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WEEK, JUNE 29 TO JULY 5, 1908 



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Cofi}ie/H loob. B. L. Clarke 



We advertise and sell high-class property 
CLARKE & THORNTON 



A' /•; . / L /■: S TA TE H R O K E R S 
1 Madison Avenue New York City 

10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

t<, /poS, by Daily Attractions in New York, Inc. 



NO. 118 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTEL 



Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON. Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 

^ Hotel Astor 

WM. G. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just oflF Broadway 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES. Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 


The Ansonia 

Broadway, 73d and 74th Streets 


The Lucerne 

JAMES. RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West S^etfty-B*ftt& Street 


Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP, Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel .Manhnhan 

Madison Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON. Mgr. 
18-20 West 25th Street 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman'* Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 

Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Garden 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE, Mgr. 
Slst Street and Columbus Avenue 


The Plaza 

FRED STERRY. Mgr. 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART. Prop. 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A HARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 


Hotel Gotham 

Fifth Avenue and 55th Street 


Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK. Mgr. 

15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL, Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hotel Savoy 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


Hoffman House 

• Broadway and 25th Street 


Hotel St. Regis 

Fifth Avenue and 55th Street 


The Holland 

66 and 68 West 46th Street 
Mrs. WM. H. WHITE. Prop. 
"Apartments " 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY. Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East 







m MEW YORK 

o4^Weekly^^SMa.gA»{ne^^e<voted to cMvo-nce Information. 



Vol. X 



JUNE 29th to JULY 5th, 1908 



No. 118 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan BIdg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractioni circulates through all the 
leading Hoteli in New York City 
ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 

Five Cent* a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Adrertiiing rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Churches 12-13 

Church of the Transfiguration 29 

"Clubs and the Ballot" (Haryot Holt Day) 23 

Did You Know in the Year 1841 25 

Elevated Railroads 22 

Ferries 22 

Hospitals 18 

Hotels 2 

Hudson River Day Line 20-27 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 28 

Location of Piers 14 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Municipal Offices 14 

Ocean Going Steamers 24 

Points of Interest 30 

Public Libraries 10 

Pullman Accommodations 22 

Railroad Stations 22 

"Seeing New York" (Frank Thornton) . . 24 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 11 

Short Trips to Forts and Islands 26 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter 17 

Theaters ig-21 

This is the Way to Reach the Bronx 27-28 

This Week in New York 5-g 

"Three Twins" (Frank Thornton) 15 

Trolley Trips in New Jersey 4 



ART NOTES 

Metropolitan Museum of Art — 

Fifth ave. and 83d st. Anpng 
the most recent accessions 
to the collection of the mu- 
seum include an exhibit of cera- 
mics in which are nine plates and 
a vase of Delft ware of the sev- 
enteenth and eighteenth centur- 
ies, a gift from Mrs. Catherine 
Van Vliet De Witt Stcrry. The 
furniture added this last month 
is intended to form the nucleus 
of a collection of specimens of 
the work of English cabinetmak- 
ers of the eighteenth century. 
Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan has 
given busts in colored plaster of 
Voltaire and Rousseau, the work 
of Houdon; the busts stand on 
original pedestals which bear the 
seal of Houdon's atelier. There 
are also three new paintings. 
One is a "Street Scene in Paris," 
showing the church of St. 
Germain des Pre, by J. F. Raf- 
aellie, painted about twenty years 
ago. Another is by William 
Morris Hunt, "The Girl at the 
Fountain," painted in i860. The 
third painting is a Madonna by 
Pietro di Domenico, of Montepul- 
ciano. The Madonna is repre- 
sented as enthroned with angels. 










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DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TROLLEY TRIPS 

After crossing the Hudson River, 
either by the Pennsylvania or Erie 
ferry at 23d St., Chambers st. or 
Cortlandt st., to Jersey City, one 
can get a trolley for Newark, from 
which point (Broad and Market 
sts.) cars may be taken for nearly 
every point in New Jersey. 

From Newark to Elizabeth is 
about seven miles across country, 
takes about one hour. Elizabeth 
is a very old city and is interesting 
on account of Colonial and Revo- 
lutionary memories. 

From Elizabeth, passing through 
Roselle, Cranford, Westfield and 
Scotch Plains, Plainfield is reached, 
which is a very beautiful residen- 
tial town, fourteen miles distant. 

By .taking a cross-country line, 
which joins the main road before 
reaching Westfield, one can go to 
Perth Amboy, a delightful trip of 
twelve miles, which takes a little 
over an hour. From New York it 
would take somewhat over three 
hours. 

One of the most delightful trol- 
ley rides is from Newark to Cald- 
well, up into the mountains, pass- 
ing through Bloomfield, Glen 
Ridge, Montclair and Verona Lake. 

Another interesting point by 
trolley is to Eagle Rock, where a 
magnificent view may be had of 
the surrounding towns and coun- 
try. Seven miles. 

Another trip from New York 
into New Jersey is by way of the 
130th St. ferry (reached by Broad- 
way trains on the Subway, getting 
ofif at Manhattan st., to Edgewater, 
from which point one can take a 
trolley for Fort Lee, Leonia, 
Englewood, Bogota, Hackensack, 
Lodi, Passaic and Paterson. From 
the park on the Palisades, on top 
of the cliff, above Edgewater, one 
can take the new double track 
branch to Palisades, Grantwood, 
Morsemere, Palisades Park and on 
to Leonia. 

Take ferry across to Hoboken 
from 23rd St., Christopher or Bar- 
clay St., take the White Line to 
Paterson, the great center of the 
silk industry, passing through Jer- 



IN NEW JERSEY 

sey Heights, Schuetzen Park and 
down to Hackensack Meadows, 
through Homestead, Secaucus and 
Carlstadt, to East Rutherford, 
where a branch line goes to Ruth- 
erford, then on through Passaic, 
Clifton, Hamilton Heights to Pat- 
erson. 

From Paterson to Singac, 
through the valley of the Upper 
Passaic River, is one of the most 
delightful of Jersey trolley trips, 
giving the trolleyer a fine view of 
the majestic Passaic Falls. 

By taking the Cortlandt st. ferry 
across to Jersey City a through 
trolley may be taken for Trenton, 
passing through Newark, Eliza- 
beth, Westfield, Plainfield, Dun- 
ellen. Bound Brook and New 
Brunswick. From Trenton one 
has the choice of a boat down the 
Delaware River to Philadelphia or 
a trolley into the Quaker City. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephonei 6joo Madiion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alto Table d'Hote 

Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooms from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In easy acceii of all the principal theatres 

Subway Station, l8th Street, within one block 

Z9th Street cars pass the door 



<0E!^^-^ 




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This Week in New York 

Monday, June 29th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The second annual Congress of the Playground Association of 
America will be held in New York City on September 8th to 12th, 1908. 
Among the speakers will be Governor Hughes, George E. Johnson, Prof. 
Royal Melendy, Dr. E. E. Arnold, E. B. De Groot, Prof. C. T. Hethering.- 
ton, Dr. Luther H. Gulick, and Joseph Lee. 

Phi Gamma Delta, convention. Waldorf-Astoria (to July i). 

Maurice Levi and his band are one of the attractions in front of the 
Manhattan Beach Hotel; they give daily concerts free, afternoon and 
evening. 

Retreat at the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Manhattanville, con- 
ducted by the Rev. J. H. O'Rourke, S.J., will open this evening, closing 
t)n the morning of July 3d. Applications may be made to the Mother 
Superior of the convent. 

There is only one way to see New York for yourself. Why not be 
your own Guide Book, you can. The American Sight-Seeing Coach or 
Yacht tickets may be purchased from the Fifth ave. side of the "Flatiron"' 



The Greatest and Most Original Attraction in New York are the 

FLEISCHMAN BATHS and 
Roof Garden Restaurant 

On the three upper floors of the Bryant Park Building. 
Northeast Corner 42d Street and 6th Jtvenue. 

The Roof Garden Restaurant is open to Ladies and Clentlemen. 
It is the coolest and most delightful dining resort in New York. 
First-class Service a la Carte. The Baths are open Day and Night, 
for ?ne>2 only. Excellent Sleeping Accommodation. 
Price of Russian or Turkish Baths, $1.50. 8 Tickets for $10.00. 17 Tickets for $20.00 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Building, Broadway and 23d st. Interview the courteous clerk who will 
arrange the trip for you, yacht sailing at 10 a. m. and 2:30 p. m. Coaches 
leave every hour. 

Baseball— New York Americans vs. Boston, at the American League 
Park. 167th street and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Tennis— Middle States championship; Orange, (N. J.) Tennis Club. 

Horse Racing — Coney Island Jockey Club, (to July 6). 

Eighth Sea Cliff Bible Conference at Sea Cliff, L. I., three sessions 
daily. Take Steamer Tolchester, daily foot of East 31st st. Round trip 50 
cents, or L. I. R. R. 

Tuesday, June 30th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"Memory," (The different kinds of memory. How can it be 
improved? Is it desirable to remember one's past life?) lecture by E. 
Laubinger, Theosophical Society, 244 Lenox ave., near 123d st. 8:15 p. m. 
Visitors welcome. 

You cannot buy Daily Attractions in New York on the news stands, 
but you can subscribe to it for three months for fifty cents, it will be 
mailed to you regularly every Saturday. , Subscribe now. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Boston, at the American League 
Park, i67tli st., and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Gala Musical Festival and Lectures; 20th annual convention of New 
York State Music Association at the College of the City of New York. 
Free programs and all information may be obtained from Mr. J. W. 
Andrews, 4 West 76th st. (to July 2). 

Wednesday, July ist 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. A. O. Dixon, of 
Chicago, will be in the tent to July 3d. Services 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Boston, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 



Attractive Rooms for Ilent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 

Central Location. Comfortable Surroundings 

No. 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 

Telephone: 3768 Madison Square' 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



PAUL L. 

^DYEING AND CLEANSING 
291 FIFTH AVENUE 

Tel. 1224 MADISON SQ. 



BRYANT 

Gowns Cleaned in Twenty-Foor Hours 
900 SIXTH AVENUE 
Bet. SOth & 51st Sts. Tel. 5207 Plaza 



THIS AVEEK — Cuutinued 

Wednesdaj^ evening meeting, ^Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. 
and 29th St., Rev. David James Burrell, D.D., LL.D., minister. 8 p. m. 
Yon are cordially invited to attend. 

Wednesday evening meeting. Second Church of Christ Scientist, 
Central Park West at 68th st. 8 p. m. Visitors welcome. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles E. Jefferson, D.D., LL.D., pastor; Wednesday evening Praise and 
Prayer Service. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

Our Bureau of Information is open to you without cost. Where do 
you want to go? What do you want to know. Ask "Father Knicker- 
bocker"; he knows. 'Phone 159 Gramercy for your convenience. 



Thursday, July 2d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"Manners and Customs of the Turks," (stereopticon views) lecture 
by Miss Carrie Clifton Knapp, at the Metropolitan Temple. Seventh ave. 
near 14th st. 8:15 p. m. Free. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Philadelphia, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Take the trip up the Hudson to West Point by the superb steamers 
of the Hudson River Day Line; no dust, no fatigue. Try it, it will 
pay you. 

Camp Northfield. under the direction of the West Side Y. M. C. A., 
320 West 57th St., is now open. It is situated half way up Notch 
Alountain, the Connecticut River makes boating and bathing possible. 
Open to September i. 

Golf — Women's Junior Open tournament; Edgewater Golf Club. 




Noiseless and Ligdt-Running 
Automatic Machine 

WITH HAND ATTACHMENT 

Ready for Use 

Ladies spending a few weeks at the sea- 
side or in the country, or when traveling, 
will find this compact Hand Machine a 
great convenience. 

'Phone 6100 Spring or write for Catalog 14 

Willcox & Gibbs Sewing Machine Go. 

658 Broadway, Cor. Bond St., New York 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Do You Want a Position In New York? 

We Can Find It for You. 

We serve all the leading employers in the Greater City and now have open more 
positions for high-grade Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men than we can fill. 
Write us to-day, or, better still, call and see us for full particulars of desirable positions 
paying 8i,ooo-S5,ooo a year. Offices in 12 cities. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



THIS WE:EK — Coutiiiued 

Golf — .Annual invitation lournaniont ; Apawamis Club; Rye, N. Y. 

Friday, July 3d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Ra.seball — New York Nationals vs. Philadelphia, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to 90th 
St. on Fifth ave. have now added a new route by which cars of the 
same type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to 57th st., thence 
over to Broadway, up Broadway to 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning i)y the same route. This new stage can readily be distinguished 
by day a red l)all, by night a red light on the front of the cars. The 
fare in each instance either way is 10 cents per person. 

Motor boat race around I-ong Island; New York Bay Racing 
Association. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of T.ung Inland Sound; American 
annual. 

Boats are now running to Midland P>each, Staten Lsland. The first 
boat leaves the Batterj- landing at 0:-!5 a. m. and tiie last boat leaves the 
beach at q p. m. 

Saturday, July 4th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Ezra Sanford, pastor 
of the Nfjrth Baptist Church, illustrated sermons. 8 p. m. 

Motor boat race; New York to Poughkeepsie. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Hart- 
ford annual and Larchmont annual. 



It's distinctive of itself 
Wliat is distinctive of itself? 

HERBO-NERVO TONIC 

For Sale at R. H. MACY & CO., Broadway and 34th Street 

and at all Dniy Stores 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Philadelphia, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth avc. (two games). 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravescnd Bay; Atlantic 
Yacht Club. 

Yachting — Special scries for thirty-footers; I^archmont. 

Sunday, July 5 th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Manhattan Congregational Church, Broadway and 76th st.; pastor, 
the Rev. Henry A. Stimson, D.D.; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. A cor- 
dial welcome to you. 

The Marble College Church, P'ifth ave. and 2gth st., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D.D., LL.D., minister; services, 11 a. m and 8 p. m. A 
welcome for all. 

Second Church of Christ Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st., 
services, II a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, Madison ave. and 60th 
St., the Rev. Walace MacMullen, D.D., minister; services. 11 a. m. 
Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach. A cordial welcome for you. 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st.. the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D.D., rector; services, R a. m. and 11 a. m. You are 
cordially invited to attend. 

Church of the New Jerusalem, 35th st. near Park ave., the Rev. Julius 
K, Smyth, pastor; services. 11 a. m. All are welcome 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church. ^Madison ave. and 31st st; services, 
I I a. m. A welcome for every one. 

Broadway Tabernacle. Church. 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefiferson, D.D., LL.D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You 
will be cordially welcomed. 

String Orchestra concert, under the direction of Nahan Franko, in 
Central Park, on the Mall. 4 p. m. 



GASHERIE DE WITT 
PROPRIETOR 



THE EARLINGTON 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout, The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Opens June 20. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

DiRECTOR'B Office and General Headquarters, 426 LAFAYETTE STREET 

TklKPHONC. 3070 SPRING 

Circulation Headquarters. 209 WEST 23rd STREET 

TCLCPHONC, 3076 CHELSEA 



Reference Branches: 



ASTOR, 426 LAFAYETTE STREET 



LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES! 



Eaat B'way, 197. .(Bast B'way Branch). 
*East B'way, 33. (Chatham Sq. Branch). 
•Rlvlngton Street, 61.. . (Rivlngton Street 

Branch). 
•Leroy St., 66... (Hudson Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 49.. (Bond Street Branch). 
•10th St., 831 East. ...(Tompkins Square 
Branch). 

Second Ave., 135. . (Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W.. (Jackson Sq. Branch). 
•23d St., 228 East. .(Epiphany Branch). 
•2Sd St., 209 W. ..(Muhlenberg Branch). 

84th St., 215 East (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., BOl W..(St. Raphael Branch). 

42d St., 226 W. (George Bruce Branch). 

60th St., 123 East. . (Cathedral Branch). 

Blst St., 463 W. (Sacred Heart Branch). 

58th St., 121 East.. (59th Street Branch). 
•67th St., 328 East. (67th Street Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'ch). 

•Avenue A, 1465 (Webster Branch). 

•79th St., 222 East...(Torkvlll« Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave., 444.. (St. Agnes B'ch) 
•96th St., 112 East (96th St. Branch). 

110th St., 174 East. ..(AKuilar Branch). 



123d St., 32 W. (The Harlem Library). 

•125th St., 224 E (125th St., Branch). 

•135th St., 103 W.... (136th St., Branch). 

•145th St., 503 W (Hamilton Grange 

Branch). 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. .. (Washington 

Heights Branch). 
Library for th« Blind, 444 Amsterdam 
Avenue. 

Boronsh of Bronx 

•140th St., 569 B (Mott Haven Br'ch). 

•Washington Ave., 1866. (Tremont Br'ch) 
•Kingsbrldge Ave., 2933. . . .(Klngsbrldga 
Branch). 

Borough of Richmond 
•Amboy Road, TottenvlUe. . (Tottenvtlla 

Branch). 
•Central Ave., Tompklnsvllle, S. I... .(St. 

George Branch). 
•12 Bennett St... (Port Richmond Br'ch) 
•Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sts. 
•Occupying Carnegie Buildings. 



HOURS 

The Branches, with exceptions noted below, are open from 9 a. m. to • p. m. 
on week days. 

Branches In Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Tear's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, Presidential Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day; after 6 p. m. on Washington ■ Birthday and Christmas Eve; 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 5 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch Is closed from 6 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and Is open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a, m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street, Tomp- 
kins Square, Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rivlngton Street and Riverside Branches from 
2 tin 6 p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rivlngton Street Branches 
are open until 10 p. m. on week days. 

The Library for the Blind Is open on week days from 1 p. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Lenox Branch Is open from 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



lO 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT 

The employment of sheer ma- 
terials for suits has been most suc- 
cessful. Worsted voile is most 
favored, 'tho transparent, it is 
nevertheless a substantial fabric. 

Shantung and tussah are the two 
silk fabrics ])referred for tailor and 
ordinary walking suits. An odd 
idea is trimming them with self- 
colored cloth or worsted voile. 

There is likewise a return of 
favor for the broad velvet band on 
the bottom of the skirt. The vel- 
vet is always the saine color of the 
dress, but of a darker shade. The 
corsage is invariably trimmed with 
the velvet, which was not the case 
last year. 

A striking suit was seen at a 
garden party, which quite enliv- 
ened the scene and looked well on 
the green grass. 

It was a tartan voile, in shades 
of blue and green. The skirt was 
composed of folds, worn beneath 
was a skirt of crimson satin, which 
showed very prettily through the 
sheer material. The jacket lined 
with the satin and simply trimmed 
with a knife pleating of green taf- 
feta, this also edged the foot of 
the skirt. 

Black in Paris is always consid- 
ered dressy, an imported dress of 
the Directoire type is very beauti- 
ful, it was made of a black silk 
gauze, having as skirt-trimming a 
single very broad band of self- 
colored filet net surrounding the 
bottom. Embroidered in a heavy 
design in black floss silk. The 
skirt which continued in clinging 
folds quite above the waist line 
closed over a corsage of a Japan- 
ese character, formed entirely of 
folds of gauze and lace insertings. 

Some of the designs in creton 
are beautiful as a painting. One 
we mention was composed of a 
bunch of small pink roses with 
leaves tied with a blue ribbon. The 
ribbon in graceful ripples ties an- 
other bunch a short space and so 
on. The coat and vest was of fine, 
soft glossy white broadcloth. The 
creton cut out close to the pattern 



TALKS 

and appliqued on the vest, the 
opening of the vest on one side so 
arranged not to mar the effect of 
the trimming. Coat with shawl 
shape collar of blue, same color as 
ribbon. The coat just met at the 
end of the collar then flares to 
show the vest. The dainty point is 
a tiny bow of pink velvet without 
ends where the coat met. 

There are also beautiful adjust- 
able collar, cufifs and belt of the 
creton, and to complete the set is 
the pocket book to match 

The all-over embroidery waist 
when introduced the early part of 
the season was looked at with in- 
difference, but now it is in great 
demand. The high class dress- 
makers show most attractive all- 
over waists dyed in colors to 
match the linen suitings. Also the 
most exquisite embroideries of the 
finest weave made up into waists 
trimmed with cluny or baby Irish. 
These are very expensive. 

Among the novelties in under- 
wear are night gowns and other 
garments of cross-bar dimities, 
trimmed with laces and embroid- 
eries. 

The embroidered silk gauntlet- 
glove gives a smart touch to the 
costume. It is milanese silk with 
five-inch semi-stiff cufif attractively 
embroidered on the cuf¥. 

A radical change is shown in 
waists intended for evening wear. 
Among the latest models it is sel- 
dom the shoulder is left bare. The 
sleeve or whatever trimming re- 
places it, is carried up over the 
top of the shoulder and from there 
falls in draped folds or frills over 
the upper portion of the arm, this 
gives a heart-shaped or small nar- 
row round decollete effect to the 
centre of the bodice. 

The wide white lace veiling that 
can be purchased by the yard is 
seen on walking and traveling hats 
as well as on the automobilist. It 
is expensive, but as it is becoming, 
looks refreshing on a sultry day, 
cleans to look like new, one should 
not cavil at the price. 

Madame Roberta. 







' ^OOO, Bl ** 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty-First Street 
Sunday, June 28th 

Services at II a. m. and 8 p. m. 



Special Musical attractions 

Mid-week Meeting, \7ednesday, 8 p. m. 

Visitors and Strangers cordially invited to All Services 

BIBLE SCHOOL, SUNDAY. 9.45 a. m. 

Graded Classes for Scholars of All Ages 



,A Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



g-rronb OIt|urrI| af (Hl^viBt, ^tXtntlBt 



Central Park West 
at 68th Street 



Services, ii a. m, and 8 p. m. 



Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. ra. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



METHODIST 



Madison Ave. Methodist Episcopal Gdurch 

CORNER OF SIXTIETH STREET 
Rev. Wallace MacMuUen, D. D. - - - Mfniater 

REV. ARLO A. BROWN, Aislitant Minister 

Preaching Service, 11a.m. Bible School, 9.45 a.m. 
Bible Classes for Men and Women, 10 a. m. 
Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 28tli 

Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach 
Quartet Choir t Mr. C. B. Hawley. Organist and Dinctar 



Miss Edna P. Smith, Sotrano 
Mrs. Anna Taylor Jones, Contraltt 



Mr. George O. Bowen, Ttnor 
Mr. Reinald Werrenratb, Bait 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NKW YORK CHUR€KE8 — Continued 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 



i^aint IBartholomew's (Shurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY- FOURTH STREET 

R«T. LEIGHTON PARKS, D.D.. Raotor 

♦ 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher from June 1 4 to July 19 

THE REV. JOSEPH G. H. BARRY, D.D. 

Dean of Nashotah House, Nashotah, Wis. 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 



CONGREGATIONAL 



BROADWAY TABERNACLE ^'T^^^^^^'];':^- ^^'r^'.VJJ^r'"' 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a. ni., 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a.m., 2.45 p. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E., 7 p.m. IVednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 



and 8 P.M. 

Rev. HENRY A. STIMSON, D. D.. Pastor 
Seats Free M Cordial Welcome to You 



NEW CHURCH 



CHURCH OF THE NEW JERUSALEM I^d^cxingM 

Reir. JULIAN K. SMYTH, Pastor. Service, II a. m. Seat» Free. All Are Welcome 



Park 
on Ave>. 



UNITARIAN 



LENOX AVENUE UNITARIAN CHURCH i^.rsTeet 

R«r. MERLE ST. CROIX WRIGHT. Minister StrvloM kt w 



REFORMED 



1628 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA I908 

TKe Marble Collegiate Church 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 



Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN, D.D., Pastor for Strangers 
will preach Sunday, June 28th 
II a. m. Subject: "Christ the Master" 
8p.m. Subject: '"Libations to Fortune" 



Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



MUNICIPAL OFFICES 



Accounts, Commissioners of, 280 B'way. 
Aqueduct Commissioners, 280 B'way. 
Board of Aldermen, 8 City Hall. 
Board of Armories, 280 Broadway. 
Board of Assessors, 320 Broadway. , 

Board of Education, 59th st. & I'ark av. 
Board Ex. numbers, 14'J Chuich st. 
Bureau of Elections, 107 W. 41st st. 
Bureau of St. Openings, 90 W. B'way. 
Bureau Licenses, 277 B'way. 
Bureau Penalties, 119 Nassau St. 
Bureau of Highways, 17 Park Row. 
Bureau of Sewers, 17 Park Row. 
Bureau of Buildings, 220 4th av. 
Charities, foot of E. 26th st. 
City Chamberlain, 27 Stewart Buildius- 
City Record, 2 City Hall. 
Civil Service, 125 Centre st. 
Comptroller, 280 B'way. 
Coroners, 125 Centre st. 
Correction, 148 B. 20th st. 
Corporation Counsel, Hall of Records. 
City Paymaster, 83 Chambers st. 
County Clerk, County Court House. 
Dept. of Bridges, 17 Park Row. 
Dept. of Water Supply, Gas and EIcc 

tricity, 17 Park Row. 
Dept. of Docks & Ferries, P. A, N. R. 
District Attorney, Centre and Franklin 
Estimate and Apportionment, Stewart 

Building. 
Excise, 1 Madison ave. ; Eagle Building, 

Brooklyn. 
Finance, 280 B'way. 
Fire, 157 E. 67th st. 
Hall of Records, Chamber and Centre. 

Health, 696 6th av., corner 55th st. 

Immigration, Com'r of, Ellis Island. 

Jurors, Commissioners of, 280 B'way. 

Mayor, 6 City Hall. 

Morgue, foot of E. 26th st. 

N. y. & N. J. Bridge Com'rs, 214 B'way. 

National Bank Examiner, 35 Nassau st. 

Park, .\rsenal, Central Park. 

Pilot Commissioners, 17 State st. 

Police, 300 Mulberry st. 

Port Warden, 1 Broadway. 

Public Administrator, liJ Nassau st. 

Public Service Commissioners, Tribune Bg 

Public Works, 17 Park Row. 

Quarantine Commissioners, 71 B'way. 

Register's Office, Hall of Records. 

Sheriff, 299 Broadway. 

Sinking Fund Com'r, Stewart Building. 

Steam Vessels Insp'rs, 17 Battery Pi. 

Street Cleaning, 17 Park Row. 

Surrogate, Hall of Records. 

Tax Commissioners, Hall of Records. 

Tenement House Commission, 61 Irving 
place. 

U. S. Life Saving Service, 17 State st. 

Weather Bureau, 100 Broadway. 

Weather i>ureau (City), Central Park. 



LOCATION OF PIERS IN 
NEW YORK 



NORTH RIVER 



A, 1 (1, 2, 3 old) 

Battery pi. 

4, 5, 6, 7 (old) 

Morris 

8, 9, 10 (old) 

Rector 

11 (old) Carlisle 

12, 13, 14 (old) 

Cedar 

13 (new), 16 

(old) Cortlandt 

14, Fulton 

15, Old Liberty 
15, 16, Barclay 

17, Park pi. 

18, Murray 

19, Warren 

20, Chambers 

21, Duane 

22, Jay 

23, Harrison 

24, Franklin 

25, N. Moore 

26, Beach 
-7, Hubert 

28, Laight 

29, 30. Vestry 
31, Watts 

42, (old) 32, 34 

Canal 
35, 36, Spring 



37, 


Charlton 


•is. 


King 


•i9. 


W. Houston 


40, 


Clarkson 


41, 


Leroy 


42, 


Morton 


43, 


Barrow 


44, 


Christopher 


45, 


46 and 47, 




W. 10th st 


48, 


W. 11th St. 


49, 


Bank 


50, 


Bethune 


51, 


Jane 


52, 


Gansevoort, 


Ft. 19, 20, 21 




22sts 


54, 


W. 24th St. 


55, 


W. 25th St. 


56. 


W. 26th St. 


1 , 


W. 27th St. 


.■j8. 


W. 28th St. 


59, 


W. 29th St. 


GO, 


W. 30th St. 


■>1, 


W. 31st St. 


l!2, 


W. 32d St. 


03, 


W. 33d St. 


64, 


W. 34th St. 


65, 


W- 35th St. 



67, W. 37th St. 



EAST RIVER 



3, Moore 

4, Broad 

7 (old), 5, 6, 7, 8 
Coenties Slip 
9, 10, 11, 13, Old 
SI. 
12 (old), Old Slip 
12, 15, 16. Wall 

17, Pine 

18, Maiden Lane 

19, Fletcher 

20, 21, Burling SI. 

22, Fulton 

23, Beekman 

24 (old), Peck SI. 

24, Roosevelt 

25, 26, Peck Slip 
27 (old), Dover 

27, Catharine 

28, Dover 

29 (old), Roose- 

velt 

29, Market 

30 (old), Roose- 

velt 

30, Pike 



31 (old), James SI. 

31, Pike 

32 (old), James 
SI. 

32, 33, Pike 

33, Oliver 

34 (old), Catha- 
rine 

34, Rutgers 

35, Catharine 

36 (old), Catha- 
rine 

36, Jeiierson 

45, Rutgers 

46, 47, Jefferson 
48, 49, Clinton 

50, Montgomery 

51, 52, Gouvern- 

eur 

53, Jackson 

54, Corlears 

55, Cherry 

56, 57, Broome 
58, 59, Delancev 
60, 61, Rivington 
62, Stanton 



M 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



"THREE TWINS" at Herald Square 



The adaptation from "Incog," a 
popular farce of some fifteen years 
ago, which IMr. Charles Dickson 
has given us in "Three Twins," will 
doubtless be seen and heard in this 
city for many months to come. It 
is capital comedy set to good 
music by Carl Hoschna, with lyrics 
by O. A. Hauerbach. 

The plot tells of the experiences 
of a young man whose father 
interferes with his matrimonial 
plans by sending him away from 
home, and who, in order to re- 
main near his sweetheart without 
discovery, disguises himself to 
look like a photograph he picks up 
by chance. This proves to be the 
likenesss of a man who has a twin 
brother in a sanitarium suffering 
with melancholia caused by the de- 
pressing influence of a wife too 
easily moved to tears. These 
three men look so much alike that 
the wife of one and the sweethearts 
of the other two are constantly 
mistaking each for the other. 

The funny situations are con- 
tinuous, and Joseph Allen as the 
testy father, and Clifton Crawford 
as the son in disguise, deserve es- 
pecial mention for their fine com- 
edy work. Clifton Crawford is the 
center of action most of the time 
and he has one excellent scene all 
to himself. There are two songs 
in the play that will soon be heard 
everywhere. One is "Cuddle up a 
Little Closer, Lovey Mine," intro- 
ducing the "seven ages of cuddling" 
in tableaux, and the other is "Yama 
Yama Man," in which Bessie 
McCoy makes a distinct hit with 
her singing and dancing. 

"Three Twins" is a very accept- 
able addition to our summer shows, 
and furnishes a very jolly evening 
of clean fun, good dancing and 
singing, and stage pictures that are 
charming enough to stamp them- 
selves upon one's memory; and 
then — how good it must sound to 
the authors and management^the 
audience as it files out sings quite 



clearly and with evident enjoy- 
ment, "Cuddle up a little closer'" 
and "Yama Yama Man" to the ac- 
companiment of the orchestra. 

Frank Thornton. 



EDEN MUSEE. 

Many important changes have 
taken place during the past few 
weeks at the Eden Musee. The 
interior has been decorated with 
palms and greens so as to give the 
efifect of a conservatory or sum- 
mer garden. One of the most in- 
teresting portions of the Musee is 
the American gallery. This con- 
tains subjects of United States 
history from the beginning of the 
Revolution to the present day. The 
figures in this gallery have been 
completely renovated and nearly 
all of them supplied with new cos- 
tumes. The re-arrangement as 
taken place shows the groups in 
artistic manner as well as in 
chronological order. Those rep- 
resenting American history have 
been made with much care and 
with a strict attention to detail. 
Among these are: "Settlement at 
Jamestown," "Pocohontas saving 
John Smith," "Spirit of '"/^T "Ad- 
miral Farragut at New Orleans," 
"Lincoln Freeing the Slaves," 
"Last Moments of John Brown," 
"Surrender of Lee." "Dewey at 
Manila,' and "Heroes of the 
American Army and Navy." With 
the approach of hot weather the 
Musee has installed a cooling ap- 
paratus througli the interior and 
no matter how warm the weather 
is there are always cooling and re- 
freshing breezes in the Musee. 
New moving pictures are received 
by every steamer and the entire 
new collection is placed on exhibi- 
tion each week. The new pictures 
are scenes of travel in foreign 
countries, interesting bits of 
scenery, quaint and picturesque 
happenings and customs of people 
in strange lands. 



IS 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flatiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave, 



*42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



*72d St. and Broadway 
79th St. and Broadwaj 
861th St. and Broadwaj 
91st St. and Broadwaj 

*96th St. and Broadwaj 

WEST SIDE BRANCF 
103d St. and Broadwa; 
110th St. and Broadwaj 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 



For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, 



Rheims, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

"SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

FTIRE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




^"^^r^-^UiiiiLjj^ 



SUBWAY STATIONS 



Coiyrieht, 1007. B. L. Clarke 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and Bioadway 
233d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 
Mott Ave. and 149th St. 



Third Ave. and 140th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

♦Express Stations 



Taxameter 



_CHeapest a>\d Best. 
Service xr%. Ne'w YorK 



-Telephone : 2380 Columbus 



Distance. 
Waiting. 



30c 
10c 



Only Three Extra Charges 

For each mile or fraction, to point ordered . . . 
Return charge, when dismissed North of 155th 

St., for each mile or fraction 

Trunk 

Couton Books at Reduced Rates 
CAB STANDS-Sherrys, Caf6 Martin, Hotel Astor, Hotel Belmont, Long Island R. R. 
Ft. East 34th Street. Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. West 23d Street 
NE.W YORK TRANSPORTATION CO., 4QtH SX. and 8th Ave. 



First half mile or fraction .... 

Each quarter mile thereafter 

Hansom, Coup^ or Victoria, 
each ten minutes (only 60 
cents per hour) 10c 

One to Five Passcnge 



20c 



20c 
20c 



17 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK 



Alexander, 118 West 49th. 

Babies', 135 East 55th. 

Bellevue, foot of East 26th. 

Beth Israel, Jefferson and Cherry. 

Central Islip State, Central Islip, L. I. 

Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 

City, Blackwell's Island. 

Columbus, 226 East 20th. 

Emergency for Women, 223 East 26th. 

Epileptic, Randall's Island. 

Fever, North Brother's Island. 

Flower, East 63d, cor. Ave. A. 

Fordham's Reception, Aqueduct ave. and 

St. James. 
French Benevolent Society, 450 W. 34th. 
Gen. Memorial, 2 West 106th. 
German, 77th, Lex'n and Fourth aves. 
Gouverneur, Gouvemeur slip and Front. 
Grace Church, 414 East 14th. 
Hahnemann, Park ave. and 67th. 
Harlem, 533 East 120th. 
Harlem Eye, Ear & Throat, 144 E. 127th. 
House of Relief, 67 Hudson. 
Incurables', Blackwell's Island. 
Infants', Blackwell's Island. 
Italian, 169 West Houston. 
Jewish for Deformities, 1917 Mad. ave. 
Jewish Maternity, 272 East Broadway. 
King's Park State, King's Park, L. I. 
Laura Franklin Free for Children, 17 

East 111th. 
Lebanon, Westchester & Cauldwell aves. 
Lincoln, 141st, cor. Concord ave. 
Long Island State, Brooklyn. 
Loomis Sanitarium for Consumptives, 

184 West 49th. 
Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat, 210 

East 64th. 
Manhattan Maternity, 327 East 60th. 
Manhattan State, Ward's Island ; Office, 

foot East 116th. 
Marine, Office, Foot Whitehall. 
Maternity of N. Y., Mothers' Home of 

the Sisters of Misericorde, 531 East 

86th. 

Merchants' Marine, 78 Broad. 
Metropolitan, Blackwell's Island. 
Metropolitan Disp. & Hosp., 248 E. 82d. 
Metropolitan Throat, 351 West 34th. 
Mintum for Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, 

foot of East 16th. 
Monteflore Home for Chronic Invalids, 

Broadway and West 138th. 
Mothers' and Babies', 596 Lexington ave. 
Mt. Moriah, 138 East 2d. 
Mt. Sinai, Madison ave. and 100th. 
Mulvey's Dog and Cat, 28 39 Broadway. 
New Amsterdam Eye & Ear, 230 W. 38tb,' 



New York, 7 West 15th and 97 Hudson. 
N. Y. Canine Infirmary, 118 West 53d. 
N. Y. Children's, Randall's Island. 
N. Y. Bye and Ear, 218 Second ave. 
N. Y. Foundling, 175 East 68th. 
N. Y. Homeopathic, 63d and Ave. A. 
N. Y. Lymph Sanitarium, 165 West 39th. 
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for 

Women, 19 West 101st. 
N. Y. Ophthalmic, 201 East 23d. 
N. Y. Orthopaedic, 126 East 59th. 
N.'Y. Polyclinic and School, 214 E. 34th. 
N. Y. Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
N. Y. Red Cross, 110 West 82d. 
N. Y. Sanitarium, 247 West 49th. 
N. Y. Skin and Cancer, 301 East 19th. 
N. Y. Throat, Nose & Lung, 229 E. 57th. 
N. Y. Veterinary, 117 W. 25th. 
Nursery and Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
Philanthropic, 2076 Fifth Ave. 
Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
Presbyterian, 41 East 70th. 
Rebeau Private, 156 West 74th. 
Red Cross, Central Park W. and 100th. 
Riverside, North Brother's Island. 
Riverside (Reception), foot of East 16th. 
Roosevelt, West 59th, near Ninth ave. 
Ruptured and Crippled, 135 East 42d. 
St. Andrew's Convalescent, 213 E. 17th. 
St. Ann's Maternity, 130 East 69th. 
St. Elizabeth's, 416 West 51st. 
St. Francis', 605 East 5th. 
St. Gregory, 93 Gold. 
St. John's Guild (office), 501 Fifth ave. 
St. Joseph's, East 143d and Brook ave. 
St. Lawrence, 163d & Edgecombe av. 
St. Luke's, Amsterdam ave. and 113th. 
St. Mark's, 117 Second ave. 
St. Mary's Free for Children, 405 West 

34th. 
St. Vincent's, 149 West 11th. 
Sanitarium for Hebrew Children (office), 

356 Second ave. 
Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, foot B. 16th 
Seton, Spuyten Duyvil. 
Sloane Maternity, W. 59th and Ams. ave. 
Society of the Lying-in, Second Ave. and 

17th. 
Sydenham, 339 East 116th. 
Trinity, 50 Varick. 
U. S. Marine (office), Battery. 
Washington Heights, 554 West 165th. 
Willard Parker, foot of East 16th. 
Woman's, 141 West 109th. 
Woman's Inflrmarv and Maternity Home, 

124 West 65th. 
Wright, J. Hood, Memorial, 503 W. 131st. 
Yorkville, 246 East 82d. 



i8 




New York Theatres 



stor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 
8.30; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

cademy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Gramercy. 
Closed. 

Ihambra — 7th ave.. 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Mat. daily, 2.15. Eve., 8.15. 
Prices, 2Sc to $1. 

merican — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 

elasco — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 4281 Bryant. Closed. 

ijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 
Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed. 

roadway — Broadway and 41st st. 
Tel., loi Bryant. Closed. 

asino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 



Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel. 
S138 Columbus. "The Merry-Go- 
Round." Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c to $1. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 

Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel. 
4457 Columbus. Vaudeville. Eve., 
8.15; mats, daily, 2.15. Prices 
25c to $1. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, see to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 2110 Madison. Closed. 



Exclusively "Home-Cooking" and Dainty Service! 
Breakfast, Luncheon "7/ —Ar>^ 14 West 33d Street 



and Afternoon Tea at 






The Table d'Hote Dinners will be discontinued until September 8th, 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. m. during July and August 

Orders for FresH Cut Flcwvers promptly filled 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



1 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Nevvburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill. 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

THE PERFECT DAY EXCURSION 

out of New York is via the morning boat to West Point, Newburgh or 
Poughkeepsie, returning on the afternoon boat. See time-table, page 27. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45 
West 42d Street, 2.00 ; W^est 129th Street, 2.20 



IVEAV YORK THEATRES — Continued 



Garrick — 35th St., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 3Si-38th. Closed. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 

Hackett — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Closed. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices. 25c 
to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad 
way. Tel., 248s-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 



Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th st "Follies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c to $150. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. Geo. M. 
Cohan in "The Yankee Prince." 
Eve., 8.30; mat.. Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50c to $2. 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. Closed. 



II 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 




The Wine 

of the Convalescent 

By those who know Is considered 
a tonic and is the condensed 
sunshine of the famous Keuka 
Valley — the most beautiful and 
fiealthful spot on the earth. 

Sold at all dealers 

PLEASANT VALLEY 
W^INE COMPANY 

RHEIMS, N. Y. 



JVEAV YOUK THEATRES — Continued 



Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. Edna 
May and Cecil Spooner in "Our 
Cinderella." Eve., 815; mats., 
Mon., Tues., Thur. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 25c to $1. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Wolf." 
Eve., 8.20; mat?.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.20. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., S46 Bryant. Closed. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 

Madison ave. and 26th st. 
"Ski-Hi." Eve., 8.30. Prices, 
50C to $1.50. 

Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 



New Amsterdam — 42d St., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow." Eve., 8.15; 
mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50C to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Richard 
Carle in "Mary's Lamb." Eve., 
8.30; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 
Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 535i-38th. The Henry Miller 
Associate Players in "The Ser 
vant in the House." Eve., 8.20; 
mats., Thur. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices. 50c to $2. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Closed. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 



-Foot of Liberty 
Telephone 5860 



Baltimore and Ohio- 
and 23d Streets. 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — ^Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O. & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria— From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpoint Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa^onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonla 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island— Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., I'ulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivington, 1st, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th, 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 2.3d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Pohit 
Ferry), 42d (change for Grand Central 
Depot). 47th, 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park pi.. Chambers, 
Franklin. Grand. Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th. 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, Slst, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145th, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CLUBS AND THE BALLOT 



It begins to look as if club life 
and club organization has been 
merely the preparatory school for 
the ballot for women. The mean- 
ing of it all has been rather a care- 
fully guarded secret, and women 
who wouldn't have considered the 
ballot under any consideration 
have been steadily growing to the 
larger comprehension of things. 
Many of us are not imaginative 
and when we have been told that 
the baby would cry when we left 
it long enough to go to the polls, 
we believed it; even when 
we had no baby we felt ap- 
prehensive about the neglect of 
some other woman's baby. But wc 
could go to the club and leave the 
baby. It has taken about sixty 
years to climb over the baby bar- 
rier as an argument. The moun- 
tain of conservatism still remains 
to be scaled, but we are making it 
by easy stages, resting at every 
"thank-you-mum" in the ascent, 
and pulling the unwilling travellers 
along with us. The better and 
higher the vantage point the 
greater the view. The word 
"male" still sticks in the constitu- 
tion,' but in spite of it, we did get 
police matrons after about a 
twenty-five years war; and we did 
get women in as factory inspectors, 
and now and then a woman as 
school commissioner; and in some 
states women march up to the 
polls like little men and put in 
their ticket without contaminating 
them a mite. 

The East has heard rumors 
about some states in the West, 
somewhere beyond the setting sun 
and Niagara Falls where the 
women vote for everything just as 
the men do. It's difficult to imag- 
ine this, and there are so many un- 
reliable rumors one can't believe 
everything one hears. Besides — 
in the West things are so different. 
Father Knickerbocker will bear me 
out any day in the statement that 
the West is not at all like the East; 
in the West it is called the effete 



East. Anyone having half an eye 
and a dictionary at hand can find 
out about effete — synonymous with 
unproductive, unfruitful, unprolific, 
spent and worn-out. Still the East 
is not stirred by the implication. 

As I was saying — the desire for 
the ballot for the gentle sex must 
be a development. The Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs which met 
last week in Boston numbers more 
than a million members. There is 
no denying the significance of this 
enrollment of names. Wait till 
there comes a time for action, and 
then see. Already the mothers ot 
a nation are interfering in child 
labor legislation, in forestry, in city 
housekeeping and many other af- 
fairs of a municipal and eelymosyn 
ary nature; they are taking lessons 
in responsibility and citizenship, 
and advancing as fast as con- 
servatism will permit. The path- 
finders have emblazed the way, and 
it is a mere matter of time before 
the ballot in my lady's hand will 
be recognized as an expedient, and 
lo, the word male will fade from 
the constitution, and there will be 
no more any fight about the ballot, 
and the only wonder about it will 
be that she didn't have it long 
before. 

Those who are in a position to 
know, state that the opposition to 
suftrage for women does not come 
from the men nearly so much as 
was long popularly supposed to be 
the case. It is good to have this 
matter cleared up and the blame 
placed where it belongs. Many of 
the anti-suffrage women are good 
club women, and would no more 
discuss the question of the ballot 
than they would religion. Club 
life surely leads toward qualified 
citizenship. 

Haryot Holt Dey. 



The sun does not stay to be im- 
plored to impart his light and heat. 
From his example do all the good 
thou canst, without staying till it 
be asked to thee. — Epictetus. 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



"SEEING NEW YORK" on a Steam Yacht 



Why do the denizens of New 
York fail to take advantage of 
many of the delightful ways of 
spending a few hours that are so 
eagerly sought for and enjoyed by 
our visitors? Is it that -we become 
indifferent to blessings that are 
always within reach, or is it possi- 
ble that we do not realize the 
beauty that surrounds this humid, 
teeming Island, and the cool and 
quiet that may so easily be attained 
if we but choose to seek the water 
diversions afforded by its unsur- 
passed location. 

The "Seeing New York Steam 
Yacht" brings within the small 
means of the many a most enjoy- 
able and interesting trip around the 
Island of Manhattan, and in three 
hours opens up to the eyes of the 



excursioner a comprehensive view 
of this marvelous city. In no 
other way can one so quickly be- 
come acquainted with its chief in- 
dustries and see the wonderful sky- 
line — over which foreign artists 
rave — caused by the enormous 
height of many of its buildings. 
Every resident of New York who 
takes an outing on this public 
"Seeing New York Yacht" is re- 
warded by a more intimate knowl- 
edge of the city and its history, 
and a deeper appreciation of the 
superiority of its situation and the 
wealth it represents. 

Those desiring to avoid a crowd 
should take the morning excursion 
which leaves the foot of West 226. 
St. at ten o'clock and completes the 
circuit shortly before one o'clock 
noon. Frank Thornton. 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 

Large Jars, $1.00 
Smaller Jan, 50 Cents 



^ Poasciscd of rare qualitiea and many valuable propertiei 
not generally found among toilet article!, beiidei it( unique 
effect ai a firtt-class 

SKIN FOOD 

used in massage for producing and preserving a fine, healthy 
complexion, places this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients second to none in either Europe or America. 



M. B. De MEDICI 



124W.21atSt.,NewTork 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



SAILS 
1908 



PORT 



NAME OP 
ITIAMBR 



ADDRESSES OF LINES 



STARTING PLACI 



June .SO . Hamburg 

" 30. Bremen. 

July 1 . Rotterdam 

1 .Liverpool 

I.Southampton.. 

2. Havre 

2.Gib'r& Naples. 

2. Hamburg 

2. Liverpool 

3. Gib'r& Naples. 

4. Routiiampton. . 
4.Giiyr& Naples. 

4. Hamburg 

4. Liverpool 

4. London 

4. Antwerp 

4. Glasgow 

T.Bremen 

S.Southampton.. 

S.Liverpool 

S.Rotterdam 

O.Copenhagen. . . 

9. Bremen 

9 . Hamburg 

9. Liverpool 

9 . Havre 



. Hamburg. . . . 

Kaiser 

Rotterdam. . . 
.Campania. . . . 

.Oceanic 

.Lorraine 

.Pannonia. . . . 

. Amerika 

.Celtic 

.Romanic 

.St. Paul.. . . . 

.K. Luise 

. Pretoria 

.Etruria 

.Minneapolis.. 

Finland 

.Columbia. . . . 

Cecille 

Teutonic 

.Lucania 

.N. Amsterdam 
.United States. 

Luctzow 

. Moltke 

.Baltic 

.Touraine 



Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 
N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

Holland-Amer., 39 B'wav 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

French Line, 19 State St 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 
Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

American Line, 9 B'way 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 
Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 
Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 
Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 

Red Star Line. 9 B'way 

Anchor Line, 17 B'way 

N. German Llovd, 5 B'wav. . . . 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

Holland-Amer., 39 B'way 

Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way. 
N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 
Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

French Line, 19 State St.*. . . . 



Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 5th St., Hobok.n 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 

Ft Morton St., N. R. 
.Ft Jane St.. N. R. 

Ft 1st St.. Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St.. N. R. 
.Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
. Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft Houston St., N. R. 

Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft 24th St., N. R. 
.Ft 8d St., Hoboken • 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft 5th St., Hoboken 

Ft 17th St.. Hoboken 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

Ft 11th St.. N. R. 

Ft Morton St., N. R. 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



DID YOU KNOW IN THE YEAR 



1841 — That the "Princeton," a ship- 
of-war, was constructed by John 
Ericsson. This was the first ship 
in which the propelling machin- 
ery was placed under water, and 
thus secure from shot. 

1842 — That the Abolitionists held a 
State Convention, declared a sep- 
arate nomination, and ran a can- 
didate for the office of Mayor in 
New York; that on June 27 water 
was received into the reservoir at 
86th St. through the aqueduct, 
and on July 4 it was also received 
into the distributing reservoir on 
Murray Hill. 

1843 — That a patent was granted to 
a resident of the city for a sew- 
ing machine that made a lasting 
stitch; that a submarine tele- 
graph connected New York with 
Fire Island, also Coney Island. 

1844 — That in consequence of fam- 
ine and political disturbances an 
enormous number of immigrants 
arrived from Ireland and other 
European countries. 

1845 — That a large amount of prop- 
erty was destroj^ed by a most 
disastrous fire. 

1847 — That the Board of Education 
took action to establish a Free 
Academy. This was the first in- 
stitution maintained at the public 
expense by whicli the pupils of 
the city schools could secure the 
advantage of the higher depart- 
ments of learning without cost. 
That the first successful type re- 
volving press was made by a res- 
ident of New York City. 

1848 — That there was inaugurated 
the first electric telegraph ser- 
vice. 

1849 — That the New York Press 
Association was formed; that the 
"Astor Place Riot" took place; 
that there was much excitement 
in regard to the phenomenon of 
spirit-rapping. 

1850 — That Jenny Lind was intro- 
duced to a large audience by P. 
T. Barnum; that the American 
Bible Union was organized; that 
in search of Franklin, an Arctic 
expedition sailed from this city. 



1851— That the "New York Times" 
was first published; that the 
Hungarian patriot, Kossuth, vis- 
ited New York and was received 
with enthusiastic demonstrations. 

1853 — That the New York Clearing 
House was organized by fifty- 
two of our city banks; that in the 
Crystal Palace was held an In- 
ternational World's Fair. 

1854 — That the Astor Library was 
opened to the public. 

1855 — That commissioners appoint- 
ed by the Supreme Court, after 
giving due consideration, select- 
ed the ground for Central Park; 
that Castle Garden was the re- 
ceiving department for emi- 
grants. 

1857 — That an unsuccessful attempt 
to lay the Atlantic Cable was 
made, the wire parting when less 
than four hundred miles out. 

1858 — That a public celebration 
announced the successful laying 
of the Atlantic Cable; that the 
Crystal Palace was burned; that 
Adelina Patti, then in her seven- 
teenth year, was heard for the 
first time in public. 

i860 — That the Prince of Wales 
was welcomed to New York with 
elaborate demonstrations; that in 
this year the Japanese visited the 
city; that it was first suggested 
of the value of an underground 
railway; that South Carolina se- 
ceded. 

1861 — That Central Park was 
opened to the public; that after 
the attack upon Fort Sumter, the 
banks having loaned large sums 
of money to the Government, 
suspended specie payments. 

1863— That in the Ninth District a 
draft in progress caused a riot 
among foreign laborers, who at- 
tacked the recruiting office, de- 
stroyed the wheel and lists and 
set the building on fire. As the 
militia had been sent to Phila- 
delphia to resist a Confederate 
invasion, the police were with- 
out assistance to suppress the 
riot for some days. Much prop- 
erty was destroyed and a large 
number killed. 



25 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TRIPS TO FORTS AND ISLANDS 



Passes for all Government Boats 
are issued by the Quarterviaster's 
Department, No. 39 Whitehall st., 
except those for the steamer Ord- 
nance, which are issued at Sandy 
Hook. Passes may also be obtained 
on application at the entrance to 
Forts. 

Bedloe's Island, S'tatue of Liberty — 
Boats from Battery (Barge Of- 
fice) hourly from o a. m. to 4 
p. m. No pass required. 
Ellis Island, U. S. Immigrant Sta- 
tion — Before being permitted to 
enter the country all immigrants 
arriving at this port are landed 
on Ellis Island, where they are 
carefully examined as to moral, 
mental and physical condition. 
Many thousands are handled in a 
single day, the process being 
most interesting and instructive. 
Visitors are permitted to visit ail 
parts of the building, and can in- 
spect the operation of the system 
for excluding undesirable aliens, 
and caring for and forwarding 
those who are admitted. Boats 
from Battery (Barge Office) 
hourly from 10 a. m. to 2 p. m. 
No pass required. 
Governor's Island — Part of the old 
fortifications of New York Har- 
bor, now headquarters of the At- 
lantic Division, U. S. A. Con- 
tains Fort Jay, Castle William, 
and various army buildings. It 
has an interesting collection of 
obsolete ordnance, showing for- 
mer makes and experiments in 
guns. Boats from Battery 
(Barge Office), half hourly. 
Apply for pass, address. Ft. Jay, 
N. Y. 
Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn — On east- 
ern side of the Narrows, at the 
entrance to the Upper Bay. Has 
many heavy modern guns, com- 
manding harbor approaches. 
Government boat from foot Wall 
St. Varying hours. Apply for 
pass. May also be reached from 
Brooklyn Bridge, 5th ave., and 
Bay Ridge L line, 3d and 5th 
ave. surface lines, from Park 
Row. 



Fort Hancock, Sandy Hook — 

Southern entrance to Lower New 
York Bay, commanding main 
ship channel. One of the most 
extensive and formidable de- 
fences upon the Atlantic Coast. 
Boat foot Wall st. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. Ap- 
ply for pass. 

Fort Jay, Governor's Island — See 
Governor's Island. 

Fort Schuyler, Throgg's Neck — iOn 
the northern side of entrance to 
Long Island Sound. Protects 
eastern approach to city. Boat 
foot Wall St., Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days and Saturdays. Apply for 
pass. May also be reached, 3d 
ave. L or Subway to 177th st, 
then by 177th st. crosstown trol- 
ley to entrance. 

Fort Slocum, David's Island — Com- 
manding entrance to Long Isl- 
and Sound. Boat foot Wall St., 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur- 
days. Apply for pass. May also 
be reached N. Y., N. H. & H. R. 
R., to New Rochelle, then by 
ferry to David's Island. 

Fort Totten, L. I.— On Willet's 
Point, entrance to Long Island 
Sound, 2^^ miles from White- 
stone, L. I. Boat foot Wall st., 
Tuesdays; Thursdays and Satur- 
days. Apply for pass. May also 
be reached, Long Island R. R. 
from East 34th st. to Whitestone, 
L. I., then by trolley. 

Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island — 
On western side of the Narrows, 
commanding all channels in 
Lower Bay. Boat foot Wall st. 
Apply for pass. May also be 
reached, boat from South Ferry 
to St. George, S. I., then trolley 
to Fort Wadsworth. 

Fort Wood — An obsolete fortifica- 
tion on Bedloe's Island, now sur- 
rounding the base of Statue of 
Liberty. (See Bedloe's Island.) 

Sandy Hook — Steamer Ordnance, 
from foot Wall st. daily, 9 a. m., 
returning, leave Sandy Hook 
4.30 p.m. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY TO REACH 



American League Park — 167th st. 
and Broadway; Subway, Broad- 
way Division, to i68th st.; 3d, 6th 
or gth ave. "L" to 125th st., 
thence Fort George trolley to 
167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 3d 
or 6th and Amsterdam ave. lines 
to 167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 
6th or 9th ave. "L" to 145th st. 
and Eighth ave., thence via 
Kingsbridge line to 167th st. and 
Broadway. 

Battery — This is the terminal of all 
elevated roads: 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 8th 
ave. and Broadway surface cars. 

Bronx Park— The Harlem R. R. 
from Grand Central Depot (42d 
St.) to Bedford Park Station. 
Or Third ave. "L" to Park. Or 
Subway to i8oth st. 

Celtic Park, Laurel Hill, L. I. City 

— Ferry foot 34th st., E. R., to 
L. I. City. 

Central Park — Surface cars: 
Fourth (Madison) Sixth, Eighth 
aves. Sixth ave. "L" to 58th st. 
Fifth ave. stages. Park coaches 
and electric wagonettes make 
the circuit of Central Park and 
afiford a most convenient means 
of viewing the principal points of 
interest within the Park. Fare. 
25 and 50 cents. Stop-over 
tickets are issued at various 
points, good for the remainder 
of the trip any time the same 
day. Coaches start from main 
entrance of Central Park, Fifth 
ave. and 59th St., every 15 min- 
utes. Gates or entrances to the 
Park: Fifth ave.: 59th, 64th, 
67th, 72d, 79th, 85th, 90th, 96th, 
I02d, iioth sts. ; Sixth ave.. Sgth 
and iioth sts. Seventh ave.: 50th 
and Iioth sts. Eighth ave. (Cen- 
tral Park West): 59th, 72d, 79th, 
85th, 96th, looth, 105th and iioth 
sts. 

Columbia College — Subway to 
ii6th St. Sixth ave. "L" to 104th 
St., walk one block west. Am- 
sterdam ave. car. 



Columbia Oval, Williamsbridge — 

Harlem Division of N. Y. C. & 
H. R. R. to Williamsbridge; 10 
minutes' walk west; Mt. Vernon 
line, 128th St. and 3d ave. to Gun- 
hill road, 5 minutes' walk west. 

Crescent Athletic Club — Shore 
road, 83d to 85th sts., Brooklyn. 
From Brooklyn Bridge, 3d ave. 
line to 83d St., or 5th ave. line, 
connecting at 65th st. with 3d 
ave. line. 

Grand Central Station — Thiid ave. 
"L" and 42d st. branch direct to 
Station. Sixth ave. "L." Or sur- 
face line to 42d st. 

Grant's Tomb — Subway to Man- 
hattan St. Sixth or Ninth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west two 
blocks. Boulevard car to irgth 

St. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 

steamers "Hendrlck Hudson" and "New York" 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



1908 



North Bound. A.m. South Bound. A.M. 



Br'klyn. byAnnex 8.00 
New York: 
Desbrosses St. .8.40 

West42d St 9.00 

West 129th St. ..9.20 

Yonkers 9.45 

West Point 11.50 

P.M. 

Newburgh 12.25 

Poughkeepsie ...1.15 
Kingston Point ..2.10 

Catskill 3.25 

Hudson 3.40 

Albany. 
Hamilton St.... 6. 10 



Albany, 

Hamilton St 8.30 

Hudson 10.40 

Catskill 11.00 

P.M. 
Kingston Point .12.25 
Poughkeepsie ...1.20 

Newburgh 2.15 

West Point ......2.50 

Yonkers 4.30 

New York : 
West 129th St... 5. 10 
West 42nd St. ..5.30 
Desbrosses St. .6 . 00 
Br'klyn, byAnnex 6.20 



SanrtoRa Sppcial Trains to and from Albany Wharf. 
Special Trains on Catskill and Kingston i:*oint 
wharfs for all points in Catskill Mountains. 

— Morning and Afternoon Concerts — 

ANNOUNCEMENT -" Mary Powell " (King- 
ston boat) leaves Desbrosses St., 1:45 P. M.; 
W. 42d St.. 2:00P. M. ; W. 129th St., 2 ;20 P. M. 
On June 29 the Day Line Steamer "Albany" 
will resume the Special Service to Poughkeep- 
sie and return, leaving New York landings one 
hour later than the regular morning boat ; mak- 
ing a trifle sei-'ice to Poughkeepsie and inter- 
mediate landings. This will enable "MaryPow- 
ell" passengers to connect at West Point with 
the Steamer "Albany," making a Delightful 
Afternoon and Evening Excursion. See Time 
Tables. Steamer " Hendrick Hudson " (New) 
in commission. 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY TO REACH-Continued 



Highbridge — Sixth ave. "L" to 
125th St. and change to Fort 
George surface car. 

McComb's Dam Park Athletic 
Field, northern end of McComb's 
Dam Park, Bronx — Sixth or 9th 
ave. "L" to 155th st., across Via- 
duct to Park at 161 st St.; 8th ave. 
line to Central Bridge at 155th 
St., across Viaduct to Park at 
i6ist St.; 2d or 3d ave. L to i6ist 
St. and 3d ave.; i6ist st. cross- 
town line to Jerome ave. 

Morningside Heights — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west one 
block and take Amsterdam ave. 
car. 

New York Athletic Club, Grounds 
at Travers Island, Pelham 
Manor, N. Y.; clubhouse. No. 58 
West 59th St. — Grounds: Harlem 
Division of N. Y., N. H. & H. R. 
R. from 131st st. and Willis ave. 
Shuttle train from "L" station at 
129th St. and 2d or 3d aves., to 
Pelham Manor; 10 minutes' walk 
or bus to grounds. Mt. Ver- 
non line from 128th st. and 3d 
ave. to Mt. Vernon; transfer to 
Pelham Manor trolley to N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R. R. station in 
Pelham Manor; then bus or 10 
minutes' walk to grounds. 

Polo Grounds — 157th st. and 
Eighth ave.; 6th or 9th ave. "L" 
to 155th St. and 8th ave.; 2d or 
3d ave. "L" to 125th st., cross- 
town trolley to 125th st. and 8th 
ave. thence to Eighth ave. 
trolley to 157th st. and 8th 
ave.; 8th ave. line to 157th St.; 
2d, 3d, Lexington, Madison or 
Lenox ave. lines to 125th st., 
thence to crosstown trolley to 
8th ave. line, north to 157th si. 
and 8th ave. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Ouly All Water Koute to 

CONEY ISIvi\NI> 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 

World. 

TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — ^Lcave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, *10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
*12.55. *1.40, 2.55, 3.40, 4.25, »5.25, 
6.10, 7.10, *7.55, *8.40, *9.25, *10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a * go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 



Speedway — Sixth ave. "L" to 125th 
St., thence Fort George surface 
car. 

Van Cortlandt Park — Sixth or 
Ninth ave. "L" to 155th st.; 
thence N. Y. & Putnam R. R. 
from Grand Central Station (42d 
St.). Subway to Kingsbridge, 
then surface car. 

Washington Bridge — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 125th St. and change to 
Fort George surface car; also by 
Subwr- to i8ist st. station. 



The heart of Abraham I^incoln 
was as large as the world, but he 
had no room in it to hold the 
memory of a wrong. — Emerson. 



FOWLER & WELLS COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1835 



PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, EST. 1838 10c. , $1.00 per YEAR 

24 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE CHURCH OF THE TRANSFIGURATION 



East 29th St., between Madison 
and Fifth aves., the Rev. George 
Clarke Houghton, D.D., rector, 
was organized in 1848 and the 
church was built in 1850, the first 
church of its name in the world. 
The building is now five times the 
size of the little church of those 
days. In the draft riots of the 
Civil War in 1864 a very large 
number of colored people were 
driven from their tenements and 
would have been killed had they 
not found refuge in the church and 
the rector stood guard over therii 
and single-handed kept the mob 
away until the soldiers dispersed 
the rioters. In 1870 George Hol- 
land, one of the most prominent 
actors of his day, died, and when 
Joe Jefferson applied to a small 
church on Madison ave. for Hol- 
land's burial the rector of that 
church refused to perform the rites 
because Holland was an actor, and 
told Joe Jefferson that there wai 
"a little church around the corner 
where it migl)t be done." referring 
to this Church of the Transfigura- 
tion, which seats 1,200 people. Jef- 
ferson's prompt reply was: "God 
bless the little church around the 
corner," and that name has clung 
with afifection to this church ever 
since. Thousands of actors, and 
others among the most prominent 
people of this city and State have 
been married and buried from the 
church. The church is open every 
day in the year from 6 a. m. to 
6 p. m., and between three and five 
hundred visitors go to see the 
church every day. There is a 
visitor's book for names in the 
vestibule, and among the thirty 
thousand persons who have signed 
that register during the past six or 
seven years are Princes and Dukes 
and other members of royal fami- 
lies of Europe and the most noted 
people of this and foreign coun- 
tries. There is a very beautiful 
Lady Chapel with superb glass 
windows and a magnificent Marble 
Altar, and beautiful oil paintings 



adorn the ceiling. The Holy Sac- 
rament is kept in the Chapel with a 
sanctuary lamp always burning in 
front of it, and hundreds of people 
kneel there every day to say then- 
prayers. The most beautiful mor- 
tuary chapel in America, and per- 
haps in Europe, is just completed, 
and here the bodies of not only 
members of this parish, but of any 
creed are brought and remain to 
the day of their burial, if their 
families have no home or other 
suitable place to take them to, and 
there is no charge or fee for this 
or for any ministration of the 
rector or clergy. A very large 
number of persons are baptized in 
this church, but the rector won't 
marry any one whose parents or 
guardians are not with them or 
give their consent to the wedding. 
The rector has refused as many as 
one hundred couples a month, and 
for that reason it is considered a 
great honor to be married in this 
church, and persons of great 
prominence in this country come 
here for the sacraments, as well as 
the humblest people. There are 
about 2,000 communicants, and the 
church is filled every Sunday, sum- 
mer and winter. There is a large 
vested choir of men and boys, and 
seven services are held every Sun- 
day and four services every week 
day in the year. Many persons 
say that they have the best music 
in New York. Dr. Houghton is 
the rector and never takes a vaca- 
tion all the year round. The 
church is full of beautiful memor- 
ials and the verger will explain 
them all to visitors, and no fee 
is charged for his services. This 
"Lychgate" at the entrance, is one 
of the very few to be found in 
America, and here the bodies of 
the dead, brought to the church for 
burial, rest for a moment for a 
prayer before being taken into the 
church for the last rites. 



Women of spirit are not to be 
won by mourners. — Steele. 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF 

Aldrich Court — 41 Broadway. This 
formed the site of the first hab- 
itation of white men on Manhat- 
tan Island; was also the site of 
the second residence of Washing- 
ton. Tablet: "This tablet marks 
the site of the first habitation of 
white men on the Island of Man- 
hattan. Adrian Block, Command- 
er of the Tiger, erected here four 
houses or huts, November, 1613. 
He built the Restless, the first 
vessel made by Europeans in this 
country. The Restless was 
launched in the spring of 1614. 
This tablet is placed here by the 
Holland Society of New York, 
September, 1890." 

Boreel Building — 115 B'way. This 
site was formerly occupied by the 
residence of Lieutenant-Governor 
James DeLancey; after his death 
it was turned into a public house, 
known under a number of names, 
the most famous being "Burns' 
Cofifee House." It was here the 
non-importation act was signed, 
also Washington's inaugural ball 
was held in the so-called "great 
room." During the year 1793 the 
building was torn down and a 
"City Hotel" was erected by a 
number of New York merchants. 
Tablet: "The site of the old his- 
torical DeLancey House, after- 
ward the 'City Hotel.' The tav- 
ern located here had various pro- 
prietors, by whose names it was 
successively called, being, among 
others, known as 'The Province 
Arms,' 'The City Arms,* and 
'Burns' Cofifee House or Tavern.' 
It was here that the celebrated 
non-importation agreement in op- 
position to the 'Stamp Act' was 
signed October 31, 1765. Erected 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, March, 1890." 

Church of the Messiah — Park ave. 
and 34th St. This site once 
formed the estate of Robert Mur- 
ray, the "Quaker Merchant of the 
Revolution," and was called "In- 
clenberg," and became historic 
through the diplomacy of Mrs. 
Murray in detaining the British 
officers, Clinton, Howe and Corn- 



INTEREST 

wallis, while Putnam and his 
troops, on their retreat to Har- 
lem, guided by Aaron Burr, 
passed within a mile of the house. 

Fort Amsterdam — This site is now 
occupied by the new Custom 
House Building, and another por- 
tion occupied by the Cunard 
Building, 29 Broadway. Tablet: 
"The site of Fort Amsterdam, 
built in 1626. Within the fortifi- 
cations was erected the first sub- 
stantial church edifice on the 
Island of Manhattan. In 1787 the 
fort was demolished and the Gov- 
ernment House built upon this 
site. This tablet is placed here 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, September, 1890." 

Mercantile Library — Astor Place. 
Founded in 1820. This is the 
principal circulating library in the 
city; was first located at 49 Ful- 
ton street and afterward moved 
to Clinton Hall, corner Nassau 
and Beekman streets, where it 
remained until transferred to the 
Astor Place Opera House, which 
was renamed the new Clinton 
Hall. This building was demol- 
ished in 1890, and the present 
building erected on its site. 

New York Historical Society — Sec- 
ond ave. and nth st. This build- 
ing contains a large and valuable 
collection of historical curiosities. 
The society was organized in 1804 
for the collection and preserva- 
tion of everything relating to the 
natural, civil and ecclesiastical 
history of the United States in 
general and New York in particular. 

Windsor Arcade — 571 Fifth ave. 
This was the site of the Windsor 
Hotel which was destroyed by 
fire March 17, 1899, at which 
about fifty lives were lost. 

West Washington Market — Located 
at the foot of West 12th st., but 
was formerly extending along 
West St., on the river side to the 
market. It is here that all early 
fruits and vegetables from Ber- 
muda Islands are received, and 
it has been estimated that during 
the peach season from 50,000 to 
100,000 baskets are received daily. 



30 



MENNENS 

TOILET 
POWDER 

htbo/ 



Borated 
Talcum 






"The Month '^|5f44i:* 
of Roses" 

calls for special complexion safeguards, to insure ^|^^ 
a summer of perfect skin condition and comfort. W 

The daily habit of using 

Mennen's S^n? Toilet Powder 

after bathing, keeps the skin smooth and healthy, prevents Prickly Heat, 
Chafing and Sunburn, insuring the much coveted "browning" without 
burning. After shaving it is delightful ; in the nursery indispensable. 

For your protection the genuine is put up in non-refillable boxes — 
the "Box that Lox," with Mennen's face on top. Guaranteed under the 
Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906. Serial No. 1542. Sold everywhere, 
or by mail 25 cents. Sample Free. 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., NEWARK, N. J. 

Try Mennen's Violet (Borated) Talcum Toilet Powder — 
it has the scent of fresh-cut Parma Violets. Sample Free. 

MENNEN'S SEN YANG TOILET POWDER, Oriental odor I ^^ „„„]„„ 

MENNEN'S BORATED SKIN SOAP (blue wrapper) (No samples 

Specially prepared for the nursery 

1 Sent Free, for 2 cent stamp to pay postage, one set Mennen's Bridge Whist Tallies, 
I enough for six tables. 



JUW /ii7 !5f0 



Is This Your Opportunity 
or His? 



m 



AT E RF R O N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufficient water for ocean-going vessels, 

j\ nd within 1 5 miles of the Battery, on 

X he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 

Ji/ very facility for manufacturing 

Xv. ight at hand. Water under pressure, 

J? reight carried by three railroads. 

Xvare opportunity: 150 acres 

kJ f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

XN o difficult}^ in building : solid ground for 
^ ^^ foundations. 

X he only large piece of waterfront propert}' 
available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 



3Bailj> Attractions 



m 



i^eto |?arfe 




Cofitieht iQob. B. L. Clarke 



Taxameter Rates Reduced 

For lowest rate and best service 'plione 



•2 :$ 8 o 



COLUMBUS 

See pav;e lo r'oi the new taritt card 
NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO.. 49lh Street and Eighth Avenue 



k/OL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

pyiight, IQOS, by Daily Attractions in New York, Inc. 



NO. 119 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTEL 


Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON, Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just oflf Broadway 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 

The Ansonia 

Broadway, 73d and 74th Streets 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES, Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 


The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 

Hotel Manhattan 

Madison Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Aldine 

\V. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON, Mir. 
18-20 West 25th Street 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman'i Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Garden 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE. Mur. 
81st Street and Columbus Avenue 


The Plaza 

FRED STERRY, Mgr. 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop. 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A BARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 


Hotel Gotham 

Fifth Avenue and 55th Street 


Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK, M|r. 
15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. J 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEF.. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hotel Savoy 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


Hoffman House 

Broadway and 25th Street 


Hotel St. Regis 

Fifth Avenue and 55th Street 


The Holland 

66 and 68 West 46th Street 
Mrs. WM. H. WHITE. Prop. 
"Apartments " 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY, Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East 







m MEW YORK 

cA Weekly SMtigABine Tevoted to o^vunce Infommtion. 



lUBRARY ot CONGR 
I wo CoDiM Hecwv 

6 WC 

j^nt tntu 



Vol. X 



JULY 6th to JULY 1 2th, 1908 



No. 1 19 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 
I Madiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractioni circulates through all the 

leading Hotels in New York City 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 
Rye Cent! a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Adrertiilng ratei based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 
Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

"A Glorious Day" (Frank Thornton) 11 

Appelate Court House 27 

Churches 12-13 

Clubs 18 

Elevated Railroads 1 + 

Ferries 1 + 

Hospitals 2+ 

Hotels 2 

Hudson River Day Line 21-26 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 15 

Latest Popular Fiction 28 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Naminc of New York Streets 25-26 

Ocean Going Steamers 28 

Points of Interest 29-30 

Public Libraries 22 

Pullman Accommodations 14 

Railroad Stations 14 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 23 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter Information 10 

Theaters 19-21 

" The Silent Woman " (Haryot Holt Dey) 4 

This Week in New York 5-9 

Trolley Trips 15 



ART NOTES 

Lenox Library — 71st st. and Fifth 
ave. Exhibition of interesting 
Japanese color prints in the form 
of albums and ilhistrated books. 
Many of these contain little mas- 
terpieces of line, color and print- 
ing; this gives an unusual oppor- 
tunity to study this fine and 
representative series. The Co- 
lonna Collection of 268 albums 
has been loaned to the New 
York Public Library and may be 
seen in the Print Room of this 
Library Building. This note- 
worthy collection includes rare 
series, such as, Harunobu's "Mar- 
riage Set"; Shigemassa and 
Shunsho's "Celebrated Beauties"; 
Korin's, "Gusshiki"; and Heku 
sai's "Shashin"; as well as some 
large early two-color prints (beni- 
ye) of special value. There is al- 
so on exhibition a collection of 
lithographs by Honore Daumier. 
the famous French caricaturist of 
"Charivari." 



The Fludson River Day Line has 
placed its popular Steamer AL- 
BANY on the special Poughkeep- 
sie service- inaugurated last year. 
This boat leaves the New York 
piers of the Line one hour after the 
regular morning through boat, 
making the customary stops, in- 
cluding Cornwall, as far as Pough- 
keepsie. She is due to remain one 
hour and thirty-five minutes at 
Poughkeepsie, giving ample time to 
visit Vassar College and other 
points of attraction. This addition 
to the schedule increases the ca- 
pacity of the Line in the lower half 
of the river nearly 100 per cent, 
and, as stop-overs are allowed, it 
gives opportunity for a great vari- 
ety of interesting little journeys for 
one to select from. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE SILENT WOMAN 



?\Iy contemporaries who wield 
the large editorial pen are eulogiz- 
ing the Silent Woman. You see 
it's like this; the enfranchisement 
has been denied specifically to tlie 
women of Oregon. Woman suf- 
frage has been defeated out there 
by upwards of twenty thousand 
majority, and it is due to the ef- 
forts of the Silent Woman who is 
courageously fighting against the 
measure. How times change! it 
is not so long ago that it was \hf 
courageous woman who dared to 
advocate suffrage. Now it is tlie 
courageous woman who oppos-es i(. 

The Silent Woman, sa}' my con- 
temporaries, believes it is as '.nuch 
woman's ri,ght to be exempt from 
political duty as from jury duty, or 
militia duty. Ah, well — Micre will 
alwaj's be this same Silent Woman, 
just as there will alwav.-. be the 
van Winkle family who sleep on, 
fifty years at a stretch, while things 
are moving on without them. There 
is no use to get the sufifrage argu- 
ments down ofif the shelf — old 
moth-eaten things- — and to dust 
them up for the contemplation for 
this Silent Woman. She wouldn't 
contemplate them if you took the 
trouble. The unprogressive woman 
as a class contains the stubborn, 
contrary woman, the stupid woman, 
and the lap-dog woman who is 
content as long as she has a com- 
fortable place herself. Call her the 
Silent Woman if the name sounds 
any better. 

The Silent Woman is a woman* 
of resource too. She declared her- 
self one time in Albany years ago 
when Susan B. Anthony led a dele- 
gation of women to the Constitu- 
tional Convention, and carried a 
gigantic petition containing more 
than one hundred thousand names 
praying that the word male should 
be eliminated from the New York 
State Constitution. The petition made 
a fine showing; hundreds of scrolls 
tied in sufifrage yellow ribbon were 
heaped high on a table in the cor- 
ridor where they would attract at- 
tention. But against the day and 
the hour when the formal presen- 



tation of that (jminous petition was 
to occur the Silent Woman made 
preparation. For days in the well- 
equipped kitchen of the Silent Wo- 
man there was riotous whisking of 
eggs and reckless beating of cake; 
and at the great moment when the 
legislators were expected to re- 
spond to the call of the sufifrage 
woman, the Silent Woman sum- 
moned them all to a feast of pie 
and cookies and jelly cake; and the 
men? Dear, dull, old things! Any 
one can guess right the first time 
on the query of where those men 
went. There was scarcely a man 
at the presentation. Although we 
have progressed some since that 
event, the same Silent Woman is 
still here, the only change being 
that she is now alluded to as cour- 
ageous; and that is the most inter- 
esting thing about the situation — 
because it means progress. 

It is not the Silent Woman who 
opened the college doors to her sex; 
nor who has legislated for years to 
make the laws better; to improve 
the conditions of working women; 
who is right now interfering in be- 
half of the little children who toil. 

Ruskin meant the Silent Woman 
when he wrote this: "There is no 
sufifering, no injustice, no misery in 
the earth but the guilt of it lies 
lastly with you. Men may tread it 
down without sympathy in their 
own struggle; but men are feeble 
in sympathy and contracted in 
hope: It is you only who can feel 
the depths of pain, and conceive 
the way of its healing. Instead 
of trying to do this you turn away 
from it; you shut yourselves within 
your dark walls and your garden 
gates: and you are content to know 
that there is beyond them a whole 
world in wilderness — a world of se- 
crets which you dare not pene- 
trate; and of suffering which you 
dare not conceive." 

Harvot Holt Dey. 



JMighty of heart, mighty of mind, 
magnanimous — to be this is indeed 
to be great in life. — Ruskin. 




' 'ooo, at *' 



This Week in New York 

Monday, July 6th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Singer tower is now open to the public, and the observation bal- 
ccin}- at No. 149 Broadway offers the visitor to this city an opportunity 
to sec New York from all dircctinns instead of a spot at a time. The 
balcony is on the fortj'-sccond floor, 548 feet above the curb, and gives 
a sight-seing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The tower 
has a platform with a high railing which accommodates about fortj' 
pcopK'. Express elevators run from the main corridor on the first floor, 
making the trip in one minute. There arc also guides stationed on the 
])iatform to point out the different points of interest to visitors and to 
give other information. 

Public Concert — Corlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlcars and Jackson 
sts. and East River, 8. p. m. 

Annual open lawn tennis tournament, under the auspices of the 
United States National Lawn Tennis Association, Englewood Field 
Club, Englewood, N. J. 2:,^o p. m. 

Tennis — Invitation doubles; Westchester Country Club. 

^'ou can subscribe to "Daily .\ttractions in New York" for three 
months for tift}' cents. It will be mailed to you regularly every 
Saturday, ^'ou cannc^t buy it on the news stands. Subscribe now. 



Exclusively "Home-Cooking" and Dainty Service! 



West 33d Street 

Oft. THE WALDORF) 



Breakfast, Luncheon yV —T^*. j* ^ ^^ 

and Afternoon Tea at ' / y^ ^"^ 

The Table d'Hote Dinners will he discontinued until September 8th, 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. m. during July and August 

Orders for FresH Cut Floivers promptly filled 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth avc., 
Waverly and Washington place. 8. p. m. 

The Roof Garden of the Hotel Martha Washington, 29 East 29th 
St., is open from 5 to 12 p. m. 



Tuesday, July 7th 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. D. C. Hughes 
will speak. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York American \'s. Detroit, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concerts — Mount Morris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris 
aves., I20th to 124th sts. 8. p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

The "Sight-Seeing" Yacht leaves foot of West 22d st. every day, in- 
cluding Sunday, at 10 a. m. and 2:30 p. m. Tickets $1. This is the 
only steam yacht making the circuit of Manhattan Island. It will 
please you. Try it! 

Horse Racing — Brighton Racing Association, Brighton Track (to 
July 29). 

Wednesday, July 8th 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson 
st. 8. p. m. 

Public Concert — Mulberry Bend Park, IMulberry to Baxter st., and 
Bayard to Park st. 8. p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Detroit, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4. p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to 90th 
St., on Fifth ave. have now added a new route by which cars of the 
same type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to 57th st.. thence 
over to Broadway, up Broadway to 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be distinguished: 
by day a red ball, by night a red light on the front of the cars. The 
fare in each instance, cither way, is 10 cents per person. 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 

Large Jars, $1.00 
Smaller Jan, 50 Cent* 



Q Postcised of rare qualitiei and many valuable propcrtiei 
not generally found among toilet articlea,bciidea iti unique 
effect at a firtt-class 

SKIN FOOD 

used in massage for producing and preserving a Rat, healthy 
complexion, places this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients second to none in either Europe or America. 

M.B.De MEDICI . 124 W. 21st St.. New York 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS MEEK — Continued 

Wednesday evening meeting. Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth avc. 
and 29II1 St., Rev. David James Burrcll, D.D., I.L.D., mini-ster. 8 p. m. 
You arc cordially invited to attend. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles E. Jefferson, D.D., LL.D., pastor; Wednesday evening Praise ard 
Prayer Service. 8 p. m. .\ welcome for everj^one. 

Wednesday evening meeting, Sccf-nd Church of Christ Scientist, 
Central Park West at 68th st. 8 p. m. Visitors welcome. 

Thursday, July 9th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Convention of the New York State Bankers' Association, at Hotel 
Frontenac, Thousand Islands. Among the speakers will be Alexander 
Gilbert, president of the New York Clearing House; J. A. Emery, who 
will speak on "The Banker and Class Legislation"; J. T. Talbot, vice- 
president of the Commercial National Bank of Chicago, on "Commercial 
Credits" (to July ii). 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Detroit, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — East River Park, 84th to 89th sts.. facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth and Madi- 
son aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

Automobiling — Fifth Annual A. A. A. reliability touring contest for 
Glidden Cup; start at Buffalo. N. Y. 

Friday, July loth 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Detroit, at the American T.eague 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

"Jerusalem, Ancient and Modern" (stereopticon views), lecture by 
Miss Carrie Clifton Knapp. at the Afctropolitan Temple, Seventh ave. 
near 14th st. 8:15 p. m. Free. 



EXCLUSIVE BOARDING HOUSE 

42, 48 and 50 East Twenty-first Street 
Mrs. DERR, Proprietor 

Large and Small Rooms, single and en suite, Baths 
Southern Cooking Summer Rates Transients 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AA^EEK — Continued 

Public Concert — Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 8 
p. m. 

Public Concert — William H. Seward Park, Hester to Division and 
Norfolk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Batter}' Park, foot of P)r()adway, itverloi iking har- 
bor. 8 p. m. 

Gospel Tent Evangel. 57th st. and Ilroadway, the Rev. G. VV. 
McPherson will speak. 8 p. m. 

Public reception to open the Ocean Grove Assembly of Sunday 
School Methods. The school will remain open until July 18, Ocean 
Grove, N. J. 

Saturday, July iith 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Games — Junior championship games of the Metropolitan Associa- 
tion of the Amateur Athletic Union, at Travers Island. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Cleveland, at the .\merican 

League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. .-Xdmission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Morningsidc Park, betwen Columbus and morn- 
ingside aves., iioth to 123d sts. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Central Park, b'ifth to Eighth aves., nearest entrance 
to reach the Mall, is at 72d st. 4 p. m. 

Eleventh Amuial convention of the Federation of American Zion- 
ists, at Atlantic City (to July 15). 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Ezra San- 
ford will give illustrated sermon. 8 p. m. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; River- 
side annual. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Benson- 
hurst Yacht Club. 

The races of the New York Yacht Club for the Glen Cove Cup?. 
They are open to all classes of the club. 



THE EARLINGTON '-'TZlir^r 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



8 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Dodd, Mead & Co. all the latest books 

FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 35th St. OtatlOliery, HtC. 



THIS WEEK— Continued 

Sunday, July i 2 th 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Fifth Avenue {'rcsbytcrian Churcli. Fifth ave. and 55th st., the Rev. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., minister; services n a. m. and 4 p. m. A wel- 
come for you. 

St. Bartholomew's Churcli, IMadison ave. and 44th st , the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D.D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 a. m. You are 
cordially invited to attend. 

Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church. Madison ave. and 6oth 
st , the Rev. Wallace MacMullen, D.D., minister; services, 11 a. m. 
Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach. A cordial welcome for you. 

Manhattan Congregational Church, Broadway and 76th st.; the Rev. 
Henry A. Stimson, D.D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. A cordial 
welcome for you. 

Second Church of Christ Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th St.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. Ynu will be welcome. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D.D.. LT^.D.. minister; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. A 
welcome for all. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefferson, D.D., LL.D., pastor; services, ri a. m. and 8 p. m. You 
will be cordially welcomed. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church. }iIadison ave. and 31st st.; services, 
1 1 a. m. A welcome for every one. 

Public Concert — Central Park, Fifth to Eighth aves., the nearest en- 
trance to the Mall is at 726 st. 4 p. m. 

West End Presbyterian Church, 105th st. and Amsterdam ave., the 
Rev. A. Edwin Keigwin, D.D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
The Rev. John B. Laird. D.D., pastor Frankford Presbyterian Churcli. 
Philadelphia, Pa., will supply the pulpit. Strangers are cordially welcomed. 



Attractive Rooms for J^ent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 

Central Location. Comfortable Surroundings 

No. 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 

Telephone : 3768 Madison Square 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TAXAMETER— Motor Cab Service— 'Phone 2380 COLUMBUS 



Telephone orders filled promptly day 
or night. Cabs are always in waiting 
at our various stands, or they may bo 
hailed and engaged on the street. When 
the flag is displayed above the taxa- 
meter it signifies that the cab is dis- 
engaged and can be hired. 

REDUCED SUMMER RATES— EF- 
FECTIVE JUNE FIRST-Tai-iff No 1 
(Red Indicator) Used Only. 
First half-mile or fraction - - 30 cts 
Each quarter-mile thereafter - 10 cts' 
Each six minutes waiting - - 10 cts. 
_ This tariff applies to all vehicles and 
irrespective of the number of passengers 
earned except that for Hansoms, Cou- 
pes, Broughams and Victorias the charge 
for waiting time is 10 cts. for each TEN 
minutes or at the rate of ONLY SIXTY 
CENTS PER HOUR. t^AlY 

EXTRAS— All Vehicles 
For ordering a cab, each mile or frac- 
tion thereof, from station or stand to 
point ordered 20 cts. ^l^uu lo 

Return charge when dismissed 
north of 155th Street or outside 
the Borough of Manhattan, for 
each mile or fraction to Times 
Tr^2t^^'® (minimum charge .$1) - 20 cts. 

^^^^^ - - 20 cts. 

. All ferriage and bridge tolls, both go- 
ing and returning, must be paid by the 
passenger. If the taxameter is out of 

£T'ra?e^s^ "^" '^ '''''■''^' ^' -^'^'- 

RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 



INFORMATION FOB PASSENGERS 

„.!• HOW THE TAXAMETER WORKS 
When the flag is lowered 30 cents will 
appear under the word "Fare," and this 
pays for the use of the cab until service 
to that amount, either in driving or in 
waiting, has been rendered. The indi- 
cator will register thereafter ten cents 
for each quarter mile, or each fraction 
of an hour waiting. This charge is for 
the exact distance traveled and the exact 
ZVZl^, *'"•' consumed, which are auto- 
^JLl^ i-^ measured by the taxameter and 
°^ThJ""'^. ^^.'^ 2"^^^" ^«« °o control 
e^.i- ^^^^'^ charges called for by the 
service are registered by the driver and 
shown under the word "Extras " 

2. THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID T^? 

V^Ei^'^'P/J^P AMOUNTs'^sligwN 
UJMU11,K I< ARE ' AND "EXTRAS!" 

THERE ARE NO CHARGES EXCEPT 

metII. indicated bytheITIa- 




The driver is charged with all amounts 
registered and is not permitted ro make 
any reductions therefrom, but will if 
required, give a receipt for the amount 
paid. 

rvJkJ^ SECURE COMPLETE PROTEC- 
TION, observe (a) that the flag is low- 
ered to Tariff 1 position at the beginning 
of the service and not before ; .(b) that 
the flag is maintained in that position 
during service; (c) that the flag is 
promptly brought to "Payment" posi- 
tion at the conclusion of the service and 
left there until the charge is settled 

4. IF THE CAB IS DISABLED, the 
^^^'.V^^ "P to the disablement must be 

T^^wA *^^^ REPORTING AT AN AD- 
J UEiSb in response fo an order is 
charged for from the time for which It 
was ordered. 

6. A CAB ORDERED AND NOT USED 
must be paid for up to the time the 
driver is dismissed, including the charee 
for sending it. 

TTmJ^^^w^?.^ '\^^ OTHER RE- 
iURNS Waitmg time and any neces- 
sary mileage will be charged for a ve- 
hicle held for a return call. Waiting 
time may be saved by dismissing the 
vehicle and placing a separate order for 
a vehicle for the return call, but the 
Company cannot guarantee to fill such 
return call unless it be given to and 
accepted by the starter at a station 
*^^"K'''l^°'i- ,,U."<^^^' 110 conditions may a 
cab be held in waiting without charge 

8. IN CASE OF DISPUTE, passengers 

fn^i.r^'^H*'^^^'? *°,P'''y the full amount 
indicated and make claim to the Com- 
pany, in writing, giving the hour, date 
driver and cab number, number of nas- 
sengers carried, distance travelled and 
waiting time consumed and wherein the 
charge is incorrect. Such claims will re- 
ceive prompt and courteous attention 

9. THE ACCURACY OF THE TAX\- 
METER is insured by systematic insppc- 
tion. Do not assume that a charge is 
incorrect without first computing all of 
the distance and all of the waiting time 
comprised in the service. 

TOURING CARS SIGHT SPTi'Twr 

CARS, DOUBLE-DECK Ai'otoI^'^'s^ 

TiT 'tt^"" Aiitomobiles of every kind by 

pu'caHon"' ^^ °' ^'•^'^l^-Rates on ap- 

CAB STATIONS. 

r^lh if- ^"^ §*^ ^^'- "'5-65 E.SSth St. 
66th St. and 3rd Av. 141 E.25th St 

CAB STANDS. 

%^ni-7/li , S-^^f ^I^"""" Hotel Astor 
Hotel Belmont, Long Island R R Ft E 
^ . , r. 34th Street. ' ' 

Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. W. 23rd St. 

NEW YORK TRANSPORTATIOirC(K~ 
EIGHTH AVE. AND FORTY-NINTH ST. 



^ „ ^ .„, PHONE. 2380 COLUMBUS 

For Hire Tariff 1 .Tariff 2 Paymeiu__CONNECTS WITH ALL CAB STANDS 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



A GLORIOUS DAY— ON THE HUDSON 



It would be interesting if one 
could learn how many people liv- 
ing in or near New York City are 
still unacquainted with the attrac- 
tions of our Hudson River. After 
taking a trip on the luxurious 
"Hendrick Hudson," the new 
steamer of The Hudson River 
Day Line, one wishes it were pos- 
sible to call the attention of all 
such to the ease and comfort with 
which a journey can be made on 
this fine steamer which plies daily 
between New York and Albany, 
and the romantic charm of the 
scenery that would repay them, for 
one would have to travel many 
hundreds of miles to find any other 
river so rich in natural beauty and 
tradition. 

The management of The Hudson 
River Day Line is unique. The 
principal officers of the company 
are college graduates and they 
give their personal attention daily 
to the running of the line. Most 
of the lesser officers on the 
steamers are young college stu- 
dents who have need of employ- 
ment during the summer holidays. 
Even the colored waiters are 
nearly all students from Hampton 
College and Howard University. 
The general service, therefore, is 
exceptionally fine. The owners of 
The' Hudson River Day Line dis- 
approve of placing the temptation 
of strong liquors in the way of 
young men off for a day's outing: 
hence, while beer and wine may be 
purchased with meals, only soft 
drinks can be gotten at the bar. 
Tliis precaution makes the trip un- 
popular with any undesirable ele- 
ment, precludes the likelihood of 
intoxication and disorder on board 
the boats, and assures a peaceful, 
restful day to those taking the trip. 

On the "Hendrick Hudson" ar- 
rangements have been made that 
attract even the most exclusive 
excursioner. Many private state- 
rooms have been provided, each 
opening on the deck adjoining, a 
portion of which is chained off so 
that each stateroom has it's own 



private balcony on which the occu- 
pants of the room may sit undis- 
turbed by outsiders and view the 
passing scene. Some of these 
staterooms are extremely hand- 
some and bear distinctive names 
according to the type of decoration 
and furnishing: for example, 
Dutch room, Japanese room. Colo- 
nial room. &c. 

The trip to Poughkeepsie covers 
the most beautiful and historically 
interesting section of the Hudson, 
and passengers going up the river 
from New York can be transferred 
at that point to the boat coming 
down the river from Albany, with 
only a few minutes' wait, so that 
one can leave New York at nine 
o'clock in the morning, spend the 
entire day on the river going to 
and from Poughkeepsie, and get 
back to this city by six o'clock in 
the evening. After June 29th a 
special steamer will make daily the 
trip so far as Poughkeepsie only, 
stopping there a couple of hours 
to permit of sight-seeing, and re- 
turning to this city at 8:40 p. m. 

Who can imagine a more satis- 
factory way in which to pass a day. 
Nothing is lacking for one's com- 
fort and pleasure: a fine steamer, 
an unusually high class of pas- 
sengers, plenty of easy chairs, 
good food, band concert morning 
and afternoon, colored quartette to 
entertain during the dinner hour, 
cool breezes from of¥ the river, 
and picture after picture of the 
magnificent homes of our multi- 
millionaires surrounded by their fine 
estates, green fields covered with 
trees and shrubbery, the world- 
famed Palisades, the historic hills 
and mountains; everything to de- 
light the eye and rest the senses: 
surely a glorious day's outing after 
the nerve-racking distractions of 
crowded city. 

Frank Thornton. 



So long as we love we serve, 
and no man is useless while he has 
a friend. — Unidentified. 







' ^000, Bt *' 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty-First Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, July Sth 

Services II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.43 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



M Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



^ttnnh (Eljurrli of CSIl|riBt. ^rletttiat ""Tilt. 



k West 
reet 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. 



Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. in. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



METHODIST 



Madison Ave. Methodist Episcopal Ghurcd 

CORNER OF SIXTIETH STREET 

Rer. Wallace MacMuUen, D. D. - - - Minister 

RBV. ARLO A. BROWN. Aisiitant MinUter 

SUNDAY, JULY Sth 

Preaching Service, 11 A. M. 
Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NBW YORK CHURCHES — Continued 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 



#aint Bartholomew's Olhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY- FOURTH STREET 



ReT. LEIGHTON PARKS. D. D.. Ractor 

♦ 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher from June 14 to July 19 

THE REV. JOSEPH G. H. BARRY, D.D. 

Dean of Nashotah House, Nashotah, Wis. 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 



CONGREGATIONAL 



IKFFEKSON. D.D.. LL.D.. Pastor 
Sunday : Public Worship, ii a.m., 8p.m. Bible School, g.45a.m.,2.45p. m. 
Y. v. S. C. E., 7 p. m. Wednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 



A.M. and 8 P.M. 
Rev. HENRY A. STIMSON. D. D., Pastor 
Seats Free M Cordial IVelcome to You 



PRESBYTERIAN 



^Xtti} AUCnitP JlrffibytPrtan (El|Urrlf Fifth Avenue and 55th s treet 

Services, July 5th, at 11 a. m. and 4 p. m . 

Rev. R. A. TORREY, D.U., thu Evangelist, will preach 



UNITARIAN 



LENOX AVENUE UNITARIAN CHURCH .^^rsTeet 

Rev. MERLE ST. CROIX WRIGHT. Minister Sarvioai at 11 



REFORMED 



1628 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 1908 

The Marble Collegiate Church 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 



Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN, D.D., Pastor for Strangers 
will preach Sunday, July 5th 
II a. m. Subject: "Proofs and a Program" 
8p.m. Subject: "Some Overlooked Patriots" 



Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 5860 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie— Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7G90 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western^ — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 58G0 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O. & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpolnt Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — Prom foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa\onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonia 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island^Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken— Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivington, 1st, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th. 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (charge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d. 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, lG6th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi., 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gl., Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th). 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145ith, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue— South Ferry, Battery pi., 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



U 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TROLLEY TRIPS 



Fi-om New York to Mount Ver- 
non one may take any one of three 
routes — one direct from 129th st. 
and Third ave., at the Harlem 
River Bridge, by way of Webster 
ave.; a second on the West Farms 
and Williamsbridge car from the 
same point, changing to Webster 
ave. car at Williamsbridge; the 
third from the Bronx Borough side 
of the Harlem River at Central 
Bridge, take the Sixth ave. "L" to 
155th St. and Eighth ave. end of 
line) and walk over the viaduct 
and bridge. This third car (from 
Central Bridge) goes up Jerome 
ave. From Mount Vernon — Yon- 
kers, Hastings, Tuckahoe, Pelhani, 
New Rochelle, East Chester, 
Larchmont, Larchmont Manor, 
Mamaroneck, Rye, Rye Beach, 
White Plains, Tarrytown, Port- 
chester may be reached. 

Take the Fordham line at 128th 
St. and Third ave., north to Third 
and Tremont aves., transfer east 
to Tremont ave. line to Unionport. 
For Throggs Neck and Fort 

IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Water Route to 

CON£Y ISL>VND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise m the 
World. 

TIME TABLE (S11B.IECT TO Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.1.5 A. M., 12.30. 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30. 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and. *10.40, *11.25 A. M.. 12.10, 
*12.55. *1.40. 2.55. S.40. 4.25. *5.2.->. 
6.10. 7.10. •7.55, *8.40, *9.25, *10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a * go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St.. N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St.. N. R.. 7.40 A. M. : Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 



Schuyler, from which an excellent 
view of Long Island Sound can be 
obtained, transfer again in West- 
chester Village. Returning, take 
Tremont ave. line to West Farms, 
transfer to West Farms line, south- 
bound, or Tremont ave. line to 
Webster ave.; transfer to Mt. Ver- 
non line, to 128th St. and Third ave. 
Fordham or Mt. Vernon line at 
128th St. and Third ave., to Tre- 
mont ave., transfer to western di- 
vision of Tremont ave. line on 
Burnside, Cedar and Sedgwick 
aves. to High Bridge. University 
Heights (Hall of Fame). Re- 
turning, via Sedgwick ave. to 
Jerome ave. line to "L" station at 
155th St. and Eighth ave., or con- 
tinuing east to i6ist st. and Third 
ave., then transfer south on Third 
ave. to starting point. By walk- 
ing across High Bridge to Amster- 
dam ave., southbound Amsterdam, 
Sixth or Third ave. car can be 
taken to Manhattan. 



LONG ISLAND TRIPS 

Nearly all the trolley trips of 
Long Island start from the New 
York end of Brooklyn Bridge. 

To reach Belmont Park by trol- 
ley take "L" road from New York 
end of Brooklyn Bridge to 
Jamaica; at Jamaica take trolley 
for Queens, which is close to Bel- 
mont Park. 

From Queens a trolley may be 
taken to Hempstead and on to 
Garden City and Mineola by a 
branch line. 

One of the most picturesque of 
Long Island trolley trips is from 
Flushing to Rockaway Park, a dis- 
tance of a little over twenty-two 
miles, taking an hour and a half. 
On the road one touches Ingleside, 
Queens Borough Heights, Garri- 
son's Lane, Jamaica, Springfield 
Lawrence, Inwood, Far Rockaway, 
Edgemere, Arverne, Hammels, 
Hollands and Rockaway Beach. 

To reach Flushing take ferry to 
Long Island City, thence by trol- 
ley to Flushing. 



15 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flaiiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
♦Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
•14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 




►42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



*72d St. andBroac 
79th St. and Broad; 
86th St. and Broad 
91st St. and Broad; 

*96th St. and Broad; 

WEST SIDE BRA! 
103d St. andBroacj 
110th St. and Broad 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 

For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, Rheims, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North Kiver, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

Fa RE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and Buadway 
233d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 
Mott Ave. and 149th St. 



Cotyright. 1907. B. L. Clarke 

Third Ave. and 140th St. 

.Tackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

•Express Stations 



It's Well Worth Your While 

To call and see the desirable positions we now have open in New York and 
vicinity for capable Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men. 
Over 500 opportunities paying $i,ooo-$5,ooo a year must be filled at once 
Call or write us to-day. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway. N. Y. 



17 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CLUBS OF NEW YORK 



Aldine Association, iii Fifth Ave 

Allenhurst, 289 Fourth Ave 

Alpha Delta Phi, 136 W 44th 

Amateur Billiard, 115 W 79th 

American Jersey Cattle, 8 W 17th 

American Kennel, 55 Liberty 

Arion, sgth St and Park Ave 

Army and Navy, 107 W 43d 

Attic, 141 W 42d 

Automobile, 54th St and B'way 

Baltusrol, 261 Broadway 

Beethoven, 207 E loth 

Boys', 'Ave A and loth 

Brook, 7 E 40th 

Brown University, 12 W 44th 

Calumet, 267 Fifth Ave 

Camera, 5 W 31st 

Catholic, Central Park South 

Century, 7 W 43d 

Chemists', 108 W 55th 

City Lunch Club, 165 Broadway 

Civic, 243 E 34th 

Clover, 45 W 21st 

Colonial Yacht, io8th and N. R. 

Columbia University, 18 Gram'y Pk. 

Columbia Yacht, 86th and N. R. 

Coney Island Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Country, Westchester, N. Y. 

Criterion, 683 Fifth Ave 

Delaware, 222 E 71st 

Delta Phi, 612 W n6th 

Democratic, 617 Fifth Ave 

Deutscher Verein, 112 Central Pk.S. 

Down Town, 60 Pine 

Drug and Chemical, 100 William 

Electrical, 14 Park PI 

Empire City, 106 W 38th 

Engineers', 32 W 40th 

Federal, "72, Ave D 

Fellowship, 211 W 45th 

Freundschaft, Park Ave and 72d 

Greenroom, 139 W 47th 

Greeters, 1146 Broadway 

Grolier, 29 E 32d 

Hardware, 253 Broadway 

Harmonic, 10 E 6oth 

Harvard, 27 W 44th 

Hotel Men's Ass'n. Cambridge bldg 

Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Knickerbocker, Fifth Ave and 32d 

Lambs', 128 W 44th 



Lawyers', 120 Broadway 

Liederkranz, iii E 58th 

Long Acre, 70 W 45th 

Lotos, 556 Fifth Ave 

^L'lchinery, 50 Church 

Manhattan, Madison Ave and 26th 

Masonic, 17 E 22d 

Mendelssohn, 113 W 40th 

Merchants', 106 Leonard St 

Metropolitan, Fifth Ave and 6oth 

National Arts, 14 Gramercy Park 

N. Y. Athletic, 58 W 59th 

N. Y. Baseball, 1133 Broadway 

New York, 9 W 42d 

N. Y. Press, 7 Spruce 

N. Y. Railroad, 62 Liberty 

N. Y. Riding, 7 W 66th 

N. Y. Yacht, z"] W 44th 

Pen and Brush, 30 W 24th 

Physicians', 72 St. Mark's PI 

Players', 16 Gramercy Park 

Princeton, 121 East 21st 

Progress, Central Pk. W. and 88th 

Racquet and Tennis, 27 W 43d 

Reform, 42 Broadway 

Republican, 54 W 40th 

Riding, 7 E 58th 

St. Nicholas, 7 W 44th 

Salmagundi, 14 W 12th 

Stewards', 49 E 28th 

Strollers', 6^ Madison Ave 

Studio, 959 Sixth Ave 

Technology, 36 E 28th 

Three Arts, 803 Lexington Ave 

Town and Country, 12 E 22d 

Transportation, Hotel Manhattan 

Turf and Field, 571 Fifth Ave 

Underwriters', T] William 

Union, Fifth Ave and 51st 

Union League, i E 39th 

University, Fifth Av and 54th St W 

Victoria, 15 W 32d 

West Side Republican, 2307 B'way 

West Side Y. \\. C. A., 320 W S/th 

Whist, 13 W 36th 

Woman's, 9 E 46th 

Woman's Press, Waldorf-Astoria 

Woman's University, 17 E 26th 

Wool, 260 W Broadway 

Wyandot, 232 East 58th 

Yale, 30 W 44th 







' ">oe, bT 



New York Theatres 



Academy of Music — Irving place 

and 14th St. Tel., 701 Gramercy. 

Closed. 
Aerial Garden — Atop of the New 

Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. near 

Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 

Eve., 8.30. Prices, 50c to $2. 
Alhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 

5C00 Morningside. Closed. 
American — 42d st. and 8th ave. 

Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 
Aster — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 

287 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 

8.30; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 

Prices, 50c to $2. 
Belasco — 42d st., west of B'way. 

Tel., 4281 Bryant. Closed. 
Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 

Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed. 



AWARDED 



ARONDACK 

Saratoga's Most 

Palatable Water 

and Fine Mixer 

at any of the 

Best Hotels. 

Families may order 

from 

Charles & Co. 

Acker Merrall Co. 

Park & Tilford 



Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 

Tel., loi Bryant. Closed. 
Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 

Tel.. 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 

World." Eve., 8.15; mat. Sat., 

2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 



The Greatest and Most Original Attraction in New York are the 

FLEISCHMAN BATHS and 
Roof Garden Restaurant 

On the three upper floors of the Bryant Park Building. 

Northeast Corner 42d Street and 6th Avenue. 
The Roof Garden Restaurant is open to Ladies and Gentlemen. 
It is the coolest and most delightful dining resort in New York. 

First-class Service a la Carte. The Baths are open Day and 

Night, for ?nen only. Excellent Sleeping Accommodation. 

Price of Russian or Turkish Baths, $1.50. 8 Tickets for $10.00. 17 Tickets for $20.00 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEAV VOKK THEATUKS—Contiuiied 



Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel. 
5138 Columbus. "The Merry-Go- 
Round." Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c to $1 

Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel. 
4457 Columbus. Closed. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Eden Musee— 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. Closed. 

Garrick— 35th st., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 3Si-38th. Closed. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 

Hackett — 42d St., west of B'way. 

Tel, 44 Bryant. Closed. 
Hammerstein's Victoria— 42d st. & 

Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 

Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 

Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices. 25c 

to $1.50. 

Herald Square— 35th st. and Broad 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve.. 8.15; mat., Sat., 
2,15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave.. between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 

Hudson— 44th St., ea.'^t of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris— Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
/15th st "FolHes of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone: 6500 Madiion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Pltce for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alto Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooms from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In easy access of all the principal theatres 

Subway Station, zSth Street, within one block 

29th Street cars pass the door 



I 



Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. Geo. M. 
Cohan in "The Yankee Prince." 
Eve., 8.30; mat.. Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50C to $.2. 

Liberty — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. Closed. 

Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. Closed. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Wolf." 
Eve., 8.20; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.20. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Closed. 





PAUL 


L. BRYANT 


DYEING 


AND CLEANSING 




Gowns Cleaned fn Twenty-Foar Hours 


308 


FOURTH AVENUE 


868 BROADWAY 




TEL. 4508 


QRAMBRCY 


TEL. -4755 QRAMBRCY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Newburjjh, Pouyhkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Pouyhkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 26. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



NE^V YORK THEATRES — Cuutimied 



Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 

St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 

Madison ave. and 26th st. 
"Ski-Hi." Eve., 8.30. Prices, 

50c to $J. 

Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow." mats.. 
Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices, 50c 

to $2. 



New York — 45fh st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Richard 
Carle in "Mary's Lamb." Eve., 
8.30; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel,, 535i-38lh. Closed. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 
Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Closed. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29tli 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

DiRECTOHS Office and General Headquarters. 426 LAFAYETTE STREET 

TklcphonC, 3S70 SPRING 

Circulation Headquarters, 209 WEST 23rd STREET 

Telephone, 3076 CHELSEA 

Reference Branches: 
ASTOR, 425 LAFAYETTE STREET LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES: 



Ea«t B'way, 197. .(EJast B'way Branch). 
•East B'way, 33. (Chatham Sq. Branch).' 
•RIvIngton Street, 61.. . (Rivlngton Street 

Branch). 
•Leroy St., 68... (Hudson Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 49.. (Bond Street Branch). 
•10th St., 831 East. ...(Tompkins Square 
Branch). 

Second Ave., 135. . (Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W..( Jackson Sq. Branch). 
•23d St., 228 East. .(Epiphany Branch). 
•23d St., 209 W. ..(Muhlenberg Branch). 

