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Full text of "Deacon's dictionary of foreign phrases and classical quotations : a treasury of reference for writers and readers of current literature"

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DEACON'S DICTIONARY OF FOREIGN PHRASES 



CLASSICAL QUOTATIONS. 



DEACON'S 




CLASSICAL QUOTATIONS: 



of Reference for Writers anb 
of Current li 



EDITED BY 

R. D. B LAC K M A N. 



EIGHTH EDITION. 



LONDON : 

C. W. DEACON & CO., 

CHARING CROSS CHAMBERS, CHARING CROSS, W.C. 



LONDON : 
C. W. DEACON & Co., DUKE STREET, ADELPHI. 



P R EF AC E. 



IT has been credibly reported in the press that a 
theatrical audience, having before them a drop curtain 
representing a Roman villa with the word " SALVE " 
prominently displayed, one of them innocently enquired 
who was the maker of the salve which he supposed to 
be thus advertised. This is an extreme instance of a 
kind of ignorance which is very much more common 
than is generally admitted. 

Anyone who has received an education, however 
meagre, however strictly confined to his native tongue, 
is credited with a perfect acquaintance with most of the 
numerous foreign expressions and classical quotations 
which occur now more frequently than ever in current 
literature. 

It is indeed almost superfluous to point out the fact 
that by the side of the movement which has set in 
against the so-called waste of time involved in an ex- 
haustive study of the classical languages, there never 
was a period when more frequent use was made of 
expressions and quotations drawn from these sources. 
Although the number of Members of Parliament who 
can quote off-hand from their Iliad or yEneid, or 
Horace, is fewer by far than half-a-century ago, yet we 
have quite recently heard an alderman cite Greek ; and 
it may be safely affirmed that those who still possess 
these accomplishments are not indisposed to display 
them. 

It is, however, chiefly in the columns of the press 



2017225 



xii Preface. 

and in works of a technical character that numbers of 
words and allusions, which are " caviare to the general," 
are to be found. Let us take at random a well-known 
evening newspaper. In a single leading article extend- 
ing over little more than a column in length the follow- 
ing seven terms occur : Menage, quid pro quo, savoir 
faire, in camera, amour propre, pro forma, infra dig. No 
better demonstration could be given of the position we 
maintain. Even popular works appear under such titles 
as Fors Clavigera, Sartor Resartus, Altiora Peto, Vestigia, 
Omnia Vanitas, &c. On the other hand the decline in 
the study of the Classics has considerably lessened the 
number of moderately well-educated persons who might, 
with the aid of a dictionary, spell out for themselves the 
meaning of such terms, and many of them are probably 
in the condition of the youth in the novel, who trans- 
lated the motto, " Toujours a Toi," by " All Days to Thee ;" 
and of the reporter who took down phonetically the well- 
known phrase, " Amiens Plato, amicus Socrates, sed major 
veritas," as " I may cuss Plato, I may cuss Socrates, said 
Major Veritas." They might even regard au serieux the 
late Henry J. Byron's clever absurdity " Honi soit qni 
mal y pense" " On his walk he madly puns." 

The difficulty we point out is largely increased 
because very many of the terms referred to are of the 
nature of idioms, or proverbial expressions, condensed 
very frequently to the last degree, and consisting some- 
times of a mere catch-word which conveys to the 
initiated all that was expressed by the original author 
in a long sentence. 

Many collections of sayings and quotations in all 
languages have been from time to time offered to the 
public, but hitherto no single work has appeared having 



Preface. xiii 

for its two-fold object, to assist the perplexed writer in 
finding any expression or quotation which may for the 
time escape his memory in its exact form, and on the 
other hand to enable the general reader at once to refer 
to the meaning of such expressions as constantly meet 
his view. These objects have been achieved, in the first 
place by making a collection, as complete as possible, 
and in the second, by so arranging its contents that by 
means of cross references they may be consulted without 
trouble or loss of time. 

The contents of the work are grouped under the 
heads of the various languages from which they are 
drawn, and in every case the words and sentences are 
accompanied by their English equivalents. There are 
comprised : 

LATIN Words, phrases, mottoes, proverbs, maxims, 
quotations, pithy expressions, sententious sayings em- 
bodying a moral or practical lesson. The great writers 
have been freely drawn upon. 

GREEK Words, phrases, proverbial and other strik- 
ing sentences from the poets and prose authors. 

FRENCH Words, phrases, idioms, proverbs, moral 
maxims or observations, and a special collection of 
original idiomatic sentences, with pertinent examples in 
English to exhibit their usage. 

ITALIAN \Vords, phrases, proverbs, quotations of 
practical import ; with a very full collection of musical 
terms. 

SPANISH Words, phrases, and especially proverbs 
and moral reflections. 

PORTUGUESE Chiefly proverbs, or moral sayings. 

GERMAN W r ords, phrases, practical maxims, and 
sentences containing important and elevating thoughts. 






xiv Preface. 

In case of the quotations no pains have been spared 
to ensure their correct transcription and translation, 
and the meanings of the Foreign Phrases and expres- 
sions have in many instances been brought out by 
original examples composed expressly for that purpose. 
Where the meaning of the Foreign Idiom can be better 
so conveyed, ordinary colloquialisms have been em- 
ployed. The student of" Comparative Proverbialisms," 
if we may coin such an expression, will find much 
material ready to his hand by noting the way in which 
the same idea has been expressed by different nations 
in their several languages. 

In each department competent assistance has been 
secured, and the whole work has passed through the 
hands of an editor well acquainted with the needs of 
the public in such matters. 

The unique character of the work will, we feel sure, 
secure for it a ready acceptance at the hands of all 
readers of current literature. To these it is now offered 
with the certainty that it will be frequently appealed to, 
and that it cannot fail to materially enhance both their 
pleasure and their profit. 




CHARING CROSS CHAMBERS, 
LONDON, W.C. 



CONTENTS. 



LATIN. Words, phrases, mottoes, maxims, quota- 
tions, pithy expressions, sententious sayings 
embodying a moral or practical lesson. All 
drawn freely from the great writers . . 17 

GREEK. Words, phrases, proverbial and other 
striking sentences from the poets and prose 
authors . . . . . . . 135 

FRENCH. Words, phrases, idioms, proverbs, 
moral maxims or observations, and a special 
collections of original idiomatic sentences, 
with pertinent examples in English to exhibit 
their usage . . . . . . .147 

ITALIAN. Words, phrases, proverbs, quotations 
of practical import ; with a very full col- 
lection of musical terms . . . . .214 

SPANISH. Words, phrases, and especially pro- 
verbs and moral reflections .... 246 

PORTUGUESE. Chiefly proverbs, or moral sayings 253 

GERMAN. Words, phrases, practical maxims, and 
sentences containing important and elevating 
thoughts . . . . . . . 256 



i8 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ab integro 
Ab intra 
Ab irato 

Abnormis sapiens 
Ab officio et beneficio 



Ab origine 
Aborigines 

Ab ovo usque ad mala 
Abscissio infiniti 

Absens heres non erit 

Absentem laedit, cum ebrio 
qui litigat 

Absente reo 
Absit invidia 
Abstulit qui dedit 

Abundat dulcibus vitiis 
Ab uno disce omnes 

Ab urbe condita 
A capite ad calcem 



Afresh, anew 

From within 

From an angry man; unfair 

Wise by natural good sense 

(Suspension) from or (de- 
privation) of (a clergy- 
man's) office (or official 
duties) and benefice 

From the origin 

Earliest inhabitants of a 
country 

From the egg to the apples ; 
from beginning to end 

Cutting off the infinite ; the 
exclusion of everything 
but the point under con- 
sideration 

The absent will not be heir. 
Out of sight, out of mind 

He that enters into dispute 
with a man in drink, 
wrongs the absent. The 
man, not being in his 
sober senses, is practi- 
cally absent 

In the absence of the ac- 
cused 

All envy apart ; let there 
be no ill-will 

He who gave has taken 
away 

He is full of pleasant faults 

From one case you may 

infer the rest 
From the founding of the 

city (Rome) 
From head to heel 



Latin Section. 



Accingere se ad opus (or 

operi) 
Accipe hoc 
Ac etiam 
Acribus initiis, incurioso 

fine 
A cruce salus 

Actio personalis moritur 
cum persona 

Actum est 

Actum est de republica 

Actum ne agas 

Actus Dei 

A cuspide corona 

Ad amussim 

Ad aperturam (libri) 

Ad arbitrium 

Ad Calendas Graecas 



Ad captandum 
Ad captandum vulgus 
Addendum (/>/. addenda) 
Adde parum parvo, magnus 
acervus erit 



Additum 



To gird oneself to the work 

Accept this 

And also 

Alert in the beginning, 

negligent in the end 
Salvation (comes) from the 

cross 
A personal action dies with 

the person ; with either 

of the parties 

It is all over ; the game's up 
It is all over with the 

commonwealth 
Do not do what is done. 

Let well alone 
Done in accordance with 

God's law 
A crown from the spear (a 

kingdom won by the 

sword) 

According to rule 
At the opening (of the book) ; 

where the book opens 
At pleasure, at will 
At the Greek Calends, i.e., 

never, as the Greeks had 

no Calends 
To attract or please 
To catch the rabble 
Something to be added 
Keep adding little to little, 

and soon there will be a 

great heap. Many littles 

make a mickle 
Something added ; an ad- 
dition 



20 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



A deo et rege 

Ad eundem (gradum) 

Ad extremum 

Ad finem 

Ad gustum 

Ad hominem 

Adhuc sub judice lis est 
A dicto secundum quid ad 
dictum simpliciter 



Ad infinitum 

Ad inquirendum 

Ad instar 

Ad interim 

Ad internecionem 

Adjuvante Deo 

Ad libitum 
Ad literam 

Ad modum 
Ad nauseam 
Ad patres 

Ad perditam securim manu- 
brium adjicere 

Ad poenitendum properat, 
cito qui judicat 




From God and the king 

To the same degree (rank) 

To (the) extremity ; at last 

To (or at) the end 

To one's taste 

To (the interests or passions 
of) the man 

The case is not yet decided 

Confusion of an absolute 
statement, with a state- 
ment limited in manner, 
place, time, or relation 

To infinity 

For inquiry (a judicial writ) 

After the fashion of; like 

In the meanwhile 

To extermination 

God helping ; with God's 
help 

At pleasure 

To the letter ; minutely 

exact 

After the manner of 
To disgust or satiety 

(Gathered) to one's fathers ; 

dead 
To throw the helve after 

the hatchet. To give 

up all hope 
He that comes too quickly 

to a decision is fast on 

the road to repent 
To what damage 
To be further considered 
To the thing, point, purpose 



Latin Section. 



21 



Adscripti glebae 

Adsum 

Ad summam 

Ad unguem 

Ad unum omnes 
Ad utrumque paratus 
Ad valorem 
Adversaria 

Adversa virtute repello 

Adversis major, par se- 
cundis 

Ad vivum 
Adytum 
^Egrescit medendo 

^Equam servare mentem 

yEquanimiter 
^Equitas sequitur legem 
JEquo animo 

Aerarium 
Aere mutare 

Aere perennius 
Aes alienum 
suae 



Attached (by law) to the 
soil. (Originally a class 
of Roman serfs) 

I am present. Here ! 

In short ; in a word 

To the nail ; to a T ; to a 
nicety 

All to a man 

Prepared for either event 

According to value 

Memoranda ; jottings ; a 
note-book 

By courage I repel ad- 
versity 

Superior to adversity, equal 
to prosperity 

To the life 

A shrine ; a private cabinet 

The remedy is worse than 
the disease 

To preserve an equal (un- 
disturbed) mind 

With equanimity 

Equity follows the law 

With an equal mind; 
calmly 

The treasury 

To buy or sell (lit. to ex- 
change by means of 
money) 

Moreenduringthan bronze; 
everlasting 

Debt (lit. money belonging 
to another) 

Of his or her age 



22 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Sternum servans sub 
pectore vulnus 



Aethiopem lavare (or deal- 
bare) 

A facto ad jus non datur 
consequentia 

Affirmatim 
Afflatus 
A fortiori 

A fronte praecipitium, a 
tergo lupi 

Agenda 

Age quod agis 



Agere cum populo 

Agnomen 

Agnosco veteris vestigia 
flammae 

Agnus Dei 
Alere flam mam 
Alias 
Alibi 

Alieni appetens 

Alii sementem faciunt, alii 
metentem 



Preserving the wound ever 
fresh in her breast ; nou- 
rishing the memory of it 
secretly ; revengeful 

To wash a blackamoor 
white. To lose one's 
labour 

The inference from the fact 
to the law is not allowed 

In the affirmative 

A breathing on ; inspiration 

With stronger reason 

A precipice in front, wolves 
in rear (behind). Be- 
tween the devil and the 
deep sea 

Things(business) to be done 

Do what you are doing ; 
mind the business you 
have in hand 

To bring a question before 

the people 
A surname 

I feel the symptoms of the 
former flame 

The Lamb of God 
To feed the flame 
Otherwise 

Elsewhere ; in another 

place 
Covetous 

Some do the sowing, and 

others the mowing. One 

beats the bush, and 

.another catches the bird 



Latin Section. 



2 3 



Aliorum medicus ipse ul- 
ceribus scates 



Aliquando bonus dormitat 

Homenis 
Aliquis malo sit usus ab illo 

Alitur vitium vivitque 

tegendo 
Aliud et idem 



Aliud nihil est agendum 

Alluvium 
Alma mater 

Alter ego 
Alter idem 
Alter ipse amicus 
Alternis horis 
Altero marte 
Alterum tantum 

Altiora peto 
Alumni 

Alumnus 



Alveolus 
Amantium irae 



The physician of others, 
thou thyself art full of 
sores. Physician, heal 
thyself 

Even the good Homer 
sometimes nods 

Some advantage may come 
of that evil 

Vice thrives and lives by 
concealment 

Another, yet the same ; the 
same thing in a different 
form or light 

I have nothing else to do ; 
there is no more to be 
done 

Sediment (from a river) 

A foster mother. Gener- 
ally applied to a Univer- 
sity 

Another self 

Another exactly similar 

A friend is a second self 

Every other hour 

In a second battle 

As much more ; as much 
again 

I seek higher things, a 
higher life 

Those who have received 
their education at a col- 
lege 

A nursling; foster-child; 
usually applied to one 
that has studied at a 
university 

A small trough or channel 

The quarrels of lovers 



24 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Amantium irae amoris inte- 

gratio est 
Amanuensis 

A maximis ad minimos 
A mensa et toro 

Amicitia sine fraude 
Amicus certus in re incert a 
cernitur 



Amicus curia? 



Amicus humani generis 
Amicus Plato, amicus So- 
crates, sed major veritas 

Amicus usque ad aras 

Amicus vita? solatium 

Amor et melle et felle est 

fecundissimus 
Amor gignit amorem 
Amor nummi 
Amor patriae 
An ambulaturus esset quis- 

quam superprunas,atque 

pedes ejus non crema- 

rentur ? 



The quarrelling of lovers is 

the renewal of love 
A secretary, who writes to 

another's dictation 
From the greatest to the 

least 

From table and bed ; from 
bed and board 

Friendship without deceit 

A sure friend is made 
manifest in a doubtful 
matter ; when one is in 
difficulty. A friend in 
need is a friend indeed 

A friend of the court ; a 
person who gives an 
opinion or contributes 
information on the invi- 
tation of the judge, 
although not otherwise 
engaged in the cause 

A friend of the human race 

Plato is my friend, Socrates 
is my friend, but truth is 
greater 

A friend even to the altars 
to the last extremity 

A friend is the comfort of life 

Love is extremely rich both 

in honey and in gall 
Love begets love 
The love of money 
Love of one's country 
Could anyone walk upon 
hot coals, and his feet not 
be burned ? 



Latin Section. 



Anglice 

Anguillam cauda tenes 



Anguis in herba 
Animo et fide 
Animo non astutia 
Animum rege, qui, nisi 

paret, imperat 
Animus 

Animus furandi 
Animus in pedes decidit 

Animus lastus bene afficit 

vultum 
Animus meminisse horret 

luctuque refugit 

Animus non deficit aequus 



Anno aetatis suae 

Anno Christi 
Anno domini (A.D.) 
Anno mundi (A.M.) 
Annosa vulpes non capitur 
laqueo 

Anno urbis conditae(A.U.C.) 

Annualia 
Annulus 
Annus magnus 



In English 

You hold an eel by the 
tail. You are dealing 
with an active and slip- 
pery person 

A snake in the grass 

By courage and faith 

By valour, not by craft 

Rule your passions, or 
they will govern you 

Mind ; grudge, hostile feel- 
ing 

Felonious intent 

His heart fell down to his 
hose, into his boots 

A merry heart maketh a 
cheerful countenance 

My mind shudders at the 
recollection and shrinks 
from it in grief 

A well - balanced (firm, 
courageous) mind is not 
wanting 

In the year of his (or her) 
age 

In the year of Christ 

In the year of (our) Lord 

In the year of the world 

An old fox is not caught in 
a trap. Old birds are 
not to be caught with 
chaff 

In the year from the build- 
ing of the city (Rome) 

Yearly payments 

A ring 

A great year 



26 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Annus mirabilis 



Ante barbam doces senes 



Ante bellum 

Ante Christum (A.C.) 

Ante lucem 

Ante meridiem (A.M.) 

Ante omnia 

Ante tubani trepidat 

Ante victoriam ne canas 
triumphum 



A numine salus 



A parte ante 
A parte post 
A posse ad esse 

A posteriori 

Appetitus rationi pareat 

Apprenticius legis 
Appropinquet deprecatio 

A priori 



A year of wonders (1666). 

Name of a poem by 

Dryden 
You teach old persons 

before your beard has 

come. Jack Sprat would 

teach his granny 
Before the war 
Before Christ 
Before light 
Before noon 
Before all things 

He trembles before the 
trumpet (sounds) 

Do not celebrate a triumph 
before the victory. 
Count not your chickens 
before they be hatched. 
Do not fry your fish be- 
fore you catch them. 
Catch the bear before 
you sell his skin 

Salvation (health, bodily, or 
spiritual) comes from the 
Deity 

From the part before 

From the part after 

From possibility to realiza- 
tion 

From effect to cause 

Let the appetite obey the 
reason 

A barrister-at-law 

Let my complaint come 

before you 
From cause to effect 



Latin Section. 



27 



Aptat se pugnae 

Aqua benedicta 

Aquae furtivse suaves sunt 

Aquafortis 

Aqua regia 



Aquarius 

Aqua vitae 

Aquila non capit muscas 

Aranearum telas texere 



Arbiter elegantiarum 

Arboretum 
Arcades ambo 

Arcana imperil 

Arcanum (pi. arcana) 

Arcanum demens detegit 
ebrietas 



Arcus nimis intensus rum- 
pitur 

Ardentia verba 
Arena 



He prepares for the con- 
test 

Holy water 

Stolen waters are sweet 
Lit. strong water ; nitric acid 

A mixture of nitric and 
muriatic acids capable of 
meltinggold or platinum; 
lit. royal water 

The Water-carrier (one of 
the signs of the Zodiac) 

Water of life ; brandy 

An eagle does not catch 

flies 
To weave spiders' webs, 

elaborate but feeble 

arguments 
An authority on matters of 

elegance, or taste 
A plantation 

Arcadians both ; birds of a 
feather 

The mysteries of govern- 
ment ; state secrets 

A secret 

Insane intoxication dis- 
closes a secret. In vino 
veritas. When wine's in, 
wit's out 

A bow too much kept on 
the stretch breaks. A 
bow long bent at last 
waxeth weak 

Burning, glowing words 

Sand ; the field of battle 
or contest 



28 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Argilla quidvis imitaberis 
uda 



Argumentum ad absurdum 

Argumentum ad crumenam 
Argumentum ad hominem 



Argumentum ad ignoran- 
tiam 

Argumentum ad invidiam 

Argumentum ad judicium 
Argumentum ad miseri- 

cordiam 

Argumentum ad populum 
Argumentum ad verecun- 

diam 



Argumentum baculinum 

Aries 

Arma accipere 

Arma dare 

Armamenta 

Arrectis auribus 



You may mould soft clay 

into any shape you 

please. Young minds 

are easily impressed 
An argument directed to 

show the absurdity of an 

opponent's case 
An argument to the purse ; 

an appeal to interest 
Argument deriving its force 

from the situation of one's 

opponent 
Argument founded on one's 

opponent's ignorance of 

facts 
An argument appealing to 

low passions (lit. envy) 
Argument to the judgment 
An argument appealing to 

one's pity 

An appeal to the people 
An argument appealing to 

the modesty or sense of 

decency of one's oppo- 
nent 
The argument of the staff 

or stick ; conviction by 

force 
The Ram (one of the signs 

of the Zodiac) 
To be created a Knight 

(lit. to receive arms) 
To create a person a 

Knight (lit. to give arms) 
The rigging and tackling 

of a ship 
With ears erect ; pricking 

one's ears ; on the alert 



Latin Section. 



Ars est celare artem 
Ars longa, vita brevis 
Arte perire sua 

Artes honorabit 
Articulus 



Artium magister (A.M.) 
Asinum tondes 

Asinus ad lyram 

Assidua stilla saxum ex- 

cavat 
Assumpsit 
At spes non fracta 
Audaces (or audentes) for- 

tuna juvat 
Audacter et sincere 
Audi alteram partem 
Audire alteram partem 
Audita querela 
Aula regis 
Aura popularis 
Aurea mediocritas 
Aureo hamo piscari 



Aureola 

Auribus tenere lupum 

Auri sacri fames 
Aurora Borealis 



It is true art to conceal art 
Art is long, life is short 
To perish by one's own 
machinations ; to be 
caught in one's own trap 
He will honour the arts 
An article, or little joint; a 
particular point or mo- 
ment 
Master of Arts (M.A.) 

You are shearing an ass. 

Great cry, and little wool 
An ass at the lyre ; an 

awkward fellow 
A steady drop hollows a 

stone 

He assumed 
But hope is not broken 
Fortune favours the bold 

Boldly and sincerely 
Hear the other side 
To hear the other side 
The complaint being heard 
The king's court 
The popular breeze 
The golden mean 
To fish with a golden hook. 

Money makes the mare 

to go 

A circle of gold(-en rays) 
To hold a wolf by the ears. 

To have caught a Tartar 
The accursed thirst for 

gold 
The Northern Lights 



30 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Aut amat, aut odit mulier 



Aut Caesar aut nullus 



Aut Caesar, aut nihil 

Aut nunquam tentes aut 
perfice 



Aut vincere aut mori 
Auxilium ab alto 
A verbis ad verbera 
A verbis legis non est re- 
cedendum 

A vinculo matrimonii 
Avito viret honore 

Basis virtutum constantia 



Beatse memoriae 
Beati possidentes 



Beatus ille qui procul ne- 
gotiis 



A woman either loves or 
hates ; is never neutral 
in feeling 

Either Caesar or nobody ; 
not content with any 
place under the highest 

Either Caesar, or nothing ; 
neck or nothing 

Either never try or accomp- 
lish. Do not begin any 
undertaking that you are 
not prepared to carry 
out. Having put your 
hand to the plough, do 
not turn back. "Drink 
deep, or taste not, the 
Pierian spring " 

Victory or death 

Help from on high 

From words to blows 

The words of a statute must 
be strictly adhered to (by 
the judges in interpreta- 
tion) 

From the bond of marriage 

He flourishes upon ances- 
tral honours 

Firmness (or steadiness) is 
the foundation of the 
virtues 

Of blessed memory 

Happy, fortunate are they 
who are in possession. 
Possession is nine points 
of the law 

Happy is the man that is 
far removed from busi- 
ness 



Latin Section. 



Bella ! horrida bella ! 
Bello flagrante 
Bellum internecinum 
Bellum lethale 
Bene est tentare 
Beneficium accipere liber- 

tatem vendere est 
Bene orasse est bene stu- 

duisse 
Bene qui latuit, bene vixit 

Benigno numine 

Bibliotheca 

Bis dat qui cito dat 

Bis peccare in bello non 

licet 

Bis pueri senes 
Bona fide 
Bonis nocet, quisquis pe- 

percerit malis 
Bonus 

Bonus dux bonum reddit 
comitem 



Bovi clitellas imponere 



Breve et irreparabile tern- 
pus vitae est omnibus 
Brevi manu 



\\lars ! horrid wars 

During hostilities 

A war of extermination 

A deadly war 

It is as well to try 

To receive a benefit is to 
sell one's liberty 

To have prayed well is to 
have studied well 

He that has lived unknown 
has lived well 

By the favour of heaven; by 
the favour of Providence 

A library 

He gives twice who gives 
in a trice (lit. quickly) 

To blunder twice is not 
allowed in war 

Old men are twice boys 

In good faith 

He hurts the good who 
spares the bad 

A consideration for some- 
thing received 

A good leader makes a 
good follower. A good 
master makes a good 
servant. A good Jack 
makes a good Jill 

To put a pack saddle on 
an ox ; to impose a duty 
on one not fit to dis- 
charge it 

To everybody life is short, 
nor can it be recovered 

"With the short hand"; 
off-hand ; summarily 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Brutum fulmen 
Cacoethes 
Cacoethes carpendi 
Cacoethes loquendi 
Cacoethes scribendi 
Cadit quaestio 

Caeca est invidia 
Caecum 

Caetera desunt 
Caeteris paribus 
Callida junctura 



Calumniare fortiter, et ali- 
quid adhaerebit 



Calx viva 
Cancelli 

Cancer 

Candida pax 
Candide et constanter 
Cane pejus et angue 

Canes timidi vehementius 

latrant 
Cantabit vacuus coram 

latrone viator 

Cantate Domino 



A harmless menace 

An overwhelming desire 

A rage for grumbling 

A rage for speaking 

An itch for writing 

The question falls to the 

ground ; there is an end 

of the discussion 
Envy is blind 

A blind (thing) ; a blind 

alley ; cul-de-sac 
The remainder is wanting 
Other things being equal 

Skilful or clever joining 
(of literary composition) ; 
cunning workmanship 

Slander stoutly, and some- 
thing will stick (to 
the person slandered). 
Throw plenty of mud, 
and some of it will stick 

Quick-lime 

Lattice work ; the bar (of 
tribunals) ; barriers 

The Crab (one of the signs 
of the Zodiac) 

White-robed peace 

Candidly and constantly 

Worse than a dog or a 

snake 
Timid dogs bark the 

loudest 
The penniless wayfarer 

will sing before (in the 

presence of) the robber 
Sing to the Lord 



Latin Section. 



33 



Capias 

Capricornus 
Caput mortuum 
Caret 

Caret initio et line 

Caries 
Carpe diem 

Cassis tutissima virtus 
Casus belli 



Casus foederis 
Causa causans 



Caveat 

Caveat actor 

Caveat emptor 

Cave canem 

Cavendo tutus 

Cave tibi cane muto ct aqua 

silente 
Cedant arma togae 



Celerius occidit festinata 
maturitas 



A writ for arresting a debtor 
(lit. " you may take ") 

A sign in the Zodiac 

Worthless remains 

"It wants " ; a mark to 
indicate an omission 

It wants both beginning 
and end 

Rottenness ; decay 

Enjoy the (present) day ; 
seize the opportunity 

Virtue is the safest helmet 
(protection) 

An occasion for war ; 
something that causes or 
justifies war 

The end of the league 

The cause that causes (all 
other things) ; the Great 
First Cause ; the Su- 
preme Being 

Let him take care,or look out 

Let the doer beware 

Let the purchaser beware 

Beware the dog 

Safe through caution 

Be on your guard against 
a silent dog and still water 

Let arms yield to the gown ; 
let military power yield 
to the civil authority 

Forced ripeness falls away 
more quickly. Premature 
development of one's 
powers ends in an early 
grave. Soon ripe, soon 
rotten 

c 



34 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Celsae graviore casu deci- 
dunt turres 



Censor morum 
Cerealia 



Cerebrum 

Cernit omnia Deus vindex 

Certamina divitiarum 



Certiorari 



Certum voto pete finem 

Cessante causa, cessat et 

effectus 
Cessio bonorum 



Cicada cicadae cara, for- 
micae formica 



Cicatrix 
Cilium 

Circuitus verborum 
Circulus in probando 



up the 
inferior 



Lofty towers fall down with 
heavier crash. The high- 
est tree hath the greatest 
fall. Climb not too high, 
lest the fall be the greater 

Censor of morals 

The festival of Ceres (in 
honour of the goddess 
of agriculture) 

The brain 

An avenging God marks 
all things 

Struggles of riches, or after 
wealth ; to be richer 
than others 

A writ to call 
records of an 
court 

Seek to limit (set bounds 
to) your desires 

Remove the cause, and the 
effect also ceases 

The giving up of one's 
goods (property, to one's 
creditors) ; insolvency 

Tree-cricket is dear to 
tree-cricket, ant to ant. 
Like draws to like. Birds 
of a feather 

A scar 

A hair (small and fine) ; 
eyelash 

A circumlocution ; a round- 
about way of expression 

A vicious circle (lit. a circle 
in the proof ; as by using 
the conclusion as an ar- 
gument to reach it) 



Latin Section. 



35 



Cito maturum, cito putrid- 
urn 

Cito rumpes arcurn, semper 
si tensum habueris 



Civis Romanus sum 
Clarior e tenebris 
Clarumet venerabilenomen 

Cloaca 
Cloaca maxima 

Coelitus mihi vires 
Coelumnonanimum mutant 
qui trans mare currunt 

Cogito, ergo sum 
Cognomen 
Cognovit actionem 



Collectanea 

Colluvies 

Colluvies vitiorum 

Colossus 

Colubrem in sinu fovere 

Comes facundus in via pro 
vehiculo est 



Comitas inter gentes 
Comitia 



Soon ripe, soon rotten 

You will soon break the 
bow if you keep it always 
on the stretch. He that 
runs fast will not run long 

I am a Roman citizen 

More bright from obscurity 

A famous and venerable 
name 

A drain 

The greatest sewer (ox 
Rome) 

My strength is from heaven 

Those who cross the sea 
change their climate, not 
their minds 

I think, therefore I exist 

A surname 

He (the defendant) has ac- 
knowledged the action 
(or plaintiff's claim) 

A collection of things 

Sweepings ; offscourings 

A sink of vices 

A gigantic statue, or figure 

To cherish a serpent in 
one's bosom 

A road-companion with 
plenty to say is as good 
as a coach. (Often comes 
jncundits, an agreeable 
companion) 

Courtesy or politeness be- 
tween nations 

Assemblies (political, in 
ancient Rome) 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Comitium 

Commune bonum 
Commune periculum con- 

cordiam parit 
Communibus annis 
Compendia plerumque sunt 

dispendia 

Communi consensu 
Componere lites 
Compos mentis 

Conciliatrix 
Concio ad clerum 
Concordia discors 
Conditio sine qua non 



Condominium 
Conscia mens recti famae 
mendacia ridet 

Consensus facit legem 
Consequitur quodcunque 

petit 

Consilio et animis 
Consilio, non impetu 

Conspectus 
Constantia et virtute 
Consuetude pro lege ser- 

vatur 
Contra 

Contra bonos mores 
Copia fandi 



Place of assembly where 
comitia were held 

A common good 

A common danger produces 
concord 

On the annual average 

Short cuts are generally 
farthest about 

By common consent 

To settle disputes 

In one's senses; of a sound 
mind 

A reconciler (female) 

A discourse to the clergy 

Discordant concord 

An indispensable condi- 
tion ; lit. a condition 
without which (the agree- 
ment can) not (be made) 

Joint control 

A mind conscious of in- 
tegrity laughs to scorn the 
lies of rumour 

Consent makes law 

He attains whatever he 
attempts 

By wisdom and courage 

By deliberation, not im- 
petuosity 

A general view ; synopsis 

By constancy and virtue 

Custom is observed as law 

Against 

Against good manners 

A great flow of talk 



Latin Section. 



37 



Copia verborum 

Coram nobis 
Coram non judice 

Cornucopia 
Corpus delicti 

Corpus juris canonici 
Corpus juris civilis 
Corpus sine pectore 
Corrigenda 
Cortex 

Cor unum, via una 
Crambe bis cocta, or repe- 
tita 



Crassa Minerva 

Credat Judseus Apella ! 

Non ego 
Crede Deo 
Crede quod habes, et habes 

Credenda 

Credo quia impossibile est 

Crescit amor nummi quan- 
tum ipsa pecunia crescit 



Crescit eundo 

Crescit sub pondere virtus 



An abundant supply of 

words 
Before us 
Before one who is not the 

judge 

The horn of plenty 
The whole body or nature 

of the offence 
The body of the canon law 
The body of the civil law 
A body without soul 
Things to be corrected 
Bark ; shell, cover 
One heart, one way 
Cabbage twice cooked, or 

served. To harp on the 

same string. The same 

old story 

(A man of) plain good sense 
Let Apella the Jew believe 

it ! I will not 
Trust to God 

Believe you have it, and 

you have it 
Things to be believed 

I believe because it is im- 
possible 

The love of money increases 
as fast as the money it- 
self increases. The more 
a man has, the more he 
desires to have 

Jt increases as it goes 

Virtue increases under a 
weight. Oppression fos- 
ters manly determination 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Greta an carbone notandi ? 



Cribro aquam haurire 

Crimen falsi 

Crimen hcsae niajestatis 
Crimine abunodisce omnes 

Cristae surgunt illi 

Crux 

Crux criticorum 

Crux mihi ancora 
Cubile ferarum 

Cucullus non facit mona- 
chum 

Cui bono ? 

Cui malo? 

Cui multum est piperis 
etiam oleribus immiscet 

Culpam poenapremit comes 

Cum diis volentibus 
Cum grano salis 



Are they to be marked with 

chalk or with charcoal ? 

Are they wise men or 

fools ? 
To draw water in a sieve. 

To lose one's pains, 

labour 
The charge of falsehood, 

or perjury 
The charge of high treason 

From one deed of wicked- 
ness learn the character 
of the whole people 

His crest rises. He is 
cock-a-hoop 

A cross ; difficult point to 
settle 

The cross or puzzle of 
critics 

The cross is my anchor 

The den or lair of wild 

beasts 
The cowl does not make 

the monk 

Who will be the better for 
it ? What good will it do ? 

Whom will it harm ? 

He that has plenty of pepper 
can season his cabbage 
well 

Punishment presses hard 
on the heels of miscon- 
duct (crime) 

With Heaven's help 

With a grain of salt ; with 
some reserve 



Latin Section. 



39 



Cum multis aliis, quae nunc 
praescribere longum est 

Cum privilegio 
Cum te sono 
Cunctando restituit rem 



Curae leves loquuntur, in- 

gentes stupent 
Cura pii Dis sunt 

Curiosa felicitas 
Cur ominum fit culpa pan- 
corum scelus ? 

Currente calamo 
Curriculum 



Currus bovem trahit 



Cutta supellex 

Custos 

Gustos morum 
Custos rotulorum 

Dabit Deus his quoque 
finem 

Da dextram misero 



Da locum melioribus 

Damnant quod non intelli- 
gent 



With many others, which 

it would be tedious to 

mention now 
With privilege or- license 
I agree with you 
By (judicious) delay, he 

re-established the cause 

(of the state) 
Light griefs speak, great 

ones are stupefied (dumb) 
The good are Heaven's 

(peculiar) care 
A felicitous tact 
Why is the wickedness of 

a few laid to the charge 

of all ? 
W T ith a running pen 

A race course ; hence a 

course of study (at school 

or college) 
The coach draws the ox ; 

to put the cart before the 

horse 
Small stock of (mental) 

furniture 
A guardian 

The guardian of morals 
The custodian of the rolls 

God will put an end to 
these (troubles) also 

Give a lift (lit. the right 
hand) to a man in mis- 
fortune (or distress) 

Give place to your betters 

They condemn what they 
do not understand 



40 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Damnum absque injuria 
Dare pondus fumo 



Da spatium tenuemque mo- 
ram : male cuncta minis- 
trat impetus 

Data 

Davus sum, non CEdipus 



De alieno corio liberalis 



De auctoritate mihi com- 

missa 

Debito justitiae 
Debitum naturae 
De bonis non 

Deceptio visus 

Decies repetita placebit 



Decipimur specie recti 



Loss without (legal) injury 

To give weight to smoke. 
To give importance to 
trifles. To make moun- 
tains of molehills 

Allow time and a short 
delay ; all things are 
done badly that are done 
with too great hurry 

Things granted 

I am Davus, not CEdipus ; 
lam apoor.uninstructed, 
plain man, not a genius. 
You have applied to the 
wrong person I can't 
help you 

To cut large thongs from 
another man's leather ; 
to be very liberal out of 
another man's pocket 

By the authority intrusted 
to me 

By debt of justice 

The debt of nature ; death 

Of the goods not yet ad- 
ministered 

An illusion of the sight 

Though ten times repeated, 
it will please. A good 
story cannot be too often 
told 

We are deceived by the 
appearance of what is 
right ; fair appearances 
often mislead; fair ap- 
pearances are necessary 
to the purposes of decep- 
tion 



Latin Section, 



4 1 



Decipit frons prima multos 



Decori decus addit avito 

Decus et tutamen 
De die in diem 

Dediscit animus sero quod 
didicit diu 



De facto 
Deficit 

De fumo in flammam 

De gustibus non est dispu- 
tandum 

Dei gratia 

Dei memor, gratus amicis 

De jure 

De lana caprina rixari 

Dele 

Delectando pariterque mo- 
nendo 

Delenda est Carthago 

Deliberandum est diu, quod 
statuendum semel 



The first appearance de- 
ceives many. We must 
eat a peck of salt with 
a man before we know 
him 

He adds glory to the glory 
of his ancestors 

Honour and protection 

From day to day 

The mind is long in unlearn- 
ing what it has long 
learned. Early impres- 
sions are not easily ef- 
faced 

In fact, in reality 

Lit. it is wanting ; a defi- 
ciency 

Out of the frying-pan into 
the fire 

There is no disputing about 
tastes. Everyone to his 
liking 

By the grace of God 

Mindful of my God and 
grateful to my friends 

By right in law 

To wrangle about goat's 
wool : that is, nothing at 
all 

Delete ; blot out 

By pleasing while instruct- 
ing. Onme tulit, &>c. 

Carthage must be destroyed 

What can be decided only 
once, should be long pon- 
dered over 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Deliberat Roma, perit Sa- 
guntum 



Deliquium 
Delirium tremens 

De lunatico inquirendo 
Deme supercilio nubem 

De minimis non curat lex 

Demissus vultum 

De mortuis nil nisi bonum 



Denique 

De non apparentibus et de 
non existentibus eadem 
est ratio 



De novo 

Deo dignus vindice nodus 

Deo duce, ferro comitante 
Deo ducente 



Rome deliberates, Sagun- 
tum perishes. While the 
doctors are deliberating 
the patient dies 

Want (of backbone); pros- 
tration 

" Trembling delirium," a 
brain affection caused by 
excessive drinking 

A writ to a commission to 
inquire whether a person 
is or is not a lunatic 

Remove the cloud from 
your brow ; smooth out 
those wrinkles 

The law does not regard 
trifles 

Of dejected countenance 

Of the dead nothing but 
good (be spoken). Let 
nothing be said of the 
dead but good 

Lastly ; in short 

The reasoning is the same 
as to things that are 
not seen, and things 
that do not exist ; what 
is not apparent must be 
considered as non-exis- 
tent ; a logical maxim 

Anew 

A knot worthy of a god to 
unloose it ; a supreme 
difficulty 

God being my leader, and 
my sword my companion 

Under the guidance of God 



Latin Section. 



43 



Deo et regi fidelis 

Deo favente 
Deo gratias 
Deo juvante 
De omnibus rebus 
Deo, non fortuna 
Deo, patriae, amicis 

Deos obsecro tit te conser- 

vent 

Deo volente (D.V.) 
De profundis 
De quibus certus es, loquere 

opportune 

De quibus ignoras tace 



Desideratum (pi. desiderata) 

Desipere in loco 
Desunt caetera 
Deter digniori 

Deteriores omnes sumus li- 
centia 

Detritus 

Detur pulcriori 

Deum cole, regem serva 

Deus est qui regit omnia 

Deus est summum bonum 



True to (my) God and (my) 

sovereign 

With God's favour 
Thanks to God 
God helping 
On or about all things 
From God, not fortune 
For (my) God, (my) 

country, and (my) friends 
I pray the gods to preserve 

you 

God willing 
Out of the depths 
Speak at the right moment 

on those subjects that 

you are master of 
Hold your tongue about 

things that you know 

nothing about 
A thing desired, much 

wanted 

To unbend on occasion 
The remainder is wanting 
Let it be given to the 

more worthy 
We are all the worse for 

uncontrolled liberty of 

action 
Threadbare ; hackneyed ; 

odds and ends 
Let it be given to the 

fairest 
Worship God and serve 

the king 
There is a God who rules 

all things 
God is the chief good 



44 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Deus ex machina 



Deus nobis haec otia fecit 

Deus undecunque juvat 
modo propitius 



De vita hominis nulla cunc- 
tatio longa est 



Dextras dare 

Dicenda bona sunt bona 
verba die 



Dicenda tacendaque calles 

Dicto tempore 
Dictum 

Dictum de dicto 
Dictum sapienti sat est 

Die 



A god out of a machine 
(or stage contrivance), 
brought on the scene to 
unravel some perplexity 
that cannot be easily un- 
ravelled in a natural 
manner 

God made us these com- 
forts 

When God wills, all winds 
bring rain. When God 
pleases, the most unlikely 
matters turn out well for 
us 

When the life of a man is 
at stake, no delay is (too) 
long ; in opposition to 
the view, " Of wretches 
hanged that jurymen 
might dine ! " Contrast 
also, "W T hile the doctors 
consult, the patient dies" 

To shake hands (lit. to 
give right hands) 

Good words should be 

spoken on a good day. 

The better day, the 

better deed 
Thou clearly knowestwhen 

to speak, and when to 

keep silent 

At the appointed time 
A saying, maxim 
Report upon hearsay 

A word is enough to the 

wise man 
By day 



Latin Section. 



