only for 
artists' fees and transportation costs. In 1979, there were 
104 applications and 85 grant awards totaling $181,734. 



National Endowment for the Arts 



212 



Artists Spaces/ Photography Workshops and 
Spaces 

Matching grants ($20,000 maximum) are awarded to 
organizations that provide spaces where artists can 
experiment and create new works and that provide 
exhibition space not generally available through museums 
or commercial galleries. Additional funds, up to $10,000, 
may be awarded on a nonmatching basis for fees and 
honoraria to artists. In 1979, there were 144 applications 
and 84 grant awards totaling $680,000. 

Building Arts 

Nonmatching grants ($5,000 maximum) are awarded to 
visual artists for researching and experimenting with new 
designs, materials, and techniques for building 
construction. Artists may apply for either a research grant 
or a planning grant. Research grants assist craftspersons 
and artists in developing innovative uses of industrial 
materials and technology in the design of building 
components; planning grants are used to design the sites 
and the buildings themselves, This is a new 1980 funding 
category. 

Crafts Programs 

In addition to crafts awards under Fellowships and 
Building Arts (see above) and Services to the Field (see 
below), the Visual Arts Program makes grants in four other 
categories for crafts projects. 

Crafts Apprenticeships • Nonmatching grants 
($5,000 maximum) are awarded to apprentices or to 
master craftspersons to hire apprentices. Matching grants 
($10,000 maximum) enable organizations such as art 
schools, community art centers, and crafts workshops to 
support existing apprenticeship programs. Grantees may 
reapply for a grant in the succeeding year. In 1979, there 
were 86 applications and 18 grant awards totaling 
$86,500. 

Crafts Exhibitions • Matching grants ($50,000 
maximum) are made to universities, museums, community 
art centers, crafts associations, state arts agencies, and 
other organizations to develop crafts exhibitions of 
contemporary or historical significance and to publish 
catalogues of lasting value. Funds may not be used for 
purchase of works for permanent collections. In 1979, 
there were 54 applications and 18 grant awards totaling 
$165,416. 

Crafts Projects . Grants ($3,000 maximum) are 
awarded to craftspersons to carry out specific projects of 
short duration. Funds may be used for travel, research, 
and experimentation, or other important activities that 
advance artists' careers. This is a new 1980 funding 
category. 

Crafts Workshops and Master Classes • Matching 
grants ($15,000 maximum) are awarded to organizations 
to sponsor short-term workshops and master classes 
where nationally recognized craftspersons meet with their 
professional peers and advanced students to experiment, 



collaborate, or produce new works, usually on a specific 
theme. In 1979, there were 33 applications and 19 grant 
awards totaling $125,000. 

Photography Assistance Programs 

In addition to photography projects funded under 
Fellowships and Artists Spaces (see above) and Services 
to the Field (see below), the Visual Arts Program makes 
additional matching grants to organizations such as 
museums, universities, state arts agencies, libraries, or 
historical archives that are capable of undertaking 
projects in the following categories: 

Exhibitions • Grants up to $15,000 for a major 
exhibition and $7,500 for smaller exhibitions are awarded 
to enable organizations to present photography exhibitions 
of contemporary or historical significance. Eligible costs 
include publication of accompanying catalogues. In 1979, 
there were 97 applications and 44 grant awards totaling 
$318,858. 

Publications • Grants ($2,000 maximum) are made 
to assist the publication of outstanding works of historical 
or contemporary significance in photography, and to help 
provide an appropriate context for reproduction of 
photographs, publication of research, essays, and 
criticism, and documentation of the work of little-known 
photographers of historical significance. In 1979, there 
were 46 applications and 14 grant awards totaling 
$113,710. 

Surveys . Grants ($15,000 maximum) enable 
organizations to commission photographers to investigate 
and document aspects of American culture or the physical 
character of a particular city or region. Other eligible 
projects include research, collection, and cataloguing 
historical photographs of a region, or combinations of new 
commissioned work with historical photographs. 
Organizations may apply for Exhibitions or Publications 
Grants (see above) on successful completion of a Survey 
Project. In 1979, there were 64 applications and 11 grant 
awards totaling $92,860. 

Services to the Field 

Grants (usually not more than $10,000) are awarded on a 
matching basis to organizations and on a nonmatching 
basis to individuals to provide services to professional 
visual artists. Priority is given to programs providing artists 
with financial aid, technical assistance, or funds for 
materials and equipment. Other eligible projects may 
include providing arts communities with information and 
printed materials on contemporary art, publications that 
contribute to the national dialogue on contemporary art, or 
documentation of public and private crafts and 
photography collections. In 1979, there were 228 
applications and 1 12 grant awards totaling $556,000. 

Contact for Information 

Visual Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 
Washington, DC 20506 



213/214 



National 
Endowment for 
the Humanities 



21 3 Introduction 

The National Endowment for the Humanities is an 
independent federal agency which makes grants to 
organizations and individuals for research, education, and 
public activity in the humanities. The humanities include, 
but are not limited to, history, philosophy, languages, 
literature, linguistics, archeology, jurisprudence, history 
and criticism of the arts, ethics, comparative religion, and 
those aspects of the social sciences employing historical 
or philosophical approaches. The last category includes 
cultural anthropology, sociology, political theory, 
international relations, and other subjects concerned with 
questions of value rather than with quantitative matters. 
Historical, theoretical, and critical studies in the arts are 
eligible for assistance. Support for creative, original works 
in the arts or for performance or training in the arts is 
available from the National Endowment for the Arts (see 
no. 193). Both the Humanities and Arts Endowments are 
part of the National Foundation on the Arts and the 
Humanities established by Congress in 1965 within the 
executive branch of the government. The Foundation also 
includes the Federal Council on the Arts and the 
Humanities which promotes coordination between the 
programs of the two Endowments and those of other 
federal agencies that support cultural activities. 

Unless applying for a fellowship, prospective applicants 
should send the Endowment a preliminary description of 
their project. Staff will inform applicants of a proposal's 
eligibility, furnish them with specific guidelines and 
instructions, and request additional information if such is 
needed for accurate evaluation by reviewers and 
panelists. 

Grants are awarded competitively following a careful 
evaluation process. All applications are reviewed 
individually by professionals outside the federal 
government. Nonfederal panels judge applications in 
competition with one another within a given program. Four 
times each year, the National Council on the Humanities, 
an advisory body appointed by the President, meets to 
consider applications in light of reviewers' and panelists' 
comments. 

The Endowment received an appropriation of $145 million 
in 1979 to conduct grant making through six divisions: 
Education Programs (see no. 216), Fellowships (see no. 
217), Public Programs (see no. 218), Research Programs 



(see no. 219), Special Programs (see nos. 220 and 214), 
and State Programs (see no. 221). The Office of Planning 
and Policy Assessment each year supports a small 
number of "Planning and Assessment'' studies to collect 
and analyze information about national needs in the 
humanities; to design models and techniques useful for 
policy research, analysis, and evaluation; and to research, 
develop, and demonstrate more efficient management and 
administrative methods 

The Endowment does not generally support predoctoral 
fellowships, construction or restoration costs, museum or 
library acquisitions, costs of permanent equipment, 
research for an academic degree, or individual travel to 
professional meetings. (Requests for aid in traveling 
abroad to international meetings should be addressed to 
the American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46th 
Street, New York, NY 10007. which has a small grant 
from the Endowment for that purpose.) For social science 
projects in which statistical measurement and clinical 
approaches predominate, support is available from the 
National Science Foundation, the National Institute of 
Education, and other government agencies (see nos. 225 
and 95). 

In addition to detailed brochures and guidelines 
describing individual divisions and programs, each year 
the Endowment issues a Program Announcement 
summarizing current programs and procedures of the 
agency Annual reports, press releases, and other 
publications are also available, usually through the Public 
Affairs Office 

The Endowment maintains a library collection of 
approximately 5,000 books and 500 journals, which are 
available through interlibrary loan or for use on the 
premises. Holdings include foundation reports, books 
resulting from Endowment-funded projects, biographical 
materials, and reference works in the fields supported by 
the Endowment. 

Contact for Information 



Public Affairs Office, National Endowment for the 
Humanities, 806 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 



20506 



214 Challenge Grants 



What/For Whom 



Grants to any cultural or educational nonprofit institution 
whose program is entirely or partially in the humanities 
(see no 213 for definition). Each federal dollar must be 
matched by at least three nonfederal dollars. 



Description 



Challenge Grants, administered by the Division of Special 
Programs, afford humanities institutions an opportunity to 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



214/215/216 



strengthen their long-term financial stability by stimulating 
new or increased support from nonfederal sources. The 
purpose of this funding mechanism is to challenge an 
institution to examine both traditional and potential 
sources of support, its present audience and others who 
might be served, long-range programming, and financial 
needs. Further objectives are to encourage a nationwide 
public-private partnership in support of cultural institutions 
and to arouse citizen concern and support of these 
institutions. 

Challenge Grant funds and related matching funds — 
unlike other Endowment program grants — may be used for 
a variety of purposes deemed critical to maintaining or 
strengthening the institution's humanities activities, such 
as the acquisition of equipment and materials; building 
cash reserves and endowments; deficit defrayal; fund 
raising and development; general operations; 
maintenance, preservation, and conservation of 
collections; renovation of facilities; and other management 
and administrative expenses. Every applicant must 
develop a multiyear fund-raising plan. 

The federal portion of a Challenge Grant has ranged from 
a minimum of $2,000 up to $500,000 a year, depending 
on the merits of a proposal, size of an institution, and 
funds available. Every dollar awarded must be matched 
by the equivalent of at least three nonfederal dollars. 
Awards are based on assessments of institutional 
resources and needs; fund-raising ability; financial, 
administrative, and management improvements; promise 
for strengthened programs; and long-range support from 
nonfederal sources. 



215/Giffts-and-Matching Grants 



What/For Whom 



Grants to applicants for support from the National 
Endowment for the Humanities 



Description 



An applicant may sometimes be offered a gifts-and- 
matching grant as a supplement to an outright grant or as 
the sole form of Endowment support. The grantee must 
raise the gift portion to a level approved by the 
Endowment and have this sum donated to the 
Endowment, which then matches this money with federal 
funds and disburses the whole. The Endowment may 
accept an unlimited number of gifts, but the annual 
congressional appropriation limits the sum that can be 
matched with federal funds. 

The Endowment will not accept a gift for a particular 
project until the National Council on the Humanities has 
made a recommendation to the chairperson. An applicant 
who receives a formal offer of support from the 
Endowment, contingent upon the receipt of gift money for 
a project, should ask the donors to make their gifts 
payable to the Endowment. 

Contact for Information 

Public Affairs Office, National Endowment for the 
Humanities, Washington, DC 20506 



Example 



Approximately 46 percent of Challenge Grants applicants 
were awarded grants in 1979. The following institutions 
are among those which received grants for three-year 
projects from 1977 through 1979. The Chicago Historical 
Society in Illinois received $231,500 to establish a 
development office to broaden its community membership 
base and expand its business, corporate, and foundation 
support. The Eleutherian Mills Historical Library and 
Hagley Museum in Wilmington, Del., received $205,000 to 
aid capital improvements, including energy conservation 
measures; to increase and consolidate new sources of 
financial support; and to expand its humanities programs. 
Middlebury College in Vermont received $550,000 to 
strengthen the college's humanities offerings in 
languages, English literature, and history, and to create 
new endowments. The Tennessee State Museum in 
Nashville received $150,000 to raise monies for a museum 
association, hire a public relations director, and provide 
for equipment and storage facilities. 



216 Division off Education Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to two- and four-year colleges, universities 
(including extension and continuing education divisions), 
graduate schools, professional schools (including schools 
of education, vocational and technical schools), 
elementary and secondary schools and systems, and 
state education departments. Grants may also be made to 
other organizations that propose projects related to the 
formal curriculum of educational institutions. 



Description 



The Division of Education Programs supports the 
improvement of instruction in the humanities (see no. 213 
for definition) at all educational levels. The brochure 
Education Program Guidelines describes the Division's 
grants categories and application procedures in detail. 



Contact for Information 



Challenge Grant Program, National Endowment for the 
Humanities, 806 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20506 



Elementary and Secondary Education Grants 

Assistance is offered for imaginative efforts to improve 
teaching and learning at elementary and secondary levels. 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



216 



Especially encouraged are projects that promise to serve 
as models for other programs. Preferred proposals relate 
recent scholarship to inservice teacher training and the 
design of new curricula; promote collaboration between 
schools and other educational and cultural institutions, 
such as museums and universities; improve teacher and 
student knowledge of English literature, foreign languages 
and literatures, and history, especially social history; and 
emphasize expository writing within the context of 
humanities curricula. One in six applications is normally 
approved. Cost sharing of at least 10 to 20 percent is 
required. 

This program sponsors extended teacher institutes to 
allow school teachers and administrators to undertake 
yearlong collaborative efforts in curriculum development 
under the guidance of experts from schools and colleges. 
Regional development projects aiming at strengthening 
the humanities throughout an entire school system, or 
among contiguous school systems or groups of public or 
private schools, have also been funded. Collaboration 
among all appropriate educational and cultural institutions 
in the community is encouraged. 



Higher Education Institutional Grants 

Projects are designed primarily to strengthen the 
humanities curriculum and teaching at an individual 
college or university. 

Consultant Grants . Awards are made to enable 
institutions in the early stages of planning new programs 
or of reconsidering existing curricula, to obtain the advice 
and assistance of experienced teachers, scholars, and 
administrators. Consultants are selected from the National 
Board of Consultants, drawn from reviewers and directors 
of curriculum development projects funded by the 
Division. Virtually every eligible, timely, reasonable request 
for consultant aid is honored. In 1978, 90 percent of the 
135 applications were approved. Grants average $4,700. 
No cost sharing is required. 

Pilot Grants • Awards are made for the final 
planning, initial implementation, and evaluation of new 
courses in the humanities. Consultants, released time, and 
faculty workshops are examples of eligible expenses. 
Funding under a pilot grant may not exceed $50,000 over 
a 12- to 18-month period. Available funds normally permit 
approval of one out of three applications. The Endowment 
will assume no more than 80 percent of project costs. 

Development Grants . Support is provided for new 
programs in the humanities or for extensive revisions of 
existing programs. Funds may be used to develop a 
specific area of the humanities curriculum, such as a 
group of related courses or an ordered program of 
studies, or to make comprehensive revisions that affect 
the entire humanities curriculum. Development grants may 
not exceed $300,000 in outright funds over a three- to 
five-year period. Supplemental funding may be requested 
on a gifts-and-matching basis. 



Higher Education Projects Grants 

Support is offered to develop and test imaginative 
approaches to humanities education through one- to 
three-year projects centering on curriculum development. 
Projects Grants support the development of educational 
models for widespread use, in contrast to Institutional 
Grants as described above. Projects Grants recipients 
develop model courses and create, test, and disseminate 
exemplary curriculum materials that address a distinct 
need in humanities teaching. Publication costs of 
textbooks and other materials are not funded. Projects 
Grants include Humanities Institutes awards to colleges 
and universities for intensive residential institutes attended 
by faculty involved in undergraduate humanities teaching. 
The theme of the institute must be of regional or national 
interest. Each institute selects its participants in open 
competition from among faculty nominated by colleges 
according to Endowment guidelines. At least 10 percent 
cost sharing is required of Higher Education Projects 
grantees. One out of five requests for funding is expected 
to be approved. 

Example 

The following summaries indicate the variety of projects 
sponsored by the Division from 1977 through 1979. 

Elementary and Secondary Education Grants included a 
$79,774 grant to Purdue University in Indiana to conduct a 
"Foreign Language Teacher Institute" during the summer 
of 1978. Sixty teachers of French, German, and Spanish in 
a three-state area worked toward improving their spoken 
fluency, increasing their knowledge of language and 
culture, and developing teaching techniques and 
materials. The University of Wyoming received a two-year 
grant of $235,216 for a six-state "Regional Humanities 
Teaching Project." More than 200 elementary and 
secondary school teachers and administrators 
participated in institutes designed to improve the quality of 
humanities instruction. 

Higher Education Institutional Grants included a $5,395 
Consultant Grant to Quinnipiac College in Hamden, Conn., 
to plan an 18-hour humanities concentration for students 
in health and business programs. Southeast Community 
College in Cumberland, Ky., received a $3,355 grant to 
help design an Appalachian studies humanities core 
program with the assistance of the Center for Southern 
Folklore. A $41 ,534 Pilot Grant went to Lakeland 
College near Sheboygan, Wis., to test a team-taught, 
interdisciplinary core curriculum in the humanities and 
natural and social sciences in 1978-1979. James Sprunt 
Institute, a state-supported technical community college in 
Duplin County, N.C., was awarded $49,221 to test an 
interdisciplinary curriculum that examines the United 
States historical, political, and ethical experience. A 
$200,000 Development Grant went to Pacific Lutheran 
University in Tacoma, Wash., to implement a series of 
interdisciplinary team-taught humanities courses on social, 
economic, and technological change, and on human 
responsibility for dealing with these changes. The 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



216/217 



University of Kansas was awarded a $295,879 grant to 
implement a three-year program entitled "Business and 
the Humanities: A Closer Relationship." The program 
aimed at developing new courses of special interest to 
business students in philosophy, English, history, and 
languages. 

Higher Education Projects Grants included a $177,418 
grant to the American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities in Washington, D.C., to sponsor two "Institutes 
on Modernization and Social Change in Asia" for faculty 
members from 60 institutions to prepare courses 
describing three Asian societies. Wayne State University in 
Michigan received $49,200 for a series of six workshops 
and six conferences, the recommendations from which 
could provide a framework for humanities-based 
continuing education programs for working adults around 
the country. 

Contact for Information 

Division of Education Programs, National Endowment for 
the Humanities, 806 15th Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20506 



21 7 Division off Fellowships 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships, stipends, and seminars for teachers at the 
undergraduate level, scholars, and other professionals. An 
advanced degree is not necessary to qualify, but active 
candidates for degrees are ineligible. 



Description 



Fellowships and stipends are awarded for full-time study 
or research to teachers, scholars, and interpreters of the 
humanities (see no. 213 for definition) for periods of one 
year or less. The Division of Research Grants (see no. 
219) supports projects that require more than a single 
investigator or substantial expenses for research 
assistance, equipment, materials, or other costs. 
Proposals to plan curricula or develop teaching materials 
should be addressed to the Division of Education 
Programs (see no. 216). 

NEH Fellowships 

Approximately 369 fellowships were awarded for 
1979-1980. Maximum stipends are $10,000 for six months, 
or $20,000 for 12 months. Fellowships are offered in three 
categories: 

Category A • Fellowships support independent 
study and research by teachers, scholars, and others 
(including nonacademics) whose work seems likely to 
lead to significant contributions to humanistic thought and 



knowledge. Fellowships may be held for either six or 12 
months. In 1979, 167 such fellowships were awarded. 

Category B . Fellowships support independent 
study and research by persons engaged primarily in 
undergraduate teaching whose work will enhance their 
ability as teachers as well as contribute to humanistic 
thought and knowledge. Tenure covers either six or 12 
months. In 1979, 137 such fellowships were awarded. 

Category C • Fellowships of 12-month tenure 
provide opportunities for undergraduate college teachers 
to participate in seminars directed by distinguished 
scholars at designated universities with libraries suitable 
for advanced study. Faculty members of departments with 
doctoral programs are not eligible. In 1979, 65 such 
fellowships were awarded. 

Fellowships and Stipends for the Professions 

Assistance is given to persons in professions other than 
teaching to permit study of the historical, philosophical, 
social, and cultural dimensions of their professional 
interests. Nine-month fellowships were scheduled in 1979 
for journalists, and four-week seminars were held for 
business executives, journalists, labor leaders, lawyers 
and judges, physicians and other health care 
professionals, public administrators, and school 
administrators. Summer seminars of four or six weeks 
were also offered to teachers in law schools and schools 
of medicine and health care. Approximately 24 journalists 
received fellowships, 350 persons participated in 
professional seminars, and 100 persons in 
professional-school teacher seminars for law, medical, 
and health care schools. 

Summer Seminars for College Teachers 

Seminars are offered to provide teachers in under- 
graduate and two-year colleges an opportunity for 
advanced study or research in their own or related fields; 
the two-month stipend is $2,500. For eight weeks, those 
selected work under the direction of a distinguished 
scholar at an institution with access to the collections of a 
major library, participating in seminar discussions and 
pursuing individual projects. College teachers wishing to 
attend a seminar apply directly to the seminar director. 
(Each December the Division publishes a list of seminars 
to be held in the forthcoming year.) 

The Division plans to offer 123 seminars during the 
summer of 1979, each with 12 members, at institutions 
throughout the country. 

Summer Stipends 

College (two-year and four-year) and university faculty 
members, and others working in the humanities may apply 
for a stipend of $2,500 for two consecutive months of 
full-time study or research. An applicant employed by a 
college or university must be nominated by that institution. 
About one in seven applications is approved. In 1979, 230 
awards were made. 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



217/218 



Fellowship Support to Centers for Advanced Study 

Centers for advanced study, research libraries, and other 
equivalent institutions independent of universities are 
eligible to apply for funds with which to offer fellowships 
for study and research in the humanities Approximately 
40 to 50 fellowships were sponsored in 1979. 



Example 

The following summaries indicate the variety of projects 
sponsored by the Division from 1976 through 1979. 

NEH Fellowships included one to a professor of political 
science at the University of Texas, Dallas, for a study of 
the role of Chinese adolescents in the Cultural Revolution 
A professor of English and Afro-American Studies at 
Western Illinois University investigated the concept of 
luxury in eighteenth-century literature and thought while 
participating in a seminar at Northwestern University in 
Evanston, III , on "Romance and Romanticism: 
Psychological Revolutions of the Eighteenth and Early 
Nineteenth Centuries." 

Fellowships and Stipends for the Professions awarded a 
grant of $323,046 to the University of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor to bring 12 practicing journalists — reporters, editors, 
a photographer, a television producer, and a National 
Public Radio program director — to the university for an 
academic year of study in the humanities 

Summer Seminars for College Teachers funded a seminar 
at Indiana University, Bloomington, on "Liberty, Equality, 
and Fidelity in Bioethics," which brought philosophical and 
theological principles to bear on such issues as abortion, 
death and dying, eugenics, experimentation on human 
subjects, and truth and confidentiality. At the University of 
California, Berkeley, a historian conducted a seminar on 
"The Folk in American History," which examined selected 
oral and material sources — songs, anecdotes, dress, 
housing, tools — from different periods in U.S. history. 
Participants included historians and teachers of art, 
anthropology, ethnic studies, music, and speech 

Summer Stipends enabled a high school English teacher 
in Centerville, Ind., to analyze, identify, and catalogue a 
large number of Carl Sandburg's unpublished letters and 
manuscripts. A professor of history at Onondaga 
Community College in Syracuse, N.Y., studied the 
transition of obstetrics from an art practiced by untrained 
men and women to a branch of medicine controlled by 
male physicians, a contribution to both the history of 
women and the history of medicine 



Contact for Information 

Division of Fellowships, National Endowment for the 
Humanities, 806 15th Street. NW, Washington, DC 20506 



218 Division of Public Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to educational institutions, film and video 
production centers, radio and television stations, historical 
organizations, libraries, museums, and other nonprofit 
organizations 



Description 



The Division of Public Programs supports projects that link 
the resources of museums, historical organizations, public 
libraries, and the broadcast media with the expert 
knowledge of scholars and teachers in the humanities 
(see no 213 for definition). Projects are designed to 
engage the general public in thoughtful explorations of 
US history, customs, and values and of the varieties of 
human experience in other cultures. 



Media Program 

Assistance is provided for film, radio, and television 
programs that examine and interpret fundamental 
concepts and themes in the humanities. Film and ■ 
television projects should be of regional or national 
importance; radio projects may be for local use. Only 
projects that demonstrate extensive and thoughtful use of 
materials in the humanities and evidence cooperation 
among scholars and professional producers, writers, and 
directors are competitive Cost sharing frequently is 
required Four categories of grants are made: 

Planning Grants to develop project ideas and long-range 
planning; 

Development Grants to prepare finished scripts tor 
programs: 

Pilot Grants to produce pilot programs: 

Production Grants to support the full production of a 
single program or series. 

Museums and Historical Organizations Program 

Support is given to projects that use the educational 
services, collections, and staff expertise of museums and 
historical organizations to interpret the intellectual and 
cultural heritage of human civilizations to the public Not 
only museums and historical organizations but also other 
institutions capable of implementing interpretive programs 
in the humanities are eligible for assistance. Four major 
categories of support are provided 

General Planning Grants • Awards are made to 
examine the strengths and shortcomings of current 
programs m the humanities and to call upon appropriate 
outside expertise — scholars, curators, exhibit consultants, 
or others — to design a long-term strategy for improvement 
Smaller institutions relying heavily on volunteer staff are 
especially encouraged to apply. 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



218/219 



Sharing Collection Resources . Grants are made 
so that institutions with outstanding collections may 
assemble interpretive exhibitions for short- or long-term 
loans to other institutions. 

Permanent Interpretive Projects • Assistance is 
provided for the interpretation of important collections 
permanently housed in museums, historical organizations, 
and other institutions Examples of projects are new 
installations; historic site interpretations; film series and 
public symposia; and catalogues, brochures, and 
self-guiding tour programs. Funding is available for both 
planning and executing projects. 

Temporary Interpretive Projects • Support is 
available for projects of short duration that provide 
thematic interpretations of objects, artifacts, documents, 
and other resources not on permanent display. Special 
encouragement is given to programs that use the artifact 
and archival collections of small museums and local 
historical organizations. Funding is available for both 
planning and executing projects 

Public Library Program 

The newest of the Endowment's public programs, the 
Public Library Program makes awards for projects based 
on the collections and services of nonprofit libraries 
serving the general public. Any nonprofit library is eligible 
to apply for funds so long as the humanities project is 
aimed at the general adult public. Among organizations 
eligible to apply are community, county, regional, and 
state libraries; public library systems; independent 
nonprofit libraries; library associations; library schools; and 
academic or research libraries. 

Projects should promote greater public use of humanities 
resources in libraries and strengthen the ability of libraries 
and their staffs to provide programs in the humanities. 
Encouragement is given to library projects that involve 
continuing collaboration with other community educational 
and cultural institutions and with scholars trained in the 
subject areas of the humanities. Proposals are also 
welcomed that relate library humanities resources to 
audiences of handicapped, minority, and older persons, 
and residents of isolated rural areas 

Planning awards typically do not exceed $15,000 and last 
from six to nine months. Implementation grants normally 
range from $10,000 to $200,000 for a maximum of two 
years. Cost-sharing is ordinarily required. 



Example 

The following summaries indicate the variety of projects 
sponsored by the Division 

The Media Program awarded a Development Grant of 
$76,150 to WPBT-TV in North Miami, Fla., for work on a 
series exploring the history of slavery in the United States. 
A Pilot Grant of $505,414 to the University of Washington 
in Seattle made possible a six-part television series on the 
ethical, legal, and moral issues arising from technological 



advances and medical and biological research. A 
Production Grant of $266,389 in 1978 to Southwest 
Missouri State University in Springfield sponsored two 
hour-long films examining the esthetic, cultural, economic, 
and psychological expectations of an Ozarks community's 
inhabitants. 

In 1978, the Museums and Historical Organizations 
Program gave the Museum of Northern Arizona in 
Flagstaff an award of $271,820 to reinstall and interpret its 
permanent anthropology collections, featuring Anazazi, 
Hopi, and Navajo cultures. Designed in cooperation with 
tribal members, the exhibits emphasize the continuity 
between prehistoric and historic cultures and the diversity 
of the region's native groups in origin, language, and 
world view. An award of $82,513 to Old Salem, Inc., in 
Winston-Salem, N.C., will permit the installation of three 
permanent interpretive exhibits that portray Moravian 
concepts of education and religion in the community s 
everyday life during the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries 

In 1978. the Public Library Program granted the Alpha 
Regional Library in West Virginia $49,295 for a series of 
workshops and a community outreach effort involving 
humanities scholars, local historians, and the general 
public in studies of folklore and folklife, genealogy, history 
of technology, and oral history. The Oklahoma Department 
of Libraries was awarded a $300,000 grant and $100,000 
in gifts and matching funds to develop a statewide urban 
and rural network of library programs based on the theme 
of Oklahoma's multicultural heritage Pierce County Rural 
Library District in the state of Washington received a 
$75,000 award in 1979 to implement humanities 
programming for senior citizens, particularly those 
confined to nursing and private homes. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Division of Public Programs, 
National Endowment for the Humanities, 806 15th Street, 
NW, Washington, DC 20506 



219 Division of Research Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to individuals, colleges and universities, research 
institutions, libraries, historical organizations, learned 
societies, and archives 



Description 



The Division of Research Programs is concerned with all 
phases of the research process: collecting and making 
accessible the raw materials of research; production of 
reference works, research tools, authoritative editions and 
translations; the support of research conferences; and the 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



219 



interpretation and dissemination of knowledge of the 
humanities (as defined in no. 213). Many grants are for 
long-range, collaborative projects. Applicants should also 
investigate the possibility of a grant from the National 
Historical Publications and Records Commission (see no. 
166). A statement is available from either agency 
explaining the ways in which these programs complement 
each other. 



General Research Program 

This program supports a wide range of scholarship in the 
humanities in two categories: Basic Research projects, 
and State, Local, and Regional History projects. 

Basic Research Program • Projects develop and 
interpret knowledge in all fields of the humanities and 
frequently involve innovative methodologies and 
collaborative, interdisciplinary scholarship. Support for 
archeological projects is offered through this program. 
Projects that primarily address scientific questions are 
considered by the National Science Foundation (see no. 
225). 

State, Local, and Regional History Projects • 
Support is provided to increase understanding of the 
history and customs of communities and regions in the 
United States and to encourage cooperation among 
scholars and citizens in developing and using the 
resources of the humanities. 



Conferences 

The Division supports conferences and workshops for 
scholars to discuss or develop research on a particular 
topic, explore directions in which research should move, 
or plan improved conditions for research. 



Publications Program 

Grants subvent the publication of scholarly books in the 
humanities. Nonprofit publishers may apply for grants; 
commercial publishers, for contracts. No subsidy of more 
than $10,000 per volume may be awarded. 



Research Collections 

The purpose of the program is to make research 
resources more accessible to scholars. Grants are made 
to organize material, fill gaps in collections through oral 
history techniques, and locate and organize research 
materials on specific subjects. Assistance is given to 
address national problems in library and archival fields, 
and to catalogue, inventory, arrange, or otherwise process 
any significant research collection and prepare guides to 
that collection. Small grants — usually $1,000 or less— are 
made to bring in a consultant to advise on the^ 
methodology for making a collection accessible. 



Research Materials 

Support is provided for up to three years to prepare 
reference works and research tools in the humanities 
under three categories. 

Research Tools and Reference Works • Grants are 
made to create bibliographies, dictionaries, atlases, 
encyclopedias, concordances, linguistic grammars, data 
bases, indexes, and guides. 

Editions . Grants are made to edit works by 
significant authors or of materials that focus on historic 
events, themes, or figures. 

Translations • The Program supports annotated 
translations to acquaint readers with the cultural legacy 
and current scholarship of other cultures. All translations 
must include an introduction and annotations dealing with 
the historical and intellectual context of the work. 

Example 

The following summaries indicate the variety of projects 
sponsored by the Division. 

The General Research Program in 1978 awarded a Basic 
Research grant of $150,000 to the American Jewish 
Committee in New York City for the "Oral History of • 
Recent Soviet Emigres in America." Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale received $100,000 for a two-year 
project, "Works on Cinematic and Aesthetic Theory by 
Sergei M. EisenstekV' and the Virginia Historical 
Landmark Commission was awarded up to $196,819 for a 
three-year project, "York River Underwater Archaeology, 
Shipwreck." 

State, Local, and Regional History Projects awards 
included $23,965 to a researcher for an "Architectural 
History of Bangor, Me," and $35,719 to a resea r cher in 
Menasha, Wis., for a "Social History of Neenah, 
Wisconsin's Prominent Paper Manufacturing Families." 

Conference grants included one for $8,820 to the 
University of Alabama for "The American Writers and the 
Thirties." With a grant of $42,081 the University of 
California, San Diego, sponsored a research conference 
on the "Chinese Cultural Experience in America: An 
Approach through the Movement Arts." 

Research Materials awarded a researcher at Clark 
University in Worcester, Mass., a Research Tools and 
Reference WorRs grant of $16,710 for a "Bibliography of 
the History of the Family and Kinship." An Editions award 
of $65,000 to Mississippi State University sponsored an 
edition of the works of W.M. Thackeray. A Translations 
award of $29,040 to the University of Kansas was given 
for the T'ang Code, the single most important collection of 
laws in the history of East Asia. 

Contact for Information 

Division of Research Programs, National Endowment for 
the Humanities, 806 15th Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20506 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



220 



220 Division of Special Programs 



What/For Whom 

Grants to individuals including young people, and 
nonprofit organizations. 



Description 

The Division of Special Programs was established in 1979 
to ensure support for promising new project ideas falling 
outside the guidelines of the Endowment's five major 
program divisions. 

Challenge Grants (see no. 214) 

Program Development 

A limited number of grants are made to test new ways of 
relating the humanities to the interests and concerns of 
wider audiences. Professional, civic, service-oriented, and 
job-related voluntary organizations in particular are 
encouraged to use resources in the humanities to examine 
topics of interest to their members. Consortia of civic, 
educational, and cultural organizations are encouraged to 
use local humanities resources and to examine topics of 
special concern to the citizens of a region or metropolitan 
area. 

Guidelines were under development early in 1979 for a 
new category of funding for personnel training and 
technical assistance. Eligible groups may include 
museums, library associations, public radio and television 
stations, community and ethnic groups, and others 
involved in interpreting the humanities to the public. 
Sponsored projects would strengthen the long-term ability 
of an institution's staff to provide humanities programs and 
could involve seminars, workshops, and the employment 
of consultants. Also planned was the addition to the 
Endowment staff of a folklorist, whose particular 
responsibility would be to work with grass roots 
organizations, ethnic and folk groups often unaware of 
federal resources. 

