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Full text of "Dedication of Champaign County Court House, August 22, 1901, Urbana, Illinois"

977.366 
D36 
cop. 2 





August 22, 19O1 
URBANA, ILLINOIS 



OF ILLINOIS 






IBRARY 



A SANA-CHAMPAIGN 
BOOKSTACKS 



Befcication - of * Champaign 
County * Court 

augustt 22, 1901 

rbana, f Utnots 



THE GAZETTE PRESS, 
CHAMPAIGN, IWU 



*' 



jTHIS Program, and the matter accompanying it, is 
presented to the public by the Board of fiupervi- 
sors of Champaign County, Illinois, in the belief that 
it will be found of especial interest and value at the 
present time, when the county is taking possession of 
its new and elegant Court House Building. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE NEW COURT HOUSE. 



The following brief description of the new building is 
furnished by Mr. Royer, of the firm of ROYER & BROWN, 
the architects of the building. 

The remodeled Champaign County Court House is a 
building covering an area measuring 108 by 116 feet. It 
is three stories in height. The treatment of the exterior 
is in the Romanesque style of architecture, the materials 
used being red sandstone and mottled brick. The stone 
work extends from the grade line to the second story. 
From that point up to the cornice the walls are of mot- 
tled brick with stone trimmings. The main cornice is of 
terra cotta, of a color to match the stone, with heavy leaf 
ornament. The building is covered with a heavy steel 
roof, composed of steel trusses and rafters, upon which is 
a three-inch layer of concrete, which carries the outer 
covering of red tile. The construction throughout is fire- 
proof, all floors and walls being either of brick or hollow 
tile. The floors are constructed of steel beams with flat 
tile arches between, the whole being covered with about 
three inches of concrete before the finished floors are 
laid. 

The building faces the north, fronting on Main Street, 
the main entrance being in the tower. The tower is 135 
feet high, being surmounted by a tile roof with dormers 
on each face and turrets at the corners. Directly below 
the roof is an open balcony from which an excellent view 
of the surrounding country may be had. The two stories 
of the tower below the balcony are occupied by the clock 
works, the four clock-faces being just below the balcony. 

The building has three entrances, the main or tower 
entrance being on the north. The west entrance is in the 
center of the west side, and the south entrance directly in 
the rear of the building. All entrances lead through ves- 
tibules and corridors to the main corridor on the first 



floor. This is a room 55 x 53 feet, on either side of which 
is a marble stairway leading to the second story. 

On the first floor are the offices of the Circuit Clerk, 
Recorder, Supervisor of Assessments, Treasurer, Coroner, 
Surveyor and Sheriff. The general office of the Circuit 
Clerk is at the right of the main corridor, and is a room 
35 x 36 feet. A private office is directly south of the gen- 
eral office. Directly opposite these offices are those of 
the Recorder. These consist of a general office, 25 x 40 
feet, with vault and toilet attached. On the left side of 
the corridor are the Treasurer's offices, with vaults and 
toilet, the main office being a room 35 x 36 ; the office of 
the Supervisor of Assessments, a room 21x25 '> the offices 
of the Coroner and Surveyor, rooms 17x20; and the 
Sheriff's office, a room 25 X3O, with vault and toilet rooms 
attached. 

On the second floor are the offices of County Clerk, 
County Superintendent of Schools, State's Attorney, 
Board of Supervisors, and the County Court. The County 
Clerk has a suite of three rooms on the north with vaults 
and toilet. The Superintendent of Schools has the north- 
west corner of this floor. The County Court is on the 
south side of the building, and to it is attached a private 
office for the use of the County Judge. On this floor are 
also public toilet rooms. 

The third floor is given up almost entirely to the use 
of the Circuit Court. On the south is the Circuit Court, 
a room 42 x 72 feet, the bench being on the east. Con- 
nected with the court room are the judge's private office, 
the attorneys' room, the law library, and the corridor 
leading to the three jury rooms. Besides the rooms 
already enumerated there are on this floor the grand jury 
rooms, with waiting rooms for both sexes attached, and 
general committee rooms and toilet rooms. 

The interior of the building is treated, as far as is 
consistent, in the same style of architecture as the exte- 
rior. All corridors and lobbies have marble floor with 
marble wainscotting four feet high. All door and window 
finish is of quarter sawed white oak. The side walls and 



ceilings are of plaster, all the offices having ornamental 
plaster ceilings and cornices, the court room and corridors 
having the ceilings intersected with heavy plaster girders. 