84th St., 215 East (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., 501 W..(St. Raphael Branch). 

4 2d St., 226 W. (George Bruce Branch). 

50th St., 123 East. .(Cathedral Branch). 

6l8t St., 463 W. (Sacred Heart Branch). 

68th St., 121 East. .(59th Street Branch). 
•67th St., 328 East. (67th Street Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'ch). 

•Avenue A, 1465 (Webster Branch). 

•79th St., 222 East. ..(Yorkvllls Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave., 444.. (St. Agnes B'ch) 
•96th St., 112 East (96th St. Branch). 

110th St., 174 Bast. ..(Agullar Branch). 



123d St., 82 W. (The Harlem Library). 

•125th St., 224 E (125th St., Branch). 

•135th St., 103 "W.... (135th St., Branch). 

•145th St., 503 W (Hamilton Grange 

Branch). 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. .. (Washington 

Heights Branch). 
Library for the Blind, 444 Amsterdam 
Avenue. 

Borough of Bronx 

•140th St., 569 E (Mott Haven Br'ch). 

•Washington Ave., 1866. (Tremont Br'ch) 
•Klngsbrldge Ave., 2933. . . . (Klngsbrldga 
Branch). 

Borough of Richmond 

•Amboy Road, Tottenvllle. . (Tottenvllle 

Branch). 
•Central Ave., TompklnsvlUe, S. I (St. 

George Branch). 
•12 Bennett St... (Port Richmond Br'ch) 
•Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sts. 
•Occupying Carnegie Buildings. 



HOURS 

The Branches, with exceptions noted below, are open from 9 a. m. to > p. m. 
on week days. 

Branches In Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Year's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, Presidential Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day; after 6 p. m. on Washlngtor. « Birthday and Christmas Eve; 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 6 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch Is closed from 5 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and Is open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a. m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street, Tomp- 
kins Square, Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rivlngton Street and Riverside Branches from 
2 till 6 p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rivlngton Street Branches 
are open until 10 p. m. on week days. 

The Library for the Blind Is open on week days from 1 p. m. to B p. m. 
The Lenox Branch Is open from 9 a. m. to 6 p. nx. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 



Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ I 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



S'HORT 

The slender effect vogue is 
shown in the careful consideration 
given to the cut of undergarments. 
Garments gathered about the 
waist line are no longer worn. In- 
deed, they are not only made of 
the sheerest materials, but are cut 
on bias lines so as to l)c perfectly 
smooth. A short time ago the 
combination garment was worn 
only by the comparatively few, to- 
day it is the most popular under- 
garment. The two piece is made 
cither in the corset cover and 
drawers, or corset cover and short 
petticoat. The three piece of 
drawers and petticoat are cut in one 
piece and joined to the corset 
cover by means of ribbon-threaded 
embroidered beading. The "Merry 
Widow" gown is on the style of 
the Empire model, with this slight 
difference, the sleeves fall in one 
with the yoke from the shoulder 
and the fullness brought by a 
gathering under the arm gives a 
horn shaped sleeve. The round 
necked gown which was so seri- 
ously objected to on account of no 
opening now has its fastening at 
the side from the neck to half way 
down the skirt. 

A decided novelty in corsets is 
one which hooks at the side. The 
steel is very light and flexible. The 
lacing at the back from the waist 
down. There are straps across the 
front which lace together, which 
gives a flat effect at the lower edge 
of the front of the corset. 

The woman who enjoys surf 
bathing will hail with delight the 
non-elastic stocking supporter. 
These are made exactly as other 
supporters, except in place of the 
elastic strong tape is substituted. 

The hi.gh-class specialty shops 
have made a great success with 
their beautiful white dresses of all- 
over embroidery for waist and 
tailored skirt of linen. 

A model of a jumper dress is 
worthy of mention combining style 
and simnlicity. The sleeveless and 
low-necked bodice is entirely of all- 
over embroidery. The skirt of 
white lawn, in which is a nine-inch 
band of the same all-over. 



TALKS 

While the lace coat is favored 
this season, the coat of embroidery 
is the greater novelty. The wise 
woman will purchase one of these 
coats to be worn with her last 
year's lingerie dress and is trans- 
formed into the latest style. 

The latest hint from Paris is the 
using of fine tapestry, velvet and 
flowered silks for shoe uppers. 
Those who are fortunate to pos- 
sess odd pieces take them to their 
boot makers and have them made 
into shoes for house use. 

A shop on Fifth ave. noted for its 
high-class leather goods has a nov- 
elty in wrist bags known as the 
"Diana Bracelet Bag." As the 
name indicates, the handle is two 
brass bracelets sufficiently large to 
slip easily over the wrist. The 
diminutive travelling clocks, with 
case of English morocco, are irre- 
sistible. When the cunning little 
doors are closed it can be packed 
in the trunk without incurring any 
damage. Then there is the Auto- 
mobilist and Tourist's Diary, in a 
case of silver with an automobile 
embossed on one side and an 
ocean steamer on the other. The 
case is six by four inches. The 
book is removable and a new one 
easily adjusted. 

Every woman is aware of the 
fact that the fingernail soon wears 
a hole through the silk or mil- 
anise glove fingers. They are ex- 
pensive, and nothing can be done 
but throw them away. From Ara- 
minta we learn to cut off the fin- 
gers and part of the thumb, rool 
a hem, finish the hem with a row of 
French dots; now we have splendid 
mitts and just the thing for hot 
weather. 

As this is fruit season, it is well 
to know how to remove stains from 
wash goods. Wet the places, then 
lip-ht a common sulphur match and 
hold it over the spots; continue this 
till the stain disappears. 

Don't forget to provide yourself 
with a box of folding hangers for 
3^our outing. They are a great 
convenience where closet room is 
scarce. 

Madame Roberta. 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK 



Alexander, 118 West 49th. 

Babies', 135 East 55th. 

Bellevue, foot of East 26th. 

Beth Israel, Jefferson and Cherry. 

Central Islip State, Central Islip, L. I. 

Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 

City, Blackwell's Island. 

Columbus, 220 East 20th. 

Emergency for Women, 223 East 26th. 

Epileptic, Randall's Island. 

Fever, North Brother's Island. 

Flower, East 63d, cor. Ave. A. 

Fordham's Reception, Aqueduct ave. and 

St. James. 
French Benevolent Society, 450 W. 34th. 
Gen. Memorial, 2 West 106th. 
German, 77th, Lex'n and Fourth aves. 
Gouverneur, Gouvemeur slip and Front. 
Grace Church, 414 East 14th. 
Hahnemann, Park ave. and 67th. 
Harlem, 533 East 120th. 
Harlem Eye, Ear & Throat, 144 E. 127th. 
House of Relief, 67 Hudson. 
Incurables', Blackwell's Island. 
Infants', Blackwell's Island. 
Italian, 169 West Houston. 
Jewish for Deformities, 1917 Mad. ave. 
Jewish Maternity, 272 East Broadway. 
King's Tark State, King's Park, L. I. 
Laura Franklin Free for Children, 17 

East 111th. 
Lebanon, Westchester & Cauldwell aves. 
Lincoln, 141st, cor. Concord ave. 
Long Island State, Brooklyn. 
Loomls Sanitarium for Consumptives, 

184 West 49th. 
Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat, 210 

East 64th. 
Manhattan Maternity, 327 East 60th. 
Manhattan State, Ward's Island ; Office, 

foot East 116th. 
Marine, Office, Foot Whitehall. 
Maternity of N. Y., Mothers' Home of 

the Sisters of Misericorde, 531 East 

86th. 
Merchants' Marine, 78 Broad. 
Metropolitan, Blackwell's Island. 
Metropolitan Disp. & Hosp., 248 E. 82d. 
Metropolitan Throat, 351 West 34th. 
Minturn for Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, 

foot of East 16th. 
Monteflore Home for Chronic Invalids, 

Broadway and West 138th. 
Mothers' and Babies', 596 Lexington ave. 
Mt. Moriah, 138 East 23. 
Mt. Sinai, Madison ave. and 100th. 
Mulvey's Dog and Cat, 28 39 Broadway. 
New Amsterdam Eye & Ear, 230 W. 38th- 



New York, 7 West 15th and 97 Hudson. 
N. Y. Canine Infirmary, 118 West 53d. 
N. Y. Children's, Randall's Island. 
N. Y. Eye and Ear, 218 Second ave. 
N. Y. Foundling, 175 East 68th. 
N. Y. Homeopathic, 63d and Ave. A. 
N. Y. Lymph Sanitarium, 165 West 39th. 
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for 

Women, 19 West 101st. 
N. Y. Ophthalmic, 201 East 23d. 
N. Y. Orthopaedic, 126 East 59th. 
N. Y. Polyclinic and School, 214 E. 34th. 
N. Y. Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
N. Y. Red Cross, 110 West 82d. 
N. Y. Sanitarium, 247 West 49th. 
N. Y. Skin and Cancer, 301 East 19th. 
N. Y. Throat, Nose & Lung, 229 E. 57th. 
N. Y. Veterinary, 117 W. 25th. 
Nursery and Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
Philanthropic, 2076 Fifth Ave. 
Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
Presbyterian, 41 East 70th. 
Rebeau Private, 156 West 74th. 
Red Cross, Central Park W. and 100th. 
Riverside, North Brother's Island. 
Riverside (Reception), foot of East 16th. 
Roosevelt, West 59th, near Ninth ave. 
Ruptured and Crippled, 135 East 42d. 
St. Andrew's Convalescent, 213 E. 17th. 
St. Ann's Maternity, 130 East 69th. 
St. Elizabeth's, 416 West 51st. 
St. Francis', 605 East 5th. 
St. Gregory, 93 Gold. 
St. John's Guild (office), 501 Fifth ave. 
St. Joseph's, East 143d and Brook ave. 
St. Lawrence, 163d & Edgecombe av. 
St. Luke's, Amsterdam ave. and 113th. 
St. Mark's, 117 Second ave. 
St. Mary's Free for Children, 405 West 

34th. 
St. Vincent's, 149 West 11th. 
Sanitarium for Hebrew Children (office), 

356 Second ave. 
Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, foot B. 16th 
Seton, Spuyten Duyvil. 
Sloane Maternity, W. 59th and Ams. ave. 
Society of the Lying-in, Second Ave. and 

17th. 
Sydenham, 339 East 116th. 
Trinity, 50 Varick. 
U. S. Marine (office), Battery. 
Washington Heights, 554 West 165th. 
Willard Parker, foot of East 16th. 
Woman's, 141 West 109th. 
Woman's Infirmary and Maternity Home, 

124 West 65th. 
Wright, J. Hood, Memorial, 503 W. 131st. 
Yorkville, 246 East 82d. 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NAMING OF NEW YORK STREETS 



Ann — Owners of land frequently 
bestowed on paths that were cut 
through their property the first 
names of their wives. 

Bank — Owing to a fever epidemic 
that broke out in 1822, when 
many people hurriedly left town. 
A row of hastily erected build- 
ings, principally used by banks, 
was built in the vicinity of the 
present thoroughfare. 

Battery Place — Reminds us of the 
fact that in 1693 a platform was 
erected in this vicinity to serve 
as a battery. In 1753 this was en- 
larged. 

Bridge — Locates a bridge that at 
one time crossed the Broad street 
ditch. 

Broad — Was originally an inlet or 
ditch, known as the Breede Graft 
or Broad Canal. 

Cedar — This and other streets 
bearing the name of trees, sug- 
gest the wooded character of 
Manhattan during the early days. 

Chatham Square — This as well as 
Pitt street, perpetuates the name 
of America's devoted and elo- 
quent friend, William Pitt, Earl 
of Chatham. 

Cherry — This was originally part 
of a cherry farm. 

Corlears — Jacobus van Corlear, 
who offered the use of his house 
for school purposes to Governor 
Stuyvesant, and Anthony van 
Corlears, the trumpeter, who it 
is alleged, gave Spuyten Duyvil 
its name when he boasted he 
could swim across its troubled 
waters. 

Duane — Named for New York's 
first Mayor after the Revolution, 
James Duane. 

Ferry — This was the road that led 
to the first ferry from New York 
to Brooklyn. 

Fletcher — Named in honor of Gov- 
ernor Benjamin Fletcher, during 
whose term (1692-1698) printing 
was introduced into the colony. 



Fulton — Named after Robert Ful- 
ton, and is the only memorial on 
Manhattan Island to preserve the 
memory of him who helped so 
much toward its development. 

Hanover Square — Named in honor 
of King George, who was of the 
house of Hanover. 

Liberty — Originally called Crown 
street, the name being changed 
after the Revolution, when all 
reference to royalty was sup- 
pressed. 

Macdougal — Named after Alexan- 
der Macdougal, a noted "Son of 
Liberty," who was arrested in 
1770 on a charge of seditious 
libel, for which he was impris- 
oned in the Debtor's Prison 
(present Register's Office), thus 
becoming the first martyr in the 
patriot cause. 

Minetta — Derives its name from a 
Dutch word, meaning "the little 
one" — that is, the little creek to 
distinguish it from a large creek 
not far away. The former creek, 
which originated in the marshy 
ground in the neighborhood of 
Washington Square, still flows 
under the pavements of modern 
New York. 

Morris — Named for Gouverneur 
Morris, who, besides occupying 
many important public positions, 
was one of the Street Commis- 
sioners appointed in 1807 to lay 
out the new streets, which result- 
ed in the city of rigid straight 
lines and right angles. 

Murray Hill — This took its name 
from the Murray Mansion. It 
was here that the mother cf 
Lindley Murray, the grammarian, 
entertained the British generals, 
it has been said, while Putnam 
and his tired forces made their 
escape from the lower point of 
the island to Harlem. 

New — This was the first street 
opened by the English after tak- 
ing possession of New Amster- 
dam. 



2.«; 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NAMING OF NEW YORK STREETS Continued 



Pearl — The oldest street in New 
Amsterdam. Was so called be- 
cause of the pearl shells found 
along its path. 

Rector — Being originally church 
property, therefore owes its name 
to that fact. 

Ridge — This was an actual ridge 
along the top of a hill on James 
De Lancey's property. The slope 
from Ridge street to the river 
still exists. 

Roosevelt — This recalls the name 
of Isaac and of his son Nicholas 
J. Roosevelt. The former was 
a member of one of the cele- 
brated committees of "one hun- 
dred" to guard the safety of New 
York previous to the Revolution. 

Rutherford — This recalls the name 
of Colonel John Rutherford, who 
was one of the committee that 
planned the present system of 
avenues and streets. 

Spring — Owes its name to the dis- 
covery of a spring in the neigh- 
borhood about the year 1800, 
when Aaron Burr's Manhattan 
Banking and Water Supply Com- 
pany began to furnish the city 
with drinkable water. 

Stone — Was the first street in New 
Amsterdam to be paved with 
stone, which achievement created 
a great sensation. 



Sullivan — This honors the name of 
Brigadier-General John Sullivan, 
one of the most active officers ot 
the Revolutionary War, who re- 
ceived the thanks of Washington 
for his services in Westchester. 
In Rhode Island he fought what 
Lafayette pronounced to be the 
best contested battle of the war. 

Wall — Owes its name to the wall of 
palisades that originally marked 
its path. 

Water — So named, because it con- 
sisted of land that in the early 
days of this city it was literally 
under water. 

Watts — This preserves the memory 
of John Watts, the last City Re- 
corder under English rule. He 
was one of the Assemblymen that 
protested against England's right 
to billet soldiers on the citizens 
of New York. Years after he 
founded the Leake and Watts 
Orphan Asylum. His monument 
is prominent in Trinity Church- 
yard. 

Whitehall — This was the thorough- 
fare that led to Peter Stuyves- 
ant's town house. It is supposed 
to have been so named either on 
account of its white walls, or be- 
cause English governors who oc- 
cupied it subsequently were re- 
minded of London's Whitehall. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
''New York" and "Albany" 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



1908 



Lv. Read Down. 



"sToo 

8 :40 
9:00 
9:20 
:45 



A.M. I P.M. 



11 :50 
12:25 



1 :15 

2 :10 



3:25 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1 :00 

*1 :25 

1:45 



2:35 



1 :4o 

2 :00 
2 :20 



4:50 
5:00 
5:25 
5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



:45 



.Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St.. . 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkers . . . . 
..Highland Falls.. 
. . .West Point. . . 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
. New Hamburgh . 

Milton 

. . Poughkeopsie . . 
..Kingston Point.. 
. . . . Kingston . . . . 
. . . . Catskill . . . . 
. . . . Hudson . . . . 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



6:00 



6:20 






6:00 


9 


:00 


5:30 


8 


:40 


5 :10 


8 


:10 


4:30 


7 


:35 


2 :50 


5 


:45 




*5 


:20 


2 :15 


5 


:05 






1 :20 


4 


:1() 


12 :25 






11 :00 






10:40 






8:30 







P.M. I P.M. I P.M. 



A.M. I A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 
and Kingston Point wharfs 
for all points in Catskill 

MounJ^ains 

Morning and Afternoon 
Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M.. West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect .afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



APPELLATE COURT HOUSE OF NEW YORK 



The Court House of the Appel- 
late Division of the Supreme Court 
is situated on the northeast cor- 
ner of Twenty-fifth street and 
Madison avenue. The cost, includ- 
ing the furnishings, was about 
$750,000, and was completed in the 
year 1900. The interior is rich in 
mural paintings, also marbles, and 
the exterior is decorated with 
sculptures. The caryatides, by T. 
S. Clarke, which support the cor- 
nice of the Madison avenue side, 
represent the Four Seasons; the 
group above, by Karl Bitter, repre- 
sents Peace; on the pedestals of 
the balustrade are the statues of 
the Great Law-Givers: Alfred, Con- 
fucius, Justinian, Manu, Vaivas- 
vata, Zoroaster, St. Louis, Maho- 
met, Solon, Lycurgus, Moses; at 
the entrance on Twenty-fifth street 
are two large seated statues, Force, 
the pedestal with this inscription 
thereon, "We must not use force 
till just laws are defied," also Wis- 
dom, "Every law not based on wis- 
dom is a menace to the state." 
These statues arc the work of F. 
W. Rucstuhl; the bas-relief of the 
pediment, by C. H. Niehaus, rep- 
resents the Triumph of Law over 
Anarchy; and above this, by C. _D. 
French, is a group symbolizing 
Justice. On the window pediments 
are the reclining figures of Morn- 
ing, Noon, Evening, Night, by M. 
M. Schwartzott. As you enter the 
main hall has a wainscoting and 
pilasters of Sienna marble, with 
bronze gold capitals. Paintings fill 
the frieze spaces, and the ceiling is 
modeled in gold of two shades. The 
Court Room is also decorated in 
the same manner. The bench, 
screen and dais are of dark oak, 
very handsomely carved. On the 
stained glass windows of the dome 
are inscribed the names of the fol- 
lowing eminent jurists: Fish, Jay, 
Butler, Shaw, Webster, Ogden, 
Choate, Kent, Clinton, Livingston, 
Hamilton, Marshall, Legare, Story, 
Pinckney, Taney, Van Buren, 



O'Connor, Marcy, Spencer. The 
mural paintings of the two apart- 
ments are symbolical, as well as 
allegorical. The frieze on the 
north wall facing the entrance, by 
H. S. Mowbray, represents the 
Transmission of the Law. This 
consists of eight groups, as fol- 
lows: Mosaic, Egyptian, Greek, 
Roman, Byzantine, Norman, Com- 
mon Law, and Modern Law, each 
group illustrating the distinct per- 
iod that had its influence on our 
own; each group is united by an 
allegorical winged figure to repre- 
sent transmission from one age to 
another. To the left on the west- 
erly wall the frieze, by W. L. Met- 
calf, represents Justice; between 
the entrance doors on the south 
wall the two lunettes, by C. Y. 
Young, represent Law and Equity; 
to the right, on the easterly wall, 
the frieze, by Robert Reid, repre- 
sents Justice supported by the 
guardians of the Law, with sword 
and fasces. She gives Prosperity 
and Peace to the Arts and 
Sciences, holding the symbols of 
the Law, sword, book and scales; 
Education follows Peace, teaching 
the youth, the book being lighted 
by a lamp held by Religion; 
Drama follows Prosperity, and 
Music with harp; on the south 
wall the subjects are Poetry, Paint- 
ing, Sculpture, Architecture and 
Fame. The Court Room is most 
interesting. The centre panel il- 
lustrates Wisdom attended by 
Learning, Experience, Humility, 
Love, also Faith, Patience, Doubt, 
Inspiration. It is intended thatthe 
figure of Wisdom personify spirit- 
ual wisdom. Love to carry out the 
sentiment of the figure of Wisdom. 
There are other panels represent- 
ing The Power of Law, Justice of 
the Law, the seals of the City and 
State. On the wall behind the dais 
of the Justices the long frieze. _bj- 
Kenyon Cox, represents the Reign 
of Law, and other interesting pan- 
els are to be enjoyed. Open daily 
to the public. 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

LATEST POPULAR FICTION 

"The Husbands of Edith," by which is all out of reason, namely, 

George Barr McCutcheon; Dodd, the friend to assume his name and 

Mead & Company, publishers, New masquerade as the lady's husband, 

York. all being satisfactorily arranged. 

In the many books by Mr. Roxbury Medcroft (the architect; 

McCutcheon which have enter- -goes secretly back to London, and 

tained us we find his latest. "The Brouck (the young American) as- 

Husbands of Edith," exceedingly sunics the architect's name, and 

cleveri and in his best style. with the architect's wife on his 

The story opens in Paris, where arm, takes train for Vienna. They 

there is a misunderstanding, not are accompanied with Mrs. Med- 

accidental, but deliberately croft's baby, sister and maids. As 

planned by an English architect they are not obscure people, nat- 

and his wife. He is notified his urally in their travels they meet 

presence IS needed ni London to ..-ith acquaintances, and not unnat- 

protect the English people from a ^,,^^ii Brouck falls in love with the 

gigantic swmdhng concern. To ^-^^^^ ^hey join a party of Eng- 

conceal tlieir movements it is ,- , , • , r , ■ , i i 

necessary the schemers should con- •''^'^ tourists for a trip through the 

tinue in the belief the architect is tyro). Now the fun begins, which 

stil abroad. Happily he meets with t'le reader will enjoy and have a 

an American friend who is always hearty laugh at the many predica- 

ready for an adventure. His plan, mcnts. 



FOWLER 


& WELLS 


COMPANY :: 


ESTABLISHED 


1835 




PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 




PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, 


EST. 1838 


10c. , 


$1.00 per 


YEAR 


24 


EAST 22d 


STREET, NEW 


YORK 


CITY 





OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



SAILS mnm-r NAME OP 

1908 run.1 ITBAMBR 



PORT .r^...,„; ADDRKSIE8 OF LINKS STARTING PLACE 



July 7 . Bremen Cecile N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft .3(1 St., IIol)okeii 

S.Southampton Teutonic While Star Line, 9 B'way Kt 11th St., N. R. 

S.Liverpool Lueania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St.. N. R. 

S.Rotterdam N..\mstei-dam IIo!land-Amer., 39 B'way Ft 5th St., Hohoken 

9. Copenhagen United States.S<;indinavian-Amer., 1 B'way.. . . Ft 17th St., Iloboken 

9. Bremen lAietzow X. Ccrman Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

9.Hamburf? .Moltke Ilamburc^-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

9. Liverpool Baltic White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

9. Havre Touraine French Line, 19 State St Ft Morton St., N. R. 

11. Liverpool Caronia Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 

11. London Minnetonka.. Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'wny.. . .Ft Houston St., N. R. 

11 . Southampton New York Vraerican Line, 9 B'way Ft Fulton St., N. R. 

11. Antwerp Vaderland.. . .Red Star Line, 9 B'way Ft Fulton St., N. R. 

11. Glasgow Furnessia.. . .Anchor Line, 17 B'way Ft 24th St., N. R. 

14. Bremen Kronprinz. . . .N. German Lloyd, 5 B'wav Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

15 . Southampton Adriatic White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

15. Liverpool Lusitania Cunard S. S. Co.. 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 

15. Rotterdam Ryndam IIoUand-Amer., 39 B'wav Ft 5th St., Hoboken 

16. Havre Bretagne French Line, 19 State St Ft Morton St., N. R. 

16.Gib'r& Naples Carpathia Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 

16. Bremen P. Alice X. German Lloyd,5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

16. Hamburg Kaiserin Hamburg- Amer., 45 B'way Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

16. Liverpool Cedric White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 11th St., in. R. 

16. Copenhagen C.F.Tietgen. . Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way.. . . Ft 17th St., Hoboken 

18. Hamburg P. Lincoln.. . .Hamburg- Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

IS . Liverpool Umbria Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



American Museum of Natural His- 
tory — Central Park West and 
77th St. Every day, 9 a. m. to 5 
p. m., and Tuesday and Saturday 
evenings, 7 to 10; Sunday, i to 5 
p. m. Free. 

Appellate Division, Supreme Court 
— Madison ave. and 25th st. Open 
daily. 

Aquarium — Battery Park, foot of 
Broadway. Admission free. Open 
from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Closed 
on Monday forenoon. A fort in 
1807; Concert Hall in 1825; Castle 
Garden, 1855 to 1892. 

Assay Office — Located in Wall 
street, just east of the Sub-Treas- 
ury; is an old-fashioned build- 
ing, erected in the year 1823 for 
the Branch Bank of the United 
States, and is the oldest struc- 
ture on the street. It is esti- 
mated that from twenty to one 
hundred millions of crude bullion 
are received and assayed yearly. 
Visiting hours, from 10 a. m. to 
2 p. m. 

Astor Library — Lafayette place. 
Founded by J. J. Astor in 1849. 

Brooklyn Bridge — Park Row and 
Centre. Opened May 24, 1883. 
Length, 5.989 ft.; centre span, 
1. 595 ft.; height, 135 ft.; width, 
85 ft. 

Carnegie Mansion — Fifth ave. and 
90th St. Cost, $4,000,000. 

Cathedral of St. John the Divine — 
Amsterdam ave., iioth-ii3th sts. 

Central Park— Fifth to Eighth 
aves., 59th to iioth sts. Contains 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
Casino, McGowan's Pass Tavern 
and Cleopatra's Needle. Zoologi- 
cal Garden at 66th st. and Fiftli 
ave. 843 acres. 

Chamber of Commerce — 65 Lib- 
erty. Organized 1768. 

Columbia University (formerly 
King's College) — Broadway and 
Amsterdam ave., ii6th to 120th 
sts. Charter granted by George 
IL in 1754. 

Conservatories — Central Park, op- 
posite East 105th. Choice plants. 
Free. Hours, 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Ellis Island^U. S. Immigrant Sta- 
tion. All immigrants arriving at 
this port are landed on Ellis Isl- 
and before being permitted to 
enter the country, where they are 
carefully examined as to physi- 
cal, financial and moral condi- 
tion. Many thousands are handled 
in a single day (the estimated 
number for the year 1905 was 
800,000). The process is most in- 
teresting and instructive and vis- 
itors are permitted to visit all 
parts of the extensive buildings, 
and can with facility inspect the 
operation of the system for ex- 
cluding undesirable aliens, and 
caring for and forwarding those 
who are admitted. Free. No. 
pass required. Boats from Bat- 
tery (Barge Office), hourly, on 
the hour, from 10 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

East River — Follows the eastern 
I'ortion of the city and separates 
it from Long Island. From 
Coenties Slip to Maiden Lane, 
along its shores, may be seen 
many interesting sights in con- 
nection with this city's great 
shipping industry. 

Fire-boats — The "New Yorker" is 
the name of the largest and best 
equipped fire-boat in the service 
of the New York fire depart- 
ment. There are also six others 
connected with the department, 
their stations are as follows: 
"New Yorker" at tlie Battery; 
"Wm. L. Strong," foot of Grand 
St., East River; "David A. 
Boody," foot of North 8th st., 
Brooklyn; "Abram S. Hewitt." 
foot of Main St., Brooklyn; "Scth 
Low," foot of 42d St., Brooklyn; 
"D. O. Mills," East 133d st. and 
Harlem River; "George B. Mc- 
Clellan," foot of Gansevoort st. 

" Flatiron " Building — Broadway 
and 5th ave., 22d and 23d sts. 

Five Points — Formerly consisted 
of squalid rookeries and drinking 
places, located in the neighbor- 
hood of Worth, Baxter and Park 
streets. In this locality many 
notorious crimes were commit- 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



ted. The Five Points Mission 
House is at 63 Park st. The 
open space in tlie centre of the 
"Points" is now called Paradise 
Park. 

Grant's Tomb — -Riverside Drive 
and 123d St. Built on plan of Na- 
poleon's Tomb at the Hotel des 
Invalides, Paris. Dedicated 1897. 
Contains bodies of Gen. and Mrs. 
Grant in rare caskets. Near by is 
the Chinese tree planted by Li 
Hung Chang. 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Free. 

Hall of Fame — New York Univer- 
sity, Sedgwick ave. and E. i8oth 
St. Granite colonnade to contain 
statues of 150 famous Americans. 

Hall of Records — Chambers and 
Centre sts. City records. 

Hamilton Grange — Convent ave., 
near 141st. Home of Alexander 
Hamilton when shot in duel by 
Aaron Burr. 

Ludlow Street Jail — Located at 
Ludlow and Essex streets, near 
Grand. In former days persons 
arrested for debt, under the old 
law, were kept here; now persons 
arrested for violation of United 
States law are incarcerated with- 
in its walls. 

Marble Collegiate Church — Fifth 
ave. and 29th st. The Collegiate 
Reformed Church of New York 
is the oldes't Protestant church in 
America, having had a complete 
and continuous organization 
since the summer of A. D. 1628. 
The Rev. Jonas Michaelius was 
its first minister, who was sent to 
New Amsterdam on the Island 
of Manhatas by the Classis of 
Amsterdam in Holland. As its 
name conveys, the Collegiate 
Church is a group of churches. 
The Marble Collegiate Church is 
the tenth in historical succession 
of the sanctuaries of the Collegi- 
ate Church. 

Old Jewish Cemetery — Located on 
Xew Bowery, near Oliver st. One 
of the oldest burial places in the 
city, and established during the 
time of Peter Stuyvesant. An- 



other cemetery, or "Place of 
Rest," can be found in Twenty- 
first street, west of Sixth ave. 

Players' Club — Presented to actors 
and friends of the drama by Ed- 
win Booth, at a cost to him of 
more than $200,000. Located at 
16 Gramerc}' Park. Formally 
opened in the year 1888, on New 
Year's Eve. 

Riverside Drive — From West 72d 
St., north to 134th st. Overlooks 
the Hudson. 

Salvation Army — This organization 
gives yearly a Christmas dinner 
to over 20,000 poor at Madison 
Square Garden. Headquarters 
located at 120 West 14th st. Many 
branches are maintained in vari- 
ous other parts of the city. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor — The home 
for the aged sailors on Staten 
Island; of interest to strangers. 
Free. Daily, except Sunday. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument — 
Riverside Drive and 89th. 

Somerindyke House — This house 
formerly stood in Ninth avenue, 
near 75th st. Was the home of 
royalty during its exile. Louis 
Philippe and his brothers, the 
Due de Montpensier and the 
Comte de Beaujolais, taught 
school for their living. The Duke 
of Kent, Queen Victoria's father, 
visited them here. 

Trinity Church — Broadway, oppo- 
site Wall St. Original church 
built 1696, the second 1788, the 
present church 1839, and conse- 
crated 1846. The land was be- 
stowed upon the parish by Queen 
Anne. Its special interior feature 
is the wonderful carved altar in 
memory of the late William B. 
Astor. The churchyard is very 
ancient, containing graves of his- 
toric heroes. 

'Viaduct— Over West 155th st., 7th 
and 8th aA es. and Harlem River. 

Williamsburg Bridge — Delancey st. 
Length, 7,200 ft.; centre span, 
1,600 ft.; height, 135 ft.; width, 
118 ft. 



30 




WEST VIEW OF HOUSE 



This Ideal Country Seat For Sale 

Within One Hour of Wall Street, on Penna. Railroad; 
high, rolling country; consists of 85 acres; mansion 
stone and brick, eighteen rooms; heated b}^ steam. 
Gas and electric lighting. Water under pressure and 
Waring system of sewerage, all in good order. Farmer's 



house, coachman's lodge, stables, barns, &c. 



All 




kinds of fruit. 
Finest collec- 
tion of shade 
trees and orna- 
mental trees 
and shrubber3\ 



Clarke & Thornton 
I Madison Avenue 

NEW YORK 



APPROACH TO HOUSE-LOOKING WEST 



Is This Your Opportunity 
or His? 



w 



AT ERFRO N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufificient water for ocean-going vessels, 

-T^ nd within 15 miles of the Battery, on 

J. he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 

Hj ver}^ facility for manufacturing 

Xv ight at hand. Water under pressure. 

ir reight carried b\^ three railroads. 

Xvare opportunit}- : 150 acres 

KJ f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

IN o difficult}^ in building : solid ground for 
^ ^ foundations. 

J. he only large piece of waterfront propert}^ 
available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 



WEEK, JULY 13 TO JULY 19, 1908 



Bail? Attractions 



m 



ileto Hotfe 



flBRAHY of OONontoi 
IwoCooies HeceivtM 
JUL tljiywa 




Cotyright loob. B. L. Ciaike 



TAXAMETER GABS 



Foot East 34th 



STANDS: Sherry's: Cafe Martin : Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R. R. 
Street ; Central R. R. of N. J., Foot West 23rd Street 

TELEPHONE 2380 COLUMBUS 

One central Exchange connects all taxameter cab stands : on receipt of call the nearest available 

cab is promptly dispatched 
Reduced Snmmer Rates now in effect NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

Tariff folder mailed on request Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 



VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

Copyright, ifoS, by Daily Attractions in Nrw York, Inc. 



NO. 120 




WEST VIEW OF HOUSE 



This Ideal Cotintry Seat For Sale 

Within One Hour of Wall Street, on Penna. Railroad; 
high, rolling country; consists of 85 acres; mansion 
stone and brick, eighteen rooms; heated by steam. 
Gas and electric lighting. Water under pressure and 
Waring system of sewerage, all in good order. Farmer's 
house, coachman's lodge, stables, barns, &c. All 

kinds of fruit. 
Finest collec- 
tion of shade 
trees and orna- 
mental trees 
and shrubbery. 




Clarke & Thornton 
I Madison Avenue 

NEW YORK 



APPROACH TO HOUSE— LOOKING WEST 



PmLY ATTIR/^CTn©MS 



M YORK 



Vol. X 



m 

a4 Weekly SMtgAzine 'Devoted to a^dvance Infommtion. 
JULY 13th to JULY 19th, 1908 



No. 120 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and publish :d by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attraction! circulates through all the 
leading Hoteli in New York City 
ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 

Rve Centi a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Advertiiing rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day tor the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Churches iz-ii 

Clubs 14 

"Cruising on the Euphrates" (Haryot 

Holt Dey) 23 

Express Companies 24 

Ferry Trips 25 

" Follies of igo8" (Frank ThorntnnI 21 

Grant's Tomb 27 

Hudson River Day Line 720 

Hotels iS 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 27 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

" Nerves on a Strike ' " 21 

Ocean Going Steamers 26 

Points of Interest 28-50 

Public Libraries 11 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 4 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter Information 22 

Theaters IQ-21 

"The Hotel Men's Assn." (Frank Thornton) 15 

This Week in New York 5-io 

Trolley Trips— Staten Island 25 



ART NOTES 

Metropolitan Museum of Art — 

82d St. and Fifth ;ivc. Open ev- 
er}' week day from 10 a. m. to 
6 p. m. Saturday, from 10 a. m. 
to 10 p. m. ; Sunday from i to 
5 p. m. Free, except on Monday 
and Friday, when a fee of 25 
cents is charged. Van Courtlandt 
House — Van Courtlandt Park. 
Exhibition of a collection of 
Colonial Bookplates. Free ex- 
cept Thursdaj'S, when a fee of 25 
cents is charged (to Nov. i). 
Astor Library — 425 Lafayette St., 
Exhibition of interesting matter 
constantly changing. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone I 6500 Madiion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte also Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Roomt from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In eaiy acccii of all the principal tbeatret 

Subway Station, 28th Street, within one block 

29th Street cars pass the door 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



Something quite new is the 
separate flounce for silk petticoats, 
ready made. These are of dififerent 
materials, but chiefly of net or 
chiffon most wondrously tucked, 
])uffed and embellished with bows 
of ribbon. The}^ can- be sewed on the 
petticoat and when defaced another 
adjusted with little or no trouble. 

The wash petticoat in cotton 
goods is not to be disdained. There 
is one strong point of recommen- 
dation — they are easily laundered. 
The Pongee petticoat is really 
quite beautiful with flounce prettily 
embroidered in floral patterns, 
holding to the natural color of the 
flowers. 

There is no garment more de- 
sirable of a warm Summer after- 
noon than a Kimono of Oriental 
silk. The American woman is 
built on a dififerent model than hei 
little Jap sister. Consequently, the 
Kimono must have more fulness in 
the skirt. This is obtained b> 
means of tucks or box pleats 
stitched to the waist line. A rib- 
bon belt or sash adds to the fin- 
ished appearance. 

In Dressing Sacques we noticed 
two styles as being attractive. One 
was made in one piece, the sleeve 
formed by two parts over the arm 
caught together and tied with 
satin ribbons. The other was ac- 
cordion-pleated. The yokes are 
round, square or pointed, of em- 
broidery and lace, and the mate- 
rials are dotted Swisses, silk, all- 
over laces, and fine, pretty-colored 
cashmeres. 

Tn dress goods chevron serges, 
which were worn with favor in the 
early .spring, are still the vogue, 
but as the season advances it is 
produced in a sheerer weave and 
consequently will be used for the 
summer tailored suits. 

In Shantung is a novel and much 
admired weave This is of large 
rough knots freely sprinkled on 
the surface and are known as 
"neigeuse" (snow flake). Whilst 
used for dresses, it is better suited 
for wraps and outside garments. 



and is trimmed with glossy satin 
bands. 

The use of cloth as a trimming 
on woolen materials of a sheer na- 
ture has been referred to in these 
articles, but as the season advances 
the vogue increases to such an ex- 
tent it seems worthy of mention. 

A very stylish tailor suit is of 
black woolen voile, the skirt plain, 
the jacket has deep directoire fac- 
ings of white moire, also the cufifs. 
A lace waistcoat, black or white, 
completes the costume, which in 
its simplicity is elegant. 

A novelty is the stamped-out de- 
vices in white tafifeta, which makes 
a handsome foot trimming on 
skirts. 

The tunic for outdoor wear has 
not fulfilled the predictions, 
though instances are seen of the 
draped tunic and the arrangement 
of trimming to simulate one, but 
for long skirted toilettes for din- 
ner and ball dresses it is much fa- 
vored. It is beautiful and grace- 
ful when of white lace slightly 
draped over a skirt of self-colored 
satin or silk voile; with the ad- 
dition of a broad lace flounce on 
the hem the efifect is enhanced. 

Trimmings of pongee for suits, 
whether of the natural color, 
lavender or blue, is of buttons. 
These are quite large, covered with 
the pongee or crochet matching 
the color. The coats are slashed 
at the sides or back to the waist 
line. On each side of the openings 
is a row of these large buttons. 
The sleeves are slashed and the 
openings closed with silk straps, 
cords or braides, with a size 
smaller buttons on each side. 

Araminta tells us if one should 
be on the top of the mountains 
and needed a hot water bag and 
did not have one a substitute can 
be found in a stone jug. Heat the 
jug in the oven, fill with boiling 
water, pound the cork in tight. The 
water will keep hot for eight hours 
or more. These jugs can always 
be found in the little village store. 
Madame Roberta. . 



.^t^^ 




' ^00«, Bl *■ 



This Week in New York 

Monday, July 13th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Baseball — Xew Ymk Americans vs. Cleveland, at the American 
League Park, 167th st and Broadway. 4 p. m. Ad-mis.- ion 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth avc., Wav- 
crlj-- and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Corlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts., and East river. 8 p. m. 

Taxameter cabs are now running nn a reduced Summer rate; 'phone 
2380 Columbus, for all information. It will surprise you, but you can ride 
in their well-appointed cabs at a very low figure. Try them. Call 2380 
Cokimbus. 

The Roof Garden of the Hotel Martha Washington (Woman's 
Ifiitel) is now open from 5 to \2 p. m. Dinner is served a la carte. 

Horse Racing — Brighton Beach Racing Association; Brighton Track 
it(. July 29). 

Tennis — Invitation tournanKiit; Seabright (N. J.) Lawn Tennis and 
Cricket Club. 



The Greatest and Most Original Attraction in Ne-w York are the 

FLEISCHMAM BATHS and 
Roof Garden Restaurant 

On the three upper floors of the Bryant Park Building. 

Northeast Corner 42d Street and 6th Avenue. 
The Roof Garden Restaurant is open to Ladies and Gentlemen. 
It is the coolest and most delightful dining resort in New York. 

First-class Service a la Carte. The Baths are open Day and 

Night, for »u>i only. Excellent Sleeping Accommodation, 

Price of Russian or Turkish Baths, $1.50. 8 Tickets for $10.00. 17 Tickets for $20.00 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

Tuesday, July 14th 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baseball- New York Americans vs. Cleveland, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Mount Morris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris aves., 
i20th to 124th .^ts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

The Singer tower is now open to the public, and the observation bal- 
cony at No. 149 Broadway offers the visitor to this city an opportunity 
to see New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. The 
balcony is on the forty-second floor, 54S feet above the curb, and gives 
a sight-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The tower 
has a platform with a high railing which accommodates about forty 
people. Express elevators run from the main corridor on the first floor, 
making the trip in one minute. There are also guides stationed on the 
platform to point out the different points of interest to visitors and to 
give other information. A fee of 50 cents is charged. 

Golf — Team match with Hackensack Golf Club; Ridgcwood (N. J.) 
Golf Club. 

Wednesday, July 15th 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Cleveland, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadwa}^ 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson st. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Mulberry Bend Park, ^Mulberry to Baxter St., and 
Bayard to Park st. 8 p. m. 

Wednesday evening meeting. Second Church of Christ Scientist, 
Central Park West at 68th st. 8 p. m. Visitors welcome. 

Wednesday evening meeting, Marble Collegiate Church, Eifth ave. 
and 29th St., Rev. David James Burrell, D.D., LL.D., minister. 8 p. m. 
You are cordially invited to attend. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles E. Jefferson, D.D., LL.D., pastor; Wednesday evening Praise 
and Prayer Service. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 



FOWLER & WELLS COMPANY :: established leas 

PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, EST. 1838 10c. , $1.00 per YEAR 

24 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Relay Run — Xcw York to Chicago; starts I'ruin City Hall steps at 
10 a. m. Route: Up Broadway to 726 St., thence to Riverside Drive, 
I hence to Broadwaj- at 135th st. Fifteen hundred Y. M. C. A. boys under 
•■iglitecn years of age will ]\articipate; the run will occupy about six days. 



Thursday, July i6th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. St. Louis, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broad waj-. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — East River Park, 84th to 89th sts., facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park. Broadway. Fifth and Madison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 



h^ 



r ^ rf::ri?i;^^-'^fe 



-•^JF Jil i mJ iBI I B^ 



NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8,40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings: Yonkers, West Point, NewburBli. Poiighkeepsie. Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Pousjhkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for \Vest Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 20. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. 'West 42d Street 
2.00 ; W^est 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at 'West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVEEK — Continued 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to 90th 
St., on Fifth ave. have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up I'^ifth ave. to 57th St., thence 
over to Broadway, up Broadway to y2d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be dis- 
tinguished: by day a red ball, by night a red light on the front of the 
cars. The fare in each instance, either way, is 10 cents per person. 



Friday, July 17th 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. St. Louis, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadwaj-. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert^Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 
8 ]). m. 

Public Concert — Wm. H. Seward Park, Hester to Division and Nor- 
folk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Battery Park, foot of Broadway, overlooking har- 
bor. 8 p. m. 

You can subscribe to "Daily Attractions in New York" for three 
months for fifty cents. It will be mailed to you regularly every Sat- 
urday. You can not buy it on the news stands. Subscribe now. 

Theatrical Field Day at the Polo Grounds, 157th st. and Eighth ave., 
in aid of the Home for Destitute Crippled Children. Twenty Chinese 
actors, from their theater in Doyer st., will present in the open air 
their latest playlet, 'The Duel," culminating in a thrilling sword contest 
in which all take part. There will be events of all kinds in which famous 
artists and athletes will compete, and Miss Lillian Russell is expected 
to umpire the baseball game between prima donnas and soubrettes. The 
founder and president of the home is Mrs. A. L. Erlinger. and Mr. George 
M. Cohan and Sam Harris are in charge of this benefit. 



GASHERIE DE WITT 
PROPRIETOR 



THE EARLINGTON 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 

8 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVBEK — Continued 

Saturday, July i8th 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baseball- — Xew York American^ vs. St. Louis, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admisi^ion 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Morningside I'ark, between Morningside ave., East 
and West, and iicth to 123d sts. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Central Park, Fifth to Eighth aves., nearest entrance 
to reach the Mall, is at yid st. 4 p. m. 

First outdoor swimming meet of the New York Athletic Club, at 
Travers Island, on the arrival of the 2 o'clock train from 129th st. The 
program includes lOO-yard swimming handicap, 100-yard swim for 
novices, fancy diving and canoe tilting. From the new platform the 
divers will give some thrilling exhibitions. 

Two hundred and seventy mile race ior cruising power-boats from 
Marblehead, [NLiss , to New Rochelle, N. Y.; the start will be made at 
10 a. m. 

Motor Boat — Motor Boat races; Marblehead. Mass., to New 
Rochelle, N. Y. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Atlantic 
Yacht Club. 

Yachting — Special series for tliirty-footers; Larchmont. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sfnmd; Larch- 
mont race week, to July 2Sth. 

Sunday, July 19th 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th St., the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D.D., rector; .'■ervices 8 a. m. and 11 a. m. the Rev. 
Joseph G. H. Barry, D.D., Dean of Nashotah House, Nashotah, Wis., 
will preach. All seats are free, and you will be cordially welcomed. 

Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, Madison ave. and 6oth 
St.. the Rev. Wallace MacMullen, D.D., minister: services. 11 a. m. 
Rev. Arlo .\, Brown will preach. A cordial welcome for you. 




C^-'t'o^'a^I house plans 

A new book, containing 150 plans of houses costing 
from $500 to $18,000, which anyone thinking of 
building ahouse should have if they wish to save money and 
also get the latest and best ideas of a practical architect. 160 
large octavo pages. Price, paper cover, $1.00. Sent by mail, 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price. 

Daily Attractions in New York 1 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Attractive Rooms for l^ent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 

Central Location. Comfortable Surroundings 

No. 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 

Telephone : 3768 Madison Square 



THIS AVEEK — Continued 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D.D., LL.D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. A 
welcome for all. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefferson, D.D., LL.D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

Second Church of Christ Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D.D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House, 30 
East Thirtj'-first st. A welcome for everyone. 

West End Presbyterian Church, 105th st. and Amsterdam ave., the 
Rev. A. Edwin Keigwin, D.D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
Strangers are cordially welcomed. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th st , the Rev. D. Asa Black- 
burn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. Strangers will be welcoine. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the speaker at the 
4 o'clock service, Evangelist John A. Davis; at the 8 o'clock, the Rev. 
R. A. Torrey. You are invited to attend. 

Public Concert — Central Park, Fifth to Eighth ave-., the nearest 
entrance to the Mall is at 72d st. 4 p. m. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 55th St., the Re\. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 4 p. m. The 
Rev. R. A. Torrey, D.D., the noted Evangelist, will preach. A welcome 
for you. 



$7,300. 



WILL BUY YOU A BEAUTIFUL 
HOME IN BROOKLYN 



Fine Residential District, wide asphalted street 

20 minutes from City Hall, Manhattan 

Brown stone house, 8 rooms, bath and store room 

All modern improvements, plenty of large closets 

Cabinet finish, in perfect repair 

Terms reasonable 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Directors Office and General Headquarters, 426 LAFAYETTE STREET 

TCLCPHOIMC, 3S70 SPRING 

Circulation Headquarters, 209 WEST 23rd STREET 
tclephonc, 3076 chelsea 

Reference Branches: 
ASTOR, 426 LAFAYETTE STREET LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES: 



East B'way, 197. .(Eaat B'way Branch). 
•Eait B'way, 83. (Chatham Sq. Branch). 
•Rlvlngton Street, 61.. .(Rivlngton Street 

Branch). 
•Leroy St., 66...(HudBon Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 49.. (Bond Street Branch). 
•10th St., 831 Eaat. ...(Tompklna Square 
Branch). 

Second Ave., 135. .(Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W..(JackBon Sq. Branch). 
•23d St., 228 Eaat. .(Epiphany Branch). 
•JSd St., 209 W. ..(Muhlenberg Branch). 

34th St., 215 Bast (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., 501 ■W..(St. Raphael Branch). 

42d St., 226 W.(Georgre Bruce Branch). 

60th St., 123 Eaat. .(Cathedral Branch). 

5l8t St., 463 W.(Sacred Heart Branch). 

58th St., 121 East.. (59th Street Branch). 
•67th St., 328 Eaat. (67th Street Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'ch). 

•Avenue A, 1466 (Webster Branch). 

•79th St., 222 Eaat. ..(YorkvUle Branch). 
•Amaterdam Ave., 444.. (St. Agnea B'ch) 
•96th St., 112 East (96th St. Branch). 

110th St., 174 BIaat...(Agullar Branch). 



12Sd St., 82 W. (The Harlem Library). 

•125th St., 224 E (125th St., Branch). 

•136th St., 103 W.... (135th St., Branch). 

•145th St., 503 "W (Hamilton Orange 

Branch). 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. . . (Waahlngton 

Heighta Branch). 
Library for th« Blind, 444 Amaterdam 
Avenue. 

Borough of Bronx 

•140th St., 569 B (Mott Haven Br'ch). 

•Washington Ave., 1866. (Tremont Br'ch) 
•Klngsbridge Ave., 2933. . . . (Klngabrldg* 
Branch). 

Borough of Richmond 

•Amboy Road, Tottenvllle. . (TottenvlUe 

Branch). 
•Central Ave., TompklnsvlUe, S. I (St. 

George Branch). 
•12 Bennett St... (Port Richmond Br'ch) 
•Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sta. 
•Occupying Carnegie Buildings. 



HOURS 

The Branchea, with ezceptlona noted below, are open from t a. m. to I p. m. 
on week daya. 

Branchea In Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Tear's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, Prealdentlal Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day; after 6 p. m. on Washlngtot. f Birthday and Christmas Eve; 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 5 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch Is closed from 5 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and la open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a. m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street, Tomp- 
klna Square. Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rlvlngton Street and Riverside Branchea from 
2 till 6 p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rlvlngton Street Brtnchea 
are open until 10 p. m. on week daya. 

Th« Library for the Blind la open on week days from 1 p. m. to t p. m. 

Tha Lenox Branch la open from 9 a. m. to < p. m. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



C'^S?^-^ A 




' '»Oo, bt ** 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty-First Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, July t2th 

Services II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL, 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



M Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. Sunday School, ii a. m. 

Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 







METHODIST 


Madison 


Ave. MetKodist Episcopal Cfiurcli 






CORNER OF SIXTIETH STREET 


Rer. 


Wallace 


MacIVIulIen, D. D. - - - Minister 

REV. ARLO A. BROWN. AMlstant Minister 

SUNDAY, JULY 12tl, 

Preaching Service, 11 A. M. 




Rev 


Arlo A. Brown will preach 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NEW YORK CHURCHES — Continued 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

#aint Bartholomew's fflhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 



RaT. LEIGHTON PARKS. D. D., Rector 

♦ 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher from June 14- to July 19 

THE REV. JOSEPH G. H. BARRY, D.D. 

Dean of Nashotah House, Nashotah, Wis 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 

CONGREGATIONAL 

BROADWAY TABERNACLE ""'n^^^^^^Xv:. ^L'v'.VJ^r"' 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a.m.. 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 P. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E.. 7 p.m. Wednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 

INDEPENDENT 

CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 

Sunday Services, 1 1 A. M. and 7.45 P. M. Strangers in the City Welcome 

PRESBYTERIAN 



iFiftli Aupttup PrpfibytPrtan (!It|urrt| 



Fifth Avenue and 55th Street 



Services, Inly 12th. at 11 a. m. and 4 p. m. 
Rev. K. A. T()RK1-:V. D.D.. the Evangelist, will preach 



REFORMED 



1628 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 1908 

The Marble Collegiate Church 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LLD., Minister 

Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN, D.D., Pastor for Strangers 
will preach Sunday, July 12th 
II a. m. Subject. " Wh.\t is Eternal Life?" 
8 p. m. Subject : " The Ethics of Sleep " 



Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CLUBS OF NEW YORK 



Aldine Association, in Fifth Ave 

Allenhurst, 289 Fourth Ave 

Alpha Delta Phi, 136 W 44th 

Amateur Billiard, 115 W 79th 

American Jersey Cattle, 8 W 17th 

American Kennel, 55 Liberty 

Arion, S9th St and Park Ave 

Army and Navy, 107 W 43d 

Attic, 141 W 42d 

Automobile, 54th St and B'way 

Baltusrol, 261 Broadway 

Beethoven, 207 E loth 

Boys', Ave A and loth 

Brook, 7 E 40th 

Brown University, 12 W 44th 

Calumet, 267 Fifth Ave 

Camera, 5 W 31st 

Catholic, Central Park South 

Century, 7 W 43d 

Chemists', 108 W 55th 

City Lunch Club, 165 Broadway 

Civic, 243 E 34th 

Clover, 45 W 21st 

Colonial Yacht, io8th and N. R. 

Columbia University, 18 Gram'y Pk. 

Columbia Yacht, 86th and N. R. 

Coney Island Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Country, Westchester, N. Y. 

Criterion, 683 Fifth Ave 

Delaware, 222 E 71st 

Delta Phi, 612 W ii6th 

Democratic, 617 Fifth Ave 

Deutscher Verein, 112 Central Pk.S. 

Down Town, 60 Pine 

Drug and Chemical, 100 William 

Electrical, 14 Park PI 

Empire City, 106 W 38th 

Engineers', 32 W 40th 

Federal, ']2> Ave D 

Fellowship, 211 W 45th 

Freundschaft, Park Ave and 72d 

Greenroom, 139 W 47th 

Greeters, 1146 Broadway 

Grolier, 29 E 32d 

Hardware, 253 Broadway 

Harmonic, 10 E 60th 

Harvard, 2.^ W 44th 

Hotel Men's Ass'n. Cambridge bldg 

Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Knickerbocker, Fifth Ave and 32d 

Lambs', 128 W 44th 



Lawyers', 120 Broadway 

Liederkranz, in E 58th 

Long Acre, 70 W 45th 

Lotos, 556 Fifth Ave 

Machinery, 50 Church 

Manhattan, Madison Ave and 26th 

Masonic, 17 E 22d 

Mendelssohn, 113 W 40th 

Merchants', 106 Leonard St 

Metropolitan, Fifth Ave and 6oth 

National Arts, 14 Gramercy Park 

N. Y. Athletic, 58 W 59th 

N. Y. Baseball, 1133 Broadway 

New York, 9 W 42d 

N. Y. Press, 7 Spruce 

N. Y. Railroad, 62 Liberty 

N. Y. Riding, 7 W 66th 

N. Y. Yacht, i^ W 44th 

Pen and Brush, 30 W 24th 

Physicians', 72 St. Mark's PI 

Players', 16 Gramercy Park 

Princeton, 121 East 21st 

Progress, Central Pk. W. and 88th 

Racquet and Tennis, 27 W 43d 

Reform, 42 Broadway 

Republican, 54 W 40th 

Riding, 7 E 58th 

St. Nicholas, 7 W 44th 

Salmagundi, 14 W 12th 

Stewards', 49 E 28th 

Strollers', 67 Madison Ave 

Studio, 959 Sixth Ave 

Technology, z^i E 28th 

Three Arts, 803 Lexington Ave 

Town and Country, 12 E 22d 

Transportation, Hotel Manhattan 

Turf and Field, 571 Fifth Ave 

Underwriters', TJ William 

Union, Fifth Ave and 51st 

Union League, i E 39th 

University, Fifth Av and 54th St W 

Victoria, 15 W 32d 

West Side Republican, 2307 B'way 

West Side Y. M. C. A., 320 W S/tli 

Whist, 13 W 36th 

Woman's, 9 E 46th 

Woman's Press, Waldorf-Astoria 

Woman's University, 17 E 26th 

Wool, 260 W Broadway 

Wyandot, 232 East 58th 

Yale, 30 W 44th 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE HOTEL MEN'S MUTUAL BENEFIT ASSOCIATION 



On j\I:oiula\-, July i.Uh, tlicrc will 
be an exodus of the Hotel Mana- 
gers of this city, all bound by 
special train over the New ^'ork 
Central R. R. for Saratoga Springs, 
to attend the 29th Annual Inter- 
national Reunion of the hotel men 
of the United States and Canada. 

The sessions of the association 
will continue throughout the week, 
commencing with the reception on 
Monday evening at Congresr Spring 
Park, of the International Hotel 
Supply Men's Exhibitors, and end- 
ing with a grand reception tendered 
to the Hotel Men's Mutual Benefit 
Assn. on Friday evening at the 
same park, by the Hotel Men of 
Saratoga Springs. Business and 
pleasure' will receive equal atten- 
tion during the week, and one very 
interesting feature of the program 
will be an exhibition by the Inter- 
national Hotel Supply Men, which 
will be the largest of its kind ever 
held in the United States. 

The election of new ofificers takes 
place on Tuesday, the 14th. Mr. 
Edward M. Tierney, proprietor of 
the Hotel Marlborough of this city, 
is the popular candidate for the 
Presidency, and as he has received 
the endorsement of the New York 
City and State Associations, The 
Board of Directors of the Chicago 
.'\sfn., The Washington, D. C, Ho- 
tel Men's Assn., The Norfolk. Va., 
and The Southern Hotel Men's 
.-Vssns., The Southwestern Hotel 



.\lcn"s As>n.. The New England 
Hotel Men's Arsn., The Wheeling, 
W. Va., Hotel Men's Assn., Tlie 
Long Island Hotel Men's Assn.. 
and many others, it would seem im- 
probable that any man can be found 
who will be willing to run against 
o strong a candidate, and, there- 
fore, it is expected by his friends 
that ]\Ir. Tierney's election will be 
unanimous. 

Mr. Edward M, Tierney is tiir 
type of man that makes many 
friends and holds them for all time. 
He is a man of fine presence, with 
a face that evidences good-cheer 
and kindly feeling, a manner thai 
is courteous, a nature that is con- 
siderate, generous and helpful, that 
harbors ill-will toward no one. 
Like many others of our best hotel 
men, he has risen from the ranks, 
and with wide experience he has ac- 
cpiired keen insight, ripe judgment, 
and a sense of justice that is never 
questioned. Last, but not of least 
importance to the man who must 
l^reside at many functions, he is a 
quick thinker and a ready speaker, 
and his apt after-dinner talks have 
added to his popularity among his 
asrociates. Surely Air. Tierney is 
well qualified to fill even so im- 
portant a position as that of Presi- 
dent of the great international 
"Hotel Men's INIutual Benefit Asso- 
ciation." 

Fr.\nk Thornton. 



Dr. j. T. WHELAN 

CHIROPODIST 
All Instruments Sterilized 


M. S. WILSON 

ELECTRO-VIBRATORY 
FACIAL MASSAGE 

MANICURING 


McGUTCHEON 

Suite 707 


BUILDING 


347 FIFTH AVENUE, near 34th street 

NEW YORK 


TELEPHONE: 6192 MADISON SQUARE 



15 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flaiiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Aster Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Ave 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



*42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



*72d St. andBroadw 
79th St. and Broadw 
861:h St. and Broadw 
91st St. and Broadw 

*96th St. and Broadw 

WEST SIDE BRAN( 
103d St. and Broadw 
110th St. andBroadw 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 



For any information tend to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, 



Rheime, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

"SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

FTiRE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



MAP 

OF 

MANHATTAN 




^:«^ 



SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and Bioadway 
233d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 
Mott Ave. and 149th St. 



Cotyrieht, 1907. B. L. Clarke 



Third Ave. and 149th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

♦Express Stations 



New York is Short of Men 

And long on opportunities. We are unable to supply the demands of leading 
employers for high-grade Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men. 
Positions paying $i,ooo-$5,ooo a year now open. If you would locate in 
Greater New York, call or write us to-day. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 







LEADING NEW YORK HOTEL s! 


Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON. Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES. Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 


The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN. Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 


Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP, Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Manhattan 

Madison Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON. Mgr. 
18-20 West 25th Street 


Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman'i Hotel) 1 
A. W. EAGER 
29 East Twenty-ninth Street i 

Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Gnrden , 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE. Mgr. 
81st Street and Columbus Avenue 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 

Florence House 

N. B. BARRY. Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 18th Street 


The Plaza i 

FRED STERRY, Mgr. 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A BARNETT. Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street i 

Prince George Hotel i 

A. E. DICK. Mgr. 

15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL, Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hoffman House 

Broadway and 25th Street 


Hotel Savoy 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Holland 

66 and 68 West 46th Street 
Mrs. WM. H. WHITE. Prop. 
"Apartments " 

Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY, Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel St. Regis 

Fifth Avenue and 55th Street 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. j 
Broadway and 27th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD. Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just off Broadway 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE. Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square Easi 


I 


8 



toi^s 




• Jeoo, Bt 



New York Theatres 



icademy of Music — Irving place 

and 14th St. Tel., 701 Gramercy. 

Closed. 
Serial Garden — Atop of the New 

Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. near 

Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 

Eve., 8.30. Prices, 50c to $2. 
Uhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel, 

5000 INIorningside. Vaudeville. 

Daily mats, 2.15; eve., 8.15. 

Prices 50c to $1. 

merican — 42d st. and 8th ave. 

Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 
.stor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 

287 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 

8.30; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 

Prices, 50c to $2. 
3elasco — 42d St., west of B'way. 

Tel., 4281 Bryant. Closed. 
3ijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 

Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed. 
Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 

Tel., loi Bryant. Closed. 



AWARDED 



^..-^ 



rAA 



JU&i 



ARONDACK 

Saratoga'* Most 

Palatable Water 

and Fine Mixer 

at any of the 

Best Hotels. 

Families may order 

from 

Charles & Co. 

Acker Merrall Co. 

Park & Tilford 



Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 

Tel.. 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 

World." Eve., 8.15; mat. Sat., 

2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 
Circle — Broadway and 60th st. Tel. 

5138 Columbus. "The Merry-Go- 

Round." Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. 

and Sat., 2.15. Prices. 50c to $1 
Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel 

4457 Columbus. Closed. 



Exclusively "Home-Cooking" and Dainty Service! 

Breakfast, Luncheon •// —A^^ . ^ 14 West 33d Street 

and Afternoon Tea at //^^/^^"^-^^^^ io... the ^valdori^ 

The Table d'Hote Dinners will be discontinued until September 8th, 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. m. during July and August 

Orders for FresK Ctit FloMvers promptly Ailed 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



jVEAV VORK theatres — Continued 



Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. Closed. 

Garrick — 35th St., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 35i-38th. Closed. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 

Hackett — 42d st., west of B'way. 

Tel., 44 Bryant. Closed. 
Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 

Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 

Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 

Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices. 25c 

to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 



Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel, 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th st "Follies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. Closed. 

Liberty — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. Closed. 

Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., S464 Columbus. Closed. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Closed. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 

Madison ave. and 26th st. 
"Ski-Hi." Eve., 8.30. Prices. 

50c to $2. 

Majestic — Broadway and sgth st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Hendrick Hudson ' 
"New York" and "Albany" 



1908 

Lv. Read Down. 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



Ar. 



1908 

Read Up. 



A.M. 1 A.M. 


P.M. 




A.M. 1 P.M. I P.M. 


8:00 








ii':45 
11 :20 
11 :00 


6:20 
6:00 
5 :.30 
5 :10 
4:30 




8:40 
9:00 
9:20 
9 :45 


9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 


i :45 
2 :00 
2 :20 


. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..We.st 129th St... 
.... Yonkers .... 


9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7 :35 




4:50 
5:00 
5 :25 
5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 


..Highland Falls.. 
. . .West Point. . . 
.... Cornwall .... 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
. New H a mbu rgh . 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsie . . 


8:40 
8:35 
8 :15 
8 :00 
7:.30 
7 :15 
7:00 

" 6 ':66 




11:50 
12:25 


1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 


2 :50 
'2':i5 


5 :45 

*5:20 

5 :05 










1 :15 

2 :10 


2:35 


1 :20 
12:25 


4:10 






7:45 


.... Kingston .... 
.... Catskill 




:{ :25 




11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 




3 :40 








6 :10 






.... Albany .... 



















P.M. 1 P.M. I P.M. I 



A.M. 1 A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 

and Kingston Point wharfs 

for all points in Catskill 

Mountains 

Morning and Afternoon 

C oncerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NKVV YORK THEATRES — Continued 



New Amsterdam — 42CI st., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow." mats., 
Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices, 50c 
to $J. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Richard 
Carle in "Mary's Lamb." Eve., 
8.30; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 535i-38th. Closed. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 
Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Closed. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 

NERVES ON A STRIKE? 

It is the first step that counts, 
whether you're learning to walk 
or trying to get on in life. You 
(lid not learn to walk by watching 
other.';, but by striking out for 
yourself and by keeping at it, in 
spite of bumps and failures. The 
first step is hard, but it gives you 
confidence. Don't stand hesitating, 
now, dissatisfied with the present, 
dreading the future; make up your 
mind what position you want and 
go after it. If you never make a 
start you never will get anywhere. 
The first step toward better things 
is to get your nerve built up, b}' 
])ure Tonic. Vegetation was made 
for man, woman and beast. The 
lierbs and vegetables that Herbo- 
X'ervo Confection Tonic is made 
from are pure and simple; a child 
can take it with impunity. The 
Confection at Park & Tilfords. 
The Tonic at Hegeman's, 2CO 
Broadway, Caswell & Massey, 
Daggett & Ramsdell, R. H. Macy & 
Co., and Riker's Drug Counters. 
The Soda drink "Herbo-Nervo," 
Ice Cream Soda and Egg Phos- 
phate at Hegeman's, Riker's, Cas- 
well & Massey and Daggett & 
Ramsdell's. Try it. You wil be 
convinced. 



"FOLLIES OF 1908" 

.\T THE JARDIN l.E I'.^RIS 

.\top the New York and Cri- 
terion Theatres a most attractive 
Roof Garden has been created, and 
here the "Follies of 1908" is the 
summer show, "conceived and pro- 
duced by F. Ziegfeld, Jr.," for the 
entertainment of the New York 
public. One need not hurry 
through dinner to see the curtain 
rise on this "Revue," for the show 
is planned to appeal to the eye 
rather than to the ear, it has 
neither beginning nor end, there is 
no jjlot to follow: hence, it does 
not matter if one comes in late or 
goes early. 

One part of the "Revue," entitled 
"Miss Columbia looking for a Pres- 
idential Affinity," is rather offensive 
to many people. In it appear the 
caricatures of several of our prom- 
inent men. dressed in woman's 
clothing, the last in line being our 
Chief Executive. The actor who 
takes this part does an excellent 
bit of specialty work, such as would 
ordinarily- bring him considerable 
anplause, but the temper of the an 
(licnce is such that he is allowed 
to leave the stage without any evi- 
dence of appreciation of his art. 

No true American really enjoys 
seeing the President of this coun- 
try held up to ridicule. A majority 
of us feel that the highest office in 
the gift of the people should be 
respected by them, and no matter 
how we ma)' differ in opinion from 
the incumbent we have placed in 
that oftice, it belittles us much more 
than it docs the President to pic- 
ture him in a costume and position 
that arouses a feeling of disgust in 
the beholder. 

The conspicuous stars of the 
show are undoubtedly the beau- 
tiful dancer, ^^I'lle Dazie, and the 
clever artist, Nora Bayes. whose 
character songs are always worth 
hearing. 

Fr.-\nk Thokntox 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TAXAMETER— Motor Cab Service— 'Phone 2380 COLUMBUS 

Telephone orders filled promptly day 
or night. Cabs are always in waiting 
at our various stands, or they may bo 
hailed and engaged on the street. When 
the flag is displayed above the taxa- 
meter, it signifies that the cab is dis- 
engaged and can be hired. 

REDUCED SUMMER RATES— EF- 
FECTIVE JUNE FIRST— Tariff No. 1 
(Red Indicator) Used Only. 

First half-mile or fraction - - 30 cts. 

Each quarter-mile thereafter - 10 cts. 

Each six minutes waiting - - 10 cts. 

This tariff applies to all vehicles and 
irrespective of the number of passengers 
carried except that for Hansoms, Cou- 
pes, Broughams and Victorias the charge 
for waiting time is 10 cts. for each TEN 
minutes or at the rate of ONLY SIXTY 
CENTS PER HOUR. 

EXTRAS— All Vehicles 

For ordering a cab, each mile or frac- 
tion thereof, from station or stand to 
point ordered 20 cts. 
Return charge when dismissed 

north of 155th Street or outside 

the Borough of Manhattan, for 

each mile or fraction to Times 

Square (minimum charge $1) - 20 cts. 
Trunk 20 cts. 

All ferriage and bridge tolls, both go- 
ing and returning, must be paid by the 
passenger. If the tasameter is out of 
order, fare will be charged at regular 
legal rates. 



RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 



INFORMATION FOR PASSENGERS 

1. HOW THE TAXAMETER WORKS. 
When the flag is lowered 30 cents will 
appear under the word "Fare," and this 
pays for the use of the cab until service 
to that amount, either in driving or in 
waiting, has been rendered. The indi- 
cator will register thereafter ten cents 
for each quarter mile, or each fraction 
of an hour waiting. This charge is for 
the exact distance traveled and the exact 
waiting time consumed, which are auto- 
matically measured by the taxameter and 
over which the driver has no control. 

The "extra" charges called for by the 
service are registered bv the driver and 
shown under the word "Extras." 

2. THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID IS 
THE SUM OF THE AMOUNTS SHOWN 
UNDER "FARE" AND "EXTRAS." 
THERE ARE NO CHARGES EXCEPT 
THOSE INDICATED BY THE TAXA- 
METER. 




The driver is charged with all amounts 
registered and is not permitted to make 
any reductions therefrom, but will, if 
required, give a receipt for the amount 

's. TO SECURE COMPLETE PROTEC- 
TION, observe (a) that the flag is low- 
ered to Tariff 1 position at the beginning 
of the service and not before ; (b) that 
the flag is maintained in that position 
during service; (c) that the flag is 
promptly brought to "Payment" posi- 
tion at the conclusion of the service and 
left there until the charge is settled. 

4. IF THE CAB IS DISABLED, the 
service up to the disablement must be 
paid for. 

5. A CAB REPORTING AT AN AD- 
DRESS in response to an order is 
charged for from the time for which it 
was ordered. 

6. A CAB ORDERED AND NOT USED 
must be paid for up to the time the 
driver is dismissed, including the charge 
for sending it. 

7. THEATRE AND OTHER RE- 
TURNS. Waiting time and any neces- 
sary mileage will be charged for a ve- 
hicle held for a return call. Waiting 
time may be saved by dismissing the 
vehicle and placing a separate order for 
a vehicle for the return call, but the 
Company cannot guarantee to fill such 
return call unless it be given to and 
accepted by the starter at a station 
or stand. Under no conditions may a 
cab be held in waiting without charge. 

8. IN CASE OF DISPUTE, passengers 
are requested to pay the full amount 
indicated and make claim to the Com- 
pany, in writing, giving the hour, date, 
driver and cab number, number of pas- 
sengers carried, distance travelled and 
waiting time consumed and wherein the 
charge is incorrect. Such claims will re- 
ceive prompt and courteous attention. 

9. THE ACCURACY OF THE TAXA- 
METER is insured by systematic inspec- 
tion. Do not assume that a charge is 
incorrect without first computing all of 
the distance and all of the waiting time 
comprised in the service. 

TOURING CARS, SIGHT-SEEING 
CARS, DOUBLE-DECK MOTOR BUS- 
SES, and Automobiles of every kind by 
the Hour, Day or Week — Rates on ap- 
plication, 

CAB STATIONS. 
4f)th St. and 8th Av. 55-65 E.88th St. 
C6th St. and 3rd Av. 141 E •25th St 

CAB STANDS. 
Sherry's Cafe Martin Hotel Astor 
Hotel Belmont, Long Island R. R., Ft. E. 

34th Street. 
Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. W. 23rd St. 



Taiitt 1 Taiitf 2 Payment 



NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO. 
EIGHTH AVE. AND F0RTV=N1NTH ST. 

PHONE. 2380 COLUMBUS 

CONNECTS WITH ALL CAB STANDS 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CRUISING ON THE EUPHRATES 



Noah's flood washed away the 
Garden of Eden, and no man has 
found it to this day; but the Eu- 
phrates mingled its magic waters 
with the great water-ways of the 
earth, and from thence have flowed 
into the lesser streams, so that from 
the deck of your own little boat 
where you may be enjoying your 
summer vacation, you may behold 
the very shores of Eden — an ideal 
hmd where the strife and the strug- 
gle are no more, and where the 
Tree of Life and the Tree oi 
Knowledge grow side by side. 

The only time and place to look 
for an enduring Eden is when you 
are cruising, for there and then you 
may behold it with your own eyes. 
Far from the haunts of men, far 
from the market-place and the bat- 
tle — with only God and you, the 
sky, the sunlight, the breezes, the 
moving picture of the waves, ships 
that pass in the daylight rocking you 
with their great friendly swells, sea 
gulls floating yonder, a school of 
fish jumping and glinting in the 
sunlight — ah, — it's the stmpTe life 
found at last! That land in the 
distance? That is the Garden of 
Eden! 

The land you may not have, but 
the waters are all your own with 
a clear title, and no man to dis- 
pute. Even the problems of the 
land h'ave all passed away; no cap- 
ital and labor, no single tax, no 
tax at all; no disagreeable neigh- 
bors, no unsightly views, no mi- 
crobes, no bacteria, and no health 
department to swoop down upon 
you when 'you shake your dust- 
cloth: no dust-cloth; no defective 
plumbing, no lawnmowers, phono- 
graphs, pianos, cuckoo clocks nor 
social _ obligations; no jealousies 
nor rivalries nor competitions: 
nothing to obstruct your view; sun- 
light on all sides at once; no gar- 
bage problem — toss it overboard, 
and sail away and leave it for the 
fishes! Isn't it ideal? Why, its 
the simple life we've all been look- 
ing for — discovered at last! What 



a ,-,lo\v, stupid old world it is not 
to have discovered it long ago! 
And no servant problem either! 

Even though your yacht may not 
classify with the millionaire's crafv, 
from its friendly deck you may 
find your Eden just the same. For 
you the great water ways of 
the earth may become navigable 
streams, awaiting you, their discov- 
erer. Such romantic places in which 
to anchor at nightfall! In coves 
where no habitation is to be seen, 
where Nature seems to have been 
exi)ecting just you, and has hur- 
ried like any busy housekeeper 
making ready for the entertainment 
of guests; and now holds the 
moon up to shine down upon you; 
and always the stars. The nighc 
makes such strange, weird outlines 
of the trees, and you forget how- 
it looks and must wait for sun- 
rise to "see it over again in new 
lights. Nothing to interrupt your 
sleep; sleeping out of doors with- 
out knowing it; no trollies nor 
automobiles; nor milk wagons 
over cobble stones; no fire engines 
nor policeman's rattle; but just the 
bells of the ship's clock, only you 
never even hear them, neither the 
night watch, nor the middle watcii. 

Now and again you cast anchor 
near some market place to lay in 
supplies, and remind yourself that 
this is the same world after all; the 
same people rushing about, busy 
as ants, burdened with their puny 
affairs. 

The Euphrates flows into sunny 
climes where there is no winter. 
On the crest of its wave you .= ail 
away beyond the pale of problems 
where God gives harmony to mod- 
ern mariners. 

Haryot Holt Dev. 



''The one plain duty of every man 
is to face the future as he faces the 
present, regardless of what it may 
have in store for him, and, turning 
toward the light, as he sees the 
light, to play his part manfully as 
a man among men." 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



EXPRESS COxMPANIES 
Adams. — 59-61 Broadway, 91 Maiden 
Lane, 2 Reade, 200 Chambers, 137 
West Broadwav, 307 Canal, 250 
Grand, 122 Prince, 322 Lafayette, 
13 B. 14tli, 25 "W. 23rd, 11 W. 
34th, 26 E. 42nd, 242 W. 47th, Madi- 
son av. and 48th, 1033 Third av., 
1257 Third av., 1789 Lexington av., 
355 Amsterdam av., 2753 V^ Broad- 
way, 308 W. 124th, 43 W. 125th, 
132 Hamilton place, 663 E. 148th. 

American Express Co. — 65 Broad- 
way, 81 Dey st., 142 West Broad- 
way, 21 Mott St., 302 Canal St., 93 
Bowery, 139 Spring st., 18 Astor 
place, 22 West 15th st., 922 Broad- 
way, 1434 Broadway, 120 Bast 42d 
St., Vanderbilt av. and 44th st., 399 
Madison av., 315 Columbus av., 
1251 3d av., 683 Columbus av., 235 
T^^est 116th St., 117 West 125th St.. 
138th St. and Park av., 2016 Am- 
sterdam av., 2800 Webster av. 
(Bronx Park). 

Long Island. — 1383 B'way, 304 Canal. 
257 Mercer, 1047 6th av., 95 5th av., 
572 Columbus av., 133 W. 125th, 
ft. James, Wall, B. 34th, 

National. — 141 B'way, 302 Canal, 158 
Duane, 105 Bleecker, 133 5th av., 
30 B. 125th, 275 W. 125th, ft. W. 
42d, and Franklin. 

X. Y. & Boston Desiiateh. — 304 Canal. 
100 Maiden La., 63 Gold, 45 Church, 
257 Mercer, 123 Prince, 95 5th av.. 
Piers 18 and 40 N. R., 613 6th av. 

IV. Y. Tran.sfer Co. — 1354 B'way, 182 
5th av., 521 7th av., 4th av. and 
42d, 245 Columbus av., 105 W. 
125th, ft. Rector, Liberty, Cort- 
landt. Chambers, Desbrosses and 
W. 23 d. 

United States. — 2 Rector (General), 
142 West, 127 Franklin, corner 
West Broadway, 296 Canal. 128 
Division, 35 ^V. 3rd, 7 E. 14th, 24 
B. 21st, 555 W. 23d, 134 W. 38th, 
7 E. 39th, 1255 Broadway, corner 
47th, 1243 3rd av., 224 Columbus 
av., 2218 Broadway, corner 79th, 
696 Columbus av., corner 94th, 145 
W. 125th. 

\Vells, Fargo & Company's Offices. — 
51 Broadway, 107 John St., 100 
Warren St., 198 West Broadway, 
18 Chatham Square, 310 Canal St., 
Fifth av.. Brie Ferry, West 23d St., 
173 Mercer st., 60 East 8th st., 95 
1159 Broadway, 613 Sixth av., 1047 
Sixth av., 88th st. and Columbus 
av., 133 West 125th st. 

AVe-stcott Express Co. — 149, 415, 429, 
922, 1216, 1434 Broadway, Astor 
Place and Lafavette st.. Grand 
Central S'tation. 275. 315, 683 Co- 
lumbus av., Parle av. and 128th st., 
117 W. 125th St.. D., L. & W. R. R. 
Depot. Barclay St.: D.. L. & W. R. 
R. Depot. Christopher pt.: D.. L. & 
M^ R. R. Depot. West 23rd st.; 
West S'hore R. R. Depots at Des- 
brosses St. and foot West 42d st. 
POST OFFICES 

General. . . .Broadway and Park Row 
Branch P. O. Stations. 
A — 136 Greene St.; B — 380 Grand 



St.; C — 589 Hudson st.; D — 4th ave. 
and 12th St.; E — 110 West 32d st.; 
F — 399 3d av.; G — 1648 Broadway; 
H — Lexington av., corner 44th St.; 
I — Columbus av., corner 105th St.; 
J — 8th av., cor. 124th St.; K — 203 B. 
88th St.; L, — 141 E. 125th st.; M — 1965 
Amsterdam av. ; X — Broadway, cor- 
ner 69th St.; O — 122 Fifth av.; P — 
Produce Exchange Building; R — 3d 
av., corner 150th st. ; S — Broadway, 
corner Howard st. ; T — 3319 3d av. ; 
U — 3d av., corner 103d st.; V — Cor- 
ner West Broadway and Canal st. ; 
W — 498 Columbus av. ; X — B. 138th 
st.;Y — 1160 3d av.; Bedford Park — 
Southern Boulevard, near Webster 
av. ; City Island — Main st. and Ford- 
ham av. ; Foreign Branch — ^Corner 
West and Morton sts. ; High Bridge 
— Sedgwick av., near Depot, place; 
Kings Bridge — "Kings Bridge," near 
Railroad Station; Madison Square — 
Fourth av., corner 23d st. ; Tre- 
mont — 719 Tremont av. ; University 
Heights — University of tlie City of 
New York; AVestchester — Main St., 
near West Farms road; "Williams- 
bridge — -White Plains av., near 
Briggs av. 

DISTANCES IN NEW YORK 



From the 


From the 




Battery 


City Hall 




14 mile 




To Rector st. 


1/0 " 




" Dey St. 


% " 




" City Hall. 


1 


1/2 miie 


" Leonard st. 


1 14 miles 


% " 


" Canal st. 


1 V2 " 


1 


" Spring St. 


1% " 


1% miles 


" E. Houston St. 




IV2 " 


•' E. 4th St. 


■2Vi " 


1% " 


" E. 9th St. 


21/2 " 


2 " 


" B. 14th St. 


2% •' 


2% " 


" E. 19th St. 


.S " 


2% " 


'• E. 24th St. 


31/4 •' 


2% " 


" E. 29th St. 


.S1/2 •• 


3 


•' B. 34th St. 


3% '• 


3% " 


" E. 38th St. 


4 


3V. " 


" E. 44th st 


414 " 


3% " 


■' E. 49th St. 


4Vi " 


4 


" E. 54th St. 


4% " 


4% " 


•' E. 58th St. 


^ 


4y2 " 


" E. 63rd St. 


5% " 


4% " 


" E. 68th St. 


51/2 " 


5 


" E. 73rd St. 


5% " 


5% " 


" B. 78th St. 


6 , •' 


5y2 " 


" E. 83rd St. 


61/4 " 


5% '> 


" E. 88th St. 


C'Vi " 


6 


•• E. 93rd St. 


C,% " 


6 14 " 


" E. 97th St. 


7 


evs " 


" E. 102d st 


714 " 


6% " 


" E. 108th St. 


71/. " 


7 


•' E. 112th St. 


7% •' 


714 " 


" E. 117th St. 


H 


71/2 '• 


•' E. 121stst. 


8 1.4 '■ 


7% " 


" E. 126th St. 


101/2 " 


10 


" W. 160th St. 



The distance across the city : 
.Vt Battery pi. is 1/2 mile; at Fulton St.. 
% mile ; at Chambers st., 1 mile; at 
Grand st., 2V^ miles: at Houston St.. 
2%miles; at 14th st., 2% miles: at 2.3d 
St., 2% miles; at Inwood, % mile. 

From 23d st. northward to 125th st. 
the width of the island averages from 
2 to 214 miles. 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



PAUL L. 


BRYANT 


DYEING AND CLEANSING 


Gowns Cleaned in Twenty-Four Hours 


291 FIFTH AVENUE 


900 SIXTH AVENUE 


Tel. 1224 MADISON SO. 


Bet. 50th & 51st Sts. Tel. 5207 Plaza 



STATEN ISLAND TROLLEY TRIPS 



Broadway trolley to Whitehall 
St. At foot of Whitehall st. take 
the Municipal Ferry to St. George, 
Shore Line along the shore to 
Holland Hook, passing through 
New Brighton, Snug Harbor, Liv- 
ingston, West- New Brighton, Port 
Richmond, Tower Hill, Elm Park 
and Mariners' Harbor. On the re- 
turn trip take Shore Line to South 
Beach, passing Tompkinsville, 
Stapleton, Clifton, Rosebank, Fort 
Wadsworth and Arrochar. From 
South Beach, Rapid Transit Rail- 
way or Shore Line to St. George 
and Municipal Ferry back to Man- 
hattan. Another Staten Island trip 
is to Midland Beach, a pleasant 
shore resort on the southern beach. 
Take ferry to St. George from foot 
of Whitehall St., Manhattan, then 
Midland Beach Line of Staten Isl- 
and Midland Railroad to Midland 
Beach, passing through Tompkins- 
ville, Stapleton, Concord, Garret- 
sons and Grant City. Returning, 
take Midland Beach Line to Con- 
cord, transfer Port Richmond Line 
to Bergen Point Ferry, Port Rich- 
mond, via Clove road, Castleton 
Corners, Prohibition Park and 
Wes'terleigh, or transfer to Port 
Richmond Line from Concord to 
Castleton Corners, transfer Castle- 
ton ave. line to Columbia st. and 
Castleton ave.. West New 
Brighton, Brighton Heights and 
Castleton ave. line to St. George, 
passing Smith's Infirmary. From 
Bergen Point Ferry, Port Rich- 
mond Light and Railroad Com- 
pany can be taken to St. George, 
passing through West New 
Brighton, Livingston and New 
Brighton. Ferry from St. George 
to Manhattan. 



A FEW FERRY TRIPS 

A trip on the ferry from the foot 
of West 23rd St. across to Jersey, 



taking the Annex to Fulton st., 
Brooklyn, and return, gives one a 
pleasant sail of a couple of hours 
and a view of the "skyscrapers," 
the Battery, Statue of Liberty and 
Brooklyn Bridge, at a small cost. 

Another trip may be made from 
foot of East 42nd St., down the 
East River to Broadway, Brooklyn, 
taking boat from there to foot of 
Roosevelt st., Manhattan, at ad- 
joining slip, and return. 

Still another trip may be taken 
by taking the ferry at foot of 
Franklin st.. North River, to Wee- 
hawken, thence by trolley to Four- 
teenth St.,' Hoboken, changing 
there to the Washington st. car for 
Hoboken ferry, across to the foot 
of West 23rd St., Christopher or 
Barclay st.. New York. 

A ferry trip that almost circum- 
navigates Manhattan Island can be 
made by taking boat at foot of Ful- 
ton St., East River, across to 
Brooklyn. Take Annex (slip next 
to Fulton ferry) and go to Jersey 
Cit}'; take Pennsylvania ferry to 
West 23rd St. At 23rd St. take car 
to 42nd St. Take ferry at foot of 
West 42nd St. for Weehawken. 
Take trolley from Weehawken to 
Fort Lee, where another car must 
be taken to Edgewater, at which 
point take ferry to 130th st., Man- 
hattan. Take a trolley across town 
to East 99th St., walk to the river 
from the car and take ferry, which 
will carry you through Hell Gate 
and into the Sound to College 
Point. From College Point take 
trolley to Long Island City and to 
Astoria. Take ferry to East 92nd 
St. From here take Second ave. 
trolley to East 42nd st. ferry, down 
the East River to Broadway, 
Brooklyn. Take boat at adjoining 
slip to Roosevelt st., Manhattan, 
and you are back almost to the 
starting point. 



25 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



^^ 


MAGFADDEN'S 


m 


Physical Culture Restaurants 


W' 


Caterers Nature's 


^ 


Pure Nourishing Foods 


' k- 


Popular Prices 

New York: Pittsburg: 




654 Broadway 302 Wood St. 


l^^^^^|i|fj, w.^ 


220 Fulton St. Boston: 

120 Pearl St. 2"-29 Kingston St. 


Bernarr Macfadden 

Pres. P. C. Restaurant Co. 

Pres. P. C. Pub. Co. 


487 Pearl St. ^'5-37 Arch St. 

106 East 23d St. Chicago: 


Philadelphia: 

25-27 South 8th St. 


2078 Seventh Ave. Tacoma Buildinsj 

615 Sixth Ave. Madison and Wabash Ave. 


Henry Ward Beecher 


said : 


" There is no 
human food." 


ligher art than that which tends toward the improvement of 



1 



D E MEDICI 

= N E W =^ 

GOLGREAM 



Large Jars, $1.00 
Smaller Jan. 50 Cents 



^ Poisoscd of rare qualitici and many valuable propertiei 
not generally found among toilet articles, beiidei its unique 
effect as a 6rst-cla8s 

SKIN FOOD 

used in massage for producing and preserving a Rm, healthy 
complexion, places this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients second to none in either Europe or America. 

M. B. De MEDICI . 124W.21itSt.,NewTork 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



SAILS 
iqoS 



PORT 



NAME OP 

STEAMER 



ADDRESSES OF LINES 



STARTING PLACE 



.Tuly 14. Bremen 

15 . Southampton. . 

15. Liverpool 

■ 15. Rotterdam. . . . 

IG. Havre 

" 1 6. Gib'r & Naples. 

" 10. Bremen 

" 1(5. Hamburg 

" 16. Liverpool 

16. Copenhagen. . . 

18. Hamburg 

" 18. Liverpool 

18. London 

•■ 18. Gib'r & Naples. 

18. Glasgow 

'• 18. Southampton.. 

18. Antwerp 

21 .Bremen 

" 22. Southampton. . 

'■ 22. Liverpool 

•• 23. Havre 

'• 23. Bremen 

•• 23. Copenhagen.. . 

" 23. Liverpool 

" 23 . Hamburg 

" 25. Naples 



.Kronprinz. . 
..Adriatic. . . 
.Lusitania. . . 
. K.vndam. . . . 
•Bretagne.. . 
.('arpathia.. . 

P. Alice 

. Kaiserin. . . . 

.Cedric 

.C.P.Tietgen. 
. P. Lincoln.. 

.Umbria 

• Mesaba 

.K.Albert.. . 
.California.. 

.St. Louis.. . 
.Zeeland.. . . 

K. Wm. 11. . , 

Majestic. . . 
. Mauretania. 
.Provence. . . 

Bremen 

.Oscar II. . . 

. \rabic 

. Deutchland. 
. Ultonia 



.N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way . . . 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Curard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

Holland-Amer., 39 B'way 

.French Line, 19 State St 

. Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 
. N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 
, Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 
. White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way. 
.Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . ■ 
. Cunard S. S. Co.. 21 State St. . 
, Atlantic Trans, Line, 9 B'way. 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

..vnchor Line, 17 B'way 

. American Line, 9 B'way 

.Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

. N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

.French Line, 19 State St 

. \. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 
.Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way. 
. White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Ilamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 
.Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 



. Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
. Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.'<'t 5th St., Hoboken 
.Ft Morton St., N. R. 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft r'.d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
. Ft 17th St.. Hoboken 

Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft Houston St.. N. R. 
. Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 24th St.. N. R. 
.Ft Fulton St., N. R. 

Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St.. Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft Morton St., N.R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
. Ft 17th St., Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



GRANT'S TOMB 



Grant's Tomb is located on River- 
side Drive and 123d st. This may 
be reached by Sixth ave. and Am- 
sterdam ave. car to 123d St., then 
walk west. Hours, 10 to 5 daily, in- 
cluding Sunday. No admission fee. 
This monument was designed by 
John H. Duncan, and is constructed 
of white granite from Maine, with 
marble interior, and from its com- 
manding site overlooking the Hud- 
son is very imposing. The struc- 
ture is 90 feet on the side and 72 
feet in height, with circular cupola 
and Ionic columns 70 feet in diam- 
eter. The dome rises 150 feet from 
the ground, the apex of the monu- 
ment about 280 feet above the river ; 
from the plaza facing the south 
side steps 70 feet wide ascend to 
the portico, which has double lines 
of Doric columns before the en- 
trance and massive bronze doors ; 
above the portico two 'sculptured 
figures by J. Massey Rhind, em- 
blematic of Peace and War. On a 
panel are inscribed these words : 
"Let us have peace." (This was the 
concluding sentence of General 
Grant's letter accepting the nomi- 
nation for the Presidency, May 29, 
1868.) 

The interior is "jd feet between 
the walls. The four great piers of 
the rotunda carry arches and are 
about 50 feet from the floor. The 
gallery is circular, supported bv the 
arches, 40 feet in diameter ; the 
dome about 105 feet above the floor. 
Sculptured reliefs by J. Massey 
Rhind represent Youth, Military 
Life, Civil Life and Death. In the 
small rooms surrounding the ro- 
tunda are stands of battle flags. 
Through the circular opening in 
the floor the sarcophagus is seen 
in the crypt directly beneath the 
centre of the dome. It is of red 
porphyry from Montello, Wis., and 
is supported on a pedestal of gran- 
ite from Quincy, Mass. Upon the 
lid is the name, Ulysses S. Grant. 
The companion sarcophagus, an 
exact counterpart, both in material 
and design, was provided, it being 
the expressed wish of General 



Grant that Mrs. Grant should lie 
by his side. 

General Grant died July 2^, 1885, 
at Mount McGregor, N. Y. The 
funeral was the grandest pageant 
ever seen. The remains lay in state 
in the City Hall and was then con- 
veyed to the temporary tomb. The 
procession was eight miles long 
and it was estimated that over a 
million people lined the route. 

There were 90,000 contributors, 
and the fund, with interest, amount- 
ed to $600,000, and was raised by 
the Grant Monument Association. 
The corner-stone was laid April 27, 
1892, by President Harrison. Sealed 
in it were copies of the Declaration 
of Independence, Constitution of 
the United States and Articles of 
Confederation, a Bible, the "Me- 
moirs" of General Grant, an Ameri- 
can flag, badges of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and the Loyal Le- 
gion, and a number of medals 
struck in United States mints in 
commemoration of events in Gen- 
eral Grant'sdife. 

IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Water Route to 

CONBY ISIvAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise m the 
World. 

TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 120th St., North River, 0.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30. 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4..30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45. 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, *10.40, *11.25 A. M.. 12.10, 
*12.55. *1.40, 2.55, 8.40. 4.25, *5.2o, 
6.10, 7.10, •7.55, •8.40, ♦9.25, •10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a * go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets. 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St.. N. R„ 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare : — -Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



Art Galleries — The art galleries of 
New York to which the public are 
admitted are comparatively few 
in number, but there are a num- 
ber of notable pictures to be seen 
by those interested in art mat- 
ters, in some public buildings 
which are devoted to other pur- 
poses. Thus there are in the 
Lenox Library a number of fine 
pictures bequeathed to the city 
by Mr. Lenox, including works 
by Reynolds, Turner and Mun- 
kacsy. The New York Historical 
Society possesses some valuable 
pictures, while there are some in- 
teresting portraits of former 
mayors of New York to be seen 
at the City Hall. Some of the 
chief artistic treasures of New 
York, however, are to be found 
in the collections of private in- 
dividuals. American Water Color 
Society, 109th st. and Amster- 
dam ave.; National Academy of 
Design, Amsterdam ave. and 
104th St.; Society of American 
Artists, 215 West 57th St.; Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth 
ave. and 82d st.; Lenox Library, 
895 Fifth ave.; N. Y. Historical 
Society, Central Park West and 
76th St. 

Battery Park — Foot Broadway. 
Affords fine view of the harbor. 

Birthplace of President Roosevelt 
— Our President was born at No. 
j8 East 20th st., October 27, 1858. 
A political organization under 
the name of "Roosevelt Home 
Club," occupies a portion of the 
building. 

Botanical Gardens — In Bronx 
Park, at 177th st. Special exhibi- 
tion of rare orchids and ferns. 
10 a. m. to 5 p. m. Free. 

Bowling Green — Foot Broadway. 
Oldest park. Drill ground in 1626. 

Bronx Park — Southern Boulevard 
and East i82d st. and Pelham 
ave. Admissicm free. Closed at 
sundown. 

Church of the Ascension — Fifth 
ave. and lOth st. This church was 
founded in 1828 and was located 



in Canal st. The present church 
was built in 1841 and contains 
the largest oil painting of a 
sacred subject in the world. This 
picture is 38 feet high and 40 feet 
wide and was presented to this 
church by Mrs. Rhinelander, at 
a cost of over $20,000. It is sup- 
posed that it took 3,000 pounds of 
paint to execute this work. A 
story told of the early days is 
that planks were laid to Broad- 
way across the meadows and a 
small sum of money was paid to 
the truant officer to prevent the 
boys from bathing in the brook, 
which was located at the back of 
the church, during service. 

Chinatown — Mott, Pell and Doyers 
sts. Contains Chinese theatres, 
shops, restaurants, etc. 

City Hall— City Hall Park. Built 
1803. Contains portraits of Gov- 
ernors, Washington's table, desk 
and portrait in silk. 

City Prison — Called "The Tombs." 
Centre and Franklin sts. 

Clearing House — "/"/ Cedar. Daily 
Imsiness nearly $300,000,000. 

Cooper Union Library and School 
— 3d and 4th aves. and 7th st. 
I-'ounded 1857 by P. Cooper. 

Curb Market — On Broad street, be- 
low E.xchange place, a large 
number of men with standing in 
the financial world not regular 
members of the Stock Exchange, 
and dealing principally in unlist- 
ed securities which are known as 
"cats and dogs." This organiza- 
tion is now confined to a roped 
arena in the centre of the street. 

Custom House — Wall, corner Will- 
iam. New bldg., Bowling Green. 

Eden Musee — West 23d st., be- 
tween Broadway and Sixth ave. 
This is a museum containing 
many interesting and historical 
groups in wa.x. Admission, 50 
cents; Sunday, 25 cents. 

Fort George — 190th st., between 
Amsterdam and nth aves. A 
high, rocky projection on which 
a redoubt had been erected dur- 
ing the Revolution. The Isabella 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



Homo for old people is located 
lie re. 

'raunce's Tavern — Broad and Pearl 
sts. One hundred and sevent^-- 
eight years old; recently pur- 
chased by the Sons of the Revo- 
lution. It was here that Wash- 
ington said farewell to his officers 
of the American Army in 1783. 

tolden Hill — Near John and Will- 
iam streets was shed the first 
blood of the Revolution in a 
skirmish between citizens and 
'the king's soldiers. This is 
known as the "Battle of Golden 
Hill " A tablet marks the spot — 
William and John streets, Golden 
Hill. Here, January 18, 1770, the 
fight took place between the 
"Sons of Liberty" and the Brit- 
ish Regulars, i6th P'oot. First 
blood in the War of the Revolu- 
tion. Erected by the Sons of the 
Revolution. 

larlem River Speedway^E.xtend- 
ing from 155th to 208th st., on 
the western bank of the Harlem 
River; 100 feet wide, with side- 
walks for pedestrians. 

lerald Building — Broadway and 
35th St. 

ligh Bridge — Harlem River and 
175th St. 

umel Mansion— lidgecombe ave. 
and i6oth st. Washington's 
Headquarters. Once the home 
of Aaron Burr. 

wennedy House — Formerly stood 
on the site of the present Wash- 
ington Building. overlooking 
Battery Park, erected in 1760 by 
Archibald Kennedy, Collector of 
the Port. Here General Putnam 
had his headquarters previous to 
the Battle of Long Island, and 
at various times it was occupied 
also by Lord Cornwallis, Lord 
Howe, Sir Henry Clinton and 
Talleyrand. Here also Benedict 
Arnold arranged his conspiracy, 
and from here Washington wit- 
nessed the departure of the Brit- 
ish troops. 

Menagerie — Central Park, opposite 
East 64th. Rare animals and birds. 
Free. Hours, 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Metropolitan Museum of Art-Cen- 
tral Park, opposite 82d. Daily, lO 
a. 111. to 5 p. m. Saturday, 10 to 
10 p. m.; Sunday, i to 5.30 p. m. 
Free. E.Kcept Monday and Fri- 
day, fee 25c. 

Morgue — About 4,000 bodies of 
adults and 3,000 children are re- 
ceived yearly, including those who 
die in the hospital of the Depart- 
ment of Charities as well as those 
found in public places. Erected 
in 1897. Open day and night. At 
the foot of East 26th st. 

Navy Yard, Fort Sands — Open 
daily to visitors, except Sun- 
days and holidays, from 8 a. m. 
to 5 p. m. No pass reqiiired to 
visit yards, but permission to 
visit ships must be obtained from 
commanding officers. It is also 
necessary to have pass to obtain 
admission to yard on Sundays 
and holidays. By trolley from 
Brookljn Bridge. 

Obelisk — Near Museum of Art. 
Erected in Egypt, 1500 B. C. Pre- 
sente<l by the Khedive. Brought 
here 1881 at cost of $100,000. 

Potter's Field — Here lie the bodies 
of the unknown and pauper dead. 
Located on Hart's Island. Can 
be reached by boat from East 
26th St. Pass can be had by ap- 
plying to Department of Chari- 
ties or Correction. 

Rhinelander Sugar House — For- 
merly stood on the corner of the 
present Rose and Duane streets, 
one of the many buildings in 
which American prisoners were 
incarcerated during the Revolu- 
tion, subject to inhuman cruel- 
ties at the hands of the infamous 
Cunningham. 

Rogues' Gallery — Police Headquar- 
ters, No. 300 Mulberry st. Can 
be viewed only by special per- 
mission. .A^ collection of photo- 
graphs of notorious criminals 
who have from time to time been 
in the hands of the police. 

Spanish Museum — .\t the foot of 
West 156th St., near Riverside 
Drive, is situated the property on 
which Mr. Archer Huntington 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS or INTEREST— Continued 



has built the beautiful Hispanic 
Society Building. Built of gray 
stone with Doric columns, Ro- 
man-Spanish in style of archi- 
tecture, a stone embankment pre- 
serves the terraced foundation, 
and two flights of stone steps 
lead down to the street in the 
middle front. For many years 
Mr. Huntington has devoted 
much time and money to the col- 
lecting of rare and choice Span- 
ish antiques from earliest peri- 
ods, including those of the Span- 
ish colonies, it being his wish to 
establish in this city a museum 
and library that would represent 
the complete history of Spain in 
its national, political, social, in- 
tellectual and art life. Visitors 
arc welcome. 

Statue of Liberty — Bedloe's Island. 
Steamer from Battery every 
hour; 25 cents round trip; tickets 
good for admission to the statue; 
presented by France. 

St. Paul's Church — Broadway and 
Vesey st. Built in 1764; main- 
tained by Trinity Parish. Attend- 
ed by Washington, whose pew 
remains. 

St. Patrick's Cathedral— Fifth ave. 
and 50th St. (3pen daily. Visitors 
are welcome. On view is the 
cardinal's hat hanging on the 
altar. It is so high up under the 
arch that it looks like a mere 
speck. 

Stock Exchange — 20 Broad st. 

Sub-Treasury — Wall and Nassau. 
Government banking house, $200,- 
000,000 in gold and silver coins 
often stored here. Site of Wash- 
ington's inauguration. The stone 
he stood on can be seen. 

The Swramp — Is located west of 
Franklin Square, and east of City 
Hall Park. Here is to be found 
• the centre of the hide and leather 
trade of New York. As this sec- 
tion is in a hollow, it is called to 
this day "The Swamp," the at- 
mosphere being strongly impreg- 
nated with the odor of fresh sole 
leather and of salted hides. 



Van Cortlandt Mansion — Van Cort- 
landt Park, near Jerome ave., 
now a historic museum in charge 
of Colonial Dames. 

Ward's Island — Located in the 
East River near its junction with 
the Harlem River, and forms the 
northern boundary of Hell Gate. 
It is OAvned by the city and con- 
tains about 200 acres, and is oc- 
cupied by the Alanhattan State 
Hospital for the Insane, the State 
Emigrant Hospital, Houses of 
Refuge, and a nursery or home 
for children, as well as home for 
invalid soldiers of the Civil War. 
Can be reached by boat from 
East ii6th St. in the afternoon. 
Procure pass from Manhattan 
State Hospital. Also by steamer 
from Peck Slip, 11.30 a. m., Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

Washington Arch — Washington 
Sq. and 5th ave. Dedicated 1893. 

Washington Bridge — Amsterdam 
ave., 181 st, over Harlem River. 

Washington Building — Located at 
Battery place and Broadway, 
erected by Cyrus W. Field, the 
author and founder of the At- 
lantic cable. Tablet erected : No. 
I Broadway: "Here stood Ken- 
nedy House, once headquarters 
of Generals Washington and 
Lee " On the Bowling Green 
opposite, the leaden statue of 
King George was destroyed by 
the people, July 9, 1776, and later 
made into bullets for the Ameri- 
can army. 

Washington Market — Occupies the 
entire blocks, Washington, West, 
Fulton and Vesey streets. This 
is the principal meat and veg- 
etable market of the city, and in 
the early morning hours afifords 
a spectacle well worth witnessing. 

Woodlawn Cemetery — Jerome and 
Webster aves.. East 211th to 

Zoological Park — Bronx Park, 
Southern Boulevard and East 
i82d St. and Pelham ave. Free 
except Monday and Thursday. 
Admission, 25 cents; children, 15 
cents. Open until sundown. 



30 



Boracted 
TsJcum 



1ENNENS 

rOILET POWDER 



"The Box 
that lox 





cannot begin too early to realize the value of 
a healthy, well-groomed appearance, and its 
bearings on the successes of after-life. Don't 
handicap the child— advise and insist upon the daily use of genuine MENNEN'S BOR= 
ATED TOILET TALCUM POWDER, the first necessity in the nursery, the satisfying 
finish of the bath and the shave. Mennen's prevents and relieves Chafing, Prickly 
Heat, Sunburn and all skin troubles of Summer. 

For your protection the genuine is put up in non=refilIable boxes— the "Box that 
Lox," with Mennen's face on top. Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 
1006. Serial No. iS42. Sold everywhere, or by mail 25 cents. Sample free. 
GE^RHARD MENNEN CO., NE'WA.RK, N. J. 
Try Mennen's Violet (Borated) Talcum Toilet Powder— It has the scent of fresh-cut 
Parma Violets. Sample free. MENNEN'S SEN YANG TOILET POWDER, Oriental 
Odor. MENNEN'S BORATED SKIN SOAP (blue wrapper). No Samples. 

Specially prepared for the nursery. Sent free, for 2 cent stamp to pay postage, one 
set Mennen's Bridge Whist Tallies, enough for six tables. 



JUL 11 WOb 

Is This Your Opportunity 
or His? 



H 



AT ERF R O N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufficient water for ocean-going vessels, 

l\ nd within 1 5 miles of the Battery, on 

J. he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 

i2j very facility for manufacturing 

Xx. ight at hand. Water under pressure. 

1/ reight carried by three railroads. 

JK. are opportunity : 1 50 acres 

KJ f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

XN o difficulty in building : solid ground for 
^ ^^ foundations. 

J. he only large piece of waterfront propert}^ 
available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 



©ailp Attractions 



m 



j^eto ^ork 



UBHARYofCONBRESS 
I wo Copies KecavM 

JUL 18 j908 



/Ut? 




Cc'fyright loob. />'. /,. Clarke 



TAXAMETER GABS 

STANDS: Sherry's; Cafe Martin ; Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R. R.. Foot East 34th 
Street : Central R. R. of N. J., Foot West 23rd Street 

TELEPHONE 2380 COLUMBUS 

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cab is promptly dispatched 
Reduced Summer Rates now in effect NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

Tariff folder mailed on request Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 



VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

opyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in New York, Inc. 



NO. 121 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTELS 



Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON. Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 

Hotel Astor 

WM. G. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 

Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES. Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 


The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 

Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 


Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON, Mgr. 

18-20 West 25th Street 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman* Hotel).'-' 
A. W. EAGRR , 
29 East Twenty-nAh -St^et 

Hotel NaA^arre 

Strictfy Fir^Aoof • 

Seventh Avenue "and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Garden 

The Plaza 

FRED STERRY. Mgr. 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 

Park Avenue Hotel 

REED & BARNETT. Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE. Mgr. 
81st Street and Columbus Avenue 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART. Prop 

Florence House 

N. B. BARRY, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 18th Street 


Prince George Hotel 

A. B. DICK. Mgr. 
15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hotel Savoy 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


Hotel Gotham 

S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


The Holland 

66 and 68 West 46th Street 
Mrs. WM. H. WHITE. Prop. 
"Apartments " 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY. Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE. Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD. Pres. and Mgr. 

47th Street, just off Broadway 


Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 



Paely Atteacteoms 

m MEW YOEHC 

o4 Weekly efymgajsine ^Devoted to c^no'oa.nce Jnfomuition. 

Vol. X JULY 2oth to JULY 26th, 1908 No. 121 

Daily Attractions in art notes 

Nxr 1 /T \ Lenox Library — 71st st. and Fifth 

eW 1 OrRj (inc. 1 ave. The large and interesting 

^ collection of lithographs pre- 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily sented to the New York Public 
Attractions in New York, a New York Library by Joseph Pennell, in- 
corporation; offke, I Madison Avenue; ^j^^j^ ^ number by Pennell him- 
E. R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, ^^jf^ ^j^j ^^^ j^^^ ^^ exhibition in 
Secretary and Treasurer The address of the ^j^^ j^^^j. j^^jj ^f ^j^jg Library. 
officers IS the office of this Magazine. ^j^^^ ^j ^j^^^^ ^^^^ drawn as 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, ilustrations for volumes in the 

I M«di«on Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. "Highways and Byways" series 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy of books on English countries. 