Science, Technology, and Human Values 

The purpose of this program is to foster research, 
education, and public programs that seek to understand 
and assess the implications of scientific and technological 
innovation through the perspective of the humanities, 
particularly history, jurisprudence, and philosophy. This 
office provides overall coordination for grants made in 
support of this initiative, most often by the appropriate 
division — Education or Public Programs, for example. 
Liaison is also maintained with the National Science 
Foundation's (NSF) counterpart program, Ethics and 
Values in Science and Technology (see no. 223), which 
sponsors projects in which natural or social science 
methodology or subject matter predominate or in which 
humanists and scientists collaborate. Joint funding may be 



arranged for projects in the latter category. When it is 
unclear to an applicant whether an NSF or Endowment 
program is more appropriate for a particular proposal, an 
inquiry may be addressed to the Office of Science, 
Technology, and Human Values. The Office is looking into 
possibilities for similar liaison arrangements with other 
federal scientific agencies, such as the Department of 
Energy. 

Special Projects 

This office is responsible for supporting humanities 
projects that do not fit precisely into any division's 
program or that fall between two divisions, or that are in 
totally new areas of humanities activity. Projects funded 
under this category constitute a wide variety of 
emergency, experimental, one-time, or other special or 
unique activities. 

Youth Programs 

The Office of Youth Programs sponsors opportunities for 
young people to learn about the humanities outside of 
formal educational settings, through two grant categories. 

Youthgrants • Grants are made to young people, 
usually in their teens or 20s, to develop and conduct 
humanities projects. Neither academic affiliation nor an 
academic degree is required. Although teachers and 
scholars are encouraged to serve as advisors, young 
people must have primary responsibility for the project's 
initiation, planning, and execution. The program is 
expressly designed to encourage ventures similar to those 
conducted by more experienced professionals within the 
Endowment's other programs. For example, a project 
could involve designing and conducting an educational 
program, formal or informal; study or research of a 
specific subject area in the humanities; dissemination of 
humanistic knowledge or materials; or application of the 
humanities to ethical or social problems. 

Most awards for individual projects are under $2,500, but 
grants for group projects may range up to $10,000; no 
matching is required. Scholarships, loans, or other types 
of student aid are not provided. It is estimated that in 
1980, 500 applications will be considered, and 125 grants 
made. 

Youth Projects • This experimental program 
encourages organizations and institutions to offer 
opportunities for young people to enrich their 
understanding and skills in the humanities. Grants are 
made to nonprofit organizations, such as youth, civic, and 
labor organizations; libraries; museums; colleges; and 
community groups. Projects actively and substantially 
involve large numbers of young people or produce 
innovative resource materials for their use. Collaboration 
between experienced professionals in the humanities and 
in youth education is required. Grants ranged up to 
$200,000 and averaged about $30,000, or a maximum of 
about $50 per young participant. It is estimated that in 
1980, 800 applications will be received, and 130 awards 
made. 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



220/221 



Example 



Program Development granted $150,000 in 1978 to the 
Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Union in New York City 
to sponsor discussion programs for its members at union 
halls on such topics as the community, family, and work. 
North Carolina State University in Raleigh received 
$57,000 for an experimental humanities program operated 
through the Agriculture Extension Service. Faculty 
members travel to rural areas, leading discussions on 
such topics as regional writers, religion, and First 
Amendment rights. 

In 1978, the Office of Science, Technology, and Human 
Values awarded a grant of $50,000 to Carnegie-Mellon 
University for a "Retrospective Assessment of Pittsburgh 
and Allegheny County Air Pollution Control Statutes: 
Values, Policy Formulation, Social Impacts, and Value 
Change." 

Special Projects awarded the Institute for Advanced 
Study, in cooperation with the American Institute of 
Physics and the Federation of Public Programs in the 
Humanities, a $220,000 grant in 1978 to develop a series 
of activities for the National Einstein Centennial 
Celebration in 1979. The Endowment contributed 
$248,000 towards the funding of "Japan Today," an 
international symposium exploring the culture of 
contemporary Japan through exhibitions, drama, film, 
music, dance, and seminars coordinated by the Japan 
Society. 

In 1978, Youth Programs awarded a recent college 
graduate in California a $2,653 Youthgrant to develop a 
series of radio programs documenting music of the San 
Francisco Bay Area labor movement. An award of $2,060 
to a 19-year-old undergraduate at the University of 
Maine-Orono enabled him to research occupations in 
Lincoln County, Me., between 1900-1930 and prepare a 
traveling exhibit that will include historical photographs 
and transcribed interviews with residents who worked at 
these occupations. 

The Girl Scout Council of St. Croix Valley in Minnesota 
received a $6,514 Youth Project award to develop a 
guidebook on historic sites in that region, focusing on the 
contributions of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century 
women. A $5,000 award to a summer CETA program (see 
no. 144) in Atlanta, Ga., helped young people research 
the Sweet Auburn neighborhood, the center of the black 
business community and home of Martin Luther King, Jr. 
The young people conducted interviews with residents, 
contributed to photographic essays and oral histories, and 
prepared tours and brochures on the history of Sweet 
Auburn. 



221 /Division of State Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to state humanities committees, which in turn 
provide up to one-half of project costs for proposals from 
public and private nonprofit groups, organizations, and 
institutions. 



Description 



The Division of State Programs coordinates a program of 
grants to private, volunteer citizens' committees in each 
state. Each state humanities committee supports, through 
open grants competitions, humanities projects designed 
by the state's citizens and responsive to their interests. 
Each committee establishes its own program and 
procedures for solicitation and review of proposals. 

Although the committees are permitted to invite 
applications in any humanities area, they particularly 
encourage projects that are designed for an adult, 
out-of-school audience and that bring together scholars 
and members of the public for discussions from the 
perspective of the humanities of contemporary social and 
public policy, values, history, and cultural traditions. 

Committees are composed equally of professionals in the 
humanities and members of the general public: humanities 
scholars, administrators of academic and cultural 
institutions, representatives of business, labor, farming, the 
professions, civic and ethnic organizations — more than 
1,100 citizens in the 50 states. Two members on each 
committee are appointed by the governor. 

Grants range from $100 to much larger sums for statewide 
efforts. At least 50 percent matching in cash or in kind is 
required. 



Example 



In 1978 approximately 2,200 projects were funded by 
state humanities programs at an average cost of just 
under $8,000 each. The Alaska Humanities Forum 
sponsored "Alaska Review," a television series that 
explores public policy issues and ethics, a conference on 
the problems of Aleutian and Pribilof native cultures, and a 
statewide conference on the contemporary role of the 
writer in Alaska. The Oklahoma Humanities Committee 
sponsored a television series featuring interviews with 
more than 80 Oklahoma women, a statewide conference 
on "Moral Implications of the Holocaust: What Can We 
Learn and Teach?" and a "summer humanist" program 
under which scholars live in and work with small towns to 
develop local humanities programs. 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate Program), Division of Special Programs, 
National Endowment for the Humanities, 806 15th Street, 
NW, Washington, DC 20506 



Contact for Information 



State humanities committee (see Appendix I) or Division 
of State Programs, National Endowment for the 
Humanities, 806 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20506 



222/223 



National Science 
Foundation 



Description 



222 Introduction 



The National Science Foundation (NSF) was established in 
1950 to promote and advance scientific progress in the 
United States. The Foundation supports scientific research 
and education projects in the mathematical, physical 
environmental, biological, social, behavioral, and 
engineering sciences. Basic research is emphasized, but 
NSF is also involved in applied research directed toward 
the solution of more immediate problems. Its educational 
programs are aimed at ensuring increased understanding 
of science at all educational levels and an adequate 
supply of scientists and engineers NSF does not 
specifically support projects in clinical medicine, the arts 
and the humanities, business areas, or social work 
However, projects that use the arts and humanities to 
achieve NSF's overall goals will be considered for funding 
Most awards are made on a cost-sharing or jointly funded 
basis. Prospective applicants are encouraged to contact 
the appropriate program for its brochures and to discuss 
the proposal prior to submitting an application 

NSF annually issues A Guide to Programs, which in 
summary form describes the principal characteristics, 
basic purpose, and eligibility requirements for each 
program. The Guide to Science Education Programs and 
guideline brochures for education grants also are issued 
annually. A newsletter, NSF Bulletin, annual report, awards 
lists, and other materials are also available. 



Contact for Information 

Public Information Branch, National Science Foundation, 
Washington, DC 20550 



223 Off ice of Science and Society 



What/For Whom 



Grants to colleges, universities, museums, citizen groups, 
laboratories, industrial firms, professional associations, 
and other profit and nonprofit organizations; grants to 
professional scientists and engineers for Public Service 
Science Residencies. 



The Office of Science and Society programs are intended 
to improve understanding of the relationship between 
science and society among the general public and the 
scientific and technological communities, and to 
encourage informed public participation in the resolution 
of policy issues involving science and technology 
Individual grants programs are described in the Guide to 
Science Education Programs and guideline brochures, 
issued annually These publications should be consulted 
for specifics concerning eligibility, application procedures, 
matching and cost-sharing requirements. 

Ethics and Values in Science and Technology 

The program supports proiects that encourage and refine 
professional and public debate on the ethical rules and 
social standards governing the conduct of scientific and 
technological activities, including the sponsorship and 
application of research. Liaison is maintained with the 
National Endowment for the Humanities counterpart 
program, the Office of Science, Technology, and Human 
Values (see no. 220) Example: In 1978, a $147,919 award 
was made to Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., to 
study the ethical problems of anthropological and 
sociological fieldwork. The project includes a survey of the 
literature on this topic and workshops with professional 
fieldworkers Materials for experienced fieldworkers and 
graduate students planning careers in fieldwork will be 
produced 

Public Understanding of Science 

The program assists efforts to improve the distribution of 
information about science and technology to the general 
public, particularly with regard to the scientific and 
technological content of major public issues During 1978, 
56 percent of the program's funds were allocated for 
broadcasting and 29 percent for museum projects 
Example: The Otrabanda Company in New Orleans, La . 
was awarded $36,400 in 1977 to develop a scientifically 
and historically accurate dramatic presentation of the 
discovery of glass, which would demonstrate the process 
of scientific discovery and the impact of science on 
human life A network of science museums and college 
centers has hosted the presentation around the country. 
Each performance concludes with a discussion among 
cast and audience of the relationships between science 
and society; performances are supplemented by 
interviews and radio and television adaptations. 

Science for Citizens 

The goal of the Science for Citizens program is to 
encourage communication between scientists and those 
citizens or citizen groups ordinarily without access to 
information that would help clarify and resolve policy 
issues with significant scientific and technical aspects. In 
1979, the Science for Citizens program planned three 
types of activities: Public Service Science Residencies, to 



National Science Foundation 



223/224 



encourage scientists and engineers to initiate or 
participate in efforts to resolve public policy issues 
involving science and technology; forums, conferences, 
and workshops on scientific and technological policy 
sponsored by citizen groups and other nonprofit 
organizations; and planning studies to promote 
investigation into methods of providing scientific and 
technical assistance. Example: In 1978, the Art Hazards 
Resource Center in New York City received $18,000 to 
establish an information center to inform artists and 
craftspersons about the health hazards of arts and crafts 
materials and how to work with them safely. 

Comment 

At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, legislation 
was pending in Congress to create a new Department of 
Education. If the legislation is enacted, some of the NSF 
science education programs may be transferred to the 
new department (see no. 65). 

Contact for Information 

Office of Science and Society, Directorate for Science 
Education, National Science Foundation, Washington, 
DC 20550 



224 Science Education Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to institutions, chiefly colleges and universities. 
Fellowships, traineeships, and other student assistance to 
individuals with or without institutional affiliations 



Description 



The Science Education Directorate of the National Science 
Foundation conducts programs described in the Guide to 
Science Education Programs and guideline brochures, 
issued annually. These publications should be consulted 
for specifics concerning eligibility, application procedures, 
matching and cost-sharing requirements. 

Science Education Resources Improvement 

This division supports the strengthening of science 
education and research training in schools, colleges, and 
universities. Programs range from those aimed at 
institution-wide improvement in the sciences to projects 
dealing with a single component of an individual course 
Example: In 1978, the College of Ganado in Arizona 
received a grant of $202,100 to improve its social science 
curriculum for the Navajo and Hopi student population 
through the production of bicultural and bilingual 
instructional materials. A grant of $3,900 permitted the 



Department of Anthropology at Catholic University in 
Washington, DC, to purchase needed equipment as part 
of a major revision of the undergraduate anthropology 
curriculum A grant of $12,300 was made to Hamline 
University in St Paul, Minn., to permit the development of 
data-analysis exercises for an anthropology course on 
cultural change. Stockton State College in Pomona, N.J., 
was awarded $6,300 to help purchase basic equipment 
for a "Physics of Music" course, which investigates the 
physical properties of sound in the musical arts and 
acoustics, and is designed primarily for nonscience 
majors. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY., was 
awarded $25,000 for an interdisciplinary effort to develop 
and test materials treating ethical issues raised by 
computer development, for incorporation into the 
undergraduate computer science curriculum 

Scientific Personnel Improvement 

This division provides support for fellowships, 
traineeships, science teacher development, and 
student-oriented activities, including programs to increase 
involvement of physically handicapped persons, women, 
and minorities in scientific studies and professions. The 
division administers programs that emphasize the 
development of individuals rather than institutions. 
Example: In 1978, a Graduate Fellowship to a student of 
anthropological archeology at the University of 
Pennsylvania in Philadelphia permitted his training in 
comparative archeology essential to a study of long-term 
cultural adaptation and change in Southwest Asia. A 
Minority Graduate Fellowship,supported research on the 
changing organization of the American family. A National 
Needs Postdoctoral Fellowship recipient at the 
Washington Center for Metropolitan Studies in 
Washington, DC, examined processes and trends in 
private urban renewal in U.S. eastern seaboard cities. The 
University of Kansas in Lawrence received $17,990 for 
undergraduate sociological research on the social impacts 
of water resources projects, human aging, discrimination 
against minorities in the work world, citizen efforts to 
influence social policy, and the power structures of energy 
and agricultural organizations. 

Science Education Development and Research 
(SEDR) 

This division emphasizes activities to develop new 
knowledge and new means for improving science 
education at 'all levels Programs supported include basic 
research in selected instructional materials, technologies, 
and methods Only innovative projects judged to have 
potential to improve science education nationwide are 
sponsored by SEDR. Since 1972, cumulative awards of 
$3,131,032 have underwritten the development of a 
three-year integrated human sciences curriculum for the 
middle school, the Human Sciences Program. The 
interdisciplinary curriculum focuses on the links between 
the natural sciences and social-behavioral sciences, and 
is based on an educational theory that considers 
developmental characteristics of adolescents and the 
variations among families and communities A publisher 



National Science Foundation 



224/225 



has been selected to print and distribute the curriculum, 
scheduled for completion by the end of 1979. 

Office of Science and Society (see no. 223) 

Comment 

At the time the Cultural Directory went to press, legislation 
was pending in Congress to create a new Department of 
Education. If the legislation is enacted, some of the NSF 
science education programs may be transferred to the 
new department (see no. 65). 

Co ntact for Information 

Office of the Assistant Director, Directorate for Science 
Education, National Science Foundation, Washington, 
DC 20550 



225 Scientific Research Programs 



What/For Whom 



Research grants (with costsharing required) to academic 
and nonprofit research institutions that apply on behalf of 
scientists and researchers for up to two years of support. 
Doctoral Dissertation Grants to graduate students 
sponsored by institutions. 



Description 



The National Science Foundation supports research in 
numerous scientific fields, including behavioral, neural, 
and social sciences. In addition to grants made to 
scientists at research institutions, support may also be 
provided for research workshops, symposia, and 
conferences; the purchase of specialized research 
facilities and equipment; and travel to selected 
international meetings. Doctoral Dissertation Grants are 
awarded for research in the behavioral, neural, and social 
sciences. Inquiries concerning other fellowship and 
traineeship programs sponsored by the Foundation should 
be addressed to the Division of Scientific Personnel 
Improvement (see no. 224). Detailed information on 
research support is contained in the Foundation's Guide 
to Programs (published annually), and Grants for Scientific 
Research, both available from the office listed below. 
Program areas of special interest are described below. 



Implications and Role in the Design of Mesoamerican 
Ceremonial Centers," an 18-month study of ceremonial 
architecture and symbols at several Mexican and 
Guatemalan sites. "Near Eastern Epigraphy," an 18-month 
project at the State University of New York in Buffalo, 
supported by a 1977 award of $20,000, analyzed proper 
names in the Northwest-Semitic languages and the 
religious, sociological, and acculturation patterns these 
evince. In 1978, Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind., 
received $4,100 for 18 months of research on the effect of 
tourism on ritual behavior in a traditional culture, 
"Possession and Performance in Haitian Entertainment 
Events." 



History and Philosophy of Science Program 

Studies of the history of science and technology examine 
the growth of sciences, scientific organizations, and 
intellectual movements; the interaction of science and 
technology; and the impact of science and technology on 
society. Research concerning the philosophy of science is 
directed toward the logic, language, and broad 
philosophy of the scientific approach; interrelations among 
the sciences; and the relationship of scientificUnquiry to 
values and other human concerns. Studies of scientific 
topics from historical and philosophic perspectives also 
are eligible for consideration by the National Endowment 
for the Humanities (see no. 213). Example: NSF awarded 
the American Academy of Arts and Sciences $27,100 in 
1977 for a year's work on its "History of Women Scientists 
in America," which considers the career patterns and 
lifestyles of women scientists. The origin and development 
of paper-making and printing in traditional Chinese culture 
was the subject of the University of Chicago's "History of 
Paper and Printing Technology," sponsored for a year by 
a 1977 award of $35,300. 



Linguistics Program 

Research is supported on the syntactic, semantic, 
phonological, and phonetic properties of individual 
languages and of language in general. Studies of social 
influences on language and dialect variation are also 
sponsored. Example: Rice University in Houston, Tex., 
recieved $5,300 in 1977 for "Textual Documentation of a 
North American Indian language: Bella Coola," to prepare 
a text for publication, based on earlier research, that will 
preserve a portion of the Bella Coola Indian language and 
culture. In 1977, a $13,400 "Planning Grant for a Center 
for the Study of Native American Languages" was made 
to WSF Associates in Albuquerque, N.Mex. 



Anthropology Program 

The program supports research in archeology and 
cultural, physical, and social anthropology. Grants also 
are made to preserve and increase accessibility of 
systematic anthropological collections. Example: In 1977, 
an award of $14,400 was made to Colgate University in 
Hamilton, N.Y., for "The Cross Petroglyph: Its Astronomical 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate Program), Directorate for Biological, 
Behavioral, and Social Sciences, National Science 
Foundation, Washington, DC 20550 



226/227 



National Trust 
for Historic 
Preservation 



Description 



226 Introduction 



Chartered by Congress in 1949, the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation is the only national, private, nonprofit 
corporation responsible for encouraging the protection, 
preservation, and interpretation of the cultural heritage of 
the United States. The Trust offers advice on preservation 
problems (see no. 230) and works with individuals, 
groups, and public agencies in planning and carrying out 
preservation programs. The Trust sponsors educational 
programs (see nos. 227-228) and it owns and operates 
historical museums and similar properties. Its funding 
programs (see nos. 227, 229, 231) seek to encourage 
public participation in the preservation of historic districts, 
sites, buildings, structures, and objects of significance in 
American history and culture. 

Trust programs are supported by membership dues, 
endowment funds, contributions, and matching grants 
from the Department of the Interior. Regional and field 
offices carry out the work of the Trust in their areas. In 
addition, the Executive Vice President of the Trust 
appoints to the Board of Advisors at least two individuals 
from each state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. 
territories to represent the Trust and keep it informed of 
preservation activities in their areas. These advisors may 
be reached through the Trust's regional and field offices 
(see Appendix J). Membership in the Trust is open to 
individuals, organizations, and businesses interested in 
historic preservation. 

Contact for Information 

National Trust for Historic Preservation regional or field 
offices (see Appendix J) or National Trust for Historic 
Preservation, Washington, DC 20006 



227/ Education Funds 



What/For Whom 



Grants to member organizations of the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation. Internships for undergraduate and 
graduate students in preservation-related fields. 



The Education Services Division of the Trust awards 
grants to its member organizations for educational 
programs and for the development of educational 
materials in fields related to historic preservation. It 
awards summer internships in historic preservation 
activities to undergraduate and graduate students. 

Cosponsored Conference Grants 

Member organizations holding conferences on historic 
preservation are eligible for grants up to $1,500 to defray 
costs of speakers, printing, and educational materials, 
provided these are not covered by income from 
participants in the conferences. Example: In 1977, the 
Trust awarded $1,000 to the Savannah (Ga.) Landmark 
Rehabilitation Project, Inc., for a conference on 
rehabilitation of low-income housing in a Victorian 
neighborhood. Among the 12 grants awarded in 1978 
were those assisting a conference in New Harmony, 
lnd.,on historic theaters, and one in Providence, R.I., on 
neighborhood conservation. 

Internships 

A highly competitive 12-week summer internship program 
is provided for approximately 40 undergraduate and 
graduate students in preservation-related activities. Interns 
are assigned to member organizations, which compete for 
project assignments and share equally with the Trust in 
paying the intern's $135-a-week stipend. Interns pay their 
own room and board. Example: In 1978, one intern 
prepared a documentary history of the Chinese-American 
community in Portland, Oregon. The study surveyed the 
community's origins, its social and cultural organizations, 
and its physical evolution. This material will provide 
important data for decisions about the community's 
preservation and development. (See also examples of 
internships under no. 231.) 

Preservation Education Fund 

Grants of up to $10,000 are awarded for the development 
and enrichment of programs in preservation education. At 
the elementary and secondary levels, grants support the 
development of teaching units, audiovisual packages, 
games, and other educational materials. Applicants must 
demonstrate support from a school system. At the college 
and graduate levels, the Fund supports the design of new 
programs and materials to supplement existing ones. It 
also helps to underwrite special workshops and visiting 
lecturers. Students enrolled in preservation programs 
(exclusive of postdoctoral students) are eligible for 
scholarship grants through their universities. Example: In 
1978, there were 12 grants totaling $66,000. The 
Northwest Vocational Technical School in Sturgis, S.D., 
received $7,500 for establishing a historic preservation 
and building renovation program. This Building Design 
and Construction Program trains craftspersons in 
carpentry, drafting, masonry, and metalworking as these 



National Trust for Historic Preservation 



227228229 



crafts apply to historic structures. The University of 
Vermont received $7,000 to assist in developing a new 
course in historic preservation law. This grant will also be 
used for enriching existing courses in the techniques, 
economics, and architectural terminology of conservation 
and preservation. 

V 

Contact for Information 

Education Services Division, National Trust for Historic 
Preservation, Washington, DC 20006 



publicized in the Educational Opportunities brochures, 
published each October. 

International Cooperation 

The Trust exchanges information on preservation activities 
with organizations throughout the world. It maintains 
an active file on international study opportunities, 
conferences, publications, and other preservation 
activities. A directory of international preservation 
organizations is available to members on request. 



228 Education Services 



What/For Whom 



Audiovisual materials, career information, conferences, 
international preservation information exchange, and 
reference and research services for member organizations 
and individuals. Film competition for students and 
independent producers. 



Reference and Research Services 

The Trust library is open to members, researchers, and 
writers. The library staff serves as a clearinghouse for 
reference information on all aspects of historic 
preservation. A research coordinator advises students and 
researchers, suggests and reviews topics for papers and 
theses, and keeps a list of current preservation research 
in the United States. A speakers reference service 
provides the names of individuals interested in speaking 
on various preservation topics. In 1979, the Trust will 
publish a directory of state and local private, nonprofit, 
preservation groups. 



Description 



Contact for Information 



Audiovisual Materials 

The Education Services Division of the Trust lends 
photographs and films on American architecture and 
preservation to Trust members. A free catalogue of films 
and slide shows is available to members on request. In 
addition, the Division sponsors an annual film competition 
open to students and independent producers. Entries 
must illustrate and interpret the progress of historic 
preservation in the United States. Up to six prizes of 
$1 ,000 are awarded each year. 



Education Services Division, National Trust for Historic 
Preservation, Washington, DC 20006 



229 Historic Preservation Funds 



What/For Whom 

Consulant Service Grants; preservation loans and 
revolving funds to member organizations of the National 
Trust for Historic Preservation. 



Career Information 

An academic programs coordinator provides career 
counseling in the historic preservation field. The October 
issue of Preservation News (see no. 230) includes a 
supplement describing graduate and undergraduate 
preservation courses available throughout the United 
States. Each month the "Work" column in Preservation 
News publicizes job opportunities in the preservation field. 



Conferences and Meetings 

The Education Services Division plans the Annual Meeting 
and Preservation Conference for the entire membership of 
the National Trust; it also plans the Williamsburg Seminar 
on Historical Administration for beginning professionals 
and graduate students, the Community Preservation 
Conference, and the Historic Preservation Maintenance 
Workshop. These and other Trust-sponsored meetings are 



Description 



The Trust awards grants and loans to member 
organizations for consultant services and for the 
acquisition of historic property in need of restoration and 
preservation. 

Consultant Service Grants 

Matching awards ranging from $500 to $5,000 assist 
member organizations in securing the services of qualified 
professional consultants on preservation-related projects. 
Consultants may investigate a wide range of subjects, 
such as new uses for historic buildings, or the economic 
feasibility of developing historic districts. The National 
Trust discourages requests for assistance for architectural 
survey work because substantial funding is available 
through other non-National Trust programs (see nos. 107, 
110, 113, 124, and 125). Example: In 1978, 63 grants 



National Trust for Historic Preservation 



229/230 



were awarded, for a total of $74,000 One went to the 
African-American Historical and Cultural Society for a 
feasibility study of adapting the San Francisco Municipal 
Railway Power Plant Station, built in 1896, to a museum 
gallery and library. The project included cost estimates, 
seismic evaluation, site inspection, and preparation of a 
phased rehabilitation plan. 



Endangered Properties Program 

The Office of Historic Properties administers this $2-million 
program sponsored jointly by the Trust and the Secretary 
of the Interior. Its purpose is to give members immediate 
assistance in securing properties of national historical 
significance which are threatened by real and present 
danger. Such properties must meet the criteria for 
National Historic Landmarks (see no 126). In addition, 
they must represent an aspect of the American heritage, 
be associated with important people or events, embody 
distinguishing artistic or technical characteristics, or 
represent the work of a master craftsperson or designer A 
revolving fund provides loans, loan guarantees, purchase 
options, or direct purchase of properties to be resold after 
being secured by protective convenants. Example: In 
1978, a six-month loan of $18,500 was made to the 
Veblen Preservation Project, Inc., to secure the Minnesota 
homestead of Thorstein Veblen, the nationally recognized 
economist and author of Theory of the Leisure Class The 
homestead is listed in the National Register of Historic 
Places. 



National Preservation Revolving Fund 

The Trust makes low-interest loans to assist organizations 
in preserving historic structures by establishing and 
operating local revolving funds within districts or areas of 
recognized historical and architectural significance These 
loans, averaging $25,000, are usually in the form of 
challenge loans determined on a case-by-case basis. 
Capital for this program is $1 million. 



Contact for Information 

National Trust regional offices (see Appendix J) 

or (Appropriate Program), National Trust for Historic 

Preservation, Washington, DC 20006 



Description 



The Trust offers assistance aimed at increasing interest 
and technical competence in the preservation of the 
nation's historic properties. 

Advisory Services 

The Advisory Services Division provides professional 
advice on preservation problems to both members and 
nonmembers The Division oversees the work of the three 
field offices located in Charleston, S.C .; Oklahoma City, 
Okla .; and Washington, DC. Information fact sheets are 
available on request They cover topics such as "Funding 
Sources for Preservation," "Preservation of Auditoriums 
and Opera Houses." "Factors Affecting Valuation of 
Historic Property." and "Neighborhood Conservation." 

Asset Real Property Program 

This program allows members to donate properties to the 
Trust and receive full tax credit, as well as assurance that 
historically or archeologically significant properties will be 
properly secured by protective covenants Any property 
may be donated outright, subject to a life estate, or by 
will. The Trust sells these properties to increase its 
resources for preservation purposes. 

Landmarks and Preservation Law 

Lawyers in the Landmarks and Preservation Law Division 
review local ordinances and offer legal advice to 
communities involved with historic preservation. They work 
on legislative drafts which may affect preservation, and in 
special instances may enter as a party to litigation. The 
Division issues a chart of the status of pending 
Congressional legislation and of local litigation ejecting 
historic preservation This chart is available to members 
from this division at the address listed below 

Media Services 

The Media Services Division provides promotional aids to 
community groups involved with historic preservation 
Several short television and radio announcements, 
narrated by famous personalities, may be borrowed free 
of charge Also available to members and to the news 
media is a kit on historic preservation. It includes 
suggestions for special activities to help celebrate 
National Historic Preservation Week each May. 



230 Historic Preservation Services 



What/For Whom 

Advisory services, tax credits for donations of property, 
legal advice, media services, publications, and special 
events and awards for member organizations and 
individuals. 



Preservation Press 

The Press publishes a monthly newspaper, Preservation 
News, and a bimonthly magazine, Historic Preservation, 
which are regularly sent to all Trust members. The Press 
also publishes books on preservation topics ranging from 
historic recipes to ghost towns, technical reports, and 
preservation law. Particularly helpful publications are A 
Guide to Federal Programs for Historic Preservation and 
its 1976 Supplement These describe all federal 



National Trust for Historic Preservation 



230/231 



assistance programs related to historic preservation and 
environmental education. Equally valuable is A Guide to 
State Historic Preservation Programs. Critiques of 
members' publications are available free of charge. A 
small fee is charged for a publications kit containing 
practical information about publishing in the preservation 
field. An annual journalism award is presented to students 
for outstanding writing in this area. In addition, the 
catalogue of National Trust Preservation Bookshop lists a 
large number of diverse publications on preservation, 
American folklife, architecture, arts, and material culture. 

Special Events 

The Special Events Division organizes group tours to 
•historic sites and restoration projects in the United States 
and abroad. This division also annually presents the 
Louise du Pont Crowninshield Award for superlative 
achievement in the preservation and interpretation of 
nationally significant historic places. 

Contact for Information 

National Trust regional offices (see Appendix J) 

or (Appropriate Division), National Trust for Historic 

Preservation, Washington, DC 20006 



231 /Maritime Preservation Program 



What/For Whom 



Advisory, educational, and technical assistance to groups 
or individuals involved in maritime preservation efforts; 
awards to young people. Loans and matching grants for 
maritime preservation projects to nonprofit and public 
agency members of the National Trust for Historic 
Preservation. 



involved in maritime preservation projects. Such projects 
may include preservation, restoration, or replication of 
historic vessels, relics, lighthouses, shipyards, and other 
waterfront structures and sites of historic importance; 
acquisition of such properties listed in the National 
Register of Historic Places; survey projects such as 
identifying underwater archeological sites or planning 
projects such as feasibility studies of proposed 
preservation activities; educational programs in maritime 
history; training to preserve traditional skills in building 
and operating all sizes and types of vessels; and museum 
programs. 

In 1979, $5 million was allocated by the Interior 
Department's Heritage Conservation and Recreation 
Service to administer maritime preservation grants jointly 
with the National Trust and State Historic Preservation 
Offices. Under this program the Trust's Maritime Office is 
responsible for processing all grant applications except 
those dealing with properties listed in the National 
Register of Historic Places. These should be directed to 
the Department of the Interior (see no. 126). 



Example 

In the first round of matching grants for maritime 
preservation in May 1978, 19 grants were awarded. The 
Maine State Museum in Augusta received $3,000 to 
preserve and exhibit the remains of the square-rigged 
ship St. Mary. The Sea Education Association, Inc., of 
Woods Hole, Mass., received $5,400 to conduct a sail 
training and maritime heritage course for college students. 
The Nebraska State Historical Society received $10,000 to 
restore the Missouri River dredge Captain Meriwether 
Lewis. The South Street Seaport Museum in New York City 
used $160,000 to restore and preserve the 1885 
full-rigged ship Wavertree. Youth Adventure, Inc., of 
Mercer Island, Wash., received $5,875 to conduct a 
training program in preservation skills and sailing aboard 
the 1913 schooner Adventuress. 



Description 



Formed in 1976, the Office of Maritime Preservation aims 
at increasing public awareness of America's maritime 
heritage through preservation, restoration, or replication of 
maritime vessels, relics, and structures. The Office 
compiles comprehensive national inventories of maritime 
properties that should be preserved, and organizes 
educational activities such as seminars, conferences, and 
internships. The program offers advisory and technical 
assistance in maritime preservation techniques, methods 
of exhibition, and legal and legislative matters related to 
maritime preservation. It also makes annual awards to 
recognize and encourage the maritime preservation efforts 
of young people. 

The Trust makes low-interest loans and dollar-for-dollar 
matching grants to assist communities and private groups 



Three maritime internships were awarded in 1978 under 
the Trust's Internship Program (see no. 227). An intern in 
Baltimore, Md., developed an audiovisual presentation 
documenting the construction and activities of the clipper 
ship Pride of Baltimore to be used for teaching. Another 
intern studied wooden boat building and developed a 
plan for exhibiting a boat collection in the Maritime 
Museum of Bath, Maine. The third intern helped develop 
"Paddle to the Sea," a summer learning program for 
children aged 9 to 12, at the Mariner's Museum in 
Newport News, Virginia. 



Contact for Information 

Office of Maritime Preservation, National Trust for Historic 
Preservation, Washington, DC 20006 



232 



Office of 

Management and 
Budget 



232 Federal Assistance Information 



What/For Whom 

Published and computerized information on federal 
assistance programs for the general public. 



Description 

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB), 
established in the Executive Office of the President, is 
responsible for advising and assisting the President on all 
matters concerning the organization and expenditures of 
the federal government. This responsibility entails, in part, 
the collection of current data on all federal programs 
including guidelines, types of assistance, and the 
coordination of programs to stimulate interagency 
cooperation and prevent duplication. All of this information 
has been published and updated annually by the Office's 
Federal Program Information Branch which is now 
programmed for a nationwide computer system. 

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance 

The Catalog is a comprehensive listing and description of 
federal programs and activities that provide assistance or 
benefits to the American public. To aid potential 
beneficiaries in identifying and obtaining available 
assistance, the Catalog describes the specific type of 
support provided by each program, the purpose for which 
it is available, who may apply for it, how and where to 



apply, and which other federal programs provide similar 
assistance. Extensively indexed, the Catalog includes 
information on grants, loans, loan guarantees, 
scholarships, and other types of financial support; 
technical assistance, counseling, and training; and 
services in the form of federal property, facilities, 
equipment, or goods. Published in the summer of each 
year and updated each winter, the Catalog may be 
purchased from the Federal Book Stores (see 
Appendix G) and is often available for reference 
at public libraries and local chambers of commerce. 