The entire building is frescoed, the general idea being 
to keep it in accord with the style of architecture used in 
the construction. The work on the Circuit Court room is 
especially elaborate and in keeping with the use to which 
it is to be put. 

All furniture in the building was made especially for 
it, and is of the very best hard wood. 

The heat for the building is to be furnished by the 
central heating plant now being installed in the city of 
Urbana. The building is piped for gas and wired for 
electricity. Elevator service is provided for passengers 
and freight. 

Below is given a list of the firms having to do with 
the construction of the building. 

General Contract V. Jobst & Sons, Peoria. Heating Walsh & Heuck, 
Champaign. Plumbing Dunlap & Wright, Champaign. Frescoing Wm. G. 
Andrews, Clinton, Iowa. Furniture The A. H. Andrews Company, Chicago. 
Metal Furniture Art Metal Construction Company, St. Louis. Heat Regula- 
tion Johnson Temperature Controlling Company, Chicago. The following 
contracts were sub-let by the general contractors : Stone Work, Wm. Goodall, 
Danville. Marble Work, C. N. Clark, Urbana. Roofing Max Jennings, Lo- 
gansport, Ind. 

The following is a list of the Board of Supervisors 
holding office at the time the contract for remodeling the 
court house was let (September, 1899). 

Babb, John Champaign Leidendeker, H. J Hensley 

Battles, Fred Harwood Little, I. R Condit 

Bear, L. N Ludlow Lof tus, Michael Sadorus 

Bennett, J South Homer McLeod, Norman Crittenden 

Boone, G. D Sidney Mclntyre, D. P Ayers 

Busboom, H Compromise Pattengale, T. J Champaign 

Busey, J. B Newcomb Raymond, I. S Raymond 

Cain, Jas. T Colfax Robinson, Paris Philo 

Cunningham, H Urbana Roles, L. D Brown 

Clark, John I Rantoul Scott, A. S. Scott 

Davis, J. E Pesotum Sperling, Fred East Bend 

Eubeling, F. E Urbana Stearns, Wm Mahomet 

Gardiner, J. C Ogden Swigart, O. H Champaign 

Glascock, A. B St. Joseph Thornburn, T. B Somer 

Grimes, Jos. T Tolono Wilson, C. V Kerr 

Hoge, E. S Stanton Ware, J. C Champaign 

Of the above the following were appointed a building committee : F. E. 
Eubeling, Chairman ; O. H. Swigart, G. D. Boone, J. Bennett, J. B. Busey. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, ILL., 1901. 

Babb, John Champaign Jones, W. P Sidney 

Battles, Fred Harwood Kellogg, O. P St. Joseph 

Bear, L. N Ludlow Leidendeker, H. J Hensley 

Bennett, J South Homer McCullough, John ...Urbana 

Busboom, Heije Compromise Mclntyre, D. P Ayers 

Busey, J. B Newcomb McLeod, Norman Crittenden 

Cain, Jas. T Colfax Paine, Ben C Raymond 

Chester, E. E Champaign Pattengale, T. J Champaign 

Church, John Condit Pfiester, John Scott 

Coyle, Anthony Kerr Pittman, J. C. W Mahomet 

Cunningham, H Urbana Sayers, J. O Brown 

Davis, J. E Pesotum Sperling, Fred East Bend 

Ekblaw, Claus F Rantoul Swigart, O. H Champaign 

Eubeling, F. E Urbana Thompson, Fred Somer 

Freeman, J. H Ogden VanVleck, C. F Philo 

Grimes, Joseph T Tolono Youmans, B. F Stanton 

Hicks, S. J Sadorus 



THE PRESENT OFFICERS OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. 

Judge of Circuit Court 
FRANCIS M. WRIGHT 

Clerk of Circuit Court 
JASPER W. PORTER 

State's Attorney 
ANDREW J. MILLER 

County Judge 
CALVIN C. STALEY 

County Clerk 

THOMAS A. BURT 

County Treasurer 

ELLIS M BURR 

Sheriff 

ERNST LORENZ 

Superintendent of Schools 

GEORGE R. SHAWHAN 

County Surveyor 
JOSEPH O'BRIEN 

Coroner 

HENRY L. PENNY 
Master in Chancery 
ROYAL WRIGHT 



DEDICATORY EXERCISES OF THE NEW 
CHAMPAIGN COUNTY COURT HOUSE 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, A.D. 1901 



MASTER OF CEREMONIES, JUDGE F. M. WRIGHT 

DEDICATION COMMITTEE D. P. McINTYRE, J. C. W. PITTMAN, O. P. 
KELLOGG, FRED THOMPSON, T. J. PATTENGALE 

Music -O. P. KELLOGG, FRED THOMPSON 
SPEAKERS J. C. W. PITTMAN, T. J. PATTENGALE 



Ten o'clock A. M. 