45 



Dies adimit aegritudinem 

hominibus 
Dies faustus 
Dies infaustus 
Dies irae 
Dies non (in law) 



Difficile est satiram non 
scribere 



Difficilia quae pulcra 



Digitomonstrari, et dicier: 
Hie est 

Digna canis pabulo 



Dignus vindice nodus 



Dii laboribus omnia ven- 
dunt 



Dii majores 
Dii minores 
Dii penates 
Diis aliter visum 

Dilationes in lege sunt 

odiosae 
Diluculo surgere saluberri- 

mum est 



Time assuages the griefs of 
men 

A lucky day 

An unlucky day 

The day of wrath 

A day on which judges do 
not sit. Juridicus (judi- 
ciary, legal) is under- 
stood 

It is difficult not to write 
satire. It is difficult to 
refrain from lashing the 
follies and sins of society 

The best things are the 
most difficult to get at. 
Chalepa ta kala 

To be pointed at by the 
finger, and have it said : 
" There he is " 

The dog (is) worth her 
keep. It is an ill dog 
that deserves not a crust 

A knot (or difficulty) worthy 
of (such) an untier (or 
rectifier) 

The gods sell everything 
for labour (exertions). 
Without pains, no gains. 
No mill, no meal 

The greater gods 

The lesser gods 

Household gods 

Heaven willed it otherwise 

Delays in law are odious 

It is very healthy to rise 
at daybreak 



4 6 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Dimidium facti, qui bene 

ccepit habet 
Diruit, aedificat, mutat 

quadrata rotundis 



Discenionem facere 
Discere docendo 
Discipulus est prioris pos- 
terior dies 



Discum audire quam philo- 
sophum 



Disjecta membra 

Disponendo me, non mu- 

tando me 
Distrahit animum librorum 

multitude 
Dives qui fieri vult, et cito 

vult fieri 

Divide et impera 

Divina particula aurae 

Docet digitis suis 

Doce ut discas 

Dolus versatur in gene- 

ralibus 

Domine, dirige nos 
Dominus providebit 
Dominus videt plurimum 

in rebus suis 



Well begun is half done 

He pulls down, he builds 
up, he changes square 
things into round. He is 
always capriciously alter- 
ing things 

To divide the House 
To learn through teaching 
Each succeeding day is 
the scholar of the pre- 
ceding. Older and 
wiser. Learn from ex- 
perience 

To listen to a quoit rather 
than to a philosopher ; to 
prefer trifles to serious 
talk 

Scattered limbs, or mem- 
bers 
By displacing me, not by 

changing me 

A multitude of books dis- 
tracts the mind 
He that wishes to become 
rich, also wishes to be- 
come so quickly 
Divide and govern 
The Divine spirit (in man) 
He teaches with his fingers 
Teach, that you may learn 
Fraud lurks in generalities. 

Be definite 
O Lord, direct us 
The Lord will provide 
The master has the keenest 
eye in his own affairs 



Latin Section. 



47 



Dominus vobiscum 
Domus et placens uxor 
Dorsum 

Dos est magna parentium 
virtus 

Dramatis personae 

Duabus ancoris fultus 
Duabus niti ancoris 

Duabus sellis sedere 



Ducit amor patriae 

t 

Dulce domum 

Dulce est desipere in loco 



Dulce et decorum est pro 
patria mori 

Dum deliberamus quando 
incipiendum, incipere 
jam serum fit 



Dum fortuna fuit 



The Lord be with you 

A house and pleasing wife 

The back ; ridge (of a hill) 

The virtue of parents is a 
great dowry 

Characters represented in 

a drama 

j To ride at two anchors. To 
^ be in harbour. To have 
( two strings to one's bow 

To sit in two saddles. To 
hold with the hare and 
run with the hounds. 
To play a double game. 
To be on both sides 

The love of country leads 
me 

Sweet homeward (from 
Winchester College song 
at end of term) 

It is sweet to unbend on 
proper occasions ; (lit. to 
play the fool, to lay aside 
one's wisdom and gra- 
vity). " A little nonsense 
now and then is relished 
by the wisest men " 

It is sweet and glorious to 
die for one's country 

While we are considering 
when to begin, it is 
already becoming (too) 
late to begin. While the 
doctors deliberate the 
patient dies. Too much of 
a good thing 

As long as fortune lasted 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Dum relego, scripsisse 
pudet 



Dum spiro, spero 
Dum tacent, clamant 



Dum vita est, spes est 

Dum vitant stulti vitia, in 
contraria currunt 



Dum vivimus, vivamus 

Duo cum faciunt idem, 
non est idem 

Duo parietes de eadem 
fidelia dealbare 



Duos qui sequitur lepores, 
neutrum capit 

Duplici spe uti 



Dura mater 

Dura menorum ilia 

Dura molli saxa cavantur 

aqua 

Durante bene placito 
Durante vita 
Durum telum est necessitas 



While I am reading (my 
compositions)over again, 
I am ashamed of having 
written them 

Whilst I breathe, I hope 

Though they keep silence, 
they cry aloud. Their 
silence speaks loud 

While there is life, there 

is hope 
While striving to shun one 

vice, fools run into its 

opposite. Fools are ever 

in extremes 
Whilst we live let us live 

When two persons do the 
same thing, it is not the 
same thing 

To whitewash two walls 
from one pot. To kill 
two birds with one stone. 
To do two things at once 

He that follows two hares, 
catches neither. Too 
many irons in the fire 

To have a double hope. 
To have two strings to 
one's bow 

The outer membrane cover- 
ing the brain 
The hard, strong loins 

Hard stones are hollowed 

by soft water 

During (our) good pleasure 
During life 
Necessity is a hard weapon 



Latin Section. 



49 



Dux femina facti 
Dux vitae ratio 

Ea fa ma vagatur 
Eamus quo ducit fortuna 

Ecce homo 

Ecce iterum Crispinus ! 

Ecce signum 
E contrario 
Editio princeps 
Effodiuntur opes irrita- 
menta malorum 



Ego de caseo loquor, tu de 

creta respondes 
Ego et rex meus 
Eheu ! fugaces labuntur 

anni ! 

Eheu jam satis ! 
Ejusdem farinae 



Ejusdem generis 
Elixir vitae 



Emeritus 



Emollit mores, nee sinit 
esse feros 



A woman was the leader to 
the deed 

The guide of life is common 
sense (judgment) 

That report gets wind 

Let us go where fortune 
leads 

Behold the man 

Lo, Crispin again ! Like 
clock-work 

Behold the sign 

On the contrary 

The first edition 

Riches, which are incen- 
tives to evils (or evil 
courses), are dug out of 
the ground 

I talk of cheese, and you of 
chalk 

My king and I 

Alas ! the years glide fleet- 
ing by 

Alas ! now there is enough 

Lit. of the same flour ; of 
the same kidney (or 
quality) 

Of the same kind, or sort 

The quintessence of life ; a 
cordial or potion that 
prolongs life 

(A soldier, &c.) that has 
served his time (now 
usually applied to pro- 
fessors) 

(Learning)softens manners, 
and does not permit men 
to be rude 

D 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ens rationis 

Eodem collyrio omnibus 
mederi 

Eo nomine 

Epicuri de grege porcus 

Episcopatus non est arti- 
ficiumtransigendae vitae 

Epithalamium 

E pluribus unum 
Erectos ad sidera tollere 
vultus 



Ergo 

Errare est humanum 
Erratum (pi. errata) 
Esse quam videri 

Est mihi namque domi 
pater, est injusta noverca 

Est modus in rebus 

Est natura hominum novi- 

tatis avida 
Esto perpetua 
Esto quod esse videris 
Est pii Deum et patriam 

diligere 

Est proprium stultitiae ali- 
orum cernere vitia, obh- 
visci suorum 



A creature of reason 

To cure all diseases with 

the same salve ; to play 

the quack 
By that name 
A hog from the drove of 

Epicurus ; a glutton 
The office of bishop is not a 

mere device for passing 

life 
Song or poem on one's 

marriage 
One out of many 
To raise their countenances 

boldly (lit. erect, upright) 

to the stars. To hold up 

their heads like free men 
Therefore 
To err is human 
An error 
To be rather than to seem 

to be 
For at home I have a father 

and an unjust step- 
mother 
There is a medium in all 

things 
Human nature is fond of 

novelty 

Be thou perpetual 
Be what you seem to be 
It is the part of a good 

man to love (his) God 

and his country 
It is a peculiarity of fools 

to perceive the faults of 

others, but to forget their 

own 



Latin Section. 



Estquaedam flere voluptas 



Est quoque cunctarum 
novitas carissima rerum 
Esurient! ne occurras 



Et caetera 

Et decus et pretium recti 

Et hoc genus omne 



Edam oblivisci quod scis 
interdum expedit 

Et nati natorum, et qui 
nascentur ab illis 

Et nunc et semper 
Et sic de similibus 
Et tu, Brute 



Eurus 

Everso succarrere seclo 



Ex 

Ex abundantia 
Ex abusu non arguitur in 
usum 



Ex acervo 
Ex adverse 



There is a certain pleasure 
in weeping ; a certain 
luxury in grief 

Novelty is the most de- 
lightful of all things. 

Do not encounter a hungry 
man. Durum telum ne- 
cessitas 

And the rest ; and so on 

Both the ornament and the 
reward of uprightness 

And every thing of the 
kind ; all this sort of 
things (persons, &c.) 

It is sometimes expedient 
to forget (to fail to re- 
collect) what you know 

And the children of our 
children, and those that 
shall be born of them 

Now and ever 

And so of similar things 

You, too, Brutus (Brutus 
being expected to. act 
otherwise) 

The east wind 

To succour the down- 
thrown age, or times. A 
saviour of society 

From, out of 

Out of the abundance 

No argument against the 
use of a thing can be 
drawn from the abuse 
of it 

Out of a heap 

From the opposite side 



52 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ex animo 

Exarsere ignes animo 

Ex capite 

Ex cathedra 

Excelsior 

Exceptio probat regulam 

Exceptis excipiendis 

Excerpta 

Excitari non hebescere 

Ex concesso 

Ex curia 
Excursus 

Ex delicto 
Ex dono 

Exegi monumentum sere 
perennius 



Exemplar 



Heartily, sincerely 

Fires blazed up in (my) 
mind 

Out of one's head ; from 
memory 

From the chair (of au- 
thority) 

Higher; aiming at higher 
achievements 

The exception proves the 

rule 
The due exceptions being 

made 
Extracts 
To be spirited, not inactive 

From what has been 
granted, or admitted (by 
an opponent) 

Out of court 

A sally ; a digression ; a 
special disquisition 

From the crime 

By or from the gift of 

I have reared (for myself) 
a monument (or me- 
morial) more enduring 
than bronze. (Said by 
Horace of his poetry.) 
Not marble, nor the 
gilded monuments of 
princes, shall outlive this 
powerful strain. (Shake- 
speare.) Jamque opus 
exegi, &c. 

Specimen ; illustration ; 
pattern 



Latin Section. 



53 



Exemplaria Graeca noc- 
turna versate manu., ver- 
sate diurna 



Study diligently the writ- 
ings of the Greeks both 
day and night. Give 
your days and nights to 
the Greek authors 



Exempli gratia (e. g. or ex. By way of example 



Exemploplusquam ratione 
vivimus 

Exequatur 
Exeunt omnes 
Ex facto jus oritur 



Ex fide fortis 

Ex hoc malo proveniat 
aliquod bonum 

Ex hypothesi 

Exit 

Exitus acta probat 



Ex longinquo 
Ex mero motu 

Ex necessitate rei 

Ex nihilo nihil fit 
Ex officio 
Exordium 

Ex parte 

Ex pede Herculem 



We live more by example 

than by reason 
An official recognition 
All retire 

The law arises from the 
fact ; first settle the fact, 
and then the law wil) 
apply 

Strong through faith 
From this evil some gooc 
may issue 

Accordingto the hypothesis 
He goes out 

The issue proves deeds. 

All's well that end's well. 

The evening crowns the 

day 

From a great distance 
Of his own accord ; spon- 
taneously 
From the necessity of the 

case 

Nothing conies of nothing 
By virtue of his office 
A beginning, introduction 

(to a poem, speech, &c.) 
On one side only 
Judge of the whole from a 

part 



54 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Experientia docet 

Experientia stultorum ma- 

gistra 

Experimentum crucis 
Experto crede 

Expertus metuit 

Explorant adversa viros 
Ex post facto 

Expressio unius est exclusio 
alterius 

Ex professo 
Ex proposito 

Ex quovis ligno non fit 
Mercurius 



Extemplo 
Ex tempore 
Extra muros 
Ex ungue leonem 

Ex uno disce omnes 
Ex utraque parte 
Ex vi termini 

Ex voto 

Faber fortunae suae 



Experience teaches 

Experience is the mistress 

of fools 
A crucial experiment 

Trust one that has tried ; 

believe one that has had 

experience 
Having had experience, he 

feared it. A burnt child 

dreads the fire 
Adversity tries men 

From something done after- 
wards 

The express mention of one 
man is the exclusion of 
the other 

Professedly 

By design 

A (n image of) Mercury 
cannot be made out of 
every piece of wood. 
You cannot make a silk 
purse out of a sow's ear ; 
or a horn of a pig's tail 

At once 

Without premeditation 

Beyond the walls 

By his claw (one knows) 
the lion 

From one you may learn all 

On both sides 

By the meaning or force of 
the expression 

According to vow 

Architect, builder, of one's 
own fortune 



Latin Section. 



55 



Facetiae 

Facile est inventis addere 

Facile princeps 

Facilis descensus Averni 

Facilis est descensus 

Facinus, quos inquinat, 
aequat 

Facsimile 
Factotum 

Fac ut sciam 
Faex populi 

Falsi crimen 

Falsum in uno, falsum in 

omni 
Fama 
Famae damna majora quam 

quae aestimari possint 

Famam extendere factis 
Fama nihil est celerius 

Fama semper vivit 
Fare, fac 
Fare quae sentias 
Farrago libelli 



Jests ; witty and pleasant 

sayings 
It is easy to add to things 

invented ; to improve an 

invention 
The acknowledged chief ; 

an easy first 
The descent to the nether 

regions is easy 
The downhill road is easy 

Guilt levels (places on a 
level) those whom it con- 
taminates 

An exact copy ; lit. make 
the like 

A do-all, a general agent, 
servant, or deputy 

Tell me 

The dregs, scum, of the 

people 
A charge of forgery 

False (or wrong) in one 
point, false in every point 

Fame, report 

Injuries to reputation are 
too great to be estimated 

To extend one's fame by 

deeds 
Nothing travels faster than 

scandal 

Reputation lives fot ever 
Speak and act 
Speak what you think 
The hotch-potch, or mis 

cellaneous contents of the 

little book 



56 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Fasces 



Fascia 

Fasciculus 

Fas est ab hoste doceri 

Fata morgana 

Fata obstant 

Fata volentem ducunt, no- 

lentem trahunt 
Fatetur facinus, qui judi- 

cium fugit 

Favete linguis 

Fax mentis incendium 

gloriae 
Fecit 



Felicitas habet multos ami- 
cos 



Feliciter 

Felicium multi cognati 

Felix qui nihil debet 



A bundle (rods and an axe) 
carried before the highest 
Roman magistrate, and 
indicating their power to 
scourge and behead 
criminals 

Bandage, fillet ; wreath 
(round a column) 

A small bundle, packet, 
parcel 

It is allowable to learn 
even from an enemy 

Will o' the Wisp, false 
lights 

The Fates oppose 

The fates lead the willing, 

and drag the unwilling 
He that shuns judgment 

(or trial), acknowledges 

his crime 
Favour with your tongues ; 

be silent 
The passion of glory is the 

torch of the mind 
"He made it"; inscribed 

on a picture, with the 

artist's name 
Happiness has many 

friends. In time of 

prosperity friends will be 

plenty 
Happily ; successfully 

Rich people have many 
relations 

Happy he who owes no- 
thing. Out of debt, out 
of danger 



Latin Section. 



57 



Felix qui potuit rerum cog- 
noscere causas 

Felo de se 

Ferae naturae 

Fere libenter homines id, 
quod volunt, credunt 

Feriunt summos fulmina 
montes 



Ferrum ferro acuitur 
Fessus viator 
Festina lente 
Festinatio tarda est 



Fiat 

Fiat experimentum in cor- 
pore vili 

Fiat justitia ruat coelum 

Fiat lux 
Fide et amore 
Fide et fiducia 
Fidei coticula crux 

Fidei defensor (F.D.) 
Fide, non armis 
Fides ante intellectum 



Happy he who succeeded 

in ascertaining the causes 

of things 
A suicide (lit. a felon upon 

himself) 

Of a wild nature 
Men are generally ready to 

believe what they wish 

(to be true) 
Thunderbolts strike the 

tops of mountains. 

Huge winds blow on 

high hills 
Iron sharpens iron 
A weary traveller 
Hasten slowly 
Haste is slow. The greater 

hurry the worse speed. 

He who is hasty fishes in 

an empty pond 
" Let it be done ; " a 

peremptory order 
Let the experiment be per- 
formed on a worthless 

body 
Let justice be done though 

the heavens should fall 
Let there be light 
By faith and love 
By faith and confidence 
The cross is the touchstone 

of faith 

Defender of the Faith 
By faith, not by arms 
Faith before intellect. 

First believe, and then 

try to understand (an old 

scholastic maxim) 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Fides et justitia 
Fides non timet 
Fides Punica 

Fidus Achates 
Fidus et audax 
Fieri facias (Fi. Fa. 



Filius nullius 

Fimbriae 

Finem respice 

Finis 

Finis coronat opus 

Fit via vi 

Flagrante bello 
Flagrante delicto 

Flatus 
Flectamus genua 

Flecti non frangi 
Foederis area 
Foenum habet in cornu, 
longe fuge 



Fcetus 

Fons et origo 
Fons malorum 
Foramen 



Fidelity and justice 
Faith has no fear 

Punic (or Carthaginian) 

faith ; treachery 
A faithful friend 
Faithful and intrepid 

" Cause it to be done ; " a 
writ empowering a sheriff 
to levy execution on the 
goods of a debtor 

A son of nobody ; bastard 

Fringe ; moustache 

Look to the end 

The end 

The end crowns the work 

Force finds a way (lit. a 
way is made by force) 

During hostilities 

In the commission of the 
crime ; redhanded 

A breath, breeze ; inflated- 
ness 

Let us pray (lit. let us bend 
(our) knees) 

To be bent, not to be broken 

The ark of the covenant 

He has hay on his horn ; 
keep at a safe distance. 
Like a dangerous animal ; 
as an angry bull 

Young ones in the womb ; 
offspring ; produce 

The source and origin 

The fountain, source of evils 

An aperture 



Latin Section. 



59 



Formaliter 

Formidabilior cervorum 
exercitus duce leone 
quam leonum cervo 

Forsan iniseros meliora 
sequentur 

Fors Clavigera 
Fortem posce animum 

Fortes fortuna juvat 
Forti et fideli nil difficile 

Fortior est qui se quam qui 
fortissima moenia vincit 



Fortis cadere, cedere non 

potest 

Fortis et fidelis 
Fortiter et honeste 
Fortiter geret crucem 

Fortiter in re 
Fortitudine et prudentia 
Fortunae cetera mando 



Fortunae films 
Fortuna favet fatuis 
Fortuna multis dat nimis, 
satis nulli 



In due form 

An army of stags led by a 
lion is more formidable 
than an army of lions led 
by a stag 

Perhaps better days may 
be in store for the unfor- 
tunate 

Chance, the key-bearer 
Pray for a courageous 

mind 

Fortune helps the brave 
Nothing is difficult to the 

faithful and brave 
More valiant is he that 
conquers himself than he 
that takes the most 
strongly fortified city. 
He that ruleth his spirit 
is better than he that 
taketh a city 
The brave may fall, but 

cannot yield 
Brave and trustworthy 
Bravely and honestly 
He will bravely bear the 

cross 

With firmness in acting 
By fortitude and prudence 
I commit the rest to For- 
tune. I cannot think of 
any better precautions 
or arrangements 
A child of fortune 
Fortune favours fools 
Fortune gives too much to 
many, enough to none 



6o Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Fortuna, nimium quern 
fovet, stultum facit 

\ 

Fortuna opes auferre, non 
animum, potest 



Fortuna sequatur 

Fortunatos nimium, sua si 
bona norint ! 

Fractum non abjicio ensem 
Frangas non flectes 
Fraus est celare fraudem 

Frons prima decipit 
multos 

Fronti nulla fides 
Fruges consumere nati 



Frustra 

Frustra laborat qui omni- 
bus placere studet 

Fugaces labuntur anni 

Fugam fecit 

Fugiendo in media saepe 
ruitur fata 



When Fortune caresses a 
man too much, she makes 
him a fool 

Fortune can take away 
wealth but not mind (cou- 
rage, wisdom) ; cannot 
deprive of courage. A 
man of strong mind rises 
superior to all the 
changes of fortune. Wis- 
dom conquers fortune 

Let fortune follow. Good 
luck to the project ! 

Only too happy were they 
but sensible of the bless- 
ings they enjoy! 

I do not discard a broken 
sword 

You may break, you can- 
not bend me 

It is a fraud to conceal a 
fraud 

The first view deceives 
many. Second thoughts 
are best 

There is no trusting to 
appearances; all that 
glitters is not gold 

Men born to consume the 
fruits oi the earth ; no 
good but to eat 

In vain 

He labours in vain who 
studies to please all 

The years glide fleeting on 

He has absconded 

By fleeing, men often rush 
ri^ht on their fate 



Latin Section. 



61 



Fugit bora 
Fuimus 

Fuit Ilium 
Fulmen brutum 
Functus officio 
Furiosus furore suo punitur 

Furor fit laesa saepius 

patientia 
Furor iraque mentem prae- 

cipitant 



Furor loquendi 

Furor poeticus 

Furor scribendi 

Gallus in suo sterquilinio 

plurimum potest 
Gaudetque viam fecisse 

ruina 

Gaudet tentamine virtus 
Gemini 

Genius loci 

Genus irritabile vatum 

Gloria in excelsis 

Gloria Patri 

Gloria virtutis umbra 

Gradatim 

Gradu diverse, via una 



The hours fly 

We have been ; we are no 

more 

Troy has been is no more 
Harmless thunderbolt 
Having performed his office 
A madman is punished by 

his own fury 
Patience if too often abused 

becomes madness 
Rage and anger hurry on 

the mind headlong. 

Angry men seldom want 

woe 
An euthusiastic eagerness 

for speaking 
Poetical fire 
A mania for writing 
Every cock crows loudest 

on his own dunghill 
And he rejoices to have 

made his way by ruin 
Virtue rejoices in trial 
Twins ; the Twins (a sign of 

the Zodiac) 

The genius of the place 
The irritable race, or tribe, 

of poets 
Glory (to God) in the 

highest 

Glory to the Father 
Glory is the shadow of 

virtue 
Step by step ; gradually 

The same way by different 

steps 



62 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Gradus 

Gradus ad Parnassum 



Graeculus esuriens 
Grata superveniet, quae 
non sperabitur, hora 

Gratia ab officio, quod 
mora tardat, abest 



Gratia gratiam parit 

Gratias agere 

Gratior et pulcro veniens 
in corpore virtus 

Gratis 

Gratis dictum 
Gravamen 



Graviora manent 
Graviora quaedam sunt re- 
media periculis 
Gravis ira regum semper 

Grex totus in agris unius 
scabie cadit 



A step 

A step to Parnassus (a 
mountain in Greece 
sacred to Apollo and the 
Muses, and inspiring 
poetry and song); a book 
of helps towards writing 
Greek and Latin verse 

A hungry Greekling 

The hour that is not hoped 
for will be delightful 
when it arrives 

There are no thanks for a 
kindness which has been 
delayed. He loseth his 
thanks, who promiseth 
and delayeth 

Kindness begets kindness. 
One good turn deserves 
another 

To give thanks 

Even virtue is more fair, 
when it appears in a 
comely person 

For nothing ; free 

Mere assertion 

The thing complained of; 
what weighs most heavily 
against the accused 

Greater afflictions await us 

Some remedies are worse 
than the disease 

The anger of kings is 
always severe 

A whole flock perishes in 
the fields from the scab of 
one sheep. A rotten sheep 
infects the whole flock 



Latin Section. 



Gutta cavat lapidem non 
vi sed saepe cadendo 

Gutta fortunae prae dolio 
sapientiae 



Habeas corpus 



Habeas corpus ad prose- 
quendum 

Habeas corpus ad respond- 

endum 
Habeas corpus ad satis- 

iaciendum 

Habent sua fata libelli 
Habeo te loco parentis 

Habet 
Habitat 



Haec olim meminisse 
juvabit 

Hae nugas in seria ducent 

mala 
Haeretlaterilethalis arundo 

Has tibi erunt artes 



The drop hollows the 
stone not by its force but 
by constant dropping 

A drop of fortune is better 
than a butt (cask, hogs- 
head) of wisdom. An 
ounce of mother-wit is 
worth a pound of clergy. 
Better to be happy than 
wise 

" You may have the body ;" 
a writ for delivering a 
person from imprison- 
ment 

You may have the body in 
order to prosecute 

You may have the body 

to answer 
You may have the body 

in satisfaction 

Books have their own 

destiny 
I love or regard you as a 

parent 
He has it ; he is hit 

Abode ; dwelling - place 

(chiefly of very inferior 

animals) 
To remember these things 

hereafter will be a 

pleasure 
These trifles will lead to 

serious evils 
The deadly reed (shaft, 

spear) sticks to his side 
Let these be your arts (or 

practical aims) 



6 4 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Haereticis non est sejrvanda 
fides 



Haud facile emergunt 
quorum virtutibus obstat 
res angusta domi 



Haud ignara mali, miseris 
succurrere disco 

Haud ignota loquor 

Haud inscia ac non incauta 

futuri 

Haud passibus aequis 
Helluolibrorum 



Herbarium 

Heredis fletus sub persona 

risus est 
Hesperus venit 
Heu! 
Heu misero mihi ! quanta 

de spe decidi 

Hiatus 

Hiatus valde deflendus 



No faith should be kept 
with heretics (that is, 
with such as claim to 
think on religious mat- 
ters for themselves, and 
refuse the teaching of 
the church). (A maxim 
of the Roman Catholic 
church) 

They whose good qualities 
are oppressed by poverty 
at home rise with diffi- 
culty. "Slow rises worth 
by poverty depressed " 

Not ignorant of misfortune, 
I learn to succour the 
unfortunate 

I speak of well-known 
events 

Not ignorant nor improvi- 
dent as to the future 

Not with equal steps 

A great reader ; lit. a 

glutton (devourer) of 

books 
A collection of dried plants 

systematically arranged 
The weeping of an heir is 

laughter under a mask 
The evening approaches 
Alas! 

Alas, unhappy me ! from 
what great hope have I 
fallen 

A gap 

A gap, or deficiency, much 
to be regretted 



Latin Section. 



Hibernis ipsis Hiberniores 
Hie et ubique 
Hie finis fandi 

Hie jacet 

Hie murus aeneus esto, nil 

conscire sibi, nulla pal- 

lescere culpa 

Hie sepultus 
Hinc illae lacrimae 
Hoc age 

Hoc erat in votis 
Hoc indicium volo 

Hoc opus, hie labor est 

Hodie mihi, eras tibi 
Hodie, non eras 

Homines amplius oculis 
quam auribus credunt 

Homines nihil agendo dis- 
cunt male agere 



Homo aeratus 

Homo doctus in se semper 
divitias habet 



More Irish than the Irish 
themselves 

Here, there, and every- 
where 

Here was an end to, the 
discourse 

Here lies 

Be this a brazen wall (about 
thee), to be conscious of 
no guilt, to turn pale at 
no charge. Conscious 
innocence 

Here buried 

Hence those tears 

Do this 

This was in his wishes 

I wish this unsaid. I with- 
draw the statement (ex- 
pression) 

This is the labour, this is 
the work ; this is the 
great difficulty 

To-day to me, to-morrow 
it belongs to you 

To-day not to-morrow ; 
without procrastination 

Men trust their eyes more 
than their ears 

By doing nothing, men 
learn to do ill. Idleness 
is the parent of vice. 
Satan finds some mischief 
still for idle hands to do 

A man of money; a money- 
ed man 

A learned man always has 
riches within himself 



66 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Homo duplex 

Homo extra est corpus 

suum quum irascitur 
Homo homini lupus 

Homo multarum literarum 
Homo sum ; humani nihil 
a me alienum puto 

Homo trium literarum 
Homunculi quanti sunt ! 



Honesta mors turpi vita 

potior 
Honesta quam splendida 

Honorarium 

Honores mutant mores 
Honor fidelitatis prae- 

mium 

Honos alit artes 
Horresco referens 
Horribile dictu 
Hortus siccus 

Hos ego versiculos feci, 
tulit alter honores 

Hostis honori invidia 
Hostis humani generis 

Humano capiti cervicem 
equinam jungere 



A double (deceitful) man 
A man when angry is be- 
side himself 
Man is a wolf to (his fellow) 

man 

A man of many letters 
I am a man, and deem no- 
thing that relates to man 
foreign to my feelings 
"A man of three letters" 

(i.e. Lat. //'), a thief 
How great little men are ! 
How consequential are 
(the) manikins! 
An honourable death is 
preferable to a base life 
Respectable things rather 

than splendid ones 
A present in recognition of 

services 

Honours alter manners 
Honour is the reward of 

loyalty 

Honour nourishes the arts 
I shudderatthe recollection 
Horrible to tell 
A collection of dried plants 

(lit. a dry garden) 

I wrote these versicles, 

another carried off the 

honours (credit of them) 

Envy is the bane of honour 

An enemy of the human 

race 

To put a horse's head on a 
human body (said of a 
painter); out of character 



Latin Section. 



67 



Humanum est errare 
Hunc tu caveto 
Hypogastrium 
Hypotheses non fingo 



Ibidem (Ibid.) 

Ibi omnis effusus labor 

Idem 

Idem sonans 

Id est (i.e.) 
Id genus omne 
Idoneus homo 

Ignis fatuus 

Ignoramus 

Ignorantia legis neminem 

excusat 
Ignoratio elenchi 

Ignoscas aliis multa, nil tibi 

Ignoscito saepe aliis, mm- 

quam tibi 
Ignoti nulla cupido 

Ignotum per ignotius 



Ilium fuit 

Ille crucem pretium sceleris 
tulit, hie diadema ! 



To err is human 
Beware of this man 
The bottom of the belly 
I do not frame hypotheses ; 

I make no suppositions ; 

I concern myself solely 

with facts 
In the same place 
There all the labour was 

expended (or wasted) 
The same 
Sounding alike ; having the 

same sound or meaning 
That is, that is to say 
All persons of that sort 
A fit man ; a man of known 

ability 

Will-o'-the-wisp 
An ignorant person 
Ignorance of the law ex- 
cuses no one 
Missing the point (of the 

argument) 
Forgive many things to 

others, nothing to thyself 
Forgive others often, thy- 
self never 
No desire is felt for a thing 

unknown 
Explaining that which is 

unknown by something 

more unknown 
Troy has existed; such 

things have been 
One man receives cruci- 
fixion as the reward of 
his guilt ; another, a 

diadem (crown) 



68 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Illuminati 

Imitatores, servum pecus 

I mo pectore 

Impedimenta 

Imperat aut servit collecta 

pecunia cuique 
Imperator 

Imperium in imperio 

Impetus 
Impotens sui 

Impransus 



Imprimatur 

Imprimis 

Impromptu 

Impune 

In absentia 

In aeternum 

In angustiis amici apparent 

In arduis virtus 

In armis 

In articulo 

In articulo mortis 

In banco 

In camera 

In capite 

In ccelo quies 



Enlightened ones ; scholars 
Servile herd of imitators 

From the lowest breast ; 
from the bottom of one's 
heart 

Things which impede us ; 
luggage; baggage 

Money is always either 
our master or our slave 

Military commander ; em- 
peror 

A government within a 
government 

Force ; impulse 

Without power over one- 
self 

A man that has not dined; 
or is unable to find him- 
self a dinner 

Let it be printed 

In the first place 

Without study ; extempo- 
raneously 

With impunity 

In absence 

For ever 

Adversity trieth friends 

Virtue in difficulties 

Under arms 

In the very article, or act 

At the point of death 

On the bench (not in 
chambers) 

In chamber ; in private 

In the head ; in chief 

There is rest in heaven 



Latin Section. 



69 



Incognita 

In commendam 

Incubus 

In curia 

Inde irae 

Index expurgatorius 

Index rerum 

In diem(orlnhoram) vivere 

In dies 
In dubiis 

In eadem conditione 



In equilibrio 

In esse 

Inest sua gratia parvis 



In extenso 

In extremis 

Infandumrenovaredolorem 

In flagrante delicto 

In fore 

In forma pauperis 
In foro conscientiae 

Infra dignitatem (infra dig.) 
In future 



Not recognised; in disguise 

In trust tor a time 

Nightmare ; intolerable 
burden 

In the court 

Hence this anger 

A list of prohibited books 

A student's note book or 
catalogue of reference 

To live for the day, or the 
hour, from hand to mouth 

Every day 

In doubtful matters, or cir- 
cumstances 

In the same condition or 
category; under the same 
circumstances 

Equally balanced 

In being 

Little things have their 
value. Trifles are not to 
be despised 

At full length 

In extreme difficulties 

To renew the unutterable 
grief 

Taken in the act of com- 
mitting the offence, red- 
handed 

In prospective (lit. in about- 
to-be) 

As a pauper 

Before the tribunal of con- 
science 

Beneath one's dignity 

In the future 



70 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ingens telum necessitas 

Ingenuas didicisse fideliter 
artes, emollit mores, nee 
sinit esse feros 



Ingratus unus miseris omni- 
bus nocet 

In gremio legis 

In hoc signo spes mea 
In hoc signo vinces 

In infinite 
In initio 

Iniquissimam pacem j ustis- 
simo bello antefero 

Injuriarum remedium est 

oblivio 
In limine 
In loco 

In loco parentis 
In medias res 
In mediis rebus 

In medio tutissimus ibis 

In memoriam 

In mortua manu 

In nubibus 

Innuendo 

In nullum avarus bonus est, 
in se pessimus 



Necessity is a powerful 
weapon. Also Duntin telum 

Faithful study of the liberal 
arts softens men's man- 
ners, and prevents their 
being rude (polishes their 
minds) 

One ungrateful man does 
an injury to all the 
wretched 

In the lap (or bosom) of 
the law 

In this sign is my hope 

In this sign thou shalt 
conquer 

Perpetually 

In the beginning 

I prefer the hardest terms 
of peace to the most 
just war 

The best remedy for in- 
juries is to forget them 

At the threshold 

In the place 

In the place of a parent 

Into the midst of things 

Inthe midstof things, in the 
very heart of the business 

Safety lies in a medium 

To the memory of 

In a dead hand 

In the clouds ; befogged 

Hint ; suggestion (lit. by 
signifying) 

The avaricious man is good 
to no one, but he is 
worst to himself 



Latin Section. 



In oculis civium 

In omni labore emolumen- 

tum est 
In otio et negotio probus 



In ovo 

In pace 

In pace leones saepe in 

proelio cervi sunt 
In partibus infidelium 

In perpetuam rei memor- 

iam 

In perpetuum 
In pontificalibus 

In posse 

In praesenti 
In procinctu 

In propria persona 
In puris naturalibus 
Inquinat egregios adjuncta 
superbia mores 

In re 

In rerum natura 

Insanire certa ratione mo- 
doque 

Insanus omnis furere credit 
ceteros 



In the eyes of citizens ; in 

the public eye ; in public 

There is profit in all labour 

Upright in business and 
out of business ; upright 
in every relation of life 

In the egg 

In peace 

Lions in peace are often 
deers in war 

In infidel (i.e. not Roman 
Catholic) countries 

In perpetual memory of 
the affair 

In perpetuity ; for ever 

In pontificals ; in episco- 
pal robes 

In a state of possible ex- 
istence 

At the present time 

In readiness (as for battle, 
or a journey) 

In one's own person 

In a state of nudity 

The most excellent man- 
ners are stained by the 
addition of pride 

In the matter (or estate) of 

In the nature of things 

To be mad with definite 

reason and measure. 

There is method in his 

madness 
Every madman thinks 

everybody else mad 



72 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



In secula seculorum 
In se magna ruunt 
Insignia 

In situ 

Insomnia 

Instanter 

In star omnium 

In statu pupillari 

In statu quo 

In statu quo ante helium 

In te, Domine, speravi 

Integer vitae scelerisque 

purus 
Integra mens augustissima 

possessio 

Intemperans adolescentia 
effetum corpus tradet 
senectuti 

In tempore veni ; quod re- 
rum omnium est primum 

In tenebris 

Inter alia 

Inter arma leges silent 

Interdum etinsanirejucun- 
dum est 



For ages of ages ; for ever 

and ever 
Great things rush against 

each other 
Distinguishing marks or 

badges of rank or honour 
In the situation 
Sleeplessness 
Instantly 
Like all ; an example to 

others 

In the position of a pupil 
In the former position 
In the same state, posture, 

or position, as before the 

war 
In Thee, O Lord, have I 

trusted 
A man of upright life, and 

pure from guilt 
Integrity is the most 

august (noblest) posses- 
sion 
An intemperate youth will 

hand down to old age a 

worn-out body 
I came in the nick of time ; 

which is the main thing 

in all the concerns of life 
In darkness 
Among other things 
In the midst of arms the 

laws are silent 
It is pleasant to play the 

fool (to relax one's 

gravity) at times. Dulce 

est desipere, &>c. 



Latin Section. 



73 



Interdum stultus bene lo- 
quitur 
Interea 
Inter ignes luna minores 

Interim 
Inter nos 
Inter pocula 
Interregnum 

In terrorem 
Inter se 
Intestatus 

In toto 

I nunc, et versus tecum 

meditare canoros 
Intra muros 
In transitu 
Intra verba peccare 
In utrumque paratus 
In vacuo 

Inveniam viam aut faciam 



In veritate triumpho 
Invictus maneo 
In vino veritas 



Invita Minerva 



Even a fool sometimes 

speaks sense 
In the meanwhile 

(Like) the moon among 

the smaller fires (stars) 
In the meanwhile 
Between ourselves 
Between cups ; over a glass 
The time between two 

reigns 

As a warning 
Among themselves 
Dying without a will ; in- 
testate 

In the whole ; entirely 
Go now, and practise by 
thyself melodious verses 
Within the walls 
In course of transit 
To offend in words only 
Prepared for either event 
In empty space, or in a 

vacuum 

If I cannot find a way I 
will make one. I will 
carry my point at all 
hazards 

I rejoice in truth 
I remain unconquered 
There is truth in wine ; 
truth is told under the in- 
fluence of wine. Drunken 
folk often speak the truth 
Against one's humour, or 
inclination ; (lit. Mi- 
nerva being unwilling) 



74 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ipse dixit 



Ipsissirna verba 
Ipso facto 
Ipso jure 

Ira furor brevis est 
Irani qui vincit, hostem 
superat maximum 

Irrevocable verbum 



Ita est 

Ita lex scripta est 

Ita sit sane 

Ite ita 

Iterum 

Jacta est alea 

Jamque opus exegi, quod 
nee Jovis ira, nee ignes, 
nee poterit ferrum, nee 
edax abolere vetustas 



Janitor 
Januae mentis 



Januis clausis 

Jesus, hominum Salvator 

(I.H.S.) 
Judex damnatur cum no 

cens absolvitur 



" He (the master himself) 
said it ; " an authorita- 
tive assertion ; dogma- 
tism 

The very words 

By the fact itself 

By the law itself 

Anger is brief madness 

He that overcomes his 
anger, conquers his 
greatest enemy 

A word that cannot be 
called back. The spoken 
word cannot be recalled 

It is even so 

Such is the law 

Granted ; let it be so 

Go after this manner 

Again 

The die is cast 

I have now completed a 
work, which neither the 
wrath of Jove, nor fire, 
nor sword, nor the tooth 
of time, will be able to 
destroy 

A porter ; door-keeper ; 
gate-keeper 

Gates of the mind; en- 
trances for (or sources of) 
knowledge 

With closed doors 

Jesus, the Saviour of man- 
kind 

The judge is condemned 
when a criminal is 
acquitted 



Latin Section. 



75 



Judicium Dei 
Juncta juvant 

Juniorcs ad labores 

Jurarc et fallere numen 
Jurare in verba magistri 

Jure divino 

Jure humano 

Jus canonicum 

Jus civile 

Jus et norma loquendi 

Jus gentium 
Jus militare 
Jus municipale 
Jus summum saepe summa 
est malitia 

Justitiac soror fides 
Justitix tenax 

Justitia regnorum funda- 
mentum 

Justitia vacat 

Justum et tenacem propo- 
siti virum 

Labor ipse voluptas 
Labor limae 



The judgment of God 

Things when joined aid 

(each other). Union is 

strength 
Young men for labours ; 

the burden is for young 

shoulders 
To swear and to break 

one's oath 
To swear to the words of a 

master ; to say ditto to 

one 

By divine law 
By human law 
Canon law 
Civil law 

The law and rule of speak- 
ing ; ordinary usage 

Law of nations 

Martial law 

Statute law 

The rigour of the law is 
often the hardest in- 
justice 

Faith is the sister of justice 

Firm in justice 

Justice is the foundation 
of kingdoms 

There is no justice in it 

A just man, and steady to 
his purpose 

Labour itself is pleasure 

The labour of the file ; 
of polishing (literary) 
work 



76 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Labor omnia vincit 

Laborum dulce lenimen 
Lacuna 
Lapis lazuli 
Lapsus calami 
Lapsus lingua? 
Lapsus memoriae 
Lares et penates 
Lateat scintillula forsan 

Latet anguis in herba 

Latitat 

Laudari a viro laudato 

Laudator temporis acti 

Laus Deo 
Lector benevole 
Legibus firmatus 
Legimus, ne legantur 



Legis constructio non facit 
injuriam 

Lenior et melior fis, acce- 
dente senecta ? 



Leo 

Leone fortior fides 



Labour overcomes all ob- 
stacles 

Sweet solace of toils 
A gap ; deficiency 
Sapphire 
A slip of the pen 
A slip of the tongue 
A slip of the memory 
Household gods 

A small spark may per- 
chance lurk unseen 

There's a snake in the grass 

He is in concealment 

To be praised by a man 
who is himself praised 

A praiser, eulogiser, of 
times gone by (of the 
past) 

Praise be to God 

Kind, gentle reader 

Established by law 

We (reviewers, censors) 
read (books) to prevent 
their being read (by 
others) 

The law shall not be inter- 
preted so as to cause 
wrong 

Do you become milder 
(more gentle, tolerant) 
and better as old age 
approaches ? 

The Lion (one of the signs 
of the Zodiac) 

Faith is stronger than a lion 



Latin Section. 



