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Full text of "Davidson College Catalog"

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CATALOG FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2007-2008 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 






http://www.archive.org/details/davidsoncollegec20072008 



CATALOG OF 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE 

ACADEMIC YEAR 2007-2008 

OFFICIAL RECORD 
FOR THE YEAR 2006-2007 



DAVIDSON 

Published by Davidson College 
Edited by the Office of Academic Affairs 



Academic Calendar 



2007-2008 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



Fall Semester 2007 

August 23-26 
August 27 
September 3—7 
October 13-16 
October 26 
October 26-28 
November 21—25 
December 12 

December 13 

December 14 (8:40am) - 
December 20 (12:15pm) 



Orientation 

Classes Begin 

Late drop/ add (with $20 fee) — in Registrar's Office only 

Fall Break (classes resume October 17) 

Last day to declare Pass/ Fail grading choice 

Family Weekend 

Thanksgiving Break (classes resume November 26) 

Fall Semester Classes End 

(December 10—12, classes at professor's option) 

Reading Day 

Examination Period (no exams Sunday) 



Spring Semester 2008 

January 14 
January 21 
January 21—25 
March 1-9 
March 21 
March 22-25 
May 7 

May 8 

May 9 (8:40am) - May 14 (12:15pm) 



May 17 
May 18 



Classes begin 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (no classes) 

Late drop/ add (with $20 fee) — in Registrar's Office only 

Semester Break (classes resume March 10) 

Last day to declare Pass/ Fail grading choice 

Easter Break (classes resume March 26) 

Spring Semester Classes End 

(May 1—7, classes at professor's option) 

Reading Day 

Examination Period, including Sunday afternoon 
(Seniors must complete exams by Monday, 
May 12, 5:15 pm) 

Baccalaureate (4:45 pm) 

Commencement (10:00 am) 



Accreditation 

• Southern Association of Colleges and Schools: Davidson College is accredited in its awarding 
of baccalaureate degrees by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur GA 30033; Phone: 404-679-4500; Fax: 404-679-4558). 

• American Chemical Society 

Nondiscrimination Policy 

Davidson College admits qualified students and administers all educational, athletic, financial, 
and employment activities without discriminating based on race, color, gender, national origin, 
religion, age, sexual orientation, or disability unless allowed by law and deemed necessary to the 
administration of the educational programs. In addition, the college complies with all applicable 
federal, state, and local laws governing non-discrimination. 



Table of Contents 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 2007-08 2 

HISTORY OF STATEMENT AND PURPOSE 5 

ADMISSION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION 9 

Admission Requirements and Procedures 9 

Financial Aid 13 

Honors, Awards, and Scholarships 15 

Tuition and Fees 19 

CAMPUS LIFE 25 

The Honor Code and the Code of Responsibility 25 

Residence Halls 25 

Art, Music, Theatre 28 

Athletics and Physical Education 29 

Religious and Spiritual Life 30 

Social Life 31 

Career Services 36 

Health and Safety 37 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND POLICIES 41 

The Curriculum 41 

Requirements for Graduation 42 

Standards of Progress 44 

International Perspectives and Stud}' Opportunities 45 

Pre-Professional Programs 50 

Academic Support 55 

General Information and Regulations 60 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION BY DEPARTMENTS 64 

OFFICIAL RECORD 207 

Trustees 207 

Faculty Emeriti 209 

Continuing Faculty, 2006-07 212 

Other Instructional Appointments, 2006-07 220 

New Faculty and Instructional Appointments 224 

Administrative Staff 227 

Curricular Enrichment 239 

Book Funds 241 

Honor Societies 248 

Awards 249 

Class of 2007 253 

Enrollment Statistics 257 

Geographical Distribution 258 

Alumni Association 259 

Index 260 

Capsule Information 263 



4 — History and Statement of Purpose 




History and Statement of Purpose — 5 



HISTORY AND 
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 




HISTORY 

"When the peculiar circumstances of a community demand it, and their benevolence will justify 
it, the establishment of a College having the Bible for its first charter, and the prosperity of the Church 
and our countrv for its great design, ought to be regarded as an enterprise of no common grandeur." 
— Davidson's first President, Robert Hall Morrison, in his inaugural address, August 2, 1838. 

Founded by Concord Presbvtery, Davidson College opened as a manual labor institute in 
1837. The college's name memorializes General William Lee Davidson, who died at the nearbv 
Revolutionary War battle of Cowan's Ford in 1781. General Davidson's son provided the initial 

acreage for the campus. 

The college seal and the college motto, Alenda Lux Ubi Orta 
Libertas ("Let Learning Be Cherished Where Liberty Has Arisen"), 
recall the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence; both seal and 
motto resulted from the suggestion of Peter Stuart Ney, an elusive 
Frenchman believed by some to have been Napoleon's Marshal 
Ney. 

Original academic subjects included moral and natural 

philosophy, evidences of Christianity, classical languages, logic, 

and mathematics. Three professors, including Morrison, taught this 

curriculum to Davidson's sixty-five students. 

Although Presbyterian-originated, the college maintained from the beginning its intent to 

educate students without regard to their denominational affiliation. Students came from a variety 

of religious and regional backgrounds. By 1860, Davidson alumni lived in twelve states and two 

foreign countries. 

A bequest in 1856 from Maxwell Chambers of Salisbury, North Carolina, provided the 
college with the means to strengthen its base and expand its influence. The gift of a quarter of a 
million dollars made the institution, for a time, the richest college south of Princeton and helped 
the college survive through the Civil War years. It also provided for the construction of a central 
academic building that was named in honor of the college's first substantial benefactor. The present 
Chambers Building, which replaced the one burned in 1921, also bears his name. 

While the college had a student bodv of only twenty-four men in 1866, during the post-war 
recovery period there was a gradual expansion of curriculum, faculty, and students. Newly added 
academic disciplines included chemistry, English, history, and physics. Bv 1890 the teaching faculty 
included its first Ph.D. -holding professors. Increasing growth in enrollment gave the college a 
student body of over 300 by 1910. 

In 1911, the college offered the A.B. and the B.S. degrees, with the former requiring study of 
Greek and Latin, the latter allowing substitution of a modern foreign language in place of Latin. 
There were fifteen departments, though majors were not part of the curriculum until the 1920s. A 
strengthened financial base was augmented by the generosity of the Rockefellers who provided 



6 — History and Statement of Purpose 



funds for replacing the original Chambers building and by annual support from the Duke 
Endowment which continues today. 

The 1920s and 1930s saw courses in accounting, business, economics, and music 
added to the curriculum, as well as honors programs and seminars. In 1923, Davidson 
was selected as the third college in North Carolina to be chartered for a chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa. Curricular revisions in the 1960s and 1980s altered the academic calendar and degree 
requirements, but retained Davidson's emphasis on a broad liberal arts education along with 
increasing opportunities for specialization, independent academic work, study abroad, and 
interdisciplinary programs. 

First admitting women as degree candidates in 1973, the college has grown to over 1,600 
students on campus. The teaching faculty numbers just over 160. Renovations and expansion of 
campus facilities have supported the college's growth in athletics, the visual arts, the sciences, 
residential housing, student and community activities, and the performing arts. 

Recent academic program changes include the expansion of concentrations and the 
options for a second major or minor in many departments. Special attention is given to writing 
across the curriculum and includes small classes designed to help first-year students make the 
transition to college-level work and writing. 

Davidson's underlying philosophy appears in the college's official statement of purpose. 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

Davidson College is an institution of higher learning established in 1837 by Presbyterians 
of North Carolina. Since its founding, the ties that bind the college to its Presbyterian heritage, 
including the historic understanding of Christian faith called The Reformed Tradition, have 
remained close and strong. The college is committed to continuing this vital relationship. 

The primary purpose of Davidson College is to assist students in developing humane 
instincts and disciplined and creative minds for lives of leadership and service. In fulfilling 
its purpose, Davidson has chosen to be a liberal arts college, to maintain itself as a residential 
community of scholars, to emphasize the teaching responsibility of all professors, and to 
ensure the opportunity for personal relationships between students and teachers. Further, 
Davidson believes it is vital that all students in every class know and study under mature and 
scholarly teachers who are able and eager to provide for each of them stimulation, instruction, 
and guidance. 

The Christian tradition to which Davidson remains committed recognizes God as the 
source of all truth, and believes that Jesus Christ is the revelation of that God, a God bound by 
no church or creed. The loyalty of the college thus extends beyond the Christian community to 
the whole of humanity and necessarily includes openness to and respect for the world's various 
religious traditions. Davidson dedicates itself to the quest for truth and encourages teachers 
and students to explore the whole of reality, whether physical or spiritual, with unlimited 
employment of their intellectual powers. At Davidson, faith and reason work together in 
mutual respect and benefit toward growth in learning, understanding, and wisdom. 

As a college that welcomes students, faculty and staff from a variety of nationalities, 
ethnic groups, and traditions, Davidson values diversity, recognizing the dignity and worth of 
every person. Therefore, Davidson provides a range of opportunities for worship, civil debate, 
and teaching that enrich mind and spirit. Further, Davidson challenges students to engage in 
service to prepare themselves for lives of growth and giving. 



History and Statement of Purpose — 7 



Davidson seeks students of good character and high academic ability, irrespective of 
economic circumstances, who share its values and show promise for usefulness to society. In the 
selection of faculty, the college seeks men and women who respect the purpose of the college, 
who are outstanding intellectually, who have the best training available in their fields of study, 
and whose interest in students and teaching is unfeigned and profound. The Trustees commit to 
being faithful stewards of the traditions of the college. They are charged with governing under 
the Constitution and By-laws and with providing the financial resources necessary for adequate 
student aid and appropriate facilities and programs, including furnishing the faculty with the time 
and opportunity for creative scholarship fundamental to the best teaching. 

As a liberal arts college, Davidson emphasizes those studies, disciplines, and activities that 
are mentally, spiritually, and physically liberating. Thus, the college concentrates upon the study 
of history, literature and languages, philosophy and religion, music, drama and the visual arts, 
the natural and social sciences, and mathematics. The college encourages student engagement 
with other cultures through domestic and international studies. The college also requires physical 
education, provides for competitive athletics, and encourages a variety of social, cultural, and 
sendee activities. While Davidson prepares many of its students for graduate and professional 
studv, it intends to teach all students to think clearly, to make relevant and valid judgments, to 
discriminate among values, and to communicate freely with others in the realm of ideas. 

Davidson holds a priceless heritage bequeathed by those who have dedicated their lives and 
their possessions for its welfare. To it much has been entrusted, and of it much is required. 

DAVIDSON'S PRESIDENTS 

Robert Hall Morrison (1836-1840); Samuel Williamson (1841-1854); Drury Lacy (1855-1860); John 
Lycan Kirkpatrick (1860-1866); George Wilson McPhail (1866-1871); John Rennie Blake, chair of the 
faculty (1871-1877); Andrew Dousa Hepburn (1877-1885); Luther McKinnon (1885-1888); William 
Joseph Martin, vice President and acting President (1887-1888); John Bunyan Shearer (1888-1901); 
Henry Louis Smith (1901-1912); William Joseph Martin (1912-1929); Walter Lee Lingle (1929-1941); 
John Rood Cunningham (1941-1957); Clarence John Pietenpol, acting President (1957-1958); David 
Grier Martin (1958-1968); Frontis Withers Johnston, acting President (1968); Samuel Reid Spencer, 
Jr. (1968-1983); Frontis Withers Johnston, interim President (1983-1984); John Wells Kuykendall 
(1984-1997); Robert Fredrick Vagt (1997-2007); Thomas Warren Ross (2007-). 



ADMISSION AND 
FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Davidson is committed to its responsibility as a liberal arts college and seeks to enroll students 
from a variety of racial, economic, social, religious, and geographic backgrounds. Davidson seeks 
to enroll students who will contribute to the life of the college and who have the promise to 
make good use of their education after graduation. To enroll such students, everv application 
is reviewed with care. Admission to Davidson is highly selective. Decisions are based on many 
factors, with evaluation in three general areas: (1) academic achievement as indicated by secondary 
school curriculum, grades and standardized test scores; (2) personal characteristics as evidenced in 
personal statements and letters of recommendation; and (3) outstanding interests, achievements, 
and activities, as demonstrated by participation in and contribution to school, community, or 
religious organizations. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants must complete secondary school graduation requirements before enrolling at 
Davidson. Excluding consideration for exceptional circumstances, at least 16 high school units 
are required, although the student accepted at Davidson usually has taken 20 units. These units 
should include the following: 4 units of English, 3 units of mathematics, 2 units of the same foreign 
language, 2 units of science, and 2 units of history/ social studies. It is strongly recommended that high 
school students continue for the third and fourth years in science and in the same foreign language, continue 
mathematics through calculus, and take additional courses in history. 

Candidates considering Davidson should take at least five academic subjects each year in 
secondary school, unless the school curriculum is structured around four. It is important that a 
challenging academic program be taken each year, but especially in the junior and senior years. 

All applicants are required to take the SAT of the College Entrance Examination Board or 
the ACT of the American College Testing Program and to have an official score report sent to 
Davidson. Registration for either test should be completed at least five weeks before the date on 
which the test is scheduled. Tests may be taken on any of the following test dates: 

SAT Test Dates ACT Test Dates* 



October 6, 2007 SAT and Subject Tests September 15, 2007 

November 3, 2007 SAT and Subject Tests October 27, 2007 

December 1, 2007 SAT and Subject Test December 8, 2007 

January 26, 2008 SAT and Subject Test February 9, 2008 

March 1, 2008 SAT only April 12, 2008 

May 3, 2008 SAT and Subject Tests June 14, 2008 
June 7, 2008 SAT and Subject Tests 

*0n certain dates, the ACT is offered only in select testing locations. Please consult www. 
actstudent.org/ to confirm the dates and times of ACT offerings in specific areas. 



10 — Admission and Financial Aid 



It is recommended that juniors take the SAT or the ACT no later than the end of the junior 
year. This is especially important for those interested in applying under the Early Decision plan. 
Those interested in the Regular Plan must take the test no later than December of the senior year. 

It is strongly recommended, but not required, that applicants submitting SAT scores also take 
two subject tests. These tests should be taken no later than the December test date of the senior 
year. The mathematics test is particularly encouraged. Subject tests should be taken in the spring 
of the junior year if that subject will not be continued in the senior year. 

HOW TO APPLY 

Students should notify the Office of Admission and Financial Aid as soon as they become 
interested in Davidson. General information about the college will be sent at that time, followed 
by the preliminary application for admission. 

The preliminary application should be completed and returned to the Admission Office with 
a $50 nonrefundable application fee. All applicants will then receive application essay questions, 
a transcript form, and recommendation forms. When all forms are completed and returned, and 
the results of the SAT or ACT are received, the applicant will be notified that the application is 
complete. All admission decisions will be available on the Admission web site and sent by letter. 

Davidson subscribes to The Common Application, a copy of which may be obtained from 
the High School Guidance Office. A student who intends to use The Common Application should 
call the Admission Office (1-800-768-0380) to request our Common Application Supplement or 
acquire forms from our web site. A Common Application to Davidson is not complete without 
the Supplement. 

All forms required to complete an application can be found at www.davidson.edu in the 
Admission section. Students may submit an application by mail or online. 

Application deadline dates may vary from year to year. To determine the exact application 
deadline, please consult either a current copy of the Application for Admission or call the Office 
of Admission and Financial Aid at 1-800-768-0380. Current admission information may also be 
obtained from www.davidson.edu. 

The Early Decision Plan is binding and is for applicants who are certain they want to attend 
Davidson. Early decision applications will be accepted, denied, or deferred into the Regular 
Decision Plan pool of applicants. Those candidates who are deferred will be re-evaluated during 
the Regular Decision selection process. To apply through the Early Decision Plan, the student 
should: 

1. Take the SAT or the ACT in the junior year and have the results sent to Davidson by the 
appropriate testing agency. 

2. Complete all application requirements by the stated deadlines. 

3. Submit the Early Decision Candidate's Agreement, which states that Davidson is definitely 
his/her first choice; and that if accepted, he/she will enroll and withdraw all applications pending 
elsewhere. 

For those applying under the Regular Decision Plan, letters informing applicants of the 
decision on their applications will be mailed or posted to the web site prior to April 1. Applicants 
who are accepted under the Regular Plan are required to make a nonrefundable enrollment deposit 
by May 1. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 1 1 



DEFERRED ADMISSION 

An admitted first-year student may, with the permission of the Dean of Admission, defer 
matriculation for one year without reapplying to Davidson. The student must first confirm his or 
her intent to enroll at Davidson by submitting the Candidate's Reply Form and the required $300 
enrollment deposit by May 1. A written request for deferral must also be submitted, preferably 
along with the enrollment deposit, but no later than June 1. The letter should state in detail what 
the student will be doing in the interim year. If the deferral request is approved, the student must 
return the signed deferral contract, coupled with an additional non-refundable deposit in the 
amount of $1200. 

CAMPUS VISITS 

While not required, a campus visit is strongly encouraged. Evaluative interviews are not used 
as a part of the selection process. Group and individual information sessions are conducted by an 
admission officer or a senior admission fellow. The format of the session may be a group setting or 
an individual conversation; neither is evaluative. Visitors may plan to spend a number of hours on 
campus attending classes (Monday through Friday), meeting students arid faculty members, and 
taking a campus tour. A limited number of overnight accommodations are available in the Guest 
House on campus. For reservations call 1-704-894-2127. 

The Office of Admission and Financial Aid is open all year and appointments should be 
made on our web site or by calling 1-704-894-2230 or 1-800-768-0380 at least two weeks before the 
proposed visit. The TDD Relay Service available is 1-800-735-2962. Campus tours and information 
sessions are scheduled daily and available on Saturdays during peak visitation periods (spring and 
fall). Please call the Admission Office or visit the web site to confirm the time and date. Detailed 
visit information is available at www.davidson.edu/visit. 

CREDIT EARNED PRIOR TO ENTERING DAVIDSON 

First-year students may transfer a maximum of four credits from courses taken prior to 
entering Davidson. The maximum includes credits from AP, IB, joint enrollment, and summer 
school courses taken between high school graduation and college entrance. 

Advanced Placement 

Students who have completed college-level work in secondary school and wish to apply 
for placement or credit at Davidson should take the appropriate examinations offered by the 
Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. Interested students 
whose schools do not administer the examinations should arrange to take them at another school. 
For further information, call the Advanced Placement Program (AP) at 1-609-771-7300 or consult 
the AP web page at www.collegeboard.com/ap/ students/ index.html. See the Registrar's web 
page on the Davidson College site (www.davidson.edu) for specific examinations, scores, and 
course equivalents. 

Consult the "information for new students" section of the Registrar's web page for details. 



12 — Admission and Financial Aid 



International Baccalaureate Degree Credit 

Davidson recognizes the International Baccalaureate Program Examinations for admission 
purposes and placement. Placement decisions are made by the Registrar in consultation with the 
appropriate department chair. 

Davidson will normally offer one course credit to entering students for each Higher Level 
Examination of the International Baccalaureate Degree passed with a grade of 6 or 7, up to a 
maximum of four courses. See the Registrar's web page on the Davidson College site (www. 
davidson.edu) for specific examinations, scores, and course equivalents. 

Joint Enrollment 

Students may receive credit for a maximum of two courses taken in joint enrollment programs 
if the courses are equivalent courses and meet all transfer requirements and if they are not used 
for admission to Davidson. Transfer evaluation of college courses taken prior to graduation from 
high school requires: 

1. An official transcript from the college or university attended; 

2. An official letter from the college or university confirming that the courses were: 

a. taught on its campus; 

b. taught by a regular member of its faculty; 

c. taken in competition with degree candidates of that institution who constitute a majority 
in those courses; and 

d. a regular part of the curriculum of the institution. 

3. An official letter from the high school principal or guidance counselor confirming that the 
courses were not used to satisfy high school graduation requirements. 

Each joint enrollment program is evaluated on an individual basis after matriculation. The 
responsibility for having the above documentation sent to the Registrar's Office lies with the 
student. 

(Note: the second item is particularly important.) 

TRANSFERRING TO DAVIDSON 

Students interested in transferring to Davidson should complete the requirements for 
admission listed above and submit a complete college transcript and a statement of honorable 
withdrawal from the college(s) previously attended. 

Davidson accepts transfer credit from other colleges and universities approved by a regional 
accrediting agency, provided each transferred course is consistent with the academic objectives 
of the college and the grade earned in the transferred course is comparable to a Davidson grade 
of "C-" or better. Credit for one full academic year at another college or university is normally 
transferred to Davidson as eight courses. The Registrar determines the amount of credit that may 
be transferred to Davidson. 

Davidson will accept a maximum of 16 transfer courses toward graduation. The maximum 
number of transfer courses accepted for the major is determined by the major department. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 13 



NON-TRADITIONAL APPLICANTS 

Non-traditional applicants such as home-schooled students or those seeking early admission 
to college should contact the Office of Admission prior to submitting an application. Non- 
traditional applicants should anticipate additional application requirements such as subject level 
testing in 3-5 areas (SAT) and/or an evaluative on-campus interview with the Dean of Admission 
and the Dean of Students. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 

An increasing number of students from abroad are recognizing the value of a liberal arts 
education as a means of obtaining first-rate preparation for professional careers or graduate 
study. Davidson welcomes the presence of such talented international students as a vital part of 
the campus community. The college's goal is to help pave the way for that highly select group 
of individuals who will achieve prominence in a variety of fields — medicine, business, law, 
technology, the arts, and education. 

Prior to enrollment at Davidson, an international applicant should have completed a program 
of study at the secondary school level expected of a student preparing for university entrance in 
his or her own counrrv. All applicants must take the SAT available through the College Entrance 
Examination Board. Non-native English speakers must provide evidence of fluency in English 
through recommendations, writing samples, and successful performance on the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), also available through the College Board. The College Board 
number for Davidson College is 5150. Results for the SAT and the TOEFL must be sent directly to 
Davidson by the testing agency. 

Davidson welcomes applications from international students wishing to pursue a four-year 
undergraduate degree; however, the college is not able to offer substantial financial assistance 
to students who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. If a student's personal 
financial situation is such that more than nominal assistance is required, he or she must be aware 
that competition for available funds is keen; it is advised that the student file additional applications 
to other colleges. International students applying for aid must submit the Foreign Financial Aid 
Form provided with the admission application material. 

STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Early decision or regular decision admission to Davidson is offered without regard to financial 
circumstances except in the case of international students. In 2007-08, Davidson students will 
receive over $18 million in financial assistance from college sources. These funds are combined 
with grants and employment funds from federal, state, and other outside sources to form aid 
"packages" for Davidson students. Beginning in August 2007, students' demonstrated financial 
need will be funded entirely through grants and student employment. While most financial aid is 
designated for students with demonstrated financial need, Davidson sets aside significant funds 
for merit-based scholarships. Students receiving need-based packages are eligible for merit-based 
aid. 

Prospective students who wish to be considered for need-based financial aid must complete 
the CSS/ Financial Aid PROFILE and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Both 
forms should be completed online. 



14 — Admission and Financial Aid 



Financial Aid Policy 

Davidson maintains a strong financial aid program to assist students whose families may not 
be able to finance the entire cost of a Davidson education. Determination of a student's financial 
need begins with the assumption that the parents and student have the primary responsibility to 
meet education costs to the extent they are able. Once need is established, Davidson makes every 
effort to help families meet college expenses through a combination of federal and state programs 
and Davidson's own financial aid funds. 

Merit-based scholarships are offered to a small number of entering students. These awards are 
made without regard to financial need and are intended to recognize outstanding accomplishments 
and exceptional potential for future contributions to society. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards 

In order to receive any grant, loan, or work assistance, a student must maintain satisfactory 
academic progress in the course of study he/she is pursuing at Davidson. Students who fail to 
maintain satisfactory academic progress do not receive the following types of financial aid: Federal 
Pell Grant; Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant; Federal Work-Study; Federal 
Perkins Loan; Federal Stafford Loan; Federal PLUS loan; North Carolina Student Incentive Grant; 
North Carolina State Contractual Scholarship Fund; or Davidson College scholarships, grants or 
employment. 

Satisfactory academic progress is reviewed annually prior to the beginning of each academic 
year. Because the definition of satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes parallels 
the definition of "good standing" as defined by the faculty, a continuing student who is deemed to 
be in good academic standing also will meet the standards of academic progress for financial aid. 
First-year students, all of whom are required to meet rigorous admission criteria, are presumed to 
be in good standing throughout their first year provided they carry at least a half-time course load. 
Satisfactory progress for these students is assessed at the end of their first year. 

Need-based grant support is available for a maximum of eight semesters (pro rated for transfer 
students). A student may not receive Federal Title IV assistance for more than twelve semesters. 

In cases where a student may be allowed to continue at Davidson even though academic 
standards have not been met, financial aid may be offered on a probationary basis for one semester 
if mitigating circumstances so warrant. If standards of progress are not met at the end of that 
semester, financial aid eligibility is lost until the student regains good standing. 

Written notice is given to all students whose financial aid eligibility is rescinded for lack of 
academic progress. Students may appeal such decisions by writing the Senior Associate Dean 
of Admission and Financial Aid. Appeals should include an explanation of why satisfactory 
progress was not maintained; any additional reasons why financial aid should not be withheld; 
and supporting documentation from the Dean of Students and/ or the College Registrar. 

After financial aid has been withdrawn for failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress, 
students may re-establish eligibility by improving their grade point average and grade point totals 
at their own expense. Approved classes may be taken during summer sessions as well as the 
academic year. Students wishing to regain financial aid eligibility also must be re-admitted to the 
college by the Executive Committee of the Faculty and make proper application to the Financial 
Aid Office for reinstatement of their financial aid eligibility. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 15 



Honors, Awards, and Scholarships 

A limited number of first-vear students are awarded merit-based scholarships. Selection 
criteria are generally based on scholastic promise, ability, character, leadership, and promise 
of contribution to society, as evaluated in the application for admission by the admission staff 
and the Faculty Committee on Admission and Financial Aid. In the case of area or talent specific 
scholarships, selection may also be based on the outcome of an audition, interview, portfolio 
review, or writing sample. Scholarship specific application deadlines may apply. Please refer to 
the admission application for details. 

General Scholarship Awards 

Even T admitted student is considered for general scholarships. Selection is made by the 
Scholarship Coordinator and the admission staff on the basis of the strength of the candidate's 
application for admission. Scholarships can be renewed throughout the recipients' upper-class 
vears, provided grade point average and progress toward degree requirements are met. No 
separate scholarship application is required for these awards. 

Special Competition Scholarships 

Each admitted student is considered for the scholarships described below. No separate 
scholarship application initiated by the student is required. Nominees are selected by the Davidson 
admission staff, the Dean of Admission and Financial Aid, and the Scholarship Coordinator. 
Finalists will be required to participate in a scholarship interview. The scholarships are renewable, 
providing the recipients meet grade point average requirements, make standard progress toward 
their degrees, and are significantlv involved in the life of the college communitv. 

Thompson S. and Sarah S. Baker Scholarships: These scholarships, valued annually at the level 
of comprehensive fees, were established by this Class of 1926 alumnus whose prominence at 
Davidson foreshadowed his later civic and business leadership, and bv his wife. Thev are offered 
to first-year students whose accomplishments, purposefulness, sendee, and maturity mark them 
as capable of the highest achievement. 

John Montgomery Belk Scholarships: These scholarships were established bv John Montgomery 
Belk, a member of the Class of 1943, whose career has been marked bv extraordinan leadership 
and senice in business, civic affairs, and the church. They are for students whose leadership in 
academics, student government, athletics, or senice distinguishes them as capable of the highest 
achievement; and are valued annually at the level of the college's comprehensive fees. Scholars 
also receive two summer stipends of $3000 each. 

Lowell L Bnjan Scholarships: Two $30,000 scholarships are offered to first-year students who 
have the capacity and ability to contribute in a superlative manner to their sport and to the academic 
and co-curricular life at Davidson. The scholarships were established bv Lowell L. Bryan, Class of 
1968. 

Encin Scholarship: This tuition award (not to include fees) is offered to a first-year student 
on the basis of leadership, academic excellence, and integrity. The scholarship was established 
by Goudyloch Erwin Dyer and her husband, Robert C. Dyer, in memory of her brothers, George 
Phifer Envin and Edward Jones Erwin, Jr. her father, Davidson professor of English Edward Jones 
Erwin; and her grandfather, George Phifer Erwin. (Not awarded every year.) 

Missy and John Knykendall Scholarships: Three awards are offered annually in each first- 
year class. Established by the college family in honor of Davidson's fifteenth President, John 
Kuykendall and his wife Missy, the Kuvkendall Scholarships are for students who, through their 



16 — Admission and Financial Aid 



habits of mind, leadership, and character, offer the potential to provide the college community 
the kind of servant leadership that characterized the thirteen-year presidency (1984-1997) of John 
Kuykendall, Davidson Class of 1959. Scholars are chosen for their personal character, academic 
accomplishments, generosity, thoughtful leadership, humane interests, and sense of kindness. The 
scholarships are valued at $10,000 each. 

Amos Norris Scholarship: This full cost award has been created by Robert Norris, Davidson 
Class of 1972, in honor of his father, Amos Norris. The award is offered to an outstanding first-year 
student athlete with integrity, a strong work ethic, and excellent leadership qualities. Nominees 
are identified by the Dean of Admission and Financial Aid and the Director of Athletics. (Not 
awarded every year.) 

John I. Smith Scholars Program: These two full-tuition awards, established by the John I. Smith 
Charities, Inc. of Greenville, S.C., in honor and memory of College Trustee John I. Smith, Davidson 
Class of 1924, are offered annually to first-year students on the basis of leadership, academic 
excellence, and a commitment to community service. 

William Holt Terry Scholarships: These two full-tuition awards, created to honor Dean Terry 
(Davidson Class of 1954 and Dean of Students for 23 years), are offered annually to first-year 
students who have demonstrated exemplary leadership skills and personal qualities through 
student government, athletics, service, or other activities. 

Special Application Scholarships 

These scholarships are defined with specific reference to particular areas of study or talent 
and require a separate application for consideration. Detailed information is included in each 
student's admission application materials. 

Special application scholarships can be renewed throughout the recipients' upper-class years 
at the college, provided grade point average and progress toward degree requirements are met. 
Any additional renewal requirements are listed in the scholarships' descriptions. 

Rupert T. Barber Scholarship: One $2000 award will be to a student who demonstrates 
exceptional talent and passion for theatre upon entering Davidson. The award is renewable for 
four years of study at Davidson, based on grade point requirements and active involvement in the 
theatre program throughout all four years of attendance. This scholarship is not awarded every 
year. 

Romare Howard Bearden Scholarship: This $10,000 award is offered to a student with exceptional 
ability and promise as a studio artist. Preference is given to African-American students. The 
recipient must declare a major in art (either studio or history) to retain the award for all four years. 
(Not awarded every year.) 

Patricia Cornwell Scholarships in Writing: This $20,000 award was established by Patricia 
Cornwell, award-winning novelist and member of the Class of 1979. Offered to two first-year 
students, the Cornwell Scholarship recognizes students with exceptional ability and promise in 
writing. Cornwell Scholars may be creative writers of poetry or fiction, drama or film; writers who 
combine creativity with a knowledge of science or technology; journalists; or other writers who 
demonstrate extraordinary talent. Cornwell Scholars are expected to be actively involved in the 
writing community. 

Julius Dobson Neely and Joseph Dobson Scholarship: This $5,000 award is offered to one student 
in each first-year class who expresses an interest in Latin as a major field of study and who has 
shown significant experience and success in the field. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 17 



Wachovia Teaching Scholarship: This award is offered annually to exceptional first-vear students 
interested in pursuing a career in teaching. The number arid size of awards will vary. 

Music Scholarships: The music department offers four $18,000 scholarships, which are 
provided through the Vail Family, Donald B. Plott, Zachary F. Long, Jr., J. Estes Milkier, and James 
C. Harper endowments. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of auditions which are held on 
specific weekends during the vear. The scholarships are renewable subject to annual evaluation. In 
addition, music majors are ekgible to apply for grants to study away from campus. 

Pepper Visual Arts Scholarship: One $5,000 award is given each year to a first-year student. 
Selection is based upon the Art Department's review of skdes and/ or photographs in the 
applicant's portfolio. The scholarship is renewable on the basis of satisfactorv academic progress 
and active involvement in studio art. The recipient must declare a major in art (studio or history) 
to retain the award for the junior and senior year. 

W. Olin Puckett Scholarship: One $10,000 award is offered in each first-vear class to a student 
leader with academic distinction who is preparing for a career in medicine or the sciences. 

Williams Challenge Scholarship: One $10,000 scholarship is available annually to a first-year 
student as a challenge to consider the ministry or other church-related vocations. An additional 
S2,000 annually helps support an internship or conference attendance. 

National Merit Scholarships 

Three awards are offered annually to first-vear students selected from among those who have 
been identified as National Merit finalists and who have designated Davidson as thek first choice 
college. In compliance with National Merit dkectives, the size of the award is linked to established 
financial need: the minimum award is $750; the maximum award is $2,000. 

International Scholarships 

A limited number of students who are nationals of countries other than the United States 
receive financial assistance each year. These funds vary in amount and are based on a combination 
of need and merit. The International Student Financial Aid Application of the College Scholarship 
Service should be submitted to the Office of Admission and Financial Aid along with Davidson's 
application for admission. 

Children of Presbyterian Ministers 

Davidson College, in recognition of its long and significant relationship with the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.), ensures that all Davidson students who are chkdren of ordained Presbyterian 
(U.S.A.) ministers will receive at least $1,000 in renewable, annual grants from Davidson. Students 
not receiving this amount through other merit-based or need-based grants are funded through the 
John Richards Hay and Sara Craig Hay Scholarship Program. 

Tlie Julian and Robert Lake Scholarship is a $15,000 merit-based scholarship awarded to a. member 
of each first-year class who is the child of a minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Selection 
is made by the Dean of Admission and Financial Aid and the Scholarship Coordinator based upon 
the student's application for admission. 

Outside Resources 

In addition to awards controlled by the college, students at Davidson receive funds from a 
variety of external sources, including the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.), and many others. Information about locating and applying for such assistance 
may be obtained from high school counselors or the Office of Admission and Financial Aid. 



1 8 — Admission and Financial Aid 



Army ROTC Scholarships: Awarded on merit, not need, to both men and women. Army 
scholarships pay full tuition and mandatory fees, a book stipend each semester, and a personal 
expense allowance of $250 to $500 a month during the school year, depending on the cadet's 
class status. Four-year scholarships are awarded annually to high school seniors for the following 
academic year, with an application deadline of December 1 . Two-, three-, and four-year scholarships 
are available to enrolled Davidson students. Interested students may obtain an application and 
further information by contacting the Davidson College Department of Military Studies (Army 
ROTC). 

Davidson students also have access to financial aid provided by Air Force ROTC, by 
participating in the program at UNC-Charlotte. Registration in this program is possible following 
the Charlotte Area Educational Consortium (CAEC) cross-registration procedures. 

Federal and State Grant Programs 

Federal Pell Grants: Pell Grants provided by the federal government are a form of gift aid based 
on a federal need-analysis formula. They range in value up to $4,310 for 2007-08. Information is 
available in high school guidance offices, college financial aid offices, and from the U.S. Department 
of Education. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants: These federal grants of up to $4,000 per 
year are available to students who demonstrate high financial need according to Davidson's 
analysis of the FAFSA and the PROFILE. 

North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grants: The State Legislature of North Carolina provides a 
tuition reduction grant each academic year to all full-time undergraduate students who are legal 
residents of North Carolina attending private institutions in the state. In 2006-07 this grant was 
$1,900. 

North Carolina State Contractual Scholarship Fund: These grants of up to $5,000 per year are 
available to residents of North Carolina who demonstrate financial need according to Davidson's 
analysis of the FAFSA and the PROFILE. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grants: Grants of up to $1,500 per year are made by the State of 
North Carolina to residents who demonstrate high financial need according to the State's analysis 
of the FAFSA. 

Other State Programs: Students who do not live in North Carolina should ask their guidance 
counselors about possible funding from their own states. 

Student Loans 

Federal Perkins Loans: The availability of these federal loan funds varies as appropriations and 
repayments fluctuate. Perkins Loans are made to students who meet federal eligibility guidelines. 
Loans may be made up to $4,000 for each year of college and a maximum of $20,000 total for 
undergraduate study under the Perkins program. No interest is charged while the student is 
enrolled at Davidson. Repayment begins nine months after graduation and may extend over a ten- 
year period. Minimum repayment is $30 per month. During the repayment period, five percent 
interest is charged on the unpaid balance of the principal of the loan. 

Federal Stafford Loans: Through this federal program, participating banks and other lenders 
make loans of up to $3,500 for the first year of an undergraduate program, $4,500 for the second 
year, and $5,500 per year for the third and fourth years of undergraduate study. Additional 
information is available horn Davidson's Office of Admission and Financial Aid. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 19 



Federal PLUS Loans: Through this federally guaranteed loan program, parents may borrow 
up to the cost of attendance minus other aid. The variable interest rate is adjusted annually. 
Monthly repayment begins within 60 days of disbursement. Applications and more information 
are available in Davidson's Office of Admission and Financial Aid. 

Other Loan Programs: Students may wish to pursue loans through the GATE Student Loan or 
through other alternative loan sources. Information about these loan programs is available from 
the Office of Admission and Financial Aid. 

Employment 

More than 400 Davidson students have on-campus jobs awarded as part of the need-based 
financial aid package. Assignment to a specific job is made by the Office of Admission and 
Financial Aid. Entering students usually are able to work ten to twelve hours a week without 
handicap to their academic work. Funding is available through the Federal Work-Study Program 
and from Davidson College. A portion of federal work-study funds is earmarked for students 
employed in community service activities. Campus work opportunities for students who may not 
have financial aid eligibility are available in several departments. Students are urged to contact 
departments directly. Off-campus employment opportunities may be explored through various 
college publications. 

Student employees are paid monthly bv direct deposit on the 15th of the month following 
the pay period. 

TUITION AND FEES 

During the summer preceding the academic year, each student receives a complete bill for 
tuition and fees. Scholarship and grant awards from Davidson, loans for which the parent or 
student have applied, and federal and state sources are noted on college bills. Outside awards, 
campus jobs, and loans which have been offered but have not been applied for are not shown as 
credits. Advance payment by mail is required, as it is easier for both the student and the college. 

The fees for the 2007 - 2008 academic year are as follows: 

Required Student Charges (tuition and 

student activity fee) $31,794 

Room (double) 4,763 

Meals (full board) 4,257 

Total $40,814 

Fees are payable in two installments (August 10 and December 21). Please note that Davidson 
does not accept credit card payments for tuition, room, meal plans, and fees. An orientation fee 
for new students ($100 for first-year students and transfers) is included in the fall semester billing. 
Other fees may also be required. See " Additional fees." 

A student who is unable to pay fees in full by the installment due date must contact the 
Business Services Office prior to that date. No student will be allowed to return for any semester 
if his/her account is not paid in full or if arrangements to use the college approved payment plan 
have not been made prior to the due date. There is a $25 penalty charge for late payment. Interest 
charges at 18 percent per annum are also assessed on late payments. 



20 — Admission and Financial Aid 



In order to graduate and receive a diploma, all financial obligations to Davidson must be paid 
in full. Furthermore, no official transcripts will be released until a student has met all financial 
obligations to the college. 

Students who enter at the beginning of the spring semester will be billed one-half of the 
required student charges, room, and meal fees listed above. 

After the tenth day of classes, no refunds on tuition or room rent will be made. Fees paid in 
advance for subsequent semesters for which a student does not register will be refunded in full, 
subject to the notification deadlines specified in the "Academic and Personal Leave" policy that 
follows. Fees for meals are refunded on a pro rata basis determined by the week of withdrawal. 
The usual fees include: 

1. Room: Rent is $4,763 for double occupancy. Singles and suites cost $5,751. Martin Court 
Apartments and Houses are $5,959. All students are required to live on campus for their entire 
college career unless officially excused by the Director of Residence Life. 

2. Meals: A full board plan based on 19 meals per week is required for all first-year students 
during the fall semester. The second semester, first-year students may choose from the 19-meal 
plan or an identically priced 16-meal plan. The 16-meal plan provides additional food points 
(Bonus Bucks) to be used in any of the campus food locations (Commons, Union Cafe, Wildcat 
Den, and vending machines). Upper-class students may choose from a variety of meal plan 
options each semester. The college does not provide meals during semester or holiday recess 
periods. Meal plans may be changed without penalty during the first week of classes. After that 
time, a student incurs a 15 percent charge when changing to a lower meal plan or canceling a 
meal plan altogether. 

3. Medical Care: Routine medical care (not full health service) is available at the Student Health 
Facility. The college contracts with a nearby medical group for provision of part-time 
medical services at the Student Health Facility. Male and female physicians rotate scheduled 
appointments during "sick call" on weekday afternoons. They also provide after-hours 
emergency consultation to our nurses. The college's professional staff of registered nurses 
(RNs) are on duty at the Student Health Facility on weekdays from 7:30 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. 
Overnights and weekends, an on-call nurse is accessible to students by pager (704-337-7047) to 
assess the need for immediate face-to-face evaluation, regular sick call assessment, or referral to 
a local hospital emergency room. Outpatient services provided at the Student Health Facility are 
free of charge, with the exception of laboratory tests, medical supplies, and medications costing 
more than $10. Students are also financially responsible for any additional medical services, 
such as X-rays, performed at other medical facilities. When observational or recuperative needs 
of an ill student render residence hall housing inadequate, the Student Health Facility has the 
capacity to accommodate overnight/ weekend inpatient ("infirmary") students. For this, there 
is a comprehensive charge of $25 per day, which covers meals, routine medications, bandages, 
and other supplies. All Student Health Facility charges are billed directly to the student's 
college account. 

4. Laundry: The college laundry furnishes bed linens to students and provides wash, dry, and 
fold services of everyday laundry. Washing and pressing of shirts and blouses is included in 
this service. Students who fail to return their bed linens directly to the front counter at year's 
end will be charged replacement cost. Dry cleaning, pressing, alterations and the laundering of 
large pieces (sleeping bags, blankets, quilts, etc.) are available at competitive prices. 

5. Mail: Students are provided a mail box at the Davidson College Post Office. 

6. Activity fee: The fee is for student publications, student government, and social and cultural 
activities. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 21 



Additional fees include: 

1. Applied music fee: The hour-per-week applied instruction for majors in the Department of Music 
is covered in the usual fee, but there are separate charges for additional instruction or for 
private lessons for those who are not music majors. Fees per semester for individual instruction 
in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instruments are: one-hour lesson per week $700 and one 
half-hour lesson per week $375. Charges are $20 per semester for use of practice facilities. 

2. Student accident and sickness insurance: All students attending Davidson are automatically enrolled 
in the insurance plan. The $370 fee is charged to each student's account. Students covered by 
comparable insurance may be exempted from the student insurance program by submitting a 
signed waiver request form on or before August 10th. 

3. Enrollment deposit: All students are required to make a $300 deposit prior to enrollment. This 
deposit is maintained on account during the student's enrollment, and is refunded, less any 
outstanding fees and fines, following graduation. A student must maintain the $300 enrollment 
deposit in order to be granted on-leave status. 

4. Study abroad administrative fee: A student studying abroad on a non-Davidson program for a 
semester or year is charged a non-refundable $350 administrative fee. This amount is billed to 
the student's account when the completed "leave" request form is submitted to the Registrar. 

5. Transcripts: There is a fee of $3 for each transcript. An additional fee will be assessed if special 
(express) mailing is required. 

6. Vehicle registration: A fee of $50.00 will be charged to register each vehicle kept on campus. 

7. Miscellaneous fees: Students pay fees for late registration, late drop/add, library fines, damaged 
property, parking fines, lost post office kevs, etc., when incurred. A penalty of $20 will be 
charged on all returned checks. 

Academic and Personal Leave 

A student who wishes to take academic or personal leave from Davidson may do so upon 
approval from the Registrar and Dean of Students. Guidelines are available from the Registrar. 
After March 15, a penalty of $250 is charged if a student receives approval for academic or personal 
leave beginning the following fall semester. A $500 penalty applies after June 15. In like manner, a 
penalty of $250 is charged if a student notifies the Registrar after November 1 that he or she does 
not intend to enroll for the spring semester, and a $500 penalty applies after January 1. 

A student studying abroad on a non-Davidson program must pay the non-refundable $350 
administrative fee. (See 4 in Additional Fees above.) A student must pay his or her account in full 
and maintain the $300 enrollment deposit in order to be granted on-leave status. 

Withdrawal 

A student is charged $250 if the student notifies the Dean of Students after March 15 that he or 
she plans to withdraw from the college. After June 15, the charge is $500. If during the fall semester 
a student notifies the Dean of Students after November 1 of his or her intention to withdraw from 
the college there is a $250 charge. After Januarv 1, the charge is $500. 

In order to receive a refund of the $300 enrollment deposit, a student's account balance must 
be paid in full. 



22 — Admission and Financial Aid 



REFUND POLICY 

Davidson's policy is to refund 100 percent of tuition or room rent if a student withdraws 
before the tenth day of classes. Otherwise, no refund of tuition or room rent is made. Fees for meals 
are refunded on a pro rata basis as determined by the date of withdrawal. 

The college offers tuition-refund insurance through AWG Dewar, Inc. Detailed information 
may be obtained by calling 617-774-1555. 

Return of Title IV Funds 

In accordance with federal law, if a student who is a recipient of Title IV grant and/ or loan 
funds (Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins 
Loan, Federal Stafford Loan, Federal PLUS Loan) withdraws during a payment period, Davidson 
must determine the amount of Title IV funds the student has earned. That amount is determined 
by a formula established by federal law. 

If a student has received less Title IV funds than the student has earned, the student may 
receive the additional earned funds. If the student has received more assistance than he or she 
earned, the excess funds must be returned. 

If the student withdraws before completing 60 percent of the payment period, the amount of 
assistance that a student has earned is determined on a pro rata basis. For example, if a student 
completes 30 percent of the payment period, the student has earned 30 percent of the assistance he 
or she originally was scheduled to receive. Once a student completes more than 60 percent of the 
payment period, the student has earned all of the assistance. 

If a student has received excess funds, Davidson must return a portion of those funds equal 
to the lesser of (1) the institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of the student's 
funds, or (2) the entire amount of the excess funds. After Davidson has allocated the funds for 
which it is responsible, the student must return the remaining amount. 

Unearned Title IV funds returned by the institution and/ or student must be returned in the 
following order: Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans, Subsidized Federal Stafford loans, Federal 
Perkins loans, Federal PLUS loans received on behalf of the student, Federal Pell Grants, Federal 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity grants, other grant or loan assistance authorized by Title 
IV. 

Detailed rules and laws related to these calculations are available upon request from the 
Office of Admission and Financial Aid. 

Credit Balances 

A student generally may receive a distribution of a credit balance from his/lier account only once during 
each semester. After the conclusion of the late drop/ add period, a student may request a refund in 
the Business Services Office. Normally, refunds are issued within two weeks of the request date. 
However, no funds will be issued until the student has an actual credit balance on his/her account. 
Refunds for Federal Title IV recipients are made in accordance with the refund policy specified by 
the U.S. Department of Education. 



Admission and Financial Aid — 23 



GENERAL STUDENT ACCOUNT INFORMATION 

Books: Books and other supplies are available at the Davidson College Bookstore. Purchases 
may be made using cash, personal or traveler's checks, credit card (VISA, MasterCard, Discover 
Card or American Express) or through the CatCard Services Office declining balance charge 
system. The cost of books varies with the course of study and typically ranges from $900 - $1,000 
per year. 

CatCard: The 'CatCard' is an all-purpose identification card that can be used throughout 
campus. A magnetic stripe on the CatCard provides access to the residence halls, the Library, Baker 
Sports Complex (recreation and spectator uses), and several academic buildings. The CatCard 
also holds meal plan information and declining balance funds. Students and parents may deposit 
money at the CatCard Services Office (or via phone with a credit card) into a declining balance 
account that allows students to make purchases at all on-campus dining and retail locations and 
in some vending areas. It may be used at the College Union for purchases ranging from concert 
tickets to video rentals. The CatCard is also accepted by a limited number of local restaurants and 
the local CVS. 

Lost or damaged cards are replaced for a fee at the CatCard Services Office in the lower level 
of Belk Residence Hall during regular business hours Monday-Fridav. 

Defened Payments: Davidson collects fees in two installments, but it recognizes the need, or 
preference, of many parents to pay on a monthly basis. Educational Computer Systems, Inc. (ECSI) 
is the college's approved pavment plan company. Information may be obtained at wwio.ecsi.net or 
by calling 1-888-549-3274. 

Fire or theft: The college assumes no responsibility for damages or loss of personal property 
due to fire, theft, or other casualties. The student's personal or family property and casualty 
insurance will normally provide limited coverage for such a loss. 

Insurance: All currently enrolled students are required to purchase student health insurance 
or provide a written waiver verifying adequate coverage by August 10. 

Upchargefee: $10 is taken from the first deposit of each school year. Because federal and state 
banking regulations govern card transactions, students or parents may withdraw funds from the 
declining balance account for only two reasons: 

1. Graduation or withdrawal of student from Davidson. 

2. Year end refunds (requested during the last 15 days of the academic year). 



-ws§t<- 




CAMPUS LIFE 



The "Davidson Experience" is not confined to the classroom. The college offers students a 
broad environment in which to develop socially, physically, intellectually, and spiritually. 

THE HONOR CODE AND THE CODE OF RESPONSIBILITY 

As students and alumni proudly attest, the honor system at Davidson is the touchstone of 
the college life, creating an atmosphere of trust in the college community. In addition to faculty 
and administration support, the students believe in this system, defend it, and shoulder the 
responsibility for its implementation. Evidences that the system actually works are the open stacks 
and unguarded doors of the library, the absence of proctors during tests, the self-scheduled final 
examinations, and the sense that a person's word is his or her bond. 
Hie Honor Code is very simply stated: 

"Every student shall be honor bound to refrain from cheating (including plagiarism). 
Even/ student shall be honor bound to refrain from stealing. Even/ student sliall be honor 
bound from lying about official college business. Even/ student shall be honor bound 
to report immediately all violations of tlie Honor System which come under his or her 
observation; failure to do so shall be a violation of the Honor System. Even/ student found 
guilty of a violation shall ordinarily be dismissed from the college for a period. " 
Entering students sign a pledge that thev will live under the system, which includes the 
condition that they will report an observed violation. A student who does lie, cheat, or steal is tried 
under the Code of Disciplinary Procedures. Students who admit guilt or who are found guilty by 
the Honor Council are ordinarily suspended from the college. 

The Code of Responsibility is the basis of daily life at Davidson and attempts to foster an 
atmosphere of good conduct by emphasizing "the responsible use of freedom, as opposed to 
license." Students who violate the rights of others are subject to sanctions as applied under the 
Code of Disciplinary Procedures. 

The college community believes that these two codes, the Honor Code and the Code of 
Responsibility are an integral part of the educational experience, helping students to develop an 
honorable, responsible lifestyle. The codes produce an atmosphere of trust and freedom rarely 
found among American colleges. They form the cornerstone of this community. 

RESIDENCE LIFE 

As a four-year residential college community, Davidson houses approximately 90 percent 
of its student body. Students grow emotionally, spiritually, and intellectually in residence hall 
settings. Daily interaction of students within the residence halls has helped to build campus 
traditions unique to Davidson. 



26 — Campus Life 



The Residence Life staff assigns first-year roommates and rooms with special attention to 
the learning and leadership styles of each student, as well as family and educational background. 
All first-year students are required to live on a first-year hall with about thirty classmates for the 
entire year. Single rooms are not available to first-year students. Two upper-class hall counselors 
live on each first-year hall and work closely with residents easing their transition into campus 
life. This is an exciting and challenging period for students, highlighted by hall rivalries, social 
activities, intramural sports, and community service projects. During this time, first-year students 
learn the difficulties and rewards of communal living and develop a sensitive appreciation of 
people with different backgrounds and needs. Close friendships which are established during this 
year regularly continue throughout a student's Davidson years. 

Each spring upper-class students participate in a lottery process to select rooms from among 
eleven traditional residence halls and six apartment-style residence halls. Most students participate 
in the lottery in pairs, as most rooms are designed for double occupancy. There are a limited 
number of single rooms from which to choose. All residence halls are equipped with lounges, 
some have kitchen facilities, and all are air conditioned. Each apartment contains a living room, 
kitchen, and four or five single bedrooms. The college provides each student with a bed, mattress, 
desk, desk chair, chest, and space for hanging clothes. All students share with the college the 
responsibility to maintain a clean, safe, and enjoyable living environment in the residence halls. 
A resident advisor is assigned to each upper-class floor or building to promote cooperation and 
accountability on each hall. Additionally, a courtesy policy protects a student's right to sleep or 
study at any hour. 

Because the college is able to accommodate such a large percentage of its student body in the 
residence halls, most students are required to live on campus all four years. Upper-class students 
may live off campus only with the permission of the Residence Life Office; however, fluctuating 
demand for housing from year to year means that the college cannot guarantee on-campus housing 
to every student desiring it. In the event students cannot be accommodated, there are apartments 
and houses for rent in the Davidson community. The Residence Life Office maintains a current 
listing of off -campus properties for students. 

Although Davidson College strives to provide safe and secure residence halls, the college 
cannot accept responsibility for the loss, damage, or theft of personal property. Students wishing 
to protect themselves from such loss should cover their belongings with appropriate insurance. 

DINING SERVICES 

The college operates three dining facilities on campus during the academic year— Vail 
Commons, the Union Cafe in the Alvarez Student Union, and the Wildcat Den in Baker Sports 
Complex. 

Vail Commons offers 19 meals a week. It is an "all you can eat" facility during meal serving 
periods. The Commons provides a wide range of offerings including multiple entrees at each meal, 
vegetarian entree options, a variety of breakfast cereals, pizza made to order, a sandwich bar, 
a large salad bar, and a choice of desserts, many made from scratch in our bakery. Soft serve 
ice cream and yogurt are available daily as well. Beverages include soft drinks, fruit juices, milk, 
coffee, and tea. 

The Union Cafe, located in the Alvarez Campus Center has deli, grill, and pizza counters, as 
well as an array of daily specials. Convenience foods and snack items are also available. 

The Wildcat Den is located on the lower level of Baker Sports Complex. The Den operates as 
a lunch counter only, providing sandwiches, chips, beverages, and a candy selection. A sandwich 
special is available during the lunch period five days a week. 



Campus Life — 27 



First-vear students are required to participate in a full-meal plan for the entire year. Upper- 
class students may select from a variety of meal plans. Each meal plan includes Bonus Bucks 
that students may use at any dining location as well as in vending machines located throughout 
campus. Unused Bonus Bucks do not carry over to later semesters. Students may use meal plans 
at the Cafe and/ or the Wildcat Den on a limited basis and charge up to a pre-set amount for an 
"equivalent" meal at these locations at designated times of the day. 

A registered dietitian is on the Dining Services staff and maintains an office in Vail Commons. 
The dietitian is available to all students for nutritional counseling. 

Dining Services also operates a catering program for college activities and community events. 
Many students are employed by the catering department throughout the year. No prior experience 
is necessary. 

LAUNDRY 

The college operates a central laundry facility where students may drop off laundry and pick 
it up clean, folded, wrapped, or in the case of dress shirts, pressed and placed on hangers. This 
service is included in the tuition and fees which all students are required to pay. Large items like 
blankets, quilts, and sleeping bags can also be laundered for an additional charge. The laundrv 
facility, located behind Cannon and Sentelle Residence Halls, is open five and one-half days a 
week. Drv cleaning and alteration services are also available for an additional charge payable bv 
cash or against the declining balance account on the CatCard. During the summer prior to the 
first year, each student receives a laundrv number to place in each piece of clothing and on the 
student's laundry bag. This number is retained throughout the student's career at Davidson. At 
the opening of school, the laundry provides residential students with bed linens which may be 
exchanged for clean linens as necessary during the year. 

PATTERSON COURT 

The Patterson Court system provides an outlet for leadership, social, service, athletic, and 
community -based interaction in a small-group setting. About 70 percent of Davidson women and 
42 percent of Davidson men participate in one of the twelve organizations that make up Patterson 
Court Council: seven fraternities (Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma 
Delta, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and Sigma Phi Epsilon); and four women's eating 
houses (Connor, Rusk, Turner, and Warner Hall). Alpha Phi Alpha does not have housing while 
the remaining organizations rent facilities from the college around the area designated as Patterson 
Court. All organizations situated on Patterson Court provide meal plan options for upper-class 
members. 

Every first-year student in good academic standing is invited to participate in the membership 
process known as court selection, hi January, first-year students (and interested, unaffiliated upper- 
class students) may complete a membership form on which thev indicate an interest in joining one 
of the eleven single-gender organizations. Students may join any organization. This may or may 
not include the opportunity for national affiliation. Each national fraternity reserves the right to 
restrict its membership based on its selected criteria. Organizations may orally encourage students 
to join. 

Participation in Patterson Court events is open to those students who have an investment 
in the risk management obligations of the organizations as demonstrated by the Patterson Court 
sticker on the student ID. Stickers may be obtained bv independents each semester for a nominal 



28 — Campus Life 



fee. System-wide activities, policies, and initiatives are coordinated by the Patterson Court Council. 
The organizations are accountable for their individual and collective actions to the Patterson Court 
Judicial Board. Members of Patterson Court organizations who excel in leadership, scholarship, 
and community involvement are recognized by the Order of Omega National Honor Society. 

ART 

The Katherine and Tom Belk Visual Arts Center houses two galleries, the William H. Van 
Every, Jr. Gallery and the Edward M. Smith Gallery. Throughout the year the galleries feature both 
one-person and group exhibitions that explore a wide range of media and cultural issues. The work 
of internationally renowned, nationally recognized, emerging, and regional artists is presented in 
a series of exhibitions that focuses on contemporary art and ideas. Selections from the Davidson 
College Art Collection of over 2,700 prints, drawings, photographs, paintings, and sculpture that 
range from old masters to modern and contemporary artists also are exhibited regularly. There is 
an annual group exhibition featuring student work in the spring and an exhibition of the studio art 
faculty held traditionally in the fall. 

In keeping with the educational mission of Davidson College and the galleries, a series of 
related programs accompanies the yearly exhibitions and includes individual speakers, panels, 
or forums. These are comprised of artists, art historians, critical thinkers, and experts in various 
disciplines who bring unique perspectives to the understanding and appreciation of each exhibition. 
The programs are usually held in the Visual Art Center 's Semans Auditorium, followed by a 
reception for the artist or speaker in the atrium. 

Every spring senior studio art majors present solo exhibitions in the Smith Gallery. Throughout 
the year students are encouraged to interact on an informal, elective basis with the professional 
artists working on gallery installations and to seek the input of visiting artists and critics available 
for individual critiques. In addition, visiting art historians give free public lectures and special 
seminars singularly designed for art majors. The visits by these artists and art historians are co- 
sponsored with the Friends of the Arts at Davidson. 

MUSIC 

The Music Department offers many performance opportunities through various ensembles, 
some of which tour. Vocal groups include the Chorale, the Concert Choir, and the Opera Workshop. 
Instrumentalists may join the Symphony Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Flute Choir, 
and African Drumming Ensemble. Chamber Music opportunities involve various student 
ensembles coached by faculty. Private instruction in voice and for all instruments is available. For 
additional information, contact the Music Department. 

Campus musical events include the Concert Series; Classical Indian Music Series; Musical 
Interludes; recitals by visiting artists, faculty, vocal and instrumental ensembles, and students; 
and lectures by visiting musical scholars. In nearby Charlotte, concerts are offered by the Charlotte 
Symphony Orchestra, Opera Carolina, the Community Concerts Series, the Oratorio Singers, and 
various other musical organizations. 

Students especially gifted in music performance are encouraged to apply for scholarships 
provided through the Donald B. Plott, Estes Millner, Zachary F. Long, Jr., Vail Family, and James 
C. Harper Endowments. 



Campus Life — 29 



THEATRE 

Through its curriculum and production program, the Theatre Department seeks to develop 
an appreciation and understanding of the theatrical arts for the newcomer and to offer in-depth 
training for experienced students. The department's program provides many opportunities for 
student involvement in its production season. Typically, four full-length plays and numerous one- 
acts are presented annually. Roles are cast by open audition and students are encouraged to try 
out regardless of experience level. 

Theatre Department main stage productions (one each semester) are performed in the Duke 
Family Performance Hall, a 600+ seat proscenium theatre in the Knobloch Campus Center. Other 
performance spaces, located in Cunningham Fine Arts Building, are Hodson Hall and a smaller 
black box facility. Studio productions, student plays, and performance projects are presented in 
these spaces year-round. 

Full-length plays are directed by theatre faculty, guest directors, or advanced theatre 
students. One-acts are directed by students. Other student performance projects are encouraged 
and supported by the department. Guest artists, including playwrights, directors, actors, and 
designers, work with students on a regular basis. 

There is ample opportunity to see quality theatre in the area aside from department productions. 
Davidson's Artist Series regularly brings touring plavs into the Duke Familv Performance Hall. 
Manv resident companies and university programs produce quality work in the Charlotte area. 
The department keeps a list of current offerings on file for those interested. 

ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Davidson College is an excellent liberal arts college with a unique tradition of intercollegiate 
athletic competition. The college considers physical education, recreational sports, and 
intercollegiate athletics an integral part of every student's educational experience. Davidson 
supports a competitive athletics program with equal opportunity for participation of men and 
women. Davidson fields eleven men's and ten women's intercollegiate teams at the NCAA Division 
I level. Both men and women play varsity basketball, tennis, and soccer; run indoor/ outdoor track 
and cross country; and participate in swimming and diving. Men's sports include wrestling, golf, 
football, and baseball. Women's teams include field hockey, lacrosse, and volleyball. The college 
strives to provide keen competition at a realistic level for every sport and offers a limited number 
of athletic scholarships in both men's and women's sports. 

Davidson students aspire to excellence in athletics, as in academics. The college seeks to 
maximize opportunities for student participation as athletes and spectators in a variety of sports. 
A remarkable 85 percent of students participate in the intramural sports program. One-day 
intramural events are planned throughout the year. Residence halls, fraternities, eating houses, 
faculty, and staff field teams in six sports including flickerball, three-on-three and five-on-five 
basketball, Softball, small-field soccer, and volleyball. Seventeen club sports pit Davidson teams 
against club teams of other colleges. Students are responsible for organizing, regulating, and 
scheduling activities for these club teams. Clubs include women's lacrosse and volleyball; men's 
rugby and weight lifting; and open clubs for men and women in sailing, fencing, water skiing, 
crew, canoeing, ultimate frisbee, field hockev, tennis, and soccer. 



30 — Campus Life 



Davidson's physical education program is based upon the belief that physical activity 
is important to a person's overall development. Mandatory in the first two years, the program 
emphasizes the carry-over value of sports as a lifetime endeavor. The more than 50 courses offered 
in the physical education curriculum range from aerobics and archery to racquetball and scuba. 
For additional information see Physical Education in the Courses section. 

Davidson athletic and physical education facilities are outstanding. The Baker Sports Complex 
includes the Ben T. Craig Plaza, the Newell Entrance Court, and the Nisbet Lobby. In the lobby are 
two racquetball courts, a squash court, a Nautilus center, and the Hall of Fame Room. 

The centerpiece of the facility is the John M. Belk Arena, featuring a main varsity court with a 
hardwood floor. For athletic events, the Belk Arena seats nearly 6,000. When the bleacher seating is 
retracted, two additional hardwood basketball courts and two volleyball courts are available. 

The Charles A. Cannon Pool is an eight-lane pool with a stainless steel movable bulkhead to 
accommodate competition in both yards and meters. The separate diving well features both one 
and three-meter boards. The facility includes a balcony for spectator seating. 

The Louis and Carl Knobloch Indoor Tennis Center features a durable acrylic-based hard- 
court surface covering four courts. They are lit with indirect lighting and have movable screens 
between them. The center also has locker rooms, offices, and a conference room. 

The Finley Physical Education Center incorporates a weight room with both Nautilus and 
free weights, a state of the art athletic medical facility, a wrestling room, and a dance studio. The 
center also has locker rooms for student/ faculty/ staff use and for sports teams, one additional 
racquetball court, a classroom, and office space. 

RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL LIFE 

Religious life at Davidson is celebrated on the affirmation that we are all created in the 
image of God, whatever our creed, heritage, or beliefs. As a Presbyterian church-related college, 
Davidson values the life of the spirit and fosters openness to and respect for the world's various 
faith traditions. Davidson's chaplains serve as pastors to the entire college community. They 
are available to people from any faith tradition, or none at all, for pastoral counseling, spiritual 
direction, and program planning. They also coordinate a variety of activities including on-campus 
worship services, international mission/ study trips, programs integrating service and social 
justice, and interfaith dialogue. 

Four area churches, all within walking distance of the college, have active campus ministries. 
Through the Catholic Campus Ministry, Mass is celebrated weekly in Lingle Chapel. The local 
Episcopal Church sponsors a Canterbury Fellowship on campus, the Methodist Church Fellowship 
meets weekly for discussion of faith and current issues, and the Davidson College Presbyterian 
Church hosts the Westminster Fellowship for a meal and a program on Sunday afternoons. 

The Davidson area has a growing Jewish community. Monthly Sabbath services are held on 
the college campus. Two synagogues in Charlotte, one Conservative and one Reform, encourage 
Davidson students' participation in their community life and worship, especially during the High 
Holy Days. 

Several other campus-based groups also flourish. InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Campus 
Outreach, the Orthodox Christian Fellowship, and Reformed University Fellowship offer small group 
Bible studies, a weekly large group meeting, and occasional retreats. Our Jewish Student Union and 
Muslim Student Association provide opportunities for students to gather to celebrate holy days and 
participate in fellowship. Integrating faith with social justice and service is the goal of Sanctuary, 
a student group which sponsors projects such as housing the homeless on campus throughout 



Campus Life — 3 1 



the winter. Tlie Gospel Choir, rooted in the African American tradition, offers fellowship and the 
development of musical talents under the direction of Assistant Dean of Students, Ernest Jeffries. 
Interfaith Fellowship brings together Jewish, Muslim, Christian, Hindu, and Buddhist students, 
along with those of no specific tradition who are spiritual seekers, for conversation, retreats, and 
visits to area houses of worship from many traditions. 

VOCATIONAL EXPLORATION 

Though it has a complex and intimidating name, the Lilly Programs have a relatively simply 
purpose — to assist the whole college community to embrace the "big questions" about identity, 
purpose, faith, and vocation. Embracing these questions is fundamental to a liberal arts education. 
Moreover, despite the great diversity within human life and society, every person and every 
community must come to terms with these fundamental issues. Therefore, through opportunities 
for personal introspection and community dialogue, the Lilly Programs creates space for people 
to explore who they are, why they are, what they believe, and how they are called to contribute to 
a life shared in common. Celebrating differences, acknowledging commonalities, and wrestling 
with the "big questions" is the mission of the Lilly Programs for the Theological Exploration of 
Vocation, which is served through a variety of programs and initiatives. 

Vocational Vertigo: A Sophomore Experience — The sophomore year is full of critical choices, 
questions, and life changes. It's a year of searching for direction, purpose and balance. To support 
and challenge sophomores, this year-long program, that starts with a retreat at the beginning of 
sophomore year, helps students deepen their sense of identity, purpose, faith, and vocation. 

Care Internships — Each summer six students are awarded eight- week Care Internships. 
They live on campus, intern in the local area, and meet regularly to explore the big questions of 
identity, purpose, faith, and vocation. 

Profs on God— On a monthly basis, students are invited to participate in a dialogue led by a 
faculty or staff person, which explores the big questions of identity, purpose, faith, and vocation. 
The hallmarks of the program are diversity and dialogue. 

Lilly Lectures — Each year, several lectures and other community events are offered that 
draw attention to and help the college community explore the big questions of identity, purpose, 
faith, and vocation. 

Ministry Fellowships — Each year, up to ten juniors, who are identified as having gifts for 
ministry, are given the opportunity to explore it as a vocation through an eight-week summer 
internship in a congregational setting and a communal discernment process throughout their 
senior year. 

Academic Enrichment— The bi-annual Lester B. Coltraine III Visiting Professorship and 
funds for the development and support of courses related to faith, values, and vocation enrich the 
academic as well as the extra-curricular environment. 

Alumni Summer Seminar— Bi-annually a three-day, summer seminar is offered to alumni 
interested in embracing, once again, the big questions of identity, purpose, faith, and vocation. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Social life at Davidson takes its cue from the setting: activities are often the result of small-group 
interests — sailing at the lake campus, entertainment in the Campus Center, going to Charlotte for 
dinner and other entertainment, bowling in Huntersville, or skiing at Beech Mountain. In addition 
there are many campus-wide activities which involve large numbers of students as well as other 



32 — Campus Life 



members of the college community. These events are often sponsored by the College Union Board, 
the Patterson Court Council, the Residence Life Office, and other student organizations. Student 
groups work cooperatively to sponsor campus events. Spring Frolics, 'Aftermidnight,' The Red 
and Black Ball, Homecoming, major concerts, and the Campus Christmas Party are a few of the 
major events. Social activities are planned and produced by students. 

THE KNOBLOCH CAMPUS CENTER 

The Knobloch Campus Center is the center of college community life. The Center combines 
the Alvarez College Union and the Duke Familv Performance Hall. Knobloch is the gathering 
place for students, faculty, staff, and visitors. It provides opportunities for involvement in formal 
and informal activities. 

Special features abound, including the Cafe in a three-story atrium with skylight, a 600-seat 
state-of-the-art performance hall, a fitness center, climbing wall, outdoor center, information desk, 
post office, copy center, meeting rooms, bookstore, student organization offices, and offices for the 
Chaplain, Career Services, Student Activities, and Community Services. Outdoor features include 
an amphitheater on the west side of the building and a terrace overlooking the football field to the 
south. 

A planned program of social and co-curricular activities is initiated by the College Union 
Board and provided in collaboration with a host of other student organizations and departments. 
Student committees are responsible for presenting films, speakers, dancers, artists, poets, and 
musicians of all types. Recent performers include the Black Eyed Peas, Bill Cosby, Ben Folds, 
Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds, John Mayer, Bob Dylan, Ludacris, and the Indigo Girls. Recent 
Public Lecture Committee and College Union Speakers Committee guest speakers include Fareed 
Zakaria, Julian Bond, Paul Kingman, Bobby Kennedv Jr., Nikki Giovanni, Cornel West, and 
Marian Wright Edelman. 

Students assisted bv faculty and staff, are responsible for the Artists Series which has recently 
presented "RENT," the Bruce Wood Dance Company, Ailey II, the Poncho Sanchez Latin Jazz 
Band, Chicago City Limits, Monk on Monk, and Ladvsmith Black Mambazo. 

The Davidson Outdoors Center invites students to get away from campus on weekend trips 
for canoeing, rock climbing, camping, hiking, and skiing. Two professional staff members work 
with a group of twenty student trip leaders to provide outdoor activities. Major trips have taken 
students canoeing in the Everglades and on the Rio Grande, sailing off the Gulf Coast of Florida, 
hang gliding at the Outer Banks, sea kavaking off the Georgia Coast, and Whitewater rafting on the 
New and Gaulev rivers in West Virginia. 

Through its programs, facilities, and services, the Campus Center is the heartbeat of the 
college and the focal point for out-of-class activity. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

As stated in the by-laws of the Student Government Association (SGA), the purpose of the 
student government is "to share with the Board of Trustees, the Faculty, and the Administration 
the responsibility for developing and maintaining Davidson as a superior academic community." 

Based on one of the earlier student government constitutions (1910), Davidson students 
govern themselves through the senate, headed by the President and vice President of SGA, and 
the many committees of the SGA. The student senate is made up of three representatives from 



Campus Life — 33 



each class, representatives from each Patterson Court House, and independent representatives. 
Officers and senators are elected bv student vote. 

Although activity is centered in the senate, active participation in student government is not 
restricted to elected officials. Students from all classes serve on numerous committees of the senate 
and fill student positions on faculty and trustee committees. 

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

Chidsey Leadership Fellows— Up to 20 freshmen are selected to be Chidsey Leadership Fellows 
each vear. This program provides a 4-year comprehensive leadership experience in which Fellows 
develop self awareness, knowledge of leadership theories and contexts, leadership capabilities, 
and connections with others. The program includes seminars, retreats, mentoring, coursework, 
and visiting lectures with significant leaders. Fellows learn how to use their unique strengths and 
values to become leaders who are able to inspire a group of people to powerfully and effectively 
accomplish a common purpose. 

Leadership Davidson— Designed to improve students' overall leadership skills and enable them 
to use these skills bevond Davidson, Leadership Davidson provides a vear-long opportunity 
for participants to identify, acquire, and hone the skills necessary to lead effectively. Through 
experiential learning— learning by doing— students build skills in comniunication, listening, 
motivation, value clarification, self-awareness, and critical thinking. Based on their expressed 
interests, students are matched one-to-one with local and Charlotte area professional business and 
community leaders in mentoring relationships. 

Leadership Development Center — Located in Jackson Court # 8, the Leadership Development 
Center houses the leadership library, lounge and offices. The leadership librarv consists of books, 
magazines, videos, and a collection of group development activities. Students can access online 
resources, or have a small group meeting in the Leadership Lounge. Staff is available to coach 
student leaders or consult with student organizations by appointment. 

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS 

New groups are founded each vear through the Student Government Association and the 
College Union to meet student interests and concerns. Students may join existing groups in the 
following areas: academic specialty clubs and honoraries, club sports, political action groups, 
religious groups, international clubs, social service groups, hobby clubs, and performing arts 
organizations. Students mav also establish new groups according to their interests. 

MINORITY STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

On the Davidson College campus, several programs and sendees are available specificallv to 
assist students from minoritv groups: 

Asian Cultural Awareness Association —A student-led organization for all members of the 
Davidson community interested in the Asian American culture. A variety of social and cultural 
activities are sponsored throughout the vear. 



34 — Campus Life 



Black Student Coalition —The BSC is a student run organization designed to establish and 
maintain a spirit of solidarity among African American students. In addition, its purpose is to 
create a sense of awareness within the Davidson College community regarding the contributions 
of African Americans, to provide an outlet for the social and cultural needs of African American 
students, and to support the African American citizens of the town of Davidson in overcoming 
any problems that they may face. All Davidson College students are eligible to be members of the 
BSC. 

Counselor for Minority Outreach — One of the counselors at the Student Counseling Center is 
designated in this manner. As such, the CMO has a special responsibility to address the community 
needs and resources for minority students, who include ethnic/ racial minorities, international 
students, and those first-in-family-to-attend-college. This responsibility includes performing 
needs assessment on campus, coordinating Counseling Center services and programming with 
that of others on campus working with minorities, planning and providing or supporting minority- 
oriented programming, and supporting minority students in vocalizing their needs to faculty and 
administration. 

Davidson Africa Students Association — DASA is a student led organization designed to promote 
African Awareness and culture. Open to all members of the community, DASA sponsors many 
cultural and social programs throughout the year. 

Exchange Programs — Davidson College has cooperative arrangements with Howard University 
and Morehouse College which provide students opportunities for study at campuses with 
significant African American student, faculty, and staff populations. Study may be arranged for a 
year or a semester. 

Dr. Martin L. King, Jr/Black History Month Cultural Arts Series — During the months of January 
and February, an assortment of activities commemorating the history and accomplishments of 
African Americans are held on campus. Typical activities include a gospel songfest, speeches from 
political leaders, lectures by historians, art exhibits, films, and literary performances. 

Organization of Latin American Students— OLAS is a student-led organization for all members 
of the Davidson Community interested in the Latin American culture. A variety of social and 
cultural events are sponsored throughout the year. 

Pre-College Enrichment Program— This is a summer pre-orientation experience for incoming 
students of color. Participants are involved in an assortment of activities designed to facilitate their 
adjustment to college life. 

Second Family Program— African American, Hispanic, and Asian American first- year students 
have the option to participate in a "Second Family" program with selected faculty and staff. Under 
the auspices of the Academic Affairs and Dean of Students Offices, this program facilitates students' 
adjustment to campus by giving them an opportunity to develop a rapport with established 
members of the college. The "second family" and student develop one-to-one relationships via 
participation in various activities of mutual interest. 



Campus Life — 35 



Students Together Reaching for Individual Development in Education — S.T.R.I.D.E. is a support 
program for first-vear, ethnic minority students to assist with their adjustment to Davidson 
College. A series of designed experiences offer academic, cultural, and social support, as well 
as vital information to aid students in understanding and working effectively within the college 
conwiunity. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE AT DAVIDSON 

Davidson College's commitment to service is clear in its statement of purpose: "The primarv 
purpose of Davidson College is to assist students in developing humane instincts and disciplined 
and creative minds for lives of leadership and service." While service and communitv involvement 
are principles practiced across campus, the Community Service Office serves as the hub for service 
efforts on campus. Through its programs, events, and resources, the office works with students, 
faculty, staff and communitv members to promote learning through service and engagement with 
the coiruTvunitv . 

Bonner Scholarship Program— The Bonner Scholars Program offers 20 four-year, developmental, 
field-based communitv service scholarships each vear as an alternative to Federal Work-studv 
placements. The program's mission is to provide opportunities for students with financial need 
to use their talents in the surrounding community. The Bonner Scholarships integrate individual 
initiative and leadership with intellectual, spiritual, and emotional growth. 

Community-based Learning— The increasing need for volunteers in the surrounding communitv 
invites student participation at many levels. Students often engage in community service work 
inside and outside the classroom. Students may enroll in courses which include a community 
service component; courses of this kind exist in political science, foreign language, biology, 
economics, English, and psvchologv. In addition, students may pursue independent studv work 
addressing community concerns. 

Freedom Schools™ —The Children's Defense Fund describes its Freedom Schools program as 
"an educational and cultural enrichment program that provides summer options for children 
where there are none and strengthens parent and community involvement with the year-round 
achievement of children." Freedom Schools at Davidson College serves a limited number of 
children in primary and secondary grades. The program integrates reading, conflict resolution 
and social action in an activity-based curriculum that promotes social, cultural and historical 
awareness. Davidson College students primarilv serve as servant leader interns or the program 
at two community sites. 

Leaders in Service —Organizing around service provides students with an incredible opportunity 
to assume leadership roles. Many opportunities exist both on and off campus for students to take 
on such positions. The following are several student-led initiatives and organizations that focus 
on service and social change: 

Engage for Change is a student-led, campus-wide initiative designed to unite the student 
body and engage in discourse regarding social change efforts. Bv combining efforts of several 
chartered student organizations, the intense focus enables students to encounter and respond to 
one theme for social action throughout the course of an academic vear. 



36 — Campus Life 



United Community Action (UCA), a student-run organization, coordinates many student 
community service efforts and works to address community needs. These leaders work closely 
with the staff in the Community Service Office to discuss developments in the community, to plan 
activities that build self- and community- awareness, and to coordinate on-campus programming 
related to community service. Projects such as service trips over student breaks, the annual Project 
Life Bone Marrow Typing Drive, the Ada Jenkins After School Program, tutoring, and weekend 
construction work with Habitat for Humanity are some examples of UCA's work. 