Federal Assistance Programs Retrieval System 
(FAPRS) 

Formerly administered by the Department of Agriculture, 
FAPRS is a computerized means of identifying federal 
programs offering various kinds of assistance of interest to 
individuals, organizations, communities, and state and 
local governments. Given specific information about a 
project needing support — either financial or technical — the 
computer prints out a listing of appropriate federal 
programs. This listing is keyed to the Catalog of Federal 
Domestic Assistance (described above), which contains 
detailed information on each program. The FAPRS data 
bank contains information for the following arts and 
humanities-related categories: cultural affairs (promotion of 
the arts and humanities), education (including curriculum 
support, and research and development), historic 
preservation, libraries, museums, and recreation. FAPRS is 
accessible to the public through county extension agents 
(see no. 24), various other local, state, and federal 
governments, and private organizations and universities 
which have tied into the three commercial time-sharing 
companies under contract with OMB to make this material 
available. Sometimes a small fee is charged. 

Contact for Information 

Local county extension agents or Federal Program 
Information Branch, Office of Management and Budget, 
726 Jackson Place, NW, Washington, DC 20503 



233/234 



Office of 

Personnel 

Management 



233 Federal Cooperative Education 
Programs 



psychology, and welfare; 181 in information and the arts; 
and 64 in library and archives. The category "information 
and the arts" includes positions such as audiovisual 
producer, exhibits specialist, illustrator, interpreter, 
museum curator, musical technician, photographer, public 
information specialist, translator, and writer-editor. 

Contact for Information 

Recruitment Manager, Office of Personnel Management 
regional offices or Student Employment Programs 
Section, Office of Personnel Management, Washington, 
DC 20415 



What/For Whom 



234 Federal Employment 



Temporary federal employment for college students from 
educational institutions that have cooperative education 
agreements with federal agencies. 



Description 



Cooperative Education programs provide students the 
opportunity for career-related assignments with federal 
agencies and departments. Through written agreements 
between educational institutions and federal agencies, 
periods of academic study are interspersed with related 
work assignments so that students can acquire practical 
experience as well as classroom theory. Most positions 
are in engineering, accounting, the physical and life 
sciences, and public administration. Students enrolled in 
approved curricula at the associate, baccalaureate, or 
advanced-degree levels must be referred by their schools 
through such agreements. Direct applications from 
students are not accepted. 

Students selected for appointments receive pay 
commensurate with their qualifications and level of 
academic training. Most students selected need not 
qualify in competitive civil service examinations. Interested 
students should consult their school's director of 
cooperative education or the head of their graduate 
department. Students must maintain an academic record 
that ensures their graduation. Those who satisfactorily 
complete academic requirements and work-study 
assignments may, at the employing agency's option, have 
their positions converted to permanent positions in the 
federal career service without further examination. 



Example 



During the school year ending June 1978, more than 
12,500 students received assignments with federal 
departments and agencies. In past years approximately 
63 percent of those students who successfully completed 
both academic and work performance assignments 
remained within the federal government. Current 
employment records show the following breakdown: 3,988 
in engineering and architecture; 695 in social sciences, 



What/For Whom 



Federal employment opportunities for U.S. citizens, age 18 
or older. 



Description 



Most federal employees are hired under the Federal Merit 
System, which determines candidates' eligibility according 
to their education, experience and, for some positions, 
scores on a written examination. Federal jobs are filled 
from lists of qualified applicants — called "eligibles" — who 
are grouped by the grade level for which they qualify. Job 
grade level is based on a General Schedule (GS) 
classification system which assesses the degree of 
difficulty and level of responsibility. 

Education and experience requirements for career 
positions vary according to grade level: 

Entrance level (GS-5 through GS-7): Most positions 
require a bachelor's or master's degree, or three years of 
professional or administrative work experience. An 
equivalent combination of experience and education is 
also acceptable. For some entry-level positions (for 
example, writer-editor), a candidate's education may have 
been in any field. For others (for example, a theater 
specialist), it must have been in a directly related field. 
Many positions require a written test, the Professional and 
Administrative Career Examination or PACE exam. 

Mid-Level (GS-9 through GS-12): Beyond entry-level 
requirements, eligibles must have two or three years 
additional appropriate work experience, or a Ph.D. degree 
in an appropriate discipline. 

Senior Level (GS-13 through GS-15): Eligibles must meet 
entry-level requirements and have three years of 
substantial professional experience, one of which is 
comparable to the next lower grade in the Federal 
Service. 

In response to the Federal Design Improvement Program 
the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has 
established special examining procedures for certain 



Office of Personnel Management 



234/235/236 



arts-related positions. These procedures involve evaluation 
of applicant slide portfolios by a blue-ribbon panel of 
designers drawn from government and from the private 
sector. The positions affected are architect and landscape 
architect GS-5/13, with nationwide examining by OPM's 
Denver Area Office, and graphic designers, illustrators, 
and photographers GS-5/12, with nationwide examining by 
OPM's Los Angeles Area Office beginning in early 1979. 

Positions related to the arts and humanities are filled in 
various ways through different local and nationwide 
examinations. Some examining and hiring responsibilities 
are delegated to federal agencies. Interested individuals 
are urged to contact the Federal Job Information Center in 
the area where employment is sought (check your local 
phone directory under "U.S. Government" for the phone 
number). 

Example 

As of October 31, 1977, the following agencies were the 
major employers in each of the arts- and humanities- 
related fields shown below. Of 283 archeologists: Interior 
203, Agriculture 40, Army 34; of 1 ,589 architects: Army 

287, Navy 286, General Services Administration 166, 
Interior 155, Air Force 141, Housing and Urban 
Development 130; of 357 archivists: General Services 
Administration 306; of 187 arts specialists: Army 155, Air 
Force 16; of 281 exhibits specialists: Smithsonian 78, 
Interior 52, Army 47; of 256 foreign language 
broadcasters: International Communication Agency all; of 
1 ,1 78 general arts and information specialists: 
International Communication Agency 236, Army 200, Navy 
120; of 500 historians: Air Force 171, Army 102, Interior 
102; of 2,252 illustrators: Army 837, Air Force 459, Navy 
404, Interior 73; of 161 interpreters: Justice 109, State 18. 

Also, of 607 landscape architects: Agriculture 185, Interior 
161 , Army 131; of 3,337 librarians: Library of Congress 
1 ,064, Army 489, Veterans Administration 352, Air Force 
277, Navy 263; of 216 museum curators: Smithsonian 103, 
Interior 51, Army 42; of 388 museum specialists and 
technicians, Smithsonian 215, Interior 60, Army 45; of 58 
music specialists: Army 39, U.S. International 
Communication Agency 7; of 2,972 photographers: Army 
715, Air Force 485, Navy 433, Veterans Administration 

288, other Defense agencies 155, Agriculture 141; of 
2,724 public information specialists: Army 569, Agriculture 
376, Health, Education, and Welfare 218; of 105 
sociologists: Health, Education, and Welfare 36, Army 25, 
Interior 17; of 31 theatre specialists: Army 27, Interior 4; of 
1,513 visual information specialists: Army 285, Navy 224, 
Air Force 183, Health, Education, and Welfare 96; of 2,100 
writer-editors: International Communication Agency 351, 
Army 345, Air Force 199, Navy 173. 

Contact for Information 

Federal Job Information Center in area where employment 
sought or Federal Job Information Center, Office of 
Personnel Management, Washington, DC 20415 



235 Federal Summer Employment 



What/For Whom 



Summer employment opportunities in federal agencies. 



Description 



Federal agencies and departments throughout the United 
States, especially in large metropolitan areas, have 
summertime job openings in clerical, technical, 
subprofessional, professional, and administrative fields for 
individuals with appropriate education and experience. 
Salaries are based on the standard civil service grade 
levels. Because the number of available positions is small 
in comparison to the number of applicants, hiring is 
extremely competitive. Each fall the Office issues a 
Summer Jobs announcement which describes anticipated 
job openings and application procedures for the following 
summer; supplements for local geographic areas are 
available from the area office of the Office of Personnel 
Management. If an agency is not listed in either the . 
announcement or the supplement, applicants should 
contact the agency directly to inquire about summer 
employment. Persons with severe physical handicaps may 
qualify for special placement assistance. 



Example 



Positions available ih the summer of 1979 included 
architectural trainee, graphic designer, historian, illustrator, 
journalist, law intern, museum aid/technician, recreation 
aid/assistant, and urban studies planner. 



Contact for Information 



Federal Job Information Centers or Office of Personnel 
Management area office or Student Employment 
Programs Section, Office of Personnel Management, 
Washington, DC 20415 



236 Intergovernmental Personnel 
Act (IPA) Grant Program 



What/For Whom 



Grants to state, local, and Indian tribal governments; to 
colleges and universities; and to other nonprofit 
organizations that provide governments with professional, 
advisory, research, development, education, information or 
related services. 



Description 



A cultural agency or institution could benefit from this 
program in one of three ways: as a state or local 



Office of Personnel Management 



236/237/238 



government agency receiving a grant to administer a 
training program; as a state or local government agency 
participating in training programs administered by other 
institutions; or as a nonprofit cultural institution, such as a 
public library, museum, or university, that applies for a 
grant to provide training to state and local government 
employees. Culturally related state and local government 
institutions could include state and local arts agencies, 
public libraries, state universities and colleges, municipal 
museums, and botanical gardens. 

Training programs have included the areas of accounting, 
management techniques, uses of computers, program 
evaluation, planning and policy development, and labor 
relations. Funding has also been provided for research 
and demonstration programs in personnel administration 
techniques. State and local governments are granted 
broad discretion in the strategies and specific training 
programs selected to meet the personnel needs of their 
jurisdictions. Generally, grants cover up to 50 percent of 
program costs. Training that is substantially provided for 
by other federal assistance programs, such as that for law 
enforcement officers or for scientists, may not be 
supported with IPA grant monies. 



Example 



In 1978, there were 1,137 mobility assignments made, of 
which 860 were to federal agencies from educational 
institutions, and state and local governments; and 277 
from federal agencies to educational institutions and state 
and local governments. Employees of Quinnipiac College 
in Hamden, Conn., the Forsyth County Public Library in 
Winston-Salem, N.C., and the Wisconsin Historical Society 
in Madison, Wise, were assigned to the National 
Endowment for the Humanities; and an employee of the 
Cultural Resources Council in Syracuse, N.Y., was 
assigned to the National Endowment for the Arts. An 
architect from the Heritage Conservation and Recreation 
Service in the Department of the Interior was assigned to 
the Georgia Department of Natural Resources in Atlanta. 
He was detailed to a local Savannah nonprofit housing 
corporation to work on a project for meeting the housing 
needs of low-income inner-city dwellers through the 
preservation of historic and architecturally significant 
neighborhoods. A staff member of the National 
Endowment for the Arts received an eight-month 
assignment to Columbia University in New York City to 
serve as a teacher and resource person in architectural 
conservation and preservation. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Personnel Management regional offices or IPA 
state designee or IPA Grant Program, Office of 
Intergovernmental Personnel Programs, Office of 
Personnel Management, Washington, DC 20415 



Contact for Information 



Office of Personnel Mobility and Faculty Fellows, Office of 
Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20415 



237 Intergovernmental Personnel 
Act (IPA) Mobility Program 

What/For Whom 

Temporary employee assignments to federal, state, local, 
and Indian tribal governments and to colleges and 
universities for developing improved management 
systems. 

Description 

The Personnel Mobility Program provides for temporary 
assignments of personnel to federal executive agencies 
from institutions of higher education, state, local, and 
Native American governments, and vice versa. The 
employee's assignment must benefit both the federal and 
nonfederal partners, as well as enhance the employee's 
professional development. Assignments range from a few 
weeks to two years. Payment of an employee's salary may 
be shared by the cooperating agencies or the salary may 
be paid entirely by one agency. 



238 Presidential Management 
Intern Program 



What/For Whom 



Internships for graduates of master's- or doctoral-degree 
programs in general management. Candidates must be 
nominated by the appropriate university official (indicated 
below). 



Description 



The Presidential Management Intern Program was 
established "to attract to federal service men and women 
of exceptional management potential who have received 
special training in planning and managing public 
programs and policies." Through this program as many as 
250 public management graduates may enter the federal 
service each year for two-year internships. Eligible 
graduates must hold advanced degrees and must 
demonstrate exceptional ability, leadership capacity, and 
commitment to a public service management career; 
actual managerial experience is not a requirement. 
Students must be nominated by their dean, department 



Office of Personnel Management 



238/239 



chairperson, or graduate program director during the 
academic year in which their degree requirements will be 
fulfilled. Nominating officials are expected to make special 
efforts to identify qualified women and minority students. 
Interns are selected from among the nominees through a 
rigorous screening process conducted by the regional 
offices. All Cabinet departments and more than 20 other 
federal agencies have designated Presidential 
Management positions. Most assignments are located in 
the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. 

The emphasis on career development distinguishes these 
internships from most federal entry-level positions: 
Rotating assignments, on-the-job training, seminars, 
discussion groups, and career counseling expose interns 
to different aspects of management. After successfully 
completing the two-year term, interns are eligible for 
career civil service appointments without further 
competition. 

Example 

In 1979, interns from four universities were on assignment 
to the Arts and Humanities Endowments, the Department 
of Interior's Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, 
and the National Park Service. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Personnel Management regional 
offices or Office of Presidential Management 
Internships, Intergovernmental Personnel Program, Office 
of Personnel Management, Washington, DC 20415 



239 Technical Assistance and 
Training 

What/For Whom 

Technical assistance and training to federal, state, local, 
and Indian tribal governments and their employees for 
developing improved management systems. 

Description 

State, local, and Indian tribal governments may request 
technical assistance in personnel management areas such 
as affirmative action, fair job application design, labor- 
management relations, job analysis procedures, and 
recruiting methods. The Office provides written materials 
and short-term consultation without any charge. Costs of 
extensive technical assistance, such as reclassification of 
a personnel system, or an audit of CETA personnel are 
often reimbursed by the governmental unit that benefits 
from the undertaking. A college, library, or museum that is 
affiliated with an eligible government may also request 
assistance. 

State and local government employees are encouraged to 
participate in training programs established for federal 
agency personnel. For example, in Washington, D.C., and 
at regional training centers around the country, the Office 
of Personnel Management offers training in automatic data 
processing for libraries and in effective letter writing. 
Training courses on such subjects as affirmative action 
planning and labor-management relations are available for 
use by state and local governments to build their own 
training capacity. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Personnel Management regional office or IPA 
state designee or Office of Intergovernmental Personnel 
Programs, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E 
Street, NW, Washington, DC 20415 



240 



President's 
Commission on 
White House 
Fellowships 



240 White House Fellowships 



What/For Whom 



Twelve-month assignments to a Cabinet-level agency, the 
Office of the Vice President, or the Executive Office of the 
President for United States citizens in the early years of 
their professional development. 



Description 



The White House Fellowship program seeks "to provide 
gifted and highly motivated young Americans with some 
firsthand experience in the process of governing the 
Nation," in part to ensure that leaders in private life will 



have an understanding of the problems of national 
government. In most cases, a Fellow serves as a special 
assistant to a high-level Cabinet official, the Vice 
President, or in the Executive Office of the President. Each 
Fellow receives an annual stipend, not to exceed $40,000, 
based on past salary, education, and experience. 
Applicants are selected from promising young people with 
diverse backgrounds in the professions, business, local 
and state government, the arts, and academics, among 
other areas, rather than according to narrow educational 
or professional criteria. Federal employees are not eligible 
with the exception of career military personnel. Strong 
candidates will have demonstrated leadership, 
professional achievement, community commitment, and 
involvement. Fellows usually resume their professional 
careers at the end of the assignment. An educational 
program sponsors sessions for Fellows to meet with 
top-level government officials. 

Since the program began in 1964, state legislators, city 
planners, a symphony orchestra conductor, medical 
doctors, college professors, men and women in business, 
journalists, lawyers, and others have participated. 
Between 14 and 19 persons are selected as Fellows 
annually. 



Contact for Information 

President's Commission on White House Fellowships, 
1900 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20415 



241/242/243 



Small Business 
Administration 



Contact for Information 



SCORE and ACE Coordinators in Small Business 
Administration field offices or SCORE and ACE Office 
of Assistant Administrator for Management Assistance, 
Small Business Administration, 1411 L Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20416 



241 /Management Training for Arts 
Businesses 



243 Small Business Loan Programs 



What/For Whom 



Training for managers of small businesses and for 
individuals involved in the visual arts. 



Description 



In 1979, the Small Business Administration, in cooperation 
with the National Endowment for the Arts, initiated three 
pilot projects to develop a training program focusing on 
the technical and managerial problems of small 
businesses dealing with the visual arts. The projects assist 
businesses (such as commercial art galleries and crafts 
cooperatives) and individuals (such as artists, sculptors, 
photographers, printmakers, and craftspersons). Training 
programs cover topics such as copyrights, patents, and 
taxes, as well as methods for establishing and operating a 
business. Results of the projects will be developed into a 
training package which will be disseminated to field 
offices in 1980 for use in local management training 
programs. 



Contact for Information 



Office of Management Information and Training, Small 
Business Administration, 1441 L Street, NW, Washington, 
DC 20416 



242 SCORE and ACE 



What/For Whom 



Management counseling and training for managers of 
existing and potential small businesses. 



Description 



The Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and the 
Active Corps of Executives (ACE) provide volunteer 
management counseling and training services to small 
businesses. "Small" businesses are defined on the basis 
of dollar volume or number of employees; they are not 
dominant in their field. Volunteers are reimbursed for 
out-of-pocket expenses. 



What/For Whom 



Loans and loan guarantees to independently owned and 
operated profit-making small businesses; loans to 
development companies that finance these small 
businesses or cooperatives whose members are 
profit-making firms or individuals. 



Description 



The Small Business Administration (SBA) administers loan 
programs to assist profit-making small businesses. "Small" 
businesses are defined on the basis of dollar volume or 
number of employees; they are not dominant in their- field. 
Culturally related businesses (such as teaching studios, 
performing arts schools, or retail music, art, or craft 
shops) are evaluated on the basis of marketing feasibility, 
job-producing potential, and community benefits rather 
than on cultural or esthetic considerations. Loans may 
may be used to purchase real estate, buildings, 
machinery, eguipment, and inventory, as well as to cover 
construction or expansion costs. Funds may not be used 
for nonprofit and lobbying enterprises. Three types of 
loans are available. 

Business Loans 

The SBA guarantees, to a maximum of 90 percent, 
business loans made by approved local lending 
institutions. In 1979, the maximum loan was $500,000. If 
adequate local financing is unavailable, direct SBA 
business loans for not more than $350,000 may be made. 
Interest rates must meet the "legal and reasonable" 
criteria of the SBA Business loans generally have a 
maximum term of 10 years. 

Development Company Loans 

State and local profit or nonprofit development companies 
(corporations chartered by a state to promote economic 
growth within specific areas) may receive loans from SBA 
to provide long-term financing to local small businesses. 
These funds may not be used for working capital, 
refinancing debt, or assisting communications media. 

Economic Opportunity Loans 

The SBA either guarantees or makes direct loans to 
low-income or socially or economically disadvantaged 



Small Business Administration 



243 



persons who have been denied adequate financing 
through normal lending channels. Such loans are made 
for the purpose of establishing, preserving, or 
strengthening small businesses. Credit requirements are 
more flexible than under the business loan program. The 
maximum loan is $100,000 for up to 15 years. 

Example 

In 1978, a $25,000 SBA-guaranteed bank loan was made 
for the establishment of a music school in Iowa. In 
California, a handcrafted-jewelry business received a 
direct loan of $30,000 to relocate and to purchase 
equipment and stock supplies; a retail shop for 
handcrafted items received a $15,000 direct loan for 



operating expenses and for increasing inventory; a 
commercial art gallery received an SBA-guaranteed bank 
loan for $25,000; and a firm which makes hand-blown 
glass and stained glass received a direct loan of $90,000 
for the purchase of machinery and supplies. In Gallup, 
N. Mex., two businesses received loans of $160,000 and 
$100,000 respectively to construct buildings in which 
Native American jewelry, pottery, leathercrafts, and rugs 
will be sold. 

Contact for Information 

Financing Division, SBA regional offices or Office of 
Finance, Small Business Administration, Washington, 
DC 20416 






244/245 



Smithsonian 
Institution 

244 Introduction 



The Smithsonian Institution is a trust organization 
chartered by Congress and managed by an independent 
Board of Regents. It is supported by trust endowments, by 
gifts and grants, and by congressional appropriations. In 
carrying out its trust mandate, the Institution performs 
fundamental research; publishes the results of studies, 
explorations, and investigations; preserves for study and 
reference more than 75 million items of scientific, cultural, 
and historical interest; maintains exhibits representative of 
the arts, American history, technology, aeronautics and 
space exploration, and natural history; lends objects to 
other museums and engages in cooperative education, 
research, and training programs at both the national and 
international levels. 

All its museums, located in the Washington, D.C., 
metropolitan area, are open to the general public. The 
staff answers inquiries on collections, lends objects to 
other institutions, and provides guided tours. The Visitor 
Information and Associates' Reception Center operates 
seven days a week to answer general inquiries about 
facilities and exhibits by phone, mail, or in person. 
Specific inquiries or requests for policy statements are 
directed to the appropriate office. Write to the Center at 
the address listed below, or call (202) 381-6264. For 
information about the historic importance of objects, or to 
inquire about loans or exchanges of objects, contact the 
appropriate Smithsonian facility or the Office of the 
Registrar at the address below. The general library is 
housed in the National Museum of Natural History and 
Technology. In addition, each museum has its own 
specialized library and education office to provide 
assistance to researchers. Some facilities lend slides of 
objects in their collections for educational use by 
individuals or institutions. 

Contact for Information 

The Visitor Information Center, Smithsonian Institution, 
Washington, DC 20560 



245 Archives and Museums 



What/For Whom 

All Smithsonian museums (located in Washington, D.C., 
except as noted below) are open to the general- public. 
Research libraries are open to qualified scholars. 



Description 



Anacostia Neighborhood Museum . A nationally 
recognized center of black history and culture, this urban 
museum maintains an exhibition hall and sponsors 
neighborhood arts education programs, visual and 
performing arts programs, and traveling exhibitions 
(toured through SITES, no. 247). A small reference library 
specializing in black history is open to qualified scholars. 

Archives of American Art • The Archives is a 
research center devoted to the historical documentation of 
the visual arts in the United States through collecting, 
preserving, and microfilming relevant material dealing with 
artists, dealers, critics, and art societies. Materials on film 
are available to scholars and students at the Archives' 
Washington, DC, office (located in the Fine Arts and 
Portrait Gallery Building), and at its regional centers in 
New York, Boston, Detroit, and San Francisco. A Checklist 
of the Collection lists all collections of more than 10 items; 
it also includes oral history interviews. The Checklist may 
be ordered from the Archives at the address listed below. 

Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Design and Decorative 
Arts (2 East 91st Street, New York, NY 10028) . 
Collections include contemporary and historical 
decorative arts, prints, metalwork, furniture, and textiles. 
Programs include lectures, workshops, and tours. 

Freer Gallery of Art . A center for research in the 
artistic achievements of Far and Near Eastern civilizations, 
the gallery contains collections of Oriental paintings, 
sculpture, ceramics, and manus'cripts. It also houses a 
nineteenth- and twentieth-century American collection. 

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden • The 
museum exhibits contemporary American and European 
art and sculpture from the late nineteenth century f o the 
present. 

The Museum of African Art • Acquired by the 
Smithsonian in 1979, the Museum's permanent collection 
includes 7,000 African sculptures, utensils, musical 
instruments, textiles, Afro-American paintings (the largest 
collection of its kind, including 60 works by Henry Tanner), 
and the archives of photography by Eliot Elisofon. A 
5,000-volume research library is open to the public by 
appointment. 

National A_ir and Space Museum . Displays 
document the history of flight from ballooning to space 
exploration and include a collection of art related to air 
and space flight. 

National Collection of Fine Arts . Devoted to the 
study and presentation of American art, the collection 
contains American painting, sculpture, prints, and 
drawings from the eighteenth century to the present. 
Research facilities include the Inventory of American 
Paintings Executed Before 1914. The Renwick Gallery, a 
department of the National Collection, includes crafts, 
design and decorative arts, and exhibits by American and 
foreign artisans. 



Smithsonian Institution 



245/246/247 



National Gallery of Art (see nos. 259-263). 

National Museum of History and Technology . The 
Museum's extensive collections, archives, and library 
document the history of American material culture. This 
includes the applied arts, science and technology, and 
national, military, and maritime history. The Eisenhower 
Institute for Historical Research, with its National Armed 
Forces Museum Advisory Board, promotes the study of 
the interaction of military thought and policy with the 
American historical experience. It also offers advice on 
research opportunities in military history. 

National Museum of Natural History and National 
Museum of Man . Most of the Museum's collections and 
archives deal with the natural sciences. Of more general 
interest are the Center for the Study of Man and the 
Department of Anthropology, located within the Museum 
of Natural History. The latter maintains a major research 
facility focusing on human natural history, with particular 
emphasis on Native American culture. The Museum also 
contains the National Anthropological Archives, whose 
holdings include both public and private records and 
papers relating to all cultures of the world, and more than 
90,000 photographs and portraits. 

The Center for the Study of Man coordinates a worldwide 
program of interdisciplinary, cross-cultural research 
projects conducted by the Smithsonian in conjunction with 
other research organizations. Its grants program aims to 
support urgent field research in anthropology in order to 
document and recover ethnological data on vanishing 
cultural groups. Between 6 and 10 grants ($1,000 
maximum) are awarded annually. The Center also 
maintains the National Anthropological Film Center, which 
documents and preserves films dealing with minority 
cultures and assists these groups in making and 
preserving films of their own cultures. The Center for the 
Study of Man also sponsors and disseminates research on 
social and cultural issues related to contemporary 
immigration to the United States through its Research 
Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies. 

National Portrait Gallery . The Gallery exhibits 
portraits of Americans who have made significant 
contributions to U.S. history and culture. It also maintains 
the Catalog of American Portraits, a national inventory of 
important American portraits found in public and private 
collections. 



Contact for Information 



Except for the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, contact 
appropriate facility at Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
DC 20560 



246 Elementary and Secondary 
Education Programs 

What/For Whom 

Tours and educational materials for elementary and 
secondary students and teachers. 

Description 

The Office of Elementary and Secondary Education 
designs programs and materials to supplement a wide 
range of classroom activities and studies including art, 
dance, music, history, science, and social studies. 
Occasionally this Office will design such materials on 
teacher request. Guided tours for school groups are 
available in all museum facilities. In addition, a number of 
publications and audiovisual materials are available for 
classroom use. For schools in the Washington, D.C., area, 
the Office publishes Learning Opportunities for Schools, 
grade-level guides to Smithsonian exhibits. They should 
be ordered from the Office two to four weeks ahead of a 
planned tour. Many materials are available nationally, 
including Museums Where Fun Is Learning, a film for 
teachers which may be rented from the National Archives 
(see no. 163); Art to Zoo, a free quarterly publication 
focusing on the use of community cultural resources 
(maximum, four copies per school); and two sets of slides 
entitled A Museum Is . . . and Make a Museum, each with 
a teacher's guide and taped narration. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560 



247 Exhibits: Loans/Rentals 



Smithsonian Archives • Located in the Arts and 
Industries Building, the Smithsonian Archives' holdings 
deal primarily with the Institution's own history, such as 
personal collections of personnel and supporters. Also 
included are records of scientific societies and an oral 
history collection of interviews with Smithsonian museum 
curators and scientists. The archives has published A 
Guide to Manuscript Collections of History and 
Technology, available to college and university libraries at 
a nominal cost. 



What/For Whom 



Loans of museum artifacts or rentals of exhibits to 
qualified institutions. 



Description 



Museum Loans 

All Smithsonian facilities lend objects and artifacts to other 
institutions for exhibit or study. Each facility has its own 



Smithsonian Institution 



247/248/249 



loan policy and should be contacted at the address listed 
below. Some facilities lend slides of objects in their 
collections to individuals or institutions for lectures. 

The Air and Space Museum has more than 1 ,000 artifacts 
on loan throughout the world, including the Apollo 8 
Command Module on loan to the Museum of Science and 
Industry in Chicago, and an Apollo space suit on loan to 
the Neil A. Armstrong collection in Wapokeneta, Ohio. The 
National Collection of Fine Arts organizes its own traveling 
exhibitions, including paintings, sculptures, and prints. 
Currently on loan are "Women Artists in Washington" at 
the the University of Maryland; "Love and Life," a painting 
by George F. Watts at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts; 
and a collection of paintings by Joseph Shannon at the 
Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte, N.C. 



SITES 

The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service 
(SITES) rents traveling exhibits on a variety of subjects 
including arts and crafts, archeology, architecture, ethnic 
cultures, American history, natural history, historic 
buildings, and photography. More than 120 exhibits are in 
continuous circulation: more than 800 are installed each 
year. Most exhibitions are of objects; they include artifacts 
from the Smithsonian and from other lenders around the 
world. Rental fees, which cover most organizational 
expenses including insurance, range from $100 to 
$10,000. The borrower is required to pay outgoing 
transportation charges to the next exhibitor. A signed 
contract is also required. For a list of exhibitions, contact 
SITES at the address listed below. 

SITES exhibits available in 1978 included "Canyon 
Graphics and Graffiti," "America's Architectural Heritage," 
"Embroideries by the Children of Chijnaya, Peru," "Berlin 
Porcelain," "A Cartoon History of U.S. Foreign Policy," 
"Folk Arts and Crafts: The Deep South," "African Artists in 
America," "Louisiana's Singing Century," "Space Art from 
the U.S.S.R.," "The Art of Scientific Illustration," and "The 
Inaugural Story from George Washington to Gerald Ford." 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Office), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
DC 20560 



Description 



248/Folklife Program 



What/For Whom 



Collections of folklife artifacts and videotaped 
performances, and scholarly documentation of 
Smithsonian folklife festivals available to researchers and 
scholars in Washington, D.C. Technical assistance to 
groups for producing folklife programs and festivals. 
Loans of folklife monographs and films to educators and 
other qualified borrowers. 



The Smithsonian Folklife Program focuses on ethnographic 
research and artifact collection. The program collects, 
preserves, and presents artifacts and performances of the 
nation's oral traditions; encourages the survival of cultural 
forms endangered by modern technological society; 
develops scholarly documentation of the papers, films, 
tapes, and other materials amassed during Smithsonian 
folklife festivals; and plans and develops folklife programs 
and presentations in conjunction with other Smithsonian 
divisions. The program, in cooperation with the American 
Folklife Center (see no. 180) of the Library of Congress 
and the Folk Arts Program (see no. 199) of the National 
Endowment for the Arts, assists in the development of 
folklife festivals and activities in selected parts of the 
country where no equivalent programs exist. Work is 
guided by the Smithsonian Folklife Advisory Council, the 
12 members of which represent various disciplines within 
the Smithsonian complex. 

Each year the program produces the Festival of American 
Folklife on the National Mall in Washington, DC. The 
Festival is a living exhibition of the cultural diversity of 
American folkways, representing the traditional and ethnic 
subcultures of America. Additional Festival "living exhibits" 
focusing on skills, crafts, and folklore generated by. 
occupations are planned for the future. These will be held 
indoors in coordination with other museum exhibits. 

The Folklife Program has produced a series of studies in 
monographs, film, and videotape. These are available on 
loan at the address listed below. Studies include a 
monograph and three films documenting the potting 
techniques of the Meaders Family; a monograph and film 
concerning the history and construction of the Ojibwa 
Dance Drum; a collection of articles on Contemporary 
Approaches to Occupational Folklife; and a Children's 
Folklife Videotape Series with accompanying teacher's 
manuals. 

Contact for Information 

Folklife Program, Office of American and Folklife Studies, 
2600 LEnfant Plaza, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
DC 20560 



249 Foreign Currency Program 



What/For Whom 

Project grants on behalf of established scholars to U.S. 
institutions of higher education, museums, and research 
institutions, for basic research in specified foreign 
countries. 



Description 



Research must be conducted in countries where the 
United States holds excess foreign currency; namely, 



Smithsonian Institution 



249/250/251 



Burma, Egypt, Guinea, India, and Pakistan. Most grants 
support basic research in anthropology, archeology and 
related disciplines, biology, astrophysics and earth 
sciences, history, and museum professional programs. 
Research results are published. Only legitimate costs of 
research (such as travel expenses, project staff salaries, 
and equipment) are authorized, and these must be met 
with foreign currencies expended in the host country. The 
training of graduate students may be included. Some 
projects are binational, with the American grantee 
institution collaborating with an institution in the host 
country. Project grants range from $2,000 to $60,000. 

Example 

Appropriations of $3,876,000 in 1977 and $4,110,000 in 
1978 provided grants to support the work of the Center for 
Art and Archaeology at Benares; excavation of salient 
areas of Roman and Punic Carthage; a historic study of 
nineteenth- and twentieth-century Indian photographs; 
exhibitions of Polish posters; and a corpus of ancient 
mosaics of Tunisia. 

Contact for Information 

Foreign Currency Program, Office of Fellowships and 
Grants, Smithsonian Institution, L'Enfant Plaza, Room 3300, 
Washington, DC 20560 



member. The Smithsonian cooperates with schools that 
want to grant academic credit for these assignments. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Office), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
DC 20560 



251 /Kennedy Center Programs 



What/For Whom 



Education materials, programs, and workshops for 
children, youth, and educators; performing arts programs 
for the general public; special facilities for new or 
experimental productions; music awards for 
instrumentalists, singers, and composers. 



Description 



The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a 
bureau of the Smithsonian Institution separately 
administered by its own Board of Trustees, is the National 
Cultural Center as established by Act of Congress in 
1958. In addition to a wide variety of performing arts, the 
Center offers many education programs and workshops, 
national performance awards, and public services. 



250 Higher Education Programs 



What/For Whom 



Research opportunities for scholars, students, and other 
qualified individuals. 



Description 



American Studies Program 

The Office of American and Folklife Studies administers 
the American Studies Program in association with several 
universities in the Washington area. Courses, seminars, 
and directed research projects enable scholars and 
graduate students to use the Smithsonian's unique 
resources for pursuing American and folklife studies. (For 
a description of the Folklife Program, see no. 248.) 

Open Study Program 

The Office of Fellowships and Grants administers the 
Open Study Program for students or other individuals to 
work on specific projects in any area of the institution for a 
minimum of 12 weeks. No stipends are offered. 
Assignments consist of supervised tasks that allow the 
participant to learn about specified subjects while 
participating in the ongoing work of a Smithsonian staff 



Education Programs 

The Center cosponsors a number of education programs 
for children, youth, handicapped children, beginning 
performers, and teachers. 