77 



Leonina societas 



Leges juraque servamus 



Leve fit, quod bene fertur, 
onus 

Levis est dolor qui capere 
consilium potest 

Levius fit patientia quid- 
quid corrigere est nefas 



Lex loci 
Lex mercatoria 
Lex non scripta 
Lex scripta 
Lex talionis 
Lex terrae 
Libertas 

Libertas est potestas fa- 
ciendi id quod jure liceat 

Libertas et natale solum 
Liberum arbitrium 
Libra 

Limae labor 
Lingua franca 



Lis sub judice 
Lite pendente 



A partnership in which one 
partner takes the lion's 
share (i.e., the whole) of 
the profits 

We keep (the) statutes and 
laws ; we maintain our 
laws and rights 

A load that is cheerfully 
borne becomes light 

It is light grief that can 
take counsel 

Whatever cannot be amen- 
ded is made easier by 
patience. What can't 
be cured must be endured 

The law of the place 

The law merchant 

The unwritten law 

Statute or written law 

The law of retaliation 

The law of the land 

Liberty 

Liberty is the power of 
doing that which is per- 
mitted by the law 

Liberty and my native land 

Free will, or choice 

The Scales (one of the 
signs of the Zodiac) 

The labour of the file in 
polishing compositions 

The mixed language used 
between Europeans and 
Orientals in the Levant ; 
a broken tongue; a patois 

A case not yet decided 

During the trial 



78 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Literae humaniores 



Litera scripta manet 

Literati 

Literatim 

Litus ama, altum alii tene- 

ant 
Loco citato (loc. cit.) 

Locum tenens 
Locus pcenitentiae 

Locus sigilli (L.S.) 
Locus standi 



Longo intervallo 
Longum iter est per prae- 

cepta, breve et efficax per 

exempla 



Lucidus ordo 
Lucus a non lucendo 



Liidere cum sacris 
Lumina civitatis 

Lupanar 

Lupus pilum mutat, non 

mentem 
Lustrum 



Learning of a rather polite 
nature, of a more humane 
description ; Greek and 
Latin classics 

The written letter remains 

Literary men 

Literally ; letter for letter 

Love thou the shore, let 
others possess the deep 

At the place or passage 
quoted 

A deputy (one holding the 
place of another) 

Place (opportunity) for re- 
pentance 

The place of the seal 

A place for standing ; 
right to appear before a 
court 

By a long interval 

Tedious is the way by 
precepts, short and effec- 
tual by examples. Ex- 
ample is better than 
precept 

A clear arrangement 

A misnomer. Literally, 
lucus (a grove) is so called 
from there being no light 
(lux) in it 

To trifle with sacred things 

Lights of the state ; re- 
markable citizens 

A brothel 

The wolf changes his coat, 

not his disposition 
A space of five years 



Latin Section. 



79 



Lusus naturae 
Luxuria saevior armr? 

Macte virtute 
Magister admissionum 
Magister artium (M.A.) 
Magistratus indicat virum 

Magna Charta 

Magna civitas, magna 

solitude 
Magna est veritas et prae- 

valebit 

Magnas componere lites 
Magna servitus est magna 

fortuna 
Magnas inter opes inops 

Magnas nugas 
Magni nominis umbra 

Magno conatu 
Magnos homines virtute 
metimur, non fortuna 

Magnum bonum 
Magnum est vectigal parci- 

monia 

Magnum opus 
Magnus Apollo 
Major domo 

Major famae sitis est quam 

virtutis 
Majusculae 



A freak of nature 

Luxury more terrible (in 

its ravages) than war 
Proceed in virtue 
Master of the ceremonies 
Master of arts 
The magistrate shows the 

man 
The great charter (granted 

A.D. 1215 by King John) 
A great city is a great 

desert 
Truth is great and it will 

prevail 

To settle great quarrels 
A great fortune is a great 

slavery 
Poor in the midst of great 

wealth 

Mighty trifles 
The shadow of a great 

name 

By a great attempt 
Great men we estimate by 

their virtue (or valour), 

not by their success 
A great good 
Economy is a great revenue 

(tax) " 
A great work 
Great Apollo 
Master of the house ; a 

steward 
The thirst for fame is 

greater than for virtue 
Capital (letters) 



8o Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Mala fide 

Male parta male dilabuntur 

Mali exempli 

Malo mori quam foedari 

Malum in se 
Malum prohibitum 
Malus animus 
Malus pudor 
Mandamus 



Manebant vestigia mori- 

entis libertatis 
Manes 

Manet alta mente repostum 
Mania a potu 
Manibus pedibusque 

Manifesto 
Manu forti 
Manu propria 

Manus haec inimica ty- 

rannis 
Manus justa nardus 

Mare clausum 

Mare, ignis, et mulier sunt 
tria mala 



In bad faith 

Ill-got, ill-spent. Ill-gotten 
goods seldom prosper 

Of a bad example 

I had rather die than be 
disgraced ; death before 
dishonour 

Bad in itself 

A prohibited evil or wrong 

Bad feeling or purpose 

False shame 

" We command " ; a writ 
from a superior court 
directing some action on 
the part of an inferior 
court 

There remained the traces 
of dying liberty 

The shades ; ghost of a 
dead person 

It (the grievance) remains 
deeply seated in the mind 

Madness caused by drunk- 
enness 

With hands and feet ; with 
all one's might 

Palpably ; clearly 

With a strong hand 

With one's own hand 

This hand is at war with 

tyrants 
The just hand is as precious 

ointment 
A closed sea ; a bay 

The sea, fire, and woman 
are three evils 



Latin Section. 



81 



Mare liberum 

Marsupium idem esto nobis 

omnibus 
Materfamilias 

Materialiter 
Materia medica 
Materiam superabat opus 

Maxima debetur puero re- 

verentia 
Maxima illecebra est 

peccandi impunitatis spes 

Maximas virtutes jacere 
omnesnecesse est, volup- 
tate dominante 

Maximum 

Maximus in minimis 

Mea maxima culpa 



Mecum sentit 
Mediocria firma 

Mediocribus esse poetis 
non homines, non Di,non 
concessere columnae 



Medio tutissimus ibis 
Me duce, tutus eris 



An open sea ; open to all 
Let us all have one com- 

mon purse 
The mother of a family ; 

the mistress of a house 



to 



Materially ; according 

the occasion 
Substances used in the 

healing art 
The workmanship was 

better than the materials 
The greatest reverence 

is due to a child 
The greatest incitement to 

wrongdoing is the hope 

of impunity 
Where pleasure prevails, 

all the highest virtues 

must be neglected 
The greatest possible 
Very great in trifling things 
Through my very great 

fault ; chiefly through 

my fault ; I am most to 

blame 

He is of my opinion 
Moderation is safe. Aurea 

mediocritas 
Mediocrity is not permitted 

in poets, either by the 

gods, or by men, or by the 

columns (or pillars sup- 

porting the booksellers' 

shops) 
A middle course will be 

safest 
Under my guidance you 

will be safe 



82 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Me judice 
Meliores priores 

Melior est correptio mani- 
festa amore occulto 

Memento mori 
Meminerunt omnia amantes 

Memorabilia 



Memoria in aeterna 

Memoriter 

Mens aequa rebus in arduis 

Mens agitat molem 

Mensa secunda 
Mens conscia recti 

Mens invicta manet 

Mens praescia futuri 
Mens sana in corpore sano 

Mens sibi conscia recti 
Mentis gratissimus error 

Meo periculo 
Mero motu 

Merum sal 



In my opinion 

The better, the first ; the 
best men, the first place 

Open rebuke is better than 
secret love 

Remember death 

Lovers recollect all things ; 
have long memories 

Things worthy of being 
remembered ; reminis- 
cences 

In everlasting remem- 
brance 

By memory 

An even mind in diffi- 
culties 

Mind moves the mass ; 
mind moves matter 

The second course; dessert 

A mind conscious of recti- 
tude 

The mind remains un- 
conquered 

A foreseeing mind 

A sound mind in a sound 
body 

A mind conscious of up- 
rightness 

A most pleasing hallucina- 
tion 

At my own risk 

Of his own motion, or free 

will 
Pure salt ; genuine Attic 

wit 



Latin Section. 



Metiri se quemque suo 
modulo ac pede verum 
est 

Metuenda corolla draconis 



Meum et tuum 
Mihi cura futuri 
Militavi non sine gloria 

Minimum 

Minor est quam servus 
dominus qui servos timet 

Minus 

Minutiae 

Mirabile dictu 

Mirabile visu 

Mirabilia 

Minim 

Miserabile vulgus 

Miserere nobis 

Miseris succurrere disco 

Mittimus 

Moderata durant 
Modicum 
Modo et forma 
Modus operandi 
Mole ruit sua 

Mollia tempora 
Mollia tempora fandi 



It is just that every man 
should measure himself 
according to his own 
measure or standard 

The crown (or crest) of a 
dragon (or serpent) is to 
be feared 

Mine and thine 

My care is for the future 

I served with some dis- 
tinction 

The smallest possible 

A master that fears his ser- 
vants is inferior to a 
servant 

Less ; without 

The smallest details 

Wonderful to be told 

Wonderful to behold 

Wonderful things 

Wonderful 

A wretched crew 

Have compassion on us 

I learn to succour the 
distressed 

Warrant of commitment 
to prison ; lit. " we send " 

Moderate things endure 

A small quantity 

In manner and form 

Manner of working 

It is crushed by its own 
weight 

Golden opportunities 

The favourable occasions 
for speaking 



84 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases 



Molliter manus imposuit 

Momentum 

Mon strum horrendum 

informe cui lumen 

ademptum 
Monumentum acre peren- 

nius 



More majorum 

Mores hominum multorum 
vidit et urbes 



More Socratico 
More solito 

More suo 

Mors janua vitae 

Mors omnibus communis 

Mors potius macula 

Mors ultima linea rerum 

est 
Mortuo leoni et lepores 

insultant 
Mos pro lege 
Motu proprio 
Mulier quae sola cogitat 

male cogitat 
Multa cadunt inter calicem 

supremaque labra 
Multa docet fames 

Multa petentibus desunt 
multa 



He laid his hands gently on 
Impulse 

A monster, horrible, un- 
shapely, and eyeless 

A monument more enduring 
than bronze. See Exegi 
monumentum, &c. ; Jam- 
que opus exegi, &c. 

After the manner of our 
ancestors 

He saw the manners and 
the cities of many peoples. 
Far - travelled. Much- 
experienced 

After the manner of So- 
crates 

As usual ; in the accus- 
tomed manner 

After his own manner 

Death is the gate of life 

Death is common to all 

Death rather than disgrace 

Death is the utmost limit 
of all things 

When the lion is dead 
even hares insult him 

Custom(is accepted) for law 

Of his own accord 

A woman that thinks by 
herself thinks ill 

There's many a slip 'twixt 
cup and lip 

Hunger teaches many 
lessons 

To those who desire many 
things, many things are 
wanting 



Latin Section. 



Multa tuli fecique 

Muiti te oderint, siteipsum 
ames 

Multo ante 

Multos in summa pericula 
misit venturi timor ipse 
mali 

Multum in parvo 

Mundus vult decipi, et de- 
cipiatur 

Murus aeneus conscientia 

sana 

Mutare vel timere sperno 
Mutatis mutandis 

Mutato nomine 

Mutato nomine de te fabula 
narratur 

Nam tua res agitur paries 
dum proximus ardet 

Natale solum 

Xaturam expelles furca, 
tamen usque recurret 



Natus ad gloriam 

Nebulae 

Nee bella, nee puella 

Ne cede malis 



Much have I suffered and 
done 

Let many people hate you, 
provided you love your- 
self 

Long before 

The very apprehension of 
an impending evil has 
placed many in the 
greatest peril 

Much in little ; a great deal 
in a small compass 

The world wishes to be de- 
ceived, and let it be 
deceived 

A sound conscience is a 
wall of brass 

I scorn to change or to fear 

The necessary changes 

being made 
Under a changed name 

Change the name, and the 
story applies to yourself 

For your interests are con- 
cerned when your neigh- 
bour's house is on fire 

Natal soil 

You may drive out nature 
with a fork, yet it will 
still come back ; nature 
will be nature still 

Born to glory 

Mists ; cloudlets 

Neither beautiful nor young 

(lit. nor a girl) 
Yield not to misfortunes 



86 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Necesse est ut multos time- 
at, quern multi timent 

Necessitas non habet legem 
Nee mora, nee requies 
Nee pluribus impar , 
Nee prece nee pretio 

Nee quaerere nee spernere 

honorem 
Nee scire fas est omnia 

Nee semper feriet quod- 
cunque minabitur arcus 



Nee temere nee ttmide 

Nee timeo, nee sperno 
Ne exeat 
Nefasti dies 



Ne front! crede 

Ne glorieris de die crastino, 
quia nescis quid pari- 
turus sit dies 

Nemine contradicente(nem. 

con.) 
Nemine dissentiente (nein. 

diss.) 
Nemo malus felix 



He whom many fear, must 
fear many 

Necessity has no law 

No rest or repose 

A match for two (or more) 

Neither by entreaty nor by 
bribe 

Neither to seek nor to 
despise honour 

It is not permitted to know- 
all things 

The arrow (lit. bow) will 
not always hit that which 
it threatens (is aimed at). 
The best laid schemes o' 
mice and men gang aft 
agley 

Neither rashly nor timo- 
rously 

I neither fear nor despise 

Let him not depart 

Unlucky days ; days on 
which the courts do not 
sit 

Do not trust to appearance 

Boast not thyself of to- 
morrow, for thoukno west 
not what a day may bring 
forth 

Without opposition ; no 
one contradicting 

No one disagreeing 

No bad man is happy. 
There is no peace unto 
the wicked 



Latin Section. 



Nemo me impune lacesset 

Nemo mortalium omnibus 

horis sapit 
Nemo nimium beatus est 

Nemo repente fuit turpissi- 

mus 
Nemo solus sapit 

Ne nimium 
Ne obliviscaris 
Ne plus supra 



Ne plus ultra 

Ne puero gladium 

Neque semper arcum tendit 
Apollo 

Nequicquam sapit, qui sibi 
non sapit 

Ne quid detrimenti respub- 

lica capiat 
Ne quid nimis 
Nescia mens hominum fati 

sortisque futurae 



Nescis, mi fili, quantula 
sapientia gubernatur 
mundus ! 

Nescit vox missa reverti 



No one will attack me with 
impunity 

No mortal is wise at all 
times 

There is no man over 
happy 

No man ever became a 
villain at once 

No one has a monopoly of 
wisdom 

(Do) nothing in excess 

Do not forget 

Nothing above (one) ; the 
highest type ; the chief 
example 

Nothing beyond ; the 
greatest extent 

Do not put a sword in a 
boy's hand 

Nor does Apollo always 
bend his bow. Due re- 
laxation is necessary 

To no purpose is he wise 
w,ho is not wise for him- 
self (to his own benefit) 

(To take care) that the 
state suffer no harm 

Go not too far 

The mind of man is 
ignorant of fate and 
future destiny. We know 
not what a day may 
bring forth 

Thou knowest not, my son, 
with how little wisdom 
the world is governed ! 

The spoken word cannot 
be recalled 



88 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ne sus Minervam 



Ne sutor ultra crepidam 

Ne vile velis 

Nictat oculis suis 

Nidus 

Nihil ad me attinet 

Nihil ad rem 

Nihil agas quod non prosit 

Nihil debet 

Nihil eripit fortuna nisi 
quod et dedit 

Nihil est ab omni parte 
beatum 

Nihil quod tetigit non 

ornavit 
Nihil sub sole novi 

Nil 

Nil actum reputans, dum 
quid superesset agendum 



Nil admirari 

Nil conscire sibi nulla 
pallescere culpa 



Let not a pig (presume to 
teach) Minerva (the 
Goddess of Wisdom). 
Teach not thy granny to 
suck eggs 

Let the shoemaker stick to 
his last. Let everyone 
mind his own business 

Incline to nothing base 

He winks with his eyes 

A nest 

It is nothing to me 

Nothing to the point 

Do nothing but what may 
turn to good account 

He owes nothing ; a plea 
denying a debt 

Fortune takes from us 
nothing but what she 
has given us 

There is no situation (in 
life) that is in every re- 
spect happy 

He touched nothing which 
he did not adorn 

Nothing new under the sun 

Nothing 

Thinking that nothing was 
done while anything re- 
mained to be done. 
Leaving no stone un- 
turned 

To wonder at nothing 
To be conscious of wrong, 
to turn pale at no accu- 
sation 



Latin Section. 



89 



Nil desperandum ! 
Nil dicit 

Nil falsi audeat, nil verinon 
audeat dicere 



Nil fuit unquam sic impar 

sibi 
Nil mortalibus ardui est 

Nil similius insane quam 
ebrius 

Nil sine Deo 

Nimium ne crede colori 



Nimium premendo litus 

Nisi Dominus frustra 
Nisi prius 



Nitor in adversum 
Nocet differre paratis 



Nocte (or noctu) 



Never despair ! 
He says nothing 

Let him (a historian, for 
example) not dare to 
state anything that is 
false, or to refrain from 
stating anything that is 
true 

Nothing was ever so un- 
like itself 

Nothing is difficult to 
mortals 

Nothing is more like a 
madman than a drunken 
man 

Nothing without God 

Trust not too much to ap- 
pearances ; a blush may 
cover deceit 

By hugging the shore too 
closely ; keeping out of 
danger 

Unless the Lord (help us), 
(our labour'is) in vain 

Lit. unless before ; a writ 
by which the sheriff is to 
bring up a jury on a cer- 
tain day " unless before " 
that day the judges go 
into the counties to hold 
assizes 

I strive against opposition 

It is prejudicial to those 
that are ready, to delay. 
Strike while the iron is 
hot 

By night 



go Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Noctes coenaeque Deum 

Nocte silenti 

Nocturna versate manu, 
versate diurna 

Nolens volens 
Noli irritare leones 
Noli me tangere 
Nolle prosequi 



Nolo episcopari 

Nolumus leges Angliae 
mutari 

Nominatim 

Nominis umbra 

Non aquanon ignipluribus 

locis utimur quam ami- 

citia 

Non assumpsit 
Non causa, pro causa 



Nou compos mentis 
Non conscire sibi 
Non constat 

Non cuivis homini contingit 
adire Corinthum , 

Non ego ventosae venor 
suffragia plebis 



Nights and feasts of the 
gods 

In the dead of night 

Give your days and nights 
to the study of these 
authors 

Whether he will or not 

Do not rouse the lions 

Do not touch me 

To be unwilling to prose- 
cute ; stoppage of a suit 
by the plaintiff 

I do not wish to be made 
a bishop 

We are unwilling that the 
laws of England be 
changed 

By name ; by special re- 
ference 

The shadow of a name 

We do not use fire or water 
in more places than we 
do friendship 

He did not assume 

An inductive fallacy in 
which the cause assigned 
has no relation to the 
effect 

Not of sound mind 

To be conscious of no fault 

It is not evident, agreed, 
settled 

It is not every man's for- 
tune to go to Corinth 

I do not hunt for the votes 
of the common people, 
which veer with every 
wind 



Latin Section. 



Non equidem invideo, 

miror magis 
Non est ad astra mollis 

a terris via 
Non est alter 
Non est inventus 
Non est jocus esse malig- 

num 
Non est tanti 

Non est vivere, sed valere, 
vita 



Non generant aquilae co- 

lumbas 
Non haec in fcedera 

Non ignara mali, miseris 
succurrere disco 

Non libet 
Non licet 
Non liquet 

Non magni pendis quia 
contigit 

Non nobis, Domine 

Non nobis solum sed omni- 
bus 

Non nobis solum sed toti 
mundo nati 

Non nostrum tantas com- 

ponere lites 
Non numero hasc judi- 

cantur sed pondere 



Indeed I do not envy, I 
am surprised rather 

There is no easy path from 
the earth to the stars 

There is no other 

He has not been found 

There is no fun in ill- 
natured remarks 

It is not worth while ; not 
worth the trouble 

Life is not life without the 
enjoyment of health. 
" For life is only life 
when blest with health " 

Eagles do not bring forth 
doves 

Not into such leagues as 
these 

Not ignorant myself of mis- 
fortune,! learn to succour 
the distressed 

It does not please me 

It is not lawful 

(The case) is not clear 

You do not value it highly 
because it came inci- 
dentally 

Not to us, O Lord 

Not for ourselves only, but 
for all 

Born not for ourselves 
only, but for the whole 
world 

It is not our duty to adjust 
such high disputes 

These things are estimated 
not by number but by 
weight 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Non obstante 

Non omnia possumus omnes 

Non omnis error stultitia 

est dicenda 
Non omnis moriar 
Non possumus 
Non quo, sed quomodo 

Non res, sed spes erat 



Non revertar inultus 
Non semper erit aestas 
Non sequitur 



Non sibi, sed omnibus 
Non si male nunc et olim 
sic erit 



Non solum sed etiam 
Non sum dignus 
Non sum qualis eram 
Non tali auxilio, nee defen- 
soribus istis tempus eget 

Non unique prematur in 
annum 

Non ut diu vivamus cur- 
andum est, sed ut satis 



Notwithstanding 

We cannot all of us do all 
things 

Not every mistake is to be 
stigmatised as folly 

I shall not wholly die 

We cannot 

Not by whom, but in what 
manner 

Not performance, but hope. 
He was a most promising 
man, though he did not 
accomplish anything 
great 

I shall not return unavenged 

It is not always May 

It does not follow. A form 
of fallacy in which the 
conclusion states what 
cannot be justly inferred 
from the premises 

Not for oneself, but for all 

When things are at their 
worst they begin to 
mend. It is a long lane 
that has no turning 

Not only but also 

I am not worthy 

I am not what I was 

The juncture needs not 
such help or such de- 
fenders as you offer 

Let your compositions be 
kept in your desk for nine 
years 

We should be anxious not 
to live long but to live 
enough 



Latin Section. 



93 



Non vi, sed saepe cadendo 
Non vultus, non color 



Nosce teipsum 
Noscitur a sociis 

Nos patriam fugimus, nos 
dulcia linquimus arva 

Nosse haec omnia salus est 

adolescentulis 
Nostro marte 

Nota bene (N.B.) 

Novos amicos dum paras, 

veteres cole 
Novus homo 
Xovus rex, nova lex 
Nuces relinquere 

Nucleus 

Nudis verbis 
Nudum pactum 
Nugae canorae 
Nugis addere pondus 
Nugis armatus 

Nulla aconita bibuntur 

fictilibus 
Nulla bona 
Nulla dies sine linea 



Nulla est sincera voluptas 



Not by force, but by fre- 
quent falling 

Neither the countenance 
nor the colour ; nothing 
like it 

Know thyself 

He is known by his asso- 
ciates 

We are fleeing from our 
country, we are leaving 
our pleasant fields 

It is good for young men 
to know all these things 

By our army, or soldiers, 
or valour 

Mark well 

Whilst you seek newfriends, 
make much of the old ones 

A new man 

New kings make new laws 

To abandon one's nuts ; to 
cease to be a child 

Kernel (of a nut ; or of any 
matter) 

In plain words 

An invalid agreement 

Melodious trifles 

To give weight to trifles 

Armed with trifles 

No poison is drunk out of 
earthenware 

No goods, effects, assets 

No day without a line 
without some work ac- 
complished 

No joy is unalloyed 



94 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Nulla falsa doctrina est quae 
non permisceat aliquid 
veritatis 

Nulla fere causa est, in qua 
non femina litem moverit 



Nulla pallescere culpa 

Nulli jactantius maerent, 
quam qui maxime 
laetantur 



Nullis amor est medicabilis 

herbis 
Nulli secundus 

Nullius addictus jurare in 
verba magistri 

Nullius films 

Nullo modo 

Nullum imperium tutum, 
nisi benevolentia muni- 
turn 

Nullum magnum ingenium 
sine mixtura dementias 
fuit 

Nullum magnum malum 
quod extremum est 

Nullum medicamentum 
est idem omnibus 



Nullus dolor est quern non 
longinquitas temporis 
minuat atque molliat 



There is no false doctrine 
but mixes up with itself 
some element of truth 

There are hardly any dis- 
putes but a woman has 
been at the bottom of 
them 

Not to turn pale on any 
imputation of guilt 

None mourn with more 
show of sorrow than 
those who are especially 
delighted 

Love is not to be cured by 
any herbs 

Second to none ; rirst 
fiddle 

Not bound to swear to the 
opinions of any master ; 
wholly independent 

Nobody's child; an illegiti- 
mate son 

In no wise ; by no means 

No government is safe un- 
less fortified by good 
will 

There was never a great 
genius without a touch 
of madness 

No evil which is last can 
be great 

No medicine is the same 
for all persons. One 
man's meat is another 
man's poison 

There is no grief that 
length of time does not 
lessen and assuage 



Latin Section. 



95 



Nunc aut nunquam 
Xunc scio quid sit amor 
Nunquam ad liquidum 

fama perducitur 
Nunquam dormio 

Nunquam minus solus, 

quam cum solus 
Nunquam non paratus 

Nunquam potest non esse 
virtuti locus 



Nusquam tuta fides 

Obiit 

Obiter dictum 

Obscuris vera involvens 

Obscurum per obscurius 



Observanda 
Obsta principiis 
Obstupui, steteruntque 

comas, et vox faucibus 

haesit 

Occasio furem facit 
Occasionem cognosce 



Occupet extremum scabies 
Occurrent nubes 
Oculis subjecta fidelibus 



Now or never 

Now I know what love is 

Report never shows things 

in their true light 
I never sleep ; I am always 

wide awake 
Never less alone than 

when alone 
Never unprepared ; aye 

ready 

There must always be 
room for virtue ; virtue 
can never be at a dis- 
count 
Our confidence is nowhere 

safe 

He or she died 
A thing said by the way 
Involving the truth in ob- 
scure terms 

(To explain) one obscure 
thing by something still 
more obscure. The 
blind leading the blind 
Things to be observed 
Resist the first beginnings 
I was astounded, my hair 
stood on end, and my 
voice clave to my throat 
Opportunity makes the thief 
Know your opportunity. 
Strike while the iron is 
hot 

Plague take the hindmost 
Clouds will intervene 
Under faithful eyes ; fully 
and carefully examined. 
Plain as a pikestaff 



96 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Oderint dum metuant 

Oderunt peccare boni, 

virtutis amore 
Odi profanum vulgus 
Odium theologicum 
Officina gentium 

Ohe ! jam satis 

O imitatores, servum pecus 

Oleum addere camino 

Olim 

Olim meminisse juvabit 



Omne ignoturn pro mag- 

nifico 
Omne in prsecipiti vitium 

stetit 

Omnem crede diem tibi 
diluxisse supremum 

Omne nimium vertitur in 
vitium 



Omnes 
Omne scibile 



Omnes eodem cogimur 



Omne solum forti patria est 



Let them hate provided 
they fear 

Good men hate to sin, out 
of very love of virtue 

I loathe the profane vulgar 

The hatred of divines 

The workshop of the 
nations 

Oh ! there is now enough 

O servile herd of imitators 

To pour oil upon the fire ; 
to add fuel to the flame 

Formerly 

It will be pleasant to re- 
member these things in 
after times 

Everything unknown is re- 
garded as magnificent 

Every kind of vice has 
reached its highest de- 
velopment 

Believe that each day that 
dawns on you is your 
last 

Everything in excess be- 
comes a vice. There may 
be too much of a good 
thing 

All persons 

Everything that may be 
known; everythingknow- 
able 

We are all driven towards 
the same quarter (death- 
wards) 

Every soil is the fatherland 
of a brave man 



Latin Section. 



97 



Omnes sint unum 
Omne tulit punctum, qui 
miscuit utile dulci 

Omnia ad Dei gloriam 
Omnia bona bonis 

Omnia fert aetas, animum 
quoque 

Omnia inconsulto impetu 
ccepta, initiis valida, 
spatio languescunt 

Omnia mala exempla bonis 
principiis orta sunt 

Omnia mea mecum porto 

Omnia non pariter sunt 

omnibus apta 
Omnia novit Graeculus 

esuriens 

Omnia praeclara sunt rara 
Omnia suspendens naso 
Omnia tuta timens 

Omnia vanitas 
Omnia vincit amor 
Omnia vincit labor 

Omnibus hoc vitium est 
Omnibus notum tonsoribus 



Let all be one (united) 
He gained every vote, who 

blended the useful with 

the agreeable 
All things are for the glory 

of God 
All things are good with 

good men 
Time bears away all things, 

and the powers of the 

mind among them 
All things commenced with 

inconsiderate haste, al- 
though vigorous at the 

outset, droop after a time 
All bad precedents have 

taken their origin from 

good beginnings 
I carry all my property 

with me 
All things are not alike 

suited for all men 
A starving Greekling 

knows everything. Will 

undertake any office 
All excellent things are 

rare 
One who turns up his nose 

at everything 
Fearing all things, even 

such as are safe 
All is vanity 

Love conquers all things 
Labour overcomes all 

things 

All have this vice 
Every barber (gossip 1 

knows that 



9 8 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Omni exceptione major 
Omnium consensu capax 
imperii, nisi imperasset 



Superior to all exception 
Everybody would have 
considered him capable 
of governing, if he had 
never governed 
A miscellaneous collection 



Omnium gatherum 

[Gatherum is latinized humorously from " gather " ; 
it is not a proper Latin word] 



Onus 

Onus probandi 

Ope et consilio 

Operae pretium est 

Operculum 

Opinionum commenta delet 

dies, naturae judicia con- 

firmat 

Opprobrium medicorum 



Optat ephippia bos piger, 
optat arare caballus 



Optimates 

Optimum est pati quod 

emendare non possis 
Optimum obsonium labor 
Opum furiosa cupido 

Opusculum 
Ora et labora 
Orandum est ut sit mens 
sana in corpore sano 



A burden 

The burden of proving 

By help and counsel 

It is worth while 

A cover ; lid 

Time wipes out the com- 
ments of opinion, but it 
confirms the judgments 
of nature 

The disgrace of the doctors : 
said of any disease for 
which there has not been 
found any cure 

The lazy ox wishes for 
horse-trappings, and the 
horse wishes to plough. 
We are dissatisfied with 
what we have, and long 
for what we have not 

Persons of the first rank 

What cannot be cured 
must be endured 

Work is the best relish 

The ungovernable lust for 
riches 

A little work (book) 

Pray and work 

We should pray for a 
sound mind in a sound 
body 



Latin Section. 



99 



Ora pro nobis 
Orationem concludere 
Orator fit, poeta nascitur 

Ore rotundo 

Ore tenus 
Origo mali 
O ! si sic omnia 

O tempora ! O mores ! 

Otium cum dignitate 
Otiuni sine dignitate 
Ovem lupo committere 

Pabulum 

Pace 

Pace et bello 

Pacta conventa 

Palaestra 

Palladium 



Pallida mors 

Pallidus ira 

Palmam qui meruit ferat 



Pray for us 

To end a speech 

The orator is made such by 
education, but a poet 
must be born such 

With a round mouth ; 
volubly ; grandly 

From the mouth 

The origin of evil 

Oh! that he had always 
done or spoken thus 

Oh the times ! Oh the 
manners ! 

Ease with dignity 

Ease without dignity 

To set the wolf to guard 
the sheep ; or, the fox to 
keep the geese 

Fodder ; matter for study, 
&c. 

With the favour, leave of 

In peace and in war 

Conditions agreed upon 

Gymnasium ; place for 
exercise in wrestling, &c. 

Protection ; support ; an 
image of Pallas Athene, 
carefully preserved at 
Troy, the safety of the 
city being supposed to 
depend on it 

Pale death 

Pale with rage 

Let him who has won the 
palm bear it 



ioo Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Panacea 
Pandectae 



Par 

Parendo imperat 

Pares cum paribus facil- 
lime congregantur 

Pari passu 

Paritur pax bello 

Par negotiis neque supra 

Par nobile fratrum 

Par oneri 

Par pari refero 

Pars minima sui 

Pars pro toto 
Parta tueri debent 

Parthis mendacior 

Particeps criminis 

Parturiunt montes, nasce- 
tur ridiculus mus 



Parva componere magnis 
Parva leves capiuntanimas 



A cure for every complaint 
The Pandects (or Digest), 

a collection of Roman 

laws from the writings of 

Roman jurists, made by 

order of Justinian 
Equal ; the condition of 

equality ; equal value 
By obeying, she (a wife) 

rules (her husband) 
Like draws 'to like. Birds 

of a feather flock to-* 

together 
With an equal pace ; side 

by side 

Peace is produced by war 
Neither above nor below 
A noble pair of brothers 
Equal to the burden 
I return like for like 

The smallest part of the 

man or thing 
Part for the whole 

What is gained ought to be 

maintained 
More lying than Parthians ; 

a consummate liar 
An accomplice 

The mountains are in 
labour, a ridiculous 
mouse will be born. 
Great cry and little wool 

To compare little things 
with great 

Little minds are caught 
with trifles 



Latin Section. 



101 



Parvum parva decent 



Passim 
Paterfamilias 

Pater noster 
Pater patriae 
Patres conscripti 



Patria cara,carior libertas 

Patriae fumus igne alieno 
luculentior 

Patriae infelici fidelis 
Patris est filius 

Faucis carior est fides 
quam pecunia 

Paucis verbis 
Paulo post futurum 



Pax in bello 
Pax potior bello 



Little things suit little 
minds ; humble things 
become humble men. 
The man in a low station 
never makes himself ridi- 
culous but when his 
efforts exceed his means 

Everywhere 

The father of a family ; the 

head of a house 
Our Father 
Father of his country 
Conscript fathers(or, rather, 

fathers and conscripti or 

elected peers) ; Roman 

senators 
My country is dear, but 

liberty is dearer 
The smoke of one's own 

country is brighter than 

a foreign fire 
Faithful to an unhappy 

country 
Like father, like son (lit. 

he is his father's son) 
To few persons is loyalty 

dearer than money ; 

most men have their 

price 
In few words ; in brief 

A little past the future ; a 
name given by Latin 
grammarians to the 
future perfect tense 

Peace in war 

Peace is more powerful 
than war 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Pax vel injusta utilior est 
quamjustissimumbellum 

Pax vobiscum 
Peccavi 

Pecuniam in loco negligere 
maximum est lucrum 



Penates 
Pendente lite 
Penetralia 
Penetralia mentis 

Pennas incidere alicui 

Per acuta belli 

Per angusta ad augusta 

Per annum 

Per capita 

Per centum 

Per contra 

PerDeumet ferrum obtinui 

Per diem 

Peream si falsa loquor 

Pereant amici, dum una 
inimici intercidant 

Per fas et nefas 



Perfervidum ingenium 



Peace even on hard terms 
is better than the justest 
war 

Peace be with you 

I have sinned 

To spend money freely 
(despise money) on pro- 
per occasions is the 
greatest gain 

(Roman) household gods 

Whilst the suit is pending 

Secret rooms or recesses 

The inmost recesses of the 
mind; the heart of hearts 

To clip one's wings ; to 
take one down a peg 

Through the dangers of 
war 

Through difficulties to 
honours 

By the year 

By the head 

By the hundred 

On the contrary 

By the help of God and 
my sword have I won it 

By the day 

May I die if I speak what is 
false 

Let our friends perish, pro- 
vided that our enemies 
fall with them 

Through right and wrong; 
justly or unjustly ; 
through thick and thin ; 
by every means 

A very intense disposition 



Latin Section. 



103 



Periculosae plenum opus 

aleae 

Periculum in mora 
Periissem ni per iissem 

Perimus licitis 
Per incuriam 

Per mare per terras 
Permitte divis caetera 

Per multum risum poteris 
cognoscere stultum 

Per saltum 
Per se 
Persona ingrata 

Persia atque obdura 
Per vias rectas 
Pervigilium 

Pessimum genus inimi- 

corum laudantes 
Petitio principii 

Pia fraus 



Pila est mea 
Piscem natare doces 



A work full of dangerous 

hazard 

Danger in delay 
I should have died if I had 

not succeeded (lit. gone 

through with it) 
We perish by what is 

lawful 
Through heedlessness, or 

negligence 

Through sea and land 
Leave the rest to the gods 

By his much laughter, you 
will be able to recognise 
a fool. The loud laugh 
speaks the vacant mind 

By a leap or jump 

By itself 

An objectionable person ; 

a person disliked (by 

some one) 

Hold hard ; never say die 
By straight roads 
Watching all night 

Flatterers are the worst 
kind of enemies 

Begging the question ; the 
logical fallacy of assum- 
ingwhat has to be proved 

A pious fraud ; fraud com- 
mitted for a good object ; 
a justifiable injustice 

My ball ! I've won 

You teach a fish to swim. 
To carry coals to New- 
castle 



104 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Pisces 
Placebo 
Placet 
Plebs 

Pleno jure 
Plenum 

Plerunique gratae divitibus 

vices 
Plexus 



Ploratur lacrimis amissa 

pecunia veris 
Plura faciunt homines e 

consuetudine, quam e 

ratione 
Plures crapula quam gla- 

dius 
Plus 
Plus dolet quam necesse 

est, qui ante dolet quam 

necesse est 
Plus ratio quam vis caeca 

valere solet 

Plus salis quam sumptus 

Plus vident oculi quam 

oculus 
Poeta nascitur, non fit 

Polliceri montes auri 



The Fishes (one of the signs 
of the Zodiac) 

" I will please ; " blarney ; 
soft sawder 

" It pleases ; " decree ; or- 
dinance ; official order 

The common people ; the 
plebeians 

With full authority 

" Full " ; substance ; ma- 
terial ; substantiality 

Changes are generally 
agreeable to the wealthy 

Net-work; interwoven 
threads ; a system of 
meshes 

The loss of money is 
lamented with real tears 

Men do more actions from 
habit than on reflection 

The belly (gluttony) kills 
more than the sword 

More 

He grieves more than is 
needful, who grieves be- 
fore it is needful 

Common sense can usually 
effect more than blind 
force 

More relish than cost 

Two eyes see better than 

one 
The poet is born, not 

made 
To make extravagant 

promises 



Latin Section. 



105 



Pons asinorum 



Porro unum est necessa- 

rium 
Posse comitatus 



Posse videor 

Possunt quia posse videntur 



Post 

Post bellum auxilium 

Postea 

Post factum nullum con- 
silium 

Post hoc, ergo propter hoc 



Post meridiem (P.M.) 

Post mortem 

Post nubila Phoebus 



Post obit 

Post prcelia praemia 



The asses' bridge ; applied 
to the fifth proposition 
in Euclid 

One thing further is neces- 
sary 

The power of the county. 
A posse of police is a body 
of police 

I appear to be able ; I 
think I can 

They are able because they 
seem to be able ; they 
can because they think 
they can 

After 

Aid after the war ; help 
offered too late 

Afterwards 

Advice comes too late when 
a thing is done 

After this, therefore in con- 
sequence of this ; the 
logical fallacy of treating 
a subsequent event as 
undoubtedly a result of a 
preceding one, although 
of course it is not neces- 
sarily so 

After noon 

After death 

After clouds, the sun ; 
after adversity, pros- 
perity. It is a long lane 
that has no turning 

A bond payable after death 

After battles (come) re- 
wards 



106 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Postremo 

Post scriptum (P.S.) 

Post tenebras lux 

Post tot naufragia portum 

Postulatum (pi. Postulata) 

Potentissimus est qui se 
habet in potestate 

Praecognita 

Praemonitus prsemunitus 
Praemunire 



Praescriptum 
Praenomen 

Praepropera consilia raro 

sunt prospera 
Praesertim 
Praeteriti anni 

Primae viae 
Prima facie 

Primo 



Lastly ; in short 

Written afterwards 

After darkness light. "Joy 

cometh in the morning " 
After so many shipwrecks 

(we reach) a harbour 

A demand ; an assumption 
required for an argument 

He is most powerful who 
has himself in his own 
power 

Things previously known 

Forewarned, forearmed 

A writ issued against cer- 
tain offenders, who are 
thus placed outside the 
protection of the law, 
and are liable to for- 
feiture of goods and to 
imprisonment. The name 
is taken from the first 
words, pramoneri or 
pramuniri facias : " Cause 
A. B. to be forwarned 
that he appear, &c." 

A thing prescribed 

A Christian name 

Over-hasty counsels sel- 
dom prosper 
Especially 

Years past and gone ; by- 
gone days 
The first passages 

At first sight ; on a first 
view, or consideration 

In the first place 



Latin Section. 



107 



Primum mobile 



Primus inter omnes 
Primus inter pares 
Princeps obsoniorum 
Principia 
Principiis obsta 
Principia, non homines 
Principiis obsta 

Priusquam incipias con- 
sulito.et ubi consuliueris, 
mature facto opus est 

Private consensu 
Pro aris et focis 
Probatum est 
Probitas laudatur et alget 

Probitas verus honor 
Pro bono publico 
Probum non poenitet 

Pro confesso 

Pro et con (for contra) 

Profanum vulgus 

Pro forma 

Pro hac vice 

Proh pudor 



The first impulse. Strictly, 
the first movable sphere, 
supposed to communi- 
cate motion to the other 
spheres 

The first among them all 

Chief among equals 

The prince of tit-bits 

First principles 

Resist beginnings 

Principles, not men 

Oppose the beginnings (of 
evil) 

Before you begin consider, 
and when you have well 
considered, then act with 
promptitude. Deliberate 
slowly, execute promptly 

By one's own consent 

For our altars and firesides 

It is proved 

Honesty is praissd and 
freezes (is left in cold 
neglect) 

Honesty is true honour 

For the public good 

The honest man does not 

repent 

As if conceded 
For and against 
The common people 
For the sake of form 
For this turn or occasion 
For shame 



io8 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Pro libertatepatriae 

Pro loco et tempore 
Prooemium 

Propaganda 



Pro patria 
Propositi tenax 
Propria persona 
Proprio motu 

Pro rata 

Pro rege, lege, et grege 

Pro re nata 
Pro tanto 

Pro tempore 
Proviso 
Proxime accessit 

Proximus ardet Ucalegon 



Proximus sed proximus 
longo intervailo 

Prudens futuri 
Publico consilio 



For the liberty of one's 
country 

For place and time 

Introduction, preface, pre- 
lude 

Short for the congregation 
de propaganda fide (for 
propagating or spreading 
the knowledge of the 
faith) 

For our country 

Firm of purpose 

One's own individuality 

On one's own motion ; of 

one's own accord 
In proportion 

For the king, the law, and 

the people 
For a special emergency, 

or business 

For so much ; to that ex- 
tent 

For the time being 
A condition, stipulation 

Honourable mention (lit. 
he came next) 

Ucalegon('s house), next 
door, is on fire. When 
thy neighbour's house is 
on fire, be careful of thine 
own (see Nam tua res, &>c.) 

