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Full text of "The DCS information storage and retrieval system for graduate applicants and students"

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LIBRARY OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 

510.84 

I^6r 

no. 782-787 

cop. 2 




The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
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Latest Date stamped below. 

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are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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v RECTI 



L161 — O-1096 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/dcsinformationst783lars 



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UIUCDCS-R-76-783 

to. si 

■■7X3 

January 1976 



THE DCS INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL 

SYSTEM FOR GRADUATE APPLICANTS AND STUDENTS 

by 

J. B. Larson 
W. J. Kubitz 




UIUCDCS-R-76-783 



THE DCS INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL 
SYSTEM FOR GRADUATE APPLICANTS AND STUDENTS 



J. B. Larson 
W. J. Kubitz 



January 1976 



This work was supported by the Department of Computer Science. 



Department of Computer Science 
University of Illinois at Urb ana-Champaign 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

1. Introduction 1 

2. Editor (ED) and Browse (BR) Users' Guide 3 

2.1 Special Function Keys 3 

2.2 ED Step by Step Instructions 5 

2.3 Browse (BR) Introduction 12 

2.4 BR Step by Step Instructions 13 

3. Program Structure 17 

3.1 File Structures 18 

3.2 Program Structures 21 

4. Software Maintenance 23 

5. Problems & Possibilities 25 



Appendices 

Page 

Appendix A 31 

A.l FAA Field Table with Values and Ranges 32 

A. 2 FAA Translation Table 34 

A. 3 GSR Field Table with Values and Ranges 35 

A. 4 GSR Translation Table 37 

A. 5 GSR Format Table . . 38 

Appendix B 39 

B.l Sample Output Generated by HASP Command 40 

B.2 Sample Output Generated by PRINT Command 41 

Appendix C 

Quick Summary of ED and BR Commands 42 

Appendix D 

Quick Summary of console commands 43 



1. Introduction 

This document describes the use, structure, and maintenance of the 
Fellowship, Assistantship and Admissions - Graduate Student Records 
(FAA-GSR) information system. This system was developed beginning in 
the summer of 1973 to the present. It began as an off-line, batch job 
operation and evolved into its present form, a fully interactive, remote 
terminal system. Only the system in its present form is documented here. 

The FAA-GSR system is a file editing - information retrieval system 
involving two basic programs. The editing program (ED) allows the user to 
access and change any element of the entire file. The retrieval program 
(BR) supplies a means by which sets of records may be selected and printed. 
In addition, a level of security is maintained by requiring the user to 
have knowledge of certain passwords. Each program is written in DEC-10 
FORTRAN and is structured to facilitate easy transfer to another machine. 
Each program consists of approximately 600 - 800 FORTRAN statements and 
occupies 20K DEC-10 36 bit words. Note that although the two programs, 
BR and ED, are basically the same for both the FAA and GSR systems, the data 
bases are quite different as described later. In addition, the usage is 
different in that the frequency of updating and complexity of the desired 
sorting/searching operations differ. 

The motivation for the development of the system was the increasing 
number of applicants to the graduate program in the late sixties and early 
seventies. Along with the increased number of applicants was an increasing 



number of requests from both inside and outside the Department for information 
of a statistical nature about both applicants and students. These requests 
often entailed tedious manual searching/sorting operations on a dynamically 
changing data base. The existing manual records were not organized in a 
way which allowed easy searching by any parameter other than name. Searches 
involving multiple parameters were particularly time consuming and frustrating. 
This situation is extreme in the case of admissions information (FAA) 
because the data base is constantly being updated. For the student 
record (GSR) information, the difficulty lies in the varying requirements 
of the different degree programs and the multiplicity of parameters over 
which simultaneous searching must be performed. It was and is hoped that the 
present interactive system can greatly alleviate many of these problems. 

The transition to this interactive system is not without its problems, 
however. At this time, duplication of effort is involved on the part of 
the clerical personnel in that a hard, hand-written copy is created first 
and used as a source of input to the computer system. This is partly 
a result of lack of faith in the non-volatility of the computer data base 
(unfortunately well documented in practice) and also due to the fact that 
some of the input data comes from the subjective deliberations of a committee 
(FAA). The situation is not as complicated in the GSR case since the data 
is primarily objective (from our point of view) and stable in time. The 
major concerns in this case are loss of data and security. 

The intent here is to document the current state of the systems, 
provide user knowledge, and suggest possible means of maintaining the system. 

There is also a discussion of possible future additions and changes. 



Section 2 contains a user guide to using the FAA-GSR system. Section 
3 describes the program implementation and data structures from a layman's 
point of view. Section 4 gives suggestions on maintenance of the programs 
and data files. Section 5 discusses current problems and future improvements 
The Appendices provide current operational procedures from a personnel point 
of view and summarize system commands and definition for quick reference. 

2. Editor (ED) and Browse (BR) Users' Guide 

Section 2.2 gives a list of steps describing how to edit an FAA or 
GSR file. Section 2.3 gives a similar description for the browsing pror- 
gram. At each step, the computer message which appears on the terminal 
is given and the proper response is described. An explanation of 
what actually happens at each step is also given along with a description 
of what can be done in the event that the wrong information is entered. 
First, the special function of some keys on the terminal and general 
instructions for operating a DEC-10 terminal will be given. 

2.1 Special Function Keys 

Entering a Line into the Computer . One special function key is the 
return key. To enter a line of information into the computer, press the 
RETURN key. 

Correcting a Line . If an error in a line is discovered before RETURN 
is pressed, you can back up one character at a time to that place at which 
the error occured on the line by pressing the RUBOUT key or by pressing 
CTL H (i.e. press the CTL key and the H key simultaneously) and then retyping 
the remainder of the line with the correction. Each time the RUBOUT key 
is pressed, the character which is being deleted is printed between \ 
marks. Each time CTL H is typed, the cursor (the flashing line at the 



bottom of the line) is backed up over the deleted character. 

After pressing RUBOUT, the line which appears on the screen is not 
the line which is actually used by the computer because of the deleted 
characters which are displayed at the terminal but not used by the computer . 
To see the line of information which is actually utilized by the computer, 
type CTL R. 

Deleting an Entire Line . CTL U will delete an entire line. 

Stopping Output Temporarily . If the machine is listing a rather large 
amount of information (e.g. a complete listing of a record) and you wish 
to stop the output temporarily in order to read some of the information 
before it disappears off the top of the screen, press CTL S. To restart 
the listing, press CTL Q. 

Suppressing Output . CTL suppresses output to terminal but the computer 
continues to calculate and generate output. This provides a way of speeding 
up the output process in order to get to the end of output execution. 
For example, this can be used to skip rapidly over remaining output after 
an item of interest has been obtained. 

No Response from Computer . Normally, the computer should respond 
to a command within 1 or 2 seconds. If for some reason, the computer does 
not respond within a few minutes, there is probably something wrong with 
the DEC-10. If the terminal does not seem to respond, type CTL C several 
times. If a period appears on the screen, type CONTINUE and press RETURN 
twice. A message should appear indicating what the program is looking for. 
If no period appears on the terminal, hang up the phone and try again later. 
Use this procedure only if the machine does not respond properly. 



2.2 ED Step by Step Instructions (Refer to Figure 1) 

Organization of Work by Task . 

Step 1 Organize the work according to task. That is, 

collect all the ADDs, CHANGES, SEQUENTIAL CHANGES, NAME 
CHANGES and DELETES together into separate groups. This 
is necessary because the system operates in one command mode 
at a time. Thus, all the ADDs are done while in the ADD 
mode, all the CHANGES while in the CHANGE mode, etc. 

Login and Initialization . 

Step 2 Turn on the terminal and dial the computer (3-4000) . 

When a continuous tone is heard, place the phone in the cradle 
(cord towards you) and press CTL C (press the keys CTL and 
C simultaneously) several times. A message requesting LOGIN 
should appear on the screen. If you get a busy signal from 
the phone, then hang up and try later; there is no line available 
at this time. If no message appears on the screen, then the 
computer is not operating; hang up and try again later. 

Step 3 Computer: A message requesting you to LOGIN 

Response: LOGIN 4535,1122 (FAA) 
LOGIN 4535,1120 (GSR) 

Step 4 Computer: PASSWORD 

Response: enter password 

Step 5 Computer: operator messages about changes in normal schedule 

terminated with a period 

Response: RUN ED 

Step 6 Computer: ENTER DATE 

Response: enter date as YY/MM/DD 

Example: If today's date is June 13, 1975, then enter: 
75/06/13 

Step 7 Computer: CHECK DATE 

Response: If the date is correct, type Y and proceed to Step 8, 
otherwise, type N and repeat Step 6. 