Alliance for Arts Education • The Alliance, a joint 
project of the Center and HEWs Office of Education (OE), 
is directed to develop educational and recreational 
programs in the arts for children and youth. It assists state 
and local education agencies in developing arts education 
projects under consideration for funding by OE (see no. 
67). In addition, the Alliance supports and administers a 
Children's Arts Series and Festival. The Children's Arts 
Series sponsors regular, free, quality performances 
throughout the year for school children, with workshops 
and symposia for teachers. The Children's Festival is a 
week-long program of performances by nationally known 
companies. A Festival Outreach Program is designed to 
take elements of the Festival to major cities across the 
United States. Each year more than 350 college and 
university theater groups participate in regional festivals, 
and representative productions are presented in the 
spring at the Kennedy Center as part of the American 
College Theater Festival. The Theater Festival includes 
symposia with leading professionals. Scholarships and 
awards are given to outstanding student writers and 
performers who participate through their college arts or 
drama department. 



Smithsonian Institution 



251/252 



The Alliance annually selects nine college student interns 
for four-month work assignments in the Kennedy Center. 
Interns receive experience in many phases of arts 
administration, and they work on a variety of arts 
education projects. Interns are sponsored by State 
Committees of the Alliance and must be enrolled in an 
institution willing to award credit for the assignment. 

American Film Institute (AFI) . An independent 
organization created by the National Endowment for the 
Arts in 1967 (see nos. 193 and 202) and operating in the 
Kennedy Center, AFI offers informational materials, 
education newsletters, curriculum consultation, library 
services, and workshops and symposia to students, 
teachers, and researchers in film and television. 

National Aesthetic Education Learning Center 
(NAELC) • One of 1 1 centers across the United States, 
NAELC offers workshops, seminars, and demonstrations 
for teachers, principals, and other educators in an effort to 
improve arts programs and integrate them into standard 
school curricula. 

National Committee Arts for the Handicapped 
(NCAH) • As the national coordinating agency for the 
development and implementation of arts programs for 
handicapped children and youth, NCAH provides 
opportunities for handicapped children to learn through 
the arts by sponsoring model programs, training 
personnel, conducting research, disseminating curriculum 
and instructional methods, and promoting national 
awareness of the arts' significance for handicapped 
individuals. For a description of funding categories in arts 
education for handicapped children, see no. 93 under the 
Office of Education. 

National Symphony Education/Outreach 
Program • The National Symphony not only offers special 
concerts for young people and families in the Washington, 
D.C., area, but also prepares its audiences through 
printed teaching materials and by sending docents into 
the public schools. The Symphony also offers an annual 
workshop on Center programs to music supervisors and 
teachers. There is an annual competition for young 
soloists open to high school and college students. 

Performing Arts Library 

Jointly sponsored by the Kennedy Center and the Library 
of Congress, the Performing Arts Library opened in 1979. 
For a description of its holdings, see no. 187 under the 
Library of Congress. 



with the Stuart Ostrow Foundation, the Center created the 
Musical Theatre Laboratory, enabling authors, composers, 
lyricists, choreographers, directors, and actors to develop 
new musicals without the commercial pressures of 
full-scale production. The Laboratory seats 100 and 
performances are free. 

As a part of the Center's encouragement of American 
composers and performers, two award programs have 
been established. The John F. Kennedy Center- 
Rockefeller Foundation International Competitions for 
Excellence in the Performance of American Music are 
open to pianists, other instrumentalists, and singers on an 
annual rotating basis. The Kennedy Center Friedheim 
Awards are open to composers of orchestral and chamber 
music, with categories alternating annually. 

Public Services 

In addition to its educational programming, the Center 
annually hosts a full range of symposia, special 
performances, lectures, and workshops which are open to 
the public free of charge. Weekly performing arts 
symposia are coordinated by the Friends of the Kennedy 
Center, the Center's Auxiliary, and feature many of the 
artists appearing at the Center. The Friends also 
coordinate weekly demonstrations of the Concert Hall's 
Filene Memorial Organ and sponsor recitals by young 
organists from all parts of the United States. 

Since its opening in 1971, the Kennedy Center has 
maintained a Specially Priced Tjcket Program through 
which up to 15 percent of tickets for regular performances 
are made available at half-price to students, handicapped 
individuals, senior citizens, and some military personnel. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Program), Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts, Washington, DC 20566 



252 Museum Training Programs 



What/For Whom 



Training programs and internships for museum personnel 
and students in all aspects of museum operations. 
Specific programs for Native Americans are included. 



Performing Arts Programs 

The Kennedy Center offers quality programs throughout 
the year in drama and musical theater, opera, dance, and 
music. Artists of national and international fame perform in 
the Center's four main auditoriums — the Concert Hall, the 
Opera House, the Eisenhower Theater, and the Terrace 
Theater. The American Film Institute operates the AFI 
Theater showing classic films and modern American and 
international motion pictures. In addition, in cooperation 



Description 



The Office of Museum Programs offers internships to 
students and museum professionals for on-the-job 
training. Selected candidates work in any Smithsonian 
department for periods of six weeks to a year. There are 
no stipends; personal interviews are required. The Native 
American Training Program specifically assists Native 
Americans in establishing and managing their own 
museums and cultural institutions. 



Smithsonian Institution 



252/253 



A series of workshops is available for professional 
museum staff. A descriptive brochure is available at the 
address listed below. In 1979, the series included 
workshops on such topics as Design and Production of 
Exhibits for Art Museums, Label Writing and Editing, 
Museum Membership Programs, Principles of 
Conservation, Programs for Handicapped Persons, and 
Soliciting and Administrating Grants. 

This Office also houses the Museum Reference Center, a 
Smithsonian branch library. Its collection of resources and 
technical literature is available for use by researchers in 
museology and by museum personnel. 

Contact for Information 

Office of Museum Programs, Smithsonian Institution, 
Washington, DC 20560 



in need of planning or technical assistance but lacking 
local sources of help. The Alaska State Museum in Juneau 
received a grant to establish a conservation-services 
project to assist Alaskan museums with the preservation of 
collections. 



Seminar/Workshop Program 

Grants are made to organizations and institutions wishing 
to offer seminars and workshops in museum practices to 
members of the museum profession. Funds for such 
programs may include fees, travel, and subsistence for 
staff and faculty. Applications are judged on the strength 
and usefulness of the program offered. Example: In 1978, 
the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in 
Winston-Salem, N.C., received support for a summer 
institute in material culture and museum training. The 
Washington Conservation Guild in the District of Columbia 
received a grant to conduct a workshop for museum 
conservators on the use of the polarizing microscope for 
identification of materials. 



253 National Museum Act Programs 



What/For Whom 



Grants to museums, academic institutions, nonprofit 
museum-related organizations and associations, and 
individuals employed or sponsored by these 
organizations. Divisions and employees of the Smithsonian 
are not eligible. 



Description 



The Office of Museum Programs administers seven 
categories of grants to support projects that advance the 
museum profession through training, research, and 
special studies. Priority is given to projects for the training 
of museum conservators, for the study of conservation 
problems, and for research leading to new or improved 
conservation techniques. In 1978, approximately 80 grants 
were awarded. These ranged from $116 to $70,400, and 
averaged $7,000. Funds may not be used for general 
operating expenses, constructing or renovating museum 
buildings, or for purchasing acquisitions. (For programs 
providing support in these areas see listings under 
"Museums" heading in the Index.) 

Professional Assistance 

Grants are made to organizations and institutions offering 
professional and technical services to museums and the 
museum profession. Such services include consultation, 
coordination of museum activities and disciplines, 
publication of information on conservation, and other 
technical museum concerns. Applications are judged on 
need for the services offered as well as on the 
qualifications of the applicant. Example: In 1978, the 
American Association for State and Local History received 
a grant to provide 60 consultations per year to museums 



Special Studies and Research 

Museums and museum professionals, museum-related 
organizations, and academic institutions may receive 
grants to support original research projects and studies 
dealing with critical museum problems. Projects related to 
the theory and techniques of museum conservation 
receive priority. Funds may be used to cover all essential 
costs, including salaries, supplies, travel, subsistence, 
space, consultation, and manuscript preparation to 
camera-ready copy. Example: In 1978, Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., received support for 
research on the separation and spectrophotometric 
identification of organic pigments in works of art. The 
North Carolina State University studied the use of polymer 
resin systems for consolidation of degraded historic 
textiles. 

Stipends to Individuals for Conservation Studies 

Individuals who apply through eligible organizations may 
receive stipends to cover the costs of graduate study in 
museum conservation or professional training in the crafts 
of conservation. Applicants must be graduate students or 
have had two years of conservation experience. Example: 
In 1978, two individuals received support for studies in 
archeological conservation at the University of London's 
Institute of Archaeology. The Boston Museum of Fine Arts 
received a grant to support individual training in 
conservation and analytical techniques at its research 
laboratory. 

Stipend Support for Graduate/Professional 
Education and Training 

Academic institutions receive grants enabling them to 
offer stipends to graduate students and museum 
professionals for study at the applicant institution. 



Smithsonian Institution 



253/254 



Applications are judged on the basis of the quality of 
course work offered, available resources, job placement 
records of former students, and methods for awarding 
stipends. Priority is given to programs that involve minority 
groups and to proposals that offer training in museum 
conservation. Example: In 1978, the University of 
California at Los Angeles received funds to give stipend 
support to students seeking an M.B.A. in Arts 
Management. The Museum of African Art in Washington, 
D.C., received a grant to support a doctoral study in art 
history at Yale University. 



Description 



African Diaspora Program 

This program focuses on black cultures of the world and 
their influence on American black culture. Part of the 
program's research has included a study of the music and 
culture of the civil rights movement. The Divison develops 
performing arts presentations, such as a new Gospel 
Series, and it offers symposia and research publications 
on black culture. Collections of tapes, slides, and field 
notes are available to qualified researchers. 



Stipend Support for Museum Internships 

Museums and museum-related organizations may receive 
grants to provide internships for museum training in a 
museum environment. Such internships must benefit 
individuals, not institutions. Applications are judged on the 
quality of and need for the training offered, methods of 
awarding stipends, and the job placement record of 
former interns. Example: In 1978, the Minneapolis Institute 
of Arts received a grant to support internships for 
graduate students in conservation, curatorial practice, or 
education. The Pierpont Morgan Library in New York City 
offered internships in curatorial practice with specialization 
in medieval and Renaissance manuscripts. 

Travel for Museum Professionals 

Maximum grants of $2,000 may be awarded to 
professional museum personnel to defray the costs of 
transportation and subsistence during a travel-study 
project. Travel must benefit the applicant's professional 
career development. Study of conservation methods and 
collections management is specifically encouraged. 
Example: In 1978, grants were made for museum 
professionals to study pre-Columbian fabrics in Peru; 
traditional techniques for conserving silk textiles in Japan 
and Taiwan; exhibition design and interpretive programs 
of major folk art and ethnographic collections in 
Scandinavia and Western Europe; and the handling of 
Asian art collections in United States museums. 

Contact for Information 

National Museum Act, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
DC 20560 



Children's Theater 

This program, new in 1978, presents the "Discover 
Puppets" series for children. They not only see a dramatic 
puppet production, but also learn how puppets are made 
and controlled. The program is repeated each season. 



Performing Arts Series 

Throughout the winter months the Division sponsors a 
series of dance, drama, and music performances at the 
Smithsonian. The Chamber Music Series offers concerts 
by the Smithsonian Chamber Players, as well as open 
rehearsals at the Hirshhorn Museum by the 20th Century 
Consort. The American Musical Theater Series presents 
historic American musical performances. Other series 
focus on regional and ethnic music and dance 
presentations. Representatives of ethnic groups interested 
in performing should contact the Division at the address 
listed below. 



Recording Program 

Albums focusing on America's musical heritage are 
available for purchase and are accompanied by a 
discography and liner notes. These albums include jazz 
reissues, albums of little known jazz musicians, and a 
six-record collection of classic jazz. Three new Duke 
Ellington recordings are also available. The "American 
Musical Theater" albums are reconstructions of the 
Ziegfeld Follies of 1919, and of the musical plays Anything 
Goes, Lady Be Good, Hot Chocolates, and Oh, 
Kay! Orchestrion is a new recording of the music of the 
Smithsonian's mechanical orchestra. 



254 Performing Arts Programs 



What/For Whom 



Reference and research materials to qualified researchers 
in black culture; puppet theater for children; performing 
arts series and recordings available to the general public. 



Touring Performance Service 

Although this program has not operated since 1976, it is 
expected to be revived in the near future. It arranges 
musical and folk arts programs to tour educational and 
cultural institutions. Contact the address below for more 
information. 



Contact for Information 

Division of Performing Arts, Smithsonian Institution, 
Washington, DC 20560 



Smithsonian Institution 



255 Public Services 



What/For Whom 



International publications exchanges; membership 
programs for the general public; sale of photographs of 
collections, and of recordings of radio programs; and 
special events and facilities for handicapped persons. 



Description 



Exchange of Publications 

The International Exchange Service assists universities, 
organizations, and individuals in the United States in 
sharing information and research data with similar 
organizations abroad by means of a publications 
exchange. Senders assume postage costs to the 
Smithsonian, which in turn sends the publications to 
recipients abroad. Organizations using this service include 
the National Education Association, the Southwest 
Museum in Los Angeles, and the Universities of Oregon 
and Pennsylvania, as well as the Smithsonian's own 
galleries and museums. 

Membership Programs 

Members of the National Associates Program are eligible 
to participate in a wide variety of foreign and domestic 
study tours, regional outreach programs beyond the 
Washington, D.C., area, and in-depth seminars. They 
receive discounts on Smithsonian publications and on 
purchases at museum shops. Membership is open to 
anyone. Members of the Resident Associates Program 
(designed for residents of the Washington, D.C., 
metropolitan area) receive all National Program benefits 
and in addition may participate in local educational and 
cultural activities such as symposia, field trips, and 
classes in arts, crafts, the humanities, and science. Events 
are announced in Associate, a monthly newsletter. All 
members receive Smithsonian, a monthly magazine. 



broadcast weekly. Tapes of these programs are available 
to radio stations. Any station may request a quarterly 
subscription (13 weekly programs) for a nominal fee. 
Contact Radio Smithsonian at the address listed below. 

Special Events and Facilities for Handicapped 
Persons 

Structural barriers have been removed from the major 
Smithsonian museums, and at least one staff person in 
each museum has been assigned to assist handicapped 
individuals in planning visits to exhibit areas. In addition, 
the Smithsonian's Committee on the Handicapped has 
published Museums and Handicapped Students: 
Guidelines for Educators. It is available free from the 
National Air and Space Museum, Room 3566, at the 
address listed below. Occasionally exhibits are 
specifically designed for handicapped individuals. The 
Discovery Room at the Museum of Natural History 
contains touchable items from many areas of the museum. 
The major museums publish brochures in Braille and 
provide cassettes and raised-line drawings for 
visually-impaired persons. The National Air and Space 
Museum provides printed materials and a teletype 
machine for hearing-impaired persons, as well as 
wheelchairs equipped with mirrors to make all exhibits 
visible to persons with limited mobility. The Museum of 
History and Technology takes photos, slides, and artifacts 
to nursing homes, and adapts many exhibits to the special 
needs of senior citizens. In 1979, a new "touch tour" for 
visually-impaired persons opened at the ambulatories and 
sculpture garden of the Hirshhorn Museum. Thirty 
sculptures, including works by Rodin, Degas, Matisse, 
and Moore, provide a variety of tactile experiences. 
Contact the individual Smithsonian facilities at the address 
listed below for further information. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Facility), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, 
DC 20560 



Photographs of Collections 

More than a million photographs and slides of objects in 
the Smithsonian's collections or in storage are available 
for purchase at minimal cost. These include historic 
photographs more than 130 years old. Arrangements to 
obtain photographs of most other objects in the 
collections can be made. With few exceptions, writers or 
publishers may reproduce photographs upon payment of 
a reproductions fee. There is no fee for use of materials in 
nonprofit educational programs. For listings of 
photographs in specific subject areas, contact the 
Customer Services Branch of the Photographic Services 
Division at the address listed below. 

Radio Smithsonian 

Conversation and music related to the Smithsonian 
Institution's exhibits, research, and other activities are 



256 Research Fellowships 



What/For Whom 



Research fellowships for scholars and graduate students. 



Description 



Fellowships with stipends are available for research at the 
Smithsonian Institution under the supervision of a staff 
member. Research may be conducted in any subject for 
which material is available in the collections. Applicants 
must have command of the English language. An annual 
handbook, Smithsonian Opportunities for Research and 
Study in History, Art, Science (available from the office 



Smithsonian Institution 



256/257/258 



listed below), describes in detail the main categories of 
assistance. 

Postdoctoral Fellowships 

One-year stipends of $12,000 with travel and research 
allowances are available to researchers with a Ph.D., 
equivalent degree, or recognized scholarly standing. 



Library of Congress (see no. 179). The research must 
produce a written inventory of those institutions' resources 
relating to the participant's tribe. The inventory becomes 
part of the National Anthropological Archives, and is 
available for use in other research projects. Applicants 
must be nominated by their tribal governments and must 
be fluent in English. Only one candidate from a tribe will 
be selected. 



Predoctoral Fellowships 

One-year stipends of $7,000 with travel and research 
allowances are available to candidates for a Ph.D. or 
equivalent degree. Candidates must be working on 
dissertation research projects approved by their 
universities or departments and by the Smithsonian staff 
member serving as research supervisor. 

Visiting Research Student Program 

Stipends of $100 per week for 10-week periods are 
available to graduate students interested in pursuing 
directed research projects. 

Example 

In 1977, an appropriation of $565,000 provided 3 
Postdoctoral Fellowships, 1 1 Predoctoral Fellowships, and 
1 1 Visiting Research Student stipends for research in 
arts-related fields. For research in science and history, 22 
Postdoctoral and 14 Predoctoral Fellowships were 
awarded, as well as 10 Visiting Research Student 
stipends. 



Example 



With a 1978 appropriation of $11,500, seven Native 
Americans did research under contract in Washington, 
D.C. A man from the Kiowa tribe in Oklahoma and a 
woman from the Makah tribe in Washington each received 
$1,500 to do historical research on their tribes for one 
month. They produced the requisite comprehensive 
inventories of tribal resources found in their respective 
research institutions. 



Contact for Information 



Director of National Anthropological Archives, National 
Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, 
Washington, DC 20560 



258 Woodrow Wilson International 
Center for Scholars 



Contact for Information 



Office of Fellowships and Grants, Smithsonian Institution, 
L'Enfant Plaza, Room 3300, Washington, DC 20560 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships and guest scholarships for established 
scholars with doctoral degrees in the United States, or 
equivalent achievement in other countries, who have 
published work beyond their Ph.D. dissertations. 



Description 



257 Tribal History Research 
Assistance 

What/For Whom 

Contracts with Native Americans for doing tribal research 
in Washington, D.C. 

Description 

The National Anthropological Archives administers the 
American Indian Cultural Resources Training Program to 
assist Native Americans in developing tribal history 
programs. Through a personal service contract, the 
participant is paid to spend up to one month in 
Washington, D.C, doing research at the Anthropological 
Archives and at other major cultural resource' institutions 
such as the National Archives (see no. 162) and the 



The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, a 
joint public-private enterprise located within the 
Smithsonian Institution, is independently administered by 
16 Presidentally appointed trustees. As a memorial to 
Woodrow Wilson, the Center seeks "to strengthen the 
fruitful relatiorKbetween the world of learning and the 
world of public affairs." The two major divisions of study 
are Social and Political Studies and Historical and Cultural 
Studies. Four additional Drograms include The Kennan 
Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, The Latin 
American Program, The International Security Studies 
Program, and a newly developing East Asian Program. 

Fellows are selected competitively. Approximately 10 
percent of the applicants are selected each fall; periods of 
fellowships range from four months to one year. Up to 40 
fellows can be accommodated at one time. Fellows are 
expected to work full time in Washington on a single major 
scholarly project. Most applicants must hold a doctoral 



Smithsonian Institution 



258/259/260 



degree or its foreign equivalent, and they must have 
published work beyond their doctoral dissertations. In 
such areas as law, diplomacy, government, journalism, or 
the creative arts, an equivalent level of maturity and 
professional achievement will be required. In general, the 
stipend is equal to a fellow's earned income in the 
preceding year within limits set by the Board of Trustees. 
When possible, cost of living adjustments are extended to 
non-U. S. scholars if necessary. Travel support is offered 
on a case-by-case basis, but all fellows are requested to 
seek outside support for travel expenses. Non-U. S. fellows 
are expected to apply to their country's U.S. Educational 
Commission for a Fulbright-Hays Travel Grant. 

In addition to the Fellowship Program, the Center 
maintains a small Guest Scholar Program. When space 
becomes available for a short time, guest scholars are 
invited by arrangement with the Director of the Center to 
use the space for short-term study. Priority is given to 
scholars working on projects related to the research 
supported by the Fellowship Program. Although limited 
funds are available in special cases, guest scholars 
usually do not receive financial assistance. 

The Center publishes the Wilson Quarterly, a scholarly 
journal with a circulation of approximately 90,000, which 
relies heavily on past and present fellows for articles, book 
reviews, and editorial advice. Consideration is given to 
publication of research undertaken by fellows while at the 
Center. 

Example 

In 1978, in the Social and Political Studies division, an 
Italian scholar examined the development of absolutism in 
the Papal States and the organization of the Holy See 
during the Counter-Reformation as a prototype of the rise 
of the early modern state. In the division of Historical and 
Cultural Studies, a British scholar examined the idea of 
equality in the United States and its impact on American 
thought and culture since the Revolution. Another British 
professor of history studied efforts to control warfare 
through legal limitations and restraints. Also in a 
contemporary vein, a historian from Ohio State University 
began a study of civil rights in the United States, focusing 
on the question of immunities and personal liberty. Literary 
projects included a study of the fiction of Graham Greene 
by an associate professor of English from Northwestern 
University. 



259 Introduction 

National Gallery of Art 



The National Gallery of Art, formally established as a 
bureau of the Smithsonian Institution, is separately 
administered under the direction of a Board of Trustees. 

The Gallery's collections contain more than 55,000 works 
of art. They include paintings, sculpture, and graphic arts 
by major American and European artists, dating from the 
thirteenth century to the present. Special temporary 
exhibitions of international and national loans supplement 
the Gallery's collections throughout the year. The Gallery 
is open to the public every day except Christmas Day and 
New Year's Day. The monthly Calendar of Events with 
detailed information on the Gallery's current exhibitions 
and activities is available at no charge on request, by 
phone or mail, from the Special Events Office. 

Administered by the Education Department, the Art 
Information Service answers questions by mail, phone, or 
personal visit about the Gallery's works of art, particular 
artists, or other art matters. 

Exhibit catalogues and pamphlets describing the Gallery's 
events, facilities, services, and individual works of art are 
available without charge. Reproductions (prints, 
postcards, and slides) are for sale, as are specialized 
publications such as the Gallery's Annual Report and the 
annual Studies in the History of Art, a scholarly journal 
dealing with subjects related to the Gallery's collections, 
as well as books on art history and catalogues of current 
and previous exhibitions. 

The Gallery has regularly scheduled tours of collections, 
special exhibitions, and individual paintings; in addition, 
taped tours may be rented. Tours for groups (15 or more 
people, including schoolchildren) on any topic pertinent to 
the Gallery's collections, or to a special temporary 
exhibition, may be arranged by applying to the Education 
Department at least two weeks in advance. 

Contact for Information 

(Appropriate Office), National Gallery of Art, Washington, 
DC 20565 



Contact for Information 



The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 
Smithsonian Institution Building, Washington, DC 20560 



260 Fellowships 

National Gallery of Art 



What/For Whom 



Fellowships in any field of art history for Ph.D. candidates. 
Only recommendations by chairpersons of graduate 
departments of art history in American colleges or 
universities are considered; no applications from 
individuals are accepted. 



Smithsonian Institution 



260/261 



Description 



The National Gallery of Art offers graduate fellowships in 
the history of art. Applicants must be Ph.D. candidates, 
must have finished all their course work, and must have 
devoted at least one full year's research to their proposed 
dissertation topics. 

Chester Dale Fellowships . Four one-year 
fellowships of $8,000 each are awarded annually for the 
advancement or completion of doctoral dissertations, 
either in the United States or abroad. There are no 
requirements for residence at the Gallery. 

David E. Finley Fellowship . Each year, one 
fellowship of $8,000 per year for two years and eight 
months (or a total grant of $21,333) is awarded for two 
years of European travel and research on a dissertation 
topic already well advanced, plus a supplementary period 
to be spent as a research fellow at the National Gallery of 
Art. The candidate must demonstrate interest in museum 
work. 

Samuel H. Kress Fellowships • Two one-year 
research fellowships of $8,000 each are awarded 
annually. Approximately six months are to be spent in 
residence at the National Gallery working on research 
projects assigned for training purposes, and the remaining 
six months on the candidate's own work in the United 
States or abroad. 

Robert H. and Clarice Smith Fellowship • A 
one-year fellowship of $8,000 is awarded annually for 
productive scholarly work, in the United States or abroad, 
in Dutch or Flemish art history. The fellowship is intended 
for the advancement or completion of a doctoral 
dissertation, or of a book, in either field. There are no 
requirements for residence at the Gallery. 

Contact for Information 

National Gallery Fellowships, National Gallery of Art, 
Washington, DC 20565 



September through June. Each spring several Sundays 
are devoted to the Gallery's annual American Music 
Festival. The concerts are broadcast locally on WGMS, 
AM and FM, and intermission talks include program notes 
by the Music Director. 

Extension Services 

Audiovisual and educational materials such as films and 
slide packages are available free of charge, except for 
return postage. Recent packages include Henri Matisse, 
Paper Cut-Outs, and The Chinese Past. Advisory services 
are provided to teachers and study groups concerning 
adaptations of materials for particular uses. A catalogue of 
programs is available at no charge. Contact the Education 
Department at the address listed below. 

Lectures 

Prominent scholars and critics give lectures in the 
auditorium on Sundays at 4 p.m., free of charge. During 
the summer the Education Department presents a series 
treating a single theme. During the spring the Andrew W. 
Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, a special series 
commissioned by the Gallery, are given by a leading 
scholar and are subsequently issued in book form. 

National Lending Service 

The National Lending Service lends a limited number of 
works of art to qualified museums throughout the country. 
These works are available on an annual, renewable basis 
and are intended as supplements to the permanent 
collections of the borrowing institutions. To qualify, 
museums must satisfy the Gallery's requirements for 
continuous security and environmental control, and they 
must meet the American Association of Museums' 
definition of a museum: ". . . an organized and permanent 
nonprofit institution, essentially educational or aesthetic in 
purpose, with professional staff, which owns and utilizes 
tangible objects, cares for them, and exhibits them to the 
public on some regular schedule." 



261 /Public Services 

National Gallery of Art 

What/For Whom 



Concerts and lectures, extension services, and 
photographic services for researchers, students, and the 
general public. Loans of artworks to qualified museums. 



Description 



Concerts 

Free concerts by the National Gallery Orchestra and 
professional soloists and ensembles are presented in the 
Gallery's East Garden Court on Sunday evenings from late 



Photographic Services 

The Gallery encourages the faithful reproduction of the 
works of art in its collections. Black-and-white 8- by 
10-inch glossy prints are available for sale at a nominal 
fee. Color transparencies may be rented for three months 
at a nominal fee for nonprofit or educational uses. The fee 
is higher for commercial uses. Special requests for black- 
and-white prints or color transparencies requiring new 
photography are filled as time allows, for an additional fee. 
There is no charge for reproducing artworks in the 
collection, but permission must be requested in writing. 
For further information, contact the Office of Photographic 
Services at the address listed below. 

Contact for Information 

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC 20565 



Smithsonian Institution 



262/263 



262 Research Facilities 

National Gallery of Art 



Contact for Information 



(Appropriate Facility), National Gallery of Art, Washington, 
DC 20565 



What/For Whom 



An Art Reference Library, Photographic Archives, and 
Slide Library for use by responsible organizations, 
including libraries participating in the Interlibrary Loan 
Service, and by qualified scholars in the visual arts. 



Description 



Art Reference Library 

The Library contains a fine arts collection of more than 
8,000 books, bound periodicals and catalogues on 
microfilm, and 120 drawers of vertical files containing 
pamphlets. Emphasis is on the history of Western art, 
particularly European and American painting, drawing, 
prints, and sculpture. Special collections include artist 
monographs, Vinciana, museum and private collections, 
exhibitions catalogues, and art sales records. The Library 
maintains an extensive publications-exchange program 
with institutions in the United States and abroad. 

Photographic Archives 

The Archives contains more than 800,000 photographs of 
works of art in collections throughout the world. 
Architecture, paintings and drawings, sculpture, and the 
decorative arts are among the fields covered by the 
collection. Although the Archives is mainly a research 
facility for scholars in Washington, D.C., the staff will 
answer specific questions by phone or letter and give 
information, when available, on how to obtain particular 
photographs. The Archives does not lend its own 
photographs. 

Slide Library 

Color and black-and-white slides of objects in the 
Gallery's collections and in special exhibitions are 
available for loan. Selections may be made from the 
Gallery's exhibit catalogues (see no. 259). 



263 Student Summer Employment 

National Gallery of Art 



What/For Whom 



Opportunities for summer employment at the National 
Gallery of Art as aides or interns. 



Description 



Summer Aides Program • A summer work program 
is held for students of high school age or older who are 
handicapped or who are from low-income families in the 
Washington metropolitan area. School counselors 
determine eligibility of applicants who then apply to the 
Gallery for positions. Aides are paid minimum wage. 

Summer Interns Program • A limited number of 
jobs are available in the summer for graduate students 
and graduating seniors, generally with background in art 
history, to serve as curatorial assistants, educational 
lecturers, conservation technicians, or in other positions 
for which they are qualified. Interns meet regularly with 
departmental supervisors for discussion of the Gallery's 
functions and for visits to nonpublic areas of the building. 
The period of internship is from mid-June to late August. 
Interns are paid at the Civil Service GS-5 level. Brochures 
containing more specific information, including deadlines 
for applications, are available each December for the 
following summer. 



Contact for Information 



Personnel Office, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 
DC 20565 



264/265 



Tennessee Valley 
Authority 



Example 



264 Community Assistance 
Programs 



What/For Whom 



Technical and programming advice on exhibitions and on 
the marketing of visual and performing arts and crafts to 
community arts organizations; advisory and technical 
services involving community restoration and development 
for communities in the Tennessee Valley region. For 
purposes of these programs the Tennessee Valley region 
includes Tennessee and portions of Alabama, Georgia, 
Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Virginia. 



Description 



The Office of Community Development was established in 
1979 by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to 
coordinate community activities which are assisted by 
various TVA programs. This Office runs two programs with 
significant cultural components: Cultural Awareness and 
Operation Townlift. 

Cultural Awareness 

The Office offers technical assistance and advice to 
community arts organizations on museum exhibition, 
programming and audience development, and on the 
marketing of arts and crafts indigenous to the Tennessee 
Valley region. In addition, the Office itself arranges 
exhibits for TVA facilities throughout the region. 

Operation Townlift 

Multidisciplinary teams of professionals, ranging from 
historic preservation experts to traffic and parking 
specialists, help many small and medium-sized 
communities in the Tennessee Valley region adapt to new 
industry, commerce, and tourism. Townlift assistance often 
focuses on the downtown area of a community and on the 
restoration of older, historic buildings. When local 
authorities decide to rebuild an area, the Townlift team 
helps in the design of new structures that are in keeping 
with the architectural character and standards of the 
community. 

The Tennessee Valley Authority offers Prearchitectural 
Programming Assistance to small valley towns with limited 
financial resources. Programming services assist local 
governments in planning public facilities such as libraries, 
parks, recreation areas, and community centers. 



TVA has organized an ongoing "Cultural Heritage Exhibit 
Series." Exhibits have included photographs and artifacts 
depicting innovations and inventions in the Valley from 
1933 to 1948; "Kentucky Seen," a photographic 
documentary of Kentucky recording "the vestiges of a 
self-reliant people as they make the transition from one 
lifestyle to another"; "Cherokee Crafts," an exhibition and 
sale by Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc., of arts and 
crafts of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; "TVA 
Archaeology," an exhibition of archeological methods and 
artifacts discovered over the years in more than 25 TVA 
projects; and "Living With Crafts," an exhibition and sale 
of crafts for cooking, dining, and sleeping, as well as a 
collection of student crafts. 

In 1978, with $1.3 million, Operation Townlift teams 
completed improvements of the Scottsboro, Ala., county 
square, which is being proposed for listing in the National 
Register of Historic Places (see no. 126). That same year, 
in conjunction with the Townlift program, TVA published 
Townlift Buildings Improvements Manual, a handbook of 
preservation and rehabilitation techniques for buildings, 
particularly historic buildings. 

Contact for Information 

Director, Office of Community Development, Tennessee 
Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN 37902 



265 Recreation Technical 
Assistance 

What/For Whom 

Technical assistance in the use of recreational and 
cultural resources for communities and organizations in 
the Tennessee Valley region (all of Tennessee and 
portions of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, 
North Carolina, and Virginia). 

Description 

Although direct financial aid is not available, TVA assists 
communities >n applying for grants from appropriate 
sources to help develop cultural or recreational resources. 
Assistance is also available for developing the conceptual 
design of facilities, analyzing cultural and recreational 
needs, and identifying alternatives to meet these needs. 
The Recreation Technical Assistance Program is also 
responsible for all agency nominations to the National 
Register of Historic Places (see no. 126). 

Example 

TVA has provided planning assistance to a community in 
southwest Virginia for the restoration of a pioneer fort. It 



Tennessee Valley Authority 265 

has assisted in the restoration of an English colony on the Contact for Information 

Cumberland Plateau in eastern Tennessee, and in the Chief, Recreation Resources Branch, Division of Forestry, 

organization of a parks and recreation department in a Fisheries, and Wildlife Development, Forestry Building, 

community in western North Carolina. TVA and community Norris TN 37828 

arts organizations have cosponsored noontime concerts 

and arts exhibits in Knoxville office buildings. 



266 



United States 
Postal Service 



266 Postage Stamp Art 



What/For Whom 



Commissions to artists. 



Description 



The Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee reviews and 
recommends to the Postmaster General subjects and 
designs for commemorative and other postage stamps 



and commissions artists to execute stamp designs. The 
Committee reviews the artist's portfolio of artworks in any 
medium and generally commissions only artists familiar 
with the intricacies of stamp art, the particular stamp's 
subject matter, and those who have executed work in a 
genre similar to the one the stamp requires. 