The college employs four staff members who work with students on a regular basis to 
coordinate and initiate community service efforts or projects. Overall, Davidson provides a 
wealth of one-time and on-going opportunities for students to work directly in the community in 
meaningful ways. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Students interested in writing, editing, photography, or broadcasting enjoy working on the 
following publication and broadcast media: 

Hie Davidsonian: a weekly newspaper edited, written, and managed by students. It has received an 
All- American rating bv the Associated College Press numerous times since 1951. 
Libertas: a news and arts magazine written, edited, managed, and produced by students. Libertas, 
established bv students in 1996, emphasizes student issues as well as Davidson's place in the larger 
community. 

Quips and Cranks: the college yearbook, a student project. 

Tlie Wildcat Handbook: a guide designed to acquaint first-year students with the traditions, policies, 
activities, and personnel of the college. 

Hobart Park: an experimental magazine begun by students in 1979 to encourage writing and graphics 
by students and faculty. 

WDAV-FM: a 100,000 watt classical music/ fine arts station for Greater Charlotte and the Piedmont. 
Training is available for interested students; qualified students hold jobs on the staff. 
WALT-AM: the student, local-band radio station. WALT has a varied musical format and is entirely 
student operated. 

The Office of College Communications depends upon student employees as writers, designers, and 
photographers. 

CAREER SERVICES 

The Office of Career Services exists to aid students in the ongoing and lifelong process of 
career development. The staff helps students individually to explore their interests and the work 
around them, define their unique niche, and take meaningful steps toward career preparation. 
This may include vocational assessment, community service, travel and study abroad, internships, 
graduate school, or a successful job search. 

From their first semester at Davidson, students are encouraged to think about plans for the 
future, especially summer options and semester internships. An information sheet is kept on each 
student to help guide the career counseling process. 

Exploration of Interests: Davidson students are encouraged to explore their options to discover 
areas of true interest. Self -assessment— through personality and interest inventories, one-on-one 
career counseling with staff, and interactive workshops -helps students discover where their 



Campus Life — 37 



career interests lie. Students are then coached to explore these interests through informational 
interviews, mentorships, and internships. 

Seminars and workshops on resumes, cover letter writing, internship and job search techniques, 
networking, interviewing, and industry panels of alumni prepare students to implement career 
decisions. 

Internships and Summer Jobs: All students are encouraged to participate in summer jobs and 
internships to explore career interests, to gain experience, and to enhance personal development. 
Career Sendees provides an online database of internship, community service, and volunteer 
opportunities. These experiences are regarded as the best first phase of the career implementation 
process. 

Alumni and Parent Resources: Students are encouraged to seek information and advice on 
careers from alumni and parents. Indexes of all alumni citing tvpe and place of emplovment are 
available in the office to help students understand the range of personal resources available to 
them. 

Career Resources Library: Organized by vocational clusters, the library provides specific career 
planning and job search resources. These include information on various career fields; internships 
and summer jobs; sendee opportunities; and local, national, and international emplovers. A unique 
feature of the librarv is an international section that includes guides for researching overseas job 
and sendee opportunities. 

Career Coaching & Networking: Seniors are offered a variety of structured experiences designed 
to assist with a job search. Alumni and emplovers offer resume critiques and mock interviews 
based on students' needs. In the past year 1013 organizations engaged in recruiting through 
Career Sendees' campus-based programs and activities. Through Davidson's relationship with a 
consortium of leading colleges and universities, seniors also have the opportunity to interview in 
Chicago, New York Citv, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C through the Selective Liberal Arts 
Consortium. In partnership with CSO Interfase, Davidson provides extensive online job search 
and campus recruiting support to students via eCareers. 

Graduate School Guidance: In close partnership with faculty, Career Sendees supports students 
in selecting and applving to graduate and professional programs, and researching sources of 
financial aid. Each vear graduate school recruiters from across the countrv visit campus to talk 
with interested students. 

Davidson has pre-professional groups headed bv Davidson faculty and supported by a 
Career Sendees staff member. In addition, an extensive graduate fellowship file is maintained for 
opportunities in a varietv of fields. 

Exploring Options Bei/ond Campus: Students may wish to spend a semester away from campus 
to go abroad, study at other institutions, or enhance their development through volunteer sendee 
or work. The career counselors are available to provide counseling and assist with planning for 
these options. 

HEALTH AND SAFETY 

The college provides for the health and safetv of students through professional services and 
institutional policies. A few are described below. Complete information is available from the Office 
of the Dean of Students. 

Student Counseling Center —The Student Counseling Center (SCC) offers a broad range of 
counseling and psvchological sendees. Some students seek consultation at the SCC in learning 



38 — Campus Life 



new skills associated with time management, stress management, and study techniques and 
habits. Others desire information and assessment regarding interests, abilities, and personality. 
Counseling is offered regarding a variety of life circumstances, from coping with the difficulties 
associated with studying arid living in a busy environment, dating, or moving away from home, 
to coping with changes in family life brought on by divorce or death of a family member. Students 
with a learning disability or Attention Deficit Disorder also benefit from counseling services. 
Eating disorders, anxiety, depression, or substance abuse can also be addressed at the SCC 

The SCC is located in the same building as the Student Health Service. The staff consists of 
doctoral level licensed psychologists and other trained and experienced health professionals. Up 
to ten sessions per year are available to each student at no charge. (Arrangements can be made 
for students needing additional sessions.) The relationship between student and counselor is 
professional and is fully confidential within the confines of safety of self and others. The Student 
Counseling Center is open 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., weekdays. A counselor is "on call" by pager 
(704-356-2118) after hours and weekends for psychological emergencies. 

In addition to one part-time, private psychiatrist on-site, the SCC has established referral 
relationships with excellent nearby private psychiatrists. Students are financially responsible for 
such private services. Entering students who have previously received counseling or psychiatric 
services and wish to continue at Davidson are encouraged to contact the Director (Dr. David 
Staton at P.O. Box 7188 or at dastaton@davidson.edu) in the summer before arriving on campus. 
The SCC provides for education/ prevention by presenting talks and workshops to student groups 
and staff/ faculty during the academic year. 

Student Health Service —The Davidson College Student Health Service provides routine 
health care with the services of a full-time nursing staff and part-time staff of physicians contracted 
with nearby medical groups. The staff includes a full-time health educator who is available for 
individual consultation and extensive health-related programming. A nutritionist is also accessible 
for individual consultation in Vail Commons. 

The Student Health facility is open weekdays 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., with a registered nurse 
on duty. Nurses provide routine screening and lab services and run an allergy clinic for students 
requiring allergy shots. The services of physicians are provided on an appointment basis during 
"sick call," weekday afternoons. Same day appointments are available for urgent problems. 

After-hours and weekends, the nursing staff provides an "on-call nurse," who is available 
by pager (704-337-7047), to consult with students by phone about health concerns. The nurse can 
determine if the student needs to be seen immediately at the Student Health facility, referred to a 
local emergency room, or seen at the next "sick call." 

All outpatient services are available to students at no additional charge, with the exception 
of laboratory work, medical supplies, and medications which are billed to the student's college 
account. 

The infirmary section of the facility has a limited number of beds available for the care of 
students who need observation and supervision, for those who have infectious diseases or short- 
term orthopedic needs, and for others whose illness calls for time away from the residence hall 
setting. It is not a hospital; care is similar to what would be received at home. There is a $25 fee per 
night for an overnight stay which covers meals, bandages, and other routine medical supplies. 

When students require medical care beyond the scope of the Student Health Service, the staff 
can assist in making arrangements for appropriate care at an area hospital. In emergencies, this 
may include obtaining local ambulance services. Occasionally, the physician may refer a student 
to a specialist as needed. 

Dental care is available to students at their own expense through two private dental 
practices in Davidson. An optometric practice is available in the neighboring town of Cornelius. 
Ophthalmologists are available in Cornelius (4 miles), Mooresville (7 miles), and Charlotte (19 
miles). A private physical therapist is available in Davidson. 



Campus Life — 39 



Services for Disabled Students —The college does not discriminate on the basis of disability 
in the admission or education of students. The Associate Dean of Students serves as the point of 
contact for all matters regarding disabled students. Disabled students who request help are able to 
receive individualized assistance. 

The Associate Dean of Students assists disabled students in locating available resources in 
the college community and ensures that services are provided consistent with applicable law and 
college policies. Additionally, there are various student organizations that provide support and 
information to students with disabilities. 

Special procedures have been developed for students handicapped by learning disabilities. 
Students who seek adapted instruction on the basis of a learning disability undergo an evaluation by 
college-designated learning specialists, usually at the student's expense. The results of the evaluation, 
made available to the college with the student's permission, may include recommendations for 
compensatory learning strategies to be used by the student and recommendations for services 
and accommodations to be provided by the college. Using these recommendations as a guide, 
strategies are developed to enhance learning strengths and compensate for learning difficulties. 

If any adjustments to academic requirements are recommended, they are considered by the 
Curriculum Requirements Committee. The result may be approval of the recommendations or a 
substitution for the academic requirement. 

A copy of the Policy for Disabled Students at Davidson College and additional information 
regarding services provided by the college to disabled students are available in the Office of the 
Dean of Students. Hearing impaired students may contact the office via the TDD Relay Services 
at 1-800-735-2962. 

Davidson College Campus Police Department — The Campus Police Department exists as a 
support unit of the college for the purpose of establishing and maintaining an atmosphere in which 
people can go safely about their varied activities in furtherance of the college's higher objectives. 
The Davidson College Campus Police Department is the primary response agency for all crimes 
and incidents on campus, providing emergency assistance, investigating and documenting 
incidents, and is the liaison with local police, fire, and medical response agencies. The Department 
is located in the Tomlinson building and provides public safety services 24 hours-a-day, 7 days- 
a-week. Campus Police Officers may be reached at any time by dialing extension 2178 from any 
on-campus phone, or the duty phone at (704) 609-0344. 

The Davidson College Campus Police Department enforces state laws concerning the 
possession of illegal weapons on campus. Weapons, including but not limited to firearms, 
explosives, fireworks, and martial arts weaponry, are not permitted on any property owned or 
leased by Davidson College. Violators are subject to disciplinary action and criminal charges. 
The college also reserves the right to remove from the possession of anyone on campus (or their 
residence) any item which may be deemed a threat to the safety and well being of others on 
campus. Such items include, but are not limited to, knives, pellet guns, and other objects, which in 
and of themselves may not be illegal. 

INVOLUNTARY WITHDRAWAL 

The college reserves the right to suspend, enforce the withdrawal of, or expel a student 
whose academic standing is unsatisfactory or a student who violates the Honor Code, the Code 
of Responsibility, or college regulations. For copies of the codes, write to the Office of the Dean of 
Students. 

The Dean of Students, after consultation with healthcare providers, professors, counselors, 
or other individuals as appropriate, may require the temporary withdrawal of a student who is 
suffering medical or psychological problems. The student will be encouraged to seek professional 
care and will be considered for readmission when the student's condition has improved and after 
consultation with the care provider. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 
AND POLICIES 



Note: Even/ effort is made to keep the information in this section current. Changes are sometimes made 
after the catalog goes to press, however, tlie online catalog (littp://catalog/davidson.edu) is current on course 
offerings. Students should consult with their advisors and the Registrar's Office in planning their program. 
Nezc students in particular should consult tlie Registrar's Office pages on tlie Davidson College web site, 
www.davidson.edu. 

THE CURRICULUM 

The liberal arts curriculum at Davidson College is dedicated to the intellectual and personal 
growth of students. This curriculum affirms the intrinsic worth of a broad exposure to intellectual 
and artistic achievement and strives to nurture students' capacities for knowledge, understanding, 
judgment, and compassion. Teaching is the primary activity and responsibility of the faculty, 
which is also active in research and service. Developing skills in the methods by which knowledge 
is acquired, evaluated, and appropriately applied is the primary activity and responsibility of 
students. 

Credit is granted on a course credit basis, with a course being equivalent (for transfer 
purposes) to four semester or six quarter hours. The curriculum consists of six general areas of 
study: Literature, Fine Arts, History, Religion and Philosophy, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, 
and the Social Sciences. To encourage the excitement and self-discipline that come from probing a 
subject in depth, the college requires a major in one of the following departments: 



Anthropologv 


French 


Political Science 


Art 


German 


Psychology 


Biology 


Historv 


Religion 


Chemistry 


Mathematics 


Sociology 


Classics 


Music 


Spanish 


Economics 


Philosophy 


Theatre 


English 


Physics 





Students also may develop an interdisciplinary major through the Center for Interdisciplinary 
Studies. Davidson allows double majors. 

In order to make connections among courses and disciplines, the curriculum includes 
opportunities for students to pursue a concentration or a minor as well as a major. A concentration 
is an interdisciplinary cluster of courses which addresses a specific area of study. A student may 
choose a concentration to complement the major, but concentrations are not required. Davidson 
offers concentrations in Applied Mathematics, Asian Studies, Computer Science, Education, 
Ethnic Studies, Film and Media Studies, Gender Studies, Genomics, International Studies, Medical 
Humanities, Neuroscience, and Southern Studies. Requirements for concentrations are described 
in the section following the Theatre Department course listings in the print catalog and in the 
Academic Departments and Concentrations section in the Online Catalog. Students pursuing a 
concentration mav not pursue a double major or a minor. 



42 — Academic Program and Policies 



Some departments offer a minor, a designated set of five or six courses. Students are allowed 
to declare one and only one minor to the appropriate academic department by no later than 
October 1 of their senior year. Students declaring a minor may not also declare a concentration or a 
second major. A minimum overall 2.0 cumulative grade point average and a minimum 2.0 average 
on all courses counted toward the minor are required. Specific requirements for minors are listed 
after major requirements in the departments where they are offered. 

The college offers courses but no major in Arabic, Chinese, Communication, Computer Science, 
Greek, Humanities, Latin, Military Studies, Physical Education, Russian, South Asian Studies, and 
Education. Through the Teacher Education Program students may complete the necessary course 
work to apply for a teaching license. Students have various opportunities for independent and 
interdisciplinary studies, study abroad, and participation in off-campus programs. 

The Davidson curriculum stresses competence in reading, writing, fundamental mathematical 
skills, oral communication, and use of computers. Students develop oral communication skills 
through class discussion, seminar presentations, and formal oral communication courses. To 
develop their skills in writing and analysis, students may select one of the following options to 
satisfy the college composition requirement: English 100W or 101 W, the four-course humanities 
sequence (HUM 150, 151 W, 250, 251), the two-course Cultures and Civilizations sequence (HUM 
160, 161 W), or a departmental 100W or 101 W First-year Seminar. Departmental first-year seminars 
(100W or 101 W) are discussion-based, writing-intensive courses rooted in a discipline. The courses 
normally require completion of five to seven shorter writing assignments and a longer research 
paper. Readings for each course span and exemplify different approaches to writing. The courses 
address elements of style and revision, processes of peer review, word-processing skills, library- 
based and web-based research techniques, and conventions of documentation. Some 100W 
sections (but not 101W sections) may also satisfy a distribution requirement in the departmental 
area. Students should check the departmental listing for the distribution area satisfied. The class 
schedule for each semester lists current offerings under the appropriate departments. 

Computers are used in most laboratory science and mathematics courses and in individual 
courses in the social sciences and the humanities. Students interested in the degree of competence 
expected in individual courses may consult the instructor or the course syllabi available in the 
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the library. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Davidson offers a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science degree. To receive a bachelor's 
degree the candidate for the degree shall: 

1. Be of good character and conduct, as certified by the Dean of Students, and discharge all college 
financial obligations to the satisfaction of the Controller. 

2. Complete satisfactorily 32 courses, at least one-half (16) in residence at Davidson College. The 
period of residence must include the senior year (at least the final 7 courses). Courses in off- 
campus programs officially sponsored by Davidson College are considered to be courses in 
residence. 

3. Complete the foreign language requirement by successfully completing the intermediate level 
(201 or higher) of a Davidson foreign language course, by an approved transfer course at an 
equivalent level, or by equivalent proficiency as determined and certified by the appropriate 
Davidson foreign language department. Courses offered through the Self-Instructional 
Language Program do not satisfy the foreign language requirement. A student who satisfactorily 
documents that English is not his or her first language satisfies the foreign language requirement 



Academic Program and Policies — 43 



through the requirement in composition. It is strongly recommended that the student complete 
the foreign language requirement before entering the senior year. 

4. Complete the composition requirement by completing successfully by the end of the first year 
at Dayidson College a course designated with a W. Advanced Placement or other credits 
completed prior to college matriculation do not satisfy the composition requirement. 

5. Complete all requirements for a major field of study, including an average of 2.0 on all courses 
in the major. For the computation of the major grade point average, when a course is repeated, 
only the most recent grade counts. 

6. Complete Distribution requirements as follows: 

a. Literature: one course from among the specified courses in the Departments of Chinese, 
Classics, English, French, German/ Russian, and Spanish. 

b. Fine Arts: one course from among the specified courses in the Departments of Art, Music, 
and Theatre. 

c. History: one course from among the specified courses in the Department of History. 

d. Religion and Philosophy: two courses, at least one of which must be in Religion, from 
among the specified courses in the Departments of Religion and Philosophy. 

e. Natural Science and Mathematics: three courses from among the specified courses in the 
Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. At least one of the three 
must be a course in Mathematics or Computer Science and at least one must be a science 
course with a laboratory. 

f. Social Sciences: two courses from among the specified courses in the Departments of 
Anthropology, Economics, Education, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

NOTE: TJie four-course Humanities sequence (150, 15IW, 250, 251) satisfies the composition 

requirement and distribution requirements as follows: literature (one course); history (one course); 

and religion and philosophy (two courses, including Religion). Tl\e two-course Humanities sequence 

(160, 161W) satisfies the composition requirement and the distribution requirement in literature. 

A student who withdraws from either Humanities sequence after one semester receives one credit 

toward graduation, but neither distribution nor composition credit. A student who withdraws from 

the four-course sequence after the second semester receives credit only for HUM 151W, satisfying the 

composition requirement but no distribution requirement. 

At least six of the ten distribution requirements must be completed for a student to enter the 

junior year. It is strongly recommended that the student complete all ten distribution requirements 

before entering the senior year. 

7. Complete a course designated as satisfying the Cultural Diversity requirement. Such courses 
deal principally with one or more cultures that differ from the predominant cultures of the 
United States or Europe. 

8. No single course satisfies more than one distribution requirement, but a course may satisfy 
a distribution requirement and other requirements such as composition, cultural diversity, 
major, minor, concentration, and (for courses above the 201 level) foreign language. 

The Registrar may designate a transfer credit (including AP or other pre-college credit) 
as satisfying a foreign language, distribution, composition, or cultural diversity requirement 
following, as occasion demands, consultation with appropriate department chairs. 

9. Satisfy the requirements in physical education as follows: PE 101; team sports (one unit); 
lifetime sports (one unit); and water-related activities (one unit). A student may be excused 
from some or all of the Physical Education requirements for medical reasons as certified by 
a college physician. PE 101 and at least two of the remaining three PE requirements must be 
completed before the junior year. The Director of Physical Education certifies completion of 
requirements in Physical Education. 



44 — Academic Program and Policies 



The college awards degrees only at the end of the spring semester during the Commencement 
Exercises and at the end of the summer (August 31). Students who enter as first-year students must 
complete the degree within four calendar years; students who transfer to Davidson are expected 
to complete the degree according to their class standing as they enter. In order to extend study into 
the fifth year (9th semester), a student must apply to the Curriculum Requirements Committee. 

Note: A student who completes requirements for two majors in departments that offer majors 
leading to different degrees must choose the degree to be conferred, A.B. or B.S. 

DEPARTMENTAL AND GRADUATION HONORS 

Most departments that offer a major also offer an Honors Program. Students with an overall 
grade point average of 3.2 are eligible for consideration for honors by their department as early as 
the spring semester of the sophomore year, but no later than the fall semester of the senior year. 
Each department may impose additional individual requirements for honors; students should 
consult the major departmental listing in the catalog and their major advisor for details. Candidates 
for honors who maintain at least a 3.2 overall grade point average and at least a 3.5 average in 
the major and who receive the recommendation of their major department are graduated with 
honors or high honors in the department of their major. Each department may impose individual 
requirements in that department in addition to the requirements here specified. 

Latin degree honors are awarded based on cumulative grade point average at graduation: 

3.500 - 3.749 cum laude 

3.750 - 3.999 magna cum laude 

4.00 summa cum laude 

STANDARDS OF PROGRESS 

Davidson measures satisfactory academic progress annually prior to the beginning of the 
fall semester. In order to be eligible for enrollment in the fall semester, students must meet the 
requirements outlined below: 

A. For entrance to the sophomore class or the third semester, the student must have completed 
seven courses (8 courses represent normal progress), including the composition (W-course) 
requirement. A student who has not earned a 1.60 cumulative grade point average by the 
beginning of the first semester of the sophomore year will be placed on academic probation. 
A student on academic probation receives special advising services through the Dean of 
Students' Office and the academic advisor. 

B. At the time of entrance into the fourth semester (second semester sophomore year) a student 
with a cumulative grade point average of 1.7 or below at the end of the third semester must 
immediately make an appointment in the office of the Dean of Students to assess clearly the 
steps necessary to achieve the average of 1.8 required for entry into the junior class (fifth 
semester). 

C. For entrance to the junior class or the fifth semester, the student must have completed 15 courses 
(16 courses represent normal progress) and must have a cumulative grade point average 
of at least 1.80. In addition, the student must have completed six of the ten distribution 
requirements (described above under "Requirements for Graduation"), must have completed 
three of the four required credits in physical education including PE 101, and must have 
officially declared a major. 



Academic Program and Policies — 45 



D. For entrance to the senior class or the seventh semester, the student anticipating graduation in 
May must have completed 24 courses; the student may become a senior anticipating August 
graduation with 22 courses. 

Students who do not meet the appropriate minimum Standards of Progress are ineligible 
to return for the fall semester. Some course deficiencies existing at the end of an academic year 
(May) may be made up in through a summer contract course with a Davidson faculty member or 
through approved transfer credit. (Note, however, that transfer credits do not affect the grade point 
average.) The Curriculum Requirements Committee specifies Standards of Progress for students 
whose records are irregular and who do not fit the requirements for one of the categories above. 

The Executive Committee of the Faculty may require a student whose academic work is 
unacceptable to withdraw from Davidson at any time. No student who has been required to 
withdraw is guaranteed readmission. A student wishing to return must apply to the Dean of 
Students for readmission. The Executive Committee of the Faculty states the minimum conditions 
under which the student may return. 

INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES 

Davidson seeks to lay intellectual foundations on which students build an understanding of 
the emerging world of the twenty-first century so that they may take their places as leaders in it. 
Davidson provides all students the experience of studying societies or cultures that differ from 
those of the United States or Europe. Required study in foreign language and in diverse cultural 
viewpoints is incorporated into the curriculum. For students wishing to pursue international 
studies beyond the general requirements, curricular and programmatic opportunities exist to 
allow for international emphasis. 

The college expects many facets of the Davidson experience — studying abroad, enjoying 
friendships with international students, hearing speakers of note, taking part in conferences on 
world affairs themes — to contribute to the process of producing graduates with a world vision. 
Some of the components of Davidson's international studies programs are described below. 

Dean Rusk International Studies Program 

Davidson strives for distinction among national liberal arts colleges in its emphasis on understanding 
the world at large and preparing students for the challenges of national and international leadership. 
Recognizing that international awareness is critical in today's interdependent world, the college 
inaugurated the Dean Rusk Program in 1985 to provide a cornerstone for efforts to enhance 
international offerings on campus and to "give each student, first, an informed awareness of our 
whole planet, and second, a direct knowledge of at least one foreign area." The Program, named for 
Davidson's distinguished alumnus who was Secretary of State during the Kennedy and Johnson 
administrations, serves as an organizing mechanism for expanding internationalism across the 
Davidson experience rather than as a separate department or major. 

The Dean Rusk Program fosters initiatives designed to ensure that Davidson students leave 
the college with a broad understanding of all dimensions of global affairs — political, cultural, 
social, economic, and historical. It sponsors visits by experts on international issues, hosts 
conferences and cultural events, and counsels students about international travel, internships, and 
careers. It encourages pursuit of an international curriculum through the college's concentration 
in International Studies, a major at the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, area studies, or courses 



46 — Academic Program and Policies 



in various academic departments. The Rusk Program coordinates Davidson's chapter of the Phi 
Beta Delta Honor Society for international scholars. In support of international experience, the 
program provides grants for student and faculty research, study, or service abroad, including 
medical volunteer work in developing countries. The Dean Rusk Program serves as a catalyst for 
dialogue on world issues in the greater Charlotte business, professional, cultural, and educational 
communities through programs it organizes in the Charlotte area and through a speakers program 
in local schools. It also promotes cultural interaction between American students and foreign 
nationals studying at the college. 

Student and Faculty Advisory Committees help ensure that the Dean Rusk International 
Studies Program is attuned to student interests and serves the college's educational objectives. 
Members of the Student Advisory Committee also organize a number of international activities 
on campus and in the community. In addition to its grant-making and campus programming 
activities, the Dean Rusk Program also includes the offices of the International Student Advisor 
and the Study Abroad Coordinator. 

International Students 

Davidson College defines international students broadly to include dual citizens, Americans 
living abroad, foreign nationals, and permanent residents. This broad definition capitalizes on 
the diversity and wealth of experiences international students bring to campus. The International 
Student Office provides assistance on immigration and work permits, coordinates international 
student orientation, aids with student advocacy, and promotes interaction among foreign students, 
the college, and local communities. Also available is guidance on cultural adjustments as well as 
academic, personal, and financial concerns. Services offered are as diverse as the students and are 
meant to encourage a meaningful educational experience while students achieve personal and 
academic goals. 

The Davidson International Association, composed of foreign and American students who are 
interested in international issues and programming, holds weekly meetings, organizes excursions 
in the surrounding area, and represents international interests on campus. 

Study Abroad 

Davidson encourages students to study in other countries and offers the following specific 
opportunities: the junior year or semester in Tours, France; a fall semester program in India; a fall 
semester program in Peru, and spring semester Classics program. The cost of semester and year- 
long programs, including tuition, room, board, and some travel expenses is approximately the 
same as for a similar period at Davidson. Students receiving financial aid may usually apply part or 
all of it to the cost of the year or semester study abroad program. The college also offers a summer 
archaeological dig in Cyprus and summer programs in England, France, Ghana, Kenya, Russia, 
Spain, arid Zambia (see descriptions below). With approval in advance, students also participate 
in academic study abroad programs sponsored and administered by accredited American colleges 
or universities. There is a non-refundable administrative fee of $350 for students participating 
in a non-Davidson program for a semester or year. While international students are permitted 
to participate in non-Davidson study abroad programs, their Davidson College scholarships and 
financial aid can only be applied to Davidson-sponsored study abroad programs that take place 
during the academic year. 

DAVIDSON IN TOURS (FRANCE): Davidson students may study for an academic year as fully 
matriculated students at the Universite Francois Rabelais, or for a semester at the Institut de 
Touraine in Tours. 



Academic Program and Policies — 47 



With a population of 250,000, Tours is the cultural capital of the Loire Valley. Known 
for its historic towns, Renaissance chateaux, and striking natural beauty, the Val de Loire has 
been designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The city of Tours boasts a rich and varied 
architectural heritage with the old city — Le Vieux Tours — attracting students and visitors alike to 
its lively Place Plumereau. A network of regional trains connects Tours to Orleans, Chenonceaux, 
Amboise, and other nearby sites of interest. Paris and its attractions are fifty-five minutes away by 
high-speed train. 

The program begins in September for academic-year and fall-semester students with a four- 
week language course in Paris, after which students go to Tours, where they enroll in classes. The 
program ends around December 20th for fall-semester students. Spring-semester students are in 
France from January until April, including a two-week stay in Paris. The academic year program 
ends around mid-June. Students typically earn four course credits for a semester and up to eight 
course credits for the academic year. A member of the Davidson faculty serves as resident Director 
to assist with academic and personal matters and to teach one course per semester. All students 
live with families, where they have two meals a day. Applications from non-Davidson students 
are welcome. 

Semester Programs 

DAVIDSON IN INDIA: The South Asian Studies Program offers an opportunity to study and 
travel in India during the fall semester of even-numbered years. Following a one-week orientation 
session at Davidson, students travel to India with the Davidson faculty Director. There they attend 
lectures on Indian history, culture, and society by Indian scholars and take a seminar taught by 
the Director. After twelve weeks in Chennai, they travel together for two weeks visiting important 
historical, archaeological, and religious sites in other parts of India. Students may earn four 
course credits. The Semester-in-India program is intended for juniors and seniors; occasionally 
sophomores have been included. Applications from non-Davidson students are welcome. 

DAVIDSON CLASSICS SEMESTER ABROAD: This four-course program studying the art, 
archaeology, history, and literature of classical antiquity is conducted on location in Greece, Italy 
and Turkey and at the discretion of the Director, sites in other countries may be included as well. 
Open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors; limited to sixteen participants. The program goes 
every other spring, next in 2009. 

DAVIDSON IN PERU: This program is offered in the fall of odd-numbered years. Students 
live with families in the city of Arequipa while taking two intensive Spanish language courses, 
a course taught by the resident Director, and a course taught by a team of Peruvian professors. 
Group excursions are included. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are eligible regardless of 
major. Spanish language background is recommended but not required. Applications from non- 
Davidson students are welcome. 

Summer Programs 

DAVIDSON IN CYPRUS: In most summers, Davidson sponsors a multidisciplinary archaeological 
project on the island of Cvprus. The program includes hands-on training in the field (excavation 
and survey), lectures given by the project Director and other visiting or resident specialists, visits 
to archaeological or historical sites and museums on weekends, and extensive interaction with the 
local residents of Athienou. The seven-week program is open to all classes and carries one course 
credit. Applications from non-Davidson students are welcome. 



48 — Academic Program and Policies 



DAVIDSON IN ENGLAND (THE CAMBRIDGE PROGRAM): A six-week summer program at 
Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University is jointly sponsored by the Departments of English 
and History for up to thirty students. British lecturers and tutors lead the course of study, which 
explores the history and literature of Britain from the late eighteenth through the early nineteenth 
century. The curriculum emphasizes topics that take advantage of the students' presence in Britain 
and ability to experience their subjects first-hand, encouraging them to visit the sites of poets' 
inspiration, novels' settings, and history's memorable events. 

Participants in the program earn one course credit, awarded for either English 370 or History 390, 
which counts towards major requirements in either department. A Davidson English or History 
professor serves as resident Director. Students majoring in all fields of study are encouraged to 
apply. Applications from non-Davidson students are welcome. 

JUNE IN TOURS (FRANCE): This four-week program is offered at the Institut de Touraine for 
French language study. The morning language program is enriched by afternoon content courses 
and cultural activities, plus excursions on Saturday. Students live with families. A member of 
the Davidson faculty serves as resident Director. Applications from non-Davidson students are 
welcome. 

DAVIDSON IN GHANA, WEST AFRICA: This six-week program is designed to immerse students 
in modern and traditional Ghanaian life. The program includes one course credit, a non-credit 
performing arts class, a service project, and excursions into other regions of Ghana. The classes 
are taught by University of Cape Coast professors and artists. The program is limited to fifteen 
participants and is offered as enrollment warrants. Applications from non-Davidson students are 
welcome. 

DAVIDSON IN KENYA: Each summer, a small group of Davidson students with an interest in 
medicine spends three or four weeks in Kenya where they work in hospitals in the Nairobi area. 
In the spring semester before the summer experience, students enroll on the Davidson campus in 
Biology 368: The Study and Treatment of Human Disease: Western and Third World Perspectives. 
Each student studies two diseases and consults with an area physician concerning treatment. 

DAVIDSON IN MOSCOW: Davidson sponsors a six-week summer program at the prestigious 
Moscow State Institute for International Affairs (MGIMO). The program includes intensive 
Russian language instruction and a second course, taught in English, on Russian history, politics, 
or economics. All courses are taught by native Russian speakers from the MGIMO faculty. Housing 
is in the MGIMO dormitory. A Davidson professor serves as the resident Director. The program 
includes numerous cultural excursions. Students majoring in all fields of study are encouraged to 
apply, although preference will be given to those with one or more years of college-level Russian. 
Participants may earn two course credits, one of which counts toward the minor in Russian. 

DAVIDSON IN SPAIN: Davidson offers a five-week summer program in Cadiz, Spain. After a 
week of group travel through Spain, students take two courses in Cadiz while living with host 
families. Specific course credits depend on the student's level of preparation. 

DAVIDSON IN ZAMBIA: This three-week summer experience offers students an opportunity to 
work and study at a mission hospital in Mwandi, Zambia. Mwandi is a community of about 6,000 



Academic Program and Policies — 49 



located on the northern fringes of the Kalahari Desert along the Zambezi River. It is approximately 
150 miles west of Livingstone, Zambia, and Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe. Students participating in 
this experience have the opportunity to work with Zambian doctors and health care staff in the 
Mwandi mission hospital and in bush clinics in surrounding communities. Students learn about 
diseases and other health concerns, (e.g., malnutrition) that are prevalent in third world Africa. 
Preparation for the summer experience begins during the spring semester at Davidson. Students 
enroll in a seminar course, which concentrates on the study of infectious diseases and treatments 
for those diseases. In addition, students learn about the culture and history of Zambia. Students 
design an individual project to be completed when in Mwandi. A final paper summarizing the 
project is required by the end of the summer. 

Students may also participate in the following programs with which Davidson College is affiliated: 

INTERCOLLEGIATE CENTER FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES IN ROME, ITALY: This program is 
administered by Duke University. Students studv ancient history, archaeology, Greek and Latin 
literature, and ancient art. Students take classes and live in the Center Building in central Rome. 

SWEDISH PROGRAM: Students take special program courses in Swedish language, economics, 
literature, historv, and politics. Students live with families or in student apartments. Group 
excursions and activities are scheduled. 

WAKE FOREST/ SASASAAS FALL SEMESTER FN BEIJING, CHINA: Students begin or continue 
Chinese language study at the Beijing Institute of Education while taking two courses in Chinese 
culture taught in English. Students are housed in dormitories on campus. Group activities and 
excursions are included. 

See also: The School for Field Studies under the Department of Biology. 

South Asian Studies Program 

The South Asian Studies Program is an interdisciplinarv program that enables students to 
studv India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bhutan, which together constitute a 
region in which a fifth of the world's population is concentrated and which serves as the home of 
some of the world's oldest and richest cultural expressions. 

More than a dozen courses on the region are taught by faculty members representing the 
academic perspectives of art, history, religion, and sociology. Instruction is also available in Hindi 
through the Self-instructional Language Program. Davidson offers a Semester-in-India Program 
based in the Chennai region. In 1970, the college was accepted as a member institution in the 
Library of Congress Public Law 480 English Language Materials Program, which now brings to 
Davidson's library numerous books, monographs, and English-language periodicals published in 
India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. 

Self-Instructional Language Program 

Competence in a foreign language is essential to international mobility and understanding. 
While Davidson maintains strong programs in French, German, Spanish, Russian, and Chinese, 
it also offers a Self-Instructional Language Program (SIL) that enables qualified students to study 
less commonly taught languages for which classroom instruction is unavailable. Each offering is 
an intensive audio-lingual course utilizing appropriate texts and audio/ video materials, combined 



50 — Academic Program and Policies 



with three hours of small group work per week with a native speaker. The emphasis is on the 
spoken language with some work on basic reading and writing skills. A final oral examination, 
which forms the basis for the semester grade, is conducted by a specialist, usually invited from 
another institution. The languages offered depend on the current availability of native speaker 
conversation partners and appropriate materials. Self-Instructional Language Program courses 
do not satisfy the foreign language requirement or the cultural diversity requirement. Normally, 
participants must satisfy the foreign language requirement before enrolling in a SIL course. An 
additional fee is required. For more information, see the section about the program under Courses 
of Instruction. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Many Davidson graduates continue their education at graduate or professional schools. The 
sound liberal arts education that Davidson offers serves as an excellent preparation for further 
study or for entering a career directly following graduation. 

Students who have definite plans for graduate or professional school are urged to become 
familiar with graduate school admission requirements and to consult with their advisors early 
about the best program to pursue. In general, graduate school standards are high. Applicants are 
expected to have done undergraduate work of good quality, to have a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language, and to make acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination. 

PRE-MEDICINE (PRE-DENTISTRY): In general, pre-medical and pre-dental students complete 
the same course of study. Medical schools in particular recommend that pre-medical students be 
as academically diverse as possible. With its strong tradition in the liberal arts, Davidson College 
supports this recommendation in three ways. First, all Davidson students are required to take 
classes in diverse academic disciplines. Second, pre-medical and pre-dental students may major in 
the department of their choice. Third, pre-medical and pre-dental students, whether they major in 
the sciences or humanities, are encouraged to take a variety of courses outside their major. 
A. Required Courses, Tests and Recommendation 

1. Course work— Pre-medical and pre-dental students must take the following courses: 
Biology 111 and 112; Chemistry 115, 201, 202, and 215; Physics 120 and 220 or 130 and 
230. Some medical schools require Mathematics 130 and 135. Many medical schools have 
additional requirements, which are found in the Medical School Admission Requirements, 
a publication of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Requirements for 
dental schools are listed in Admission Requirements of U.S. and Canadian Dental Schools, a 
publication of the American Association of Dental Schools. 
2. Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) — Medical schools require all candidates 
for admission to take the MCAT, an exam which is administered in the spring and 
summer of each year. This exam, which should not be attempted before all introductory 
science courses are completed, is typically taken in the spring of the junior year. If not 
satisfied with their results, students may retake the MCAT in the summer of the rising 
senior year without delaying application to medical school. Dental students take the 
Dental Admissions Test (DAT) which is offered year round and is self-scheduled by the 
student. 
3. Pre-medical Advisory Committee (PAC) Recommendation— The Committee, which is 
chaired by the Pre-medical Director, evaluates pre-medical and pre-dental students. It 
is highly recommended that all of these students take advantage of the PAC evaluation 
process. This evaluation ordinarily takes place in the junior year. 
B. Recommended Courses and Experiences 



Academic Program and Policies — 5 1 



1. Courses 

a. Humanities and Social Sciences — Academic diversity can be achieved by 
selecting courses in the languages, fine arts, and social sciences. 

b. Medical Humanities— Students must understand the major controversies 
and dilemmas facing American medicine. Medical Humanities offers 
interdisciplinary courses in the theory and practice of medicine. 

c. Advanced Biology, Chemistry, and Neuroscience— The courses in these 
disciplines help students build vocabulary and concepts which are important in 
medical and dental studies, particularlv during the first vear. 

2. Experiences 

a. Hospital or Clinical Experience — Enjoying work in a medical setting is essential 
to a successful medical or dental career. Medical humanities offers "Issues in 
Medicine" and "Health Care Ethics," each for one course credit. Included in 
each course are internships at Charlotte area hospitals and clinics. Physicians in 
the Charlotte area also provide shadowing opportunities on a volunteer basis. 
International opportunities are available through the Dean Rusk International 
Studies Program. 

b. Service Experience— Service to humanity is one of the highest ideals of the 
medical profession. Students should participate in sendee organizations 
including the Pre-medical Society of Davidson College. The Pre-medical honor 
society, Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED), recognizes excellent pre-medical and pre- 
dental students. 

c. Study Abroad — Foreign travel adds immeasurably to a student's education. 
Students who plan to study abroad must plan early in their Davidson studies in 
order to complete all requirements on time. 

d. Research— The advancement of medicine and dentistry depends on an 
understanding of basic research. Many research opportunities are available in 
the science departments at Davidson and elsewhere. 

C. Services to Pre-medical Students 

1. Pre-medical Director— The pre-medical Director is the adjunct advisor for all pre- 
medical and pre-dental students and assists in all matters related to admission to 
professional school. 

2. Pre-medical Society and AED — These organizations provide opportunities for 
leadership, citizenship, and education through a variety of programs including a 
speaker series, community service opportunities, social activities, and the AED's 
MCAT Forum and practice interviews. 

PRE-LAW SOCIETY: The Pre-Law Society works closely with the Careers Office to provide 
guidance to students interested in pursuing legal careers. Membership in the Pre-Law Society 
offers students the following: information on legal careers; the law school admission process; 
LSAT prep courses; sample LSAT tests; the opportunity to interview with law school admission 
representatives; access to the Davidson Alumni Attorney Network; the chance to make contacts 
in the Charlotte legal community; exposure to legal issues through speakers, panel discussions, 
and other programs on campus; and feedback on drafts of personal statements. Society materials 
include Davidson pre-law handouts, guides to law schools, law school catalogs, books on legal 
issues, and preparation manuals for the LSAT. 



52 — Academic Program and Policies 



TEACHER EDUCATION: In its mission to prepare successful facilitators of learning, the 
Department of Education embraces the primary purpose of Davidson College, which is "to assist 
students in developing humane instincts and disciplined and creative minds for leadership and 
service." Further, the Department of Education exults in the choice of the college "to emphasize the 
teaching responsibility of all professors" and actively recruit faculty "whose interest in students 
and teaching is unfeigned and profound." The endorsement that quality teaching is the foundation 
of a strong liberal arts institution informs the threefold mission of the Department of Education: 
(1) to provide a course of study leading to a Licensure Concentration in Education, resulting in 
the attainment of a North Carolina teaching license; (2) to provide a course of study leading to 
an Interdisciplinary Concentration in the study of Education as a liberal art; and (3) to provide 
courses that meet the distribution requirements in the Social Sciences. 

Teacher Licensure: Through a series of articulation agreements with Duke University, Queens 
University of Charlotte, and the North Carolina Department of Instruction, Davidson College 
provides a course of study leading to North Carolina initial licensure/ certification at the secondary 
level in the fields of English, French (K-12), Latin, Mathematics, Spanish (K-12), Science (which 
includes majors in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics), and Social Studies (which includes majors 
in Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Religion). All 
course work is completed at Davidson. Through reciprocity agreements, North Carolina licenses 
are accepted in forty-two additional states. For more detailed information, interested students 
should contact the chair of the Department of Education during the first or second year. The 
Teacher Education Program Handbook is available on the Education Department web site (www. 
davidson.edu) and provides all details related to licensing procedures. 

ENGINEERING DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM: Believing that the liberal arts college has a 
contribution to make toward the education of engineers in a society faced with increasingly 
complex technological and human problems, Davidson has cooperative dual degree engineering 
programs with Columbia University in New York and Washington University in St. Louis. The 
student attends Davidson for three or four years and, if accepted, attends the engineering school for 
the last two years. Students are guaranteed admission to these two affiliated engineering schools 
if they complete the science and math prerequisites and achieve, for admission to Columbia, a 3.0 
GPA, or, for admission to Washington University at St. Louis, a 3.25 GPA. 

A student electing the 4/2 path in this program completes a normal Davidson degree 
program. The required science and math courses can be taken as electives or can be part of a 
Davidson major course of study. Students electing the 3/2 path attend Davidson for three years 
and attend the engineering school for the last two years. Davidson academic departments, in 
consultation with the engineering advisor, will count some engineering courses toward senior- 
year departmental course requirements. Upon successful completion of the prescribed courses 
in the dual degree program, the student receives bachelor's degrees from both Davidson and the 
engineering school. 

To receive a Davidson degree under the cooperative dual degree plan a student must: 

1. complete at Davidson all distribution requirements with at least a "C" average; 

2. choose a Davidson major and complete a course of study for that major; 

3. complete Davidson graduation requirements in foreign language, composition, cultural 
diversity, and physical education; and 

4. graduate from one of the cooperating schools in an approved engineering curriculum. 
Other 4/2 engineering options exist, which include applying to any engineering school for an 

M.S. or Ph.D. program or an M.B.A. program. Admission to these programs is not guaranteed. 
Since many of the required preparatory courses for the 3/2 path must be taken in proper 



Academic Program and Policies — 53 



sequence, it is wise, and for some schools and/ or curricula essential, for a prospective 3/2 student 
to begin the program during the first semester at Davidson. For further information and assistance, 
contact the faculty 3/2 engineering advisor, Dr. Wolfgang Christian. 

ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) 

The Army ROTC program at Davidson is designed to enhance a student's college education 
by providing unique training and practical experience in leadership and management— qualities 
essential to success in any career. Upon graduation from Davidson, students who have successfully 
completed ROTC training are awarded a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Army 
National Guard, or U.S. Army Reserve. To prepare students to become commissioned officers, the 
ROTC program combines college courses in military studies with summer training. The military 
studies curriculum consists of a two-year Basic Course and a two-year Advanced Course. 

The Basic Course is taken during the first and second years and covers management 
principles, national defense, military history, leadership development, military courtesy, customs 
and traditions of the military, and phvsical training. No military commitment is incurred for 
participation in the Basic Course. Some or all of the Basic Course requirements may be waived by 
the Professor of Military Studies for those who have completed Junior ROTC programs or have 
previous military experience. For more information see the Military Studies section under Courses 
of Instruction. 

The Advanced Course is limited to students who have completed (or have received credit 
for) the Basic Course and have demonstrated the leadership and scholastic potential to become 
an officer. The course provides instruction in advanced leadership development, military history, 
training management, organization and management techniques, tactics, logistics, and the military 
justice system. Advanced Course students attend the six-week ROTC Leadership Development 
and Assessment Course (LDAC) at Fort Lewis, Washington, during the summer between their 
junior and senior year. Students receive travel expenses, room and board, medical and dental care, 
and a salary while attending the LDAC. 

The ROTC program offers Davidson students the opportunity to participate in numerous 
challenging and rewarding extracurricular activities such as adventure training, social events, and 
community service activities. Both men and women may enroll in ROTC and apply for Army 
ROTC Scholarships. High School seniors applying to Davidson College may compete for four-year 
merit scholarships. Davidson College students may apply for two- and three-year scholarships. 
Army scholarships provide up to full tuition, an allowance for books, and a personal expense 
stipend. 

A Davidson student may also participate in other military programs. See "Outside Resources" 
in the section on Admission and Financial Aid. 

SPECIAL STUDY OPTIONS 

THE CENTER FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES: The Center for Interdisciplinary Studies 
offers students the opportunity to design their own interdisciplinary majors or develop 
interdisciplinary independent study courses with members of the Davidson faculty. More 
information is found under the section "Courses of Instruction." 

CHARLOTTE AREA EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM (CAEC): The Charlotte Area Educational 
Consortium is composed of more than 20 colleges and universities in the greater Charlotte area. 
Through the CAEC students taking a full course load at Davidson may, during the regular 



54 — Academic Program and Policies 



academic year, take an additional course (one not normally offered at Davidson) at no extra cost 
by cross-enrolling at another CAEC institution. Students must provide their own transportation 
to the institution at which they are cross-enrolling. Additional information is available in the 
Registrar's Office. 

CONTRACT COURSES: Students may arrange with individual professors to take independent 
study courses on a contract basis during the summer. Tuition for contract courses is announced 
annually. Contracts are available in the Registrar's Office. A completed and filed contract 
constitutes registration. 

DAVIDSON-BROUGHTON HOSPITAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM: During the summer, 
Davidson offers a one-course program in Clinical Psychology at Broughton Hospital in Morganton, 
NC Students receive credit for Practicum in Psychology (Psychology 290). The program includes 
supervised work in the service units of the hospital. 

DAVIDSON-HOWARD UNIVERSITY PROGRAM: Davidson and Howard University in 
Washington, DC, have a cooperative arrangement that allows Davidson students to study for a 
year at Howard. Additional information is available in the Dean of Students Office. 

DAVIDSON-MOREHOUSE COLLEGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM: This program provides an 
opportunity for students to matriculate at an institution which is culturally and racially different 
from their home institution. The exchange of students is on a one-to-one basis for a semester or a 
year. Additional information is available in the Dean of Students Office. 

DAVIDSON IN WASHINGTON PROGRAM: The Political Science Department sponsors 
the Davidson in Washington program, an eight-week summer session of work and study in 
Washington, DC. Students serve as interns in Congressional offices, government agencies, or 
interest group offices and take part in a symposium conducted by a Davidson faculty member in 
residence. They earn two course credits. The program is open to a limited number of rising juniors 
and seniors. Participants must have a 2.5 grade point average. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY: Independent studies and tutorials allow students to work on topics of 
special interest and in exceptional cases to design a personal course of study with the approval of 
a faculty member who supervises the student and determines the means of evaluation. 

MEDICAL INTERNSHIPS: Davidson College has a cooperative arrangement with the Carolinas 
Medical Center that provides students interested in medicine or medical research with internship 
and independent study opportunities in a clinical hospital environment. These experiences are 
normally arranged through the Pre-medical Studies or Medical Humanities Programs. 

SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES: Davidson College is affiliated with the School for Field 
Studies, enabling students to participate in a semester-long or month-long program studying 
environmental issues. Students must apply for acceptance to the School for Field Studies. The 
semester and summer programs concentrate on international environmental issues at one of five 
SFS research centers: British West Indies; Baja, Mexico; Costa Rica; Australia; or Kenya. Accepted 
students register for Biology 381, 382, 383, and 384 for semester programs and for Biology 385 (for 
summer programs). 



Academic Program and Policies — 55 



STUDENT RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES: Advanced students may apply for summer research 
opportunities with faculty who receive externally funded or Davidson College faculty study 
and research grants. Some research projects result in collaborative papers that are presented 
at professional conferences. Students may receive a stipend as a research assistant and are also 
eligible to applv for a limited number of "summer supplemental housing grants" which help 
defray the expense of remaining on campus for eight to ten weeks. The Abernethy Endowment, 
the Dean Rusk International Studies Program, the Summer Research Program, and the Kemp 
Scholars Program also provide students with funding for study and research projects during 
the summer or the academic year. Application guidelines and due dates for each program are 
announced annuallv. 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

THE LIBRARY 

The E.H. Little Library is located immediately behind Chambers (the central academic 
building) near the student center and dormitories and is very convenient for the whole academic 
community. The 100,000 square-foot building is open 106 hours a week. Those wishing to study 
after the usual 1:00 a.m. closing time may use the 24-hour study room. 

Since the founding of the college, the faculty has played a key role in the development of 
the collection, which today stands at over 600,000 volumes, mostly selected by the faculty. The 
resulting collection is one carefully evaluated by scholars for appropriate use at Davidson. 
Approximately 2,000 periodicals are received along with 600 serial publications and manv daily 
newspapers. Complete runs of the major local and national papers such as Tlie Charlotte Observer, 
Tlie New York Times, TJie Times (London), Tlie Washington Post, and Tiie Atlanta Constitution are 
available. Evans' Bibliography of Books Printed in America from 1639-1800, and Shaw & Shoemaker's 
Checklist of American Imprints, 1801-1819, available electronically, contain every American book 
printed during that time period. Early English Books Online (EEBO) contains digitized images of 
over 125,000 British books, pamphlets, and more published between 1475 and 1700. Since 1883 the 
library has been a U.S. Government depository, and that collection numbers over 200,000 items. 

Almost 1,000 students and faculty members come to the building each day, checking out 
about 90,000 items a year. A professional librarian is on duty most hours the library is open to help 
students or faculty members find needed materials. Reference librarians are available to speak to 
classes regarding research methods in the various disciplines. Over fifty students, most on work- 
study assignments, are employed in the library each year. 

The library employs a sophisticated, integrated web-based computer system. From the 
library's home page it is easy to search the library catalog for all the library's books, media, and 
many government documents by author, title, subject, and keyword. Many periodical indexes are 
also available electronically. There is online access to daily newspapers from around the country 
and around the world. The library subscribes to many electronic full-text journals including those 
from Project Muse and JSTOR. NC-LIVE offers access to many additional data bases and thousands 
of full-text journals. 

Materials that are not found in the library may be obtained through interlibrary loan from 
a wide variety of libraries across the state and nation. A telefacsimile machine is available for 
student and faculty use. 

Students have access to the campus network via computers found on each floor of the library. 



56 — Academic Program and Policies 



Wireless connectivity is also available. Laptop computers may be checked out at the Circulation 
desk; a public scanner is available; and there are assisted technology stations available for students 
with physical, visual, or learning disabilities. Cataloguing and interlibrary loans are facilitated by 
the library's participation in OCLC and SOLINET (Southeastern Library Network), national and 
regional computer networks. 

The Daviclsoniana Room features several thousand books by and about Davidson alumni 
and faculty members. Woodrow Wilson, who attended Davidson in 1873-74, Dean Rusk, 
Class of 1931, and Davidson's three North Carolina governors are represented. The legendary 
Peter Stuart Ney, who designed the college seal, is also featured. The Rare Book Room houses 
incunabula, autographed editions, examples of fine printing, a first edition of the world's first 
great encyclopedia, Ena/clopedie, ou Dictionnaire raisonne des sciences, des arts et des metiers, par une 
societe de gens de lettres (1751-1765) by Diderot, and the Cumming Map Collection. 

The building is named for E.H. Little of New York and Mecklenburg County, who gave $1 
million towards the construction. At his death, he left $1 million as an endowment for the upkeep of 
the building. There are endowed book funds for acquisitions that now exceed six million dollars. 

The music library is located in the Sloan Music Center. Open 87 hours a week, this modern 
facility houses over 12,000 recordings, scores, videos, and books, all of which are listed in the 
library catalog. Listening and viewing stations are available throughout the library. A full-time 
librarian is available to assist faculty, students, staff, and the greater college community. 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 

Computing is an important activity at Davidson. Computing tools are used extensively in 
all disciplines of the academic program. A growing number of courses require that students use 
computers to create Web pages, submit assignments, and prepare presentations. Many more 
encourage such use and provide opportunities for student involvement in computing. 

Computing and networks for instruction, research, and administration are supported by 
Information Technology Services (ITS). Separate servers are used for administration and instruction 
in order that optimal services can be given to each without compromise by the other. The ITS 
staff includes specialists in programming, personal computing, instructional technology, system 
management, data communication, and telecommunications. Training and support for students, 
faculty, and staff using personal computers and other college technology resources are important 
activities of the department. 

All computing services for students are free. Every residence hall room includes ethernet 
jacks for connecting students' personal computers to the campus network. Every student has 
an electronic mail account. Public-access personal computers are available in several academic 
buildings including the library. The Student Computing Center houses the largest personal 
computer lab, which is open more than 100 hours per week. Student assistants are on duty to 
answer questions, assist new users, and assure proper operation of printers and other equipment. 
A help desk is also available to troubleshoot student, faculty, and staff computer problems and 
questions. Faculty members and departments often arrange for special training programs tailored 
for a particular course or application. Individual office consultations are available to assist faculty 
and staff with software applications. 

A campus-wide high speed data network connects all buildings and residence halls. The 
campus is connected to the Internet. Faculty from a variety of departments schedule their classes 
and laboratory sections in computer classrooms equipped with Macintosh or Windows personal 
computers, each connected to the campus network. In addition, there are more than 1000 Windows 
and Apple Macintosh computers on the campus. 



Academic Program and Policies — 57 



EDUCOM CODE: The statement below, known as the EDUCOM Code, is the policy of 
Davidson College. Members of the college community abide by its provisions. 

Respect for intellectual labor and creativity is vital to academic discourse and enterprise. This principle 
applies to works of all authors and publishers in all media. It encompasses respect for the right to 
acknowledgement, right toprivaci/, and right to determine the form, manner, and terms of publication 
and distribution. Because electronic information is volatile and easily reproduced, respect for the 
work and personal expression of others is especially critical in computer environments. Violations of 
authorial integrity, including plagiarism, invasion of privacy, unauthorized access, and trade secret 
and copyright violations, may be grounds for sanctions against members of the academic community. 

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE 

CHEMISTRY INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS PROGRAM: (located in Martin Chemical 
Laboratory Rooms G10 and 328) Carefully selected senior and junior chemistry majors and minors 
hold dedicated evening question and answer sessions to assist students enrolled in Chemistry 
110, 115, 201, 202, and 215. The Program is funded by the Chemistry Department throughout the 
academic year and provides free assistance for all students. 

MATH CENTER: Peer tutors are available evenings during the academic year on a drop-in basis 
to assist students enrolled in Calculus I and II with concepts, applications, and use of the graphing 
calculator. The Mathematics Department coordinates the Center and supervises the peer tutors. 
This assistance is free for all students. The student's professor will provide further information. 

SPEAKING CENTER: (located in Chambers North Wing lower-level) Peer tutors are available 
to assist any student with both general and discipline-specific problems for such auricular and 
co-curricular presentations as speeches, group projects, and interviews. Assistance is available 
for dealing with such areas as speech anxiety, topic selection, research strategies, organization, 
and effective delivery. Resources include a media-equipped classroom for presentations, private 
rooms for tutorials, and digital video recorders to record presentations for analysis. Students may 
purchase DVD-Rs at the College Bookstore if they wish to retain a copy of their presentation. The 
Director of the Speaking Center, a professor of Communication Studies, teaches courses in principles 
of oral communication and communication studies and provides training and supervision for the 
peer tutors. Tutorials are free for all students. 

TUTORING PROGRAM: The Office of the Dean of Students coordinates a tutorial program for 
students desiring academic assistance. Specially trained students who are well-versed in the 
subject matter are available to tutor in most subject areas. Students pay their tutors directly. Grant 
subsidies are available for students receiving need-based financial aid. 

WRITING CENTER: (located in Chambers North Wing lower-level) Peer tutors are available to 
assist any student with both general and discipline-specific writing problems at any stage in the 
writing process. The Director of the Writing Center, a member of the English Department, teaches 
writing courses and provides training and supervision for the peer tutors. Tutorials are free for all 
students. 



58 — Academic Program and Policies 



LABORATORIES AND STUDIOS 

KATHERINE AND TOM BELK VISUAL ARTS CENTER: This 43,000 square foot building, 
designed by the architect Graham Gund, houses classroom facilities for painting, drawing, 
printmaking, and sculpture. Art history is taught in the Semans Lecture Hall, equipped with video 
and sound technology, and in a seminar room, which doubles as a study room for art history slides 
and images. The Visual Arts Center contains two public galleries as well as studios and offices 
for faculty, the gallery Director, slide collection and curator, and staff. Declared majors with an 
emphasis in studio art may apply for one of the eight individual student studios in the building. 

CHARLES A. DANA SCIENCE BUILDING: The Dana Science Building contains classrooms and 
laboratories for instruction and research on three floors. Two floors house the Physics Department, 
where there are special facilities for student-faculty research in the areas of atomic and molecular 
physics, condensed matter physics, laser spectroscopy, theoretical physics, and computational 
physics. Student laboratories are used for the study of introductory physics, electronics, optics, and 
advanced physics. All labs contain networked, Pentium-based computers. Major instrumentation 
includes a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser coupled to a Ti-sapphire ring cavity, two pulsed Nd: 
YAG dye laser systems, a carbon dioxide laser system, a 1.3-m scanning monochromator, a Fourier 
transform infrared spectrometer, a differential scanning calorimeter, wavemeters and spectrum 
analyzers, a transient capacitance spectroscopy system, liquid helium and nitrogen cryostats, 
a Penning ion trap, and a 2-Tesla electromagnet. This equipment is used to study alkali atoms, 
negative ions, celluar and molecular biophysics, semiconductors, and doped insulators. Dana 
also houses the Physics Computation Center, which contains high-end workstations for science 
computation. The second floor of the Dana Science Building houses the cell and molecular facilities 
for the Biology department. There are two teaching laboratories where biochemistry, genetics, 
cell biology, microbiology, immunology, and developmental biology are taught. Student- 
faculty research facilities include research laboratories in genetics, genomics and proteomics, 
developmental neuroscience, and immunology. Specialized equipment rooms support student- 
faculty research and house major instrumentation including a DNA sequencing setup, DNA and 
RNA hybridization systems, PCR equipment, 96-well microplate reader, tissue culture facilities, 
a confocal microscope, inverted microscopes, epifluorescence microscopes, and image analysis 
work stations. 

MARTIN CHEMICAL LABORATORY: The building houses a lecture hall, a seminar room, 
a computer lab, five instructional laboratories, seven laboratories devoted to student-faculty 
research, and several instrument rooms. A chemistry library— which features 4,700 books and 75 
journal subscriptions, as well as online access to all American Chemical Society Journals — is also 
in this building. Major instrumentation includes a 400 MHz Fourier transform nuclear magnetic 
resonance spectrometer; a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer; and instruments 
for atomic absorption, ultraviolet-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy. 
Separation systems — such as an ion chromatograph, high performance liquid chromatograph, 
gas chromatographs, and a GC-mass spectrometry system — are also available. Other equipment 
includes electrochemical and electro analytical instruments, a laboratory microwave system, a 
pulsed dye laser, a polarized light microscope, a cold room for biochemical studies, and an aerosol 
flow cell-FTIR to study atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reactions. In addition, the building 
features a computational cluster for molecular mechanics, protein structure determination, and 
quantum mechanical calculations. 



Academic Program and Policies — 59 



WATSON LIFE SCIENCES BUILDING: The Watson Life Sciences Building houses laboratories 
for instruction and research in biology and psychology. Special facilities are available for 
student-faculty research in the areas of animal behavior, behavioral neuroscience, cell biology, 
child development, clinical psychology, conservation biology, ecology, entomology, industrial- 
organizational psychology, microbiology, physiology, population biology, psychopharmacology, 
attention and perception, social psychology, socioecology, and virology. Major instrumentation 
includes computer stations in teaching laboratories, water purification systems, incubators and 
growth chambers, standing and countertop centrifuges, phase contrast microscopes, an autoclave, 
a -70° freezer, ecological sampling equipment, global positioning svstem, computer based 
phvsiologv equipment, operant chambers, a computer controlled radial maze, and equipment 
to measure motor behavior, locomotor activity, and the conditioned rewarding effects of drugs. 
Watson also houses the animal care facilities. 

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY & MEDIA SERVICES: Located in the south wing, lower level 
of the Chambers Building, the Office of Instructional Technology & Media Sendees includes the 
Language Resource Center (LRC), the Center for Instructional Technology (CIT) and the Connolly 
Media Lab. The office supports college needs related to classroom technology, portable media 
equipment, television and satellite downloads, digital media sendees, short term loaner equipment, 
and media services for live events. 

The Language Resource Center primarily serves Davidson's foreign language and Classics 
community and contains a laboraton classroom equipped with 22 multimedia workstations and 
projection equipment. All workstations provide fast internet access, learning materials related 
to foreign languages and cultures, and multimedia software and equipment. In addition to 
hosting language classes, the LRC is available to all classes bv resenation and offers students the 
opportunity to hear, read, write, and produce foreign language and other class materials on their 
own time. 

The Center for Instructional Technology is a curricular development center for all Davidson 
faculty containing multimedia software and equipment for both Macintosh and Windows 
workstations. The Instructional Technology Group (ITG) is composed of staff with expertise 
to assist faculty as they apply technology to teaching and learning. All members of the ITG are 
available to faculty for training, consultation, and assistance in preparing materials for classroom 
use. 

The Connolly Media Lab is a digital video editing lab for campus video projects. Access, 
training, and support for non-linear video and audio editing in the lab are available to faculty, 
students, and staff by request. 

MUSIC FACILITIES: The Music Department occupies the Sloan Music Center. The departmental 
and faculty offices, two classrooms, and the Music Library are on the main level. The wing devoted 
to the Music Library preserves and maintains collections of music scores, reference books, videos, 
DVDs and CDs, and has four listening stations, four computer-based multi-media stations, and a 
small group listening/ viewing room. 

The Tyler-Tallman Recital Hall on the upper level seats 175 and provides an intimate 
performance space for student recitals, lectures, and master classes. Available on the stage are a 
Kingston Harpsichord and two concert grand pianos: a New York Steinway "D" and a Hamburg 
Steinwav "D." A spacious instrumental hall and a large choral room equipped with a Steinway 
"D" offer students excellent ensemble rehearsal spaces. 



60 — Academic Program and Policies 



The lower level houses piano, voice, and high string studios and includes instructional 
spaces for string, wind, and brass teachers. A state of the art electronic music studio, a recording 
studio, and a keyboard laboratory are located here. There are seven spacious practice rooms, fully 
soundproofed and equipped with pianos and stands, as well as multi-functional classroom/ small 
ensemble rehearsal space. The student lounge with vending areas, lounge chairs, and study tables 
sits in the center of this level. 

Other venues for the Music Department's concerts are the Duke Family Performance Hall 
with a drop-in acoustical shell and a Steinway "D" concert grand piano, the Carnegie Guest House 
living room with its Bosendorfer Imperial grand piano, and the sanctuary of the Davidson College 
Presbyterian Church, which is the site of many choral concerts and the annual Christmas Vespers 
Service. 

THEATRE FACILITIES: Mainstage theatre productions take place in the Duke Family Performance 
Hall. The Hall is a state of the art theatre with a seating capacity of 625 and a 48 line fly system. Our 
second stage series, including student directed one-acts, are performed in the 289-seat Hodson 
Hall or the 100-seat black box theatre, both in the Cunningham Fine Arts Building. 

GENERAL INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS 

Admission and Withdrawal 

The Admission and Financial Aid Committee is responsible for setting the criteria for 
admitting students to Davidson College. All withdrawals, voluntary or involuntary, are processed 
through the Office of the Dean of Students. 

Course Enrollments 

The Schedule of Courses for each semester lists the course offerings planned at the time of the 
publication of the schedule. The document is not a contract; the college reserves the right to alter 
course offerings if enrollments or resources require. Further, the college cannot guarantee that a 
student will be able to enroll in any particular course. Enrollments are guided by stated course 
ceilings, stated prerequisites, space requirements, a random number registration priority system, 
and academic quality determinations. 

Schedule Adjustment Period 

At the beginning of each academic year, the Registrar distributes procedures for Schedule 
Adjustment which may include a pre-semester period and periods during the first week of each 
semester to drop and add, periods during the second week of each semester to drop and to add with 
written approval of the professor of any course to be added. A $20.00 late fee is charged for courses 
added or dropped after the first week of the semester. After that time, a student who drops a course 
without special permission from the Dean of Students (for medical or psychological reasons) or the 
Dean of the Faculty (for specific educational reasons) receives an "F" in the course. 

Course Loads 

The normal academic load is four or five credit courses per semester. Students who have 
extra credits may elect a three-course load in any one semester of the senior year or the spring 
semester of the junior year. During the regular academic year, there is no reduction in tuition for a 
reduced course load, nor is there an additional fee for an overload. (Each Davidson course credit 
is equivalent to four semester hours.) 



Academic Prosram and Policies — 61 



Class Attendance 

Regular class attendance is the student's obligation, and the student is responsible for all 
the work of all class meetings. A student who is absent from more than one-fourth of the course 
meetings scheduled by the instructor shall be assigned a grade of "F" unless the instructor specifies 
a different policy at the beginning of the course. Students should note that each professor has the 
discretion to establish the attendance policy in each class. 

The Committee on Educational Policy reviews schedules for athletic and other college- 
sponsored extracurricular actiyities to insure minimal necessary class absences and to require 
early notification to students and professors of schedule demands that conflict with class times. 

Grading System 

Each instructor reports grades at the end of each semester. The grading system is: 

A 4.0 grade points 

A- 3.7 grade points 

B+ 3.3 grade points 

B 3.0 grade points 

B- 2.7 grade points 

C+ 2.3 grade points 

C 2.0 grade points 

C- 1.7 grade points 

D+ 1.3 grade points 

D 1.0 grade point 

F 0.0 grade points 

There is no percentage-based institutional numerical standard or equivalent for the grades issued 
by individual faculty members. 

Special grades are issued as follows: 

I Incomplete; student has not completed final work. 

P/Fl Pass or Fail for course taken on a Pass/ Fail basis; to earn a Pass, the student 

must perform at the level of "C-" or aboye. See the Academic Regulations for 

additional P/F information. 
LA Laboratory — ungraded, no separate credit is awarded. 
WA Authorized Withdrawal; recommended bv the Dean of Students or the Dean 

of the Faculty. 
UG Ungraded credit; credit transferred from another institution or Davidson 

Study Abroad credit. 
NG No grade received from the professor. 



Transfer Credit 

The Registrar evaluates all transfer credit. The host college must be accredited for a "liberal 
arts and general" program or analogously accredited in countries outside the United States. The 
course must be consistent with the academic objectives of Davidson College. In order to receive 
credit, the student must earn the grade of "C-" or higher. 

Transfer credit assigned at Davidson is on an ungraded basis (UG) and is not used in 
computing the grade point average. Transfer credit is limited to 16 courses (or no more than one- 
half of the courses for graduation) and no more than one-half of the courses used to satisfy major 



62 — Academic Program and Policies 



requirements. Individual departments may employ additional restrictions. Other guidelines for 
transfer credit may apply: further details may be found on the "Authorization to Transfer Credit" 
form in the Registrar's Office. 

A student who has previously obtained a Bachelor's degree from Davidson or from another 
institution may not receive a second degree from Davidson using credit from the previous 
degree. 

Self-Scheduled Exams 

The ultimate expression of Davidson's Honor Code is the self-scheduling of semester 
examinations for most classes. The academic calendar provides ten or eleven three-hour 
examination periods at the end of each semester during which students may take examinations on 
a self-scheduled basis. The Honor Council, the Student Government Association, and the Office of 
the Registrar administer self -scheduled exams. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professors: Fairlev (On leave), Ringle (Chair) 
Associate Professors: Lozada 
Assistant Professors: Cho 
Visiting Professors: Samson 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Anthropology 220, 221, 222, 232, 240, 251, 253, 257, 265, 340, 
341, 350, 354, and 356 are options for fulfilling the cultural diversity requirement. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses, including: 

1. Introductory Cultural Anthropology (101), 

2. one approved course in biocultural anthropology (e.g., 102, 270, 271, 340, 375), 

3. one approved course in archaeology (e.g., 108, 207, 208, 251, 354, 356), 

4. Theory in Anthropologv (370), 

5. a methods course (371, 375, 377), 

6. Senior Colloquium in Anthropology (490), 

7. four additional courses (at least two numbered 300 or above). 

Normally, seven of the ten major courses should be taken in residence at the college. A 
maximum of three 100-level courses and two independent studies may count toward fulfillment 
of major requirements. A current list of departmental offerings satisfying the biocultural and 
archaeological requirements will be posted on the departmental Web page. Courses taken at 
another institution may be applied to major requirements with prior written permission. College 
policy is that Pass/ Fail courses taken at Davidson mav not be applied toward the major without 
departmental approval. Note that 498 and 499 are in addition to major requirements for honors 
candidates. 

Distribution Requirements: Any course in anthropology numbered 370 or under may be 
counted toward fulfillment of the distribution requirements for social sciences. However, first-year 
students are encouraged to take 100- and 200-level courses rather than more advanced courses. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses, at least four of which must be taken in residence at Davidson 
College, including Anthropology 101 or 102 or 108; 370; and four other courses in anthropology, 
including one numbered 200 or above and one numbered 300 or above. Normally, courses taken 
on a Pass/Fail basis at Davidson mav not be counted toward the minor. 

Honors Requirements: A major desiring to become a candidate for honors in anthropology 
must apply in writing to the department at the beginning of the fall semester of the senior year. 
Applicants must have an overall GPA of 3.2 and a GPA of 3.5 in all course work taken in the major 
at the time of application. To receive honors, a student must, in addition to maintaining this level 
of performance, complete Ant. 498 during the fall semester and receive a grade of at least A- on the 
honors thesis (Ant. 499), as well as a departmental recommendation. Further conditions are posted 
on the departmental Web page. 



64 — Anthropology 



101W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR: SPORTS, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY Lozada 

Survey of the social and cultural impact of sports throughout the world. Topics include the impact of sports 
on globalization, the commodification of culture, childhood socialization, gender ideologies, national and 
ethnic identity, and popular culture. Satisfies the distribution requirement in composition. Open only to 
first-year students. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

101 INTRODUCTORY CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 
Cross-cultural study of the nature of systems of knowledge and belief, social and political institutions, 
economic behavior, and human ecological adaptation. Anthropological approaches to traditional tribal 
and peasant societies as well as complex contemporary societies. (Fall and Spring) 

102 HUMANKIND EVOLVING Cho 
Introduction to humanity's biological heritage. Topics include introductory evolutionary theory, 
population genetics, primate biology and behavior, and the primate fossil record. Principal emphasis upon 
fossil evidence for human evolution, with particular focus on biological adaptations and the emergence 
of culture. (Fall) 

108 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY Ringle 

Introduction to how archaeologists reconstruct the past. Methods of dating, artifact analysis, excavation, 
and interpretation, using examples drawn from prehistory. Contributions of archaeology to anthropology, 
as well as the use of other disciplines by archaeologists. (Fall; offered in alternating years) 

205 ETHNIC RELATIONS Fairley 

Comparative and historical study of social processes related to ethnic differences in modern complex 
societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal distribution of 
power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

207 FORAGERS, FARMERS, AND CHIEFS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD Ringle 
The development of human society from the late Ice Age through complex agricultural communities. Topics 
include hunting and gathering, post-glacial adaptation, world colonization, causes and consequences of 
agriculture, and the rise of social inequality. Examples include the Near East, Europe, North America, and 
Polynesia. (Spring; offered in alternating years) 

208 EARLY CITIES AND STATES Ringle 
Archaeology of prehistoric and early historic complex societies. Early chiefdoms and states of South 
America, Egypt, and Asia. Anthropological theories of state formation, including the roles of ecology, 
ideology, technology, warfare, and economic organization. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

220 RELIGION, SOCIEITY, AND SOCIETY Samson 

Social aspects of contemporary religious belief and practice. Special emphasis on categories of ritual 
behavior, collective identity as expressed through religious representation, formation of new and revitalized 
religious groups, and the persistence of religion as a form of social identity. (Fall; offered alternating years) 

222 AFRICAN CIVILIZATIONS Fairley 

African civilizations and their influence on the histories of Europe and the Americas. Two major regional 
civilizations will be examined, including the impact of European colonization in the 19th century. (Not 
offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 



Anthropology — 65 



232 CONTEMPORARY GHANAIAN SOCIETY AND CULTURE Fairley 

Examination of the Ghanaian family, gender roles, religious beliefs, social stratification, political economy, 
and inter-ethnic relations. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the legacy of colonialism and 
efforts to develop a national culture. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years as part oftlie Davidson in 
Ghana summer program) 

251 MESOAMERICAN CIVILIZATIONS Ringle 

Origins and development of the major civilizations of Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize from the earliest 
times to the Spanish conquest. Emphasis upon the Olmecs, Mayas, Toltecs, and Aztecs. Examination of 
social and political organization, economic systems, ecological adaptations, major artistic achievements, 
and writing systems. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

253 LATIN AMERICAN SOCIETY AND CULTURE TODAY Samson 

Overview of Latin American culture from an anthropological perspective. An ethnographic focus 
demonstrates linkages between life in local communities and forces of cultural, social, and political change 
at the level of the nation-state. (Spring) 

257 THE AFRICAN CONTINUUM Fairley 

African cultural influences on the formation of the cultures of the United States, the Caribbean, and Central 
and South America. Emphasis on the dynamic nature of African culture in the Americas as shaped by 
historical and social forces. Prerequisite: Anthropologx/ 101. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

261 SCIENCE, RELIGION, AND SOCIETY Lozada 

Inquiry into the production and cultural meanings of scientific knowledge and technological change. 
Comparison of the function and rhetoric of scientific "truths" to other modes of truth-production, such as 
religion, and consideration of the cultural production of the language of science. Topics include the conflict 
and dialogue between science and religion, rationality, ethics and the practice of science, environmental 
issues, and social change. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

265 CONTEMPORARY CHINESE SOCIETY' AND CULTURE Lozada 

Examines Chinese society from the bottom up, with an emphasis on the structure of everyday life. The 
periods under examination include pre-revolutionary China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong), socialist 
China, and post-socialist China. Topics include marriage and reproductive strategies, lineage organization, 
inheritance patterns, gender roles, and religion and life cycle rituals. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating 
years) 

270 BIOCULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON RACE Cho 
Examines the concept of race from a biocultural perspective, deconstructing race by exploring evidence 
from population genetics and human origins. Contemporary racial issues such as classification of racial/ 
ethnic groups, intelligence, and achievement are explored. (Spring; offered in alternating years) 

271 HUMAN VARIATION AND ADAPTATION Cho 
Human biological variation among and within living populations. Evolutionary, genetic, ecological, 
demographic, and especially cultural factors that contribute to biological variation are explored. Topics 
include biological adaptations to hot/ cold climates, high altitudes, and lactose intolerance, among others. 
(Spring) 



66 — Anthropology 



272 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY Cho 

The application of the techniques used in biological anthropology to the law. Various topics and 
methodologies related to the identification of human skeletal remains, including the excavation of human 
remains, estimation of age-at-death, trauma and analysis, cause and manner of death, and mass disasters, 
are introduced. (Spring; offered in alternating years) 

275 MONKEYS, APES, HUMANS Cho 

Examination of the anatomy and social behavior of living primates. To better understand the human 
species, we will examine topics such as infanticide, mating systems, intelligence, locomotion, concealed 
ovulation, menopause, and extensive culture. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

310 POLITICS, SOCIETY, AND CULTURE Lozada 

Examines authority, organization, and power using the comparative perspective. Topics include the 
acquisition and legitimization of authority, comparative political systems, local level politics, the connections 
between local and wider political systems, cultural and symbolic aspects of power and legitimacy, and 
social movements in a variety of cultural contexts. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

340 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY Cho 
Cross-cultural study of belief systems concerning health and illness, practices of diagnosis and treatment, 
and roles of patients and practitioners. Western biomedicine and non-Western health care systems are 
examined. The interaction of ecological and cultural factors that influence disease manifestations, and the 
bio-cultural context of sickness and therapy are explored. (Fall) 

341 GLOBALIZATION Lozada/ Fairley 
Explores globalization and the social and cultural processes transforming local life throughout the world. 
Introduction to the impact of global capitalism, transnational culture and political flows, and the role of 
global non-government organizations in different regions. Topics include global capitalism, state power 
and sovereignty, diaspora ethnicity and migration, and the localization of transnational culture. (Not offered 
2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

343 GENDER, POWER, AND CULTURE Lozada 

Explores how gender ideologies shape the exercise of power upon men and women in different 
societies and cultures. Topics include the construction of masculinity and femininity, commodification 
and consumption of gender, social position, agency, and the political economy of gender. Emphasis on 
developing an understanding of different theoretical perspectives in the cross-cultural study of gender. 
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or permission of tire instructor. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

350 ART, SOCIETY AND CULTURE Fairley 

Cross-cultural study of the visual and performing art traditions of selected non-western societies. In 
addition to examining the major theoretical approaches to the study of art, the course will explore non- 
western aesthetic systems, relationships between art and social structure, gender and artistic production, 
and art as mediator between the sacred and the secular. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 222. (Not offered 
2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

354 ART AND WRITING OF THE ANCIENT MAYA Ringle 

The sculpture and painting of the ancient Maya, including an introduction to hieroglyphic decipherments 
concerning Maya dynastic history, warfare, and political organization. Other topics include Maya myth, 
ritual, and astronomical knowledge. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 



Anthropology — 67 



356 ART, MYTH, AND HISTORY OF ANCIENT CENTRAL MEXICO Ringle 

Study of Aztec and Mixtec religion, ritual, and philosophy as exemplified in works of art, architecture, 
ciyic planning, literary works, and painted books (codices). Case studies include the Aztec Great Temple, 
the Codex of Borgia, and the Codex Nuttall, as well as the art of the ancestral city of Teotihuacan. (Spring; 
offered in alternating years) 

370 THEORY IN ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 
Theoretical and interpretiye perspectives in modern cultural anthropology. Issues include functionalism, 
historical analysis, cultural evolution, ecology, cultural materialism, structuralism, and symbolic analysis. 
Writings of major thinkers, including Radcliffe-Brown, Harris, Levi-Strauss, Douglas, Geertz, Turner, 
Godelier, and Sahlins. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or permission of instructor. (Fall) 

371 ETHNOGRAPHIC WRITING AND RESEARCH Staff 
Approaches to ethnographic and ethnohistorical research and analysis in cultural anthropology. 
Examination of selected studies that demonstrate a variety of approaches to the study of single cultures and 
to cross-cultural comparisons. Students design and complete research projects. With advance departmental 
approval, an off-campus ethnographic field school course may be substituted for credit toward the major. 
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or permission oftlie instructor. (Spring) 

375 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY Cho 

Identification of bones in the human skeleton and basic skeletal biology. Osteological methods and 
analyses applicable to bioarchaelogy and forensic anthropology are introduced. Does not satisfy social 
science distribution requirement. (Not offered 2007-08; offered in alternating years) 

377 IMAGING THE EARTH Ringle 

The use of geographical information systems (GIS) to analyze, model, and present spatial relationships in 
the biological and social sciences. Course is computer-based and emphasizes individual research projects. 
Does not satisfy social science distribution requirement. (Fall; offered in alternating years) 

382 ANTHROPOLOGY OF VISUAL CULTURE Staff 

An examination of the major theoretical approaches to the study of visual culture. Fieldwork is an essential 
component of this course, thus students will be trained to produce short ethnographic videos on American 
culture. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101. (Fall; offered in alternating years) 

490 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM FN ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 

Advanced seminar required of all senior majors, exploring in depth an anthropological issue of critical 
importance. Students choose a topic related to this issue and prepare seminar presentations and a major 
research paper. (Fall) 

498 HONORS RESEARCH Staff 

Proposal forumalation, research and writing of the honors thesis.498 is taken in the fall semester by 
qualifying senior majors and is graded in P/F mode.499 is taken in the spring semester and involves 
completion of the thesis and a departmental oral defense. Required for honors but does not count as a course 
toward the anthropology major. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. (Fall) 



68 — Anthropology/ Art 



499 HONORS THESIS Staff 

Research and writing of the honor thesis.Concludes with a departmental oral examination. Open to 
qualifying senior majors. Required for honors but does not count as a course toward tlxe anthropology major. 
Prerequisite: Departmental permission. (Spring) 

380-385 SEMINARS IN ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 

One-time seminars in selected topics in anthropology. Topics announced in advance. Not open to first-year 
students. 