Step 8 Computer: ENTER CODE WORD 

Response: type in the code word 

Step 9 Computer: IS 375 THE CURRENT SEM-YR? ENTER CR OR NEW SEM-YR 



DATE 
CODEWORD 

m 



SEMESTER 
CHECK 



COMMAND 



ADD 



S^ I FIELDS I 

©I ^ I ©J * 1| 

i -^ m SSN P 42 * FIELD VALUE — ' 

*| f #1 T LZ_ 



NAMEC 



CHANGE 



JL 



A 



DELETE ' 



SCHANGE ■ 



CRSADO 



>3 



ILLEGAL 
COMMAND 



LOOP ON ALL 



®, 



_&. 



LIST 
RECORD 



FIELD 
NAME 



uT 



OLD 
NAME 



M 



NEW 
NAME 



FIRST OR 
INITIAL 



NEW 
SSN 



NAME 



A 



FIELO 
NAME 



I 



FIELD 
VALUE 



LIST 
RECORD 



ii / 



NAME 



• ® 



LOOP ON DESIGNATED 



BEGINNING 
FIELD 



ENDING 
FIELD 



NAME 



I 



m 



FIELD VALUE 
T7 



M. 



n # 



LIST 
RECORD 



FIELD 
NAME 



3" 



COURSE 
J 



UNITS 



TOTAL 



» PROF 



NAME 



E~I 



M 



GRADE 



RANK 



ILLEGAL RESPONSE 



STOP 
EXIT 



® 



V 



SCHANGE 
ONLT 



NO 



STORE RECORD K- 



YES 



PERMANENT 
ENTRY? 

T 



NOTE, THIS PATH RETURNS TO THE COMMANO 

FROM WHICH IT CAME EXCEPT FOR SCHANGE 



FIELD 
NAME 



LIST 
RECORD 



T 



FIELD 
VALUE 



Figure 1. Control Flow for ED 



Response: normally type CR unless this is a new semester, 
then type the SEM-YR. 

Explanation: When a large amount of course information is being 
entered for one semester, the program automati- 
cally inserts the above semester and year into the 
appropriate field. If you wish to enter course 
information for a new semester (the one following 
that printed, presumably), then type Y, otherwise, 
enter a carriage return (CR) . 

Step 10 Computer: ENTER COMMAND 

Response: Enter one of the following commands: 

ADD - if you are adding a new record to the file 

CHANGE - if you are modifying random fields of 

current records (e.g. general exam results) 

SCHANGE - if you are modifying or adding information 
to a sequence of the same fields for all 
existing records (e.g. entering course 
information by_ student for the previous 
semester for GSR or attend information 
for the FAA file). 

NAMEC - if you wish to change the name corresponding 
to a certain SSN or the SSN corresponding to 
a certain name. 

DELETE - if you wish to delete a record from the 
file entirely. 

STOP - to terminate this session. 

CRSADD - if you wish to enter course information by 
course at the end of a semester. 

Any other command will return you to Step 10. 

Explanation of the ED Command Modes . Note that the sets of steps 
given below for each possible command (Steps 11 - 31) are mutually exclusive 
even though numbered sequentially. Figure 1 shows the control flow for the 
ED program. 

Add Command . 

Step 11 Computer: ENTER SSN 

Response: Enter the SSN (Social Security Number) for the new 
record as 9 digits (do not include separators such 
as / or -) . Enter a / to return to the command 
level (Step 10) . 



Example: 438702607 

Errors: If a record with that SSN is already in the file, the 
message SSN ERROR is printed; return to Step 11. If 
you type in the wrong SSN, it may be changed later by 
using the NAMEC command or by typing / and then NO 
to abort this entry. Then proceed with Step 11 again. 

Step 12 Computer: prints a field name 

Response: Enter the value for this field. (Be careful to dis- 
tinguish between (zero) and the letter 0, and the 
number 1 and the letter L) . Return to Step 12 unless 
this is the last field in which case go to Step 17. 

Explanation: Each element of a record is accessed via its field 
name. A list of all valid fields for each set 
of records (FAA or GSR) is given in Appendix A. 

For GSR File Only: To enter a date of any kind, enter SYY, 

as three digits where S has the value 
of 1 for Spring semester, 2 for Summer 
and 3 for Fall and the year is the calendar 
year (YY) . For example, Fall semester 1975 
would be 375. 

In response to the CRS.PROF field, enter 
the name of the professor only if he is in 
the CS Department. Otherwise, enter blank 
for professor. If a professor is new to 
the Department (i.e. not in the list of 
professors which the program stores) , a 
message to this effect is printed. If YES 
is the response to the message, the professor 
is added to the internal list, otherwise, 
he is ignored. Since there is only space 
for the names of 80 different professors, 
be sure that the name is spelled properly. 
If you get this message and this is indeed a 
new name, then a YES response will auto- 
matically add the name to the list. 

The GSR file automatically computes accumu- 
lated statistics such as CUMGPA and these 
need not be entered. 

Alternate Response: If desired, instead of entering a field 

value at some point, you may enter a special 
character which will not change the current 
value of the field. Instead one of the 
following actions is taken: 

i) // causes the entire record to be listed 
(see Step 16) after which control is 
returned to Step 12. 



ii) * allows one to change fields so that one 
can begin entering information from a 
different field in the record (Step 13) . 

iii) / is used to indicate that all the 

information has been entered for this 
record and that the record is ready 
to be stored (proceed to Step 17) . 

Step 13 Computer: ENTER FIELD [Computer response to * entry] 

Response: Enter a valid field name. If the field name is one 
describing course information, proceed to Step 14, 
otherwise, return to Step 12. (Only enough letters 
of the field name to distinguish it from the others 
need be entered) . One of the special characters 
of Step 12 can also be entered at this point. 

Step 14 Computer: WHICH COURSE? 

Response: Enter the course name corresponding to the actual value 
(grade, credit, professor or semester) which is to be 
changed . 

Step 15 Computer: CHANGE THIS COURSE NAME (Y/N) 

Response: Normally enter N (NO). Enter Y (YES), key RETURN 

and enter new course name if the name of the course 
is to be changed. Otherwise, press RETURN. Go back 
to Step 12. 

Step 16 Computer: COURSE OR HISTORY (C/H) [Computer response to # entry] 

Response: Enter C or H to obtain either a course or history 

list of the current record. Return to the previously 
entered state (Step 12, 13, or 17). 

Explanation: C causes a listing of the complete course records 

for that student. H causes a complete listing of all 
non-course information for that student. 

Step 17 Computer: PERMANENT ENTRY? ("Computer response to / entryj 

Response: Normally, enter YES, If this record is to be abandoned, 
enter NO. Enter # or * as described in Step 12 above. 
Continue to Step 11. 

SCHANGE Command . 

Step 18 Computer: ENTER BEGINNING FIELD 

Response: Enter the name of the first field which is to be altered 

Step 19 Computer: ENTER ENDING FIELD 

Response: Enter the name of the last field to be altered. 



CHANGE Command . 

Step 18 Computer: ENTER LAST NAME 

Response: Enter the last name for the record or a / to 

return to Step 10. The computer may request first 
name and/or SSN if there are two or more records 
with the same last name. 

Step 19 Computer: ENTER FIELD 

Response: Enter the name of the field whose value is to be 
changed or the characters # or / as described 
previously. 

Step 20 Computer: Prints a field name 

Response: Enter the value of the field or the special 

character # or /. Normally (unless / is pressed) 
return to Step 19. 

Step 21 Computer: PERMANENT ENTRY? 

Response: Type YES, NO, //, or *. This is similar to Step 17 
of the ADD command, however, a NO response leaves 
the record in the file unchanged. (i.e. the latest 
editing is not recorded). Continue with Step 18. 

SCHANGE Command . 

Step 22 Computer: ENTER BEGINNING FIELD 

Response: Enter the name of the first field which is to be 
altered. 

Step 23 Computer: ENTER ENDING FIELD 

Response: Enter the name of the last field to be altered. 

Step 24 Computer: ENTER LAST NAME 

Response: Enter the last name for the required record or / 
to return to the command level (Step 10) . The 
computer may request further information if there 
are two records with the same last name. 

Step 25 Computer: Prints a field name 

Response: Enter the value of the field or a special character 
as described in Step 12. 

Step 26 Computer: PERMANENT ENTRY? 

Response: Same as Step 21. Continue with Step 24. 



10 



NAMEC Command . 

Step 27 Computer: ENTER OLD NAME 

Response: Enter the last name of the record to be changed or /. 

Step 28 Computer: ENTER NEW NAME 

Response: Enter the new last name for this record. The program 
will then request the first name and SSN, enter the 
proper values for the new record. A blank entry to any 
of these queries will result in blanks being recorded . 

Step 29 Computer: PERMANENT ENTRY? 

Response: YES, NO, *, or //. Same as Step 21. Continue with 
Step 27. 

DELETE Command . 