ITT : : -. , r r ,\ T" As the drawings were reproduced 

Daily Attraction. circuUtes through all the ^^^ publication by photo-mechan- 

leading Hotel, m New York City -^^^ process, there is an excellent 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION opportunity here to study them 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS '' •■ ,1 t A ^ 4- „ 

as ongmally executed on stone 

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Adyerti.ing rate, based on bona fide circulation ^^^ose work Whistler referred in 

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have credential cards ; ask to see them before handled the lithographic Crayon 

placing order, for your protection and ours. ^'tjl the SUre draughtsmanship 

and facility characteristic of all 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- his WOrk, but also with a supple- 

day for the following week's issue. Advertise- ness of expression ranging from 

ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. pencil-like pale grays tO rich 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attraction, in crayonnings of sonorous black. 

New York. { Inc. ) . 

CONTENTS Page I hold him great, who for love's 

Art Notes 3 Sake 

■' A Roof Garden " (Percy Ratcliff) 23 ^ ■ •.. „ . 

Automobile Trips to Nearby Points 15 Can givc With generous earnest 

Churches 12-13 will ; 

S'"^.^ '^ Yet he who takes for love's sweet 

Femes 22 1 . 

Hospitals 10 sake. 

Hudson River Day Line 2025 I think I hold more generous 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 15 Still Unidentified 

Location of Piers 24 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 . — 

Ocean Going Steamers 2fi 

Points of Interest 30 The comiiion problem, yours, 

Public Libraries 14 mine, every one's, 

Railroad Stations 22 t , . r 1 ^ c • ■ 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 11 Is not to fancy what were fair in 

Subway Stations 16-17 life 

Thea'ters"''"^^'°^'''"^"^'^°'"''''^^''^*i -21 Pi'Ovidcd it could be— but finding 

The Hot'eY'Men'sM.'B.Assn. (Frank first 

Thornton) 25-26 What may be, then how to make 

This is the Wav to Reach Highbridge. . ..27-28 ji f^:- 

This Week in New York 5-9 -r. i_ . n 

Trolley Trips 29 — Robert Browning. 

3 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE WOMAN'S PROBLEM 



Without casting your eye down 
the page to find out what it is that 
is being prattled about here, and 
dignified by the name of The Wo- 
man's Problem, know here and 
now that it is Intemperance. Tt is 
no problem to any one but the 
woman, so it is not being taken 
away from anybody else when it 
is claimed by the women. Things 
that do not belong to anybody else 
— that nobody else wants — usually 
belong to some woman — mending 
baskets, babies and such things; 
even drunkards have some woman 
somewhere whom they can depend 
upon to gather them in, take ofif 
their shoes and cravats, and put 
them to bed. 

The women are progressing with 
their problem. This is not to say 
that men and legislatures are not 
helping. Even the children are 
carrying banners and authorizing 
the movement. This is where you 
read the last few words over again 
and halt at authorize. The move- 
ment that is authorized by the chil- 
dren has tremendous momentum. 
Tt is like the ball you throw so that 
it comes back to you. For thirty- 
four years the women have been 
teaching temperance, organizing 
Loyal Legions and Bands of Hope. 
For a steady, silent growth, senti- 
ment hand in hand with time can 
be depended upon; and now the 
boys_ who learned about it in the 
Public Schools are working for it 
in the legislatures. They learned 
from the text-book what alcohol 
does; how it softens the muscles, 
addles the brain and destroys man- 
hood. None of that for them— if you 
please! Years ago they felt con- 
tempt for John L. Sullivan because 
he was no caretaker of the great 
prizes the Creator had awarded 
him. 

What I started in to say is this: 
The revenues of the United States 
Government for spirits of all char- 
acters for ten months of the fiscal 
year ending April 30, have fallen 
of¥ $11,727,286.94. Isn't this enough 



to make old topers and new sit up 
and take notice? 

I have always felt a wholesome 
regard for the maternal element in 
Carrie Nation's hatchet. Of course 
everybody said she was crazy; and 
maybe she was. But it seemed to 
me that all the agony and the re- 
bellion of spirit of American wo- 
men who for generations and gen- 
erations had suffered from this 
same intemperance — who had but- 
ted their poor helpless heads 
against the wall, and clawed the 
air, and moaned and prayed and 
cursed — had finally all culminated 
in one frenzied idea, and that Car- 
rie Nation had somehow been se- 
lected to be the agent for its ex- 
pression; just as anarchists in 
counsel select the bomb thrower, 
so the Higher Power made Carrie 
Nation a kind of storm signal of 
His displeasure, and sent her with 
a hatchet to chop up bottles and 
bar-rooms, instead of His destroy- 
ing everything as if it were another 
Sodom and Gomorrah. The hat- 
chet has had significance in Ameri- 
can afifairs before. 

There was no humor in Carrie 
Nation's crusade. She was not 
there to amuse nor to be polite. 
She had no funny stories to tell as 
had John B. Gough and Sam Jones 
— and other temperance lecturers — 
to make the audience laugh. In- 
temperance is no laughing matter 
to women. And. oh, the pathos 
of it — down in Alabama at the elec- 
tion for Prohibition, the little chil- 
dren of the drunkards beseiged the 
voters: "Please, sir, give us a 
chance !" "Please, sir, vote for us!" 
And many a voter thus accosted 
went to the polls with moist eyes 
and cast a ballot for prohibition. 
Haryot Holt Dey. 



Courage for the great sorrows 
of life, and patience for the small 
ones, and then, when you have ac- 
complished your daily task, go to 
sleep in peace. God is awake. — 
Victor Hugo. 




* ^"00, bt * 



This Week in New York 

Monday, July 20th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Coiicars Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jack>on 
sts., and East river. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington S(iuare Park, foot of Fiftli ave.. Wavcrly 
and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York .Americans vs. St. Pouis, at the .\inerican 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Golf — ]\Iarshall Field Cup tournament; Glen View Club. 

Horse Racing — Brighton Beach Racing Association; Brighton 
'J'rack (to July 29). 

The Roof Garden of the Hotel Astor is ncnv open. 

Our Bureau of Information is oi)en to yon withmit cist. 'Phone 
us, 159 Gramercy. what 3"ou want to know or. where you want to go! 
Is it a trolley trip? ask us, we will publish it in the following issue. Get 
the habit of knowing we want to help you out. Try "Father Knicker- 
bocker"'; he knows. 

"The Pending Revision of Electrical Units and Standards": lecture 
by Professor Carhart. in room ,-oi Fayerweather, Cohmibia University. 
[:.^o p. m. Free. 



Exclusively "Home-Cooking" and Dainty Service! 



Breakfast, Luncheon '// — •/r~ - 14 

and Afternoon Tea at /^T^^-^^^^^^^ ^< 






West 33d Street 

Ot-t. THE WALDORF) 



rile Tabic d'Hote Dinners will be discontinnecl until September Sth. 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. m. during July and August 

Orders for FresH Cut Flo'wers promptly filled 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continued 

Taxameter cabs are now running on a reduced Summer rate; 'phone 
2380 Columbus for all information. It will surprise you. but you can ride 
in their well-appointed cabs at a very low figure. Try them. Call 2380 
Columbus. 

The' original "Seeing New York" Yacht encircles the Island of Man- 
hattan twice daily, leaving from foot of West 22d St., at 10 a. m. and 
2:30 p. m. You do not realize the beauties of our water way until you 
spend the three restful hours enjo3'ing this beautiful trip. Fare $1. 



Tuesday, July 21st 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Mount ]\Iorris Park, ]Madison and Mt. Morris aves., 
i2oth to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Golf — Open tournament; Glen View Club. 

Horse Show — Atlantic City, N. J. 

Motor Boating — [Motor boat race; Larchmont Yacht Club. 

The Roof Garden of the Hotel Martha Washington (Woman's Hotel) 
is now open from 5 to 12 p. m. Dinner is served a la carte. 

You can subscribe to "Daily Attractions in New York" for three 
months for fifty cents. It will be mailed to you regularly every Sat- 
urday. You can not buy it on the news stands. Subscribe now. 

Wednesday, July 2 2d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson 
St. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — ^lulberry Bend Park, ^Mulberry to Baxter St., and 
Bayard to Park st. 8 p. m. 

Wednesday evening meeting". Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. 
and 29th St., Rev. David James Burrcll, D.D., LL.D., minister. 8 p. m. 
Rev. John S. Allen, D.D., will preside. You are cordially invited 
to attend. 



Jittract'we Rooms for l^ent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 

Central Location. Comfortable Surroundings 

No. 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 

Telephone : 3768 Madison Square 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. y\dmission 50 cents. 

Wednesday evening meeting. Second Church of Christ Scientist, 
Central Park West at 68th st. 8 p. m. Visitors welcome. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway. 8 p. m. Speaker: 
Evangelist John A. Davis (to July 31). You will be welcome. 

Horse Show — Horse Show; Orange Court Hou-c. 



Thursday, July 23d 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — East River Park, 84th to 891)1 >ts., facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, P>roadway, Fiftli and Madison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

. Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to 90th 
St. on Fifth ave., have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to S7th st., thence over 
to Broadway, up Broadway to 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily- be dis- 
tinguished, by day a red ball, bj- night a red light on the front of the 
cars. The fare in each instance, either way, is 10 cents per person. 



Friday, July 24th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Battery Park, foot of Broadway, overlooking the 
liarI:)or. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Wm. H. Seward Park, Hester to Division and 
Norfolk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Pittsburg, at the Polo Grounds. 
F57th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 

Large Jars, $1.00 
Smaller Jart, 50 Centi 



Q Poiieised of rare qualities and many valuable properties 
not generally found among toilet articles, besides its unique 
effect as a first-class 

SK I N F O O D 

used in massage for producing and preserving a fiat, htaithy 
complexion, places this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients second to none in either Europe or America. 



M. B. De MEDICI 



124W.21itSt.,N.wTork 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WE:e:K — Continuea 

The Singer tower is now- open to the jiublic, and tlie observation bal- 
cony at No. 149 Broadway offers the visitor to this city an opportunity 
to sec New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. The 
balcony is on the forty-second floor, 548 feet above the curl), and gives 
a siglU-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all direction>. The tower 
has a i)latform with a high railing which accommodates al)out forty 
people. E.xpress elevators run from the main corridor on the first floor, 
making the trip in one minute. There are also guides stationed on the 
platform to point out the different points of interest to visitors and to 
give other information, A fee of =;o cents is char.ged. 



Saturday, July 25th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Central Park, 59th st. from Fifth to Eighth aves,, 
on the Mall, nearest entrance 72d st, 4 p, m. 

Public Concert — Morningside Park, between Morningside and 
Columbia, and West iioth to 123d st, 4 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs, Pittsburg, at the Polo Ground^, 
i57tli st, and Eighth ave, 4 p, m. Admission 50 cents, 

I'^ield day of the Westchester Countv firemen, at the Empire Cit\' 
raci.' track, Yonkers, 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; N^ew York 
Canoe Club, 

Yachting — Closing of Larchmont week of races 

The Roof Garden of the Waldorf-Astoria is now open. 



Sunday, July 26th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

'i'lie Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave, and jQtIi st., the Rev, David 
James lUirrell, D,D,, EI^,D,, minister; services, it a. m. and 8 p, m.; the 
Rev. John S. Allen. D.D., will preach. A cordial welcome for everyone. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th st , the Rev. D. Asa Black- 
burn, i^astor; services, 11 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. Strangers will be welcome. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave, and 31st st,, the Rev, 
Edward Eoux, D,D., minister; services, 11 a, m, in the Parish House, 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 



WANTED ^" Unfurnished 

======^==. Housekeeping Apartment 

of 7 Rooms and Bath, between 23d and 42d Streets, West of Le.xington 

and East of Seventh Ave. 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue, New York 



8 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Dodd, Mead & Co. all t™ latest books 

FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 35th St. OtatlOIiery, HtC. 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Second Churcli of Clirist Scientist, Central Park \Ve>t, at ()Sth st.; 
services, ii a. ni. and (S p. ni. Yoi. will be welcome. 

Hroadway Tabernacle Cluirch. 56th st. and liroadway, the Rev 
(.^harles Jefferson. D.D., LL.D., pastor; services, i i a. ni. and 8 p. ni. 
Von will be cordially welcomed. 

St. liartholomew's Clinrch, ]\Iadison ave. and 44fh st.. the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D.D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 a. m.; the Rev. 
J. Stuart Holden, rector of St Paul's Church, Portman Square, London, 
will preach The full choir will be present; all seats are free. You arc 
cordially invited to attend. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Pifth Avenue and 55th st., the 
Rev. J. Ross Stevenson. D. D., minister, services, 1 1 a. ni. and 4 j). ni. 
The Rev. John A. Hutton, M. A-, of Glasgow, will i)reach nmrnini; and 
afternoon. A welcome fin- strangers. 

Madison Avenue ^Methodist Episcopal Church, ]\ladison ave. and 
()Oth St.. the Rev. Wallace MacMullen, D.D., minister; servicer, it a. m.; 
the Rev. Arlc- A. Brown will preach. You will be welcome. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway. 8 p. m. The Rev. 
R. .A.. Torrey will speak. You are invited to be present. 

Public Concert— Central Park, on the Mall; 59th st., i'lfth to Eighth 
aves., nearest entrance 72d st. 4 p. m. 

Eccentric Standard Engineers' games at Celtic Park. 

Swimming Championship of the .\merican Ufe Saving Suciet}-; it 
will start from the sea wall at the Battery and end at the societj-'s 
Twenty-third street. Cone}' Island, station, on the beach of the Children's 
Aid Society grounds. 

West End Presbyterian Church, lo^th st. and Amsterdam ave., the 
Rev. A. Edwin Keigwin, D.D., pastor; ser\ices, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
Strangers are cordially welcomed. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles E. Jefferson, D.D.. LL.D., pastor; Wednesday evening Praise 
and Praj'er Service. 8 p. m. A \velcome for everyone. 



THE EARLINGTON '-'rziirol"'' 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for boo^ilet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK 



Alexander, 118 West 49th. 

Babies', 135 East 55th. 

Bellevue, foot of East 26th. 

Beth Israel, Jefferson and Cherry. 

Central Islip State, Central Islip, L. I. 

Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 

City, Blackwell's Island. 

Columbus, 226 East 20th. 

Emergency for Women, 223 East 26th. 

Epileptic, Randall's Island. • 

Fever, North Brother's Island. 

Flower, East 63d, cor. Ave. A. 

Fordham's Reception, Aqueduct ave. and 

St. James. 
French Benevolent Society, 450 W. 34th. 
Gen. Memorial, 2 West 106th. 
German, 77th, Lex'n and Fourth aves. 
Gouverneur, Gouvemeur slip and Front. 
Grace Church, 414 East 14th. 
Hahnemann, Park ave. and 67th. 
Harlem, 533 East 120th. 
Harlem Eye, Ear & Throat, 144 E. 127th. 
House of Relief, 67 Hudson. 
Incurables', Blackwell's Island. 
Infants', Blackwell's Island. 
Italian, 169 West Houston. 
Jewish for Deformities, 1917 Mad. ave. 
Jewish Maternity, 272 East Broadway. 
King's Park State, King's Park, L. I. 
Laura Franklin Free for Children, 17 

East 111th. 
Lebanon, Westchester & Cauldwell aves. 
Lincoln, 141st, cor. Concord ave. 
Long Island State, Brooklyn. 
Loomls Sanitarium for Consumptives, 

184 West 49th. 
Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat, 210 

East 64th. 
Manhattan Maternity, 327 East 60th. 
Manhattan State, Ward's Island ; Office, 

foot East 116th. 
Marine, Office, Foot Whitehall. 
Maternity of N. Y., Mothers' Home of 

the Sisters of Misericorde, 531 East 

86 th. 

Merchants' Marine, 78 Broad. 
Metropolitan, Blackwell's Island. 
Metropolitan Disp. & Hosp., 248 E. 82d. 
Metropolitan Throat, 351 West 34th. 
Mintum for Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, 

foot of East 16th. 
Monteflore Home for Chronic Invalids, 

Broadway and West 138th. 
Mothers' and Babies', 596 Lexington ave. 
Mt. Morlah, 138 East 2d. 
Mt. Sinai, Madison ave. and 100th. 
Mulvey's Dog and Cat, 2839 Broadway. 
New Amsterdam Eye & Ear, 230 W. 38tli' 



New York, 7 West 15th and 97 Hudson. 
N. Y. Canine Infirmary, 118 West 53d. 
N. Y. Children's, Randall's Island. 
N. Y. Eye and Ear, 218 Second ave. 
N. Y. Foundling, 175 East 68th. 
N. Y. Homeopathic, 63d and Ave. A. 
N. Y. Lymph Sanitarium, 165 West 39th. 
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for 

Women, 19 West 101st. 
N. Y. Ophthalmic, 201 East 23d. 
N. Y. Orthopaedic, 126 East 59th. 
N. Y. Polyclinic and School, 214 E. 34th. 
N. Y. Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
N. Y. Red Cross, 110 West 82d. 
N. Y. Sanitarium, 247 West 49th. 
N. Y. Skin and Cancer, 301 East 19th. 
N. Y. Throat, Nose & Lung, 229 E. 57tb. 
N. Y. Veterinary, 117 W. 25th. 
Nursery and Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
Philanthropic, 2076 Fifth Ave. 
Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
Presbyterian, 41 East 70th. 
Rebeau Private, 156 West 74th. 
Red Cross, Central Park W. and 100th, 
Riverside, North Brother's Island. 
Riverside (Reception), foot of East 16th. 
Roosevelt, West 59th, near Ninth ave. 
Ruptured and Crippled, 135 East 42d. 
St. Andrew's Convalescent, 213 E. 17th. 
St. Ann's Maternity, 130 East 69th. 
St. Elizabeth's, 416 West 51st. 
St. Francis', 605 East 5th. 
St. Gregory, 93 Gold. 
St. John's Guild (office), 501 Fifth ave. 
St. Joseph's, East 143d and Brook ave. 
St. Lawrence, 163d & Edgecombe av. 
St. Luke's, Amsterdam ave. and 113th. 
St. Mark's, 117 Second ave. 
St. Mary's Free for Children, 405 West 

34th. 
St. Vincent's, 149 West 11th. 
Sanitarium for Hebrew Children (office), 

356 Second ave. 
Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, foot B. 16th 
Seton, Spuyten Duyvil. 
Sloane Maternity, W. 59th and Ams. ave. 
Society of the Lying-in, Second Ave. and 

17th. 
Sydenham, 339 East 116th. 
Trinity, 50 Varick. 
U. S. Marine (office). Battery. 
Washington Heights, 554 West 165th. 
Willard Parker, foot of East 16th. 
Woman's, 141 West 109th. 
Woman's Inflrmarv and Maternity Home,, 

124 West 65th. 
Wright, J. Hood, Memorial, 503 W. 131st. 
Yorkville, 246 East 82d. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



A visit to an exclusive establish- 
ment where gowns are dreams and 
are designed for each individual 
wearer, disclosed the fact, 'tho 
the front of the large, brown stone 
house with shades drawn down and 
windows closed tight gave the ap- 
pearance the house was closed for 
the Summer, the ultra ultras always 
have a gown on the stocks. Hav- 
ing- the privilege of admiring, we 
will mention a superb gown of gray 
niousseline de soie made over an 
underdress of orange satin — satin 
as soft as the mousseline. The 
skirt closely gathered and pleated 
back and- front, falling loosely 
from the belt, which is unusualli' 
high. The pleats fastened ex- 
tremely close, loosened only below 
the knees. A wide band of silver 
embroidery, done on gray filet in 
relief, breaks the line of the skirt; 
from back and front the band of 
embroidery meets on the sides, 
where it is carried to the belt line. 
The corsage composed of the em- 
broidery. It may be as well to 
mention orange and gray is one of 
the newest combinations. 

Another costume was of old 
rose, ribbed tusso, oddly trimmed 
with buttons of the same material, 
rimmed with black. The skirt in 
princess form wrinkling above the 
waist line and in a low curve in 
front. Following this line is a 
^ash of soft black satin, which 
crossed in a flat knot in the middle, 
dropping ends that reached below 
the knees and were gathered to a 
point and finished with a tassel. 
The hem of the skirt turned over 
on to the right side, the top edge 
finished with a line of the buttons. 
which served for trimming and as 
weights. The coat — half long — had 
its open side seams trimmed with 
buttons, beginning at the waist line 
and reaching nearly to the hem, 
tiny sleeves — only a few inches 
long — were shaped in one with the 
shoulders by means of a seam on 
the top; this was covered by a 
band of embroidery lightly done in 



l)l;ick, finished in a i)oint as it fell 
over the sleeves of the lace blouse; 
these sleeves were three lace 
flounces overlapping each other. 
The hat to be worn with this gown 
is of cerise straw, wide brimmed 
and high crowned, the trimming a 
sash of black satin softly circling 
the rcrown and ending under a 
bunch of black ostrich feathers 
posed on one side with a low, 
graceful, backward movement. The 
parasol matched the gown. 

The wise woman will make it 
])ossible to take advantage of the 
midsummer reduction of goods in 
every department. Araminta bur- 
rows through the dry goods' coun- 
ters, unearths most beautiful rem 
nants of muslins with designs of 
flowers painted so exquisitely as 
to rival the originals; these are 
to be laid away till next Spring, 
when the dainty gowns will be 
worn, and with the soul-comforting 
knowledge if they had been bought 
in the season they would have cost 
more than twice as much. 

Stop a moment at the silk coun- 
ter and examine what is known as 
the "Annual July Clearing Sale"; 
short ends of fancy rough Pongees, 
Foulards, Rajah, etc.; many of 
these are lengths to make a gown; 
all at fifty cents a yard. Shantung 
Silk — the regular price is $2 a 
yard — can now be purchased at 

Then Araminta is again wise and 
she shows her wisdom in the pur- 
chase of one of those beautiful im- 
ported hand-embroidered French 
Pique Robes, now selling at one- 
half the former price, such as $70 
now $35, and others in proportion. 

Now to the Shoe Department for 
Walking and Dress Shoes in all 
styles and leathers, where one can- 
not resist being provident and pur- 
chasing enough shoe leather to last 
a season. Araminta will see that 
each shoe is fitted to a tree where 
they will remain till next winter 
well shaped and seasoned. 

Madame Roberta. 



.^ Qisrs j jyy 




' ^ooa, bT *■ 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




' ladison Ave. Baptist Church 



Corner of Thirty-First Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, July tgth 

Services II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL, 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



^ IVelcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



g>er0n!i OII|urrI| nf OII|rlHt. #rienttHl 



Central Park West 
at 68th Street 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. Sunday School, ii a. m. 

Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



METHODIST 



Madison Ave. Methodist Episcopal Church 

CORNER OF SIXTIETH STREET 

Rev. Wallace MacMuUen, D. D. - - - Minister 

REV. ARLO A. BROWN, AisUtant MinUter 

SUNDAY. JULY 19th 

Preaching Service, 11 A. M. 
Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NEW YORK CHURCHES — Continued 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

i^aint 25artholomew's (Khurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY- FOURTH STREET 

R«T. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 

♦ 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher from June 14 to July 19 

THE REV. JOSEPH G. H. BARRY, D.D. 

Dean of Nashotah House, Nashotah, Wis. 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 

CONGREGATIONAL 

BROADWAY TABERNACLE '''T^^^^^^'^':^:. A^.^n.'^P^a^o^"" 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a. m., 8 p. m. Bible School, g.45a.m.,2.45P. ni. 
Y. P. S. C. E.. 7 p.m. IVednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8p.m. 

INDEPENDENT 

CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 

Sunday Services, II A. M. and 7.45 P. M. Strangers in the City Welcome 

PRESBYTERIAN 

iFtftI) Aurmir |IrrBbl|tmmi (!lI|Urrl) ^'^^^^ Avenue and 55th street 

Services, July loth, at ii a. m. and 4 p. m. 

Rev. R. A. TORREY. D.D.. the Evangelist, will preach 

REFORMED 



1628 THE OUDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA J908 

The Marble Collegiate Churcli 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 

Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN, D.D., Pastor for Strangers 
will preach Sunday, July igth 
II a. m. Subject: "The Singing S.wior " 
8 p. m. Subject : " Demoniacal Po.ssession" 

Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 

13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

DiRECTOR'8 Office and General Headquarters, 425 LAFAYETTE STREET 

Telephone, 3970 SPRING 

Circulation Headquarters, 209 WEST 23rd STREET 

Telephone. 307S CHELSEA 



Reference Branches: 



ASTOR, 426 LAFAYETTE STREET 



LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES: 



Eaat B'way. 197. .(Baat B'way Branch). 
• East B'way, 83. (Chatham Sq. Branch). 
•Rlvtngton Street, 61.. . (Rivlngton Street 

Branch). 
•Leroy St., 68 (Hudson Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 49.. (Bond Street Branch). 

•10th St., 831 East (Tompkins Square 

Branch). 

Second Ave., 135. . (Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W.. (Jackson Sq. Branch). 
•23d St., 228 East. .(Epiphany Branch). 
•23d St., 209 W. ..(Muhlenberg Branch). 

S4th St., 215 East (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., 501 W..(St. Raphael Branch). 

42d St., 226 W.(George Bruce Branch). 

50th St., 123 East. . (Cathedral Branch). 

61st St., 463 W. (Sacred Heart Branch). 

58th St., 121 East. .(59th Street Branch). 
•67th St., 328 East. (67th Street Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'ch). 

•Avenue A, 1465 (Webster Branch). 

•79th St., 222 East. ..(Torkvllle Branch). 
•Amsterdam Ave.. 444.. (St. Agnes B'cb) 
•96th St., 112 East (96th St. Branch). 

lietb St., 174 East. ..(Agullar Branch). 



123d St., 32 W. (The Harlem Library). 

•125th St., 224 E (125th St.. Branch). 

•135th St., 103 W.... (135th St., Branch). 

•145th St., 503 W (Hamilton Orange 

Branch). 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. .. (Washington 

Heights Branch). 
Library for the Blind, 444 Amsterdam 
Avenue. 

Borough of Bronx 

•140th St., 569 E (Mott Haven Br'ch). 

•Washington Ave., 1866. (Tremont Br'ch) 
•Klngsbrldge Ave., 2933. . . . (Klngsbrldge 
Branch). 

Borough of Richmond 

•Amboy Road, TottenvlUe. . (TottenvlUe 

Branch). 
•Central Ave., TompklnsvlUe, S. I... .(St. 

George Branch). 
•12 Bennett St... (Port Richmond Br'ch) 
•Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sts. 
•Occupying Carnegie Buildings. 



HOURS 

The Branches, with exceptions noted below, are open from 9 a. m. to I p. m. 
on week days. 

Branches in Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Year's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, Presidential Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day; after 6 p. m. on Washingtot. « Birthday and Christmas Eve; 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 5 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch Is closed from 6 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and Is open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a. m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street, Tomp- 
kins Square, Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rlvington Street and Riverside Branches from 
2 till 6 p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rlvington Street Brinches 
are open until 10 p. m. on week days. 

The Library for the Blind is open on week days from 1 p. m. to B p. m. 

The Lenox Branch is open from 9 a. m. to S p. m. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 



Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ I 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



AUTOMOBILE TRIPS 

Long Beach — Cross .uth st. ferry 
to Long Island City. Straight 
ahead from ferry; after passing 
Vernon st.. turn obliquely to left 
into Jackson ave., which follow 
for five-eighths mile to Thomp- 
son ave. (Hoffman Boulevard), 
into which turn right, and fol- 
low across railroad and creek; 
two miles farther, cross railroad 
again to (316) Locust Grove. 
Keep to right at crossroads 
along Hoffman Boulevard; cross 
railroad; three miles beyond, 
meet and then leave railroad; 
follow Boulevard to Fulton st. 
(9) Jamaica. Go along Fulton st. 
to Merrick road, into which turn 
right and follow it across rail- 
road, past Springfield and several 
creeks to (16) Valley Stream. 
Straight ahead along road across 
creek, railroad and two more small 
streams (1714), Lynbrook. 
Straight ahead along Merrick 
road, across Mill River and 
railroad to Lincoln ave. (19) 
Rockville Center. Turn to right 
into Lincoln ave.; after crossing 
Powells Creek take first right 
fork and next left; i^ miles be- 
yond, cross Hog Island Channel; 
continue near railroad over Long 
Beach Channel and Inner Beach 
Lead to (25) Long Beach. Posts 
giving direction and distance will 
be found all along the road. 
Staten Island offers rare attrac- 
tions for a short automobile 
outing. The roads are good 
macadam with easy grades and 
picturesque views. In a circuit 
of the_ island the travelling dis- 
tance is thirty-three miles. The 
run from Manhattan may be 
varied by taking the ferry from 
the foot 'of Whitehall street to 
St. George, thence following the 
southern route via the Richmond 
and Amboy roads to Tottenvillc, 
returning via the Shore road, 
Fresh Kills road and Old Stone 
road to Fort Richmond, thence 
by ferry to Bergen Point and 
over the Hudson County Boule- 
vard to Jersey City, Weehawken 
or Fort Lee. The distance of 



TO NEARBY POINTS 

the round trip from Columbu> 
Circle, returning via Jersey City 
or Weehawken, is about fifty 
miles. 

Hotel Gramatan, Bronxville, may 
be reached from Broadway or 
5th ave. to 59th st., through 
Central Park to iioth st.. 7th 
ave. to Central Bridge, crossing 
bridge and viaduct all the way, 
north on Jerome ave. to Yonkers 
ave., thence continue along Cen- 
tral ave. to Ammann's Corners, 
then to the right to Bronxville 

West Point— New York to Fort 
Lee to Hackensack, ten miles; 
liackensack to Suffern, eighteen 
miles; Sufifern to West Haver- 
straw, eight miles; West Haver- 
straw to West Point, fourteen 
miles, total to West Point, fifty 
miles. Returning, Garri.'^ons to 
Peekskill, nine miles; Peekskill 
to Ossining, twelve miles; Ossin- 
mg to Tarrytown. six miles; Tar- 
rytown to Yonkers, ten miles; 
Yonkers to New York, Broadway 
and 5gth st., thirteen miles. To- 
tal round trip 100 miles. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Water Route to 

CONEY ISLA.ND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 

World. 
TIME TABLE (Sitbject to Change.) 

Leave foot 12nth St., North River, 9.00 
0.4.5, 10..S0. 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50. 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M. 
1.1.5. 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30. 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and. *10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12 10 
*12.55. »1.40. 2.55. 8.40. 4.25, •5 •>5 
6.10, 7.10. •7.55, •8.40, *9.25, •lO.lo! 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a • go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St.. N. R.. 7.40 A. M. : Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Pare : — Gentlemen, 75c • 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 



IS 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flatiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave 



•'42d St. and Park Ave. 
42d St. and Broadway 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th 
66th St. and Broadway 



— Grand Central. 
— Times Square. 



St. 



•72d St. andBroadviy 
79th St. and BroadvK 
86th St. and Broadv' 
91st St. and Broad\if 

*96th St. and Broadvf 

WEST SIDE BRAN!! 
103d St. and Broadiis 
110th St. and Broadvlf 





Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 

For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, Rheim«, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:50 P. M. 

Fa RE, 91.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 





SUBWAY ^STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



1225th St. and Bioadway 
233d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 
Mott Ave. and 149th St. 



Cofyright, 1007. B. L. Clarke 



Third Ave. and 149th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

♦Express Stations 



Good Positions Now Open for Salesmen, Executive, 
Clerical and Technical Men 

Who can earn ^1,000-^5,000 a year. Full information free if you call or 
write us to-day. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CLUBS OF NEW YORK 



Aldine Association, in Fifth Ave 

Allenhurst, 289 Fourth Ave 

Alpha Delta Phi, 136 W 44th 

Amateur Billiard, 115 W 79th 

American Jersey Cattle, 8 W 17th 

American Kennel, 55 Liberty 

Arion, 59th St and Park Ave 

Army and Navy, 107 W 43d 

Attic, 141 W 42d 

Automobile, 54th St and B'way 

Baltusrol, 261 Broadway 

Beethoven, 207 E loth 

Boys', Ave A and loth 

Brook, 7 E 40th 

Brown University, 12 W 44th 

Calumet, 267 Fifth Ave 

Camera, 5 W 31st 

Catholic, Central Park South 

Century, 7 W 43d 

Chemists', 108 W 55th 

City Lunch Club, 165 Broadway 

Civic, 243 E 34th 

Clover, 45 W 21st 

Colonial Yacht, loSth and N. R. 

Columbia University, 18 Gram'y Pk. 

Columbia Yacht, 86th and N. R. 

Coney Island Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Country, Westchester, N. Y. 

Criterion, 683 Fifth Ave 

Delaware, 222 E 71st 

Delta Phi, 612 W ii6th 

Democratic, 617 Fifth Ave 

Deutscher Verein, 112 Central Pk.S. 

Down Town, 60 Pine 

Drug and Chemical, 100 William 

Electrical, 14 Park PI 

Empire City, 106 W 38th 

Engineers', 32 W 40th 

Federal, Tz Ave D 

Fellowship, 211 W 45th 

Freundschaft, Park Ave and 72d 

Greenroom, 139 W 47th 

Greeters, 1146 Broadway 

Grolier, 29 E 32d 

Hardware, 253 Broadway 

Harmonic, 10 E 6oth 

Harvard, 27 W 44th 

Hotel Men's Ass'n. Cambridge bldg 

Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Knickerbocker, Fifth Ave and 32d 

Lambs', 128 W 44th 



Lawyers', 120 Broadway 

Liederkranz, iii E 58th 

Long Acre, 70 W 45th 

Lotos, 556 Fifth Ave 

Machinery, 50 Church 

Manhattan, Madison Ave and 26th 

Masonic, 17 E 22d 

Mendelssohn, 113 W 40th 

Merchants', 106 Leonard St 

Metropolitan, Fifth Ave and 6otli 

National Arts, 14 Gramercy Park 

N. Y. Athletic, 58 W 59th 

N. Y. Baseball, 1133 Broadway 

New York, 9 W 42d 

N. Y. Press, 7 Spruce 

N. Y. Railroad, 62 Liberty 

N. Y. Riding, 7 W 66th 

N. Y. Yacht, zj W 44th 

Pen and Brush, 30 W 24th 

Physicians', 72 St. Mark's PI 

Players', 16 Gramercy Park 

Princeton, 121 East 21st 

Progress, Central Pk. W. and 88th 

Racquet and Tennis, 27 W 43d 

Reform, 42 Broadway 

Republican, 54 W 40th 

Riding, 7 E 58th 

St. Nicholas, 7 W 44th 

Salmagundi, 14 W 12th 

Stewards', 49 E 28th 

Strollers', 67 Madison Ave 

Studio, 959 Sixth Ave 

Technology, 36 E 28th 

Three Arts, 803 Lexington Ave 

Town and Country, 12 E 22d 

Transportation, Hotel Manhattan 

Turf and Field, 571 Fifth Ave 

Underwriters', T] William 

Union, Fifth Ave and 51st 

Union League, i E 39th 

University, Fifth Av and S4th St W 

Victoria, 15 W 32d 

West Side Republican, 2307 B'way 

West Side Y. M. C. A., 320 W 57th 

Whist, 13 W 36th 

Woman's, 9 E 46th 

Woman's Press, Waldorf-Astoria 

Woman's University, 17 E 26th 

Wool, 260 W Broadway 

Wyandot, 232 East 58th 

Yale, 30 W 44th 



'^ 




' ^'oa, Bi 



New York Theatres 



cademy of Music — Irving place 
'. and 14th St. Tel., 701 Gramercy. 

Closed. 
^erial Garden — Atop of the New 

Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. near 
-Broadway. "Tlie Merry Widow." 
- Tel., 3093 Bryant. Eve., 8.30. 

t Prices, 50c. to $2. 
i-'hambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Daily mats. 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices 50c to $l. 

nerican — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
^ Pel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 
tor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
87 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 
.30; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 
"^ Prices, 50c to $2. 



Belasco — 42d St., west of B'way. 

Tel., 4281 Bryant. Closed. 
Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 

Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed. 
Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 

Tel., loi Bryant. Closed. 
Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 

Tel.. 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 

World." Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat., 

2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 
Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel.. 

5138 Columbus. "The Merry-Go- 

Round." Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. 

^nd Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c to $1. 
Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel. 

4457 Columbus. Closed. 
Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 

Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 



The Greatest and Most Original Attraction in New York are the 

FLEISCHMAM BATHS and 
Roof Garden Restaurant 

On the three upper floors of the Bryant Park I-Suilding. 

Northeast Corner 42d Street and 6th Jtvenue. 
The Roof Garden Restaurant is open to Ladies and Gentlemen. 
It is the coolest and most delightful dining resort in New Yorl<. 

First-class Service a la Carte. The Baths are open Day and 

Night, for w<v/ only. Excellent Sleeping Accommodation. 

Price of Russian or Turkish Baths, $1.50. 8 Tickets for $10.00. 17 Tickets for $20.00 



X9 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. ni.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings: Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Througli rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for PouKhkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 29. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; W^est 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at W^est Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



NEW YORK THEATRES — Coutinued 



Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. Closed. 

Garrick — 35th St., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 3Si-38th. Closed. 



Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 

Hackett — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Closed. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices. 250 
to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve.. 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave.. between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK THEATRES — Continued 



Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 

' way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 

York Theatre, Broadway and 

I 45th St "Follies of 1908." Eve., 

8.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 
) Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 

St. Tel., 2243-38th. Closed. 
Liberty — 42d St., west of B'way. 

Tel., 27 Bryant. Closed. 
Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. Closed. 

Lyric — ^42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
wa}\ Tel., 546 Br3rant. Closed. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 

Madison ave. and 26th st. 
Closed. 

Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow." mats., 
Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices, 50c 
to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Richard 
Carle in "Mary's Lamb." Eve., 
8.30; mats., Wed. and Sat,, 2.15. 
Prices, soc to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St.. west of Broadway. 
Tel., 535i-38th. Closed. 



Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 
Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Closed. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 



THE SITUATION IS YOURS 

Make yourself the master of 
your thoughts. If you will lead 
your mind into clianncls of only 
good thoughts, so shall you be. 
Good thoughts are the seed from 
which grow good deeds, peace, 
contentment and happiness. Thii 
is to be said of Herho-Nervo Ton- 
ic, because it is pure ; it is the mas- 
ter of the situation and builds up 
your nerve force and gives only 
Iiealthy thoughts which go to make 
up a pure mind. After proclaiminp; 
your intention to do a thing, do it 
and purchase your Herbo-Nervo 
Tonic at R. H. Macy & Co's., Cas- 
well & Massey's, Dagett & Rams- 
(Icll's, Hegeman's and Riker's 
Drug counters. Your Herbo-Ner- 
vo soda drink. Herbo-Nervo egg 
phosphate and Herbo-Nervo ice 
cream soda at their soda fountains. 
The Herbo-Nervo confection at 
their candy counters. The seal is 
tlic monogram B.E.T.. Blanche E. 
Tliomas, 29 East 29th St. N. Y. C. 



Dr. 


j. T. WHELAN M. S. WILSON 




CHIROPODIST ELECTRO-VIBRATORY 


All Instruments Sterilized FACIAL MASSAGE | 




MANICURING 




McGUTGHEON BUILDING 




Suite 707 • 


347 


FIFTH AVENUE, near 34th street 




NEW YORK 




TELEPHONE: 6192 MADISON SQUARE 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 58GO 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-3Sth. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O. & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpoint Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point— From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa^onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonla 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th. 

Street. 
Staten Island— Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



« 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., bulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivington, 1st, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th. 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (charge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park pi.. Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d. 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145th, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 





PAUL L. BRYANT 


DYEING 


AND CLEANSING 


Gowu Cleaned In Twenty-Foar Hoars 


308 


FOURTH 


AVENUE 


868 BROADWAY 




TEL. 


4508 QRAMERCY 


TEL. 4755 QRAMBRCY 



A ROOF GARDEN 



. It is typical of the New Yorker, 
the readiness to adopt, possess, 
anything new, especially when it is 
for his bodily comfort. This was 
evidenced when the well-known, 
genial proprietor of the Hotel Mar- 
tha Washington. Mr. Arthur W. 
Eager and his able Manager, Mrs. 
Tucker, invited the residents and 
the "Stranger within our Gates" to 
enjoy the cooling breezes on the 
Roof Garden and the Restaurant. 
When one gazes at the over crowd- 
ed trollies, filled with suffering hu- 
manity, to the boats, in the same 
condition, rushing any where, any 
place, to get relief from the sun- 
baked streets, and we step out on 
this ideal roof garden where instant- 
ly we are met with the refreshing 
breeze, and realize that Manhattan 
is really an Island — for there west- 
ward is the North river, and as it is 
just sunset we are spellbound with 
the beauty of the after glow, the 
blending of color which no artist 
has been able to place on his can- 
vas; to the East river with its 
ever varying picture of Sound 
steamers and lighter craft. But the 
fresh air has whetted our appetite 
and we seat ourself at table in a 
cozy corner and immediately 'a 
waitress in a well fitting black 
dress, the whitest of dainty aprons, 
is ready to execute our order. 
Looking over the menu we are at 
a loss what to order, there is such 
an abundance to select from; are 
we vegetarians? then we have vege- 
tables so fresh one is ready to affirm 
without question they have just been 
dug from Mother Earth. Be what 
your preference, it is yours most 
appetizingly prepared and served. 
Having dined, we saunter to an- 
other part of this capacious "gar- 
den," as it extends from 29th to 
30th street, seating ourselves in a 
comfortable rocker the "man of the 



family" lights his cigar and, as the 
blue cloud wafts skyward, we hear 
him murmur, "Life is worth liv- 
ing." If by good chance you 
should have the pleasure of seeing 
a dainty lady, reminding you of a 
l)it of porcelain or a French shep- 
lierdess, in a gown of white, sug- 
gestive of a vapory cloud, you will 
not be surprised to learn it is Mrs. 
Tucker, to whom we are indebted 
for this hospitality. The only 
requisite is that of all high-class 
hotels, i. e., the gentleman shall 
ask for a card at the desk, which 
we all know is the safeguard from 
undesirable guests. 

Percv Ratcliff. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone I 6500 MadUon 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Plice for Ladlei Traveling Alone 

RES TAU RANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte aUo Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 ct». Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooms from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In eaty acceti of all the principal theatres 

Subway Station, 28th Street, within one block 

29th Street cars pass the door 



23 



^AIL^ ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



MUNICIPAL OFFICES 



Accounts, Commissionei's of, 280 B'way. 
Aqueduct Commissioners, 280 B'way. 
Board of Aldermen, 8 City Hall. 
Board of Armories, 280 Broadway. 
Board of Assessors, 320 Broadway. 
Board of Education, 59th st. & Park av. 
Board Ex. Plumbers, 149 Church st. 
Bureau of Elections, 107 W. 41st st. 
Bureau of St. Openings, 90 W. B'wny. 
Bureau Licenses, 277 B'way. 
Bureau Penalties, 119 Nassau St. 
Bureau of Highways, 17 Park Row. 
Bureau of Sewers, 17 Park Row. 
Bureau of Buildings, 220 4th av. 
Charities, foot of E. 26th st. 
City Chamberlain, 27 Stewart BuildiniJC. 
City Record, 2 City Hall. 
Civil Service, 125 Centre st. 
Comptroller, 280 B'way. 
Coroners, 125 Centre st. 
Correction, 148 B. 20th st. 
Corporation Counsel, Hall of Records. 
City Paymaster, 83 Chambers st. 
County Clerk, County Court House. 
Dept. of Bridges, 17 Park Row. 

Dept. of Water Supply, Gas and lOlec 
tricity, 17 Park Row. 

Dept. of Docks & Ferries, P. A, N. R. 

District Attorney, Centre and Franklin 

Estimate and Apportionment, Stewart 
Building. 

Excise. 1 Madison ave. : Eagle Building. 
Brooklyn. 

I'^inance, 2S0 B'way. 

Fire. 157 E. 67th st. 

Hall of Records. Chambers and Centr(\ 

Health, 696 6th a v., corner 55th st. 

Immigration, Com'r of, Ellis Island. 

Jurors, Commissioners of, 280 B'way. 

Mayor. G City Hall. 

Morgue, foot of E. 26th st. 

N. Y. & N. J. Bridge Com'rs, 214 B'way. 

National Bank Examiner. 35 Nassau st. 

Park, Arsenal, Central Park. 

Pilot Commissioners, 17 State st. 

Police. 300 Mulberry st. 

Port Warden, 1 Broadway. 

Public Administrator. 119 Nassau st. 

Public Service Commissioners, Tribune Bg 

Public Works, 17 Park Row. 

Quarantine Commissioners. 71 B'way. 

Register's Office, Hall of Records. 

Sheriff, 299 Broadway. 

Sinking Fund Com'r," Stewart Building. 

Steam Vessels Insp'rs, 17 Batterv PI. 

Street Cleaning, 17 Park Row. 

Surrogate, Hall of Records. 

Tax Commissioners, Hall of Records. 

Tenement House Commission, 01 Irving 
place. 

U. S. Life Saving Service, 17 State st. 

Weather Bureau, 100 Broadway. 
Weather Bureau (City), Central Park. 



LOCATION OF PIERS IN 
NEW YORK 



\ 





NORTH 


RIVER 


A, 


I (1, 2, 3 old) 1 


37, 


Charlton 




Battery pi. 


38, 


King 


4, 


5, 6, 7 (old) 


i9, 


W. Houston 




Morris | 


40, 


Clarkson 


8, 


9, 10 (old) 


41, 


Leroy i 




Rector 


42, 


Morton 


11 


(old) Carlisle 


43, 


Barrow 


12, 


13, 14 (old) 


44, 


Christopher 




Cedar 


45, 


46 and 47, i 


13 


(new), 16 I 




W. 10th St. 




(old) Cortlandt 


48, 


W. 11th St. 


14, 


Fulton 


49, 


Bank 


15 


(old). Liberty 


50, 


Bethune 


15, 


16, Barclay 


51, 


Jane 


17, 


I'ark pi. 


52, 


Gansevoort, 


18, 


Murray 


Ft. 19, 20, 21, i,[ 


19, 


Warren 




22 sts. 


20, 


Chambers 


54. 


W. 24th St. ; 


21, 


Duane 


.5.5, 


W. 25th St. 


22, 


Jay 


56, 


W. 26th St. 


23', 


Harrison 


57, 


W. 27th St. 


24, 


Franklin 


58, 


W. 2Sth St. 


25, 


N. Moore 


59, 


W. 29th St. 


26, 


Beach 


(50, 


W. 30th St. 


27, 


Hubert 


">1, 


W. 31st St. 


28, 


Laight 


1)2, 


W. 32d St. 


29, 


30. Vestry 


fi3. 


W. 33d St. 


31, 


Watts 


'>4, 


W. 34th St. 


42, 


(old) 32, 34 


65, 


W. 35th St. 




Canal 


67, 


W. 37th St. 


35, 


36, Spring 








EAST 


RIVER 


3, 


Moore 


31 


(old), James SI. 


4, 


Broad 


31, 


Pike 


7 


^old), 5, 6, 7, 8, 


32 


(old), James 




Coenties Slip 




SI. 


9, 


10, 11, 13, Old 


32 


33, Pike 




SI. 


33^ 


Oliver 


12 


(old). Old Slip 


34 


(old), Catha- 


12, 


1.5, 16. Wall 




rine 


17, 


Pine 


34, 


Rutgers 


18, 


Maiden Lane 


35, 


Catharine 


19 


Fletcher 


36 


(old), Catha- 


20, 


21, Burling SI. 




rine 


r>o 


Fulton 


36 


. .Jefferson 


2.3 


Beekman 


45. 


Rutgers 


24 


(old). Peck SI. 


46 


47, Jefferson 


24 


Roosevelt 


48 


49, Clinton 


25 


26. Peck Slip 


50 


Montgomery 


27 


(old), Dover 


51, 


52, Gouvern 


27 


Catharine 




enr 


28 


Dover 


53 


Jackson 


29 


(old), Roose- 


54 


Corlears 




velt 


55 


Cherry 


29 


Market 


56 


57, Broome 


30 


(old), Roose- 


58 


59, Delancey 




velt 


,60 


61, Rivington 


30 


Pike 


l62 


Stanton 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE HOTEL MEN'S M. B. ASSN. 

The jyth annual reunion ul the in the llulel Alen's Mutual Benefit 
hotel men of the United States and Assn. He is now Treasurer of the 
Canada, held at Saratoga Springs New York State Hotel Alen's 
during the past week, was indeed a Assn., and Chairman of the Legis- 
brilliant success, tilling the members lative Committee of the New York 
present with unbounded enthusia:ni City Hotel Mien's Assn., so it is 
and cementing more thoroughly evident that JMr. Tierney has had 
than ever the bonds of friendship ample training for the very import- 
existing among them. ant office to which he has now been 

On Monday, July 13th, over 450 elected, the highest in the gift of 
members registered at Congress the hotel men of the country. 
Spring Park, and many tardy ones Mr. Tierney has always elo- 
arrived on Tuesdaj^ in time to take quently supported all issues up- 
part in the election of new officers. holding the rights and integrity of 
It was a source of great satisfac- the hotel men throughout the state, 
tion to the hotel men of New York and in his speech before the H. M. 
City to have Mr. Edward M. Tier- M. B. Assn., on Tuesday the 14th, 
ney of the Hotel iNlarlborough he earnestly advocated the con- 
unanimously elected President, and certed action of the organization 
Mr. Frederick A. Reed, of Reed & against prohibition. We quote 
Barnett, proprietors of the Park from his speech : 

Avenue Hotel, elected director for , "To attempt to enforce a law that 

New York ^iutP abridges any man s right in the exercise 

i\cv\ iuiK oLdie. Qf jjjg personal liberty and social duties, 

Mr. Edward M. Tierney has had is as dangerous to society's laws as is 

' ^ 1^,,.^ „.,^i -r^r-^^A ^^,^<i^;^,-,,.„ ;„ fii« tlie communistic principle that the suc- 

; a long and varied experience m the ^.g^gj^^l ^^^^ gj,Qu,g ^^^J^ i^i^ ^^^^^ ^,,i^,, 

' hotel business. in 1886, as man- his idle and unproductive neighbor. 

ager of the Seaside Hotel at Rock- * * * It might be asked of us, what 

Twav Reach ATr Tiernev had hi-, '^ ^^^ remedy for the existing condition 

away «eacn, lur. iierney naa nis ^^ ^,^g jj^^j^^. ^^a^p^ and how are we 

hrst opportunity to demonstrate going to effect a reform in our present 

his ability and the natural qualities system of laws for its control? * * * 

that have since made him well We would in the words of an eminent 

, , J- 1 1^1 divine, caution against prohibition as a 

known and successful as a hotel dangerous policy of oppression, not only 

keeper. In 188S he formed a co- as being impracticable but impossible 

partnership with J. W. Kennedy, "^ accomplishment and recommend a 

*^ , ,1 Y i.1 1 Mi. 1 measure of restriction in the traffic 

and they together built and man- „nder .such limitations as may be defined 

aged the Hotel Arlington of Bing- by an equitable law that is framed in 

hamton, N. Y., which hotel is still consonance with that humanity that 

11 TV/T 'T- 1 ii v:n\ not brook any unreasonable re- 

owned by Mr. Tierney and the ,ti-alnt put upon o^ne's natural desire 

estate of J. W. Kennedy, and man- for food and drink." 

aged by Mr. Tierney under the Mr. Tierney concluded by calling 

firm name of The Kennedy-Tierney the attention of his hearers to the 

Co. Mr. Tierney is interested in fact that the}^ were allowing them- 

five of the leading hotels of New selves to be deluded into the belief 

York State, and occupies official that the hotel keeper is not the 

position in three of them: the Ar- point of attack in the warfare of 

lington Hotel of Binghamton, N. the prohibitioni; t against the sak 



Y., the Hotel Marlborough of this of liquor, and urged them to unite 

City, and the new Hotel Rochester for self-defense before the prohi- 

of Rochester, N. Y. bition movement had attained any 

From 1893 to 1897 inclusive, Mr. greater impetus. 
Tierney was President of the New The exhibition prepared by the 

York State Hotel Men's Assn.. and International Hotel Supply Men 

for the past four years he has been was a credit to this age of artis- 

Director for the State of New York tic achievement, and filled with 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



FOWLER & WELLS COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1835 



PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, EST. 1838 1 Oc, $1.00 per YEAR 

24 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



wonder many of the hotel men 
from smaller towns, where the 
needs and demands of the metrop- 
olis are neither felt nor known. 
There were sixty-seven exhibitors, 
and the beautiful display made by 
The Gorham Co. of this City is 
worthy of special mention. It con- 
tained everything possible in table 
silver for hotel use, and many nov- 
elties such as the most fastidious 
diner would delight in; among 
these were casserole mold frames. 
oyster cocktail plates, cafe parfait 
stands, bowls to hold and keep 
warm preserved fruits, caviar dish- 
es, etc., etc. 

The hotel men of Saratoga 
Springs planned and carried out to 
perfection a most elaborate pro- 
gramme for the entertainment of 
the visiting hotel men and their 
families, and throughout the five 
days of the reunion there was one 
continuous round of pleasure inter- 



spersed with the business sessions. 
Each day had its special luncheon, 
banquet and evening reception, and 
the afternoon trips included a visit 
to Saratoga Lake, a sail around 
Lake George, and a reception by 
the Chamber of Commerce at the 
Hotel Rensselaer, Troy. 

Frank Thornton. 



I 



n'JI>^ 


^"IPH 


ASK FOR 


^91 


ARONDACK 


1^* 




Saratoga's Most 
Palatable Water 


13^ 


V 


and Fine Mixer 
at any of the 
Best Hotels. 


Bi 


w^ 


Families may order 

from 

Charles & Co. 

Acker Merrall Co. 


JBBSaSm 


'W^tM^ 


Park & Tilford 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



SAILS 
1908 

.Tulv 



PORT 



NAME OF 
STEAMER 



ADDRESSES OF LINES 



STARTING PLAQ 



21 .Bremen K. Wm. II. . . . 

22 . Southampton Majestic 

22. Liverpool Mauretania. . 

23 . Havre Provence .... 

2^ .Bremen Bremen 

23 . Copenhagen Oscar II 

23. Liverpool Arabic 

23. Hamburg Deutschland. . 

25. Naples Qltonia 

25. Liverpool ("armania. . . . 

25 . London Minnehaha. . . 

25 . Antwerp Gothland .... 

25. Glasgow Caledonia 

28. Bremen Kaiser 

28. Rotterdam Noordam. . . . 

29. Southampton Oceanic 

29 . Liverpool Lucania 

30. Bremen p. F. Wilholra 

30. Liverpool Celtic 

30. Havre Touraine 

1 . Hamburg Pennsylvania. 

1 . Liverpool Campania . . . 

1 . Gib'r & Naples P. Irene 

1 .Antwerp Kroonland. . . 

I.Southampton Philadelphia.. 



N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 

White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 

Cunard S. S Co., 21 State St Ft 

French Line, 19 State St Ft 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 

Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way. . . . Ft 

White Star Line 9 B'way Ft 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co.. 21 State St Ft 

Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. . . Ft 

Red Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 

Anchor Line, 17 B'way Ft 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'wav Ft 

IIolland-Amer., 39 B'way Ft 

White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'wav Ft 

White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 

French Line, 19 State St Vt 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 

Red btar Line, 9 B'way Ft 

American Line, 9 B'way Ft 



3d St., Hoboken 
11th St., N. R. 
Jane St., N. R. 
Morton St.,N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken 
17th St., Hoboken 
11th St., N. R. 
1st St., Hoboken 
.Tane St., N. R. 
.Jane St., N. R. 
Houston St., N. R. 
Fulton St.. N. R. 
24th St., N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken 
5th St., Hoboken 
11th St., N. R. 
Jane St., N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken 
11th St., N. R. 
Morton St., N. R. 
Ist St., Hoboken 
Jane St.. N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken ; 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Fulton St., N. R. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY TO REACH 



American League Park — 167th st. 
and Broadway; Subway, Broad- 
way Division, to i68th st.; 3d, 6th 
or 9th ave. "L" to 125th st., 
thence Fort George trolley to 
167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 3d 
or 6th and Amsterdam ave. lines 
to 167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 
6th or 9th ave. "L" to i4Sth st. 
and Eighth ave., thence via 
Kingsbridge line to 167th st. and 
Broadway. 

Battery — This is the terminal of all 
elevated roads: 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 8th 
ave. and Broadway surface cars. 

Bronx Park— The Harlem R. R. 
from Grand Central Depot (42d 
St.) to Bedford Park Station. 
Or Third ave. "L" to Park. Or 
Subway to i8oth st. 

Celtic Park, Laurel Hill, L. I. City 

—Ferry foot 34th St., E. R., to 
L. I. City. 

Central Park — Surface cars : 
Fourth (Madison) Sixth, Eighth 
aves. Sixth ave. "L" to 58th st. 
Fifth ave. stages. Park coaches 
and electric wagonettes make 
the circuit of Central Park and 
afTord a most convenient means 
of viewing the principal points of 
interest within the Park. Fare. 



25 and 50 cents. Stop-over 
tickets are issued at various 
points, good for the remainder 
of the trip any time the same 

St. 

day. Coaches start from main 
entrance of Central Park, Fifth 
ave. and 59th St., every 15 min- 
utes. Gates or entrances to the 
Park: Fifth ave.: 59th, 64th, 
67th, 72d, 79th, 85th, 90th, 96th, 
i02d, iioth sts. ; Sixth ave.. 59th 
and iioth sts. Seventh ave.: 50th 
and Iioth sts. Eighth ave. (Cen- 
tral Park West): 59th, 72d, 79th, 
8sth, 96th, looth, 105th and iioth 
sts. 

Columbia College — Subway to 
ii6th St. Sixth ave. "L" to 104th 
St., walk one block west. Am- 
sterdam ave. car. 

Columbia Oval, Williamsbridge — 
Harlem Division of N. Y. C. & 
H. R. R. to Williamsbridge; 10 
minutes' walk west; Mt. Vernon 
line, 128th St. and 3d ave. to Gun- 
hill road, 5 minutes' walk west. 

Crescent Athletic Club — Shore 
road, 83d to 85th sts., Brooklyn. 
From IBrooklyn Bridge, 3d ave. 
line to 83d St., or 5th ave. line, 
connecting at 65th st. with 3<1 
ave. line. 




MAGFADDEN'S 

Physical Culture Restaurants 

Caterers Nature's 
Pure Nourishing Foods 



Popular Prices 



^r- 



Bernarr Macfadden 

Pres. P. C. Restaurant Co. 

Pres. P. C. Pub. Co. 

Philadelphia : 

25-27 South Sth St. 



New York: 

654 Broadway 
220 Fulton St. 
120 Pearl St. 
487 Pearl St. 
106 East 23d St. 
2078 Seventh Ave. 
615 Sixth Ave. 



Pittsburg : 

302 Wood St. 

Boston : 

27-29 Kingston St. 
35-37 Arch St. 

Chicago : 

Tacoma Building 

Madison and Wabash Ave. 



Henry Ward Beecher said : 



" There is no higher art than that which tends toward the improvement of 
human food." 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



\ 



THIS IS THE WAY TO REACH Continued 



Grand Central Station — Third ave. 
"L" and 42d st. branch direct to 
station. Sixth ave. "L." Or sur- 
face line to 42d st. 

Grant's Tomb — Subway to Man- 
hattan St. Sixth or Ninth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west two 
blocks. Boulevard car to iigth 

Highbridge — Sixth ave. "L" to 
i2Sth St. and change to Fort 
George surface car. 

McComb's Dam Park Athletic 
Field, northern end of McComb's 
Dam Park, Bronx — Sixth or gth 
ave. "L" to 155th st., across Via- 
duct to Park at 161 st St.; 8th ave. 
line to Central Bridge at 155th 
St., across Viaduct to Park at 
i6ist St.; 2d or 3d ave. L to i6ist 
St. and 3d ave.; i6ist st. cross- 
town line to Jerome ave. 

Morningside Heights — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west one 
block and take Amsterdam ave. 
car. 

New York Athletic Club, Grounds 
at Travers Island, Pelham 
Manor, N. Y.; clubhouse, No. 58 
West 59th St. — Grounds: Harlem 
Division of N. Y., N. H. & H. R. 
R. from 131st St. and Willis ave. 
Shuttle train from "L" station at 
129th St. and 2d or 3d aves.. to 



Pelham Manor; 10 minutes' walk 
or bus to grounds. Mt. Ver- 
non line from 128th st. and 3d 
ave. to Mt. Vernon; transfer to 
Pelham Manor trolley to N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R. R. station in 
Pelham Manor; then bus or 10 
minutes' walk to grounds. 

Polo Grounds — 157th st. and 
Eighth ave.; 6th or gth ave. "L" 
to 155th St. and 8th ave.; 2d or 
3d ave. "L" to 125th st., cross- 
town trolley to 125th st. and 8th 
ave. thence to Eighth ave. 
trolley to 157th st. and 8th 
ave.; 8th ave. line to 157th st.; 
2d, 3d, Lexington, Madison or 
Lenox ave. lines to 125th st., 
thence to crosstown trolley to 
8th ave. line, north to 157th si. 
and 8th ave. 

Speedway — Sixth ave. "L" to 125th 
St., thence Fort George surface 
car. 

Van Cortlandt Park — Sixth or 
Ninth ave. "L" to 155th st. ; 
thence N. Y. & Putnam R. R. 
from Grand Central Station (d2d 
St.). Subway to Kingsbridge, 
then surface car. 

Washington Bridge — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 125th St. and change to 
Fort George surface car; also by 
Subwp- to i8ist St. station. 



EXCLUSIVE BOARDING HOUSES OF NEW YORK 



17 MADISON AVENUE 

.Near 24tli Street, opposite Park 
Single and Double Rooms. Transients 



69 MADISON AVENUE 

Rooms .Single, Double and Knsuite. Tel. Exch. 
Southern Cooking. Table Guests. References. 

104 and 106 MADISON AVE. 

Private Baths. Transients. Telephone. 

Strictly First Class 



165 MADISON AVENUE 

Telephone Exchaiii;.-. 'J'ransients. 

Larye and Small Rooms. Private Baths. 



159 MADISON AVENUE 

Transients .-Xrconiodated. Telephone Connection 
Private Baths. Table Board 



51 TWENTY-NINTH ST. East 

Tiansients. Table Guests 

Near 2Sth St. Subway. Tel. 2226 Madison 



221 WEST 44th STREET 

Near Broadway. Tran.sients .\ccomodated 

Table Guests. Telephone ' 



6 7 V^est 46th STREET 

Single and Iioulde Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Southern CookinK 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TROLLEY TRIPS 



From New York to Mount Ver- 
non one may take any one of three 
routes — one direct from 129th st. 
and Third ave., at the Harlem 
River Bridge, by way of Webster 
ave.; a second on the West Farms 
and Williamsbridge car from the 
same point, changing to Webster 
ave. car at Williamsbridge; the 
third from the Bronx Borough side 
of the Harlem River at Central 
Bridge, take the Sixth ave. "L" to 
155th St. and Eighth ave. end of 
line) and walk over the viaduct 
and bridge. This third car (from 
Central Bridge) goes up Jerome 
ave. From Mount Vernon — Yon- 
kers, Hastings, Tuckahoe, Pelhani, 
New Rochelle, East Chester, 
Larchmont, Larchmont Manor, 
Mamaroneck, Rye, Rye Beach, 
White Plains, Tarrytown, Porl- 
chester may be reached. 

Take the Fordham line at 128th 
St. and Third ave., north to Third 
and Tremont aves., transfer east 
to Tremont ave. line to Unionport. 
For Throggs Neck and Fori 
Schuyler, from which an excellent 
view of Long Island Sound can be 
obtained, transfer again in West- 
chester Village. Returning, take 
Tremont ave. line to West Farms, 
transfer to West Farms line, south- 



bound, or Tremont ave. line to 
Webster ave.; transfer to Mt. Ver- 
non line, to 128th St. and Third ave. 
Fordham or Mt. Vernon line at 
128th St. and Third ave., to Tre- 
mont ave., transfer to western di- 
vision of Tremont ave. line on 
Burnside, Cedar and Sedgwick 
aves. to High Bridge. University 
Heights (Hall of Fame). Re- 
turning, via Sedgwick ave. to 
Jerome ave. line to "L" station ai 
155th St. and Eighth ave., or con- 
tinuing east to i6ist st. and Third 
ave., then transfer south on Third 
ave. to starting point. By walk- 
ing across High Bridge to Amster- 
dam ave., southbound Amsterdam, 
Sixth or Third ave. car can be 
taken to Manhattan. 



What is it that thou are fretting 
and self-tormenting about? J,s it 
because thou art not happy? Who 
told thee thou was to be happy? 
Is there any ordinance of the uni- 
verse that thou shouldst be happy? 
Yes, thou canst do without happi- 
ness, and instead thereof, find 
lik'ssedness. — Carlylc. 



"There is nothing either good 
)r had but thinking makes it so." 
— Shakespeare. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



tana T'^E TABLE 

lyUO DAILY (except SUNDAYS 


) 1908 


Lv. Read Down. 




Ar. Head Up. 


A.M. 1 A.M. 1 P.M. 1 




A.M. 1 P.M. 1 P.M. 


8:00 
8:40 
9:00 
9:20 
9:45 






.Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
.... Yonkers .... 


ii-Ah 
11 :20 
11 :00 


6:20 
6:00 
5 :30 
5 :10 
4:30 




9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 


1 :45 
2:00 

2 :20 


9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7 :35 


4 :50 
5:00 

5 :25 

5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 

6 :45 


..Highland Falls.. 
...West Point... 
.... Cornwall .... 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
.New Hamburgh. 

Milton 

. . Poughkeep&io . . 
. .Kingston Point . . 


8:40 
8 :35 
8:1.-. 
8:00 
7:S0 
7:15 
7:00 

(i :66 




11 :50 
i2":25 


1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 


2:50 
■2:15 

' i ':26 
12 :25 


5:45 

*5 :20 

5:05 








1 :15 
2:10 


2 :S5 


4 :10 




7 :45 


.... Kingston .... 
Catskill 




;j ^f) 




11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 




H:40 
«:10 

















.... Albany .... 






P.M. 1 P.M. ! P.M. 




A.M. 1 A.M. 1 P.M. 










29 







Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
"New York" and "Albany" 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 

and Kingston Point wharfs 

for all points in Catskill 

Mountains 

Morning and Afternoon 

Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect ,\fternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF 

Aldrich Court — 41 Broadway. This 
formed the site of the first hab- 
itation of white men on Manhat- 
tan Island; was also the site of 
the second residence of Washing- 
ton. Tablet: "This tablet marks 
the site of the first habitation of 
white men on the Island of Man- 
hattan. Adrian Block, Command- 
er of the Tiger, erected here four 
houses or huts, November, 1613. 
He built the Restless, the first 
vessel made by Europeans in this 
country. The Restless was 
launched in the spring of 1614. 
This tablet is placed here by the 
Holland Society of New York, 
September, 1890." 

Boreel Building — 115 B'way. This 
site was formerly occupied by the 
residence of Lieutenant-Governor 
James DeLancey; after his death 
it was turned into a public house, 
known under a number of names, 
the most famous being "Burns' 
Coffee House." It was here the 
non-importation act was signed, 
also Washington's inaugural ball 
was held in the so-called "great 
room." During the year 1793 the 
building was torn down and a 
"City Hotel" was erected by a 
number of New York merchants. 
Tablet: "The site of the old his- 
torical DeLancey House, after- 
ward the 'City Hotel.' The tav- 
ern located here had various pro- 
prietors, by whose names it was 
successively called, being, among 
others, known as 'The Province 
Arms,' 'The City Arms,' and 
'Burns' Coffee House or Tavern.' 
It was here that the celebrated 
non-importation agreement in op- 
position to the 'Stamp Act' was 
signed October 31, 1765. Erected 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, March, 1890." 

Church of the Messiah — Park ave. 
and 34th St. This site once 
formed the estate of Robert Mur- 
ray, the "Quaker Merchant of the 
Revolution," and was called "In- 
clenberg," and became historic 
through the diplomacy of Mrs. 
Murray in detaining the British 
officers, Clinton, Howe and Corn- 



INTEREST 

wallis, while Putnam and his 
troops, on their retreat to Har- 
lem, guided by Aaron Burr, 
passed within a mile of the house. 

Fort Amsterdam — This site is now 
occupied by the new Custom 
House Building, and another por- 
tion occupied by the Cunard 
Building, 29 Broadway. Tablet: 
"The site of Fort Amsterdam, 
built in 1626. Within the fortifi- 
cations was erected the first sub- 
stantial church edifice on the 
Island of Manhattan. In 1787 the 
fort was demolished and the Gov- 
ernment House built upon this 
site. This tablet is placed here 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, September, 1890." 

Mercantile Library — Aster Place. 
Founded in 1820. This is the 
principal circulating library in the 
city; was first located at 49 Ful- 
ton street and afterward moved 
to Clinton Hall, corner Nassau 
and Beekman streets, where it 
remained until transferred to the 
Astor Place Opera House, which 
was renamed the new Clmton 
Hall. This building was demol- 
ished in 1890, and the present 
building erected on its site. 

New York Historical Society — Sec- 
ond ave. and nth st. This build- 
ing contains a large and valuable 
collection of historical curiosities. 
The society was organized in 1804 
for the collection and preserva- 
tion of everything relating to the 
natural, civil and ecclesiastical 
history of the United States in 
general and New York in particular. 

Windsor Arcade — 571 Fifth ave. 
This was the site of the Windsor 
Hotel which was destroyed by 
fire March 17, 1899, at which 
about fifty lives were lost. 

West Washington Market — Located 
at the foot of West 12th St., but 
was formerly extending along 
West St., on the river side to the 
market. It is here that all early 
fruits and vegetables from' Ber- 
muda Islands are received, and 
it has been estimated that during 
the peach season from 50,000 to 
100,000 baskets are received daily. 



30 



Is This Your Opportunity 



m 



or His? 



AT E R F R O N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufficient water for ocean-going vessels, 

A nd within 15 miles of the Battery, on 

i he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 

H/ very facility for manufacturing 

Xx. ight at hand. Water under pressure. 

t^ reight carried by three railroads. 

Xx. are opportunity : 1 50 acres 

vJ f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

JN o difficulty in building : solid ground for 

foundations. 
L he only large piece of waterfront property 
available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 











FOR 
SALE 


1 00 Acres of Park Land 


Suitable for Residential Park Development 




Within one hour from Wall Street, on Penn. R. R. 
High rolling country ; fine views. 
Shrubbery, shade, ornamental and fruit trees. 
Gas, electricity, water, and telephone. 
One fine residence, stable, barns already on 
property. Other fine residences close by. 
Country Club opposite side of road. 
Price and terms attractive. 

CLARKE CBi THORNTON 

1 Madison Avenue 



Bail? Attractions 



tn 



iSeto gorfe 




4 



Taxameter Rates Reduced 

For lowest rate and best service 'phone 

COLUMBUS 

See page 24 for the new tariff card 

NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO.. 49th Street and Eighth Avenue 



VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEA-R 5 CENTS A COPY 

opyright, 1008. by Daily Attractions in Ntui York, Inc. 



NO. 122 



1 




li 



Mr. EDWARD M. TIERNEY 

Proprietor of the Hotel Marlborough 
who has just been unaminously elected 

President of the 
HoTEF. Men's Mutual Benefit Associati(3n 

of the United States and Canada 



Sahly Atteactiom 



^ 



■ O, XXc. Nj. 



!OPY 



i 



^ 



o4 WeeA(y S^Agnzine devoted to o^vunce InformAUon. 



T 



JULY 27th to AUGUST 2d, 1908 



No. 122 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and publish ?d by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue; 
E. R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractioni circulatet through all the 
leading Hoteli in New York City 
ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 

FiTe Cent* a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

AdTcrtiting rate* bated on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1 908, by Daily Attractioni in 
New York. (Inc.) 

CONTENTS Page 

" A Noble Life " (J. S. Voorhees 25 

Art Notes 3 

Church of the Transfiguration 4 

Churches 12-13 

" Domestic Engineering " (Haryot Holt 

Dey) 23 

Elevated Railroads 1 + 

Ferries 14 

Hotels 18 

Hudson River Day Line 7-28 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 27 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 26 

Points of Interest 29-30 

Public Libraries 22 

Pullman Accomodations 14 

Railroad Stations 14 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 15 

Short Trips to Nearby Points 27 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter Information 24 

Theaters 19-21 

"The Mimic World" (Frank Thornton) 21 
This Week in New York 5-10 



ART NOTES 

Metropolitan Museum of Art — 

Fifth ave., opposite 82d st. Open 
every weekday from 10 a. m. tc 
6 p. m., Saturday from 10 a. m. 
to 10 p. m., Sunday from i to 5 
j).iu. Free, except on Monday and 
h^-iday, when a fee of 25 cents 
is charged. In the Room of Re- 
cent Accessions are two por- 
traits of Saint Gaudens, by Ken- 
yon Cox and Ellen Emmet; "A 
Lady in Black and Green." by 
J. W. Alexander; a pastel por- 
trait of Albert Gallatin, by 
James Sharpies, the gift of Miss 
Josephine L. Stevens. A cas- 
sone font. Umbrian school 
(about 1500) presented by James 
Loeb. Six landscapes by Hiro- 
hogo, two landscapes by Kawa- 
l)ata, Gyokusho and other Jap- 
anese paintings, the gift of Fran- 
cis Lathon. A plaster copy of 
"Dying Clytie," liy George 
Watts. American Museum of 
Natural History — Central Park 
West and 77th st.; rare' and val- 
uable acquisition of a collection 
of weapons for warfare and the 
chase, fashioned and used by the 
Veddahs, or "Hunters," a savage 
people (of Ceylon, representing 
the Yakkos of Sanscrit writers, 
who are believed to have been 
true aborigines and sole inhabit- 
ants of the island before the 
Hindu conquest. 



AVARICE 

Avarice is an incurable malady, 
an ever burning fire, a tyranny 
which extends far and wide, for he 
who in this life is the slave of 
money is loaded with heavy chains 
and destined to carry far heavier 
chains in the life to come. — St. 
John Chrysostom. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE CHURCH OF THE TRANSFIGURATION 



No. I East 29th St., the Rev. George 
Clarke Houghton, D.D., rector, 
was organized in 1848 and the 
church was built in 1850, the first 
church of its name in the world. 
The building is now five times the 
size of the "little church" of those 
days. In the draft riots of the 
Civil War in 1864 a very large 
number of colored people were 
driven from their tenements and 
would have been killed had they 
not found refuge in the church and 
the rector stood guard over them 
and single-handed kept the mob 
away until the soldiers dispersed 
the rioters. In 1870 George Hol- 
land, one of the most prominent 
actors of his day, died, and when 
Joe Jefferson applied to a small 
church on Madison ave. for Holland's 
burial the rector of that church de- 
clined to perform the burial rites 
because Holland was an actor, and 
told Joe Jefferson that there was 
"a little church around the corner 
where it might be done." referring 
to this Church of the Transfigura- 
tion, which seats 1,200 people. Jef- 
ferson's prompt reply was: "God 
bless the little church around the 
corner," and that name has clung 
with afTection to this church ever 
since. Thousands of actors, and 
others among the most prominent 
people of this city and State have 
been married and buried from the 
church. The church is open every 
day in the year from 6 a. m. to 
6 p. m., and between three and five 
hundred visitors go to see the 
church every day. There is a 
visitor's book for names in the 
vestibule, and among the thirty 
thousand persons who have signed 
that register during the past six years 
are Princes and Dukes and other 
members of royal families of Europe 
and .some of the most noted people 
of this and foreign countries. There 
is a tiny, but very beautiful "Lady 
Chapel" with superb glass windows 
and a beautiful Marble Altar, and 
charming oil paintings adorn the ceil- 
ing. The Holy Sacrament is kept in 
the Chapel with a sanctuary lamp 



always burning in front of it, and 
very many people kneel there 
every day to say their prayers. The 
most beautiful mortuary chapel in 
America, a Memorial of the first 
Rector, is just completed, and 
here the bodies of not only mem- 
bers of this parish, but of any creed 
may be brought and remain to 
the day of their burial, if their 
families have no home or other 
suitable place to take them to, and 
there is no charge or fee for this 
or for any ministration of the 
Rector or clergy. A very large 
number of persons are baptized in 
this church, but the rector won't 
marry any one whose parents or 
guardians are not with them or 
at least give their consent to the 
wedding. 

The Rector has refused as many as 
one hundred couples in one month. 
The very poor as well as the more 
favored people attend the Sunday and 
week day services, and visitors, 
whether strangers, frequent comers, 
poor or rich, are always made wel- 
come. Persons of great prominence 
in this country come here for the 
Sacraments and other ministrations, 
as well as the humblest people. 
There are more than 2,000 communi- 
cants, and the church is filled every 
Sunday, Summer and Winter. There 
is a large vested choir of men and 
boys, and seven services are held 
every Sunday and from three to five 
services every week day in the year. 
Many persons say that there is no 
better music in New York than the 
music rendered by the choir in this 
church. Dr. Houghton is the Rector 
and may be found in the church 
every day all the year round. The 
church is full of beautiful memorials 
and the Verger will explain them all 
to visitors ; no fee is charged for his 
services. The "Lychgate" at the en- 
trance is one of the very few to be 
found in America, and here the bod- 
ies of the dead, brought to the church 
for burial, rest for a moment for a 
prayer before taken into the church 
for the last rites. 

G. C. Houghton. 



cOT^S 




' iooa, *T 



This Week in New York 

Monday, July 27th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"Some Educational Problems of the Physicist." lecture by Professor 
Tufts, in room 301 Fayerweather, Columbia University. 4.30 p. ni. Free. 

Public Concert — Coriears Hook Park,' Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts. and East River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fiftli ave., 
VVaverly and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Pittsburg, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission, 50 cents. 

There is nothing better offered for a short trip than the one to 
West Point via the sumptuous steamers of the Hudson River Day Line; 
consult the time table, see index in this magazine. It will please you to 
take this day's outing. Try it. 

You can subscribe to "Daily Attractions in New York" for three 
months for fifty cents. It will be mailed to you regularly every Sat- 
urday. You can not buy it on the news stands. Subscribe now. 



The Greatest and Most Original Attraction in New York are the 

FLEISCHMAH BATHS and 
Roof Garden Restaurant 

On the three upper floors of the Bryant Park Building. 

Northeast Corner 42d Street and 6th Avenue. 
The Roof Garden Restaurant is open to Ladies and Gentlemen, 
it is tlie coolest and most delightful dining resort in New York. 

First-class Service a la Carte. The Baths are open Day and 

Night, for ?ri()i only. Excellent Sleeping Accommodation. 

Price of Russian or Turkish Baths, $1.50. 8 Tickets for $10.00. 17 Tickets for $20.00 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WBEK — Continued 

Horse Racing — Brighton Beach Racing Association; Brighton Track 
(to July 29). 

The Roof Garden of Hotel Martha Washington (Woman's Hotel) 
is now open from 5 to 12 p. m. Dinner is served a la carte. 

The evening roof playgrounds are open from 7.30 to 10 p. m. every 
evening except Sunday; they are located at Henry, Catherine and 
Oliver sts; Rivington, Forsyth and Eldridge sts.; Mott and Elizabeth, 
between Prince and Spring sts.; Hester, Orchard and Ludlow sts.; 
Henry and Gouverneur sts.; Rivington and Suffolk sts.; Attorney, near 
Rivington St.; Market and Monroe sts. 



Tuesday, July 28th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

■Public Concert — Mount AIc>rris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris aves., 
I20th to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Pittsburg, at the Polo Grounds. 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p..m. Admission, 50 cents. 

A group of four large bells will be placed in the forty-sixth story 
of the tower of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Building, which building 
covers from Madison to Fourth aves., and from 23d to 24th st. The 
group consists of four large bells, the largest will weigh 7,000 pounds 
and the smallest 1,500, and are said to be the largest bells ever assembled 
in a group; they will strike the quarter of each hour in chimes and it 
is said may be heard at a great distance. 

Taxameter cabs are now running on a reduced Summer rate; 'phone 
2380 Columbus for all information. It will surprise you, but you can ride 
in their well-appointed cabs at a very low figure. Try them. Call 2380 
Columbus. 

The evening recreation centres are now open. Sessions nightly, except 
Sunday, from 7.30 until 10 p. m. A complete list will be furnished upon 
ai)plication; several are here given: For Men and Boys, 208 West 13th 
St.; 124 West 30th St.; Ninth and Tenth sts. east of Avenue B; High 
School of Commerce, 65th st. west of Broadway; io8th and 109th sts. 
east of 2d ave. For Women and Girls: Third and Fourth sts. east of 
First ave.; 514 West 44th st.; 103d and 104th sts. near Fifth ave.; 145th 
and 146th sts. east of Willis ave. 



FOWLER cSc WELLS COMPANY :: established leas 

PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, EST. 1838 10c. , $1.00 per YEAR 

24 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

Wednesday, July 29th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"Tlie Doctrine of God Held and danglit in Korea, in China, and 
in Jai)an. coni])arcMl with the Doctrine of God set forlii by Christian 
People," lecture I)y the Rev. Horace G. Underwood, D. 1)., of Seoul, 
Korea, in the New York University Auditorium, on University Heights. 
4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson st. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Mulberry Bend Park. Mulberry to Baxter St., and 
Bayard to Park st. 8 p. m. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. ni. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings: Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 28. 

Afternoon Boat. Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; W^est 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Cuutiiiiicd 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. Louis, at the Polo Grounds, 
T57th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission. 50 cents. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles E. Jefferson, D. 1)., LL. 1)., pastor ; Wednesday evening, Praise 
and Prayer Service. 8 p. m. You will be cordially welcomed. 

]\'Iadisiin .Xveniu" Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st., the Rev. 
Edward Lou.x, 1). D., minister; Wednesday evening meeting in the 
I'arish House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for you. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West at 68th st.; 
Wednesday evening meeting. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, 29tli st. and Fifth ave., the Rev. 
David James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; Wednesday evening 
meeting. 8 p. m. The Rev. John S. Allen, D. D., pastor for strangers, 
will preside. A welcome to all strangers. 

Horse Show — Horse Show, Long Branch, L. L (to "Aug. i). 



Thursday July 30th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Annual benefit for the Hebrew Infant Asylum at Averne, under the 
supervision of Henry B. Harris; the program promised is most 
attractive. 

The Orange Common Council visit the Fifth Regiment, N. G. 
N. J., at the state encampment at Sea Girt. 

Public Concert — East River Park, 84th to 89th sts., facing East 
River. S p. m. 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt {>> 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — ^Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth ave., and 
23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. Louis, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 ]). m. Admission. 50 cents. 

The original '"Seeing New York" Yacht encircles the Island of Man- 
hattan twice daily, leaving from foot of West 22d st., at 10 a. m. antl 
2.30 p. m. You do not realize the beauties of our waterway until j'ou 
spend the three restful hours enjoying this beautiful trip. Fare $1. 

Horse Racing — Saratoga Racing Association, Saratoga, N. Y. (to 
Aug. 22). 

The vacation playgrounds are now open daily except Sunday from 
I to 5.30 p. m. A complete list will be furnished upon application; 



PAUL L. 


BRYANT 


DYEING AND CLEANSING 


Gowns Cleaned in Twenty-Four Hours 


291 FIFTH AVENUE 


900 SIXTH AVENUE 


Tel. 1224 MADISON SQ. 


Bet. 50th & 51st Sts. Tel. 5207 Plaza 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

several are here given: 225 East 27th St.. 208 West 13th st.; 41st and 
42d sts. east of Third ave.; 320 East 20th st.; 38 First St.; Amsterdam 
ave. and 68th st.; 32d and 33d sts. near Second ave.; Avenue A, 77th 
and 78th sts.; 82d st. between First and Second aves. 

Friday, July 3 ist 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Hudson I'ark, Lcroy, Clarkson and N'arick sts. 
8 p. m. 

Pubbc Concert — Battery Park, foot lof Broadway, overlooking the 
harbor. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Wm. H. Seward Park. Hester to Division and 
Norfolk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. T>ouis, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission. 50 cents. 

The motor omnibuses which run fnoni Washington Square to 90th 
St. on Fifth ave., have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to 57th st., thence over 
to Broadway, up Broadway tio 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be dis- 
tinguished, by day a red ball, by night a red light on the front of the 
cars. The fare in each instance, either way. is 10 cents per person. 

Our Bureau of Information is open to you without cost. 'Phone 
us, 159 Gramercy. what 3'ou want to know or where you want to go. 
Is it a trolley trip? Ask us: we will publish it in the following issue. 
Get the habit of knowing we want to help you out. Try "Father 
Knickerbocker"; he knows. 

Saturday, August ist 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall; main entrance, 5<)th st. 
Fifth or Eighth aves.; nearest entrance 72d st. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Morningside Park, between ]\Iorningside and 
Columbia and West iioth to 123d st. 4 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. Louis, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission. 50 cents. 

The Singer tower is now open fo the public, and the observation bal- 
cony at No. 149 Broadway offers the visitor to this city an opportunitj' 



Dodd, Mead & Co. all the latest books 

FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 35th St. OtatlOfiery, lltC» 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

to see New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. The 
balcony is on the forty-second floor, 548 feet above the curb, and gives 
a sight-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The tower 
has a platform with a high railing which accommodates about forty 
people. Express elevators run from the main corridor on the first floor, 
making the trip in one minute. There are also guides stationed on the 
platform to point out the different points of interest to visitors and to 
give other information. A fee of 50 cents is charged. 

Motor Boating — Motor Boat race for the British International 
Trophy; Huntington Harbor, L. I. 



Sunday, August 2d 



MISCELLANEOUS 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., the Rev. 
Lcighton Parks, D. D., rector; services. 8 a. m. and 11 a. m.; the Rev. 
J. Stuart Holden, rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square, London, 
will preach. The full choir will be present. All seats are free. A wel- 
come for all. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth avenue and 55th street, the 
Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 4 p. m. 
Rev. J. Tolefree Parr, M. A., the London Evangelist, will preacli botli in 
the morning and afternoon. A welcome for strangers. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. 
David James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 
8 p. m.; the Rev. John S. Allen, D. D., will preach. A cordial welcome 
for everyone. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefiferson, D. D., LL. D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, Madison ave and 
60th St., the Rev. Wallace MacMuIlen, D. D., minister; service, 11 a. m.; 
the Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach. You will be welcome. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church. Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House. 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th st., the Rev. D. Asa Black- 
burn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers Avill be welcome. 

St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church, West End ave. and 86th st.; 
services, 11 a. m.; the Rev. M. B. Chapman, D. D.. will preach. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway. 8 p. m. ; Rev. Len G. 
Broughton, of Atlanta, Ga., will speak. 

Public Concert — Central Park on the Mall, main entrance 59th st. 
Fitth or Eighth aves., nearest entrance 72d st. 4 p. m. 



i 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



LEADING HOTELS THROUGH WHICH DAILY 
ATTRACTIONS CIRCULATES 



Aberdeen, 17 W 326. 
Albany, B'way and 41st 
Albemarle, Broadway and 24th 
Albert, Univ. PI. and nth 
Aldine, 431 Fourth ave 
Algonquin, 59 W 44th 
Ansonia, Broadway and 73d 
Arlington, 18 W 25th 
Ashland House, Fourth Ave & 24th 
Astor House, B'way and Barclay 
Astor, Broadway and 44th 
Bartholdi, Broadway and 23d 
Belleclaire, Broadway and 77th 
Belmont (New), Park Ave & 42d 
Belvedere, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Beresford, Central Pk W and 81st 
Breslin, Broadway and 29th 
Bretton Hall, Broadway and 86th 
Brevoort, Fifth Ave and 8th 
Bristol, 124 W. 49th 
Broadway Central, 673 Broadway 
Broztell, 3 E 27th 
Buckingham, Fifth Ave and 50th 
Calumet, 340 W 57th 
Calvert, Broadway and 41st 
Collingwood, 45 W 35th 
Colonial, 8ist and Columbus Ave 
Continental, Broadway and 20th 
Cumberland, Broadway and 54th 
Endicott, Columbus Ave and 8ist 
Empire, Broadway and 63d 
Essex, Madison Ave and s6th 
Flanders, 135 W 47th 
Florence, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Gerard, 123 W 44th 
Gilsey, Broadway and 29th 
Gotham, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Grand Union, Park Ave and 42d 
Gregorian, 42 W 35th 
Grenoble, Seventh Ave and 56th 
Hamilton, 132 W 45th 
Hargrave, 72d st. nr Central Pk W 
Hoffman House. Broadway & 25th 
Holland House, Fifth Ave and 30th 
Holland, 66 W 46th 
Imperial, Broadway and 31st 
King Edward, 155 W 47th 
Knickerbocker, Broadway and 42d 
Latham, 4 East 28th 
Le IMarquis, 12 E 31st 



Long Acre, 157 W 47th 
Lorraine, Fifth Ave and 45th 
Lucerne, Amsterdam Ave and 7(}th 
Madison, 37 Madison Ave 
Majestic, Central Park W and 72d 
Manhattan, Madison Ave and 42d 
^L^nhattan Square, 50 W 77th 
A^ansfield, 12 W 44th 
Marie Antoinette, B'way and 67th 
Markwell, Broadway and 49th 
Marlborough, Broadway and 36th 
Martha Washington, 29 E 29th 
Martinique, Broadway and 33d 
Murray Hill, Park Ave and 40th 
Navarre, Seventh Ave and 38th 
New Amsterdam, 4th Ave and 21st 
New Grand, Broadway and 31st 
New Weston, Madison Ave & 49th 
Orleans, 100 W 80th 
Oxford, Park Ave and 58th 
Park Avenue, Park Ave and 33d 
Pierrepont, 45 W 32d 
Plaza, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Portland, 132 W 47th 
Preston, 363 Fourth Ave 
Prince George, 12 E 28th 
Raymond, 42 E 28th 
Regent, Broadway and 70th 
San Remo, Central Park W & 74th 
Savoy, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Seville, Madison Ave and 29th 
Sherman Sq, Broadway and 71st 
Somerset, 150 W 47th 
St. Andrew, Broadway and 72d 
St. Charles, 47th st, nr 7th Ave 
St. Denis, Broadway and nth 
St. George, Broadway and 12th 
St. Lorenz, 72d st & Lex Ave 
St. Paul, Columbus Ave and 60th 
St. Regis, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Stratford, n E 32d 
Victoria, Broadway and 27th 
Waldorf.Astoria, Fifth Ave & 34th 
Walton. Columbus Ave and 70th 
Warrington. 161 Madison Ave 
Wellington, Seventh ave and 55th 
Westminster, Irving PI and i6th 
Wolcott, 4 W 31st 
Woodstock, 127 W 43d 
Woodward, Broadway and 55th 







New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty-First Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, July 26th 

Servicej II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



.A Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



g'rrottJi CEIiurrli at (t\}t\Bt, ^rUntiHt 



Central Park West 
at 68th Street 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. in. Sunday School, ii a. m. 

Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



METHODIST 



Madison Ave. Methodist Episcopal Church 

CORNER OF SIXTIETH STREET 

Rey. Wallace MacMuIlen, D. D. - - - Minister 

REV. ARLO A. BROWN. Aiiuunt MioUter 

SUNDAY, JULY 26th 

Preaching Service, 11 A. M. 
Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NXW YORK OHURCHBS— Oontinn«d 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

^aint ^Bartholomew's (Ehurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 



Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 



SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 
SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher July 26th 

THE REV. J. STUART HOLDEN, 

Rector of St Paul's Church, Portman Square, London 



THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT 



ALL SEATS FREE 



CONGREGATIONAL 



IKFrEKSUN, D.D., LL.D., Paator 
Sunday : Public Worship, ii a. m., 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 p. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E.. 7 p.m. Wednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8p.m. 

INDEPENDENT 

CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 



Sunday Services, 1 1 A. M. and 7.45 P. M. 



Strangers in tFie City Welcome 



PRESBYTERIAN 



iFiftl) Au^ttup PrffihytFrian C!Il|«rrl) Fifth^venu^and ssthsireet 

SERVICES JULY 26th; U a.m. aud 4 p.m. STEANGEKS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

Rev. .JOHN A. HDTTON, M.A., of Glasgow, Pastor of the Belhaven United Free Church 

of Srotlami. will prcarli Imth in the moriiiug aud afternoon 



REFORMED 



1628 



THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 



190B 



The Marble Collegiate Ghurcli 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STnECT 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 



Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN, D.D., Pastor for Strangers 

will preach Sunday, July 26th 
II a. m. Subject: "The Needle-woman of Joppa" 
8 p. ra. Subject : "What is Thv Name" 



Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the ye^r. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio— Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 5860 
Franlslin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — ^Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 
Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 
Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 
Pa\onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonia 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 
Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island^Foot of Whitehall Street^ 
Weeliawken — Foot of Franklin Street 
and foot of West 42d Street. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpoint Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., l<'ulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivington, Ist, 
8th, 14th, 19th. 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th, 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (change for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park pi.. Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, Slst, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th. 145.th, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



For walking or traveling costumes 
the leading dressmakers have shown 
great ingenuity in the combination of 
stripes and plain check of the shep- 
herds' plaid order. 

One of which the description is 
now given, the stripes are three 
inches wide so that the skirt, which is 
mounted in folds of precisely that 
width, stitched down to the extent 
of about half a yard, shows in the 
upper portion the plain or the check- 
stripe only while the lower part, 
wlicrc tlie pleats, being no longer con- 
fined, expand freely, exhibiting botli 
the plain and fancy portions of the 
fabric. 

The new straight-back jacket in- 
troduced in the early spring may be 
regarded as the one in vogue at the 
moment. The cut is peculiar, illus- 
trating the straight line not only in 
front, but in the back, where it is, 
even more accentuated. From the 
shoulders — 'tho being of a semi- 
fitting order — the garment stands off 
from the figure the entire length of 
the centre back seam, while the 
basque is slantingly rounded in front. 

Black lace dresses are decidedly in 
favor. They are worn over self- 
colored or contrasting taffeta skirts, 
the lace having a very deep band foot 
trimming of satin or messaline the 
color of the underrobe. 

Chiffon costumes are hung over 
satin foundations which «ire weighted 
at the hem. Petticoats are discarded 
and either silk or lisle Knickerbockers 
are worn. With the narrow cut and 
trailing weight walking is rather dif- 
ficult. 

We can safely predict there will 
be a radical change in the styles this 
fall. For instance the Japanese sleeve 
will entirely disappear, and with it 
the full cut sleeve and loose blouse 
bodice. The figure will be perfectly 
outlined. Sleeves full length and 
tight, finished with deep frills over 
the hands; high, tight collars, and 
tight skirts. 

A new buckle idea for the low-cut 
shoe is one that can be pinned on, 
after the shoe is tied with the wide 
silk laces. The buckle is pinned on, 



also through those witli a bow. They : 
are made of gold plate or gilt and ! 
oxidised silver. Some of the designs ! 
have a simulated tongue, giving the I 
full effect of a buckle when placed on , 
the shoe ; others are plain, on which \ 
the initials can be engraved. | 

An improvement on the pump : 
(which is really a slipper) is the way 
of keeping it on the feet. The old- ' 
fashioned manner was to grip the 
toes and depend on the counter for ; 
help. Now its fitting quality as well j 
as comfort is improved by the use of] 
elastic in front or with one eyelet tie. I 

The "Colonial," so much admired j 
and worn by women, had for its ; 
model a full length portrait of George i 
Washington. The buckle and tongue ■ 
is the distinguishing feature from i 
other low cut shoes. This is ob- 1 
tained bv the extension of the vamp ' 
upward into the flaring tongue, across ' 
which an ornamental buckle fastens. I 

Indications are that satins will en- I 
joy quite a vogue next fall and win-i 
ter. \ 

Since the opening of wash dresses i 
in the early spring there has been a \ 
decided growing interest in the tail-J 
ored cotton suit. They are "natty" i 
and a strong feature to recommend ■ 
them is the low price. They are: 
found in printed and woven patterns ' 
giving the effect of woolen goods as , 
well as colors and white. The great- 1 
est novelty is the black linen, which j 
has a distinctive stylish appearance. ■'■ 

During the mid-summer it has been : 
the custom for manufacturers to,; 
spring a novelty on the public. This! 
season it is the tailored wash malinei 
waist, also the strictly tailored net'j 
waist without any trimming; it is a"j 
question whether these plain and se-i 
vere waists will meet with general] 
favor. The popular taste is pretty-j 
sure to want showy and a good deal 
for their money. ] 

A simple remedy to tighten the! 
sewing machine belt is to put a drop' 
of machine oil on it, turn the wheel' 
rapidly several times, then proceed ' 
with your sewing — the difficulty isj 
overcome. I 

Madame Roberta. 



IS 



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1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Pulton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Foiu-th Ave. 

23(1 St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



►42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 50th St. 
6Gth St. and Broadway 



♦72d St. and Broadw' 

79th St. and Broadw 

86th St. and Broadw 

91st St. and Broadw 

•96th St. and Broadw 

WEST SIDE BRANC 
103d St. and Broadw 
110th St. andBroadwi 



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16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

FnRE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 




'J^^ 



SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St 
Manhatt 
137th St 
145th St 
157th St 
168th St 
181st St 
207th St 
215th St 



. and Broadway 
an Street 
. and Broadway 
. and Broadway 
. and Broadway 
. and Eleventh Ave. 
and Eleventh Ave. 
. and Dyckman St. 
. and Broadway 



225th St. and Bioadway 
233d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 
Mott Ave. and 149th St. 



Cotyright. IQ07. B- L. Clarke', 



Third Ave. and 149th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

•Express Stations 



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17 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTELS 



Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON, Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 

Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 



Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP, Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 



Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON, Mgr. 

18-20 West 25th Street 

Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 



Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE, Mgr. 
Slst Street and Columbus Avenue 



The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
'Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 

Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 



Hotel Gotham 

S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 



The Holland 

66 and 68 West 46th Street 
Mrs. WM. H. WHITE, Prop. 
'Apartments " 



Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN 
Broadway and 42d Street 



Hotel Latham 

H. P. RITCHEY, Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 



King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just off Broadway 



Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES. Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 



The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 



Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 



Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman's Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 



Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Garden 



The Plaza 

FRED STERRY. Managing Director 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 



Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A BARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 



Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK, Mgr. 

15 Bast 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 



Hotel Savoy 

Herman H. Reis, John F. Reis, Managers 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. 



Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 



Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 



Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 



Hotel WoodstQck 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square Eas 



l8 




* ^»00, Bl 



New York Theatres 



J :ademy of Music — Irving place 
1 and 14th St. Tel., 701 Gramercy. 
I Closed. 

jerial Garden — Atop of the New 

»: Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. near 

Broadway. "The Merry Widow." 

- Tel., 3093 Bryant. Eve., 8.30. 

- Prices, 50c. to $2. 

rjlhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 

5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 

baily mats, 2.15; eve., 8.15. 

Prices 50c to $1. 
J Tierican — 42d st. and 8th ave. 

Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 

stor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 

287 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 

8.30; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 
t Prices, 50c to $2. 
^elasco — 42d St., west of B'way. 

Tel, 4281 Bryant. Closed. 

ijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 

Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed. 

roadway — Broadway and 41st st. 

Tel., loi Bryant. Closed. 



b^-^j^H 




ASK FOR 

ARONDACK 

Saratoga*! Most 

Palatable Water 

and Fine Mixer 

at any of the 

Beit Hotels. 


^< 






Families may order 

from 

Charles & Co. 

Acker Merrall Co. 

Park & Tilford 



Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel.. 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 

Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel., 
5138 Columbus. Closed. 

Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel. 

4457 Columbus. Closed. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 



Exclusively "Home-Cooking" and Dainty Service! 

Breakfast, Luncheon 
and Afternoon Tea at 



/^/fe^^^^>2^ 



14 West 33d Street 

(Off. THE WALDORF) 



The Table d'Hote Dinners will be discontinued until September 8th, 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. m. during July and August 

i\ Orders for FreaH Ctit Flowers promptly Ailed 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



KEAV VORK THEATRES — Continued 



Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel, 2110 Madison. Closed. 

Garrick — 3Sth st., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 3Si-38th. Closed. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 

Hackett — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Closed. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices, 25c 
to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th st "Follies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. Closed. 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel.. 27 Bryant. Closed. 

Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. Closed. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephonei 6500 Madiion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladlei Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alto Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooms from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In easy accett of all the principal tbeatret 

Subway Station, 18th Street, within one block 

iglh Street cars pass the door 



Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Closed. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 

Madison ave. and 26th st. 
Closed. 

Majestic — Broadway and 59th st 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 



Large Jars, $L00 
Smaller Jari, 50 Centi 



Q Possessed of rare qualities and many valuable properties 
not generally found among toilet articles, besides its unique 
effect as a £rst-class 

SKIN FOOD 

used in massage for producing and preserving a flat, hcaltliy 
complexion, places this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients second to none in either Europe or America. 

M. B. De MEDICI . 1 24 W. 2 1 at St., N«w York 



20 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK THEATRES — Continued 



New Amsterdam — 42d St., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow," mats., 
Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices, 50c 
to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Closed. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 535i-38th. Closed. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 
Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Closed. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 



"THE MIMIC WORLD" 
AT THE CASINO 

At the beginning of the programme 
we are told that the management 
makes no pretense at plot, but sim- 
ply strives to amuse, with a musical 
review of some of the successes of 
the current season, and this state- 
ment explains the show fully. "The 
Mimic World" is a series of skits 
covering some prominent incident or 
satirizing some character in "Father 
and the Boys," "The Witching Hour," 
"The Honor of the Family," "The 
Yankee Prince," "Lord Dundreary," 
"Nearly a Hero," "Girls," and "The 
Merry Widow." 

Roy Atwell gives a clever imper- 
sonation of E. H. Sothern in "Lord 
Dundreary," and Will West as Colo- 
nel Brideau, pictures true to life Otis 
Skinner as he appears in "The Honor 



i)f the Family." The Review intro- 
duces us to a young prodigy, Sey- 
mour Felix, who imitates remarkably 
well George Cohan's peculiarities of 
manner and dancing. A burlesque on 
the opening scene in "Girls," pre- 
sents a picture of a comfortless fur- 
nished room occupied by three men 
supposed to be woman-haters, and 
in this a janitress who makes things 
generally miserable for the tenants of 
the house, plays a prominent part. 

There is a future worth working 
for in store for the dancer who im- 
personates Mile. Genee ; her make- 
up is perfect and her dancing de- 
lightful, and if she can create for her- 
self a personality as charming as the 
one she here portrays, her talent can- 
not fail to win recognition, and a 
handsome recompense must neces- 
sarily follow. 

Frank Thornton. 



It is not blessedness to know 

that thou thyself alone are blessed. 

— Wisdom of the Brahmins. 

Male firmness is very often ob- 
stinacy. Women have always 
something better, worth all quali- 
ties. They have tact. — Lord Bea- 
consfield. 



"It would be a great thing if 
people could realize that they can 
never add to the sum of their hap- 
piness by doing wrong." — Lub- 
bock. 



THE EARLINGTON '™«,BTor" 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Kemodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

DiRECTOR-8 Office and General Headquarters. 4.26 LAFAYETTE STREET 

TCLKPHONC, 3070 SPRING 

Circulation Headquarters, 209 WEST 23nD STREET 

TelephONK, 3076 CHELSEA 

Reference Branches: 
ASTOR, 425 LAFAYETTE STREET LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES: 



East B'way, 197. (Ea.st B'way Branch). 
*East B'way, 33. (Chatham Sq. Branch). 
*Rivington Street, Gl . . (Rivington Street 

Branch). 
*Leroy St., 66.. (Hudson Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 49. (Bond Street Branch). 
*l()th St., 331 East. .. (Tompkins Square 
Branch) 

Second Ave., 135.(Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W. . (.Jackson Sq. Branch). 
*li3d St., 228 East. . (Epiphany Branch). 
*23d St., 209 W. . (Muhlenberg Branch). 

34th St., 215 East... (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., 501 W. . (St. Raphael Branch). 

42d St., 226 W.( George Bruce Branch). 

50th St., 123 East.. (Cathedral Branch). 

51st St., 463 W.. (Sacred Heart Branch). 

58th St., 121 East(59th Street Branch). 
*67th St., 328 East. (67th Street Branch). 
*Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'chi. 

♦Avenue A, 1465 (Webster Branch ) . 

*79th St., 222 East..(Yorkville Branch). 
♦Amsterdam Ave., 444. (St. Agnes B'ch). 
*96th St., 112 East.. (96th St. Branch). 

110th St., 174 East.. (Aguilar Branch). 



123d St., 32 W. (The Harlem Library). 
*125th St., 224 E.. . (125th St. Branch). 
*135th St., 103 W.. (135th St. Branch). 

*145th St., 503 W (Hamilton Grange 

Branch), 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. . (Washington 

Heights Branch). 
Library for the Blind, 444 Amsterdam 
Avenue. 

BOROUGH OP BRONX. 

*140th St., 569 E..(Mott Haven Br'ch). 
♦Washington Ave., 1806.(Tremont B'ch). 
♦Kingsbridge Ave., 2933. . . ( Kingsbridge 
Branch). 

BOROUGH OF RICHMOND. 

*Amboy Road, Tottenville. . . (TottenviUc 

Branch) . 
♦Central Ave., Tompkinsville, S. I.. (SI. 

George Branch). 
♦12 Bennett St. (Port Richmond BrChi, 
♦Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sts. 
♦Occupying Carnegie Buildin,?s. 



HOURS 

Thei Branches, with exceptions noted bebiw, are open from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
on week days. 

Branches in Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Year's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, I'residential Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day ; after 6 p. m. on Washington's Birthday and Christmas Eve ; 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 5 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch is closed from 5 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and is open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a. m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street. Tomj)- 
kins Square, Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rivington Street and Riverside Branches from 
2 till p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rivington Street Branches 
are open until 10 p. m, on week days. 

The Library for the Blind is open on week days from 1 p. m. to 5 p. m. 
The Lenox Branch is ojjen from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



DOMESTIC ENGINEERING 



Domestic engineering is such a 
good word combination that I am 
glad I thought of it. It is unques- 
tionably true that all kinds of engi- 
neering, scientifically considered, are 
inferior in importance to this branch 
of the world's work. Even the mil- 
lennium which is said to be headed 
this way will not arrive till the sci- 
ence of domestic engineering is as 
well understood as — well, as civil en- 
gineering or electrical engineering or 
any other of the involved sciences 
that require in the understanding 
years of application and plenty of ca- 
pacity. 

Domestic engineering would be a 
fine name for a chair in a great uni- 
versity ; and every student should 
take the course. It means the family in 
every relation ; it means the heart of 
the family ; the ethics, management, 
development and success of the fam- 
ily worked out on scientific prin- 
ciples, without groping or flounder- 
ing or grappling, but according to 
courtesy and honor and the sugges- 
tions outlined in the Ten Command- 
ments. It means the Sunday law 
and the servant problem, intemper- 
ance, the mother-in-law and how to 
avoid the family skeleton. 

"Domestic Science" is supposed to 
comprehend the whole subject of 
home-making ; but it doesn't. En- 
gineering is an action word, and im- 
plies a constant forging aliead. When 
a family must be conducted through 
time to eternity there must be a 
right way to do it. It is this right 
way that must be taught clearly to 
students of this branch of science. 
Surely one person in each family 
should be intelligent on the subject. 

The home and how to make it : 
how to keep it ; how to be happy in 
it ; the relation of each member of 
the familv to it and to each other 



from tiic youngest to the oldest. Do- 
mestic engineering must bear upon 
each one of these issues. We have 
had all the material side of home 
making; we know how it is that 
everyone must have good food to 
eat and pretty things to wear ; a 
comfortable chair to sit in and a 
bright light to read by ; clean linen 
and clean water; we know that or- 
der is heaven's first law, and that 
cleanliness is next to godliness ; we 
also know the application of innu- 
merable rules, but there is still the 
Spirit of the family relation. We 
want to know all about that. 

To the student in every science 
there constantly arise new and dif- 
ficult complications — problems that 
seem in their premises to contradict, 
defy and challenge ; all waiting to be 
solved, straightened out, disen- 
tangled. Domestic engineering has 
all these features to entitle it to 
classify in high place, and to entitle 
it to the name of an undiscovered 
science. 

The only rule we have had thus 
far to help us with our problems is 
an exceedingly vague application of 
the law of love known as the Golden 
Rule. What we want to know is 
how to apply this law to every cir- 
cumstance and combination of them, 
so that it will not fail. There must 
be a way. We want to learn how 
to love our mother-in-law, and to 
have her love us ; how to soothe the 
disappointed and the grouchy ; we 
want to know how to make the 
home run so smoothly that every 
one in the family will run after it 
and fight for it instead of fighting 
with those in it; and often running 
away from it. 

There must be rules. Where arc 
they? 

Harvot TToi.t r>v.\ 



attractive Rooms for Itent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 
Central Location. Comfortable SurroundiDgs 
No. 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 
Telephone : 3768 Madison Square 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TAXAMETER— Motor Cab Service— 'Phone 2380 COLUMBUS 



Telephone orders filled promptly day 
or night. Cabs are always In waiting 
at our various stands, or they may be 
hailed and engaged on the street. When 
the flag is displayed above the taxa- 
meter, it signifies that the cab Is dis- 
engaged and can be hired. 

REDUCED SUMMER RATES — EF- 
FECTIVE JUNE FIRST — TarifiE No. 1 
(Red Indicator) Used Only. 

First half-mile or fraction - - 30 cts. 

Each quarter-mile thereafter - 10 cts. 

Each six minutes waiting - - 10 cts. 

This tariff applies to all vehicles and 
irrespective of the number of passengers 
carried except that for Hansoms, Cou- 
pes, Broughams and Victorias the charge 
for waiting time is 10 cts. for each TEN 
minutes or at the rate of ONLY SIXTY 
CENTS PER HOUR. 