395-396 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of 
the research and determines the means of evaluation. Prereqiusites: Sophomore or junior standing, vivo courses 
in anthropology, and permission of the instructor. (Fall and Spring) 

495-496 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic(s) of the 
research and determines the means of evaluation. Prerequisites: Senior standing, hvo courses in anthropology, 
and permission of tlte instructor. (Fall and Spring) 

ART 

Professors: Jackson (On leave), Ligo (On leave, Fall), Savage, Serebrennikov (Chair), S. 

Smith, Warren 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Clay. 
Affiliated Professors: Krentz (Classics), Thomas (History), Toumazou (Classics) 

Distribution Requirements: Any course numbered below 320 will satisfy the distribution 
requirement in fine arts. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Art 102, 226, 228, and 332 are options for fulfilling the cultural 
diversity requirement. 

Major Requirements: A major is offered in art with emphasis in studio or art history. In either 
case the requirement is eleven courses, to be divided as follows: 

Emphasis in Studio: Two courses in art history, one of which must be Art 100, and nine studio 
courses, including Art 397 in the junior year and Art 401 in the senior year. 

Emphasis in Art History: Two courses in studio below the 300-level, and nine art history 
courses, including 100, 400, and 402. 

Honors Requirements: Students having a 3.2 overall average and at least a 3.5 average in the 
major may apply to the faculty for participation in the honors program. 

Honors in Studio: The exhibition requirement under Art 401 will be completed in the fall 
semester of the senior year. In the spring semester the student will present a second exhibition of 
new work based on a consistent series and must score a grade of A on the oral examination. All 



Art — 69 



work for honors in studio will be in addition to both the major requirements and the requirements 
for graduation from Davidson College. 

Honors in Art History: Candidates for honors must have a 3.2 overall GPA by the end of the 
junior year and a 3.5 GPA in art by the time of graduation. For requirements, see Art 496. If, 
in the opinion of the faculty the thesis does not warrant "Honors," a grade other than "A" will 
be assigned for Art 496. Further details can be found on the department's Web pages at www. 
davidson.edu/ art. 

The department maintains Web pages that introduce the art department and provide links to 
other sites of interest to the student of art. 

HISTORY 

100 SURVEY OF WESTERN ART Staff 

Flistorv of art from prehistory to the present examined in relation to the cultural background in which it 
was shaped. (Fall and Spring) 

102 SURVEY OF ASIAN ART Thomas 

Introduction to major monuments of Indian, Chinese, and Japanese architecture, sculpture, and painting. 

(Fall) 

124 AMERICAN ART Smith 

American art from the early colonial period to the present. Emphasis on Copley, West, Cole, Eakins, 
Homer, Bellows, Wood, Hopper, and Pollock. (Fall) 

200 GREEK ART AND ARCHITECTURE (=CLA 341) Toumazou 

(Cross-listed as Classics 341). Minoan-Mycenaean art and architecture of the Aegean Bronze Age; later 
Greek art and architecture from the Geometric to the Hellenistic Period. (Fall) 

202 ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE (=CLA 202) Staff 

(Cross-listed as Classics 342). Art and architecture of the Roman Republic and Empire, including influences 
of earlier Etruscan and Hellenistic Greek art upon the Romans. (Spring) 

206 FROM CATACOMBS TO CATHEDRALS Serebrennikov 

A survey of Christian art in the Middle Ages including art and architecture from the Early Christian tombs 
in Rome to the earliest illustrated Bibles, Bvzantine mosaics, and the Gothic cathedrals in France. (Not 
offered 2007-08.) 

208 RENAISSANCE ART IN NORTHERN EUROPE Serebrennikov 

Painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts from Northern Europe, primarily the Low Countries and Germany, 
from 1400 to 1550. Major artists, development of oil painting, evolution of devotional imagery, emergence 
of secular art, effect of widely dispersed graphic images on the culture of this period, and outcome of the 
Protestant Reformation on the art of this region. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

210 RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY Serebrennikov 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1300 to approximately 1570. Works bv artists such as 
Giotto, Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, and Mchelangelo, and writers who were their contemporaries: 
Alberti and Vasari. (Spring) 



70— Art 



212 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ART & ARCHITECTURE Serebrennikov 

Painting, sculpture, architecture in Counter-Reformation Italy and the Golden Age of Protestant Holland. 
Artists including Caravaggio, Rubens, and Rembrandt, as well as issues such as how the differing demands 
of a Catholic culture and a Protestant economy affected the art of the period. (Spring) 

214 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ART Smith 

Eroticism and revolution in painting and sculpture from Tiepolo to David. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

216 NINETEENTH-CENTURY PAINTING Ligo 

Developments in the history of painting from 1790-1890. From the emergence of neo-classicism to the 
variety of responses to the movement which came to be called Impressionism. Emphasis on French 
painting and parallel developments taking place in England, Germany, and Spain. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

218 MODERN PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Ligo 

Developments in painting and sculpture that occurred from 1890-1955. From the reaction against 
Impressionism through Abstract Expressionism. Developments in western Europe during this period 
and parallel developments occurring in Russia and the United States. Participation in a study tour of the 
appropriate modern art museums in Washington, D.C, and New York during the semester break is an 
integral part of the course and, as such, is strongly recommended. (Spring) 

220 MODERN ARCHITECTURE Ligo 

Developments in architecture that occurred between 1850 and the present. Impact of the industrial 
revolution upon the development of architectural form. Recent architectural developments with emphasis 
on the works of Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright. Participants solve an assigned design problem and 
present it to the class for critique. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

222 PAINTED WOMEN, WOMEN PAINTING Serebrennikov 

As a survey of gender in art, this course's first half examines how women have been represented in Western 
art and what that implies about the balance of power between the genders over the centuries. The second 
half of the course deals with the gradual growth of art made by women, the issues addressed by that art, 
and its reception in American culture of the past century. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

228 ISLAMIC ART Thomas 

Architectural and painting traditions under the Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphs and in Moorish Spain, 
Ottoman Turkey, Safavid Persia, and Mughal India. (Spring) 

230 EARTH ART - FROM LASCAUX TO LUTYENS Ligo 

The world history of garden design as a manifestation of humanity's ever changing relationship with 
the natural world. Important gardens and their creators will be studied in light of the theology, politics, 
architecture, painting, theatre and stage design, poetry, and philosophy that shaped them. (Spring) 

232 CLASSICS ABROAD: GREEK AND ROMAN ARCHITECTURE Staff 

Survey of major and minor forms of classical art and architecture. Includes the arts of Byzantium and 
examples of Medieval and Renaissance art and architecture derived from the classical tradition. Formerly 
Art History 328. (Not offered 2007-08.) 



Art — 71 



304 THE GOTHIC CATHEDRAL Ligo 

Developments in architecture in western Europe from 1000-1500. From the emergence of the Romanesque 
to the demise of the Gothic. Political, socio-economic, theological context from which these architectural 
styles emerged. Development in sculpture and stained glass during this period. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

318 CONTEMPORARY ART Smith 

Major developments in 20th-century painting and sculpture from the beginnings of Pop Art (c. 1955) to 
the present. (Fall) 

322 SEMINAR: CLASSICAL GREEK SCULPTURE (=CLA 444) Toumazou 

(Cross-listed as Classics 444.) (Further information from Professor Toumazou.) 

332 SEMINAR ON INDIAN ART HISTORY Thomas 

The seminar begins with the art nurtured by the Tamil dynasties, continues with the art of the Buddhist 
cave temples, and concludes with an in-depth study of Mughal art. This specially-designed, weekly 
seminar is offered as part of the Semester-in-India Program. 

400 PERSPECTIVES IN ART HISTORY Serebrennikov 

Required during the fall semester for all senior art majors with an emphasis in art history. Normally limited 
to majors. (Fall) 

402 CAPSTONE SEMINAR Smith 

Topics in art history. Required during the spring semester of all senior art majors with an emphasis in art 
history. May include a study tour of appropriate sites. Normally limited to majors. (Spring) 

496 SENIOR ART HISTORY HONORS THESIS Staff 

Students submit a written proposal for a topic in the spring of their junior year. If the topic is accepted, the 
student enrolls in Art 496 during the fall semester of the senior year. A draft of the thesis is submitted by 
the end of the semester, whereupon an "Incomplete" is assigned. The final draft is defended during the 
spring semester in a one-hour oral examination. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/advisor. 

320-370 SEMINARS Staff 

Courses numbered with even numbers from 320 through 370 are art history seminars limited to 
ten upperclass students with preference to art majors. They are offered on an irregular basis in 
areas of special interest to the faculty, including such topics as history of photography, modern and 
contemporary critical theory, and individual artists. 

390, 392, 394 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For the student who wishes to pursue some special interest in art history under the supervision of a faculty 
member who reviews and approves the student's work on a regularly scheduled basis. The project must 
be initiated by a qualified student and approved in advance with a substantial paper as the end result. 
Normally limited to majors. 

STUDIO 

101 BASIC STUDIO Clay 

Introduction through the studio to the work of the artist— tools, way of seeing methods and media. 



72— Art 



Emphasizes basic principles of visual organization. Open to first- and second-year students only. (Fall and 
Spring) 

201 BASIC DRAWING Staff 

Introduction to the structure and articulation of natural and non-objective forms through the use of line 
and tone analysis of composition. Explores a variety of media. (Fall and Spring) 

203 BASIC PAINTING Warren 

Exploration of oil and acrylic. Emphasis on obtaining a basic understanding of pictorial organization and 
critical dialogue. (Fall and Spring) 

205 BASIC PRINTMAKING - ETCHING O'Malley 

Introduction to history and technique of intaglio: etching, dry point, soft ground, and aquatint. (Fall) 

207 BASIC PRINTMAKING - LITHOGRAPHY O'Malley 

Introduction to history and techniques of lithography. Art of the hand-pulled lithograph explored through 
stone and plate techniques. (Fall) 

209 BASIC SCULPTURE Savage 

Three-dimensional concepts using a variety of media. Emphasis on material and special relationships, 
technical processes, and critical dialogue. (Fall) 

301 ADVANCED DRAWING Savage 

Advanced analysis of composition and visual concepts through a variety of drawing media with special 
projects in media chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Art 201. (Spring) 

303 ADVANCED PAINTING Warren 

Attention to the individual's personal response to visual elements. Development of a particular medium 
chosen by the student special challenges. Prerequisite: Art 203. (Spring) 

305 ADVANCED PRINTMAKING O'Malley 

Advanced printmaking challenges including multi-color prints and combination of media. Development 
of a particular medium chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Art 205 or 207. (Spring) 

309 ADVANCED SCULPTURE Savage 

Sculptural concepts with attention to complex processes such as large-scale fabrication and bronze casting. 
Individual development of particular media chosen by the student. Prereqiusite: Art 209. (Spring) 

321-371 SEMINARS Staff 

Courses numbered with odd numbers from 321 through 371 are studio art seminars limited to ten 
upperclass students with preference to art majors. They are offered on an irregular basis in areas of special 
interest to the faculty. 

ART 391, 393, 395 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For the student who wishes to pursue some special interest in studio under the direction and supervision 
of a faculty member who evaluates the student's work. Evaluation will be based upon the quality of work 
produced weekly by the student. The project must be initiated by a qualified student and approved in 
advance. Normally limited to majors. 



Art/Biology — 73 



397 JUNIOR ADVANCED STUDY Savage 

Exploration of a specific medium during the junior year, determined upon consultation with the advisor, 
leading to the senior exhibition and a preliminary oral exam on the material required for Art 401. Limited 
to majors. (Spring) 

401 SENIOR EXHIBITION AND EXAMINATION Staff 

Comprehensive oral examination based on a list of 19th- and 20th-century artists together with an exhibition 
of the student's work. Limited to majors. (Spring) 

BIOLOGY 

Professors: Case (Chair), Putnam, Peroni, M. Campbell 

Associate Professors: Bernd, Dorcas, Hales, Hay, Lorn, Paradise, Stanback, Wessner 

Assistant Professor: Sarafova 

Lecturer: McNally 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Haynes, Watson 

Affiliated Faculty: Ramirez (Psychology), Heyer (Mathematics) 

Distribution Requirements: Any 100-level biology course may be counted toward the fulfillment 
of the area requirement in Natural Science and Mathematics. The department recommends Biology 
111 and 112 for students who are in premedical studies or plan to major in biology. Biology 104, 
111, and 112 fulfill the distribution requirement for a laboratory science. Biology 100W and 103 are 
taught without a laboratory component. Biology 104 credit is granted to students who score 4 or 
5 on the AP exam, or 6 or 7 on the IB exam. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Students who participate in the School for Field Studies in a 
non-western country receive Cultural Diversity credit for Biology 384. Cultural diversity credit is 
also given for the summer programs in Kenya and Zambia (Biology 368). 

Major Requirements: The biology major requires eleven courses: Biology 111 and 112; eight 
biology courses numbered 300 or above; and Chemistry 115. Of the eight biology courses numbered 
300 or above, at least one course must be taken from each of the following groups: Group A (301, 
302, 303, 306, 307, and 308); Group B (305, 311, 312, 316, 317, and 331); and Group C (321, 322, 
323, and 341). Seven of the courses required for the major must be Davidson courses taught by 
Davidson College faculty. 

Chemistry 201/202; Mathematics 130/135, 130/110, or 130M/137; and Physics 120/220 or 
130/230 are strongly recommended. Premedical students should consult with the Premedical 
Director when choosing their basic science classes. 

Honors Requirements: The departmental honors program is designed to promote individual 
excellence through directed independent study and research. Twelve lecture and research courses 
are required, including Biology 111, 112, 371, 372, and Chemistry 115. Students should plan their 
programs with their faculty advisors such that the combination of courses and research meets, 
in general, the balance of courses specified for the major. A proposal should be submitted for 
departmental action in the spring semester of the candidate's junior year. Research results must be 
presented in writing and orally to the department in the spring semester of the candidate's senior 



74 — Biology 



year. The recommendation of the department regarding honors or high honors will be based upon 
quality of the course work and the research and its presentation. A detailed description of the 
honors program in biology can be found in the biology department handbook. 

School for Field Studies: Davidson College is affiliated with the School for Field Studies, enabling 
students to participate in a semester-long or month-long program studying environmental issues. 
Students must apply for acceptance to the School for Field Studies. Permission of instructor is 
required. See http://www.bio.davidson.edu/programs/sfs/sfshome.htm 

The semesters and summer programs concentrate on international environmental issues at 
one of five SFS centers: Turks and Caicos Islands; Costa Rica; Australia; Baja California, Mexico, or 
Kenya. Semester program students receive major credit for Biology 381, 382, and 383, and course 
credit for Biology 384. Summer program students receive course credit for Biology 385. 

100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR WRITING SEMINAR Staff 

A writing intensive study of selected topics in biology. Satisfies the distribution requirement in composition. 
Open only to first-year students. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

103 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY I Hay, McNally, Wessner 
Introduction to the science of biology designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors. Course 
content and emphasis will vary with instructor. No laboratory. Not open to students who have credit for Biology 
111 or 112, except by permission of the chair. (Fall and Spring) 

104 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY II Hay, McNally 
Introduction to the science of biology designed to meet science requirements of non-science majors. Course 
content and emphasis will vary with instructor. One laboratory meeting per week. Not open to students who 

liave credit for Biology 111 or 112, except by permission oftlie clmir. (Fall and Spring) 

111 MOLECULES, GENES, AND CELLS Staff 
Introduction to the unifying principles of biology at the levels of organization from molecules through 
cells. The main topics are biochemistry and bioenergetics, cell structure and physiology, and Mendelian 
and molecular genetics. A laboratory, emphasizing planning, performing, and presenting experiments, 
meets once each week. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. (Fall and Spring) 

112 ORGANISMS, EVOLUTION, AND ECOSYSTEMS Staff 
Introduction to organismal and superorganismal biology. Topics include evolution, ecology, and animal 
anatomy and physiology. Laboratory sessions meet once a week and are comprised of investigative 
exercises and some animal dissections. Not open to seniors except bi/ pennission of instructor. Prerequisite: 
Biolog}/ 111. (Fall and Spring) 

301 GENETICS Hales, Sarafova 

Examination of classical and molecular genetics, including the physical nature of genetic material, 
transmission of genetic information, patterns of inheritance, linkage and gene mapping, recombinant DNA 
technology, gene regulation, and the history of genetics. Attention is paid to issues such as gene therapy, 
human cloning, and genetically modified crops. Prerequisites: Biology 111 andll2. Cltemistry 115, 160, or 201 
recommaided. One laboratory meeting per week. Not open to first-year students. Satisfies Group A. (Fall) 



Biology — 75 



302 MICROBIOLOGY Wessner 
An introduction to tine diverse world of microorganisms. Topics include the structure, metabolism, 
identification, and genetics of prokaryotes and viruses. Special emphasis is placed on interactions between 
microbes and humans, both in terms of pathogenesis and biotechnology. Laboratory focuses on isolating, 
identifying, and characterizing bacteria and viruses, using a series of classical and molecular techniques. 
Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111 and 1 12. One laboratory meeting per week. Satisfies Group A. 

303 BIOCHEMISTRY Hay 
Introduction to the principles of biochemistrv. Emphasis is placed upon the structure and function of 
biomolecules, as well as, upon metabolism and bioenergetics. Laboratory emphasizes the purification and 
characterization of an enzyme. Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111, 111, and Chemistry 201. One laboratory/ meeting per 
week. Satisfies Group A. (Fall) 

304 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Campbell 
Molecular (recombinant DNA) methods applied to a variety of biological questions. Emphasizes 
experimental methods and design, with particular attention to genomic organisms. Uses primary 
literature. Extensive participation in class discussions. Web assignments describe the structure/ function 
relationships of a protein, its evolution, and the protein's 3D shape. Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111 and 112, and 
one of tlie following: Chemistry 201, Biology 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 309. 

305 MICROANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES (HISTOLOGY) Putnam 
Microanatomv of the cell with particular reference to those organelles which are altered in the process of 
development of the four major tissues of the body (epithelial, connective, muscular and nervous tissues). 
Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111 and 112, or permission oftlie instructor. One laboratory meetingper week. Satisfies Group 
B. (Spring) 

306 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Watson 
Investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development covering topics such 
as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, axis specification, and organogenesis via analysis of classical and 
modern experiments. Laboratory emphasizes direct experimental manipulations of earlv embryos including 
student-designed research projects. Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111 and 112. Biology 301 or 308 recommended. One 
laboratory meeting per week. Satisfies Group A. (Spring) 

307 IMMUNOLOGY Sarafova 
Introduction to the immune system with an emphasis on mammalian models. Course focuses on the 
cellular and molecular levels of the immune system in health and disease. Topics include recognition of 
antigens, development of lymphocyte repertoires, and adaptive immune responses. Prerequisites: Biologi/ 
111, 112, and one oftlie following: Biologi/ 301, 302, 304, 306, 308, 309, or permission of instructor. One laboratory 
meeting per week. Satisfies Group A. (Not offered in 2007-08.) 

308 CELL BIOLOGY Bernd 

Examination of the multitude of coordinated interactions that must occur between sub-cellular 
compartments in order for a cell to be able to function and to adequately respond to its local environment. 
Laboratory focuses on analysis of signaling and response mechanisms used by eukaryotic cells and 
includes student-designed research projects. Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111 and 112. Biologi/ 301 recommended. 
One laboratory/ meeting per -week. Satisfies Group A. (Fall) 



76 — Biology 



309 GENOMICS, PROTEOMICS, AND SYSTEMS BIOLOGY Haynes 
Students will utilize print and online resources to understand how genome-scale information (e.g., DNA 
sequences, genome variations, microarrays, proteomics, and clinical studies) can provide a systems 
biology perspective. Students will use computers, databases, and bioinformatics tools to analyze data and 
post their analyses online. Prerequisites: Biology 111, 112, and one of the following 301, 302, 304, 306, 308 or 310. 
One laboratory meeting per week. Satisfies Group A if taken with lab. (Fall) 

310 BIOINFORMATICS (=CSC 310) Heyer 
(Cross-listed as CSC 310, Bioinformatics). A survey of computational techniques used to extract meaning 
from biological data. Algorithms and statistical procedures for analyzing genomic and proteomic data 
will be discussed in class and applied in the computer lab using Perl. Interdisciplinary teams will explore 
a particular topic in depth. Prerequisite: One of tlie following: Mathematics 210, Computer Science 121, Physics 
200, Biology 309, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered in 2007-08.) 

311 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY Putnam 
Major organ systems of the vertebrate body are examined in light of major evolutionary changes from 
primitive Pisces to the more advanced Amphibia, Reptilia, and Mammalia. Laboratory involves dissection 
of the shark and the cat. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and 112 or permission of the instructor. One laboratory meeting 
per week. Satisfies Group B. (Fall) 

312 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY Dorcas 
Introduction to the physical and chemical principles governing the lives of animals with an emphasis on 
understanding the physiological problems animals face, how those problems vary in relation to animals' 
environments, and the processes by which animals solve their problems. The laboratory focuses on 
independent investigation. Prerequisite: Biology 111 and 112. One laboratory meeting per week. Satisfies Group 
B.(Fall) 

316 BOTANY Hay 
Introduction to the fundamentals of plant biology. Topics include: anatomy, physiology, taxonomy, and 
diversity of plants. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and 112. One laboratory meeting per week. Satisfies Group B. (Not 
offered in 2007-08.) 

317 ENTOMOLOGY Paradise 
Biology of insects and related arthropods, structured around application and investigation of issues such 
as medical entomology, evolutionary history, biodiversity and systematics of insects, forensic entomology, 
conservation, and ecology. Major emphasis in the laboratory involves field trips, the making of a collection 
of local insects, stream macroinvertebrate ecology, and applied forensic entomology. Prerequisite: Biology 
111 and 112, or permission of instructor. One laboratory meeting per week. Satisfies Group B. (Not offered in 2007- 
08.) 

321 ECOLOGY Peroni 

The study of interactions between organisms and their environment, at the level of populations, 
communities, and ecosystems. Course includes investigative field labs and some weekend field trips. 
Prerequisites: Biology 111 and 112, or permission of tlie instructor. One laboraton/ meeting per week. Satisfies Group 
C. (Fall) 



Biology — 77 



322 VERTEBRATE FIELD ZOOLOGY Stanback 
Natural history of vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, birds) emphasizing phylogeny, 
adaptations, ecology, and behavior. One weekend field trip is required. Prerequisites: Biology 111 and 112, or 
permission of the instructor. One laboratory meeting per week (usually field trip). Satisfies Group C. (Spring) 

323 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (=FSY 323) Case 
(Cross-listed as Psychology 323). An evolutionary approach to the study of animal behavior, concentrating 
on the adaptive nature of social systems. Laboratories include research projects on the behavior of animals 
in captivity and in the natural environment. Biologi/ 111 and 112, or Psychology 101, or permission of the 
instructor. Satisfies Group C. (Spring) 

331 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (=PSY 303) Ramirez 
(Cross-listed as Psychology 303). Role of the nervous system sensory and motor mechanism physiological 
bases of motivation and emotion sleep and arousal and physiological bases of learning, memory, and 
language. Extensive laboratory training. Work with animals is required. Psychology 101 or Biologi/ 111 or 
Biology 112 and permission oftlie instructor required. Recommended completion b\j Pall, senior year, for majors. 
(Fall) 

332 FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY (=PSY 324) Ramirez 
(Cross-listed as Psychology 324). Intensive readings in molecular neurobiology, neuroanatomy, 
neurophysiology, and/ or behavior. Students: 1) make classroom presentations of critical analyses of the 
course readings 2) conduct laboratory research or hospital rounds and 3) submit an annotated bibliography 
and a write-up of the laboratory project or term paper. Prerequisites: Psychologxj 303 (Biologi/ 331) and 
permission oftlie instructor. (Spring) 

333 CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR NEUROSCIENCE Lorn 
An advanced examination of neurons and synapses at the cellular, molecular, and genetic levels, including 
molecular basis of neuronal transmission and memory, and genetics of behavior. Laboratories emphasize 
visualization of neuronal morphology and synapses in model organisms and examine the behavior of 
simple organisms and growing neurons. Prerequisites: Biologi/ 111 and one of tlie following: Bio 301, 304, 306, 
308, 309, or 331. Not open to first-year students. (Spring) 

341 BIOSTATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Peroni 

Biological research including experimental design, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, scientific 
writing, and the use of library resources, computer spreadsheets, and statistical software. Prerequisites: 
Biology 111 and 112, or permission of the instructor. Recommended for prevet students and students who plan to 
enroll in Biology 323, 351, 352, 371, or 372. Lecture and laboratory. Satisfies Group C. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

342 EVOLUTION Stanback 
A literature-based discussion of current topics and trends in evolutionary biology. Prerequisites: Biology 111 
and 112, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 



78 — Biology 



343 LABORATORY METHODS IN GENOMICS Campbell 

A laboratory intensive course. Students design, print, hybridize, scan, and analyze their own DNA 
microarrays. Students also perform additional genomic data analysis determined by current research 
trends. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

351, 352 GROUP INVESTIGATIONS Staff 

Series of courses introducing students to methods and techniques of biological research. Courses serve as 
background to student decisions for optional senior research. Permission ofilie instructor required. (Fall and 
Spring) 

361, 362 SEMINAR Staff 

Group study of selected topics of biological interest. See www.bio.davidson.edu for examples of seminar 
topics. Open to juniors and seniors. Permission of Die instructor required. (Pall and Spring) 

371, 372, 373 RESEARCH/ INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Field and/ or laboratory investigative work under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who 
reviews and approves the topic(s) of the independent study or research. Research is presented at the end of 
the semester in a scientific paper, with an additional oral presentation in some cases, e.g., requirement for 
honors thesis, requirement for funded research. The student is encouraged to plan the research project in 
advance of the semester in which it is to be completed. Permission oftlie instructor required. (Fall and Spring) 

381, 382, 383, 384 COURSES IN INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL FIELD STUDIES Dorcas 
Twelve-week four-course semester program at one of five School for Field Studies research centers. 
Grading is Pass/ Fail. Biology 381, 382 and 383 may be counted for major credit. Permission of the instructor 
required. See ivziriv.bio.davidson.edu/sfs (Fall and Spring) 

368 STUDY AND TREATMENT OF HUMAN DISEASE Case, Putnam 

Group study of major tropical diseases and their treatment in Africa. Course includes seminar discussions 
during the spring semester and a 1 month experience in a hospital setting in either Kenya or Zambia 
during the summer. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor is required. (Spring) 

385 TECHNIQUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL FIELD RESEARCH Dorcas 

One-month intensive field work course for junior or senior science majors during the summer in one of five 
School for Field Studies locations around the world. Grading is Pass/ Fail, but may be counted for major 
credit. Permission ofthe instructor required. See um.no.bio.davidson.edu/programs/sfs/sfshome.htm (Summer) 

401 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM Case 

A capstone course for the major which focuses on a current issue in the biological sciences that has ethical, 
political, legal, and social implications. Colloquium members choose the specific topic for the semester and 
work collaboratively on a major project related to that topic. At the end of the semester, students present 
their findings to the department. (Fall) 



Center for Interdisciplinary Studies — 79 



CENTER FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 



Director: Professor Denham (German) 

Professors: Putnam (Biology), Stell (Philosophy) 

Adjunct Lecturers: Konen (Medical Humanities) (Fall), Veilleux (Medical Humanities) 

(Fall) 
Advisory Faculty: Associate Professors M. Foley (Economics), Lerner (Music), Multhaup 

(Psychology), Wessner (Biology), Assistant Professor Wills (Religion) 

The Center for Interdisciplinary Studies (CIS), housed in the Carolina Inn on Main Street, 
offers capable and highly motivated students the opportunity to design their own interdisciplinary 
majors. In addition, Davidson faculty members (occasionally in cooperation with faculty members 
from other institutions) may, through the CIS, offer courses not easily aligned with a single 
department or program. 

A potential applicant should first discuss his or her plans with the Director. If these ideas 
seem appropriate, the student will be invited to submit a proposal outlining the major, identifying 
potential advisors, and detailing the area in which the senior thesis (a requirement for all majors) 
will be done. Acceptance of the proposal comes when the Director, advisors, and a member of the 
CIS Advisory Faculty Board agree that the proposal is meritorious. Students majoring through 
the CIS are expected to satisfy all college graduation requirements. The Director certifies the 
satisfactory completion of each student's major. 

See department website for current proposal guidelines and course listing. 

220 INTRODUCTION TO FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES Lerner, McCarthy 

An introduction to film history and analysis, with an equal emphasis on film language (cinematic means 
of expression) and thematics. Viewing and discussion of films from a wide variety of national traditions 
and genres, supplemented by discussion of analytical and theoretical texts. Required course for fulfilling the 
Film and Media studies concentration. 

315 MASTERPIECES OF FRENCH CINEMA (IN ENGLISH) Staff 

French films and filmmakers from origins of cinema to the contemporary period, emphasizing surrealism 
(Bunuel, Vigo, Cocteau), poetic realism (Clair, Renoir, Came), and the "New Wave" (Resnais, Godard, 
Truffaut). No prerequisite. Taught in English. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

380 ISSUES IN MEDICINE Putnam 
This course has two main components. 1) In the classroom, students examine the four principles of medical 
ethics: patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. Guest ethicists/ physicians provide 
lectures and discussions of issues important to the ethical practice of medicine. Each student makes a class 
presentation on an ethical topic of his or her choice. 2) In area clinics and hospitals, students observe eight 
medical practices and write both descriptive and reflective summaries of their activities. (Fall) 

381 HEALTH REGULATION AND PUBLIC POLICY Veilleux 
Topics in health care law including: HIPP A, EMTALA, ADA, CLIA. 

388 HISTORY OF MEDICAL LAW Veilleux 

This course examines the interrelationship between law and medicine in the United States and how 
physicians' roles in the legal system have evolved through U.S. history. The course considers physicians 



80 — Center for Interdisciplinary Studies 



as medical examiners, expert witnesses, defendants, and politicians the course looks at issues or incidents 
in which physicians have had a large impact on the law. Satisfies a requirement for the Medical Humanities 
Concentration. 

390 HEALTH CARE ETHICS SteU 

Introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of ethical thinking and decision making in health care. The 
course has two components: didactic (lectures, class discussion, library research, paper writing, etc.) 
and "experiential," involving an externship assignment to a clinical or administrative department at the 
Carolinas Medical Center. Examples of externship activities include observing on clinical rounds, attending 
departmental conferences, journal clubs and Grand Rounds, and doing administrative projects. (Fall) 

395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY Denham 

Independent study under one or more faculty members who approve the topic, help guide the research, 
review progress regularly, and evaluate the final results or product of the independent study. (Fall and 
Spring) 

397 FUTURE OF AMERICAN HEALTH CARE Konen 

This course reviews the origins and concepts of primary care medicine in America in its present state and 
proposes models which might better serve a majority of the basic health care needs of America's population 
in the new millennium. By the end of the course, students are expected to be creative in articulating a 
workable primary care system for the next century. (Fall) 

421 SEMINAR IN FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES Staff 

Advanced topics in the area of film history, thematics, aesthetics, and production. Prerequisite: CIS 220. 
Required course for fulfilling the Film and Media Studies Concentration. 

495 THESIS Denham (Fall) 

496 THESIS Denham (Spring) 



Chemistry — 8 1 



CHEMISTRY 



Professors: Beeston (Chair), Blauch, Carroll, Nutt, Schuh 

Associate Professors: Stevens, Striplin 

Assistant Professor: Hauser 

Visiting Associate Professor: D. Brown 

Distribution Requirements: Chemistry 105, 106, 107, 115, 199c (with lab), and 201 count toward 
the fulfillment of the requirement of at least one laboratory course in natural science. Chemistry 
103, 104, 110, and 199c (non-laboratory courses) count toward the fulfillment of the requirements 
in natural science. Students who elect to take Chemistry 110 are encouraged to take Chemistry 115 
in order to complete their survey of introductory chemistrv. 

Introductory Chemistn/ Program; Students who have earned AP credit for Chemistry 115 
may begin their studv of chemistry with Chemistry 201. Other students should begin with either 
Chemistrv 110 or 115. Chemistry 110 is designed for those students who have not completed at 
least one year of high school chemistn' or who have had high school chemistry but need a more 
thorough introduction to the subject matter. Chemistry 115 is recommended for students who 
have a good background from high school chemistry. A student may elect to take either Chemistry 
110 or 115 as the first chemistry course at Davidson. 

Major Requirements: Prospective majors are encouraged to discuss their programs with a 
department representative early in the first year. The prerequisites for advanced courses require 
careful planning to obtain a feasible schedule. 

For Class of '08 and '09 

1. Chemistn' courses: 

a. 201 (115 is a prerequisite for this course), 202, 215, 351, 352, and 371 

b. two courses selected from 381, 391, or 496 

c. one course selected from 401, 410, 420, 430, or 450 

d. one additional 300 or 400 level course, excluding 306 

2. Supporting and prerequisite courses: 

a. Mathematics 135 or 137 

b. Physics 220 or 230 

3. Students must attend ten sessions of the chemistrv colloquium during their junior and 
senior years. 

For Class of '10 and '11 

1. Chemistn' courses: 

a. 201 (115 is a prerequisite for this course), 202, 215, 351, 352, 371, 381, and 391 

b. two 400 level courses selected from 401, 410, 420, 430, 450, or 496 

2. Supporting and prerequisite courses: 

a. Mathematics 135 or 137 

b. Physics 220 or 230 

3. Students must attend ten sessions of the chemistn colloquium during their junior and 
senior years. 



82 — Chemistry 



Minor Requirements: The minor consists of Chemistry 115, 201, 202, 215, and two additional 
courses numbered 300 or higher. In addition, students must attend six sessions of the chemistry 
colloquium during their junior and senior years. At least five courses counted toward the minor 
must be taken at Davidson. Only Chemistry 490 or 496 may be taken Pass/ Fail. 

Honors Requirements: 
Candidates for honors must take: 

1. Chemistry courses: 

a. 201 (115 is a prerequisite for this course), 202, 215, 351, 352, and 371 

b. one course selected from 381 or 391 

c. two courses selected from 401, 410, 420, 430, or 450 

d. 496 and 497 

2. Supporting and prerequisite courses: 

a. Mathematics 135 or 137 

b. Physics 220 or 230 

3. Students must attend ten sessions of the chemistry colloquium during their junior and 
senior years. 

American Chemical Society Attainments Program: 

The following program is certified by the American Chemical Society as a nationally approved 
undergraduate major in chemistry. This program is strongly recommended to all majors who plan 
to study chemistry in graduate school or to seek employment as professional chemists. 

1. Chemistry courses: 

a. 201 (115 is a prerequisite for this course), 202, 215, 351, 352, 371, 381, 391, 401, and 450 

b. one course selected from 410, 420, or 430 
c.496 

2. Supporting and prerequisite courses: 

a. Mathematics 135 or 137 

b. Physics 220 or 230 

3. Students must attend ten sessions of the chemistry colloquium during their junior and 
senior years. 

4. Mathematics 150 and 235 or Physics 201 are strongly recommended. 

5. Approved mathematics or physics courses may be substituted for one of the seminar 
courses numbered 410-430. 

103 TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY Staff 

An introduction to chemistry designed to meet the science requirement of non-science majors. Course 
content and emphasis will vary with instructor. Possible offerings may focus on the chemistry of food and 
drink, environmental chemistry, or archaeological chemistry. No prerequisites. May not be taken for credit after 
any chemistry course numbered 200 or above has been taken for credit. No laboratory. 

105 CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY Striplin 

Introduction to the science of chemistry and its relation to modern society. The laboratory provides 
experience in the scientific approach to problems with an emphasis on the evaluation and interpretation 
of experimental data. Designed for students who do not plan to take additional courses in chemistry. No 
prerequisite. May not be taken for credit after Giemistn/ 106, 107, or 115 lias been taken for credit. One laboratory 
meeting per week. 



Chemistry — 83 



106 CHEMISTRY OF ART AND ARTIFACTS Beeston 
Fundamental principles of chemistry applied to an understanding of the sources of color; the materials, 
methods, and products of the artist; the analysis of works of art and archaeological artifacts; forgery 
detection; and conservation/ preservation. Designed for students who do not plan to take additional 
chemistry courses. No prerequisites. May not be taken for credit after Chemistry 105, 107, or 115 lias hem taken for 
credit. One laboratory meeting per week. (Fall) 

107 CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT Hauser 
Introduction to chemistrv and its application to environmental issues. Topics include general, analytical, 
and organic chemistry; basic toxicology; air, water, and ground pollution; major classes of pollutants; 
recycling techniques; and an introduction to green chemistry. Designed for students who do not plan to 
take additional courses in chemistry. May not be taken for credit after Chemistry 104, 105, 106, or 115 has been 
taken for credit, without permission oftlxe instructor. One laboratory meeting per week. 

110 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY Brown, Striplin 

Mathematical background for the study of chemistry. Atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, 
nomenclature, stoichiometry, and chemical reactions. Properties of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. 
Designed for students who desire to continue studying chemistry at Davidson but lack the background 
needed to begin Chemistry 115. No prerequisite. May not be taken for credit after any chemistry course numbered 
115 or above lias been taken for credit. No laboratory. (Fall) 

115 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY Beeston, Nutt, Schuh 

Principles of chemistry for students who plan to take additional courses in chemistry. Topics include 
stoichiometrv, chemical thermodynamics, atomic and molecular structure, chemical equilibria, chemical 
dynamics, and descriptive chemistry of the main group elements. The laboratory illustrates the lecture 
topics and emphasizes quantitative measurements. Prerequisite: Chemistni 110 or a good background from high 
school chemistry. One laboraton/ meeting per week. (Fall and Spring) 

201 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I Brown, Carroll, Stevens 
Introduction to organic chemistry including nomenclature, properties, structure, and synthesis of organic 
compounds. Laboraton' introduces students to basic experimental techniques of organic chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 115. One laboraton/ meeting per week. (Fall and Spring) 

202 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II Brown, Carroll, Stevens 
A continuation of the study of organic compounds with emphasis on theoretical treatment of structures 
and reactions. Laboratory includes introduction to spectroscopic determination of organic structures. 
Prerequisite: Cliemistry 201. One laboraton/ meeting per week. (Fall and Spring) 

215 CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM Blauch, Hauser, Striplin 

Aqueous and non-aqueous chemical equilibrium with applications in biochemistry, environmental 
chemistry, forensic chemistry, archaeological chemistry, and consumer chemistry. Laboratory 
experiments include qualitative and quantitative analysis using volumetric, potentiometric, 
chromatographic, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisite: Cliemistn/ 201 or permission of the instnictor. 
One laboraton/ meeting per week. (Fall and Spring) 



84 — Chemistry- 



SOS BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY Stevens 

Continuation of introductory organic chemistry with emphasis on structure, synthesis, and reactions of 
biological compounds. Topics include carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, alkaloids, 
steroids and terpenes, the mechanism of action of cofactors, and energy storage in the body. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 202. No laboratory. 

304 TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND GREEN CHEMISTRY Brown, Hauser 
Introduction to environmental chemical principles and methodology including aspects of the chemistry of 
air, water, and soil; identities, sources, properties, and reactions of pollutants; green chemical approaches to 
pollution prevention; environmentally-benign synthetic methodologies, design of safer chemical products, 
alternative solvents and catalyst development, and applications of biomimetic principles. Prerequisite or 
Corequisite: Chemistry 215. No laboratory. (Fall) 

305 FORENSIC CHEMISTRY Hauser 
Introduction to forensic chemical principles and methodology. Course topics include key forensic and legal 
concepts, statistics, sampling, quality control, sample preparation and analysis as applied to drugs, arson, 
explosives, gun-shot residue, inks, paints, fibers, papers, and glass. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Chemistry 215. 
No laboratory. 

306 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Schuh 
Physical chemistry and its application to the life sciences. Topics include necessary mathematical 
background, thermodynamics applied to intermediary metabolism, enzyme kinetics, equilibria, antigen- 
antibody interactions, chemistry of respiration, and physical properties of proteins. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
215. Does not count toward a major in chemistry. No laboratory. 

308 CHEMISTRY OF BIOMEDICAL POLYMERS Brown 
Introduction to the nomenclature, reactions, synthesis, analysis, and structure-property relationships of 
synthetic polymers. Biomedical applications of modern polymers in bones, joints, teeth, artificial organs, 
synthetic skin, and drug delivery systems. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202. No laboratory. 

309 MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY Stevens 
Chemical basis of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical development. Topics include drug discovery, 
pharmacokinetics (delivery of a drug to the site of its action), pharmacodynamics (mode of action of the 
drug), drug metabolism, and patent issues that affect the development and manufacture of pharmaceuticals. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 202. No laboratory. 

351 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: THERMODYNAMICS Blauch, Striplin 
Chemical thermodynamics with an introduction to statistical mechanics and applications to solution 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 135; Prerequisite or Corequisite: Chemistry 215 and Physics 220 or 230. No 
laboratory. (Fall) 

352 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: KINETICS AND QUANTUM MECHANICS Striplin 
Chemical kinetics followed by a discussion of quantum mechanics and its application to spectroscopy 
and the structure of matter. Prerequisites: Chemistry 215, Mathematics 135, and either Physics 220 or 230. 
No laboratory. (Spring) 



Chemistry — 85 



371 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS . Blauch, Hauser 

Introduction to analytical methods including spectrometry, separations, and electrochemistry. Emphasis 
will be placed on the principles behind and components of analytical instrumentation. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 202 and 215. One laboratory/ meeting per week. (Fall) 

381 CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION Beeston, Stevens 

An introduction to experimental techniques employed in the synthesis, isolation, purification, 
characterization, and identification of organic, organometallic, and coordination compounds. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 202 and 215. One laboratory/ meeting per week. (Spring) 

391 EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Blauch, Striplin 

Experimental study of topics in thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. 
Laboratory program involves the measurement of reaction rates and mass transport rates; the determination 
of thermodynamic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties; and the study of phase transitions and 
the behavior of macromolecules. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Cliemistry 351 or 352. One laboratory/ meeting per 
week. (Spring) 

401 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Nutt 

Application of modern theories of physics and chemistry to the study of bonding, structure, synthesis, and 
reaction pathways of non-metal, organometallic, and transition metal compounds. Prerequisite: Cliemistn/ 
352 or permission oftlie instructor. No laboratory/. (Fall) 

SEMINARS, TUTORIALS 

405 SEMINAR Staff 

Selected topics in Chemistry. Prerequisites and permission will van/ by topic. 

410 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Carroll 

Selected topics in organic chemistry. Prerequisites: Cliemistn/ 202 and 351 or pennission of the instructor. 

420 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Blauch, Striplin 

Selected topics in physical chemistry. Prerequisites: 351 and 352 or permission oftlie instructor. 

450 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY Schuh 

Selected topics in biochemistry. Prerequisites: Cliemistn/ 202 and 351, and Biologx/ 111; or permission of tlie 
instructor. (Fall) 

490 INDIVIDUAL INVESTIGATION Staff 

Designed for any qualified student who desires to pursue some special interest in chemistry under the 
direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of the research and 
who evaluates the student's work. Admission by consent of the faculty member following acceptance 
of the student's written research proposal. Consult the department's guidelines for the preparation of 
independent research proposals. 

496 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH Staff 

Laboratory, literature, or applied chemistry projects conducted with the direction and supervision of a 
faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of the research and who evaluates the student's 
work. Admission by consent of the faculty member following acceptance of the student's written research 



86 — Chemistry/Chinese 



proposal. Consult the department's guidelines for the preparation of independent research proposals. This 
course is designed for declared chemistry majors. 

497 THESIS RESEARCH Staff 

Reading and discussion of selected materials, formulation of a research proposal, research, and preparation 
of a thesis under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the research 
topic. Student work is also evaluated by the department. Admission by consent of the faculty member 
following acceptance of the student's written research proposal. Consult the department's guidelines for 
the preparation of independent research proposals. Prerequisite: Chemistry 496. 

CHINESE 

Associate Professor: V. Shen (Chair) 
Assistant Professor: P. Shao 
Adjunct Professor: C. Shen 

Foreign Language Requirement: Successful completion of Chinese 201 satisfies the foreign 
language requirement. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Chinese 120, 121, 206, 207, 224, 405, and 406. 

Minor Requirements: 

1. Satisfactory completion of six courses numbered above Chinese 102, including: 

a. two Chinese language courses chosen from: Chinese 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 350, 351; 
and 

b. two courses in Chinese literature, culture, or cinema, with at least one 400-level 
course chosen from: Chinese 120, 121, 206, 207, 224, 292, 405, 406. 

2. Only one of the following courses may be included in the minor: Anthropology 265, 
History 383, 385, 386, 472, or 475, Political Science 332 or 471, Religion 280, 281, or 285. 

3. With the approval of the Chinese Program Chair and the Registrar up to three Chinese 
language, literature, cinema, or cultural courses taken outside Davidson College 
(either from other American institutions or abroad) may be applied toward the minor. 

It is strongly recommended that students study abroad in an approved program in a Chinese- 
speaking country or place. Foreign Language Requirement 

Successful completion of Chinese 201 satisfies the foreign language requirement. 

101 ELEMENTARY CHINESE I V. Shen 
Elementary Chinese is a two-semester course in modern standard Chinese (Mandarin) designed for 
students who have no previous exposure to the Chinese language. The goal is to develop students' 
communicative competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing at the elementary level. (Fall) 

102 ELEMENTARY CHINESE II V. Shen 
Continuation of elementary Chinese I. The goal is to develop the students' communicative competency in 
listening, speaking, reading, and writing at the elementary level. Prerequisite: Chinese 101. (Spring) 



Chinese — 87 



120 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN CHINESE CULTURE V. Shen 
Introduces several aspects of Chinese culture including Chinese cultural motifs and their cultural 
implications, Peking opera, 20th century Chinese drama, Chinese etymology and calligraphy, Chinese 
popular music, Chinese cinema, Chinese martial arts, and food. Taught in English. (Not offered every year.) 

121 INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE CULTURE Shao 
Examination of key aspects of traditional Chinese culture, including birth myths, views of the body, 
women and sexuality, symbols of evil and folklore, feng-shui and divination, martial arts and heroism, 
gardens and imperial places, and traditional music. Taught in English. (Not offered every year.) 

201 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I Shao 
Intermediate Chinese I is a two-semester course in standard Chinese (Mandarin) designed for students 
who have had one year of Chinese at the college level. The goal is to develop the students' communicative 
competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: Chinese 102. 
(Fall) 

202 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE H Shao 
Continuation of Intermediate Chinese I. The goal is to develop the students' communicative competency in 
listening, speaking, reading, and writing at the intermediate level. Prerequisite: Chinese 201. (Spring) 

206 INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE LITERATURE Shao 
Selection of poetry, drama and narrative from ancient times up to 1900, with special emphasis on major 
themes and conventions. Taught in English. (Not offered even/ year.) 

207 ENGENDERING CHINESE CINEMA V. Shen 

Course examines gender relations in 20th-century China through cinematic representations. Bv looking 
in detail at the films of a few key directors and reading scholarly works, the class discusses the changing 
social and political positions of women in cinema from the 1920s to the 1990s, and how this change affects 
gender relations. Taught in English. (Not offered every year.) 

224 MARTIAL ARTS AND HEROISM IN CHINESE FICTION AND FR.M Shao 

Introduction to the Chinese idea of martial arts heroes and its representation in fiction and film with 
emphasis on its historical and changing cultural contests. Taught in English. (Not offered every year.) 

301 ADVANCED CHINESE I C. Shen 
Extensive reading and discussion of texts of increased difficulty, exposure to authentic Chinese materials, 
emphasis on expanding vocabulary, speaking and writing skills and skills that will help further develop 
proficiency in Chinese. (Fall) 

302 ADVANCED CHINESE II C. Shen 
Extensive reading and discussion of texts of great difficulty, exposure to authentic Chinese materials, 
emphasis on expanding vocabulary, speaking and writing skills and skirls that will help further develop 
proficiency in Chinese. Continuation of Chinese 301. (Spring) 

303 ADVANCED CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE Staff 
To further improve students' oral proficiency to converse on various topics in daily life, perform various 
discourse function, and speak appropriately in different social situations. Prereqiusite: Oiinese 202 or 
permission oftlte instructor. (Not offered every year.) 



88 — Chinese/Classics 



350, 351 ADVANCED READING AND WRITING Staff (Not offered every year.) 

405 Seminar: Topics in Chinese Cinema and Modern Literature V. Shen 
Reading and discussion of selected works in Chinese literature and cinema. Discussion of individual 
research projects. Taught in English. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Spring) 

406 SEMINAR IN TRADITIONAL CHINESE LITERATURE Shao 

Critical study of tales, short stories and novels from 1300 to 1900, with special attention to themes, 
conventions, critical approaches, and the problem of adaptation from fiction to film, theater, and cartoons. 

Taught in English. (Fall) 

CLASSICS 

Professors: Krentz (On leave), Toumazou 
Associate Professor: Neumann (Chair) 
Assistant Professor: Cheshire 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Johnson 
Adjunct Instructor: Welsh 

Affiliated Faculty: Ahrensdorf (Political Science), W.T. Foley (Religion), Griffith 
(Philosophy), Snyder (Religion), Studtmann (Philosophy) 

Distribution Requirements: Classics 211, 222, 256, and any course in Greek or Latin numbered 
above 300 satisfy the distribution requirement in literature. Classics 257, 341, 342, and 444 satisfy 
the distribution requirement in fine arts. Any course in classics cross-listed by the Department 
of History satisfies the distribution requirement in history. Classics 261 satisfies a distribution 
requirement in philosophy. Classics 268 satisfies a distribution requirement in social science. 
Classics 272, 378 and Latin 329 satisfy a distribution requirement in religion. 

Foreign Language Requirement: Any course in Greek or Latin numbered above 200 satisfies the 
foreign language requirement. 

Major Requirements: The Department of Classics offers a major with an emphasis in either 
classical civilization or classical languages. 
Emphasis in classical civilization: 

1. three courses in Greek and Latin, including one course in each language and one course 
at the 200 level or above in either language 

2. eight other courses at the 200 level or above, including: 

• at least one course in ancient literature (Classics 211, 222); 

• at least one course in ancient history (Classics 231, 232); 

• at least one course in ancient art (Classics 341, 342); 

• at least one seminar (400-level course). 

Note: Students who successfully complete the Classics Semester Abroad (CLA 255-258) are 
exempted from the specific distribution of courses in literature, history, and art. 
Emphasis in classical languages: 

1. seven language courses, including five at the 200 level or above and at least two in each 
language; 

2. four other courses at the 200 level or above, including 

• one course in ancient literature (Classics 211, 222); 



Classics — 89 



• one course in ancient history (Classics 231, 232); 

• one course in ancient art (Classics 341, or 342); 

• one seminar (400-level course). 

Note: Students who successfully complete the Classics Semester Abroad (CLA 255-258) are 
exempted from the specific distribution of courses in literature, history, and art. 

Placement: Students who have studied Latin in secondary school must take a placement test 
before enrolling in Latin at Davidson. By qualifying scores on the placement test a student may 
be exempted from Latin 101, 102, and 201. Students who receive a score of 4 or 5 on either or 
both of the Advanced Placement Latin tests, or who receive a score of 6 or 7 on the higher level 
International Baccalaureate Latin exam, receive automatic credit for Latin 199. Any such student 
who places out of Latin 201 on our placement test will receive credit for 201 instead of 199. 

Students may enroll for one advanced Greek and one advanced Latin course at the 200-level 
if they have not taken a course above 201 in the language before. 

Honors Requirements: Candidates may be admitted to the honors program provided they 
have attained an overall grade point average of at least 3.2, an average of 3.5 or higher in the 
major, and the unanimous endorsement of the department's faculty. In addition to the regular 
course requirements for the major, candidates for honors must complete and successfully defend 
an honors thesis. A student who receives an A- or better on the thesis and maintains the above 
grade point averages throughout the senior year will receive the department's recommendation 
for graduation with honors. 

GREEK 

101 ELEMENTARY GREEK I Staff 
Introduction to Attic Greek. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers. (Fall) 

102 ELEMENTARY GREEK H Staff 
Continuing introduction to Attic Greek. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers. Prerequisite: 
Greek 101. (Spring) 

201 INTERMEDIATE GREEK Staff 

Readings in Greek literature. Prerequisite: Greek 102. (Fall) 

212/312 HERODOTUS Toumazou 

Readings in Greek of selections from Herodotus's Histories with attention to their literary, historical and 
cultural contexts. The remaining portions of the Histories will be read in translation, in addition to select 
secondary literature. Prerequisite: Greek 201 (Fall) 

214/314 SOPHOCLES Cheshire 

A select tragedy by Sophocles, with focus on the composition and performance, the historical relevance, 
and the fundamental universality of Athenian tragedy generally. Prerequisite: Greek 201 (Spring) 

399 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GREEK 

Readings and research on Greek texts, under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who 
reviews and approves the topic(s) and evaluates the student's work. Prerequisites: Greek 201 and permission 
oftlie instructor. 



90 — Classics 



499 HONORS THESIS 

Writing of a thesis under the supervision of an appropriate professor. Oral defense before the entire classics 

faculty required. Admission by unanimous consent of the Department of Classics. 

LATIN 

101 ELEMENTARY LATTN I Staff 
Introduction to classical Latin. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers. (Fall) 

102 ELEMENTARY LATIN II Staff 
Continuing introduction to classical Latin. Requires drill sessions with Apprentice Teachers. Prerequisite: 
Latin 101 or qualifying score on placement test. (Spring) 

201 INTERMEDIATE LATIN Staff 

Readings in Latin literature. Prerequisite: Latin 102 or qualifying score on placement test. (Fall) 

222/322 SALLUST Johnson 

Readings in the writings of Sallust, the first great Roman historian, with a view to improving students' 
ability to read Latin and to deepen their understanding of the history of Republican Rome. Prerequisite: 
Latin 201 or qualifying score on placement test. (Spring) 

225/325 OVID Welsh 

Readings and research on Ovid's Ars Amatoria (The Art of Loving) and Remedia Amoris (Cures for Love), 
with attention to issues of language, meter, genre, voice, and subjectivity. Selected scholarship on the 
interpretation of these poems and their contexts under Augustus. Prerequisite: Latin 201 or qualifying score 
on placement test. (Fall) 

229/329 CHRISTIAN LATTN WRITERS Foley 

Readings and research on selected Christian Latin authors from 200 to 600, including Tertullian, Cyprian, 
Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, and Gregory the Great. Prerequisite: Latin 201 (Spring) 

326 LATTN PROSE COMPOSITION Neumann 

An introduction to writing Latin prose with a view toward greater mastery of the language. 
Prerequisite: Latin 201 or qualifying score on placement test. (Spring) 

399 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN LATIN 

Readings and research on Latin texts, under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who 
reviews and approves the topic(s) and evaluates the student's work. Prerequisites: Latin 201 and permission 
of the instructor. 

499 HONORS THESIS 

Writing of a thesis under the supervision of an appropriate professor. Oral defense before the entire classics 

faculty required. Admission by unanimous consent of the Department of Classics. 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

101W First-Year Seminar Staff 

(COMP) Writing-intensive study of selected topics. Satisfies tlie distribution requirement in composition. Opm 
only to first-year students, (Fall or Spring) 



Classics — 91 



211 GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (=ENG 211) Cheshire 

(Cross-listed English 211). Selected works from a variety of ancient Greek literary genres, from Homer's 
epic (ca. 8th c. BCE) to Plutarch's biography (ca. 2nd c. CE). (Spring) 

222 ROMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (=ENG 222) Neumann 

(Cross-listed English 222). Selected works of Roman literature from the early Republic through the Empire. 

(Offered in alternate years) 

231 GREEK HISTORY (=HB 109) Staff 
(Cross-listed History 109). Introduction to the history and culture of ancient Greece. Not open to seniors. 
(Offered in alternate years) 

232 ROMAN HISTORY (=HIS 110) Staff 
(Cross-listed History 110). Introduction to the history and culture of the ancient Roman world. Not open to 
seniors. (Offered in alternate years) 

250 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY Staff 

Greek and Roman mythology, with an emphasis on its varied treatment in literature and art, both ancient 
and modern. (Not offered 2007-08) 

261 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (=PHI 105) Staff 

(Cross-listed Philosophy 105). Introduction to the origins and development of philosophy with emphasis 
on Plato and Aristotle. (Fall) 

268 CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY (=POL 208) Ahrensdorf 

(Cross-listed Political Science 208). Major political philosophers from the 5th century B.C.E. to the end of 
the Middle Ages. (Fall) 

272 THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY (=REL 242) Foley 

(Cross-listed Religion 242). The theological and historical development of the early church from the New 
Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon (451 CE) with a focus upon early controversies as revealed 
through primary sources. (Fall) 

334 ATHENIAN LAW (=HIS 314) Krentz 

(Cross-listed History 314). Analysis of the Athenian legal process in a discussion-intensive approach using 
surviving Athenian speeches as case studies. (Not offered in 2007-08) 

341 GREEK ART AND ARCITITECTURE (=ART 200) Toumazou 
(Cross-listed Art 200). Minoan-Mycenaean art and architecture of the Aegean Bronze Age; later Greek art 
and architecture from the Geometric to the Hellenistic period. (Fall) 

342 ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE (=ART 202) Toumazou 
(Cross-listed Art 202). Art and architecture of the Roman Republic and Empire, including influences of 
earlier Etruscan and Hellenistic Greek art upon the Romans. (Spring) 

344 FIELD SCHOOL FN MEDITERRANEAN ARCHAEOLOGY Toumazou 

Intensive, on-site training in archaeological field methods and techniques. Daily instruction on excavation 
and recording, lectures by specialists, visits to other archaeological sites and museums. Conducted at a site 
near Athienou in southcentral Cyprus. Prerequisite: permission oftlie instructor. (Summer) 



92 — Classics 



353 GREEK SPORTS AND ATHLETIC FESTIVALS Staff 
Ideal of the athlete in the Greek system of values explored through art and archaeology, literature, and 
inscriptions. Selected victory odes of Pindar and field demonstrations of individual athletic events. (Not 
offered 2007-08) 

354 THE CLASSICAL TRADITION Neumann 
Overview of the field of classics; the history of the reception of Greco-Roman antiquity; the state of the field 
today. (Not offered 2007-08) 

376 CULT, MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT Johnson 

Readings and research on marginal religious beliefs and practices in the ancient Greek and Roman 
worlds. 

378 RELIGIONS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (=REL 341) Snyder 

(Cross-listed Religion 341). A survey of religious practices and beliefs in the Roman Empire; emperor 
cult, mystery religions, Judaism and Christianity as seen from the Roman perspective, magic, astrology; 
attention to material evidence in addition to literary remains. (Offered in alternate years) 

399 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Research and writing under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves 

the topic(s) and evaluates the student's work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

441 THE PARTHENON Toumazou 

Exploration of the architectural, aesthetic, religious and political contexts of the Parthenon, including 
its impact through the ages. The class will visit the recreation of the Parthenon in Nashville. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. (Spring) 

451 CICERO AND HIS WORLD Neumann 

An examination of the life and works of the statesman, orator and intellectual Marcus Tullius Cicero (106- 
43 BCE). Prerequisite: Permission of the instmctor. (Fall) 

499 HONORS THESIS 

Writing of a thesis under the supervision of an appropriate professor. Oral defense before the entire 
Classics faculty required. Admission by consent of the Department of Classics. 

SEMINARS 

Seminars change annually. 

430-435 SEMINARS IN ANCIENT HISTORY 

Seminars change annually. Recent seminars have included Alexander the Great and Roman Imperialism. 
(Not offered in 2007-08) 

440-445 SEMINARS IN ANCIENT ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

450-455 SEMINARS IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 



Errata Sheet 
Add to 2007-08 College Catalog between pages 92 and 93. 



Communication Studies 

Director: Professor Turner 
Adjunct Lecturer: P. Baker 

COM 101 - Introduction — Principles of Oral 
Communication 

Instructor 
Staff 

Examination and implementation of both classical and 
contemporary principles of effective oral communication. 
Individual presentations informed by readings, discussions, 
lectures, and examinations of key speeches. Formerly SPE 101. 

Prerequisites & Notes 
(Fall and Spring) 

COM 201 - Introduction to Communication Studies 
Instructor 

Turner 

This course provides a survey of the nature and processes of 
communication. Begins with basic concepts of communication, 
including language, nonverbal processes, perception, listening, 
and adaptation to audiences; then examines communication in 
specific contexts, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small 
group, organizational, public, and mass communication. 

Prerequisites & Notes 
(Spring) 



Page 2 



COM 295 - Independent Study 

Instructor 
Staff 

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member who 
determines the means of evaluation. Open to advanced students 
with special projects. 

Prerequisites & Notes 

Prerequisites: Communication Studies 101 or 201 and 

permission of the instructor. (Fall and Spring) 



COM 390 - Special Topics in Oral Communication 

Instructor 
Staff 

Group study of selected topics in Communication Studies. 

Prerequisites & Notes 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Spring) 



Economics — 93 



ECONOMICS 



Professors: Appleyard (Chair), B. Baker, Hess, Kumar, Martin, Ross (Dean of Faculty) 
Associate Professors: Chaston, M. Foley, F. Smith (On leave) 
Adjunct Instructor: Sparling 

Major Requirements 

1. Ten economics courses that are distributed as follows: 

a. Economics 101; 

b. Economics 202, 203, 205, and 495 (All four courses must be completed at Davidson 
College.); 

c. a course from the 210 or 310 series; 

d. a course from the 220 or 320 series; 

e. a course from the 230 or 330 series; and 

f. two other courses above Economics 101, with the exceptions of Economics 130, 195, 
196, 199, and 401, and the exception that, of Economics 211, 212, and 213, only two of 
them may be counted toward the major. 

2. At least one of the ten courses must be a 300-level course. 

3. At least one of the ten courses must be an "S" course. 

Courses taken Pass/ Fail at Davidson may not be counted towards the major. 

An "S" course contains a significant writing component. At least two of the department's 
courses each semester are offered as "S" courses. Economics 402 will satisfy the "S" requirement; 
with the approval of the department, Economics 295, 296, 395, or 396 may satisfy the "S" 
requirement. 

The department strongly recommends that students fulfill the core requirements of Economics 
202, 203, and 205 early in the major. Some economics courses, including Economics 202 and 203, 
have a calculus prerequisite. 

Distribution Requirements: Any course except 195 and 196 counts toward fulfillment of the 
distribution requirement in social science; however, the department recommends Economics 101. 

Minor Requirements 

1. Six economics courses that are distributed as follows: 

1. Economics 101; 

2. Economics 105 or 205; 

3. Economics 202 and 203; 

4. either Economics 130 or a course from the 230 or 330 series; and 

5. one other economics course above Economics 205, except Economics 401. 

2. Requirements (lb), (lc), and at least one of the requirements (Id) or (le) must be 
completed at Davidson College. 

Courses taken Pass/ Fail at Davidson College may not be counted towards the minor. 

Honors Requirements: In the process of fulfilling the major requirements stated above, honors 
candidates must pass Economics 401, earn a grade of A- or better in Economics 402, and maintain 
a grade point average of 3.5 or higher both in the major and overall. Prospective honors candidates 



94 — Economics 



should apply in writing to the department chair in the spring semester of the junior year. Note that 
Economics 401 does not count towards the major, since it is graded on a Pass/ Fail basis; however, 
Economics 402 may be counted as an elective towards the major, as well as counting as the "S" 
course required for the major. 

100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR Staff 

Writing-intensive study of selected topics in economics. Satisfies the distribution requirements in 
composition and in social science. Open only to first-year students, 

101 INTRODUCTORY ECONOMICS Staff 

Theories and institutions that organize and direct economic activities in contemporary society. Covering 
both microeconomics and macroeconomics, prepares students for understanding domestic and 
international economic issues; and serves as a foundation for further work in economics. Meets for extra 
sessions. 

105 STATISTICS Foley, Martin 

Application of probability and statistics to economic analysis. Topics include: probability rules, discrete 
and continuous random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, correlation, and regression. 
Spreadsheet software is utilized. An economics research paper is a major component of the course. One 

laboratory session per week. 

122 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS Sparling 

This course provides students without an economics background a broad overview of the health economics 
field. A foundation of microeconomics principles is developed, and this foundation is then used to analyze 
leading health care issues. 

130 SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Appleyard 

Investigation of the causes of and gains from international trade, and of the impact of policies that restrict 
trade. Analysis of the balance of payments and exchange rates and of their implications for economic 
policy. Discussion of problems of developing countries and possible strategies for solving those problems. 
Does not carry major credit. Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Fall) 

195, 196 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Designed for non-economics majors who desire to pursue some special interest in economics on an 
independent study basis. The proposal must be approved in advance by the faculty member who 
supervises the student and determines the means of evaluation. 

202 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMIC THEORY Staff 
Analysis of production and consumption activities of individual economic units. Areas of concentration 
include the theory of consumer behavior, cost analysis, production and distribution theory, market 
structure, game theory, general equilibrium, and welfare criteria. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and either AP 
Calculus or Mathematics 130 or equivalent. 

203 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMIC THEORY Staff 
Theories of aggregate demand and supply; detennination of real national income, employment, and the 
price level; and use of fiscal and monetary policies to achieve macroeconomic objectives. Prerequisites: 
Economics 101 and either AP Calculus or Mathematics 130 or equivalent. 



Economics — 95 



205 BASIC ECONOMETRICS Chaston, Foley, Martin 

Applications of linear regression analysis to economic analysis. Topics include model specification, 
parameter estimation, inference, and problems relating to data issues, statistical concerns, and model 
diagnostics. Statistical software is utilized. An economics research paper is a major component of the 
course. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and eitlier Economics 105 or permission of the instructor. One laboratory 
session per week. 

211 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING Baker 
Comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, application of funds, corporation 
accounts and statements; interpretation and analysis of financial statements. Of the courses Economics 211, 
212, and 213, only tivo of than may be counted toward the major. 

212 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING Baker 
Complex problems in various areas of financial accounting, with emphasis on theoretical background and 
analysis of accounting data. Prerequisite: Economics 211.(Spring) 

213 COST ACCOUNTING Baker 
Study of allocation and utilization of resources. Emphasis on cost behavior, cost allocation, product costing, 
budgeting, decision-making and control activities related to job-order, process and activity-based costing 
(ABC) systems. Prerequisite: Economics 211. (Fall) 

215 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS Hess 

Basic mathematical techniques used in economic analysis. Topics include static and dynamic analyses of 
market equilibrium, macroeconomic models, and optimization. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and either AP 
Calculus or Mathematics 130 or equivalent. 

221 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES Ross, Smith 
Principal events affecting economic policy and behavior in the United States since colonial times. Emphasis 
on historical origins of contemporary American problems. Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Not offered 2007- 
08.) 

222 HEALTH ECONOMICS Chaston 
Application of basic tools of economic analysis to the markets for medical care and health insurance 
in the United States. Includes international comparisons of health care systems in both developed and 
developing countries and proposals to reform the health care system in the United States. Prerequisite: 
Economics 101. (Spring) 

226 ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS Martin 
Weekly seminar. Reading and discussion on the application of economic tools to the evaluation of 
environmental amenities, the analysis of pollution control policies, and the use of natural resources. 
Strengths and weaknesses of the economic approach to these issues are examined. Prerequisite: Economics 
101. Mathematics 130 recommended. (Spring) 

227 GENDER AND ECONOMICS Chaston 
Role of gender in economic decision-making and market transactions. Models of time allocation between 
the household and the market, theories of discrimination, and occupational ghettoization and segregation 
will be studied. Related public policy initiatives will be assessed. Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Spring) 



96 — Economics 



229 URBAN ECONOMICS Smith 

Role of economics in the development of modern cities. Topics include: the monocentric-city model, urban 
land values, crime, transportation, education, and taxation. Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Not offered 2007- 
08.) 

231 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Kumar 
Development and nature of economic thought from the ancient Greeks to the present, with particular 
attention to the classical, Marxian, Austrian, neoclassical, institutional, and Keynesian schools. Prerequisite: 
Economics 101. (Fall) 

232 ECONOMICS OF TRANSITION Foley 
Examination of the legacy of the Soviet economic system in theory and practice. Critical analysis of the 
transformation from central planning to market-oriented systems including macroeconomic stabilization, 
market liberalization, and institutional development. Case studies include Russia, China, central and 
eastern Europe, and the Baltic states. Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Spring) 

233 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Hess 
Models and strategies for economic growth and development with concentration on the contemporary less 
developed countries. Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Fall) 

280-284 SEMINARS Staff 

Reading, research, papers, and discussion on selected topics in economics. Each faculty member announces 
in advance the particular topic or area of the seminar. Prerequisite: Economics 101. 

295, 296 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH Staff 

Designed for the student who desires to pursue some special interest in economics. A research proposal 
must be approved in advance by the faculty member who supervises the student and determines the 
means of evaluation. Prerequisites: Economics 101 and permission of the instructor. 

314 FINANCE Martin 

Fundamental aspects of financial theory in both a theoretical and practical manner. Includes net present 
value theory, the capital asset pricing model, capital market efficiency, dividend and capital structure 
issues, and option models. Prerequisites: Economics 105. 202, and 211. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

317 ECONOMETRICS Martin 
Theory and applications of linear regression modeling to the analysis of economic theory and to the 
forecasting of economic variables. Prereqinsites: Economics 205 and Mathematics 135. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

318 SPORTS ECONOMICS Smith 
The economics of professional and collegiate sports leagues. The course examines sports economics topics 
from labor economics, public economics, and industrial organization. Prerequisites: Economics 202 and 105. 
(Not offered 2007-08.) 

319 GAME THEORY AND STRATEGIC BEHAVIOR Foley 
Study of strategic situations in theory and practice. Course begins with static and dynamic games of 
complete information, moves to static games of incomplete information, and then concludes with dynamic, 
incomplete information games. Prerequisite: Economics 202 and 105. (Fall) 



Economics — 97 



323 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION Chaston 
Theoretical basis for antitrust laws and the regulation of industries. Mergers, market power, economies 
of scale, barriers to entry, and contestable market theory. Emphasis is placed on past and recent antitrust 
cases. Prerequisites: Economics 202 and 105 or permission oftlie instructor. (Spring) 

324 LABOR ECONOMICS Foley, Ross 
Labor markets, unionization, unemployment, and public policy primarily in the setting of the United 
States. Prerequisites: Economics 202 and 105 or permission oftlie instructor. (Fall) 

325 PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICS Smith 
Analysis of the role the public sector plays in a mixed economy. Topics include public goods, externalities, 
tax policy, expenditure policy, budget deficits, and the national debt. Includes proposals for tax, welfare, 
and health care reforms. Prerequisite: Economics 202. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

328 MONEY AND TEIE FINANCIAL SYSTEM Kumar 

Money and financial system. Term structure of interest rates, structure of financial markets, regulatory 
framework, asset demand theories, Federal Reserve system and operation of monetary policy. Prerequisite: 
Economics 203. (Spring) 

336 ECONOMIC GROWTH AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Hess 
Determinants and consequences of economic growth; theories and policy implications of sustainable 
development; global trends in population and resources. Prerequisites: Economics 203 and eitlier Economics 
105 or equivalent. (Spring) 

337 INTERNATIONAL TRADE Appleyard 
Economic basis for international trade, determinants and consequences of trade flows, barriers to trade, 
and trade policy. Prerequisite: Economics 202. (Spring) 

338 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE Hess, Kumar 
Macroeconomics of an open economy, balance-of-payments adjustment, exchange-rate regimes, and 
coordination of international economic policy. Prerequisite: Economics 203. (Fall) 

380-384 SEMFNARS Staff 

Reading research, papers, and discussion on selected topics in economics. Each faculty member announces 
in advance the particular topic or area of the seminar. Prerequisites: Economics 202 or 203 or 205 and permission 
oftlie instructor. 

395, 396 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH Staff 

Designed for the major who desires to pursue some special interest in economics. A research proposal 
must be approved in advance by the faculty member who supervises the student and determines the 
means of evaluation. Prerequisites: Economics 202 or 203 or 205 or permission oftlie instructor. 

401 HONORS RESEARCH Staff 

Independent research designed to formulate a written proposal for an honors thesis. The proposal will 
encompass a review of recent literature, development of a theoretical framework and research hypotheses, 
and the preparation of an annotated bibliography. An oral defense of the written proposal is required. 
Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission oftlie department chair. (Fall) 



98 — Economics/Education 



402 HONORS THESIS Staff 

Completion of the honors research proposed in Economics 401. Oral defense of the thesis is required. 
Prerequisite: Pass in Economics 401 and permission of the department chair. (Spring) 

495 SENIOR SESSION Staff 

Required of all seniors majoring in economics. Students participate in colloquia on economic problems, 
theory, and policy; prepare group projects on economic issues; and take comprehensive examinations 
that include the major achievement test in economics, an oral exam and written examinations in economic 
theory and analysis. Prerequisites: Economics 202, 203, and 205 or permission of the department chair. (Spring) 

EDUCATION 

Associate Professor: Gay (Chair) (On leave, Fall) 

Assistant Professor: Kelly 

Adjunct Professor: Brown 

Lecturer: Gerdes 

Affiliated Professor: Ault (Psychology) 

Graduation Requirements 

Distribution Requirements (Social Science): Education 121, 221, 240, 243, and 250. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Education 240 and 250. 

Goals of the Teacher Education Program: To prepare facilitators of learning for secondary schools, 
the program addresses the following goals: 

1. to provide a program of studies constituting a liberal education; 

2. to provide an academic major constituting in-depth knowledge of subject matter 
appropriate for teaching in secondary schools; 

3. to provide a sequence of professional studies courses and experiences leading to 
pedagogical proficiency. 

Teacher Licensure: Through a series of articulation agreements with Duke University, Queens 
University of Charlotte, and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Davidson 
College provides a course of study leading to North Carolina initial licensure/ certification at 
the secondary level in the fields of English, French (K-12), Latin, Mathematics, Spanish (K-12), 
Science (which includes majors in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics), and Social Studies (which 
includes majors in Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, 
and Religion). Through reciprocity agreements, North Carolina licenses are accepted in forty-two 
additional states. For more detailed information, interested students should contact the chair of 
the Department of Education during the first or second year. The Teacher Education Program 
Handbook is available on the Education Department Web page and provides all details related to 
licensing procedures. 

General Requirements: In addition to meeting the requirements of the major, students in 
the Teacher Education Program must take the following courses: Education 121, 242, 243, and 
Psychology 101. Students must also have minimum scores designated by the State of North 
Carolina on the Praxis Series or minimum scores on the SAT prior to applying to the Teacher 
Education Program. 



Education — 99 



Admission Requirements: Formal admission to the Teacher Education Program usually occurs 
during the second or third vear. Students complete an "Admission to the Teacher Education 
Program" form and meet the following guidelines: 

1. proficiency in oral and written communications through completion of core 
requirements and interviews with the Education Department faculty; 

2. state designated minimum scores on the Praxis I series (Pre-Professional Skills Test) or 
minimum scores on the SAT; 

3. successful completion (grade of "C" or better) of two of the following four courses: 
Psychology 101; Education 121, 242, or 243; 

4. a minimum overall GPA of 2.5; 

5. a recommendation from the Dean of Students, the departmental advisor, and one other 
faculty member regarding the student's interest and suitability for teaching; 

6. approval of the Teacher Education Committee; and 

7. approval of the Department of Education faculty and chair. 

Student Teaching: Students take Education 400, 410-411, and 420 concurrently in one semester 
during the senior vear that is reserved for student teaching. No additional courses can be taken at 
this time. The criteria for admission to student teaching include: 

1. admission to the Teacher Education Program; 

2. a minimum overall grade point average of 2.5; 

3. a rninimum grade point average in the teaching field of 2.0; 

4. completion of all professional education courses with no grade below "C;" and 

5. recommendation by the chair of the Education Department and approval of the Teacher 
Education Committee. 

Concentration: There are two tracks — a traditional student-teaching track leading to licensure 
(which is outlined above) and an interdisciplinary track for students who are interested in the 
studv of education, but not currently pursuing licensure. Both of these are described in detail in the 
separate section of this catalog on concentrations. Early schedule planning with the department 
chair is necessary to ensure completion of all requirements by graduation. 

100W GROWING UP "JIM CROW" Kelly 

This writing-intensive course will introduce students to how a generation of white and black southerners 
learned race and racism in the Age of "Jim Crow." Students will analyze films and videos as complex 
texts that can be viewed through multiple and intersecting lenses. From the perspectives of black and 
white southerners, students will examine oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of 
numerous topics: Jim Crow; schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, 
interracial harmony, and desegregation. Students will be introduced to various approaches to writing 
for critical engagement and for college success. Tlie course fid/Ms the "W" reqiurement and a distribution 
requirement in social science. Tlie course is open only to first-year students. 

