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Full text of "The Dart 1925"

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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



3 8130 10025 9093 



E. J. GRAY MEMORM. nBRART 

• t N M9y UVA N I A 




A qood book, is the precious 

lire blood of c« ma.5ter-5p»rit 

trcA9ured up For Oi life beyrtiwlife. 

"Mil Von 



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The 

Dickinson Dart 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY 
WILLIAMSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA 




NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE 



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To 
DEAN McCLURE, our Teacher and 
Friend, in gratitude for his every effort 
to instill in us the spirit of Honor and 
Intellectual Avidity. We. the Class of 
Nineteen Twenty five, joyfully dedicate 
this, the third issue of The Dart. 



a n 11 y o DO 11 n 11 11 D 11 D 11 a 6 II ii n a D » uii u Oil im " n " n » ii h « » u u y u u u u u u u u u u u u u li a 

Five 

46273 



3 THE DART OF 1925 Q] 



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THERE is to those who enter within the portals 
of this volume, a legacy, not of silver or gold, but 
of events and literal happenings, which have attended 
the students of Dickinson Seminary during the year 
Nineteen Twenty-five. May the Gentle Reader or 
the Sweet Critic think not that the effort to produce 
this volume has been of a minor character. Rather 
than this, the task has been one which has called forth 
all the energy and assiduity that could be found in 
those who were assigned to the task; none of whom 
will say that the achievement was easy, nor the way 
lined with laurels or other trophies. They have con- 
scientiously used every means to produce a monument 
and a voice which will speak in no uncertain tones 
of the trials and sorrows, as well as the joys and 
pleasures, all of which have most assuredly been 
among us. Therefore, let everyone who enters with- 
in these portals, enter as a guest, and every student 
as an old familiar friend, for herein can be found the 
actions, accomplishments, and successes, all of which 
are arrayed as a perpetual witness and memoir to the 
Class of '25. 



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Edi 



Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Assistant Manager 
Sales Manager 
Assistant Manager 
Faculty Adinsor 



Norman Scribner 
Elizabeth Heckman 
John Simms 
Guy Houck 
Leonard Rothermel 
Muriel Teeple 
M. Louise Van Dyke 



Athletic Editors 
James Faulkner 
John Westwood 
G. Richard Long 



Literary Editors 

Susan Virginia SkiUington 

Irene Henry 



Organizations 
Dorothy L. Moore 
Ruth Reeder 
Harriet Berger 



Art Editors 
Paul Crago 
Rossiter Lloyd 
Ethel Charieton 



Photographs 
John Harrington 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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John W Long 



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Members of tte Class of 192,5 

Dickinson Seminary has offered you the opportunity of increasing your circle 
of friends and developing an understanding and appreciation of friendship. 

She has undertaken to teach you how to study and to see the relation between 
books and life, between school days and the days that follow. 

She has sought to widen your horizons and thus to enlarge your capacities 
both for happiness and service. 

She has sought to interpret life and to help you to see, to love and to seek after 
"the good, the beautiful, the true." 

She has hoped to awake in each of you a consciousness of self — both your 
powers and your limitations — and in that way help you to find your place in the world. 

She has tried to motivate you in such a way as to cause you to bring all those 
acquisitions and opportunities under tribute to a great purpose which will direct 
your energies and powers to noble achievements. 

Dickinson Seminary has sought to make your "School Days" mean all this 
and more. How well she has succeeded time will tell. 

In closing, let me repeat what I have said to a former class: "You are now 
to take your places in that loyal body of men and women who have preceded you 
and are now known as the Alumni. You will soon find your places in the com- 
munities where you will be privileged to serve. May the strength which you have 
found here sustain you, the knowledge you have gained here enlarge your horizon, 
the friendships you have formed here inspire you, the ideals you have set up before 
you ennoble your effort, and the faith you have had strengthened here serve as a 
sure anchor in the voyage of life so that you may find your place and so serve as 
to bring at the end the approval of your fellow-toilers and the Master's "well done" 
is the wish of one who desires aKays to be counted 

Your friend, 




'^y^.^yiOM 



■^-<n^ 



President. 



la floniHiiflyyiiDiiDooHHiiiiaDiiflflyyyoQyiiyiioiniiiD iiiiionnoiiiniinniDal 

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BENJAMIN McCLURE, B.A., Dean, English 

Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., 

1913-1914. 
University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, 1914-1916, 

1919-1920, B.A.June, 1920. 
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va., 1916- 

1917. 
Instructor in English, University of Minnesota, 

Minneapolis, Minn., 1920-1923. 
Dean 1923-1925. 



M. LOUISE VANDYKE, A.B., Preceptress, 
English 

Wesley Collegiate Institute, 1912-1914. 

University of Delaware, 1914-1917. 

Dickinson College, 1917-1918. 

Taught at Conemaugh High School, May, 1918; 
Frostburg High School, 1919-20; Chesapeake 
City High School, 1920-21; Wesley Collegiate 
Institute, 1921-1924; Dickinson Seminary, 
1924-25. 





A. HARLAND GREENE, A.B., Latin 

Dickinson College. A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, Dickinson Seminary. 



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/. MILTON SKEATH, A.B., Mathematics 

Dickinson College, 1917-1921, A.B. 
University of Pennsylvania, 1924. 
Instructor at Dickinson Seminary, 1921-25. 





JOHN G. CORN WELL, JR.. A.B.. Science 

Dickinson College, A.B., 1921. 

Graduate Work, University of Pennsylvania, 1922- 
24. 

Instructor at Hanover High School, 1921-23: Dick- 
inson Seminary, 1923-25. 



RUTH INEZ KAPP, B.A., History and English 

Pennsylvania State College, B.A., 1919-23. 
Taught at Clearfield Junior High School, 1923-24; 
Dickinson Seminary, 1924-25. 




QOOOyyOHtlDD 



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NATALIE WALKER. A.B., French and Spanish 
Cornell University, 1919-23. 
Lycee de Jeunes Filles, Versailles, France. 
Dickinson Seminary, 1924-25. 



JAMES W. STERLING, M.A., Greek and English 

Dickinson Seminary, 1915-19. 
Syracuse University, 1919-24. 
Instructor at Dickinson Seminary, 1924-25. 





REV. W. W. WILLARD, B.D., Bible. Rural 

Economics, Rural Church Methods and 

Leadership 

Pastor M. E. Church in Woolrich, Pa. Graduate 
of Dickinson Seminary Classical Course, 1904, 
Drew Theological Seminary, Bachelor of 
Divinity, 1908. 



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FRANK M. CARLSON, Accounting, Penmanship, 

Salesmanship, Bookkeeping. Member National 

Salesman Association 

Graduate Bryant and Stratton School of Commerce, 
Teacher's Diploma. 

National Salemen's Training Association, Chicago, 
111. 





MAE BELLE ALLEN, Shorthand, Typewriting, 

Rapid Calculation, Commercial Arithmetic 
Ferris Normal and Business College, Big Rapids, 

Mich. 
Williamsport, Dickinson Seminary, 1924-25. 



M. R. SWARTZ,B.A., Athletic Director 

Lebanon College, B.A. 

Connecticut State College Coach, 1919-20. 
Pitcher, International League, 1919-23, Reading 
and Rochester Club. 




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MILDRED E. HERRINGTON, Girls' Athletic 
Director, Junior Department 

Ithaca School of Physical Education. 
Harvard School of Physical Education. 



MINNIE MAE HOOVEN, M.E.L., 
Academic Department 
Dickinson Seminary, M.E.L. 





MARGARET E. RUTHERFORD. 

Junior Department 
Bloomsburg Normal School. 
Columbia University. 
Taught at Dickinson Seminary, 1922-25. 



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MRS. ELIZABETH REED MANN, M.E.L. 
Expression, Dramatics 
Dickinson Seminary, M.E.L. 
Edith Coburn School of Expression. 
Post Graduate Work, Paris, France. 





FRANK EARL OWEN. A.L.C.M., 

Violin, History of Music, Music Appreciation, 
Elements, Ear Harmony, Orchestra 

Diploma — London College of Music, London, En- 
gland 

M. Victoria Thursty, Albert Fryer, Vladimir Res- 
nikoff. 

Instructor at Dickinson Seminary, 1923-25. 



CATHERINE IZER, Voice 

Harrisburg, Penna. 

Soprano Soloist and Director, Messiah Lutheran 
Church Choir, Harrisburg. 

Pupil of Mrs. Thamzine Cox, Harrisburg; Mr. 
Ross David and Frank La Forge of New York. 




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LUCIE MATHLIDE MANLEY, Art 
Elinira College for Women. 

Art Students' League, New York. 

Private Study, Boston, Mass., and Florence, Italy. 



PRISCILLA S. CUNNINGHAM, 
Supervisor of Commercial Art 

Student at Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art. Metropolitan Summer School 
of Art. 

Dickinson Seminary. 




MARY MULLINER. Instrumental 
Percy Alwyn, Schenectady. 
Dickinson Seminary. 
Peabody Conservatory. 



QO' 



Eighteen 



a THE DART O F 1 925 QI 



EDITH JARRETT 

Training — Beechwood School. 
Teacher's Diploma. 
Kindergarten Instructor. 



MRS. J. HARRY AKER, B.5., Home Economics 

Ravenna College, South Eastern Teacher's Col- 
lege, University of Colorado. 



;. HARRY AKER, M.B., M.M.. Piano 

William Knoche, Edgar Crosier, Edward Mac- 
Dowell; Graduate, The Royal Conservatory 
of Music, Leipzig; Josef Pembaur; Telemque 
Lambrino, Alfred Reisenaur, Leipzig; Teresita 
Carreno, Berlin; Anton Bandrowski, Berlin; 
Gustave Schreck, Leipzig; Two years assis- 
tant to Alfred Reisenaur. 



EMILY DODD CHAPIN, Mezzo-Soprano, Vocal 

Dickinson Seminary. 

Pupil of Mme. Barnet, three seasons. 

Pupil of Professors A. P. Collins and Antony 
Reese, three seasons. 



la ofloii II 11 HH y Da D y HHiiy II yy 00 on 11 ypofloiiyDyiiiflD 11 DoyoDnooa l 

Nineteen 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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West View of Old Main 



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a THE DART OF 1925 g| 



Alma Mater 

Come and in tuneful lays 
Your happy voices raise 

To Dickinson. 
Our Alma Mater dear, 
Thy sons from far and near 
Sing thee with hearty cheer, 

Fair Dickinson. 

Hail! Thou with honors crowned 
For truth and sight renowned, 

Hail Dickinson! 
In every land and clime 
Thy illustrious sons now shine 
And prove thy ways sublime, 

Hail Dickinson! 

Not wreaths of flowers, we 
Now gladly bring to thee. 

Dear Dickinson, 
Tributes of praise and love 
Wherever we may move 
Shall our attachment prove. 

Dear Dickinson. 

Fondly our memory 
Shall ever turn to thee, 

Fair Dickinson. 
All those time-honored ways 
Those maidens, fair as fays 
Those happy joy-filled days 

In Dickinson, 



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THE DART 



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Leonard Rothermel 
Irene Henry 
S. Virginia Skillington 
Benjamin Harris 
Harriet Berger 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Class Historian 



Class Matto 
Tacite Agite 



Class Flower 
Tea Rose 



Class Colors 
Gold and Black 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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Margaret Kathryn Barr "Peg" 

Watsontown, Pa. 

Secretarial Course. 

"There some silent people who are 
more interesting than the best talkers." 



M. Elizabeth Beard "Betty" 

Newberry, Pa. 

Y. W. C. A. 4; Tripartite 4; Choral Club 4. 

College Preparatory Course. 

New England Conservatory of Music. 

"Her voice is ever soft, 
Gentle and low, an excellent thing in a woman." 





Harriet Louise Berger 

New Bethlehem, Pa. 



'Roomie" 



Y. W. C. A. 4; Tripartite, Vice-President 4: Dart 
Board 4; Organizations 4; Choral Club 4; 
Freshman Scholarship Prize 1. 

College Preparatory Course. 

"Of mannei.'i gentle, of affections mild." 



IS! 



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DART 



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19 2 5 



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Pauline Moyer Boyd 

316 S. Grier St., Williamsport, Pa. 

".4 icoiiKin ni'ech a f:troitgei- head iluin her 
otcn for cnunsel — ^he fthould get married." 



Guy E. Brown 



"Red" 



Theta Pi Pi; Y. M. C. A.; Belles Lettres; Athletic 
Association; Track 4; Basketball Manager 4. 

Commercial Course. 

Temple University. 

"Much Htiidt/ hiilh ironi liiiii to the bonen." 





Ethel Mae Charleton "Mike" 

409 W. Louther St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Y. W. C. A.; Tripartite 4; Dramatic Class 4; "Miss 
Somebody Else": Dart Board (Art Depart- 
ment) . 

College Preparatory. 

Dickinson College. 

"Fair /rf.s.s-cs )»((»'.s iiii/ierifil race eiistiii ren." 



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Daniel R. Coney 



'Rabbi" 



Williamsport, Pa. 



Theta Pi Pi Fraternity; Gamma Epsilon Society; 
Dramatic Class '23 ; Y. M. C. A. ; Union Board. 
"Upriglit QiKiIcers pleane both iikdi (iiul God." 





Yolonde Mae Corson 

Muncy, Pa. 

Y. W. C. A. 4; Tripartite 4. 

College Preparatory. 

"Those about her, from her slmll 
read the perfect wai/x of honor." 



Paul H. Crago 



"Red' 



Porto Rico 



Belles Lettres Literary Society; Glee Club; Senior 
Banquet Committee; Dart Board; Union 
Board; Class Basketball; Class Football: Var- 
sity Track. 

Penn State. 

"Men have died from time to time and 
worms have eaten them — hut not for love." 




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Evelyn Fischler 

Williamsport, Pa. 

Williamsport High School. 
Hood College. 

".4// uitr knowlcdr/e is ourselves to know. 



James Marshall Faulkner 

Delmar, Del. 



'Jim" 



Y. M. C. A. 4; Belles Lettres 4; Dart Board 4; 
Athletic Editor; Student Body Organization, 
President 4; Forensic Oratory 4. 

College Preparatory. 

Washington and Lee. 

"Kindness in tcomcn, not their 
brauteous looks, shall tvin my love." 





Abraham Feldman 

Williamsport, Pa. 



"Abie" 



Dart Board; Football 3, 4; Track Manager 4. 
Manager 4. 

College Preparatory. 

Johns Hopkins University. 