EXTRAS— All Vehicles 

For ordering a cab, each mile or frac- 
tion thereof, from station or stand to 
point ordered 20 cts. 
Return charge when dismissed 

north of 155th Street or outside 

the Borough of Manhattan, for 

each mile or fraction to Times 

Square (minimum charge $1) - 20 cts. 
Trunk 20 cts. 

All ferriage and bridge tolls, both go- 
ing and returning, must be paid by the 
passenger. If the taxameter is out of 
order, fare will be charged at regular 
legal rates. 

RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 

INFORMATION FOB PASSENGERS 

1. HOW THE TAXAMETER WORKS. 
When the flag is lowered 30 cents will 
appear under the word "Fare," and this 
pays for the use of the cab until service 
to that amount, either in driving or in 
waiting, has been rendered. The indi- 
cator will register thereafter ten cents 
for each quarter mile, or each fraction 
of an hour waiting. This charge is for 
the exact distance traveled and the exact 
waiting time consumed, which are auto- 
matically measured by the taxameter and 
over which the driver has no control. 

The "extra" charges called for by the 
service are registered by the driver and 
shown under the word "Extras." 

2. THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID IS 
THE SUM OF THE AMOUNTS SHOWN 
UNDER "FARE" AND "EXTRAS." 
THERE ARE NO CHARGES EXCEPT 
THOSE INDICATED BY THE TAXA- 
METER. 




Tariff 1 Tariff 2 Payment 



The driver is charged with all amounts 
registered and is not permitted to make 
any reductions therefrom, but will, if 
required, give a receipt for the amount 
paid. 

3. TO SECURE COMPLETE PROTEC- 
TION, observe (a) that the flag is low- 
ered to Tariff 1 position at the beginning 
of the service and not before ; (b) that 
the flag is maintained in that position 
during service; (c) that the flag is 
promptly brought to "Payment" posi- 
tion at the conclusion of the service and 
left there until the charge is settled. 

4. IF THE CAB IS DISABLED, the 
service up to the disablement must be 
paid for. 

5. A CAB REPORTING AT AN AD- 
DRESS in response to an order is 
charged for from the time for which it 
was ordered. 

6. A CAB ORDERED AND NOT USED 
must be paid for up to the time the 
driver is dismissed, including the charge 
for sending it. 

7. THEATRE AND OTHER RE- 
TURNS. Waiting time and any neces- 
sary mileage will be charged for a ve- 
hicle held for a return call. Waiting 
time may be saved by dismissing the 
vehicle and placing a separate order for 
a vehicle for the return call, but the 
Company cannot guarantee to fill such 
return call unless it be given to and 
accepted by the starter at a station 
or stand. Under no conditions may a 
cab be held in waiting without charge. 

8. IN CASE OF DISPU'iB, passengers 
are requested to pay the full amount 
indicated and make claim to the Com- 
pany, in writing, giving the hour, date, 
driver and cab number, number of pas- 
sengers carried, distance travelled and 
waiting time consumed and wherein the 
charge is incorrect. Such claims will re- 
ceive prompt and courteous attention. 

9. THE ACCURACY OF THE TAXA- 
METER is insured by systematic inspec- 
tion. Do not assume that a charge is 
incorrect without first computing all of 
the distance and all of the waiting time 
comprised in the service. 

TOURING CARS, SIGHT-SEEING 
CARS, DOUBLE-DECK MOTOR BUS- 
SES, and Automobiles of every kind by 
the Hour, Day or Week^Rates on ap- 
plication. 

CAB STATIONS. 
49th St. and 8th Av. 55-65 E.88th St. 
66th St. and 3rd Av. 141 E •25th St. 

CAB STANDS. 
Sherry's Caf§ Martin Hotel Astor 
Hotel Belmont, Long Island R. R., Ft. E. 

34th Street. 
Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. W. 23rd St. 

NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO. 
EIGHTH AVE. AND FORTY-NINTH ST. 

PHONE. 2380 COLUMBUS 

CONNECTS WITH ALL CAB STANDS 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



A NOBLE LIFE 



The greatest good is accomplished 
by the example of a noble life. 

In the passing away of Townsend 
Wandell on June 27th, at Bologna, 
Italy, where he was accidentally 
killed, the City of New York has lost 
a useful, respected and honored citi- 
zen, one who believed in and faitli- 
fuUy practiced the "golden rule." Al- 
though a man of means, he was mod- 
est, always thoughtful of others and 
ever ready to help a worthy cause. 

Lowell well said: "Be noble; and 
the nobleness that lies in other men, 
sleeping, but never dead, will rise 
in majesty to meet thine own." 

Mr. Wandell will be greatly missed 
by his bereaved family, his friends, 
business associates, and all who 
knew him, for everyone loved 
and respected him. They could not 
help loving him for he was true, hon- 
est and just. He had a kind word for 
everyone, and his wise counsel and 
advice was appreciated. Yes, the 
world is better for having known Mr. 
Wandell, and although his self-sacri- 
ficing earthly career is ended, his 
pure, upright example will live, and 
inspire others for good. 

Townsend Wandell was born in 
New York City, sixty-seven years 
ago. His father was Judge Ben- 
jamin Coe Wandell. He attended 
the New York Free Academy, 
which became the College of the City 
of New York, where he graduated 
with high honors. He also graduated 
from the Law School of Columbia 
College, from which he received the 
degree of LL.B. He was admitted to 



the bar, and has practiced law in 
New York since 1865. He was al- 
ways steadfast in his purpose, up- 
right and trustworthy, and these sterl- 
ing qualities gained for him many 
clients, who placed tlie entire charge 
of their estates in his hands, because 
they knew that he could lie depended 
upon for a just and accurate ac- 
counting of every dollar. 

Mr. Wandell was a member of the 
Union League Club, the Sons of The 
Revolution, the Holland Society, the 
St. Nicholas Society, the Metropoli- 
tan Museum of Art, the New York 
Historical Society, New York Bio- 
graphical and Geneological Society, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon, the Dwight Alumni Association 
and the Columbia Law School 
.\lumni. He was trustee and man- 
ager of the New York City Church 
Extension and Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Church, and manager 
of the New York Deaconess Home 
and Training School. 

J. S. V00RHEE.S. 



A man or. a woman in tolerable 
health has no moral right to in- 
dulge in an unpleasant mood, nor 
to depend upon moods for the per- 
formance of the duties of life. — J. 
G. Holland. 



Tact is the knack of keeping 
quiet at the right time; of being 
so agreeable yourself that no one 
can be disagreeable to you; of 
making inferiority feel like equal- 
itv. — George Horace Lorimer. 



Dr. J. T. WHELAN 

CHIROPODIST 
All Instruments Sterilized 



M. S. WILSON 

ELECTRO-VIBRATORY 
FACIAL MASSAGE 

MANICURING 



McCUTGHEON BUILDING 

Suite 707 

347 FIFTH AVENUE, near 34th street 

NEW YORK 

TELEPHONE: 6192 MADISON SQUARE 



2S 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



H^ 



MAGFADDEN'S 

Physical Culture Restaurants 

Caterers Nature's 
Pure Nourishing Foods 



New York: 

654 Broadway 
220 Fulton St. 
120 Pearl St. 
487 Pearl St. 
106 East 23d St. 
2078 Seventh Ave. 
61S Sixth Ave. 



Popular Prices 

Pittsburg ; 



Bernarr Mactadden 

Pres. P. C. Restaurant Co. 

Pre». P. C. Pub. Co. 

Philadelphia : 

25-27 South 8th St. 

Henry Ward Beecher said : 

"There is no higher art than that which tends toward the improvement of 
human food." 



302 Wood St. 

Boston : 

27-29 Kingston St. 
35-37 Arch St. 

Chicago : 

Tacoma Buildinti 
Madison and Wabash Ave. 



THE TRUTH 



In these hot days when the rapid 
evaporation of perspiration from the 
skin causes thirst ahnost maddening, 
those who fly to ice-cream sodas, 
beverages with "sticks" in them and 
Ijcverages without sticks, but reek- 
ing with sugar, only to absorb what 
adds to their discomfort, would 
really quench that thirst if they sim- 
ply drank pure Herbo Nervo Egg 
Phosphate, Herbo Nervo Fruitade, 
Herbo Nervo Orangeade, Herbo 
Nervo Raspberryade, Herbo Nervo 
Currantade, without sugar, and per- 
sist until he learns to like the effects. 
Never after will he like any thing 
Init the natural herbs for the nerves, 
mixed with the pure fruit juices, — 



or plain, — which cannot be improv( d 
upon. 

Besides its cooling and stimulating 
properties, fruit juice is a germ 
killer, and Herbo Nervo is a tissue 
and nerve-builder; which bring me 
back to first principles — -herbs and 
fruit juices for hot days, without 
much sugar, and ad libitum. 

Daggett & Ramsdell, Caswell & 
Massey, Hegeman, and all first class 
soda fountains. 

Herbo Nervo confections, at Park 
& Tilford's, R. H. Macy's, and all 
first class druggists, confectioners 
and soda fountains. The seal is the 
monogram B. E. T. Blanche E. 
Thomas, 29 East 29th street. New 
York City. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



^*'" PORT 

1908 '^"*^ 

July 28. Bremen 

" 28. Rotterdam.... 

" 29. Southampton. 

" 29. Liverpool 

" 30. Bremen 

" .30. Liverpool 

" 30. Havre 

.Vug. 1 . Hamburg 

1 . Liverpool 

l.Gib'r& Naples 

" 1 .Antwerp 

" 1 . Southampton. 

" I.London 

" I.Glasgow 



NAMi or 

ITRAMKR 



ADDRISIBI OP LINKS 



•TARTINO PLACE 



Kaiser N. German Lloyd. 5 B'way. . . . 

Noordam Holland-Amer., 39 B'way 

Oceanic White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Lucania Cunard S. S. Co.. 21 State St. . 

P.F.Wilhelm. .N. German Lloyd, .5 B'way. . . . 

Celtic White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Touraine French Line, 19 State St 

Pennsylvania. Hamburg-Amor., 45 B'wav. . . . 
Campania.. . . Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

P. Irene N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 

Kroonland. . . .Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

Philadelphia. .American Line, 9 B'way 

Minneapolis. . Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 
Columbia. . . . Anchor Line, 17 B'way 



.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 5th St., Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
. Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 

Ft Morton St., N. R. 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
, Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
, Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft Houston St., N. R. 
, Ft 24th St., N. R. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TRIPS TO NEARBY RESORTS 



Bergen Beach: Jamaica Bay — From 
Brooklyn Bridge, via Flatbush 
ave. From Williamsburg Bridge, 
via Nostrand ave. 

Brighton Beach: Coney Island — 

From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L, Flatbush ave. 
and Smith st. trolley. From Wil- 
liamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries, via Nostrand ave. 
trolley. 

Coney Island — Iron Steamboats, 
foot Battery pi., West 22d st. and 
West 129th St. From Brooklyn 
Bridge, via Brighton Beach L, 
5th ave. L, Court st., Union st., 
3d ave., Vanderbilt ave., Smith 
St. trolley. 

Hotel Gramatan, Bronxville, N. Y. 

— Grand Central Depot, 42d st., 
on Harlem Division, N. Y. C. 
R. R. 

Long Beach — Via L. I. R. R. from 
East 34th St., and from Flatbush 
ave., Brooklyn. 

Manhattan Beach — From 34th St., 
E. R., via L. I. R. R. From 
South Ferry, via 39th st. ferry, 
and Manhattan Beach Line. 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L. 

Millbrook Inn, Millbrook, Dutchess 
County, N. Y. — Grand Central 
Depot, 42d St., to Poughkeepsie. 

North Beach: Flushing Bay — From 
Williamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries, Grand st. line, East 
99th St. and East 134th st. fer- 
ries. 

Rockaway Beach — From Williams- 
burg Bridge, 42d street., 23d 
St., Grand st., Roosevelt st. 
via Broadway L to Manhattan 
Junction, thence via L. L R. R. 
From East 34th st. to Long Isl- 
and City, thence L. I. R. R. 

Ulmer Park: On Gravesend Bay — 

From Brooklyn Bridge, via 5th 
ave. and West End L, 3d ave. 
surface line. From 39th ' st.. 
South Ferry, via 86th st. line. 



West Point, Newburgh and Pough- 
keepsie — By Hudson River Day 
Line superb steamers leaving 
Desbrosses st. 8.40 a. m.. West 
A2d St. 9 a. m., West 129th st. 
9.20 a. m., returning on down 
boat, reaching 42d st. 5.30 p. m. 

Woodmansten Inn, Westchester, 

N. Y. — Third ave. L to 177th st., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester Village; or by Sub- 
way to West Farms, 177th st., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester; or 3d ave. L. to 
129th St., then N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. to Westchester Station. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Ouly All Water Koiite to 

cone:y isi^a.nd 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise m the 
World. 

TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, *10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
•12.55, ♦1.40, 2.55, 3.40, 4.25, *5.25, 
6.10, 7.10, *7.55, •8.40, •9.25, 'lO-lO, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a • go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A: M. ; 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAXn REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers, 
S.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., ^12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R., 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M.. 2.30 P. M. ; 
Rockiiway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5. .30 P. M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Grand Republic at Pior 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. : Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



27 



EXCLUSIVE BOARDING HOUSES OF NEW YORK 



17 MADISON AVENUE 

Near 24th Street, opposite Park 
Single and Double Rooms. Transients 



69 MADISON AVENUE 

Knonis Single, Double and Knsuite. Tel. Excli. 
Southern Cooking. Table Guests. References. 



104 and 106 MADISON AVE. 

Private Baths. Transients. Telephone. 

Strictly First Class 



165 MADISON AVENUE 



Telephone Exchange. 
Large and Small Rooms. 



Transients. 

Private Baths. 



159 MADISON AVENUE 

Transients Accomodated. Telephone Connection 
Private Baths. Table Board 



51 TWENTY-NINTH ST. East 

Transients. Table Guests 

Near 28th St. Subway. Tel. 2226 Madison 



221 WEST 44th STREET 

Near Broadway. Transients Accomodated 

Table Guests. Telephone 



67 West 46th STREET 

Single and Double Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Southern Cooking 



Every one is least known to 
himself, and it is very difficult for 
a man to know himself. — Cicero. 



Even the Son of Man came not 
to be ininistered unto, but to min- 
ister. — Bible. 



$7,300. ^To' 



WILL BUY YOU A BEAUTIFUL 
ME IN BROOKLYN 



Fine Residential District, wide asphalted street 

20 minutes from City Hall, Manhattan 

Brov^n stone house, 8 rooms, bath and store room 

All modern improvements, plenty of large closets 

Cabinet finish, in perfect repair 

Terms reasonable 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Headrick Hudson ' 
" New York " and "Albany " 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



1908 



A.M. I P.M. 



Lv. Read Down 
A.M^ 

' 8 :00 
8:40 
9:00 
9:20 
0:45 



Ar. 



Read Up. 



I A.M. I P.M. I P.M. 



11:50 
i2;25 



1 :15 
2:10 



3:25 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1 :00 
I'l :25 
1 :45 



2:35 



1 :45 

2 :00 
2 :20 



4 :50 

5 :00 
5:25 
5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7 Al 



Brooklyn Annex. 
, .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 

.West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkers . . . . 

.Highland Falls.. 
...West Point... 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
. New Hamburgh . 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsie . . 
. .Kingston Point. . 
. . . . Kingston . . . . 

. . . . Catskill 

. . . . Hudson . . . . 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



8 : 



6 :00 



6:00 
5 :30 
5:10 
4 :30 


9 

8 
8 

7 


:00 
:40 
:10 
:.35 


2:50 
'2:15 


5 

*5 
5 


:45 
:20 
:05 






1 :20 
12:25 


4 


:10 


11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 







P.M. I P.M. 1 P.M. I 



I A.M. I A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catslsill 
and Kingston Point wharfs 
for all points in Catsltill 
Mountains 
Morning and Afternoon 
_ Concerts 

ANNOUNCEiVlENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat M.A.RY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



American Museum of Natural His- 
tory — Central Park West and 
77th St. Every day, 9 a. m. to 5 
p. m., and Tuesday and Saturday 
evenings, 7 to 10; Sunday, i to 5 
p. m. Free. 

Appellate Division, Supreme Court 
— Madison ave. and 25th st. Open 
daily. 

Aquarium — Battery Park, foot of 
Broadway. Admission free. Open 
from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Closed 
on Monday forenoon. A fort in 
1807; Concert Hall in 1825; Castle 

! Garden, 1855 to 1892. 

Assay Office — Located in Wall 
street, just east of the Sub-Treas- 
ury; is an old-fashioned build- 
ing, erected in the year 1823 fot 
the Branch Bank of the United 
States, and is the oldest struc- 
ture on the street. It is esti- 
mated that from twenty to one 
hundred millions of crude bullion 
are received and assayed yearly. 
Visiting hours, from 10 a. m. to 
2 p. m. 

Astor Library— Lafayette place. 
Founded by J. J. Astor in 1849. 

Brooklyn Bridge — Park Row and 
Centre. Opened May 24, 1883. 
Length, S.989 ft.; centre span, 
1,595 ft.; height, 135 ft.; width, 
85 ft. 

Carnegie Mansion— Fifth ave. and 
90th St. Cost, $4,000,000. 

Cathedral of St, John the Divine- 
Amsterdam ave., iioth-ii3th sts. 

Central Park— Fifth to Eighth 
aves., 59th to iioth sts. Contains 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
Casino, McGowan's Pass Tavern 
and Cleopatra's Needle. Zoologi- 
cal Garden at 66th st. and Fifth 
ave. 843 acres. 

Chamber of Commerce — 65 Lib- 
erty. Organized 1768. 

Columbia University (formerly 
King's College) — Broadway and 
Amsterdam ave., ii6th to 120th 
sts. Charter granted by George 
n. in 1754. 

Conservatories — Central Park, op- 
posite East losth. Choice plants. 
Free. Hours, 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Ellis Island— U. S. Immigrant Sta- 
tion. All immigrants arriving at 
this port are landed on Ellis Isl- 
and before being permitted to 
enter the country, where they are 
carefully examined as to physi- 
cal, financial and moral condi- 
tion. Many thousands are handled 
in a single day (the estimated 
number for the year 1905 was 
800,000). The process is most in- 
teresting and instructive and vis- 
itors are permitted to visit all 
parts of the extensive buildings, 
and can with facility inspect the 
operation of the system for ex- 
cluding undesirable aliens, and 
caring for and forwarding those 
who are admitted. Free. No. 
pass required. Boats from Bat- 
tery (Barge Office), hourly, on 
the hour, from 10 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

East River — Follows the eastern 
portion of the city and separates 
it from Long Island. From 
Coenties Slip to Maiden Lane, 
along its shores, may be seen 
many interesting sights in con- 
nection with this city's great 
shipping industry. 

Fire-boats — The "New Yorker" is 
the name of the largest and best 
equipped fire-boat in the service 
of the New York fire depart- 
ment. There are also six others 
connected with the department, 
their stations are as follows: 
"New Yorker" at tTie Battery; 
"Wm. L. Strong," foot of Grand 
St., East River; "David A. 
Boody," foot of North 8th st., 
Brooklyn; "Abram S. Hewitt." 
foot of Main st., Brooklyn; "Scth 
Low," foot of 42d St., Brooklyn; 
"D. O. Mills," East 133d st. and 
Harlem River; "George B. Mc- 
Clellan," foot of Gansevoort st. 

" Flatiron " Building — Broadway 
and 5th ave., 22d and 23d sts. 

Five Points — Formerly consisted 
of squalid rookeries and drinking 
places, located in the neighbor- 
hood of Worth, Baxter and Park 
streets. In this locality many 
notorious crimes were commit- 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 






POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



ted. The Five Points Mission 
House is at 63 Park st. The 
open space in the centre of the 
"Points" is now called Paradise 
Park. 

Grant's Tomb — Riverside Drive 
and 123d St. Built on plan of Na- 
poleon's Tomb at the Hotel des 
Invalides, Paris. Dedicated 1897. 
Contains bodies of Gen. and Mrs. 
Grant in rare caskets. Near by is 
the Chinese tree planted by Li 
Hung Chang. 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Free. 

Hall of Fame — New York Univer- 
sity, Sedgwick ave. and E. 180th 
St. Granite colonnade to contain 
statues of 150 famous Americans. 

Hall of Records — Chambers and 
Centre sts. City records. 

Hamilton. Grange — Convent ave., 
near 141st. Home of Alexander 
Hamilton when shot in duel by 
Aaron Burr. 

Ludlow Street Jail— Located at 
Ludlow and Essex streets, near 
Grand. In former days persons 
arrested for debt, under the old 
law, were kept here; now persons 
arrested for violation of United 
States law are incarcerated with- 
in its walls. 

Marble Collegiate Church— Fifth 
ave. and 29th st. The Collegiate 
Reformed Church of New York 
is the oldest Protestant church in 
America, having had a complete 
and continuous organization 
since the summer of A. D. 1628. 
The Rev. Jonas Michaelius was 
its first minister, who was sent to 
New Amsterdam on the Island 
of Manhatas by the Classis of 
Amsterdam in Holland. As its 
name conveys, the Collegiate 
Church is a group of churches. 
The Marble Collegiate Church is 
the tenth in historical succession 
of the sanctuaries of the Collegi- 
ate Cliurch. 

Old Jewish Cemetery — Located on 
New Bowery, near Oliver st. One 
of the oldest burial places in the 
city, and established during tlie 
time of Peter Stuyvesant. An- 



other cemetery, or "Place of 
Rest," can be found in Twenty- 
first street, west of Sixth ave. 

Players' Club— Presented to actors 
and friends of 4:he drama by Ed- 
win Booth, at a cost to him of 
more than $200,000. Located at 
16 Gramercy Park. Formally 
opened in the year 1888, on New 
Year's Eve. 

Riverside Drive — From West 72d 
St., north to 134th st. Overlooks 
the Hudson. 

Salvation Army — This organization 
gives yearly a Christmas dinner 
to over 20,000 poor at Madison 
Square Garden. Headquarters 
located at 120 West 14th st. Many 
branches are maintained in vari- 
ous other parts of the city. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor— The home 
for the aged sailors on Staten 
Island; of interest to strangers. 
Free. Daily, except Sunda3^ 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument — 
Riverside Drive and 89th. 

Somerindyke House — This house 
formerly stood in Ninth avenue, 
near 75tli st. Was the home of 
royalty during its exile. Louis 
Philippe and his brothers, the 
Due de Montpensier and the 
Comte de Beaujolais, taught 
school for their living. The Duke 
of Kent, Queen Victoria's father, 
visited them here. 

Trinity Church — Broadway, oppo- 
site Wall St. Original church 
built 1696, the second 1788, the 
present church 1839, and conse- 
crated 1846. The land was be- 
stowed upon the parish by Queen 
Anne. Its special interior feature 
is the wonderful carved altar in 
memory of the late William B. 
Astor. The churchyard is very 
ancient, containing graves of his- 
toric heroes. 

Viaduct — Over West 155th St., 7th 
and 8tli aves. and Harlem River. 

Williamsburg Bridge — Delancey st. 
Lcngtii, 7,200 ft.; centre span, 
i,f)00 ft.; heiglit, 135 ft.; width, 
118 ft. 



30 



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For your protection the genuine is put up in non^refillable boxes-the "Box that 
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FOR 
SALE 



100 Acres of Park Land 

Suitable for Residential Park Development 



Within one hour from Wah Street, on Penn. R, R. 
High rolHng country' ;• fine views. 
Shrubbery, shade, ornamental and fruit trees. 
Gas, electricity, water, and telephone. 
One fine residence, stable, barns already on 
property. Other fine residences close by. 
Country Club opposite side of road. 
Price and terms attractive. 



CLARKE CEb THORNTON 

1 Madison Avenue 



WEEK, AUGUST 3 TO AUGUST 9, 1908 



JBailp Attractions 



m 



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j^eto §orfe 



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TAXAMETER GABS 



STANnS- Sherrv's- Cafe Martin: Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R. R.. Foot East 34th 
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One central Exchange connects all taxaraeter cab stands; on receipt of call the nearest available 

cab is promptly dispatched „.,„ . ..„ 

Reduced Summer Rates now in effect ^EW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

Tariff folder mailed on request EighthtAvenue and Forty-ninth Street 



VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

Copyright. 190S. by Daily Attractions in Ntw York, Inc. 



NO. 123 




Herbo-N 



ervo 



THE GREAT 
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and CONFECTION 



:Manufactured only by: 



Mrs. Blanche E. Thomas 



MRS. BLANCHE E. THOMAS 



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creasing the gastric juices is the basis of all good digestion. It aids assimilation, 
thereby promoting circulation which nourishes and builds up the tissues — 
giving renewed vigor and vim. For insomnia, neuralgia and headache. 

Til v_>40ntCCtlOn \ — chocolate creams, nut-bars, tonic cough- 
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Fruitade 

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With sugar or without. Hegeman, 
Daggett & Ramsdell, Caswell & Massey, 
R. H. Macy & Co., Hiker's and all 
first-class dealers. Indorsed by the late 
Dr. J. Clarke Thomas, N. Y. C. 




J. CLARKE THOMAS, M. D. 



j A I ■ i*0o j 

W.ASS i, /;'JlC. Ky,' 



DM JiXJi^W 

o4 Weekly SHag/uBme 'Devoted to c/U-oance JnformMtton\ 



Vol. X 



AUGUST 3d to AUGUST 9th, 1908 i - NO. ll^j 



'^SS A //Jlc. Ky, 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. .R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractioni circulates through all the 
I eading Hotels in New York City 
ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 

Five Centi a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

AdTertising rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Churches 12-13 

Clubs II 

Did You Know in the Year 1865 25 

Distances in New York 22 

Express Companies. 22 

Ferry Trips 24 

Hospitals 14 

Hotels 18 

Hudson River Day Line 20-27 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 20 

Long Island Trips 27 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 24 

Points of Interest 30 

Post Offices 22 

Railroad Stations 28 

" Sheep " (Haryot Holt Dey) 15 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 4 

Short Trips to Nearby Resorts 23 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Theaters ig-21 

This Week in New York 5-10 

Trolley Trips 29 



ART NOTES 

Metropolitan Museum of Art — 
Fifth ave., opposite 82d st. Open 
every weekday from 10 a. m. tc 
6 p. m., Saturday from 10 a. m. 
to 10 p. m., Sunday from i to 5 
p.m. Free, except on Monday and 
Friday, when a fee of 25 cents 
is charged. In the Room of Re- 
cent Accessions are two por- 
traits of Saint Gaudens, by Ken- 
yon Cox and Ellen Emmet; "A 
Lady in Black and Green," bj 
J. W. Alexander; a pastel por- 
trait of Albert Gallatin, by 
James Sharpies, the gift of Miss 
Josephine L. Stevens. A cas- 
sone font. Umbrian school 
(about 1500) presented by James 
Loeb. Six landscapes by Hiro- 
hogo, two landscapes by Kawa- 
bata, Gyokusho and other Jap- 
anese paintings, the gift of Fran- 
cis Lathon. A. plaster copy of 
"Dying Clytie," by George 
Watts. American Museum of 
Natural History — Central Park 
West and 77th St.; rare and val- 
uable acquisition of a collection 
of weapons for warfare and the 
chase, fashioned and used by the 
Veddahs, or "Hunters," a savage 
people (of Ceylon, representing 
the Yakkos of Sanscrit writers, 
who are believed to have been 
true aborigines and sole inhabit- 
ants of the island before the 
Hindu conquest. 



There are some very pretty wo- 
men who don't understand the law 
of the road with regard to hand- 
some faces. Nature and custom 
agree in conceding to all rnales 
the right of at least two distincts 
looks at every comely female _ coun- 
tenance, without any infraction of 
courtesy or the sentiment of re- 
spect. — Holmes. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT 

When one looks calmly and 
without undue excitement at the 
Sheath Skirt, at which even Paris 
claihis to be shocked, we find it 
is only an exaggerated expression 
of the close draped and circular 
cut skirts, the model of which will 
be the standard in the fall. 

The vogue for black satin and 
black Crepe de Chine, as shown by 
the fashionables at Newport, Bar 
Harbor, etc., tends to confirm the 
prediction they will be worn ex- 
tensively this fall. They appear 
not only at ceremonious occasions, 
but in simple dresses with short 
skirts for street wear. The design 
most approved is of the simplest 
possible type, the skirts sheath- 
fitting, the waistline high, the 
sleeves small and long and the col- 
lars either one extreme or the 
other, that is, very high and boned 
in sharp points at the back, or fin- 
ished without any collar. By the 
way, the collarless dress is quite a 
fad in Paris, and is worn with the 
big hats that sits well down on the 
head. 

The Sash which made its ap- 
pearance on the classic dress is 
creeping strongly into favor for 
both dressy and simple costumes. 
In the shops they are usually of 
Satin with deep heavy fringes in 
self tone, to be worn with dresses 
of all kinds. In fact, the sash is 
worn even with the suit coat 
wrapped about the figure outside 
of the jacket. 

Very simple but pretty trim- 
mings for suits of the tailor order 
are bands, four or five inches wide, 
placed chevron-wise, in other 
words, forming V's, placed hori- 
zontally, the points meeting in the 
center of the band. The folds fol- 
low one on the other meeting in 
the center of the band. 

For the Summer Home particu- 
larly are the flowered cretonnes. 
One design was evidently copied 
from the varnished chintz of our 
grandmothers' day. Among the 
many articles which go to beautify 
the home and give it the sense of 
freshness are entire bedroom sets, 



TALKS 

coverings for sitting-room and 
library furniture. There are also 
pretty pillow slips, waste paper 
baskets, picture frames, and other 
novelties. 

It is an accepted fact that the 
summer guest, whether he be cot- 
tager, hotel guest, or sojourning at 
a modest boarding house, must do 
his part for the Bazaar, the pro- 
ceeds of which are devoted to the 
maintenance of the "Little Church 
in the Woods." Araminta, when 
she returns to the city, will keep 
this object in view when shopping 
and will pick up pretty things, 
which look doubly pretty when 
displayed daintily on the Bazaar 
table. She will have with her rem- 
nants of ribbon and silk which 
her deft hands will fashion into 
attractive and useful articles. "A 
good seller," she will show you is 
a work bag. Take a dinner plate 
and lay it on a piece of brown 
paper, outline it with a pencil, 
cut it out. Now we have the pat- 
tern for our bag. Take two pieces 
of silk and cut them by the pat- 
tern, lay them together, baste care- 
fully and scallop the edge. Have 
rings, which we cover with cro- 
chet; these we sew on the scal- 
loped edge an inch apart, then run 
through two silk cords, draw the 
cord and there is the bag. A 
pretty floral design lined with 
white or color makes up well. 

At the Art Counter can be found 
stamped and colored designs on 
linen and felt for pen wipers and 
needle cases to be outlined, the 
leaves for the pen wiper of cham- 
ois and the needle book of flannel 
which can be pinked or scalloped. 
The coverings are only 5 cent::^; 
when made up always find pur- 
chasers. 

String Ties only require a yard 
of inch wide velvet ribbon. Fasten 
at the back with small hooks and 
eyes, a Tom Thumb bow in front, 
the long ends finished with brass 
bullet buttons. A variety of colors 
made up will attract buyers. 

Madame Robesta. 



c^tof^s 




ieoo, bt 



This Week in New York 

Monday, August 3d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Horse Racing — Saratoga Racing Association; Saratoga, N. Y. 

Motor Boat— Motor Boat Club race week; Huntington, L. I. (to Aug. 8). 

Polo — Westchester Polo Club, tournament ; Newport, R. I. 

Tennis — Open tournament; Ridgewood (N. J.) Golf Club. 

Public Concert— Corlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts. and East River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth ave., 
Waverly and Washington place, 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Cincinnati, at the Polo Grounds, 157th 
St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

The evening recreation centres are now open. Sessions nightly, except 
Sunday, from 7.30 until 10 p. m. A complete list will be furnished upon 
application; several are here given: For Men and Boys, 208 West 13th 
St.; 124 West 30th St.; Ninth and Tenth sts. east of Avenue B; High 
School of Commerce, 65th st. west of Broadway; io8th and 109th sts. 
east of 2d ave. For Women and Girls : Third and Fourth sts. east of 
First ave.; 514 West 44th st. ; 103d and 104th sts. near Fifth ave.; 145th 
and 146th sts. east of Willis ave. 

You can subscribe to "Daily Attractions in New York" for three 
months for fifty cents. It will be mailed to you regularly every Saturday. 
You can not buy if on the news stands. Subscribe now. 



Exclusively "Home-Cooking" and Dainty Service! 

Breakfast, Lunclieon 
and Afternoon Tea 



Z7^-A 



^- 14 West 33d Street 



The Table d'Hote Dinners will be discontinued until September 8th, 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. in. during July and August 

Orders for Fresh Cut Flo'ivers promptly filled 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WE)E:K — Continued 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to gotli 
St. on Fifth ave., have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to 57th St., thence over 
to Broadway, up Broadway to 726. st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be distinguished, 
by day a red ball, by night a red light on the front of the cars. The fare 
in each instance, either way, is 10 cents per person. 

Tuesday, August 4th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Tennis — Annual tournament; Norfolk (Conn.) Tennis Club. 

Public Concert — Mount Morris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris aves., 
T20th to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, East 
Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball— New York Nationals vs. Cincinnati, at the Polo Grounds, 137th 
St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Summer assembly of the New York State Baptist Young People's Union, 
at Hamilton, N. Y., the seat of Colgate University (to Aug. 13). 

There is nothing better offered for a short trip than the one to West 
Point via the sumptuous steamers of the Hudson River Day Line; consult 
the time table, see index in this magazine. It will please you to take this 
day's outing. Try it. 

Taxameter cabs are now rfmning on a reduced Summer rate ; 'phone 
2380 Columbus for all information. It will surprise you, but you can ride 
in their well-appointed cabs at a very low figure. Try them. Call 2380 
Columbus. 

Our Bureau of Information is open to you without cost. 'Phone us, 
159 Gramercy, what you want to know or where you want to go. Is it a 
trolley trip? Ask us; we will publish it in the following issue. Get the 
habit of knowing we want to help you out. Try "Father Knickerbocker" ; 
he knows. 



$7,300. ^<^ 



V^ILL BUY YOU A BEAUTIFUL 
ME IN BROOKLYN 



Fine Residential District, wide asphalted street 

20 minutes from City Hall, Manhattan 

Brown stone house, 8 rooms, bath and store room 

All modern improvements, plenty of large closets 

Cabinet finish, in perfect repair 

Terms reasonable » 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Wednesday, August 5 th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Go\i — Tnvitation tournament; Sliinnccuck Hills ( L. I.) dolt' ("Inb. 

I'nlilic Conceii — Al)inii(lon S(inarc Park, l^i,!>hlli a\c. and lluilsnn 
St. 8 p. ni. 

Public Concert — Mulberry Bend Park, Mulberry to ]^)axter st., and 
Bayard to Park st. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Cincinnati, at tbe Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

"The Doctrine of God Held and Taught in Korea, in China, and Japan, 
compared with the Doctrine of God set forth by Christian People," lecture 
by the Rev. Horace G. Undervi^ood, D.D., of Seoul, Korea, in the New 
York University Auditorium, on University Heights, 4 p. m. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, 29th st. and Fifth ave., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; Wednesday evening meeting. 8p.m. 
The Rev. John S. Allen, D. D., pastor for strangers, will preside. A welcome 
to all strangers. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Charles 
E. Jeflferson, D. D., LL. D., pastor; Wednesday evening, Praise and Prayer 
Service. 8 p. m. You will be cordially welcomed. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister ; Wednesday evening meeting in the Parish 
House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for you. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West at 68th st. ; 
Wednesday evening meeting. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

The evening roof playgrounds are open from 7.30 to 10 p. m. every 
evening except Sunday ; they are located at Henry, Catherine and Oliver 
sts. ; Rivington, Forsyth and Eldridge sts. ; Mott and Elizabeth, between 
Prince and Spring sts. ; Hester, Orchard and Ludlow sts. ; Henry and 
Gouverneur sts. ; Rivington and Suffolk sts. ; Attorney, near Rivington st. ; 
Market and Monroe sts. 



GASHERIE DE WITT 
PROPRIETOR 



THE EARLINGTON 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WE}E:K — Continued 

Thursday^ August 6th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Horse Show— Ninth Annual Horse Show at Bay Shore, L. I. (to Aug. 8). 

Public Concert— East River Park, 84th to 89th sts., facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fisli Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth and Madison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Cincinnati, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Horse Show — Eighth annual Bay Shore Horse Show, at Bay Shore, 
L. I., Frank Hubbs, chairman (to Aug. 8). 

Trolley ride given by the Men's Club of St. Stephen's Church, Woodlawn 
Heights, to Fisher's Grove. Special cars will leave McLean ave. at 8.30 p. m. 

A group of four large bells will be placed in the forty-sixth story 
of the tower of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Building, which building 
covers from Madison to Fourth ave., and from 23d to 24th st. The 
group consists of four large bells, the largest will weigh 7,000 pounds and 
the smallest 1,500, and are said to be the largest bells ever assembled in 
a group ; they will strike the quarter of each hour in chimes and it is said 
may be heard at a great distance. 

Friday, August yth 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Dog Show — Monmouth County Kennel Club, Hollywood, N. J. (also 
Aug. 8). 

Public Concert — Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Battery Park, foot of Broadway, overlooking the har- 
bor. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Wm. H. Seward Park, Hester to Division and Norfolk 
to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 



Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continaed 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Chicago, at the Polo Grounds, 157th 
St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. ni. Admission 50 cents. 

The A-acation playgrounds are now open daily except Sunday from 
I to 5.30 p. m. A complete list will he furnished upon application ; several 
are here given : 225 East 27th St., 208 West 13th st. ; 41st and 42d sts. 
east of Third ave. ; 320 East 20th st. ; 38 First st. ; .Amsterdam ave. and 
68th St. ; 32d and 33d sts. near Second ave. ; Avenue A, 77th and 78th sts. ; 
82d St. between First and Second aves. 



Saturday, August 8th 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Motor Boat — Huguenot Yacht Club; Auxiliary boat race; New Ro- 
chellc, N. Y. 

Golf — Team matcli with Ridgewood Golf Club; Houvenkopf Golf Club; 
Suffern, N. J. 

Golf — Invitation tournament; Shinnecock Hills (L. I.) Golf Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Bensonhurst 
Yacht Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound ; Horseshoe 
Harbor Annual and Corinthian of Stamford. 

Public Concert — Central Park, 59th st., from Fifth to Eighth aves., 
nearest entrance to the Mall is at 72d st. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Morningside Park, between Morningside and Columbia, 
and West iioth to 123d st. 4 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Chicago, at the Polo Grounds, 157th 
St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

"Optical Methods of Measuring High Temperatures," lecture by Pro- 
fessor Hallock, in Room 301 Fayerweather Hall, Columbia University. 
4.30 p. m. Free. 

The original "Seeing New York" Yacht encircles the Island of Man- 
hattan twice daily, leaving from foot of West 22d St., at 10 a. m. and 
2.30 p. m. You do not realize the beauties of our waterway until you 
spend the three restful hours enjoying this beautiful trip. Fare $1. 

The Singer tower is now open to the public, and the observation l)al- 
cony at No. 149 Broadway offers tlie visitor to this city an opportunity 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 

Large Jars, $1.00 
Smaller Jan, SO Centi 



Q Poiieised of rare quilitiei and manf valuable propertict 
not generally found among toilet articlet, beiidei hi unique 
effect ai a 6rit-claii 

SKIN FOOD 

u«ed in manage for producing and preierring a flat, bcaJtllY 
complexion, placea thii rare " Novelty " among other 
emollient! lecond to none in either Europe or America. 

M.B.DaMBDIGI . 124 W. 2 lit St.. N.w Tort 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

lo see New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. The 
balcony is on the forty-second floor, 548 feet above the curb, and gives 
a sight-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The tower 
has a platform with a high railing which accommodates about forty people. 
Express elevators run from the main corridor on the first floor, making 
the trip in one minute. There are also guides stationed on the platform to 
point out the different points of interest to visitors and to give other 
information. A fee of 50 cents is charged. 



Sunday, August 9th 



MISCELLANEOUS 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth avc. and 29th st., the Rc\'. David 
James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m; the 
Rev. John S. Allen, D. D., will preach. A cordial welcome for everyone. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st St., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House, 30 
East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., the Rev. Leighton 
Parks, D. D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 a. m. ; the Rev. J. Stuart 
Holden, rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square, London, will preach. 
The full choir will be present. All seats are free. A welcome for all. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st. ; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West S/th st., the Rev. D. Asa Black- 
burn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers will be welcome. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Charles 
Jefl^erson, D. D., LL. D., pastor; services, ti a. m. and 8 p. m. You will 
be cordially welcomed. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 55th st., the Rev. J. 
Ross Stevenson, D. D., minister; services 11 a. m. and 4 p. m.; Rev. 
Len G. Broughton, D. D., of Atlanta, Ga., the well-known Southern 
evangelist and author, will- preach in the morning and afternoon. You 
are cordially invited. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway. 8 p. m. Tlie Rev. Len G. 
Broughton and the Rev. Millard A. Jenkins will speak. You are invited 
to attend. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on tlic Mall ; 59th st. from Fifth to 
Eighth aves., nearest entrance 72d st. 4 p. m. 



FOWLER & WELLS COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1835 



PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, EST. 1838 lOc, $1.00 per YEAR 

24 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



10 



L.^ 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CLUBS OF NEW YORK 



Aldine Association, iii Fifth Ave 

Allenhurst, 289 Fourth Ave 

Alpha Delta Phi, 136 W 44th 

Amateur Billiard, 115 W 79th 

American Jersey Cattle, 8 W 17th 

American Kennel, 55 Liberty 

Arion, 59th St and Park Ave 

Army and Navy, 107 W 43d 

Attic, 141 W 42d 

Automobile, 54th St and B'way 

Baltusrol, 261 Broadway 

Beethoven, 207 E loth 

Boys', Ave A and loth 

Brook, 7 E 40th 

Brown University, 12 W 44th 

Calumet, 267 Fifth Ave 

Camera, 5 W 31st 

Catholic, Central Park South 

Century, 7 W 43d 

Chemists', 108 W 55th 

City Lunch Club, 165 Broadway 

Civic, 243 E 34th 

Clover, 45 W 21st 

Colonial Yacht, loBth and N. R. 

Columbia University, 18 Gram'y Pk. 

Columbia Yacht, 86th and N. R. 

Coney Island Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Country, Westchester, N. Y. 

Criterion, 683 Fifth Ave 

Delaware, 222 E 71st 

Delta Phi, 612 W Ii6th 

Democratic, 617 Fifth Ave 

Dcutscher Verein, 112 Central Pk.S. 

Down Town, 60 Pine 

Drug and Chemical, 100 William 

Electrical, 14 Park PI 

Empire City, 106 W 38th 

Engineers', 32 W 40th 

Federal, Tz Ave D 

Fellowship, 211 W 45th 

Freundschaft, Park Ave and 72d 

Greenroom, 139 W 47th 

Greeters, 1146 Broadway 

Grolier, 29 E 32d 

Hardware, 253 Broadway 

Harmonic, 10 E 6oth 

Harvard, 27 W 44th 

Hotel Men's Ass'n. Cambridge bidg 

Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Knickerbocker, Fifth Ave and 32d 

Lambs', 128 W 44th 



Lawyers', 120 Broadway 

Liederkranz, iii E 58th 

Long Acre, 70 W 45th 

Lotos, 556 Fifth Ave 

Machinery, 50 Church 

Manhattan, Madison Ave and 26th 

Masonic, 17 E 22d 

Mendelssohn, 113 W 40th 

Merchants', 106 Leonard St 

Metropolitan, Fifth Ave and 6oth 

National Arts, 14 Gramercy Park 

N. Y. Athletic, 58 W 59th 

N. Y. Baseball, 1133 Broadway 

New York, 9 W 42d 

N. Y. Press, 7 Spruce 

N. Y. Railroad, 62 Liberty 

N. Y. Riding, 7 W 66th 

N. Y. Yacht, z^ W 44th 

Pen and Brush, 30 W 24th 

Physicians', 72 St. Mark's PI 

Players', 16 Gramercy Park 

Princeton, 121 East 21st 

Progress, Central Pk. W. and 88th 

Racquet and Tennis, 27 W 43d 

Reform, 42 Broadway 

Republican, 54 W 40th 

Riding, 7 E 58th 

St. Nicholas, 7 W 44th 

Salmagundi, 14 W 12th 

Stewards', 49 E 28th 

Strollers', 67 Madison Ave 

Studio, 959 Sixth Ave 

Technology, 36 E 28th " 

Three Arts, 536 West End Ave 

Town and Country, 12 E 22d 

Transportation, Hotel Manhattan 

Turf and Field, 571 Fifth Ave 

Underwriters', TJ William 

Union, Fifth Ave and 51st 

Union League, i E 39th 

University, Fifth Av and 54th St W 

Victoria, 15 W 32d 

West Side Republican, 2307 B'way 

West Side Y. \\. C. A., 320 W 57th 

Whist, 13 W 36th 

Woman's, 9 E 46th 

Woman's Press, Waldorf-Astoria 

Woman's University, 17 E 26th 

Wool, 260 W Broadway 

Wyandot, 232 East 58th 

Yale, 30 W 44th 







' '"OO, »T *' 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty- First Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, August 2d 

Services II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



Ji Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



»ttiinh QHurrli nf CUliriBt, ^rl^nttat ^T&',h''st''re^"' 

Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. Sunday School, ii a. m. 

Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



REFORMED 



1623 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 1908 

The Marble Collegiate Ghurcli 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D.. Minister 

Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN. D.D., Pastor for Strangers 

Services, 1 1 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Sunday, Mugust 2, I90S 

Dr. Allen will preach at both services 

Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 



I 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

MIECW YORK CHCR0EB8 — Oontlnaed 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

^aint llartholomew's Qlhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 

Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 



SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 
SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher August 2d 

THE REV. J. STUART HOLDEN, 

Rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square, London 



THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT 



ALL SEATS FREE 



(^rtnttg Parish 



Rev. WILLIAM T. MANNING, D. D., Rector 
Sunday Services 



TRINITY CHURCH. Broadway and Wal 
St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 

ST. PAUL'S CHAPEL, Broadway and Ful- 
ton St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 7.3) 
P. M. 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, Varick, near 
Laight St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 
P. M. 

TRINITY CHAPEL, 25th St., near Broad- 
way. 8 and 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. 

ST. CHRYSOSTOM'S CHAPEL, 7th Ave. 
and 39th St.. 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 8 P.M. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHAPEL, Houston 

St , east of Bowery, 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. 

and H P. M. 
ST. AGNES'S CHAPEL, 92d St., west of 

Columbus Ave., 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 

4 P. M. 
ST. LUKE'S CHAPEL, Hudson St., opp. 

Grove St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 

P. M. 
INTERCESSION CHAPEL, Broadway and 

158th St., 8 and 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 
ST CORNELIUS'S, Governor's Island, S 

A. M. and 11.45 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 



CONGREGATIONAL 



Eev. CHAELKS 
E. JEFFERSON, D.D., LL.D., PaBtor 
Sunday : Public Worship, ii a.m. ,8p.m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 P. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E.. 7 p.m. IVednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 



INDEPENDENT 



CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 



Sunday Services. 11 A. M. and 7.45 P. M. 



Strangers in the City Welcome 



PRESBYTERIAN 



iil^tftll AutnUe 5?l*^SbHt^^^^t^ (!ll|UrrI:| FmhAvenue^ndsstA street 

SERVICES ACKUTSr 2(i ; U a 111. and 4 p.m. STRANGERS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

Rev. .1. T(-)LEFRb:E fARR, M.A., of London, the Ministerial Evangelist of the National Free 

Church, and President of the Chistian Eudeavorers Union of Creat Britain and Ireland. 

will preach both in the morning and afternoon 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK 



Alexander, 118 West 49th. 

Babies', 135 East 55th. 

Bellevue, foot of East 26th. 

Beth Israel, Jefferson and Cherry. 

Central Islip State, Central Islip, L. I. 

Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 

City, Blackwell's Island. 

Columbus, 226 East 20th. 

Emergency for Women, 223 East 26th. 

Epileptic, Randall's Island. 

Fever, North Brother's Island. 

Flower, East 63d, cor. Ave. A. 

Fordham's Reception, Aqueduct ave. and 

St. James. 
French Benevolent Society, 450 W. 34th. 
Gen. Memorial, 2 West 106th. 
German, 77th, Lex'n and Fourth aves. 
Gouverneur, Gouvemeur slip and Front. 
Grace Church, 414 East 14th. 
Hahnemann, Park ave. and 67th. 
Harlem, 533 East 120th. 
Harlem Eye, Ear & Throat, 144 E. 127th. 
House of Relief, 67 Hudson. 
Incurables', Blackwell's Island. 
Infants', Blackwell's Island. 
Italian, 169 West Houston. 
Jewish for Deformities, 1917 Mad. ave. 
Jewish Maternity, 272 East Broadway. 
King's Park State, King's Park, L. I. 
Laura Franklin Free for Children, 17 

East 111th. 
Lebanon, Westchester & Cauldwell aves. 
Lincoln, 141st, cor. Concord ave. 
Long Island State, Brooklyn. 

Loomis Sanitarium for Consumptives, 
184 West 49th. 

Manhattan Bye, Ear and Throat, 210 
East 64th. 

Manhattan Maternity, 327 East 60th. 

Manhattan State, Ward's Island ; Office, 
foot East 116th. 

Marine, Office, Foot Whitehall. 

Maternity of N. Y., Mothers' Home of 
the Sisters of Misericorde, 531 East 
86th. 

Merchants' Marine, 78 Broad. 

Metropolitan, Blackwell's Island. 

Metropolitan Disp. & Hosp., 248 E. 82d. 

Metropolitan Throat, 351 West 34th. 

Mintum for Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, 
foot of East 16th. 

Monteflore Home for Chronic Invalids, 
Broadway and West 138th. 

Mothers' and Babies', 596 Lexington ave. 

Mt. Morlah, 138 East 2d. 

Mt. Sinai, Madison ave. and 100th. 

Mulvey's Dog and Cat, 2839 Broadway. 

New Amsterdam Eye & Ear, 230 W. SSth' 



New York, 7 West 15th and 97 Hudson. 
N. Y. Canine Infirmary, 118 West 53d. 
N. Y. Children's, Randall's Island. 
N. Y. Eye and Ear, 218 Second ave. 
N. Y. Foundling, 175 East 68th. 
N. Y. Homeopathic, 63d and Ave. A. 
N. Y. Lymph Sanitarium, 165 West 39th. 
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for 

Women, 19 West 101st. 
N. Y. Ophthalmic, 201 East 23d. 
N. Y. Orthopaedic, 126 East 59th. 
N. Y. Polyclinic and School, 214 E. 34th. 
N. Y. Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
N. Y. Red Cross, 110 West 82d. 
N. Y. Sanitarium, 247 West 49th. 
N. Y. Skin and Cancer, 301 East 19th. 
N. Y. Throat, Nose & Lung, 229 E. 57th. 
N. Y. Veterinary, 117 W. 25th. 
Nursery and Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
Philanthropic, 2076 Fifth Ave. 
Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
Presbyterian, 41 East 70th. 
Rebeau Private, 156 West 74th. 
Rod Cross, Central Park W. and 100th. 
Riverside, North Brother's Island. 
Riverside (Reception), foot of East 16th. 
Roosevelt, West 59th, near Ninth ave. 
Ruptured and Crippled, 135 East 42d. 
St. Andrew's Convalescent, 213 E. 17th. 
St. Ann's Maternity, 130 East 69th. 
St. Elizabeth's, 416 West 51st. 
St. Francis', 605 East 5th. 
St. Gregory, 93 Gold. 
St. John's Guild (office), 501 Fifth ave. 
St. Joseph's, East 143d and Brook ave. 
St. Lawrence, 163d & Edgecombe av. 
St. Luke's, Amsterdam ave. and 113th. 
St. Mark's, 117 Second ave. 
St. Mary's Free for Children, 405 West 

34th. 
St. Vincent's, 149 West 11th. 

Sanitarium for Hebrew Children (office), 

356 Second ave. 
Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, foot E. 16th 

Seton, Spuyten Duyvil. 

Sloane Maternity, W. 59th and Ams. ave. 

Society of the Lying-in, Second Ave. and 
17th. 

Sydenham, 339 East 116th. 

Trinity, 50 Varick. 

U. S. Marine (office). Battery. 

Washington Heights, 554 West 165th. 

Willard Parker, foot of East 16th. 

Woman's, 141 West 109th. 

Woman's Infirmary and Maternity Home, 
124 West 65th. 

Wright, J. Hood, Memorial, 503 W. 131st. 

Yorkville, 246 East 82d. 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHEEP 



There are sheep grazing on the 
hillside, making a picture which my 
window frames effectively. It is a 
summer scene, a landscape which 
only the brush of a master could 
transfer to canvas. The sunlight on 
the green of the fields, a few elms, 
fleecy clouds veiling the blue o'er- 
head, and the placid, contented sheep 
as motionless as a still life study. 
There are lambs in the flock, lambs 
that appeal to you because they are 
so gentle and woolly and helpless, 
and it must come as a distinct shock 
that they find their only field of use- 
fulness on the platter served with 
peas and mint sauce. The material 
intrudes on the ideal. 

Tending sheep was a very popular 
vocation in Bible times in the coun- 
tries the Bible tells about, and many 
of the best people written about in 
the Bible tended sheep and were not 
ashamed of the calling. Times were 
slower then than they are now, but 
even at that time there could have 
been no special excitement about it, 
unless one of the sheep should stray 
away from the fold, or a wolf should 
visit the flock. Shepherds must cer- 
tainly have had standing recognized 
in High place, for the angel messen- 
ger bearing tidings of the Christ child 
appeared first to shepherds who 
watched their flocks by night, bring- 
ing the wonderful Christmas greet- 
ing of love and peace which we work 
up in evergreen letters around holi- 
day time. Shepherds figure in the 
5trongest metaphor of the Bible, and 
David tended the sheep before he 
was called to be the king and to es- 
tablish the greatest dynasty of his- 
tory. 

Sheep are such quiet, stupid crea- 
tures — just like the duties of one's 
everyday life, and duties like sheep 
are all very much alike. Your sheep 
are much the same as mine, the only 
difference is in the shepherd. You 
may be the better shepherd because 
you neglect none of yours, and in the 
heat of summer and the cold of win- 
ter are _ always at your post, never 
failing in vigilance and caution, liv- 



ing up the responsibility of every 
hour. 

There must be rewards to shep- 
herds who tend their sheep faithfully 
when they long to be doing some- 
thing else ; who see their days glid- 
ing swiftly by and no glory attending 
their effort ; shepherds who like Da- 
vid hear the bugle call to war, and 
scent the battlesmoke, and long to 
desert the stupid old sheep — and yet 
stand by them. Yes, there must come 
a reward sometime. Make no mis- 
take about that. 

David played on the harp while he 
tended the flock, signifying his good 
cheer, patience and content with his 
employment. Afterward he wrote 
the Psalms that are chanted in church 
on Sundays, and are used also for 
responsive reading, and are full of 
that personal element that reminds 
you of your own affairs, your ene- 
mies and your sure triumph over 
them, and contain gratifying state- 
ments that thrill you, and give you 
a sense of security you dare not men- 
tion. 

All weary shepherds should take 
new courage when they consider what 
David had in store for him. The 
quiet years uneventful and dragging 
contained the discipline and the de- 
velopment he required for the de- 
mands of later years. Even the 
fidelity to his task, and the courage 
with which he resisted temptation 
when sorne one said to him that he 
was wasting his time, were part of 
the discipline that strengthened and 
prepared him for his great future. 

The sheep on the hillside make a 
picture which my window frames 
effectively. 

Haryot Holt Dey. 



When people bore you be not swift 
their dullness to condemn — 

For, ten to one, the chances are 
they think that you bore them. — 

Chicago Record-Herald. 



Human improvement is from 
within outward. — Froude. 



IS 



SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flaiiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
•14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



*42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



•72d St. andBroadw 
79th St. and Broadw 
8&th St. and Broadw 
91st St. and Broadw 

•96th St. and Broadw 

WEST SIDE BRAN( 
103d St. and Broadw 
110th St. andBroadw 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 



For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, 



Rheims, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

P71RE, $i.OO 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 




<:^ 



SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and Bioadway 
233d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lent • Ave. 
145th St. and Lenoi. Ave. 
Mott Ave. and 149th St. 



Cotyrieht, 1907, B. L. Clarke 



Third Ave. and 149th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

♦Express Stations 



The Right Opportunity. Let Us Find It For You. 

Leading employers secure all their high-grade men through us. Just now 
the demand exceeds the supply. We have open in Greater New York alone over 
500 first-class positions for Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men, 
paying $i,ooo-$5, 000. If you want to sell your ability to good advantage, it will 
pay you to call or write us. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 







LEADING NEW YORK HOTEL s! 


Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON, Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES, Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 

The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 

Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 


Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON. Mgr. 
18-20 West 25th Street 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman't Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street , 
Dutch Grill Palm Garden . 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE, Mgr. 
Slst Street and Columbus Avenue 


The Plaza 

FRED STERRY, Managing Director 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A HARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL, Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Prince George Hotel 

A. B. DICK. Mgr. 
15 Bast 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


Hotel Gotham 

S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel Savoy 

Herman H. Ries, John F. Ries, Managers 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. . 


Holland House 

Fifth Avenue and 30th Street 


Hotel St. Regis , 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. , 


Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN 
Broadway and 42d Street 


Hotel Victoria i 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY, Manager 
28tb Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just oflF Broadway 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUBTTE, Mgr. i 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East!" 


li 


i 







'»00, Bit 



New York Theatres 



cademy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Gramercy. 
Closed. 

erial Garden — Atop of the New 
Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. near 
Broadway. "The Merry Widow." 
Tel., 3093 Bryant. Eve., 8.30. 
Prices, Soc. to $2. 
Ihambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Daily mats, 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices 50c to $1. 

merican — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed, 
stor — B'way and 4Sth st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 
8.30; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 
Prices, soc to $2. 
elasco — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 4281 Bryant. Closed, 
ijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 
Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed, 
roadw^ay — Broadway and 41st st. 
Tel., loi Bryant. Closed, 
isino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel.. 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices 500 to $2. 





t'"'~^2.-'- 


'''^^PPfM 


^SK FOR 




ivi 


ARONDACK 




Saratoga'i Most 




M 


Palatable Water 

and Fine Mixer 

(t any of the 

Beit Hotels. 

Familiea may order 

from 




HSkC^^^p^ 


Charles & Co. 




Sbt "< 


Acker Merrall Co. 




KiiiiyiMii^ 


Park & Tilford 



Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel., 
5138 Columbus. Closed. 

Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel. 
4457 Columbus. Closed. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 



PAUL L. BRYANT 

DYEING AND CLEANSING Gowns Cleaned In Twenty-Foor Hoari 

308 FOURTH AVENUE 868 BROADWAY 

[ TEL. 4508 ORAMBRCY TEL. 4755 QRAMBRCY 

19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 



3?C.^ r . _ iff", ,' I ':_ X 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street. 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings: Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 27. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at 'West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



NEAV YORK THEATRES — Continued 



Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 

Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 
Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st, 

Tel., 21 10 Madison. Closed. 
Garrick — 35th St., east of Sixth ave. 

Tel., 35i-38th. Closed. 
Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 

23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 
Hackett — 42d St., west of B'way. 

Tel., 44 Bryant, Closed. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices, 25c 
to $1.50. 



Herald Square — 35th st, and Broad 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Hippodrome^Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New- 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th st "Follies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 




The Wine 

of the Convalescent 

By those who know is considered 
a tonic and is the condensed 
sunshine of the famous Keuka 
Valley — the most beautiful and 
healthful spot on the earth. 

Sold at all dealers 

PLEASANT VALLEY 
WINE COMPANY 

RHEIMS, N. Y. 



NEW YORK THEA 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 

St. Tel., 2243-38111. Geo. M. Co- 
han in "The Yankee Prince." Eve., 
8.30. Mat., Sat. 2.TS. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Liberty — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. Closed. 

Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. Closed. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Closed. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 
Madison ave. and 26th st. 
Closed. 

Majestic — Broadway and SQth st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 



TRES — Continued 

New Amsterdam — 42d St., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow." mats., 
Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices, 50c 
to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Cohen & 
TTarris' Minstrel. Eve., 8.15; mat., 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 

Tel., 535r-38th, Closed. 
Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 

Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel, 2000 Madison. "The Girl 
(Juestion." Eve., 8.15. Mats., 
Wed. and Sat. 2.15. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



EXPRESS COMPANIES 

Adams. — 59-61 Broadway, 91 Maiden 
Lane, 2 Reade, 200 Chambers, 137 
West Broadway, 307 Canal, 250 
Grand, 122 Prince, 322 Lafayette, 
13 E. 14tli, 25 W. 23rd, 11 W. 
34tli, 26 E. 42nd, 242 W. 47th, Madi- 
son av. and 48th, 1033 Third av., 
1257 Third av., 1789 Lexington av., 
355 Amsterdam av., 2753 ^^ Broad- 
way, 308 W. 124th, 43 W. 125th, 
132 Hamilton place, 663 E. 148th. 

American Express Co, — 65 Broad- 
way, 81 Dey st., 142 West Broad- 
way, 21 Mott St., 302 Canal st., 93 
Bowery, 139 Spring st., 18 Astor 
place, 22 West 15th St., 922 Broad- 
way, 1434 Broadway, 120 East 42d 
St., Vanderbilt av. and 44th st., 399 
Madison av., 315 Columbus av., 
1251 3d av., 683 Columbus av., 235 
West 116th St., 117 West 125th St.. 
138th St. and Park av., 2016 Am- 
sterdam av., 2800 Webster av. 
(Bronx Park). 

Long Island. — 1383 B'way, 304 Canal, 
257 Mercer, 1047 6th av., 95 5th av., 
572 Columbus av., 133 W. 125th, 
ft. James, Wall, E. 34th, 

National. — 141 B'way, 302 Canal, 158 
Duane, 105 Bleecker, 133 5th av., 
30 E. 125th, 275 W. 125th, ft. W. 
42d, and Franklin. 

N. Y. & Boston Despatch. — 304 Canal, 
100 Maiden La., 63 Gold, 45 Church, 
257 Mercer, 123 Prince, 95 5th av.. 
Piers 18 and 40 N. R., 613 6th av. 

N. Y. Transfer Co. — 1354 B'way, 182 
5th av., 521 7th av., 4th av. and 
42d, 245 Columbus av., 105 W. 
125th, ft. Rector, Liberty, Cort- 
landt, Chambers, Desbrosses and 
W. 23d. 

United States. — 2 Rector (General), 
142 West, 127 Franklin, corner 
West Broadway, 296 Canal, 128 
Division, 35 W. 3rd, 7 E. 14th, 24 
E. 21st, 555 W. 23d, 134 W. 38th, 
7 E. 39th, 1255 Broadway, corner 
47th, 1243 3rd av., 224 Columbus 
av., 2218 Broadway, corner 79th, 
696 Columbus av., corner 94th, 145 
W. 125th. 

■\VeIls, Fargo & Company's Offices. — 
51 Broadway, 107 John st., 100 
Warren St., 198 West Broadway, 
18 Chatham Square, 310 Canal St., 
Fifth av., Erie Ferry, West 23d St., 
173 Mercer st., 60 East 8th st., 95 
1159 Broadway, 613 Sixth av., 1047 
Sixth av., 88th st. and Columbus 
av., 133 West 125th st. 

AVestcott Express Co. — 149, 415, 429, 
922, 1216, 1434 Broadway, Astor 
Place and Lafayette st.. Grand 
Central Station, 275, 315, 683 Co- 
lumbus av., Park av. and 128th st., 
117 W. 125th St., D., L. & W. R. R. 
Depot, Barclay st.; D., L. & W. R. 
R. Depot, Christopher st. ; D.. L. & 
W. R. R. Depot, West 23rd st.; 
West S'hore R. R. Depots at Des- 
brosses St. and foot West 42d st. 
POST OFFICES 

General. . . .Broadway and Park Row 
Branch P. O. Stations. 
A — 136 Greene st. ; B — 380 Grand 

St.; C — 589 Hudson st.; D — 4th ave. 



and 12th St.; E — 110 West 32d st.; 
P — 399 3d av.; G — 1648 Broadway; 
H — Lexington av., corner 44th St.; 
I — Columbus av., corner 105th St.; 
J — 8th av., cor. 124th St.; K — 203 B. 
88th St.; L — 141 E. 125th St.; M — 1965 
Amsterdam av. ; N — Broadway, cor- 
ner 69th St.; O — 122 Fifth av.; P — 
Produce Exchange Building; R — 3d 
av., corner 150th st. ; S — Broadway, 
corner Howard st. ; T — 3319 3d av. ; 
U — 3d av., corner 103d st.; V — Cor- 
ner West Broadway and Canal st. ; 
W — 498 Columbus av.; X — E. 138th 
st.;Y — 1160 3d av.; Bedford Park — 
Southern Boulevard, near Webster 
av. ; City Island — Main st. and Ford- 
ham av. ; Foreign Branch — Corner 
West and Morton sts. ; High Bridge 
— Sedgwick av., near Depot place; 
Kings Bridge — "Kings Bridge," near 
Railroad Station; Madison Square — 
Fourth av., corner 23d St.; Tre- 
mont — 719 Tremont av. ; University 
Heights — University of the City of 
New York; Westchester — Main St., 
near West Farms road; AVilliams- 
bridge — White Plains av., near 
Briggs av. 

DISTANCES IN NEW YORK 



From the 


Prom the 




Battery 


City Hall 




Vi mile 




To Rector st. 


Y? " 




" Dey St. 


% " 




" City Hall. 
" Leonard st. 


1 


yo mile 


11/4 miles 


% " 


" Canal st. 


1 y, " 


1 


" Spring St. 


1% " 


IVi miles 


" E. Houston St. 


2 


1% " 


" E. 4th St. 


214 " 


lya " 


•• E. 9th St. 


2yo " 


9 i< 


•' E. 14th St. 


2% " 


2% " 


" B. 19th St. 


3 


2V2 " 


•' E. 24th St. 


314 •' 


2% '. 


" E. 29th St. 


sy, "■ 


3 


" E. 34th St. 


3% " 


31/4 " 


" E. 38th St. 


4 


3 y, " 


" E. 44th st 


4% " 


3% " 


" B. 49th St. 


4y2 " 


4 


" E. 54th St. 


4% " 


4% " 


" E. 58th St. 


5 


41/2 " 


" E. 63rd St. 


514 " 


4% " 


" E. 68th St. 


sya " 


.5 


" E. 73rd St. 


5% " 


sy* " 


" E. 78th St. 


6 


sya " 


" E. 83rd St. 


6% " 


5% '• 


" E. 88th St. 


6y, " 


6 


" E. 93rd St. 


6% " 


CM " 


" E. 97th St. 


7 


6 1/2 " 


" E. 102d st 


71/4 " 


6% " 


" E. lOSth St. 


7y2 " 


7 '.' 


" E. 112th St. 


1% " 


7% " 


" E. 117th St. 


8 


7y2 " 


" E. 121st St. 


8% " 


7% " 


" E. 126th St. 


10 y2 " 


10 " 


" W. 166th St. 



The distance across the city : 
At Battery pi. is % mile ; at Fulton st., 
% mile ; at Chambers st., 1 mile ; at 
Grand St., 2% miles; at Houston St.. 
2y8miles; at 14th st, 2% miles; at 23d 
St., 2% miles; at Inwood, % mile. 

From 23d St. northward to 125th st. 
the width of the island averages from 
2 to 2% miles. 



I 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TRIPS TO NEARBY RESORTS 



The Abbey — Fort Washington ave. 
and West 198th st. By Sul)way to 
Dyckman st. (about 10 minutes' 
walk to Abbey) ; Elevated to 
145th St. and Eighth ave., trans- 
fer to Broadway car to 198th st. 
Trolley, take car to 145th st. and 
Amsterdam ave., transfer to 
Broadway car, to 198th st., then up 
tlie hill to the Abbey. 

Bergen Beach: Jamaica Bay — From 
Brooklyn Bridge, via Flatbush 
ave. From Williamsburg Bridge, 
via Nostrand ave. 

Brighton Beach: Coney Island — 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L, Flatbush ave. 
and Smith st. trolley. From Wil- 
liamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries, via Nostrand ave. 
trolley. 

Coney Island — Iron Steamboats, 
foot Battery pL, West 22d st. and 
West 129th St. From Brooklyn 
Bridge, via Brighton Beach L, 
Sth ave. L, Court St., Union St., 
3d ave., Vanderbilt ave., Smith 
St. trolley. 

Long Beach — Via L. I. R. R. from 
East 34th St., and from Flatbush 
ave., Brooklyn. 

Manhattan Beach — From 34th st., 
E. R., via L. I. R. R. From 
South Ferry, via 39th st. ferry, 
and Manhattan Beach Line. 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L. 

Millbrook Inn, Millbrook, Dutchess 
County, N. Y. — Grand Central 
Depot, 42d St., to Poughkeepsie. 

North Beach: Flushing Bay — From 
Williamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries, Grand st. line. East 
99th St. and East 134th st. fer- 
ries. 

Rockaway Beach — From Williams- 
burg Bridge, 42d street., 23d 
St., Grand st., Roosevelt st. 
via Broadway L to Manhattan 
Junction, thence via L. L R. R. 
From East 34th st. to Long Isl- 
and City, thence L. I. R. R. 

Ulmer Park: On Gravesend Bay — 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 5th 



ave. and West End L, 3d ave. 
surface line. From 39th St., 
South Ferry, via 86th st. line. 

West Point, Newburgh and Pough- 
keepsie — By Hudson River Day 
Line superb steamers leaving 
Desbrosses st. 8.40 a. m. and 9.40 
a. m.. West 42d st. 9 a. m. and 10 
a. m., West 129th st. 9.20 a. m. 
and 10.20 a. m., returning on 
either boat, reaching 42d st. 5.30 
p. m. or 8.30 p. m. Mary Powell 
2 pm. from West 42d st. ; return 
from West Point on Steamer 
"Albany," due 8.30 p. m. 

Woodmansten Inn, Westchester, 
N. Y. — Third ave. L to 177th st., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester Village; or by Sub- 
way to West Farms, 177th st., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester; or 3d ave. L. to 
129th St., then N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. to Westchester Station. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone I 6500 Madlion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladles Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooma from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In eaiy acceii of all the principal theatret 

Subway Station, 18th Street, within one block 

zgtb Street cars pass the door 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



A FEW FERRY TRIPS 



A trip on the ferry from the foot 
of West 23rd St. across to Jersey, 
taking the Annex to Fulton st., 
Brooklyn, and return, gives one a 
pleasant sail of a couple of hours 
and a view of the "skyscrapers," 
the Battery, Statue of Liberty and 
Brooklyn Bridge, at a small cost. 

Another trip may be made from 
foot of East 42nd St., down the 
East River to Broadway, Brooklyn, 
taking boat from there to foot of 
Roosevelt St., Manhattan, at ad- 
joining slip, and return. 

Still another trip may be taken 
by taking the ferry at foot of 
Franklin st., North River, to Wee- 
hawken, thence by trolley to Four- 
teenth St., Hoboken, changing 
there to the Washington st. car for 
Hoboken ferry, across to the foot 
of West 23rd St., Christopher or 
Barclay St., New York. 

A ferry trip that almost circum- 
navigates Manhattan Island can be 
made by taking boat at foot of Ful- 
ton St., East River, across to 
Brooklyn. Take Annex (slip next 
to Fulton ferry) and go to Jersey 



City; take Pennsylvania ferry to 
West 23rd St. At 23rd St. take car 
to 42nd St. Take ferry at foot of 
West 42nd st. for Weehawken. 
Take trolley from Weehawken to 
Fort Lee, where another car must 
be taken to Edgewater, at which 
point take ferry to 130th st., Man- 
hattan. Take a trolley across town 
to East 99th St., walk to the river 
from the car and take ferry, which 
will carry you through Hell Gate 
and into the Sound to College 
Point. From College Point take 
trolley to Long Island City and to 
Astoria. Take ferry to East 92nd 
St. From here take Second ave. 
trolley to East 42nd st. ferry, down 
the East River to Broadway, 
Brooklyn. Take boat at adjoining 
slip to Roosevelt st., Manhattan, 
and you are back almost to the 
starting point. 



If a man stumbles and falls, lift 
him up; help him to his feet. But 
if he lies down, don't carry him." — 
Theodore Roosevelt. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



I 

i 



SAILS 
1908 



PORT 



NAME OP 
ITEAMKR 



ADDRESIES OF LINES 



STARTING PLA 



AlU 



4 .Bremen 

5. Liverpool 

.5. Southampton. . 
G.Havre 

6. Liverpool 

6 . Hamburg 

6. Bremen 

6. Copenhagen.. . 
6.Gib'r & Naples^. 

S.Hamburg 

8. Liverpool 

.S . Antwerp 

S . Southampton.. 
8. London 

11 .Bremen 

11 .Rotterdam.. . . 

12. Liverpool 

lli. Southampton. . 

13. Liverpool 

1 3 . Hamburg 

13. Bremen 

13. Havre 

1.5. Hamburg. . . . 

1.5. Liverpool 

15.rTib'r& Naples. 

1 .5 . Antwerp 

1.5 . Southampton. . 

1.5. London 

15. Glasgow 



.Cecille. . . . . . 

. Lusitania. . . . 

.Teutonic. . . . 

.Savoie 

. Celtic 

. Amerika 

.Barbarossa. . 
. Hellig Olav. . 
.Slavonia.. . . 

Patricia 

. Etruria 

.Vaderland. . . 

.St. Paul 

. Minnetonka.. 

Kronprinz. . . 
.Rotterdam. . . 
, Mauretania. . 

.Adriatic 

. Cedric 

. Bluecher. . . . 
.F. der Grosse. 
.Rretagne. . . . 

. Pretoria 

. Umbria 

K. Luisp 

.Finland 

.New York. . . . 

.Mesaba 

.California.. . 



. N. German Llovd, 5 B'way.. . . 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 
. White Star Line, 9 B'wav. . . . 

. French Line, 10 State St 

.White Star Line, 9 B'way. . . . 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . , 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 
. Scandlnavian-Amer., 1 B'wav. 
. Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'w^av. . . . 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

.Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

.American Line, 9 B'way 

Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 
. N. German Llovd. 5 B'way. . . . 

Holland Amer., 39 B'way 

.Cunard S. S. Co.. 21 State St.. 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

. Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 

N. German Llovd. 5 B'way.. . . 
.French Line, 10 State St 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

N. German Lloyd. 5 B'way. . . . 
.Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

American Line, 9 B'way 

Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 
, Anchor Line, 17 B'way 



3d St.. Hoboken 
Jane St., N. R. 
11th St., N. R. 
Morton St., N. R. 
11th St., N. R. 
1st St.. Hoboken 
3d St.. Hoboken 
17th St., Hoboken 
.Tane St.. N. R. 
1st St.. Hoboken 
.Tane St., N. R, 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Houston St., N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken 
5th St., Hoboken 
Jane St., N. R. 
11th St., N. R. 
11th St.. N. R. 
1st St.. Hoboken 
3d St., Hoboken 
Morton St., N. R. 
1st St.. Hoboken 
Jane St.. N. R. 
3d St.. Hi.boken 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Houston St., N. B. 
24th St., N. R. 



24 



J 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



DID YOU KNOW IN THE YEAR 



l865__Tliat I he surrender of (jen- 
eral Lee ami the Confederate Army 
caused great excitement and re- 
joicing. Al)Out one week from this 
time President Lincoln was assas- 
sinated while in a box at the the- 
ater ill Wasliington. His bodv was 
laid in state in the City Hall, and 
was viewed by tlie sorrowing mul- 
titude. 

1867— That the Ninth Avenue Ele- 
vated opened a short section as an 
experiment. That in January a 
bridge of ice formed in the East 
River between New York and 
Brooklyn. It is estimated that five 
thousand persons crossed over it. 

1868 — That a part of an undergrojnd 
railway was built under Broadway, 
near City Hall, but was abandoned 
for lack of funds. 

1869 — That the American Museum of 
Natural History, now located at 
77th St., Central Park West, was 
incorporated. That the telegrapji 
messenger service was organized. 

1870— That the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art received its charter. 

1872 — That there was appointed a 
committee of seventy to investigate 
the Tweed Ring and to bring those 
criminals to justice. 

1873 — That the city charter was 
amended, and many important 
modifications were made on pre- 
vious enactments. That there was 
a panic of unusual severity' which 
effected the business interests very 
seriously. That the annexing of 
Morrisania, West Farms and 
Kingsbridge nearly doubled the 
area of the city. 

187s — That six millions of dollars 
was expended to improve Fourth 
avenue ; this expense was shared 
equally by the New York Central 
Railroad Company and the city. 
1876 — That a World's Fair was held 
at Philadelphia in conmiemoration 
of the one hundredtli amiiversary 
of the signing of the Declaration 
of Independence. 
1878 — That electric arc lamps were 

used to light the streets. 
1879— That the Central Station tele- 



phone service was put in opera- 
tion. 

1880 — That there were completed and 
in operation four elevated railroad 
lines. 

1881 — That it was estimated that 
there were being published over 
four hundred and forty newspapers. 
That incandescent lamp service 
was in operation. That President 
Garfield was assassinated in Wash- 
ington. 

1883— That the East River or Brook- 
lyn Bridge was open to the public. 
That the statue of Washington, 
now standing upon the steps of the 
Sub-Treasury Building located in 
Wall street, was presented to the 
United States Government by the 
New York Chamber of Commerce, 
on the occasion of the hundredtli 
anniversary of the British evacua- 
tion of New York. 

1888 — ^That a subway plan by Mayor 
Hewitt failed to pass the Legisla- 
ture. That the city was visited by 
a blizzard of wind and snow and 
that for several days shut ofif all 
communication with the surround- 
ing country ; all trafific was at a 
standstill, which resulted in great 
suffering and many deaths. 

1889 — That for over three days the 
city was given up to patriotic dis • 
play as a commemoration of the 
first inauguration of a President 
of the United States. It is esti- 
mated that over three million 
strangers visited the city during 
this time which was known as th? 
"Columbus" celebration. 
1890 — That the United Stales censuf 
reported that the population of the 
city was estimated over 1,515,000. 
That Mayor Hugh J. Grant ap- 
pointed a Commission to report on 
a route for a subway between Citv 
Hall and Harlem. That the New 
York Central Railroad closed 
transportation over that route for 
several days on account of a 
"strike" by the engineers. 
1891 — That plans were made for ar. 
East Side tunnel but were aban- 
doned. That a cable railroad was 
laid from Battery to Central Park 



2'{ 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



LEADING HOTELS THROUGH WHICH DAILY 
ATTRACTIONS CIRCULATES 



Aberdeen, 17 W 32d 
Albany, B'way and 41st 
Albemarle, Broadway and 24th 
Albert, Univ. PI. and nth 
Aldine, 431 Fonrth ave 
Algonquin, 59 W 44th 
Ansonia, Broadway and 73d 
Arlington, 18 W 25th 
Ashland House, Fourth Ave & 24th 
Astor House, B'way and Barclay 
Astor, Broadway and 44th 
B.artlioldi, Broadway and 23d 
Belleclaire, Broadway and 77th 
Belmont (New), Park Ave & 42d 
Belvedere, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Beresford, Central Pk W and 8ist 
Breslin, Broadway and 29th 
Bretton Hall, Broadway and 86th 
Brevoort, Fifth Ave and 8th 
Bristol, 124 W. 49th 
Broadway Central, 673 Broadway 
Broztell, 3 E 27th 
Buckingham, Fifth Ave and 50th 
Calumet, 340 W 57th 
Calvert, Broadway and 41st 
Collingwood, 45 W 35th 
Colonial, 81 st and Columbus Ave 
Continental, Broadway and 20th 
Cumberland, Broadway and 54th 
Endicott, Columbus Ave and 81 st 
Empire, Broadway and 63d 
Essex, Madison Ave and 56th 
Flanders, 135 W 47th 
Florence, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Gerard, 123 W 44th 
Gilsey, Broadway and 29th 
Gotham, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Grand Union, Park Ave and 42d 
Gregorian, 42 W 35th 
Grenoble, Seventh Aye and 56th 
Hamilton, 132 W 45th 
Hargrave, 72d st, nr Central Pk W 
Hofifman House, Broadway & 25th 
Holland House, Fifth Ave and 30th 
Holland, 66 W 46th 
Imperial, Broadway and 31st 
King Edward, 155 W 47th 
Knickerbocker, Broadwaj' and 42d 
Latham, 4 East 28th 
Le Marquis, 12 E 31st 



Long Acre, 157 W 47th 
Lorraine, Fifth Ave and 45th 
Lucerne, Amsterdam Ave and 79th 
Madison, 2,1 Madison Ave 
Majestic, Central Park "W and "jzA 
Manhattan, Madison Ave and 42d 
Manhattan Square, 50 W 77th 
Mansfield, 12 W 44th 
Marie Antoinette, B'way and 67th 
Markwell, Broadway and 49th 
Marlborough, Broadway and 36th 
Martha Washington, 29 E 29th 
Martinique, Broadway and 33d 
Murray Hill, Park Ave and 40th 
Navarre, Seventh Ave and 38th 
New Amsterdam, 4th Ave and 21st 
New Grand, Broadway and 31st 
New Weston, Madison Ave & 49th 
Orleans, 100 W 8oth 
Oxford, Park Ave and 58th 
Park Avenue, Park Ave and 33d 
Pierrepont, 45 W 32d 
Plaza, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Portland, 132 W 47th 
Preston, 363 Fourth Ave 
Prince George, 12 E 28th 
Raymond, 42 E 28th 
Regent, Broadway and 70th 
San Remo, Central Park W & 74th 
Savoy, Fifth Ave and S9th 
Seville, Madison Ave and 29th 
Sherman Sq, Broadway and 71st 
Somerset, 150 W 47th 
St. Andrew, Broadway and 72d 
St. Charles, 47th st, nr 7th Ave 
St. Denis, Broadway and nth 
St. George, Broadway and 12th 
St. Lorenz, 72d st & Lex Ave 
St. Paul, Columbus Ave and 60th 
St. Regis, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Stratford, 11 E 32d 
Victoria, Broadway and 27th 
Waldorf,Astoria, Fifth Ave & .14th 
Walton, Columbus Ave and 70th 
Warrington, 161 Madison Ave 
Wellington, Seventh ave and 55th 
Westminster, Irving PI and i6th 
Wolcott, 4 W 31st 
Woodstock, 127 W 43d 
Woodward, Broadway and 55th 



26 



;XCLUSIVE BOARDING HOUSES OF NE\A^ YORK 



17 MADISON AVENUE 

Near 24th Street, opposite Park 
Single arid Double Rooms. Transients 



!69 MADISON AVENUE 

ilRooins Single, Double and Ensuite. Tel. Exch. 
Southern Cooking. Table Guests. References. 



104 and 106 MADISON AVE. 

.Private Baths. Transients. Telephone. 

Strictly First Class 



[165 MADISON AVENUE 



Telephone Exchan^t- 
Large and Small Rooms. 



Transients. 

Private Baths. 



159 MADISON AVENUE 

Transients Accomodated. Telephone Connection 
Private Baths. Table Board 



51 TWENTY-NINTH ST. East 

Transients. Table Guests 

Near 28th St. Subway. Tel. 2226 Madison 



221 WEST 44th STREET 

Near Broadway. Transients .-Vccomodated 

Table Guests. Telephone 



6 7 West 46th STREET 

single and Double Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Southern Cookint; 



LONG ISLAND TRIPS 



Nearly all the trolley trips of 
Long Island start from the New 
York end of Brooklyn Bridge. 

To reach Belmont Park by trol- 
ley take "L" road from New York 
end of Brooklyn Bridge to 
Jamaica; at Jamaica take trolley 
for Queens, which is close to Bel- 
mont Park. 

From Queens a trolley may be 
taken to Hempstead and on to 
Garden City and Mineola by a 
branch line. 

One of the most picturesque of 
Long Island trolley trips is from 
Flushing to Rockaway Park, a dis- 



tance of a little over twenty-two 
miles, taking an hour and a half. 
On the road one touches Ingleside, 
Q'ueens Borough Heights, Gam- 
son's Lane, Jamaica, Springfield 
Lawrence, Inwood, Far Rockaway, 
Edgemere, Arverne, Hammels, 
Hollands and Rockaway Beach. 

To reach Flushing take ferry to 
Long Island City, thence by trol- 
ley to Flushing. 



"Trade is occupation for a liveli- 
hood, profession is occupation for 
service of the world." — President 
Faunce of Brown University. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
"New York" and "Albany" 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



Lv. Read Down. 



Ar. 



1908 

"Read Up. 



A.M. 
"8:00 



A.M. I P.M. I 



I A.M. I P.M. I P.M. 



11 



12 



I 2 



50 



25 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 



2:35 



1 :45 

2 :00 
2 :20 



4 :50 
5:00 
5:25 

5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7 :45 



.Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkers . . . . 
..Highland Falls.. 
...West Point... 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
.New Hamburgh. 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsie . 
..Kingston Point.. 
.... Kingston . . . . 

Catskill 

.... Hudson ... 
.... Albany ... 



6:00 



6:20 
6:00 
5 :30 
5 :10 
4 :30 



2 :50 
2':i.5 



1 :20 
12:25 



9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7:35 



5:45 

*5 :20 

5 :05 



4 :10 



P.M. I P.M. I P.M. I 



I A.M. 



11 :00 

10:40 

8 :30 ■ . . . . 
I A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 
and Kingston Point vi'harfs 
for all points in Catskill 

Moun tains 

Morning and Afternoon 
Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 
The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M.. West 
42d St. at 2 P. M.. West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 



-Foot of Liberty 
Telephone 5860 



Baltimore and Ohlo- 
and 23d Streets. 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — ■ 
Grand. Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St.; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpoint Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fuliton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City^ — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa^ onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonia 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island^Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for • City Hall and 
3d av.), Canal, Grand, Rivington, 1st, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th. 65th, 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 2.3d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Pohit 
Ferry), 42d (charge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — -South Ferry Battery pi., 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gl.. Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145th, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi., 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TROLLEY TRIPS 

From New York to Mount Ver- 
non one may take any one of three 
routes — one direct from 129th st. 
and Third ave., at the Harlem 
River Bridge, by way of Webster 
ave.; a second on the West Farms 
and Williamsbridge car from the 
same point, changing to Webster 
ave. car at Williamsbridge; the 
third from the Bronx Borough side 
of the Harlem River at Central 
Bridge, take the Sixth ave. "L" to 
iSSth St. and Eighth ave. end of 
line) and walk over the viaduct 
and bridge. This third car (from 
Central Bridge) goes up Jerome 
ave. From Mount Vernon — Yon- 
kers, Hastings, Tuckahoe, Pelham, 
New Rochelle, East Chester, 
Larchmont, Larchmont Manor, 
Mamaroneck, Rye, Rye Beach, 
White Plains, Tarrytown, Port- 
chester may be reached. 

Take the Fordham line at i28lh 
St. and Third ave., north to Third 
and Tremont aves., transfer east 
to Tremont ave. line to Unionport. 
For Throggs Neck and Fort 
Schuyler, from which an excellent 
view of Long Island Sound can be 
obtained, transfer again in West- 
chester Village. Returning, take 
Tremont ave. line to West Farms, 
transfer to West Farms line, south- 
bound, or Tremont ave. line to 
Webster ave.; transfer to Mt. Ver- 
non line, to 128th St. and Third ave. 

Fordham or Mt. Vernon line at 
r28th St. and Third ave., to Tre- 
mont ave., transfer to western di- 
vision of Tremont ave. line on 
Burnside, Cedar and Sedgwick 
aves. to High Bridge. University 
Heights (Hall of Fame). Re- 
turning, via Sedgwick ave. to 
Jerome ave. line to "L" station at 
iS5th St. and Eighth ave., or con- 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Wdter Ki)iite to 

CONKY ISLAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 

World. 
TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00. 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15. 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, »10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10. 
*12.55, •1.40, 2.55. S.40, 4.25, ♦5.2.i, 
6.10, 7.10, •7.55, ^8.40, •9.25, 'lO.!©, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a * go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trjps 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. B^are : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAND REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers. 
8..S0 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., *12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R., 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M., 2.30 P. M. ; 
Rockaway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5.30 P. M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Grand Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. ; Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



tinning east to i6ist st. and Third 
ave., then transfer south on Third 
ave. to starting point. By walk- 
ing across High Bridge to Amster- 
dam ave., southbound Amsterdam, 
Sixth or Third ave. car can be 
taken to Manhattan. 



attractive Rooms for I^ent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 

Central Location. Comfortable Surroundings 

No, 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 

Telephone : 3768 Madison Square 



39 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



Aldrich Court— 41 Broadway. This 
formed the site of the first hab- 
itation of white men on Manhat- 
tan Island; was also the site of 
the second residence of Washing- 
ton. Tablet: "This tablet marks 
the site of the first habitation of 
white men on the Island of Man- 
hattan. Adrian Block, Command- 
er of the Tiger, erected here four 
houses or huts, November, 1613. 
He built the Restless, the first 
vessel made by Europeans in this 
country. The Restless was 
launched in the spring of 1614. 
This tablet is placed here by the 
Holland Society of New York, 
September, 1890." 

Boreel Building — 115 B'way. This 
site was formerly occupied by the 
residence of Lieutenant-Governor 
James DeLancey; after his death 
it was turned into a public house, 
known under a number of names, 
the most famous being "Burns' 
Cofifee House." It was here the 
non-importation act was signed, 
also Washington's inaugural ball 
was held in the so-called "great 
room." During the year 1793 the 
building was torn down and a 
"City Hotel" was erected by a 
number of New York merchants. 
Tablet: "The site of the old his- 
torical DeLancey House, after- 
ward the 'City Hotel.' The tav- 
ern located here had various pro- 
prietors, by whose names it was 
successively called, being, among 
others, known as 'The Province 
Arms,' 'The City Arms,' and 
'Burns' Cof¥ee House or Tavern.' 
It was here that the celebrated 
non-importation agreement in op- 
position to the 'Stamp Act' was 
signed October 31, 1765. Erected 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, March, 1890." 

Church of the Messiah— Park ave. 
and 34th St. This site once 
formed the estate of Robert Mur- 
ray, the "Quaker Merchant of the 
Revolution," and was called "In- 
clenberg," and became historic 
through the diplomacy of Mrs. 
Murray in detaining the British 
officers, Clinton, Howe and Corn- 



wallis, while Putnam and his 
troops, on their retreat to Har- 
lem, guided by Aaron Burr, 
passed within a mile of the house. 

Fort Amsterdam — This site is now 
occupied by the new Custom 
House Building, and another por- 
tion occupied by the Cunard 
Building, 29 Broadway. Tablet: 
"The site of Fort Amsterdam, 
built in 1626. Within the fortifi- 
cations was erected the first sub- 
stantial church edifice on the 
Island of Manhattan. In 1787 the 
fort was demolished and the Gov- 
ernment House built upon this 
site. This tablet is placed here 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, September, 1890." 

Mercantile Library — Aster Place. 
Founded in 1820. This is the 
principal circulating library in the 
city; was first located at 49 Ful- 
ton street and afterward moved 
to Clinton Hall, corner Nassau 
and Beekman streets, where it 
remained until transferred to the 
Astor Place Opera House, which 
was renamed the new Clmton 
Hall. This building was demol- 
ished in 1890, and the present 
building erected on its site. 

New York Historical Society — Sec- 
ond ave. and nth st. This build- 
ing contains a large and valuable 
collection of historical curiosities. 
The society was organized in 1804 
for the collection and preserva- 
tion of everything relating to the 
natural, civil and ecclesiastical 
history of the United States in 
general and New York in particular. 

Windsor Arcade — 571 Fifth ave. 
This was the site of the Windsor 
Hotel which was destroyed by 
fire March 17, 1899, at which 
about fifty lives were lost. 

West Washington Marlcet — Located 
at the foot of West 12th St., but 
was formerly extending along 
West St., on the river side to the 
market. It is here that all early 
fruits and vegetables from Ber- 
muda Islands are received, and 
it has been estimated that during 
the peach season from 50,000 to 
100,000 baskets are received daily. 



30 



Is This Your Opportunity 
or His? 



m 



AT ERF RO N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufficient water for ocean-going vessels, 

J\ nd within 15 miles of the Battery, on 

i he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 

-C/ very facility for manufacturing 

Xx. ight at hand. Water under pressure. 

J7 reight carried by three railroads. 

Xx. are opportunity : 1 50 acres 

\J f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

IN o difficulty in building : solid ground for 

^^ foundations. 
1. he only large piece of waterfront property 
available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 



Henry B. Harris' 

ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



AT THE LIBERTY THEATRE 42nd street, west of Broadway 

- Telephone Bryant 27 

MONDAY, AUGUST 10th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

A full line of plain and fancy laughs in 

"The Traveling Salesman" 

By JAMES FORBES, the man who wrote "THE CHORUS LADY' 



AT THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 14th street and Irving Place 
1^^^:^^=^=^=^^^==^^:^=^^=^:^==: Telephone, Gramercy 71 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13th 

Henry B. Harris will present 
(in conjuction with Maurice Campbell) 

Henrietta Crosman 

In A REPERTOIRE OF HER MOST SUCCESSFUL PLAYS 



AT THE HUDSON THEATRE 44th street, East of Broadway 
=:^^====^==^^====^=^:==: Telephone, Bryant 680 

MONDAY, AUGUST 24th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

Robert Edeson 

in 

"THE GALL OF THE NORTH" 

Bv GEORGE BROADHURST Founded on Stewart Edward White's "Conjuror's House' 



AT THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE 23d street and Sth Avenue 
=^=^^^=^^^=^^=^^^=^^^=^^^=^1^^^=^^==: Telephone, Chelsea 600 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

Rose Stahl 

'" Coret' Wsr' "THE CHORUS LADY" 

By JAMES FORBES 



WEEK, AUGUST 10 TO AUGUST 16, 1908 



Bail? Attractions 



m 



i5eto ^orfe 



or^"^ y^, 




Cofyright loob. B. L. Clarke 



TAXAMETER GABS 



STANDS: Sherry's: Cafe Martin: Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R. R., Foot Bast 34th 
Street : Central R. R. of N. J.. Foot West 23rd Street 

TELEPHONE 2380 COLUMBUS 

One central Exchange connects all taxameter cab stands ; on receipt of call the nearest available 

cab is promptly dispatched 
Reduced Summer Rates now in effect NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

T.iiift' folder mailed on request Eighth Avenue and Forly-ninth Street 



VOL. 10 $2,00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

'pyright. iQoS, by Daily Attractions in Ntu) York, Inc. 



NO. 124 




rierbo-J\ 



ervo 



THE GREAT 
NERV^E TONIC 
ajid CONFECTION 

Manufactured only t-iy — 



Mrs. Blanche E. Thomas 

29 East 29TH St., New York City 



MRS. BLANCHE E. THOMAS 



y|| 1 OniC \ — A combination of pure simple vegetables and herbs. 

The basal principles of a wholesome stomach, blood and tissue building. In- 
creasing the gastric juices is the basis of all good digestion. It aids assimilation, 
thereby promoting circulation which nourishes and builds up the tissues — 
giving renewed vigor and vim. For insomnia, neuralgia and headache. 

jj v^OniCCtlOn I^Chocolate creams, nut-bars, tonic cough- 
drops, and in evers' form where sugar can be used. 
For sale at Park 8i. Tilford's. 



Guaranteed under tlie Pure Food and Di uys 
Act., June 30, iQofi. Serial No. 12,586. 



% 



Herbo-Nervo Soda 

Egg Phosphate 

Fruitade 

Orangeade 

Rasberryade 

" Currantade 

With sugar or without. Hegeman, 
Daggett & Ramsdell, Caswell & Massey, 
R. H. Macy & Co., Hiker's and all 
first-class dealers. Indorsed by the late 
Dr. J. Clarke Thomas, N. Y. C. 




J. CLARKE THOMAS, M. D. 



«LIR»A.«»Y of 0<iN6RE«s][ 

■J 



m MEW YORK toHV 



o4 Weekly 9\ia.gA*ine 'Devoted to cMvance Jnformjitldn, 



Vol. X 



AUGUST loth to AUGUST i6th, 1908 



No. 124 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. ,R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractioni circulatei through all the 
leading Hotel* in New York City 
ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT II NOT FOR SAL E ON NEWS STANDS 

i FiTe Centi • Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 



Adrertiiing ratei based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractioni in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 



CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Churches 12-13 

Elevated Railroads 28 

Ferries 28 

Grant's Tomb 15 

Hospitals 25 

Hotels iS 

Hudson River Day Line O-23 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 24 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 26 

Points of Interest 29-30 

Public Libraries 11 

Pullman Accomodations 28 

Railroad .Stations 28 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 21 

Short Trips to Nearby Resorts 27 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter Information 14 

Theaters ig-20 

"|The Motherly Face " (Haryot Holt Dey) 4 

This Week in New York 5-10 

This is the Way to Reach the Bronx, etc. .23-24 
Where Daily Attractions Circulates 22 



ART NOTES 
Metropolitan Museum of Art — 
Fifth ave., opposite 82d st. Open 
every weekday from 10 a. m. to 
6 p. m., Saturday from 10 a. m. 
to 10 p. m., Simday from i to 5 
p.m. Free, except on Monday and 
Friday, when a fee of 25 cents 
is charged. In the Room of Re- 
cent Accessions are two por- 
traits of Saint Gaudens, by Ken- 
yon Cox and Ellen Emmet; "A 
Lady in Black and Green," by 
J. W. Alexander; a pastel por- 
trait of Albert Gallatin, by 
James Sharpies, the gift of Miss 
Josephine L. Stevens. A cas- 
sone font. Umbrian school 
(about 1500) presented by James 
Loeb. Six landscapes by Hiro- 
hogo, two landscapes by Kawa- 
bata, Gyokusho and other Jap- 
anese paintings, the gift of Fran- 
cis Lathon. American Museum of 
Natural History — Central Park 
West and 77th st.; rare' and val- 
uable acquisition of a collection 
of weapons for warfare and the 
chase, fashioned and used by the 
Veddahs, or "Hunters," a savage 
people !of Ceylon, representing 
the Yakkos of Sanscrit writers, 
who are believed to have been 
true aborigines and sole inhabit- 
ants of the island before the 
Hindu conquest. 





"" • . .■^. 


^SK FOR 

AKONDACK 






Saratoga'! Most 




P^ 


Palatable Water 


^V-^bSj 




and Fine Mixer 
at any of the 
Bett Hotels. 




^^PF| 


Families may order 




from 




H|n|. "^^Sil^*? 


Charles & Co. 




j^miil 


Acker Merrall Co. 




Park & TJIford 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE MOTHERLY FACE 



•♦The motherly face isn't written 
about,- nor pictured in fashion 
plates, nor carved in marble, nor 
even affected by anybody. But it 
has appeared in an advertisement. 
A New Hampshire military academy 



mend a hole in a boy's stocking, 
and could hold him on her lap if 
his legs dragged the floor. 

The motherly face is a good 
and great kind of a face to have. 
So few women have it. The most 



advertises the face of a motherly of us would rather look pretty. 



looking woman, and announces this 
woman to be its star attraction. 
Now this is a novelty, as you will 
all agree. 

This is the time of year when all 
the academies and other halls of 
learning place their advertisements 
in the magazines. The announce- 
ments resemble each other, all are 
dignified and conservative, save 
now and then one which prints" the 
picture of its buildings, or its 
campus, or its trees, or possibly 
the face of a splendid boy, to in- 
dicate the kind of boys that are 
turned out of this particular school. 
But this military academy in 
New Hampshire prints the pic- 
ture of the face of a motherly 
woman with brown eyes, smooth 
hair parted in the middle, and 
wearing a gown appropriately 
selected from a May Manton pat- 
tern. It is a plain, good face and 



Over on Randall's Island, that 
belongs to Father Knickerbocker, 
whose picture is in this magazine, 
there is a city building called the 
House of Refuge. City boys who 
make mistakes are sent there. 
There are fine large buildings and 
plenty of green grass there, but 
it isn't a nice place to live — that 
is — for a boy to live in. The grass 
is not to roll on. The signs warn 
you to keep ofif. If you should hap- 
pen over there about the supper 
hour you would see about 900 boys 
march in pairs to the supper room. 
They are not very big boys, that 
is, not too large to sit on a 
mother's lap, and as they march 
past you, in vain will you look for 
a boy with a responsive face. All 
are dull, stolid and unhappy, and 
reflect nothing. 

Following them into Father 
Knickerbocker's supper room at 



looks like your Aunt Hannah. The the House of Refuge you will see 

gown has a little gimp to outline hard tables, hard benches, hard 

the yoke, and is finished at the faces, hard bread and prune sauce, 

neck with a plain collar and a Not much of a supper. Father 

breastpin. The printed matter ac- Knickerbocker wouldn't be keen 

companying the picture states that about it himself. At the end of 

this is the school mother. You each table stands armed guard. 



just naturally like her looks, and 
if you have a boy to place in school 
this fall you are sure to look twice 
at the picture, and mentally con- 
clude that he would be safe with 
the original of that picture. She 
looks as if she could understand 
boys, and as if she had time to 
listen to their prayers. She has 
no pompadour requiring nocturnal 
curlpapers in its construction, and 
she needs no lady's maid since her 
dress does not button in the back. 
She doesn't look pretty, nor as if 
she expected to look pretty and 
vvas disappointed because she 
didn't. But she looks good, and as 
if she wore white aprons, and could 



If instead of the guard there 
should be a woman to stand at the 
head of each table — an Aunt Han- 
nah in a white apron, and with a 
smile to half lubricate the bread 
so it wouldn't stick in a boy's 
throat, a woman who looked as if 
she believed in prayers and liked 
to say them, why — how pleasant 
that would be!!! 

If there were a mother Knicker- 
bocker it might be different. 

Harvot Holt Dey. 



Man carves his destiny; woman 
is helped to hers. — Julia Ward 
Howe. 



I 







* '»o«, bt * 



This Week in New York 

Monday, August loth 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"Recent investigations Concerning the Nature of Electricity," lec- 
ture by Professor Tufts, in Room 301 Fayerweather, Columbia Univer- 
sity. 4.30 p. m. Free. 

Public Concert — -Corlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts. and East River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth ave., 
Waverly place and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Chicago, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Horse Racing — Saratoga Racing Association; Saratoga, N. Y. (to 
Aug. 22). 

Opening night, "The Traveling Salesman," by James Forbes, pre- 
sented by Mr. Henry B. Harris at the Liberty Theater, 42d St., VVest 
Broadway. 8.15 p. m. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway; the Rev. J. C. Massey, 
of Raleigh, N. C, will speak. 8 p. m. (to Aug. 15). 



THE EARLINGTON °^="S:,.™r" 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Tennis — Invitation tournament; Meadow Club, Southampton, L. I. 

Our Bureau of Information is open to you without cost. 'Phone us, 
159 Gramercy, what you want to know or where you want to go. Is it a 
trolley trip? Ask us; we will publish it in the following issue. Get the 
Iiabit of knowing we want to help you out. Try "Father Knickerbocker"; 
he knows. 

Tuesday, August i ith 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — ]Mount Morris Park, Madison and Mount Morris 
aves., I20th to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Chicago, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Motor Boat — Annual motor boat cruise of the American Power Boat 
Association of New York, to the the Thousand Islands (to Aug. 19). 

The Roof Garden of the Hotel ^Martha Washington is now open 
from 5 to 12 p. m. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to 90th 
St. on Fifth ave., have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up F'ifth ave. to 57th st., thence over 
to Broadway, up Broadway to 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be distinguished, 
by day a red ball, by night a red light on the front of the cars. The fare 
in each instance, either way, is 10 cents per person. 

Wednesday, August 12 th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Second annual parade and picnic of the Staten Island Gardeners' 
Horse Troop. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson st. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Mulberry Bend Park, !\Iulberry to Baxter St., and 
Bayard to Park st. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. .\dmiss'on 50 cents. 



FOWLER 


& WELLS 


COMPANY :: 


ESTABLISHED 


1835 




PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 




PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, 


EST. 1838 


10c. , 


$1.00 per 


YEAR 


24 


EAST 22d 


STREET, NEW 


YORK 


CITY 





DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Horse Racing — Empire City Rajmg A.ssociation; Yonkers, N. Y. 
(to Aug. i8). 

Polo — Polo tournament; Point Judith Country Club, Narraganselt 
Pier, R. I. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister; Wednesday evening meeting in tlic I'arish 
House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for you. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Charles 
E. Jefferson, D. D., LL. D., pastor; Wednesday evening Praise and 
Prayer Service. 8 p. m. You will be cordially welcomed. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West at 68th st.; 
Wednesday evening meeting. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, 29th st. and Fifth ave., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; Wednesday evening meeting. 
8 p. m. The Rev. John S. Allen, D. D., pastor for strangers, will preside. 
A welcome to all strangers. 

Thursday^ August 13th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Mr. Henry B. Harris presents Henrietta Crosman at the Academy 
of Music, 14th St. and Irving place, to-night at 8.15 p. m. 

Public Concert — East River Park. 84th to 89th sts., facing East River. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 




MACFADDEN'S 

Physical Culture Restaurants 

Caterers Nature's 
Pure Nourishing Foods 



Popular Prices 



Bernarr Macfadden 

Pres. P. C. Restaurant Co. 

Prei. P. C. Pub. Co. 

Philadelphia : 

85-27 South 8th St. 



New York: 

654 Broadway 
220 Fulton St. 
120 Pearl St. 
487 Pearl St. 
106 East 23d St. 
2078 Seventh Ave. 
6:5 Sixth Ave. 



Pittsburg : 

302 Wood St. 

Boston : 

27-29 Kingston St. 
35-37 Arch St. 

Chicago : 

Tacoma Building 
Madison and Wabash Ave. 



<3 



We will be pleased to have any reader of " Daily Attractions" try one 
of our lunches FREE this week. Bring this advertisement with you and 
give it to cashier. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVBEIK — Continued 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth ave. and 23d 
to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Brj'ant Park, facing Sixth ave., and from 40th to 
42d sts. 8 p. m. 

Tennis — East vs. West vs. South, doubles; Crescent Athletic Club, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (to Aug. 15). 

You can subscribe to "Daily Attractions in New York" for three 
months for fifty cents. It will be mailed to you regularly every Saturday. 
You can not buy it on the news stands. Subscribe now. 

Friday, August 14th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Eatterj' Park, foot of Broadway, overlooking the 
harbor. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — ^Wm. H. Seward Park, Hester to Division and Nor- 
folk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Cleveland, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

The Singer tower is now open to the public, and the observation 
balcony at No. 149 Broadway offers the visitor to this city an opportunity 
to see New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. The 
balcony is on the forty-second floor, 548 feet above the curb, and gives 
a sight-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The tower 
has a platform with a high railing which accommodates about fortj" 
. people. Express elevators run from the main corridor on the first floor, 
making the trip in one minute. There are also guides stationed on the 
platform to point out the dififerent points of interest to visitors and to 
give other information. A fee of 50 cents is charged. 

Saturday, August 15 th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Morningside Park, between Morningside and 
Columbia aves.. West iioth to 123d sts. 4 p. m. 



PAUL L. 


BRYANT 


DYEING AND CLEANSING 


Gowns Cleaned fn Twenty-Foor Hoars 


291 FIFTH AVENUE 


900 SIXTH AVENUE 


Tel. 1224 MADISON SQ. 


Bet, SOth & SJst Sts. Tel. 5207 Plaza 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS W^BEK — Contlnned 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall, main entrance, 59th st. 
Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Cleveland, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Polo — Polo tournament; Saratoga Polo Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Atlantic 
Yacht Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Hugue- 
not Annual, Bridgeport Annual and Hempstead Harbor Annual. 

A group of four large bells will be placed in the forty-sixth story 
of the tower of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Building, which building 
covers from IVIIadison to Fourth ave., and from 23d to 24th st. The 
group consists of four large bells, the largest will w'eigh 7,000 pounds and 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 








NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 23. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POAVELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; 'West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continued 

the smallest 1,500, and are said to be the largest bells ever assembled in 
a group; they will strike the quarter of each hour in chimes and it is said 
may be heard at a great distance. 

Sunday, August i6th 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Second Church of Christ, Scientist. Central Park West at 68th St.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 55th St., the Rev. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 4 p. m. 
Rev. Len G. Broughton, D. D., of Atlanta, Ga., the well known Southern 
pastor, evangelist and author, will preach in the morning and afternoon. 
You are cordially invited. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefiferson. D. D., LL. D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D. D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 a. m.; the Rev. 
J. Stuart Holden, rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square, London, 
will preach. The full choir will be present. All seats are free. A wel- 
come for all. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House, 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th st., the Rev. D. Asa Black- 
burn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers will be welcome. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m.; 
the Rev. John S Allen, D D., will preach. A cordial welcome for 
everyone. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, S7th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Millard A. 
Jenkins, of Hopkinsville, Ky., will speak (to Aug. 22). 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall; main entrance, 59th st. 
Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 

Large Jart. $1.00 
Smaller Jar*. SO Centi 



^ PoMciied of rare qualitiei and many valuable propertlei 
not generally found among toilet article!, bciidci it< onique 
effect ai a firit-claii 

SKIN FOOD 

used in maiiage for producing and prcierviog a fine, lualtiiy 
complexion, placet this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollient! lecond to none in either Europe or America. 