121 HISTORY OF EDUCATIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE Gay/Gerdes 

Traces historical development and underlying philosophies of educational institutions and practices in the 
United States; considers current roles and functions of the school in relation to other social institutions such 
as state and church. (Fall and Spring) 



100 — Education 



221 CONTEMPORARY EDUCATIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE Gay 

A course that examines contemporary educational theory and teaching practices. Requires approximately 
sixty hours of fieldwork in a public or private school, weekly class meetings, and the production of a 
portfolio containing items determined in consultation with the course instructor. 

240 READING, 'RUING, AND RACE: THE RACIAL ACHIEVEMENT GAP KeUy 
A critical examination of competing explanations and impassioned debates over the racial achievement 
gap in the United States with a focus on the education of African- Americans from slavery to the 21st 
century. This course will also explore how gender and class complicate race-specific solutions to the racial 
achievement gap. Satisfies a distribution requirement in Social Science, provides credit toward the Education 
Concentration and the Ethnic Studies Concentration, and satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement. (Fall) 

241 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (=PSY 241) Ault 
(Cross-listed as Psychology 241). Individual development of normal children with emphasis on learning, 
social and emotional development, cognitive and language development. Special study of behavioral, 
social learning, and cognitive theories of development. Includes observations at local day-care centers. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101 (Spring) 

242 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND TEACHING EXCEPTIONALITIES Gerdes 
Psychology of learning as it relates to teaching. Focus on contemporary theories of learning, retention, 
transfer, motivation, educational assessment, and adolescent psychology, and their particular application 
to classroom teaching. Includes special emphasis on teaching exceptional students and appropriate clinical 
experiences in educational institutions. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Spring) 

243 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT Brown 

(Cross-listed as Psychology 243); An in-depth examination of specific theories, concepts, and methods 
related to the period of adolescence. Students will explore a wide range of topics including: cognitive 
development, moral development, identity formation, gender role, social relationships, and the effects of 
culture on adolescent development. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Fall) 

250 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION Kelly 

The course examines critical issues related to diversifying today's educational system. Discussion topics 
include curricular content, assessment techniques, and the educational system's role in preparing its 
citizens to live and work in a global society. It views multicultural education as encompassing teachers, 
parents, students, administrators, employees, employers, and society at large. The focus is on examining 
traditional assumptions, expectations, and biases. Satisfies the adtural diversity requirement. (Spring) 

300 SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION Staff 
Individual research on topics requested by students under conditions specified in a written contract 
arranged no later than the end of the first week of the term in which credit is to be authorized. Contract 
must include project title, summary statement of project objectives and proposed activities, preliminary 
bibliography, specific evaluation criteria and techniques, and schedule of conferences with the instructor. 
Prereqidsite: Approval of the department cliair and acceptance of contract by the faculty sponsor of the department. 

301 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EDUCATION Staff 

Areas of study vary according to educational objectives and preferences of interested students. Includes 
experiences in school settings (public or private) and any level (elementary or secondary) for any subject. 
The independent study is under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and 



Education/English — 101 



approves the topic(s) of the independent study and evaluates the student's work. Prerequisite: Approval of 
the instructor. 

302 FIELD PLACEMENT IN EDUCATION Staff 

Independent studv in the Interdisciplinarv Concentration in Education under the supervision of a faculty 
member who approves the student's topic(s) and evaluates the work. Areas of study and experience vary 
according to the student's educational objectives and preferences. Requires approximately eight hours per 
week in a public or private school, weekly meetings with a department faculty member, and production 
of a portfolio, that synthesizes the completed concentration courses. Prerequisite: Approval oftlie instructor. 
(Spring) 

400 ORGANIZATION FOR TEACFflNG Kelly 

Procedures for effective organization and presentation of subject matter in particular academic disciplines 
at the high-school level. Approximately one-third of this course is taken under the direct supervision of 
one or more Da\idson College professors in the academic discipline of anticipated certification. Requires 
appropriate clinical experiences in schools. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. (Spring) 

410, 411 INTERNSHIP IN TEACFUNG Kelly 

Ten to twelve weeks of full-time involvement in the secondary school spent in observing, classroom 
teaching, and other tasks appropriate to accomplished professional teaching. Close classroom supervision 
by the local secondary school and Davidson professors. Prerequisite: Approval of college committee on teaclier 
education. (Spring) 

420 SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION Gerdes 

Function of the secondary school, nature of the secondary student, and secondary school curriculum. 
Emphasis on diagnostic and remedial procedures for secondary students. Discussion includes evaluation 
and shared experiences resulting from the internship experience. Prerequisite: Approval of tlie instructor. 
(Spring) 

ENGLISH 

Professors: Flanagan, Gibson, Kuzmanovich, Lewis (On leave), Mills (Chair), Nelson, 

Parker (On leave) 
McGee Visiting Professor of Writing: Terese Svoboda (Spring 2008) 
Associate Professors: S. Campbell, Churchill (On leave), Fox, A. Ingram, R. Ingram, 

Miller 
Assistant Professors: Fackler, Vaz-Hooper 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Gazzaniga 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: English 282, 284, 286, 290, 383, 394, 486 fulfill the cultural 
diversity requirement. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses as follows: 

1. English 220 

2. Three historical survey courses: 

English 240. British Literature through 18th century 

English 260 or English 290 

(English 260: British Literature, 19th through 20th century, including colonial and 



102 — English 



post-colonial literature; English 290: World Literatures, a historical survey of selected 
texts outside the British and American literary traditions.) 
English 280. American literature through 20th century 

3. A course in writing, creative writing, or creative practice (at 200 or 300 level) 

4. Five electives, three of them forming a coherent self-designed "cluster" by interest, 

period, or genre and at least two of the five at the 400-495 level. 
Note: Students who declare a major in English should complete 220 and 240 by the end of the sophomore 
year. Tlie remaining two historical survey courses should be completed by the end of the junior year. 
Tliose who cannot meet these deadlines must make prior arrangements with the Chair. 

Distribution Requirements: Students may take either English 100W or 101W to satisfy the 
English composition requirement, but may not take both. English 100W and courses numbered 110 
or higher - with the exception of 201, 202, 203, 204, 301, 303, 304, 305, 310, independent studies, and 
tutorials— may be counted toward the fulfillment of the distribution requirement in literature. 

Honors Requirements: The Honors Program requires a 3.5 GPA in English courses by the time of 
graduation and 3.2 overall GPA at the point of application to the program. It normally comprises 
twelve courses. These twelve include two in addition to the ten required of all majors: English 

498, in which the student researches a thesis and presents plans to a thesis committee; and English 

499, in which the student writes the thesis and, at the end, is examined by the thesis committee. 
Exceptions to the requirement of twelve courses may include the following: 

1. Students who apply to the Honors Program may ask the Department to substitute 
English 498 for an elective. 

2. With the Department's permission, two courses required of the honors student may come 
from other departments related to the student's thesis. 

A more detailed description of the Honors Program may be found on the Departmental web 
page. To be awarded honors, students must achieve at least a grade of B+ in both English 498 and 
English 499. 

Transfer Courses: The English Department accepts up to five courses from other colleges and 
universities as credit toward the major. To be granted transfer credit toward the major, students, 
after receiving College credit from the Registrar, should make their requests to the English 
Department Chair and submit for evaluation all relevant course materials. 

ENG 100W COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE Staff 

Introductory instruction in analyzing and writing about literature. Includes a research paper. Not available 
to students who are in Humanities or who have otherwise fulfilled the composition requirement, except by 
permission of the chair during Drop/ Add. Open only to first-year students. 

100W WRITING ABOUT DRAMA Fox 

100W BEYOND PRINCE CHARMING Fackler 

101IS INTERCULTURAL ENGLISH COMMUNICATION Staff 

Instruction in English for non-native speakers with an emphasis on the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary 
requisite for communicating at the college level. Not available for students who are eligible to enroll in a W course 
or in the Humanities sequence. 



English— 103 

101W WRITING PHOTOGRAPHY Staff 

101 W ETHICS AND TECHNOLOGIES OF MEDICINE Vaz-Hooper 

101W ENGLISH COMPOSITION I Staff 

Instruction in expository writing and the research paper. Not available to students who are in Humanities 
or who have otherwise fulfilled the composition requirement, except by permission of the chair during 
Drop/ Add. Open only to first-year students. 

101 W ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING AND WILDERNESS LEADERSHIP A. Ingram 

110 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE Staff 

Designed for non-majors. Emphasizes close reading and informed appreciation of literary texts. Topics 
and readings vary by section. Does not count toward the major. 

201 INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION Staff 
For students who wish a more advanced instruction in writing than English 100W or 101 W. The focus of 
the course may vary from semester to semester. 

202 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING Parker 
Practice in the writing of poetry and short fiction with some reading of contemporary American poets and 
fiction writers. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

203 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING POETRY Staff 
Practice in the writing of poetry with some reading of contemporary poets in English. Not open to first-year 
students. 

204 INTRODUCTION TO WRITING FICTION Staff 
Practice in the writing of short fiction with some reading of contemporary fiction writers in English. 

211 GREEK LITERATURE FN TRANSLATION Cheshire 

(Cross-listed Classics 211). Selected works from a variety of ancient Greek literary genres, from Homer's 
epic (ca. 8th c. BCE) to Plutarch's biography (ca. 2nd c. CE). (Spring) 

220 LITERARY ANALYSIS Staff 

Designed for majors. Emphasizes theoretical approaches and critical strategies for the written analysis of 
poetry, fiction, and drama. Writing intensive. Required for the major. Students who major in English should 
complete 220 by the end oftlie sopliomore year. Tliose who do not meet this deadline must make special arrangements 
with the Chair. 

222 ROMAN LITERATURE FN TRANSLATION Neumann 

(Cross listed Classics 222.) Selected works of Roman literature from the early Republic through the 
Empire. 

231 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE CampbeU 

Explores young adult fiction from 1860 to the present from various critical perspectives and within varied 
educational contexts. 



104 — English 



240 BRITISH LITERATURE FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO 1800 Staff 

Introductory survey of the British literary tradition in poetry, drama, and narrative during the Middle 
Ages, Renaissance, and Eighteenth Century, with special emphasis on Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and 
Milton. Students who major in English should compete 240 by the end of tlie sophomore year. Tliose who cannot 
meet this deadline must make special arrangements with the Chair. 

260 BRITISH LITERATURE SINCE 1800 Staff 
British literature of the Romantic and Victorian periods and the twentieth century. Students who major in 
English should complete 260 by the end of the junior year. Tlwse who cannot meet this deadline must make special 
arrangements with tlie Qiair. 

261 MODERN DRAMA (=THE 261) Fox 
(Cross-Listed as Theatre 261). European, American, and British drama from Ibsen to Pinter with emphasis 
on the major movements within Western theater: realism, naturalism, expressionism, Epic Theater, and 
Theater of the Absurd. 

280 AMERICAN LITERATURE THROUGH THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Staff 
Historical survey treating the development of American letters from the beginnings through the twentieth 
century. Students who major in English should complete 280 by the end of the junior year. Tliose who cannot meet 
this deadline must make special arrangements with tlie Qiair. 

281 LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH Mills 
Regional survey from literary beginnings to the present, with particular attention to literature from the 
New and the Contemporary South. 

282 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE Hanagan 
Readings in poetry, drama, and prose by African-American writers from the early 20th century to the 
present. 

283 SHORT PROSE FICTION Nelson 
Theory and development of the short story with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century authors. Lecture, 
discussion, and workshops. Some attention given to writing for publication. 

284 ETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURES Fox 
Readings in poetry, drama, and prose by selected ethnic American writers. Course topics vary from year 
to year. 

286 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE A. Ingram 

Literatures of the native peoples of North America, including myths and oral traditions, autobiography, 
poetry, drama, and fiction; emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century works. First-year students require permission 
of the instructor. 

290 WORLD LITERATURES Staff 

Historical survey of selected texts outside the British and American literary traditions. Students who major 
in English should complete 290 by tlie end of tlie junior year. Tltose who cannot meet this deadline must make 
special arrangements with the Clmir. 



English— 105 



291 STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND RELIGION Gibson 

Special topics considering relationships between literature and religion. 

293 FILM AS NARRATIVE ART Staff 
Relationship between prose narrative and film, with emphasis on literary origins and backgrounds of 
selected films, verbal and \isual languages, and problems of adaptation from novel and short story to 
film. 

294 STUDIES IN MODERNISM Churchill 
An examination of modernist literature and arts, with emphasis on formal experimentation within 
historical, political, and social contexts. Specific themes and texts may v arv. 

295 WOMEN WRITERS Gazzaniga 
Selected 19th and 20th<enturv British and American women authors. Explores how culture influences the 
writing, reading, and interpretation of literature and how women waiters articulate their experience. 

301 WRTHNG NONFICTION PROSE Staff 

Advanced studv of contemporary nonfiction prose, approaches to expository writing across the curriculum 
and editing; students mav pursue special interests. First-year students require permission of the instructor. 

303 WRITING POETRY D Staff 
Advanced work in writing poetry. Permission of the instructor required. 

304 WRITING FICTION II Staff 
Advanced work in writing fiction. Permission of the instructor required. 

305 WRITING PLAYS Staff 
Offered in years when a professor in residence or a visiting professor of writing or theater focuses on 
plavwriting. Permission oftlie instructor required. 

310 TFIE ENGLISH LANGUAGE A. Ingram 

Introduction to theories of modern linguistics as they illuminate the historical development of English 
phonology, morphology, and syntax from Old and Middle English to Modern English. Attends to both 
written and spoken English; examines definitions and theories of grammar, as well as attitudes toward 
language change in England and the U.S. First-year students require permission oftlie instructor. 

340 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE LITERATURE Staff 

Historical and critical study of one or more themes in a selection of Medieval and Renaissance texts (to 
1660). Includes readings from various genres and attention to critical approaches. First-year students require 
permission oftlie instructor. 

343 CHAUCER Gibson 

Critical study of The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde in Middle English with attention to their 
historical and cultural context. First-year students require permission oftlie instructor. 

352 SHAKESPEARE R.Ingram 

Critical reading, discussion, and performance of selected plays. First-year students require permission oftlie 
instructor. 



106 — English 



353 STUDIES IN ENGLISH RENAISSANCE LITERATURE Staff 

Topics in Renaissance literature such as Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, Renaissance schools of poetry, 
and Northern humanist culture. First-year students require permission of the instructor. 

355 MILTON R. Ingram 

Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, selected minor poems, selected prose. First-year 
students require permission of the instructor. 

360 STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE, 1660-1900 Staff 
Historical and critical study of one or more themes in a selection of British literary texts from 1660-1900. 
Includes readings from various genres and attention to critical approaches. First-year students require 
permission of the instructor. 

361 THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Vaz-Hooper 
Historical and critical study of British literature from 1660 to 1800. First-year students require permission of 
the instructor. 

362 BRITISH ROMANTICISM Vaz-Hooper 
Poetry and prose of early 19th-century Britain. First-year students require permission of the instructor. 

363 THE BRITISH NOVEL TO DICKENS Fackler 
Selected authors including Richardson, Defoe, Swift, Radcliffe, Fielding, Sterne, and Austen with an 
emphasis on critical and theoretical approaches. First-year students require permission of the instructor. 

370 DAVIDSON SUMMER PROGRAM AT CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY 

Limited to thirty students, the Davidson Summer Program at Cambridge focuses on the history and 
literature of late 18th- and 19th-century Britain. Students may receive credit for either English 370 or 
History 390. 

371 VICTORIAN LITERATURE Vaz-Hooper 
Readings in the prose and poetry of the period. First-year students require permission of the instructor. 

372 BRITISH FICTION FROM DICKENS TO THE PRESENT Fackler 
Selected works of British and Commonwealth fiction from the Victorian period to the present. First-year 
students require permission of the instructor. 

373 MODERN BRITISH AND IRISH POETRY Churchill 
Development of poetry in England and Ireland from Hopkins and Hardy to the present. First-year students 
require permission of the instructor. 

380 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE Nelson 
Historical and critical study of one or more themes in a selection of American literary texts. Includes 
readings from various genres and attention to critical approaches. First-year students require permission of 
the instructor. 

381 AMERICAN FICTION: 19TH CENTURY A. Ingram 
Historical and theoretical understanding of romanticism, realism, and naturalism, with attention to 
Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Crane, and others. First-year students require permission of the 
instructor. 



English— 107 



382 NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY Staff 
Historical and theoretical understanding of major trends in American poetry of the nineteenth century 
with special attention to Romanticism, Sentimentalism, and Realism. Major authors include Emerson, 
Whitman, Poe, Longfellow, Melville, Dickinson, Dunbar, among others. First-year students require permission 
of the instructor. 

383 CARIBBEAN LITERATURE Flanagan 
An exploration of major themes and tropes in fiction, poetry and drama by writers of African, Asian, and 
European descent in the English, French, and Spanish speaking islands. Writers include figures such as 
V.S. Naipaul, Kamau Brathwaite, Maryse Conde, Paule Marshall, Derek Walcott, Jean Rhys, and Edouard 
Glissant. First-year students require permission oftlie instructor. 

386 AMERICAN FICTION: 20TH CENTURY Nelson 
Historical and theoretical understanding of modernism, postmodernism, and contemporary literature, 
with attention to Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Ellison, O'Connor, Welty, Bellow and others. First-year 
students require permission oftlie instructor. 

387 MODERN AMERICAN POETRY Staff 
Development of poetry in America from Whitman and Dickinson to the present. First-year students require 
permission oftlie instructor. 

388 CONTEMPORARY THEATRE Fox 
Alternative and mainstream American and British theatre after 1950, from Pinter to Kushner, with emphasis 
on developments arising in political theatre, postmodern theatre, and solo performance. First-year students 
require permission oftlie instructor. 

389 STUDIES FN LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT A.Ingram 
Special topics in environmental literature, such as American nature writing, the Thoreauvian narrative, 
ecocriticism, and ecoliterature. First-year students require permission oftlie instructor. 

391 LITERARY CRTTICISM Kuzmanovich 
Analytic and comparative reading of major critical texts. First-year students require permission of tlie 
instructor. 

392 STUDIES FN LITERATURE BY WOMEN Mills 
Special topics in women's writing such as Inflections of the Self, Poetry and Female Identity, the Woman 
Hero, Gender and Text. First-year students require permission oftlie instmctor. 

393 STUDIES FN LITERATURE AND THE VISUAL ARTS Staff 
Special topics considering relationships between literature and the visual arts. Designed especially for 
students who wish to pursue the study of film beyond the level of English 293 and for students interested 
in relationships among painting, sculpture, and literature. Permission oftlie instructor required. 

394 STUDIES FN MODERN LITERATURE Staff 
Special topics in modern literature, such as Modern International Fiction, Contemporary Poetry, Literature 
and Medicine, and Contemporary Drama. First-year students require permission oftlie instructor. 



108 — English 



395 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN LITERATURE Staff 
Independent study under the direction of a faculty member who approves the topic and determines the 
means of evaluation. Permission of the instructor required. 

396 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN WRITING Staff 
Independent study under the direction of a faculty member who approves the topic and determines the 
means of evaluation. Permission of the instructor required. 

397 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 
Independent study under the direction of a faculty member who approves the topic and determines the 
means of evaluation. Permission of the instructor required. 

400^94 SEMINARS Staff 

Seminars, numbered 400 through 494, are limited to twelve juniors and seniors with preference to English majors. 

English 495, 498 and 499 are limited to seniors 

495 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM Staff 

Approaches a wide range of literature through specific topics, themes, or problems chosen by the course 
instructors. Topics may include a genre, a specific historical issue, or some other broad organizing principle. 
Emphasizes synthesis and analysis of material from disparate cultures and periods by reading, discussing, 
and writing about works that exemplify the course's topics. Prerequisite: Limited to senior English majors. (Not 
offered 2007-08.) 

498 SENIOR HONORS RESEARCH Mills 
Reading and research for the honors thesis and field examination taught by the student's thesis Director and 
the departmental honors advisor. Culminates in an oral presentation to the student's honors committee. 
Final evaluation conducted by the student's thesis Director. Ordinarily, taken in the fall of the senior year. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor required. 

499 SENIOR HONORS THESIS Mills 
Writing of the honors thesis begun in English 498, supervised by the student's thesis Director and supported 
by instruction of the departmental honors advisor. Concludes with an oral defense of the thesis and a field 
examination administered by the student's honors committee. Final evaluation conducted by the student's 
thesis Director in consultation with the student's honors committee. Ordinarily, taken in the spring of the 
senior year. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor required. 



French— 109 



FRENCH 



Professors: Jacobus, Slawy-Sutton (Chair), Sutton, Yoder 

Associate Professor: Kruger 

Assistant Professor: Fache 

Visiting Professor: Buckley (Resident Director, France, 2007-08) 

Distribution Requirements: Any course numbered 220-229, 290 or 320-363 may be counted 
toward the fulfillment of the distribution requirement in literature. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: French 361 and 363 are options for fulfilling the cultural 
diversity requirement. 

Foreign Language Requirement: Completion of French 201 meets the foreign language 
requirement for the degree. 

Students with prior work in French must take a placement test to assess their language 
proficiency. Using the results of the placement exam (which tests reading and listening skills) and 
the high school record, the department places the student at the appropriate level. 

Students may satisfy the language requirement bv high achievement on the placement exam. 
Should they wish to continue French, they should enroll in a course numbered 202 or above. Other 
students may petition the department to satisfy the language requirement on the basis of an oral 
examination given by a member of the department. 

Study Abroad: The department strongly encourages all students, especially French majors 
or minors, to study abroad for a minimum of one semester. Davidson's own program is located 
in Tours where students may spend an academic year or either the fall or spring semester (see 
section on Study Abroad for more details). Students participating in non-Davidson foreign-study 
programs must secure advance approval from the department for credit toward the major. 

Major Requirements: Ten French courses numbered above 202, and including: 

1. French 211 or equivalent; 

2. French 260 or the equivalent; 

3. three 300-level courses including at least one in the 320-359 series and at least one in the 
361-379 series; 

4. 490 (Senior Seminar); 

5. 491 or 499 (Senior Thesis or Honors Thesis). 

Note 1: In addition to 490 and 491 (or 499), senior majors are required to take a third course 

in the department during the senior vear. 

Note 2: We encourage majors to take courses in French studies offered by other departments. 

With approval of the French department, one such course may be included as one of the ten 

required for the major. Examples include ART 224, FilS 228, and HIS 328. 
In the spring semester of their senior vear, French majors write a senior thesis in French 
based on a personal reading program developed with the help of a faculty advisor. The reading 
program may be organized around a literary theme, genre, or movement, as well as a particular 
author or a civilization topic. Recent topics (translated for convenience) have included: "Economic 
Development in Senegal," "Images of Homelessness in French literature," "Literary Treatments of 
Robespierre," "The Novels of Simone Schwarz-Bart," and "Balzac and Ambition." 



110 — French 



Students interested in obtaining teacher certification (K-12) in French must satisfy all the 
education requirements in addition to the major requirements in French, with the exception of 
French 491 (which is waived to allow the student to complete the education program in the spring 
semester, including student teaching). Teacher certification candidates submit and present orally 
a paper on foreign language pedagogy in lieu of the senior thesis. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses at the level of French 211 and above. Must include Composition 
and Conversation (211 or the equivalent), Introduction to French Literature (220-229, or the 
equivalent), a course in French culture or civilization (260, 360-369, or the equivalent), and three 
additional courses beyond 211 in French language, literature, and/ or civilization, one of which 
must be at the 300 level or above. At least two of the six courses must be taken at Davidson, one of 
which must be at the 300 level or above. 

Honors Requirements: Candidates for honors take the regular courses for the major, with the 
exception of French 491. In the Fall, in order to be accepted as candidates for honors, students must, 
in addition to having a 3.5 GPA in French courses, write an essay demonstrating their ability in 
written French. Then, with prior departmental approval, candidates for honors register for French 
499 in the spring semester of the senior year, write an honors thesis, and complete an oral defense 
in French before a departmental thesis committee. 

100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR Staff 

Writing intensive (in English) study of selected topics. Satisfies the composition requirement and distribution 
requirement in literature. Prerequisite: Open only to first-year students. (Not offered 2007-08) 

101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I Kruger 
Introductory French course developing basic proficiency in the four skills: oral comprehension, speaking, 
writing, and reading. Requires additional work in drill sessions and the language laboratory. Normally, for 
students with no previous instruction in French. 

102 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II Kruger 
Continuing development of basic proficiency in the four skills. Drill sessions and work in language 
laboratory. Prerequisite: French 101 at Davidson or permission of tire department. 

103 INTENSIVE BEGINNING FRENCH Jacobus 
Beginning French. Learn conversational French quickly. Meets every day for 6 class-hours per week plus 
meetings with an assistant teacher (AD- Completes two semesters of French in one semester. Equivalent 
to French 101 and 102. Counts as two courses and prepares for French 201. More information: French 103. 
(Fall only) 

201 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Fache, Yoder 
Development of skills in spoken and written French, with extensive oral practice and grammar review. 
Requires work in the language laboratory or the equivalent. Fulfils foreign language requirement. 

202 ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Slawy-Sutton, Sutton 
Further cultivation of intermediate-level oral and written skills, with selected grammar review. Prerequisite: 
French 201, placement examination, or permission of tire department. 



French — 111 



Guidelines for selecting courses beyond the intermediate level. 

The minimum requirement for courses numbered 211 or above is French 202. Students who have 
completed 202 or the equivalent may enroll in any course in the 200s. For help in matching literature, 
civilization, and advanced language courses to linguistic skills and interests, students mav consult with 
anv member of the French Department. 

Completion of a course numbered 220 or above is normally required for enrollment in a course numbered 
300 or above. 

211 FRENCH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION Yoder 

Advanced oral and written practice; review of selected grammatical topics. Prerequisite: French 202, 
placement examination, or permission of the instructor. 

Introductory Literature Courses 

Students beginning the studv of French literature normallv choose a course at this level. Senior French 
majors mav not enroll in introductory literature courses for major credit. At least one introductory 
literature course, from the following list will be offered each semester. 

220 PORTRAITS OF WOMEN Fache 

Literature treating portraits of women in French and Francophone texts, films, music, and painting. 
Discussion of issues such as national identity, religion and morality, colonialism and the status of women. 
Typical authors: Moliegravere, Meacuterimeacutee, Baudelaire, Bacirc, Bugul. Prerequisite: French 202 or 
above. (Offered Fall 2007) 

223 CFULDHOOD AND YOUTH Slawy-Sutton 
Literature treating the theme, "l'enfance et l'adolescence," through different genres and literary periods. 
Typical authors: Maupassant, Colette, Preacutevert, Anouilh, Sarraute, Sebbar. Prerequisite: French 202 or 
above. (Offered Fall 2007) 

224 INNOCENCE AND AWARENESS Kruger, Sutton 
Literature treating the theme of self-discovery in different genres and literary periods. Typical authors: 
Voltaire, Haubert, Camus, Moliegravere, Duras. Prereqitisite: French 202 or above. 

225 MALE AND FEMALE Yoder 
Literature treating the theme of changing gender roles and relationships. Typical authors: Marie de France, 
Moliegravere, Sand, Maupassant, Gide, Mauriac, Camus, Bacirc, Condeacute. Prerequisite: French 202 or 
above. 

Civilization, Independent Study for Non-Majors, Pedagogy 

250 FRENCH PHONETICS AND TRANSLATION Yoder 

Systematic studv of French pronunciation and intonation as they relate to underlying grammatical 
patterns and presentation of translation theory with exercises designed to reduce the number of anglicisms 
in written and spoken French. Extensive individualized instruction in the Language Resource Center. 
Prerequisite: French 211 or tlie equivalent, or permission oftlie instructor. (Spring) 

260 CONTEMPORARY FRANCE Sutton 

Contemporary French social and political institutions, attitudes and values, emphasizing current events. 
Especially recommended for those planning to study in France. Prerequisite: French 202 or above. (Offered 
Fall 2007.) 



112 — French 



285 PHONETICS AND TRANSLATION ABROAD 

A course in corrective phonetics and translation taken at a university in a French-speaking county. 

290 MASTERWORKS OF FRENCH FICTION IN TRANSLATION Staff 

The course is an introduction to major works of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century French and Francophone 
literature in translation. No prior knowledge of French is necessary. 

295, 296, 297 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR NON-MAJORS 

Individual work under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of study and 

determines the means of evaluation 

Advanced courses in literature 

320 THE FRENCH NOVEL Kruger, Slawy-Sutton 

Reading and discussion, in historical and social context, of major French novels selected from the classical, 
romantic and contemporary periods. Prerequisite: Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of 
the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

322 NORTH AFRICA FN NOVEL AND FILM (I) Slawy-Sutton 

Analysis of French texts of the 19th and 20th centuries (from French colonization to immigration) which 
deal with themes and images relative to North Africa, and of contemporary literature by North African 
immigrants in France. (Offered Spring 2008.) 

329 STUDIES IN THE NOVEL Kruger, Slawy-Sutton 
Typical course titles: "Adultery in the Novel," "The I's Have It" (first-person narrative), "L Asie dans 
romans et films francophones," or: "Ecrivains francophones vietnamiens." Prerequisite: Any course number 
French 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

330 MODERN FRENCH DRAMA Staff 
Thematic and esthetic analysis of masterpieces of French theater, ranging from the romantic era through 
the contemporary period. Typical authors: Hugo, Musset, Claudel, Anouilh, Giraudoux, Montherlant, 
Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Beckett, Genet. Prerequisite: Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of 
the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

339 STUDIES FN THE THEATER Staff 

Prereqidsite: Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

349 STUDIES FN POETRY Jacobus 

Typical titles: "Women Poets" or "Poetry, Passion, Painting." Prerequisite: Any course numbered French 220 
or above, or permission oftlie instructor. (Offered Fall 2007.) 

Advanced courses in civilization 

361 FRANCOPHONE AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN Yoder 

Literature and civilization of French-speaking Africa and the Antilles. Focus on social, political and 
prophetic roles of the writer. Prereqidsite: Any course numbered French 220 or above. (Offered Fall 2007.) 



French — 113 



362 QUEBEC: LITERATURE, SOCIETY, AND CULTURE Kruger 
Literature and civilization of Queacutebec. Focus on the events, individuals and movements that have 
shaped this dynamic and diverse French-speaking society. Prerequisite: Any course numbered French 220 or 
above. (Offered Spring 2008.) 

363 NORTH AFRICA IN NOVEL AND FILM (E) Slawy-Sutton 
Francophone authors of the Maghreb: Literature and civilization of French-speaking North Africa. Focus 
on French colonization and post-colonial themes. Texts by major writers from Algeria, Morocco and 
Tunisia (Djebar, Sebbar, Memmi, Chraiumlbi, Dib). Prerequisite: Any course numbered French 220 or above. 
(Not offered 2007-08.) 

365 MASTERPIECES OF FRENCH CINEMA Staff 

French films and filmmakers from origins of cinema to the contemporary period, emphasizing surrealism 
(Bunuel, Vigo, Cocteau), poetic realism (Clair, Renoir, Carne), and the "New Wave" (Resnais, Godard, 
Truffaut). Taught in English. Readings and all written work may be done in French for major credit in French. (Not 
offered 2007-08.) 

369 STUDIES FN FRENCH CIVILIZATION Sutton 

T\"pical titles: "Ougrave; va la France?" Study of questions concerning French society, including national 
identity, the social welfare system, the French economv, secondary/ higher education, and France's 
relations to other states. Prerequisite: Any course numbered French 220 or above. (Not Offered 2007-08.) 

Study Abroad and Independent Study for Majors 

229 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LLTERATURE ABROAD 

Course in literature taught by the Davidson program Director in Tours. {Offered 2007-08.) 

280-284, 380 LANGUAGE STUDY ABROAD 

Courses in French grammar, vocabulary building, composition, and corrective phonetics-taken at a 

university in a French-speaking country. 

287-288, 387-389 STUDIES FN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE ABROAD 

Courses on topics related to francophone civilization (e.g., culture, historv, politics) taken at a university in 

a French-speaking country. 

384-386 STUDIES FN LrTERATURE ABROAD 

Courses in francophone literature taken at a university in a French-speaking country. 

395-397 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR MAJORS 

Individual work under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of study and 

determines the means of evaluation. 

Seminars and Honors 

490 SENIOR MAJOR SEMTNAR Sutton 

An advanced seminar treating a special topic in French literature and/ or civilization chosen by the 
instructor each year. Offered in the fall semester and required of majors. (Fall) 



114 — French/German/Russian 



491 SENIOR THESIS 

An in-depth study of a literary theme, genre, movement, author, or topic of civilization in close consultation 
with a faculty advisor. Required of all senior majors in the spring semester, except those students enrolling 
in 499 Senior Honors Thesis. 

499 SENIOR HONORS THESIS 

Seniors who satisfy requirements for admission to the departmental honors program enroll in 499. A written 
request containing a brief description of the thesis project and a working bibliography is submitted to the 
department for consideration no later than the fifth week of the fall semester of the senior year. Approval 
of project proposal constitutes permission to enroll in 499. An oral defense of the thesis is required. 



GERMAN/RUSSIAN 



Professors: Denham, Epes, Henke (Chair), McCulloh 
Associate Professor: McCarthy 
Assistant Professor: Ewington 
Visiting Instructor: Muller 

Distribution Requirements: German 100W, 231, 251, 329-349; Russian 100W, 294, 302, 320, 349- 
361 satisfy the distribution requirement in literature. 

Foreign Language Requirement: German 201 or Russian 201 meets the foreign language 
requirement for the degree. 

Achievement tests are used to place entering students at a level appropriate to their 
background. Please see the note on placement under each language. 

GERMAN 

Placement: Students who have studied German prior to entering Davidson but have not been 
awarded college credit for it will take an online placement test administered by Davidson. They will 
be placed in German 251 or 252 if their preparation is exceptional; such students may request an 
additional oral examination to certify completion of the language requirement without additional 
courses. Students are placed in German 201, if their preparation is strong; in German 102, if less 
strong. In some cases, the department will recommend that a student who has studied German in 
high school begin in German 101. No student who has studied German in high school, however, 
should expect to take German 101 for credit without the express permission of the department. 

Major Requirements: Nine courses above German 231 are required for the major in German. 
They must include: German 251 or a comparable course at a university in a German-speaking 
country; German 291 or 321; and German 499, the senior comprehensive course. During the senior 
year at Davidson, students must take at least three courses at the 400 level or above, one of which 
must be German 499. With departmental approval, one of the courses may be a 300- or 400-level 
course related to German studies (e.g., European History, Contemporary European Politics, 
European Art). Students must pass a comprehensive examination based on the departmental 
reading list. Finally, students must demonstrate proficiency by passing either the current Test DaF 
(4x4, TDN), the Kleines Sprachdiplom, the Zentrale Oberstufenprufung, or the DSH 2 (Deutsche 



German/Russian — 115 



Sprachpriifung fur den Hochschulzugang auslandischer Studienbewerber) at a fully accredited 
university in a German-speaking country. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses above German 231 are required for the minor, at least three of 
which must be taken at Davidson. These should include: German 251 or 291 (or both), and at least 
one 400-level course that is not cross-listed with another department. The department strongly 
recommends study abroad in an approved program in a German-speaking country. 

Honors Requirements: In addition to the major requirements, a student accepted by the 
department for consideration for honors must write and defend a senior thesis, German 495. To 
be considered, a student must at the time of application have an overall GPA of 3.2 or better. To 
receive honors, the student must at the time of graduation have a 3.5 average in all courses counted 
toward the major, and the department must judge the thesis and its defense worthy of honors. 

Study Abroad: A German major should plan to study abroad if at all possible. Students who 
have completed German 201 are encouraged to apply for the Duke program in Berlin and should 
plan to take as many courses as possible from among German 251, 252, and 291 before departure. 

100W (Comp) First- Year Seminar McCarthy, McCulloh 

Writing-intensive study (in English) of selected topics. Satisfies the distribution requirements in composition 
and literature. Open only to first-year students. 

101, 102 Elementary German I and II Denham, Henke, McCarthy, McCulloh 

For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, 
along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Each course requires online work and 
participation in AT sessions. German 101 or an appropriate placement score is prerequisite to German 102. (101 
offered in tlie Fall; 102 in Fall and Spring) 

103 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY GERMAN Henke 

For beginners. Introduction and development of the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing 
along with presentation of the fundamental structures of German. Requires online work and participation 
in AT sessions. Meets six class hours per week. [Equivalent to GERMAN 101 and 102, counting for two 
courses.] (Spring) 

201 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Denham, Henke 

Continuing work in developing language skills, with strong emphasis on speaking and writing. The 
course requires online work and participation in AT sessions. Fulfills the foreign language requirement. 
Prerequisite: German 102, 103, or placement. (Fall and Spring) 

231 CULTURAL TOPICS IN TRANSLATION McCarthy 

Selected interdisciplinary topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss culture. Covers various aspects of culture 
and society, including history, politics, economics, literature, film, art and architecture, music, mass media, 
and folk customs. Topics vary from vear to year; samples include Fascism in film, Weimar modernism, 
Berlin from the Enlightenment to the present, Vienna at the turn of the century, and the Holocaust in 
German history and culture. No prerequisite for German 231. (Spring) 



116 — German/Russian 



251 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE McCulloh 
Literary works from five periods of German literature: Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Twentieth 
Century to 1945, and 1945 to the present. The course offers an introduction to German literature and 
literary ciriticism while serving as a basis for extensive conversation and composition. Prerequisite: German 
201 or placement. (Spring) 

252 GERMAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION McCarthy 
Advanced oral and written practice and review of selected grammatical topics. Prerequisite: German 201, 
placement examination, or permission of the instructor. (Fall) 

291 CONTEMPORARY GERMANY McCarthy 

Examination of contemporary life in Germany. Texts include current newspapers and magazines, 
supplemented by video and film. Emphasis on composition and conversation. Strongly recommended for 
students planning to study in Germany. Prerequisite: German 201 or permission oftlte instructor. (Spring) 

298 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves 
the topics of the study, reviews the student's work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student's 
accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the supervising faculty member and the department cltair. 

398, 399 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For majors, minors, and other advanced students. Independent study under the direction and supervision 
of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of the study, reviews the student's work on a 
regular basis, and evaluates the student's accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter 
ones will be among the requirements. Prerequisites: Permission of the supervising faculty member and the 
deparbnent chair. 

401-489 SEMINARS Denham, McCulloh 

Courses numbered 401-489 are seminars; specific topics are announced in advance of registration. 

Prerequisites: German 251 or permission of the instructor. (Tivo seminars are offered on campus each Pall.) 

491, 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For majors. Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and 
approves the topics of the study, reviews the student's work on a regular basis, and evaluates the student's 
accomplishment. Either one major paper or a series of shorter ones will be among the requirements. 

Prerequisites: Permission of the supervising faculty member and the department chair. 

493 SENIOR THESIS Staff 

GER 493 or 495 requires permission of the department; German 495 in restricted to those students who 
have been accepted as candidates for departmental Honors. Research and writing of a thesis under the 
direction and supervision of a faculty member; approval of the topic by the supervising faculty member is 
required before registration for the course. Credit in not awarded for both 493 and 495. 

495 SENIOR HONORS THESIS Staff 

GER 493 or 495 requires permission of the department; German 495 is restricted to those students who 
have been accepted as candidates for departmental honors. Research and writing of a thesis under the 
direction and supervision of a faculty member; approval of the topic by the supervising faculty member is 
required before registration for the course. Credit is not awarded for both 493 and 495. (Spring) 



German/Russian — 117 



499 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM McCulloh 

The Senior Colloquium emphasizes individual projects related to a central theme and discussion of selected 
items from the departmental reading list. (Spring) 



RUSSIAN 



Placement: Students who have studied Russian prior to entering Davidson but have not been 
awarded college credit for it will take a placement test at Davidson and will be placed at a level 
appropriate to them on the basis of the test, their language experience, and an oral interview. 
No student with a background of Russian study may take Russian 101 for credit without the 
permission of the department. 

Although Davidson does not offer a Russian major at this time, students may pursue a major 
related to Russian through the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies. 

Minor Requirements: Elementary and Intermediate Russian 201 and 202 are required for 
the minor. In addition, students must take six courses, at least three of which must be taken at 
Davidson. These must include: 

1. At least four courses in literature or advanced language selected from the following: 
Russian 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 301, 319, 320, 395, 396, 401, 410 and courses taken abroad 
with departmental approval (329-379). No more than two courses may be courses in 
literature in translation. 

2. At least one course from among History 339, 435, or a comparable course taken abroad 
With departmental approval, one of the six courses may be a second history course from 
the list above, or Political Science 336 (Russian/ Post-Soviet States Politics). 

Study Abroad: Students minoring in Russian are strongly encouraged to study abroad. All 
students are eligible to participate in the Davidson in Moscow program. The department will 
advise students concerning opportunities for spending a semester or academic year in Russia. 

100W RUSSIAN AND THE WEST Ewington 

100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR Ewington 

Sample topics include Women in Russian Literature, Russia and the West, Literature of Dissent. Satisfies the 
composition requirement. Open only to first-year students. (Fall) 

101, 102 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I AND H Ewington, Staff 

For beginners. Introduction and development of basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, 
along with presentation of the Cyrillic alphabet, fundamental sounds and structures of Russian and a 
general introduction to Russian culture. Each course requires work with audio, video, and computer 
exercises and participation in organized drill sessions. Russian 101 or an appropriate placement score is 
prerequisite to Russian 102. (101 in tlie Fall, 102 in tlw Spring) 

201 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I Ewington 

Continuing work in development of basic skills of Russian, with an emphasis on speaking and reading 
literary texts and newspapers. Prerequisite: Russian 102 or placement. (Fall) 



118 — German/Russian 



202 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II Muller 

For those who wish to continue toward advanced levels of Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 201 or placemmt. 
(Spring) 

293 TOPICS IN RUSSIAN CULTURE IN TRANSLATION Staff 
Selected topics in Russian culture in English translation. Sample topics include St. Petersburg, Post-Soviet 
Culture, Stalinism, Soviet and Russian film, The Poet in Russian Culture. Prerequisite: English 101 or 
equivalent. (Not offered 2007-08) 

294 TOPICS IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE FN TRANSLATION Ewington 
Selected topics in Russian literature in translation. Sample topics include Women in Russian Literature, 
Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, The Devil in Russian Literature, memoir literature, the Nineteenth-Century 
Russian novel. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Fulfills the distribution requirement in Literature. 
(Spring) 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY 

A topic chosen by the student and researched under the direction of the faculty member, who reviews and 
approves the topic and determines the means of evaluation of the student's work. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

301 ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN Ewington 

Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Russian 202. 
(As enrollment warrants.) 

319 CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA 

Discussions and written assignments based on excerpts from current newspapers, magazines, and films, 
focusing on recent Russian history, literature, and daily life. Prerequisite: Russian 202. (As enrollment 

warrants.) 

320 MASTERPIECES OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE 

Advanced reading and discussion on works by some of the following authors: Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, 
Tolstoy, Turgenev, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov, Pasternak, Akhmatova, and Tolstaya. Prerequisite: Russian 202. 
(As enrollment warrants.) 

329-379 COURSES TAKEN IN A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING COUNTRY 

Russian courses numbered 329-379 represent courses taken in a Russian-speaking country. The permanent 

record will show a short title (in English) reflecting the topic of the course taken abroad. 

395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR ADVANCED STUDENTS 

Advanced study under the direction of the faculty member, who reviews and approves the topic and 

determines the means of evaluation of the student's work. Prerequisite: Permission of tlie instructor. (Fall, 

Spring) 

401 SEMINAR rN SPECIAL TOPICS Staff 

Study of a specific author, genre, theme, or aspect of culture. Readings, compositions, oral reports, and 
discussions in Russian. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Not offered in 2007-08) 



German/Russian/History — 119 



410 SPECIAL TOPICS EM TRANSLATION Staff 

Intensive reading and discussion of a single Russian writer or aspect of Russian culture at the advanced 
level. Sample authors include Tolstov, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Counts toward the major requirement 
in English. 

HISTORY 

Professors: Barnes, Berkey, Krentz, Levering, McMillen (Chair), Thomas, Wertheimer 

Associate Professors: Aldridge, Dietz (On leave), Guasco 

Assistant Professors: Dennis, Mangan, Pegelow Kaplan, Tilburg (On leave) 

Distribution Requirements: Any course in history numbered below 395 may be counted toward 
the distribution requirement in history. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: History 162, 163, 171, 175, 176, 183, 184, 218, 302, 303, 350, 361, 
364, 375, 381, 383, 384, 385, 386, 451, 464, 465, 471, and 472 are options for fulfilling the cultural 
diversity requirement. 

Advanced Placement Credit: Students normally receive credit for History 122 or 141 when 
they have earned a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in European or American 
History of the College Entrance Examination Board. Students normally receive credit for a 100-level 
course, as appropriate, when they have earned a score of 7 or 6 on The Higher Level Examination 
in History of the International Baccalaureate Program. No more than two such courses may count 
toward the major. 

Major Requirements: Eleven courses in history above 101, including: 

1. At least three, but no more than four, 100-level courses above 101, normally to be 
completed by the end of the second year, divided among at least three of the following 
areas (see note 2): 

a. Pre-Modern Europe (109, 110, 111, 112, 119, Humanities I) 

b. Modern Europe (120, 121, 122, Humanities II) 

c. United States (141, 142) 

d. Latin America, India, Far East, Middle East, China (162, 163, 171, 175, 176, 183, 184) 
Note: Students who have completed the Humanities Program receive credit for one 100- 
level course in either a or b, but not both. 

2. One course numbered between 200 and 298, to be taken at Davidson College and 
normally to be completed by the end of the second year. 

3. Four to six courses between 299 and 479, at least one of which must be a topical seminar 
at the 400-level. 

4. History 7 480 (Senior Research Seminar), or History 488/489 (Kelley Honors Seminar). 
Notes: 

(1) One regular course applied to the major must deal substantially with the pre-modern 
period (109-119, 162, 171, 175, 183, 215, 218, 311-319, 321, 322, 385, 414, 415, 416, 421, 
422, 465, 475, 478, HUM I or suitable transfer course). 

(2) Most courses numbered below 300 are not open to seniors; those 300 and above are 
normally not open to first-year students. Seminars are open onlv to juniors and 
seniors. 



120 — History 



(3) History majors may elect to apply the following course toward requirements at the 
300 level: GER 231 (only the Denham/ Holocaust section). 

(4) Normally, at least seven (7) of the courses used to satisfy the major are to be taken at 
Davidson. 

(5) If you go abroad or attend another institution, you can receive up to two credits for a 
semester away from Davidson: for a year, up to three courses. Any history course 
taken at another institution for which you desire credit toward the major must be 
discussed with the department chair before you leave and after you return. 

(6) Davidson's Cambridge Summer Program counts as one history credit at the 300-level. 

Honors Requirements: Candidates for admission to the honors program in history must have 
an overall grade point average of 3.2 after the fall semester of the junior year. Honors candidates 
must write an honors thesis and defend it orally, in History 488/489 (the Kelley Seminar) during 
the senior year. To qualify for honors at graduation, candidates must have earned an average of 
3.5 or above in the major, an "A" or " A-" on the thesis (History 489), and an overall average of 3.2 
or above. 

Tfie Kendrick K. Kelley Program in Historical Studies represents a living memorial to Ken Kelley, 
Class of '63, an honors history graduate who was killed while serving in Vietnam in 1968. The 
Kelley Program seeks to enrich the academic experience of students majoring in history and to 
encourage them to emulate Ken Kelley's virtues and achievements. 

The program has three components. First, junior history majors who have grade point 
averages of at least 3.2 are invited to apply to the Kelley Scholars program. Those admitted to the 
program enroll in a year-long Kelley Seminar (History 488/489) for seniors which culminates in 
the writing of a thesis, which authors defend orally. Travel funds enable Kelley Scholars to pursue 
research in distant libraries and archives. Second, the Kelley Lecture Series brings distinguished 
historians to the Davidson campus. Third, the Kelley Award annually recognizes the senior history 
major who best exemplifies Ken Kelley's personal qualities: superior academic performance, self- 
effacing leadership, and personal integrity. 

100-Level Courses 

100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR Staff 

Selected topics in history, e.g., "Individuals and Society in the Early Republic, 1787-1837" and "American 
Reformers and Utopians." Satisfies the composition requirement and the distribution requirement in 
history. Open only to first-year students. 

109 GREEK HISTORY (=CLA 231) Krentz 
(Cross-listed as Classics 231). Introduction to the history and culture of ancient Greece. 

110 ROMAN HISTORY (=CLA 232) Krentz 
(Cross-listed as Classics 232). Introduction to the history and culture of the ancient Roman world. 

112 THE MEDIEVAL MILLENNIUM: EUROPE, C. 500-1500 Barnes 

Medieval Europe from the late Roman era to the 15th century, with emphasis on the importance of the 
medieval period in the shaping of Western civilization. 



History— 121 



119 ENGLAND TO 1688 Dietz 
Political, constitutional, religious, and social history of England from Roman times through the medieval 
and early modern periods. 

120 BRITAIN SINCE 1688 Dietz 
The rise of the first urban industrial society, its period of world dominance, and the effects of its subsequent 
loss of status as a world power. Special emphasis on the political and social development of Britain since 
the Revolution of 1688. 

121 EARLY MODERN EUROPE Barnes 
Significant political, socio-economic, and intellectual currents in European history from the Renaissance 
through the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. 

122 EUROPE SINCE 1789 Pegelow Kaplan, Tilburg 
Significant political, socio-economic, and intellectual currents in European history since 1789. 

141 THE UNITED STATES TO 1877 Guasco, McMillen 
American history from the first English settlements through the Civil War and Reconstruction Era. 

142 THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877 Aldridge, Levering, McMillen, Wertheimer 
American history since the end of Reconstruction. Topics include the industrialization, Populism, 
Progressivism, Spanish-American War, First and Second World Wars, the Great Depression and New 
Deal, Cold War, Vietnam, and rise of the welfare state. 

162 LATIN AMERICA TO 1825 Mangan 
A survey of Latin American history from the eve of Spain's conquest of the Americas to the era of Latin 
American independence from Spain. An in-depth introduction to the societies of the Americas and the 
major social, political, and economic themes following the arrival of Europeans to the Americas. 

163 LATIN AMERICA, 1825 TO PRESENT Mangan 
Introduction to the history of modern Latin America, emphasizing major political events, economic 
trends, and important changes in Latin American society, with particular attention to ethnicity, class, and 
gender. 

171 INDIA Thomas 

Indian sub-continent from pre-historic times to the present. Focuses on contributions of Hindu, Buddhist, 
Jain, and Islamic traditions; history of British rule; origins of Indian nationalism; rise of independent India, 
Pakistan, and Bangladesh. 

175 ISLAMIC CrvTLIZATION AND THE MIDDLE EAST, 600-1500 Berkey 
Political, social, cultural and religious history of the Middle East from late antiquity to the end of the Middle 
Ages. Cultural identity and political legitimacy within Classical and medieval Islamic civilization. 

176 ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION AND THE MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1500 Berkey 
History of the Middle East from the end of the Middle Ages to the present day. Cultural aspects of contact 
and conflict between the Middle East and the West and of Islam's response to the challenge of modernity. 



122 — History 



183 EAST ASIAN HISTORY UNTIL 1600 Dennis 
China and Japan from pre-historical origins until 1600. Includes an introduction to Chinese philosophical 
traditions, culture, and politics; examines the Qin, Sui, Tang, Song, and Ming dynasties; and considers their 
influences on Asia. The Japanese section covers growth from the Chinese tradition to the establishment of 
empire including the creation of a samurai culture. 

184 EAST ASIAN HISTORY, 1600 TO THE PRESENT Dennis 
This course provides a basic overview of the last four centuries of Chinese and Japanese history, covering 
political, economic, social, and military developments. 

200-Level Courses 

215 MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT IN PRE-MODERN EUROPE Barnes 

An introduction to medieval and early modern beliefs and practices that were emphatically rejected by 
the modern scientific outlook, but continue to pose major challenges for historians of Western thought 
and culture. 

218 JIHAD AND CRUSADE Berkey 

A study of the history of religious violence. Topics will include the relationship between religion and 
violence in a number of different traditions, with a special focus on the history of violent conflict between 
the Islamic world and the West. 

225 WOMEN AND WORK: GENDER AND SOCIETY IN BRITAIN, 1700-1918 Dietz 

An examination of British women's lives and social relations with regard to production — artistic, domestic, 
industrial, intellectual, etc. —in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. 

228 THE MODERN BODY: GENDER, SEX, AND POLITICS IN FRANCE Tilburg 

One of the greatest "discoveries" of modern historical thought has been that even the human body has 
aspects that are historically contingent. This course examines the way historians of modern France tackled 
the history of the body. 

244 SETTLEMENT OF THE AMERICAN WEST, 1800-1900 McMillen 

An examination of three controversial issues connected with the settlement of the American West — gender, 
race, and environment. 

252 THE UNITED STATES FROM 1900 TO 1945 Wertheimer 
An examination of United States history and controversies about it during the first half of the 20th century, 
with emphasis on individual projects. Topics include the Progressive Era, the ;Roaring Twenties, the Great 
Depression, and the two world wars. 

253 THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1945 Wertheimer 
An examination of United States history and controversies about it from World War II to the present, with 
emphasis on individual projects. Topics include the Cold War, the upheavals of the 1960s, and the "New 
Right." 

255 AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE Aldridge 

American popular culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include sports, popular music, theatre, 
motion pictures and television. The course also will introduce students to the historian's craft and improve 
students' research and writing skills. 



History — 123 



256 THE 1960S: AN EXPLOSIVE DECADE Levering 
An examination of America's political, social, and cultural history of the 1960s, addressing such topics 
as popular politics, the Great Society programs, the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement and race 
relations, the student revolt and the counter-culture, the women's and environmental movements, and the 
decade's legacies. 

257 AFRICAN AMERICANS AND US FOREIGN POLICY Aldridge 
An examination of African American engagement with U.S. foreign relations in the 20th century that will 
introduce students to the methods and skills of the historian's craft. 

262 PIRACY IN THE AMERICAS Guasco 

An examination of the history of piracy in the Atlantic world, primarily in the 17th and 18th centuries. 
Special consideration given to the emergence of the sea rovers, the social composition of pirate communities, 
and the ongoing fascination with swashbucklers and peg-legged captains. 

264 REBELLION AND REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA Mangan 

Case studies of revolution and rebellion in Latin America as the window to introduce students to the 
methods and skills of the historian's craft. 

300-Level Courses 

302 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877 Aldridge 
African American experience from the colonial period through the Reconstruction era. Topics include the 
slave trade, the institution of slavery, free blacks, slave revolts, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and 
African American culture. 

303 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY SFNCE 1877 Aldridge 
African American experience since the end of Reconstruction. Topics include the origins of the Jim Crow 
system, the Harlem Renaissance, black participation in the military, and the civil rights movement. 

306 AMERICAN WOMEN TO 1870 McMillen 
Women in the American colonies and the United States to 1870, with emphasis on the changing nature of 
work, the cult of domesticity, early feminism, reform efforts, and women's equality. 

307 AMERICAN WOMEN, 1870 TO THE PRESENT McMillen 
Women in the United States from 1870 to the present, with emphasis on the suffrage movement, women's 
roles in two World Wars, the struggle for women's rights, changing work roles, and equality for women. 

314 ATHENIAN LAW (=CLA 334) Krentz 

(Cross-listed as Classics 334). Analysis of the Athenian legal process in a discussion-intensive approach 
using surviving Athenian speeches as case studies. 

317 THE EUROPEAN RENAISSANCE Barnes 

Focuses on basic social and cultural shifts, in Italy as well as in northern Europe and Iberia, from the 14th 
century to the 16th century. Special attention to the varieties and implications of humanism, as well as to 
the effects of the printing press, religious and political conflicts, and encounters with the world beyond 
Europe. 



124 — History 



321 THE EXPLOSION OF CHRISTENDOM: EUROPE FN THE 16TH CENTURY Barnes 
The great religious and social upheavals of the Reformation era, with close attention to Protestant, Catholic, 
and radical movements and their broader consequences for Western society. 

322 THE AGE OF DISCOVERY, 1492-1700 Guasco, Mangan 
Exploration of the European voyages of discovery, cross-cultural encounters, and the conquest of the 
Americas in the early modern period. Special consideration given to issues of race and ethnicity and the 
roles of religion, disease, technology, and the circulation of ideas throughout the Atlantic world. 

325 BRITAIN FROM 1688 TO 1832 Dietz 

The evolution of British society and culture during the "Long Eighteenth Century," with emphasis on the 
reaction to an age of revolution— the Glorious Revolution, Industrial Revolution, American Revolution 
and French Revolution. 

328 BOHEMIAN FRANCE; ART, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY, 1789-1945 Tilburg 

The course explores the development of modern art and culture in France, as it relates to the cataclysmic 
changes of the 18th and 19th centuries, and traces the way that Enlightenment thought threaded and 
structured artistic and literary movements in the "long nineteenth century" from the French Revolution 
to World War I. 

332 EUROPEAN METROPOLIS, 1870-1914 Tilburg 

This course explores the political, cultural, and intellectual history of the turn of the century through the 
prism of some of Europe's most sparkling cities: Berlin, Barcelona, Paris, London, and Vienna. 

335 COMPARATIVE GENOCIDE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Pegelow Kaplan 
This course combines an introduction to key concepts in genocide studies with an examination of specific 
twentieth-century genocides. The examined cases include the Ottoman mass murder of the Armenians; the 
Holocaust; mass crimes in Stalinist Russia, Cambodia and Bosnia; and the Rwandan genocide. The course 
pays specific attention to the role of mass media and the international community's politics of naming and 
intervention. 

336 EUROPEAN WOMEN AND GENDER, 1650-PRESENT Tilburg 
The contributions of women in the history of modern Europe, as well as the ways that gender difference 
was employed in the construction of political and social relations. Topics include: scientific debates and 
women, the birth of feminism, women and the Industrial Revolution, prostitution, women and fascism, 
and changing concepts of masculinity. 

339 TWENTIETH-CENTURY RUSSIA Pegelow Kaplan 
Major social, economic, ideological, and political developments, emphasizing the construction and 
contestation of Russianness, the drive to modernize, World War I and the revolutions of 1917, the civil 
war, debates of the 1920s, imposition of Stalinist totalitarianism, World War II, the Soviet Union under 
Stalin's successors, the collapse of the U.S.S.R. and developments since 1991. 

340 COLONIAL AMERICA Guasco 
Foundation and development of the British North American colonies to 1763. Examines colonial America 
as the product of Old World elements in a unique New World environment. 



History— 125 



341 THE ERA OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUHON Guasco 

The colonial movement from resistance to revolution; early republican thought and the adoption of state 
constitutions; the War for Independence; political and socio-economic struggles of the Confederation 
period; the origins of the federal Constitution; and the Revolution's social impact. 

343 THE OLD SOUTH McMillen 
American South from colonial origins to secession, including, as major topics, structure of society, the 
economy, slavery, growth of Southern sectionalism, the role of women, and intellectual and cultural 
developments. 

344 THE SOUTH SINCE 1865 McMillen 
Political, economic, and social developments in the South since the Civil War. Focus on Reconstruction, 
Populism, racism, the Depression, and flourishing of the "Sun Belt" after 1945. 

346 THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION McMillen 

Origins of sectional conflict; military, political, and social transformations of the war years; the upheavals 
of the Reconstruction era; and the legacies of the era for modern America. 

349 THE VIETNAM EXPERIENCE Levering 
America's involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975. Examines diplomatic, military, political, social, and 
domestic aspects of American intervention. 

350 AFRICAN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL FflSTORY Aldridge 
Key African American thinkers and intellectual movements from the mid-19th century to the present. 
Persons and subjects examined include W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, black nationalism, 
assimilationism, the Harlem Renaissance, black feminism, liberalism, and conservatism. 

354 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY SINCE 1939 Levering 
American foreign relations during a period of global political, economic, and military leadership. Topics 
include World War II, Cold War and detente, Vietnam War, and relations with the Third World. 

355 AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY Wertheimer 
Law in American history from English settlement to the present. Topics include the origins and evolution of 
the United States legal system; law and economic development; race, sex, and the law; the legal profession; 
industrialization and the regulatory state; and individual liberties and civil rights. 

357 THE CIVIL RIGFITS MOVEMENT IN THE UNITED STATES Aldridge 

An examination of the American civil rights movement's origins; its diverse strains of thought; its legal 
issues, strategies, and grassroots efforts; and its legacies. 

364 GENDER AND HISTORY IN LATIN AMERICA Mangan 

Compares women's and men's experiences to determine how gender roles have shaped the social and 
political history of Latin America. Themes include conquest encounters, elite and religious notions of 
gender propriety, labor roles, and political activism. 



126 — History 



365 ISSUES IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY Mangan 

Study of; major issues in Latin American history, such as colonial rule, rebellion, social change, political 
structure, and imperialism. Readings and themes emphasize historical events and issues in the Peruvian 
cities and/ or regions of Arequipa, Cuzco, and Lima to complement travel experiences of the Davidson- 
in-Arequipa program. Course will be taught as a component of the Davidson-in- Arequipa program. Satisfies the 
distribution requirement in History. Provides major credit in History. 

375 NATIONALISM AND COLONIALISM IN THE MODERN ARAB WORLD Berkey 

European colonialism and American involvement in the Middle East and the Arab response. Great Power 
politics, nationalist ideology, and cultural identity in the Arab world. 

381 ASIA DURING THE ERA OF WESTERN IMPERIALISM Thomas 

British, French, Portuguese, and Spanish colonialism in Asia. History of colonial rule and Asian reactions; 
emergence of nationalism; birth of independent nations; and post-colonial relations among nations. 

385 HISTORY OF IMPERIAL CHINA, 900-1800 Dennis 
Survey of late inperial Chinese history with topics covering the environment, daily life, family, kinship, 
sex, government, law, military, economy, science, medicine, print coluture, and travel. 

386 HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA Dennis 
Chinese history from 1840 to the present, including China's transformation from a Confucian empire 
to a socialist state, and its more recent conversion into an authoritarian regime promoting wealth and 
nationalism. 

390 DAVIDSON SUMMER PROGRAM AT CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY 

Limited to thirty students, the Davidson Summer Program at Cambridge focuses on the history and 

literature of late 18th- and 19th-century Britain. Students may receive credit for either English or History. 

395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Reading and research on a special subject and writing of a substantial paper. Under the direction and 
supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of the independent study. Admission 
with permission of the professor, who will also evaluate the student's work. Does not satisfy distribution 
requirement. 

400-Level Courses 

415 ALEXANDER THE GREAT (=CLA 435) Krentz 

(Cross-listed CLA 435) Investigation of Alexander's career from its grounding in Phillip II's Macedon to 
his intentions at the time of his premature death. Emphasis on military, political, and religious questions. 

Permission of the Instructor. 

417 ROMAN IMPERIALISM (=CLA 437) Krentz 

(Cross-listed as Classics 437) Roman overseas conquests and their results, from the wars with Carthage to 
the annexation of Dacia. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



History— 127 



420 THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR Dietz 
An examination of how 17th-century English men and women turned their world "upside down." 
Emphasis on the political, social, and religious causes and consequences of the Great Rebellion of 1640- 
1660. 

421 EVERYDAY LIFE IN RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION EUROPE Barnes 
Material circumstances, customs, and assumptions of daily living in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries, 
especially among common folk. Possible topics include: family life, sexual mores, popular entertainment, 
magic, witchcraft, crime and punishment. 

422 GENDER IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (C. 15TH-18TH CENTURIES) Dietz 
From Christine de Pisan to Mary Wollstonecraft. An examination of changing roles, expectations, and 
desires of men and women, with particular emphasis on their interaction. 

424 THE FRENCH REVOLUTION Tilburg 

This seminar will explore the history and historiography of the French Revolution through books, 
paintings, music, and film. 

426 VICTORIAN PEOPLE Dietz 
Society and culture of Victorian Britain through the lens of some of its more captivating personalities and 
their writings. Possible figures include: Charles Darwin, George Eliot, William Gladstone, William Morris, 
and Sidney and Beatrice Webb. 

427 EUROPEAN CONSUMER CULTURE: 1750 TO THE PRESENT Tilburg 
This seminar explores the history and historiography of consumer culture in Europe from the eighteenth 
century through the 1980s. It uses the lens of consumerism to observe the momentous economic, social, 
and political transformations of the modern era, up to and including the controversial process of 
"Americanization following World War II. " Major Credit in History 

433 TWENTIETH-CENTURY GERMANY Pegelow Kaplan 

Selected topics. 

440 SLAVERY FN THE AMERICAS Guasco 
Comparative exploration of the foundation and development of slavery in the western hemisphere 
since 1492. Topics include the transatlantic slave trade, work and labor, resistance and rebellion, and the 
articulation of African culture throughout the Americas. 

441 NATIVES AND NEWCOMERS FN EARLY AMERICA Guasco 
Examination of the encounter between indigenous peoples and English, French, and Spanish newcomers 
in North America. Special emphasis is on the clash of cultures in spiritual, material, and physical realms 
and how Europeans and Indians contributed to the creation of a distinctive American landscape by the 
end of the eighteenth century. 

446 PRESIDENTS AND FIRST LADIES Levering 

Presidents and first ladies from Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through Ronald and Nancy Reagan. 
Emphasis on their goals and policies, their successes and failures, and the changing meanings of "liberalism" 
and "conservatism" that they represented. Satisfies a Major Requirement in History, 



128 — History 



448 THE 1950S: A CRITICAL DECADE McMillen 

From Korea to Montgomery, McCarthy to Elvis: an exploration of the events, personalities, and culture of 
the 1950s in United States history. 

451 AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL HISTORY Aldridge 

A study of African American cultural history with particular focus on the 20th century. Specific artistic 
and cultural forms studied may include the visual arts, music, dance, film, and television in their historical 
context. 

455 LAW AND SOCIETY IN AMERICAN HISTORY Wertheimer 

Selected topics in U.S. legal history. Seminar members will work collaboratively on a large-scale research 
project. 

464 RELIGION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA Mangan 
Exploration of the nexus between religion and social upheaval through topics including conquest, rebellion, 
liberation theology, and religious tradition new to the region, such as Evangelicalism. 

465 COLONIALISM AND IMAGINATION FN EARLY LATIN AMERICA Mangan 
This seminar follows the rise and fall of colonial power in Latin America with a focus on the emergence 
of colonial Latin America as a historical unit. Topics include justification of colonial rule, civilization and 
barbarism, differences between the Old and New Worlds and American Identity. 

471 GANDHI Thomas 
Mohandas Gandhi's life, philosophy of non-violence, approaches to conflict resolution, and views on 
economic and social change. 

472 LAW, JUSTICE, AND HUMAN RIGHTS FN CHTNA Dennis 
This course will examine the historical development of government, law, notions of justice and human 
rights in China, from ancient to modern times. 

475 HISTORY OF THE BOOK Dennis 

This course will examine the historical development of books from ancient times to modern, focusing on 
China, but including other areas of the world for comparative perspective. 

478 TRAVELS TO AND FROM TFIE MUSLIM WORLD V.Gardner 

This seminar explores historical literature produced by writers who traveled across cultural lines with the 
Islamic world, from Europe to the Islamic world, and from the Islamic world to Europe. Provides major 
credit in History. Cultural Diversity requirement and International Studies Concentration. 

480 SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR Staff 

Capstone course for history majors. After discussion of the nature of primary sources and of different 
historiographic approaches, students define, research, and write a major research paper. Required of 
senior majors not enrolled in History 488/489. 

488, 489 KELLEY HONORS SEMINAR: RESEARCH AND THESIS Aldridge and Staff 

Two-semester research seminar for senior history majors who qualify for honors work and who are selected 
as Kelley Scholars. Group meetings and individual tutorials, readings in historiography, discussions 
of current research in the field, and lectures by various members of the department as well as visiting 
historians. Culminates in the writing of a thesis. Admission by invitation of the history department. 



Humanities — 129 



HUMANITIES PROGRAM 



Program Director: Associate Professor R. Ingram (English) 

The Western Tradition: First Year 

Directors: Associate Professor Snyder (Religion) and Professor Swallow 
(Mathematics) 

The Western Tradition: Second Year 

Directors: Associate Professor Robb (Philosophy) and Professor Goldstein 
(Philosophy) 

Cultures & Civilizations: One-year Sequence 
Director: Professor Berkey (History) 

Faculty Affiliated with the Humanities Program 

Emeritus Professor: Abbott (English) 

Professors: Barnes (History), Berkey (History), Denham (German), Epes (German), 

Gibson (English), Goldstein (Philosophy), Henke (German), Ligo (Art), Mahony 

(Religion), Munger (Psychology), Parker (English), Rigger (Political Science), S. 

Smith (Art) 
Associate Professors: Chaston (Economics), Churchill (English), Gay (Education), 

R. Ingram (English), Lerner (Music), Neumann (Classics), Robb (Philosophy), 

Snyder (Religion) 
Assistant Professors: Cheshire (Classics), Guasco (History), Studtmann (Philosophy), 

Wills (Religion) 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: Higham (Humanities) 

The Humanities program offers two separate course sequences, The Western Tradition 
and Cultures & Civilizations. The Western Tradition, a two-year, four-course sequence, is an 
interdisciplinary study of texts and contexts of the West, from the ancient world to the present. 
Cultures & Civilizations, a one-year, two-course sequence, is a comparative, interdisciplinary 
study of western and non-western texts. 

Satisfactory completion of the four-course Western Tradition sequence enables a student 
to satisfy the composition (W-course) requirement and receive credit for four distribution 
requirements as follows: literature (one course), history (one course), philosophy and religion (two 
courses). Enrollment is limited to 80 students, chosen at random from those entering students who 
list Humanities 150 as their first preference in registration. 

Satisfactory completion of the two-course Cultures & Civilizations sequence enables a student 
to satisfy the composition (W-course) requirement, the cultural diversity requirement, and to 
receive credit for the distribution requirement in literature. Enrollment is limited to 32 students, 
chosen at random from those entering students who list Humanities 160 as their first preference 
in registration. 

To receive distribution credit for either Humanities sequence, a student must pass all courses 
in that sequence. Students may not change sequences. 



130 — Humanities/Mathematics 



In the Western Tradition sequence, classes meet together for lectures and in groups of 16 
students for discussions led by individual instructors. In the Cultures & Civilizations sequence, 
two discussion groups (of 16 students) usually meet jointly with both instructors. Humanities 
courses encourage and reward clear thinking, speaking, and writing. 

150 W TRAD: THE ANCIENT WORLD Berkey, Epes, Higham, Snyder 

Interdisciplinary study of texts and contexts of the Hebrew Old Testament and the ancient and classical 
world. 

151W (COMP) W TRAD: LATE ANTIQUITY AND THE MEDIEVAL WORLD Epes, Gay, Higham, 

Neumann, Swallow 
Interdisciplinary study of texts and contexts of the Roman Empire, the Christian New Testament, and 
medieval Europe. Prerequisite: Humanities 150. 

250 W TRAD: THE RENAISSANCE TO THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY Guasco, Henke, R. Ingram, 

Lerner, Robb 
Interdisciplinary study of texts and contexts of western culture from the Renaissance to the late 18th 
century. Prerequisites: Humanities 150 and 151W. 

251 W TRAD: THE MODERN WORLD Abbott, Goldstein, Higham, Lerner, Smith 
Interdisciplinary study of texts and contexts of western culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: 
Humanities 150, 151W, and 250. 

CULTURES & CIVILIZATIONS 

160 CULTURES & CIVILIZATIONS I Chaston, Rigger 

Comparative, interdisciplinary study of texts from western and non-western cultures. Creative and critical 
thinking about what constitutes a civilization, how a cultural tradition defines itself and how it relates to 
those identified as different. 

161W (COMP) CULTURES & CIVILIZATIONS H Berkey, Denham 

Comparative, interdisciplinary study of texts from western and non-western cultures. Creative and critical 
thinking about what constitutes a civilization, how a cultural tradition defines itself and how it relates to 
those identified as different. Prerequisite: Humanities 160. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors: Bivens, Davis, Klein, Neidinger (Chair), Swallow 
Associate Professors: Heyer, Molinek, Mossinghoff 
Visiting Associate Professor: Whitton 
Assistant Professors: Chartier (On leave), Mason 

Distribution Requirements: Mathematics 110, 118, 130, 135, 137, 150, and Computer Science 
121 count towards the fulfillment of the distribution requirements in natural science and 
mathematics; specifically, each fulfills the requirement of one course in mathematics. Credit for 
Mathematics 130 can be obtained by departmental approval of a student's performance on one of 
the Advanced Placement Examinations in Mathematics. Credit for Computer Science 121 can be 
obtained by departmental approval of a student's performance on one of the Advanced Placement 
Examinations in Computer Science. 



Mathematics — 131 



Information for Prospective Mathematics Majors: Prospective mathematics majors should 
complete the following five mathematics courses (or their high school equivalents) by the end of 
the sophomore year: Mathematics 130, 135, 150, 235 and 300. Note that Mathematics 130, 135, 150, 
and 235 are sequenced, although the last two may be taken together. These courses, along with 
Mathematics 300, are prerequisites for many electives in mathematics, a number of which are 
offered only in alternate years. Students who are interested in computer science electives should 
complete Computer Science 231 by the end of the sophomore year. 

Major Requirements: The major in mathematics consists of eleven mathematics or computer 
science courses: Mathematics 135, 150, 235, 300, 355, one course from each of Group A, B, and C 
listed below, and three additional mathematics or computer science courses chosen from 137 and 
all courses numbered above 200. 

Group A: Computer Science 231 (Data Structures) and 325 (Numerical Analysis); 

Mathematics 210 (Mathematical Modeling) and 341 (Mathematical Statistics) 

Group B: Mathematics 221 (Discrete Methods), 255 (Elementary Number Theory), and 365 
(Geometry) 

Group C: Mathematics 335 (Vector Calculus and Partial Differential Equations), 340 
(Probability), and 435 (Complex Analysis) 

At least five courses in the major must be at the 300- or 400-level. At most three computer 
science courses may be included in the major. Computer science independent studies may not be 
included unless the specific instance is approved by the department. Groups A, B, and C establish 
breadth in three areas of mathematics, and students are encouraged, therefore, to consider courses 
outside these groups as potential electives for inclusion in their majors. 

Minor Requirements: A minor in mathematics consists of six mathematics courses: Mathematics 
135, 150, 235, 300, and two additional mathematics courses chosen from 137 and all courses 
numbered above 200, one of which must have Mathematics 300 as a prerequisite. Unless a specific 
exception is approved by the department, the five courses numbered above 135 must be taken 
at Davidson and may not include independent studies or computer science courses other than 
Computer Science 325. 

No pass-fail course may be applied toward the minor. College requirements specify a grade 
point average of 2.0 for those courses which constitute a student's minor and an overall grade 
point average of 2.0 for all courses. 

Honors Requirements: Candidates for honors in mathematics may emphasize either pure 
or applied mathematics. In meeting the major requirements stated above, honors candidates 
emphasizing pure mathematics must include Mathematics 221, 335, 340, 360, 430, 435 and either 
450 or 455 in their programs. Course work for those emphasizing applied mathematics must 
include Mathematics 210, 221, 335, Computer Science 325, a two-course sequence consisting of 
Mathematics 340 and 341 or of Mathematics 430 and 435, and one additional course chosen from 
Mathematics 340, 430, 435, 437, or an approved seminar. All honors candidates must participate 
in an independent study course in which they prepare an honors thesis that is defended orally 
before the mathematics faculty. College requirements for honors specify minimum grade point 
averages of 3.2 overall and 3.5 in the major. The major average is computed on all Mathematics and 
Computer Science courses numbered above 130. The final recommendation of the department for 
graduation with honors is determined by the quality of the honors thesis, the oral defense and the 
complete overall academic record of the candidate. At the department's discretion, high honors 



1 32 — Mathematics 



may be awarded when the candidate's academic record is truly exceptional and his or her thesis is 
of the highest quality and includes original mathematical concepts or results. 

Any student considering an honors program should notify his or her academic advisor and 
the chair of the department during the spring semester of the sophomore year or as soon as possible 
thereafter. During the junior year, the student should identify an area of mathematics he or she 
would like to explore and should seek out a member of the department to serve as the potential 
honors supervisor. Formal application for honors should be made in writing to the chair of the 
department no later than April 30 of the junior year. Early application is encouraged. Applications 
must include the name of the honors supervisor, the general area of investigation, and a semester 
by semester schedule for the required course work and independent study. 

Graduate School: A student who intends to go to graduate school in mathematics should: 
(1) take the course work portion of the honors requirements in either pure mathematics or 
applied mathematics, (2) take the Graduate Record Examination, including the Advanced Test in 
Mathematics, during the fall semester of the senior year, and (3) acquire a reading proficiency in 
French, German or Russian. 

Certificate for Secondary School Teaching: Mathematics 340 and 365 are required for students 
who intend to seek North Carolina certification in the teaching of secondary school mathematics. 
Mathematics 210 and 481 are also recommended for such students. 

Applied Mathematics Concentration: This concentration offers a track for students interested 
primarily in the natural sciences and another track for students interested primarily in the social 
sciences. The concentration is described in detail in a separate section of this catalog. 

Computer Science: Students who are interested in computer science are encouraged to consider 
the Computer Science Concentration. The concentration is described in detail in a separate section 
of this catalog. In addition, valuable experience can be gained by serving as a student assistant for 
Information Technology Services. Inquiries concerning these opportunities should be made at the 
User Services Building. 

The student who intends to pursue graduate study in computer science should augment 
the Computer Science Concentration with Mathematics 150, 235, 300, 340, and 355. The Graduate 
Record Examination should be taken during the fall semester of the senior year. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC) 

121 PROGRAMMING AND PROBLEM SOLVPNG Staff 

An introduction to computer science and structured programming using the Java programming language. 

(Fall) 

200 COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS (=PHY 200) Boye, Christian 

(Cross-listed as Physics 200) . Introduction to computer programming using an object-oriented programming 
language such as Java. Assignments will be based on simulations emphasizing problem solving in science, 
program writing, and numerical methods in science. A final project of the student's choice is presented 
in an end-of-term poster session. Prerequisite: Physics 120 or 130 at Davidson or permission of the Instructor. 
(Spring) 



Mathematics — 133 



231 DATA STRUCTURES Staff 

A study of abstract data types, including lists, stacks, queues, and search tables, and their supporting data 
structures, including arrays, linked lists, binary search trees, and hash tables. Implications of the choice of 
data structure on the efficiency of the implementation of an algorithm. Efficient methods of sorting and 
searching. Programs are written in Java or in C++. Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or 200 or permission of 
instructor. (Spring) 

310 BIOFNFORMATICS Staff 

(Cross-listed as Biology 310.) A survey of computational techniques used to extract meaning from biological 
data. Algorithms and statistical procedures for analyzing genomic and proteomic data will be discussed 
in class and applied in the computer lab using Perl. Interdisciplinary teams will explore a particular topic 
in depth. Prerequisite: One of the following: Ma&iematics 210, Computer Science 121, Physics 200, Biology 309, or 
permission oftlie instructor. (Offered Spring of even numbered years.) 

323 OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING Staff 

Techniques of object-oriented prograrnming, including abstraction, information hiding, encapsulation, 
composition, aggregation, inheritance, polymorphism, and design patterns. Prerequisite: Computer Science 
231 or permission of instructor. (Offered Pall of odd numbered years.) 