Next, but next at a great 
distance ; a bad second 

Thoughtful of the future 
By public consent 



Latin Section, 



109 



Publicum bonum private 
est praeferendum 



Pugnis et calcibus 

Punica fides 

Qua ducitis adsum 

Quse amissa salva 

Quae fuerant vitia mores 

sunt 
Quaere 
Quaerenda pecunia pri- 

m um, virtus post 

mummos 
Quaistio fit de legibus, non 

de personis 

Quae supra nos nihil ad 

nos 
Qualis ab incepto 

Quamdiu se bene gesserit 
Quam multa injusta ac 
prava fiunt moribus 

Quam prope adcrimensine 
crimine 

Quam stepe forte temere 

eveniunt quas nonaudeas 

optare ! 
Quandoque bonus dormitat 

Homerus 
Ouando ullum inveniemus 

parem ? 



The public good is to be 
preferred to private ad- 
vantage ; privilege must 
yield to public interest 

With fists and heels ; with 
all one's might 

Punic (or Carthaginian) 
faith ; treachery 

Wherever you lead, I am 
with you 

What w r as lost is safe 

What used to be vices are 
now common manners 

Query ; search for 

Money must first be got, 
and after coins virtue 

The question refers to the 

laws, and not to persons 

(or parties) 
The things above us are 

nothing to us 

The same as from the be- 
ginning 

During his good behaviour 
How many injustices and 

wrongs are enacted 

through custom 
How near a man may 

approach to guilt without 

being guilty 
How often do things you 

dare not hope for happen 

by mere chance ! 
Sometimes the good Homer 

nods (goes to sleep) 
When shall we find his like 

again ? 



no Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Quantum 

Quantum est in rebus inane! 



Quantum libet 
Quantum meruit 
Quantum mutatus ab illo 

Quantum sufficit 
Quantum valeat 

Quaquaversum 

Quare ? 

Quare impedit ? 

Quasi 

Quern pcenitet peccasse 
pene est innocens 

Quern te Deus esse jussit 

Qui amicus est amat, qui 
amat non utique amicus 
est 

Qui capit ille facit 

Quicquid agunt homines 
nostri est farrago libelli 



Quicquid excessit modum 
pendet instabili loco 

Quicunque turpi fraude 
semel innotuit, etiamsi 
verum dicit, amittit fidem 



How much 

How much emptiness there 

is in the pursuits of man 

(in life). What trifles 

men pursue ! 
As much as you please 
As much as he deserved 
How changed from what 

he once was 
As much as is sufficient 
(To take a thing for) what 

it is worth 

In whatever direction 
Why ? for what reason ? 
W 7 hy does he stand in the 

way, or hinder ? 
As if ; in a manner 
He who is sorry for having 

done wrong is next to 

innocent 
What God commanded you 

to be 
He who is a friend loves, 

but he who loves is not 

necessarily a friend 
If the cap fits, put it on 
Whatever men do (all the 

interests of menjforms the 

miscellaneous matter of 

our (my) little book 
Whatever has exceeded its 

bounds is in a state of 

instability 
Whoever has once become 

known for an act of base 

deceit, even when he 

speaks the truth, loses 

the credit of it 



Latin Section. 



in 



Quid de quoque viro, et cui 
dicas, saepe caveto 

Qui derelinquunt legem, 
laudant improbos 

Quid leges sine moribus 
vanae proficiunt ? 

Quid nunc ? 



Qui docet, discit 
Quid pro quo 

Quidquid delirant reges 
plectuntur Achivi 

Quidquid multis peccatur 
inultum est 

Quidquid praecipies, esto 

brevis 
Quid rides ? 

Quid sit futurum eras, fuge 
quaerere 

Quid tantum insano juvat 
indulgere dolori ? 

Quid turpius est quam 

illudi ? 
Quid verum atque decens 

Quieta non inovere 
Quietus 



Take watchful care what 
you say about any man, 
and to whom you say it 

They that forsake the law, 
praise the wicked 

Where is the good of laws 
in the absence of morals ? 

"What now?" One curious 
to know everything is a 
quidnunc 

He who teaches others, 
learns himself 

Tit for tat ; a mutual con- 
sideration 

Whatever mad thing their 
kings may do, the Greeks 
suffer for it 

The guilt that is committed 
by many passes un- 
punished 

When you lay down a rule, 
be short 

Why do you laugh ? 

Avoid inquiring what is 
going to happen to- 
morrow 

What does it avail you to 
give v/ay so much to un- 
reasonable grief? 

What is more shameful 
than to be made a fool of ? 

What is true and honour- 
able 

To let sleeping dogs lie 

Calm, at rest ; hence the 
condition of being settled 
or at rest (lit. " quiet ") 



ii2 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Qui facit per alium facit 
per se 



Oui invidet minor est 
Qui male agit odit lucem 

Qui nescit dissimulare 
nescit vivere 

Qui non est hodie eras minus 
aptus erit 

Qui non libere veritatem 
pronunciat, proditor est 
veritatis 

Qui non proficit, deficit 

Qui non vetat peccare cum 
possit, jubet 

Qui non vult fieri desidiosus, 
amet 

Quinquennium 
Quiproquo 

Quis consistat coram invi- 

dentia ? 
Quis custodiet ipsos cus- 

todes ? 

Qui sentit commodum, 
sentire debet et onus 

Quis fallere possit aman- 

tem ? 



What a man does through 
another, he does through 
himself. He is respon- 
sible for his agent 

He who envies is the in- 
ferior 

He that does evil hates the 
light 

He who knows not how to 
dissemble knows not how 
to live 

He that is not fit to-day 
will be less fit to-morrow 

He who does not freely 
speak the truth is a traitor 
to the truth* 

He who does not advance, 
goes backwards 

He that does not forbid 
wrongdoing, when it is 
in his power, orders it 

Let him who does not wish 
to become indolent fall 
in love 

A period of five years 

A quibble, pun, conun- 
drum 

Who can stand in the pre- 
sence of envy ? 

Who shall guard the guards 
themselves ? 

He who feels the ad vantage 
ought to feel the burden 
as well 

Who can deceive a lover ? 



Latin Section. 



Quis talia fando temperet 
a lacrimis ? 

Qui tarn ? 

Qui terret, plus ipse timet 

Qui timide rogat, docet 

negare 
Qui transtulit, sustinet 

Qui uti scit, ei bona 

Qui vult decipi decipiatur 

Quo? 
Quoad hoc 

Quo animo ? 

Quocunque modo 

Quod avertat Deus 

Quod decet honestum est, 

et quod honestum est 

decet 
Quod erat demonstrandum 

(Q.E.D.) 
Quod erat faciendum 

(Q.E.F.) 
Quod est violentum, non 

est durabile 

Quodlibet 
Quod potui perfeci 
Quod sors feret, feremus 
aequo animo 

Quod vide (Q.V.) 



Who can restrain himself 
from tears in relating 
such things ? 

Who as well ? 

He who awes others, is 
more in fear himself 

He who asks timidly 
teaches a refusal 

He who brought us hither 
still preserves us 

Good things to him who 
knows how to use them 

Let him that wishes to be 
deceived be deceived 

Whither ? 

As regards this particular 
matter 

With what mind or inten- 
tion ? 

In whatsoever manner 

Which may God avert 

What is becoming is 
honourable, and what is 
honourable is becoming 

Which was to be proved 

Which was to be done 

What is violent is not last- 
ing. Extremes seldom 
last long 

Any thing whatever 

I did what I could 

Whatever chance shall 
bring, we shall bear with 
a calm and firm mind 

Which see 

H 



ii4 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Quo fata vocant 

Quo jure ? 

Quo me cunque vocat 

patria 
Quondam 
Quondam vicimus hisarmis 

Quo pacto ? 
Quorum 



Quorum pars fui 

Quorum pars magna fui 
Quos Deus vult perdere 
prius dementat 

Quota 

Quot homines, tot sententiae 

Quotidie 

Quot servi, tot hostes 

Quo warranto? 
Radix 
Kara avis 

Kara fides probitasque viris 
qui castra sequuntur 

Rari nantes 

Ratio et consilium propriae 
ducis artes 

Rationale 



Whither destiny calls me 
By what right ? 
Wherever my country 

calls me 

Formerly ; former (adj.) 
We were once victorious 

with these arms 
How ? By what means ? 
" Of whom." A sufficient 

number to form a legal 

meeting 
Of which, or whom, I was 

a part 

In which I bore a great part 
Those whom God wishes to 

destroy He first deprives 

of their senses 
Share, proportion 
So many men, so many 

minds 

Daily ; from day to day 
So many servants, so many 

enemies 

By what authority ? 
A root 

A rare bird ; a prodigy 
Good faith and probity are 

rare among such as follow 

camps 
Swimmingone here another 

there 
Reason and deliberation 

are the proper qualities 

of a general 
A statement of reasons ; 

an exposition of the 

principles of a subject 



Latin Section. 



Recipe 

Recte et suaviter 
Rectus in curia 

Redire cum perit nescit 

pudor 
Redivivus 

Redolet lucerna 
Reductio ad absurdum 
Regalia 

Regina 

Regium donum 
Re infecta 

Rem acu tetigisti 

Renascentur 
Renovate nomine 
Repente 
Requiem 

Rsquiescat in pace (R.I. P.) 

Rerum primordia 
Res angusta domi 

Res est sacra miser 

Res est soliciiti plena timoris 

amor 
Residuum 



Receive. (The items of 

the prescription follow) 
Justly and mildly 
Upright in the court 

Tne sense of shame once 
lost, is gone for ever 

Restored to life ; resusci- 
tated 

It smells of the lamp ; it is 
a laboured production 

Reducing an argument to 
an absurdity 

Badges, marks, or ensigns 
of royalty 

A queen 

A royal gift 

Without accomplishing 
one's object 

You have touched the 
thing exactly (lit. with a 
needle) 

They will rise again 

By a revived name 

Suddenly 

A hymn entreating rest 

for the dead 
May he (or she) rest in 

peace 
The first elements of things 

Narrow circumstances at 

home 
A person in distress is a 

sacred object 
Love is a constant source 

of fear and anxiety 
The residue ; the dregs 



n6 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Res judicata 

Respice finem 

Responsio mollis avertit 

excandescentiam 
Res publica 
Resurgam 
Retinens vestigia famae 

Revera 
Revocare gradum 

Rex 

Ride et sapis 

Ridentem dicere verum quid 
vetat ? 



Ride, si sapis 
Risum teneatis ? 
Rostra 

Ruat ccelum 

Rudis indigestaque moles 

Rus in urbe 

Rusticus exspectat dum 
defluat amnis ; ' at ille 
labitur, et labetur in 
omne volubilis aevum 



Saepe intereunt aliis medi- 
tantes necem 



A decided case, a case or 
point on which judgment 
has been pronounced 

Look to the end 

A soft answer turncth 
away wrath 

The commonwealth 

I shall rise again 

Maintaining the traces of 
fame 

In truth 

To recall (retrace) one's 
steps 

A king 

Laugh and be wise 

What hinders one from 
laughing and speaking 
the truth ? One may 
speak truth without pull- 
ing a long face 

Laugh, if you are wise 

Can you forbear to laugh ? 

A raised platform to speak 

from ; tribune 
Though the heavens fall (let 

justice be done) 
A rough and chaotic mass 
The country in town 
The peasant (according to 
the fable) waits till the 
river flow past ; but it 
glides on, and will glide 
on rolling for ever and 
ever 

Those who set the trap for 
others often fall into it 
themselves 



Latin Section. 



117 



Saepe stilum vertas, iterum 
quae digna legi sint 
scripturus 



Saevis inter se convenit 

ursis 
Sagittarius 

Sal Atticum 

Salus populi suprema est 

lex 

Salve ! 
Salvo jure 
Salvo pudore 
Sanatorium 
Sancte et sapienter 
Sanctum 

Sanctum sanctorum 
Sanitas sanitatum, omnia 
sanitas 



Sapere aude 

Sapiens dominabitur astris 

Sapiens ipse fingit fortunam 

sibi 
Sapientiam ac eruditionem 

stulti spernunt 
Sapientia prima est stul- 

titia caruisse 
Sartor resartus 
Satagit rertim suarum 



Frequently turn the stilus 
(re-write your compo- 
sitions again and again), 
if you propose to write 
anything worth reading 
twice 

Even savage bears agree 
among themselves 

The Archer (one of the 
signs of the Zodiac) 

Attic salt ; wit 

The welfare of the people 
is the highest law 

Hail ! Welcome ! 

Saving the right 

Without offence to modesty 

A convalescent institution 

Religiously and wisely 

A holy (place); a private 
cabinet 

Holy of holies 

Lit., Health of healths, all 
is health. (After "vanity 
of vanities, all is vani- 
ty.") The chief concern 
is health 

Dare to be wise 

The wise man will govern 
the stars 

The wise man fashions his 
fortune for himself 

Fools despise wisdom and 
instruction 

The first step to wisdom is 
to be free from folly 

The tailor mended 

He has enough to do with 
his own affairs 



n8 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Sat habeo 

Sat cito, si sat bene 

Satis accipere 

Satis eloquentiae, sapientia: 

parum 
Satis, superque 

Satis verborum 
Saturno rege 

Scandalum magnatum 

(Scan. Mag.) 
Scelere velandum est scelus 

Scholium 

Scienter 

Scilicet 

Scintilla 

Scio cui credidi 

Scire facias 

Scire quid valeant humeri, 
quid ferre recusent 



Scire tuum nihil est, nisi 
te scire hoc sciat alter 

Scoriae 
Scorpio 

Scribendi recte sapere est 
principium et fons 



I have enough ; I am con- 
tent 
Soon enough if but well 

enough 

To take security, or bail 
Sufficient eloquence, but 

little wisdom 
Enough, and more than 

enough 
Enough of words ; you 

need say no more 
In the reign of Saturn ; in 

the golden age 
Scandal or slander of great 

personages 
One crime is to be concealed 

by another 
Annotation ; gloss 
Knowingly 

That is to say ; to \vit 
A spark 

I know whom I have trusted 
"Cause it to be known"; 

a writ 
To know how strong the 

shoulders are and what 

they refuse to carry. To 

know one's strength and 

one's weakness 
Your knowledge is nothing 

(useless) unless others 

know that you possess it 
Ashes 
The Scorpion (one of the 

signs of the Zodiac) 
The first principle and 

source of good writing is 

to think justly 



Latin Section. 



119 



Scribimus indocti, doctique 

Secundum ajtem 
Secundum formam statuti 



Segnius irritant animum 
demissa per aures, quam 
quae sunt oculis subjecta 
fidelibus 

Semel et simul 

Semel insanivimus omnes 

Semper avarus eget 

Semper felix 

Semper fidelis 

Semper idem (fern, eadem) 

Semper paratus 

Semper vivit in armis 

Senatus consultum 

Sensorium 

Separatio a mensa et toro 

Septum 

Sequela 

Sequiturque patrem non 

passibus aequis 
Sequor non inferior 
Sera in fundo parcimonia 



Learned and unlearned 

we all write 
According to art 

According to the form of 
the statute 

According to nature 

In self defence 

Those things looked upon 
by trustworthy eyes more 
duly impress the mind 
than those which are 
merely heard by the ears 

At once and together 

We have all once been mad 

The miser is ever in want 

Always happy 

Always faithful 

Always the same 

Always ready 

He ever lives in arms 

A decree of the (Roman) 
Senate 

Seat of sense or thought ; 
the brain 

Separation from bed and 
board 

An inclosure ; fold ; barrier ; 
fence 

A consequence or result 

He follows his father, but 

not \vith equal paces 
I follow, but am not inferior 

Economy is useless when 
all is spent. To lock the 
door after the horse is 
stolen 



120 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Sera nunquam est ad bonos 

mores via 
Seriatim 
Sero sapiunt Phryges 



Sero, sed serie 

Sero venientibus ossa 



Serum est cavendi tempus 

in mediis malis 
Servabo fidem 
Servare modum 
Sesqui (in compounds) 

Sesquipedalia verba 

Sic 

Sic itur ad astra 

Sic jubeo 

Sic passim 

Sic totidem verbis 

Sic transit gloria mundi 

Sicut ante 

Sic utere tuo ut alienum non 
laedas 



Sic volo, sic jubeo 
Sic vos non vobis 



The way to good manners 

is never too late 
In regular order 
The Phrygians are wise too 

late. A day after the 

feast (or the fair) 
Late, but seriously 
The bones for those who 

come late^ First come 

best served 
Caution time is over when 

one is in the midst of evils 
I will keep faith 
To keep within bounds 
Once and a half; more by 

half; one half more 
Words a foot and a half 

long 
So, thus 

Such is the way to immor- 
tality (lit. to the stars) 
So I order 
So everywhere 
So in as many words 
So passes away the glory 

of the world 
As before 
Exercise your rights in 

such a manner as not to 

injure another man's 

rights 

So I wish, so I command 
Thus you (do) not (labour) 

for yourselves. Applied 

when one person does 

the work and another 

reaps the fruits 



Latin Section. 



121 



Si Deus nobiscum quis 

contra nos ? 
Si fortuna juvat 
Silent leges inter arma 

Si leonina pellis rfon satis 
est, assuenda vulpina 



Similia similibus curantur 
Similis simili gaudet 

Simplex munditiis 

Sine Cerere etLibero friget 
Venus 

Sine cura 
Sine die 

Sine dubio 

Sine ictu 

Sine invidia 

Sine joco 

Sine odio 

Sine omni periculo 

Sine qua non 



Sinus 

Si quaeris monumentum, 

circumspice 
Siste viator 
Sit sine labe decus 



If God (be) with us, who 

(shall be) against us ? 
If fortune favours 

The laws are silent in the 
midst of arms 

If the lion's skin is not 
enough, sew the fox's to 
it. Supplement strength 
(force) by address (cun- 
ning, astuteness) 

Like is cured by like 

Like delights in like. 

Birds of a feather 
Simple in (thy) elegance 
When poverty comes in at 

the door, love flies out 

at the window 
Without charge or care 

Without a day appointed 
(for further consideration, 
or for next meeting) 

Without doubt 

Without a blow 

Without envy 

Without jesting ; seriously 

Without hatred 

Without any danger 

An indispensable condi- 
tion ; lit. without which 
(the agreement can) not 
(be concluded) 

A bosom ; gulf or bay 

If you seek my monument 
look around 

Stop, traveller 

Let honour be stainless 



122 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Sit tibi terra levis 
Si vales, bene est 
Si vivere perseverarent 

Sola juvat virtus 
Sola nobilitas virtus 
Solvitur ambulando 
Spargere voces in vulgum 
ambiguas 

Sparsim 
Spectemur agendo 

Sperat infestis 

Spero meliora 

Spes gregis 

Spes mea Christus 

Spes protracta aegrum 

efficit animum 
Spes tutissima coslis 

Spicilegium 
Spiculum 
Spolia opima 



Sponte sua 

Spretas injuria formae 

Stans pede in uno 

Stare super vias antiquas 

Stat magni nominis umbra 



May the earth lie lightly on 

thee 
If you are in good health, 

it is well 
If they were to persist in 

living 

Virtue alone assists me 
Virtue alone is true nobility 
Doubt is resolved by action 
To scatter among the 

people words bearing a 

double meaning 
(Scattered) here and there 
Let us be known by our 

actions 

He hopes in adversity 
I hope for better things 
The hope of the flock 
Christ is my hope 
Hope deferred maketh the 

heart sick 
The safest hope is in 

Heaven 

A selection ; an anthology 
A spike ; spine ; needle 

The choicest spoils (won by 
one commander from the 
other in single combat) 
Unsolicited ; of one's own 

accord 
The offence of despising 

(her) beauty 
Standing on one foot 
To stand to the old paths 
He stands the shadow of a 
mighty name 



Latin Section. 



123 



Stat pro ratione voluntas 

Statu quo 

Status 

Status quo ante bellum 

Stet 

Stet pro ratione voluntas 

Stillicidium 

Stimulus 

Stratum super stratum 

Striae 



Stultum est timere quod 
vitare non potes 

Stultusspernit eruditionem 

patris sui 
Stylo inverse 

Sua cuique voluptas 

Suae quisque fortunes faber 

Suaviter in modo, fortiter 

in re 

Sub armis esse 
Sub cruce veritas 
Sub dio 
Sub hoc signo vinces 

Subito 
Sub Jove 
Sub judice 



Will stands for reason 
As things were before 

Condition; standing (soci- 
ally or otherwise) 

The position existing be- 
fore the war 

Let it stand 

Let my will stand for a 
reason 

A dripping ; drizzle 

A spur ; goad ; incitement 

Layer above layer 

Furrows or small channels, 
especially on boulders, 
columns, &c. 

It is foolish to dread that 
which you cannot avoid 

A fool despises his father's 

instruction 
With the wrong end of the 

stylus (or pen) 
Every man has his own 

pleasures 
Every man is the maker of 

his own fortune 
Gentle in manner, but 

resolute in deed 
To be in arms 
Truth under oppression 
Under the open sky 

Under this sign thou shalt 

conquer 
Suddenly 

Under the open sky 
Under consideration 



124 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Sublatum ex oculis quaeri- 
mus 

Sub poena 
Sub rosa 
Sub silentio 
Substratum 

Subsultim 
Succedaneum 
Suggestio falsi 



Sui generis 
Suis stat viribus 

Summum bonum 
SummumjuSjSummainjuria 

Sunt lacrimae rerum, et 
mentem mortaliatangunt 



Suo gladio jugulari 

Suo marte 
Suo motu 
Supersedeas 

Super visum corporis 

Supplicationes eloquitur 
pauper, dives autem 
Joquitur aspere 

Suppressio veri 



When the well is dry we 
begin to appreciate the 
value of water 

Under a penalty 

Under the rose ; secretly 

In silence 

What lies under an 
erection ; support 

By leaps or jumps 

A substitute 

The suggestion of wh.-ii is 
false ; putting forward as 
the fact what one knows 
to be untrue 

Of its own kind 

He stands by his own 

strength 
The greatest good 

The rigour of the law is the 
rigour of oppression 

There are circumstances 
that move to tears, and 
the woes of mortals 
touch the mind (heart) 

To be condemned out of 
one's own mouth ; foiled 
with one's own devices 

By one's own valour 

On one's own motion 

A writ to stay or set aside 
proceedings 

Upon a view of the body 

The poor use entreaties, 
but the rich speak 
roughly 

A suppression of the truth 



Latin Section. 



125 



Supra 
Surdo loqui 

Surgit amari aliquid 
Suspiria de profundis 
Suum cuique 
Suum cuique pulcrum 



Suus cuique mos 
Symposium 

Tabula rasa 

Taedium vita 

Tarn Marte quam Minerva 

Tangere ulcus 

Tantaene animis ccelesti- 

bus irae ? 

Tantas componere lites 
Tanti 
Tardus ad iram abundat 

intelligentia 
Te Deum 



Te judice 

Telum imbelle sine ictu 

Tempora mutantur, nos et 
mutarnur in illis 



Above 

To talk to a deaf man : to 
lose one's labour ; to 
urge a hopeless suit 
Something bitter rises 
Sighs from the depths 
Let each man have his own 

To every one his own (is) 

most beautiful. The 

crow thinks her own 

bird fairest 
Everyone has his particular 

habit 
A banquet ; feast ; usually 

of learned persons 
A blank tablet 
Weariness of life 
Possessed equally of 

courage and genius 
To touch the sore. To hit 

the nail on the head 
Does such anger dwell 

(rage) in heavenly minds? 
To settle so great a quarrel 
Of such importance 
He that is slow to anger is 

of great understanding 
Hymn of thanksgiving, 

beginning Te Deum lauda- 

mus (Thee, God, we 

praise) 
You being the judge 

A feeble weapon thrown 

without effect 
The times change and we 

change with them 



126 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Tempus edax rerum 

Tempus fugit 
Tempus in ultimum 
Tempus omnia revelat 
Tenax propositi 
Teres atque rotundus 

Terminus 
Terrae filius 

Terra es, terram ibis 

Terra firma 
Terra incognita 
Tertium quid 
Timeo Danaos et dona 

ferentes 

Timet pudorem 
Timor Domini fons vitae 

Toga 

Toga virilis 

Tot homines, quot sententia? 

Totidem verbis 
Toties quoties 
Totis viribus 
Toto ccelo 

Totum 

Totum in eo est 

Totus mundus agit histrio- 

nem 
Totus teres atque rotundus 



Time the devourer of all 

things 
Time flies 

To the last extremity 
Time reveals all things 
Tenacious of his purpose 
Polished (smooth) and 

round. Round as a ball 
The end 
A son of the soil ; a man 

of mean birth 
Dust thou art, to dust thou 

shalt return 

Solid earth ; a firm footing 
An unknown land 
A third something 
I fear the Greeks, even 

when they offer presents 
He fears shame 
The fear of the Lord is the 

fountain of life 
The Roman civil dress 
The gown of manhood 
So many men, so many 

minds 

In just so many words 
As often as 
With all his might 
By the whole heavens ; 

diametrically opposed 
The whole 
All depends on this 
All the world's a stage 

Complete, smooth, and 
round 



Latin Section. 



127 



Traditus non victus 
Transeat in exemplum 

Tria juncta in uno 
Triumpho morte tarn vita 
Tros Tyriusque mihi nullo 
discrimine agetur 

Truditur dies die 

Tuebor 

Tu ne cede malis 

Tu quoque 



Tutor et ultor 

Tuum est 

Uberrima fides 

Ubi jus incertum, ibi jus 

nullum 
Ubi libertas, ibi patria 

Ubi mel, ibi apes 

Ubique 

Ubi solitudinem faciunt 
pacem appellant 



Ubi supra 
Ultima ratio 



Betrayed, not conquered 

May it pass into an ex- 
ample 

Three joined in one 

I triumph in death as in life 

Trojan and Tyrian shall 
be treated by me with no 
difference 

One day is pressed on- 
ward by another 

I will defend 

Do not you yield to mis- 
fortunes 

You, too. " You're an- 
other." A tu quoque is a 
retort, implying that the 
case of the opposite 
party is no better than 
its rival's; each being 
guilty of the same mis- 
doings 

Protector and avenger 

It is your own 

Implicit reliance 

Uncertainty destroys law 

Where liberty dwells, there 
is my country 

Where there is honey, there 
are bees 

Everywhere 

Where they (military 
monarchs) make a soli- 
tude (by killing all the 
people), they call it peace 

Where above mentioned 

The final reason or argu- 
ment 



128 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ultima ratio regum 
Ultima Thule 

Ultimatum 
Ultimo (ult.) 
Ultimus regum 
Ultra 
Ultra vires 

Umbilicus 
Una voce 

Unguibus et rostro 

Unguis in ulcere 
Uno animo 

Uno avulso, non deficit 
alter 



Unum et commune pericu- 
lum, una salus ambobus 
erit 

Urbem lateritiam invenit, 
marmoream reliquit 



Urbi et Orbi 

Usque ad aras 
Usque ad nauseam 
Usus loquendi 
Usus promptum reddit 



The last reasoning of 
kings ; military force 

Most distant Thule ; the 
furthest land or limit 

The last proposal 

The preceding month 

The last of the kings 

Beyond ; extreme 

Beyond, in excess of (one's 
legal) powers 

The navel; middle; centre 

With one voice ; unani- 
mously 

With claws and beak. 
With all one's force 

A claw in the wound 

With one mind ; unani- 
mously 

On the removal of one, 
another is not wanting. 
II n'y a d'homme neces- 
saire. There is no one so 
important but the world 
can go on without him 

There shall be one common 
danger, one safety for 
both 

He (Augustus) found the 
city (Rome) a city of 
bricks, he left it a city of 
marble 

To the city (Rome) and to 
the world 

To the very altars 

Even to satiety, to disgust 

The (or a) usage of speech 

Practice makes perfect 



Latin Section. 



129 



T"t infra 

Uti possidetis 

1 "t prosim 

Ut quisqueest viroptimus, 
ita difficillime essc alios 
improbos suspicatur 

Utrum horum mavis accipe 

Ut supra 

Ut vidi, ut perii 

Vacuum 
Vade mecum 



Vae victis 

Vale 

Valeas ! 

Valeat quantum valere 

potest 

Valete ac plaudite 
Valvae 

Varise lectiones 
Variorunv^edition) 

m 

Varium et mutabile semper 

femina 
Vates sacer 
Vehimur in altum 
Velis et remis 

Velox consilium sequitur 

poenitentia 
Vel prece, vel pretio 



As below 

As you possess ; state of 

present possession 
That I may do good 
The better a man is, the 

less is he inclined to 

suspect others 
Take whichever you prefer ; 

choose your horn (of a 

dilemma) 

As above ; as above stated 
The moment I beheld, how 

was I lost ! 

Absolutely empty space 
"Go with me;" a book 

carried as a constant 

companion 

Woe to the vanquished 
Farewell 
Be off with you ! 
Let it pass for what it is 

worth 

Farewell and applaud 
A folding door ; valves 
Various readings 
An edition with the notes 

of various writers (cum 

notis variorum] 
A woman is ever change- 
able, ever capricious 
Sacred prophet, or poet 
We are borne on high 
With sails and oars ; by 

every possible means 
Hasty counsels are fol- 
lowed by repentance 
For either love or money 
i 



130 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Veluti in speculum 
Venalis populus, venalis 
curia patrum 

Vendidit hie auro patriam 

Venenum in auro bibitur 
Yenienti occurrite morbo 



Venire facias 

Veniunt a dote sajrittae 



Veni, vidi, vici 
Ventis remis 

Ventis secundis 

Ventis verba profundere 

Vento et fluctibus loqui 

Vento vivere 

Verba facit pedibus suis 

Verbatim 

Verbatim et literatim 

Verbum sat sapienti 

Vere prius volucres taceant, 
aestate cicadse 



Yeritas nihil veretur nisi 
abscondi 



As in a mirror 

The people is venal, the 

senate is venal. Every 

man has his price 
This man sold his country 

for gold 

Poison is drunk out of gold 
Meet an approaching 

disease ; combat it on 

the first symptoms 
The writ for summoning a 

jury 
The darts come from her 

dowry ; her money is her 

chief attraction 
I came, I saw, I conquered 
With all one's might (lit. 

with wind arid oars) 
With prosperous winds 
To pour forth words to the 

winds ; to speak to deaf 

ears 
To speak to the wind and 

the waves ; to waste one's 

words 

To live upon wind 
He speaks with his feet 
Word for word ; literally 
\Vord for word, and letter 

for letter 
A word is enough for u 

wise man 
Sooner can^birds be silent 

in spring, and the crickets 

in summer ; an extreme 

improbability 
Truth fears nothing but 

concealment 



Latin Section. 



Yeritas odium parit 
Veritatis simplex oratio est 

Ver non semper viret 

Versus 

Verus et fidelis semper 

Vestigia 

Vestigia nulla retrorsum 



Vetustas pro lege semper 

habetur 
Vexata quaestio 

Via 

Via media 

Viaticum 



Via trita, via tuta 

Vice 
Vice versa 

Victrix fortunae sapientia 

Vide 

Vide et crede 

Videlicet (viz.) 

Video meliora proboque, 
deteriora seqnor 



Truth begets hatred 

The language of truth is 

simple 
Spring does not always 

flourish 
Against 

Always true and loyal 
Footsteps, traces 
There are no backward 

footsteps. " He has 

burned his bridges " 
Ancient custom is always 

reckoned as a law 
A vexed question ; a moot 

point 

By the way of 
A middle course 
Provision for the (last) 

journey ; the Eucharist. 

when administered to the 

sick, or to persons unable 

to go to church 
The beaten path is the safe 

path 
In the place of 

The terms being ex- 
changed ; the reverse 
Wisdom conquers fortune 
See 

See and believe 
Namely 

I see and approve of the 
better things, I follow 
the worse. I know the 
right, and yet the wrong 
pursue 



132 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Vide ut supra 

Vi et armis 

Vigilate 

Vincam aut moriar 

Vincere aut mori 

Vincit amor patriae 

Vincit, qui se vincit 

Vincit veritas 
Vinctus invictus 
Vinculum matrimonii 
Vires acquirit eundo 

Virgo 

Viri infelicis procul amici 
Vir sapit qui pauca loquitur 
Virtus ariete fortior 

Virtus est vitium fugere 
Virtus in actione consistit 
Virtus in arduis 
Virtus incendit vires 
Virtus invidiae scopus 
Virtus non stemma 
Virtus probata florescit 
Virtus semper viridis 

Virtus sub cruce crescit, ad 
aethera tendens 

Virtute mea me involve 



See what is stated above 
By force of arms 
Be watchful 
I will conquer or die 
To conquer or to die 
Love of country prevails 
He conquers who over- 
comes himself 
Truth conquers 
Chained but not conquered 
The bond of marriage 
She acquires strength in 

her progress 
The Maiden (one of the 

signs of the Zodiac) 
Friends keep at a distance 
from an unfortunate man 
The man is wise who talks 

little 
Virtue is stronger than a 

battering ram 
It is virtue to shun vice 
Virtue consists in action 
Virtue in difficulties 
Virtue kindles the strength 
Virtue is the mark of envy 
Virtue, not pedigree 
Virtue flourishes in trial 

Virtue is always green 

(fresh, blooming) 
Virtue increases under the 

cross and strives towards 

heaven 
I wrap myself up in my 

virtue (integrity) 



Latin Section. 



Virtute non viris 

Virtute officii 

Virtuti nihil obstat et arm is 

Virtutis amore 
Virum volitare per ora 



Virus 

Vis a tergo 

Vis comica 

Vis inertias 

Vis poetica 

Vis preservatrix 

Vis unita fortior 

Vis vita? 

Vita brevis, ars longa 

Vitam impendere vero 

Vitam regit fortuna, non 

sapientia 
Vitanda est improba siren, 

Desidia 
Vitiis nemo sine nascitur \ 

Vivat regina 
Vivat respublica 
Vivat rex 
Viva voce 
Vive memor leti 
Vive, vale 
Vivida vis animi 



From virtue not from men 
By virtue of office 

Nothing can oppose virtue 

and courage 
By the love of virtue 

To flit through the mouths 
of men ; to pass from 
lip to lip ; to spread 
like wild-fire 

Poisonous infectious mat- 
ter 

A propelling force from 
behind 

Comic power, or talent 

The power of inertness 

Poetic genius 

A preserving power 

Union is strength 

The vigour of life 

Life is short and art is long 

To stake one's life for the 
truth 

It is fortune that governs 
human life, not wisdom 

The wicked siren, Sloth, is 
to be shunned 

No man is born without 
his faults 

Long live the queen 

Long live the republic 

Long live the king 

By the living voice ; orally 

Live mindful of death 

Farewell and be happy 

The living force of the mind 



134 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 

Vivit post funera virtus 
Vix decimus quisque est 
Vixere fortes ante Aga- 

memnona 
Volenti non fit injuria 



Volo, non valeo 
Vota vita mea 
Vox et praeterea nihil 
Vox faucibus haesit 

Vox populi, vox Dei 

Vulgo 

Vulneratus, non victus 

Vulnus immedicabile 
Vultus est index animi 

Zephyrus 
Zonam perdidit 
Zonam solvere 



Virtue survives the grave 
There is scarce one in ten 
There lived brave men 
before Agamemnon 

No injustice is done to 
a person by an act to 
which he consents 

I am willing, but unable 

My life is devoted 

A voice and nothing more 

The voice stuck in the 
throat 

The voice of the people is 
the voice of God 

Commonly 

Wounded, but not con- 
quered 

An irreparable injury ; an 
incurable wound 

The face is the index of 
the mind 

A gentle wind ; a zephyr 

He has lost his purse 

To loose the virgin zone 
(belt, worn by girls, and 
laid aside on marriage) ; 
to marry (a woman) 



GREEK SECTION. 



(Hades) 



(Athumia) 



TOV KaXXovs KO.I a/DT7?<; 
(Aidos tou kallous kai 
aretes polis) 

Atet /coXotos Trpos KoXoiov travel 
(Aiei koloios pros koloion 
hizanei) 

Atretre, /cat SoOrjcrerai V/JLIV (Ai- 
teite, kai dothesetai humin) 
Auav (^Eon) 
(Acme) 

(x\cropolis) 

AXAwv larpos, auros eAKecri 
flpvuv (Allon iatros, autos 
helkesi bruon) 

a Kai fl/xeya (Alpha and 
Omega) 



(Ambrosia) 



(Among the ancients), the 

abode of the dead, the 

world of spirits 
Despondency; exhaustion of 

the heart 
Modesty is the citadel of 

beauty and virtue 

A jackdaw always sits beside 
a jackdaw. Birds of a 
feather 

Ask, and it shall be given you 

An age ; a long period of time 

The highest point ; the crisis 

A citadel 

The physician of others, thou 
thyself art full of ulcers. 
(Lat. Aliorum m#ltats t &c.) 
Physician, heal thyself. 

The first and the last (letters 
of the Greek alphabet); the 
beginning and the end 

The food of the gods (con- 
ferring immortality) ; any- 
thing pleasing to the taste 
or smell 



136 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



A/A</>OTpOt KAwTTES, KO.I 6 Sea- 

P.IVOS Kai 6 K\e\]/a<s (Ampho- 
teroi klopes, kai ho dexa- 
menos kai ho klepsas) 

AvayK^s orSev icr^rei irAeov 
(Anangkes ouden ischuei 
pleon) 

Ava0<rp,a (Anathema) 



t avSpcov Aya/xeju.vo>j/ (An ax 
andron Agamemnon) 

AvOpu>Tro<s com 7rvevp.a Kai crKia 
fj-ovov (Anthropos esti pneu- 
ma kai skia monon) 

Aia rj KVWV TOV ^Spw/Aaro? ( Axia 
he kuon tou bromatos) 

A^iw/xttra (Axiomata) 
(Apotheosis) 



(Apollyon) 
ATT oi>pa? TTJV ey^eAw X ts 
(Ap* ouras ten engchelun 
echeis) 



(Apophysis) 



Apeo7rayo9 (Areopagus) 



/xerpov (Ariston me- 
tron) 
Apto-rov vSwp (Ariston hudor) 



Both are thieves, the receiver 
and the thief. No receiver, 
no thief 

There is no virtue like neces- 
sity 

A solemn curse ; an accursed 
thing 

Agamemnon, king of men 

Man is but a breath and a 
shadow 

The dog is worth his food. It 

is an iU dog that deserves 

not a crust 
Admitted propositions, axioms; 

general maxims 
Deification ; the placing of a 

distinguished person among 

the (heathen) deities 
Lit. the Destroyer ; Beelzebub 
You have (hold) the eel by 

the tail. You have to do 

with an active and slippery 

customer 
The process of a bone ; the 

prominence to which a 

tendon is attached 
A famous court of justice held 

on Mars' (Ares') Hill, at 

Athens 
Moderation (a middle course) 

is best 
The best (or first) of things is 

water 



Greek Section, 



P.OL (Arkei moi) 

rj/jLicrv ai TO? (Arche 
hemisu pantos) 

ArXas (Atlas) 



Av-ofj.a.Tov (Automaton) 
AvToi/o/Mia (Autonomia) 
Ba(9cs (Bathos) 



BaA/V es Krpa/cas (Ball' CS 
korakas) 

Bacris (Basis) 

Be/JaTrTioytevos (Uebaptisme- 
nos) 

Bopeas (Boreas) 

o^Sov (Boustrophe- 
don) 



axaipo?, Seivov KOLKOV 
(Gelos akairos, deinon 
kakon) 

r^pacrKw aiet TTO\/ a 8iSa(r/co/X- 
fos (Gerasko aiei polla 
didaskomenos") 

JYojtfi Kaipov (Gnothi kairon) 



It suffices me ; I am content 
The beginning is the half of 

the whole. Well begun is 

half done 

A giant who was fabled by the 
Greeks to have borne the 
earth on his shoulders, as a 
punishment for attempting 
to storm heaven ; a collec- 
tion of maps 

A thing that is self-moved, as 
a clock, &c. 

Self-government ; being go- 
verned by one's own laws 

A sinking ; ludicrous descent 
from the elevated to the 
mean in speech or writing 

Away with you ! Be hanged ! 

Foundation; base 

Soaked (in wine). Lat. vino 
madidus 

The north wind ; the north 

Turning in writing, as oxen 
do in ploughing ; writing 
from left to right, and from 
right to left 

Mirth (laughter) out of season 
is a grievous ill 

I learn more and more as I 
grow old. Older and wiser. 
Live and learn 

Know the right time, or oppor- 
tunity 



'38 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



ouSe 

rai (r8Xr)<s a/Aeivof, ovSe ptytov 
*aK?7s (Gunaikos oude 
chrem' aner leizetai esthles 
ameinon, oude rhigion 
kakes) 

<aAojs (Deina peri 
phakes 



Aei </>6peiv ra rtov tfecoy (Uei 
pherein ta ton theon) 



(Delta) 



AT//XOS (Demos) 
Aia0o-is (Diathesis) 

Ata TroXXa (Dia polla) 
(Diastole) 



(Diaphoresis) 
Aoy/m (Dogma) 
Acopa SvcrfJia^rjTa Motcrav (D5ra 

dusmacheta Moisan) 



(Heautous emphani- 
zousin hoitines eisin) 

(Eidolon) 
(Eikon) 

El? TO 7TV/3 CK TOV KttTTl'OU (Eis 

to pur ek tou kapnou) 



Man gains no better possession 
than a good wife, nor worse 
than a bad one. A man 
must ask his wife leave to 
thrive 

Terrible things about a lentil. 
Much matter of a wooden 
platter. Much ado about 
nothing 

We must bear what the gods. 
send. We must patiently 
submit to Providence 

The triangular tract of land 
at the mouth of a great 
river; so called from its 
similarity to the Greek letter 
A(D) ' 

The people 

A disposition, state, condition 

(as illness, heat, cold, &c.) 
For many reasons 
The dilation (of the heart or 

lungs) 
Perspiration 

An opinion, belief, tenet 
The gifts of the Muses, not 

obtained without severe 

struggles 
They show themselves in their 

true character 

An image, idea, " idol " 
An image or representation 

Out of the smoke (frying-pan)^ 
into the fire 



Greek Section. 