Music, 
PRAYER, 
VOCAL SOLO, 
ADDRESS, 
VOCAL SOLO, 
ADDRESS, 

VIOLIN SOLO, 

ADDRESS, 

SONG, 

ADDRESS, 

VIOLIN SOLO, 

ADDRESS, 

SONG, 



ORCHESTRA 



- MISS MYRA DAVIS 

- JUDGE F. M. WRIGHT 

- N. H. COHEN 

- C. C. STALEY, GEORGE W. GERE 

J. O. CUNNINGHAM, J. L. RAY 

SOLLIE COHEN 

- J. J. REA, MICHAEL LOFTUS 

MAHOMET QUARTET 

J. S. WOLFE, T. J. SMITH, A. S. SCOTT 

MISS JESSIE BESORE 

G. R. SHAWHAN, R. C. WRIGHT 

J. S. McCULLOUGH 

- URBANA QUARTET 



Two o'clock P. M. 



Music, 
ADDRESS, 

INSTRUMENTAL SOLO, 
SONG, 



ORCHESTRA 

HON. H. J. HAMLIN 

- MAURICE EISNER 

URBANA QUARTET 



During the day the St. Joseph Band -will furnish music in the 
Court House Grounds. 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. 



Prior to 1833 the portion of Illinois now known as 
Champaign County was embraced within the limits of 
Vermillion, and was designated as the " Attached Part of 
Vermillion." It was but sparsely populated, the largest 
settlement being on Salt Fork. About thirty families 
were grouped about the Big Grove, and a few families 
were located on the Sangamon. It is not possible to give 
the population at that time, but the historians of the 
county have estimated that it could not have exceeded 
five hundred persons. It is not now possible to say who 
was the first white settler in what is now Champaign 
County. It seems to lie between one Runnel Fielder, who 
settled about four miles northeast of Urbana in 1822, and 
William Tompkins, who stopped near where the city of 
Urbana now stands at about the same time. The next of 
which there is absolute knowledge was Henry. Sadorus. 
Mr. Sadorus settled with his family on the spot that is 
now known throughout the county as the Sadorus Home- 
stead, in Sadorus Township, in 1824. His son, Allen 
Sadorus, now owns this property, and lives in the nearby 
town of Sadorus, named in honor of his father. Follow- 
ing the Sadorus family, the next settler in the county of 
which there is record was William Marcus, who settled at 
or near Sadorus Grove in 1824. He moved away the 
same year. Permanent settlements were few until after 
the Black Hawk war in 1832. Population then flowed in 
rapidly and settlements along the streams and by the tim- 
ber tracts became, to use the expression of the early citi- 
zens, "very numerous." 

In 1833 the General Assembly acceded to the de- 
mands of the settlers and passed a bill creating the county 
of Champaign, and appointed John F. Richardson of 
Clark County, James P. Jones of Coles County, and Ste- 



phen B. Shelledy of Edgar County, commissioners to fix 
the county capitol. This bill was approved and signed by 
Governor John Reynolds on February 20, 1833. 

The geographical position and territorial area of the 
county is as follows : 

" The county of Champaign is bounded on the east by 
the county of Vermillion ; on the north by Ford county ; 
on the west by the counties of McLean and Piatt ; and on 
the south by Douglas ; and may be further described as 
follows : Beginning on the southeast corner of Section 
33, Town 17 north, of Range 14 west of 26. P. M.; thence 
north to the northeast corner of Section 4, Town 22 north, 
of Range 14 west of 2d P. M.; thence west to line between 
Ranges 6 and 7, east of 3rd P.M.; thence south to line be- 
tween Towns 16 and 17 north, of Range 7 east of 3rd 
P. M.; thence west to the place of beginning ; being a 
tract of land thirty-six miles long by twenty-eight miles 
wide, containing 1,008 square miles, or 645,120 acres." 