325 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS Staff 

Survey of methods to approximate numerical solutions of problems in root-finding, differentiation, 
integration, curve-fitting, differential equations, and systems of equations. Derivations, limitations, and 
efficiency of different algorithms are considered. Prerequisites: Matliematics 150 and 235. (Offered Spring of 
even numbered years.) 

331 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS Staff 

Algorithm design strategies, including greedy, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming methods. 
Advanced data structures, including balanced search trees, graphs, heaps, and priority queues. Advanced 
methods of searching and sorting. Computational complexity and analysis of algorithms. NP-complete 
problems. Prerequisite: Computer Science 231. Prereqidsite or corequisite: Matliematics 221 or permission of 
instructor. (Offered Fall of even numbered years.) 

CSC 395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves 
the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students' work. 
Open to qualified students with tlie permission oftlie department clwir. Eligible for major credit by departmental 
approval. 

397 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENCE (=PHY 397) Staff 
(Cross-listed as Physics 397). Independent study using computers to model dynamical systems in the 
natural sciences under the direction and supervision of the instructor who approves the specific topic of 
study. Emphasis is on the use of object-oriented programming and web-based protocols to investigate 
both dynamical systems and the representation of those systems as data structures and algorithms. 

482 COMPUTER SCIENCE SEMINAR Staff 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Ordinarily offered in Spring of odd numbered years.) 



134 — Mathematics 



MATHEMATICS 



110 APPLICATIONS OF FINITE MATHEMATICS WITH COMPUTING Staff 

Mathematical techniques which have been used, productively and extensively, during the last thirty years 
and which do not involve the use of calculus. Probability, linear programming, matrix algebra, Markov 
chains, game theory, and graph theory are representative topics. In the computer laboratory students learn 
to use computer software, including a spreadsheet, to solve problems. One 75-minute computer laboratory 
meeting per week. Not open to students with credit for Mathematics 150, 221, or 340. 

118 EXPLORING MATHEMATICAL IDEAS Staff 

Survey of abstract mathematical ideas that deepen understanding of patterns from mathematics, art, 
and the physical world. Topics may include the nature of number, infinity, dimension, symmetries, 
alternate geometries, topology, chaos, fractals, and probability. While techniques and concepts have much 
in common with advanced theoretical mathematics, little background is assumed and the course is not 
practical preparation for later courses in mathematics. Not open to students with credit for, or enrolled in, 
Mathematics 300. 

130 CALCULUS I Staff 

An introduction to the differential and integral calculus of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and 
inverse trigonometric functions with applications including graphical analysis, optimization and numerical 
methods. In the fall, there are two variants in addition to the basic course, indicated by the first letter of 
the section designation: Sections designated with "X" cover the same topics as the basic course, but are 
addressed to students encountering calculus for the first time. Sections designated with "M" are titled 
"Calculus and Modeling I" and investigate mathematical approaches to describing and understanding 
change in the context of problems in the life sciences. Sections designated with "X" are not open to any student 
with one semester of a high school or college course about calculus. Other fall sections assume previous exposure to 
(not proficiency in) some calculus concepts. Spring sections have no re 

135 CALCULUS II: MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS Staff 

An introduction to techniques and applications of single-variable integration followed by the calculus 
of functions of several variables, including partial derivatives and multiple integrals. Tools of analysis 
include polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; parametric equations; and vectors, lines, and planes 
in space. Prerequisite: Any section of Mathematics 130 or one year of high school calculus. 

137 CALCULUS AND MODELING II Staff 

Continued study of calculus and other mathematical methods for modeling change and uncertainty. Topics 
include multivariable calculus; systems of linear equations, difference equations and differential equations; 
and probability models such as Bayes 1 rule and random walks. Students will be guided in the discovery 
and mastery of mathematical techniques in the context of problems in the life sciences. Prerequisite: 130 M 
(Calculus and Modeling I). (Spring) 

139 ADVANCED PLACEMENT/ TRANSFER CREDIT: CALCULUS II 

A second course in calculus awarded for qualifying scores on the Advanced Placement Calculus BC 
examination, or for eligible transfer courses. Credit for MathemaHcs 139 is forfeited by a student who enrolls in 
Mathematics 235. 



Mathematics — 135 



150 LINEAR ALGEBRA AND MATHEMATICA WITH APPLICATIONS Staff 

An introduction to systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, and eigenvectors in an 
interactive learning environment provided by the computer algebra system Mathematica. Applications are 
chosen from linear programming, least squares approximation, graph theory, cryptography, tomography, 
fractals, and other topics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 135 or Mathematics 130 and prior experience with vectors. 

191 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves 
the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students' work. 
Open to qualified students with permission of the department chair. Does not count towards a mathematics major. 

210 MATHEMATICAL MODELING Staff 

A survey of discrete mathematical modeling techniques and their application to the natural and social 
sciences. Mathematical tools are selected from Monte Carlo simulation, queuing theory, Markov Chains, 
optimization, discrete dvnamical systems, artificial intelligence, and game theory. Emphasis is on 
formulating models, investigating them analytically and computationally, and communicating the results. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 150 or permission of the instructor. (Spring) 

221 DISCRETE METHODS Staff 

An introduction to the basic techniques of problem solving in discrete mathematics. Topics include 
counting methods for arrangements and selections, generating functions, recurrence relations and 
inclusion-exclusion, covering circuits, graph coloring, trees and searching, and network algorithms. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 135 or 150 or permission of the instructor. (Fall) 

235 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND INFINITE SERIES Staff 

A study of solution techniques and applications for ordinary differential equations including first order 
equations, linear differential equations, series solutions, and basic concepts of numerical and graphical 
techniques applied to equations and systems. An introduction to infinite series and power series is 
included. Optional topics include Laplace transforms and Bessel functions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 135. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 150. 

255 ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY Staff 

Introduction to elementary additive and multiplicative number theory, including divisibility properties 
of integers, congruence modulo n, linear and quadratic congruences, some Diophantine equations, 
distribution of primes, and additive arithmetic problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 150 or permission of the 
instructor. (Offered Spring of odd numbered years.) 

291 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves 
the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students' work. 
Open to qualified students with permission of the department chair. Major credit is awarded for this course. 

300 INTRODUCTION TO PROOF, ANALYSIS AND TOPOLOGY Staff 

An introduction to proof techniques (including quantifiers and induction), elementary set theory, 
equivalence relations, and cardinality; followed by an introduction to the topology of the real numbers 
and elementary real analysis, including rigorous topological and analytic treatments of convergence of 
sequences and continuity of functions. Prerequisite: One of Mathematics 150, 221, and 235 or permission of the 
instructor. 



136 — Mathematics 



335 VECTOR CALCULUS AND PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Staff 

A study of the calculus of vector-valued functions and vector fields and an introduction to partial differential 
equations. Topics include curves in space, Lagrange multipliers, Green's theorem, divergence theorem, 
Stokes' theorem, Fourier series, separation of variables, boundary value problems, and applications to 
physics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 235. (Spring) 

340 PROBABILITY Staff 
A study of probability theory relative to both discrete and continuous probability laws. Topics include 
independence and dependence, mean, variance and expectation, random variables, jointly distributed 
probability laws, Chebysheff's Inequality and a version of the Central Limit Theorem. Applications of 
probability theory are approached through a variety of idealized problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 135. 
(Fall) 

341 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS Staff 
A mathematical approach to statistical theory. Includes a study of distribution theory, important properties 
of estimators, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and selected topics 
from non-parametric statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 340. (Offered Spring of odd numbered years.) 

355 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I Staff 

An introduction to the theory of groups, rings and fields. Topics include normal subgroups, quotient 
groups, homomorphisms, Cayley's theorem, permutation groups, ideals, the field of quotients of an 
integral domain, and polynomial rings. Prerequisites: Mathematics 150 and 300. (Fall) 

360 INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY Staff 

An introduction to metric and topological spaces. Topics include concepts of completeness, compactness, 
connectedness and fixed point theorems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 300 or permission of the instructor. (Offered 
Spring of even numbered years.) 

365 GEOMETRY Staff 

A rigorous treatment of Euclidean geometry and an introduction to hyperbolic geometry. Neutral geometry 
is developed synthetically via a modified version of Hilbert's axioms. The Poincare and Beltrami-Klein 
models are used to establish the relative consistency of hyperbolic geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 300. 
(Fall) 

391, 392 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the 
topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students' work. Open 
to qualified students with permission of the department cltair. Major credit is awarded for both of these courses. 

430 REAL ANALYSIS Staff 

A rigorous treatment of one-variable calculus including: metric spaces, sequences and series, continuity, 
differentiation, the Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions. Prerequisites: Mathematics 235 and 

300. (Fall) 

435 COMPLEX ANALYSIS Staff 

The algebra and geometry of complex numbers, sequences and series of complex numbers, derivatives and 
integrals of functions of a complex variable. The Cauchy-Goursat Theorem, the Cauchy Integral Formula 
and its consequences, Taylor series, classification of singularities, the Residue Theorem, Laurent series, 



Mathematics — 137 



harmonic functions, conformal mappings, and, if time permits, miscellaneous applications. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 235 and 300. (Spring) 

437 DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS Staff 

A study of the iteration of systems, typically arising from physical or biological models, and the resulting 
long term behavior. Periodic and chaotic dynamics as well as fractal graphics will be investigated. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 235 and 300 or permission of the instructor. (Offered Spring of odd numbered years.) 

450 ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA Staff 

A further study of vector spaces, dual spaces, inner product spaces, modules, linear transformations, 
characteristic roots, matrices, canonical forms, trace, transpose, determinants, normal transformations and 
quadratic forms. Prereqitisite: Mailiemati.es 355 or permission oftlie instructor. (Offered Spring of odd numbered 
years.) 

455 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA B Staff 

A continuation of Mathematics 355 including additional topics in group theory and ring theory, extension 
fields, straight-edge and compass constructions, Galois Theory and solvability by radicals. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 355. (Offered Spring of even numbered years.) 

Seminars 

Typically, one of Mathematics 483, 485, 486, or 487 is offered in Spring of even numbered years. Prerequisite: 
Permission oftlie instructor. 

481 SEMINAR FN PROBLEM SOLVING AND HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS Staff 

A seminar in the history of mathematics with an emphasis on problem solving techniques available during 
different historical periods. The chronological development of mathematics is studied from ancient Egypt 
and Babylon to the Renaissance, with occasional non-chronological forays into modern mathematics. 
Prerequisite: Permission oftlie instructor. (Fall) 

483 ANALYSIS SEMINAR Staff 

485 ALGEBRA SEMINAR Staff 

486 TOPOLOGY SEMINAR Staff 

487 SPECIAL TOPICS SEMTNAR Staff 

491, 492 FNDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves 
the topic(s) of the independent study and who determines the basis for the evaluation of students' work. 
Prerequisite: Permission oftlie instructor. Open to qualified students with permission oftlie department cliair. Major 
credit is awarded for both oftliese courses. 



138 — Military Studies 



MILITARY STUDIES 



Chair: Lieutenant Colonel Johnson (On location at UNC Charlotte) 
Assistant Professor: Major Kolouch (Officer-in-charge at Davidson) 

Note: Tlie ROTC Program at Davidson College is wider the auspices of the Department of the Army 
which is responsible for making program decisions. 

The Department of Military Studies — also known as the ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps) Department— offers qualified students the opportunity to obtain a commission as an 
officer in the United States Army, Army Reserve, or Army National Guard while they are earning 
a college degree. ROTC helps students to build for their future in any career by developing 
confidence, responsibility, self-discipline and leadership abilities. This opportunity is open to 
both men and women. Students may pursue either a four-year or a two-year program of military 
studies instruction leading to a commission as an Army Second Lieutenant. 

The Four-year Program is divided into two parts: the Basic Course and the Advanced 
Course. 

The Basic Course is usually taken during the first and second years, and covers such subjects as 
management principles, national defense, military history, leadership development, and physical 
fitness training. Enrollment in the Basic Course can begin in any term in the first and second years. 
No military commitment is incurred for participation in the Basic Course. After completing the 
Basic Course, students who have demonstrated the potential to become officers and who have 
met the physical and scholastic standards for commissioning are eligible to enroll in the Advanced 
Course. Basic Course students (first- and second-year students) must complete Military Studies 
101, 102, 201, and 202. 

The Advanced Course is taken during the last two years. It includes instruction in organization 
and management, principles of training management, tactics, ethics and professionalism, further 
leadership development, and advanced physical fitness training. During the summer between 
their third and fourth years, Advanced Course students attend a fully-paid, six- week, Leadership 
Development and Assessment Course at Fort Lewis, WA. This course gives cadets the chance 
to put into practice the leadership theories and principles, and military skills learned in the 
classroom, and introduces them to how the Army functions in a field environment. Advanced 
Course students must complete Military Studies 301, 302, 401, and 402. 

The Two-year Program is designed for juniors who did not take ROTC during the first two 
years of college. To enter the two-year program, students must attend a fully-paid, six-week, 
Leadership Training Course at Fort Knox, Kentucky, during the summer between the second and 
third years. After successfully completing the Leadership Training course, students who meet 
scholastic requirements may enroll in the Advanced Course. The Professor of Military Studies 
may waive any, or all, Basic Course and Basic Camp requirements for students who have had high 
school Junior ROTC experiences or prior military service. 

ROTC students enroll in a military studies course each term. See the military studies advisor 
for specific details. Military Studies 301 is a credit course. All other military studies courses listed 
are non-credit courses. All cadets attend a leadership lab conducted on Tuesday afternoons. This 
lab reinforces classroom instruction and focuses on tactical leadership and basic skills. 



Military Studies — 139 



101 LEADERSHIP AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT Major Kolouch 
Introduces cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. 
Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time 
management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army 
profession. Includes instruction in map reading, land navigation, and customs and courtesies of the Army. 
Open to all Davidson students. 

102 INTRODUCTION TO TACTICAL LEADERSHIP Major Kolouch 
Overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting 
briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership 
values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Includes 
instruction in basic tactics. Open to all Davidson students. 

201 INNOVATIVE TEAM LEADERSHIP Major Kolouch 
Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining 
team dvnamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership 
framework (trait and behavior theories). Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building 
in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. 
Includes instruction in troop leading procedures, tactical movement, battle drills, and offensive and 
defensive operations. 

202 FOUNDATIONS OF TACTICAL LEADERSHIP Major Kolouch 
Examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment 
(COE). The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study 
of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in 
the context of military operations. Includes instruction in terrain analysis, patrolling, tactical orders, route 
planning, and navigational methods. 

301 ADAPTIVE TACTICAL LEADERSHIP Major Kolouch 
Challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with 
challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback 
on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self -evaluations, 
cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. Includes instruction in squad 
operations, problem solving, and combat orders. Prerequisite: ROTC Basic Course (or Leadership Training 
Course) or consent oftlie instructor. Credit Course. (Fall) 

302 LEADERSHIP FN CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS Major Kolouch 
Uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading 
tactical operations up to platoon level. Cadets review aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. 
They also conduct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison operation orders. Includes 
instruction in platoon operations, stability and support operations, and garrison orders. Designed to 
prepare third-year students to perform effectively at the Leadership Development and Assessment Course 
(LDAC). Mandatory for junior ROTC students. Prerequisite: Military Studies 301 or consent oftlie instructor. 
(Spring) 

401 DEVELOPFNG ADAPTIVE LEADERS Lieutenant Colonel Johnson 

Develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a 
member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical 



140 — Military Studies/Music 



decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets 
to make the transition to Army officers. Includes instruction in risk management, training management, 
code of conduct, rules of engagement, counseling, and evaluations. Mandatory for all senior ROTC students. 
Prerequisite: Military Studies 302. (Fall) 

402 LEADERSHIP IN A COMPLEX WORLD Lieutenant Colonel Johnson 

Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the 
contemporary operating environment (COE). Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, 
military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also 
explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host 
nation support. Includes instruction in Army organization and modularity, the platoon command team, 
a battle analysis, and a staff ride. Mandatory for all senior ROTC students. Prerequisite: Military Studies 401. 
(Spring) 

MUSIC 

Professors: B. Lawing (On leave, Spring), Sprague, Stasack (Chair) 

Associate Professors: Botelho, Lerner 

Instructor: Chamra 

Artist Associates: Cooper, Culpepper, Koljonen, C Lawing, Rowland, Thornton 

Distribution Requirements: Music 100W, 101, 121, 122, 141, 201, 221-246, 261, 325, and 328 
satisfy the distribution requirement in Fine Arts. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Music 141, 241, 242, 245, 246, and 263 are options for fulfilling 
the cultural diversity requirement. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses to include: 

1. three courses in music theory: 201, 202, 302; 

2. two courses in music history: 325, 328; 

3. one course in U.S. or world music: 122, 141, 228, 241, 242, 245, 246, 263; 

4. three electives at the 200 level or higher; 

5. senior seminar: 401; 

6. applied study (continuously while declared and in residence); 

7. keyboard proficiency. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses total, 

1. four from Music 101 or 201, 121, 122, 141; 

2. two electives at the 200 level or higher; and 

3. at least two semesters of ensemble participation or two semesters of applied lessons. 

Honors Requirements: The departmental honors program encourages the attainment of 
excellence in the major. Please consult the department's Handbook for Music Majors, Music 
Minors, Applied Music Students and Award Recipients for specific details and expectations 
regarding each of the above requirements. 



Music — 141 



01 BASIC AURAL-TRAINING C. Lawing 
Designed to increase aural recognition of musical parameters. Sight singing, melodic dictation, rhythmic 
dictation, and general musicianship will be emphasized. 

02 ADVANCED AURAL-TRAINING C. Lawing 
Designed to increase aural recognition of musical parameters. Sight singing melodic dictation, rhythmic 
dictation, and general musicianship will be emphasized. 



C. Lawing 

Sprague 

B. Lawing 
Chamra 
Sprague 

Staff 

Staff 

Snow 

Culpepper 

C. Lawing 

Staff 

Staff 

101 FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC Botelho 

Introduction to music theory and analysis, with emphasis on intervals, modes, scales, rhythm, meter, and 
form. No prerequisite. No music training required. (Fall) 

121 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC IN WESTERN dVILIZATION Staff 
Designed for students who have had but slight contact with the art. Works of important masters from all 
periods. Develops wider understanding of music through intelligent listening. No prerequisite. No music 
training required. 

122 MUSIC OF THE UNITED STATES Lerner 
The cultivated and vernacular traditions of U.S. music from the Colonial period to the present. Focus on 
close listening and cultural trends. Topics include: parlor song, minstrelsy, Tin Pan Alley, ragtime, blues, 



03 KEYBOARD PROFICIENCY 

Develop skills necessary to pass Music major keyboard proficiency exam. 

10 CONCERT CHOIR 

11 WIND AND JAZZ ENSEMBLE 

12 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

13 CHORALE 

14 OPERA WORKSHOP 

Ability to read music and sing classical repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

15 DICTION 

43-44 AFRICAN DRUMMING ENSEMBLE 

45^6 VOCAL CLASS, 2 Hours 
(Additional fee) 

47^8 PIANO CLASS, 1 Hour 
(Additional fee) 

50 VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL STUDY, 0.5 Hour 
(Additional fee) 

55 VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL STUDY, 1 Hour 
(Additional fee) 



142 — Music 



jazz, modernism, country, film music, rock, postmodernism. No prerequisite. No music training required. 
(Fall) 

141 WORLD MUSICS Stasack 

Exploration of selected musical systems of the world, approached through study of their basic stylistic 
elements. Discussion centers on the music and instruments indigenous to each system and includes extra- 
musical cultural associations such as religion and theatre. Listening drawn from field and studio recordings 
of native performers. No prerequisite. No music training required. 

155 APPLIED MUSIC Staff 

Applied instruction designed for students with previous vocal or instrumental training. Must successfully 
complete jury at end of each semester of study. See department for competency levels and literature 
requirements. Additional fee required. Prerequisite: By audition or permission oftlie instructor. 1 credit for 2 
consecutive semesters. 

195 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study in music under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic, 
and determines the means of evaluation. Open to qualified students with permission oftlie chair. 

201 THEORY I: HARMONY Botelho 
Introduction to the grammar of tonal music through part-writing and analysis. Includes scales, intervals, 
triads, seventh chords, and their inversions. Ear training in intervals, chords, melody, and rhythm. No 

prerequisite. Knowledge of scales and key signatures required. (Fall) 

202 THEORY II: ADVANCED HARMONY Botelho 
Continuation of Music 201: Contrapuntal techniques within a diatonic framework, including sequences, 
melodic and rhythmic figuration; modal mixture, applied chords, modulation, and the neopolitan- 
and augmented-sixth chords. Ear training includes one- and two-part exercises. Prerequisite: Music 201. 
(Spring) 

111 MUSIC TECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION B. Lawing 

An introduction to digital music production. The class consists of several independent projects that 
examine various hardware and software instruments and processors, and apply them to various audio 
productions. No prerequisite. (Fall) 

212 CONDUCTING Chamra, B. Lawing, Sprague 

Designed for students who plan to pursue both choral and instrumental conducting. Emphasis on 
technique, rehearsal procedure, literature, and stylistic practices. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

221-223 STUDIES OF COMPOSERS AND STYLES Staff 

Courses concentrating upon specific topics in music history. No prerequisite. 

224 THE SYMPHONY B. Lawing 

History of the symphony and its literature from pre-classical examples to the present. (Normally offered in 
alternate years) 

226 OPERA Staff 

Opera from the Italian Renaissance through the 20th century. (Normally offered in alternate years) 



Music — 143 



228 FILM MUSIC Lerner 

Historical, stylistic, and analytic study of film music from the origins of cinema in the 1890s to the present, 
focusing on fictional Holh r wood narratives while also considering music's function in documentary and 
avant-garde filmmaking. Emphasizes close reading of music in relation to film, and vice versa. Weekly 
screenings. No prerequisite. (Fall) 

230 CHORAL LITERATURE Sprague 
A survey of the history of choral literature with an emphasis on those larger works which are landmarks 
in the evolution of choral music and which are considered part of today's standard repertoire. Emphasis 
on close listening and analysis of text music relationships will be correlated with analyses of structural and 
stylistic elements in the music. Some prior knowledge of music is desirable, but not required. (Normally 
offered in alternate years) 

231 THE CONCERTO Sprague 

A survey of the evolution and literature of this popular instrumental form. Topics of inquiry will include 
discussion of stylistic changes and solo-tutu" relationships, as well as musical structure. Some prior 
knowledge of music is desirable, but not required. (Normally offered in alternate years) 

232 JAZZ B. Lawing 
A general introduction to jazz. The class will explore the roots of jazz, will critically examine jazz 
improvisation, and will present a history of jazz from its beginnings to the 1990s. 

233 AMERICAN MUSIC THEATRE B. Lawing 
An introduction to the history and literature of the Broadway musical. Greatest emphasis is placed on the 
period beginning with Oklahoma and continuing to the present. 

241 MUSIC OF LATIN AMERICA Botelho 
An introduction to the music of Hispanic- and Luso- American countries and cultures from colonial times 
to the present. No prerequisite. (Normally offered in alternate years, Spring) 

242 MUSIC OF ASIA Stasack 
Indigenous classical and folk music of China, Japan, Korea, and India. Includes vocal and instrumental 
music, as well as prominent dance and theatre forms. Considers aspects of musical systems, aesthetics, and 
performance practice. Emphasis on historical traditions. No prerequisite. (Normally offered in alternate years) 

245 MUSIC FN WORLD RELIGIONS Stasack 
Cross-cultural study of musical styles, roles, and performance practices in religious belief systems and 
sacred rituals around the world. Thematic issues include: explicit and implicit relationships between 
musical substance and ideology; music as a tool for expressing, preserving, and empowering sacred texts; 
music as a means of structuring ritual; and the power of music to transform experience. No prerequisite. 

246 MUSIC OF BRAZIL Botelho 
A survey of cultivated and vernacular traditions of Brazilian music from colonial times to the present. 
Topics include: sacred and secular colonial music, the barroco mineiro, nationalism, the avant-garde, 
samba, bossa nova, MPB, candomble, jazz, tropical rock, and rap. No prerequisites. (Normally offered in 
alternate years, Spring) 



144 — Music 



255 APPLIED MUSIC: INTERMEDIATE Staff 
Applied instruction designed for students with previous vocal or instrumental training. Must successfully 
complete jury at the end of each semester of study. See department for competency levels and literature 
requirements. Additional fee required. Prerequisite: Music 155. 1 credit for 2 consecutive semesters. 

256 APPLIED MUSIC: ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE Staff 

Applied instruction designed for students with previous vocal or instrumental training. Must successfully 
complete jury at end of each semester of study. See department for competency levels and literature 
requirements. Additional fee required. Prerequisite: Music 255. 1 credit for 2 consecutive semesters. 

261 INTRODUCTION TO COMPOSITION Stasack 

A course exploring the sounds and architectures of contemporary musical styles while cultivating 
individual projects in composition, with opportunities for performance of works in a class recital. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Fall) 

263 COMPOSITION IN NON-WESTERN STYLES Stasack 

Study and appreciation of compositional techniques employed in musical systems of non-European 
cultures. Student focus on a particular area. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Normally offered in 
alternate years) 

271 MODERNISM/POSTMODERNISM Lerner 

A study of modern and postmodern music, combining close listening (e.g., Schoenberg, Cage, Reich) with 
critical responses to its aesthetic and ideological contexts (e.g., Adorno, Jameson, McClary). Representative 
genres include: symphony; string quartet; opera; film score; performance art. First-year students require 
permission of the instructor. 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic, and 
determines the means of evaluation. Open to qualified students with permission oftlie chair. 

302 FORM AND ANALYSIS Botelho 

Analytical techniques and formal processes of tonal music, including expressive styles and topics, binary 
and ternary forms, variation, fugue, and sonata form. Prerequisite: Music 202. (Fall) 

325 MUSIC HISTORY I: ANTIQUITY TO 1800 Sprague 

The history of music in medieval and early modern Europe in its cultural and social context, emphasizing 
musical style, notation, and performance practice. Periods include Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and 
Classical through Beethoven's first stylistic period. No prerequisite. Ability to read music expected. (Fall) 

328 MUSIC HISTORY E: AFTER 1800 Lerner 

The history of music in modern Europe and the United States in its cultural and social context, emphasizing 
musical style, notation, and performance practice. Periods include Romantic, Post-romantic, Modern, and 
Postmodern. No prerequisite. Ability to read music expected. (Spring) 

355 APPLIED MUSIC: ADVANCED Staff 

Applied instruction designed for students with previous vocal or instrumental training. Must successfully 
complete jury at end of each semester of study. See department for competency levels and literature 
requirements. Additional fee required. Prerequisite: Music 256. 1 credit for 2 consecutive semesters. 



Music — 145 



361 ADVANCED STUDIES IN COMPOSITION Stasack 

Development of creative and technical skills in music composition. Considers all parameters of sound — 
pitch, rhvthm, texture, dvnamics, form and orchestration. Emphasis on exploring the unique sensibilities 
of the individual. Prerequisite: 261. 

380-382 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MUSIC HISTORY Staff 

Specialized studv of a composer, period, or genre, utilizing a variety of specialized notational, analytical, 
and theoretical methodologies. Prerequisite: Permission oftlie instructor. Normally, students will have had at 
least one prior semester of college-level music or related study. 

395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic, and 
determines the means of evaluation. Open to qualified students ivith permission oftlie clmir. 

401 SENIOR SEMINAR Staff 

A capstone seminar synthesizing historical mquiry, analytical methods, and performance practice along 
with techniques of music research, writing, and close listening. Topics chosen by the course instructor. 
Prerequisite: Limited to senior music majors; open to otlier qualified students hj permission of tlie instructor. 
(Spring) 

Vocal and Instrumental Study 

Vocal and instrumental studies are offered as follows: 
Bassoon- Arm Shoemaker 
Banjo, mandolin and fiddle-Jon Singleton 
Cello-John Cloer 
Clarinet-Bob Listokin 
Contrabass-Jeff Ferdon 
Flute- Amy Orsinger Whitehead 
Guitar-Jim Duckworth 
Harpsichord-Neil Lerner 
Horn-Frank Portone 
Oboe-Janet Carpenter 
Organ-Christopher Brayne 
Non-western percussion- Adam Snow 
Percussion-Adam Snow 
Piano-Ruskin Cooper, Cvnthia Lawing 
Saxophone-Seth Carper 
Trumpet- William Lawing 
Trombone and tuba-Brian French 
Viola-Piotr Swic 
Violin-Martha Koljonen 
Voice-Jacquelyn Culpepper, Diane Thornton, Melody Morrison Beaty 



146 — Philosophy 



PHILOSOPHY 



Professors: Goldstein, Stell 

Associate Professor: Robb (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Griffith (On leave), McKeever, Studtmann (On leave) 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Young 

Distribution Requirements: Any philosophy course numbered below 400 counts toward 
fulfillment of the distribution requirement in Philosophy and Religion. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses in philosophy, including: 

History of Philosophy (105 and 106); 

Reasoning (101 or 200); 

Ethics (215); 

Senior thesis and colloquium (450 and 451); 

and four additional courses numbered 101 or above. 

Minor Requirements: Five courses in philosophy, including 105, 106, and three additional 
courses numbered 101 or above, at least one of which is numbered 200 or above. 

Senior Tfiesis: To be certified for graduation, each major must complete a thesis of acceptable 
quality on an approved topic. Completion of the thesis is a requirement for Philosophy 450. 

Honors: Majors who maintain through the end of the senior year at least a 3.2 overall average 
and at least a 3.5 average in philosophy, and who receive at least an A- in PHI 495 are awarded 
"Honors in Philosophy". 

Majors who maintain through the end of the senior year at least a 3.5 overall average and at 
least a 3.75 average in philosophy, and who receive an A in PHI 495 are awarded "High Honors 
in Philosophy". 

100W FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR Young 

Writing-intensive study of selected topics in philosophy. Satisfies the composition requirement. Topic for 
this year: the soul. Oven only to first-year students. (Spring) 

101 REASON AND ARGUMENT Staff 

Introduction to reasoning with a focus on the nature and evaluation of arguments, the identification of 
fallacies, and the rules of rational discourse. (Not offered 2007-08) 

105 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (=CLA 261) Young 
(Cross-listed as Classics 261.) Introduction to the origins and development of philosophy in ancient Greece, 
with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. (Fall) 

106 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY Robb 

Introduction to philosophy in the early modern period, i.e. the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 
Emphasis on metaphysical and epistemological issues in the work of philosophers selected from this list: 
Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Kant. (Spring) 



Philosophy — 147 



107 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY Young 

Introduction to philosophers of the medieval period. We will study thinkers of the Christian, Islamic, 
and Jewish traditions, spanning from the fourth century C.E. up to the fourteenth century. Philosophers 
covered may include: Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Avicenna, Averroes, Maimonides, Aquinas, Duns 
Scotus, and Ockham. (Spring) 

110 PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY Goldstein 
A survey of selected philosophical problems. Topics may include: religious belief, free will, knowledge, 
relativism, and morality. (Spring) 

120 APPLIED ETHICS McKeever 

Introduction to the philosophical analysis of contemporary moral controversies. Topics may include: 
abortion, euthanasia, feminism, world hunger, business ethics, nuclear war, human rights. (Fall) 

130 MEDICAL ETHICS Stell 

Ethical analysis of patient-phvsician relationship; contraception, abortion, sterilization, artificial 
insemination, in vitro fertilization, surrogate motherhood; euthanasia and the care of dying patients; 
refusal of medical treatment and the use of "unorthodox" medical treatment; experimentation on human 
subjects; human genetic control; allocation of scarce medical resources; and health care delivery systems. 
(Fall) 

160 GREAT PHILOSOPHERS Young 

Introduction to philosophv through intensive study of the work of one philosopher. The philosopher 
selected varies from year to year. This year: Plato. (Fall) 

200 SYMBOLIC LOGIC Robb 

Systematic study of formal reasoning. Focus on the representation and evaluation of arguments in 
propositional and predicate logic. Additional topics vary, and may include meta-logic, modal logic, and 
non-classical logics. (Spring) 

210 GAMES AND DECISIONS McKeever 

Introduction to the formal analysis of games and rational decision-making. Decision under risk, ignorance, 
and certainty as applied in morals, politics, and religion. (Spring) 

111 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE Robb 
The central questions of epistemology are: What is knowledge? Do we have any? If so, how did we get it? 
This course accordingly looks at the nature, scope, and sources of knowledge. (Not offered 2007-08) 

212 METAPHYSICS Staff 
Philosophical study of the most fundamental features of the world and our place in it. Topics may include: 
abstract and concrete entities, God, causation, space and time, necessity, freedom and determinism, 
identity of objects and persons over time. (Not offered 2007-08) 

213 PHILOSOPHY OF NATURAL SCIENCE Robb 
Philosophical questions at the foundations of natural science. Topics include: the nature of scientific 
explanation, the aim of science, scientific progress, and selected philosophical issues in tine sciences of 
physics and biology. (Fall) 



148 — Philosophy 



215 ETHICS McKeever 
Critical introduction to theories of value and obligation, analysis of; the meaning and function of moral 
language, the relationship between morality and happiness. (Fall) 

216 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE Studtmann 
Discussion of theories of communication, linguistic meaning, truth. Other topics may include: metaphor, 
naming and describing, reference, vagueness, universals. (Not offered 2007-08) 

217 PHILOSOPHY OF MFND Robb 
Introduction to the mind-body problem: What is the relation between the mind and the body, or more 
generally, between mental and physical phenomena? Answers explored include dualism, behaviorism, 
the mind-brain identity theory, and functionalism. Topics may also include: consciousness, mental 
representation, mental imagery, psychological explanation. (Spring) 

220 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY McKeever, Stell 

Introduction to the philosophical evaluation of political power and the social and economic institutions 
through which it is exercised. Discussion of such questions as: What justification is there for government? 
What moral duties do citizens have? Are there moral limits to government authority? Analysis of such 
concepts as freedom, rights, justice, and equality. (Not offered 2007-08) 

222 PHILOSOPHY AND TECHNOLOGY Studtmann 

In the twentieth century, computers have been at the forefront of technological advance. In this course, 
we study the ways in which computer technology intersects with philosophy. The course is divided into 
four sections: the nature of computability; computers and the mind; computers and epistemology; and 
computers and ethics. (Not offered 2007-08) 

225 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION McKeever 

Introduction to philosophical issues in classical and contemporary religious thought. Topics may include: 
justification of religious claims, relation of faith to knowledge, arguments for the existence of God, divine 
attributes, life after death, problem of evil, status of religious language, relation of religion to morality, 
alternatives to theism. (Spring) 

230 PHILOSOPHY OF MEDICINE Stell 

Introduction to the conceptual foundations of medicine, especially the concepts of health and illness, 
professional intervention, healing, controlling the time and manner of dying, placebo, pain and suffering, 
personal and social responsibility for disease. (Not offered 2007-08) 

235 EXISTENTIALISM Griffith 

Analysis of the existential conditions of human life, such as death, the fragility and finiteness of life, 
freedom, commitment, the need for God, and the quest for meaning, worth and dignity. Readings are 
from both philosophy and literature. (Not offered 2007-08) 

275 MIND AND EMOTION Goldstein 

How is consciousness (mind) related to body? Can you ever know what other people feel? Why do 
animals and people prefer pleasure to pain? Is pain good for the masochist? What are emotions and how 
do they motivate behavior? What enables us to have words in English and other public languages to 
specify sensations and other personal, non-public events? (Fall) 



Philosophy — 149 



325 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW Stell 

Analysis of the nature and function of law. Various theories of law, relation of law to morality, economic 
analysis of law. An assessment of the principles of legal reasoning and jurisprudence, emphasis on 
discussion of decided cases. Prerequisite: 215 or 220. (Spring) 

350-353 SEMINAR FN PHILOSOPHY Goldstein, McKeever, Young 

Focused discussion of an important philosopher or cluster of related issues. Topics for this year: David 
Hume (Fall), The Good Life (Fall), The Problem of Evil (Spring). 

365 PHILOSOPHY OF MATHEMATICS Studtmann 

Analysis of the philosophical foundations of mathematics. Topics may include: the nature of mathematical 
truth, pure versus applied mathematics, the reality of mathematical entities, infinity, paradoxes, axiomatic 
systems, formal number theory, Godel's Theorem. (Not offered 2007-08) 

399 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FN PHILOSOPHY Staff 

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member who approves the topic (s) and determines 
the means of evaluation. Permission of the instructor and the department chair required. (Fall and Spring) 

450 ADVANCED PHILOSOPHICAL WRITING AND SENIOR THESIS Goldstein 
Required of all senior Philosophy majors. Analysis of techniques philosophers use to articulate, defend, 
and criticize theses. Emphasis on skills required to pursue an extended writing project. Students complete 
senior theses during the semester. (Fall) 

451 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM FN PHILOSOPHY McKeever 
Capstone seminar required of all senior Philosophy majors. Topic for this year: ethics. (Spring) 

495 HONORS THESIS Staff 

Open only to Philosophy majors eligible for honors. Includes the writing of a thesis under the supervision 
of a faculty member and an oral defense before the Philosophy faculty. Required of all honors candidates. 
(Spring) 



150 — Physical Education 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Athletic Director: Jim Murphy 

Director of Physical Education: Sander Helfgott 

Graduation Requirement: The college maintains a physical education requirement for 
graduation; however, the program carries no academic credit. A total of four courses is required: 
PE 101 (required of all students, including transfers, during their first semester at Davidson); one 
lifetime credit (PE 2**); one water credit (PE 3**); and one team credit (PE 4**). The requirement 
must be completed by the end of the sophomore year. Students receive credit for a team sport by 
participating on a varsity or junior varsity athletic team or by participating in 75 percent of games 
in a club or intramural sport. Lifetime credit will be given to students who participate in one 
of the lifetime physical education classes. A swim evaluation is administered during orientation 
to determine swimming ability and to offer guidance in course selection. Students who do not 
successfully complete a swim evaluation must register for an appropriate swimming class. 

PE 101 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A twelve-hour course offered in the fall of each year which consists of ten core hours and two electives. 
Core topics include Alcohol and Drugs, Sexuality, Adult CPR, Standard First Aid, Career and Life Planning 
and Psychological Health. Two hours of electives include topics of Nutrition, Stress Management, Time 
Management, Religion, Think Smart, Infant/ Child CPR, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Fitness. Required 
of all first-year and transfer students during the first semester at Davidson. 



PE 2** Lifetime Sports Credit: One course required. 



201 Aerobics 

202 Archery 

204 Backpacking 

205 Badminton 

208 CPR -Adult 

209 CPR- Child & Infant 

210 CPR - Community 

211 CPR - Instructor 

212 CPR - Professional 

213 Croquet 



217 Dance -Jazz 

218 Dance - Modern 

219 Dance - Tap 

220 Fencing 

222 First Aid - Community 
226 Golf 

229 Juggling 

230 Karate 

234 Racquetball 
236 Rock Climbing 



237 Self Defense 

241 Squash 

242 Tennis 

245 Wilderness Leadership 

248 Cardio Kick-Boxing 

253 Yoga 255 Belly Dancing 

256 Fitness Training 

261 Pilates 

265 Nutrition 



PE 3** Water Sports Credit: Upon successfully completing swim test, one course required. 



301 Canoeing 

302 Crew 

304 Kayaking 

305 Lifeguard Training 

306 Lifeguard Instructor 



307 Sailing 

308 Scuba Diving I 

311 Swim Level 1-3 

312 Swim Level 4-6 

313 Swim Level 6-7 



315 Water Polo 

316 Water Skiing 

318 Water Safety Instructor 

319 Boat Smart 

321 Fitness Swimming 



PE 4** Team Sports Credit: 75% participation in an intramural team, club sports team, or 
intercollegiate varsity or junior varsity team. 



Physics — 151 



PHYSICS 

Professors: Boye, Cain (Chair), Christian 
Associate Professors: Belloni, Gfroerer, Yukich 

Distribution Requirements: Any course in physics numbered 103 or above may be counted 
toward the fulfillment of the distribution requirement in Natural Science and Mathematics. 
Phvsics 120, 220, 130, or 230 satisfies the distribution requirement in laboratory science. AP credit 
for Physics 118 or 119 does not satisfy the distribution requirement in laboratory science. 

Major Requirements: Physics 120 or 130 is a prerequisite to a major in physics. Only with specific 
permission of the department chair can Physics 118 satisfy this prerequisite. The major consists of 
ten physics courses: 200, 220 or 230, 310, 320, 330, 335, 350, and 360; the mathematics requirement; 
and one course chosen from courses numbered 400 to 460. If Physics 201 is not taken to fulfill the 
mathematics requirement, then an additional physics course is required at the 400 level with the 
approval of the department. 

Mathematics Requirement: Either Physics 201 or both Mathematics 150 and 235 will satisfy the 
mathematics requirement. 

Major Requirements (Engineering Dual Degree (3-2) Track): Students seeking to complete the dual 
degree engineering (3-2) track with a physics major are required to take the following courses in 
order to receive a B.S. degree in Phvsics from Davidson: Physics 230, 310, 320, 335; the mathematics 
requirement; and two courses chosen from 330, 350, and 360. 

Honors Requirements: In addition to completing the requirements for a major in physics, a 
candidate for honors in phvsics must submit a written thesis covering an independent research 
project. Such a project may be based upon work completed in Physics 495, 496, or in an 
undergraduate research program on or away from campus that is approved by the department. 
Applications for honors in physics should be made in writing to the chair of the department no 
later than the end of the junior year. 

The awarding of honors in physics is based on: 

1. An overall average of at least 3.2, with an average of at least 3.5 in physics courses taken at 
Davidson. 

2. An acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination in Physics. 

3. An oral presentation of the research in a departmental seminar. 

4. The favorable vote of the physics faculty concerning the qualities of the candidate, the 
course of study, the written thesis, and the oral defense. 

Applied Mathematics Concentration: Students who are interested in applied mathematics are 
encouraged to consider the Applied Mathematics Concentration. The concentration offers a track 
for students interested primarily in the natural sciences and another track for students interested 
primarily in the social sciences. The concentration is described in detail in this catalog under 
concentrations. 



152 — Physics 



Computer Science Concentration: Students who are interested in computer science are invited 
to investigate the Computer Science Concentration. This concentration is described in detail in 
this catalog under concentrations. Physics courses involved in the computer science concentration 
are Physics 200, 310, and 397. Mathematics courses in the concentration are listed under the 
Mathematics Department. The student who intends to pursue graduate study in computer science 
should major in physics or mathematics or take upper-level physics and math courses to augment 
the Computer Science Concentration. Examples of student computational work can be found at 
http :/ / webphysics. davidson.edu. 

103 PHYSICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT Cain 

A study of the physical laws and processes that underlie environmental phenomena with a special focus 
on energy and radiation. Technical, economic and social consequences of these laws and processes will 
be examined to better delineate the complex decisions related to environmental issues. No laboratory. 

Designed for non-science majors. (Spring) 

105 ASTRONOMY Cain 

A survey of the current scientific view of the Universe. Emphasis on the physical and mathematical 
principles necessary to understand how astronomers observe and interpret phenomena. Topics include 
the historical development of major astronomical theories, the interaction of light and matter, the life cycle 
of stars, and the structure and evolution of the Universe. No laboratory. Designed for non-science majors. 
(Fall) 

110 THE PHYSICS AROUND YOU Cain, Yukich 

A descriptive course, intended primarily for non-science majors, concerning the laws of mechanics, heat, 
electricity, light, magnetism, the atom, and the nucleus; as applied to the devices used and the natural 
occurrences observed in everyday experience. No laboratory. Designed for non-science majors. Not open to 
students with credit for Physics 120, 220, 130 or 230. (Fall) 

115 MUSICAL TECHNOLOGY Boye 

The physical principles of sound, light, and electricity are developed and explored in order to understand 
their application in such technologies as digital audio recording and reproduction, synthesis of musical 
instruments, CDs, MP3s, personal audio players, lasers, and room acoustics. No laboratory. Designed for 
non-science majors. (Spring) 

118 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT: MECHANICS 

Course credit for appropriate scores on the AP Physics B exam or the AP Physics C (mechanics) exam. The 
course does not satisfy the lab science distribution requirement. Only with specific permission of the dwir may 
the course serve as prerequisite to oilier courses in Physics. Credit for Physics 118 is forfeited by a student who elects 
to take Physics 120 or 130. 

119 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT: ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 

Course credit for appropriate scores on the AP Physics C (electricity and magentism) exam. The course 
does not satisfy the lab science distribution requirement. Only with specific permission of the diair may (he 
course serve as prerequisite to oilier courses in Physics. Credit for Physics 119 is forfeited by a student who elects to 
take Physics 220 or 230. 



Physics — 153 



120, 220 GENERAL PHYSICS Belloni, Cain, Christian, Yukich 

Mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. One laboratory period 
each week. Physics 120 or permission of the instructor is prerequisite for Physics 220. (Both courses offered Fall 
and Spring) 

130, 230 GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS Boye, Cain, Christian, Gfroerer 

Mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics and modem physics. More comprehensive than 
Physics 120, 220 and designed for students who intend to major in chemistry, mathematics, physics, or 
who follow the dual-degree (3-2) Engineering track. One laboratory each week. Corequisite for Physics 130: 
Math 130. Prerequisite for Physics 230: Physics 130 or permission oftlie instructor. (Physics 130, Pall; Physics 230, 
Spring) 

200 COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS Christian 
Introduction to computer programming using an object-oriented programming language such as Java. 
Assignments will be based on simulations emphasizing problem solving in science, program writing, and 
numerical methods in science. A final project of the student's choice is presented in an end-of-term poster 
session. Prerequisite: Physics 120 or 130 at Davidson or permission oftlie instructor. (Spring) 

201 MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SCIENTISTS Belloni, Boye, Gfroerer 
Designed to develop a basic competence in many areas of mathematics needed for junior/ senior level 
work in the sciences. Basic methods of power series, complex numbers, Fourier analysis, linear algebra, 
ordinary and partial differential equations and vector calculus covered clearly and carefully but without 
detailed proofs. Symbolic computation and scientific visualization tools used as appropriate. Prerequisite: 
MAT 135. (Spring) 

310 ELECTRONICS AND INSTRUMENTATION Boye, Yukich 

Theoretical and laboratory investigations of analog and digital circuits including diodes, transistors, 
operational amplifiers, and logic gates, and their use in computers and as instrument building blocks. 
Integration of these components to construct power supplies, oscillators, amplifiers and microcomputer 
systems. Introduction to assembly language and LabVTEW programming provided.Two laboratory 
periods each week. Prerequisite: Physics 220 or 230. (Fall) 

320 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS Boye, Gfroerer 

A survey of 20th and 21st century physics. Topics include relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and 
nuclear physics, elementary particles and cosmology. Two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: 
Physics 220 or 230. (Fall) 

330 INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS Belloni, Gfroerer 

Newtonian principles are used with differential, integral, and vector calculus to analyze classical dynamics. 
Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics are also developed and applied. Topics may 
include: linear and non-linear oscillations, gravitational systems, the calculus of variations, many-particle 
systems, non-inertial reference frames, rigid-body dynamics, normal modes, and wave theory. Prerequisites: 
Physics 220 or 230 and Mathematics 135, or permission oftlie instructor. (Fall) 

335 ADVANCED LABORATORY Gfroerer, Yukich 

Introduces physics majors to advanced laboratory experiments and research techniques, including writing 
and oral communication skills. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Physics 220 or 230 and Physics 320. 
Physics 310 is recommended. (Spring) 



154 — Physics 



350 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM Belloni, Cain, Yukich 

Electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic waves, with emphasis on the application of Maxwell's 
equations. Prerequisite: Physics 330 or permission of the instructor. (Spring) 

360 QUANTUM MECHANICS I Belloni, Christian 

Quantum mechanics with applications to exactly-solvable systems. Prerequisites: Physics 330 and 350 or 
permission of the instructor. (Fall) 

391, 392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS Staff 

Open to qualified students with permission of instructor. Topics announced in advance of registration. 

395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Open to students with substantial backgrounds in physics with written permission from a supervising 
professor who reviews and approves the study topic. The independent study typically culminates in a 
paper and/ or an oral presentation. 

397 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENCE (=CSC 397) Christian 
(Cross-listed as Computer Science 397). Independent study using computers to model dynamical systems 
in the natural sciences under the direction and supervision of the instructor who approves the specific topic 
of study. Emphasis is on the use of object-oriented programming and web-based protocols to investigate 
both dynamical systems and the representation of those systems as data structures and algorithms. 
Prerequisites: CSC/PHY 200 or CSC 121 and one of 310, CSC 231 or CSC 325, or permission of the instructor. 

400 STATISTICAL AND THERMAL PHYSICS Cain, Gfroerer 

An introduction to thermal physics using a statistical approach to describe systems composed of very many 
particles. The conclusions of classical thermodynamics are derived from statistical results. Prerequisite: 
Physics 330 or permission of the instructor. (Spring) 

410 INTERMEDIATE ASTROPHYSICS Belloni 

Astrophysical concepts are considered using the techniques of classical mechanics, electromagnetic theory, 
statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics. Topics include: star formation, the structure and evolution 
of degenerate stars, supernova explosions, special and general relativity, and cosmology. Prerequisites: Two 
or more of Physics 330, 350, 360, and 400, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

415 OPTICS AND LASERS Yukich 

Applications of electromagnetic theory to modern optics and lasers. Topics include electromagnetic wave 
propagation and superposition, optical elements and devices, Fourier transforms, diffraction, polarization, 
interference, and coherence theory. Specific applications are made to lasers, spectrometers, interferometers, 
and optical systems. Physics 350 or persmission of the instructor. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

430 ADVANCED MECHANICS Boye, Christian 

Continuation of Physics 330 including computer modeling. Topics include; motion in non-inertial reference 
frames, rigid-body motion, Hamiltonian formalism, coupled oscillations and other selected topics such as 
special and general relativity. Prerequisite: Physics 330. (Spring) 

495, 496 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH Staff 

Open to students with substantial backgrounds in physics with written permission of the supervising 
professor who reviews and approves the research topic. Satisfactory completion of a project includes a 
presentation at a departmental seminar. 



Political Science — 155 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Professors: Ahrensdorf, Menkhaus, Ortmayer, Rigger, Shaw, Thornberry (Chair) 
Associate Professors: Alexander, Crandall, Roberts, Sellers 

Distribution Requirements: Only courses numbered 100 to 350 count toward the distribution 
requirement in Social Science. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Political Science 233, 240, 241, 332, 333, 337, 471, 475, and 479 
are options for fulfilling the cultural diversity requirement. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses in political science, as follows: 

1. Students must take at least one course in each of the following sub-fields. Seminars do not 
count toward sub-field requirements. If a course is listed in more than one subfield, a 
student may choose which one to use for the major. The same course cannot count for 
two sub-fields. 

1. Political Theory-Political Science 100W (Shaw), 102, 205, 208, 209, 300, 301, 302, 303, 
304, 305; 

2. American Politics-Political Science 111, 210, 215, 311, 312, 314, 315, 316, 318, 319, 323, 
325; 

3. Comparative Politics-Political Science 130, 230, 233, 240, 241, 325, 331, 332, 333, 336, 
337; 

4. International Politics-Political Science 141, 240, 241, 340, 345, 346, 347, 348. 

5. Methodology-Political Science 221. 

2. A seminar numbered 450 to 489. Seminars may have specific prerequisites and usually 
require prior course work in that sub-field. 

3. A major paper. This paper will be written under the supervision of a Davidson College 
Political Science faculty member. An oral defense may be expected. This requirement 
can be met by the completion of an honors thesis or by the writing of a paper (at least 
20 pages) done in the context of a seminar or an independent study. Not all seminars 
will offer this option; check with the faculty member offering the course. A grade of C 
or better must be earned on the paper to satisfy this requirement. 

Note that Political Science 221 and a seminar must be taken at Davidson. 

Honors Requirements: Juniors or seniors who meet the general college honors requirements, 
who have made a 3.5 G.P.A. on at least four political science courses, and who can furnish 
convincing evidence of a special interest in and capacity for research may be admitted to the 
departmental honors program. Each successful applicant will develop an individualized plan of 
work in consultation with a professor in the department. This plan must include, in addition to the 
normal major requirements, the preparation of an honors thesis (Political Science 498). Those who 
maintain a 3.5 G.P.A. in all political science courses through the senior year and who produce a 
thesis that is judged of high quality by the entire department will be awarded "Honors in Political 
Science." 



156 — Political Science 



100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR WRITING SEMINAr Roberts, Shaw 

Topics covered include "The American Dream of Success" and "Justice and Piety." Satisfies the distribution 
requirement in composition. Opm only to first-year students. (Offered every year .) 

102 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES Ahrensdorf 

This course investigates the theories at the foundation of liberal democracy, capitalism, communism, 
fascism, Nazism, and political Islam. Not open to juniors and seniors. Formerh/101. (Offered every year.) 

Ill AMERICAN POLITICS Roberts, Sellers 

Analysis of American political processes, institutions, and problems. Not open to juniors and seniors. (Offered 
every semester.) 

130 COMPARATIVE POLITICS Menkhaus, Rigger 

Introduction to the comparative study of political institutions, selected public policy challenges, and 
political trends in selected countries and regions around the world. Students are introduced to aspects of 
critical analysis and comparative methods as part of exploration of topics such as comparative electoral 
systems, executive-legislative relations, health care policies, gun control, immigration, taxation, and the 
democratization. Not opm to juniors and saviors. (Offered every semester.) 

141 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS Alexander, Crandall, Ortmayer 

Contemporary global issues, foreign policy, and the structures and processes of conflict and cooperation in 
a dynamically changing world environment. Not opm to juniors and smiors. (Offered every semester.) 

205 FAMILY AND JUSTICE Shaw 

Examination of the ways in which families and political and economic institutions shape one another, 
witii special emphasis on policies; that promote marriage over 'alternative' family arrangements; state- 
mandated family leave policies; 'family-friendly' corporate employment practices; same-sex marriage; 
divorce law; and welfare reform. (Fall) 

208 CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY Ahrensdorf 
Through a study of works by Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle, this course examines the Socratic revolution 
in the history of thought, why Socrates founded political philosophy, and the radical challenge that classical 
political philosophy poses to modern and contemporary political thought. (Offered every year.) 

209 MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THEORY Ahrensdorf, Shaw 
Major political thinkers of medieval Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. (Offered alternate years.) 

210 PARTIES AND INTEREST GROUPS Roberts 
Analysis of the internal operation of parties and interest groups and their role in the American electoral and 
legislative process. Not open to juniors and seniors except by permission of the instructor. (Offered every year.) 

215 THE POLITICS OF FEMINISM Roberts, Thornberry 

Philosophical origins of the feminist movement and its impact on the current American political scene. Not 

opm to first-year students. (Offered alternate years.) 

221 METHODS AND STATISTICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Rigger, Sellers, Thornberry 

The framework of social science analysis, and the use of statistics for studying political problems. Topics 
range from research design and hypothesis testing to correlation and multiple regression. 



Political Science — 157 



230 WEST EUROPEAN POLmCS Ortmayer 

Comparative analysis of the political culture, party systems, political economy, and foreign policies of 
France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and other selected Western European states. (Offered even/ year.) 

233 POLITICS OF THE AMERICAS Crandall 

This course examine the history, politics, economics, and society of the countries and regions comprising 
the Americas- and Latin America in particular. In addition to the regular course readings, students will 
also view several Latin American films and read novels by Latin American authors. (Offered every year.) 

240 POLITICS OF AFRICA Menkhaus 
Survey of contemporary political and economic issues facing the African continent, including international 
relations of Africa. 

241 POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST Menkhaus 
Survey of contemporary political and economic issues facing the Middle East, including international 
relations of the Middle East. (Not offered in 2007-08.) 

294 DAVIDSON FN WASHINGTON INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 
Project involving student research conducted in Washington, D.C, as part of the summer program of 
Davidson in Washington. Must have a significant political component. (Offered every year.) 

295 FNDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 
Research leading to the submission of a major paper under the direction and supervision of a faculty 
member who reviews and approves the topic of the independent study and evaluates the student's work. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Offered every semester.) 

300 MODERN POLITICAL THEORY Shaw 
Leading political philosophers from the Renaissance to the latter part of the 19th century. (Offered every 
year.) 

301 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY Shaw 
Major political philosophers from Nietzsche to the present. (Offered every year.) 

302 SPECIAL TOPICS FN CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY Ahrensdorf 
This course explores such central themes of classical political thought as "education and politics," "idealism 
and realism," and "politics and literature." (Offered alternate years.) 

303 SPECIAL TOPICS FN CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY Shaw 
The course explores topics of special relevance to debates in contemporary political theory such as 
"multicultural citizenship," "democratic theory," and "postmodern theory." (Offered alternate years.) 

304 FOUNDATIONS OF LIBERALISM Shaw 
Major political philosophers within the liberal tradition, including Locke, Kant, de Tocqueville, and 
Rawls. 

305 EDUCATION AND POLITICS Ahrensdorf 
This course examines the proper political and moral education of aspiring leaders in works by Plato, 
Machiavelli, and Shakespeare. 



158 — Political Science 



311 THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS Roberts, Sellers 
Legislative behavior and policy-making in the United States, with particular emphasis on the Congress. 

(Offered every year.) 

312 THE PRESIDENCY Roberts 
The modern American presidency from a policy-making perspective, including consideration of the 
various internal and external factors which constrain the behavior of incumbent presidents. (Offered every 
year.) 

314 PUBLIC POLICY Roberts, Sellers, Thornberry 
Formation, implementation and evaluation of governmental responses to public needs. Focus on special 
topics such as; environmental policy and health care. (Offered alternate years.) 

315 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW Thornberry 
Development and interpretation of the Constitution of the United States through analysis of the decisions 
of the Supreme Court. Not open to first- and second-year students. (Offered alternate years.) 

316 CIVIL LIBERTIES Thornberry 
Analysis of Constitutional guarantees of civil liberties in the United States with special focus on the Bill of 
Rights and the 14th Amendment. Not open to first- and second-year students. (Offered alternate years.) 

318 STRATEGY AND ETHICS IN CAMPAIGNS Sellers 
This course will explore the vocation of political candidates, by discussing strategic and ethical dilemmas 
that they face in election campaigns. Students in the course will examine why politicians run for office, 
how they try to win office, and whether their decisions in these areas are normatively desirable. Not operi 
to first year students. (Offered alternate years.) 

319 PUBLIC OPINION Sellers 
Formation, change and measurement of political attitudes. (Offered alternate years.) 

323 POLITICS AND THE MEDIA Roberts, Sellers 
An assesment of the role mass media play in American politics with emphasis on systematic as well as 
individual effects. Prerequisite: 101, 111, 130, 141 or permission of the instructor. 

324 PHILANTHROPY AND THE NON-PROFIT SECTOR Menkhaus 
Exploration of the emerging role of the non-profit sector and charitable organizations in community 
development and advocacy. Permission required. (Offered alternate years.) 

325 LEGISLATURES Rigger and Sellers 
Comparative analysis of the legislative process in presidential and parliamentary systems. Considers 
elections, law-making and executive-legislative elections. Satisfies the distribution requirement in the Social 
Sciences. Provides major credit in Political Science. 

326 POLITICS AND FILM Ortmayer 
The course examines from a variety of perspectives, and through a spectrum of cinema genres, how film 
and politics intersect and interact. The course investigates what films tell us about politics in America, how 
they say it, and what their contribution to American political culture has become. Satisfies the distribution 
requirement in Social Science. Provides major credit in Political Science. 



Political Science — 159 



331 THE RISE OF NEW DEMOCRACIES Crandall, Rigger 
The study of selected countries undergoing democratic transitions using theories of democratization in 
contemporary societies as a framework. (Offered alternate years.) 

332 CHINESE POLITICS Rigger 
Introduces the political institutions and behavior of the People's Republic of China and Hong Kong. 

333 THE POLITICS OF JAPAN AND THE EAST ASIAN DRAGONS Rigger 
Introduces the political institutions and behavior of Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea. 

336 RUSSIAN/POST-SOVIET STATES' POLLTICS Ortmayer 
Comparative analysis of the political systems, political economies, and foreign policies of Russia and 
former Soviet republics, including Ukraine, the Caucasian republics, and Central Asian states. (Offered 
alternate years.) 

337 POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT Menkhaus 
Theories of development and underdevelopment, selected issues affecting Third World states, and the 
comparative study of change in countries of Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. (Offered 
alternate years.) 

340 INTERNA'nONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY Crandall 

This course examines the history, philosophy, and current debates and issues related to international 
political economy. "Students will read political economy philosophers such as Schumpeter, Marx, Ricardo, 
Smith, Hayek, and Sen." The history component covers the development of the modern international 
economy from the late 19th century through the post-Cold War era. Contemporary topics covered include: 
free trade agreements, international financial and trade institutions such as the World Trade Organization, 
World Bank, International Monetary Fund, micro-enterprise, exchange-rate policy, and global poverty. 
Prerequisite: Economics 101. (Offered alternate years.) 

345 EVOLUTION AND PRACTICE OF U.S. POLICY FN THE AMERICAS Crandall 
This course traces the evolution of United States involvement in Latin America beginning with the War of 
1898 and continuing through the present day. It focuses on recent US-Latin American issues such as the 
war on drugs, undocumented immigration, and intermittent U.S. interventions in the hemisphere. 

346 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY Ortmayer 
Analysis of the foreign policy process, bureaucratic politics, executive-congressional relations and selected 
foreign policy problems in a discussion-intensive approach using case studies (e.g. interventions in Haiti 
and Somalia, South African sanctions, Cuba Missile Crisis) (Offered every year.) 

347 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Menkhaus 
Survey of theories of international cooperation, conflict, and organization; the historical evolution, 
functions, and current politics of key international organizations, especially the United Nations; U.S. foreign 
policy toward the U.N. and selected issues and case studies with a focus on the politics of intervention and 
international peacekeeping. (Offered alternate years.) 

348 CONTEMPORARY NATIONAL SECURELY Menkhaus, Ortmayer 
Analysis of global security threats, the nature of contemporary warfare, and debates over U.S. national 
security policies. Emphasis will be on case studies from the post-Cold War era. (Offered alternate years.) 



160 — Political Science 



360 THE LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL NOVEL Crandall 

This course analyzes the political messages and discussions within some of Latin America's most widely 
read works of fiction. The course also examines the broader political, economic, and social context in which 
these stories take place. The novels will be read in English translation. Satisfies the distribution requirement 
in Social Science. Proindes major credit in Political Science. Cultural Diversity requirement, Ethnic Studies 
Concentration, and International Studies Concentration. 

390 TUTORIAL Staff 

Individual programs of supervised study conducted through the preparation and discussion of a series of 
essays under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of the 
tutorial. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (Offered every semester.) 

393 SYMPOSIUM: DAVIDSON IN WASHINGTON Staff 

A symposium on topics of contemporary politics conducted in Washington as part of the summer program 
of Davidson in Washington. Possible topics include: National Security, Citizenship in the 21st Century, 
Justice and the Family. 

495 ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Research leading to the submission of a major paper under the direction and supervision of a faculty 
member who reviews and approves the topic of the independent study. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. (Offered every semester.) 

498 HONORS THESIS Staff 

Required of and limited to seniors in the Honors Program. Thesis is written under supervision of an 
appropriate instructor and is defended orally before at least three members of the political science faculty. 
(Offered every year.) 

450-459 POLITICAL THEORY Ahrensdorf, Shaw 

Reading, research, reports, and discussions on selected topics within the sub-field. Past seminars include 
"Lincoln and the Crisis of American Democracy" and "The City and Justice." Prerequisite: Permission oftlie 
instructor. Note: Individual courses may liave additional prerequisites. At least one seminar is offered in each sub-field 
every year. 

460-469 AMERICAN POLITICS Roberts, Sellers,Thornberry 

Reading, research, reports, and discussions on selected topics within the sub-field. Past seminars include 
"Politics of Reproduction," "Southern Politics," and "Political Manipulation of the News." Prerequisite: 
Permission of tlte instructor. Note: Individual courses may have additional prerequisites. At least one seminar is 
offered in each sub-field every year. 

470-479 COMPARATIVE POLITICS Crandall, Menkhaus, Rigger 

Reading, research, reports, and discussions on selected topics within the sub-field. Past seminars include 
"Conflict in the Andes," "European Integration," and "US-Taiwan-China Triangle." Prerequisite: Permission 
oftlie instructor. Note: Individual courses may liave additional prerequisites. At least one seminar is offered in each 
sub-field every year. 

480-489 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS Ortmayer, Rigger 

Reading research, reports, and discussions on selected topics within the sub-field. Past seminars 
include: "International Political Economy," "U.S. National Security Policy," "Conflict Resolution," and 



Political Science/Psychology — 161 



"Humanitarianism and War." Prerequisite: Permission of tire instructor. Note: Individual courses may liave 
additional prerequisites. At least one seminar is offered in each sub-field every year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Ault (Chair), Barton, Kello, Munger (On leave), Palmer, Ramirez 

Associate Professors: Multhaup, M. Smith 

Assistant Professor: Tonidandel 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Boyd 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Martin 

Adjunct Lecturer: Huddleston (On location at Broughton Hospital) 

Affiliated Faculty: F. Brown (Education), Case (Biology) 

Major Requirements: Ten courses are required including 101; 310; and 400, 401, or 402. Three 
courses must be methods courses: one must be 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, or 323; and one must be 314, 
315, 316, 318, or 319; the third can be from either sequence. Of the ten courses, students must take 
at least one in each of the following areas: 

Animal Behavior/ Physiological courses: 282, 284, 302, 303, 305, 323, 324, 360, 361, 365 

Cognitive courses: 276, 301, 304, 357, 377 

Developmental courses: 234, 241, 243, 245, 315, 319, 352, 356, 377 

Clinical/ Industrial-Organizational/ Social/ Personality courses: 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 254, 
260, 314, 316, 318, 350, 351, 356, 359, 361, 364, 365 

One of the ten courses must be a seminar. 

In addition, all seniors must satisfactorily complete an oral interview conducted by a 
psychologist who is not a member of the department. 

(Courses 295-298 are reserved for transfer credits.) 

Distribution Requirement: Psychology 101, 199c, and any course numbered between 230 and 
284 are courses which may be counted toward fulfillment of the distribution requirement in Social 
Science. 

Honors Requirements: The Department of Psychology considers for honors those senior majors 
who meet the general college requirements with a minimum 3.2 GPA overall, meet the stated 
requirements for a major in Psychology with a minimum 3.5 GPA, and complete a senior thesis 
(PSY 400). Completion of these courses does not guarantee a recommendation for graduation 
with honors. The student's work must be of superior quality. Evidence for such superior quality 
consists of generally high degrees of proficiency or exceptional creativity in course work, thesis, 
papers and projects. 



101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

Survey of the current psychology of learning perception, motivation, intelligence, thinking, social and 
abnormal behaviors, with emphasis on the application of scientific methods to psychological investigation 
and on the biological bases of behavior and experience. Students may be required to participate in 
experiments or in alternative research experiences. (Fall and Spring) 



162 — Psychology 



195 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Study in an area of psychology not covered by other catalog offerings under the direction and supervision 
of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of the independent study. Students submit a 
written plan of study to the faculty member prior to the close of Drop/ Add in the semester of registration. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 101 and permission of supervising instructor. Does not count toward fulfillment of major 
or distribution requirements. (Pall and Spring) 

230 INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY Boyd 
Review of theories of personality to understand and predict human behavior. Emphasis on traditional 
models (e.g., theories of Freud, Rogers, Skinner) and applications of these models to contemporary 
psychological issues (e.g., Type A behavior and health personality inventories.) Prerequisite: Psychology 
101. (Spring) 

231 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Barton 
Characteristics, etiology, and treatment of major patterns of maladaptive behavior (anxiety disorders, 
depression, antisocial behavior, schizophrenia, etc.). Theoretical and empirical evidence for understanding 
causality and treatment. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Spring) 

232 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Parmer 
Social influence upon individual behavior. Attitude formation and change; attitude measurement; 
conformity; communication processes and persuasion; prejudice; violence and helping behavior; 
cooperation-competition; group dimensions; person perception; and attribution theory. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. (Fall) 

233 THEORIES OF COUNSELING Staff 
Survey of the major theories of psychotherapy with an emphasis on psychoanalytic, person-centered, 
behavioral, cognitive, and family systems psychotherapy. Study concludes with a transtheoretical 
approach to integrating all types of counseling theory. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

234 CHILD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY Martin 
An overview of the psychological disorders of childhood, including their description, classification, 
etiology, assessment and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and empirical bases of these 
disorders, focusing on relevant research methods and findings as well as case history material. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 101. (Fall) 

241 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (=EDU 241) Ault 

(Cross-listed as Education 241). Individual development of normal children with emphasis on learning 
social and emotional development, cognitive and language development. Special study of behavioral, 
social learning, and cognitive theories of development. Includes observations at local day-care centers. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Fall) 

243 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (=EDU243) Brown 

(Cross-listed as Education 243). An in-depth examination of specific theories, concepts, and methods 
related to the period of adolescence. Students will explore a wide range of topics including: cognitive 
development, moral development, identity formation, gender role, social relationships, and the effects of 
culture on adolescent development. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Fall) 



Psychology — 163 



245 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING Multhaup 

Introduction to human aging from a psychological perspective. Adult age-related changes in memory, 
intelligence, wisdom, personality, etc. Attitudes toward aging and adjustment to aging. Emphasis on the 
application of scientific methods to the study of aging. Students with credit in Psychology 245 may not 
enroll in Psychology 319. Prerequisite: Psychology/ 101. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

250 AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

Introduction to the study of psychology from an African American perspective. Compares and contrasts 
theories from traditional European-centered and Afrocentric approaches to explain the life experiences, 
cognition, and behaviors of African Americans. The historical development of black psychology, black 
identity development, cultural bias in psychological testing, black communication styles, black self -hatred, 
and the mental health of African Americans. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Spring) 

254 INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Boyd 

Current theory, research, and practice in the selection, training, and evaluation of employees; management 
and development of employees as resources for the organization; design and development of the 
organization as a whole. Prerequisite: Psychologi/ 101. (Fall) 

260 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT KeUo 

Organizational Development (OD) is a multi-disciplinary area of research and practice that deals with the 
understanding and application of the principles of behavioral science to planned organizational change. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 101,;254 is desirable but not required. (Spring) 

276 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY Multhaup 

Introduction to cognitive psychology. Structure and processes underlying cognition including perception, 
memory, attention, language, problem solving, imagery, etc. Emphasis on theories and empirical evidence 
for understanding cognition. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. (Spring) 

282 LEARNING Ramirez, Smith 

Overview of major topics in learning: elicitation, classical conditioning, reinforcement, punishment, problem 
solving, behavioral economics, and verbal behavior. Focus on empirical data, research methodology, and 
technologies generated from learning research. Students with credit in Psychology 305 may not enroll in 
this course. Prerequisite: Psychologi/ 101. (Spring) 

284 DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR Smith 

The course examines the effects of drugs on human and animal behavior. Consideration is also given to 
the physiological effects of drugs on the central nervous system. Methods for preventing and treating drug 
abuse are also addressed. Students with credit in Psychology 302 may not enroll in this course. Prereqiusite: 
Psychologi/ 101. (Spring) 

290 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

Field work and/ or data collection in an applied area of psychology. Before the close of Drop/ Add in the 
semester of registration, the student submits a written plan of study to the supervising faculty sponsor and 
negotiates a placement with a field supervisor. The student makes regular visits to the field setting (e.g., a 
school, clinic, business) for the work and reports regularlv to the faculty sponsor. Prerequisite: Pewiission of 
faculty sponsor. Grading is pass-fail. Tliis course may be taken only once. (Fall and;Spring) 



164 — Psychology 



301 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-PERCEPTION AND ATTENTION Munger 
Research methods, concepts, and empirical findings in perception and attention are examined in lecture and 
extensive laboratory experience. Course explores how a physical stimulus impinges on sense organs and is 
subsequently processed and understood by perceptual systems (e.g., how do we ;see; things?) Participation 
in research as subjects and experimenters is required. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Recommended completion 
by Fall, senior year, for majors. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

302 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-BEHAVIORAL PHARMACOLOGY Smith 
Students conduct experiments on the effects of drugs on human and animal behavior. Scientific writing 
is a strong focus in this course, with students writing research reports on each experiment. Students 
are required to propose a novel line of research in the form of a research proposal. Studies conducted 
in other behavioral pharmacology laboratories are discussed and critiqued. Some work with animals is 
required. Students with credit in Psychology 284 may not enroll in this course. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 
Recommended completion by Pall, senior year, for majors. (Spring) 

303 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (= BIO 331) Ramirez 
(Cross-listed as Biology 331). Role of the nervous system; sensory and motor mechanism; physiological 
bases of motivation and emotion; sleep and arousal; and physiological bases of learning memory, and 
language. Extensive laboratory training. Work with animals is required. Prerequisites: Psychology 101 or 
Biology 111 or Biology 112 and permission of the instructor. Recommended completion by Pall, smior year, for 
majors. (Fall) 

304 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-MEMORY Multhaup 
Research methods, concepts, and empirical findings in the field of memory are explored in lecture and 
extensive laboratory experience. Emphasis is on human memory. Participation in research as subjects and 
experimenters is required. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Recommmded completion b\j Fall, smior year, for majors. 
(Fall) 

305 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-LEARNING Ramirez 
The major learning theories of the 20th century will be explored. Particular attention will be paid to the 
theories of Thorndike, Pavlov, Skinner, Tolman, Hull, Hebb, and Bolles. The empirical data supporting 
these theoretical frameworks will be assessed. This is a laboratory intensive course involving animals. 
Students with credit in Psychology 282 may not enroll in this course. Prerequisite: Psyclwlogy 101. 
Recommended completion by Fall, senior year, for majors. (Spring) 

310 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-DESIGN AND ANALYSIS Barton, Tonidandel 

Introduction to psychological research. Descriptive, correlational, and experimental methods of research 
will be examined. Primary focus on data analysis including descriptive statistics and inferential statistics 
with emphasis on analysis of variance. Mandatory weekly computer lab. Prerequisite: Psyclwlogy 101. 
Recommended in tlie sophomore, or no later than junior, year for majors. (Fall and;Spring) 

314 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-CLINICAL Barton 

Research methodologies and statistical techniques used in clinical research. Ethical and practical constraints 
to the empirical study of clinical problems. Students critique empirical articles in Clinical Psychology 
and Behavioral Medicine in lecture/ discussion and develop skills with multivariate statistics. Required 
participation in research experiences as subjects and investigators. Prerequisites: Psychology 231 (or permission 
oftlie instructor) and 310. Recommended completion by Fall, smior year, for majors. (Fall) 



Psychology — 165 



315 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-CHILD DEVELOPMENT Ault 
Research methods for studying child development are examined in lecture, laboratory and field settings. 
Methods include observations, interviews, and experiments with emphasis on ethical implications of 
research with children and research designs commonly used by developmental psychologists. Course 
requirements include participation in research as investigators. Prerequisite: Psychology 310. Recommended 
completion In/ Fall, senior year, for majors. (Spring) 

316 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-INDUSTRIAL/ ORGANIZATIONAL Tonidandel 
Research methods and statistical techniques used in industrial/ organizational psychology examined 
through lectures, laboratories, and field studies. Students gain knowledge and experience in research 
methods used in these fields. Students will be expected to apply these techniques and methods to complete 
individual research projects. Ethical and practical issues in organizational research discussed. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 310 required, Psychology;254 and/or 260 recommended but not required. Recommended completion by 
Fall, senior year, for majors. (Spring) 

318 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-SOCIAL Palmer 

Research methods and statistical techniques used in social psychology are examined through lecture, 
laboratory, and field research. Students will gain knowledge in formulating research questions, translating 
them into research methodologies, data collecting, and analysis. Comparative strengths of different 
methodologies, ethical issues, and scientific writing will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Psychology 310. 
Recommended completion by Fall, senior year, for majors. (Fall) 

319 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-ADULT DEVELOPMENT Multhaup 
Research methods, concepts, empirical findings, and ethics for studying adult development (focus on 
younger and older adulthood) are explored in lecture and laboratory settings. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 
(Not open to students with credit in Psychology 245. Ifholding245 credit, see the instructor if interested in Psychology 
319). Recommended completion by Fall, senior year, for majors. (Not offered 2007-08). 

323 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (=BIO 323) Case 
(Cross-listed as Biology 323). An evolutionary approach to the study of animal behavior, concentrating on 
the adaptive nature of social systems.Laboratories include research projects on the behavior of animals in 
captivity and in the natural environment. Prerequisite: Biology 111 and 112, or Psychology 101. (Spring) 

324 FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY (=BIO 332) Ramirez 
(Cross-listed as Biology 332). Intensive readings in molecular neurobiology, neuroanatomv, 
neurophysiology, and/ or behavior. Students: 1) make classroom presentations of critical analyses 
of the course readings; 2) conduct laboratory research or hospital rounds; and 3) submit an annotated 
bibliography and a write-up of the laboratory project or term paper. Prerequisites: Psychology 303 (Biology 
331) and the permission oftlie instructor. (Spring) 

330-349 TUTORIAL Staff 

Intensive readings in a specific area of study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who 
reviews and approves the topic of research. Students submit a written plan of study to the supervising 
faculty member prior to the close of Drop/ Add in the semester of registration. Open ordinarily only to 
advanced majors in psychology. Prerequisite: Permission oftlie instructor. (Fall and Spring) 



1 66 — Psychology/Religion 



350-380 ADVANCED SEMINARS IN EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

Topics announced in advance of registration. Recent seminars include: Behavioral Medicine and Health 
Psychology, Children and Television, Clinical Psychopharmacology, High Performance Organizations, 
Selection and Training in Organizations, Motivation and Attitudes in Work Organizations,;Gender and 
Identity, Reminiscence, Behavioral Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
usually required. (Fall and Spring) 

400 SENIOR THESIS Staff 
Research, designed and conducted by the student, supervised by a faculty member, and reported in writing 
according to the form approved in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and consent of an additional faculty member who serves on the student's 
thesis committee. For further details, see the department Web page. (Fall and Spring) 

401 ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY Multhaup, Tonidandel 
Central issues in psychology which cut across previous course boundaries. Specific topics vary year by 
year. The course begins with a review of major approaches to psychology (e.g., Behaviorist, Biological, 
Cognitive Evolutionary, Humanist, Psychoanalytic) and ethical principles that apply to a variety of 
situations that psychologists face. Limited to seniors except by permission of the department. (Spring) 

402 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY Munger 
Development of psychological thought in the Western world and emergence of psychology as a scientific 
discipline. Course begins with ancient Greek philosophers and works through philosophical writings that 
led to psychology, explores the founding of psychology as a scientific discipline in the late 19th century, 
and follows its development in the 20th century. Readings include primary sources. Limited to seniors except 
by permission oftlie department. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

RELIGION 

Professors: W.T. Foley, Lustig, Mahony (Chair), Ottati, Plank 
Associate Professors: Poland, Snyder 
Assistant Professors: Lee (On leave), Wills 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: Beach- Verhey 

Distribution Requirements: All courses may be counted toward the fulfillment of the distribution 
requirement; the department recommends that the first course be chosen from among 100 or 200 
level courses. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Religion 170, 244, 255, 270, 271, 272, 280, 285, 370, 380, and 381 
are options for fulfilling the cultural diversity requirement. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses in religion (The Humanities 150-251 sequence counts as one 
course). Courses must include at least five courses at the 300- or 400-level, two seminars, 401, one 
course in a non-Christian tradition, and one course from each of the following groups: 

1 . Religion: 120, 130, 221, 222, 223, 230, 231, 232, 320, 321, 333, 363, 452; 

2. Religion: 140, 160, 170, 242, 255, 260, 261, 262, 270, 271, 272, 275, 280, 285, 340, 341, 347, 
361, 362, 363, 370, 380, 381, 475; 



Religion — 167 



3. Religion: 141, 142, 143, 150, 155, 244, 245, 247, 248, 250, 251, 253, 256, 257, 263, 284, 343, 
344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 350, 355, 360, 365, 448, 450, 461, 466. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses, at least four of which must be above the 100-level. These 
courses must include either one 3004evel course and a seminar or two seminars. In addition, they 
must meet the same distribution requirements as applied to the major; i.e., one course from each 
of the three specified categories. 