(Hector) 

O-IS (Ecchymosis) 



fte (Eleeson me) 

ex /xvias TTOUIV (Ele- 
phanta ek muias poiein) 



(Empyreuroa) 



EeAr7/XaKas /"* fK T<ov e f*-<* v 

(Exelelakas me ek tdn 

emon) 
EO> (or CKTOS) Spo/xou <epc<r$ai 

(Exo, or ektos, dromou 

pheresthai) 



A bully, a blustering fellow 
Extravasation of blood under 

the skin 
Pity me 
To make an elephant of a fly ; 

to make much of; to make 

a mountain of a molehill 
Coal to preserve a smouldering 

fire 

You have rogued me out of 
my all 



enta) 



To be borne outside the race- 
course, to get off the course ; 
to wander from the point. 
Lat. extra okas vagari. 
(Epea ptero- Winged words 



(Epigennema) 
(Epiglottis) 



(Epidermis) 
ETTI Svoiv ay/cvpair op/xetv (Epi 
duoin angkurain hormein) 

ETTI vpov (Epi xurou) or ETTI 
vpov aKfjiTqs (Epi xurou 
akmes) 

(Epitome) 



TTOTrod'a (Epopoiia) 



(Erysipelas) 



A result, consequence 

A cartilaginous plate that 

covers the windpipe during 

the act of swallowing 
The outer skin, or cuticle 
To ride at two anchors ; to 

be in harbour ; to have two 

strings to one's bow 
On the edge of a razor ; in 

extreme peril 

A summary, abstract, or 
abridgment 

The composition of epic 
poetry ; the epopee, epic 
poetry 

St. Anthony's fire ; an inflam- 
matory eruption 



140 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Epos (Eros) 
ETI-'/XOV (Etymon) 

Evye (Euge) 

Ev8a.L/uuv 6 /j.r]8ev o<eiAu>v (Eu- 
daimon ho meden ophetlon) 



(Euthanasia) 
Evt>r)Ka (H eureka) 



(Hebe; 
ia (Hegemonia) 



'HSu SouAeu/x.0. (Hedu douleu- 
ma) 

'HAi r;Ai/v-a rep-irei (Helixhelika 
terpei) 

H /AcroT?7s ev iracriv acr^aAccr- 
repov (He mesotes en pasin 
asphalesteron) 

(Echo) 



(Theioteros) 
(Theios) 

v yoL'i^ao-i KiTat (Theon 
en gounasi keitai) 

'Jaropia <^)iAocro^)ta ecrriv fK 
TrapaSetyuarwv (Historia 
philosophia estin ek para- 
deigmaton 

Kaipov yvwOi (Kniron gnothi) 



The god of love ; Cupid 

An original or primitive word ; 

a root 

Well done ! Bravo ! 
Happy the man who owes 

nothing. Out of debt, out 

of danger 

An easy, happy death 
Lit. " I have found (it) ;" a 

discovery, especially after 

long and difficult research 
The goddess of youth 
The lead, the chief command, 

the sovereignty of one state 

over subordinate states 

hegemony 

A sweet service (or bondage) 

Like delights like. Birds of a 
feather 

Moderation (a middle course) 
in all things is safest 

A reverberated or reflected 
sound 

By special providence 
By divine providence 

It (the event, issu;) lies on 
the knees (rests in the 
bosom) of the gods 

History is philosophy teaching 
by example 



Know your opportunity 



Greek Section. 



141 



ros brachu metron echei) 
Kar' t^oxyv (Kat 7 exochen) 
KuT-qyop-qxa (Categorema) 

KotfCdVtKOI/ ICftiOV 6 ' avdpMTTOS 

(Koinonikon zoon ho an- 
thropos) 

Ko/Xoio; ~OTt KO\OLOV 

poti koloion) 
Kooy<.os (Cosmos) 



(Ktemata 
kai chremata) 

KvSos (Kudos) 

(Lathe biosas) 



s (Lalisteros 



AoXio--po? 
korones) 

(Lethe) 



Aoyos e^i (Logos echei) 
Mai/ia (Mania) 



apicrro?, oorts ctxact 
Ka/\a)<; (Mantis aristos, hostis 
eikazei kalos) 

Mai/m KUKUH' (Mantis kakon) 

]\lcya (3i/3\iov, /xeya /caKov 
(Mega biblion, mega kakon) 



Time and tide wait for no 
man 

By excellence ; pre-eminently 

A predicate ; something as- 
serted of a subject 

Man is a social animal 



Jackdaw to jackdaw. Like to 
like. Birds of a feather 

Order, harmony; the universe 
(as an embodiment of order 
and harmony) 

Property in kind and in money 

Glory, fame, honour 

Live in obscurity, or retire- 
ment 

More talkative (chattering) 
than a jackdaw 

" Forgetfulness, oblivion," one 
of the rivers of Hades, 
whose waters caused those 
that drank of them to forget 
the past 

The story prevails 

Madness, rage, vehement or 
uncontrollable desire 

The best divine is he who 
well divines 

A prophet of evils 

A great book is a great evil 



142 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



MeAer7 TO TTOJ/ (Melete to pan) 

Mera(9ns (Metathesis) 
ig (Metalepsis) 



Merao-racris (Metastasis) 
ayav (Meden agan) 



MT; Kptvere Jva fn; KpiOrjre (Me 
krinete hina me krithete) 
(Myrmidon) 



(Myopia) 
(Nectar) 



Nc/Acrts (Nemesis) 



a Se KCU crtSr/pov Kat Trup 
KaATj TIS ova-a (Nika de kai 
sideron kai pur kale tis 
ousa) 

a Noemata) 

? (Nous) 



Diligent care is everything. 
Nothing is impossible to a 
willing mind 

A change of places, or 
opinions ; a transposition 

Participation, alternation ; the 
use of one word for another, 
a change of construction 

A removal, change; revolution 

Too much of one thing is 
good for nothing. Not too 
much of anything. Pursue 
nothing too hotly 

Judge not, that you be not 
judged 

(From murmidones, the soldiers 
under Achilles at the siege 
of Troy), a soldier under 
a daring or unscrupulous 
leader, a ruthless character ; 
one that executes orders in- 
volving harshness 

Shortsightedness 

Anciently, the drink of the 
gods ; a very pleasant drink 

Retribution ; a female Greek 
divinity personifying the 
righteous anger of the gods 
against the proud and in- 
solent 

A woman who is beautiful 
(Beauty) conquers both iron 
and fire 

Thoughts, perceptions 
Intellect, mental capacity, 
talent 



Greek Section. 



'43 



(Nuchthemeron) 



Seo/xevos eyytora. 
(Ho elachiston deome- 

nos enggista theon) 
*O ^wv tora a/couetv, aKoucTw 

(Ho echon ota akouein, 

akoueto) 
Ofy Trep <j)v\\o>v yevff), TOM/ Se 

/cat avSpcov (Hoie per phullon 

genee, toie de kai andron) 
Ol 7roAA.ot (Hoi polloi) 
'O KOO-JUOS OVTOS )U.ta TroXts eorn 

(Ho kosmos houtos mia 

polls esti) 
O/ji/JLa Oeicf etcrw TrerrXwv (Omma 

theis' eiso peplon) 
Ovap Kat {i?rap (Onar kai hupar) 
'Ov oi Ocoi ^iXovcrti', airoOvrjcTKei 

veos (Hon hoi theoi philou- 

sin, apothneskei neos) 

ua (Onomatopoii'a) 



OuSev TTpay^a. (Ouden pragma) 



Ov Suvartu TroAts pu/3ryvat 

opous Kcifjievrj (Ou dunatai 
polis krubenai epano orous 
keimene) 

Ou Aoyw aXA.' cpyoi (Ou logo 
all' ergo) 

IIa0o9 (Pathos) 



A night and a day; the space 

of 24 hours 
He that has fewest wants is 

nearest (likest) to the gods 

He that hath ears to hear, let 
him hear 

As is the race of leaves, such 
(is the race) also of men 

The many, the multitude 
This universe is one city (or 
commonwealth) 

Turn your eyes within your 

mantles 
Sleeping and waking ; always 

He whom the gods love, dies 
young 

The formation of words in 
imitation of sounds ; as 
buzz, hum 

It is no matter ; of no conse- 
quence 

A city that is set upon an hill 
cannot be hid 



Not in word, but in deed ; 
not theoretically, but prac- 
tically 

"Feeling," the quality of 
speech or action that excites 
emotion ; the expression of 
strong feeling 



144 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



KctXoos (Panu kalos) No, thank you. Lat. benigne 

Hap' eauTov (Par* heautou) Of oneself, on one's own 

motion 

Hap" fpoL (Par' emoi) In my opinion. Lat. me judice 

Hap" e/xou (Par' emou) By my advice 

Ilacriv fV(j)povov(TL (rv/A/xa^et Every prudent man has for- 
WX 1 ! (P^sin euphronousi tune for an ally 
summachei tuche) 

Ws (Perilepsis) A. grasping with the hand ; 

comprehension 
(Periplous) A sailing round; an account 

of a coasting voyage 

a/3pa yeXwn-es (Pino- Let us drink and be merry ! 
men habra gelontes) 

IToSt Kai xeipi(Podi kai cheiri) With foot and hand; with 
or ITocri Kai ^eptrtv (Posi kai feet and hands ; with all 
chersin) one's might 

IloXXot fj.aOr)Tai KpeiTTovcsStSau- Many pupils come to excel 
KaXwv (Polloi mathetaikreit- their teachers 
tones didaskalon) 

IIou o-Tco (pou sto) " Where I may stand;" a basis 

to work from, leverage 
ground 

va (Prolegomena) Preliminary observations ; 
prefatory remarks 

ua (Prosopopoiia) Personification 

I]w,- av o\oifj.r]v (Pos an oloi- Would that I could perish 
men) 

5</>w? /J.OL era? <pa<rov SwOv- Tell me plainly thy troubles 
/j.iat (Saphos moi sas phra- 
son dusthumias) 

Anciently a river in the infernal 
regions 

(Systole) The contraction (of the heart 

or lungs) 



Greek Section. 



o? (Sphakelos) 
(Sphinx) 



TauTa Oe.(j)v cv yowacri Ketrai 
(Tauta theon en gounasi 
keitai) 

Ti o-e Set XiOov fj.vptfw (Ti se 
dei lithon murizein) 

To KO.XOV (To kalon) 
To irptirov (To prepon) 



Tou Kttl ttTTO yA.toO~O~77S /X/\6TOS 

yAu/aojj/ pee^ auSr; (Tou kai 

apo glosses melitos glukion 
rheen aude) 

Touro KO.V ?rat9 -yvoirj (ToutO 

kan pais gnoie) 

dp/xttTos yap oia yStoros 
KuAur^as (Trochos 
h.trniatos gar hoia biotos 
trechei kulistheis) 

Twv d/\wi/ cruyKareSr/SoKevai 

/xeSi/xvov (Ton halon sun- 

katededokenai medimnon) 
'Yyieia (Hygeia) 

crre TO (^>ws TOU KOCT/AOU 

(Humeis este to phos tou 

kosmou) 

rpoTfpov (Husteron 

proteron) 
4>ap/xa/(ov v^Trev^es (Pharmakon 

nepenthes) 



Gangrene, mortification ; con- 
vulsion 

An ancient fabulous monster 
that proposed riddles to 
people, whom it tore to 
pieces on failing to solve 
them 

These things depend upon 
the gods (lit. rest on the 
knees of the gods) 

Why should you anoint a 
stone? Care and labour 
lost 

The beautiful ; the chief good 

The becoming ; correct con- 
duct 

And his voice (speech) flowed 
from his tongue sweeter 
than honey (of a good 
speaker) 

Even a child would know this. 

Every schoolboy knows this 
For life runs rolling on, like 

the wheel of a chariot 



To have eaten a bushel of 
salt together. To be old 
friends 

The goddess of health 
Ye are the light of the world 



The last (put) first. The cart 

before the horse 
A drug that lulls or removes 

sorrow 



146 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



(Phasis) 

TCJV KTeavwv (Pheideo 
ton kteanon) 

VTTVOV 6X.yr)Tpov (Philon 
hupnou thelgetron) 
Xaipe (Chaire) 



(Chairon 
poreuou) 

ra KaXa (Chalepa ta 
kala) 

Xaos (Chaos) 
Xapwv (Charon) 



voyw.os (Cheiron nomos) 
) \pv(TOTfpa (Chruso 
chrusotera) 



An appearance, phase 
Husband your resources 

The blessed charm (spell) of 

sleep 
Happiness to you ! Welcome ! 

Farewell ! Away with you ! 
Make your journey in peace ; 

depart in peace 
Good things are difficult to 

(attain). The best things 

are worst to come by 
Vacant space ; a confused or 

disordered mass 
The ferryman who conducted 

the dead in his boat across 

the river Styx 
The law of might 
More golden than gold itself; 

finer, more precious 



FRENCH SECTION. 



A b.-irbe de fou on apprend 

a raser 

A bas le traitre 
Abbe 
A beau jeu beau retour 

A bis et a blanc 
A bon appetit il ne faut 
point de sauce 

A bon chat, bon rat 

A bon chien il ne vient 
jamais un bon os 



A bon commencement 

bonne fin 
A bon demandeur bon 

refuseur 
A bon entendeur il ne faut 

que clemi mot 



A bon vin il ne faut point 

de bouchon 
A bon vin point d'enseigne 



Men learn to shave on a 

fool's chin 

Down with the traitor 
An abbot 
One good turn deserves 

another 

By fits and starts 
A good appetite needs no 

sauce ; hunger is the 

best sauce 
Well matched; set a thief 

to catch a thief 
A good bone does not 

always come to a good 

dog. Merit seldom meets 

with its reward 
A good beginning makes 

a good end 
Shameless craving must 

have shameful refusing 
To one of good intelligence 

half a word is enough. 

A word (is sufficient) to 

the wise 
Good wine needs no bush 

Good wine needs no bush 



148 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



A brebis tondue le ciel 

mesure le vent 
Abrege 
Acariatre 

A chacun son gout 
A chaque oiseau son nid 

est beau 



Acheter des objets d'occa- 

sion 

A cheval 
A cheval donne il ne faut 

jamais regarder la bride 
A chien endormi rien ne 

tombe en la gueule 
A cceur ouvert 

A centre cceur 
A corps perdu 
A coup sur 



Acquerir mechamment et 
depenser sottement 



Adieu 

Adieu la voiture 
A discretion 
Affaire d'amour 
Affaire de creur 
Affaire d'honneur 
Affiche 



Heaven tempers the wind 

to the shorn lamb 
An abridgement 
Peevish ; churlish 
Everyone to his liking 
Every bird thinks its own 

nest beautiful. Home 

is home be it ever so 

homely 
To buy second-hand things 

On horseback 

Never look a gift horse in 

the mouth 
A closed mouth catcheth 

no flies 
With open heart; candidly; 

unreservedly 
Unwillingly; with one's 

face against 
Neck or nothing ; post 

haste ; \vithout ballast 
With a dead certainty ; 

sure as fate ; clear as 

noon-day 
To acquire wickedly and 

spend foolishly. Ill got, 

ill spent. Ill-gotten 

goods seldom prosper 
Good-bye; farewell; lit. (I 

commit you) to God 
The affair is over 
At discretion 
An affair of love 
A love affair 
An affair of honour 
A placard 



French Section. 



149 



A fond ; de fond en comble 

Agacerie 

Agent de change 

A grands frais 

Agrement 

A haute voix 

A htiis clos 

Aide-de-camp 

Aide-toi, et le ciel t'aidera 

Aimable 

Aimer eperdument 



Air distingue 
Air distrait 
Air noble 
Ajustez vos flutes 

A 1'abandon 
A la belle etoile 

A la bonne heure 

A 1'abri 
A la derobee 

A la faim il n'y a point de 
mauvais pain 

A la fin ils en vinrent aux 

coups 
A la Fran^aise 



Thoroughly ; from top to 

bottom 
Allurement 
A stockbroker 
At great expense 
Consent 

Loudly ; openly 
On the sly ; behind the 

scenes 

Assistant to a general 
Help yourself and heaven 

will help you 
Amiable 
To love to distraction ; to 

hold dear; to be supreme- 
ly in love with 
A distinguished air or 

appearance 
An absent or abstracted 

look 
A distinguished, patrician 

air, manner, or presence 
Settle your differences 

yourselves 
At random 
In the open air ; al fresco ; 

out of doors 
Good ; well timed. That 

will do 

In shelter ; under cover 
Stealthily 
With hunger no bread is 

nasty. Hungry dogs eat 

dirty puddings 
At last they came to blows 

After the French mode 



150 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



A la guerre comme a la 

guerre 
A la lettre 
A la mode 
A 1'Anglaise 
A la sourdine 

Alentours (les) 

A 1'envi 

A I'extremite 

A 1'impossible nul n'est tenu 

A 1'improviste 

Allant a tort et a travers 



Allegresse 

Aller a tatons 

Aller planter ses choux 

A loisir 

A 1'ongle on connait le lion 

A main armee 
A ma puissance 
Amateur 

Ambigu 

Ambulances 
Ame damnee 



Take the rough with the 

smooth 

Word for word, literally 
According to the fashion 
After the English custom 
Murmuringly ; with bated 

breath 
Neighbouring ; nearness ; a 

stone's throw 
Emulously 
At the point of death ; 

without resource 
The best can do no more 
Unawares 
Like a bull at a gate ; wide 

of the mark ; not having 

a leg to stand upon 
Cheerfulness; mirth; hi- 
larity; vivacity 
To feel the pulse ; to throw 

out a feeler 
Rustication ; estrangement 

from the world 
At leisure 
The lion is known by his 

paw 

By force of arms 
To my power 

A lover (of some pursuit 
or business) ; one that 
practises it for love of it, 
but not professionally 

Mixture; alloy; jumble; 
farrago 

Movable military hospitals 

A miserable drudge 



French Section. 



Ame de bouc 
Amende honorable 

Ame qui vive 

A merveille 

Amitie 

Amour et seigneurie ne se 

tinrent jamais compagnie 
Amour fait beaucoup, mais 

argent fait tout 
Amour-propre 
Ancienne noblesse 

Ancien regime 



A outrance 
A pas de geant 
A peindre 



A perte de vue 

/ A pierre fendre 
Appartement 



Apres cela on a recom- 
mence de plus belle 
Apres la mort le m^decin 
Apres la pluie vient le beau 
temps 

Apres moi le deluge 



A contemptible person 

A sufficient and courteous 

apology 

Not a soul ; nobody 
Marvellously well 
Friendship 
Love and lordship do not 

keep company 
Love is potent, but money 

is omnipotent 
Self-esteem 
The old nobility (of France 

before the Revolution) 
The former (old) govern- 
ment or administration 

(in France before the 

Revolution) 
To the uttermost 
With great strides 
Fit for a model 
Glimpse ; epitome ; digest 
Afar off ; incontiguous ; 

from end to end ; wide of 

the mark 
Cold as stone ; cold as 

Charity 
A suite of two or more 

rooms. (A single apart- 
ment is chambre) 
They went on then worse 

than ever 

After death, the doctor 
After rain comes fine 

weather. After a storm 

comes a calm 
After me, the deluge. The 

devil take the hindmost 



152 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Apres nous le deluge 



Apres perdre, perd on bien 

A propos 

A propos de bottes 

A propos de rien 

A quelque chose malheur 

est bon 
A qui chapon mange, 

chapon lui vient 

A quoi bon faire cela ? 

A reculons, a rebours 
A rez-de-chaussee 
Argent comptant 

Argent re?u le bras rompu 
Armes blanches 

Arriere-garde 
Arriere-pensee 

Arts d'agrement 

A six heures il pleuvait a 

verse 
Assez d'histoires inventees 

a plaisir 
Assez y a, si trop n'y a 



The devil take the hind- 
most ; the charity that 
begins at home ; to take 
care of number one 
After losing at first, one 
becomes a good loser 

To the point ; seasonable 

By the way ; by the by 

Without a sufficient motive 

It is an ill wind that blows 
nobody any good 

Capon comes to him who 
eats capon. Spend and 
God will send 

What's the good of doing 
that ? 

To the right about 

On the ground floor 

Ready money, for im- 
mediate payment 

Borrowed money is a 
broken arm 

Side arms (sabre, sword, 
bayonet) ; cold steel 

The rear-guard 

An after thought ; a mental 
reservation 

Accomplishments ( in la- 
dies' schools) 

At six it poured with rain 

That's enough of your tales 

There is enough, if there 
be not too much. Too 
much of one thing is good 
for nothing. Enough is 
as good as a feast 



French Section. 



Assignat 

Assistance obligee 
A t;ltons 

A tort et a travers 
A tort ou a raison 
A tons oiseaux leurs nids 

sont beaux 
A toute outrance 

A toutes jambes 

A tout propos 

A tout seigneur tout honneur 

Attache 

Atteler les chevaux 
Attroupement 

Auberge 

Au bon droit 

Au bout de son Latin 

Au bout du compte 

Au contraire 
Au courant 

Au desespoir 
Au fait 
Au fond 



French paper money after 
the Revolution in the 
end of last century 

Compulsory help ; poor 
relief 

Experimentally; on trial; 
at a venture 

Anyhow ; confusedly 

Reason or none 

All birds fancy their own 
nests 

Desperately ; tremendous- 
ly ; with a vengeance 

As fast as one's legs can 
carry one 

At every turn, ever and 
anon 

Render to Caesar the things 
that are Caesar's 

An official belonging to an 
embassy 

Put the horses to 

A mob ; a muster ; a con- 
gregation 

An inn 

With just right 

At the end of his resources 

On the whole; in conclu- 
sion ; in short ; taking one 
thing with another 

On the contrary 

Fully acquainted (with 

matters) 
In utter despair 
Well informed; master of it 
To the bottom 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Aujourd'hui roi, demain 
rien 

Au jour le jour 

Au naturel 

Au pied de la lettre 

Au pis aller 

Au premier abord la chose 

n'est pas claire 
Au renard endormi rien 

ne tombe en la gueule 

Au reste 
Au revoir 

Au royaume des aveugles 
les borgnes sont rois 

Au serieux 

Aussitot dit, aussitdt fait 
Autant d'hommes, autant 

d'avis 
Autant en emporte le vent 

Autant vaut porter de 1'eau 

a la riviere 
Autre droit 
Aux abois 



Aux aguets 

Avaler des couleuvres 

Avant 
Avant-coureur 



To-day a king, to-morrow 

nothing. To-day me, to- 
morrow thee 
From hand to mouth 
In the natural state 
Literall)' 
At the worst 
At first sight the matter is 

not clear 
When the fox is asleep, 

nothing falls into his 

mouth 

In addition to this; besides 
Adieu, until we meet again 
In the kingdom of the 

blind, men with a single 

eye are kings 
Seriously ; in a serious 

mood 

No sooner said than done 
So many men so many 

opinions 
So much the wind carries 

away. It is all idle talk 
You might as well carry 

coals to Newcastle 
Another's right 
At death's door ; in extremis ; 

having one foot in the 

grave 

Watchful ; vigilant : catch- 
ing a weasel asleep 
To pocket the affront ; to 

swallow the pill ; to bear 

with 

Forward; advance 
A forerunner 



French Section. 



Avant-propos 

Avec de bon sens, le reste 
vient 



Avec nantissement ' 
Avec votre permission 
A vieux comptes nouvelles 
disputes 



Avis au lecteur 

Avisez la fin 

Avocat 

Avoir 1'air emprunte 

Avoir la languebienpendue 

Avoir le cceur haut et la 

fortune basse 
Avoir le diable au corps 

Avoir une memoire de 

lievre 
A volonte 
A votre sante 
A vue d'ceil 

Ayez toujours plusieurs 

cordes a votre arc 
Badaud 
Badauderie 
Badinage 
Bagatelle 

Bal par souscriptions 
Bal champetre 



Prelude ; preface ; prologue 
With good sense all other 

things come. Good 

sense will conduct a man 

to success 

With security (pledge) 
With permission 
Old reckonings cause 

new disputes. Short 

reckonings make long 

friends 
A word to the wise is 

sufficient 
Consider the end 
An advocate ; a barrister 
To look awkward 
To have the gift of the gab 
To have high spirit and 

low fortune 
Out of one's mind ; having 

a bee in one's bonnet ; 

mad as a March hare 
To have a treacherous 

memory 

At will ; at pleasure 
To your health 
Forthwith ; speedily ; at 

short notice 
To have more than one 

string to your bow 
A (Parisian) Cockney 
Silliness ; foolery 
Playful discourse 
A trifle 

A subscription ball 
A country ball 



156 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Baliverne 
Balourdise 
Bande noire 
Barbouillage 
Bas bleu 

Baste pour cela 
Bastille 



Batir des chateaux en Es- 

pagne 
Baton 
Battre la campagne 



Battre la generale 

Battre 1'eau avec un baton 
Battre le fer sur I'enclume 



Battue 
Bavardej 
Beau ideal 
Beau monde 

Beaute et folie vont souvent 
de compagnie 

Beaux esprits 
Beaux yeux 
Bel esprit 



Humbug ; nonsense 
Stupidity ; want of skill 
The black gang ; a bad lot 
Scrawl ; rigmarole 
A blue stocking; a learned 

woman 
Well, so be it ; mum for that 

A castle or stronghold in 
Paris, where state- 
prisoners were confined 
in the end of last century 

To build castles in the air 

A stick ; a staff 

To go on a fool's errand ; 
to strain at a gnat and 
swallow a camel ; to 
reckon without one's host 

To beat to arms; a warning 
voice ; to give the signal 
of danger, or distress 

To burn one's finger's ; to 
skin a flint 

To take time by the fore- 
lock ; to make hay while 
the sun shines 

A massacre of game 

A foolish gossiping woman 

A perfect model 

The fashionable w r orld 

Beauty and folly often go 
in company. Fair and 
sluttish (foolish) 

Men of wit and humour 

Beautiful eyes 

A brilliant mind 



French Section. 



Belle 

Belles-lettres 
Belle tournure 
Beneficiaire 

Besoin fait vieille trotter 



Bete 
Bete noire 

Betise 

Bevue 

Bien-aime 

Bien attaque, biende fendu 

Bien perdu bien connu 



Bienseance 
Bijou 

Billet doux 
Billets d'etat 

Bise 

Bizarre 
Blase 

Bois ont oreilles et champs 
ont oeillets 

Bon ami 

Bonbon 

Bon bourgeois 



A beautiful woman; beautiful 
Refined literature 
Symmetry ; shapeliness 

A person obtaining a bene- 
fit ; beneficiary 

Need makes the old wo- 
man trot. Needs must 
when the Devil drives 

A beast ; a stupid person 

Lit. black beast ; one 
especially disliked 

Gross folly ; nonsense 

A blunder ; a false step 

Well-loved 

Well matched. Set a 
thief to catch a thief 

Once lost, then prized. 
We never know the 
worth of water till the 
well is dry 

Good manners 

A jewel ; a treasure 

A love-letter 

Government paper ; bank 
notes 

A north-east wind ; a fresh 
breeze 

Odd 

Used up, worn out 

Woods have ears and 
fields have eyes. The 
very walls have ears 

A good friend 

A sweetmeat 

A substantial citizen ; a 
comfortable tradesman 



158 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Bon diable 

Bon gre, mal gre 

Bonheur 

Bonhomie 

Bonhomie 

Bon jour, bonne oeuvre 

Bon marche tire 1 'argent 

hors de la bourse 
Bon mot 
Bonne 
Bonne bete 

Bonne bouche 
Bonne et belle assez 

Bonne foi 

Bonne la maille qui sauve 
le denier 



Bonnet de nuit 
Bonnet rouge 

Bonne vie bonne fin 

Bon pays, mauvais chemin 

Bon poete, mauvais homme 



A jolly good fellow 
Willing or unwilling 
Good luck 
Good-natured simplicity 

Good nature ; easy temper ; 

credulity 
The better the day, the 

better the deed 
A good bargain draws the 

money out of the purse 
A pun, a witty expression 
A nurse-maid 

A good-natured stupid 

creature 
A delicate bit, a choice 

morsel 
Good and handsome 

enough 

Good faith ; plain dealing 
It is a good halfpenny 

that saves a penny. 

Spend a penny, save a 

groat. A penny saved 

is a penny gained 
A nightcap 
The cap of liberty; lit. the 

red cap 
A good life makes a good 

end (a happy death) 
A good country, a bad 

road. The worse for the 

rider, the better for the 

bider 
A good poet, a bad man. 

The better workman, the 

worse husband 



French Section. 



Bon soir 
Bon ton 
Bon vivant 

Bon voyage 

Bouche a feu 

Bourgeois 

Bourgeoisie 

Bourse 
Boutade 



Boutez en avant 

Bref 

Brevet 

Brevete 

Brigue 

Brisons la ! 

Brochure 

Brouillerie 

Bruit ; rumeur 

Bruler le pave 

Brusque 

Brusquerie 

Bureau (pi. bureaux) 

Bureaucratie 



Bureau de conciliation 



journey, or 



of citizens 



a cock- 
a wild 



Good evening 

The height of fashion 

A good liver ; a jolly com- 
panion 

A pleasant 
voyage 

A field piece 

A citizen 

The body 
burgesses 

The exchange 

A whim ; a freak 
and-bull story 
goose chase 

Push forward 

In short 

Patent ; licence 

Patented 

Indirect means 
cabal 

That's enough of it ! 

A pamphlet 

Falling out ; state of vari- 
ance ; enmity ; castts belli 

Rumour 

To rush along 

Abrupt ; blunt 

Rudeness 

A (public) office 

Bureaucracy ; the undue 
influence of the perma- 
nent officials in the 
administration 

The conciliation com- 
mittee ; a committee for 
settling disputes 



intrigue ; 



i6o Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Bureau de la guerre 
Cadastre 

Cabotage 

Camaraderie 

Canaille 

Canard 

Cap-a-pie 

Caresser sa marotte 

Carte 

Carte blanche 

Carte de visite 
Carte du pays 
Cartel 



Car tel est notre plaisir 



Catalogue raisonne 

Causeries 
Causes celebres 

Ce gar9on ne vaut pas le 

pain qu'il mange 
Cela arrive comme maree 

en careme 

Cela me donne la chair de 

poule 
Cela n'est pas de mon bail 



The war office 

A register of the survey of 
lands 

Jolting ; chaos 

Good fellowship 

The rabble 

A false story 

From head to foot 

To ride 'one's hobby-horse 

A card, a bill of fare 

A blank sheet of paper ; 
full powers 

A small photographic por- 
trait 

A rough sketch ; a bird's 
eye view 

A challenge ; an agree- 
ment between belligerent 
states for an exchange of 
prisoners, &c. 

For such is our pleasure. 
The justification of des- 
potic acts 

A catalogue with illus- 
trations or notices 

Familiar talk ; chat 

Celebrated trials in the 
law courts 

That boy is not worth his 
salt 

That comes like fish in 
Lent ; in the nick of 
time 

That makes my flesh creep 

That is no affair of mine ; 
I am not responsible for 

that 



French Section. 



161 



Cela saute aux yeux 

Cela sert a faire bouillir la 

marmite 
Cela tombe bien 
Cela va sans dire 
Cela viendra 



Celui-la gouverne bien mal 
le miel, qui n'en goute, 
et ses doigts n'en leche 



Celui-la cherche toujours 

midi a quatorze heures 
Celui qui nedit rien consent 
Ce manage est sur le tapis 
Ce monde est plein de fous 
Ce n'est pas la mer a boire 

Ce n'est que le premier pas 

qui coute 
Certaines gens trouvent a 

redire a tout propos 

Certaines personnes Sont 

nees coiffees 
Ces deux tableaux font 

pendant 
Ces fabricants sont hors de 

pair 

C'est a dire 
C'est a moi a faire les cartes 

C'est a pen pres le meme 



That tells its own tale 

That helps to make the 
pot boil 

That is lucky 

That's understood 

That will come (happen 
one day). All in good 
time 

He is a bad manager who 
tastes not the honey and 
licks his fingers. It is a 
poor cook that cannot 
lick his own fingers. 
Muzzle not the ox that 
treadeth out the corn 

That fellow is always too 
late 

Silence gives consent 

That wedding is talked of 

The world is full of fools 

It is not a mountain to 

remove 
To take the bull by the 

horns 
Some people find fault on 

every occasion 

Some are born with silver 

spoons in their mouths 
Those two pictures match 

Those manufacturers are 

unrivalled 
That is to say ; namely 

It's my turn to shuffle the 

cards 
It's about the same thing 

L 



1 62 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



C'est autant de gagne 
C'est bien le cas de le dire 
C'est bonnet blanc et blanc 
bonnet 

C'est clair coninie deux et 

deux font quatre 
C'est de 1'argent en barre 
C'est de 1'hebreu pour lui 
C'est du ble en grenier 



C'est egal 

C'est en fait de lui 

C'est la mouche du coche 

C'est la que le bat le 

blesse 
C'est le fils de la poule 

blanche 
C'est le mot de 1' enigme 

C'est le refrain de la 

ballade 
C'est son affaire 

C'est son cheval de ba- 

taille 
C'est un balai neuf, il fait 

balai neuf 
C'est un bon parti 

C'est un chevalier d'in- 

dustrie 
C'est une autre chose 

C'est une autre paire de 

manches 
C'est une bonne fotirchette 



That is so much to the good 
You may indeed say so 
There are six of the one 

and half a dozen of the 

other 
It is as plain as a pike-staff 

It is as good as ready money 

That's Greek to him 

It is as good as money in 

one's pocket ; (lit. wheat 

in one's granary) 
No matter ; it is all one 
All is over with him 
He's like the fly on the 

coach wheel 
That's where the shoe 

pinches 
He was born with a silver 

spoon in his mouth 
It is the (key-)word of the 

riddle 
The old story over again 

Leave that to her 

That is his forte, his strong 
point (lit. his war-horse) 
New brooms sweep clean 

She is a good match 
He is an adventurer 

It is quite a different thing 
That's quite another thing 

He is a keen guest 



French Section. 



163 



C'est une bonne lieue au 

has mot 

C'est une fort rnauvaise tete 
C'est une vraie aubaine 
C'est un fin matois , 
C'est un homme qui ne sait 

pas vivre 

C'est un opera tres couru 
C'est un poeme plein de 

verve 
C'est un sot a vingt-quatre 

carats 

C'est un sot en trois lettres 

C'est un vieux routier 

defiez-vous-en ! 
C'est un vrai homme de 

bien 

C'est votre affaire 
C'etait a qui n'irait pas 
Get habit a bonne fa?on 
Cette demoiselle a la vue 

basse 
Cette histoire est vieille 

comme les rues 
Cette propriete sera mise 

aux encheres 
Ceux qui parlentbeaucoup, 

ne disent jamais rein 



Chacun a sa manie (or sa 

marotte) 

Chacun a son gout 
Chacun cherche son sem- 

blable 



It's at the very least three 

miles off 
He is a sad dog 
It is quite a god-send 
He's a knowing card 
He is an ill-mannered man 

This opera is very popular 
It is a spirited poem 

He is a fool of twenty-four 

carats ; an unalloyed, 

absolute fool 
He is a fool to speak so 

plainly 
He is an old bud beware 

of him! 
He is a very honest man 

That's your business 
None of them will go 
This coat is well made 
That young lady is short 

sighted 
That tale is as old as Adam 

That estate will be sold by 

auction 
People that talk much 

never say anything ; 

great talkers seldom say 

anything worth hearing 
Everyone has his hobby 

Everyone to his taste 
Each one seeks his like ; 
like draws to like 



1 64 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Chacun ira au moulin avec 
son propre sac - 



Chacun paie son ecot 
Chacun porte sa croix 

Chamade 
Champ clos 
Champs- Ely sees 

Changer de note 
Changer son cheval borgne 
pour un aveugle 

Chansons a boire 
Chapeau bas ! 
Chapelle ardente 



Chaque chose a son temps 

Chaque oiseau trouve son 
nid beau 

Chaque pays chaque mode ; 

(or, a sa guise) 
Char-a-bancs 
Charbonnier est maitre 

chez soi 
Charge d'affaires 



go to 
his own 



Everyone must 

the mill with 

sack. Let every tub stand 

on its own bottom. Every 

herring must hang by its 

own head 
Each one pays his own 

score 
Everyone bears his cross ; 

none knows the weight 

of another's burden 
A parley 

The lists (lit. closed field) 
Elysian fields ; a beau- 

tiful park in Paris 
To turn over a new leaf 
To exchange a one-eyed 

horse for a blind one ; to 

change for the worse 
Drinking-songs 
Hats off! 
The place where a dead 

body lies in state ; (lit. 

a burning chapel ; from 

the great number of wax 

lights) 
To everything there is a 

season 
Every bird thinks its own 

nest handsome. Noplace 

like home 
So many countries so man}' 

customs 

A waggonette ; pleasure-car 
An Englishman's house is 

his castle 
One entrusted with state 

affairs at a foreign court 



French Section. 



165 



Charlatan 
Chasse-cousin 



Chasser le bouc emissaire 

Chateau 

Chateaux en Espagne 

Chat echaude craint 1'eau 
froide 

Chef de cuisine 
Chef de police 

Chef-d'ceuvre 
Chemin faisant 
Chere amie 
Cheval de bataille 

Chevalier 
Chevalier d'industrie 



Chose qui plait est a demi 

vendue 
Ci-devant 
Claquer 

Clique 

Coiffeur 

Coiffure 

Comme deux gouttes d'eau 

Comme il faut 



A quack ; mountebank ; 
humbug 

Lit., Chase away cousin ; 
anything fitted to drive 
away poor relations and 
other importunate per- 
sons ; bad wine 

To drive out the scapegoat 

A castle 

Castles in the air ; fanciful 
plans 

A scalded cat dreads cold 
water. A burnt child 
dreads the fire 

The head or the chief cook 

The head (chief) of the 

police 

A master-piece 
By the way ; in passing 
A dear friend ; a mistress 
A war-horse ; the main 

argument 
A knight 
A knight of industry ; one 

who lives by fraud ; 

a swindler ; a sharper 
Pleasing ware is half sold 

Formerly 

One paid to applaud a per- 
formance 
A set, or party 
A hairdresser 
An ornamental head-dress 
As like as two peas 
In good taste 



1 66 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Comme on fait son lit on 

se couche 
Commis 

Commissaire de police 
Commis voyageur 
Commissionnaire 



Compagnon de voyage 
Comptoir 
Concierge 
Conciergerie 

Confrere 
Conge 
Conge d'elire 

Connaisseur 
Conseil de famille 

Conseil de prud'hommes 



Conseiller d'etat 

Contour 

Contrecoup 

Contre fortune bon coeur 



As you make your bed so 

you must lie on it 
A clerk (in business) 

A commissioner of police 

A commercial traveller 

A person commissioned 
(especially to invite tra- 
vellers to take up their 
quarters at some hotel or 
inn) ; a messenger 

A fellow traveller 

A counting-house 

A door keeper 

A door-keeper's lodge ; a 
noted prison in Paris 

A colleague 

Discharge ; leave 

Leave to elect (an ecclesi- 
astic 

A critical judge 

A family council ; a com- 
mission of lunacy 

A council of wise men ; men 
with special knowledge. 
A mixed coun cil of master 
tradesmen and workmen, 
for the consideration of 
disputes between masters 
and men 

Privy counsellor 

The outline of a figure 

In defiance of 

A good heart against 
fortune. Set a stout 
heart to a stey (stift) brae 
(hill). Nil desperandum. 
Tu ne cede malis 



French Section. 



167 



Contre-temps 
Cordon 

Cordon bleu 
Cordon militaire 
Cordon sanitaire 

Corps d'armee 
Corps diplomatique 
Corps dramatique 

Cortege 

Corvee 

Coterie 

Coucher a la belle etoile 
Couci-couci 

Coudre le peau de renard 
a celle du lion 



Couleur de rose 

Coup 

Coup d'essai 
Coup de grace 
Coup de main 
Coup de maitre 

Coup de pied 
Coup de plume 
Coup de soleil 
Coup d'etat 



A mischance 

A surrounding girdle of 
troops, &c. 

The ribbon worn by cooks 

A military line(of exclusion) 

A sanitary line (drawn 
around an infected spot) 

The body of an army 

The diplomatic body 

A dramatic body ; a com- 
pany of players 

A procession 

Forced labour 

A set (of acquaintances) 
street that has no outlet 

Sleep in the open air 

No great catch ; so-so 

To sew the fox's skin to 
the lion's ; to supplement 
strength and boldness 
with cunning (or diplo- 
macy). If the lion's skin 
cannot, the fox's shall 

Rose colour ; of flattering 
or pleasing appearance 

A stroke 

A first essay ; attempt 

A finishing stroke 

An armed surprise 

A master-stroke ; with 
consummate skill 

A kick 

A literary attack; a satire 
A sunstroke 

A stroke of policy or of 
violence in state affairs 



1 68 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Coup de theatre 
Coup d'oeil 
Coupe 

Coupon 

Courage sans peur 

Court plaisir long repentir 

Coute que coute 

Coute que coute je ferai 

mon devoir 
Craignez la honte 
Creme de la creme. La 

creme ; le dessus du 

panier 
Critique 

Cuisine 

Cul-de-sac 

Cure 

D'accord 

Dame de comptoir 

Dame d'honneur 

Dames de la halle 

Dans cette affaire je vous 

donne carte blanche 
De bonne grace 
Debris 



An unexpected event a 

surprise 
A quick glance of the eye ; 

a twinkling 
The front covered outside 

part of the "diligence" 

(or stage-coach) 
A dividend warrant 
Courage without fear 
The evening's amusement 

should bear the morning's 

reflection 

Let it cost what it may 
At any cost I will do my 

duty 

Fear shame 
Pink of perfection ; " The 

glass of fashion and the 

mould of form " 
Criticism ; a piece of criti- 
cism 
The kitchen ; method of 

cooking 
The bottom of the bag ; a 

blind alley 
The incumbent of a church 

living ; never a curate 

(vicaire) 

In harmony ; agreed 
A counter-woman ; bar- 
woman 

A lady of honour 
Market women 
You can act as you please 

in that affair 
With a good grace 
Fragments remaining ; 

ruins 



French Section. 