"Who stole my purse, stole trnsh. A 
Daniel come to judgment! Yea! A Dnniel!" 



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THE DART 



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James Griffiths 



"Jim" 



Girardville, Pa. 



Kappa Delta Pi; Y. M. C. A.; Belles Lettres Liter- 
ary Society; Varsity Football, Track. 
College Preparatory. 
Bucknell University. 

"Consistency, thou art a jewel." 





W. LeRoy Hann "Spike" 

419 E. 2nd Ave., South Williamsport, Pa. 

Belles Lettres 2, 3, 4; Ladies Auxiliary 2, 3, 4. 

College Preparatory. 

Bucknell University. 

"He'd undertake to prove by force 
of Argument, a cow's no horse." 



Mary Harlan 



Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4; Belles Lettres; Union Society 
3, 4; Tripartite 3, 4; Dramatic Class 3; Junior 
Union Board 3; Literary Editor, Dart Board 
4; Asst. Business Manager; Sleigh-Ride Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Secretary Athletic Association 4; 
Basketball Team 4; Choral Club; Athletic 
Association; Student Organization 3. 

Commercial Course. 

Pierce's Business College. 

"/ profess not talking; only this 
Let each man do his best." 




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Elizabeth Heckman "Betty" 

Clearfield, Pa. 

College Preparatory. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

"Not n better sonl was found hy tlie 
crier OK his round thni' tlie town." 



John G. Harrington 

Hazleton, Pa. 



"Doc" 



Theta Pi Pi; Glee Club; Belles Lettres; Leopard 
Club; Dart Board; Dramatic Club; Third 
Prize in Spelling Contest. 

College Preparatory. 
Jefferson Medical College. 

"Froicli is till' liini/iiii<ie of the Godx." 





Benjamin William Harris 

Montoursville, Pa. 



"Ben" 



Theta Pi Pi; Belles Lettres 4; Junior Union Board. 

College Preparatory. 

"There is no pleasure like tlie /iiiin. 
Of being loved and loving." 



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19 2 5 



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Irene Mae Henry 



"RinkV 



Tower City, Pa. 



Vice-President Senior Class; Y. W. C. A., Social 
Secretary 4: Tripartite 3, 4, President 4; 
Belles Lettres Union Society 3, 4; Dramatic 
3; "Ghost Story" 3: "Tillie of Bloomsburg" 
4; Choral Club 3, 4; Student Organization 3; 
Dickinson Union Board 3, 4; Junior Union 
Board 3; Dart Board 4; Chestnut Committee 
4; Sleigh Ride Committee 3, 4; Greater Dick- 
inson Banquet Committee 3; Orchestra 4; 
Girl's Basketball Team 4; Athletic Associa- 
tion 3, 4. 

Conservatory, College Preparatory. 
Oberlin College. 

"(_))i, lioic wonderful is the human voice 
U ix indeed the oryan of the soul." 





Elizabeth Hil 



Williamsport, Pa. 



Dramatic Class 4; Senior Class Play. 

College Preparatory. 

Wilson College. 

"/ nerer Inien^ so young a body with so old a head.' 



Eugene Hoover 



Duncannon, Pa. 



"Jeff" 



Theta Pi Pi; Gamma Epsilon Literary Society; 
Choral Club 2, 3; Baseball 3, 4; Senior Bas- 
ket ball; Scrub Basketball; Junior Union 
Board. 

Dickinson College. 

"Short is my date, but deathless my renown." 




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THE DART OF 1925 



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Guy Houck 



'Houckie" 



Dudley, Pa. 



Kappa Delta Pi; Y. M'. C. A. 3, 4; Belles Lettres 
Literary Society; Orchestra 3, 4; Junior Union 
Board, (Exchange Editor) ; Dart Board, (Asst. 
Advt. Manager) ; Baseball 3, 4. 

Commercial Course. 

"When a ninn is in love u'ith one woman in a family, 
it is astonishing how fond he becomes of every person 
connected irith it." 



Sofia Camarinos 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Conservatory. 

"Music is the poor nirin's Parnassii 





Ross Lloyd 



Blakely, Pa. 



Kappa Delta Pi; Class Football 3, 4; Captain 
Track 3, 4; Dramatic Class; Leopard Club; 
Belles Lettres Literary Society. 

College Preparatory. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

"Man's love is of man's life a thing apart, 
'Tis a woman's whole existence." 



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Braden P. Hughes 



'Coonie" 



Theta Pi Pi; Varsity Football; Basi^etball ; Base- 
ball. 
College Preparatory. 
Allegheny College. 

"My only books, were women's looks 
And folly's all they've taught me." 





W. Harris Huling 

Williamsport, Pa. 



"Turk" 



Theta Pi Pi; Dart Board; Junior Board; Class 
Football; junior Varsity Basketball. 

College Preparatory. 

Penn State College. 

"Behold the child, by nature's kindly law, 
Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw." 



G. Richard Long 



'Dick' 



Delmar, Del. 



Theta Pi Pi; Class Football 4; Leopard Club; 
Glee Club; School Reporter; Varsity Base- 
ball; Union Board; Dart Board. 

College Preparatory. 

Dickinson College. 

"A Poet soaring in the high regions of his fancies. 
With his garland and singing robes about him." 




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Clarence H. Love 

Waterville, Pa. 

Kappa Delta Pi; Belles Lettres; Literary Society; 
Class Football 4; Varsity Baseball; Dart 
Board; Dramatic Class. 

College Preparatory. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

"He tenchvH them all their ciirees." 



Jorge Carlos Mestre 

Santiago, Cuba 

Gamma Epsilon Literary Society; Y. M. C. A. 3, 
4; Orchestra 3, 4. 

Commercial Course. 

College Preparatory. 

Havana University. 

"The soul of iinisie nhiiiibem in the shell. 

Till waked aiid kindled by the master spell." 




Dorothy L. Moore 



"Dot' 




Ridge, Md. 



Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3; President 4; 
Tripartite 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Critic 4; Dramatics 
4; "Miss Somebody Else"; Junior Union 
Board; Literary Editor; Union Board 3, 4; 
Literary Editor; Dart Board; Associations; 
Thanksgiving Day Toast 2; Oratory Contest 
3, 4; Patton Scholarship 3; Jackson Scholar- 
ship 3; Metzgar Prize 3; Scripture and Hymn 
Reading Contest 2, 4. 

College Preparatory Course. 

Dickinson College. 

"/( matters not how lonr/ we lire, but hoiv." 



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Olive Margaret Moyer 

Jonestown, Pa. 



•0///e' 



Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4; Tripartite 2, 3, 4; Spelling 

Contest Prize 2. 
College Preparatory. 
Bloomsburg Normal. 

"Your silence shows that ijuu. agree." 




u 




Ruth Reeder 

Williamsport, Pa. 
English Course. 
"Since Eve ate the ajijile — much depends on dinner. 



Mary Hall Resh 

Y. W. C. A. 4; Tripartite; Choral Club 4; Basket- 
ball Team 4; Cap and Gown Committee 4; 
Baseball 4. 

College Preparatory. 

Maryland State Normal. 

"/; is good to leiiiitlien to the last siiniii/ mood." 




Thirty-five 



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THE DART 



O F 



19 2 5 



Q 




Sarah Eleanor Roher "Sallie" 

523 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, Pa. . . 

Y. W. C. A. 4; Tripartite 4; Maxwell Essay Contest 

4. 

College Preparatory. 
American University. 

"Oh, sir! the good die first." 



Richard G. Raup 

Wiiliamsport, Pa. 



''Dick" 



Glee Club; Basketball; Baseball '25. 
College Preparatory. 
Lehigh University. 

"Wlien there is u ivohkiu — titere is a «•«//.' 





Leonard Harry Rotherme! "Bill" 

Kappa Delta Pi; Y. M. C. A. Social Secretary; 
Belles Lettres; Dickinson Union Board, Edi- 
tor-in-Chief; Dart Board, Subscription Dept. ; 
Athletics; Varsity Baseball 3, 4; President, 
Senior Class; President, Athletic Association. 

College Preparatory. 

Connecticut Wesleyan. 

"Oh ivhat may man within him hide, 
Though Angel on the outivard side?" 



QDI 



Thirty-six 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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Q 



J. Luther Roudabush "Rudy' 

Williamsport, Pa. 

Seminary Orchestra. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic. 

"Fill me with the old fditiihiir juice, 
Methinks I might recover by and bi/." 





Marguerite Schlegel 

Renovo, Pa. 

Secretarial Course. 

"Man in the artificer of his own liappiness." 



Norman O. Scribner -'Scribbie" "Bishop" 

Baltimore, Md. 

Kappa Delta Pi; Varsity Football; Editor-in-Chief 
"Dart". 

College Preparatory. 
Ohio Wesleyan University. 

"To me the meanest flower that blows can give 
thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears." 




Thirty-seven 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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m 




John E. Simms "Admiral" 

Glee Club; Union Board; Dart Board. 

College Preparatory. 

"He lives, the soul, enchanted bi/ nielodi/ nf song." 



O. R. Williams 



"Bill" 



Beiiefonte, Pa. 



Gamma Epsiion Society; Secretary Y. M. C. A. 

'25; Union Board '24; Student Council 3, 4. 

College Preparatory. 

"The (i)icieiil sdi/ini/ is no heresy — 
Haiiiiint/ and iririntj go by destiny." 





James H. Spence 

Kappa Delta Pi; Gamma Epsiion Literary Society. 
College Preparatory. 
Penn State College. 

"Silence is more innsical than any song." 



Thirty-eight 



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THE DART 



O F 



19 2 5 



Q 



Muriel C. Teeple 



"Teep" 



Y. W. C. A. 4; Tripartite 4; Dramatics 4; Choral 
Club 4; Dart Board; Assistant Sales Manager 
4; Penmanship Certificate 4. 

Commercial Course. 

"/ would have thought her spirit had 

been invincible against all assaults of affection" 





John R. AX'estwood "Westy" "jack" 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kappa Delta Pi; Belles Lettres; Dart Board; Un- 
ion Board; Dramatic Club; Leopard Club; 
Secretary Student Body; Head Cheer Leader; 
Glee Club; Y. M. C. A.; Greater Dickinson 
Banquet Speech; Class Football. 

College Preparatory. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

"Fit language there is none, 
For the heart's deepest things." 



Martha Alford White 

Baltimore, Md. 

Y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Tripartite; Dramatics; Union 
Alumni Editor; Union Exchange Editor, 
Hymn and Bible Reading Contest 3, 4; Prize 
Alexander Patton Scholarship. 

Commercial Course. 
Maryland State Normal. 

".4 good heart's ivorth gold." 




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Susan Virginia Skillington "Susie" 

Altoona, Pa. 

Tripartite; Literary Society 4; Dramatics 4; "Miss 
Somebody Else"; Choral Club 4; Dart Board; 
Literary Editor 4; Senior Class Secretary; 
Greater Dickinson Banquet Committee; 
Hymn and Scripture Reading; Contest Hymn 
Reading Prize. 

College Preparatory. 

Dickinson College. 

"All thhi<is I tlioi((/lit I knctc, but »o»' confess. 
The more 1 knoiv, I knoie. I kiioie tlie less." 



Ruth Kober 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Commercial Course. 

"Silence at the proper season is 
wisdom and better tluin any speech.' 



Elizabeth G. Edler 

Williamsport, Pa. 

College Preparatory. 
The Sargent School. 

"Our patience will achieve more than onr force.' 



a flyyoiiflyyiiDHflDOCiiiiyflDflflflyiioyo yflOflfliiyooo iiiODiiflniiflOflOfloal 

Forty 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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JUNIORS 



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Milton B. C^risi , Presidenl 



LoL Rubh, \ u: I'icident 





Frances Bubb. Secretary 



Francis Geigle, Trcasuier 



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Forty-three 



B THE DART OF 1925 QI 



INASMUCH as the Class of '26 was not organized until this year ( 1925), and inas- 
much as there were no activities as a class until after its organization, there is lit- 
tle to be written concerning the history of the years of '22 and '23, '23 and '24. 
This class ranked high in scholarship for the first two years, three or four members 
having maintained averages of ninety or above. With regards to athletics, the 
first year our class united with the Juniors and won. Likewise the second year the 
class joined with the Seniors of that year and turned out to be victorious. During 
these two first years of the existence of the class there have been numerous changes 
in the enrollment. We were glad to welcome new members into our midst this year 
and we are also disappointed and sorrowful over the absence of former class-mates 
who did not return for the work of another school year. 

A new period in the life of the Junior Class was begun on the 22nd of January, 
1925, for it was on that date that it came to exist and function as an organized unit. 
As a result of the election, the following were chosen for officers of the class: 

Milton B. Crist President 

Lou Ross Vice-President 

Frances Bubb Secretary 

Francis Geigle Treasurer 

Blue and Red were selected as the class colors. The violet was unanimously 
agreed upon as the class fiower. The motto adopted was "Facta, non verba," which 
means, "Deeds, not words." 

The Junior Class began its social activities by giving a banquet to the Seniors 
at the close of their Sleigh Ride. Our President, Milton Crist, competently filled the 
position of toast master. Miss Kapp, as Junior Councillor, delivered a short speech. 
George McCahan, acting in the capacity of Chairman of the Junior Banquet Com- 
mittee responded with a toast. Much credit was reflected upon the Junior Class 
and particularly the Banquet Committee for the success of the whole affair, which 
was highly complimented on by the Seniors. 

The next and most outstanding social event of the year was the Junior Sleighing 
Party and Banquet which took place on the 22nd day of January, 1925. After due 



Q0< 



Forty-four 



a THEDART oT 19 2 5 Q] 



deliberation and much preparation, we were finally off (or rather snow-balled off) 
on our journey. It was a perfect day for the event. After a two-hours' delightful 
ride in the sleighs behind the jingling sleigh-bells we, at last, arrived at our destina- 
tion, the Evergreen Tea Room. While waiting for the chief event of the day, the 
big dinner, we were favored with piano selections by Miss Mulliner. After about 
a half hour of patient waiting, filled with pleasant anticipations of what was to fol- 
low, we sat down to a "gorgeous" feast of chicken and waffles with all the trimmings. 
Following the meal, we all went out doors, where some occupied themselves with 
taking pictures, while others engaged in snow battles. After a brief but very en- 
joyable sojourn, of a couple hours at the Tea Room, we again heard the sleigh-bells 
calling us away from our fun in order to "load up" once more. The return trip was 
filled with songs and various discussions. The sleighs pulled up in front of the 
old Sem about seven-thirty. The following rendered to us their services as chap- 
erons: Miss Kapp, Miss Van Dyke, Miss Mulliner, and Professor and Mrs. Skeath. 
We were greatly indebted to them for the capable and sportsmanlike way in which 
they helped to make the party such an enjoyable affair. At eight o'clock we gather- 
ed in the gayly decorated dining room for the banquet given by the Seniors. Al- 
though we had eaten only a few hours previous to this time, nevertheless our appe- 
tites had been sharpened by the ride back through the frosty air, so that we did full 
justice to the elaborate repast. Dr. Long made the main address of the evening, 
after which a number responded with toasts. Dean McClure, Miss Van Dyke, Miss 
Kapp, and Professor Skeath gave brief talks. Mr. Crist and Mr. Geigle represented 
the Junior Class, and Mr. Scribner, the Senior Class in their responses. We felt 
greatly indebted to the Seniors for their excellent preparation and for the happy 
evening which was made possible for us through their efforts. 