M.B.DaMBDIGI . 124 W.2Iat St..N«wTorL 



10 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

DIRECTOR'S OrricE and General Headquarters, 426 LAFAYETTE STREET 

TKLCPHONC, 3970 spring 

Circulation Headquarters. 209 WEST 23rd STREET 
tklcphonc, 3078 chelsea 

Reference Branches: 
ASTOR. 426 LAFAYETTE STREET LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES! 



East B'way, 197. (East B'way Branch). 
♦East B'way, 33. (Chatham Sq. Branch). 
♦Kivington Street, 61 . . (Rivlngton Street 

Branch). 
*Leroy St., 66.. (Hudson Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 49. (Bond Street Branch). 
*10th St., 331 East. .. (Tompkins Square 
Branch) 

Second Ave., 135.(Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W. . (Jackson Sq. Branch). 
*23d St., 228 East.. (Epiphany Branch). 
*23d St., 209 W. . (Muhlenberg Branch). 

34th St., 215 East... (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., 501 W. . (St. Raphael Branch). 

42d St., 226 W. (George Bruce Branch). 

50th St., 123 East.. (Cathedral Branch). 

51st St., 463 W.. (Sacred Heart Branch). 

58th St., 121 East (59th Street Branch). 
*67th St., 328 East.(6Tth Street Branch). 
♦Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'chj. 

♦Avenue A, 1465 (Webster Branch ). 

♦79th St., 222 East..(Yorkville Branch). 
♦Amsterdam Ave., 444. (St. Agnes B'ch). 
♦96th St., 112 East.. (96th St. Branch). 

110th St., 174 East.. (Aguilar Branch). 



123d St., 32 W. (The Harlem Librarv). 
♦125th St., 224 E.. . (125th St. Branch). 
♦135th St., 103 W.. (135th St. Branch). 

♦145th St., 503 W (Hamilton Grange 

Branch). 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. . (Washington 

Heights Branch). 
Library for the Blind, 444 Amsterdam 
Avenue. 

BOROUGH OF BRONX. 

♦140th St.. 569 E..(Mott Haven Br'ch). 
♦Washington Ave., 1866. (Tremont B'ch). 
♦Kingsbridge Ave., 2933. . . (Kingsbridge 
Branch). 

BOROUGH OF RICHMOND. 
♦Amboy Road, Tottenville. . . (Tottenville 

Branch). 
♦Central Ave., Tompkinsville, S. I.. (St. 

George Branch). 
♦12 Bennett St. (Port Richmond Br'ch). 
♦Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sts. 
♦Occupying Carnegie Buildings. 



HOURS 

Thei Branches, with exceptions noted below, are open from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
on week days. 

Branches in Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Year's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, Presidential Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day ; after 6 p. m. on Washington's Birthday and Christmas Eve : 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 5 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch is closed from 5 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and is open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a. m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street, Tomp- 
kins Square, Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rivington Street and Riverside Branches from 
2 till 6 p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rivington Street Branches 
are open until 10 p. m. on week days. 

The Library for the Blind is open on week days from 1 p. m. to 5 p. m. 

The Lenox Branch is open from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ I 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



TI 



^lO^Si^ 




' ^»oe, Bt 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 



■ '^-^ 


r 


1 


Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty-Firrt Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, Jtugust 9th 

Servicet II a. m. in Parith House 

BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 




Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 




IM^r^ 


M Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



»ttanli QIl|urrI| at CdlirlHt, »tUnt\Bt 



Central Park West 
at 68th Street 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. 



Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



COLLEGIATE 



1628 THE Ol-DEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 1908 

The Marble Collegiate Church 

FirTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-MNTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 

Rev. JOHN S. ALLEN, D.D., Pastor for Strangers 

Services, 1 1 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
Sunday, August 9, 190S 
Dr. Allen will preach at both services 
Social Worship, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. All seats open to strangers. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NBW YORK OHUROHES— OonUBa«4 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

^aint iBartholomew's Olhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 



Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 



SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 
SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher August 9th 

THE REV. J. STUART HOLDEN, 

Rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square, London 



THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT 



ALL SEATS FREE 



©rtnitjj PariHli 



Rev. 



WILLIAM T. MANNING, D. D., Rector 

Sunday Services 



TRINITY CHURCH, Broadway and Wal 
St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 

ST. PAUL'S CHAPEL, Broadway and Ful- 
ton St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 7.30 
P. M. 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL. Varick, near 
Laight St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 
P. M. 

TRINITY CHAPEL, 25th St., near Broad- 
way, 8 and 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. 

ST. CHRYSOSTOM'S CHAPEL, 7th Ave. 
and 39th St., 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 8 P.M. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHAPEL, Houston 

St , east of Bowery, 7.30 and 10.30 A.M. 

and 8 P. M. 
ST. AGNES'S CHAPEL, 92d St., west of 

Columbus Ave., 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 

4 P. M. 
ST. LUKE'S CHAPEL, Hudson St., opp. 

Grove St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 

P. M. 
INTERCESSION CHAPEL, Broadway and 

158th St., 8 and 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 
ST CORNELIUS'S, (lovernor's Island, 8 

A. M. and 11.45 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 



CONGREGATIONAL 



BROADWAY TABERNACLE ""'n^^vrEVsT^'u^B.: ^^B^'.VJ^r''' 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a. m., 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 P- m. 
Y. P. S. C. E..7p.m. Wednesday : Praise and Prayer Service. 8 p. m. 



INDEPENDENT 



CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 



Sunday Services. 1 1 A. M. and 7.45 P. M. 



Strangers in the City Welcome 



PRESBYTERIAN 



iFtftli AuPttue PrffibytPrtan (!Il|urrl| Fifth Avenue ^ndjsthstreet 

SERVICES AUUUST Bth; 11 a.m. auJ 4 p.m. YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

Rev. LEN G. BROUGHTON, D. D.. the well-known Southern pastor, author and evangelist, 

will preach both in the morning and afternoon 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TAXAMETER—Motor Cab Service— 'Phone 2380 COLUMBUS 



Telephone orders filled promptly dfiy 
or night. Cabs are always in waiting 
at our various stands, or they may be 
hailed and engaged on the street. When 
the flag is displayed above the taxa- 
meter, it signifies that the cab is dis- 
engaged and can be hired. 

REDUCED SUMMER RATES— EF- 
FECTIVE JUNE FIRST— Tariff No. 1 
(Red Indicator) Used Only. 

First half-mile or fraction - - 30 cts. 

Each quarter-mile thereafter - 10 cts. 

Each six minutes waiting - - 10 cts. 

This tariff applies to all vehicles and 
irrespective of the number of passengers 
carried except that for Hansoms, Cou- 
pes, Broughams and Victorias the charge 
for waiting time is 10 cts. for each TEN 
minutes or at the rate of ONLY SIXTY 
CENTS PER HOUR. 

EXTRAS— All Vehicles 

For ordering a cab, each mile or frac- 
tion thereof, from station or stand to 
point ordered 20 cts. 
Return charge when dismissed 

north of 15.5th Street or outside 

the Borough of Manhattan, for 

each mile or fraction to Times 

Square (minimum charge $1) - 20 cts. 
Trunk - - - - 20 cts. 

All ferriage and bridge tolls, both go- 
ing and returning, must be paid by the 
passenger. If the taxameter is out of 
order, fare will be charged at regular 
legal rates. 

RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 

INFORMATION FOR PASSENGERS 

1. HOW THE TAXAMETER WORKS. 
When the flag is lowered 30 cents will 
appear under the word "Fare," and this 
pays for the use of the cab until service 
to that amount, either in driving or in 
waiting, has been rendered. The indi- 
cator will register thereafter ten cents 
for each quarter mile, or each fraction 
of an hour waiting. This charge is for 
the exact distance traveled and the exact 
waiting time consumed, which are auto- 
matically measured by the taxameter and 
over which the driver has no control. 

The "extra" charges called for by the 
service are registered by the driver and 
shown under the word "Extras." 

2. THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID IS 
THE SUM OF THE AMOUNTS SHOWN 
UNDER "FARE" AND "EXTRAS." 
THERE ARE NO CHARGES EXCEPT 
THOSE INDICATED BY THE TAXA- 
METER. 




The driver is charged with all amounts 
registered and is not permitted to make 
any reductions therefrom, but will, if 
required, give a receipt for the amount 
paid. 

3. TO SECURE COMPLETE PROTEC- 
TION, observe (a) that the flag is low- 
ered to Tariff 1 position at the beginning 
of the service and not before; (b) that 
the flag is maintained in that position 
during service ; (c) that the flag is 
promptly brought to "Payment" posi- 
tion at the conclusion of the service and 
left there until the charge is settled. 

4. IF THE CAB IS DISABLED, the 
service up to the disablement must be 
paid for. 

5. A CAB REPORTING AT AN AD- 
DRESS in response to an order is 
charged for from the time for which it 
was ordered. 

6. A CAB ORDERED AND NOT USED 
must be paid for up to the time the 
driver is dismissed, including the charge 
for sending it. 

7. THEATRE AND OTHER RE- 
TURNS. Waiting time and any neces- 
sary mileage will be charged for a ve- 
hicle held for a return call. Waiting 
time may be saved by dismissing the 
vehicle and placing a separate order for 
a vehicle for the return call, but the 
Company cannot guarantee to fill such 
return call unless It be given to and 
accepted by the starter at a station 
or stand. Under no conditions may a 
cab be held In waiting without charge. 

8. IN CASE OF DISPU1E, passengers 
are requested to pay the full amount 
indicated and make claim to the Com- 
pany, in writing, giving the hour, date, 
driver and cab number, number of pas- 
sengers carried, distance travelled and 
waiting time consumed and wherein the 
charge is incorrect. Such claims will re- 
ceive prompt and courteous attention. 

0. THE ACCURACY OF THE TAXA- 
METER is insured by systematic inspec- 
tion. Do not assume that a charge is 
incorrect without first computing all of 
the distance and all of the waiting time 
comprised in the service. 

TOURING CARS, SIGHT-SEEING 
CARS, DOUBLE-DECK MOTOR BUS- 
SES, and Automobiles of every kind by 
the Hour, Day or Week — Rates on ap 
plication. 

CAB STATIONS. 
4nth St. and 8th Av. 55-65 E.88th St. 
r.Oth St. and 3rd Av. 141 E 25th St 

CAB STANDS. 
Sherry's Caf6 Martin Hotel Astor 
Hotel Belmont, Long Island R. R., Ft. E. 

34th Street. 
Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. W. 23rd St. 



Taiitt 1 Tariff 2 Payment 



NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO. 
EIGHTH AVE. AND FORTY=NINTH ST. 

PHONE. 2380 COLUMBUS 

CONNECTS WITH ALL CAB STANDS 



M 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



GRANT'S TOMB 



Grant's Tomb is located on River- 
side Drive and 123d st. This may 
be reached by Sixth ave. and Am~ 
sterdam ave. car to 123d St., then 
walk west. Hours, 10 to S daily, in- 
cluding Sunday. No admission fee. 
This monument was designed by 
John H. Duncan, and is constructed 
of white granite from Maine, with 
marble interior, and from its com- 
manding site overlooking the Hud- 
son is very imposing. The struc- 
ture is 90 feet on the side and ^2 
feet in height, with circular cupola 
and Ionic columns 70 feet in diam- 
eter. The dome rises 150 feet from 
the ground, the apex of the monu- 
ment about 280 feet above the river ; 
from the plaza facing the south 
side steps 70 feet wide ascend to 
the portico, which has double lines 
of Doric columns before the en- 
trance and massive bronze doors ; 
above the portico two (sculptured 
figures by J. Massey Rhind, em- 
blematic of Peace and War. On a 
panel are inscribed these words : 
"Let us have peace." (This was the 
concluding sentence of General 
Grant's letter accepting the nomi- 
nation for the Presidency, May 29, 
1868.) 

The interior is ^d feet between 
the walls. The four great piers of 
the rotunda carry arches and are 
about 50 feet from the floor. The 
gallery is circular, supported bv the 
arches, 40 feet in diameter ; the 
dome about 105 feet above the floor. 
Sculptured reliefs by J. Massey 
Rhind represent Youth, Military 
Life, Civil Life and Death. In the 



small rooms surrounding the ro- 
tunda are stands of battle flags. 
Through the circular opening in 
the floor the sarcophagus is seen 
in the crypt directly beneath the 
centre of the dome. It is of red 
porphyry from Montcllo, Wis., and 
is supported on a pedestal of gran- . 
ite from Quincy, Mass. Upon the 
lid is the name, Ulysses S. Grant. 
The companion sarcophagus, an 
exact counterpart, both in material 
and design, was provided, it being 
the expressed wish of General 
Grant that Mrs. Grant should lie 
by his side. 

General Grant died July 23, 1885, 
at Mount McGregor, N. Y. The 
funeral was the grandest pageant 
ever seen. The remains lay in state 
in the City Hall and was then con- 
veyed to the temporary tomb. The 
procession was eight miles long 
and it was estimated that over a 
million people lined the route. 

There were 90,000 contributors, 
and the fund, with interest, amount- 
ed to $600,000, and was raised by 
the Grant Monument Association. 
The corner-stone was laid April 27, 
1892, by President Harrison. Sealed 
in it were copies of the Declaration 
of Independence, Constitution of 
the United States and Articles of 
Confederation, a Bible, the "Me- 
moirs" of General Grant, an Ameri- 
can flag, badges of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and the Loyal Le- 
gion, and a number of medals 
struck in United States mints in 
commemoration of events in Gen- 
eral Grant's life. 




l^^^^^^l HOUSE PLANS 

A new book, containing 150 plans of houses costing 
from $500 to $18,000, which anyone thinking of 
building a house should have if they wish to save money and 
also get the latest and best ideas of a practical architect. 160 
large octavo pages. Price, paper cover, $1.00. Sent by mail, 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price. 

Daily Attractions in New York 1 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 



IS 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flatiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
♦Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
•14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



*42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadveay — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



*72d St. and Broad 
79th St. and Broad' 
86<th St. and Broad' 
91st St. and Broad 

*96th St. and Broad 

WEST SIDE BRA> 
103d St. and Broad 
110th St. and Broad' 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 

For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, Rheims, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 226. Street 
North River, 10 A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

F71RB, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 




116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



STATIONS 

225th St. and Broadway 
231&t St. and Broadway 
2.38th St. and Broadway 
242d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 



Cotyrieht. 1Q07. B. L. Clarke 

Mott Ave. and 149th St. 

Third Ave. and 14&th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

•Express Stations 



Do You Want a Position In New York? 

We Can Find It for You. 

We serve all the leading employers in the Greater City and now have open more 
positions for high-grade Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men than we can fill. 
Write uE to-day, or, better still, call and see us for full particulars of desirable positions 
paying $i.ooo-$5,ooo a year. Offices in 12 cities. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 



E aIdI NGN E W Y O 



RK HOTELS 



Astor House 

A. H.THURSTON. M«r. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 

Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 

Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 



Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES, Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway^ 



The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN. Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 

Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 



Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON. M«r. 
18-20 West 25th Street 

Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 



Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE. Mgr. 
81st Street and Columbus Avenue 

The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
•Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G^ CART. Prop 

Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 

Hotel Gotham 



Holland House 

Fifth Avenue and 30th Street 



Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman** Hotel) 
A. W. EAGER 
29 East Twenty-ni^th^treet^ 



Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill PalmGarden^ 



The Plaza 

FRED STERRY, Managing Director 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street^ 

Park Avenue Hotel 

REED & BARNETT. Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 



Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN 
Broadway and 42d Street 

King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD. Pres. and Mgr. 

47th Street, just off Broadway 



Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY. M.n.ger 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 



Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK. Mgr. 
15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. ji 

Hotel Savoy 

Herman H. Ries. John F. Ries. Managers 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. R 

Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 

Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th S treet 

Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 



Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square E 



i8 



(OI^S 




• ieo«, Bl 



New York Theatres 



\cademy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Stuyve- 
sant. Beginning August i.Uli, 
Henrietta Crosman in. Repertoire 
Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, soc. to $1.50. 

Serial Garden — Atop of the New 
Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. near 
Broadway. '"The Merry Widow." 
Tel., 3093 Bryant. Eve., 8.30. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

\lhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Daily mats, 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices soc to $1. 

American — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 

^stor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. "Paid in Full." Eve., 
8.30; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

ielasco — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 4281 Bryant. Closed. 



Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 

Tel., 1530 Madison. Closed. 
Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 

Tel., loi Bryant. Closed. 
Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 

Tel. 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 

World." Eve., 8.1S; mat., Sat., 

2.15. Prices 50c to $2. 
Circle — Broadway and 60th st. Tel., 

5138 Columbus. Closed. 

Colonial — B'way and 62d st. Tel. 

4457 Columbus. Closed. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Closed. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission, 50c; Sunday, 25c. 



Exclusively " Home-(>()oking " and Dainty Service! 

>t. Luncheon 
and Afternoon Tea at 



Breakfast, Luncheon *// -r^ •, 14 West 33d Street 






{Ott. THE WALDORF) 



The Table d'Hote Dinners will be discontinued until September 8th, 
The Fernery closing at 6 p. m. during July and August 



4- Orders for Fresh Ctit FloM^ers promptly fillecl 

19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK THEATRES— Continued 



Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Closed. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 ID Madison. Closed. 

Garrick — 35th st., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 3Si-38th. Closed. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
23d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Closed. 

Hackett — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Closed. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Br>ant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roof 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices, 2Sc 
to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad 
way. Tel., 248s-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mat, Sat., 
2.15. Prices. 50c to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Closed. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telepbonei 6500 Midlton 
EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RES TAU RANT FOR 

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 

Dinner, 75 ctt. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Roomi from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In ea>y acceu of all the principal tbeatret 

Subway Station, 28th Street, within one block 

29tb Street cars pass the door 



Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Closed. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th st "Follies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel, 2243-38th. Geo. M. Co- 
han in "The Yankee Prince." Eve., 
8.15. Mat., Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. 
to $2. 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant "The Traveling 
Salesman." Eve., 8.15; mat., 
Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Lincoln Square — B'way and 66th 
St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. Closed. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 

Lyceum — 4Sth st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Closed. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 
Madison ave. and 26th st. 
Closed. 

Majestic — Broadway and sgth st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d St., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow." mats.. 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c 
to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Cohen & 
Harris' Minstrels. Eve., 8.30; 
mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50c. to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 53Si-38th. Closed. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of B'way. 
Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. "The Girl 
Question." Eve., 8.15. Mats., 
Wed. and Sat. 2.15. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
Closed. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



One can scarcely restrain them- 
.elves from giving utterance to the 
gratitude they feel is the just due 
o the wearers of the pretty, cool 
md summery costumes seen on 
jitreet and trolleys, not forgetting 
;he convenient and delightful taxa- 
jneter, this past torrid weather. 

Without question the simple tail- 
)r made dress of a cotton fabric 
las become a fad. The high-class 
tores on Fifth Avenue are selling 
he plainest sort of linen jumper 
Iresses, in white and colors. The 
inen coat suit, known ,as the 
Prince Chap," is a favorite; this 
5 a semi-fitting coat with pleated 
;>r gored skirt. An objection was 
lound in the thirty-six and forty- 
;nch coat on account of its wrink- 
ing when the wearer is seated. 
, The most popular skirt at the 
iresent time in wash goods is the 
ircular gored, which buttons up 
he front panel; these are real 
rue buttonholes, opening all the 
i^ay down, thus making it easy to 
au'nder. 

A more dressy suit is one of 
inen with coat of all-over filet net 
vith batiste applique and embroid- 
:ry, the skirt trimmed with the 
amc insertion just above the hem 
hen up each side of the front gore. 

Leather belts of calf skin in va- 
ious colors are attractive. One 
tyle the upper side has a cut-out 
i'Ortion the entire length, in which 
olored silk embroidery on a silk 
jound is laid. The lining for the 
iiack is white kid, and the buckle 
{'f solid metal. 

The taffeta silk petticoat is no 
c-nger worn; the close fitting skirt 
,emanded something more pliable, 
onsequently we have the sheath- 
ffect petticoat in soft silks in all 
.olors. For more dressy occasions 
5 the crepe de chine, elaborately 
rimmed with embroidered panels, 
ices, ribbons and chiffon. 
; The tailored net waist will be in 
i;reat demand this fall; these are 
nade with long sleeves, finished at 
he hand in pointed effect, with 



small i)carl buttons and eyelet loops 
for fastening, so that the part over 
the hand fits snugly. 

A letter from a Paris correspond- 
ent speaks of the use of two fab- 
rics in the construction of a toilette. 
Naturally, it is in dressy toilettes 
that these minglings are especially 
found. Lace counts as a fabric 
and is a most important part of 
the attire. But the tailored suit 
has not escaped — the jackets made 
of dififerent weaves from the skirt; 
for example, coats of plain shan- 
tung or tussah, in their natural 
tints, are worn with skirts of some 
light weight woolen fabrics, the 
color is of no importance, and is 
often of a fancy description. 

We must admit the fact that 
dress is now undergoing a marked 
transformation. Creators of the 
models of style and fashion find 
their inspiration in Greek and Ro- 
man history. 

The Spanish mantilla, as a head 
covering, has been readily adopted 
by the French woman when going 
to .the theater, restaurant dinner 
or to balls. 

A late summer fashion is the 
white or colored pique jacket, worn 
with fancy woolen skirts; for ex- 
ample, a woolen gray check skirt 
will have a pique coat, either white 
or gray._ A tartan skirt in shades 
of blue and green will be worn 
with one of "corn-flower" blue 
pique. 

It is often found the most desir- 
able spot on the lawn is "sunny" 
at the very time one would like to 
enjoy it with book or sewing. A 
canopy or umbrella can be easily 
constructed; the one referred to 
was nine feet in diameter, the 
framework of strong steel ribs, 
covered with heavy sail drill^ in 
colored stripes. The pole support- 
ing the canopy is inserted in a pipe 
screwed into the ground. The can- 
opy can be moved any place on the 
grounds; sinking the pipe is all 
that is necessary. 

Madame Roberta. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



LEADING HOTELS THROUGH WHICH DAILY 
ATTRACTIONS CIRCULATES 



Aberdeen, 17 W 32d 
Albany, B'way and 41st 
Albermarle, Broadway and 24th 
Albert, Univ. PI. and nth 
Aldine, 431 Fourth ave 
Algonquin, 59 W 44th 
Ansonia, Broadway and 73d 
Arlington, 18 W 25th 
Ashton, 1312 Madison Ave 
Astor House, B'way and Barclay 
Astor, Broadway and 44th 
Bartholdi, Broadway and 23d 
Belleclaire, Broadway and 77th 
Belmont (New), Park Ave & 42d 
Belvedere, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Beresford, Central Pk W and 81st 
Breslin, Broadway and 29th 
Bretton Hall, Broadway and 86th 
Brevoort, Fifth Ave and 8th 
Broadway Central, 673 Broadway 
Broztell, 3 E 27th 
Buckingham, Fifth Ave and 50th 
Calumet, 340 W 57th 
Calvert, Broadway and 41st 
Collingwood, 45 W 35th 
Colonial, 8ist and Columbus Ave 
Continental, Broadway and 20th 
Cumberland, Broadway and S4th 
Endicott, Columbus Ave and 8ist 
Empire, Broadway and 63d 
Essex, Madison Ave and 56th 
Flanders, 135 W 47th 
Florence, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Gerard, 123 W 44th 
Gilsey, Broadway and 29th 
Gotham, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Grand Union, Park Ave and 42d 
Gregorian, 42 W 35th 
Grenoble, Seventh Ave and 56th 
Hamilton, 132 W 45th 
Hargrave, 112 W 72d 
Hoffman House, Broadway & 25th 
Holland House, Fifth Ave and 30th 
Holland, 66 W 46th 
Imperial, Broadway and 31st 
Iroquois, 49 W 44th 
King Edward, 155 W 47th 
Knickerbocker, Broadway and 42d 
Latham, 4 East 28th 
Le Marquis, 12 E 31st 



Lenori, Madison Ave and 63d 
Long Acre, 157 W 47th 
Lorraine, Fifth Ave and 45th 
Lucerne, Amsterdam Ave and 79th 
Madison, zi Madison Ave 
Majestic, Central Park W and 72^ 
Manhattan, Madison Ave and 42(li 
Manhattan Square, 50 W 77th 
Mansfield, 12 W 44th 
Marie Antoinette, B'way and 67th i 
Markwell, Broadway and 49th 
Marlborough, Broadway and 36th 1 
Martha Washington, 29 E 29th 
Martinique, Broadway and 33d 
Murray Hill, Park Ave and 40th 
Navarre, Seventh Ave and 38th 
New Amsterdam, 4th Ave and 21st 
New Grand, Broadway and 31st 
New Weston, Madison Ave & 491? 
Orleans, 100 W 8oth 
Oxford, Park Ave and s8th 
Park Avenue, Park Ave and 33d 
Plaza, Fifth Ave and S9th 
Portland, 132 W 47th 
Prince George, 12 E 28th 
Raymond, 42 E 28th 
Regent, Sherman Sq and 70th 
Renaissance, 512 Fifth Ave 
San Remo, Central Park W & 74tli 
Savoy, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Seville, Madison Ave and 29th 
Seymour, 44 W 45th 
Sherman Sq, Broadway and 7rst 
Somerset, 150 W 47th 
St. Andrew, Broadway and 72d 
St. Denis, Broadway and nth 
St. George, Broadway and 12th 
St. Lorenz, 72d st & Lex Ave | 

St. Paul, Columbus Ave and 60th I 
St. Regis, Fifth Ave and 55th 1 

Stratford, 11 E 32d I 

Victoria, Broadway and 27th f 

Waldorf,Astoria, Fifth Ave & 34tl I 
Walton, Columbus Ave and 70th 
Warrington, 161 Madison Ave 
Wellington, Seventh ave and 5Sth 
Westminster, Irving PI and i6th 
Wolcott, 4 W 31st 
Woodstock, 127 W 43d 
Woodward, Broadway and 5Sth 



22 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY TO REACH 



American League Park — 167th st. 
and Broadway; Subway, Broad- 
way Division, to i68th St.; 3d, 6th 
or 9th ave. "L" to 125th St., 
thence Fort George trolley to 
167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 3d 
or 6th and Amsterdam ave. lines 
to 167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 
6th or 9th ave. "L" to 145th st. 
and Eighth ave., thence via 
Kingsbridge line to 167th st. and 
Broadway. 

Battery — This is the terminal of all 
elevated roads: 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 8th 
ave. and Broadway surface cars. 

Bronx Park— The Harlem R. R. 
from Grand Central Depot (42d 
St.) to Bedford Park Station. 
Or Third ave. "L" to Park. Or 
Subway to iBoth st. 

Celtic Park, Laurel Hill, L. I. City 

— Ferry foot 34th st., E. R., to 
L. I. City. 

Central Park — Surface cars; 
Fourth (Madison) Sixth, Eighth 
aves. Sixth ave. "L" to 58th st. 
Fifth ave. stages. Park coaches 
and electric wagonettes make 
the circuit of Central Park and 
rifford a most convenient means 
i>f viewing the principal points of 
interest within the Park. Fare, 



25 and 50 cents. Stop-over 
tickets are issued at various 
points, good for the remainder 
of the trip any time the same 

St. 

day. Coaches start from main 
entrance of Central Park, Fifth 
ave. and sgth St., every 15 min- 
utes. Gates or entrances to the 
Park: Fifth ave.: 59th, 64th, 
67th, 72d, 79th, 85th, 90th, 96th, 
I02d, iioth sts. ; Sixth ave.. 59th 
and iioth sts. Seventh ave.: 59th 
and Iioth sts. Eighth ave. (Cen- 
tral Park West): 59th, 72d, 79th, 
85th, 96th, looth, 105th ^nd Iioth 
sts. 

Columbia College — Subway to 
ii6th St. Sixth ave. "L" to 104th 
St., walk one block west. Am- 
sterdam ave. car. 

Columbia Oval, Williamsbridge — 

Harlem Division of N. Y. C. & 
H. R. R. to Williamsbridge; 10 
minutes' walk west; Mt. Vernon 
line, 128th St. and 3d ave. to Gun- 
hill road, 5 minutes' walk west. 

Crescent Athletic Club — Shore 
road, 83d to 85th sts., Brooklyn. 
From Brooklyn Bridge, 3d ave. 
line to 83d St., or 5th ave. line, 
connecting at 65th st. with 3d 
ave. line. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
"New York" and "Albany" 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



1908 



Lv. Read Down. 



Ar, Read Up. 



^M. I AJ^. I P.M. I 
8:00 
8:40 
9:00 
9:20 
9:45 



I A.M. I P.M. I P.M, 



11:50 



12:25 



3:25 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 



2:35 



1 :45 

2 :00 
2:20 



4 :50 
5:00 
5:25 

5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7:45 



Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 

.West 129th St... 
, . . . Yonkers . . . . 
. .Highland Falls.. 
...West Point... 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
, . . Newburgh . . . 
■ New Hamburgh. 

Milton 

, . Poughkeepsle . . 
. .Kingston Point. . 
, , . . Kingston . . . . 

Catskill 

. . . . Hudson . . . , 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



00 



6:20 
6:00 
5:30 
5 :10 
4:30 


9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7:35 


2:50 
"2 as 


5:45 

*5 :20 

5 :05 


1:20 
12:25 


4 :10 


11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 





P.M. I P.M. I P.M. 



A.M. I A.M. I P.M 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 
and Kingston Point wharfs 
for all points in Catskill 

Mountains 

Morning and Afternoon 
Concerts 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kinsston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Poiigh- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



33 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY 

Grand Central Station — Third ave. 
"L" and 42d st. branch direct to 
station. Sixth ave. "L." Or sur- 
face line to 42d st. 

Grant's Tomb — Subway to Man- 
hattan St. Sixth or Ninth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west two 
blocks. Boulevard car to 119th 

Highbridge — Sixth ave. "L" to 
125th St. and change to Fort 
George surface car. 

McComb's Dam Park Athletic 
Field, northern end of McComb's 
Dam Park, Bronx — Sixth or gth 
ave. "L" to 155th st., across Via- 
duct tb Park at i6ist St.; 8th ave. 
line to Central Bridge at 155th 
St., across Viaduct to Park at 
i6ist St.; 2d or 3d ave. L to i6ist 
St. and 3d ave.; i6ist st. cross- 
town line to Jerome ave. 

Morningside Heights — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west one 
block and take Amsterdam ave. 
car. 

New York Athletic Club, Grounds 
at Travers Island, Pelham 
Manor, N, Y.; clubhouse. No. 58 
West 59th St. — Grounds: Harlem 
Division of N. Y., N. H. & H. R. 
R. from 131st St. and Willis ave. 
Shuttle train from "L" station at 
129th St. and 2d or 3d aves., to 
Pelham Manor; 10 minutes' walk 
or bus to grounds. Mt. Ver- 
non line from 128th st. and 3d 
ave. to Mt. Vernon; transfer to 
Pelham Manor trolley to N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R. R. station in 
Pelham Manor; then bus or 10 
minutes' walk to grounds. 

Polo Grounds — 157th st. and 
Eighth ave.; 6th or 9th ave. "L" 
to 155th St. and 8th ave.; 2d or 
3d ave. "L" to 125th st., cross- 
town trolley to 125th st. and 8th 
ave. thence to Eighth ave. 
trolley to 157th st. and 8th 
ave.; 8th ave. line to 157th st. ; 
2d, 3d, Lexington, Madison or 
Lenox ave. lines to 125th st., 
thence to crosstown trolley to 
8th ave. line, north to 157th si. 
and 8th ave. 



TO RBACH-Continued 

Speedway — Sixth ave. "L" to 125111 
St., thence Fort George surfact 
car. 

Van Cortlandt Park— Sixth 0( 

Ninth ave. "L" to 155th sti 
thence N. Y. & Putnam R. l. 
from Grand Central Station (42; 
St.). Subway to Kingsbridge 
then surface car. 

Washington Bridge — Sixth avt' 
"L" to 125th St. and change t 
Fort George surface car; also bl 
Subw?- to i8ist St. station. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO 

The Only All Water Eoute to 

CONBY ISLAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 
Greatest Amusement Enterprise m tl 

World. 
TIME TABLE ( Subject to Change.) 
Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.0' 

9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.0> 

3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 
Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.0 

9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 W 

1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.1 

7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 
Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later ths 

at 22d St. 
Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Is 

and, ♦10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.1 

♦12.55. ^1.40, 2.55, 8.40, 4.25, ^5.2 

6.10, 7.10, ♦7.55, ^8.40, ♦9.25, ♦10.1 

10.45 P. M. 

Returning from Coney Island, trlj 
marked with a ♦ go to 129th St., Norn 
River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 
Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cent 



STEAMER TAURUS makes' trJi 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANK 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (Nev 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tack 
on board. Pare : — Gentlemen, 75c 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GR.\ND REPUBLIC f 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkei 
8.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.5 
A. M., *12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. I 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (nev 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M.. 2.30 P. M 
Rockaway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5.30 P. 1 

Trips marked * transfer to Steam 
Grand Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. ; Chlldre 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplecha 
Park at Rockaway. 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK 



lexander, 118 West 49th. 
;ables', 135 East 55th. 
ellevue, foot of East 26th. 
iieth Israel, Jefferson and Cherry, 
i'entral Islip State, Central Islip, L. I. 
Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
!'lty, Blackwell's Island, 
'olumbus, 226 East 20th. 
Imergency for Women, 223 East 26th. 
Ipileptic, Randall's Island, 
'ever, North Brother's Island, 
•'lower. East 63d, cor. Ave. A. 
i'ordham's Reception, Aqueduct ave. and 

St. James, 
'rench Benevolent Society, 450 W. 34th. 
ien. Memorial, 2 West 106th. 
ierman, 77th, Lex'n and Fourth aves. 
iouvemeur, Gouvemeur slip and Front, 
(race Church, 414 East 14th. 
[ahnemann. Park ave. and 67th. 
Tarlem, 533 East 120th. 
larlem Bye, Ear & Throat, 144 E. 127th. 
louse of Relief, 67 Hudson. 
Incurables', Blackwell's Island, 
nfants', Blackwell's Island. 
Italian, 169 West Houston, 
rewlsh for Deformities, 1917 Mad. ave. 
fewlsh Maternity, 272 East Broadway. 
jClng's Park State, King's Park, L. I. 
L-aura Franklin Free for Children, 17 
i^ East 111th. 

jiiCbanon, Westchester & Cauldwell aves. 
Uncoln, 141st, cor. Concord ave. 
;>ong Island State, Brooklyn. 
iOomls Sanitarium for Consumptives, 

184 West 49th. 
lanhattan Eye, Ear and Throat, 210 

East 64th. 
lanhattan Maternity, 327 East 60th. 
Manhattan State, Ward's Island ; OflBce, 

foot East 116th. 
larine, Office, Foot Whitehall. 
i;iatemlty of N. Y., Mothers' Home of 
f the Sisters of Miserlcorde, 531 East 
I 86th. 

■ilerchants' Marine, 78 Broad, 
ietropolitan, Blackwell's Island, 
.letropolitan Disp. & Hosp., 248 E. 82d. 
.Ietropolitan Throat, 351 West 34th. 
■lintum for Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, 

foot of East 16th. 
Monteflore Home for Chronic Invalids, 
'.' Broadway and West 138th. 
I Ijlothers' and Babies', 596 Lexington ave. 
\At. Morlah, 138 East 2d. 
kit. Slnal, Madison ave. and 100th. 
tfulvey'g Dog and Cat, 28 39 Broadway, 
^ew Amsterdam Eye & Ear, 230 W. 38thi" 



New York, 7 West 15th and 97 Hudson. 
N. Y. Canine Infirmary, 118 West 53d. 
N. Y. Children's, Randall's Island. 
N. Y. Eye and Ear, 218 Second ave. 
N. Y. Foundling, 175 East 68th. 
N. Y. Homeopathic, 63d and Ave. A. 
N. Y. Lymph Sanitarium, 165 West 39th. 
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for 

Women, 19 West 101st. 
N. Y. Ophthalmic, 201 East 23d. 
N. Y. Orthopaedic, 126 East 59th. 
N. Y. Polyclinic and School, 214 E. 34th. 
N. Y. Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
N. Y. Red Cross, 110 West 82d. 
N. Y. Sanitarium, 247 West 49th. 
N. Y. Skin and Cancer, 301 East 19th. 
N. Y. Throat, Nose & Lung, 229 E. 57th. 
N. Y. Veterinary, 117 W. 25th. 
Nursery and Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
Philanthropic, 2076 Fifth Ave. 
Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
Presbyterian, 41 East 70th. 
Rebeau Private, 156 West 74th. 
Red Cross, Central Park W. and 100th. 
Riverside, North Brother's Island. 
Riverside (Reception), foot of East 16th. 
Roosevelt, West 59th, near Ninth ave. 
Ruptured and Crippled, 135 East 42d. 
St. Andrew's Convalescent, 213 E. 17th. 
St. Ann's Maternity, 130 East 69th. 
St. Elizabeth's, 416 West 51st. 
St. Francis', 605 East 5th. 
St. Gregory, 93 Gold. 
St. John's Guild (office), 501 Fifth ave. 
St. Joseph's, East 143d and Brook ave. 
St. Lawrence, 163d & Edgecombe av. 
St. Luke's, Amsterdam ave. and 113th. 
St. Mark's, 117 Second ave. 
St. Mary's Free for Children, 405 West 

34th. 
St. Vincent's, 149 West 11th. 

Sanitarium for Hebrew Children (office), 

356 Second ave. 
Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, foot E. 16th 

Seton, Spuyten Duyvil. 

Sloane Maternity, W. 59th and Ams. ave. 

Society of the Lying-In, Second Ave. and 
17th. 

Sydenham, 339 East 116th. 

Trinity, 50 Varick. 

U. S. Marine (office), Battery. 

Washington Heights, 554 West 165th. 

Willard Parker, foot of East 16th. 

Woman's, 141 West 109th. 

Woman's Infirmary and Maternity Home, 
124 West 65th. 

Wright. J. Hood, Memorial, 503 W. 131st. 

Yorkville, 246 East 82d. 



as 



EXCLUSIVE BOARDING HOUSES OF NEW YOR, 



17 MADISON AVENUE 

Near 24th Street, opposite Park 
Single and Double Rooms. Transients 



69 MADISON AVENUE 

Rooms Single, Double and Ensuite. Tel. Exch. 
Southern Cookiny. Table Guests. References. 



104 and 106 MADISON AVE. 

Private Baths. Transients. Telephone. 

Strictly First Class 



165 MADISON AVENUE . 

Telephone Exchange. Transients. 

Large and Small Rooms. Private Baths. 



159 MADISON AVENUE 

Transients Accomodated. Telephone Connectioi 
Private Baths. Table Board 



51 TWENTY-NINTH ST. Eaa 

Transients. Table Guests 

Near 28th St. Subway. Tel. 2226 Madisa 



221 WEST 44th STREET 

Near Broadway. Transients Accomodate! 
Table Guests. Telephone 



67 West 46th STREET 



Single and Double Rooms 
Newly Furnished. Southern Cookfili 



Lost — a golden hour, set with sixty 
diamond minutes. There is no 
reward, for it is gone forever. — 
Beecher. 



"What I kept I lost, _»_ 

What I spent I had, 
What I gave I have." 

— Persian Proverb. 



Dodd, Mead & Co. 

FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 3Sth St. 



ALL THE LATEST BOOKS 
Stationery, Etc. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



SAILS 
1908 



NAME OP 
ITBAMER 



ADDRISIB8 OF LINIt 



•TARTINO rV 



6. 


Gib'r & Naples. . . 


. . Slavonla 


H 


Hamburg 




8 


Liverpool 


. . Etruria 


8. 


Antwerp 


. . Vaderland. . . 


8 


Southaiupton. . . 


. .St. Paul 


8 


London 


. Minnetouka. . 


11 


Bremen 


. . Ivronpriuz. . . 


11 


Rotterdam 


. . Rotterdam.. . 


12 


Liverpool 


. .Mauretania.. 


12 


(Southampton. . . 


. .Adriatic 


18 


Liverpool 


. . Cedric 


18 


Hamburg 


. . Bluecher 


18 


Bremen 


. . F. der Grosse. 


18 


Havre 


. Bretagne. . . . . 


15 


Hamburg 


. . Pretoria 


m 


Liverpool 


. .Umbria 


15 


Glb'r&Napl:-s. . 


. . Iv. Luise 


15 


Antwerp 


. . Finland 


15 


Soutliamplon. . . 


. .New York . . . 


15 


London 


. .Mesaba 


15 






18 


Bremen 


. . K. Wm. II 


18 


Rotterdam 


. N. Amsterdair 


19 


Liverpool 


. . Lucanla 


19 


.Southampton.. . 


. . Majestic 


20 


Liverpool 


. .Arabic 


20 


Hamburg 


. . Kaiserin 


20 


Bremen 


. . Kurfuerst. . . . 


20 


. Gib'r & Naples. . 


. .Pannonia. . . . 


20 


Copenhagen. . , . 


. . United States 


20 


. Havre 


. Lorraine 


22 


. Hamburg 


• . Waldersee. . . . 


22 


Liverpool 


. ."Caronia 



Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 
Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 
Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

American Line, 9 B'way 

Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 
N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

Holland Amer., 39 B'way 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

WJiite Star Line, 9 B'way 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 
N. German Llovd, 5 B'way. . . . 

Fi-ench Line, 19 -State St 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 
Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 
N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 

Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

American Line, 9 B'way 

Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 

Anchor Line, 17 B'way 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 

Holland-Amer., 39 B'way 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

White Star Line, 9 B'way 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 
N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 
Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 
Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way. 

French Line, 19 State St 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 
Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 



.Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft 1st St., Hobokei 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft Fulton St., N. f 
.Ft Fulton St., N. E 
.Ft Houston St., N.^ 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboker 
.Ft 5tb St., Hoboke. 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboke 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboker 

Ft Morton St., N. I 
.Ft 1st St.. Hoboke. 
.Ft JnneSt., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hobokeii 

Ft Fulton St., N.I 
.FtFrrlton St., N.I 
.Ft Houston St., N.' 
.Ft 24th St., N. R. 
• Ft 3a St., Hobokei 
.Ft 5in St., Hoboke 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St., N. K. 
.Pt 1st St., HobokL- 
.Ft 3d St., Hobokei 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft 17th St., Hobok 

Ft Morton St., N. 1 
.Ft 1st St.. Hoboke 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TRIPS TO NEARBY RESORTS 



The Abbey — Fort Washington ave. 
and West 198th st. By Subway to 
Dyckman st. (about 10 minutes' 
walk to Abbey) ; Elevated to 
145th St. and Eighth ave., trans- 
fer to Broadway car to 198th st. 
Trolley, take car to 145th st. and 
Amsterdam ave., transfer to 
Broadway car, to 198th st., then up 
the hill to the Abbey. 
Jergen Beach: Jamaica Bay — From 
Brooklyn Bridge, via Flatbush 
ave. From Williamsburg Bridge, 
via Nostrand ave. 
Jrighton Beach: Coney Island — 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L, Flatbush ave. 
and Smith st. trolley. From Wil- 
liamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries, via Nostrand ave. 
trolley. 
;^oney Island — Iron Steamboats, 
i foot Battery pi., West 22d st. and 
! West 129th St. From Brooklyn 
r>ridge, via Brighton Beach L, 
5th ave. L, Court st., Union st., 
.id ave., Vanderbilt ave., Smith 
St. trolley. 
jiotel Gramatan, Bronxville, N. Y. 
' — Grand Central Depot, 42d st., 
I'll Harlem Division, N. Y. C. 
1< R. 
;^ong Beach — Via L. I. R. R. from 
; East 34th St., and from Flatbush 
I ave., I3rooklyn. 

Manhattan Beach — From 34th st., 
, E. R., via L. I. R. R. From 
f South Ferry, via 39th st. ferry, 
and Manhattan Beach Line. 
\ From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
f Brighton Beach L. 



Millbrook Inn, Millbrook, Dutchess 
County, N, Y.— Grand Central 
Depot, 42d St., to Poughkeepsie. 

North Beach: Flushing Bay — From 
Williamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries. Grand st. line. East 
99th St. and East 134th st. fer- 
ries. 

Rockaway Beach — From Williams- 
burg Bridge, 42d street., 23d 
St., Grand st., Roosevelt st. 
via Broadway L to Manhattan 
Junction, thence via L. I. R. R. 
From East 34th st. to Long Isl- 
and City, thence L. I. R. R. 

Ulmer Park: On Gravesend Bay — 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 5th 
ave. and West End L, 3d ave. 
surface line. From 39th st.. 
South Ferry, via 86th st. line. 

West Point, Newburgh and Pough- 
keepsie — By Hudson River Day 
Line superb steamers leaving 
Desbrosses st. 8.40 a. m. and 9.40 
a. m., West 42d st. 9 a. m. and 10 
a. m.. West 129th st. 9.20 a. m. 
and 10.20 a. m., returning on 
either boat, reaching 42d st. 5.30 
p. m. or 8.30 p. m. Mary Powell 
2 pm. from West 42d st. ; return 
from West Point on Steamer 
"Albany," due 8.30 p. m. 

Woodmansten Inn, Westchester, 
N. Y. — Third ave. L to 177th St., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester Village; or by Sub- 
way to West Farms, 177th St., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester; or 3d ave. L. to 
129th St., then N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. to Westchester Station. 



$7,300. ^To 



WILL BUY YOU A BEAUTIFUL 
ME IN BROOKLYN 



Fine Residential District, wide asphalted street 

20 minutes from City Hall, Manhattan 

Brown stone house, 8 rooms, bath and store room 

All modern improvements, plenty of large closets 

Cabinet finish, in perfect repair 

Terms reasonable 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Teiephone 5860 
Franlclin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — ^Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O- & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpoint Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand anfli 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave.' 
College Point — From foot of Bast 99thi 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St.^ 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St.- 
From foot of West 23d Street to New-. 

ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14thl 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street toil 

Pa^ onia Avenue. ' 

Foot of Cortlandt Street to Bxchangei 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Piacc. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communi 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communi- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonla 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Eichangei 

Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island— 'Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivington, Ist, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th, 72d, 80th, 86th,: 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th. 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (charge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d. 59th, 67th, 76th,! 
84th. 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th,) 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gi.. Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
ISth, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th 140th, 145ith, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue— South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50tb, 59th. 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



Apthorpe Mansion — Formerly lo- 
cated at the corner of Ninth (or 
Columbus) ave. and 91st st. It 
was here where George Wash- 
ington remained during his evac- 
uation of New York, and after it 
wa^ occupied by Lord Howe. 

Barge Office— In Battery Tark. 
This was originally the landing 
place of cabin passengers from 
ocean steamers, and was for a 
time used as an emigrant station. 
Now occupied by customs in- 
spectors. 

Block House — Located in Central 
Park. Built by the Americans, 
but later improved and occupied 
by the English during the Revo- 
lution. 

Bowery — Located from Chatham 
Sqtu.re to junction of Third an.l 
Fourth avenues. In the early 
Dutch days this was a lane run- 
ning along the farms or "Bou- 
weries," on the northern outskirts 
of the city; from this the name 
was taken. On and near this 
thoroughfare the notorious dives 
of Owen Gagen and Harry Hill 
were located. 

Bread Line — Originated by Fleisch- 
mann, the celebrated baker, now 
deceased, who nightly, between 
the hours of 11 to 12, gives to 
hundreds of homeless men of 
this city the surplus breads. This 
custom, which was started during 
the life of the philanthropist, is 
still carried on. 

Carnegie Hall — 57th st. and Seventh 
ave. Founded by Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie. Cost over $1,250,000. 
Formal opening on May 5th, 
1891. One of the finest edifices 
in the world for concerts, lec- 
tures, conventions, etc. 

Cotton Exchange — Located in Han- 
over Square. This is a large 
building of )^ellow brick, with 
stone facings and it is estimated 
that it cost $1,000,000. Spot sales 
of more than five hundred thou- 
sand bales of cotton are made 
during the year. On this site, 



November 8th, 1725, the first 
newspaper was printed in New 
York, and called the "New York 
Gazette." Tablet: Cotton Ex- 
Exchange — ^ On this site Wil- 
liam Bradford, appointed public 
printer, April loth, A. D., 169.^, 
issued, November 8th, 1725, "The 
New York Gazette," the fir^ t 
newspaper printed in New York. 
Erected by the New York His- 
torical Society, April loth, A. D., 
1893, in commemoration of the 
two hundredth anniversary of the 
introduction of printing in New 
York. 

Governor's Island — Is situated in 
the Bay, about one thousand 
yards from the Battery; it covers 
an area of over sixty-five acres 
and is used by the United States 
Government as a military sta- 
tion. Fort Columbus is located 
near the centre of the island and 
Castle William, a circular fort of 
sandstone, built in the year 181 1, 
overlooks the Bay on the western 
side. From here the "sunset 
gun" is fired daily. 

Metropolitan Opera House — 
Broadway, between 39th and 
40th sts. In September, 1892, the 
interior was destroyed by fire, 
and rebuilt during the following 
year. Tablet: Broadway, be- 
tween Forty-third and Forty- 
fourth streets — General George 
Washington and General Israel 
Putnam met near this spot dur- 
ing the movement of the Ameri- 
can Army, September 15th, 1776, 
the day before the Battle of 
Harlem. 

Millionaires' Row — The district on 
Fifth ave. from 49th st., contain- 
ing many of the residences of 
well known millionaires: Fifth 
ave., 513 — Mr. O. H. P. Belmont. 
Fifth ave., 579 — Miss Helen M. 
Gould. Fifth ave., 634 — Mr. D. 
O. Mills. Fifth ave., 636— Mr. 
John R. Drexel. Fifth ave., 640 
—Mr. Geo. Vanderbilt. Fiftli 
ave., 660 — Mr. W. K. Vanderbilt. 
Fifth ave., 680 — Dr. Seward 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



Webb. Fifth ave., 68i— Mr. Levi 
P. Morton. Fifth ave., 689— Mr. 
Wm. Rockefeller. Fifth ave., 834 
■ — Mr. Frank Gould. Fifth ave., 
840 — INIr. Jno. Jacob Astor. Fifth 
ave., 842 — Mrs. Wm. Astor. 
Fifth ave. and 57th st. — Mrs. C. 
P. Huntington, i East 57th st. — 
Mrs. Herman. Oelrichs. 4 East 
54th St.— Mr. Jno. D. Rockefel- 
ler. 2 East 6ist St. — Commodore 
E. T. Gerry. 2 West 57th st.— 
Mr. H. P. 'Whitney, i East 66th 
St. — Mr. H. O. Havemeyer. Fifth 
ave and 67th st. — Mr. Geo. J. 
Gould. Fifth ave. and 68th st.— 
Mrs. W. Mizner. 22 East 72d st. 
—Mr. R. W. Goelet. Fifth ave. 
and 76th St.— Mr. W. A. Clarke. 
Fifth ave. and 90th st. — Mr. An- 
drew Carnegie. 219 Madison ave. 
Mr. J. Pierpont INIorgan. 

Morningside Park — Beginning a 
short distance from the north- 
west corner of Central Park at 
iioth St., and extends northward 
to 123d street; it contains about 
32 acres. 

National Academy of Design — Am- 
sterdam ave. and iioth st. 
Founded in 1826, and is consid- 
ered the foremost art institution 
in this country. Open to the 
public on Sundays, free. 

Post Office (General) — Located at 
the Junction of Broadway and 
Park Row. Open all hours of 
the day and night, week daj^s, 
and from 9 to 11 a. m. on Sun- 
days. Tablet: Post Office Build- 
ing — On the common of the City 
of New York, near where this 
building now stands, there stood, 
from 1766 to 1776, a liberty pole, 
erected to commemorate the re- 
peal of the stamp act; it was re- 
peatedly destroyed by the vio- 
lence of the Tories, and as re- 
jicatedly replaced by the Sons of 
Liberty, who organized a con- 
stant watch and guard. In its 
defence the first martyr blood of 
the American Revolution was 
shed, on January i8th, 1770.- — 
A. D., 1897, erected by the Mary 



Washington Colonial Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Re\- 
oh'.ticn. 

Residence of Charles M. Schwab- 
Riverside Drive and 73d st. This 
is said to be the handsomest and 
costliest residence in this, coun- 
try; the material used in con- 
struction was imported from 
Germany and other foreign coun- 
tries. The estimated cost of the 
building, furnishings and prop- 
erty is estimated at about eight 
millions. It is said that at the 
death of Mr. and Mrs. Schwai) 
this property will revert to this 
city to be used as a museum. 

St. Mark's Chui-ch — Located at 
Second ave. and Tenth st. One 
of the oldest churches in this 
city; its site was formerly a part 
of the farm of Petrus Stuyve- 
sant, the last Dutch Governor of 
New Amsterdam, whose remains 
rest in a tomb under the edifice. 
The present church is the sec- 
ond, the first having been erected 
in 1826. It was from the grave- 
yard surrounding this church the 
body of A. T. Stewart, the mer- 
chant prince, was stolen, over 
twenty years ago. Tablet, St. 
Mark's Church: In this vault lies 
buried Petrus Stuyvesant, late 
Captain General and Governor- 
in-Chief of Amsterdam, in New 
Netherland, now called New 
York and the Dutch West India 
Islands. Died in A. D., 1672. 
Aged 80. 



A woman who is guided by the 
head and not by the heart is a so- 
cial pestilence.- — Balzac. 



To say "every one is talking 
about him" is an eulogy; but to 
say "Every one is talking about 
her" is an elegy. — Anonymous. 



The pleasure of talking is the 
inextinguishable passion of women, 
coeval with the act of breathing. — 
Lesage. 



30 



MENNEN'S 

BORATED TALCUM 

TOILET POWDER 




Bhe Box 
tKoctlox 



Patience and Mennen's" 

do wonders for the skin and com- 
plexion of those who lead an outdoor 
') life- The continued daily use of 

MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER 

will improve a poor complexion and 

- T,.- -^^^ - Pi'eserve a prood one. For vacation 

^■■J''' days Mennen's is a necessity and a 

'/[ 1 f^omfort. It prevents and relieves 

:!aw *^ Chafing, Sunburn and 

\««f- jB r^" Prickly Heat. After shav- 

nwimm./ j^^g ^^^^ after bathing it is 

delightful. In the nursery it 
is indispensable. 

For your protection the genuine 
is put up in non-refillable boxes — 
the "Box that Lox," with Mennen's 
face on top. Guaranteed under the 
Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906. 
Serial No. 1542. Sold everywhere, 
or by mail 25 cents. Sample Free. 

Gerhard Mennen Co., Newarfc, N. J. 

Try Mennen's Violet ( Borated ) 
Talcum Toilet Powder — It has the 
scent of Fresh-cut Parma Violets. 
Sample Free. 

Mennen's Sen Vans Toilet Powder, Oriental Odor 
Mennen's Borated Skin Soap [blue wrapper] 

Speciiilly prepared for tJie nursery. No Samples. 

Sent free, for a 2-cent stamp to pay post- 
age, one set Mennen's Bridge Whist Tal- 
lies, enough for six tables. 



Henry B. Harris' *""5 « '»"8 

ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

AT THE LIBERTY THEATRE 4^nd street, west of Broadway 
=^========:=^===^=^=== Telephone Bryant 27 

MONDAY, AUGUST 10th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

A full line of plain and fancy laughs in 

''The Traveling Salesman" 

By JAMES FORBES, the man who wrote "THE CHORUS LADY' 



AT THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC 14th street and Irving Place 

• Telephone, Stuyvesant 701 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13th 

Henry B. Harris will present 
(in conjuction with Maurice Campbell) 

Henrietta Grosman 

In A REPERTOIRE OF HER MOST SUCCESSFUL PLAYS 



AT THE HUDSON THEATRE 44th street, East of Broadway 
^^^^^^=^==^^^^===^==^^=^:=^=i= Telephone, Bryant 680 

MONDAY, AUGUST 24th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

Robert Edeson 

in 

''THE GALL OF THE NORTH" 

Bv GEORGE BROADHURST Founded on Stewart Edward White's ■'Conjuioi's House' 

AT THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE 23d street and 8th Avenue 
^==^^^^=:^=^^^^^^=^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Telephone, Chelsea 600 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

Rose Stahl 

'"coret'wsr' "THE CHORUS LADY" 

By JAMES FORBES 



WEEK, AUGUST 17 TO AUGUST 23, 1908 



Bail? Attractions 



m 



jOteto gorb 




Cotyright loob, B. L. Clarke 



TAXAMETER GABS 

STANDS: Sherry's; Cafe Martin; Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R. R Foot Fast 3-4th 
Street ; Central R. R. of N. J., Foot West 23rd Street 

TELEPHONE 2380 COLUMBUS 

One central Exchange connects all taxameter cab stands; on receipt of call the nearest available 

cab is promptly dispatched 
Reduced Summer Rates now in effect NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

Tantt folder mailed on request. Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 



VOL. 10 



$2.00 A YEAR 



5 CENTS A COPY 



'nbvrimWi rnnX hu n/»'l< 



NO. 125 



V L T.. 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTELS 



Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON. Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES, Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 

The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 


Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP, Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 


Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON, M<r. 
18-20 West 25th Street 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman'a Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 

Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Garden 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE, Mgr. 
Slst Street and Columbus Avenue 


The Plaza 

FRED STERRY, Managing Director 

Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 

Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL, Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED ft HARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 

Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK, Mgr. 
15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 

Hotel Savoy 

Herman H. Ries, John F. Ries, Managers 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. 


Hotel Gotham 

S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Holland House 

Fifth Avenue and 30th Street 


Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN. Prop. 
Broadway and 42d Street 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD. Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just ofiF Broadway 


Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY, Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East 



PaHLY ATnRACTfl©]M; 



qA Weekly H/ViagAzine T>eK>otea to c/taijAnce JnformAtion. 



Vol. X 



AUGUST 1 7th to AUGUST 23d, 1908 



No. 125 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (^Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue; 
E. ,R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Mtdiion Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractioni circulatei through all the 
leading Hotels in New York City 
ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT l» NOT FOR SALE ON NEW S STANDS 

Fire Centi a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Adrertiiing ratei bated on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 



CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Automobile Trips to Nearby Points 25 

Banks and Trust Companies 14 

Churches 12-13 

Did You Know in the Year 1S65 27 

Elevated Railroads 22 

. Ferries 22 

Hotels 2 

Hudson River Day Line 20 28 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 25 

" Liars " (Haryot Holt Dey) 4 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 23 

Points of Interest 29-30 

Pullman Accomodations 22 

Railroad Stations 22 

" Short Talks" (Mme. Roberta) 11 

Staten Island Trolley Trips 28 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter Information 26 

Transfer Information 24 

Theaters 19-21 

The Marble Collegiate Church 15 

"The Traveling Salesman " at the Liberty 23 

This Week in New York 5-10 

Where Daily Attractions Circulates iS 



ART NOTES 

Metropolitan Museum of Art — 

8_'<1 St. and Fifth avc. Open ev- 
ery week day from 10 a. ni. to 
6 p. m. Saturday, from 10 a. m. 
t(i 10 p. m.; Sunday from i to 
5 p. m. Free, except on Monday 
and Friday, when a fee of 25 
cents is charged. Van Cortlandt 
House — Van Cortlandt Park, 
Fxliihition of a collection of 
Colonial Bookplates. Free ex- 
cept Thursdays, when a fee of 25 
cents is charged (to Nov. i). 
Astor Library — 425 Lafayette st., 
l'",\liihition of interesting matter, 
constantly changijig. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Tclepbonei 6500 Maditon 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Roomi from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In eaiy acceu of all the principal tbeatrei 

Subway Station, 18th Street, within one block 

zgth Street cars pass the door 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



LIARS 



President Roosevelt's Liars' Club 
is increasing in numbers. 

A president who can make trulb 
and honesty the fashion will go 
down in history in a companion 
locket with the Father of our Coun- 
try. We have outgrown the cherry 
tree episode and we need a new dem- 
onstration. 

We are such a flippant generation 
that we almost sit up and take no- 
tice when a man is called a liar in 
public, and is impaled by the press 
to be peered at and examined as if 
he were some poor miserable degen- 
erate, or a new kind of bug. 

Tt lias not been our habit to notice 
trifles like lies, and we Iiave need 
to be reminded that truth is a key- 
stone, and that wlien the keystone 
is out of line, structures fall in pieces 
about somebody's ears. 

So we have somehow gained the 
impression that we must get used to 
liars, meet them placidly on their 
own unstable ground, their quaking 
bog, and since we are very busy our- 
selves we must forget all about their 
vagaries, and turn our attention to 
other and more important matters. 
Then along comes the President to 
assure us that a lie is not an unim- 
portant matter — and thus set us right 
again just as we are about to turn 
our backs on the tfiings we learned 
at our mother's knee. 

The difficulty and disadvantage 
about your attitude toward liars is 
that by tlie time you get used to 
them vou are a changed person yotn-- 
self. You are either a pessimist or 
a philosopher. The pessimist sus- 
pects everybody of lying and is sore 
about it. While tiie philosopher is 
unmoved by any intelligence wliat- 
ever, and whether it is true or false 



it is all one to him. This latter 
frame of mind which is at once un- 
Innried and non-expectant is the de- 
velopment of years, and liars have 
contributed largely to it. It en- 
ables you to be smilingly quiescent 
of the adage that children and fools 
speak the truth. 

The best liars are said to believe 
their own lies. They like their own 
lies, and tell then when the truth 
would serve their purpose better, Init 
being subjects of a moral strabismus 
that distorts ethical perspective, they 
finally are blinded to truth so that 
tliey do not recognize it when they 
meet it. b'act or fancy it's all one to 
tliem. 

In addition to the fact that a presi- 
dent of these United States has al- 
most made honesty the fashion, we 
also have honor turning no in a col- 
lege curriculum, and stories about it 
are printed in the daily papers. The 
facts may not be talked about such 
a great deal, but a good many people 
are thinking it over. 

The fate of Ananias and Sapphira, 
who were struck dead for lying, is 
one of the scandals of sacred his- 
tory. If all the liars to-day should 
meet with a similar experience — 
what a sight ! What a battlefield of 
the slain ! 

Harvot Holt Dev. 



Women swallow at one mouthful 
the lie that flatters, and drink drop 
by drop a truth that is bitter. — 
Diderot. 



There is nothing a man of good 
sense dreads in a wife so much as 
her having more sense than him- 
self. — Fielding. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ I 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 







* ^«Oo, bT 



This Week in New York 

Monday, August 17th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"The Traveling Salesman." (he latest snecess presented b}' Henry 
B. Harris, is now plaj'ing at the Liberty Theater. You can 'p'lonc for 
seats — Bryant 27. Every evening, at 8.15. 

Public Concert — Corlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts. and East River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth ave., Wav- 
crly and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Cleveland, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, Bible Convention, 
leader, the Rev. James INI. Gray, President ]\Ioody Bible Training School, 
Chicago, 111. (to Aug. 30th, inclusive). 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

You can 'phone for a "Taxameter" cab to 2380 Columbus, and have 
no fear of not enjoying your ride; they are allowed in the parks, they 
are clean and smokeless. Ahvaj-s take the Green Taxicab. 'Phone as 
above; your order will be transferred to their nearest cab stand without 
trouble or cost to you. Best service and lowest rates. Try one! 

I'Vec Swimming Classes have been organized by the United, States 
Volunteer Life Saving Corps at each of the free floating and interior 
public baths. Instruction in swimming and rescue work is given free 




HE-RBO-NERVO TONIC 

CONFECTION AND SODA DRINK 

llf'ULMiiairs, Kikei's, CaswelKV Massey, Ranisiiill \ Ci.. 
R. H. Macy and all drug counters. Conft-ction at 
Park & Tilfords and all first-class dealers. 

^MANl-hACTURED BY 

MRS. BLANCHE E. THOMAS 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WKE:K — Continued 

to all men, women and children who apply. The night schools now in 
session are: 'West 51st st.; Battery; Pier No. i^, East River; Corlcars 
St.; East Fifth st. ; East 112th st. ; Manhattan and Conover and North 
First St., Brooklyn. 

You can subscribe to Daily Attractions in New York for three 
months for fifty cents; it is not for sale on news stands. Send to this 
office, I Madison ave., and get the habit of knowing. Subscribe now. 

Horse Racing — Saratoga Racing Association; Saratoga, N. Y. (to 
Aug. 22). 

Horse Racing — Grand Trotting Circuit; Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (to 
Aug. 22). 

Horse Racing — Empire City Racing Association; Yonkers, N. Y. 
(to Aug. 18). 

Motor Boat — Annual motur boat cruise of the American Power Boat 
Association; New York to the Thousand Islands (to Aug. 19). 



Tuesday, August i8th 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Polo — 'Polo tournament; Westchester Polo Club; Newport, R. 1. 
(to Aug. 22). 

Polo — Polo tournament; Saratoga Polo Club. 

Horse Show — Annual Exhibition of the Bar Harbor Horse Show 
Association; Bar Harbor. 

Public Concert — Mount Morris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris aves . 
1 20th to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Detroit, .at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Washington Square to goth 
St. on Fifth ave. have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to 57th st., thence over 
lo Broadway, up Broadway to 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be distinguished, 



D E MEDICI 

= N E W = 

GOLGREAM 



Large Jan, $1.00 
Smaller Jan, SO Cents 



^ Potietied of rare qualitiei and many valuable propertlea 
not generally found among toilet artlcle>,beiidea Iti unique 
effect ai a fint-claii 

SKIN FOOD 

used in maiiage for producing and preierving a Rat, healthy 
complexion, placei tbii rare " Novelty " among other 
emollient* lecend to none in eitber Europe or America. 

M.B.De MEDICI . 124W.21itSt.,NawTork 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEBK — Continued 

by day a red ball, by night a red liRht on the front of the cars. The fare 
in each instance, either way, i> lo cents i)er person. 

Wednesday, August 19th 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Second Church of Christ. ScieiUi>l, Central Park West at 68th st.; 
Wednesday evening meeting. S p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, 29th st. and Fifth ave., the Rev. 
David James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; Wednesday evening meet- 
ing. 8 p. m. A welcome to all strangers. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st St., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D.. minister; Wednesday evening meeting in the 
Parish House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for you. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles E. Jefferson, D. D., EL. D.. pastor; Wednesday evening Praise 
and Prayer Service. 8 p. m. You will be cordially welcomed. 

Public Concert— Mulberry Bend Park, Mulberry to Baxter sts , and 
Bayard to Park sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Abingdon St|uare Park, Eighth ave. and TTudson st. 
8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Detroit, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Thursday^ August 20th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Golf — Open tournament; Essex Country Club. 

Golf — Annual tournament; Deal (N. J.) Golf Club. 

Public Concert— East River Park. 84th to 89th sts., facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — ^Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton sts., and 
Pitt to Sherifif sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth to Ahidison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Detroit, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 



PAUL L. BRYANT 

DYEING AND CLEANSING Gowns Cleaned In Twenty-Fonr Hoor* 

308 FOURTH AVENUE 868 BROADWAY 

TBL. 4508 QRAMERCY TEL. 4755 QRAMBRCY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

The Singer tower is now open to the public, and the observation 
balcony at No. 149 Broadway offers the visitor to this city an oppor- 
tunity to see New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. 
The balcony is on the forty-second floor, 548 feet above the curb, anil 
gives a sight-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The 
tower has a i)latform with a high railing which accommodates about 
forty people. K.xpress elevators run from the main corridor on the first 
floor, making the tv\]) in one minute. There are also guides stationed on 
the platfom I0 point out the different points of interest to visitors and 
to give other information. A fee i.-f 50 cents is charged. 

Friday, August 21st 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Did you know that Henrietta Crosman was now playing at the 
Academ\' of Music, Tr\ing place and 14th St.? Better go, 3'ou will 
enjoy it. 

Public Concert— Hudson Park, f.eroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 
8 ]). m. 

Public Concert — Battery Park, foot of Broadway, overlooking the 
harbor. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Wm. Id. Seward Park, ITcster to Division sts. and 
Norfolk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. St. Louis, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Our Bureau of Liformation is open to you without cost. "Phone us, 
159 Gramercy, what you want to know or where you want to go. Ls it a 
trolley tri])? Ask us; we will publish it in the following issue. Get 
the habit of knowing we want to helj) you out. Try "Father Knicker- 
bocker"; he knows. 

We desire to call attentiou to the e.xcellent service of the lludsdU 
River Day Line as far as Poughkeeixsie. Their second boat, wliicii 
leaves Desbrosses st. at 9.50, I'ortj'-second st. at 10, and ijgth st. at 
10.25 'I- ni., remains in Poughkeepsie one hour and thirty-tive minutes, 
allowing time to take a trolley ride, see Vassar College, etc., and return 
to New York in the early evening. By taking this second beat to West 
Point, return may be made either by first or second boat, giving, 
respectively, one hour and fifty minutes or four hours and forty-five 



FOWLER & WELLS COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1635 



PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 

PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, EST. 1838 10c. , $1.00 pep YEAR 

24 EAST 22d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



a 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WE:e:K — Continued 

minutes. Or return may he made from Ncwburg, allowing', respeetively, 
half an hour and three hours and twenty minutes. Eaeh steamer has its 
own orchestra. 

Saturday, August 2 2d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Long distance swimming race: Miss Ehiine Golding, of I^ath Beach; 
Miss .Annette Kellcrman. of Australia; Mrs. C. I^. Brown, of Chicago. 
The race will start at Irvingtcn and finish at Piermont, a distance of 
three miles. Afternoon. 

Daily Attractions in New York is jjublished every Saturday; you 
can subscribe to it for three months for fifty cents. The only magazine 
that gives advance information. Subscribe now; you will be pleased. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the ?\Iall, main entrances 5gth st. 
Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Morningside Park, between Morningside and Col- 
umbia aves. and West iioth to 123d sts. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — De Witt Clinton Park. 52d to S4th sts., nth ave. to 
Hudson River. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. St. Louis, a*, the .\nieriean 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 3.30 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Marine and 
Field Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing .\ssociation of Long Island Sound: Stam- 
ford Annual. 

A group of four large l)ells will be placed in the forty-si.xth story 
of the tower of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Building, which building 
covers from Madison to Fourth ave., and from 23d to 24th st. The 
group consists of four large bells, the largest will weigh 7.000 pounds 
and the smallest 1,500, and are said to be the largest bells ever assem- 



GASHERIE DE WITT 
PROPRIETOR 



THE EARLINGTON 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continued 

bled in a j^roiip; they will strike the quarter of each hour in chimes, and 
it is said may be heard at a great distance. 



Sunday, August 23d 



MISCELLANEOUS 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D. D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 p. m.; the Rev. 
J. Stuart Holden, rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square. London, 
will preach. The full choir will be present. All seats are free. A 
welcome for all. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. 
l^avid James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. ni. and 
iS 1). m. A cordial welcome for everyone. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist. Central Park West, at 68th st.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th st., the Rev. D. Asa 
Blackburn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers will be 
welcome. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefferson, D. D., LL. D.. jjastor; services. 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the 
Rev. Edward Lcux, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish 
House, 30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 551)1 st., the Rev. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., LI^. D., minister; services. 11 a. ni. and 4 p. m. 
Rev. Hugh Black, D. D., Professor in Union Theological Seminary, and 
formerly of Edinburgh, will preach in the morning and afternoon. You 
are cordially invited. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall; main entrances, 59th st., 
l-'ifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 



Dk. j. T. WHELAN 

CHIROPODIST 
All Instruments Sterilized 



M. S. WILSON 

ELECTRO-VIBRATORY 
FACIAL MASSAGE 

MANICURING 



McGUTCHEON BUILDING 

Suite 707 

347 FIFTH AVENUE, near 34th street 

NEW YORK 

TELEPHONE: 6192 MADISON SQUARE 



10 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT 

Stripes in worsted, cheviots and 
wash goods for street wear has 
been the vogue tliis season; it is 
the natural result the fashionable 
dressmakers are taking up, checks 
for the fall. These will be found 
in two-color efifects, black always 
the foundation. 

Fashion points most decidedly 
to the use of satin for dressy wear. 
As this has been worn by the ultra 
fashionables the past year it is safe 
to say it will be the vogue this 
fall and winter. The dressmakers 
give preference to the thirty-six 
inch width, as it cuts to much bet- 
ter advantage. 

The use of border materials is 
by no means over. They will be 
found in the fall and winter impor- 
tations of sheer and heavy dress 
materials for reception or street 
wear. 

Persian designs will be the nov- 
elty in silks, and will be used for 
the separate waist. 

l"or neckwear the vogue for 
bows and jabots shows no sign of 
waning, as they are made of real 
Jrish lace and are quite expensive, 
selling for $2.50 and $3, may be the 
reason, as every woman with half 
a look can tell the insignificant bit 
of lace costs money, which gives 
to the wearer such a comfortable 
sensation. 

The dry goods shops are show- 
ing beautiful designs in table cov- 
ers, center-pieces and doilies. The 
designs are either floral or conven- 
tional; where the coronation em- 
broidery is used the outer edge is 
finished with embroidered scallops. 
Whilst the colored embroidery 
gives a beautiful effect it is apt to 
lose its color when laundered, 
therefore the all-white is more eco- 
nomical. 

Decorative pieces trimmed with 
• cluny lace and insertions will be 
popular this fall. 

A late design in the college or 
draw-string bag is the covering of 
both outer sides with woven tapes- 
try of an antique pattern, the ends 
and bottom of leather. 

The material that will be used 



TALKS 

for gowns this fall will be silk, as 
it is more adaptable for the soft, 
clinging directoire gown, whi^ch 
fashion has decreed is to be the 
model. 

For color the first favorite will 
be green. The new canard (duck's 
neck) shade is a cross between a 
green and blue; by some it might 
be considered a peacock, though by 
comparison the difference is readily 
seen. 

Blues and browns are staple and 
are always popular, the old stand- 
by, navy, and almost as well known 
Copenhagen, with the gendarme, or 
French military blue (which might 
be described as royal with a slatish 
tendency), will be generally worn. 

Black is always good form, and 
this fall will have something quite 
new in the guimpe and sleeves of 
black tulle. As there is an objec- 
tion by some to the entire black 
guimpe, they will be embellished 
with white. 

Smoke gray and taupe has been 
very much in evidence in Paris 
this past season, so it is safe to say 
it will be worn this winter. Gray 
was much used in millinery — never 
light gray — but London smoke and 
the tone known as taupe (mole). 

Plumes in these shades of gray 
will be worn on hats of all colors. 
Black hats with dark gray plumes 
are very stylish. The effect of gray 
is carried cut in the gray veil and 
further emphasized by the use of 
the dark gray suede shoe and the 
black shoe with gray upper. 

There is no question but the 
girdle or sash will be universally 
worn this coming season. There 
are several different styles; we 
mention the folded or gathered gir- 
dle, about three and a half inches 
wide, fastened at one side with a 
flat rosette and hanging, fringed 
ends about twelve or eighteen 
inches in length. Another is rather 
of the sash order, after passing once 
'round the waist are crossed over 
and loosely knotted, falling over 
the front, back or side of the 
skirt. 

Madame Roberta. 







' ^ooa, BIT 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirty-First Street 

Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, August 16th 

Service* II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL, 9.45 a. m. 
No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



Jl IVelcotne for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



g'erottJi (Eliurrli af CHlirlflt, l^rlentiat ''T^'/suel^''" 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. ni. 



Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



COLLEGIATE 



1628 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA J908 

The Marble Collegiate Ghurcli 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 

Kev. ALFRED K. MYERS, will preach 
Sunday, August 16th, 1908 

II a. m. Subject: "Thy Will be Done" 

S p. m. Subject : "The Call for Men" 

Midweek Meeting, Wednesday Evening, at 8 o'clock 

This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

KEW VORK CHURCHES— €ontlnned 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

^aint iBartholomew's Qlhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 



Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 

♦ 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher August 16th 

THE REV. J. STUART HOLDEN, 

Rector of St Paul's Church, Portman Square, London 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 



®rtntti| Parialt 

Rev. WILLIAM T. MANNING, D. D., Rector 
Sunday Services 

TRINITY CHURCH, Broadway and Wal ST. AU( lU.STINE'S CHAPEL, Houston 

St.. 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. St , east of Bowery. 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. 



ST. PAUL'S CHAPEL, Broadway and Fiil- 



and -i P. M. 



ton St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 7.3J ST. AflNES'S CHAPEL, 92d St., west of 
p. M. Cohimbus Ave., 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, Varick, near T.ii'^fic /uaht^i tr j o. 

l.aight St., 7.30 and 10.30 A.M. and 8 ^l: ^'^'b^ ^ ^,"-^^^;^'o,P"f^°?, '^••' '^''P; 

ij vf (.rove St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 

P. M. 

TRINITY CHAPEL, 25tli St., near Broad- INTERCESSION CHAPEL, Broadway and 

way, 8 and 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. isgth St., 8 and 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

ST. CHRYSOSTOM'S CHAPEL, 7th Ave. ST CORNELIUS'S, Governor's Inland, 8 

and 39tli St.. 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 8 P.M. A. M. and 11.45 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 

CONGREGATIONAL_ 

CFFEKSUN, D.D.. LL.D.. i'astor 
Sunday : Public Worship, ii a. ni., 8 p. m. Bible School, g.45 a. m., 2.45 p. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E., 7 p.m. IVednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 

INDEPENDENT 



CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 

Sunday Services, 1 1 A. !M. and 7.43 P. IVl. Strangers in the City Weioome 



PRESBYTERIAN 



iFtftll AnrnUe JlrflibytPnmt (!lI)Urrl| tifth Avenue and 55th street 

SEKVU'ES AUGCSr liltli: 11 a in i.n.l 4 p.iij. YOU AUE CORDIALLY INVITED 

Kiv. l.EN G. liUOl (Uri'oN. I). 1).. till' will kuiiwu Soutlii-rii pastor, author auJ evangelist, 

ivill preacli Ijotli iu the inoruii.g ami uftiTiu>oii 

n 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES OF NEW YORK 



American Savings Bank, 115 W. 4"_'cl 

Astor Trust Co., 380 Fifth av 

Banl£ for Savings, 280 Fourth av 

Banli of America, The, 44 Wall 

Bank of Manhattan Co., 40 Wall 

Bank of New York, 48 Wall 

Bank of the Metropolis, 31 Union Sq 

Bankers' Trust Co., 7 Wall 

Cai-negie Trust Co., 115 B'way 

Central Trust Co. of New York, 54 Wall 

Century Bank, Fifth av, at 20th 

Branch, B'way and 104th 
Chase National Bank, 83 Cedar 
Chatham National Bank, The, 192 B'way 
Chemical National Bank, 270 B'wav 
Coal & Iron Nat Bk of N Y, 143 Liberty 
Colonial Bank, The, Columbus av & 81st 
Branch, 1900 B'way 
Branch, 606 Columbus av 
Branch, 917 Columbus av 
Branch, B'way & 103d 
Branch, B'way & 78th 
Branch, St. Nicholas av & 116th 
Columbia Bank, Fifth av & 42d 
Consolidated National Bank, 56 B'way 
Corn Exchange Bank, 13 William 

Astor Place Brch, Astor & Lafayette pi 
B'way Branch, B'way & Spring 
East Side Branch, Norfolk & Orand 
Eleventh Ward Brch. Ave D & 10th 
Fifth Ave Branch, Fifth av & 19th 
Forty-second St Branch, 303 W 42d 
Grand Central Branch, 7 E 42d 
Harlem Branch, 101 W. 125th 
Hudson River Brch., Col'bus av & 72d 
Twent.v-eighth St Brch. B'way & 2Stli 
Union Square Branch, 34 Union Sq 
University Branch, 2902 B'way 
Washington Hgts Br, Amsterdam av & 
143d 
Dry Dock Savings Inst, 341 Bowery 
East River National Bank, 680 B'way 
Emigrant Industl Svgs Bk, 51 Chambers 
Empire Trust Co, 42 B'wav 

Branch 05ice, 487 Fifth av 
Equitable Trust Co of N Y, 15 Nassau 
Excelsior Savings Bank, 6th av & 23d 
Farmers' Loan & Trust Co, 22 William 

Brancii, 475 Fifth av 
Fifth Ave Bank of N Y, 530 Fifth av 
Fifth Ave Trust Co, 514 Fifth av 
Fifth National Bank, 300 Third av 
First National Bank of N Y, 2 Wall 
Fourteenth Street Bank, 3 E 14th 

Branch, 345 Grand 
Fourth National Bank, 14 Nassau 
Gallatin National Bank. 36 Wall 
Gansevoort Bank. 354 W 14th 
Garfield National Bank. 73 W 23d 
Germania Bk City of N Y, 190 Bowerv 
First Ave Branch, First av & 77th 
Bronx Branch, Third av & 155th 
Greenwich Bank, 402 Hudson 
William St Branch, 135 William 
B'way Branch, 1440 B'way 
B'way Branch, 874 B'way 
W B'way Branch, 260 W B'way 
Greenwich Savings Bank, 246 Sixth av 
Hamilton Bank of N Y City, 215 W 
125th 
412 E 138th 

Seventh Ave Brch, 2301 Seventh av 
Hanover National Bank, IMne «& Nassau 



Hudson Trust Co, 147 W 42d 
Imptrs' & Traders' Nat Bank, 303 B'way 
Interboro Bank, 49 Wall 
Knickerbicker Trust Co, 06 B'way 
Knickerbocker Trust Co, 358 Fifth av 
Liberty National Bank, 139 B'way 
Lincoln National Bank, 32 E 42d 
Lincoln Trust Co, 208 Fifth av 
Downtown Office, 413 B'way 
Uptown Office, B'way & 72d 
Manhattan Trust Co, 20 Wall 
Market & Fulton National Bank of N Y, 

81 Fulton 
Mechanics' National Bank, S3 Wall 
Mechanics' & Traders' Bank, 505 B'way 
Branch, B'way & 40th 
Branch, 033 Madison av 
Branch, Astor Theatre Bldg 
Mercantile National Bank, 195 B'way 
Merchants' Exchange Nat Bk, 257 B'vvay 
Merchants' National Bank, 42 Wall 
Metropolitan Bank, Fourth av & 23d 
Maiden Lane Branch, 100 William 
Shoo Leather Branch, 271 B'way 
Metropolitan Trust Co, 49 Wall 
Morton Trust Co, 38 Nassau 
Mount Morris Bank, 85 E 125th 
Mutual Bank, The, 1282 B'way 
Nassau Bank, Beekman & Nassau 
Nat Bank of Commerce N Y, 31 Nassau 
National Bank of N America, 43 Ex pi 
National Butchers & Drov Bk, 083 B'wav 
National City Bank, The, 52 Wall 
National Copper Bank, 115 B'way 
National Park Bank, 214 B'way 
New Amsterdam Nat Bk, B'way & 39th 
N Y Clearing House, 77 Cedar 
N Y County Nat Bank, 79 Eighth av 
N Y Produce Exchange Bank, 10 B'way 
Central Park Branch, 919 Seventh av 
Broadway Branch, B'way & 86th 
Columbus Ave Brch, 93d & Col'bus av 
Harlem Mkt Branch, 2001 First av 
Harlem Branch, 3d av & 110th 
Madison Ave Branch, 051 Madison av 
Branch, Amsterdam av & Manhattan 
N Y Trust Co, 20 Broad 
Night & Day Bank, Fifth av & 44th 
Oriental Bank, The, 182 B'way 
Oriental Bank, 122 Bowery 
Pacific Bank, 470 B'way 
People's Bank, 395 Canal 
I'henix National Bank, 35 Nassau 
Plaza Bank, The, 753 Fifth av 
St Nicholas Bank, 54 Wall 
Seaboard National Bank, 18 B'way 
Second National Bank. 190 Fifth av 
Trust Co of Am, 1.35 B'way 
Branch, 30 Wall 
Colonial Brch, 222 B'way 
Union Dime Savings Inst, B'way & .■52d 
Union Exchange Bank, 160 Fifth av 
Union Trust Co, 20 B'way 

Branch, 425 Fifth av 
U S Exchange Bank, 23 W 125th 
U S Mortgage & Trust Co, 55 Cedar 
West End Office, B'wav & 73d 
125th St Br. Eighth av & 125th 
U S Trust Co of N Y, 45 Wall 
Van Norden Trust Co. 780 Fifth av 
West Side Bank. 4S5 Eighth av 
Windsor Trust Co., Fifth av .& 47th, 
65 Cedar 




DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NEW YORK'S HISTORIC CHURCH 

First School iMniiulcd in 1633 by 
the Dutcli Churcli, witli Adam 
Roelantscn as the first scliool- 
master, is now the Collegiate 
School at 77th St. and West End 
ave.. and is tlie oldc: t educa- 
tional institution in America. 

First Church Organ used in New- 
York was one presented to the 
Consistory of the Dutch Church 
by Governor Burnet in 1720. 

First Sanctuary erected on Man- 
hattan Island exclusively for 
worship was a wooden edifice 
built in 1633 on the site now 39 
Pearl st. This in turn was fol- 
lowed by a stone structure, built 
within the ramparts in 1642, 
known as "The Church in the 
Fort." 

Tenth Building in this historic 
series of sanctuaries is the Mar- 
ble Collegiate Church, at Fifth 
Avenue and Twenty-ninth st. It 
is built of Hastings marble in 
Romanesque style. Its massive 
clock and bell tower terminates 
in a spire 215 feet high, sur- 
mounted by a gilded weathercock 
bli feet high, after the manner 
of the early Dutch churches. 

First Pastor for Strangers. — This 
church was the first in New York 
to provide the services of a ras- 
tor especially for strangers. The 
Rev. John S. Allen, D. D.. is the 
]. resent Pastor for Stranger;'. 

Rev. David James Burrell, D. D., 
LL. D., has been the pastor of 
this church for the past sixteen 
years, during which time his 
practical and attractive preach- 
ing of the gospel has made the 
Marble Collegiate Church the 
"City Temple" of New York. 



THE MARBL1-: COLLF.I. I ATK CHt'KCH 

First Religious Service on Man- 
hattan Island was held in the 
trading post established here by 
the Dutch in 1614. five 3'ears after 
the first landing made by Hen- 
drik Hudson. 

First New York Pastor was the 
Re\'. Jonas Michaelius. 

First Permanent Church was reg- 
ularly organized by this pastor 
in the summer of 1628. This 
Church, known to-day as the Col- 
legiate Church of New York, is 
the oldest with a continuous his- 
tory in America. 

First Place of Stated Worship was 
in the ample loft of a horse-mill, 
so called to distinguish it from 
two others wdiich were wind- 
mills, and is now known as 32 
and 34 South William Street. 

First Church Bell in New York, 
captured by the Dutch in 1625 
from the Spaniards in Porto 
Rico, pealed out its call to wor- 
ship from the belfry of this 
horse-mill church. 

First RuHng Elder of this first 
church was Peter Minuit, who 
was also the first Director-Gen- 
eral of this Commonwealth and 
the first of the great Dutch Pat- 
roons "a wholly incorruptible 
man." 

First Real Estate Transaction on 
Manhattan was the purchase of 
the whole island by Peter Minuit, 
and the mynheers of this church, 
for the modest sum of 60 florins 
($24.00). 



Time is 
Too Slow for those who Wait. 
Too Swift for those who Fear. 
Too Long for those who Grieve, 
Too Short for those who Rejoice; 
But for those who Love 
Time is not! 
— Henry van Dyke : 



IS 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flatiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
♦Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



'42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



♦72d St. andBroad\| 
79th St. and BroadT | 
86th St. and Broadv I 
91st St. and Broadv j 

*96th St. and Broadv | 

WEST SIDE BRAN I 

103d St. and Broadi | 
110th St. and Broadv 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 



For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, 



16 



Rheims, N. Y. 



-I 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

FTIRE, 91.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




UlililJULlMJjl^^m^ 



MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 




il- — > 



■.:^ SUBWAY 


STATIONS 


Cotyrisht. 1Q07, P- L. Clarke 


225th St. and Broadway 


Mott Ave. and 14nth St. 




2;:51&t St. and Broadway 


Third Ave. and 149th St. 


i 116th St. and Broadway 


2.38th St. and Broadway 


Jackson Ave. 


Manhattan Street 


242d St. and Broadway 


Prospect Ave. 


137th St. and Broadway 




Simpson Street 


145th St. and Broadway 


E.VST SIDE BRANCH 


Freeman Street 


157th St. and Broadway 


110th St. and Lenox Ave. 


174th St. 


168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 


116th St. and Lenox Ave. 


177th St. 


181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 


125th St. and Lenox Ave. 


180th St. and West Farms 


207th St. and Dyckman St. 


1.35th St. and Lenox Ave. 




215th St. and Broadway 


145th St. and Lenox Ave. 


•Express Stations 



It's Well Worth Your While 

To call and see the desirable positions we now have open in New York and 
vicinity for capable Salesmen, E.xecutive, Clerical and Technical men. 
Over 500 opportunities paying $1, 000-55,000 a year must be filled at once 
Call or write us to-day. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



LEADING HOTELS THROUGH WHICH DAILY 
ATTRACTIONS CIRCULATES 



s. 

B 
V, 

Pi 
C) 
•B; 
W 
Ci 

^\ 
Bl 

As 

•14 
IS 
23 
28 
33 



Aberdeen, 17 W 32d 
Albany, B'way and 41st 
Albermarle, Broadway and 24th 
Albert, Univ. PI. and nth 
Aldine, 431 Fourth ave 
Algonquin. 59 W 44th 
Ansonia, Broadway and 73d 
Arlington, 18 W 25th 
Ashton, 1312 Madison Ave- 
Astor House, B'way and Barclay 
Astor, Broadway and 44th 
Bartholdi, Broadway and 23d 
Belleclaire, Broadway and 77th 
Belmont (New), Park Ave & 42d 
Belvedere, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Beresford, Central Pk W and 81 st 
Breslin, Broadway and 29th 
Bretton Hall, Broadway and 86th 
Brevoort, Fifth Ave and 8th 
Broadway Central, 673 Broadway 
Broztell, 3 E 27th 
Buckingham, Fifth Ave and 50th 
Calumet, 340 W 57th 
Calvert, Broadway and 41st 
Collingwood, 45 W 35th 
Colonial, 81 st and Columbus Ave 
Continental, Broadway and 20th 
Cumberland, Broadway and 54th 
Endicott, Columbus Ave and 8ist 
Empire, Broadway and 63d 
Essex, Madison Ave and 56th 
Flanders, 135 W 47th 
Florence, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Gerard, 123 W 44th 
Gilsey, Broadway and 29th 
Gotham, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Grand Union, Park Ave and 42d 
Gregorian, 42 W 35th 
Grenoble, Seventh Ave and 56th 
Hamilton, 132 W 4Sth 
Hargrave, 112 W 72d 
HofYman House. Broadway & 25th 
Holland House, Fifth Ave and 30th 
Holland, 66 W 46th 
Imperial, Broadway and 31st 
Iroquois, 49 W 44th 
King Edward, 155 W 47th 
Knickerbocker, Broadway and 42d 
Latham, 4 East 28th 
Le Marquis, 12 E 31st 



Lcnori, Madi: on Ave and 63(1 
Long Acre, 157 W 47tli 
Lorraine, Fifth Ave and 45th 
Lucerne, Amsterdam Ave and 79th 
Madison, 37 Madison Ave 
Majestic, Central Park W and 72d 
Manhattan, Madison Ave and 42d 
Manhattan Square, 50 W 77th 
Mansfield, 12 W 44th 
Marie Antoinette, B'way and 67th 
Markwell, Broadway and 49th 
Marlborough, Broadway and 36th 
Martha Washington, 29 E 29th 
Martinique, Broadway and 33d 
Murray Hill, Park Ave and 40th 
Navarre, Seventh Ave and 38th 
New Amsterdam, 4th Ave and 21st 
New Grand, Broadway and 31st 
New Weston, Madison Ave & 49th 
Orleans, 100 W 8oth 
Oxford, Park Ave and 58th 
Park Avenue. Park Ave and 33d 
Plaza, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Portland, 132 W 47th 
Prince George, 12 E 28th 
Raymond, 42 E 28th 
Regent, Sherman Sq and 70th 
Renaissance, 512 Fifth Ave 
San Remo, Central Park W & 74tli 
Savoy, Fifth Ave and S9th 
Seville, Madison Ave and 29th 
Seymour, 44 W 45th 
Sherman Sq, Broadway and 71st 
Somerset, 150 W 47th 
St. Andrew, Broadway and 72d 
St. Denis, Broadway and nth 
St. George, Broadway and 12th 
St. Lorenz, 72d st & Lex Ave 
St. Paul, Columbus Ave and 60th 
St. Regis, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Stratford, 11 E 32d 
Victoria, Broadway and 27th 
Waldorf.Astoria, Fifth Ave & 34th 
Walton. Columbus Ave and 70th 
Warrington. 161 Madison Ave 
Wellington, Seventh ave and 5Sth 
Westminster, Irving PI and i6th 
Wolcott, 4 W 31st 
Woodstock, 127 W 43d 
Woodward, Broadway and 55th 



18 



fO^S 




• IBOO, »1 



New York Theatres 



Academy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Stuyve- 
sant. Henrietta Crosman in 
"Mistress Nell." Eve, 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2. Prices, 50c. 
to $1.50. 

Aerial Garden — Atop of the New 
Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. 
near Broadway. "The Merry 
Widow." Tel, 3093 Bryant. 
I'Ae., S.30. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Alhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Daily mats., 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices 50c. to $1. 

American — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 

Astor — B'way and 4Sth st. Tel, 
287 Bryant. William Hodge in 
"The Man from Home." Eve , 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 




YL'sT jiSK FOR 

ARONDACK 

Saratoga Water 
Wherever you are 
Drinking or dining 

Try it at drinking 
Parlor, 1117 B'way. 
Positively excells. 

The best. 
Highest Awards 



Belasco — 42d st., west of B'waj'. 

Tel, 4281 Bryant. Closed. 
Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 

Tel, 1530 Madison. Beg. Aug. 

20th, "All for a Girl." Eve., 8.15; 

mat.. Sat., 215. Prices soc. to 

$2. 



$7,300. ^i 



WILL BUY YOU A BEAUTIFUL 
ME IN BROOKLYN 



Fine Residential District, wide asphalted street 

20 minutes from Cit\^ Hall, Manhattan 

Brown stone house, 8 rooms, bath and store room 

All modern improvements, plenty of large closets 

Cabinet finish, in perfect repair 

Terms reasonable 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 







NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m.; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. in. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Nevvburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New Y'ork landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 28. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; W^est 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at AVest Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



IVEAV YORK THEATRES — Coutinued 



Broadway — Brciadway and 41st st. 

Tel., loi Bryant. Beg. Aug. 31st. 

"Algeria." Eve., 8.15; mat., 

Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 
Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 

Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 

World." Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat., 

2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 
Circle — Broadway and 60th st. Tel., 

5138 Columbus. Closed. 
Colonial — Broadway and 62d st. 

Tel., 4457 Columbus. Closed. 
Criterion — Broadway and 44th 

Tel , 2240 Bryant. Closed. 



St. 



Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st.j 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve.J 
8.15-; mats.. Wed. and Sat.. 2.15.] 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way' 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission 50c.; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
I'el., 747 Bryant. Beg. Sept. 3(1, 
"The Thief." Eve., 8.15; mat.. 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YOKK THEA 

Garden — IMadison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. Beg. Sept. 
28th, "The Devil." Eve., 8.15; 
mats., Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices 
50c. to $2. 

Garrick — 3Stli st., east of Si.xlh ave. 
Tel., 35i-3<'^th. Beg. Aug. 31^1, 
"The AloUuse." Eve., 8.15; mat., 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 
j.id M. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Wil- 
liams & Walker in "Bandanna 
Land." Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. 
and Sat.. 2.15. Prices 50c. to $1. 

Hackett — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel , 44 Bryant. Mr. John 
-Mason in "The Witching Hour." 
I've., 8.15; mats., Thurs. and 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 

Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Bryant. 

i Vaudeville. Daily mats, 2; Rooi 

Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices, 25c. 

to $1.50. 

i Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel.. 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel.. 3400 Bry- 
ant. Beg. Aug 29th. Mats. 
daily, 2; eve., 8.15. Prices 50c. to 
$1.50 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Beg. 
Aug. 24th.. Robert Edeson in 
"The Call of the North." Eve.. 

I 8.1s; mat.. Sat., 2.15. Prices soc. 
to $2. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th St. "Folies of 1908." Eve., 
8.T5. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 3243-38th. Geo. M. Co- 
han in "The Yankee Prince." 
Eve., 8.15. Mat., Sat.. 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 



TKES — Continued 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel , 27 Bryant. "The Traveling 
.Salesman." Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat. 
2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Lincoln Square — Broadway and 
66th St. Tel., 5464 Columl)us. 
Closed. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
I'el., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of P>road- 
way. Tel. 546 Bryant. Beg. 
Aug. 24th, "Love Watches." 
Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 2.15. Prices 
50C. t(.) $2. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 261I1 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 
.Madison ave. and 26tli st. 
Closed. 

Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st , west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The I\Ierry Widow"; mats.. 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices Soc. 
to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Rieh.ard 
Carle in "Mary's Lamb." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 535i-38th. Closed. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of 1? road- 
way. Tel., 4465 Bryant. Closed. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel , 2000 Madison. "The Girl 
Question." Eve., 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat.. 2.1 S- Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Weber's — Broadwa}', between 29tli 
and 30th sts. Tel.. 214 Madison. 
"T\aid in Full." Eve., 8.30; mats , 
Wed. and Sat., 2.30. Prices soc. 

to $2. 



Attractive Rooms for l^ent in Private House 

Large and Small Rooms, Baths 

Central Location. Comfortable Surroundings 

No. 113 Madison Ave., near 29th Street 

Telephone: 37''il^ Madison Square 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio— Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 5860 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23a 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island— East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River- 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — ^Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad 

way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

.\storla — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpolnt Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa\onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonia 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City— Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island— Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., I'ulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.), Canal, Grand, Rlvington, 1st, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th. 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (char.ge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th. 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129tn (change for Suburban L Road). 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gl., Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th). 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145ith, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue— South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th. 59th. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE TRAVELING SALESMAN— AT THE LIBERTY 



With a characterization as new 
to the stage as is Patricia O'Brien 
of "The Chorus Lady," James 
Forbes' new comedy, "The Travel- 
ing Salesman," opened the Henry 
B. Harris season at the Liberty 
Theater. 

"The Traveling Salesman" is a 
remarkably clever comedy, which, 
while essentially constructed for 
laughing purposes, contains the 
same adroit changes from comic 
to serious that made Mr. Forbes' 
former play, "The Chorus Lady," 
one of the most gigantic successes 
of the present decade. 

The story of the new comedy, 
the scenes of which are laid in 
Grand Crossing, a village of the 
Middle West, opens on Christmas 
Day, the first act showing the in- 
terior of the depot, with the meet- 
ing and mutual attraction of the 
principal personages. Bob Blake, 
"the traveling salesman," and Beth 
Elliott, the telegraph operator and 
ticket agent. Beth is possessed of 
a piece of untillable land, appar- 
ently worthless, that suddenly ac- 
quires value because it is necessary 
to a scheme of improvement 
planned by the railroad. Blake's 
employer, Martin Drurj^, becomes 
cognizant of the corporation's 
plans through a leak at headquar- 
ters, and attempts to defraud the 



girl of her property through an 
ingenious perversion of the laws 
governing the sale of land by the 
township for unpaid taxes. It is 
Blake's aim to frustrate this job- 
bery, and the predicament in which 
he finds himself through his im- 
petuous, misguided efforts, fur- 
nishes the necessary dramatic 
thread of Mr. Forbes' comedy, 
which aims chiefly at a humorous 
exposition of the characteristics of 
the modern drummer. 

The second act, which transpires 
in Blake's room at the Illite Hotel, 
is said to be as unique in its de- 
piction of life "on the road" as was 
the second act of his earlier suc- 
cess. "The Chorus Lady," in illus- 
trating life "behind the scenes." 
The story is related through the 
medium of widely contrasting types 
of villagers and drummers, and for 
their interpretation Mr. Harris has 
assembled a )cast that includes 
Frank J. Mclntyre, Gertrude Cogh- 
lan. William Beacii, Sarah Mc- 
Vickar, Arthur Shaw, Percival T. 
Moore, H. D. Blakemore, Nicholas 
Burnham, Edward Elis. E. M. 
Dresser, R. C. Turner and Maud 
B. Sinclair. 

The play, which has been staged 
by Mr. Forbes, has the pictorial 
advantage of an adequate scenic 
equipment from the studio of Jo- 
seph A. Physioc. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



kIL» 



PORT 



NAME OP 
ITIAMER 



ADDRISSES OP LINIt 



•TARTINO PLACE 



'up. 1 S. I^remen 

18. Rotterdam. . . . 

1!). Liverpool 

10. Southampton. . 

20.Livei'pool 

'iO.H.amburg 

20. Bremen 

20. Gib'r & Naples. 
20. Copenhagen. . . 

20. Havre 

22. Hamburg 

22. Liverpool 

22.(}ib'r & Naples. 

22. Antwerp 

22. Southamiiton. . 

22. London 

22. Glasgow 

25. Bremen 

25 .Rotterdam. . . . 

26. Liverpool 



K. Wm. IL . . .N. German Lloyd. 5 B'wav. . . . 

.N. Amstrdam.Holland-Amer., .39 B'way 

.Lucania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

.Majestic White Star Line, 9 B'wav 

.Arabic White Star Line, 9 B'way 

. Kaiserin Hamburg-Amer., 4r> B'way. . . . 

Kurfuei-st.. . .N. (Jerman Lloyd, 5 B'wav.. . . 
.Pannonia. . . . Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 

• United States. Scandinavian-Amer, 1 B'way.. 
.Lorraine French Line. 19 State St.. . ". . 

■ Waldersee. . . .Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way. . . . 

.Caronia Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State" St. . 

. K. Albert N. fJerman Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 

■Zeeland Red Star Line, 9 B'way 

• St. Louis American Line, 9 B'way 

• Minnetonka. . Atlantic Trans. Line, OB'way. 

• Celedonia. . . . Anchor Line. 17 B'way 

KniserWdeG. .N. German Lloyd. 5 B'way.. . . 

■ Kyndam nolland-.\mer., .39 B'way!. . . . 

• Lusitania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 



• Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 5th St., Hoboken 
.Ft Jane St., N. R. 

Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft 11th St.. N. R. 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

• Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

• Ft.Tane St., N. R. 
.Ft 17th St., Hoboken 

Ft Morton St.. N. R. 

• Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

• Ft.Tane St., N. R. 

• Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
Ft Fulton St., N. R. 

.Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft Houston St.. N. R. 
.Ft 24th St.. N. R. 

• Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 5th St., Hoboken 

• Ft .lane St., N. R. 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



INFORMATION REGARDING TRANSFERS 

At the request of our readers we publish the following list where] 
transfers are abolished, to prevent confusion and to save them trouble' 
as far as possible: 

The transfer points which have been discontinued include all those 
of the Third Avenue Railway Company, the Forty-second Street, Man- 
hattanville and St. Nicholas Avenue Railway Company and the Central 
Park, North and East River Railroad Company, known as the Belt Line, 
and operating in Fifty-ninth st. 



(ireenwich st. and Battery pi. 

State St. and Battery place. 

Cortlandt and West sts. 

Duane and West sts. 

Watts and West sts. 

Christopher and West sts. 

] 4th St. and 10th av. 

•_':^dst. and 10th a v. 

28th St. and 10th av. 

4L'd St. and 10th av. 

2<)th St. and lOth av. 

(Joerck and Delancey sts. 

Corlears and Cherry st. 

.lames Slip and South st. 

IMonroe and Jackson sts. 

Mangin and I»elancey sts. 

10th St. and av. D. 

14th St. and av. C. 

14th St. and 1st av. 

17th st. and 1st a v. 

ISth St. and 1st av. 

2Hd St. and 1st a v. 

2Sth St. and 1st a v. 

2".>th st. and 1st a v. 

:uth St. and 1st av. 

50th St. and 1st a v. 

noth St. and 2d av. 

59th St. and od av. 

r>nth St. and Lexington av. 

uOth St. and Madison av. 

r»9th St. and (ith av. 

50th st and 7th av. 

59th St. and Sth av. 

59th St. and Columbus av. 

llOth St. and 1st av. 

110th St. and 2d av. 

llOth St. and Lexington a v. 

110th St. and Madison av. 

St. Nicholas av. and 116th st. 

St. Nicholas and Sth avs. 



Houston st. and Bowery. 
Stanton st. and Bowery. 
Spring St. and Bowei-y. 
Broome st. and Bowery. 
Bayard st. and Bowery. 
Chambers st. and Broadway. 
Park row and Broadway. 
Broadway and 71st st. 
Broadway and r,5th st. 
Broadway and r>9th st. 
Broadwav and Hod st. 
ruth St. and Hd a v. 
29th St. and 3d a v. 
2Sth St. and 3d av. 
23d St. and od a v. 
ISth St. and 3d av. 
17th St. and 3d av. 
14th St. and 3d av. 
Stuvvesnnt place and 3tl a v. 
Stli St. and 3d a v. 
42(1 St. and 7th a\-. 
42d St. and Broadw.iy. 
42d St. and Gth a v. 
42d St. and Madison av. 
42d St. and Lexington av. 
42d St. and 2d av. 
42d St. and Sth a v. 
42d St. and 9th av. 
Slitli St. and Amsterdam av. 
Amsterdam av. and 14.'ith st. 
125th St. and Sth av. 
125th St. and Lenox a v. 
125th St. and Madison a v. 
125tli st. and Lexington av. 
125th St. and 2d av. 
125th St. and 1st. a v. 
116th St. and 3d av. 
86th St. and 3d av. 
59th St. and 3d av. 







PALLISER'S 
UP-TO-DATE 



HOUSE PLANS 



A new book, containing 150 plans of houses costing 
from $500 to $18,000, which anyone thinking of 
building a house should have if they wish to save money and 
also get the latest and best ideas of a practical architect. 160 
large octavo pages. Price, paper cover, $1.00. Sent by mail, 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price. 

Daily Attractions in New York 1 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



AUTOMOBILE TRIPS 

Long Beach — Cross 34th st. ferry 
to Long Island City. _ Straight 
ahead from ferry; after passing 
Vernon St.. turn obliquely to left 
into Jackson ave., which follow 
for five-eighths mile to Thump- 
son ave. (Hoffman Boulevard), 
into which turn right, and fol- 
low across railroad and creek; 
two miles farther, cross railroad 
again to (3K') Locust Grove. 
Keep to right at crossroads 
along Hoffman Boulevard; cross 
railroad; three miles beyond, 
meet and then leave railroad; 
follow Boulevard to Fulton st. 
(9) Jamaica. Go along Fulton st. 
to Merrick road, into which turn 
right and follow it across rail- 
road, past Springfield and several 
creeks to (16) Valley Stream. 
Straight ahead along road across 
creek, railroad and two more small 
streams (i7/^)> Lynbrook. 
Straight ahead along Merrick 
road, across Mill River and 
railroad to Lincoln ave. (19) 
Rockville Center. Turn to right 
into Lincoln ave.; after crossing 
Powells Creek take first right 
fork and next left; i^ miles be- 
yond, cross Hog Island Channel; 
continue near railroad over Long 
Beach Channel and Inner Beach 
Lead to (25) Long Beach. Posts 
giving direction and distance will 
be found all along the road. 

Staten Island offers rare attrac- 
tions for a short automobile 
outing. The roads are good 
macadam with easy grades and 
picturesque views. In a circuit 
of the island the travelling dis- 
tance is thirty-three miles. The 
run from Manhattan may be 
varied by taking the ferry from 
the foot of Whitehall street to 
St. George, thence following the 
southern route via the Richmond 
and Amboy roads to Tottcnvillc, 
returning via the Shore road. 
Fresh Kills road and Old Stone 
road to Fort Richmond, thence 
by ferry to Bergen Point and 
over "the Hudson County Boule- 
vard to Jersey City, Weehawken 



TO NEARBY POINTS 

or Fort Lee. The distance of 
the round trip from Columbus 
Circle, returning via Jersey City 
or Weehawken, is about fiftj- 
miles. 
Hotel Gramatan, Bronxville, may 
be reached from Broadway or 
5th ave. to 5gth st., through 
Central Park to iioth st., 7th 
ave. ,to Central Bridge, crossing 
bridge and viaduct all the way, 
north on Jerome ave. to Yonkers 
ave., thence continue along Cen- 
tral ave. to Ammann's Corners, 
then to the right to Bronxville. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Water Koute to 

CONCY ISLAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 
World. 

TIME TABLE (Subject to Ciianqe.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00. 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and. »10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
*12.55. *1.40, 2.55, 8.40, 4.25, *5.2.->, 
6.10, 7.10, •7.55, •8.40, •9.25, •10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a * go to I29th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 centi. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St.. N. R., 7.40 A. U. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAND REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers, 
8.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., *12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R., 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M.. 2.30 P. M. ; 
Rock.Tway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5.30 P. M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Gr.nnd Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. ; Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



as 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TAXAMETER— Motor Cab Service— 'Phone 2380 COLUMBUS 



Telephone orders filled promptly day 
or night. Cabs are always in waiting 
at our various stands, or they may be 
hailed and engaged on the street. When 
the flag is displayed above the taxa- 
meter, it signifies that the cab is dis- 
engaged and can be hired. 