Step 30 Computer: ENTER LAST NAME 

Response: Enter the last name of the record to be deleted or /. 

Step 31 Computer: PERMANENT ENTRY? 

Response: Type YES to permanently delete this record, continue 
with Step 30. 

CRSADD Command . (GSR Only) 

Step 32 Computer: ENTER COURSE 

Response: Enter the course name. CS 321, for example. The 
computer will then ask for the credit for the 
course, UNITS the total final enrollment, TOTAL 
and the name of the professor, PROF. The date is 
entered automatically. A / will return to the 
command mode. 

Step 33 Computer: ENTER LAST NAME 

Response: Enter the last name of the student for whom the 
grade is to be recorded or a /. The / returns 
you to Step 23. 

The computer will ask for the GRADE and RANK for each 
student. Note that exit is to the command mode rather 
than PERMANENT ENTRY?. Errors can be corrected using 
CHANGE. 

STOP Command . 

Step 34 Computer: The program execution is halted. Logout of the computer 

by typing K/F. Hang up the phone and turn the terminal 
off. 

11 



2.3 Browse (BR) Introduction. 

The Browse program (BR) allows a user to list any record or 
logically described subset of records on the terminal or on the printer. 
Logical sets of records are defined by the user as follows: The program 
maintains several levels or sets of records numbered by level as 1, 2, 3, 
etc. At level 1, all records are included. A logical subset of these 
records can be transferred ot the next level (i.e. level 2) by entering 
the command RETAIN and an EXPRESSION consisting of a boolean expression 
involving relations between field names and constants which describe the 
new set. Further refinement can be obtained by executing the command 
RETAIN once again and forming a set of records at level 3. Previous 
levels may be accessed by backing (BACKUP) up one level at a time to 
the desired set. Using this process, any set of records which can be 
described by a logical expression can be selected and a formatted list 
(COMPLETE) or a list restricted to only a few fields can be generated 
on the terminal (LIST) or on hard copy (HC) . In addition, the browse 
program can be used to generate some statistics. 



12 



2.4 BR Step by Step Instructions (Refer to Figure 2) 

First follow the login Steps 1 through 4 of the edit program. 

instructions. 

Step 5 Computer: . (period) 

Response: RUN BR 

Step 6 Computer: DO YOU WISH TO KEEP A LOG? 

Response: Normally, enter blank. However, if you wish a 
hard copy log of what you have done, respond Y 
and a hard copy log of your dialog will be printed 
on the DEC-10 output printer. 

Step 7 Computer: ENTER COMMAND 

Response: Enter one of the following commands. (Only the 
first two characters are necessary) . 

RETAIN — to retain only a subset of the current set of records 

BACKUP — to backup to a set of records at the previous level 

CLEAR — to begin again with the set of all records 

AVERAGE — to find the average value of some field 

LIST — to list a selected set of fields of the current set of records 

HC (hard copy) — to obtain a hard copy listing of the output 

generated by LIST from the DEC-10 line printer 

COMPLETE — to obtain a complete list of a set records on the terminal 

PRINT (GSR) —rto obtain a complete hard copy listing of a set of 
HASP (FAA) V records from the printer. 

HELP — to obtain a list of all valid field names 

STOP — to terminate program execution 

Explanation of the BR Commands . 

Here again, the commands are mutually exclusive as shown 

in Figure 2. 

Retain Command . 

Step 8 Computer: ENTER EXPRESSION 

Response: Enter an expression describing the set of records 
to be retained or enter a / to return to the 
command mode. 

13 



<£ 



LOG ? 



J. 



Q£ 



COMMAND 



CLEAR I — >=^-»h LEVELU j- 




RETAIN i — ^-» 



BACKUP 



HELP ■"* 



AyERAGE 



__ FIELDS J 

©J 

i — -=^» FIELD ? 



LIST i. 



HC > 



COMPLETE ■ 



HASP f 

IFAA) 



STOpI® 

exitV- 



ILLEGAL 
COMMAND 



EXPRESSION 



LEVEL = 
LEVEL + 1 



0.{"livk; 



16 r- 



^l COMPUTE AND i 
^_LIST AVERAGE _] 



FIELD i 



Li;L*.'J 



blonk T generate"! 

— 1 list r 



® 



LABEL 



FIELD i 



i l»l + l ! 



blonkl I GENERATE J_ 
\ HARD COPY ! 



,GSR ONLY 



(5) 



COURSE/ 
HISTORY 



IT ONI 

ECORD 

'CI 



I 1 NO MORE 

C OR H i LIST ONE ' CR j GO TO NEXT j RECORDS 
i RECORD ! i RECORD 



J 



POINT .J BUIL0 MLt ° 

;,.., T^ SEND TO PRINTER f 



COPIES ? 



BUILD FILE a 
SENO TO PRINTER 



Figure 2 Control Flow for BR 



14 



Explanation: An expression is any boolean expression of binary 
relations between a field name and a proper value 
for that field. Valid relational operators are: 
=, <=, >=, <, and >. Boolean operators are + (or), I 
(andX and\ (not). A sequence of fields may be 
accessed by specifying only enough of the field 
name to represent all fields to be accessed. Course 
information may be accessed with the GSR program by 
specifying the associated course name and then the 
desired item (grade, professor, credit, rank, 
semester). Field value constants are matched with 
field values to as many characters as specified. 
Fields which are coded may be specified by either 
the coded value or the descriptive value. 

All records can be retained by using the ? for 
the field value and asking for all values <?. 
(i.e. ? is the largest value). 

Any record is matched by using the "wild card" 
feature. This is done by using the * in place 
of a value or portion of a value. (i.e. the * 
matches any value). Thus SEM ENT = *75 gives 
all students who entered in the calendar year 
1975. In this case the * matches 1, 2 or 3. 

Example 1: INT - NUMERICAL 

Explanation: retains all records with any interest in numerical 
analysis (FAA file) 

Example 2: EXP 1 = ART 

Explanation: retains all records which contain an EXP 1 field 
of artificial intelligence (FAA file) 

Currently, values for fields containing numerical information in the 
GSR file must have the entire field specified. Items taking on fractional 
values such as course units and grade-point averages are stored as four 
digits with the values expressed in terms of hundredths. For example, 
a 4.95 GPA is stored as 0495 and 1 1/4 units is stored as 0125. 

Whole number information is stored as an integer right adjusted in 

the four digit field. 

Example 3: COURSE = CS329 & CRS. GRADE = A 

Explanation: retains all records with a grade of A in CS329 
(GSR file) 

Example 4: CUM GPA = 0450 

Explanation: retains all records with a GPA = 4.50 

15 



Example 5: #400 
Explanation: 



<= 0200 & SEM REG >= 0003 



BACKUP Command 



Step 9 Explanation: 



retains all records with less than two 400 level 
units and more than 2 regular semesters registered. 

The program responds to this expression with the 
number of records in the new set, the percentage 
of old set which this new set comprises, and the 
level number assigned to this set. 



The program responds with the previous level and 
it now accesses the set of records corresponding 
to this level. 



CLEAR Command 



Step 10 Explanation: 



The program returns to accessing the set of all 
records and resets the level to 1. 



AVERAGE Command. 



Step 11 



Computer: ENTER FIELD 

Response: Enter the field name of the field which is to be 
averaged. 



Explanation: 



The program prints the average value for all records 
of the current set which are non-blank for the 
field entered. (Course information cannot be 
averaged) . 



LIST Command. 



Step 12 Computer: ENTER FIELD (i) 

Response: Enter the name of each field which is to be listed 

for up to 20 fields. Enter a blank field at the end 
to initiate listing. Enter / to return to the command 
mode without a list. The computer advances i by 1 
after each valid entry. 



Explanation: 



The set of fields is listed on the terminal. All 
available space is used (hence the limitation of 
20 fields) 



HC Command . 



Step 13 



Computer : 
Response: 



ENTER LABEL 

Type in the label which is to appear on the hard 
copy listing. Continue as with the LIST command 
above. 



16 



COMPLETE Command . 

Step 14 Computer: Course or History (C/H) (GSR only) 

Response: Enter C to obtain a list of the course information. 
H to obtain a listing of the rest of the fields for 
each retained record. After each record, the listing 
stops, press RETURN to continue with the next record 
or / to return to the COMMAND mode. 

PRINT (GSR) or HASP (FAA) Command . 

Step 15 Explanation: This command forms a hard copy complete listing 

of the saved records. This process may take some 
time as they involve a great deal of processing. 
The HASP command will ask how many copies are 
desired. 

HELP Command . 

Step 16 Explanation: HELP gives a list of all valid field names which 

can be used in boolean expressions describing 
sets of records. 

STOP Command . 

Step 17 Explanation: Terminate execution. Enter K/F to logout. 