Truly every member of the Junior Class who went on this memorable Sleigh 
Ride will always have the fondest recollections of this perfect day. 

We Juniors have not been as successful thus far in athletics as might be de- 
sired. In football, after a hard but well-fought game, we were finally forced to 
acknowledge defeat at the hands of the Seniors. We also regret to report an unsuc- 
cessful basketball season. But in bowling we came out ahead of the others. All 
hope for the remaining half of the season is not to be despaired of, for the prospects 
look very bright in tennis, and for the inter-class baseball game and also the track- 
meet which will be held on Campus Day. 



a o y y BHii H ii y ii oy y H 1 oDii QoypoDyG 11 coiioiiy 00 110 iflDHimoflyfloa 

Forty-five 



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Q 



Baird, Courtney C. 
Baird, Lotta T. R. 
Bechdel, Joseph 
Bubb, Frances 
Cecil, Jesse Mae 
Cox, Eleanor F. 
Crist, Milton B. 
Decker, Reba B. 
Dunham, Frank L. 
Edler, Dorothy Louise 
Elliot, James Norwood 
Flamand, Juan F. 
Geigle, Francis R. 
Glazer, Chas. A. 
Graham, Virginia 
Griffiths, Newton 
Hand, Helen M. 
Hayes, Millard C. 
Herritt, Thomas G. 
Hill, Clayton C. 
Jones, Ethel 
Kendall, Harold 
Maitland, Elizabeth 
McCahan, Geo. R. 
McClain, Leslie Carlton 
McKay, Earl Zimmerman 
Morgan, Alberta 
Moltz, Mae 
Nye, Geo. R. 
Reeser, Helen 
Rich, John R. 
Roney, Elizabeth Dorothy 
Ross, Virginia 
Ross, Lou Elizabeth 
Rothrock, L. E. 
Scott, Arietta B. 
Seigel, Elizabeth 
Sterner, Margaret Rich 
Stinson, Ethelyn 
Snyder, Willard T. 
Tyson, Gladys 
Whitaker, P. Vernon 
Willard, Willis W. 
Young, Louise C. 



Swarthmore, Pa. 
Avis, Pa. 
Blanchard, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Welisboro, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. 
Trevorton, Pa. 
West Philadelphia, Pa. 
North East, Pa. 
Girardville, Pa. 
Pine Grove, Pa. 
Wayland, N. Y. 
Jersey Shore, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Barnesboro, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Robertsdale, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Robertsdale, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Mount Union, Pa. 
Woolrich, Pa. 
Ocean Grove, N. J. 
Riddlesburg, Pa. 
Riddlesburg, Pa. 
Benezett, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Catawissa, Pa. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Woolrich, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 



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T-yrf feel free to say that Dickinson 
W Seminary never had a better coach. 
and because of the general athletic re- 
naissance that he has produced, for the 
splendid spirit that he has always shown, 
we feel it our duty to dedicate this sec- 
tion to him He is well worthy of this, 
our effort to remember him, and to express 
our appreciation. The Class of '25 bids 
him good luck, may his victories, for the 
Gold and White, be numerous, and may 
he have the loyal support of eveiy true 
Dickinsonian. 



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3 THE DART OF 1925 g] 



"Oh the school upon the hill-top. 

Will celebrate tonight, 
For the team is bringing victory 
To the Gold and to the White." 

THESE glorious words rushing forth from the enthusiastic throats of the en- 
tire student body, and echoing and re-echoing back and forth across the 
spacious floor of the gymnasium, or forming a vast column of sound floating 
across the broad expanse of the athletic field, have indeed caused the hearts of 
many a strong and brave foe to tremble with a strange, unconquerable feeling of 
awe! And what a "grand and glorious feeling" do these words, that seem to have 
within themselves some weird uncanny force, instill into the panting breasts of a 
Gold and White team! 

For athletics, always a part of the course at Dickinson Seminary, have at last 
found their true worth during the last few years. It can be safely said that there 
is no other preparatory school of its size in the state of Pennsylvania, and in truth, 
in the states of the East, where there can be found an institution that can surpass in 
any way the calibre of our team, its ideals of sportsmanship, and the ultimate success 
of its athletics in later years, than those teams placed upon the field of sport by 
Dickinson Seminary! 

This seems, indeed, a bold statement to make, but with a football team that 
emerged victorious over the best scholastic teams of the East representing it, and 
with its basketball teams maintaining an excellent record of games won and lost, 
one can readily see the force of the statement. 

One of the most deciding factors in the uplift of athletics at this school is with- 
out a doubt the acquisition of a new $165,000 gymnasium, which was formally dedi- 
cated on November 8, 1924, with very impressive ceremonies. The gymnasium, 
with facilities for baseball, handball, bowling, indoor baseball and track as well as 
containing wonderfully equipped sets of body building instruments, boasts of a 60x 
20 foot swimming pool. It is in the gymnasium auditorium that plays, recitals, 
and really all social functions of the Seminary are held. 

The untiring and successful efforts of Coach Swartz has contributed largely 



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Forty-eight 



3 THE DART OF 1925 Q] 



to the high standing now held by Dickinson Seminary teams. By his keen judgment, 
his ability to influence the players in giving his best talent for the colors, he has 
been a wonderful success. 

Credit is due also to Coach Cornwell and Coach Skeath, of the track team, 
for their work throughout the season in raising the large number of candidates who 
responded to the call. 

Above all, the student body is to be congratulated for its great loyalty, its co- 
operation, and for having presented to the school such a cheer leader as John R. 
Westwood. 

And so — with the close of another year at good old Dickinson we may look 
back upon the really striving time that we have all had while here, and can attribute 
a great portion of our pleasure to the witnessing of many close games. 

May the standard of athletics at Dickinson Seminary never be lowered, and 
may hope and future developments and unselfish participation give to her such a 
name that she will be feared and regarded as a great institution by all those who 
are to follow this Class of 1925! 




lypiiflyiiHfly yoiiiiiioyyyiiyflflyDflyiiyiiiiiiDyyyDyyoooDoiiHoa 

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Footba 



The following vias the lineup on our football team this past season of 1924: 

Braden "Coonie" Hughes Left End 

G. Richard "Dick" Hohensheldt Left Tackle 

Richard "Tod" Todhunter Left Guard 

Thomas "Tom" Herrit Center 

Joseph "Joe" Bechdel Right Guard 

Norman O. "Scribbie" Scribner Right Tackle 

Arthur "Artie" Emich Right End 

Earl Z. "Mack" McKay Quarterback 

Millard C. "Bye" Hayes Left Halfback 

George R. "Granny" Nye, Capt Fullback 

Despite the fact that only five of these men had been on the varsity team of 
1923, and, returning, had again donned the togs of their Alma Mater, Coach "Cardy" 
Swartz, an athlete of much ability, and one of the most successful football mentors 
ever at Dickinson, calmly proceeded to build around these veterans a team that 
ended the season with but one defeat. 

That defeat, coming as it did from the hands of the Sem's ancient foe, Wyom- 
ing Seminary, of Kingston, was a bitter pill to swallow, but it is more than over- 
balanced by the victories over Harrisburg "Tech", Cornell Freshmen, and West 
Chester Normal, three of the best scholastic elevens in the state. 

The season opened in a blaze of glory for the Gold and White eleven, Keystone 
Academy being forced to bow to the invincible playing of our team with a score of 
13-7. Keystone, however gained the honor of being the first team to score upon 
the locals, and incidentally became the first of two teams who were the only two to 
score at all during the entire season. 

"Harrisburg Tech must be destroyed!" Verily the Fates smiled benignly upon 
the ministers, and gave them a well earned victory over Tech — 14-0. With Burkett 
and Nye ploughing great holes through the opposing line, and with Scribner and 
Bechdel acting as towers of defense, it was left to Hayes to intercept a forward 
pass and dash eighty-five yards for a touchdown, followed shortly after by Burkett's 
plunge through the line for six extra points. It was indeed a happy squad that re- 
turned to Dickinson! 

Passing over the Mansfield Normal victory of 31-0, we find Coach Swartz get- 
ting ambitious to sign up with the Cornell Freshmen for a tilt. Appearances were 
decidedly against our warriors for at that time Cornell Frosh boasted of an almost 
impenetrable eleven. But again Dame Fortune smiled favorably, and our scouts 
returned, though somewhat the worse for wear, with a score of 14-0. 



a oDDiiy miiDy noil II oooHHy Oil flflyy 110 II oflHy 1111 flypiflymniDOiiHoa 

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g THE DART o"^ 1925 g] 



West Chester Normal, undefeated for three years and not scored on for two, 
were the next that were vanquished. A scare at the hands of "Bye" Hayes, who 
scored Seminary's only touchdown in the first five minutes of play, practically as- 
sured the Gold and White supporters victory. The team was badly crippled as a 
result of the game, for Hayes and Hohenscheldt were out of the game indefinitely. 

Luckily enough, Susquehanna Reserves were easy victims, and succumbed 
to a white-wash of 19-0. 

And then, the game of the year! With the grandstands packed, the bleachers 
filled to over-flowing with a shouting mass of frantic spectators, and with the entire 
sfudent body yelling and cheering itself hoarse with the cry of "Fight ! Team ! Fight !" 
the break came. Dame Fortune gave her place to her daughter Misfortune, which 
deed coupled with a seemingly ceaseless flow of strength on the part of Wyoming, 
we were defeated with a score of 19-0. 

With this game a part of history, our team was more battered than ever. "Bye" 
Hayes had played with a plaster paris cast, on his shoulders, and Earl McKay was 
again the possessor of fractured ribs and a broken arm. Credit is due Wyoming 
for they played a clean game throughout. 

The last game of the season was scheduled to be played with Bloomsburg 
Normal. They cancelled the game, however. 

Thus closed one of the most successful of all the seasons for the Gridiron of 
the Gold and the White. There stands a record of seven games, with six victories 
and one defeat. As a counterbalance to the twenty-six points gained by opponents, 
Dickinson has to her credit ninety-seven points. 

Much credit is due to "Cardy", our well-known and equally loved Coach. And 
to say of him: Great deeds, high thoughts, and not words alone extol the virtue 
of a man. 



The Second Team 

Much credit is due the fellows who sacrificed their spare time and their plea- 
sures to give to the varsity team what help it could, and to do their part in turning 
out a great team under the Gold and White Colors. The scrubs were victors over 
Picture Rocks High School 13-0 and fought a good battle against Galeton High 
School and against overwhelming odds lost 63-7, but at least did their share of 
feasting at the Football Banquet at Christ Church. 

The members of the second team are, Rothermel and Long, ends, Cummings, 
Mueller, tackles, Baid and Feldman, guards, while Lloyd, Glazer, N. Gritfiths, Myers 
Crist, backs. 



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g THE DART O F 1 9 2 5 Q 



Prospectus ior 192,5 Football 

Rated as having one of the strongest teams of all the Preparatory schools of 
the Eastern United States last fall, the Athletic Committee of the Seminary has 
drawn up one of the most strenuous schedules in the history of the school for the 
coming season, 1925. Mercersburg Academy, which has always been noted for 
its great teams, Cornell Freshman, who fell victims to Dickinson only after the 
hardest battle of the year, Perkiomen, which has turned out many very successful 
elevens in the last few years, and Wyoming Seminary, the only victor over the Gold 
and the White in the past season, 1924, will be on the schedule, which includes five 
"at home" and four "away." The Thanksgiving Game is with the Perkiomen team. 

Coach Swartz is indeed fortunate in losing but three letter-men this year by 
graduation : "Jim" Griffiths, "Tiny" Scribner, and "Coonie" Hughes. 



a opoyyiiHi iyfliifliiyiiiiH yiiiiaiiyDiiyflyyoiiiiyfliio oaiioiimioiiDDiifloa 

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Capt Nye, Fullback 



Hughes Left End 



HoiiLNbiu-LDT, Left Tackle 



NYE — Fullback — Captain 

An enthusiastic spectator at one of the games here this season suddenly became 
interested in a big, heavy set fellow, who playing one of the backfield positions, was 
having things his own way despite the determined efforts of his opponents. After 
the husky had outshone all previous efforts by a mighty plunge through the line 
which resulted in a touchdown, the spectator jumped to his feet and shouted, "Ye 
gods, how that guy can buck the line!" 

The "guy" turned out to be George "Granny" Nye, of Hummelstown, to whose 
capable leadership the team owes much of its success. The best that we can do for 
him is to allow him to carry away our most sincere wishes for his ultimate success, 
and prophesy for him a great future, not only in athletics but in the problems of life 
as well. 



HUGHES— Left End 

Coming to us with football experience at Franklin High, "Coonie" at once 
proceeded to show his great ability as an end. His aggressiveness, his stellar de- 
fense, was one of the great factors in Seminary's freak season. Many thanks, 
"Coonie." 



HOHENSHELDT—Left Tackle 

"Big Dick" Hohensheldt, the sheik from Harrisburg Tech! Despite his sheikish 
qualities, "Dick" turned out as a player of no mean merit. Toward the last of the 
season, Hohensheldt played a backfield position, and as he will return next year is 
nearly certain of a place on the varsity. Best O'luck, "Dick!" 



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rODHl'MTEB, Left Cklurd 



Herritt, Center 



Bechdel, Rit;ht Cuard 



TODHUNTER—Left Guard 

"Little Dick" Todhunter literally -was a tower of defense on the line. If a tank 
could have ploughed through "Toddie." it would have had a job. A fellow who was 
always alert, who did his utmost for a victory, we owe to him a lasting debt of 
gratitude. 