169 



Debut 

Debutant 

De bon augure 

Decoiffer St. Pierre pour 

coiffer St. Paul^ 
De fol juge breve sentence 



Degage 

De gaiete de cceur 

De haute lutte 

Dehors 

Dejeuner 

Dejeuner a la fourchette 

De la main a la bouche se 

perd souvent la soupe 
De 1'audace, encore de 

1'audace, toujours de 

1'audace 

De 1'eau benite de cour 
De mal en pis 
Demi-monde 

Denouement 

De nouveau seigneur nou- 

velle mesnie 
De par le roi 
De petit vient on au grand 



De pied en cap 
Depot 
Dernier 
Dernier ressort 
De semaine 



The first appearance 

One who makes a debut 

Propitious 

Rob Pefer to pay Paul 

A foolish judge passes a 

hasty sentence. A fool's 

bolt is soon shot 
Free ; untrammelled 
From lightness of heart 
By a violent struggle 
Outside 
A breakfast 
A meat breakfast 
There's man}' a slip 'twixt 

the cup and the lip 
Audacity, again audacity, 

and always audacity 

Shallow promises 

From bad to worse 

Half - and - half (dubious) 

society 

The end of a plot 
New lords, new laws 

By authority 

From little we come to 
great. Many littles make 
a mickle. We must creep 
before we walk 

From head to foot 

A storehouse 

The last 

A last resource 

By the week 



170 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Deshabille 
Detour 
De trop 



Deux chiens ne s'accordent 
point a un os 

Deux yeux voient plus clair 
qu'un 

De vive voix 

Devoir 

Dieu defend le droit 
Dieu et mon droit 
Dieu vous garde 
Diners a la carte 

Diseur de bons mots 

Distingue 

Distrait 

Dites-moi, s'ilvous plait 

Dites-vous cela pour rire 

ou pour le bon ? 
Divertissement 
Donner prise sur soi 
Donner tete baissee 

Dos a dos 
Double entente 
Douceur 
Doux yeux 
Droit des gens 

Droit et en avant 



Undressed 

A circuitous march 

Too much ; in the way ; 

one too many; something 

too much 
Two dogs never agree 

about one bone. Two of a 

trade seldom agree 
Two eyes see more clearly 

than one. Two heads are 

better than one 
Orally : by word of mouth ; 

viva voce 
Duty 

God defends the right 
God and my right 
God keep you 
Dinners according to the 

bill of fare 
A joker 

Of aristocratic appearance 
Absent-minded 
Tell me, if you please 
Do you say that in earnest 

or in jest ? 
Entertainment 
To lay one's self open 
Headstrong ; to go farther 

and fare worse 
Back to back 
A double meaning 
Sweetness ; a gift 
Soft glances ; ogling 
The law of nations ; inter- 
national law 
Right and forward 



French Section. 



171 



Drole 

Drole de corps 

Du fort an faible 

D'une mouche il fait un 

elephant 
D'une pierre fa ire deux 

coups 
Eau de vie 
Echappe belle 
Echelon 



Eclaircissement 

Eclat 

Eclat de rire 

Ecole militaire 

Ecorcher les oreilles 

Egalite 

Eleve 

Elite 

Elle a fait des siennes 

Elle a les yeux a fleur de 

tete 

Elle a tres bonne mine 
Elle est continuellement 

dans le monde 
Elle est douee de beaucoup 

de sang-froid 
Elle est en butte aux 

medisances des autres 
Elle 1'a acheve tant bien 

que mal 

Elle 1'a fait par megarde 
Elle m'a compris a demi- 

mot 



Droll ; funny 

A droll fellow ; a punster 

From the strong to the 

weak ; one with another 
He makes mountains of 

mole-hills 
To kill two birds with one 

stone 
Brandy 

A narrow escape 
An army in form like the 

steps of a staircase ; 

marching in detached 

groups 

A clear explanation 
Splendour ; brilliancy 
A burst of laughter 
A military school 
To jar upon the nerves 
Equality 
A pupil 

The best society 
That's an old trick of hers 
She has staring eyes 

She looks very well 

She goes out a great deal 

She is endowed with great 

self-possession 
She is exposed to their 

scandal 
She finished it as best she 

could 

She did not do it on purpose 
A hint was sufficient for 

her 



172 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Elle m'a pris a partie 
Elle ne laisse pas de le 

flatter 

Elle paie de mine 
Elle prend tout pour argent 

comptant 
Elles se ressemblaient 

comme deux gouttes 

d'eau 

Elle trouvera a qui parler 
Elle voit tout en noir 
Elle voulait me temr tete 
Eloge 

Eloignement 
Embarras de richesses 



Embonpoint 
Embouchure 
Emeute 
Eminemment 

Employe 

Empressement 

En ami 

En attendant 

En avant ! 

En avez-vous a lui ? 

En bloc 

En bon train 

Encore 

En effet ' 

En famille 

Enfans perdus 



She took me to task 

She continually flatters 

him 

She has a good appearance 
She believes anything 

They were as like as two 
peas in a pod 

She will find her match 

She looks on the black side 

She wanted to oppose me 

Eulogium 

Estrangement 

A superabundance of 

riches ; too many to 

choose from 
Stoutness of body 
The mouth of a river 
Insurrection ; riot 
Eminently ; so as to be the 

very ideal 
A person employed by 

another 

Eagerness ; earnestness 
As a friend 
In the meantime 
Forward ! advance 
Are you angry with him ? 
In the lump 
In a fair way 
Again 

In effect ; just so 
Unceremoniously 
Lost children ; a forlorn 

hope 



French Section. 



173 



Enfant gate 
Enfant terrible 



Enfant trouve 

Enfermer le loup dans la 

bergerie 
En fin 
Enfin,jem'en laveles mains 

Enfin, vous n'etes jamais 

de trop 
En flute 

En foule 

En grande tenue 

En grande toilette 

En habiles gens 

En masse 

En me voyant il m'a battu 

froid 
Ennui 
En passant 
En plein jour 
En revanche 
En route 
Ensemble 

En suivant la verite 
Entente cordiale 

Entr'acte 
Entre deux feux 
Entre deux vins 
Entree 



A spoiled child 

A terrible child one that 
is apt to do or say some- 
thing exceedingly ill- 
timed and embarrassing 

A foundling 

To shut up the wolf in the 
sheepfold 

At last 

Well, I shall wash my 
hands of it 

Anyhow, you are never in 
the way 

Armed with guns only on 
the upper deck 

In a crowd 

In full dress 

Full-dressed ; in full fig 

Like able men 

In a body 

As soon as he saw me he 
gave me the cold shoulder 

Weariness ; spleen 

In passing 

In broad daylight 

In return 

On the way 

Together ; the general effect 

In following the truth 

Friendly feeling ; com- 
plete understanding 

Between the acts 

Between two fires 

Half drunk 

Freedom of access ; a 
course of dishes 



174 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Entre le marteau et 1'en- 

clume 
Entremets 
Entre nous 
Entrepot 
En verite 

Envoyez-le promerier 
En y arrivant il a trouve 

visage de bois 
Epergne 

Espionnage 
Esprit de corps 
Esquisse 
Estrade 
Etat-major 

Etourderie 

Etre au bout de son role 

(or rouleau) 
Etre comme 1'oiseau sur la 

branche 
Etre sans gene 
Etre toujours par monts et 

par vaux 
Etre un sot fieffe 
Etui 

Exigeant 
Expose 



un 



Fa$on de parler 
Faire de 1'esprit 
Faire d'une mouche 
elephant 



Between hammer and anvil 

Dainty side dishes 

Between ourselves 

A warehouse 

In truth 

Pack him off 

When he got there he found 
the door shut 

An ornamental stand for 
the centre of a table 

System of spies 

Corporate feeling 

A sketch 

A raised stand 

A number of officers form- 
ing the general's council 

Giddiness ; imprudence 

To be at one's wits' end 

A rolling stone gathers no 

moss 

To be free and easy 
To be always on the move 

To be a complete fool 

A case for instruments 

Troublesome 

An exposition ; a concise 

statement 
Front of a building 
Manner of speaking 
To show off one's wit 
To make an elephant of a 

fly; to make a mountain 

of a molehill 



French Section. 



'75 



Faire claquer son fouet 
Faire 1'ecole buissonniere 
Faire le diable a quatre 

Faire mon devoir 
Faire patte de velours 
Faire sans dire 
Faire ses choux gras 
Faire venir 1'eau a la bouche 
Faire voile a tout vent 

Fait accompli 

Fascine ; fagot 

Faubourg 

Faute de rnieux il se con- 

tente de pain 
Fauteuil 
Faux pas 
Femme (sole) celibataire ; 

vieille fille 
Femme de chambre 
Femme (converts) mariee 
Ferme modele (ornee) 
Fete 
Fete champetre 

Feu de joie 
Feuilleton 



Fille de chambre 



To take merit to oneself 
To play the truant 

To thunder at the top of 

one's voice 
To do my duty 
To sham Abraham 
To act unostentatiously 
To bask in the sunshine 
To make one's mouth water 

To spread one's sail to 

every wind 
A thing accomplished ; an 

accomplished fact 
A fagot 
A suburb 
He put up with bread for 

want of something better 
An arm chair 
A false step ; a mistake 
A spinster ; an unmarried 

woman 
Chambermaid 
A married woman 
A model farm 
A festival 
An entertainment in the 

open air ; a rural feast 
A firing of guns in token of 

joy ; a bonfire 
A small leaf or fly sheet ; 

the name given to the 

novels appearing in 

French newspapers 
A chambermaid ; a lady's 
maid 



176 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Fille d'honneur 
Flaneur 
Fleur de lis 



Flux de bouche; flux de 

paroles 
Flux de mots 
Fondre en larmes 
Fortune de la guerre 
Fortune du pot 
Fracas 

Froides mains, chaud 

amour 
Frondeur 

Gabelle 

Gage d'amour 

Gageure est la preuve des 

sots 

Gaiete de cceur 
Gamin 



Garde du corps 

Garde mobile 

Gardez bien 

Gardez la foi 

Gare a lui, c'est un mauvais 

plaisant 
Gaucherie 
Gendarmerie 
Gendarmes 

Gens de condition 



A lady of honour 

A lounger 

Blossom of the lily ; the 

arms of the French 

monarchy 
A flow of words ; garrulity 

To spin a long yarn 

To cry one's eyes out 

The fortune of war 

Pot-luck 

A disturbance ; a noisy 
quarrel 

A cold hand and warm 
heart 

A declaimer against the 
existing administration 

The salt tax 

A love pledge 

A wager is a fool's argu- 
ment 

Flow of spirits 

A street arab 

A youth ; a waiter 

Life-guardsman ; a body- 
guard 

The French militia 

Take care 

Keep faith 

Take care, he likes practical 
jokes 

Awkwardness; vulgarity 

The armed police force 

Men - at - arms ; mounted 
police 

People of rank 



French Section. 



177 



Gens d'eglise 
Gens de guerre 
Gens de lettres 
Gens de meme famille 
Gens de pen 

Gentilhomme 

Gibier de potence 

Gite 

Glacis 

Gobemouches 

Gourmand 

Gout 

Goutte a goutte 

Grand bien vous fasse ! 

Grand diseur n'est pas 

grand faiseur 
Grandes promesses et peu 

d'effets 

Grand et bon 
Grand parure 
Grasse panse, maigre cer- 

velle 
Grippe 
Grisette 

Grosse tete, peu de sens 
Guerre a mort 
Guerre a outrance 
Guet-a-pens 
Habitue 

Hardi gagneur, hardi man- 
geur 



Churchmen 

Military men 

Literary men 

Birds of a feather 

Men of a low order ; un- 
important men 

A gentleman 

A gaol bird 

Gist (of a case) 

A slope ; earthwork 

Bumpkins 

A glutton 

Taste 

Drop by drop 

Much good may it do you ! 

Great talkers are no great 
doers 

Great promises and little 
deeds ; great cry and 
little wool 

Great and good 

Full dress 

A fat belly, a lean brain 

An influenza 

A pretty young work- wo- 
man 

Great head and little sense 
War till death 
War to the knife 
Ambush 

An habitual frequenter (of 

a place) 
Quick at meat, quick at 

work 



1 78 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Haricot 

Hauteur 

Haut gout 

Haut ton 

Hectare 

Heureux commencement 

est la moitie de 1'oeuvre 
Heureux qui peut vivre de 

ses rentes 
Homme de robe 
Homme d'esprit 
Homme d'etat 
Honi soit qui mal y pense 

Honnetes gens 
Hors de combat 

Hors la loi 
Hotel de ville 
Hotel Dieu 

Ici on parle Franais 

Idee fixe 

Jl a affaire a forte partie 

II a beau parler on ne 

1'ecoute pas 
II a des moyens 
II a epouse une bonne femme 

de menage 
II a evente la meche 
II a fait main basse sur tout 
II a fallu battre en retraite 
11 aime bien d'avoir les 

coudees franches 



The kidney bean ; a kind 

of ragout 

Haughtiness ; pride 
High flavour 
High tone 

2-47 English acres of land 
Well begun is half done 

Happy is he who has a 
competency 

A gownsman 

A man of talent, or of wit 

A statesman 

Evil be to him who evil 
thinks 

Honest people 

Disabled; out of condition 
to fight 

Outlawed 

A town hall 

A house of God ; an hos- 
pital 

French is spoken here 

A fixed idea 

He has a rough customer 
to deal with 

He talks in vain, no one 
listens 

He's a clever fellow 

His wife is a good manager 

He got wind of it 
He pounced on everything 
They were obliged to retreat 
He likes to be perfectly free 



French Section. 



179 



II a 1'airde ne pasy toucher 
II a la mer a boire 
II a le diable au corps 
II a les yeux cernes 

II a le vin mauvais 

II a 1'oeil au guet 

II a mange son pain blanc 

le premier 
II a mis son bonnet de 

travers aujourd'hui 
II a montre beaucoup 

d'humeur 
II a preche d'abondance 

II a pris mes paroles a con- 

tre sens 
II a pris ses jambes a son 

con 
II a pris son courage a deux 

mains 
II a remue ciel et terre pour 

y parvenir 
II a une dent contre lui 

Ilavait son discours sur le 

bout du doigt 
II brode tres-bien 
II chasse de race 

11 debite ses propos a tout 

bout de champ 
II depense beaucoup en 

menus plaisirs 
II ecrit a batons rompus 
II en a fait une bonne affaire 



He looks very demure 
He has an impossible task 
The devil is in him 

He looks dark round the 

eyes 
He is quarrelsome in his 

cups 

He is on the look out 
His best days are passed 

He got out of bed the wrong 

side this morning 
He showed a good deal of 

temper 
He preached extempore 

He took what I said in the 

wrong light 
He made off 

He screwed his courage to 

the sticking point 
He moved heaven and 

earth to succeed 
He owes me a grudge 

He knew his speech by 

heart 

He can tell a good tale 
He's a chip of the old block 

He is always thrusting his 

remarks forward 
He spends a great deal in 

trifles 
He writes by fits and starts 

That was good business for 
him 



i8o Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



II en fait ses choux gras 



II en fait toujours faire a 

sa guise 
II en rabattra de sa premiere 

demande 
II en sait long 
II est bon de faire de 

necessite vertu 
II est bon de parler, et 

meilleur de se taire 



II est comme une poule 

mouillee 

II est coutumier du fait 
II est marque a 1'A 
II est mort crible de dettes 

II est parti prenant la clef 

des champs 
II est rendu 
II est sain de se lever de 

bonne heure 
II est sujet a caution 

II est tres comme il faut 

II est tres maniere 

II est venu a point nomme 

II etait en train de sortir 
II etait grippe 
II etait tres-obere 

II fait beau temps 



He makes his cabbages fat 

by it. He feathers his 

nest by it 
He always wants to go his 

own road 
He will take something less 

than he asked 
He's a knowing card 
It is wise to make a virtue 

of necessity 
It is good to speak, but it 

is better to be silent. 

Speech is silvern, silence 

is golden 
He is a perfect stupid 

He is an old hand at it 

He stands Ai 

He was over head and ears 

in debt when he died 
He made off 

He is quite done up 
Early rising is healthy 

You must discount what 

he says 

He is a perfect gentleman 
He is very stiff 

He came in the nick of 

time 

He was just going out 
He had caught cold 
He was over head and ears 

in debt 
It is fine (weather) 



French Section. 



181 



II fait celui qui n'entend 

pas 
II fait cher vivre dans la 

capitale 
II fait fleche de tout bois 

II fallait me tenir a quatre 

pour ne pas rire 
II faudra bien en passer 

par la 
II faut attendre le boiteux 



II faut de 1'argent 

II faut le faire bon gre mal 

gre 
II faut precher d'exemple 

II faut prendre la balle au 

bond 
II fit un vent a ecorner un 

bceuf 

II gelait a pierre fendre 
II lui a mis martel en tete 

II m'a coupe 1'herbe sous le 

pied 
II m'a debite tout cela a 

brule-pourpoint 
II m'a donne une poignee 

de main 

II m'a mis au pied du mur 
II m'a pousse a bout 
II m'a pris au depourvu 
II m'a ri au nez 
II me faut coucher sur la 

dure 



He plays the deaf man 

Living is expensive in the 

metroplis 
He turns everything to 

account 
I did my best not to laugh 

We must put up with it 

It is necessary to wait for 
the lame man ; wait for 
the truth 

Money is wanting 
You are bound to do it 

Example is better than 

precept 
Take time by the forelock 

The wind was enough to 
shave your eyebrows 

It froze very hard 

He tormented him to 
death 

He cut the ground from 
under my feet 

All that he told me point- 
blank 

He shook hands with me 

He got me into a corner 
He exasperated me 
He took me unawares 
He laughed in my face 
My lodging is on the cold 
cold ground 



1 82 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



II me traita de Turc a 

Maure 
II m'obeissait au doigt et a 

1'ceil 
II n'a pas invente la poudre 



11 n'a pas souffle mot de 

notre entrevue 
II n'a que faire de poesie 
II ne faut jamais defier un 

fou 
II ne faut jamais depasser 

la mesure 
II ne faut pas regarder de 

si pres dans ces affaires 
II ne faut pas remplir 

ses devoirs comme par 

maniere d'acquit 
II n'entend jamais raillerie 
II ne peut plus y tenir 
II ne restait plus que le nid 
II ne s'agit pas de tout cela 

II ne sait sur quel pied 

danser 
II n'est d'heureux que qui 

croit 1'etre 

II n'est pas aussi diable 

qu'il est noir 
II n'est rien moins qu'un 

avare 

II n'est sauce que d'appetit 
II n'y a pas a s'y tromper 

cela saute aux yeux 



He used me abominably 

He was always at my beck 
and call 

He was not the inventor of 
gunpowder ; he is no 
conjuror ; he will never 
set the Thames on fire 

He did not say a single 
word about our interview 

Poetry is not his forte 

Never bid defiance to a 
fool 

Never o'erstep the bounds 

In such matters you must 
noc be so particular 

Duty must not be done as 
a mere matter of form 

He can never take a joke 
He can hold out no longer 
The bird had flown 
That's not the question at 

all 
He's at his wit's end 

The only happy man is 
he who thinks himself 
happy 

The devil is not so black 
as he is painted 

He is anything but a 
miser 

Hunger is the best sauce 

There is positively no mis- 
taking that 



French Section. 



'83 



II n'y a pas de petit chez soi 
li n'y a pas de quoi rire 

II n'y a pas la de quoi 

fouetter un chat 
II n'y a pire eau que 1'eau 

qui dort 
II n'y a que le premier pas 

qui coute 
II n'y va pas par quatre 

chemins 
II parla bien a propos 

II parle a tout bout de 

champ 
II parle en connaissance 

de cause 
II regarde 1'afFaire a un tout 

autre point de vue 

II retourna trempe comme 

une soupe 
II savait son discours sur 

le bout du doigt 
Us courent sur ses brisees 

Us disputent a tout propos 

II se noyerait dans une 

goutte d'eau 
Us en riaient sous cape 

Us en sont venusaux mains 
II s'en prend toujours a inoi 
II sert de risee a toute 

la societe 

II s'est brule la cervelle 
Us etaient a couteaux tires 



There's no place like home 
That's no laughing matter 
It is a peccadillo 

Still waters run deep 

It is only the first step that 
gives trouble (lit. costs) 

He goes straight to the 
point 

He spoke most opportunely 

He is always magging 

He knows what he is 

talking about 
He considers the matter 

from quite a different 

point of view 
He came back wet through 

He knew his speech by 
heart 

They are treading on his 
heels 

They dispute about every- 
thing 

To be a penny wise and a 
pound foolish 

They laughed in their 
sleeve at it 

They came to fisticuffs 

He always blames me 

He is the butt of the 
whole company 

He blew his brains out 

They were at drawn daggers 



184 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Us etaient bien certaine- 
ment d'intelligence 

Us etaient ruines de fond 

en comble 

Us firent bonne chere 
Us 1'ont fait a mon insu 

Us marchent bon train 
Us n'en peut mais 

Us n'eri pouvaient plus de 
fatigue et de soif 

Us ne se sentaient pas de 
satisfaction 

Us nous ont donne le 
change 

Ilss'accordent commechien 
et chat 

Us se firent force compli- 
ments 

Us se sont brouilles 

Us se voient de loin en loin 

Us sont a bout de leurs 

forces 
Us voulaient manager la 

chevre et le chou 

II tient table ouverte 

toujours 
II tondrait un reuf 

II veut toujours s'en faire 

accroire 
Us vont se faire la courte 

echelle 



There is no doubt they 
were accomplices 

They were utterly im- 
poverished 
They fared sumptuously 

They did it unbeknown 

to me 
They are getting on fast 

He can't do anything in 

the matter 
They were worn out with 

fatigue and thirst 

They were overjoyed 
They gave us the slip 

They agree like dog and 

cat 
They complimented each 

other highly 
They have quarrelled with 

each other 
They see each other from 

time to time 
They are at their wits' 

end 
They wished to run with 

the hare and hunt with 

the hounds 
He always keeps open 

house 
He would skin a flint 

He is always putting him- 
self forward 

They mean to give one 
another a turn 



French Section. 



185 



II vous dira au juste ce que 

cela coutera 
II y a plus de fous ache- 

teurs que de fous ven- 

deurs 
II y a quelque anguille sous 

roche 
II y a relache trois fois 

par semaine 
Impuissant 
Insouciance 
J'accepte mais a charge de 

revanche 

Jacquerie 

J'ai bonne cause 

J'ai cede a mon corps 
defendant 

J'ai du faire le pied degrue 
toute la journee 

J'ai eu mal au coeur pen- 
dant la traversee 

J'ai loue une maison a tres- 
bon compte 

J'ai maille a partir avec 
vous 

J'ai passe une nuit blanche 

J'ai |saute 1'escalier quatre 
a quatre 

Jamais en arriere 

Jardin des plantes 

Je 1'accompagnerai malgre 

lui 

Jel'ai pris a condition 
Je le reconnais bien la ! 



He will tell you exactly 

what it will cost 
There are more fools 

among buyers than 

among sellers 
Theie's something hidden 

The theatre is closed 
three times a week 

Powerless 

Coolness ; unconcern 

I will accept on condition 
that I will repay you 
another time 

A revolt of (French) pea- 
sants (in 1358) 

I have a good cause 

I gave way against my 
will 

I had to wait about all day 

I was sick when crossing 

I have hired a very cheap 

house 
I have a bone to pick with 

you 

I passed a sleepless night 
I bolted upstairs 

Never behind 

A botanical garden 

I w T ill go with him in spite 

of his unwillingness 
I had it on approval 
That's just like him ! 



1 86 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Je lui donnerais des points 

Je lui en veux pour sa ne- 
gligence 
J'en ai bien vu d'autres 

J'en aurais leve la main 
Je n'avais ni sou ni maille 
Je n'en cherche qu'un 
Je ne peux pas en revenir 
Je ne peux pas etre au four 

et au moulin 
Je ne sais quoi 
Je n'etais pas bien dans 

mon assiette 
Je ne veux pas qu'il en soit 

quitte a si bon compte 
Je n'oublierai jamais 
Je pense 

Je peux parler en connais- 

sance de cause 
Je saurai en tirer parti 

Je suis pret 
Jet d'eau 

Jeter le manche apres la 

cognee 
Jeu de mots 
Jeu d'esprit 
Jeu de theatre 
Je vais lui dire son fait 

Je viendrai mais contre 

creur 
Je vis d'espoir 



I am more than a match 

for him 
I owe him one for his 

neglect 
I have gone through worse 

than that 

I could have sworn to it 
I was quite cleared out 
I seek but for one 
I can't get over my surprise 
I cannot be in two places 

at one time 
I know not what 
I did not feel quite at 

ease 
He shan't get oft so easily 

as that 

I shall never forget 
I think 

I can speak from experi- 
ence of it 

I shall be able to turn it to 
account 

I am ready 

A fountain ; a water-spout 

To throw the handle after 

the hatchet 
A play upon words 
A witticism 
Stage-trick, or attitude 

I shall give him a piece of 

my mind 
I will come, but against 

my wish 
I live in hope 



French Section. 



187 



Je vous demande bien par- 
don. II n'y a pas de quoi 

Je vous paierai au fur et a 
mesuredevotre ouvrage 

Je vous sais gre de me 
1'avoir dit 

Joli 

Jour de fete 

Journal des debats 

Juste milieu 

J'y suis pour mon cout 
La bataille se fit en rase 

campagne 
La beaute sans vertu est 

une fleur Sans parfum 
La bonne fortune, et la 

mauvaise, sont neces- 

saires a I'homme pour le 

rendre habile 
La carriere ouverte aux 

talents 
Lachete 
La faim chasse le loup du 

bois 



L'affaire se traita de gre 

a gre 
La fenetre donne sur la 

cour interieure 
La fin couronne 1'oeuvre 
La grande nation 
La grande sagesse de 

1'honime consiste a con- 

naitre ses folies 



I really beg your pardon. 

Don't mention it 
I'll pay you as you go on 

I am much obliged to you 
for telling me 

Pretty, attractive 

A fete day 

The journal of the (Parlia- 
mentary) debates 

The happy or golden 
medium 

I paid dear for it 

The battle was fought in 
the open country 

Beauty without virtue is 
a flower without perfume 

Good and bad fortune are 
necessary to a man in 
order to develop his 
character 

The career open to talent 

Cowardice ; laxity 
Famine drives the wolf 

from the wood ; hunger 

breaks through stone 

walls 
They settled the matter by 

themselves 
The window looks on to 

the inner courtyard 
All's well that ends well 
The great nation (France) 
The great wisdom of man 

consists in knowing his 

follies 



1 88 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Laisser-aller 

Laisser faire 
Laissez-nous faire 
La langue lui a fourche 
La maladie sans maladie ; 

hypocondrie 

La Medecine expectante 
L'amour et la fumee ne 

peuvent se cacher 
L'amour propre est le plus 

grand de tousles flatteurs 
La nuit etait si sombre 

qu'il fallait marcher a 
tatons 
La nuit porte conseil 



La patience est amere, mais 

son fruit est doux 
La pelle qui se moque du 

fourgon 
La philosophic, qui nous 

promet de nous rendre 

heureux, nous trompe 
La propriete est un vol 
L'argent est un bon servi- 

teur, et un mechant 

maitre 

La ttite montee 
La verite est cachee au 

fond du puits 
Laver la tfite 
La vertu est la seule 

noblesse 
L'eau en vient a la bouche 



To let (matters) go (on as 

they will) 

Letthingstake their course 
Let us alone 
He made a lapsus-lingui 
Disease without disease ; 

hypochondria 
At the eleventh hour 
Love and smoke cannot be 

concealed 
Self-love is the greatest 

of all flatterers 
The night was so dark that 

we had to grope our way 

Night gives counsel. Take 
counsel with^our pillow. 
Sleep on it 

Patience is bitter, but its 
fruit is sweet 

The pot calling the kettle 
black 

Philosophy, which pro- 
mises to make us happy, 
deceives us 

Property is robbery 

Money is a good servant, 
and (but) a bad master 

Excited ; hot-headed 
Truth lies hidden at the 

bottom of the well 
To bring to book 
Vertue is the only true 

nobility 
That makes one's mouth 

water 



French Section. 



189 



Le beau monde 
Le bleu jure avec le vert 
Le bon de 1'histoire 
Le bon temps viendra 

Le bureau et la' fabrique 

sont de plain-pied 
Le capitaine devait an tiers 

et au quart 

Le cerf etait aux abois * 
Le chant du cygne 
Le chateau fut detruit de 

fond en comble 
Le commencement de la fin 
Le cout en ote le gout 

Le cygne noir 

Le diable boiteux 

Le diner est cuit a point 

Le droit du plus fort 

L'educationest maintenant 
a la portee de tous 

Le gouvernement Ameri- 
cain fut fait a 1'instar du 
gouvernment Anglais 

Le grand ceuvre 

Le jeu n'en vaut pas la 

chandelle 
Le mieux est 1' ennemi du 

bien 
Le moineau en la main 

vaut mieux que 1'oie qui 

vole 



The fashionable world 
Blue clashes with green 
The cream of the story 
There is a good time 

coming 
The office and the factory 

are on the same floor 
The captain was over head 

and ears in debt 
The stag was at bay 
A funeral dirge 
The castle was utterly 

sacked and destroyed 
The turning point 
The cost takes away the 

taste 

The pink of perfection 
The devil on two sticks 
The dinner is done to a T 
Might is right ; to take the 

law into one's own hands 
Education is now within the 

reach of all 
The American government 

was modelled on the 

English 

The great work ; the phi- 
losopher's stone 
The game is not worth the 

candle 
Better is the enemy of well 

A sparrow in the hand is 
better than a goose on 
the wing. A bird in the 
hand is worth two in the 
bush 



1 90 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Le mot de 1'enigme 

Le mot pour rire 

L' Empire c'est la paix 

L' Empire c'est la guerre 

L'empire des lettres 

L'ennemi etait sur le qui 
vive 

Le palais de la verite 

Le petit caporal 

Le petit monde 

Le peuple demandait ven- 
geance a cor ct a cri 

Le pot au lait 

Le roi et 1'etat 

Le roi le veut 

Le roi s'en avisera 

Les adulateurs font leurs 
orges en pillant les autres 

Les affaires font les horn-" 
mes 

Le sage entend ademi mot 

Le savoir-faire 
Le savoir-vivre 
Les bon comptes fom les 

bons amis 
Les bras croises 
Les bras-me sont tombesa 

cette nouvelle 
Les cavaliers couraient a 

bride abattue 
Les cordonniers sont tou- 

jours les plus mal 

chausses 
Les doux yeux 



The key of the mystery 
The cream of the jest 
The Empire is Peace 
The Empire is War 
The republic of letters 
The enemy was on the 

alert 

To speak one's mind 
The little corporal 
The lower classes 
The people howled for 

vengeance 

Stretch of imagination 
The king and the state 
The king wills it 
The king will consider the 

matter 
Flatterers feather their nest 

by robbing others 
Business makes men 

The wise man understands 

with half a word 
Tact 

Knowledge of the world 
Short reckonings make 

long friends 
With folded arms ; idle 
The news took me aback 

The horseman rode with 
bloody spurs 

The shoemaker's wife and 
the farmer's horse are 
always the worst shod 

Soft glances 



French Section. 



191 



Les eaux sont basses chez 

lui 

Les eniants tienent deleurs 
parents en general 

Les extremes se touchent 

Les femnies distinguees se 
mettent avec bon gout 

Les femmes sont souvent 
plus sensibles que sensees 

Les filles atteignent leur 

majorite plus tot que les 

gardens 
Les fous font les festins, et 

les sages les mangent 
Les fous inventent les 

modes, et les sages les 

suivent 
Les greves font beaucoup 

de tort aux ouvriers 
Les hommes prechent 

chacun pour son saint 
Les larmes aux yeux 
Les murailles ont des 

oreilles 
L'esperance est le songe 

d'un homme eveille 
Les petits ruisseaux font 

les grandes rivieres 

Les plaisirs fatiguent a la 

longue 
Les plaisirs sont amers 

sitot qu'on en abuse 
Le style c'est 1'homme 
L'etat c'est moi ! 



The waters are low with 
him ; he is at low water 
He is hard up 

Children generally resem- 
ble their parents 

Extremes meet 

Ladies are distinguished by 
their good taste in dress 

Women are frequently 
more sensitive than sensi- 
ble 

Girls come of age sooner 
than boys 

Fools make feasts, and wise 

men eat them 
Fools invent fashions, and 

wise folk follow them 

Stikes injure the workmen 

Men all have an ' eye to 

their own interest 
In the melting mood 
Walls have ears 

Hope is the dream of a 
waking man 

The small streams make 
the great rivers. Many 
a mickle makes a muckle 

Even pleasures pall 

Pleasures become bitter as 
soon as they are abused 
The style is the man 
The state ! I am the state ! 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Le temps present est gros 

de 1'avenir 
Le tout ensemble 

Le travail eloigne de nous 
trois grands maux, 1'en- 
nui, le vice, et le besoin 

Lettre de cachet 

Le vaisseau etait a deux 
doigts de sa perte 

Le vrai n'est pas toujours 
vraisemblable 

L'habit ne fait pas le moine 

L'homme est toujours 1'en- 

fant, et 1'enfant toujours 

1'homme 

L'homme necessaire 
L'homme propose, et Dieu 

dispose 
L'hypocrisie est un hom- 

mage que le vice rend a 

la vertu 
Liaison 
Litterateur 
Livraison 

Locale 

Loin des yeux loin du cceur 

L'oisivete est la mere de 

tons les vices 
Loyal devoir 
Loyaute m'oblige 
Loyaute n'a honte 
Lune de miel 



The present time is big 

with the future 
The effect of the whole ; 

the general effect 
Labour rids us of three 

great evils irksomeness, 

vice, and need 
A warrant of arrest 
The vessel was all but lost 

The true is not always 

probable. Truth is 

stranger than fiction 
The frock doesn't make the 

monk 
The man is always the 

child, and the child is 

always the man 
The right man 
Man proposes, and God 

disposes 
Hypocrisy is a homage 

which vice renders to 

virtue 

An illicit connection 
A literary man 
Part of a book published 

in series 
Place ; premises 
Out of sight out of mind 
Satan finds some mischief 

still for idle hands to do 
Loyal duty 
Loyalty binds me 
Loyalty has no shame 
Honey-moon 



French Section. 



193 



Ma foi 

Maintiens le droit 
Maison d'arret 
Maison de campagne 
Maison de force 

Maison de sante 
Maison de ville 
Maitre des hautes-oeuvres 
Maitre d'hotel 
Malades imaginaires 



Maladie du pays 
Maladresse 

Mai a propos 
Mai de mer 
Malgre 
Malgre nous 
Malgre soi 

Malheur ne vient jamais 

seul 

Malle-poste 
Manege 
Manger son ble en herbe 

Marchandise, qui plait, est 

a demi vendue 
Marcher bras dessus bras 

dessous 
Marie ton fils quand tu 

voudras, mais ta fille 

quand tu pourras 
Mauvaise honte 



My faith 

Maintain the right 

House of custody ; prison 

A country seat 

House of correction ; bride- 
well 

Lunatic asylum 

The town hall 

Master of the high works 

Steward 

People that fancy them- 
selves ill ; hypochon- 
driacs 

Home-sickness 

Want of tact ; awkward- 
ness 

Ill-timed ; out of place 

Sea-sickness 

Notwithstanding 

In spite of us 

In spite of one's self; 
against the grain 

Misfortunes never come 
alone 

The mail-coach ; the mail 

The art of horsemanship 

To burn the candle at both 
ends 

Goods that please are half 
sold 

To walk arm in arm 

Marry your son when you 
will, and your daughter 
when you can 

False shame 



Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Mauvais gout 

Mauvais sujet 

Mauvais ton 

Medecin, gueris-toi toi- 

meme 

Medecin tant pis 
Melange 

Melee 
Menage 

Mener a la lisiere ; mener 
en laisse ; mener par le 
nez 

Menu 

Mesalliance 

Mettre de 1'eau dans son 

vin 
Mettre la charrue devant 

les bosufs 
Mettre un document au net 

Mieux vauttard que jamais 
Mise en scene 

Moire antique 

Montrer le bout de 1'oreille 

Morceau 

Morgue 

Mot a mot 

Mot du guet ; mot de passe 

Mots d'usage 

Mousseline de laine 

N,ager entre deux eaux 

Naivete 



Bad taste 

A rascal 

Vulgarity 

Physician, heal thyself 

A hypochondriac 

A light entertainment of 

a mixed character 
A disorderly fight 
Household ; housekeeping ; 

economy ; sparingness 
To lead by the nose 

The bill of fare 

Marriage with a person of 
inferior rank 

To pour oil on troubled 
waters 

To put the cart before tin- 
horse 

To make a fair copy of ;i 
document 

Better late than never 

The getting up of a dra- 
matic piece 

Watered silk 

The ass with the lion's skin 

A small piece 

A mortuary 

Word for word 

The watchword 

Words in common use 

A thin woollen material 

To play fast and loose 

Ingenuousness ; innocence 



French Section. 



Ne battre que d'une aile 

Ne (fern. Nee) 

Neglige 

Ne manquez jamais 

votre parole 
Ne pour la digestion 



Ne prends pas si facilement 

la mouche 
Ne prenez pas ce que je 

dis au pied de la lettre 
Ne remettez pas a demain 

ce que vous pouvez faire 

aujourd'hui 
Ne restez jamais entre deux 

airs 
Ne reveillez pas le chat qui 

dort 
N'est-il pas temps de plier 

bagage ? 
Xe vendez jamais la peau 

de 1'ours avant de 1'avoir 

mis par terre 
Ne vous faites pas tirer 

1'oreille 
Niaiseries 

Ni 1'un ni 1'autre 
N'importe 
Noblesse oblige 



To while away one's time 

Born 

Undress 

Never break a promise 

Born merely for the purpose 
of digestion. A social 
drone. Fruges consu- 
mere nati 

Don't be so short tempered 

Don't take what I say 

literally 
Do not put offt ill to-morrow 

what you can do to-day 

Never stay in a draught 

Let well alone ; keep on 

the right road 
Is it not time to be off ? 

Never reckon your chickens 
before they are hatched 

Don't be so unwilling 

Follies, fooleries, absurdi- 
ties, sillinesses, nonsense 

Neither the one nor the 
other 

No matter ; it does not 
signify ; never mind 

Nobility obliges (persons 
that posess it to act 
nobly); we owe some- 
thing to ourselves (our 
own self-respect) 



ig6 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Nom de guerre 

Nom de plume 

Nonchalance 

Nonpareil 

Nos besoins sont nos forces 



Notre-Dame 



N'oubliez pas 
Nourriture passe nature 



Nous avons change tout 
cela 

Nous croyons a propos de 

le quitter 
Nous en etions quittes pour 

la peur 
Nous etions parmi les gros 

bonnets de 1'endroit 
Nous le forcerons a mettre 

les pouces 
Nous ne savons ce que c'est 

que bonheur ou malheur 

absolu 

Noussommesquitteaquitte 
Nous verrons 
Nous y mettrons bon ordre 

Nuance 

Nul bien sans peine 



Assumed name; cognomen 

An assumed literary name 

Carelessness ; indifference 

Unequalled 

Ourwants are our strength. 
Necessity is the mother 
of invention 

Our Lady ; a term applied 
in France to churches 
dedicated to the Virgin 
Mary. The Church of 
Notre-Dame is the Ca- 
thedral of Paris 

Do not forget 

Nurture passes beyond 
nature. Birth is much, 
but goodbreedingis more 

We have changed all that ; 
we are rid of those old- 
fangled notions 

We think it proper to leave 
him 

We got off with nothing 
worse than a fright 

We w r ere amongst the dons 
of the place 

We will make him submit 

We do not know what is 
absolutely good or bad 
fortune 

W r e are quits 

We shall see 

We shall soon set that 
straight 

Shade (of colour, &c.) 

No pains, no gains 



French Section. 



197 



Occasions manquees 
Octroi 

CEil de boeuf 

On commence par etre 
dupe ; on finit par etre 
fripon 

On connait I'ami au besoin 

On coupe les cheveux ras 

aux forsats 
On clit 

On doit appeler tin chat 

un chat 
On en a vu bien d'autres 

On est mieux seul qu'avec 

un sot 

On est un sot 
On 1'a accueilli d'emblee 
On 1'afait mourir a petit feu 

On lui annonga sa mort de 

but en blanc 
On n'a jamais bon marche 

de mauvaise marchandise 

On n'auraitguere de plaisir, 
si Ton ne se flattait point 

On ne cherche point a 
prouver la lumiere 

On ne comprend rien a son 
barbouillage 



Favourable opportunities 

missed 
A tax on articles (for sale) 

entering a town 
A bull's eye 

They begin by being fools 
(dupes), and end in be- 
coming knaves 

A friend in need is a friend 
indeed 

Convicts have their hair 
cropped 

It is said ; a rumour 

You should call a spade a 

spade 
We are used to that sort of 

thing 
One is better alone than 

with a fool 

General report is a fool 
They welcomed him at once 
He was killed by inches 

They told her abruptly of 

his death 
Bad merchandise is never 

a good bargain. Buy 

cheap, buy dear 
But little pleasure would 

a man have if he did not 

flatter himself 
There is no need to prove 

(the existence of) light 

There is no understanding 
his scrawls (rigmarole) ; 
one cannot make head 
or tail of them 



198 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



On ne donne rien si liberale- 

ment que ses conseils 
On ne peut pas avoir le 

drap et 1'argent 
On ne peut pas avoir 

toujours raison 
On ne peut pas s'aviser de 

tout 
On ne saurait faire boire un 

ane s'il n'a soif 

On n'est jamais bien juste 

a l'egard d'un rival 
On n'est jamais si heureux, 

ni si malheureux,qu'on se 

['imagine 
On perd tout le temps qu'on 

peut mieux employer 

On peut aisement se faire 

trop valoir 
On peut savoir a un sou 

pres ce que cela coutera 
On peut souvent faire d'une 

pierre deux coups 
On pourrait s'attirer une 

bien mauvaise affaire 
On pourra toujours payer 

d'audace 
On prend le peuple par les 

oreilles, comme on prend 

un pot par les anses 
On prend souvent 1'indo- 

lence pour la patience 
On se fait cuisinier, mais 

on est ne rotisseur 



People give nothing so 
liberally as their advice 

You can't have your cake 
and eat it too 

One can't be always right 

You cannot think of every- 
thing 

One man may lead a horse 
to the water, but twenty 
cannot make him drink 

We are never very just 
towards a rival 

We are never so happy, 
nor so unhappy, as we 
suppose 

All the time is lost that 
might be better em- 
ployed 

It is easy to be too conceited 

You can tell to a halfpenny 

what it will cost 
One can often kill two birds 

with one stone 
You might get yourself into 

very hot water 
Anyhow we can put a bold 

front on it 
The people should be taken 

by the ears as a pot is 

taken by the handle 
Indolence is often taken 

for patience 
A man may learn to be a 

cook, but he must be 

born a roaster 



French Section. 