3. Program Structure 

The basic file structures, program structures, and the internal data 
structures are described in this section. The FAA-GSR system is composed 
of two programs, EDIT and BROWSE, and two major files, a data file and a 
table. The program ED performs maintenance of the records stored in the data 
file, GRAD.O or GRAD.l. Through this program, any field within any record 
can be modified. The program BR allows the user to list any logically de- 
scribed subset of these records. The data file contains the active records 
in a random access-binary format. The structure of these records is given in 
the table file, TABLE.DAT. 



17 



3.1 File Structures 



Data file (or record Hl^ , r.p A n n rr rr 

L *- inis ri le contains all 

of the records for the eve*-**™ t? i. 

r cne system. Each record in the faa f-ti 

j-n cne hAA file contains 240 

characters; each record in the GSR file contains 600 h 

« contains 600 characters and 800 

digits. The character information is packed s ^ 

packed 5 characters to a word (36 
bits/word, 7 bits/char) of memory while the m^ « * 

y wnile the digit information is encoded 

(-• eac h Kord contalns ^ ^ representation ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

« c haraccers and dlglts are accessed through one ^ ^ cim 

to facilitate transfer to another machine. 

The ED program accesses each record by the last n am e « 

y cne last name, first name, and 
SSN. It is assumed that each record will at l M .f k 

W1J " L at leas t have a unique SSN. 
Records are stored in order of last n amo « 

last name, first name, and SSN. New records 

are added to the file by fi rst storing them in a transactions file 

XKAN. DAT , until 20 recordg ^ been accumuiated> ^^ ^^^^ J^ ^ , 

-* the current file i nd i cated by either . x _ . fl ^ ^ ^ ^ 
- -e transactions file. ReC ords are changed by selecting the record 

Edifying it, and replacing the old record with the 

record with the new version. Records 
are DEEETEd by bl a„ klng out the la „ 

' lhe NAME Change operation adds 
the record with the new name and deletes the „ih 

aeietes the old copy. The ADD operation 
simply adds the new record. 

ISSiS-LiiSiJEABLEJJAT The structure of the entlre ^ ^ ^ I 

contained in this f-fio T 

" TU ° "" eS "" '""^ «or.d ^ thl. fUe; . fleld 
-Me con t a lnlng all ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



18 



each record, and a decode table which contains decode information for fields 

which are coded. Included in the field table is the name of each field 

within the record, the starting character within the record and the field's 

length (see Appendix A). Since some fields are coded to conserve storage, 

this table contains information about where to look in the decode table 

for the codes for each field. A type column is included to invoke special 

routines within the programs according to special requirements of each 

field. Also the fields are logically grouped in the field table and a 

special column indicates this grouping. Finally, a formatted printout 

is available in the program BR and the table contains the row and column 

in which each field value is to be printed. The decode table contains the 

coded values and the printed values for coded fields. 

More precisely, the table structure is as follows: 

The first line of the file contains special information as follows: 

Column Name Description 

1-3 NFIELD # of fields in the table 

4-6 INST field number of INT 1 

7-9 EXST field number of EXP 1 

10-12 GS the field number of the field COURSE 

13-15 NS // of characters in each record 

The field table format is as follows: 

Column Name Description 

1-10 FIELD field name 

11-14 BEG beginning location of the field 

value 

15-17 LEN length of each value of the field 

18-20 DB beginning location of the decode 

table entries for this field 



19 



Column 



21-23 



24-26 



27-29 



Name 



DE 



IADV 



TYPE 



30-32 
33-35 



ROW 
COL 



Description 

ending location of the decode 
table entries for this field 

a pointer to the next logical 
set of fields 

type of the field 

1 - this field must be decoded 

2 - this field is a number 

3 - the field is a number 

represented in hundredths 
of units 

5 - COURSE 

6 - CRS.PROF 

7 - CRS. GRADE 

8 - CRS. DATE 

9 - CRS. UNITS 

10 - CRS. RANK 

11 - CRS. TOTAL 

row in which to print this value 

column in which to start printing 
this value 



The decode table format is 
Column Name 



Description 

coded value in the record 

decoded value which is printed 



1-2 CODE 

6-30 VAL 

The actual tables are given in appendix A. 

Format file, FORMAT This file contains the format for listing 
of indivudual records. The format is as follows: The first line con- 
tains a number indicating the number of vertical lines to draw. The 
next lines specify first the column in which to draw the vertical line 
and then the rows which bound the line. Next, the horizontal lines 
are specified in a similar manner (i.e. // of lines, row and column where 
the line is to appear). Following this is a list of names (or labels) 



20 



which are to appear on the output. The column, row and actual name are 
given. The current format files are given in Appendix A. 

3.2. Program Structures 

ED Program Structure . This program is composed of several subroutines 

which perform various tasks. Each routine is described below along with 

the pertinent data structures. 

MAIN — This is the driving program which decodes each command 
into several calls to various routines. Also, the data 
structures are initialized at the beginning of each execution 
and whenever necessary elsewhere. The actual structures 
are described below. 

NAME, SSN — are arrays which store the first 5 letters of the 

last name and the SSN for quick location of records. 

REC — contains the current record. 

NP — contains the number of entries in the decode table. 

NFIELD — contains the number of fields in record. 

GS — points to the beginning of the grade information. 

NS — points to the beginning location of the digit information 
within each record. 

CFILE — points to the active data file. 

The remaining subroutines are described below: 

UPDATE — sorts the transaction file and merges the sorted list of 
records with the old data files. A bubble sort is used 
since most transactions are in order anyway. 

FNAME — locates the required record and reads the current 
record into REC. 

LFIELD — accepts a field name and locates its position in the table 
by calling FFIELD. 

FFFIELD — actually locates the field name which was input and stores 
its location in the variable FPTR . 



21 



ACCPT — accepts a field value and stores this value in the record . 

PRT — lists an entire record on the terminal. 

STOW — generates accumulated statistics and stores the record 
in the data file, 

STORE — stores a field value into the record, 

CHAR — retrieves a character (or digit) from the record. 

BR Program Structure . 

MAIN — The main procedure of BR initializes the arrays, accepts 

commands and executes the proper sequence of calls to sub- 
routines as indicated by the command. Data structures 
which do not appear in the editing program are the following: 

SAVE — stores the level to which each record is assigned. 

LEVEL — contains the current level. 

The remaining subroutines are: 

RETAIN — accepts a boolean expression, forms a polish postfix 
string by calling POLISH and then checks each saved 
record against this expression by calling CHECK. 

POLISH — forms a polish postfix string and builds a symbol table 
STAB with the following structure. Each row of STAB 
corresponds to one operand. The first column contains 
the type, the second contains a length value, and the 
third column contains the starting location. 

A type of indicates a constant value which is stored 
in the original expression string. The begin field of 
STAB points to the value position in the string and the 
length element of STAB is the constant length in the 
expression string. A type of -1 indicates the field 
which is to be compared with a vilue. In this case, 
the begin field points to the field location in the field 
table, the length indicates the number of adjacent 
elements of the field which are to be accessed. 

The polish string contains operators (indicated by 
positive numbers) and operands (indicated by negative 
numberswhich point to some row of the symbol table). 
Each token which is inserted into the polish string is 
obtained by a call to the routine TOKEN. 

TOKEN — selects the next token from the input string and 

inserts operands into the symbol table STAB described 
above. 

22 






CHECK — matches a record to the polish string and returns a 1 
if the record matches the string. If a course number 
is given, then this course is looked up in the course 
list of the record and the corresponding field of the table 
is interrogated. A coded field value is first encoded 
if the given value is found in the table, otherwise, the 
coded value it assumed. 

COMPL — prints a complete record on the terminal when invoked by 
PRINT command. The virtual page is generated within the 
program from the constant values of the file FORMAT 
and then the record values are inserted for each record. 

HASP — (FAA only) A temporary file is formed which is readible 

by the followup PL/1 program on the IBM 360/75. The proper JCL 

is queued up with this file for printing. The JCL and 

output format is stored in a file JCL under 4535,1116 

in a format similar to that of the file FORMAT. The PL/1 

program is stored in the file NEWLST under 4535,1116 

and its load module is stored on disk. 

AVERAG — computes the average of all saved records. 

LIST — accepts field names for field values to be printed. Each 
line of print is generated within this procedure and 
proper spacing is determined to fill the available space. 
Also invoked by HC command. 

HELP — lists all field names. 



4. Software Maintenance 

Modification of the programs to include new features may prove 
to be quite difficult since the programs currently occupy all the 
available space. Some modifications to the files are quite simple, 
however, and a suggested procedure is given for making these changes. 