REDUCED SUMMER RATES— EF- 
FECTIVE JUNE FIRST— Tariff No. 1 
(Red Indicator) Used Only. 

First half-mile or fraction - - 30 cts. 

Each quarter-mile thereafter - 10 cts. 

Each six minutes waiting - - *10 cts. 

This tariff applies to all vehicles and 
irrespective of the number of passengers 
carried except that for Hansoms, Cou- 
pes, Broughams and Victorias the charge 
for waiting time is 10 cts. for each TEN 
minutes or at the rate of ONLY SIXTY 
CENTS PER HOUR. 

EXTRAS— All Vehicles 

For ordering a cab, each mile or frac- 
tion thereof, from station or stand to 
point ordered 20 cts. 
Return charge when dismissed 

north of 155th Street or outside 

the Borough of Manhattan, for 

each mile or fraction to Times 

Square (minimum charge $1) - 20 cts. 
Trunk 20 cts. 

All ferriage and bridge tolls, both go- 
ing and returning, must be paid by the 
passenger. If the taxameter is out of 
order, fare will be charged at regular 
legal rates. 

RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 

INFORMATION FOR PASSENGERS 

1. HOW THE TAXAMETER WORKS. 
When the flag is lowered 30 cents will 
appear under the word "Fare," and this 
pays for the use of the cab until service 
to that amount, either in driving or in 
waiting, has been rendered. The indi- 
cator will register thereafter ten cents 
for each quarter mile, or each fraction 
of an hour waiting. This charge is for 
the exact distance traveled and the exact 
waiting time consumed, which are auto- 
matically measured by the taxameter and 
over which the driver has no control. 

The "extra" charges called for by the 
service are registered by the driver and 
shown under the word "Extras." 

2. THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID IS 
THE SUM OF THE AMOUNTS SHOWN 
UNDER "FARE" AND "EXTRAS." 
THERE ARE NO CHARGES EXCEPT 
THOSE INDICATED BY THE TAXA- 
METER. 




For Hire 



Tariff 1 



Tariff 2 



Payment 



The driver is charged with all amounts 
registered and is not permitted ro make 
any reductions therefrom, but will, if 
required, give a receipt for the amount 
paid. 

3. TO SECURE COMPLETE PROTEC- 
TION, observe (a) that the flag is low- 
ered to Tariff 1 position at the beginning 
of the service and not before ; (b) that 
the flag is maintained in that position 
during service; (c) that the flag is 
promptly brought to "Payment" posi- 
tion at the conclusion of the service and 
left there until the charge is settled. 

4. IF THE CAB IS DISABLED, the 
service up to the disablement must be 
paid for. 

5. A CAB REPORTING AT AN AD- 
DRESS in response to an order is 
charged for from the time for which it 
was ordered. 

6. A CAB ORDERED AND NOT USED 
must be paid for up to the time the 
driver is dismissed, including the charge 
for sending it. 

7. THEATRE AND OTHER RE- 
TURNS. Waiting time and any neces- 
sary mileage will be charged for a ve- 
hicle held for a return call. Waiting 
time may be saved by dismissing the 
vehicle and placing a separate order for 
a vehicle for the return call, but the 
Company cannot guarantee to fill such 
return call unless it be given to and 
accepted by the starter at a station 
or stand. Under no conditions may a 
cab be held in waiting without charge. 

8. IN CASE OF DISPU'IE, passengers 
are requested to pay the full amount 
indicated and make claim to the Com- 
pany, in writing, giving the hour, date, 
driver and cab number, number of pas- 
sengers carried, distance travelled and 
waiting time consumed and wherein the 
charge is incorrect. Such claims will re- 
ceive prompt and courteous attention. 

9. THE ACCURACY OF THE TAXA- 
ISIETER is insured by systematic inspec- 
tion. Do not assume that a charge is 
incorrect without first computing all of 
the distance and all of the waiting time 
comprised in the service. 

TOURING CARS, SIGHT-SEEING 
CARS, DOUBLE-DECK MOTOR BUS- 
SES, and Automobiles of every kind by 
the Hour, Day or Week — Rates on ap- 
plication. 

CAB STATIONS. 
49th St. and 8th Av. 55-65 E.SSth St. 
G6th St. and 3rd Av. 141 E25th St 

CAB STANDS. 
Sherry's Caf§ Martin Hotel Astor 
Hotel Belmont, Long Island R. R., Ft. E. 

34th Street. 
Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. W. 23rd St. 

NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO. 
EIGHTH AVE. AND FORTY=NINTH ST. 

PHONE. 2380 COLUMBUS 

CONNECTS WITH ALL CAB STANDS 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



DID YOU KNOW IN THE YEAR 



1865— That the surrender of Gen- 
eral Lee and the Confederate Army 
cansed great excitement and re- 
joicing. About one week from this 
time President Lincohi was assas- 
sinated while in a box at the the- 
ater in Washington. His bodv was 
laid in state in the City Hall, and 
was viewed by the sorrowing mul- 
titude. 
1867— That the Ninth Avenue Ele- 
vated opened a short section as an 
experiment. That in January a 
bridge of ice formed in the East 
River between New York and 
Brooklyn. It is estimated that five 
thousand persons crossed over it. 
1868 — That a part of an undergro.md 
railway was built under Broadway, 
near City Hall, but was abandoned 
for lack of funds. 
1869 — That the American Museum of 
Natural History, now located at 
77th St., Central Park West, was 
incorporated. That the telegraph 
messenger service was organized. 
1870— That the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art received its charter. 
1872 — That there was appointed a 
committee of seventy to investigate 
the Tweed Ring and to bring those 
criminals to justice. 
1873 — That the city cliarter was 
amended, and many important 
modifications were made on pre- 
vious enactments. That there was 
a panic of unusual severity which 
effected the business interests very 
seriously. That the annexing of 
Morrisania, West Farms and 
Kingsbridge nearly doubled the 
area of the city. 
1875 — That si.x millions of dollars 
was expended to improve Fourth 
avenue ; this expense was shared 
equally by the New York Central 
Railroad Company and the city. 
1876 — That a World's Fair was held 
at Philadelphia in commemoration 
of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the signing of the Declaration 
of Independence. 
1878 — That electric arc lamps were 

used to light the streets. 
1879— That the Central Station tele- 



phone service was put in opera- 
tion. 

1880 — That there were completed and 
in operation four elevated railroad 
lines. 

1881 — That it was estimated that 
there were being published over 
four liundred and forty newspapers. 
That incandescent lamp service 
was in operation. That President 
Garfield was assassinated in Wash- 
ington. 

1883— That the East River or Brook- 
Ivn Bridge was open to the public. 
That the statue of Washington, 
now standing upon the steps of the 
Sub-Treasury Building located in 
Wall street, was presented to the 
United States Government by the 
New York Chamber of Commerce, 
on the occasion of the hundredth 
anniversary of the British evacua- 
tion of New York. 

i8g8— That a subway plan by Mavor 
Hewitt failed to pass the Legisla- 
ture. That the city was visited by 
a blizzard of wind and snow and 
that for several days shut off all 
communication with the surround- 
ing country ; all traffic was at a 
standstill, which resulted in great 
suffering and many deaths. 
iggg—That for over three days the 
city was given up to patriotic dis- 
play as a commemoration of t!ie 
first inauguration of a President 
of the United States. It is e.sti- 
mated that over three million 
strangers visited the city during 
this time which was known as th? 
"Columbus" celebration. 
i8go— That the United Stales ccnsur 
reported that the population of ihe 
city was estimated over 1,515,000. 
That Mayor Hugh J. Grant ap- 
pointed a Commission to report on 
a route for a subway between Citv 
Hall and Harlem. That the New 
York Central Railroad closed 
transportation over that route for 
several days on account of a 
"strike" by the engineers. 
1891 — That plans were made for a.; 
East Side tunnel but were abai:» 
doned. That a cable railroad was 
laid from Battery to Central Park. 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Dodd, Mead & Co. all the latest books 

stationery, htc. 



FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 35th St. 



STATEN ISLAND TROLLEY TRIPS 



Broadway trolley to Whitehall 
St. At foot of Whitehall st. take 
the Municipal Ferry to St. George, 
Shore Line along the shore to 
Holland Hook, passing through 
New Brighton, Snug Harbor, Liv- 
ingston, West New Brighton, Port 
Richmond, Tower Hill, Elm Park 
and Mariners' Harbor. On the re- 
turn trip take Shore Line to South 
Beach, passing Tompkinsville, 
Stapleton, Clifton, Rosebank, Fort 
Wadsworth and Arrochar. From 
South Beach, Rapid Transit Rail- 
way or Shore Line to St. George 
and Municipal Ferry back to Man- 
hattan. Another Staten Island trip 
is to Midland Beach, a pleasant 
shore resort on the southern beach. 
Take ferry to St. George from foot 
of Whitehall St., Manhattan, then 
Midland Beach Line of Staten Isl- 
and Midland Railroad to Midland 
Beach, passing through Tompkins- 
ville, Stapleton, Concord, Garret- 
sons and Grant City. Returning, 
take Midland Beach Line to Con- 
cord, transfer Port Richmond Line 
to Bergen Point Ferry, Port Rich- 
mond, via Clove road, Castleton 



Corners, Prohibition Park and 
Westerleigh, or transfer to Port 
Richmond Line from Concord to 
Castleton Corners, transfer Castle- 
ton ave. line to Columbia st. and 
Castleton ave.. West New 
Brighton, Brighton Heights and 
Castleton ave. line to St. George, 
passing Smith's Infirmary. From 
Bergen Point Ferry, Port Rich- 
mond Light and Railroad Com- 
pany can be taken to St. George, 
])assing through West Nev/ 
Brighton, Livingston and New 
Brighton. Ferry from St. George 
to Manhattan. 



Women, like Empresses, con- 
demn to imprisonment and hard 
labor nine-tenths of mankind. — 

Tolstoy. 



There are beautiful flowers thai 
are scentless, and beautiful womci; 
that are unlovable. — Hovelle. 



Marriage is a lottery in which 
men stake their liberty and women 
their happiness. — Mme. de Rieux. 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers "Hendrick Hudson' 
" New York " and "Albany " 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



Lv. Read Down. 



1908 

Ar. Read Up. 



AJVr. I A.M. I P.M. I 
8:00 
8 :40 
0:00 
0:20 
:45 



11 :50 



12:25 



1 :15 
2:10 



.•{ ■.2V^ 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10 :50 



1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 



:.3.5 



1 :45 

2 :00 
2:20 



4 :50 

5 :00 
5:25 
5 :45 
6:15 
G :30 
0:45 



7:45 



.Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkers . . . . 
..Highland Falls.. 
...West Point... 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
.New Hamburgh. 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsle . . 
..Kingston Point.. 
. . .. Kingston .. . . 

. . . . Catskill 

. . . . Hudson . . . . 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



I A.M. I P.M. I P.M. 



7: 



0:00 



P.M. I P.M. I P.M. I 



I A.M. 
28 



6:00 
5:30 
5 :10 
4 :30 


9 

8 
8 

7 


:00 
:40 
:10 
:35 


2:50 
'2:i.5 


5 

*5 
5 


:45 
:20 
:05 






1 :20 
12 :25 


4 


:10 






11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 







A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 

and Kingston Point wharfs 

for all points in Catskill 

Mountains 

Morning and Afternoon 

Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may lie made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsle Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



Apthorpe Mansion — Formerly I" 
cated at the corner of Ninth (or 
Columbus) ave. and 91st st. It 
was here where George Wash- 
ington remained during his evac- 
uation of New York, and after it 
was occupied by Lord Howe. 

Barge Office — In Battery Park. 
This was originally the landing 
place of cabin passengers from 
ocean steamers, and was for a 
time used as an emigrant station. 
Now occupied by customs in- 
spectors. 

Block House — Located in Central 
Lark. Built by the Americans, 
but later improved and occupied 
by the English during the Revo- 
lution. 

Bowery — Located from Chatham 
Si^arrf- to junction of Third an.l 
Fourth avenues. In the early 
Dutch days this was a lane run- 
ning alons? the farms or "Bou- 
weries," on the northern outskirts 
of the city; from this the name 
was taken. On and near this 
thoroughfare the notorious dives 

■ of Owen Gagen and Harry Hill 
were located. 

Bread Line — Originated by Fleisch- 
mann, the celebrated baker, now 
deceased, who nightly, between 
the hours of 11 to 12, gives to 
hundreds of homeless men of 
this city the surplus breads. This 
custom, which was started during 
the life of the philanthropist, is 
still carried on. - 

Carnegie Hall — 57th st. and Seventh 
ave. Founded by Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie. Cost over $1,250,000. 
Formal opening on May 5th, 
i8gi. One of the finest edifices 
in the world for concerts, lec- 
tures, conventions, etc. 

Cotton Exchange — Located in Han- 
over Square. This is a large 
building of 3'ellow brick, with 
stone facings and it is estimated 
that it cost $1,000,000. Spot sales 
of more than five hundred thou- 
sand bales of cotton are made 
during the year. On this site, 



Novcm!)er Stli, 1725, the first 
newspaper was printed in New 
York, and called the "New York 
Gazette." Tablet: Cotton Ex- 
Exchange — On this site Wil- 
liam Bradford, appointed public 
printer, April loth, A. D., 169.3, 
issued, November 8th, 1725, "The 
New York Gazette," the fir; t 
newspaper printed in New York. 
Erected by the New York His- 
torical Society, April loth, A. D., 
1893, in commemoration of the 
two hundredth anniversary of the 
introduction of printing in New 
York. 

Governor's Island — Is situated in 
the Bay, about one thousand 
yards from the Battery; it covers 
an area of over sixty-five acres 
and is used by the United States 
Government as a military sta- 
tion. Fort Columbus is located 
near the centre of the island and 
Castle William, a circular fort of 
sandstone, built in the year 181 1, 
overlooks the Bay on the western 
side. From here the "sunset 
gun" is fired daily. 

Gramercy Park — Located between 
Third ani Fourth aves., 20lh and 
21 st sts.; covers an area of about 
ii/< acres, set aside by S. B. Rug- 
gles as a place of recreation for 
residents of this neighborhood. 
It is not open to the general 
public TTronting this park is the 
"Players' Club." and the former 
residence of the late Samuel J. Til- 
den. Tablet: Gramercy Park- - 
Gramercy Park, founded by Sam- 
uel B. Ruggles, 1831, commem- 
orated by this tablet imbedded in 
the Gramercy farm by John Rug- 
gles Strong, 1875. 

Metropolitan Opera House — 
Broadway, between 39th and 
40th sts. In September, 1892, the 
interior was destroyed by fire, 
and rebuilt during the following 
year. Tablet: Broadway, be- 
tween h'orty-third and I^'orty- 
fourth streets — General George 
Washington and General Israel 
Putnam met near this spot dur- 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



ing the movement of the Ameri- 
can Army, September 15th, 1776, 
the day before the Battle of 
Harlem. 

Millionaires' Row — The district on 
Fifth ave. from 49th st., contain- 
ing many of the residences of 
well known millionaires: Fifth 
ave., 513— Mr. O. H. P. Belmont. 
Fifth ave., 579 — Miss Helen M. 
Gould. Fifth ave., 634 — Mr. D. 
O. Mills. Fifth ave., 636— Mr. 
John R. Drexel. Fifth ave., 640 
—Mr. Geo. Vanderbilt. Fifth 
ave., 660— Mr. W. K. Vanderbilt. 
Fifth ave., 680 — Dr. Seward 
Webb. Fifth ave., 681— Mr. Levi 
P. Morton. Fifth ave., 689— Mr. 
Wm. Rockefeller. Fifth ave., 834 
— Mr. Frank Gould. Fifth ave., 
840 — Mr. Jno. Jacob Astor. Fifth 
ave., 842 — Mrs. Wm. Astor. 
Fifth ave. and 57th st. — Mrs. C. 
P. Huntington, i East 57th st. — 
Mrs. Herman. Oelrichs. 4 East 
S4th St.— Mr. Jno. D. Rockefel- 
ler. 2 East 6ist St. — Commodore 
E. T. Gerry. 2 West 57th st. — 
Mr. H. P. Whitney, i East 66th 
St.— Mr. H. O. Havemeyer. Fifth 
ave and 67th st.— Mr. Geo. J. 
Gould. Fifth ave. and 68th st. — 
Mrs. W. Mizner. 22 East 72d st. 
—Mr. R. W. Goelet. Fifth ave. 
and 76th St.— Mr. W. A. Clarke. 
Fifth ave. and 90th st. — Mr. An- 
drew Carnegie. 219 Madison ave. 
Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan. 

Morningside Park — Beginning a 
short distance from the north- 
west corner of Central Park at 
iioth St., and extends northward 
to 123d street; it contains about 
32 acres. 

National Academy of Design — Am- 
sterdam ave. and iioth st. 
Founded in 1826, and is consid- 
ered the foremost art institution 
in this country. Open to the 
public on Sundays, free. 

Post Office (General)— Located at 
the Junction of Broadway and 
Park Row. Open all hours of 
the day . and night, week days, 
and from 9 to 11 a. m. on Sun- 



days. Tablet: Post Office Build- 
ing — On the common of the City 
of New York, near where this} 
building now stands, there stood,! 
from 1766 to 1776, a liberty pole,! 
erected to commemorate the re- 
peal of the stamp act; it was re- 
peatedly destroyed by the vio- 
lence of the Tories, and as re.-, 
peatedly replaced by the Sons of 
Liberty, who organized a con- 
stant watch and guard. In its 
defence the first martyr blood ot 
the American Revolution was 
shed, on January i8th, 1770. — 
A. D., 1897, erected by the Mary 
Washington Colonial Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Re\ - 
oluticn. 

Residence of Charles M. Schwab — 
Riverside Drive and 73d st. This 
is said to be the handsomest and 
costliest residence in this coun- 
trv; the material used in con- 
struction was imported from 
Germany and other foreign coun- 
tries. The estimated cost of the 
building, furnishings and prop- 
erty is estimated at about eight 
millions. It is said that at the 
death of Mr. and Mrs. Schwab 
this property will revert to thi^ 
city to be used as a museum. 

St. Mark's Church — Located at 
Second ave. and Tenth st. One 
of the oldest churches in this 
city; its site was formerly a part 
of the farm of Petrus Stuyve- 
sant, the last Dutch Governor of 
New Amsterdam, whose remains 
rest in a tomb under the edifice 
The present church is the sec- 
ond, the first having been erected 
in 1826. It was from the grave- 
yard surrounding this church the 
body of A. T. Stewart, the mer 
chant prince, was stolen, over 
twenty years ago. Tablet, St. 
Mark's Church: In this vault lies 
buried Petrus Stuyvesant, late 
Captain General and Governor- 
in-Chief of Amsterdam, in New 
Netherland, now called New 
York and the Dutch West India 
Islands. Died in A. D., 1672. 
Aged 80. 



30 



Is This Your Opportunity 
or His? 



m 



AT ERF RO N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufficient water for ocean-going vessels, 

l\ nd within 15 miles of the Battery, on 
X he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 
jOj very facility for manufacturing 
X\. ight at hand. Water under pressure. 
-T reight carried by three railroads. 
Jlx. are opportunit}' : 1 50 acres 
\J f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

IN o difficult}^ in building : solid ground for 

foundations. 
X he only large piece of waterfront propert}' 

available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 



«(I6 17 iao3 ^ 



Vf) f T HENRY B. HARRIS 

*'-''-' ATTRACTIONS 

H|-IT«l-> IN NEW YORK 

WERE 

STRONG 
FOR 

The Chorus Lady 

DON'T 

MISS 

The New James Forbes Comedy 

The Traveling Salesman 

" The Hit of the Century " 
AT THE 

LIBERTY THEATRE 



AT THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC " '' street and 1, vin. Place 

■ .^— ^-^__^_^^^^^^^^^^^___ ielcpnone, Stuyvesaiit -oi 

lleniy li . Harris and Manrice Canipl'ell present 

Henrietta Crosman in "Mistress Nell" 

In Preparation "As You Like It" 

AT THE HUDSON THEATRE ^^ '> Str^^' East of Broadway 
_^.^_^^^_„___^____^^^^^^__^^^^______ leleprione, ririant 600 

MONDAY, AUGUST 24th 

Henry li. Hani'- will present 

Robert Edeson in "The Call of the North" 

Hy GKOKCK HROADH L'KST. Founded on Stewart Edward White's " Conjnror's House.'. 

AT THE GR AND OPERA HOUSE ^3' street and Sth Avenue 

'■ I eieplione, Ciielsea 600 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

Rose Stahl '^ ^S^'L^ilss"" "The Chorus Lady" 

By JAMES FORBES 



WEEK, AUGUST 24 TO AUGUST 30, 1908 



Bail? Attractions; 



tn 



i^eto ^orfe 




TAXAMETER GABS 

STANDS: Sherry's; Cafe Martin; Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R R Foot East 34th 
Street ; Central R. R. of N. J.. Foot West 23rd Street 

TELEPHONE 2380 COLUMBUS 

One central Exchange connects all taxameter cab stands; on receipt of call the neaiest available 

cab is promptly dispatched 
Reduced Summer Rates now in effect NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

Tariff folder mailed on request Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 



/OL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 



NO. 126 




I 



I 



Go to *'THE DEVIL" 

at the 

Garden Theatre 



I 



27th St. and Madison Ave. 



Evenings at 8.15 



First Matinee Saturday at 2.15 



Henry W. Savage, by exclusive arrangement with the author, offers the 
only authorized version in America of Franz Molnar's celebrated play " The 
Devil" ( Der Teufel), with English translation and adaptation by Oliver Herford. 
This continental success, with a distinguished cast, including Edwin E. Stevens. 
Paul McAllister, Frank Monroe, W. Chrystie Miller, Arthur Hoyt, Dorothy Dorr, 
Marguerite Snow, Marion Lome, Jane Murray, etc., was staged by Jules Herzka, 
Director-General of the Vienna Volstheater, where he produced the play in col- 
laboration with the author. 

Prices 50c. to $1.50"Nothing Higher 







CftPYB. 



<4 



:ly Attiracth©: 



MEW YQM,K 

Weekly &yia.ga.»iTie 'DcLotca to crfa'onnce informAtion. 



Vol. X 



AUGUST 24th to AUGUST 30th, 1908 



No. 126 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and publish :d by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E, .R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. lTcLARKE, Publisher, 

1 Madison Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, l 59 Gramercy 

Daily Attractions circulates through all the 

leading hotels in New York City 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT F OR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 
Five Cents a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Advertising rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mtm- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 
Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
New York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Appelate Court House 25 

Churches 12-13 

Elevated Railroads 30 

Ferries 30 

Hotels 18 

Hudson River Day Line 21-26 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 15 

Lons Island Trips 26 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 26 

Points of Interest 27-2g 

Pullman Accomodations 30 

Railroad Stations 30 

Short Trips to Nearby Resorts 15 

" Short Talks " (Mme. Roberta) 23 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Transfer Information 14 

Theaters 19-22 

'"_ The Girl Question " (Frank Thornton) . . 22 
' The Traveling Salesman " at the Liberty 4 

This Week in New York 5-10 

Where Daily Attractions Circulates 24 

"Who's Who Among Women" (Haryot 
Holt Dey) 11 



ART NOTES 
Metropolitan Museum of Art — 

Fifth ave., opposite S^d st. Open 
every day from 10 a. m. to 6 
p. m., Saturday from 10 a. m. 
to ID p. m.. Sunday from i p. m. 
to 5 p. m. Free, except on Mon- 
day and Friday, when a fee of 
25 cents is charged. Some re- 
cent accessions include enamels, 
ivories, ceramics, textiles and 
wodwork. In the woodwork 
there is a Gothic chest made in 
France in the Fifteenth Cen- 
tury, and other specimens of 
Flemish and French. There is 
also an interesting copy of the 
beautiful grille made for the 
tomb of Queen Eleanor in West- 
minster Abbey, who died in 1290, 
the grille is of iron and was 
made by Thomas de Leightone 
in the year 1294 at a cost of about 
sixty-five dollars, or £13; this 
was presented to the museum bj^ 
J. Starkie Gardner, the expert on 
metal work. There are other 
specimens of American fnrniture 
of the Colonial period, among 
which is a ladderback chair with 
five horizontal slats, in.'^tead of 
four, the usual number; this is 
believed to be American of the 
Eighteenth Century, but in the 
carving is equal to the best 
specimens of that period of Eng- 
lish make. 




n sT ASK FOR 

\RONDACK 

Mratoga Water 
V\ herever you are 
Drinking or dining 

Try it at drinking 
"arlor, 1217 B'way. 
Positively excells. 

The best. 
Highest Awards 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



"THE TRAVELING SALESMAN" AT THE LIBERTY 



.\ iK'w comedy, "The Traveling 
Salesman," by James Forbes, 
opened the regular season of the 
Liberty Theatre, vmder the direc- 
tion of Henry B. Harris. 

First, It may be said, and with- 
out the least fear of contradiction, 
that the new comedy scored an em- 
phatic and instantaneous success. 
Not since the great furore caused 
by the tirst presentation on Broad 
way of Mr. Forbes' name as a 
dramatist, when Rojc Stahl. in his 
"Chorus Lady,"' created a veritable 
sensation, has a play met witli such 
eulogistic praise or with a more 
complete verdict of approval than 
"The Traveling Salesman.'' 

The very title of the new play sug- 
gests comedy in its very best vein, 
and it is not strange that the gen- 
uine understanding shown by this 
3'oung author of the American 
chorus girl in "The Chorus Lady," 
should be equally prominent in this 
new type to the American stage. 
that of the traveling salesman. The 
new type is one that will stand out 
clear and distinct as one of the 
really interesting characters of ou'- 
interesting American life. The 
New York morning press, in com- 
menting upon the first performance 
of "The Traveling Sale<man," are 
unanimous in their verdict of ap- 
proval. The New York Herald 
says: 

"There are no ifs and huts tied 
to 'The Traveling Salesman.' It 
needed no booming on the part of 
the author's friends, for the ap- 
plause of a capacity audience and 
many recalls after each act plainly 
demonstrated that the piece had 
made a big hit." 

The New York American assures 
its readers that " 'The Traveling 
Salesman' delivered the goods, and 
it's not likely that he will have to 
move into anj' new territory for 
some time to come. While the 
New York Times believes that 
"this 'Traveling Salesi^.ian' is per- 
fectly al)lc to take care of his own 
territt)ry (which is New York), 



and, as promised, hands out a ver>"« 
large line of plain and fancy 
laughs." 

The New York Press says: "'Sir. 
h'trbes matches the incisive droll 
humor that accomplished his great 
success for 'The Chorus Lady.' He 
has again proved his adeptness in 
slang, meeting every fresh compli 
cation with a pithy and mirthful 
turn of speech." 

The New York World believes 
tliat " 'The Traveling Salesman' 
will prove a big and popular suc- 
cess, for, despite the fact that alter 
Kicking the thermometer straight 
in the face without so much as an 
apologetic blush, the play was wit- 
nessed by an audience that packed 
the large playhouse to its doors, 
a condition which is likely to con- 
tinue." 

The New York Telegraph says: "In • 
the language of the traveling sales- 
man himself, James Forbes has put 
another one over. The new play is 
right in the class with 'The Chorus 
Lady,' and, at the head of the class, 
an attractive comedy. Only the 
longest stay will satisfy the New 
Yorkers who will want to see the 
piece. It is a rollicking, 'ively, clean 
entertainment, and will rival 'The 
Chorus Lady' in longevity." 

"Mr. Forbes is to be congratu- 
lated indeed, for 'The Traveling 
Salesman' is here to stay for some 
time to come," is what the New 
York Commercial thinks of the 
new piece. While the Journal of 
Commerce believes that " 'The 
Traveling Salesman' is sure to sell 
his goods, and without the least 
possible doubt the new James 
Forbes' comedy will prove in gen- 
eral popularity a second 'Chorus 
Lady.' ' 



When a man docs good work 
out of all proportion to his pay, in 
^even cases out of nine, there is a 
woman at the back of the virtue. — 
Kipling. 



,^l£iiSi.V 




* ieoo, bT 



This Week in New York 

Monday, August 24th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Annual meeting of the National Association of Colored Women, 
Brooklyn. The executive beard will hold sessions on the opening and 
closing days, Monday and Saturday. The program i)romised is most 
interesting. (To Aug. 29 inc.) 

First night, Robert Edeson in "The Call of the North." at the 
Hudson Theatre, 44th st. east of Broadway. 8.15 p. m. Yun can "p'T"!"^ 
for seats. Bryant 680. 

The Rev. William Wilkinson holds daily meetings in front of the 
new Custom House at Piowling Green at 12 o'clock. This is fedlowed 
b}' another service on Wall st. at i p. m. 

At Fort George. .Mr. and Mr>. M. K. Schiffert, assisted by others, 
h(jld services Saturday and Sunday afternoons and evenings. On Sixty- 
second St., near Tenth ave., street meetings are held nightly for colored 
people; these meetings are led by the Rev. C. L. Butler and Benjamin 
Glasco. I'o the conference of workers, which meets Mondaj^ and Friday 
mornings at to n'clv ck, 541 Fexington ave., the public is cordially 
welcomed. 

Gospel Tent Kvangel. 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. James M. 
Gray. D. 1)., president of the Moody Bible Training School, Chicago, 
will conduct a P)ible convention. Strangers are cordially welcomed. (To 
Aug. 30). 



: SIGN OrT] 
THf: ^ - 1 
GREEN TEAPOT 

=West3_3''-''Sl. -=■ 
• Phone 3165 ; 3S- 




^ Dainty Home Coooking — Breakfast, Luncheon, Supper, 
served with delicacy and good taste. Food, salads 
and fruit according to season. 

Ihir SfccHilty: AFTERXOOX TEA 

^ Full line of antiques, old laces, fans, etc. Art ob- 
jects in large variety. 

^i West ^30 Street, near Waldorf-Astoria 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continued 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. St. Louis, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — ^Corlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts. and East River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — 'Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth ave., Wav- 
erly and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

You can subscribe to "Daily Attractions in New York" for three 
month for fifty cents; it will be mailed to you regularly every Saturday. 
Subscribe now. 

Queen Titania will be publicly crowned this evening, in the stadium 
erected on the ocean front in Auditorium Scpiare, Asbury Park. The 
court ball is announced for Wednesday evening, August 26th. The baby 
parade on the afternoon of Friday, August 28th. 

The Publisher desires to call attention to the advertisement of 
Mr. Macfadden's Physical Culture Restaurants. Through some mis- 
understanding the coupons were not accepted at some of the restaurants'; 
we therefore beg to state that if our readers will present the coupon in 
this book for this week they will be accepted at all of the different 
addresses good for a regular dinner in lieu of cash. 

Tuesday, August 25th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Tennis — Oj'cn tournament: East Jersey Lawn Tennis Association; 
Elizabeth (N. J.), Town and Cbuntry Club. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. St. Louis, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — ]\Iount Morris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris aves., 
I20th to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Our Bureau of Information is open. 'Phone 159 Gramercy. "Father 
Knickerbocker" knows. Ask him without cost to you. 

Wednesday, August 26th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Polo — Polo tournament; Saratoga Polo Club. 

Mrs. W. A. Barstow won the third race for Women Corinthians of 
the Atlantic Yacht Club; the fourth and last race will be sailed to-day. 



34 WEST TWENTY-FIFTH STREET. 

Single and Double Rooms. Baths. Table Excellent. 
Transients accommodated. ABSOLUTELY FIRST CLASS. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WE]E:K— Continued 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American Lcagne 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth avc. and Hudson st. 
8 p. ni. 

Public Concert — Mulberrj' Bend Park, Mulberry to Baxter, and 
Bayard to Park sts. 8 p. m. 

Wednesday evening meeting, the Rev. Alfred E. Meyer will preside; 
the Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st. 8 p. m. You will 
be welcome. 

Wednesday evening Praise and Prayer Service, Broadway Tabernacle 
j Church, 56th St. and Broadway. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

Wednesday evening meeting. Second Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Central Park West at 68th st. 8 p. m. A cordial welcome to strangers. 

Wednesday evening meeting, Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Mad- 
ison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. Edward Loux, D. D., minister; in Parish 
House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for strangers. 

Thursday^ August 27th 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Public Concert — East River Park — 84th to 89th sts., facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth to Madison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

"The Traveling Salesman," the "Hit of the Century," the new play 
at the Liberty Theatre, presented by Mr. Henry B. Harris, from the 
i;cn of James Forbes, the author of "The Chorus Lady." Go and see 
them live it, they don't play it; it is just "the real thing." 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

We desire to call attention to the excellent service of the Hudson 
River Day Line as far as Poughkeepsie. Their second boat, which 
leaves Desbrosses st. at 9.50, Forty-second st. at 10, and 129th st. at 
10.25 'I- "i-. remains in Poughkeepsie one hour and thirty-five minutes, 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 



Large Jan, $1.00 
Smaller Jan, 50 Cents 



Q PoMcised of rare qualitiei and many valuable propertiet 
not {enerally found among toilet article!, beiidct iti unique 
effect at a firit-claii 

SKIN FOOD 

uaed in manage for producing and preicrring a fine, healthy 
complexion, placea tliii rare " Novelty " among other 
emollient! !econd to none in either Europe or America. 

M.B.De MEDICI . 124W.21ttSt..N«wTork 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

allowing time to take a trolley ride, see Vassar College, etc., and return 
to New York in the early evening. F.y taking thi.s second boat to West 
I'oint, return • may be made either by first or second boat, givmg. 
respectively, one hour and fifty minutes or four liours and forty-fi\e 
minutes. Or return may be made from Xewburg, allowing, respectively 
half an hour and three hours and twenty minutes. Each steamer has 
its own orchestra. 



I 



Friday, August 28 th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American League 
Park, 167th St. and Broadway. 4 p. m. .Vdmi'^sion 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Hudson Park, Lcroy, Clarkson and \\-u-ick sts. 
S p. m. 

Public Concert — Battery Park, foot of Broadway, overlooking the 
harbor. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Wm. H. Seward Park, Hester to Division, Norfolk 
to Essex sts. 8. p. m, 

Henrietta Crosman is now playing at the .-\cademy of Music, Irving 
jilace and 14th .^t. Best seats, $1.50. 

You can 'p't"!"-' for a "Ta.xametcr" cab to jj8o Columbus, .and have 
no fear of not enjoying your ride; they are allowed in the parks, they 
are clean and smokeless. Always take the Green Taxicab. , "Phone as 
above; your order will be transferred to their nearest cab stand without 
trouble or cost to you. Best service and lowest rates. Trv one! 





MAGFADDEN'S 

Physical Culture Restaurants 

Caterers Nature's 
Pure Nourishing Foods 

Popular Prices 



^ 



New York: 

654 Broadway 
220 Fulton St. 
120 Pearl St. 
487 Pearl St. 
io6 East 23d St. 
2078 Seventh Ave. 
615 Sixth Ave. 

We will be pleased to have any reader of " Daily Attractions" try 
of our luDches FREE th s week. Bring this advertisement with you 
give it to cashier. 

8 



Bernarr Mactadden 

Pres, P. C. Restaurant Co 

Pre». P. C. Pub. Co. 

Philadelphia: 

25-27 South 8th St. 



Pittsburg : 

302 Wood St. 

Boston : 

27-29 Kingston St. 
35-37 Arch St. 

Chicago : 

Tacoma Building 
Madison and Wabash 



one 
and 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVEE^K — Continned 

Saturday, August 29th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Dog Show — FairtieUl Country Kennel Chib; Stamford, Conn. 

Baseball — Xew York Americans vs. Chicago, at the American League 
Park", 167th St. and Broadway. ,?.,?o p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Horse Racing — Coney Island Jockey Chdi; Sheepshe-ad Bay, 1,. I. 
(to Sept. 12). 

Yachting — Vaclit Racing .Assuciatiim of (iravesend Bay: Benson- 
hurst Yacht Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Ameri- 
can Summer and Xorthport Annual. 

Fifth annual amateur circus, under the auspices of the summer 
residents of West End, Long Branch to Asbury Park, ]\Ir. Joseph M. 
Byrnes, president. The tent will be pitched on the large square oppo- 
site the Deal railroad station. The proceeds will be divided among 
Protestant, Hebrew and Roman Catholic charities. 

Public Concert — Morningside Park, between Morningsidc and Col 
umbus aves., West iroth to 123d st. 4 p. m. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the .Mall, main entrance to Park, 
59th St. Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 

Polo — National polo championship at Van Cortlandt Park. After- 
noon. 

Free Swimming Classes have been (-rganized by the L'nited States 
Volunteer Life Saving Corps at each of the free floating and interior 
public baths. Instruction in swimming and rescue work is given free 
to all men, women and children wlio apply. The night schools now in 
session are: West 51st st.; I'attery; Pier Xo. 3,^, East River: Corlears 
St.; East F'ifth st.; East luth st.; Manhattan and Conover and Xorth 
First St.. Brooklyn. 

Annual outing of the Queens Borough Royal .Arcanum to Gala 
Park. North Beach. 



THE EARLINGTON '"■TZIZZ"' 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 
up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. • 
Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEQK — Continned 

Annual club regatta of the Wyanoke Boat Club on the Harlem 
River at Macombe Dam Park. Afternoon. The list of events comprises 
senior single shell, junior single gig for president's cup, junior and 
senior double, junior four gig and eight shell, together with a four barge 
race with lady passengers, and a half mile swimming race. All races 
one mile, finishing in front of the boat house. 

Sunday, August 30th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Marble Collegiate Church. Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. 
David James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 
8 p. m.; the Rev. Alfred E. Meyer will preach at both services. A cor- 
dial welcome for all. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 55th st., the Rev. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 4 p. m. Rev. 
W. J. Dawson, D. D.. formerly of London, noted evangelist and author, 
will preach in the morning and afternoon. Strangers are cordially 
invited. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House, 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., the Rev. 
Leighton Parks, D. D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 a. m. ; the Rev. 
J. Stuart Holden, rector of St. Paul's Church, Portman Square, London, 
will preach. The full choir will be present. All seats are free. A 
welcome for all. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th st., the Rev. D. Asa 
Blackburn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers will be 
welcome. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st.; 
services,. II a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church. 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefiferson, D. D., LL. D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. James M. 
Gray, president Moody Bible Training School, Cliicago. HI., leader. 
8 p. m. You are invited. 

Public Concert — Central Park on the MM. main entrance to park, 
59th St. Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 



PAUL L. 

DYEING AND CLEANSING 
291 FIFTH AVENUE 

Tel. 1224 MADISON SO. 


BRYANT 

Gowns Cleaned in Twenty-Four Hours 
900 SIXTH AVENUE 
Bet. 50th & 51st Sts. Tel. 5207 Plaza 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



WHO'S WHO AMONG WOMEN 



The desire to be somebody — to 
be a recognized somebody, is a 
definite human ambition, if not a 
weakness. It is also the fashion. 
Therefore, my neighbor, a pub- 
lisher up Broadway, is making a 
book about it. If you were born 
to greatness, or if you have 
achieved greatness, or if you have 
had greatness thrust upon you. the 
probabilities are that you will be 
solicited to enter your name in the 
book. It is likely to be a very 
interesting book, having your name 
in it, a statement of your achieve- 
ments and your social affiliations. 
On your library shelf it is likely 
to hold its own among the books 
of which you are fond, and it may 
be referred to at odd times, par- 
ticularly when you are depressed 
in mind, o'ershadowed by doubt, 
or lacking in that essential, self- 
confidence. It will also prove a 
kind of memorial to you after you 
have gone, especially if you have 
forgotten to leave a better one. 
There is something almost en- 
couraging to find one's name in 
alphabetical sequence, situated in 
orderly fashion, and if one is not 
of m.uch consequence, or if achieve- 
ments have been meager, it is 
pleasant to be at least in good 
company. 

Some of us who have done but 
little to claim attention will have 
our names in the book. Some of 
us who have done a great deal will 
not be mentioned. For this reason, 
the book, while of value in a way, 
will not serve as a reliable book 
of reference for the Recording 
Angel. 

We can't all discover radium — 
worse luck! — nor be the president 
of the General Federation, nor 
make books and pictures, nor carve 
in butter, nor hunt the North Pole, 
nor christen a battleship, nor make 
a test trip in a flying machine. 
There are so many things that 
women do nowadays to get their 
names and their pictures before the 



iniblic, notably, that it seems as if 
wc all might get into the alpha- 
betical arrangement if we study 
our cases properly. Some of us 
miss all our chances of recognition, 
never even have a photograph in 
a decollete gown, nor have more 
than a mention in the society col- 
umn, are not even good looking, 
even have no money. It's discour- 
aging nowadays to be almost a no- 
body. 

The question is what does a 
woman have to do to be in "Who's 
Who Among Women". It goes 
without saying that you can ac- 
complish wonders and still escape 
greatness in your brief span of 
years — and not be anybody worth 
mentioning. 

For example, there is my friend 
and hostess the thrifty farm wo- 
man. She has not been invited to 
even subscribe to "Who's Who." 
But if she should be solicited, her 
record would show that she is the 
mother of ten sons, and therefore 
a person of whom Rosevelt and 
Napoleon must approve. She bakes 
bread three times a week, ten 
loaves at a time; that is thirty 
loaves a week; or 1,560 loaves a 
year, or 46,800 loaves in thirty 
years, a mere fractional part of 
her busy life. Twice a week she has 
baked six dozen ginger cookies; 
that is 7,800 ginger cookies in a 
year; in thirty years, 234,000 ginger 
cookies. Since the boys have been 
large enough to want a pie cut in 
four pieces, it has taken three pies 
for dinner; not counting the pies 
those boys have eaten for break- 
fast and between meals, that is 
1,090 pies in a year, or 32,700 pies 
in thirty years; and no baker's 
license either. There are also such 
details as patches, and milking and 
churning and threshers and racing 
with the lark every morning. 

If this isn't a career, then I don't 
know the name of it. But she has 
not been asked. 

Haryot Holt Dey. 



-r^^^^^r^ 




' '»o«, bT 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 



^E^w 


Madison Ave. Baptist Church 


^^If 


Corner of Thirly-Firrt Street 


W' ' .^4^ 


Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 


i;::?--^-: >J|K|iif 


Sunday, JIugust 23d 




Service* II a. m. in Parish House 




BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.45 a. m. 




No Evening Service 


Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 


M IVelcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



g'Frottb QHjurrly nf OUriat, ^rietttiat 



Central Park West 
at 68th Street 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. 



Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



COLLEGIATE 



1628 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 


woa 


The Marble Collegiate Gliurc 


h 


FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 




REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 


Rev. ALFRED E. MYERS, will preach 




Sunday, August 23cl, 1908 




11 a.m. Subject: "'Love is All" 
8 p. m. Subject : "A Self-consecrating Young Man" 




Midweek Meeting, Wednesda)- Evening, at S o'clock 




This historic church stands hospitably open all the year. 
You are cordially invited. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NEW TORK CHURCEES — Contlaoed 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

^aint iSarthoIomew's Qlhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 



Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 

♦ 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher August 23cl 

THE REV. J. STUART HOLDEN, 

Rector of St Paul's Church, Portman Square, London 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 



Srtnitg Partalt 

Rev. WILLIAM T. MANNING, D. D., Rector 
Sunday Services 

TRINITY CHURCH, Broadway and Wal ST. AUCIUSTINE'S CHAPEL, Houston 

St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. St . east of Bowery, 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. 



ST. PAUL'S CHAPEL, Broadway and I-iil 



and >< P. M. 



ton St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M, and 7.3J ST. AGNES'S CHAPEL, 92d St.. west of 
P. M. Columbus Ave., 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 

4PM 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL. Varick, near „^ r'lTi^ir.c nuAuirT u j 
Laight St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 ^'-^ ^^ o ^^ f/^"^ j ;«'ol^"^^°?, ^*-' °,PP,A 
P M Grove St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 

P. M. 

TRINITY CHAPEL, 25th St near Broad- INTERCESSION CHAPEL, Broadway and 
way, 8 and 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. Iggth St., 8 and 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

ST. CHRYSOSTOM'S CHAPEL, 7th Ave. .ST CORNELIUS'S. Governor's Island, 8 
and 39th St.. 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 8 P.M. A. M. and 11.45 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 

CONGREGATIONAL 

BROADWAY TABERNACLE """rz^rrAT^'iT: L^L"D.?"ptl"r"' 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a.m., 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 p. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E.. 7 p.m. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 

INDEPENDENT 



CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 

Sunday Services, 11 A. M. and 7.45 P. M. Stran(2ers in the City Weloome 



PRESBYTERIAN 



3FtftI| AWnUr Pr^fibyt^riatt QIl|lirrlj ^lUh Avenue and 55th street 
SKKVICES AUGUST 23d; 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. STBANGEKS ARE COEDIALLY INVITED 

Kev. HUGH BLACK, D. D., Professor in Union Theological Seminary and formerly Associate 
Pastor of Free .Saint George's Church, of Edinburgh, will preach both in the morning and afternoon 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



INFORMATION REGARDING TRANSFERS 

At the request of our readers we publish the following list where 
transfers are abolished, to prevent confusion and to save them trouble 
as far as possible: 

The transfer points which have been discontinued include all those 
of the Third Avenue Railway Company, the Forty-second Street, Man- 
hattanville and St. Nicholas Avenue Railway Company and the Central 
Park, North and East River Railroad Company, known as the Belt Line, 
and operating in Fifty-ninth st. 



Greenwich st. and Battery pi. 

State St. and Battery place. 

Cortlandt and West sts. 

Duane and West sts. 

Watts and West sts. 

Christopher and West sts. 

14th St. and 10th av. 

23d St. and 10th av. 

28th St. and 10th av. 

42d St. and 10th av. 

29th St. and 10th av. 

Goerck and Delancey sts. 

Corlears and Cherry st. 

James Slip and South st. 

Monroe and Jackson sts. 

Mangin and Delancey sts. 

10th St. and av. D. 

14th St. and av. C. 

14th St. and 1st av. 

17th St. and 1st av. 

18th St. and 1st av. 

23d St. and 1st av. 

28th St. and 1st av. 

29th St. and 1st av. 

34th St. and 1st av. 

59th St. and 1st av. 

59th St. and 2d av. 

59th St. and 3d av. 

o9th St. and Lexington av. 

59th St. and Madison av. 

59th St. and 6th av. 

59tb st and 7th av. 

59th St. and 8th av. 

59th St. and Columbus av. 

110th St. and 1st av. 

110th St. and 2d av. 

110th St. and Lexington av. 

110th St. and Madison a v. 

St. Nicholas av. and 116th st. 

St. Nicholas and 8th avs. 



Houston st. and Bowery. 
Stanton st. and Bowery. 
Spring St. and Bowery. 
Broome st. and Bowery. 
Bayard st. and Bowery. 
Chambers st. and Broadway. 
Park row and Broadway. 
Broadway and Tlst st. 
Broadway and 65th st. 
Broadway and 5nth st. 
Broadway and 53d st. 
34th St. and 3d av. 
29th St. and 3d av. 
28th St. and 3d av. 
23d St. and 3d a v. 
18th St. and 3d av. 
17th St. and 3d av. 
14th St. and 3d av. 
Stuyvesant place and Md a v. 
Sth St. and 3d av. 
42d St. and 7th av. 
42d St. and Broadwav. 
42d St. and Clh a v. 
42d St. and Madison av. 
42d St. and Lexington av. 
42d St. and 2d av. 
42d St. and Sth av. 
42d St. and 9th av. 
86th st. and Amsterdam av. 
Amsterdam av. and 145th st. 
125th St. and 8th av. 
125th St. and Lenox av. 
125th St. and Madison av. 
125th St. and Lexington a v. 
125th St. and 2d av. 
125th St. and 1st. av. 
116th St. and 3d av. 
86th St. and 3d av. 
59th St. and 3d av. 




C^-S^-'d^a'^tI house puns 

A new book, containing 150 plans of houses costing 
from $500 to $18,000, which anyone thinking of 
building ahouse should have if they wish to save money and 
also get the latest and best ideas of a practical architect. 160 
large octavo pages. Price, paper cover, $1.00. Sent by mail, 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price. 

Daily Attractions in New York 1 Madison Avenue. NEW YORK 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TRIPS TO NEARBY RESORTS 



Bergen Beach: Jamaica Bay — From 
Brooklyn Bridge, via Flatbush 
ave. From Williamsburg Bridge, 
via Nostrand ave. 

Brighton Beach: Coney Island — 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L, Flatbush ave. 
and Smith st. trolley. From Wil- 
liamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries, via Nostrand ave. 
trolley. 

Coney Island — Iron Steamboats, 
foot Battery pL, West 22d st. and 
West 129th St. From Brooklyn 
Bridge, via Brighton Beach L, 
5th ave. L, Court St., Union St., 
3d ave., Vanderbilt ave., Smith 
St. trolley. 

Hotel Gramatan, Bronxville, N. Y. 
— Grand Central Depot, 42d st., 
on Harlem Division, N. Y. C. 
R. R. 

Long Beach — Via L. I. R. R. from 
East 34th St., and from Flatbush 
ave., Brooklyn. 

Manhattan Beach — From 34th st., 
E. R., via L. I. R. R. From 
South Ferry, via 39th st. ferry, 
and Manhattan Beach Line. 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 
Brighton Beach L. 

Millbrook Inn, Millbrook, Dutchess 
County, N. Y. — Grand Central 
Depot, 42d St., to Poughkeepsie. 

North Beach: Flushing Bay — From 
Williamsburg Bridge and Broad- 
way ferries. Grand st. line. East 
99th St. and East 134th st. fer- 
ries. 

Rockaway Beach — From Williams- 
burg Bridge, 42d street., 23d 
St., Grand st., Roosevelt st. 
via Broadway L to Manhattan 
Junction, thence via L. I. R. R. 
From East 34th st. to Long Isl- 
and City, thence L. I. R. R. 

Ulmer Park: On Gravesend Bay — 
From Brooklyn Bridge, via 5th 
ave. and West End L, 3d ave. 
surface line. From 39th St., 
South Ferry, via 86th st. line. 

West Point, Newburgh and Pough- 
keepsie — By Hudson River Day 
Line superb steamers leaving 
Desbrosses st. 8.40 a. m. and 9.40 
a. m., West 42d st. 9 a. m. and 10 



a. m.. West 129th st. 9.20 a. m. 
and 10.20 a. m., returning on 
either boat, reaching 42d st. 5.30 
p. m. or 8.30 p. m. Mary Powell 
2 pm. from West 42d st. ; return 
from West Point on Steamer 
"Albany," due 8.30 p. m. 
Woodmansten Inn, Westchester, 
N. Y. — Third ave. L to 177th St., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester Village; or by Sub- 
way to West Farms, 177th St., 
then Westchester trolley to 
Westchester; or 3d ave. L. to 
129th St., then N. ¥., N. H. & H. 
R. R. to Westchester Station. 

IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Water Route to 

CONBY ISLAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 
World. 

TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, •10.40, •11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
•12.55, •1.40, 2.55, 3.40, 4.25, •5.23. 
6.10, 7.10, •7.55, ^8.40, •9.25, •10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a • go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 centi. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trjpa 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies. 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAND REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers, 
8.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., •12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R.. 
10.15 A. M., *l.lo P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M.. 2.30 P. M. : 
Rockaway Beach, 12.30 P.M., 5.30 P.M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Gr.nnd Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. ; Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



T5 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Fla;iron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
'14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



•42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



•72d St. andBroadw 
79th St. and Broadw 
86th St. and Broadw 
91st St. and Broadw 

»96th St. and Broadw 

WEST SIDE BRAN( 
103d St. and Broadw 
110th St. andBroadw 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 

For any information aend to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, Rheimi, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 
North Kiver, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

F71RE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 




MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 




SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and Broadway 
231&t St. and Broadway 
L'88th St. and Broadway 
242d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenix Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenoik. Ave. 



Cotirieht, 1907, B. L. Clarke 

Mott Ave. and 149th St. 

Third Ave. and 149th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

•Express Stations 



New York is Short of Men 

And long on opportunities. We are unable to supply the demands of leading 
employers for high-grade Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men. 
Positions paying $i,ooo-$5,ooo a year now open. If you would locate in 
Greater New York, call or write us to-day. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTELS 



Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON, Mir. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 

Hotel Astor 

WM. G. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 

Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 



Hotel Arlington 

T. E. TOLSON. Mgr. 
18-20 West 25th Street 



Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 



Hotel Endicott 

JAMBS W. GREENE. M<r. 
8l8t Street and Columbus Avenue 



The Essex 



Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
'Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 



Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 



Hotel Gotham 

S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 



Holland House 

Fifth Avenue and 30th Street 



Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN. Prop. 
Broadway and 42d Street 



King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD. Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just oflF Broadway 



Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY, Manner 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 



Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES. Prop. 

157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 



The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 



Hotel Marlborough 

E. M. TIERNEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 36th Street 



Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman*! Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 

Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 
Dutch Grill Palm Garden 



The Plaza 

FRED STERRY, Managing Director 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 

Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A BARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 

Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK, M<r. 
15 Bast 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 



Hotel Savoy 

Herman H. Ries, John F. Ries, Managers 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. 



Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 



Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 



P, 
pel! 

T( 
El 
h 



Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 



Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, M<r. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square Ea| 



f^ 



LOT'S 




New York Theatres 



Academy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Stuyve- 
sant. Henrietta Crosman in 
"As You Like It." Eve., 8.15; 
mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2. Prices, 
50c. to $1.50. 

Aerial Garden — Atop of the New 
Amsterdam Theatre — 42d st. 
near Broadway. "The Merry 
Widow." Tel, 3093 Bryant. 
Eve., 8.30. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Alhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Daily mats., 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices 50c. to $1. 

American — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 

A.stor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. William Hodge in 
"The Man from Home." Eve., 
8.15;' mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Belasco — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 4281 Bryant. "The Devil." 
Eve.. 820; mat., Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 




Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 
Tel., 1530 Madison. jNIr. Douglas 
Fairbanks in "All for a Girl." 
Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat, 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 
Tel., loi Bryant. Beg. Aug. 31st. 
"Algeria." Eve., 8.15; mat.. 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel., 
5138 Columbus. Closed. 

Colonial — Broadway and 62d st. 
Tel.. 4457 Columbus. Closed. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Miss Isadora 
Duncan in her famous classical 
dances. Eve., 8.30. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 



HERBO-NERVO TONIC 

CONFECTION AND .SODA DRINK 

ABSOLUTE PURITY GUARANTEED. SERIAL No. 12.586 

Hpginmn's. Hiker's, Caswell St Massey. Kamsdell & Co.. K. H. 
.Mary ami all drug counters and soda lountains. Confection at 
I'ark * Tilford's and all first class dealers. 



MRS. 



M.\NVFACTURED BY- 

BLANCHi; £. 



THOMAS 



Indorsed by the late Dr. ,J. Clarke Thomas, N Y V 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEAV YORK THEATRES — Coutinued 



Eden Musee — j^d . st., hcl. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission 50c.; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Beg. Sept. 3d, 
"The Thief." Eve., 8.15; mat., 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 ]\Iadison. "The Devil." 
Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $1.50. 

Garrick — 35th st., cast of Si.xth ave. 
Tel., 35i-38th. Beg. Aug. 31st, 
"The Mollusc." Eve., 8.15; mat.. 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Gayety — 4-th st. and ISroadway. 
Beg. Sept. 7th, "The .-\mcrican 
Idea." Eve., 8.15: mat.. Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. arid 
23d St. Tel, 600 Chelsea. Wil- 
liams & Walker in "Bandanna 
Land." Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed, 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $1. 

Hackett — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Mr. John 
Mason in "The Witching Hour." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. and 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Bryant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats, 2; Roof 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices, 2=;c. 
to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15, Prices 50c. to $2. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone: 6500 Midlion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place for Ladlei Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cti. 

Rooma from $1 per day up, inoludintf Bath 

In easy acceu of all the principal theatrei 

Subway Station, 18th Street, witliin one block 

29th Street cart pass the door 



Hippodrome — Sixth ave., betweenj 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Beg. Sept. 5th. Mats 
■ daily, 2; eve., 8.15. Prices 50c. tt 
$r.5o 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broadj 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Roberj 
Edeson in "The Call of the 
North." Eve.. 8.15: mats:, Wedl 
and Sat., 2A^. Prices 50c. to $2| 



$7,300. HO 



WILL BUY YOU A BEAUTIFUL 
ME IN BROOKLYN 



Fine Residential District, wide asphalted street 

20 minutes from City Hall, Manhattan 

Brown stone house, 8 rooms, bath and store room 

All modern improvements, plenty of large closets 

Cabinet finish, in perfect repair 

Terms reasonable 

CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Avenue 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 



f^- .„ 



h= 











NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. ni.; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh. Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Throueh rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 26. 

Afternoon Boat. Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at 'West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



INEAV VOKK THKATKES — Cuiitiiuiea 



Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th St. "Folies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. Geo. M. Co- 
han in "The Yankee "Prince." 
Eve., 8.15. Mat., Sat.. 2.T5. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Keith & Proctor's: 5th .Avenue — 
28th St. and Broadway. Tel., 2880 
Madison. Vaudeville. Eve., 8.13; 
mats., daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $r. 



125th Street— I25tli st., near Lex- 
ing^ton ave. Tel., 1250 Harlem. 
X'audeville. Eve., 8.15; mats., 
daily. 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel,, 27 Bryant. "The Traveling 
Salesman.'' Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat. 
2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Lincoln Square — Broadway and 
66th St. Tel., 5464 Columl)us. 
Closed. 

Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadwaj'. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Closed. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK THEATRES — Continued 



Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Beg. 
Aug. 27th, Miss Billie Burke in 
Love Watches." Eve., 8.15; 
mat., Sat., 2.1=;-. Prices 50c. to 
$2. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Madison Square Roof Garden — 

Madison ave. and 26th st. 
Closed. 
Majestic — Broadway and sgth st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
"The Merry Widow"; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. 

to $2. 



New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Richard' 
Carle in "Mary's Lamb." five., j 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 535i-38th. Closed. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 4465 Bryant. Beg. 
Sept. 2ist. Blanche Bates in, 
"The Fighting Hope." Eve.. 
8.15; mat.. Sat., 2.15. Prices 50g| 
to $2. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th stl 
Tel , 2000 Madison. "The Girf 
Question." Eve., 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29tli 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
"Paid in Full." Eve., 8.30; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.30. Prices soc.^ 
to $2. 



"THE GIRL QUESTION"— AT WALLACK'S 



The summer show now being 
produced at Wallack's makes an at- 
tempt at a plot, and if the man- 
agement had seen fit to provide a 
couple of good singers it would 
be well worth seeing and hearing, 
for some of the musical numbers 
are excellent. 

The story is a very simple one 
and deals largely with humble peo- 
ple: A head waiter who is be- 
witched by the pretty cashier of 
the restaurant in which he has a 
financial interest, a cashier who as- 
pires to the stage and a -rich hus- 
band, and a head waitress who is 
unselfishly in love with the head 
waiter, are the three centre figures. 
The best act is the second, a New- 
Year's Eve Party given by the head 



waiter at the restaurant, which fur- 
nishes opportunity for the intro- 
duction of several odd characters 
among the invited guests, and 
some fine coon dancing is part 01 
the entertainment. 

Helen Royton acts well the dif- 
ficult role of "Mrs. Jessie Sears," 
a stenographer who has captured 
and become the wife of her wealthy 
employer: the type of woman who 
frankly admits that if she has mar- 
ried for money she thinks she is 
earning it, and who openly amuses 
herself with every man available. 
By clever work Miss Royton un- 
doubtedly makes her part the best 
feature of the show. 

Fr.'\nk Thornton. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scailp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT 

The employment of colored nets 
on dresses, though not new. will be 
used to a greater extent than for-, 
merly. The private view of im- 
ported model gowns shows the net 
dyed to match the fabric of the 
costume. 

As to the style of nets, the hex- 
agon mesh effects will take the 
lead, but filets will not be neglected. 

Embroidered colored laces will 
be the novelty this year, but as they 
are very expensive they will not be 
generally employed. 

The beautiful double fold Ninon 
veiling can now be bought for 95 
cents a yard. It has been found by 
the high class dressmakers it is par- 
ticularly adaptable for waists, lend- 
ing itself readily to draping; it 
comes in all colors. 

In the lace goods department 
boas, ruffs and yokes with Sleeves 
to match, can be found; these are 
the early fall importations. 

The new style of stock collar is 
of net, tucked, the upper edge 
loosened and held in place by a 
band of velvet ribbon. At the bot- 
tom is another band of the velvet 
ribbon finished with a double bow 
with ends. 

The latest neck bow for the wo- 
man who automobiles is one of 
leather. On the ends the leather is 
cut out and silk brocade in peacock 
colorings is underlaid. 

There never has been such a de- 
mand for the "sweater" as this 
season. This no doubt is owing to 
the attractive form in which they 
are' woven. The one which is quite 
long and finished just like a cutaway 
coat with small side pockets is at- 
tractive. Grays are more gener- 
ally worn, but white alwa3\s has ad- 
mirers. It is almost an indispens- 
able garment for automobiling, the 
sea shore, or in fact any place in 
the country during the cool eve- 
nings. 

The sleeveless coat which has 
been such a favorite will remain 
with us until the cold weather. 
Many of the latest models have not 
even the band which formed the 
armhole, the side seam closed 



TALKS 

slightly above the waist line re- 
mainingopen from that point. This 
style of coat is to be worn with 
the high skirt, which terminates 
where the opening of the jacket 
commences. 

If a purchaser of woolen goods 
has a. doubt in her mind it is not 
"all wool," let her take a sample 
home and test it by pulling out a 
few threads of warp and filling, 
then burn each thread separately 
with a lighted match. The wool 
will shrivel and give out a smell like 
burned feathers, leaving a round 
ash; cotton burns with a flame 
and with little odor, leaving little 
or no ash. Sometimes the warp 
may be of cotton and the filling of 
wool, and vice versa, so that it is 
essential to test both warp and 
filling. 

The same test can be used for 
silk fabrics to detect the presence 
of tin salts, giving the appearance 
of weight. If the fabric is largely 
impregnated with tin, it glows 
redly in the flame and is reduced to 
ashes. 

One of the newest fancy work 
fads is the stenciling of fancy de- 
signs on pillow covers, curtains, 
dresser scarfs etc., in burlap, scrim, 
crash and dimity. After the design 
is stenciled it is colored with dyes, 
which give broad scope to the ar- 
tistic taste when outlined. For this 
purpose there can be bought a 
portfolio of stencils of different de- 
signs and a book of instruction. 

It looks as if the high, straight 
band of linen finished with a high, 
pleated frill of linen or mousseline 
de soie will be the favorite stock of 
every woman so much is it in evi- 
dence. 

There is always something new 
in belt pins to tempt the shopper; 
the one we mention is oval in 
shape about 2^ inches in size, with 
a most excellent imitation of a 
hand painted medallion on porce- 
lain, the medallion set in a gilt 
frame with solid back, to which a 
substantial pin is attached. It 
could be worn as a brooch or bod- 
ice pin. Mme. Roberta. 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

LEADING HOTELS THROUGH WHICH DAILY 
ATTRACTIONS CIRCULATES 



! 



Aberdeen, 17 W 326. 
Albany, B'way and 41st 
Albermarle, Broadway and 24th 
Albert, Univ. PI. and nth 
Aldine, 431 Fourth ave 
Algonquin. 59 W 44th 
Ansonia, Broadway and 73d 
Arlington, 18 W 25th 
Ashton, 1312 Madison Ave 
Astor House, B'way and Barclay 
Astor, Broadway and 44th 
Bartholdi, Broadway and 23d 
Belleclaire, Broadway and 77th 
Belmont (New), Park Ave & 42d 
Belvedere, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Beresford, Central Pk W and 81 st 
Breslin, Broadway and 29th 
Bretton Hall, Broadway and 86th 
Brevoort, Fifth Ave and 8th 
Broadway Central, 673 Broadway 
Broztell, 3 E 27th 
Buckingham, Fifth Ave and 50th 
Cadillac, B'way and 43d 
Calumet, 340 W 57th 
Calvert, Broadway and 41st 
Collingwood, 45 W 35th 
Colonial, 81 st and Columbus Ave 
Continental, Broadway and 20th 
Cumberland, Broadway and 54th 
Endicott, Columbus Ave and 8ist 
Empire, Broadway and 63d 
Essex, Madison Ave and 56th 
Flanders, 135 W 47th 
Florence, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Gerard, 123 W 44th 
Gilsey, Broadway and 29th 
Gotham, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Grand Union, Park Ave and 42d 
Gregorian, 42 W 35th 
Grenoble, Seventh Ave and 56th 
Hamilton, 132 W 45th 
Hargrave, 112 W 72d 
HofYman House, Broadway & 25th 
Holland House, Fifth Ave and 30th 
Holland, 66 W 46th 
Imperial, Broadway and 31st 
Iroquois, 49 W 44th 
King Edward, 155 W 47th 
Knickerbocker, Broadway and 42d 
Latham, 4 East 28th 



"Le Marquis, 12 E 31st 
Lenori, Madison Ave and 63d 
Long Acre, 157 W 47th 
Lorraine, Fifth Ave and 45th 
Lucerne, Amsterdam Ave and 79th 
Madison, T,y Madison Ave 
Majestic, Central Park W and 72d 
Manhattan, Madison Ave and 42d 
Mansfield, 12 W 44th 
Marie Antoinette, B'way and 67th 
Markwell, Broadway and 49th 
Marlborough, Broadway and 36th 
Martha Washington, 29 E 29th 
Martinique, Broadway and 33d 
Murray Hill, Park Ave and 40th 
Navarre, Seventh Ave and 38th 
Xctherland, Fifth Ave and 59th 
New Amsterdam, 4th Ave and 21st 
New 'Grand, Broadway and 31st 
New Weston, Madison Ave & 49th 
Orleans, 100 W 8oth 
Oxford, Park Ave and 58th 
Park Avenue, Park Ave and 33d 
Plaza, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Portland, 132 W 47th 
Prince George, 12 E 28th 
Raymond, 42 E 28th 
Regent, Sherman Sq and 70th 
Renaissance, 512 Fifth Ave 
San Remo, Central Pa,rk W & 74th 
Savoy, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Seville, Madison Ave and 29th 
Seymour, 44 W 45th 
Sherman Sq, Broadway and 71st 
Somerset, 150 W 47th 
St. Andrew, Broadway and 72d 
St. Denis, Broadway and nth 
St. Lorenz, 72d st & Lex Ave 
St. Paul, Columbus Ave and 6oth 
St. Regis, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Stratford, n E 32d 
Victoria, Broadway and 27th 
Waldorf-.Astoria, Infth Ave & 34lh 
Walton, Columbus Ave and 70th 
Warrington. i6t Madison Ave 
Wellington, Seventh ave and 5Sth 
Westminster. Irving PI and i6th 
Wolcott, 4 W 31st 
Woodstock, 127 W 43d 
Woodward, Broadway and S5th 






DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



APPELLATE COURT HOUSE OF NEW YORK 



The Court House of the Appel- 
late Division of the Supreme Court 
is situated on the northeast cor- 
ner of Twenty-fifth street and 
Madison avenue. The cost, includ- 
ing the furnishings, was about 
$750,000, and was completed in tlie 
year 1900. The interior is rich in 
mural paintings, also marbles, and 
the exterior is decorated with 
sculptures. The caryatides, by T. 
S. Clarke, which support the cor- 
nice of the JNIadison avenue side, 
represent the Four Seasons; the 
group above, by Karl Bitter, repre- 
sents Peace; on the pedestals of 
the balustrade are the statues of 
the Great Law-Givers: Alfred, Con- 
fucius, Justinian, Manu, Vaivas- 
vata, Zoroaster, St. Louis, Maho- 
met, Solon, Lycurgus, Moses; at 
the entrance on Twenty-fifth street 
are two large seated statues. Force, 
the pedestal with this inscription 
thereon, "We must not use force 
till just laws are defied," also Wis- 
dom, "Every law not based on wis- 
dom is a menace to the state." 
These statues are the work of F. 
W. Rucstuhl; the bas-relief of the 
pediment, by C. H. Niehaus, rep- 
resents the Triumph of Law over 
Anarchy; and above this, by CD. 
French, is a group symbolizing 
Justice. On the window pediments 
are the reclining figures of Morn- 
ing, Noon, Evening, Night, by M. 
M. Schwartzott. As you enter the 
main hall has a wainscoting and 
pilasters of Sienna marble, with 
bronze gold capitals. Paintings fill 
the frieze spaces, and the ceiling is 
modeled in gold of two shades. The 
Court Room is also decorated in 
the same manner. The bench, 
screen and dais are of dark oak, 
very handsomely carved. On the 
stained glass windows of the dome 
are inscribed the names of the fol- 
lowing eminent jurists: Fish, Jay, 
Butler, Shaw, Webster, Ogden, 
Choate, Kent, Clinton, Livingston, 
Hamilton, Marshall, Legare, Story, 
Pinckney, Taney, Van Buren, 



O'Connor, Marcy, Spencer. The 
mural paintings of the two apart- 
ments are symbolical, as well as 
allegorical. The frieze on the 
north wall facing the entrance, by 
H. S. Mowbray, represents the 
Transmission of the Law. This 
consists of eight groups, a.s fol- 
lows: Mosaic, Egyptian, Greek, 
Roman, Byzantine, Norman, Com- 
mon Law, and Modern Law, each 
group illustrating the distinct per- 
iod that had its influence on our 
own; each group is united by an 
allegorical winged figure to repre- 
sent transmission from one age to 
another. To the left on the west- 
erly wall the frieze, by W. L. Met- 
calf, represents Justice; between 
the entrance doors on the south 
wall the two lunettes, by C. Y. 
Young, represent Law and Equity; 
to the right, on the easterly wall, 
the frieze, by Robert Reid, repre- 
sents Justice supported by the 
guardians of the Law, with sword 
and fasces. She gives Prosperity 
and Peace to the Arts and 
Sciences, holding the symbols of 
the Law, sword, book and .scales; 
Education follows Peace, teaching 
the youth, the book being liglited 
by a lamp held by Religion; 
Drama follows Prosperity, and 
Music with harp; on the south 
wall the subjects are Poetry, Paint- 
ing, Sculpture, Architecture and 
Fame. The Court Room is most 
interesting. The centre panel il- 
lustrates Wisdom attended liy 
Learning, Experience, Humility, 
Love, also Faith, Patience, Doubt, 
Lispiration. It is intended that the 
figure of Wisdom personify spirit- 
ual wisdom, Love to carry out the 
sentiment of the figure of Wisdom. 
There are other panels represent- 
ing The Power of Law, Justice of 
the Law. the seals of the City and 
State. On the wall behind the dais 
of the Justices the long frieze. b> 
Kenyon Cox, represents the Reign 
of Law, and other interesting pan- 
els are to be enjoyed. Open dailj 
to the public. 



25 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
"New York" and "Albany" 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



Lv. Read Down. 



Ar. 



J908 

Read Up. 



A.M. 1 A.M. 1 P.M. 1 1 A.M. 


P.M. 1 P.M. 


8 :00 






.Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
.... Yonkers .... 


11 :45 
11 :20 
11 :00 


6:20 
6:00 
5 :30 
5 :10 
4:30 




8:40 
9:00 
9:20 
9 45 


9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 


1 :45 
2:00 
2:20 


9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7 :35 




4 :50 

5 :00 
5 :25 
5 :45 
«:15 
6:30 
6:45 


..Highland Falls.. 
. . .West Point. . . 
.... Cornwall .... 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
.New Hamburgh. 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsie . . 
..Kingston Point.. 


8:40 
8:35 
8:15 
8:00 
7:30 
7:15 
7:00 

'6':66 




11 :50 
i2':25 


1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 


2:50 
'2:i5 


5 :45 

*5:20 

5 :05 










1 :15 

2 :10 


2:35 


1 :20 
12:25 


4:10 






7 :45 


.... Kingston .... 
. . Catskill .... 




3 '25 




11:00 

10:40 

8:30 




3 :40 






.... Hudson .... 






6 :10 






.... Albany .... 



















Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 
and Kingston Point wharfs 
for all points in Catskill 

Mou ntains 

Morning and Afternoon 
Concerts 



P.M. I P.M. I P.M I 



A.M. I A.M. I P.M. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music. 



LONG ISLAND TRIPS 



Nearly all the trolley trips of 
Long Island start from the New 
York end of Brooklyn Bridge. 

To reach Belmont Park by trol- 
ley take "L" road from New York 
end of Brooklyn Bridge to 
Jamaica; at Jamaica take trolley 
for Queens, which is close to Bel- 
mont Park. 

From Queens a trolley may be 
taken to Hempstead and on to 
Garden City and Mineola by a 
branch line. 



One of the most picturesque of 
Long Island trolley trips is from 
Flushing to Rockaway Park, a dis- 
tance of a little over twenty-two 
miles, taking an hour and a half. 
On the road one touches Ingleside, 
Queens Borough Heights, Gam- 
son's Lane, Jamaica, Springfield 
Lawrence, Inwood, Far Rockaway, 
Edgemere, Arverne, Hammels, 
Hollands and Rockaway Beach. 

To reach Flushing take ferry to 
Long Island City, thence by trol- 
ley to Flushing. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



SAILS 
1908 



PORT 



NAMB OF 
STEAMER 



ADDRESSES OF LINES 



STARTING PLm 



Aug. 25. Bremen KaisorWdeG. .\. Germ^an Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hobokeu 

" 25. Udtlcrdam Ryndam Holland-Amer., 39 B'wav Ft 5th St., Hoboken 

" 2<; . Livi'ipool Lusitania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 

" L'Ci. Sdiithampton Oceanic White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

•' 27. Hamburg Deutchland. . . Hamburg- Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 1st St., HoboktMi 

" 27 . Gib'r & Naples Hamburg (lamburg-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 1st St., Hnliokcn 

" 27. Bremen Bremen N. German Lloyd, 5 B'wav Ft 3d St.. HolMikcn 

•' 27. Liverpool Celtic White Star Line, 9 B'way ^n 11th St., N. K. 

" 27 . Havre Touraine French Line, 19 State St Ft Morton St., N. R. 

'■ 29. Hamburg P.Lincoln. . . . llamburg-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

'■ 20 . Liverpool Campania. . . . Cunard S. S. Co.. 21 State St Ft Jane St.. N. R. 

'• 29. Southampton Philadelphia, .\merican Line, 9 B'way Ft Fulton St., N. K. 

" 29. London Minneapolis. . \tlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'wav. ... Ft Houston St.. N. U. 

•■ 29. Dover Kroonland. . . Ited Star Line, 9 B'way Ft Fulton St.,.N. R. 

•• 29 . Glasgow Columbia. . . . Anchor Line, 17 B'way Ft 24th St., N. R. 

Sept. 1 . Rotterdam Potsdam Holland-Amer., 39 B'way Ft 5th St., Hoboken 

I.Bremen Cecille X. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

2. Southampton Teutonic White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

2. Liverpool Mauretania. . Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 

3. Havre Savoie French Line, 19 State St Ft Morton St., N. R. ,j 

S.Copenhagen Oscar IT Scandinavian-Amer.. 1 B'wav.. . . Ft 17th St., Hoboken i] 

S.Bremen P.F.William.. N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

3 . Hamburg Amerika Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 1st St., Hoboken^ 

26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF 
Aldrich Court — 41 Broadway. This 
formed the site of the first hab- 
itation of white men on Manhat- 
tan Island; was also the site of 
the second residence of Washing- 
ton. Tablet: "This tablet marks 
the site of the first habitation of 
white men on the Island of Man- 
hattan. Adrian Block, Command- 
er of the Tiger, erected here four 
houses or huts, November, 1613. 
He built the Restless, the first 
vessel made by Europeans in this 
country. The Restless was 
launched in the spring of 1614. 
This tablet is placed here by the 
Holland Society of New York, 
September, 1890." 
Apthorpe Mansion — Formerly lo- 
cated at the corner of Ninth (or 
Columbus) ave. and 91st st. It 
was here where George Wash- 
ington remained during his evac- 
uation of New York, and after it 
was occupied by Lord Howe. 
Barge Office — In Battery Park. 
This was originally the landing 
place of cabin passengers from 
ocean steamers, and was for a 
time used as an emigrant station. 
Now occupied by customs in- 
spectors. 

Block House — Located in Central 
Park. Built by the Americans, 
but later improved and occupied 
by the English during the Revo- 
lution. 

Boreal Building — 115 B'way. This 
site was formerly occupied by the 
residence of Lieutenant-Governor 
James DeLancey; after his death 
it was turned into a public house, 
known under a number of names, 
the most famous being "Burns' 
Coffee House." It was here the 
non-importation act was signed, 
also Washington's inaugural ball 
was held in the so-called "great 
room." During the year 1793 the 
building was torn down and a 
"City Hotel" was erected by a 
number of New York merchants. 
Tablet: "The site of the old his- 
torical DeLancey House, after- 
ward the 'City Hotel.' The tav- 
ern located here had various pro- 



INTEREST 

prietors, by whose names it was 
successively called, being, among 
others, known as 'The Province 
Arms,' 'The City Arms,' and 
'Burns' Coffee House or Tavern.' 
It was here that the celebrated 
non-importation agreement in op- 
position to the 'Stamp Act' was 
signed October 31, 1765. Erected 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, March, 1890." 

Bowery — Located from Chatham 
Sr;;urf- to junction of Third an.l 
Fourth avenues. In the early 
Dutch days this was a lane run- 
nuig alon,^ the farms or "Bou- 
weries," on the northern outskirts 
of the city; from this the name 
was taken. On and near this 
thoroughfare the notorious dives 
of Owen Gagen and Harry Hill 
were located. 

Bread Line — Originated by Fleisch- 
mann, the celebrated baker, now 
deceased, who nightly, between 
the hours of 11 to 12, gives to 
hundreds of homeless men of 
this city the surplus breads. This 
custom, which was started during 
the life of the philanthropist, is 
still carried on. 

Carnegie Hall — 57th st. and Seventh 
ave. Founded by Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie. Cost over $1,250,000. 
Formal opening on May 5th, 
iSgi. One of the finest edifices 
in the world for concerts, lec- 
tures, conventions, etc. 

Church of the Messiah — Park ave. 
and 34th St. This site once 
formed the estate of Robert Mur- 
ray, the "Quaker Merchant of the 
Revolution," and was called "In- 
clenberg," and became historic 
through the diplomacy of Mrs. 
Murray in detaining the British 
officers, Clinton, Howe and Corn- 
wallis, while Putnam and his 
troops, on their retreat to Har- 
lem, guided by Aaron Burr, 
passed within a mile of the house. 

Cotton Exchange — Located in Han- 
over Square. This is a large 
building of j-ellow brick, with 
stone facings and it is estimated 
that it cost $r,ooo,ooo. Spot sales 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



of more than five hundred thou- 
sand bales of cotton are made 
during the year. On this site, 
November 8th, 1725, the first 
newspaper was printed in New 
York, and called the "New York 
Gazette." Tablet: Cotton Ex- 
Exchange — 'On this site Wil- 
liam Bradford, appointed public 
printer, April loth, A. D., 1693, 
issued, November 8th, 1725, "The 
New York Gazette," the first 
newspaper printed in New York. 
Erected by the New York His- 
torical Society, April loth, A. D., 
1893, in commemoration of the 
two hundredth anniversary of the 
introduction of printing in New 
York. 
Fort Amsterdam — This site is now 
occupied by the new Custom 
House Building, and another por- 
tion occupied by the Cunard 
Building, 29 Broadway. Tablet: 
"The site of Fort Amsterdam, 
built in 1626. Within the fortifi- 
cations was erected the first sub- 
stantial church edifice on the 
Island of Manhattan. In 1787 the 
fort was demolished and the Gov- 
ernment House built upon this 
site. This tablet is placed here 
by the Holland Society of New 
York, September, 1890." 
Governor's Island — Is situated in 
the Bay, about one thousand 
yards from the Battery; it covers 
an area of over sixty-five acres 
and is used by the United States 
Government as a military sta- 
tion. Fort Columbus is located 
near the centre of the island and 
Castle William, a circular fort of 
sandstone, built in the year 181 1, 
overlooks the Bay on the western 
side. From here the "sunset 
gun" is fired daily. 
Gramercy Park — Located between 
Third ani Fourth aves., 20th and 
2rst sts.; covers an area of about 
1 1/2 acres, set aside by S. B. Rug- 
gles as a place of recreation for 
residents of tin's neighborhood. 
It is not ojien to the general 
public FrL.nting this park is the 
"Players' Club," and the former 



residence of the late Samuel J. Til- 
den. Tablet: Gramercy Park--. 
Gramercy Park, founded by Sam 
uel B. Ruggles, 1831, commem-' 
orat'^d by this tablet imbedded in 
the Gramercy farm by John Rug- 
gles Strong, 1875. 
Metropolitan Opera House — 
Broadway, between 39th and 
40th sts. In September, 1892, the 
interior was destroyed by fire, 
and rebuilt during the following 
year. Tablet: Broadway, be- 
tween Forty-third and Forty- 
fourth streets — General George 
Washington and General Israel 
Putnam met near this spot dur- 
ing the movement of the Ameri- 
can Arm}^ September 15th, 1776, 
the day before the Battle of 
Harlem. 

Mercantile Library — Astor Place. 
Founded in 1820. This is the 
principal circulating library in the 
city; was first located at 49 Ful- 
ton street ajid afterward moved 
to Clinton Hall, corner Nassau 
and Beekman streets, where it 
remained until transferred to the 
Astor Place Opera House, which 
was renamed the new Clmton 
Hall. This building was demol- 
ished in 1890, and the present 
building erected on its site. 

Millionaires' Row — The district on 
Fifth ave. from 49th st., contain- 
ing many of the residences of 
well known millionaires: Fifth 
ave., 513— Mr. O. H. P. Belmont. 
Fifth ave., 579 — Miss Helen M 
Gould. Fifth ave., 634— Mr. D 
O. Mills. Fifth ave., 636— Mr 
John R. Drexel. Fifth ave., 641 
—Mr. Geo. Vanderbilt. Fift 
ave., 660— Mr. W. K. Vanderbilt 
Fifth ave., 680 — Dr. Sewar 
Webb. Fifth ave., 681— Mr. Levi1 
P. Morton. P^ifth ave., 689— Mr. 
Wm. Rockefeller. Fifth ave., 8^14 
— Mr. Frank Gould. Fifth ave., 
840— Mr. Jno. Jacob Astor. Fifth 
ave., 842 — Mrs. Wm. Astor. 
Fifth ave. and 57th St.- — Mrs. C. 
P. Huntington, i East 57th st. — 
Mrs. Flerman. Oclrichs. 4 East 
54th St.— Mr. Jno. D. Rockefel- 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



ler. 2 East 6ist st. — Commodore 
E. T. Gerry. 2 West S7th st.— 
Mr. H. P. Whitney, i East 66th 
St. — Mr. H. O. Havemeyer. Fiftli 
ave and 67th st. — Mr. Geo. J. 
Gould. Fifth ave. and 68th st.— 
Mrs. W. Mizner. 22 East 72d st. 
—Mr. R. W. Goelet. Fifth ave. 
and 76th St.— Mr. W. A. Clarke. 
Fifth ave. and 90th ft.— Mr. An- 
drew Carnegie. 219 Madison ave. 
Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan. 

Morningside Park — Beginning a 
short distance from the north- 
west corner of Central Park at 
iioth St., and extends northward 
to 123d street; it contains about 
32 acres. 

National Academy of Design — Am- 
sterdam ave. and iioth st. 
Founded in 1826, and is consid- 
ered the foremost art institution 
in this country. Open to the 
public on Sundays, free. 

New York Historical Society — Sec- 
ond ave. and nth st. This build- 
ing contains a large and valuable 
collection of historical curiosities. 
The society was organized in 1804 
for the collection and' preserva- 
tion of everything relating to the 
natural, civil and ecclesiastical 
history of the United States in 
general and New York in particular. 

Post Office (General) — Located at 
the Junction of Broadway and 
Park Row. Oper all hours of 
the day and night, week days, 
and from 9 to 11 a. m. on Sun- 
days. Tablet: Post Office Build- 
ing — On the common of the City 
of New York, near where this 
building now stands, there stood, 
from 1766 to 1776, a liberty pole, 
erected to commemorate the re 
peal of the stamp act; it was re- 
peatedly destroyed by the vio- 
lence of the Tories, and as re- 
peatedly replaced by the Sons of 
Liberty, who organized a con- 
stant watch and guard. Tn its 
defence the first martyr bloud cif 
the American Revolution wa^^ 
shed, on January i8th, 1770. — 
A. D., 1897, erected by the Mary 



KKIOiST — Continued 

Washington Colonial Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Rev- 

'ili-.tic n. 

Residence of Charles M. Schwab — 
Riverside Drive and 73d st. This 
is said to be the handsomest and 
costliest residence in this coun- 
trv; the material used in con- 
struction was imported from 
Germany and other foreign coun- 
tries. The estimated cost of the 
building, furnishings and prop- 
erty is estimated at about eight 
millions. It is said that at the 
death of Mr. and Mrs. Schwab 
this property will revert to this 
city to be used as a museum. 

St. Mark's Church — Located at 
Second ave. and Tenth st. One 
of the oldest churches in this 
city; its site was formerly a part 
of the farm of Petrus Stuyve 
sant, the last Dutch Governor 01 
New Amsterdam, whose remains 
rest in a tomb under the edifice. 
The present church is the sec- 
ond, the first having been erected 
in 1826. It was from the grave- 
yard surrounding this church the 
body of A. T. Stewart, the mer- 
chant prince, was stolen, over 
twenty years ago. Tablet, St. 
Mark's Church: In this vault lies 
buried Petrus Stuyvesant, late 
Ca)3tain General and Governor- 
in-Chief of Amsterdam, in New 
Netherland, now called New 
York and the Dutch West India 
Islands. Died in A. D., 1672. 
Aged 80. 

West Washington Market — Located 
at the foot of West 12th st., but 
was formerly extending along 
West St., on the river side to the 
market. It is here that all early 
fruits and vegetables from Ber- 
muda Islands are received, and 
it has been estimated that during 
the peach season from 50,000 to 
100,000 baskets are received daily. 

Windsor Arcade — 571 Fifth ave. 
This was the site of the Windsor 
Hotel which was destroyed by 
fire March 17, 1899, at which 
about fifty lives were lost. 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 5860 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 586a Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

•phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St.; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpolnt Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West l.'^Oth St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa^onla Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonla 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island^Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., tulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivlngton, Ist, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 5nth, 57th. 65th. 72d. 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th. 12l8t, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton. Franklin Scl. Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th. 18th. 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (charge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th. 53d, 59th. 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129tn (change for Suburban L Road) 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gl., Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th. 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d. 8lst. 9.3d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th. 145th, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay. Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



.30 



MENNEN'S 

BORATED TALCUM 

TOILET POWDER 




Patience and Mennen's'' 

do wonders for the skin and com- 
plexion of those who lead an outdoor 
life. The continued daily use of 

MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER 

will improve a poor complexion and 
preserve a good one. For vacation 
; Mennen's is a necessity and a 
fort. It prevents and relieves 
Chafing, Sunburn and 
Prickly Heat. After shav- 
ing and after bathing it is 
delightful. In the nursery it 
is indispensable. 

For your protection the genuine 
is put up in non-refillable boxes — 
the "Box that Lox," with Mennen's 
face on top. Guaranteed under the 
Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906. 
Serial No. 1542. Sold everywhere, 
or by mail 25 cents. Sample Free. 

Gerhard Mennen Co., Newark, N. J. 

Try Mennen's Violet (Borated) 
Talcum Toilet Powder — It has the 
scent of Fresh-cut Parma Violets. 
Sample Free. 

Mennen's Sen Van? Toilet Powder, Oriental odor 
Mennen's Borated Skin Soap [blue wmpper] 

Specially prepared for the nursery. No Samples. 

Sent free, for a 2-cent stamp to pay post- 
age, one set Mennen's Bridge Whist Tal- 
lies, enough for six tables. 



MIG U2 1903 



I 



Fi 1 HENRY B. HARRIS 

your COOK leaves you attractions 

^f ^ ,1^^,^ I.' I.* iN NEW YORK 

at a moment s notice, 

If your pet stock 
falls off ten points, 

or your dog is sacrificed 
for not having a muzzle, 

Dont' feel blue, just go to see 

Henry B. Harris' production 
of James Forbes' Comedy 

THE 
TRAVELING 

SALESMAN 

at the LIBERTY 
AT THE HUDSON THEATRE ."!■ s.i..,. e.s, or sroadwa, 

— . .^^__^^^^^^^^__ Telephone, Bryant f.^o 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday 
Henry B. Harris presents 

ROBERT. EDESON 

in "The Call of the North" 

By GEORGE BROADHUKST. Founded on Stewart Edward White's "Conjurors House.' 

AT THE A CADEMY OF MUSIC ' ' Steet and Irvins Place 
— ^^^^^_^^^^____^^^^_ Telephone, .Stuyvesant 701' 

Henry B. Harris and Maurice Campbell present 

Henrietta Crosman in "As You Like It" 

LAST WEEK 

AT THE GRAN D OPERA HOUSE ^^d street and Sth Avenue 
^^^^^-^— ^^^^— — — ^— — Telephone, Chelsea 600 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th 

Henry B. Harris will present 

Rose Stahl " cZedynu^cLr^ "The Chorus Lady'J 

By JAMES FORBES 



WEEK, AUGUST 31 TO SEPTEMBERS, 1908 



Bail? Attractions 



m 



tuBRAHY of OONurttsat 



j^eto ^orfe 



iwu Copies rtecci>e<i 

AUG 2s iyy» 




^ y zov^ t». 




TAXAMETER GABS 



STANDS: Sherry's; Cafe Martin; Hotel Astor : Hotel Belmont. L. I. R. R. Foot East 34th 
Street ; Central R. R. of N. J., Foot West 23rd Street 

TELEPHONE 2380 COLUMBUS 

One central ExchanRe connects all taxameter cab stands ; on receipt of call the nearest available 

cab is promptly dispatched 
Reduced Summer Rates now in effect NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 
Tariff folder mailed on request Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 



VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

"<'/r;-4///, looS. by Dally Att>;utl,»is hi Xew Yoyk. In.. 



NO. 127 





¥% 



HIPPODROME 

OPENS 
Saturday Night, September 5th 



EVERYTHING ENTIRELY NEW 
BIGGER, BETTER THAN BEFORE 



m MEW YOUK 

c/l Weekly &Yia.ga.zme '^eiotca to <yta<vnTu.e information. 



Vol. X AUGUST 3ist to SEPTEMBER 6th, 1908 No. 127 

Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 



Thl« magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New Yorlc, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E..R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 



B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madison Avenue, 901 3 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractions circulates through all the 

leading hotels in New York City 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 

Five Cents a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Advertising rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
Nevvr York. ( Inc. ) 



CONTENTS Page 
Art Notes 3 

" Busy-Kodies ' (Haryot Holt Uey) 4 

Churches 12-13 

Eden M usee 23 

Elevated Railroads 24 

Ferries 24 

Hospitals 14 

Hotels i8 

Hudson River Day Line 8-23 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 15 

Latest Fiction (Elizabeth Hopkins) .... 25 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 25 

Pullman Accomodations 24 

Public Libraries 30 

Points of Interest 27-2g 

Railroad Stations 24 

" Short Talks" (Mme. Roberta) 11 

Subway Stations 16-17 

" The Devil "-at the Garden i£ 

Theaters 19-22 

This Week in New York 5-10 

Where Daily Attractions Circulates 26 



ART NOTES 

Lenox Library — ^7ist st. and Fifth 
ave. A most interesting exhibi- 
tion of etchings has been ar- 
ranged by the Print Department 
of the New York Public Library 
in the lower hall of the Library 
Building, and which consists of 
a small but eminently character- 
istic representative selection '^c 
Danish etchings drawn from the 
private collection of Dr. Axel 
Hellrung. A number of the best 
known names appear in the list 
of etchings here shown. There are 
figtire studies by Carl Bloch and 
Frants Schwartz, Hans Nicolay 
Hansen (who is credited with in- 
dividuality and a lively imagina- 
tion). Luise Ravn Hansen (who in 
"Stormy Day at Gjorslev," strives 
to render the effect of rolling 
lowering storm clouds), Sigvard 
Hansen (who prefers snow- 
scenes, which he depicts effect- 
ively), Kyhn, Adolph Larsen 
(who helps along a moonlight ef- 
fect by the use of a greenish 
ink), J. Lubschitz and Th. Niss, 
landscapes which have a local as 
well as artistic interest. Finally. 
P. S. Kroyer presents portraits of 
Greig and his wife at the piano, 
and of Frohlich, a Danish paint- 
er. It is intended to keep open 
this exhibition until October ist. 



7u<ir ASK Fon 

ARONDACK 

Saratoga Water 
wherever you are 
Drinking or dining 

Try it at drinking 
I'arlor, 1217 B'way. 
Positively excells. 

The best. 
Highest Awards 




DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



BUSY- 

Onc kind of busybody consists 
of a pair of mirrors attached to the 
vvindowsill at such an angle as to 
allow the person within the house 
to look up and down the street to 
see what the neighbors are doing. 
This household convenience is 
largely in vogue in Philadelphia, 
and. is attached to the second story 
window. When you ring the front 
door bell the busybody reflects you 
and your arrival is thus anticipated 
by the one who opens the door. 
It is a simple and inexpensive af- 
fair and is not in use in New York 
where it is claimed everyone is too 
busy to mind other people's busi- 
ness. 

The habit of minding your own 
business is on the list of good and 
desirable habits recommended for 
cultivation. 

My neighbor the schoolteacher 
tells me that she endeavors to in- 
stiU it into the minds of the chil- 
dren who come to her for instruc- 
tion. When grievances are brought 
to her the main point with the 
aggrieved one is what the other 
boy said and what the other ])oy 
did. 

"Never mind what the other br)y 
said and what the other boy did," 
interrupts the teacher. "Tell me 
what you said and what you did.'' 

This is different and not so in- 
teresting. 

Again: On the blackboard is 
written this significant sentence: 
"Let every boy mind his own busi- 
ness!" Then when a boy ceases 
to be interested in his own affairs 
exclusively, the teacher requests 
him to go to the blackboard and 
copy the words he finds there. It 
is a pleasant little hint and has 
effect on the impressionable juven- 
ile mind. It is a boy's first lesson 
in minding his own business. 

Busybodies have time — more time 
than most people, and they also 
have discernment and ideas. Often 
they have amendments to your own 
ideas. And they have advice^ 
.storehouses of advice which they 
love to dispense with wholehearted 
generosity. If it were not for the 
bu.sybodies there wouldn't be such 



BODIES 

a lot of advice circling about. 
And if it were not for you and 
your affairs the busybodies would- 
n't have enough to do to keep 
them busy, in which case they 
wouldn't be busybodies at all, but 
just plain nondescripts, like your- 
self, attending to their own busi- 
ness in a phlegmatic sort of way, 
and not enjoying life as they do now. 

Trust busybodies to obtain the 
facts. They may not have them 
on hand, but they can get them. 
If j-ou want to know how much 
money you've got, how old you 
are, how much you weigh, how 
large your f(iOt is, what sort of a 
man ynur father is. what mistakes 
3'ou have made, or if you want 
points ou an impending crisis, just 
beckon or whistle to a busybodj', 
and the facts are yours for the ask- 
ing. The world swarms with these 
natural fact-collectors who are un- 
employed — who are really not look- 
ing for compensation, but just 
work for the love of it. 

From their watch-tower they see 
everything and understand. They 
know the names of your carriage 
compau}', the facts about your 
pcopleinlaw. the cut of the gar- 
ments on your clothes-line, the cost 
of 3'our gold tooth, and they could 
name your family skeleton, or the 
amount of your grocery bill were 
either subject iatroduced. 

There is no question about the 
amount of valuable talent that is 
wasted in busj'bodies. If wisely 
directed and properly organized it 
would supply all the details re- 
quired b}^ the largest com.merci;il 
agency in the land at one half the 
present cost, and still have a bal- 
ance unappropriated. 

When you get married, or have 
appendicitis, or commit suicide, 
then come the busybodies after the 
facts. Between their imagination 
and their memory, attentive and 
retentive, not a crumb remains un- 
swept. And when they get to- 
gether to talk it over, compare 
notes and reminiscences — how 
l)leasant that you are not there! 
Idle busj-bodies — a paradox! 

H.\RYOT IIOLT DeV. 




This Week in New York 

Monday, August 31st 

MISCELLANEOUS 

I'ul^ilic Concert — Corlciirs Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
pts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth ave., Wav- 
erly and Washington phice. 8 p. m. 

P>asehall — New York Americans vs. Philadelphia, at the American 
League Park, \67th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Unquestionably the most palatable of the waters at Saratoga i^ that 
of the Arondack Spring. The New York headquarters for this most 
excellent mineral water is now located at No. 1217 Broadway, 
next to Daly's Theatre, where very attractive oflices and a delight- 
fully cool drinking ])arlor have been established. Those who call at 
No. 1 217 can. without indulging in an extravagant flight of fancy, 
just think that they have somehow transferred themselves to Saratoga 
and are enjoying the refreshing draughts of the real water at the great 
American Spa. Water, service, surroundings, everything at 1217 is 
perfect, and the result is a delight to the visitor. 

Daily Attractions in New York is published every Saturday for the 
succeeding week's daily attractions in New York; you can subscribe to 
it for three months for fifty cents; it will be mailed to you regularly. 
Subscribe now. 




HERBO-NERVO TONIC 

CONFECTION AND SODA DRINK 

ABSOLUTE PURITY GUARANTEED. SERIAL No. 12,586 

HcgiTiian's, Kiker's, CaswcU &• Masscy. Kanisdell & Co., li. H. 
Mary an<i all drug counters and soda louutaina. Coufection at 
I'lirk & Tilforrt's and all first class dealers. 



-MANl'F.\rTrRF:D BV- 



MRS. BLANCHK E. THOMAS 



■d hv Ihi- lati- I) 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

Mr. Henry W. Savage offers at the Garden Theatre, Madison ave. 
:ind 27th St., the three-act play, "The Devil," English translation and 
adaptation by Oliver Herford, every evening at 8.15; best seats $1.50. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, Temperance Conven- 
tion. Speakers: Rev. J. Q. A. Henry, of Los Angeles, Cal., and 
Evangelist George Stewart, of Tennessee (to Sept. 5). 8 p. ml You 
are cordially invited to attend. 

There is nothing better ofifered for a short trip than the one to 
West Point via the sumptuous steamers of the Hudson River Day Line; 
consult the time table, see index in this magazine. It will please you to 
take this day's outing. Try it. 

Motor Boat — Motor boat race week; Atlantic Yacht Club (to 
Sept. 7). 

Tennis — Open tournament; Nyack (N. Y.) Country Club. 

Horse Racing — Empire City Racing Association, between Yonkers 
and Mt. Vernon (Jerome ave.) ; every week day at 2.30 p. m. Admission 
$2, ladies $1 (to Sept. 4). 

First Annual Fair of the Long Branch Fair Association of Mon- 
mouth County at Elkwoo-d Park (to Sept. 7). 

Tuesday, September ist 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of the State meet at 
Niagara Falls. 

Professional tournament of the Scottish-American Golf Club, at Van 
Cortlandt Park (also Wednesday). 

Fifth annual encampment of the United States war veterans, and 
the tenth anniversary of the war with Spain, held in Boston (also 
Wednesday and Thursday). Admiral George Dewey and Rear-Admiral 
W. S. Schle}^, Joseph B. Coghlan, Nehemiah M. Dyer, and Frank E. 
Chadwick are expected to attend. 

Public Concert — Mt. Morris Park, Madison and Mt. Morris aves., 
i2oth to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — -Tompkins Square Park, Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Philadelphia, at the American 
League Park. 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ I 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK— tonUinied 

When in doubt try "Tlie Traveling Salesman," at llic Lil)erty 
Theatre; you will make no mistake. "Father" knows. 

The evening roof playgrounds are open from 7.30 to 10 p. m. every 
evening except Sunday; they arc located at Jlcnry. Catherine and 
Oliver sts; Rivington, Forsyth and Eldridge sts.; Mott and I'.lizabcth, 
between Prince and Spring sts.; Hester, Orchard and Ludlow sts.; 
Henry and Gouve'rneur sts.; Rivington and Sufifolk sts.; Attorney, near 
Rivington St.; Market and Monroe sts. 

Wednesday, September 2d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — ]\Iulbcrry Bend Park, Mulberry to Baxter, and 
Bayard to Park sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Stiuarc Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson 
St. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Philadelphia, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Another 'success for Robert Edeson, his greatest yet, "The Call 
of the North," at the Hudson; you can 'phone for seats, Bryant 680. 

Wednesday evening meeting, Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Mad- 
ison ave. and 31st St., the Rev. Edward Loux, D. D., minister; in Parish 
House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for strangers. 

Wednesday evening Praise and Praj^er Service, Broadway Tabernacle 
Church, 56th St. and Broadway. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

Wednesday evening meeting, tlie Rev. Alfred E. Myers will preside; 
the Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st. 8 p. m. You will 
be welcome. 

Wednesday evening meeting. Second Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Central Park West at 68th st. 8 p. m. A cordial welcome to strangers. 

Thursday^ September 3d 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Hamilton Fish Park. Houston to Stanton, and Pitt 
to Sheriff sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Square Park, Broadway, Fifth to Madison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 



FOWLER 


& WELLS 


COMPANY :: 


ESTABLISHED 


1835 




PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 




PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, 


EST. 1838 


10c. , 


$1.00 pep 


YEAR 


24 


EAST 22d 


STREET, NEW 


YORK 


CITY 





DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVKPMv — ContiiuuMi 

Public Concert — East Ri\-er Park, S4th to .Sgth sts., facing East 
River. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. I'bilailelpbia. at the American 
League Park. 167th st. and Broadway. 4 ]>. ni. Admission 50 cents. 

Did you know that Rose Stahl, in "The Chorus Lady," will play 
at the Grand Opera J louse, beginning },londay evening, September 7th. 
\ ou can order your scats in advance. This is an opportunity for you. 

The original "Seeing New York" Yacht encircles the Lsland of 
Manhattan twice daily, leaving from foot of West 22d st. at 10 a. m. and 
2.30 p. m. You do not realize the beauties of our waterway until 3'ou 
spend the three restful hours enjoying this beautiful trip. Fare $1. 

Golf — New York Championship; Van Cortlandt Park (to Sept. 5). 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. ni . ; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. ni. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and \Vest by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 23. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WKKK — Continued 

Friday, September 4th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Annu,-il iDUrnaiiR'nt of the New Ynrk and New Jersey State Rille 
As.soeiation, at Sea Girt, N. J. (to Sept. 12). Afany New York riflemen 
will he pre>ent. and anient;- them will be members of Squadron A, 7th. 
9th. Jjd, J.^d, 7t>t, 47th, and 6()th Regiments. 

Publie Concert — Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarksun and Varick sts. 
I 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — P)attery Park, foot of I'roadway, overlooking the 
harbor. S p. m. 

Publie Concert — Wm. 11. Seward Park, Hester to Division, and 
N^orfolk to Essex sts. 8 p. m. 

Baseball — ^New York Americans vs. Washington, at the American 
League Park. 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Saturday, September 5 th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Public Concert — Central Park, (in the Mall, main entrance 59th st.. 
Mfth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Washington, at the American 
League Park. 167th st. and Broadway. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

You can 'pli'-n^' f'f^'" '^ "Taxameter" cab tn -'380 Columbus, and have 
no fear of not enjoying j'cnir ride; they arc allowed in the parks, the}- 
arc clean and smokeless. Always take the Green Taxicab. 'Phone as 
above; your order will be transferred to their nearest cab stand without 
trouble or cost to you. Best service and lowe>t rates. Try one! 

Golf — Team match vs. North Jersey Country Club; Ridgefield 
(N. J.) Golf Club. 

Dog Show — Piping Rock Kennel Club; Piping Rock, L. 1. 

Horse Racing — Grand Trotting Circuit; Long Branch. 

Hc-rse Racing — Coney Island Jockej' Club; Sheepshead Bay, L. 1. 
(to Sept. 19). 

Motor Boat — Motor boat racing; Larchmont Yacht Club. 

Polo — Polo championship; Van Cortlandt Park. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Seawan- 
haka Corinthian Yaclit Club Fall and Hartford Sjiecial. 11.30 a. m. 



PAUL L. 


BRYANT 


DYEING AND CLEANSING 


Gowns Cleaned in Twenty-Four Hours 


291 FIFTH AVENUE 


900 SIXTH AVENUE 


Tel. 1224 MADISON SQ. 


Bet. 50th & 51st Sts. Tel. 5207 Plaza 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — CoiHinucd 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Brooklyn 
Yacht Club. 

First banquet of the coming season given by the Friars, Mr. Charles 
Emerson Cook, abbot, Mr. Henry Savage, guest, and Mr. A. L. Erlanger, 
advance agent; Hotel Astor. 



Sunday, September 6th 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House, 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefferson, D.D., LL. D., pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

Church of the Strangers, 309 West 57th St., the Rev. D. Asa 
Blackburn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers will be 
welcome. 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. 
David James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 
8 p. m.; the Rev. Alfred E. Myers will preach at both services. A cor- 
dial welcome for all. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Madison ave. and 44th st., the Rev. 
Lcighton Parks, D. D., rector; services, 8 a. m. and 11 a. m. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 55th st., the Rev. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m.. 4 p. m. and 
8 p. m. Rev. G. Campbell Morgan, D D., of London, noted evangelist, 
author and lecturer, will preach morning, afternoon and evening. Strang- 
ers are cordially invited. 

Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church. ALadison ave. and 
60th St., the Rev. Wallace MacMuIlen, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m.; 
the Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach. You will be welcome. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. J. B. Phillips, 
of j\Iacon, Ga., will speak. 8 p. m. (to Sept. 16). A cordial welcome 
for everyone. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall, main entrance, 50th st., 
Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 

The Golden Gate Professional Club, an organization (jf Californians 
of arts and letters; benefit to raise funds for the establishing of a home, 
Mrs. Bermont 'Packard, president; Belasco's Theatre, 42d st., near' 
Broadway. 8.15 p. m. Tickets may be obtained from members. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT 

In the "Ready lu wear" there is 
nothing more attractive and ser- 
viceable than the Hunting or 
Tramping Suit, made of waterproof 
khaki. The skirt just reaches the 
medium high laced boot, buttoned 
down the front, with deep stitched 
hem at bottom. Coat semi-fitting or 
Norfolk, color tan or olive; a soft 
hat and leggins to match. 

The wise woman who has the op- 
portunity of shopping this month 
should gratify herself with one of 
those beautiful hand-embroidered 
and lace appliqued, batiste parasols 
as the number is limited. The price 
less than one-half they were in the 
early season. 

Who could resist the lingerie 
hat with brim faced with linen 
covered with embroidery, trimmed 
with a wreath of American Beau- 
ties and purple lilacs. 

The edict has gone forth from 
the makers of Fashion the elbow 
sleeve is not to be worn. The fall 
and winter dresses of the most 
elegant type will have the long 
sleeve, which will be close and 
tight. 

For waists of sheer materials, 
transparent or not, the long-fitting 
sleeve, formed entirely of encir- 
cling tucks rather less than one 
inch broad, or else tucks of grad- 
uated width, similarly arranged, 
the broadest at the top will be the 
most favored. 

For heavier materials, tucks are 
not appropriate. Then the mous- 
quetaire style is preferred. This is 
long and tight fitting, extending 
over the back of the hand in square 
or pointed form. Sometimes fin- 
ished with a lingerie or lace ruffle. 

For foulard or tafifeta dresses a 
very efifective trimming consists of 
four or five double folds about an 
inch and a half wide placed on the 
bottom of the skirt and surround- 
ing it. Theyi may be of the same 
material and color of the dress, 
but of graduated shades, and follow 
each other, leaving no space be- 
tween. 

Something quite new and novel 
IS the shaded underskirt of a single 



TALKS 

color, shading from dark to light, 
t'le. latter always placed at the top. 
This is a fashion especially for 
evening dresses. 

Naturally the long sleeve will 
alter the length of the glove. The 
two or three button will be worn. 
In Paris, where the long sleeve is 
the mode the full length glove is 
worn over the sleeve, the long 
glove considered more dressy. 

This warm weather is a reminder 
of the "way" Araminta has in 
yented_ to keep ice water for an 
indefinite period. 

If possible, get one of those 
gray stone pitchers. Then fold a 
piece of thick wrapping paper the 
height of the pitcher, measure it 
'round so as to take in the handle 
and lap an inch, lay it out on a 
table and interline it with cotton 
batting, baste with coarse thread 
all 'round, sew it together, meas- 
ure the top with paper and line 
the same way. Sew on the top, 
fill the pitcher with ice and a little 
water. _ Keep it covered with the 
"cosey," and you will be well repaid 
for your little trouble. In case of 
sickness, when it is not convenient 
to get ice at night, the home made 
cooler would prove a blessing. 

When Araminta was in the coun- 
try last summer one of the win- 
dows was shutterless. returning 
this year she came prepared with 
an original idea in the way of an 
awning. All that is required is a 
piece of awning cloth the length 
of the upper sash with a hem at 
one end. On arrival she got a 
barrel hoop which she ran through 
the hem, tacked the awning on to 
the upper sash, and the hoop on 
each side. 

It is no use to cry over spilled 
ink on the carpet, but with quick 
action the stain can be removed. 
Mop up the ink with a sponge 
dipped frequently in clear water, 
changing the water as necessary, 
then rub the spot with a weak 
solution of ammonia or oxalic 
acid. 

Madame Roberta. 