199 



On vend toutes les marchan- 

dises au prix de revient 
Orgeat 
Os a ronger 
Oublier je ne puis 
Outrance 
Outre 
Ouvrage 
Ouvrier 
Papeterie 

Papier mache 

Papiilote 
Par accident 
Par accord 
Par-ci par-la 
Par complaisance 

Pardonnez-moi 

Par excellence 

Par exemple 

Parfaitement bien 

Par faveur 

Par hasard 

Par le droit du plus fort 

Par les memes voies on ne 

va pas toujours aux 

memes fins 
Parlez du loup, et vous 

verrez sa queue 

Par moitie 

Parole 

Par parenthese 



All these goods are sold at 
cost price 

A liquor made from barley 

A bone to pick 

I can never forget 

Excess ; extremity 

Extravagant 

Work 

Workman 

A case with writing ma- 
terials 

A substance made of a pulp 
obtained from rags 

Curl paper 

By accident 

In harmony with 

Here and there 

With a desire to be agree- 
able 

Pardon me 

Eminently ; the very ideal 

For example; for instance 

Perfectly well 

By favour 

By chance 

By right of the strongest 

By the same roads we do 
not always arrive at the 
same ends 

Speak of the wolf and you 
will see his tail. Speak 
of the devil, and he will 
appear 

By halves 

Word 

By way of parenthesis 



200 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Par precaution 
Par principe 
Par privilege 
Par signe de mepris 

Part du lion 
Parti 
Partie carree 



Partout 
Parvenu 

Pas 

Pas a pas on va bien loin 

Pas de nouvelles, bonnes 

nouvelles 
Passe 

Passe-partout 
Pas seul 

Patois 

Patte de velours 
Pauvrete n'est pas vice 
Pays de Cocagne 



By way of precaution 
On principle 
By way of privilege 
As a token of contempt 

The lion's share 

Party 

Often used incorrectly by 
English writers and 
speakers to signify a 
small and select party : 
the true meaning, how- 
ever, is a party com- 
posed of two gentlemen 
and two ladies. N.B. 
The expression is some' 
times erroneously writ- 
ten thus partie quarree 

Everywhere 

A person of low origin who 
has risen ; upstart 

A step 

Step by step one goes a 
long way 

No news is good news 

Past ; out of date 
A master-key 

A dance performed by one 

person 
A dialect 
A velvet paw 
Poverty is no vice 

An imaginary country, 
where everything is to be 
had in abundance, and 
without labour 



French Section. 



201 



Pays Latin 

Peine forte et dure 
Penchant 

Pensee 

Pere de famille 

Perruques 

Persiflage 
Personnel 

Petit 

Petit bourgeois 

Petites affiches 

Petit maitre 

Peu 

Peu a pen 

Peu de bien, peu de soin 

Pen de femmes desirent 

coiffer Sainte Catherine 
Peu de gens savent ctre 

vieux 
Peu s'en est fallu qu'il ne 

soit tombe 
Piece de resistance 
Pieces de position 
Pied poudreux 
Piquant 
Pis aller 
Place aux dames 



Lit., The Latin territory, 
district, region. The 
students of the Pays 
Latin, that is, of the Uni- 
versity 

Severe punishment; strong 
and severe pain 

Strong inclination for any- 
thing 

A thought ; consideration 

The father of a family ; 
paterfamilias 

Lit. wigs ; drivelling old 
men 

Chaff; banter 

The staff of an establish- 
ment 

Small, little, insignificant 

A second-rate citizen, cit 

Advertisements 

A little master ; a fop 

Little, few 

By degrees 

Little wealth, little care 

Few women wish to die old 
maids 

Few persons know how to 
grow old (gracefully) 

He very nearly fell 

The principal dish 

Heavy guns 

A vagabond 

Pointed ; pungent 

The last resort 

(Make) way for the ladies 



202 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Plaqu6 ; double (Ormolu) 

Plateau 

Plains pouvoirs 

Plus on est de fous, plus 

on rit 

Plus sages que les sages 
Point d'appui 
Porte-monnaie 
Pose 
Poste restante 



Pour comble de bonheur 
Pour connaitre un homme, 
il faut avoir mange un 
muid de sel avec lui 

Pour couper court 

Pour encourager les autres 

Pour faire rire 
Pour passer le temps 
Pour prendre conge 

(P.P.C.) 
Pour totijours 

Pour vivre longtemps, il 
faut etre vieux de bonne 
heure 

Pour y parvenir 

Pouvez-vous traduire a 

livre ouvert ? 
Precis 
Prendre fait et cause pour 

quelqu'un 



Ormolu ; brass with the 

appearance of gold 
Tray ; table-land 
Full powers 
The more fools, the more 

fun 

More wise than the wise 
Point of support ; prop 
A purse 

Position ; attitude 
Lit. post left ; place at the 
* Post Office where letters 

may be addressed to be 

left till called for 
As the height of happiness 
To know a man, you must 

have eaten a bushel (lit. 

hogshead) of salt with 

him 

To cut matters short 
To serve as a warning to 

the rest 

To move laughter 
To pass away the time 
To take leave 

For ever 

In order to live long, one 
must be old (in acquire- 
ments) early 

To accomplish the object 
Can you translate at sight ? 

A summary ; an epitome 
To take anybody's side 



French Section. 



203 



Prendre la clef des champs 
Prendre la lune avec les 
dents 

Prendre une condition 
Prends-moi tel que je suis 
Prenez des informations la- 

dessus 

Prenez garde 
Pres de 1'eglise, loin de 

Dieu 
Prestige 

Pret a accomplir; pres 

d'accomplir 
Pret pour mon pays 
Pris sur le fait 
Proces verbal 
Projet 
Proletaire 

Propriete litteraire 
Protege (fern, gee) 

Qu'a cela ne tienne, venez 

sans fa9on 
Quand il tomberait des 

hallebardes, je viendrais 
Quand on ne trouve pas 

son repos en soi-meme, 

il est inutile de le cher- 

cher ailleurs 



To catch the ball as it 
bounds ; to seize an op- 
portunity 

To take French leave 
To seize the moon with 
one's teeth ; to try to do 
the impossible 
To take service 
Take me just as I am 
Make enquiries about it 

Take care 

The nearer the church, 
the farther from God 

Magic spell ; position ; in- 
fluence 

Ready to accomplish 

Ready for my country 
Caught in the act 
Official report 
A plan or project 

A person of the lower 
orders 

Literary property ; copy- 
right 

One protected or patron- 
ized 

Never mind, come without 
ceremony 

I will come though it rain 
cats and dogs 

When one does not find 
repose in oneself, it is 
vain to seek it elsewhere 



204 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Quand on voit la chose on 

la croit 
Que diable allait-il faire 

dans cette galere ? 
Que dit-on de nouveau ce 

soir? 

Que je t'y prenne 
Quelle imprevoyance de 

vivre toujours au jour le 

jour 

Quelque chose 
Que lui importe cela 
Que vous faut-il ? 
Qui aime bien, chatie bien 



Qui est-ce qui attachera le 

grelot ? 

Qui m'aime,aimemonchien 
Qu'importe ! 
Qui n'a point de sens a 

trente ans, n'en aura 

jamais 

Qui n'a sante n'a rien 

Qui n'entend qu'une cloche, 

n'entend qu'un son 
Qui ne risque rien n'a rien 

Qui pense ? 

Qui se ressemble s'assemble 

Qui trop embrasse mal 

etreint 
Qui veut noyer son chien 

1'accuse de la rage 



Seeing is believing 

Why on earth did you go 

there ? 
What's the news this 

evening? 
Let me catch you 
How imprudent always to 

live from hand to mouth 

A trifle ; something 
What's that to him 
What do you require ? 
He loves well , who chastises 

well ; spare the rod and 

spoil the child 
Who will bell the cat ? 

Love me, love my dog 
What does it matter ! 
He who has no sense at 

thirty, will never have 

any. A fool at forty is 

a fool indeed 
He that wants health wants 

everything 
Hear both sides 

Nothing venture nothing 

gain 

Who thinks ? 
Birds of a feather flock 

together 
Don't have too many irons 

in the fire 
Give a dog a bad name and 

hang him 



French Section. 



205 



Qui vive ? 

Quoi de plus ennuyeux que 
de faire tapisserie toute 
la soiree 

Raconteur 

Ragout 

Raison d'etre 

Raisonne, catalogue rai- 
sonne 

Ramollissement 

Ranz des vacbes 



Rapprochement 

Rechauffe 

Recherche 

Reclame 

Reconnaissance 

Recueil 

Recueil choisi 

Reculer pour mieux sauter 

Redacteur 

Regime 

Remercier 

Renaissance 

Rencontre 

Rendezvous 

Rentes 

Repondre en Normand 



Who goes there ? (on the 
qui vive, or the alert) 

How annoying to be ne- 
glected at the ball 

A narrator 

A highly seasoned dish 
Reason for existence 
Explanatory catalogue 

Softening of the brain 
Lit. ranks or rows of the 
cows ; Swiss melodies 
played as cow-calls so 
called because the cows 
on hearing the air come 
up to the player in rows 
The act of bringing to- 
gether : reconciliation 
Warmed up (cauld kail 

het again) 
Elegant ; attractive 
A puff 

A survey of the position 
A collection 
A choice collection 
To walk before you run 
Editor (of a newspaper) 
Government ; mode of 

living 

To return thanks 
Revival 
An encounter 
A place fixed for a meeting 
The funds (of France) 
To give an evasive answer 



206 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Reponse sans replique 

Resume 
Reunion 
Revanche 
Reveil 

Revenons a nos moutons 

Rien ne pese tant qu'un 

secret 
Rien ne ressemble mieux 

a un honnete homme 

qu'un fripon 
Rien n'est beau que le vrai 

Rigueur 

Rira bien, qui rira le 

dernier 
Rire sous cape; rire dans 

sa barbe 
Role 
R61e d'equipage 

Roquelaure 

Roue 

Rouge 

Rouge et noir 

Roulette 

Ruse centre ruse 

Ruse de guerre 

Sain et sauf 

Salle 

Salle a manger 

S'amuser a la moutarde 



A reply that admits of no 
rejoinder ; a conclusive 
answer 

An abstract or epitome 

A reunion 

Revenge 

The beat of the drum at 
daybreak 

Let us return to our subject 

Nothing so oppressive as 
a secret 

Nothing more closely re- 
sembles an honest man 
than a knave 

Nothing is beautiful but 
truth 

Strictness 

He laughs best who laughs 

last 
To laugh in one's sleeve 

A character in a play 

A list of the crew; muster- 
roll 

A cloak 
A profligate 

Red ; powder for the face 
A game of chance 
A game of chance 
Diamond cut diamond 
A stratagem 
Safe and sound , 
A hall 

A dining room 
To stand trifling 



French Section. 



207 



Sang-froid 

Sans 

Sans ceremonie 
Sans changer 
Sans culottes 

Sans Dieu, rien 

Sans doute 

Sans fa9on 

Sans pain et sans vin, 
1'amour n'estrien; quand 
la pauvrete entre par la 
porte, 1'amour s'envole 
par la fenetre 

Sans peur et sans reproche 

Sans souci 

Sans tache 

Sante 

Sauce d'appetit est la 

meilleure 
Sauve qui peut 
Savant 
Savoir 
Savoir faire 
Savoir vivre 

Seance 

Secret de la comedie 
Selon les regies 
S'embarquer sans biscuit 



Sens dessus dessous 



Cold blood ; indifference ; 

apathy 
Without 

Without ceremony 
Without changing 
Ragged men ; the lower 

classes 

Nothing without God 
Without doubt 
Without ceremony 
Without bread and without 

wine, love is nothing ; 

when poverty enters the 

door, love flies out of the 

window 
Without fear and without 

reproach 
Free and easy 
Without stain 
Health 
Hunger is the best sauce 

Save himself who can 

A learned man 

Knowledge 

Ability ; skill ; wits 

Good breeding ; refined 
manners 

Session ; sitting 

Everybody's secret 

According to rule 

To embark without pro- 
visions. To begin an 
undertaking without the 
means of carrying it out 

Topsy-turvy, upside down 



208 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Ses folies sautent aux yeux 
Ses ouvrages font loi 
Se tirer d'affaire 
Se trouver a la hauteur de 

la situation 
Siecle 
Siecle d'or 

Siecles des tenebres 
Si je puis 
Silhouette 
Sobriquet 
Societes anonymes 
Soi-disant 

Soi-meme 

Soiree 

Solidarite 



Son esprit n'est pas de bon 

aloi 
Songes sont mensonges 

Sortie 

Soubrette 

SoufHer le chaud et le froid 

Souhaiter une bonne fete 

Soupcon 

Sous tous les rapports 

Souvenez-vous que lesbons 
comptes font les bons 
amis 



His foibles are palpable 
His works are quiteclassics 
To save one's bacon 
To rise to the occasion 

An age 

The golden age (of 
Louis XIV.) 

The dark ages 

If I can 

A small portrait in profile 

A nickname 
Joint-stock companies 

Self-styled ; would-be; pre- 
tended 

One's self 

An evening party 

A union of interest be- 
tween individuals ; joint 
liability 

His wit is something musty 

Dreams are lies. Don't 
trust dreams 

A sally 

A female attendant 

To blow hot and cold 
To wish many happy re- 
turns of the day 

A little of anything ; a 
a suspicion ; a taste 

In all respects ; under all 
circumstances 

Remember, short reckon- 
ings make long friends 



French Section. 



209 



Souvenir 

Souvent le mieux est 

1'ennemi du bien 
Soyez ferine 
Spirituel 
Suave 
Suite 

Suivez la raison 

Sujet 

Sur le tapis 

Suzerain 
Tableau 

Table d'hote 

Tache sans tache 

Tachez de ne pas nous 

faire faux bond 
Taisez-vous 

Tant bien que mal il en sut 

sortir 

Tant mieux 
Tant pis 
Tant soit peu 
Tapis 
Tel est tres-susceptible qui 

taquine les autres 
Tel maitre, tel valet 

Tel qui rit vendredi di- 

manche pleurera 
Tete-a-tete 
Tic douloureux 
Tiens a la verite 
Tiens ta foi 



A keepsake 

It's often best to leave 
well alone 

Be stanch 

Intelligent 

Sweet 

Remaining part; atten- 
dants ; a series 

Follow reason 

A subject 

On the carpet ; under con- 
sideration 

Over-lord 

Picture; striking represen- 
tation 

The ordinary (dinner) 

A work without a stain 

Try not to disappoint us 

Be quiet 

Somehow or other he got 

through it 
So much the better 
So much the worse 
Never so little 
A carpet 
Very touchy persons often 

tease others 
Like master, like man 
Don't laugh till you cry 

Face to face ; conversation 
Neuralgic pain 
Keep the truth 
Keep thy faith 



210 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Tiers-etat 



Timbre-poste 

Tire a quatre epingles 

Tirer a la courte paille 

Tirer le diable par le queue 

Tocsin 

Tomber des nues 

Tome 
Ton 

Toujours a toi 
Toujours pret 
Tour de force 
Tour d'expression 

Tout 

Tout-a-fait 
Tout a 1'heure 
Tout au contraire 

Tout ce qui brille n'est 

pas or 

Tout chemin va a Rome 
Tout chien qui aboie ne 

mord pas 

Tout chien sur son fumier 
est hardi 



Tout de meme 



Lit. The third estate ; that 
is, the people of France 
as distinguished from 
the nobility and the 
higher clergy. The 
commons 

Postage stamp 

Neat as a pin 

To draw lots 

To go to the dogs 

An alarm bell 

Unexpected ; without 

parallel 

Volume 

Tone ; taste; 

Ever thine 

Always ready 

A feat of strength 

A peculiar mode of ex- 
pression 

All 

Quite ; entirely 

Just now 

On the contrary ; quite the 

reverse 
All that glitters is not gold 

By hook or by crook 
Every dog that barks does 

not bite. Barking dogs 

seldom bite 
Every dog is valiant on his 

own dunghill. Every 

cock crows loudest on 

his own dunghill 
All the same 



French Section. 



211 



Tout d'un coup 
Tout est pris 

Tout le monde 

Tout le monde ne gagne 

pas a etre connu 
Tout le monde veut du 

bien a cette personne 
Tout lui sourit 

Tout ou rien 

Tout se passa en un clin 

d'oeil 
Tout vient a. point a qui 

salt attendre 
Traduire a livre ouvert 
Trait 

Traiter de haut en has 
Travailler en pleinair 
Tres-bien 
Tres-peu 
Triste 
Tristesse 
Un bon marche n'est pas 

toujours bon marche 
Un chien peut bien regarder 

un eveque 

Une bonne a tout faire 
Une fois n'est pas coutume 



Une heure vient de sonner 
Un homme averti en vaut 
deux 



At one stroke ; suddenly 

All is taken ; every avenue 
preoccupied 

Every one 

Everyone does not im- 
prove on acquaintance 

Everyone wishes her well 

Everything goes well with 

him 

All or nothing 
The whole thing took place 

in a flash of lightning 
All things come to him 

who waits 

To translate at sight 
A feature 
To laugh to scorn 
To work out of doors 
Very well 
Very little 
Sad ; melancholy 
Sadness ; depression 
A bargain is not always a 

good bargain 
Surely a cat may look at a 

king 
A general servant 

One act does not make a 
habit ; one swallow does 
not make a summer ; no 
rule without an ex- 
ception 

One o'clock has just struck 
To be forewarned is to be 
forearmed 



212 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Un malheur ne vient 

jamais seul 
Un sot a triple etage 
Un sot trouve toujours un 

plus sot qui 1'admire 
Un tiens vaut deux tu 

1'auras 

Un vaurien qui bat le pave 
Valet de chambre 
Vedettes 
Ventre a terre 
Verite 

Verite sans peur 
Vers de societe 



Vertu 

Verve 

Vis-a-vis 

Vive la bagatelle ! 

Vive le roi ! 

Vivre comme un coq en pate 

Voila qu'il broie du noir 

Voila tout 

Voila une autre chose 

Voir le dessous des cartes 

Voir tout couleur de rose ; 
voir tout en rose 

Voiture 

Voulez-vous faire une partie 
de boules ? 



Misfortunes seldom come 

alone 

An egregious blockhead 
A fool always finds a greater 

fool to admire him 
A bird in the hand is 

worth two in the bush 
A vagabond loafing about 
An attendant ; a footman 
Sentinels on horseback 
With whip and spur 
Truth 

Truth without fear 
Society verses, composed 

for the amusement of a 

private party 
Virtue 

Animation ; spirit 
Opposite ; face to face 
Success to trifling ! Trifles 

for ever ! 

Long live the king 
To live in clover 

Look at him in a brown 

study 
That is all 

That's quite a different 

matter 
To be in the secret 

To regard everything fa- 
vourably; to look always 
on the sunny side 

A carriage 

Will you have a game of 
skittles ? 



French Section. 



213 



Youloir prendre la lune 

avec les dents 
Vouloir rompre 1'anguille 

au genou 
Vous faites la sourde oreille 

Vous ne me garderez pas 

rancune pour cela 
Yous ne me jetterez pas 

ainsi de la poudre aux 



Vous n'etes pas clans mes 

petits papiers 
Vous pretez continuelle- 

ment a rire 
Vous verrez que vous vous 

en mordrez les doigts 
Vous vous moquez de moi 
Vous vous pretez la a quel- 

que chose d'equivoque 
Vous y perdrez vos pas 
Voyageur 
Yraisemblance 



To attempt the impossible 
To attempt the impossible 

You are deaf to the voice 
of the charmer 

You wont bear me malice 

on that account 
You wont blind me in 

that way 

You are not in my good 

books now 
You are always making 

yourself ridiculous 
You will find you will be 

sorry for it 

You are laughing at me 
You are engaged in a 

doubtful business 
You will lose your labour 
A traveller 
Likelihood ; probability 



ITALIAN SECTION. 



A buon intenditor poche 
parole 



A cader va chi troppo alto 
sale 



A can che lecchi cenere 

non gli fidar farina 
A causa persa, parole assai 



A caval donate non gli si 

guarda in bocca 
Accelerando 

A chi consiglia non duole il 

capo 

Adagio (Ado.) 
Ad area aperta il giusto 

pecca 



Ad ogni cosa e rimed io 
fuora ch' alia morte 



A person of good appre- 
hension (needs) few 
words. A word (is 
enough) to the wise 

Who climbs too high may 
fear to fall. Climb not 
too high lest the fall be 
greater 

A dog that licks ashes, 
trust not with meal 

What is done cannot be 
undone. " Advice comes 
too late when a thing is 
done " 

Look not a gift horse in 
the mouth 

Gradually faster ; with in- 
creasing quickness 

Counsel is easier than help 

Slowly 

With an open chest by 

him, the just man sins. 

Opportunity makes the 

thief 
For everything there's a 

remedy except death. 

There's a salve for every 

sore 



Italian Section. 



215 



Ad ogni uccello, suo nido e 
bello 

Affettuoso (Affeto.) 
Aggio 



Agitato 

Ai ricchi non mancano 
parenti 



Al confessor, medico, ed 
avvocato, non si de'tener 
il vero celato 

Al finir del gioco, si vede 
chi ha guadagnato 

Al fresco 

Alia barba dei pazzi, il 
barbier impara a radere 
Alia buon 'ora 
Alia caccia 



AH'arnico curagli il fico, al 
1'inimico il persico 

Alia rinfusa 

Allegretto (Allege.) 
Allegro (Allo.) 



There is no place like home 
(lit., to every bird its 
own nest is admirable) 

Softly, affectingly, patneti- 
cally 

(Exchange, discount) The 
difference in value be- 
tween one sort of money 
and another, and es- 
pecially between notes 
and coin (particularly on 
the Continent) 

With agitation 

The rich have never re- 
lations to seek. Land 
was never lost for want 
of an heir 

Hide nothing from thy 
confessor, physician, or 
lawyer 

At the end of the game 
one may see who hath 
won 

In the fresh, or open air 

A barber learns to shave 
on a fool's chin 

At last ; well done you 

In hunting style ; after the 
manner of the chase 
(caccia) 

Pull a fig for your friend, 
and a peach for your 
enemy 

Helter-skelter, higgledy- 
piggledy 

Lively, pretty 

Sprightly, lively 



216 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Al molino ed alia sposa 
sempre manca qualche 
cosa 

Alto (A., or Alt.), or con- 
tralto 

Alto relievo 

Altro che ! 

Amor e signoria non vo- 
gliono compagnia 

Amoroso (Amo.) 

Andante (Andte.) 

Andantino (Ando.) 

Andare stretto 



Animate (An. or Anim.) 
Anno di neve, anno di bene 
A poco a poco 
Appassionato 

Appetite non vuol salse 
Appoggiato 



Appoggiatura 

A prima vista 

Aquila non mangia mosche 

Arco 
Aria 
Arietta 
Arioso 



A mill and a woman are 
always in want of some- 
thing 

The voice above the tenor, 
counter-tenor 

High relief (in sculpture) 

Certainly; I should think so 

Love and lordship like no 
fellowship 

Tenderly, lovingly 

Moderately slowly 

Somewhat slower than au- 
dante 

To do business shabbily. 
To lose the ship for a 
ha'porth of tar 

With animation 

A snow year, a rich year 

By and by, by degrees 

With passion ; in an im- 
passioned manner 
Hunger is the best sauce 

Lit. propped ; indicating 
that the notes are to be 
played so as to glide in- 
sensibly into each other 

A note between others to 
effect an easy movement 

At sight 

An eagle does not feed 

upon flies 

The bow (of the violin, &c.) 
An air 
A little air 
In light, airy manner 



Italian Section. 



217 



Arpeggio (Arpo.) 

Arrivederci 
Assai 

Assai ben balla a chi For- 

tuna suona 
A tavola rotonda non si 

contende del luogo 
Attacca subito 



Avere sulla punta della 

lingua 
Aver la pera monda 



Aver le traveggole 
A vostro commodo 

Bandito (pi. banditi) 
Barba bagnata mezza rasa 

Barcarola 



Basso (B.) 



Indicating that the notes 
are to be struck in rapid 
succession, not simul- 
taneously ; as on the harp 

Hope to meet you soon 
again 

Very ; as allegro assai, 
very lively 

He dances well to whom 
Fortune pipes 

At a round table there's 1 
no dispute about place 

"Attack suddenly"; indi- 
cating that a second 
movement is to be begun 
instantly after the close 
of the first 

To have a thing at the tip 
of one's tongue 

To have one's pear ready 
pared. To be born with 
a silver spoon in one's 
mouth 

To see double; to see one 
thing for another 

At your leisure; at your 
convenience 

An outlaw 

A lathered beard is half 
shaved. Well begun is 
half done 

A melody or air sung by 
the gondoliers of Venice ; 
a piece of instrumental 
music in imitation of 
such airs 

Base, or bass ; the lowest 
male voice 



218 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Basso relievo 



Battuta 



Bella donna e veste tag- 
liuzzata sempre s'imbatte 
in qualche uncino 

Bella femina che ride, vuol 
dir, borsa che piange 

Belle parole non pascon i 
gatti 

Ben trovato 

Bisogna battere il ferro 

mentre e caldo 
Bisogno fa trottar la vecchia 

Bocca (in) chiusa, mosca 

non ci entra 
Bravo 

Bravura 

Brillante (Brill.) 
Buffo 

Cadenza 



Cader dalla padella nelle 
bragie 



Low relief; where the figures 
(in sculpture) do not 
stand out far 

The accented part of the 
bar in music ; the part 
marked in beating time 

A pretty girl in a tattered 
gown is sure to find some 
hook in the way 

When a pretty woman 
smiles look to your purse 

Fine words don't feed cats ; 

fine words butter no 

parsnips 

Well found ; very ingenious 
Strike while the iron is hot 

Need makes the old wife 

trot 
A close mouth catcheth no 

flies 
Well done ! An assassin, 

bandit, or daring villain 

A florid, brilliant, difficult 

air 
Brilliant ; lively 

Comic; the comic actor in 
an opera 

An ornamental passage in- 
troduced by a musical 
performer, either actu- 
ally or apparently im- 
promptu, and heralding 
the close 

To fall out of the frying- 
pan into the fire 



Italian Section. 



219 



Calando (Calo.) 

Cambio non e furto 
Camera 

Cane che abbaie, non 
morde 

Cane vecchio non baia 

indarno 
Canone 



Can scottato d'acqua calda 
ha paura, poi della fredda 



Cantabile (Cant.) 
Cantata 



Cantilena 



Canto 



Gradually becoming slower 
and less vigorous 

Exchange is no robbery 

A chamber. Musica di 
camera, chamber-music 

The dog that barks does 
not bite. Barking dogs 
seldom bite 

If the old dog barks, he 
gives counsel 
canon ; when the same 
melody is taken up by 
the different parts in 
succession, at the dis- 
tance of one or more 
bars. In the canone can- 
crizans, or canone al rovescio, 
in one of the parts, the 
melody is sung back- 
wards 

The scalded dog dreads 
hot water, and after- 
wards cold. The burnt 
child dreads the fire 

In graceful, elegant, sing- 
ing style 

A composition for one or 
more voices, including 
recitatives and airs ; now 
usually a short compo- 
sition in oratorio form, 
but without dramatis per - 



The part of a composition 
containing the melody or 
air 

The treble, or highest part 
in choral music 



220 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Canzone 
Canzonetta 

Capella 



Capo 

Capper! ! 

Cappita! Caspita ! 

Capriccio 



Capriccioso 

Cara sposa 

Carbonaro (pi. carbonari) 



Casino 

Cattiva e quella lana, che 

non si puo tingere 
Caval non morire, che erba 

de' venire 
Cavatina 



Cembalo 

Cento carra di pensieri non 

pagheranno un' oncia di 

debito 



Cercare il pelo nell' uovo 



Chaconne 



A song 

A canzonet ; a little or 
short song 

A church. Maestro di 
Capella, chapel-master ; 
director of the music of 
a church 

The head ; beginning 

Dear me ! 

Wonderful ! 

An irregular composition, 
in which the composer 
follows his fancy or 
caprice, rather than rule 

In free, fantastic style 

Dear spouse, or wife 

Lit. a charcoal-burner. 
A member of a secret 
society (in Italy) ; hence 
an ultra-democrat 

Club-house 

It is a bad cloth that will 
take no colour 

While the grass grows, the 
steed starves 

An air in one part or move- 
ment ; a short, simple 
air 

The harpsichord 

A hundred waggon -loads of 
thoughts will not pay 
one ounce of debt. A 
pound of care will not 
pay an ounce of debt 

To pick faults where no 
faultsare. "Tofindspots 
in the sun " 

A slow dance tune 



Italian Section. 



221 



Che sara sara 
Chiaroscuro 

Chi ben cena ben dorme 

Chi bestia va a Roma 
bestia ritorna 

Chi compra ha bisogno di 
cent' occhi, chi vende ne 
ha assai di uno 

Chi con 1'occhio vede, col 
cuor crede 

Chi tace confessa 

Chi da presto raddoppia il 
dono 



Chi digallinanasce convien 
che raspi, o razzoli 

Chi dorme coi cani si 
sveglia colle pulci 

Chi fa il conto senza 1'oste 
lo fa due volte 

Chi ferra, inchioda 



Chi ha arte per tutto ha 

parte 
Chi 1' ha per natura, fin alia 

fossa dura 



What is to be, will be 

An artistic distribution of 
light and shade 

He that sups well, sleeps 
well 

He that goes to Rome a 
fool returns a fool. 
Ccelum, non animum, &>c. 

Who buys hath need of a 
hundred eyes ; who sells 
hath enough of one 

He that sees with the eye, 
believes with the heart. 
Seeing is believing 

Silence is confession (or 
admission) 

He gives twice who gives 
quickly. " He gives 
twice who gives in a 
trice " 

What is born of hen will 
scrape 

Evil communications cor- 
rupt good manners 

He that reckons without 
the host must reckon 
twice 

He that shoes a horse, 
pricks him. It is a good 
horse that never stum- 
bles, and a good wife 
that never grumbles 

He that has an art, has 
everywhere a part 

That which we have by 
nature remains with us 
till death. What is bred 
in the bone will come 
out of the flesh 



222 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Chi la dura la vince 



Chi nasce bella nasce 
maritata 

Chi non ha cervello, abbia 
jjambe 



Chi non ha cuore, abbia 
gambe 



Chi non pud fare come 
voglia, faccia come puo 

Chi non sa niente, non 
dubita di niente 

Chi non s'arrischia, non 
guadagna. Chinonrisica 
non rosica 

Chi per man d'altri s'im- 
bocca, tardi satolla 

Chi pratica con lupi im- 
para a urlar 



Chi risponde presto, sa 
poco 

Chi si maritain fretta stenta 
adagio 

Chi sputa contra il vento 
si sputa contra il viso 



Patience conquers hard- 
ship. " He that endureth 
overcomes " 

She that is born handsome, 
is born married 

He that has no brains, 
ought to have legs. Who 
has not a good tongue, 
ought to have good hands 

He that has no heart 
(courage) ought to have 
legs. One pair of heels is 
often worth two pair of 
hands 

He that cannot do as he 
would, must do as he can 

He who knows nothing, 
doubts nothing 

Nothing venture, nothing 
have 

He that depends on ano- 
ther man's table often 
dines late 

He that keeps company 
with a wolf will learn to 
howl. Tell me who you 
keep company with, and 
I'll tell you what you are 

He who answers suddenly, 
knows little of the matter 

Marry in haste and repent 
at leisure 

He that spits against the 
wind spits in his own 
face. He that blows in 
the dust fills his eyes 



Italian Section. 



223 



Chi tardi arriva male 
alloggia 

Chi t' ha offeso non ti per- 

dona mai 
Chi tutto abbraccia, nulla 

stringe 

Chi va al mulino s'infarina 

Chi va piano, va sano ed 
anche lontano 

Cicerone 

Cicisbeo (pL cicisbei) 

Coda 



Col'arco (C.A.) 



Colla paglia si maturano le 

nespole 
Colla parte (C.P.), or Colla 

voce 



Commodo (Com.) 
Compagnia d'uno, com- 
pagnia di niuno 



Who arrives late finds 
bad accommodation ; the 
sluggard never gets in 
time 

He that has offended you 
will never forgive you 

He that grasps at all 
catches none. Grasp all, 
lose all 

You cannot touch pitch 
without being defiled 

He that goes gently goes 
safely, and also far. Fair 
and softly go far in a day 

A guide 

A man that hangs about a 
married woman 

Tail; a short passage ex- 
tending the conclusion 
of a piece of music 

"With the bow;" indica- 
ting that the player is to 
resume the bow, after 
notes played by a twitch 
of the fingers 

Patience overcomes every- 
thing 

" With the part, or voice," 
indicating that the ac- 
companist is to keep 
by the principal part (in 
cases where the perfor- 
mer quickens or slackens 
his pace at pleasure) 

Easy 

The company of one is the 
company of none; one 
man's company is no 
company 



224 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Compagno allegro per ca- 
mino ti serve per ronzino 

Con amore 

Con anima 
Concertante 



Concerto 



Con commodo 

Con cura 

Con delicatezza 

Con diligenza 

Con dolcezza 

Con dolore 

Con forza 

Con fuoco 

Con grazia 

Con gusto 

Conoscente (pi. conos- A connoisseur 

centi) 
Conoscere il pel nell'uovo 



A merry companion on the 
road is as good as a nag. 
Comes jucundus, &>c. 

With love (for the occupa- 
tion) 

With animation 

A piece of music, in which 
several principal instru- 
ments or voices take the 
principal part alternate- 
ly, the others accom- 
panying 

A composition for a single 
principal instrument, 
with accompaniments 
for a full orchestra 

At a convenient rate 

Carefully 

With delicacy 

Diligently 

With sweetness 

With grief 

With force 

With fire, or spirit 

With grace 

Tastefully; in elegant style 



Con pazienza 
Con permesso 
Con piacere 
Con scienza 

Con sordini 



To know the skin of an 
egg ; to know which side 
one's bread is buttered on 

Patiently 

May I 

With pleasure 

With learning ; with 
thorough knowledge 

With mutes 



Italian Section. 



225 



Conti chiari amici can 
Contrabasso (C.B.) 

Contrabbandiere 
Contrada dei nobili 

Contra-fagotto 

Con variazioni 

Conversazione 

Corno 

Corno di bassetto 

Corpo di Bacco ! 

Cosa ben fatta e fatta due 

volte 
Cosa fatta capo ha 

Cosa fatta per forza non 

vale una scorza 
Cresce il di,cresce '1 freddo, 

dice il pescatore 

Crescendo (Cr., or Cres.) 



Da capo (D.C.) 

Danari fanno danari 
Dar del naso dentro 
Da retta 



Short reckonings, dear 
friends. Even reckoning 
keeps long friends 

Thedouble-bass; the largest 
of the violin class of in- 
struments 

A smuggler 

The quarter of the nobles 

(in Italian cities') 
The double bassoon 
With variations 
A social gathering 
A horn 

The basset-horn ; a large 
instrument like the cla- 
rionet 

Good Heavens ! (lit. body of 
Bacchus) 

A thing well done is double 
done 

A thing done is out of hand 

A thing done perfect is not 
worth a rush 

As the day lengthens, the 
cold strengthens, says 
the fisherman 

Increasingly; with gradu- 
ally increasing loudness ; 
indicating that the notes 
it refers to are to be 
gradually swelled 

From the beginning ; over 
again 

Money makes money 

To put one's foot in it 

I say Listen 

p 



226 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Dare in guardia la lattuga 
ai paperi 



Del cuoio d' altri si fanno 
corregge larghe 

Delle ingiurie il rimedio e 

lo scordarsi 
Del senno di poi n'e piena 

ogni fossa 

Dentro da un orecchio e 

fuora dall'altro 
Devotissimo suo 
Di badessa tornar conversa 



Di buona terra to la vigna, 
di buona madre to la 
figlia 

Di buon'ora 

Di giorno 

Di giovani ne muoiono 

molti, di vecchi ne 

scampa nessuno 
Di il vero e affronterai il 

diavolo 
Dilettante (pi. dilettanti) 



Diminuendo (Dim.) 



To give the lettuce to the 

keeping of the geese ; 

to give the wolf the 

wether (or the fox the 

chickens) to keep 
They cut large thongs from 

olhei people's leather. 

De alieno corio, &*c. 
The best remedy for wrongs 

is to forget them 
Every ditch is full of people 

that are wise alter the 

event 
In at one ear, and out at 

the other 
Yours truly 

From an abbess to become 
a lay-sister. To come 
down in the world. From 
horses to asses 

Like father, like son. 
Take a vine of a good 
soil, and the daughter of 
a good mother 

Early 

By day 

Of young men die many, 

ot old men escape not 

any 
Speak the truth and shame 

the devil 
One that cultivates art or 

science only by way of 

amusement or recreation 
Gradually decreasing in 

loudness. Opposite to 

crescendo 



Italian Section. 



227 



Dimmi con chivai, e sapro 
quello che fai 



Di molto 

Dio non voglia 
Di notte 
Di salto 

Dispicca 1'impiccato, che 
impicchera poi te 

Di un dono far due amici 
Divertimento 



Divieni tosto vecchio, se 
vuoi vivere lungamente 
vecchio 

Dolce (Dol.) 

Dolce cose a vedere, e dolci 
inganni 



Dolce far niente 
Doloroso 

Domanda all'osto s' egli ha 
buon vino 

Donne, preti, e polli non 
son mai satolli 



Tell me who you keep 
company with, and I'll 
tell you what your 
character is. A man is 
known by his associates 

Very ; adagio di molto, very 
slow 

Heaven forbid 

By night 

By leaps and bounds 

Save a thief from the 
gallows, and he'll cut 
your throat 

With one gift to make two 
friends. To kill two 
birds with one stone 

A short musical piece, vocal 
or instrumental, in a light 
and familiar style 

You must soon become old, 
if you wish to live long 
old. Old young, and old 
long 

Soft and sweet (music) 

Sweetto the eye and flatter- 
ing to the sense. "All 
that glitters is not gold." 
" A goodly apple rotten 
at the heart " 

The pleasure of idleness 

In melancholy style ; soft 
and pathetic (music) 

Ask your host if his wine 
be good. Ask my com- 
panion if I be a thief 

Women, priests, and poul- 
try never have enough 



228 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Dono molto aspettato e 
venduto, non donate 



Dopo il cattivo ne vien il 
buon tempo 

Dove 1'oro parla, ogni 
lingua tace 

Dove sono donne ed ocche 
non vi sono parole poche 

Due 

Due teste vagliano pin che 
una sola 

Due tordi ad una pania 

Duettino 
Duetto 



Due visi sotto una beretta 

Due volte 

Duro con duro non fa mai 
buon muro 

E cattivo vento che non e 
buono per qualcheduno 

Ecome ilcanedell'ortolano, 
che non mangia de'cavoli 
egli, e non ne lascia man- 
giar agli altri 

Egli m' ha dato un osso da 
rodere 



A gift long waited for is 
sold, not given. He 
loses his thanks who 
promiseth and delayeth 

After bad weather comes 
good. After a storm 
comes a calm 

Where gold speaks, every 
tongue is silent 

Where there are women 
and geese, there is plenty 
of gabble 

Two 

Two heads are better than 
one 

(To stop) two gaps with 
one bush 

A short duet 

A duet ; a musical compo- 
sition for two voices or 
two instruments 

(To carry) two faces under 
one hood 

Twice 

Hard with hard makes not 
a good wall 

It is an ill wind that blows 
nobody good 

He is like the gardener's 
dog, who never eats 
cabbages himself, nor 
allows others to eat them. 
The dog in the manger 

He has given me a bone to 
gnaw ; a bone to pick 



Italian Section. 



229 



E meglio averoggiun uovo, 
che dimani una gallina 



E meglio cader dalle fines- 
tre che dal tetto 



E rr.eglio esser capo di 
cardella che coda di 
storione 

E meglio esser fortunato 
che savio 

E meglio esser mendicante 

che ignorante 
E meglio piegar che 

scavezzar 
E meglio senza cibo restar 

che senz'onore 

E meglio tardi che mai 
E pur troppo vero 
Espressione (Espe.) 
Espressivo (Espo.) 

Esser fortunato come un 
cane in chiesa 

Esser fuori di se 
Esser tra 1'ancudine e il 
martello 



It is better to have an egg 
to-day than a hen to- 
morrow. A bird in the 
hand is worth two in the 
bush. Never quit cer- 
tainty for hope 

It is better to fall from the 
window than from the 
roof. It's never so bad 
but it might have beer- 
worse 

Better be the head of a sprat 
than the tail of a stur- 
geon 

It is better to be lucky than 
wise. Lucky men need 
little counsel 

Better be a beggar than a 
fool 

Better to bend than to 
break 

Better be without food than 
without honour. Rather 
death than false of faith 

Better late than never 

It is but too true 

With expression ; feeling 

Expressively ; with ex- 
pression 

To have the same luck as 
a dog in a church ; to 
be unlucky 

To be beside oneself 

To be between the anvil 
and the hammer ; to 
be in desperate straits. 
" Between the devil and 
the deep sea " 



230 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Fa bene a te e ai tuoi, e 
poi agli altri se tu puoi 



Fagotto 
Falsetto 
Fantoccino 

Fiasco 
Ficcanaso 
Ficcare carote 
Finale 

Fine (Fin.) 
Fioriture 



Flauto 

Flauto piccolo 
Flebile (Flebe.) 

Forte (F., or For.) 

Forte e 1'aceto di vin dolce 



Fortissimo (Ff. or Fo.) 
Forzando (Forzo., or Fz.) 

Fuga 

Fuga doppia 

Fugato 



Fughetta 



Do good to thyself and 
thine, and afterwards 
to others if thou canst. 
Charity begins at home 

The bassoon 

An artificial voice 

Doll ; puppet ; childish ; 
imbecile 

An utter failure 

Meddlesome intruder 

To tell fibs 

The final part (of a musical 
piece, concert, &c.) 

The end ; finish (music) 

Flourishes (in music) ; or- 
namental passages in- 
troduced by a performer 

The flute 

The small flute ; flageolet 

In weeping, mournful- 
style 

Loud 

Strong is the vinegar from 
sweet wine ; the sweetest 
wine makes the sharpest 
vinegar. Corruptio op- 
timi pessima 

Very loud 

An emphasis upon a single 
note 

A fugue 

A double fugue 

A piece containing passages 
in imitation of the fugue 
style, but not a regular 
fugue 

A short fugue 



Italian Section. 