A new field may be added by first finding some empty space in the 
record. Characters should be inserted only in the character area of 
the record (1-600 for GSR, and 1-240 for FAA); all digits may be placed 
anywhere but for the GSR file, it's more economical to place digits 
in elements 601-1300. To add a new field, assign the BEG and LEN fields 



23 



to a vacant space in the record. Next, assign a type field. Use 
(or blank) in most cases. If the field must be decoded use a value of 
1. To suppress leading O's on output of a digit field, use the value 2. 
Decide where the new value is to appear on the output and assign the 
ROW and COL parameters accordingly (if it is not to be printed, leave 
the row and col fields blank) . 

To actually insert the field into the table, some renumbering 
of existing fields is necessary. Find the logical place in the field 
table for the new field. Adjust the various pointers as follows: 
Add one to the NFIELD, IVST, and EST (FAA only), and the GS parameters. 
Calculate the field number of this new field (i.e. the number of this new 
line in the field table) , and add 1 to each IADV field which has a value 
greater than this field number. Then insert this new field into the 
table. 

If this field is to be decoded, the decode information must be 
added to the decode table. For the GSR file, since the professor 
list must be the last set of decode values of the decode table, enter 
the new decode values just before the professor list. Determine the 
range of these new values (i.e. the locations of these new values 
in the decode table) . Enter the beginning and ending locations of these 
new values into the DB and DE columns for the new entry of the field 
table. Finally, the DB columns for each field which codes professors 
names must be updated. Add the number of new values entered into the 
decode table to each DB parameter associated with a professor name 
(there should be 3 of these). For the FAA file, simply add the new code 
values to the end of the table and enter the range into the DB and DE 

24 



elements of the new line of the field table. If the coding values 
are already in the decode table, they can be reused. Simply place 
their range into the DB and DE columns of the new entry. 

Finally, any labels which are to appear on the output must be entered 
into the FORMAT file (GSR) or the JCL file (FAA) by entering the row 
and column in which the label is to appear followed by the actual 
label on the same line. 

Some other simple changes are also possible. To change the decoded 
name for any field, change the associated value of the decode table. 
To change the name of any field, just change the name in the field table. 
No further modification can be made without program modification. 
Additional course information is only possible with program modification. 

5.0 Problems & Possibilities 

Duplication of Effort The largest single disadvantage to the 
current operational procedure is duplication of effort since, at this 
time, the record custodian is maintaining both the old and the new 
systems. Decisions must be made in the near future which will allow 
us to at least reduce this duplication. 

In the case of the GSR system, this will not be too difficult 
since a hard copy can be generated immediately and the information 
is available from other sources as a last resort. We could also 
consider generating our own backup but, to date, we have been able 
to successfully recover by using standard system backups. Thus, it 
should be possible to rapidly shift almost all student records over 
to the automated system. Toward this end a trial run is being carried 
out during the current semester. 

25 



Of course, some information will continue to be recorded by 
hand since it is of a more archival nature. In addition, information 
such as address, phone number, current registration and so forth has 
never been a part of the permanent record and has not been included 
in the automated system. 

In the case of the FAA system, the problem is slightly more 
complicated due to the fact that certain objective information is 
needed by the FAA committee prior to a meeting in order to make 
subjective judgements about the applicant. These decisions are 
based on a non-linear, time varying, weighted subjective summation of 
objective and subjective information. [Objective information in this 
case is subjective information whose origins are obscure.] Then, 
after the meeting, the subjective judgements must be recorded. Thus, 
either two accesses to the records must be made or a duplicate hand 
record must be used. 

One possible direction in which to move is toward entering the 
information into the computer, using the computer output along with 
the other information to make judgements at the meeting and then 
entering the results into the computer. This involves two accesses with 
intermediate printed output generation. 

The other approach would hand record all data including results 
of the meeting and then enter all data. This appears to be the pre- 
ferable way to operate primarily because the objective data must be 
brought together from a variety of sources and this is not done easily 
or efficiently while sitting at a terminal. 



26 



There is reluctance to switch over to this new system. This 
reluctance is based on the realization that the information is of great 
importance and may not be lost under any circumstance. There is also 
concern about the availability, reliability and non-volitility of 
the (or any) computer-based system. 

Availability One problem is availability. That is, will the 
computer be available when needed? Our experience in this regard 
has been very good. Data that is needed rapidly can be obtained 
from the hard copy printout. Data that requires large amounts of 
terminal time such as sorts, statistical information and so forth is 
usually less urgent. 

Reliability Another concern is reliability. There are two 
aspects to this. Will the computer system preserve the data and is 
the data correct? 

Correctness of the data is achieved by checking the hard copy out- 
put from the system. The record custodian can do this for the FAA 
system. For the GSR system the best check is achieved by having 
each student check his or her own record at the time of pre- 
registration. 

The existence reliability of the data base has had its ups and 
downs and is not under our control. Under current policy, f lias are 
deleted if not accessed during a one month period. This is only 
occasionally a problem since normal routine causes accesses at a rate 
exceeding this. However, ficticious accessing can be done on a 
monthly basis and can be made a routine task for the record custodian. 

Maintanence A third area for concern is maintanence. Again 
these are two aspects - record maintanence and software system 



27 



maintanence. The former is easily done by the record custodian. The 
latter has been done by a senior graduate student and can probably be 
continued this way. As the system evolves, very little of this should 
be necessary unless a major change is required when the switch 
to a new computer system is made. 

In summary, the existing problems are well in hand and a move 
from the manual system to the computer system can and should be made 
if we are to avoid an expensive duplication of effort. 

Usefulness The current system, as simple as it is, is quite 
powerful and allows one to do what was either very time consuming or 
impossible previously. In the FAA case, we can achieve rapid dis- 
semination of summary information on applicants to our staff and to 
others. We can generate summary and statistical information in a 
multitude of ways to meet the varying needs of the department, the 
staff, the graduate college, the University, outside agencies and, 
of course, our -friend and benefactor, the federal government with it's 
surverys of ever increasing complexity and number. Without the 
current system some of this information would be extremely difficult 
to obtain. A great deal of clerical time is saved here. 

Similar remarks apply to the GSR system except that it is varying 
departmental needs which are served primarily. How many students 
in each program have GPAs below 4.00? How many are first year? Which 
students have been here more than 10 semesters? Who has passed this 
exam or that? Who is to take this exam or that? We now administer 
four degree programs with differing requirements to over 230 students. 
V,'tj need a system which allows us to keep track of who is doing what 
without repetitious file searching. 



28 



Of course, one can just as easily get infomration of little or 
no value. Deciding what is important is always more difficult when the 
choices are large. 

Cost-effectiveness It was never claimed that this sytem would 
save money. It hasn't yet, of course, and perhaps it won't. It does 
allow us do things which were previously almost impossible. As we 
use the computer more directly reducing the manual duplication, the 
economics will improve. 

The Future The FAA system is mature, having been used for a full 
year, and should require only routine maintanence and possible minor 
revisions. For example, the department has decided to add a fifth 
area to the possible entrance requirements and this will require 
an expansion of the prerequisite grade fields. 

The GSR system has not had even a one semester cycle yet and 
thus it is reasonable to expect that some changes may be needed. 
Hopefully they will be minor. 

The longer term direction in which to proceed is toward a self- 
contained terminal system using floppy disc or tape cassette. So- 
called word processing systems are now available. These are glorified 

typewritters with storage and minimal processing capability. Within 
the next ten years these should evolve into more sophisticated 
systems since the addition of greater processing capability to a 
system having storage and I/O should be a bargain that cannot be 
resisted. 

In the short term, the present system should be allowed a 
controlled evolution. The FAA procedure could go from data to 
computer with no intermediate copying. The GSR system should go to 

29 



the computer system approach but maintain the manual records system 
for another semester. However, the manual records should not be used 
but rather kept as a backup. The computer system should be used to 
see if it works. This is currently being attempted. 



30 



Appendix A 
Field and Translation Tables 



31 



A. 1 FAA Field Table with Values and Ranges 





c 
o 






00 

3 

•H 














u 




3 
O 




•H 






*3 










CD 




01 




•H 




4J 




0) 


3 


* 






g 


a 




4-1 




4-1 


o> 


m 




rH 00 


W 


O T3 




5 


g 


>■> 


o 


a 




ca 


g 


u 




x> c 




4J iH 




o 


3 


H 


•H 


nj 




iH 


cti 


O O) 


x: 


rt -h 


a) 


0) 


* 


Pi 


rH 




4-1 


u 


qj 


tfl 01 


2; 


hJ iH 


4-) 


H 3 


.H 


M -H 


•K 




O 


M 


O 0) 


nl 


00 


3 <H 




•h 


00 


c 


X- 


0) Pn 


0> 


u 


u 


0) 


•H XI 


,3 


c 


nJ x> 


T3 


00 [3-, 


s 


(JJ >H 


nl 


4-J 


a 


3 




4-1 


t-i Cfl 


o 


cd 


U (fl 


rH 


c 


(U 


T3 00 


H 


3 W 


>> 


CU 


4-1 


u 


QJ .3 




Pi 


H H 


0) 


•H 3 


hJ 


O 0) 




•H X 


H 


4J 


3 


cfl 


6 a- 


>. 