* ^»0B, bT *' 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Madison Ave. Baptist Church 

Corner of Thirly-Firrt Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, August 30th 

Services II a. m. in Parish House 

BIBLE SCHOOL, 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



■M Welcome for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



^ftanh (El|urrl| of a^rlflt, ^rUnttat ^r,^th''suel![ 



West 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. 



Wednesday Evening Meeting, 8 p. m. 



Sunday School, il a. m. 



COLLEGIATE 



1628 



THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 



1908 



The Marble Collegiate Church 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 

Rev. ALFRED K. MYERS, will preach 

Sunday, August 30th, 1908 

II a. m. Subject : "The Evils of a Misspent Sunday " 
S p. m. Subject ; "Jesus in the Furnace Fires of Temptation " 

The Apostle's Creed is the subject under consideration at the Mid- 
week Meetings, Wednesday evenings at 8 o'clock. On Wednesday, 
Sept. 2, "l believe in Jesus Christ the Son of God." A Cordial Welcome. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

\K\\ VOHK <m IKIir.S CoiiliniitMl 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 

^aint iBartholomew's Qlhurch 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 



Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., Rector 

•f 

SPECIAL SUMMER SERVICES 

SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 11 O'CLOCK 

Preacher August 30th 

THE REV. J. STUART HOLDEN, 

Rector of St Paul's Church, Portman Square, London 

THE FULL CHOIR WILL BE PRESENT ALL SEATS FREE 



©rtnttg PartBlt 



Rev. WILLIAM T. MANNING, D. D., Rector 
Sunday Services 

TRINITY CHURCH. Broadway and Wall ST. AUGUSTINE'S CHAPEL, Houston 

St.. 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. St , east of Bowery, 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. 

ST. PAUL'S CHAPEL, Broadway and Ful- and 8 P. M. 

ton St., 7.30 and 10.30 A.M. and 7.3J SI"- AGNES'S CHAPEL, 92d St., west of 

p. M. Columbus Ave., 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, Varick, near ttil-itic r-u mjxti u j c. 

Laisht St., 7,30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 ^^ LUKE'S CHAPEL, Hudson St., opp 

p M Grove St., 7.30 and 10.30 A. M. and 8 

P. M. 

TRINITY CHAPEL, 25th St.. near Broad- INTERCESSION CHAPEL, Broadwayand 

way. 8 and 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. Iggth st., 8 and 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

ST. CHRYSOSTOM'S CHAPEL, 7th Ave. ST CORNELIUS'S, Governor's Island. 8 

and 39th St.. 7.30 and 11 A. M. and 8 P.M. A. M. and 11.45 A. M. and 3.30 P. M. 

CONGREGATIONAL 

BROADWAY TABERNACLE ""'n^irE^Z'^X^':. A-D.^f^^r^' 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a.m., 8 p. m. Bible School, g.45 a. m., 2.45 P. m, 
v. P. S. C. E.. 7 p. m. IVednasday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p. m. 

INDEPENDENT 



CHURCH OF THE STRANGERS 

309 West 57th Street 
REV. D. ASA BLACKBURN, Pastor 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 

Sunday Services, 1 1 A. M. and 7.45 P. M. Strangers in tde City Welcome 



PRESBYTERIAN 



3Fiftl| Aufttue J^rpfibytprtan (!Il)urrlj Firth Avenji^and 55th street 

8KEVICES AUGUST 3i>tli; U a.m. and 4 p.m. STRANGERS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

Rfv. WILLIAM J. DAWSON. D. D., formerly of Loridou. and well known as an evangelist. lecturer 

and author, will prtarh both in the morning and afternoon 

1.3 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HOSPITALS OF NEW YORK 



Alexander, 118 West 49th. 

Babies', 135 East 55th. 

Bellevue, foot of East 26th. 

Beth Israel, Jefferson and Cherry. 

Central Islip State, Central Islip, L. I. 

Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 

City, Blackwell's Island. 

Columbus, 226 East 20th. 

Emergency for Women, 223 East 26th. 

Epileptic, Randall's Island. 

Fever, North Brother's Island. 

Flower, East 63d, cor. Ave. A. 

Fordham's Reception, Aqueduct ave. and 

St. James. 
French Benevolent Society, 450 W. 34th. 
Gen. Memorial, 2 West 106th. 
German, 77th, Les'n and Fourth aves. 
Gouverneur, Gouvemeur slip and Front. 
Grace Church, 414 East 14th. 
Hahnemann, Park ave. and 67th. 
Harlem, 533 East 120th. 
Harlem Eye, Ear & Throat, 144 E. 127th. 
House of Relief, 67 Hudson. 
Incurables', Blackwell's Island. 
Infants', Blackwell's Island. 
Italian, 169 West Houston. 
Jewish for Deformities, 1917 Mad. ave. 
Jewish Maternity, 272 East Broadway. 
King's Park State, King's Park, L. I. 
Laura Franklin Free for Children, 17 

East 111th. 
Lehanon, Westchester & Cauldwell aves. 
Lincoln, 141st, cor. Concord ave. 
Long Island State, Brooklyn. 
Loomls Sanitarium for Consumptives, 

184 West 49th. 
Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat, 210 

East 64th. 
Manhattan Maternity, 327 East 60th. 
Manhattan State, Ward's Island ; Ofl5ce, 

foot East 116th. 
Marine, Office, Foot Whitehall. 

Maternity of N. Y., Mothers' Home of 

the Sisters of Misericorde, 531 East 

86th. 
Merchants' Marine, 78 Broad. 
Metropolitan, Blackwell's Island. 
Metropolitan Disp. & Hosp., 248 E. 82d. 
Metropolitan Throat, 351 West 34th. 
Mintum for Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, 

foot of East 16th. 
Monteflore Home for Chronic Invalids, 

Broadway and West 138th. 
Mothers' and Babies', 596 Lexington ave. 
Mt. Moriah, 138 East 2d. 
Mt. Sinai, Madison ave. and 100th. 
Mulvey's Dog and Cat, 2839 B roadway. 
New Amsterdam Eye & Ear, 230 W. SStlV 



New York, 7 West 15th and 97 Hudson. 
N. Y. Canine Infirmary, 118 West 53d. 
N. Y. Children's, Randall's Island. 
N. Y. Eye and Ear, 218 Second ave. 
N. Y. Foundling, 175 East 68th. 
N. Y. Homeopathic, 63d and Ave. A. 
N. Y. Lymph Sanitarium, 165 West 39th. 
N. Y. Medical College and Hospital for 

Women, 19 West 101st. 
N. Y. Ophthalmic, 201 East 23d. 
N. Y. Orthopaedic, 126 East 59th. 
N. Y. Polyclinic and School, 214 E. 34th. 
N. Y. Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 
N. Y. Red Cross, 110 West 82d. 
N. Y. Sanitarium, 247 West 49th. 
N. Y. Skin and Cancer, 301 East 19th. 
N. Y. Throat, Nose & Lung, 229 E. 57th. 
N. Y. Veterinary, 117 W. 25th. 
Nursery and Child's, 571 Lexington ave. 
Philanthropic, 2076 Fifth Ave. 
Post-Graduate, 303 East 20th. 

Presbyterian, 41 East 70th. 

Rebeau Private, 156 West 74th. 

Red Cross, Central Park W. and 100th. 

Riverside, North Brother's Island. 

Riverside (Reception), foot of East 16th. 

Roosevelt, West 59th, near Ninth ave. 

Ruptured and Crippled, 135 East 42d. 

St. Andrew's Convalescent, 213 E. 17th. 
,St. Ann's Maternity, 130 East 69th. 

St. Elizabeth's, 416 West 51st. 

St. Francis', 605 East 5th. 

St. Gregory, 93 Gold. 

St. John's Guild (office), 501 Fifth ave. 

St. Joseph's, East 143d and Brook ave. 

St. Lawrence, 163d & Edgecombe av. 

St. Luke's, Amsterdam ave. and 113th. 

St. Mark's, 117 Second ave. 

St. Mary's Free for Children, 405 West 
34th. 

St. Vincent's, 149 West 11th. 

Sanitarium for Hebrew Children (office), 
356 Second ave. 

Scarlet Fever & Diphtheria, foot E. 16th 

Seton, Spuyten Duyvil. 

Sloane Maternity, W. 59th and Ams. ave. 

Society of the Lying-in, Second Ave. and 
17th. 

Sydenham, 339 East 116th. 

Trinity, 50 Varick. 

U. S. Marine (office), Battery. 

Washington Heights, 554 West 165th. 

Willard Parker, foot of East 16th. 

Woman's, 141 West 109th. 

Woman's Inflrmarv and Maternity Home, 
124 West 65th. 

Wright. J. Hoed, Memorial, 503 W. 131st. 

Yorkville, 246 East 82d. 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



"THE DEVIL"— AT THE GARDEN 



No better indication can be of- 
fered to show how much closer 
America and Europe are getting 
in touch on all matters pertaining 
to things theatrical than the great 
interest aroused by Franz Alolnar's 
sensational play, "The Devil," in 
this country. 

In the space of little over a 
year the play had spread rapidly 
over all Europe and as soon as the 
fact became known that Henry W. 
Savage had obtained the rights for 
America the theatre going public 
quickly made it apparent that it 
was fully aware of the unusual 
qualities of the work and glad to 
welcome it. 

When Mv. Savage allowed the 
play to be given at Hartford dur- 
ing the summer it registered a 
success beyond that of any pro- 
duction ever offered 'twixt seasons. 
The cynicisms and brilliant epi- 
grams of the original lost nothing 
in the adaptation of an author so 
polished in style as Oliver Her-- 
ford, and Mr. Savage was quickly 
assured he had obtained another 
triumph to equal those connected 
with his name in the past decade 
and perhaps even surpass the 
brilliance of his famous operetta, 
"The Merry Widow." 

Twenty two curtain calls marked 
the opening of "The Devil" at the 
Garden Theatre, when the play had 
its Metropolitan premiere, and each 
succeeding performance has been 
before phenomenally crowded 
houses. 

The cast chosen by Mr. Savage 
for this production has proven re 
markable discernment, and Mol- 
nar's diamond points of speech and 
action are made to sparkle with 
the most brilliant effect. Mr. Ed- 
win Stevens is doing the be t work 
of his life with his vivid picture of 
a modernized Spirit of Evil and 
the quaint humor with which his 
"really pleasant Devil" weaves his 
net about his victims marks his 
performance as one most attractive 
and assures him the close attention 
of his audience. 



The remarkable cast also in- 
cludes I'aul McAllister, Dorothy 
Dorr, Marion Lome, Marguerite 
Snow. W. Chrystie Miller, Frank 
Monroe, Henry Clark, Arthur 
Hoyt, Franklin Rixby, Nan Le- 
wald, Jane Murray, and Theodosia 
(le Cappet. 



A woman without a laugh in her 
is the greatest bore in existence.— 
Thackeray. 

IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

Thi- Only All Water Route to 

CONBY ISI^A.ND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 
Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 

World. 
TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, *10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
*12.55. •1.40, 2.55, 8.40, 4.25, •5.25. 
6.10, 7.10, •7.55, •8.40, •9.25, •10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked with a • go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 cents. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Fare: — Gentlemen, 75c.; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAND REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers. 
8.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., *12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R.. 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M.. 2.30 P. M. : 
Rockaway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5.30 P. M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Grand Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. : Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



15 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 



Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flaiiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



>l 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
♦Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Aster Place 
•14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



•42d St. and Park Ave.— Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



•72d St. andBroac 
79th St. and Broad 
86th St. and Broad 
91st St. and Broad 

*96th St. and Broad 

WEST SIDE bra: 1 
103d St. and Broac 1 
110th St. and Broad 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 



For any information send to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, 



Rheims, N. Y. 



16 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West rzd Street 
North River, lo A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

F71RE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



MAP 

OP 

MANHATTAN 




SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and liroadway 
231st St. and Broadwav 
238th St. and Broadway 
242d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Len'^x Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 



Cotiright. 1007. B. L. Clarke 

Mott Ave. and 149th St. 

Third Ave. and 149th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

•Express Stations 



Good Positions Now Open for Salesmen^ Executive, 
Clerical and Technical Men 

Who can earn ;J 1,000-^ 5, 000 a year. Full information free if you call or 
write us to-day. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



17 







LEADING NEW YORK HOTELS, 


Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON, Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES, Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 


The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 


Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman'a Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 

Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 

Dutch Grill Palm Garden 

The Plaza 

FRED STERRY. Managing Director 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Ansonia 

Broadway, 73d to 74th Streets 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Buckingham 

Fifth Avenue at 50th Street 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED & BARNETT, Prop. \ 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE, Mgr. 
81st Street and Columbus Avenue 


Prince George Hotel ^ 

A. B. DICK, Mgr. 
15 Bast 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 


Hotel Savoy 

JOHN F. RIES. Managing Director 1 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL, Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hotel St. Andrew 

CHARLES H. DAVIS, Manager 
Broadway and 72d Street 


Hotel Gotham 

Chas. L. Wctherbee and William R. Wood 
S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 1 


Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN, Prop. 
Broadway and 42d Street 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY, Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just off Broadway 


Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY. Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East 


li 


I 



lotsts 




i»OB, »•« 



New York Theatres 



\cademy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Stuyve- 
sanl. Maclyn Arbuckle in "The 
Round Up." Eve., 8.15; mat,^., 
Wed. and Sat., 2. Prices, 50c. 
to $1.50. 

\lhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville, 
Daily mats., 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices 50c. to $l. 

\merican — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel. 3560 Bryant. Closed. 

;\stor — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. William Hodge in 
"The Man from Home." Eve, 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Belasco — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 4281 Bryant. "The Devil." 
Eve., 8.20; mat.. Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Jijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 
Tel., 1530 Madison. Mr. Douglas 
Fairbanks in "All for a Girl." 
Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 



Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 
Tel., loi Bryant. "Algeria." 
Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat., 2.15. Prices 
50c. to $2. 

Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Circle — Broadway and 6oth st. Tel., 
5138 Columbus. Closed. 

Colonial — Broadway and 62d st. 
Tel., 4457 Columbus. Closed. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Miss Isadora 
Duncan in her famous classical 
dances. Eve., 8.20. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission 50c.; Sunday, 25c. 




^1 Dainty Home Coooking — Breakfast, Luncheon. Supper, 
served with delicacy and good taste. Food, salads 
and fruit according to season. 

Our Ste.ialty: AFTERNOON TEA 

fl Full line of antiques, old laces, fans, etc. Art ob- 
jects in larse variety. 

31 West 33D Street, near Waldorf-Astoria 



ii> 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Lord & Taylor 

Wholesale Distributors 



''Onyx' Hosiery 




Look for this Trade Mark 

Stamped on every pair 

Two-thirds of all the women of America 
know this brand, the other third will 
soon be clamoring for them. "Onyx" 
quality is recognized as the standard of 
of all hosiery, and for beauty of design, 
durability, exquisite fabric, variety of 
weight and great choice in colors, has 
no equal. Sold at your favorite dealers. 



Broad' 



roaawav 



New York 



NEW YORK THEATKES — Continued 



Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Beg. Sept. 3, 
Brnce MacRae and Margaret 
lllington in ''The Thief." Eve.. 
S.I 5; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. "The Devil."' 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $1.50. 

Garrick — 35th st., east of Sixth ave. 



Tel., 35i-38th. 
"The Mollusc.' 
Wed. and Sat. 
to $2. 



Beg. Sept. 1st, 
Eve., 815; mats., 
2.15. Prices 50c. 



Gaiety — 46th st. and Brnadwaj 
Geo. M. Cohan in "The Yankee 
I'rince." Eve., 8.15; mat.. Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. anc 
23(1 St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. "The 
Time, The Place and The Girl.'; 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $1. 

Hackett — 42d St., west of B'wayl 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Mr. JohiT 
Mason in "The Witching Hour." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. an( 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



34 WEST TWENTY-FIFTH STREET. 



Single and Double Rooms. 
Transients accommodated. 



Baths. Table Excellent. 
ABSOLUTELY FIRST CLASS. 



AKW YORK THKATKES— Coutinued 



Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Bryant. 
Vaudeville. Daily mats., 2; Roo£ 
Garden, eve., 8.15. Prices, 25c. 
to $1.50. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel.. 2485-38111. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. Beg. Sept. 5th, "Sporting- 
Days." and "Battle in the Skies." 
Mats., daily, 2; eve., 8.15. Prices 
50c. to $1.50. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Robert 
Edeson in "The Call of the 
North." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Jardin de Paris — Atop of the New 
York Theatre, Broadway and 
45th St. "Folies of 1908." Eve., 
8.15. Prices, see. to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel.. 2243-38th. Beg. Sept. 
2d, "The Girls of Gottenberg." 
Eve., 8.15. Mat., Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Keith & Proctor's: 5th Avenue — 
28th St. and Broadway. Tel., 2880 
Madison. Vaudeville. Eve., 8.15; 
mats., daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 



125th^ Street— 125th st., near Lex- 
ington ave. Tel., 1250 Harlem. 
Vaudeville. Eve., 8.15; mats., 
daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 

Liberty — 42d St., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. "The Traveling 
.Salesman." Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat. 
2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Lincoln Square — Broadway and 
66th St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. 
Closed. 

Lyric — 42d st., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Beg. Sept. 
7th, Miss Mary Mannering in 
"Glorious Betsy." Eve., 8.15; 
mat. Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
\va)^ Tel., 546 Bryant. Miss 
Rillie Burke in Love Watches." 
Eve.. 8.20; mats., Thur. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 

Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
'The Merry Widow." Eve., 8.15; 
mats., Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. Prices 
^oc. to $2. 



THE EARLINGTON "'TZ'^n'^r 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York Chy Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 




The Wine 

of the Convalescent 

By those who know is considered 
a tonic and is the condensed 
sunshine of the famous Keuka 
Valley — the most beautiful and 
healthful spot on the earth. 

SoIJ at all deale s 

PLEASANT VALLEY 
WINE COMPANY 

RHEIMS, N. Y. 



NEW YORK TJIEATllES — Continued 



New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. Richard 
Carle in "Alary's Lamb." Eve, 
8.30; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.30. 
Prices soc. to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel, 535i-38th. Beg. Sept. 5. 
Carlotta Nillson in "Diana of 
Dobson's." Eve., 8.15; mats., 
Thur. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 4465 Bryant. Beg. 
Sept. 2ist. Blanche Bates in 
"The Fighting Hope." Eve., 
8.15; mat., Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Beg. Sept. 
I, Arnold Daly in "The Regen- 
eration." Eve., 8.15; mats., VVed. 
and Sat.. 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 



Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
"Paid in Full." Eve., 8.30; mats.. 
Wed. and Sat., 2.30. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

West End — ^West 125th st., near 
8th ave. Tel., 2904 Morningside. 
Beg. Sept. 28th, Camille D'Ar- 
ville and Jefferson De Angelis in 
"The Gay White Way." Eve., 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $1.50. 



Wisdom is only knowing what is 
best to do next. Virtue is doing 
it. — David Starr Jordan. 



Be like a vine which has pro- 
duced grapes, and knows not what 
it has done. — Marcus Aurelius An- 
toninus. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE EDEN MUSEE 

One of the mosl reniarkabK' 
places ill the world is the Eden 
Miisce. There are so many halls 
and corridors and so many hun- 
dreds of wax groups and figures 
and other objects of interest that 
the Musee could almost present a 
different entertainment each day. 
Instead of doing this, however, 
an effort is made to have the 
amusement conform to the season. 
Just at present the midsummer or 
vacation season is on and the in- 
terior of the Musee presents a 
breezy appearance. There arc 
palms and decorations of greens 
throughout which arc kept rustling 
by artificial breezes. Some of the 
figures present a languid appear- 
ance as if tired of being stared at 
while others have that natty air 
which comes from being fond of 
publicity. In the Winter Garden 
moving pictures are shown hourly 
afternoon and evening, with a 
change of pictures each hour. The 
moving picture markets of the 
whole world are closely scanned 
and the best pictures available arc 
first shown at the Eden Musee. 
Among these pictures are vacation 
trips through Ireland, Scotland and 
other European countries, char- 
acter sketches from various lands, 
and humorous and mysterious 
scenes. Karl Kapussy and his 
Royal Hungarian Orchestra re- 

HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone: 6500 Madlion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Place Tor Ladies Traveling Alone 

RESTAURANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 eta. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooma from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In ea>y acccii of all the principal theatres 

Subway Station, z8th Street, within one block 

Z9tb Street cars pass the door 



main a leading attraction and ren- 
der afternoon and evening concerts 
with elaborate programs of class- 
ical music. Out of town visitor? 
will find the Eden Musee one of 
the most interesting amusement re- 
sorts in New York. 

Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
"New York" and "Alljany" 



A.M. I P.M. 



Lv. Read Down. 

Xm. 

"8:00 
8:40 
9:00 
9:20 
9:45 



Ar. 



A.M. 



1908 

^^[jteadUrT. 
P.M. I P.M. 



11 :50 
i2":25 



1 :15 

2 :10 



.S :'2r^ 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1 :00 

*1 :25 

1 :45 



2:35 



1 :45 
2:00 

2 :20 



4 :50 
5:00 
5:25 

5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 

6 :45 



7:45 



.Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkers . . . . 
..Highland Falls.. 
...West Point... 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
. New Hamburgh . 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsle . . 
. .Kingston Point. . 
. . . . Kingston . . . . 

Catskill 

. . . . Hudson . . . . 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



00 



P.M. I P.M. I P.M. I 



6:20 
6:00 
5:30 
5 :10 
4 :30 


9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7:35 


2:50 
"2 as 


5:45 

♦5:20 

5:05 






1 :20 

12:25 


4 :10 


11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 





I A.M. I A.M. I P.M. 
23 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 

and Kingston Point wharfs 

for all points in Catskill 

Mountains 

Morning and Afternoon 

Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 5860 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-3Sth. 

Pennsylvania — -Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
.Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y., C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpolnt Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa'sonia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonla 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island— Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.), Canal, Grand, Rivington, 1st, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and l&t av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th. 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Pohit 
Ferry), 42d (char.ge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road) 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi., 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gl.. Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d. 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145ith, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



2-i 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Dodd, Mead & Co. all the latest books 

FIFTH AVENUE, Cor. 35th St. OtatlOnery, HtC. 



LATEST POPULAR FICTION 

Betty Pembroke by Elizabctli curtains cf her lied and looks out, 

Hazelwood Hancock is one of "Mamma," said lietly, "I had an 

the most deliglitful books of true awful night" — and she tells of a 

Southern life that has been pub- dream: the carrying of this 

lished for many days. The author "dream" and its elYect on Hetty is 

has the rare faculty of transplant- intensely interesting to the end of 

ing her readers to the "spot"' where the story. 

Betty lived. The first introduction Chapter third, where a big ball 
to Betty is the morning after a is given at Betty's home; "The 
terrible wind storm; she runs into Oaks," for her formal introduction 
her mother's bedroom with only to society, is a most delightful pen 
her pink wrapper and slippers on picture of "Ole Virginie" society, 
to warm herself before the cheer- and will be enjoyed by those who 
ful wood fire with its great brass have lived it and equally by the 
andirons, fender, tongs, and shovel, reader who knows it only by the 
shining as only ".\unt Lucy could telling. Betty's visit to New York, 
make them shine." Betty is a her Ioa'cs, and the silent over- 
pretty picture, but the dark rings shadowing of the dream must be 
'round her eyes is noticed by Old left for the reader. The author has 
Mammy Aunt Lucy, who "strokes breathed into this story the true 
the reddish brown hair sympathet- essence of Southern life. We 
ically." Mrs. Pembroke, hearing heartily commend it to your 
them talking, parts the tlowered perusal. Eliz-Msetii Hopkins. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



''* roBT NAME OP 

, rum ITIAMBR 



PORT r^,. WW. ADDRBSIES OP LINM STARTING PLACE 



I.Rotterdam I'otsdam HoIIand-Amer, 39 B'way Pt 5th St., Iloboken 

1 . Bremen Cecille \. Genuan Lloyd. .5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

2. Southampton Teutonic White Star Line, B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

2. Liverpool Mauretania.. ("unard S. S. Co.. 21 State St Ft Jane St.. N. R. 

S.Havre Savoie French Line, 19 State St I't Morton St., N. R. 

.'^. Coiic-uhacen Oscar II Scandinavian-Amer. 1 B'way Kt 17th St., IIolKikun 

■M'.reinpn P.F.AYilliam. . \. German Lloyd, ,"> B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

.'i.IIamburic Vmerika llnmburg-Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 1st St., Iloboken 

3. Liverpool Baltic White Star Line, B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

3.Gib'r& Naples.. . . Carpathia.. . .('unard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft .Tane St., X. R. 

.■i. Liverpool Carmania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft .Tane St., N. R. 

o.Hambur;^ 1'. Grant Hamburj^-.Vmer., 45 B'way l'"t 1st St., Hoboken 

S.Antwerp Vaderland. . . .Red Star Line, 9 B'way Ft Pulton St., N. R. 

5. Southampton St. Paul American Line, B'way Ft Pulton St., N. R. 

5 . London Minnetonka. . Atlantic Trans. Line, B'way. . . . Ft Houston St., N. R. 

5 . Gib'r & Naples. . . . P. Irene X. German Lloyd, 5 B'way I''t 3d St., Hoboken 

5. Glasgow Furnesia \nchor Line, 17 B'way V^t 24th St., N. It. 

8. Bremen KronprinzW. .\. (ierman Lloyd. 5 B'way Ft 3d St., Hoboken 

S.Rotterdam X(X)rdam Holland-.Vmer. 39 B'way.. , Ft 5th St., Iloboken 

O.Southampton Adriatic White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

9.Liveii)ool Lucania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St., N. R. 

10 . Bremen Barbarossa. . . N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 3d St.. llolwken 

10. Naples Fltonia Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft Jane St"., N. R. 

10. Hamburg Bluecher Ilamburs-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 1st St., Iloboken 

10. Liverpoc7l Cedric White Star Lhie. 9 B'way Ft 11th St., N. R. 

10. Copenhagen C.F.Tietgen.. Scandinavian-Amer, 1 B'way.. . . Pt 17th St., Hoboken 

10 . Havre Provence French Line, 19 iState St Pt Morton St., N. R. 



25 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



LEADING HOTELS THROUGH WHICH DAILY 
ATTRACTIONS CIRCULATES 



Aberdeen, 17 W 32d 
Albany, B'way and 41st 
Albermarle, Broadway and 24th 
Albert, Univ. PI. and nth 
Aldine, 431 Fourth ave 
Algonquin. 59 W 44th 
Ansonia, Broadway and 73d 
Arlington, 18 W 25th 
Ashton, 1312 Madison Ave 
Astor House, B'way and Barclay 
Astor, Broadway and 44th 
Bartholdi, Broadway and 23d 
Belleclaire, Broadway and 77th 
Belmont (New). Park Ave & 42d 
Belvedere, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Beresford, Central Pk W and 81st 
Bonta, Broadway and 94th 
Breslin, Broadway and 29th 
Bretton Hall, Broadway and 86th 
Brevoort, Fifth Ave and 8th 
Broadway Central, 673 Broadway 
Broztell, 3 E 27th 
Buckingham, Fifth Ave and 50th 
Cadillac, B'way and 43d 
Calumet, 340 W S7th 
Calvert, Broadway and 41st 
Collingwood, 45 W 35th 
Colonial, 8ist and Columbus Ave 
Continental, Broadway and 20th 
Cumberland, Broadway and 54th 
Endicott, Columbus Ave and 8rst 
Empire, Broadway and 63d 
Essex, Madison Ave and 56th 
Flanders, 135 W 47th 
Florence, Fourth Ave and i8th 
Gerard, 123 W 44th 
Gilsey, Broadway and 29th 
Gotham, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Grand Union, Park Ave and 42d 
Gregorian, 42 W 35th 
Grenoble, Seventh Ave and 56th 
Hamilton, 132 W 4Sth 
Hargrave, 112 W 72d 
Hoffman House, Broadway & 25th 
Holland House, Fifth Ave and 30th 
Imperial, Broadway and 31st 
Iroquois, 49 W 44th 
K!ing Edward, 155 W 47th 
Knickerbocker, Broadway and 42d 
Latham, 4 East 28th 



Le Marquis, 12 E 31st 
Long Acre, 157 W 47th 
Lorraine, Fifth Ave and 4Sth 
Lucerne, Amsterdam Ave and 79th 
Madison, 2i7 Madison Ave 
Madison Avenue, Mad. Ave & 92d 
Majestic, Central Park W and 72d 
Manhattan, Madison Ave and 42d 
Mansfield, 12 W 44th 
Marie Antoinette, B'way and 67th 
Markwell, Broadway and 49th 
Marlborough, Broadway and 36th 
Martha Washington, 29 E 29th 
Martinique, Broadway and 33d 
Murray Hill, Park Ave and 40th 
Navarre, Seventh Ave and 38th 
Netherland, Fifth Ave and 59th 
New Amsterdam, .4th Ave and 21st 
New Grand, Broadway and 31st 
New Weston, Madison Ave & 49th 
Orleans, 100 W 8oth 
Oxford, Park Ave and 58th 
Park Avenue, Park Ave and 33d 
Plaza, Fifth Ave and S9th 
Portland, 132 W 47th 
Prince George, 12 E 28th 
Raymond, 42 E 28th 
Regent, Sherman Sq and 70th 
Renaissance, 512 Fifth Ave 
San Remo, Central Park W & 74tb 
Savoy, Fifth Ave and 59th 
Seville, Madison Ave and 29th 
Seymour, 44 W 45th 
Sherman Sq, Broadway and 71st 
Somerset, 150 W 47th 
St. Andrew, Broadway and 72d 
St. Denis, Broadway and iifh 
St. Lorenz, 72d st & Lex Ave 
St. Paul, Columbus Ave and 6oth 
St. Regis, Fifth Ave and 55th 
Stratford, 11 E 32d 
Victoria, Broadway and 27th 
Waldorf-Astoria, Fifth Ave & 34th 
Walton, Columbus Ave and 70th 
Warrington, 161 Madison Ave 
Wellington, Seventh ave and 55th 
Westminster, Irving PI and i6th 
Wolcott, 4 W 31st 
Woodstock, 127 W 43d 
Woodward, Broadway and 55th 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



Art Galleries — The art galleries of 
Xew York to which the public are 
admitted are comparatively few 
in number, but there are a num- 
ber of notable pic1;ures to be seen 
by those interested in art mat- 
ters, in some public buildings 
which are devoted to other pur- 
poses. Thus there are in the 
Lenox Library a number of tine 
pictures bequeathed to the city 
by Mr. Lenox, including works 
by Reynolds, Turner and Mun- 
kacsy. The New York Historical 
Society possesses some valuable 
pictures, while there are some in- 
teresting portraits of former 
mayors of New York to be seen 
at the City Hall. Some of the 
chief artistic treasures of New 
York, however, are to be found 
in the collections of private in- 
dividuals. American Water Color 
Society, logth st. and Amster- 
dam ave.; National Academy of 
Design, Amsterdam ave. and 
104th St.; Society of American 
Artists, 215 West 57th St.; Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, Fiftli 
ave. and 82d st. ; Lenox Library, 
89s Fifth ave.; N. Y. Historical 
Society, Central Park West and 
76tli St. 

Battery Park — Foot P>roadway. 
Affords tine view of the harbor. 

Birthplace of President Roosevelt 
— Our President was born at No. 
28 East 20th St., October 27, 1858. 
A political organization under 
the name of "Roosevelt Home 
Club," occupies a portion of the 
builcHng. 

Botanical Gardens — In Bronx 
Park, at 177th st. Special exhibi- 
tion of rare orchids and ferns. 
10 a. m. to 5 p. m. Free. 

Bowling Green — Foot Broadway. 
Oldest park. Drill ground in 1626. 
t Bronx Park — Southern Boulevard 
and East i82d st. and Pelham 
ave. Admission free. Closed at 
sundown. 

Church of the Ascension — Fifth 
ave. and 10th st. This church was 
founded in 1828 and was located 



in Canal st. Tlie present church 
was built in 1841 and contains 
the largest oil painting of a 
sacred subject in the world. This 
picture is 38 feet high and 40 feet 
wide and was presented to this 
church by Mrs. Rhinelander, at 
a cost of over $20,000. It is sup- 
posed that it took 3,000 pounds of 
paint to execute this work. A 
story told of the early days is 
that planks were laid to Broad- 
way across the meadows and a 
small sum of money was paid to 
the truant officer to prevent the 
boys from bathing in the brook, 
which was located at the back of 
the church, during service. 

Chinatown — Mott, Pell and Doyers 
sts. Contains Chinese theatres, 
shops, restaurants, etc. 

City Hall— City Hall Park. Built 
1803. Contains portraits of Gov- 
ernors, Washington's table, desk 
and portrait in silk. 

City Prison — Called "The Tombs." 
Centre and Franklin sts. 

Clearing House — ~'] Cedar. Daily 
l)usincss nearly $300,000,000. 

Cooper Union Library and School 
— 3d and 4th aves. and 7th st. 
Founded 1857 by P. Cooper. 

Curb Market — On Broad street, be- 
low Exchange place, a large 
number of men with standing in 
tlie tinancial world not regular 
members of th-? Stock Excliange, 
and dealing principally in unlist- 
ed securities which are known as 
"cats and dogs." This organiza- 
tion is now confined to a roped 
arena in the centre of the street. 

Custom House — Wall, corner Will- 
iam. Xew bidg.. Bowling Green. 

Eden Musee — West 23d st., be- 
tween Broadway and Sixth ave. 
This is a museum containing 
many interesting and historical 
groups in wax. Admission, 50 
cents; Sunday, 25 cents. 

Fort George— 190th st., between 
.Amsterdam and nth aves. A 
high, rocky projection on which 
a redoubt had been erected dur- 
ing the Revolution. Tlie Lsal)ella 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTKREST — Continued 



Home for old people is located 
here. 

Fraunce's Tavern — Broad and Pearl 
sts. One hundred and seventy- 
eight years old; recently pur- 
chased by the Sons of the Revo- 
lution. It was here that Wash- 
ington said farewell to his officers 
of the American Army in 1783. 

Golden Hill — Near John and Will- 
iam streets was shed the first 
blood of the Revolution in a 
skirmish between citizens and 
'the king's soldiers. This is 
known as the "Battle of Golden 
Hill " A tablet marks the spot — 
William and John streets, Golden 
Hill. Here, January 18, 1770, the 
tight took place between the 
"Sons of Liberty" and the Brit- 
ish Regulars, i6th Foot. First' 
blood in the War of the Revolu- 
tion. Erected by the Sons of the 
Re\'oluti<m. 

Harlem River Speedway— Extend- 
ing from 155th to 2o8th St., on 
the western bank of the Harlem 
River; 100 feet wjde, with side- 
walks for pedestrians. 

Herald Building — ^ Broadway and 
35th St. 

High Bridge — Harlem ' River and 
175th St. 

Jumel Mansion — Edgecombe ave. 
and i6oth st. Washington's 
Headquarters. Once the home 
of Aaron Burr. 

Kennedy House — Formerly stood 
on the site of the present Wash- 
ington Building, overlooking 
Battery Park, erected in 1760 by 
Archibald Kennedy, Collector of 
the Port. Here General Putnam 
had his headquarters previous to 
the Battle of Long Island, and 
at various times it was occupied 
also by Lord Cornwallis, Lord 
Howe, Sir Henry Clinton and 
Talleyrand. Here also Benedict 
Arnold ;irranged his conspiracy, 
and from here Washington wit- 
nessed the departure of the Brit- 
ish troops. 

Menagerie — Central P.irk, ojjijosile 
East 64th. Rare animals and l)inls. 
Free. Hours, g a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Metropolitan Museum of Art— Cen^ 
tral Park, opposite 82d. Daily, ic 
a. m. to 5 p. m. Saturday, 10 to 
10 p. m.; Sunday, i to 5.30 p. m. 
Free. Except Monday and Fri- 
day, fee 25c. • 

Morgue — About 4,000 bodies of 
adults and 3,000 children are re- 
ceived yearly, including those who 
die in the hospital of the Depart- 
ment of Charities as well as those 
found in public places. Erected 
in 1897. Open day and night. At 
the foot of East 26th st. 

Navy Yard, Fort Sands — Open 
daily to visitors, except Sun- 
days and holidays, from 8 a. m. 
to 5 p. m. Xo pass required to 
visit yards, but permission to 
visit ships must be obtained from 
commanding officers. It is also 
necessary to have pass to obtain 
admission to yard on Sundays 
and holidays. By trolley from 
Brooklyn Bridge. 

Obelisk — Near Museum of Art. 
b^rected in Egypt, 1500 B. C. Pre- 
sented by the Khedive. Brought 
here 1881 at cost of $100,000. 

Potter's Field — Here lie the bodies 
of the unknown and pauper dead. 
Located on Hart's Island. Can 
be reached by boat from East 
26th St. Pass can be had by ap- 
plying to Department of Chari- 
ties or Correction. 

Rhinelander Sugar House — For- 
merly stood on the corner of the 
present Rose and Duane streets, 
one of the many buildings in 
which American prisoners were 
incarcerated during the Revolu- 
tion, subject to inhuman cruel- 
ties at the hands of the infamous 
Cunningham. 

Rogues' Gallery — Police Headquar- 
ters, No. 300 Mulberry st. Can 
be viewed only by special per- 
mission. A collection of photo- 
graphs of notorious criminals 
who have from time to time been 
in the hands of the police. 

Spanish Museum — At the foot of 
West 156111 St., near Riverside 
Drive, is situated the property on 
wliich Mr. Archer Huntington 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST— Continued 



has built the beautiful Hispanic 
Society Building. Built of gray 
stone with Doric columns, Ro- 
man-Spanish in style of archi- 
tecture, a stone embankment pre- 
serves the terraced foundation, 
and two flights of stone steps 
lead down to the street in the 
middle front. For many years 
Mr. Huntington has devoted 
much time and money to the col- 
lecting of rare and choice Span- 
ish antiques from earliest peri- 
ods, including those of the Span- 
ish colonies, it being his wish to 
establish in this city a museum 
and library that would represent 
the complete history of Spain in 
its national, political, social, in- 
tellectual and art life. Visitors 
are welcome. 

Statue of Liberty — Bedloe's Island. 
Steamer from Battery every 
hour; 25 cents round trip; tickets 
good for admission to the statue; 
presented by I">ance. 

St. Paul's Church — P)road\vay and 
Vcsey St. Built in 1764; main- 
tained by Trinity Parish. Attend- 
ed by Washington, whose pew 
remains. 

St. Patrick's Cathedral— Fifth ave. 
and 50th St. Open daily. Visitors 
are welcome. On view is the 
cardinal's liat hanging on the 
altar. It is so high up under the 
arch that it looks like a mere 
speck. 

Stock Exchange — 20 Broad st. 

Sub-Treasury — Wall and Nassau. 
Government banking house, $200,- 
000,000 in gold and silver coins 
often stored here. Site of Wash- 
ington's inauguration. The stone 
he stood on can be seen. 

The Swamp — Is located west of 
I'Vanklin Square, and east of City 
Hall Park. Here is to be found 
the centre of the hide and leather 
trade of New York. As this sec- 
tion is in a hollow, it is called to 
this day "The Swamp," the at- 
mosphere being strongly impreg- 
nated with the odor of fresh sole 
leather and of salted hides. 



Van Cortlandt Mansion — Van Cort- 
landt Park, near Jerome ave., 
now a historic museum in charge 
of Colonial Dames. 

Ward's Island — Located in tlie 
East River near its junction with 
the Harlem River, and forms the 
northern boundary of Hell Gate. 
It is owned by the city and con- 
tains about 200 acres, and is oc- 
cupied by the Manhattan State 
Hospital for the Insane, the State 
Emigrant Hospital, Houses of 
Refuge, and a nursery or home 
for children, as well as home for 
invalid soldiers of the Civil War. 
Can be reached by boat from 
East ii6th st. in the afternoon. 
Procure pass from Manhattan 
State Hospital. Also by steamer 
from Peck Slip, 11.30 a. m., Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

Washington Arch — Washington 
S(i. and 5th ave. Dedicated 1893. 

Washington Bridge — Amsterdam 
ave., 181st, over Harlem River. 

Washington Building — Located at 
Battery place and Broadwa}', 
erected by Cyrus W. Field, the 
author and founder of the At- 
lantic cable. Tablet erected : No. 
I Broadwaj'^: "Here stood Ken- 
nedy House, once headquarters 
of Generals Washington and 
Lee " On the Bowling Green 
opposite, the leaden statue of 
King George was destroyed by 
the people, July 9, 1776, and later 
made into bullets for the Ameri- 
can army. 

Washington Market — Occupies the 
entire blocks, Washington, West, 
Fulton and Vesey streets. This 
is the principal meat and veg- 
etable market of the citj% and in 
the early morning hours affords 
a spectacle well worth witnessing. 

Woodlawn Cemetery — Jerome and 
Wel)ster aves., East 2ilth to 

Zoological Park — Bronx Park, 
Southern r)OuU'vard and East 
i82d St. and Pelhani ave. Free 
except Monday and Thursday. 
Admission, 25 cents; children, 15 
cents. Open until sundown. 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Directors Office and General Headquarters, 4-26 LAFAYETTE STREET 

TklkphONE, 3970 SPRING 

Circulation Headquarters. 209 WEST 23rd STREET 
Telephone, 3076 CHELSEA 



Reference Branches: 



ASTOR, 4.26 LAFAYETTE STREET 



LENOX, 890 FIFTH AVENUE 



CIRCULATION BRANCHES: 



East B'way, 197. (East B'way Branch). 
*East B'way, 33. (Chatham Sq. Branch). 
*Rivington Street, 61. . (Rivington Street 

Branch). 
*Leroy St., 66.. (Hudson Park Branch). 

Bond Street, 40. (Bond Street Branch). 
*10th St., 331 East. .. (Tompkins Square 
Branch) 

Second Ave., 135.(Ottendorfer Branch). 

13th St., 251 W. . (Jackson Sq. Branch). 
*23d St., 228 East.. (Epiphany Branch). 
*23d St., 209 W. . (Muhlenberg Branch). 

34th St., 215 East... (34th St. Branch). 

40th St., 501 W. . (St. Raphael Branch). 

42d St., 226 W. (George Bruce Branch). 

50th St., 123 East.. (Cathedral Branch). 

51stSt., 463 W..( Sacred Heart Branch). 

58th St., 121 East(59th Street Branch). 
*67th St., 328 East. (67th Street Branch). 
♦Amsterdam Ave., 190. (Riverside Br'ch). 

♦Avenue A, 1465 (Webster Branch). 

*79th St., 222 East..(Yorkville Branch). 
♦Amsterdam Ave., 444. (St. Agnes B'ch). 
♦96th St., 112 East.. (96th St. Branch). 

110th St., 174 East..(AguiIar Branch). 



123d St., 32 W. (The Harlem Library). 
*125th St., 224 E.. . (125th St. Branch). 
♦135th St., 103 W.. (135th St. Branch). 

* 145th St., 503 W (Hamilton Grange 

Branch), 
St. Nicholas Avenue, 922. . (Washington 

Heights Branch). 
Library for the Blind, 444 .\msterdam 
Avenue. 

BOROUGH OF BRONX. 

*140th St.. 569 E. . (Mott Haven Br'ch). 
♦Washington Ave., 1866.(Tremont B'ch). 
♦Kingsbridge Ave., 2933. . . (Kingsbridge 
Branch). 

BOROUGH OF RICHMOND. 
♦Amboy Road, Tottenville. . . (Tottenvillc 

Branch). 
♦Central Ave., Tompkinsville, S. I.. (St. 

George Branch). 
♦12 Bennett St. (Port Richmond Br'ch). 
♦Stapleton, Canal and Brook Sts. 
♦Occupying Carnegie Buildin.gs. 



HOURS 

Tha Branches, with exceptions noted below, are open from 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. 
on week days. 

Branches in Carnegie Buildings are open full hours on all legal holidays. 

The other branches are closed during the entire day on New Year's Day, 
Decoration Day, the Fourth of July, Presidential Election Day, Thanksgiving Day 
and Christmas Day; after 6 p. m.on Washington's Birthday and Christmas Eve; 
and on Election Day (when not Presidential) after 5 p. m. 

The East Broadway Branch is closed from 5 p. m. on Fridays to 6 p. m. on 
Saturdays, and is open on Sundays from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Sacred Heart, Cathedral and St. Raphael Branches are open on Sundays 
from 10 a. m. till noon, and the reading rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street. Tomp- 
kins Square, Muhlenberg, Ottendorfer, Rivington Street and Riverside Branches from 
2 till 6 p. m. 

The Reading Rooms of the Fifty-eighth Street and Rivington Street Branches 
are open until 10 p. m. on week days. 

The Library for the Blind is open on week days from 1 p. m. to 5 p. m. 
The Lenox Branch is open from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



D E MEDICI 



GOLGREAM 

Lar<e Jars. $1.00 
Smaller Jan, 50 Centi 



^ PoHciaed of rare qualitiei and many valuable propertict 
not generally found among toilet articlei,beiidei hi unique 
effect at a fint-class 

SKIN FOOD 

uied in massage for producing and preserving a fine, btalthy 
complexion, placet thit rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients lecond to none in either Europe or America. 

M. B. De MEDICI . 124W.21atSt..NewYork 



30 



THE ANSONIA 

Broadway, 73d and 74th Sts. 

AT SUBWAY EXPRESS STATION 



An early selection is desirable, as the choice 
of apartments is rapidly becoming limited 



HOUSEKEEPING 

5 rooms and bath $1,800 

7 rooms and bath 2,700 

10 rooms and 2 baths 3,000 

11 rooms and 3 baths 3,600 

13 rooms and 4 baths 5.000 



NON-HOUSEKEEPING 

1 or 2 rooms and bath S 900 

3 rooms and bath 1,400 

4 rooms and baths 2,200 



PER YEAR 



May be had, furnished or unfurnished, as 

desired, and service for care of 

rooms is optional 

And also transiently 

Telephone 3320 Columbus 
RESTAURANT A LA CARTE 



THE THREE REIGNING 
SUCCESSES of the SEASON 



AT THE HUDSON THEATRE 4 th Steet, East of Boadway 

■ ^^— ^^-^^__^^^..^_^_^^^^^^__ Telephone, Bryant 5oo 

Evenings at 8.20 Matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2.15 

Special Matinee, Labor Day, September 7th 

Henry B. Harris presents 

ROBERT EDESON 

m "The Call of the North" 

A. New Play by GEORGE BROADHURST. 
Founded on Stewart Edward White's "Conjuror's House." 



AT THE LIB ERTY THEATRE ^^^ Steet. west of Broadway 

telephone, Bryant, 27 

Evenings at 8.15 Matinee, Saturday at 2. 15 

Special Matinee, Labor Day, September 7th 

Henry B. Harris presents 

THE TRAVELING SALESMAN 

"The Comedy Sensation of the Year" 
By JAMES FORBES 

Beginning September 7th, this attraction will be transferred to the NEW 
GAIETY THEATRE, Broadway and 46th Street. 



AT THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE ^^ street and 8th Avenue 
^^^— •^^^^^^— ^— ^^^_ _1_1 Telephone, Chelsea, 600 

Evenings at 8.15 Matinees, Wednesday and Saturday at 2.15 

Special Matinee, Labor Day, September 7th 
Third Inaugural Season 
Henry B. Harris presents 

ROSE STAHL 

in "The Chorus Lady" 

By JAMES FORBES 



WEEK, SEPTEMBER 7 TO SEPTEMBER 13, 1908 



©ailp Attractions 



m 



i5eto gorfe 



IlIBRARY of O^NGHESS 
IwoCoDles Heeeiy**. 

SEP 3 J li*08 







Cofyrieht iQob. B. L. Clarke 



HIPPODROME 

SIXTH AVENUE Telephone, 3400 Bryant 43d to 44th Streets 

Matinees at 2, Evenings at 8 TWICE DAILY Matinee, Best Seats, $1. 
SPORTING DAYS BIRD BALLET BATTLE IN THE SKIES 

VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 



5 CENTS A COPY 



NO. 128 



^ofyri'sht-, rooS. hy P,i/7v Atfy.ul ions in A'crc YoiJ;. lu, . 



THE ANSONIA 

Broadway, 73d and 74th Sts. 



AT SUBWAY EXPRESS STATION 



An early selection is desirable, as the choice 
of apartments is rapidly becoming limited 



HOUSEKEEPING 

5 rooms and bath $1,800 

7 rooms and bath 2,700 

10 rooms and 2 baths 3,000 

11 rooms and 3 baths 3,600 

13 rooms and 4 baths 5,000 



NON-HOUSEKEEPING 

1 or 2 rooms and bath 9 900 

3 rooms and bath 1,400 

4 rooms and baths 2,20.0 



PER. YEAR 



May be had, furnished or unfurnished, as 

desired, and service for care of 

rooms is optional 

And also transiently 

Telephone 3320 Columbus 



RESTAURANT A LA CARTE 



Pmly Atteacte©m; 



m 

cA Weekly aynLyAxine T>evotea to cr«oi/«nce juj orrrmUon. 



Vol. X SEPTEMBER 7th to SEPTEMBER 13th, 1908 No. 128 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and publisli:!d by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporationj office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. .R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secreury and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

1 Madison Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractions circulates through all the 

leading hotels in New York City 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STAND S 
Five Cents a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Advertising rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 
Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
NewT York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Churches 12-13 

Clubs 26 

" Current Events" (Agnes Lewis MitchiU) 4 

Did You Know in the Year 1865 25 

Elevated Railroads 2S 

Ferries 28 

Hotels 18 

Hudson River Day Line 20-27 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 22 

Long Island Trips 2- 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 27 

Points of Interest 29-30 

Pullman Accomodations 28 

Railroad Stations 28 

"Short Talks"(Mme. Roberts) 23 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Taxameter Information 14 

Theaters 19-22 

This Week in New York 5-11 

"The First Week in September" 

(Haryot Holt Dey) 15 

Transfer Information 2+ 

Where to Shop in New York 6 



ART NOTES 

Hiptorical Society — Central Park 
West between 77th and 78th 
streets. The sc-ciety was founded 
in 1804 in the old City Hall, at 
Wall and Nassau sts. and has 
occupied the building at nth 
St. and Second Ave., oppo- 
site St. INIark's Church since 
1857. The new building was 
built in part through the gener- 
osity of Henry Dexter, a bene- 
factor of this society. The lib- 
rary contains over one hundred 
and fifty thousand volumes 
dealing with historical subjects, 
about one hundred thousand 
I)aniphlets, an art collection of 
nearly one thousand paintings, 
including the Bryan collection 
of old masters, the Burr collec- 
tion and many portraits; the 
Abbott Egyptian collection of 
more than one thousand pieces, 
the Peter Marie collection of 
miniatures, and the Nineveh 
sculptures, presented by James 
Lenox, and other things of in- 
terest. 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 

Waterfront 
Property? 



IVc buy or sell ///ffh- Class 
Frofcrly for Yoii 

CLARKE & THORNTON 

REAL ESTATE BROKKRS 
Phone Gramercy 159 1 Madison Ave. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CURRENT 
Rival Sultans — The report has 
been confirmed that Abdel-el- 
Aziz has surrendered to his 
brother, Mulia Hafig, who is 
proclaimed Sultan of Morocco. 
Paris newspapers say that in or- 
der to be recognized by Europe, 
Mulia Hafig must first accept tlic 
Algeciras act, and all other treat- 
ies between Morocco and the 
powers. This is contrary to his 
policy, which has been that of 
entire antagonism to foreigners 
and western ideas of civilization. 
In order to maintain himself as 
Sultan, he must levy taxes, and 
to do this an army is necessary 
to hold his fickle hordes. Money 
he must have, and he cannot get 
it short of Europe. Unless he 
promises to subscribe to the Al- 
geciras act, to quiet disorders, 
to protect Europeans, and to fur- 
ther civilization in Morocco, he 
will have no support from 
Europe. And without that his 
victory is an empty boast. 
Belgium takes the Congo — After 
much controversy the Chamber 
of Deputies, has adopted the 
Congo annexation act, which re- 
moves that unfortunate region 
from the control of King Leo- 
pold, and fixes the responsibil- 
ity for its welfare upon the state. 
All the world has taken up 
the question of reforms in the 
Congo, and Great Britain and the 
United States had decided to in- 
terfere and end the abuses. Com- 
plications have arisen over the 
action of King Leopold in with- 
drawing the control of the Crown 
domain which is the richest part 
of the Congo, from the adminis- 
tration. This action has been 
resented by those in favor of 
annexation imtil the opposition 
became so great that Leopold 
was forced to abandon the 
Crown domain to Belgium. His 
personal share in the revenues 
of the Congo, continues liow- 
ever during his life time. 
Venezuela — i"The Bad Man of Cara- 
cas" bids fair to become as pop- 
ular a nick name as "The Sick 



EVENTS 

Man of Europe." The fact that 
M. De Reus wrote a letter dis- 
couraging young Hollanders 
from seeking employment in 
Venezuela forms one of Castro'.s 
many flimsy pretexts for getting 
into trouble. The Netherlands 
has endured a great deal from 
the Venezuelan government as it 
is represented by Castro, and 
even between the Dutch and his 
predecessors there was hard feel- 
ing, dating back as far as 1857. 
Non-payment of interest on 
loans, the annulling of conces- 
sions without legal procedure, 
banishment of foreigners, con- 
fiscation of vessels in search of 
revolutionists, unwarranted dis- 
missal of ministers and other ar- 
bitrary acts make the name of 
Castro notorious. At the pres- 
ent writing, Holland is seriously 
considering a blockade as the 
best way to bring him to terms. 
Schools for Consuls — It is no 
longer a question of "push and 
pull" that gives a consulship to 
the man aspiring to that ofticc. 
We send our consuls to a special 
school nowadays, and require 
that the successful candidate^ 
pass a stiff, competitive exam- 
ination. Training in commercial 
law, political economy, and the 
acquisition of the languages 
required for entrance in the 
consular service, are the qualifi- 
cations demanded of the would- 
be consul. No longer are spe- 
cial posts obtained by successful 
wire-pulling, but men are as- 
signed to positions which they 
take upon completing the re- 
quired course. Many useless 
consulates have been closed, and 
many new ones opened, showing 
the development and trend of 
our foreign relations. To Zan- 
zibar, to Mauritius, to Johan- 
nesburg and to Boma, to posts 
in India, New Foundland, and 
South America we are sending 
men trained and equipped in the 
special knowledge for which 
the work of the consular service 
calls. Agnes Lkwis Mitchill. 



iOT^S 




This Week in New York 

Monday, September yth 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Gala Labor Day Trip to Poughkeepsie and return on the great swift 
steamer Hendrick Hudson; leaves Desbrosses st. 9.40 a. m. ; West 42d si. 
10 a. ra.; West 129th st. 10.20 a. m. The Hudson is substituted for this 
trip and the day following as her great size gives abundant room and 
provides a day's outing under perfect conditions. Afternoon boat, Mary 
Powell, connects at West Point with the Hudson returning. 

The Republican Club of Richmond County, Staten Island; annual 
outing for the benefit of the building fund, at Oakwood Park. Oakwood. 

Labor Day. Special Matinee at all the principal theatres. 2. 15 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Americans vs. Washington, at the American 
League Park, 167th st. and Broadway (two games). Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Ccrlears Hook Park, Cherry, Corlears and Jackson 
sts. and East River. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Washington Square Park, foot of Fifth ave., Wav- 
erly and Washington place. 8 p. m. 

Fifty-second annual Scottish games of the New York Caledonian 
Club, at Washington Park Casino, Grand st , between Maspeth and 
Newtown, Long Island. The grounds can be reached by either the 
Thirty-fourth or Ninety-second st. ferry, thence direct to the grounds 
by electric cars. The Flushing ave. and the Ridgewood cars also run 
direct to the grounds from New York entrance to Brooklj^n Bridge. 



Betty Pemb roke 

Bv Elizabeth Hazlewood Hancock 



r sale at Bookstores and at the 
News Stand in this Hotel 



"It is a romance of girlish loveliness, and sets our 
thiiikiii« not of problems — political, ethical or social 
— but of Betty ani the irresistible charm with which 
sin- rides and dances and laughs." 

A't'7ti ] \>i!c 'fiiiiis. 
"Ihe description of an open-air horse show, vividly 
portrayed iu glowing color.^, is a masterly achieve- 

MH-Ut " 

Augusta ,(;,<) //,-;<(/,/. 
TheNealePob.Co. Flatiron BIdg. New York 



WHERE TO SHOP 



I N 



NEW YORK, 



The following establishments have been carefully selected as furnishing: the best assortment; 
of the special article mentioned, at prices that are right. 



BOOKS 

DODD, MEAD & CO., 5th Ave., cor. 35th St. 
All the Latest Books, Periodicals, etc. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



CRAWFORD SHOES Me?Ld women 

23d St. & 4th Av. 93 Nassau, cor. Fulton St. 

1363 B'way, nr 36th St. 141 W. 125th St. 

103 W. 42d St., near 6th Ave. 

Many other stores. 



FURS 

C. G. GUNTHERS SONS, 
J84 Fifth Ave. 



GLOVES 

LORD & TAYLOR, Broadway & 20th St. 
" Reynicr ": perfection in quality, fit and style. 
New importations for street and evening wear. 
All the fashionable shades and lengths. 



JEWELERS 



BLACK, STARR & FROST 

5th Ave. & 39th St. 

Pearl Necklaces, Diamonds, Emeralds. 

Sapphires. Exclusive designs in diamond 

jewelry and watches 



LADIES' TAILOR 

EDWARD C. BALCH J52-54 W. 34th St. 
Tailor-made Costumes of all descriptions at 
lowest prices consistent with the highest grade 
materials and workmanship. 
Special facilities for filling orders in limited time 



LEATHER GOODS 

THE GORHAM CO. 
Fifth Ave. & 36th St. 



MEN'S CLOTHING l^lH^^^Zir. 

BROOKS BROTHERS, B'way & 22d St. 

Ranging in price from the medium to the more 

expensive. 

Also boy's clothing 



SILVERWARE 

THE GORHAM CO., 5th Ave. & 36th St. 

Sterling Silver Tea and Dinner Services, Table 
Silver. Serving Pieces, Family Chests, Decora- 
tive Pieces, Toilet Silver, etc. 



SILKS AND VELVETS 

LORD & TAYLOR, frl7Z& mhl;: 

125 shades tafteta at 58 cts. per yard 
80 shades " Mirage silk " at $1.35 Per yard. 
Black taffeta, 36 in. wide, superb quality, at $1 
per yard. 

SHIRTWAISTS 

A large assortment of Imported and Originali' 
advance models for Fall 

JAMES McCREERY & CO. 

23d Street 34th Street 1 



STATIONERY Fine Art. 

BLACK, STARR & FROST 
5th Ave. & 39th St. 
Heraldic Dies, Wedding Invitations 
Visiting and Reception Cards 
Imported and Domestic Writing Paper 



INFORMATION 



BUREAU 



CHIROPODIST & MANICURE 

Dr. J. T.WHELAN& Miss M.S. WILSON 
McCutcheon BIdg., 347 Fifth Ave., near 34th St. 
Electro-vibratory Facial Massage 
All Instruments sterilized 
'Phone: Madison 6192 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 

PAUL L. BRYANT 

Gowns cleaned in 24 hours if necessary 
291 Fifth Ave.. 'Phone: Madison 1224 
868 Broadway, 'Phone: Gramercy 4755 
308 Fourth Ave., 'Phone: Gramercy 4508 
900 Sixth Ave.. 'Phone: Plaza =;207 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 

UNIVERSAL, 28 E. 23d St. 

Harriet V. Peckham, Mgr. 
Furnishes first-class servants, male and female, 
white or colored; all nationalities. References 
carefully investigated. 'Phone: Gramercy 4339' 



PRINTER 

THE WOLFER PRESS, 304-310E.23dSt. 
Maurice Wolfer, Prop. 

"Characteristic printing individually for you" 
Telephone Call, 1147 Gramercy 



Mail orders will receive careful and prompt attention. 
Daily Attractions in New Vork " when purchasing. 

6 



You will confer a favor by mentlonin 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVEEK — Coiitiuucd 

Opening night. Rose Stahl in "The Chorus Lady" at the Grand 
Opera House, Eighth ave. and 23d st. 'I'liis is j^our opportunity to 
welcome "Patricia O'Brien." Don't miss it. You can 'phone for stats: 
Clielsea 600; popular prices. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. J. B. Phillips, 
I if Macon, Ga., speaker (to Sept. 16). You are cordially invited to attend. 

Dog Show — Sheepshead Bay Kennel Club; Brighton Beach, N. Y. 

Horse Racing — Coney Island Jockey Club; Sheepshead Bay, L. I. 
(to Sept. 19). 

Polo — Polo tournament; Squadron A Polo Club. 

Tennis — Hudson River championship; Hudson River Lawn Tennis 
Association. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Larch- 
mont Fall, Norwalk Annual and Sachem's Head Annual. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Atlantic 
Yacht Club. 

A sure cure for the "Blue Rose." Try a dose of "The Traveling 
Salesman," the latest from the pen of James Forbes, under the direction 
of Mr. Henry B. Harris, at the new Gaiety Theatre, Broadway and 
46th St.; to-night at 8.15. 

Tuesday, September 8th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Second annual congress of the Playground Association of America, 
.Among the speakers will be Governor Charles E. Hughes, George E. 
Johnson, Prof. Royal Melendy, Dr. E. E. Arnold, E. B. De Groot, Prof. 
C. T. Hetherington, Dr. Luther II. Gulick and Joseph Lee. Mayor 
George B. McClellan has consented to serve as honorary president, and 
prominent people from all parts of the country will act as officials. The 
congress will in every possible way try to arouse public sentiment 
towards the further progress of the playground movement (to Sept. 12). 
The meetings will be held at the American Museum of Natural History, 
77th St. and Central Park West. General Sessions: Open to the public. 
Special Conferences: Open to those especially interested in the subjects. 
Committee Meetings: Open to committee members only. Council Meet- 
ings: Open to the public. General conference, this afternoon at 3, and 
this evening at 8. 




H 



AINTY HOME COOKING-Breakfast. Luncheon, 
Supper, served with delicacy and good taste. 
Food, salads and fruit according to season. 



h GREEN TEA POT. 

N>5 31 

West 3^3 '■-"51 -3 

Phone 3165 : 38: 



Our Specialty : AFTERNOON TEA 

^ Full line of antiques, old laces, fans, etc. Art ob 
jects in large variety. 

31 West 33d Street, near Waldorf-Astoria 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS AVKEK -Contiuued 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth avc. 4 p. ni. Admission 50 cents. 

I'liblic Concert — jNIount Morris Park, Madison and I\It. ^lorris avcs., 
i20th to 124th sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Tompkins Square Park. Avenue A to Avenue B, 
East Seventh to East Tenth sts. 8 p. m. 

Bigger, better, brighter than ever, the big show at the only "Hippo- 
drome." Every evening at 8; every day at 2. Prices to suit you, from 
25 cents to $1.50. Go and enjoy it. Everything new. 

Wednesday, September 9th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Second annual congress of the Playground Association of America, 
at the American Museum of Natural History, 77th st. and Central Park 
West. General conference; morning session 9 a. m., and evening 8 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — Abingdon Square Park, Eighth ave. and Hudson st. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Mulberry Bend Park, Mulberry to Baxter, and 
Bayard to Park sts. 8 p. m. 

Mr. Robert Edeson is now playing in his latest success, "The Call 
of the North." at the Hudson Theatre, 44th st., near Broadway. Matinee 
to-day at 2.15. It is as good as a tonic, this breath from the North. 

Daily Attractions in New York is published every Saturday for the 
succeeding week's daily attractions in New York; you can subscribe to 
it for three months for fifty cents; it will be mailed to you regularly. 
Subscribe now. 

Wednesday evening meeting, the Rev. Alfred E. Myers will preside; 
the Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st. 8 p. m. You will 
be welcome. 

Wednesday evening Praise and Prayer Service, Broadway Tabernacle 
Church, 56th St. and Broadway. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

Wednesday evening meeting, Second Church of Christ, Scientist, 

Central Park West, at 68th st. 8 p. m. A cordial welcome to strangers. 

Wednesday evening meeting, Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Mad- 



Great America's Greatest Champagne is 

"GREAT WESTERN" 

For any information icnd to 

PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY, Rheimi, N. Y. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS WEEK — Continued 

ison ave. and 31st St., the Rev. Edward Lonx, D. D., minister; in Parish 
House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. .A welcome for strangers. 

Thursday^ September loth 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Second annual congress of the Playground Association of America, 
at the American Museum of Natural History, 77th st. and Central Park 
West. 8 p. m. Open to the public. Address by Charles E. Hughes, 
Governor of New York. Dr. Wood Hutchinson, Dr. Luther H. Gulick. 

The original "Seeing New York" Yacht encircles the Island of 
iManliattan twice daily, leaving from foot of West 22d st. at 10 a. m. and 
2.30 p. m. You do not realize the beauties of our waterwaj- until you 
spend the three restful hours enjoying this beautiful trip. Fare $1. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Indian 
Harbor's Long Island Sound Corinthian cup. 

Public Concert — East River Park, 84th to 89th sts., facing East 
i-iiver. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Hamilton h'ish Park, Houston to Stanton, Pitt to 
Sheriilf sts. 8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Madison Scjuare Park, Broadwaj-, Fifth to Madison 
aves., 23d to 26th sts. 8 p. m. 

Friday, September iith 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Attention is called to the concerts in the different parks; this is the 
last week, with the exception of Central Park, which will continue on 
Saturday and Sunday, to September 20th inclusive. 

Second annual congress of the Playground Association of America, 
at the American Museum of Natural History, 77th st. and Central Park 
West. 8 p. m. Open to the public. Dr. Wm. Maxwell, Supt. of Schools, 
New York. "University Extension in Physical Training," Prof. C. W. 
Hetherington: "A Home Playground," Joseph Lee. Special Confer- 
ence, presided over by Mayor George B. McClellan. 9 a. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 




HERBO-NERVO TONIC 

CONFECTION ANO SODA. DRINK 



ABSOLUTE PURITY GUARANTEED. 



SERIAL No. 12,586 



lligpiiian's. Kiker's, Caswell .1' llassey, Eamsdell & Co., K. H. 
Mnry and all druR counters and soda fountains. Confection at 
Pink \- Tilford's and all tirst class dealers. 



-MANUF,\CTUKF.D EV- 



MRS. BLANCHC E. THOMAS 

Imloracd by the lute Dr. ,7- Clarke Tin. mas. N. Y. C. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



FOWLER 


& WELLS 


COMPANY :: 


ESTABLISHED 


1836 




PHRENOLOGISTS AND PUBLISHERS 




PHRENOLOGICAL JOURNAL, 


EST. 1838 : 


10c. , 


$1.00 per 


YEAR 


24 


EAST 22d 


STREET, NEW 


YORK 


CITY 





THIS WEEK — Contlnned 

Public Concert — Hudson Park, Leroy, Clarkson and Varick sts. 
8 p. m. 

Public Concert — Wm. H. Seward Park, Hester to Division, Norfolk 
to Essex St. 8 p. m. 

Saturday, September i2th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Annual Rhode Island clambake of the Staten Island Yacht Club of 
Stapleton, William E. Horn, commodore, at Highland Beach. The club's 
fleet will leave the clubhouse at g a. m. 

The motor omnibuses which run from Wasliington Square to 90th 
St., on Fifth ave. have now added a new route by which cars of the same 
type run from Washington Square up Fifth ave. to S7th st., thence 
over to Broadway, up Broadway to 72d st. and across to Riverside Drive, 
returning by the same route. This new stage can readily be dis- 
tinguished: by day a red ball, by night a red light on the front of the 
cars. The fare in each instance, either way, is 10 cents per person. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Crescent 
Athletic Club. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound; Indian 
Harbor Fall. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds, 
T57th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission 50 cents. 

Public Concert — ^Central Park, on the Mall, 59th St., Fifth or Eighth 
aves. 4 p. m. 

Second annual congress of the Playground Association of America, 
at the American Museum of Natural History, 77th st. and Central Park 
West. Council meetings, 9 a. m. Harvest Festival of all Nationalities, 
3 p. m. Biograph and lantern pictures of pla3^ground afifairs will be 
shown from 8 to 8.20 o'clock everv evening, before the addresses begin. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



34 WEST TWENTY-FIFTH STREET. 

Single and Double Rooms. Baths. Table Excellent. 
Transients accommodated. ABSOLUTELY FIRST GLASS 



THIS WEEK — Coutinued 

Sunday, September 13th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. 
David James Burrell, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 
8 p. m.; the Rev. Alfred E. Myers will preach at both services. A cor- 
dial welcome for all. 

Madison Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, Madison ave. and 
6oth St., the Rev. Wallace MacMullen, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m.; 
the Rev. Arlo A. Brown will preach. You will be welcome. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Lou.x, D. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. in the Parish House, 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth ave. and 55th st.. the Rev. 
J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., LL. D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 
4 p. m. Rev. William J. Dawion, D. D., formerly of London, noted 
evangelist, author and lecturer, will preach morning and afternoon. 
Strangers are cordially invited. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st.; 
services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m. You will be welcome. 

Church of the Incarnation (Protestant Episcopal), Madison ave. and 
35th St., the Rev. William Mercer Grosvenor, D. D., rector; services, 8 
a. m., II a. m. and 4 p. m. Dr. Grosvenor will preach. You are welcome. 

Church of the Strangers, 509 West 57th st., the Rev. D. Asa 
Blackburn, pastor; services, 11 a. m. and 7.45 p. m. Strangers will be 
welcome. 

Broadway Tabernacle Church, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. 
Charles Jefiferson, D. D., LL. D., pastor; services, 11 a. ni. and 8 p. m. 
You will be cordially welcomed. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the MM. 59th st., Fifth or Eighth 
aves. 4 p. m. 



A POSITION IN NEW YORK— WHY NOT? 

The best opportunities are here, provided you are a capable Salesman, 
Executive, Clerical or Technical man. We know, because we now have open 
over 500 good positions, paying Sr.ooo to $5,000 a year. No city offers larger 
or better chances for advancement. Call or write today. 

HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, New York. 







' ■••oo, bT * 



]|New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Hadison Ave. Baptist Charch 

Corner of Thirly-Firrt Street 
Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, September 6th 

Services II «. m. in Pariih House 

BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.45 .. m. 

No Evenins Service 



Mid-week Meeting, \7ednesday, 8 p. m. 



•A lV«tcom« for Everyone 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



&fr0tt6 QHurrl? of OIl|riBt. »sUnt\Bt 



Central Park West 
at 68tb Street 



Services, ii a. rii. and 8 p. ni. 



Wednesday Evening Meetine. 8 p. na. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



COLLEGIATE 



f62a THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 1908 

The Marble Collegiate Church 

FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BURRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 

Kev. ALFRED E. MYERS, will preach 

Sunday, September 6th, 1908 

II a. m. Subject : "The Holy Spirit Convicting of Sin " 
8 p. m. Subject : "The Prophet of Nazareth " 

The Apostle's Creed is the subject under consideration at the Mid-week- 
Meetings, Wednesday evenings at 8 o'clock. On Wednesday, Sept. gth, 
"I believe in the Holy Ghost and the Church." A Cordial Welcome. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

IVKAV YORK CHURCHES- Continiied 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 



B 


aint IJartholomew's 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 


(Eh 

Rector 


urc 


h 


Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., 




Rev. Robert S. W. Wood, Assistant 
CHURCH CLOSED 


Minister 
















WILL REOPEN SEPTEMBER 20, 


1908 








services: 8 a.m., 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. 







CHAPLAIN TO S TRANGERS 

Rev. JAMES B. WASSON, D.D. 

10 WEST 61st STREET 

Telephone, i8S Columbus 

Commissioned by Bishop Gieer and confirmed by the Chapter of the Cathedral of 
St. John, the Divine, to minister to all stianyers in the city, irrespective of creed. 



PRESBYTERIAN 



iFtftl) AtlPttUe J^r^fibytPnait OII|Urrl| P^fth Avenue and 55th street 

SKKVICES SEPT. (ith; 11 a ni. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. STRANGERS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

REV. a. CAMPBELL MOKGAN, D. D., of Loudon, noted evangelist author and 

'lecturer, will preach niorniug, afternoon and evening. 



CONGREGATIONAL 



BROADWAY TABERNACLE '''rjK'.^kVs%V'i'^':. L\"D."°P^.t^r"« 

Sunday : Public Worship, ii a.m., 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 p. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E., 7 p.m. tVednesday : Praise and Prayer Service. 8p.m. 





A Timely Suggestion 




^-T' 


'T is as legitimate for churches to advertise to draw | 


1 


people to hear the word of God, in 


order that they 


.-J- 


^ may get blessing, as it is for shops 


to advertise in 




order that they may draw people 


to buy goods. 


The c 


hurches have something good to tell, 


and they ought 


to let 


the people know it. I am glad that 


we have adver- 


tised. 








Rev. 


Dr. Torrev. 



I.^ 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TAXAMETER— Motor Cab Service— 'Phone 2380 COLUMBUS 



Telephone orders filled promptly day 
or night. Cabs are always in waiting 
at our various stands, or they may be 
hailed and engaged on the street. When 
the flag is displayed above the taxa- 
meter, it signifies that the cab is dis- 
engaged and can be hired. 

REDUCED SUMMER RATES— EF- 
FECTIVE JUNE FIRST— Tariff No. 1 
(Red Indicator) Used Only. 

First half-mile or fraction - - 30 cts. 

Each quarter-mile thereafter - 10 cts. 

Each six minutes waiting - - 10 cts. 

This tariff applies to all vehicles and 
irrespective of the number of passengers 
carried except that for Hansoms, Cou- 
pes, Broughams and Victorias the charge 
for waiting time is 10 cts. for each TEN 
minutes or at the rate of ONLY SIXTY 
CENTS PER HOUR. 

EXTRAS— All Vehicles 

For ordering a cab, each mile or frac- 
tion thereof, from station or stand to 
point ordered 20 cts. 
Return charge when dismissed 

north of 155th Street or outside 

the Borough of Manhattan, for 

each mile or fraction to Times 

Square (minimum charge $1) - 20 cts. 
Trunk 20 cts. 

All ferriage and bridge tolls, both go- 
ing and returning, must be paid by the 
passenger. If the taxameter is out of 
order, fare will be charged at regular 
legal rates. 

RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE. 

INFORMATION FOR PASSENGERS 

1. HOW THE TAXAMETER WORKS. 
When the flag is lowered .30 cents will 
appear under the word "Fare," and this 
pays for the use of the cab until service 
to that amount, either in driving or in 
waiting, has been rendered. The indi- 
cator will register thereafter ten cents 
for each quarter mile, or each fraction 
of an hour waiting. This charge is for 
the exact distance traveled and the exact 
waiting time consumed, which are auto- 
matically measured by the taxameter and 
over which the driver has no control. 

The "extra" charges called for by the 
service are registered by the driver and 
shown under the word "Extras." 

2. THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID IS 
THE SUM OF THE AMOUNTS SHOWN 
TTNDER "FARE" AND "EXTRAS." 
THERE ARE NO CHARGES EXCEPT 
THOSE INDICATED BY THE TAXA- 
METER. 




For Hire Tariff 1 Tariff 2 Payment 



The driver is charged with all amounts 
registered and is not permitted to make 
any reductions therefrom, but will, if 
required, give a receipt for the amount 
paid. 

3. TO SECURE COMPLETE PROTEC- 
TION, observe (a) that the flag is low- 
ered to Tariff 1 position at the beginning 
of the service and not before ; (b) that 
the flag Is maintained in that position 
during service ; (c) that the flag is 
promptly brought to "Payment" posi- 
tion at the conclusion of the service and 
left there until the charge is settled. 

4. IF THE CAB IS DISABLED, the 
service up to the disablement must be 
paid for. 

5. A CAB REPORTING AT AN AD- 
DRESS in response to an order is 
charged for from the time for which it 
was ordered. 

6. A CAB ORDERED AND NOT USED 
must be paid for up to the time the 
driver is dismissed, including the charge 
for sending it. 

7. THEATRE AND OTHER RE- 
TURNS. Waiting time and any neces- 
sary mileage will be charged for a ve- 
hicle held for a return call. Waiting 
time may be saved by dismissing the 
vehicle and placing a separate order for 
a vehicle for the return call, but the 
Company cannot guarantee to fill such 
return call unless it be given to and 
accepted by the starter at a station 
or stand. Under no conditions may a 
cab be held in waiting without charge. 

8. IN CASE OF DISPU'IE, passengers 
are requested to pay the full amount 
indicated and make claim to the Com- 
pany, in writing, giving the hour, date, 
driver and cab number, number of pas- 
sengers carried, distance travelled and 
waiting time consumed and wherein the 
charge is incorrect. Such claims will re- 
ceive prompt and courteous attention. 

9. THE ACCURACY OP THE TAXA- 
METER is insured by systematic Inspec- 
tion. Do not assume that a charge is 
incorrect without first computing all of 
the distance and all of the waiting time 
comprised in the service. 

TOURING . CARS, SIGHT-SEEING 
CARS, DOUBLE-DECK MOTOR BUS- 
SES, and Automobiles of every kind by 
the Hour, Day or Week — Rates on ap- 
plication. 

CAB STATIONS. 
49th St. and 8th Av. 55-65 E.SStb St. 
G6th St. and 3rd Av. 141 E 25th St 

CAB STANDS. 
Sherry's CafS Martin Hotel Astor 
Hotel Belmont, Long Island R. R., Ft. E. 

34th Street. 
Central R. R. of N. J., Ft. W. 23rd St. 

NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO. 
EIGHTH AVE. AND FORTV=NINTH ST. 

PHONE. 2380 COLUMBUS 

CONNECTS WITH ALL CAB STANDS 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THE FIRST WEEK IN SEPTEMBER 



The autumn cf the year, like the 
autumn of life, is a restful time af- 
ter the activity, the turbulence, the 
restlessness that belongs to a'l 
growth. The year, like life, yields 
unresistingly to its gentle influence. 
The summer that was wooed so 
graciously, became fierce and un- 
manageable before she ended her 
career, and the year grew weary of 
her. The city has come home 
again, and taken upon her shoul- 
ders the burdens of cosmopolitan 
life — and its charms. 

But the summer has left traces. 

The man who sent his family out 
of town grew weary of the free- 
dom that was so novel and so wel- 
come at the outset. Even he has 
been counting the days- to the re- 
turn of the routine of domestic liv- 
ing and personal comfort. The 
clematis that has clambered up to 
the eaves and wound itself about 
the shutters, and finally peeped un- 
ceremoniously in at the windows, 
has witnessed the chaos of his 
housekeeping. Only last Sunday he 
dusted about some, and tried to re- 
member where things belonged, 
and then he looked around and 
groaned aloud. The household 
spider has made a comfortable 
home from himself in the corner, 
and spun a web that is a marvel of 
silky architecture. A few flies have 
yielded up the ghost on the family 
mirror, and died of very loneliness 
and despair, and left a halo about 
their remains. There is work for 
the housewife to do. 

The rooms in your apartment 
look small since you came home, 
and there is an acknowledged stuf- 
finess about them. There is a good 
deal of noise in the street, too. 
From early to late wheels rattle 
harshly over the pavements in a 
manner which contrasts strangely 
with the melody of the birds 
and the crickets and katydids, or 
the roar of the sea — the sounds 
which have familiarized themselves 
by association. The active people 
in the flat overhead have come 
home. The janitor's boy plays on the 



accordcon in the court below the 
same repertoire as before you went 
away, and some new people have 
moved in the adjoining apartment 
— musical people with a piano and 
a cornet. The pale little woman 
who lives on the second floor looks 
])aler than when you went away. 
She has an appealing expression in 
her eyes, and just as you are about 
to ask her if the baby is well, you 
hesitate — and you don't ask about 
the baby. 

The children are glad to be home 
again. They have already explored 
their favorite haunts. They have 
looked over the familiar toys, and 
greeted the favorite one with silent 
hugs. The family cat has returned, 
glad to resign a life of feline vag- 
rancy for one of respectable do- 
mesticity. The children have ex- 
hibited the treasures brought from 
the country and seashore, and re- 
garded them more favorably than 
ever in the light of city surround- 
ings. A pair of rabbits are re- 
leased in the back yard and at 
once proceed to execute ideas — and 
burrow and undermine the fence, 
and escape. There is a deserted 
hornet's nest on the parlor mantel 
and a mud-turtle in the washbowl. 
A bunch of ferns and some cat- 
tails, a box of butterflies and some 
birch-bark and some shells, will 
form a part of the home decoration 
this winter. 

There is no place like home after 
all! 

Hakyot Holt Dey. 




rsr ASK FOP 

4R0NDACK 

Saratoga Water 
Wherever you are 
Drinking or dining 

Try it at drinking 
Parlor, 1217 B'way. 
Positively excells. 

The best. 
Highest Awards 



IS 



TAXAMETER 



TELEPHONE 



2380 



com 



One central Exchange connects all taxametei cab stands; on receipt of call the nearest availab 




South Ferry 

Bowling Green 

Wall Street 

F^ilton St. 

City Hall Park 
•Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Ave. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



•42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St. and Broadway 



•72d St. and Broadv F 
79th St. BBd Broad* r 
86th St. and Broadv r 
91st St. and Broadv r 

*96th St. and Broadv ■ 

WEST SIDE BRAN 1 

103d St. and Broadv 5 
110th St. andBroadv^' 



SEEING NE^A^ YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flatiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 



:abs 



BUS 



is promptly dispatched. 



New York Transportation Company 

Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 

s r ANUS 
Sherry's ; Cafe Martin : Hotel Astor ; Hotel 
Belmont; L. I. R. K., Foot East 34th Street; 
Central R. R. of N. |., Foot West 23d Street. 

Reduced Rates now in ettect. Tariff folder mailed on request. 
For full information see pat'e 14 




[giU 



jiJ-..-^\\mA-^ 



MAP 
OP 

MANHATTAN 




SUBWAY STATIONS 



116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



225th St. and Broadwav 
231st St. and Broadway 
238th St. and Broadway 
242d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenox Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 



Cojhriefit. 1007. B. L. CUrke 

Mott Ave. and 149th St. 

Third Ave. and 14&th St. 

Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farms 

•Express Stations 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 

North River, lo A. M. and 2:^0 P. M. 

F71RE, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by the Lecturer 







LEADING NEW YORK HOTEL! 


Astor House 

A. H. THURSTON. Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES. Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway | 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 


The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 


Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP, Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman's Hotel) 
A. W. EAGER 1 
29 East Twenty-ninth Street ' 


The Ansonia 

Broadway, 73d to 74th Streets 


Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 1 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 1 
Dutch Grill Palm Garden 1 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


The Plaza 

FRED STERRY, Managing Director 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


Hotel Buckingham 

Fifth Avenue at 50th Street 


Park Avenue Hotel ' 

REED ft BARNETT, Prop. . 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street ' 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE. Mgr. 
Slst Street and Columbus Avenue 


Prince George Hotel 

A. B. DICK. M<r. 
15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART, Prop 


1 

Hotel Savoy 

JOHN F. RIES, Managing Director 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hotel St. Andrew i; 

CHARLES H. DAVIS, Manager 
Broadway and 72d Street 


Hotel Gotham 

Chas. L. Wetherbee and William R. Wood 
S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN. Prop. 
Broadway and 42d Street 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pre*, and Mgr. 
47th Street, just oflF Broadway 


Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY. Managar 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUBTTE. M<r. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square Eaj 


I 


8 h 

1 



rtOl^S 




' '"00, bT 



New York Theatres 



Academy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel.. 701 Stuyve- 
sant. Maclyn Arbuckle in "The 
Round Up." Eve., 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2. Prices. 50c. 
to $1.50. 

Alhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Daily mats., 2.15; eve., 8.15. 
Prices soc. to $1. 

American — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel., 3560 Bryant. Italian Op- 
era: Repertoire. Eve., 8.15; 
mat., Sat., 2.15: Prices, 50c. to 
$1. 

Aster — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. William Hodge in 
"The Man from Home." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, Soc. to $2. 

Belasco — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel, 4281 Bryant. "The Devil." 
Eve., 8.20; mat., Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 



Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 
Tel., 1530 Madison. Mr. Douglas 
Fairbanks in "All for a Girl." 
Eve., 8.1S; mats., Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 
Tel., loi Bryant. "Algeria." 
Eve., 8.20; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.20. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mats., Thur. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Circle — Broadway and 60th st. Tel., 
5138 Columbus. Closed. 

Colonial — Broadway and 62d st. 
Tel., 4457 Columbus. Vaude- 
vill'e. Eve., 8.15; dlaily mats., 
2.15. Prices. 50c. to $1. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel , 2240 Bryant. Hattie Will- 
iams as "Flufify Ruffles." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50C. to $2. 



Special matinee at all the princiiKil theatres Labor Day. 



ABLE D'HOTE DINNER from 6 to8 

Exclusively home cooking and dainty service 

*'Tea Rooms" 

Breakfast after 8 a. m. / /Ue^ / \^t^''-*^'^ 14 W. 33rd StrCCt 

A la Carte Luncheon. 12 to 3 ^ / {0pp. THE IVM.DORF) 

Afternoon Tea until 6 p. ra. S. M. TUCICER. 



Zz^y^^"^-^^^ 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 



ut.-_jyjLii 



rtJ'" '~i'"^;j-ctyi m ^i :»i.LiutL i in ' ntm: ' ; mt i ii.i i nin.uij te;^ 





NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. ni. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. ni . ; 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings : Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landing's) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for West Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 27. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY PO'WELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. West 42d Street 
2.00 ; West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at 'West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



NEW YORK THE 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission 50c.; Sunday, 25c. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. Bruce MacRae 
and Margaret Illington in ''The 
Thief." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. "The Devil."' 



.\TRES — Continued 

Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat.j 

2.15. Prices 50c. to $1.50. 
Garrick — 35th st., east of Sixth avej 

Tel., 35i-38th. '-The Mollusc. 

Eve., 8.20; mats., Wed. and Sat.] 

2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 
Gaiety — 46th st. and Broadway 

Tel., 210 Bryant. "The Travel! 

ing Salesman." Eve., 8.15; mats.] 

Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices! 

50c. to $2. 
Grand Opera House — 8th ave. ant 

_'3d St. Tel., 600 Chelsea. Rost 

Stahl in "The Chorus Lady.'j 

Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat." 

2.15. Prices 50c. to $1. 



Special matinee at 



the principal theatres Labor Day. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



IVKW YOUK THi;\' 

Hackett — 4-'d st., west of H'way. 
Tel, 44 Bryant. Mr. John 
Mason in "The Witching Hour." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. and 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Bryant. 
Vaudeville. Eve. 8.15; daily 
mats., 2. Prices, 25c. to $1. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 2485-38th. "Three 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 

. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave., between 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. "Sporting Days," and "Bat- 
tle in the Skies." Eve., 8; Mats., 
dailj', 2. Prices, 25c. to $1.50. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Robert 
Edeson in "The Call of the 
North." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. "The Girls 
of Gottenberg." Eve., 8.15; 
mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Keith & Proctor's: 5th Avenue — 
28th St. and Broadway. Tel., 2880 
Madison. ^'audevilIe. Eve., 8.15; 
mats., daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 

125th Street— 125th st., near Lex- 
ington ave. Tel., 1250 Harlem. 
Vaudeville. Eve., 8.15; mats., 
daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. Lillian Russell 
in ,'ildfire." Eve., 8.15; mat.. 
Sat. 2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Lincoln Square — Broadway and 
66th St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. 
Vaudeville. Eve.. 8.15; mats., 
daily. 2. Prices, 25c. to $1. 



'i{ r;s < 'oiiHiiiitMi 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephonei 6500 Madiion 

EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exceptional Plice for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RES TAU RANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 
Dinner, 75 eta. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Roomi from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In eaay acceii of all the principal theatres 

Subway Station, i8th Street, within one block 

29th Street can pass the door 



Lyric — 42d St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Miss Mary 
JVIannering as "Glorious Betsy." 
Eve., 8.15; mat., Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50C. to $2. 

Lyceum — 45th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Miss 
Billie Burke in Love Watches." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Thur. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 



Special matinee at all the princiiial theatres Labor Day. 



D E MEDICI 

= N E W = 

GOLGREAM 



Large Jar*. $1.00 
Smaller Jara, SO Cent* 



Q Possessed of rare qualities and many valuable properties 
not generally found among toilet articles, besides Its unique 
effeat as a first-class 

SKIN FOOD 

used in massage for producing and preserving a fint, heaitiiy 
complexion, places this rare " Novelty " among other 
emollients second to none in either Europe or America. 

M.B.De MEDICI . 124W.21atSt..N«wIorfc 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK THEATRES — Continued 



Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st , west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
'The Merry Widow." Eve., 8.15; 
mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 
50c. to $2. 

New York — 45th st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. "Follies 
of 1908." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel, 535i-38th. Carlotta Nillson 
in "Diana of Dobson's." Eve., 
8.15; mats., Thur. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 

Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 4465 Bryant. Beg. 
Sept. 2ist. Blanche Bates in 
"The Fighting Hope." Eve., 
8.15; mat.. Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. 
to $2. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Arnold Daly 
in "the. Regeneration." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat.. 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29tli 
and 3Gth sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
"Paid in Full." Eve., 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. 
to $2. 

West End — ^West 125th st., near 
8th ave. Tel., 2904 Morningside. 
Beg. Sept. 28th, Camille D'Ar- 
ville and Jefferson De Angelis in 
"The Gay White Way." Eve, 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices Soc. to $1.50. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Ouly All Water Koiite to 

CONE^Y ISLAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise m the 

World. 
TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30, 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45. 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, *10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
*12.55, *1.40, 2.55, S.40, 4.25, *5.25, 
6.10, 7.10, *7.55, ♦8.40, •9.25, ♦10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marked vpith a ♦ go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Tickets 129th St., 50 centi. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trjps 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St.. N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Pare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAND REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers, 
8.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., *12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R., 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M., 2.30 P. M. ; 
Rockaway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5.30 P. M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Grand Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. ; Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



Special matinee at all the principal theatres Labor Day. 




C^^lo'-lfA^I BOUSE PLANS 

A new book, containing 150 plans of houses costing 
from $500 to $18,000, which anyone thinking of 
building ahouse should have if they wish to save money and 
also get the latest and best ideas of a practical architect. 160 
large octavo pages. Price, paper cover, $1.00. Sent by mail, 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price. 

Daily Attractions in New York 1 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



When we speak of the Dircc- 
toire style of dress it has many 
modifications to fit in with the 
present times. True there is the 
scant, clinging skirt lines, with 
train; high waist line in costumes, 
wraps and coats; close and small 
sleeves; long coat-tail back; large 
revers; large pockets; and button 
trimmings. The present mode 
does not follow this entire, as 
two or three of these characteris- 
tics may be found in one garment, 
or it may be only one character- 
istic. The Empire differs from the 
Directoire chiefly in the slightly 
fuller lines of skirt, waist and 
sleeves. 

The fabrics required for this 
style of dress are, of course, of 
the clinging type, soft but 
weighty. In the first place satin, 
which is not at all like the stiff 
satin of years ago, but soft and 
pliable takes first place, followed 
closely by satin liberty and crepe 
de chine. 

For separate coats or for the 
coat of a costume, Ottoman rep 
will rival satin to some extent. 

Velvet for winter costumes will 
be extensively worn, as it is a 
most satisfactory material for the 
close fitting and draped skirts. 
This applys particularly to Chiffon 
velvet. 

The latest style of hair dressing 
and hair ornaments are of the 
Greek order. Broad barrettes, 
fastening under the Grecian knot, 
will be worn. 

The newest hat pins have tassei 
ornaments in gold, which dangle 
from each side of the jewelled 
center. 

The wide neck ruching. which 
has taken place of the linen collar 
to a great extent, grows higher 
and higher, in fact, these ruchings 
are so wide as to seern like sepa- 
rate pieces of neck wear. 

Pearl jewelery is greatly in 
vogue, and is worn with day and 
evening toilettes. Dog collars of 
pearls and diamonds are very 
fashionable. 



This fall the straight band or 
"dog collar"' of fur, surmounted by 
a ruche of ribbon or tulle will be 
worn. 

Somehow it is the sleeve that 
gives the year when the dress was 
designed. We now are able with 
the present style to have an up- 
to-date sleeve. For instance let us 
take the foulard gown. Match the 
ground color of the silk with chif- 
fon, lay it in tucks from shoulder 
to wrist and at intervals band it 
with silk cut from the old sleeves. 

From Araminta, who never 
throws anything away, we learn 
how to make use of worn out 
stocks. As we all know the stock 
will be frayed at the edge whilst 
the tie ends are perfectly good, 
Araminta buys the embroidered 
white belting, which comes by the 
yard. Measure the neck for the 
right length, transfer the old ties. 
At each side of the stock, just be- 
hind the ear, sew on a piece of 
tape, top and bottom the width 
of feather bone (the size that is 
used for waists). Cut it the width 
of the collar and slip it in the 
little cap. Result a stylish stock 
for the expense of a few cents. 

The binding of ones dress will 
often leave a dirty black mark 
across the instep of the tan shoe, 
which simply refuses to be cleaned 
with the tan polish. 

The remedy is to wash the shoes 
with a rag dampened and rubbed 
on naphtha soap. The whole shoe 
must be washed. Rinse the cloth 
and wipe the shoes, then rub dry 
with a soft towel. They will be 
clean and lusterless. Apply a 
good tan polish and rub vigor- 
ously with an old stocking leg. Tf 
care is taken not to dampen the 
shoes too much they will have a 
fine polish and look like new. 

Ivory can be cleaned and its 
whiteness restored by the use of 
a lemon and a little salt. Cut the 
lemon in half, dip it in salt. Rub 
well the discolored part. Then 
wash immediately in warm water. 
Madame Roberta. 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



INFORMATION REGARDING TRANSFERS 

At the request of our readers we publish the following list where 
transfers are abolished, to prevent confusion and to save them trouble 
as far as possible: 

The transfer points which have been discontinued include all those 
of the Third Avenue Railway Company, the Forty-second Street, Man- 
hattanville and St. Nicholas Avenue Railway Company and the Central 
Park, North and East River Railroad Company, known as the Belt Line, 
and operating in Fifty-ninth st. 



Greenwich st. and Battery pi. 

State St. and Batter.v place. 

Cortlandt and West sts. 

Duane and West sts. 

Watts and West sts. 

Christopher and West sts. 

14th St. and 10th av. 

23d St. and 10th av. 

28th St. and 10th av. 

42d St. and 10th av. 

29th St. and 10th av. 

Goerck and Delancey sts. 

Corlears and Cherry St.- 

.Tames Slip and South st. 

Monroe and Jackson sts. 

Mangin and Delancey sis. 

10th St. and av. D. 

14th St. and av. C. 

14th St. and 1st av. 

17th St. and 1st av. 

18th St. and 1st av. 

23d St. and 1st av. 

28th St. and l&t av. 

29th St. and Istav. 

34th St. and 1st av. 

59th St. and 1st av. 

.59th St. and 2d av. 

,59th St. and 3d a v. 

59th St. and Lexington av. 

59th St. and Madison av. 

59th St. and 6th av. 

59th st and 7th av. 

59th St. and 8th av. 

59th St. and Colnmbus av. 

110th St. and 1st av. 

110th St. and 2d a v. 

110th St. and Lexington a v. 

110th St. and Madison av. 

St. Nicholas av. and 116th st. 

St. Nicholas and 8th avs. 



Houston St. and Bowery. 
Stanton st. and Bowery. 
Spring St. and Bowery. 
Broome st. and Bowery. 
Bayard st. and Bowery. 
Chambers st. and Broad\va.\-. 
Park row and Broadwn.\ . 
Broadway and 71st si. 
Broadway and 65th st. 
Broadway and 59th st. 
Broadway and 53d st. 
34th St. and 3d av. 
29th St. and 3d av. 
2Sth St. and 3d a v. 
23d St. and 3d a v. 
18th St. and 3d av. 
17th St. and 3d av. 
14th St. and 3d av. 
Stuyvesant place and .'Id av. 
8th St. and 3d av. 
42d St. and 7th av. 
42d St. and Broadwav. 
42d St. and 6th av. 
42d St. and Madison av. 
42d St. and Lexington av. 
42d St. and 2d av. 
42d St. and 8th av. 
42d St. and 9th av. 
86th St. and Amsterdam av 
Amsterdam av. and 145th st. 
125th St. and 8th av. 
125th St. and Lenox av. 
125th St. and Madison av. 
125th St. and Lexington a\-. 
125 th St. and 2d a v. 
125th St. and 1st. av. 
116th St. and 3d av. 
86th St. and 3d av. 
59th St. and 3d av. 



THE EARLINGTON "''"Zllli::"' 

RICHFIELD SPRINGS, N. Y. 

Remodeled and renovated throughout. The largest, most modern and 

up-to-date hotel in Central New York. Now Open. 

Opposite the famous Sulphur Baths. 

GOLF, TENNIS, BOATING AND DRIVING 

Write for booklet, rates, etc. 
New York City Address : care THE BROZTELL, 3 East 27th Street 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



DID YOU KNOW IN THE YEAR 



1865— That the surrender of Gen- 
eral Lee and the Confederate Army 
caused great excitement and re- 
joicing. About one week from this 
time President Lincohi was assas- 
sinated while in a box at the the- 
ater in Washington. His bodv was 
laid in state in the City Hall, and 
was viewed by the sorrowing mul- 
titude. 
1867— That the Ninth Avenue Ele- 
vated opened a short section as an 
experiment. That in January a 
bridge of ice formed in the East 
River between New York and 
Brooklyn. It is estimated that five 
thousand persons crossed over it. 
1868 — That a part of an undergroind 
railway was built under Broadway, 
near City Hall, but was abandoned 
for lack of funds. 
1869 — That the American Museum of 
Natural History, now located at 
77th St., Central Park West, was 
incorporated. That the telegraph 
messenger service was organized. 
1870— That the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art received its charter. 
1872 — That there was appointed a 
committee of seventy to investigate 
the Tweed Ring and to bring those 
criminals to justice. 
1873 — That the city charter was 
amended, and many important 
modifications were made on pre- 
vious enactments. That there was 
a panic of unusual severity which 
effected the business interests very 
seriously. That the annexing of 
Morrisania, West Farms and 
Kingsbridge nearly doubled "the 
area of the city. 
1875 — That six millions of dollars 
was expended to improve Fourth 
avenue ; this expense w-as shared 
equally by the New York Central 
Railroad Company and the city. 
1876 — That a World's Fair was held 
at Philadelphia in commemoration 
of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the signing of the Declaration 
of Independence. 
1878 — That electric arc lamps were 

used to light the streets. 
1879— That the Central Station tele- 



phone service was put in opera- 
tion. 
1880 — That there were completed and 
in operation four elevated railroad 
lines. 
1881 — That it was estimated that 
there were being published over 
four liundred and forty newspapers. 
That incandescent lamp service 
was in operation. That President 
Garfield was assassinated in Wash- 
ington. 
1883— That the East River or Brook- 
lyn Bridge was open to the public. 
That tlie statue of Washington, 
now standing upon the steps of the 
Sub-Treasury Building located in 
Wall street, was presented to tiie 
United States Government by the 
New York Chamber of Commerce, 
on the occasion of the hundredth 
anniversary of the British evacua- 
tion of New York. 
1888 — That a subway plan by Mayor 
Hewitt failed to pass the Legisla- 
ture. That the city was visited by 
a blizzard of wind and snow and 
that for several days shut off all 
communication with the surround- 
ing country: all traffic was at a 
standstill, which resulted in great 
suffering and many deaths. 
1889— That for over three days the 
city was given up to patriotic dis- 
play as a commemoration of the 
first inauguration of a President 
of the United States. It is esti- 
mated that over three million 
strangers visited the city during 
this time which was known as th? 
"Columbus" celebration. 
1S90— That the United Stales ccnsn? 
reported that the population of ihe 
city was estimated over 1,515,000. 
That Mayor Hugh J. Grant ap- 
pointed a Commission to report on 
a route for a subway between Citv 
Hall and Harlem. That the New 
York Central Railroad closed 
transportation over that route for 
several days on account of a 
"strike" by the engineers. 
1891 — That plans were made for ai; 
East Side tunnel but were abai:» 
doned. That a cable railroad was 
laid from Battery to Central Park 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



CLUBS OF NEW YORK 



Aldine Association, in Fifth Ave 

Allenhurst, 289 Fourth Ave 

Alpha Delta Phi, 136 W 44th 

Amateur Billiard, 115 W 79th 

American Jersey Cattle, 8 W 17th 

American Kennel, 55 Liberty 

Arion, 59th St and Park Ave 

Army and Navy, 107 W 43d 

Attic, 141 W 42d 

Automobile, 54th St and B'way 

Baltusrol, 261 Broadway 

Beethoven, 207 E lOth 

Boys', Ave A and loth 

Brook, 7 E 40th 

Brown University, 12 W 44th 

Calumet, 267 Fifth Ave 

Camera, 5 W 31st 

Catholic, Central Park South 

Century, 7 W 43d 

Chemists', 108 W 55th 

City Lunch Club, 165 Broadway 

Civic, 243 E 34th 

Clover, 45 W 21st 

Colonial Yacht, loSth and N. R. 

Columbia University, 18 Gram'y Pk. 

Columbia Yacht, 86th and N. R. 

Coney Island Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Country, Westchester, N. Y. 

Criterion, 683 Fifth Ave 

Delaware, 222 E 71st 

Delta Phi, 612 W ii6th 

Democratic, 617 Fifth Ave 

Deutscher Verein, 112 Central Pk.S. 

Down Town, 60 Pine 

Drug and Chemical, 100 William 

Electrical, 14 Park PI 

Empire City, 106 W 38th 

Engineers', 32 W 40th 

Federal, Tz Ave D 

Fellowship, 211 W 4Sth 

Freundschaft, Park Ave and 72d 

Greenroom, 139 W 47th 

Greeters, 1146 Broadway 

Grolier, 29 E 32d 

Hardware, 253 Broadway 

Harmonic, 10 E 6oth 

Harvard, 27 W 44th 

Hotel Men's Ass'n, Cambridge bldg 

Jockey, 571 Fifth Ave 

Knickerbocker, Fifth Ave and 32d 

Lambs', 128 W 44th 



Lawyers', 120 Broadway 

Liederkranz, in E 58th 

Long Acre, 70 W 45th 

Lotos, 556 Fifth Ave 

Machinery, 50 Church 

Manhattan, Madisort Ave and 26th 

Masonic, 17 E 22d 

Mendelssohn, 113 W 40th 

Merchants', ic6 Leonard St 

Metropolitan, Fifth Ave and 6oth 

National Arts, 14 Gramercy Park 

N. Y. Athletic, 58 W 59th 

N. Y. Baseball, 1133 Broadway 

New York, 9 W 42d 

N. Y. Press, 7 Spruce 

N. Y. Railroad, 62 Liberty . 

N. Y. Riding W 66th 

N. Y. Yacht, ^^ W 44th 

Pen and Brush, 30 W 24th 

Physicians', 72 St. Mark's PI 

Players', 16 Gramercy Park 

Princeton, 121 East 21st 

Progress, Central Pk. W. and 88th 

Racquet and Tennis, 27 W 43d 

Reform, 42 Broadway 

Republican, 54 W 40th 

Riding, 7 E 58th 

St. Nicholas, 7 W 44th 

Salmagundi, 14 W 12th 

Stewards', 49 E 28th 

Strollers', 67 Madison Ave 

Studio, 959 Sixth Ave 

Technology, 36 E 28th 

Three Arts, 536 West End Ave 

Town and Country, 12 E 22d 

Transportation, Hotel Manhattan 

Turf and Field, 571 Fifth Ave 

Underwriters', ^^ William 

Union, Fifth Ave and 51st 

Union League, i E 39th 

University, Fifth Av and 54th St W 

Victoria, 15 W 32d 

West Side Republican, 2307 B'way 

West Side Y. M. C. A., 320 W 57th 

Whist, 13 W 36th 

Woman's, 9 E 46th 

Woman's Press, Waldorf-Astoria 

Woman's University, 17 E 26th 

Wool, 260 W Broadway 

Wyandot, 232 East 58th 

Yale, 30 W 44th 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers " Hendrick Hudson " 
''New York" and "Albany" 



1908 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except SUNDAYs) 



1908 



Lv. Read Down. 



Ar, 



Read Up. 



A.M. 
8:00 
8 :40 
9:00 
9:20 
9:45 



A.M. I P.M. I 



A.M. 



11 :50 
12:25 



1 :15 
2:10 



3:25 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1 :00 
n :25 
1 :45 



2:35 



1 :45 

2 :00 
2 :20 



4 :50 
5:00 

5 :25 

5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 

6 :45 



7:45 



Brooklyn Annex. 
. .Desbrosses St... 
. ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkors . . . . 
..Highland Falls.. 
. . .West Point. . . 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
. . . Newburgh . . . 
.New Hamburgh. 

Milton 

. . Poughkeepsie . . 
..Kingston Point.. 
. . . . Kingston . . . . 

Catskill 

. . . . Hudson . . . . 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



6:00 



P.M. I P.M. 

6:20 

6:00 

5:30 

5 :10 

4 :30 



2:50 
■2':i5 



1 :20 
12 :25 



11 :00 

10:40 

8:30 



9:00 
8:40 
8:10 
7:35 



5:45 

*5 :20 

5 :05 



4 :10 



P.M. I P.M. I P.M I 



I A.M. I A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catsl<ill 
and Kingston Point vvliarfs 
for all points in Catslsill 

Moun tains 

Morning and Afternoon 
Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 
The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music 



LONG ISLAND TRIPS 



Nearly all the trolley trips of 
Long Island start from the New 
York end of Brooklyn Bridge. 

To reach Belmont Park by trol- 
ley take "L" road from New York 
end of Brooklyn Bridge to 
Jamaica; at Jamaica take trolley 
for Queens, which is close to Bel- 
mont Park. 

From Queens a trolley may be 
taken to Hempstead and on to 
Garden City and Mineola by a 
branch line. 



One of the most picturesque of 
Long Island trolley trips is from 
Flushing to Rockaway Park, a dis- 
tance of a little over twenty-two 
miles, taking an hour and a half. 
On the road one touches Ingleside, 
Queens Borough Heights, Garri- 
son's Lane, Jamaica, Springfield 
Lawrence, Inwood, Far Rockaway, 
Edgemere, Arverne, Hammels, 
Hollands and Rockaway Beach. 

To reach Flushing take ferry to 
Long Island City, thence by trol- 
ley to Flushing. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



kILt 



PORT 



NAME OF 
STIAMER 



ADDREStEl OF LINES 



•TARTINO PLACE 



S .Bremen KronprlnzW. . 

.S.Rotterdam Noordam 

"J. Southampton .\driatic 

9. Liverpool Lucania 

10. Bremen Barbarossa. . . 

10. Naples intonia 

10. Hamburg Bluecher 

10. Liverpool Cedric 

lO.Copenliageu C.F.Tietgen. . 

10 . Havre Provence. . . . 

12. Liverpool Etruria 

12. Glasgow Caledonia.. . . 

12. Hamburg Pennsylvania 

12. Antwerp Finland 

12. Southampton New York. . . . 

12 . London Mesaba 

15. Bremen KaiserWm.II. 

15 . (Jib'r & Naples. . . . Hamburg. . . . 

15. Rotterdam Rotterdam.. . 

16. Liverpool Lusitania.. . . 

1 6 . Southampton Ma.iestlc 

17. Liverpool .\rabic 

17 . Copenhagen Hellig Ola v. . 

17 . Bremen Friedrich d (i. 

17 . Hamburg Kaiserin 

17 . Havre Lorraine 



N. German Llovd. 5 B'wav Ft 

Holland-.Vmer.". 39 B'wav Ft 

White Star Lino, 9 B'wav Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'wav Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Pt 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 

White Star Line. 9 B'way Ft 

Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'wav.. . . Ft 

French Line, 19 State St Pt 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft 

.\nchor Line, 17 B'way Ft 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 

Red Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 

.\merican Line, 9 B'way Ft 

Atlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. ... Ft 

N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'wav Ft 

Holland-.\mer., 39 B'wav Ft 

Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St Ft 

White Star Line, 9 B'wav Ft 

. White Star Line, 9 B'way Ft 

Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way.. . . Ft 

. N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way Ft 

Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way Ft 

. French Line, 19 State St Ft 

27 



3d St., Hobokcn 
5th St., Hoboken 
11th St., N. R. 
Jane St., N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken 
Jane St.. N. R. 
1st St., Hoboken 
11th St., N. R. 
17th St., Hoboken 
Morton St., N. R. 
Jane St., N. R. 
24th St., N. R. 
1st St., Hoboken 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Fulton St., N. R. 
Houston St., N. R. 
3d St., Hoboken 
1st St., Hoboken 
5th St., Hoboken 
Jane St., N. R. 
11th St., N. R. 
nth St., N. R. 
17th St., Hoboken 
3d St., Hoboken 
1st St., Hoboken 
Morton St., N. R. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Teieplione 5860 
Pranlflin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 355 Broadway; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 6th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of East 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and East 

23d Street to Greenpolnt Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa\onla Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonla 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., tulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.), Canal, Grand, Rivington, let, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th, 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th, 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (change for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th, 53d. 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, l&6th, 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road) 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gl.. Chambers, 
Franklin, Grand, Bleecker, 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th). 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d, 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 14,5ith, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad). 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 34th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST 



American Museum of Natural His- 
tory — Central Park West and 
77th St. Every day, 9 a. m. to 5 
p. m., and Tuesday and Saturday 
evenings, 7 to 10; Sunday, i to 5 
p. m. Free. 