Example 

In 1978, Benjamin Somoroff was commissioned to design 
a stamp depicting the development of photography. Jerry 
Pinkney painted portraits of Harriet Tubman and Martin 
Luther King, Jr., in 1978 and 1979 as part of the Postal 
Service's "Black Heritage U.S.A." Series. In 1979, 
Bradbury Thompson painted a portrait of Robert Kennedy. 

Contact for Information 

Director, Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee, Office of 
Stamps, U.S. Postal Service, L'Enfant Plaza-West, SW, 
Washington, DC 20260 



267/268 



United States 
Senate 



267 Senate Commission on 
Art and Antiquities 

What/For Whom 

Exhibits and interpretive materials for researchers; 
internships of up to one year for college undergraduates 
(preferably juniors and seniors) with a concentration in 
American art history, or related fields. 

Description 

The Senate Commission on Art and Antiquities accepts, 
places, and preserves works of art and historical objects 
in the Senate wing of the U.S. Capitol and Senate Office 
Buildings. It prepares exhibits of documents and 
memorabilia that illustrate the Senate's historic and artistic 
heritage. It provides interpretive material on the restored 
chambers and other collections of the Senate. One to 
three internship positions are available for students to 
work with the Senate Curator and the collection of 
paintings, sculpture, furniture, and historical objects in the 
Senate wing of the U.S. Capitol. Duties include assisting in 
preparation of catalogues of the collection and exhibits of 
Senate documents and memorabilia and working on the 
social history of the Capitol building and other research 
fields. Students may apply independently, or through their 
college or university. They may intern for a summer, one 
semester, or an academic year. No financial stipend is 
given, but the sponsoring college or university often 
grants academic credit. Applications must be submitted to 
the Commission at least 60 days prior to the beginning of 
the desired internship. 

Contact for Information 

Office of the Curator, U.S. Senate Commission on Art and 
Antiquities, Room S-411, U.S. Capitol, Washington, 
DC 20510 



268 Senate Historical Office 



What/For Whom 

Information and research assistance to Senators, their 
staff, historians, political scientists, and the general public. 



Description 

The Senate Historical Office promotes access to the 
primary source material contained in the papers of 
Senators, and serves as a clearinghouse for 
Senate-related research activity through its research 
services and publications. The Office helps researchers 
identify and locate official records and personal papers, 
and will intercede on their behalf regarding access to 
closed committee records. Files are maintained on recent 
Senate-related research projects. A photographic archives 
contains photographs and engravings of the significant 
events and personages of Senate history. Conferences for 
scholars and legislators are organized to publicize and 
encourage Senate scholarship. The Office has initiated an 
oral history project to tape and transcribe interviews with 
retiring Senators and senior staff; the Office also offers 
guidance to other oral history projects. 

Publications are prepared and regularly updated. The 
United States Senate: A Historical Bibliography is a 
selective compilation of books and articles on the Senate, 
focusing primarily on its development as an institution. An 
extensive survey of the locations of all former Senators' 
papers will be issued as a comprehensive catalogue in 
1980. 

Both the White House and Supreme Court have curatorial 
offices whose staff respond to inquiries from the public 
concerning the architecture and history of these 
institutions. For further information, contact: The White 
House, Office of the Curator, Washington, DC 20500; or 
Supreme Court of the United States, Curator's Office, 
Washington, DC 20543. 



Contact for Information 

United States Senate Historical Office, Washington, 
DC 20510 



269/270 



Veterans 
Administration 



270 Fine Arts Commissions 



What/For Whom 

Commissions to artists to create original artworks for 
installation in new Veterans Administration buildings. 



Description 



269 Educational and Vocational 
Benefits 

What/For Whom 

Direct payments, loans, study stipends, and counseling 
for veterans and dependents of disabled or deceased 
veterans. 

Description 

Allowances are provided to veterans and, under 
circumstances of death or disability, their dependents to 
pursue full-time or part-time educational, professional, or 
vocational programs, including apprenticeships and 
on-the-job training. Students may pursue any course of 
study, including arts, crafts, or humanities curricula, at any 
educational institution approved for training, such as a 
vocational or business school, two- or four-year college, 
university, or professional or technical institution. 
Payments are made monthly for the duration of the 
program of study; the amount of support varies according 
to the program. Servicepersons who entered active duty 
after December 31, 1976, may make monthly contributions 
to an individual education fund administered by the 
Veterans Administration (VA); every $1 contributed by the 
participant is matched by the VA with $2 and additional 
sums from the Department of Defense. 

Financial support is also provided to disabled veterans for 
the duration of an educational or vocational program. 
Support includes subsistence payments as well as the 
entire cost of tuition, books, fees, and training supplies. 

Contact for Information 



Veterans Administration field offices or 
Administration, Washington, DC 20420 



Veterans 



Under this program, artists are commissioned to produce 
works of art which reflect the American cultural heritage 
for incorporation into the architectural design of new 
Veterans Administration buildings. Free-standing or 
wall-mounted sculptures, tapestries, and murals are 
among artworks eligible for consideration. A maximum of 
one-half of one percent of a building's estimated 
construction cost up to a maximum of $50,000 is reserved 
for the design, fabrication, and installation of the artwork. 

Artists are selected through a cooperative procedure 
between the Veterans Administration, the National 
Endowment for the Arts, and the project architect. When 
the plans for a building have been approved, the Veterans 
Administration Committee on the Arts and the project 
director determine the medium, maximum cost, and 
location of artworks. If the Committee proposes 
contracting for the creation of an original work, the Visual 
Arts Program of the Arts Endowment (see no. 212) is 
asked to convene a panel to recommend artists for the 
commission. Under special circumstances, the Committee 
may recommend the purchase of an existing object of art. 
In either case, the Administrator of Veterans Affairs makes 
the final selection. 



Example 



The Veterans Administration estimates that this program 
will spend about $250,000 for approximately eight projects 
annually. Examples of artworks commissioned during 
1978-1979 are a sculpture entitled "Dancing Indian" by 
Michael Noranja, which will cost about $3,500 and will be 
installed in the Blind and Low Vision Center in Palo Alto, 
Calif. A marble sculpture by Norman Hines and an art 
object lending library by Guy McCoy will cost about 
$15,000 to purchase and install in a nursing home in 
Sepulveda, Calif. 



Contact for Information 



Chairman, Committee on the Arts, Veterans Administration, 
Washington, DC 20420 



Appendices 

A- J 



Appendix A Department of Commerce 

Secretarial Representatives 

Economic Development Administration (EDA) Regional Offices 

Regional Commissions 

Appendix B Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 

Regional Offices 

Educational Programs Regional Commissions 

Appendix C Department of Housing and Urban Development 

Regional Offices 

Appendix D Department of the Interior 

Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service Regional Offices 
National Park Service Regional Offices 

Appendix E Department of Labor 

Employment and Training Administration Regional Offices 

Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional XDffices 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regional Offices 

Appendix F General Services Administration 

Federal Information Centers and Telephone Tielines 

Appendix G Government Printing Office 

Federal Bookstores 

Appendix H National Endowment for the Arts 

Regional Representatives 
State Arts Agencies 

Appendix I National Endowment for the Humanities 

State Programs 

Appendix J National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Regional and Field Offices 



Department of Commerce 



Appendix A 



Secretarial Representatives 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

41 1 Stuart Street 
Seventh Floor 
Boston, MA 02116 
(61 7) 223-0695 

Region II 

(New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, 

Virgin Islands) 

Federal Building 
26 Federal Plaza 
Room 3722 
New York, NY 10007 
(212) 264-5647 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

William J. Green Federal Building 

600 Arch Street 
Room 10424 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 
(215)597-7527 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

1365 Peachtree Street, NE 
Suite 300 

Atlanta, GA 30309 
(404) 881-3165 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

CNA Building 

55 East Jackson Boulevard 

Room 1402 

Chicago, IL 60604 

(312)353-4609 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

Federal Building 
1100 Commerce Street 
Room 9040 
Dallas, TX 75242 
(214) 749-2891 

Region VII 

(Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 

Federal Building 

601 East 12th Street 
Room 1844 

Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816) 374-3961 



Region VIII 

(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, 

South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

Title Building 
909 1 7th Street 
Room 515 
Denver, CO 80202 
(303) 837-4285 

Region IX 

(Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada) 

Federal Building 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

Box 361 35 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415)556-5145 

Region X 

(Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

Federal Building 
915 Second Avenue 
Room 958 
Seattle, WA 98174 
(206) 442-5780 



Department of Commerce 



Economic Development 
Administration (EDA) Regional 
Offices 



Appendix A 



Regional Commissions 



Rocky Mountain 

(Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

Title Building 
909 1 7th Street 
Suite 505 

Denver, CO 80202 
(303) 837-4714 

Southeastern 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

1365 Peachtree Street, NE 
Suite 700 

Atlanta, GA 30309 
(404) 881-7401 

Midwestern 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

1 75 W. Jackson Boulevard 
Suite A- 1630 
Chicago, IL 60604 
(312)353-7707 

Atlantic 

(Connecticut, Delaware, District of 

Columbia, Maine, Maryland, 

Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New 

Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto 

Rico, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virgin 

Islands, Virginia, West Virginia) 

600 Arch Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19106 

(215) 597-4603 

Southwestern 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

American Bank Tower 

Suite 600 

221 West Sixth Street 

Austin, TX 78701 

(512)397-5461 

Western 

(Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, 
California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, 
Nevada, Oregon, Washington) 

1 700 Westlake Avenue North 
Seattle, WA 98109 
(206) 442-0596 



Coastal Plains Regional Commission 

215 East Bay Street 
Charleston, SC 29401 
(803) 724-4250 

Four Corners Regional Commission 

2350 Alamo, SE 
Suite 303 

Albuquerque, NM 87106 
(505) 766-2990 

New England Regional Commission 

53 State Street 
Suite 400 

Boston, MA 02109 
(617)223-6045 

Old West Regional Commission 

201 Main Street 
Suite D 

Rapid City, SD 57701 
(605) 348-6310 

Ozarks Regional Commission 

1 100 North University Avenue 
Suite 109 

Little Rock, AR 72207 
(501 ) 378-5905 

Pacific Northwest Regional Commission 

700 East Evergreen Boulevard 
Vancouver, WA 98661 
(206) 696-2581 

Southwest Border Regional 
Commission 

100 North Stone Avenue 
Suite 309 

Tucson, AZ 85726 
(602) 792-6781 

Upper Great Lakes Regional 

Commission 

504 Christie Building 

120 North Fourth Avenue, West 

Duluth, MN 55802 

(218) 727-6692, Ext 458 or 459 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



Appendix B 



Regional Offices 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

John F. Kennedy Federal Office Building 
Government Center 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617) 223-6831 

Region II 

(New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, 

Virgin Islands) 

26 Federal Plaza 
New York, NY 10007 
(212)264-4600 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

3535 Market Street 
P.O. Box 13716 
Philadelphia, PA 19101 
(215) 596-6492 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

101 Marietta Tower 
Atlanta, GA 30323 
(404) 221-2442 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

300 South Wacker Drive 
35th Floor 

Chicago, IL 60606 
(312) 353-5160 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

1200 Main Tower Building 
11th Floor 
Dallas, TX 75202 
(214)655-3301 

Region VII 

(Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 

601 East 12th Street 
Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816) 374-3436 

Region VIII 

(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, 

South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

1 9th and Stout Streets 
Denver, CO 80202 
(303) 837-3373 



Region IX 

(Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada) 

50 United Nations Plaza 
San Francisco, CA 94102 
(415)556-6746 

Region X 

(Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

1321 Second Avenue 
Seattle, WA 98101 
(206) 442-0486 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 



Appendix B 



Educational Programs 
Regional Commissions 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

John F Kennedy Federal Building 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617) 223-7500 

Region II 

(Canal Zone, New Jersey, New York, 

Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands) 

26 Federal Plaza 
New York, NY 10007 
(212) 264-4370 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia) 

3535 Market Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19108 
(215)596-1001 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

101 Marietta Tower Building 
Atlanta, GA 30323 
(404) 221-2063 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

300 South Wacker Drive 
Chicago, IL 60606 
(312)353-5215 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

1200 Main Tower Building 
Dallas, TX 75202 
(214) 767-3626 

Region VII 

(Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 

New Federal Office Building 
601 East 12th Street 
Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816) 374-2276 

Region VIII 

(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, 

South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

Federal Regional Office Building 
1961 Stout Street 
Denver, CO 80202 
(303) 837-3544 



Region IX 

(American Samoa, Arizona, California, 
Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Trust Territory 
of the Pacific, Wake Islands) 

50 United Nations Building 
San Francisco, CA 94102 
(415)556-4920 

Region X 

(Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

Arcade Plaza Building 
1321 Second Avenue 
Seattle, WA 98101 
(206) 442-0460 



Department of Housing and Urban Development 
Regional Offices 



Appendix C 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

Boston Regional Office 

800 John F. Kennedy Federal Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

(617) 223-4066 

Region II 

(New Jersey, New York, Panama Canal 

Zone, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands) 

New York Regional Office 

26 Federal Plaza 

Room 3541 

New York, NY 1 0007 

(212)264-8068 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

Philadelphia Regional Office 
General Information Center 
Curtis Building 
625 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 
(215) 597-2560 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

Atlanta Regional Office (Georgia) 

Room 21 1 

Pershing Point Plaza 

1371 Peachtree Street, NE 

Atlanta, GA 30309 

(404) 526-5585 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

Chicago Regional Office 
300 South Wacker Drive 
Chicago, IL 60606 
(312)353-5680 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

Fort Worth Regional Office 
1 100 Commerce Street 
Dallas, TX 75242 
(214) 749-7401 



Region VII 

(Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 

Kansas City Regional Office 
300 Federal Office Building 
91 1 Walnut Street 
Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816) 374-2661 

Region VIII 

(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, 

South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

Denver Regional Office 
2500 Executive Towers 
1405 Curtis Street 
Denver, CO 80202 
(303) 837-4881 

Region IX 

(American Samoa, Arizona, California, 

Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Pacific Trust 

Territories) 

San Francisco Regional Office 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

P O. Box 36003 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415)556-4752 

Region X 

(Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

Seattle Regional Office 
Arcade Plaza Building 
1321 Second Avenue 
Stop 329 

Seattle, WA 98101 
(206) 442-5412 



Department of the Interior 



Appendix D 



Heritage Conservation and 
Recreation Service 
Regional Offices 



National Park Service 
Regional Offices 



Northeast Region 
(Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, 
Virginia, West Virginia, and the District 
of Columbia) 
Federal Office Building 
600 Arch Street 
Room 9310 

Philadelphia, PA 19106 
(215)597-7383 

Southeast Region 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 

Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto 

Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virgin 

Islands) 

148 International Boulevard 

Atlanta, GA 30303 

(404)221-4538 

Lake Central Region 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

Federal Building 

Ann Arbor, Ml 48107 

(313) 668-2000 

Mld-Contlnent Region 
(Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

Denver Federal Center 
P.O. Box 25387 
Denver, CO 80225 
(303) 234-3523 

Northwest Region 

(Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

Federal Building 
915 Second Avenue 
Seattle, WA 98174 
(206) 442-4706 

South Central Region 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

5000 Marble Avenue, NE 
Albuquerque, NM 87110 
(505) 766-3514 

Pacific Southwest Region 

(American Samoa, Arizona, California, 

Guam, Hawaii, Nevada) 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, CA 94102 
(415) 556-8360 

Alaska Area Office 
1011 East Tudor 
Suite 297 

Anchorage, AK 99503 
(907) 277-1666 



North Atlantic Regional Office 

National Park Service 
1 5 State Street 
Boston, MA 02109 

Mid-Atlantic Regional Office 

National Park Service 
143 South Third Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 

National Capital Region 

National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Drive, SW 
Washington, DC 20242 

Southeast Regional Office 

National Park Service 
1895 Phoenix Boulevard 
Atlanta, GA 30349 

Midwest Regional Office 

National Park Service 
1 709 Jackson Street 
Omaha, NE 68102 

Rocky Mountain Regional Office 

National Park Service 
655 Parfet Street 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 

Southwest Regional Office 

National Park Service 

P.O. Box 728 

Santa Fe, NM 87501 

Western Regional Office 

National Park Service 
450 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Pacific Northwest Regional Office 

National Park Service 

601 Fourth and Pike Building 

Seattle, WA 98101 



Department of Labor 



Appendix E 



Employment and Training 
Administration 
Regional Offices 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

John F. Kennedy Building 

Room 1703 

Boston, MA 02203 

(617) 223-6349 

Region II 

(New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, 

Virgin Islands) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

1515 Broadway 

Room 3713 

New York, NY 10036 

(212)399-5445 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 
and Training Administration 
P.O. Box 8796 
Philadelphia, PA 19101 
(215) 596-6336 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

1371 Peachtree Street, NE 

Room 415 

Atlanta, GA 30309 

(404) 881-4411 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

230 South Dearborn Street 

6th Floor 

Chicago, IL 60604 

(312)353-0313 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

555 Griffin Square Building 

Room 316 

Dallas, TX 75202 

(214) 749-2721 



Region VII 

(Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

Federal Building 

91 1 Walnut Street 

Room 1000 

Kansas City, MO 64106 

(816) 374-3796 

Region VIII 

(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, 

South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

16122 Federal Office Building 

1961 Stout Street 

Denver, CO 80294 

(303) 837-4477 

Region IX 

(American Samoa, Arizona, California, 
Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Trust Territory 
of the Pacific Islands) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

Box 36084 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415) 556-7414 

Region X 

(Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment 

and Training Administration 

Federal Office Building 

909 First Avenue 

Room 1145 

Seattle, WA 98174 

(206) 442-7700 



Department of Labor 



Appendix E 



Bureau of Labor Statistics 
Regional Offices 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

1603 John F. Kennedy Federal Building 
Government Center 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617)223-6761 

Region II 

(New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, 

Virgin Islands) 

1515 Broadway 
Suite 3400 

New York, NY 10036 
(212) 399-5405 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

3535 Market Street 
P.O. Box 13309 
Philadelphia, PA 19101 
(215) 596-1154 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

1371 Peachtree Street, NE 
Atlanta, GA 30309 
(404) 881-4418 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

Federal Office Building 
230 South Dearborn Street 
Ninth Floor 
Chicago, IL 60604 
(312) 353-1880 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

555 Griffin Square Building 
Second Floor 
Dallas, TX 75202 
(214) 749-3516 

Regions VII and VIII 
(Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

91 1 Walnut Street 
Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816) 374-2481 



Regions IX and X 

(Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, 

Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington) 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

Box 3601 7 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415)556-4678 



Department of Labor 



Appendix E 



Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration (OSHA) 
Regional Offices 



Region I 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 
John F. Kennedy Federal Building 
Government Center 
Room 1804 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617)223-6712/3 

Region II 

(New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, 

Virgin Islands) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 

1515 Broadway 

1 Astor Plaza 

Room 3445 

New York, NY 1 0036 

(212)399-5754 

Region III 

(Delaware, District of Columbia, 

Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 

Gateway Building 

3535 Market Street 

Suite 2100 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 

(215)596-1201 

Region IV 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 

1375 Peachtree Street, NE 

Suite 587 

Atlanta, GA 30309 

(404) 881-3573 

Region V 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, 

Ohio, Wisconsin) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 
230 South Dearborn Street 
Room 3263, 32nd Floor 
Chicago, IL 60604 
(312)353-2220 

Region VI 

(Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, 

Oklahoma, Texas) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 
555 Griffin Square Building 
Room 602 
Dallas, TX 75202 
(214) 767-4731 



Region VII 

(Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 

91 1 Walnut Street 

Room 3000 

Kansas City, MO 64106 

(816) 374-5861 

Region VIII 

(Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, 

South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 

Federal Building 

1961 Stout Street 

Room 1554 

Denver, CO 80294 

(303) 837-3883 

Region IX 

(American Samoa, Arizona, California, 
Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Trust Territory 
of the Pacific Islands) 

US. Department of Labor-OSHA 

9470 Federal Building 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

P.O. Box 36017 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415) 556-0584 

Region X 

(Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

U.S. Department of Labor-OSHA 

Federal Office Building 

909 First Avenue 

Room 6048 

Seattle, WA 98174 

(206) 442-5930 



General Services Administration 



Federal Information Centers 
and Telephone Tielines 



Appendix F 



Alabama 

Birmingham 

322-8591 

Toll-free tieline to Atlanta, Georgia 

Mobile 

438-1421 

Toll-free tieline to New Orleans, Louisiana 

Arizona 

Phoenix 

Federal Building 
230 North First Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85025 
(602) 261-3313 

Tucson 

622-1511 

Toll-free tieline to Phoenix 

Arkansas 

Little Rock 

378-6177 

Toll-free tieline to Memphis, Tennessee 

California 

Los Angeles 

Federal Building 
300 North Los Angeles Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90012 
(213) 688-3800 

Sacramento 

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse 
650 Capitol Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916)440-3344 

San Diego 

Federal Building 
880 Front Street 
Room 1S11 

San Diego, CA 92188 
(714) 293-6030 

San Francisco 

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

P. O Box 36082 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415)556-6600 

San Jose 
275-7422 

Toll-free tieline to San Francisco 

Santa Ana 

836-2386 

Toll-free tieline to Los Angeles 



Colorado 

Colorado Springs 

471-9491 

Toll-free tieline to Denver 

Denver 

Federal Building 
1961 Stout Street 
Denver, CO 80294 
(303) 837-3602 

Pueblo 

544-9523 

Toll-free tieline to Denver 

Connecticut 

Hartford 

527-2617 

Toll-free tieline to New York, New York 

New Haven 

624-4720 

Toll-free tieline to New York, New York 

District of Columbia 

Seventh and D Streets, SW 
Room 5716 

Washington, DC 20407 
(202) 755-8660 

Florida 

Fort Lauderdale 

522-8531 

Toll-free tieline to Miami 

Jacksonville 
354-4756 

Toll-free tieline to St. Petersburg 

Miami 

Federal Building 
51 Southwest First Avenue 
Miami, FL 33130 
(305) 350-4155 

Orlando 

422-1800 

Toll-free tieline to St. Petersburg 

St. Petersburg 

William C. Cramer Federal Building 
144 First Avenue, South 
St. Petersburg, FL 33701 
(813)893-3495 

Tampa 

229-7911 

Toll-free tieline to St Petersburg 

West Palm Beach 

833-7566 

Toll-free tieline to Miami 



Appendix F 



Georgia 

Federal Building 
275 Peachtree Street, 
Atlanta. GA 30303 
(404) 221-6891 



NE 



Maryland 

Federal Building 
31 Hopkins Plaza 
Baltimore, MD 21201 
(301) 962-4980 



Hawaii 

Federal Building 
300 Ala Moana Boulevard 
PO Box 50091 
Honolulu, HI 96850 
(808) 546-8620 



Massachusetts 

John F Kennedy Federal Building 
Cambridge Street 
Room E-130 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617) 223-7121 



Illinois 

Everett McKinley Dirksen Building 
219 South Dearborn Street 
Room 250 
Chicago, IL 60604 
(312) 353-4242 



Indiana 

Gary/Hammond 

883-4110 

Toll-free tieline to Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Federal Building 
575 North Pennsylvania 
Indianapolis, IN 46204 
(317) 269-7373 



Michigan 
Detroit 

McNamara Federal Building 
477 Michigan Avenue 
Room 103 
Detroit, Ml 48226 
(313) 226-7016 

Grand Rapids 
451-2628 

Toll-free tieline to Detroit 



Minnesota 

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse 
110 South Fourth Street 
Minneapolis, MN 55401 
(612) 725-2073 



Iowa 

Des Moines 

284-4448 

Toll-free tieline to Omaha, Nebraska 

Kansas 

Topeka 

295-2866 

Toll-free tieline to Kansas City, Missouri 

Wichita , 

263-6931 

Toll-free tieline to Kansas City, Missouri 

Kentucky 

Federal Building 
600 Federal Place 
Louisville, KY 40202 
(502) 582-6261 

Louisiana 

US Postal Service Building 
701 Loyola Avenue 
Room 1210 

New Orleans, LA 70113 
(504) 589-6696 



Missouri 
Kansas City 

Federal Building 
601 East 12th Street 
Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816)374-2466 

St. Joseph 

223-8206 

Toll-free tieline to Kansas City 

St. Louis 

Federal Building 
1 520 Market Street 
St. Louis, MO 63101 
(314)425-4106 

Nebraska 

Federal Building 

U.S. Post Office and Courthouse 

215 North 17th Street 

Omaha, NE 68102 

(402) 221-3353 



Appendix F 



New Jersey 

Newark 

Federal Building 
970 Broad Street 
Newark, NJ 07102 
(201 ) 645-3600 

Paterson/Passaic 

523-0717 

Toll-free tieline to Newark 

Trenton 

396-4400 

Toll-free tieline to Newark 



New Mexico 

Albuquerque 

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse 
500 Gold Avenue, SW 
Albuquerque, NM 87102 
(505) 766-3091 

Santa Fe 

983-7743 

Toll-free tieline to Albuquerque 

New York 

Albany 

463-4421 

Toll-free tieline to New York 

Buffalo 

Federal Building 
1 1 1 West Huron Street 
Buffalo, NY 14202 
(716) 846-4010 

New York City 

Federal Building 
26 Federal Plaza 
Room 1-114 
New York, NY 10007 
(212) 264-4464 

Rochester 

546-5075 

Toll-free tieline to Buffalo 

Syracuse 

476-8545 

Toll-free tieline to Buffalo 



North Carolina 

Charlotte 

376-3600 

Toll-free tieline to Atlanta, Georgia 

Ohio 

Akron 

375-5638 

Toll-free tieline to Cleveland 



Cincinnati 

Federal Building 
550 Main Street 
Cincinnati, OH 45202 
(513) 684-2801 

Cleveland 

Federal Building 
1240 East Ninth Street 
Cleveland, OH 44199 

Columbus 

221-1014 

Toll-free tieline to Cincinnati 

Dayton 

223-7377 

Toll-free tieline to Cincinnati 

Toledo 

241-3223 

Toll-free tieline to Cleveland 

Oklahoma 

Oklahoma City 

U.S. Post Office and Courthouse 
201 Northwest Third Street 
Oklahoma City, OK .73102 
(405)231-4868 

Tulsa 

584-4193 

Toll-free tieline to Oklahoma City 

Oregon 

Federal Building 

1220 Southwest Third Avenue 

Room 109 

Portland, OR 97204 

(503) 221-2222 

Pennsylvania 

Allentown/Bethlehem 

821-7785 

Toll-free tieline to Philadelphia 

Philadelphia v 

Federal Building 
600 Arch Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 
(215) 597-7042 

Pittsburgh 

Federal Building 
1000 Liberty Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15222 
(412) 644-3456 

Scranton 
346-7081 
Toll-free tieline to Philadelphia 



Appendix F 



Rhode Island 

Providence 

331-5565 

Toll-free tieline to Boston, 



Massachusetts 



Tennessee 

Chattanooga 

265-8231 

Toll-free tieline to Memphis 

Memphis 

Clifford Davis Federal Building 
167 North Main Street 
Memphis, TN 38103 

Nashville 
242-5056 
Toll-free tieline to Memphis 



Texas 

Austin 

472-5494 

Toll-free tieline to Houston 

Dallas 

749-2131 

Toll-free tieline to Forth Worth 

Forth Worth 

Fritz Garland Lanham Federal Building 
819 Taylor Street 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 
(81 7) 334-3624 

Houston 

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse 
515 Rusk Avenue 
Houston, TX 77208 
(713)226-5711 

San Antonio 

224-4471 

Toll-free tieline to Houston 



Norfolk 

Stanwick Building 

3661 East Virginia Beach Boulevard 

Room 106 

Norfolk, VA 23502 

(804)441-6723 

Richmond 
643-4928 
Toll-free tieline to Norfolk 

Roanoke 

982-8591 

Toll-free tieline to Norfolk 



Washington 

Federal Building 
915 Second Avenue 
Seattle, WA 98174 
(206) 442-0570 

Tacoma 

383-5230 

Toll-free tieline to Seattle 



Wisconsin 
Milwaukee 
271-2273 

Toll-free tieline to Chicago, Illinois 



Utah 

Ogden 

399-1347 

Toll-free tieline to Salt Lake City 

Salt Lake City 

Federal Building 

1 25 South State Street 

Room 1205 

Salt Lake City, UT 84138 

(801)524-5353 



Virginia 

Newport News 

244-0480 

Toll-free tieline to Norfolk 



Government Printing Office 



Federal Bookstores 



Appendix G 



Atlanta 

Federal Building 

275 Peachtree Street, N.E. 

Room 100 

Atlanta, GA 30303 

(404)221-6947 

Birmingham 

9220 Parkway East-B 
Roebuck Shopping City 
Birmingham, AL 35206 
(205) 254-1056 

Boston 

John F. Kennedy Federal Building 
Sudbury Street 
Room G25 
Boston, MA 02203 
(617)223-6071 

Chicago 

Everett McKinley Dirksen Building 
219 South Dearborn Street 
Room 1463 
14th Floor 

Chicago, IL 60604 
(312)353-5133 

Cleveland 

Federal Office Building 
1240 East Ninth Street 
First Floor 

Cleveland, OH 44114 
(216)522-4922 

Columbus 

Federal Building 
200 North High Street 
Room 207 

Columbus, OH 43215 
(614) 469-6955 

Dallas 

Federal Building 
1 1 00 Commerce Street 
Room 1C46 
Dallas, TX 75242 
(214) 749-1541 

Denver 

Federal Building 
1961 Stout Street 
Room 1421 
Denver, CO 80202 
(303) 327-3964 

Detroit 

Patrick V. McNamara Federal Building 

477 Michigan Avenue 

Suite 160 

Detroit, Ml 48226 

(313)226-7816 



Houston 

45 College Center 
9319 Gulf Freeway 
Houston, TX 77017 
(713) 226-5643 

Jacksonville 

Federal Building 
400 West Bay Street 
Room 158 
P.O. Box 35089 
Jacksonville, FL 32202 
(904) 791-3801 

Kansas City 

Federal Office Building 
601 East 12th Street 
Room 144 

Kansas City, MO 64106 
(816) 758-2160 

Los Angeles 

Federal Office Building 

300 North Los Angeles Street 

Room 2039 

Los Angeles, CA 90012 

(213) 798-5841 

Milwaukee 

Federal Building 

519 East Wisconsin Avenue 

Room 190 

Milwaukee, Wl 53202 

(414)291-1305 

New York 

26 Federal Plaza 
Room 1 1 

New York, NY 10007 
(212) 264-3825 

Philadelphia 

Federal Office Building 
600 Arch Street 
Room 1214 

Philadelphia, PA 19106 
(215) 597-0677 

Pueblo v 

Majestic Building 
720 North Main Street 
Pueblo, CO 81003 
(303) 544-3142 

San Francisco 

Federal Office Building 

450 Golden Gate Avenue 

Room 1023 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415)446-6657 



Appendix G 



Seattle 

Federal Office Building 
91 5 Second Avenue 
Room 194 
Seattle, WA 98104 
(206) 399-4270 

Washington, D.C. 