■H 


3 -H 




a oq 


0) 


O 0) 




3 


a 


>-( 


3 rH 


c 




3 


fc 


C 

•H 




01 

Q 


o 


Om JZ 




O 


4-1 
3 


.3 


3 « 
1 1 


1 




•H 




60 ' 






a 








O 


u 


!3 < 


o 




QJ 


• 


a) 






o> 
P 


















4-1 
O 


NAME 


1 


20 










1 3 




C 




_ 




INIT 


31 


1 






. 




1 19 




C 




- 




SEX 


32 


1 


1 


2 






1 25 




A 




F,M 




YOB 


33 


9 










1 .45 




N 




00-99 




CULCAT 


35 


1 


8 


14 




1 







N 




1-7 


1 


PROG 


36 


1 


3 


7 




1 


1 57 




N 




1-5 


2 


AID? 


37 


1 


34 


35 






1 82 




A 




Y,N 




COLL 1 


38 


16 






26 




3 3 




C 




- 




HRS 1 


54 


2 








1 


3 27 




N 




00-99 




GPA 1 


56 


3 








1 


3 35 




N 




000-500 




DEG 1 


59 


4 










3 47 




C 




- 




FLU 1 


63 


8 










3 55 




C 




- 




YR 1 


71 


T> 










3 64 




N 




00-99 




COLL 2 


73 


16 






26 




4 3^ 












HRS 2 


89 


*? 








1 


4 27 












GPA 2 


91 


3 








1 


4 35 












DEG 2 


94 


4 










4 47 












FLD 2 


98 


8 










4 55 












YR 2 


106 


2 


' 






1 


4 64 


> 


sames 


a deg 1, 


etc. 


COLL 3 


ioe 


16 






26 




5 3 










HRS 3 


124 


2 










5 27 












GPA 3 


lit 


> 3 










5 35 












DEG 3 


12S 


► 4 










5 47 












FLD 3 


13: 


5 e 










5 55 












YR 3 


141 


2 








1 


5 64> 












TOEFL? 


14: 


5 1 


34 


35 


28 









A 




Y,N 




T SCORE 


14' 


\ 3 















N 




000-700 




GRE YR 


14: 


f 1 






37 




9 38 




N 




0-9 




VERBAL 


141 


3 2 


i 








8 38 


j 


N 




00-99 




QUANT 


15( 


) 2 


> 


i 






7 38 


I 


N 




00-99 




AT1YR 


is: 


2 1 






37 




L 9 48 


N 




0-9 




ATI CD 


is; 


3 2 


> 








L 7 48 




N 




00-99 




a r 1 X 


is: 


E" *" 


> 








L 8 48 




N 




00-99 




AT2YR 


15 


7 ^ 






37 




L 9 53 


^ 










AT2CD 


15 


3 2 


> 








L 7 53 




same 


as ATI, 




AT 27. 


16 


o : 


> 








1 8 53 


J 














32 



A.l (continued) 





c 
o 

•H 






00 

a 

•H 
T3 










0) 


u 

01 




a 
o 

•H 


QJ 


4-> 

to 




iH 00 


a 


* 

O T3 




S 


I 




4-1 

o o 




4-1 

tO 


i 


u 




X> C 




4J .H 




o 


3 


H 


•H tO 




iH 


to 


O <D 


x 


tO -H 


0) 


01 


* 


Pti 


iH 




4-1 l-i 


01 


CO <U 


25 


—) <-H 


4J 


H C 


iH 


J-l 1-t 


* 




O 


U 


O 01 «0 


00 


S 7l 




•H 


oo 


c 


XI 


ai Pm 


01 


4-1 


O 


01 


•H J3 X! 


c 


tO X 


T3 


00 fc 


(3 


0) -H 


to 


4J 


p. 


3 




4-1 


M tO O 


to 


U tO 


H 


c 


01 


*T3 00 


H 


4J 


^ 


Pa 


4J 


u 


0) X 


P5 


H H 


01 


•H C 


h) 


O 0) 




•rl X 


H 


4J 


3 


tO 


P. >, 






•H 


C tH 




O PQ 


OJ 


O 0) 




3 


P. 


u 


3 t-l C 




C 


Pei 


1-1 

00 
0) 




01 

Q 


T3 

O 
O 
01 


PL! JZ 




O 


4-1 

O 


to 

X! 


C tO tO 
1 1 1 

IZ < O 




01 

4J 




« 






Q 
















O 

:z 


PREF 


162 




15"' 


18 




1 


1 


105 


N 


1-4 


3 


SW 1 


163 








41 




7 


20 
23 "^ 


A A-E,X,P,W 




SW 2 


164 








41 




7 








SW 3 


165 








41 




7 


26 










HU 1 


166 








44 




8 


20 










HU 2 


167 








44 




8 


23 










HU 3 


168 












8 


26 




same < 


is 




NA 1 


169 








47 




9 


20 J 


SW 1 






NA 2 


170 








47 




9 


23 










NA 3 


171 












9 


26 










LD 1 


172 








50 




10 


. 20 










LD 2 


173 








50 




10 


23 










' LD 3 " 


174 












10 


26 J 








T/L EXF 


175 




34 


35 






3 


94 


A 


Y,N 




REF 1 


176 




19 


23 


56 


1 


7 


59 


N 


0-4 


4 


REF 2 


177 




19 


23 


56 


1 


8 


59 | 








REF 3 


178 




19 


23 


56 


1 


9 


59 \ 


same 


as 




REF 4 


179 




19 


23 


56 


1 


10 


59 j 
J 


Ref . 


1 




REF 5 


180 




19 


23 




1 











CONS 


181 




24 


30 




1 


5 


94 


N 


0-9, b 


5 


FAA 


182 




19 


23 




1 


4 


94 


N 


0-4 


4 


ARC 


183 


2 
















C 


1,2A 




ATTEND 


185 




34 


35 


64 




7 


92 


A 


Y,N 




SEM EN1 


" 186 




31 


33 




1 


8 


90 


N 


1-3 


6 


YR ENT 


187 


r« 


i 






1 


8 


98 


N 


00-99 




AID CA1 


r 189 


1 


78 


88 




1 


9 


92 


N 


0-9 ,b 


7 


EMPLOYE 


-R 190 


1C 


i 








1C 


90 


C 


- 




INT 1 


200 


2 


! 36 


77 


69 




11 


30 


N 


11-51 


8 


INT 2 


202 


r 


» 36 


77 


69 




11 


48* 


i 








INT 3 


204 


I 


» 36 


77 


69 




11 


66 










INT 4 


206 




► 36 


.77 


69 




11 


84 










INT 5 


20E 


1 2 


» 36 


77 






11 


102 




same 


as 




EXP 1 


21C 


► 2 


» 36 


77 


74 




12 


> 30 / 


INT 1 




EXP 2 


212 


> 2 


• 36 


77 


74 




12 48 










EXP 3 


21^ 


i 2 


» 36 


77 


74 




12 ^ 










EXP 4 


21<! 


*• 


> 36 


77 


74 




12 84 










EXP 5 


21£ 


) 2 


! 36 


77 






12 102^ 








OTHER 


22C 


) E 


\ 








o 


C 


— 


6 


SEM AP 


F 'L 228 


J .1 


31 


32 


; 80 


1 


o 


N 


1-3 


DUMMY 


22< 


> 1 






80 




o 


C 


- 




SSN 


21 


L S 


> 








o 


N 


9 digits 


DATE 


233 


L £ 


i 






p 


o 




C 


00-99, 


/ 9 



*Jump to this field in ED ADD mode if blank is entered 
** 

2 = numeric - must be decoded 

3 = numeric - stored as 100 x value 
5-11 course information 



33 



A. 2 FAA Translation Table 



© 



L 



G> 



® 



© 



@ 



(L 



r u( 



V 



1 
2 
3 
Y 
N 

1 
2 
3 
A 
5 
6 
7 
B 
9 
b 



MALE 

FEMALE 

NON DEGREE 

MASTER' 

DOCTORATE 

MTCS 

MCS 

AMERICAN INDIAN 

BLACK AMERICAN 

ORIENTAL SURNAMED 

SP SURNAMED 

FOREIGN STUDENT 

CAUCASIAN AMER 

OTHER 

FELLOWSHIP 

ASSISTANTSHIP 

T & F WAIVER 

NONE 

BELOW AVG. 

AVERAGE 

ABOVE AVERAGE 

EXCELLENT 

SUPERIOR 

FELLOWSHIP 

TA OR RA 

RA ONLY 

ADM ONLY (BY FIAT) 

ADM ONLY (BY REQ.) 