Honors Requirements: A minimum of 3.2 GPA overall, and 3.5 in the department; completion of 
senior thesis of honors quality, with oral examination; and the recommendation of the department. 
For admission into the honors program, consult with the chair of the department. 

100W (COMP) FIRST-YEAR WRITING SEMINARS IN RELIGION Staff 

Writing-intensive study of various topics within the field of religious studies. Open only to first-year 
students; successful completion fulfills the distribution requirements in composition as well as religion. 

130 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT Snyder 

Critical and interpretive study of the history, literature, and beliefs of the earlv Christian movement. Not 
open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add or to students who liave taken Religion 230 or 231. 

140 SIN AND REDEMPTION IN CHRISTIAN THOUGHT Foley 
An examination of how selected Christian authors from the ancient, medieval, Reformation and modern 
periods viewed the human dilemma and its divine resolution. Not open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add. 

141 INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY Poland 
Reflection on fundamental concepts and issues such as creation, God, human nature, faith, evil, salvation. 
Not open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add. 

142 AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND RELIGION Wills 
Introduction to the study of religion through close readings of selected religious autobiographies and 
investigations of their historical and biographical contexts. Readings may change from year to year. Not 
open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add. 

143 BEING HUMAN Ottati 
This course explores the questions: What does it mean to be a human being? What does it mean to be a 
good one? Typical sources for study and discussion include the Book of Genesis, Darwin's The Descent of 
Man, Reinhold Niebuhr's The Nature and Destiny of Man, novels and films. Not open to juniors or seniors 
until Drop/Add. 

150 INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGICAL ETHICS Beach-Verhey 

An introduction to fundamental questions and methods of ethical inquiry and theological thinking on the 
moral life. Not open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add. 

155 BASIC ISSUES IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE Lustig 

An examination of several proposed models of the relations between religion and science (conflict, contrast, 
convergence, confirmation). Analysis of challenges that modern physical and biological science pose to 
traditional understandings of creation, redemption, and divine purpose. Not open to juniors or seniors until 
Drop/Add. 



168 — Religion 



170 THE SACRED QUEST IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE Mahony 

Introductory considerations of the human search for meaning as reflected in religious expressions from 
Eastern and Western cultures. Particular attention is given to the role of the mythological imagination, 
sacred narrative, ritual, theological reflection, and philosophical inquiry;in the realization of personal and 
communal identity. Not open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add. 

222 TRAGEDY AND COMEDY IN BIBLICAL NARRATIVE Plank 
A study of the tragic and comic dimensions of biblical literature. Special attention will be given to the Saul 
and David narrative and to the books of Ruth, Jonah, and Esther. 

223 WISDOM LITERATURE Plank 
Israelite, Jewish, and early Christian wisdom writings. Particular attention to the sage's search for meaning, 
the problem of unjust suffering, the purpose of work, the contours of blessing, and the significance of 
creation. 

230 JESUS AND HIS INTERPRETERS Snyder 
Representations of Jesus in the New Testament literature and in selected non-canonical works, with an 
emphasis on the diverse views of Jesus held by early Christians. The course concludes with selected forays 
into representations of Jesus in the visual arts and film. 

231 THE LETTERS AND THOUGHT OF THE APOSTLE PAUL Snyder 
Paul and his letters set in their Greco-Roman context with special attention to the social, historical, and 
religious environment in which Paul worked. Reflection on themes such as grace and law as they appear 
in later literature and culture. 

232 PARABLES EM THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN TRADITIONS Plank 
Selected parables in the Jewish and Christian traditions, including parables of Jesus, the Rabbis, the 
Hasidim, Kierkegaard, and Kafka. Emphasis on the religious significance of narrative. 

242 THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY (= CLA 272) Foley 

(Cross-listed as Classics 272). The theological and historical development of the early church from the New 
Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon (451 CE.) with a focus upon early controversies as revealed 
through primary sources. 

244 MODERN JEWISH LITERATURE Plank 
Modern Jewish fiction, poetry, and literary theory with particular focus on modern Midrash and the 
significance of writing as a religious act. Selected texts from Yiddish, Euro- American, and Israeli literature 
include writings of I.L. Peretz, Sholem Aleichem, S. An-ski, LB. Singer, Cynthia Ozick, David Grossman, 
and Amos Oz. 

245 MODERN CHRISTIAN THOUGHT Poland 
Challenges to Christian belief and theological responses to them from the Enlightenment to the early 
twentieth century. 

247 FOOD IN RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVE Poland 

Examines food practices in various religious traditions; explores contemporary ethical dilemmas 
concerning what we eat. 



Religion— 169 



248 CHRISTIANITY AND NATURE Poland 

An exploration of Christian attitudes toward nature and toward non-human animals as displayed in 
scripture and tradition. 

250 STUDIES IN THEOLOGICAL ETHICS Beach-Verhey 
A focused studv of a given ethical issue and its theological significance. Topics to be studied may include 
medical ethics, justice and poverty, war and peace, the meaning of virtue, and civil rights. 

251 GOD AND MAMMON: CHRISTIAN REFLECTION ON ECONOMIC LIFE Beach-Verhey 
A study of the history of Christian reflection on economic life in the light of the contemporary context. 
Attention will be given to the historic relationship between Protestant Christianity and capitalism, and to 
theological notions such as vocation, distributive justice, and environmentalism. 

255 VIRTUE ETHICS Staff 
Selected readings from Aristotle, Aquinas, Mencius and Xunzi. Issues examined will include the role of 
virtues and vices, the viability of cross-cultural comparison, and the honor code. 

256 RELIGION, ETHICS, AND MEDICINE Lustig 
An introduction of basic themes, methods, and issues in religious bioethics. Exploration of ways that 
religious perspectives differ from, complement, or converge with secular approaches. 

257 DEATH, DYING, AND THE AFTERLIFE Lustig 
This course explores religious, ethical, psychological, and cultural dimensions of dying, death, and the 
afterlife. It considers a range of topics, including scientific and religious perspectives on embodiment 
within the context of dying and death, varying definitions of death, and the ritual meanings associated 
with death. 

258 VOCATION OF CriTZEN AND SOLDIER Ortati 
Theological and philosophical perspectives on civil government, war, and military service with readings 
from Biblical and classical sources. Emphasis on recent essays on specific moral questions and issues. 

260 RELIGION IN AMERICA Wills 
Historical survey of the American religious experience from colonial times to the present. 

261 AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS Wills 
The course explores the varied religious experiences of African Americans from pre-slavery through the 
Civil Rights movement. 

263 ENGLISH RELIGION, 1500-1829 Foley 

The course is a survey of English religion from the English Reformation to Catholic Emancipation, drawing 
on primary sources to examine such religious developments as Puritanism, the dissenting traditions, 
Anglicanism, Latitudinarianism, and Methodism. Satisfies tJie;distribution requirement in Religion; Provides 
major credit in Religion. 

270 CLASSICAL HINDUISM Mahony 

Historical, thematic, and theological consideration of selected aspects of classical Hinduism. Topics include 
concepts of divinity, the place in religious life of sacred narrative and ritual, the religious significance of the 
intellect and emotions, devotional sensibilities, the value and role of meditation, and ethical views. 



170 — Religion 



271 CLASSICAL BUDDHISM Mahony 
Historical and thematic study of Buddhist thought and practice in representative Asian cultures. Topics 
include the nature of Gautama Buddha's enlightenment, sectarian and philosophical developments, 
cultural values, psychological insights, contemplative practices, and ethical views. 

272 CLASSICAL ISLAM Mahony 
Theological and cultural study of Islamic history and religious expressions. Topics include the life of 
Muhammad, teachings of the Qur'an, developments in Islamic sectarianism, religious law and ethics, 
contemplative and ritual practices, and aesthetic values and expressions. Emphasis is on Islam before the 
rise of European colonialism, yet considerable attention is also given to Islam in the contemporary world. 

275 JEWISH RELIGIOUS LIFE Plank 

Historical, thematic, and semiotic study of Jewish religious practice. Special attention given to liturgy, 
prayer, ritual, and domestic piety. 

280 ANCIENT CHINESE RELIGIONS Staff 

An introduction to pre-Buddhist Chinese belief through primary texts in translation. The course will focus 
on popular religious practices, conceptions of what constitutes a good life, and the relationship between 
the individual and the state. 

301 PERSPECTIVES IN THE STUDY OF RELIGION Staff 

This course critically examines various methods, disciplines, and theories employed in the academic study 
of religion, focusing particularly on those approaches that locate religion in its social, cultural, and political 
contexts. Pre/Corequisites: Any two Religion courses OR permission oftlie instructor. Beginning with tlie class of 
2011, required of all Religion majors by the end oftlie junior year. 

320 THE GENESIS NARRATIVE Plank 
A literary study of the book of Genesis, appropriating midrashic, intertextual, and post-modern strategies 
of interpretation. 

321 THE EXODUS TRADITION Plank 
A literary study of the book of Exodus and its appropriations in biblical literature, midrash, Jewish and 
Christian ritual, and Holocaust iconography. Use of literary, midrashic, intertextual, and post-modern 
strategies of interpretation. 

333 REVELATION AND THE APOCALYPTIC IMAGINATION Snyder 

The ancient near eastern context for apocalyptic literature in canonical and non-canonical literature 
such as Enoch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Close attention to the Book of Revelation and its modern 
(mis) interpretations . 

341 RELIGIONS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (=CLA 378) Snyder 

(Cross-listed as Classics 378). A survey of religious practices and beliefs in the Roman Empire; emperor 
cult, mystery religions, Judaism, and Christianity as seen from the Roman perspective, magic, astrology, 
attention to material evidence in addition to literary remains. 

343 MODERN AND POSTMODERN THEOLOGIES Poland 

Major theological movements and figures within the Christian tradition during the 20th and 21st centuries. 
Sequel to Religion 245, Modern Christian Thought. Either 141 or 245. 



Religion — 171 



344 MODERN CRITICS OF RELIGION Poland 

Nineteenth- and early twentieth-century critiques of religion. Figures studied may vary from year to year, 
but may include Nietzsche, Freud, and Marx among others. Not open to freshmen and sophomores until Drop/ 
Add. 

346 MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT Plank 
Selected Jewish thinkers and their negotiation of the issues of tradition and modernity from the 
Enlightenment to the post-holocaust period. Attention to figures such as Mendelssohn, Buber, Rosenzweig 
Heschel, Fackenheim and Levinas. 

347 CHRISTIAN LATIN WRITERS (= LAT 377) Foley 
(Cross-listed as Latin 377). Readings and research on selected Christian Latin authors from 200 to 600, 
including Tertullian, Cyprian, Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, and Gregory the Great. Prerequisite: Latin 
201. 

348 THEORIES OF RELIGION Staff 
Critical examination of the methods, disciplines, and theories employed in the academic study of religion, 
ranging from seminal works in the field to studies currently at the center of several ideological debates. 

349 RELIGION AND THE EMOTIONS Staff 
Study of a range of religious thinkers, philosophers, and psychoanalysts on such emotions as guilt, anxiety, 
anger, love, gratitude, melancholy, shame, and resentment. 

350 REFORMED THEOLOGY AND ETHICS Ottati 
A study of the signal and dynamic ideas, themes, and issues of the Reformed tradition in theology and 
ethics, with emphasis on the sovereignty of God, predestination, sin, grace, law, faithfulness, and political 
participation. 

352 PROTESTANT AND ROMAN CATHOLIC ETHICS Lustig and Beach-Verhey 

Compares and contrasts Protestant and Roman Catholic approaches to theological ethics. Analyzes the 
historical, conceptual, and methodological similarities and differences in the two traditions, applying their 
distinctive perspectives to several contemporary issues. 

355 WOMAN AND THE BODY FN THE CHRISTIAN TRADITION Poland 

A study of Christian attitudes toward gender and the human body as reflected in scripture, doctrine, and 
practice. Not open to freshmen and sophomores until Drop/Add. 

360 AMERICAN CrvTL RELIGION Wills 
Examination of the many ways that the United States serves as a focus for religious energies — for rituals, 
creeds, and myths that organize our lives and explain us to ourselves as a national community. Topics may 
include landscape, family, education, holidays and electoral politics as civil religious institutions. 

361 RELIGION FN THE AMERICAN SOUTH Wills 
A study of the nature and significance of religion as a part of life in the American South, both historically and 
in the contemporary setting. Attention is given to key personalities and events, as well as denominations 
and sectarian movements of significance in southern culture. 



172 — Religion 



362 RELIGION IN VICTORIAN ENGLAND Foley 
The historical development of the Church of England and dissent in the nineteenth-century. Particular 
focus upon Victorian religion's various responses to industrialization, urbanization, political reform, 
developments in science and technology, and the rise of biblical criticism. 

363 SCRIPT AND SCRIPTURE Snyder 
Treatment of orality and literacy, with implications for the formation of written scriptures. History of the 
Bible and its influence on textuality in western culture. The place of written scripture in Judaism and 
Islam. 

365 WOMEN IN AMERICAN RELIGION Wills 

Using biographies and autobiographies of women from various periods and traditions of American 
religion, this course will explore women's roles in those traditions and the conventions through which 
those women have been portrayed. 

370 ASIAN MEDITATION TEXTS Mahony 

A study of the religious significance, ideals, and practice of meditation in selected Buddhist and Hindu 
traditions. Readings center on translations of primary texts but also include pertinent indigenous 
commentaries and modern interpretive works. 

380 (180) JAPANESE BUDDHISM Staff 
An historical introduction to the major texts, figures, and schools of Buddhism in Japan, with particular 
emphasis on the Pure Land Buddhism, Esoterica Buddhism, and Zen Buddhism. Beyond textual study, 
the course will also examine the rituals, mystical techniques, and devotional practices which have defined 
the character of Japanese Buddhist schools. 

381 (281) CHINESE BUDDHISM Staff 
An historical survey of the major forms of Buddhism;that developed in China, from the beginning of 
the Common Era to the ;Golden Age; of Chinese Buddhism during the Tang and Song Dynasties to its 
eventual decline. 

395, 396 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Admission by consent of the instructor; use 396 for second Independent Study. Independent study under 
the direction and supervision of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topics of study and 
determines the means of evaluation. 

401 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM Staff 

Required of all senior majors. Explores issues within the study of religion and discusses strategies for 
research. Each student will complete a thesis directed by an appropriate department member. 

SEMINARS 

428 POETRY OF PRAISE AND PAIN Plank 

455 CREATION THEOLOGIES Poland 

456 BARTH'S EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS Foley 
479 HINDU DEVOTIONAL TEXTS Mahony 



Religion — 173 



498 HONOR THESIS Staff 
Research paper on some aspect of religious studies. For senior majors approved by the department. See thesis 
instruction sheet for details. 

410419 SEMINARS IN THEORY AND METHODOLOGY Varies 

420439 SEMINARS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES Varies 

440459 SEMINARS IN THEOLOGY AND ETHICS Varies 

460489 SEMINARS LN THE HISTORY OF RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS Varies 



1 74 — Russian/Self-Instructional Languages 



RUSSIAN 



See Department of German/ Russian 
SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGES 



Director: Associate Professor Kruger (French) 

Please note that the program requires the payment of an additional fee ($105) for each 
course enrollment. 

Highly motivated students with a demonstrated aptitude for language learning may apply 
for small group instruction in languages not taught in the classroom at Davidson. Students 
enrolled in the Self-Instructional Language Program (SILP) may not use these courses to satisfy 
the college's language or cultural diversity requirement. Most students do not begin study in SILP 
until their second year, after they have successfully completed their foreign language requirement. 
A minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 is required. Auditing is normally not permitted in SILP courses. 

Davidson College adheres to the standards established by the National Association of Self- 
Instructional Language Programs (NASILP). Each offering is an intensive audio-lingual course 
utilizing recommended self -instructional materials in combination with regular sessions with a 
native speaker. Emphasis is placed on the spoken language, although additional skills are also 
developed. Students spend three hours per week with the drill leader/conversation partner in 
anticipation of a final examination conducted by a specialist who is usually invited from another 
institution. The results of the final examination serve as the basis for the course grade. Please note 
that the Pass/Fail option is not available for SILP courses. 

Since SILP courses can be offered only when there is sufficient demand and when a qualified 
native speaker is available, students are required to obtain permission from the Director each 
semester that they are in the program. Interested students should contact the Director as much 
in advance as possible and submit an application as well as a letter of recommendation from 
a Davidson language faculty member. Please note permission granted only by the Director of 
SILP. Once students have received permission, they may include their request for a SIL course on 
the Web tree during the course selection period. The Director is under no obligation to arrange 
instruction for students who apply once the semester has begun. 

Davidson seeks to provide self -instructional learning opportunities in languages where study 
will complement course work in the existing academic program. Students wishing to learn a less 
commonly taught language not found on the list below are invited to contact the SILP Director 
well in advance of the new semester. Requests for other languages will be considered on a case- 
by-case basis. 

115, 116, 117 Beginning, Continuing, Intermediate Italian 

125 Beginning Korean 

141, 142, 143 Beginning, Continuing, Intermediate Portuguese 

171, 172 Beginning, Continuing Hindi 

185, 186 Beginning, Continuing Japanese 



Sociology — 175 



SOCIOLOGY 



Professor: Saharatnam (On leave) 
Associate Professors: Ruth, Kaufman (Chair) 
Assistant Professor: Marti 
Visiting Instructor: Veliz 

Distribution Requirements: Any course in sociology numbered under 370, other than Sociology 
260, may be counted toward fulfillment of the distribution requirements for the social sciences. 
However, first-vear students are encouraged to take 100- and 200-level courses rather than more 
advanced courses. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Sociology 205, 215, 305, and 347 are options for the 
requirement. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses, including Sociologv 101, 260, 370, 399 and 499, and five other 
courses (one numbered 200 or above, two numbered 300 or above, and two at any level). No more 
than two independent research courses mav count toward the major. 

No required courses (101, 260, 370, 399, or 499) may be taken pass/ fail by a major in the 
discipline. 

Honors Requirements: A major desiring to become a candidate for honors in sociology 7 must 
apply in writing to the department at the beginning of the fall semester of the senior year. 
Applicants must have an overall GPA of 3.2 and a GPA of 3.5 in all course work taken in the major. 
In order to receive honors, a student must, in addition to maintaining this level of performance, 
receive a grade of at least A- on the Senior Thesis (499) as well as departmental recommendation. 

101 INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY Staff 

Introduction to the scientific study of human social interaction with particular focus on the mutual 
influences between individuals and the groups to which thev belong; the basic theories, concepts and 
techniques used by sociologists in their research. Not open to seniors. 

205 RACIAL AND ETHNIC RELATIONS Marti, Veliz 

Comparative and historical studv of social processes related to racial and ethnic differences in modern 
complex societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal 
distribution of power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice. 

212 DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL Ruth 

Sociological theories and research concerned with the definition and characteristics of behaviors which do 
not conform to moral and legal codes in society. Ways in which societies attempt to control and sanction 
such behavior. 

215 LATINOS IN THE UNITED STATES Veliz 

A look at the social demography of the Latino population in the United States. This class will explore 
population, education, immigration and labor market issues. 



176 — Sociology 



217 GENDER AND SOCIETY Kaufman 

The course introduces a critical approach to examining the social construction of gender. It explores several 
different perspectives on gender inequality and the role of social institutions such as family, education, 
economy, and media in creating the experience of gender in society. 

219 SOCIOLOGICAL CRIMINOLOGY Ruth 

Analysis of social and legal aspects of crime, perspectives on causation, and consequences of variable social 
reactions to crime. Examination of research pertaining to crime and crime statistics; and modern trends in 
criminal law, law enforcement administration, and corrections. Not open to seniors. 

230 SOCIOLOGY OF WORK Staff 
This course provides a survey of work organizations, labor processes, labor markets, and employment 
stratification. Diverse organizational structures ranging from subsistence farming to the Total Quality 
Management structure common to Japanese firms are examined. 

231 LEADERSHIP & ORGANIZATIONS Marti 
Leaders, teams, and organizations are closely intertwined in the operations of social institutions, social 
structures, and social processes. The course provides an introduction to models and theories of leadership, 
processes inherent in the dynamics of small group interactions, and critical insights from organizational 
theory. 

245 THE FAMILY IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE Staff 
Introduction to the sociology of the family in various Western and non-Western societies. Impact of 
industrialization, the market, colonialism, migration, and revolution on families in such contexts as pre- 
industrial Europe, India, and China. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

246 AMERICAN FAMILIES Kaufman 
Introduction to families in the USA. Dating, cohabitation, civil unions, marriage, divorce, remarriage, 
intergenerational relationships, domestic violence, and family policy are explored. Attention is given to 
gender, race, and class differences. (Offered alternate years.) 

250 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Veliz 

Theories and comparative examples of the unequal distribution of social resources and the consequences 
of inequality for social life. Analysis of class structure, social mobility, and social programs to reduce 
inequality. 

260 SOCIAL STATISTICS Kaufman 

Introduction to the application of quantitative analysis in sociology and other social sciences. Topics include 
descriptive measures, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi-square, correlation, and regression. 
Computer applications through the use of SPSS. Cannot be taken for credit after ECO 205. 

305 ETHNIC RELATIONS FN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE Staff 

A comparative and historical study of ethnic relations in contexts outside the United States. Theories of 
ethnic relations, historical documents, case studies, and other descriptive and analytical literature on the 
topic are examined. (Not offered 2007-08.) 



Sociology — 177 



310 GENDER, RACE, AND SPORTS Kaufman 

This course examines the interrelations among gender, race, and sports. The construction of racial and gender 
identities through sports, the influence of youth sports on children's socialization, sports in educational 
settings, and media images of female and minority athletes will be examined. (Offered alternate.) 

319 PENOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE Ruth 
Corrections focusing upon penology and criminal justice. Includes a pre-term orientation period, outside 
lectures and briefings with speakers from corrections and law enforcement administration, field trips to 
several correctional facilities and a semester-long on-site field experience with officers and inmates at an 
area correctional unit. Prerequisites: Pre-registration interview and permission oftlie instructor. 

320 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION Marti 
The sociology of religion pursues an understanding of both the ;social-ness; of religion itself and the 
mutually influencing interactions between religion and its social environment. Students will analyze 
religious beliefs, practices, and organizations from a sociological perspective, with a primary focus on 
religion in contemporary American society. (Offered alternate years.) 

347 SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT Staff 

This course explores the dynamics, processes, and effects of development. Issues of development, along 
with local and global responses to development are examined. Inequalities based on nation-state differences 
and gendered economic divisions are analyzed. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

360 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY Ruth 

Sociological factors of health and illness, social organization of modern medicine, sociological analysis 
of the role and status of medical and paramedical personnel in this country, and the social differences in 
the acquisition of medical aid and in the reaction to medical treatment. Recommended for junior and senior 
premedical students. Not open to first-year students. 

370 THEORY rN SOCIOLOGY Marti 

Intellectual controversies that have stimulated efforts to develop scientific theories of society and social 
interaction. Writings of major sociological thinkers. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or permission oftlie instructor. 

380-385 JUNIOR SEMINARS FN SOCIOLOGY Staff 

Topics announced in advance. Not open to first-year students. 

395 OR 495 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FN SOCIOLOGY Staff 

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic (s) of 
the research and determines the means of evaluation. Prerequisites: Sophomore, junior or senior standing, two 
courses in sociology, and permission oftlie instructor. 

399 METHODS FN SOCIAL RESEARCH Kaufman 

Techniques in qualitative and quantitative sociological research, analyzing and interpreting data, and 
evaluating research methods. Students will complete a thesis proposal. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 

410-420 ADVANCED SEMFNARS FN SOCIOLOGY Staff 

Topics announced in advance. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and permission oftlie instructor. 



178 — Sociology/South Asian Studies 



499 SENIOR THESIS Marti 

Literature Review, Research Design, data collection and analysis, oral defense of thesis. Required of all senior 
majors. 

SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES 

Director. Professor Thomas (History) 

Affiliated Professors: Appleyard (Economics), Berkey (History), Hess (Economics), 

Mahony (Religion), Martin (Economics) 
Affiliated Associate Professor: Stasack (Music) 

South Asian Studies (SOU) is an interdisciplinary program focusing on an important region of 
the non western world: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. The program's 
courses provide opportunities for students to explore the arts, history, languages, religions, and 
social structures of a culture other than their own. 

Davidson College conducts a Semester-in-India program in the fall semester of even 
numbered years, which combines a period of residence in Chennai and a time of travel/ study to 
major archaeological and historical sites in India. Participating students may earn four Davidson 
College course credits. Three courses will be taught by Indian scholars and/ or by experts in their 
respective fields. Davidson College's resident Director of the program will teach the fourth course. 
A more detailed description is given in the Educational Programs section; details are also available 
from the Office of Study Abroad. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: South Asian Studies (SOU) 310, 354, and 385 fulfill the cultural 
diversity requirement. 

Other courses which cross the curriculum and are included in the South Asian Studies 
program are as follows: 

ART 102 SURVEY OF ASIAN ART 

ART 228 ISLAMIC ART 

HIS 171 INDIA 

HIS 381 ASIA DURING THE ERA OF WESTERN IMPERIALISM 

HIS 471 GANDHI 

MUS 242 MUSIC OF ASIA 

REL 270 CLASSICAL HINDUISM 

REL271 CLASSICAL BUDDHISM 

REL 272 CLASSICAL ISLAM 

REL 370 ASIAN MEDITATION TEXTS 

SIL171 BEGINNING HINDI 

SIL 172 CONTINUING HINDI 

Check the respective departmental listings for availability of courses, prerequisites, and details. 



South Asian Studies/Spanish — 1 79 



310 INDIA: PAST AND PRESENT Staff 

Specially designed lecture course dealing with Indian cultural traditions and their current expressions in 
Indian philosophy; art, religious movements; and political, social, and economic systems. Offered as part 
of the Semester-in-India program. Permission offlie instructor required. (Not offered 2007-08) 

312 TUTORIAL IN SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES Staff 

Permission of the instructor wlw will approve tlie topic, supervise the study program, and evaluate the student's 
work, is required. 

354 ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY INDIA Staff 

Lectures and field trips focusing on some of the pressing problems faced by contemporary India and 
institutions which address those problems. Topics may include the environment, the status of women, 
implications of the population explosion, economic conditions, and the political process. Offered as part of 
the Semester-in-India program. Offered in alternating years. Prerequisite: Permission of tlie instructor (Not offered 
2007-08.) 

385 PUBLIC HEALTH IN INDIA Staff 

A series of lectures on various aspects of public health in India delivered by scholars and medical 
professionals. Field trips relating to the lectures will be part of this course. Offered in India as part of the 
Semester-in-India program. (Not offered 2007-08.) 

396-399 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Study under the supervision of the Program Director who approves the topic of study. Paper required. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor is required. 

SPANISH 

Professors: Hemandez-Chiroldes (On leave, Spring), Maiz-Pena, (Chair), Pena, 

Vasquez 
Assistant Professors: Kietrys, Rivera, Sanchez-Sanchez, Willis (On leave) 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Santamaria 

Distribution Requirements: Any one of the following courses meets the literature distribution 
requirement: Spanish 241, 242, 243, 244, 270, 320, 321, 322, 330, 331, 340, 341, 343, 344, 346, 347, 349, 
350, 352, 374, 375. 

Foreign Language Requirement: Completion of Spanish 201 meets the foreign language 
proficiency distribution requirement. 

Cultural Diversity Requirement: Spanish 241, 244, 270, 340, 341, 343, 344, 347, 352, 374, and 375 
are options for fulfilling the cultural diversity requirement. 

Placement of First-year Students: Students who have taken Spanish in high school and who 
want to take Spanish courses at Davidson must take a placement test before the beginning of the 
academic year. Please contact the chair of the Spanish Department. 



180 — Spanish 



Major Requirements: Ten courses above Spanish 201, conducted in Spanish, including Spanish 
490 and 491 and a minimum of one course from each of the following areas: 
Area I: Literature and Culture of Spain prior to 1700 (320, 321, 322, 329); 
Area II: Literature and Culture of Spain since 1700 (330, 331, 339, 350); 
Area III: Civilization of Spain and Latin America (347, 352, 353, 361, 362, 369, 374, 394); 
Area IV: Literature and Culture of Latin America Prior to 1900 (340, 349); 
Area V: Literature and Culture of Latin America Since 1900 (341, 343, 346, 375). 
At least five of the courses toward the major should be taken at Davidson. Courses taken 
in the Davidson College program in Cadiz, may satisfy one or several of the departmental area 
requirements. The chair of the Spanish Department determines which areas may be satisfied in 
this manner. 

A Senior research project with an oral defense is required in the last semester of the senior 
year. Study in a Spanish-speaking country is strongly recommended but not required. Also 
recommended is at least a minimum knowledge of a second foreign language. 
Courses to be counted toward the major may not be taken pass/ fail. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses conducted in Spanish above Spanish 201 or 203, at least three 
in residence at Davidson College. Two courses may be at the 200-level. At least four courses must 
be at the 300-level or above. The department may also require Spanish 303- Advanced Grammar 
and Composition as one of the four upper-level courses, depending on the student's language 
proficiency. Courses to be counted toward the minor may not be taken pass/fail. 

Honors Requirements: Twelve courses are required for departmental honors. In addition to the 
major requirements, two other courses (Spanish 498, 499) are devoted to research and writing of 
the honors thesis. An oral examination is administered at the completion of the thesis and covers 
the thesis, its period, and/ or the genre of its subject. 

Study Abroad: With specific approval of the department chair, up to three transferred courses 
for one semester or five transferred courses for the academic year may be applied to the Spanish 
major or minor. No more than three such courses may apply toward the minor in Spanish, no more 
than five toward the major in Spanish. 

Service Learning: Several departmental courses offer the opportunity for service learning. 
Some may require this component. 

100W DIVIDED LIGHT: WRITING HISPANIC EXILE Vasquez 

Fulfills distribution requirements in literature and cultural diversity. 

101 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I Staff 
An introduction to speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. Requires practice sessions 
twice a week and possible work through the Language Resource Center. 

102 ELEMENTARY SPANISH H Staff 
Development of further skills in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Spanish through a review 
of grammar and readings in the literature and culture of Spain and/ or Latin America. Requires practice 
sessions twice a week and work through the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or its 
equivalent. 



Spanish— 181 



103 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY SPANISH (2 credits) Staff 

Intensive introductory course equivalent to Spanish 101 and 102. Meets six class-hours per week plus;four 
hours weekly;with an assistant teacher. Completes two semesters of Spanish in one semester. Counts as 
two courses. 

201 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Staff 

Extensive reading and discussion in Spanish of texts of moderate difficulty in the culture and literature 
of Spain and Latin America; grammar study; extensive conversation practice. A combination among 
conversation sessions, work through the Language Resource Center, and service learning is required. 
Meets the degree requirement for proficiency in foreign language. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or its equivalent. 

203 ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE SPANISH ABROAD Staff 

(Summer in Spain Program) Course complements Spanish 201, placing special emphasis on cultural and 
artistic subjects to help students integrate into contemporary Spanish society. Prerequisites: Spanish 102 and 
concurrent enrollment in Spanish 201. 

219 INDEPENDENT STUDY: LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS Staff 

Study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the topic(s) and determines 
the means of evaluation. 

241 LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION Hemandez-Chiroldes 

Selected works of Latin American literature in English translation. Readings and class discussions are in 
English. 

244 U.S. LATINO LITERATURE IN ENGLISH Vasquez 

Reading and discussion of a variety of texts to develop a general idea of the complex experience of people 
of Latin American background living in the United States. Readings and instruction in English. 

260 CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION Staff 

Training and practice to develop fluency, accuracy, and expressiveness in oral and written communication. 
Requires conversation session once a week. Strongly recommended for students planning to study abroad. 
The department recommends that this course be taken before 270. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or its equivalent. 
(Fall and Spring) 

270 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE AND CULTURE Staff 

Reading and discussion of works by Spanish and Latin American writers. Introduction to cultural, 
historical, and textual analysis of Hispanic literature and culture. Conducted in Spanish. Spanish 260 or its 
equivalent. (Fall and Spring) 

302 ADVANCED GRAMMAR Staff 
Problems in Spanish grammar and idiom-building, particularly those faced by English-speaking people; 
problems of translation; an overview of Spanish phonetics; and a brief study of the evolution of the Spanish 
language. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 260 or its equivalent. 

303 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION Staff 
Review, expansion, and fine-tuning of grammatical knowledge; building and use of a growing body of 
vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. Spanish 260 or equivalent. 



182 — Spanish 



311 FOREIGN LANGUAGES FN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (FLES) Pena 

Year-long project in teaching Spanish and Hispanic culture to children in a local elementary school. 
Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents; approval of the FLES supervisor and chair. 

320 SPANISH LITERATURE THROUGH THE GOLDEN AGE Sanchez-Sanchez, Willis 
Major works from medieval times through the seventeenth century, studied against a background of 
historical developments and literary currents. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or 
their equivalents. (Fall) 

321 THEATER OF SPAIN'S GOLDEN AGE Sanchez-Sanchez, Willis 
Development of 16th- and 17th-century Spanish theater, including works by Lope de Vega, Cervantes, 
Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcoacuten, and Calderoacuten de la Barca. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: 
Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

322 CERVANTES Willis 
Advanced study of Don Quijote and the literary criticism it has generated. Other works by Cervantes may 
be included. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

329 INDEPENDENT STUDY: SPANISH LITERATURE PRIOR TO 1700 Staff 
Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the; project 
and determines the means of evaluation. 

330 MODERN SPAIN Kietrys, Vasquez 
Thematic introduction to the culture, literature, and fine arts of Spain since 1700. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

331 TWENTIETH CENTURY SPAIN Kietrys, Vasquez 
Writers of the early decades, the Generation of 1927 and the Spanish Civil War, the Franco and democratic 
years, into the 1980s, 1990s, and the new century; films. ;Srudy and analysis of socio-historical, ideological, 
and cultural contexts. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

339 INDEPENDENT STUDY: SPANISH LITERATURE SINCE 1700 Staff 
Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the project; 
and determines the means of evaluation. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

340 LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE I Hernandez-Chiroldes, Maiz-Pena, 

Pena, Rivera 
Literature and the arts against a background of history and socio-political developments from 1492 to 1900, 
with a focus on major currents of thought and world views. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 
260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Fall) 

341 LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE II Hernandez-Chiroldes, Maiz-Pena, 

Pena, Rivera 

Ideas, theologies, and aesthetics that have shaped modern Latin American literatures and other arts, from 
1900 to the present. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Spring) 



Spanish— 183 



343 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL Hernandez-Chiroldes, Maiz-Pena, 

Pena, Rivera 
Most important works of major contemporary writers from Latin America studied against a background 
of recent history and relevant ideologies and values. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 
270 or their equivalents 

344 LATINO CULTURE IN THE U.S. Rivera, Vasquez 
Study of the development of a distinctive Latino culture in the United States; Latino culture as a form of 
dialogue between the United States and Latin America. Conducted in Spanish. 

346 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE Rivera 
Study of the most important Latin American playwrights, plays and performances within the ideologies 
and aesthetics that have shaped contemporary Latin American theatre. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: 
Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

347 HISPANIC THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE Rivera 
The course expands the communicative, interpretive, and analytical Spanish language skills of the students 
by using the most recent studies and research about contemporary Hispanic theatre theories and practices. 
Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

349 INDEPENDENT STUDY: LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE Staff 
Study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the topic (s) and determines 
the means of evaluation. 

350 GARCIA LORCA AND HIS GENERATION Staff 
Theatre, narrative, and poetry of Garciacute;a Lorca's literary and intellectual generation in its pre-Civil 
War and exile years. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

352 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA Pena 
Exploration of the cinema and filmmaking traditions of Latin America since the 1950's with specific 
attention to the aesthetic media and political debate and histories of national film industries. Conducted in 
Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 or 270 or their equivalents. 

353 CONTEMPORARY SPANISH FILM Vasquez 
Spanish film from the 1960s through the 1990s and into the new century, focusing on exiles from Republican 
Spain after the Spanish Civil War and on Spain during the years of democracy. Different themes and 
approaches to Spain and Western Europe in terms of national identity. Optional times to view films outside 
of class provided. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

SPA 355-358 SEMINAR IN SPECIAL TOPICS Staff 

An area in literature or civilization outside the content of other core courses. Subject announced in the 
Schedule of Classes. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or tlteir equivalents. 

361 CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN Kietrys, Sanchez-Sanchez,Vasquez, Willis 

Reading, discussion, visual representations, and student research on Spain's social, economic, political, 
and religious life, and the fine arts. May follow a thematic or historical model or a series of theoretical 
approaches. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 270 or their equivalents. (Fall) 



184 — Spanish 



369 INDEPENDENT STUDY: HISPANIC CULTURES Staff 

Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the;project and 
determines the means of evaluation. Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. 

374 CARIBBEAN PEOPLES, IDEAS, AND ARTS Hernandez-Chiroldes, Rivera 

Literatures and arts, ideas, and socio-economic structures in the Caribbean islands and rimlands (Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Colombia, and Central America). Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or tlieir equivalents. 

375 LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS Maiz-Pena 
An examination of genre, gender, and representation in women's writing in Latin America from the 17th 
century to the present. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 and 270 or tlieir equivalents. 

393 ADVANCED LANGUAGE SEMINAR Staff 

(Summer in Spain Program) Advanced language and composition course. Students will take advantage of 
their immersion experience for their writing and discussion. Prerequisites: Spanish 260 (or permission oftlie 
instructor) and concurrent enrollment in Spanish 394. 

394 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN SPANISH CULTURES Staff 
(Summer in Spain Program) An advanced course in Spanish culture studied through film, literature, music, 
and periodicals with a focus on contemporary culture. Art will be studied from a historical perspective. 

Prerequisites: Spanish 260 (or permission oftlie instructor) and concurrent enrollment in Spanish 393. 

SPA 401-410 SEMINAR IN SPECIAL TOPICS Staff 

An area in literature or civilization outside the content of other core courses. Subject announced in the 
Schedule of Classes. Conducted in Spanish. Spanish 260 and 270 or tlieir equivalents. 

429 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Special topics, themes, a genre, or a single figure in literature, history, or culture, outside the content of 
other courses under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the topic(s) and 
determines the means of evaluation. Open to senior majors. Prerequisites: Any two literature, culture or 
civilization courses, or approval oftlie clvxir and the instructor. 

490 SENIOR SEMINAR I Staff 
Intensive course in reading and discussion of theoretical, literary, critical and cultural texts, and student 
research centered around a theme which will vary each year. Course instruction will be shared by several 
faculty members. (Fall) 

491 SENIOR SEMINAR II Staff 
Continuation of Spanish 490 concentrating on independent work on the final senior major paper, in 
consultation with one of the professors of the Spanish Department. (Spring) 

498, 499 SENIOR HONORS, TUTORIAL, AND THESIS Staff 

Research for and writing of the honors thesis begins in Spanish 498 (in the spring of the junior year or the 
fall of the senior year) and is completed in Spanish 499 during the senior year. Spanish 498 requires a thesis 
outline and progress reports; Spanish 499 requires an oral examination by a committee of department 
professors on the completed thesis. 



Theatre— 185 



THEATRE 

Professors: Costa (Chair), Gardner 

Associate Professor: Green 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Ripley, Sutch 

Adjunct Professor: Beasley 

Affiliated Faculty: Fox (English) 

Distribution Requirements: Theatre 101, 121, 201, 221, 245, 250, 281, 335, 355, and 371 may be 
counted toward the fulfillment of the distribution requirement in fine arts. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses as follows: 

1. Theatre 121 or 201 or 221; Theatre 245, 250, 261 (English 261) or 281, 335, 355, and 371. 

2. One of the following: Theatre 345, 362, 436, or 455. 

3. Anv additional two Theatre courses at the 300 level or above. These two courses may 
not include independent studies, Theatre 401 (Theatre Practicum) or 499 (Honors 
Thesis). 

Production Requirements for Majors and Minors: Theatre majors are required to work on three 
department productions for a minimum of twenty (20) hours per show in a capacity other than actor 
or director. One assignment must be in stage management. One assignment must be completed 
by the end of the junior year. A student who completes more than fifty (50) hours of work on any 
one production fulfills two of the three production requirements. A student who serves as the 
Production Stage Manager for a mainstage production and completes more than ninety (90) hours 
on that show fulfills all three production requirements. 

Theatre minors are required to work on one department production in a capacity other than 
actor or director for a minimum of thirty (30) hours. 

Production can be in anv of these roles: production stage manager, assistant stage manager, 
assistant to the designer, properties master, or any work approved by the department chair and 
the technical director. 

Minor Requirements: Six courses, three of which must be taken at Davidson College, consisting 
of: Theatre 371; two courses from Theatre 201, 221, 245, 261 (English 261) or 281, 335, 355; three 
courses at either the 300 level or above; or 250, and the production requirement outlined above. 
Courses taken Pass/ Fail may not be counted toward the minor. 

Honors Requirements: A major desiring to become a candidate for honors in theatre must apply 
in writing to the department by May 1st of their junior year. Applicants must have an overall 
GPA of 3.2 and a GPA of 3.5 in all course work taken in the major. To receive honors, a student 
must, in addition to maintaining this level of performance, receive a grade of at least A- on the 
honors thesis (499), and approval from the thesis committee. The honors program is comprised of 
eleven courses: Theatre 499 in addition to the ten major courses required of all majors. Theatre 499 
requires the writing/ production and defense of a thesis before an appointed committee. 



186 — Theatre 



Transfer Courses: The Theatre Department accepts up to five courses from other colleges 
and universities as credit toward the major. In no case will the department preapprove transfer 
credit. To be granted transfer credits to be applied to the major, students must demonstrate to the 
department that courses taken elsewhere are comparable to specific Davidson courses in content, 
contact hours, and rigor. At the conclusion of study abroad or study at another accredited U.S. 
institution, students should make their requests for transfer credit toward the major to the Theatre 
Department chair and submit for evaluation all relevant course materials. 

11 APPLIED THEATRE; First-year students only. (Fall) 

12 APPLIED THEATRE; First-year students only. (Spring) 

21 APPLIED THEATRE; Second-year students only. (Fall) 

22 APPLIED THEATRE; Second-year students only. (Spring) 

31 APPLIED THEATRE; Third-year students only. (Fall) 

32 APPLIED THEATRE; Third-year students only. (Spring) 

41 APPLIED THEATRE; Fourth-year students only. (Fall) 

42 APPLIED THEATRE; Fourth-year students only. (Spring) 

45 APPLIED THEATRE. Topics in Arts Management; Fourth-year students only. (Fall) 

46 APPLIED THEATRE. Topics in Arts Management; Fourth-year students only. (Spring) 

101 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE ARTS Green, Ripley, Sutch 

Study of materials of creative expression in theatre. Lectures, readings, discussions, videos, field trips, 
critical writing and laboratory work build understanding of the theatrical event and the fundamental 
components of stage production. (Fall and;Spring) 

121 STUDIO THEATRE I Gardner 

Group study of theatre practices intended to expand the student's knowledge of presentational modes. 
Ensemble exercises and improvisational work contribute to the development of a performance piece which 
is included in the studio theatre series. Meets for extra hours; please consult with tlie instructor. (Spring) 

201 EXERCISES IN PLAYCRAFTTNG AND PERFORMANCE Gardner 

Examination and utilization of the creative elements of theatre stressing theory, script development, 
problem-solving, and critical analysis. Intended for the student with previous training or experience in 
theatre. (Fall) 

221 STUDIO THEATRE II Gardner 

Continuation of group studies and exercises from Theatre 121. Students in Theatre 221 have additional 
individual responsibilities in ensemble leadership, script development, and production supervision. Open 
to Tlxeatre majors and students who have completed Tlieatre 121, 201, or 245. (Spring) 

245 ACTING I Costa, Green, Ripley, Sutch 

Study and application of the psycho-physical and emotional bases of performance. Emphasis on relaxation 
of the actor's body, ensemble improvisation, freeing the natural voice, acting on impulse. The training will 
culminate in realistic scene work. (Fall and Spring) 



Theatre— 187 



250 PLAY ANALYSIS FOR PRODUCTION Sutch 

Examination of traditional methods of plav anlvsis and their application in the development of production 
plans for a wide variety of theatrical scripts. 

261 MODERN DRAMA (=ENG 261) Fox 

(Cross-listed as English 261.) European, American, and British drama horn Ibsen to Pinter with emphasis 
on the major movements within Western theater: realism, naturalism, expressionism, Epic Theater, and 
Theater of the Absurd. 

281 TWENTIETH CENTURY THEATRE AND DRAMA Beasley, Green 

The course is a studv of plavs and theatrical theory from a range of geographic regions. The course 
explores ways practitioners experimented with form and content in articulating their reactions to the 
human condition of the 20th centurv. 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For the beginning or intermediate student with a special topic to be pursued under the direction and 
supervision of a facultv member. The topic of studv must be reviewed and approved by the faculty 
member before permission is granted for enrollment. Normally, assigned work and criteria for evaluation 
will be clearly established by the instructor before the beginning of the semester and in all cases no later 
than the end of the Drop/ Add period. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

335 FUNDAMENTALS OF STAGE DESIGN Gardner 

Introduction, through exercises and projects, to the principles of designing scenery, costumes, lighting, 
sound, and properties for the theatre. Class includes a once a week lab. (Fall) 

345 ACTING II Costa, Ripley 

Studv and application of the Stanislavsky acting process. Group and individual exercises designed to 
promote personalization and emotional fullness in characterization. Advanced techniques for scene and 
character analysis. Performances of scenes from classical realism, acting for the camera scenes, and Anton 
Chekhov's plays. Prerequisite: Tlieatre 245. Meets for extra hours; please consult with tlie instructor. (Fall) 

355 DIRECTING I Costa, Sutch 

Fundamentals of directing for the stage, focusing on text analvsis, blocking principles, the director-actor 
relationship, the director-designer conceptual process and scene work. Prerequisites: Tlieatre 245. (Fall) 

362 COMMUNITY-BASED THEATRE FOR SOCIAL CHANGE Green 

Course investigates the potential for theatre and performance to be catalysts for social change. Focusing on 
Community-Based Theatre, the course explores ways in which performance has participated in struggles 
against oppression and has been integral to community-building. Course combines case studies from 
various historical and geographical contexts with practical activities used by Community-Based Theatre 
practitioners. Meets for extra hours; please consult with tlie instructor. 

371 WORLD THEATRE HISTORY Gardner, Green 

Study of the theory and practice of stage performance throughout the world from ancient Greece to the 
present. Lectures, readings and discussions, with emphasis on the Western tradition. (Spring) 

380-385 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATRE Staff 

Group study of selected theatre topics. Prerequisite: Permission of tlie instructor. 



Theatre 



381 ADVANCED ACTING SEMINAR Staff 

Prerequisite: Tlieatre 245. 

386 VOICE AND MOVEMENT FOR THE ACTOR I Ripley 

Foundations of vocal technique and movement analysis for the actor. ;Provides a working knowledge 
of anatomical and kinesiological principles pertinent to strong and healthy vocal production Prerequisite: 
Theatre 245. (Fall) 

390-398 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For the advanced student with a special topic to be pursued under the direction and supervision of a faculty 
member. The topic of study must be reviewed and approved by the faculty member before permission is 
granted for enrollment. Normally, assigned work and criteria for evaluation will be clearly established by 
the instructor before the beginning of the semester; in all cases this will occur before the end of the Drop/ 
Add period. Prerequisite: Permission of tin instructor. 

390 INDEPENDENT STUDY - HISTORY AND CRITICISM Green 
Topics normally involve reading assignments, research projects and papers. Prerequisite: Permission oftlie 
instructor. 

391 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ADVANCED ACTING Costa 
Topics normally involve role research, preparation and/or performance. Prerequisite: Permission of tire 
instructor. 

392 INDEPENDENT STUDY- ADVANCED DIRECTING Costa 
Topics normally involve background research, script analysis, promptbook preparation, scene and/ or 
play direction. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

393 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ADVANCED DESIGN Gardner 
Topics may concentrate on any area of theatre design, including scenery, lighting, costumes, makeup, 
properties or sound, and normally involve design exercises and projects. Prerequisite: Permission of tire 
instructor. 

394 INDEPENDENT STUDY -DRAMATURGY Staff 
Play analysis and interpretation in a performance-related context. Topics normally involve research in 
analytical methodologies as well as participation in production as an assistant to a faculty or guest director. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

395 INDEPENDENT STUDY -STAGE MANAGEMENT Staff 
Practicum in play preparation and oversight responsibility for mainstage or studio production, including 
rehearsal assistance, promptbook preparation, backstage communications and performance management. 

Prerequisite: Permission of tire instructor. 

396 INDEPENDENT STUDY -PLAYWRITING Staff 
Topics normally involve writing exercises and a fully-developed original play script. Prerequisite: Permission 
of tire instructor. 

397 INDEPENDENT STUDY - PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT AND ADVANCED DESIGN Staff 



Theatre — 1 ! 



399 ADMINISTRATION OF THE NOT-FOR-PROFIT ARTS ORGANIZATION Staff 

Issues of administration, operations, evaluation, education, public cultural policies and funding as they 
relate to the visual and performing arts. Readings, papers, and discussions, including regular sessions with 
executive directors of Charlotte-Mecklenburg arts organizations. Recommended for juniors and seniors 
with interest in the arts, contemporary American culture, public policy, and/ or relevant economic issues. 
Meets for extra hours; please consult with tire instructor. (Offered alternate years.) 

401 THEATRE PRACTICUM Staff 

Field work and studv in production, administration or dramaturgy in an off-campus program approved 
by the department and supervised by a department faculty member. Preparatory readings, research, and 
written work relevant to the area of study are required. Grading for this course is Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: 
Permission of tire instructor. 

435 ADVANCED SCENE DESIGN Gardner 
Advanced study of the design and implementation of scenic design for the stage. Continuation of 
principles covered in 335, with special emphasis on multi-scene solutions for specific plays. Process work, 
including research and play analysis, will be emphasized.Rendering techniques will include scale models 
and computer graphics. "THE 250 is highly recommended but not required." Prerequisite:335; (additional 
lab hours required.) 

436 LIGHTING DESIGN AND TECHNICAL PRODUCTION Gardner, Staff 
Advanced study, through exercises and projects, of the tools, principles and techniques of designing and 
executing stage lighting, with parallel study of related technical areas. Prerequisite: Tlieatre 335. 

445 ACTING ffl Costa, Sutch 

Advanced study of one or more production styles involving in-depth research and resulting in class 
performance. An effort will be made to tailor course content to promote the individual actor's development. 
Prerequisites: Tlieatre 245, 345. (Offered alternate years.) 

455 DIRECTING II Costa 

Study and employment of directing principles, culminating in presentation. Each student will direct a 
one-act play for the Studio Theatre Series. Prerequisites: Tlieatre 355 and permission ofilie instructor. (Not open 
to first-year students.) (Spring) 

486 VOICE AND MOVEMENT FOR THE ACTOR II Costa, Ripley 

Advanced study of vocal technique and movement analysis for the actor. Provides an in-depth analysis of 
individual habits and fosters healthy expansion of movement vocabulary and vocal production. Prerequisite: 
245 and 386. Meets for extra hours; please consult with tlte;instructor. (Spring) Provides major credit in Tlieater. 

499 HONORS TUTORIAL AND THESIS Staff 

Required for graduation with honors in Theatre. For Theatre majors only with a 3.5 GPA in the theatre 
major and an overall GPA of 3.2. Prerequisite: Approval oftltesis propiosal b\/ May 1st offlie preznous academic 
year. (Spring) 



190 — Concentrations 



CONCENTRATIONS 



APPLIED MATHEMATICS CONCENTRATION 

The Applied Mathematics Concentration offers an introduction to the process of modeling 
natural or social phenomena by mathematical systems. The goal of the concentration is to 
foster skills in the development of an appropriate variety of mathematical tools, to acquire an 
appreciation for the limitations of a given mathematical model and for modeling as a dynamic 
process, and to experience this process within a specific domain of application. The concentration 
has two tracks: a natural science emphasis and a social science emphasis. Either track is open to all 
students, regardless of major. 

Requirements: 
Social Science Track: 

A student in the social science track whose major is mathematics must include at least one 
elective from a department other than mathematics. 

1 . MAT 135 - Calculus II: Multivariate Calculus 

2. MAT 137 - Calculus and Modeling II 

3. One course selected from: 

MAT 210 - Mathematical Modeling 

MAT 235 - Differential Equations and Infinite Series 

4. One course selected from: 

MAT 110 - Applications of Finite Mathematics with Computing 
MAT 150 - Linear Algebra and Mathematica with Applications 

5. One course selected from: 

ECO 105 -Statistics 

PSY 310 - Psychological Research-Design and Analysis 

SOC 260 - Social Statistics 

6. Two electives selected from: 

ECO 205 - Basic Econometrics 

ECO 215 - Mathematical Economics 

ECO 317 - Econometrics 

ECO 319 - Game Theory and Strategic Behavior 

ECO 336 - Economic Growth and Sustainable Development 

ECO 338 - International Finance 

Natural Science Track 

1 . MAT 135 - Calculus II: Multivariate Calculus 

2. MAT 150 - Linear Algebra and Mathematica with Applications 

3. PHY 130, 230 - General Physics with Calculus Two courses 

4. One course selected from: 

MAT 137 - Calculus and Modeling II 

MAT 235 - Differential Equations and Infinite Series 

PHY 201 - Mathematical Methods for Scientists 



Concentrations — 191 



5. One elective selected from: 

BIO 310 - Bioinformatics (= CSC 310) 

BIO 341 - Biostatistics and Experimental Design 

CHE 351 - Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics 

CHE 352 - Physical Chemistry: Kinetics and Quantum Mechanics 

CHE 401 - Inorganic Chemistry 

CSC 200 - Computational Physics (= PHY 200) 

CSC 310 - Bioinformatics (= BIO 310) 

CSC 325 - Numerical Analysis 

MAT 210 - Mathematical Modeling 

MAT 235 - Differential Equations and Infinite Series 

MAT 335 - Vector Calculus and Partial Differential Equations 

PHY 200 - Computational Physics (= CSC 200) 

PHY 310 - Electronics and Instrumentation 

PHY 330 - Intermediate Mechanics 

PHY 350 - Electricity and Magnetism 

PHY 360 - Quantum Mechanics I 

PHY 400 - Statistical and Thermal Physics 

Additional Information: The collection of elective courses an applicant plans to use to satisfy the 
concentration requirements may be amended subject to the approval of the Applied Mathematics 
Advisory Committee. A seminar or independent study involving substantive application of 
mathematical techniques mav satisfy an elective requirement upon the consent of the Applied 
Mathematics Advisor}' Committee. 

No more than two courses from those courses which constitute a student's major may be 
applied toward the concentration in Applied Mathematics. With the approval of the Applied 
Mathematics Advisory Committee, a student mav substitute an additional elective course for a 
required course in the student's major. 

At least one elective course must be taken during or after the spring semester of the junior 
year. A grade of "C" or higher is required in all courses applied toward the concentration. 

Application Procedure: 

The Applied Mathematics Concentration is administered by the Applied Mathematics 
Advisory Committee. The faculty liaison is Dr. Donna K. Molinek. A student must submit a 
written application to the Applied Mathematics Advisory Committee by the last day of class of 
the spring semester of the junior year. Earlier application increases the opportunity for coherence 
and flexibility in planning the applicant's course of study. Appropriate progress toward satisfying 
the required portion of the concentration should be made by the end of the sophomore year. 
Certification of completion of all the requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar 
upon the recommendation of the Applied Mathematics Advisory Committee. 

ASIAN STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

The Asian Studies Concentration provides students with a coherent, interdisciplinary 
introduction to the history, cultures, economics, and politics of this dynamic region. The 
concentration offers students a choice of three tracks: East Asian Studies, South Asian Studies, 
and Middle Eastern Studies. Concentrators will work with a faculty advisor to design a coherent 
program which may include some courses outside the chosen track. 



1 92 — Concentrations 



Requirements: 

Six courses distributed among at least three departments and as follows: 

1 . Completion of one of the following: 

CHI 120 - Introduction to Modern Chinese Culture 

HIS 171 -India 

HIS 175 - Islamic Civilization and the Middle East, 600-1500 

HIS 176 - Islamic Civilization and the Middle East since 1500 

HIS 183 - East Asian History until 1600 

HIS 184 - East Asian History, 1600 to the Present 

2. Completion of five other courses in Asian Studies. (Check with the current faculty 

liaison for a list of eligible courses.) 

3. Study of a language appropriate to the student's chosen track. (The language and level 

of competence required will depend on the student's program and on the resources 
available for language instruction.) 

4. An international experience in Asia. 

Note: A grade of "C" or higher must be earned in all graded courses applied towards the 
concentration. No more than two 100-level courses may be included in the concentration; 
no more than two of the six courses may be applied both to the concentration and to a 
major. 

Application Procedure: 

The Asian Studies concentration is administered by the Asian Studies Advisory Committee. 
The faculty liaison is Dr. Fuji Lozada. A student must submit a written application at the beginning 
of the junior year to the Asian Studies Advisory Committee. If a substitution for any of the courses 
is to be considered, the applicant must explain in writing the reason for the request and show how 
such substitutions would enhance the proposal. Certification of completion of all the requirements 
for the concentration is made by the Registrar upon the recommendation of the Asian Studies 
Advisory Committee. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 

The Computer Science Concentration, jointly sponsored by the departments of Mathematics 
and Physics, provides a solid foundation for further study in the subject of computer science. 

Requirements: 

Six courses distributed as follows: 

1. Either of the following courses: 

CSC 121 - Programming and Problem Solving or 
CSC 200 - Computational Physics 

2. Data Structures 

CSC 231 - Data Structures 

3. Discrete Methods 

MAT 221 - Discrete Methods 

4. Two courses chosen from: 

CSC 323 - Object-Oriented Programming 
CSC 325 - Numerical Analysis 
CSC 331 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms 
PHY 310 - Electronics and Instrumentation 



Concentrations — 193 



5. One elective course 

One additional course listed in Requirement 4, or one of the following courses: 
CSC 310 - Bioinformatics 

CSC 482 - Computer Science Seminar or an approved independent study or seminar 
at the 300- or 400-level (normally CSC 395, CSC 396, or PHY/ CSC 397). 

Additional Information: No more than two courses from those courses which constitute a 
student's major may be applied toward the concentration. A grade of "C" or higher is required in 
all courses applied toward the concentration. 

The Physics Computation Center in Dana Science Building and the Genomics, Applied 
Mathematics, and Computer Science laboratory in Chambers provide high-powered computing 
environments for students in advanced computer science courses. Students wishing to balance 
their academic experience in the Computer Science Concentration with more practical experience 
in computing are encouraged to investigate an outside internship, for example, with Davidson's 
Information Technology Services. 

Application Procedure: 

The Computer Science Concentration is administered by the Computer Science Advisory 
Committee. The faculty liaison is Dr. Michael Mossinghoff. A student must submit written 
application to the Advisory Committee by the end of the first week of classes in the fall semester 
of the senior year. Since some courses in the concentration have several prerequisites and some 
courses are offered in alternate years, early planning is advised. Certification of completion of 
all requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar upon the recommendation of the 
Computer Science Advisory Committee. 

EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

The concentration in Education prepares students to enter the field of teaching. The 
concentration has two tracks: 1. the traditional student-teaching (licensure) track leading to North 
Carolina Teaching Licensure in English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Latin, French, or 
Spanish; and 2. the interdisciplinary track designed for students who are interested in education 
but not currently interested in pursuing teaching licensure— these students might be preparing 
for graduate school, for teaching at an independent school where licensure is not required, or for 
obtaining a lateral-entry position in a discipline for which Davidson does not offer licensure (e.g., 
Art, German, Music, Russian, Theatre). 

Requirements: 

Licensure Track: Students should meet with the Chair of the Education Department during their first 

year to plan their schedules and discuss application procedures. 

Completion of: 

1. Before the final semester of the senior year, four courses with a grade of "C" or highter 

EDU 121 - History of Educational Theory and Practice 

EDU 242 - Educational Psychology and Teaching Exceptionalities 

EDU 243 - Adolescent Development (= PSY 243) 

PSY 101 - General Psychology 



1 94 — Concentrations 



2. Prior to student-teaching 

a. achieve designated minimum scores on the Praxis 1 series or minimum scores on the 
SAT, 

b. earn a minimum overall GPA of 2.5, 

c. provide recommendations from the Dean of Students, the departmental advisor, and 
one other faculty member regarding the student's interest and suitability for 
teaching; and 

d. be approved by the Teacher Education Committee. 

3. In the final semester of the senior year complete the student teaching block by taking 
the following courses concurrently: 

EDU 400 - Organization for Teaching 
EDU 410, 411 - Internship in Teaching 
EDU 420 - Seminar in Secondary Education 

Interdisciplinary Track: 

Completion of six courses with a grade of "C" or higher: two required and four elective. No 
more than two courses from student's major. 

1. Theory 

EDU 121 - History of Educational Theory and Practice 

2. Field Placement 

EDU 302 - Field Placement in Education 
In the final semester choose four electives from the categories below. 

3. Elective (At least 1 course from the following group.) 

EDU 241 - Child Development 

EDU 242 - Educational Psychology and Teaching Exceptionalities 

EDU 243 - Adolescent Development 

PSY 276 - Cognitive Psychology 

4. Elective (At least 1 course from the following group.) 

EDU 100W - Growing Up "Jim Crow" 

EDU 221 - Contemporary Educational Theory and Practice 

EDU 240 - Reading, 'Riting, and Race: The Racial Achievement Gap 

EDU 250 - Multicultural Education 

EDU 300 - Seminar: Special Topics in Education 

EDU 301 - Independent Study in Education 

ENG 100W - Composition and Literature 

ENG 231 - Young Adult Literature 

5. Elective (1 course) 

A 300- or 400-level course (other than an independent study) outside the departments 
of Education and Psychology that would be particularly valuable to students as a 
teacher. In order to count this course toward the concentration, students must submit 
an essay to the Chair of the Department of Education, demonstrating an intellectual 
link between this course and educational studies. 



Concentrations — 195 



Application Procedure: 

The concentration in Education is administered by the Teacher Education Committee. The 
faculty liaison is Dr. Richard Gay. A student must submit written application to the Teacher 
Education Committee by the last class day of the fall semester of the junior year. The proposal must 
specify the courses to be used to satisfy the concentration requirements. Certification of completion 
of all requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar upon the recommendation of the 
Teacher Education Committee. 

ETHNIC STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

The Ethnic Studies Concentration provides students with an understanding of the forces that 
have made African Americans, Native Americans, and Latinos integral, and yet distinct, groups in 
American society. This interdisciplinary course of study, offered by departments in the humanities 
and social sciences, introduces analytical skills that are required to understand the cultural, 
economic and political factors, both historical and modern, that have shaped these ethnic groups. 

The inclusion of theories of ethnicity and race assists students in developing the critical tools 
necessary to understand and evaluate issues of democracy and cultural pluralism in a complex 
country and world. The concentration also encourages comparative study of ethnicity, thus 
emphasizing that the study of ethnic identity and relations is a part of understanding the human 
experience. 

1 . Completion of six courses to include: 

a. Ethnic Relations Course 
ANT 205 - Ethnic Relations 

SOC 205 - Racial and Ethnic Relations 

b. Track Selection 

Three courses from one track and one course from a second track. At least two of 
these four courses must be at the 300 level or higher. An approved independent 
study course may substitute for one of these four courses. 
Africana Track: 

ANT 222 - African Civilizations 

ANT 232 - Contemporary Ghanaian Society and Culture 

EDU 240 - Reading, 'Riting, and Race: The Racial Achievement Gap 

ENG 282 - African American Literature 

ENG 383 - Caribbean Literature 

FRE 361 - Francophone Africa and the Caribbean 

HIS 302 - African American History to 1877 

HIS 303 - African American History since 1877 

HIS 350 - African American Intellectual History 

HIS 357 - The Civil Rights Movement in the United States 

HIS 440 - Slavery in the Americas 

HIS 451 - African American Cultural History 

POL 240 -Politics of Africa 

REL 261 - African American Religious Traditions 



1 96 — Concentrations 



Native American Track: 

ANT 251 - Mesoamerican Civilizations 
ANT 354 - Art and Writing of the Ancient Maya 
ANT 356 - Art, Myth, and History of Ancient Central Mexico 
ENG 286 - Native American Literature 
HIS 441 - Natives and Newcomers in Early America 
Latin American Track: 

MUS 241 - Music of Latin America 

POL 233 - Politics of the Americas 

POL 345 - Evolution and Practice of U.S. Policy in the Americas 

SOC 215 - Latinos in the United States 

SPA 100W - Divided Light: Writing Hispanic Exile 

SPA 244 - U.S. Latino Literature in English 

SPA 374 - Caribbean Peoples, Ideas, and Arts 

SPA 375 - Latin American Women Writers 

c. One course from among the following electives that emphasizes comparative 
ethnic studies or a course from one of the above tracks (provided that no more than 
three courses are chosen from a single track). An approved independent study course 
may substitute for this requirement. 

Electives: 

ANT 208 - Early Cities and States 

ANT 257 - The African Continuum 

ANT 350 - Art, Society and Culture 

ENG 281 - Literature of the American South 

ENG 284 - Ethnic American Literatures 

ENG 394 - Studies in Modern Literature 

HIS 340 - Colonial America 

HIS 343 - The Old South 

HIS 344 - The South since 1865 

MUS 141 - World Musics 

SOC 245 - The Family in Comparative Perspective 

d. Of the six courses applied to the concentration no more than three may also satisfy 
the student's academic major. The six courses must also represent no fewer than three 
academic disciplines. 

2. An approved essay based on a first-hand experience directly related to the student's 
special focus — Africana, Native American, or Latino. Topics may be related to 
participation in an internship, field research, or international study. The essay is due to 
the faculty liaison no later than the fifth week of classes in the semester following the 
completion of the first-hand experience. Standards for the paper are established by the 
faculty liaison. 

3. A grade of "C" or higher is required in all courses applied toward the concentration. 

4. Only one course in any track can be taken pass/ fail, and this depends on GPA. 

Application Procedure: 

The Ethnic Studies Concentration is administered by the Ethnic Studies Advisory Committee. 
The faculty liaison is Dr. Helen Cho. Students must submit a written proposal to the Ethnic Studies 
faculty liaison by the last day of the fall semester of the junior year. The proposal must specify 



Concentrations — 197 



the courses to be used to satisfy the concentration requirements. Certification of completion of all 
the requirements for the concentration is made bv the Registrar upon the recommendation of the 
Ethnic Studies faculty liaison. 

FILM AND MEDIA CONCENTRATION 

The Film and Media Studies Concentration promotes the development of multimedia 
literacy among our students, providing an interdisciplinary understanding of the history, theory, 
language, and cultural aspects of film and other audio-visual media. Combining introductory and 
advanced courses in film and media studies with electives from the humanities and the social 
sciences, the concentration seeks to create critically sensitive readers of film and media while 
fostering insight into one of the principal forms of art and communication in the contemporary era. 
Courses incorporate aesthetic, thematic, and theoretical analysis and include a variety of national 
cinemas in addition to the Hollywood tradition, promoting the multicultural sensitivity essential 
to mature world citizenship. Experience in film or video production helps to prepare students to 
function more effectively and participate more actively in the ever-developing multimedia culture 
of the 21st century. 

Some departments offer seminars or permit independent studies in film and media. Check 
with the faculty liaison for specific approval (prior to enrollment) to include one of these in the 
concentration. 

Requirements: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of six courses to include: 

a. CIS 220 - Introduction to Film and Media Studies 

b. CIS 421 - Seminar in Film and Media Studies 

c. Four electives selected from the following courses: 
ANT 382 - Anthropology of Visual Culture 

CHI 207 - Engendering Chinese Cinema 

CHI 405 - Seminar: Topics in Chinese Cinema and Modern Literature 

CIS 315 - Masterpieces of French Cinema (in English) 

ENG 293 - Film as Narrative Art 

ENG 393 - Studies in Literature and the Visual Arts 

ENG 493 - Film Art 

FRE 365 - Masterpieces of French Cinema 

SPA 352 - Contemporary Latin American Cinema 

SPA 353 - Contemporary Spanish Film 

2. No more than two production courses may be included in the concentration. 

3. Only one independent study may be included in the concentration. 

4. No more than two courses in the concentration may also be in the student's major 
field of study. 

5. No more than two courses taken away from Davidson may be counted toward the 
concentration. 

6. A grade of "C-"or higher must be earned in all graded courses applied toward the 
concentration. 

Application Procedure 

The Film and Media Studies Concentration is administered by the Film and Media Studies 
Advisory Committee. The faculty liaison is Dr. Maggie McCarthy. Students submit a written 



198 — Concentrations 



application to the Advisory Committee by the last day of the fall semester of the junior year. The 
application will specify the courses to be used to satisfy the concentration requirements. If one 
of the proposed electives is an independent study, the student shall provide for the Advisory 
Committee's approval a complete description of that course prior to the term of enrollment. 
Certification of completion of all the requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar 
upon the recommendation of the Film and Media Studies Advisory Committee. 

GENDER STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

A Gender Studies Concentration offers students the opportunity to explore traditional 
disciplines through an interdisciplinary perspective that focuses on the significance of gender as 
a social construct. Students study the unique contributions of women and men to society, science, 
humanities, and the arts; the importance of gender and gender roles in a variety of social and 
historical contexts; and new scholarly methods and theories arising from interdisciplinary study. 
The concentration encourages students to examine historical and contemporary representations 
of women and men in religion, in the arts and literature, in social and political theory, and in the 
sciences. It fosters scholarly investigation that recognizes gender as an empirical reality. While 
the immediate goal of Gender Studies is to stimulate intellectual curiosity and to provide new 
strategies for investigation, the long-term goal is to help Davidson men and women function freely 
and fairly in the world. 

Application Procedure: 

The Gender Studies Concentration is administered by the Gender Studies Advisory Committee 
of the Faculty. The faculty liaison is Dr. Ann Fox. Students shall meet with the faculty liaison to 
declare the concentration by the last day of fall semester of the junior year. During this meeting, 
the student and faculty liaison will discuss the courses to be used to satisfy the concentration 
requirements. If one of the proposed electives is an independent study, tutorial, practicum, or 
internship, the student shall provide to the faculty liaison for the Advisory Committee's approval 
a complete description of that course prior to the term of enrollment. Certification of completion of 
all the requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar upon the recommendation of 
the Gender Studies Advisory Committee. 

Requirements: 

1. Satisfactory completion of 5 courses to include: 

a. one introductory course from: 
ENG 295 - Women Writers 

HIS 306 - American Women to 1870 

HIS 307 - American Women, 1870 to the Present 

POL 215 - The Politics of Feminism 

SOC 217 - Gender and Society 

b. one 400-level seminar or a department seminar to be designated by the Advisory 
Committee; 

c. three electives, one of which must be at the 300- or 400-level. Electives are selected 
from any course in section a. above as well as the following group: 

ANT 343 - Gender, Power, and Culture 
ART 222 - Painted Women, Women Painting 
CHI 207 - Engendering Chinese Cinema 



Concentrations — 199 



ECO 227 - Gender and Economics 

ENG 261 - Modern Drama 

ENG 282 - African American Literature 

ENG 392 - Studies in Literature by Women 

FRE 223 - Childhood and Youth 

FRE 225 - Male and Female 

FRE 320 - The French Novel 

HIS 225 - Women and Work: Gender and Society in Britain, 1700-1918 

HIS 228 - The Modern Body: Gender, Sex, and Politics in France 

HIS 336 - European Women and Gender, 1650-Present 

HIS 364 - Gender and History in Latin America 

HIS 422 - Gender in Early Modern Europe (C. 15th-18th Centuries) 

POL 205 - Family and Justice 

REL 142 - Autobiography and Religion 

REL 248 - Christianity and Nature 

REL 320 - The Genesis Narrative 

REL 355 - Woman and the Body in the Christian Tradition 

REL 365 - Women in American Religion 

SOC 246 - American Families 

SOC 310 - Gender, Race, and Sports 

SPA 375 - Latin American Women Writers 

2. A maximum of one elective may be an independent study, tutorial or practicum. 

3. Only two courses in the concentration may be in the student's major field of study. 

4. A grade of "C-" or higher is required in all courses applied toward the concentration. 

Additional Information: The above list, while as complete as possible, is not exhaustive. Every 
semester, as new courses are developed and extant courses are revised, there are often courses not 
on this list which can be approved as electives for the Gender Studies Concentration. In addition, 
many departments offer special topics courses that can be approved as electives for the Gender 
Studies Concentration. Please check with the faculty liaison for the most current, complete listing 
of approved electives when planning a program of study. If there is a question about when a 
particular elective will next be offered, please consult the department offering that course. 

GENOMICS CONCENTRATION 

In 1953, two young scientists published the structure of DNA, a Nobel Prize winning discovery 
that gave birth to the interdisciplinary field of genomics. Beginning in 1990, scientists around the 
world embarked upon the Human Genome Project, with the goal of determining the composition 
of the entire human genome. The project is now complete, but there is so much more to learn 
from the genome: how our bodies function, how to prevent diseases, what makes different species 
unique, and even how life evolved on earth. 

To ensure that future scientists, physicians, and policymakers are prepared to take full 
advantage of the genomic revolution, the National Research Council (NRC) issued a report 
(Bio2010) calling upon academic institutions to alter the way undergraduates prepare for post- 
baccalaureate education. The genomics concentration fulfills NRC recommendations to provide 
undergraduates with a strong foundation in biological, mathematical, physical, and information 
sciences. The diverse academic background provided by this concentration in the context of a 



200 — Concentrations 



liberal arts education will help prepare students of all majors for exciting fields such as drug 
discovery, pharmaceutical industry, biomedical sciences, patent law, and ethics. 

Application Procedure: 

Students interested in pursuing the Genomics Concentration should contact one of the two 
primary advisors (Drs. Malcolm Campbell and Laurie Heyer) as early as possible to discuss 
curriculum options. Those who decide to pursue the concentration must submit a written 
application to either of the primary genomics advisors no later than the last day of the spring term 
in their junior year. Certification of completion of all requirements for the concentration is made by 
the Registrar upon the recommendation of the Genomics Advisory Committee. 

Requirements: 

The Genomics Concentration requires six courses (only five courses if Bio 309 is offered 
with a lab) that meet the criteria below, with no more than two courses "double counting" for the 
concentration and a student's major. No more than three of these six courses may be listed under 
any single department or prefix (i.e., CSC). No more than one of these six courses can be taken 
pass/ fail. A maximum of one transfer course credit can be applied towards the concentration if 
approved by the advisors. 

1 . Two* or Three required courses 

*Only CIS 310 and BIO 309 if BIO 309 is offered with a lab. 
BIO 309 - Genomics, Proteomics, and Systems Biology 
BIO 343 - Laboratory Methods in Genomics 
CSC 310 - Bioinformatics 

2. Three courses from the list below. However, no more than two of these three courses can 
come from a single course prefix (department or CSC). The purpose of the requirement is 
to foster additional diversity in a student's curriculum. Because of their similarity, either 
CSC 121 or PHY 200 can be applied towards the concentration, but not both. 

BIO 301 -Genetics 

BIO 302 - Microbiology 

BIO 303 - Biochemistry 

BIO 304 - Molecular Biology 

BIO 306 - Developmental Biology 

BIO 308 -Cell Biology 

BIO 351, 352 - Group Investigations 

BIO 371, 372, 373 - Research/ Independent Study 

CHE 303 - Bioorganic Chemistry 

CHE 306 - Biophysical Chemistry 

CHE 309 - Medicinal Chemistry 

CHE 371 - Instrumental Analysis 

CHE 450 - Advanced Biochemistry 

CSC 121 - Programming and Problem Solving 

CSC 231 - Data Structures 

CSC 323 - Object-Oriented Programming 

CSC 331 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms 

CSC 395, 396 - Independent Study 

MAT 210 - Mathematical Modeling 



Concentrations — 201 



MAT 235 - Differential Equations and Infinite Series 

MAT 340 - Probability 

MAT 341 - Mathematical Statistics 

MAT 360 - Introduction to Topology 

MAT 391, 392 - Independent Study 

MAT 491, 492 - Independent Study 

PHY 200 - Computational Physics (= CSC 200) 

PHY 201 - Mathematical Methods for Scientists 

PHY 310 - Electronics and Instrumentation 

PITY 397 - Independent Study in Advanced Software Development in Science 

PSY 276 - Cognitive Psychology 

PSY 282 -Learning 

PSY 284 - Drugs and Behavior 

PSY 301 - Psychological Research-Perception and Attention 

PSY 302 - Psychological Research-Behavioral Pharmacology 

PSY 303 - Psychological Research-Behavioral Neuroscience 

PSY 304 - Psychological Research-Memory 

PSY 310 - Psychological Research-Design and Analysis 

PSY 324 - Functional Neuroanatomy 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

Given the international focus of contemporary problems, students have the possibility 
of studying how different disciplines contribute to understanding and formulating effective 
solutions to these global challenges. The International Studies Concentration offers a student the 
opportunity to pursue a coherent, multi-disciplined program in international studies. 

Requirements: 

1. Six courses chosen from the list of approved courses in international studies. Three 
courses shall be of a general international or multi-cultural nature; three courses shall be related to 
one particular geographic area. The six courses, at least two of which must be at or above the 300 
level, shall be distributed among at least three departments and may include no more than two 
courses from the department of the applicant's major. A grade of "C" or higher must be earned on 
any graded course in order for the course to count toward the concentration. The approved list of 
courses is updated annually and available from the faculty liaison. 

2. Proficiency in a modern foreign language, according to standards set by each language 
department or by the Director of the Self-Instructional Language Program (SILP). This proficiency 
is to be at a level significantly above that required for graduation. Students should consult the chair 
of the relevant department or the Director of SILP prior to submitting applications. 

3. A summer, semester, or year during the student's college career spent in study or work 
outside the United States. Each candidate shall submit a reflective and substantive paper based on 
the experience abroad to the chair of the International Education Committee by early April of the 
senior year, according to standards specified by that committee. Note: In those individual cases in 
which financial limitations cannot be overcome and thus prevent an international experience, the 
International Education Committee may assign a substitute experience. 



202 — Concentrations 



Application Procedure: 

The International Studies Concentration is administered by the International Education 
Committee of the faculty. The faculty liaison is Dr. Dennis R. Appleyard. Students shall submit 
a written application to the Committee by the conclusion of the late Drop/ Add period of the fall 
semester of the senior year. Certification of completion of all the requirements for the concentration 
is made by the Registrar upon the recommendation of the International Education Committee. 