HERRITT— Center 

With lowered head, legs firmly braced, with clenched teeth and body tensed 
with determination, "Tom" calmly passed the pigskin to a back — and fought! Next 
season, "Tom", old boy, we shall again look to you to so capably fill your position. 



BECHDEL— Right Guard 

One of the "little fellows" on the line, "Joe" sure did his stuff, playing in every 
game, and not only playing, but doing it well ! Always in there fighting, using every 
muscle for dear old Dickinson, he was a typical stellar lineman. Much obliged, 
"Joe," to you goes the "crown of glory." 



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ScRlBNER. Right Tackle 



Emick. Rmht L:nd 



K!cKay, Quarterback 



SCRIBNER— Right Tackle 

A small lad, "Bishop" filled up his berth as efficiently as Jumbo 
the elephant could have done, and not only filled the berth — but made opposing 
linesmen think the Jumbo v/as really playing there! "Scribbie," old boy, these 
cracks but show our appreciation for your playing this year! Possessing fight, 
strength, and all-around ability, the "Bishop" is sure to make a name for himself in 
College! 



EMICK— Right End 

To "Artie" goes the honor of having caught the longest pass of the year of 
70 yards. Not only for that, but for his ability as an end, his general versatility, and 
for his smile despite difficulty, we most gratefully extend him our thanks. 



McKA Y — Quarterback 

Diminutive, yes, but nevertheless possessing an ability to carry the ball and run 
the team that other players might well desire! While encountering serious injuries 
during the year, he never faltered, but always did his best. Such determination 
and talent will get you somewhere worth while in the near future. Mack. 



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Hayes. Left Halfback 



CiRiii-i IHS, Left lacklc 



HA YES— Left Halfback—Captain-Elect 

A speedy, heavy built fellow of great ability, "Bye" soon earned the name of 
one of the best punters and backs in the state, and the title was totally deserved. 
It was with pleasure and satisfaction that the student body learned of his election 
as Captain for next year, and to this honor may we add our best wishes. 



GRIFFITHS— Left Tackle 

Breaking into the game at Harrisburg, "Heimmie" starred, and thereafter 
played a great game on the line, when Hohensheldt was changed to the backfield 
and playing in six of the seven games. "Heimmie" was a hard man to oppose, and 
by his fine work, earned a big name for himself. Let us wish him much glory at 
Bucknell. 



QD' 



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Fifty-eight 



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Tte 192,5 Basketball Season 

On January 17th the Gold and White opened its season with a decisive victory 
over the Keystone Academy, 39-16, which gave promise of being one of the best 
teams that had ever started the season for the Seminary. With Captain McKay and 
"Nye" forming a nucleus for the team, Coach Swartz was highly optimistic about the 
coming program. 

We were forced to bow, however, to the superior playing of the Bloomsburg 
quintet in the next game, and followed that with a loss at Wyoming Seminary. On 
this trip the fellows were not in the best of condition, and were up against two of 
the best teams in the state, but these facts are not directly responsible for the defeats. 

These two set backs seemed as an impetus towards a better team, and the re- 
sults of this impetus were evident when the teams won three successive victories 
over Trevorton High, Wyoming and Renovo High. The force of these three games 
was lost when two other games were dropped to Harrisburg Tech, and Bloomsburg 
Normal, on December 14th and 20th, but these losses did not break the fighting spirit 
of the team. 

The season ended on March 14th, when Harrisburg Tech emerged victorious 
over the locals after one of the hardest and most exciting games of the year, upon 
the home floor. The score was tied several times, and only a spectacular shot from 
the middle of the floor by Kitzmuller in the last minute of play saved the game from 
extra periods. 

During the entire season the Junior Varsity played good basketball, and won 
all but two of the twelve games played, and were a great help in building up the 
varsity five, who in turn won six out of twelve played. 

PERSONNEL OF BASKETBALL LETTER MEN 

McKay, Captain Forward 

Hayes Forward 

Hughes Center 

Emick Guard 

Nye Guard 

Geigle Guard 

Brown Manager 



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JUNIOR VARSITY FIVE 

Geigle Forward 

Todhunter Forward 

McCahan Center 

Griffiths Guard 

Hohensheldt Guard 



0pp. 

16 

42 

30 

19 

21 

10 

33 

24 

23 

24 

24 

32 

288 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE AND RESULTS 

Keystone Academy, Home 
Bloomsburg Normal, Away 
Wyoming Seminary, Away 
Trevorton H. S., Home 
Wyoming Seminary, Home 
Renovo H. S., Home 
Harrisburg Tech, Away 
Bloomsburg Normal, Home 
Renovo H. S., Away 
Mansfield Normal, Away 
Mansfield Normal, Home 
Harrisburg Tech, Home 



D.S. 
39 
14 
27 
39 
29 
53 
28 
21 
31 
23 
36 
30 

370 




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Prospectus of 192,5 Baseball Season 

When Coach "Carty" Swartz issued a first call for baseball men, about two 
weeks before the Easter holidays, there was a general scramble for positions, about 
thirty-five men reporting. Of these only Nye, Rothermel, Todhunter, and Hoover 
were veterans of last year's team, and form.ed the background for the 1925 team. 
Coach Swartz at once began to pick his first and second teams, from the best skilled 
of the squad, and has formed a team of which five men are new to Dickinson Sem- 
inary baseball. Of these Emick, who has already earned a name for himself as a 
hitter and fielder. Long, a lanky Southerner who is seen holding down the center 
field job in great style, Hughes of Franklin High, Kendall and Evans of Boston, 
and Griffiths, have been showing up very well as team-mates. 

Because of the inclement weather, practice has been very irregular, which fact 
has greatly hampered the progress of the nine. Montgomery High School, however, 
was the first to taste the bitter pill of defeat, at the hands of the Gold and >X^iite 
players. Kendall pitched a fair game, and, aided by the heavy hitting of Hughes, 
Nye, Emich, Todhunter, and Long, won with the score of 8-0. 

In the second game Mansfield Normal took the measure of the locals, in a game 
which was close until the 7th inning, when the Sem's infield blew up and allowed 
four runs to cross the plate, and Mansfield reversed the score of the previous Satur- 
day. (It might be added that the dance that was to be held at the Normal School 
that evening had keyed the "Ducks" up to a too great pitch of anticipation.) 

When Wyoming Seminary walloped Dickinson 15-5 it put a rather sad face 
upon the home squad, but superior playing against a rather loose infield, and a 
team that can do wonders in the hitting department, will always have a great ma- 
chine, as Wyoming certainly has. 

With Bloomsburg Normal to be met twice, Montgomery High to be encountered, 
and two or three other fast travelling clubs to be tackled, the outcome of the season 
is, indeed, doubtful. But with Coach Swartz putting special attention upon the 
pitching staff, and more work upon the batters, there is much ground for optimism 
for a big year in baseball circles. With faculty and student body codperating as it 
will, there is no doubt that Dickinson Seminary, counting all in all, will have a banner 
year. 

Varsity Lineup 

Hoover Ri<^ht Field 

Todhunter, Captain Catcher 

Rothermel Third Base 

Nye First Base 

Long Center Field 

Emick Short Stop 

Hughes Left Field 

N. Griffiths Second Base 

Kendall Pitcher 

C. H. Love Pitcher 

Evans Pitcher 

Squad 
Baird, Winegardner, Herritt, Kast, Raup, Myers, Martin, Hunt, Rich 



ia iiyiiiiiiiiflyflii(iDiifliiniiy(iiiiiiDflO(iyyi]iiii(iBii(iyGoiioD Diiiii]DiiiiyDiiiniflflal 

Sixty-three 



Q 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 




QO 



Sixty-four 



3 THE DART OF 1925 Q] 



COACH CORNWELL'S announcement of the opening of Track season was met 
with a rather large response. After a few days of setting-up exercises in the 
gym the squad reported on the track. The candidates were soon assigned the 

distances which they were best suited to have. Much attention centered around the 
relay team which, though it did not take any laurels, did make, however, a good show- 
ing at the Penn Relays. This team was made up of Griffiths, Geigle, Hanson, and 
Lloyd, with Hayes as alternate. 

A triangle meet, in which Wyoming Seminary, Bloomsburg State Normal, and 
our school competed, was held at Kingston. Here our team made a good showing, 
considering the few men that entered each event. We ended with five first places. 
McClain ran the long distance, Crago, McKay, and Sheldon, the half mile, Lloyd, 
Crist, and Hayes in the dashes, Scribner, Griffiths, and Hayes in the weight events, 
and in the jumping, Hayes and McKay featured. The high score man of the meet 
was "Bye" Hayes, who scored 16 points. 

The meets at Penn State and Dickinson College will close our season. Here the 
events will be entered in much the same way as they were at Kingston. An entirely 
different relay team from the one which set a record at Penn State last year will try 
to make even a better record this year. 

Athletic Association 

The Williamsport Dickinson Seminary Athletic Association has completed the 
second successful year of its e.xistence, being reorganized so as to hold a governing 
position in the school life. The promotion of athletics and school spirit are two of 
the organization's greatest aims. The election of team managers and the wearing 
of the school letter are governed by the association. As every student is a member 
and is admitted to all athletic contests free, the interest in the association is not just 
that of a few, but of an organization of several hundred members. We hope that, 
with the school, the Athletic Association may continue to grow in influence and be- 
come a still greater factor in the school life. 

OFFICERS 

Leonard Rothermel President 

J. Milton Crist Vice-President 

Mary Harlan Secretary 

Professor J. Milton Skeath Faculty Advisor and Treasurer 



Sixty -five 




Sixty-six 



Q 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 




%m& — = 



VARIETY 



m 



Sixty-seven 



IQJ 



Q 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 





Q 



IQ 



Sixty-eight 



[y| THE DART OF 1925 QI 



THE Class of 1925! Here's to it, and long may it live! I ask with entire 
modesty, where before has there ever been gathered together such an illus- 
trious body of high-thinking, intelligent and purely intellectual young people 
as right here in our dear Class of '25? It is astounding when we consider what a 
wealth of talent in embryo lies about us. "We have future great artists, musicians, 
doctors, lawyers, authors and ministers in our number. I have no doubt but that 
our Susan Virginia Skillington will one day be president of the United States. 

This famous class became organized in October, 1923. It was while we were 
Freshmen — before we were even organized — that Dr. Long came to take over the 
presidency of Dickinson. He has wonderfully built up the school both in spirit and 
in modernity. We feel bound to him by close ties of fellowship. It is we who have 
worked along with him during these four years and have helped him to make the 
school what it is. 'We surely wish him the best of success and hope that he will 
go right on with the improvements. 

Our class spirit has been good; our officers have been efficient and willing work- 
ers. We early displayed our unusual prowess in the competent way in which we 
defeated our bitter rivals, the Juniors, at the inter-class football game. Truly men 
that can play football as our classmen did that day, are destined to do great things! 

And then our sleigh-ride unanimously agreed to have been the "best yet." A 
few childish tricks by the Juniors such as postponing the sleighs and locking up our 
president, merely added zest to the occasion. The famous Waffle Contest was won 
by our esteemed, Mr. Faulkner, with a record of eighteen waffles. 

Our class, due to an unexpected delay in the finishing of our wonderful new 
gymnasium, will be the first class to hold its graduation exercises in the new audi- 
torium. We keenly appreciate this honor and hope to be worthy of it. Our gym- 
nasium, by the way, has helped to make our school-year worth while and delightful. 

We are nearing our great goal — graduation. As we look back over our four 
years spent within the portals of old Dickinson, we fell immensely grateful for the 
opportunities we have had and we will always have a warm spot in our hearts for 
our Alma Mater. 



laooymiiniy flaDOfliioiiyH yaoHoyDoyoyiiHiioyoo fliiiiJHiioiiyiiHoa 

Sixtv-nine 



3 THEDARTOF1925 3| 



Class Will 

WE, the Class of 1925, of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary at Fourth and 
Academy Streets, City of Williamsport, County of Lycoming, Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania, do hereby swear this to be our final Will and Testament 
made by us in a state of sound body and mind as we pass into another world. 

Being the possessors of a more than usual amount of ability and intellectual 
attainments, and an Athletic reputation unequalled by any class before, we deem 
it our bounden duty to select Dr. John W. Long to attempt the execution of our 
final wishes. 

We wish to state that we expect our Funeral Services to be conducted in a 
manner befitting the victors over the Juniors in Football. 

It is our desire to take this opportunity to thank the faculty for their fine co- 
operation during our struggles toward a better life and especially to the Dean for 
directing our steps in the path of honor. 

To the Class of 1926 we do hereby bequeath a large sum of money not less 
than fifty, not over one hundred dollars to be used in purchasing an extra supply 
of cheese for the sustaining of Prof. Owens' enormous appetite. Try and get — 
the money. 

We the Class of 1925, therefore make the following disposition of our estate, 
both real and otherwise, material and spiritual, which we have acquired during 
our residence in the state of ignorance: 

To Milton Crist, Bill Rothermel's leadership of the class. 

To "Tiny" Todhunter, Doc Harrington's massive physique. 

To "Bye" Hayes, Ben Harris' method of manipulating a new case. 

To Joe Bechdel, Abie Feldman's meekness coupled with a calm and placid atmos- 
phere. 

To Clarence Martin, "Jim" Spence's ability to make a hit with town girls. 

To McKay, "Dick" Long's and "Jim" Faulkner's "Southern line." 

To next year's Glee Club, Simms' bass and Raup's tenor. 

To Jim Elliott, Jack Westwood's noise-making powers. 

To Suzette Nichols, Pauline Moyer's nerve to embark in matrimonial seas. 

To "Granny" Nye, Guy Houck's successful career on a "mean trombone." 



Seventy 



g THE DART OF 1925 Q 



To Olive Long, George Mestre's mastery of the violin. 

To all Seminary Ducks, we leave as a Shining Beacon, the intellectual glories, 
literary talent and tendency to work of the Class of 1925, coupled with our 
incomparable method of love-making. 

To Virginia Graham, Ethel Charlton's collegiate walk. 

To Marshall, Scribbie's job as "dad" of the school. 

To "Droney" Moore, Sue Skillington's ability to monopolize any conversation. 

To George McCahan, O. R. Williams' matrimonial bliss. 

To 'Willis Willard and Peg Cornely, Scribbie's and Betty's social success. 

To Rembrant Rich, "Coony" Hughes' ability as a real sheik. 

To Prof. Carlson, Long's, Faulkner's and "Westwood's ability to eat waffles. 

To "Newt" Griffiths, his brother, James Griffiths' surplus shoes. 

To Rev. F. H. Love, Ross Lloyd's collegiate cut trousers. 