231 



Furioso (Furo.) 
Furore 

Galantuomo 

Gallina che schia mazzi ha 

fatto 1'uovo 
Gatta guantata non piglia 

mai sorce 

Gavotta 



Generalissimo 

Giga 

Giocoso 

Giojoso 

Giovine ozioso, vecchio 

bisognoso 
Giovine Santo, Diavolo 

vecchio 

Giuoco di mano giuoco di 

villano 
Gli assenti hanno torto 

Grandioso 

Grassa cucina, magro 

testamento 
Grazioso (Graz.) 

Gruppetto 



Guardati da chi non ha che 

perdere 
Gusto 



Vehemently 

Great attraction, enthusi- 
asm, fury, rage 

An honest man 

It is the hen that cackles 
who laid the egg 

A gloved cat never catches 
mice. A muffled cat is 
no good mouser 

A lively dance tune ; 
originally a French 
dance gavotte, gavot 

Commander-in-chief 

A jig 

Humorously ; in a sportive 
vein 

Joyously 

A young man idle, an old 
man needy 

A young saint, an old devil. 
Early piety is often de- 
ceptive 

Practical jokes are vulgar 

The absent are always in 

the wrong 
In grand, lofty style 
A fat kitchen, a lean will 

In a flowing, graceful move- 
ment 

A small group (of musical 
notes) ; the embellish- 
ment called " a turn " 

Beware of him that has. 
nothing to lose 

Taste, enjoyment, zest 



232 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Gustoso 

I fatti sono maschi, le 
parole femine 

II diavolo tenta tutti, ma 
1'ozioso tenta il diavolo 

II mondo e fatto a scale ; 

chi le scende, e chi le 

sale 
II poco mangiar e poco 

parlare non fece mai male 

II savio udendo, piu savio 
diventa 



II volto sciolto ed i pensieri 
stretti 




I matti fanno le feste, ed i 

savj se le godono 
Impresario 

Improvvisatore 

In bianco 

Incognito (incog.) 

In disgrazia della giustizia 

Inganno 



The devil tempts everyone, 
but the lazy man tempts 
the devil 

The world is like a stair- 
case, which one goes up 
and another comes down 

Eating little and speaking 
little have never injured 
any one 

The wise man by listening 
becomes still wiser. Lay 
your hand on your mouth 
and let your soul be in- 
structed 

The countenance open, 
but the thoughts strictly 
reserved. A clear brow 
dark thoughts. " A 
fair face may hide a foul 
heart." " There is no 
trusting to appearances " 

Fools make feasts, and wise 
men enjoy them 

Manager (of an opera com- 
pany) ; contractor 

An extemporary poet or 
story-teller 

In blank ; in white 

Unknown ; unrecognised 

Under the frown of justice; 
under a cloud 

A trick ; deception ; an 
unexpected transition 
from one chord to an- 
other 



Italian Section. 



2 33 



Innamorato 
In petto 
Intermezzo 



Introduzione 



1 pensieri non pagano ga- 

belle 
I piccoli cani trovano, ma 

grandi hanno la lepre 



Istesso tempo 

Lagrimoso 

L' allegro 

La mala compagnia e 

quella che mena gli 

uomini alia forca 
Lamentabile, or Lamente- 

vole 

Languendo, or Languente 
La poverta e la madre di 

tutte le arti 
La pratica val piu della 

grammatica 
La prima pioggie e quella 

che bagna 
Larghetto (Largh.) 
Largo (Larg.) 



In love ; lover 

Concealed withinthe breast 

An interlude (musical) ; a 
short dramatic piece, 
light and sparkling, in- 
troduced between the 
parts of a large work 
(drama, opera, &c.) 

The introduction ; the 
opening movement of a 
musical piece 

Thoughts are free 

The little dogs find (raise), 
but the big ones hold 
(seize, catch) the hare. 
Some do the sowing, 
others the mowing. One 
sows, another reaps 

Same time 

In tearful, mournful style 

The merry man 

Bad company is what 
brings men to the gallows 

In plaintive style 

Languishingly 

Necessity is the mother of 

invention 
Experience is the best 

teacher 
It is the first shower that 

wets 
A degree faster than largo 

A slow, solemn movement 
(in music) 



234 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Lasciate ogni speranza,voi 

ch'entrate 
La speranza e il pan de' 

miseri 
Lauda la moglie e tienti 

donzello 
Lazzaretto 



Lazzaroni (sing, lazzarone) 



Legato (Leg.) 

Leggiero, or Leggiera- 

mente 

Lentando, or Slentando 
Lento (Lnto.) 
Libretto 

Lingua Franca 
Lingua volgare 



Liuto 

L'occupazione e il miglior 
rimedio contra la noia 

Lusingando 



Leave hope behind, all ye 
who enter here 

Hope is the poor man's 
bread (only comfort) 

Praise married life, but 
remain single 

A hospital, or pest-house, 
for persons suffering 
from (chiefly) contagious 
disease, or held in quaran- 
tine on suspicion of 
disease 

Idle, improvident, wretched 
people (especially at 
Naples) ; the very dregs 
of the people 

In a smooth, continuous 
style ; without break be- 
tween notes 

Lightly 

Gradually becoming slower 
Slow 

The words of a play or 

opera (lit. a little book) 
The mixed language of 

Europeans and Orientals 

in the Levant 
The vulgar tongue ; the 

common language, as 

opposed to the dialects 

of Italy 
The lute 
The best cure for ennui is 

to get something to do 

In a soothing, persuasive 

style 



Italian Section. 



2 35 



Ma 

Madonna 
Maestoso (Maes.) 

Magari 

Maggiore (Mag.) 

Maggior fretta minor atto 

Malinconia 

Mancando (Man. or Mane.) 

Marcato 

Marcia 

Marcia funebre 

Marziale 

Ma sicuro 

Mazurka 

Meno (Men.) 

Messa di voce 



Mesto 

Mezzo (Mez.) 
Mezzo-forte (Mf.) 

Mezzo-piano (Mp.) 

Mezzo voce (M.V.) 

Minore (Min.) 

Minuetto (Mtto.) 

Misura 

Misurato 

Moderate (Mod.) 

Molto 

Molto fumo e poco arrosto 



But. Allegro ma non troppo, 
quick, but not too quick 
The Virgin Mary 

With grandeur ; in a 

majestic style 
Would to Heaven it were so 
Major 

Most haste less speed 
Melancholy 
Languishingly (music) 
In a marked, distinct style 
A march 
A dead march 
In martial style 
To be sure ; just so 
A Polish dance 
Less; as, jneno allegro, less 

quick 
The gradual swelling and 

diminishing of the voice 

on a long note 
Mournfully 
Medium 

Between forte and piano ; 

not very loudly 
Middling softly 
Middle voice 
Minor (key) 
Minuet 
Measure 

In strict or measured time 
Moderately fast 
Very 
Much smoke and little fire ; 

much cry and little wool 



236 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Mordente 



Morendo (Mor.) 

Moresco 

Mosso 



Motive 

Moto 

Naturalo fece, e poi ruppe 
lo stampo 



Navigare secondo il vento 



Nonebelloquel che e bello, 

ma quel che piace 
Nonetto 

Non fidatevi al'alchimista 
povero, o al medico am- 
malato 

Non mi ricordo 

Notturno 



Nulla nuova, buona nuova 



An ornament consisting of 
a turn, or transient shake 
on a short note 

Dying away 

In Moorish style 

With motion ; as piu mosso, 
with more motion, 
quicker 

A motet, or piece of sacred 
music, in harmony of 
several parts 

The theme of a piece of 
music 

Energy 

Nature made him, and then 
broke the mould. We 
shall not look upon his 
like again 

To sail before the wind, or 
with the stream. " To 
follow the crowd." " To 
do at Rome what the 
Romans do." "You can- 
not live in Rome and 
quarrel with the Pope " 

Handsome is that hand- 
some does 

A composition for nine 
instruments 

Do not trust to a poor 
alchymist, or a sick 
physician 

I do not remember 

A light vocal or instru- 
mental composition a- 
dapted to evening en- 
joyment 

No news is good news 



Italian Section. 



237 



Obbligatissimo 
Obbligato (Obi.) 

Oboe (pi. oboi) 
Octava Alta 

Odi, vedi, e taci, se vuoi 
vivere in pace 

Ogni cane e leone acasasua 
Ogni debole ha sempre il 

suo tiranno 
Ogni medaglia ha il suo 

rovescio 

Ogni uno per si medesimo, 

e Dio per tutti 
Onor di bocca assai giova e 

poco costa 
Opera buffa 
Opera seria 
Operetta 
Ora e sempre 
Oratorio 
Ordinario (Ordo.) 

Ottava rima 
Ottetto 

Padrone di farlo 
Padron mio 

Parla bene, ma parla poco 
Parlando (Parlante) 



Most obliged 

Absolutely necessary (in a 
musical performance) 

The hautboy 

(Play) the higher octave 

Listen, see, and keep your 
tongue between your 
teeth, if you wish to live 
in peace 

Every dog is a lion at home 

The weak man always has 
his tyrant 

Every medal has its re- 
verse. There are two 
to every question 

Every one for himself and 
God for all 

Fair words go for much, 
and cost little 

A comic opera 

A serious opera 

A short opera 

Now and ever, for ever 

A sacred musical drama 

Ordinarily; in the usual 
style 

The eight-lined stanza 

A musical composition in 

eight parts 
You can do as you like 

Lit., my master; your 
servant 

Speak well, but speak 
little 

In a speaking or decla- 
matory style 



238 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Parte 
Partitura 



Passato il pericolo, gab- 

bato il santo 
Pasticcio 



Pastorale 
Pedale (Fed.] 



Pensieroso 

Perdendosi (Per., Perd., or 

Perden.) 
Per far effetto 



Per 1'amor di Dio 

Per troppo dibatter, la 

verita si perde 
Pesante 
Piacere 
Piacere, una cosa. Mi 

piace 
Piacevole 
Piangendo 
Pianissimo (Pp.) 
Piano (P.) 
Piccolo 



A part (in vocal and in- 
strumental music) 

The score of a piece of 
music, containing all the 
parts for voices and 
instruments 

The danger passed, the 
saint is mocked 

A composite opera, made 
up of parts by different 
composers 

A pastoral piece, or move- 
ment 

A pedal (of the organ) 
pressed by the foot; a 
long note in the bass 
extending over several 
bars 

Melancholy 

A close that dies away 
(in music) 

To do the thing (any- 
thing) in style ; to come 
out strong. For appear- 
ance sake 

For the love of God 

By too much debate trutli 
is obscured 

With weight ; impressively 

Pleasure 

To like something. I like 
it 

In a pleasing style 

Plaintively 

Very soft 

Soft 

Small 



Italian Section. 



239 



Piu. Di piu in piu 

Piu lento 

Piu tosto mendicanti che 

ignoranti 
Piu vede un occhio del 

padrone che quattro de' 

servitori 
Pizzicato 



Poca roba, poco pensiero 

Poco 

Poco a poco 

Poco curante (sometimes 

written as one word) 
Podesta 
Polenta 

Pomposo (Pomp.) 
Pot-Pourri 
Poverta non e onta 
Precipitando 
Preludio 
Prender due colombe, o 

piccioni ad una fava 
Presto mature, presto 

marcio 

Presto o tardi 
Presto, prestissimo 
Prima Donna 

Prima volta 
Primo tempo 

Pur troppo 



More. More and more 

Slower 

Better starve the body than 

the mind 
One eye of the master sees 

more than four of the 

servants' 
Sounding the strings (of 

violin) with twitch of 

the finger 

Little thought, little (care) 
A little 
Little by little 
" Caring little;" a careless 

indifferent person 
Chief magistrate 
Italian porridge 
In pompous style 
A medley of popular airs 
Poverty is no disgrace 
Hurriedly 
A prelude 
To kill two birds with one 

stone 
Soon ripe, soon rot 

By and by; sooner or later 

Quick, very quick 

The principal singer in an 
opera 

The first tune 

The first time ; the time 
marked at the opening 
of the piece (musical) 

It is but too true 



240 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Quanta teste, tanti cervelli 
Quartette 

Questo vento non vaglia la 

biada 
Quintette 

Raccomandare il lardo 

alia gatta 
Rallentando (Ral., Rail., 

or Rallo.) 
Recitative 
Render pane per focaccia 

Replica 
Rialto 

Rifacimento 
Riffioramenti 

Rincrescere. Mi rincresce 
Rinforzando (Rin. or Rinf.) 
Ripieno 



Risoluto 

Ritardando (Rit. or Ritard.) 

Ritornello 

Romanza 

Rondino (rondoletto) 



Many men many minds 

A musical composition for 
four voices or instru- 
ments 

This zephyr does not even 
fan the wheat 

A musical piece for five 
voices or instruments 

To set a fox to mind the 
chickens 

Slackening (music) 

Recitative 

To give tit for tat. Like 

for like 
Repetition 

The name of a famous 
bridge in Venice 

A refurbishing or dressing- 
up 

Embellishments (added by 
a musical performer) 

To be sorry for. I am 
sorry 

Laying special emphasis 
on some note (musical) 

That which fills up 
(music); voices or in- 
struments swelling the 
volume of sound 

In a bold, resolute style 

Retardingly 

Repetition of a strain 

(music) 

A simple story or ballad 
A short rondo 



Italian Section. 



241 



Rubato 



Saggio fanciullo e chi co- 
nosce il suo vero padre 

Sbirri (sing, sbirro) 

Scena 

Scherzando, or Scherzoso 
(Scherz.) 

Scherzo 

Sciolto 
Scozzese 
Segno 

Segue (Seg.) [allegro] 
Semplice 
Sempre (Semp.) 
Sempre il mal non vien per 
nuocere 



Se non e vero, e ben trovato 

Senza (Sen.) 
Senza compliment! 
Senza ceremonie 
Senza organe 
Senza replica 



A movement consisting of 
several strains or parts, 
each ending with a repe- 
tition of the first part 
or subject 

Robbed. Tempo Rubato is 
when some notes of a 
bar are prolonged be- 
yond their proper time, 
thus robbing others of 
their proper length 

He is a wise child who 
knows his own father 

Police officers 

A scene (of an opera) 

In a playful style 

A light and sportive move- 
ment 

In a free and open manner 

In the Scottish style 

A sign ; a mark 

Here follows [the allegro] 

In a simple style 

Always 

Often out of evil comes 
forth good. " It is an ill 
wind that blows nobody 
good." " Every cloud 
has a silver lining " 

If not true, it is very 
ingenious 

Without 

No compliments, pray 

Without ceremony 

Without the organ 

Without repetition 

Q 



242 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Septetto 
Serenata 
Sestetto 
Sforzando 

Sforzato (Sf. or Sforz.) 

Siciliana 

Simpatico 

Sinfonia 

Slentando (Slent.) 

Smorzando (Smorz.) 

Soave 

Soccorso non venne mai 

tardi 
Soggetto 
Solfeggio 



Sonata 



Sonatina 
Soprano (S.) 
Sordini 



A musical composition for 

seven instruments 
A serenade ; an evening 

concert in the open air 
A musical composition for 

six voices or instruments 
With a strong accent 

(music) 

With emphasis 
In Sicilian style (music) 
Nice, genial, jolly 
A symphony 
A gradual diminishing of 

time (music) 
A gradual diminishing of 

loudness (music) 
Sweet 
It's never too late to mend 

A musical subject; theme 
Sol-faing; system of arrang- 
ing the scale of music by 
the names do, re, mi, fa, 
sol, la, si ; a voice exer- 
cise 

A musical composition of 
several movements for a 
single instrument (usu- 
ally the pianoforte), with 
or without accompani- 
ment 

A short sonata 
The highest female voice 
Mutes ; little instruments 
on the bridge of the 
violin, &c., deadening 
the sound 



Italian Section. 



2 43 



Sospirando 

Sostenuto (Sos., or Sost.) 



Sotto pena di morte 
Sotto voce (S.V.) 
Spiccato (Spice.) 

Spirito 
Spiritoso 
Staccato (Stacc.) 



Stavo bene, ma, per star 

meglio, sto qui 
Stesso 
Strepito 
Stretto 

Stringendo 

Stromenti 

Subito 

Tanto 

Tanto buono che val niente 

Tanto ne va a chi ruba, che 

a chi tiene il sacco 
Tempo 
Tempo giusto 
Teneramente 
Tenore (T., ov Ten.) 
Tenuto (Ten.) 

Terra cotta 



Sighing (music) 

A musical note sustained 

to its full length, with no 

break between it and the 

next note 
On pain of death 
In an undertone, or whisper 
With distinctly separated 

sounds (music) 
Spirit ; animation 
Spirited 
A short, distinct, and 

pointed style ; the oppo- 
site of legato 
I was well, but I'm all the 

better for being here 
The same 
Noise 
The quickening of time 

(music) 
Acceleration of time 

(music) 
Instruments 
Quick 
Not very 
It is so very good that it's 

good for nothing 
The receiver is as bad as 

the thief 
Time (music) 
In correct time (musical) 
Tenderly 
Tenor (music) 
A note to be sustained 

during its whole length 
Baked earth 



244 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Terzetto 

Thema, Tema 

Timpani 

Torso 

Tosto o tardi 

Tre fratelli, tre castelli 



Tremando, Tremolo (Tr., 

or Trem.) 
Trillo 
Triole 

Tromba 
Trombone 



Troppo disputare la verita 

fa errare 
Tutti (T.) 
Una corda 
Una rondine non fa prima- 

vera 
Una scopa nuova spazza 

bene 
Una volta furfante, e 

sempre furfante 
Un mal chiama 1'altro 
Variazioni (Var.) 

Veloce 
Vermicelli 



A trio, or musical piece for 
three voices or instru- 
ments 

A theme ; subject (music) 

Kettle-drums 

The trunk of a statue 

Sooner or later 

Three brothers, three 
castles. Two to one 
are odds at football 

Tremulous vibration of a 
note 

A trill, or shake 

A triplet ; a group of three 
notes of equal length 

Trumpet 

An instrument somewhat 

resembling a trumpet in 

sound 
Discussing truth too much 

leads to error 
All together 

(On) one string (of violin) 
One swallow does not 

make a summer 
A new broom sweeps clean 

What's bred in the bone 
will come out in the flesh 
It never rains but it pours 

Variations (on a musical 

air) 
With great rapidity 

Thin rolls of paste(prepared 
of flour, cheese, yolks of 
eggs, sugar, and saffron) 



Italian Section. 



245 



Vettura 
Vetturino 
Vibrato 

Vigoroso (Vig.) 
Viola (Va.) 
Violone 
Viva 

Vivace (Viv.) 

Viver insieme come cane 
e gatto 



Voce 

Voce di petto 

Voce di testa 

Volata 

Voler bene 

Voier male 

Volesse Iddio ! 

Volontieri 

Volta 

Volti 

Void subito (V.S.) 

Zero 



A four-wheeled carriage 

The cabman 

Strongly vibrating (music) 

Energetically 

The tenor violin 

The double bass 

(Long) live (the king, &c.) 

Brisk, lively 

To live like dog and cat. 
To lead a cat and dog 
life. To be constantly 
quarrelling 

The voice 

Chest voice (the real voice) 

Head voice (falsetto) 

A flight (of musical notes) 

To wish one well 

To wish one ill 

Would to God ! 

Willingly ; delighted 

Time 

Turn over 

Turn over (the leaf) quickly 

Cipher 



SPANISH SECTION. 



A espaldas vueltas me- 

morias muertas 
Alguazil 

Al hombre osado, la fortuna 
le da la mano 

Al que a buen arbol se 
arrima, buena sombra le 
cobija 

A muertos y a idos ni 
parientes ni amigos 

Auto de fe 



A vuestra salud 
Bien vienes mal si vienes 
solo 

Bocado comido no gana 

amigo 
Buen abogado mal vecino 

Buey viejo surco derecho 
Caballero 



Out of sight, out of mind 

A constable ; an inferior 

officer of justice 
Fortune favours the brave. 

Faint heart never won 

fair lady 
They are rich who have 

friends 

The dead have no friends 

An act of faith ; the name 
given in Spain and 
Portugal to the burning 
of Jews and heretics 
under the Inquisition 

Your good health 

Thou comest well, if thou 
comest alone (said of 
misfortunes) 

A morsel eaten gains no 
friend 

A good lawyer is a bad 
neighbour 

An old ox makes a straight 
furrow 

A gentleman 



Spanish Section. 



247 



Caballo que vuela, no Do not spur a free horse 

quiere espuela 
Cada gallo canta en su 

muladar 
Cada uno en su casa, y 

Dios en la de todos 



Cada uno sabe adonde le 
aprieta el zapato 

Cantaro que muchas veces 

va a la fuente alguna vez 

se ha de quebrar 
Comida hecha compaiiia 

deshecha 
Comprar en feria, y vender 

en casa 
Conocidos muchos, amigos 

pocos 
Contra fortuna no vale arte 

ninguna 
Corregidor 
Cria cuervos y te sacaran 

los ojos 

Dar gato por liebre 

De cualquier manera que 
vaya vestido sere Sancho 
Panza 

Del agua mansa me libre 
Dios, que de la brava 
me guardare yo 

Del dicho alhecho hay gran 
trecho 



Every cock crows loud on 

his own dunghill 
Every one in his own 

house, and God in all of 

them. Every man for 

himself, and God for us 

all 
Every one knows best 

where the shoe pinches 

him 
A pitcher goes often to the 

well, but is broken at 

last 
When good cheer is lacking 

friends will be packing 
Buy at a market, but sell 

at home 

(Havej many acquain- 
tances, (but) few friends 
There is no fighting against 

fate 

A magistrate 
Save a thief from the 

gallows and he will cut 

your throat 
To give chalk for cheese 

However I am dressed, I 
shall still be Sancho 
Panza ; I shall be neither 
more nor less meritorious 

Smooth water runs deep 



Great braggers, little doers 



248 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Del mal el menos 

Del mal pagador siquiera 

en paja 
Despues de ido el conejo, 

tomamos el consejo 
De sabios es mudar de 

consejo 

Detras de la cruz esta el 
diablo 



Dia de dos cruces 

Don 

Donde fuego se hace humo 

sale 
Donde hay gana hay mafia 

Donde las dan las toman 

Donde menos se piensa, 

salta la liebre 
Duelos con pan son menos 



El buen pano en el area se 

vende 
El comer y elrascar todo es 

empezar 
El corazon manda la carne 

El dinero hace al hombre 

entero 
El Dorado 
El hombre propone y Dios 

dispone 



Of two evils, choose the less 
Of a bad paymaster get 

your due if only in kine 
Lock the stable-door when 

the steed is stolen 
The wise man may change 

his opinion, but the fool 

never 
Behind the cross stands 

the devil. Where God 

has his church, the devil 

will have his chapel 
Two saints on one day 
Lord; master; Mr. 
There is no fire without 

some smoke 
Where there's a will there's 

a way 
One good turn deserves 

another 
The hare springs out, when 

one thinks not of it 
Sorrows with something to 

eat (bread) are endurable 

(less). A fat sorrow is 

better than a lean one 
Good wine needs no herald 

(bush) 
To eat, and to scratch, a 

man need but begin 
The spirit is willing but the 

flesh is weak 
Money makes the man 

" The golden " (land) 
Man proposes, but God 
disposes 



Spanish Section. 



249 



El vino no trae bragas, ni 
depario, ni de leiio 

En boca cerrada no entra 

mosca 
En cueros (vivos) 

Escritura, buena memoria 

Exaltado progresista 

Fonda 

Gato aullador nunca buen 

cazador 
Gentilhombre 
Gitano 
Gran victoria es la que sin 

sangre se alcanza 
Grande arma es la neces- 

sidad 

Guerra al cuchillo 

Guerra, caza, y amores, 
por un placer mil dolores 



Guerrilla 



Habiendo pregonado vino, 
vende vinagre 



Wine wears neither linen 
nor woollen breeches ; 
when wine's in wit's out 

A still tongue makes a wise 
head 

Stark naked. " Under bare 
poles." " In puris natu- 
ralibus" 

Writing, the best memory. 
Writing makes the exact 
man 

An advanced progressist; a 
radical 

An hotel 

A mewing cat is not a good 
mouser 

A gentleman 

A gipsy 

Great is the victory that is 
won without bloodshed 

Necessity is a strong arm. 
Necessity is the mother 
of invention 

War to the knife (bitter 
end) 

War, hunting, and love 
bring a thousand pains 
for one pleasure. Wars 
bring scars. Love is 
fruitful of alarms 

An irregular petty war ; 
an armed mountaineer, 
member of an indepen- 
dent band harassing the 
enemy by irregular 
attacks 

After having advertised 
wine he sells vinegar 



250 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Hablar sin pensar es tirar 
sin encarar 

Hacienda 

Hacienda tu amo te vea 

Hidalgo 



Hidalguia 
Hombre de un libro 

Hurtar el puerco, y dar los 
pies por Dios 



La mentira tiene las piernas 

cortas 
Las riquezas son bagajes de 

la fortuna 
Locos y niiios, dicen la 

verdad 
Mas vale pajaro en mano 

que buitre volando 
Mas vale saber que haber 

Mas vale ser necio que por- 

fiado 

Mas vale tarde que nunca 
Moderado 

Mucho en el suelo, poco 

en el Cielo 

No es todo oro lo que reluce 
No hay cerradura si es de 

oro la ganzua 



To speak without thinking 

is to shoot without taking 

aim 

A country estate 
The foot of the owner is the 

best manure for his land 
A gentleman, belonging by 

birth to the inferior 

nobility 
Nobility 
A man of one book 

To steal a hog, and give 
away the feet in alms to 
God. To be liberal at 
another's expense 

A lie has a short (life) legs 

Riches are the sumpter 

mules of fortune 
Children and fools speak 

truth 
A bird in the hand is worth 

two in the bush 
Knowledge is better than 

riches 
Better be ignorant than 

obstinate 

Better late than never 
A conservative 
Rich here, poor hereafter 

All is not gold that glitters 

There is no lock but a 

golden key will open it. 

" No lock will hold a- 

gainst the power of gold " 



Spanish Section. 



251 



No saber firmar 



No se gano Zamora en una 

hora 
Obra empezada medio aca- 

bada 
Ofrecer mucho, especie es 

de negar 

Ojo del amo engorda el 
caballo 

Olla podrida 

Paga lo que debes y sabras 

lo que tienes 
Piedra movediza no cria 

moho 
Piensa el ladron que todos 

son de su condicion 

Por el dinero baila el perro 

Presto maduro, presto 

podrido 
Pronunciamiento 



Quien calla otorga 

Quien escucha, su mal oye 

Quien mucho abarca poco 
aprieta 



Quien pregunta, no yerra 

Recoje tu heno mientras 
que el sol luciere 



Not to know how to sign 
one's name. To be a 
mighty grandee 

Rome was not built in a 
day 

Well begun is half done 

To offer too much is to 
court denial 

The owner's eye fattens 
the horse 

Medley ; hotch-pot(ch) 
Out of debt, out of danger 

A rolling stone gathers no 

moss 
The thief thinks that all 

are of his profession 

Money makes the mare 

to go 
Soon ripe, soon rot 

A public declaration ; an 
announcement of revo- 
lution 

Silence gives consent 

Listeners never hear good 

of themselves 
Over-reaching cheats itself. 

Grasp all, lose all. 

Grasp no more than 

thy hand will hold 

Nothing lost for lack of 

asking 
Make hay while the sun 

shines 



252 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Remuda de pasturage hace 

bizerros gordos 
Sierra 



Siesta 

Sobre gustos no hay nada 

escrito 

Tal amo, tal criado 
Tomabala por rosa, mas 

era cardo 
Un cabello hace sombra 

Un corazon contento es un 

festin continuado 
Verdad es amarga 
Visteme despacio,que estoy 

deprisa 
Vivir y vivamos 



Beasts get fat by change 

of pastures 
A chain of mountains (with 

jagged ridges like the 

teeth of a saw] 
A short sleep taken about 

mid-day 
There's no accounting for 

tastes 

Like master, like man 
I took her for a rose, but 

she turned out a thorn 
A single hair casts a 

shadow 

A contented mind is a con- 
tinual feast 
Truth is green (bitter) 
More haste less speed 

Live and let live 



PORTUGUESE SECTION. 



A bolca vazia, e a casa An empty purse, and a new 
acabada faz o homem house, make a man wise, 
sisudo, mas tarde but too late 

A caridade bem entendida Charity begins at home 

principia por casa 
Agoa tranquilla, agoa Still waters run deep 

fun da 
A palavra e prata, o silen- A still tongue makes a 

' cio e ouro wise head 

A quern servir a carapu9a If the cap fit, wear it 

que a tome 
Barriga cheia, cara alegre A heavy purse makes a 

light heart 
Bater em ferro frio You cannot get blood out 

of a stone 
Bem principiado. meio Well begun is half done 

caminho andado 
Bem sabe o gato cujas The cat knows well whose 

barbas lambe lips she licks 

Boas palavras enternece- A soft answer turneth 

ram o diabo away wrath 

Boca de mel, corasao de fel A tongue of honey, a heart 

of gall 
Cada ovelha com sua. Every Jack has his Jill 

parelha 
Cada qual com seu igual Birds of a feather flock 

together 

Cada um em sua casa e rey Every one is king in his 

own house. A man's 
house is his castle 



254 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Cuidar nao e saber 
Cunha do niesmo pau 
Dar ao diabo a sua parte 
De boas internes esta o 

inferno cheio 
Despir um Santo para 

vestir outro 
Dize-me com quern andas, 

dirte-hei quern tu 6s 

Dois proveitos nao cabem 
' em um saco 
Fazer castellos no ar 
Fazer da necessidade, vir- 

tude 
Fazer do peior o melhor 

Fugir do fumo, e cair no 
fogo 



Gato escaldado d'agua fria 

tern medo 
Longe da vista, longe do 



Mais vale so, do que mal 

acompanhado 
Mais vale tarde do que 

nunca 
Mais vale um passaro na 

mao do que dois voando 
Mais veem quatro olhos do 

que dois 
Malhar o ferro em quanto 

esta quente 
Molhar a vella em quanto 

ha vento 
Muitospoucos fazemmuito 



Care's no cure 
A chip of the old block 
Give the devil his due 
Hell is paved with good 

intentions 
Robbing Peter to pay Paul 

Tell me whom you keep 
company with, and I 
will tell you what you do 

You cannot eat the cake 
and have it 

To build castles in the air 

Make a virtue of necessity 

Make the best of a bad 

bargain 
To escape from the smoke, 

and fall into the fire. 

Out of the frying-pan 

into the fire 
A burnt child dreads the 

fire 
Out of sight, out of mind 

Let well alone 
Better late than never 

A bird in hand is worth 

two in the bush 
Two heads are better than 

one 
Strike while the iron is hot 

Make hay while the sun 

shines 
Many littles make a mickle 



Portuguese Section. 



255 



Xa adversidade se con- 

hecem os amigos 
Xiio contes com o ovo na 

gallinha 
X;\o ha melhor mostarda 

do que a fome 
Xao se colhem trutas a 

bragas enchutas 
O amor e cego 
O homem propoe, e Deus 

dispoe 
O que nao tern remedio, 

remediado esta 
O saber e poder 
Os pequenos espiritos con- 

tentao-se com as pe- 

quenas cousas 
Poupar nos farelos e des- 

perdi9ar na farinha 
Quern ama Beltrao, ama 

seu cao 
Quem boa cama fizer, n'ella 

se deitara 
Quem da o que tern, a 

pedir vem 
Quem nao arrisca, nao 

ganha 

Quem nao deve, nao teme 
Querer e poder 

Roma nao foi edificada 

n'um so dia 
Senr. Dom ; meu Senhor ; 

Snr. 
Uma mao lava outra 

Um homem prevenido vale 
por dois 



Adversity tries friends 

Count not your chickens 
before they are hatched 

Hunger is good mustard 
the best sauce 

He must crack the nut 
who would the kernel eat 

Love is blind 

Man proposes, God dis- 
poses 

What can't be cured must 
be endured 

Knowledge is power 

Little things please little 
minds 

A penny wise and a pound 

foolish 
Love me, love my dog 

As you make your bed so 

you must lie on it 
Waste not, want not 

Nothing venture, nothing 

gain 

Out of debt, out of danger 
W T here there's a will there's 

a way 
Rome was not built in a 

day 
Lord; master; Mr. 

One good turn deserves 

another 
Forewarned is forearmed 



GERMAN SECTION. 



Abgeordnete 

Alterthum 

Auch weiber wussten zu 
schweigen 



Auf den Hund kommen 
Aufgeschoben 1st nicht auf- 

gehoben 
Auf keinen griinen zweig 

kommen 



Bahnhof 
Bitte 

Blut und Eisen 
Brief 
Briefbote 
Briefmarke 
Dampfboot 
Darunter und dariiber 
Das Vaterland 
Dawider behute uns Gott ! 
Der brave Mann denkt an 
sich selbst zuletzt 

Der ewige Jude 



A deputy ; representative 

(in parliament) 
Antiquity 
Even the women (in Tyrol) 

knew how to be silent ; 

to keep their tongues 

between their teeth 
To go to the dogs 
Deferred is not denied 

" Never to come on a green 
twig;" not to get on (in 
the world). " Down on 
his luck " 

Railway station 

Please 

Blood and iron 

Letter 

Postman 

Postage stamp 

Steamboat 

Topsy-turvy 

The Fatherland (Germany) 

Heaven forbid ! 

The gallant (noble, good) 
man thinks of himself 
last 

The everlasting Jew; the 
wandering Jew 



German Section. 



257 



Der Hahn im Korbe sein 



Der wilde Jager 

Deutsch 

Deutschland 

Dichtung und Wahrheit 

Die Hiille und die Fiille 

Die Tugend ist das hochste 

Gut 

Die Wacht am Rhein 
Donner und Blitz 
Eile mit weile 



Ein Ei ist dem andern gleich 

Einem auf die Finger klop- 
fen 

Einem das Fell iiber die 
Ohren ziehen 

Ein Wortlein kann ihn 
fallen 

Eisenbahn 

Er ist sein Vater wie er 
leibt und lebt 

Eroeffnung des Reich- 
stages 

Ertragen muss man was 
der Himmel sendet 

Es bleibt dabei 

Es geschieht dir eben recht 



" To be the cock in the 
basket ; " to be cock of 
the company 

The wild huntsman 

German 

Germany 

Poetry and truth 

" The hull (husk) and the 
full ; " in plenty 

Virtue is the highest good 

The Watch on the Rhine 
Thunder and lightning 
Hasten with leisure. "More 

hurry, worse speed." 

" Slow and steady wins 

the race." Lat. festina 

lente 
One egg is like another. 

" As like as two peas " 
To rap one's knuckles ; to 

clip one's wings ; to 

check one 
"To pull the fell (hide, 

skin) over one's ears ; " 

to fleece him smartly 
A single little word can 

strike him down 
Railroad (lit. iron way) 
He is the very picture of 

his father 
Opening of the Imperial 

diet 
What heaven sends must 

be borne. Deo cede 
Agreed ! 
Serves you right 

R 



258 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Es giebt 

Es lebe der Konig! 
Es wird kein Hahn darnach 
krahen 



Finanzminister 

Frau 
Fraulein 
Friede 
Frisch auf ! 



Cluck auf dem Wege 

Gliick auf ! Gliick zu ! 
Gott ist uberall 
Guten Abend 
Guten Morgen 
Gut Heil, frisch, fromm, 
froehlich, frei ! 

Hauptstadt 
Heil dem konig 
Heimweh 



Herr 

Hier liegt der hund be- 
graben 

Hin ist hin 



Hoch lebe der Kaiser ! 
Hof 



There is ; there are 

Long live the King ! 

" There will no cock crow 
over that ; " no one will 
care a brass farthing for 
it 

Finance minister ; Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer 

Mrs. ; wife ; lady 

Miss ; young lady 

Peace 

Cheer up ! 

Money 

Good luck on the way !. 
Fortune attend you ! 

Good luck ! 

God is above all 

Good evening 

Good morning 
(Motto of the Turnverein)> 
lit. all hail, fresh, pious,, 
joyous, free 

Capital town 

Long live the king 

Home grief; a morbid de- 
sire of returning home ; 
nostalgia 

Mr. 

" Here lies the dog buried ; " 
this is the point. "There's 
the rub " 

" Gone is gone." " No- 
good in crying over spilt 
milk " 

Long live the Emperor 

Court 



German Section. 



259 



Hof-prediger 
Ich danke Ihnen 
Ich dien 

Ich werde Ihnen etwas 
husten 



Immer schlimmer 
Immer wird, nie ist 

1st dir wohl, so bleibe 



Jede strasse fuhrt ans End 
der Welt 

Kellner 

Konig und Kaiser 

Krieg 

Kunst 

Landsturm 



Landwehr 

Langsam 

Lassen Sie es gut sein 

Lebe wohl (pi., Leben Sie 

wohl) 
Lehrjahre 

Leitartikel 

Lied 

Madchen 



Court-chaplain 

I thank you 

I serve ; the motto of the 
Prince of Wales 

" I'll cough a bit for you ; " 
you will have to wait for 
it till doomsday ; you 
may whistle for it 

Worse and worse 

What is always be- 
coming, never is 

If you are well off, remain 
so. Never quit certainty 
for hope 

Every road leads to 
end of the world, 
roads go to Jericho 

Waiter 

King and emperor 

War 

Art 

General levy of the people ; 
comprising all men 
capable of bearing arms 
that are not included in 
the line, the reserve, or 
the landwehr 

Militia 

Slowly 

Never mind 

Farewell 

Apprenticeship (lit. instruc 

tion years) 
Leading article 
A song 
Girl, maid 



260 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 



Maessig 
Mahrchen 
Mein Herr 

Mit der thiir in das Haus 
fallen 



Mit Haut und Haarem 



Muenze 

Nachricht 

Neue Allgemeine Deutsche 

Bibliothek 
Nichts andres bleibt uns 

iibrig 

Nimm die Zogernde zum 
Rath, nicht zum Werk- 
zeug deiner That 

Oberhaus und Unterhaus 



Ohne Hast aber ohne Rast 

Posthaus 
Prosit Neujahr ! 
Rathhaus 
Real-schulen 



Reichskanzler 

Reichsverfassung 

Reichsrath 

Reichstag 

Rinderpest 



Moderate 

Fabulous tale 

Sir (in addressing one) 

To fall into the house with 

the door ; to blurt out 

something ; to put it 

bluntly 
" With skin and hair ; " 

completely, thoroughly ; 

out and out 
Coin 
News 
New Universal German 

Library 
Nothing else remains over 

for us. We have no 

alternative 
Deliberate slowly, execute 

promptly. Strike while 

the iron is hot 
Upper House and Lower 

House; Houses of Lords 

and Commons 
Without haste, yet without 

rest ; unhasting, yet un- 
resting 
Post-office 

A happy N ew Year (to you) ! 
Town hall 
" Real" schools, secondary 

schools giving a general 

practical education 
Imperial chancellor 
Constitution of the empire 
Council of the empire 
Imperial diet 
Cattle plague 



German Section. 



261 



Ruhe ist die erste Burgerp- 

flicht 

Sauerkraut 
Schloss 
Schnellzug 
Schoenen Dank 
Singverein 

Sitzung des Abgeordne- 

tenhauses 
So wahr ich lebe 
Sprechen sie Deutsch ? 
Steuer 
Strasse 

Sturm und Drang 
Turnverein 
Ueber Hals und Kopf 

Uebungmacht den Meister 

Universitaet 

Unter den Linden 



Yaterland 

Verbunden werden auch 
die Schwachen machtig 

Versammlung 
Vertrau' auf Gott 
Waffenstillstand 
Wanderjahre 



Tranquillity is the first 

duty of citizens 
Pickled cabbage 
Castle 

Fast train ; express 
Best thanks 
Harmonic society ; choral 

union 
Sitting of the delegates 

As (sure as) I am alive 

Do you speak German ? 

Tax, rate 

Street 

Storm and stress 

Gymnastic society 

" Over neck and head " ; 
headlong 

Practice makes perfect 

University 

Under the limes (name of 
the principal street in 
Berlin, from the rows of 
lime trees) 

Fatherland 

Even the weak, when 
united, become powerful. 
Union is strength 

Meeting 

Put your trust in God 

Armistice 

Travels (lit. wandering 
years, in which a journey- 
man went from place to 
place after his Lehrjahre, 
to acquire further expe- 
rience) 



262 Dictionary of Foreign Phrases. 

Wappen 

Was giebt es ? 

Was sein muss, das ges- 

chehe 
Weder gehauen noch ges- 

tochen 
Wer gar zu viel bedenkt, 

wird wenig leisten 



Zeitung 

Zollamt 

Zollfrei 

Zollhaus 

Zollverein 

Zu dienen 

Zu tief ins glas schauen 



Arms, coat of arms 

What is the matter ? 

Let what must be, happen. 

Come what come must 
Neither fish nor flesh 

He that considers too much, 
will not bring anything 
to performance 

Journal ; gazette ; news- 
paper 

Custom office (or house) 

Free of custom 

Custom-house 

Customs-union 

At your service 

To look too deep into one's 
glass. " To take a drop 
too much " 



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COMPOSITION AND STYLE: a Handbook for Literary 
Students, with a Complete Guide to all matters connected with 
Printing and Publishing.- Edited by R. D. BLACKMAN. 

This volume sets forth and illustrates all the rules which should be observed 
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By way of introduction and as a stimulus to the attention of the Student, 
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merest tyro in the art of composition, are treated at such length and with such 
clearness of example as will ensure their entire future avoidance. The main 
lines along which the writer must travel to acquire propriety and precision of 
style are broadly indicated ; and the care which is necessary in the employ- 
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DICTIONARY SUPPLEMENT: a Complete Handbook to the 
Epistolary Art. Edited by R. D. BLACKMAN. 

THE great success which attended the previous editjons of this work has been such as to 
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The next portion of the work is in reality an introduction to Composition and Style in 
their essential elements, and should receive an attention corresponding to their importance. 

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The contrast between the well-educated and those who have had fewer opportunities, or 
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To keep pace with the growing interest felt in technical terms and ideas, a list of 
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lu order to fully justify the title of a Complete Handbook, a list is given more complete 
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The publishers are not aware of any similar work to this, which attempts within the same 
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