Government Printing Office 
710 North Capitol Street 
Washington, DC 20402 
(202) 275-2091 

Department of Commerce 
14th and E Streets, NW 
Room 1605 

Washington, DC 20230 
(202) 377-3527 

Department of State 
21st and C Streets, NW 
Room 281 7 
North Lobby 
Washington, DC 20520 
(202) 632-1437 

Pentagon 

Main Concourse 

South End 

Washington, DC 20310 

(703)557-1821 

US Information Agency 
1776 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20547 
(202) 724-9228 

Department of Health, Education, 

and Welfare 

330 Independence Avenue, SW 

Room 1528 

Washington, DC 20201 

(202) 472-7478 



National Endowment for the Arts 



Appendix H 



Regional Representatives 



New England 

(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 

Vermont) 

Rudy Nashan 
30 Savoy Street 
Providence, Rl 02906 
(401) 274-4754 

Mid-Atlantic 

(Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New 

York, Pennsylvania) 

John Wessel 

110 West 15th Street 

New York, NY 10011 

(212)989-6347 

Mid-South 

(D.C., Kentucky, North Carolina, South 

Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West 

Virginia) 

Gerald Ness 
2130 P Street, NW 
Apt. 422 

Washington, DC 20037 
(202) 293-9042 

Gulf 

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, 

Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands) 

Charles Springman 

630 North Blount Street (temporary) 

Raleigh, NC 27604 

(919) 832-0047 

South Plains 

(Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, 

Texas) 

Frances Poteet 

601 East Austin 

#1410 

Alamo, TX 78516 

(512) 787-6756 

Great Lakes 

(Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, 

Wisconsin) 

Bertha Masor 
4200 Marine Drive 
Chicago, IL 60613 
(312) 525-6748 or 782-7858 

North Plains 

(Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North 

Dakota, South Dakota) 

Joanne Soper 
3510 Lindenwood 
Sioux City, IA 51104 
(712) 258-0905 



Southweat 

(Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, 

Wyoming) 

Bill Jamison 
P.O. Box 1804 
Santa Fe, NM 87501 
(505) 982-2041 

Northwest 

(Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, 

Washington) 

Terry Melton 

728 Rural Avenue, South 

Salem, OR 97302 

(503)581-5264 

Pacific 

(American Samoa, California, Guam, 

Hawaii, Nevada, Northern Marianas) 

Dale Kobler 

P.O. Box 15187 

San Francisco, CA 94115 

(415)863-3906 



National Endowment for the Arts 
State Arts Agencies 



Appendix H 



Alabama State Council on the Arts and 
Humanities 

Gallagher House 
114 North Hull Street 
Montgomery, AL 36130 
(205) 832-6758 

Alaska State Council on the Arts 

619 Warehouse Avenue 
Suite 220 

Anchorage, AK 99501 
(907)279-1558 

American Samoa Arts Council 

Office of the Governor 

P.O. Box 1540 

Pago Pago, American Samoa 96799 

633-4347 

Arizona Commission on the Arts and 
Humanities 

6330 North Seventh Street 
Phoenix, AZ 85014 
(602) 255-5884 

Arkansas Arts Council 

Continental Building 

Main and Markham Streets 

Suite 500 

Little Rock, AR 72201 

(501)371-2539 

California Arts Council 

2022 J Street 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916)445-1530 

Colorado Council on the Arts and 
Humanities 

Grant-Humphreys Mansion 
770 Pennsylvania Street 
Denver, CO 80203 
(303) 839-2617 or 2618 

Connecticut Commission on the Arts 

340 Capitol Avenue 
Hartford, CT 06106 
(203) 566-4770 

Delaware State Arts Council 

Office of the Arts 
State Office Building 
820 North French Street 
Wilmington, DE 19801 
(302) 571-3540 

D.C. Commission on the Arts and 
Humanities 

District Building 

Office of Communications 

Room 226 

Washington, DC 20005 

(202) 727-9332 



Fine Arts Council of Florida 

Division of Cultural Affairs 
Department of State 
The Capitol 

Tallahassee, FL 32304 
(904) 487-2980 

Georgia Council for the Arts and 
Humanities 

225 Peachtree Street, NE 
Suite 1610 
Atlanta, GA 30303 
(404) 656-3990 

Insular Arts Council of Guam 

P.O. Box 2950 
Agana, GU 96910 
477-9845 

Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and 
the Arts 

250 South King Street 
Room 310 

Honolulu, HI 96813 
(808) 548-4145 

Idaho Commission on the Arts 

c/o Statehouse 
Boise, ID 83720 
(208)384-2119 

Illinois Arts Council 

1 1 1 North Wabash Avenue 
Room 700 
Chicago, IL 60602 
(312) 793-6750 

Indiana Arts Commission 

Union Title Building 
1 55 East Market Street 
Suite 614 

Indianapolis, IN 46204 
(31 7) 633-5649 

Iowa State Arts Council 

State Capitol Building 
Des Moines, IA 50319 
(515)281-4451 

Kansas Arts Commission 

509A Kansas Avenue 
Topeka, KS 66603 
(913)296-3335 

Kentucky Arts Commission 

302 Wilkinson Street 
Frankfort, KY 40601 
(502) 564-3757 

Louisiana State Arts Council 

Division of the Arts 
P.O. Box 44247 
Baton Rouge, LA 70804 
(504) 342-6467 



Appendix H 



Maine State Commission on the Arts 
and the Humanities 

State House 
Augusta, ME 04330 
(207) 289-2724 

Maryland Arts Council 

15 West Mulberry 
Baltimore, MD 21201 
(301)685-6740 

Massachusetts Council on the Arts and 
Humanities 

1 Ashburton Place 
Boston, MA 02108 
(617) 727-3668 

Michigan Council for the Arts 

Executive Plaza 
1 200 Sixth Avenue 
Detroit, Ml 48226 

(313) 256-3735 

Minnesota State Arts Board 

314 Clifton Avenue, South 
Minneapolis, MN 55403 
(612)341-7170 

Mississippi Arts Commission 

301 North Lamar Street 
P.O. Box 1341 
Jackson, MS 39205 
(601 ) 354-7336 

Missouri State Council on the Arts 

Raeder Place 

727 North First Street 

St. Louis, MO 63102 

(314) 241-7900 

Montana Arts Council 

235 East Pine 
Missoula, MT 59801 
(406) 543-8286 

Nebraska Arts Council 

8448 West Center Road 
Omaha. NE 68124 
(402)554-2122 

Nevada State Council on the Arts 

Building D 

4600 Kietzke 

Suite 134 

Reno, NV 89502 

(702) 784-6231 or 6232 or 6236 

New Hampshire Commission on the 
Arts 

Phenix Hall 
40 North Main Street 
Concord, NH 03301 
(603) 271-2789 



New Jersey State Council on the Arts 

1 09 West State Street 
Trenton, NJ 08608 
(609) 292-6130 

New Mexico Arts Division 

113 Lincoln Avenue 
Santa Fe, NM 87501 
(505) 827-2061 

New York State Council on the Arts 

80 Centre Street 
New York, NY 10013 
(212)488-5222 

North Carolina Arts Council 

North Carolina Department of Cultural 
Resources 
Raleigh, NC 27611 
(919) 733-7897 

North Dakota Council on the Arts and 
Humanities 

North Dakota State University 
309D Minard Hall 
Fargo, ND 58102 
(701)237-7674 

Department of Community and Cultural 
Affairs (Northern Mariana Islands) 

Commonwealth of the Northern Ma'riana 

Islands 

Saipan 

Northern Mariana Islands 96950 

Ohio Arts Council 

50 West Broad Street 
Suite 3600 

Columbus, OH 43215 
(614)466-2613 

Oklahoma Arts and Humanities Council 

Jim Thorpe Building 

2101 North Lincoln Boulevard 

Oklahoma City, OK 73105 

(405)521-2931 

Oregon Arts Commission 

835 Summer Street, NE 
Salem, OR 973Q1 
(503) 378-3625 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Council 
on the Arts 

3 Shore Drive Office Center 
2001 North Front Street 
Harrisburg, PA 17102 
(717) 787-6883 

Institute of Puerto Rlcan Culture 
Apartado Postal 4184 
San Juan, PR 00905 
(809) 723-2115 



Appendix H 



Rhode Island State Council on the Arts 

334 Westminster Mall 
Providence, Rl 02903 
(401) 277-3880 

South Carolina Arts Commission 

1800 Gervais Street 
Columbia, SC 29201 
(803) 758-3442 

South Dakota State Fine Arts Council 

1 08 West 1 1 th Street 
Sioux Falls, SD 57102 
(605) 339-6646 

Tennessee Arts Commission 

222 Capitol Hill Building 
Nashville, TN 37219 
(615) 741-6395 

Texas Commission on the Arts 

Capitol Station 
P.O. Box 13406 
Austin, TX 78711 
(512) 475-6593 

Utah Arts Council 

617 East South Temple Street 
Salt Lake City, UT 84102 

(801) 533-5895/6 

Vermont Council on the Arts 

136 State Street 
Montpelier, VT 05602 

(802) 828-3291 

Virginia Commission for the Arts 

400 East Grace Street 
First Floor 

Richmond, VA 23219 
(804) 786-4492 

Virgin Islands Council on the Arts 

St. Croix 

Att: Stephen J. Bostic, Executive Director 

Caravelle Arcade 

Christiansted, St. Croix, VI 00820 

(809) 773-3075, x3 

St. Thomas 

Att: John Jowers, Associate Director 

P.O. Box 103 

St. Thomas, VI 00801 

(809) 774-5984 

Washington State Arts Commission 

1151 Black Lake Boulevard 
Olympia, WA 98504 
(206) 753-3860 



West Virginia Arts and Humanities 
Commission 

Science and Culture Center 
Capitol Complex 
Charleston, WV 25305 
(304) 348-0240 

Wisconsin Arts Board 

1 23 West Washington Avenue 
Madison, Wl 53702 
(608) 266-0190 

Wyoming Council on the Arts 

1 22 West 25th Street 
Cheyenne, WY 82002 
(307) 777-7742 



National Endowment for the Humanities 



State Programs 



Appendix I 



Alabama 

Alabama Committee for the Humanities 
and Public Policy 
Box 700 

Birmingham-Southern College 
Birmingham, AL 35204 
(205)324-1314 

Alaska 

Alaska Humanities Forum 
Loussac Sogn Building 
429 D Street 
Room 211 

Anchorage, AL 99501 
(907) 272-5341 

Arizona 

Arizona Humanities CounciJ 
112 North Central Avenue 
Suite 304 

Phoenix, AZ 85004 
(602) 257-0335 

Arkansas 

Arkansas Humanities Program 

University Tower Building 

12th and University 

Suite 1019 

Little Rock, AR 72204 

(501 ) 663-3451 

California 

California Council on the Humanities in 

Public Policy 

312 Sutter Street 

Suite 601 

San Francisco, CA 94105 

(415) 391-1474 

Colorado 

Colorado Humanities Program 
855 Broadway 
Boulder, CO 80302 
(303) 442-7298 

Connecticut 

Connecticut Humanities Council 
195 Church Street 
Wesleyan Station 
Middletown, CT 06457 
(203) 347-6888 or 347-3788 

Delaware 

Delaware Humanities Council 
2500 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Wilmington, DE 19806 
(302) 738-8491 



Florida 

Florida Endowment for the Humanities 

LET 360 

University of South Florida 

Tampa, FL 33620 

(813)974-4094 

Georgia 

Committee for the Humanities in Georgia 
Georgia Center for Continuing Education 
Athens, GA 30601 
(404) 542-5481 

Hawaii 

Hawaii Committee for the Humanities 

2615 South King Street 

Suite 21 1 

Honolulu, HI 96826 

(808) 947-5891 

Idaho 

The Association for the Humanities in 

Idaho 

P.O. Box 424 

Boise, ID 83701 

(208) 345-5346 

Illinois 

Illinois Humanities Council 
201 W. Springfield Avenue 
Room 1002 

Champaign, IL 61820 
(217)333-7611 

Indiana 

Indiana Committee for the Humanities 
4200 Northwestern Avenue 
Indianapolis, IN 46205 
(317)925-5316 

Iowa 

Iowa Board for Public Programs in the 

Humanities 

Oakdale Campus 

University of Iowa 

Iowa City, IA 52242 

(319)353-6754 

Kansas x 

Kansas Committee for the Humanities 

112 West Sixth Street 

Suite 509 

Topeka, KS 66603 

(913) 357-0359 



Kentucky 

Kentucky Humanities Council, 
Ligon House 
University of Kentucky 
Lexington, KY 40508 
(606) 258-5932 



inc 



Appendix I 



Louisiana 

Louisiana Committee for the Humanities 

Box 12 

Loyola University 

New Orleans, LA 70118 

(504) 865-9404 

Maine 

Maine Council for the Humanities and 
Public Policy 
P.O. Box 7202 
Portland, ME 04112 
(207) 773-5051 

Maryland 

The Maryland Committee for the 

Humanities, Inc. 

330 North Charles Street 

Room 306 

Baltimore, MD 21202 

(301)837-1938 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts Foundation for the 

Humanities and Public Policy 

237E Whitmore Administration Building 

University of Massachusetts 

Amherst, MA 01003 

(413)545-1936 

Michigan 

Michigan Council for the Humanities 

Nisbet Building 

Suite 30 

Michigan State University 

East Lansing, Ml 48824 

(517)355-0160 

Minnesota 

Minnesota Humanities Commission 

Metro Square 

Suite 282 

St. Paul, MN 55101 

(612) 224-5739 

Mississippi 

Mississippi Committee for the Humanities 

3825 Ridgewood Road 

Room 1 1 1 

Jackson, MS 39211 

(601)982-6752 

Missouri 

Missouri State Committee for the 

Humanities, Inc. 

6920 Millbrook Boulevard 

St. Louis, MO 63130 

(314) 889-5940 



Montana 

Montana Committee for the Humanities 
P.O. Box 8036 
Hellgate Station 
Missoula, MT 59807 
(406) 243-6022 

Nebraska 

Nebraska Committee for the Humanities 
1915 West 24th 
Room 216 

Kearney, NE 68847 
(308)234-2110 

New York 

New York Council for the Humanities 
33 West 42nd Street 
New York, NY 10036 
(212)354-3040 

North Carolina 

North Carolina Humanities Committee 
1 209 West Market Street 
Greensboro, NC 27412 
(919)379-5325 

North Dakota 

North Dakota Committee for the 

Humanities and Public Issues 

Patterson Hotel 

Suite 500 

Bismarck, ND 58501 

(701)258-9010 

Ohio 

The Ohio Program in the Humanities 
760 Pleasant Ridge Avenue 
Columbus, OH 43209 
(614) 236-6879 

Nevada 

Nevada Humanities Committee 
P.O. Box 8065 
Reno, NV 89507 
(702) 784-6587 

New Hampshire 

New Hampshire Council for the 

Humanities 

1 1 2 South State Street 

Concord, NH 03301 

(603) 224-4071 

New Jersey 

New Jersey Committee for the Humanities 

Rutgers, The State University 

C N 5062 

New Brunswick, NJ 08903 

(201)932-7726 



Appendix I 



New Mexico 

New Mexico Humanities Council 
267 Geology Building 
The University of New Mexico 
Albuquerque, NM 87131 
(505) 277-3705 (Albuquerque) 
(505) 646-1945 (Las Cruces) 

Oklahoma 

Oklahoma Humanities Committee 

Executive Terrace Building 

2809 Northwest Expressway 

Suite 500 

Oklahoma City, OK 73112 

(405)840-1721 

Oregon 

Oregon Committee for the Humanities 

418 South West Washington 

Room 410 

Portland, OR 97204 

(503)241-0543 

Pennsylvania 

Public Committee for the Humanities in 

Pennsylvania 

401 North Broad Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19108 

(215)925-1005 

Puerto Rico 

Fundacion Puertorriquena de las 

Humanidades 

Box 4307 

Old San Juan, PR 00904 

(809) 723-2087 

Rhode Island 

Rhode Island Committee for the 

Humanities 

86 Weybosset Street 

Room 307 

Providence, Rl 02903 

(401) 521-6150 

South Carolina 

South Carolina Committee for the 

Humanities 

McCrory Building 

2801 Devine Street 

Columbia, SC 29205 

(803) 799-1 704 

South Dakota 

South Dakota Committee on the 

Humanities 

University Station 

Box 35 

Brookings, SD 57006 

(605) 688-4823 



Tennessee 

Tennessee Committee for the Humanities 
1001 18th Avenue South 
Nashville, TN 37212 
(615) 320-7001 

Texas 

Texas Committee for the Humanities 
UTA Station 
P.O. Box 19096 
Arlington, TX 76019 
(817)273-3174 

Utah 

Utah Endowment for the Humanities in 

Public Policy 

Broadway Building 

1 West Broadway 

Suite 200 

Salt Lake City, UT 84101 

(801) 531-7868 

Vermont 

Vermont Council on the Humanities and 

Public Issues 

Grant House 

P.O. Box 58 

Hyde Park, VT 05655 

(802) 888-5060 

Virginia 

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and 

Public Policy 
One-B West Range 
University of Virginia 
Charlottesville, VA 22903 
(804) 924-3296 

Washington 

Washington Commission for the 
Humanities 
Olympia, WA 98505 
(206) 866-6510 

West Virginia 

The Humanities Foundation of West 

Virginia 

Box 204 

Institute, WV 25112 

(304) 768-8869 

Wisconsin 

Wisconsin Humanities Committee 
716 Langdon Street 
Madison, Wl 53706 
(608) 262-0706 

Wyoming 

Wyoming Council for the Humanities 

University Station 

Box 3274 

Laramie, WY 82701 

(307) 766-6496 



National Trust for Historic Preservation Appendix J 

Regional and Field Offices 



New England Regional Office 

100 Franklin Street 
Seventh Floor 
Boston, MA 02110 
(61 7) 482-4057 

Mld-Atlantlc Field Office 

740 Jackson Place NW 
Washington, DC 20006 
(202) 638-5200 

Southern Field Office 

Aiken House 
456 King Street 
Charleston, SC 29403 
(803) 724-471 1 

Midwest Regional Office 

407 South Dearborn Street 
Suite 710 

Chicago, IL 60605 
(312)341-1930 

Southwest/Plains Field Office 

903 Colcord Building 
Oklahoma City, OK 73102 
(405) 232-31 79 

Western Regional Office 

681 Market Street 

Suite 859 

San Francisco, CA 94105 

(415) 556-2707 



Index 



The contents of this book are indexed according to subject 
matter Numbers in the index refer to program numbers rather 
than to page numbers. The abbreviations and acronyms listed 
below are used in the index and text to identify federal agencies 

Commerce Department of Commerce 

CPB Corporation for Public Broadcasting 

CSA Community Services Administration 

DOD Department of Defense 

DOE Department of Energy 

DOL Department of Labor 

DOT Department of Transportation 

EDA Economic Development Administration 

EPA Environmental Protection Agency 

GPO Government Printing Office 

GSA General Services Administration 

HEW Department of Health, Education, 

and Welfare 

HUD Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 

ICA International Communication Agency 

Interior Department of the Interior 



JFK John F Kennedy Center for the Performing 

Arts 

Justice Department of Justice 

LC Library of Congress 

NARS National Archives and Records Service 

NASA National Aeronautics and Space 

Administration 

NEA National Endowment for the Arts 

NEH National Endowment for the Humanities 

NGA National Gallery of Art 

NPS National Park Service 

NSF National Science Foundation 

OE Office of Education 

OMB Office of Management and Budget 

OPM Office of Personnel Management 

SBA Small Business Administration 

SI Smithsonian Institution 

State Department of State 

Treasury Department of the Treasury 

Trust National Trust for Historic Preservation 

TVA Tennessee Valley Authority 

USDA Department of Agriculture 

USPS U. S Postal Service 

VA Veterans Administration 



Index 



access See barrier removal; disabled persons, programs for; 

equal opportunity; older persons, programs for 
Access America: The Architectural Barriers Act and You, 59 
ACE, 242 
ACIR, 4 
ACTION, 1-3 

Active Corps of Executives (SBA), 242 
adaptive reuse, 5, 28, 108, 125, 129, 131, 150, 226-231. See 

■ also historic preservation 
administration. See management 
Administration on Aging (HEW), 58 
adult education, 51, 66, 73, 79, 84, 102, 221 
Advisor on the Arts (ICA), 173 

Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 4 
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 5, 6; mentioned, 127 
aerospace programs, 44, 45, 192, 245, 247 
affirmative action. See equal opportunity 
African and Middle Eastern Division (LC), 182 
African Diaspora Program (SI), 254 
aging See older persons, programs for 
agrarian life and history, 15, 16, 22, 23, 163, 164, 191 See also 

history; rural areas, programs for 
Agriculture, Department of, 15-24 
Agricultural History Program Area (USDA), 15 
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (HEW), 57 
Alliance for Arts Education (OE/JFK), 67, 251 
American Association for State and Local History, 253 
American Council of Learned Societies, 213 
American Education, 65 
American Film Institute, 191, 202, 251 
American Folklife Center (LC), 180, 181 

American Indian Cultural Resources Training Program (SI), 257 
American Indian Education (OE), 66 
American Music Center, 204 
American Printing House for the Blind, 57 
American Studies Program (SI), 250 
American Television and Radio Archives (LC), 191 
amphitheaters, 20, 134, 170 
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (SI), 245 
anthropology 

Anthropology Program (NSF), 225 

employment, 116, 127; mentioned, 2, 199 

fellowships and stipends, 82, 83, 175, 217, 224 

funds for educational programs, 81, 87, 89, 216-218, 220, 

221, 223, 224 

funds for research, 19, 38, 40, 57, 82, 83, 87, 95, 175, 176. 

217-220, 224, 225, 245, 249, 257 

funds for study/travel abroad, 83, 87, 175, 176, 213, 225, 249 

internships, 175 

National Anthropological Archives (SI), 245, 257 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

research resources, 19, 39, 162-164, 182, 190. 245, 257 
Anthropology Program (NSF), 225 
AOA, 58 

Appalachian Regional Commission, 7 
apprenticeships, 135, 142, 199, 203, 212, 269; mentioned, 70, 

142. See also fellowships; internships; and specific field 
Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program (DOE), 50 



aquariums, 88 See also museums 

arboretums, 88 See also museums 

Archeological Investigations and Salvage Program (Interior), 127 

archeology 

advisory services/federal protection of sites, 5, 126-128, 136, 

151 

employment, 116, 125, 127, 234; mentioned, 2, 145 

exhibit loans, 247 

fellowships and stipends, 217, 224 

funds for educational programs, 216-218, 220, 221, 223, 224 

funds for research, 31, 127, 217, 219, 220, 224, 225, 231, 

249 

funds for study/travel abroad, 213, 225, 249 

Interagency Archeological Services (Interior), 127, 128 

internships, 128 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213, 221 

research resources, 39, 116, 127, 128, 163 

surveys, 127, 128, 231 

worker/volunteer assistance, 21 
Architect of the Capitol, 8 
Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board 

(HEW), 59 
architecture 

advisory services/federal protection of sites, 6, 126, 127, 136, 

151 

awards, 109 

Center for Cartographic and Architectural Archives (NARS), 

164 

courses and professional training, 6, 57, 101 

Design Arts Program (NEA), 197 

employment, 25. 107, 125, 127, 150, 171, 233-235 

energy conservation, 53, 56, 105, 197 

exhibit loans, 247 

federal architectural policies, 59, 104, 150, 157 

fellowships and stipends. 197 

funds for design/planning, 38. 104, 127. 150, 166, 197, 212 

landscape architecture, 109, 150, 157. 171, 197, 234 

Livable Cities (HUD), 104 

research resources, 8, 26, 28, 103, 157, 163, 164, 180, 193, 

228, 262, 268 

residencies, 194 

See also barrier removal; construction; design; historic 

preservation 
Archive of Folk Song (LC), 181 
archives 

archival science and records management, 90, 162, 166, 202, 

219 

Archive of Folk Song (LC), 181 

Archives of American Art (SI), 245 

Archives of Hispanic Literature (LC), 182 

employment, 233, 234 

Historic American Buildings Survey (Interior), 125 

Historic American Engineering Record (Interior), 125 

internships and stipends. 181, 253 

National Anthropological Archives (SI), 245 

National Archives and Records Service (GSA), 162-168 

Photographic Archives (NGA), 262 

Smithsonian Archives (SI), 245 

See also cultural facilities, libraries; museums 



Index 



Archives of American Art (SI), 245 

Archives of Hispanic Literature (LC), 182 

Art Barn, 134 

Armed Forces programs, 41-49 

art criticism, 189, 202, 212-221, 261 

Art Hazards Resource Center, 223 

art history 

funds for, 166, 213-221, 256, 260 

internships, 263, 267 

research resources. 123, 163, 191. 245, 259, 262. 267 
Art-in-Arcnitecture Program (GSA), 169 
Art in Embassies Program (State), 149 
Art Reference Library (SI), 262 
art therapy. See health 
Artists-in-Schools (NEA), 194, 206 
arts administration. See management 
arts agencies See community arts organizations, state arts 

agencies 
Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Act, 203 
Arts and Design in Public Housing (HUD), 112 
Arts and Humanities Staff (ICA), 178 
arts education 

Alliance for Arts Education (OE/JFK), 67, 251 

Artists-in-Schools (NEA), 194, 206 

arts and crafts programs, 1, 9, 24, 47, 57, 131, 137, 138 

Arts Education Program (OE), 67 

courses/seminars/workshops, 24, 47, 93, 123, 135, 245, 251, 

255 

consultant advice and information, 24, 61, 67, 76, 77, 93, 

194, 251 

disabled persons, programs for, 69, 93, 251 

federal/state policies, 65, 67, 69, 92 

funds for educational programs, 67, 69, 72, 73, 77, 78, 80, 

84, 85, 89, 91, 93, 97, 194, 198 

funds for research, 69, 93, 95 

funds for teacher training, 67, 69, 77, 80, 85. 93 

instructional materials, 69, 77, 165, 191, 246, 261 

internships, 251 

National Committee — Arts for the Handicapped, 93, 251 

volunteer opportunities, 1, 2, 148 

mentioned, 99, 100, 141-146 
Arts Education Program (OE), 67 
arts, in housing and public places See federal buildings; visual 

arts 
arts research See art criticism; art history; research 
arts service organizations, programs for, 193-212 
Asian culture, 68, 80 See also ethnic culture; minority groups, 

programs for 
Asian Division (LC), 182 
audiovisual aids and materials 

Audiovisual Archives (NARS), 163 

collections, 76, 93, 118, 163 

disabled persons, for, 69, 93 

donations/loans/sales of, 23, 55, 69, 119, 133, 155, 165, 188, 

228, 230, 244, 246, 248, 261 

employment of production specialists, 233, 234 

funds for, 69, 77, 90. 227 

National Audiovisual Center (NARS), 165 

See also instructional aids and materials 



Audiovisual Archives (NARS). 163 
auditions, 43, 135 

awards and competitions. 47. 109. 120. 154, 228. 230. 231. 251 
See also specific field 



barrier removal. 59, 91, 107, 208 See also disabled persons, 

programs for, equal opportunity, older persons, programs for 
Basic Educational Opportunity Grants (OE). 98 
behavioral sciences. 57, 95. 143, 222-225 See also science 
Biennial Awards for Design Excellence (HUD), 109 
bilingual education, 66, 68. 78, 95 
Bilingual Education Programs (OE), 68 
black culture. 57. 78, 162-164. 180-182. 191, 245, 254. 

mentioned. 40 See also ethnic culture, minority groups, 

programs for 
blind See disabled persons, programs for 
bookstores, federal government, 172 
botanical gardens, 88 See also museums 
bricks-and-mortar assistance See construction 
broadcasting See media, radio; television 
Bureau of See specific name of bureau, eg., Indian Affairs. 

Bureau of 
business See cooperatives, economic development, 

management, profit-making organizations; sales outlets, small 

business 
Business and Industrial Development Loans (USDA). 18 
Business Development Loans (Commerce). 33 



cable television See television 
Campus Work-Study (OE), 98 
Captioned Films Library (OE), 69 
career education 

funds for educational programs, 70. 74. 77, 84. 102 

funds for vocational training. 14, 60. 86. 96, 101. 123. 

141-146, 238, 240 

minority groups, programs for, 70, 101, 102, 123 

work-study. 74, 98, 233 

See also employment, labor 
Career Education Incentive Programs (OE), 70 
Carter Barron Amphitheatre. 134 

Cartographic and Architectural Archives. Center for (NARS). 164 
cartography. 118. 163. 164, 191 
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance. 232 
CEMREL, 69. 95 

Census, Bureau of the (Commerce). 26 
census data. 25. 26, 140. 162 
Center for Arts and the Aging, 208 
Center for the Book (LC), 183 

Central Midwestern Regional Educational Laboratory, 69, 95 
CETA, 141-146 
Challenge Grants (NEA), 195 
Challenge Grants (NEH). 214 



Index 



Chicano culture. See ethnic culture; Hispanic culture; minority 

groups, programs for 
Children's Literature Center (LC). 184 
choreography See dance 
Choreographers' Fellowships (NEA), 196 
Citizen Education for Cultural Understanding Program (OE), 71 
citizen groups See community groups and service organizations; 

public policy and service 
city planning. See neighborhood revitalization, urban planning 

and studies 
Civil Rights, Office for (HEW), 57 

civil service employment, 233-239 See also employment 
Coastal Plains Regional Commission, 31 
Coastal Zone Management, Office of (Commerce), 38 
College Library Resources (OE), 90 
.colleges. See higher education institutions 
Commerce Business Daily, 25, 1 72 
Commerce, Department of, 25-40 
commissions (fees), 112, 150, 169, 196. 212, 266, 270 
Communication Research, Office of (CPB), 1 1 
communications See media; radio; television 
Community Action Agencies (CSA), 9 
community arts organizations 

art in housing and public places, 112, 150, 169, 212, 270 

funds for cultural programs, 58, 67, 80, 93, 104, 107, 152, 

194, 198, 199, 201, 206, 212 

funds for employment and job training, 141-146, 236 

funds for facilities, 104, 107, 111, 131, 152 

Partnership, Office for (NEA). 206 

technical assistance, 67, 194, 198, 236, 264, 265 

See also community groups and service organizations; and 

specific arts fields 
Community Development Block Grants (HUD), 107 
Community Education Program (OE), 72 
Community Facility Loans (USDA), 18 
community groups and service organizations 

economic development, 7, 9, 24, 107-111 

exhibit/meeting space, 170 

funds for community design/planning, 106-109, 197 

funds for educational programs, 7, 9, 51, 58, 68, 72. 73. 79, 

80, 107, 152, 199, 220, 223 

funds for employment and training, 141-146 

funds for facilities, 7, 107, 110, 111, 113, 131. 152 

technical assistance, 3. 9, 24, 73, 105, 264, 265 

worker/volunteer assistance, 1-3, 21, 144, 148 
Community Planning and Development (HUD), 107-111 
Community Resource Development (USDA), 24 
Community Service and Continuing Education Program (OE), 73 
Community Services Administration. 9, 10 
competitions See awards and competitions 
composers See music 

Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (DOL), 141-146 
Comprehensive Planning Assistance ("701") (HUD), 108 
conferences and workshops, funds for. 79. 219, 221, 225, 227 
conservation 

advisory services and information, 6, 136, 189, 192. 193, 230 

courses/internships/workshops, 6, 252, 253, 263 

employment, 6, 171, 263 

funds for, 88, 203, 214, 253 

Institute of Museum Services (HEW), 88 



Museum Program (NEA), 203 

See also energy conservation and resources, environmental 

programs, historic preservation 
construction 

Department of Housing and Urban Development programs, 

103-113 

Economic Development Administration (Commerce) 

programs, 33-37 

funds for construction/renovation, 7, 18. 31, 33, 35, 36, 38, 

62, 91, 104, 107, 110, 111. 113, 124, 131, 150, 152, 195, 

203, 214, 229, 231, 243 

funds for design/planning, 7, 18, 34-36, 38, 62, 104, 107-109, 

113, 124, 131, 150, 152, 195, 212, 214, 229, 231, 243 

funds for energy conservation, 50, 52, 56 

funds for inclusion of artworks, 112, 150, 169, 212, 270 

technical assistance, 28, 52, 53, 105. 264 

See also architecture; cultural facilities; energy conservation; 

historic preservation 
continuing education, 11, 24, 51, 73. 79, 84, 216, 218. 221, 223, 

255 
Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Design and Decorative Arts (SI), 245 
Cooperative Education Program (OE). 74 
Cooperative Extension Service (USDA). 24 
Cooperative Research (USDA). 16 
cooperatives 

Craft Development Program (USDA), 17 

funds for. 10, 18, 31, 243 

managerial/technical assistance, 2, 3, 7, 9, 17, 29, 117, 241, 

243, 264 

See also crafts; small business 
copyright, 177, 189. 241 
Corporation for Public Broadcasting, 11-14 
correctional institutions. 100, 137, 138, 201, 208 
Council for International Exchange of Scholars, 176 
Council on Environmental Quality, 135 
CPB, 11-14 

Craft Development Program (USDA), 1 7 
crafts 

apprenticeships. 199. 212 

arts and crafts. 1, 9, 47, 57, 131. 137. 138 

awards and competitions. 47, 120 

Craft Development Program (USDA), 17 

courses and workshops. 24, 47. 117, 123, 132, 134, 255 

demonstrations and exhibits, 20, 47, 123, 132, 180, 199, 247, 

248, 264 

employment, 47, 132, 134, 137, 138, mentioned, 142, 144, 

145 

equipment and tools, for sale, 49, 160 

fellowships and stipends, 212 

funds for crafts businesses. 7, 10, 18, 31, 34, 37. 63, 122, 

243 

funds for educational programs, 78, 101, 104, 194, 198. 199, 

212 

funds for research, 16. 31. 199 

funds to create or acquire crafts, 169, 199. 203, 212 

Indian Arts and Crafts Board (Interior), 117 

Institute of American Indian Arts (Interior), 117, 123 

marketing and technical assistance. 2, 3. 7. 9, 17, 24, 29, 61. 

117. 147. 241, 264 



Index 



National Endowment for the Arts programs. 193, 194, 199. 

203, 212 

research resources, 23, 117, 123, 180, 245, 248 

residencies, 132, 194, 199, 212 

sales outlets/exhibit space, 10, 18, 20. 132. 134. 170, 243 

mentioned, 66, 68, 72, 227 
creative writing. See literature 

cultural exchange programs. See international programs 
cultural facilities 

energy conservation, 52, 53, 56, 105 

funds for construction/renovation, 7, 18, 31, 35, 36, 56, 107, 

110, 111, 131, 152, 195, 214 

funds for operating expenses, 10, 88, 152, 195, 214 

funds for planning, 7, 10, 34-38, 104, 107, 108, 131, 152, 

195, 197, 214 

funds for programming, 7, 9, 31, 58, 67, 72. 104. 152, 198, 

199, 218, 220 

planning and technical assistance, 7, 9, 26, 28, 47, 52, 105, 

117, 121, 208, 220, 264, 265 

property, sale or lease, 64, 129, 159 

See also archives; libraries; museums 
cultural heritage See environmental programs, ethnic culture; 

folklife; historic preservation, history 
Cultural Post, 1 93 

Cultural Presentations Program (ICA), 174 
cultural resource management, 16, 19, 38, 39, 108, 114, 115, 

119, 120, 126, 127, 136, 265 
Cultural Studies Center (Interior), 121 
curriculum materials See audiovisual aids and materials; 

instructional aids and materials 



dance 

Dance Program (NEA), 196 

fellowships/residencies/stipends, 194, 196, 200, 204 

funds for choreographers, 196, 204, 207 

funds for educational programs, 67, 78, 93, 194, 198, 199 

funds for productions and touring, 174, 196, 199, 202, 207 

performances, 132, 134, 135, 251, 254 

research resources, 180, 187, 193 

mentioned, 26, 144 

See also performing arts 
Dance Program (NEA), 196 
deaf See disabled persons, programs for 
decorative arts. 245, 262 See also design 
Defense, Department of, 41-49 
Department of See specific name of department, e.g., State, 

Department of 
Depository Libraries (GPO), 172 
design 

art and design in public places, 104, 112, 150, 197, 212 

awards, 109, 266 

book, 183, 201 

Design Arts Program (NEA), 197 

employment, 107, 171, 234, 235 

fashion, 197, 203 

fellowships and residencies, 194, 197, 200 



funds for demonstrations/exhibits/workshops, 194, 197, 199. 

203 

funds for designers. 104, 107. 109, 112. 150. 171. 197, 201, 

207,212,266 

graphic, 150, 197. 203. 234, 235, 259 

industrial and interior, 27, 104, 157, 171, 197, 203, 212 

Livable Cities Program (HUD), 104 

research resources. 8. 27. 157, 193. 245, 259 

technical assistance, 28, 105 

transportation, 150 

urban, 104. 107-109, 197 
Design, Art, and Architecture in Transportation Program (DOT), 

150 
Design Arts Program (NEA), 197 
disabled persons, programs for 

access, information and technical assistance. 57, 59, 133. 

208. 235. 252, 255 

education and job training, 57, 62, 101, 143, 263. 269 

funds for barrier removal, 91, 107, 208 

funds for educational programs, 62. 63, 65. 69. 91, 93. 101. 

208, 224, 251 

funds for research, 69, 93, 208 

hearing-impaired, programs for, 57, 69 

instructional materials, 57, 69, 93, 186, 251, 255 

museums, 252, 255, 263 

National Committee-Arts for the Handicapped, 69, 93. 251 

National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped (LC), 186 

research resources, 76, 93 

Section 504, 57, 93, 208 

Special Constituencies Office (NEA), 208 

ticket subsidies, 251 

visually impaired, programs for, 57, 186 
Division of See specific name of division, e.g.. Education 

Programs, Division of 
doctoral dissertation See fellowships and stipends, rtndents 
Doctoral Dissertation Program (OE), 83 
documentation, 125. 128, 166, 180, 199, 203, 212. 248 
DOCUMERICA, 155 
drama See performing arts; theater 
Duck Stamp Design Contest (Interior). 120 



East-West Center (ICA), 175 

ecology See energy resources and conservation, environmental 

programs 
economic development 

business loans, 18. 33, 122, 243 

Economic Development Administration (Commerce). 33-37 

funds for, 7, 9, 10, 18, 25. 31, 33-38. 63, 104, 107, 111 

funds for employment and job training, 33-35. 37. 107. 