To Myrna Kelley, Martha White's love affair with Charley Brewer. 

To Bridget Allen, Irene Henry's vocal success. 

To the faculty in general, the Senior's collection of spots. 

To Mr. Artley, the position of stationary end on the football team. 

And now to our fair Alma Mater, we leave our best wishes, our best hope for 
her continual success. May she be to those who follow what she has been to us, 
a true foster mother guiding us through the paths of youth with a firm but tender 
hand. 

So, as we depart for the "Somewhat Great Unknown" let us, the Class of 1925, 

salute DICKINSON for the last time with Hail — Farewell. 

We do hereby affix our hands: 

J. R. WESTWOOD, 

G. RICHARD LONG, 

Attorneys. 



aoyy 11 HiiHiiDDinioyyy noil yypiiycyiiHiioyoo ooyooooiiDii 1)1101) a| 

Seventv-one 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q] 



Class Prophecy 



Miss Irene Henry, society reporter and myself being on the 1935 staff of "The 
Morning Mistakes" decided to look through the files of clippings for news of our 
Class of 1925 of Dickinson Seminary. The following items are the result: 

Sporting Neii's: 

Orin A. "Battling" Williams, the 'Bellefonte Flash," has retired from the heavy 
weight ring undefeated to take up the heavier duties of married life. 

"Dangerous Dan" Coney was severely pinched in a Williamsport Ice Cream Den 
in an argument over dominoes. 

Miss Mary Resh has accepted the position at Athletic Coach at "Phinish Em 
Kuick on the Hudson" girls select school. 

Senor Crago is now coaching the University of Havana Baseball Team. 

Abraham Feldman is now official manager of the Ku Klu.x Klan Football Team, 
which plays for the benefit of the Knights of Columbus. 

The outstanding backfield women of the Vassar College eleven are Beard and 
Rohr. 

Births, Weddings and Funerals: 

Miss Martha White has become the bride of Rossiter Lloyd. Mr. Lloyd, through 
his wife's persuasion has become Conference Evangelist. Note: Miss White and 
Miss Baird, Mr. Lloyd's first love were room-mates. 

Miss Muriel Teeple and Mr. Leonard Rothermel were joined in the bonds of 
matrimony last evening. The alliance has grown out of a friendship that was 
"strictly business ". 

Congressman Faulkner is busily engaged with his three secretaries, Misses 
Kober, Schlegel and Barr, in presenting a bill for "The Suppression of School 
Faculties". 

Society Neivs: 

Miss Harriet Berger is traveling in France preparing for the chair of French 
in Siwash University. 

The Countess Doolittle, formerly Miss Susan V. Skillington, gave a garden 
fete to her many friends at Doolittle Manor. Among the entertainers were Mr. 
Norman O. Scribner and Miss Elizabeth Heckman, classical dancers who gave an 
interpretative dance entitled "The Call of Spring". 

The Majestic has booked Ben Harris in his revival of the old song hit, entitled 
"Anybody Here Seen Kelly". 

Harris Huling now operates a garage where the Seminary students may keep 
their automobiles at a low rental. 



a iooiiiiHiiyoiiiitiHoyHiinHflOfliiiiyiio inioiiiniDtiiiflDtioimiiHiiyDoyflDal 

Seventy-tivo 



13 THE DART OF 1925 ,3 



Mr. Spence after graduating from the Seminary took up his residence in Wil- 
liamsport. He became a pillar in Mulberry Street Church wljere his wife is organist. 

Mr. Clarence Love is a ward boss in Waterville, Pa. 

A reading entitled "The Birdies" was given by Dicky Long, the Greenwich 
Village Poet. 

Miss Ruth Reeder, the famous lady racing driver has opened a Ford garage. 

The Thunder an' Lightning quintet now appearing at the Majestic is made up 
of Seminary graduates. Mademoiselles Camarinos and Fischler. Messieurs Simms, 
Raup and Roudabush. 

Mr. Jeff Hoover was elected Constable of Duncannon, Pa. He reports he has 
a strong scent on the trail of some bootleggers. 

Educational Notes: 

Miss Mary Harlan has accepted the presidency of Pott's Business College. 

The New Faculty of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for the year 1935 is as 
follows: 

President, Rev. James Griffiths, D. D. 

Dean, Guy Brown, B. V. D. (Mr. Brown has grown a red moustache). 

Preceptress, Miss May Corson. 

French Department, John Harrington, P. D. Q. 

Bible Department, Dr. "Bert" Leroy Hann. 

A new "Collegiate" course is being started. Miss Ethel Charlton, Instructress. 

Prof. Guy Houck, Director of Music and Instructor in Saxaphobia and Trom- 
bonia. 

Primary Department and Kindergarten, Prof. Braden Hughes, R. S. V. P. 

Miss Elizabeth Hill has accepted a position as Dean of Wilson College. 

Theatrical World: 

The famous Moyer sisters have now perfected their vaudeville sketch "The 
Bobbed Hair Bandits". 

Senor Mestre of Havana will give a Violin entertainment at the Seminary on 
Saturday Evening (attendance required). 

Mademoiselle Dot Moore is convalescing at her apartment after having the 
balcony scene totally collapse during her initial appearance as Juliet. 



afloymiiiHHaHiiDiiyHyByinKiyiioiin&yiiyyocooDyyofliioiiyoiiai 



Seventy-three 



\^ THE DART OF 1925 QI 



Ah Dickinson! Thou mighty sage, 
Whose cycle runs from age to age, 
We came to Thee both crude and bare, 
To learn of arts discreet and fair. 

You fostered that which in the shell 
Had lain asleep, — as in a spell, 
You struck the chords which to your skill. 
Resounded notes dii'ine and still. 

You have moulded us in the cast of Truth, 
Full well we have seen the value of youth, 
Oh may your gentle admonitions 
Guard us well in all' conditions. 

We leave you now — as others have done, 
For we've run the race and the laurel's won. 
But where'ere we go under the shining sun. 
We'll extol thy praises — Oh Dickinson! 



Seventy-four 



a THE DART OF 1925 Ql 

Week of Prayer 

February 9th- 15th 

IT was with the mingled feelings that most of us looked forward to the Week of 
Prayer. Those of us who had never been present at such an occasion did not know 
just what to expect, and those of former years were discreetly silent. The studious 
feared that their studies would be interrupted, the frivolous were afraid of interfer- 
ence with their good times — suspension of the social privilege, for instance. Es- 
pecially did we look forward to the appearance of Dr. William E. P. Haas who was 
to take charge. So much depended on him. We knew from what Dr. Long had 
said that he was pastor of Wharton Memorial, one of the largest Methodist Churches 
of Philadelphia, — therefore, a man of importance. Would he be like some men of 
importance who never for one moment let one forget the fact that they are im- 
portant? We waited anxiously. 

On Monday, the first day of that Week of Prayer, the hearty clapping at the 
beginning of chapel announced the fact that Dr. Haas was here. By the time chapel 
was over all our doubts and fears were allayed. He was just the man for the job. 
Besides the other splendid things he told us, we enjoyed several new jokes, and 
most important, we had learned the equation "flapper equals ( ??) Bungalow." — And 
wasn't it interesting to figure out just who were the Dickinsonian bungalows? 

Each day following, group prayer meetings were held in the rooms of the stu- 
dents and Dr. Haas talked to the student body twice a day. Each talk was as splendid 
as the one that preceded it — which is saying a lot. But especially did Dr. Haas 
reach the hearts of the student body through his interviews. In them he showed us 
that he was interested in our problems and willing to do his best to help solve them — 
and many were the problems solved during those interviews. He answered questions 
patiently, threw light on dark places and best of all, helped us to see the Christ in 
the mirror of love. Then came Thursday, the Day of Prayer, bringing that wonder- 
fully stirring sermon — or was it just a talk? Whatever its scientific or theological 
name may be does not matter. It was the thing itself that counted, and did count 
with many of us that morning. The subject was "The Race of Life" and the 
scripture was the following two verses from Hebrews: "Wherefore seeing we also 



Seventy-five 



Q 



THE 



DART 



O F 



19 2 5 



Q 



are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight 
and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that 
is set before us, looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith, who for 
the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set 
down at the right hand of the throne of God". How vividly each phrase was ex- 
plained. The race of life as run with the Christ is not a race for weaklings. No! 
It requires the real stuff — courage, training, strength, daring, grit, determination — 
to run the race successfully. Only those who come up to the mark are victors. 
Many, seeing it in this new light, decided to enter the race and run to the finish. 
Others, before the week was over, had decided to do likewise. 

Just a few minutes before closing the communion service Sunday night, Dr. 
Haas told us that, before coming, he had prayed that one hundred young people might 
decide that they were willing to let Christ do what he wished with their lives. He 
then had seventy-four such decisions. At the close of the service he stepped to 
the edge of the platform and announced that twenty-six promises had been given 
to him that night making the one hundred decisions for which he had prayed. 

Thus closed our Week of Prayer. But in the "dorms" there is a new spirit, 
scarcely tangible and yet indisputably there. It is the spirit of the Christ. May it 
ever abide within the hearts of all true Dickinsonians. 




III I i^II HOT » 1 



m 



Seventv-six 



a THE DART OF 1925 J^ 



To whom it may concern : 

He has a little sweetheart 
With deep blue eyes 
A "bob" of golden ringlets 
And a smile like summer skies 
A dainty little turned-up nose 
And teeth that shine like pearl 
And he's her darling Archibald 
And she's his social girl. 

He trots around to meet her 

He's there upon the dot 

The duty teacher glares at him 

As the' he needed spots. 

And when this fair one does arrive 

His head gets in a whirl, 

For he's her darling Archibald 

And she's his social girl. 

They saunter into chapel 
All eyes are turned their way 
Somehow he feels so foolish 
He doesn't know what to say 
And when they both are seated 
And staring straight ahead 
May the gods help poor Archibald 
And Archibald's Co-ed. 

He gets an inspiration 
And now she has one too, 
Soon they both are started 
On the usual "bill and coo", 
He talks about the Athletes 
She raves about the girls 
And Archie hands his usual line 
To her, his social girl. 

He has a letter in his pocket 
A sweetheart fair at home 
She has a batch of photographs 
That upstairs deck her room 



E nunuu nnnnuunnnnnnuunnuununnuuuum 

Seventy-seven 



i 


THE DART OF 1925 


i 


' — ' 


But ignorance is blissful 


5 


^ 


The days gone by are dead 


= 


^ 


So may the gods bless Archibald 


= 


^^ ^^ 


And Archibald's Co-ed. 


= 


] ^ 


The silence now becomes intense 


° 


^=* 


The time is growing nigh 


^ 


'^ 


When sadly they must separate 


_' ' 


' ' 


And bid a fond good-bye. 


^ 


^ 


The duty teacher breaks it up 


^ 


s 


They part with hearts of lead 


s 


^ 


We sadly weep for Archibald 


^ 


= 


And Archibald's Co-ed. 


2 


s 


Alas Poor Archibald, 


= 


2 


'Tis True! Too True! 


^ 


° 


Henry & Westivood. 


"^^ 


2 


The Seminary Coed's Lament 


= 


*^ — ' 


Old '25 is leaving, the parting has arrived; 


^ 


= 


We girls will miss our social times, 


^ 


= 


With the boys of '25. 


5 


= 


The days will not be sunny, as were the days of yore. 


1 [ 


^ 


When others hold the envied place 


° 


5 


You Seniors held before. 


S 


cz=» 


Nor will the rain dance merrily against the ivindow pane 


^ 


^ 


But the night wind o'er the campus 


= 


*=* 


Will moan and sigh with pain; 


= 


'==' 


The pain that you have caused us 


= 


2 


By leaving us so soon, 


= 


^ 


There'll be no tennis 'neath the sun, 


= 


= 


No "walks beneath the moon". 


= 


^ 


The chestnut party thrills are gone. 


' ■ 


^ 


Its happiness is lost; 


= 


^ 


No more will parties be such fun 


= 


^ 


With you to pay the cost. 


"^ 


£ 


(Paradied from an unknown author) — Jack Westivood. 


5 


i 


mnmnnnnmmuuuuuununmunmunmuu 


i 



Seventy-eight 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q 



The 

AT last my four years are over! I suppose I'll either have to study at college or 
get a job. Well anything as long as I don't come back here. I never hated a 
place so in all my life; I never learned anything and was always in wrong. The 
whole faculty had it in for me, I never got any knowledge. All I got was spots and 
campus; I haven't enough preparation to enter grammar school. 

I don't like the class anyway. Some of them think they are too good to asso- 
ciate with me; the rest are not good enough for me to bother with. This class will 
be lucky if they stay six weeks in college; 1 think they all cheated their way through 
anyhow. 

It rains all the time around this place. When it stops raining it gets windy. 
They won't let you walk on the grass in the Spring. 1 don't hang around the campus 
with this crowd so I don't care much. 

I went out for football but I got the Captain and the Coach jealous so I quit. 
Then the fool cheer leaders try to get you to yell for a crowd that gets beaten every 
game. They are only clowns anyway and like to be in the limelight. 

When I get my diploma I'll take the first train out. I wouldn't stay here for 
commencement except that I want to razz the commencement speakers. I won't 
crack a book for exams; eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die. 



The 



Optimist 



As June with its closing activities looms up before us. we suddenly feel a little 
shock when we recollect that our school days at the "Old Sem" will soon be 
ended. It causes a little feeling of sadness to sweep over us, — a feeling that 
somehow we are loath to discuss with our dearest chum. We think how, next year 
when the old bell rings, it will not ring for us, but for many new students who have 
come to take our places. 

But this little bit of pleasant sadness is tempered with the thought of new fields 
opening for the Class of '25. New experiences will come to us, new friends and 
a new understanding. It is for this separation that Dickinson has prepared us. As 
a bird reaches the age when it must leave the nest, and leaving reluctantly, it finds 
a greater, broader life, so must we leave the sheltering wall of "Old Dickinson." 
But the great world with its opportunities for work and service can never dim these 
days of youth. 

So now that Dickinson has equipped us, we depart bravely. We will not say 
"Good-bye," but "to Dickinson, a Hail and Farewell — until we meet again." 