DENY (BY FIAT.) 

DENY (FOR FIN. REASONS) 

JANUARY 

JUNE 

AUGUST 

YES 

NO 

UNIVERSITY FELLOW 

OTHER TYPE FELLOW 

GRAD COLLEGE FELLOW 

RESEARCH ASSISTANT - 

TEACHING ASSISTANT 

TUITION AND FEE WAIVER 

INDUSTRIAL FUNDING-US 

INDUSTRIAL FUNDING-FGN 

FOREIGN GOVERNMENT FUNDING 

FULL-TIME UNIV EMPL 

SELF OR UNKNOWN 



f 



®( 



{ 



11 ALGO/DATA STRUCT ANAL 

12 APPL. BEHAVE & SOC SCIENCE 

13 APPL IN ENGINEERING 

14 APPL IN PHYSICS 

15 ART. INTELLIGENCE 

16 BIOMEDICAL COMPUTING 

17 COMBINATORICS 

18 COMPILER DESIGN 

19 COMPUTATION COMPLEXITY 

20 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN 

21 COMPUTER AIDED INSTRUCTION 

22 COMPUTER ARITHMETIC 

23 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 

24 COMPUTER GRPHICS 

25 COMPUTER NETS&DATA COMM 

26 COMPUTERS & SOCIETY 

27 ELECTRO-OPTICAL INFO PROCS 

28 FORMAL LANG & AUTOM THE. 

29 HARDWARE SYS DESIGN 

30 IMAGE PROCESSING 

31 INFER COMP CONSL SYS 

32 INFORMATION DISP SYS 

33 INFORMATION RET & SYS 

34 INTERACTIVE PROG 

35 LINEAR & NON-LIN PROG 

36 LOGICAL DESIGN 

37 MICRO COMPUTERS 

38 NUMERICAL ANAL. 

39 OPERATING SYSTEMS 

40 PARALLEL COMP 

41 PAT. REC.&MACH LEARN 

42 PROBALISTIC COMPTRS 

43 PROG LANG-THEOY 

44 PROG LANG-PRACTICE 

45 PSYCHOLOGY OF COMP PROG 

46 SIMULATION 

47 SPECIAL PURPOSE PROC 

48 STATISTICS 

49 STRUCTURED PROG 

50 SWITCHING THEORY 

51 THM PROV & PROG VERIF. 



® Date format is: YY/MM/DD 



34 



U J GSR Field Table with Values and Ranges 











60 


















c 






c 














3 




o 






•H 










M 




o 




•H 






T3 










a) a) 




•H 




4J 




0) 


e 


-K 






g 


a- w 




4J 


cu 


(0 




■-I oo 


w 


o -a 




S 


t 


^ o u 




CO . 


6 
<0 


o 




Xi c 




4J .H 




o 


3 


H -h co 




<-t 


O 0) 


X 


CO -H 


cu 


cu 


■K 


od 


iH 


4J 1-1 


a; 


Cfl cu 


z 


kJ i-H 


4J 


H 3 


iH 


>-i -H 


■*: 




O 


u U CU cfl 


00 


3 r-4 


•H 


oo 


c 


XI 


a) b 


u 


4-1 


C_> 


cu -h xi x 


3 


CO X 




00 U-, 


c 


CU -H 


cO 


■u 


a. 


3 




4-1 M cO O 


co 


U CO 


c 


0) 


TJ 00 


H 


C 4J 


>> 


a- 


4J 


O CU X 


p£ 


H H 


ID 

■H 


•h c 


►J 


o <u 




•H X 


H 


4J 


3 


co B a. >% 






3 'H 




a to 


<U 


O CU 




3 


a 


M 3rl Cl 




C 


Cu 


a 

•rA 

00 

0) 
PQ 




ai 
a 


T3 

O 
O 

a) 
Q 


a. z 




o 


4J 

3 
O 


cO 3 cO ctj 
XIII 
c_> 2 < U 




•H 

CU 
4-1 
O 
25 



























NAME 

FIRST 

SEX 

YOB 

MAR STAT 
CUL CAT 
COLL 1 
YR 1 
DEG 1 
FLD 1 
COLL 2 
YR 2 
DEG 2 

FLD 2 
UNITS-T 
SEM ENT 
APT 
%TIME 
SPONSOR 
ACAD ADV 
DEG CURR 
DEG ULT 
THESIS ADy 
AREA 
GE LD 

HW 

NA 

SU 

TC 
ATT 



1 
16 

31 , 

32 

34, 

228 j 
35 
50! 



15 

5 
1 

1 

1 

15 
2 
3 
4 



GE 
GE 
GE 
GE 
#GE 



FOR LANG 
QUAL DATE 
QUAL AREA 
QUAL STAT 
♦QUAL ATT 
PRELM DATE 
PRELM STAT 
MCS AREA 1 
MCS AREA 2 
COMMENTS 
AID? 



59 
74 

76 

79 

83 

85 

88 

90 

93 

107 

110 

111 

115 

290 

148 

146 

147 

145 

149 

150 

176 

177 

180 

112 

151 

182 

185 

186 

201 

230 

109 



3 

4 
2 

3 
2 

3 

14 

2 

1 
1 
2 

59 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 

1 

1 

3 

1 

15 

14 

60 

1 



1 2 
3 4 



33 151 
11 15 
11 15 
33*51 



16 
16 



18 
18 



16 18 
16 18 
16 18 

19* 20 



16 18 



16 18 



19 20 



16 



15 



20 



1 

1 

25 2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
36 i 2 



40 

58 
58 



•* ! "? 



vJ 

5 
5 
5 

6 
6 

6 

6 

8 

9 

6 

7 

8 



2 
2 

2 

3 
7 
8 
9 
7 
8 
9 
9 
7 
9 
8 



8 

3 

4 

21 



C 
C 
A 
N 
A 
N 
C 
N 
C 
C 



M,F 

00-99 

M,S 

0-7 

00-99 



same as 
College 1 



N 
N 
C 
N 
C 
N 
N 
N 
N 
C 
A 



00-99 
000-999 

00-99 



00-99 


7 


1-5 


2 


1-5 


2 


00-99 


7 



P,F 



same as GE LD 



N 
A 
N 
N 
A 
N 
N 
A 
C 
C 
C 
A 



0-3 




Y,N 




000-999 


5 


00-99 




P,F,R 


3 


0-2 




000-999 


5 


P,F,R 


3 



Y,N 



35 



A. 3 (continued) 









— — - — — 


bO 


















c 
o 






G 
■H 










u 




c 

o 




•rH 






T3 










QJ QJ 




•l-l 




4-1 




OJ 


c 


■K 






c 


(X 4-1 




4-J 


QJ 

B 


n) 




t-l bO 


UJ 


o -a 




£: 


t: 


>, O (J 




rO 


(J 




xi c 




4J I— 1 




O 


■ 3 


H -HO) 




.—4 


O 0) 


43 


trl -h 


QJ 


OJ 


•): 


erf 


-—I 


4-J 1-1 


QJ 


t/) OJ 


z 


J iH 


i-i 


H C 


i— 1 


U -H 






O 


i-4 a a) nJ 


00 


C >-i 


•H 


bO 


C 


X> 


QJ tu 


a> 


4-1 


u 


0) -H X) X. 


c 


CJ J3 


"3 


bO tu 


d 


QJ -H 


Rl 


4-J 


a. 


3 




4J V4 rO O 


nj 


Ij CT] 


,— ( 


a 


OJ 


-O bO 


H 


C 4J 


>^ 


CX 


4J 


U QJ J3 


Crf 


H H 


QJ 


•H C 


►J 


O 0) 




■H K 


H 


4-1 


3 


n) £ a. >y 






•rH 


C 'H 




(J 03 


OJ 


O OJ 




3 


ex 


U 3 r-H c 




G 


pLi 


c 

•H 

bO 
a) 

CQ 




QJ 
Q 


T3 
O 
U 
QJ 

a 


Cm Z 




O 


4-1 

3 
O 


cfl C P3 m 

CJ z < o 




Note i 



CUM GPA 


1320 


4 


♦CS200 


1324 


4 


♦CS300 


1328 


4 


♦300 NCS 


1332 


4 


♦CS400 


1336 


4 


♦400 NCS 


1340 


4 


♦3/400 


1344 


4 


♦ 3/4 AF MS 1348 


4 


♦CS490 


1352 


4 


♦CS499A 


1356 


4 


♦CS499B 


1360 


4 


♦EDPSY 


1364 


4 


♦SEM SUM 


1368 


4 


♦SEM REG 


1372 


4 


♦ GE PASSED 1376 


4 


GRD GPA 


1380 


4 


c 0URSE 


360 


8 


CRS. UNITS 


600 


4 


CRS. GRADE 


720 


2 


CRS.DATE 


800 


3 


CRS. RANK 


890 


4 


CRS. TOTAL 


1010 


4 


CRS. PROF 


1130 


2 


SSN 


21 


9 


EDATE 


220 


8 



57 



2 21 33 



2 33 151 



65 



64 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 

2 
3 

7 

8 

5 
9 

10 

11 

6 



vj 

6 
7 
7 
8 
8 
6 

9 
9 
10 

8 
9 

5 










54 
54 
54 ^ 
74 
54 
74, 
74 

74 
54 
54 

34 
34 

74' 