Appellate Division, Supreme Court 
— Madison ave. and 25tli st. Open 
daily. 

Aquarium — Battery Park, foot of 
Broadway. Admission free. Open 
from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Closed 
on Monday forenoon. A fort in 
1807; Concert Hall in 1825; Castle 
Garden, 1855 to 1892. 

Assay Office — Located in Wall 
street, just east of the Sub-Treas- 
ury; is an old-fashioned build- 
ing, erected in the year 1823 fot 
the Branch Bank of the United 
States, and is the oldest struc- 
ture on the street. It is esti- 
mated that from twenty to one 
hundred millions of crude bullion 
are received and assayed yearly. 
Visiting hours, from 10 a. m. to 
2 p. m. 

Aster Library — Lafayette place. 
Founded by J. J. Astor in 1849. 

Brooklyn Bridge — Park Row and 
Centre. Opened May 24, 1883. 
Length, 5,989 ft.; centre span, 
1,595 ft.; height, 135 ft.; width, 
85 ft. 

Carnegie Mansion — Fifth ave. and 
90th St. Cost, $4,000,000. 

Cathedral of St. John the Divine- 
Amsterdam ave., iioth-ii3th sts. 

Central Park— Fifth to Eighth 
aves., 59th to iioth sts. Contains 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
Casino, McGowan's Pass Tavern 
and Cleopatra's Needle. Zoologi- 
cal Garden at 66th st. and Fifth 
ave. 843 acres. 

Chamber of Commerce — 65 Lib- 
erty. Organized 1768. 

Columbia University (formerly 
King's College) — Broadway and 
Amsterdam ave., ii6th to 120th 
sts. Charter granted by George 
II. in 1754. 

Conservatories — Central Park, op- 
posite East 105th. Choice plants. 
Free. Hours, 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Ellis Island — U. S. Immigrant Sta- 
tion. All immigrants arriving at 
this port are landed on Ellis Isl- 
and before being permitted to 
enter the country, where they are 
carefully examined as to physi- 
cal, financial and moral condi- 
tion. Many thousands are handled 
in a single day (the estimated 
number for the year 1905 was 
800,000). The process is most in- 
teresting and instructive and vis- 
itors are permitted to visit all 
parts of the extensive buildings, 
and can with facility inspect the 
operation of the system for ex- 
cluding undesirable aliens, and 
caring for and forwarding those 
who are admitted. Free. No. 
pass required. Boats from Bat- 
tery (Barge Office), hourly, on 
the hour, from 10 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

East River — Follows the eastern 
portion of the city and separates 
it from Long Island. From 
Coenties Slip to Maiden Lane, 
along its, shores, may be seen 
many interesting sights in con- 
nection with this city's great 
shipping industry. 

Fire-boats — The "New Yorker" is 
the name of the largest and best 
equipped fire-boat in the service 
of the New York fire depart- 
ment. There are also six others 
connected with the department, 
their stations are as follows: 
"New Yorker" at the Battery; 
"Wm. L. Strong," foot of Grand 
St., East River; "David A. 
Boody," foot of North 8th st., 
Brooklyn; "Abram S. Hewitt." 
foot of Main st., Brooklyn; "Seth 
Low," foot of 42d St., Brooklyn; 
"D. O. Mills," East 133d st. and 
Harlem River; "George B. Mc- 
Clellan," foot of Gansevoort st. 

" Flatiron " Building — Broadway 
and 5th ave., 22d and 23d sts. 

Five Points — Formerly consisted 
of squalid rookeries and drinking 
places, located in the neighbor- 
hood of Worth, Baxter and Park 
streets. In this locality many 
notorious crimes were commit- 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF INTEREST — Continued 



ted. The Five Points Mission 
House is at 63 Park st. The 
open space in the centre of the 
"Points" is now called Paradise 
Park. 

Grant's Tomb — -Riverside Drive 
and 123d St. Built on plan of Na- 
poleon's Tomb at the Hotel des 
Invalides, Paris. Dedicated 1897. 
Contains bodies of Gen. and Mrs. 
Grant in rare caskets. Near by is 
the Chinese tree planted by Li 
Hung Chang. 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Free. 

Hall of Fame — New York Univer- 
sity, Sedgwick ave. and E. i8oth 
St. Granite colonnade to contain 
statues of 150 famous Americans. 

Hall of Records — Chambers and 
Centre sts. City records. 

Hamilton Grange — Convent ave.. 
near 141st. Home of Alexander 
Hamilton when shot in duel by 
Aaron Burr. 

Ludlow Street Jail — Located at 
Ludlow and Essex streets, near 
Grand. In former days persons 
arrested for debt, under the old 
law, were kept here; now persons 
arrested for violation of United 
States law are incarcerated with- 
in its walls. 

Marble Collegiate Church— Fifth 
ave. and 29th st. The Collegiate 
Reformed Church of New York 
is the' oldest Protestant church in 
America, having had a complete 
and continuous organization 
since the summer of A. D. 1628. 
The Rev. Jonas Michaelius was 
its first minister, who was sent to 
New Amsterdam on the Island 
of Manhatas by the Classis oJ 
Amsterdam in Holland. As its 
name conveys, the Collegiate 
Church is a group of churches. 
The Marble Collegiate Church is 
the tenth in historical succession 
of the sanctuaries of the Collegi- 
ate Cliurch. 

Old Jewish Cemetery— Located on 
New Bowery, near Oliver st. One 
of the oldest burial places in the 
city, and established during the 
time of Peter Stuyvesant. An- 



other cemetery, or "Place of 
Rest," can be found in Twenty- 
first street, west of Sixth ave. 

Players' Club — Presented to actors 
and friends of the drama by Ed- 
win Booth, at a cost to him of 
more than $200,000. Located at 
16 Gramercy Park. Formally 
opened in the year 1888, on New 
Year's Eve. 

Riverside Drive — From West 72d 
St.. north to 134th st. Overlooks 
the Hudson. 

Salvation Army — This organization 
gives yearly a Christmas dinner 
to over 20,000 poor at Madison 
Square Garden. Headquarters 
located at 120 West 14th st. Many 
branches are maintained in vari- 
ous other parts of the city. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor — The home 
for the aged sailors on Staten 
Island; of interest to strangers. 
Free. Daily, except Sunday. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument — 
Rixerside Drive and 89th. 

Somerindyke House — This house 
formerly stood in Ninth avenue, 
near 75th st. Was the home of 
royalty during its exile. Louis 
Philippe and his brothers, the 
Due de Montpensier and the 
Comte de Beaujolais, taught 
school for their living. The Duke 
of Kent, Queen Victoria's father, 
visited them here. 

Trinity Church — Broadway, oppo- 
site Wall St. Original church 
built 1696, the second 1788, the 
present church 1839, and conse- 
crated 1846. The land was be- 
stowed upon the parish by Queen 
Anne. Its special interior feature 
is the wonderful carved altar in 
memory of the late William B. 
Astor. The churchyard is very 
ancient, containing graves of his- 
toric heroes. 

Viaduct— Over West 155th st., 7th 
and 8th aves. and Harlem River. 

Williamsburg Bridge — Delancey st. 
Length, 7,200 ft.; centre span, 
1,600 ft.; height. 135 ft.; width. 
118 ft. 



30 



MENNEN'S 

BORATED TALCUM 

TOILET POWDER 




"Baby's Best Friend" 

and Mamma's greatest comfort. Mennen's relieves and prevents Chafing, Sun- 
burn, Prickly Heat, Chapping, and all Skin Troubles of Summer. 

For your protection the genuine is put up in non-refillable boxes — the "Box 
that Lox," with Mennen's face on top. Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial No. 1542. Sold everywhere, or by mail 25 cents. 
Samfilefree. 

Try Mennen's Violet (Borated) Talcum Toilet Powder — It 
has the scent of Fresh-cut Parma Violets. Sam tie free . 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., Newark, N. J. 



Mennen's Sen Yang Toilet Powder, Oriental Odor | xo j 
Mennen's Borated Skin Soap (blue wrapper) \ SamtUs \ 



Specially prepared for 
the nursery. 



pnt stamp, one set Menneu'a Bridge Whist Tallies, enough for six tables 



THE THREE REIGNING 
SUCCESSES IN NEW YORK 



AT THE HUDSON THEATRE ^ '^ Steet. East of Broadway 
-_^_^^^_^^_^.^^^______^^^^.^_^_^_^^^^^_^ lelephone, Bryant oho 

Evenings at 8.20- ' Matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2.15 

Special Matinee, Labor Day, September 7th 

Henry B. Harris presents 

ROBERT EDESON 

in "The Call of the North" 

\ New Play by GEORGE BROADHURST. • 
Founded on Stewart Edward White's " Conjuror's House." 



AT THE GAIETY THEATRE Broadway and ^f^th Street 

Telephone, Bryant, 210 

Evenings at 8.15 Matinees, Wednesday and Saturday at 2. 15 

Special Matinee, Labor Day, September 7th 

Henry B. Harris presents 

THE TRAVELING SALESMAN 

"The Comedy Sensation of the Year" 
By JAMES FORBES 



AT THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE -^ ^"-VeleVhone^TheLa, aoo 

Evenings at 8.15 Matinees, Wednesday and Saturday at 2.15 

Special Matinee, Labor Day, September 7th 
Inaugural of Third Season 
Henry B. Harris presents 

ROSE STAHL 

in "The Chorus Lady" 

By JAMES FORBES 



,v^. - 



WEEK. SEPTEMBER 14 TO SEPTEMBER 20, 1908 



©ailp Attractions 



m 



^to|?orfe 




HIPPODROME 

SIXTH AVENUE Telephone, 3400 Bryant 43d to 44th Streets 

Matineesat2.Eveningsat8 TWICE DAILY Matinee, Best Seats, $1. 
SPORTING DAYS BIRD BALLET BATTLE IN THE SKIES 



VOL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 5 CENTS A COPY 

yri^/tt, looS. h Daity Attr„,tu»ts hi \',-.v \:.,/.- /„. 



NO. 129 



THE ANSONIA 

Broadway, 73d and 74th Sts. 

AT SUBWAY EXPRESS STATION 



An early selection is desirable, ""as^jtlje^giioice 
of apartments is rapidly becortti^^tthiited 



HOUSEKEEPING 

5 rooms and bath $1,800 

7 rooms and bath 2,700 

10 rooms and 2 baths 8,000 

11 rooms and 3 baths 3,600 

13 rooms and 4 baths 5,000 



NON-HOUSEKEEPING 

1 or 2 rooms and bath $ 900 

3 rooms and bath 1,400 

4 rooms and baths 2,200 



PER YEAR 



May be had, furnished or unfurnished, as; 

desired, and service for care of 

rooms is optional 

And also transiently 

■ 

Telephone 3320 Columbus : 

RESTAURANT A LA CARTE 






Pahly Atteactkom; 



m 

oi Weekly dfyia.gAzine 'Devoted to <yta'[/»nce infomuition. 



Vol. X SEPTEMBER 14th to SEPTEMBER 20th, 1908 No. 129 



in 



Daily Attractions 
New York, (Inc.) 

This magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New Yorlc 
corporation;, office, I Madison Avenue; 
E. .R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, "" 

I Madison Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 
Telephone, i59Gramercy 

Daily Attractions circulates through all the 

leading hotels in New York City 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STANDS 
Five Cents a Copy. One Year, Two Dollars. 

Advertising rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 



Copyright, 1908, by 
"Sew York. (Inc. ) 



Daily Attractions in 



CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

"Back From the Farm" (Haryot Holt Dey) 4 

Churches 12-13 

Did You Know in the Year 1700., 29 

Distances in New York 14 

Elevated Raihoads 26 

Ferries 26 

Hotels 1-8 

Hudson River Day Line 21-27 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 28 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Naming of New York's Streets 23-24 

Ocean Going Steamers 25 

Points of Interest 30 

Post Offices 14 

Railroad Stations 26 

"Short Talks" (Mme. Roberta) 15 

Subway Stations 16-17 

Statues and Monuments 11 

Theatres 19-22 

"The Call of the North " (Frank Thornton) 22 
This is the Way to Reach the Bronx, etc . . 27-28 

This Week in New York 5-10 

Trolley Trips 25 

Whereto Shop in New York 6 



ART NOTES 

Historical Society — Central Park 
West between 77th and 78th 
streets. The society was founded 
in 1804 in the old City Hall, at 
Wall and . Nassau sts. and has 
occupied the building at nth 
st. and Second Ave., oppo- 
site St. Mark's Church since 
1857. The new building was 
built in part through the gener- 
osity of Henry Dexter, a bene- 
factor of this society. The lib- 
rary contains over one hundred 
and fifty thousand volumes 
dealing with historical subjects, 
about one hundred thousand 
pamphlets, an art collection of 
nearly one thousand paintings, 
including the Br3'-an collection 
of old masters, the Burr collec- 
tion and many portraits; the 
Abbott Egyptian collection of 
more than one thousand pieces, 
the Peter Marie collection of 
miniatures, and the Nineveh 
sculptures, presented by James 
Lenox, and other things of in- 
terest. 



The dead carry in their hands 
only that which they have given 
away. — Ingersoll. 



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Parlor, 1217 B'way. 


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The best. 
Highest Awards 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



BACK FROM 

Three year-s ago an impatient 
man and a patient woman moved 
to the country. — It was a farm — ■ 
and it was the man's idea. Strange 
how the patient are aways mar- 
ried to the impatient! 

This week a patient man and an 
impatient woman moved in froni 
the country. It was the woman's 
idea. Strange how the patient al- 
ways stay married to the impa- 
tient! But it is the impatient who 
have the ideas. 

The difference between the pa- 
tient and impatient is- merely the 
simple matter of speaking about it. 
No use to differentiate here! 

The farming fever is always epi- 
demic. Every city man has it 
once. Not having had it, you are 
likely to be a victim at any time. 
But — like cures like. The man 
contracts the disease and his wife 
goes along as caretaker. The fever 
begins to abate sooner in some 
cases than in others. It doesn't al- 
ways take three years. The great 
advantage in being immune for- 
ever after — is unspeakable. 

The impatient man in this story 
had a drop of hermit's blood in 
him. He longed to get away 
where no person could find him. 
The patient woman had a good big 
dynamo of her own, and also a 
thirty-two candle power light that 
lit up the surroundings. This is 
how he could afford to maintain 
the drop of hermit's blood. It 
was just the same in the case of 
the primitive man: — the woman, 
the cave and the rock rolled 
against the door when the man 
was away from home. Of course 
the dynamo and the electric light 
supplied light and warmth and 
brought the game up to date. 

Well — once those people were 
settled in the country, things be- 
gan to happen. No use to attempt 
recapitulation here. No one will 
ever know. Incubators, brooders, 
chickens, a fifty dollar rooster, 
fancy pigs, well bred cows, cute 
little calves, horses, agricultural 
implements, fertilizer — and the 
earth to sow money in. Did the 



THE FARM 

earth produce? Read the parable 
of the talents and find out what 
happened to the man who buried 
his talent; find out what he drew! 

Somebody has written a book 
entitled "The Truth about a Hen." 
Find it on the book stalls before 
you come down with the fever! 

The impatient man had a great 
many valuable, practical ideas 
about a hen, and he wanted to 
demonstrate. He took all the hen 
magazines, and he did everything 
they said. He scoffed audibly at his 
neighbor's method of allowing 
hens liberty to scratch in a com- 
mon barn yard among the mi- 
crobes. He would show the farm- 
ers a thing or two — how to make 
money out of hens. So he built 
him a scientific hen house, lighted, 
heated and ventilated scientifically; 
and he bought scientific hen food 
. — a certain kind for black hens and 
another kind for white ones, and 
when all the arrangements were 
completed, he turned the laying 
hens into the glad hen house. 
"What happened?" 

Why, those hens were scared al- 
most to death, and they never laid 
an egg for six months. The farm- 
ers are laughing yet. 

You can never count on what a 
hen will do. When eggs are fifty 
cents a dozen, hens wouldn't lay 
one to save your life; but when 
eggs are a drug on the market they 
will turn them out at the rate of 
two or three a day. Such is the 
perversity of a hen. If there is 
one problem that absolutely refuses 
to lend itself to science it is a hen. 

The patient woman in time be- 
gan to lose her patience. She raced 
with the lark, and raised nastur- 
tiums and cauliflower, ran a pri- 
vate delicatessen, and waited for 
the family commuter to come 
home. Finally her dynamo gave 
out, her thirty-two candle power 
light was reduced by thirty can- 
dles, impatience set in — and she 
came to. Now they have come 
hack to electrical headquarters to 
have her waning forces re-charged. 
Haryqt Holt Dey. 




' *»Oo, »T *• 



This Week in New York 

Monday, September 14th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Westchester County Fair, Colonel William Jay, J\lr. Oliver Harri- 
man, Mr. James Moran, directors, will attend the opening. The fair will 
be held upon, the fair grounds at White Plains, and will continue until 
the evening of September 19. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway, the Rev. J. B. Phillips, 
of Macon, Ga., speaker (to Sept. 16). You are invited to attend. 

Hippodrome, Kew York's biggest play-house, nothing like it in the 
world. Twice daily. 2 and 8 p. m. Prices to suit you from 25 cents 
to $1.50. 

Golf — United States Golf Association Amateur Championship; Gar- 
den City (L. T.) Golf Club. 

Horse Racing — Coney Island Jockey Club; Sheepshead Bay, L. L 
(to Sept. 19). 

Horse Show — Horse Show, Syracuse, N. Y. (to Sept. 19). 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Brooklyn, at the Polo Grounds., 
r57th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission, 50 cents. 

Our Bureau of Information i^s open to you. What is it you want 
to know? Where is it you want to go? Ask "Father Knickerbocker," 
he knows. For your convenience, no cost in any way. 'Phone, Gram- 
crcy 159. Ask for "Father." 




AINTY HOME COOKING-Breakfast. Luncheon, 
Supper, served with delicacy and good taste. 
Food, salads and fruit according to season. 

Our Specialty : AFTERNOON TEA 

fl Full line of antiques, old laces, fans, etc. Art ob- 
jects in large variety. 

31 West 33d Street, near Waldorf-Astoria 



WHERE TO SHOP IN NEW YORK 



The followlns establishments have been carefully selected as furnishing: the best assortment 
of the special article mentioned, at prices that are right. 



BOOKS 

DODD, MEAD & CO., 5th Ave., cor. 35th St. 
All the Latest Books, Periodicals, etc. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 
CRAWFORD SHOES 



The Best fcit 

Men and Women 

23cl St. & 4th Av. 93 Nassau, cor. Fulton St. 

1363 B'way, nr 36th St. 141 W. 125th St. 

103 W. 42d St., near 6th Ave. 

Many other stores. 



FURS 
C. G. GUNTHER'S SONS, 

J 84 Fifth Ave. 



GLOVES 

LORD & TAYLOR, Broadway & 20th St. 
" R«ynier ": perfection in quality, fit and style. 
New importations for street and evening wear. 
All the fashionable shades and lengths. 



JEWELERS 
BLACK, STARR & FROST 

5th Ave. & 39th St. 
Pearl Necklaces, Diamonds, Emeralds. 
Sapphires. Exclusive designs in diamond 
jewelry and watches 



LADIES' TAILOR 

EDWARD C. BALCH j52-54 w. 34th St. 

Tailor-made Costumes of all descriptions at 
lowest prices consistent with the highest grade 
materials and workmanship. 
Special facilities for filling orders in limited time 



LEATHER GOODS 
THE GORHAM CO. 

Fifth Ave. & 36th St. 



MEN'S CLOTHING L'^^oCea^u" 
BROOKS BROTHERS, BVay & 22d St. 

Ranging in price from the medium to the more 

expensive. 

Also boy's clothing 



SILVERWARE 
THE GORHAM CO., sth Ave.&36thSt. 

Sterling Silver Tea and Dinner Services, Table 
Silver. Serving Pieces, Family Chests, Decora- 
tive Pieces, Toilet Silver, etc. 



SILKS AND VELVETS 
LORD & TAYLOR, f ^1^7 & im ft*: 

125 shades taffeta at 58 cts. per yard 
80 shades " Mirage silk" at $1.35 per yard. 
Black taffeta, 36 in. wide, superb quality, at Si 
per yard. 

SHIRTWAISTS 

A large assortment of Imported and Original 
advance models for Fall 

JAMES McCREERY & CO. 

23d Street 34th Street 



STATIONERY Fine Art, 
BLACK, STARR & FROST 

5th Ave. & 39th St. 
Heraldic Dies, Wedding Invitations 
Visiting and Reception Cards 
Imported and Domestic Writing Paper 



INFORMATION 



BUREAU 



CHIROPODIST & MANICURE 
Dr. J. T. WHELAN & Miss M. S. WILSON 

McCutcheon BIdg., 347 Fifth Ave., near 34th St. 
Electro-vibratory Facial Massage 
All Instruments sterilized 
'Phone : Madison 6192 



CLEANERS AND DYERS 
PAUL L. BRYANT 

(■.owns cleaned in 24 hours if necessary 
291 Fifth Ave., 'Phone: Madison 1224 
868 Broadway, 'Phone: Gramprcy 4755 
308 Fourth Ave., 'Phone: Gramercy 4508 
900 Sixth Ave., 'Phone: Plaza 5207 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 

UNIVERSAL, 28 E. 23d St. 

Harriet V. Peckham, Mgr. 
Furnishes first-class servants, male and female 
white or colored; all nationalities. References 
carefully investigated. 'Phone: Gramercy 4339 



PRINTER 

THE WOLFER PRESS, 304-310 E. 23d St. 
Maurice Wolfer, Prop. 

" Characteristic printing individually for you " 
Telephone Call, 1147 Gramercy 



Mail orders will receive careful and prompt attention. 
Daily Attractions in New Yorl< " when purchasing. 

6 



You will confer a favor by mentioning 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continued 

The Singer tower is now open to tlic public, and the observation 
balcony at No. 149 Broadway, offers the visitor to this city an oppor- 
tunity to see New York from all directions instead of a spot at a time. 
The balcony is on the forty-second floor, 548 feet above the curb, and 
gives a sight-seeing radius of over thirty miles in all directions. The 
tower has a platform with a high railing which accommodates about 
forty people. Express elevators run from the main corridors on the first 
floor, making the trip in one minute. There are also guides stationed 
on the platform to point out the different points of interest to visitors 
and to give other information. A fee of 50 cents is charged. Hours of 
admission, 9.30 to 11.30 a. m., and 2.30 to 4.30 p. m., excepting on 
Saturday, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Not open on Sundays and legal 
holidays. 

Mardi Gras, to be celebrated for six days at Coney Island, under the 
auspices of the, showmen and shopmen of Coney Island. During the 
evening there will be a monstrous parade in which more than a thousand 
horses will figure. Twelve wonderfully constructed floats will head the 
parade, the King and Queen being' on the first one, on those following 
will be effigies, life size, of Roosevelt, Taft and Bryan. Following this, ten 
industrial floats, representing progress, prosperity, and various other 
trades, the floats will display models of cars, steamships, automobiles, 
skyscrapers. On the opening night the parade will be a floral one. The 
Island will be illuminated each night with over one hundred thousand 
electric lights, buildings will be decorated with bunting, and the usual 
horns, cow bells and confetti will be in evidence to add to the pleasure of 
this occasion. Police from Brooklyn will line the streets and every effort 
will be made to keep order, (to Sept. 19, inc.). 

Final mass meeting of the Evangelistic Committee; Converts' Rally, 
There will be a chorus of five hundred voices, led by R. E. Mitchell, 
director of music at the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. Distin- 
guished speakers will make address. Carnegie Hall, Seventh ave. and 
S7th St. 8 p. m. Tickets may be obtained at the tents, or from 
pastors, or at the headquarters, 541 Lexington ave. 

Tuesday, September 15th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Polo — Polo tournament, Squadron A, Polo Club. 



The Right Opporttinity. Let Us Find It For You. 

Leading employers secure all their high-grade men through us. Just now 
the demand exceeds the supply. We have open in Greater New York alone over 
500 first-class positions for Salesmen, Executive, Clerical and Technical men, 
paying $i,ooo-$5,ooo. If you want to sell your ability to good advantage, it will 
pay you to call or write us. HAPGOODS, 307 Broadway, N. Y. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

Goveniur ITughcs will speak nl the Wyoming Couiily i'"aii- at War- 
saw. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. Louis, at the Polo Grounds, 
T57th St. and Eighth avc. 4 p. m. yVdmission, 50 cents. 

Celebration of the centennial anniversary of the establishment of 
the first religious newspaper in America, at Portsmouth, N. H. "The 
Herald of Gospel Liberty" was originally published at this place; at 
the present time its place of publication is Dayton, Ohio. There are a 
number of religious papers still published. In the year 1808 "The Herald 
of Gospel Liberty"; in 1813 "The Christian Observer"; in 1816 "The 
Boston Recorder"; and in 1819 "The Watchman"; "The New York 
Observer" was first published in 1823, and "The Christian Advocate" in 
1826; in the year 1830 "The Christian Intelligencer," and in 1831 "The 
Lutheran Observer." 

Wednesday, September i6th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Wednesday evening meeting; Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Alad- 
ison ave. and 31st., the Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., minister; in Parish 
House, 30 East 31st st. 8 p. m. A welcome for strangers. 

Wednesday evening meeting; Second Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Central Park West, at 68th st. 8 p. m. A cordial welcome to strangers. 

Wednesday evening meeting; the Rev. Alfred E. Myers will preside; 
the Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st. 8 p. m. You will 
be welcome. 

Wednesday evening Praise and Prayer Service, Broadway Tabernacle 
Church, 56th St. and Broadway. 8 p. m. A welcome for everyone. 

Governor Hughes will speak at the Columbia County Fair at Hudson. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. Louis, at the Polo Grounds. 
T57th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission, 50 cents. 

Horse Show — Horse Show, Bryn Mawr, Pa. (to Sept. 19). 

Tennis — New Jersey State championship; Morristown (N. J.) Field 
Club. 




C^.%'b%^A^i HOUSE PLANS 

A new book, containing 150 plans of houses costing 
from $500 to $i8,ooo, which anyone thinking of 
building a house should have if they wish to save money and 
also get the latest and best ideas of a practical architect. 160 
large octavo pages. Price, paper cover, $1.00. Sent by mail, 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price. 

Daily Attractions in New York 1 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 

8 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS AVEEK — Continued 

Thursday^ September 17th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

State Fair at S3'racuse: Governor's Day; the afternoon program is 
in charge of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mrs. William 
Cummings Story, State Regent, will attend. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. St. Louis, at the Polo Grounds, 
iS7th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission, 50 cents. 

Daily Attractions in New York is published every Saturday for the 
.succeeding week's daily attractions in New York; you can subscribe to 
it for three months for fifty cents; it will be mailed to you regularly. 
Subscribe now. 

Friday, September i8th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway. Final Rally, the Rev. 
J. Wilbur Chapman will preach. 8 p. m. (through Sept. 20). 

The original "Seeing New York" Yacht encircles the Island of Man- 
hattan twice daily, leaving from foot of West 22d st. at 10 a. m. and 2.30 
p. m. You do not realize the beauties of our waterway until you spend 
the three restful hours enjoying this beautiful trip. Fare $1. 

Automobiling — Automobile race meet, Brighton Beach Track. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Pittsburg, at the Polo Grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission, 50 cents. 

Saturday, September 19th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Dog Show — Atlantic City Kennel Club; Atlantic City, N. J. 

Horse Racing — Coney Island Jockey Club; Sheepshead Bay, L. I. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of T.ong Island Sound; Larch- 
mont and Manhasset Bay. 

Yachting — Yacht Racing Association of Gravesend Bay; Atlantic 
Yacht Club. 



ABLE D'HOTE DINNERfrom 6 to8 

Exclusively home cooking and dainty service 

*'Tea Rooms" 



ZLyi 



Breakfast after 8 a. n,. / .^/^^-^^^ H W. 33rd Street 

A la Carte Luncheon. 12 to 3 ^ / ( ^Z'^' '^"^ ^VALDORF) 

Afternoon Tea until 6 p. m. S. M. TUCK.ER_ 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK — Continued 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall, main entrance 59th st., 
Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. 

Baseball — New York Nationals vs. Pittsburg, at the Polo grounds, 
157th St. and Eighth ave. 4 p. m. Admission, 50 cents. 

Sunday, September 20th 

MISCELLANEOUS 

St. Bartholomew's Church, (Protest Episcopal), Madison ave. and 
44th St., the Rev. Leighton Parks, D.D., rector; services, 8 a. m., ii a. m. 
and 5 p. m. You are cordially invited to attend. 

The Rev. James B. Wasson, D.D., Chaplain to Strangers, commis- 
sioned by Bishop Greer, and confirmed by the Chapter of the Cathedral 
of St. John the Divine, to minister to all strangers in the city, irrespec- 
tive of creed. Address: lo West 6ist st. Telephone, Columbus i88. 

Church of the Incarnation (Protest Episcopal), Madison ave and 44th 
St., the Rev. William Mercer Grosvenor, D.D., rector; services, 8 a. m., 
II a. m. and 4 p. m. Strangers are invited to attend. 

Marble Collegiate Church, Fifth ave. and 29th st., the Rev. David 
James Burrell, D.D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 8 p. m., the Rev. 
Alfred E. Myers will preach at both services. A welcome for all. 

Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Central Park West, at 68th st., 
II a. m. and 8 p. m. You are cordially invited to attend. 

Broadway Tabernacle, 56th st. and Broadway, the Rev. Charles Jef- 
ferson,^D.D., LL.D., pastor; services 11 a. m. and 8 i). m. A welcome 
for you. 

Madison Avenue Baptist Church, Madison ave. and 31st st., the Rev. 
Edward Loux, D.D., minister; services, 11 a. m., in the Parish House, 
30 East Thirty-first st. A welcome for all. 

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Fifth avenue and 55th st., the 
Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D., minister; services, 11 a. m. and 4 p. m., 
the Rev. ]. Wilbur Chapman, D.D., the well known evangelist, will preach 
morning and afternoon. 

Gospel Tent Evangel, 57th st. and Broadway. Final Rally, the Rev. 
J. Wilbur Chapman will preach. 8 p. m. A welcome for everj^one. 

Public Concert — Central Park, on the Mall, main entrance, 59th st.. 
Fifth or Eighth aves. 4 p. m. Last concert for the season. 

Field day of the Knights of Columbus Athletic Association of Newark, 
N. J., at Olympic Park. Newark, N. J. 



S. LILLY HALLENBECK 

2246 SEVENTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY 

GRADUATE SPECIALIST 

Electro Magnetic Treatments for Nervous Diseases, Face and Scalp, $ 1 
Manicuring at Residences or Hotels, 50c. Appointments can be made 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



STATUES AND MONUMENTS 



America, by Daniel Chester French, al- 
legorical marble group. Facade of New 
Custom House, Bowling Green. 

Arthur, Chester A., by G. E. Blssell. 
President of the United States; bronze 
statue. North side Madison Square. 

Bartholdl, Liberty Enlightening the 
World, copper statue 151 feet high, by 
Auguste Bartholdl. It stands upon Bed- 
loe's Island, the site of old Fort Wood, 
whose walls still surround the base. 

Beethoven, Ludwlg von, German com- 
poser, bronze bust. Mall, Central Park. 

Bolivar, Simon, Gen'I, South American 
Liberator, bronze equestrian statue, by 
R. De la Cora. Gift from the people and 
Government of Venezuela. Central Park, 
near West 81st st. entrance. 

Burns, Robert, Scottish Poet, presented 
to city by resident Scotchmen, bronze 
statue by John Steele. Mall, Central 
Park. 

Cervantes, Miguel De, Author "Don 
Quixote," bronze bust. Central Park. 

Columbus Monument, In commemora- 
tion of 400th anniversary of discovery of 
America. Columbus Circle, S. W. en- 
trance Central Park, 59th st. 

Clinton, De Witt, Mayor, 1808-10, gran- 
ite statue, by Philip Martlny. Facade 
Hall of Records. 

Christopher Columbus, Discoverer of 
America, marble statue by Emma Steb- 
blns. Presented by Marshall O. Rob- 
erts. McGown's Pass, Central Park. 

Commerce, bronze emblematic figure, 
presented by Stephen B. Gulon. Central 
Park, near S. W. entrance. 

Cooper, Peter, Philanthropist, bronze 
statue, by Augustus St. Gaudens. Cooper 
Square, 4th ave. and Bowery. 

De Vrles, Pletersen, Patron of Staten 
Island, 1640-44, granite statue, by Philip 
Martlny. Facade Hall of Records. 

De Peyster, Abraham, Colonial Mayor 
and Soldier, bronze statue; presented by 
Gen. John Watts De Peyster. Bowling 
Green. 

Dodge, William B., Philanthropist, 
bronze statue; presented by merchants. 
36th St., Broadway and 6th ave. 

Eagles an?l Goat, Ideal bronze group, 
by Fratin; presented by Gordon W. 
Burnham. Central Park, east of Mall. 

England, emblematic marble figure, by 
Charles Grafly. Facade of New Custom 
House, Bowling Green. 

Farragut, David Glasgow, Admiral, U. 
S. N., bronze statue, by Augustus St. 
Gaudens. Madison Square, 26th st. and 
Fifth ave. 

Fort Washington Memorial, Ft. Wash- 
ington ave. and 183d st. 

Garibaldi, Gulseppe, Italian Patriot, 
bronze statue, by Giovanni Turlnl, pre- 
sented to city by Italian residents. Wash- 
ington Square. 

Greeley, Horace, Editor, bronze statue, 
by J. Q. A. Ward. At entrance of Tri- 
bune Building. Printing House Square. 

Halleck, Fltz-Greene, Poet, bronze 
statue, by Wilson McDonald. The Mall, 
Central Park. 



Hale, Nathan, Patriot, bronze statue, 
by Frederick MacMonnles; erected by 
Society of Sons of the Revolution. City 
Hall Park. 

Hamilton, Alexander, Statesman, gran- 
ite statue, by Ch. Conradts, presented by 
John C. Hamilton. Central Park, East 
Drive, near Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

Hancock, Wlnfleld Scott, General, U. 
S. A., bronze statue, by Wilson McDon- 
ald; presented to city by Grand Army 
of the Republic, Hancock, Square, St. 
Nicholas ave. and 123d st. 

Irving, Washington, Author, bronze 
bust by Beer; presented by Joseph Wie- 
ner. Bryant Park, facing 40th st. 

Jay, John, Governor of New York, 
Chief Justice of U. S., marble statue in 
group typifying Law, by Philip Martlny. 
Facade of Chamber of Commerce. 

La Fayette, Marquis De, French Soldier 
and Statesman, bronze statue by Augusta 
Bartholdl; erected by French residents. 
Union Square, West. 

Lincoln, Abraham, President United 
States, bronze statue, by H. K. Browne; 
erected by popular subscription. S. W. 
corner Union Square. 

Martyrs' Monument, In memory of Rev- 
olutionary Soldiers and Sailors who died 
In the British prison ships. Trinity 
Church yard. 

Morse, Samuel F. B., Inventor of Tele- 
graph, bronze statue, by Byron M. Pick- 
ett. Near Fifth ave. and 72d St., en- 
trance Central Park. 

Porter, Josiah, Major- General, bronze 
statue; presented to city by National 
Guard Association of State of New York. 
Parade Ground, Van Courtlandt Park, 
southern end. 

Schlft Fountain, presented by Jacob H. 
SchlfT. Rutgers Square. 

Seward, William H., Statesman, bronze 
statue, by Randolph Rogers. Southwest 
corner Madison Square. 

Seventh Regiment Memorial, commem- 
orating regiment's dead In the Civil War, 
bronze Ideal figure of a soldier, by J. Q. 
A. Ward. West Drive, near 72d St., Cen- 
tral Park. 

Sherman, William Tecumseh, General, 
U. S. A., grand bronze equestrian statue, 
by Augustus St. Gaudens. Central Park 
Plaza, Fifth ave., at 59th st. 

Washington and La Fayette, bronze 
group, by Auguste Bartholdl; presented 
by Charles Broadway Rouss. Mornlngslde 
and Manhattan aves. 

Washington, George, bronze statue, by 
J. Q. A. Ward. On site of Federal Hall 
where Washington took oath of ofllce as 
President. Entrance of U. S. Sub-Treas- 
ury, Wall and Nassau sts 

Webster, Daniel, Statesman, bronze 
statue, by Thomas Ball; presented by 
Gordon W. Burnham. West Drive, at 
7 2d St. Central Park. 

Worth Monument, granite shaft, me- 
morial of Major-General Worth, U. S. A. 
Broadway, Fifth ave. and 26th st. 



^C<}^^^^. 




I 



* ^ooo, bT *' 



New York Churches 



BAPTIST 




Hadison Ave. Baptist Charch 

Corner of Thirty-Fiirt Street 

Rev. Edward Loux, D.D., Minister 

Sunday, September 13th 

Service! II a. m. in Pariih House 

BIBLE SCHOOL. 9.45 a. m. 

No Evening Service 



Mid-week Meeting, Wednesday, 8 p. m. 



Ji Welcome for Everyone 



II 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



i^^ranJi Qllfurrlj nf OIl|Hflt, ^rttntiat 



Central Park West 
at 68th Street 



Services, ii a. m. and 8 p. m. 



Wednesday Evenine Meeting. 8 p. m. 



Sunday School, ii a. m. 



COLLEGIATE 



1623 THE OLDEST CHURCH IN AMERICA 1908 

The Marble Collegiate Gliurch 

riPTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

REV. DAVID JAMES BU RRELL, D.D., LL.D., Minister 

Rev. ALFRED E. MYERS, will preach 

Sunday, September IStfi, 1908 

II a. m. Subject : " Our Schools ; Men and Women in the Making." 
8 p. m. Subject : "Jesus the Wonderworker." 

The Apostle's Creed is the subject under consideration at the Mid-week 
Meetings, Wednesday evenings at 8 o'clock. On Wednesday, Sept. i6th, 
"I believe in the Forgiveness of Sins." A Cordial Welcome. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 

NEW YOKK CHURCHES — Continued 
PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 



B> 


ain 


t Bartholomew's 

MADISON AVENUE AND 
FORTY-FOURTH STREET 


(Kh 

Rector 
Minister 


urc 


h 


Rev. LEIGHTON PARKS, D. D., 
Rev. Robert S. W. Wood, Assistant 

CHURCH CLOSED 
















WILL REOPEN SEPTEMBER 20, 
services: 8 a.m., 11 a.m. and £ 


1908 










) p.m. 







■Services* 8 n.m., 11 a.m. and 4^ p.m. 



CHAPLAIN 



while Dr. Wasson was appointed by the late 
Bishop Potter, and is now acting under the authority 
of Bishop Greer, and the Chapter of the Cathedral 
jPQ ^=^^^^^^^^^^^1^^ I of St. John the Divine, his work is not sectarian in 
character. It is his duty to act as pastor for the 
time being to all strangers in the city, whether they 
are members of any Church or not, and he will 
gladly respond to calls at any time. 

REV. JAMES B. WASSON, D. D. Residence, 10 W. 61st St. Tel. 188 Columbus 



STRANGERS 



PRESBYTERIAN 



IFtftll AUfltUe Pr^Hbytman ([II)UrrI| Fifth Avenue and 55th street 

SERVICES SEPT. 13th; 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. STRANGEKS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 

REV. WILLIAM J. DAWSON. D. D., formerly of London, noted evangelist author and 

lecturer, will preach morning and afternoon. 



CONGREGATIONAL 



BROADWAY TABERNACLE ""'"tl^.Ti^i^Xt, Ir.^':^}^^^' 

Sunday i Public Worship, ii a. m., 8 p. m. Bible School, 9.45 a. m., 2.45 p. m. 
Y. P. S. C. E.. 7 p. m. IVednesday : Praise and Prayer Service, 8 p.m. 



A Timely Suggestion 

IT is as legitimate for churches to advertise to draw 
people to hear the word of God, in order that they 
may get blessing, as it is for shops to advertise in 
order that they may draw people to buy goods. 
The churches have something good to tell, and they ought 
to let the people know it. I am glad that we have adver- 
tised. 

Rev. Dr. Torrey. 



13 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



EXPRESS COMPANIES 

Adams. — 59-61 Broadway, 91 Maiden 
Lane, 2 Reade, 200 Chambers, 137 
West Broadway, 307 Canal, 250 
Grand, 122 Prince, 322 Lafayette, 
13 E. 14th, 25 W. 23rd, 11 W. 
34th, 26 E. 42nd, 242 W. 47th, Madi- 
son av. and 48th, 1033 Third av., 
1257 Third av., 1789 Lexington av.. 
355 Amsterdam av., 2753% Broad- 
way, 308 W. 124th, 43 W. 125th, 
132 Hamilton place, 663 E. 148th. 

American Express Co. — 65 Broad- 
way, 81 Dey st., 142 West Broad- 
way, 21 Mott St., 302 Canal st.. 93 
Bowery, 139 Spring st., 18 Astor 
place, 22 West 15th St., 922 Broad- 
way, 1434 Broadway, 120 East 42d 
St., Vanderbilt av. and 44th st., 399 
Madison av., 315 Columbus av., 
1251 3d av., 683 Columbus av., 235 
West 116th St., 117 West 125th St., 
138th St. and Park av., 2016 Am- 
sterdam av., 2800 Webster av. 
(Bronx Park). 

Long Island. — 1383 B'way, 304 Canal, 
257 Mercer, 1047 6th av., 95 5th av., 
572 Columbus av., 133 W. 125th, 
ft. James, Wall, E. 34th. 

National. — 141 B'way, 302 Canal, 158 
Duane, 105 Bleecker, 133 5th av., 
30 E. 125th, 275 W. 125th, ft. W. 
42d, and Franklin. 

N. Y. & Boston Despatch. — 304 Canal, 
100 Maiden La., 63 Gold, 45 Church, 
257 Mercer, 123 Prince, 95 5th av„ 
Piers 18 and 40 N. R., 613 6th av. 

N. Y. Transfer Co. — 1354 B'way, 182 
5th av., 521 7th av., 4th av. and 
42d, 245 Columbus av., 105 W. 
125th, ft. Rector, Liberty, Cort- 
landt, Chambers, Desbrosses and 
W. 23d. 

United States. — 2 Rector (General), 
142 West, 127 Franklin, corner 
West Broadway, 296 Canal, 128 
Division, 35 W. 3rd, 7 E. 14th, 24 
E. 21st, 555 W. 23d, 134 W. 38th, 
7 E. 39th, 1255 Broadway, corner 
47th, 1243 3rd av., 224 Columbus 
av., 2218 Broadway, corner 79th, 
696 Columbus av,, corner 94th, 145 
W. 125th. 

AVells, Fargo & Company's Offices. — 
51 Broadway, 107 John St., 100 
Warren st., 198 West Broadway, 
18 Chatham Square, 310 Canal St., 
Fifth av., Erie Ferry, West 23d St., 
173 Mercer st., 60 East 8th st., 95 
1159 Broadway, 613 Sixth av., 1047 
Sixth av., 88th st. and Columbus 
av., 133 West 125th st. 

Westeott Express Co. — 149, 415, 429, 
922, 1216, 1434 Broadway, Astor 
Place and Lafayette st.. Grand 
Central Station, 275, 315, 683 Co- 
lumbus av., Park av. and 128th st., 
117 W. 125th St.. D., L. & W. R. R. 
Depot, Barclay st.; D., L. & W. R. 
R. Depot. Christopher st. ; D.. L. & 
W. R. R. Depot, West 23rd st.; 
West fe'hore R. R. Depots at Des- 
brosses St. and foot West 42d st. 
POST OFFICES 

General. . . .Broadway and Park Row 
Branch P. O. Stations. 
A — 136 Greene st. ; B — 380 Grand 

St.; C — 589 Hudson St.; D — 4th ave. 



and 12th St.; E — 110 West 32d st.; 
F — 399 3d av.; G — 1648 Broadway; 
H — Lexington av., corner 44th st. ; 
I — Columbus av., corner 105th St.; 
J — 8th av., cor. 124th St.; K-— 203 E. 
8Sth St.; L, — 141 E. 125th st.; M — 1965 
Amsterdam av. ; N — Broadway, cor- 
ner 69th St.; O — 122 Fifth av.; P — 
Produce Exchange Building; R — 3d 
av., corner 150th St.; S — Broadway, 
corner Howard st.; T — 3319 3d av.; 
V — 3d av., corner 103d St.; V — Cor- 
ner West Broadway and Canal St.; 
W — 498 Columbus av.; X — E. 138th 
st.;Y — 1160 3d av.; Bedford Park — 
Southern Boulevard, near Webster 
av. ; City Island — Main st. and Ford- 
ham av. ; Foreign Branch — Corner 
West and Morton sts. ; High Bridge 
— Sedgwick av., near Depot place; 
Kings Bridge — "Kings Bridge," near 
Railroad Station; Madison Square — 
Fourth av., corner 23d St.; Tre- 
mont — 719 Tremont av. ; University 
Heights — University of the City of 
New York; Westchester — Main St., 
near West Farms road; Williams- 
bridge — White Plains av., near 
Briggs av. 

DISTANCES IN NEW YORK 



From the 


From the 




Battery 


City Hall 




1/4 mile 




To Rector st. 


Y? " 




" Dey st. 


% " 




" City Hall. 


1 


1/2 miie 


" Leonard st. 


11/4 miles 


% " 


" Canal st. 


1 1/2 " 


1 


" Spring St. 


1% " 


1% miles 


" B. Houston St. 


2 


11/2 " 


" E. 4th St. 


214 " 


iy2 " 


" E. 9th St. 


21/2 " 


2 


" B. 14th St. 


2% " 


2% " 


" E. 19th St. 


3 


2y2 " 


" E. 24th St. 


31/4 " 


2% " 


" E. 29th St. 


31/^ " 


3 


" E. 34th St. 


3% " 


3% " 


" E. 38th St. 


4 


3y2 " 


" E. 44thst 


4% " 


3% " 


" E. 49th St. 


41/2 " 


4 


" E. 54th St. 


4% " 


4% " 


" E. 58th St. 


5 


4y2 " 


" E. 63rd St. 


514 " 


4% " 


" E. 68th St. 


.5 1^ " 


5 


" E. 73rd St. 


5% " 


5% " 


" E. 78th St. 


6 


SVs " 


" E. 83rd St. 


6 14 " 


5% " 


" E. 88th St. 


61/i " 


6 


" E. 93rd St. 


6% " 


6 14 " 


" E. 97th St. 


7 " 


6 Vo " 


" E. 102d st 


714 " 


6 34 .. 


" B. 108th St. 


71/2 " 


7 


" E. 112th St. 


7% " 


7V4, " 


" E. 117th St. 


8 


71/2 " 


" E. 121st St. 


8 14 " 


7% " 


" E. 126th St. 


101/2 " 


10 " 


" W. 166th St. 



The distance across the city : 
At Battery pi. is 1/2 mile ; at Fulton st., 
% mile ; 'at Chambers st., 1 mile ; at 
Grand st., 2% miles; at Houston St., 
2%miles; at 14th st., 2% miles; at 23d 
St., 2% miles; at Inwood, % mile. 

Prom 23d st. northward to 125th st. 
the width of the island averages from 
2 to 2^4 miles. 



14 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



The feature of tlie fall styles in 
coat and skirt suits is that thc\' 
are very much trimmed or they arc 
perfectly plain. The style of coat 
preferred is the semi-fitted, Prince 
Chap, with single or double-breast- 
ed fronts, with the conventional- 
shaped sleeve shirred into the arm 
size, or to place the fulness be- 
tween elbow and wrist, as was 
worn a few years ago. The col- 
lars are of the notched, mannish 
order. 

To those who want a change in 
tailored suits, and object to the 
Directoire, and something different 
from the Prince Chap, will turn 
with favor to the Continental. 
These Continental coats are usual- 
ly about thirty-six inches long, 
slashed almost to the waist line. 
All round the edges they are elab- 
orately embroidered in self-col- 
ored soutache braid. The long 
Continental waistcoat is a matter 
of fancy, but they must have the 
regulation army sleeve, trimmed 
from wide wrist opening to elbow, 
with a row of three enormous 
satin-covered or embroidered but- 
tons, set into similated buttonholes 
formed of twisted strands of satin. 
They have usually satin Louis 
cuffs and band collars, soutache 
braided. The skirts walking 
length. 

There is a large variety of the 
net waist. These are in black, but- 
ter-color and ecru. The butter 
color net bids fair to take a strong 
hold on those who are on the look- 
out for the latest. Another very 
attractive separate waist is the tail- 
ored maline, with tucks. The 
sleeves tucked, long and tight-fit- 
ting, finished with a frill at the side, 
which runs from the shoulder 
down over the hand. There is also 
a frill at the side front of the 
waist, the same as on the sleeve 
To give body to the waist it is 
lined with maline. The collar 
high-boned, edged with net ruch- 
ing. . 

Tn the more elaborate waists, 
chiffon, messaline, crepe de chine 
and liberty satins are the materials 



preferred. These have the high 
girdle, made either of the same ma- 
terialas the waist, or else of satin. 

Striped flannel waists carry out 
same idea as shown in other ma- 
terials. 

The only petticoat suitable to 
wear with the close-fitting skirt, is 
the Jersey. The tops of the petti- 
coats fit well over the hips and also 
give with every movement of the 
wearer. There is an elastic band 
at the waist, and no placket at the 
back, for it is slipped over the 
head. The jersey part extends well 
below the knee where it is finished 
with a silk flounce, cut on the bias 
very scant, or one of lingerie, 
trimmed with lace and insertion. 

A stylish and inexpensive gown 
suitable for evening is of black silk 
mousseline over dull silk. AUhough 
in one piece it makes no pretense 
to follow the Directoire. The skirt 
IS demi-trained and slightly raised 
above the waist line at the back. 
A guimpe effect is simulated by 
means of cutting away the lining 
of the bodice at the neck and trim- 
ming it heavily with black passa- 
menterie, lace medallions or em- 
broideries. The sleeves are long, 
closely tucked and no more trans- 
parent than is the neck. 

It seems to be the aim of the 
ultra-fashionable woman to use 
lace in ways it has never been em- 
ployed, for instance, a Princess 
tunic is draped over a trained skirt 
of dyed all-over Algerian lace, nar- 
row matching bands of the same 
lace edge of the tunic. 

A peep at the hats for the fall 
show styles worn by our grand- 
mothers. Mention of one of bronze 
satin will illustrate. 

The crown shaped like an in- 
verted bowl was shirred on reeds; 
the brim covered smoothly with 
the bronze satin and faced with sal- 
mon, set far back under the hrim 
were little rosettes of salmon-col- 
ored liberty ribbon, from which 
were long "brides" that hang 
loosely or knotted low down. 
Mad.\me Roberta. 



IS 



TAXAMETER 



TELEPHONE 



2380 



COLj 



One central Exchange connects all taxameter cab stands; on receipt of call the nearest availai 




South Ferry 

Bowling Qreen 

Wall Street 

Fulton St. 

City Hall Park 
♦Brooklyn Bridge 

Worth Street 

Canal Street 

Spring Street 

Bleecker Street 

Astor Place 
*14th St. and Fourth Aye. 

18th St. and Fourth Ave. 

23d St. and Fourth Ave. 

28th St. and Fourth Ave. 

33d St. and Fourth Ave. 



•42d St. and Park Ave. — Grand Central. 
42d St. and Broadway — Times Square. 
50th St. and Broadway 
Columbus Circle — 59th St. 
66th St, and Broadway 



•72d St. andBroac 
79th St. and Broad 
86ith St. and Broac 
91st St. and Broac 

•96th St. and Broac 

WEST SIDE BRA 

103d St. and Broa( 
110th St. andBroac 



"SEEING NEW YORK" AUTOMOBILES 

Uptown and Downtown 

EVERY HOUR FROM 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Chinatown and Bowery, Daily and Sunday, 8:30 P. M. 

Office and only Starting Point on Fifth Avenue Side 

Flaiiron Building, Telephone : 4944 Gramercy 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by Lecturer 

16 



:abs 



IBUS 



New York Transportation Company 

Eighth Avenue and Forty-ninth Street 

STANDS 

Sherry's; Cafe Martin; Hotel Astor ; Hotel 
Belmont; L. I. R. R., Foot East 34th Street; 
Central R. R. of N. J., Foot West 23d Street. 

Reduced Rates now in effect. Tariff folder mailed on request. 



b is promptly dispatched. 




116th St. and Broadway 
Manhattan Street 
137th St. and Broadway 
145th St. and Broadway 
157th St. and Broadway 
168th St. and Eleventh Ave. 
181st St. and Eleventh Ave. 
207th St. and Dyckman St. 
215th St. and Broadway 



STATIONS 

225th St. and Broadway 
231&t St. and Broadway 
238th St. and Broadway 
242d St. and Broadway 

EAST SIDE BRANCH 
110th St. and Lenox Ave. 
116th St. and Lenox Ave. 
125th St. and Lenix Ave. 
135th St. and Lenox Ave. 
145th St. and Lenox Ave. 



Cotyright. 1907. B. L. Clarke 

Mott Ave. and 149th St. 

Third Ave. and 149th St. 

.Jackson Ave. 

Prospect Ave. 

Simpson Street 

Freeman Street 

174th St. 

177th St. 

180th St. and West Farmg 

•Express Stations 



THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY 

SEEING NEW YORK" YACHT 

Encircling the Island of Manhattan 

Leaves Daily and Sundays from Foot West 22d Street 

North River, 10 A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

F7\RB, $1.00 

1,000 Points of Interest pointed out by the Lecturer 



-L2_ 



LEADING NEW YORK HOTELS 



Astor House 

A. H.THURSTON, Mgr. 
Broadway and Barclay Street 


Hotel Longacre 

H. R. SHARES, Prop. 
157-163 W. 47th Street, near Broadway 


Hotel Astor 

WM. C. MUSCHENHEIM 
Broadway and 44th Street 


The Lucerne 

JAMES RUNCIMAN, Prop. 
201 West Seventy-ninth Street 


Hotel Aldine 

W. H. GROSSCUP. Prop. 
Fourth Ave. and 29th St. 


Hotel Martha Washington 

(Woman'* Hotel) 

A. W. EAGER 

29 East Twenty-ninth Street 

Hotel Navarre 

Strictly Fireproof 

Seventh Avenue and 38th Street 
Dutch Grill Palm Garden 

The Plaza 

FRED STBRRY. Managing Director 
Fifth Avenue and 59th Street 


The Ansonia 

Broadway, 73d to 74th Streets 


Hotel Belmont 

B. L. M. BATES 
Park Avenue and 42d Street 


Hotel Buckingham 

Fifth Avenue at 50th Street 


Park Avenue Hotel 

REED A BARNETT, Prop. 
Fourth Avenue and 32d Street 


Hotel Endicott 

JAMES W. GREENE. Mgr. 
Slst Street and Columbus Avenue 


Prince George Hotel 

A. E. DICK. Mgr. 
15 East 27th St. and 14 East 28th St. 


The Essex 

Madison Ave. and 56th Street 
"Apartment Hotel." FRANCIS G. CART. Prop 


Hotel Savoy 

JOHN F. RIES, Managing Director 

Fifth Ave., 58th to 59th Sts. 


Gilsey House 

L. FRENKEL. Prop. 
Broadway and 29th Street 


Hotel St. Andrew 

CHARLES H. DAVIS, Manager 
Broadway and 72d Street 


Hotel Gotham 

Chas. L. Wetherbee and William R. Wood 
S. W. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel St. Regis 

S. E. corner Fifth Ave. and 55th St. 


Hotel Knickerbocker 

JAMES B. REGAN, Prop. 
Broadway and 42d Street 


Hotel Victoria 

GEO. W. SWEENEY. Prop. 
Broadway and 27th Street 


King Edward Hotel 

JOHN HOOD, Pres. and Mgr. 
47th Street, just off Broadway 


Waldorf-Astoria 

Fifth Avenue, 33d and 34th Street 


Hotel Latham 

H. F. RITCHEY, Manager 
28th Street, near Fifth Avenue 


Hotel Woodstock 

WILLIAM H. VALIQUETTE, Mgr. 
127 West 43d Street, Times Square East 


i8 






New York Theatres 



Academy of Music — Irving place 
and 14th St. Tel., 701 Stuyve- 
sant. Maclyn Arbuckle in "The 
Round Up." Eve., 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2. Prices, 25c. 
to $1.50. 

Alhambra — 7th ave., 126th st. Tel., 
5000 Morningside. Vaudeville. 
Eve., 8.15. Mats daily 2.15. 
Prices 25c. to $1. 

American — 42d st. and 8th ave. 
Tel., 3560 Bryant. Italian Op- 
era: Repertoire. Eve., 8.15; 
mat., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50c. to $1. 

Aster — B'way and 45th st. Tel., 
287 Bryant. William Hodge in 
"The Man from Home." Eve., 
8.i_s; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, soc. to $2. 

Belasco — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 4281 Bryant. George Ar- 
liss in "The Devil." Eve., 8.20; 
mat.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
50c. to $2. 



Bijou — Broadway, above 30th st. 
Tel., 1530 Madison. Mr. Douglas 
Fairbanks in "All for a. Girl." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Broadway — Broadway and 41st st. 
Tel., loi Bryant. "Algeria." 
Eve., 8.20; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.20. Prices, Soc. to $2. 

Casino — Broadway and 39th st. 
Tel, 1646 Bryant. "The Mimic 
World." Eve., 8.15; mats., Thur. 
and Sat , 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Circle — Broadway and 60th st. Tel., 
5138 Columbus. "School Days." 
Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 25c. to $1. 

Colonial — Broadway and 62d st. 
Tel., 4457 Columbus. Vaude- 
ville. Eve., 8.15; dlaily mats., 
2.15. Prices 25c. to $1. 

Criterion — Broadway and 44th st. 
Tel., 2240 Bryant. Hattie Will- 
iams as "Fluffy Ruffles." Eve., 
8. 15; mats., Sat., 2. Prices, 50c. 
to $2. 



The QUICKEST WAY to SEE NEW YORK 

is from tlie top of the SINGER TOVVER , 612 feet above Broadway 
On a clear day the view covers a radius of 30 miles, presenting a picture of human activity 

unparalleled in any other part of the World. Express Elevator from Ground Floor to 

Observation Platform. Competent guides in attendance. 
Hours of Admission — g 130 to 11 :30 a.m. and 2:30 to 4 :30 p.m., excepting on Saturday from 

0:00 a.m. to 4 :oo p.m. Not open on Sundays and legal holidays. 
ADMISSION, SO CENTS FREE SOUVENIRS 



19 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



Betty Pembroke 

By Elizabeth Hazlewood Hancock 



For sale at Bookstores and at the 
News Stand in this Hotel 



This novel has merit of unusual order to conimeud 
it .... A tale of Virginia people, after a Virginia 
fashion. " The Richnioiid {I 'a.) Tiincs-DisfatcJi 
"A character whi<'h hlossoiiis and expands to the 
reader's delight all through the p ot of the boolt." 

Tlic Boston Globe 
"The description of an open-air horse show, vividly 
portrayed in glowing colors, is a masterly achieve 
i>i<-nt." AuiiHsta {Ga.) HnaUi 

TheNealePab.Go. Fiatiron Bldg. New York 



NEW YORK THEATRES 

Daly's — Broadway, below 30th st. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. "Girls." Eve., 
8.15; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices soc. to $2. 

Eden Musee — 23d st., bet. B'way 
and 6th ave. World in Wax. 
Royal Blue Hungarian Band. 
Cinematograph every hour. Ad- 
mission 50C.; Sunday, 250. 

Empire — Broadway and 40th st. 
Tel., 747 Bryant. John Drew in 
"Jack Straw." Eve., 8.15; mat., 
Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Garden — Madison ave. and 27th st. 
Tel., 21 10 Madison. Edwin Stev- 
ens in "The Devil." Eve., 8.15; 
mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 
50C. to $1.50. 

Garrick — 35th st., east of Sixth ave. 
Tel., 35i-38th. "The Mollusc." 
Eve., 8.20; mat., Sat., 2.15. 
I'riccs, 50C. to $2'. 

Gaiety — 46th st. and Broadway. 
Tel., 210 Bryant. "The Travel- 
ing Salesman." Eve., 8.1.5; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 
SOC. to $2. 

Grand Opera House — 8th ave. and 



-Continued 



23d St. Tel, 600 Chelsea. The 
Rogers Bros, in Panama. Eve., 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $1. 
Hackett — ^42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 44 Bryant. Mr. John 
Mason in "The Witching Hour." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Thurs. and 
Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 



Hammerstein's Victoria — 42d st. & 
Seventh ave. Tel., 1237 Bryant.. 
Vaudeville. Eve. 8.15; dailyj 
mats., 2. Prices, 2Sc. to $1. 

Herald Square — 35th st. and Broad-I 
way. Tel, 2485-38th. "Three! 
Twins." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed.] 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Hippodrome — Sixth ave., betweeni 
43d and 44th sts. Tel., 3400 Bry- 
ant. "Sporting Days," and "Bat-i 
tie in the Skies. Eve., 8; mats. J 
daily, 2. Prices, 2Sc. to $1.50. 

Hudson — 44th St., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 680 Bryant. Robert 
Edeson in "The Call of the 
North." Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Knickerbocker — B'way and 38th 
St. Tel., 2243-38th. "The Girls 
of Gottenberg." Eve., 8. 10; 
mat., Sat., 2.15. Prices 50c. to 
$2. 

Keith & Proctor's: 5th Avenue — 
28th St. and Broadway. Tel., 2880 
Madison. Vaudeville. Eve., 8.15; 
mats., daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 

125th Street — 125th st., near Lex- 
ington ave. Tel., 1250 Harlem. 
Vaudeville. Eve., 8.15; mats., 
daily, 2. Prices 25c. to $1. 

Liberty — 42d st., west of B'way. 
Tel., 27 Bryant. Lillian Russell 
in Wildfire." Eve.. 8.15; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. 
to $2. 



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DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



The Most Charming Inland Water Trip 
on the American Continent 






tS^:' 




NEW STR. HENDRICK HUDSON NOW IN COMMISSION 

Leave Brooklyn (Annex), 8 a. m. Leave New York, Desbrosses Street, 8.40 a. m. : 
West 42d Street, 9 a. m. ; West 129th Street, 9.20 a. m. 

Landings: Yonkers, West Point, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Kingston Point, Catskill, 
Hudson and Albany. Daily (except Sunday). 

Through rail tickets between New York and Albany accepted. Tickets sold and 
baggage checked for all points East, North and West by the New York 
Transfer Co. 

The Steamer ALBANY (Special boat for Poughkeepsie and way landings) one hour later 
from New York landings than through boat. 

PERFECT DAY EXCURSIONS 

out of New York via the first or second morning boat for VJest Point, 
Newburgh or Poughkeepsie. See time-table, page 27. 

Afternoon Boat, Str. MARY POWELL, from Desbrosses Street, 1.45. A\^est 42d Street 
2.00 ; "West 129th Street, 2.20. Connects at West Point with down Steamer ALBANY 



NKW YORK THEATRES — Coutiuued 



Lincoln Square — Broadway and 
66th St. Tel., 5464 Columbus. 
Vaudeville. Eve., 8.15; mats., 
daily, 2. Prices, 25c. to $1. 

Lyric — 42d st., west of Broadway. 
Tel., 1646 Bryant. Mary Man- 
nering as "Glorious Betsy." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Lyceum — 4Sth st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 546 Bryant. Miss 
Billie Burke in Love Watches." 
Eve., 8.15; mats., Thur. and Sat., 
2.15. Prices 50c. to $2. 

Madison Square Garden (Amphi- 
. theatre) — Madison ave. and 26th 
St. Closed. 



Majestic — Broadway and 59th st. 
Tel., 3500 Columbus. Closed. 

New Amsterdam — 42d st., west of 
Broadway. Tel., 3093 Bryant. 
'The Merry Widow." Eve., 8.15; 
mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. Prices 
50c. to $2. 

New York — 4Sth st. and Broad- 
way. Tel., 464 Bryant. "Follies 
of 1908." Eve., 8.15; mats.. Wed. 
and Sat., 2.15. Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Savoy — 34th St., west of Broadway. 
Tel., S35i-38th. Closed. Eve., 
8.15; mats., Thur. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $2. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NEW YORK THEATRES — Continued 



Stuyvesant — 44th st., east of Broad- 
way. Tel., 4465 Bryant. Beg. 
Sept. 2ist. Blanche Bates in 
"The Fighting Hope." Eve., 
8.15; mat., Sat., 2.15. Prices 500. 
to $2. 

Wallack's — Broadway and 30th st. 
Tel., 2000 Madison. Arnold Daly 
in "The Regeneration." Eve., 
8.1S; mats.. Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices, 50c. to $2. 

Weber's — Broadway, between 29th 
and 30th sts. Tel., 214 Madison. 
"Paid in Full." Eve., 8.30; mats., 
Wed. and Sat., 2.30. Prices, 50c. 
to $2. 

West End — West 125th st., near 
8th ave. Tel., 2904 Morningside. 
Beg. Sept. 28th, Camille D'Ar- 
ville and Jefiferson De Angelis in 
"The Gay White Way." Eve, 
8.15; mats., Wed. and Sat., 2.15. 
Prices 50c. to $1.50. 



"THE CALL OF THE NORTH" 
AT THE HUDSON THEATRE 

The Hudson Bay Territory has 
provided material for several of 
the plays produced in this city dur- 
ing the past year, and judging from 
the scenes they have furnished of 
it, that country must be very at- 
tractive. In "The Call of the 
North" we are introduced to rug- 
ged characters such as one would 
expect to find at a trading station 
in the extreme north of Canada. 
A certain trading company has had 
Dossession of that section for so 
long a time that they think they own 
it by Divine. right, and any outsider 
is ordered off in no uncertain 
terms. If he refuses to go the 



I'actor finally sends him out into 
the forest with provisions for a 
couple of days only, and without a 
rifle. He is followed by a trusted 
Indian spy who is instructed to 
shoot him should he be ingenious 
enough to escape death by starva- 
tion or from the attack of wild 
beasts. This amounts to murder 
in either event, but no one con- 
nected with the company dares in 
interfere with the commands of the 
Factor, or seems to have any de- 
sire to do so, his methods being 
tacitly accepted because they pro- 
tect the company from competition 
and financial loss. 

Robert Edeson, as "Ned Trent" 
an American in search of the man 
who is responsible for the death 
of his father, De Witt Jennings as 
the "Factor" who proves to be the 
one for whom Trent is looking, 
Burke Clarke as "Me-en-gan" the 
Indian spy, and Macey Harlam aS| 
"Achille Picard," do very accept-5 
able work, in fact the entire com| 
pany is well selected; to Beatricf 
Prentice as "Julie Bagneau," 
little French Canadian girl who i^ 
seeking her father — the Factor' 
latest victim — must be given credit.] 

The stage settings are delight- ' 
ful; one scene, a "Bend in the 
River" in the deep forest, being 
worthy of especial mention. 

Frank Thornton. 



Beauty is the first gift Nature 
gives to woman and the first she 
takes from her. — Mere. 



Find your purpose and fling your 
life out to it. Try to be somebody 
with all your might. — Orison Swett 
Marden. 




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CONFECTION AND SOUA DRINK 

ABSOLUTE PURITY GUARANTEED. SERIAL No. 12.586 

neKenian's. Kiker's, Caswell & Massey. Eamsdell & Co., R. H. 
Mary and all rtruK counters and soda fountains. Coufoition at 
l*ark ,V' Tilford's and all first class dealers. 



-MANUFACTURED BV- 



MRS. BI.A.NCHC E. THOMAS 

Indorsrd hy the late Dr. J. Clarke Thomas. N- T. C. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NAMING OF NEW YORK STREETS 



Ann — Owners of land frequently 
bestowed on paths that were cut 
through their property the first 
names of their wives. 

Bank — Owing to a fever epidemic 
that broke out in 1822, when 
many people hurriedly left town. 
A row of hastily erected build- 
ings, principally used by banks, 
was built in the vicinity of the 
present thoroughfare. 

Battery Place — Reminds us of the 
fact that in 1693 a platform was 
erected in this vicinity to serve 
as a battery. In 1753 this was en- 
larged. 

Bridge — Locates a bridge that at 
one time crossed the Broad street 
ditch. 

Broad — Was originally an inlet or 
ditch, known as the Breede Graft 
or Broad Canal. 

i Cedar — This and other streets 
bearing the name of trees, sug- 
gest the wooded character of 
Manhattan during the early days. 

Chatham Square — This as well as 
Pitt street, perpetuates the name 
of America's devoted and elo- 
quent friend, William Pitt, Earl 
of Chatham. 

Cherry — This was originally part 
of a cherry farm. 

Corlears — Jacobus van Corlear, 
who oflfered the use of his house 
for school purposes to Governor 
Stuyvesant, and Anthony van 
Corlears, the trumpeter, who it 
is alleged, gave Spuyten Duyvil 
its name when he boasted he 
could swim across its troubled 
waters. 

Duane — Named for New York's 
first Mayor after the Revolution, 
James Duane. 

Ferry — This was the road that led 
to the first ferry from New York 
to Brooklyn. 

Fletcher — Named in honor of Gov- 
ernor Benjamin Fletcher, during 



whose term (1692-1698) printing 
was introduced into the colony. 

Fulton — Named after Robert Ful- 
ton, and is the only memorial on 
Manhattan Island to preserve the 
memory of him who helped so 
much toward its development. 

Hanover Square — Named in honor 
of King George, Who was of the 
house of Hanover. 

Liberty — Originally called Crown 
street, the name being changed 
after the Revolution, when all 
reference to royalty was sup- 
pressed. 

Macdougal — Named after Alexan- 
der Macdougal, a noted "Son of 
Liberty," who was arrested in 
1770 on a charge of seditious 
libel, for which he was impris- 
oned in the Debtor's Prison 
(present Register's Office), thus 
becoming the first martyr in the 
patriot cause. 

Minetta — Derives its name from a 
Dutch word, meaning "the little 
one" — that is, the little creek to 
distinguish it from a large creek 
not far away. The former creek, 
which originated in the marshy 
ground in the neighborhood of 
Washington Square, still flows 
under the pavements of modern 
New York. 

Morris — Named for Gouverneur 
Morris, who, besides occupying 
many important public positions, 
was one of the Street Commis- 
sioners appointed in 1807 to lay 
out the new streets, which result- 
ed in the city of rigid straight 
lines and right angles. 

Murray Hill — This took its name 
from the Murray Mansion. It 
was here that the mother cf 
Lindley Murray, the grammarian, 
entertained the British generals, 
it has been said, while Putnam 
and his tired forces made their 
escape from the lower point of 
the island to Harlem. 



23 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



NAMING OF NEW YORK STREETS Continued 



New — This was the first street 
opened by the English after tak- 
ing possession of New Amster- 
dam. 

Pearl — The oldest street in New 
Amsterdam. Was so called be- 
cause of the pearl shells found 
along its path. 

Rector — Being originally church 
property, therefore owes its name 
to that fact. 

Ridge — This was an actual ridge 
along the top of a hill on James 
De Lancey's property. The slope 
from Ridge street to the river 
still exists. 

Roosevelt — This recalls the name 
of Isaac and of his son Nicholas 
J. Roosevelt. The former was 
a member of one of the cele- 
brated committees of "one hun- 
dred" to guard the safety of New 
York previous to the Revolution. 

Rutherford — This recalls the name 
of Colonel John Rutherford, who 
was one of. the committee that 
planned the present system of 
avenues and streets. 

Spring — Owes its name to the dis- 
covery of a spring in the neigh- 
borhood about the year 1800, 
when Aaron Burr's Manhattan 
Banking and Water Supply Com- 
pany began to furnish the city 
with drinkable water. 

Stone — Was the first street in New 
Amsterdam to be paved with 
stone, which achievement created 
a great sensation. 

Sullivan — This honors the name of 
Brigadier-General John Sullivan, 
one of the most active officers of 
the Revolutionary War, who re- 
ceived the thanks of Washington 
for his services in Westchester. 
In Rhode Island he fought what 
Lafayette pronounced to be the 
best contested battle of the war. 

Wall — Owes its name to the wall of 
palisades that originally marked 
its path. 



Water — So named, because it con- 
sisted of land that in the early 
days of this city it was literally 
under water. 

Watts — This preserves the memory 
of John Watts, the last City Re- 
corder under English rule. He 
was one of the Assemblymen that 
protested against England's right 
to billet soldiers on the citizens 
of New York. Years after he 
founded the Leake and Watts 
Orphan Asylum. His monument 
is prominent in Trinity Church- 
yard. 

Whitehall — This was the thorough- 
fare that led to Peter Stuyves- 
ant's town house. It is supposed 
to have been so named either on 
account of its white walls, or be- 
cause English governors who oc- 
cupied it subsequently were re- 
minded of London's Whitehall. 



HOTEL 

MARTHA WASHINGTON 

A. W. EAGER 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




WOMAN'S HOTEL 
29 East 29th Street 

Telephone I 6500 Madlioo 
EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Exception*! Pltce for Ladiei Traveling Alone 

RES TAU RANT FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

A la Carte alio Table d'Hote 

Dinner, 75 cts. Luncheon, 35 cts. 

Rooms from $1 per day up, including Bath 

In eaty acces> of all the principal theatre! 

Subway Station, 18th Street, within one block 

29th Street cars pass the door 



24 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



TROLLEY TRIPS 



From New York to Mount Ver- 
non one may take any one of three 
routes— one direct from 129th st. 
and Third ave., at the Harlem 
River Bridge, by way of Webster 
ave.; a second on the West Farms 
and Williamsbridge car from the 
same point, changing to Webster 
ave. car at Williamsbridge; the 
third from the Bronx Borough side 
of the Harlem River at Central 
Bridge, take the Sixth ave. "L" to 
iS5th St. and Eighth ave. end of 
line) and walk over the viaduct 
and bridge. This third car (from 
Central Bridge) goes up Jerome 
ave. From Mount Vernon — Yon- 
kers, Hastings, Tuckahoe, Pelham, 
New Rochelle, East Chester, 
Larchmont, Larchmont Manor, 
Mamaroneck, Rye, Rye Beach, 
White Plains, Tarrytown, Port- 
chester may be reached. 

Take the Fordham line at 128th 
St. and Third ave., north to Third 
and Tremont aves., transfer east 
to Tremont ave. line to Unionport. 
For Throggs Neck and Fort 
Schuyler, from which an excellent 
view of Long Island Sound can be 
obtained, transfer again in West- 
chester Village. Returning, take 



Tremont ave. line to West Farms, 
transfer to West Farms line, south- 
bound, or Tremont ave. line to 
Webster ave.; transfer to Mt. Ver- 
non line, to 128th St. and Third ave. 
Fordham or Mt. Vernon line at 
128th St. and Third ave., to Tre- 
mont ave., transfer to western di- 
vision of Tremont ave. line on 
Burnside, Cedar and Sedgwick 
aves. to High Bridge. University 
Heights (Hall of Fame). Re- 
turning, via Sedgwick ave. to 
Jerome ave. line to "L" station at 
155th St. and Eighth ave., or con- 
tinuing east to i6ist st. and Third 
ave., then transfer south on Third 
ave. to starting point. By walk- 
ing across High Bridge to Amster- 
dam ave., southbound Amsterdam, 
Sixth or Third ave. car can be 
taken to Manhattan. 



No man can make his own hap- 
piness the one object of his life 
and attain it, any more than he can 
jump on the far end of his shadow. 
If you would hit the bull's-eye of 
bappiness on the target of life, aim 
above it. Place other things high- 
f^r than your own happiness and i*' 
will surely come to you. 



OCEAN GOING STEAMERS 



LS 
>8 



PORT 



NAME OP 
ITKAMER 



ADDRISIKS OF LINES 



STARTING PLACE 



)t. 15. 
15. 
15, 
16. 
16, 
17 
17. 
17 
17 
17 
IS 
19 
10. 
19 
19 
19 
19 
22 
00 

23 
23 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 



Bremen 

, Gib'r & Naples. . 
.Rotterdam.. . . 

. Liverpool 

. Southampton.. 

. Liverpool 

, Copenhagen.. . . 

.Bremen 

. Hamburg 

. Havre 

. Gib'r & Naples. 

.Liverpool 

Hamburg 

. .\ntwerp 

. Southampton.. 

. London 

. Glasgow 

.Bremen 

.Rotterdam.. . . 

.Liverpool 

. Southampton.. 
.Gib'r & Naples. 

.Bremen 

.Hamburg 

.Liverpool 

. Havre 



Kaiser Wm. II. N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way.. . . 

.Hamburg Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 

Rotterdam.. . Ilolland-Amer., 39 B'way 

Lusitania Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

Majestic White Star Line, 9 B'way. . . . 

Arabic Wliite Star Line, 9 B'way . . . . 

.MelligOlav. . .Scandinavian-Amer., 1 B'way. 
. Fi-iedrich d G. N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

.Kaiserin Ilamburg-Amer., 45 B'way.. . . 

, Lorraine French Line, 19 State St 

Cretic White Star Line. 9 B'way . . . . 

Caronia Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

.I'atricia 'lamlnii-g-.Vmer., 45 B'way.. . . 

. Zeeland Red Star Line, 9 B'way. . ' . . . 

. St. Louis American Line, 9 B'way 

. Minnehaha. . . .Vtlantic Trans. Line, 9 B'way. 

( 'aledonia. . . . Anchor Line, 17 B'way 

. Kaiser .\. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

N..\msterdam.Holland-Amer., 39 B'wav 

.Mauretania. . .Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St. . 
. Oceanic white Star Line, 9 B'wav. . . . 

Slavonia Cunard S. S. Co., 21 State St.. 

. Kurfuorst. . . . N. German Lloyd, 5 B'way. . . . 

.Ueutschland.. Hamburg-Amer., 45 B'wav.. . , 

Celtic White Star Line, 9 B'way. . . . 

. Savoie French Line, 19 State St 



.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
.Ft 5th St., Hoboken 
.n Jane St., N. R. 
. Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft 11th St., N. R. 
. Ft 17th St., Hobdkt-n 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 

Ft Morton St., N. R. 
. Ft 11th St., N. R. 
.Ft .Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft 1st St., Holioken 

Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft Fulton St., N. R. 
.Ft Houston St., N. R. 
■ Ft 24th St., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 5th St., Hoboken 
. Ft .Jane St., N. R. 
. Ft 11th St., N. R. 
. Ft Jane St., N. R. 
.Ft 3d St., Hoboken 
.Ft 1st St., Hoboken 
. Ft 11th St., N. R. 

Ft Morton St., N. R. 



25 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



New York Railroad Stations 

Baltimore and Ohio — Foot of Liberty 
and 23d Streets. Telephone 5860 
Franklin. 

Central Railroad of New Jersey — Foot of 
Liberty and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 4309 Cortlandt. 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western — Foot 
of Barclay, Christopher and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 8980 Cortlandt. 

Erie — Foot of Chambers and West 23d 
Streets. Telephone 7690 Cortlandt. 

Lehigh Valley — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2500 Franklin. 

Long Island — East 34th Street. Tele- 
phone 2015 Madison Square. 

New York Central and Hudson River — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York & Harlem — Grand Central 
Station, cor. Fourth Avenue and 42d 
Street. Telephone 6994-38th. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford — 
Grand Central Station, cor. Fourth 
Avenue and 42d Street. Telephone 
6994-38th. 

New York, Ontario & Western — Foot of 
both Franklin and West 42d Streets. 
Telephone 3099-38th. 

Pennsylvania — Foot of Cortlandt, Des- 
brosses and West 23d Streets. Tele- 
phone 2947 Cortlandt. 

Staten Island — Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Telephone 5860 Franklin. 

West Shore — Foot of West 42d and 
Franklin Streets. Telephone 5953 
Franklin. 



Pullman Accommodations 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 434 Broad- 
way ; 'phone 5860 Franklin. 
Central Railroad of New Jersey, 23d St. 

Ferry ; 'phone 3144 Chelsea. 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, 429 

Broadway ; 'phone 8980 Cortlandt. 
Erie Railroad, 399 Broadway ; 'phone 

816 Franklin. 
Lehigh Valley Railroad, 855 Broadway ; 

'phone 2500 Franklin. 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., 1216 Broadway ; 

'phone 5680 Madison. 
Grand Central Station ; 'phone 3500-38th 

St. 
N. Y., O & W. Railroad, 425 Broadway ; 

'phone 6124 Broad. 
Pennsylvania Railroad, 5th Ave. and 

29th St. ; 'phone 1032 Madison. 
West Shore Railroad, 415 Broadway ; 

'phone 3593 Franklin. 



Ferries 

Astoria — From foot of Bast 92d Street. 
Brooklyn — Foot of Catherine Slip to 
Main Street. 
Foot of East 10th Street and Bast 

23d Street to Greenpoint Avenue. 

Foot of East 23d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of East 42d Street to Broadway. 

Foot of Bast Houston Street to Grand 

Street. 



Foot of Fulton Street to Fulton St. 
Foot of Grand Street to Grand and 

Broadway. 
Foot of Whitehall Street to 39th St. 
Foot of Roosevelt Street to Broadway. 
Foot of Wall Street to Montague St. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Atlantic Ave. 
Foot of Whitehall St. to Hamilton Ave. 
College Point — From foot of East 99th 

Street. 
Fort Lee — From foot of West 130th St. 
Hoboken — From foot of Barclay and 

Christopher Streets to Newark St. 
From foot of West 23d Street to New- 
ark Street. 
From foot of West 23d Street to 14th 

Street. 
Jersey City — Foot of Chambers Street to 

Pa^onia Avenue. 
Foot of Cortlandt Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Desbrosses Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Foot of Liberty Street to Communl 

paw. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Communl- 

paw. 
Foot of West 13th Street to Bay St. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Pavonia 

Avenue. 
Foot of West 23d Street to Exchange 

Place. 
Long Island City — Foot of East 34th 

Street. 
Staten Island— -Foot of Whitehall Street. 
Weehawken — Foot of Franklin Street 

and foot of West 42d Street. 



ELEVATED RAILROADS 

Second Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., tulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall and 
3d av.). Canal, Grand, Rivington, Ist, 
8th, 14th, 19th, 23d and 1st av., 34th 
(change for Hunter's Point Ferry), 
42d, 50th, 57th, 65th. 72d, 80th, 86th, 
92d, 99th, 111th, 117th. 121st, 127th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road). 

Third Avenue — South Ferry, Hanover 
Sq., Fulton, Franklin Sq., Chatham 
Sq. (change cars for City Hall), Canal, 
Grand, Houston, 9th, 14th, 18th, 23d, 
28th, 34th (change for Hunter's Point 
Ferry), 42d (charge for Grand Central 
Depot), 47th. 53d, 59th, 67th, 76th, 
84th, 89th, 98th, 106th. 116th, 125th, 
129th (change for Suburban L Road) 

Sixth Avenue — South Ferry Battery pi., 
Rector, Cortlandt, Park gL, Chambers, 
Franklin. Grand, Bleecker. 8th, 14th, 
18th, 23d, 28th, 33d, 42d, 50th (change 
for Central Park and 58th), 53d and 
8th av., 59th, 66th, 72d. 81st, 93d, 
104th, 110th, 116th, 125th, 130th, 
135th, 140th, 145th, 155th (connects 
with New York & Northern Railroad), 

Ninth Avenue — South Ferry, Battery pi.. 
Rector, Cortlandt, Barclay, Warren, 
Franklin, Desbrosses, Houston, Chris- 
topher, 14th, 23d, 30th, 84th, 42d, 
50th, 59th. 



26 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY TO REACH 



American League Park — 167th st. 
and Broadway; Subway, Broad- 
way Division, to i68th st.; 3d, 6th 
or 9th ave. "L" to 125th St., 
thence Fort George trolley to 
167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 3d 
or 6th and Amsterdam ave. lines 
to 167th St. and Amsterdam ave.; 
6th or 9th ave. "L" to 145th st. 
and Eighth ave., thence via 
Kingsbridge line to 167th st. and 
Broadway. 

Battery — This is the terminal of all 
elevated roads: 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 8th 
ave. and Broadway surface cars. 

Bronx Park— The Harlem R. R. 
from Grand Central Depot (42d 
St.) to Bedford Park Station. 
Or Third ave. "L" to Park. Or 
Subway to 180th st. 

Celtic Park, Laurel Hill, L. I. City 

— Ferry foot 34th st., E. R., to 
L. I. City. 

Central Park — Surface cars: 
Fourth (Madison) Sixth, Eighth 
aves. Sixth ave. "L" to 58th st. 
Fifth ave. stages. Park coaches 
and electric wagonettes make 
the circuit of Central Park and 
afTord a most convenient means 
of viewing the principal points of 
interest within the Park. Fare. 



25 and 50 cents. Stop-over 
tickets are issued at various 
points, good for the remainder 
of the trip any time the same 
day. Coaches start from main 
entrance of Central Park, Fifth 
ave. and S9th St., every 15 min- 
utes. Gates or entrances to the 
Park: Fifth ave.: 59th, 64th, 
67th, 72d, 79th, 85th, 90th, 96th, 
i02d, iioth sts. ; Sixth ave.. 59th 
and iioth sts. Seventh ave.: 59th 
and Iioth sts. Eighth ave. (Cen- 
tral Park West) : 59th, 72d, 79th, 
8sth, 96th, looth, 105th and iioth 
sts. 

Columbia College — Subway to 
ii6th St. Sixth ave. "L" to 104th 
St., walk one block west. Am- 
sterdam ave. car. 

Columbia Oval, Williamsbridge — 

Harlem Division of N. Y. C. & 
H. R. R. to Williamsbridge; 10 
minutes' walk west; Mt. Vernon 
line, 128th St. and 3d ave. to Gun- 
hill road, 5 minutes' walk west. 

Crescent Athletic Club — Shore 
road, 83d to 8sth sts., Brooklyn. 
From Brooklyn Bridge, 3d ave. 
line to 83d St., or 5th ave. line, 
connecting at 65th st. with 3d 
ave. line. 



BIDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Steamers "Hendrick Hudson" 
"New York" and "Albany" 



A.M. I P.M. I 



1 908 

Lv. Read Down 
AM. 

8 :00 

8:40 

9:00 

9:20 

9:45 



TIME TABLE 

DAILY (except Sundays) 



1908 



Ar. Read Up. 



I A.M. I P.M. I P.M. 



11:50 
i2':25 



1 :15 
2:10 



3:25 
3:40 
6:10 



9:40 
10:00 
10:20 
10:50 



1:00 

*1 :25 

1:45 



2:35 



1:45 
2:00 
2:20 



4:50 
5:00 
5:25 

5 :45 
6:15 
6:30 

6 :45 



7:45 



Brooklyn Annex. 
, .Desbrosses St... 
, ..West 42d St... . 
..West 129th St... 
. . . . Yonkers . . . , 
..Highland Palls.. 
...West Point... 
. . .. Cornwall .. . . 
, . . Newburgh . . . 
.New Hamburgh, 

. . . .. Milton 

, . Poughkeepsle . . 
, .Kingston Point. . 
. . . . Kingston . . . . 

Catskill 

. . . . Hudson . . . , 
. . . . Albany . . . . 



00 



6:20 
6:00 
5:30 
5:10 
4:30 


9 

8 
8 
7 


:00 
:40 
:10 
:35 


2:50 
'2 Us 


5 

*5 

5 


:45 
:20 
:05 






1 :20 

12:25 


4 


:10 


11 :00 




10:40 




8:30 





P.M. I P.M. I P.M. I 



I A.M. I A.M. I P.M. 



Saratoga Special Trains to 
and from Albany Wharf 

Special Trains on Catskill 
and Kingston Point wliarfs 
for all points in Catskill 

M ountains 

Morning and Afternoon 
Concerts 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The popular afternoon 
boat MARY POWELL for 
Kingston leaves Desbrosses 
Street at 1.45 P. M., West 
42d St. at 2 P. M., West 
129th St. at 2.20 P. M. A 
perfect Afternoon Excurs- 
ion may be made to West 
Point returning by the Day 
Line Steamer Albany. 
Notice the Special Pough- 
keepsie Service leaving one 
hour after thru boat. Music 



27 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



THIS IS THE WAY 

Grand Central Station — Third ave. 
"L" and 42d st. branch direct to 
station. Sixth ave. "L." Or sur- 
face line to 42d st. 

Grant's Tomb — Subway to Man- 
hattan St. Sixth or Ninth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west two 
blocks. Boulevard car to iigth 

St. 

Highbridge — Sixth ave. "L" to 
125th St. and change to Fort 
George surface car. 

McComb's Dam Park Athletic 
Field, northern end of McComb's 
Dam Park, Bronx — Sixth or gth 
ave. "L" to 155th St., across Via- 
duct, to Park at i6ist St.; 8th ave. 
line to Central Bridge at 155th 
St., across Viaduct to Park at 
i6ist St.; 2d or 3d ave. L to i6ist 
St. and 3d ave.; i6ist st. cross- 
town line to Jerome ave. 

Morningside Heights — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 104th St., walk west one 
block and take Amsterdam ave. 
car. 

New York Athletic Club, Grounds 
at Travers Island, Pelham 
Manor, N. Y.; clubhouse. No. 58 
West 59th St. — Grounds: Harlem 
Division of N. Y., N. H. & H. R. 
R. from 131st St. and Willis ave. 
Shuttle train from "L" station at 
129th St. and 2d or 3d aves., to 
Pelham Manor; 10 minutes' walk 
or bus to grounds. Mt. Ver- 
non line from 128th st. and 3d 
ave. to Mt. Vernon; transfer to 
Pelham Manor trolley to N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R. R. station in 
Pelham Manor; then bus or 10 
minutes' walk to grounds. 

Polo Grounds — 157th st. and 
Eighth ave.; 6th or 9th ave. "L" 
to 155th St. and 8th ave.; 2d or 
3d ave. "L" to i2Sth st., cross- 
town trolley to 125th st. and 8th 
ave. thence to Eighth ave. 
trolley to iS7th st. and 8th 
ave.; 8th ave. line to 157th st.; 
2d, 3d, Lexington, Madison or 
Lenox ave. lines to 125th st., 
thence to crosstown trolley to 
8th ave. line, north to 157th si. 
and 8th ave. 



TO REACH-Continued 

Speedway — Sixth ave. "L" to 125th 
St., thence Fort George surface 
car. 

Van Cortlandt Park — Sixth or 
Ninth ave. "L" to 155th st.; 
thence N. Y. & Putnam R. R. 
from Grand Central Station (42d 
St.). Subway to Kingsbridge, Ai 
then surface car. ■' 

Washington Bridge — Sixth ave. 
"L" to 125th St. and change to 
Fort George surface car; also by 
Subwr- to 181 st St. station. 



IRON STEAMBOAT CO. 

The Only All Water Route to 

CONEY ISLAND 

LANDING AT DREAMLAND 

Greatest Amusement Enterprise in the 

World. 
TIME TABLE (Subject to Change.) 

Leave foot 129th St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.30. 2.00, 
3.00, 4.50, 7.45 P. M. 

Leave foot 22d St., North River, 9.00, 
9.45, 10.30, 11.15 A. M., 12.00 M., 
1.15, 2.00, 2.45, 3.45, 4.30, 5.30, 6.15, 
7.00, 7.45, 8.30, 9.10 P. M. 

Leave Pier 1, N. R., half hour later than 
at 22d St. 

Returning — Leave Iron Pier, Coney Isl- 
and, *10.40, *11.25 A. M., 12.10, 
*12.55. *1.40. 2.55, 8.40, 4.25, •5.25, 
6.10, 7.10, ♦7.55, *8.40, ♦9.25, ♦10.10, 
10.45 P. M. 
Returning from Coney Island, trips 

marlied with a ♦ go to 129th St., North 

River. 

Round Trip Tickets, 40 cents. 

Round Trip Ticliets 129th St., 50 centi. 

STEAMER TAURUS makes trips 
EVERY DAY to FISHING BANKS. 
Leave 129th St., N. R., 7.00 A. M. ; 
22d St., N. R., 7.40 A. M. ; Pier (New) 
No. 1, N. R., 8.20 A. M. Bait and tackle 
on board. Pare : — Gentlemen, 75c. ; 
Ladies, 50c. ; Children, 25c. 

STEAMER GRAND REPUBLIC for 
ROCKAWAY BEACH. Leave Yonkers, 
8.30 A. M. ; foot 129th St., N. R., 9.30 
A. M., *12.30 P. M. ; 22d St., N. R., 
10.15 A. M., *1.15 P. M. ; Pier (new) 
No. 1, N. R., 10.40 A. M.. 2.30 P. M. ; 
Rockaway Beach, 12.30 P. M., 5.30 P. M. 

Trips marked * transfer to Steamer 
Grand Republic at Pier 1, N. R. 

Round Trip Tickets, 50c. : Children, 
25c. ; include admission to Steeplechase 
Park at Rockaway. 



28 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



DID YOU KNOW IN THE YEAR 



1700 — Corner of Nassau and Wal! 
sts., the second City Hall was erect- 
ed. 

1703 — The "King's Farm," extending 
northward from Courtlandt st, was 
granted to Trinity Church Corpor- 
ation by Queen Anne. 

1709 — At the foot of Wall st. a slave 
market was established. 

1710 — The expenses of our city were 
about two hundred and seventy- 
four pounds sterling. The income, 
about two hundred and ninety-five. 
By an act of Parliament, a post- 
office was established for the Col- 
onies in America, the chief office 
of which was in New York. 

1712 — A plot to set fire to the city 
was formed by the negro inhab- 
itants. In its execution several 
white persons were killed. A num- 
ber of the incendiaries were con- 
victed and executed. 

1719— In Wall St. the first Presby- 
terian Church was erected. 

1720 — Clocks were first introduced, 
previously time having been record- 
ed by hour-glasses. 

1725 — The New York Gazette, the 
first newspaper, was published. 

1729 — A city library was founded. 

1730 — Governor Montgomery granted 
the charter upon which the city's 
present system of government is 
based. 

Between New York and Phila- 
delphia a line of stages was estab- 
lished, making bi-monthly trips. 

From London was received the 
first fire-engine used in the city. A 
fire department was at once or- 
ganized. 

1732 — First stage from New York to 
Boston made round trips once a 
month. 

1734 — Erected on the Commons, now 
City Hall Park, was a poor-house 
and a calaboose for unruly slaves. 

1740 — New York Society Library was 
organized. 

1741 — The "Negro Plot," the famous 
delusion in which a large number 
of negroes, and a Catholic priest, 
were executed without cause. 

1750 — In Nassau st. was opened the 
first theater. 



1754 — King's College obtained a char- 
ter of incorporation. 

1756 — Between New York and Staten 
Island plied the first ferry. 

1757 — The total inhabitants of the 
city was about twelve thousand. 

1761 — In Bleecker st. the second the- 
atre was opened. 

1763 — First light from the Sandy 
Hook lighthouse. 

Between New York and Paulus 
Hook, now Jersey City, a ferry was 
established. 

1765 — Famous Stamp-Act Congress 
convened in this city. Delegates 
from all the Colonies were present, 
and an agreement was adopted not 
to import goods from Great Britain 
until the Stamp-Act was repealed, 
and was signed by a large number 
of merchants, and a society who 
called themselves "Sons of Liberty" 
was organized, which extended 
throughout the country. Riots and 
great excitement occurred, in which 
the Governor was burned in effigy, 
and the citizens threatened to 
storm the fort. 

1766 — On May 20 news of the repeal 
of the Stamp Act reached the city. 
In his own house in this city, 
Philip Embury founded the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Society of the 
United States. 

1768 — At Queen's Head Tavern, 
afterward known as "Faunce's 
Tavern," a Chamber of Commerce 
was organized. 

1770 — In William st. a statue of Will- 
iam Pitt was erected. Legislature 
incorporated the New York Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

1772 — From India were imported um- 
brellas. They were thought to be 
efifeminate. 

1774 — Vessel called the "Nancy" was 
not allowed to land her cargo of 
tea, or to make entry at the Cus- 
tom House. There was also or- 
ganized a Committee of Correspon- 
dence, and a "Congress of Colo- 
nies." Resolutions of resistance 
were adopted by a large meeting 
on the Commons, now City Hall 
Park. 



29 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



POINTS OF 

Singer Tower — Broadway and Lib- 
erty St. The tower has 47 stories, 
with an elevation of 612 feet, 
and gives a sight-seeing radius 
of over thirty miles, instead of a 
spot at a time. The balcony is 
on the forty-second floor, and ex- 
press elevators make the trip 
from the ground floor to the Ob- 
servation platform in one min- 
ute. Competent guides are in 
attendance to point out the dif- 
ferent points of interest to the 
visitor. A fee of 50 cents is 
charged. Hours of admission: 
9.30 to 11.30 a. m. and 2.30 to 
4.30 p. m. except on Saturdays, 
9 to 4 p. m. Not open Sundays 
and legal holidays. 

Castle Garden — Located at the 
Battery, foot of Broadway. In 
the year 1805 Fort Clinton was 
erected near the site of the old 
Dutch block house, and on ac- 
count of its circular shape was 
soon called the "Castle." It was 
considered a wonderful triumph 
of solidity and workmanship, 
its walls were in some places 
thirty feet thick and surmounted 
with casement guns. A few 
years after this the fort and sur- 
rounding grounds became the 
property of the State, and the 
whole place changed, trees were 
planted, walks laid out, and it 
iDccame a resort for fashionable 
people. In the year 1847 it was 
converted into a theatre and opera 
house, and in 1850 became the 
scene of Jenny Lind's first great 
triumph in this country In the 
year 1852 Madame Sontag also 
sang. In the year 1855 the build- 
ing was leased to the State Board 
of Emigration and used as a 
landing for immigrants, at the 
present time the building is used 
as an aquarium which is open 
to the public from 10 a. m. to 
4 p. m. No charge of admission. 

Liberty Island — Located on the 
Bay near the Battery, at the foot 
of Broadway, also known as 
Bedloe's Island. This island cov- 
ers an area of over 13 acres. Be- 
fore the j^ear i860 was used as 



INTEREST 

a place of execution and at one 
time contained a fortification 
named "Fort Wood," whose 
star-shaped walls form the out- 
lying boundaries for the pedes- 
tal of the Statue of Liberty, 
v/hich is sometimes called "Lib- 
erty Enlightening the World." 
This statue was originated by 
Bartholdi, a French sculptor, in 
the year 1870. It was completed 
in the year 1883 and presented 
to the United States as a token 
of esteem and regard from the 
French nation. The estimated 
cost of the pedestal was $250,- 
000, which amount was raised by 
subscriptions in this country. 
The statue is made of copper 
and stands 151 feet high, it is a 
draped female figure crowned by 
a diadem, holding a tablet close 
to the body in the left hand, and 
a torch in the uplifted right 
hand. The statue stands on a 
pedestal 155 feet high, square in 
form, built of granite and con- 
crete, stairs lead completely to 
the head, here there is a mag- 
nificent view of the Bay, New 
York, New Jersey, Long Island 
and Staten Island. At night ^he 
torch is lighted by electricity, 
the base and the pedestal also. 
The statue can be seen from a 
distance of over five miles. The 
statue weighs over 25 tons and 
cost over a million francs. Boats 
leave hourly from the pier at Uie 
rear of the Barge Office, on the 
Battery, foot of Broadway; fare 
25 cents for the round trip, tick- 
ets entitle the passenger to rid- 
mission to the statue. 
Historic Claremont. — America's 
Famous Roadhouse, located at 
Riverside Drive and T26th st. On 
September i6th, 1776, near ihis 
SDot was fought the bartle of 
Harlem Heights, General Wash- 
ington in command. Claremont 
was erected over 125 years ago. 
exact date uncertain, and named 
after a country residence at Sur- 
rey, England, built by Lord 
Clive, in the year 1768. At the 
present time under the most cap- 
able management. 



Is This Your Opportunity 
or His? 



w 



ATERFRO N T 

4000 feet for sale. 22 feet channel, 
sufficient water for ocean-going vessels, 

jt\, nd within 15 miles of the Battery, on 

X he Jersey shore of Staten Island Sound. 

Jtjy very facility for manufacturing 

Xx. ight at hand. Water under pressure. 

Jr reight carried by three railroads. 

Xv. are opportunity : 1 50 acres 

\J f land adjacent. Can be subdivided. 

iM o difficulty in building : solid ground for 

^ foundations. 
i he only large piece of waterfront property 
available in New York Harbor. 



CLARKE & THORNTON, 1 Madison Ave. 



Follow the Crowds!! 

WALLACK'S THEATRE ^^'t^^^^'S!^ .,„.„ 

Evenings at 8.15 Matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2.15 

ARNOLD DALY 

IN 

" The Regeneration " 



A PLAY OF NEW YORK LIFE 

By Owen Kildare and Walter Hackett 

" Not until you are struck full and hard do you realize that 'The 
Regeneration' is a drama with a soul." 

— .Ish/on Steve>is in the Evening Joiiryial. 

LIEBLER & CO. - - - MANAGERS 



A STOR THF A TR F Broadway and 45th Street 

/^J1V^I\ AriILAAIS.E. Telephone, Bryant, 287 

Evenings at 8.15 Matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2.15 



WILLIAM HODGE 

IN 

"The Man From Home" 

By Booth Tarkington and Harry Leon Wilson 

''The SUCCESS of the CENTURY" 
LIEBLER & CO. - - - MANAGERS 



WEEK, SEPTEMBER 21 TO SEPTEMBER 27, 1908 



®ailp Attractions 



m 



i^eto gork 



UBHARY ot Cof«iir(E.SS> 
iwo Copies rttjcoi.c!" 

SEP 2i lyod 

/ 7 ^ JL / < 




Cotyriaht iQob. H. L. Ciarkt 



hllPPODROME 

IIXTH AVENUE Telephone, 3400 Bryant 43d to 44th Streets 

latineesat 2. Evenings at 8 XWICE DAILY Matinee, Best Seats, $1. 
PORTINQ DAYS BIRD BALLET BATTLE IN THE SKIES 



OL. 10 $2.00 A YEAR 



5 CENTS A COPY 



NO. 130 



THE ANSONIA 

Broadway, 73d and 74th Sts. 



AT SUBWAY EXPRESS STATION 



An early selection is desirable, as the choice 
of apartments is rapidly becoming limited 



HOUSEKEEPING 

5 rooms and bath 81,800 

7 rooms and bath 2,700 

10 rooms and 2 baths 3,000 

11 rooms and 3 baths 3,600 

13 rooms and 4 baths 5,000 



NON-HOUSEKEEPING 

1 or 2 rooms and bath $ 900 

3 rooms and bath 1,400 

4 rooms and baths 2,200 



PER YEAR 



May be had, furnished or unfurnished, as 

desired, and service for care of 

rooms is optional 

And also transiently 

Telephone 3320 Columbus 



RESTAURANT A LA CARTE 



Daily ATTiRACTn©M^ 

m MEW YOUE. 

a4 Weekly SMagajBtne ^Devoted to aWvunce Inf ormAtion. 



Vol. X SEPTEMBER 21st to SEPTEMBER 27th, 1908 No. 130 



Daily Attractions in 
New York, (Inc.) 

ThU magazine is owned and published by Daily 
Attractions in New York, a New York 
corporation; office, I Madison Avenue ; 
E. .R. Clarke, President; B. L. Clarke, 
Secretary and Treasurer. The address of the 
officers is the office of this Magazine. 

B. L. CLARKE, Publisher, 

I Madison Avenue, 9013 Metropolitan Bldg. 

Telephone, 159 Gramercy 

Daily Attractions circulates through all the 

leading hotels in New York City 

ALSO BY SUBSCRIPTION 

IT IS NOT FOR SALE ON NEWS STAND S 
Five Cents a Copy. One Year, 'I*wo Dollars. 

Advertising rates based on bona fide circulation 
will be furnished on application. Our solicitors 
have credential cards ; ask to see them before 
placing order, for your protection and ours. 

Notices for Calendar must be received on Mon- 
day for the following week's issue. Advertise- 
ments received until 4 p. m. Wednesdays. 

Copyright, 1908, by Daily Attractions in 
Nevsr York. ( Inc. ) 

CONTENTS Page 

Art Notes 3 

Chaplain to Strangers 25 

Churches 12-13 

Did You Know in the Year 1775 14 

Elevated Railroads 24 

Ferries 24 

Football at West Point 15 

Hospitals 26 

Hotels 18 

Hudson River Day Line 7-21 

Iron Steamboat to Coney Island 22 

Map of Manhattan 16-17 

Ocean Going Steamers 25 

Points of Interest 27-29 

Pullman Accommodations 24 

Public Libraries 30 

Railroad Stations 24 

"Short TaIks"(Mme Roberta) 4 

Subway Stations 16-17 

" Tantrums " ( Haryot Holt Dey ) 23 

Theatres 19-22 

This Week in New York S'li 

Where to Shop in New York 8 



ART NOTES 
Historical Society — Central Park 

West between 77th and 78th 
streets. The society was founded 
in 1804 in the old City Hall, at 
Wall and Nassau sts. and has 
occupied the building at nth 
st. and Second Ave., oppo- 
site St. Mark's Church since 
1857. The new building was 
built in part through the gener- 
osity of Henry Dexter, a bene- 
factor of this society. The lib- 
rary contains over one hundred 
and fifty thousand volumes 
dealing with historical subjects, 
about one hundred thousand 
pamphlets, an art collection of 
nearly one thousand paintings, 
including the Bryan collection 
of old masters, the Burr collec- 
tion and many portraits; the 
Abbott Egyptian collection of 
more than one thousand pieces, 
the Peter Marie collection of 
miniatures, and the Nineveh 
sculptures, presented by James 
Lenox, and other things of in- 
terest. 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 

Waterfront 
Property? 



We buy or sell High-Class 
Profe7-tyfo7- Yoii 

CLARKE & THORNTON 

REAL ESTATE BROKERS 
Phone Gramercy 159 1 Madison Ave. 



DAILY ATTRACTIONS IN NEW YORK 



SHORT TALKS 



As usual Paris takes the lead in 
the new features in corsets. The 
latest is the boneless, made of a 
woven tricot, and having no sup- 
port, except the front steel and 
bones for the eyelets at the back 
lacing. 

The real novelty, however, is the 
woven corset, without any boning. 
Its purpose is to mold the figure 
in classic outline, reducing the hips, 
thus eliminating much of the curve 
at the waist. 

This corset has three gores — the 
front, underarm and back — on each 
side. This makes two seams in each 
half of the corset. All the shaping 
and molding must come from these 
two seams. Neither of them is 
boned. 

The fabric is a woven tricot, made 
from a mercerized cotton and silk 
mixture. It is quite heavv, as all 
the strain comes on the fabric it- 
self. The material is somewhat like 
the woven-elastic bandages used for 
surgical purposes. These corsete are 
not of extreme length, but have long 
extensions to wliich the hose sup 
porter is fastened. 

Another t^'pe is of such extreme 
length it becomes almost a panta- 
lon when worn. This is also made 
of tricot material, but of an entire- 
ly different character from the one 
just described, being similar to a 
heavy Italian silk. Quite unlike the 
other this corset is boned in every 
seam, though the bones are very 
light, except for the front, which 
arc unusually heavy. The corset 
fabric extends far below the boning, 
and there are three hose supporters 
on each half. It is specially de- 
signed to be worn with the clinging 
classic gown. 

Gowns have this corset built in, 
the corset the lining. In this case 
there is no front clasp, as the cor- 
set is laced at the back, and the 
gown buttoned or hooked 
_ An improved hose supporter is of 
silk cord, with crocheted ring, over 
which is passed an oblong link. The 
ring is placed under the hem of the 
stocking. The metal link is slipped 



over the edge, the hose is held ab- 
solutely secure, and the fastening 
is warranted not to tear the most 
delicate fabric. 

The large department stores are 
showing a rubber corset for which 
tliere is a growing demand. 

The latest French veil novelty 
consists in the way of wearing it, 
rather in the material of the veil. 
A Russian mesh veil is worn over 
the face, fastened over or under the 
hat, as may suit the wearer. The 
novelty is a silk mesh, edged with 
an embroidered design. The veil is 
in folds and laid over the crown of 
the hat. The back fold on either 
side is caught under the brim and 
fastened to the hair, the front por- 
tion hanging free. 

The favorite flower this fall is the 
dahlia, in all its lovely rich color- 
ings. It is worn on the hat and in 
the corsage, and also on the neck 
ruche of pleated silk or mousseline 
de soie. • 

A dear old lady remarked : "She 
didn't know why the women were 
making such a fuss over the care 
of their complexion. They didn't 
in her day, and she would like any 
one to show her a better one." She 
was quite right, but she failed to 
observe the dust-filled air from de- 
molished buildings, digging the 
streets for subways and the clouds 
rising from the speeding automo- 
biles. They didn't have those in her 
day. 

To free the pores of the skin from 
dust the face should be washed once 
a day with soap. The soap that can 
be used without injury is Mennen's 
Borated Skin Soap, which not only 
cleanses, but keeps it in a sweet and 
wholesome condition. Then it 
should be dusted with Mennen's Bo- 
rated Talcum Toilet Powder, which 
has the scent of fresh-cut Parma 
violets. The Soap and Talcum 
Powder is guaranteed by the Na- 
tional Pure Food and Drug Act, 
which is the endorsement of purity. 

Worn-out mantles from gas burn- 
ers are superior to any silver polish. 
Madame Roberta. 



^^o^i^ijv 




' '"oe, «■' • 



This