Seventy-nine 



Q 



THE DART 



O F 



19 2 5 



Q 



Leopard Club 



SOMEONE given to coining proverbs has made the statement that "Misery loves 
company." This is quite true, we are glad to state, after a careful experiment 
entitled, "The Leopard Club. ' 
There have been many organizations formed for the sole purpose of being 
miserable in a body. A notable example might be cited in Robert Louis Stevenson's 
"Suicide Club." An uninitiated person might ask why the group should take the 
name of "leopard?" The answer comes back in these words, "Because the Leopard 
cannot change his spots." So since the law of the Medes and the Persians says 
that spots cannot be changed, then the spot bearer must be honored with the name 
of "Leopard." The membership is, indeed, exclusive, only members of the student 
body are eligible for admission. At the end of each month the spots for each brother 
are totalled. That fortunate youth who has been spotted most severly becomes, 
"Big Whiskers," but the lad who disgraces himself by collecting the least spots, or 
none at all, becomes the "Cub." 








^' -^Mk-^^MM^ 



uv 



Eighty 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q 



U 



MEMBERS of the illustrious "Leopard Club" have the distinction of being 
the only persons upon whom this special honor, "campus" is conferred. 
And "campus" is indeed a never-to-be forgotten degree of eminence. Do 
I hear rumors to the contrary? Ah, it is only the voice of the poor unfortunates 
vkfho have never acquired this special mark of distinction. Just imagine being so 
desirable that your presence cannot be dispensed with even long enough to allow 
you to run down to the "Corner Store" and then try to refute the statement. And 
speaking of the "Corner Store," well when you're on campus you'd rather have a 
hamburger at the "Corner Store" than chicken a' la king at the Waldorf Astoria. 
But for the benefit of those who are not so fortunate as we, perhaps I can best ex- 
plain "campus" by taking you back a few years into your childhood days. Remem- 
ber the afternoon the water was just right for swimming or was it a good picture at 
the Orpheum (don't tell me there isn't an Orpheum in your town) ; well anyway 
you more or less forgot to go to school that afternoon and that same evening, teacher 
called up and you stayed in for a week after? "Campus" is just a collegiate name 
for the way you spent that week. But there is another phase of "campus" which 
cannot be explained by comparison with anything in your earlier experiences be- 
cause you were less inclined to socialize then. This particular phase is effective 
on Tuesday and Friday evenings between six-thirty and seven o'clock and is by far 
the most excruciating part of the punitive process. You cannot even begin to grasp 
the full significance of the tragedy 'til you have seen Jess looking wistfully in the 
direction of chapel and Ken traversing said place with a most pathetic expression 
on his imposing physiogomy. Here is tragedy in this most heart-rending form "O 
Tempora! O Mores! That ever this should be." But I must not forget to mention 
the phase of "campus" which although it affects only the masculine inhabitants 
of this antiquated edifice must be quite as painful as the phase which affects the 
"social cases." Here again the tragedy can perhaps best be appreciated by consid- 
ering a specific example. Just try to imagine the pathos, the tragedy, the awful 
calamity if Jack were forced to give up one of his Bi-weekly calls on "Chink" or 
even worse imagine what it would mean to "Red" Crago to be deprived of one of 
his "nights out." Why, my dear, as it is he can manage to give each of his numerous 
admirers not more than three dates a semester. Now, I ask you, would that not be 
a sad state of affairs? Please, "Red," don't get on campus; it would be serious 
you know. But detrimental as campus is to our social attainments or aspirations, 
there are still those who prefer punishment to abstinence so why expostulate? But 
in parting let me say — since "discretion is the better part of valor" — use discretion. 



a iiyyiiiiHiiiyfliniDnoyfliiiiiDflflflyiioyHyiiyyyo ooyyiiiiiiiiooiiiioa 

Eighty-one 



[^ THEDARTOF 



19 2 5 



We, the class of nineteen hundred 
and twenty-five are now closing our 
sojourn as students of Dickinson. 
Tho' materially ive will be far away 
from these old walls, but may our 
spirit remain with an influence, 
which we hope, will be for the best. 

May the lessons learned in the 
class-rooms or on the campus now 
stand us in good stead. The success 
we hope to attain, may it reflect back 
upon our Alma Mater. 

As we become Alumni may we 
carry with us the watchword upon 
thy seal. Truth. May our efforts in 
life, in a small measure, reward our 
Fair Mother and make for a greater 
Dickinson. 



al 



IQ 



Eighty-two 




Eightv-three 



m 



THE DART OF 1925 



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Eighty-four 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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: 3 . - m - 



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Eighty-five 



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THE DART 



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19 2 5 



Q 




Y, M, C A. 



Y. W. C, A. 



THE work of the Y. M. C. A. for the year '24-'25 began in the early part of May, 
1924, with the installation of the new officers by Dr. Long. His helpful address 
and the encouraging words of the retiring cabinet, as they transferred the re- 
sponsibilities of the Y. M. C. A., were sources of inspiration to the new officers. The 
student body is to be congratulated for their hearty cooperation not only in being 
present at the regular night meetings, but for the considerate and the genuine spirit 
that has been prevalent throughout the school year. We also wish to express our ap- 
preciation to Dr. Long, for it has been through his kind consideration that the Y. M. 
C. A. has been able to offer a number of enjoyable entertainments during the year. 
The work of the closing week of the year '23-'24 was for the most part carried 
on in the Y. M. C. A. room in Fifth Hall. That willingness of every student to lend 
a hand made it possible for the "Y" to send two delegates to Bucknell to the Annual 
Y. M. C. A. Convention, where they not only received inspiration for the carrying 
on of the work, but helpful suggestions which made it possible to increase the num- 



m 



Eighty-six 



Q 



Q THE DART OF 1925 Q 



ber of activities of the "Y". Following close upon the convention was Campus Day 
at Dickinson which gave the "Y" cabinet a chance to display any business qualities 
which they might have. This we consider a success too, because every Sem student 
had a chance to spend all the money he had either for candy or ice cream. 

The last few weeks of that term were filled with class-work and preparation 
for commencement. On June 11, many students said good-bye to Dickinson, some 
as Alumni, others as Seniors or Juniors to be. 

At the beginning of the new year we received encouragement from the excel- 
lent group of students which came among us. The Association did all in its power 
to make the new students feel at home and to renew somewhat the spirit of Dickin- 
son in those who were returning to the school. This was aided by a reception by 
the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. in Bradley Hall at the outset of the school year. 
A little later in the Fall was held the Hallowe'en Party, which gave everyone a 
better chance to become acquainted. 

There is, however, one thing which the "Y" feels proud of for this year, and 
that is the maintaining of the Christian spirit, especially after Dr. Haas visited us 
for the week of prayer. There were held, on fifth and sixth halls, prayer meetings, 
twice a week, which were strengthening and helpful to all. The regular "Y" meet- 
ings held on Saturday night have been well attended this year, especially by the 
new students, and here we see the real value of the Y. M. C. A. Some of these 
students who have come here for the first time have been given the opportunity to 
broadcast their views on life at our regular meetings. Then again there have been 
discussions which help to broaden the participant and to make him well balanced, 
destroying any undue prejudice which he may have possessed. It is to this that 
the organization looks with pride for it is sure that the supreme purpose of the 
Y. M. C. A. is to develop character, and it feels as though this has been done at 
least in a fair measure. 

After all, this life here is but a preparation period. Our harvest shall depend 
upon our sowing. So with the sincere wish and prayer that the cabinet of '25-'26 
may have all the strength for the encounters with future problems, the retiring 
cabinet gives them the torch. May it be a light to them and all others who come 
to Dickinson ! 



BHOllllHBOilOllllDllDOlKllliflyilDfllHiyilOOOHiflHDliytig DHQHllllllOlliUlflOal 

Eightv-seven 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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Eighty-eight 



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THE DART 



O F 



19 2 5 



m 



m 



Kappa Delta Pi Fraternity 



Name. 

Norman O. Scribner (Scriby) 
Joseph W. Bechdel (Joe) 
Milton B. Crist (Milt) 
Rossiter Cliff Lloyd (Ross) 
Leonard Rotherme! (Bill) 
Richard Todhunter (Dick) 
Guy M. Houck (Guy) 
George Nye (Granny) 
James Griffiths (Hime) 
Newton Griffiths (Newt) 
Millard Hayes (Bye) 
Clarence H. Love (Lovie) 
Gilbert Mac Vaugh (Mack) 
Francis R. Geigle (Bud) 
James Spence (Jim) 
Clarence R. Winegardner (Winnie) 
Willis W. Willard (Sheik) 
E. Stewart Mitchell (Stew) 
Mitchell Hammond (Ham) 
John R. Westwood (Jack) 



Address 

Baltimore, Md. 
Blanchard, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Olyphant, Pa. 
Trevorton, Pa. 
Barnesboro, Pa. 
Dudley, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Girardville, Pa. 
Girardville, Pa. 
Wayland, N. Y. 
Waterville, Pa. 
West Philadelphia, Pa. 
Trevorton, Pa. 
Hastings, Pa. 
Robertsdale, Pa. 
Woolrich, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Olean, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Eightv-nine 




Nirtetv 



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THE DART 



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Q 



Theta Pi Pi Fraternity 



Baird, Courtney C. 
Brown, Guy E. 
Coney, Daniel R. 
Clever, Bruce R. 
Custer, C. Carl 
Elliott, James N. 
Emick, Arthur W. 
Evans, Frank V. 
Faulkner, James M. 
Glaser, Charles A. 

Harrington, John G. 
Hughes, Braden P. 
Huling, W. Harris 
Hartman, Robert G. 
Harris, Benjamin W. 
Hohensheldt, George W. 
Hill, Charles C. 
Hoover, Eugene A. 
Johnson, James T. 
Kendall, W. Harold 
Long, G. Richard 
McCahan, G. Russel 
McKay, Earl Z. 
Marshall, Frank H. 
Neal, George C. 
Poulson, Omer B. 
Fletcher, George W. 
Rich, Rembrandt R. 
Rothrock, Lee E. 
Snyder, William T. 
Whitaker, Vernon P. 



/I 



140 Park St., Avis, Pa. 
P. O. 812, Alexandria, Pa. 
446 E. Church St., Williamsport, Pa. 
Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 
240 Levergood St., Johnstown, Pa. 
925 N. Fulton St., Baltimore, Md. 
114 Bennett St., Williamsport, Pa. 
12 Church St., Westboro, Mass. 
748 State St., Delmar, Del. 
■^ Monument Ave., E. of Belmont, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
79 N. Church St., Hazleton, Pa. 
P. O. 59, Franklin, Pa. 
1748 Memorial Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 
529 Main St., Williamsport, Pa. 
Montoursville Road, Williamsport, Pa. 
630 Muench St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
825 Diamond St., Williamsport, Pa. 
P. O. 247, Duncannon, Pa. 
1840 Chatham St., Racine, Wise. 
216 Gale St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
200 Chestnut St., Delmar, Del. 
2133 N. 4th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
646 Camp St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
313 Summit! St., Norristown, Pa. 
999 Jefferson Ave., Akron, Ohio. 
307 58th St., Altoona, Pa. 
210 N. 2nd St., Clearfield, Pa. 
437 Main St., Woolrich, Pa. 
P. O. 184, Benezett, Pa. 
1167 Isabella St., Williamsport, Pa. 
418 Lancaster Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 



Qi 



IQ 



Ninety-one 



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THE DART OF 1925 



m 




m 



IQ 



Ninetv-two 



13 THE DART OF 1925 ^Q 



Tte Angel Factory 

EGYPT has its Pyramid of Kufu, China has its Wall, Babylon had its Hanging 
Gardens, Greece had its Jupiter Olympus, its Tomb of Mausolus, its Temple of 
Diana, Rhodes had its Brass Colossus, the Pharaohs had their Lighthouse, and 
in this present day and age Dickinson Seminary has its Angel Factory. It is with- 
standing the assaults of time; it is solidly set as a monument to the brave and true, 
for within its remote walls there are those who live and abide by their honor alone. 
Time has brought forth many names for this world-renowned rendezvous. Some 
call it the Celestial Domicile or the Heavenly Abode, and we feel sure that if Milton 
had resided here he would never have written Paradise Lost, and further we feel 
that the reason for his Paradise Regained was that he had a dream of this our Elysian 
Hut, which then required the ceaseless sands of time to bring it to its full fruition. 
Of course this place is not really Heaven, but then it is the closest thing to it in 
Dickinson Seminary. 

Life is joyous in the Angel Factory; every man knows what is required, he 
knows the limits to which he can go, he appreciates the trust and faith in which 
he is held, and it is a pleasure to say that he justifies the faith that is placed in 
him. Legion is the name of those who have dwelt here, and scattered today over 
many parts of the globe can be found those who look back with deep and true af- 
fection to the place wherein they possibly met their first challenge to maintain 
honor. Many of those who have gone out were denied the pleasures which the 
Angels of this year have enjoyed. Along with Prof. Cornwell's little son (who 
holds out every promise of being a perfect cheer leader) we have had duets, quar- 
tets, and sextets; also feeds which at the very sight cause the mouth to water and 
the esophagus to dilate. It is because of these many pleasures and get-togethers 
that we love the Old Haunt. May she stand forever and aye, and may Time not 
mark her as one of the forgotten wonders of the world! 



lioiiyriittHy yDiiDyiiyy siiDiioQyDoyi iiiyoyiiiniDiionQiniiiyiiDyfltia 

Ninety-three \ 



a 



THE DART OF 1925 



m 




Q 



Ninety-four 



a THEDARTOF1925 Q] 



Tripartite Literary Society 

HIDDEN away in the realms of Bradley Hall is a cozy room where almost 
every Saturday night a jolly crowd of girls gather for the usual Literary 
Meeting. 

For many years the word Tripartite has had a meaning in the heart of every 
girl in the Seminary. 

The real purpose of this organization is to develop every literary talent that 
is found, also encouraging talent along other lines. 

The programs are composed of book reviews, readings and musical numbers. 
Every minute of the allotted time is passed very pleasantly. Many times, when 
the programs are finished, the remainder of the evening is spent in charades or 
other games. 

There is no better way in which girls can know girls than in organizations 
like this, and Tripartite Literary Society without a doubt, has influenced every 
one of its members along the lines of truer and deeper friendship and the better 
things in Life. 



la floyyyy iiDOiiflycyyiiiiifliKiyiioQn iiyiioyDyooooioyoiioDDfliioQa 

Ninety-five 



Q 



THE DART OF 1925 



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Ninetv-six 



[^ THE DART OF 1925 Q 



es Lettres Literary Society 

THE history of Belle Lettres has been too long and honorable for us to attempt 
to set down its achievements. We would rather tell how the society functions 
as a Literary unit. 
At the beginning of each year the members go after the new students. Open 
meetings are held so it is possible for the new friends to catch the ideas and spirit 
of the society. The members of the faculty are divided among the three societies 
and we can truly say that the faculty cooperation that we receive is one of the 
greatest helps toward maintaining a strong and interesting program throughout the 
year. The interest of the faculty in student organization is a source of inspirations 
to the students. 