N 
N 



0000-9999 
0000-9999 



same as #CS 200 



N 
C 
N 
A 
N 
N 
N 
N 
N 
N 



*Jump to this field in ED ADD mode if blank is entered 

**2 = numeric - must be decoded 

3 = numeric - stored as 100 x value 
5-11 = course information 



0000-9999 6 

0000-9999 6 

A-E,U,S,P,DF# 4 

000-999 5 
0000-9999 
0000-9999 

11-96 7 
9 digits 

000-999 5 



36 



A. A 



GSR Translation Table 

(Numbers refer to notes in Field Table) 



© 



© 



© 



© 



© 



© 



© 



r 



M 


MALE 


F 


FEMALE 


M 


MARRIED 


S 


SINGLE 


1 


AMERICAN INDIAN 


2 


BLACK AMERICAN 


3 


ORIENTAL SURNAMED 


4 


SP SURNAMED 


5 


FOREIGN STUDENT 


6 


CAUCASIAN AMER 


1 


MS 


2 


PHD 


3 


MSTCS 


4 


MCS 


5 


OTHER 


P 


PASS 


R 


RETAKE 


F" 


FAIL 


Y 


YES 


N 


NO 


05 


A 


04 


B 


03 


C 


02 


D 


01 


E 


10 


DF 


11 


EX 


12 


AB 


13 


S 


14 


U 


15 


P 


16 


F 


00 


b 



Semester-Year format is 
SYY where 

S = 1 = Jan. 
S = 2 ■ Summer 
S = 3 = Fall 

and YY is last two digits 
of calendar year 



t — 


> 


11 


KUCK 


12 


KUBITZ 


13 


SAYLOR 


14 


WILCOX 


15 


FAIMAN 


16 


REINGOLD 


17 


MUROGA 


18 


SKEEL 


19 


HANSEN 


20 


LIU, J 


21 


LIU,C»L 


22 


YAO 


23 


GEAR 


24 


MICHALSKI 


25 


SAMEH 


26 


MONTANELLI 


27 


MURREL 


28 


FRIEDMAN 


29 


NIEVERGELT 


30 


RAY 


31 


WALTZ 


32 


MURRELL 


33 


GILLIES 


34 


POPPELBAUM 


35 


PLAISTED 


36 


MICKUNAS 


37 


CHEN 


38 


DANIELSON 


39 


KAMPEN 


40 


LAWRIE 


41 


LINDBERG 


42 


LUKASZEWICZ 


43 


OSIN 


44 


ROBERTSON 


45 


SCHREINER 


46 


SHERMAN 


47 


SLOTNICK 


48 


WATANABE 


49 


MULLER 


50 


METZE 


51 


WITZ 


52 


HOHN 


53 


HICKS 


54 


PREPARATA 


55 


LIU 


56 


LIUvC 


57 


LEVY 


58 


ALSBERG 


59 


BEAUCHAMPS 


60 


D1VILBISS 


61 


DAVIDSON 


62 


UNKNOWN 


63 


CHIEN 


64 


NORTHCOTE 



37 



Si* 



A. 5 GSR Format Table 



41 15 20 
20 15 20 
55 15 20 
1 1 20 
80 1 20 
41 3 11 
6 

80 

80 

40 
80 



I 1 
3 1 
7 1 

II 1 



15 1 80 
20 1 80 



O O 
04 U 




2 36 


SEX : 


2 48 


YEAR OF BIRTH: 


4 2 


COLLEGE 


4 20 


YEAR- 


4 25 


DEGREE 


4 32 


FIELD 


4 49 


STATS (IN UNITS) 


5 43 


cum gpa: 


5 61 


grd gpa: 


6 43 


•tCS 200 


7 43 


#CS 300 


8 43 


*CS 400 


9 43 


4CS 499A 


10 43 #CS 499B 


6 61 


#3/400 


7 61 


#N0N-CS 300 


8 61 


♦NON-CS 400 



AS OF 



9 61 tCS 490 

8 2 UNITS TRANSFERRED 

8 23 #SUM SEMES, : 

9 2 DATE ENTERED: 
9 23 *REG SEMES, : 

2 ACAD ADVISOR: 
2 DEGREE CURRENT: 
25 DEGREE ULTIMATE 
50 THESIS ADVISOR: 



10 
12 
12 
12 
13 
14 
16 
17 
18 
19 
17 
18 
19 
16 
17 
18 
19 
16 
17 
18 
19 
16 
17 
18 
21 
4 



4 



ll 
ll 
.Ll 

21 
23 
23 
23 
42 
44 
44 
42 
56 
58 
58 



AREA i: 
AREA 2: 
GENERAL EXAM 

su: 
hw: 
na: 

ld: 

tc: 

*att: 

UAL EXAM 

date: 

STAT J 

AREA : 
PRELIM 

date: 

STAT J 
LANG J 

appointment: 
XT I ME J 

sponsor: 



comments: 



68 AS OF 



38 



Appendix B 
Sample Printouts 



39 



I 1 



' z ! 
< i 

It- i 



I 2U2< 
IOU3U 
I ~Z;~Z 



1 t-UJ 


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>UJ 


1 UJ UJ 


LUa 


1 <-l 


< a 


1 <S 


< — 


1 U.C 


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1 

1 
1 
1 
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1 (X 




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1 
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1 UJ 




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1 a 


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1 <J 


QJ 


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1° 

1 

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41 



Appendix C 



Quick Summary of ED and BR Commands 

EDIT 
Command 



Function 



ADD 

CHANGE 

SCHANGE 

NAMEC 

DELETE 

STOP 

CRSADD 

Command 
RETAIN 

BACKUP 

CLEAR 

AVERAGE 

LIST 

HC 

COMPLETE 

PRINT (GSR only) 

HASP (FAA only) 

HELP 
STOP 



adds new record 
changes a field 
changes a sequence of fields 
changes a name of SSN 
deletes a record 
stops execution 
for adding course information 
BROWSE 

Function 

retains a set of records specified by 
an expression 

backs up one level 

backs up to set of all records 

averages the specified field 

lists specified fields on terminal 

prints specified fields on line printer 

lists complete records of retained set 
on terminal 

prints formatted hard copy of retained 
records on line printers 

prints formatted hard copy of retained 
records on line printer 

lists all field names 

stops execution 



42 



Appendix D 
Quick Summary of Console Commands 
Command 



RUBOUT 
CTL H 

CTL U 
CRL R 
CTL S 
CTL Q 
CTL 

CTL C 



Function 



Back up deleting single characters, 
can then retype, cursor advances. 

Back up cursor, can then retype 
characters. 

Deletes entire line. 

Display last line entered. 

Stop listing. 

Restart listing 

Suppress output, note that this also 
suppresses next command request. 

Call monitor (execution stops) . Type 
CONTINUE to resume. 



43 



H.IOGRAPHIC DATA 
HET 



1. Report No. 

UIUCDCS-R-76-783 



3. Recipient's Accession No. 



Ie and Subt itle 

THE DCS INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL 
SYSTEM FOR GRADUATE APPLICANTS AND STUDENTS 



5- Report Date 

January 1976 



6. 



jjhor(s) 

J. B. Larson and W. J. Kubitz 



8. Performing Organization Rept. 

UIUCDCS-R-76-783 



No. 



•rforming Organization Name and Address 

Department of Computer Science 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 



10. Project/Task/Work Unit No. 



11. Contract /Grant No. 



Sponsoring Organization Name and Address 



13. Type of Report & Period 
Covered 

Technical Report 



14. 



Supplementary Notes 



(Abstracts 



This report describes the use, structure and maintenance of an information 
storage and retrieval system implemented by the Department of Computer 
Science for its own use in managing information pertaining to both graduate 
applicants to the department and graduate students presently in the 
department. 



'Key U'ords and Document Analysis. 17o. Descriptors 



Information Storage and Retrieval 
Information Systems 



Identifiers /Open-Ended Terms 



T COSAT1 Field/Group 



Availability Statement 

Release Unlimited 



19. Security Class (This 
Report) 

UNCLASSIFIED 



20. Security Class (This 
Page 

UNCLASSIFIED 



21. No. of Pages 

48 



22. Price 



3* NTIS-35 ( 10-701 



USCOMM-DC 40329-P71 



# 



fttf 



vr«* 



kk ! 




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