MEDICAL HUMANITIES CONCENTRATION 

Davidson's Medical Humanities Program promotes an interdisciplinary understanding of 
medicine and health care. It enables students to appreciate the strengths and limits of the natural 
sciences, social sciences and humanities as they seek to explain and to achieve a measure of control 
over disease, illness and suffering. It helps students to grasp the institutional character of health 
care delivery, especially how legal and political institutions influence the production, distribution 
and delivery of services. 

Medical Humanities courses emphasize the role ethical values play in defining problems 
as "medical," worthy of scientific study, calling for mobilization of social as well as individual 
resources. The courses help students to develop the analytical skills that permit clear thinking and 
writing about the complex trade-offs involved in developing, using and paying for health care. 

The Davidson/CMC Connection. In 1990, Davidson College and the Carolinas Medical 
Center joined in a formal agreement "to cooperate and share resources toward the common betterment of 
health care, the education and training of physicians, and improved understanding of the relationship between 
medicine and society. " Under the auspices of this agreement, Davidson students enjoy access to an 
expanded range of educational opportunities that only a large teaching hospital can provide. 

Requirements: 

1 . PHI 130 - Medical Ethics required of all 

2. Five electives, only two of which count toward the major. No more than two electives 
may be taken from any one department or from those listed by the Center for 
Interdisciplinary Studies. Electives are selected from: 

ANT 340 - Medical Anthropology 

BIO 331 - Behavioral Neuroscience (= PSY 303) 

CIS 380 - Issues in Medicine 

CIS 381 - Health Regulation and Public Policy 

CIS 388 - History of Medical Law 

CIS 390 - Health Care Ethics 

CIS 397 - Future of American Health Care 

ECO 222 - Health Economics 

ENG 101W - Ethics and Technologies of Medicine 

PHI 215 - Ethics 

PSY 231 - Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 245 - Psychology of Aging 

PSY 303 - Psychological Research-Behavioral Neuroscience 

PSY 314 - Psychological Research-Clinical 

PSY 315 - Psychological Research-Child Development 

PSY 324 - Functional Neuroanatomy (= BIO 332) 



Concentrations — 203 



REL 256 - Religion, Ethics, and Medicine 
SOC 360 - Medical Sociology 
With the written approval of the program Director, departmental seminars from 
biology, philosophy, political science, or psychology may also be included as electives for the 
concentration. 

Additional electives may be proposed. One of the electives may be an independent study, 
tutorial, or practicum arranged with a member of the Medical Humanities faculty- Students 
planning to do this must meet with Dr. Lance Stell. 

Application Procedure: 

The Medical Humanities Advisory Council oversees and guides the Medical Humanities 
Concentration which is administered by Dr. Lance Stell, the program Director. Students interested 
in completing the concentration should obtain an application form in Preyer 105 and arrange to 
meet with Dr. Stell to review the application and proposal for the concentration. If one of the 
proposed electives is an independent study or practicum, the student shall ordinarily provide 
for approval a complete description of that course prior to the term of enrollment. Any changes 
to the courses used to fulfill the concentration must be submitted in writing to the director for 
his approval. Certification of completion of all requirements for the concentration is made by the 
Registrar upon the recommendation of the Director of the Medical Humanities Program. 

NEUROSCIENCE CONCENTRATION 

Life scientists have come to recognize that an understanding of how the brain, the "organ of 
consciousness," functions and endows human beings with the capacity to know, to feel, and to 
value, requires a multidisciplinary research effort. The Neuroscience Concentration introduces 
students to a field of science that has experienced an explosion of information and technological 
innovation. It provides students with a model for understanding how the conventional boundaries 
separating disciplines appearing to be incompatible can evaporate when new intellectual challenges 
confront us. In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the concentration provides students with an 
opportunity to explore another dimension of our humanity — the biological substrate of all our 
moral and mental faculties. 

Requirements: 

The Neuroscience Concentration requires a minimum of six courses and involves two 
components: 

1. Required Courses: 

a. PSY 303 - Psychological Research-Behavioral Neuroscience 

b. Students must take at least one of the following two courses. Taking both is highly 
recommended; if both are taken one may be considered as an elective toward the 
concentration. 

BIO 333 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience OR 
PSY 324 - Functional Neuroanatomy 

2. At least three electives chosen from a list annually reviewed and approved by the 
Neuroscience Advisory Committee (one from outside student's major and one — and 
only one — must be independent study/ research): 

ANT 102 - Humankind Evolving 
BIO 301 - Genetics 



204 — Concentrations 



BIO 303 - Biochemistry 
BIO 304 - Molecular Biology 
BIO 306 - Developmental Biology 
BIO 307 - Immunology 
BIO 308 -Cell Biology 

BIO 309 - Genomics, Proteomics, and Systems Biology 
BIO 310 - Bioinformatics (= CSC 310) 
BIO 311 - Comparative Anatomy 
BIO 312 - Animal Physiology 
BIO 323 - Animal Behavior (= PSY 323) 
BIO 341 - Biostatistics and Experimental Design 
BIO 351, 352 - Group Investigations 
BIO 361, 362 - Seminar 

BIO 371, 372, 373 - Research/ Independent Study 
CHE 303 - Bioorganic Chemistry 
CHE 308 - Chemistry of Biomedical Polymers 
CHE 309 - Medicinal Chemistry 
MAT 210 - Mathematical Modeling 
PHI 130 - Medical Ethics 
PHI 217 - Philosophy of Mind 
PSY 195 - Independent Study 
PSY 231 - Abnormal Psychology 
PSY 276 - Cognitive Psychology 
PSY 282 -Learning 
PSY 284 - Drugs and Behavior 

PSY 301 - Psychological Research-Perception and Attention 
PSY 302 - Psychological Research-Behavioral Pharmacology 
PSY 304 - Psychological Research-Memory 
PSY 305 - Psychological Research-Learning 
PSY 310 - Psychological Research-Design and Analysis 
PSY 330-349 -Tutorial 

PSY 350-380 - Advanced Seminars in Experimental Psychology 
Note: No more than two courses in the concentration may also be counted toward the major. 
A grade of "C" or higher is required in all courses applied toward the concentration. 

Application Procedures: 

The Neuroscience Concentration is administered by the Neuroscience Advisory Committee. 
The faculty liaison is Dr. Julio Ramirez. Students shall submit a written proposal to the Advisory 
Committee by the last day of the spring semester of the junior year. The proposal should specify 
the courses that will be used to satisfy the concentration requirements. If any of the courses are 
to be independent studies, research courses, or seminars, the student must provide the Advisory 
Committee with a complete description of that course before the semester of enrollment. 
Certification of completion of all requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar upon 
recommendation of the Neuroscience Advisory Committee. 



Concentrations — 205 



SOUTHERN STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

A concentration in Southern Studies offers students the opportunity to explore traditional 
disciplines through an interdisciplinary perspective that focuses on the significance of the 
American South and societies in the western hemisphere that directly affected its development 
as a region comprised of different cultures and peoples. Students study the American South and 
its history, politics, religious traditions, visual and musical images, languages, archeological past, 
natural environment, as well as its future. This concentration encourages students to examine the 
myths and realities of life in the South and to foster scholarly investigation of this unique and 
fascinating region in order to understand its place and role in the nation. While the immediate goal 
of a concentration in Southern Studies is to stimulate intellectual curiosity and to provide strategies 
for investigation of this region, the long term goal is to help Davidson students understand the 
universal by examining the particular and come to a greater understanding of the larger world. 

Requirements: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of five courses or their equivalent to include: 

a. One introductory course 

ENG 281 - Literature of the American South 

HIS 343 -The Old South 

HIS 344 - The South since 1865 

b. At least one 300- or 400-level seminar 
HIS 440 - Slavery 7 in the Americas 

HIS 451 - African American Cultural History 
HIS 455 - Law and Society in American History 

c. Three electives chosen from the approved list of courses below. One elective may be 
an independent study (390s), practicum, or summer internship undertaken with the 
approval of the Advisory Committee. 

ANT 205 - Ethnic Relations 

ANT 222 - African Civilizations 

ANT 257 - The African Continuum 

ECO 221 - Economic History of the United States 

ENG 281 - Literature of the American South 

ENG 282 - African American Literature 

ENG 383 - Caribbean Literature 

FRE 361 - Francophone Africa and the Caribbean 

HIS 302 - African American History to 1877 

HIS 303 - African American History since 1877 

HIS 340 - Colonial America 

HIS 343 -The Old South 

HIS 344 - The South since 1865 

HIS 346 - The Civil War and Reconstruction 

HIS 357 - The Civil Rights Movement in the United States 

HIS 440 - Slavery in the Americas 

HIS 451 - African American Cultural History 

HIS 455 - Law and Society in American History 

MUS 122 - Music of the United States 

REL 361 - Religion in the American South 



206 — Concentrations 



SOC 205 - Racial and Ethnic Relations 

SPA 374 - Caribbean Peoples, Ideas, and Arts 

2. Only two courses in the student's major may be counted toward the concentration; no 
more than two courses in any one department may be counted toward the concentration; 
and no more than two courses focusing on the Caribbean may count toward this 
concentration. 

3. A grade of "C-" or higher is required in all courses counted toward the concentration. 

4. In addition many departments offer special topics courses that are or can be approved 
as electives for the Southern Studies Concentration. Please check with the faculty liaison 
for a complete listing and approvals when planning a program of study. 

Application Procedures: 

The Southern Studies Concentration is administered by the Southern Studies Advisory 
Committee. The faculty liaison is Dr. Sally McMillen. Students shall submit a written application 
to the Advisory Committee by the end of fall semester of their junior year. The application 
will designate the courses to be used to satisfy concentration requirements. Any internship or 
course taken at another institution must be approved by the Advisory Committee. Certification 
of completion of all requirements for the concentration is made by the Registrar upon the 
recommendation of the Southern Studies Advisory Committee. 



OFFICIAL RECORD, 2006-07 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES (As of January 1, 2007) 

Davidson College is governed by a Board of Trustees. Twenty-four of the Trustees represent 
the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), sixteen of which are confirmed by the presbyteries within the 
State of North Carolina, and eight at-large from the national membership. Twelve are elected at- 
large by the Trustees themselves and eight bv the alumni. In addition, five members of the Board 
serve ex officio, including the President-elect and President of the National Alumni Association, 
the Chair and Past Chair of the Board of Visitors, and the President of the College. 

John F. McCartney, Chair Chicago, Illinois 

Chair, Westcon Group, Inc. 

Katie B. Morris, Vice Chair Southern Pines, North Carolina 

Director, The Katherine and Thomas M. Belk Foundation 

Beverly S. Hance, Secretary Charlotte, North Carolina 

Private Investor, Community Leader 

Robert J. Abernethv, President, American Standard Development Co. — Los Angeles, California 

Carlos E. Alvarez, Chief Executive Officer, The Gambrinus Company — San Antonio, Texas 

Robert L. Avinger, Jr., Chairman, OPT Capital, LLC — Charlotte, North Carolina 

Frances W. Baker, Pediatrician - Norfolk, Virginia 

Sarah P. Boehmler, Retired Vice President, American Stock Exchange — New York, New York 

Ann Hayes Browning, Project Coordinator, Trust for Public Land — Charlotte, NC 

Lowell L. Bryan, Director, McKinsey & Company, Inc. — New York, New York 

M. Erwin Carter, President, Newbold Corporation — Lithonia, Georgia 

John W. Chidsey, HI, CEO, Burger King Corporation — Miami, Florida 

Howard W. Covington, Jr., Partner, Covington/ Tutman Properties — Greenville, SC 

Kenneth S. Crews, Managing Director, Greenhill & Company — Dallas, Texas 

Debbie D. Darden, Former Educator - Charlotte, North Carolina 

Charles L. Davidson, m, Chair & Chief Executive Officer, The Brookdale Group, LLC, - Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert E. Dunham, Pastor, University Presbyterian Church - Chapel Hill, NC 

Elisabeth C. Ervin, Retired Educator - Morganton, North Carolina 

W. Wyche Fowler, Jr., President, Wyche Fowler International - Washington, D.C 



208 — Trustees 



S. Taylor Glover, President & Chief Executive Officer, Turner Enterprises, Inc. —Atlanta, Georgia 

Deny Harper, Chief of Audit & Investigations, Citizens Property Insurance —Tallahassee, Florida 

Lucinda Kellam Jones, Homemaker — Winston-Salem, NC 

Lawrence M. Kimbrough, President Emeritus, First Charter Corporation — Charlotte, North Carolina 

J. Gilmour Lake, Retired Former Owner and Chief Executive Officer, Computer Credit, Inc. — Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina 

S. Sherburne Laughlin, Adjunct Professor & Manager-in-Residence, Non Profit Management, American 
University — Bethesda, Maryland 

Paul R. Leonard, Jr., Chairman Emeritus, Habitat for Humanity International —Davidson, North 
Carolina 

Elizabeth Brooks Mailander, Homemaker — Arlington, Va. 

Ross W. Manire, Chief Executive Officer, Clearlinx Network Corporation — Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

William N. Mathis, President, Gulf States Investments, Energy Services — Houston, Texas 

Calvin E. Murphy, Partner/ Attorney, Murphy & Gibson, PLLC — Charlotte, North Carolina 

A. Alex Porter, President, Porter Orlin, LLC— New York, New York 

Sara Tatum Pottenger, Retired Banker, Community Volunteer — Durham, North Carolina 

William L. Rikard, Jr., Partner/ Attorney, Parker, Poe, Adams & Bernstein — Charlotte, North 
Carolina 

Patricia A. Rodgers, President & Chief Executive Officer, Rodgers Builders, Inc. —Charlotte, North 
Carolina 

John B. Rogers, Jr., Retired Minister, Covenant Presbyterian Church — Charlotte, North Carolina 

Thomas W. Ross, Sr., Executive Director, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation — Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina 

Stephen L. Salyer, President and Chief Executive Officer, Salzburg Seminar — Silver Spring, Maryland 

Mitzi Short, Vice President, Multicultural Marketing and Strategic Initiatives, PepsiCo, Inc. — Purchase, 
New York 

Arnold H. Snider, Retired General Partner, Deerfield Management — Princeton, New Jersey 

Laura M. Spangler, Pastor, Lloyd Presbyterian Church — Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Raymond L. Swetenburg, Jr., Pediatrician, Eastover Pediatrics — Charlotte, North Carolina 

Samuel V. Tallman, Retired Partner, Knight, Tallman & Co., LLC — Saint Petersburg, Florida 

Amelia C. Taylor, Former Field Hockey Coach, Cape Fear Academy — Wilmington, North Carolina 

Todd S. Thomson, Founder & Chief Executive Officer, Headwaters Capital, LLC, Ripplewood Holdings, 
LLC - New York, New York 



Trustees/Retired Faculty — 209 



Robert F. Vagt, President, Davidson College — Davidson, North Carolina 

Kenneth D. Weeks, Jr., Phvsician, Cardiologist, MidCarolina Cardiology — Mooresville, North 
Carolina 

Carolann C. VVillingham, Teacher Assistant, Wake Count}' Public Schools — Raleigh, North Carolina 

Janet H. Wilson, Community Leader— Lenoir, North Carolina 



RETIRED FACULTY (as of August 1,2006) 



Samuel Reid Spencer, Jr., President Emeritus of the College and (1951, 1983) 

Professor Emeritus of History' 

A.B. pavidson), M.A., PhD. (Harvard), L.L.D. (Davidson), L.H.D. (Oglethorpe, Queens, 
Bridgewater, Marvmount, Hollins, Man' Baldwin), Litt.D. (Washington and Lee) 

John W. Kuykendall, President Emeritus of the College and (1984, 2003) 

Samuel E. and Mary W. Thatcher Professor Emeritus of Religion 
B.A. (Davidson), B.D. (Union Seminary-Richmond), S.T.M. (Yale) 
M.A., PhD. (Princeton), DD. (Hanover), L.H.D. (Wofford) 

Anthony S. Abbott, Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of English (1964, 2001) 

A.B. (Princeton), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Horace Alden Bryan, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1955, 1992) 

A.B. (King), PhD. (Tennessee) 

John Nicholas Burnett, Maxwell Chambers Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1968, 1997) 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (Emory) 

Richard Clyde Burts, Jr., Registrar Emeritus and Professor Emeritus of Psychology (1961, 1985) 

A.B. (Furman), M.A., Ed.D. (Columbia) 

Thomas A. Cartmill, Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (1974, 1985) 

B.S. (Springfield), M.Ed. (Johns Hopkins) 

John Addis Casev, Executive Director and Professor Emeritus of information Technology (1983, 2005) 
B.S. (Loyola), M.S., Ph.D. (Michigan State) 

Richard Car gill Cole, Virginia Lasater Irvin Professor Emeritus of English (1961, 1993) 

A.B. (Hamilton), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 

Jean S. Cornell, Associate Professor Emerita of Speech (1971, 1987) 

B.A. (Ohio Wesleyan), M.S.J. (Northwestern), MA. (Arizona) 

Charles D. Dockerv, Professor Emeritus of French (1974, 2003) 

B.A. (Earlham), M.A., Ph.D. (Iowa) 

James Monroe Fredericksen, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1957, 1989) 

B.S. (Richmond), Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Dirk French, W. R. Grey Professor Emeritus of Classics (1967, 2001) 

A.B. (Lawrence), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 



210 — Retired Faculty 



William Francis Frey, Professor Emeritus of Physics (1960, 1999) 

A.B. (King), M.S.,' Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 

Ralph William Gable, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1960, 1994) 

B.S. (Texas), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

David Carroll Grant, Professor Emeritus of Biology (1968, 2000) 

A.B. (Wooster), Ph.D. (Yale) 

John Gill Holland, Professor Emeritus of English (1967, 2004) 

A.B. (Washington & Lee), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Douglas Clay Houchens, Professor Emeritus of Art (1953, 1978) 

B.F.A., M.F.A. (Richmond Professional Institute) 

Grant D. Jones, Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of Anthropology (1985, 2003) 

BA. (Florida State), M.A., Ph.D. (Brandeis) 

Robert David Kaylor, James Sprunt Professor Emeritus of Religion (1964, 1999) 

A.B. (Southwestern), B.D. (Louisville Seminary), Ph.D. (Duke) 

John D. Kelton, Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of Psychology (1959, 1997) 

B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Donald L. Kirnmel, Jr., Professor Emeritus of Biology (1971, 2000) 

A.B. (Swarthmore), M.D. (Temple), Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Lunsford Richardson King, Richardson Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1964, 2002) 

B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. puke) 

George Labban, Jr., W. R. Grey Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies (1952, 1984) 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (Texas) 

Malcolm Lester, Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of History (1959, 1989) 

A.B. (Mercer), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Glenn Carlos Lindsey, Professor Emeritus of Economics (1958, 1998) 

B.B.A., M.B.A. (Georgia) 

Samuel Dow Maloney, James Sprunt Professor Emeritus of Religion and Philosophy (1954, 1994) 

A.B. pavidson), B.D., Th.M., Th.D. pnion Seminary-Richmond) 

Robert John Manning, Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of Physics and Humanities (1968, 2005) 
A.B. (Gettysburg), M.S., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Robert E. Maydole, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (1974, 2005) 

B.S. (St. Joseph's), Ph.D. (Boston University) 

Winfred Pleasants Minter, Professor Emeritus of Political Science (1957, 1981) 

B.S., M.S. (Virginia Polytechnic), Ph.D. (Chicago) 

Martha R. McAlister, Lecturer Emerita in Speech (1987, 2003) 

B.S. (Northwestern), M.A. (UNC Greensboro) 

Alexander Jeffrey McKelway, Paul B. Freeland Professor Emeritus of Religion (1965, 1998) 

A.B. (Davidson), B.A. (Princeton Seminary), Th.D. (Basel) 



Retired Faculty — 211 



C. Louise Nelson, Professor Emerita of Economics (1964, 1988) 

B.S., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Leland Madison Park, Director Emeritus of the Davidson College Library (1967, 2006) 

A.B. pavidson), M.Ln. (Emory), Adv. M. in L.S., Ph.D. (Florida State)' 

Malcolm Overstreet Partin, Man 7 Reynolds Babcock Professor Emeritus of History (1968, 2003) 

A.B. (UNC Chapel Hill), MA, PhD. (Duke) 

Jack R. Pern 7 , Director Emeritus of the Dean Rusk Program in International Studies and Professor 
Emeritus of Political Science (1985, 1995) 

A.B. (Mercer), M.A., Ph.D. (Columbia) 

Max Eugene Pollev, J.W. Cannon Professor Emeritus of Religion (1956, 1993) 

A.B. (Albion), B.D., Ph.D. (Duke) 

J. Harris Proctor, Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of Political Science (1970, 1991) 

A.B. (Duke), M.A. (Hetcher School of Law and Diplomacy), Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Charles Edward Ratliff, Jr., William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor Emeritus of Economics (1947, 1992) 

B.S. pavidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Jem Allan Roberts, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1965, 1993) 

B.E.Py., M.S., Ph.D. (North Carolina State) 

Janet Harrison Shannon, Associate Professor Emerita of Sociology (1990, 1996) 

B.S. (Saint Joseph's), M.A., Ph.D. (Temple) 

Junius Brutus Stroud, Richardson Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1960, 1994) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

William Holt Tern-, Dean of Students Emeritus (1962, 1994) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.Div., D.Min. (Union Seminan-Richmond) 

Hallam Walker, Professor Emeritus of French (1965, 1985) 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Wilmer Hayden Welsh, Professor Emeritus of Music (1963, 1991) 

B.S. (Johns Hopkins), B.M., M.M., Artist's Diploma (Peabody Conservatory) 

Robert C. Williams, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty Emeritus and Vail 
Professor Emeritus of History (1986, 2004) 

B.A. (Wesleyan), A.M., Ph.D~ (Hanard) 

John H. Williamson, Herman Brown Professor Emeritus of Biology (1981, 2000) 

B.S. (North Carolina State), M.S. (Cornell), Ph.D. (University of Georgia, Athens) 

Albert Allen Wolf, Professor Emeritus of Physics (1965, 1991) 

B.A., M.A. (Vanderbilt), Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology) 

Erich-Oskar Joachim Siegfried Wruck, Professor Emeritus of German (1962, 1994) 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (Rutgers) 

T.C. Price Zimmermann, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty Emeritus and 
Charles A. Dana Professor Emeritus of Histon (1977, 1999) 

B.A. (Williams), B.A., M.A. (Oxford), A.M., Ph.D. (Hanard) 



212 — Continuing Faculty 



CONTINUING FACULTY, 2006-2007 (as of August 1, 2006) 

(tenured/tenure-track appointments) 



Peter J. Ahrensdorf, Professor of Political Science and Humanities (1989, 2003) 

B.A. (Yale), Ph.D. (University of Chicago) 

Daniel W. Aldridge III, Associate Professor of History (2000, 2004) 

B.A. (Michigan State), J.D. (Northwestern University Law School), Ph.D. (Emory) 

Dennis R. Appleyard, James B. Duke Professor of International Studies (1989, 1989) 

and Professor of Economics 
A.B. (Ohio Wesleyan), A.M., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

** Ruth L. Ault, Nancy and Erwin Maddrey Professor of Psychology (1979, 1989) 

B.A. (Pomona), M.A., Ph.D. (UCLA) 

Ben Baker, Professor of Economics (1997, 2006) 

B.A. (Wofford), M.A. (University of South Carolina, Columbia) 

Robin Bruce Barnes, Professor of History (1980, 1994) 

B.A. (Colby), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Cole Barton, Professor of Psychology (1983, 1994) 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (Utah) 

Ruth Freitag Beeston, Professor of Chemistry (1984, 1998) 

B.S. (Bucknell), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Mario J. Belloni, Associate Professor of Physics (1998, 2005) 

B.A. (University of California, Berkeley), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Connecticut) 

+ Jonathan P. Berkey, Professor of History and Humanities (1993, 2004) 

B.A. (Williams), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Karen Kabat Bernd, Associate Professor of Biology (1998, 2004) 

B.A. (Franklin and Marshall), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Irl C. Bivens, Professor of Mathematics (1982, 1992) 

A.B. (Pfeiffer), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

David N. Blauch, Professor of Chemistry (1993, 2006) 

B.S. (Lebanon Valley College), Ph.D. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) 

**Mauro Botelho, Associate Professor of Music (1990, 1996) 

B.M., M.M. (University of Cincinnati), Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Daniel M. Boye, Professor of Physics (1989, 2001) 

B.S. (Emory & Henry), Ph.D. (University of Georgia, Athens) 

Laurence S. Cain, Professor of Physics (1978, 1992) 

B.S. (Wake Forest), M.S., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

A. Malcolm Campbell, Associate Professor of Biology (1994, 2000) 

B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 



Continuing Faculty — 213 



Shireen E. Campbell, Associate Professor of English (1993, 1999) 

B.A. (Florida Atlantic), MA., Ph.D. (Tulane) 

Felix Alvin Carroll, Jr., Joseph R. Morton Professor of Chemistry (1972, 1986) 

B.S. (UNC Chapel Hill), Ph.D. (California Institute of Technology) 

Vema M. Case, Charles A. Dana Professor of Biology (1974, 1991) 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 

Tara Villa Chamra, Instructor in Music (2003, 2004) 

B.A. (Franklin and Marshall), M.M. (Perm State University) 

Timothy P. Chartier, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2003, 2003) 

B.S., M.S. (Western Michigan), Ph.D. (University of Colorado, Boulder) 

Kelly A. Chaston, Associate Professor of Economics (1997, 2003) 

B.A. (Rhode Island), MA. (University of New Hampshire), Ph.D. (Boston College) 

Keyne A. Cheshire, Assistant Professor of Classics (2002, 2002) 

B.A. (Carleton), M.A., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Helen Cho, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (2002, 2002) 

B.A., B.S. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), 
M.A., Ph.D. (University of Missouri, Columbia) 

Wolfgang Christian, Herman Brown Professor of Physics (1983, 1993) 

B.S., Ph.D. (North Carolina State) 

Suzanne W. Churchill, Associate Professor of English (1996, 2002) 

B.A. (Middlebury), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Ann Marie Costa, Professor of Theatre (1994, 2004) 

B.F.A. (Boston Conservatory of Music), M.F.A. (University of Pittsburgh) 

** Russell Crandall, Associate Professor of Political Science (2000, 2006) 

B.A. (Bowdoin), M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Stephen L. Davis, Professor of Mathematics (1981, 1996) 

B.A. (Lindenwood), Ph.D. (Rutgers) 

Scott D. Denham, Professor of German (1990, 2004) 

A.B. (University of Chicago), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Joseph R. Dennis, Assistant Professor of History (2005, 2005) 

B.S. (University of Wisconsin-Madison), J.D., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities) 

Vivien E. Dietz, E. Craig Wall, Jr. Distinguished Teaching Professor in Humanities and Associate 
Professor of History and Humanities (1990, 1996) 

A.B. (Harvard), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Michael Edwin Dorcas, Associate Professor of Biology (1998, 2004) 

B.S., M.S. (University of Texas at Arlington), Ph.D. (Idaho State) 

C. Earl Edmondson, Professor of History (1970, 1985) 

B.A. (Mississippi College), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 



214 — Continuing Faculty 



Hansford M. Epes, Jr., Registrar and Professor of German and Humanities (1964, 1985) 

A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

** Amanda Ewington, Assistant Professor of Russian (2002, 2002) 

B.A. (Barnard), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago) 

Nancy J. Fairley, Professor of Anthropology (1993, 2003) 

B.A. (CUNY), Ph.D. (SUNY at Stony Brook) 

Brenda A. Flanagan, Edward M. Armfield Sr. Professor of English (1996, 1996) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

** Mark C. Foley, Associate Professor of Economics (2000, 2006) 

B.S. (William and Mary), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 

W. Trent Foley, Professor of Religion (1 984, 1997) 

B.A. (Kalamazoo), M.Div. (McCormick Theological Seminary), 
M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago) 

Ann M. Fox, Associate Professor of English (1999, 2005) 

B.S., B.A. (SUNY at Buffalo), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana University, Bloomington) 

Joseph Tate Gardner, Jr., Professor of Theatre (1974, 1990) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Florida State) 

Richard R. Gay, Associate Professor of Education (1999, 1999) 

B.A., M.A. (University of Richmond), Ph.D. (UNC Greensboro) 

Timothy H. Gfroerer, Associate Professor of Physics (1999, 2004) 

B.S. (University of the South), M.S. (Georgia Institute of Technology), Ph.D. (Dartmouth) 

Gail McMurray Gibson, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of English and Humanities (1983, 1992) 

B.A., M.A. (Duke), Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Irwin Stuart Goldstein, Professor of Philosophy (1983, 1998) 

B.A. (Carleton University), M.Litt. (Bristol), Ph.D. (Edinburgh) 

** Sharon L. Green, Associate Professor of Theatre (1999, 2006) 

B.A. (University of Rochester), M.A. (University of Toronto), Ph.D. (CUNY) 

Meghan E. Griffith, Assistant Professor of Philosophy (2005, 2005) 

B.A. (Bucknell), Ph.D. (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) 

Michael J. Guasco, Assistant Professor of History (2001, 2003) 

B.A. (University of Portland), M.A. (Villanova), Ph.D. (College of William and Mary) 

+ Karen Gwen Hales, Associate Professor of Biology (2000, 2006) 

B.A. (Swarthmore), Ph.D. (Stanford) 

Cindy DeForest Hauser, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2002, 2002) 

B.S. (Washington and Lee), M.S. (UNC Wilmington), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Pamela C. Hay, Associate Professor of Biology (1985, 1991) 

B.A. (Hendrix), M.S. (University of Arkansas), Ph.D. (North Carolina State) 



Continuing Faculty — 215 



* Burkhard J. Henke, Professor of German (1993, 2006) 

Zwischenpriifung (Ludwig-Maximilians Universitat), M.A. (University of California, Santa 
Barbara), Ph.D. (University of California, Irvine) 

J. Alberto Hernandez-Chiroldes, Professor of Spanish (1979, 1991) 

B. A. (Puerto Rico), M.A. (Middlebury), Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin) 

Peter Neal Hess, Gail M. and Ernest G. Doe Professor of Economics (1980, 1993) 

B.A. (Bowdoin), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

+ Laurie J. Hever, L. Richardson King Associate Professor of Mathematics (2000, 2006) 

B.S., M.S. (University of Texas at Arlington), Ph.D. (University of Colorado, Boulder) 

Ann M. Ingram, Associate Professor of English (1994, 2000) 

B.A. (Stanford), M.A. (Monterey Institute of International Studies), 
M.A., PhD. (Emory) 

Randall M. Ingram, Associate Professor of English (1995, 2000) 

A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (Emory) 

Walter Herbert Jackson, Douglas Houchens Professor of Fine Arts (1969, 1983) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.F.A. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Everett Frank Jacobus, Jr., Professor of French (1971, 1988) 

B.A. (Duke), Ph.D. (Cornell Universit}-) 

Gayle H. Kaufman, Associate Professor of Sociology (1999, 2005) 

B.S., M.S. (Cornell University), PhD. (Brown) 

John E. Kello, Professor of Psychology (1974, 1991) 

B.S. (Old Dominion), M.A.', Ph.D. (Duke) 

** Kyra A. Kietrys, Assistant Professor of Spanish (2001, 2001) 

B.A. (Wellesley), M.A. (Middlebury), Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) 

Benjamin G. Klein, Beverly F. Dolan Professor of Mathematics (1971, 1985) 

A.B. (University of Rochester), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 

Peter M. Krentz, W. R. Grev Professor of Classics and History (1979, 1993) 

B.A., M.A., PhD. (Yale) ' 

Carole Ann Kruger, Associate Professor of French (1987, 1994) 

A.B., A.M. (UNC Greensboro), Ph.D. Puke) 

Vikram Kumar, Professor of Economics (1986, 2004) 

B.A. (St. Stephen's College), M.A. (Delhi School), Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 

+ Zoran Kuzmanovich, Professor of English (1988, 2002) 

B.A., M.A. (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), 
PhD. (Universit) 7 of Wisconsin-Madison) 

William David Lawing, J. Estes Millner Professor of Music (1976, 1994) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.M., D.M.A. (Cleveland Institute of Music) 

Jung Lee, Assistant Professor of Religion (2001, 2002) 

B.A. (Amherst), Ph.D. (Brown) 



216 — Continuing Faculty 



Neil Lerner, Associate Professor of Music (1997, 2003) 

B.A. (Transylvania), A.M., Ph.D. puke) 

Ralph B. Levering, Vail Professor of History (1986, 1992) 

B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Cynthia Lynn Lewis, Charles A. Dana Professor of English (1980, 1993) 

B.A. (Ohio State), Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Larry L. Ligo, Professor of Art History (1970, 1988) 

A.B. (Muskingum), B.D. (Princeton Seminary), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Barbara Mary Lorn, Associate Professor of Biology (2000, 2006) 

B.A. (Lawrence), Ph.D. (Northwestern University Institute for Neuroscience) 

+ Eriberto P. Lozada, Jr., Associate Professor of Anthropology (2002, 2006) 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

B. Andrew Lustig, Holmes Rolston III Professor of Religion (2005, 2005) 

B.A. (University of San Francisco), MA. (Princeton), Ph.D. (University of Virginia) 

William K. Mahony, Professor of Religion (1982, 1996) 

A.B. (Williams), M.Div. (Yale), Ph.D. (Chicago) 

Maria Magdalena Maiz-Pena, Professor of Spanish (1992, 2006) 

B A., M.A., Ph.D. (Arizona State) 

Jane E. Mangan, Assistant Professor of History (2004, 2004) 

B.A. (Vassar), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Gerardo Marti, Assistant Professor of Sociology (2004, 2004) 

B.A. (Pepperdine), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Southern California) 

• • David W. Martin, Professor of Economics (1984, 1997) 

B.A. (DePauw), M.S., Ph.D. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) 

** Margaret R. McCarthy, Associate Professor of German (1995, 2001) 

B.A. (Connecticut College), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Rochester) 

Mark R. McCulloh, Professor of German (1982, 1996) 

A.B. (Alabama), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) 

Sean D. McKeever, Assistant Professor of Philosophy (2005, 2005) 

BA. (Wesleyan), M.A., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

+ Sally G. McMillen, Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History (1988, 1998) 

BA. (Wellesley), M.L.S. (Pratt Institute), MA. (UNC Charlotte), Ph.D. puke) 

Kenneth J. Menkhaus, Professor of Political Science (1991, 2004) 

B.A. (Xavier), M.A., Ph.D. pniversity of South Carolina, Columbia)) 

Paul B. Miller, Associate Professor of English (1999, 2005) 

B.A. (College of Wooster), M.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 

Elizabeth M. Mills, Professor of English (1985, 1999) 

B.A., MA. pniversity of Texas at El Paso), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 



Continuing Faculty — 217 



+ Donna K. Molinek, Associate Professor of Mathematics (1992, 1998) 

B.S. (University of Alaska, Anchorage), M.S. (Northern Arizona), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Michael J. Mossinghoff, Associate Professor of Mathematics (2002, 2006) 

B.S. (Texas A&M), M.S. (Stanford), Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin) 

Kristi S. Multhaup, Associate Professor of Psychology (1996, 2002) 

B.A. (Gustavus Adolphus College), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Margaret P. Munger, Associate Professor of Psychology (1994, 2000) 

B.A. (University of Chicago), M.A., M. Phil., Ph.D. (Columbia University) 

Richard D. Neidinger, Professor of Mathematics (1984, 1997) 

B.A. (Trinity), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin) 

Randy F. Nelson, Virginia Lasater Irvin Professor of English (1977, 1988) 

B.A., M.A. (North Carolina State), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Jeanne M. Neumann, Associate Professor of Classics (1994, 2000) 

B.A. (Union College), M.A. (Indiana), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

William Rodger Nutt, Professor of Chemistry (1971, 1985) 

A.B. (Ohio Wesleyan), M.A., Ph.D. puke) 

Louis L. Ortmayer, Charles A. Dana Professor of Political Science (1977, 1989) 

B.A. (Yale), M.A., Ph.D. (Denver) 

Edward L. Palmer, Wayne M. and Carolyn A. Watson Professor of Psychology (1970, 1986) 

A.B. (Gettysburg), B.D. (Gettysburg Seminary), M.S., Ph.D. (Ohio) 

** Christopher J. Paradise, Associate Professor of Biology (2000, 2006) 

B.S. (SUNY at Albany), M.A. (SUNY at Binghamton), Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 

Alan Michael Parker, Associate Professor of English (1998, 2000) 

B.A. (Washington University), M.F.A. (Columbia University School of the Arts) 

** Luis H. Pena, Professor of Spanish (1987, 1997) 

B.A. (Universidad de Monterrey), M.A., Ph.D. (Arizona State) 

Patricia A. Peroni, Associate Professor of Biology (1992, 1998) 

B.A. (SUNY College at Plattsburgh), M.L.S. (SUNY at Albany), M.S. (BuckneU), Ph.D. (Duke) 

Karl A. Plank, James W. Cannon Professor of Religion (1982, 1995) 

B.A. (Hanover), M.Div., M.A., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 

* Lynn M. Poland, Associate Professor of Religion and Humanities (1990, 1991) 

A.B. (Bates), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago) 

Jeremiah Lee Putnam, Paul B. Freeland Professor of Biology (1973, 1988) 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Texas A & M) 

Julio J. Ramirez, R. Stuart Dickson Professor of Psychology (1986, 1995) 

B.S. (Fairfield), M.A., Ph.D. (Clark) 



218 — Continuing Faculty 



Shelley Rigger, Brown Professor of Political Science (1993, 2006) 

A.B. (Princeton), Ph.D. (Harvard) 

William M. Ringle, Professor of Anthropology (1986, 1998) 

B.A. (Johns Hopkins), M.A., Ph.D. (Tulane) 

** Carlos M. Rivera, Assistant Professor of Spanish (2000, 2002) 

BA. (University of Puerto Rico), MA. (New York), Ph.D. (Arizona State) 

David M. Robb, Associate Professor of Philosophy (1999, 2003) 

BA. (Stanford University), M.A., Ph.D. (Cornell University) 

Susan L. Roberts, Associate Professor of Political Science (1993, 1994) 

B.A. (Wake Forest), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Notre Dame) 

Clark G. Ross, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty, and Frontis W. Johnston 
Professor of Economics (1979, 1990) 

B.A. (University of Pennsylvania), Ph.D. (Boston College) 

** Robert D. Ruth, Associate Professor of Sociology (1971, 1980) 

A.B. (SUNY at Buffalo), M.A., Ph.D. puke) 

+ Lakshmanan Sabaratnam, Professor of Sociology (1986, 2003) 

B.A. (University of Ceylon), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Washington) 

Samuel Sanchez-Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Spanish (2004, 2004) 

B.A. (University of Huelva, Spain), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Sophia D. Sarafova, Assistant Professor of Biology (2006, 2006) 

B.S. (Swarthmore), M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. (Columbia University) 

Cort Savage, Associate Professor of Art (1992, 1998) 

B.A. (Indiana), M.F.A. (Syracuse) 

Merlyn D. Schuh, James G. Martin Professor of Chemistry (1975, 1986) 

BA. (South Dakota), Ph.D. (Indiana) 

* Patrick Joel Sellers, Associate Professor of Political Science (2000, 2002) 

B.A. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. puke) 

Nina E. Serebrennikov, Professor of Art (1987, 2001) 

B.A. (George Washington University), M.S.L.S., M.A., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Thomas C. Shandley, Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students (1994, 1994) 

B.A. (Simpson College), MA. (Bowling Green State University), 
Ph.D. (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities) 

Ping Shao, Assistant Professor of Chinese (2002,2003) 

B.A. (Guangzhou Institute of Foreign Languages), M.A. (Illinois State), Ph.D. (Washington 
University) 

Brian J. Shaw, Professor of Political Science and Humanities (1982, 1996) 

B.A. (SUNY at Stony Brook), M.A., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Vivian Shen, Associate Professor of Chinese (1998, 2004) 

B.A. (Shandong University), M.A., Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles) 



Continuing Faculty — 219 



Alan J. Singerman, Richardson Professor of French (1982, 1991) 

B.A. (Ohio), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana) 

Catherine Slawy -Sutton, Professor of French (1985, 1999) 

Licence d' anglais, Maitrise d'anglais (University of Nice), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana) 

C Shaw Smith, Jr., Professor of Art Historv and Humanities (1986, 2000) 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Fred H. Smith, MacArthur Associate Professor of Economics (2000, 2006) 

B.A. (Kenyon), MA. (University of Delaware), Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 

Mark A. Smith, Associate Professor of Psychology (1998, 2004) 

B.A. (Lenoir-Rhyne), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill)' 

Harlow Gregorv Snyder, Associate Professor of Religion (2000, 2004) 

B.S. (Seattle Pacific), M.S. (Columbia University), M.Div., S.T.M., Ph.D. (Yale) 

Raymond Sprague, Professor of Music (1999, 1999) 

B.A. (Williams), M.M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque), 
D.M.A. (University of Colorado, Boulder) 

Mark T. Stanback, Associate Professor of Biology (1995, 2001 ) 

B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley) 

Jennifer E. Stasack, Associate Professor of Music (1991, 1997) 

B.M., M.M. (University of Hawaii-Manoa), D.M.A. (University of Cincinnati) 

Lance Keith Stell, Charles A. Dana Professor of Philosophy (1976, 1985) 

B.A. (Hope), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Erland P. Stevens, Associate Professor of Chemistry (1998, 2004) 

B.S. Puke), Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Durwin R. Striplin, Associate Professor of Chemistry (1996, 2002) 

B.S. (Eastern New Mexico), Ph.D. (Washington State) 

Paul H. Studtmann, Assistant Professor of Philosophy (2004, 2005) 

B A., M A., (University of Iowa), Ph.D. (University of Colorado) 

Homer Bates Sutton, Professor of French (1980, 1995) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana) 

John R. Swallow, J.T. Kimbrough Associate Professor of Mathematics (1994, 2000) 

B.A. (University of the South), M. Phil., M.S., Ph.D. (Yale) 

I. Job Thomas, Professor of History (1979, 1994) 

B.A., MA. (Madras), Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Mary Caroline Thornberry, Professor of Political Science (1980, 1991) 

B.A., MA. puke), Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Patricia A. Tilburg, Assistant Professor of History (2003, 2003) 

B.A. (The College of New Jersey), M.A., Ph.D. pniversity of California, Los Angeles) 

Scott Tonidandel, Assistant Professor of Psychology (2002, 2002) 

B.A. pavidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Rice) 



220 — Continuing Faculty/Other Instructional Appointments 



• • Michael K. Toumazou, Professor of Classics (1987, 2000) 

A.B. (Franklin and Marshall), M.A. (Loyola University of Chicago), M.A., Ph.D. (Bryn Mawr) 

Robert F. Vagt, President of the College (1997, 1997) 

B.A. (Davidson), M.Div. (Duke), L.H.D. (Queens), LL.D. (Davis & Elkins) 

Mary S. Vasquez, Joel O. Conarroe Professor of Spanish (1996, 1996) 

B.A. (Florida State), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Washington) 

Onita M. Vaz-Hooper, Assistant Professor of English (2005, 2005) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Southern California) 

Russ C Warren, Professor of Art (1978, 1992) 

B.F.A. (New Mexico), M.F.A. (University of Texas at San Antonio) 

John Wertheimer, Professor of History (1993, 2006) 

B.A. (Oberlin), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

David R. Wessner, Associate Professor of Biology (1998, 2004) 

A.B. (Franklin and Marshall), Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Angela L. Willis, Assistant Professor of Spanish (2002, 2004) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin) 

Anne Blue Wills, Assistant Professor of Religion (2003, 2003) 

B.A. (Davidson), M.Div. (Yale), Ph.D. (Duke) 

Lauren W. Yoder, James Sprunt Professor of French (1973, 1989) 

B.A. (Eastern Mennonite), M.A., Ph.D. (Iowa) 

John Nicholas Yukich, Associate Professor of Physics (1998, 2004) 

B.A. (Kenyon), Ph.D. (University of Virginia) 

The first date shown in parentheses is that of the original academic-year appointment to the faculty 
and the second is that of appointment to current faculty rank. 

• On Leave Fall Semester 2006-07 

** On Leave Spring Semester 2006-07 
+ On Leave 2006-07 

• Study Abroad Year Program: Germany or France 

•• Study Abroad Semester Program: Art, Classics, or India 

OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL APPOINTMENTS, 2006-07 

M. Christopher Alexander, McGee Director of the Dean Rusk International Studies Program and 
Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.S. (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Denise Alvarez, Adjunct Lecturer in English 
B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill) 
(Fall Semester) 

Pat Baker, Adjunct Lecturer in Communication Studies 
B.A., MA. (Queens) 



Other Instructional Appointments — 221 



Timothy A. Beach- Verhev, Director of Exploration of Vocation Program, Associate Chaplain, Adjunct 
Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A. (Hope College), M.Div. (Union Theological Seminary), Ph.D. (Emory) 

Jack M. Beasley, Adjunct Associate Professor of Theatre 
B.A. (Vanderbilt), M.F.A. (University of Georgia, Athens) 
(Spring Semester) 

Daniel R. Boisvert, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (Providence), B.A. (University of Central Florida), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Florida) 
(Spring Semester) 

Iain Ross Bolton, Adjunct Instructor in Political Science 

B.A. (University' of Virginia), M.S. (London School of Economics and Political Science) 
(Spring Semester) 

Debra S. Bovd, Adjunct Associate Professor of French 

B.A. (University of Iowa), M.A. (Rutgers), Ph.D. (Ohio State) 
(Spring Semester) 

Maurya M. Bovd, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (Davidson), M.S., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 
(Spring Semester) 

Ann Lee Bressler, Adjunct Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (Pennsylvania State), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Virginia) 

David M. Brown, Visiting Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A. (Bern'), Ph.D. (Emory) 

D. Henry Buckley, Visiting Professor of French 

B.A. (Tufts), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Ashley Y. Butler, Adjunct Lecturer in Communication Studies 
B.A. (Eastern) 
(Spring Semester) 

Tonya J. Clay, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A. (University of Illinois at Urbana/ Champaign, M.F.A. (SUNY at Stony Brook) 

Henri Cole, McGee Professor of Writing 
B.A. (College of William and Mary), M.A. (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), M.F.A. (Columbia 
University) 
(Spring Semester) 

Donna C. Conrad, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Theatre 

B.A. (Southwestern), M.A. (University of South Carolina, Columbia), M.F.A. (University of Iowa) 
(Spring Semester) 

Ruskin K. Cooper, Artist Associate in Piano 

B.M. (Oberlin College Conservatory of Music), M.M. (University of South Florida), 
D.M.A. (UNC Greensboro) 

Jacquelyn Culpepper, Artist Associate in Voice 
B.S. (Western Carolina), M.M. (Baylor) 



222 — Other Instructional Appointments 



Camille M. Davidson, Adjunct Lecturer in Political Science 
B.A. (Millsaps), J.D. (Georgetown University Law Center) 
(Fall Semester) 

Hassan El Menyawi, Kemp Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.Sc., B.C.L., LL.B. (McGill Law School, Montreal), LL.M. (York University, Toronto) 
(Spring Semester) 

Victoria R. Gardner, Visiting Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (Temple), A.M, A.M., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Andrea Gazzaniga, Visiting Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. (Wellesley), M.A., Ph.D. (Cornell) 

Evelyn C. Gerdes, Lecturer in Education 
B.S., M.A. (East Carolina) 

Pamela C. Grundy, Adjunct Assistant Professor of History 
B.S. (Yale), M.S., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 
(Spring Semester) 

Robert N. Hallquist, Adjunct Professor of Music 

B.S. (Centenary), M.M. (Indiana University, Bloomington), D.M.A. (University of North Texas, 

Denton) 

(Spring Semester) 

Karmella A. Haynes, HHMI Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Biology 

B.S. (Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University), Ph.D. (Washington University) 

Carol L. Higham, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Humanities 
B.A. (Wellesley), M.A. (Yale), Ph.D. (Duke) 
(Spring Semester) 

John Gill Holland, Professor Emeritus of English 
A.B. (Washington & Lee), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Jane Braden Houston, Adjunct Lecturer in French 
B.A. (Hendrix), M.A. (Winthrop) 
(Fall Semester) 

Elizabeth Huddleston, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S. (Tulane), M.A. (Middle Tennessee State), Ph.D. (Florida Institute of Technology) 
(Davidson-Broughton Program Summer 2006) 

• Christian Hunt, Visiting Instructor in German 
B.A. (Davidson), M.Phil., M.St. (Oxford University) 

Larry Jinks, James K. Batten Professor of Public Policy 
B.J. (University of Missouri), M.S.J. (Columbia University) 
(Fall Semester) 

Lunsford Richardson King, Visiting Richardson Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
B.S. pavidson), Ph.D. puke) 



Other Instructional Appointments — 223 



Martha S. Koljonen, Artist Associate in Violin and Strings 
B.M. (Cleveland Institute of Music) 

Joseph C. Konen, Adjunct Lecturer in Medical Humanities 

A.B. (Hamilton), M.D. (College of Medicine, SUNY) M.S.P.H. (University of Utah) 
(Fall Semester) 

Hollv A. Korta, Adjunct Lecturer in Education 
B.A. (UNC Charlotte), M.S. (Winthrop) 
(Fall Semester) 

Cynthia Lawing, Artist Associate in Piano 

B.M. (Wittenburg), B.M., M.M. (Cleveland Institute of Music) 

Rita Martin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A. (University of Havana), MA. (Florida Atlantic), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Linda C. McNallv, Lecturer in Biology 
B.S., M.S. (UNC Charlotte) 

Fritz Y. Mercer, Jr., Adjunct Lecturer in Sociology 
B.S. (Belmont Abbey) J.D. (University of Louisville) 
(Spring Semester) 

Olga Zhitomirskaya Muller, Adjunct Lecturer in Russian 
B.S., M.S. (St. Petersburg State University) 
(Spring Semester) 

Carlos Navarro, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Spanish 
B.S., MA. (University of Miami), Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh) 
(Spring Semester) 

Douglas F. Ottati, Lester B. Coltraine III Visiting Professor of Religion 
A.B. (University of Pennsylvania), M A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago) 
(Spring Semester) 

Scott D. Ripley, Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre 

B.S. (U.S. Naval Academy), M.F.A. (University of California, San Diego) 

Michael Rowland, Artist Associate in Music/ Departmental Accompanist 
B.A. (Wake Forest), M.C.M. (Southern Baptist Seminary) 

C Mathews Samson, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.S. (Louisiana State), M.Div. (Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary), MA. (Louisiana State), 
PhD. (SUNY at Albany) 

Dolores Santamaria, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Licenciada (University Complutense de Madrid), MA. (University of South Carolina, Columbia), 
Ph.D. (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid) 

Emily Setina, Visiting Instructor in English 
B A. (Davidson), Ph.D. (expected) Yale 

Jialin C. Shen, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chinese 
B.A. (Shanghai International Studies), Ph.D. (Laval University at Quebec) 



224 — Other Instructional Appointments/New faculty 



Vadim Shkolnikov, Adjunct Instructor in Russian 
B.A. (Yale), M.A., M. Phil. (Columbia) 
(Spring Semester) 

Alica Stubnova Sparling, Visiting Instructor in Economics 
B.A. (Guilford), Ph.D. (expected) (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Karin L. Stevens, Adjunct Lecturer in Chemistry 

B.S. (Davidson), M.S. (University of California, Berkeley) 
(Spring Semester) 

Mark Sutch, Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre 
B.A. (Iowa State), M.F.A. (Rhode Island College) 

Diane Basgall Thornton, Artist Associate in Voice 
B.M., M.M. (Temple) 

Kathleen J. Turner, Director of Oral Communication and Professor of Communication Studies 
B.A. (University of Kansas), M.A., Ph.D. (Purdue) 

Jean Wright Veilleux, Adjunct Lecturer in Medical Humanities 
B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), J.D., L.L.M. (George Washington) 
(Fall Semester) 

Eve Veliz, Visiting Instructor in Sociology 
B.A. (Stanford), M.P.P. (Duke), M.A. (UNC Chapel Hill) 
(Spring Semester) 

Fiona L. Watson, HHMI Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Biology 
B.S., M.S. (Dalhousie), Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Monica M. White, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (University of Missouri, Columbia), M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 
(Spring Semester) 

Robert C. Whitton, Visiting Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) 

• Study Abroad Year Program: Germany or France 

NEW FACULTY AND INSTRUCTIONAL APPOINTMENTS 
(as of May 15, 2007) 

Pat Baker, Adjunct Lecturer in Communication Studies 
B.A., M.A. (Queens) 

Jack Beasley, Associate Professor of Theatre 

B.A. (Vanderbilt), M.F.A. (University of Georgia, Athens) 
(Fall Semester) 

Maurya M. Boyd, Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (Davidson), M.S., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 



New Faculty and Instructional Appointments — 225 



Frieda F. Brown, Adjunct Professor of Education 
A.B., M.Ed. (UNC Chapel Hill), Ph.D. (University of Louisville) 
(Fall Semester) 

* D. Henry Buckley, Visiting Professor of French 

B.A. (Tufts), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) 

Jacquelyn Culpepper, Artist Associate in Voice 
B.S. (Western Carolina) M.M. (Baylor) 

Hassan El Menyawi, Kemp Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.Sc., B.C.L., LL.B. (McGill Law School, Montreal), LL.M. (York University, Toronto) 

* Caroline Beschea Fache, Assistant Professor of French 

DEUG et Licence, Maitrise (Universite Charles de Gaulle-Lille 3), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana) 

* Maria Fackler, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. puke), M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. (expected) Yale 

Andrea Gazzaniga, Visiting Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. (Wellesley), M.A., Ph.D. (Cornell) 

Gillian S. Gremmels, Leland M. Park Director of the Davidson College Library 
B.A. (Wartburg), M.L.S. (University of Maryland, College Park) 

Kifah Hannah, Visiting Instructor in Arabic 
B.A. (Horns University), M.Sc, Ph.D. (expected) (Edinburgh University) 

Carol L. Higham, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Humanities 
B.A. (Wellesley), M.A. (Yale), Ph.D. (Duke) 

Michael Johnson, Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.A. (Truman State University), M.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Ph.D. (expected) (Rutgers) 

* Hilton Kellev, Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A. (UNC Charlotte), M.S., Ph.D. (University of Massachusetts at Amherst) 

Joseph C. Konen, Adjunct Lecturer in Medical Humanities 

A.B. (Hamilton), M.D. (College of Medicine, SUNY) M.S.P.H. (University of Utah) 
(Fall Semester) 

Jason Koo, Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. (Yale), M.F.A. (University of Houston), Ph.D. (expected) University of Missouri, Columbia) 

Cynthia Lawing, Artist Associate in Piano 

B.M. (Wittenburg), B.M., M.M. (Cleveland Institute of Music) 

Carole A. Martin, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (Bates), M.A. (University of Connecticut), M.S., Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin- Madison) 
(Fall Semester) 

* Sarah Mason, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (University of Georgia), Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) 

Ryan O'Malley, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A. (University of South Dakota), M.F.A. (Louisiana State) 



226 — New Faculty and Instructional Appointments 



* Douglas F. Ottati, Craig Family Distinguished Professor in Reformed Theology and Justice Ministry 
A.B. (University of Pennsylvania), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago) 

* Thomas Pegelow Kaplan, Assistant Professor of History 

Zwischenprufung (University Tiibigen), M.A., Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill) 

C Mathews Samson, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.S. (Louisiana State), M.Div. (Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary), MA. (Louisiana State), 
Ph.D. (SUNY at Albany) 

Dolores Santamaria, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Licenciada (University Complutense de Madrid), MA. (University of South Carolina, Columbia), 
Ph.D. (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid) 

Jessica L. Shade, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish 
BA. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (expected) (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Alica Stubnova Sparling, Adjunct Instructor in Economics 
BA. (Guilford), Ph.D. (expected) (UNC Chapel Hill) 

Teresa Svodoba, McGee Professor of Writing 

B.F.A. (University of British Columbia), M.F.A. (Columbia University) 
(Spring Semester) 

Diane Basgall Thornton, Artist Associate in Voice 
B.M., M.M. (Temple) 

Jean Wright Veilleux, Adjunct Lecturer in Medical Humanities 
BA. (UNC Chapel Hill), J.D., L.L.M. (George Washington) 
(Fall Semester) 

Jarrett T. Welsh, Adjunct Instructor in Classics 
A.B. (Davidson), A.M., Ph.D. (expected) (Harvard) 
(Fall Semester) 

Robert C. Whitton, Visiting Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) 

Douglas J. Young, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
A.B. (Brown), M.T.S. (Harvard), M.A., Ph.D. (Cornell University) 

* Tenure-track appointment 

* Study Abroad Year Program: Germany or France 



Administrative Staff — 227 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF (AS OF MAY 1, 2007) 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Robert F. Vagt, B.A. (Davidson), MDiv. (Duke), L.HD. (Queens), LL. D. (Davis & Elkins), President 
Wendy M. Roberts, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Administrative Assistant to the President 
Traci L. Russ-Wilson, Administrative Coordinator 

Planning and Institutional Research 

Linda M. LeFauve, B.A. (Wells), MA. (SUNY Buffalo), MA. (SUNY Geneseo), Director 
George Campbell, B.A. (Wake Forest), MA. (Indiana), Assistant Director 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Clark G. Ross, B.A. (University of Pennsylvania), PhD. (Boston College), Vice President for Academic 
Affairs and Dean of ¥ acuity, Frontis W. Johnston Professor of Economics 

Laura W, Boyles, B.A. (Bluffton), MA. (Ohio State), Ph.D. (UNC Greensboro), Assistant Dean for 
Academic Administration 

Ann Milner Douglas, B.A. (North Carolina Wesleyan), Assistant to the Assistant Dean for Academic 
Administration 
Patricia T. Gardner, Executive Assistant 

Academic Support Services 

Amy L. Becton, B.S. (Florida State), Teaching Assistant for Biologxj/Psychologxj 

Cheryl F. Branz, Department Assistant for German/Russian, Sociology, and Spanish 

Nancy Brown, Department Assistant for Physics 

Barbara M. Carmack, Department Assistant for Economics 

Jessica Cooley, B.A. (Davidson), Art Gallery Assistant Curator 

Sharon Coope, B.S. (California State University, San Bernardino), Chemistry Lab Manager 

Maria Cowan, A A. (Lansing CC), Staff Assistant for Medical Humanities and Pre-medicine Programs 

Mary Cushman, B.S. (Davidson), Research Technician for Psychology 

Fern L. Duncan, Department Assistant for Psychology 

Jeffrey Stuart Erickson, A.B. (Cornell University), M.F.A. (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale), 

Slide Curator 
Sheena Favors, B.S. (Furman University), Lab Technician for Biology 
Kay Hollyday Filar, B.A. (Westminster College), Department Assistant for Chemistry 
Kristen Fortin, B.A. (University of California, Berkeley), Department Assistant for English 
Christine Healey, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), Teaching Assistant for Biology and Campus Environmental Safety 

Specialist 
Katy Hoffler, B.A. (University of Maryland, College Park), Department Assistant for Music 
Brenda Pitts King Department Assistant for Art 
Kelly C. Koher, Department Assistant for Biology 

Peggy C. Maiorano, B.S. (Clemson), M.S. (UNC Charlotte), Teaching Assistant for Biology 
Melanie J. McAlpine, B.A. (Meredith), Department Assistant for Chinese, Classics, French, Religion, and 

Self-Instructional Languages 
Catherine Theresa Minogue, B.A. (Davidson), Production and Promotion Fellow for Music 
Kerrie Moore, B.A. (University of Kentucky), Department Assistant for Political Science and 

Communication Studies 



228 — Administrative Staff 



Steven J. Price, B.S., M.S. (University of Wisconsin, Green Bay), Research Coordinator in Biology 

Kenneth R. Rathbun, B.S. (Texas Tech), Physics Laboratory Manager 

Julie Ruble, B.A. (Davidson), Research Technician for Biology 

Frances Alexander Scott, Department Assistant for Medical Humanities and Pre-medicine Programs 

Claudia B. Shinn, Department Assistant for Tlieatre 

Gerald Keith Snead, A.A.S. (Gaston C.C.), B.S. (Belmont Abbey), Instrumentation Specialist 

Margaret Sprinkle, Department Assistant for History and South Asian Studies 

Brad Thomas, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Art Gallery Director 

Vanessa Victor, Department Assistant for Anthropology, Mathematics, and Philosophy 

Charles Gavin Weber, Lab Technician for Art Department 

Center for Interdisciplinary Studies 

Scott Denham, B.A. (Chicago), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard), Director and Professor of German 
Linda Shoaf, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Department Assistant 

Dean Rusk International Studies Program 

Christopher Alexander, B.S. (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga), M.S., Ph.D. (Duke), McGee 
Director and Associate Professor of Political Science 
Cristy Atkinson, Coordinator for International Studies 
Ann Brindisi, B.A. (University of Redlands), Study Abroad Counselor 
Valerie Chicora, Staff Assistant for Study Abroad 
William Hummel, B.A. (Davidson), Fellow for International Studies 

Carolyn M. Ortmayer, B.S. (University of California, Los Angeles), M.A. (Denver), Study Abroad 
Coordinator 

Carol Sandke, A.A. (Edison C.C.), Staff Assistant for Study Abroad 

Betty Sekimonyo, B.A., M.S. (Florida State), Staff Assistant for International Student Advisor 
Anna Marie Siegel, B.A. (George Mason), M.A. (Bowling Green), International Student Advisor 

Grants and Contracts 

Mary W. Muchane, B.S. (Nairobi), M.S. (University of Sheffield), Ph.D. (Duke), Director 
LuAnne G. Sledge, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), Grants Accountant 
Beverly Winecoff, Grants Assistant 

July Experience 

Evelyn C. Gerdes, B.S., M.Ed. (East Carolina), Director and Lecturer in Education 
Pat McCue, Program Assistant 

Library 

Sharon H. Byrd, A.B. (Pfeiffer), M.S.L.S. (UNC Chapel Hill), Interim Library Director and Head of Public 
Services 

A. Jaii Blodgett, B.S. (Texas Tech), M.L.S. (Texas Woman's University), M.A. (West Texas State), 
M.R.E. (Loyola University New Orleans), Ph.D. (Maryland), College Archivist and College Records 
Management Coordinator 

Annette B. Boston, B.A. (UNC Charlotte) Senior Library Assistant/Cataloging 
Susanna D. Boylston, B.A. (Sweet Briar), M.Litt. (Oxford), M.S.L.S. (Catholic University), Head of 
Library Instruction and Collection Development 

Jean C. Coates, B.A. (King), M.L.S. (UNC Greensboro), Assistant Head of Public Services for Circulation 
and Interlibrary Loan 



Administrative Staff — 229 



Sara B. Enders, Senior Library Assistant/Government Information 

Mark H. Grotjohn, A.B. (Davidson), Assistant to College Archivist/Davidson Fellow 

Joseph Gutekanst, Interlibrary Loan Coordinator 

Patricia J. Johnson, B.S. (Georgia Southern), Senior Library Assistant/Acquisitions 

Susan M. Kerr, B.A., M.S.L.S. (UNC Chapel Hill), Technical Services Manager 

Stephen L. Mantz, B.M. (Miami), M.S.L.S, M.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Music Librarian 

Lauralee Whitt McDonald, B.A. (Texas A&M), Senior Library Assistant/Music Library 

Judith M. Murphy, Staff Assistant to Director 

June B. Quick, Senior Library Assistant/Business Office 

Sanford Jackson Radcliffe, B.S. (Appalachian State), Senior Libranj Assistant/Night Circulation 

Supervisor 

Derek A. Rodriguez, B.A. (Duke), M.S.L.S (UNC Chapel Hill), Systems Librarian 

Kim E. Sanderson, B.A. (Florida International), M.S.L.S (UNC Chapel Hill), Head of Technical Services 

and Head of Cataloging; Special Collections Coordinator 

Denise B. Sherrill, B.S. (Western Carolina), Libranj Business Manager 

Kellv Sink, B.S., M.L.S. (UNC Greensboro), Assistant Head Technical Services/Head of Acquisitions & 

Serials 

Alice G. Sloop, B.A. (Berea), Senior Libranj Assistant/ Acquisitions 

Linda Y. Snyder, Senior Libran/ Assistant/Public Services 

Mittie C Wallv, Senior Libran/ Assistant/Serials 

AlTonya Washington, B.A. (Winston-Salem State), Senior Libran/ Assistant/Acquisitions 

Military Studies 

Edward B. Johnson, B.S. (East Carolina), M.S.I. (American Military University), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. 
Anny 

Stephen J. Kolouch, B.B.A (James Madison), Major. U.S. Anny 
Scott D. Louis, A.S. (Excelsior), Master Sergeant (Retired), U.S. Anny 

Office of Teacher Education 

Richard R. Gay, B. A., M.A. (University of Richmond), Ph.D. (UNC Greensboro), Director and Associate 
Professor of Education 
Elaine B. Houser, Department Assistant 

Registrar 

Hansford M. Epes, A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill), Registrar and Professor of Gentian and 
Humanities 

Debra D. Brannon, Staff Assistant 
Nancy Y. Dickens, Staff Assistant 
Lori C Hayes, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Staff Assistant 
Marcia S. Stoutjesdyk, B.B.A. (Davenport), Assistant Registrar 

ADMISSION AND FINANCIAL AID 

Christopher J. Gruber, B.A., M.B.A. (University of Richmond), Vice President and Dean of Admission and 
Financial Aid 

Susie Abernethy, College Visit/College Fair Coordinator 
Marilyn C Ainslie, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Application Processing Manager 
Castella Alexander, International Application Processor 
Melissa Bandy, B.A. (Davidson), Admission Counselor 



230 — Administrative Staff 



Janis Beam, B.S. (East Carolina), Application Processor 

Diane Brown, Financial Aid Assistant 

Alan Chester, AA.S. (Aims C.C.), B.M., M.M. (Appalachian), Information Technology Coordinator 

Jenny Clarke, B.S. (Virginia Tech), Application Processing Coordinator 

Anna M. Davis, BA. (Davidson), Senior Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

John Elliott Jr., BA. (Davidson), Admission Counselor 

Linda Erickson, B.F.A. (SUNY Empire State), Financial Aid Counselor 

Wendy Faucette, Admission Switchboard Operator 

Steven Gentile, B A. (Davidson), Admission Counselor 

Ashley Griffith, BA. (Davidson), Admission Counselor 

Steve Hairston, BA. (Hope), Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

Deborah B. Hogg, AA. (St. Petersburg), Senior Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

Lynda D. Keller, BA. (UNC Charlotte), Senior Admission Assistant 

John Leach, BA. (Davidson), M.Th. (Vanderbilt), Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

Gardner Roller Ligo, BA. (Mary Baldwin), M.Ed. (University of Virginia), Director of Merit Programs 

Dave Mabe, BA. (Davidson), Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

Larina Orlando, B.A., MA. (University of Virginia), J.D. (UNC Chapel Hill), Senior Admission 

Counselor 

Eleanor W. Payne, B.A. (Salem), Senior Associate Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

Elisia Payne, B.S. (Eastern Michigan), Merit Scholarship Assistant 

Ellen Sizemore, AA. (Elon), Receptionist 

Cathy Spencer, Executive Assistant to the Dean 

Chad A. Spencer, B.A., M.B A. (Lenoir-Rhyne), Assistant Dean of Admission and Financial Aid 

Kathleen Stevenson, B.A. (Rhodes), M.B. A. (Queens), Senior Associate Dean of Admission and Financial 

Aid 

ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

James E. Murphy III, A.B. (Davidson), M.S. (Georgia Tech), C.P.A., Director 

Gary C. Andrew, A.B. (Michigan), M.S. (Pennsylvania State), Head Men's Cross Country, Track & 

Field Coach 

Jeff Appel, B.S. (Colorado State, Pueblo), Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach 

Scott M. Applegate, B.S. (East Carolina), MA. (Miami), Assistant Athletic Director, Director of Facilities 

Chris Archambeault, B.S. (High Point), M.S. (Georgia State), Assistant Athletic Trainer 

Greg Ashton, B.S. (University of San Antonio, Texas), Head Women's Soccer Coach 

Brian Barmes, B.S., MA. (Appalachian), Equipment Room Manager 

Drew Barrett, B.S. (University of Illinois, Chicago), Head Men's Tennis Coach 

Joey Beeler, B.A. (Campbell), Sports Information Assistant 

Ray Beltz, B.S. (East Stroudsburg), Assistant Athletic Trainer 

C. Rick Bender, B.S. (Davidson), Sports Information Director 

Lauren Biggers, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Sports Information Assistant 

Raymond Brewer, AA. (Brevard), B.S. (Appalachian), Assistant Women's Track Coach 

Billy Boykin, B.A. (Davidson), Assistant Men's Tennis Coach 

Mike Clark, BA. (Lycoming), M.B.A. (Rowan University), Assistant Football Coach 

Mark Clayton, B.A. (Davidson), Assistant Ticket Manager 

Meade Clendanial, B.S. (West Chester State University of Pennsylvania), Assistant Football Coach 

Richard J. Cooke, B.S., M.S. (University of Richmond), Head Baseball Coach, Senior Men's 

Administrator 

Winnie Corrigan, B.A. (Davidson), Assistant Women's Soccer Coach 



Administrative Staff — 231 



Tim Cowie, B.S. (Roberts Weslevan College), Head Volleyball Coach 

Amanda Dawson, B.S. (Indiana University of Pennsylvania), Assistant Women's VoUei/ball Coach 

Jennifer DeDecker, B.A. (Queens), Football Administrative Assistant 

Mark Dell, B.S. (Eastern Michigan), Assistant Men's and Women's Swimming Coach 

Will DuBose, Assistant Equipment Manager 

Betsy Economou, B.S., M.B.A. (Loyola College, Maryland), Head Women's Lacrosse Coach 

David Emery, B.A., M.S. (Purdue), Head Strength and Conditioning Coach 

Janah Fletcher, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), M.S. (UNC Greensboro), Assistant Athletic Trainer 

Kelly Fillnow, B.A. (Davidson), Athletics Marketing and Promotions Assistant 

Jim Fox, B.A. (Geneseo State), Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 

Usha Gilmore, B.A. (Rutgers), Assistant Women's Basketball Coach 

Ted A. Hautau, (UNC Chapel Hill), Men's and Women's Diving Coach 

Brett P. Hayford, B.A. (Davidson), Assistant Football Coach 

Elizabeth S. Hayford, B.S. (Wingate), Head Athletic Trainer 

Sandor Helfgott, B.A. (Hunter), M.Ed. (University of Georgia), Director of Physical Education 

Jamie Hendricks, B.S. (Western Carolina), Ticket Office Manager 

Jeremy Henney, B.S. (Indiana University), Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 

Leah Parrish Jones, B.S., M.S. (Eastern Kentucky), Athletic Business Manager 

Leland T. Jones, Jr., B.S. (Mt. Olive), Assistant Director of Physical Education, Aquatics Director 

Avi Kigel, B.S. (Norfolk State), M.S. (Barry), Assistant Women's Tennis Coach 

Jeffrey Koontz, B.S. (Winthrop), Assistant Equipment Manager 

Matthew M. Matheny, A.B. (Davidson), Assistant Mai's Basketball Coach 

Martin McCann, A.B. (Davidson), Director of Marketing and Event Management 

Gavin McFarlin, B.S. (Ashland), MA. (University of Pacific), Sports Information Assistant 

Caline McHenrv, B.A. (Duke), M.S. (Ohio University), Assistant Women's Lacrosse Coach 

Robert H. McKillop, B.S. (Hofstra), Head Men's Basketball Coach 

Katy McNay, B.S., B.A. (Appalachian), M.E. (University of Georgia), Director of Compliance, Senior 

Women's Administrator 

Susan Mercer, Men's Basketball Administrative Assistant 

Guy Merritt III, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Head Football Coach 

Jessica Miller, B.S. (Old Dominion), Assistant Men's and Women's Swimming Coach 

Chris Monfiletto, B.A. (Davidson), Assistant Football Coach 

Ernest Moss, B.A. (Western Carolina), MA. (Sacred Heart), Assistant Men's Track Coach 

Robert Patnesky, B.A. (West Virginia), M.S. (Ohio University), Head Wrestling Coach 

Derek Parrish, B.S. (Ball State), Director of Intramural and Club Sports 

Amish Patel, B.A. (Michigan State), Assistant Football Coach 

Clint Peay, B.A. (University of Virginia), Assistant Men's Soccer Coach 

Caroline Price, B.S. (Furman), Head Women's Tennis Coach 

Abb}- Pyzik, B.S. (Lynchburg), Assistant Women's Basketball Coach 

Marie Reedy, B.A. (Juniata), Administrative Assistant 

Stephanie Roe, B.S. (Lander), Assistant Women's Basketball Coach 

Jeanette Scire, Cheerleading Coach 

Matt Spear, B.A. (Davidson), Head Men's Soccer Coach 

Jennifer Straub, B.A. (Wake Forest), Head Women's Cross Country/Track & Field Coach 

Timothy M. Straub, B.A. (Wake Forest), Head Golf Coach 

Ginny Sutton, B.A., (William & Mary-), Assistant Field Hockei/ Coach 

Tim Sweeney, B.S. (University of Rochester), Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 

Danny Taylor, B.S. (Appalachian), M.Ed. (NC State), Assistant Athletic Trainer 

Lisa Thompson, B.A. (University of Buffalo), Head Field Hockei/ Coach 



232 — Administrative Staff 



Gerry Waddle, B.S. (Appalachian), Assistant Athletic Trainer 

Annette Watts, B.S., M.Ed. (East Tennessee State), Head Women's Basketball Coach 

Erik Wince, B.S. (Gardner Webb), Assistant Wrestling Coach 

John Young, BA. (Williams), Head Mai's and Women's Swimming Coach 

Michael Zandler, B.S. (Bridgewater), M.Ed. (Virginia Tech), Assistant Baseball Coach 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

Karen L. Goldstein, B A. (Tufts), M.B.A. (Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania), Ph.D. 
(University of Pennsylvania), Vice President for Business and Finance 
Tammy Benshoof, A.A.S. (Eastern Wyoming), C.P.S., Administrative Coordinator 

Auxiliary Services 

Richard Terry, A.B. (Davidson), MAT. (UNC Chapel Hill), Director 
Mary Bolton, BA. (Franklin Pierce College), Manager Union Cafe 
GayGayle M. Daily, CatCard Services Assistant 
Cathy DeLuke, Catering Manager 

Bonnie Dunavent, BA. (Michigan State), Associate Director of Purchasing and Production 
Glenda T. Erwin, Bookstore Systems Manager 

Ruth French, AA. (Oldenburgische Industrie Handelkammer), CatCard Services Manager 
Gwendolyn S. Gardner, Bookstore Manager 
Sylvia Hager, Catering Administrative Assistant 

Siri L. Holland, BA. (UNC Charlotte), M.L.S. (UNC Chapel Hill), Bookstore Specialist 
Jennifer Knox, B.F.A. (Savannah College of Art and Design), MA. (Christie's Education), Summer 
Conference Coordinator 

Julie M. Knox, Bookstore Operations Manager 

Theresa C. Logan, B.S. (College Misericordia), M.S., R.D., L.D.N. (Virginia Tech), Dietitian 
Cissi Lyles, A.B. (Davidson), Guest Services Manager 

Craig Mombert, A A. (Culinary Institute of America), A A. (Alfred State), Executive Chef 
Dee Phillips, B.S. (Winthrop), Director of Dining Services 
Ed Rutkowski, B.G.S. (Kent State), Associate Director of Cash Operations 
Charlotte Sappenfield, B A. (Sacred Heart), Associate Director of Catering 
Michael Smith, Catering and Production Chef 
Megan Solomon, Dining Services Administrative Assistant 
Sue Toumazou, Bookstore Cashier/Operations Assistant 
Denise A. Wilson, Laundry Assistant Manager 
Patsv G Woods, Bookstore Assistant Manager/Textbook Manager 
Vacant, Laundn/ Manager 

Business Services 

Edward A. Kania, B.S. (St. Joseph's), C.P.A., Controller and Director of Business Services 
Rene E. Baker, A.A. (Rowan-Cabarrus C.C.), Payroll Associate 

Deborah W. Barnett, A.A. (Mitchell C.C.), B.S. (Gardner-Webb), C.C.M., Manager of Cash 
Management and Payroll 
Nancy W. Barrier, Business Services Assistant 
Jane N. Biggerstaff, C.M.M., Central Services Manager and Postmaster 
Sharon P. Broome, Central Services Assistant 
Elizabeth S. Christenbury, B.A. (Meredith), Director of Purchasing 
Sally Fredricks, Central Services Assistant 



Administrative Staff — 233 



L\nn Fesperman, Mail Courier 

Susan B. Fuller, B.S. (Virginia Tech), C.P.A., Assistant Controller 

Lori B. Gaston, B.S. (Appalachian State), C.P.A., Associate Controller 

Kathleen Haesaert, Assistant 

Donna M. Hamm, Accounts Receivable Associate 

Latoya James, Accounts Pax/able Associate 

Jackie Pitzer, Post Office Assistant 

Edna G. Rimmer, A.A. (Lenoir-Rh\Tie), Cashier 

Allen Sherrill, Mail Services Associate 

Human Resources 

Kim Ball, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), MA, Ph.D. (Indiana University), S.P.H.R., Director of Human 
Resources 

Diann S. Cavin, Assistant 

Ellen Fiori, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Associate Director 
Pam D. Tesh, Assistant Director 

Ann Todd, B.A. (Davidson), J.D. (University of Nebraska), Training Manager 
Vacant, Employment Coordinator 

Information Technology Services 

Mur Muchane, B.A. (Warren Wilson), M.S. (Tennessee), Executive Director of Information Technology 
Services 

Debbie L. Alford, Desktop Technology Support Coordinator 
Brent Babb, A.A.S. (ECPI), Network Technician 
Nancv A. Bandy, B.S. (Purdue), Systems Programmer/Analyst 
Michael Barth, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), Desktop Technology Support Coordinator 
Jaimie M. Beattv, B.S. (Lenoir-Rhyne), Systems Programmer/Analyst 

Paul Brantley, B.S. (Cornell), M.B.A. (Boston University), Instructional Technologist Science and Math 
Jeff Bowman, Network Technician 

Jason Brewer, B.M. (Miami), M.A. (Radford), Audio Designer/Instructional Technologist 
Selah Bunzey, A.A.S. (Central Piedmont CC), Help Desk Analyst 
Kevin D. Cauble, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Programmer/Analyst 
Abigail Creasy, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Systems Programmer 
Connie M. Dellinger, A.A.S. (Mitchell CC), Computer Services Assistant 
Nikol Dishman, B.A. (Lee University), Help Desk Analyst 

Patricia Dubiski, B.A. (Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts), Web Programmer/Business Analyst 
Donna Enroth, Operations Assistant 

Kristen Eshleman, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), M.S. (London School of Economics), Director of 
Instructional Technologist 

Michael D. Greco, B.A. (Lenoir Rhvne), Computer Support Analyst 
Man 7 Jones, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Director of Business Operations 
Kyosung Koo, B.S. (Samchok National), M.A. (Murray State), Instructional Technologist 
Robert H. Lee, B.S. (Davidson), Coordinator, Network Services 
David J. Link, B.S. (Lenoir-Rhyne), Systems Programmer/Analyst 
Brian J. Little, B.A. (North Carolina State), Computer Support Analyst 
Lydia B. Lorenzin, Director, Client Support Services 
Chase Lovellette, B.A. (Davidson), Assistant Instructional Technologist 