The program is planned a week ahead. No student is forced to take part, 
but it is to his advantage to train himself to stand on his feet and talk. The Belle 
Lettres makes for a well rounded life. There are many activities throughout the 
school year that rightfully claim the interest of the wide-awake student. But as 
a member of the Belle Lettres, providing you cooperate with the organization, you 
will receive something that no other phase of school life can possibly give you. 

In the year which has past our new gymnasium has been finished. Among 
its countless advantages and equipment we find the Literary Society rooms. The 
room occupied by the Belle Lettres Union Society is one of the best in the building. 
The Society library is there, and all that is needed for a thriving society is at hand. 
Students! It is up to you. Old Belle Lettres with her long and honorable history 
waits for you in the coming year to carry on. 



Ninety-seven 



a 



THE DART OF 1925 



11 




Q 



Ninety-eight 



g THE DART 0~F 1925 QJ 



Gamma Epsilon Literary Society 

To the members of the Class of 1925, publishers of the annual in which this 
editorial appears. Gamma Epsilon Literary Society; First would extend her 
most sincere congratulations, and best wishes for future success and prosperity. 

Of the number of her own that she now gives to the world, of the graduating 
class, she is justly proud to have numbered them as her members. The record of their 
success here at Dickinson Seminary is an assurance, that "wherever in life's broad 
field of battle, in the bivouac of life they will not be like dumb driven cattle, but 
heroes in the strife," and we believe that they will reflect honor and glory to the 
Literary Society. 

They bid farewell to their society, and to their Alma Mater with a keen sense 
of lasting gratitude and indebtedness, not only for the pleasant associations and 
friendships, but also for the self development in being equipped to wrestle with the 
problems of life. 

In the last year the Literary Societies have suffered some from lack of interest. 
Other activities which have taken place at the time specified for the meeting of the 
Societies, has done much to dampen the interest shown toward them. It is gratify- 
ing to say, however, that quite a number of former members of the society have 
paid us visits during the last year, and have given us courage to fight on, among 
them being Dr. Gray. 

With the installation of the new officers we look forward to a better and greater 
year for 1926, when the Gamma Epsilon will come into her own once more. 



laoiiyiiiiyH yDDHOoyHiiyyoflyy yflyiioflDDfloo iioyflOflflyyiiDfloa 

Ninety-nine 




One Hundred 



3 THE DART OF 1925 Q] 



The Choral Club 

GREAT was the dismay when the rising young artists of Dickinson Seminary 
discovered that the august body, known as the faculty had decided that, for 
the advancement of music, there would be separate musical clubs for the 
masculine and feminine sections of our esteemed student body. Especially dis- 
mayed were those prima donnas who had advised their friends to join because of 
the main attraction — boys. 

Regardless of this damper placed on their enthusiasm, a goodly number appear- 
ed in Mrs. Chapin's (better known as Miss Dodd) studio Saturday morning for the 
initiation into the mysteries of Choral Club work. 

Looking back we conclude that boys are very unnecessary things when it comes 
to making Choral Club a pleasure and a success. Just picture again the number of 
occasions on which we displayed our various talents to our fellow students who were 
not so wonderfully endowed by nature. 

First comes Sunday Evening vespers. What would they be without the aid of 
Mrs. Chapin and the Choral Club? 

Then comes our first public appearance, when a splendid Christmas program 
was rendered in the new gymnasium. 

Last, but far from least, on that memorable occasion when Dr. Haas completed 
his work here by preaching in Mulberry Methodist Church, none other than our 
choral club occupied the choir loft. 

Too much cannot be said concerning Mrs. Emily Dodd Chapin, our delightful 
instructor. It is to her we owe the success and good times that we have enjoyed 
in the choral club. In spite of being separated from her newly acquired and dearly 
beloved husband she has borne cheerfully and even gaily the many trials and tribu- 
lations heaped upon her by the Dickinsonian future prima donnas. 

Every Choral Club girl is sorry to see her leave but we feel certain that she 
will make friends wherever she goes. Good luck, Mrs. Chapin. 

At the departure of Mrs. Chapin, Prof. Owens took up her good work. He 
proved to be an excellent substitute and the girls are very grateful to him for his 
interest in their club. 



m 



One Hundred One 




One Hundred Two 



g THE DART OF 1925 (^ 



THE orchestra played a very important part in the school life at Dickinson 
during the recent school days. It has been said by several old Dickinsonians 
that it is the best orchestra that has ever been organized at Dickinson. We 
will admit that it is an orchestra to be proud of, and it might be well to say a few 
things regarding their able leader. 

The orchestra is directed by Professor Owen, supervisor of the violin depart- 
ment. Professor Owen, a hale and hearty Englishman, came to the Seminary direct 
from Europe where he was studying under some famous artists. This is the second 
year in which he has had charge of the orchestra, and his ability as a leader is proved 
by the success it has made. 

The orchestra is composed of both boarding and town students. All of the 
violinists are from the violin department. It is due to the persistent effort with 
Professor Owen that the Seminary has such a fine orchestra. It has played for ban- 
quets, dinners, socials, and most social affairs of the school. Then they proved 
themselves generous enough to play for different activities in the town and on one 
occasion went out of town. While coming back from this trip which was giving 
a musicale in Elimsport, one of the cars ran against a telephone pole and upset. 
We are mighty lucky to have the orchestra with us today because the car was badly 
damaged, but outside of a few scratches all of the occupants were safe. 

After all, the orchestra has had a very successful year, and now for their hard 
work it is being rumored that they are going to have a picnic. It is hoped that we 
shall have a fine time. 

Director 

Professor Frank A. Owen 

First Violinists 

Prudence Dieffenbocher, Virginia Ross, Ethel Stinson, Jorge C. Mestre 

Second Violinists 

Frances Knights, Margaret Cornelly, Olive Long 

Cornets 
Albert Wilber, Luther Roudabush 

Trombone 
Guy M. Houck 

Piano 
Irene Henry 



One Hundred Three 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q] 



THE swimming pool in the New Gymnasium was built at a cost of $12,000. 
It is 20x60 feet and is graded from a depth of four feet at one end to eight feet 
at the other. A spring-board and all other modern accessories add to the ap- 
peal of a dip. 

The girls take possession of the pool on Tuesdays and Thursdays, while the 
boys use it on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. Several nights during the week 
are granted to the Y. W. C. A. of Williamsport. It attracts the attention and favor- 
able comment of visitors. To the various teams that engage in sports on Sem's 
home grounds, the pool is a magnet. Once his boys are in, a visiting coach has a 
difficult time in prying them out. 

During the winter months the pool is used more than at any other time. Quite 
a few of the fellows have found the water, while not as hard as cement, hard enough 
to sting a bare-back in their endeavors to follow Crist and "Newt" in some of their 
flips and twists. To Norman O. Scribner, the biggest man in the Seminary, goes 
the honor of taking the initial plunge. And Oh, Boy! what a splash. "Cardy," like 
everyone else, learns by experience. He knows now that "Tod," "Abie" and Annibal 
are too much for one pool. While I don't have the exact cost of the experience, I 
think it was the price of about five thousand gallons of water that went down the 
overflow. I might add that Baird was home at the time or the lesson might have 
been more expensive. Foresight on the part of Dr. Long prevented what might 
have been a sad accident. In ordering the strainers for the filtering outlets, he was 
far sighted enough to see the possibility of some one being drawn into the filtering 
machinery; consequently he ordered them with a fine hole. And sure enough his 
wisdom was justified, when Tallman was found, wedged to his armpits, in one of 
the strainers. 

The Seminary girls are also proving themselves to be true "ducks." Although 
no champions have been developed as yet, there are rumors floating around that 
"Rinky" is quite a fancy diver. 

No inter-class aquatic competitions were held because of the already filled 
schedule in both the social and the athletic life of the past school year. But in 
1925-26 there should be inaugurated a keen class rivalry in water sports. 

Without a doubt the pool was enjoyed by all, both teachers and students. May 
the "old swimming hole" be as attractive in the years to come as it was in '24-'25. 



One Hundred Four 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q| 



The Bo^vling Alleys 

UPON our return from Christmas vacation we were delighted to find that the 
bowling alleys had been installed and were ready to use. Soon every one 
was manifesting great zeal in the pursuit of this sport and the members of 
the interclass teams were endeavoring to acquire such skill as would enable them 
to vie successfully with their opponents. 

The teams were divided into three classes, the Seniors, the Juniors, and the 
Sophomores and Freshmen. Each team was displaying marked skill though the 
probable outlook seemed to favor the Seniors. But this outlook, though probable, 
began to be despaired of as quite impossible, for the Seniors seemed to have cultivat- 
ed such a love for the beautiful and classical that they allowed nothing to interfere 
in their pursuit of it. The Juniors, quick to observe this characteristic of the Sen- 
iors, took advantage of it by having most of the games scheduled for Wednesday 
afternoons, at which time the Seniors were intently occupied in their search for the 
more refined and nobler art at the Majectic Theatre. Needless to say the Juniors 
won and the Seniors brought up the rear. 

Bowling afforded ample means of indoor recreation and the necessary physical 
exercise during the inclement winter months. Consequently the bowling alleys 
were used extensively by the students between the Christmas and the Easter holi- 
days. Evidence of this is the fact that between thirty-seven and thirty-eight hun- 
dred games were played, in the participation of which some obtained remarkable 
skill — the following being worthy of honorable mention: 

Name Score 

Robert Hunt 226 

Millard Hayes 214 

James Spence 211 

John Hanson 211 

James Johnson 206 

In summing up the achievement made in bowling and the value it has been to 
each individual, it is justly placed among those assets which are of high standing. 
No other sport has called forth so many participants or formed a more delightful 
and healthful pastime for the students of our school. 



a ymmiiOflyiiooiifloiiysGsyDinKifliiyoHByyyyiioiiDaiiiiyiioflDiiyDa 



One Hundred Five 



Q 



THE 



DART 



O F 



19 2 5 



Q 




OH Faithful 



OUT in Yellowstone National Park there is to be found a geyser called "Old 
Faithful." But Yellowstone is not the only place that can boast of such a pos- 
session. Dickinson Seminary has an "Old Faithful" in the life and personage 
of its caretaker, Mr. William Cross. If he has a cross he bears it with a smile, for 
one would never be led to believe that his name was a revelation of his true char- 
acter. He is always on the job with a ready smile and a twinkle in his eye. 

Through many years of service Mr. Cross has become devoted to the Seminary, 
during which time he has mastered all trades which in any way have a bearing upon 
the lives of the students. No snow is too deep for him to make a path through; no 
task too large for him to do; no day so dreary as to dull his senses. Because of 
all this we wish to include a remembrance of him in this, our Dart. 



Q 



One Hundred Six 



Q 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 



n^ 


T^^M. ^ 


^^ 


DRAMATICS 



Q 



O/ie Hundred Seven 



a 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 




y 



One Hundred Eight 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q 



Dramatic Class 

THE Dramatic Class meets every Thursday evening to study the fundamental 
principles of dramatic art and to acquire poise and ease in public speaking. The 
teacher of the class is Mrs. Elizabeth Reed Mann, who is also head of our Ex- 
pression Department. In the beginning of the school year, stage directions were 
studied and many interesting pantomines were given. When a play was chosen and 
the various characters were selected, the real culmination of the hopes and aspira- 
tions of the class were realized. The play chosen for presentation was "Miss Some- 
body Else," a comedy in four acts by Marion Short. It was the first play to be pre- 
sented in our new gymnasium auditorium. 

"Miss Somebody Else" was presented to a large and appreciative audience on 
the 28th of March. Constance Darcy, tired of being rich, submerges her identity 
into that of an Irish maid and also helps some poor friends of hers to prosperity by 
her clever schemes. Constance, or Nora, as she is now called, likewise succeeds 
in apprehending a gentleman crook who had stolen funds belonging to her father. 
The play was full of humorous incidents, witty dialogues and dramatic incidents. 
It was well presented by an able cast under the e.xcellent direction of Mrs. Mann. 

Cast of characters : 

Constance Darcy 5. Virginia Skillington 

Celeste, a Maid in the employ of Constance . .Margaret Comely 

Anne Delavan Elizabeth Heckman 

Mildred Delavan Jesse Mae Cecil 

Mrs. Blainwood Lotta Baird 

Fay Blainwood Olive Long 

Alice Stanley Dorothy Moore 

Freda Mason Ethel Charlton 

Mrs. Herrick Martha White 

Susan Ruggs, Mrs. Delavan's maid-servant . . . .Mildred McCahan 

Cruger Blainwood George McCahan 

Ralph Hastings Francis Geigle 

John, Chauffeur to Constance Ross Lloyd 

Jasper Delavan Gilbert MacVaugh 

Sylvester Crane Charles Glazer 

Bert Shaffer Vernon Whitaker 

The Scenes 
Act I. A small tea-room in the Tuxedo Brook Club House. A day in June. 
Acts II, II, IV. The same scene, a few weeks later. 

Specialties 

A Minuet Mary Hill 

Japanese Fan Drill Elizabeth Hill 

The Dramatic Class was also represented on the night of the Forensic Oratorical 
Contest, May 23, 1925, when Miss Kathleen Clarkson, Miss Margaret Comely, and 
Mr. Milton B. Crist, presented a very clever sketch. 

Martha White. 



aflflfliiHBytiyofliiDoiiyiyiiyiiHyyyiiyiiiioiKiyoiioiiyyyyoflcfloal 



One Hundred Nine 



3 T H E D ART OF 1925 Q 



Calendar, 192,4=2.5 



1924 

Monday, September 15 Registration of Day Students 

Tuesday, September 16 Registration of Boarding Students 

Wednesday, September 17 Classes Begin 

Friday, September 19 Reception by Christian Associations 

Sunday, September 21 Alatriculation Sermon 

Friday, November 14 Faculty Musical Recital 

Friday, October 31 Reception by President and Faculty 

Thursday, November 21 Thanksgiving Day 

Friday, December 19, 10:30 A.M Christmas Recess Begins 

1925 

Monday, January 5, 7 :00 P.M Christmas Recess Ends 

Tuesday, January 6 Classes Resume 

Thursday, January 29 First Semester Examinations Begin 

Friday, January 30 First Semester Closes 

Saturday, January 31 Second Semester Begins 

Thursday, February 12 Day of Prayer for Colleges 

Friday, April 3, 10 :30 A.M Easter Recess Begins 

Monday, April 13, 7 :00 P.M Easter Recess Ends 

Tuesday, April 14, 8:00 A.M Classes Resume 

Thursday, May 28 Senior Examinations Begin 

Friday, June 5 President's Reception to the Senior Class 

Wednesday, June 10 Final Examinations Begin 

Friday, June 12 Senior Musicale 

Saturday, June 13 Art Exhibition, Senior Class Play 

Sunday, June 14 Baccalaureate Sermon, Campus Service 

Monday, June 15 — Junior Class Day, Meeting of Directors, Alumni Meeting, Re- 
union of Classes, Senior Reception. 