On the 6th of May, 1833, Isaac Busey, Jacob Bartley 
and George Akers having been elected as the first county 
commissioners met at the house of Phillip Stanford and 
organized the first county commissioners court for Cham- 
paign County. The first act the court did was to appoint 
Thomson R. Webber as clerk. The next was to appoint 
Garrett Moore as constable, then Moses Thomas assessor 
and treasurer of the county. The next meeting of the 
court was held June 3, at which time T. R. Webber was 
recommended to the Governor to be appointed recorder, 
which was done, his commission dating July 2, 1833. At 
this meeting Garrett Moore was appointed surveyor. At 
the same meeting Moses Thomas, the assessor, reported 
the revenue of the county to be $71.37. 

The court divided the county into two election dis- 
tricts, calling one the Salt Fork precinct, and appointed 
Moses Thomas, Robert Prather and Capt Wm. Nox, Jr., 
as judges. The other precinct was called the Big Grove, 
and Matthew Busey, Joshua Trickle and John Whittaker 
were appointed judges. The court then adjourned to as- 
semble at the call of the clerk, when the commissioners 



10 




appointed by the act of the legislature to locate the county 
seat should be ready to report 

On the 2ist day of June 
the commissioners ap- 
pointed by the Governor 
presented the court a 
written report locatingthe 
county seat at Urbana. 

The September term of 
court for that year was 
one of importance, and 
many things were then 
done that are still of in- 
terest. It was ordered 
that in the future the 
meetings should be held 
at the house of Matthew 
Busey instead of that of 
Philip Stanford. John 
Salisbury was appointed 
sheriff soon after the or- 
ganization, and Septem- 
ber 2, 1833, he was order- 
ed to proceed and collect 
the revenue, amounting 
to $71.37. As it was nec- 
essary to have a source of 
revenue, November 7th, 
1833, a license was grant- 
ed to Isaac H. Alexander to retail goods, wares and mer- 
chandise until the end of the next term of the court the 
license being $5. Afterwards the time was extended 
" $3.00 worth." Soon after this the commissioners fixed 
the following rates of prices to be charged the public, 
viz.: For keeping a man and horse one night, including 
supper, bed and horse feed, 75 cents ; single meal, i8& 
cents ; horse feed, 12^ cents ; one-half pint whiskey, 6% 
cents; one-half pint French brandy, i8& cents; half pint 
wine, 18^4 cents ; half pint gin, 12% cents; half pint rum, 
cents; half pint domestic brandy, 18^ cents. 



THOMSON RHODES WEBBER. 
Few men in this country have presided in 
as many official capacities for so long- a term, 
and with the united respect of all who knew 
him, as Mr. Webber. He was the first post- 
master in the county. Upon the organ- 
ization of the county he was elected 
clerk of both courts and continued in that offi- 
cial capacity as county clerk twenty years, 
and circuit clerk twenty-seven years. For 
forty years he acted as master in chancery. 
Mr. Webber was born in Shelby county, Ken- 
tucky, October 6, 1807, and died at his resi- 
dence south of Urbana, December 14, 1881. 



II 



The first fiscal statement was made by T. R. Webber, 
and showed county orders unpaid, $85.25 ; fees for sur- 
veying 84 lots in the town of Urbana, $21 ; recording plat, 
$3.36 ; fees of commissioners and for stationery, $17.75 ; 
making a total indebtedness of $127.36; deducting the 
revenue, $71.37, left $55.99; then deducting license of 
Alexander, $5, left the indebtedness of the county, De- 
cember 2. 1833, at $50.99. 

At the meeting of the 
County Commissioners, 
held December i, 1834, it 
was ordered that hereaf- 
ter the court meet at the 
house of Isaac Busey. 

In January, 1836, a tem- 
porary court house was 
ordered to be built, on lot 
25, the same to be of hewn 
logs of good size. The 
building was to be 24 x 20 
feet, one and one-half sto- 
ry, shingle roof, hewn 
joists and sleepers, one 
door and two windows on 
each side. The contract 
was let to John Craig, but 




COL. MATTHEW W. BUSEY. 
A pioneer of Champaig-n county. Born in 
Shelby county, Kentucky, May 15, 1798, died at 
his home in this county in 1852. Colonel Busey 
was influential in having- the county capitol 
placed in Urbana. 

hold its sessions in private 

houESE untilT8^7'bwhen a frame court house, 22 x 30 feet, 



the building was never 
r. , finished to the satisfaction 
Y\. of the commissioners and 
\ The court continued to 



with two rooms, was built by Moses and Williams Harvey. 
This building was replaced in 1849 by a brick building, 
30 x 40 feet, two stories, with offices below and court and 
jury rooms above. In 1859 this building was torn down, 
and the building immediately preceding the present one 
was erected at a cost of $40,000. 