234 — Administrative Staff 



Kimberly McGee, B.B.A. (University of Texas-San Antonio), M.PA. (UNC Charlotte), Systems 

Programmer/Analyst 

Robert McSwain, B.S. (Appalachian State) Videographer 

Julie A. Memrick, BA. (Russell Sage), Help Desk Analyst 

Anne H. Pender, BA. (Wesleyan), Windows Computer Analyst-Student Systems 

Don Piercy, Telecommunications Analyst 

John W. Robbins, Jr., BA. (Davidson) Senior Systems Analyst 

Kenitra Smith, B.S (Maryland), MBA (Johns Hopkins), Director, Administrative Computing 

Lisa E. Smith, B.S. (Bowling Green State), MA. (Case Western Reserve), Student Computer Services 

Coordinator 

Rob Smith, B A. (University of South Carolina), Director of Systems and Networks 

Diane P. Stirling, Director of Instructional Support Services 

Sandy Wierman, BA. (Sweet Briar), Programmer 

David P. Wright, B.S., M.S. (UNC Charlotte), Programmer 

Investments and Capital Project Financing 

R. Burton Hudson, Jr., B.B.A. (Wake Forest), M.B A. (Florida State), C.F A., C.T.P., Director 

Physical Plant 

David Holthouser, B.S. (North Carolina State), Director of Facilities and Engineering 
Kevin Anderson, Supervisor for Mechanical Maintenance 
Jerry Archer, Director for Operations & Maintenance 

Lacarissa Barrett, B.S., (California State University, Sacramento), Physical Plant Accounting Manager 
Irvin Brawley, Jr., B.S. (North Carolina State), Director of Grounds and Property Management 
John Christian, B.S. (Appalachian State), Project Coordinator 
Gloria Cole, Superintendent of Building Services 
Tony Freeze, Warehouse Coordinator 
Terry Gantt, Senior Accounts Payable Staff Assistant 

Christine Healey, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), Environmental Health and Safeh/ Specialist 
Charles Jolly, Assistant Director of Grounds 

Rick Leichman, A.A.S. (Rowan-Cabarrus C.C.), CADD and Facilities Data Coordinator 
Jill Lowe, BA. (UNC Charlotte), Staff Assistant 
Hazel Martin, Superintendent of Building Services 
Sylvia W. McDaniel, Housing Manager 
Rhonda C. Moore, Assistant to the Director 
Lisa Moose, Maintenance Inspector 

Scott Overcash, B.S. (North Carolina State), Central Store Coordinator 
Mack V. Puckett, Supervisor of Electrical Maintenance 
Ronnie Shirley, Project Engineer 
Mike Tabor, Paint Foreman 

Sam Westmoreland, Supervisor of Building Maintenance 

Drew Whittington, B.S. (Louisiana State), Director of Facilities Planning & Management 
Barbara Benson Zaionz, BA. (Salem), Director for Building Services 

COLLEGE RELATIONS 

Eileen Keelev, A.B. (Davidson), Vice President for College Relations 

Ellen Henshaw, B.S. (Davidson), Business Analyst and Database Manager 

David M. McClintock, A.B. (Davidson), Director of Principal Gifts 

Deb Rutkowski, B.A. (Kent State), Executive Assistant to the Vice President 



Administrative Staff — 235 



Alumni Relations 

Peter J. Wagner, A.B. (Davidson), Director 
Nana' Blackwell, Associate Director 
Hope Childress, Staff Assistant 
Linda Kunkle, Staff Assistant 
Ginnv Rucinski, Staff Assistant 
Nikki Sawver, A.B. (Davidson), Assistant Director 
Kendall Williams, A.B. (Davidson), Reunion Coordinator 

College Communications 

Vacant, Director 
Gavle McManigle Fishel, B.A. (Elon), Director of Design 
William R. Giduz, A.B. (Davidson), M.S. (Columbia), Director, Media Relations 
Paige Herman, B.A. (Virginia Commonwealth Universitv), Web Editor 
Margaret Bovkin Kimmel, A.B. (Davidson), Senior Creative Associate and College Editor 
Adam J. Martin, B.A. (Davidson), Media Relations Felloiv 
Winnie E. H. Newton, B.S.A. (UNC Charlotte), Assistant Director of Design 
Anna Prushinski, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Communications Assistant/Office Manager 
Angenette Rice-Figueroa, B.S. (West Virginia University), Associate Director for Publications 
John Stennis Syme, A.B. (Davidson), Senior Writer 

Development 

Elizabeth O. Kiser, B.A. (St. Mary's College), Director of Development 
Maria Aldrich, A.B. (Davidson), Director, Annual Fund 
Kathv Barton, A.A. (Central Piedmont C.C.), Staff Assistant, Development 
Natalie Bombard, A.B. (Davidson), Assistant Director, Annual Fund 
Charlie Collins, B.S. (Stevens Institute of Technology), Prospect Researclier, Development 
Susan J. Cooke, B.A. (Wake Forest), M.P.A. (Virginia Commonwealth), Director of Research, 
Development 

C. Gavle Craig, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Staff Assistant, Parent Programs 
Preston Davis, A.B. (Davidson), Assistant to the Director of Davidson Athletic Foundation 
David J. Fagg, B.S. (Davidson), MA. (Boston Universitv 7 ), Associate Director, Davidson Athletic 
Foundation 

Matthew M. Hanson, A. B. (Davidson), Gifts Officer, Annual Fund 
Quoinesha Hogans, B.A. (UNC Charlotte), Staff Assistant, Davidson Athletic Foundation 
Harriet O. Kessler, B.A. (Texas), Assistant Director, Parent Programs 

Sherry N. Malushizky, B.A., MA. (UNC Charlotte), Director, Friends of the Arts and Artist Residency 
Programs 

Karen R. Martin, B.A. (West Chester), M.S. (Syracuse), Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations 
Dawn Nelson, Staff Assistant, Annual Fund 

Debbie Painter, B.A. (Concord Universitv 7 ), Staff Assistant, Annual Fund 
Jordie Poncy, B.S. (Davidson), Annual Fund Felloiv 
Molly Shaw, A.B. (Davidson), Director, Parent Programs 
Kelley Cherry Sink, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Associate Director, Development 
Valerie A. Tartaglia, Staff Assistant, Development 

Michael O. Warner, B.A. (St. Louis), M.F.A. (Universitv- of Texas-Austin), Director, Davidson Athletic 
Foundation 



236 — Administrative Staff 



Donor Relations 

Denise Hart Howard, Director 

Mary Mack Benson, Gift Records Coordinator 

Virginia K. Dowdy, Staff Assistant 

Joan A. Franz, Gift Records Coordinator 

Amy Sledge Johnson, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), Special Events Coordinator 

Karen Locey, Staff Assistant 

Major Gifts 

Matthew B. Merrell, A.B. (Davidson), J.D. (UNC Chapel Hill), Director 
James M. Gibert III, A.B. (Davidson), J.D. (Emory), Director, Planned Giving 
J. George Guise, A.B. (Davidson), J.D. (Vanderbilt), Major Gifts Officer 
Parker W. Ingalls, B.A., M.B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Major Gifts Officer 
Kelly H. Knetsche, A.B. (Davidson), Major Gifts Officer 
Louise H. Mohamed, Staff Assistant 
Rachel E. Smith, A.B. (Davidson), Major Gifts Officer 

WDAV Classical 89.9 Radio 

Kim Hodgson, B.A. (Antioch), MA. (Wisconsin), General Manager 
Liz Syverson Barr, Traffic Manager 

Joe Brant, B.S. (Michigan State), Operations Manager, Host/Producer 
Kim Cline, B.A. (UNC Chapel Hill), Administrative Manager 
Marty Cronin, B.S. (University of Missouri), Coiyorate Support Representative 
Francis Dominguez, M.A., M.F.A. (New Orleans), Program Director 
Jennifer Foster, A.B. (Davidson), Host/Producer 
Rachel Jeffreys, B.S. (Georgetown), Host/Producer 
Bryan Leather, B.A. (Syracuse), Corporate Support Representative 
Mike McKay, B.A., M.Ed. (UNC Charlotte), Host/Producer 
LuAnn Ritsema, B.A. (Hunter), Director of Marketing & Corporate Relations 
Rachel Stewart, A.B. (Davidson), Director of New Media 
Kristen Turtle, B.A. (Notre Dame), Member Seivice Coordinator 
Theodore Weiner, Music Director 

STUDENT LIFE 

Thomas C. Shandley, B.A. (Simpson), MA. (Bowling Green), Ph.D. (Minnesota), Vice President for 
Student Life/Dean of Students 
Denise Allen, Executive Assistant 

Ernest Jeffries, B.M., M.Ed. ( University of South Carolina), M. Div. (Hood Theological Seminary), 
Assistant Dean of Students, Director of Minorih/ Student Affairs 
Kathy Bray-Merrell, A.B. (Davidson), Associate Dean of Students 
K. Annette Reagan, Staff Assistant 

Chidsey Leadership Development 

Julia Jones, B.A. (Carleton), M.B.A. (Stanford), Director 
Erin Lane Bean, B.A. (Davidson), Staff Assistant 

Career Services 

John E. Adams, B.A. (Wofford), MA. (Chicago Theological Seminary), Director 



Administrative Staff — 237 



Rita A. Baker, B.A. (North Carolina State), M.Ed. (UNC Charlotte), Assistant Director 

Alexis Ernst-Treutel, B.A. (University of Wisconsin - Platteville), M.A. (University of Wisconsin 

- Madison), Careers Librarian 

Brenda Harvey, Coordinator of Recruiting Activities 

Julie Lucas, Office Manager/Receptionist 

Elizabeth K. Westley, B.A. (James Madison), M.A. (Bowling Green), Associate Director 

College Chaplain 

Robert Spach, A.B. (Davidson), M.A. (Virginia), M.Div. (Princeton Theological Seminary), D.Min. 
(Columbia Theological Seminary), Chaplain 

Jeremy Barras, B.A. (Connecticut College), M.A.H.L. (Hebrew Union), M.A.E.D. (Xavier), Adjunct 
Jewish Chaplain 
Linda Gurlev, Staff Assistant 

Timothy A. Beach- Verhey, A.B. (Hope), M.Div. (Union Theological Seminar)'), Ph.D. (Emory), 
Associate Chaplain, Director of Theological Exploration of Vocation, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of 
Religion 

Sandy Poole, Staff Assistant 
Karen Soos, B.A. (Virginia Tech), M.Div. (Catholic Theological Union), Adjunct Catholic Chaplain 

College Union 

William H. Brown, B.A. (Davidson), M.C.E. (Presbyterian School of Christian Education), Director 
Lynda C. Daniels, Master Calendar Coordinator 
Ed Daugherty, B.S. (Davidson), Director of Davidson Outdoors 

Mike Goode, B.S. (Davidson), M.Ed. (Oregon State), Assistant Director of Davidson Outdoors 
James L. Nash, B.A. (Miami University-Ohio), Technical Director Knobloch Campus Center and Duke 
Family Performance Hall 
Gina Nossel, Staff Assistant 

Chioma Ohanyerenwa, B.A. (Davidson), Evening Operations Manager 
Solvig Pittenger, B. A. (Davidson), Program Advisor 
Cheryl Rampal, Staff Assistant 

Jason Shank, B.S., M.A., (Virginia Tech), Assistant Director 
Tim Stroud, B.A. (Furman), M.P.A. (University of Missouri, Kansas City), Operations Manager 

Community Service 

Stacey Riemer, B.S. (St. John Fisher), M.S. (University of Rochester), Assistant Dean for Community 
Service 

Kevin Buechler, B.A. (Trinity College), M.A. (Wesleyan University), Director of Bonner Scholars 
Yvette Clifton, B.S. (Simmons), M.S. (Brandeis), Ph.D. (Tufts), Director of love of Learning 
Linda Gurley, Staff Assistant 

Katie Long, B.A. (Davidson), Fellow for Community Service 
Sandy Poole, Staff Assistant 

Public Safety and Police 

Fountain Walker, A.A.S. (Stanly C.C), Director 
Ronald J. Cobb, Patrol Officer 
Adam DeVore, Sergeant 
Ronnie Hersey, Assistant Director 
Stacey H. Hill, Administrative Assistant 



238 — Administrative Staff 



Sean Ludden, Patrol Officer 

Tim G. Ramsey, Sergeant 

Angela Thompson, Patrol Officer 

Laura Vanzant, Patrol Officer 

Jerry Williams, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), Sergeant 

Wesley Wilson, Patrol Officer 

Residence Life 

Leslie M. Marsicano, A.B., M.Div. (Duke), Associate Dean of Students/Director of Residence Life 
Sabrina Brown, B.A. (Elizabeth City State), M.A. (Indiana University of Pennsylvania), Area 
Coordinator, Diversity Program Coordinator 

Debra U. Harrison, A.A. (Central Piedmont C.C.), Coordinator of Housing Operations 
Judy Klein, BA. (Mundelein), Security Access Coordinator 

Jennifer Knox, B.F.A. (Savannah College of Art and Design), MA. (Christie's Education), Area 
Coordinator, Summer Conference Coordinator 
Joy Mauney, Office Manager 

Cheyenne McPherson, B A. (University of Redlands), M.S. (Western Illinois University), Patterson 
Court Advisor 

Brian R. Stuart, B.A. (California State University, Chico), M.Ed. (Clemson), Area Coordinator 
Leslie A. Urban, B.A. (Davidson), M.A. (Ohio State), Associate Director of Residence Life 

Student Health and Counseling Center 

W. David Staton, A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (UNC Chapel Hill), Director, Psychologist 
Laurie Bumgamer, B.S. (Davidson), M.D. (Bowman Gray), Physician 
Donna Coombs, R.N. (New Hampshire Technical Institution), Registered Nurse 
Charlotte Frazier, B.A. (Spelman), Ph.D. (University of Missouri), Psychologist/Counselor for Minority 
Outreach 

Nance Longworth, B.S.W. (East Carolina), M.S.R.C. (UNC Chapel Hill), Counselor 
Janet Poole, R.N. (Central Piedmont C.C. School of Nursing), Head Nurse 
Sarah Prince-Carleson, B.A. (Wooster), M.D. (Wright State), Physician 
Jane Reid, Medical Staff Assistant 

Georgia S. Ringle, B A. (Newcomb), M.P.H. (Tulane School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine), 
Health Educator 
Margie Ruch, Staff Assistant 

Amanda Samson, B.A. (University of the South), M.A. (University of Florida), Ph.D. (University of 
Denver), Psychologist 

Vicki B. Sherrill, R.N. (Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing), Registered Nurse 
Craig White, B.S. (Davidson), M.D. (Harvard), Chief Physician 

Melissa Withers, B.S. (UNC Charlotte), R.N. (Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing), Registered 
Nurse 

Theological Exploration of Vocation 

Timothy A. Beach- Verhey, A.B. (Hope), M.Div. (Union Theological Seminary), Ph.D. (Emory), 

Director, Associate Chaplain, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religion 
Kristin Booher, B.A., M.A. (Boston College), Assistant Director 
Elizabeth Staton, Staff Assistant 



Curricular Enrichment — 239 



CURRICULAR ENRICHMENT 

In addition to classroom and laboratory instruction, Davidson faculty and students have 
a variety of opportunities to enrich their academic environment and experience. Some of these 
include support for research and internships both on and away from campus. Others include 
support for special projects, visiting speakers, awards, seminars, and instructional materials. 

The endowed funds listed below have been established to enhance the academic curriculum 
iii specific wavs. 

George L. Abemethy Endowment —Established by Robert Abernethy, son of this Richardson 
and Dana Professor of Philosophy from 1946-1976, to strengthen the intellectual life of Davidson 
by funding programs and projects related to the areas of Professor Abernethv's principal interests 
and life-long work— philosophv, ethics, politics, economics, public health, world affairs, and 
comparative religion. 

Barron Fund —Established by Dr. F. Hutton Barron, Class of 1961, to support meritorious 
faculty projects, providing opportunities for personal and professional growth. 

Richard R. Bernard Society for Mathematics —Honoring Professor Emeritus Bernard, membership 
in the Bernard Society is extended to mathematics majors. The Bernard Society supports the 
traditional Math Coffees, visiting speakers, and other special projects to enhance the study and 
teaching of mathematics. 

Frank Bliss Memorial Photography Fund —For students interested in photography who wish to 
pursue a noncredit project; established by family arid friends in memory of Professor Frank Bliss. 

Henry and Daisy Bridges Earth Lecture Series —Established by Henry P. Bridges, Jr., Class of 
1950, to provide perpetual funding for programs and activities which will increase the discourse 
about our planet and inform others of important concerns about its ecology. 

Joel Conarroe Lecture Series —Established through the generosity 7 of an anonvmous donor to 
honor Joel Conarroe, Davidson College Class of 1956 and President Emeritus of the John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, this lecture series is to enhance the literary experience of 
Davidson students. 

Cornelson Senior Seminar in Economics —Established by Mr. George H. Cornelson IV, Class 
of 1953, to support the Department of Economics through a lecture series and the senior session 
program. 

Emlvy-Ghigo-Meeks Memorial Fund —For added cultural opportunities for participants in 
the Davidson at the University of Tours program in France; established in memory of French 
professors J.O. Embry, Francis Ghigo, Class of 1929, and Walter E. Meeks, Jr., ardent supporters 
and early faculty directors of the program. 

Ken Kelley Program in Historical Studies — Established by alumni, family and friends in memory 
of this member of the Class of 1963, the fund supports Kelley Scholars, the Kelley Lecture Series, 
and the Kelley Award, annually presented to the senior history major who best exemplifies the 
personal qualities of Ken Kelley. 

Page and Robert E. Kizer, Jr. Fund —Established by Robert Edward Kizer, Jr., Davidson College 
Class of 1961, and his wife Page, to endow both the position of Kizer Director of Teacher Education 
and the Kizer Internship. 

Hilde Kreutzer Music Endowment —Established through the estate of Hilde B. Kreutzer to 
support the piano program at Davidson. 

Leonard Community Service Fund —Established by Judy and Paul Leonard, Class of 1962, to 
support student service projects. 



240 — Curricular Enrichment 



Malcolm Lester Endowment for the Teaching of History —Established through gifts from 
colleagues, alumni, parents and friends in honor of Dr. Lester, Davidson History Department 
Chairman for twenty-five years, this fund provides resources to supplement classroom teaching 
in history. 

Henry Lilly Endowment for the Study of English —This fund memorializing Dr. Lilly, Class 
of 1918, a legendary Davidson English professor, provides resources to supplement classroom 
instruction with a variety of opportunities for advanced study in English. 

Edwin F. Lucas, Jr. Endowment —Established by gifts from Blue Bell, Inc., family and friends, in 
honor of this member of the Class of 1942; the fund provides support for speakers and programs 
sponsored by the Pre-Management Committee. 

Samuel D. Maloney Endowment for the Study of Religion and Society —Established by gifts from 
the Thomas Jefferson, Class of 1959, family of Richmond, Virginia, to honor Samuel D. Maloney, 
Class of 1948, James Sprunt Professor Emeritus of Religion, who served on the Davidson College 
faculty from 1954 to 1994; to support both an annual lectureship and student essay prize. 

Physics Department Endowment —Established by past majors and other friends to provide 
departmental awards and other special initiatives. 

/. Harris Proctor, Jr. Fund for Political Science —Established in honor of Harris Proctor, longtime 
Chair of the Department of Political Science, this fund provides resources to enrich the study of 
political science. 

Charles E. Ratliff, Jr. Endowment in Economics —Established in honor of Dr. Ratliff, Class 
of 1947, Kenan Professor Emeritus of Economics, this fund provides resources for economics 
programs that reflect his concerns and commitments. Programming includes faculty-student 
projects in public policy, international summer study or research, faculty development, and 
visiting professorships. 

Staley Endowment —Established by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Staley in honor of Mr. Staley's 
parents, this fund is used to enhance the spiritual life of the Davidson College community. 

Stapleton/Davidson Urban Seivice Internship —Established by G. Donnell Davidson, Class of 
1939, and his wife Anne Stapleton Davidson, to involve Davidson students in Christian service 
projects related to the betterment of life for persons in the more troubled neighborhoods within 
the city of Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Robert T. Stone Internship Fund —Established in memory of this distinguished alumnus of the 
Class of 1962 to enable one or more students to pursue internships involving the environment and 
other types of community service. 

Richard Wardlow Music Fund —Established through gifts from Richard E. Wardlow and the 
Schoenith Foundation to support the programs of the department of music. 



Book Funds — 241 



ENDOWED BOOK FUNDS 

There are now 233 endowed book funds. The income from these funds, established by family 
and friends of the honorees, is used to purchase books for the library each year. All funds are 
open-ended. The market value of all endowed book funds in the library is now more than $6.7 
million. 

THE ERIC HARDY ABBERGER FUND 

THE NANCY HARDY ABBERGER FUND 

THE SUSAN DUDLEY ABBOTT FUND 

THE GEORGE LAWRENCE AND HELEN MCLANDRESS ABERNETHY FUND 

THE HENRY B. ABRAHAMS FUND 

THE ATWELL (1929) AND PAULINE HILL ALEXANDER FUND 

THE JEAN ELIZABETH ALEXANDER FUND 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL FUND 

THE ALUMNI TRAVEL FUND 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION / WILDCAT FUND 

THE GWEN GREENFIELD APPLEYARD FUND 

THE NANCY RODDEN ARNETTE FUND 

THE JANE JACKSON AVTNGER FUND 

THE JOSEPH ABRAMS BAILEY (1883) FUND 

THE BEN D. BARKER (1954) FUND 

THE CARRIE HARPER BARNHARDT FUND 

THE DEBORAH KINLEY BARNHARDT FUND 

THE DOROTHY McDOUGLE BARNHARDT FUND 

THE JAMES H. BARNHARDT, SR. FUND 

THE MR. AND MRS. THOMAS M. BARNHARDT FUND 

THE JAMES KNOX BATTEN (1957) FUND 

THE LUCILLE HUNTER BEALL FUND 

THE MARY DAVIS BEATY FUND 

THE JOHN M. BELK (1943) FUND 

THE ROBERT BERNARD BENNETT, JR. (1977) FUND 

THE THOMAS M. BERNHARDT (1974) FUND 

THE ANNA AUGUSTA SUTTON BLEDSOE FUND 



242 — Book Funds 



THE FRANCIS MARION BLEDSOE, M.D. FUND 

THE DAVID B. BOSTIAN, SR. FUND 

THE BOYLSTON FAMILY FUND 

THE KRISTIN HILLS BRADBERRY (1985) FUND 

THE ROYAL L. BRANTON (1941) FUND 

THE WILLIAM COLEMAN BRANTON (1936) FUND 

THE THOMAS McL. BREEDEN (1937) FUND 

THE JERROLD L. BROOKS (1957) FUND 

THE HATTIE STEPHENSON BUFFALOE FUND 

THE PATRICIA CASHION BURGESS FUND 

THE ALWIN C BURNS, JR. (1942) FUND 

THE RICHARD CLYDE, JR. & ANNAMARIE BOOZ BURTS FUND 

THE HERMAN S. CALDWELL, SR (1933) AND RICHARD E. CALDWELL (1937) FUND 

THE HERMAN SPENCER CALDWELL III FUND 

THE LILLIE HALTIWANGER CALDWELL FUND 

THE PRESTON BANKS CARWILE (1920) FUND 

THE HUGH D. CASHION, SR. (1933) FUND 

THE CARLETON BURKE CHAPMAN, M.D. (1936) FUND 

THE CHATHAM CALHOUN CLARK (1929) FUND 

THE WILLIAM M. CLARK, M.D.(1966) FUND 

THE CLASS OF 1972 MEMORIAL FUND 

THE SIDNEY COHEN FUND 

THE MONNA D. CONN FUND 

THE JAMES ROBERT COVINGTON (1929) FUND 

THE BEN T. CRAIG (1954) FUND 

THE CRAWFORD FUND 

THE JOHN CROSLAND, JR. (1951) FUND 

THE WILLIAM PATTERSON CUMMPNG (1921) FUND 

THE GLADYS POTTS CUNNINGHAM FUND 

THE W. RAY CUNNFNGHAM (1951) FUND 

THE HENRY FITZHUGH DADE (1938) FUND 

THE TOM DAGGY FUND 



Book Funds — 243 



THE CHALMERS GASTON DAVIDSON (1928) FUND 

THE LOYCE SHERRILL DAVIS FUND 

THE ARTHUR PRIM DICKENS, JR. (1968) FUND 

THE CHARLES ALEXANDER DFXON (1918) FUND 

THE CHARLES DWIN DOCKERY FUND 

THE JOSEPH TURPIN DRAKE (1934) FUND 

THE DUKE ENDOWMENT FUND 

THE DARRELL & ABBEY DUPLER FUND 

THE FAY ROSS DWELLE FUND 

THE NATHANIEL CABOT EARLE, JR. (2001) FUND 

THE EDGAR FAMILY FUND 

THE ENGLISH FAMILY FUND 

THE URSULA FOGELMAN FUND 

THE CAROLE ANNE FOLGER, M.D. (1978) FUND 

THE MARGARET WALKER FREEL FUND 

THE DIRK FRENCH FUND 

THE HARRY L. AND FRANCES FORD FRY FUND 

THE WILBUR L. FUGATE (1934) FUND 

THE JOHN BRYANT (1925) AND LOUISE C GALLENT FUND 

THE CONNIE WILLIAMSON GAMBLE FUND 

THE JOE P. GATES FUND 

THE HARRY GOODWIN AND LOIS GAW FUND 

THE RACHEL HELEN McKENZIE GAYNOR FUND 

THE FRANCIS GHIGO (1929) FUND 

THE ROBERT D. GILMER (1950) FUND 

THE AUGUSTFN V. GOLDIERE FUND 

THE SEDDON "RUSTY", JR. (1954) AND JANE NISBET GOODE FUND 

THE GORHAM BOOK FUND 

THE REV. GREGORY M. (1940) AND JANICE T. GRANA FUND 

THE JAMES THOMAS GREY (1965) FUND 

THE ARTHUR GWYNN GRIFFIN FUND 

THE F. DAVID GRISSETT (1972) FUND 



244 — Book Funds 



THE LUCILE S. AND JAMES R. GUDGER, M.D. (1925) FUND 

THE WILLIAM JOSEPH HALEY III (1980) FUND 

THE LUCY FARROW HALL FUND 

THE WARNER LEANDER HALL, SR. FUND 

THE BREVARD ERVIN HARRIS (1886) FUND 

THE JANTE MURRAY HARRIS FUND 

THE MADGE SADLER HAYES FUND 

THE JAMES P. HENDRLX, SR. (1925) FUND 

THE WILLIAM BLANNIE HIGHT, JR. FUND 

THE JAMES HENRY HILL (1854) AND JAMES LOLO HILL (1884) FUND 

THE JAMES WILLIAM HOWARD FUND 

THE WILLIAM MAYHEW HUNTER, JR. (1931) FUND 

THE ROBERT BRUCE JACKSON, JR. (1950) FUND 

THE GENERAL T.J. "STONEWALL" JACKSON FUND 

THE WILLIAM HOWARD JETTON (1930) FUND 

THE CLIFFORD P. JOHNSON (1977) FUND 

THE EDWARD P. AND SARAH JOHNSON FUND 

THE FRONTIS WITHERS JOHNSTON (1930) FUND 

THE JONES FAMILY FUND 

THE KEISER FAMILY FUND 

THE KENDRICK K. KELLEY III (1963) FUND 

THE LOIS ANNE KEMP FUND 

THE LAURANCE DA VIES, JR. (1929) AND MARY FUSS KIRKLAND FUND 

THE WILLIAM ALEXANDER (1934) AND HELON WILKERSON KIRKLAND FUND 

THE SANDOR KISS FUND 

THE PETER S. KNOX, JR. (1932) FUND 

THE JAMES BELL KUYKENDALL, JR. (1927) FUND 

THE JOHN WELLS KUYKENDALL (1959) FUND 

THE ZAC LACY (1997) FUND 

THE HELEN BEWLEY LAMON FUND 

THE EMMIE FRANCES BLEDSOE LESTER FUND 

THE MALCOLM LESTER FUND 



Book Funds — 245 



THE MALCOLM NICHOLSON LESTER FUND 

THE PAULINE DOMINGOS LESTER FUND 

THE COLLIER COBB LILLY (1989) FUND 

THE HENRY T. LILLY (1918) FUND 

THE CAROLINE JANE LITTLE (2002) FUND 

THE CHARLES EDWARD LLOYD FUND 

THE FAY COX AND ZACHARY F. LONG, MD. FUND 

THE STEVEN H. LONSDALE FUND 

THE GAIL YARSLEY LOWERY FUND 

THE JOHN S. LYLES (1950) FUND 

THE WILLIAM K. MAHONY FUND 

THE SAMUEL DOW MALONEY (1948) FUND 

THE ROBERT DAVID MARGOLIS, MD. (1975) FUND 

THE J. CHALMERS MARROW (1928) FUND 

THE JOHN ALEXANDER, JR., (1939) AND LUCY WORTH MAWHINNEY FUND 

THE CHARLES K. (1949) AND DOROTHY JANE MOORE MAXWELL FUND 

THE MARY ELIZABETH MAYHEW FUND 

THE HARVEY EDWARD McCONNELL, MD. (1936) FUND 

THE MARJORIE M. McCUTCHAN FUND 

THE WILLIAM G. McGAVOCK (1930) FUND 

THE MARY WETTLING McGAW FUND 

THE JOHN ALEXANDER McGEACHY, JR. (1934) FUND 

THE JOHN LACY McLEAN, JR. (1943) FUND 

THE GORDON E. McMAIN FUND 

THE WILLIAM MELVTN MEANS (1940) FUND 

THE F. DeWOLFE (1920) AND WILHELMINIA LIVINGSTON MILLER FUND 

THE J. JOSEPH MILLER (1950) FUND 

THE ALEXANDER S. "SANDY" MOFFETT (1937) FUND 

THE WILLIAM ANDREW MOFFETT (1954) FUND 

THE WILLIAM LAUDER MORGAN (1920) FUND 

THE HARVEY L. MORRISON (1933) FUND 

THE MATTHEW EDWARD MORROW FUND 



246 — Book Funds 



THE WILLIAM FREDRICK MULLISS (1933) FUND 

THE MYERS PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FUND 

THE ROLFE NEILL FUND 

THE C. LOUISE NELSON FUND 

THE RANDY F. NELSON FUND 

THE SAMUEL WILLIAM NEWELL, JR. (1939) FUND 

THE SAMUEL WILLIAM NEWELL, SR. FUND 

THE JANE HARRIS AND JILL MORRISON NIERENBERG FUND 

THE MARY WINSTON CROCKETT NORFLEET FUND 

THE RICHARD E. OFFUTT, JR. D.D.S. (1976) FUND 

THE PADDISON CUNNINGHAM FUND 

THE LELAND MADISON PARK (1963) FUND 

THE REBECCA LELAND & ARTHUR HARRIS PARK FUND 

THE COACH CHARLES W. PARKER (1938) FUND 

THE KENNETH F. PARKS (1973) FUND 

THE ERNEST F. PATTERSON, SR. FUND 

THE WILLIAM CLAYTON PATTON, M.D., (1958) FUND 

THE ROBERT RUDOLPH PERZ, M.D., (1979) FUND 

THE EDWARD WILLIAM PHIFER, JR., M.D. (1932) FUND 

THE THOMAS BRYAN PHILLIPS (1980) FUND 

THE JAMES FAULKNER PFNKNEY (1927) FUND 

THE FRADONIA BROWN PORTER FUND 

THE JAMES S. PURCELL, JR. FUND 

THE CHARLES EDWARD RATLIFF, SR. FUND 

THE WILLIAM McCLFNTOCK REID, JR. (1934) FUND 

THE WILLIAM T. REILLY III (1980) FUND 

THE V. O. ROBERSON, JR. FUND 

THE MARTHA BYRD ROBERTS FUND 

THE WILLIAM CUMMTNG ROSE (1907) FUND 

THE HELEN B. & NORMAN C ROSS FUND 

THE JAMES HENRY ROSTAN (1967) FUND 

THE JOHN PETER ROSTAN HI (1966) FUND 



Book Funds — 247 



THE ROBERT COLVERT SADLER, M.D. (1908) FUND 

THE MARGARET SALTER FUND 

THE JOAN M. SCANDLING FUND 

THE JOHN D. SCANDLING FUND 

THE LEWIS BEVINS SCHENCK (1921) FUND 

THE NEAL ANDERSON SCOTT (1940) FUND 

THE STARKEY SHARP V (1978) FUND 

THE HARRY LEE SHAW, JR. (1926) FUND 

THE J. ALEXANDER SHAW, M.D. (1918) FUND 

THE DELLA SHORE FUND 

THE JAMES P. SIFFORD, JR. (1950) FUND 

THE SIGMA ALPHA EPS1LON FRATERNITY FUND 

THE FREDRIC HOMER SMITH, JR. FUND 

THE STEPHEN B. SMITH (1966) FUND 

THE JOHN RAYMOND SNYDER FUND 

THE SAMUEL REID SPENCER, JR. (1940) FUND 

THE RICHARD A. STOOPS (1968) FUND 

THE JAMES G. SWISHER FUND 

THE MELTON HILL TANKERSLEY (1959) FUND 

THE FARISH CARTER "CHIP" TATE V (1965) FUND 

THE ARCHIBALD B. TAYLOR (1911) AND MARGARET TAYLOR WILLIAMS FUND 

THE AMELIA PAUL THOMAS FUND 

THE THOMAS G. THURSTON, II, M.D. (1937) FUND 

THE ISABELLE WHITE TREXLER FUND 

THE WILLIAM WAUGH TURNER (1899) FUND 

THE ROBERT FREDRICK (1969) AND RUTH ANNE MAXWELL VAGT FUND 

THE MARY JANE McGEE VERNON FUND 

THE WILLIAM WALLACE WADE FUND 

THE HALLAM WALKER FUND 

THE CAROLYN A. AND WAYNE M. WATSON FUND 

THE K. D. WEEKS, SR. (1935) AND K.D. WEEKS, JR. (1969) FUND 

THE LACY DONNELL WHARTON, JR. (1927) FUND 



248 — Book Funds/Honor Societies 



THE L. D. AND LILIAN BENTON WHARTON FUND 

THE MARY TILLEY WHARTON FUND 

THE JACK WILLIAMS, JR. (1934) FUND 

THE ROBERT C WILLIAMS FUND 

THE CHARLES NELSON WILLIAMSON, M.D. (1964) FUND 

THE REV. EDWARD LEE WILLINGHAM III (1948) FUND 

THE WALTER L. (1946) AND CAROLYN COONER WITHERS FUND 

THE JACK WOMELDORF (1961) FUND 

THE ROBERT DAVIDSON WOODWARD, JR. FUND 

THE JOHN T. ZAHAROV, JR. (1970) FUND 

THE T. C PRICE ZIMMERMANN FUND 

THE ANNE KATHREN ZIRKLE (1994) FUND 

THE ROSEMARY LEVY ZUMWALT FUND 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Phi Beta Kappa — This nation's pre-eminent honor society recognizes outstanding achievement 
in the study of the liberal arts in the United States. The oldest of the American Greek-letter societies, 
Phi Beta Kappa was founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary and now has 270 chapters 
at colleges and universities across the country. The Davidson College Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 
received its charter as Gamma of North Carolina from the United Chapters (now the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society) on March 1, 1923. Since then, the local chapter has elected more than 2,200 students 
to membership-in-course. Seniors at Davidson who maintain an overall average of 3.6 or above 
on at least eighteen graded, countable courses are ordinarily considered for election, which is by 
ballot of faculty and staff of the local chapter. Election to membership, however, is not automatic 
on the attainment of a certain grade average. In accordance with the constitution of the national 
Society, students elected must have qualifications of "high scholarship, liberal culture, and good 
character." Not more than 12.5 percent of a senior class may be elected. Elections take place during 
the spring semester. 

Omicron Delta Kappa — This national leadership society recognizes eminence in five phases 
of campus life: scholarship; athletics; social and religious activities; publications; and forensics, 
dramatics, music, and other cultural activities. O.D.K. has three purposes: (1) to recognize persons 
who have attained a high standard of efficiency in college and collegiate activities, and to inspire 
others to strive for conspicuous attainment along similar lines; (2) to bring together the most 
representative men and women in all phases of collegiate life and thus to mold the sentiment of 
the institution on questions of local and intercollegiate interest; and (3) to bring together members 
of the faculty and student body on a basis of mutual interest and understanding. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta — The Davidson chapter of this national honor premedical fraternity is 
North Carolina Alpha. 

Delta Phi Alpha — A nationally organized honor fraternity that recognizes achievement 
in German. The society seeks to promote greater understanding of German life, culture, and 
language. 



Honor Societies/ Awards — 249 



Eta Sigma Phi — An honor society founded at the University of Chicago in order to stimulate 
interest in the history, art, and literature of ancient Greece and Rome, and to promote closer 
relationships among students interested in classical study. 

Gamma Sigma Epsilon — A national fraternity recognizing excellence in chemistry. The chapter 
at Davidson, founded in 1919, is the mother chapter. 

Omicron Delta Epsilon — The economics honor society has as its objective the promotion of 
scholarly achievement in economics, fellowship among those in the profession, and understanding 
of key economic issues and problems. 

Omicron Gamma Chapiter of the Order of Omega — A national Greek Service and Leadership 
Honor Fraternity for men and women who are outstanding within their own organization. 
Annual initiation to the Order of Omega is open to the top three percent of the Greek population 
on campus. As a member in this organization students are charged with taking an active role in 
campus wide leadership and participation as a group in service activities. 

Phi Beta Delta — An international honor society open to juniors, seniors, faculty, and staff. 
It recognizes exceptional achievement in international studies or service and promotion of 
international awareness. 

Sigma Pi Sigma — The national Physics Honor Society. Founded in 1921, the chapter at 
Davidson is the mother chapter. 

ACADEMIC AND COMMUNITY AWARDS 

Alumni Medal — For the freshman with the highest academic average; given by the Alumni 
Association. 

Vereen Bell Memorial Aiuard — For the student submitting the best piece of creative writing; 
given in memory of author Vereen M. Bell, Class of 1932. 

Sandy Black Memorial Award — For the rising senior premedical student judged most 
outstanding in academic record and who gives promise of an outstanding contribution in the field 
of medicine: established by Mrs. Sam Orr Black in memory of her grandson, Sandy Black, Class 
of 1966. 

Franz Boas Award in Anthropology — For the senior anthropology major who best exemplifies 
the qualities of scholarship, intellectual curiosity, and ethical concern for all of humanity 
demonstrated by Franz Boas, the principal founder of modern American anthropology. 

Bremer German Language Award — For excellence in the study of the German language; 
established by C Christopher Bremer, M.D., Class of 1960. 

Agnes Sentelle Brown Award — For a sophomore, junior, or senior, chosen for outstanding 
promise as indicated by character, personality, and academic ability; established by the late Dr. 
Mark Edgar Sentelle, Davidson Professor and Dean of Students, in memory of his sister. 

William Scott Bryant Memorial Award — Established by family and friends to increase 
understanding of our national government by helping outstanding students participate in work 
and study programs in Washington, DG. 

James A. Chapman, Jr. Annual Award — For a promising student interested in a career in 
commerce. Established by the Textile Veterans Association in memory of a 1943 alumnus who 
was a leader in that industry. 

Tom Daggxj Biology Award — Established in honor of Professor Daggy, who taught in the 
Department of Biology from 1947 to 1981, this award recognizes outstanding achievement, 
leadership and service, and a love of exploring the secrets of life. 

Davidson Black Alumni Network Award — Established by Davidson alumni for students of 
African- American descent who through strength of character and commitment have demonstrated 



250 — Awards 



distinguished service to college and community. 

Department of the Army Superior Cadet Award — For the outstanding cadet in each year's group 
of Military Studies students based on scholastic excellence and demonstrated leadership ability. 

Alberta Smith DeVane Religion Award — To a senior religion major whose overall excellence 
promises outstanding contributions in ministry, medicine, the study of religion, or other service; 
established by Mrs. Helen DeVane Carnegie in memory of her mother. 

Eumenean Literary Society Award — For a member who best exemplifies the society's motto: 
Pulchrum est colere mentem, "It is beautiful to cultivate the mind." 

Gladstone Memorial Award — For a rising senior with high potential for future service to 
mankind as indicated by leadership, service, and academic record; established by family and 
friends of George L. Gladstone, jr., Class of 1960. 

Leona M. Goodell Memorial Award — Established by friends and family of this career government 
servant to help students explore careers in government. 

Goodwin-Exxon Award — For a sophomore, a junior, and a senior judged to exemplify the 
highest standards of character, good sportsmanship, and consideration of others; established by 
Henry S. Goodwin, Class of 1930, and his wife Claire L. Goodwin and funded in part by the Exxon 
Education Foundation. 

Greek Prize — Occasional award of books to a student with the greatest ability and promise in 
the study of Greek; presented by the Class of 1922. 

R. Windley Hall Fund — A first-year student writing award which also provides for a visiting 
lecturer on campus; honors the memory of a member of the Class of 1963. 

Rufus Hallmark Writing Award — Named after the distinguished musicologist Rufus Hallmark, 
Davidson class of 1965, this award recognizes the best essay on a musical topic written in the 
previous year. 

William B. Hight, Jr. Teaching Award — Established by colleagues, alumni, and friends in 
memory of Bill Hight, founder and longtime chair of the department of education; for the senior 
who has demonstrated great potential for a successful career in teaching at the secondary level. 

Douglas Houchens Studio Art Award — For the studio art major in the junior class who made 
the most progress during the previous year; honoring the professor who founded Davidson's Art 
Department in 1953. 

David Halbert Howard, Jr. Chemistnj Award — For a rising senior studying chemistry who gives 
promise of the largest degree of usefulness in a related field of service; established by the mother 
and sister of David Howard, Class of 1928, who died while a chemistry professor at Davidson in 
1936. 

Lucile and Max Jackson Award in Art History — Established by Charlotte art lovers and friends 
of the college; presented annually to the rising senior who has demonstrated not only ability and 
aptitude, but dedication to the discipline of art history. 

T\\e Keiser Prize in English — Established in 2000 by Albert Keiser, Jr., Class of 1966 in honor 
of his father, Professor Albert Keiser, Ph.D.: recognizes superior contributions by one Davidson 
student each year to the performance of classical English literature. 

John D. Kelton Award — Presented to the psychology major who develops the best essay in the 
senior capstone course. 

Kendrick Kellexj Award in Histonj — Awarded to the senior history major who best exemplifies 
the qualities displayed by Ken Kelley, Class of 1963, distinguished academic performance, self- 
effacing leadership and personal integrity. Established by family and friends in memory of Ken 
Kellev- 



Awards — 251 



Le Prix de Frangais (Tlie French Award) — Established in 1991, the French Award was created 
to honor outstanding achievement in French studies and/ or exceptional contributions to the 
Davidson French program by a senior major. 

Henry T. Lilly Award for Excellence in English — Established in 1993 and given in memory of 
Henry T. Lilly, Class of 1918, Professor of English from 1926 -1966. 

Charles E. Lloyd Award — For the student submitting the best piece of nonfiction writing; 
established in memorv of English professor (1956-80) Charles E. Llovd. 

Hie Samuel D. Malonex/ Essay Prize — Given in honor of Emeritus Professor Samuel D. Maloney 
by the Thomas Jefferson familv, the Malonev Essav Prize recognizes the student essav that best 
exemplifies outstanding work in the field of religion, ethics, and culture. 

William G. McGavock Mathematics Award — For the member of the senior class who has 
demonstrated the greatest promise and accomplishment in mathematics while at Davidson; 
honors the memory of W. G. McGavock, Class of 1930, and longtime professor of mathematics. 

Mundo Hispanico (Hie Spanish Award) — Established by the Spanish Department to recognize 
excellence in the study of the Spanish language and Hispanic culture. 

Phifer Economics Award — For an upperclass student who has made a distinguished record in 
the study of economics; established by Mrs. A.K. Phifer. 

Physics Award — Established by alumni and friends to honor outstanding achievement in the 
studv of physics. 

W. Kendrick Pritchett Award in Classics — Presented to a senior classics major who exemplifies the 
qualities displayed by W. Kendrick Pritchett, Class of 1929: distinguished academic performance, 
personal integrity, and love of ancient literature, historv, and archaeology. 

Harris Proctor Award — Established through gifts from colleagues to honor Professor Emeritus 
J. Harris Proctor. The award is presented annually to the outstanding senior political science 
major. 

Charles Malone Richards Award — For a rising senior, ordinarily preparing for the ministrv, 
who has made the most significant contribution to the religious life of the college community; 
established by familv and friends of Dr. Richards, Class of 1892, and Davidson pastor and 
professor. 

Richard Ross Memorial Music Award — This award honors Richard Ross who, in his lifetime, 
was an internationallv celebrated organ recitalist, a gifted teacher, and a dedicated Presbyterian 
Church musician. 

Dean Rusk Program Award — For the student who has contributed most to international 
studies at Davidson. 

C. Shaw Smith Award — Presented annuallv to a rising junior or senior who has made 
outstanding contributions to the life of the college community through service at the College 
Union; honors C. Shaw Smith, Class of 1939, and College Union Director from 1952-1983. 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award — Two medallions presented annually, one to a member 
of the senior class and the other to a person outside the student body, recognizing fine spiritual 
qualities practicallv applied to dairy living, usuallv going to persons who have given unselfish 
service without due recognition; established in 1926 by the New York Southern Society in memory 
of its founder. 

Tlieatre Award — For the senior who has contributed most to better theatre at Davidson 
College during four years on campus. 

Rowley P. Turner Drama Award — Presented to the student who, in the opinion of a committee 
made up of faculty and community threatre-goers, has given the best performance in a major 
drama production for the vear. 



252 — Awards 



Porter P. Vinson Chemistry Award — For a rising junior, recognizing unusual mastery of the 
field and significant promise for further study; established by family in memory of Porter Paisley 
Vinson, M.D., Class of 1909, Davidson M.A. in Chemistry 1910. 

William D. Vinson Mathematics Award — For a rising junior, recognizing unusual mastery of 
the field and significant promise for further study; established by family in memory of Davidson 
mathematics professor (1883-97) William Daniel Vinson, LL.D. 

Welsh Prize in Composition — Awarded for the best original music composition by a Davidson 
student. Established in 2006 in honor of Wilmer Hay den Welsh, Composer and Professor of Music 
from 1963-1991. 

Daniel Blain Woods Award — For the rising senior premedical student who best exhibits the 
qualities of a good doctor: wisdom, compassion, the desire to serve, the ability to analyze problems, 
integrity, and academic excellence; established by Dr. James B. Woods, Jr., Class of 1918, and his 
wife in memory of their son. 

James Baker Woods III Memorial Award — For a rising senior military science cadet who has 
displayed outstanding qualities of leadership, moral character, academic achievement, and 
aptitude for military service; established by Dr. James B. Woods, Jr., Class of 1918, and his wife in 
memory of their son, Class of 1962, who gave his life in defense of his country. 

William Gateivood Workman Psychology Award — For the senior judged to have come closest to 
attaining Dr. Workman's extraordinary standards of scholarship, character and service; established 
in honor of this longtime professor of psychology by psychology faculty and alumni. 

ATHLETIC HONOR AWARDS 

Helen DeVane Carnegie Award — Presented to the most outstanding freshman athlete. 

David Parrott Memorial Award — Presented to a student in recognition of contribution, outstanding 
sportsmanship and participation in the intramural athletic program. 

Tommy Peters Memorial Award — Presented to a male athlete with outstanding dedication and 
contribution to intercollegiate athletics. 

Susan K. Roberts Award — Presented to a woman athlete best exemplifying the Davidson spirit in 
intercollegiate athletics and campus leadership. 

Tliomas D. Sparrow Award — Presented to a male athlete best exemplifying the Davidson spirit in 
intercollegiate athletics and campus leadership. 

Rebecca E. Stimson Award — Presented to a woman athlete in recognition of outstanding dedication 
and contribution to intercollegiate athletics. 



Class of 2007 — 253 



CLASS OF 2007 - BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



francis Andrew Garcia Agcaoili 
.Paul Nielsen Andrews 
^vlarco Tulio Antunez, Jr. 
iDillon Tyson Atwood 
James Paul Avola 
Richard Cass Baltz 
Shari Michelle Barnert 
Rebecca Page Bomar 
Christine Jeannette Brough 
Brooke Elizabeth Bucholtz 
pavid Thaver Burr 
Christopher Enrique Castillo 
ICristen Kimberlv Cecala 
^Charles Richard Chrisawn 
iDaniel Adam Clavton 
Jeffries Brandt Coleman 
R\ T an James Creighan 
|Alden Lewis Crisse\ T 
^Elizabeth Louise Dallam 
tindsay Sawyer de Castrique 
iNatalie Christine Dennis 
Brett Thomas Dioguardi 
|Ke0y Louise Dresser 
(Zhristina Joi Dunn 
Jennifer Nicole Felder 
£cott Ri\ 7 ers Ferguson 
T^eslev Martin Fiser 
^vlargaret Kathleen Fitzpatrick 

► 

Catherine Courtney Abbett 
^aris Sohail Al Mazrui 
|Brian Christopher Albers 
julienne Marie Alexander 
iRachel Simone Anderson 

Guy Leland Anthony 
| Honors in Political Science 

Ryan Nicholas Aponte 
PAaron John Baila 
Irandon Peter Baila 
irigit Erin Barn' 
|Elizabeth Cordon Barn' 

Laura Michelle Beach 
|Lewis McKenney Beard 
J'eter David Benbow 
'Elizabeth Anne Bemdt 

I 



Robin Adele French 
Justin Alan Fried 
Ellen Marie Garfield 
Justin Andrew Goldberg 
Stephen James Hallidav 
Leigh Anne Harden 
Daniel Patrick Heeren 
Kathleen Claire Hermes 
Sarah Mabrey Heston 
Honors in Psychobgy 
Charlotte Austin Hindslev 
Kathn'n Elizabeth Howze 
Lamar Reinhardt Hull 
Brett Michael Jones 
Jessica Knight King 
Jessica Sarah Lahre 
Alexander Clavton Lemons 
Peter Jeffrey-Jesse Levandoski 
Kathleen Bner Lew 
Nicole Sharon Linn 
Thomas James Lodato 
Spencer Lee Magargal 
Tiffany LaSha Major 
Emily Kathryn Elizabeth McCracken 
Lauren Ann McCulloch 
Caroline Montgomery McEaddy 
Jared Daniel McKiernan 
Michelle Frances Meglin 



Kealh' Jav Miranda 
Caleb E\'erett Nannes 
Carlos Pompeyo Ortiz 

Honors in Physics 
Eric Louis Peterson 
Hannah Judith Plekon 
Erin Nicole Price 
Graham Fisher Ray 
Amy Jacqueline Reid 
Austin Randolph Reid 
Leah Marisa Reidv 
David William Ritchie 
Megan Clarke Roberts 
Alexandra Margaret Anne Robertshaw 
Linda Victoria LaTrice Russell 
Andrew David Ruth 
Joseph Scognamiglio 
Lauren Rebekah Sher 
Ian Man^in Sheridan 
Anne Elizabeth Stevens 
Robert Baird Stewart 
Jordan Alexander Sullivan 
Alice Becker Uflacker 
Alana Brittanni Vaughn 
Daniela Villarreal Al\ r arez 
Marjorie Caitlin Westfall 
Rachel Sarah Wightman 
Charlotte Elizabeth Williams 
Hannah Yi 



CLASS OF 2007 - BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Anne Blair Hedgepeth 
Brian Charles Helfrich 
Hannah Josephine Hewglev 
Ruth Speakman Hill 
Parker Russell Himes 
John Boyd Hoke 

Honors in History 
Anabel Wood Holland 
Jamie Patrick Hopkins 
Jonathon Kewn Hubbard 
Daniel Keith Hudspeth 
Katherine Leigh Hunt 
Joanna Robin Hurt 
Michael Alan Iafrate 
Tamara Elizabeth Ivins 
Graham Charles Jaenicke 



Ashley Jane Raba 
Svilen Andreev Rangelov 
James Robert Rastetter 
Lincoln Edward Ford Rathnam 

Honors in Philosophy 
Erin McCashin Ra\' 
Edward Billerbeck Reddrop 
Shari Nolana Reid 
Matthew McGeorge Rhodes 
John B. Rice 
LeAndra Shate Rice 
Matthew Theron Richardson 
Mary Alice Richter 

Honors in History 
Maxine Melane Riley 
John Wesley Robbins 



254 — Class of 2007 



Duncan Eaves Berry 
John Leonard Bialas 
Megan Adare Biggers 
Jeremy David Bloxson 
John Edward Bolton 
Marcus Rainer Boyd 
Steven Michael Braco 
Shannon McCullough Bradshaw 
Kelly Donovan Brennan 
Elizabeth Judson Brewer 
Bobby Joseph Bridges 
Drew Myer Brookie 
Margaret Elizabeth Brooks 
Katherine Susanne Brown 
Julia Andrus Browne 
Christopher Fiery Bryan 
Scott Edward Buckhout 
Elizabeth Ann Burkhead 
Elizabeth Ann Burkholder 
Christopher Wesley Burks 
Alana Jacobs Calvin 
Clark Ellison Candler 
Joseph Hall Carey, Jr. 
Amoura Camille Carter 
Caroline Elizabeth Chalmers 
Paul Alain Champaloux 
Benjamin Logan Chapman 
John-Michael Lucas Chapman 
Jessica Lauren Chasen 
Matthew Alan Cherep 
Cara Lynn Christian 
Christopher Dean Clark 
Dana Ashley Clifford 
Evan Llovd Collins 
Katherine Marie Cox 
Lisa Annette Cuellar 
Catherine Bain Cunning 
Oliver Julian Curtis 
Sara Madison Davenport 
Meredith Lynn Davis 
Julia Elise DeLozier 
Richard Alexander Derkson 
Daniel Alfred Devine 
Jessica BeAnna Dixon 
John Christopher Doehring 
Sarah Foster Dotts 
Rory Osborne Douthit 
Elizabeth Anne Dover 
Darcie Anne Draudt 

Honors in Anthropologij 
Patricia Carroll Duffy 



Elizabeth McCain Jinks 
Luke Steven Justus 
Elizabeth Moore Kallop 
George Richard Kareman 
Kidist Tassew Kassahun 
Brynn Marie Kelly 
Kevin Scott Kirksey, Jr. 
Rachel Marie Kiselewich 
Rvan Patrick Kleier 
Matthew Bryan Knight 
Alexander David Knoll 
Jessica Ann Kolansky 
Jordan Karl Kvanvig 
Nana Yaw Kyei 
Jacqueline Marie Lacaire 
Molly Megan Langer 
Elizabeth Renwick Langton 
Marc Phillip LaRochelle 
Erika Marang Larson 
Megan Kathleen LeDell 
Katharine Lorraine Levitt 
Heather Ann Lohneiss 
Chad M. Lorentzen 
Cyrus Keys Maddox 
Robert Wayne Manire II 
Jaime Michele Massar 
Jaimie Killeen Matthews 
Stephen Robinson Mayo, Jr. 
James Christian McCain 
Matthew Charles McCarville 
Andrew Michael McClellan 
Jessica Erin McCov 
Margaret Lee McEaddy 
Rebecca Maddox McElrov 
Blair Robert McGraw 
Jacqueline Elizabeth McKeon 
Marisa Briscoe McNatt 
Elizabeth Craig Meltzer 
Janelle Christine Milanes 
Jessica Morgan Mitchell 
Limothy Blake Mitchell 
Fethi Mohammed 
Ashlev Sydelle Moore 
Christina Kathryn Moore 
William Hunt Moore 
Francisco Tomas Morales 
Emily Ives Moser 
James Winston Mumby 
Jason Evan Navia 
Kristina Haley Neff 
Virginia Adele Neisler 



Ross Jay Rosenstein 
Alexander Jerome Sandel 
Maria Fernanda Santamarina 
David Yorke Sartorio 
Calvin Edward Schildknecht 
Katharine Ann Schulmann 
Kahe Reid Sears 
Laura Kimberly Sedig 

Honors in Medical Ethics 
Owen Rafael Serra 
Richard Reza Shayegan 
Robert Carleton Shenk 
Joshua David Shreve 
Caitlin McDaniel Singletary 
Gillian Colbert Siple 
Trey McCormick Skinner 

Honors in Religion 
Evelyn McMath Slaughter 
Bradley Christopher Smith 
Branson Christopher Smith 
Eric Gregory Smith 
Hartley Hutchinson Smith 
Julia Victoria Smith 
Matthew Mitchell Somers 
William Lewis Sommers 
Zacharv John Stephens 
Jessica Beaton Straus 
Katherine Ami Swiatek 
Nicholas William Tapert 
Michael Pierre Tellis 
Derrick Addison Thompson 
Amv Jean Trainor 
Amanda Rae Traver 
Eleanor Rhoades Trefzger 
Ruchi Rajesh Turakhia 
Erik Zachary Turowski 
Amir Vaez 
James David Vail V 
Henrv Sloan van Wagenberg 
Alexander Ferrell Varner 
Stuai't Ann Varner 
Emilia Anna Vasella 
Allyson Dare Vicars 
Julia Kettering Wakefield 
James David Walter II 
Lucia McCormack Waterman 
Brendan Scott Watkins 
Sarah-Grace Flanagan Wesley 
Christopher Bijan Whelton 
Jackson Boyd Whetsel 
Charles William Whetstone III 



Class of 2007 — 255 



^Christopher Rvan Dwyer 

Jenna Leigh Dvkstra 
lAlexandra Rose Eagan 

Andrew Cooper Edelman 
JMark Dickinson Estabrook II 

Man- Katherine Evans 

ohn Joseph Falconi III 
l^vlerah M\Tes Faulkner 

Jennifer Marie Fernandez 
^Marshall Sperr\ T Findlay 
^Christian David Gallon 
rFrank Boyd Gary IV 
iSteven Mark Gaultney 

Honors in English 
|Ashish George 
.Guv Milwee Graves, Jr. 
"Alice Emmaline Harvev 
|Kara Marie Hawkesworth 

Kristina Lvnne Hayden 
lAndrew Kevin Hazen 



Christina Michelle Nelson 
Douglas David Noreen 
Glvnnis Eileen ODonoghue 
Meghan Lee O'Gradv 
Anders Eric Olson 
Rvan Michael O'Neill 
Brian Gahe Orland 
Blake Louis Osborn 
Matthew Phillip Paddock 
Sean Paul Patrick 
Daniel Sheehan Pell 
Laura Katherine Pepper 
Page Gillespie Persons 
Claire Catherine Porter 
Stephen Joseph Potter 
Javson Clavton Powers 
Penfield Cadaret Price 
Virginia Lanier Prichard 
Kristen Linne Psaki 
Megan Kimberly Quale\ r 



Margaret Maxwell Whipple 
Tvson Vrvling White 
Heidi Marie Wilbrandt 
Chrishan Hamilton Williams 
Hunter Rvland Williams 
Peter Gannon Williams 
Renee Handele Williams 
Elizabeth Anne Williamson 
Claude Roberson Wilson III 
Tettev Wilson-Tei 
Braxton David Winston II 
William Paul Winter 
Maggie Cameron Womack 
Sarah Elizabeth Wood 
Jeffrev Davis Wright 
Kevin Antwan Wright 
Morgan Duval Watkins Wright 
Gregorv Mark Zage 
Johannes Eduard Zwick, Jr. 



Karen Pola Acker, B.S. 
rRachel Susan Andoga, A.B. 
| Honors in English 
Taylor McKee Anslev, A.B. 
h High Honors in Political Science 

Kevin McKim Barley, Jr., B.S. 
fclhad Daniel Barlow, A.B. 
J_ee Thomson Barrow, A.B. 

Honors in History 
|Jdalia K Bastiaens, A.B. 

Sarah Virginia Bogue, A.B. 
I Honors in Classics 
Jennifer Elizabeth Bromlev, B.S. 
'Colin Derek Brown, A.B. 
| High Honors in Philosophy 

Travis Anthony Brown, B.S. 
f Honors in Psychology 
.Lyana Buckwold, B.S. 
"Ariel Theresa Bugosh, A.B. 
k High Honors in Anthropology 
^ames Russell Butler, A.B. 
|Westray Stewart Cobb II, A.B. 
Juliette Christie Cook, A.B. 
rLindsay Marie Corliss, A.B. 
|Michaela Marie Corr, A.B. 
^Robert William Correll, B.S. 
^Bradley Louis Demeter, A.B. 

Honors in Sociolog]/ 
^William Bruce DeVoe, B.S. 



HONOR GRADUATES - CUM LAUDE 



Amv Lvnne Freeman, A.B. 

Honors in Histon/ 
Gagan Gupta, A.B. 
Cameron Elizabeth Hardest}', A.I 

Honors in English 
Omer Hashmi, A.B. 
Samuel Rvan Hatch, A.B. 
John Albert Helms, B.S. 

Honors in Mathematics 
Bruce Lowell Henschen, Jr., B.S. 
Joel Pelham Hewert, A.B. 
Jessica Noelle Hodge, B.S. 
Jonathan David Holbrook, A.B. 
Elizabeth Jeanne Ireland, A.B. 

Honors in Religion 
Rachel L\mn Jakab, A.B. 
Rebecca Anne Jameson, B.S. 
Sami Kamal Jarrah, A.B. 
Lauren Beth Kalodner, A.B. 

Honors in Histon/ 
Michelle Summer Kirlin, B.S. 
Emily Anne Kota, A.B. 

Honors in Histon/ 
Joshua Mark Metzger Lancaster, ' 
Lauren Elizabeth Law, A.B. 

Honors in Religion 
Alexander R.H. Libson, B.S. 
Ward Blair Long, A.B. 
Cara Michelle Maguire, B.S. 



Hunter Russell Mobley, B.S. 

Honors in Psychology 
Caroline Lucy Morgan, B.S. 
Lauren Christv Morse, A.B. 
Irma Janeth Navarro, A.B. 
Mallory Anne Nobles, B.S. 
Charles Graham Painter, A.B. 
Brendan Ross Parets, A.B. 

High Honors in Political Science 
Kaitlin Marie Parker, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Emily Ruth Presley, A.B. 
Caitlin Albrecht Ranson, A.B. 

Honors in Studio Art 
Albert Gardner Rordam, A.B. 

High Honors in Political Science 
Carson Lewis Sanders, A.B. 
David Lerov Sheibley, B.S. 
Nathaniel Boswell Shestak, A.B. 

Honors in Political Science 
Jenelle Margaret Simmons, A.B. 
Colin Jerome Smith, A.B. 
Lisa Ann VanderGriend, A.B. 
•S. Honors in Sociolog}/ 
Jack Varon, B.S. 
Rachel Carter Veto, A.B. 

Honors in French 
Shantia Aimee Washington, A.B. 
James Edwin Wells, B.S. 



256 — Class of 2007 



Nicholas Anthony Dovidio, B.S. 

Honors in Mathematics 
Rachel Julia Egan, A.B. 
Keith Hill Farrow, A.B. 
Lauren Elizabeth Finlev, B.S. 



Jessica Leigh Maguire, A.B. 
Valerie Katherine Mason, A.B. 
Lauren Bennett Massey, A.B. 
Patricia McDonald Massey, A. 
Molly Ann McQuillen, A.B 
Honors in Spanish 



Honors in Physics 
Walter Francis Wiggins, B.S. 
Andrea Megan Wood, A.B. 
Jeffrey Paul Yeakel, A.B 

Honors in Classics 
Ying Zhang, B.S. 



MAGNA CUM LAUDE 



Lee Wilson Ballard, A.B. 
Joseph Charles Benjamin, B.S. 
Sarah Gardner Boyce, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Laura Joy Broom, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Kathryn Rebecca Byars, B.S. 

Honors in Psychology 
Ryan Nelson Clark, B.S. 

Honors in Chemistry 
Douglas Jordan Grunwald, B.S. 

First Honor 
Patricia Wood Harris, A.B. 
Lauren Elizabeth Heinze, A.B. 
Mary Elisabeth Hobart, B.S. 



Jesse Martin Johnson, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Stephen Henry Kaliski, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Kyle Jeffrey Kinsell, B.S. 
Nelon Bryant Kirkland, A.B. 

Honors in Classics 

Second Honor 
Erik Henry Knelson, B.S. 

High Honors in Nenroscience 
Laura Elizabeth Kupper, A.B. 

Honors in Anthropology 
Philip Wilson McCrory, A.B. 
Taylor Colton McLemore, A.B. 



Meredith Anne Prasse, B.S. 
Timothy Daniel Rankin, B.S. 
Philip James Sanchez, B.S. 

High Honors in Nenroscience 
James McLeod Skelton, A.B. 
James Greenawalt Squibb III, A.B. 
Jarred Otis Taylor III, A.B. 
Erin Gale Valentine, A.B. 

Honors in Studio Art 
Benjamin Thomas Whigham, B.S. 
MacGregor John Wilkie, A.B. 
Mary Ann Sellers Wilmer, A.B. 
Lauren Nicole Yero, A.B. 

Honors in English 



SUMMER GRADUATES - 2006 



Peter Weightman Allison, B.S. 
Nicholas Avery Booker, A.B. 
Victoria Gidas, A.B. 



Hanako Kawabata, A.B. 
Akilah Tadako Jenga, A.B. 



Emily Nancy Peterson, B.S. 
George Stephen Tolson, Jr., B.S. 



ENROLLMENT 2006-2007 



Enrollment — 257 







FALL 






SPRING 






WOMEN 


MEN 


TOTAL 


WOMEN 


MEN 


TOTAL 


First- Year Students 


233 


228 


461 


234 


228 


462 


Sophomores 


232 


220 


452 


230 


211 


441 


Juniors 


141 


152 


293 


198 


190 


388 


Seniors 


220 


234 


454 


209 


222 


431 


TOTALS 


826 


834 


1,660 


871 


831 


1,722 


One- Year Certificate (International) 4 


1 


5 


4 


1 


5 


Visiting Students 


1 


1 


2 


1 





1 


Totals 


3 


2 


7 


5 


1 


h 


TOTAL HEADCOUNT* 


831 


836 


1,667 


876 


832 


1,728 


FTE 






1,667 






1,728 


*Classics 











13 


7 


20 


*Field Studies 


4 


2 


6 


1 


1 


2 


* India 


10 


6 


16 











Tours (one semester) 


11 


1 


12 


4 


2 


6 


Tours (two semester) 


1 


3 


4 


2 


3 


5 


*Wurzburg 


2 


3 


5 


2 


2 


4 


TOTALS 


28 


15 


43 


22 


15 


37 



Included in Junior, Sophomore, and Senior Numbers 
) Number of Visitors Included in Adjacent Frequency 



258 — Geographical Distribution 



GEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN OF DAVIDSON STUDENTS, FALL 2006 
Enrollment by State - Number of States (including District of Columbia) = 47 



Alabama 


21 


Missouri 


13 


Arizona 


7 


Nebraska 


1 


Arkansas 


16 


New Hampshire 


4 


California 


46 


New Jersey 


53 


Colorado 


22 


New Mexico 


4 


Connecticut 


51 


New York 


96 


Delaware 


8 


North Carolina 


304 


District of Columbia 


4 


Ohio 


57 


Florida 


111 


Oklahoma 


6 


Georgia 


115 


Oregon 


8 


Hawaii 


1 


Pennsylvania 


73 


Idaho 


1 


Rhode Island 


4 


Illinois 


42 


South Carolina 


61 


Indiana 


9 


Tennessee 


48 


Iowa 


3 


Texas 


72 


Kentucky 


30 


Utah 


1 


Louisiana 


5 


US Virgin Islands 


1 


Maine 


10 


Vermont 


7 


Maryland 


88 


Virginia 


99 


Massachusetts 


46 


Washington 


12 


Michigan 


8 


West Virginia 


8 


Minnesota 


13 


Wisconsin 


3 


Mississippi 


3 


Wyoming 


1 



Enrollment by Foreign Country - Number of Countries = 33 



Brazil 


1 


Jamaica 


2 


Bulgaria 
Burma 


6 

1 


Japan 
Malawi 


1 
1 


Canada 


4 


Mexico 


3 


Cayman Islands 

Chile 

Colombia 


1 
1 
1 


Morocco 1 
Peoples Republic of China 1 
Pakistan 3 


Dominican Republic 


: 2 


South Korea 


4 


Ecuador 


3 


Saudi Arabia 


1 


Ethiopia 
France 
Germany 
Ghana 


1 

2 
5 
4 


Singapore 
Spain 

Switzerland 
Taiwan 


1 
1 
1 

1 


Guatemala 
Hong Kong 


2 
1 


Turkey 

United Arab Emirates 


2 
3 


India 


3 


United Kingdom 


3 


Israel 


1 







Alumni Association — 259 



OFFICERS (as of May 2007) 

Raymond L. Swetenburg, Jr. 72 - President 
Stewart B. Dorsett '82 - Immediate Past President 
Lucinda Kellam Jones '87 - President-Elect 
William P. Reed, Jr. 76 - Vice President 
Earl G. Wooten, '84 - Vice President 
Peter J. Wagner '92 - Director 



Charlotte, North Carolina 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Brooklyn, New York 

Los Angeles, California 

Davidson, North Carolina 



DECADE REPRESENTATIVES 

Carla Antoinette Bullock '02 

LloydW.Chapin,Jr.'58 

Kearns Davis '91 

Thomas W. Earnhardt '68 

Virgil L.Fludd '80 

Anthonv R. Foxx '93 

Nurica N. Good '00 

Leslie Nicole Grinage '03 

Joseph C. Harris, Jr. '02 

Catherine Landis Henschen 78 

Mary Robertson Howell '87 

June Greer Rhyne '84 

Nancy C Rosselot '85 

D. Phelps Sprinkle '93 

Emelia Stuart Stephenson 76 

Debby Carlton Wallace '81 

Robert B. Welsh '48 

Craig J. White '82 

Alva M. Whitehead '67 

William D. La wing 73, Faculty Representative 

Whitney Andrea White '08, Senior Class President 



Durham, North Carolina 

Saint Petersburg, Florida 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Tyrone, Georgia 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Kernersville, North Carolina 

Bryan, Texas 

Arlington, Virginia 

Knoxville, Tennessee 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Weston, Massachusetts 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Greenville, South Carolina 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Davidson, North Carolina 

Florence, South Carolina 

Davidson, North Carolina 

Davidson, North Carolina 



260 — Index 



INDEX 



Abernethy Grants, 55 
Academic assistance, 57 
Academic calendar, 2 
Accreditation, 2 
Administrative staff, 227 
Admission requirements, 9 

Advanced Placement, 11 

Application, 10 

Campus visits, 11 

Early decision, 10 

International student, 13 

International Baccalaureate, 12 

Joint enrollment, 12 
Alumni Association, 259 
Anthropology, 63 
Applied Mathematics, 190 
Applied Music, 21, 28, 60, 134 
Art, 28, 68 
Asian Studies, 191 
Athletic honor awards, 252 
Athletics and Physical Education, 29, 150 
Attendance, 61 
Awards, 249 

Biology, 73 

Black Student Coalition, 34 

Broughton Hospital, summer program, 54 

Calendar, academic, 2 

Campus Center, 32 

Capsule Information, 263 

Career Services, 36 

Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, 53, 79 

Charlotte Area Educational Consortium, 53 

Chemistry, 81 

Chinese, 86 

Class of 2007, list of graduates, 253 

Classics, 88 

Code of responsibility, 25 

College Board tests, 9 

College Union, 32 

Communications, 36 

Computer Science, 192 

Concentrations, 41,190 

Applied Mathematics, 190 

Asian Studies, 191 

Computer Science, 192 

Education, 193 



Ethnic Studies, 195 

Film and Media Studies, 197 

Gender Studies, 198 

Geonomics, 199 

International Studies, 201 

Medical Humanities, 202 

Neuroscience, 203 

Southern Studies, 205 
Contract courses, 54 
Counseling, 37 
Course enrollments, 60 
Courses of Instruction, 63 

Anthropology, 63 

Art, 68 

Biology, 73 

Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, 79 

Chemistry, 81 

Chinese, 86 

Classics, 88 

Economics, 93 

Education, 98, 193 

English, 101 

French, 109 

German, 114 

Greek, 89 

History, 119 

Humanities, 129 

Latin, 90 

Mathematics, 130 

Military Studies, 138 

Music, 140 

Philosophy, 146 

Physical Education, 150 

Physics, 151 

Political Science, 155 

Psychology, 161 

Religion, 166 

Russian, 117, 174 

Self-Instructional Languages, 174 

Sociology, 175 

South Asian Studies, 178 

Spanish, 179 

Theatre, 185 
Cultural diversity requirement, 43 

(See listings under each academic department) 



Index — 261 



Curricular Enrichment, 239 
Curriculum, 41 

Davidson, history of, 5 
Dean Rusk Program 

in International Studies, 45 
Deferred Payments, 23 
Departmental honors, 44 
Dining Service, 26 
Disabled students, services for, 39 

Earlv decision admission, 10 
Eating houses, 27 
Economics, 93 
Education, 52, 98, 193 
EDUCOM Code, 57 
Emeriti, 209 
Employment, 19 
Endowed book funds, 241 
English, 101 
Engineering, 52 
Enrollment data, 257 
Environmental programs, 78 
Ethnic Studies, 195 
Examinations, 62 

Faculty, 212 

Fees, 19, 23 

Film and Media Sudies, 197 

Financial assistance, 13 

Food service, 20, 26 

Foreign language requirements, 42 

Foreign study, 46 

Fraternities, 27 

French, 109 

Gender Studies, 198 
Geonomics, 199 
Geographical distribution, 258 
German, 114 
Grading system, 61 
Graduation honors, 44 
Graduation, requirements for, 42 
Greek, 89 

Health & Safety, 37 
History, 119 
History of the college, 5 
Honor societies, 248 
Honor code, 25 
Honors, departmental, 44 



Howard University, study in, 54 
Humanities, 129 

Independent study, 54 
Information Technology Services, 56 
Instructional support, 57 
Interdisciplinary study, 53, 79 
International Baccalaureate degree credit, 12 
International perspectives, 45 
International scholarships, 17 
International students, 13, 46 
International Studies concentration, 201 
Internships, 37, 54 
Interviews and campus visits, 11 
Involuntary withdrawal, 39 

Kemp scholars, 55 

Laboratories and studios, 57 

Language requirements, 42 

Language resource center, 59 

Latin, 90 

Latin American students organization, 34 

Leadership development, 33 

Learning disabled services, 38 

Leave, 21 

Library, 55 

Loans, student, 18 

Majors, 41 

Math center, 57 

Mathematics, 130 

Medical Humanities, 202 

Military Studies, 138 

Minority student programs, 33 

Minors, 42 

Morehouse College exchange program, 34, 54 

Music, 28, 59, 140 

Neuroscience, 203 

New Faculty and Instructional 

Appointments, 224 
Nondiscrimination policy, 2 

Other Instructional Appointments, 2006-07, 220 

Patterson Court, 27 

Philosophy, 146 

Physical Education, 29, 43, 150 

Physics, 151 

Political Science, 155 



262 — Index 



Pre-college enrichment program, 34 
Pre-Law, 51 
Pre-Medicine, 50 
Pre-professional programs, 50 
Presidents of Davidson, 7 
Psychology, 161 
Publications, 36 
Purpose, statement of, 6 

Radio stations, 36 

Refund Policy, 22 

Religion, 166 

Religious activities, 30 

Requirements for graduation, 42 

Residence halls, 25 

Retired faculty, 209 

Room and board, 20 

ROTC, 18, 53, 138 

Russian, 117, 174 

Satisfactory academic progress, 14 

Schedule adjustment, 60 

Scholarships, 15 

School for Field Studies, 54, 78 

Self -Instructional languages, 49, 174 

Self -scheduled exams, 62 

Service, 35 

Social life, 31 

Sociology, 175 

South Asian Studies, 49, 178 

Southern Studies, 205 

Spanish, 179 

Special interest groups, 33 

Special study options, 53 



Standards of progress, 44 
Statement of purpose, 6 
Student counseling center, 37 
Student government, 32 
Student health, 38 
Study abroad, 46 
Summer graduates, 256 
Summer research, 53 
Summer study (contract courses), 54 

Teacher education, 98 
Theatre, 185 
Transcripts, 21 
Transfer credit, 61 
Trustees, 207 
Tuition and fees, 19 
Tutoring, 57 

Volunteer opportunities, 35 

Washington, study in, 54 
" W" courses, 43 
Withdrawal, 60 
Writing center, 57 



Capsule Information — 263 



DAVIDSON COLLEGE CAPSULE INFORMATION 2006-2007 

• Founded: Bv Presbyterians in 1837. 

• Campus: 450 acres with 101 buildings in Davidson, N.C., 19 miles north of Charlotte, plus 106 
acres on Lake Norman offering water sports. 

• Calendar: Two 15- week semesters (fall and spring). Enrollment (Fall, 2006): 1,667 (836 men, 
831 women 

• Comprehensive Fee (2006-07): $38,784 

• Full-time Equivalent (FIE) Faculty: 168.4. Tenured/ Tenure Track Faculty: 149 — 99 percent of 
whom hold an earned doctorate or other terminal degree in their field. 

• Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 

• Library: Twelve professional librarians offer reference assistance much of the 106 hours a 
week the Librarv is open; resources of over 621,000 volumes (including government docu- 
ments) and 4,700 serial subscriptions; plus access to thousands of online journals and other 
resources through the NC LIVE statewide computer network. Music Library with over 10,000 
books, scores, and recordings. Fullv automated catalog available an\ r where on campus and via 
the internet. Librarv building offers wireless access and laptops for checkout. 

• Information Technology: Servers for academic computing, librarv automation, administra- 
tive operations, World Wide Web, electronic mail and other distributed computing services. 
Campus-wide gigabit network; wireless networks in academic buildings, Alvarez Student 
Union, E. H. Little Librarv, Sloan Music Center, Vail Commons, Chambers Building, Patterson 
Court; Ethernet connections in all residence hall rooms; networked microcomputer labs and 
classrooms with 450 Windows and Macintosh computers available to all students for general 
use. 

• Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S. in 21 majors. 

• Off-Campus Programs: See International Perspectives in Academic Programs and Policies 
Section for more information. Junior Year Abroad/ Fall Semester/ Spring Semester or June Ses- 
sion in Tours, France; Fall Semester in India; Fall Semester in Peru; Spring Classics Semester 
Abroad; Summer Program in Ghana; Summer Programs in Zambia and Kenya (on demand); 
Summer Archaeological Dig in Cyprus; Summer Program in Cambridge, England; Summer 
Program in Cadiz, Spain; Summer Program in Moscow, Russia; Summer Political Science 
Program in Washington, D.C Summer Program in Broughton in abnormal psychology at 
Morganton, N.C. Semester and Summer Programs with the School for Field Studies in Austra- 
lia, British West Indies, Costa Rica, Kenya, and Mexico. 

• Athletics: 21 intercollegiate teams-eleven men's and ten women's. Seventeen club sports and 
numerous intramural sports. 

• As of September, 2006, the six-year graduation rate for students entering in the Fall of 2000 
is 91 percent. Detailed information on graduation rates categorized by gender, ethnicity, and 
athletic participation is available in the Office of Registrar and the E.H. Little Library. 




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Davidson, N.C. 28035 



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