Tuesday, June 16 Senior Class Day, Alumni Banquet 

Wednesday, June 17 Commencement 



One Hundred Ten 



g THE DART OF 1925 (fil 



Board of Directors 

Hon. M. B. Rich President 

Mr. Charles E. Bennett Vice-President 

Mr. J. Henry Smith Secretary 

Dr. John K. Rishel Treasurer 

Term Expires 1925 

Mr. Charles E. Bennett Montoursville, Pa. 

Mr. Walter C. Winter Lock Haven, Pa. 

Hon. Henry W. Shoemaker McElhattan, Pa. 

Dr. Guy R. Anderson Barnesboro, Pa. 

Mr. Elmore B. Jeffery Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. Edwin A. Pyles Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Clarence L. Peaslee Williamsport, Pa. 

Mr. Charles F. Sheffer Watsontown, Pa. 

Term Expires 1926 

Bishop Wm. F. McDowell Washington, D. C. 

Mr. W. W. E. Shannon Saxton, Pa. 

Mr. George W. Sykes Conifer, N. Y. 

Rev. Simpson B. Evans Newberry, Pa. 

Mr. J. Walton Bowman Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. J. E. A. Bucks Sunbury, Pa. 

Mr. J. H. B. Reese WiUiamsport, Pa. 

Mr. Henry D. Brown Williamsport, Pa. 

Term Expires 1927 

Herbert T. Ames, Esq Williamsport, Pa. 

Dr. William E. Glosser Williamsport. Pa. 

Hon. Max. L. Mitchell Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. Oliver S. Metzler Danville, Pa. 

Hon. M. B. Rich Woolrich, Pa. 

Dr. John K. Rishel Williamsport, Pa. 

Mr. J. Henry Smith Williamsport, Pa. 

Mr. H. B. Powell Clearfield, Pa. 

Mr. James B. Graham Williamsport, Pa. 

Mr. B. A. Harris Montoursville, Pa. 



aDflflyiiiiHH y Oil 00 11110 H Hyyoyyoo floyiiyiiyooooHDHiKnioyoDai 

One Hundred Eleven 



3 THEDARTOF1925 ~ Q] 



Jokes 

Charley Brewer — "I've heard that kisses are the language of love. 
Martha White— "Don't be dumb!" 



Jim Griffiths — "The church is run by a lot of old hens." 

"I suppose you are refering to the Lay members," the minister replied quietly. 



Miss Walker (showing pictures in French class) — "Now on these French 
Cathedrals you can see the 'Gargoyles'. " 

Hughes (suddenly awaking) — "Oh! Zonite." 



Prof. Carlson — "In a moment of madness I tried to kiss her, will she ever for- 
give me?" 

Prof. Sterling-"She will if you succeeded, but never if you didn't." 



Father — "My son, what do you expect to be when you get out of college?" 
Hoover — "An old man, father." 



Senior Advisor — "Always love your teacher." 

Dick Hohensheldt — "I tried that once, but she got mad. 



WANTED — A steady respectable young man to look after a garden and care 
for a cow, who has a good voice and is accustomed to singing in the choir. 



Dean — "Draw a comparison between suspense and suspenders." 
Jim Faulkner — "They both hold something." 



Newt Griffiths — "That snappy fellow you just danced with is in my class." 
Dot Jones — "You flatter yourself." 



She — "I see in the paper that three people were killed in a feud." 
He — "Those little cheap cars are awfully dangerous." 



Miss Roney — ""Are you fond of tea?" 

Jim Elliott — '"Yes, but I like the next letter much more." 



Hayes — "Say, Chum, may I borrow your coat again?' 
Baird — '"Sure, why all the formality?" 
Hayes — "Because I can't find it." 



la yyyyoBiiDflinifliicyyyDiifliiyDoooflyiiynBiiyiiooayiiiiiioiiDoyfla 



One Hundred Twelve 



[flj THE DART OF 1925 3 



Jok^ 



Peg Sterner (in music store)— "Have you Kissed Me in The Moonlight'?" 
Clerk "Nope, I'm never here, may be it was the fellow at the next counter." 



Miss Van Dyke— "Myrma, why did you let that young officer kiss you?' 
Miss Kelly — "Well, it's against the law to resist an officer." 



Prof. Green — "Name the greatest advantage of Roman civilization." 
Scribner— "The toga, it never got baggy at the knees." 



Breathes there a man with soul so dead 
Who ne'er to himself hath said: 
"I hope my teacher's sick in bed?" 
(Apologies to Scott) 



Rinky Henry — "Stop looking in that glass or people will think you're con- 
ceited." 

Frances Bubb— "Oh, no, really 1 don't think I'm half as pretty as I really am." 



Kendall— "If you're in doubt about kissing a girl, what do you do?" 
Elliot — "Give her the benefit of the doubt." 



Chink Young (over 'phone) — "Can't you come out tonight?" 
Jack — "Why-er-I have an exam tomorrow." 

Chink— "You see father stayed at the club, mother is at a bridge party and 
brother — " 

Jack — "I'll drop the course and see you in ten minutes." 



Jack Westwood — "1 put my whole mind into that poem. 
VanNote — "It must be blank verse." 



Prof. Green — "Miss Skillington, use 'nocturnal' in a sentence." 
S. 'V. S. — "The nocturnal illuminators were suddenly extinguished. 



Mrs. Mann — "Everything is ready, run up the curtain, Mr. Lloyd." 
Ross Lloyd— "What do you think I am, a squirrel?" 



One Hundred Thirteen 



3 THE DART OF 1925 g] 



One Hundred Fourteen 



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[a 



THE DART OF 1925 



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One Hundred Fifteen 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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One Hundred Sixteen 



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THE DART OF 1925 



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^ 



i 



I IllHI ■■ ■llUll^i^^ 






Patronize Our 
Advertisers 



They have made 
this hook possible 



Q 



IQ 



One Hundred Seventeen 



3^ THE DART OF 19 25 ~ Q] 



Williamsport Dickinson Seminary 

Prepares Young Men and Women 
for College and for Life 

Graduates in the College Preparatory Course admitted to practically all colleges 
by certificate without examination. 

Strong Commercial Department 

Excellent Music Department 
Piano Voice Violin Related Subjects 

Art Department 

Fine Arts Normal Art Commercial Art 

Interior Decoration Costume Design 

Expression 

Taught in Classes or Pri\atel\' to lnJi\iduals. 

Domestic Science and Kindergarten 

Lixcellent Instruction 

Athletics Receive Careful Attention 

Modern Gymnasiums Large Athletic Field Tennis Courts 

Swimming Pool. Coach for Boys 

Thorough Scholarship Home-like Atmosphere Enjoyable Social Life 

Strong Faculty Reasonable Rates 

High Ideals and Standards 

For Catalogue Apply 

PRESIDENT JOHN W. LONG, D. D. 

Williamsport, Pa. 

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One Hundred Eighteen 



Q THEDARTOF1925 Q 



Dining Room 
Furniture 



Montour Furniture Company 

Manufacturers of 

COMPLETE DINING ROOM 
AND LIBRARY SUITES 

Montoursville, Pa. 



One Hundred Nineteen 



m 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 



We Specialize on 

Young Men's Suits 



With Two Pairs of Pants 

At 
$19.75, $24.75, and $29.75 

C^^^^5 Two-Pants 

oiern s suit shop 



9 EAST MARKET STREET 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 




When Quality Flowers are De- 
sired for Occasions Call 396 

EVENDEN BROTHERS CO. 

Market Square 1 East Third St. 



Quality the best and prices 
lowest at 

The Corner Store 

Ralph S. Boush, Prop. 



Fountain Products, 

Confections and Ice Cream 

Sandwiches 

A Full Line of Sandwich Goods 

loi East Fourth Street 



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One Hundred Twenty 



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THE DART 



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19 2 5 



Q 



DICKINSON COLLEGE 



Dickinson Seminary 

Always Closely Related 



Dickinson Seminary was founded by Rev. B. H. Crever of the college class of 
1840, and the following Dickinsonians were Presidents of the Seminary : Bishop 
Thomas Bowman, 1837; J. H. Dashiell, 1840; W. L. Spottswood, 1841; Bishop 
W. P. Eveland, 1892.; and John W. Long, 1907; all, perhaps, but three. The Dick- 
insonians who have taught in the Seminary are too numerous to name, Professors 
Green, Cornwell, Skeath and VanDyke being the present representatives. 

Many Seminary graduates have gone to Dickinson for their college course, and 
many of them are now in the College. 

The College Sends This Greeting to the "Good Old Sem" 



Neyhart 
Hardware Co, 

147-151 West Third St. 
Williamsport, Pa. 



Suah't)' and. Service 
First 



Also 

Winner Bros. 

837 Arch Street 
Newberry, Pa. 



West Branch Shoe 
Repair Building Co. 

A Graduated Practipedic 
at Your Service 

THIS SIGN 



^^^% 



i SHOE RE^'AIRING 



\ 



YOUR 



BEACON LIGHT 



We carry a full line of Dr. SchoU's 
Foot Appliances 



yc 



One Hundred Twenty-one 



a 



a THE DART OF 1925 Q 

RISHEL 

"^ sy 5aies 



Attractive Designs Popular Prices 



DINING AND BED ROOM SUITE5 

COMPLETE OFFICE SUITES 

ODD DINING TABLES 

DESKS 



We Make All Own Chairs and Dining Tables 



J. K. RISHEL FURNITURE COMPANY 

'illiamsport, Pennsylvania 



PERMANENT SHOW ROOMS 

NEW YORK SHOWROOMS PHILADELPHIA SHOWROOMS 

Madison Ave., Cor. 38th St. 1017 Filbert Street 

One Block East of Fifth Ave. Near Tenth and Market Streets 

Telephone Caledonia 8979 Telephone Walnut 2876 

Q iKi oiniiniDiimiDDiiflonyHBiiiiDiiflflyDoiinoyyflDoyoiiiioaiiDooiniiioiiH Dai 

One Hundred Twenty -two 



fa 



THE 



DART OF 



19 2 5 



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BUCKNLLL UNIVERSITY 

E.MORY W. HUNT. D. D., LL. D.. President 

THL COLLLGL 
Awards the degree of B. A. on the basis of four years of undergraduate 

Awards the degree of B. 5. in Biology. Home Lconomics, Chemical 
Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, or Mechanical Engi- 
neering on the basis of four years of undergraduate work. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Offers courses in Piano. Pipe Organ, Violin, Voice Culture, and Art of 
Singing. Wind Instruments, History of Music, Public School Music, Harmony. 
Composition, Theory, Vergil Clavier. 

COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Awards the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education to high schpol 
graduates on the basis of four years of undergraduate work, and to high 
school and Normal school graduates with approved standing on the basis ot 

two years work. . e • c i • r- 

Regular college work offered in Summer Session, Extension Courses 

and Saturday Classes. u -ii i,, 

Bucknell University aims to develop men and women who will apply 
true Christian ideals in every department of human endeavor. 

For Information and Catalogue Address 

THE REGISTRAR 

Bucknell University Lewisburg, Pa. 



"Say It with flowers" 

W. G. McGinnis 

Florist 



CutFlowers, Wedding Bouquets, Funeral 
Sprays, Designs and Potted Plants 



50,000 Square Feet of Glass Devoted to 
Growing Choice Flowers 



Greenhouses: 813 Main Street 

Two Stores: 
2.40 Market St. and 1969 West Fourth St. 

WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



Harder Sporting 
Goods Co. 

W. HERBERT POFF, Prop. 

Athletic Goods 

Fishing Tackle 
Guns and Ammunition 

Toys and Games 



Everything in Leather Goods, 
Trunks, Suitcases, Etc. 



336 PINE ST. 



W ILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



m 



One Hundred Twenty-three 



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Q 


THE DART OF 1925 


Q 


5 


The Recognition of Printing as an Art 


5 


5 


yy SIGNAL academic recognition of print- 
~_^l ing as an art was the conferring of the de- 


5 


= 


gree of Master of Arts on Theodore Low 


^ 


H 


DeVinne by Harvard University. 


^ 


= 


5 While we produce printing in all its many 


= 


'=■_ 


forms and styles, we take special pleasure in 


— 


^^ 


commissions which give us an opportunity 


^ 


° 


to strive to be faithful to the traditions of 


^ 


= 


our art, as exemplified by Gutenberg, Cax- 


^ 


= 


ton and in our own land by the great Frank- 


= 


= 


lin and DeVinne. 


i 


5 


It is, therefore, with true pride 


= 


= 


that we make our imprint on 


^ 


2 


The Dart -ig2^ 


^ 


5 


Booklets ^f 


= 


= 


Catalogues "SF 


^^ 


■= 


College Publications \ 


= 


= 


Direct Mail Service 


^ 




= 


«= 


WILLIAMSPORT PRINTING & BINDING CO. 


5 


^ 


INCORPORATED 


= 


S 


WiLLIAMSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA 


1 


Q 


oomioiiDODiiyoiiooyoHiiioooooyoooioiiQODODoyDDOoooyooyDDiioo 


il 



One Hundred Twenty-four 



3 THE DART OF 1925 QJ 

WATCHES DIAMONDS JEWELRY 

Howard A. Bubb 
JEWELER 

40 West Fourth Street Williamsport, Pa. 

EXPERT WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING 



The Seminary \ ^40 wEsf^^M^i^i^ Opposite 

tiudio 



Photographer 




FOUifTH Wj\ i 1. New Y. M. C. A. 

STIfEET 



SIX EIGHT 



ONLY PACKARD CAN BUILD 
A PACKARD 

PARK MOTOR CAR COMPANY 
500 Campbell Street Williamsport, Pa. 



m 



One Hundred Twenty-five 



a 



THE DART OF 1925 



Q 




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One Hundred Twenty-six 



Hist. 

LD 

3131 

.L9 

A3 

1925 



[U6273] 
The Daxt. 

DOES HOT GIRCBIHE 

[U6273]