The first jail was 20 feet square and two stories high. 



re.-.. 





12 



It was built of hewn logs by Col. M. W. Busey, under con- 
tract with the commissioners, for the sum of $850. It 
stood on the north end of the lot just north of the First 
National Bank of Urbana. The structure was as secure 
as it was possible to make it with the materials used, but 
proved but a slight obstacle to those who chose the out- 
side to the inside. Here was imprisoned-tKej^tpriqus 
Bill Weaver, who killed David Hillibra'w, tmsbemg uie 
first murder in the county. He made his escape from the 
log jail and thus saved the county its first hanging until a 
much later day. In 1856 a new jail and jailer's residence 
was built at a cost of about $7,000. In 1864 additions and 
repairs were made at a cost of $3,700. In 1875 other re- 
pairs and additions to the amount of $1,000 were made. 
In recent years the jail has been entirely renovated and 
all modern improvements incorporated. 

The first poor farm was in St. Joseph township, and 
was purchased by the county in 1858. Previous to this 
period the care of the infirm paupers was let by contract 
to the lowest bidder, or relief was granted to those having 
them in charge. The poor farm above referred to was 
situated too far from the county seat to be convenient, 
and in 1865 a tract of forty-two acres, lying one mile east 
of Urbana, was purchased at a cost of $50.00 an acre. On 

this was erected the 
buildings now in use at 
a cost of $7,664.44. Since 
that time the buildings 
have been enlarged and 
modern improvements 
added to them. They 
are at present among 
the best of the kind in 
the state. 

The first school in the 
county was taught by J. 
B. Thomas, in 1829, in a 
small log house north of Big Grove. There is record of 
at least two other school houses in the county as early as 




THE FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE. 



1832. One was on the west side of Big Grove, and was 
taught by Claude Tompkins. The other was in the vicin- 
ity of the old Brumley place, near Urbana, the latter being 
the first school house erected in the county so far as the 
records show. From the cut here given it seems to have 
been a substantial structure. It was of hewn logs, with 
small windows covered with greased paper. The light 
thus admitted might have 
been enough for bright 
days, but certainly no one 
could have ever suffered 
from its being too bright. 
The seats of this school 
were hewn log slabs. The 
first teacher of this school 
was a lady who boarded 
at the house of Martin 
Reinhart. In 1832 Asahel 
Bruer taught this school, 
and his name still holds a 
a place of some promi- 
nence in local history, as 
he seems to have been a 
man of many peculiarities. 
From this time the num- 
ber of schools gradually 
increased. 

In 1867, after a hard 
contest with many other 
points, this county suc- 
ceeded in having the State University located in Urbana. 
Nothing of more importance was ever done by a county, for 
today the University of Illinois stands well in the fore 
among the institutions of higher education in our country 
and has made the name of our county known throughout 
the world. 

It seems that one John Dunham, of the United Breth- 
ren persuasion, was the first minister of the gospel to 
preach in this county. The date of his coming does not 







[HON. M. L. DUNLAP. 

Conspicuons in the histor}' of the county. To 
him belong-s much of the credit of placing- the 
University of Illinois in the county. Born Sep- 
tember 21, 1814, at Canajoharie, N.Y. Died near 
Savoy, Illinois, February^ 14, 1875. 



seem to be recorded. Of his methods of work the present 
day church would doubtless have much to criticise, for it 
is said that as he received no compensation for his spirit- 
ual labors, he combined with them the sale of spirits to 
his parishioners. The Methodist Episcopal Church estab- 
lished themselves in the county between 1835 and 1840. 
In 1840 Rev. A. Bradshaw was pastor of the "Urbana Mis- 
sion." In addition to this charge he preached at Big 
Grove, Hickory Grove, Rodgers, Old Homer, Salt Fork, 
Sidney, Okaw, Flat Branch and Sargents. Mr. Bradshaw 

gives the following in- 
teresting report of the 
first church erection 
work in the county. He 
says : " I built, in 1840, 
in Urbana, the first par- 
sonage ever erected in 
the county. I also built 
at the same place the 
first house of worship 
ever erected in the 
county. The lot on 
which it was put was 
purchased from the 
county for $2. 50. I paid 
for it myself, and with 
a few others felled, 
scored and hewed all 
the heavy timber that 
went into the church. I 
bought the shingles and 
was sued forthemoney." 