141-146 

funds for planning/research, 7, 10, 16. 34-38 

planning and technical assistance, 9, 24, 25. 27. 37. 264 

regional development, 7. 31 

tourism. 25. 31-37 

See also economics 



Index 



Economic Development Administration (Commerce), 33-37 
economics 

fellowships and residencies, 4, 82, 83, 175 

funds for research, 16, 82, 83, 87, 89, 175, 176 

funds for study/travel abroad, 83, 89, 175, 176 

research resources, 4, 22, 25, 162-164, 182 

statistics, 26, 140 

See also economic development 
EDA, 33-37 
editing, 166, 219 

Education, Department of, 65, 223, 224 
Education Division (HEW), 65-102 
Education for the Handicapped, Bureau of (OE), 69 
Education of All Handicapped Children Act, 69 
Education, Office of (HEW), 65-75, 77-83, 85-87, 89-91, 93, 94, 

96-102 
Education Programs, Division of (NEH), 216 
Educational Activities, Office of (CPB), 1 1 
Educational Broadcasting Facilities Program. See Public 

Telecommunications Facilities Program (Commerce), 30 
Educational Information Centers (OE), 75 
educational institutions 

Division of Education (HEW), 65-102 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

National Science Foundation programs, 222-225 

See also cultural facilities; elementary and secondary 

schools; higher education institutions; libraries; museums; 

and specific fields or types of assistance 
educational research 

funds for, 69, 73, 82, 85, 89, 93, 95, 101, 102, 224 

research resources, 11, 57, 76, 92, 95 
Educational Resources Information Center (HEW), 76 
Educational Services Division (Trust), 227 
educational television. See television 
elderly. See older persons, programs for 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 65-68, 77-79, 85 
Elementary and Secondary Education Grants (NEH), 216 
elementary and secondary schools 

Alliance for Arts Education (OE/JFK), 67, 251 

Artists-in-Schools Program (NEA), 194 

disabled students, 57, 69, 93, 251 

Division of Education (HEW), 65-102 

Elementary and Secondary Education Grants (NEH), 216 

Elementary and Secondary Education Programs (OE), 77 

energy conservation, 51-53, 55, 56 

funds for educational programs, 51, 69, 70, 77, 78, 87, 99, 

102, 123, 194, 203, 216, 224, 227 

funds for research, 69, 87, 95 

information and technical assistance, 3, 52, 92, 93, 194, 251 

instructional materials and equipment, 45, 57, 115, 159, 188. 

246 

Native Americans, programs for, 66, 123 

See also instructional aids and materials; state and local 

education agencies; and specific fields or types of 

assistance 
emergency assistance, 36, 111, 189 
Emergency School Aid Act (OE), 78 
employment 

architect/engineers, 125, 171, 233 

Armed Forces programs, 43, 46, 47 



CETA, 141-146 

commissions (fees), 112, 150, 169, 212, 266, 270 

Department of Interior programs, 114, 120, 125, 127, 132 

Department of Labor programs, 139-148 

employee exchanges, 237 

funds for employment and job training programs, 9, 14, 21, 

35, 62, 63, 107, 139, 141-146, 148, 236, 269 

job information sources, 3, 25, 75, 89, 228, 234, 235 

occupational health and safety, 61, 147 

Office of Personnel Management, 233-239 

older persons, 1, 148 

overseas employment, 2, 3, 46, 89 

public works and services, 21, 35, 141, 142, 144, 145 

statistics, 26, 27, 139, 140 

summer, 21, 125, 139, 144, 235, 263 

young persons, 21, 74, 98, 144, 233, 235, 263 

See also economics; labor 
Employment and Training Administration (DOL), 141-146 
Endangered Properties Program (Trust), 229 
energy conservation and resources 

Department of Energy, 50-56 

exhibits/films/workshops, 51, 55 

funds for educational programs, 51 

funds to acquire/design/install energy-saving measures, 31, 

50, 52, 56, 88, 91, 197 

information and technical assistance, 5, 28, 37, 52-56, 105 

See also environmental programs; historic preservation 
Energy, Department of, 50-56 
Energy Extension Service (DOE), 53 

engineering, 11, 25, 125, 126. 150, 157, 171, 192, 222-225, 233 
Environmental Education Program (OE), 79 
environmental impact statements, 5, 150 
environmental programs 

courses/exhibits/seminars, 39, 115, 119, 120, 247 

cultural resource management, 16, 19, 38, 39, 108, 114, 115, 

119, 120, 126, 127, 136, 265 

Environmental Protection Agency, 154-156 

federal protection, 38, 39, 114, 119, 136 

funds for design/planning/research, 38, 40, 79, 175, 197, 222 

funds for educational programs, 40, 79, 154, 156, 223, 224 

information and instructional aids, 19, 115, 119, 155, 230 

National Science Foundation programs, 222-225 

workers/volunteer assistance, 21, 142, 144, 145, 148 

See also energy conservation and resources; historic 

preservation 
Environmental Protection Agency, 154-156 
EPA, 154-156 

equal opportunity, 57, 59. 70, 78, 84, 95, 102, 208 
equipment 

donations/loans, 45, 51, 159, 180 

funds for business/economic development, 18, 31, 33, 243 

funds for cultural facilities, 195, 214 

funds for energy conservation, 50, 52, 56 

funds for instructional, 77, 131, 224, 225 

funds for radio and television, 12, 13, 30 

sale of, 49, 160 
ERIC, 76 
ESAA, 78 

ethics, 51, 79, 213-221, 223 
Ethics and Values in Science and Technology (NSF), 223 



Index 



ethnic culture 

bilingual education, 66, 68, 78, 95 

Ethnic Heritage Studies Program (OE), 80 

funds for educational programs, 57, 66, 68, 78, 80, 123, 198. 

199, 218 

funds for research, 16, 38-40, 87, 166 

interpretive programs/performances/workshops, 24, 117, 120, 

123, 180, 247, 254 

research resources, 117, 118, 121, 162-164, 180, 181, 245, 

247 

technical assistance and information, 117, 180, 198, 220, 

245, 254 

See also folklife; minority groups, programs for, Native 

Americans 
Ethnic Heritage Studies Program (OE), 80 
ethnology 

funds for research, 57, 82, 83, 87, 89, 95, 199, 245 

research resources, 162-164, 181, 182. 190, 245, 248 
European Division (LC), 182 
Executive Order 11593, 5, 127, 128 
exhibits 

Armed Forces, 41, 45, 47 

catalogues/publications, 203, 212 

donations/loans of materials for, 45, 162, 189, 247, 261 

employment for exhibit specialists, 233, 234 

funds for, 88, 201, 203, 212, 218 

international, 149, 173, 177, 203 

space for arts/crafts, 20, 134, 149, 170, 212 

technical assistance, 173, 177, 231, 264 

traveling, 41, 45, 47, 55, 117, 119, 123, 125, 162, 189, 201, 

203, 245, 247, 264 
Expansion Arts Program (NEA), 198 
extension programs, 24, 53, 73, 216, 232, 255, 261 



faculty and scholars 

faculty exchange program, 237 

fellowships and stipends, 4, 44, 82, 83, 87, 175, 176, 217, 

256, 258, 260 

funds for research, 44, 82, 83, 87, 95, 166, 175, 176, 213, 

217, 219, 225, 249, 256, 258 

funds for study/lecturing abroad, 83, 87, 176, 178, 213, 225, 

249, 253 

residencies and visiting professorships, 4, 44, 54, 97, 175, 

176, 223, 258 

study institutes and research opportunities, 87, 216, 217, 

224, 250, 258 

See also higher education institutions; and specific field 
Faculty Research Program (OE), 83 
FAPRS, 24, 232 

Farmers Home Administration (USDA), 18 
fashion design, 197, 203 See also design 
Federal Assistance for Programs Serving the Handicapped, 57 
Federal Aviation Administration (DOT). 150 
federal buildings 

art in public places, 169, 212, 270 

construction, 157. 171 



disabled persons, access to, 57. 59, 133. 208, 255 

General Services Administration, 157, 169-171 

information sources, 8, 157. 267. 268 

public use for exhibits/meetings/performances, 157. 170 

sale/lease of, 64. 129. 161 
Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, 193, 203 
federal government employees, programs for, 236. 237, 239 
federal government programs, information sources 

FAPRS, 24, 232 

Federal Information Centers (GSA). 158 

government advisory groups. 4, 5. 59. 65, 192, 213. 226-231 

historic research resources, 4. 8, 15, 19. 54, 116, 139, 190. 

267, 268 

publications describing, 25, 89, 105, 117, 141. 153, 167, 172, 

193, 213. 232 

public information offices, 11. 25, 57, 65. 89. 103, 114. 139. 

153. 157, 158, 179, 193, 213. 222. 226, 244 
federal government records, 49, 157, 162-164. 166. 168. 190 
Federal Highway Administration (DOT), 150 
Federal Housing Administration (HUD), 112, 113 
Federal Information Centers (GSA), 158 
Federal Interagency Committee on Education (HEW), 65 
Federal Programs for Historic Preservation, A Guide to, 230 
Federal Property Resources Service (GSA), 159-161 
Federal Railroad Administration (DOT), 150 
Federal Records Centers (NARS). 168 
Federal Register. 167, 172 

Fellowship Support to Centers for Advanced Study (NEH), 217 
fellowships and stipends 

anthropology/soctology. 82, 83, 175, 217. 224. 258 

architecture/planning/design. 197, 200 

art history. 217, 256. 260 

arts administration, 205 

crafts/folk arts, 200, 212 

dance/choreography, 196, 200 

Division of Fellowships (NEH), 217 

economics, 4, 82, 83, 175, 217 

film/photography, 200. 201, 212 

foreign area studies, 82, 83. 87, 175, 176 

history, 4, 44, 82, 83, 166. 175. 217. 256. 258 

journalism, 217, 258 

law, 82, 83, 217, 258 

library science, 90 

linguistics/languages, 82. 83 

literature. 82, 83, 175, 200, 201, 217, 258 

minority groups, 14, 66, 86. 203. 224 

museum training. 203. 253, 260 

music, 135, 200. 204 

National Endowment Fellows (NEA), 205 

performing arts. 135, 200 

philosophy, 82, 83, 175, 217, 258 

political science. 4, 82. 83. 217. 258 

professional studies, 82, 83, 86, 96, 217, 224, 240 

public policy and administration, 4. 60. 86. 96 

radio and television, 14, 200, 201 

research, 44. 82. 83, 87, 175. 176. 217, 224, 256, 258 

students, 66. 68. 83. 86. 96, 224. 256 

teachers, 87, 176 

theater, 200 

travel abroad. 83. 175. 176. 200. 213. 217 



Index 



visual arts, 200, 212, 256 

See also internships; residencies; and specific fields 
Fellowships and Stipends for the Professions (NEH), 217 
Fellowships, Division of (NEH), 217 
Festival of American Folklife, 248 
festivals 

exhibit/performance space, 170 

funds for, 31, 34, 93, 104, 198, 199, 201, 204, 212 

technical assistance, 24, 32, 93, 173, 248, 251 

See also performing arts; and specific field 
film 

American Film Institute, 191, 202, 251 

awards, 228 

collections, 49, 162, 163, 179, 187, 191, 251 

donations and loans of, 155, 188, 228, 248 

fellowships and residencies, 194, 200-202 

funds for acquisitions, 90, 203 

funds for archival collections, 202 

funds for productions, 196, 199, 202-204, 218 

industry, 27 

Media Arts: Film/Radio/Television (NEA), 202 

Media Program (NEH), 218 

National Anthropological Film Center (SI), 245 

technical assistance and training, 245, 248, 251 

See also audiovisual aids and materials; photography 
fine arts See specific field 
FHA, 18 
folk arts 

apprenticeships, 199 

Artists-in-Schools Program (NEA), 194 

courses and training, 24, 117, 123, 132, 180, 254 

definition of, 199 

exhibit loans, 247 

Folk Arts Program (NEA), 199 

folk music, 121, 123, 163, 180, 181, 199, 248, 254 

funds for, 7, 31, 198-200, 203 

performance/exhibit space, 20, 132 

research resources, 117, 121, 163, 180-182, 191, 193, 245, 

248 

residencies, 194, 199 

technical assistance, 17, 117, 180, 220 

See also ethnic culture; folklife; folklore 
Folk Arts Program (NEA), 199 
folklife 

American Folklife Center (LC), 180-181 

courses and interpretive programs, 20, 132, 180, 248, 250 

definition of, 180 

documentation, 180, 199, 248 

Festival of American Folklife, 248 

funds for festivals, 34, 199 

funds for research, 19, 166, 180 

research resources, 15, 19, 22, 23, 162-164, 180-182, 190, 

191, 245, 248, 250 

technical assistance, 24, 180, 220, 248 

See also ethnic culture; folk arts; folklore 
Folklife and the Federal Government: Activities, Resources, Funds 

and Services, 1 80 
folklore 

courses and training, 123, 181 

funds for, 199 



research resources, 121, 123, 180-182, 184, 190, 191, 248 

technical assistance, 180, 220, 248 

See also ethnic culture; folk arts; folklife; literature 
folk music See folk arts; folklife 
Folk Song, Archive of (LC), 181 
Ford's Theatre, 134 

foreign area studies, 81 (defined), 82, 83, 87, 89, 176, 182, 258 
foreign countries 

foreign nationals, programs for, 32, 81, 89, 162, 176, 189, 

200, 258 

research resources, 27, 162-164, 181, 185 

technical assistance, 2, 3 

See- also international programs and activities; international 

studies 
Foreign Curriculum Consultants Program (OE), 81 
Forest Service (USDA), 19-21, 148 
forestry, 16, 19-21 

Foster Grandparent Program (ACTION), 1 
Four Corners Regional Commission, 31 
4-H Youth Program (USDA), 24 
Freer Gallery of Art (SI), 245 
Fulbright-Hays Programs, 81, 83, 87, 176 
fund raising and development, 7, 12, 102, 193, 195, 198, 211, 

214, 265 See also management 
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (HEW), 84 



galleries, art, 88, 140, 149, 203, 241. See also museums 

Gallaudet College, 57 

genealogy, 24, 116, 162. 190. See also history 

General Research Program (NEH), 219 

General Revenue Sharing (Treasury), 152 

General Services Administration, 157-171 

Geography and Map Division (LC), 191 

Gifted and Talented Program (OE), 85 

gifted persons, education of, 76, 85 

Gifts-and-Matching Grants (NEH), 215 

Glen Echo, 134 

Government Printing Office, 172 

GPO, 172 

Graduate and Professional Opportunities Program (OE), 86 

Graduate Study Abroad (ICA), 176 

Grants-in-Aid for Historic Preservation (Interior), 124 

graphic design, 57, 101, 150, 197, 203, 234, 235, 259 See also 

design; visual arts 
Group Projects Abroad Program (OE), 87 
GSA, 157-171 

Guaranteed Student Loan (OE), 98 
guidance and counseling, 70, 75, 77, 101, 102, 141-146, 228, 

269 



H 



HABS, 125 
HAER, 125 



Index 



Handicapped Individuals, Office for (HEW), 57 

handicapped persons See disabled persons, programs for 

Haskell Indian Junior College, 123 

Hatch Extension Station Act of 1955, 16 

Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of, 57-102 

health programs, 1, 28, 57, 61, 147. 217, 223 

hearing-impaired persons See disabled persons, programs for 

Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service (Interior), 124-131 

HEW, 57-102 

HEW Fellows Program, 60 

Higher Education Act of 1965, 65 

Higher Education Institutional Grants (NEH), 216 

higher education institutions 

educational research and statistics, 75, 76, 89, 92, 95, 140 

Education Division (HEW), 65-102 

equipment, donations and funds for, 51, 159, 224, 225 

exhibit loans, 41, 47, 55, 189, 247 

faculty exchange program, 237 

Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education 

(HEW), 84 

funds for career and vocational education, 62, 69, 70. 86. 96, 

98, 101. 102, 141-146, 216 

funds for community and public education, 51, 55, 72, 73, 

79. 137, 204, 218, 220, 221, 223, 227 

funds for construction/renovation, 18, 52, 214 

funds for consultant/technical assistance, 52, 81, 97, 214, 

216, 236 

funds for elementary and secondary education, 67-72, 77, 

79-82, 85, 87. 99-102, 156. 216, 224, 227 

funds for faculty development, 51, 87, 97, 102, 216, 217, 224 

funds for museums and museum training, 88, 203, 218, 253 

funds for postsecondary curriculum development, 73, 84, 89, 

97, 100, 102, 216. 224, 227 

funds for radio and television, 12, 30 

funds for research, 16, 19, 40, 69, 82, 83, 87, 95, 101, 102, 

106, 127. 143, 166, 219, 224, 225. 249 

funds for teacher training, 68, 69, 79, 80, 85, 87, 99-102, 

216, 224 

funds to acquire artworks, 212 

Gallaudet College, 57 

Haskell Indian Junior College, 123 

Howard University, 57 

libraries, donations and funds for, 90, 188, 218 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

National Science Foundation programs, 222-225 

property, sale or lease, 64, 159 

residencies for artists or scholars, 97, 201, 212 

student work/study, 74, 98, 233 

technical assistance, 3, 52, 73, 128, 189, 232. 236. 237, 239 

See also educational institutions; faculty and scholars 
Higher Education Projects Grants (NEH), 216 
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (SI), 245 
Hispanic culture, 10, 29, 68, 181. 182 See also ethnic culture; 

minority groups, programs for 
Hispanic Division (LC), 182 
Historic American Buildings Survey (Interior), 125 
Historic American Engineering Record (Interior), 125 
historic societies 

employee exchanges, 237 

funds for construction/equipment/operating expenses, 88, 90, 



111. 152, 214 

funds for educational programs, 80. 152. 218, 253 

funds for research, 166, 219 

Museums and Historical Organizations Program (NEH), 218 

sales outlets, 20 

See also cultural facilities; historic preservation, museums 
historic preservation 

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 5, 6 

advisory and technical assistance. 5, 6, 28. 37, 52. 125. 208, 

226, 228, 230-232, 264, 265 

audiovisual and educational services. 228, 230. 231 

awards, 109, 154. 228. 230. 231 

courses and professional training. 6. 228, 231 

disabled persons, access to properties, 208, 230 

employment, 6, 25. 123. 125. 127. 228 

energy conservation. 5. 37, 52 

exhibits and tours, 45, 125, 203, 230, 231, 247 

Federal Programs lor Historic Preservation. A Guide to, 230 

federal protection of sites, 5, 39. 114. 123, 126-128. 151, 157 

funds for acquisition or restoration, 31, 33, 35, 36, 38, 104, 

107, 110, 111, 113, 124, 150, 229. 231 

funds for consultants. 38, 229 

funds for educational programs, 31, 104, 218, 227, 231' 

funds for planning and research, 5, 34-36. 38, 40. 104, 

107-109, 124, 127, 166, 229, 231 

Grants-in-Aid for Historic Preservation (Interior), 124 • 

Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service (Interior), 

124-131 

historic documents and records, 49, 116. 118, 119, 157, 

162-168, 191, 192, 203, 245, 267 

Historic Preservation Loans (HJJD), 113 

international programs, 6, 136, 228 

internships, 128, 227, 231 

maritime conservation, 25, 38-40, 45, 231. 245 

National Trust for Historic Preservation, 226-231 

property, transfer of, 129 

publications, 5, 6, 113, 118. 230, 232, 264 

research resources. 39. 125. 127, 157, 191, 193, 226 

surveys, 108, 116. 124, 125, 127. 231 

tax credits/incentives. 126. 130, 230 

workers/volunteer assistance, 21, 24, 144, 148 

mentioned. 16. 18, 192 
Historic Preservation Loans (HUD), 113 
history 

agrarian, 15. 16, 19, 22. 164, 191 

courses/exhibits/seminars, 24, 45, 123, 162. 247, 250 

employment, 116, 120, 125, 127. 234, 235, mentioned. 142, 

144, 145. 148 

federal agency history offices. 15. 19, 48. 54, 116, 139 

fellowships and residencies, 4, 44, 82, 166, 175, 176, 217, 

256, 258 

funds for educational programs. 66. 80. 82, 89. 216-218, 220. 

221. 231 

funds for research, 16, 19, 38, 40. 44. 82. 83. 95. 116, 166. 

175, 176. 217. 219. 220. 249 256-258 

funds for study/travel abroad. 83. 87. 175. 176. 213. 249 

interpretive programs. 20. 115. 119, 120. 132 

internships, 15, 48. 139. 175, 267 

maritime. 25. 38-40. 231, 245 



Index 



military and diplomatic, 44, 45, 48, 162, 163, 166, 191, 245, 

258 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

Native American, 66, 80, 115, 118, 123, 163, 164, 191, 257 

oral history, 16, 48, 219 

photographs/slides/films, 19, 48, 116, 118, 163, 164, 191, 

268 

research resources, 4, 15, 19, 23, 39, 45, 48, 54, 116, 118, 

125, 139, 157, 162-164, 168, 182, 190, 191. 245. 250. 254, 

267, 268 

scientific, 54, 191, 220, 225, 245 

state and local, 16, 38-40. 162, 168, 190, 191, 219 
History and Philosophy of Science Program (NSF). 225 
Home Economics (USDA), 24 

Housing and Urban Development, Department of, 103-113 
Howard University, 57 
HUD, 103-113 

Human Development Services, Office of (HEW), 57, 59, 62, 63 
humanities education 

Division of Education Programs (NEH), 216 

funds for educational programs. 13, 73, 77-80, 84, 85, 91, 

97, 216-218, 220, 221 

funds for educational research, 95, 216 

research resources, 76, 95 

mentioned, 100, 123 



I 



ICA, 173-178, 200 

illustration, 39, 120, 184, 191, 212, 233-235. See also design; 

visual arts 
immigration, 162, 164, 166, 185, 245 
independent presses, aid to, 166, 201 
Indian Affairs, Bureau of (Interior), 121-123 
Indian Arts and Crafts Board (Interior), 117 
Indian Education Act, 66 

industrial design, 27, 125, 126, 197, 203, 212 See also design 
Industry and Trade Administration (Commerce), 27 
Institute of American Indian Arts (Interior), 123 
Institute of International Education, 176 
Institute of Museum Services (HEW), 88 

institutions of higher education See higher education institutions 
instructional aids and materials 

available from federal agencies, 11, 45, 51, 55, 69, 105, 115, 

156, 162, 165, 186, 188, 246, 251, 261 

disabled persons, for, 57, 69, 93, 186 

funds to acquire, 70, 77, 86, 90, 166 

funds to develop, 66-69, 79-85, 87, 93, 99-102, 121, 216, 

224, 227 

funds to distribute, 68, 73, 80, 93, 94, 216 

See also audiovisual aids and materials 
Instructional Materials and School Library Resources (OE), 77 
Insured Housing Program (HUD), 112 
Interagency Archeological Services (Interior), 127-128 
Intergovernmental Personnel Act, 236-239 
Interior, Department of the, 114-136 
interior design, 104, 157, 171, 197, 212 See also design 



Internal Revenue Service (Treasury), 153 
International Centre Committee, 6 
International Communication Agency, 173-178, 200 
International Exchange Service (SI), 255 
international programs and activities 

artist study/touring opportunities, 46, 174, 200 

book distribution/exchange/promotion, 177, 183, 188.255. 

262 

employment opportunities, 2, 3, 6, 46 

exhibits and festivals, 149, 173, 177, 203 

foreign nationals, programs for, 32, 81, 89, 162, 176, 189, 

200, 258 

International Communication Agency, 173-178, 200 

technical assistance, 6, 27, 32, 136, 173, 174, 177, 188, 203, 

228 

See also foreign countries; international studies 
International Serials Data System, 188 
international studies 

fellowships and residencies, 81, 82, 175, 176, 217, 258, 260 

East-West Center, 1 75 

foreign area studies, 81 (defined), 82, 83, 87, 89, 176, 182, 

258 

Fulbright-Hays programs, 81, 83, 87, 176 

funds for educational programs. 71, 81-83, 87, 89. 216-218, 

220. 221 

funds for research, 82, 83, 87, 175, 176, 213, 217, 219, 225, 

245, 249. 258, 260 

funds for study/lecturing abroad, 83. 87, 176, 178, 213, 225, 

245, 249, 253, 260 

information and seminars, 27, 89, 228, 255 

International Education, Division of (OE), 71, 80-83, 87, 89 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

research resources, 162, 163, 181, 182, 185, 254 

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (SI), 258 

See also foreign countries; international programs and 

activities 
Interpretive Design Center (Interior), 133 
internships 

anthropology, 175 

archeology, 128 

archival/library science, 181 

art history, 263, 267 

economics, 175 

education, 100, 251 

folklife, 181 

historic preservation, 128. 227, 231 

history, 15, 48, 139, 175, 227, 267 

literature, 175 

management, 60, 238, 240, 251 

museum studies, 203, 252, 253. 263 

philosophy, 175 

Smithsonian, 250 

See also apprenticeships; fellowships and stipends; 

residencies, and specific field 
IPA, 236-239 
IRS, 153 



Index 



jazz, 43, 46, 47, 137, 204, 254 See also music 

Jazzmobile, Inc., 137 

Job Corps (DOL), 144 

jobs See employment; labor 

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 67, 93, 187, 251 

Johnson-O'Malley Act, 123 

journalism, 32, 89, 154, 217, 230, 235, 258 

jurisprudence, 213-221 See also law 

justice See equal opportunity; law 

Justice, Department of, 137-138 



Kendall Demonstration Elementary School. 57 



labor 

funds for labor unions, 51, 84, 220 

funds for research, 143, 166, 217, 219 

worker/volunteer assistance, 1, 2, 21, 144, 148 

See also economics; employment 
Labor, Department of, 139-148 
labor relations. See management 
Labor Statistics, Bureau of (DOL), 140 
land acquisition and development, 18, 31, 33, 35, 64. 124, 129, 

161, 229, 243. See also construction 
land use planning and research, 19, 103, 108, 127, 157, 162-164 
landscape architecture, 109, 150, 157, 171, 197, 234 
languages 

bilingual education, 66, 68, 78, 80 

foreign area studies, 81-83, 87, 89, 176, 182, 258 

funds for research, 82, 83, 87, 89, 95, 121, 217, 219 

funds for educational programs, 66, 68, 78, 80-82, 89, 121, 

216-218, 220, 221 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

Native American, 66, 68, 80, 121, 123, 163 

research resources, 76, 163, 180-182 

technical assistance, 177, 180 

translations, 177, 219, 233, 234 

See also linguistics 
law 

advisory services, 5, 189, 230 

courses and professional training, 57, 89, 123 

Department of Justice, 137, 138 

employment, 235 

fellowships and stipends, 82, 217, 258 

funds for research, 82, 217, 219, 258 

history, 185, 191 

libraries, 90, 95, 185 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

research resources, 22, 162, 185, 191 
Law Library (LC), 185 
Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (Justice), 137 



learned societies, 219 

liberal arts. See humanities education and specific field 

libraries 

Armed Forces, 48 

books, donations and exchanges, 177. 188. 262 

copyright, 189 

disabled persons, services for, 91, 186 

equipment donations, 159 

exhibits, donations and loans. 41. 45, 189, 247 

federal agency, 8, 22, 25, 95, 103. 118, 157, 168, 172. 193. 

213, 228, 244 

federal depository libraries, 172 

funds for acquisition of materials, 77. 90 

funds for construction/renovation, 7, 18, 91. 152. 214 

funds for consultants, 52, 214, 218, 220, 236 

funds for educational programs, 58. 67. 79. 84, 91, 152. 201. 

218, 220 

funds for energy conservation, 52, 56, 91 

funds for exhibits, 77, 212, 218 

funds for operating expenses, 91, 152, 214 

interlibrary loans, 22, 118, 185, 190, 191, 193, 262 

Library of Congress programs, 179-191 

Library Services and Construction Act, 91 

museum libraries. 90, 244, 245, 252. 262 

Performing Arts Library (LC/JFK). 187 

photographs/slides/films, 8, 118. 179, 187, 188. 190, 191. 

244. 262 

Presidential libraries, 168 

property, sale or lease. 64 

Public Library .Program (NEH), 220 

recordings, 179, 181, 182. 1,86-188 

residencies, 201, 212 

statistics and information about, 26. 76, 92. 140 

technical assistance. 53, 105. 184, 189. 192, 220. 232. 236. 

239, 264 

worker/volunteer assistance, 1, 148 

See also archives, library science 
library science 

courses and professional training. 162, 181. 239 

employment, 137, 233, 235. 237; mentioned. 142, 145 

funds to organize collections, 90, 166. 219 

funds for professional training. 90, 236 

See also archives; libraries 
Library Grants for Higher Education (OE). 90 
Library of Congress, 179-191 
Library Research and Demonstrations (OE), 90 
Library Services and Construction Act, 91 
Library Training (OE), 90 
linguistics 

fellowships and stipends, 217, 224 

funds for educational programs, 81. 82, 87. 89, 121, 216. 224 

funds for reference works. 219 

funds for research. 57. 82. 87. 95. 121, 176. 199, 217. 219. 
224, 225 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs. 213-221 
Native American languages. 121. 123. 163 
research resources. 76. 163. 182. 190 
See also languages 
Linguistics Program (NSF). 225 



Index 



literature 

Center for the Book (LC), 183 

Children's Literature Center (LC), 184 

critics, 189 

employment, 233, 234; mentioned, 142, 144-146 

fellowships and stipends, 82. 175, 176, 200, 201, 217, 251, 

258 

folk, 117, 121, 180-182, 199 

funds for educational programs, 13, 78, 199, 216-218, 220, 

221 

funds for publications, 166, 201, 219 

funds for research, 82, 83, 175, 176, 217, 219, 258 

Literature Program (NEA), 201 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

poetry, 182. 184, 187, 189, 191, 194, 201 

readings/lectures/fairs, 189, 191, 201 

recordings, 179, 182, 187, 189, 191 

research resources, 117, 121, 163, 180, 182, 184, 187, 191, 

213 

residencies, 132, 191, 194, 201 

technical assistance, 117, 153, 180, 189 
Literature Program (NEA), 201 
literary organizations, 153, 188, 201 
Livable Cities (HUD), 104 
Living Buildings Program (GSA), 170 
Living History Program (Interior), 132 
local government See community arts organizations; state and 

local education agencies; state and local government 

agencies 
low-income persons, programs for 

Community Services Administration, 9, 10 

funds for educational programs, 9, 58, 63, 65, 85, 91, 97, 

100, 104, 131, 198 

funds for employment and training, 9, 63, 101, 141-146, 148 

funds for neighborhood revitalization, 104, 107, 131, 198 

older persons, for, 1. 9, 58, 148, 198 

student assistance, 98, 263 

technical assistance, 3, 9, 10, 243 

See also economic development 



M 



magazines. See literature; publishing 

management 

advisory and information sources, 12, 13, 17, 18, 24, 25, 29, 

77, 93, 117, 193, 198, 210, 228, 236, 237, 239, 252 

arts, 93, 193, 205, 251 

courses and training, 24, 217, 239, 241, 242 

fellowships and stipends, 4, 96, 205 

funds for consultants, 195, 196, 206, 207, 210, 236 

funds for improvements, 77, 106, 108, 109, 195, 196, 198, 

206, 210, 214 

funds for training, 77, 96, 206, 236 

internships and residencies, 4, 60, 238, 240, 251 

National Endowment Fellows (NEA), 205 

Office of Minority Business Enterprise (Commerce), 29 

Small Business Administration programs, 241-243 

Management and Budget, Office of, 232 

Management Training for Arts Businesses (SBA), 241 

manpower See employment; labor, volunteers 



Manuscript Division (LC), 191 
maps, 48, 77, 118, 162-164, 179, 190, 191 
maritime culture and history, 25, 38-40, 231 , 245 See also his- 
toric preservation; history 
Maritime Preservation Program (Trust), 231 
marketing and public relations, 7, 16, 17, 27, 29, 31, 32, 117, 

177, 201, 264. See also management 
matching funds assistance, 7, 31, 72, 152, 195, 211, 214, 215 
material culture, 24, 117, 118, 245. See also folklife 
media 

advisory services and information, 11-14. 57, 230 

Audiovisual Archives (NARS), 163 

Corporation for Public Broadcasting programs, 11-14 

fellowships/internships/residencies, 14, 194, 200, 202 

funds for equipment and facilities, 12, 13, 30 

funds for programming, 12, 13, 69, 78, 196, 199, 202, 203. 

218, 223 

funds for training, 14, 69 

Media Arts: Film/Radio/Television (NEA), 202 

Media Program (NEH), 218 

research resources, 11, 26, 27, 92, 163, 191, 193 

mentioned, 92, 94 

See also audiovisual aids and materials; film; photography; 

radio; television 
Media Arts: Film/Radio/Television (NEA), 202 
Media Program (NEH), 218 

mental health See behavioral sciences; health; psychology 
Mexican-American culture See ethnic culture; Hispanic culture 
military art and artifacts, 41-43, 45, 47, 48. See also visual arts 
military history, 44, 45, 48, 162. 163, 191, 245 See also history 
military personnel, programs for, 42, 43, 47, 48, 251 
mime. See dance 

Minority Business Enterprise, Office of (Commerce), 29 
minority groups, programs for 

fellowships and stipends, 66, 86, 224 

funds for educational programs, 66, 68, 78, 80, 97, 131, 198, 

206, 220. 224 

funds for professional studies, 14, 86, 203, 224, 238, 253 

Howard University, 57 

information and technical assistance, 14, 29, 57, 220, 245 

Office of Minority Business Enterprise (Commerce), 29 

See also equal opportunity; ethnic culture; women, programs 

for 
Minority Training Grants (CPB), 14 
Model Secondary School for the Deaf, 57 
Motion Picture Branch (NARS), 163 
Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division (LC), 

191 
motion pictures See film 

murals, 6, 112, 150, 169, 212, 270 See also visual arts 
museology See museums 
Museum of African Art (SI), 245 
museums 

advisory services and technical assistance, 6, 32, 52, 105, 

117, 220, 232, 236, 239, 244, 253, 259, 264 

Armed Forces, 45 

artworks, loans of, 155, 203 

conservation, 6, 88, 203, 252, 253 

courses and professional training, 6, 123, 239, 252 

disabled persons, programs for, 69, 252, 255, 263 

employment, 233-235; mentioned, 145 



Index 



exhibit materials, donation of. 45. 51. 155, 159. 188. 189. 