About this same time the county sold a lot to David 
Cox, for the purpose of erecting a Baptist church on the 
same, for $2.00. The Christian Church established them- 
selves in the county at about the same time as the Meth- 
odists and Baptists. The other denominations followed 
gradually, and nearly all of the recognized sects and 
creeds are now represented in the county. 




WILLIAM D. SOMERS. 
The first lawyer in Champaig-n county. Very 
conspicuous in county affairs from 1840 to the 
time of his death in 1901. 



15 

The first war in which citizens of the county figured 
was the Black Hawk War. The following is taken from 
one of the histories of the county. " At the time of the 
Black Hawk war Champaign county had not been created, 
but existed as the 'annexed portion of Vermillion county.' 

"A company of mounted rangers, consisting all told 
of i2omen, was raised in Vermillion county, of which this 
portion of country formed a part. Six of this company, 
however were from Indiana. Jesse B. Brown was captain. 
The first lieutenant was James Clymer, the second wa s 
Fry, the third was McDonald. The company surgeon was 
McDougal. John B. Thomas was hospital steward. Geo. 
Scaberry was orderly sergeant of his company. The sec- 
ond sergeant was Marcus Snow, the third was George W. 
Ware. Some of the corporals were Payne, Milligan, 
Welch. The bugler's name was also Welch. Some of 
the members in addition to those named were Elias Sta- 
mey, Jacob Heater, Walter Rhodes, Martin Rhinehardt, 
Thomas Richards, Wm. S. Coe, Rev. Mr. Mahurin, Tho- 
mas LeButler, Jesse B. Wright, Jefferson Smith, Jefferson 
Homer, James Thompson. Many of these belonged to 
what was called the 'attached part of Vermillion,' and 
their names will doubtless be recognized by the older cit- 
izens of the county." 

From the records obtainable it has been found that 
the whole number of soldiers credited to the county of 
Champaign, under the several calls during the war of the 
rebellion, reaches the grand total of 2,276, being 54 in ex- 
cess of all quotas assigned, and about one-seventh of the 
entire population. Not only were the people patriotic in 
responding to the country's call for men, but those re- 
maining at home furnished ample proof of their devotion 
to their country. The records show that the county and 
the various towns paid out $229,009.90 as bounties to the 
families of soldiers, in payment of transportation charges 
and other expenses connected with the unusual demands 
made by the war. Among those serving from this county 
six held the office of colonel, one of lieutenant-colonel, 
two of major, one of adjutant, four of quartermaster, three 



i6 



of surgeon, three of assistant surgeon, one of chaplain, 
forty-two of captain, thirty-six of first lieutenant, and 
twenty-eight of second lieutenant. Of the wars that have 
come to the nation since we need say nothing. Cham- 
paign county has done her share willingly, ready to do 
do more if more was asked. 

Such in brief has been the story of our county. Of 

its financial prosperity 
nothing has here been 
said, nor need it be. Of 
the rapid increase in pop- 
ulation we have only to 
say that while in 1833 the 
county claimed less than 
500 persons the census of 
1900 shows a population 
of 47,622. 

If the stranger desires 
to know more let him 
drive over the county on 
a pleasant day in summer 
and see things for himself, 
and then let him stop and 
remember that within one 
lifetime all this prosperity 
and wealth has come to 
replace the level stretches 
of prairie and swamp, in- 
habited only by the Indian, 

the deer, the wolf, and the rattlesnake. Such a person 
will not need to have the story of the county told him. 

In 1833 the land of the county found but few buyers 
at the government price of $1.25 per acre. Today it is 
difficult to find a person willing to part with his land for 
less than $100.00 per acre. 

Champaign County, Illinois, stands well in the lead 
among the counties of the country, leading in all agricul- 
tural, educational, religious, financial and other progress- 
ive movements of the land. 




MRS. MALINDA BRYAN. 
The first bride in Champaign county. Before 
marriag-e was Miss Malinda Busey. She was 
married July 25, 1833, by Esquire J. B. Thomas 
of Homer to John Bryan. 




CHAMPAIGN COUNTY COURT HOUSE 
DEDICATED AUGUST 22, (901 



FLOOR PLANS 

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY COURT HOUSE 
URBANA, ILLINOIS 





FIRST FLOOD PLAN 




SECOND FLOOR-PLAN 



THJRD-FLOOH-PLAN- 




THE OLD COURT HOUSE 




THE OLD COURT HOUSE 






UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOiS-URBANA