247, 261 

federal, 226, 244, 245 

fellowships and stipends, 203, 253 
■ funds for acquisitions, 90, 166, 203 

funds for catalogues/publications, 166. 203, 212 

funds for conservation, 88, 166, 203, 214, 253 

funds for construction/renovation, 7, 18, 35, 152, 195, 203, 

214 

funds for consultant services, 195, 203, 214, 218, 220, 236, 

253 

funds for educational programs, 55, 67, 72, 79, 80, 84, 88, 

104, 152, 201. 203, 216, 218, 220, 223, 231, 253 

funds for energy conservation, 52, 56, 88 

funds for exhibits, 88, 203, 212, 218 

funds for fund raising and development, 88, 195, 203, 214 

funds for operating expenses, 88, 152, 195, 214 

funds for planning/research, 7, 34, 35. 37, 88. 95, 152, 166, 

195, 203, 214, 218, 249, 253 

funds for training, 88, 203, 220, 236, 249, 253, 260 

Institute of Museum Services (HEW), 88 

internships/apprenticeships/residencies, 201, 203, 212, 252, 

253, 263 

Museum Program (NEA), 203 

Museums and Historical Organizations Program (NEH), 218 

National Museum Act, 253 

Native American culture, 117, 123, 245, 252 

Office of Museum Programs (SI), 253 

property, sale or lease, 64 

reproductions/slides, 244, 247, 255, 259, 261, 262 

Smithsonian Institution, 244-263 

statistics and research resources, 26, 92, 140, 193, 245, 252 

traveling exhibits, 41, 45, 47, 55, 117, 123, 189, 245, 247 

worker/volunteer assistance, 1, 21, 144, 148 

workshops/lectures/tours, 245, 246, 252, 259 

mentioned, 53, 62 

See also archives; cultural facilities 
Museum Program (NEA), 203 

Museums and Historical Organizations Program (NEH), 218 
music 

Archive of Folk Song (LC), 181 

Armed Forces programs, 43, 46, 47 

bands and choruses, 43, 47, 204 

chamber music, 189, 204, 251, 254 

composers, 191, 204, 207, 251 

concerts and lectures, 24, 43, 47, 189, 191, 204, 251, 254, 

261 

copyright, 189 

courses and professional training, 24, 43, 47, 251 

educational materials, 77, 186, 191, 251 

employment, 43, 46, 47, 132, 137, 138, 189, 233, 234, 
mentioned, 142, 144, 145 

fellowships and scholarships, 24, 47, 200, 204 

funds for composing, 204, 207 

funds for educational programs, 67, 78, 93 

funds for performances/festivals/tours, 46, 198. 199. 204, 207 

funds for training, 43, 204 

instruments and scores, 49. 77, 186, 245 

jazz, 43. 46, 47, 137, 204, 254 

librettists, 204, 207 

musical theater, 207, 251, 254 



Music Program (NEA), 204 

opera, 135, 163, 207, 251 

orchestra, 43, 163, 204, 251 

performance opportunities overseas, 46, 174. 200 

prison programs, 137-138 

recordings, 163, 186. 187. 189, 254 

research resources, 163, 180-182. 187, 191, 193. 204, 245, 

254 

residencies and internships, 132, 135. 194, 204 

technical assistance, 24, 67, 153, 207 

vocalists, 43, 135, 204, 251 

mentioned, 26, 69, 192, 204 

See also folk arts, performing arts 
musical theater See music; theater 
Music Division (LC), 191 
Music Program (NEA), 204 
Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961. 83 



N 



NASA, 192 



Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa : 
Nationa 
Nationa 



Nationa 

Nationa 

Nationa 

(SI) 



Aeronautics and Space Administration, 192 

Aesthetic Education Learning Center (JFK), 251 

Agricultural Library (USDA), 22 

Air and Space Museum (SI), 245 

Anthropological Archives (SI), 245, 257 

Archives and Records Service (GSA), 162-168 

Audiovisual Center (NARS), 165 

Awards for Urban Environmental Design (HUD), 109 

Board of Consultants (NEH), 216 

Bureau of Standards (Commerce). 28 

Capital Parks (Interior), 134 

Center for Education Statistics (HEW), 92 

Center for Service Learning (ACTION), 3 

Collection of Fine Arts (SI), 245 

Committee-Arts for the Handicapped, 69, 93, 251 

Council for Traditional Arts, 132 

Council on the Aging, 148, 208 

Council on the Arts (NEA), 193 

Council on the Humanities (NEH), 213 

Defense Education Act of 1958, 82. 89 

Diffusion Network (OE), 94 

Direct Student Loan (OE), 98 

Endowment Fellows (NEA), 205 

Endowment for the Arts, 193-212 

Endowment for the Humanities, 213-221 

Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978, 52 

Energy Information Center (DOE), 55 

Gallery of Art, 259-263 

Historic Landmarks Program (Interior), 126 

Historic Preservation Act of 1966. 5 

Historical Publications and Records Commission (NARS), 166 

Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (HEW), 61 

Institute of Education (HEW), 95 

Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped 



(LC). 186 



Museum Act, 253 

Museum of History and Technology (SI), 245 

Museum of Natural History and National Museum of Man 

245 



Index 



National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Commerce), 

38-40 
National Park Service (Interior), 132-136 
National Portrait Gallery (SI), 245 
National Public Radio, 12 
National Referral Center (LC), 190 
National Register of Historic Places (Interior), 126; mentioned, 5, 

107, 125. 130, 151, 265 
National Science Foundation, 222-225 
National Sea Grant Program (Commerce), 40 
National Solar Heating and Cooling Information Center 

(HUD/DOE), 105 
National Teaching Fellowships (OE), 97 
National Technical Institute for the Deaf, 57 
National Trust for Historic Preservation, 226-231 
Native Americans 

Administration for Native Americans (HEW), 57 

American Indian Cultural Resources Training Program (SI). 257 

American Indian Education (OE), 66 

Bureau of Indian Affairs programs (Interior), 121-123 

courses and training, 117, 123, 236 

crafts, 117, 122, 123; mentioned, 31, 66, 199 

educational assistance for, 122, 123 

fellowships and internships, 66, 252 

funds for cultural retention programs, 66, 68, 78, 80, 121, 

123, 199 

funds for economic development, 18, 31, 34, 35, 108, 122, 152 

funds for employment and training, 35, 101, 141-146, 236 

funds for energy conservation, 31, 50, 52 

funds for tribes, 18, 31, 34, 35, 50, 52, 57, 66, 80, 101, 108, 

121-123, 141-146, 152, 199, 236 

Haskell Indian Junior College, 123 

Indian Arts and Crafts Board (Interior), 117 

Institute of American Indian Arts (Interior), 123 

Johnson-O'Malley Act, 123 

languages, 66, 68, 80, 121, 123, 163 

museum studies, 123, 252 

museums, 117, 123, 245 

music, 121, 123, 181 

Native American Language Revitalization Program (SI), 251 

Native American Training Program (SI), 252 

Office of Indian Education Programs (Interior), 123 

oral history, 117, 121, 181 

photographs/films, 23, 117, 118, 121, 163 

research resources, 115-118, 121, 123, 162-164, 181, 191, 

245, 257 

technical assistance, 52, 116, 117, 121, 237, 239 

tribal history programs, 115-118, 121, 123, 257 

mentioned, 16, 39, 56, 91, 120 

See also equal opportunity; ethnic culture; minority groups, 

programs for 
natural history museums, 88 See also museums 
NEA, 193-212 
NEH, 213-221 
NEH Fellowships, 217 
neighborhood revitalization 

funds for, 103, 104, 107, 108, 110, 111, 131, 141-146, 152, 

197, 198, 229 

Livable Cities (HUD), 104 

National Trust for Historic Preservation, 226-231 

technical assistance, 125, 198, 230 



See also economic development; historic preservation 

New England Regional Commission, 31 

NIE, 95 

NIOSH, 61 

nonprofit organizations, 153 See also areas of interest to 

nonprofit organizations 
NSF, 222-225 



Occupational Safety and Health Administration (DOL), 147 

occupations See employment; labor; and specific field 

OCR, 57 ' 

Office of See specific name of office, e.g., Education, Office of 

OHI, 57 

Older Americans Act, 58, 148 

older persons, programs for 

access, 57, 59, 107, 208, 255 

Administration on Aging programs (HEW), 58 

Center for Arts and the Aging, 208 

funds for educational programs, 9, 58, 91, 198, 208 

information and technical assistance, 9, 17, 57, 59, 208 

Special Constituencies Office (NEA), 208 

ticket subsidies, 251 

work/volunteer opportunities. 1, 143, 148, 242 

mentioned, 17, 73 
OMB. 232 

opera See music; performing arts 
Opera-Musical Theater Program (NEA), 207 
oral history 

Archive of Folk Song (LC), 181 

funds for, 16, 121, 199, 219 

recordings, 121, 181, 199, 248 

research resources, 22, 48, 117, 121, 180, 181, 245, 248 

technical assistance, 180, 268 

mentioned, 91, 144, 145 

See also folklore; history 
orchestra See music, performing arts 
Orientalia Division (LC), 182 
Ozarks Regional Commission, 31 



PACE exam, 234 

Pacific Northwest Regional Commission, 31 

painting. See visual arts 

Partnership, Office for (NEA), 206 

PBS, 13 

Peace Corps (ACTION), 2 

performing arts 

apprenticeships, 135, 199 

Armed Forces programs, 43, 46, 47 

Artists-in-Schools (NEA), 194 

awards and competitions, 251 

Challenge Grants Program (NEA), 195 

courses and professional training, 24, 47 

employment, 43, 46, 132. 134, 137, 138, 189; mentioned, 

142-145 

facilities for performances, 20, 132, 134, 170, 251 



Index 



fellowships and scholarships, 24, 47, 200, 204 

funds for audience development, 195, 198, 199, 204 

funds for educational programs, 67, 72, 77, 78, 81, 85, 89, 

93, 152, 194, 198 

funds for operating expenses, 152, 195 

funds for performances/festivals/tours, 13, 104, 132, 174, 

196, 198, 199, 202, 204, 207, 210 

funds for training, 204, 210 

lectures/seminars/workshops, 134, 135, 189, 251, 254 

National Endowment for the Arts programs, 193-212 

performance and study opportunities abroad, 43, 46, 174, 200 

Performing Arts Library (LC/JFK), 187, 251 

prison programs, 137-138 

research resources, 26, 117, 163, 187, 190, 193, 204, 245, 

251. 254 

residencies, 78, 132, 194, 199, 200, 202, 204, 210 

Smithsonian Performing Arts Programs, 254 

technical assistance, 24, 32, 61, 67, 117, 147. 173, 174. 189, 

198, 208, 264 

ticket subsidies, 251 
Performing Arts Library (LC/JFK), 187, 251 
Personnel Management, Office of, 233-239 
philosophy 

fellowships and residencies, 82, 175, 176, 213, 217, 258 

funds for educational programs, 216-218, 220, 221, 223 

funds for research, 82, 175, 176, 217, 219, 220, 225, 258 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

science and technology, 51, 220, 223, 225 
Photographic Archives (SI), 262 
photography 

Audiovisual Archives (NARS), 163 

awards and competitions, 47, 120, 228 

collections, 8, 19, 23, 49, 116, 118, 163, 164, 179, 191, 245, 

262, 268 

commissions (fees), 169, 212 

courses and professional training, 24, 47, 57, 241 

employment, 25, 42, 233, 234 

equipment, 49, 180 

exhibits, 202, 203, 212, 247 

fellowships and residencies, 194, 200, 202, 212 

funds for documentation and surveys, 199, 202, 212 

funds for training, 101, 212 

funds to acquire works, 203 

funds to collect/exhibit/preserve, 166, 202, 203, 212 

funds to create photographic works, 212, 218 

historic, 116, 118, 162-164, 166, 191, 212, 255, 268 

Prints and Photographs Division (LC), 191 

Project DOCUMERICA (EPA), 155 

reproductions/loans/donations, 8, 23, 155, 164, 188, 190, 

228, 255, 261 

research resources, 19, 23, 116, 118, 155, 162-164, 191, 

245, 262 

sales outlets/work space, 202, 212, 255 

technical assistance, 24, 61, 245 

Visual Arts Program (NEA), 212 
Photography Division (USDA), 23 
planetariums, 88 See also museums 
planning See architecture; design, regional planning, urban 

planning and studies 
plays. See theater 
poetry See literature 



policy. See public policy and service 
political science 

fellowships and residencies, 4. 82, 83, 87, 175, 176. 213. 

217, 258 

funds for educational programs. 216-218, 220. 221 

funds for research. 82. 83, 87, 89, 166. 176. 213. 217. 219, 

258 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

research resources, 162-164, 182, 191, 268 

See also public policy and service 
Postage Stamp Art (USPS). 266 

postsecondary education See higher education institutions 
preservation See conservation; historic preservation 
Preservation Education Fund (Trust), 227 
Preservation News, 230 
Presidential Libraries (NARS), 168 
Presidential Management Intern Program (OPM), 238 
President's Commission on White House Fellowships. 240 
Presidents Environmental Youth Awards (EPA), 154 
presses, aid to, 166. 201 
prime sponsors, 141 (defined), 142-146 
printmaking See visual arts 
Prints and Photographs Division (LC), 191 
prisons See correctional institutions 
private schools, 65, 77; mentioned, 92. See also elementary and 

secondary schools 
Professional Services (GSA), 171 
Professors Emeritus Grants (OE), 97 
profit-making organizations, 10, 18, 29, 31, 33, 71, 106, 146 See 

also small business 
Project CULTURE (Justice), 137, 
property 

donation of, 45, 129, 159, 230 

funds to acquire, 229, 231 

historic, 45, 129. 229-231 

lease of, 64, 129 

personal, 49, 159, 160 

real, 64, 129, 161, 229-231 

sale of, 49, 64, 160, 161 

See also construction; historic preservation 
property owners, programs for, 110, 113, 124, 130, 230 
psychology, 57, 95, 191, 233. See also science 
publication See publishing, and specific subject or name of 

publication 
Public Broadcasting Service, 13 
Public Buildings Cooperative Use Act of 1976, 5. 157 
Public Buildings Service (GSA), 169-171 
Public Health Service (HEW), 57 
Public Housing Modernization Program (HUD), 112 
public interest groups See community groups and service 

organizations, public policy and service 
Public Library Program (NEH), 218 
public policy and service 

fellowships/internships/residencies. 4. 60. 96, 205. 223. 238, 

240 

funds for public service employment. 21, 141. 142. 146 

funds for seminars and workships, 51. 79. 220. 221. 223 

See also community groups and service organizations, 

neighborhood revitalization, political science 
Public Programs. Division of (NEH), 218 
Public Service Education Programs (OE), 96 



Index 



Public Service Science Residencies (NSF). 223 

Public Telecommunications Facilities Program (Commerce). 30 

Public Understanding of Science (NSF). 223 

Public Works and Development Facilities, Grants for (Commerce). 35 

Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1965, 31, 35 

Public Works Impact Program (Commerce). 35 

publishing 

Center for the Book (LC). 183 

funds for, 166, 201. 212, 219 

international book distribution and promotion. 177. 183. 188, 

255, 262 

Preservation Office (LC), 189 

research resources, 26, 27, 190, 191 

technical assistance, 29, 189 



radio 

American Television and Radio Archives (LC), 191 

Corporation for Public Broadcasting programs. 11-14 

fellowships/internships/residencies, 14. 200-202 

funds for equipment and facilities, 12, 30, 159 

funds for programming, 12, 78, 199, 202-204. 218, 220. 223 

funds for training programs, 14, 101, 220 

information and technical assistance, 11. 12, 14. 220 

Media Arts: Film/Radio/Television (NEA). 202 

Media Program (NEH), 218 

minority groups, 14, 78 

National Public Radio, 12 

recordings, 163, 191, 255 

research resources, 11, 163, 191 

mentioned, 26, 143 
Radio Community Service Grants (CPB), 12 
Radio Expansion Grant Project (CPB), 12 
Radio Smithsonian. 255 

railroad stations, 5, 150. See also historic preservation 
Rare Book and Special Collections Division (LC). 191 
real property See property 
Reclamation, Bureau of (Interior), 119 
recording industry, 26, 27, 29 
recordings 

archival collections. 49, 162, 163. 181, 182, 187. 191, 248 

available from federal agencies, 179, 186, 188, 189, 254, 255 

funds for, 77, 90, 199, 202 

visually impaired, for, 186 
recreation 

disabled persons, for, 62, 63, 69 

funds for programs, 9, 58, 62, 63, 69, 72, 131, 137, 138, 142, 

144, 145 

planning and technical assistance, 9, 232, 264, 265 
regional arts agencies, 193-212 
Regional Commissions (Commerce), 31 
Regional Development Act of 1975, 7 
regional offices, Appendices A-J 
regional planning and development. 7, 31, 108. 206, 264, 265 

See also economic development; urban planning and studies 
Rehabilitation, Comprehensive Services, and Developmental 

Disabilities Amendments of 1978. 59, 62 
Rehabilitation Loans ("312") (HUD), 110 
Rehabilitation Services Administration (HEW), 62 



religion, 57, 166. 180, 182, 213-221 

renovation See construction; historic preservation 

Research Collections (NEH), 219 

research, funds for 

arts-related, 193, 202, 212-221, 256. 260 

educational, 69, 93, 95, 216, 224 

foreign area studies, 82, 83. 87, 1 76, 258 

humanities-related, 166, 213-221, 225 

National Historical Publications and Records Commission 
(NARS), 166 

National Science Foundation programs, 222-225 

research organizations, 10, 19, 40, 82, 106, 219. 223, 225. 

249 

scientific. 40. 54. 57, 127, 224, 225, 249, 256 

See also faculty and scholars; fellowships and stipends; 

students; and specific field 
Research Materials (NEH), 219 
Research Programs. Division of (NEH), 219 
residencies 

faculty/scholars/teachers, for, 4. 44, 54, 97, 1 75, 1 76, 223, 

258 

performing artists, for. 78, 132, 194, 199, 200, 202, 204 

visual artists, for, 78. 132. 194, 199, 200. 202. 212 

writers, for. 78. 132. 191. 194. 200-202. 212 

mentioned. 58, 142, 145 

See also fellowships and stipends; and specific field 
restoration See conservation; construction, historic preservation 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program (ACTION), 1 
Revenue Sharing (Treasury), 152 
RSVP. 1 
rural areas, programs for 

Department of Agriculture programs, 15-24 

education and technical assistance. 7. 9. 17, 18. 24, 31, 264, 

265 

funds for economic and rural development, 9, 10, 16, 18, 

141-146 

See also agrarian life and history 
Rural Development Act of 1972, 16 



S 



safety See health 

sales outlets, 10. 18, 20, 132, 134, 243 

SBA, 241-243 

scholars See faculty and scholars; and specific field 

scholarships, 24, 47, 1-75, 227, 251, 258 See also fellowships 
and stipends; students 

schools See educational institutions; elementary and secondary 
schools; higher education institutions 

science 

aerospace, 44, 45. 192, 245. 247 

courses and educational materials, 224. 246. 255 

funds for ethics/public policy seminars, 51. 79. 156. 220. 221. 223 

funds for research, 40, 54, 57, 127, 224, 225, 249. 256 

history and philosophy of, 44, 45, 54. 220. 223, 225 

National Science Foundation programs, 222-225 

research resources, 28. 39. 128, 190, 191. 245 

science and technology museums, 88. 153. 245 

scientific illustration, 39. 247 

Technology Utilization (NASA), 192 

Science and Society, Office of (NSF), 223 



Index 



Science Education Directorate (NSF), 223, 224 

Science for Citizens (NSF), 223 

Science, Technology, and Human Values (NEH), 220 

SCORE, 242 

sculpture 

collections, 245, 259, 262 

commissions (fees), 112, 150, 169, 212, 270 

exhibit/sales/work space, 132, 149, 170, 212 

fellowships and residencies, 132, 194, 212 

funds for acquisitions and exhibits, 203, 212 

loans of, 247, 261 

See also visual arts 
Section 504, 57, 93, 208 See also disabled persons, programs for 
Senate Commission on Art and Antiquities, 267 
Senate Historical Office, 268 
senior citizens. See older persons, programs for 
Senior Community Service Employment Program (DOL), 148 
Senior Companion Program (ACTION), 1 
Senior Opportunities and Services (CSA), 9 
Service Corps of Retired Executives (SBA), 242 
SITES, 247 

Slavic and Central European Division (LC), 182 
small business 

courses and training, 24, 217, 241, 242 

funds for, 10, 18, 29, 37, 50, 122, 142, 146, 243 

management counseling and technical assistance, 10, 18, 

24, 29, 53, 147, 242 

Small Business Administration, 241-243 

See also management 
Small Business Administration, 241-243 
small presses, aid to, 166, 201; mentioned, 90 
Smithsonian Archives (SI), 245 
Smithsonian Associates (SI), 255 
Smithsonian Folklife Program (SI), 248 
Smithsonian Institution, 69, 244-263 
social history, 16, 191. See also history 
social sciences 

employment, 233, 234 

funds for educational programs, 216-218, 220, 221, 223, 224 

funds for research, 95, 143, 217, 219, 225 

research resources, 26, 140, 162-164, 182, 245 

See also fellowships and stipends; and specific field 
Social Security Act, 63 
social services, 9, 57, 58, 62, 63 
Social Services Programs (HEW), 63 
sociology 

employment, 233, 234 

fellowships and residencies, 82, 83, 175, 176, 213, 217, 224 

funds for educational programs, 216-218, 220, 221, 223, 224 

funds for research, 16, 57, 82, 83, 87, 175, 176, 217, 219, 

224, 225, 258 

National Endowment for the Humanities programs, 213-221 

research resources, 22, 26, 140, 162-164, 182, 190, 191 
solar energy. See energy resources and conservation 
Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program (DOE), 56 
Sound Recording Branch (NARS), 163 
Southwest Border Regional Commission, 31 
Spanish-American culture See ethnic culture, Hispanic culture 
Speaking Tours Abroad (ICA), 178 
Special Arts Projects (OE). 78 
Special Constituencies Office (NEA), 208 



Special Economic Development/Adjustment Assistance 

(Commerce), 36 
special education, 69, 76, 85, 93 See also disabled persons, 

programs for 
Special Programs, Division of (NEH), 220 
Special Projects (NEA), 209 
state and local education agencies 

Alliance for Arts Education (OE/JFK), 67, 251 

Education Division (HEW), 65-102 

funds for, 66-73, 75, 77-82, 84, 85, 87, 94, 99-101. 216 

policies, 69, 92 

technical assistance, 67, 73, 77, 94, 251 

See also elementary and secondary schools, state and local 

government agencies, state arts agencies 
State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act of 1972, 152 
state and local government agencies 

advisory and technical assistance. 4, 5, 17, 24, 28. 45. 52, 

53, 117, 128, 192, 232, 236, 237, 239, 264 

funds for community and economic development, 7, 31. 

34-38, 104, 107, 108, 111, 131, 148. 150, 152 

funds for construction/renovation, 7, 31, 35, 36, 91, 107, 111, 

113, 124, 130, 152 

funds for design/planning/research, 7, 31, 34-38, 104, 

106-109, 124, 127, 131, 150, 152, 166 

funds for educational programs, 7. 58, 63, 91. 104, 131, 152, 

212, 216, 221 

funds for employment and training, 21, 35, 107, 141-146, 

148, 236 

funds for energy and environmental conservation, 21. 31. 38. 

50, 52, 53 

funds for historic preservation, 31, 35, 36, 38, 104, 107-111. 

113, 124, 127, 150, 166 

funds for radio and television stations, 30 

personnel exchanges and training, 236-239 

property, sale or lease, 64, 129, 160, 161 

See also state and local education agencies, stete arts 

agencies 
state and local history 

funds for research, 16, 38, 116, 166, 217, 219 

research resources, 162-164, 168, 190 

State, Local, and Regional History Projects (NEH), 219 

mentioned, 24, 91, 264 

See also history 
state arts agencies 

funds for, 152, 193-212, 236 

funds for arts curriculum development. 67, 78, 93, 194 

funds for performances and tours, 196, 198, 199. 207. 210 

funds for residencies and exhibits. 194, 201, 212 

listing of, Appendix H 

Office for Partnership (NEA), 206 

technical assistance, 206. 208. 236 

See also community arts organizations, state and local 

education agencies, state and local government agencies 
State, Department of, 149 
state humanities committees. 221, Appendix I 
State Programs, Division of (NEH). 221 
Station Arts Program (DOT), 150 

statistical data and analyses, 11, 22, 26, 27, 55. 92, 140. 193 
Still Picture Branch (NARS), 163 
stipends See fellowships and stipends 
Strengthening Developing Institutions (OE). 97 



Index 



Strengthening Major Research Libraries (OE), 90 
students 

awards, 251 

counseling and information sources, 75, 89, 92, 101, 228 

disabled students, 57. 263, 269 

fellowships, 82, 83, 86, 96, 197, 224, 260 

funds for graduate study/research, 68, 82, 83, 86, 87, 96-98, 

123, 175, 176, 197, 224, 225, 249, 253, 256, 260, 269 

funds for study/travel abroad, 46, 83, 87, 176, 249, 260 

funds for undergraduate tuition, 66, 68. 98, 123, 269 

internships, 48, 100, 128, 175, 227, 238, 250-253, 263, 267 

minority students, 57, 68, 86. 224, 238, 253 

Native American students, 66, 122, 123. 252 

ticket subsidies, 251 

veterans, 269 
- work/study, 74, 98, 233 
Student Financial Aid Programs (OE), 98 
subsidized labor. See labor 
summer programs 

courses and seminars, 51, 87, 217 

cultural instruction, 9, 144, 198 

employment, 21, 125, 144, 235 

internships, 135, 139, 227, 263 
Summer Seminars for College Teachers (NEH), 217 
Summer Stipends (NEH), 217 
Summer Youth Program (DOL), 144 
Summer Youth Recreation Program (CSA), 9 
Superintendent of Documents (GPO), 172 
Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grants (OE), 98 
Supreme Court, 268 

Surplus Personal Property Donations (GSA), 159 
Surplus Personal Property Sales (GSA), 160 
Surplus Real Property Transfers (HEW), 64 
Surplus Real Property Sales (GSA), 161 
surveys, 116, 118, 124, 127, 199, 212, 231 
Sylvan Theatre, 134 



tax information, 4, 17, 105, 126, 130, 153, 230, 241 

Tax Reform Act of 1976, 130 

Teacher Centers (OE), 99 

Teacher Corps (OE), 100 

teachers 

advisory and consultant services, 55, 67, 68, 93, 94, 184, 

189, 246, 251, 261 

courses and workshops, 51, 93, 115, 251 

educational research resources, 76, 95 

employment, 2, 120; mentioned, 142, 145 

funds for study/research abroad, 87, 176 

funds for training programs. 66-72, 77, 79, 80, 85, 93, 

99-102, 216, 224 
Teaching Abroad/Seminars for Teachers Abroad (ICA), 176 
Technical Information Center (DOE), 55 
Technology Utilization (NASA). 192 
telecommunications See media 
television 

American Television and Radio Archives (LC), 191 

Audiovisual Archives (NARS), 163 

Corporation for Public Broadcasting programs, 11-14 



fellowships/internships/residencies, 14, 200-202 

funds for equipment and facilities. 13, 30, 159 

funds for programming, 13, 78, 199, 202-204, 218, 223 

funds for training programs, 14, 101. 220, mentioned, 146 

information and technical assistance, 11, 13, 14, 220 

Media Arts: Film/Radio/Television (NEA), 202 

Media Program (NEH), 218 

mjnority groups, 14, 78 

Public Broadcasting Service, 13 

research resources, 11, 26, 76, 92, 163, 191, 251 
Television Community Service Grants (CPB). 13 
Tennessee Valley Authority, 264-265 
theater 

American College Theatre Festival (SI), 251 

Armed Forces programs, 46, 47 

employment, 46, 47, 132. 134, 137, 138, 234; mentioned, 

142, 144, 146, 189 

fellowships/residencies/scholarships, 47, 132, 194, 200, 201, 

210, 251 

funds for educational programs, 67. 78. 93, 194, 198 

funds for productions and tours, 198, 202, 207, 210 

funds for training, 101, 210 

musical theater, 207 

performance and festival opportunities, 46, 132, 134, 200, 

251. 254 

Performing Arts Library (LC/JFK), 187, 251 

playwrights, 201. 210 

puppet theater, 254 

prison programs, 137, 138 

research resources, 163, 180, 187, 193 

technical assistance, 67, 93. 207. 210 

Theater Program (NEA), 210 

mentioned, 24, 26, 68, 69, 192 

See also performing arts 
Theater Program (NEA), 210 
Title III (DOE), 52 
Title III (OE). 97 
Title IV (OE). 77 

Title V Regional Commissions (Commerce). 31 
Title IX, 102 
Title XX (HEW), 63 
tools See equipment 
tourism, 25, 31-37 
translations See languages 
transportation, 59. 150. 151, 164 
Transportation, Department of, 150-151 
travel funds. 46, 83, 87, 89, 174-176, 178, 200, 213, 225, 249, 

253, 260 See also international programs 
Treasury, Department of the, 152-153 
Treasury Fund (NEA). 211 
tribes See Native Americans 
TVA, 264, 265 



UNESCO, 6, 136 

United States Capitol, 8, 267 

United States Coast Guard, 150 

United States Fish and Wildlife Service (Interior), 120 

United States Government Organization Manual. 1 67 



Index 



United States Postal Service, 266 
United States Senate, 267-268 
United States Travel Service (Commerce), 32 
United States-US S.R Exchange Agreement, 174 
universities. See higher education institutions 
University Lecturing/Advanced Research (ICA), 176 
Upper Great Lakes Regional Commission, 31 
urban areas, programs for 

Department of Housing and Urban Development. 103-113 

education and technical assistance, 24, 34, 37, 108, 131, 198 

funds for community and economic development, 9, 10, 103, 

104, 107, 108, 110, 111, 131 

funds for employment and training, 141-146 

See also economic development; urban planning and studies 
Urban Development Action Grants (HUD), 1 1 1 
Urban Mass Transportation Administration (DOT), 150 
Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program (Interior), 131 
urban planning and studies 

employment, 235 

funds for, 5, 34, 38, 104, 106-109, 112, 166, 197, 224, 225 

research resources, 5, 57, 103, 162-164, 191 

mentioned, 2, 79, 89 

See also urban areas, programs for 
Urban Research Grants (HUD), 106 
USDA, 15-24 
USO, 46 



VA, 269-270 

Very Special Arts Festivals (OE), 93 

Veterans Administration, 269-270 

veterans, programs for, 143, 208, 269 

VISTA (ACTION), 3 

visual arts 

Archives of American Arts (SI), 245 

Armed Forces programs, 41, 42, 47 

art critics, 189, 212-221 

art in housing and public places, 112, 150, 169, 212, 270 

Artists-in-Schools (NEA), 194 

artworks, loans of, 119, 155, 247, 261 

awards and competitions, 120, 154 

Challenge Grants Program (NEA), 195 

collections, 8, 41, 117, 163, 24S 259, 262 

commissions (fees), 112, 150, 169, 212, 266, 270 

conservation, 6, 189, 192, 193, 203, 252, 253, 263 

courses and training, 24, 47, 57, 255 

employment, 42, 47, 132, 134, 137, 138, 189, 233-235; 
mentioned, 141-146 

fellowships and scholarships, 24, 200, 212, 256 

funds for acquisitions and exhibits, 77, 198, 203, 212 

funds for educational programs, 67, 72, 77, 78, 81, 85, 89, 

93, 104, 194, 195, 198, 202 

funds for study and work abroad, 83, 87, 176, 200, 249, 260 

international art exhibits, 149, 173, 203 

National Gallery of Art programs, 259-263 

Native Americans, 117, 123 

prison art programs, 137, 138 

reproductions/slides, 259, 261, 262 

research resources, 117, 163, 190, 191, 193, 245, 259, 262, 

267 



residencies, 132, 194. 212 

sales outlets/exhibit space, 120, 132, 134, 149, 170, 212 

technical assistance, 6, 24, 61, 67, 117, 147. 153, 173, 189, 

212, 241, 264 

traveling exhibits, 41, 119. 189, 247 

Visual Arts Program (NEA), 212 

workshops and lectures, 134, 241, 255, 259, 261 
Visual Arts Program (NEA), 212 
vocational education 

educational research resources, 92 

funds for, 35, 62, 69, 70, 101, 102, 141-146, 216 

funds for student assistance, 98, 101, 269 

National Technical Institute for the Deaf, 57 

property, sale or lease, 64 

Vocational Education Programs (OE), 101 
volunteer programs, 1-3, 69, 132, 148, 220, 242 See also employment 



w 



White House, 268 

White House Fellowships. 240 

Wildlife Art and Decoy Contests (Interior), 120 

Wildlife Photography Contest (Interior), 120 

Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts (Interior), 135 

women 

advisory services, 2, 57, 139 

funds for educational programs, 80, 102, 224 

funds for professional studies and training, 14, 86, 224, 238 

funds for research, 102, 166 

research resources, 162-164' 

Women's Bureau (DOL), 139 

Women's Educational Equity Act Program (OE), 102 

See also equal opportunity; minority groups, programs for 
Women in Development (ACTION), 2 
Women's Bureau (DOL), 139 

Women's Educational Equity Act Program (OE). 102 
Women's Training Grants (CPB), 14 

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (SI), 258 
Works Progress Administration, 163, 181 
workshops See specific field 
work-study programs, 74, 98. 233 
World Heritage List (Interior), 136 
writers See journalism, literature; theater 
young persons, programs for 

awards and competitions, 154, 231, 251 

business loans for, 18 

4-H Program (USDA). 24 

employment and training, 21, 141, 143, 144, 233, 235 

internships, 231, 251 

summer programs, 9, 21, 144, 235 

Youth Programs (NEH), 220 
Youth Conservation Corps (USDA), 21 
Youth Education Seminars (EPA), 156 
Youth Employment and Training Programs (DOL), 144 
Youth Programs (NEH), 220 
Youth Project Loans (USDA). 18 



zoological parks. 88 See also museums 



This book was produced by the Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC 

Printed by Universal Lithographers, Inc., Lutherville-Timonium, Maryland 

Set in Helvetica by Circle Graphics, Inc., Washington, D C 

The text paper is sixty-pound P & S White Offset and sixty-pound Brokaw 

Opaque Vellum, Canyon Blue, with ten-point Carolina (coated one side) 

cover 

Designed by Stephen Kraft. 



NX Federal Council on the 

735 Arts and the Humanities. 

.F42 Cultural Directory. 
1980 

Cof'3 



National Endowment for the Arts 

Library 

Washington, DC 20506